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Sample records for relative permeability estimates

  1. Two Relations to Estimate Membrane Permeability Using Milestoning.

    PubMed

    Votapka, Lane W; Lee, Christopher T; Amaro, Rommie E

    2016-08-25

    Prediction of passive permeation rates of solutes across lipid bilayers is important to drug design, toxicology, and other biological processes such as signaling. The inhomogeneous solubility-diffusion (ISD) equation is traditionally used to relate the position-dependent potential of mean force and diffusivity to the permeability coefficient. The ISD equation is derived via the Smoluchowski equation and assumes overdamped system dynamics. It has been suggested that the complex membrane environment may exhibit more complicated damping conditions. Here we derive a variant of the inhomogeneous solubility diffusion equation as a function of the mean first passage time (MFPT) and show how milestoning, a method that can estimate kinetic quantities of interest, can be used to estimate the MFPT of membrane crossing and, by extension, the permeability coefficient. We further describe a second scheme, agnostic to the damping condition, to estimate the permeability coefficient from milestoning results or other methods that compute a probability of membrane crossing. The derived relationships are tested using a one-dimensional Langevin dynamics toy system confirming that the presented theoretical methods can be used to estimate permeabilities given simulation and milestoning results. PMID:27154639

  2. Two Relations to Estimate Membrane Permeability Using Milestoning

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Prediction of passive permeation rates of solutes across lipid bilayers is important to drug design, toxicology, and other biological processes such as signaling. The inhomogeneous solubility-diffusion (ISD) equation is traditionally used to relate the position-dependent potential of mean force and diffusivity to the permeability coefficient. The ISD equation is derived via the Smoluchowski equation and assumes overdamped system dynamics. It has been suggested that the complex membrane environment may exhibit more complicated damping conditions. Here we derive a variant of the inhomogeneous solubility diffusion equation as a function of the mean first passage time (MFPT) and show how milestoning, a method that can estimate kinetic quantities of interest, can be used to estimate the MFPT of membrane crossing and, by extension, the permeability coefficient. We further describe a second scheme, agnostic to the damping condition, to estimate the permeability coefficient from milestoning results or other methods that compute a probability of membrane crossing. The derived relationships are tested using a one-dimensional Langevin dynamics toy system confirming that the presented theoretical methods can be used to estimate permeabilities given simulation and milestoning results. PMID:27154639

  3. Cross-property relations and permeability estimation in model porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, L.M.; Martys, N.; Bentz, D.P.; Garboczi, E.J.; Torquato, S. National Institute of Standards and Technology, Building Materials Division, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 Princeton Materials Institute, 70 Prospect Avenue, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08540-5211 )

    1993-12-01

    Results from a numerical study examining cross-property relations linking fluid permeability to diffusive and electrical properties are presented. Numerical solutions of the Stokes equations in three-dimensional consolidated granular packings are employed to provide a basis of comparison between different permeability estimates. Estimates based on the [Lambda] parameter (a length derived from electrical conduction) and on [ital d][sub [ital c

  4. Estimating three phase relative permeability based on realistic pore scale configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, R.; Prodanovic, M.; Wildenschild, D.

    2013-12-01

    Multiphase (water, oil, gas) flow in porous media is commonly encountered in subsurface. Study of multiphase flows is important in applications such as hydrocarbon recovery, carbon capture and storage, groundwater flow modeling, flow of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL), and many others. The problem is notoriously difficult to study, and much effort has gone into understanding the physics of the multiphase flow on the pore scale. In particular, imaging techniques such as x-ray microtomography can now provide 3D microstructure as well as fluid phase configurations at a very high resolution. Using these images, one can validate simulations done by various techniques, such as pore network modeling, the Lattice-Boltzmann method or computational fluid dynamics to name a few. In this work, we present an analysis of several pore-scale images of multiphase flow as well as comparable multiphase flow simulations and show the distribution of various phases in three phase flow situations. We are particularly interested in quantifying spatial configurations, connectivity and relative permeability of the intermediate wetting phase. The rock wettability is one of the key parameters that determines positioning of the phases within the pore space. The wetting phase sticks closer to the wall, while the non-wetting phase is at the center of the pores. In three phase flow, the intermediate wetting phase exists as a layer between the two phases, and this is often the oil phase that we are trying to drain from the system. At the macro scale, this means that the relative permeability is a function of more than one saturation as well as its often complicated spatial configuration. One of the key observations from experiment is high oil relative permeability even at low oil saturations. It is hypothesized that the oil exists as a very thin layer throughout the core sample, and one of the goals of this work is to validate this hypothesis. This layer is rather difficult to observe even with

  5. Estimation of primary drainage three-phase relative permeability for organic liquid transport in the vadose zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Leonardo I.; Demond, Avery H.

    2003-11-01

    The modeling of transport of organic liquid contaminants through the vadose zone often requires three-phase relative permeabilities. Since these are difficult to measure, predictive models are usually used. The objective of this study is to assess the ability of eight common models to predict the drainage relative permeability to oil in a three-phase system (water-oil-air). A comparison of the models' estimates using data set from Oak [Oak, M.J., 1990. Three-phase relative permeability of water-wet Berea. In: Seventh Symposium on Enhanced Oil Recovery, Paper SPE/Doe 20183. Tulsa, OK, April 22-25] showed that they provide very different predictions for the same system. The goodness of the models does not increase with the amount of data or computation that the models require. Also, the calculations showed how different interpretations of the models and of the terminology associated with them can significantly impact the predictions. Thus, considerable error may be introduced into the simulations of organic liquid transport in the vadose zone depending on the selection and interpretation of the three-phase relative permeability model.

  6. Permeability and relative permeability in rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, S.C.; Berryman, J.G.

    1990-10-01

    Important features of the topology of the pore space of rocks can be usefully quantified by analyzing digitized images of rock cross sections. One approach computes statistical correlation functions using modern image processing techniques. These correlation functions contain information about porosity, specific surface area, tortuosity, formation factor, and elastic constants, as well as the fluid permeability and relative permeability. The physical basis of this approach is discussed and examples of the results for various sandstones are presented. The analysis shows that Kozeny-Carman relations and Archie's empirical laws must be modified to account for finite percolation thresholds in order to avoid unphysical behavior in the calculated relative permeabilities. 33 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Relative permeability through fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Diomampo, Gracel, P.

    2001-08-01

    The mechanism of two-phase flow through fractures is of importance in understanding many geologic processes. Currently, two-phase flow through fractures is still poorly understood. In this study, nitrogen-water experiments were done on both smooth and rough parallel plates to determine the governing flow mechanism for fractures and the appropriate methodology for data analysis. The experiments were done using a glass plate to allow visualization of flow. Digital video recording allowed instantaneous measurement of pressure, flow rate and saturation. Saturation was computed using image analysis techniques. The experiments showed that gas and liquid phases flow through fractures in nonuniform separate channels. The localized channels change with time as each phase path undergoes continues breaking and reforming due to invasion of the other phase. The stability of the phase paths is dependent on liquid and gas flow rate ratio. This mechanism holds true for over a range of saturation for both smooth and rough fractures. In imbibition for rough-walled fractures, another mechanism similar to wave-like flow in pipes was also observed. The data from the experiments were analyzed using Darcy's law and using the concept of friction factor and equivalent Reynold's number for two-phase flow. For both smooth- and rough-walled fractures a clear relationship between relative permeability and saturation was seen. The calculated relative permeability curves follow Corey-type behavior and can be modeled using Honarpour expressions. The sum of the relative permeabilities is not equal one, indicating phase interference. The equivalent homogeneous single-phase approach did not give satisfactory representation of flow through fractures. The graphs of experimentally derived friction factor with the modified Reynolds number do not reveal a distinctive linear relationship.

  8. Investigation of parameter estimation and impact of injection rate on relative permeability measurements for supercritical CO2 and water by unsteady-state method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiratsuka, Y.; Yamamoto, H.

    2014-12-01

    CCS (Carbon dioxide Capture and Storage) is a promising option for mitigating climate changes. To predict the behavior of injected CO2 in a deep reservoir, relative permeability of supercritical CO2 and water of the reservoir rock is one of the most fundamental and influential properties. For determining the relative permeability, we employed the unsteady state method, in which the relative permeability is determined based on history matching of transient monitoring data with a multi-phase flow model. The unsteady-state method is relatively simple and short, but obviously its accuracy strongly depends on the flow model assumed in the history matching. In this study, we conducted relative permeability measurements of supercritical CO2-water system for Berea sandstone with the unsteady-state method under a reservoir condition at a 1km depth (P= 9.5MPa, T = 44˚C). Automatic history matching was performed with an inversion simulator iTOUGH2/ECO2N for multi-phase flow system of supercritical CO2, NaCl, and water. A sensitivity analysis of relative permeability parameters for CO2 and water was carried out to better understand the uniqueness and the uncertainty of the optimum solution estimated by the history matching. Among the parameters of the Corey-type curve employed in this study, while the end-point permeability could be optimized in a limited range, the other parameters were correlated and their combinations were not unique. However it was found that any combination of these parameters results in nearly identical shapes of the curve in the range of CO2 saturation in this study (0 to 60%). The optimally estimated curve from the unsteady-method was well comparable with those from the steady-state method acquired in the previous studies. Our experiment also focuses on the impact of injection rate on the estimates of relative permeability, as it is known that the injection rate could have a significant effect on fluid distribution such as viscous fingering with

  9. Relative Permeability of Fractured Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Mark D. Habana

    2002-06-30

    Contemporary understanding of multiphase flow through fractures is limited. Different studies using synthetic fractures and various fluids have yielded different relative permeability-saturation relations. This study aimed to extend the understanding of multiphase flow by conducting nitrogen-water relative permeability experiments on a naturally-fractured rock from The Geysers geothermal field. The steady-state approach was used. However, steady state was achieved only at the endpoint saturations. Several difficulties were encountered that are attributed to phase interference and changes in fracture aperture and surface roughness, along with fracture propagation/initiation. Absolute permeabilities were determined using nitrogen and water. The permeability values obtained change with the number of load cycles. Determining the absolute permeability of a core is especially important in a fractured rock. The rock may change as asperities are destroyed and fractures propagate or st rain harden as the net stresses vary. Pressure spikes occurred in water a solute permeability experiments. Conceptual models of an elastic fracture network can explain the pressure spike behavior. At the endpoint saturations the water relative permeabilities obtained are much less than the nitrogen gas relative permeabilities. Saturations were determined by weighing and by resistivity calculations. The resistivity-saturation relationship developed for the core gave saturation values that differ by 5% from the value determined by weighing. Further work is required to complete the relative permeability curve. The steady-state experimental approach encountered difficulties due to phase interference and fracture change. Steady state may not be reached until an impractical length of time. Thus, unsteady-state methods should be pursued. In unsteady-state experiments the challenge will be in quantifying rock fracture change in addition to fluid flow changes.

  10. Relating P-wave attenuation to permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Akbar, N.; Dvorkin, J.; Nur, A. . Dept. of Geophysics)

    1993-01-01

    To relate P-wave attenuation to permeability, the authors examine a three-dimensional (3-D) theoretical model of a cylindrical pore filled with viscous fluid and embedded in an infinite isotropic elastic medium. They calculate both attenuation and permeability as functions of the direction of wave propagation. Attenuation estimates are based on the squirt flow mechanism; permeability is calculated using the Kozeny-Carmen relation. They find that in the case when a plane P-wave propagates parallel to this orientation (Q[sup [minus]1][delta] = 90[degree]), attenuation is always higher than when a wave propagates parallel to this orientation (Q[sup [minus]1][delta] = 0[degree]). The ratio of these two attenuation values Q[sup [minus]1][delta] = 90[degree]/Q[sup [minus]1] = 0[degree] increases with an increasing pore radius and decreasing frequency and saturation. By changing permeability, varying the radius of the pore, they find that the permeability-attenuation relation is characterized by a peak that shifts toward lower permeabilities as frequency decreases. Therefore, the attenuation of a low-frequency wave decreases with increasing permeability. They observe a similar trend on relations between attenuation and permeability experimentally obtained on sandstone samples.

  11. Steam-water relative permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Ambusso, W.; Satik, C.; Home, R.N.

    1997-12-31

    A set of relative permeability relations for simultaneous flow of steam and water in porous media have been measured in steady state experiments conducted under the conditions that eliminate most errors associated with saturation and pressure measurements. These relations show that the relative permeabilities for steam-water flow in porous media vary approximately linearly with saturation. This departure from the nitrogen/water behavior indicates that there are fundamental differences between steam/water and nitrogen/water flows. The saturations in these experiments were measured by using a high resolution X-ray computer tomography (CT) scanner. In addition the pressure gradients were obtained from the measurements of liquid phase pressure over the portions with flat saturation profiles. These two aspects constitute a major improvement in the experimental method compared to those used in the past. Comparison of the saturation profiles measured by the X-ray CT scanner during the experiments shows a good agreement with those predicted by numerical simulations. To obtain results that are applicable to general flow of steam and water in porous media similar experiments will be conducted at higher temperature and with porous rocks of different wetting characteristics and porosity distribution.

  12. SINGLE-INTERVAL GAS PERMEABILITY ESTIMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Single-interval, steady-steady-state gas permeability testing requires estimation of pressure at a screened interval which in turn requires measurement of friction factors as a function of mass flow rate. Friction factors can be obtained by injecting air through a length of pipe...

  13. Characterization and estimation of permeability correlation structure from performance data

    SciTech Connect

    Ershaghi, I.; Al-Qahtani, M.

    1997-08-01

    In this study, the influence of permeability structure and correlation length on the system effective permeability and recovery factors of 2-D cross-sectional reservoir models, under waterflood, is investigated. Reservoirs with identical statistical representation of permeability attributes are shown to exhibit different system effective permeability and production characteristics which can be expressed by a mean and variance. The mean and variance are shown to be significantly influenced by the correlation length. Detailed quantification of the influence of horizontal and vertical correlation lengths for different permeability distributions is presented. The effect of capillary pressure, P{sub c1} on the production characteristics and saturation profiles at different correlation lengths is also investigated. It is observed that neglecting P{sub c} causes considerable error at large horizontal and short vertical correlation lengths. The effect of using constant as opposed to variable relative permeability attributes is also investigated at different correlation lengths. Next we studied the influence of correlation anisotropy in 2-D reservoir models. For a reservoir under five-spot waterflood pattern, it is shown that the ratios of breakthrough times and recovery factors of the wells in each direction of correlation are greatly influenced by the degree of anisotropy. In fully developed fields, performance data can aid in the recognition of reservoir anisotropy. Finally, a procedure for estimating the spatial correlation length from performance data is presented. Both the production performance data and the system`s effective permeability are required in estimating the correlation length.

  14. Accurate determination of characteristic relative permeability curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Michael H.; Benson, Sally M.

    2015-09-01

    A recently developed technique to accurately characterize sub-core scale heterogeneity is applied to investigate the factors responsible for flowrate-dependent effective relative permeability curves measured on core samples in the laboratory. The dependency of laboratory measured relative permeability on flowrate has long been both supported and challenged by a number of investigators. Studies have shown that this apparent flowrate dependency is a result of both sub-core scale heterogeneity and outlet boundary effects. However this has only been demonstrated numerically for highly simplified models of porous media. In this paper, flowrate dependency of effective relative permeability is demonstrated using two rock cores, a Berea Sandstone and a heterogeneous sandstone from the Otway Basin Pilot Project in Australia. Numerical simulations of steady-state coreflooding experiments are conducted at a number of injection rates using a single set of input characteristic relative permeability curves. Effective relative permeability is then calculated from the simulation data using standard interpretation methods for calculating relative permeability from steady-state tests. Results show that simplified approaches may be used to determine flowrate-independent characteristic relative permeability provided flow rate is sufficiently high, and the core heterogeneity is relatively low. It is also shown that characteristic relative permeability can be determined at any typical flowrate, and even for geologically complex models, when using accurate three-dimensional models.

  15. IMPACT OF CAPILLARY AND BOND NUMBERS ON RELATIVE PERMEABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2002-09-30

    Recovery and recovery rate of oil, gas and condensates depend crucially on their relative permeability. Relative permeability in turn depends on the pore structure, wettability and flooding conditions, which can be represented by a set of dimensionless groups including capillary and bond numbers. The effect of flooding conditions on drainage relative permeabilities is not well understood and is the overall goal of this project. This project has three specific objectives: to improve the centrifuge relative permeability method, to measure capillary and bond number effects experimentally, and to develop a pore network model for multiphase flows. A centrifuge has been built that can accommodate high pressure core holders and x-ray saturation monitoring. The centrifuge core holders can operate at a pore pressure of 6.9 MPa (1000 psi) and an overburden pressure of 17 MPa (2500 psi). The effect of capillary number on residual saturation and relative permeability in drainage flow has been measured. A pore network model has been developed to study the effect of capillary numbers and viscosity ratio on drainage relative permeability. Capillary and Reynolds number dependence of gas-condensate flow has been studied during well testing. A method has been developed to estimate relative permeability parameters from gas-condensate well test data.

  16. Relating tortuosity and permeability in microfractured and unfractured porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokan-Lawal, A.; Wang, W.; Prodanovic, M.

    2012-12-01

    Permeability estimates are key to any subsurface flow prediction. Several methods are available for estimating (relative) permeability either on Darcy scale (lab measurements) or on pore scale (numerical flow simulation, assuming pore space geometry is known). However, relative permeability measurements in particular can be time consuming, and there is a benefit in having a fast estimate. Thus, a number of permeability estimates are available based on the some known porous medium parameters. The famous Carman Kozeny (1937) model represents the pores as parallel tubes of length equal to the sample length and of a range of radii. This single phase permeability model developed for packings of equal spherical grains relates the absolute permeability to the tortuosity of the medium. Fractures or fracture networks, on the other hand, do not lend themselves to an analytical description akin to pores spaces in-between a packing of spheres. Thus far, the study of flow in fractures has for the most part been limited to fractures in rock with impermeable fractures. The simplest models, such as the cubic law, relate fracture permeability to its average aperture and model fracture as parallel planes which are insufficient to extend to multiphase displacement. In this study, we focus on correlating permeability with geometric tortuosity of both pore space and individual fluid phases for a wide variety of homogeneous as well as microfractured porous samples. We use a combination of lattice-Boltzmann simulation and the level set method based progressive-quasistatic (LSMPQS) algorithm to characterize the capillary dominated flow properties (capillary pressure-saturation and relative permeability-saturation relationships) of the matrix, and when present, the fracture, in samples of different compositions. At the same time, we use image analysis tools to characterize the connectivity and tortuosity of the pore space, as well as individual fluid phases at different saturations

  17. Age-related changes in mouse bone permeability.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Florez, Naiara; Oyen, Michelle L; Shefelbine, Sandra J

    2014-03-21

    The determination of lacunar-canalicular permeability is essential for understanding local fluid flow in bone, which may indicate how bone senses changes in the mechanical environment to regulate mechano-adaptation. The estimates of lacunar-canalicular permeability found in the literature vary by up to eight orders of magnitude, and age-related permeability changes have not been measured in non-osteonal mouse bone. The objective of this study is to use a poroelastic approach based on nanoindentation data to characterize lacunar-canalicular permeability in murine bone as a function of age. Nine wild type C57BL/6 mice of different ages (2, 7 and 12 months) were used. Three tibiae from each age group were embedded in epoxy resin, cut in half and indented in the longitudinal direction in the mid-cortex using two spherical fluid indenter tips (R=238 μm and 500 μm). Results suggest that the lacunar-canalicular intrinsic permeability of mouse bone decreases from 2 to 7 months, with no significant changes from 7 to 12 months. The large indenter tip imposed larger contact sizes and sampled larger ranges of permeabilities, particularly for the old bone. This age-related difference in the distribution was not seen for indents with the smaller radius tip. We conclude that the small tip effectively measured lacunar-canalicular permeability, while larger tip indents were influenced by vascular permeability. Exploring the age-related changes in permeability of bone measured by nanoindentation will lead to a better understanding of the role of fluid flow in mechano-transduction. This understanding may help indicate alterations in bone adaptation and remodeling. PMID:24433671

  18. Estimating Plastic Film Permeability Under Field Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fumigant emission is an important air quality and human health concern. Plastic films are used to reduce emissions. Laboratory tests have shown large differences in permeability between various films, including the typical polyethylene films (PEs), virtually impermeable films (VIFs), and semi-impe...

  19. Combining SIP and NMR Measurements to Develop Improved Estimates of Permeability in Sandstone Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, K.; Binley, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Permeability is traditionally measured in-situ by inducing groundwater flow using pumping, slug, or packer tests; however, these methods require the existence of wells, can be labor intensive and can be constrained by measurement support volumes. Indirect estimates of permeability based on geophysical techniques benefit from relatively short measurement times, do not require fluid extraction, and are non-invasive when made from the surface (or minimally invasive when made in a borehole). However, estimates of permeability based on a single geophysical method often require calibration for rock type, and cannot be used to uniquely determine all of the physical properties required to accurately determine permeability. In this laboratory study we present the first critical step towards developing a method for estimating permeability based on the synergistic coupling of two complementary geophysical methods: spectral induced polarization (SIP) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). To develop an improved model for estimating permeability, laboratory SIP and NMR measurements were collected on a series of sandstone cores, covering a wide range of permeabilities. Current models for estimating permeability from each individual geophysical measurement were compared to independently obtained estimates of permeability. The comparison confirmed previous research showing that estimates from SIP or NMR alone only yield the permeability within order of magnitude accuracy and must be calibrated for rock type. Next, the geophysical parameters determined from SIP and NMR were compared to independent measurements the physical properties of the sandstone cores including gravimetric porosity and pores-size distributions (obtained from mercury injection porosimetry); this comparison was used to evaluate which geophysical parameter more consistently and accurately predicted each physical property. Finally, we present an improved method for estimating permeability in sandstone cores based

  20. Permeability estimation from NMR diffusion measurements in reservoir rocks.

    PubMed

    Balzarini, M; Brancolini, A; Gossenberg, P

    1998-01-01

    It is well known that in restricted geometries, such as in porous media, the apparent diffusion coefficient (D) of the fluid depends on the observation time. From the time dependence of D, interesting information can be derived to characterise geometrical features of the porous media that are relevant in oil industry applications. In particular, the permeability can be related to the surface-to-volume ratio (S/V), estimated from the short time behaviour of D(t), and to the connectivity of the pore space, which is probed by the long time behaviour of D(t). The stimulated spin-echo pulse sequence, with pulsed magnetic field gradients, has been used to measure the diffusion coefficients on various homogeneous and heterogeneous sandstone samples. It is shown that the petrophysical parameters obtained by our measurements are in good agreement with those yielded by conventional laboratory techniques (gas permeability and electrical conductivity). Although the diffusing time is limited by T1, eventually preventing an observation of the real asymptotic behaviour, and the surface-to-volume ratio measured by nuclear magnetic resonance is different from the value obtained by BET because of the different length scales probed, the measurement remains reliable and low-time consuming. PMID:9803918

  1. Can streaming potential data improve permeability estimates in EGS reservoirs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Christian; Klitzsch, Norbert

    2013-04-01

    We study the capability of streaming potential data to improve the estimation of permeability in fractured geothermal systems. To this end, we simulate a tracer experiment numerically carried out at the Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) at Soultz-sous-Forêts, France, in 2005. The EGS is located in the Lower Rhine Graben. Here, at approximately 5000 m depth an engineered reservoir was established. The tracer circulation test provides information on hydraulic connectivity between the injection borehole GPK3 and the two production boreholes GPK2 and GPK4. Vogt et al. (2011) performed stochastic inversion approaches to estimate heterogeneous permeability at Soultz in an equivalent porous medium approach and studied the non-uniqueness of the possible pathways in the reservoir. They identified three different possible groups of pathway configurations between GPK2 and GPK3 and corresponding hydraulic properties. Using the Ensemble Kalman Fitler, Vogt et al. (2012) estimated permeability by updating sequentially an ensemble of heterogeneous Monte Carlo reservoir models. Additionally, this approach quantifies the heterogeneously distributed uncertainty. Here, we study whether considering hypothetical streaming potential (SP) data during the stochastic inversion can improve the determination of the hydraulic reservoir properties. In particular, we study whether the three groups are characterized uniquely by their corresponding SP signals along the boreholes and whether the Ensemble Kalman Filter fit could be improved by joint inversion of SP and tracer data. During the actual tracer test, no SP data were recorded. Therefore, this study is based on synthetic data. We find that SP data predominantly yields information on the near field of permeability around the wells. Therefore, SP observations along wells will not help to characterize large-scale reservoir flow paths. However, we investigate whether additional passive SP monitoring from deviated wells around the injection

  2. Perm-Fit: a new program to estimate permeability at high P-T conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulas, Evangelos; Madonna, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    Several geological processes are controlled by porous fluid flow. The circulation of porous fluids influences many physical phenomena and in turn it depends on the rock permeability. The permeability of rocks is a physical property that needs to be measured since it depends on many factors such as secondary porosity (fractures etc). We present a numerical approach to estimate permeability using the transient step method (Brace et al., 1968). When a non-reacting, compressible fluid is considered in a relative incompressible solid matrix, the only unknown parameter in the equations of porous flow is permeability. Porosity is assumed to be known and the physical properties of the fluid (compressibility, density, viscosity) are taken from the NIST database. Forward numerical calculations for different values of permeability are used and the results are compared to experimental measurements. The extracted permeability value is the one that minimizes the misfit between experimental and numerical results. The uncertainty on the value of permeability is estimated using a Monte Carlo method. REFERENCES Brace, W.F., Walsh J.B., & Frangos, W.T. 1968: Permeability of Granite under High Pressure, Journal of Geophysical Research, 73, 6, 2225-2236

  3. Permeability Coefficients of Lipophilic Compounds Estimated by Computer Simulations.

    PubMed

    Ghaemi, Zhaleh; Alberga, Domenico; Carloni, Paolo; Laio, Alessandro; Lattanzi, Gianluca

    2016-08-01

    The ability of a drug to cross the intestine-blood barrier is a key quantity for drug design and employment and is normally quantified by the permeability coefficient P, often evaluated in the so-called Caco-2 assay. This assay is based on measuring the initial growth rate of the concentration of the drug beyond the cellular barrier but not its steady-state flux through the membrane. This might lead to confusion since, in the case of lipophilic drugs, the initial slope is strongly affected by the retention of the drug in the membrane. This effect is well known but seldom considered in the assay. Here, we exploit all-atoms molecular dynamics and bias exchange metadynamics to calculate the concentration of two lipophilic drugs across a model membrane as a function of time. This allows estimating both the steady-state flux and the initial slope of the concentration growth and comparing Caco-2 and steady-state estimates of P. We show that our computational procedure is able to reproduce the experimental values, although these may differ from the permeability coefficients by orders of magnitude. Our findings are generalized by a simplified one-dimensional model of the permeation process that may act as a roadmap to assess which measure of membrane permeability would be more appropriate and, consequently, whether retention corrections should be included in estimates based on Caco-2 assays. PMID:27392273

  4. Estimated bounds on rock permeability changes from THM Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Berge, P A; Blair, S C; Wang, H F

    1998-08-01

    We performed THM modeling to estimate bounds on permeability changes in the NFE. For our modeling, we used the TM three-dimensional (3-D) finite-difference code FLAC{sup 3D} version 2.0 (Itasca Consulting Group Inc. 1997) to compute changes in stress and displacement in an elastic model subjected to temperature changes over time. Output from TH modeling (Hardin et al., 1998, Chapter 3) using the code NUFT (Nitao 1993) provided the temperature changes for input to FLAC{sup 3D}. We then estimated how the stress changes could affect permeability. For this report, we chose to base our 3-D THM modeling on a coarser version of the 2-D model we ran for the work described in Chapter 4 of the Near-Field/Altered Zone Models Report (Hardin et al., 1998, Chapter 4). The grid and temperature field were based on those used by the TH code for 50 yr of heating for the reference Case 1 TH model calculated using Total System Performance Assessment-Viability Assessment (TSPA-VA) base-case properties, nominal infiltration, and a point-load repository design (Hardin et al., 1998, Chapter 3). The stress field rotated in the region between and below the drifts after 50 yr of heating. High vertical shear stresses were computed for these regions. The maximum computed displacement was about 7 cm, mainly vertical. Estimates of permeability changes were obtained by analyzing stresses, following a method we developed previously for 2-D models. In our 3-D modeling for this report, we only considered vertical and horizontal fractures. We extended our 2-D method to a simplified 3-D case. We conclude that widespread permeability enhancement is likely for fractures parallel to NS fracture set No.2, the vertical fractures that strike north-south, for regions above the drifts. In some regions just above the drifts, permeability may increase by a minimum of a factor of two and possibly more than a factor of four if slip also occurs along the vertical fractures in EW set No.1, the east-west fractures

  5. Wettability effects on two- and three-fluid relative permeabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradford, Scott A.; Abriola, Linda M.; Leij, Feike J.

    1997-10-01

    Specification of relative permeability ( kr)-saturation ( S) relations for all fluid phases is required for the simulation of multiphase flow and transport in porous media. Indirect methods are frequently employed to estimate these kr- S relations owing to the time, expense, and difficulty associated with direct measurements. A common indirect approach uses capillary pressure data in conjunction with a selected pore-size distribution model to estimate kr- S relations. Such methods typically assume perfect wettability of the solid. Natural porous media, however, are composed of a variety of mineral constituents with different adsorptive properties, which can exhibit non-zero contact angles and/or fractional wettability. Consequently, fluid distributions in natural media may be more complex than those predicted by simple pore-size distribution models and, under such conditions, current estimation approaches for kr may be inadequate. In this work, the pore-size distribution model of N.T. Burdine (1953, Relative permeability calculations from pore-size distribution data. Transactions of the American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical and Petroleum Engineers 198, 71-77) is extended to incorporate wettability variations. In this model, wetting and less wetting (non-wetting or intermediate) fluid pore classes are used to calculate kr for water or organic. The wettability of the porous medium is used to determine the contributions of the pore classes to kr. For both two- and three-fluid systems, the model predicts that an increase in the contact angle (measured through water) or organic-wet fraction of a medium will be accompanied by an increase in the water kr and a decrease in the organic kr. In three-fluid media, kr values for water and organic depend on both liquid saturations when the solid is imperfectly wetted. The model assumes that wettability variation has no influence on the air kr. Model predictions are shown to be consistent with available experimental data.

  6. Preliminary results on estimating permeability characteristics of carbonate rocks using pore microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M.; Keehm, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Direct numerical simulation on pore microstructures from X-ray microtomography is regarded as a good tool to determine and characterize the physical properties of rocks, especially for sandstone. When the same approach is considered for carbonate rocks, we face many difficulties mostly from the heterogeneous nature of carbonates. In this study, we report preliminary results on permeability estimation of carbonate rocks from X-ray tomographic pore microstructures. Since carbonate rocks have quite different types of pore geometry depending on depositional and diagenetic environments, we choose three rock samples with different porosity types: interparticle; vuggy/moldic; and fracture, and obtain high-resolution 3D pore microstructures using X-ray microtomography technique. From the original 3D pore geometry (typically 2,000^3 voxels), we choose various digital sub-blocks to determine local variation and length dependency, and calculate permeability using the Lattice-Boltzmann method. For the interparticle case, the calculated permeability values show very similar trends to clastic sediments, and we can determine a porosity-permeability relation for a given formation as we do with the Koneny-Carman relation. On the other hand, for vuggy or fracture cases, we cannot observe any significant dependence of permeability on porosity. Thus we focus more on the local variation and scale variation of permeability. We perform analyses on percolation probability; local porosity distribution; and direction/length/width of fractures. And we present preliminary conceptual models to determine permeability characteristics. Although the results are from a few limited samples and more detailed researches will be required, our approach will be helpful to estimate and characterize permeability of carbonate rocks, and to investigate scaling and representativeness issues. Acknowledgements: This research was supported by the Basic Research Project of the Korea Institute of Geoscience and

  7. Biofilm growth and the related changes in the physical properties of a porous medium: 2. Permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Stewart W.; Milly, P. C. D.; Jaffé, Peter R.

    1990-09-01

    Growth of a biofilm in a porous medium reduces the total volume and the average size of the pores. The change in the pore size distributions is easily quantified when certain geometric assumptions are made. Existing models of permeability or of relative permeability can be manipulated to yield estimates of the resulting reduction in permeability as a function of biofilm thickness. The associated reductions in porosity and specific surface can be estimated as well. Based on a sphere model of the medium, the Kozeny-Carman permeability model predicts physically realistic results for this problem. Using a cut-and-random-rejoin-type model of the medium, the permeability model of Childs and Collis-George yields qualitatively reasonable results for this problem, as does a generalization of the relative permeability model of Mualem. Permeability models of Kozeny-Carman and of Millington and Quirk lead to unrealistic results for a cut-and-random-rejoin-type medium. The Childs and Collis-George and the Mualem models predict that the permeability reduction for a given volume of biomass is greatest when the porous medium has uniform pore sizes.

  8. Tight junction, selective permeability, and related diseases.

    PubMed

    Krug, Susanne M; Schulzke, Jörg D; Fromm, Michael

    2014-12-01

    The tight junction forms a barrier against unlimited paracellular passage but some of the tight junction proteins just do the opposite, they form extracellular channels zigzagging between lateral membranes of neighboring cells. All of these channel-forming proteins and even some of the barrier formers exhibit selectivity, which means that they prefer certain substances over others. All channel formers exhibit at least one of the three types of selectivity: for cations (claudin-2, -10b, -15), for anions (claudin-10a, -17) or for water (claudin-2). Also some, but not all, barrier-forming claudins are charge-selective (claudin-4, -8, -14). Moreover, occludin and tricellulin turned out to be relevant for barrier formation against macromolecule passage. Tight junction proteins are dysregulated or can be genetically defective in numerous diseases, which may lead to three effects: (i) impaired paracellular transport e.g. causing magnesium loss in the kidney, (ii) increased paracellular transport of solutes and water e.g. causing leak-flux diarrhea in the intestine, and (iii) increased permeability to large molecules e.g. unwanted intestinal pathogen uptake fueling inflammatory processes. This review gives an overview on the properties of tight junction proteins featuring selective permeability, and in this context explains how these proteins induce or aggravate diseases. PMID:25220018

  9. Extending Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Data for Permeability Estimation in Fine-Grained Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daigle, H.; Dugan, B.

    2008-12-01

    We developed a method for using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) T2 data and gamma ray data to estimate lithology-dependent permeability in silt- and clay-rich sediments. This model, based on the Schlumberger-Doll Research (SDR) model, allows for high resolution (<1 m) permeability estimates throughout a logged interval. Our model was calibrated using direct measurements on core samples from Keathley Canyon Lease Block 151 in the northern Gulf of Mexico. From NMR and gamma ray data we are able to determine permeability from 10-18 to 10-14 m2 (0.001 to 10 millidarcies). Thus from discrete core samples and log data we were able to develop a permeability model for the entire sedimentary column (425 m). Lithologic variation was incorporated into the model by varying the A coefficient based on the gamma ray response. This provides a more accurate permeability model than assigning a constant value to A as is typically done. The relationship between A and intrinsic lithologic properties is unclear; simple pore system models suggest that A may be related to specific surface, tortuosity, and pore structure; we investigate simple models to quantify how these properties vary with sediment consolidation and what their relationship is to A. A comprehensive understanding that links NMR data and A to pore-scale properties will provide new constraints on deformation and flow in porous systems, and will contribute to our understanding of sediment properties for fluid flow modeling at local and regional scales.

  10. Two-point correlation functions to characterize microgeometry and estimate permeabilities of synthetic and natural sandstones

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, S.C.; Berge, P.A.; Berryman, J.G.

    1993-08-01

    We have developed an image-processing method for characterizing the microstructure of rock and other porous materials, and for providing a quantitative means for understanding the dependence of physical properties on the pore structure. This method is based upon the statistical properties of the microgeometry as observed in scanning electron micrograph (SEM) images of cross sections of porous materials. The method utilizes a simple statistical function, called the spatial correlation function, which can be used to predict bounds on permeability and other physical properties. We obtain estimates of the porosity and specific surface area of the material from the two-point correlation function. The specific surface area can be related to the permeability of porous materials using a Kozeny-Carman relation, and we show that the specific surface area measured on images of sandstones is consistent with the specific surface area used in a simple flow model for computation of permeability. In this paper, we discuss the two-point spatial correlation function and its use in characterizing microstructure features such as pore and grain sizes. We present estimates of permeabilities found using SEM images of several different synthetic and natural sandstones. Comparison of the estimates to laboratory measurements shows good agreement. Finally, we briefly discuss extension of this technique to two-phase flow.

  11. Estimating changes in rock permeability due to thermal-mechanical effects

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.F.; Blair, S.C.; Berge, P.A.

    1997-10-01

    This paper presents results of a modeling study of changes in fracture permeability due to thermal-mechanical effects associated with the potential geological repository at Yucca Mountain. a methodology for estimating changes in permeability is developed and applied to the Drift Scale Test (DST) now being conducted in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. Temperature, stress, and displacement of rock in the heated zone are presented along with predicted zones where slip on fractures may occur. The zones of predicted fracture slip are used as a basis for predicting where permeability may be changed. this new procedure goes beyond previous models that relate stress to strain or displacement, and provides information about rock response that is needed for design of future tests at Yucca Mountain. Our results also contribute to the understanding of coupled processes in the near-field environment of a repository.

  12. Influence of relative permeabilities on chemical enhanced oil recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Destefanis, M. F.; Savioli, G. B.

    2011-05-01

    The main objective of chemical flooding is to mobilize the trapped oil remaining after a secondary recovery by waterflooding. This purpose is achieved by lowering the oil-water interfacial tension and producing partial miscibility between both phases. The chemical partition among phases (phase behavior) influences all other physical properties. In particular, it affects residual saturations determining relative permeability curves. Relative permeabilities rule the flow of each phase through the porous medium, so they play an essential role in oil recovery. Therefore, in this work we study the influence of relative permeabilities on the behavior of a surfactant-polymer flooding for the three different types of phase behavior. This analysis is performed applying the 3D compositional numerical simulator UTCHEM developed at the University of Texas at Austin. From the examples studied, we conclude that the influence of relative permeabilities depends on the type of phase behavior, i.e., as microemulsion relative permeability decreases, oil recovery increases for Types II(+) and III while slightly decreases for Type II(-). Moreover, a better displacement efficiency is observed for Types II(+) and III, because they behave similarly to a miscible displacement.

  13. Effective Permeability and Miniaturization Estimation of Ferrite-loaded Microstrip Patch Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, Ashish; Thakur, Atul; Thakur, Preeti

    2016-08-01

    Miniaturization of a microstrip patch antenna using composite nanosized ferrite material is proposed in this paper. Detailed simulations were performed to analyze the effect of increase in relative permeability of substrate material on physical size and efficiency of a microstrip antenna. An analytical expression for estimation of the effective relative permeability is established here on the basis of the detailed simulation. Composite nano ferrite (Mn0.5Zn0.35Co0.15Fe2O4 + SrFe12O19) with an average crystallite size of 72 nm was synthesized and characterized for electromagnetic properties. The substrate material was prepared by the co-precipitation method. Matching values of complex permittivity ( ɛ* = 4.1-0.1j) and complex permeability ( μ* = 3.72-0.28j) up to 1 GHz were obtained from the electromagnetic characterization. Measurement of the resonant frequency of the fabricated antenna validates the derived expression of effective relative permeability. It reduces the error in calculation of resonant frequency from 10% to 1%. Simulation and measurement results also confirm that an antenna fabricated with the above parameters can reduce the patch size by almost 44% and increases -10 dB reflection loss bandwidth over a pure dielectric FR4 substrate. Therefore, we propose here an analytical expression for estimation of effective relative permeability and Mn0.5Zn0.35Co0.15Fe2O4 + SrFe12O19 composite nano ferrites as suitable candidate for a high-bandwidth miniaturized antenna in the microwave frequency range.

  14. Effective Permeability and Miniaturization Estimation of Ferrite-loaded Microstrip Patch Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, Ashish; Thakur, Atul; Thakur, Preeti

    2016-05-01

    Miniaturization of a microstrip patch antenna using composite nanosized ferrite material is proposed in this paper. Detailed simulations were performed to analyze the effect of increase in relative permeability of substrate material on physical size and efficiency of a microstrip antenna. An analytical expression for estimation of the effective relative permeability is established here on the basis of the detailed simulation. Composite nano ferrite (Mn0.5Zn0.35Co0.15Fe2O4 + SrFe12O19) with an average crystallite size of 72 nm was synthesized and characterized for electromagnetic properties. The substrate material was prepared by the co-precipitation method. Matching values of complex permittivity (ɛ* = 4.1-0.1j) and complex permeability (μ* = 3.72-0.28j) up to 1 GHz were obtained from the electromagnetic characterization. Measurement of the resonant frequency of the fabricated antenna validates the derived expression of effective relative permeability. It reduces the error in calculation of resonant frequency from 10% to 1%. Simulation and measurement results also confirm that an antenna fabricated with the above parameters can reduce the patch size by almost 44% and increases -10 dB reflection loss bandwidth over a pure dielectric FR4 substrate. Therefore, we propose here an analytical expression for estimation of effective relative permeability and Mn0.5Zn0.35Co0.15Fe2O4 + SrFe12O19 composite nano ferrites as suitable candidate for a high-bandwidth miniaturized antenna in the microwave frequency range.

  15. Experimental study about estimating the permeability and storativity properties of CO2 in low permeable rocks under the CO2 injection by flow-pump method.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, H.; Mitani, Y.; Ikemi, H.; Kitamura, K.

    2014-12-01

    Recently, it is generally believed that the increase of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) emission has become a major contributing factor of a global warming. Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) is an emerging technology and considered as the promising method to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the atmosphere. Generally, CCS is intended to apply in oil or natural gas reservoir layers with overlying cap rock. However, in Japan, few proper sites are available for CCS. Therefore, low-permeable rock mass without cap rock is suggested as alternative option. It is required to clarify behavior of CO2 in rock for longitudinal and stable storage of CO2. In order to clarify the properties of permeability and storativity of low permeable rocks, Ainoura sandstone, saturated with water injected with a constant and appropriate flow rate of supercritical CO2, flow pump permeability test under the condition of temperature and pressure of in-situ CO2 reservoir has been conducted. In this experiment, the differential pressure between both ends of specimen changed in 4 stages and finally in stable condition. Furthermore, relative permeability of water and CO2, and specific storage of specimen during CO2 injection has been calculated with theoretical analysis of flow pump permeability test for two phase flow. Using the results of the experiment, 3D core-scale flow-simulation by using TOUGH2 (ECO2N module) has been conducted due to confirm the flow of fluid and CO2 distribution in the specimen. To compare the results of simulation and experimental results, the permeability and storativity properties of carbon dioxide in low permeable rock has been estimated. As a result, low permeable rocks could become an effective storage of supercritical CO2.

  16. The Benefits of Maximum Likelihood Estimators in Predicting Bulk Permeability and Upscaling Fracture Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanuele Rizzo, Roberto; Healy, David; De Siena, Luca

    2016-04-01

    The success of any predictive model is largely dependent on the accuracy with which its parameters are known. When characterising fracture networks in fractured rock, one of the main issues is accurately scaling the parameters governing the distribution of fracture attributes. Optimal characterisation and analysis of fracture attributes (lengths, apertures, orientations and densities) is fundamental to the estimation of permeability and fluid flow, which are of primary importance in a number of contexts including: hydrocarbon production from fractured reservoirs; geothermal energy extraction; and deeper Earth systems, such as earthquakes and ocean floor hydrothermal venting. Our work links outcrop fracture data to modelled fracture networks in order to numerically predict bulk permeability. We collected outcrop data from a highly fractured upper Miocene biosiliceous mudstone formation, cropping out along the coastline north of Santa Cruz (California, USA). Using outcrop fracture networks as analogues for subsurface fracture systems has several advantages, because key fracture attributes such as spatial arrangements and lengths can be effectively measured only on outcrops [1]. However, a limitation when dealing with outcrop data is the relative sparseness of natural data due to the intrinsic finite size of the outcrops. We make use of a statistical approach for the overall workflow, starting from data collection with the Circular Windows Method [2]. Then we analyse the data statistically using Maximum Likelihood Estimators, which provide greater accuracy compared to the more commonly used Least Squares linear regression when investigating distribution of fracture attributes. Finally, we estimate the bulk permeability of the fractured rock mass using Oda's tensorial approach [3]. The higher quality of this statistical analysis is fundamental: better statistics of the fracture attributes means more accurate permeability estimation, since the fracture attributes feed

  17. Calculation of large scale relative permeabilities from stochastic properties of the permeability field and fluid properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lenormand, R.; Thiele, M.R.

    1997-08-01

    The paper describes the method and presents preliminary results for the calculation of homogenized relative permeabilities using stochastic properties of the permeability field. In heterogeneous media, the spreading of an injected fluid is mainly sue to the permeability heterogeneity and viscosity fingering. At large scale, when the heterogeneous medium is replaced by a homogeneous one, we need to introduce a homogenized (or pseudo) relative permeability to obtain the same spreading. Generally, is derived by using fine-grid numerical simulations (Kyte and Berry). However, this operation is time consuming and cannot be performed for all the meshes of the reservoir. We propose an alternate method which uses the information given by the stochastic properties of the field without any numerical simulation. The method is based on recent developments on homogenized transport equations (the {open_quotes}MHD{close_quotes} equation, Lenormand SPE 30797). The MHD equation accounts for the three basic mechanisms of spreading of the injected fluid: (1) Dispersive spreading due to small scale randomness, characterized by a macrodispersion coefficient D. (2) Convective spreading due to large scale heterogeneities (layers) characterized by a heterogeneity factor H. (3) Viscous fingering characterized by an apparent viscosity ration M. In the paper, we first derive the parameters D and H as functions of variance and correlation length of the permeability field. The results are shown to be in good agreement with fine-grid simulations. The are then derived a function of D, H and M. The main result is that this approach lead to a time dependent . Finally, the calculated are compared to the values derived by history matching using fine-grid numerical simulations.

  18. NMR permeability estimators in `chalk' carbonate rocks obtained under different relaxation times and MICP size scalings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios, Edmilson Helton; Figueiredo, Irineu; Moss, Adam Keith; Pritchard, Timothy Neil; Glassborow, Brent Anthony; Domingues, Ana Beatriz Guedes; Azeredo, Rodrigo Bagueira de Vasconcellos

    2016-07-01

    The effect of the selection of different nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation times for permeability estimation is investigated for a set of fully brine-saturated rocks acquired from Cretaceous carbonate reservoirs in the North Sea and Middle East. Estimators that are obtained from the relaxation times based on the Pythagorean means are compared with estimators that are obtained from the relaxation times based on the concept of a cumulative saturation cut-off. Select portions of the longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) relaxation-time distributions are systematically evaluated by applying various cut-offs, analogous to the Winland-Pittman approach for mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) curves. Finally, different approaches to matching the NMR and MICP distributions using different mean-based scaling factors are validated based on the performance of the related size-scaled estimators. The good results that were obtained demonstrate possible alternatives to the commonly adopted logarithmic mean estimator and reinforce the importance of NMR-MICP integration to improving carbonate permeability estimates.

  19. NMR permeability estimators in "chalk" carbonate rocks obtained under different relaxation times and MICP size scalings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios, Edmilson Helton; Figueiredo, Irineu; Moss, Adam Keith; Pritchard, Timothy Neil; Glassborow, Brent Anthony; Domingues, Ana Beatriz Guedes; Azeredo, Rodrigo Bagueira de Vasconcellos

    2016-04-01

    The effect of the selection of different nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation times for permeability estimation is investigated for a set of fully brine-saturated rocks acquired from Cretaceous carbonate reservoirs in the North Sea and Middle East. Estimators that are obtained from the relaxation times based on the Pythagorean means are compared with estimators that are obtained from the relaxation times based on the concept of a cumulative saturation cutoff. Select portions of the longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) relaxation-time distributions are systematically evaluated by applying various cutoffs, analogous to the Winland-Pittman approach for mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) curves. Finally, different approaches to matching the NMR and MICP distributions using different mean-based scaling factors are validated based on the performance of the related size-scaled estimators. The good results that were obtained demonstrate possible alternatives to the commonly adopted logarithmic mean estimator and reinforce the importance of NMR-MICP integration to improving carbonate permeability estimates.

  20. Tracer kinetic modelling in MRI: estimating perfusion and capillary permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sourbron, S. P.; Buckley, D. L.

    2012-01-01

    The tracer-kinetic models developed in the early 1990s for dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) have since become a standard in numerous applications. At the same time, the development of MRI hardware has led to increases in image quality and temporal resolution that reveal the limitations of the early models. This in turn has stimulated an interest in the development and application of a second generation of modelling approaches. They are designed to overcome these limitations and produce additional and more accurate information on tissue status. In particular, models of the second generation enable separate estimates of perfusion and capillary permeability rather than a single parameter Ktrans that represents a combination of the two. A variety of such models has been proposed in the literature, and development in the field has been constrained by a lack of transparency regarding terminology, notations and physiological assumptions. In this review, we provide an overview of these models in a manner that is both physically intuitive and mathematically rigourous. All are derived from common first principles, using concepts and notations from general tracer-kinetic theory. Explicit links to their historical origins are included to allow for a transfer of experience obtained in other fields (PET, SPECT, CT). A classification is presented that reveals the links between all models, and with the models of the first generation. Detailed formulae for all solutions are provided to facilitate implementation. Our aim is to encourage the application of these tools to DCE-MRI by offering researchers a clearer understanding of their assumptions and requirements.

  1. Poroelastic model to relate seismic wave attenuation and dispersion to permeability anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Parra, J.O.

    2000-02-01

    A transversely isotropic model with a horizontal axis of symmetry, based on the Biot and squirt-flow mechanisms, predicts seismic waves in poroelastic media. The model estimates velocity dispersion and attenuation of waves propagating in the frequency range of crosswell and high-resolution reverse vertical seismic profiling (VSP) (250--1,250 HZ) for vertical permeability value much greater than horizontal permeability parameters. The model assumes the principal axes of the stiffness constant tensor are aligned with the axes of the permeability and squirt-flow tensors. In addition, the unified Biot and squirt-flow mechanism (BISQ) model is adapted to simulate cracks in permeable media. Under these conditions, the model simulations demonstrate that the preferential direction of fluid flow in a reservoir containing fluid-filled cracks can be determined by analyzing the phase velocity and attenuation of seismic waves propagating at different azimuth and incident angles. As a result, the fast compressional wave can be related to permeability anisotropy in a reservoir. The model results demonstrate that for fast quasi-P-wave propagating perpendicular to fluid-filled cracks, the attenuation is greater than when the wave propagates parallel to the plane of the crack. Theoretical predictions and velocity dispersion of interwell seismic waves in the Kankakee Limestone Formation at the Buckhorn test site (Illinois) demonstrate that the permeable rock matrix surrounding a low-velocity heterogeneity contains vertical cracks.

  2. 3D pore-network analysis and permeability estimation of deformation bands hosted in carbonate grainstones.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zambrano, Miller; Tondi, Emanuele; Mancini, Lucia; Trias, F. Xavier; Arzilli, Fabio; Lanzafame, Gabriele; Aibibula, Nijiati

    2016-04-01

    In porous rocks strain is commonly localized in narrow Deformation Bands (DBs), where the petrophysical properties are significantly modified with respect the pristine rock. As a consequence, DBs could have an important effect on production and development of porous reservoirs representing baffles zones or, in some cases, contribute to reservoir compartmentalization. Taking in consideration that the decrease of permeability within DBs is related to changes in the porous network properties (porosity, connectivity) and the pores morphology (size distribution, specific surface area), an accurate porous network characterization is useful for understanding both the effect of deformation banding on the porous network and their influence upon fluid flow through the deformed rocks. In this work, a 3D characterization of the microstructure and texture of DBs hosted in porous carbonate grainstones was obtained at the Elettra laboratory (Trieste, Italy) by using two different techniques: phase-contrast synchrotron radiation computed microtomography (micro-CT) and microfocus X-ray micro-CT. These techniques are suitable for addressing quantitative analysis of the porous network and implementing Computer Fluid Dynamics (CFD)experiments in porous rocks. Evaluated samples correspond to grainstones highly affected by DBs exposed in San Vito Lo Capo peninsula (Sicily, Italy), Favignana Island (Sicily, Italy) and Majella Mountain (Abruzzo, Italy). For the analysis, the data were segmented in two main components porous and solid phases. The properties of interest are porosity, connectivity, a grain and/or porous textural properties, in order to differentiate host rock and DBs in different zones. Permeability of DB and surrounding host rock were estimated by the implementation of CFD experiments, permeability results are validated by comparing with in situ measurements. In agreement with previous studies, the 3D image analysis and flow simulation indicate that DBs could be constitute

  3. Estimation of reservoir permeability using gravity change measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, Trevor M.; Kissling, Warwick M.

    1994-01-20

    Exploitation of a liquid-dominated geothermal system generally results in a transfer of mass that causes measurable changes in gravity. When the rate of mass transfer is controlled by the permeability of the reservoir rocks then analysis of measured gravity changes, using numerical reservoir simulation models, can yield values for reservoir properties. One such case is during the early stages of exploitation, during the formation and expansion of a 2-phase zone. Calculations using MULKOM models show that for Wairakei field the gravity changes associated with permeabilities of 50 and 100 md would be clearly distinguishable (> 50 microgal) in less than 2 years. A measured gravity change of -415 microgal between 1950 and 1961 suggests a permeability of 100 md for rocks in the upper part of the 2-phase zone. This value is consistent with those obtained from well tests.

  4. Estimation of In Situ Stress and Permeability from an Extended Leak-off Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nghiep Quach, Quoc; Jo, Yeonguk; Chang, Chandong; Song, Insun

    2016-04-01

    Among many parameters needed to analyze a variety of geomechanical problems related to subsurface CO2 storage projects, two important ones are in situ stress states and permeability of the storage reservoirs and cap rocks. In situ stress is needed for investigating potential risk of fault slip in the reservoir systems and permeability is needed for assessing reservoir flow characteristics and sealing capability of cap rocks. We used an extended leak-off test (XLOT), which is often routinely conducted to assess borehole/casing integrity as well as fracture gradient, to estimate both in situ least principal stress magnitude and in situ permeability in a CO2 storage test site, offshore southeast Korea. The XLOT was conducted at a casing shoe depth (700 m below seafloor) within the cap rock consisting of mudstone, approximately 50 m above the interface between cap rock and storage reservoir. The test depth was cement-grouted and remained for 4 days for curing. Then the hole was further drilled below the casing shoe to create a 4 m open-hole interval at the bottom. Water was injected using hydraulic pump at an approximately constant flowrate into the bottom interval through the casing, during which pressure and flowrate were recorded continuously at the surface. The interval pressure (P) was increased linearly with time (t) as water was injected. At some point, the slope of P-t curve deviated from the linear trend, which indicates leak-off. Pressure reached its peak upon formation breakdown, followed by a gradual pressure decrease. Soon after the formation breakdown, the hole was shut-in by pump shut-off, from which we determined the instantaneous shut-in pressure (ISIP). The ISIP was taken to be the magnitude of the in situ least principal stress (S3), which was determined to be 12.1 MPa. This value is lower than the lithostatic vertical stress, indicating that the S3 is the least horizontal principal stress. The determined S3 magnitude will be used to characterize the

  5. Permeability estimates from artificial drawdown and natural refill experiments at Solfatara volcano, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woith, Heiko; Chiodini, Giovanni; Mangiacapra, Annarita; Wang, Rongjiang

    2016-04-01

    The hydrothermal system beneath Campi Flegrei is strongly affected by sub-surface processes as manifested by a geothermal "plume" below Solfatara, associated with the formation of mud-pools (Fangaia), fumaroles (Bocca Grande, Pisciarelli), and thermal springs (Agnano). Within the frame of MED-SUV (The MED-SUV project has received funding from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme FP7 under Grant agreement no 308665), pressure transients in the hydrothermal system of Campi Flegrei are being continuously monitored at fumaroles, mudpools, hot springs, and geothermal wells. In total, waterlevel and temperature is recorded at 8 sites across the hydrothermal plume along a profile aligned between Agnano Termal in the East and Fangaia in the West. Autonomous devices are used to record the water level and water temperature at 10 minute intervals. At Fangaia mudpool water level and water temperature are dominantly controlled by rain water. Thus, the pool is refilled episodically. Contrary, the water level at a well producing hot water (82°C) for the Pisciarelli tennis club drops and recovers at nearly regular intervals. The induced water level changes are of the order of 1-2m and 3-4m in case of the mudpool and the hot-water-well, respectively. At first glance, both monitoring sites might seem to be fully useless to access natural changes in the Campi Flegrei fluid system. At a second thought, both timeseries provide a unique opportunity to monitor potential permeability changes in the aquifer system. A similar approach had been proposed to deduce earthquake-related permeability changes from Earth tide variations. Contrary to the indirect Earth tide approach, we have the chance to estimate the hydraulic aquifer properties from our monitoring data directly, since each time series contains a sequence of discrete hydraulic tests - namely drawdown tests and refill experiments. Although our Cooper-Jacob approach is really crude, we obtained reasonable permeability

  6. PARAMETER ESTIMATION OF TWO-FLUID CAPILLARY PRESSURE-SATURATION AND PERMEABILITY FUNCTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Capillary pressure and permeability functions are crucial to the quantitative description of subsurface flow and transport. Earlier work has demonstrated the feasibility of using the inverse parameter estimation approach in determining these functions if both capillary pressure ...

  7. Predicting bulk permeability using outcrop fracture attributes: The benefits of a Maximum Likelihood Estimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, R. E.; Healy, D.; De Siena, L.

    2015-12-01

    The success of any model prediction is largely dependent on the accuracy with which its parameters are known. In characterising fracture networks in naturally fractured rocks, the main issues are related with the difficulties in accurately up- and down-scaling the parameters governing the distribution of fracture attributes. Optimal characterisation and analysis of fracture attributes (fracture lengths, apertures, orientations and densities) represents a fundamental step which can aid the estimation of permeability and fluid flow, which are of primary importance in a number of contexts ranging from hydrocarbon production in fractured reservoirs and reservoir stimulation by hydrofracturing, to geothermal energy extraction and deeper Earth systems, such as earthquakes and ocean floor hydrothermal venting. This work focuses on linking fracture data collected directly from outcrops to permeability estimation and fracture network modelling. Outcrop studies can supplement the limited data inherent to natural fractured systems in the subsurface. The study area is a highly fractured upper Miocene biosiliceous mudstone formation cropping out along the coastline north of Santa Cruz (California, USA). These unique outcrops exposes a recently active bitumen-bearing formation representing a geological analogue of a fractured top seal. In order to validate field observations as useful analogues of subsurface reservoirs, we describe a methodology of statistical analysis for more accurate probability distribution of fracture attributes, using Maximum Likelihood Estimators. These procedures aim to understand whether the average permeability of a fracture network can be predicted reducing its uncertainties, and if outcrop measurements of fracture attributes can be used directly to generate statistically identical fracture network models.

  8. Artificial Neural Networks applied to estimate permeability, porosity and intrinsic attenuation using seismic attributes and well-log data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iturrarán-Viveros, Ursula; Parra, Jorge O.

    2014-08-01

    Permeability and porosity are two fundamental reservoir properties which relate to the amount of fluid contained in a reservoir and its ability to flow. The intrinsic attenuation is another important parameter since it is related to porosity, permeability, oil and gas saturation and these parameters significantly affect the seismic signature of a reservoir. We apply Artificial Neural Network (ANN) models to predict permeability (k) and porosity (ϕ) for a carbonate aquifer in southeastern Florida and to predict intrinsic attenuation (1/Q) for a sand-shale oil reservoir in northeast Texas. In this study, the Gamma test (a revolutionary estimator of the noise in a data set) has been used as a mathematically non-parametric nonlinear smooth modeling tool to choose the best input combination of seismic attributes to estimate k and ϕ, and the best combination of well-logs to estimate 1/Q. This saves time during the construction and training of ANN models and also sets a lower bound for the mean squared error to prevent over-training. The Neural Network method successfully delineates a highly permeable zone that corresponds to a high water production in the aquifer. The Gamma test found nonlinear relations that were not visible to linear regression allowing us to generalize the ANN estimations of k, ϕ and 1/Q for their respective sets of patterns that were not used during the learning phase.

  9. A multiple fractal model for estimating permeability of dual-porosity media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Liu, Richeng; Jiang, Yujing

    2016-09-01

    A multiple fractal model that considers the fractal properties of both porous matrices and fracture networks is proposed for the permeability of dual-porosity media embedded with randomly distributed fractures. In this model, the aperture distribution is verified to follow the fractal scaling law, and the porous matrix is assumed to comprise a bundle of tortuous capillaries that also follow the fractal scaling law. Analytical expressions for fractal aperture distribution, total flow rate, total equivalent permeability, and dimensionless permeability are established, where the dimensionless permeability is defined as the ratio of permeability of the porous matrices to that of the fracture networks. The dimensionless permeability is closely correlated to the structural parameters (i.e., α, θ, Dtf, Dtp, De, Dp, emax, λmax) of the dual-porosity media, and it is more sensitive to the fractal dimension for the size distribution of fracture aperture than to that for the size distribution of pore/capillary diameter. The maximum pore/capillary diameter has a greater impact on the dimensionless permeability than that of the maximum fracture aperture. The dimensionless permeability of fracture networks constructed by the fractal aperture distribution has close values with those of models with lognormal aperture distribution. The proposed multiple fractal model does not involve any empirical constants that do not have clear physical meanings, which could serve as a quick estimation method for assessing permeability of dual-porosity media.

  10. Estimation of cell membrane permeability of the rat brain using diffusion magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imae, T.; Shinohara, H.; Sekino, M.; Ueno, S.; Ohsaki, H.; Mima, K.; Ootomo, K.

    2008-04-01

    We propose a method to noninvasively evaluate the permeability of the cell membrane in the rat brain using diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Diffusion MRI reflects the intra- and extracellular diffusion coefficients of water and cell membrane permeability. The images were acquired using a 4.7T MRI system with applications to motion-probing gradients in six directions. Numerical simulations based on the finite-difference method were carried out for estimating diffusion MRI signals with various combinations of membrane permeability and intracellular diffusion coefficient values. We defined an evaluative function as the difference between the signals estimated by simulation and experimentally obtained signals. We found that the combination of membrane permeability and intracellular diffusion coefficient in the simulation corresponding to the minimum value of the evaluative function leads to an estimation of these properties of the rat brain. The estimated intracellular diffusion coefficient and membrane permeability were (1.3±0.1)×10-3mm2/s and 74±23μm/s, respectively. Our method is useful for noninvasively estimating the cell membrane permeability of biological tissues, and is easily applicable to human tissues.

  11. Estimation of Permeability from NMR Logs Based on Formation Classification Method in Tight Gas Sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Deng-Feng; Liu, Xiao-Peng; Hu, Xiao-Xin; Xu, Rui; Zhu, Ling-Ling

    2015-10-01

    The Schlumberger Doll Research (SDR) model and cross plot of porosity versus permeability cannot be directly used in tight gas sands. In this study, the HFU approach is introduced to classify rocks, and determine the involved parameters in the SDR model. Based on the difference of FZI, 87 core samples, drilled from tight gas sandstones reservoirs of E basin in northwest China and applied for laboratory NMR measurements, were classified into three types, and the involved parameters in the SDR model are calibrated separately. Meanwhile, relationships of porosity versus permeability are also established. The statistical model is used to calculate consecutive FZI from conventional logs. Field examples illustrate that the calibrated SDR models are applicable in permeability estimation; models established from routine core analyzed results are effective in reservoirs with permeability lower than 0.3 mD, while the unified SDR model is only valid in reservoirs with permeability ranges from 0.1 to 0.3 mD.

  12. The effective porosity and grain size relations in permeability functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urumović, K.; Urumović, K., Sr.

    2014-06-01

    Hydrogeological parameters of coherent and incoherent deposits are deeply dependent of their granulometric characteristics. These relations were shaped in formulas and defaultly used for calculation of hydraulic conductivity, and are valid only for uniform incoherent materials, mostly sands. In this paper, the results of analyses of permeability and specific surface area as a function of granulometric composition of various sediments - from siltey clays to very well graded gravels are presented. The effective porosity and the referential grain size are presented as fundamental granulometric parameters which express an effect of forces operating fluid movement through the saturated porous media. Suggested procedures for calculating referential grain size and determining effective (flow) porosity result with parameters that reliably determine specific surface area and permeability. These procedures ensure successful appliance of Kozeny-Carman model up to the limits of validity of Darcy's law. The value of an effective porosity in function of referential mean grain size has been calibrated within range from 1.5 μm to 6.0 mm. Reliability of these parameters application in KC model was confirmed by very high correlation between predicted and tested hydraulic conductivity - R2 = 0.99 for sandy and gravelly materials and R2 = 0.70 for clayey-siltey materials. Group representation of hydraulic conductivity (ranged from 10-12 m s-1 up to 10-2 m s-1) presents coefficient of correlation R2 = 0.97, for total sum of 175 samples of various deposits. These results present the new road to researches of porous material's effective porosity, permeability and specific surface area distribution, since these three parameters are critical conditions for successful groundwater flow modelling and contaminant transport. From the practical point of view, it is very important to be able to identify these parameters swiftly, cheaply and very accurately.

  13. Relative Permeabilities: a pore-level model study of the capillary number dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Ferer, M.V.; Mason, G.; Bromhal, G.S.; Smith, D.H.

    2008-03-01

    Relative permeabilities are widely used by the petroleum industry in reservoir simulations of recovery strategies. In recent years, pore level modeling has been used to determine relative permeabilities at zero capillary number for a variety of more and more realistic model porous media. Unfortunately, these studies cannot address the issue of the observed capillary number dependence of the relative permeabilities. Several years ago, we presented a method for determining the relative permeabilities from pore-level modeling at general capillary number. We have used this method to determine the relative permeabilities at several capillary numbers and stable viscosity ratios. In addition, we have determined these relative permeabilities using one of the standard dynamic methods for determining relative permeabilities from core flood experiments. Our results from the two methods are compared with each other and with experimental results.

  14. The effects of viscous forces on three-phase relative permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Maloney, D.R.; Mahmood, S.M.; Honarpour, M.M.

    1989-04-01

    The overall objective of Three-Phase Relative Permeability Project (BE9) is to develop guidelines for improving the accuracy of three-phase relative permeability determinations. This report summarizes previous studies and explains the progress made at NIPER on studying the effect of variations in viscous forces on three-phase relative permeabilities by changing the viscosity of both wetting and nonwetting phases. Significant changes were observed due to viscosity variations. An increase in oil viscosity reduced the relative permeability to gas; an increase in brine/(wetting-phase) viscosity reduced the relative permeability to brine. A slight increase in gas relative permeability was also observed. These observations suggest that the viscosities of both oil and water influence three-phase permeability data. During this study, data scatter was sometimes encountered which was comparable to that of published results. The causes of this scatter are outlined in this report and remedial attempts are discussed. 20 refs., 16 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Fracture characterization and fracture-permeability estimation at the underground research laboratory in southeastern Manitoba, Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paillet, Frederick L.

    1988-01-01

    Various conventional geophysical well logs were obtained in conjunction with acoustic tube-wave amplitude and experimental heat-pulse flowmeter measurements in two deep boreholes in granitic rocks on the Canadian shield in southeastern Manitoba. The objective of this study is the development of measurement techniques and data processing methods for characterization of rock volumes that might be suitable for hosting a nuclear waste repository. One borehole, WRA1, intersected several major fracture zones, and was suitable for testing quantitative permeability estimation methods. The other borehole, URL13, appeared to intersect almost no permeable fractures; it was suitable for testing methods for the characterization of rocks of very small permeability and uniform thermo-mechanical properties in a potential repository horizon. Epithermal neutron , acoustic transit time, and single-point resistance logs provided useful, qualitative indications of fractures in the extensively fractured borehole, WRA1. A single-point log indicates both weathering and the degree of opening of a fracture-borehole intersection. All logs indicate the large intervals of mechanically and geochemically uniform, unfractured granite below depths of 300 m in the relatively unfractured borehole, URL13. Some indications of minor fracturing were identified in that borehole, with one possible fracture at a depth of about 914 m, producing a major acoustic waveform anomaly. Comparison of acoustic tube-wave attenuation with models of tube-wave attenuation in infinite fractures of given aperture provide permeability estimates ranging from equivalent single-fractured apertures of less than 0.01 mm to apertures of > 0.5 mm. One possible fracture anomaly in borehole URL13 at a depth of about 914 m corresponds with a thin mafic dike on the core where unusually large acoustic contrast may have produced the observed waveform anomaly. No indications of naturally occurring flow existed in borehole URL13; however

  16. MODEL FOR HYSTERETIC CONSTITUTIVE RELATIONS GOVERNING MULTIPHASE FLOW. 2. PERMEABILITY-SATURATION RELATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A theoretical model is described for the prediction of relative permeability-saturation (k-S) relations in two-phase (air-water) and three phase (air-oil-water) porous media systems subject to arbitrary saturation paths. Integral expressions for air, water, and oil relative perme...

  17. Effects of phase transformation of steam-water relative permeabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, A.K.

    1986-03-01

    A combined theoretical and experimental study of steam-water relative permeabilities (RPs) was carried out. First, an experimental study of two-phase concurrent flow of steam and water was conducted and a set of RP curves was obtained. These curves were compared with semi-empirical and experimental results obtained by other investigators for two-phase, two-component flow (oil/gas; gas/water; gas/oil). It was found that while the wetting phase RPs were in good agreement, RPs for the steam phase were considerably higher than the non-wetting phase RPs in two-component systems. This enhancement of steam RP is attributed to phase transformation effects at the pore level in flow channels. The effects of phase transformation were studied theoretically. This study indicates that there are two separate mechanisms by which phase transformation affects RP curves: (1) Phase transformation is converging-diverging flow channels can cause an enhancement of steam phase RP. In a channel dominated by steam a fraction of the flowing steam condenses upstream from the constriction, depositing its latent heat of condensation. This heat is conducted through the solid grains around the pore throat, and evaporation takes place downstream from it. Therefore, for a given bulk flow quality; a smaller fraction of steam actually flows through the throat segments. This pore-level effect manifests itself as relative permeability enhancement on a macroscopic level; and (2) phase transformation along the interface of a stagnant phase and the phase flowing around it controls the irreducible phase saturation. Therefore, the irreducible phase saturation in steam-water flow will depend, among other factors, on the boundary conditions of the flow.

  18. A new empirical model for estimating the hydraulic conductivity of low permeability media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, S.; Wen, Z.; Lu, C.; Shu, L.; Shao, J.; Huang, Y.; Zhang, S.; Huang, Y.

    2015-05-01

    Hydraulic conductivity (K) is one of the significant soil characteristics in terms of flow movement and solute transport. It has been recognized that K is statistically related to the grain-size distribution. Numerous models have been developed to reveal the relationship between K and the grain-size distribution of soil, but most of these are inappropriate for fine-grained media. Therefore, a new empirical model for estimating K of low permeability media was proposed in this study. In total, the values of K of 30 soil samples collected in the Jiangning District of Nanjing were measured using the single-ring infiltrometer method. The new model was developed using the percentages of sand, silt and clay-sized particles, and the first and the second rank moment of the grain-size through the moment method as predictor variables. Multivariate nonlinear regression analysis yielded a coefficient of determination (R2) of 0.75, indicating that this empirical model seems to provide a new approach for the indirect determination of hydraulic conductivity of low permeability media.

  19. Permeability estimation from log-derived porosity II. Via co-kriging

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Jen Ho; Pu, Zhi Wei . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    In paper (I) (given at this meeting), the authors applied fuzzy regression to the problem of permeability estimation from porosity-log data. In this paper, they introduce another novel approach, co-kriging. Co-kriging is a multivariate geostatistical technique designed for characterizing joint spatial correlations between pairs of variables (log-derived porosity vs. core-derived permeability in the context of this paper). In other words, co-kriging yields estimates that use not only the information from direct measurements of the variables being estimated, but also the information from measurements of a second variable. Thus, co-kriging can be used to predict permeability at uncored wells. This is a powerful technique because they usually have more log data than core data. By making use of co-kriging they can make good use of the log-derived porosity data. Results of the study using the data from Chunchula field illustrate the power of this technique.

  20. Determining CO2-brine relative permeability and capillary pressure simultaneously: an insight to capillary entrance and end effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Kianinejad, A.; DiCarlo, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    CO2-brine relative permeability relations are important parameters in modeling scenarios such as CO2 sequestration in saline aquifers and CO2 enhanced recovery in oil reservoir. Many steady-state experimental studies on CO2-brine relative permeability showed that the CO2-brine relative permeability differs greatly from typical oil-brine relative permeability. Particularly, they reported a very small endpoint CO2 relative permeability of 0.1~0.2 at a relative high residual water saturation of 0.4~0.6. In this study, we hypothesize the measured low endpoint CO2 relative permeability in previous studies was an experimental artifact that is primary due to low CO2 viscosity. We conducted steady-state CO2 drainage experiments by co-injecting equlibrated CO2 and brine into a long (60.8 cm) and low permeability (116-mD) Berea sandstone core at 20 °C and 1500 psi. During every experiment, both the overall pressure drop across the core and the pressure drops of the five independent and continuous sections of the core were monitored. The in-situ saturation was measured with a medical X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) scanner. In the center three sections where saturation was uniform, we determined the relative permeability to both brine and CO2 phases. In the entrance and exit sections, both measured pressure gradients and saturation were non-uniform. To cope with this, we make several self-consistent assumptions that reveal the nature of capillary entrance and effect in steady-state two-phase core flooding experiments. Based on these assumptions we determined the relative permeability to CO2 and CO2-brine capillary pressure simultaneously using measured pressure drops. We found: (1) a much higher endpoint CO2 relative permeability of 0.58 at a water saturation of 48%, (2) the entrance region with non-uniform saturation expanded CO2 relative permeability data to much lower water saturation, (3) the determined CO2-brine capillary pressure curve is self-consistent and matches

  1. Permeability Estimation of Porous Rock by Means of Fluid Flow Simulation and Digital Image Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winardhi, C. W.; Maulana, F. I.; Latief, F. D. E.

    2016-01-01

    Permeability plays an important role to determine the characteristics of how fluids flow through a porous medium which can be estimated using various methods. Darcy's law and the Kozeny-Carman equation are two of the most utilized methods in estimating permeability. In Darcy's law, permeability can be calculated by applying a pressure gradient between opposing sides of inlet-outlet of a certain direction. The permeability then depends on the fluid viscosity and the flowrate. The Kozeny-Carman equation is an empirical equation which depends on several parameters such as shape factor of the pore, tortuosity, specific surface area, and porosity to determine the permeability. For both methods, digital image obtained by means of Micro CT-Scan is used. In this research, the permeability estimation using the Darcy's law was conducted by simulating fluid flow through the digital image using Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM). As for the Kozeny-Carman equation, digital image analysis was used to obtain the required parameters. Two Kozeny-Carman equations were used to calculate the permeability of the samples. The first equation (KC1) depends on pore shape factor, porosity, tortuosity, and specific surface area while the second equation (KC2) only depends on pore radius, porosity, and tortuosity. We investigate the methods by first testing on three simple pipe models which vary in the radii. By using the result from Darcy's law as a reference, we compare the results from the Kozeny-Carman equations. From the calculation, KC2 yield smaller difference to the reference. The three methods were then applied to the Fontainebleau sandstone to verify the previous result.

  2. Experimental investigation the effect of nanoparticles on the oil-water relative permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amedi, Hamidreza; Ahmadi, Mohammad-Ali

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the effects of the nanosilica particles on the water and oil relative permeability curves at reservoir conditions. Real reservoir crude oil sample was employed as an oil phase in relative permeability measurements. In addition, real carbonate reservoir rock samples were employed as a porous media in core displacement experiments. To determine relative permeability curves, the unsteady-state approach was employed in which Toth et al. method was applied to the recovery data points. By increasing the nanosilica content of the aqueous phase the oil relative permeability increased while the residual oil saturation decreased; however, by increasing the nanosilica concentration in the aqueous solution the water relative permeability decreased. The outcomes of this paper can provide a better understanding regarding chemically enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by nanoparticles. Moreover, relative permeability curves help us in the history matching section of reservoir simulation for any further EOR scenarios.

  3. Estimation of bone permeability considering the morphology of lacuno-canalicular porosity.

    PubMed

    Kameo, Yoshitaka; Adachi, Taiji; Sato, Narumichi; Hojo, Masaki

    2010-04-01

    Load-induced interstitial fluid flow in lacuno-canalicular porosity is believed to play an important role in cellular activities regulating adaptive bone remodeling. To investigate interstitial fluid behavior based on poroelasticity, it is important to determine the anisotropic permeability tensor reflecting the morphological features of the lacuno-canalicular porosity as fluid channels. In this study, we presented an estimation method of trabecular permeability by describing the analytical relationship between the volume orientation (VO) fabric tensor, which represents the canalicular orientation, and the permeability tensor. The relationship showed that the trabecular permeability tensor is proportional to the product of the volume fraction of the interstitial fluid and the VO fabric tensor of the canaliculi. We applied the proposed method to a two-dimensional fluorescent image of a trabecular cross section to quantify the canalicular anisotropy and the trabecular permeability tensor. The results indicated that the canaliculi are predominantly oriented in the radial direction of the trabecula, and the permeability depends strongly on the canalicular morphology. PMID:20142108

  4. A fast nonlinear regression method for estimating permeability in CT perfusion imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bennink, Edwin; Riordan, Alan J; Horsch, Alexander D; Dankbaar, Jan Willem; Velthuis, Birgitta K; de Jong, Hugo W

    2013-01-01

    Blood–brain barrier damage, which can be quantified by measuring vascular permeability, is a potential predictor for hemorrhagic transformation in acute ischemic stroke. Permeability is commonly estimated by applying Patlak analysis to computed tomography (CT) perfusion data, but this method lacks precision. Applying more elaborate kinetic models by means of nonlinear regression (NLR) may improve precision, but is more time consuming and therefore less appropriate in an acute stroke setting. We propose a simplified NLR method that may be faster and still precise enough for clinical use. The aim of this study is to evaluate the reliability of in total 12 variations of Patlak analysis and NLR methods, including the simplified NLR method. Confidence intervals for the permeability estimates were evaluated using simulated CT attenuation–time curves with realistic noise, and clinical data from 20 patients. Although fixating the blood volume improved Patlak analysis, the NLR methods yielded significantly more reliable estimates, but took up to 12 × longer to calculate. The simplified NLR method was ∼4 × faster than other NLR methods, while maintaining the same confidence intervals (CIs). In conclusion, the simplified NLR method is a new, reliable way to estimate permeability in stroke, fast enough for clinical application in an acute stroke setting. PMID:23881247

  5. Estimation of gas permeability of a zeolite membrane, based on a molecular simulation technique and permeation model

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Shigejirou; Takaba, Hiromitsu; Yamaguchi, Takeo; Nakao, Shinichi

    2000-03-09

    A method for estimating gas permeability through a zeolite membrane, using a molecular simulation technique and a theoretical permeation model, is presented. The estimate of permeability is derived from a combination of an absorption isotherm and self-diffusion coefficient based on the adsorption-diffusion model. The adsorption isotherm and self-diffusion coefficients needed for the estimation were calculated using conventional Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations. The calculated self-diffusion coefficient was converted to the mutual diffusion coefficient and the permeability estimated using the Fickian equation. The method was applied to the prediction of permeabilities of methane and ethylene in silicalite at 301 K. Calculated permeabilities were larger than the experimental values by more than an order of magnitude. However, the anisotropic permeability was consistent with the experimental data and the results obtained using a grand canonical ensemble molecular dynamics technique (Pohl et al., Mol.Phys. 1996, 89(6), 1725--1731).

  6. Ensemble Kalman Filter Assimilation of Temperature Data to Estimate Permeability in Geothermal Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, C.; Widera, A.

    2012-04-01

    Reliable information on heterogeneous permeability fields of geothermal reservoirs is of particular interest, even after production started. This information permits the prediction of temperature and pressure variation with time, the optimization of the production rate of the geothermal installation in terms of profit or sustainability, and the detection of optimal locations for additional injection or production wells. Therefore, we study the capability of the data assimilation technique Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) to estimate heterogeneous permeability fields using sparse temperature data from five geothermal wells inside a synthetic reservoir. To simulate the transient temperature variation inside the geothermal system, we use the finite volume software SHEMAT-Suite for solving coupled transient equations for groundwater flow and heat transport in a porous rock matrix. The EnKF is essentially a sequential assimilation procedure which compares observations to predictions by SHEMAT-Suite and adjusts system variables (in this case: permeability, temperature, and hydraulic head) of the numerical simulator according to the error statistics assuming a Gaussian error distribution. For the EnKF, the error statistics are obtained from the mean and variance of a number of realisations. This way, estimated permeability converts in the direction of true permeability assimilation step by assimilation step. We demonstrate that the basic features of the permeability field are reproduced by the EnKF, even when assimilating data from just five wells. In addition, we are able to quantify uncertainty of the permeability estimation. The fit using temperature data is comparable with the fit using tracer concentration data (Vogt et al., 2010). However, different time scales (months respectively years) apply for the two different data types. Optimal fits are obtained when taking into account hydraulic head data in combination with temperature data. We also present the effect of

  7. Estimating the Permeability of Carbonate Rocks using Image Analysis and Effective Medium Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurgawczynski, M.; Jing, X.; Zimmerman, R. W.

    2004-12-01

    A methodology was recently developed to estimate the permeability of sedimentary rocks from two-dimensional pore images [Lock et al., J. Appl. Phys., 2002]. The only data required from the images are the areas and perimeters of the individual pores. The hydraulic conductivities of the individual pores are estimated from their areas and perimeters using the hydraulic radius approximation. Stereological correction factors are applied to determine the true cross-sectional shapes from the images, and to determine the true number density of pores per unit area. A constriction factor accounts for the variation of the cross-sectional area along the tube length. The pores are assumed to be arranged in a cubic lattice, after which the effective-medium equation of Kirkpatrick is used to estimate the effective conductance of the pores. Finally, the permeability is estimated from the effective pore conductance and the number density of pores. When applied to several data sets of sandstones, having permeabilities in the range of 20-1400 mD, the permeability estimates were always within roughly a factor of two of the values measured in the laboratory. This methodology is now being applied to a set carbonate rocks, having permeabilities in the range of 0.5 to 25 mD. Carbonates generally have more complex and heterogeneous pore structures than do sandstones. Nevertheless, our preliminary results how that, for rocks that do not contain appreciable amounts of vugs that are unconnected to the main conducting pore space, the method again yields permeabilities within a factor of two of the measured values. However, when applied to vuggy carbonates, the predictions may be too high by several orders of magnitude. The error in these cases arises from including isolated vugs in our calculation of the effective pore conductance. These vugs are easily identified by eye. However, as our aim has been to develop a rapid, objective permeability estimation method that requires little if any

  8. A probabilistic approach for estimating water permeability in pressure-driven membranes.

    PubMed

    Boateng, Linkel K; Madarshahian, Ramin; Yoon, Yeomin; Caicedo, Juan M; Flora, Joseph R V

    2016-08-01

    A probabilistic approach is proposed to estimate water permeability in a cellulose triacetate (CTA) membrane. Water transport across the membrane is simulated in reverse osmosis mode by means of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Different membrane configurations obtained by an annealing MD simulation are considered and simulation results are analyzed by using a hierarchical Bayesian model to obtain the permeability of the different membranes. The estimated membrane permeability is used to predict full-scale water flux by means of a process-level Monte Carlo simulation. Based on the results, the parameters of the model are observed to converge within 5-ns total simulation time. The results also indicate that the use of unique structural configurations in MD simulations is essential to capture realistic membrane properties at the molecular scale. Furthermore, the predicted full-scale water flux based on the estimated permeability is within the same order of magnitude of bench-scale experimental measurement of 1.72×10(-5) m/s. PMID:27444876

  9. Estimating the hydraulic conductivity of slowly permeable and swelling materials from single-ring experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GéRard-Marchant, P.; Angulo-Jaramillo, R.; Haverkamp, R.; Vauclin, M.; Groenevelt, P.; Elrick, D. E.

    1997-06-01

    The in situ determination of the field-saturated hydraulic conductivity of low-permeability porous materials is a major concern for both geotechnics and soil physics with regards to environmental protection or water resources management. Recent early-time single-ring infiltration experiments, involving sequential constant head and falling head conditions, allow its efficient estimation. Nevertheless, the theory on which the interpretation was based was still strictly valid to nondeformable soils and implicity relied on a particular form of the hydraulic conductivity-soil water pressure head relationship. This theory is now extended to deformable materials, without any restrictive hypothesis. A new concept, bulk sorptivity, which characterizes the solid phase movement, is introduced. Field experiments, conducted on two liners of swelling and slowly permeable materials, revealed that neglecting the soil deformation induces an underestimation of the actual coefficient of permeability of the soil.

  10. Estimating large-scale fracture permeability of unsaturatedrockusing barometric pressure data

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Zhang, Keni; Liu, Hui-Hai

    2005-05-17

    We present a three-dimensional modeling study of gas flow inthe unsaturated fractured rock of Yucca Mountain. Our objective is toestimate large-scale fracture permeability, using the changes insubsurface pneumatic pressure in response to barometric pressure changesat the land surface. We incorporate the field-measured pneumatic datainto a multiphase flow model for describing the coupled processes ofliquid and gas flow under ambient geothermal conditions. Comparison offield-measured pneumatic data with model-predicted gas pressures is foundto be a powerful technique for estimating the fracture permeability ofthe unsaturated fractured rock, which is otherwise extremely difficult todetermine on the large scales of interest. In addition, this studydemonstrates that the multi-dimensional-flow effect on estimatedpermeability values is significant and should be included whendetermining fracture permeability in heterogeneous fracturedmedia.

  11. Dyke leakage localization and hydraulic permeability estimation through self-potential and hydro-acoustic measurements: Self-potential 'abacus' diagram for hydraulic permeability estimation and uncertainty computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolève, A.; Vandemeulebrouck, J.; Grangeon, J.

    2012-11-01

    In the present study, we propose the combination of two geophysical techniques, which we have applied to a dyke located in southeastern France that has a visible downstream flood area: the self-potential (SP) and hydro-acoustic methods. These methods are sensitive to two different types of signals: electric signals and water-soil pressure disturbances, respectively. The advantages of the SP technique lie in the high rate of data acquisition, which allows assessment of long dykes, and direct diagnosis in terms of leakage area delimitation and quantification. Coupled with punctual hydro-acoustic cartography, a leakage position can be precisely located, therefore allowing specific remediation decisions with regard to the results of the geophysical investigation. Here, the precise localization of leakage from an earth dyke has been identified using SP and hydro-acoustic signals, with the permeability of the preferential fluid flow area estimated by forward SP modeling. Moreover, we propose a general 'abacus' diagram for the estimation of hydraulic permeability of dyke leakage according to the magnitude of over water SP anomalies and the associated uncertainty.

  12. The effect of saturation path on three-phase relative permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kianinejad, Amir; Chen, Xiongyu; DiCarlo, David A.

    2015-11-01

    Simulation and fluid flow prediction of many petroleum-enhanced oil recovery methods as well as environmental processes such as carbon dioxide (CO2) geological storage or underground water resources remediation requires accurate modeling and determination of relative permeability under different saturation histories. Based on this critical need, several three-phase relative permeability models were developed to predict relative permeability; however, for practical purposes most of them require a variety of parameters introducing undesired complexity to the models. In this work, we attempt to find out if there is a simpler way to express this functionality. To do so, we experimentally measure three-phase, water/oil/gas, relative permeability in a 1 m long water-wet sand pack, under several saturation flow paths to cover the entire three-phase saturation space. We obtain the in situ saturations along the sand pack using a CT scanner and then determine the relative permeabilities of liquid phases directly from the measured in situ saturations using an unsteady state method. The measured data show that at a specific saturation, the oil relative permeability varies significantly (up to two orders of magnitude), depending on the path through saturation space. The three-phase relative permeability data are modeled using standard relative permeability models, Corey-type, and Saturation Weighted Interpolation (SWI). Our measured data suggest that three-phase oil relative permeability in water-wet media is only a function of its own saturation if the residual oil saturation is treated as a function of two saturations. We determine that residual saturation is the key parameter in modeling three-phase relative permeability (effect of saturation history).

  13. Reservoir condition special core analyses and relative permeability measurements on Almond formation and Fontainebleu sandstone rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Maloney, D.

    1993-11-01

    This report describes the results from special core analyses and relative permeability measurements conducted on Almond formation and Fontainebleu sandstone plugs. Almond formation plug tests were performed to evaluate multiphase, steady-state,reservoir-condition relative permeability measurement techniques and to examine the effect of temperature on relative permeability characteristics. Some conclusions from this project are as follows: An increase in temperature appeared to cause an increase in brine relative permeability results for an Almond formation plug compared to room temperature results. The plug was tested using steady-state oil/brine methods. The oil was a low-viscosity, isoparaffinic refined oil. Fontainebleu sandstone rock and fluid flow characteristics were measured and are reported. Most of the relative permeability versus saturation results could be represented by one of two trends -- either a k{sub rx} versus S{sub x} or k{sub rx} versus Sy trend where x and y are fluid phases (gas, oil, or brine). An oil/surfactant-brine steady-state relative permeability test was performed to examine changes in oil/brine relative permeability characteristics from changes in fluid IFTS. It appeared that, while low interfacial tension increased the aqueous phase relative permeability, it had no effect on the oil relative permeability. The BOAST simulator was modified for coreflood simulation. The simulator was useful for examining effects of variations in relative permeability and capillary pressure functions. Coreflood production monitoring and separator interface level measurement techniques were developed using X-ray absorption, weight methods, and RF admittance technologies. The three types of separators should be useful for routine and specialized core analysis applications.

  14. Measurement of Relative Permeability Using Single-Step Transient Flow Centrifuge Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, E. H.; Perfect, E.; Mayes, M. A.

    2007-12-01

    Steady-state flow centrifuge methods have been widely used to determine the relative permeability function, krw, of porous media. The centripetal acceleration greatly accelerates the speed at which equilibrium conditions are found in drainage or imbibition experiments. While equilibrium conditions are required by steady- state flow centrifuge methods, transient flow centrifuge methods utilize the time variant adaptation of state variables (e.g. fluid saturation, pressure or flux) to sudden changes in boundary conditions. Transient flow centrifuge experiments were conducted using a commercial rock core ultracentrifuge to displace wetting fluids from an initially fully-saturated sample by non-wetting fluids. The cumulative production of wetting fluid leaving the sample was recorded using an automated digital camera recording system. The time series of cumulative wetting fluid production forms the input for the objective function of inverse numerical modeling efforts and for the independent estimation of krw using an analytical solution for the transient flow of fluids through a porous medium in a centripetal field (the Hagoort method). In this study, single-step transient outflow experiments were run on Berea sandstone cores. The angular velocity was 942 sec-1. Independent laboratory techniques were used to measure the saturated water content, θs, and the intrinsic permeability, ksat. Besides these measurements, synthetic production data were generated with forward simulations of Hydrus-1D using the standard van Genuchten parameters for 'Sand' and 'Silt' soils. The models simulated acceleration of the centrifuge rotor during the first ~95 seconds of the experiment by increasing the angular velocity stepwise in 2.5 second intervals to 733 sec-1. The data were interpreted using a modified version of the Hagoort method in which numerical derivatives are used to compute the slope of the production curve in order to calculate relative saturation and the corresponding krw

  15. Estimation of permeability of a sandstone reservoir by a fractal and Monte Carlo simulation approach: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadapalli, U.; Srivastava, R. P.; Vedanti, N.; Dimri, V. P.

    2014-01-01

    Permeability of a hydrocarbon reservoir is usually estimated from core samples in the laboratory or from well test data provided by the industry. However, such data is very sparse and as such it takes longer to generate that. Thus, estimation of permeability directly from available porosity logs could be an alternative and far easier approach. In this paper, a method of permeability estimation is proposed for a sandstone reservoir, which considers fractal behavior of pore size distribution and tortuosity of capillary pathways to perform Monte Carlo simulations. In this method, we consider a reservoir to be a mono-dispersed medium to avoid effects of micro-porosity. The method is applied to porosity logs obtained from Ankleshwar oil field, situated in the Cambay basin, India, to calculate permeability distribution in a well. Computed permeability values are in good agreement with the observed permeability obtained from well test data. We also studied variation of permeability with different parameters such as tortuosity fractal dimension (Dt), grain size (r) and minimum particle size (d0), and found that permeability is highly dependent upon the grain size. This method will be extremely useful for permeability estimation, if the average grain size of the reservoir rock is known.

  16. Relative ion permeability of normal and cystic fibrosis nasal epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, M; Gatzy, J; Boucher, R

    1983-01-01

    The raised transepithelial electric potential difference (PD) across respiratory epithelia in cystic fibrosis (CF) has suggested an abnormality in ion permeation. We characterized this abnormality further by measuring in the nasal epithelia of CF and normal subjects the concentration-PD relationship for amiloride, an inhibitor of cell Na+ permeability, and PD responses to superfusion with solutions of different composition. Amiloride was more efficacious in the CF subjects but the ED50 was not different from that of normals (approximately 2 X 10(-6) M). Na+ replacement by choline induced effects similar to those of amiloride, i.e. a greater depolarization in CF subjects. A 10-fold increase in the K+ concentration of the perfusate induced a small (less than 10 mV) depolarization in both subject populations. When Cl- in the perfusate was replaced by gluconate or SO2-(4) the nasal PD of normal subjects hyperpolarized (lumen became more negative) by approximately 35 mV. A significantly smaller response (less than 17 mV) was induced in CF homozygotes but not in heterozygotes (38 mV). The smaller response of CF subjects appears to reflect an absolute decrease in luminal surface Cl- permeability because pretreatment with amiloride did not increase the response to Cl- free solution (7 mV). Accordingly, three abnormalities (decreased Cl- permeability, raised PD, greater amiloride efficacy) have been identified in CF respiratory epithelia. Whereas "excessive" active Na+ transport can account for these abnormalities and the dessication of airway surface liquid, it is possible that a lower lumenal cell membrane Cl- permeability and inhibition of a potential path of Cl- secretion can also explain the observations. PMID:6853720

  17. Liquid-Gas Relative Permeabilities in Fractures: Effects of Flow Structures, Phase Transformation and Surface Roughness

    SciTech Connect

    Chih-Ying Chen

    2005-06-30

    Two-phase flow through fractured media is important in petroleum, geothermal, and environmental applications. However, the actual physics and phenomena that occur inside fractures are poorly understood, and oversimplified relative permeability curves are commonly used in fractured reservoir simulations. In this work, an experimental apparatus equipped with a high-speed data acquisition system, real-time visualization, and automated image processing technology was constructed to study three transparent analog fractures with distinct surface roughnesses: smooth, homogeneously rough, and randomly rough. Air-water relative permeability measurements obtained in this study were compared with models suggested by earlier studies and analyzed by examining the flow structures. A method to evaluate the tortuosities induced by the blocking phase, namely the channel tortuosity, was proposed from observations of the flow structure images. The relationship between the coefficients of channel tortuosity and the relative permeabilities was studied with the aid of laboratory experiments and visualizations. Experimental data from these fractures were used to develop a broad approach for modeling two-phase flow behavior based on the flow structures. Finally, a general model deduced from these data was proposed to describe two-phase relative permeabilities in both smooth and rough fractures. For the theoretical analysis of liquid-vapor relative permeabilities, accounting for phase transformations, the inviscid bubble train models coupled with relative permeability concepts were developed. The phase transformation effects were evaluated by accounting for the molecular transport through liquid-vapor interfaces. For the steam water relative permeabilities, we conducted steam-water flow experiments in the same fractures as used for air-water experiments. We compared the flow behavior and relative permeability differences between two-phase flow with and without phase transformation effects

  18. Review: Mathematical expressions for estimating equivalent permeability of rock fracture networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Richeng; Li, Bo; Jiang, Yujing; Huang, Na

    2016-06-01

    Fracture networks play a more significant role in conducting fluid flow and solute transport in fractured rock masses, comparing with that of the rock matrix. Accurate estimation of the permeability of fracture networks would help researchers and engineers better assess the performance of projects associated with fluid flow in fractured rock masses. This study provides a review of previous works that have focused on the estimation of equivalent permeability of two-dimensional (2-D) discrete fracture networks (DFNs) considering the influences of geometric properties of fractured rock masses. Mathematical expressions for the effects of nine important parameters that significantly impact on the equivalent permeability of DFNs are summarized, including (1) fracture-length distribution, (2) aperture distribution, (3) fracture surface roughness, (4) fracture dead-end, (5) number of intersections, (6) hydraulic gradient, (7) boundary stress, (8) anisotropy, and (9) scale. Recent developments of 3-D fracture networks are briefly reviewed to underline the importance of utilizing 3-D models in future research.

  19. Factors influencing unsteady relative permeability of a mixed-wet reservoir rock

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanty, K.K.; Miller, A.E. )

    1991-09-01

    Capillarity, viscous fingering, and heterogeneity influence the flow in a core plug and hence affect the relative permeability determined from an unsteady test. Several unsteady water/oil relative permeability tests were carried out in a mixed-wet core while in-situ 3D saturation distribution was monitored by a computerized-tomography (CT) scanner. Results illustrate included in this paper that, in the early part of the Johnson-Bossler-Naumann (JBN) method, relative permeability is dominated by fingering and heterogeneity effects. The later part of this method ({gt}1 PV), however, represents the relative permeability of the end-face saturation and is influenced by the capillary number and throughput. Thus, laboratory results must be scaled to the field on the basis of the flow parameters: end-effect, capillary, instability, and heterogeneity numbers.

  20. Direct measurement of relative permeability in rocks from unsteady-state saturation profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kianinejad, Amir; Chen, Xiongyu; DiCarlo, David A.

    2016-08-01

    We develop a method to measure liquid relative permeability in rocks directly from transient in situ saturation profiles during gravity drainage experiments. Previously, similar methods have been used for sandpacks; here, this method is extended to rocks by applying a slight overpressure of gas at the inlet. Relative permeabilities are obtained in a 60 cm long vertical Berea sandstone core during gravity drainage, directly from the measured unsteady-state in situ saturations along the core at different times. It is shown that for obtaining relative permeability using this method, if certain criteria are met, the capillary pressure of the rock can be neglected. However, it is essential to use a correct gas pressure gradient along the core. This involves incorporating the pressure drop at the outlet of the core due to capillary discontinuity effects. The method developed in this work obtains relative permeabilities in unsteady-state fashion over a wide range of saturations quickly and accurately.

  1. Estimating permeability from quasi-static deformation: Temporal variations and arrival time inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Vasco, D.W.; Ferretti, Alessandro; Novali, Fabrizio

    2008-05-01

    Transient pressure variations within a reservoir can be treated as a propagating front and analyzed using an asymptotic formulation. From this perspective one can define a pressure 'arrival time' and formulate solutions along trajectories, in the manner of ray theory. We combine this methodology and a technique for mapping overburden deformation into reservoir volume change as a means to estimate reservoir flow properties, such as permeability. Given the entire 'travel time' or phase field, obtained from the deformation data, we can construct the trajectories directly, there-by linearizing the inverse problem. A numerical study indicates that, using this approach, we can infer large-scale variations in flow properties. In an application to Interferometric Synthetic Aperture (InSAR) observations associated with a CO{sub 2} injection at the Krechba field, Algeria, we image pressure propagation to the northwest. An inversion for flow properties indicates a linear trend of high permeability. The high permeability correlates with a northwest trending fault on the flank of the anticline which defines the field.

  2. Estimating retinal vascular permeability using the adiabatic approximation to the tissue homogeneity model with fluorescein videoangiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Osswald, Christian R.; Dosmar, Emily; Guthrie, Micah J.; Hones, Logan; Sinha, Lagnojita; Xu, Xiaochun; Mieler, William F.; St. Lawrence, Keith; Kang-Mieler, Jennifer J.

    2015-06-01

    Clinical symptoms of diabetic retinopathy are not detectable until damage to the retina reaches an irreversible stage, at least by today's treatment standards. As a result, there is a push to develop new, "sub-clinical" methods of predicting the onset of diabetic retinopathy before the onset of irreversible damage. With diabetic retinopathy being associated with the accumulation of long-term mild damage to the retinal vasculature, retinal blood vessel permeability has been proposed as a key parameter for detecting preclinical stages of retinopathy. In this study, a kinetic modeling approach used to quantify vascular permeability in dynamic contrast-enhanced medical imaging was evaluated in noise simulations and then applied to retinal videoangiography data in a diabetic rat for the first time to determine the potential for this approach to be employed clinically as an early indicator of diabetic retinopathy. Experimental levels of noise were found to introduce errors of less than 15% in estimates of blood flow and extraction fraction (a marker of vascular permeability), and fitting of rat retinal fluorescein angiography data provided stable maps of both parameters.

  3. Relative vascular permeability and vascularity across different regions of the rat nasal mucosa: implications for nasal physiology and drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Niyanta N.; Gautam, Mohan; Lochhead, Jeffrey J.; Wolak, Daniel J.; Ithapu, Vamsi; Singh, Vikas; Thorne, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Intranasal administration provides a non-invasive drug delivery route that has been proposed to target macromolecules either to the brain via direct extracellular cranial nerve-associated pathways or to the periphery via absorption into the systemic circulation. Delivering drugs to nasal regions that have lower vascular density and/or permeability may allow more drug to access the extracellular cranial nerve-associated pathways and therefore favor delivery to the brain. However, relative vascular permeabilities of the different nasal mucosal sites have not yet been reported. Here, we determined that the relative capillary permeability to hydrophilic macromolecule tracers is significantly greater in nasal respiratory regions than in olfactory regions. Mean capillary density in the nasal mucosa was also approximately 5-fold higher in nasal respiratory regions than in olfactory regions. Applying capillary pore theory and normalization to our permeability data yielded mean pore diameter estimates ranging from 13–17 nm for the nasal respiratory vasculature compared to <10 nm for the vasculature in olfactory regions. The results suggest lymphatic drainage for CNS immune responses may be favored in olfactory regions due to relatively lower clearance to the bloodstream. Lower blood clearance may also provide a reason to target the olfactory area for drug delivery to the brain. PMID:27558973

  4. Relative vascular permeability and vascularity across different regions of the rat nasal mucosa: implications for nasal physiology and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Niyanta N; Gautam, Mohan; Lochhead, Jeffrey J; Wolak, Daniel J; Ithapu, Vamsi; Singh, Vikas; Thorne, Robert G

    2016-01-01

    Intranasal administration provides a non-invasive drug delivery route that has been proposed to target macromolecules either to the brain via direct extracellular cranial nerve-associated pathways or to the periphery via absorption into the systemic circulation. Delivering drugs to nasal regions that have lower vascular density and/or permeability may allow more drug to access the extracellular cranial nerve-associated pathways and therefore favor delivery to the brain. However, relative vascular permeabilities of the different nasal mucosal sites have not yet been reported. Here, we determined that the relative capillary permeability to hydrophilic macromolecule tracers is significantly greater in nasal respiratory regions than in olfactory regions. Mean capillary density in the nasal mucosa was also approximately 5-fold higher in nasal respiratory regions than in olfactory regions. Applying capillary pore theory and normalization to our permeability data yielded mean pore diameter estimates ranging from 13-17 nm for the nasal respiratory vasculature compared to <10 nm for the vasculature in olfactory regions. The results suggest lymphatic drainage for CNS immune responses may be favored in olfactory regions due to relatively lower clearance to the bloodstream. Lower blood clearance may also provide a reason to target the olfactory area for drug delivery to the brain. PMID:27558973

  5. Characterization of geologic media using Minkowski functionals and applying pore connectivity as an extra ruling factor when estimating permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, L. M.; Anwar, S.

    2013-12-01

    Over the last two decades, several approaches to characterize porous medium were developed. One of them being the topology based Minkowski functionals, which are basic geometric measures defined for binary image of porous media. By segmenting three-dimensional (3D) pore space representations, it is possible to characterize quantitatively structural features at the pore scale such as porosity, pore mean curvature, specific surficial area, and pore connectivity using these measures. Structural features are believed to strongly control the permeability of porous media; however a rigorous mathematical validation of such relationship between structural features and the hydraulic property is missing in the literature. We hypothesize that rock permeability not only depend on the macroscopic properties such as porosity and grain size distribution but also depend on the structural features of porous media such as pore connectivity, specific surficial area, and pore mean curvature. We aim to develop a relationship between such structural features of porous media that occurs at pore scale with macroscopic properties such as hydraulic conductivity. Our hypothesis is tested by using a numerical scheme for computational fluid dynamics called Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), which enables the estimation of hydraulic parameters such as tortuosity and permeability which are relatively difficult and time consuming when obtained from laboratory experiments. 3D pore networks with similar porosity but significantly different structural properties are numerically generated using SGeMS. A series of LBM based flow simulations in different 3D pore networks are designed to understand the correlation between the structural property of porous media and its permeability.

  6. Use of geology in the interpretation of core-scale relative permeability data

    SciTech Connect

    Ringrose, P.S.; Jensen, J.L.; Sorbie, K.S.

    1996-09-01

    A number of factors, such as wettability, pore-size distribution, and core-scale heterogeneity, are known to affect the measured relative permeability in core plug samples. This paper focuses on the influence of geological structure at the laminaset scale on water-oil imbibition relative permeability curves. The endpoint positions and curve shapes vary as a function of the type of internal heterogeneity, the flow rate, and the assumptions on the pore-scale petrophysics (e.g. wettability). Interaction between the capillary forces and heterogeneity can occur at the cm-dm scale, which results in widely varying two-phase flow behavior for rocks with the same single-phase permeability. The geometry of heterogeneity as expressed in standard geological descriptions (e.g., cross-laminated, ripple-laminated, plane-laminated) can be translated into features of the expected relative permeability behavior for each rock type, thus aiding the interpretation of relative permeability data. The authors illustrate how their findings can help to interpret sets of relative permeability data from the field, using some examples from the Admire sand, El Dorado Field, Kansas.

  7. Special core analyses and relative permeability measurement on Almond formation reservoir rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Maloney, D.; Doggett, K.; Brinkmeyer, A.

    1993-02-01

    This report describes the results from special core analyses and relative permeability measurements conducted on samples of rock from the Almond Formation in Greater Green River Basin of southwestern Wyoming. The core was from Arch Unit Well 121 of Patrick Draw field. Samples were taken from the 4,950 to 4,965 ft depth interval. Thin section evaluation, X-ray diffraction, routine permeability and porosity, capillary pressure and wettability tests were performed to characterize the samples. Fluid flow capacity characteristics were measured during two-phase unsteady- and steady-state and three-phase steady-state relative permeability tests. Test results are presented in tables and graphs. Relative permeability results are compared with those of a 260-mD, fired Berea sandstone sample which was previously subjected to similar tests. Brine relative permeabilities were similar for the two samples, whereas oil and gas relative permeabilities for the Almond formation rock were higher at equivalent saturation conditions compared to Berea results. Most of the tests described in this report were conducted at 74[degrees]F laboratory temperature. Additional tests are planned at 150[degrees]F temperature. Equipment and procedural modifications to perform the elevated temperature tests are described.

  8. Special core analyses and relative permeability measurement on Almond formation reservoir rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Maloney, D.; Doggett, K.; Brinkmeyer, A.

    1993-02-01

    This report describes the results from special core analyses and relative permeability measurements conducted on samples of rock from the Almond Formation in Greater Green River Basin of southwestern Wyoming. The core was from Arch Unit Well 121 of Patrick Draw field. Samples were taken from the 4,950 to 4,965 ft depth interval. Thin section evaluation, X-ray diffraction, routine permeability and porosity, capillary pressure and wettability tests were performed to characterize the samples. Fluid flow capacity characteristics were measured during two-phase unsteady- and steady-state and three-phase steady-state relative permeability tests. Test results are presented in tables and graphs. Relative permeability results are compared with those of a 260-mD, fired Berea sandstone sample which was previously subjected to similar tests. Brine relative permeabilities were similar for the two samples, whereas oil and gas relative permeabilities for the Almond formation rock were higher at equivalent saturation conditions compared to Berea results. Most of the tests described in this report were conducted at 74{degrees}F laboratory temperature. Additional tests are planned at 150{degrees}F temperature. Equipment and procedural modifications to perform the elevated temperature tests are described.

  9. Estimating permeability in the Wilcox G' sandstone in the Lake Creek Gas unit well No. 48 using data from logging measurements. The evaluation of formation permeability using time lapse measurements during and after drilling. Topical report, September 1991-August 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Holditch, S.A.; Yao, C.Y.

    1993-08-01

    In this research, the authors have developed technology that allows an engineer to better understand mud filtration in low to medium permeability gas reservoirs. They use this knowledge to analyze log data to improve our estimates of formation permeability by layer. By developing accurate permeability profiles of the reservoir layers, they can optimize well completions in layered complex gas reservoirs.

  10. Estimation of the radionuclide transport by applying the mean, the standard deviation and the skewness of permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Niibori, Y.; Tochiyama, O.; Chida, T.

    1997-12-31

    The authors have investigated the characteristic permeability on the basis of some probability density functions of permeability, applying the Monte Carlo method and FEM. It was found that its value does not depend on type of probability density function of permeability, but on the arithmetic mean, the standard deviation and the skewness of permeability. This paper describes the use of the stochastic values of permeability for estimating the rate of radioactivity release to the accessible environment, applying the advection-dispersion model to two-dimensional, heterogeneous media. When a discrete probability density function (referred to as the Bernoulli trials) and the lognormal distribution have common values for the arithmetic mean, the standard deviation and the skewness of permeability, the calculated transport rates (described as the pseudo impulse responses) show good agreements for Peclet number around 10 and the dimensionless standard deviation around 1. Further, it is found that the transport rates apparently depends not only on the arithmetic mean and the standard deviation, but also on the skewness of permeability. When the value of skewness does not follow the lognormal distribution which has only two independent parameters (the mean and the standard deviation), the authors can replicate the three moments estimated from an observed distribution of permeability, by using the Bernoulli trials having three independent parameters.

  11. Estimates of crustal permeability on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca mid-ocean ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcock, William S. D.; McNabb, Alex

    1996-02-01

    Observational studies of hydrothermal venting on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge place strong constraints on the spacing and area of vent fields, the depth of circulation, and the hydrothermal heat flux. A method is described to estimate a uniform crustal permeability from these parameters under the assumptions that upflow is confined to a narrow plume underlying each vent field and downflow can be described by potential flow into a point sink at the base of each plume. For a reasonable range of parameter values, the isotropic permeability of the Endeavour lies in the range 6 × 10 -13 to 6 × 10 -12 m 2. A significant elongation of vent fields along-axis suggests that the permeability structure is strongly anisotropic, with the across-axis permeability about an order of magnitude lower than the permeability in orthogonal directions.

  12. An Experimental Study of CO2-Brine Relative Permeability in Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; DiCarlo, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate determinations of CO2-brine relative permeability are important for modeling potential CO2 storage scenarios. The most common assumption is that CO2-brine relative permeability is likely to be similar to oil-brine relative permeability for water-wet rocks. But recent measurements of CO2-brine relative permeability have differed greatly from oil-brine relative permeability; particularly, the measurements show a very low CO2 end point relative permeability (kr,CO2=0.1~0.2) and a relatively high residual water saturation (Swr>0.4) ( Lee et al. 2010, Zuo et al. 2012, Akbarabadi et al. 2013 and etc.). It has been hypothesized that the differences are related to CO2-brine having a different contact angle from oil-brine. In this study, we hypothesize that the differences are caused by large capillary end effects resulted from the very low CO2 viscosity. We conduct steady-state CO2-brine flow experiments in 2-foot-long and 2.8-inch-diamter Berea sandstone cores at 20 °C and 1500 psi. Four pressure taps drilled on a core allow both the total pressure drop and that across five individual sections to be measured. Three experiments, two drainage and one imbibition, have been conducted so far. Our results show: (1) The relative permeability to both brine and CO2 of the last section (downstream, 15 cm long) is significantly smaller than that of any of the middle three sections. This testifies that the capillary end effect makes the relative permeability under-measured at the end of a core. (2) The values of the middle three sections are very close to each other, which indicate the middle part of our core is free of capillary end effect. (3) The CO2 end point relative permeability is 0.3~0.5, which is much higher than the recent measurements. (4) The brine end point relative permeability during imbibition is about 0.08, which is close to literature data. Reference: Lee, Y.S, Kim, K. H. and Lee, T.H. et al. Analysis of CO2 Endpoint Relative Permeability and Injectivity

  13. Numerical-Simulation-Based Determination of Relative Permeability in Laminated Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedaghat, Mohammad H.; Gerke, Kirill; Azizmohammadi, Siroos; Matthai, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    Reservoir simulation using the extended Darcy's law approach requires relative permeability curves derived either via analytic saturation functions (Corey models etc.) or from special core analysis (SCAL). Since such experimental exploration of the space of influential parameters (pore geometry and wettability) is costly and time consuming, establishing ways to extract ensemble relative permeability from numerical simulation, kri, over the entire range of water saturation is highly desirable. Recent work has highlighted that the shape of relative permeability strongly depends on the balance between viscous, gravitational, and capillary forces. Our work focuses on finding accurate ways to compute ensemble kri(sw) for layered rocks when both capillary and viscous forces are strong. Two methods are proposed: an unsteady state saturation variation (USSV) method and a steady state saturation variation (SSSV) technique. To evaluate these approaches, SCAL data was extracted numerically from a real mm-scale layered sample. Results obtained with a Finite Element-Centered Finite Volume (FECFM) simulator, suggest that either of the approaches work significantly better than conventional unsteady state and JBN (Johnson-Bossler-Naumann) methods. Also, investigating saturation and velocity profiles within the sample indicates that bed-by-bed variations in wettability influence the flow pattern along/across interfaces making equipermeable layers behave like zones with different flow velocity. This dramatically challenges conventional relative permeability models and is addressed in terms of a new variable called relative permeability index.

  14. a Novel Fractal Model for Two-Phase Relative Permeability in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, G.; Dong, P. C.; Mo, S. Y.; Gai, S. H.; Wu, Z. S.

    2015-03-01

    Multiphase flow in porous media is very important in various scientific and engineering fields. It has been shown that relative permeability plays an important role in determination of flow characteristics for multiphase flow. The accurate prediction of multiphase flow in porous media is hence highly important. In this work, a novel predictive model for relative permeability in porous media is developed based on the fractal theory. The predictions of two-phase relative permeability by the current mathematical models have been validated by comparing with available experimental data. The predictions by the proposed model show the same variation trend with the available experimental data and are in good agreement with the existing experiments. Every parameter in the proposed model has clear physical meaning. The proposed relative permeability is expressed as a function of the immobile liquid film thickness, pore structural parameters (pore fractal dimension Df and tortuosity fractal dimension DT) and fluid viscosity ratio. The effects of these parameters on relative permeability of porous media are discussed in detail.

  15. Characterizing two-phase flow relative permeabilities in chemicalflooding using a pore-scale network model

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qingjie; Shen, Pingping; Wu, Yu-Shu

    2004-03-15

    A dynamic pore-scale network model is presented for investigating the effects of interfacial tension and oil-water viscosity on relative permeability during chemical flooding. This model takes into account both viscous and capillary forces in analyzing the impact of chemical properties on flow behavior or displacement configuration, as opposed to the conventional or invasion percolation algorithm which incorporates capillary pressure only. The study results indicate that both water and oil relative-permeability curves are dependent strongly on interfacial tension as well as an oil-water viscosity ratio. In particular, water and oil relative-permeability curves are both found to shift upward as interfacial tension is reduced, and they both tend to become linear versus saturation once interfacial tension is at low values. In addition, the oil-water viscosity ratio appears to have only a small effect under conditions of high interfacial tension. When the interfacial tension is low, however, water relative permeability decreases more rapidly (with the increase in the aqueous-phase viscosity) than oil relative permeability. The breakthrough saturation of the aqueous phase during chemical flooding tends to decrease with the reduction of interfacial tension and may also be affected by the oil-water viscosity ratio.

  16. Uncertainty Assessment of Interpolation-Based Three Phase Relative Permeability Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranaee, Ehsan; Giovanni, Porta; Monica, Riva; Alberto, Guadagnini

    2013-04-01

    A major element affecting uncertainty associated with prediction of three-phase flow in reservoirs is the parameterization of relative permeability. The latter are typically obtained through interpolation of two phase relative permeability data because of intrinsic difficulties related to direct measurements. Here, we discuss and analyze the saturation history dependency of water, oil and gas relative permeabilities and distinguish key features of three- and two- phase flow configurations. We start by investigating the advantages and limitations of several methodologies available in the literature and widely adopted in three-phase flow simulation. This analysis is performed by comparing model outcomes against experimental data published in the literature. The results provided by considering Corey-type equations as input to the aforesaid models is compared against the use of linear interpolation of two-phase measurements from oil-water and oil-gas environment. Our results show that available models typically fail to reproduce the set of experimental results ever the full range of saturations. This analysis suggests that not only saturation history but also wettability, residual oil and trapping behavior of oil during drainage and imbibition are key elements distinguishing between the physics of two- and three-phase settings. These effects should be taken in account to predict three-phase relative permeability. We then propose an alternative formulation to compute oil relative permability under three-phase conditions. Our model takes into account (i) the dependence of three-phase oil relative permeability on the saturation path, and (ii) the effect of wettability observed for three-phase systems. The model is based on a sigmoid-type interpolation of the oil relative permeability-saturation data in a two-phase oil-water system. Three-phase oil relative permeability is then computed through an additional interpolation between the oil-water effective sigmoid curve and

  17. Flow visualization and relative permeability measurements in rough-walled fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Persoff, P.; Pruess, K.

    1993-01-01

    Two-phase (gas-liquid) flow experiments were done in a natural rock fracture and transparent replicas of natural fractures. Liquid was injected at constant volume flow rate, and gas was injected at either constant mass flow rate or constant pressure. When gas was injected at constant mass flow rate, the gas inlet pressure, and inlet and outlet capillary pressures, generally did not reach steady state but cycled irregularly. Flow visualization showed that this cycling was due to repeated blocking and unblocking of gas flow paths by liquid. Relative permeabilities calculated from flow rate and pressure data show that the sum of the relative permeabilities of the two phases is much less than 1, indicating that each phase interferes strongly with the flow of the other. Comparison of the relative permeability curves with typical curves for porous media (Corey curves) show that the phase interference is stronger in fractures than in typical porous media.

  18. Water Retention Curve and Relative Permeability for Gas Production from Hydrate-Bearing Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahabadi, N.; Dai, S.; Seol, Y.; Jang, J.

    2014-12-01

    Water retention curve (soil water characteristic curve SWCC) and relative permeability equations are important to determine gas and water production for gas hydrate development. However, experimental studies to determine fitting parameters of those equations are not available in the literature. The objective of this research is to obtain reliable parameters for capillary pressure functions and relative permeability equations applicable to hydrate dissociation and gas production. In order to achieve this goal, (1) micro X-ray Computer Tomography (CT) is used to scan the specimen under 10MPa effective stress, (2) a pore network model is extracted from the CT image, (3) hydrate dissociation and gas expansion are simulated in the pore network model, (4) the parameters for the van Genuchten-type soil water characteristic curve and relative permeability equation during gas expansion are suggested. The research outcome will enhance the ability of numerical simulators to predict gas and water production rate.

  19. Control of fault geometry and permeability contrast on fault-related hydrothermal fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Christine; Rüpke, Lars; Hasenclever, Jörg; Grevemeyer, Ingo; Petersen, Sven

    2015-04-01

    High-temperature black smoker systems along slow-spreading ridges such as the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) are frequently related to tectonic fault zones and therefore are commonly found off axis. While preferential flow of hot fluids along highly permeable, fractured rocks seems intuitive, such efficient flow leads to the entrainment of cold ambient seawater resulting in a drastic decrease in vent temperatures. This temperature drop is difficult to reconcile with high-temperature black smoker activity observed at outcropping fault zones. In our recent study we aim to resolve this apparent contradiction by combining newly acquired seismological data (Grevemeyer et al., 2013) from the high-temperature, off-axis Logatchev 1 hydrothermal field (LHF1) along the MAR with 2D hydrothermal flow modeling. The seismic data shows intense off-axis seismicity with focal mechanisms suggesting a fault zone dipping from LHF1 toward the ridge axis. In order to explain fault-related high-temperature hydrothermal discharge as observed at LHF1, our simulations predict that fault zones need to be just permeable and wide enough to capture and redirect hydrothermal plumes rising from depth but, because they are not isolated conduits, must not be too wide or permeable in order to prevent cooling through mixing with ambient colder fluids. The two controlling parameters fault width and permeability contrast between fault and surrounding rock can be expressed as a single term, the relative transmissibility of the fault zone, which is defined by the product of the two. Low relative fault transmissibility leads to plumes that cross the fault and vent above the heat source rather than at the fault termination at the seafloor. High relative fault transmissibility leads to significantly lower vent exit temperatures than those observed at black smoker systems. Our findings further illustrate the intrinsic relationship between permeability, mass flux and upflow temperature: the higher the permeability

  20. System and method for determining the relative permeability of an earth formation surrounding a wellbore

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, W.A.; Walsh, D.J.

    1983-12-20

    A method for determining the relative permeability of an earth formation surrounding a wellbore having a longitudinal axis comprising the steps of injecting a fluid into the wellbore such that the fluid invades the earth formation, measuring at different points in time a quantity that varies in response to the radius from the wellbore axis of the fluid invasion into the earth formation, determining in response to said quantity measurements the radius from the wellbore axis of the fluid invasion into the earth formation, and determining in response to said radii determinations the relative permeability of the earth formation. A system for performing the method is also disclosed.

  1. New Technique for TOC Estimation Based on Thermal Core Logging in Low-Permeable Formations (Bazhen fm.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Evgeny; Popov, Yury; Spasennykh, Mikhail; Kozlova, Elena; Chekhonin, Evgeny; Zagranovskaya, Dzhuliya; Belenkaya, Irina; Alekseev, Aleksey

    2016-04-01

    A practical method of organic-rich intervals identifying within the low-permeable dispersive rocks based on thermal conductivity measurements along the core is presented. Non-destructive non-contact thermal core logging was performed with optical scanning technique on 4 685 full size core samples from 7 wells drilled in four low-permeable zones of the Bazhen formation (B.fm.) in the Western Siberia (Russia). The method employs continuous simultaneous measurements of rock anisotropy, volumetric heat capacity, thermal anisotropy coefficient and thermal heterogeneity factor along the cores allowing the high vertical resolution (of up to 1-2 mm). B.fm. rock matrix thermal conductivity was observed to be essentially stable within the range of 2.5-2.7 W/(m*K). However, stable matrix thermal conductivity along with the high thermal anisotropy coefficient is characteristic for B.fm. sediments due to the low rock porosity values. It is shown experimentally that thermal parameters measured relate linearly to organic richness rather than to porosity coefficient deviations. Thus, a new technique employing the transformation of the thermal conductivity profiles into continuous profiles of total organic carbon (TOC) values along the core was developed. Comparison of TOC values, estimated from the thermal conductivity values, with experimental pyrolytic TOC estimations of 665 samples from the cores using the Rock-Eval and HAWK instruments demonstrated high efficiency of the new technique for the organic rich intervals separation. The data obtained with the new technique are essential for the SR hydrocarbon generation potential, for basin and petroleum system modeling application, and estimation of hydrocarbon reserves. The method allows for the TOC richness to be accurately assessed using the thermal well logs. The research work was done with financial support of the Russian Ministry of Education and Science (unique identification number RFMEFI58114X0008).

  2. A study of relative permeability for steam-water flow in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Ambusso, W.; Satik, C.; Horne, R.

    1996-12-31

    We report on continuing experimental and numerical efforts to obtain steam-water relative permeability functions and to assess effect of heat transfer and phase change. To achieve these, two sets of steady-state flow experiments were conducted: one with nitrogen and water and another with steam and water. During these experiments, a mixture of nitrogen-water (or steam-water) was injected into a Berea sandstone core. At the onset of steady state conditions, three-dimensional saturation distributions were obtained by using a high resolution X-ray computer tomography scanner. By identifying a length of the core over which a flat saturation profile exists and measuring the pressure gradient associated with this length, we calculated relative permeabilities for nitrogen-water flow experiments. The relative permeability relations obtained in this case were in good agreement with those reported by other investigators. Another attempt was also made to conduct a steamwater flow experiment under adiabatic conditions. This experiment was completed with partial success due to the difficulties encountered during the experiment. The results of this experiment showed that a flat saturation profile actually developed over a substantial length of the core even at a comparatively modest injection rate (6 grams per minute) with low steam quality (4% by mass). The completion of this set of experiments should yield steam-water relative permeability relations in the near future.

  3. A study of relative permeability for steam-water flow in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Ambusso, Willis; Satik, Cengiz; Horne, Roland

    1996-01-24

    We report on continuing experimental and numerical efforts to obtain steam-water relative permeability functions and to assess effect of heat transfer and phase change. To achieve these, two sets of steady-state flow experiments were conducted: one with nitrogen and water and another with steam and water. During these experiments, a mixture of nitrogen-water (or steam-water) was injected into a Berea sandstone core. At the onset of steady state conditions, three-dimensional saturation distributions were obtained by using a high resolution X-ray computer tomography scanner. By identifying a length of the core over which a flat saturation profile exists and measuring the pressure gradient associated with this length, we calculated relative permeabilities for nitrogen-water flow experiments. The relative permeability relations obtained in this case were in good agreement with those reported by other investigators. Another attempt was also made to conduct a steam-water flow experiment under adiabatic conditions. This experiment was completed with partial success due to the difficulties encountered during the experiment. The results of this experiment showed that a flat saturation profile actually developed over a substantial length of the core even at a comparatively modest injection rate (6 grams per minute) with low steam quality (4% by mass). The completion of this set of experiments should yield steam-water relative permeability relations in the near future.

  4. Changes in pore geometry and relative permeability caused by carbonate precipitation in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Fei; Tsuji, Takeshi

    2014-11-01

    The C O2 behavior within the reservoirs of carbon capture and storage projects is usually predicted from large-scale simulations of the reservoir. A key parameter in reservoir simulation is relative permeability. However, mineral precipitation alters the pore structure over time, and leads correspondingly to permeability changing with time. In this study, we numerically investigate the influence of carbonate precipitation on relative permeability during C O2 storage. The pore spaces in rock samples were extracted by high-resolution microcomputed tomography (CT) scanned images. The fluid velocity field within the three-dimensional pore spaces was calculated by the lattice Boltzmann method, while reactive transport with calcite deposition was modeled by an advection-reaction formulation solved by the finite volume method. To increase the computational efficiency and reduce the processing time, we adopted a graphics processing unit parallel computing technique. The relative permeability of the sample rock was then calculated by a highly optimized two-phase lattice Boltzmann model. We also proposed two pore clogging models. In the first model, the clogging processes are modeled by transforming fluid nodes to solid nodes based on their precipitated mass level. In the second model, the porosity is artificially reduced by adjusting the gray scale threshold of the CT images. The developed method accurately simulates the mineralization process observed in laboratory experiment. Precipitation-induced evolution of pore structure significantly influenced the absolute permeability. The relative permeability, however, was much more influenced by pore reduction in the nonwetting phase than in the wetting phase. The output of the structural changes in pore geometry by this model could be input to C O2 reservoir simulators to investigate the outcome of sequestered C O2 .

  5. Changes in pore geometry and relative permeability caused by carbonate precipitation in porous media.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fei; Tsuji, Takeshi

    2014-11-01

    The CO_{2} behavior within the reservoirs of carbon capture and storage projects is usually predicted from large-scale simulations of the reservoir. A key parameter in reservoir simulation is relative permeability. However, mineral precipitation alters the pore structure over time, and leads correspondingly to permeability changing with time. In this study, we numerically investigate the influence of carbonate precipitation on relative permeability during CO_{2} storage. The pore spaces in rock samples were extracted by high-resolution microcomputed tomography (CT) scanned images. The fluid velocity field within the three-dimensional pore spaces was calculated by the lattice Boltzmann method, while reactive transport with calcite deposition was modeled by an advection-reaction formulation solved by the finite volume method. To increase the computational efficiency and reduce the processing time, we adopted a graphics processing unit parallel computing technique. The relative permeability of the sample rock was then calculated by a highly optimized two-phase lattice Boltzmann model. We also proposed two pore clogging models. In the first model, the clogging processes are modeled by transforming fluid nodes to solid nodes based on their precipitated mass level. In the second model, the porosity is artificially reduced by adjusting the gray scale threshold of the CT images. The developed method accurately simulates the mineralization process observed in laboratory experiment. Precipitation-induced evolution of pore structure significantly influenced the absolute permeability. The relative permeability, however, was much more influenced by pore reduction in the nonwetting phase than in the wetting phase. The output of the structural changes in pore geometry by this model could be input to CO_{2} reservoir simulators to investigate the outcome of sequestered CO_{2}. PMID:25493903

  6. Investigating the Relative Permeability of Tight Porous Media Using a Multiscale Network Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmani, A.; Prodanovic, M.

    2013-12-01

    Tight reservoirs, such as tight gas sandstone and tight carbonates, are rich sources of oil and gas that can significantly benefit the high global energy demand. However, the petrophysical properties (such as permeability or capillary pressure) of these so called unconventional reservoirs is difficult to quantify in terms of only porosity or saturation. This is mainly due to the high heterogeneity in pore shape, pore configuration, pore interconnectivity and a lack of understanding of fluid physics within said porous media. One unorthodox petrophysical phenomenon that remains inexplicable via conventional models is what is coined as 'permeability jail' (Shanley et al, 2004). By definition, a permeability jail is a range of water saturation in which neither the wetting phase nor the nonwetting phase is capable of moving. We investigate the effects of fluid physics (snap-off, film flow and wettability) and pore connectivity (pore shape and pore connectivity due to cementation and existence of microporosity) on tight rock relative permeability curves. Pore level modeling has become an established approach in investigating the effects of various pore structure features and fluid behaviors in pore scale on macroscopic petrophysical properties. We construct multiscale pore network flow models that contain both macro- (primary) and microporosity (secondary porosity). We first build theoretical network models based on granular packings to isolate the effects of each pore structure feature as well as fluid physics on both drainage and imbibition relative permeability curves. We then extend our method to imaged media to predict the relative permeability curves of Estaillades limestone based on X-ray microtomography images with identified solid, microporous and pore spaces.

  7. The impact of wettability and connectivity on relative permeability in carbonates: A pore network modeling analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharbi, Oussama; Blunt, Martin J.

    2012-12-01

    We use pore network modeling to study the impact of wettability and connectivity on waterflood relative permeability for a set of six carbonate samples. Four quarry samples are studied, Indiana, Portland, Guiting, and Mount Gambier, along with two subsurface samples obtained from a deep saline Middle Eastern aquifer. The pore space is imaged in three dimensions using X-ray microtomography at a resolution of a few microns. The images are segmented into pore and solid, and a topologically representative network of pores and throats is extracted from these images. We then simulate quasi-static displacement in the networks. We represent mixed-wet behavior by varying the oil-wet fraction of the pore space. The relative permeability is strongly dependent on both the wettability and the average coordination number of the network. We show that traditional measures of wettability based on the point where the relative permeability curves cross are not reliable. Good agreement is found between our calculations and measurements of relative permeability on carbonates in the literature. This work helps establish a library of benchmark samples for multiphase flow and transport computations. The implications of the results for field-scale displacement mechanisms are discussed, and the efficiency of waterflooding as an oil recovery process in carbonate reservoirs is assessed depending on the wettability and pore space connectivity.

  8. A laboratory study to estimate pore geometric parameters of sandstones using complex conductivity and nuclear magnetic resonance for permeability prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterman, Gordon; Keating, Kristina; Binley, Andrew; Slater, Lee

    2016-06-01

    We estimate parameters from the Katz and Thompson permeability model using laboratory complex electrical conductivity (CC) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data to build permeability models parameterized with geophysical measurements. We use the Katz and Thompson model based on the characteristic hydraulic length scale, determined from mercury injection capillary pressure estimates of pore throat size, and the intrinsic formation factor, determined from multisalinity conductivity measurements, for this purpose. Two new permeability models are tested, one based on CC data and another that incorporates CC and NMR data. From measurements made on forty-five sandstone cores collected from fifteen different formations, we evaluate how well the CC relaxation time and the NMR transverse relaxation times compare to the characteristic hydraulic length scale and how well the formation factor estimated from CC parameters compares to the intrinsic formation factor. We find: (1) the NMR transverse relaxation time models the characteristic hydraulic length scale more accurately than the CC relaxation time (R2 of 0.69 and 0.33 and normalized root mean square errors (NRMSE) of 0.16 and 0.21, respectively); (2) the CC estimated formation factor is well correlated with the intrinsic formation factor (NRMSE=0.23). We demonstrate that that permeability estimates from the joint-NMR-CC model (NRMSE=0.13) compare favorably to estimates from the Katz and Thompson model (NRMSE=0.074). This model advances the capability of the Katz and Thompson model by employing parameters measureable in the field giving it the potential to more accurately estimate permeability using geophysical measurements than are currently possible.

  9. Connected pathway relative permeability from pore-scale imaging of imbibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, S.; Rücker, M.; Ott, H.; Georgiadis, A.; van der Linde, H.; Enzmann, F.; Kersten, M.; Armstrong, R. T.; de With, S.; Becker, J.; Wiegmann, A.

    2016-04-01

    Pore-scale images obtained from a synchrotron-based X-ray computed micro-tomography (μCT) imbibition experiment in sandstone rock were used to conduct Navier-Stokes flow simulations on the connected pathways of water and oil phases. The resulting relative permeability was compared with steady-state Darcy-scale imbibition experiments on 5 cm large twin samples from the same outcrop sandstone material. While the relative permeability curves display a large degree of similarity, the endpoint saturations for the μCT data are 10% in saturation units higher than the experimental data. However, the two datasets match well when normalizing to the mobile saturation range. The agreement is particularly good at low water saturations, where the oil is predominantly connected. Apart from different saturation endpoints, in this particular experiment where connected pathway flow dominates, the discrepancies between pore-scale connected pathway flow simulations and Darcy-scale steady-state data are minor overall and have very little impact on fractional flow. The results also indicate that if the pore-scale fluid distributions are available and the amount of disconnected non-wetting phase is low, quasi-static flow simulations may be sufficient to compute relative permeability. When pore-scale fluid distributions are not available, fluid distributions can be obtained from a morphological approach, which approximates capillary-dominated displacement. The relative permeability obtained from the morphological approach compare well to drainage steady state whereas major discrepancies to the imbibition steady-state experimental data are observed. The morphological approach does not represent the imbibition process very well and experimental data for the spatial arrangement of the phases are required. Presumably for modeling imbibition relative permeability an approach is needed that captures moving liquid-liquid interfaces, which requires viscous and capillary forces simultaneously.

  10. Estimating permeability using median pore-throat radius obtained from mercury intrusion porosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhiye; Hu, Qinhong

    2013-04-01

    Mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) has been widely used to characterize the pore structure for various types of porous media. Several relationships between permeability and pore structure information (e.g., porosity and pore-size distribution) have been developed in the literature. This work is to introduce a new, and simpler, empirical equation to predict permeability by solely using the median pore-throat radius (r50), which is the pore-throat radius corresponding to 50% mercury saturation. The total of 18 samples used in this work have a wide range of permeability, from 10-6 to 103 mD, which makes the new equation more applicable. The predicted permeabilities by using the new equation are comparable with permeability values obtained from other measurement methods, as shown from ten samples with permeability data measured with nitrogen.

  11. Relative permeability and the microscopic distribution of wetting and nonwetting phases in the pore space of Berea sandstone

    SciTech Connect

    Schlueter, E.M.; Cook, N.G.W. |; Witherspoon, P.A.; Myer, L.R.

    1994-04-01

    Experiments to study relative permeabilities of a partially saturated rock have been carried out in Berea sandstone using fluids that can be solidified in place. The effective permeability of the spaces not occupied by the wetting fluid (paraffin wax) or the nonwetting fluid (Wood`s metal), have been measured at various saturations after solidifying each of the phases. The tests were conducted on Berea sandstone samples that had an absolute permeability of about 600 md. The shape of the laboratory-derived relative permeability vs. saturation curves measured with the other phase solidified conforms well with typical curves obtained using conventional experimental methods. The corresponding wetting and nonwetting fluid distributions at different saturations are presented and analyzed in light of the role of the pore structure in the invasion process, and their impact on relative permeability and capillary pressure. Irreducible wetting and nonwetting phase fluid distributions are studied. The effect of clay minerals on permeability is also assessed.

  12. Pore scale modeling of porosity-permeability relations in reacting porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raoof, A.; Spiers, C. J.; Hassanizadeh, M.; Nick, H.

    2012-12-01

    The main objective of this research is to gain a better understanding of the relation between the progress of chemical reactions and porosity/permeability evolution in porous media, such as a reservoir rock in which CO2 is to be stored. The microscopic pore space is modeled using a Multi-Directional Pore Network (MDPN), which allows for a distribution of coordination number ranging between one and 26. This topological property, together with geometrical distributions of pore sizes are used to mimic the microstructure of real porous media at the mm to cm scale. In order to simulate transport of multi-component chemical species, mass balance equations are solved within each element of the network (i.e., pore body and pore throat) . We have considered both advective and diffusive transport processes within the pore spaces together with multi-component chemical reactions, allowing for both equilibrium and kinetic calculations. By averaging over the network domain, we calculate the evolution of porosity and permeability as well as of flux-averaged concentration breakthrough curves. We obtain constitutive relations linking porosity and permeability as they involve during dissolution of calcium carbonate within a calcite-cemented sandstone, under conditions relevant to geological storage of CO2. Effect of distribution of reactive minerals is evaluated and transition between advection- and diffusion- dominated transport is shown to play a key role in determining evolution of porosity and permeability in reservoir rocks.

  13. Pore scale modeling of porosity-permeability relations in reacting porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raoof, A.; Spiers, C. J.; Hassanizadeh, S.; Nick, H. M.

    2013-12-01

    The main objective of this research is to gain a better understanding of the relation between the progress of chemical reactions and porosity/permeability evolution in porous media, such as a reservoir rock in which CO2 is to be stored. The microscopic pore space is modeled using a Multi-Directional Pore Network (MDPN), which allows for a distribution of coordination number. This topological property, together with geometrical distributions of pore sizes are used to mimic the microstructure of real porous media at the mm to cm scale. In order to simulate transport of multi-component chemical species, mass balance equations are solved within each element of the network (i.e., pore body and pore throat) . We have considered both advective and diffusive transport processes within the pore spaces together with multi-component chemical reactions, allowing for both equilibrium and kinetic calculations. By averaging over the network domain, we calculate the evolution of porosity and permeability as well as of flux-averaged concentration breakthrough curves. We obtain constitutive relations linking porosity and permeability as they involve during dissolution of calcium carbonate within a calcite-cemented sandstone as well as a carbonate rock, under conditions relevant to geological storage of CO2. Effect of distribution of reactive minerals is evaluated and transition between advection- and diffusion- dominated transport is shown to play a key role in determining evolution of porosity and permeability in reservoir rocks.

  14. Quantifying Evaporation and Evaluating Runoff Estimation Methods in a Permeable Pavement System

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency constructed a 0.4-ha parking lot in Edison, New Jersey, that incorporated permeable pavement in the parking lanes which were designed to receive run-on from the impervious hot-mix asphalt driving lanes. Twelve lined permeable pavement sec...

  15. A general model for nonwetting phase relative permeability of disturbed porous media with lognormal pore size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z.; Mohanty, B.

    2013-12-01

    Describing convective nonwetting phase flow in unsaturated porous media requires knowledge of relative nonwetting pahse permeability. This study was mainly conducted to formulate a general nonwetting pahse relative permeability model for porous media with lognormal pore size distribution based on Kosugi (1999) work for unsaturated relative hydraulic conductivity. The model-data comparison showed that the existing commonly used Burdine and Mualem permeability model could overestimate experimental relative nonwetting phase permeability data. The sensitivity analysis of the permeability model emphasized the importance of different pore tortuosity-connectivity value for gas and water phase. Subsequently, the suggested modified Burdine and Mualem permeability model for (alpha,beta,eta) in the general nonwetting phase permeability model should be (2.5, 2, 1) and (2, 1, 2) respectively. These two suggested models have the lowest mean root mean square error (RMSE) among the investigated permeability models. This finding could present more accurate permeability model parameterization in the multiphase subsurface flow modeling under isothermal and non-isothermal conditions.

  16. Estimating diffusion coefficients in low-permeability porous media using a macropore column

    SciTech Connect

    Young, D.F.; Ball, W.P.

    1998-09-01

    Diffusion coefficients in an aquitard material were measured by conducting miscible solute transport experiments through a specially constructed macropore column. Stainless steel HPLC columns were prepared in a manner that created an annular region of repacked aquitard material and a central core of medium-grained quartz sand. The column transport approach minimizes volatilization and sorption losses that can be problematic when measuring hydrophobic organic chemical diffusion with diffusion-cell methods or column-sectioning techniques. In the transport experiments, solutes (triated water, 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene, and tetrachloroethene) were transported through the central core by convection and hydrodynamic dispersion and through the low-permeability annulus by radial diffusion. All transport parameters were independently measured except for the effective diffusion coefficient in the aquitard material, which was obtained by model fitting. Batch-determined retardation factors agreed very closely with moment-derived retardation factors determined from the column experiments, and no evidence of pore exclusion was found. A model with retarded diffusion was found to apply, and the effective tortuosity factor of the aquitard material was estimated at an average value of 5.1.

  17. Relative permeability experiments of carbon dioxide displacing brine and their implications for carbon sequestration.

    PubMed

    Levine, Jonathan S; Goldberg, David S; Lackner, Klaus S; Matter, Juerg M; Supp, Michael G; Ramakrishnan, T S

    2014-01-01

    To mitigate anthropogenically induced climate change and ocean acidification, net carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere must be reduced. One proposed option is underground CO2 disposal. Large-scale injection of CO2 into the Earth's crust requires an understanding of the multiphase flow properties of high-pressure CO2 displacing brine. We present laboratory-scale core flooding experiments designed to measure CO2 endpoint relative permeability for CO2 displacing brine at in situ pressures, salinities, and temperatures. Endpoint drainage CO2 relative permeabilities for liquid and supercritical CO2 were found to be clustered around 0.4 for both the synthetic and natural media studied. These values indicate that relative to CO2, water may not be strongly wetting the solid surface. Based on these results, CO2 injectivity will be reduced and pressure-limited reservoirs will have reduced disposal capacity, though area-limited reservoirs may have increased capacity. Future reservoir-scale modeling efforts should incorporate sensitivity to relative permeability. Assuming applicability of the experimental results to other lithologies and that the majority of reservoirs are pressure limited, geologic carbon sequestration would require approximately twice the number of wells for the same injectivity. PMID:24274391

  18. Estimation of water saturated permeability of soils, using 3D soil tomographic images and pore-level transport phenomena modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamorski, Krzysztof; Sławiński, Cezary; Barna, Gyöngyi

    2014-05-01

    There are some important macroscopic properties of the soil porous media such as: saturated permeability and water retention characteristics. These soil characteristics are very important as they determine soil transport processes and are commonly used as a parameters of general models of soil transport processes used extensively for scientific developments and engineering practise. These characteristics are usually measured or estimated using some statistical or phenomenological modelling, i.e. pedotransfer functions. On the physical basis, saturated soil permeability arises from physical transport processes occurring at the pore level. Current progress in modelling techniques, computational methods and X-ray micro-tomographic technology gives opportunity to use direct methods of physical modelling for pore level transport processes. Physically valid description of transport processes at micro-scale based on Navier-Stokes type modelling approach gives chance to recover macroscopic porous medium characteristics from micro-flow modelling. Water microflow transport processes occurring at the pore level are dependent on the microstructure of porous body and interactions between the fluid and the medium. In case of soils, i.e. the medium there exist relatively big pores in which water can move easily but also finer pores are present in which water transport processes are dominated by strong interactions between the medium and the fluid - full physical description of these phenomena is a challenge. Ten samples of different soils were scanned using X-ray computational microtomograph. The diameter of samples was 5 mm. The voxel resolution of CT scan was 2.5 µm. Resulting 3D soil samples images were used for reconstruction of the pore space for further modelling. 3D image threshholding was made to determine the soil grain surface. This surface was triangulated and used for computational mesh construction for the pore space. Numerical modelling of water flow through the

  19. Relative permeability of hydrate-bearing sediments from percolation theory and critical path analysis: theoretical and experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Daigle, Hugh; Rice, Mary Anna; Daigle, Hugh

    2015-12-14

    Relative permeabilities to water and gas are important parameters for accurate modeling of the formation of methane hydrate deposits and production of methane from hydrate reservoirs. Experimental measurements of gas and water permeability in the presence of hydrate are difficult to obtain. The few datasets that do exist suggest that relative permeability obeys a power law relationship with water or gas saturation with exponents ranging from around 2 to greater than 10. Critical path analysis and percolation theory provide a framework for interpreting the saturation-dependence of relative permeability based on percolation thresholds and the breadth of pore size distributions, which may be determined easily from 3-D images or gas adsorption-desorption hysteresis. We show that the exponent of the permeability-saturation relationship for relative permeability to water is related to the breadth of the pore size distribution, with broader pore size distributions corresponding to larger exponents. Relative permeability to water in well-sorted sediments with narrow pore size distributions, such as Berea sandstone or Toyoura sand, follows percolation scaling with an exponent of 2. On the other hand, pore-size distributions determined from argon adsorption measurements we performed on clays from the Nankai Trough suggest that relative permeability to water in fine-grained intervals may be characterized by exponents as large as 10 as determined from critical path analysis. We also show that relative permeability to the gas phase follows percolation scaling with a quadratic dependence on gas saturation, but the threshold gas saturation for percolation changes with hydrate saturation, which is an important consideration in systems in which both hydrate and gas are present, such as during production from a hydrate reservoir. Our work shows how measurements of pore size distributions from 3-D imaging or gas adsorption may be used to determine relative permeabilities.

  20. Evaluation of methods for measuring relative permeability of anhydride from the Salado Formation: Sensitivity analysis and data reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, R.L.; Kalbus, J.S.; Howarth, S.M.

    1997-05-01

    This report documents, demonstrates, evaluates, and provides theoretical justification for methods used to convert experimental data into relative permeability relationships. The report facilities accurate determination of relative permeabilities of anhydride rock samples from the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Relative permeability characteristic curves are necessary for WIPP Performance Assessment (PA) predictions of the potential for flow of waste-generated gas from the repository and brine flow into repository. This report follows Christiansen and Howarth (1995), a comprehensive literature review of methods for measuring relative permeability. It focuses on unsteady-state experiments and describes five methods for obtaining relative permeability relationships from unsteady-state experiments. Unsteady-state experimental methods were recommended for relative permeability measurements of low-permeability anhydrite rock samples form the Salado Formation because these tests produce accurate relative permeability information and take significantly less time to complete than steady-state tests. Five methods for obtaining relative permeability relationships from unsteady-state experiments are described: the Welge method, the Johnson-Bossler-Naumann method, the Jones-Roszelle method, the Ramakrishnan-Cappiello method, and the Hagoort method. A summary, an example of the calculations, and a theoretical justification are provided for each of the five methods. Displacements in porous media are numerically simulated for the calculation examples. The simulated product data were processed using the methods, and the relative permeabilities obtained were compared with those input to the numerical model. A variety of operating conditions were simulated to show sensitivity of production behavior to rock-fluid properties.

  1. Flow Rate- and Fracture Property Dependence of Fracture-Matrix Ensemble Relative Permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthai, S. K.; Lang, P.; Bazrafkan, S.

    2012-12-01

    The grid-block scale ensemble relative permeability, kri of fractured porous rock with appreciable matrix permeability is of decisive interest to reservoir simulation and the prediction of production, injector-producer water breakthrough, and ultimate recovery. While the dynamic behaviour of naturally fractured reservoirs (NFR) already provides many clues about (pseudo) kri on the inter-well length scale, such data are difficult to interpret because, in the subsurface, the exact fracture geometry is unknown. Here we present numerical simulation results from discrete fracture and matrix (DFM) unstructured grid hybrid FEM-FVM simulation models, predicting the shape of fracture-matrix kri curves. In contrast to our earlier work, we also simulate capillary fracture matrix transfer (CFMT) and without relying the frequently made simplifying assumption that fracture saturation reflects fracture-matrix capillary pressure equilibrium. We also employ a novel discretization of saturation which permits jump discontinuities to develop across the fracture-matrix interface. This increased physical realism permits - for the first time - to test our earlier semi-analytical model of the flow rate dependence of relative permeability, ensuing from CFMT. The sensitivity analysis presented here constrains CMFT-related flow rate dependence of kri and illustrates how it manifests itself in two geometries of layer-restricted well-developed fracture patterns mapped in the field. We have also investigated the dependence of kri on fracture aperture as computed using discrete element analysis for plausible states of in situ stress. Our results indicate that fracture-matrix ensemble relative permeability can be matched with a new semi-analytic model taking into account the fracture-matrix flux ratio, the wetted fracture-matrix interface area as a function of saturation and the breakthrough saturation. However, we also detect a scale dependence of kri requiring a more elaborate treatment.

  2. Three-phase flow in porous media: A review of experimental studies on relative permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh, A. H.; Piri, M.

    2014-09-01

    We present a detailed, synthesized review of experimental studies on three-phase relative permeability published since 1980. We provide comprehensive, yet highly focused, analysis of critical aspects of the field and their evolution over the last three decades. In particular, we review the effects of saturation history, wettability, spreading, and layer drainage on the measured flow properties. We also list all the processes, rock types, fluid systems, and measurement techniques in order to provide a clear map for future studies. Behavior of the measured three-phase relative permeabilities with respect to fluid saturations, saturation histories, wettability of rock samples, spreading characteristics, interfacial tensions, and other pertinent properties are carefully discussed. Studies that use a diverse set of experimental techniques and data analysis to deduce relative permeability are included. The experimental techniques that should be utilized to reduce uncertainty are also explored. We interpret the measured properties and outcomes of different studies and compare them to substantiate distinct trends at various saturation ranges and provide ideas for new studies. This is intended to distill a clear image of where the field stands and to allow composition of possible paths for future investigations. The areas of critical relevance that have not been investigated or require further studies are highlighted.

  3. Upscaling porosity-permeability relation in porous media; reactive pore-scale modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raoof, A.; Spiers, C.; Hassanizadeh, S. M.

    2012-04-01

    The main objective of this research is to gain a better understanding of the relation between porosity-permeability evolution at the local scale and its manifestation at larger (REV) scales. Continuum pore space changes during the progress of chemical reactions in porous media. Such phenomena takes place in reservoir rock in which CO2 is to be stored. In the present approach, the microscopic pore space is modeled using a Multi-Directional Pore Network (MDPN), which allows for a distribution of pore coordination number ranging between one and 26. This topological property, together with geometrical distributions of pore sizes are used to mimic the microstructure of real porous media at the REV scale. In order to simulate transport of multi-component chemical species, mass balance equations are solved within each element of the network (i.e., pore body and pore throat). We have considered both advective and diffusive transport processes within the pore spaces and have used a Reaction Network Simulator to model multi-component chemical reactions, allowing for both equilibrium and kinetic calculations. By averaging over the network domain, we calculate the evolution of porosity and permeability as well as of flux-averaged concentration breakthrough curves. We have obtained constitutive relations linking porosity and permeability as the pore space involve during dissolution of calcium carbonate within calcite-cemented sandstone, under conditions relevant to geological storage of CO2. Results show that transition between advection- and diffusion- dominated transport, along with the distribution of reactive sites between pore bodies and pore throats, play a key role in determining evolution of porosity and permeability.

  4. Relative permeability and trapping of CO2 and water in sandstone rocks at reservoir conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krevor, Samuel C. M.; Pini, Ronny; Zuo, Lin; Benson, Sally M.

    2012-02-01

    We report the results of an experimental investigation into the multiphase flow properties of CO2 and water in four distinct sandstone rocks: a Berea sandstone and three reservoir rocks from formations into which CO2 injection is either currently taking place or is planned. Drainage relative permeability and residual gas saturations were measured at 50°C and 9 MPa pore pressure using the steady state method in a horizontal core flooding apparatus with fluid distributions observed using x-ray computed tomography. Absolute permeability, capillary pressure curves, and petrological studies were performed on each sample. Relative permeability in the four samples is consistent with general characteristics of drainage in strongly water-wet rocks. Measurements in the Berea sample are also consistent with past measurements in Berea sandstones using both CO2/brine and oil/water fluid systems. Maximum observed saturations and permeabilities are limited by the capillary pressure that can be achieved in the experiment and do not represent endpoint values. It is likely that maximum saturations observed in other studies are limited in the same way and there is no indication that low endpoint relative permeabilities are a characteristic of the CO2/water system. Residual trapping in three of the rocks is consistent with trapping in strongly water-wet systems, and the results from the Berea sample are again consistent with observations in past studies. This confirms that residual trapping can play a major role in the immobilization of CO2 injected into the subsurface. In the Mt. Simon sandstone, a nonmonotonic relationship between initial and residual CO2 saturations is indicative of a rock that is mixed or intermediate wet, and further investigations should be performed to establish the wetting properties of illite-rich rocks. The combined results suggest that the petrophysical properties of the multiphase flow of CO2/water through siliciclastic rocks is for the most part typical

  5. Permeability estimation of porous media by using an improved capillary bundle model based on micro-CT derived pore geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lanlan; Liu, Yu; Teng, Ying; Zhao, Jiafei; Zhang, Yi; Yang, Mingjun; Song, Yongchen

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a permeability estimation method for porous media. This method is based on an improved capillary bundle model by introducing some pore geometries. We firstly carried out micro-CT scans to extract the 3D digital model of porous media. Then we applied a maximum ball extraction method to the digital model to obtain the topological and geometrical pore parameters such as the pore radius, the throat radius and length and the average coordination number. We also applied a random walker method to calculate the tortuosity factors of porous media. We improved the capillary bundle model by introducing the pore geometries and tortuosity factors. Finally, we calculated the absolute permeabilities of four kinds of porous media formed of glass beads and compared the results with experiments and several other models to verify the improved model. We found that the calculated permeabilities using this improved capillary bundle model show better agreement with the measured permeabilities than the other methods.

  6. Investigation of the two- and three-phase relative permeability relation in carbon dioxide-oil-water systems for light and heavy oil reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarivnyy, Ostap

    CO2 flooding has gained increased interest in regard to both light and heavy oil reservoirs, as a means of combining improved oil recovery and geological storage of CO2 in partially depleted oil reservoirs. Distribution and movement of CO2 in oil reservoirs is a function of the relative permeability of three phases of water, oil, and CO2 in oil reservoirs. In general, three-phase relative permeability relations are required with respect to the design of CO2 field projects for accurate predictions via numerical reservoir simulation of CO 2 flood performance and to model production and injection problems. However, a two-phase relative permeability relation is used to generate the three-phase relative permeability relation for use in reservoir simulations. An overview of the available literature indicates few attempts have been made to experimentally determine the three-phase relative permeability relation for CO2-oil-water systems under practical reservoir conditions. This research attempts to investigate the two- and three-phase relative permeability relation of CO2-oil-water systems through a series of carefully designed laboratory experiments. Fourteen experiments in two-phase systems, and four experiments in three-phase systems with heavy and light oils, were conducted in order to study the effect of pressure, temperature, viscosity, and flow rate on the relative permeability relation. It was shown that relative permeability is temperature dependent and increases with an increase in temperature. Pressure and oil viscosity had similar effects, although higher pressure caused a decrease in relative permeability to water in water-oil and water-oil-gas systems. Investigating the effect of flow rate it was found that higher injection flow rate caused increase in relative permeability values. The effect of the injection flow rate on relative permeability behaviour can be explained by the formation of emulsion during the displacement process. A set of new correlations

  7. Quantifying Evaporation and Evaluating Runoff Estimation Methods in a Permeable Pavement System - abstract

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies on quantifying evaporation in permeable pavement systems are limited to few laboratory studies that used a scale to weigh evaporative losses and a field application with a tunnel-evaporation gauge. A primary objective of this research was to quantify evaporation for a la...

  8. Calibrating Lattice Boltzmann flow simulations and estimating uncertainty in the permeability of complex porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosa, Aleksandra; Curtis, Andrew; Wood, Rachel

    2016-08-01

    A common way to simulate fluid flow in porous media is to use Lattice Boltzmann (LB) methods. Permeability predictions from such flow simulations are controlled by parameters whose settings must be calibrated in order to produce realistic modelling results. Herein we focus on the simplest and most commonly used implementation of the LB method: the single-relaxation-time BGK model. A key parameter in the BGK model is the relaxation time τ which controls flow velocity and has a substantial influence on the permeability calculation. Currently there is no rigorous scheme to calibrate its value for models of real media. We show that the standard method of calibration, by matching the flow profile of the analytic Hagen-Poiseuille pipe-flow model, results in a BGK-LB model that is unable to accurately predict permeability even in simple realistic porous media (herein, Fontainebleau sandstone). In order to reconcile the differences between predicted permeability and experimental data, we propose a method to calibrate τ using an enhanced Transitional Markov Chain Monte Carlo method, which is suitable for parallel computer architectures. We also propose a porosity-dependent τ calibration that provides an excellent fit to experimental data and which creates an empirical model that can be used to choose τ for new samples of known porosity. Our Bayesian framework thus provides robust predictions of permeability of realistic porous media, herein demonstrated on the BGK-LB model, and should therefore replace the standard pipe-flow based methods of calibration for more complex media. The calibration methodology can also be extended to more advanced LB methods.

  9. The Relative Permeability of CO2 and Water in Sandstone Rocks at Reservoir Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krevor, S. C.; Pini, R.; Zuo, L.; Benson, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    A firm understanding of the multiphase flow properties of CO2 and water in porous media is essential to predicting the long-term fate of CO2 in geologic storage. Recently, pilot-scale and simulation based studies have highlighted the importance that properties of relative permeability, residual saturation, and rock heterogeneity will play in determining the long-term distribution of CO2 in the subsurface. There is a need for more observations to expand the current dataset of experimental work, as well as a discussion of these results in the context of the theory that is used in reservoir-scale predictions of subsurface flow. In this paper we present the results of an experimental investigation into the flow properties of CO2 and water in 4 distinct rock lithologies: a Berea sandstone and 3 reservoir rocks from formations into which CO2 injection is either currently taking place or is planned. Drainage and imbibition relative permeability and end-point saturations were measured using the steady-state method in a high pressure and temperature core-flooding apparatus with fluid distributions observed using X-ray CT. Absolute permeability, capillary pressure curves, and petrological studies were performed on each sample to fully characterize the rocks. The results are discussed in terms of their potential impact on basin-scale modeling of industrial CO2 injection projects. Theoretical explanations for generally low end-point CO2 relative permeabilities are discussed as well as its relevance for reservoir simulations. It is shown that small-scale heterogeneity plays an important role in both the overall saturations of CO2 in a rock as well as the saturation distribution within the rock. Clear evidence of heterogenous flow-properties are observed even in rocks of homogeneous rock lithology. Observations of residual CO2 saturation are discussed in the context of the long-term stability of CO2 injected in the subsurface. The experiments are compared with results reported

  10. Fault-related structural permeability: Qualitative insights of the damage-zone from micro-CT analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomila, Rodrigo; Arancibia, Gloria; Nehler, Mathias; Bracke, Rolf; Stöckhert, Ferdinand

    2016-04-01

    Fault zones and their related structural permeability play a leading role in the migration of fluids through the continental crust. A first approximation to understanding the structural permeability conditions, and the estimation of its hydraulic properties (i.e. palaeopermeability and fracture porosity conditions) of the fault-related fracture mesh is the 2D analysis of its veinlets, usually made in thin-section. Those estimations are based in the geometrical parameters of the veinlets, such as average fracture density, length and aperture, which can be statistically modelled assuming penny-shaped fractures of constant radius and aperture within an anisotropic fracture system. Thus, this model is related to fracture connectivity, its length and to the cube of the fracture apertures. In this way, the estimated values presents their own inaccuracies owing to the method used. Therefore, the study of the real spatial distribution of the veinlets of the fault-related fracture mesh (3D), feasible with the use of micro-CT analyses, is a first order factor to unravel both, the real structural permeability conditions of a fault-zone, together with the validation of previous estimations made in 2D analyses in thin-sections. This early contribution shows the preliminary results of a fault-related fracture mesh and its 3D spatial distribution in the damage zone of the Jorgillo Fault (JF), an ancient subvertical left-lateral strike-slip fault exposed in the Atacama Fault System in northern Chile. The JF is a ca. 20 km long NNW-striking strike-slip fault with sinistral displacement of ca. 4 km. The methodology consisted of the drilling of vertically oriented plugs of 5 mm in diameter located at different distances from the JF core - damage zone boundary. Each specimen was, then, scanned with an x-ray micro-CT scanner (ProCon X-Ray CTalpha) in order to assess the fracture mesh. X-rays were generated in a transmission target x-ray tube with acceleration voltages ranging from 90

  11. Porosity-Permeability Relations in Granular, Fibrous and Tubular Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Feng; Yin, Xiaolong

    2011-11-01

    A Voronoi diagram-based stochastic geometry generator was developed to generate porous media models of granular, fibrous and tubular types. By adjusting geometry parameters such as number of random seeds and width of channels between grains or radius of fibers/tubes, homogenous and isotropic models of porous media with specified porosity can be accurately generated. The relation of porosity to geometry parameters was proven to be repeatable, and additional manipulations on geometries were built in, including creation of anisotropy and heterogeneity. A parallelized Lattice Boltzmann simulator with nearly ideal speedup was developed and employed to study porosity-permeability relations. Simulation data obtained in the porosity range of 0.01-0.4 revealed that properly normalized permeability in tubular porous media is higher than that in the granular type when porosity becomes greater than 0.1, which can be explained by its more efficient use of the pore space to conduct the flow. Simulation data obtained from fibrous media in solid volume fraction range of 0.01-0.4 agreed with published results, and showed a rapid change with solid volume fraction in the dilute limit. This research is supported by Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America (RPSEA) 09122-29.

  12. [Estimation of the Index Value of Dielectric Permeability inside the Membranes of Purple Bacteria].

    PubMed

    Borisov, A Y; Kozlovsky, V S

    2015-01-01

    The joint application of the precise X-ray data for isolated bacteriochlorophyll complexes of reaction centers and the fundamental formulae for the energy of interaction between two equal dipoles enabled us to suggest a new methodical approach for determination of the values of the index of dielectric permeability in the micro volume enclosing special pairs in Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction centers. The most probable value for this parameter was thus determined within 1.66-1.76. This approach was generalized for the inner layer of the membranes of purple bacteria and yielded the index value about 1.70-1.85. It is argued that this range of dielectric permeability is adequate for bacterial and plant membranes as well. Low magnitude of this parameter contributes to higher efficiency of energy migration from vast light-harvesting chlorophyll "antenna" to the energy converting reaction centers and hence to higher efficiency of the whole photosynthesis. PMID:26394473

  13. Real-time estimation of paracellular permeability of cerebral endothelial cells by capacitance sensor array.

    PubMed

    Hyun Jo, Dong; Lee, Rimi; Hyoung Kim, Jin; Oh Jun, Hyoung; Geol Lee, Tae; Hun Kim, Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Vascular integrity is important in maintaining homeostasis of brain microenvironments. In various brain diseases including Alzheimer's disease, stroke, and multiple sclerosis, increased paracellular permeability due to breakdown of blood-brain barrier is linked with initiation and progression of pathological conditions. We developed a capacitance sensor array to monitor dielectric responses of cerebral endothelial cell monolayer, which could be utilized to evaluate the integrity of brain microvasculature. Our system measured real-time capacitance values which demonstrated frequency- and time-dependent variations. With the measurement of capacitance at the frequency of 100 Hz, we could differentiate the effects of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a representative permeability-inducing factor, on endothelial cells and quantitatively analyse the normalized values. Interestingly, we showed differential capacitance values according to the status of endothelial cell monolayer, confluent or sparse, evidencing that the integrity of monolayer was associated with capacitance values. Another notable feature was that we could evaluate the expression of molecules in samples in our system with the reference of real-time capacitance values. We suggest that this dielectric spectroscopy system could be successfully implanted as a novel in vitro assay in the investigation of the roles of paracellular permeability in various brain diseases. PMID:26047027

  14. Real-time estimation of paracellular permeability of cerebral endothelial cells by capacitance sensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun Jo, Dong; Lee, Rimi; Hyoung Kim, Jin; Oh Jun, Hyoung; Geol Lee, Tae; Hun Kim, Jeong

    2015-06-01

    Vascular integrity is important in maintaining homeostasis of brain microenvironments. In various brain diseases including Alzheimer’s disease, stroke, and multiple sclerosis, increased paracellular permeability due to breakdown of blood-brain barrier is linked with initiation and progression of pathological conditions. We developed a capacitance sensor array to monitor dielectric responses of cerebral endothelial cell monolayer, which could be utilized to evaluate the integrity of brain microvasculature. Our system measured real-time capacitance values which demonstrated frequency- and time-dependent variations. With the measurement of capacitance at the frequency of 100 Hz, we could differentiate the effects of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a representative permeability-inducing factor, on endothelial cells and quantitatively analyse the normalized values. Interestingly, we showed differential capacitance values according to the status of endothelial cell monolayer, confluent or sparse, evidencing that the integrity of monolayer was associated with capacitance values. Another notable feature was that we could evaluate the expression of molecules in samples in our system with the reference of real-time capacitance values. We suggest that this dielectric spectroscopy system could be successfully implanted as a novel in vitro assay in the investigation of the roles of paracellular permeability in various brain diseases.

  15. The effect of surface active agents on the relative permeability of brine and gas in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, M.W.; Schraufnagel, R.A.; Smith, K.; Thomas, T.

    1995-11-01

    All oil and gas producing wells produce hydrocarbon at some residual water saturation. Therefore, the relative permeability to the hydrocarbon at the effective water saturation dictates performance and not the absolute permeability of the formation. Surface active agents are included in most aqueous treating fluids to improve the compatibility of aqueous fluids with the hydrocarbon containing reservoir. A review of the literature indicates very little core flow data to describe the effects to be expected. Traditionally, it is believed that the reduced surface tension will reduce capillary pressure and enhance the recovery of water after the treatment. The reduced water saturation is then believed to result in higher effective gas saturation and higher relative permeability to gas after the treatment. The principal emphasis of this study has been the development of non-damaging stimulation fluids to improve the production of methane from coalbed methane and other low permeability gas reservoirs.

  16. The 2D versus 3D imaging trade-off: The impact of over- or under-estimating small throats for simulating permeability in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, C. A.; Crandell, L. E.; Um, W.; Jones, K. W.; Lindquist, W. B.

    2011-12-01

    Geochemical reactions in the subsurface can alter the porosity and permeability of a porous medium through mineral precipitation and dissolution. While effects on porosity are relatively well understood, changes in permeability are more difficult to estimate. In this work, pore-network modeling is used to estimate the permeability of a porous medium using pore and throat size distributions. These distributions can be determined from 2D Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images of thin sections or from 3D X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) images of small cores. Each method has unique advantages as well as unique sources of error. 3D CT imaging has the advantage of reconstructing a 3D pore network without the inherent geometry-based biases of 2D images but is limited by resolutions around 1 μm. 2D SEM imaging has the advantage of higher resolution, and the ability to examine sub-grain scale variations in porosity and mineralogy, but is limited by the small size of the sample of pores that are quantified. A pore network model was created to estimate flow permeability in a sand-packed experimental column investigating reaction of sediments with caustic radioactive tank wastes in the context of the Hanford, WA site. Before, periodically during, and after reaction, 3D images of the porous medium in the column were produced using the X2B beam line facility at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Lab. These images were interpreted using 3DMA-Rock to characterize the pore and throat size distributions. After completion of the experiment, the column was sectioned and imaged using 2D SEM in backscattered electron mode. The 2D images were interpreted using erosion-dilation to estimate the pore and throat size distributions. A bias correction was determined by comparison with the 3D image data. A special image processing method was developed to infer the pore space before reaction by digitally removing the precipitate. The different sets of pore

  17. Evaluating the relative air permeability of porous media from their water retention curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assouline, S.; Tuli, A.; Hopmans, J. W.

    2016-05-01

    Accurate modeling of water and air flow in porous media requires the definition of the relevant hydraulic properties, namely, the water retention curve (WRC) and the relative hydraulic conductivity function (RHC), as well as the definition of the relative air permeability function (RAP). Capitalizing on the approach developed previously to represent the RHC, a new model allowing the prediction of RAP based on information resulting from the WRC is proposed. The power value ηa in the model is a decreasing exponential function of the coefficient of variation, ɛ, characterizing the pore size distribution of the porous medium, and derived from its WRC. The model was calibrated using data from 22 disturbed and undisturbed soil samples and was validated using data from eight soil types ranging from quartz sand to silty clay loam. The proposed model provided accurate prediction of the soil RAP and performed in some cases (sandy loam and silty clay loam soils) better than available alternative models.

  18. Breaking down the barriers: the gut microbiome, intestinal permeability and stress-related psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, John R.; Kennedy, Paul J.; Cryan, John F.; Dinan, Timothy G.; Clarke, Gerard; Hyland, Niall P.

    2015-01-01

    The emerging links between our gut microbiome and the central nervous system (CNS) are regarded as a paradigm shift in neuroscience with possible implications for not only understanding the pathophysiology of stress-related psychiatric disorders, but also their treatment. Thus the gut microbiome and its influence on host barrier function is positioned to be a critical node within the brain-gut axis. Mounting preclinical evidence broadly suggests that the gut microbiota can modulate brain development, function and behavior by immune, endocrine and neural pathways of the brain-gut-microbiota axis. Detailed mechanistic insights explaining these specific interactions are currently underdeveloped. However, the concept that a “leaky gut” may facilitate communication between the microbiota and these key signaling pathways has gained traction. Deficits in intestinal permeability may underpin the chronic low-grade inflammation observed in disorders such as depression and the gut microbiome plays a critical role in regulating intestinal permeability. In this review we will discuss the possible role played by the gut microbiota in maintaining intestinal barrier function and the CNS consequences when it becomes disrupted. We will draw on both clinical and preclinical evidence to support this concept as well as the key features of the gut microbiota which are necessary for normal intestinal barrier function. PMID:26528128

  19. Electrokinetic effects and fluid permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    G. Berryman, James

    2003-10-01

    Fluid permeability of porous media depends mainly on connectivity of the pore space and two physical parameters: porosity and a pertinent length-scale parameter. Electrical imaging methods typically establish connectivity and directly measure electrical conductivity, which can then often be related to porosity by Archie's law. When electrical phase measurements are made in addition to the amplitude measurements, information about the pertinent length scale can then be obtained. Since fluid permeability controls the ability to flush unwanted fluid contaminants from the subsurface, inexpensive maps of permeability could improve planning strategies for remediation efforts. Detailed knowledge of fluid permeability is also important for oil field exploitation, where knowledge of permeability distribution in three dimensions is a common requirement for petroleum reservoir simulation and analysis, as well as for estimates on the economics of recovery.

  20. Effect of bedrock permeability on stream base flow mean transit time scaling relations: 1. A multiscale catchment intercomparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, V. Cody; McDonnell, Jeffrey J.

    2016-02-01

    The effect of bedrock permeability and underlying catchment boundaries on stream base flow mean transit time (MTT) and MTT scaling relationships in headwater catchments is poorly understood. Here we examine the effect of bedrock permeability on MTT and MTT scaling relations by comparing 15 nested research catchments in western Oregon; half within the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest and half at the site of the Alsea Watershed Study. The two sites share remarkably similar vegetation, topography, and climate and differ only in bedrock permeability (one poorly permeable volcanic rock and the other more permeable sandstone). We found longer MTTs in the catchments with more permeable fractured and weathered sandstone bedrock than in the catchments with tight, volcanic bedrock (on average, 6.2 versus 1.8 years, respectively). At the permeable bedrock site, 67% of the variance in MTT across catchments scales was explained by drainage area, with no significant correlation to topographic characteristics. The poorly permeable site had opposite scaling relations, where MTT showed no correlation to drainage area but the ratio of median flow path length to median flow path gradient explained 91% of the variance in MTT across seven catchment scales. Despite these differences, hydrometric analyses, including flow duration and recession analysis, and storm response analysis, show that the two sites share relatively indistinguishable hydrodynamic behavior. These results show that similar catchment forms and hydrologic regimes hide different subsurface routing, storage, and scaling behavior—a major issue if only hydrometric data are used to define hydrological similarity for assessing land use or climate change response.

  1. Rapid estimates of relative water content.

    PubMed

    Smart, R E

    1974-02-01

    Relative water content may be accurately estimated using the ratio of tissue fresh weight to tissue turgid weight, termed here relative tissue weight. That relative water content and relative tissue weight are linearly related is demonstrated algebraically. The mean value of r(2) for grapevine (Vitis vinifera L. cv. Shiraz) leaf tissue over eight separate sampling occasions was 0.993. Similarly high values were obtained for maize (Zea mays cv. Cornell M-3) (0.998) and apple (Malus sylvestris cv. Northern Spy) (0.997) using a range of leaf ages. The proposal by Downey and Miller (1971. Rapid measurements of relative turgidity in maize (Zea mays L.). New Phytol. 70: 555-560) that relative water content in maize may be estimated from water uptake was also investigated for grapevine leaves; this was found to be a less reliable estimate than that obtained with relative tissue weight. With either method, there is a need for calibration, although this could be achieved for relative tissue weight at least with only a few subsamples. PMID:16658686

  2. Uncertainty relations for approximation and estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaeha; Tsutsui, Izumi

    2016-05-01

    We present a versatile inequality of uncertainty relations which are useful when one approximates an observable and/or estimates a physical parameter based on the measurement of another observable. It is shown that the optimal choice for proxy functions used for the approximation is given by Aharonov's weak value, which also determines the classical Fisher information in parameter estimation, turning our inequality into the genuine Cramér-Rao inequality. Since the standard form of the uncertainty relation arises as a special case of our inequality, and since the parameter estimation is available as well, our inequality can treat both the position-momentum and the time-energy relations in one framework albeit handled differently.

  3. Geologic sequestration of supercritical carbon dioxide: An experimental study of capillary trapping and relative permeability (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piri, M.; Akbarabadi, M.

    2010-12-01

    We present the results of an extensive experimental study on the effects of hysteresis and wetting on permanent capillary trapping and relative permeability of CO2/brine systems. We performed 48 unsteady-state drainage and imbibition full-recirculation flow experiments in two different sandstone rock samples, i.e., Berea and Nugget. A state-of-the-art reservoir condition core-flooding system and a rotated medical CT scanner were utilized to perform the tests through vertically-placed rock samples. Both supercritical CO2/brine and gaseous CO2/brine fluid systems were used. A wide flow rate range of 0.25 to 20 cm3/min for supercritical CO2 and 0.125 to 120 cc/min for gaseous CO2 were used to investigate the variation of irreducible brine saturation (Swirr) with maximum CO2 flow rate and variation of trapped CO2 saturation (SCO2r) with Swirr. The irreducible brine saturation ranged between 0.680 to 0.406 and 0.663 to o.336 for experiments in Berea with supercritical and gaseous CO2, respectively. The trapped CO2 saturation varied between 0.196 to 0.308 and from 0.258 to 0.423 in the subsequent imbibition experiments. For a given Swirr, the amount of trapped supercritical CO2 saturation was less than that of gaseous CO2 in the same sample. This was attributed to brine being less wetting in the presence of supercritical CO2 than in the presence of gaseous CO2. The ratio of SCO2r to initial CO2 saturation was found to be much higher for low initial CO2 saturations. This means that greater fractions of injected CO2 can be permanently trapped at higher initial brine saturations. Maximum CO2 and brine relative permeabilities at the end of drainage and imbibition and also variation of brine relative permeability due to post-imbibition dissolution of trapped CO2 were also studied.

  4. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF RELATIVE PERMEABILITY UPSCALING FROM THE MICRO-SCALE TO THE MACRO-SCALE

    SciTech Connect

    Laura J. Pyrak-Nolte; Nicholas J. Giordano; David D. Nolte

    2004-03-01

    The principal challenge of upscaling techniques for multi-phase fluid dynamics in porous media is to determine which properties on the micro-scale can be used to predict macroscopic flow and spatial distribution of phases at core- and field-scales. The most notable outcome of recent theories is the identification of interfacial areas per volume for multiple phases as a fundamental parameter that determines much of the multi-phase properties of the porous medium. A formal program of experimental research was begun to directly test upscaling theories in fluid flow through porous media by comparing measurements of relative permeability and capillary-saturation with measurements of interfacial area per volume. This project on the experimental investigation of relative permeability upscaling has produced a unique combination of three quite different technical approaches to the upscaling problem of obtaining pore-related microscopic properties and using them to predict macroscopic behavior. Several important ''firsts'' have been achieved during the course of the project. (1) Optical coherence imaging, a laser-based ranging and imaging technique, has produced the first images of grain and pore structure up to 1 mm beneath the surface of the sandstone and in a laboratory borehole. (2) Woods metal injection has connected for the first time microscopic pore-scale geometric measurements with macroscopic saturation in real sandstone cores. (3) The micro-model technique has produced the first invertible relationship between saturation and capillary pressure--showing that interfacial area per volume (IAV) provides the linking parameter. IAV is a key element in upscaling theories, so this experimental finding may represent the most important result of this project, with wide ramifications for predictions of fluid behavior in porous media.

  5. Uncertainty relation revisited from quantum estimation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Yu; Sagawa, Takahiro; Ueda, Masahito

    2011-10-15

    We use quantum estimation theory to formulate bounds of errors in quantum measurement for arbitrary quantum states and observables in a finite-dimensional Hilbert space. We prove that the measurement errors of two noncommuting observables satisfy Heisenberg-type uncertainty relation, find the achievable bound, and propose a strategy to achieve it.

  6. System response as a function of relative permeability in geologic CO2 sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollyea, R.

    2015-12-01

    Within the portfolio of risk assessment strategies for carbon capture and sequestration projects, numerical modeling and simulation is frequently utilized for predicting CO2 storage capacity, leakage potential, and geomechanical reservoir integrity. In numerical CO2 injection models, one commonly used approach for simulating the effects of relative permeability (krel) is to apply the van Genuchten (1980) model to the wetting phase and the Corey (1954) model to the non-wetting phase. In this formulation, wetting phase permeability decay is controlled by a phase interference parameter (m), and non-wetting phase permeability decay is controlled by irreducible non-wetting phase saturation (Sgr). Although krel is a well-known phenomenon, there exists much uncertainty in parameterizing krel models and little is known about the influence of parameter space on reservoir performance. This work presents results from a numerical modeling experiment designed to isolate the effects of variability in krel parameters, m and Sgr. A series of CO2 injection simulations is performed for 399 unique combinations of m and Sgr, which vary systematically over a range of 0.1 - 0.99 and 0.01 - 0.50, respectively. CO2 is injected at modest 2.78 kg/s for 10 years into a radially symmetric grid using a beta version of TOUGH3/ECO2N, and all reservoir properties remain constant across the ensemble of 399 simulations. Results from this work show the injection pressure response ranging from ~10 MPa to >60 MPa, where the high end of this range is focused on a narrow portion of the parameter space corresponding to m < 0.3 for all Sgr. Additionally, the maximum CO2 plume radius (defined as CO2 saturation > 0.01) ranges from 550 m to 1250 m, where the high end of this range corresponds with low m and low Sgr. Although the model geometry is quite simple, these results demonstrate enormous variability in the both injection pressure and CO2 plume dimension solely as a function of krel.

  7. Numerical modelling of thermal convection related to fracture permeability in Dinantian carbonate platform, Luttelgeest, the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipsey, Lindsay; Pluymaekers, Maarten; van Wees, Jan-Diederik; Limberger, Jon; Cloetingh, Sierd

    2016-04-01

    The presence of convective fluid flow in permeable layers can create zones of anomalously high temperature which can be exploited for geothermal energy. Temperature measurements from the Luttelgeest-01 (LTG-01) well in the northern onshore region of the Netherlands indicate variations in the thermal regime that could be indicative of convection. This thermal anomaly coincides with a 600 m interval (4600 - 5200 m) of Dinantian carbonates showing signs of increased fracture permeability of ~60 mD. For the purpose of geothermal energy exploration, it is of interest to know whether or not convection can occur in a particular reservoir, where convection cells are likely to develop and the temperature enhancements in convective upwellings. Three-dimensional numerical simulations provide insight on possible flow and thermal structures within the fractured carbonate interval. The development and number of convection cells is very much a time dependent process. First longitudinal rolls fill the domain, increasing in width until ultimately transforming into a more complex polyhedral structure. The model relaxes into a steady-state five-cell convection pattern. Furthermore, geometric aspects of the carbonate platform itself likely control the shape and location of upwellings. Convective upwellings can create significant temperature enhancements relative to the conductive profile and in agreement with the observations in the Luttelgeest carbonate platform. This enhancement is critically dependent on the aquifer thickness and geothermal gradient. Given a gradient of 39 °C/km and an aquifer thickness of 600 m, a temperature of 203 °C can be obtained at a depth of 4600 m directly above upwelling zones. Contrarily, downwelling zones result in a temperature of 185 °C at the same depth. This demonstrates the strong spatial variability of thermal anomalies in convective fractures aquifers at large depth, which can have a strong effect on exploration opportunity and risk of

  8. Permeability of filter cakes of palm oil in relation to mechanical expression

    SciTech Connect

    Kamst, G.F.; Bruinsma, O.S.L.; Graauw, J. de

    1997-03-01

    Permeability and compressibility data are required for an adequate process model for compressible-cake filtration and mechanical expression. Experimental and modeling results of the permeability of palm-oil filter cakes (a highly compressible viscoelastic material) are combined with compressibility data, leading to a model for the expression step. Permeability measurements show that permeability depends strongly on the quantity of fine particles in the cake. Removal of fine particles from the slurry before expression significantly increases the solid-phase content during expression due to higher permeability. Modeling results of the expression step show that for palm-oil filter cakes there is a pressure above which the attainable mass fraction of solids becomes independent of pressure. Decrease in specific cake resistance has two effects: a higher mass fraction of solids at the same pressure and a higher pressure at which the mass fraction of solids is not affected further.

  9. Generalized Spearman estimators of relative dose.

    PubMed

    Morton, R

    1981-06-01

    In a biological assay the expected response may be transformed to a variable bounded between 0 and 1. If the transformed response is regarded as analogous to the tolerance distribution function, the mean of that distribution may be estimated for the standard and test preparations, and a simple estimator of the relative potency obtained. The special case where the identity transformation is used for a quantal response corresponds to Spearman's estimator, and our generalization has similar unbiasedness properties to that estimator. Asymptotic results are derived when the intervals between dose levels decrease and the sample of each dose level simultaneously increases. These results are evaluated for the case with equal sample sizes at regularly spaced values of the dose metameter. An approximate test for similarity is proposed. If the tolerance distribution is known up to a scale parameter, then the transformation may be chosen so that the estimator is asymptotically fully efficient. An application to the thermal disinfestation of wheat is given. PMID:7272411

  10. Relative Attribute SVM+ Learning for Age Estimation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shengzheng; Tao, Dacheng; Yang, Jie

    2016-03-01

    When estimating age, human experts can provide privileged information that encodes the facial attributes of aging, such as smoothness, face shape, face acne, wrinkles, and bags under-eyes. In automatic age estimation, privileged information is unavailable to test images. To overcome this problem, we hypothesize that asymmetric information can be explored and exploited to improve the generalizability of the trained model. Using the learning using privileged information (LUPI) framework, we tested this hypothesis by carefully defining relative attributes for support vector machine (SVM+) to improve the performance of age estimation. We term this specific setting as relative attribute SVM+ (raSVM+), in which the privileged information enables separation of outliers from inliers at the training stage and effectively manipulates slack variables and age determination errors during model training, and thus guides the trained predictor toward a generalizable solution. Experimentally, the superiority of raSVM+ was confirmed by comparing it with state-of-the-art algorithms on the face and gesture recognition research network (FG-NET) and craniofacial longitudinal morphological face aging databases. raSVM+ is a promising development that improves age estimation, with the mean absolute error reaching 4.07 on FG-NET. PMID:25850101

  11. Evaluating the Influence of Pore Architecture and Initial Saturation on Wettability and Relative Permeability in Heterogeneous, Shallow-Shelf Carbonates

    SciTech Connect

    Byrnes, Alan P.; Bhattacharya, Saibal; Victorine, John; Stalder, Ken

    2007-09-30

    Thin (3-40 ft thick), heterogeneous, limestone and dolomite reservoirs, deposited in shallow-shelf environments, represent a significant fraction of the reservoirs in the U.S. midcontinent and worldwide. In Kansas, reservoirs of the Arbuckle, Mississippian, and Lansing-Kansas City formations account for over 73% of the 6.3 BBO cumulative oil produced over the last century. For these reservoirs basic petrophysical properties (e.g., porosity, absolute permeability, capillary pressure, residual oil saturation to waterflood, resistivity, and relative permeability) vary significantly horizontally, vertically, and with scale of measurement. Many of these reservoirs produce from structures of less than 30-60 ft, and being located in the capillary pressure transition zone, exhibit vertically variable initial saturations and relative permeability properties. Rather than being simpler to model because of their small size, these reservoirs challenge characterization and simulation methodology and illustrate issues that are less apparent in larger reservoirs where transition zone effects are minor and most of the reservoir is at saturations near S{sub wirr}. These issues are further augmented by the presence of variable moldic porosity and possible intermediate to mixed wettability and the influence of these on capillary pressure and relative permeability. Understanding how capillary-pressure properties change with rock lithology and, in turn, within transition zones, and how relative permeability and residual oil saturation to waterflood change through the transition zone is critical to successful reservoir management and as advanced waterflood and improved and enhanced recovery methods are planned and implemented. Major aspects of the proposed study involve a series of tasks to measure data to reveal the nature of how wettability and drainage and imbibition oil-water relative permeability change with pore architecture and initial water saturation. Focus is placed on

  12. Factoring Algebraic Error for Relative Pose Estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, P; Duchaineau, M

    2009-03-09

    We address the problem of estimating the relative pose, i.e. translation and rotation, of two calibrated cameras from image point correspondences. Our approach is to factor the nonlinear algebraic pose error functional into translational and rotational components, and to optimize translation and rotation independently. This factorization admits subproblems that can be solved using direct methods with practical guarantees on global optimality. That is, for a given translation, the corresponding optimal rotation can directly be determined, and vice versa. We show that these subproblems are equivalent to computing the least eigenvector of second- and fourth-order symmetric tensors. When neither translation or rotation is known, alternating translation and rotation optimization leads to a simple, efficient, and robust algorithm for pose estimation that improves on the well-known 5- and 8-point methods.

  13. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF RELATIVE PERMEABILITY UPSCALING FROM THE MICRO-SCALE TO THE MACRO-SCALE

    SciTech Connect

    JiangTao Cheng; Ping Yu; William Headley; Nicholas Giordao; Mirela Mustata; Daiquan Chen; Nathan Cooper; David D. Nolte; Laura J. Pyrak-Nolte

    2001-12-01

    The principal challenge of upscaling techniques for multi-phase fluid dynamics in porous media is to determine which properties on the micro-scale can be used to predict macroscopic flow and spatial distribution of phases at core- and field-scales. The most notable outcome of recent theories is the identification of interfacial areas per volume for multiple phases as a fundamental parameter that determines much of the multi-phase properties of the porous medium. A formal program of experimental research was begun to directly test upscaling theories in fluid flow through porous media by comparing measurements of relative permeability and capillary-saturation with measurements of interfacial area per volume. During this reporting period, we have shown experimentally and theoretically that the optical coherence imaging system is optimized for sandstone. The measurement of interfacial area per volume (IAV), capillary pressure and saturation in two dimensional micro-models structures that are statistically similar to real porous media has shown the existence of a unique relationship among these hydraulic parameters. The measurement of interfacial area per volume on a three-dimensional natural sample, i.e., sandstone, has the same length-scale as the values of IAV determined for the two-dimensional micro-models.

  14. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF RELATIVE PERMEABILITY UPSCALING FROM THE MICRO-SCALE TO THE MACRO-SCALE

    SciTech Connect

    Laura J. Pyrak-Nolte; Ping Yu; JiangTao Cheng; Daiquan Chen; Nicholas Giordano; Mirela Mustata; John Coy; Nathan Cooper; David D. Nolte

    2002-12-01

    The principal challenge of upscaling techniques for multi-phase fluid dynamics in porous media is to determine which properties on the micro-scale can be used to predict macroscopic flow and spatial distribution of phases at core- and field-scales. The most notable outcome of recent theories is the identification of interfacial areas per volume for multiple phases as a fundamental parameter that determines much of the multi-phase properties of the porous medium. A formal program of experimental research was begun to directly test upscaling theories in fluid flow through porous media by comparing measurements of relative permeability and capillary-saturation with measurements of interfacial area per volume. During this reporting period, we have shown experimentally that the coherence detection can be performed in a borescope. The measurement of interfacial area per volume (IAV), capillary pressure and saturation in two dimensional micro-models structures has shown the existence of a unique relationship among these hydraulic parameters for different pore geometry. The measurement of interfacial area per volume on a three-dimensional natural sample, i.e., sandstone, is essentially completed for imbibition conditions.

  15. Effects of pressure on pore characteristics and permeability of porous rocks as estimated from seismic wave velocities in cores from TCDP Hole-A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Keigo; Takahashi, Miki; Mizoguchi, Kazuo; Masuda, Koji; Ito, Hisao; Song, Sheng-Rong

    2010-09-01

    Changes in Vp/Vs (Poisson's ratio) around a fault are related to changes in the fluid transport properties of rocks, which play a significant role in seismogenic processes. Here we report a notable relationship between Vp/Vs and the permeability of porous fault-related rocks (Chelungpu fault, Taiwan) by direct and simultaneous measurement of elastic wave velocities (Vp and Vs) and permeability under increasing effective confining pressure (Peff) up to 25 MPa. Vp and Vs for all samples increased with Peff in the range up to 20 MPa, then were nearly constant as Peff increased to 25 MPa. Most silty sandstones with large proportions of fine-grained material showed positive correlations between Vp/Vs and permeability with rising pressure. On the other hand, well-sorted sandstones showed only slight changes in permeability with respect to Vp/Vs with rising pressure. We infer that grain size distributions, in particular the amount of silt- and clay-size grains, are responsible for the change in permeability with pressure as small particles clog pore networks with increasing Peff, causing the decrease in permeability. These findings may be useful to explain changes in permeability and pore pressure in the deep crust.

  16. Stochastic Estimates of the Permeability Field of the Soultz-sous-Forêts Geothermal Reservoir - Comparison of Bayesian Inversion, MC Geostatistics, and EnKF Assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosack, Christian; Vogt, Christian; Rath, Volker; Marquart, Gabriele

    2010-05-01

    The knowledge of the permeability distribution at depth is of primary concern for any geothermal reservoir engineering. However, permeability might change over orders of magnitude even for a single rock type and is additionally controlled by tectonic or engineered fracturing of the rocks. During reservoir exploration pumping tests are regularly performed where tracer marked water is pumped in one borehole and retrieved at one or a few others. At the European Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) test site at Soultz-sous-Forêts three wells had been drilled in the granitic bedrock down to 4 to 5 km and were hydraulically stimulated to enhance the hydraulic connectivity between the wells. In July 2005, a tracer circulation test was carried out in order to estimate the changes of the hydraulic properties. Therefore a tracer was injected into the well GPK3 for 19 hours at a rate of 0.015 m3 s-1 and a concentration of 0.389 mol m-3. Tracer concentration was measured in the production wells over the following 5 months, while the produced water was re-injected into GPK3. This experiment demonstrated a good hydraulic connection between GPK3 and one of the production wells, GPK2, while a very low connectivity was observed in the other one, GPK4. We tested three different approaches simulating the pumping experiment with the numerical simulator shemat_suite in a simplified 3D model of the site in order to study their respective potential to estimate a reliable permeability distribution for the Soultz reservoir: A full-physics gradient-based Bayesian inversion, a massive Monte Carlo approach with geostatistic analysis, and an Ensemble-Kalman-Filter (EnKF) assimilation. A common feature in all models is a high permeability zone which acts as main flow area and transports most of the tracer. It is assumed to be associated with the fault zone cutting through the boreholes GPK2 and GPK3. With the Bayesian Inversion we were able to estimate a parameter set consisting of porosity

  17. Corticosterone mediates stress-related increased intestinal permeability in a region-specific manner

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Gen; Wu, Shu-Pei; Hu, Yongjun; Smith, David E; Wiley, John W.; Hong, Shuangsong

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic psychological stress (CPS) is associated with increased intestinal epithelial permeability and visceral hyperalgesia. It is unknown whether corticosterone (CORT) plays a role in mediating alterations of epithelial permeability in response to CPS. Methods Male rats were subjected to 1-hour water avoidance (WA) stress or subcutaneous CORT injection daily for 10 consecutive days in the presence or absence of corticoid-receptor antagonist RU-486. The visceromotor response (VMR) to colorectal distension (CRD) was measured. The in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion was used to measure intestinal permeability in jejunum and colon simultaneously. Key Results We observed significant decreases in the levels of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and tight junction proteins in the colon but not the jejunum in stressed rats. These changes were largely reproduced by serial CORT injections in control rats and were significantly reversed by RU-486. Stressed and CORT-injected rats demonstrated a 3-fold increase in permeability for PEG-400 (MW) in colon but not jejunum and significant increase in VMR to CRD, which was significantly reversed by RU-486. In addition, no differences in permeability to PEG-4,000 and PEG-35,000 were detected between control and WA groups. Conclusions & Inferences Our findings indicate that CPS was associated with region-specific decrease in epithelial tight junction protein levels in the colon, increased colon epithelial permeability to low-molecular weight macromolecules which were largely reproduced by CORT treatment in control rats and prevented by RU-486. These observations implicate a novel, region-specific role for CORT as a mediator of CPS-induced increased permeability to macromolecules across the colon epithelium. PMID:23336591

  18. Flow modeling and permeability estimation using borehole flow logs in heterogeneous fractured formations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paillet, Frederick L.

    1998-01-01

    A numerical model of flow in the vicinity of a borehole is used to analyze flowmeter data obtained with high-resolution flowmeters. The model is designed to (1) precisely compute flow in a borehole, (2) approximate the effects of flow in surrounding aquifers on the measured borehole flow, (3) allow for an arbitrary number (N) of entry/exit points connected to M < N far-field aquifers, and (4) be consistent with the practical limitations of flowmeter measurements such as limits of resolution, typical measurement error, and finite measurement periods. The model is used in three modes: (1) a quasi-steady pumping mode where there is no ambient flow, (2) a steady flow mode where ambient differences in far-field water levels drive flow between fracture zones in the borehole, and (3) a cross-borehole test mode where pumping in an adjacent borehole drives flow in the observation borehole. The model gives estimates of transmissivity for any number of fractures in steady or quasi-steady flow experiments that agree with straddle-packer test data. Field examples show how these cross-borehole-type curves can be used to estimate the storage coefficient of fractures and bedding planes and to determine whether fractures intersecting a borehole at different locations are hydraulically connected in the surrounding rock mass.

  19. Investigations of the impact of wettability heterogeneity on trapping and relative permeability using pore-scale simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, F.

    2015-12-01

    Wettability is one of the most important factors influencing the multi-phase fluid flow behavior in porous media. However, the role of wettability at pore-scale still remains poorly understood. In this study, we carried out a series of pore-scale simulations of multiphase displacement process to investigate the impact of wettability heterogeneity on trapping, sweep efficiency and relative permeability using lattice Boltzmann method. We first artificially generated mixed-wet bead pack models with varying degree of wettability by introducing spatial heterogeneity. Based on these models, we then calculated the relative permeability curves and performed the drainage and imbibition simulations to obtain the residual non-wetting phase distributions. The results indicate that strong wettability heterogeneity results in a decrease of non-wetting phase permeability due to the pinned interfaces at wettability discontinuities. The wetting phase permeability as well as the sweep efficiency are largely influenced by the degree of wettability rather than the wettability heterogeneity. The non-wetting phase is observed to be less trapped with strong heterogeneity conditions.

  20. Simultaneous Determination of Capillary Pressure and Relative Permeability Curves from Core-Flooding Experiments with Various Fluid Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pini, Ronny; Hingerl, Ferdinand; Benson, Sally

    2013-04-01

    Geological systems are complex and so are the processes that determine the distribution of two (or more) immiscible phases within their porous structure; nevertheless, an empirical relationship between the capillary pressure and saturation, the capillary pressure function, provides the foundation for the theory of multiphase flow in porous media. The simultaneous existence of at least two fluids in a porous rock further implies that the ability of each fluid to flow is reduced by the presence of the other and a so-called relative permeability function has been introduced and defined as the ratio between the effective permeability to the given phase and the absolute permeability of the rock. When coupled to the continuum-scale equations of motion, these two characteristic curves allow for a description of multiphase displacement processes in a variety of natural settings that are related to a wide range of applications, thus including the storage of carbon dioxide into deep saline aquifers. In this study, capillary pressure and relative permeability drainage curves are measured on a single Berea Sandstone core by using three different fluid pairs, namely gCO2/water, gN2/water and scCO2/brine. An important feature of this experimental investigation is that these two multiphase properties are obtained simultaneously during a core-flooding experiment. The applied technique possesses many of the characteristics of a conventional steady-state relative permeability experiment and consists of injecting the nonwetting fluid at increasingly higher flow rates in a core that is initially saturated with the wetting phase, while observing fluid saturations with a medical x-ray CT scanner [Pini et al. 2012]. Injection flow rates are varied so as to cover a sufficiently large range of capillary pressures, whereas fluid-pairs and experimental conditions are selected in order to move across a range interfacial tension values (40-65 mN/m), while maintaining a constant viscosity ratio

  1. Relating permeability and electrical resistivity in fractures using random resistor network models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkby, Alison; Heinson, Graham; Krieger, Lars

    2016-03-01

    We use random resistor network models to explore the relationship between electrical resistivity and permeability in a fracture filled with an electrically conductive fluid. Fluid flow and current are controlled by both the distribution and the volume of pore space. Therefore, the aperture distribution of fractures must be accurately modeled in order to realistically represent their hydraulic and electrical properties. We have constructed fracture surface pairs based on characteristics measured on rock samples. We use these to construct resistor networks with variable hydraulic and electrical resistance in order to investigate the changes in both properties as a fault is opened. At small apertures, electrical conductivity and permeability increase moderately with aperture until the fault reaches its percolation threshold. Above this point, the permeability increases by 4 orders of magnitude over a change in mean aperture of less than 0.1 mm, while the resistivity decreases by up to a factor of 10 over this aperture change. Because permeability increases at a greater rate than matrix to fracture resistivity ratio, the percolation threshold can also be defined in terms of the matrix to fracture resistivity ratio, M. The value of M at the percolation threshold, MPT, varies with the ratio of rock to fluid resistivity, the fault spacing, and the fault offset. However, MPT is almost always less than 10. Greater M values are associated with fractures above their percolation threshold. Therefore, if such M values are observed over fluid-filled fractures, it is likely that they are open for fluid flow.

  2. Evaluation of two-phase relative permeability and capillary pressure relations for unstable displacements in a pore network

    SciTech Connect

    Dehoff, Karl J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Zhang, Changyong; Grate, Jay W.

    2012-10-29

    A series of displacement experiments was conducted using five wetting-nonwetting immiscible fluid pairs in a homogenous and uniform pore network. The micromodel was initially saturated with either polyethylene glycol 200 (PEG) or water as a wetting fluid, which was subsequently displaced by a nonwetting fluid (dodecane, hexadecane, or mineral oil) at different flow rates. The experiments were designed to allow determinations of nonwetting fluid relative permeabilities ( ), fluid saturations ( ), and capillary pressure heads ( ). In the displacements, nonwetting fluid saturations increased with increasing flow rates for all five fluid pairs, and viscous fingering, capillary fingering, and stable displacement were observed. Viscous fingering occurred when PEG was displaced by either dodecane or hexadecane. For the water displacements, capillary fingers were observed at low capillary numbers. Due to unstable fingering phenomena, values for the PEG displacements were smaller than for the water displacements. A fitting exercise using the Brooks-Corey (1964) relationship showed that the fitted entry pressure heads are reasonably close to the computed entry pressure head. The fitted pore geometry factor, Sn values for the displacements are considerably lower than what is expected for displacements in homogeneous, highly uniform, porous systems, demonstrating the impact of unstable displacement on the apparent value of Sn. It was shown that a continuum-based multiphase model could be used to predict the average behavior for wetting fluid drainage in a pore network as long as independently fitted - and - relations are used. The use of a coupled approach through the Brooks-Corey pore geometry factor underpredicts observed values.

  3. Simultaneous determination of capillary pressure and relative permeability curves from core-flooding experiments with various fluid pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pini, Ronny; Benson, Sally M.

    2013-06-01

    Capillary pressure and relative permeability drainage curves are simultaneously measured on a single Berea Sandstone core by using three different fluid pairs, namely gCO 2/water, gN2/water and scCO 2/brine. This novel technique possesses many of the characteristics of a conventional steady-state relative permeability experiment and consists of injecting the nonwetting fluid at increasingly higher flow rates in a core that is initially saturated with the wetting phase, while observing fluid saturations with a medical x-ray CT scanner. Injection flow rates (0.5-75 mL/min) are varied so as to generate a large range of capillary pressures (up to 18 kPa), whereas fluid-pairs and experimental conditions are selected in order to move across a range interfacial tension values (γ12=40-65 mN/m), while maintaining a constant viscosity ratio (μw/μnw ≈30). Moreover, these experiments, carried out at moderate pressures (P=2.4 MPa and T=50°C), can be compared directly with results for gas/liquid pairs reported in the literature and they set the benchmark for the experiment at a higher pressure (P=9 MPa and T=50°C), where CO 2 is in the supercritical state. Contrary to some prior investigations, from these experiments we find no evidence that the scCO 2/brine system behaves differently than any of these other fluid pairs. At the same time, capillary pressure data show a significant (but consistent) effect of the different values for the interfacial tension. The fact that the three different fluid pairs yield the same drainage relative permeability curve is consistent with observations in the petroleum literature. Additionally, the observed end-point values for the relative permeability to the nonwetting phase (kr,nw 0.9) and the corresponding irreducible water saturations (Sw,irr 0.35) suggest that water-wet conditions are maintained

  4. Literature review and recommendation of methods for measuring relative permeability of anhydrite from the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, R.L.; Howarth, S.M.

    1995-08-01

    This report documents a literature review of methods for measuring relative permeability as applied to low permeability anhydrite rock samples from the Salado Formation. About one hundred papers were reviewed, and four methods were identified as promising techniques for measuring the relative permeability of the Salado anhydrite: (1) the unsteady-state high-rate method, (2) the unsteady-state stationary-liquid method, (3) the unsteady-state centrifuge method, and (4) the unsteady-state low-rate method. Except for the centrifuge method, all have been used for low permeability rocks. The unsteady-state high-rate method is preferred for measuring relative permeability of Salado anhydrite, and the unsteady-state stationary-liquid method could be well suited for measuring gas relative permeability of Salado anhydrite. The unsteady-state low-rate method, which combines capillary pressure effects with relative permeability concepts may also prove effective. Likewise, the unsteady-state centrifuge method may be an efficient means for measuring brine relative permeability for Salado anhydrite, especially at high gas saturations.

  5. Evolution of pore-geometry and relative-permeability due to carbonate precipitation within natural rock sample: Insights from a coupled FVM-LBM method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, T.; Jiang, F.

    2013-12-01

    To predict long-term CO2 behavior within the reservoir in Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) projects, we usually use reservoir simulation. A key parameter in the reservoir simulation is 'relative permeability'. However, since the relative permeability is significantly influenced by mineral precipitation (e.g., change of pore space), we should consider the time evolution of relative permeability in reservoir simulation. To investigate the influence of carbonate precipitation to the relative permeability during CO2 storage, we develop numerical calculation method. Pore spaces of Berea sandstone were extracted by high-resolution micro-CT scanned images. The fluid velocity field within the 3D pore spaces was then calculated using the two-phase lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The calcite deposition within the pore space was calculated by using an advection-reaction formulation solved by finite volume method; we modeled the precipitated rock by transferring the fluid node to solid node according to the calcium concentration level. To increase the computation efficiency, we applied the graphics processor unit (GPU) parallel computing technique. The relative permeability of the rock sample is finally calculated separately by a highly optimized two-phase LB model. The calculated permeability variation due to the carbonate precipitation demonstrates that evolution of pore structure significantly influences the absolute permeability, while it only affects the relative permeability of non-wettable phase at low water saturation conditions.

  6. Progress on flow visualization and relative permeability measurement in transparent replicas of natural fractures from Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Persoff, P.; Pruess, K.; Petersen, L.P.

    1995-01-01

    Small sections (75 mm x 75 mm) of two natural rock fractures from outcrop boulders of Tiva Canyon tuff have been reproduced as transparent replicas. Aperture maps were drawn from images of the replicas filled with dye. Apertures were measured by the areas occupied by liquid drops of known volume. For both these fractures, the average aperture is about 350 {mu}m, while the hydraulic aperture is less (72 and 130 {mu}m). Two-phase (air-water) flow experiments have been conducted in these replicas to measure relative permeability and capillary pressures. The results obtained confirm the results of previous fracture experiments, and theoretical analysis, that the sum of relative permeabilities is much less than 1 at intermediate saturations. The welded tuffs in the vadose zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, are being investigated as the potential site of a geological repository for high-level nuclear wastes.

  7. A FORTRAN program for interpretation of relative permeability from unsteady-state displacements with capillary pressure included

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Udegbunam, E.O.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a FORTRAN program for the determination of two-phase relative permeabilities from unsteady-state displacement data with capillary pressure terms included. The interpretative model employed in this program combines the simultaneous solution of a variant of the fractional flow equation which includes a capillary pressure term and an integro-differential equation derived from Darcy's law without assuming the simplified Buckley-Leverett flow. The incorporation of capillary pressure in the governing equations dispenses with the high flowrate experimental requirements normally employed to overcome capillarity effects. An illustrative example is presented herein which implements this program for the determination of oil/water relative permeabilities from a sandstone core sample. Results obtained compares favorably with results previously given in the literature. ?? 1991.

  8. User's Guide for Hysteretic Capillary Pressure and Relative Permeability Functions in iTOUGH2

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, C.A.

    2009-08-01

    The precursor of TOUGH2, TOUGH, was originally developed with non-hysteretic characteristic curves. Hysteretic capillary pressure functions were implemented in TOUGH in the late 1980s by Niemi and Bodvarsson (1988), and hysteretic capillary pressure and relative permeability functions were added to iTOUGH2 about ten years later by Finsterle et al. (1998). Recently, modifications were made to the iTOUGH2 hysteretic formulation to make it more robust and efficient (Doughty, 2007). Code development is still underway, with the ultimate goal being a hysteretic module that fits into the standard TOUGH2 (Pruess et al., 1991) framework. This document provides a user's guide for the most recent version of the hysteretic code, which runs within iTOUGH2 (Finsterle, 1999a,b,c). The current code differs only slightly from what was presented in Doughty (2007), hence that document provides the basic information on the processes being modeled and how they are conceptualized. This document focuses on a description of the user-specified parameters required to run hysteretic iTOUGH2. In the few instances where the conceptualization differs from that of Doughty (2007), the features described here are the current ones. Sample problems presented in this user's guide use the equation-of-state module ECO2N (Pruess, 2005). The components present in ECO2N are H{sub 2}O, NaCl, and CO{sub 2}. Two fluid phases and one solid phase are considered: an aqueous phase, which primarily consists of liquid H2O and may contain dissolved NaCl and CO{sub 2}; a supercritical phase which primarily consists of CO{sub 2}, but also includes a small amount of gaseous H{sub 2}O; and a solid phase consisting of precipitated NaCl. Details of the ECO2N formulation may be found in Pruess (2005). The aqueous phase is the wetting phase and is denoted ''liquid'', whereas the supercritical phase is the non-wetting phase and is denoted ''gas''. The hysteretic formalism may be applied to other iTOUGH2 equation

  9. Radiation effects on the fibrinolytic system and their relation to hemorrhagic diathesis and increased endothelial permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Ballelos, E.E.

    1982-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of wholebody X-irradiation on the fibrinolytic system, the causes of radiation-induced changes in plasmin (fibrinolytic) activity, and the contribution of increased plasmin activity to increased capillary (endothelial) permeability and hemorrhagic diathesis. The parameters evaluated using adult, male, Rochester ex-Wistar rats were: (1) plasmin, plasminogen, and plasminogen activator levels in plasma within one month after 425, 655, or 885 rad and at 3.5, 7 and 12 months after 425 rad, by a modified caseinolytic method; (2) tissue plasminogen activator activity (TPAA) in heart, kidneys, lungs, liver, pancreas and spleen, by a fibrin plate method (885 rad); (3) vascular permeability, by a radioisotopic method (885 rad); and (4) gross hemorrhagic response, scored for severity. The dose-dependent changes described in plasmin, plasminogen and plasminogen activator were multi-phasic. Epsilon-amino-caproic acid (0.3 gm/kg body weight) prevented the immediate and early radiation effects on these fibrinolytic components, and partially inhibited the later effects (within one month) whether administered only as a single injection before irradiation or maintained by daily water intake thereafter. The kidneys, spleen and pancreas were markedly susceptible to radiation-induced changes in TPAA. The lungs and liver showed significant changes in capillary permeability, which correlated positively with changes in vascular volume and blood plasmin and plasminogen activator levels. Increased plasmin (fibrinolytic) activity, superimposed on a hemostatic apparatus already impaired because of thrombocytopenia, contributed to hemorrhagic diathesis in acute radiation sickness.

  10. Relating damage evolution of concrete cooled to cryogenic temperatures to permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogbara, Reginald B.; Iyengar, Srinath R.; Grasley, Zachary C.; Rahman, Syeda; Masad, Eyad A.; Zollinger, Dan G.

    2014-11-01

    Typically, 9% Ni steel is used for primary containment of liquefied natural gas (LNG). Utilization of concrete in place of 9% Ni steel for primary containment would lead to significant cost savings. Hence, this study investigates changes in the microstructure of concrete due to cryogenic freezing that would affect its relevant engineering properties for containment. The study also evaluates the effect of aggregate type on the damage potential of concrete subjected to cryogenic freezing. The aim is to investigate design methodologies to produce damage-resistant cryogenic concrete. The study employed four concrete mixture designs involving river sand as fine aggregate, and coarse aggregates with different coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) values. Specifically, the coarse aggregates were limestone, sandstone, trap rock and lightweight aggregate. Concrete cubes were cured under water for at least 28 days and thereafter frozen from ambient (20 °C) to cryogenic temperature (-165 °C). Acoustic emission (AE) sensors were placed on the concrete cubes during freezing. X-ray computed tomography (XRCT) was employed to study the microstructure of concrete cores, before and after cryogenic freezing. The impact of the microstructural evolution thus obtained from AE and XRCT on relevant engineering properties was determined via water and chloride permeability tests. Microcrack propagation determined from AE correlated with changes in permeability. There were no observable cracks in majority of the concrete mixtures after freezing. This implies that microcracks detected via AE and increased permeability was very well distributed and smaller than the XRCT's resolution. Damage (microcracking) resistance of the concrete with different aggregates was in the order limestone ⩾ trap rock ≫ lightweight aggregate ⩾ sandstone.

  11. Unexpected effects of peripherally administered kynurenic acid on cortical spreading depression and related blood–brain barrier permeability

    PubMed Central

    Oláh, Gáspár; Herédi, Judit; Menyhárt, Ákos; Czinege, Zsolt; Nagy, Dávid; Fuzik, János; Kocsis, Kitti; Knapp, Levente; Krucsó, Erika; Gellért, Levente; Kis, Zsolt; Farkas, Tamás; Fülöp, Ferenc; Párdutz, Árpád; Tajti, János; Vécsei, László; Toldi, József

    2013-01-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) involves a slowly-propagating depolarization wave in the cortex, which can appear in numerous pathophysiological conditions, such as migraine with aura, stroke, and traumatic brain injury. Neurons and glial cells are also depolarized transiently during the phenomena. CSD is followed by a massive increase in glutamate release and by changes in the brain microcirculation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of two N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists, endogenous kynurenic acid (KYNA) and dizocilpine, on CSD and the related blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability in rats. In intact animals, KYNA hardly crosses the BBB but has some positive features as compared with its precursor L-Kynurenine, which is frequently used in animal studies (KYNA cannot be metabolized to excitotoxic agents such as 3-hydroxy-L-kynurenine and quinolinic acid). We therefore investigated the possible effects of peripherally administered KYNA. Repetitive CSD waves were elicited by the application of 1 M KCl solution to the cortex. Direct current-electrocorticograms were measured for 1 hour. Four parameters of the waves were compared. Evans blue dye and fluorescent microscopy were used to study the possible changes in the permeability of the BBB. The results demonstrated that N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists can reduce the number of CSD waves and decrease the permeability of the BBB during CSD. These results suggest that KYNA itself or its derivatives may offer a new approach in the therapy of migraines. PMID:24068867

  12. EXPOSURE RELATED DOSE ESTIMATING MODEL (ERDEM)

    EPA Science Inventory

    ERDEM is a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model with a graphical user interface (GUI) front end. Such a mathematical model was needed to make reliable estimates of the chemical dose to organs of animals or humans because of uncertainties of making route-to route, lo...

  13. Effect of curcumin on permeability of coronary artery and expression of related proteins in rat coronary atherosclerosis heart disease model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaolong; Lu, Yan; Sun, Yi; Zhang, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Our objective is to explore the effect of curcumin on permeability of coronary artery and expression of related proteins in rat coronary atherosclerosis heart disease model. Methods: 45 healthy male Wistar rats of clean grade were selected and divided into treatment group, model control group and blank control group. The rats in the treatment group and model control group received high-fat diet for 12 weeks and intraperitoneal injection of VD3 to establish rat coronary atherosclerosis heart disease model. After modeling, the rats in the treatment group received gavage of 100 mg/(kg·d) curcimin, and the rats in the model control group and blank control group received gavage of 5 ml/(kg·d) distilled water, the intervention time was 4 weeks. After intervention, the rats were killed, and the hearts were dissected to obtain the samples of coronary artery. After embedding and frozen section, immunofluorescence method was used to detect the change of endarterium permeability in 3 groups, Western blot was used to detect matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and CD40L in coronary artery tissue, and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to detect serum tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and C reaction protein (CRP). Results: After modeling, compared with the blank control group, total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG) and low density lipoprotein cholesterin (LDL-c) in the treatment group and model control group were significantly higher (P<0.05), however, high density lipoprotein cholesterin (HDL-c) was significantly lower. The pathological sections showed that there was lipidosis in rat coronary artery in treatment group and model control group, indicating that the modeling was successful. Immunofluorescence showed that there was only a little fluorochrome permeability in artery in blank control group, there was some fluorochrome permeability in artery in the treatment group and there was a lot of fluorochrome permeability in artery in the model

  14. Anisotropy and spatial variation of relative permeability and lithologic character of Tensleep Sandstone reservoirs in the Bighorn and Wind River Basins, Wyoming. Annual report, October 1, 1994-- September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, T.L.

    1996-03-01

    This research is to provide improved strategies for enhanced oil recovery from the Tensleep Sandstone oil reservoirs in the Bighorn and Wind River basins, Wyoming. Because of the great range of API gravities of the oils produced from these reservoirs, the proposed study concentrates on understanding the spatial variation and anisotropy of relative permeability within the Tensleep Sandstone. This research will associate those spatial distributions and anisotropies with the depositional subfacies and zones of diagenetic alteration found within the sandstone. The associations of the above with pore geometry will link relative permeability with the dimensions of lithofacies and authigenic mineral facies. Hence, the study is to provide criteria for scaling this parameter on a range of scales, from the laboratory to the basin-wide scale of subfacies distribution. Effects of depositional processes and burial diagenesis will be investigated. Image analysis of pore systems will be done to produce algorithms for estimating relative permeability from petrographic analyses of core and well cuttings. In addition, these studies are being coupled with geochemical modeling and coreflood experiments to investigate the potential for wellbore scaling and formation damage anticipated during EOR, eg., CO{sub 2} flooding. This will provide a regional basis for EOR strategies for the largest potential target reservoir in Wyoming; results will have application to all eolian reservoirs through correlations of relative permeability variation and anisotropy with eolian depositional lithofacies.

  15. Relative permeability hysteresis and capillary trapping characteristics of supercritical CO2/brine systems: An experimental study at reservoir conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbarabadi, Morteza; Piri, Mohammad

    2013-02-01

    We present the results of an experimental study on the effects of hysteresis on capillary trapping and relative permeability of CO2/brine systems at reservoir conditions. We performed thirty unsteady- and steady-state drainage and imbibition full-recirculation flow experiments in three different sandstone rock samples, low- and high-permeability Berea and Nugget sandstones. The experiments were carried out at various flow rates with both supercritical CO2 (scCO2)/brine and gaseous CO2 (gCO2)/brine fluid systems. The unsteady-state experiments were carried out with a wide range of flow rates to establish a broad range of initial brine saturations (Swi). This allowed investigation of the sensitivity of residual trapped CO2 saturation (S) to changes in Swi. The values were successfully compared with those available in the literature. For a given Swi, the trapped scCO2 saturation was less than that of gCO2 in the same sample. This was attributed to brine being less wetting in the presence of scCO2 than in the presence of gCO2. Post-imbibition dissolution of trapped CO2 and formation of dissolution front was also investigated. During the steady-state experiments, scCO2 and brine were co-injected with monotonically increasing or decreasing fractional flows to perform drainage and imbibition processes. We carried out seven sets of steady-state flow tests with various trajectories generating a comprehensive group of relative permeability hysteresis curves. The scanning curves revealed distinct features with potentially important implications for storage of scCO2 in geological formations. For both series of experiments, the ratio of S to initial CO2 saturation (1- Swi) was found to be much higher for low initial CO2 saturations. The results indicate that very promising fractions (about 49 to 83%) of the initial CO2 saturation can be stored through capillary trapping.

  16. Biomimetic PVPA in vitro model for estimation of the intestinal drug permeability using fasted and fed state simulated intestinal fluids.

    PubMed

    Naderkhani, Elenaz; Vasskog, Terje; Flaten, Gøril Eide

    2015-06-20

    A prerequisite for successful oral drug therapy is the drug's ability to cross the gastrointestinal barrier. Considering the increasing number of new chemical entities in modern drug discovery, reliable and fast in vitro models are required for early and efficient prediction of intestinal permeability. To mimic the intestinal environment, use of biorelevant media may provide valuable information on in vivo drug permeation. The present study aims at improving the novel biomimetic phospholipid vesicle-based permeation assay's (PVPAbiomimetic) biorelevance by investigating the applicability of the biorelevant media; fasted state simulated intestinal fluid (FaSSIF) and fed state simulated intestinal fluid (FeSSIF). The FaSSIF and FeSSIF's influence on the permeability of the model drugs acyclovir, indomethacin, griseofulvin and nadolol was then assessed. The barriers' robustness in terms of storage stability was also evaluated. The barriers were found to maintain their integrity in presence of FaSSIF and FeSSIF. The model drugs showed changes in permeability in presence of the different simulated intestinal fluids that were in agreement with previous reports. Moreover, the barrier showed improved storage stability by maintaining its integrity for 6months. Altogether, this study moves the PVPAbiomimetic an important step towards a better in vitro permeability model for use in drug development. PMID:25840125

  17. Relating space radiation environments to risk estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, S.B. ||

    1993-12-31

    A number of considerations must go into the process of determining the risk of deleterious effects of space radiation to travelers. Among them are (1) determination of the components of the radiation environment (particle species, fluxes and energy spectra) which will encounter, (2) determination of the effects of shielding provided by the spacecraft and the bodies of the travelers which modify the incident particle spectra and mix of particles, and (3) determination of relevant biological effects of the radiation in the organs of interest. The latter can then lead to an estimation of risk from a given space scenario. Clearly, the process spans many scientific disciplines from solar and cosmic ray physics to radiation transport theeory to the multistage problem of the induction by radiation of initial lesions in living material and their evolution via physical, chemical, and biological processes at the molecular, cellular, and tissue levels to produce the end point of importance.

  18. Relating space radiation environments to risk estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Stanley B.

    1993-01-01

    A number of considerations must go into the process of determining the risk of deleterious effects of space radiation to travelers. Among them are (1) determination of the components of the radiation environment (particle species, fluxes and energy spectra) which will encounter, (2) determination of the effects of shielding provided by the spacecraft and the bodies of the travelers which modify the incident particle spectra and mix of particles, and (3) determination of relevant biological effects of the radiation in the organs of interest. The latter can then lead to an estimation of risk from a given space scenario. Clearly, the process spans many scientific disciplines from solar and cosmic ray physics to radiation transport theeory to the multistage problem of the induction by radiation of initial lesions in living material and their evolution via physical, chemical, and biological processes at the molecular, cellular, and tissue levels to produce the end point of importance.

  19. Estimating the permeability distribution and its uncertainty at the EGS demonstration reservoir Soultz-sous-Forêts using the ensemble Kalman filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, C.; Marquart, G.; Kosack, C.; Wolf, A.; Clauser, C.

    2012-08-01

    We present an estimation of the permeability fields of the reservoir at the Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) at Soultz-sous-Forêts, France, based on the data assimilation technique Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF). To this end, we assimilate data from a tracer circulation experiment performed in 2005. Using a 3-D numerical simulation of fluid transport and chemical tracer dispersion, we advance the tracer in time and control the concentration. With the EnKF we obtain reliable fits for concentration data recorded in both existing production boreholes, GPK2 and GPK4. As an alternative to discrete fracture networks, our heterogeneous equivalent porous medium approach thus can also characterize the hydraulically fractured zone of the engineered geothermal system. We present best estimates for permeabilities (10-14 m2-10-12 m2for the fracture zone) and the corresponding uncertainty which is about one order of magnitude. After comparing our results to results from a massive Monte Carlo and from a gradient-based Bayesian approach, it becomes clear that only the EnKF of this three approaches is able to fit concentrations at GPK2 and GPK4 simultaneously. Based on the EnKF estimates obtained, a long-term performance prediction including an uncertainty analysis for the reservoir (as it was in 2005) yields no thermal breakthrough in the system within at least 50 years of operation. Our study demonstrates the efficiency of the EnKF when estimating the permeability distribution in an EGS reservoir even with sparse data available.

  20. Relating space radiation environments to risk estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, S.B.

    1991-10-01

    This lecture will provide a bridge from the physical energy or LET spectra as might be calculated in an organ to the risk of carcinogenesis, a particular concern for extended missions to the moon or beyond to Mars. Topics covered will include (1) LET spectra expected from galactic cosmic rays, (2) probabilities that individual cell nuclei in the body will be hit by heavy galactic cosmic ray particles, (3) the conventional methods of calculating risks from a mixed environment of high and low LET radiation, (4) an alternate method which provides certain advantages using fluence-related risk coefficients (risk cross sections), and (5) directions for future research and development of these ideas.

  1. Relative permeability of homogenous-wet and mixed-wet porous media as determined by pore-scale lattice Boltzmann modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, C. J.; Karpyn, Z. T.; Ayala, O.

    2014-05-01

    We present a pore-scale study of two-phase relative permeability in homogenous-wet porous media, and porous media altered to a mixed-wet state. A Shan-Chen type multicomponent lattice Boltzmann (LB) model is employed to determine pore-scale fluid distributions and relative permeability. Mixed-wet states are created by altering the wettability of solid surfaces in contact with the nonwetting phase at the end of steady state simulation of initially homogenous-wet porous media. To ensure accurate representation of fluid-solid interfacial areas, we compare LB simulation results to experimental measurements of interfacial fluid-fluid and fluid-solid areas determined by X-ray computed microtomography imaging of water and oil distributions in bead packs. The LB simulations are found to match experimental trends observed for fluid-fluid and fluid-solid interfacial area-saturation relationships. The relative permeability of both fluids in the homogenous-wet porous media was found to decrease with a decreasing contact angle. The relative permeability of both fluids in the altered, mixed-wet porous media was found to decrease for all mixed-wet states in comparison to the initial homogenous-wet states. The nonwetting phase relative permeability decreased significantly, while the wetting phase experienced only a minor decrease. The significance of the decrease was found to be dependent on the distribution of the unaltered solid surfaces, with less dependence on the severity of alteration.

  2. Preparation and investigation of dc conductivity and relative permeability of epoxy/Li-Ni-Zn ferrite composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darwish, M. A.; Saafan, S. A.; El-Kony, D.; Salahuddin, N. A.

    2015-07-01

    Ferrite nanoparticles - having the compositions Li(x/2)(Ni0.5Zn0.5)(1-x)Fe(2+x/2)O4 (x=0, 0.2, 0.3) - have been prepared by the co-precipitation method. The prepared powders have been divided into groups and sintered at different temperatures (373 K, 1074 K and 1473 K). X-Ray diffraction analysis (XRD) for all samples has confirmed the formation of the desired ferrites with crystallite sizes within the nanoscale (<100 nm). The dc conductivity, the relative permeability and the magnetization of the ferrite samples have been investigated and according to the results, the sample Li0.15(Ni0.5Zn0.5)0.7 Fe2.15O4 sintered at 1473 K has been chosen to prepare the composites. The particle size of this sample has been recalculated by using JEOL JEM-100SX transmission electron microscope and it has been found about 64.7 nm. Then, a pure epoxy sample and four pristine epoxy resin /Li0.15(Ni0.5Zn0.5)0.7 Fe2.15O4 composites have been prepared using different ferrite contents (20%, 30%, 40%, and 50%) wt.%. These samples have been characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and their dc conductivity, relative permeability and magnetization have also been investigated. The obtained results indicate that the investigated composites may be promising candidates for practical applications such as EMI suppressor and high frequency applications.

  3. Soil Water Retention and Relative Permeability for Full Range of Saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. F.

    2010-09-28

    Common conceptual models for unsaturated flow often rely on the oversimplified representation of medium pores as a bundle of cylindrical capillaries and assume that the matric potential is attributed to capillary forces only. The adsorptive surface forces are ignored. It is often assumed that aqueous flow is negligible when a soil is near or at the residual water content. These models are successful at high and medium water contents but often give poor results at low water contents. These models do not apply to conditions at which water content is less than the residual water content. We extend the lower bound of existing water-retention functions and conductivity models from residual water content to the oven-dry condition (i.e., zero water content) by defining a state-dependent, residual-water content for a soil drier than a critical value. Furthermore, a hydraulic conductivity model for smooth uniform spheres was modified by introducing a correction factor to describe the film flow-induced hydraulic conductivity for natural porous media. The total unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is the sum of those due to capillary and film flow. The extended retention and conductivity models were verified with six datasets from the literature. Results show that, when the soil is at high and intermediate water content, there is no difference between the un-extended and the extended models; when the soil is at low water content, the un-extended models overestimate the water content but under-estimate the conductivity while the extended models match the retention and conductivity measurements well.

  4. The Relative Performance of Targeted Maximum Likelihood Estimators

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Kristin E.; Gruber, Susan; van der Laan, Mark J.; Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

    2011-01-01

    There is an active debate in the literature on censored data about the relative performance of model based maximum likelihood estimators, IPCW-estimators, and a variety of double robust semiparametric efficient estimators. Kang and Schafer (2007) demonstrate the fragility of double robust and IPCW-estimators in a simulation study with positivity violations. They focus on a simple missing data problem with covariates where one desires to estimate the mean of an outcome that is subject to missingness. Responses by Robins, et al. (2007), Tsiatis and Davidian (2007), Tan (2007) and Ridgeway and McCaffrey (2007) further explore the challenges faced by double robust estimators and offer suggestions for improving their stability. In this article, we join the debate by presenting targeted maximum likelihood estimators (TMLEs). We demonstrate that TMLEs that guarantee that the parametric submodel employed by the TMLE procedure respects the global bounds on the continuous outcomes, are especially suitable for dealing with positivity violations because in addition to being double robust and semiparametric efficient, they are substitution estimators. We demonstrate the practical performance of TMLEs relative to other estimators in the simulations designed by Kang and Schafer (2007) and in modified simulations with even greater estimation challenges. PMID:21931570

  5. Estimates of Preventability and Their Relation to Health Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poole, Gary D.

    It was hypothesized that a person's estimates of the preventability of health problems would be related to health behaviors such that a person who engages in healthful behavior should make higher estimates of preventability. A study was conducted to investigate the relationship between causal attribution of health problems and health-related…

  6. Crustal Permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingebritsen, S.; Gleeson, T.

    2014-12-01

    Existing data and models support a distinction between the hydrodynamics of the brittle upper crust, where topography, permeability contrasts, and magmatic heat sources dominate patterns of flow and externally derived (meteoric) fluids are common, and the ductile lower crust, dominated by devolatilization reactions and internally derived fluids. The permeability structure of the uppermost (~<1 km) crust is highly heterogeneous, and controls include primary lithology, porosity, rheology, geochemistry, and tectonic and time-temperature histories of the rocks. Systematic permeability differences among original lithologies persist to contact-metamorphic depths of 3-10 km, but are not evident at regional-metamorphic depths of 10-30+ km - presumably because, at such depths, metamorphic textures become largely independent of the original lithology. Permeability can vary in time as well as space, and its temporal evolution may be gradual or abrupt: streamflow responses to moderate to large earthquakes demonstrate that dynamic stresses can instantaneously change permeability by factors of up to 20 on a regional scale, whereas a 10-fold decrease in the permeability of a package of shale in a compacting basin may require 107years. Temporal variation is enhanced by strong chemical and thermal disequilibrium; thus lab experiments involving hydrothermal flow in crystalline rocks under pressure, temperature, and chemistry gradients often result in 10-fold permeability decreases over daily to sub-annual time scales. Recent research on enhanced geothermal reservoirs, ore-forming systems, and the hydrologic effects of earthquakes consistently shows that shear dislocation caused by tectonic forcing or fluid injection can increase near-to intermediate-field permeability by factors of 100 to 1000. Nonetheless, considering permeability as static parameter is often a reasonable assumption for low-temperature hydrogeologic investigations with time scales of days to decades.

  7. The pH dependency of relative ion permeabilities in the crayfish giant axon.

    PubMed

    Strickholm, A; Wallin, B G; Shrager, P

    1969-07-01

    The dependence of the membrane potential on potassium, chloride, and sodium ions, was determined at the pH's of 6.0, 7.5, and 9.0 for the resting and depolarized crayfish ventral nerve cord giant axon. In normal saline (external potassium = 5.4 mM), the dependence of the membrane potential on the external potassium ions decreased with lowered pH while that for chloride increased. In contrast, in the potassium depolarized axon (external potassium = 25 mM), the dependence of the membrane potential on external potassium was minimum around pH 7.5 and increased in either more acidic or basic pH. In addition, the dependence of the membrane potential on external chloride in the depolarized axon was maximum at pH 7.5 and decreased in either more acidic or basic pH. The sodium dependency of the membrane potential was small and relatively unaffected by pH or depolarization. The data are interpreted as indicating a reversible surface membrane protein-phospholipid conformation change which occurs in the transition from the resting to the depolarized axon. PMID:5791546

  8. Estimation of the heterogeneity of fracture permeability by simultaneous modeling of multiple air-injection tests in partially saturated fractured tuff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Y. W.; Huang, K.; Bodvarsson, G. S.

    Air-injection tests were used to investigate the flow characteristics of the fractured volcanic tuffs at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the potential site for a high-level nuclear waste repository. Because the tuff matrix pores are saturated over 90% with water and the matrix permeability is on the order of microdarcies, the air component of flow is mainly in the fractures. Air-injection tests can therefore help to determine the flow characteristics and heterogeneity structure of the densely fractured welded tuff. The tests were carried out in the Exploratory Studies Facility, an 8 km long underground tunnel at the Yucca Mountain site, in twelve 40 m long boreholes, forming three clusters within a cubic rock volume of approximately 40 meters on each edge. Each borehole in the test block was packed off (or isolated) into four sections (or zones) by inflatable packers. The in situ field tests consisted of constant-rate air injection into one of the isolated borehole zones while the pressure response was monitored in all the isolated zones. The pressure data showed an almost universal response in all monitored zones to injection into any borehole-zone, indicating that the fractures are well connected for airflow. Air-injection tests were performed in succession for all isolated zones. A simultaneous inversion was performed for the pressure response of all the monitoring zones for all the injection tests in the test block. TOUGH2, a 3D numerical code for multiphase, multicomponent transport, was used for this purpose. Spatially variable fracture permeability was used as an adjustable parameter to fit the simulated pressure responses to those measured, assuming fixed fracture porosity. For most of the pneumatic experiments, the calculated pressure changes matched the data well, and the estimated permeability ranged over four orders of magnitude, from 10-15 m2 to 10-11 m2.

  9. Pore-Scale Study of the Effect of the Saturation History on Fluid Saturation and Relative Permeability of Three-Fluid Flow in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, S. Y.; Tsai, J. P.; Chang, L. C.

    2014-12-01

    The flow of three immiscible fluids - water, NAPL, air - in porous media is important in many subsurface processes. To model the three-fluid flow, the relation of relative permeability-saturation-capillary pressure (k-S-P) of three fluids is of central importance. In this experimental study, we directly measure the k-S-P of the water (wetting phase) when three fluids are coexist in a micromodel during the water drainage and imbibition. The results show that the sequence of the non-wetting fluids (air and NAPL) entering into the micromodel affects the fluid distributions as well as the relative permeability of water. During the drainage process, the relative permeability of water dropped drastically when the pathway of water from inlet to outlet of the micromodel was visually blocked by the non-wetting fluids. At this stage, the relative permeability of water was low but not down to zero. The water was still able to move via corner flows or thin-film flows. During the imbibition process, the water displaced two non-wetting liquids via both "snap-off" and "piston-type" motions. The relative permeability of water jumped when the water pathway was formed again. In addition, we found that the well-known scaling format proposed by Parker et al. [1] might fail when the interfaces between the most non-wetting (air) and the most wetting (water) fluids occurs in the three-fluids system. References[1] J. C. Parker, R. J. Lenhard, and T. Kuppusamy, Water Resources Research, 23, 4, 618-624 (1987)

  10. Minimax Quantum Tomography: Estimators and Relative Entropy Bounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrie, Christopher; Blume-Kohout, Robin

    2016-03-01

    A minimax estimator has the minimum possible error ("risk") in the worst case. We construct the first minimax estimators for quantum state tomography with relative entropy risk. The minimax risk of nonadaptive tomography scales as O (1 /√{N }) —in contrast to that of classical probability estimation, which is O (1 /N )—where N is the number of copies of the quantum state used. We trace this deficiency to sampling mismatch: future observations that determine risk may come from a different sample space than the past data that determine the estimate. This makes minimax estimators very biased, and we propose a computationally tractable alternative with similar behavior in the worst case, but superior accuracy on most states.

  11. Minimax Quantum Tomography: Estimators and Relative Entropy Bounds.

    PubMed

    Ferrie, Christopher; Blume-Kohout, Robin

    2016-03-01

    A minimax estimator has the minimum possible error ("risk") in the worst case. We construct the first minimax estimators for quantum state tomography with relative entropy risk. The minimax risk of nonadaptive tomography scales as O(1/sqrt[N])-in contrast to that of classical probability estimation, which is O(1/N)-where N is the number of copies of the quantum state used. We trace this deficiency to sampling mismatch: future observations that determine risk may come from a different sample space than the past data that determine the estimate. This makes minimax estimators very biased, and we propose a computationally tractable alternative with similar behavior in the worst case, but superior accuracy on most states. PMID:26991163

  12. Estimating Relative Positions of Outer-Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balian, Harry; Breckenridge, William; Brugarolas, Paul

    2009-01-01

    A computer program estimates the relative position and orientation of two structures from measurements, made by use of electronic cameras and laser range finders on one structure, of distances and angular positions of fiducial objects on the other structure. The program was written specifically for use in determining errors in the alignment of large structures deployed in outer space from a space shuttle. The program is based partly on equations for transformations among the various coordinate systems involved in the measurements and on equations that account for errors in the transformation operators. It computes a least-squares estimate of the relative position and orientation. Sequential least-squares estimates, acquired at a measurement rate of 4 Hz, are averaged by passing them through a fourth-order Butterworth filter. The program is executed in a computer aboard the space shuttle, and its position and orientation estimates are displayed to astronauts on a graphical user interface.

  13. Surprise Calculator: Estimating relative entropy and Surprise between samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seehars, Sebastian

    2016-05-01

    The Surprise is a measure for consistency between posterior distributions and operates in parameter space. It can be used to analyze either the compatibility of separately analyzed posteriors from two datasets, or the posteriors from a Bayesian update. The Surprise Calculator estimates relative entropy and Surprise between two samples, assuming they are Gaussian. The software requires the R package CompQuadForm to estimate the significance of the Surprise, and rpy2 to interface R with Python.

  14. Huber's M-estimation in relative GPS positioning: computational aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, X.-W.; Guo, Y.

    2005-08-01

    When GPS signal measurements have outliers, using least squares (LS) estimation is likely to give poor position estimates. One of the typical approaches to handle this problem is to use robust estimation techniques. We study the computational issues of Huber’s M-estimation applied to relative GPS positioning. First for code-based relative positioning, we use simulation results to show that Newton’s method usually converges faster than the iteratively reweighted least squares (IRLS) method, which is often used in geodesy for computing robust estimates of parameters. Then for code- and carrier-phase-based relative positioning, we present a recursive modified Newton method to compute Huber’s M-estimates of the positions. The structures of the model are exploited to make the method efficient, and orthogonal transformations are used to ensure numerical reliability of the method. Economical use of computer memory is also taken into account in designing the method. Simulation results show that the method is effective.

  15. An Experimental Study of CO2 Exsolution and Relative Permeability Measurements during CO2 Saturated Water Depressurization Relevant to Carbon Sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, L.; Krevor, S. C.; Falta, R. W.; Benson, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    Saline aquifers and depleted oil and gas fields have been considered as preferred geological sequestration options for carbon dioxide to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Given the high solubility of CO2 in water, over time, the fraction of CO2 in the subsurface may be dominated by dissolved CO2. CO2 laden brine may permeate cap rocks and carry dissolved CO2 to shallower depths, if there is an upward pressure gradient from the reservoir to the overlying groundwater aquifers. This kind of non-hydrostatic pressure gradients can be caused by gas injection in deeper formations, or groundwater depletion. Such upward flows will depressurize the brine and the dissolved CO2 will come out of solution as pressure drops. We present the results of an experimental investigation into the effects of CO2 exsolution on multiphase flow properties in a CO2-water system with various reservoir rocks and a risk assessment of CO2 leakage due to exsolution in carbon sequestration. The relative permeability of exsolved CO2 and water was measured in a core-flooding apparatus during depressurization with X-ray computed tomography. Very low relative permeabilities of CO2 and water are measured in the exsolution experiments, compared to the relative permeabilities derived from steady-state drainage measurements in the same cores, even when the CO2 saturation is as high as 40%. The large relative permeability reduction in both the CO2 and water phases is hypothesized to result from the presence of a disconnected exsolution gas phase in this flow system. After the CO2 was exsolved, a CO2-saturated water flooding experiment demonstrated the durability and the stability of the low water mobility in the presence of the exsolution gas phase, while the water mobility returned to normal after all of the exsolved CO2 dissolved by a fresh water. A large pressure drop across the core, which is 4~5 times higher than the pressure drop predicted by the drainage relative permeability, was maintained over 120

  16. Permeability extraction: A sonic log inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Akbar, N.; Kim, J.J.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper the authors provide the missing important link between permeability and acoustic velocities by generating a permeability-dependent synthetic sonic log in a carbonate reservoir. The computations are based on Akbar`s theory that relates wave velocity to frequency, rock properties (e.g., lithology, permeability, and porosity), and fluid saturation and properties (viscosity, density, and compressibility). An inverted analytical expression of the theory is used to extract permeability from sonic velocity. The synthetic sonic and the computed permeability are compared with the observed sonic log and with plug permeability, respectively. The results demonstrate, as predicted by theory, that permeability can be related directly to acoustic velocities.

  17. Relative azimuth inversion by way of damped maximum correlation estimates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ringler, A.T.; Edwards, J.D.; Hutt, C.R.; Shelly, F.

    2012-01-01

    Horizontal seismic data are utilized in a large number of Earth studies. Such work depends on the published orientations of the sensitive axes of seismic sensors relative to true North. These orientations can be estimated using a number of different techniques: SensOrLoc (Sensitivity, Orientation and Location), comparison to synthetics (Ekstrom and Busby, 2008), or by way of magnetic compass. Current methods for finding relative station azimuths are unable to do so with arbitrary precision quickly because of limitations in the algorithms (e.g. grid search methods). Furthermore, in order to determine instrument orientations during station visits, it is critical that any analysis software be easily run on a large number of different computer platforms and the results be obtained quickly while on site. We developed a new technique for estimating relative sensor azimuths by inverting for the orientation with the maximum correlation to a reference instrument, using a non-linear parameter estimation routine. By making use of overlapping windows, we are able to make multiple azimuth estimates, which helps to identify the confidence of our azimuth estimate, even when the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is low. Finally, our algorithm has been written as a stand-alone, platform independent, Java software package with a graphical user interface for reading and selecting data segments to be analyzed.

  18. Estimating Body Related Soft Biometric Traits in Video Frames

    PubMed Central

    Arigbabu, Olasimbo Ayodeji; Ahmad, Sharifah Mumtazah Syed; Adnan, Wan Azizun Wan; Yussof, Salman; Iranmanesh, Vahab; Malallah, Fahad Layth

    2014-01-01

    Soft biometrics can be used as a prescreening filter, either by using single trait or by combining several traits to aid the performance of recognition systems in an unobtrusive way. In many practical visual surveillance scenarios, facial information becomes difficult to be effectively constructed due to several varying challenges. However, from distance the visual appearance of an object can be efficiently inferred, thereby providing the possibility of estimating body related information. This paper presents an approach for estimating body related soft biometrics; specifically we propose a new approach based on body measurement and artificial neural network for predicting body weight of subjects and incorporate the existing technique on single view metrology for height estimation in videos with low frame rate. Our evaluation on 1120 frame sets of 80 subjects from a newly compiled dataset shows that the mentioned soft biometric information of human subjects can be adequately predicted from set of frames. PMID:25121120

  19. Estimating body related soft biometric traits in video frames.

    PubMed

    Arigbabu, Olasimbo Ayodeji; Ahmad, Sharifah Mumtazah Syed; Adnan, Wan Azizun Wan; Yussof, Salman; Iranmanesh, Vahab; Malallah, Fahad Layth

    2014-01-01

    Soft biometrics can be used as a prescreening filter, either by using single trait or by combining several traits to aid the performance of recognition systems in an unobtrusive way. In many practical visual surveillance scenarios, facial information becomes difficult to be effectively constructed due to several varying challenges. However, from distance the visual appearance of an object can be efficiently inferred, thereby providing the possibility of estimating body related information. This paper presents an approach for estimating body related soft biometrics; specifically we propose a new approach based on body measurement and artificial neural network for predicting body weight of subjects and incorporate the existing technique on single view metrology for height estimation in videos with low frame rate. Our evaluation on 1120 frame sets of 80 subjects from a newly compiled dataset shows that the mentioned soft biometric information of human subjects can be adequately predicted from set of frames. PMID:25121120

  20. AA Parametric Model for Predicting Relative Permeability-Saturation-Capillary Pressure Relationships of Oil?Water Systems in Porous Media with Mixed Wettability

    SciTech Connect

    Lenhard, Robert J.; Oostrom, Mart )

    1998-01-01

    A parametric two-phase, oil-water relative permeability/capillary pressure model for petroleum engineering and environmental applications is developed for porous media in which the smaller pores are strongly water-wet and the larger pores tend to be intermediate- or oil-wet. A saturation index, which can vary from 0 to 1, is used to distinguish those pores that are strongly water-wet from those that have intermediate- or oil-wet characteristics. The capillary pressure submodel is capable of describing main-drainage and hysteretic saturation-path saturations for positive and negative oil-water capillary pressures. At high oil-water capillary pressures, an asymptote is approached as the water saturation approaches the residual water saturation. At low oil-water capillary pressures (i.e., negative), another asymptote is approached as the oil saturation approaches the residual oil saturation. Hysteresis in capillary pressure relations, including water entrapment, is modeled. Relative permeabilities are predicted using parameters that describe main drainage capillary pressure relations and accounting for how water and oil are distributed throughout the pore spaces of a porous medium with mixed wettability. The capillary pressure submodel is tested against published experimental data, and an example of how to use the relative permeability/capillary pressure model for a hypothetical saturation-path scenario involving several imbibition and drainage paths is given. Features of the model are also explained. Results suggest that the proposed model is capable of predicting relative permeability/capillary pressure characteristics of porous media mixed wettability.

  1. Characterisation and monitoring of the Excavation Disturbed Zone (EDZ) in fractured gneisses of the Roselend underground laboratory: permeability measurements, transport property changes and related radon bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassermann, Jérôme; Sabroux, Jean-Christophe; Richon, Patrick; Pontreau, Sébastien; Guillon, Sophie; Pili, Eric

    2010-05-01

    The Roselend tunnel was drilled in the fifties by blasting in the micashists, granites and gneisses of the Méraillet massif (French Alps). It is situated on the shore of the Roselend reservoir Lake near its dam. Several tectonic shear fractures related to the Alpine orogeny intersect the dead end tunnel (with length of 128 m and section about 2 m), indeed the fracture density varies from 0.45 to 1 fracture per meter along the tunnel (Dezayes and Villemin 2002). Some fractures are partially or totally filled with secondary minerals. The flow rates of percolating water through the fractured medium are seasonal dependent. Large fractures drain a large fluid volume unlike small ones that drain limited fluid volume (Patriarche et al. 2007). The Roselend underground laboratory allows the study of the geochemical and geophysical responses of a fractured rock mass to periodic sollicitations due to water level variations of the nearby Roselend reservoir Lake. The tunnel was instrumented in the nineties to understand the relationship between radon (Rn-222) concentration and water level variations of the Roselend reservoir Lake (Trique et al. 1999). In order to characterize the geometry and the extent of the EDZ, core drilling and permeability measurements through pneumatic testing are performed along the Roselend tunnel. Drilled core analysis consists of direct observations at a macroscopic scale of fractures (density of fractures from EDZ) and also at a microscopic scale via thin sections. Method of pressure build-up in wells (Jakubick and Franz 1993, Bossart et al. 2002) is used to determine permeability profile along each borehole and hence to precise the extent and geometry of the EDZ. A strong correlation is observed between permeability profiles and the density of fractures estimated from core analysis. The extent of the EDZ appears to be about one tunnel radius i.e. one meter around the tunnel corridor. Another experiment consisting of continuous differential

  2. Impact of permeability on seismoelectric transfer function of P waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzhauer, J.; Bordes, C.; Oppermann, F.; Brito, D.; Yaramanci, U.

    2012-04-01

    Recent developments in the understanding of seismoelectrics have shown its potential relevance for porous media characterization with particular focus on permeability estimations. According to promising theoretical and numerical studies, permeability should influence the seismoelectric transfer function at higher frequencies. The dynamic seismoelectric transfer function E(ω)/ ü(ω), where E relates to the coseismic electric field induced by the seismic particle acceleration ü, is expected to increase with increasing permeabilities when crossing the Biot transition frequency. Still, only few experiments have been developed on that matter so far. To address the transfer function dependence on permeability, we adapted a column experiment to comply with steady-state permeability estimations. These observations were run in-situ, during the fluid-balancing phase prior to seismoelectric measurements. The 50 cm-long column had previously been carefully filled with perfectly rounded glass beads. The use of sorted glass beads is expected to achieve similar porosities reproducible throughout the experiment, opposed to varying permeabilities depending on the introduced particle size. The acoustic source delivered compressional waves with an optimal effect limited to the [1-3] kHz frequency range. These limitations are due to strong seismic attenuation in uncompacted porous media on one side, and to the dilemma of observing propagation in downsized laboratory setup on the other. First results validated the experimental protocol in terms of porosity/permeability independence: for particle size varying between 100 μm and 500 μm, permeability varied by a factor 20, with a maximum by 5.10-11 m2, while porosity remained by 39 ± 2 % during the whole experiment. Further investigations are being led regarding the normalised transfer function, corrected for both the fluid conductivity and the seismic energy. For that purpose, we compare the dependence of our measured transfer

  3. Space-to-Space Based Relative Motion Estimation Using Direct Relative Orbit Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, T.; Schaub, H.

    There has been an increasing interest in space-based space situational awareness around satellite assets and the tracking of orbital debris. Of particular interest is the space-based tracking of objects near critical circular orbit regimes, for example near the Geostationary belt or the International Space Station. Relative orbit descriptions such as the Clohessy-Wiltshire equations describe the motion using time-varying Cartesian or curvilinear coordinates. Orbit element differences describe the unperturbed motion using constant variations of inertial orbit elements. With perturbations these only vary slowly, but can be challenging to estimate. Linearized Relative Orbit Elements (LROEs) employ invariants of the linearized relative motion, are thus constant for the unperturbed linear case, and share the benefit of the CW equations in that they directly related to space-based relative motion measurements. The variational LROE equations enable the relative orbit to be directly propagated including perturbation forces. Utilization of the invariant-inspired relative motion parameters exhibits exciting applications in relative motion sensing and control. Many methods of relative motion estimation involve the direct estimation of time-evolving position and velocity variables. Developed is an angles-only relative orbit Extended Kalman filter (EKF) navigation approach that directly estimates these nominally constant LROEs. The proposed variational equations and filtering scheme enables direct estimation of geometric parameters with clear geometric insight. Preliminary numerical simulation results demonstrate the relative orbit insight gained and speed of convergence. EKF implementations often exhibit significant sensitivity to initial conditions, however, initial results show that the LROE filter converges within fractions of an orbit with initialization errors that exceed 100 percent. The manuscript presents the invariants of motion, develops the variational equations for

  4. Worldwide Estimates Relative to Five Continental-Scale Populations

    PubMed Central

    Steele, Christopher D; Court, Denise Syndercombe; Balding, David J

    2014-01-01

    We estimate the population genetics parameter (also referred to as the fixation index) from short tandem repeat (STR) allele frequencies, comparing many worldwide human subpopulations at approximately the national level with continental-scale populations. is commonly used to measure population differentiation, and is important in forensic DNA analysis to account for remote shared ancestry between a suspect and an alternative source of the DNA. We estimate comparing subpopulations with a hypothetical ancestral population, which is the approach most widely used in population genetics, and also compare a subpopulation with a sampled reference population, which is more appropriate for forensic applications. Both estimation methods are likelihood-based, in which is related to the variance of the multinomial-Dirichlet distribution for allele counts. Overall, we find low values, with posterior 97.5 percentiles when comparing a subpopulation with the most appropriate population, and even for inter-population comparisons we find . These are much smaller than single nucleotide polymorphism-based inter-continental estimates, and are also about half the magnitude of STR-based estimates from population genetics surveys that focus on distinct ethnic groups rather than a general population. Our findings support the use of up to 3% in forensic calculations, which corresponds to some current practice. PMID:26460400

  5. Multiple Component Event-Related Potential (mcERP) Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knuth, K. H.; Clanton, S. T.; Shah, A. S.; Truccolo, W. A.; Ding, M.; Bressler, S. L.; Trejo, L. J.; Schroeder, C. E.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We show how model-based estimation of the neural sources responsible for transient neuroelectric signals can be improved by the analysis of single trial data. Previously, we showed that a multiple component event-related potential (mcERP) algorithm can extract the responses of individual sources from recordings of a mixture of multiple, possibly interacting, neural ensembles. McERP also estimated single-trial amplitudes and onset latencies, thus allowing more accurate estimation of ongoing neural activity during an experimental trial. The mcERP algorithm is related to informax independent component analysis (ICA); however, the underlying signal model is more physiologically realistic in that a component is modeled as a stereotypic waveshape varying both in amplitude and onset latency from trial to trial. The result is a model that reflects quantities of interest to the neuroscientist. Here we demonstrate that the mcERP algorithm provides more accurate results than more traditional methods such as factor analysis and the more recent ICA. Whereas factor analysis assumes the sources are orthogonal and ICA assumes the sources are statistically independent, the mcERP algorithm makes no such assumptions thus allowing investigators to examine interactions among components by estimating the properties of single-trial responses.

  6. Non-Darcian flow in low-permeability media: key issues related to geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste in shale formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui-Hai

    2014-05-01

    In clay or other low-permeability media, water flow becomes non-Darcian and characterized by the non-linear relationship between water flux and hydraulic gradient. This work is devoted to addressing a number of key issues related to geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste in clay/shale formations. It is demonstrated that water flow velocity in the damaged zone (often considered as a potential preferential advection paths in a repository) surrounding the tunnel is extremely small, as a result of non-Darcian flow behavior, such that solute transport is dominated by diffusion, rather than advection. The finding is also consistent with the often-observed existence of persistent abnormal pressures in shale formations. While relative permeability is the key parameter for modeling the unsaturated flow process, without incorporating non-Darcian flow behavior, significant errors can occur in the determination of relative permeability values from traditional measurement methods. An approach for dealing with temperature impact on non-Darcian flow and a formulation to calculate non-Darcian water flux in an anisotropic medium are presented, taking into consideration that a geological repository is subject to temperature evolution in the near field as a result of heat generated by nuclear waste, and that shale formations are generally anisotropic.

  7. Effect of temperature and relative humidity on the water vapour permeability and mechanical properties of cassava starch and soy protein concentrate based edible films.

    PubMed

    Chinma, C E; Ariahu, C C; Alakali, J S

    2015-04-01

    The effect of temperature and relative humidity on the water vapour permeability (WVP) and mechanical properties of cassava starch and soy protein concentrate (SPC) based edible films containing 20 % glycerol level were studied. Tensile strength and elastic modulus of edible films increased with increase in temperature and decreased with increase in relative humidity, while elongation at break decreased. Water vapour permeability of the films increased (2.6-4.3 g.mm/m(2).day.kPa) with increase in temperature and relative humidity. The temperature dependence of water vapour permeation of cassava starch-soy protein concentrate films followed Arrhenius relationship. Activation energy (Ea) of water vapour permeation of cassava starch-soy protein concentrate edible films ranged from 1.9 to 5.3 kJ/mol (R (2)  ≥ 0.93) and increased with increase in SPC addition. The Ea values were lower for the bio-films than for polyvinylidene chloride, polypropylene and polyethylene which are an indication of low water vapour permeability of the developed biofilms compared to those synthetic films. PMID:25829623

  8. [Aging-related increase of sensitivity of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore to inductors in the rat heart].

    PubMed

    Sahach, V F; Vavilova, H L; Strutyns'ka, N A; Rudyk, O V

    2004-01-01

    An age-related increase in the sensitivity of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) to inductors of it's opening, Ca2+ ions and phenylarsineoxide (PAO) was studied in experiments in vitro on isolated heart mitochondria of adult and old rats. Two indices were measured spectrophotometrically (lambda = 520 nm) by a decrease in an optical density (OD), resulting from mitochondrial swelling and a release of mitochondrial unidentified substances (mitochondrial factor, MF) registered also spectrophotometrically in a range of waves lambda = 230-260 nm. Dose-dependent effect of Ca2+ (10(-7)-10(-4) mol/l) and PAO (10(-8)-10(-4) mol/l) on swelling of the mitochondria were observed in samples from both adult and old rats. Swelling of the mitochondria from the heart of old rats induced by application of the above inductors was more intensive than the respective effect in samples from adult rats. In samples from the heart of both adult and old rats Ca2+ ions within the tested concentration range (10(-7)-10(-4) mol/l) evoked the release of MF in a dose-dependent manner. Mitochondria from the heart of old rats were found to be capable of releasing some amounts of MF in the absence of the MPTP inductors PAO. When this inductor was applied in a 10(-9) to 10(-4) mol/l concentration range, isolated mitochondria from the heart of old rats released unidentified substances with the absorption peaks at two wavelength, lambda = 230 nm and lambda = 240-245 nm. The former peak was found to be Cyclosporin A-insensitive, while the latter peak could be practically completely inhibited by this antibiotic. The concentrations of tested solutions (10(-7) mol/l CaCl2 and 10(-9) mol/l PAO), at which the release of the factor from the mitochondria of the old rat heart was observed, were significantly lower than those in adult rats. Our experimental data show that mitochondria isolated from the heart tissue of old rats demonstrate significantly higher sensitivity to inductors of MPTP

  9. Co-sequestration of SO2 with supercritical CO2 in carbonates: An experimental study of capillary trapping, relative permeability, and capillary pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbarabadi, Morteza; Piri, Mohammad

    2015-03-01

    In this study we performed three categories of steady- and unsteady-state core-flooding experiments to investigate capillary trapping, relative permeability, and capillary pressure, in a scCO2 + SO2/brine/limestone system at elevated temperature and pressure conditions, i.e., 60 °C and 19.16 MPa. We used a Madison limestone core sample acquired from the Rock Springs Uplift in southwest Wyoming. We carried out two sets of steady-state drainage-imbibition relative permeability experiments with different initial brine saturations to study hysteresis. We found that the final scCO2 + SO2 drainage relative permeability was very low, i.e., 0.04. We also observed a rapid reduction in the scCO2-rich phase imbibition relative permeability curve, which resulted in a high residual trapping. The results showed that between 62.8% and more than 76% of the initial scCO2 + SO2 at the end of drainage was trapped by capillary trapping mechanism (trapping efficiency). We found that at higher initial brine saturations, the trapping efficiency was higher. The maximum initial and residual scCO2-rich phase saturations at the end of primary drainage and imbibition were 0.525 and 0.329, respectively. Each drainage-imbibition cycle was followed by a dissolution process to re-establish Sw = 1. The dissolution brine relative permeabilities for both cycles were also obtained. We characterized the scCO2 + SO2/brine capillary pressure hysteresis behavior through unsteady-state primary drainage, imbibition, and secondary drainage experiments. We observed negative imbibition capillary pressure curve indicative of possible wettability alteration throughout the experiments due to contact with scCO2 + SO2/brine fluid system. The trapping results were compared to those reported in literature for other carbonate core samples. We noticed slightly more residual trapping in our sample, which might be attributed to heterogeneity, different viscosity ratio, and pore-space topologies. The impact of dynamic

  10. Seismic waves increase permeability.

    PubMed

    Elkhoury, Jean E; Brodsky, Emily E; Agnew, Duncan C

    2006-06-29

    Earthquakes have been observed to affect hydrological systems in a variety of ways--water well levels can change dramatically, streams can become fuller and spring discharges can increase at the time of earthquakes. Distant earthquakes may even increase the permeability in faults. Most of these hydrological observations can be explained by some form of permeability increase. Here we use the response of water well levels to solid Earth tides to measure permeability over a 20-year period. At the time of each of seven earthquakes in Southern California, we observe transient changes of up to 24 degrees in the phase of the water level response to the dilatational volumetric strain of the semidiurnal tidal components of wells at the Piñon Flat Observatory in Southern California. After the earthquakes, the phase gradually returns to the background value at a rate of less than 0.1 degrees per day. We use a model of axisymmetric flow driven by an imposed head oscillation through a single, laterally extensive, confined, homogeneous and isotropic aquifer to relate the phase response to aquifer properties. We interpret the changes in phase response as due to changes in permeability. At the time of the earthquakes, the permeability at the site increases by a factor as high as three. The permeability increase depends roughly linearly on the amplitude of seismic-wave peak ground velocity in the range of 0.21-2.1 cm s(-1). Such permeability increases are of interest to hydrologists and oil reservoir engineers as they affect fluid flow and might determine long-term evolution of hydrological and oil-bearing systems. They may also be interesting to seismologists, as the resulting pore pressure changes can affect earthquakes by changing normal stresses on faults. PMID:16810253

  11. Comparison of relative permeability-saturation-pressure parametric models for infiltration and redistribution of a light nonaqueous-phase liquid in sandy porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Oostrom, Mart ); Lenhard, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    To test and evaluate the ability of commonly used constitutive relations to predict multi-fluid flow, predictions for a numerical flow and transport simulator are compared to experimental data. Three quantitative experiments were conducted in one meter-long vertical columns. The columns were filled with either a uniform sand, a sand with a broad particle-size distribution, or with a layered system where a layer of a coarse-textured uniform sand was placed between two layers of a finer-textured uniform sand. After establishing a variably water-saturated condition, a slug of a light nonaqueous-phase liquid (LNAPL) was injected uniformly at a constant rate. Water and LNAPL saturations were measured as a function of time and elevation with a dual energy gamma-radiation system. The infiltration and redistribution of the LNAPL were simulated with nonhysteretic and hysteretic parametric relative permeability saturation-pressure (k-S-P ) models. The models were calibrated using two-phase air water retention data and an established scaling theory. The nonhysteretic Brooks Corey k-S-P model, which utilizes the Burdine relative permeability model, yielded predictions that closely matched the experimental data. Use of the nonhysteretic and hysteretic k-S-P models, based on the van Genuchten S-P relations and k-S relations derived from the Mualem relative permeability model, did not agree as well with the experimental data as those obtained with the Brooks-Corey k-S-P model. Explanations for the differences in performance of the three tested parametric k-S-P models are proposed.

  12. Local permeability changes, passive degassing and related gas hazard at the Baia di Levante area (Vulcano island, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diliberto, Iole Serena; Cangemi, Marianna; Gagliano, Antonina Lisa; Inguaggiato, Salvatore; Madonia, Paolo; Pedone, Maria; Fabio Pisciotta, Antonino

    2016-04-01

    Vulcano, the southernmost island of the Aeolian archipelago (Italy), is presently characterized by active fumarolic fields located along the rim of La Fossa cone and the shoreline of the Baia di Levante beach, in the northern portion of the island.The Baia di Levante fumarolic vents are fed by a shallow hydrothermal aquifer heated by magmatic gases rising from the deep down, with a spatial distribution strongly affected by the local fracture network. These fractures are the expression of a deformation field, dominated by a northward motion to Lipari, abruptly decaying to the Vulcanello peninsula, immediately northward of the Baia di Levante beach. Variable rates of fluid transfer to the surface, following permeability changes affecting the fracture network are among the results of stress field variations over time which induce fluctuations in the pressure state of the hydrothermal system. Under these conditions, increments in hydrothermal gas flow, able to cause an increase of gas hazard, could be determined by a rearrangement of the shallow permeability distribution induced by changes in the deformation field. In this case not associated to any variation in the volcanic activity state. Since 2009 an huge gas flow increment has been noticed in some undersea vents of the Baia di Levante area, leading to increase of gas hazard in their immediate surroundings. On the contrary, the acquired data from the INGV volcanic surveillance program didn't suggest any correlated increase of the magmatic fluid component in the degassing activity.In July 2015, we carried out multi-parametric geochemical surveys in this area, based on direct (thermocouple) and indirect (thermal infrared camera and pyrometer) soil temperature, soil CO2 flux, atmospheric concentration of CO2 and H2S measurements at low elevation (one meter a.s.l.). The chemical and isotopic composition of low temperature fumarole gases was determined too.The comparison of the new data with previous surveys carried out

  13. Relative permeability of retina and retinal pigment epithelium to the diffusion of tritiated water from vitreous to choroid

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, G.; Goodnight, R.; Lean, J.S.

    1986-11-01

    The movement of intravitreally injected tritiated water from the vitreous to the choroid was accelerated by the removal of intervening retina. Both rate of transfer and peak choroidal levels of the tracer were increased, but the proportion of the intravitreal dose recovered was unaltered. In contrast, the movement of tritiated water after diffuse damage to the retinal pigment epithelium by sodium iodate was similar to that of control eyes. The main resistance to the diffusion of this tracer from the vitreous to the choroid is the retina. The differential permeability of the retina and the retinal pigment epithelium may have a role in normal retinal adhesion.

  14. Prevalence Estimates of Combat-Related PTSD: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Lisa K.; Frueh, B. Christopher; Acierno, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Objective To provide a critical review of prevalence estimates of combat-related PTSD among military personnel and veterans, and of the relevant factors that may account for the variability of estimates within and across cohorts, including methodological and conceptual factors accounting for differences in prevalence rates across nations, conflicts/wars, and studies. Method We examined MEDLINE and PsycINFO databases for literature on combat-related PTSD. The following terms were used independently and in combinations in this search: PTSD, combat, veterans, military, epidemiology, prevalence. Results The point prevalence of combat-related PTSD in US military veterans since the Vietnam War ranges from about 2 – 17%. Studies of recent conflicts suggest that combat-related PTSD afflicts between 4 – 17% of US Iraq War veterans, but only 3 – 6% of returning UK Iraq War veterans. Thus, the prevalence range is narrower and tends to have a lower ceiling among combat veterans of non-US Western nations. Variability in prevalence is likely due to differences in sampling strategies; measurement strategies; inclusion and measurement of the DSM-IV clinically significant impairment criterion; timing and latency of assessment and potential for recall bias; and combat experiences. Prevalence rates are also likely affected by issues related to PTSD course, chronicity, and comorbidity; symptom overlap with other psychiatric disorders; and sociopolitical and cultural factors that may vary over time and by nation. Conclusions The disorder represents a significant and costly illness to veterans, their families, and society as a whole. However, further carefully conceptualized research is needed to advance our understanding of disorder prevalence, as well as associated information on course, phenomenology, protective factors, treatment, and economic costs. PMID:20073563

  15. Pharmacokinetic parameter estimations by minimum relative entropy method.

    PubMed

    Amisaki, T; Eguchi, S

    1995-10-01

    For estimating pharmacokinetic parameters, we introduce the minimum relative entropy (MRE) method and compare its performance with least squares methods. There are several variants of least squares, such as ordinary least squares (OLS), weighted least squares, and iteratively reweighted least squares. In addition to these traditional methods, even extended least squares (ELS), a relatively new approach to nonlinear regression analysis, can be regarded as a variant of least squares. These methods are different from each other in their manner of handling weights. It has been recognized that least squares methods with an inadequate weighting scheme may cause misleading results (the "choice of weights" problem). Although least squares with uniform weights, i.e., OLS, is rarely used in pharmacokinetic analysis, it offers the principle of least squares. The objective function of OLS can be regarded as a distance between observed and theoretical pharmacokinetic values on the Euclidean space RN, where N is the number of observations. Thus OLS produces its estimates by minimizing the Euclidean distance. On the other hand, MRE works by minimizing the relative entropy which expresses discrepancy between two probability densities. Because pharmacokinetic functions are not density function in general, we use a particular form of the relative entropy whose domain is extended to the space of all positive functions. MRE never assumes any distribution of errors involved in observations. Thus, it can be a possible solution to the choice of weights problem. Moreover, since the mathematical form of the relative entropy, i.e., an expectation of the log-ratio of two probability density functions, is different from that of a usual Euclidean distance, the behavior of MRE may be different from those of least squares methods. To clarify the behavior of MRE, we have compared the performance of MRE with those of ELS and OLS by carrying out an intensive simulation study, where four pharmaco

  16. Estimation of Relative Elasticities of Substitution and Relative Compensation for Part-Time Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuckman, Howard P.; Katz, David A.

    1981-01-01

    Using data from 881 higher education institutions and a mathematical model, researchers related the estimated compensation rates of part-time faculty members to their institutional types and sexes. Results indicate a growing compensation gap between part- and full-time faculty and increasing substitutability of part- for full-time teachers. (RW)

  17. Being surveyed can change later behavior and related parameter estimates.

    PubMed

    Zwane, Alix Peterson; Zinman, Jonathan; Van Dusen, Eric; Pariente, William; Null, Clair; Miguel, Edward; Kremer, Michael; Karlan, Dean S; Hornbeck, Richard; Giné, Xavier; Duflo, Esther; Devoto, Florencia; Crepon, Bruno; Banerjee, Abhijit

    2011-02-01

    Does completing a household survey change the later behavior of those surveyed? In three field studies of health and two of microlending, we randomly assigned subjects to be surveyed about health and/or household finances and then measured subsequent use of a related product with data that does not rely on subjects' self-reports. In the three health experiments, we find that being surveyed increases use of water treatment products and take-up of medical insurance. Frequent surveys on reported diarrhea also led to biased estimates of the impact of improved source water quality. In two microlending studies, we do not find an effect of being surveyed on borrowing behavior. The results suggest that limited attention could play an important but context-dependent role in consumer choice, with the implication that researchers should reconsider whether, how, and how much to survey their subjects. PMID:21245314

  18. Being surveyed can change later behavior and related parameter estimates

    PubMed Central

    Zwane, Alix Peterson; Zinman, Jonathan; Van Dusen, Eric; Pariente, William; Null, Clair; Miguel, Edward; Kremer, Michael; Hornbeck, Richard; Giné, Xavier; Duflo, Esther; Devoto, Florencia; Crepon, Bruno; Banerjee, Abhijit

    2011-01-01

    Does completing a household survey change the later behavior of those surveyed? In three field studies of health and two of microlending, we randomly assigned subjects to be surveyed about health and/or household finances and then measured subsequent use of a related product with data that does not rely on subjects' self-reports. In the three health experiments, we find that being surveyed increases use of water treatment products and take-up of medical insurance. Frequent surveys on reported diarrhea also led to biased estimates of the impact of improved source water quality. In two microlending studies, we do not find an effect of being surveyed on borrowing behavior. The results suggest that limited attention could play an important but context-dependent role in consumer choice, with the implication that researchers should reconsider whether, how, and how much to survey their subjects. PMID:21245314

  19. The Impact of Fluid Properties and Flow Conditions on the Measurement of Relative Permeability and Residual CO2 Trapping Saturation for CO2-Brine Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, B.; Al-Menhali, A.; Krevor, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    Successful industrial scale carbon dioxide injection into deep saline aquifers will be dependent on the ability to model the flow of the fluid and to quantify the impact of various trapping mechanisms. The effectiveness of the models is in turn dependent on high quality laboratory measurements of basic multiphase flow properties such as relative permeability and residual trapping at reservoir conditions. Compared with typical oil-brine systems, however, a unique defining characteristic of the CO2-brine system is its combination of high viscosity ratio and low density ratio. This combination of properties results in unique complications for experiments with CO2 and brine and unique flow conditions must be used to achieve the combined goals of observations across a large saturation range and the avoidance of the effects of heterogeneity as well as capillary forces and gravity segregation. We have simulated the corefloods experiments at various conditions and calculated with different interpretation techniques: Steady state method, JBN-type method and history matching. As one of the essential mechanisms for CO2 storage underground, residual trapping refers to the trapping of CO2 through capillary forces within the pore space of a permeable aquifer. There are few studies that have observed the trapping characteristics for CO2-brine systems in permeable rocks, including the impact of reservoir conditions, and this remains a major uncertainty for geologic CO2 storage. This work presents results from a core-flooding laboratory that has been recently developed at Imperial College dedicated to observations of CO2-brine systems. The apparatus includes high precision pumps, accurate temperature control and a rotating X-ray CT scanner that allows experiments to be performed in both vertical and horizontal directions. The proper approach to measuring relative permeability for CO2-brine system is proposed and demonstrated. The changes in residual trapping correlated to pressure

  20. Flow mechanisms, relative permeabilities, and coupling effects in steady-state two-phase flow through porous media. The case of strong wettability

    SciTech Connect

    Avraam, D.G.; Payatakes, A.C.

    1999-03-01

    The pore-scale flow mechanisms and the relative permeabilities during steady-state two-phase flow in a glass model pore network were studied experimentally for the case of strong wettability ({theta}{sub e} < 10{degree}). The capillary number, the fluid flow rate ratio, and the viscosity ratio were changed systematically, while all other parameters were kept constant. The flow mechanisms at the microscopic and macroscopic scales were examined visually and videorecorded. As in the case of intermediate wettability, the authors observed that over a broad range of values of the system parameters the pore-scale flow mechanisms include many strongly nonlinear phenomena, specifically, breakup, coalescence, stranding, mobilization, etc. Such microscopically irreversible phenomena cause macroscopic nonlinearity and irreversibility, which make an Onsager-type theory inappropriate for this class of flows. The main effects of strong wettability are that it changes the domains of the system parameter values where the various flow regimes are observed and increases the relative permeability values, whereas the qualitative aspects of the flow remain the same. Currently, a new true-to-mechanism model is being developed for this class of flows.

  1. Stainless Steel Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Buchenauer, Dean A.; Karnesky, Richard A.

    2015-09-01

    An understanding of the behavior of hydrogen isotopes in materials is critical to predicting tritium transport in structural metals (at high pressure), estimating tritium losses during production (fission environment), and predicting in-vessel inventory for future fusion devices (plasma driven permeation). Current models often assume equilibrium diffusivity and solubility for a class of materials (e.g. stainless steels or aluminum alloys), neglecting trapping effects or, at best, considering a single population of trapping sites. Permeation and trapping studies of the particular castings and forgings enable greater confidence and reduced margins in the models. For FY15, we have continued our investigation of the role of ferrite in permeation for steels of interest to GTS, through measurements of the duplex steel 2507. We also initiated an investigation of the permeability in work hardened materials, to follow up on earlier observations of unusual permeability in a particular region of 304L forgings. Samples were prepared and characterized for ferrite content and coated with palladium to prevent oxidation. Issues with the poor reproducibility of measurements at low permeability were overcome, although the techniques in use are tedious. Funding through TPBAR and GTS were secured for a research grade quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and replacement turbo pumps, which should improve the fidelity and throughput of measurements in FY16.

  2. Permeability within basaltic oceanic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Andrew T.

    1998-05-01

    Water-rock interactions within the seafloor are responsible for significant energy and solute fluxes between basaltic oceanic crust and the overlying ocean. Permeability is the primary hydrologic property controlling the form, intensity, and duration of seafloor fluid circulation, but after several decades of characterizing shallow oceanic basement, we are still learning how permeability is created and distributed and how it changes as the crust ages. Core-scale measurements of basaltic oceanic crust yield permeabilities that are quite low (generally 10-22 to 10-17 m²), while in situ measurements in boreholes suggest an overlapping range of values extending several orders of magnitude higher (10-18 to 10-13 m²). Additional indirect estimates include calculations made from borehole temperature and flow meter logs (10-16 to 10-11 m²), numerical models of coupled heat and fluid flow at the ridge crest and within ridge flanks (10-16 to 10-9 m²), and several other methods. Qualitative indications of permeability within the basaltic oceanic crust come from an improved understanding of crustal stratigraphy and patterns of alteration and tectonic modification seen in ophiolites, seafloor samples and boreholes. Difficulties in reconciling the wide range of estimated permeabilities arise from differences in experimental scale and critical assumptions regarding the nature and distribution of fluid flow. Many observations and experimental and modeling results are consistent with permeability varying with depth into basement and with primary basement lithology. Permeability also seems to be highly heterogeneous and anisotropic throughout much of the basaltic crust, as within crystalline rocks in general. A series of focused experiments is required to resolve permeability in shallow oceanic basement and to directly couple upper crustal hydrogeology to magmatic, tectonic, and geochemical crustal evolution.

  3. Relating the Hadamard Variance to MCS Kalman Filter Clock Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutsell, Steven T.

    1996-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) Master Control Station (MCS) currently makes significant use of the Allan Variance. This two-sample variance equation has proven excellent as a handy, understandable tool, both for time domain analysis of GPS cesium frequency standards, and for fine tuning the MCS's state estimation of these atomic clocks. The Allan Variance does not explicitly converge for the nose types of alpha less than or equal to minus 3 and can be greatly affected by frequency drift. Because GPS rubidium frequency standards exhibit non-trivial aging and aging noise characteristics, the basic Allan Variance analysis must be augmented in order to (a) compensate for a dynamic frequency drift, and (b) characterize two additional noise types, specifically alpha = minus 3, and alpha = minus 4. As the GPS program progresses, we will utilize a larger percentage of rubidium frequency standards than ever before. Hence, GPS rubidium clock characterization will require more attention than ever before. The three sample variance, commonly referred to as a renormalized Hadamard Variance, is unaffected by linear frequency drift, converges for alpha is greater than minus 5, and thus has utility for modeling noise in GPS rubidium frequency standards. This paper demonstrates the potential of Hadamard Variance analysis in GPS operations, and presents an equation that relates the Hadamard Variance to the MCS's Kalman filter process noises.

  4. Estimation and upscaling of dual-permeability model parameters for the transport of E.coli D21g in soils with preferential flow

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dual-permeability models are increasingly used to quantify the transport of solutes and microorganisms in soils with preferential flow. An ability to accurately determine the model parameters and their variation with preferential pathway characteristics is crucial for predicting the transport of mi...

  5. The role of geology in the behavior and choice of permeability predictors

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, L.D.; Corbett, P.W.M.; Jensen, J.L.; Lewis, J.J.M.

    1997-03-01

    For effective flow-simulation models, it may be important to estimate permeability accurately over several scales of geological heterogeneity. Critical to the data analysis and permeability prediction are the volume of investigation and sampling interval of each petrophysical tool and how each relates to these geological scales. The authors examine these issues in the context of the As Sarah Field, Sirte Basin, Libya. A geological study of this braided fluvial reservoir has revealed heterogeneity at a series of scales. This geological hierarchy in turn possessed a corresponding hierarchy of permeability variation.The link between the geology and permeability was found to be very important in understanding well logs and core data and subsequent permeability upscaling. They found that the small scale (cm) permeability variability was better predicted using a flushed-zone resistivity, R{sub xo}, tool, rather than a wireline porosity measurement. The perm-resistivity correlation was strongest when the probe permeabilities were averaged to best match the window size of the wireline R{sub xo}. This behavior was explained by the geological variation present at this scale. For the larger scale geological heterogeneity, the production flowmeter highlighted discrepancies between flow data and averaged permeability. This yielded a layered sedimentological model interpretation and a change in averaging for permeability prediction at the bedset scale (ms-10 x ms).

  6. Quantitation of small intestinal permeability during normal human drug absorption

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Understanding the quantitative relationship between a drug’s physical chemical properties and its rate of intestinal absorption (QSAR) is critical for selecting candidate drugs. Because of limited experimental human small intestinal permeability data, approximate surrogates such as the fraction absorbed or Caco-2 permeability are used, both of which have limitations. Methods Given the blood concentration following an oral and intravenous dose, the time course of intestinal absorption in humans was determined by deconvolution and related to the intestinal permeability by the use of a new 3 parameter model function (“Averaged Model” (AM)). The theoretical validity of this AM model was evaluated by comparing it to the standard diffusion-convection model (DC). This analysis was applied to 90 drugs using previously published data. Only drugs that were administered in oral solution form to fasting subjects were considered so that the rate of gastric emptying was approximately known. All the calculations are carried out using the freely available routine PKQuest Java (http://www.pkquest.com) which has an easy to use, simple interface. Results Theoretically, the AM permeability provides an accurate estimate of the intestinal DC permeability for solutes whose absorption ranges from 1% to 99%. The experimental human AM permeabilities determined by deconvolution are similar to those determined by direct human jejunal perfusion. The small intestinal pH varies with position and the results are interpreted in terms of the pH dependent octanol partition. The permeability versus partition relations are presented separately for the uncharged, basic, acidic and charged solutes. The small uncharged solutes caffeine, acetaminophen and antipyrine have very high permeabilities (about 20 x 10-4 cm/sec) corresponding to an unstirred layer of only 45 μm. The weak acid aspirin also has a large AM permeability despite its low octanol partition at pH 7.4, suggesting

  7. State Medicaid Pharmacy Payments and Their Relation to Estimated Costs

    PubMed Central

    Adams, E. Kathleen; Kreling, David H.; Gondek, Kathleen

    1994-01-01

    Although prescription drugs do not appear to be a primary source of recent surges in Medicaid spending, their share of Medicaid expenditures has risen despite efforts to control costs. As part of a general concern with prescription drug policy, Congress mandated a study of the adequacy of Medicaid payments to pharmacies. In this study, several data sources were used to develop 1991 estimates of average pharmacy ingredient and dispensing costs. A simulation was used to estimate the amounts States pay. Nationally, simulated payments averaged 96 percent of estimated costs overall but were lower for dispensing costs (79 percent) and higher for ingredient costs (102 percent). PMID:10137796

  8. On the capillary pressure function in porous media based on relative permeabilities of two immiscible fluids: Application of capillary bundle models and validation using experimental data.

    PubMed

    Babchin, A J; Bentsen, R; Faybishenko, B; Geilikman, M B

    2016-07-01

    The objective of the current paper is to extend the theoretical approach and an analytical solution, which was proposed by Babchin and Faybishenko (2014), for the evaluation of a capillary pressure (Pc) curve in porous media based on the apparent specific surface area, using an explicit combination of the relative permeability functions for the wetting and nonwetting phases. Specifically, in the current paper, the authors extended this approach by the application of two types of capillary bundle models with different formulations of effective capillary radius formulae. The application of the new models allowed the authors to improve the results of calculations of the effective average contact angle given in the paper by Babchin and Faybishenko (2014). The validation of the new models for calculations of the Pc curve is also given in this paper using the results of a specifically designed core experiment, which was originally conducted by Ayub and Bentsen (2001). PMID:26211849

  9. Ground penetrating radar inversion in 1-D: an approach for the estimation of electrical conductivity, dielectric permittivity and magnetic permeability1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lázaro-Mancilla, O.; Gómez-Treviño, E.

    2000-03-01

    This paper presents a method for inverting ground penetrating radargrams in terms of one-dimensional profiles. We resort to a special type of linearization of the damped E-field wave equation to solve the inverse problem. The numerical algorithm for the inversion is iterative and requires the solution of several forward problems, which we evaluate using the matrix propagation approach. Analytical expressions for the derivatives with respect to physical properties are obtained using the self-adjoint Green's function method. We consider three physical properties of materials; namely dielectrical permittivity, magnetic permeability and electrical conductivity. The inverse problem is solved minimizing the quadratic norm of the residuals using quadratic programming optimization. In the iterative process to speed up convergence we use the Levenberg-Mardquardt method. The special type of linearization is based on an integral equation that involves derivatives of the electric field with respect to magnetic permeability, electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity; this equation is the result of analyzing the implication of the scaling properties of the electromagnetic field. The ground is modeled using thin horizontal layers to approximate general variations of the physical properties. We show that standard synthetic radargrams due to dielectric permittivity contrasts can be matched using electrical conductivity or magnetic permeability variations. The results indicate that it is impossible to differentiate one property from the other using GPR data.

  10. Estimated Perennial Streams of Idaho and Related Geospatial Datasets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rea, Alan; Skinner, Kenneth D.

    2009-01-01

    The perennial or intermittent status of a stream has bearing on many regulatory requirements. Because of changing technologies over time, cartographic representation of perennial/intermittent status of streams on U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) topographic maps is not always accurate and (or) consistent from one map sheet to another. Idaho Administrative Code defines an intermittent stream as one having a 7-day, 2-year low flow (7Q2) less than 0.1 cubic feet per second. To establish consistency with the Idaho Administrative Code, the USGS developed regional regression equations for Idaho streams for several low-flow statistics, including 7Q2. Using these regression equations, the 7Q2 streamflow may be estimated for naturally flowing streams anywhere in Idaho to help determine perennial/intermittent status of streams. Using these equations in conjunction with a Geographic Information System (GIS) technique known as weighted flow accumulation allows for an automated and continuous estimation of 7Q2 streamflow at all points along a stream, which in turn can be used to determine if a stream is intermittent or perennial according to the Idaho Administrative Code operational definition. The selected regression equations were applied to create continuous grids of 7Q2 estimates for the eight low-flow regression regions of Idaho. By applying the 0.1 ft3/s criterion, the perennial streams have been estimated in each low-flow region. Uncertainty in the estimates is shown by identifying a 'transitional' zone, corresponding to flow estimates of 0.1 ft3/s plus and minus one standard error. Considerable additional uncertainty exists in the model of perennial streams presented in this report. The regression models provide overall estimates based on general trends within each regression region. These models do not include local factors such as a large spring or a losing reach that may greatly affect flows at any given point. Site-specific flow data, assuming a sufficient period of

  11. Extension of synthetic estimation filters for relative position measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monroe, Stanley E., Jr.; Juday, Richard D.

    1988-01-01

    The construction of synthetic estimation filters (SEF) for out-of-plane rotation is reported. When images corresponding to rotations between the angles which were used to construct the estimator were input to the simulator, the yaw measurement accuracy was a little better than one-half of a degree over the five degree range. If individual phase-only filters were used and the only criteria for yaw angle was 'best correlation', 11 filter would be required for the same range and accuracy. The technique proposed here is invariant to translation.

  12. Experimental investigation of the permeability for unconsolidated porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, S.Y.; Jia, L.Q.; Xia, C.M.; Zheng, G.Y.

    1997-07-01

    A device was constructed to investigate the permeability of unconsolidated media at low flow rate and small pressure drop. The stability and reliability of the device have been verified through repeated experiments on a given porous medium. The experimental investigation on the porous media demonstrated that the permeability-porosity relation is unique for a given medium. Experiments with the narrow screened sands show that conventional hydrodynamics theory and dimension analysis can not be applied satisfactorily in the study of the capillary porous media. For screened sand whose particle size ranges from 0.10mm to 0.45mm and size rate is 1:1.25, the permeability can be estimated from formula k = 4.89 x 10{sup {minus}4} d{sup 1.465} {phi}{sup 4.69} where k and d are limited in m{sup 2} and m, respectively.

  13. An experimental study of relative permeability hysteresis, capillary trapping characteristics, and capillary pressure of CO2/brine systems at reservoir conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin Suthanthiraraj, Pearlson Prashanth

    We present the results of an extensive experimental study on the effects of hysteresis on permanent capillary trapping and relative permeability of CO2/brine and supercritical (sc)CO2+SO2/brine systems. We performed numerous unsteady- and steady-state drainage and imbibition full-recirculation flow experiments in three different sandstone rock samples, i.e., low and high-permeability Berea, Nugget sandstones, and Madison limestone carbonate rock sample. A state-of-the-art reservoir conditions core-flooding system was used to perform the tests. The core-flooding apparatus included a medical CT scanner to measure in-situ saturations. The scanner was rotated to the horizontal orientation allowing flow tests through vertically-placed core samples with about 3.8 cm diameter and 15 cm length. Both scCO2 /brine and gaseous CO2 (gCO2)/brine fluid systems were studied. The gaseous and supercritical CO2/brine experiments were carried out at 3.46 and 11 MPa back pressures and 20 and 55°C temperatures, respectively. Under the above-mentioned conditions, the gCO2 and scCO2 have 0.081 and 0.393 gr/cm3 densities, respectively. During unsteady-state tests, the samples were first saturated with brine and then flooded with CO2 (drainage) at different maximum flow rates. The drainage process was then followed by a low flow rate (0.375 cm 3/min) imbibition until residual CO2 saturation was achieved. Wide flow rate ranges of 0.25 to 20 cm3/min for scCO2 and 0.125 to 120 cm3min for gCO2 were used to investigate the variation of initial brine saturation (Swi) with maximum CO2 flow rate and variation of trapped CO2 saturation (SCO2r) with Swi. For a given Swi, the trapped scCO2 saturation was less than that of gCO2 in the same sample. This was attributed to brine being less wetting in the presence of scCO2 than in the presence of gCO 2. During the steady-state experiments, after providing of fully-brine saturated core, scCO2 was injected along with brine to find the drainage curve and as

  14. Changes in airway permeability and responsiveness after exposure to ozone. [Sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, W.M.; Delehunt, J.C.; Yerger, L.; Marchette, B.; Oliver, W. Jr.

    1984-06-01

    The relationship between airway responsiveness and the permeability of histamine through the airways in conscious sheep after exposure to ozone (O/sub 3/ was examined). Airway responsiveness was assessed by measuring the change from baseline in mean pulmonary flow resistance following a controlled 2-min inhalation challenge with 1% histamine, containing 200 ..mu..Ci/ml of (/sup 3/H)histamine. The rate of appearance of the (/sup 3/H)histamine in the plasma during inhalation challenge was used to estimate airway permeability. To perturb the airways, conscious sheep were exposed to either 0.5 or 1.0 ppm O/sub 3/ for 2 hr via an endotracheal tube. Airway responsiveness and airway permeability were measured prior to and 1 day after exposure. In six sheep exposed to 0.5 ppm O/sub 3/, increased airway responsiveness and airway permeability were obseved 1 day after exposure. Four of seven sheep exposed to 1.0 ppm O/sub 3/ had enhanced airway responsiveness and airway permeability, while the remaining three sheep showed corresponding decreases in airway responsiveness and airway permeability. Since the O/sub 3/-induced directional changes in airway responsiveness paralleled the directional changes in airway permeability in both the positive and negative directions, it was concluded that changes in airway responsiveness to inhaled histamine following exposure to O/sub 3/ may be related to concomitant changes in airway permeability to this agent.

  15. EPA Permeable Surface Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA recognizes permeable surfaces as an effective post-construction infiltration-based Best Management Practice to mitigate the adverse effects of stormwater runoff. The professional user community conceptually embraces permeable surfaces as a tool for making runoff more closely...

  16. Permeability of Clay Concretes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, F.; Ekolu, S. O.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the effect of clay addition on water permeability and air permeability of concretes. Clay concrete mixes consisted of 0 to 40% clay content incorporated as cement replacement. Flow methods using triaxial cells and air permeameters were used for measuring the injected water and air flows under pressure. It was found that the higher the clay content in the mixture, the greater the permeability. At higher water-cement ratios (w/c), the paste matrix is less dense and easily allows water to ingress into concrete. But at high clay contents of 30 to 40% clay, the variation in permeability was significantly diminished among different concrete mixtures. It was confirmed that air permeability results were higher than the corresponding water permeability values when all permeability coefficients were converted to intrinsic permeability values.

  17. Permeability control by cholinergic receptors in Torpedo postsynaptic membranes: agonist dose-response relations measured at second and millisecond times.

    PubMed

    Neubig, R R; Cohen, J B

    1980-06-10

    A quantitative analysis of nicotine acetylcholine receptor function in Torpedo postsynaptic membranes is presented. 22Na+ efflux induced by carbamylcholine (Carb) and the partial agonist phenyltrimethylammonium (PTA) is assessed by determining dose-response relations using three approaches: (1) a filtration assay measuring responses on the 10-s time scale, (2) the same filtration assay after blocking different fractions of the receptor sites with alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BgTx), and (3) a rapid-mix quenched-flow technique which permits measurement of the initial rate of 22Na+ efflux on the millisecond time scale. The concentrations of agonist producing half-maximal responses in these three assays at 4 degrees C are 13, 150, and 600 microM, respectively, for Carb and 50, 50, and 200 microM, respectively, for PTA. The rate constants for 22Na+ efflux are 1.3 x 10(-4) s-1 in the absence of agonst and 65 s-1 and 0.8 s-1 in the presence of maximal concentrations of Carb and PTA, respectively, representing a stimulation of 5 x 10(5) by Carb. The Hill coefficient for the Carb response, expressed as rate constants for 22N+ efflux, is 1.97 +/- 0.06 for Carb concentrations between 3 microM and 1 mM. The inhibition of the agonist-stimulated 22Na+ efflux by alpha-BgTx is compatible with two alpha-BgTx (and acetylcholine) sites per functional unit. Inhibition of Carb responses (slow assay) by d-tubocurarine appears competitive with a KI approximately 0.5 microM, while responses to PTA are inhibited noncompetitively with KI = 0.3 microM. This paradox is due to the presence of spare receptors and to complexities in the binding of dTC to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Determination of responses without the complication of spare receptors allows a meaningful comparison to direct measurements of agonist and antagonist binding in the same system. A model is proposed to account for both binding and response. PMID:7397104

  18. Estimate of the optimum weight ratio in zero-valent iron/pumice granular mixtures used in permeable reactive barriers for the remediation of nickel contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Calabrò, P S; Moraci, N; Suraci, P

    2012-03-15

    This paper presents the results of laboratory column tests aimed at defining the optimum weight ratio of zero-valent iron (ZVI)/pumice granular mixtures to be used in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) for the removal of nickel from contaminated groundwater. The tests were carried out feeding the columns with aqueous solutions of nickel nitrate at concentrations of 5 and 50 mg/l using three ZVI/pumice granular mixtures at various weight ratios (10/90, 30/70 and 50/50), for a total of six column tests; two additional tests were carried out using ZVI alone. The most successful compromise between reactivity (higher ZVI content) and long-term hydraulic performance (higher Pumice content) seems to be given by the ZVI/pumice granular mixture with a 30/70 weight ratio. PMID:21885195

  19. Leaf Relative Water Content Estimated from Leaf Reflectance and Transmittance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderbilt, Vern; Daughtry, Craig; Dahlgren, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Remotely sensing the water status of plants and the water content of canopies remain long term goals of remote sensing research. In the research we report here, we used optical polarization techniques to monitor the light reflected from the leaf interior, R, as well as the leaf transmittance, T, as the relative water content (RWC) of corn (Zea mays) leaves decreased. Our results show that R and T both change nonlinearly. The result show that the nonlinearities cancel in the ratio R/T, which appears linearly related to RWC for RWC less than 90%. The results suggest that potentially leaf water status and perhaps even canopy water status could be monitored starting from leaf and canopy optical measurements.

  20. Theoretical studies of permeability inversion from seismoelectric logs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, H.; Guan, W.; Zhao, W.

    2012-04-01

    Permeability is one of the most important parameters for evaluating the level of difficulty in oil and gas exploitation. A quick, continuous and accurate in-situ estimate of reservoir permeability is highly significant. Stoneley wave logs have been used to determine formation permeability (Tang and Cheng, 1996). However, the inversion errors of this method are too big in low-permeability formations, especially in high-porosity and low-permeability formations resulting from the high clay content in pores. In this study, we propose to invert permeability by using the full waveforms of seismoelectric logs with low frequencies. This method is based on the relationship of permeability with the ratio of the electric excitation intensity to the pressure field's (REP) with respect to the Stoneley wave in seismoelectric logs. By solving the governing equations for electrokinetic coupled wavefields in homogeneous fluid-saturated porous media (Pride, 1994), we calculate the full waveforms of the borehole seismoelectric wavefields excited by a point pressure source and investigate frequency-dependent excitation intensities of the mode waves and excitation intensities of the real branch points in seismoelectric logs. It is found that the REP's phase, which reflects the phase discrepancy between the Stoneley-wave-induced electric field and the acoustic pressure, is sensitive to formation permeability. To check the relation between permeability and REP's phase qualitatively, an approximate expression of the tangent of the REP's argument is derived theoretically as tan(θEP) ≈-ωc/ω = -φη/ (2πfα ∞ρfκ0), where θEPdenotes the arguments of the REP and their principal value is the REP's phase,ω is the angular frequency,ωc is a critical angular frequency that separates the low-frequency viscous flow from the high-frequency inertial flow, φ is the porosity, α∞ is the tortuosity, κ0 is the Darcy permeability, ρf and η are the density and the viscosity of the pore

  1. PERMEABILITY OF BACTERIAL SPORES I.

    PubMed Central

    Black, S. H.; Gerhardt, Philipp

    1961-01-01

    Black, S. H. (The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor) and Philipp Gerhardt. Permeability of bacterial spores. I. Characterization of glucose uptake. J. Bacteriol. 82:743–749. 1961.—The total uptake of glucose by masses of clean, dormant spores was measured to assess their permeability. After correction for intercellular space, packed spores of Bacillus cereus strain terminalis were found in 87 determinations to be permeated by glucose to 40% of their weight. The glucose uptake was relatively independent of environmental variables, and thus was concluded to occur principally through a process of passive diffusion. PMID:13869665

  2. Estimating relative abundances of proteins from shotgun proteomics data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Spectral counting methods provide an easy means of identifying proteins with differing abundances between complex mixtures using shotgun proteomics data. The crux spectral-counts command, implemented as part of the Crux software toolkit, implements four previously reported spectral counting methods, the spectral index (SIN), the exponentially modified protein abundance index (emPAI), the normalized spectral abundance factor (NSAF), and the distributed normalized spectral abundance factor (dNSAF). Results We compared the reproducibility and the linearity relative to each protein’s abundance of the four spectral counting metrics. Our analysis suggests that NSAF yields the most reproducible counts across technical and biological replicates, and both SIN and NSAF achieve the best linearity. Conclusions With the crux spectral-counts command, Crux provides open-source modular methods to analyze mass spectrometry data for identifying and now quantifying peptides and proteins. The C++ source code, compiled binaries, spectra and sequence databases are available at http://noble.gs.washington.edu/proj/crux-spectral-counts. PMID:23164367

  3. Permeability-porosity data sets for sandstones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, P.H.

    2004-01-01

    Due to the variable nature of permeability-porosity relations, core should be obtained and permeability (k) and porosity (??) should be determined on core plugs in the laboratory for the formation of interest. A catalog of k versus (??) data sets is now available on the Web. Examples from the catalog are considered to illustrate some aspects of k versus ?? dependencies in siliciclastic reservoirs.

  4. 2D and 3D imaging resolution trade-offs in quantifying pore throats for prediction of permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Beckingham, Lauren E.; Peters, Catherine A.; Um, Wooyong; Jones, Keith W.; Lindquist, W.Brent

    2013-09-03

    Although the impact of subsurface geochemical reactions on porosity is relatively well understood, changes in permeability remain difficult to estimate. In this work, pore-network modeling was used to predict permeability based on pore- and pore-throat size distributions determined from analysis of 2D scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of thin sections and 3D X-ray computed microtomography (CMT) data. The analyzed specimens were a Viking sandstone sample from the Alberta sedimentary basin and an experimental column of reacted Hanford sediments. For the column, a decrease in permeability due to mineral precipitation was estimated, but the permeability estimates were dependent on imaging technique and resolution. X-ray CT imaging has the advantage of reconstructing a 3D pore network while 2D SEM imaging can easily analyze sub-grain and intragranular variations in mineralogy. Pore network models informed by analyses of 2D and 3D images at comparable resolutions produced permeability esti- mates with relatively good agreement. Large discrepancies in predicted permeabilities resulted from small variations in image resolution. Images with resolutions 0.4 to 4 lm predicted permeabilities differ- ing by orders of magnitude. While lower-resolution scans can analyze larger specimens, small pore throats may be missed due to resolution limitations, which in turn overestimates permeability in a pore-network model in which pore-to-pore conductances are statistically assigned. Conversely, high-res- olution scans are capable of capturing small pore throats, but if they are not actually flow-conducting predicted permeabilities will be below expected values. In addition, permeability is underestimated due to misinterpreting surface-roughness features as small pore throats. Comparison of permeability pre- dictions with expected and measured permeability values showed that the largest discrepancies resulted from the highest resolution images and the best predictions of

  5. Variation of Permeability with Porosity in Sandstone Diagenesis Interpreted with a Fractal Pore Space Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pape, H.; Clauser, C.; Iffland, J.

    Permeability is one of the key rock properties for the management of hydrocarbon and geothermal reservoirs as well as for aquifers. The fundamental equation for estimating permeability is the Kozeny-Carman equation. It is based on a capillary bundle model and relates permeability to porosity, tortuosity and an effective hydraulic pore radius which is defined by this equation. Whereas in clean sands the effective pore radius can be replaced by the specific surface or by the grain radius in a simple way, the resulting equations for permeability cannot be applied to consolidated rocks. Based on a fractal model for porous media, equations were therefore developed which adjust the measure of the specific surface and of the grain radius to the resolution length appropriate for the hydraulic process. These equations are calibrated by a large data set for permeability, formation factor, and porosity determined on sedimentary rocks. This fractal model yields tortuosity and effective pore radius as functions of porosity as well as a general permeability-porosity relationship, the coefficients of which are characteristic for different rock types. It can be applied to interpret the diagenetic evolution of the pore space of sedimentary rocks due to mechanical and chemical compaction with respect to porosity and permeability.

  6. Implementation of Biofilm Permeability Models for Mineral Reactions in Saturated Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Vicky L.; Saripalli, Kanaka P.; Bacon, Diana H.; Meyer, Philip D.

    2005-02-22

    An approach based on continuous biofilm models is proposed for modeling permeability changes due to mineral precipitation and dissolution in saturated porous media. In contrast to the biofilm approach, implementation of the film depositional models within a reactive transport code requires a time-dependent calculation of the mineral films in the pore space. Two different methods for this calculation are investigated. The first method assumes a direct relationship between changes in mineral radii (i.e., surface area) and changes in the pore space. In the second method, an effective change in pore radii is calculated based on the relationship between permeability and grain size. Porous media permeability is determined by coupling the film permeability models (Mualem and Childs and Collis-George) to a volumetric model that incorporates both mineral density and reactive surface area. Results from single mineral dissolution and single mineral precipitation simulations provide reasonable estimates of permeability, though they under predict the magnitude of permeability changes relative to the Kozeny and Carmen model. However, a comparison of experimental and simulated data show that the Mualem film model is the only one that can replicate the oscillations in permeability that occur as a result of simultaneous dissolution and precipitation reactions occurring within the porous media.

  7. A permeability and compliance contrast measured hydrogeologically on the San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Lian; Brodsky, Emily E.; Erskine, Jon; Fulton, Patrick M.; Carter, Reed

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogeologic properties of fault zones are critical to faulting processes; however, they are not well understood and difficult to measure in situ, particularly in low-permeability fractured bedrock formations. Analysis of continuous water level response to Earth tides in monitoring wells provides a method to measure the in situ hydrogeologic properties. We utilize four monitoring wells within the San Andreas Fault zone near Logan Quarry to study the fault zone hydrogeologic architecture by measuring the water level tidal response. The specific storage and permeability inferred from the tidal response suggest that there is a difference in properties at different distances from the fault. The sites closer to the fault have higher specific storage and higher permeability than farther from the fault. This difference of properties might be related to the fault zone fracture distribution decreasing away from the fault. Although permeability channels near faults have been documented before, the difference in specific storage near the fault is a new observation. The inferred compliance contrast is consistent with prior estimates of elastic moduli in the near-fault environment, but the direct measurements are new. The combination of measured permeability and storage yields a diffusivity of about 10-2 m2/s at all the sites both near and far from the fault as a result of the competing effects of permeability and specific storage. This uniform diffusivity structure suggests that the permeability contrast might not efficiently trap fluids during the interseismic period.

  8. Committee neural network model for rock permeability prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagheripour, Parisa

    2014-05-01

    Quantitative formulation between conventional well log data and rock permeability, undoubtedly the most critical parameter of hydrocarbon reservoir, could be a potent tool for solving problems associated with almost all tasks involved in petroleum engineering. The present study proposes a novel approach in charge of the quest for high-accuracy method of permeability prediction. At the first stage, overlapping of conventional well log data (inputs) was eliminated by means of principal component analysis (PCA). Subsequently, rock permeability was predicted from extracted PCs using multi-layer perceptron (MLP), radial basis function (RBF), and generalized regression neural network (GRNN). Eventually, a committee neural network (CNN) was constructed by virtue of genetic algorithm (GA) to enhance the precision of ultimate permeability prediction. The values of rock permeability, derived from the MPL, RBF, and GRNN models, were used as inputs of CNN. The proposed CNN combines results of different ANNs to reap beneficial advantages of all models and consequently producing more accurate estimations. The GA, embedded in the structure of the CNN assigns a weight factor to each ANN which shows relative involvement of each ANN in overall prediction of rock permeability from PCs of conventional well logs. The proposed methodology was applied in Kangan and Dalan Formations, which are the major carbonate reservoir rocks of South Pars Gas Field-Iran. A group of 350 data points was used to establish the CNN model, and a group of 245 data points was employed to assess the reliability of constructed CNN model. Results showed that the CNN method performed better than individual intelligent systems performing alone.

  9. Application of a continuous intrinsic dissolution-permeation system for relative bioavailability estimation of polymorphic drugs.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuefang; Chu, Weijing; Lei, Ming; Li, Jin; Du, Wei; Zhao, Chunshun

    2014-10-01

    A new continuous dissolution-permeation system, consisting of an intrinsic dissolution apparatus and an Ussing chamber, was developed for screening and identification of high-bioavailability polymorphisms at pre-formulation stages. Three different solid forms of two model drugs (agomelatine and carbamazepine) were used to confirm the system's predictive ability. Ranks for cumulative permeation of the three solids were: Form III>Form I>Form II for agomelatine, and Form III>Form I>the dihydrate form for carbamazepine. Regression analysis of these parameters and published pharmacokinetics confirmed linear IVIVCs (most correlation coefficients >0.9). To confirm dissolution-absorption relationships, permeability coefficients were calculated. Relatively constant values among various polymorphisms for each drug supported a linear dependency between polymorphism-increased dissolution and polymorphism-enhanced permeation. A combined analysis of intrinsic dissolution rates and permeability coefficients revealed that both drugs are of the BCS II class and have dissolution-limited absorption. In conclusion, our new system was valuable not only for high-bioavailability polymorphism screening, but also for drug classification within the BCS system. PMID:25014368

  10. Relative importances of outer membrane permeability and group 1 beta-lactamase as determinants of meropenem and imipenem activities against Enterobacter cloacae.

    PubMed Central

    Cornaglia, G; Russell, K; Satta, G; Fontana, R

    1995-01-01

    The roles of outer membrane permeability and Bush group 1 beta-lactamase activity in determining Enterobacter cloacae susceptibility to either meropenem or imipenem were investigated. A beta-lactamase-deficient strain was obtained by mutagenesis from a clinical isolate of E. cloacae, and a porin-deficient strain was selected from this mutant with cefoxitin. Both strains were transformed with the plasmid pAA20R, which contained the gene coding for the carbapenem-hydrolyzing CphA beta-lactamase, and the carbapenem permeability coefficients were measured by the Zimmermann and Rosselet technique (W. Zimmermann and A. Rosselet, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 12:368-372, 1977). The permeability coefficient of meropenem was roughly half that of imipenem in the normally permeable strain and almost seven times lower than that of imipenem in the porin-deficient strain. In the porin-deficient strain, the virtual absence of porins caused the MICs of meropenem to increase from 8 to 16 times, while it did not affect the MICs of imipenem. Conversely, the beta-lactamase affected imipenem but not meropenem activity: meropenem showed a similar activity in the parent strain and in the beta-lactamase-deficient mutant with both a low- and high-density inoculum, whereas imipenem was 16 times less active against the parent strain when the high-density inoculum was used. It is concluded that outer membrane permeability and stability to group 1 beta-lactamase have different impacts on the activities of meropenem and imipenem against E. cloacae. PMID:7726496