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1

Directed Relativistic Blast Wave  

E-print Network

A spherically symmetrical ultra-relativistic blast wave is not an attractor of a generic asymmetric explosion. Spherical symmetry is reached only by the time the blast wave slows down to non-relativistic velocities, when the Sedov-Taylor-von Neumann attractor solution sets in. We show however, that a directed relativistic explosion, with the explosion momentum close to the explosion energy, produces a blast wave with a universal intermediate asymptotic -- a selfsimilar directed ultra-relativistic blast wave. This universality might be of interest for the astrophysics of gamma-ray burst afterglows.

Andrei Gruzinov

2007-04-23

2

Self-similar relativistic blast waves with energy injection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A sufficiently powerful astrophysical source with power-law luminosity in time will give rise to a self-similar relativistic blast wave with a reverse shock travelling into the ejecta and a forward shock moving into the surrounding medium. Once energy injection ceases and the last energy is delivered to the shock front, the blast wave will transit into another self-similar stage depending only on the total amount of energy injected. I describe the effect of limited duration energy injection into environments with density depending on radius as a power law, emphasizing optical/X-ray Gamma-ray Burst afterglows as applications. The blast wave during injection is treated analytically, the transition following last energy injection with one-dimensional simulations. Flux equations for synchrotron emission from the forward and reverse shock regions are provided. The reverse shock emission can easily dominate, especially with different magnetizations for both regions. Reverse shock emission is shown to support both the reported X-ray and optical correlations between afterglow plateau duration and end time flux, independently of the luminosity power-law slope. The model is demonstrated by application to bursts 120521A and 090515, and can accommodate their steep post-plateau light-curve slopes.

van Eerten, Hendrik

2014-08-01

3

A SEMI-ANALYTIC FORMULATION FOR RELATIVISTIC BLAST WAVES WITH A LONG-LIVED REVERSE SHOCK  

SciTech Connect

This paper performs a semi-analytic study of relativistic blast waves in the context of gamma-ray bursts. Although commonly used in a wide range of analytical and numerical studies, the equation of state (EOS) with a constant adiabatic index is a poor approximation for relativistic hydrodynamics. Adopting a more realistic EOS with a variable adiabatic index, we present a simple form of jump conditions for relativistic hydrodynamical shocks. Then we describe in detail our technique of modeling a very general class of GRB blast waves with a long-lived reverse shock. Our technique admits an arbitrary radial stratification of the ejecta and ambient medium. We use two different methods to find dynamics of the blast wave: (1) customary pressure balance across the blast wave and (2) the 'mechanical model'. Using a simple example model, we demonstrate that the two methods yield significantly different dynamical evolutions of the blast wave. We show that the pressure balance does not satisfy the energy conservation for an adiabatic blast wave while the mechanical model does. We also compare two sets of afterglow light curves obtained with the two different methods.

Uhm, Z. Lucas, E-mail: uhm@iap.fr [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095 Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6 - CNRS, 98 bis boulevard Arago, 75014 Paris (France)

2011-06-01

4

Self-similar relativistic blast waves with energy injection  

E-print Network

[abbreviated] I describe the evolution of limited duration energy injection blast waves and their transition stage, with an emphasis on the optical / X-ray plateau phase of Gamma-ray Burst (GRB) afterglows as an application. A complete fluid profile during injection including the reverse shock region is given. The transition is shown with one-dimensional simulations of radial flow to take about a sound crossing time. While energy injection is ongoing, the sideways flux of energy due to jet expansion usually lies orders of magnitude below the injected energy, causing the flow to remain approximately radial. For synchrotron emission from shock-accelerated particles, the resulting flux equations are provided for general circumburst medium structure. The relative flux between forward and reverse shock region depends on their respective magnetizations and the Lorentz factor of the inflowing matter from the source, but for typical afterglow values it is shown that emission from the reverse shock can easily dominate...

van Eerten, Hendrik

2014-01-01

5

Early GRB Afterglows from Relativistic Blast Waves in General Radiative Regimes  

E-print Network

We present simple analytical expressions for the predicted spectral and temporal behavior of the early afterglow radiation from gamma-ray bursts in radiative regimes intermediate between the adiabatic and the fully radiative solutions of the blastwave hydrodynamic equations. Our expressions are valid as long as the relativistic electrons responsible for the observed synchrotron emission are in the fast cooling regime and the blast wave is relativistic. We show that even a slight deviation from a perfectly adiabatic evolution results in significant changes of the temporal characteristics of the afterglow emission.

M. Boettcher; C. D. Dermer

1999-07-20

6

Blast waves in rotating media.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The model investigated involves a cylindrically symmetric blast wave generated by an infinitely long line explosion in a cold and homogeneous gas rotating rigidly in its self-gravitational field. It is found that within the context of rotation in a gravitational field a blast wave will not adopt the one-zone form familiar from similarity solutions but, rather, a two-zone form. The inner compression zone arises as a response to the presence of the restoring force, which drives a rarefaction wave into the outer compression zone.

Rossner, L. F.

1972-01-01

7

The Relativistic Wave Vector  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Lorentz transformation applies directly to the kinematics of moving particles viewed as geometric points. Wave propagation, on the other hand, involves moving planes which are extended objects defined by simultaneity. By treating a plane wave as a geometric object moving at the phase velocity, novel results are obtained that illustrate the…

Houlrik, Jens Madsen

2009-01-01

8

On the Propagation and Interaction of Spherical Blast Waves  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The characteristics and the scaling laws of isolated spherical blast waves have been briefly reviewed. Both self-similar solutions and numerical solutions of isolated blast waves are discussed. Blast profiles in the near-field (strong shock region) and the far-field (weak shock region) are examined. Particular attention is directed at the blast overpressure and shock propagating speed. Consideration is also given to the interaction of spherical blast waves. Test data for the propagation and interaction of spherical blast waves emanating from explosives placed in the vicinity of a solid propellant stack are presented. These data are discussed with regard to the scaling laws concerning the decay of blast overpressure.

Kandula, Max; Freeman, Robert

2007-01-01

9

Nonlinear, relativistic Langmuir waves in astrophysical magnetospheres  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Large amplitude, electrostatic plasma waves are relevant to physical processes occurring in the astrophysical magnetospheres wherein charged particles are accelerated to relativistic energies by strong waves emitted by pulsars, quasars, or radio galaxies. The nonlinear, relativistic theory of traveling Langmuir waves in a cold plasma is reviewed. The cases of streaming electron plasma, electronic plasma, and two-streams are discussed.

Chian, Abraham C.-L.

1987-01-01

10

Relativistic Bernstein waves in a degenerate plasma  

SciTech Connect

Bernstein mode for a relativistic degenerate electron plasma is investigated. Using relativistic Vlasov-Maxwell equations, a general expression for the conductivity tensor is derived and then employing Fermi-Dirac distribution function a generalized dispersion relation for the Bernstein mode is obtained. Two limiting cases, i.e., non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic are discussed. The dispersion relations obtained are also graphically presented for some specific values of the parameters depicting how the propagation characteristics of Bernstein waves as well as the Upper Hybrid oscillations are modified with the increase in plasma number density.

Ali, Muddasir; Hussain, Azhar [Department of Physics, G.C. University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Salam Chair in Physics, G.C. University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Murtaza, G. [Salam Chair in Physics, G.C. University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan)

2011-09-15

11

Unsteady relativistic shock-wave diffraction by cylinders and spheres.  

PubMed

The unsteady relativistic shock-wave diffraction patterns generated by a relativistic blast wave impinging on a circular cylinder and a sphere are numerically simulated using some high-resolution relativistic kinetic beam schemes in a general coordinate system for solving the relativistic Euler equations of gas dynamics. The diffraction patterns are followed through about 6 radii of travel of the incident shock past the body. The complete diffraction patterns, including regular reflection, transition from regular to Mach reflection, slip lines, and the complex shock-on-shock interaction at the wake region resulting from the Mach shocks collision behind the body are reported in detail. Computational results of several incident shock Mach numbers covering the near ultrarelativistic limit are studied. Various contours of flow properties including the Lorentz factor and velocity streamline plots are also presented to add a better understanding of the complex diffraction phenomena. The three-dimensional relieving effects of the sphere cases are evident and can be quantitatively evaluated as compared with the corresponding cylinder cases. PMID:22463327

Tsai, I-Nan; Huang, Juan-Chen; Tsai, Shang-Shi; Yang, J Y

2012-02-01

12

Relativistic electron acceleration by oblique whistler waves  

SciTech Connect

Test-particle simulations of electrons interacting with finite-amplitude, obliquely propagating whistler waves are carried out in order to investigate the acceleration of relativistic electrons by these waves. According to the present findings, an efficient acceleration of relativistic electrons requires a narrow range of oblique propagation angles, close to the whistler resonance cone angle, when the wave amplitude is held constant at relatively low value. For a constant wave propagation angle, it is found that a range of oblique whistler wave amplitudes permits the acceleration of relativistic electrons to O(MeV) energies. An initial distribution of test electrons is shown to form a power-law distribution when plotted in energy space. It is also found that the acceleration is largely uniform in electron pitch-angle space.

Yoon, Peter H. [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States) [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Pandey, Vinay S. [National Institute of Technology Delhi, Dwarka, Delhi—110077 (India)] [National Institute of Technology Delhi, Dwarka, Delhi—110077 (India); Lee, Dong-Hun [School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-11-15

13

Nonlinear waves in strongly interacting relativistic fluids  

E-print Network

During the past decades the study of strongly interacting fluids experienced a tremendous progress. In the relativistic heavy ion accelerators, specially the RHIC and LHC colliders, it became possible to study not only fluids made of hadronic matter but also fluids of quarks and gluons. Part of the physics program of these machines is the observation of waves in this strongly interacting medium. From the theoretical point of view, these waves are often treated with li-nearized hydrodynamics. In this text we review the attempts to go beyond linearization. We show how to use the Reductive Perturbation Method to expand the equations of (ideal and viscous) relativistic hydrodynamics to obtain nonlinear wave equations. These nonlinear wave equations govern the evolution of energy density perturbations (in hot quark gluon plasma) or baryon density perturbations (in cold quark gluon plasma and nuclear matter). Different nonlinear wave equations, such as the breaking wave, Korteweg-de Vries and Burgers equations, are...

Fogaça, D A; Filho, L G Ferreira

2013-01-01

14

Evolution of blast wave profiles in simulated air blasts: experiment and computational modeling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Shock tubes have been extensively used in the study of blast traumatic brain injury due to increased incidence of blast-induced neurotrauma in Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts. One of the important aspects in these studies is how to best replicate the field conditions in the laboratory which relies on reproducing blast wave profiles. Evolution of the blast wave profiles along the length of the compression-driven air shock tube is studied using experiments and numerical simulations with emphasis on the shape and magnitude of pressure time profiles. In order to measure dynamic pressures of the blast, a series of sensors are mounted on a cylindrical specimen normal to the flow direction. Our results indicate that the blast wave loading is significantly different for locations inside and outside of the shock tube. Pressure profiles inside the shock tube follow the Friedlander waveform fairly well. Upon approaching exit of the shock tube, an expansion wave released from the shock tube edges significantly degrades the pressure profiles. For tests outside the shock tube, peak pressure and total impulse reduce drastically as we move away from the exit and majority of loading is in the form of subsonic jet wind. In addition, the planarity of the blast wave degrades as blast wave evolves three dimensionally. Numerical results visually and quantitatively confirm the presence of vortices, jet wind and three-dimensional expansion of the planar blast wave near the exit. Pressure profiles at 90° orientation show flow separation. When cylinder is placed inside, this flow separation is not sustained, but when placed outside the shock tube this flow separation is sustained which causes tensile loading on the sides of the cylinder. Friedlander waves formed due to field explosives in the intermediate-to far-field ranges are replicated in a narrow test region located deep inside the shock tube.

Chandra, N.; Ganpule, S.; Kleinschmit, N. N.; Feng, R.; Holmberg, A. D.; Sundaramurthy, A.; Selvan, V.; Alai, A.

2012-09-01

15

Electromagnetic wave in a relativistic magnetized plasma  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented from a theoretical investigation of the dispersion properties of a relativistic plasma in which an electromagnetic wave propagates along an external magnetic field. The dielectric tensor in integral form is simplified by separating its imaginary and real parts. A dispersion relation for an electromagnetic wave is obtained that makes it possible to analyze the dispersion and collisionless damping of electromagnetic perturbations over a broad parameter range for both nonrelativistic and ultrarelativistic plasmas.

Krasovitskiy, V. B. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics (Russian Federation)

2009-12-15

16

High-speed measurement of firearm primer blast waves  

E-print Network

This article describes a method and results for direct high-speed measurements of firearm primer blast waves employing a high-speed pressure transducer located at the muzzle to record the blast pressure wave produced by primer ignition. Key findings are: 1) Most of the lead styphnate based primer models tested show 5.2-11.3% standard deviation in the magnitudes of their peak pressure. 2) In contrast, lead-free diazodinitrophenol (DDNP) based primers had standard deviations of the peak blast pressure of 8.2-25.0%. 3) Combined with smaller blast waves, these large variations in peak blast pressure of DDNP-based primers led to delayed ignition and failure to fire in brief field tests.

Courtney, Michael; Eng, Jonathan; Courtney, Amy

2012-01-01

17

Characterising the acceleration phase of blast wave formation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Intensely heated, localised regions in uniform fluids will rapidly expand and generate an outwardly propagating blast wave. The Sedov-Taylor self-similar solution for such blast waves has long been studied and applied to a variety of scenarios. A characteristic time for their formation has also long been identified using dimensional analysis, which by its very nature, can offer several interpretations. We propose that, rather than simply being a characteristic time, it may be interpreted as the definitive time taken for a blast wave resulting from an intense explosion in a uniform media to contain its maximum kinetic energy. A scaling relation for this measure of the acceleration phase, preceding the establishment of the blast wave, is presented and confirmed using a 1D planar hydrodynamic model.

Fox, T. E.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Schmitz, H.; Pasley, J.

2014-10-01

18

NO FLARES FROM GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOW BLAST WAVES ENCOUNTERING SUDDEN CIRCUMBURST DENSITY CHANGE  

SciTech Connect

Afterglows of gamma-ray bursts are observed to produce light curves with the flux following power-law evolution in time. However, recent observations reveal bright flares at times on the order of minutes to days. One proposed explanation for these flares is the interaction of a relativistic blast wave with a circumburst density transition. In this paper, we model this type of interaction computationally in one and two dimensions, using a relativistic hydrodynamics code with adaptive mesh refinement called RAM, and analytically in one dimension. We simulate a blast wave traveling in a stellar wind environment that encounters a sudden change in density, followed by a homogeneous medium, and compute the observed radiation using a synchrotron model. We show that flares are not observable for an encounter with a sudden density increase, such as a wind termination shock, nor for an encounter with a sudden density decrease. Furthermore, by extending our analysis to two dimensions, we are able to resolve the spreading, collimation, and edge effects of the blast wave as it encounters the change in circumburst medium. In all cases considered in this paper, we find that a flare will not be observed for any of the density changes studied.

Gat, Ilana; Van Eerten, Hendrik; MacFadyen, Andrew [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Physics Department, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

2013-08-10

19

Nonlinear waves in strongly interacting relativistic fluids  

E-print Network

During the past decades the study of strongly interacting fluids experienced a tremendous progress. In the relativistic heavy ion accelerators, specially the RHIC and LHC colliders, it became possible to study not only fluids made of hadronic matter but also fluids of quarks and gluons. Part of the physics program of these machines is the observation of waves in this strongly interacting medium. From the theoretical point of view, these waves are often treated with li-nearized hydrodynamics. In this text we review the attempts to go beyond linearization. We show how to use the Reductive Perturbation Method to expand the equations of (ideal and viscous) relativistic hydrodynamics to obtain nonlinear wave equations. These nonlinear wave equations govern the evolution of energy density perturbations (in hot quark gluon plasma) or baryon density perturbations (in cold quark gluon plasma and nuclear matter). Different nonlinear wave equations, such as the breaking wave, Korteweg-de Vries and Burgers equations, are obtained from different equations of state (EOS). In nuclear matter, the Walecka EOS may lead to a KdV equation. We explore equations of state such as those extracted from the MIT Bag Model and from QCD in the mean field theory approach. Some of these equations are integrable and have analytical solitonic solutions. We derive these equations also in spherical and cylindrical coordinates. We extend the analysis to two and three dimensions to obtain the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) equation, which is the generalization of the KdV. The KP is also integrable and presents analytical solitonic solutions. In viscous relativistic hydrodynamics we have second order patial derivatives which physically represent dissipation terms. We present numerical solutions and their corresponding algorithms for the cases where the equations are not integrable.

D. A. Fogaça; F. S. Navarra; L. G. Ferreira Filho

2012-12-31

20

Linear wave propagation in relativistic magnetohydrodynamics  

SciTech Connect

The properties of linear Alfven, slow, and fast magnetoacoustic waves for uniform plasmas in relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are discussed, augmenting the well-known expressions for their phase speeds with knowledge on the group speed. A 3+1 formalism is purposely adopted to make direct comparison with the Newtonian MHD limits easier and to stress the graphical representation of their anisotropic linear wave properties using the phase and group speed diagrams. By drawing these for both the fluid rest frame and for a laboratory Lorentzian frame which sees the plasma move with a three-velocity having an arbitrary orientation with respect to the magnetic field, a graphical view of the relativistic aberration effects is obtained for all three MHD wave families. Moreover, it is confirmed that the classical Huygens construction relates the phase and group speed diagram in the usual way, even for the lab frame viewpoint. Since the group speed diagrams correspond to exact solutions for initial conditions corresponding to a localized point perturbation, their formulae and geometrical construction can serve to benchmark current high-resolution algorithms for numerical relativistic MHD.

Keppens, R. [Centre for Plasma-Astrophysics, K.U. Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Leuven Mathematical Modeling and Computational Science Centre, K.U. Leuven (Belgium); FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands) and Astronomical Institute, Utrecht University (Netherlands); Meliani, Z. [Centre for Plasma-Astrophysics, K.U. Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium)

2008-10-15

21

Measurement of Blast Waves from Bursting Pressureized Frangible Spheres  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Small-scale experiments were conducted to obtain data on incident overpressure at various distances from bursting pressurized spheres. Complete time histories of blast overpressure generated by rupturing glass spheres under high internal pressure were obtained using eight side-on pressure transducers. A scaling law is presented, and its nondimensional parameters are used to compare peak overpressures, arrival times, impulses, and durations for different initial conditions and sizes of blast source. The nondimensional data are also compared, whenever possible, with results of theoretical calculations and compiled data for Pentolite high explosive. The scaled data are repeatable and show significant differences from blast waves generated by condensed high-explosives.

Esparza, E. D.; Baker, W. E.

1977-01-01

22

Measurement of blast waves from bursting pressureized frangible spheres  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Small-scale experiments were conducted to obtain data on incident overpressure at various distances from bursting pressurized spheres. Complete time histories of blast overpressure generated by rupturing glass spheres under high internal pressure were obtained using eight side-on pressure transducers. A scaling law is presented, and its nondimensional parameters are used to compare peak overpressures, arrival times, impulses, and durations for different initial conditions and sizes of blast source. The nondimensional data are also compared, whenever possible, with results of theoretical calculations and compiled data for Pentolite high explosive. The scaled data are repeatable and show significant differences from blast waves generated by condensed high-explosives.

Esparza, E. D.; Baker, W. E.

1977-01-01

23

Micro-blast waves using detonation transmission tubing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Micro-blast waves emerging from the open end of a detonation transmission tube were experimentally visualized in this study. A commercially available detonation transmission tube was used (Nonel tube, M/s Dyno Nobel, Sweden), which is a small diameter tube coated with a thin layer of explosive mixture (HMX + traces of Al) on its inner side. The typical explosive loading for this tube is of the order of 18 mg/m of tube length. The blast wave was visualized using a high speed digital camera (frame rate 1 MHz) to acquire time-resolved schlieren images of the resulting flow field. The visualization studies were complemented by computational fluid dynamic simulations. An analysis of the schlieren images showed that although the blast wave appears to be spherical, it propagates faster along the tube axis than along a direction perpendicular to the tube axis. Additionally, CFD analysis revealed the presence of a barrel shock and Mach disc, showing structures that are typical of an underexpanded jet. A theory in use for centered large-scale explosions of intermediate strength (10 < ? {p}/{p}_0 ? 0.02) gave good agreement with the blast trajectory along the tube axis. The energy of these micro-blast waves was found to be 1.25 ± 0.94 J and the average TNT equivalent was found to be 0.3. The repeatability in generating these micro-blast waves using the Nonel tube was very good (± 2 %) and this opens up the possibility of using this device for studying some of the phenomena associated with muzzle blasts in the near future.

Samuelraj, I. Obed; Jagadeesh, G.; Kontis, K.

2013-07-01

24

Rapid miniature fiber optic pressure sensors for blast wave measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a serious potential threat to soldiers who are exposed to explosions. Since the pathophysiology of TBI associated with a blast wave is not clearly defined, it is crucial to have a sensing system to accurately quantify the blast wave dynamics. This paper presents an ultra-fast fiber optic pressure sensor based on Fabry-Perot (FP) interferometric principle that is capable of measuring the rapid pressure changes in a blast event. The blast event in the experiment was generated by a starter pistol blank firing at close range, which produced a more realistic wave profile compared to using compressed air driven shock tubes. To the authors' knowledge, it is also the first study to utilize fiber optic pressure sensors to measure the ballistics shock wave of a pistol firing. The results illustrated that the fiber optic pressure sensor has a rise time of 200 ns which demonstrated that the sensor has ability to capture the dynamic pressure transient during a blast event. Moreover, the resonant frequency of the sensor was determined to be 4.11 MHz, which agrees well with the specific designed value.

Zou, Xiaotian; Wu, Nan; Tian, Ye; Niezrecki, Christopher; Chen, Julie; Wang, Xingwei

2013-02-01

25

Spectroscopic diagnostics in a colliding-blast-wave experiment  

SciTech Connect

Visible spectral lines from [ital n]=3, [Delta][ital n]=0 transitions in N[sup +] and N[sup 2+] ions are used for measuring the plasma electron density and temperature in a region of two colliding blast waves, propagating through a 1.5--10-Torr nitrogen atmosphere. The blast waves originate at the tips of two aluminum rods irradiated with two beams of the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) Pharos-III 1.054-[mu]m-wavelength Nd:glass laser operated at an energy of 200--430 J for each beam in 5-ns pulses. An electron density in the colliding-blast-wave region of [ital N][sub [ital e

Elton, R.C.; Billings, D.; Manka, C.K.; Griem, H.R.; Grun, J.; Ripin, B.H. (Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 20375 (United States)); Resnick, J. (Research Support Instruments, Inc., Alexandria, Virginia 22314 (United States))

1994-02-01

26

Compact-electron-beam or light-ion-beam fusion reactor cavity design using non-spherical blast waves  

Microsoft Academic Search

The application of inhomogeneous cavity gas densities and the non-spherical blast wave resulting from an explosion in this gas offers the potential to reduce the distance between the final diode and the target in a relativistic-electron-beam (REB) or light-ion beam (LIB) fusion reactor. It can also sharply reduce the overpressure experienced by the diode after the target explosion.

G. A. Moses; R. Spencer

1979-01-01

27

RANKINE-HUGONIOT RELATIONS IN RELATIVISTIC COMBUSTION WAVES  

SciTech Connect

As a foundational element describing relativistic reacting waves of relevance to astrophysical phenomena, the Rankine-Hugoniot relations classifying the various propagation modes of detonation and deflagration are analyzed in the relativistic regime, with the results properly degenerating to the non-relativistic and highly relativistic limits. The existence of negative-pressure downstream flows is noted for relativistic shocks, which could be of interest in the understanding of the nature of dark energy. Entropy analysis for relativistic shock waves is also performed for relativistic fluids with different equations of state (EoS), denoting the existence of rarefaction shocks in fluids with adiabatic index {Gamma} < 1 in their EoS. The analysis further shows that weak detonations and strong deflagrations, which are rare phenomena in terrestrial environments, are expected to exist more commonly in astrophysical systems because of the various endothermic reactions present therein. Additional topics of relevance to astrophysical phenomena are also discussed.

Gao Yang; Law, Chung K., E-mail: cklaw@princeton.edu [Center for Combustion Energy and Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

2012-12-01

28

Modeling of Laser-generated Radiative Blast Waves  

SciTech Connect

We simulate experiments performed with the Falcon laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to generate strong, cylindrically diverging blast waves of relevance to astrophysics. In particular, we are interested in producing and modeling radiative shocks. We compare numerical simulations with the data and with an analytic approximation to blast-wave propagation with a radiative-loss term included. Our goal is to develop a laboratory setting for studying radiative shocks of relevance to supernova remnants, gamma-ray burst afterglows, and other high-energy astrophysics phenomena. We will show that a good degree of agreement exists between the experimental data and the numerical simulations, demonstrating that it is indeed possible to generate radiative shocks in the laboratory using tabletop femtosecond lasers. In addition, we show how we can determine the energy-loss rate from the blast-wave evolution. This analytic method is independent of the exact mechanism of radiative cooling and is scalable to both the laboratory and astrophysical radiative blast waves. (c) 2000 The American Astronomical Society.

Keilty, K. A.; Liang, E. P.; Ditmire, T.; Remington, B. A.; Shigemori, K.; Rubenchik, A. M.

2000-08-01

29

The improvement wave equations of relativistic and non-relativistic quantum mechanics  

E-print Network

In this work, we follow the idea of the De Broglie's matter waves and the analogous method that Schr\\"{o}dinger founded wave equation, but we apply the more essential Hamilton principle instead of the minimum action principle of Jacobi which was used in setting up Schr\\"{o}dinger wave equation. Thus, we obtain a novel non-relativistic wave equation which is different from the Schr\\"{o}dinger equation, and relativistic wave equation including free and non-free particle. In addition, we get the spin 1/2 particle wave equation in potential field.

Wu, X; Wu, G S; Zhang, X B; Zhang, B; Wu, Xiangyao; Han, Wei; Wu, Gui-Song; Zhang, Xiao-Bo; Zhang, Bingxin

2004-01-01

30

Simulation of blast-induced, early-time intracranial wave physics leading to traumatic brain injury.  

SciTech Connect

U.S. soldiers are surviving blast and impacts due to effective body armor, trauma evacuation and care. Blast injuries are the leading cause of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in military personnel returning from combat. Understanding of Primary Blast Injury may be needed to develop better means of blast mitigation strategies. The objective of this paper is to investigate the effects of blast direction and strength on the resulting mechanical stress and wave energy distributions generated in the brain.

Taylor, Paul Allen; Ford, Corey C. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

2008-04-01

31

A thoracic mechanism of mild traumatic brain injury due to blast pressure waves  

Microsoft Academic Search

The mechanisms by which blast pressure waves cause mild to moderate traumatic\\u000abrain injury (mTBI) are an open question. Possibilities include acceleration of\\u000athe head, direct passage of the blast wave via the cranium, and propagation of\\u000athe blast wave to the brain via a thoracic mechanism. The hypothesis that the\\u000ablast pressure wave reaches the brain via a thoracic

A. C. Courtney; Michael Courtney

2009-01-01

32

Simulation of the Reflected Blast Wave froma C-4 Charge  

SciTech Connect

The reflection of a blast wave from a C4 charge detonated above a planar surface is simulated with our ALE3D code. We used a finely-resolved, fixed Eulerian 2-D mesh (167 {micro}m per cell) to capture the detonation of the charge, the blast wave propagation in nitrogen, and its reflection from the surface. The thermodynamic properties of the detonation products and nitrogen were specified by the Cheetah code. A programmed-burn model was used to detonate the charge at a rate based on measured detonation velocities. Computed pressure histories are compared with pressures measured by Kistler 603B piezoelectric gauges at 8 ranges (GR = 0, 2, 4, 8, 10, and 12 inches) along the reflecting surface. Computed and measured waveforms and positive-phase impulses were similar, except at close-in ranges (GR < 2 inches), which were dominated by jetting effects.

Howard, W M; Kuhl, A L; Tringe, J W

2011-08-01

33

Interactions between Blast Waves and V-Shaped and Cone-Shaped Structures  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 2-D numerical model of interactions between a blast wave and a V-shaped or a cone-shaped structure is developed. The model simulates the blast wave reflection from a V-shaped or a cone-shaped structure, the movement of the structure due to the blast impact and the induced shock wave behind the structure. Elliptic grid generation and coordinate transformation are utilized to

W. Peng; Z. Y. Zhang; G. Gogos; G. Gazonas

2011-01-01

34

Investigating ULF Wave Modulation of Relativistic Electron Precipitation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Loss processes greatly impact the dynamics of the Earth's radiation belts. Balloon payloads can provide observations of bremsstrahlung x-rays emitted from precipitating relativistic electrons. Intense duskside relativistic electron precipitation events observed by balloon borne x-ray detectors have been reported, and frequently show modulation on ULF wave timescales with periods of 100's of seconds (Foat et al., 1998; Millan et al., 2002). Theoretical studies have shown ULF waves are capable of increasing relativistic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt; however, modulation of precipitation by these waves is not well understood. This study takes an observational approach to investigate the relationship between ULF waves and the modulation of duskside REP events. The modulated duskside REP observations will be compared to satellite and ground-based ULF wave observations and several possible precipitation modulation mechanisms will be investigated.

Woodger, L. A.; Millan, R. M.

2012-12-01

35

Matter Density and Relativistic Models of Wave Function Collapse  

E-print Network

Mathematical models for the stochastic evolution of wave functions that combine the unitary evolution according to the Schroedinger equation and the collapse postulate of quantum theory are well understood for non-relativistic quantum mechanics. Recently, there has been progress in making these models relativistic. But even with a fully relativistic law for the wave function evolution, a problem with relativity remains: Different Lorentz frames may yield conflicting values for the matter density at a space-time point. We propose here a relativistic law for the matter density function. According to our proposal, the matter density function at a space-time point x is obtained from the wave function psi on the past light cone of x by setting the i-th particle position in |psi|^2 equal to x, integrating over the other particle positions, and averaging over i. We show that the predictions that follow from this proposal agree with all known experimental facts.

Daniel Bedingham; Detlef Duerr; GianCarlo Ghirardi; Sheldon Goldstein; Roderich Tumulka; Nino Zanghi

2011-11-06

36

Investigation of ULF Wave Modulation of Relativistic Electron Precipitation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Loss processes greatly impact the dynamics of Earth's radiation belts. Balloon payloads can provide information about loss to the atmosphere through observations of bremsstrahlung x-rays emitted from precipitating relativistic electrons. The Balloon Array for Radiation belt Relativistic Electron Losses (BARREL) provides spatial and temporal information about precipitating electron events through an array of slowly drifting balloons distributed in magnetic local time and L values. Duskside relativistic electron precipitation events observed by previous balloon-borne x-ray detectors have been reported, and frequently show modulation on ULF wave timescales (Foat et al., 1998; Millan et al., 2002). Similar observations were recently made during the 2013 BARREL Campaign. Theoretical studies have suggested ULF waves are capable of precipitating relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belts (Brito et al., 2012). This study takes an observational approach to investigate the relationship between ULF waves and balloon observations of modulated duskside REP events.

Woodger, L. A.; Sample, J. G.; Millan, R. M.

2013-12-01

37

Relativistic scattered wave calculations on UF6  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Self-consistent Dirac-Slater multiple scattering calculations are presented for UF6. The results are compared critically to other relativistic calculations, showing that the results of all molecular orbital calculations are in qualitative agreement, as measured by energy levels, population analyses, and spin-orbit splittings. A detailed comparison is made to the relativistic X alpha(RX alpha) method of Wood and Boring, which also uses multiple scattering theory, but incorporates relativistic effects in a more approximate fashion. For the most part, the RX alpha results are in agreement with the present results.

Case, D. A.; Yang, C. Y.

1980-01-01

38

Investigating EMIC Waves as a Precipitation Mechanism for Relativistic Electrons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Evidence has indicated that EMIC waves may be one of the major causes of relativistic electron precipitation (REP). We solved the pitch-angle diffusion equation for the scattering of relativistic electrons by EMIC waves, and generated flux-energy spectra of the precipitating electrons. After being converted into Bremsstrahlung X-ray counts, these spectra can be directly compared with previous (e.g. MAXIS, MINIS, BARREL test campaigns) and future (e.g. BARREL) balloon spectra measurements to determine if EMIC waves are the causes of the REP events. Parameter studies have also been conducted to investigate the influence of various geomagnetic parameters and environmental conditions on the REP spectra.

Li, Z.; Millan, R. M.; Woodger, L. A.

2012-12-01

39

Relativistic wave and particle mechanics formulated without classical mass  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: > Formal derivation of the Klein-Gordon equation with an invariant frequency. > Formal derivation of the relativistic version of Newton's equation. > The classical mass is replaced by the invariant frequency. > The invariant frequencies for selected elementary particles are deduced. > The choice of natural units resulting from the developed theories is discussed. - Abstract: The fact that the concept of classical mass plays an important role in formulating relativistic theories of waves and particles is well-known. However, recent studies show that Galilean invariant theories of waves and particles can be formulated with the so-called 'wave mass', which replaces the classical mass and allows attaining higher accuracy of performing calculations [J.L. Fry and Z.E. Musielak, Ann. Phys. 325 (2010) 1194]. The main purpose of this paper is to generalize these results and formulate fundamental (Poincare invariant) relativistic theories of waves and particles without the classical mass. In the presented approach, the classical mass is replaced by an invariant frequency that only involves units of time. The invariant frequencies for various elementary particles are deduced from experiments and their relationship to the corresponding classical and wave mass for each particle is described. It is shown that relativistic wave mechanics with the invariant frequency is independent of the Planck constant, and that such theory can attain higher accuracy of performing calculations. The choice of natural units resulting from the developed theories of waves and particles is also discussed.

Fry, J.L. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States); Musielak, Z.E., E-mail: zmusielak@uta.edu [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States); Chang, Trei-wen [Department of Physics, National Kaohsiung Normal University, Kaohsiung 802, Taiwan (China)

2011-08-15

40

Relativistic electromagnetic waves in an electron-ion plasma  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

High power laser beams can drive plasma particles to relativistic energies. An accurate description of strong waves requires the inclusion of ion dynamics in the analysis. The equations governing the propagation of relativistic electromagnetic waves in a cold electron-ion plasma can be reduced to two equations expressing conservation of energy-momentum of the system. The two conservation constants are functions of the plasma stream velocity, the wave velocity, the wave amplitude, and the electron-ion mass ratio. The dynamic parameter, expressing electron-ion momentum conversation in the laboratory frame, can be regarded as an adjustable quantity, a suitable choice of which will yield self-consistent solutions when other plasma parameters were specified. Circularly polarized electromagnetic waves and electrostatic plasma waves are used as illustrations.

Chian, Abraham C.-L.; Kennel, Charles F.

1987-01-01

41

Investigation of Relativistic Electron Resonance with EMIC Waves  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wave-particle interaction of relativistic electrons with EMIC waves has been proposed as an important loss mechanism for radiation belt electrons (e.g. Thorne and Andreoli, 1980). Lorentzen et al (2000) and Millan et al (2002) suggested this mechanism to be responsible for dusk side relativistic electron precipitation (REP) detected by balloon borne instrumentation. This study will use the linear electromagnetic dispersion code WHAMP to investigate the effects of density, magnetic field, anisotropy, and heavy ions on the minimum resonance energy for relativistic electrons with EMIC waves. Results will be compared with observations of REP during the MAXIS balloon campaign on Jan. 19, 2000 and the MINIS balloon campaign on Jan. 21, 2005.

Woodger, L. A.; Millan, R. M.; Denton, R. E.

2008-12-01

42

Model for small arms fire muzzle blast wave propagation in air  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Accurate modeling of small firearms muzzle blast wave propagation in the far field is critical to predict sound pressure levels, impulse durations and rise times, as functions of propagation distance. Such a task being relevant to a number of military applications including the determination of human response to blast noise, gunfire detection and localization, and gun suppressor design. Herein, a time domain model to predict small arms fire muzzle blast wave propagation is introduced. The model implements a Friedlander wave with finite rise time which diverges spherically from the gun muzzle. Additionally, the effects in blast wave form of thermoviscous and molecular relaxational processes, which are associated with atmospheric absorption of sound were also incorporated in the model. Atmospheric absorption of blast waves is implemented using a time domain recursive formula obtained from numerical integration of corresponding differential equations using a Crank-Nicholson finite difference scheme. Theoretical predictions from our model were compared to previously recorded real world data of muzzle blast wave signatures obtained by shooting a set different sniper weapons of varying calibers. Recordings containing gunfire acoustical signatures were taken at distances between 100 and 600 meters from the gun muzzle. Results shows that predicted blast wave slope and exponential decay agrees well with measured data. Analysis also reveals the persistency of an oscillatory phenomenon after blast overpressure in the recorded wave forms.

Aguilar, Juan R.; Desai, Sachi V.

2011-11-01

43

An investigation of the interaction of a blast wave with an internal structure  

Microsoft Academic Search

A computational investigation of the interaction of a blast wave with a simple internal structure is presented. The focus of the research is on the fluid dynamics involved in the explosion and the resulting shock interactions. In particular, a Rayleigh-Taylor type instability associated with the density gradients behind the blast wave is studied in detail. Computational issues associated with the

Frank Marconi

1993-01-01

44

Multidimensional effects on relativistic electrons in an oblique shock wave  

SciTech Connect

Multidimensional effects on electron motion in a magnetosonic shock wave propagating obliquely to an external magnetic field are studied by means of a two-dimensional (two space coordinates and three velocities) relativistic, electromagnetic particle code. The simulations demonstrate that after trapping and energization in the main pulse of the shock wave, electrons can be detrapped from it keeping their ultrarelativistic energies. This detrapping is caused by magnetic fluctuations propagating along the wave front. Furthermore, some of the detrapped electrons can be accelerated to much higher energies by the shock wave because they can enter and exit the shock wave as a result of their gyromotions.

Shikii, Kenta; Toida, Mieko [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

2010-08-15

45

Computational Study of Human Head Response to Primary Blast Waves of Five Levels from Three Directions  

PubMed Central

Human exposure to blast waves without any fragment impacts can still result in primary blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI). To investigate the mechanical response of human brain to primary blast waves and to identify the injury mechanisms of bTBI, a three-dimensional finite element head model consisting of the scalp, skull, cerebrospinal fluid, nasal cavity, and brain was developed from the imaging data set of a human female. The finite element head model was partially validated and was subjected to the blast waves of five blast intensities from the anterior, right lateral, and posterior directions at a stand-off distance of one meter from the detonation center. Simulation results show that the blast wave directly transmits into the head and causes a pressure wave propagating through the brain tissue. Intracranial pressure (ICP) is predicted to have the highest magnitude from a posterior blast wave in comparison with a blast wave from any of the other two directions with same blast intensity. The brain model predicts higher positive pressure at the site proximal to blast wave than that at the distal site. The intracranial pressure wave invariably travels into the posterior fossa and vertebral column, causing high pressures in these regions. The severities of cerebral contusions at different cerebral locations are estimated using an ICP based injury criterion. Von Mises stress prevails in the cortex with a much higher magnitude than in the internal parenchyma. According to an axonal injury criterion based on von Mises stress, axonal injury is not predicted to be a cause of primary brain injury from blasts. PMID:25409326

Wang, Chenzhi; Pahk, Jae Bum; Balaban, Carey D.; Miller, Mark C.; Wood, Adam R.; Vipperman, Jeffrey S.

2014-01-01

46

Computational study of human head response to primary blast waves of five levels from three directions.  

PubMed

Human exposure to blast waves without any fragment impacts can still result in primary blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI). To investigate the mechanical response of human brain to primary blast waves and to identify the injury mechanisms of bTBI, a three-dimensional finite element head model consisting of the scalp, skull, cerebrospinal fluid, nasal cavity, and brain was developed from the imaging data set of a human female. The finite element head model was partially validated and was subjected to the blast waves of five blast intensities from the anterior, right lateral, and posterior directions at a stand-off distance of one meter from the detonation center. Simulation results show that the blast wave directly transmits into the head and causes a pressure wave propagating through the brain tissue. Intracranial pressure (ICP) is predicted to have the highest magnitude from a posterior blast wave in comparison with a blast wave from any of the other two directions with same blast intensity. The brain model predicts higher positive pressure at the site proximal to blast wave than that at the distal site. The intracranial pressure wave invariably travels into the posterior fossa and vertebral column, causing high pressures in these regions. The severities of cerebral contusions at different cerebral locations are estimated using an ICP based injury criterion. Von Mises stress prevails in the cortex with a much higher magnitude than in the internal parenchyma. According to an axonal injury criterion based on von Mises stress, axonal injury is not predicted to be a cause of primary brain injury from blasts. PMID:25409326

Wang, Chenzhi; Pahk, Jae Bum; Balaban, Carey D; Miller, Mark C; Wood, Adam R; Vipperman, Jeffrey S

2014-01-01

47

The blast wave of the Shuttle plume at ionospheric heights  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The main engine burn (MEB) of the Space Shuttle deposits ˜2×1012 joules of explosive energy and ˜3×105 kg of exhaust in almost horizontal flight at 105-110 km altitude during the period 300-550 s into the ascent. This extremely robust perturbation provides a potential active-excitation source for a variety of geophysical processes, including (1) the effects of aurora-like localized heating on the generation of gravity waves in the thermosphere, (2) the ducting mechanisms for long-period infrasound in the upper atmosphere, (3) dynamo effects associated with transient charge separation, (4) interactions with ambient midlatitude current systems at E-layer heights, and (5) effects in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide of transient electron-density perturbations in the D-region. The sine qua non of such an agenda is to gain a quantitative understanding of the near-field behavior of the MEB exhaust-plume's quasi-cylindrical expansion, which generates a blast wave propagating away from the explosion. We report on observed electron-density signatures of this blast wave as manifested on lines-of-sight (LOSs) from a very-long-baseline interferometer (VLBI) illuminated by 137-MHz beacon signals from the MARECS-B satellite. We also compare the observations to a preliminary three-dimensional neutral-air acoustic model coupled to the ionospheric electron density.

Li, Y. Q.; Jacobson, A. R.; Carlos, R. C.; Massey, R. S.; Taranenko, Y. N.; Wu, G.

1994-12-01

48

Investigating EMIC Wave Generation and Relativistic Electron Resonance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wave-particle interaction of relativistic electrons with electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves is thought to play an important role in radiation belt dynamics, and may be a dominant electron precipitation mechanism. We use data from the LANL MPA instruments to investigate the temperature anisotropy of ring current protons that may drive EMIC waves during relativistic electron precipitation events. These data are used as input to the WHAMP plasma dispersion code to solve for EMIC wave frequencies in a multi-species magnetized plasma. The minimum electron resonance energy is calculated and compared to balloon observations of precipitating electron energy spectra. We also use LEPA data from CRRES to investigate ion distributions during EMIC wave events identified in the Meredith et al. (2003) study.

Millan, R. M.; Woodger, L. A.; Denton, R. E.

2007-12-01

49

Bernstein wave in relativistic plasma with arbitrary energy anisotropy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Bernstein wave (BW) in a magnetized relativistic plasma is discussed in detail for a particular choice of distribution function1 that permits an exact analytical reduction of the dispersion relation for arbitrary energy anisotropy. The resulting dispersion relation is solved numerically in order to highlight the effect of energy anisotropy and the relativistic effects on the propagation characteristics of BW. The oscillatory character of the Bessel function appears due to the particular choice of the distribution function and thus changes the propagation characteristics significantly for short wavelengths (i.e., perpendicular wavelength is smaller than Larmour radius k?>1 ). However, for longer wavelengths, these characteristics show a trend similar to the Maxwellian distribution. The dispersion relations for the non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic regimes are also obtained. The anisotropy provides a free energy to make the Bernstein wave unstable satisfying the threshold condition due to oscillatory character of the Bessel functions. Our result may prove useful for a wide range of applications e.g., for magnetized relativistic plasma environments such as astrophysical and space plasmas, laboratory plasmas with intense rf heating and for relativistic electron beams used for microwave generation. 1. P. H. Yoon and R.C. Davidson, Phys. Rev. A, 35, 2619 (1987).

Bashir, M.; Hirose, A.; Murtaza, G.; Noreen, N.; Tahir, I.

2012-12-01

50

Minimal position-velocity uncertainty wave packets in relativistic and non-relativistic quantum mechanics  

SciTech Connect

We consider wave packets of free particles with a general energy-momentum dispersion relation E(p). The spreading of the wave packet is determined by the velocity v={partial_derivative}{sub p}E. The position-velocity uncertainty relation {delta}x{delta}v{>=}1/2 |<{partial_derivative}{sub p}{sup 2}E>| is saturated by minimal uncertainty wave packets {phi}(p)=Aexp(-{alpha}E(p)+{beta}p). In addition to the standard minimal Gaussian wave packets corresponding to the non-relativistic dispersion relation E(p)=p{sup 2}/2m, analytic calculations are presented for the spreading of wave packets with minimal position-velocity uncertainty product for the lattice dispersion relation E(p)=-cos(pa)/ma{sup 2} as well as for the relativistic dispersion relation E(p)={radical}(p{sup 2}+m{sup 2}). The boost properties of moving relativistic wave packets as well as the propagation of wave packets in an expanding Universe are also discussed.

Al-Hashimi, M.H. [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Bern University, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland)], E-mail: hashimi@itp.unibe.ch; Wiese, U.-J. [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Bern University, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland)

2009-12-15

51

On the Wave aspect of Relativistic Quantum Fields  

E-print Network

In the state-vector space for relativistic quantum fields a new set of basis vectors are introduced, which are taken to be eigenstates of the field operators themselves. The corresponding eigenvalues are then interpreted as representing matter waves associated with the respective quantum fields. The representation, based on such basis vectors, or the wave-representation naturally emphasizes the wave aspect of the system, in contrast with the usual, Fock or particle-representation emphasizing the particle aspect. For the case of a relativistic, free neutral field, the wave-representation is explicitly constructed, and its mathematical properties as well as physical implications are studied in detail. It is expected that such an approach will find useful applications, e.g., in quantum optics.

Minoru Omote; Susumu kamefuchi

2005-10-21

52

Surfatron acceleration of a relativistic particle by electromagnetic plane wave  

E-print Network

We study motion of a relativistic charged particle in a plane slow electromagnetic wave and background uniform magnetic field. The wave propagates normally to the background field. Under certain conditions, the resonance between the wave and the Larmor motion of the particle is possible. Capture into this resonance results in acceleration of the particle along the wave front (surfatron acceleration). We analyse the phenomenon of capture and show that a captured particle never leaves the resonance and its energy infinitely grows. Scattering on the resonance is also studied. We find that this scattering results in diffusive growth of the particle energy. Finally, we estimate energy losses due to radiation by an accelerated particle.

A. I. Neishtadt; A. A. Vasiliev; A. V. Artemyev

2010-11-09

53

Blast Wave Exposure Impairs Memory and Decreases Axon Initial Segment Length  

PubMed Central

Abstract Exposure to a blast wave has been proposed to cause mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), with symptoms including altered cognition, memory, and behavior. This idea, however, remains controversial, and the mechanisms of blast-induced brain injury remain unknown. To begin to resolve these questions, we constructed a simple compressed air shock tube, placed rats inside the tube, and exposed them to a highly reproducible and controlled blast wave. Consistent with the generation of a mild injury, 2 weeks after exposure to the blast, we found that motor performance was unaffected, and a panel of common injury markers showed little or no significant changes in expression in the cortex, corpus callosum, or hippocampus. Similarly, we were unable to detect elevated spectrin breakdown products in brains collected from blast-exposed rats. Using an object recognition task, however, we found that rats exposed to a blast wave spent significantly less time exploring a novel object when compared with control rats. Intriguingly, we also observed a significant shortening of the axon initial segment (AIS) in both the cortex and hippocampus of blast-exposed rats, suggesting altered neuronal excitability after exposure to a blast. A computational model showed that shortening the AIS increased both threshold and the interspike interval of repetitively firing neurons. These results support the conclusion that exposure to a single blast wave can lead to mTBI with accompanying cognitive impairment and subcellular changes in the molecular organization of neurons. PMID:23025758

Baalman, Kelli L.; Cotton, R. James; Rasband, S. Neil

2013-01-01

54

Gravitational Wave Science: Challenges for Numerical Relativistic Astrophysics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gravitational wave detectors on earth and in space will open up a new observational window on the universe. The new information about astrophysics and fundamental physics these observations will bring is expected to pose exciting challenges. This talk will provide an overview of this emerging area of gravitational wave science, with a focus on the challenges it will bring for numerical relativistic astrophysics and a look at some recent results.

Cenrella, Joan

2005-01-01

55

Loss of relativistic electrons at geosynchronous orbit by EMIC waves  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There are several loss mechanisms for relativistic electrons in the Earth's outer radiation belt. They are associated with adiabatic and/or non-adiabatic processes. Adiabatic processes do not produce a real loss of radiation belt particles because the relativistic particle flux variations are modulated by the change in the magnetic field strength. That is, the flux decrease is due to the field decrease, and the flux recovers when the field returns. Secondly, non-adiabatic processes produce irreversible losses; in other words, particles are lost permanently. Unlike adiabatic processes, non-adiabatic processes lead to a permanent loss. One of them is atmospheric precipitation associated with wave-particle interactions or magnetic moment scattering due to field stretching. The other is the loss through the magnetopause, called magnetopause shadowing. Recently, it has been suggested that EMIC waves are responsible for relativistic electron loss. In this study we selected several intervals showing relativistic flux dropouts at geosynchronous orbit. Around the intervals, geosynchronous spacecraft observed well-defined EMIC waves. We examine if the EMIC waves are a major factor to control the flux dropouts at geosynchronous orbit. We also discuss the effect of other non-adiabatic mechanisms for the flux dropouts.

Hyun, K.; Kim, K.; Lee, E.; Lee, D.

2013-12-01

56

Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamics: Renormalized Eigenvectors and Full Wave Decomposition Riemann Solver  

Microsoft Academic Search

We obtain renormalized sets of right and left eigenvectors of the flux vector Jacobians of the relativistic MHD equations, which are regular and span a complete basis in any physical state including degenerate ones. The renormalization procedure relies on the characterization of the degeneracy types in terms of the normal and tangential components of the magnetic field to the wave

Luis Antón; Juan A. Miralles; José M. Martí; José M. Ibáñez; Miguel A. Aloy; Petar Mimica

2010-01-01

57

RELATIVISTIC MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS: RENORMALIZED EIGENVECTORS AND FULL WAVE DECOMPOSITION RIEMANN SOLVER  

Microsoft Academic Search

We obtain renormalized sets of right and left eigenvectors of the flux vector Jacobians of the relativistic MHD equations, which are regular and span a complete basis in any physical state including degenerate ones. The renormalization procedure relies on the characterization of the degeneracy types in terms of the normal and tangential components of the magnetic field to the wave

Luis Anton; Jose M MartI; Jose M Ibanez; Miguel A. Aloy; Petar Mimica; Juan A. Miralles

2010-01-01

58

Relativistic collision operators for modeling noninductive current drive by waves  

SciTech Connect

A weakly relativistic Fokker-Planck operator for electron-electron collision was first used by Karney and Fisch to calculate the efficiencies of current drive by waves with fast phase velocity [C. F. F. Karney and N. J. Fisch, Phys. Fluids 28, 116 (1985)]. The present work extends Karney and Fisch's work by expressing the weakly relativistic collision operator in potential form, and working out a general Legendre expansion of the potential functions. This general Legendre expansion reproduces the results in Karney and Fisch's paper and is useful in implementing the weakly relativistic operator in Fokker-Planck codes. To justify the use of the weakly relativistic collision operator for current drive applications under ITER conditions, a comparison is made of current drive efficiencies predicted by this operator and a fully relativistic collision operator. Good agreement between efficiencies predicted by these two models is found. This suggests that the weakly relativistic collision operator is sufficiently precise for modeling the current drive schemes under ITER conditions.

Hu, Y. J.; Hu, Y. M. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031, China and Center for Magnetic Fusion Theory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Lin-Liu, Y. R. [Department of Physics and Center for Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, National Central University, Taiwan (China)

2011-02-15

59

Relativistic particle motion in nonuniform electromagnetic waves  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

It is shown that a charged particle moving in a strong nonuniform electromagnetic wave suffers a net acceleration in the direction of the negative intensity gradient of the wave. Electrons will be expelled perpendicularly from narrow laser beams and various instabilities can result.

Schmidt, G.; Wilcox, T.

1973-01-01

60

Study of Point Blast wave Instability in Numerical Experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The detection of cases demonstrating an unstable evolution of the point blast wave in perfect gas was the problem actually formulated since 1980s when it was found with the help of self-similar approach to stability problem that for cases of gas specific ratio ? being less than 1.20 bllast wave became unstable: the Rayleigh-Taylor type instability showed up at the shock front (Ref.1-3). Later these results were confirmed in computer experiments when 2D hydrodynamic code was used. This code selected shock wave front and used the 1-st order Godunov scheme. In this paper we set ourselves the task of doing that using 3D hydrodynamic code. So we carry out computer simulation of blast wave using 3D Eulerian code TREK (Ref.5,6). The other objective of computation is to determine if the regime of perturbation evolution depends on the second (angular) number of spherical harmonic. The computation geometry is as follows: At t=0, the initial pressure is set constant in the centre region, and the pressure is equal to zero beyond this region. The central region presents a slightly perturbed sphere: the value of sphere radius has a small perturbation proportional to spherical harmonic (Legendre polynomial). The entire material is ideal gas with density being equal of unit and ? = 1.1- 1.2. The perturbations considered are of reasonably high harmonic polar numbers n: n=16 and higher. Computation results are as follows: We prove the perturbation amplitude increase in case of n=16 and ? < 1.2 i.e. we get the direct proof of blast wave instability in these cases. We prove also that the perturbations evolution mode converts to the self-similar pattern in a short time (i.e. when the shock front radius increased by 3-4 times) independently from initial conditions and further proceeds according to the self-similar theory. We prove that oscillations period of non-axially symmetric harmonics is equal to that of axially symmetric ones with the same polar number n. We prove also that these periods are equal to that in self-similar theory (Ref.1-3). The non linear stage of evolution of blast wave axially symmetric perturbations is also studied. The computation of raising perturbations evolution is continued until the formation of singularities and jets on the axis of symmetry and their turbulizations. 1. V.Ktitorov, Voprosy Atomnoi Nauki i Tekhniki, Ser.TPF, No2, p.28, (1984); 2. D.Ryu and E.T.Vishniac, Astr.J, 313, p.820 (1987); 3. V.Ktitorov, Khimich. Fizika (Chem Phys Issues) V.14, No 2-3, p.169, (1995); 4. V.Ktitorov, V.Meltzas, Proceedings of the 6th IWPTM, p.251-258. 5. A.Stadnik, V.Tarasov, Yu. Yanilkin, Voprosy Atomnoi Nauki i Tekhniki, Ser.MMFP, No3, p.52, (1995); 6. Yu.Yanilkin et al., Proceedings of the 6th IWPTM,. p.520-526.

Ktitorov, Vladimir; Yanilkin, Yurii

1999-06-01

61

Radiative precursors driven by converging blast waves in noble gases  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A detailed study of the radiative precursor that develops ahead of converging blast waves in gas-filled cylindrical liner z-pinch experiments is presented. The experiment is capable of magnetically driving 20 km s-1 blast waves through gases of densities of the order 10-5 g cm-3 (see Burdiak et al. [High Energy Density Phys. 9(1), 52-62 (2013)] for a thorough description). Data were collected for Ne, Ar, and Xe gas-fills. The geometry of the setup allows a determination of the plasma parameters both in the precursor and across the shock, along a nominally uniform line of sight that is perpendicular to the propagation of the shock waves. Radiation from the shock was able to excite NeI, ArII, and XeII/XeIII precursor spectral features. It is shown that the combination of interferometry and optical spectroscopy data is inconsistent with upstream plasmas being in LTE. Specifically, electron density gradients do not correspond to any apparent temperature change in the emission spectra. Experimental data are compared to 1D radiation hydrodynamics HELIOS-CR simulations and to PrismSPECT atomic physics calculations to assist in a physical interpretation of the observations. We show that upstream plasma is likely in the process of being radiatively heated and that the emission from a small percentage of ionised atoms within a cool background plasma dominates the emission spectra. Experiments were carried out on the MAGPIE and COBRA pulsed-power facilities at Imperial College London and Cornell University, respectively.

Burdiak, G. C.; Lebedev, S. V.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Swadling, G. F.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Hall, G. N.; Khoory, E.; Pickworth, L.; Bland, S. N.; de Grouchy, P.; Skidmore, J.; Suttle, L.; Bennett, M.; Niasse, N. P. L.; Williams, R. J. R.; Blesener, K.; Atoyan, L.; Cahill, A.; Hoyt, C.; Potter, W.; Rosenberg, E.; Schrafel, P.; Kusse, B.

2014-03-01

62

Channeling of relativistic laser pulses, surface waves, and electron acceleration.  

PubMed

The interaction of a high-energy relativistic laser pulse with an underdense plasma is studied by means of 3-dimensional particle in cell simulations and theoretical analysis. For powers above the threshold for channeling, the laser pulse propagates as a single mode in an electron-free channel during a time of the order of 1 picosecond. The steep laser front gives rise to the excitation of a surface wave along the sharp boundaries of the ion channel. The surface wave first traps electrons at the channel wall and preaccelerates them to relativistic energies. These particles then have enough energy to be further accelerated in a second stage through an interplay between the acceleration due to the betatron resonance and the acceleration caused by the longitudinal part of the surface wave electric field. It is necessary to introduce this two-stage process to explain the large number of high-energy electrons observed in the simulations. PMID:22463415

Naseri, N; Pesme, D; Rozmus, W; Popov, K

2012-03-01

63

New wave equation for ultra-relativistic particles  

E-print Network

In this letter we present a novel wave equation for ultra-relativistic matter, particles that satisfy the condition, $p>>m$, and whose energy-momentum relation can therefore be approximated by the relation, $E\\simeq p+\\frac{m^{2}}{2p}$. We discuss the implications of this wave equation and analyse their possible solutions. In particular, it is found that the plane-wave solution is completely consistent with the theory of neutrino oscillations. On the other hand, we also provide the Lagrangian formulation and discuss the associated conservation laws.

Ginés R. Pérez Teruel

2014-07-28

64

Rarefaction wave in relativistic steady magnetohydrodynamic flows  

E-print Network

We construct and analyze a model of the relativistic steady-state magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) rarefaction that is induced when a planar symmetric flow (with one ignorable Cartesian coordinate) propagates under a steep drop of the external pressure profile. Using the method of self-similarity we derive a system of ordinary differential equations that describe the flow dynamics. In the specific limit of an initially homogeneous flow we also provide analytical results and accurate scaling laws. We consider that limit as a generalization of the previous Newtonian and hydrodynamic solutions already present in the literature. The model includes magnetic field and bulk flow speed having all components, whose role is explored with a parametric study.

Sapountzis, Konstantinos

2014-01-01

65

Supernova blast wave within a stellar cluster outflow  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we develop a semi-analytic model of a supernova which goes off in the centre of a stellar cluster. The supernova remnant interacts with a stratified, pre-existent outflow produced by the winds of the cluster stars. We compare our semi-analytic model with numerical simulations using the spherically symmetric Euler equations with appropriate mass and energy source terms. We find good agreement between these two approaches, and we find that for typical parameters the blast wave is likely to reach the Taylor-Sedov regime outside the cluster radius. We also calculate the predicted X-ray luminosity of the flow as a function of time, and we obtain its dependence on the outer radius and the number of stars of the cluster.

Rodríguez-Ramírez, J. C.; Raga, A. C.; Velázquez, P. F.; Rodríguez-González, A.; Toledo-Roy, J. C.

2014-11-01

66

Blast waves from violent explosive activity at Yasur Volcano, Vanuatu  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

and seismic waveforms were collected during violent strombolian activity at Yasur Volcano (Vanuatu). Averaging ~3000 seismic events showed stable waveforms, evidencing a low-frequency (0.1-0.3 Hz) signal preceding ~5-6 s the explosion. Infrasonic waveforms were mostly asymmetric with a sharp compressive (5-106 Pa) onset, followed by a small long-lasting rarefaction phase. Regardless of the pressure amplitude, the ratio between the positive and negative phases was constant. These waveform characteristics closely resembled blast waves. Infrared imagery showed an apparent cold spherical front ~20 m thick, which moved between 342 and 405 m/s before the explosive hot gas/fragments cloud. We interpret this cold front as that produced by the vapor condensation induced by the passage of the shock front. We suggest that violent strombolian activity at Yasur was driven by supersonic dynamics with gas expanding at 1.1 Mach number inside the conduit.

Marchetti, E.; Ripepe, M.; Delle Donne, D.; Genco, R.; Finizola, A.; Garaebiti, E.

2013-11-01

67

Parametric instability of a relativistically strong electromagnetic wave.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The stability of a circularly polarized electromagnetic wave that is strong enough to make plasma electrons, but not ions, relativistic is studied. Small perturbations are considered which propagate parallel to the large-amplitude driver. A relativistically strong wave can be unstable on time scales as short as twice its own oscillation period, and decays into a forward-going plasma oscillation and either one or two electromagnetic waves. Ion motion introduces an additional instability which can be important at short perturbation wavelengths, where the driver would otherwise be stable. The unstable ion and electron modes both have potential for producing anomalously large acceleration of relativistic particles, as well as significant amounts of backscattered light. These effects may be important in two applications: (1) the use of intense lasers to heat or compress plasma, and (2) the plasma surrounding a pulsar, if the pulsar is losing energy by radiation of electromagnetic waves at its rotation frequency. Instability persists in the nonrelativistic regime, reducing to stimulated Raman scattering as a special case.

Max, C. E.

1973-01-01

68

SPIKE PENETRATION IN BLAST-WAVE-DRIVEN INSTABILITIES  

SciTech Connect

The problem of interest is the unstable growth of structure at density transitions affected by blast waves, which arise in natural environments such as core-collapse supernovae and in laboratory experiments. The resulting spikes of dense material, which penetrate the less dense material, develop broadened tips, but the degree of broadening varies substantially across both experiments and simulations. The variable broadening presumably produces variations in the drag experienced by the spike tips as they penetrate the less dense material. The present work has used semianalytic theory to address the question of how the variation in drag might affect the spike penetration, for cases in which the post-shock interface deceleration can be described by a power law in a normalized time variable. It did so by following the evolution of structure on the interface through the initial shock passage, the subsequent small-amplitude phase of Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth, and the later phase in which the spike growth involves the competition of buoyancy and drag. In all phases, the expansion of the system during its evolution was accounted for and was important. The calculated spike length is strongly affected by the drag attributed to spike tip broadening. One finds from such a calculation that it is not unreasonable for narrow spikes to keep up with the shock front of the blast wave. The implication is that the accuracy of prediction of spike penetration and consequent structure by simulations very likely depends on how accurately they treat the broadening of the spike tips and the associated drag. Experimental validation of spike morphology in simulations would be useful.

Drake, R. P., E-mail: rpdrake@umich.edu [Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Science, and Applied Physics, University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

2012-01-10

69

Spike morphology in blast-wave-driven instability experiments  

SciTech Connect

The laboratory experiments described in the present paper observe the blast-wave-driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability with three-dimensional (3D) initial conditions. About 5 kJ of energy from the Omega laser creates conditions similar to those of the He-H interface during the explosion phase of a supernova. The experimental target is a 150 {mu}m thick plastic disk followed by a low-density foam. The plastic piece has an embedded, 3D perturbation. The basic structure of the pattern is two orthogonal sine waves where each sine wave has an amplitude of 2.5 {mu}m and a wavelength of 71 {mu}m. In some experiments, an additional wavelength is added to explore the interaction of modes. In experiments with 3D initial conditions the spike morphology differs from what has been observed in other Rayleigh-Taylor experiments and simulations. Under certain conditions, experimental radiographs show some mass extending from the interface to the shock front. Current simulations show neither the spike morphology nor the spike penetration observed in the experiments. The amount of mass reaching the shock front is analyzed and potential causes for the spike morphology and the spikes reaching the shock are discussed. One such hypothesis is that these phenomena may be caused by magnetic pressure, generated by an azimuthal magnetic field produced by the plasma dynamics.

Kuranz, C. C.; Drake, R. P.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Fryxell, B.; Budde, A. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Science, Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics, University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Hansen, J. F.; Miles, A. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Plewa, T. [Department of Scientific Computing, Florida State University, 400 Dirac Science Library, Tallahassee, Florida 32306 (United States); Hearn, N. [Center for Astrophysical Thermonuclear Flashes, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Knauer, J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

2010-05-15

70

Dispersion of waves in relativistic plasmas with isotropic particle distributions  

SciTech Connect

The dispersion laws of Langmuir and transverse waves are calculated in the relativistic nonmagnetized formalism for several isotropic particle distributions: thermal, power law, relativistic Lorentzian {kappa}, and hybrid {beta}. For Langmuir waves the parameters of superluminal undamped, subluminal damped principal, and higher modes are determined for a range of distribution parameters. The undamped and principal damped modes are found to match smoothly. Principal damped and second damped modes are found not to match smoothly. The presence of maximum wavenumber is discovered above that no longitudinal modes formally exist. The higher damped modes are discovered to be qualitatively different for thermal and certain nonthermal distributions. Consistently with the known results, the Landau damping is calculated to be stronger for nonthermal power-law-like distributions. The dispersion law is obtained for the single undamped transverse mode. The analytic results for the simplest distributions are provided.

Shcherbakov, Roman V. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

2009-03-15

71

Jet and vortex flow induced by anisotropic blast wave: experimental and computational study  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   This paper discusses gas-dynamic aspects of intense explosions in uniform environments. In experiments, the energy of a laser\\u000a is almost instantaneously released in a volume of air shaped as either a flattened or stretched cylinder generating a blast\\u000a wave. Its shape evolves in time and ultimately becomes spherical. But momentum transferred to the air when the blast wave\\u000a is

V. Svetsov; M. Popova; V. Rybakov; V. Artemiev; S. Medveduk

1997-01-01

72

Chaotic Motion of Relativistic Electrons Driven by Whistler Waves  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Canonical equations governing an electron motion in electromagnetic field of the whistler mode waves propagating along the direction of an ambient magnetic field are derived. The physical processes on which the equations of motion are based .are identified. It is shown that relativistic electrons interacting with these fields demonstrate chaotic motion, which is accompanied by the particle stochastic heating and significant pitch angle diffusion. Evolution of distribution functions is described by the Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov equations. It is shown that the whistler mode waves could provide a viable mechanism for stochastic energization of electrons with energies up to 50 MeV in the Jovian magnetosphere.

Khazanov, G. V.; Telnikhin, A. A.; Kronberg, Tatiana K.

2007-01-01

73

Whistler wave generation by non-gyrotropic, relativistic, electron beams  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Particle-in-cell code, EPOCH, is used for studying features of the wave component evident to propagate backwards from the front of the non-gyrotropic, relativistic beam of electrons injected in the Maxwellian, magnetised background plasma with decreasing density profile. According to recent findings presented in Tsiklauri [Phys. Plasmas 18, 052903 (2011)], Schmitz and Tsiklauri [Phys. Plasmas 20, 062903 (2013)], and Pechhacker and Tsiklauri [Phys. Plasmas 19, 112903 (2012)], in a 1.5-dimensional magnetised plasma system, the non-gyrotropic beam generates freely escaping electromagnetic radiation with properties similar to the Type-III solar radio bursts. In this study, the backwards propagating wave component evident in the perpendicular components of the electromagnetic field in such a system is presented for the first time. Background magnetic field strength in the system is varied in order to prove that the backwards propagating wave's frequency, prescribed by the whistler wave dispersion relation, is proportional to the specified magnetic field. Moreover, the identified whistlers are shown to be generated by the normal Doppler-shifted relativistic resonance. Large fraction of the energy of the perpendicular electromagnetic field components is found to be carried away by the whistler waves, while a small but sufficient fraction is going into L- and R-electromagnetic modes.

Skender, M.; Tsiklauri, D.

2014-04-01

74

Dual Band Relativistic Backward Wave Oscillator with Gaussian Radiation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Generating dual-band signals using a relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO) with a two-section slow wave structure is attractive to many applications such as plasma diagnostics and sounding systems. Using different sections in the RBWO provides a change of the synchronism conditions and as a result two microwave frequencies at C-band and X-band have been produced at the output. The synchronism condition can be provided by variation of the corrugated waveguide period. In this abstract, a two-spiral corrugated and a sinusoidal structures have been used as two sections to produce the frequency bands. The slow wave structures have been designed analytically and the simulation results verified the analytics. The RBWO is generating a microwave signal that propagates backwards, so the two-spiral corrugated structure acts as a reflector. This reflector gives the ability to extract the signals azimuthally. Two dominant frequencies at 7GHz and 10GHz have been found with a microwave power of megawatts and with a Gaussian beam. The simulations show that the two beam-wave interaction regions work independently. The fully electromagnetic, fully relativistic particle-in-cell (PIC) code MAGIC was used to simulate the device with a voltage pulse 460kV and with a 2T axial magnetic field.

Elfrgani, Ahmed; Vadiee, Ehsan; Prasad, Sarita; Fuks, Mikhail; Schamiloglu, Edl

2012-10-01

75

Blast shock wave mitigation using the hydraulic energy redirection and release technology.  

PubMed

A hydraulic energy redirection and release technology has been developed for mitigating the effects of blast shock waves on protected objects. The technology employs a liquid-filled plastic tubing as a blast overpressure transformer to transfer kinetic energy of blast shock waves into hydraulic energy in the plastic tubings. The hydraulic energy is redirected through the plastic tubings to the openings at the lower ends, and then is quickly released with the liquid flowing out through the openings. The samples of the specifically designed body armor in which the liquid-filled plastic tubings were installed vertically as the outer layer of the body armor were tested. The blast test results demonstrated that blast overpressure behind the body armor samples was remarkably reduced by 97% in 0.2 msec after the liquid flowed out of its appropriate volume through the openings. The results also suggested that a volumetric liquid surge might be created when kinetic energy of blast shock wave was transferred into hydraulic energy to cause a rapid physical movement or displacement of the liquid. The volumetric liquid surge has a strong destructive power, and can cause a noncontact, remote injury in humans (such as blast-induced traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder) if it is created in cardiovascular system. The hydraulic energy redirection and release technology can successfully mitigate blast shock waves from the outer surface of the body armor. It should be further explored as an innovative approach to effectively protect against blast threats to civilian and military personnel. PMID:22745740

Chen, Yun; Huang, Wei; Constantini, Shlomi

2012-01-01

76

Blast Shock Wave Mitigation Using the Hydraulic Energy Redirection and Release Technology  

PubMed Central

A hydraulic energy redirection and release technology has been developed for mitigating the effects of blast shock waves on protected objects. The technology employs a liquid-filled plastic tubing as a blast overpressure transformer to transfer kinetic energy of blast shock waves into hydraulic energy in the plastic tubings. The hydraulic energy is redirected through the plastic tubings to the openings at the lower ends, and then is quickly released with the liquid flowing out through the openings. The samples of the specifically designed body armor in which the liquid-filled plastic tubings were installed vertically as the outer layer of the body armor were tested. The blast test results demonstrated that blast overpressure behind the body armor samples was remarkably reduced by 97% in 0.2 msec after the liquid flowed out of its appropriate volume through the openings. The results also suggested that a volumetric liquid surge might be created when kinetic energy of blast shock wave was transferred into hydraulic energy to cause a rapid physical movement or displacement of the liquid. The volumetric liquid surge has a strong destructive power, and can cause a noncontact, remote injury in humans (such as blast-induced traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder) if it is created in cardiovascular system. The hydraulic energy redirection and release technology can successfully mitigate blast shock waves from the outer surface of the body armor. It should be further explored as an innovative approach to effectively protect against blast threats to civilian and military personnel. PMID:22745740

Chen, Yun; Huang, Wei; Constantini, Shlomi

2012-01-01

77

DYNAMICS AND AFTERGLOW LIGHT CURVES OF GAMMA-RAY BURST BLAST WAVES WITH A LONG-LIVED REVERSE SHOCK  

SciTech Connect

We perform a detailed study on the dynamics of a relativistic blast wave with the presence of a long-lived reverse shock (RS). Although a short-lived RS has been widely considered, the RS is believed to be long-lived as a consequence of a stratification expected on the ejecta Lorentz factors. The existence of a long-lived RS causes the forward shock (FS) dynamics to deviate from a self-similar Blandford-McKee solution. Employing the ''mechanical model'' that correctly incorporates the energy conservation, we present an accurate solution for both the FS and RS dynamics. We conduct a sophisticated calculation of the afterglow emission. Adopting a Lagrangian description of the blast wave, we keep track of an adiabatic evolution of numerous shells between the FS and RS. An evolution of the electron spectrum is also followed individually for every shell. We then find the FS and RS light curves by integrating over the entire FS and RS shocked regions, respectively. Exploring a total of 20 different ejecta stratifications, we explain in detail how a stratified ejecta affects its blast wave dynamics and afterglow light curves. We show that, while the FS light curves are not sensitive to the ejecta stratifications, the RS light curves exhibit much richer features, including steep declines, plateaus, bumps, re-brightenings, and a variety of temporal decay indices. These distinctive RS features may be observable if the RS has higher values of the microphysics parameters than the FS. We discuss possible applications of our results in understanding the gamma-ray burst afterglow data.

Uhm, Z. Lucas; Zhang Bing [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada-Las Vegas, 4505 South Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States); Hascoeet, Romain; Daigne, Frederic; Mochkovitch, Robert [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095 Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-CNRS, 98 bis Boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Park, Il H., E-mail: uhm@physics.unlv.edu [Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-12-20

78

Full-Trajectory Diagnosis of Laser-Driven Radiative Blast Waves in Search of Thermal Plasma Instabilities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Experimental investigations into the dynamics of cylindrical, laser-driven, high-Mach-number shocks are used to study the thermal cooling instability predicted to occur in astrophysical radiative blast waves. A streaked Schlieren technique measures the full blast-wave trajectory on a single-shot basis, which is key for observing shock velocity oscillations. Electron density profiles and deceleration parameters associated with radiative blast waves were recorded, enabling the calculation of important blast-wave parameters including the fraction of radiated energy, ?, as a function of time for comparison with radiation-hydrodynamics simulations.

Moore, A. S.; Gumbrell, E. T.; Lazarus, J.; Hohenberger, M.; Robinson, J. S.; Smith, R. A.; Plant, T. J. A.; Symes, D. R.; Dunne, M.

2008-02-01

79

Full-trajectory diagnosis of laser-driven radiative blast waves in search of thermal plasma instabilities.  

PubMed

Experimental investigations into the dynamics of cylindrical, laser-driven, high-Mach-number shocks are used to study the thermal cooling instability predicted to occur in astrophysical radiative blast waves. A streaked Schlieren technique measures the full blast-wave trajectory on a single-shot basis, which is key for observing shock velocity oscillations. Electron density profiles and deceleration parameters associated with radiative blast waves were recorded, enabling the calculation of important blast-wave parameters including the fraction of radiated energy, epsilon, as a function of time for comparison with radiation-hydrodynamics simulations. PMID:18352379

Moore, A S; Gumbrell, E T; Lazarus, J; Hohenberger, M; Robinson, J S; Smith, R A; Plant, T J A; Symes, D R; Dunne, M

2008-02-01

80

Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamics: Renormalized eigenvectors and full wave decomposition Riemann solver  

E-print Network

We obtain renormalized sets of right and left eigenvectors of the flux vector Jacobians of the relativistic MHD equations, which are regular and span a complete basis in any physical state including degenerate ones. The renormalization procedure relies on the characterization of the degeneracy types in terms of the normal and tangential components of the magnetic field to the wavefront in the fluid rest frame. Proper expressions of the renormalized eigenvectors in conserved variables are obtained through the corresponding matrix transformations. Our work completes previous analysis that present different sets of right eigenvectors for non-degenerate and degenerate states, and can be seen as a relativistic generalization of earlier work performed in classical MHD. Based on the full wave decomposition (FWD) provided by the the renormalized set of eigenvectors in conserved variables, we have also developed a linearized (Roe-type) Riemann solver. Extensive testing against one- and two-dimensional standard numeric...

Anton, L; Marti, J M; Ibanez, J M; Aloy, M A; Mimica, P

2009-01-01

81

EFFECT OF INTERACTING RAREFACTION WAVES ON RELATIVISTICALLY HOT JETS  

SciTech Connect

The effect of rarefaction acceleration on the propagation dynamics and structure of relativistically hot jets is studied through relativistic hydrodynamic simulations. We emphasize the nonlinear interaction of rarefaction waves excited at the interface between a cylindrical jet and the surrounding medium. From simplified one-dimensional (1D) models with radial jet structure, we find that a decrease in the relativistic pressure due to the interacting rarefaction waves in the central zone of the jet transiently yields a more powerful boost of the bulk jet than that expected from single rarefaction acceleration. This leads to a cyclic in situ energy conversion between thermal and bulk kinetic energies, which induces radial oscillating motion of the jet. The oscillation timescale is characterized by the initial pressure ratio of the jet to the ambient medium and follows a simple scaling relation, {tau}{sub oscillation}{proportional_to}(P{sub jet,0}/P{sub amb,0}){sup 1/2}. Extended two-dimensional simulations confirm that this radial oscillating motion in the 1D system manifests as modulation of the structure of the jet in a more realistic situation where a relativistically hot jet propagates through an ambient medium. We find that when the ambient medium has a power-law pressure distribution, the size of the reconfinement region along the propagation direction of the jet in the modulation structure {lambda} evolves according to a self-similar relation {lambda}{proportional_to}t{sup {alpha}/2}, where {alpha} is the power-law index of the pressure distribution.

Matsumoto, Jin; Shibata, Kazunari [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Masada, Youhei, E-mail: jin@kusastro.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of System Informatics, Department of Computational Science, Kobe University, Kobe (Japan)

2012-06-01

82

A blast wave from the 1843 eruption of ? Carinae  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Very massive stars shed much of their mass in violent precursor eruptions as luminous blue variables (LBVs) before reaching their most likely end as supernovae, but the cause of LBV eruptions is unknown. The nineteenth-century eruption of ? Carinae, the prototype of these events, ejected about 12 solar masses at speeds of 650kms-1, with a kinetic energy of almost 1050erg (ref. 4). Some faster material with speeds up to 1,000-2,000kms-1 had previously been reported but its full distribution was unknown. Here I report observations of much faster material with speeds up to 3,500-6,000kms-1, reaching farther from the star than the fastest material in previous reports. This fast material roughly doubles the kinetic energy of the nineteenth-century event and suggests that it released a blast wave now propagating ahead of the massive ejecta. As a result, ? Carinae's outer shell now mimics a low-energy supernova remnant. The eruption has usually been discussed in terms of an extreme wind driven by the star's luminosity, but the fast material reported here indicates that it may have been powered by a deep-seated explosion rivalling a supernova, perhaps triggered by the pulsational pair instability. This may alter interpretations of similar events seen in other galaxies.

Smith, Nathan

2008-09-01

83

Numerical study of water mitigation effects on blast wave  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The mitigating effect of a water wall on the generation and propagation of blast waves of a nearby explosive has been investigated using a numerical approach. A multimaterial Eulerian finite element technique is used to study the influence of the design parameters, such as the water-to-explosive weight ratio, the water wall thickness, the air-gap and the cover area ratio of water on the effectiveness of the water mitigation concept. In the computational model, the detonation gases are modelled with the standard Jones Wilkins Lee (JWL) equation of state. Water, on the other hand, is treated as a compressible fluid with the Mie Gruneisen equation of state model. The validity of the computational model is checked against a limited amount of available experimental data, and the influence of mesh sizes on the convergence of results is also discussed. From the results of the extensive numerical experiments, it is deduced that firstly, the presence of an air-gap reduces the effectiveness of the water mitigator. Secondly, the higher the water-to-explosive weight ratio, the more significant is the reduction in peak pressure of the explosion. Typically, water-to-explosive weight ratios in the range of 1 3 are found to be most practical.

Cheng, M.; Hung, K. C.; Chong, O. Y.

2005-11-01

84

A Blast Wave from the 1843 Eruption of Eta Carinae  

E-print Network

Very massive stars shed much of their mass in violent precursor eruptions as luminous blue variables (LBVs) before reaching their most likely end as supernovae, but the cause of LBV eruptions is unknown. The 19th century eruption of Eta Carinae, the prototype of these events, ejected about 12 solar masses at speeds of 650 km/s, with a kinetic energy of almost 10^50 ergs. Some faster material with speeds up to 1000-2000 km/s had previously been reported but its full distribution was unknown. Here I report observations of much faster material with speeds up to 3500-6000 km/s, reaching farther from the star than the fastest material in earlier reports. This fast material roughly doubles the kinetic energy of the 19th century event, and suggests that it released a blast wave now propagating ahead of the massive ejecta. Thus, Eta Car's outer shell now mimics a low-energy supernova remnant. The eruption has usually been discussed in terms of an extreme wind driven by the star's luminosity, but fast material reported here suggests that it was powered by a deep-seated explosion rivalling a supernova, perhaps triggered by the pulsational pair instability. This may alter interpretations of similar events seen in other galaxies.

Nathan Smith

2008-09-09

85

Impact! Chandra Images a Young Supernova Blast Wave  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two images made by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, one in October 1999, the other in January 2000, show for the first time the full impact of the actual blast wave from Supernova 1987A (SN1987A). The observations are the first time that X-rays from a shock wave have been imaged at such an early stage of a supernova explosion. Recent observations of SN 1987A with the Hubble Space Telescope revealed gradually brightening hot spots from a ring of matter ejected by the star thousands of years before it exploded. Chandra's X-ray images show the cause for this brightening ring. A shock wave is smashing into portions of the ring at a speed of 10 million miles per hour (4,500 kilometers per second). The gas behind the shock wave has a temperature of about ten million degrees Celsius, and is visible only with an X-ray telescope. "With Hubble we heard the whistle from the oncoming train," said David Burrows of Pennsylvania State University, University Park, the leader of the team of scientists involved in analyzing the Chandra data on SN 1987A. "Now, with Chandra, we can see the train." The X-ray observations appear to confirm the general outlines of a model developed by team member Richard McCray of the University of Colorado, Boulder, and others, which holds that a shock wave has been moving out ahead of the debris expelled by the explosion. As this shock wave collides with material outside the ring, it heats it to millions of degrees. "We are witnessing the birth of a supernova remnant for the first time," McCray said. The Chandra images clearly show the previously unseen, shock-heated matter just inside the optical ring. Comparison with observations made with Chandra in October and January, and with Hubble in February 2000, show that the X-ray emission peaks close to the newly discovered optical hot spots, and indicate that the wave is beginning to hit the ring. In the next few years, the shock wave will light up still more material in the ring, and an inward moving, or reverse, shock wave will heat the material ejected in the explosion itself. "The supernova is digging up its own past," said McCray. The observations were made on October 6, 1999, using the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) and the High Energy Transmission Grating, and again on January 17, 2000, using ACIS. Other members of the team were Eli Michael of the University of Colorado; Dr. Una Hwang, Dr. Steven Holt and Dr. Rob Petre of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD; Professor Roger Chevalier of the University of Virginia, Charlottesville; and Professors Gordon Garmire and John Nousek of Pennsylvania State University. The results will be published in an upcoming issue of the Astrophysical Journal. The ACIS instrument was built for NASA by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, and Pennsylvania State University. The High Energy Transmission Grating was built by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL, manages the Chandra program. TRW, Inc., Redondo Beach, CA, is the prime contractor for the spacecraft. The Smithsonian's Chandra X-ray Center controls science and flight operations from Cambridge, MA. More About SN 1987A Images to illustrate this release and more information on Chandra's progress can be found on the Internet at: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2000/sn1987a/index.html AND http://chandra.nasa.gov More About SN 1987A

2000-05-01

86

Electrostatic rogue-waves in relativistically degenerate plasmas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we investigate the modulational instability and the possibility of electrostatic rogue-wave propagations in a completely degenerate plasma with arbitrary degree of degeneracy, i.e., relativistically degenerate plasma, ranging from solid density to the astrophysical compact stars. The hydrodynamic approach along with the perturbation method is used to reduce the governing equations to the nonlinear Schrödinger equation from which the modulational instability, the growth rate of envelope excitations and the occurrence of rogue as well as super-rogue waves in the plasma, is evaluated. It is observed that the modulational instability in a fully degenerate plasma can be quite sensitive to the plasma number-density and the wavenumber of envelop excitations. It is further revealed that the relativistically degeneracy plasmas (R0 > 1) are almost always modulationally unstable. It is found, however, that the highly energetic sharply localized electrostatic rogue as well as super-rogue waves can exist in the astrophysical compact objects like white dwarfs and neutron star crusts. The later may provide a link to understand many physical processes in such stars and it may lead us to the origin of the random-localized intense short gamma-ray bursts, which "appear from nowhere and disappear without a trace" quite similar to oceanic rogue structures.

Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

2014-10-01

87

Investigating EMIC Waves as a Precipitation Mechanism for Relativistic Electrons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Loss processes greatly impact the dynamics of the Earth's radiation belts. In 1996, a balloon-borne germanium detector flown over Kiruna, Sweden detected the first terrestrial X-rays with energies on the order of 1 MeV. The spectrum for these bursts was very flat, consistent with bremsstrahlung emissions from relativistic electron precipitation (REP) into Earth's atmosphere. A subsequent balloon campaign, MAXIS, launched from Antarctica in Jan. of 2000, showed that REP represents a significant loss process in the outer radiation belts. Because of the duskside location of these events, it was hypothesized that electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves may be the scattering mechanism. Theoretical studies have indicated wave-particle interactions of electron with EMIC waves as a major precipitation mechanism. However, observational studies have not conclusively demonstrated that EMIC waves are the primary loss mechanism for duskside REP. This dissertation investigates whether EMIC waves are the precipitation mechanism for duskside relativistic electron precipitation. As part of this investigation, the MINIS balloon campaign was conducted in January of 2005 to obtain the first multi-point measurements, of REP. Two REP events, one from MAXIS and one from the MINIS balloon observations, are selected for a detailed study. Supporting spacecraft wave observations show magnetospheric conditions are favorable for wave growth. A linear dispersion code solver, WHAMP, along with satellite measurements are used to show what conditions are needed to drive the minimum resonant electron energy low enough to be comparable with REP observations. Comparison of these energies with results from the cold dispersion relation shows the cold plasma approximation is a good approximation for frequencies far from the ion cyclotron frequency. Evidence that supports EMIC waves as the precipitation mechanism for REP such as proton precipitation concurrent with MINIS REP events and relative location to cold plasmaspheric regions will be presented. Finally, ULF modulation of the precipitation that has been previously reported is investigated to show that toroidal mode waves are most likely the waves linked to the modulation in the balloon detected REP.

Woodger, Leslie A.

88

Interaction between blast wave and reticulated foam: assessing the potential for auditory protection systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Injuries to the tympanic membrane (ear drum) are particularly common in individuals subjected to blast overpressure such as military personnel engaged in conflict. Here, the interaction between blast wave and reticulated foams of varying density and thickness has been investigated using shock tube apparatus. The degree of mitigation afforded by the foam samples is discussed in relation to an injury threshold which has been suggested by others for the tympanic membrane.

Wilgeroth, J. M.; Nguyen, T.-T. N.; Proud, W. G.

2014-05-01

89

Relativistic shock waves and the excitation of plerions  

SciTech Connect

The shock termination of a relativistic magnetohydrodynamic wind from a pulsar is the most interesting and viable model for the excitation of the synchrotron sources observed in plerionic supernova remnants. We have studied the structure of relativistic magnetosonic shock waves in plasmas composed purely of electrons and positrons, as well as those whose composition includes heavy ions as a minority constituent by number. We find that relativistic shocks in symmetric pair plasmas create fully thermalized distributions of particles and fields downstream. Therefore, such shocks are not good candidates for the mechanism which converts rotational energy lost from a pulsar into the nonthermal synchrotron emission observed in plerions. However, when the upstream wind contains heavy ions which are minority constituent by number density, but carry the bulk of the energy density, much of the energy of the shock goes into a downstream, nonthermal power law distribution of positrons with energy distribution N(E)dE {proportional to}E{sup {minus}s}. In a specific model presented in some detail, s = 3. These characteristics are close to those assumed for the pairs in macroscopic MHD wind models of plerion excitation. The essential mechanism is collective synchrotron emission of left-handed extraordinary modes by the ions in the shock front at high harmonics of the ion cyclotron frequency, with the downstream positrons preferentially absorbing almost all of this radiation, mostly at their fundamental (relativistic) cyclotron frequencies. Possible applications to models of plerions and to constraints on theories of energy loss from pulsars are briefly outlines. 27 refs., 5 figs.

Arons, J. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA)); Gallant, Y.A. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA). Dept. of Physics); Hoshino, Masahiro; Max, C.E. (California Univ., Livermore, CA (USA). Inst. of Geophysics and Planetary Physics); Langdon, A.B. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

1991-01-07

90

A powerful reflector in relativistic backward wave oscillator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An improved TM021 resonant reflector is put forward. Similarly with most of the slow wave structures used in relativistic backward wave oscillator, the section plane of the proposed reflector is designed to be trapezoidal. Compared with the rectangular TM021 resonant reflector, such a structure can depress RF breakdown more effectively by weakening the localized field convergence and realizing good electrostatic insulation. As shown in the high power microwave (HPM) generation experiments, with almost the same output power obtained by the previous structure, the improved structure can increase the pulse width from 25 ns to over 27 ns and no obvious surface damage is observed even if the generated HPM pulses exceed 1000 shots.

Cao, Yibing; Sun, Jun; Teng, Yan; Zhang, Yuchuan; Zhang, Lijun; Shi, Yanchao; Ye, Hu; Chen, Changhua

2014-09-01

91

RELATIVISTIC MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS: RENORMALIZED EIGENVECTORS AND FULL WAVE DECOMPOSITION RIEMANN SOLVER  

SciTech Connect

We obtain renormalized sets of right and left eigenvectors of the flux vector Jacobians of the relativistic MHD equations, which are regular and span a complete basis in any physical state including degenerate ones. The renormalization procedure relies on the characterization of the degeneracy types in terms of the normal and tangential components of the magnetic field to the wave front in the fluid rest frame. Proper expressions of the renormalized eigenvectors in conserved variables are obtained through the corresponding matrix transformations. Our work completes previous analysis that present different sets of right eigenvectors for non-degenerate and degenerate states, and can be seen as a relativistic generalization of earlier work performed in classical MHD. Based on the full wave decomposition (FWD) provided by the renormalized set of eigenvectors in conserved variables, we have also developed a linearized (Roe-type) Riemann solver. Extensive testing against one- and two-dimensional standard numerical problems allows us to conclude that our solver is very robust. When compared with a family of simpler solvers that avoid the knowledge of the full characteristic structure of the equations in the computation of the numerical fluxes, our solver turns out to be less diffusive than HLL and HLLC, and comparable in accuracy to the HLLD solver. The amount of operations needed by the FWD solver makes it less efficient computationally than those of the HLL family in one-dimensional problems. However, its relative efficiency increases in multidimensional simulations.

Anton, Luis; MartI, Jose M; Ibanez, Jose M; Aloy, Miguel A.; Mimica, Petar [Departamento de AstronomIa y AstrofIsica, Universidad de Valencia, 46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Miralles, Juan A. [Departament de Fisica Aplicada, Universitat d'Alacant, Ap. Correus 99, 03080 Alacant (Spain)

2010-05-01

92

Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamics: Renormalized Eigenvectors and Full Wave Decomposition Riemann Solver  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We obtain renormalized sets of right and left eigenvectors of the flux vector Jacobians of the relativistic MHD equations, which are regular and span a complete basis in any physical state including degenerate ones. The renormalization procedure relies on the characterization of the degeneracy types in terms of the normal and tangential components of the magnetic field to the wave front in the fluid rest frame. Proper expressions of the renormalized eigenvectors in conserved variables are obtained through the corresponding matrix transformations. Our work completes previous analysis that present different sets of right eigenvectors for non-degenerate and degenerate states, and can be seen as a relativistic generalization of earlier work performed in classical MHD. Based on the full wave decomposition (FWD) provided by the renormalized set of eigenvectors in conserved variables, we have also developed a linearized (Roe-type) Riemann solver. Extensive testing against one- and two-dimensional standard numerical problems allows us to conclude that our solver is very robust. When compared with a family of simpler solvers that avoid the knowledge of the full characteristic structure of the equations in the computation of the numerical fluxes, our solver turns out to be less diffusive than HLL and HLLC, and comparable in accuracy to the HLLD solver. The amount of operations needed by the FWD solver makes it less efficient computationally than those of the HLL family in one-dimensional problems. However, its relative efficiency increases in multidimensional simulations.

Antón, Luis; Miralles, Juan A.; Martí, José M.; Ibáñez, José M.; Aloy, Miguel A.; Mimica, Petar

2010-05-01

93

Steady-state solutions for relativistically strong electromagnetic waves in plasmas.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

New steady-state solutions are derived which describe electromagnetic waves strong enough to make plasma ions and electrons relativistic. A two-fluid model is used throughout. The following solutions are studied: (1) linearly polarized waves with phase velocity much greater than c; (2) arbitrarily polarized waves with phase velocity near c, in a cold uniform plasma; (3) circularly polarized waves in a uniform plasma characterized by a scalar pressure tensor. All of these waves are capable of propagating in normally overdense plasmas, due to nonlinearities introduced by relativistic effects. The propagation of relativistically strong waves in a density gradient is examined, for the example of a circularly polarized wave strong enough to make electrons but not ions relativistic. It is shown that such a wave propagates at constant energy flux despite the nonlinearity of the system.

Max, C. E.

1973-01-01

94

Blast-wave impact-mitigation capability of polyurea when used as helmet suspension-pad material  

E-print Network

work, the blast-wave impact-mitigation ability of polyurea when used as a helmet suspension-injury induced death. To assess the blast-wave impact-mitigation ability of polyurea, the temporal evolution strategies. A review of the literature carried out as part of the present work revealed that there is a clear

Grujicic, Mica

95

The Formation of a Blast Wave by a Very Intense Explosion. II. The Atomic Explosion of 1945  

E-print Network

The Formation of a Blast Wave by a Very Intense Explosion. II. The Atomic Explosion of 1945 of a blast wave by a very intense explosion. 11. The atomic explosion of 1945 BYSIRGEOBFREYTAYLOR,P.R.S. (Received 10 November 1949) [Plates 7 t o 91 Photographs by J.E. Mack of the first atomic explosion in New

Ravelet, Florent

96

Relativistic electron pitch-angle scattering by electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves during geomagnetic storms  

Microsoft Academic Search

During magnetic storms, relativistic electrons execute nearly circular orbits about the Earth and traverse a spatially confined zone within the duskside plasmapause where electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are preferentially excited. We examine the mechanism of electron pitch-angle diffusion by gyroresonant interaction with EMIC waves as a cause of relativistic electron precipitation loss from the outer radiation belt. Detailed calculations

Danny Summers; Richard M. Thorne

2003-01-01

97

Performance testing of lead free primers: blast waves, velocity variations, and environmental testing  

E-print Network

Results are presented for lead free primers based on diazodinitrophenol (DDNP)compared with tests on lead styphnate based primers. First, barrel friction measurements in 5.56 mm NATO are presented. Second, shot to shot variations in blast waves are presented as determined by detonating primers in a 7.62x51mm rifle chamber with a firing pin, but without any powder or bullet loaded and measuring the blast wave at the muzzle with a high speed pressure transducer. Third, variations in primer blast waves, muzzle velocities, and ignition delay are presented after environmental conditioning (150 days) for two lead based and two DDNP based primers under cold and dry (-25 deg C,0% relative humidity), ambient (20 deg C, 50% relative humidity), and hot & humid (50 deg C, 100% relative humidity) conditions in 5.56 mm NATO. Taken together, these results indicate that DDNP based primers are not sufficiently reliable for service use.

Courtney, Elya; Summer, Peter David; Courtney, Michael

2014-01-01

98

Oxy-acetylene driven laboratory scale shock tubes for studying blast wave effects.  

PubMed

This paper describes the development and characterization of modular, oxy-acetylene driven laboratory scale shock tubes. Such tools are needed to produce realistic blast waves in a laboratory setting. The pressure-time profiles measured at 1 MHz using high-speed piezoelectric pressure sensors have relevant durations and show a true shock front and exponential decay characteristic of free-field blast waves. Descriptions are included for shock tube diameters of 27-79 mm. A range of peak pressures from 204 kPa to 1187 kPa (with 0.5-5.6% standard error of the mean) were produced by selection of the driver section diameter and distance from the shock tube opening. The peak pressures varied predictably with distance from the shock tube opening while maintaining both a true blast wave profile and relevant pulse duration for distances up to about one diameter from the shock tube opening. This shock tube design provides a more realistic blast profile than current compression-driven shock tubes, and it does not have a large jet effect. In addition, operation does not require specialized personnel or facilities like most blast-driven shock tubes, which reduces operating costs and effort and permits greater throughput and accessibility. It is expected to be useful in assessing the response of various sensors to shock wave loading; assessing the reflection, transmission, and absorption properties of candidate armor materials; assessing material properties at high rates of loading; assessing the response of biological materials to shock wave exposure; and providing a means to validate numerical models of the interaction of shock waves with structures. All of these activities have been difficult to pursue in a laboratory setting due in part to lack of appropriate means to produce a realistic blast loading profile. PMID:22559580

Courtney, Amy C; Andrusiv, Lubov P; Courtney, Michael W

2012-04-01

99

Asymmetric modes decomposition in an overmoded relativistic backward wave oscillator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Most of the investigated overmoded relativistic backward wave oscillators (RBWOs) are azimuthally symmetric; thus, they are designed through two dimensional (2-D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. However, 2-D PIC simulations cannot reveal the effect of asymmetric modes on beam-wave interaction. In order to investigate whether asymmetric mode competition needs to be considered in the design of overmoded RBWOs, a numerical method of determining the composition of both symmetric and asymmetric modes in three dimensional (3-D) PIC simulations is introduced in this paper. The 2-D and 3-D PIC simulation results of an X-band overmoded RBWO are analyzed. Our analysis indicates that the 2-D and 3-D PIC simulation results of our device are quite different due to asymmetric mode competition. In fact, asymmetric surface waves, especially EH11 mode, can lead to serious mode competition when electron beam propagates near the surface of slow wave structures (SWSs). Therefore, additional method of suppressing asymmetric mode competition, such as adjusting the reflections at both ends of SWSs to decrease the Q-factor of asymmetric modes, needs to be utilized in the design of overmoded RBWOs. Besides, 3-D PIC simulation and modes decomposition are essential for designing overmoded RBWOs.

Zhang, Dian; Zhang, Jun; Zhong, Huihuang; Jin, Zhenxing; Ju, Jinchuan

2014-09-01

100

Wave Function Orthogonality in Relativistic Nucleon Knockout Reactions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nucleon knockout reactions such as (e,e'N) and (?,N) are usually treated using the Distorted Wave Impulse Approximation (DWIA). The standard DWIA amplitude suffers from an orthogonality defect which results from the use of nucleon continuum and bound state wave functions that belong to different Hamiltonians. In the past this problem has been discussed mainly within the framework of a nonrelativistic calculation of the amplitude. In the present work, we study the effect of nonorthogonality in the relativistic treatment of the above reactions. The continuum nucleon wave function is made orthogonal to the relevant bound states using the Gram-Schmidt procedure.The orthogonality effects are found to be negligible for (e,e'p) reactions for missing momenta up to 700 MeV/c,for all the three standard coplanar kinematics. By contrast the orthogonalization of the wave functions appears to have a more pronounced effect in the case of (?,p) reactions, particularly at large angles. For these reactions, the spin dependent observables show more sensitivity than the cross sections.

Sherif, H. S.; Johansson, J. I.

1999-10-01

101

Implementation of the exploding wire technique to study blast-wave-structure interaction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effort invested in improving our understanding of the physics of high-energy explosion events has been steadily increasing since the latter part of the twentieth century. Moreover, the dramatic increase in computer power over the last two decades has made the numerical simulation approach the dominant tool for investigating blast phenomena and their effects. However, field tests, on both large and small scales, are still in use. In the current paper, we present an experimental tool to better resolve and study the blast-structure interaction phenomenon and to help validate the numerical simulations of the same. The experimental tool uses an exploding wire technique to generate small-scale cylindrical and spherical blast waves. This approach permits safe operation, high repeatability, and the use of advanced diagnostic systems. The system was calibrated using an analytical model, an empirical model, and numerical simulation. To insure that spherical blast geometry was achieved, a set of free air blast experiments was done in which high-speed photography was used to monitor the blast structure. A scenario in which an explosion occurred in the vicinity of a structure demonstrated the system's capabilities. Using this simple but not trivial configuration showed unequivocally the effectiveness of this tool. From this comparison, it was found that at early times of blast-structure interaction, the agreement between the two sets of results was very good, but at later times incongruences appeared. Effort has been made to interpret this observation. Furthermore, by using similitude analysis, the results obtained from the small-scale experiments can be applied to the full-scale problem. We have shown that an exploding wire system offers an inexpensive, safe, easy to operate, and effective tool for studying phenomena related to blast-wave-structure interactions.

Ram, O.; Sadot, O.

2012-11-01

102

Double shock front formation in cylindrical radiative blast waves produced by laser irradiation of krypton gas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radiative blast waves were created by irradiating a krypton cluster source from a supersonic jet with a high intensity femtosecond laser pulse. It was found that the radiation from the shock surface is absorbed in the optically thick upstream medium creating a radiative heat wave that travels supersonically ahead of the main shock. As the blast wave propagates into the heated medium, it slows and loses energy, and the radiative heat wave also slows down. When the radiative heat wave slows down to the transonic regime, a secondary shock in the ionization precursor is produced. This paper presents experimental data characterizing both the initial and secondary shocks and numerical simulations to analyze the double-shock dynamics.

Kim, I.; Quevedo, H. J.; Feldman, S.; Bang, W.; Serratto, K.; McCormick, M.; Aymond, F.; Dyer, G.; Bernstein, A. C.; Ditmire, T.

2013-12-01

103

Nonlinear Interaction of Relativistic Electrons and Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves in a Two-wave Model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nonlinear interaction of relativistic electrons with a monochromatic electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave was investigated extensively in previous studies. Here we extend this work to investigate wave particle interactions in a two-wave model. By varying the separation of the two wave numbers, we calculate the Chirikov parameter, which measures the degree of the overlap of the resonant islands in the phase portrait. We demonstrate that the resonant islands highly overlap over a large range of the wave number separation, depending on which three typical regimes are identified. 1) a degenerate regime in which the effect of the two waves can be approximated by one wave model; 2) a transition regime where the resonant latitude of one wave moves equatorward and finally drops out of resonance with the electrons; 3) a non-overlap region where one wave is resonant with the electrons and the other is not. In the degenerate region, the concepts from the single wave interaction, i.e., phase bunching and phase trapping, still apply. When the particle initial pitch angle or the wave amplitude decreases, the length of the range of the degenerate region increases. In the transition region, the motions of the electrons are stochastic. In the non-overlap region, only the resonant wave is responsible for the electron scattering while the nonresonant wave contributes little. As one important application in the realistic space environment, we demonstrate that EMIC wave interactions with electrons can be treated by a single wave if the range of wave frequencies is located inside the degenerate region.

An, X.; Chen, L.; Bortnik, J.; Thorne, R. M.

2013-12-01

104

Anomalous skin effects in relativistic parallel propagating weakly magnetized electron plasma waves  

SciTech Connect

Fully relativistic analysis of anomalous skin effects for parallel propagating waves in a weakly magnetized electron plasma is presented and general expressions for longitudinal and transverse permittivites are derived. It is found that the penetration depth for R- and L-waves increases as we move from non-relativistic to highly relativistic regime. The ambient magnetic field reduces/enhances the skin effects for R-wave/L-wave as the strength of the field is increased. In general, the weak magnetic field effects are pronounced for the weakly relativistic regime as compared with other relativistic cases. The results are also graphically illustrated. On switching off the magnetic field, previous results for field free case are retrieved [A. F. Alexandrov, A. S. Bogdankevich, and A. A. Rukhadze, Priniples of Plasma Electrodynamics (Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, 1984), Vol. 9, p. 106].

Abbas, Gohar; Bashir, M. F. [Salam Chair in Physics, G. C. University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Department of Physics, G. C. University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Murtaza, G. [Salam Chair in Physics, G. C. University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan)

2011-10-15

105

Extended adiabatic blast waves and a model of the soft X-ray background. [interstellar matter  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An analytical approximation is generated which follows the development of an adiabatic spherical blast wave in a homogeneous ambient medium of finite pressure. An analytical approximation is also presented for the electron temperature distribution resulting from coulomb collisional heating. The dynamical, thermal, ionization, and spectral structures are calculated for blast waves of energy E sub 0 = 5 x 10 to the 50th power ergs in a hot low-density interstellar environment. A formula is presented for estimating the luminosity evolution of such explosions. The B and C bands of the soft X-ray background, it is shown, are reproduced by such a model explosion if the ambient density is about .000004 cm, the blast radius is roughly 100 pc, and the solar system is located inside the shocked region. Evolution in a pre-existing cavity with a strong density gradient may, it is suggested, remove both the M band and OVI discrepancies.

Cox, D. P.; Anderson, P. R.

1981-01-01

106

Whistler wave generation by non-gyrotropic, relativistic, electron beams  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Super-thermal electron beams travelling away from the Sun on the open magnetic field lines are widely accepted to be the source of the Type-III bursts. The earliest idea of the generation of the Type-III bursts was based on the plasma emission mechanism. A fast moving electron beam excites Langmuir waves at the local plasma frequency, ?p. The Langmuir waves are partially transformed via scattering at ?p and 2?p, with ion sound and oppositely propagating Langmuir waves, respectively, into electromagnetic waves. As the electron beam propagates away from the Sun, through less dense coronal and interplanetary environment, the frequency of the emitted electromagnetic radiation decreases, because plasma frequency is a function of the square root of the plasma density. Type-III bursts have been subject of theoretical, observational and numerical studies. The first detailed theory of the Type-III emission invoked coherent plasma waves, generated by a stream of fast particles, which are due to Rayleigh and combination scattering at ?p and 2?p subsequently transformed into radio waves. Stochastic growth of the density irregularities was invoked in order to produce stochastically generated clumpy Langmuir waves, where the ambient density perturbations cause the beam to fluctuate around marginal stability. Other theories on the mechanism which generates the Type-III emission include: linear mode conversion of Langmuir waves, Langmuir waves producing electromagnetic radiation as antennas and non-gyroptropic electron beam emission [1] of commensurable properties to the Type-III bursts. In Refs. [2,3] it was found that the non-gyrotropic beam excites electromagnetic radiation by the current transverse to the magnetic field, which results in (?,k)-space drift while propagating along the 1-dimensional spatial domain throughout the decreasing plasma density profile. The role of the electron beam pitch angle and the background density gradient profile was investigated in [4]. In this study [5], for the first time, the backwards propagating wave component evident in the perpendicular components of the electromagnetic field in such a system is presented. Features of the wave component propagating backwards from the front of the non-gyrotropic, relativistic, beam of electrons injected in the Maxwellian, magnetised background plasma with decreasing density profile are studied by using the Particle-In-Cell code EPOCH. Magnetic field in the 1.5-dimensional system is varied in order to prove that the backwards propagating wave is harmonic of the electron cyclotron frequency. The analysis has lead to the identification of the backwards travelling waves as whistlers. Moreover, the whistlers are shown to be generated by the normal and anomalous Doppler resonance. Large fraction of the energy of the perpendicular electromagnetic field components is found to be carried away by the whistler waves. [1] D. Tsiklauri, Phys. Plasmas 18, 052903 (2011). [2] D. Tsiklauri, H. Schmitz, Geophys. Res. Abs. 15, EGU2013-5403 (2013). [3] H. Schmitz, D. Tsiklauri, Phys. Plasmas 20, 062903 (2013). [4] R. Pechhacker, D. Tsiklauri, Phys. Plasmas 19, 112903 (2012). [5] M. Skender, D. Tsiklauri, submitted to Phys. Plasmas (2013): http://astro.qmul.ac.uk/ tsiklauri/

Skender, Marina; Tsiklauri, David

2014-05-01

107

Scattering of magnetosonic waves in a relativistic and an-isotropic magnetised plasma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gravitational waves (GW) propagating through a magnetised plasma excite\\u000alow-frequency magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. In this paper we investigate\\u000awhether these waves can produce observable radio emission at higher frequencies\\u000aby scattering on an an-isotropic intrinsically relativistic distribution of\\u000aelectrons and positrons in the force-free wind surrounding a double neutron\\u000astar binary merger. The relativistic particle distribution is assumed to be

Joachim Moortgat; Jan Kuijpers

2006-01-01

108

Nonlinear propagation of high-frequency energy from blast waves as it pertains to bat hearing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Close exposure to blast noise from military weapons training can adversely affect the hearing of both humans and wildlife. One concern is the effect of high-frequency noise from Army weapons training on the hearing of endangered bats. Blast wave propagation measurements were conducted to investigate nonlinear effects on the development of blast waveforms as they propagate from the source. Measurements were made at ranges of 25, 50, and 100 m from the blast. Particular emphasis was placed on observation of rise time variation with distance. Resolving the fine shock structure of blast waves requires robust transducers with high-frequency capability beyond 100 kHz, hence the limitations of traditional microphones and the effect of microphone orientation were investigated. Measurements were made with a wide-bandwidth capacitor microphone for comparison with conventional 3.175-mm (?-in.) microphones with and without baffles. The 3.175-mm microphone oriented at 90° to the propagation direction did not have sufficient high-frequency response to capture the actual rise times at a range of 50 m. Microphone baffles eliminate diffraction artifacts on the rise portion of the measured waveform and therefore allow for a more accurate measurement of the blast rise time. The wide-band microphone has an extended high-frequency response and can resolve shorter rise times than conventional microphones. For a source of 0.57 kg (1.25 lb) of C-4 plastic explosive, it was observed that nonlinear effects steepened the waveform, thereby decreasing the shock rise time, from 25 to 50 m. At 100m, the rise times had increased slightly. For comparison to the measured blast waveforms, several models of nonlinear propagation are applied to the problem of finite-amplitude blast wave propagation. Shock front models, such as the Johnson and Hammerton model, and full-waveform marching algorithms, such as the Anderson model, are investigated and compared to experimental results. The models successfully predict blast wave rise times at medium distances in a homogeneous atmosphere, although rise time predictions are shorter than what was measured in an inhomogeneous atmosphere. Atmospheric turbulence, absent in the models, may be the primary cause of this difference in rise times at longer distances. Results from the measurements and models indicate that bats located within approximately 200 m of the detonation of 0.57kg of C-4 will be exposed to audible levels of high-frequency energy, but whether those levels could be damaging to bat hearing cannot be established at this time.

Loubeau, Alexandra

109

A Three-Dimensional Numerical Investigation into the Interaction of Blast Waves with Bomb Shelters  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigates the behavior of blast wave by employing the finite volume method to solve the associated three-dimensional, time-dependent, inviscous flow Euler equations. The numerical results are shown to be in good agreement with the experimental results obtained from shock tube flow studies. The results also identify the complex phenomena of flow structures, pressure distributions, and different types of

Chang-Hsien Tai; Jyh-Tong Teng; Shi-Wei Lo; Chia-Wei Liu

2005-01-01

110

A Three-Dimensional Numerical Investigation into the Interaction of Blast Waves with Bomb Shelters  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study investigates the behavior of blast wave by employing the finite volume method to solve the associated three-dimensional, time-dependent, inviscous flow Euler equations. The numerical results are shown to be in good agreement with the experimental results obtained from shock tube flow studies. The results also identify the complex phenomena of flow structures, pressure distributions, and different types of reflected waves for closed-ended and open-ended bomb shelters.

Tai, Chang-Hsien; Teng, Jyh-Tong; Lo, Shi-Wei; Liu, Chia-Wei

111

A repetitive 0.14 THz relativistic surface wave oscillator  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary experimental results of a repetitive 0.14 THz overmoded relativistic surface wave oscillator (RSWO) are presented in this paper. The repetitive RSWO is developed by using a rectangularly corrugated slow-wave structure with overmoded ratio of 3 and a foilless diode emitting annular electron beam with thickness of 0.5 mm. The high quality electron beams at the repetition rate of 10 are obtained over a wide range of diode voltage (180 kV < U < 240 kV) and current (700 A < I < 1.2 kA). The generation experiments of RSWO are conducted at an axial pulsed magnetic field whose maximum strength and duration can reach about 2.7 T and 1 s, respectively. The experimental results show that the RSWO successfully produces reasonable uniform terahertz pulses at repetition rate of 10, and the pulse duration, frequency, and power of a single pulse are about 1.5 ns, 0.154 THz, and 2.6 MW, respectively, whereas the dominated radiation mode of the RSWO is TM{sub 02}.

Wang Guangqiang; Tong Changjiang; Li Xiaoze; Wang Xuefeng; Li Shuang; Lu Xicheng [Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, P.O. Box 69-1, Xi'an 710024 (China); Wang Jianguo [Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, P.O. Box 69-1, Xi'an 710024 (China); School of Electronic and Information Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China)

2013-04-15

112

Observations of relativistic electron precipitation from the radiation belts driven by EMIC waves  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For some time theoretical modeling has shown that electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves should play an important role in the loss of relativistic electrons from the radiation belts, through precipitation into the atmosphere. Up to now there has been limited experimental evidence for relativistic electron precipitation driven by EMIC waves. In this paper we present case studies of events showing EMIC waves, observed by ground-based pulsation magnetometers, which are linked to strong responses in a subionospheric precipitation monitor. This response is consistent with precipitation occurring near the plasmapause, where EMIC waves may resonate with relativistic electrons. At the same time there is only a weak response in a co-located riometer chain, as expected for relativistic electron precipitation that penetrates deeply into the atmosphere.

Rodger, Craig J.; Raita, Tero; Clilverd, Mark A.; Seppälä, Annika; Dietrich, Sarah; Thomson, Neil R.; Ulich, Thomas

2008-08-01

113

Mechanisms of primary blast-induced traumatic brain injury: insights from shock-wave research.  

PubMed

Traumatic brain injury caused by explosive or blast events is traditionally divided into four phases: primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary blast injury. These phases of blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) are biomechanically distinct and can be modeled in both in vivo and in vitro systems. The primary bTBI injury phase represents the response of brain tissue to the initial blast wave. Among the four phases of bTBI, there is a remarkable paucity of information about the cause of primary bTBI. On the other hand, 30 years of research on the medical application of shockwaves (SW) has given us insight into the mechanisms of tissue and cellular damage in bTBI, including both air-mediated and underwater SW sources. From a basic physics perspective, the typical blast wave consists of a lead SW followed by supersonic flow. The resultant tissue injury includes several features observed in bTBI, such as hemorrhage, edema, pseudoaneurysm formation, vasoconstriction, and induction of apoptosis. These are well-described pathological findings within the SW literature. Acoustic impedance mismatch, penetration of tissue by shock/bubble interaction, geometry of the skull, shear stress, tensile stress, and subsequent cavitation formation, are all important factors in determining the extent of SW-induced tissue and cellular injury. Herein we describe the requirements for the adequate experimental set-up when investigating blast-induced tissue and cellular injury; review SW physics, research, and the importance of engineering validation (visualization/pressure measurement/numerical simulation); and, based upon our findings of SW-induced injury, discuss the potential underlying mechanisms of primary bTBI. PMID:21332411

Nakagawa, Atsuhiro; Manley, Geoffrey T; Gean, Alisa D; Ohtani, Kiyonobu; Armonda, Rocco; Tsukamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Tominaga, Teiji

2011-06-01

114

Effect of EMIC Wave Normal Angle Distribution on Relativistic Electron Scattering  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The flux level of outer-zone relativistic electrons (above 1 MeV) is extremely variable during geomagnetic storms, and controlled by a competition between acceleration and loss. Precipitation of these electrons due to resonant pitch-angle scattering by electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves is considered one of the major loss mechanisms. This mechanism was suggested in early theoretical studies more than three decades ago. However, direct experimental evidence of the wave role in relativistic electrons precipitation is difficult to obtain because of lack of concurrent measurements of precipitating electrons at low altitudes and the waves in a magnetically conjugate equatorial region. Recently, the data from balloon-borne X-ray instruments provided indirect but strong evidence on an efficiency of the EMIC wave induced loss for the outer-zone relativistic electrons. These observations stimulated theoretical studies that, particularly, demonstrated that EMIC wave induced pitch-angle diffusion of MeV electrons can operate in the strong diffusion limit and this mechanism can compete with relativistic electron depletion caused by the Dst effect during the initial and main phases of storm. Although an effectiveness of relativistic electron scattering by EMIC waves depends strongly on the wave spectral properties, the most favorable assumptions regarding wave characteristics has been made in all previous theoretical studies. Particularly, only quasi field-aligned EMIC waves have been considered as a driver for relativistic electron loss. At the same time, there is growing experimental and theoretical evidence that these waves can be highly oblique; EMIC wave energy can occupy not only the region of generation, i.e. the region of small wave normal angles, but also the entire wave normal angle region, and even only the region near 90 degrees. The latter can dramatically change he effectiveness of relativistic electron scattering by EMIC waves. In the present study, we calculate the pitch-angle diffusion coefficients using the typical wave normal distributions obtained from our self-consistent ring current-EMIC wave model, and try to quantify the effect of EMIC wave normal angle characteristics on relativistic electron scattering.

Gamayunov, K. V.; Khazanov, G. V.

2006-01-01

115

The physical properties of the blast wave produced by a stoichiometric propane/oxygen explosion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The trajectory of the primary shock produced by the explosion of a nominal 18.14 t (20 tn) hemispherical propane/oxygen charge was analysed previously to provide the physical properties immediately behind the shock, but gave no information about the time-resolved properties throughout the blast wave. The present study maps all the physical properties of the wave throughout and beyond the positive durations for a range of distances from about 1.6-18 m scaled to a 1 kg charge at NTP. The physical properties were calculated using a hydro-code to simulate the flow field produced by a spherical piston moving with a specific trajectory. This technique has been used extensively to determine the physical properties of blast waves from a variety of sources for which the piston path was determined by high-speed photography of smoke tracers established close to the charges immediately before detonation. In the case of the propane/oxygen explosion, smoke tracer data were not available to determine the trajectory of the spherical piston. An arbitrary piston path was used and its trajectory iteratively adjusted until it produced a blast wave with a primary shock whose trajectory exactly matched the measured trajectory from the propane/oxygen explosion. Throughout the studied flow field the time histories of hydrostatic pressure, density and particle velocity are well described by fits to the modified Friedlander equation. The properties are presented as functions of scaled radius and are compared with the properties of the blast wave from a 1 kg TNT surface burst explosion, and with other measurements of the same explosion.

Dewey, M. C.; Dewey, J. M.

2014-07-01

116

The physical properties of the blast wave produced by a stoichiometric propane/oxygen explosion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The trajectory of the primary shock produced by the explosion of a nominal 18.14 t (20 tn) hemispherical propane/oxygen charge was analysed previously to provide the physical properties immediately behind the shock, but gave no information about the time-resolved properties throughout the blast wave. The present study maps all the physical properties of the wave throughout and beyond the positive durations for a range of distances from about 1.6-18 m scaled to a 1 kg charge at NTP. The physical properties were calculated using a hydro-code to simulate the flow field produced by a spherical piston moving with a specific trajectory. This technique has been used extensively to determine the physical properties of blast waves from a variety of sources for which the piston path was determined by high-speed photography of smoke tracers established close to the charges immediately before detonation. In the case of the propane/oxygen explosion, smoke tracer data were not available to determine the trajectory of the spherical piston. An arbitrary piston path was used and its trajectory iteratively adjusted until it produced a blast wave with a primary shock whose trajectory exactly matched the measured trajectory from the propane/oxygen explosion. Throughout the studied flow field the time histories of hydrostatic pressure, density and particle velocity are well described by fits to the modified Friedlander equation. The properties are presented as functions of scaled radius and are compared with the properties of the blast wave from a 1 kg TNT surface burst explosion, and with other measurements of the same explosion.

Dewey, M. C.; Dewey, J. M.

2014-11-01

117

Dispersion characteristics of the electromagnetic waves in a relativistic electron beam guided by the ion channel  

SciTech Connect

In this article, the dispersion characteristics of the paraxial (near axis) electromagnetic (EM) waves in a relativistic electron beam guided by the ion channel are investigated. Equilibrium fields such as ion-channel electrostatic field and self-fields of relativistic electron beam are included in this formalism. In accordance with the equilibrium field structure, radial and azimuthal waves are selected as base vectors for EM waves. It is shown that the dispersion of the radially polarized EM and space charge waves are influenced by the equilibrium fields, but azimuthally polarized wave remain unaffected. In some wave number domains, the radially polarized EM and fast space charge waves are coupled. In these regions, instability is analyzed as a function of equilibrium structure. It is shown that the total equilibrium radial force due to the ion channel and electron beam and also relativistic effect play a key role in the coupling of the radially polarized EM wave and space charge wave. Furthermore, some asymptotic behaviors such as weak and strong ion channel, nonrelativistic case and cutoff frequencies are discussed. This instability could be used as an amplification mechanism for radially polarized EM waves in a beam-plasma system where a relativistic electron beam is guided by the ion channel.

Mirzanejhad, Saeed; Sohbatzadeh, Farshad; Ghasemi, Maede; Sedaghat, Zeinab; Mahdian, Zeinab [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Mazandaran University, 47416-95447 Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2010-05-15

118

Nonlinear growth of dynamical overstabilities in blast waves. [effects on supernova remnants  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The numerical gasdynamics code ZEUS-2D is used to directly model the dynamical overstabilities in blast waves. The linear analysis is confirmed by perturbing a blast wave with a low-amplitude eigenfunction of the overstability. The amplitude of the perturbations is increased in order to determine the nonlinear behavior of the overstabilities. The overstability is found to saturate due to weak transverse shocks in the shell. Transverse velocities in the dense shell reach the postshock sound speed, and high-density regions with sizes of the order of the shell thickness form. Transverse oscillations continue even after saturation. This confirms and explains the damping of the overstability experimentally discovered by Grun et al. (1991).

Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Norman, Michael L.

1993-01-01

119

Calculation of wing response to gusts and blast waves with vortex lift effect  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A numerical study of the response of aircraft wings to atmospheric gusts and to nuclear explosions when flying at subsonic speeds is presented. The method is based upon unsteady quasi-vortex lattice method, unsteady suction analogy and Pade approximant. The calculated results, showing vortex lag effect, yield reasonable agreement with experimental data for incremental lift on wings in gust penetration and due to nuclear blast waves.

Chao, D. C.; Lan, C. E.

1983-01-01

120

Biomechanical Assessment of Brain Dynamic Responses Due to Blast Pressure Waves  

Microsoft Academic Search

A mechanized and integrated computational scheme is introduced to determine the human brain responses in an environment where\\u000a the human head is exposed to explosions from trinitrotoluene (TNT), or other high-yield explosives, in military applications.\\u000a The procedure is based on a three-dimensional (3-D) non-linear finite element method (FEM) that implements a simultaneous\\u000a conduction of explosive detonation, shock wave propagation, blast–head

M. S. Chafi; G. Karami; M. Ziejewski

2010-01-01

121

Influence of ambient air pressure on the energy conversion of laser-breakdown induced blast waves  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Influence of ambient pressure on energy conversion efficiency from a Nd?:?glass laser pulse (? = 1.053 µm) to a laser-induced blast wave was investigated at reduced pressure. Temporal incident and transmission power histories were measured using sets of energy meters and photodetectors. A half-shadowgraph half-self-emission method was applied to visualize laser absorption waves. Results show that the blast energy conversion efficiency ?bw decreased monotonically with the decrease in ambient pressure. The decrease was small, from 40% to 38%, for the pressure change from 101 kPa to 50 kPa, but the decrease was considerable, to 24%, when the pressure was reduced to 30 kPa. Compared with a TEA-CO2-laser-induced blast wave (? = 10.6 µm), higher fraction absorption in the laser supported detonation regime ?LSD of 90% was observed, which is influenced slightly by the reduction of ambient pressure. The conversion fraction ?bw/?LSD?90% was achieved at pressure >50 kPa, which is significantly higher than that in a CO2 laser case.

Wang, Bin; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Arakawa, Yoshihiro

2013-09-01

122

Causal Wave Propagation for Relativistic Massive Particles: Physical Asymptotics in Action  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Wavepackets representing relativistic quantum particles injected into a half-space, from a source that is switched on at a definite time, are represented by superpositions of plane waves that must include negative frequencies. Propagation is causal: it is a consequence of analyticity that at time t no part of the wave has travelled farther than…

Berry, M. V.

2012-01-01

123

Synchrotron emission from bent shocked relativistic jets. 2: Shock waves in helical jets  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present multi-wavelength numerical results of a computer code, which solves the transfer equations for the synchrotron emission in compact extragalactic relativistic jets with bends and shock waves. We show those results for a rectilinear shocked jet and for a helicoidal shocked jet. The 'flare' in the total and polarized fluxes produced by the ejection of the shock wave from

J. L. Gomez; A. Alberdi; J. M. Marcaide

1994-01-01

124

Wave functions and decay constants of $B$ and $D$ mesons in the relativistic potential model  

E-print Network

With the decay constants of $D$ and $D_s$ mesons measured in experiment recently, we revisit the study of the bound states of quark and antiquark in $B$ and $D$ mesons in the relativistic potential model. The relativistic bound state wave equation is solved numerically. The masses, decay constants and wave functions of $B$ and $D$ mesons are obtained. Both the masses and decay constants obtained here can be consistent with the experimental data. The wave functions can be used in the study of $B$ and $D$ meson decays.

Mao-Zhi Yang

2011-04-19

125

Three dimensional electrostatic solitary waves in a dense magnetoplasma with relativistically degenerate electrons  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, small but finite amplitude electrostatic solitary waves in a relativistic degenerate magnetoplasma, consisting of relativistically degenerate electrons and non-degenerate cold ions, are investigated. The Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation is derived employing the reductive perturbation technique and its solitary wave solution is analyzed. It is shown that only compressive electrostatic solitary structures can propagate in such a degenerate plasma system. The effects of plasma number density, ion cyclotron frequency, and direction cosines on the profiles of ion acoustic solitary waves are investigated and discussed at length. The relevance of the present investigation vis-a-vis pulsating white dwarfs is also pointed out.

Ata-ur-Rahman,; Qamar, A. [Institute of Physics and Electronics, University of Peshawar, Peshawar 25000 (Pakistan) [Institute of Physics and Electronics, University of Peshawar, Peshawar 25000 (Pakistan); National Centre for Physics, QAU Campus, Shahdrah Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Masood, W. [National Centre for Physics, QAU Campus, Shahdrah Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan) [National Centre for Physics, QAU Campus, Shahdrah Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); COMSATS, Institute of Information Technology, Park Road, Chak Shahzad, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Eliasson, B. [Physics Department, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG, Scotland (United Kingdom)] [Physics Department, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG, Scotland (United Kingdom)

2013-09-15

126

Investigation of EMIC Waves During Balloon Detected Relativistic Electron Precipitation Events  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Multiple relativistic electron precipitation (REP) events were detected by balloon-borne instrumentation during the MAXIS 2000 and MINIS 2005 campaigns. It has been suggested that resonance with EMIC waves caused these precipitation events (Lorentzen et al, 2000 and Millan et al, 2002) due to their location in the dusk sector. We present observations of dusk-side relativistic electron precipitation events, and use supporting satellite and theoretical data to investigate the relationship between EMIC waves and the detected REP. Satellite data can provide direct measurements of not only the waves themselves but also important resonance condition parameters. The data will be presented collectively with each event to showcase similarities and differences between events and the challenges that arise in trying to understand the relationship between dusk-side relativistic electron precipitation and EMIC waves.

Woodger, L. A.; Millan, R. M.

2009-12-01

127

The Construction of a 'Relativistic' Wave-Particle: The Soliton.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although most waves studied by students satisfy the linear equation, particle physicists have become interested in nonlinear waves--those not satisfying the superposition principle. A mechanical wave system, satisfying the sine-Gordon equation, can be constructed using a modified transverse wave system to demonstrate nonlinear wave-particle…

Isenberg, Cyril

1982-01-01

128

Symmetrized Relativistic Augmented-Plane-Wave Method: Gray Tin and the Warped Muffin-Tin Potential  

Microsoft Academic Search

A symmetrized form of the relativistic augmented-plane wave (RAPW) method is described. This symmetrized relativistic APW technique (SRAPW) uses the double-space-group projection operators to greatly reduce the size of the Hamiltonian matrix that must be dealt with on symmetry points and lines. This enables one to obtain better convergence than can be obtained with the unsymmetrized RAPW technique and identifies

Dale Dean Koelling

1969-01-01

129

Phase space dynamics after the breaking of a relativistic Langmuir wave in a thermal plasma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The relativistic Vlasov equation is integrated numerically in an Eulerian framework in order to investigate the phase space development of the wavebreak of a relativistic Langmuir wave in a thermal plasma. Relativistic kinematic and beam loading effects lead to a "differential retardation" in the time required by the electrons to evolve in phase space, the largest momentum electrons taking the longest time. This leads to the formation of a long lasting spike in momentum space at the wavebreak position that propagates with a velocity close to the speed of light and to an extremely steep density change in coordinate space.

Grassi, Anna; Fedeli, Luca; Macchi, Andrea; Bulanov, Sergei V.; Pegoraro, Francesco

2014-06-01

130

Transverse Wave Propagation in Relativistic Two-fluid Plasmas in de Sitter Space  

E-print Network

We investigate transverse electromagnetic waves propagating in a plasma in the de Sitter space. Using the 3+1 formalism we derive the relativistic two-fluid equations to take account of the effects due to the horizon and describe the set of simultaneous linear equations for the perturbations. We use a local approximation to investigate the one-dimensional radial propagation of Alfv\\'en and high frequency electromagnetic waves and solve the dispersion relation for these waves numerically.

M. Atiqur Rahman; M. Hossain Ali

2008-06-17

131

Spatially and temporally resolved temperature and shock-speed measurements behind a laser-induced blast wave of energetic nanoparticles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Spatially and temporally resolved temperature measurements behind an expanding blast wave are made using picosecond (ps) N2 coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) following laser flash heating of mixtures containing aluminum nanoparticles embedded in ammonium-nitrate oxidant. Production-front ps-CARS temperatures as high as 3600 ± 180 K—obtained for 50-nm-diameter commercially produced aluminum-nanoparticle samples—are observed. Time-resolved shadowgraph images of the evolving blast waves are also obtained to determine the shock-wave position and corresponding velocity. These results are compared with near-field blast-wave theory to extract relative rates of energy release for various particle diameters and passivating-layer compositions.

Roy, Sukesh; Jiang, Naibo; Stauffer, Hans U.; Schmidt, Jacob B.; Kulatilaka, Waruna D.; Meyer, Terrence R.; Bunker, Christopher E.; Gord, James R.

2013-05-01

132

Numerical simulation on the interaction of blast waves with a series of aluminum cylinders at near-field  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper demonstrates the application of numerical simulation in predicting the interaction of blast waves with a series of aluminum cylinders at near-field. The results from the experiments performed by Held [Held M. Impulse method for the blast contour of cylindrical high explosive charges. Propellants Explos Pyrotech 1999;24:17–26] are used as a benchmark for comparison. This numerical simulation, performed using

C. Y. Tham

2009-01-01

133

Classification and stability of plasma motion in periodic linearly polarized relativistic waves  

SciTech Connect

Based on a relativistic fluid-Maxwell model, laser-induced plasma dynamics is investigated for relativistic periodic waves. Within a one-dimensional (1D) description, the Akhiezer-Polovin model is applied to the existence of periodic, nonlinearly coupled electromagnetic and electrostatic waves, and the corresponding particle motion. Known existence criteria for periodic solutions are generalized. The corresponding stability behaviors are investigated by 1D integrators of the relativistic fluid-Maxwell model. It is shown that in contrast to the vacuum solution, linearly polarized coupled electromagnetic-electrostatic waves are unstable in plasmas. The magnitudes of the growth rates are investigated in terms of the maximum amplitudes and normalized phase velocities.

Lehmann, G.; Spatschek, K. H. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf, D-40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)

2010-07-15

134

The Blast-Wave-Driven Instability as a Vehicle for Understanding Supernova Explosion Structure  

SciTech Connect

Blast-wave-driven instabilities play a rich and varied role throughout the evolution of supernovae from explosion to remnant, but interpreting their role is difficult due to the enormous complexity of the stellar systems. We consider the simpler and fundamental hydrodynamic instability problem of a material interface between two constant-density fluids perturbed from spherical and driven by a divergent central Taylor-Sedov blast wave. The existence of unified solutions at high Mach number and small density ratio suggests that general conclusions can be drawn about the likely asymptotic structure of the mixing zone. To this end we apply buoyancy-drag and bubble merger models modified to include the effects of divergence and radial velocity gradients. In general, these effects preclude the true self-similar evolution of classical Raleigh-Taylor, but can be incorporated into a quasi-self-similar growth picture. Loss of memory of initial conditions can occur in the quasi-self-similar model, but requires initial mode numbers higher than those predicted for pre-explosion interfaces in Type II SNe, suggesting that their late-time structure is likely strongly influenced by details of the initial perturbations. Where low-modes are dominant, as in the Type Ia Tycho remnant, they result from initial perturbations rather than generation from smaller scales. Therefore, structure observed now contains direct information about the explosion process. When large-amplitude modes are present in the initial conditions, the contribution to the perturbation growth from the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is significant or dominant compared to Rayleigh-Taylor. Such Richtmyer-Meshkov growth can yield proximity of the forward shock to the growing spikes and structure that strongly resembles that observed in the Tycho. Laser-driven high-energy-density laboratory experiments offer a promising avenue for testing model and simulation descriptions of blast-wave-driven instabilities and making connections to their astrophysical counterparts.

Miles, A R

2008-05-27

135

THE Blast-Wave-Driven Instability as a Vehicle for Understanding Supernova Explosion Structure  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Blast-wave-driven instabilities play a rich and varied role in supernovae (SNe) evolution from explosion to remnant, but interpreting their role is difficult due to the enormous complexity of stellar systems. We consider the simpler idealized problem of an interface between two constant-density fluids perturbed from spherical and driven by a central blast wave. Where valid, the existence of unified solutions suggests that general conclusions can be drawn about the likely asymptotic structure of the mixing zone. To this end, we apply buoyancy-drag and bubble merger models that include effects of divergence and compressibility. In general, these effects preclude the true self-similar evolution of classical Rayleigh-Taylor (RT), but can be incorporated into a quasi-self-similar growth model. Loss of memory of initial conditions (ICs) can occur in the model, but requires pre-explosion mode numbers higher than predicted for Type II SNe, suggesting that their late-time structure is influenced by details of the initial perturbations. Where low modes dominate, as in the Type Ia Tycho remnant, they result from initial perturbations rather than generation from smaller scales. Therefore, the structure observed now contains direct information about the explosion process. When large-amplitude modes exist in the ICs, the contribution from the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability is significant compared to RT. Such RM growth can yield proximity of the forward shock to the growing spikes and structure that strongly resembles that observed in Tycho. Laser-driven laboratory experiments offer a promising avenue for testing model and simulation descriptions of blast-wave-driven instabilities and making connections to their astrophysical counterparts.

Miles, Aaron R.

2009-05-01

136

The soft X-ray background as a supernova blast wave viewed from inside: Solar abundance models  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A model of the soft X-ray background is presented in which the Sun is assumed to be inside an active supernova blast wave. The blast wave evolves in a preexisting cavity. The broad band surface brightnesses is explained by such a blast wave with an explosion energy of E sub approx. 5 x 10 to the 50th power ergs and radius 80 to 100 pc, using solar abundances. An approach to treating the problem of large anisotropies in the ambient medium is also explored, accommodating the observed anticorrelation between the soft X-ray surface brightness and the 21 cm column density. It is found that only for post shock temperatures below 10 6 K a shock propagating into a density enhancement will be dimmer than a similar shock in a lower density region.

Edgar, R. J.

1984-01-01

137

X-Ray Emitting Blast Wave from the Recurrent Nova RS Ophiuchi  

E-print Network

Stellar explosions such as novae and supernovae produce most of the heavy elements in the Universe. Although the onset of novae from runaway thermonuclear fusion reactions on the surface of a white dwarf in a binary star system is understood[1], the structure, dynamics, and mass of the ejecta are not well known. In rare cases, the white dwarf is embedded in the wind nebula of a red-giant companion; the explosion products plow through the nebula and produce X-ray emission. Early this year, an eruption of the recurrent nova RS Ophiuchi[2,3] provided the first opportunity to perform comprehensive X-ray observations of such an event and diagnose conditions within the ejecta. Here we show that the hard X-ray emission from RS Ophiuchi early in the eruption emanates from behind a blast wave, or outward-moving shock wave, that expanded freely for less than 2 days and then decelerated due to interaction with the nebula. The X-rays faded rapidly, suggesting that the blast wave deviates from the standard spherical shell structure[4-6]. The early onset of deceleration indicates that the ejected shell had a low mass, the white dwarf has a high mass[7], and that RS Ophiuchi is a progenitor of the type of supernova integral to studies of the expansion of the universe.

J. L. Sokoloski; G. J. M. Luna; K. Mukai; Scott J. Kenyon

2006-05-12

138

Modeling and simulation of blast-induced, early-time intracranial wave physics leading to traumatic brain injury.  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this modeling and simulation study was to establish the role of stress wave interactions in the genesis of traumatic brain injury (TBI) from exposure to explosive blast. A high resolution (1 mm{sup 3} voxels), 5 material model of the human head was created by segmentation of color cryosections from the Visible Human Female dataset. Tissue material properties were assigned from literature values. The model was inserted into the shock physics wave code, CTH, and subjected to a simulated blast wave of 1.3 MPa (13 bars) peak pressure from anterior, posterior and lateral directions. Three dimensional plots of maximum pressure, volumetric tension, and deviatoric (shear) stress demonstrated significant differences related to the incident blast geometry. In particular, the calculations revealed focal brain regions of elevated pressure and deviatoric (shear) stress within the first 2 milliseconds of blast exposure. Calculated maximum levels of 15 KPa deviatoric, 3.3 MPa pressure, and 0.8 MPa volumetric tension were observed before the onset of significant head accelerations. Over a 2 msec time course, the head model moved only 1 mm in response to the blast loading. Doubling the blast strength changed the resulting intracranial stress magnitudes but not their distribution. We conclude that stress localization, due to early time wave interactions, may contribute to the development of multifocal axonal injury underlying TBI. We propose that a contribution to traumatic brain injury from blast exposure, and most likely blunt impact, can occur on a time scale shorter than previous model predictions and before the onset of linear or rotational accelerations traditionally associated with the development of TBI.

Ford, Corey C. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Taylor, Paul Allen

2008-02-01

139

Electromagnetic wave instability in a relativistic electron-positron-ion plasma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

By employing the anisotropic plasma distribution function, the stability of circularly polarized electromagnetic (EM) waves is studied in a relativistically hot electron-positron-ion (e-p-i) plasma, investigating two specific scenarios. First, linear dispersion relations associated with the transverse EM waves are analyzed in different possible frequency regimes. The expression of the aperiodic hydrodynamic instability is obtained and numerically the transverse EM modes are shown to grow exponentially. Secondly, we have found that the transverse electromagnetic wave interact with a collisionless anisotropic e-p-i plasma and damp through the nonlinear Landau damping phenomena. Taking the effects of the latter into consideration, a kinetic nonlinear Schrödinger equation is derived with local and nonlocal nonlinearities, computing the damping rates. The present work should be helpful to understand the linear and nonlinear properties of the intense EM waves in hot relativistically astrophysical plasmas, e.g., pulsars, black holes, neutron stars, etc.

Rozina, C.; Tsintsadze, N. L.; Jamil, M.; Rasheed, A.; Ali, S.

2014-10-01

140

Transverse Wave Propagation in Relativistic Two-fluid Plasmas around Schwarzschild-de Sitter Black Hole  

E-print Network

We investigate transverse electromagnetic waves propagating in a plasma influenced by the gravitational field of the Schwarzschild-de Sitter black hole. Applying 3+1 spacetime split we derive the relativistic two-fluid equations to take account of gravitational effects due to the event horizon and describe the set of simultaneous linear equations for the perturbations. We use a local approximation to investigate the one-dimensional radial propagation of Alfv\\'en and high frequency electromagnetic waves. We derive the dispersion relation for these waves and solve it for the wave number $k$ numerically.

M. Hossain Ali; M. Atiqur Rahman

2008-07-29

141

Enhanced frequency agility of high-power relativistic backward wave oscillators  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes how finite length effects in high-power backward wave oscillators can be exploited in a controlled manner to achieve enhanced frequency agility. Experiments were performed using a Sinus-6 high-power relativistic repetitively pulsed electron beam accelerator. A uniform slow wave structure was used in these studies and its parameters were fixed. Sections of smooth-walled circular waveguide of varying lengths

L. D. Moreland; E. Schamiloglu; R. W. Lemke; A. M. Roitman; S. D. Korovin; V.V. Rostov

1996-01-01

142

Superluminal spectral densities of ultra-relativistic electrons in intense electromagnetic wave fields  

Microsoft Academic Search

Superluminal radiation from electrons accelerated in electromagnetic waves is investigated. The radiation field is a Proca\\u000a field with negative mass-square, minimally coupled to the electron current. The spectrum is continuous in the ultra-relativistic\\u000a regime, where steepest-descent asymptotics can be used to evaluate the power coefficients. The time averaging of Lissajous\\u000a orbits in polarized wave fields is discussed, and the tachyonic

R. Tomaschitz

2010-01-01

143

Plasma heating by a relativistic electron beam. I - Wave kinetic equation and spectral function  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new possibility for plasma heating is proposed and theoretical investigation is performed. Under a suitable experimental condition, the wave induced by the two-stream instability and Buneman/ion-acoustic wave induced by the return current can coexist and interact to yield a new contribution to plasma heating by the relativistic electron beam. The authors assume this is the case and develop the formulation necessary for the analysis of the spectral function of turbulent plasma.

Okazaki, T.; Kato, T.

1980-10-01

144

Simulation of astrophysical jet using the special relativistic hydrodynamics code  

E-print Network

This paper describes a multidimensional hydrodynamic code which can be used for the studies of relativistic astrophysical flows. The code solves the special relativistic hydrodynamic equations as a hyperbolic system of conservation laws based on High Resolution Shock Capturing (HRSC) Scheme. Two standard tests, one of which is the relativistic blast wave tested in our previous paper\\cite{DO1}, and the other is the collision of two ultrarelativistic blast waves tested in here, are presented to demonstrate that the code captures correctly and gives solution in the discontinuities, accurately. The relativistic astrophysical jet is modeled for the ultrarelativistic flow case. The dynamics of jet flowing is then determined by the ambient parameters such as densities, and velocities of the jets and the momentum impulse applied to the computational surface. We obtain solutions for the jet structure, propagation of jet during the time evolution, and variation in the Mach number on the computational domain at a fixed time.

Orhan Donmez; Refik Kayali

2006-02-14

145

A relativistic beam-plasma system with electromagnetic waves E. G. Evstatiev, P. J. Morrison, and W. Horton  

E-print Network

A relativistic beam-plasma system with electromagnetic waves E. G. Evstatiev, P. J. Morrison, and W multiwave model that describes the interaction of an electron beam, plasma waves, and electromagnetic waves, and electrostatic and electromagnetic waves. The model obtained is finite dimensional, and allows for efficient

Morrison, Philip J.,

146

A high efficient relativistic backward wave oscillator with coaxial nonuniform slow-wave structure and depth-tunable extractor  

SciTech Connect

A high efficient relativistic backward wave oscillator with coaxial nonuniform slow-wave structures (SWSs) and depth-tunable extractor is presented. The physical mechanism to increase the power efficiency is investigated theoretically and experimentally. It is shown that the nonuniform SWSs, the guiding magnetic field distribution, and the coaxial extractor depth play key roles in the enhancement of the beam-wave power conversion efficiency. The experimental results show that a 1.609 GHz, 2.3 GW microwave can be generated when the diode voltage is 890 kV and the beam current is 7.7 kA. The corresponding power efficiency reaches 33.6%.

Ge Xingjun; Zhong Huihuang; Zhang Jun; Qian Baoliang [College of Optoelectronic Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

2013-02-15

147

Energy-Dependent Gamma-Ray Burst Peak Durations and Blast-Wave Deceleration  

E-print Network

Temporal analyses of the prompt gamma-ray and X-ray light curves of gamma-ray bursts reveal a tendency for the burst pulse time scales to increase with decreasing energy. For an ensemble of BATSE bursts, Fenimore et al. (1995) show that the energy dependence of burst peak durations can be represented by $\\Delta t \\propto E^{-\\gamma}$ with $\\gamma \\simeq 0.4$--0.45. This power-law dependence has led to the suggestion that this effect is due to radiative processes, most notably synchrotron cooling of the non-thermal particles which produce the radiation. Here we show that a similar power-law dependence occurs, under certain assumptions, in the context of the blast-wave model and is a consequence of the deceleration of the blast-wave. This effect will obtain whether or not synchrotron cooling is important, but different degrees of cooling will cause variations in the energy dependence of the peak durations.

James Chiang

1998-05-22

148

Two-Dimensional Blast-Wave-Driven Rayleigh-Taylor Instability: Experiment and Simulation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper shows results from experiments diagnosing the development of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability with two-dimensional initial conditions at an embedded, decelerating interface. Experiments are performed at the Omega Laser and use ~5 kJ of energy to create a planar blast wave in a dense, plastic layer that is followed by a lower density foam layer. The single-mode interface has a wavelength of 50 ?m and amplitude of 2.5 ?m. Some targets are supplemented with additional modes. The interface is shocked then decelerated by the foam layer. This initially produces the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability followed and then dominated by Rayleigh-Taylor growth that quickly evolves into the nonlinear regime. The experimental conditions are scaled to be hydrodynamically similar to SN1987A in order to study the instabilities that are believed to occur at the He/H interface during the blast-wave-driven explosion phase of the star. Simulations of the experiment were performed using the FLASH hydrodynamics code.

Kuranz, C. C.; Drake, R. P.; Harding, E. C.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Robey, H. F.; Remington, B. A.; Edwards, M. J.; Miles, A. R.; Perry, T. S.; Blue, B. E.; Plewa, T.; Hearn, N. C.; Knauer, J. P.; Arnett, D.; Leibrandt, D. R.

2009-05-01

149

Computational Study of Thrust Generation from Laser-Driven Blast Wave  

SciTech Connect

We have performed axisymmetric simulations in order to investigate the thrust generation resulting from the interference between the projectile and the blast wave produced by a pulsed laser. The results obtained by our numerical code well agree for the pressure history and the momentum coupling coefficient with the experimental data. In such analysis, it is found that the approximate impulse estimated only by the pressure history at the projectile base is difficult to predict the actual one. Since the shock wave rapidly attenuates in low fill pressure, and the interaction with the projectile almost finishes in the shroud, a high momentum coupling coefficient can be achieved unlike the case of high fill pressure in which the projectile experiences the subsequent negative thrust.

Ohnishi, Naofumi [Center for Research Strategy and Support, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Department of Aerospace Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Ogino, Yousuke [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

2008-04-28

150

Numerical analysis of blast-induced wave propagation using FSI and ALEmulti-material formulations  

Microsoft Academic Search

As explosive blasts continue to cause casualties in both civil and military environments, there is a need to identify the dynamic interaction of blast loading with structures, to know the shock mitigating mechanisms and, most importantly, to identify the mechanisms of blast trauma. This paper examines the air-blast simulation using Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) multi-material formulation. It will explain how

Mehdi Sotudeh Chafi; Ghodrat Karami; Mariusz Ziejewski

2009-01-01

151

Linear and nonlinear wave propagation in weakly relativistic quantum plasmas  

SciTech Connect

We consider a recently derived kinetic model for weakly relativistic quantum plasmas. We find that that the effects of spin-orbit interaction and Thomas precession may alter the linear dispersion relation for a magnetized plasma in case of high plasma densities and/or strong magnetic fields. Furthermore, the ponderomotive force induced by an electromagnetic pulse is studied for an unmagnetized plasma. It turns out that for this case the spin-orbit interaction always gives a significant contribution to the quantum part of the ponderomotive force.

Stefan, Martin; Brodin, Gert [Department of Physics, Umea University, SE-901 87 Umea (Sweden)

2013-01-15

152

Large-amplitude electromagnetic waves in magnetized relativistic plasmas with temperature  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Propagation of large-amplitude waves in plasmas is subject to several sources of nonlinearity due to relativistic effects, either when particle quiver velocities in the wave field are large, or when thermal velocities are large due to relativistic temperatures. Wave propagation in these conditions has been studied for decades, due to its interest in several contexts such as pulsar emission models, laser-plasma interaction, and extragalactic jets. For large-amplitude circularly polarized waves propagating along a constant magnetic field, an exact solution of the fluid equations can be found for relativistic temperatures. Relativistic thermal effects produce: (a) a decrease in the effective plasma frequency (thus, waves in the electromagnetic branch can propagate for lower frequencies than in the cold case); and (b) a decrease in the upper frequency cutoff for the Alfvén branch (thus, Alfvén waves are confined to a frequency range that is narrower than in the cold case). It is also found that the Alfvén speed decreases with temperature, being zero for infinite temperature. We have also studied the same system, but based on the relativistic Vlasov equation, to include thermal effects along the direction of propagation. It turns out that kinetic and fluid results are qualitatively consistent, with several quantitative differences. Regarding the electromagnetic branch, the effective plasma frequency is always larger in the kinetic model. Thus, kinetic effects reduce the transparency of the plasma. As to the Alfvén branch, there is a critical, nonzero value of the temperature at which the Alfvén speed is zero. For temperatures above this critical value, the Alfvén branch is suppressed; however, if the background magnetic field increases, then Alfvén waves can propagate for larger temperatures. There are at least two ways in which the above results can be improved. First, nonlinear decays of the electromagnetic wave have been neglected; second, the kinetic treatment considers thermal effects only along the direction of propagation. We have approached the first subject by studying the parametric decays of the exact wave solution found in the context of fluid theory. The dispersion relation of the decays has been solved, showing several resonant and nonresonant instabilities whose dependence on the wave amplitude and plasma temperature has been studied systematically. Regarding the second subject, we are currently performing numerical 1-D particle in cell simulations, a work that is still in progress, although preliminary results are consistent with the analytical ones.

Muñoz, V.; Asenjo, F. A.; Domínguez, M.; López, R. A.; Valdivia, J. A.; Viñas, A.; Hada, T.

2014-02-01

153

Frequency multiplication of light back-reflected from a relativistic wake wave  

SciTech Connect

A method of coherent high-frequency electromagnetic radiation generation, proposed by Bulanov, Esirkepov, and Tajima [Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 085001 (2003)], is experimentally demonstrated. This method is based on the radiation frequency multiplication during reflection at a mirror flying with relativistic velocity. The relativistic mirror is formed by the electron density modulations in a strongly nonlinear wake wave, excited in an underdense plasma in the wake behind an ultrashort laser pulse. In our experiments, the reflection of a countercrossing laser pulse from the wake wave is observed. The detected frequency multiplication factor is in the range from 55 to 114, corresponding to a reflected radiation wavelength from 7 to 15 nm. This may open a way towards tunable high-intensity sources of ultrashort coherent electromagnetic pulses in the extreme ultraviolet and x-ray spectral regions. Parameters of the reflecting wake wave can be determined using the reflected radiation as a probe.

Pirozhkov, A. S.; Ma, J.; Kando, M.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Fukuda, Y.; Chen, L.-M.; Daito, I.; Ogura, K.; Homma, T.; Hayashi, Y.; Kotaki, H.; Sagisaka, A.; Mori, M.; Koga, J. K.; Kawachi, T.; Daido, H.; Bulanov, S. V.; Kimura, T.; Kato, Y.; Tajima, T. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 8-1 Umemidai, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan)

2007-12-15

154

Relativistic electron precipitation events driven by electromagnetic ion-cyclotron waves  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We adopt a canonical approach to describe the stochastic motion of relativistic belt electrons and their scattering into the loss cone by nonlinear EMIC waves. The estimated rate of scattering is sufficient to account for the rate and intensity of bursty electron precipitation. This interaction is shown to result in particle scattering into the loss cone, forming ˜10 s microbursts of precipitating electrons. These dynamics can account for the statistical correlations between processes of energization, pitch angle scattering, and relativistic electron precipitation events, that are manifested on large temporal scales of the order of the diffusion time ˜tens of minutes.

Khazanov, G.; Sibeck, D.; Tel'nikhin, A.; Kronberg, T.

2014-08-01

155

Wave front for a reaction-diffusion system and relativistic Hamilton-Jacobi dynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The problem of wave-front propagation for the n-dimensional reaction-diffusion system involving Kolmogorov-Petrovskii-Piskunov kinetics and the diffusion transport with a finite velocity has been considered. By using a scaling procedure we have given an asymptotic derivation of the equation governing the evolution of a reaction front in the long-time large-distance limit. It has been found that this equation is identical in form to the relativistic Hamilton-Jacobi equation. In the case of a constant value of chemical rate function we have derived exact formulas for the position of reaction front and the speed of propagation by using relativistic mechanics techniques.

Fedotov, Sergei

1999-05-01

156

On the Non-relativistic Limit of Linear Wave Equations for Zero and Unity Spin Particles  

E-print Network

The non-relativistic limit of the linear wave equation for zero and unity spin bosons of mass $m$ in the Duffin-Kemmer-Petiau representation is investigated by means of a unitary transformation, analogous to the Foldy-Wouthuysen canonical transformation for a relativistic electron. The interacting case is also analyzed, by considering a power series expansion of the transformed Hamiltonian, thus demonstrating that all features of particle dynamics can be recovered if corrections of order $1/m^{2}$ are taken into account through a recursive iteration procedure.

P. Yu. Moshin; J. L. Tomazelli

2007-04-26

157

On the Non-relativistic Limit of Linear Wave Equations for Zero and Unity Spin Particles  

E-print Network

The non-relativistic limit of the linear wave equation for zero and unity spin bosons of mass $m$ in the Duffin-Kemmer-Petiau representation is investigated by means of a unitary transformation, analogous to the Foldy-Wouthuysen canonical transformation for a relativistic electron. The interacting case is also analyzed, by considering a power series expansion of the transformed Hamiltonian, thus demonstrating that all features of particle dynamics can be recovered if corrections of order $1/m^{2}$ are properly taken into account through a recursive iteration procedure.

Moshin, P Yu

2007-01-01

158

Reduction of the wave packet of a relativistic charged particle by emission of a photon  

E-print Network

The problem of reduction of the wave packet of a relativistic charged particle by emission of a photon is studied with help of the path integral approach. A general expression for arbitrary order correlation function of the electromagnetic field is obtained. As a specific example an ultrarelativistic electron circulating in a storage ring is considered. It is shown that the longitudinal width of the electron wave packet defined by characteristic difference of time between registrations of two photons emitted by the electron is of the order of the wave length of the photons.

S. V. Faleev

1997-06-16

159

Dispersion relations of nonlinearly coupled electromagnetic and electrostatic waves in relativistic plasmas  

SciTech Connect

In the present work large amplitude electromagnetic waves in cold plasmas at relativistic intensities are studied analytically in a plane wave geometry. Special attention is drawn to the nonlinear coupling of electromagnetic and electrostatic modes. In the framework of the Akhiezer-Polovin model, periodic and more general quasiperiodic waves are taken into account. For small densities a two-time-scale method is used to calculate an analytical solution up to the fourth order in the plasma density. Nonlinear dispersion relations are calculated for coupled waves, taking into account the full plasma response for linear as well as for circular polarization. In the presence of a large amplitude electrostatic wave, the results show a major difference from the commonly considered dispersion relation for electromagnetic waves. Finally, the solutions of the Akhiezer-Polovin model are compared with particle-in-cell simulations.

Pesch, T. C.; Kull, H.-J. [Institute of Theoretical Physics A, RWTH Aachen University, Templergraben 55, 52056 Aachen (Germany)

2010-01-15

160

Influence of the principal geometrical parameters of straight city streets on positive and negative phase blast wave impulses  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study is concerned with the effect of confinement, provided by tall buildings which border straight city streets, on the positive and negative phase impulses of blast waves originating from explosive detonations. An approach to the problem is described which is based on a parametric study comprising numerical simulations validated by comparison with small-scale experiments. Results of the simulations are

T. A Rose; P. D Smith

2002-01-01

161

Numerical simulation of the fluid–structure interaction between air blast waves and free-standing plates  

Microsoft Academic Search

A numerical method is used to compute the flow field corresponding to blast waves of different incident profiles propagating in air and impinging on free-standing plates. The method is suitable for the consideration of compressibility effects in the fluid and their influence on the plate dynamics. The history of the pressure experienced by the plate is extracted from numerical simulations

Nayden Kambouchev; Ludovic Noels; Raul Radovitzky

2007-01-01

162

Fluid/Structure Interaction Computational Investigation of Blast-Wave Mitigation Efficacy of the Advanced Combat Helmet  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To combat the problem of traumatic brain injury (TBI), a signature injury of the current military conflicts, there is an urgent need to design head protection systems with superior blast/ballistic impact mitigation capabilities. Toward that end, the blast impact mitigation performance of an advanced combat helmet (ACH) head protection system equipped with polyurea suspension pads and subjected to two different blast peak pressure loadings has been investigated computationally. A fairly detailed (Lagrangian) finite-element model of a helmet/skull/brain assembly is first constructed and placed into an Eulerian air domain through which a single planar blast wave propagates. A combined Eulerian/Lagrangian transient nonlinear dynamics computational fluid/solid interaction analysis is next conducted in order to assess the extent of reduction in intra-cranial shock-wave ingress (responsible for TBI). This was done by comparing temporal evolutions of intra-cranial normal and shear stresses for the cases of an unprotected head and the helmet-protected head and by correlating these quantities with the three most common types of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), i.e., axonal damage, contusion, and subdural hemorrhage. The results obtained show that the ACH provides some level of protection against all investigated types of mTBI and that the level of protection increases somewhat with an increase in blast peak pressure. In order to rationalize the aforementioned findings, a shockwave propagation/reflection analysis is carried out for the unprotected head and helmet-protected head cases. The analysis qualitatively corroborated the results pertaining to the blast-mitigation efficacy of an ACH, but also suggested that there are additional shockwave energy dissipation phenomena which play an important role in the mechanical response of the unprotected/protected head to blast impact.

Grujicic, M.; Bell, W. C.; Pandurangan, B.; Glomski, P. S.

2011-08-01

163

On Using Cyclotron Waves for Output of Radiation from High-Power Relativistic Backward-Wave Oscillators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We discuss the scheme of a high-power relativistic backward-wave oscillator operating with a high-current explosive-emission electron beam. The radiation output from the tube is based on reflection of the operating wave into a fast cyclotron wave which transmits the energy of the high-frequency field towards the collector. At the collector, reverse conversion into the output electromagnetic wave takes place. The proposed scheme allows one to increase electric strength, as well as the transverse size of the working space of the backward-wave oscillator. It is shown that within the proposed scheme, one can reduce the focusing magnetic field without decreasing the power of the output radiation.

Goykhman, M. B.; Gromov, A. V.; Kladukhin, V. V.; Kovalev, N. F.; Kolganov, N. G.; Palitsin, A. V.

2014-09-01

164

Wave function of particle and the coordinates distribution in relativistic quantum theory  

E-print Network

The conditions for observation of the particle coordinates, required by logic of the Special Relativity and filtering the quantum field effects, are described. A general relation between the corresponding density of probability and the wave function is found. It is a relativistic invariant describing probability of the particle emergences in space -time. This density is concretized for bosons, both scalar and vector (including photon), charged and neutral, also electron. The Heisenberg's uncertainty relations have been approved in regards to relativistic particle. As applied to the quantum field, this new construction is transformed to new characteristic of the particles distribution in space-time, which complete distribution throughout impulses. The operators of these distributions and the invariant relativistic description for free quantum fields have been obtained. These new properties of the particles and fields are proposed for experimental investigations.

V. F. Krotov

2008-04-28

165

Compressional Mode ULF Waves Excitation and Relativistic Electron Acceleration during a Geomagnetic Storm Event  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There has been increasing evidence indicating the importance of magnetospheric ULF waves in the Pc-5 frequency range in enhancing relativistic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt. These ULF waves can be divided into two groups: poloidal modes and toroidal modes. In theory, electron acceleration by poloidal-mode wave should be more effective than by toroidal mode wave due to that electron drift motion is mainly along the azimuthal direction overlapping with compressional (poloidal) mode wave electric field. We found evidence of relativistic electron acceleration by the compressional-mode ULF waves during a storm sudden commencement event on September 25, 2001. In this event, the energetic electron flux measured by LANL shows modulations of low-energy electrons and acceleration of high-energy electrons by the compressional mode electric field oscillations over 2-3 hours. The energy threshold of accelerated electrons at the geosynchronous orbit agrees well with the theory of drift-resonant interaction of magnetospheric electrons with compressional-mode ULF waves. Global MHD simulation of the event through NASA/CCMC will also be presented.

Shao, X.; Tan, L. C.; Tornquist, M.; Vassiliadis, D.; Sharma, A. S.; Fung, S. F.

2012-12-01

166

Brain Response to Primary Blast Wave Using Validated Finite Element Models of Human Head and Advanced Combat Helmet  

PubMed Central

Blast-induced traumatic brain injury has emerged as a “signature injury” in combat casualty care. Present combat helmets are designed primarily to protect against ballistic and blunt impacts, but the current issue with helmets is protection concerning blasts. In order to delineate the blast wave attenuating capability of the Advanced Combat Helmet (ACH), a finite element (FE) study was undertaken to evaluate the head response against blast loadings with and without helmet using a partially validated FE model of the human head and ACH. Four levels of overpressures (0.27–0.66?MPa) from the Bowen’s lung iso-damage threshold curves were used to simulate blast insults. Effectiveness of the helmet with respect to head orientation was also investigated. The resulting biomechanical responses of the brain to blast threats were compared for human head with and without the helmet. For all Bowen’s cases, the peak intracranial pressures (ICP) in the head ranged from 0.68 to 1.8?MPa in the coup cortical region. ACH was found to mitigate ICP in the head by 10–35%. Helmeted head resulted in 30% lower average peak brain strains and product of strain and strain rate. Among three blast loading directions with ACH, highest reduction in peak ICP (44%) was due to backward blasts whereas the lowest reduction in peak ICP and brain strains was due to forward blast (27%). The biomechanical responses of a human head to primary blast insult exhibited directional sensitivity owing to the different geometry contours and coverage of the helmet construction and asymmetric anatomy of the head. Thus, direction-specific tolerances are needed in helmet design in order to offer omni-directional protection for the human head. The blasts of varying peak overpressures and durations that are believed to produce the same level of lung injury produce different levels of mechanical responses in the brain, and hence “iso-damage” curves for brain injury are likely different than the Bowen curves for lung injury. PMID:23935591

Zhang, Liying; Makwana, Rahul; Sharma, Sumit

2013-01-01

167

Radiation from highly relativistic geodesics. [gravitational wave generation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A number of recent works are reviewed concerning the generation and emission of gravitational waves. It is shown that at high frequencies, the generation of gravitational radiation is a local phenomenon. Two examples are described illustrating this generation when a high-energy particle collides against the space-time curvature. One, after Matzner and Nutku, uses a method of virtual photons; the other, after Chrzanowski and Misner, is based on the W.K.B. approximation, corresponding to geometric optics, for the inhomogeneous wave equation. This method uses a factorized integral representation of the Green function which is valid asymptotically to infinity in space.

Misner, C. W.

1974-01-01

168

Localization of small arms fire using acoustic measurements of muzzle blast and/or ballistic shock wave arrivals.  

PubMed

The accurate localization of small arms fire using fixed acoustic sensors is considered. First, the conventional wavefront-curvature passive ranging method, which requires only differential time-of-arrival (DTOA) measurements of the muzzle blast wave to estimate the source position, is modified to account for sensor positions that are not strictly collinear (bowed array). Second, an existing single-sensor-node ballistic model-based localization method, which requires both DTOA and differential angle-of-arrival (DAOA) measurements of the muzzle blast wave and ballistic shock wave, is improved by replacing the basic external ballistics model (which describes the bullet's deceleration along its trajectory) with a more rigorous model and replacing the look-up table ranging procedure with a nonlinear (or polynomial) equation-based ranging procedure. Third, a new multiple-sensor-node ballistic model-based localization method, which requires only DTOA measurements of the ballistic shock wave to localize the point of fire, is formulated. The first method is applicable to situations when only the muzzle blast wave is received, whereas the third method applies when only the ballistic shock wave is received. The effectiveness of each of these methods is verified using an extensive set of real data recorded during a 7 day field experiment. PMID:23145587

Lo, Kam W; Ferguson, Brian G

2012-11-01

169

Circular polarization for electric fields associated with seismic waves generated by blasting  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In discussion on electric fields associated with seismic waves, the so-called electrokinetic effect is the most popular. In fact it has been extensively studied in both field observations and laboratory experiments. In the meantime, we found a circular polarization of electric field in association with aftershocks of large earthquakes and succeeded in explaining this phenomenon by extending the so-called induction effect, as clearly indicated by Honkura et al. [2009], in which we called the mechanism the seismic dynamo effect. It is circular polarization of electric field that is the essential feature in this mechanism. Such polarization can arise if resonance occurs between the frequency of ground velocity and the cyclotron frequency of a certain kind of ion in the Earth's magnetic field. We have so far found clear circular polarization of electric field for aftershocks of two large earthquakes, whereas we have found linear polarization in the cases of artificial seismic wave caused by blasting. It should be noted that the typical frequency of ground velocity observed for natural earthquakes is lower than that for artificial ones. Therefore, at present, there is a possibility that the difference between circular polarization for natural earthquakes and linear polarization for artificial earthquakes arises from a difference in mechanisms corresponding to respective typical frequencies of seismic wave. If the mechanism proposed by Honkura et al. [2009] is universal, irrespective of the types of seismic wave, it is possible to show further examples of circular polarization of electric field even for artificial earthquakes. Hence, we made simultaneous observations of ground velocity and electric field at some sites near blasting points in Japan. Here we present seven examples of electric filed variations obtained for artificial earthquakes. In some cases, electric fields have shown circular polarization, which is left-circular, implying the motion of ions with positive electric charge and the likely ion is Na+ if we take into account of the cyclotron frequency for the Earth's magnetic field at the observation sites. In a few cases, electric field variations arrived at the observation site earlier than the associated waves, although the precursory time is very short, less than 0.1 second. Nevertheless, this is significant in that the electric field travels faster than the elastic wave in the crust with implications of earlier detection of a seismic event.

Matsushima, M.; Honkura, Y.; Kuriki, M.; Ogawa, Y.

2010-12-01

170

Relativistic solitary waves with phase modulation embedded in long laser pulses in plasmas  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the existence of nonlinear phase-modulated relativistic solitary waves embedded in an infinitely long circularly polarized electromagnetic wave propagating through a plasma. These states are exact nonlinear solutions of the 1-dimensional Maxwell-fluid model for a cold plasma composed of electrons and ions. The solitary wave, which consists of an electromagnetic wave trapped in a self-generated Langmuir wave, presents a phase modulation when the group velocity V and the phase velocity V{sub ph} of the long circularly polarized electromagnetic wave do not match the condition VV{sub ph} = c{sup 2}. The main properties of the waves as a function of their group velocities, wavevectors, and frequencies are studied, as well as bifurcations of the dynamical system that describes the waves when the parameter controlling the phase modulation changes from zero to a finite value. Such a transition is illustrated in the limit of small amplitude waves where an analytical solution for a grey solitary wave exists. The solutions are interpreted as the stationary state after the collision of a long laser pulse with an isolated solitary wave.

Sanchez-Arriaga, G.; Siminos, E.; Lefebvre, E. [CEA, DAM, DIF, 91297 Arpajon (France)

2011-08-15

171

Mode selection in an S-band relativistic backward wave oscillator based on a coaxial waveguide  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The competition of oscillations in a relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO) based on a coaxial waveguide has been studied by theoretical and experimental methods. It is established that the starting current for asymmetric magnetic TE m1 type waves is lower than that for the TEM wave. Predominant excitation of the former waves is confirmed by numerical simulations using the PIC-code KARAT. In an experimental RBWO prototype, the excitation of asymmetric oscillations was suppressed by longitudinal cuts in the central conductor of the coaxial waveguide. As a result, stable generation of the TEM wave has been achieved at a frequency of 1.23 GHz, a peak power of 260 MW, and a 28% efficiency of electron-beam-power conversion into radiation power for a microwave-pulse duration of 33 ns.

Totmeninov, E. M.; Klimov, A. I.; Konev, V. Yu.; Pegel, I. V.; Rostov, V. V.; Tsygankov, R. V.; Tarakanov, V. P.

2014-02-01

172

Solitary and rogue waves in Fermi-Dirac plasmas: relativistic degeneracy effects  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ion acoustic (IA) solitary and rogue waves are studied in an unmagnetized plasma consisting of non-degenerate warm ions, relativistically degenerate electrons and positrons. By using the reductive perturbation technique, the evolution of IA solitary waves is described by the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation. However, when the frequency of the carrier wave is much smaller than the ion plasma frequency then the KdV equation is also used to study the nonlinear evolution of modulationally unstable modified IA wavepackets through the derivation of nonlinear Schrödinger equation. It is found that the characteristics of the IA solitary and rogue waves are substantially influenced by the intrinsic plasma parameters. The relevance of the present investigation involving IA solitary and rogue waves in astrophysical plasma environments is also highlighted.

Rahman, Ata-ur; Ali, S.

2014-05-01

173

Exact relativistic expressions for wave refraction in a generally moving fluid.  

PubMed

The law for the refraction of a wave when the two fluids and the interface are moving with relativistic velocities is given in an exact form, at the same time correcting a first order error in a previous paper [Cavalleri and Tonni, Phys. Rev. E 57, 3478 (1998)]. The treatment is then extended to a generally moving fluid with variable refractive index, ready to be applied to the refraction of acoustic, electromagnetic, or magnetohydrodynamic waves in the atmosphere of rapidly rotating stars. In the particular case of a gas cloud receding because of the universe expansion, our result can be applied to predict observable micro- and mesolensings. The first order approximation of our exact result for the deviation due to refraction of the light coming from a further quasar has a relativistic dependence equal to the one obtained by Einsteins' linearized theory of gravitation. PMID:23679540

Cavalleri, G; Tonni, E; Barbero, F

2013-04-01

174

Simulations of Magnetic Field Generation in Laser-Produced Blast Waves  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Magnetic fields are ubiquitous in the Universe. The origin of these fields and process by which they are amplified are not fully understood, although amplification is thought to involve turbulence. Experiments being conducted at medium-scale laser facilities (such as the LULI laser the Janus laser) can investigate the self-generation of magnetic fields under conditions that resemble astrophysical shocks. In these experiments, two 527 nm, 1.5 ns long laser beams are focused onto a 500 ?m diameter graphite rod producing an explosion and asymmetric blast wave into a Helium filled chamber. A variety of diagnostics measure the velocity, electron density, and show that a large scale magnetic field is produced. We report preliminary hydrodynamic and MHD simulations using FLASH of a simplified version of the experiment. The results provide insights into the origin and generation of the magnetic field.

Lamb, D.; Fatenejad, M.; Gregori, G.; Miniati, F.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B.; Ravasio, A.; Koenig, M.; Murphy, C. D.

2011-11-01

175

Wave amplification by a relativistic electron beam in a planar electrostatic system with sinusoidal-ripple boundary  

SciTech Connect

Primary study is devoted to the amplification mechanism of electromagnetic fast wave by a relativistic electron beam in a planar electrostatic system, where the superplate of two parallel metallic plates is corrugated with sinusoidal ripples and connected to a negative voltage, while the subplate is smooth and grounded. In the system the electrostatic field governs the electrons to move along approximately sinusoidal trajectories and pumps the kinetic energy of electrons to the wave. Under exclusion of the space-charge wave effect and the Smith-Purcell effect, the fast wave gets relativistic Doppler upshift frequency and gain by extracting energy from a sheet electron beam, which is very similar to that in a free-electron laser pumped by a magnetostatic wiggler. Formulas derived and numerical analysis indicate that the amplification mechanism of wave pumped by the planar electrostatic system with sinusoidal ripples is favorable for a mildly relativistic electron beam to generate terahertz wave.

Zhang Shichang [Institute of Photoelectronics, Campus Mail Box 50, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu SC610031 (China)

2009-09-15

176

Method of accelerating photons by a relativistic plasma wave  

DOEpatents

Photons of a laser pulse have their group velocity accelerated in a plasma as they are placed on a downward density gradient of a plasma wave of which the phase velocity nearly matches the group velocity of the photons. This acceleration results in a frequency upshift. If the unperturbed plasma has a slight density gradient in the direction of propagation, the photon frequencies can be continuously upshifted to significantly greater values.

Dawson, John M. (Pacific Palisades, CA); Wilks, Scott C. (Santa Monica, CA)

1990-01-01

177

Relativistic theory of wave-particle resonant diffusion with application to electron acceleration in the magnetosphere  

Microsoft Academic Search

Resonant diffusion curves for electron cyclotron resonance with field-aligned electromagnetic R mode and L mode electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are constructed using a fully relativistic treatment. Analytical solutions are derived for the case of a single-ion plasma, and a numerical scheme is developed for the more realistic case of a multi-ion plasma. Diffusion curves are presented for plasma parameters

Danny Summers; Richard M. Thorne; Fuliang Xiao

1998-01-01

178

Coherent keV backscattering from plasma-wave boosted relativistic electron mirrors  

E-print Network

A new parameter regime of laser wakefield acceleration driven by sub-petawatt femotsecond lasers is proposed, which enables the generation of relativistic electron mirrors further accelerated by the plasma wave. Integrated particle-in-cell simulation including the mirror formation and Thomson scattering demonstrates that efficient coherent backscattering up to keV photon energy can be obtained with moderate driver laser intensities and high density gas targets.

Li, F Y; Chen, M; Wu, H C; Liu, Y; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J; Mori, W B; Zhang, J

2014-01-01

179

Wave dispersion in a counterstreaming, relativistic thermal, magnetized, electron-positron plasma  

SciTech Connect

The dispersion equation is analyzed for waves in a strongly magnetized, electron-positron plasma in which counterstreaming electrons and positrons have a relativistic thermal distribution in their respective rest frames, for propagation parallel to the magnetic field. We derive the response tensor for the medium, demonstrate the dispersion curves for different temperatures, and discuss the differences from the cold-plasma case. Application to the case of pulsar magnetospheres is discussed.

Verdon, M. W.; Melrose, D. B. [School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)

2011-05-15

180

Relativistic Covariance and Quark-Diquark Wave Functions  

E-print Network

We derive covariant wave functions for hadrons composed of two constituents for arbitrary Lorentz boosts. Focussing explicitly on baryons as quark-diquark systems, we reduce their manifestly covariant Bethe-Salpeter equation to covariant 3-dimensional forms by projecting on the relative quark-diquark energy. Guided by a phenomenological multi gluon exchange representation of covariant confining kernels, we derive explicit solutions for harmonic confinement and for the MIT Bag Model. We briefly sketch implications of breaking the spherical symmetry of the ground state and the transition from the instant form to the light cone via the infinite momentum frame.

M. Dillig

2006-04-24

181

Rapid startup in relativistic backward wave oscillator by injecting external backward signal  

SciTech Connect

Investigation on accelerating the building up of oscillation and achieving a rapid startup in powerful relativistic backward wave oscillator by injecting a weak external backward signal is carried out in this paper. Synchronizing the signal with the backward wave excited by intense electron beam extracting with slow wave structure, the initial noise is greatly reduced and mode competition is restrained. The analysis is demonstrated by high power X-band backward wave oscillator experiment, in which a plasma switch is designed to realize the backward signal injection. The results show that the significant reduction of microwave output delay is attained and the start time of oscillation is ahead of 10 ns with the energy conversion efficiency increases about 62%.

Song, W.; Teng, Y.; Zhang, Z. Q.; Li, J. W.; Sun, J.; Chen, C. H.; Zhang, L. J. [Science and Technology on High Power Microwave Laboratory, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an, Shanxi 710024 (China)

2012-08-15

182

Loss of geosynchronous relativistic electrons by EMIC wave scattering under quiet geomagnetic conditions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have examined relativistic electron flux losses at geosynchronous orbit under quiet geomagnetic conditions. One 3 day period, from 11 to 13 October 2007, was chosen for analysis because geomagnetic conditions were very quiet (3 day average of Kp< 1), and significant losses of geosynchronous relativistic electrons were observed. During this interval, there was no geomagnetic storm activity. Thus, the loss processes associated with geomagnetic field modulations caused by ring current buildup can be excluded. The >2 MeV electron flux at geosynchronous orbit shows typical diurnal variations with a maximum near noon and a minimum near midnight for each day. The flux level of the daily variation significantly decreased from first day to third day for the 3 day period by a factor of >10. The total magnetic field strength (BT) of the daily variation on the third day, however, is comparable to that on the first day. Unlike electron flux decreases, the flux of protons with energies between 0.8 and 4 MeV adiabatically responses to the daily variation of BT. That is, there is no significant decrease of the proton flux when the electron flux decreases. During the interval of quiet geomagnetic conditions, well-defined electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves were detected at geosynchronous spacecraft. Low-altitude polar-orbiting spacecraft observed the precipitation of energetic protons and relativistic electrons in the interval of EMIC waves enhancement. From these observations, we suggest that the EMIC waves at geosynchronous orbit cause pitch angle scattering and relativistic electron losses to the atmosphere under quiet geomagnetic conditions.

Hyun, K.; Kim, K.-H.; Lee, E.; Kwon, H.-J.; Lee, D.-H.; Jin, H.

2014-10-01

183

Including the relativistic kinetic energy in a spline-augmented plane-wave band calculation  

SciTech Connect

The first-order relativistic correction to the kinetic energy of an electron, the mass-velocity term, is not bounded from below. It can, therefore, not be used within a variational framework. To overcome this deficiency we developed a method to include the entire relativistic kinetic energy {radical}(p{sup 2}c{sup 2}+m{sub 0}{sup 2}c{sup 4}){minus}m{sub 0}c{sup 2} in a spline-augmented plane-wave band calculation. The first results for silver are quite promising, especially for d and p states: The analysis of the energies of the core states as well as of the valence band structure suggests that the energies of d bands are reproduced within 1 mRy. However, the combination of the relativistic kinetic energy with the Darwin term leads to energies which are too low for s-like valence states by 10 mRy. Therefore, the s and d valence band complex is spread out and the Fermi level is lowered by the same amount as the s states. We expect to overcome these deficiencies in future investigations by using a alternative form of the relativistic potential correction along the lines proposed by Douglas and Kroll. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

Fehrenbach, G.M.; Schmidt, G. [Sektion Physik der Ludwig Maximilians Universitaet Muenchen, Theresienstrae 37, 80333 Munich (Federal Republic of Germany)] [Sektion Physik der Ludwig Maximilians Universitaet Muenchen, Theresienstrae 37, 80333 Munich (Federal Republic of Germany)

1997-03-01

184

Modeling blast waves, gas and particles dispersion in urban and hilly ground areas.  

PubMed

The numerical simulation of shock and blast waves as well as particles dispersion in highly heterogeneous media such as cities, urban places, industrial plants and part of countries is addressed. Examples of phenomena under study are chemical gas products dispersion from damaged vessels, gas dispersion in urban places under explosion conditions, shock wave propagation in urban environment. A three-dimensional simulation multiphase flow code (HI2LO) is developed in this aim. To simplify the consideration of complex geometries, a heterogeneous discrete formulation is developed. When dealing with large scale domains, such as countries, the topography is considered with the help of elevation data. Meteorological conditions are also considered, in particular regarding complex temperature and wind profiles. Heat and mass transfers on sub-scale objects, such as buildings, trees and other obstacles are considered as well. Particles motion is addressed through a new turbulence model involving a single parameter to describe accurately plumes. Validations against experiments in basic situations are presented as well as examples of industrial and environmental computations. PMID:25199503

Hank, S; Saurel, R; Le Métayer, O; Lapébie, E

2014-09-15

185

Cylindrical and Spherical Ion-Acoustic Shock Waves in a Relativistic Degenerate Multi-Ion Plasma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A rigorous theoretical investigation has been made to study the existence and basic features of the ion-acoustic (IA) shock structures in an unmagnetized, collisionless multi-ion plasma system (containing degenerate electron fluids, inertial positively as well as negatively charged ions, and arbitrarily charged static heavy ions). This investigation is valid for both non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic limits. The reductive perturbation technique has been employed to derive the modified Burgers equation. The solution of this equation has been numerically examined to study the basic properties of shock structures. The basic features (speed, amplitude, width, etc.) of these electrostatic shock structures have been briefly discussed. The basic properties of the IA shock waves are found to be significantly modified by the effects of arbitrarily charged static heavy ions and the plasma particle number densities. The implications of our results in space and interstellar compact objects like white dwarfs, neutron stars, black holes, and so on have been briefly discussed.

Hossen, M. R.; Nahar, L.; Mamun, A. A.

2014-12-01

186

Cylindrical and Spherical Ion-Acoustic Shock Waves in a Relativistic Degenerate Multi-Ion Plasma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A rigorous theoretical investigation has been made to study the existence and basic features of the ion-acoustic (IA) shock structures in an unmagnetized, collisionless multi-ion plasma system (containing degenerate electron fluids, inertial positively as well as negatively charged ions, and arbitrarily charged static heavy ions). This investigation is valid for both non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic limits. The reductive perturbation technique has been employed to derive the modified Burgers equation. The solution of this equation has been numerically examined to study the basic properties of shock structures. The basic features (speed, amplitude, width, etc.) of these electrostatic shock structures have been briefly discussed. The basic properties of the IA shock waves are found to be significantly modified by the effects of arbitrarily charged static heavy ions and the plasma particle number densities. The implications of our results in space and interstellar compact objects like white dwarfs, neutron stars, black holes, and so on have been briefly discussed.

Hossen, M. R.; Nahar, L.; Mamun, A. A.

2014-07-01

187

Amplification of a high-frequency electromagnetic wave by a relativistic plasma  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The amplification of a high-frequency transverse electromagnetic wave by a relativistic plasma component, via the synchrotron maser process, is studied. The background plasma that supports the transverse wave is considered to be cold, and the energetic component whose density is much smaller than that of the background component has a loss-cone feature in the perpendicular momentum space and a finite field-aligned drift speed. The ratio of the background plasma frequency squared to the electron gyrofrequency squared is taken to be sufficiently larger than unity. Such a parameter regime is relevant to many space and astrophysical situations. A detailed study of the amplification process is carried out over a wide range of physical parameters including the loss-cone index, the ratio of the electron mass energy to the temperature of the energetic component, the field-aligned drift speed, the normalized density, and the wave propagation angle.

Yoon, Peter H.

1990-01-01

188

Effects of initially energetic electrons on relativistic laser-driven electron plasma waves  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, using kinetic calculations and accurate 1D2V particle-in-cell simulations, we point out the important role of initially energetic electrons of the distribution tail in the behavior of high amplitude electron plasma waves (EPWs). In the presence of these electrons, the conventional warm fluid theory (WFT) breaks at very high wave amplitudes that are still noticeably lower than the wave breaking amplitude (WBA). The fluid breakdown results in electron super-heating with respect to the adiabatic laws. Indeed, a new kinetic regime of the relativistic EPWs appears below the WBA. It is argued that the mentioned super-heating results in WBA values lower than the corresponding WFT prediction.

Yazdanpanah, J.; Anvari, A.

2014-02-01

189

Planar and nonplanar ion acoustic shock waves in relativistic degenerate astrophysical electron-positron-ion plasmas  

SciTech Connect

We have studied the propagation of ion acoustic shock waves involving planar and non-planar geometries in an unmagnetized plasma, whose constituents are non-degenerate ultra-cold ions, relativistically degenerate electrons, and positrons. By using the reductive perturbation technique, Korteweg-deVries Burger and modified Korteweg-deVries Burger equations are derived. It is shown that only compressive shock waves can propagate in such a plasma system. The effects of geometry, the ion kinematic viscosity, and the positron concentration are examined on the ion acoustic shock potential and electric field profiles. It is found that the properties of ion acoustic shock waves in a non-planar geometry significantly differ from those in planar geometry. The present study has relevance to the dense plasmas, produced in laboratory (e.g., super-intense laser-dense matter experiments) and in dense astrophysical objects.

Ata-ur-Rahman,; Qamar, A. [Institute of Physics and Electronics, University of Peshawar, Peshawar 25000 (Pakistan); National Centre for Physics, QAU Campus, Shahdrah Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Ali, S. [National Centre for Physics, QAU Campus, Shahdrah Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Mirza, Arshad M. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Group, Physics Department, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan)

2013-04-15

190

Long-term cyclotron dynamics of relativistic wave packets: Spontaneous collapse and revival  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this work we study the effects of collapse and revival, as well as the zitterbewegung (ZB) phenomenon, for the relativistic electron wave packets, which are a superposition of the states with quantum numbers sharply peaked around some Landau level n0 of the order of few tens. The probability densities as well as average velocities of the packet center and the average spin components were calculated analytically and their evolution is visualized. Our computations demonstrate that due to the dephasing of the states for times larger than the cyclotron period the initial wave packet (which includes the states with the positive energy only) loses the spatial localization so that the evolution can no longer be described classically. However, at the half-revival time t=TR/2 its reshaping takes place first. It is shown that the behavior of the wave packet containing the states of both energy bands (with En>0 and En<0) is more complicated. At short times of a few classical periods such a packet splits into two parts, which rotate with cyclotron frequency in the opposite directions and meet each other every one-half of the cyclotron period. At these moments their wave functions have a significant overlap that leads to ZB, and at the time of fractional revival each of two subpackets is decomposed into few packet fractions. However, at t=TR each of the two subpackets (with positive or negative energy) restores at various points of the cyclotron orbit, which makes reshaping of the initial wave packet impossible, entirely unlike the wave packet which consists of states with energies En>0 only. The obtained results can be useful for the description of electromagnetic radiation and absorption in relativistic plasma on astrophysics objects, where superhigh magnetic field has a value of the order 108-109T, as well as for interpretation of experiments with trapped ions.

Demikhovskii, V. Ya.; Maksimova, G. M.; Perov, A. A.; Telezhnikov, A. V.

2012-02-01

191

Effect of Oblique Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves on Relativistic Electron Scattering: CRRES Based Calculation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We consider the effect of oblique EMIC waves on relativistic electron scattering in the outer radiation belt using simultaneous observations of plasma and wave parameters from CRRES. The main findings can be s ummarized as follows: 1. In 1comparison with field-aligned waves, int ermediate and highly oblique distributions decrease the range of pitc h-angles subject to diffusion, and reduce the local scattering rate b y an order of magnitude at pitch-angles where the principle absolute value of n = 1 resonances operate. Oblique waves allow the absolute va lue of n > 1 resonances to operate, extending the range of local pitc h-angle diffusion down to the loss cone, and increasing the diffusion at lower pitch angles by orders of magnitude; 2. The local diffusion coefficients derived from CRRES data are qualitatively similar to the local results obtained for prescribed plasma/wave parameters. Conseq uently, it is likely that the bounce-averaged diffusion coefficients, if estimated from concurrent data, will exhibit the dependencies similar to those we found for model calculations; 3. In comparison with f ield-aligned waves, intermediate and highly oblique waves decrease th e bounce-averaged scattering rate near the edge of the equatorial lo ss cone by orders of magnitude if the electron energy does not excee d a threshold (approximately equal to 2 - 5 MeV) depending on specified plasma and/or wave parameters; 4. For greater electron energies_ ob lique waves operating the absolute value of n > 1 resonances are more effective and provide the same bounce_averaged diffusion rate near the loss cone as fiel_aligned waves do.

Gamayunov, K. V.; Khazanov, G. V.

2007-01-01

192

Self-modulation of nonlinear waves in a weakly magnetized relativistic electron-positron plasma with temperature.  

PubMed

We develop a nonlinear theory for self-modulation of a circularly polarized electromagnetic wave in a relativistic hot weakly magnetized electron-positron plasma. The case of parallel propagation along an ambient magnetic field is considered. A nonlinear Schrödinger equation is derived for the complex wave amplitude of a self-modulated wave packet. We show that the maximum growth rate of the modulational instability decreases as the temperature of the pair plasma increases. Depending on the initial conditions, the unstable wave envelope can evolve nonlinearly to either periodic wave trains or solitary waves. This theory has application to high-energy astrophysics and high-power laser physics. PMID:22680585

Asenjo, Felipe A; Borotto, Felix A; Chian, Abraham C-L; Muñoz, Víctor; Valdivia, J Alejandro; Rempel, Erico L

2012-04-01

193

Latitudinal dependence of nonlinear interaction between electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave and radiation belt relativistic electrons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are long suggested to account for the rapid loss of radiation belt relativistic electrons. Here we perform both theoretical analysis and numerical simulation to comprehensively investigate the nonlinear interaction between EMIC wave and relativistic electrons. In particular, we emphasize the dependence of nonlinear processes on the electron initial latitude. The nonlinear phase trapping yields negative equatorial pitch angle transport, with efficiency varying over the electron initial latitude, implying that it can increase the loss rate predicted by quasilinear theory. The nonlinear channel effect phase bunching produces positive equatorial pitch angle transport, less dependent on the electron initial latitude, suggesting that it can decrease the loss rate predicted by quasilinear theory. The nonlinear cluster effect phase bunching alternately causes positive and negative equatorial pitch angle transport, quasi-periodically dependent on the electron initial latitude, suggesting that it can either decrease or increase the loss rate predicted by the quasilinear theory. Such latitudinal dependence of nonlinear processes should be taken into account in the evaluation of radiation belt electron loss rate driven by EMIC waves.

Su, Zhenpeng; Zhu, Hui; Xiao, Fuliang; Zheng, Huinan; Shen, Chao; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Shui

2013-06-01

194

Precipitation of relativistic electrons by interaction with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

On August 20, 1996, balloon-borne X-ray detectors observed an intense X-ray event as part of a French balloon campaign near Kiruna, Sweden, at 1532 UT (1835 magnetic local time), on an L shell of 5.8. The energy spectrum of this event shows the presence of X rays with energies >1 MeV, which are best accounted for by atmospheric bremsstrahlung from monoenergetic ~1.7 MeV precipitating electrons. Ultraviolet images from the Polar satellite and energetic particle data from the Los Alamos geosynchronous satellites show the onset of a small magnetospheric substorm 24 min before the start of the relativistic electron precipitation event. Since the balloon was south of the auroral oval and there was no associated increase in relativistic electron flux at geosynchronous altitude, the event is interpreted as the result of selective precipitation of ambient relativistic electrons from the radiation belts. Pitch angle scattering caused by resonance with electromagnetic ion cyclotron mode waves is the most likely mechanism for selective precipitation of MeV electrons. A model is presented in which wave growth is driven by temperature anisotropies in the drifting substorm-injected proton population. The model predicts that this wave growth and resonance with ~1.7 MeV electrons will occur preferentially in regions of density >10 cm-3, such as inside the duskside plasmapause bulge or detached plasma regions. The model predictions are consistent with the location of the balloon, the observed energies, and the timing with respect to the substorm energetic particle injection.

Lorentzen, K. R.; McCarthy, M. P.; Parks, G. K.; Foat, J. E.; Millan, R. M.; Smith, D. M.; Lin, R. P.; Treilhou, J. P.

2000-03-01

195

Effect of EMIC Wave Normal Angle Distribution on Relativistic Electron Scattering in Outer RB  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We present the equatorial and bounce average pitch angle diffusion coefficients for scattering of relativistic electrons by the H+ mode of EMIC waves. Both the model (prescribed) and self consistent distributions over the wave normal angle are considered. The main results of our calculation can be summarized as follows: First, in comparison with field aligned waves, the intermediate and highly oblique waves reduce the pitch angle range subject to diffusion, and strongly suppress the scattering rate for low energy electrons (E less than 2 MeV). Second, for electron energies greater than 5 MeV, the |n| = 1 resonances operate only in a narrow region at large pitch-angles, and despite their greatest contribution in case of field aligned waves, cannot cause electron diffusion into the loss cone. For those energies, oblique waves at |n| greater than 1 resonances are more effective, extending the range of pitch angle diffusion down to the loss cone boundary, and increasing diffusion at small pitch angles by orders of magnitude.

Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.

2007-01-01

196

Smooth Light Curves from a Bumpy Ride: Relativistic Blast Wave Encounters a Density Jump  

SciTech Connect

Some gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow light curves show significant variability, which often includes episodes of rebrightening. Such temporal variability had been attributed in several cases to large fluctuations in the external density, or density ''bumps''. Here we carefully examine the effect of a sharp increase in the external density on the afterglow light curve by considering, for the first time, a full treatment of both the hydrodynamic evolution and the radiation in this scenario. To this end we develop a semi-analytic model for the light curve and carry out several elaborate numerical simulations using a one dimensional hydrodynamic code together with a synchrotron radiation code. Two spherically symmetric cases are explored in detail--a density jump in a uniform external medium, and a wind termination shock. The effect of density clumps is also constrained. Contrary to previous works, we find that even a very sharp (modeled as a step function) and large (by a factor of a >> 1) increase in the external density does not produce sharp features in the light curve, and cannot account for significant temporal variability in GRB afterglows. For a wind termination shock, the light curve smoothly transitions between the asymptotic power laws over about one decade in time, and there is no rebrightening in the optical or X-rays that could serve as a clear observational signature. For a sharp jump in a uniform density profile we find that the maximal deviation {Delta}{alpha}{sub max} of the temporal decay index {alpha} from its asymptotic value (at early and late times), is bounded (e.g, {Delta}{alpha}{sub max} < 0.4 for {alpha} = 10); {Delta}{alpha}{sub max} slowly increases with {alpha}, converging to {Delta}{alpha}{sub max} {approx} 1 at very large {alpha} values. Therefore, no optical rebrightening is expected in this case as well. In the X-rays, while the asymptotic flux is unaffected by the density jump, the fluctuations in {alpha} are found to be comparable to those in the optical. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results for the origin of the observed fluctuations in several GRB afterglows.

Nakar, Ehud; /Caltech; Granot, Jonathan; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

2006-06-06

197

A compact relativistic backward-wave oscillator with metallized plastic components  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This letter presents the mechanism and realization of a compact relativistic backward-wave oscillator with metallized plastic components. The physical idea, specific structure, and the main testing results are presented. The three periods slow-wave structures with both inner and outer ripples and the coaxial extractor are designed to reduce the volume and increase the efficiency of the device. The metallized plastic components replacing the stainless steel components in the high power microwave (HPM) sources are put forward to reduce the device weight. In the initial experiment, a microwave with frequency of 1.54 GHz, power of 1.97 GW, efficiency of 33.5%, and pulse duration above 47 ns is generated, which proves that this technical route is feasible. Undoubtedly, the technical route can provide a guide to design other types of HPM sources and be benefit to the practical application of the compact HPM systems.

Ge, Xingjun; Zhang, Jun; Zhong, Huihuang; Qian, Baoliang

2014-09-01

198

Purification of the output modes of overmoded relativistic backward wave oscillators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Successful suppression of mode competition in the beam-wave interaction process of overmoded relativistic backward wave oscillators (RBWOs) cannot ensure the output modes purity. Optimizing the magnitude and the phase of the mode conversion coefficients in the devices is significant for purifying the output modes. A universal method of purifying the TM01 and TM02 mixed modes output by overmoded RBWOs without decreasing the total output power is presented in this paper. With this method, we purify the TM01 and TM02 mixed modes generated in an X-band overmoded RBWO (D/? ? 2.6) operated at the constant diode voltage of 730 kV. Dependence of modes purification effect on the variation of diode voltage is also analyzed in particle-in-cell simulation. Our analysis indicates that when the diode voltage is in the range of (730 ± 60) kV, the percentage of output power carried by TM01 mode will be higher than 95%.

Zhang, Dian; Zhang, Jun; Zhong, Huihuang; Jin, Zhenxing; Yuan, Yuzhang

2014-02-01

199

Relativistic magnetosonic shock waves in synchrotron sources - Shock structure and nonthermal acceleration of positrons  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The theoretical properties of relativistic, transverse, magnetosonic collisionless shock waves in electron-positron-heavy ion plasmas of relevance to astrophysical sources of synchrotron radiation are investigated. Both 1D electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations and quasi-linear theory are used to examine the spatial and kinetic structure of these nonlinear flows. A new process of shock acceleration of nonthermal positrons, in which the gyrating reflected heavy ions dissipate their energy in the form of collectively emitted, left-handed magnetosonic waves which are resonantly absorbed by the positrons immediately behind the ion reflection region, is described. Applications of the results to the termination shocks of pulsar winds and to the termination shocks of jets emanating from the AGN are outlined.

Hoshino, Masahiro; Arons, Jonathan; Gallant, Yves A.; Langdon, A. B.

1992-01-01

200

Investigating the Relationship of EMIC Waves and Relativistic Electron Precipitation Events  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

EMIC waves are generated and driven by anisotropic ring current protons. These unstable protons are injected into the inner magnetosphere by increased earthward convection during periods of elevated geomagnetic activity. A study by Meredith et al. (2003) showed EMIC wave events resonant with radiation belt electrons of energies less then 2MeV were located near the plasmapause in high density regions typical of the plasmaspheric plume. This study seeks to investigate the theory of relativistic electron precipitation (REP) due to wave particle interaction with EMIC waves. REP events were detected by balloon borne instrumentation during the MAXIS and MINIS balloon campaigns conducted in Jan. of 2000 and 2005 respectively. The location of these events with respect to the plasmapause will be explored using a plasmapause test particle simulation code and IMAGE EUV data. Also, data provided by the LANL satellite MPA instrument will be used to investigate the temperature anisotropy of ring current protons that may drive EMIC waves in the region of detected REP.

Woodger, L. A.; Millan, R. M.; Goldstein, J.; McCarthy, M. P.; Smith, D. M.; Sample, J. G.

2007-05-01

201

Dynamical-systems approach to relativistic nonlinear wave-particle interaction in collisionless plasmas.  

PubMed

In this report, we present a dynamical systems approach to study the exact nonlinear wave-particle interaction in relativistic regime. We give particular attention to the effect of wave obliquity on the dynamics of the orbits by studying the specific cases of parallel (? = 0) and perpendicular (? = -?/2) propagations in comparison to the general case of oblique propagation ? =]-?/2,0[. We found that the fixed points of the system correspond to Landau resonance and that the dynamics can evolve from trapping to surfatron acceleration for propagation angles obeying a Hopf bifurcations condition. Cyclotron-resonant particles are also studied by the construction of a pseudo-potential structure in the Lorentz factor ?. We derived a condition for which Arnold diffusion results in relativistic stochastic acceleration. Hence, two general conclusions are drawn: (1) The propagation angle ? can significantly alter the dynamics of the orbits at both Landau and cyclotron-resonances. (2) Considering the short-time scales upon which the particles are accelerated, these two mechanisms for Landau and cyclotron resonant orbits could become potential candidates for problems of particle energization in collisionless space and cosmic plasmas. PMID:23004882

Osmane, A; Hamza, A M

2012-05-01

202

Investigation of EMIC Wave Scattering as the Cause for the BARREL January 17, 2013 Relativistic Electron Precipitation Event  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Scattering by electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves has been suggested to be a major cause of relativistic electron precipitation (REP). This mechanism has also been proposed as the cause for REP observed by balloon-borne detectors predominantly in the dusk sector. Observations from the recent BARREL balloon campaign, along with simultaneous detailed spacecraft measurements of waves and plasma conditions, give us an unprecedented opportunity to investigate this mechanism. We simulate relativistic electron pitch-angle diffusion by EMIC waves using wave and particle data measured by GOES and the Van Allen Probes, and compare the energy distribution of the resulting precipitation with BARREL observations of precipitation made on January 17, 2013. This comparison sheds light on the role of EMIC waves in causing REP as well as the effectiveness of the quasi-linear model.

Li, Z.; Millan, R. M.; Hudson, M. K.; Woodger, L. A.; Fennell, J. F.; Engebretson, M. J.; MacDonald, E.

2013-12-01

203

Investigating EMIC waves as a relativistic electron precipitation mechanism during the MINIS balloon campaign  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The MINIS balloon campaign was conducted in January of this year to obtain the first multi-point measurements of relativistic electron precipitation (REP). Two balloons were launched in the northern hemisphere at Churchill, Manitoba, carrying an X-ray scintillator and H? photometer, and four balloons were launched in the southern hemisphere at SANAE, Antarctica, carrying the same scintillator and additional field instruments. Observations from previous balloon campaigns suggest wave-particle interaction with EMIC waves as the precipitation mechanism for REP due to the location of the events in the dusk sector, near the edge of the plasmapause. [Millan et al., 2002]. REP events were detected on Jan. 21st and 25th by the MINIS campaign during the SSC, main phase, and recovery phase of the geomagnetic storm produced by the Jan. 20, 2005 CME. We investigate the precipitation mechanism for these events; specifically, whether EMIC waves play a role in REP. Ground based search coil magnetometer data are used to determine the presence of EMIC waves. We also use IMAGE Satellite data to determine the location of the REP events with respect to the plasmapause and correlated proton precipitation.

Woodger, L. A.; Millan, R. M.; Sample, J. G.; McCarthy, M. P.; Bale, S.; Bering, E. A.; Blake, J. B.; Collier, A. B.; Holzworth, R. H.; Hughes, A. R.; Kokorowski, M.; Lay, E.; Lin, R. P.; Moraal, H.; O'Brien, T. P.; Parks, G. K.; Pulupa, M.; Reddell, B. D.; Smith, D. M.; Stoker, P.

2005-12-01

204

Storm time, short-lived bursts of relativistic electron precipitation detected by subionospheric radio wave propagation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study we report on ground-based observations of short bursts of relativistic electron precipitation (REP), detected by a subionospheric propagation sensor in Sodankylä, Finland during 2005. In two ˜4 hour case study periods from L = 5.2, around local midnight, several hundred short-lived radio wave perturbations were observed, covering a wide range of arrival azimuths. The vast majority (˜99%) of these perturbations were not simultaneous with perturbations on other paths, consistent with a precipitation "rainstorm" producing ionospheric changes of small spatial sizes around the Sodankylä receiver. The recovery time of these radio wave perturbations are ˜1.2 s, which is consistent with the modeled effects of a burst of >2 MeV precipitating electrons. This agrees with satellite observations of the microburst energy spectrum. The energetic nature of the precipitation which produces the FAST perturbations suggests that they should be observable in both day and night conditions. While it is widely assumed that satellite-detected REP microbursts are due to wave-particle interactions with very low-frequency chorus waves, the energy spectra predicted by our current models of chorus propagation and wave-particle interaction are not consistent with the experimentally observed radio wave perturbations presented here or previously reported satellite observations of REP microbursts. The results inferred from both the satellite and subionospheric observations, namely the absence of a large, dominant component of <100 keV precipitating electrons, fundamentally disagrees with a mechanism of chorus-driven precipitation. Nonetheless, further work on the modeling of chorus-driven precipitation is required.

Rodger, Craig J.; Clilverd, Mark A.; Nunn, David; Verronen, Pekka T.; Bortnik, Jacob; Turunen, Esa

2007-07-01

205

Transverse Wave Propagation in Relativistic Two-fluid Plasmas around Reissner-Nordström-de Sitter Black Hole  

E-print Network

The transverse electromagnetic waves propagating in a relativistic two-fluid plasma influenced by the gravitational field of the Reissner-Nordstr\\"{o}m-de Sitter black hole has been investigated exploiting 3+1 split of spacetime. Reformulating the two-fluid equations, the set of simultaneous linear equations for the perturbations have been derived. Using a local approximation, the one-dimensional radial propagation of Alfv\\'{e}n and high frequency electromagnetic waves are investigated. The dispersion relation for these waves is obtained and solved numerically for the wave number.

M. Atiqur Rahman; M. Hossain Ali

2009-02-22

206

Singular states of relativistic fermions in the field of a circularly polarized electromagnetic wave and constant magnetic field  

E-print Network

Dirac's equation in the field of a circularly polarized electromagnetic wave and constant magnetic field has exact localized non-stationary solutions. The solutions corresponds relativistic fermions only. Among them singular solutions with energy eigenvalues close to each other are found. The solutions are most practicable and can be separated by means of the phase matching between the momentum of the electromagnetic wave and spinor. Characteristic parameters of the singular states are defined.

Boris V. Gisin

2012-03-09

207

Effect of acoustic wave on the parametric X-ray generation by relativistic electrons in a crystal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An exhaustive description of the parametric X-ray (PXR) generation by relativistic electrons in a crystal excited by an acoustic wave is proposed. A principal question as to whether it is possible to enhance the PXR yield under these conditions is considered.

Zhukova, P. N.; Ladnykh, M. S.; Mkrtchyan, A. G.; Mkrtchyan, A. R.; Nasonov, N. N.

2010-11-01

208

Skull flexure from blast waves: a mechanism for brain injury with implications for helmet design  

SciTech Connect

Traumatic brain injury [TBI] has become a signature injury of current military conflicts. The debilitating effects of TBI are long-lasting and costly. Although the mechanisms by which impacts cause TBI have been well researched, the mechanisms by which blasts cause TBI are not understood. Various possibilities have been investigated, but blast-induced deformation of the skull has been neglected. From numerical hydrodynamic simulations, we have discovered that nonlethal blasts can induce sufficient flexure of the skull to generate potentially damaging loads in the brain, even if no impact occurs. The possibility that this mechanism may contribute to TBI has implications for the diagnosis of soldiers and the design of protective equipment such as helmets.

Moss, W C; King, M J; Blackman, E G

2009-04-14

209

On the multistream approach of relativistic Weibel instability. II. Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal-type waves in magnetic trapping  

SciTech Connect

The stationary state with magnetically trapped particles is investigated at the saturation of the relativistic Weibel instability, within the “multiring” model in a Hamiltonian framework. The multistream model and its multiring extension have been developed in Paper I, under the assumption that the generalized canonical momentum is conserved in the perpendicular direction. One dimensional relativistic Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal waves with deeply trapped particles are addressed using similar mathematical formalism developed by Lontano et al.[Phys. Plasmas 9, 2562 (2002); Phys. Plasmas 10, 639 (2003)] using several streams and in the presence of both electrostatic and magnetic trapping mechanisms.

Ghizzo, A. [Institut Jean Lamour UMR 7163, Université de Lorraine, BP 239 F-54506 Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France)] [Institut Jean Lamour UMR 7163, Université de Lorraine, BP 239 F-54506 Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France)

2013-08-15

210

Evanescent waves propagation along a periodically corrugated surface and their amplification by relativistic electron beam (quasi-optical theory)  

SciTech Connect

By using a quasi-optical approach, we study propagation of evanescent waves along a periodically corrugated surface and their excitation by relativistic electron beams. Under assumption of a shallow (in the scale of period) corrugation, the dispersion equation for normal waves is derived and two particular cases are studied. In the first case, the wave frequency is far from the Bragg resonance; therefore, the evanescent wave propagation can be described by using the impedance approximation with deceleration of the zeroth spatial harmonic. The second case takes place at the frequencies close to the Bragg resonance. There, the field can be represented as two counter-propagating quasi-optical wave beams, which are coupled on the corrugated surface and form an evanescent normal wave. With regard to the interaction with an electron beam, the first case corresponds to the convective instability that can be used for amplification of radiation, while the second case corresponds to the absolute instability used in surface-wave oscillators. This paper is focused on studying main features of amplifier schemes, such as the increments, electron efficiency, and formation of a self-consistent spatial structure of the radiated field. For practical applications, the feasibility of realization of relativistic surface-wave amplifiers in the submillimeter wavelength range is estimated.

Ginzburg, N. S.; Malkin, A. M.; Zheleznov, I. V.; Sergeev, A. S. [Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 46, Ul'yanov St., Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation)] [Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 46, Ul'yanov St., Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation)

2013-06-15

211

Skull Flexure from Blast Waves: A Mechanism for Brain Injury with Implications for Helmet Design  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has become a signature injury of current military conflicts, with debilitating, costly, and long-lasting effects. Although mechanisms by which head impacts cause TBI have been well researched, the mechanisms by which blasts cause TBI are not understood. From numerical hydrodynamic simulations, we have discovered that nonlethal blasts can induce sufficient skull flexure to generate potentially damaging loads in the brain, even without a head impact. The possibility that this mechanism may contribute to TBI has implications for injury diagnosis and armor design.

Moss, William C.; King, Michael J.; Blackman, Eric G.

2009-09-01

212

A high-efficiency overmoded klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator with low guiding magnetic field  

SciTech Connect

A klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator with a ratio of transverse dimension to free-space wavelength being about four is presented. In the beam-wave interaction region, the electron beam interacts with surface wave and volume wave simultaneously. The cathode holder plays an important role in the reflection of backward waves. A guard electrode, an electron collector ring, and a reflection ring are used to optimize the beam-wave interaction. The particle in cell simulation results reveal that microwaves with a power of 2 GW and a frequency of 12.3 GHz are generated with an efficiency of 42% when the diode voltage is 400 kV, the beam current 12 kA, and the magnetic field 0.48 T.

Xiao Renzhen; Tan Weibing; Li Xiaoze; Song Zhimin; Sun Jun; Chen Changhua [National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on High Power Microwave, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China)

2012-09-15

213

On plane-wave relativistic electrodynamics in plasmas and in vacuum  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We revisit the exact microscopic equations (in differential, and equivalent integral form) ruling a relativistic cold plasma after the plane-wave Ansatz, without customary approximations. We show that in the Eulerian description the motion of a very diluted plasma initially at rest and excited by an arbitrary transverse plane electromagnetic travelling-wave has a very simple and explicit dependence on the transverse electromagnetic potential; for a non-zero density plasma the above motion is a good approximation of the real one as long as the back-reaction of the charges on the electromagnetic field can be neglected, i.e. for a time lapse decreasing with the plasma density, and can be used as initial step in an iterative resolution scheme. As one of many possible applications, we use these results to describe how the ponderomotive force of a very intense and short plane laser pulse hitting normally the surface of a plasma boosts the surface electrons into the ion background. In response to this penetration, the electrons are pulled back by the electric force exerted by the ions and the other displaced electrons and may leave the plasma with high energy in the direction opposite to that of propagation of the pulse ‘slingshot effect’ (Fiore G et al 2013 arXiv:1309.1400).

Fiore, Gaetano

2014-06-01

214

Macro-mechanical modeling of blast-wave mitigation in foams. Part III: verification of the models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Three different approaches to macro-mechanical modeling of blast-wave mitigation in foam namely: the single-phase effective gas flow model, the two-phase mixture model and the single bubble/shock wave interaction model are critically reviewed. The nature and extent of the approximations inherent in the formulation of the first two models were examined in Part I of this study. In this part, the applicability of the aforementioned approaches is verified based on a comparison of experimental pressure records obtained in shock tube tests with the results of numerical predictions that used the models under consideration. Deficiencies and inconsistencies that are found during this comparison are clarified and possible improvements are suggested. It is emphasized that both the single-phase and the two-phase approaches predict well the refraction of the incident shock at the air/foam interface while they do not uniquely determine the relaxation process and the shape of the transmitted shock wave front. Various flexibilities that are exploited to better describe the inter-phase interactions do not improve the results significantly. The single bubble model is examined with particular attention paid to the manner in which it predicts the shape of the shock wave front. Connections between the flow viscosity and the transient dynamics of the bubble compression that occur at scales of the shock wave front thickness are explored.

Britan, A.; Shapiro, H.; Liverts, M.; Ben-Dor, G.

2014-05-01

215

Versatile gas gun target assembly for studying blast wave mitigation in materials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has become a serious problem for military personnel returning from recent conflicts. This has increased interest in investigating blast mitigating materials for use in helmets. In this paper we describe a new versatile target assembly that is used with an existing gas gun for studying these materials.

Bartyczak, S.; Mock, W., Jr.

2012-03-01

216

Gravitational waves and the deformation of compact objects: Topics in relativistic astrophysics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this dissertation, we present various theoretical investigations of sources of gravitational waves, relevant to interpreting the data from current and planned gravitational wave detectors; an idee fixe is the deformation of compact objects. We begin in the strong field, vacuum regime, with a construction of initial data for the numerical simulation of black hole binaries (specializing to the case of nonspinning holes in a quasicircular orbit). The data we construct contain more of the binary's expected physics than any other current data set. In particular, they contain both the binary's outgoing radiation and the expected tidal deformations of the holes. Such improved initial data will likely be necessary for simulations to achieve the accuracy required to supply advanced gravitational wave detectors with templates for parameter estimation. We end in the weak field, hydrodynamic regime with a calculation of the expected accuracy with which one can combine standard electromagnetic and gravitational wave observations of white dwarf binaries to measure the masses of the binary's components. In particular, we show that this measurement will not be contaminated by finite size effects for realistic sources observed by LISA, though such effects could be important for exceptional sources and/or advanced mHz gravitational wave detectors. In the middle, we make a detour into the messy and poorly constrained realm of the physics of neutron star interiors, calculating the shear modulus of hadron--quark mixed phase in hybrid stars. Here we include a rough treatment of charge screening, dimensional continuation of the lattice, and the contributions from changing the cell volume when shearing lowerdimensional lattices. We find that the last of these contributions is necessary to stabilize the lattice for those dimensions, where it makes a considerable contribution to the shear modulus. We then move back to sounder theoretical footing in making a general relativistic calculation of the maximum elastic quadrupole deformation that could be sustained by a star with a known shear modulus and breaking strain (provided by, e.g., the hadron--quark mixed phase in the core, or the more standard lattice of nuclei in the crust). We find that the standard Newtonian calculation considerably overestimates the quadrupole, particularly for massive, compact stars. We also present the dimensionally continued Poisson summation formula we discovered while performing the shear modulus calculation, and thought interesting enough to prove rigorously. Our method of proof also provides a new way of proving other (Voronoi) summation formulae obtained from functions satisfying modular transformations, and allows one to relax certain of the standard hypotheses.

Johnson-McDaniel, Nathan Kieran

217

30 CFR 57.6306 - Loading, blasting, and security.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...device, all persons shall leave the blast area except persons in a blasting shelter or other location that protects them from concussion (shock wave), flying material, and gases. (f) Before firing a blast— (1) Ample warning shall be given to...

2012-07-01

218

30 CFR 56.6306 - Loading, blasting, and security.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...device, all persons shall leave the blast area except persons in a blasting shelter or other location that protects them from concussion (shock wave), flying material, and gases. (f) Before firing a blast— (1) Ample warning shall be given to...

2013-07-01

219

30 CFR 56.6306 - Loading, blasting, and security.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...device, all persons shall leave the blast area except persons in a blasting shelter or other location that protects them from concussion (shock wave), flying material, and gases. (f) Before firing a blast— (1) Ample warning shall be given to...

2012-07-01

220

30 CFR 57.6306 - Loading, blasting, and security.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...device, all persons shall leave the blast area except persons in a blasting shelter or other location that protects them from concussion (shock wave), flying material, and gases. (f) Before firing a blast— (1) Ample warning shall be given to...

2013-07-01

221

The Physics of Supernova Remnant Blast Waves. I. Kinematics of DEM L71 in the Large Magellanic Cloud  

E-print Network

We present the results from Fabry-Perot imaging spectroscopy of the Balmer-dominated supernova remnant DEM L71 (0505-67.9) in the LMC. Spectra extracted from the entire circumference of the blast wave reveal the broad and narrow component H-alpha line emission characteristic of non-radiative shocks in partially neutral gas. The new spectra of DEM L71 include portions of the rim that have not been previously observed. We find that the broad component width varies azimuthally along the edge of DEM L71, ranging from 450+/-60 km/s along the eastern edge to values as high as 985 (+210)(-165) km/s along the faint western edge. In part of the faint northern rim the broad component is not detected, possibly indicating a lower density in these regions and/or a broad component width in excess of 1000 km/s. Between the limits of zero and full electron-ion temperature equilibration at the shock front, the allowed range of shock velocities is 430-560 km/s along the east rim and 700-1250 km/s along other parts of the blast...

Ghavamian, P; Hughes, J P; Williams, T B; Ghavamian, Parviz; Rakowski, Cara E.; Hughes, John P.

2003-01-01

222

Thermal effects on the propagation of large-amplitude electromagnetic waves in magnetized relativistic electron-positron plasma.  

PubMed

The propagation of circularly polarized electromagnetic waves along a constant background magnetic field in an electron-positron plasma is calculated by means of both a fluid and a kinetic theory treatment. In the fluid theory, relativistic effects are included in the particle motion, the wave field, and in the thermal motion by means of a function f, which depends only on the plasma temperature. In this work we analyze the consistency of the fluid results with those obtained from a kinetic treatment, based on the relativistic Vlasov equation. The corresponding kinetic dispersion relation is numerically studied for various temperatures, and results are compared with the fluid treatment. Analytic expressions for the Alfvén velocity are obtained for the fluid and kinetic models, and it is shown that, in the kinetic treatment, the Alfvén branch is suppressed for large temperatures. PMID:23004888

Domínguez, Macarena; Muñoz, Víctor; Valdivia, Juan Alejandro

2012-05-01

223

Impulsive Neutral Current Sheet and stochastic acceleration vs Shock Wave acceleration spectra of Relativistic solar protons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It has been shown in a series of works that some solar particle events (SPE) are composed of two different relativistic populations, a Prompt Component (PC) and a Delayed Component (DC), each one with different energy spectrum behavior. The source spectra of the DC tend to be an inverse power law at the steady state situation, whereas the spectra of the PC are considerable deviated from such a power law. Here we attempt to reproduce the observational spectra of the PC and the DC on terms of different scenarios: (i) DC acceleration from magnetic merging in a Magnetic Neutral Current Sheet (MNCS). (ii) Stochastic acceleration of an injected population pre-accelerated in a MNCS. (iii) Stochastic acceleration with monoenergetic injection. (iv) Stochastic acceleration with monoenergetic injection, while undergoing adiabatic deceleration. We contrast our results with those assuming Shock Wave Acceleration. Results are illustrated for the case of the September 29, 1989, July 14, 2000, October 28, 2003 and January 20, 2005 Ground Level Events (GLE`s).

Pérez-Peraza, J.; Gallegos-Cruz, A.; Miroshnichenko, L. I.; et al.

224

Preliminary experimental investigation of a dual-band relativistic backward wave oscillator with dual beams  

SciTech Connect

A dual-band relativistic backward wave oscillator with dual electron beams generating C-band and X-band microwaves is investigated experimentally. The frequencies, powers, and radiation patterns of the dual-band microwaves are measured. With the diode voltage of 657 kV and the total beam current of 14 kA guided by a magnetic field of about 1.7 T, the dual-band microwaves are generated with dominant frequencies of 4.58 and 8.30 GHz close to the results from the particle-in-cell simulation. The powers of the C-band and X-band microwaves are 520 and 113 MW, respectively. The effects of variations in the guiding magnetic field and diode voltage on the powers of the dual-band microwaves are presented and discussed. The radiation patterns of the dual-band microwaves from the radiating antenna are tested both corresponding to a TM{sub 01} mode and the independency of the operation processes of them is discussed.

Wang Ting; Qian Baoliang; Zhang Jiande; Zhang Xiaoping; Cao Yibing; Zhang Qiang [College of Optoelectronic Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

2011-01-15

225

Energy loss of protons in Au, Pb, and Bi using relativistic wave functions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a theoretical study on proton energy loss in solid targets of atomic number greater than 54. Fully relativistic wave functions and binding energies are obtained by solving numerically the Dirac equation. Ab initio calculations are developed for the first (stopping) and second (straggling) moments of the energy transferred from the ion to the target electrons. The shellwise local plasma approximation is employed for the inner shells, and the Mermin dielectric function is employed for the valence electrons. The dielectric response of each subshell is calculated separately, including in this way the screening among the electrons of the same binding energy. Results for stopping and straggling cross sections of protons in Au, Pb, and Bi are compared with the available experimental data. The theoretical stopping results are very good in the case of Au, reproducing the experimental data in an extensive energy region (10 keV-100 MeV). For Pb and Bi, the stopping results agree with the measurements for energies above 300 keV, for which the inner shells play a major role. However, we found some difficulties around the stopping maximum. For the energy-loss straggling, we obtained reasonably good agreement with the experiments for the three targets studied.

Montanari, C. C.; Archubi, C. D.; Mitnik, D. M.; Miraglia, J. E.

2009-03-01

226

The mechanism and realization of a band-agile coaxial relativistic backward-wave oscillator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The mechanism and realization of a band-agile coaxial relativistic backward-wave oscillator (RBWO) are presented. The operation frequency tuning can be easily achieved by merely altering the inner-conductor length. The key effects of the inner-conductor length contributing to the mechanical frequency tunability are investigated theoretically and experimentally. There is a specific inner-conductor length where the operation frequency can jump from one mode to another mode, which belongs to a different operation band. In addition, the operation frequency is tunable within each operation band. During simulation, the L-band microwave with a frequency of 1.61 GHz is radiated when the inner-conductor length is 39 cm. Meanwhile, the S-band microwave with a frequency of 2.32 GHz is radiated when the inner-conductor length is 5 cm. The frequency adjustment bandwidths of L-band and S-band are about 8.5% and 2%, respectively. Moreover, the online mechanical tunability process is described in detail. In the initial experiment, the generated microwave frequencies remain approximately 1.59 GHz and 2.35 GHz when the inner-conductor lengths are 39 cm and 5 cm. In brief, this technical route of the band-agile coaxial RBWO is feasible and provides a guide to design other types of band-agile high power microwaves sources.

Ge, Xingjun; Zhang, Jun; Zhong, Huihuang; Qian, Baoliang; Wang, Haitao

2014-11-01

227

Relativistic treatment of pion wave functions in the annihilation pp{yields}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}  

SciTech Connect

Quark model intrinsic wave functions of highly energetic pions in the reaction pp{yields}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} are subjected to a relativistic treatment. The annihilation is described in a constituent quark model with A2 and R2 flavor-flux topology, and the annihilated quark-antiquark pairs are in {sup 3}P{sub 0} and {sup 3}S{sub 1} states. We study the effects of pure Lorentz transformations on the antiquark and quark spatial wave functions and their respective spinors in the pion. The modified quark geometry of the pion has considerable impact on the angular dependence of the annihilation mechanisms.

El-Bennich, B.; Kloet, W.M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854-8019 (United States)

2004-09-01

228

Infrared and X-Ray Evidence for Circumstellar Grain Destruction by the Blast Wave of Supernova 1987A  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Multiwavelength observations of supernova remnant (SNR) 1987A show that its morphology and luminosity are rapidly changing at X-ray, optical, infrared, and radio wavelengths as the blast wave from the explosion expands into the circumstellar equatorial ring, produced by mass loss from the progenitor star. The observed infrared (IR) radiation arises from the interaction of dust grains that formed in mass outflow with the soft X-ray emitting plasma component of the shocked gas. Spitzer IRS spectra at 5 - 30 microns taken on day 6190 since the explosion show that the emission arises from approx. 1.1 x 10(exp -6) solar mass of silicate grains radiating at a temperature of approx. 180+/-(15-20) K. Subsequent observations on day 7137 show that the IR flux had increased by a factor of 2 while maintaining an almost identical spectral shape. The observed IR-to-X-ray flux ratio (IRX) is consistent with that of a dusty plasma with standard LMC dust abundances. This flux ratio has decreased by a factor of approx. 2 between days 6190 and 7137, providing the first direct observation of the ongoing destruction of dust in an expanding SN blast wave on dynamic time scales. Detailed models consistent with the observed dust temperature, the ionization fluence of the soft X-ray emission component, and the evolution of IRX suggest that the radiating si1icate grains are immersed in a 3.5 x 10(exp 6) K plasma with a density of (0.3 - 1) x 10(exp 4)/cu cm, and have a size distribution that is confined to a narrow range of radii between 0.02 and 0.2 microns. Smaller grains may have been evaporated by the initial UV flash from the supernova.

Dwek, Eliahu; Arendt, Richard G.; Bouchet, Patrice; Burrows, David N.; Challis, Peter; Danziger, John; DeBuizer James M.; Gehrz, Robert D.; Kirshner, Robert P.; McCray, Richard; Park, Sangwok; Polomski, Elisha; Woodward, Charles

2007-01-01

229

Challenges in Computing Thermal and Non-thermal Emission from Relativistic Outflows  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Multi-wavelength emission from relativistic outflows (e.g., jets and blast waves) provides us with valuable information about the physical conditions of the emitting plasma, its fluid dynamics and about the process which generates the outflows (i.e., the central engine). We use the relativistic hydrodynamics (RHD) code MRGENESIS coupled to a radiative transfer code SPEV to simulate the dynamics and emission of relativistic jets in two astrophysical scenarios, one involving non-thermal synchrotron emission in radio, and the other where thermal emission in optical is predominant. We give an overview of the structure of two codes and explain how they are coupled to compute the time-dependent emission from the evolving relativistic fluid. A considerable attention is given to the computational challenges that we face when applying SPEV to compute the light curves and spectra of relativistic jets.

Mimica, P.; Aloy, M. A.; Cuesta-Martínez, C.; Aloy, C.

2014-09-01

230

Modelling relativistic solitary wave interactions in over-dense plasmas: a perturbed nonlinear Schr\\"{o}ndinger equation framework  

E-print Network

We investigate the dynamics of localized solutions of the relativistic cold fluid plasma model in the small but finite amplitude limit, for slightly overcritical plasma density. Adopting a multiple scale analysis, we derive a perturbed nonlinear Schr\\"{o}ndinger equation that describes the evolution of the envelope of circularly polarized electromagnetic field. Retaining terms up to fifth order in the small perturbation parameter, we derive a self-consistent framework for the description of the plasma response in the presence of localized electromagnetic field. The formalism is applied to standing electromagnetic solitary wave interactions and the results are validated by simulations of the full cold-fluid model. To lowest order, a cubic nonlinear Schr\\"{o}ndinger equation with a focusing nonlinearity is recovered. Classical quasiparticle theory is used to obtain analytical estimates for the collision time and minimum distance of approach between solitary waves. For larger solitary wave amplitudes the inclusi...

Siminos, E; Saxena, V; Kourakis, I

2014-01-01

231

Effect of EMIC waves on relativistic and ultrarelativistic electron populations: Ground-based and Van Allen Probes observations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

study the effect of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves on the loss and pitch angle scattering of relativistic and ultrarelativistic electrons during the recovery phase of a moderate geomagnetic storm on 11 October 2012. The EMIC wave activity was observed in situ on the Van Allen Probes and conjugately on the ground across the Canadian Array for Real-time Investigations of Magnetic Activity throughout an extended 18 h interval. However, neither enhanced precipitation of >0.7 MeV electrons nor reductions in Van Allen Probe 90° pitch angle ultrarelativistic electron flux were observed. Computed radiation belt electron pitch angle diffusion rates demonstrate that rapid pitch angle diffusion is confined to low pitch angles and cannot reach 90°. For the first time, from both observational and modeling perspectives, we show evidence of EMIC waves triggering ultrarelativistic (~2-8 MeV) electron loss but which is confined to pitch angles below around 45° and not affecting the core distribution.

Usanova, M. E.; Drozdov, A.; Orlova, K.; Mann, I. R.; Shprits, Y.; Robertson, M. T.; Turner, D. L.; Milling, D. K.; Kale, A.; Baker, D. N.; Thaller, S. A.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Kletzing, C.; Wygant, J.

2014-03-01

232

A comparison of the new exact solutions of the relativistic wave equations of a charged particle propagating in a strong laser field in an underdense plasma  

E-print Network

The relativistic wave equations of a charged particle propagating in a classical monochromatic electromagnetic plane wave, in a medium of index of refraction n_m plasma). These solutions describe a high-contrast periodic structure of the particle density on the plasma length scale, and they may have relevance in the study of novel acceleration mechanisms.

Sandor Varro

2013-11-01

233

Blast wave and contraction in Au(111) thin film induced by femtosecond laser pulses. A time resolved x-ray diffraction study.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We utilize 100 fs optical pulses as a means of heating 150 nm thick single Au (111) crystals, below the melting point and monitor the subsequent structural evolution with subpicosecond time resolution using 0.6 ps, 8.04 KeV x-ray pulses. By monitoring the energy and time dependent modulation of the width and shift of the x-ray diffraction rocking curve, we have obtained information on electron-phonon coupling, photon-lattice interaction, and time resolved kinetics of the crystal disorder. The data show that during the first couple picoseconds after optical excitation, the formation of a "blast force" and lattice contraction, followed by a pressure wave formed 10-20 ps later. Both the blast and pressure wave propagate through the crystal with sonic velocities. These time resolved x-ray diffraction data provide a detail description of the processes induced by ultrafast laser pulses impinging on very thin metallic crystals.

Chen, Jie; Chen, Wei-Kan; Rentzepis, Peter M.

2011-06-01

234

Explicit general solutions to relativistic electron dynamics in plane-wave electromagnetic fields and simulations of ponderomotive acceleration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study examines single-particle electron motions in both a plane electromagnetic wave and a Gaussian focus in vacuum. Exact, explicit analytic expressions for relativistic electron trajectories in a plane wave are obtained, using the proper time as a parameter, in the general case of arbitrary initial positions and velocities. It is shown that previous analyses can be completed using the proper-time parameter. The conditions under which localized oscillatory motions ('figure-of-eight' orbits) occur are derived from the new solutions. The general solutions are also connected with the figure-of-eight orbits by a Lorentz transformation. The analytic solutions for arbitrary initial conditions and an arbitrary initial field phase can be used to determine the ranges of electron ejection angle and emerging electron energy in a vacuum laser accelerator, in which electrons are ejected externally, and provide a basis for explaining the spectrum of nonlinear Thomson scattering radiation. Numerical solutions are used for electron motions in the focus of a Gaussian laser beam, and the mean motion allows one to test a new expression for the relativistic ponderomotive force. It is suggested that plane wave solutions can provide a basis for approximating the orbital motion of particles in Gaussian beams.

Yang, J.-H.; Craxton, R. S.; Haines, M. G.

2011-12-01

235

Particle-in-cell simulation for parametric decays of a circularly polarized Alfvén wave in relativistic thermal electron-positron plasma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Parametric decays of a left-handed circularly polarized Alfvén wave propagating along a constant background magnetic field in a relativistic thermal electron-positron plasma are studied by means of a one dimensional relativistic particle-in-cell simulation. Relativistic effects are included in the Lorentz equation for the momentum of the particles and in their thermal motion, by considering a Maxwell-Jüttner velocity distribution function for the initial condition. In the linear stage of the simulation, we find many instabilities that match the predictions of relativistic fluid theory. In general, the growth rates of the instabilities increase as the pump wave amplitude is increased, and decrease with a raise in the plasma temperatures. We have confirmed that for very high temperatures the Alfvén branch is suppressed, consistent with analytical calculations.

López, Rodrigo A.; Muñoz, Víctor; Viñas, Adolfo F.; Alejandro Valdivia, J.

2014-03-01

236

Role of helmet in the mechanics of shock wave propagation under blast loading conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effectiveness of helmets in extenuating the primary shock waves generated by the explosions of improvised explosive devices is not clearly understood. In this work, the role of helmet on the overpressurisation and impulse experienced by the head were examined. The shock wave–head interactions were studied under three different cases: (i) unprotected head, (ii) head with helmet but with varying

S. Ganpule; L. Gu; A. Alai; N. Chandra

2011-01-01

237

Evidence of resonant surface-wave excitation in the relativistic regime through measurements of proton acceleration from grating targets.  

PubMed

The interaction of laser pulses with thin grating targets, having a periodic groove at the irradiated surface, is experimentally investigated. Ultrahigh contrast (~10(12)) pulses allow us to demonstrate an enhanced laser-target coupling for the first time in the relativistic regime of ultrahigh intensity >10(19) W/cm(2). A maximum increase by a factor of 2.5 of the cutoff energy of protons produced by target normal sheath acceleration is observed with respect to plane targets, around the incidence angle expected for the resonant excitation of surface waves. A significant enhancement is also observed for small angles of incidence, out of resonance. PMID:24237527

Ceccotti, T; Floquet, V; Sgattoni, A; Bigongiari, A; Klimo, O; Raynaud, M; Riconda, C; Heron, A; Baffigi, F; Labate, L; Gizzi, L A; Vassura, L; Fuchs, J; Passoni, M; Kv?ton, M; Novotny, F; Possolt, M; Prok?pek, J; Proška, J; Pšikal, J; Štolcová, L; Velyhan, A; Bougeard, M; D'Oliveira, P; Tcherbakoff, O; Réau, F; Martin, P; Macchi, A

2013-11-01

238

Evidence of Resonant Surface-Wave Excitation in the Relativistic Regime through Measurements of Proton Acceleration from Grating Targets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The interaction of laser pulses with thin grating targets, having a periodic groove at the irradiated surface, is experimentally investigated. Ultrahigh contrast (˜1012) pulses allow us to demonstrate an enhanced laser-target coupling for the first time in the relativistic regime of ultrahigh intensity >1019W/cm2. A maximum increase by a factor of 2.5 of the cutoff energy of protons produced by target normal sheath acceleration is observed with respect to plane targets, around the incidence angle expected for the resonant excitation of surface waves. A significant enhancement is also observed for small angles of incidence, out of resonance.

Ceccotti, T.; Floquet, V.; Sgattoni, A.; Bigongiari, A.; Klimo, O.; Raynaud, M.; Riconda, C.; Heron, A.; Baffigi, F.; Labate, L.; Gizzi, L. A.; Vassura, L.; Fuchs, J.; Passoni, M.; Kv?ton, M.; Novotny, F.; Possolt, M.; Prok?pek, J.; Proška, J.; Pšikal, J.; Štolcová, L.; Velyhan, A.; Bougeard, M.; D'Oliveira, P.; Tcherbakoff, O.; Réau, F.; Martin, P.; Macchi, A.

2013-11-01

239

Approximative analytic study of fermions in magnetar's crust; ultra-relativistic plane waves, Heun and Mathieu solutions and beyond  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Working with a magnetic field periodic along Oz and decaying in time, we deal with the Dirac-type equation characterizing the fermions evolving in magnetar's crust. For ultra-relativistic particles, one can employ the perturbative approach, to compute the conserved current density components. If the magnetic field is frozen and the magnetar is treated as a stationary object, the fermion's wave function is expressed in terms of the Heun's Confluent functions. Finally, we are extending some previous investigations on the linearly independent fermionic modes solutions to the Mathieu's equation and we discuss the energy spectrum and the Mathieu Characteristic Exponent.

Dariescu, Marina-Aura; Dariescu, Ciprian

2012-10-01

240

Suitability of high-current standing-wave linac technology for ultra-relativistic electron beam propagation experiments  

SciTech Connect

Near-term development of the existing PHERMEX standing-wave linac would provide a 40 to 60 MeV electron beam with a current of 3 kA capable of answering a number of fundamental issues concerning endoatmospheric, ultra-relativistic electron beam propagation. Inherent high-repetition rate and multiple-pulse capability would allow alternative propagation scenarios to be investigated. Much of the theoretical expertise required to support the technology development and time-resolved beam propagation experiments presently resides within the Theoretical Applications Division.

Moir, D.C.; Faehl, R.J.; Newberger, B.S.; Thode, L.E.

1981-01-01

241

Nonlinear quantum theory of stimulated Cherenkov radiation of transverse electromagnetic waves from a low-density relativistic electron beam in a dielectric medium  

SciTech Connect

A nonlinear quantum theory of stimulated Cherenkov radiation of transverse electromagnetic waves from a low-density relativistic electron beam in an isotropic dielectric medium is presented. A quantum model based on the Klein-Gordon equation is used. The growth rates of beam instabilities caused by the effect of stimulated Cherenkov radiation have been determined in the linear approximation. Mechanisms of the nonlinear saturation of relativistic quantum Cherenkov beam instabilities have been analyzed and the corresponding analytical solutions have been obtained.

Bobylev, Yu. B.; Kuzelev, M. V. [Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics (Russian Federation)

2012-06-15

242

Discrete Self-Similarity in Ultra-Relativistic Type-II Strong Explosions  

E-print Network

A solution to the ultra-relativistic strong explosion problem with a non-power law density gradient is delineated. We consider a blast wave expanding into a density profile falling off as a steep radial power-law with small, spherically symmetric, and log-periodic density perturbations. We find discretely self-similar solutions to the perturbation equations and compare them to numerical simulations. These results are then generalized to encompass small spherically symmetric perturbations with arbitrary profiles.

Oren, Yonatan; 10.1063/1.3231838

2009-01-01

243

A Free-Lagrange method for unsteady compressible flow: simulation of a confined cylindrical blast wave  

Microsoft Academic Search

A Free-Lagrange numerical procedure for the simulation of two-dimensional inviscid compressible flow is described in detail.\\u000a The unsteady Euler equations are solved on an unstructured Lagrangian grid based on a density-weighted Voronoi mesh. The flow\\u000a solver is of the Godunov type, utilising either the HLLE (2 wave) approximate Riemann solver or the more recent HLLC (3 wave)\\u000a variant, each adapted

G. J. Ball

1996-01-01

244

Synchro-Compton radiation from relativistic charges driven by a strong plane vacuum wave of elliptic polarization  

SciTech Connect

The classical astrophysical problem of the spectral and angular distribution of the incoherent radiation emitted by relativistic charges, when driven by a strong plane electromagnetic vacuum wave of elliptic polarization, is solved. The solution utilizes the asymptotic technique introduced by Bleistein and by Ursell to yield an accurate asymptotic approximation to the pertinent cross section that is uniformly valid for arbitrary initial momentum of the charged particles, for arbitrary intensity and polarization of the incident strong wave, for arbitrary direction of observation, and throughout the range of the emitted high harmonics of the incident frequency. In conclusion, the main steps of the derivation are reexamined in order to show that the method of Bleistein and of Ursell has great potential for the quantitative analysis of astrophysical radiation processes more general than the one considered.

Leubner, C.

1982-02-15

245

Simulation of the energy distribution of relativistic electron precipitation caused by quasi-linear interactions with EMIC waves  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Previous studies on electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves as a possible cause of relativistic electron precipitation (REP) mainly focus on the time evolution of the trapped electron flux. However, directly measured by balloons and many satellites is the precipitating flux as well as its dependence on both time and energy. Therefore, to better understand whether pitch angle scattering by EMIC waves is an important radiation belt electron loss mechanism and whether quasi-linear theory is a sufficient theoretical treatment, we simulate the quasi-linear wave-particle interactions for a range of parameters and generate energy spectra, laying the foundation for modeling specific events that can be compared with balloon and spacecraft observations. We show that the REP energy spectrum has a peaked structure, with a lower cutoff at the minimum resonant energy. The peak moves with time toward higher energies and the spectrum flattens. The precipitating flux, on the other hand, first rapidly increases and then gradually decreases. We also show that increasing wave frequency can lead to the occurrence of a second peak. In both single- and double-peak cases, increasing wave frequency, cold plasma density or decreasing background magnetic field strength lowers the energies of the peak(s) and causes the precipitation to increase at low energies and decrease at high energies at the start of the precipitation.

Li, Zan; Millan, Robyn M.; Hudson, Mary K.

2013-12-01

246

Blast Mitigation by Water Mist (2) Shock Wave Mitigation Using Glass Particles and Water Droplets in Shock Tubes.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report is the second in a series of reports discussing mitigation of blasts using water mists. The previous report described numerical simulations of a TNT blast. The present report has combined that numerical procedure with a two-continuum model for...

D. Schwer, K. Kailasanath

2003-01-01

247

Fluid\\/Structure Interaction Computational Investigation of Blast-Wave Mitigation Efficacy of the Advanced Combat Helmet  

Microsoft Academic Search

To combat the problem of traumatic brain injury (TBI), a signature injury of the current military conflicts, there is an urgent need to design head protection systems with superior blast\\/ballistic impact mitigation capabilities. Toward that end, the blast impact mitigation performance of an advanced combat helmet (ACH) head protection system equipped with polyurea suspension pads and subjected to two different

M. Grujicic; W. C. Bell; B. Pandurangan; P. S. Glomski

2011-01-01

248

Blood brain barrier dysfunction and delayed neurological deficits in mild traumatic brain injury induced by blast shock waves  

PubMed Central

Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) resulting from exposure to blast shock waves (BSWs) is one of the most predominant causes of illnesses among veterans who served in the recent Iraq and Afghanistan wars. Such mTBI can also happen to civilians if exposed to shock waves of bomb attacks by terrorists. While cognitive problems, memory dysfunction, depression, anxiety and diffuse white matter injury have been observed at both early and/or delayed time-points, an initial brain pathology resulting from exposure to BSWs appears to be the dysfunction or disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Studies in animal models suggest that exposure to relatively milder BSWs (123 kPa) initially induces free radical generating enzymes in and around brain capillaries, which enhances oxidative stress resulting in loss of tight junction (TJ) proteins, edema formation, and leakiness of BBB with disruption or loss of its components pericytes and astrocyte end-feet. On the other hand, exposure to more intense BSWs (145–323 kPa) causes acute disruption of the BBB with vascular lesions in the brain. Both of these scenarios lead to apoptosis of endothelial and neural cells and neuroinflammation in and around capillaries, which may progress into chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) and/or a variety of neurological impairments, depending on brain regions that are afflicted with such lesions. This review discusses studies that examined alterations in the brain milieu causing dysfunction or disruption of the BBB and neuroinflammation following exposure to different intensities of BSWs. Furthermore, potential of early intervention strategies capable of easing oxidative stress, repairing the BBB or blocking inflammation for minimizing delayed neurological deficits resulting from exposure to BSWs is conferred. PMID:25165433

Shetty, Ashok K.; Mishra, Vikas; Kodali, Maheedhar; Hattiangady, Bharathi

2014-01-01

249

Three-dimensional modeling of the asymmetric blast wave from the 2006 outburst of RS Ophiuchi: Early X-ray emission  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Context: Chandra/HETG observations of the recurrent nova RS Ophiuchi at day 13.9 of its 2006 outburst reveal a spectrum covering a large range in plasma temperature and characterized by asymmetric and blue-shifted emission lines (Nelson et al. 2008; ApJ, 673, 1067; Drake et al. 2008, ApJ, in press). Aims: We investigate the origin of asymmetries and broadening of the emission lines observed with Chandra/HETG. We explore possible diagnostics of the early blast wave and of the circumstellar medium (CSM) in which the explosion occurred. Methods: We perform 3D hydrodynamic simulations of the blast wave from the 2006 outburst, propagating through the inhomogeneous CSM. The model takes into account the thermal conduction (including the effects of heat flux saturation) and the radiative cooling. From the simulations, we synthesize the X-ray emission and derive the spectra as they would be observed with Chandra/HETG. Results: The simulated nova remnant is highly aspherical and the blast wave is efficiently collimated by the inhomogeneous CSM. Our model reproduces the observed X-ray emission in a natural way if the CSM in which the outburst occurred is characterized by an equatorial density enhancement. Our “best-fit” model predicts that most of the early X-ray emission originates from a small region propagating in the direction perpendicular to the line-of-sight and localized just behind the interaction front between the blast wave and the equatorial density enhancement. The model predicts asymmetric and blue-shifted line profiles remarkably similar to those observed. These asymmetries are due to substantial X-ray absorption of red-shifted emission by ejecta material. Conclusions: The comparison of high quality data of Chandra/HETG with detailed hydrodynamic modeling has allowed us to unveil, for the first time, the details of the structure emitting in the X-ray band in early phases of the outburst evolution, contributing to a better understanding of the physics of interactions between nova blasts and CSM in recurrent novae. This may have implications for whether or not RS Ophiuchi is a type Ia SN progenitor system. Two movies are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

Orlando, S.; Drake, J. J.; Laming, J. M.

2009-01-01

250

Underwater blast wave pressure sensor based on polymer film fiber Fabry-Perot cavity.  

PubMed

This paper describes the theoretical and experimental aspects of an optical underwater shock wave sensor based on a polymer film optical fiber Fabry-Perot cavity manufactured by vacuum deposition technology. The transduction mechanism of the sensor involves a normally incident acoustic stress wave that changes the thickness of the polymer film, thereby giving rise to a phase shift. This transient interferometric phase is interrogated by a three-phase-step algorithm. Theoretically, the sensor-acoustic-field interaction principle is analyzed, and the phase modulation sensitivity based on the theory of waves in the layered media is calculated. Experimentally, a static calibration test and a dynamic calibration test are conducted using a piston-type pressure calibration machine and a focusing-type electromagnetic shock wave. Results indicate that the repeatability, hysteresis, nonlinearity, and the overall measurement accuracy of the sensor within the full pressure range of 55 MPa are 1.82%, 0.86%, 1.81%, and 4.49%, respectively. The dynamic response time is less than 0.767 ?s. Finally, three aspects that need further study for practical use are pointed out. PMID:25322237

Wang, Junjie; Wang, Meng; Xu, Jian; Peng, Li; Yang, Minghong; Xia, Minghe; Jiang, Desheng

2014-10-01

251

Message found in a gravity wave A blast from the past.  

E-print Network

water from a spring. It must be wonderful. I've never actually had sex myself. After each flash Sun. I'm using five or six stones per letter. Long story short. I made my gravity wave detector fro 2008 | www.nature.com/naturephysics Jacey I love to think about infinity and the fourth dimension, so I

Loss, Daniel

252

Role of helmet in the mechanics of shock wave propagation under blast loading conditions S. Ganpulea  

E-print Network

/deceleration-induced injury, typi- cally associated with the impact TBI encountered in sports and automobile accidents (Cernak this focusing affects the load transmitted to the head. The main objective of this work was to understand the physics of flow past the human head with and without helmets, subjected to primary shock wave loading

Farritor, Shane

253

Configuration mixing of angular-momentum projected triaxial relativistic mean-field wave functions. II. Microscopic analysis of low-lying states in magnesium isotopes  

E-print Network

The recently developed structure model that uses the generator coordinate method to perform configuration mixing of angular-momentum projected wave functions, generated by constrained self-consistent relativistic mean-field calculations for triaxial shapes (3DAMP+GCM), is applied in a systematic study of ground states and low-energy collective states in the even-even magnesium isotopes $^{20-40}$Mg. Results obtained using a relativistic point-coupling nucleon-nucleon effective interaction in the particle-hole channel, and a density-independent $\\delta$-interaction in the pairing channel, are compared to data and with previous axial 1DAMP+GCM calculations, both with a relativistic density functional and the non-relativistic Gogny force. The effects of the inclusion of triaxial degrees of freedom on the low-energy spectra and E2 transitions of magnesium isotopes are examined.

J. M. Yao; H. Mei; H. Chen; J. Meng; P. Ring; D. Vretenar

2010-06-08

254

Wave-Particle Duality Revitalized: Consequences, Applications and Relativistic Quantum Mechanics  

E-print Network

The proposed paper presents the unobserved inadequacies in de Broglie's concepts of wave-particle duality and matter waves in the year 1923. The commonly admitted quantum energy or frequency expression h{\

Himanshu Chauhan; Swati Rawal; R. K. Sinha

2011-10-19

255

Wave-Particle Duality Revitalized: Consequences, Applications and Relativistic Quantum Mechanics  

E-print Network

The proposed paper presents the unobserved inadequacies in de Broglie's concepts of wave-particle duality and matter waves in the year 1923. The commonly admitted quantum energy or frequency expression h{\

Chauhan, Himanshu; Sinha, R K

2011-01-01

256

Subshell fitting of relativistic atomic core electron densities for use in QTAIM analyses of ECP-based wave functions.  

PubMed

Scalar-relativistic, all-electron density functional theory (DFT) calculations were done for free, neutral atoms of all elements of the periodic table using the universal Gaussian basis set. Each core, closed-subshell contribution to a total atomic electron density distribution was separately fitted to a spherical electron density function: a linear combination of s-type Gaussian functions. The resulting core subshell electron densities are useful for systematically and compactly approximating total core electron densities of atoms in molecules, for any atomic core defined in terms of closed subshells. When used to augment the electron density from a wave function based on a calculation using effective core potentials (ECPs) in the Hamiltonian, the atomic core electron densities are sufficient to restore the otherwise-absent electron density maxima at the nuclear positions and eliminate spurious critical points in the neighborhood of the atom, thus enabling quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) analyses to be done in the neighborhoods of atoms for which ECPs were used. Comparison of results from QTAIM analyses with all-electron, relativistic and nonrelativistic molecular wave functions validates the use of the atomic core electron densities for augmenting electron densities from ECP-based wave functions. For an atom in a molecule for which a small-core or medium-core ECPs is used, simply representing the core using a simplistic, tightly localized electron density function is actually sufficient to obtain a correct electron density topology and perform QTAIM analyses to obtain at least semiquantitatively meaningful results, but this is often not true when a large-core ECP is used. Comparison of QTAIM results from augmenting ECP-based molecular wave functions with the realistic atomic core electron densities presented here versus augmenting with the limiting case of tight core densities may be useful for diagnosing the reliability of large-core ECP models in particular cases. For molecules containing atoms of any elements of the periodic table, the production of extended wave function files that include the appropriate atomic core densities for ECP-based calculations, and the use of these wave functions for QTAIM analyses, has been automated. PMID:21780749

Keith, Todd A; Frisch, Michael J

2011-11-17

257

Fluid\\/Structure Interaction Computational Investigation of Blast-Wave Mitigation Efficacy of the Advanced Combat Helmet  

Microsoft Academic Search

To combat the problem of traumatic brain injury (TBI), a signature injury of the current military conflicts, there is an urgent\\u000a need to design head protection systems with superior blast\\/ballistic impact mitigation capabilities. Toward that end, the\\u000a blast impact mitigation performance of an advanced combat helmet (ACH) head protection system equipped with polyurea suspension\\u000a pads and subjected to two different

M. Grujicic; W. C. Bell; B. Pandurangan; P. S. Glomski

258

Spin oscillations of relativistic fermions in the field of a traveling circularly polarized electromagnetic wave and a constant magnetic field  

E-print Network

The Dirac equation, in the field of a traveling circularly polarized electromagnetic wave and a constant magnetic field, has singular solutions, corresponding the expansion of energy in vicinity of some singular point. These solutions described relativistic fermions. States relating to these solutions are not stationary. The temporal change of average energy, momentum and spin for single and mixed states is studied in the paper. A distinctive feature of the states is the disappearance of the longitudinal component of the average spin. Another feature is the equivalence of the condition of fermion minimal energy and the classical condition of the magnetic resonance. Finding such solutions assumes the use of a transformation for rotating and co-moving frames of references. Comparison studies of solutions obtained with the Galilean and non-Galilean transformation shown that some parameters of the non-Galilean transformation may be measured in high-energy physics.

Boris V. Gisin

2014-05-13

259

The Relativistic Transformation for an Electromagnetic Plane Wave with General Time Dependence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In special relativity, the transformation between inertial frames for an electromagnetic plane wave is usually derived for the time-harmonic case (the field is a sinusoid of infinite duration), even though all practical waves are of finite duration and may not even contain a dominant sinusoid. This paper presents an alternative derivation in which…

Smith, Glenn S.

2012-01-01

260

Effect of EMIC Wave Normal Angle Distribution on Relativistic Electron Scattering Based on the Newly Developed Self-consistent RC/EMIC Waves Model by Khazanov et al. [2006  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

It is well known that the effects of EMIC waves on RC ion and RB electron dynamics strongly depend on such particle/wave characteristics as the phase-space distribution function, frequency, wave-normal angle, wave energy, and the form of wave spectral energy density. Therefore, realistic characteristics of EMIC waves should be properly determined by modeling the RC-EMIC waves evolution self-consistently. Such a selfconsistent model progressively has been developing by Khaznnov et al. [2002-2006]. It solves a system of two coupled kinetic equations: one equation describes the RC ion dynamics and another equation describes the energy density evolution of EMIC waves. Using this model, we present the effectiveness of relativistic electron scattering and compare our results with previous work in this area of research.

Khazanov, G. V.; Gallagher, D. L.; Gamayunov, K.

2007-01-01

261

Spatial Localization and Ducting of EMIC Waves: Effect on Ultra-Relativistic Electron Populations using Ground-based and Van Allen Probes Observations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the effect of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves on the loss and pitch-angle scattering of relativistic and ultra-relativistic electrons during the recovery phase of a moderate geomagnetic storm on October 11, 2012. The EMIC wave activity was observed in-situ on the Van Allen Probes confined to very narrow (DeltaL 0.1-0.4) left-hand polarized emission in regions of mass density gradient at the outer edge of the plasmasphere at L 4. Conversely, conjugate on the ground, EMIC wave were seen across the CARISMA array throughout an extended 18 hour interval. The waves have complex polarization patterns on the ground, in good agreement with model results from Woodroffe and Lysak [2012] and consistent with Earth’s rotation sweeping magnetometer stations across multiple polarization reversals in the fields in the Earth-ionosphere duct. Despite the extended interval of EMIC waves, reductions in Van Allen Probe 90o pitch-angle ultra-relativistic electron flux were not observed, but loss was seen at lower pitch angles. Computed radiation belt electron pitch-angle diffusion rates demonstrate that rapid pitch-angle diffusion is confined to low pitch angles and cannot reach 90o. For the first time, from both observational and modeling perspectives, we show evidence of EMIC waves triggering ultra-relativistic ( 2-8 MeV) electron loss, but which is confined to pitch angles below around 45 degrees and not affecting the core distribution. This work has received funding from the European Union under the Seventh Framework Programme (FP7-Space) under grant agreement n 284520 for the MAARBLE (Monitoring, Analyzing and Assessing Radiation Belt Energization and Loss) collaborative research project.

Mann, Ian; Shprits, Yuri; Murphy, Kyle; Baker, Daniel N.; Usanova, Maria; Wygant, John; Orlova, Ksenia; Reeves, Geoffrey; Turner, Drew; Kletzing, Craig; Raita, Tero; Spence, Harlan; Milling, D. K.; Drozdov, Alexander; Robertson, Matthew; Kale, Andy; Thaller, Scott

262

Relativistic breather-like solitary waves with linear polarization in cold plasmas  

E-print Network

Linearly polarized solitary waves, arising from the interaction of an intense laser pulse with a plasma, are investigated. New localized structures, in the form of exact, nonlinear solutions of the one-dimensional Maxwell-fluid model for a cold plasma with fixed ions are presented. Unlike stationary circularly polarized solitary waves, the linear polarization gives rise to a breather-like behavior and a periodic exchange of electromagnetic energy and electron kinetic energy at twice the frequency of the wave. A numerical method based on a finite-differences scheme allows to compute a branch of solutions within the frequency range $\\Omega_{min}<\\Omega<\\omega_{pe}$, where $\\omega_{pe}$ and $\\Omega_{min}$ are the electron plasma frequency and the frequency value for which the plasma density vanishes locally, respectively. A detailed description of the spatio-temporal structure of the waves and their main properties as a function of $\\Omega$ are presented. Small amplitude oscillations appearing in the tail ...

Sánchez-Arriaga, G; Saxena, V; Kourakis, I

2014-01-01

263

Precipitation of trapped relativistic electrons by amplified whistler waves in the magnetosphere  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Numerical study of a loss-cone negative mass instability to amplify whistler waves by energetic electrons in the radiation belts is presented. The results show that a very low intensity whistler wave can be amplified by 50keV electrons more than 25dB, consistent with the Siple experimental result [Helliwell et al., J. Geophys. Res. 85, 3360 (1980)]. The dependencies of the amplification factor on the energetic electron density and on the initial wave intensity are evaluated. It is shown that the amplification factor decreases as the initial wave intensity increases. However, this gain can still exceed 15dB for a 30dB increase of the initial wave intensity, which is needed for the purpose of precipitating MeV electrons in the radiation belts. We then show that there exists a double resonance situation, by which, as an example, a wave is simultaneously in cyclotron resonance with 50keV electrons as well as with 1.5MeV electrons; the wave is first amplified by 50keV electrons and then precipitates 1.5MeV electrons. With the aid of the cyclotron resonance, the threshold field for the commencement of chaos in the electron trajectories is reduced considerably from that for a general case. Pitch angle scattering of 1.5MeV electrons is demonstrated. The results show that a whistler wave with magnetic field amplitude of 0.08% of the background magnetic field can scatter electrons from an initial pitch angle of 86.5° to a pitch angle <50°.

Kuo, S. P.; Kuo, Steven S.; Huynh, James T.; Kossey, Paul

2007-06-01

264

Two-dimensional s-polarized solitary waves in relativistic plasmas. I. The fluid plasma model.  

PubMed

The properties of two-dimensional linearly s-polarized solitary waves are investigated by fluid-Maxwell equations and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. These self-trapped electromagnetic waves appear during laser-plasma interactions, and they have a dominant electric field component E(z), normal to the plane of the wave, that oscillates at a frequency below the electron plasma frequency ?(pe). A set of equations that describe the waves are derived from the plasma fluid model in the case of cold or warm plasma and then solved numerically. The main features, including the maximum value of the vector potential amplitude, the total energy, the width, and the cavitation radius are presented as a function of the frequency. The amplitude of the vector potential increases monotonically as the frequency of the wave decreases, whereas the width reaches a minimum value at a frequency of the order of 0.82 ?(pe). The results are compared with a set of PIC simulations where the solitary waves are excited by a high-intensity laser pulse. PMID:22060509

Sánchez-Arriaga, G; Lefebvre, E

2011-09-01

265

Test Particle Simulations of Interaction Between Monochromatic Chorus Waves and Radiation Belt Relativistic Electrons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Chorus waves have been suggested to be effective in acceleration of radiation belt electrons. Here we perform gyro-averaged test-particle simulations to calculate the bounce-averaged pitch angle and energy diffusion coefficients for parallel-propagating monochromatic chorus waves, and perform a comparison of test-particle (TP) model with quasi-linear (QL) theory to evaluate the influence of nonlinear processes. For small amplitude chorus waves, the diffusion coefficients of TP and QL models are in good agreement. As the wave amplitude reaches a threshold value, two nonlinear processes (phase trapping and phase bunching) start to occur, especially at large equatorial pitch angles. Phase trapping yields rapid increases in pitch angle and kinetic energy. In contrast, phase bunching causes overall decreases in pitch angle and kinetic energy. For the waves with amplitudes slightly above the threshold value, the average behavior is dominated by the phase trapping, and TP diffusion coefficients are larger than QL ones. As wave amplitude increases, TP diffusion coefficients become smaller than QL ones, indicating that phase trapping gradually reduces the dominance over phase bunching.

Gao, Zhonglei; Zhu, Hui; Zhang, Lewei; Zhou, Qinghua; Yang, Chang; Xiao, Fuliang

2014-06-01

266

Two-dimensional s-polarized solitary waves in relativistic plasmas. I. The fluid plasma model  

SciTech Connect

The properties of two-dimensional linearly s-polarized solitary waves are investigated by fluid-Maxwell equations and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. These self-trapped electromagnetic waves appear during laser-plasma interactions, and they have a dominant electric field component E{sub z}, normal to the plane of the wave, that oscillates at a frequency below the electron plasma frequency {omega}{sub pe}. A set of equations that describe the waves are derived from the plasma fluid model in the case of cold or warm plasma and then solved numerically. The main features, including the maximum value of the vector potential amplitude, the total energy, the width, and the cavitation radius are presented as a function of the frequency. The amplitude of the vector potential increases monotonically as the frequency of the wave decreases, whereas the width reaches a minimum value at a frequency of the order of 0.82 {omega}{sub pe}. The results are compared with a set of PIC simulations where the solitary waves are excited by a high-intensity laser pulse.

Sanchez-Arriaga, G.; Lefebvre, E. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

2011-09-15

267

EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES OF MITIGATION MATERIALS FOR BLAST INDUCED TBI  

E-print Network

The objective of this experimental study is to compare the effects of various materials obstructing the flow of a blast wave and the ability of the given material to reduce the damage caused by the blast. Several methods ...

Young, Laurence Retman

268

Blast overpressure relief using air vacated buffer medium  

E-print Network

Blast waves generated by intense explosions cause damage to structures and human injury. In this thesis, a strategy is investigated for relief of blast overpressure resulting from explosions in air. The strategy is based ...

Avasarala, Srikanti Rupa

2009-01-01

269

Relativistic electron loss due to ultralow frequency waves and enhanced outward radial diffusion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using the THEMIS and GOES satellites and ground-based magnetometers, the loss of outer zone radiation belt electrons through the magnetopause in response to ultralow frequency (ULF) waves is examined. A 2 orders of magnitude decrease in >2 MeV electron flux observed at geosynchronous orbit, starting at 00 UT on 25 June 2008, is attributed to a rapid (1-4 h) nonadiabatic loss process. ULF waves were observed by the THEMIS-A, -D, and -E probes in the afternoon-to-dusk sector from the magnetopause to geosynchronous altitude. Estimates of the electron resonant energies indicate strong drift resonant interactions occurring between the energetic electrons and the observed waves. The rate of outward radial diffusion was estimated for MeV electrons using the observed ULF wave azimuthal electric field and compressional magnetic field and the diffusion time (˜2.5 h) was found to be in good agreement with the observed time for nonadiabatic flux decreases at geosynchronous orbit. The magnetopause was compressed inside of its nominal position because of increased solar wind dynamic pressure. The electron loss is interpreted as a combination of magnetopause shadowing (from the compressed magnetosphere) and enhanced outward diffusion from ULF wave-particle drift resonant interactions. The enhanced day-night asymmetry of the MeV electron drift path from the compression suggests that enhanced losses may have also occurred around local noon as well as in the afternoon-to-dusk sector.

Loto'Aniu, T. M.; Singer, H. J.; Waters, C. L.; Angelopoulos, V.; Mann, I. R.; Elkington, S. R.; Bonnell, J. W.

2010-12-01

270

Nonlinear Korteweg-de Vries-Burger equation for ion acoustic shock waves in a weakly relativistic electron-positron-ion plasma with thermal ions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The nonlinear propagation of ion acoustic waves in electron-positron-ion plasma comprising of Boltzmannian electrons, positrons, and relativistic thermal ions has been examined. The Korteweg-de Vries-Burger equation has been derived by reductive perturbation technique, and its shock like solution is determined analytically through tangent hyperbolic method. The effect of various plasma parameters on strength and structure of shock wave is investigated. The pert graphical view of the results has been presented for illustration. It is observed that strength and steepness of the shock wave enervate with an increase in the ion temperature, relativistic streaming factor, positron concentrations, electron temperature and they accrue with an increase in coefficient of kinematic viscosity. The convective, dispersive, and dissipative properties of the plasma are also discussed. It is determined that the electron temperature has remarkable influence on the propagation and structure of nonlinear wave in such relativistic plasmas. The numerical analysis has been done based on the typical numerical data from a pulsar magnetosphere.

Saeed, R.; Shah, Asif

2010-03-01

271

Quasi-linear analysis of whistler waves driven by relativistic runaway beams in tokamaks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The presence of a whistler wave instability (WWI) excited by runaway electrons may be the reason for the observation that the number of runaway electrons produced during disruptions in large tokamaks depends sensitively on the magnetic field strength. Previous work has shown that the linear growth rates of these waves are such that they are stable for high magnetic field (so the runaway beam can form) but unstable for low magnetic field. Here, it is shown that the quasi-linear diffusion process due to the WWI represents a very efficient pitch-angle scattering mechanism for runaways and consequently may stop runaway beam formation in large tokamak disruptions.

Pokol, G.; Fülöp, T.; Lisak, M.

2008-04-01

272

Relativistic particle acceleration in the process of whistler-mode chorus wave generation  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have found that efficient acceleration of resonant electrons takes place in a self-consistent particle simulation reproducing whistler-mode chorus emissions. While the majority of electrons lose energy contributing to the generation of chorus emissions, a fraction of resonant electrons having large pitch angle are simultaneously energized through nonlinear wave trapping by the generated chorus emissions. A small fraction of energetic

Yuto Katoh; Yoshiharu Omura

2007-01-01

273

Radiation Reaction in Relativistic Motion of a Particle in a Wave Field  

Microsoft Academic Search

An approximate solution of the equations of motion of Dirac's classical theory f pointlike particles is obtained for a particle in the field of a plane wave, under the assumption that the radiation reaction terms in these equations can be considered as small. The appearance of runaway terms in this solution is avoided by letting the interaction set in gradually.

E. Gora

1951-01-01

274

Integral representations of solutions of the wave equation based on relativistic wavelets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A representation of solutions of the wave equation with two spatial coordinates in terms of localized elementary ones is presented. Elementary solutions are constructed from four solutions with the help of transformations of the affine Poincaré group, i.e. with the help of translations, dilations in space and time and Lorentz transformations. The representation can be interpreted in terms of the initial-boundary value problem for the wave equation in a half-plane. It gives the solution as an integral representation of two types of solutions: propagating localized solutions running away from the boundary under different angles and packet-like surface waves running along the boundary and exponentially decreasing away from the boundary. Properties of elementary solutions are discussed. A numerical investigation of coefficients of the decomposition is carried out. An example of the decomposition of the field created by sources moving along a line with different speeds is considered, and the dependence of coefficients on speeds of sources is discussed.

Perel, Maria; Gorodnitskiy, Evgeny

2012-09-01

275

FIVE YEARS OF MID-INFRARED EVOLUTION OF THE REMNANT OF SN 1987A: THE ENCOUNTER BETWEEN THE BLAST WAVE AND THE DUSTY EQUATORIAL RING  

SciTech Connect

We have used the Spitzer satellite to monitor the mid-IR evolution of SN 1987A over a five year period spanning the epochs between days {approx}6000 and 8000 since the explosion. The supernova (SN) has evolved into a supernova remnant and its radiative output is dominated by the interaction of the SN blast wave with the pre-existing equatorial ring (ER). The mid-IR spectrum is dominated by emission from {approx}180 K silicate dust, collisionally heated by the hot X-ray emitting gas with a temperature and density of {approx}5 x 10{sup 6} K and {approx}3 x 10{sup 4} cm{sup -3}, respectively. The mass of the radiating dust is {approx}1.2 x 10{sup -6} M{sub sun} on day 7554 and scales linearly with IR flux. Comparison of the IR data with the soft X-ray flux derived from Chandra observations shows that the IR-to-X-ray flux ratio, IRX, is roughly constant with a value of 2.5. Gas-grain collisions therefore dominate the cooling of the shocked gas. The constancy of IRX is most consistent with the scenario that very little grain processing or gas cooling has occurred throughout this epoch. The shape of the dust spectrum remained unchanged during the observations while the total flux increased by a factor of {approx}5 with a time dependence of t'{sup 0.87{+-}0.20}, t' being the time since the first encounter between the blast wave and the ER. These observations are consistent with the transitioning of the blast wave from free expansion to a Sedov phase as it propagates into the main body of the ER, as also suggested by X-ray observations. The constant spectral shape of the IR emission provides strong constraints on the density and temperature of the shocked gas in which the interaction takes place. Silicate grains, with radii of {approx}0.2 {mu}m and temperature of T {approx} 180 K, best fit the spectral and temporal evolution of the {approx}8-30 {mu}m data. The IR spectra also show the presence of a secondary population of very small, hot (T {approx}> 350 K), featureless dust. If these grains spatially coexist with the silicates, then they must have shorter lifetimes. The data show slightly different rates of increase of their respective fluxes, lending some support to this hypothesis. However, the origin of this emission component and the exact nature of its relation to the silicate emission is still a major unsolved puzzle.

Dwek, Eli [Observational Cosmology Lab., Code 665, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Arendt, Richard G. [CRESST/UMBC, Code 665, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Bouchet, Patrice [DSM/DAPNIA/Service d'Astrophysique, CEA/Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Burrows, David N.; Park, Sangwook [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Challis, Peter; Slavin, Jonathan D. [Harvard-Smithsonian, CfA, 60 Garden Street, MS-19, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Danziger, I. John [Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, Via Tiepolo 11, Trieste (Italy); De Buizer, James M. [Gemini Observatory, Southern Operations Center, c/o AURA, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Gehrz, Robert D.; Woodward, Charles E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street, SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Polomski, Elisha F., E-mail: eli.dwek@nasa.go, E-mail: Patrice.Bouchet@cea.f [University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire, WI 54702 (United States)

2010-10-10

276

Five Years of Mid-Infrared Evolution of the Remnant of SN 1987A: The Encounter Between the Blast Wave and the Dusty Equatorial Ring  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We have used the Spitzer satellite to monitor the laid-IR evolution of SN 1987A over a 5 year period spanning the epochs between days 6000 and 8000 since the explosion. The supernova (SN) has evolved into a supernova remnant (SNR) and its radiative output, is dominated by the interaction of the SN blast wave with the pre-existing equatorial ring (ER). The mid-IR spectrum is dominated by emission from approximately 180 K silicate dust, collisionally-heated by the hot X-ray emitting gas with a temperature and density of 5 x 10(exp 6) K and approximately 3 x 10(exp 4) per cubic centimeter, respectively. The mass of the radiating dust is approximately 1.2 x 10(exp -6) solar mass on day 7554, and scales linearly with IR flux. Comparison of the IR data with the soft X-ray flux derived from Chandra observations shows that the IR-to-X-ray flux ratio, IRX, is roughly constant with a value of 2.5. Gas-grain collisions therefore dominate the cooling of the shocked gas. The constancy of IRX is most consistent with the scenario that very little grain processing or gas cooling have occurred throughout this epoch. The shape of the dust spectrum remained unchanged during the observations while the total flux increased by a factor of approximately 5 with a time dependence of t(sup '0.87 plus or minus 0.20), t' being the time since the first encounter between the blast wave and the ER. These observations are consistent with the transitioning of the blast wave from free expansion to a Sedov phase as it propagates into the main body of the ER, as also suggested by X-ray observations. The constant spectral shape of they IR, emission provides strong constraints on the density and temperature of the shocked gas in which the interaction takes place. The IR spectra also suggest the presence of a secondary population of very small, hot (T greater than or equal to 350 K), featureless dust. If these grains spatially coexists with the silicates, then they must have shorter lifetimes. The data show slightly different rates of increase of their respective fluxes, lending some support to this hypothesis. However, the origin of this emission component and the exact nature of its relation to the silicate emission is still a major unsolved puzzle.

Dwek, Eli; Arendt, Richard G.; Bouchet, Patrice; Burrows, David N.; Challis, Peter; Danziger, I. John; De Buizer, James M.; Gehrz, Robert D.; Park, Sangwook; Polomski, Elisha F.; Slavin, Jonathan D.; Woodward, Charles E.

2010-01-01

277

POES satellite observations of EMIC-wave driven relativistic electron precipitation during 1998-2010  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using six Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES) satellites that have carried the Space Environment Module-2 instrument package, a total of 436,422 individual half-orbits between 1998 and 2010 were inspected by an automatic detection algorithm searching for electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) driven relativistic electron precipitation (REP). The algorithm searched for one of the key characteristics of EMIC-driven REP, identified as the simultaneity between spikes in the P1 (52 keV differential proton flux channel) and P6 (>800 keV electron channel). In all, 2331 proton precipitation associated REP (PPAREP) events were identified. The majority of events were observed at L-values within the outer radiation belt (3 < L < 7) and were more common in the dusk and night sectors as determined by magnetic local time. The majority of events occurred outside the plasmasphere, at L-values ~1 Re greater than the plasmapause location determined from two different statistical models. The events make up a subset of EMIC-driven proton spikes investigated by Sandanger et al. (2009), and potentially reflect different overall characteristics compared with proton spikes, particularly when comparing their location to that of the plasmapause, i.e., EMIC-driven proton precipitation inside the plasmapause, and potentially EMIC-driven REP outside the plasmapause. There was no clear relationship between the location of plasmaspheric plumes and the locations of the PPAREP events detected. Analysis of the PPAREP event occurrence indicates that high solar wind speed and high geomagnetic activity levels increase the likelihood of an event being detected. The peak PPAREP event occurrence was during the declining phase of solar cycle 23, consistent with the 2003 maximum in the geomagnetic activity index, Ap.

Carson, Bonar R.; Rodger, Craig J.; Clilverd, Mark A.

2013-01-01

278

Derivation of nonlinear Schroedinger equation for electrostatic and electromagnetic waves in fully relativistic two-fluid plasmas by the reductive perturbation method  

SciTech Connect

The reductive perturbation method is used to derive a generic form of nonlinear Schroedinger equation (NLSE) that describes the nonlinear evolution of electrostatic (ES)/electromagnetic (EM) waves in fully relativistic two-fluid plasmas. The matrix eigenvector analysis shows that there are two mutually exclusive modes of waves, each mode involving only either one of two electric potentials, A and {phi}. The general result is applied to the electromagnetic mode in electron-ion plasmas with relativistically high electron temperature (T{sub e} Much-Greater-Than m{sub e}c{sup 2}). In the limit of high frequency (ck Much-Greater-Than {omega}{sub e}), the NLSE predicts bump type electromagnetic soliton structures having width scaling as {approx}kT{sub e}{sup 5/2}. It is shown that, in electron-positron pair plasmas with high temperature, dip type electromagnetic solitons can exist. The NLSE is also applied to electrostatic (Langmuir) wave and it is shown that dip type solitons can exist if k{lambda}{sub D} Much-Less-Than 1, where {lambda}{sub D} is the electron's Debye length. For the k{lambda}{sub D} Much-Greater-Than 1, however, the solution is of bump type soliton with width scaling as {approx}1/(k{sup 5}T{sub e}). It is also shown that dip type solitons can exist in cold plasmas having relativistically high streaming speed.

Lee, Nam C. [Department of Physics, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-08-15

279

Relativistic klystrons  

SciTech Connect

Experimental work is underway by a SLAC-LLNL-LBL collaboration to investigate the feasibility of using relativistic klystrons as a power source for future high gradient accelerators. Two different relativistic klystron configurations have been built and tested to date: a high grain multicavity klystron at 11.4 GHz and a low gain two cavity subharmonic buncher driven at 5.7 GHz. In both configurations power is extracted at 11.4 GHz. In order to understand the basic physics issues involved in extracting RF from a high power beam, we have used both a single resonant cavity and a multi-cell traveling wave structure for energy extraction. We have learned how to overcome our previously reported problem of high power RF pulse shortening, and have achieved peak RF power levels of 170 MW with the RF pulse of the same duration as the beam current pulse. 6 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Allen, M.A.; Azuma, O.; Callin, R.S.; Deruyter, H.; Eppley, K.R.; Fant, K.S.; Fowkes, W.R.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Hoag, H.A.; Koontz, R.F.

1989-03-01

280

Mechanism of phase control in a klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator by an input signal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Theoretical analyses and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations are carried out to understand the mechanism of microwave phase control realized by the external RF signal in a klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO). Theoretical calculations show that a modulated electron beam can lead the microwave field with an arbitrary initial phase to the same equilibrium phase, which is determined by the phase factor of the modulated current, and the difference between them is fixed. Furthermore, PIC simulations demonstrate that the phase of input signal has a close relation to that of modulated current, which initiates the phase of the irregularly microwave during the build-up of oscillation. Since the microwave field is weak during the early time of starting oscillation, it is easy to be induced, and a small input signal is sufficient to control the phase of output microwave. For the klystron-like RBWO with two pre-modulation cavities and a reentrant input cavity, an input signal with 100 kW power and 4.21 GHz frequency can control the phase of 5 GW output microwave with relative phase difference less than 6% when the diode voltage is 760 kV, and beam current is 9.8 kA, corresponding to a power ratio of output microwave to input signal of 47 dB.

Xiao, Renzhen; Song, Zhimin; Deng, Yuqun; Chen, Changhua

2014-09-01

281

Relativistic Lighthouses: The Role of the Binary Pulsar in proving the existence of Gravitational Waves  

E-print Network

This paper discusses the role of the discovery and analysis of the first binary pulsar in settling the long-running quadrupole formula controversy over the status of gravitational waves as a prediction of general relativity. It also discusses how we should understand the resolution of this controversy in the context of the so-called science wars. In other words it discusses whether concepts such as interpretive flexibility and the experimenters' regress can shed light on what can also be seen as a classical confirmation of realist expectations, in which a theoretical controversy is settled by a conclusive experiment.

Kennefick, Daniel

2014-01-01

282

Neuro-Glial and Systemic Mechanisms of Pathological Responses in Rat Models of Primary Blast Overpressure Compared to "Composite" Blast  

PubMed Central

A number of experimental models of blast brain injury have been implemented in rodents and larger animals. However, the variety of blast sources and the complexity of blast wave biophysics have made data on injury mechanisms and biomarkers difficult to analyze and compare. Recently, we showed the importance of rat position toward blast generated by an external shock tube. In this study, we further characterized blast producing moderate traumatic brain injury and defined “composite” blast and primary blast exposure set-ups. Schlieren optics visualized interaction between the head and a shock wave generated by external shock tube, revealing strong head acceleration upon positioning the rat on-axis with the shock tube (composite blast), but negligible skull movement upon peak overpressure exposure off-axis (primary blast). Brain injury signatures of a primary blast hitting the frontal head were assessed and compared to damage produced by composite blast. Low to negligible levels of neurodegeneration were found following primary blast compared to composite blast by silver staining. However, persistent gliosis in hippocampus and accumulation of GFAP/CNPase in circulation was detected after both primary and composite blast. Also, markers of vascular/endothelial inflammation integrin alpha/beta, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and L-selectin along with neurotrophic factor nerve growth factor-beta were increased in serum within 6?h post-blasts and persisted for 7?days thereafter. In contrast, systemic IL-1, IL-10, fractalkine, neuroendocrine peptide Orexin A, and VEGF receptor Neuropilin-2 (NRP-2) were raised predominantly after primary blast exposure. In conclusion, biomarkers of major pathological pathways were elevated at all blast set-ups. The most significant and persistent changes in neuro-glial markers were found after composite blast, while primary blast instigated prominent systemic cytokine/chemokine, Orexin A, and Neuropilin-2 release, particularly when primary blast impacted rats with unprotected body. PMID:22403567

Svetlov, Stanislav I.; Prima, Victor; Glushakova, Olena; Svetlov, Artem; Kirk, Daniel R.; Gutierrez, Hector; Serebruany, Victor L.; Curley, Kenneth C.; Wang, Kevin K. W.; Hayes, Ronald L.

2012-01-01

283

Amplification of a fast wave by extracting both the kinetic energy and electrostatic potential energy of a large-orbit relativistic electron beam in a coaxial electrostatic wiggler  

SciTech Connect

Nonlinear model and simulation technique of the interaction and energy transfer between a fast wave and a large-orbit relativistic electron beam in a coaxial electrostatic wiggler are presented. Unlike the situations in a magnetostatic-wiggler free-electron laser (MWFEL) and in an electron cyclotron maser (ECM), the electrostatic potential of the electrons plays an important role and participates in the energy exchange between the wave and the electron beam. Compared to MWFEL and ECM, the coaxial electrostatic-wiggler configuration has a distinguishing peculiarity that besides the electron-beam's kinetic energy, its electrostatic potential energy can be effectively transferred to the fast wave. Simulation shows that wave could be amplified with ultrahigh gain by extracting both the kinetic energy and electrostatic potential energy of the electron beam.

Zhang Shichang [Institute of Photoelectronics, Campus Mail Box 50, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China)

2010-05-15

284

Photographs of Blast Effects on Structures  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This photograph collection shows a wood-frame house located 1,100 meters from ground zero, exposed to a nuclear blast at the Nevada Test Site. The test was Upshot-Knothole Annie, a 16 Kt tower shot, on March 17, 1953. Exposure to thermal radiation was 25 cal/cm2, about one-quarter of that experienced at ground zero in Hiroshima. The blast over pressure was 5 psi, and the blast wave created surface winds of 160 mph.

Griffith, Christopher

285

Zero field splitting of the chalcogen diatomics using relativistic correlated wave-function methods.  

PubMed

The spectrum arising from the (?*)(2) configuration of the chalcogen dimers, namely, the X(2)1, a2, and b0(+) states, is calculated using wave-function theory based methods. Two-component (2c) and four-component (4c) multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) and Fock-space coupled cluster (FSCC) methods are used as well as two-step methods spin-orbit complete active space perturbation theory at 2nd order (SO-CASPT2) and spin-orbit difference dedicated configuration interaction (SO-DDCI). The energy of the X(2)1 state corresponds to the zero-field splitting of the ground state spin triplet. It is described with high accuracy by the 2- and 4-component methods in comparison with experiment, whereas the two-step methods give about 80% of the experimental values. The b0(+) state is well described by 4c-MRCI, SO-CASPT2, and SO-DDCI, but FSCC fails to describe this state and an intermediate Hamiltonian FSCC ansatz is required. The results are readily rationalized by a two-parameter model; ??, the ?* spinor splitting by spin-orbit coupling and K, the exchange integral between the ?(1)* and the ?(-1)* spinors with, respectively, angular momenta 1 and -1. This model holds for all systems under study with the exception of Po(2). PMID:21950849

Rota, J-B; Knecht, S; Fleig, T; Ganyushin, D; Saue, T; Neese, F; Bolvin, H

2011-09-21

286

Zero field splitting of the chalcogen diatomics using relativistic correlated wave-function methods  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The spectrum arising from the (?*)2 configuration of the chalcogen dimers, namely, the X21, a2, and b0+ states, is calculated using wave-function theory based methods. Two-component (2c) and four-component (4c) multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) and Fock-space coupled cluster (FSCC) methods are used as well as two-step methods spin-orbit complete active space perturbation theory at 2nd order (SO-CASPT2) and spin-orbit difference dedicated configuration interaction (SO-DDCI). The energy of the X21 state corresponds to the zero-field splitting of the ground state spin triplet. It is described with high accuracy by the 2- and 4-component methods in comparison with experiment, whereas the two-step methods give about 80% of the experimental values. The b0+ state is well described by 4c-MRCI, SO-CASPT2, and SO-DDCI, but FSCC fails to describe this state and an intermediate Hamiltonian FSCC ansatz is required. The results are readily rationalized by a two-parameter model; ??, the ?* spinor splitting by spin-orbit coupling and K, the exchange integral between the ? 1^{*} and the ? _{-1}^{*} spinors with, respectively, angular momenta 1 and -1. This model holds for all systems under study with the exception of Po2.

Rota, J.-B.; Knecht, S.; Fleig, T.; Ganyushin, D.; Saue, T.; Neese, F.; Bolvin, H.

2011-09-01

287

Relativistic Astrophysics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Preface; Prologue: Conference overview Bernard Carr; Part I. The Universe At Large and Very Large Redshifts: 2. The size and age of the Universe Gustav A. Tammann; 3. Active galaxies at large redshifts Malcolm S. Longair; 4. Observational cosmology with the cosmic microwave background George F. Smoot; 5. Future prospects in measuring the CMB power spectrum Philip M. Lubin; 6. Inflationary cosmology Michael S. Turner; 7. The signature of the Universe Bernard J. T. Jones; 8. Theory of large-scale structure Sergei F. Shandarin; 9. The origin of matter in the universe Lev A. Kofman; 10. New guises for cold-dark matter suspects Edward W. Kolb; Part II. Physics and Astrophysics Of Relativistic Compact Objects: 11. On the unification of gravitational and inertial forces Donald Lynden-Bell; 12. Internal structure of astrophysical black holes Werner Israel; 13. Black hole entropy: external facade and internal reality Valery Frolov; 14. Accretion disks around black holes Marek A. Abramowicz; 15. Black hole X-ray transients J. Craig Wheeler; 16. X-rays and gamma rays from active galactic nuclei Roland Svensson; 17. Gamma-ray bursts: a challenge to relativistic astrophysics Martin Rees; 18. Probing black holes and other exotic objects with gravitational waves Kip Thorne; Epilogue: the past and future of relativistic astrophysics Igor D. Novikov; I. D. Novikov's scientific papers and books.

Jones, Bernard J. T.; Markovic, Dragoljub

1997-06-01

288

Gram-range explosive blast scaling and associated materials response  

E-print Network

Gram-range explosive blast scaling and associated materials response M. J. Hargather1 , G. S. Laboratory-scale gram-range explosive blast testing of materials is shown to be feasible. Blast loading from different explosive compounds is coupled to a witness plate through the air by way of a shock wave of known

Settles, Gary S.

289

Explicit mathematical construction of relativistic nonlinear de Broglie waves described by three-dimensional (wave and electromagnetic) solitons ``piloted'' (controlled) by corresponding solutions of associated linear Klein-Gordon and Schrödinger equations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Starting from a nonlinear relativistic Klein-Gordon equation derived from the stochastic interpretation of quantum mechanics (proposed by Bohm-Vigier, (1) Nelson, (2) de Broglie, (3) Guerra et al. (4) ), one can construct joint wave and particle, soliton-like solutions, which follow the average de Broglie-Bohm (5) real trajectories associated with linear solutions of the usual Schrödinger and Klein-Gordon equations.

Vigier, Jean-Pierre

1991-02-01

290

Relativistic parametrization of the self-consistent-charge density-functional tight-binding method. 1. Atomic wave functions and energies.  

PubMed

A detailed treatment of a confined relativistic atom, needed as an initial step for the parametrization of the self-consistent-charge density-functional tight-binding method, is presented and discussed. The required one-component quantities, i.e., orbital energies, orbital wave functions, and Hubbard parameters, are obtained by weighted averaging of the corresponding numbers determined for the atomic spinors. The wave function and density confinement is achieved by introducing the Woods-Saxon potential in the atomic four-component Dirac-Kohn-Sham problem. The effect of the additional confining potential on energy eigenvalues and the shape of atomic wave functions and densities is discussed and numerical examples are presented for the valence spinors of carbon, germanium, and lead. PMID:17567112

Witek, Henryk A; Köhler, Christof; Frauenheim, Thomas; Morokuma, Keiji; Elstner, Marcus

2007-07-01

291

Non-Thermal Radio and Gamma-Ray Emissions from a Supernova Remnant by Blast Wave Breaking Out of the Circumstellar Matter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We calculated synchrotron radio emission and ?-ray emission due to bremsstrahlung, inverse-Compton scattering, and ?0-decay from the remnant of supernova that exploded in the circumstellar matter (CSM) formed by the progenitor's stellar wind. This sort of situation is a possible origin of mixed-morphology supernova remnants (SNRs), like W 49B, which exhibit recombination-radiation spectra in X-ray emission. We assumed that the CSM of 1.5 M? exists at 0.07-3 pc away from the supernova in the interstellar medium (ISM) of density 0.016 cm-3. When the blast wave breaks out of the CSM into the ISM, its velocity rapidly increases, and hence particle acceleration is enhanced. The maximum energy of protons reaches ˜1300 TeV just after the break-out with ˜0.5% of the explosion energy. We considered the non-thermal emission from the blast-shocked ISM shell after the break-out. Synchrotron radio flux at 1 GHz is tens of Jy, comparable to that observed from mixed-morphology SNRs. Because of low density, the ?-ray luminosity is dominated by inverse-Compton scattering, which is higher than the ?0-decay luminosity by an order of magnitude. The total ?-ray luminosity, including bremsstrahlung, is on the order of 1033 erg s-1 lower than the typical value of 1035-1036 erg s-1 observed from mixed-morphology SNRs. However, if, e.g., ˜10% of accelerated protons interact with some matter of density of 100 cm-3, the ?0-decay ?-ray luminosity would be enhanced to be comparable with the observed value.

Shimizu, Takafumi; Masai, Kuniaki; Koyama, Katsuji

2013-06-01

292

Nuclear Blast  

MedlinePLUS

... including blinding light, intense heat (thermal radiation), initial nuclear radiation, blast, fires started by the heat pulse and ... time, and is the main source of residual nuclear radiation. Fallout from a nuclear explosion may be carried ...

293

Acceleration of Magnetospheric Relativistic Electrons by Ultra-Low Frequency Waves: A Comparison between Two Cases Observed by Cluster and LANL Satellites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Understanding the origin and acceleration of magnetospheric relativistic electrons (MREs) in the Earth's radiation belt during geomagnetic storms is an important subject and yet one of outstanding questions in space physics. It has been statistically suggested that during geomagnetic storms, ultra-low-frequency (ULF) Pc-5 wave activities in the magnetosphere are correlated with order of magnitude increase of MRE fluxes in the outer radiation belt. Yet, physical and observational understandings of resonant interactions between ULF waves and MREs remain minimum. In this paper, we show two events during storms on September 25, 2001 and November 25, 2001, the solar wind speeds in both cases were > 500 km/s while Cluster observations indicate presence of strong ULF waves in the magnetosphere at noon and dusk, respectively, during a approx. 3-hour period. MRE observations by the Los Alamos (LANL) spacecraft show a quadrupling of 1.1-1.5 MeV electron fluxes in the September 25, 2001 event, but only a negligible increase in the November 2.5, 2001 event. We present a detailed comparison between these two events. Our results suggest that the effectiveness of MRE acceleration during the September 25, 2001 event can be attributed to the compressional wave mode with strong ULF wave activities and the physical origin of MRE acceleration depends more on the distribution of toroidal and poloidal ULF waves in the outer radiation belt.

Shao, X.; Fung, S. F.; Tan, L. C.; Sharma, A. S.

2010-01-01

294

Electron acceleration and emission in a field of a plane and converging dipole wave of relativistic amplitudes with the radiation reaction force taken into account  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A comparative analysis is performed of the electron emission characteristics as the electrons move in laser fields with ultra-relativistic intensity and different configurations corresponding to a plane or tightly focused wave. For a plane travelling wave, analytical expressions are derived for the emission characteristics, and it is shown that the angular distribution of the radiation intensity changes qualitatively even when the wave intensity is much less than that in the case of the radiation-dominated regime. An important conclusion is drawn that the electrons in a travelling wave tend to synchronised motion under the radiation reaction force. The characteristic features of the motion of electrons are found in a converging dipole wave, associated with the curvature of the phase front and nonuniformity of the field distribution. The values of the maximum achievable longitudinal momenta of electrons accelerated to the centre, as well as their distribution function are determined. The existence of quasi-periodic trajectories near the focal region of the dipole wave is shown, and the characteristics of the emission of both accelerated and oscillating electrons are analysed.

Bashinov, Aleksei V.; Gonoskov, Arkady A.; Kim, A. V.; Marklund, Mattias; Mourou, G.; Sergeev, Aleksandr M.

2013-04-01

295

Electron acceleration and emission in a field of a plane and converging dipole wave of relativistic amplitudes with the radiation reaction force taken into account  

SciTech Connect

A comparative analysis is performed of the electron emission characteristics as the electrons move in laser fields with ultra-relativistic intensity and different configurations corresponding to a plane or tightly focused wave. For a plane travelling wave, analytical expressions are derived for the emission characteristics, and it is shown that the angular distribution of the radiation intensity changes qualitatively even when the wave intensity is much less than that in the case of the radiation-dominated regime. An important conclusion is drawn that the electrons in a travelling wave tend to synchronised motion under the radiation reaction force. The characteristic features of the motion of electrons are found in a converging dipole wave, associated with the curvature of the phase front and nonuniformity of the field distribution. The values of the maximum achievable longitudinal momenta of electrons accelerated to the centre, as well as their distribution function are determined. The existence of quasi-periodic trajectories near the focal region of the dipole wave is shown, and the characteristics of the emission of both accelerated and oscillating electrons are analysed. (extreme light fields and their applications)

Bashinov, Aleksei V; Gonoskov, Arkady A; Kim, A V; Marklund, Mattias; Mourou, G; Sergeev, Aleksandr M

2013-04-30

296

CAFE: A New Relativistic MHD Code  

E-print Network

We present CAFE, a new independent code designed to solve the equations of Relativistic ideal Magnetohydrodynamics (RMHD) in 3D. We present the standard tests for a RMHD code and for the Relativistic Hydrodynamics (RMD) regime since we have not reported them before. The tests include the 1D Riemann problems related to blast waves, head-on collision of streams and states with transverse velocities, with and without magnetic field, which is aligned or transverse, constant or discontinuous across the initial discontinuity. Among the 2D tests, without magnetic field we include the 2D Riemann problem, the high speed Emery wind tunnel, the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability test and a set of jets, whereas in the presence of a magnetic field we show the magnetic rotor, the cylindrical explosion and the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. The code uses High Resolution Shock Capturing methods and as a standard set up we present the error analysis with a simple combination that uses the HLLE flux formula combined with linear, PPM ...

Lora-Clavijo, F D; Guzman, F S

2014-01-01

297

CAFE: A New Relativistic MHD Code  

E-print Network

We present CAFE, a new independent code designed to solve the equations of Relativistic ideal Magnetohydrodynamics (RMHD) in 3D. We present the standard tests for a RMHD code and for the Relativistic Hydrodynamics (RMD) regime since we have not reported them before. The tests include the 1D Riemann problems related to blast waves, head-on collision of streams and states with transverse velocities, with and without magnetic field, which is aligned or transverse, constant or discontinuous across the initial discontinuity. Among the 2D tests, without magnetic field we include the 2D Riemann problem, the high speed Emery wind tunnel, the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability test and a set of jets, whereas in the presence of a magnetic field we show the magnetic rotor, the cylindrical explosion and the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. The code uses High Resolution Shock Capturing methods and as a standard set up we present the error analysis with a simple combination that uses the HLLE flux formula combined with linear, PPM and fifth order WENO reconstructors.

F. D. Lora-Clavijo; A. Cruz-Osorio; F. S. Guzman

2014-08-25

298

Relativistic Quantum Scars  

SciTech Connect

The concentrations of wave functions about classical periodic orbits, or quantum scars, are a fundamental phenomenon in physics. An open question is whether scarring can occur in relativistic quantum systems. To address this question, we investigate confinements made of graphene whose classical dynamics are chaotic and find unequivocal evidence of relativistic quantum scars. The scarred states can lead to strong conductance fluctuations in the corresponding open quantum dots via the mechanism of resonant transmission.

Huang, Liang [Department of Electrical Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Lai Yingcheng [Department of Electrical Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Ferry, David K.; Goodnick, Stephen M. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Center for Solid State Electronics Research, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Akis, Richard [Department of Electrical Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Center for Solid State Electronics Research, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

2009-07-31

299

Traumatic brain injury caused by laser-induced shock wave in rats: a novel laboratory model for studying blast-induced traumatic brain injury  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The detailed mechanism of blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) has not been revealed yet. Thus, reliable laboratory animal models for bTBI are needed to investigate the possible diagnosis and treatment for bTBI. In this study, we used laser-induced shock wave (LISW) to induce TBI in rats and investigated the histopathological similarities to actual bTBI. After craniotomy, the rat brain was exposed to a single shot of LISW with a diameter of 3 mm at various laser fluences. At 24 h after LISW exposure, perfusion fixation was performed and the extracted brain was sectioned; the sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin. Evans blue (EB) staining was also used to evaluate disruption of the blood brain barrier. At certain laser fluence levels, neural cell injury and hemorrhagic lesions were observed in the cortex and subcortical region. However, injury was limited in the tissue region that interacted with the LISW. The severity of injury increased with increasing laser fluence and hence peak pressure of the LISW. Fluorescence originating from EB was diffusively observed in the injuries at high fluence levels. Due to the grade and spatial controllability of injuries and the histological observations similar to those in actual bTBI, brain injuries caused by LISWs would be useful models to study bTBI.

Hatano, Ben; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa; Otani, Naoki; Saitoh, Daizoh; Tokuno, Shinichi; Satoh, Yasushi; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Matsushita, Yoshitaro; Sato, Shunichi

2011-03-01

300

Gyrotrons and dopplertrons - Electromagnetic wave generators based on coherent radiation from magneto-resonant, relativistic, electron beams  

Microsoft Academic Search

The application of magnetized, intense, relativistic-electron beams to the generation of electromagnetic radiation at wavelengths ranging from 10 cm down to a fraction of a millimeter has enabled significant advances to be made in peak power capabilities. The physical mechanisms are conveniently divided into three categories according to the experimental feature which determines the output wavelength. These categories are related

V. L. Granatstein

1978-01-01

301

Relativistic motion with linear dissipation  

E-print Network

A general formalism for obtaining the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian for a one dimensional dissipative system is developed. The formalism is illustrated by applying it to the case of a relativistic particle with linear dissipation. The relativistic wave equation is solved for a free particle with linear dissipation.

G. Gonzalez

2005-03-28

302

Relativistic Bohmain Mechanics  

E-print Network

In this paper we generalize the ideas of de Broglie and Bohm to the relativistic case which is based on the relativistic Schr\\"odinger equation. In this regard, the relativistic forms of the guidance equation and quantum potential are derived. In our formulation of Relativistic Bohmian Mechanic, the quantum equilibrium hypothesis $(\\rho=|\\psi|^{2})$ and the probabilistic interpretation of the wave function are not an intrinsic feature of the theory as well as expected from the theoretical structure of Bohmian mechanics but still we can extract the statistical predictions of this theory. In fact with assuming the quantum equilibrium hypothesis in non-relativistic case and then acceleration to particles by an external field we go to the relativistic regime. So in this case the quantum equilibrium would not be established and theory will have testable predictions that can be experienced, or this will be compared to the result of relativistic quantum mechanics. In some simple cases such calculations have been don...

Khodagholizadeh, Jafar; Babazadeh, Alireza

2014-01-01

303

Point form relativistic quantum mechanics and relativistic SU(6)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The point form is used as a framework for formulating a relativistic quantum mechanics, with the mass operator carrying the interactions of underlying constituents. A symplectic Lie algebra of mass operators is introduced from which a relativistic harmonic oscillator mass operator is formed. Mass splittings within the degenerate harmonic oscillator levels arise from relativistically invariant spin-spin, spin-orbit, and tensor mass operators. Internal flavor (and color) symmetries are introduced which make it possible to formulate a relativistic SU(6) model of baryons (and mesons). Careful attention is paid to the permutation symmetry properties of the hadronic wave functions, which are written as polynomials in Bargmann spaces.

Klink, W. H.

1993-01-01

304

Macro-mechanical modeling of blast-wave mitigation in foams. Part II: reliability of pressure measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A phenomenological study of the process occurring when a plane shock wave reflected off an aqueous foam column filling the test section of a vertical shock tube has been undertaken. The experiments were conducted with initial shock wave Mach numbers in the range 1.25le {M}_s le 1.7 and foam column heights in the range 100-450 mm. Miniature piezotrone circuit electronic pressure transducers were used to record the pressure histories upstream and alongside the foam column. The aim of these experiments was to find a simple way to eliminate a spatial averaging as an artifact of the pressure history recorded by the side-on transducer. For this purpose, we discuss first the common behaviors of the pressure traces in extended time scales. These observations evidently quantify the low frequency variations of the pressure field within the different flow domains of the shock tube. Thereafter, we focus on the fronts of the pressure signals, which, in turn, characterize the high-frequency response of the foam column to the shock wave impact. Since the front shape and the amplitude of the pressure signal most likely play a significant role in the foam destruction, phase changes and/or other physical factors, such as high capacity, viscosity, etc., the common practice of the data processing is revised and discussed in detail. Generally, side-on pressure measurements must be used with great caution when performed in wet aqueous foams, because the low sound speed is especially prone to this effect. Since the spatial averaged recorded pressure signals do not reproduce well the real behaviors of the pressure rise, the recorded shape of the shock wave front in the foam appears much thicker. It is also found that when a thin liquid film wet the sensing membrane, the transducer sensitivity was changed. As a result, the pressure recorded in the foam could exceed the real amplitude of the post-shock wave flow. A simple procedure, which allows correcting this imperfection, is discussed in detail.

Britan, A.; Liverts, M.; Shapiro, H.; Ben-Dor, G.

2013-02-01

305

Note: A table-top blast driven shock tube.  

PubMed

The prevalence of blast-induced traumatic brain injury in conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan has motivated laboratory scale experiments on biomedical effects of blast waves and studies of blast wave transmission properties of various materials in hopes of improving armor design to mitigate these injuries. This paper describes the design and performance of a table-top shock tube that is more convenient and widely accessible than traditional compression driven and blast driven shock tubes. The design is simple: it is an explosive driven shock tube employing a rifle primer that explodes when impacted by the firing pin. The firearm barrel acts as the shock tube, and the shock wave emerges from the muzzle. The small size of this shock tube can facilitate localized application of a blast wave to a subject, tissue, or material under test. PMID:21198058

Courtney, Michael W; Courtney, Amy C

2010-12-01

306

Note: A table-top blast driven shock tube  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The prevalence of blast-induced traumatic brain injury in conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan has motivated laboratory scale experiments on biomedical effects of blast waves and studies of blast wave transmission properties of various materials in hopes of improving armor design to mitigate these injuries. This paper describes the design and performance of a table-top shock tube that is more convenient and widely accessible than traditional compression driven and blast driven shock tubes. The design is simple: it is an explosive driven shock tube employing a rifle primer that explodes when impacted by the firing pin. The firearm barrel acts as the shock tube, and the shock wave emerges from the muzzle. The small size of this shock tube can facilitate localized application of a blast wave to a subject, tissue, or material under test.

Courtney, Michael W.; Courtney, Amy C.

2010-12-01

307

THE VERY UNUSUAL INTERPLANETARY CORONAL MASS EJECTION OF 2012 JULY 23: A BLAST WAVE MEDIATED BY SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLES  

SciTech Connect

The giant, superfast, interplanetary coronal mass ejection, detected by STEREO A on 2012 July 23, well away from Earth, appears to have reached 1 AU with an unusual set of leading bow waves resembling in some ways a subsonic interaction, possibly due to the high pressures present in the very energetic particles produced in this event. Eventually, a front of record high-speed flow reached STEREO. The unusual behavior of this event is illustrated using the magnetic field, plasma, and energetic ion observations obtained by STEREO. Had the Earth been at the location of STEREO, the large southward-oriented magnetic field component in the event, combined with its high speed, would have produced a record storm.

Russell, C. T. [University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1567 (United States); Mewaldt, R. A.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Leske, R. A. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Luhmann, J. G. [University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Mason, G. M. [Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Von Rosenvinge, T. T. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Gomez-Herrero, R. [University of Alcala, E-28871 Alcala de Henares (Spain); Klassen, A. [Kiel University, D-24118 Kiel (Germany); Galvin, A. B.; Simunac, K. D. C., E-mail: ctrussell@igpp.ucla.edu [University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States)

2013-06-10

308

The Very Unusual Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection of 2012 July 23: A Blast Wave Mediated by Solar Energetic Particles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The giant, superfast, interplanetary coronal mass ejection, detected by STEREO A on 2012 July 23, well away from Earth, appears to have reached 1 AU with an unusual set of leading bow waves resembling in some ways a subsonic interaction, possibly due to the high pressures present in the very energetic particles produced in this event. Eventually, a front of record high-speed flow reached STEREO. The unusual behavior of this event is illustrated using the magnetic field, plasma, and energetic ion observations obtained by STEREO. Had the Earth been at the location of STEREO, the large southward-oriented magnetic field component in the event, combined with its high speed, would have produced a record storm.

Russell, C. T.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Luhmann, J. G.; Mason, G. M.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Leske, R. A.; Gomez-Herrero, R.; Klassen, A.; Galvin, A. B.; Simunac, K. D. C.

2013-06-01

309

Electrocardiographic changes following primary blast injury to the thorax.  

PubMed

Profound physiological changes occur following primary blast exposure but the contribution of cardiac arrhythmias is unknown. Thirteen rats, under intravenous anaesthesia, were exposed to a blast wave directed at the thorax (Group II); 10 other animals underwent abdominal blast (Group III) and nine animals acted as controls (Group I). Animals were monitored before, during and after blast exposure. Group II animals demonstrated apnoea, bradycardia and hypotension. No significant physiological changes were seen in Groups I or III. Group II displayed a variety of ECG disturbances, from ventricular extrasystoles to ventricular fibrillation. All abnormalities reverted to sinus rhythm within minutes except in fatally injured animals. These ECG changes probably result from stress wave injury. Significant disturbances might account for some fatalities following primary blast exposure and may exacerbate the triad of apnoea, bradycardia and hypotension. Such observations may have important consequences for the management of blast casualties. PMID:11346922

Guy, R J; Watkins, P E; Edmondstone, W M

2000-01-01

310

An exact solution to the relativistic equation of motion of a charged particle driven by a linearly polarized electromagnetic wave  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An exact analytic solution is found for a basic electromagnetic wave-charged particle interaction by solving the nonlinear equations of motion. The particle position, velocity, and corresponding time are found to be explicit functions of the total phase of the wave. Particle position and velocity are thus implicit functions of time. Applications include describing the motion of a free electron driven by an intense laser beam..

Shebalin, John V.

1988-01-01

311

Ion-acoustic waves in unmagnetized collisionless weakly relativistic plasma of warm-ion and isothermal-electron using time-fractional KdV equation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Collisionless unmagnetized plasma consisting of a mixture of warm ion-fluid and isothermal-electron is considered, assuming that the ion flow velocity has a weak relativistic effect. The reductive perturbation method has been employed to derive the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation for small - but finite-amplitude electrostatic ion-acoustic waves in this plasma. The semi-inverse method and Agrawal's method lead to the Euler-Lagrange equation that leads to the time fractional KdV equation. The variational-iteration method given by He is used to solve the derived time fractional KdV equation. The calculations show that the fractional order may play the same rule of higher order dissipation in KdV equation to modulate the soliton wave amplitude in the plasma system. The results of the present investigation may be applicable to some plasma environments, such as space-plasmas, laser-plasma interaction, plasma sheet boundary layer of the earth's magnetosphere, solar atmosphere and interplanetary space.

El-Wakil, Sayed A.; Abulwafa, Essam M.; El-Shewy, Emad K.; Mahmoud, Abeer A.

2012-06-01

312

A NEW MULTI-DIMENSIONAL GENERAL RELATIVISTIC NEUTRINO HYDRODYNAMICS CODE OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE. III. GRAVITATIONAL WAVE SIGNALS FROM SUPERNOVA EXPLOSION MODELS  

SciTech Connect

We present a detailed theoretical analysis of the gravitational wave (GW) signal of the post-bounce evolution of core-collapse supernovae (SNe), employing for the first time relativistic, two-dimensional explosion models with multi-group, three-flavor neutrino transport based on the ray-by-ray-plus approximation. The waveforms reflect the accelerated mass motions associated with the characteristic evolutionary stages that were also identified in previous works: a quasi-periodic modulation by prompt post-shock convection is followed by a phase of relative quiescence before growing amplitudes signal violent hydrodynamical activity due to convection and the standing accretion shock instability during the accretion period of the stalled shock. Finally, a high-frequency, low-amplitude variation from proto-neutron star (PNS) convection below the neutrinosphere appears superimposed on the low-frequency trend associated with the aspherical expansion of the SN shock after the onset of the explosion. Relativistic effects in combination with detailed neutrino transport are shown to be essential for quantitative predictions of the GW frequency evolution and energy spectrum, because they determine the structure of the PNS surface layer and its characteristic g-mode frequency. Burst-like high-frequency activity phases, correlated with sudden luminosity increase and spectral hardening of electron (anti-)neutrino emission for some 10 ms, are discovered as new features after the onset of the explosion. They correspond to intermittent episodes of anisotropic accretion by the PNS in the case of fallback SNe. We find stronger signals for more massive progenitors with large accretion rates. The typical frequencies are higher for massive PNSs, though the time-integrated spectrum also strongly depends on the model dynamics.

Mueller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Marek, Andreas, E-mail: bjmuellr@mpa-garching.mpg.de, E-mail: thj@mpa-garching.mpg.de, E-mail: amarek@mpa-garching.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

2013-03-20

313

Modelling human eye under blast loading.  

PubMed

Primary blast injury (PBI) is the general term that refers to injuries resulting from the mere interaction of a blast wave with the body. Although few instances of primary ocular blast injury, without a concomitant secondary blast injury from debris, are documented, some experimental studies demonstrate its occurrence. In order to investigate PBI to the eye, a finite element model of the human eye using simple constitutive models was developed. The material parameters were calibrated by a multi-objective optimisation performed on available eye impact test data. The behaviour of the human eye and the dynamics of mechanisms occurring under PBI loading conditions were modelled. For the generation of the blast waves, different combinations of explosive (trinitrotoluene) mass charge and distance from the eye were analysed. An interpretation of the resulting pressure, based on the propagation and reflection of the waves inside the eye bulb and orbit, is proposed. The peculiar geometry of the bony orbit (similar to a frustum cone) can induce a resonance cavity effect and generate a pressure standing wave potentially hurtful for eye tissues. PMID:23521031

Esposito, L; Clemente, C; Bonora, N; Rossi, T

2015-02-01

314

Blast Loading Experiments of Surrogate Models for Tbi Scenarios  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study aims to characterize the interaction of explosive blast waves through simulated anatomical models. We have developed physical models and a systematic approach for testing traumatic brain injury (TBI) mechanisms and occurrences. A simplified series of models consisting of spherical PMMA shells housing synthetic gelatins as brain simulants have been utilized. A series of experiments was conducted to compare the sensitivity of the system response to mechanical properties of the simulants under high strain-rate explosive blasts. Small explosive charges were directed at the models to produce a realistic blast wave in a scaled laboratory test cell setting. Blast profiles were measured and analyzed to compare system response severity. High-speed shadowgraph imaging captured blast wave interaction with the head model while particle tracking captured internal response for displacement and strain correlation. The results suggest amplification of shock waves inside the head near material interfaces due to impedance mismatches. In addition, significant relative displacement was observed between the interacting materials suggesting large strain values of nearly 5%. Further quantitative results were obtained through shadowgraph imaging of the blasts confirming a separation of time scales between blast interaction and bulk movement. These results lead to the conclusion that primary blast effects could cause TBI occurrences.

Alley, M. D.; Son, S. F.

2009-12-01

315

Fast lattice Boltzmann solver for relativistic hydrodynamics.  

PubMed

A lattice Boltzmann formulation for relativistic fluids is presented and numerically validated through quantitative comparison with recent hydrodynamic simulations of relativistic fluids. In order to illustrate its capability to handle complex geometries, the scheme is also applied to the case of a three-dimensional relativistic shock wave, generated by a supernova explosion, impacting on a massive interstellar cloud. This formulation opens up the possibility of exporting the proven advantages of lattice Boltzmann methods, namely, computational efficiency and easy handling of complex geometries, to the context of (mildly) relativistic fluid dynamics at large, from quark-gluon plasmas up to supernovae with relativistic outflows. PMID:20867451

Mendoza, M; Boghosian, B M; Herrmann, H J; Succi, S

2010-07-01

316

Fast Lattice Boltzmann Solver for Relativistic Hydrodynamics  

SciTech Connect

A lattice Boltzmann formulation for relativistic fluids is presented and numerically validated through quantitative comparison with recent hydrodynamic simulations of relativistic fluids. In order to illustrate its capability to handle complex geometries, the scheme is also applied to the case of a three-dimensional relativistic shock wave, generated by a supernova explosion, impacting on a massive interstellar cloud. This formulation opens up the possibility of exporting the proven advantages of lattice Boltzmann methods, namely, computational efficiency and easy handling of complex geometries, to the context of (mildly) relativistic fluid dynamics at large, from quark-gluon plasmas up to supernovae with relativistic outflows.

Mendoza, M.; Herrmann, H. J. [ETH Zuerich, Computational Physics for Engineering Materials, Institute for Building Materials, Schafmattstrasse 6, HIF, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Boghosian, B. M. [Department of Mathematics, Tufts University, Bromfield-Pearson, Medford, Massachusetts 02155 (United States); Succi, S. [Istituto per le Applicazioni del Calcolo C.N.R., Via dei Taurini, 19 00185, Rome (Italy) and Freiburg Institute for Advanced Studies, Albertstrasse, 19, D-79104, Freiburg (Germany)

2010-07-02

317

Relativistic Newton and Coulomb Laws  

E-print Network

The relativistic equations for the electromagnetic and gravitation interactions are similar: The only Lagrangian equation is the equation with Lorentz force. The potential satisfies the wave equation with the right - hand side proprtional to the velocity of another particle multiplied by the delta - function concentrated at the position of another particle. If the interaction propagates at the speed of light, then the wave equation has the unique solution: the Lienard - Wiechert potential. The Maxwell equations are completely defined by the obtained relativistic Coulomb law. The Coulomb law and the Newton gravity law differ from each other only in the choice of the constants. If we choose in Coulomb law the electric charges equal to the masses and choose the interaction constant of another sign, then we get Newton gravity law. If we choose in the relativistic Coulomb law the electric charges equal to the masses and choose the interaction constant of another sign, then we get the relativistic Newton gravity la...

Zinoviev, Yury M

2008-01-01

318

Relativistic Newton and Coulomb Laws  

E-print Network

The relativistic equations for the electromagnetic and gravitation interactions are similar: The only Lagrangian equation is the equation with Lorentz force. The potential satisfies the wave equation with the right - hand side proprtional to the velocity of another particle multiplied by the delta - function concentrated at the position of another particle. If the interaction propagates at the speed of light, then the wave equation has the unique solution: the Lienard - Wiechert potential. The Maxwell equations are completely defined by the obtained relativistic Coulomb law. The Coulomb law and the Newton gravity law differ from each other only in the choice of the constants. If we choose in Coulomb law the electric charges equal to the masses and choose the interaction constant of another sign, then we get Newton gravity law. If we choose in the relativistic Coulomb law the electric charges equal to the masses and choose the interaction constant of another sign, then we get the relativistic Newton gravity law.

Yury M. Zinoviev

2008-01-07

319

Increase in the energy efficiency of a pulsed-periodic relativistic backward wave oscillator with a modulating resonant reflector  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An efficient microwave oscillator (320 MW and 7.9 GHz) that generates microwave pulses with a duration of 90 ns is developed using optimization of an electron-wave system and decompression of the longitudinal magnetic field with a maximum induction of 0.62 T in the region of an explosive-emission cathode and a lower field (0.36 T) with respect to cyclotron resonance in the slow-wave structure. In a packet (up to 10 ns) repetitively-pulsed (100 Hz) regime, the maximum conversion efficiency of the electron-beam power to microwave radiation is 27%. The mean energy of the radiation pulse (23 J) is about 18% of the pulse energy of high-voltage oscillator.

Tot'meninov, E. M.; Vykhodtsev, P. V.; Gunin, A. V.; Klimov, A. I.; Rostov, V. V.

2014-03-01

320

Path integral calculation of relativistic Green’s functions for particles in the field of the plane wave  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  The Green’s functions for charged particles of spin zero and 1\\/2 interacting with electromagnetic plane wave, expressed in\\u000a the coordinate gauge, are calculated in the path integral framework using the delta-functional technique. It is also shown\\u000a that in the case of spin zero, the semi-classical Green’s function is accurate.

T. Boudjedaa; L. Chetouani; L. Guéchi; T. F. Hammann

1994-01-01

321

Acute Blast Injury Reduces Brain Abeta in Two Rodent Species  

PubMed Central

Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. How the primary blast wave affects the brain is not well understood. In particular, it is unclear whether blast injures the brain through mechanisms similar to those found in non-blast closed impact injuries (nbTBI). The ?-amyloid (A?) peptide associated with the development of Alzheimer’s disease is elevated acutely following TBI in humans as well as in experimental animal models of nbTBI. We examined levels of brain A? following experimental blast injury using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for A? 40 and 42. In both rat and mouse models of blast injury, rather than being increased, endogenous rodent brain A? levels were decreased acutely following injury. Levels of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) were increased following blast exposure although there was no evidence of axonal pathology based on APP immunohistochemical staining. Unlike the findings in nbTBI animal models, levels of the ?-secretase, ?-site APP cleaving enzyme 1, and the ?-secretase component presenilin-1 were unchanged following blast exposure. These studies have implications for understanding the nature of blast injury to the brain. They also suggest that strategies aimed at lowering A? production may not be effective for treating acute blast injury to the brain. PMID:23267342

De Gasperi, Rita; Gama Sosa, Miguel A.; Kim, Soong Ho; Steele, John W.; Shaughness, Michael C.; Maudlin-Jeronimo, Eric; Hall, Aaron A.; DeKosky, Steven T.; McCarron, Richard M.; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P.; Gandy, Sam; Ahlers, Stephen T.; Elder, Gregory A.

2012-01-01

322

Radial diffusion and MHD particle simulations of relativistic electron transport by ULF waves in the September 1998 storm  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In an MHD particle simulation of the September 1998 magnetic storm the evolution of the radiation belt electron radial flux profile appears to be diffusive, and diffusion caused by ULF waves has been invoked as the probable mechanism. In order to separate adiabatic and nonadiabatic effects and to investigate the radial diffusion mechanism during this storm, in this work we solve a radial diffusion equation with ULF wave diffusion coefficients and a time-dependent outer boundary condition, and the results are compared with the phase space density of the MHD particle simulation. The diffusion coefficients include contributions from both symmetric resonance modes (? ? m?d, where ? is the wave frequency, m is the azimuthal wave number, and ?d is the bounce-averaged drift frequency) and asymmetric resonance modes (? ? (m ± 1)?d). ULF wave power spectral densities are obtained from a Fourier analysis of the electric and magnetic fields of the MHD simulation and are used in calculating the radial diffusion coefficients. The asymmetric diffusion coefficients are proportional to the magnetic field asymmetry, which is also calculated from the MHD field. The resulting diffusion coefficients vary with the radial coordinate L (the Roederer L-value) and with time during different phases of the storm. The last closed drift shell defines the location of the outer boundary. Both the location of the outer boundary and the value of the phase space density at the outer boundary are time-varying. The diffusion calculation simulates a 42-hour period during the 24-26 September 1998 magnetic storm, starting just before the storm sudden commencement and ending in the late recovery phase. The differential flux calculated in the MHD particle simulation is converted to phase space density. Phase space densities in both simulations (diffusion and MHD particle) are functions of Roederer L-value for fixed first and second adiabatic invariants. The Roederer L-value is calculated using drift shell tracing in the MHD magnetic field, and particles have zero second invariant. The radial diffusion calculation reproduces the main features of the MHD particle simulation quite well. The symmetric resonance modes dominate the radial diffusion, especially in the inner and middle L region, while the asymmetric resonances are more important in the outer region. Using both symmetric and asymmetric terms gives a better result than using only one or the other and is better than using a simple power law diffusion coefficient. We find that it is important to specify the value of the phase space density on the outer boundary dynamically in order to get better agreement between the radial diffusion simulation and the MHD particle simulation.

Fei, Yue; Chan, Anthony A.; Elkington, Scot R.; Wiltberger, Michael J.

2006-12-01

323

Experimental Studies of Mitigation Materials for Blast Induced Tbi  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The objective of this experimental study is to compare the effects of various materials obstructing the flow of a blast wave and the ability of the material to reduce the damage caused by the blast. Several methods of energy transfer in blast wave flows are expected including: material interfaces with impedance mismatches, density changes in a given material, internal shearing, and particle fracture. Our hypothesis is that the greatest energy transfer within the obstructing material will yield the greatest mitigation effects to the blast. Sample configurations of foam were varied to introduce material interfaces and filler materials with varying densities and impedances (liquids and powders). The samples were dynamically loaded using a small scale blast produced by an explosive driven shock tube housing gram-scale explosive charges. The transmitted blast profiles were analyzed for variations in impulse characteristics and frequency components as compared to standard free field profiles. The results showed a rounding effect of the transmitted blast profile for all samples with the effects of the high density fillers surpassing all others tested. These results lead to a conclusion that low porosity, high density materials offer superior attenuation by reducing air blast features and spatially distributing the transmitted wave.

Alley, M. D.; Son, S. F.; Christou, G.; Goel, R.; Young, L.

2009-12-01

324

Phase locking of an S-band wide-gap klystron amplifier with high power injection driven by a relativistic backward wave oscillator  

SciTech Connect

Theoretical analyses and preliminary experiments on the phase-locking characteristics of an inductively loaded 2-cavity wide-gap klystron amplifier (WKA) with high power injection driven by a GW-class relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO) are presented. Electric power of the amplifier and oscillator is supplied by a single accelerator being capable of producing dual electron beams. The well phase-locking effect of the RBWO-WKA system requires the oscillator have good frequency reproducibility and stability from pulse to pulse. Thus, the main switch of the accelerator is externally triggered to stabilize the diode voltage and then the working frequency. In the experiment, frequency of the WKA is linearly locked by the RBWO. With a diode voltage of 530 kV and an input power of {approx}22 MW, an output power of {approx}230 MW with the power gain of {approx}10.2 dB is obtained from the WKA. As the main switch is triggered, the relative phase difference between the RBWO and the WKA is less than {+-}15 Degree-Sign in a single shot, and phase jitter of {+-}11 Degree-Sign is obtained within a series of shots with duration of about 40 ns.

Bai Xianchen; Zhang Jiande; Yang Jianhua; Jin Zhenxing [College of Optoelectronic Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

2012-12-15

325

The pathobiology of blast injuries and blast-induced neurotrauma as identified using a new experimental model of injury in mice.  

PubMed

Current experimental models of blast injuries used to study blast-induced neurotrauma (BINT) vary widely, which makes the comparison of the experimental results extremely challenging. Most of the blast injury models replicate the ideal Friedländer type of blast wave, without the capability to generate blast signatures with multiple shock fronts and refraction waves as seen in real-life conditions; this significantly reduces their clinical and military relevance. Here, we describe the pathophysiological consequences of graded blast injuries and BINT generated by a newly developed, highly controlled, and reproducible model using a modular, multi-chamber shock tube capable of tailoring pressure wave signatures and reproducing complex shock wave signatures seen in theater. While functional deficits due to blast exposure represent the principal health problem for today's warfighters, the majority of available blast models induces tissue destruction rather than mimic functional deficits. Thus, the main goal of our model is to reliably reproduce long-term neurological impairments caused by blast. Physiological parameters, functional (motor, cognitive, and behavioral) outcomes, and underlying molecular mechanisms involved in inflammation measured in the brain over the 30 day post-blast period showed this model is capable of reproducing major neurological changes of clinical BINT. PMID:21074615

Cernak, Ibolja; Merkle, Andrew C; Koliatsos, Vassilis E; Bilik, Justin M; Luong, Quang T; Mahota, Theresa M; Xu, Leyan; Slack, Nicole; Windle, David; Ahmed, Farid A

2011-02-01

326

Structural blast design  

E-print Network

Blast design is a necessary part of design for more buildings in the United States. Blast design is no longer limited to underground shelters and sensitive military sites, buildings used by the general public daily must ...

Kieval, Tamar S. (Tamar Shoshana), 1980-

2004-01-01

327

A Multi-Mode Shock Tube for Investigation of Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury  

PubMed Central

Abstract Blast-induced mild traumatic brain injury (bTBI) has become increasingly common in recent military conflicts. The mechanisms by which non-impact blast exposure results in bTBI are incompletely understood. Current small animal bTBI models predominantly utilize compressed air-driven membrane rupture as their blast wave source, while large animal models use chemical explosives. The pressure-time signature of each blast mode is unique, making it difficult to evaluate the contributions of the different components of the blast wave to bTBI when using a single blast source. We utilized a multi-mode shock tube, the McMillan blast device, capable of utilizing compressed air- and compressed helium-driven membrane rupture, and the explosives oxyhydrogen and cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX, the primary component of C-4 plastic explosives) as the driving source. At similar maximal blast overpressures, the positive pressure phase of compressed air-driven blasts was longer, and the positive impulse was greater, than those observed for shockwaves produced by other driving sources. Helium-driven shockwaves more closely resembled RDX blasts, but by displacing air created a hypoxic environment within the shock tube. Pressure-time traces from oxyhydrogen-driven shockwaves were very similar those produced by RDX, although they resulted in elevated carbon monoxide levels due to combustion of the polyethylene bag used to contain the gases within the shock tube prior to detonation. Rats exposed to compressed air-driven blasts had more pronounced vascular damage than those exposed to oxyhydrogen-driven blasts of the same peak overpressure, indicating that differences in blast wave characteristics other than peak overpressure may influence the extent of bTBI. Use of this multi-mode shock tube in small animal models will enable comparison of the extent of brain injury with the pressure-time signature produced using each blast mode, facilitating evaluation of the blast wave components contributing to bTBI. PMID:21083431

Reneer, Dexter V.; Hisel, Richard D.; Hoffman, Joshua M.; Kryscio, Richard J.; Lusk, Braden T.

2011-01-01

328

Duskside relativistic electron precipitation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

On August 20, 1996, a balloon-borne X-ray pinhole camera and a high resolution germanium X-ray spectrometer observed an intense X-ray event near Kiruna, Sweden, at 1835 MLT, on an L-shell of 5.8. This X-ray event consisted of seven bursts spaced 100-200 seconds apart, with smaller 10-20 second variations observed within individual bursts. The energy spectra of these bursts show the presence of X-rays with energies greater than 1 MeV, which are best accounted for by atmospheric bremsstrahlung from mono-energetic 1.7 MeV precipitating electrons. The X-ray imager observed no significant motion or small-scale spatial structure in the event, implying that the bursts were temporal in nature. Ultra- violet images from the Polar satellite and energetic particle data from the Los Alamos geosynchronous satellites show a small magnetospheric substorm onset about 24 minutes before the start of the relativistic precipitation event. Since the balloon was south of the auroral oval and there was no associated increase in relativistic electron flux at geosynchronous altitude, the event must be the result of some mechanism selectively precipitating ambient relativistic electrons from the radiation belts. The balloon X-ray observations are analyzed in a magnetospheric context, in order to determine which of several mechanisms for selective precipitation of relativistic electrons can account for the event. Resonance with electromagnetic ion cyclotron mode waves on the equator is the most likely candidate. The drift of substorm-injected warm protons is calculated using input from the geosynchronous satellites. Wave growth in the model is driven by temperature anisotropies in the warm proton population. A numerical solution of the wave dispersion relation shows that electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves can be excited in high-density duskside regions such as the plasmasphere or detached plasma regions. These waves can selectively precipitate relativistic electrons of energy 1.7 MeV in regions of density greater than 10 cm-3 , given the appropriate warm proton temperature, density, and anisotropy. The model is used to investigate the effects of variations in these free parameters, and shows that only a narrow range of values can produce waves that interact with 1.7 MeV electrons.

Lorentzen, Kirsten Ruth

1999-10-01

329

Dynamic Theory of Relativistic Electrons Stochastic Heating by Whistler Mode Waves with Application to the Earth Magnetosphere  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the Hamiltonian approach an electron motion in a coherent packet of the whistler mode waves propagating along the direction of an ambient magnetic field is studied. The physical processes by which these particles are accelerated to high energy are established. Equations governing a particle motion were transformed in to a closed pair of nonlinear difference equations. The solutions of these equations have shown there exists the energetic threshold below that the electron motion is regular, and when the initial energy is above the threshold an electron moves stochastically. Particle energy spectra and pitch angle electron scattering are described by the Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov equations. Calculating the stochastic diffusion of electrons due to a spectrum of whistler modes is presented. The parametric dependence of the diffusion coefficients on the plasma particle density, magnitude of wave field, and the strength of magnetic field is studies. It is shown that significant pitch angle diffusion occurs for the Earth radiation belt electrons with energies from a few keV up to a few MeV.

Khazanov, G. V.; Tel'nikhin, A. A.; Kronberg, T. K.

2007-01-01

330

Dynamic Theory of Relativistic Electrons Stochastic Heating by Whistler Mode Waves with Application to the Earth Magnetosphere  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the Hamiltonian approach an electron motion in a coherent packet of the whistler mode waves propagating along the direction of an ambient magnetic field is studied. The physical processes by which these particles are accelerated to high energy are established. Equations governing a particle motion by group symmetries of the problem were transformed in to a closed pair of nonlinear difference equations. The solutions of these equations have shown there exists the energetic threshold below that the electron motion is regular, and when the initial energy is above the threshold an electron moves stochastically. It is proved that the upper boundary of particle stochastic heating is conditioned by intrinsic property of the particle chaotic motion. Particle energy spectra and pitch angle electron scattering are described by the Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov equations. It is shown that significant pitch angle diffusion occurs for the Earth radiation belt electrons with energies from a few keV up to a few MeV.

Khazanov, G. V.; Tel'nikhin, A. A.; Kronberg, T. K.

2006-01-01

331

Neuropathology of explosive blast traumatic brain injury.  

PubMed

During the conflicts of the Global War on Terror, which are Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) in Afghanistan and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF), there have been over a quarter of a million diagnosed cases of traumatic brain injury (TBI). The vast majority are due to explosive blast. Although explosive blast TBI (bTBI) shares many clinical features with closed head TBI (cTBI) and penetrating TBI (pTBI), it has unique features, such as early cerebral edema and prolonged cerebral vasospasm. Evolving work suggests that diffuse axonal injury (DAI) seen following explosive blast exposure is different than DAI from focal impact injury. These unique features support the notion that bTBI is a separate and distinct form of TBI. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge pertaining to bTBI. Areas of discussion are: the physics of explosive blast generation, blast wave interaction with the bony calvarium and brain tissue, gross tissue pathophysiology, regional brain injury, and cellular and molecular mechanisms of explosive blast neurotrauma. PMID:22836523

Magnuson, John; Leonessa, Fabio; Ling, Geoffrey S F

2012-10-01

332

Rock blasting environmental impacts  

SciTech Connect

The rock blasting environmental impacts such as: flyrock, ground vibrations, air-blast, and/or noise, dust and fumes are identified and mentioned. Some comments on the correction factors that might be taken into consideration to calculate the initial velocity and the maximum projection of the rock fragments are mentioned as well. The blast fumes causes, its alleviation and protective measures are identified, described and discussed. To mitigate, minimize and/or avoid blast fumes, the AN/FO, Al/AN/FO and S/AN/FO dry blasting agents optimum equations are developed, discussed and recommended.

Agreda, C. [Peruvian Mining Research Co., Lima (Peru)

1995-12-31

333

Modern BLAST Programs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) is arguably the most widely used program in bioinformatics. By sacrificing sensitivity for speed, it makes sequence comparison practical on huge sequence databases currently available. The original version of BLAST was developed in 1990. Since then it has spawned a variant of specialized programs. This chapter surveys the development of BLAST and BLAST-like programs for homology search, discusses alignment statistics that are used in assessment of reported matches in BLAST, and provides the reader with guidance to select appropriate programs and set proper parameters to match research requirements.

Ma, Jian; Zhang, Louxin

334

Magnetic moment of relativistic fermions  

E-print Network

In the paper a new class of exact localized solutions of Dirac's equation in the field of a circularly polarized electromagnetic wave and a constant magnetic field is presented. These solutions possess unusual properties and are applicable only to relativistic fermions. The problem of the magnetic resonance is considered in the framework of the classical theory of fields. It is shown that interpretation of the magnetic resonance for relativistic fermions must be changed. Numerical examples of parameters of the electromagnetic wave, constant magnetic field and the localization length scale for real measurements are presented.

Boris V. Gisin

2011-05-19

335

Blast Mitigation Using Water - A Status Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The need to mitigate the effects of blast waves has been heightened by the recent incident with the USS Cole. In the spirit of one of the findings of the DoD USS Cole Commission, that there is a need for, 'More responsive application of currently availabl...

K. Kailasanath, P. A. Tatem, J. Mawhinney

2002-01-01

336

Relativistic fluid formulation and theory of intense relativistic electron beams  

SciTech Connect

A new general relativistic fluid formulation has been obtained for intense relativistic electron beams (IREB) with arbitrarily high relativistic mass factor ..gamma... This theory is valid for confined IREB equilibria such as those found inside high energy accelerators as well as in the pinched and ion-focused regimes of beam propagation in plasma channels. The new relativistic fluid formulation is based on the covariant relativistic fluid formulation of Newcomb with the parameter lambda identical to 1, in order to allow for realistic confined equilibria. The resulting equilibrium constraints require that the beam has a slow rotational velocity around its direction of propagation and that the off-diagonal thermal stress element, associated with these two directions of motion, be nonzero. The effective betatron oscillation frequency of the fluid elements of the beam is modified by the radial gradient and anisotropies in the thermal stress elements of the beam fluid. The wave equation, for sausage, hose and filamentation excitations on the relativistic fluid beam, is found to be formally identical to that obtained from the Vlasov equation approach, hence phase-mixing damping is a generic and self-consistent correlate of the new relativistic fluid formulation.

Siambis, J.G.

1984-01-01

337

Relativistic electron microbursts  

SciTech Connect

The authors report the first satellite observations of relativistic ([gt]1 MeV) electron precipitation in microbursts with measured durations of less than 1 s. Microburst of lower-energy electrons (10-100 keV) have been found to occur preferentially in the early daylight hours and to be closely associated with VLF chorus emissions. In contrast, the relativistic electron microbursts occurred more frequently near 2230 LT than 1030 LT, and no association was found with ELF/VLF chorus, consistent with the fact that resonant interactions with [approximately]1-MeV electrons require significantly lower frequencies. The available data on these relativistic microbursts thus appear to indicate that many of the bursts may be due to wave-particle interaction not with whistler mode chorus but possibly with other waveforms. The locations of many of the relativistic microbursts are concentrated at the outer edge of the trapped radiation belt, where the gyroradii of the electrons are comparable to the curvature of the magnetic field lines and stable trapping may therefore not occur. The preferred location of the microbursts, which may be primarily spatial in character, implies the possible importance of irregularities in the magnetic field lines near the trapping boundary as the responsible mechanism.

Imhof, W.L.; Voss, H.D.; Mobilia, J.; Datlowe, D.W.; Gaines, E.E.; McGlennon, J.P. (Lockheed Palo Alto Research Lab., CA (United States)); Inan, U.S. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States))

1992-09-01

338

GAMMA-RAY BURST DYNAMICS AND AFTERGLOW RADIATION FROM ADAPTIVE MESH REFINEMENT, SPECIAL RELATIVISTIC HYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS  

SciTech Connect

We report on the development of Mezcal-SRHD, a new adaptive mesh refinement, special relativistic hydrodynamics (SRHD) code, developed with the aim of studying the highly relativistic flows in gamma-ray burst sources. The SRHD equations are solved using finite-volume conservative solvers, with second-order interpolation in space and time. The correct implementation of the algorithms is verified by one-dimensional (1D) and multi-dimensional tests. The code is then applied to study the propagation of 1D spherical impulsive blast waves expanding in a stratified medium with {rho}{proportional_to}r{sup -k}, bridging between the relativistic and Newtonian phases (which are described by the Blandford-McKee and Sedov-Taylor self-similar solutions, respectively), as well as to a two-dimensional (2D) cylindrically symmetric impulsive jet propagating in a constant density medium. It is shown that the deceleration to nonrelativistic speeds in one dimension occurs on scales significantly larger than the Sedov length. This transition is further delayed with respect to the Sedov length as the degree of stratification of the ambient medium is increased. This result, together with the scaling of position, Lorentz factor, and the shock velocity as a function of time and shock radius, is explained here using a simple analytical model based on energy conservation. The method used for calculating the afterglow radiation by post-processing the results of the simulations is described in detail. The light curves computed using the results of 1D numerical simulations during the relativistic stage correctly reproduce those calculated assuming the self-similar Blandford-McKee solution for the evolution of the flow. The jet dynamics from our 2D simulations and the resulting afterglow light curves, including the jet break, are in good agreement with those presented in previous works. Finally, we show how the details of the dynamics critically depend on properly resolving the structure of the relativistic flow.

De Colle, Fabio; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico [Astronomy and Astrophysics Department, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Granot, Jonathan [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Lopez-Camara, Diego, E-mail: fabio@ucolick.org [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ap. 70-543, 04510 D.F. (Mexico)

2012-02-20

339

A new scheme of causal viscous hydrodynamics for relativistic heavy-ion collisions: A Riemann solver for quark-gluon plasma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this article, we present a state-of-the-art algorithm for solving the relativistic viscous hydrodynamics equation with the QCD equation of state. The numerical method is based on the second-order Godunov method and has less numerical dissipation, which is crucial in describing of quark-gluon plasma in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. We apply the algorithm to several numerical test problems such as sound wave propagation, shock tube and blast wave problems. In sound wave propagation, the intrinsic numerical viscosity is measured and its explicit expression is shown, which is the second-order of spatial resolution both in the presence and absence of physical viscosity. The expression of the numerical viscosity can be used to determine the maximum cell size in order to accurately measure the effect of physical viscosity in the numerical simulation.

Akamatsu, Yukinao; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro; Nonaka, Chiho; Takamoto, Makoto

2014-01-01

340

Distinguishing Realistic Military Blasts from Firecrackers in Mitigation Studies of Blast Induced Traumatic Brain Injury  

SciTech Connect

In their Contributed Article, Nyein et al. (1,2) present numerical simulations of blast waves interacting with a helmeted head and conclude that a face shield may significantly mitigate blast induced traumatic brain injury (TBI). A face shield may indeed be important for future military helmets, but the authors derive their conclusions from a much smaller explosion than typically experienced on the battlefield. The blast from the 3.16 gm TNT charge of (1) has the following approximate peak overpressures, positive phase durations, and incident impulses (3): 10 atm, 0.25 ms, and 3.9 psi-ms at the front of the head (14 cm from charge), and 1.4 atm, 0.32 ms, and 1.7 psi-ms at the back of a typical 20 cm head (34 cm from charge). The peak pressure of the wave decreases by a factor of 7 as it traverses the head. The blast conditions are at the threshold for injury at the front of the head, but well below threshold at the back of the head (4). The blast traverses the head in 0.3 ms, roughly equal to the positive phase duration of the blast. Therefore, when the blast reaches the back of the head, near ambient conditions exist at the front. Because the headform is so close to the charge, it experiences a wave with significant curvature. By contrast, a realistic blast from a 2.2 kg TNT charge ({approx} an uncased 105 mm artillery round) is fatal at an overpressure of 10 atm (4). For an injury level (4) similar to (1), a 2.2 kg charge has the following approximate peak overpressures, positive phase durations, and incident impulses (3): 2.1 atm, 2.3 ms, and 18 psi-ms at the front of the head (250 cm from charge), and 1.8 atm, 2.5 ms, and 16.8 psi-ms at the back of the head (270 cm from charge). The peak pressure decreases by only a factor of 1.2 as it traverses the head. Because the 0.36 ms traversal time is much smaller than the positive phase duration, pressures on the head become relatively uniform when the blast reaches the back of the head. The larger standoff implies that the headform locally experiences a nearly planar blast wave. Also, the positive phase durations and blast impulses are much larger than those of (1). Consequently, the blast model used in (1) is spatially and temporally very different from a military blast. It would be useful to repeat the calculations using military blast parameters. Finally, (1) overlooks a significant part of (5). On page 1 and on page 3, (1) states that (5) did not consider helmet pads. But pages pages 3 and 4 of (5) present simulations of blast wave propagation across an ACH helmeted head form with and without pads. (5) states that when the pads are present, the 'underwash' of air under the helmet is blocked when compared to the case without. (1) reaches this same conclusion, but reports it as a new result rather than a confirmation of that already found in (5).

Moss, W C; King, M J; Blackman, E G

2011-01-21

341

Relativistically expanding pair plasmas as bursting sources of cosmic gamma rays  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

High temperature shock heating of relativistically expanding plasmas produced in neutron star binary mergers provides a model for cosmic gamma ray burst sources. This requires the fireball resulting from the merger to have a very high entropy per baryon, mechanisms for which are discussed. The energy, temporal structure and spectrum produced by the blast wave and reverse shock as the fireball is decelerated in an external medium are comparable to those observed, as is the frequency of occurrence and the characteristics of the spatial distribution of the events. Difficulties common to all cosmological gamma ray burst scenarios concern the total amount of energy ultimately appearing at gamma ray energies, the time scales, the spectrum, and the great variety of time profiles. A very general mechanism which overcomes these problems is presented. Situations where the pair plasma is created in regions which are relatively free of baryons are discussed. The effect of the interaction of the expanding fireball with the external medium is considered.

Meszaros, Peter; Rees, M. J.

1993-01-01

342

Determination of explosive blast loading equivalencies with an explosively driven shock tube  

SciTech Connect

Recently there has been significant interest in evaluating the potential of many different non-ideal energetic materials to cause blast damage. We present a method intended to quantitatively compare the blast loading generated by different energetic materials through use of an explosively driven shock tube. The test explosive is placed at the closed breech end of the tube and initiated with a booster charge. The resulting shock waves are then contained and focused by the tube walls to form a quasi-one-dimensional blast wave. Pressure transducers along the tube wall measure the blast overpressure versus distance from the source and allow the use of the one-dimensional blast scaling relationship to determine the energy deposited into the blast wave per unit mass of test explosive. These values are then compared for different explosives of interest and to other methods of equivalency determination.

Jackson, Scott I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hill, Larry G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morris, John S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01

343

Octonic relativistic quantum mechanics  

E-print Network

In this paper we represent the generalization of relativistic quantum mechanics on the base of eght-component values "octons", generating associative noncommutative spatial algebra. It is shown that the octonic second-order equation for the eight-component octonic wave function, obtained from the Einshtein relation for energy and momentum, describes particles with spin of 1/2. It is established that the octonic wave function of a particle in the state with defined spin projection has the specific spatial structure in the form of octonic oscillator with two spatial polarizations: longitudinal linear and transversal circular. The relations between bispinor and octonic descriptions of relativistic particles are established. We propose the eight-component spinors, which are octonic generalisation of two-component Pauli spinors and four-component Dirac bispinors. It is shown that proposed eight-component spinors separate the states with different spin projection, different particle-antiparticle state as well as different polarization of the octonic oscillator. We demonstrate that in the frames of octonic relativistic quantum mechanics the second-order equation for octonic wave function can be reformulated in the form of the system of first-order equations for quantum fields, which is analogous to the system of Maxwell equations for the electromagnetic field. It is established that for the special type of wave functions the second-order equation can be reduced to the single first-order equation, which is analogous to the Dirac equation. At the same time it is shown that this first-order equation describes particles, which do not create quantum fields.

V. L. Mironov; S. V. Mironov

2008-03-04

344

Porcine head response to blast  

E-print Network

Recent studies have shown an increase in the frequency of traumatic brain injuries related to blast exposure. However, the mechanisms that cause blast neurotrauma are unknown. Blast neurotrauma research using computational ...

Nyein, Michelle K.

345

Relativistic telemetry  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many relativistic formulas can be derived without explicitly using Lorentz transformations but, instead, directly from Einstein's postulate: ``All physical laws are the same for all inertial observers.'' These formulas include time dilation, addition of velocities, the Doppler effect, and optical aberration. From the visual picture seen by one observer, one can deduce the picture seen at the same space-time point

Asher Peres

1987-01-01

346

Relativistic Thermodynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A generally relativistic theory of thermodynamics is developed, based on four main physical principles: heat is a local form of energy, therefore described by a thermal energy tensor; conservation of mass, equivalent to conservation of heat, or the local first law; entropy is a local current; and non-destruction of entropy, or the local second law. A fluid is defined by the thermostatic energy tensor being isotropic. The entropy current is related to the other fields by certain equations, including a generalized Gibbs equation for the thermostatic entropy, followed by linear and quadratic terms in the dissipative (thermal minus thermostatic) energy tensor. Then the second law suggests certain equations for the dissipative energy tensor, generalizing the Israel-Stewart dissipative relations, which describe heat conduction and viscosity including relativistic effects and relaxation effects. In the thermostatic case, the perfect-fluid model is recovered. In the linear approximation for entropy, the Eckart theory is recovered. In the quadratic approximation for entropy, the theory is similar to that of Israel and Stewart, but involving neither state-space differentials, nor a non-equilibrium Gibbs equation, nor nonmaterial frames. Also, unlike conventional thermodynamics, the thermal energy density is not assumed to be purely thermostatic, though this is derived in the linear approximation. Otherwise, the theory reduces in the non-relativistic limit to the extended thermodynamics of irreversible processes due to Müller. The dissipative energy density seems to be a new thermodynamical field, but also exists in relativistic kinetic theory of gases.

Hayward, Sean A.

2013-03-01

347

Classical Simulation of Relativistic Zitterbewegung in Photonic Lattices  

SciTech Connect

We present the first experimental realization of an optical analog for relativistic quantum mechanics by simulating the Zitterbewegung (trembling motion) of a free Dirac electron in an optical superlattice. Our photonic setting enables a direct visualization of Zitterbewegung as a spatial oscillatory motion of an optical beam. Direct measurements of the wave packet expectation values in superlattices with tuned miniband gaps clearly show the transition from weak-relativistic to relativistic and far-relativistic regimes.

Dreisow, Felix; Heinrich, Matthias; Keil, Robert; Tuennermann, Andreas; Nolte, Stefan [Institute of Applied Physics, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Longhi, Stefano [Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milan (Italy); Szameit, Alexander [Institute of Applied Physics, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Physics Department and Solid State Institute, Technion, 32000 Haifa (Israel)

2010-10-01

348

Effect of laser supported detonation wave confinement on termination conditions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A laser supported detonation (LSD) wave was driven using line-focusing laser optics, in which an induced blast wave expanded laterally from the LSD region to surrounding air in two-dimensional space. The LSD wave was confined in quasi-1D space using a wedge nozzle to restrict the lateral expansion of a blast wave. The LSD termination threshold and the blast wave energy were deduced from shadowgraphs showing the blast wave expansion. The respective threshold laser intensities for cases with and without confinement were estimated as 17 and 34 GW/m2, indicating that the lateral expansion strongly influenced on the LSD termination condition.

Ushio, Masato; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Kawamura, Koichi; Arakawa, Yoshihiro

2008-06-01

349

Repeated blast exposures cause brain DNA fragmentation in mice.  

PubMed

The pathophysiology of blast-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI) and subsequent behavioral deficits are not well understood. Unraveling the mechanisms of injury is critical to derive effective countermeasures against this form of neurotrauma. Preservation of the integrity of cellular DNA is crucial for the function and survival of cells. We evaluated the effect of repeated blast exposures on the integrity of brain DNA and tested the utility of cell-free DNA (CFD) in plasma as a biomarker for the diagnosis and prognosis of blast-induced polytrauma. The results revealed time-dependent breakdown in cellular DNA in different brain regions, with the maximum damage at 24 h post-blast exposures. CFD levels in plasma showed a significant transient increase, which was largely independent of the timing and severity of brain DNA damage; maximum levels were recorded at 2 h after repeated blast exposure and returned to baseline at 24 h. A positive correlation was observed between the righting reflex time and CFD level in plasma at 2 h after blast exposure. Brain DNA damage subsequent to repeated blast was associated with decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, increased release of cytochrome C, and up-regulation of caspase-3, all of which are indicative of cellular apoptosis. Shock-wave-induced DNA damage and initiation of mitochondrial-driven cellular apoptosis in the brain after repeated blast exposures indicate that therapeutic strategies directed toward inhibition of DNA damage or instigation of DNA repair may be effective countermeasures. PMID:24074345

Wang, Ying; Arun, Peethambaran; Wei, Yanling; Oguntayo, Samuel; Gharavi, Robert; Valiyaveettil, Manojkumar; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P; Long, Joseph B

2014-03-01

350

Experimental Studies of Mitigation Materials for Blast Induced TBI  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The objective of this experimental study is to compare the effects of various materials obstructing the flow of a blast wave and the ability of the given material to reduce the damage caused by the blast. Several methods of energy transfer in blast wave flows are known or expected including: material interfaces with impedance mismatches, density changes in a given material, internal shearing, and particle fracture. The theory applied to this research is that the greatest energy transfer within the obstructing material will yield the greatest mitigation effects to the blast. Sample configurations of foam were varied to introduce material interfaces and filler materials with varying densities and impedances (liquids and powders). The samples were loaded according to a small scale blast produced by an explosive driven shock tube housing gram-range charges. The transmitted blast profiles were analyzed for variations in impulse characteristics and frequency components as compared to standard free field profiles. The results showed a rounding effect of the transmitted blast profile for all samples with the effects of the low density fillers surpassing all others tested.

Alley, Matthew; Son, Steven

2009-06-01

351

The Exact Solution of the Riemann Problem in Relativistic MHD  

E-print Network

We discuss the procedure for the exact solution of the Riemann problem in special relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). We consider both initial states leading to a set of only three waves analogous to the ones in relativistic hydrodynamics, as well as generic initial states leading to the full set of seven MHD waves. Because of its generality, the solution presented here could serve as an important test for those numerical codes solving the MHD equations in relativistic regimes.

B. Giacomazzo; L. Rezzolla

2005-07-25

352

Blast furnace reactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Vast a dvances h ave b een m ade in blast-furnace t echnology d uring t he p ast two decades through p lant t rials and plant d evelopments a ssisted by research to provide b etter u nderstanding of physical and chemical w orkings of the blast f urnace. T he f ields of research have i ncluded

E. T. Turkdogan

1978-01-01

353

Toxicology of blast overpressure  

Microsoft Academic Search

Blast overpressure (BOP) or high energy impulse noise, is the sharp instantaneous rise in ambient atmospheric pressure resulting from explosive detonation or firing of weapons. Blasts that were once confined to military and to a lesser extent, occupational settings, are becoming more universal as the civilian population is now increasingly at risk of exposure to BOP from terrorist bombings that

Nabil M. Elsayed

1997-01-01

354

Lightweight blast shield  

DOEpatents

A tandem warhead missile arrangement that has a composite material housing structure with a first warhead mounted at one end and a second warhead mounted near another end of the composite structure with a dome shaped composite material blast shield mounted between the warheads to protect the second warhead from the blast of the first warhead.

Mixon, Larry C. (Madison, AL); Snyder, George W. (Huntsville, AL); Hill, Scott D. (Toney, AL); Johnson, Gregory L. (Decatur, AL); Wlodarski, J. Frank (Huntsville, AL); von Spakovsky, Alexis P. (Huntsville, AL); Emerson, John D. (Arab, AL); Cole, James M. (Huntsville, AL); Tipton, John P. (Huntsville, AL)

1991-01-01

355

Quantum Tunneling Time: Relativistic Extensions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several years ago, in quantum mechanics, Davies proposed a method to calculate particle's traveling time with the phase difference of wave function. The method is convenient for calculating the sojourn time inside a potential step and the tunneling time through a potential hill. We extend Davies' non-relativistic calculation to relativistic quantum mechanics, with and without particle-antiparticle creation, using Klein-Gordon equation and Dirac Equation, for different forms of energy-momentum relation. The extension is successful only when the particle and antiparticle creation/annihilation effect is negligible.

Xu, Dai-Yu; Wang, Towe; Xue, Xun

2013-11-01

356

Energy components in rock blasting  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ten production blasts and one single-hole confined blast have been monitored in two quarries in order to assess the measurable forms of energy in which the energy delivered by the explosive is transformed in rock blasting. The seismic field from seismographs readings, the initial velocity of the blasted rock face obtained from high-speed video camera records, and the fragment size

José A. Sanchidrián; Pablo Segarra; Lina M. López

2007-01-01

357

Investigation of blast-induced traumatic brain injury  

PubMed Central

Objective Many troops deployed in Iraq and Afghanistan have sustained blast-related, closed-head injuries from being within non-lethal distance of detonated explosive devices. Little is known, however, about the mechanisms associated with blast exposure that give rise to traumatic brain injury (TBI). This study attempts to identify the precise conditions of focused stress wave energy within the brain, resulting from blast exposure, which will correlate with a threshold for persistent brain injury. Methods This study developed and validated a set of modelling tools to simulate blast loading to the human head. Using these tools, the blast-induced, early-time intracranial wave motions that lead to focal brain damage were simulated. Results The simulations predict the deposition of three distinct wave energy components, two of which can be related to injury-inducing mechanisms, namely cavitation and shear. Furthermore, the results suggest that the spatial distributions of these damaging energy components are independent of blast direction. Conclusions The predictions reported herein will simplify efforts to correlate simulation predictions with clinical measures of TBI and aid in the development of protective headwear. PMID:24766453

Ludwigsen, John S.; Ford, Corey C.

2014-01-01

358

Advances in relativistic molecular quantum mechanics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A quantum mechanical equation H?=E? is composed of three components, viz., Hamiltonian H, wave function ?, and property E(?), each of which is confronted with fundamental issues in the relativistic regime, e.g., (1) What is the most appropriate relativistic many-body Hamiltonian? How to solve the resulting equation? (2) How does the relativistic wave function behave at the coalescence of two electrons? How to do relativistic explicit correlation? (3) How to formulate relativistic properties properly?, to name just a few. It is shown here that the charge-conjugated contraction of Fermion operators, dictated by the charge conjugation symmetry, allows for a bottom-up construction of a relativistic Hamiltonian that is in line with the principles of quantum electrodynamics (QED). Various approximate but accurate forms of the Hamiltonian can be obtained based entirely on physical arguments. In particular, the exact two-component Hamiltonians can be formulated in a general way to cast electric and magnetic fields, as well as electron self-energy and vacuum polarization, into a unified framework. While such algebraic two-component Hamiltonians are incompatible with explicit correlation, four-component relativistic explicitly correlated approaches can indeed be made fully parallel to the nonrelativistic counterparts by virtue of the ‘extended no-pair projection’ and the coalescence conditions. These findings open up new avenues for future developments of relativistic molecular quantum mechanics. In particular, ‘molecular QED’ will soon become an active and exciting field.

Liu, Wenjian

2014-04-01

359

An animal-to-human scaling law for blast-induced traumatic brain injury risk assessment.  

PubMed

Despite recent efforts to understand blast effects on the human brain, there are still no widely accepted injury criteria for humans. Recent animal studies have resulted in important advances in the understanding of brain injury due to intense dynamic loads. However, the applicability of animal brain injury results to humans remains uncertain. Here, we use advanced computational models to derive a scaling law relating blast wave intensity to the mechanical response of brain tissue across species. Detailed simulations of blast effects on the brain are conducted for different mammals using image-based biofidelic models. The intensity of the stress waves computed for different external blast conditions is compared across species. It is found that mass scaling, which successfully estimates blast tolerance of the thorax, fails to capture the brain mechanical response to blast across mammals. Instead, we show that an appropriate scaling variable must account for the mass of protective tissues relative to the brain, as well as their acoustic impedance. Peak stresses transmitted to the brain tissue by the blast are then shown to be a power function of the scaling parameter for a range of blast conditions relevant to TBI. In particular, it is found that human brain vulnerability to blast is higher than for any other mammalian species, which is in distinct contrast to previously proposed scaling laws based on body or brain mass. An application of the scaling law to recent experiments on rabbits furnishes the first physics-based injury estimate for blast-induced TBI in humans. PMID:25267617

Jean, Aurélie; Nyein, Michelle K; Zheng, James Q; Moore, David F; Joannopoulos, John D; Radovitzky, Raúl

2014-10-28

360

An animal-to-human scaling law for blast-induced traumatic brain injury risk assessment  

PubMed Central

Despite recent efforts to understand blast effects on the human brain, there are still no widely accepted injury criteria for humans. Recent animal studies have resulted in important advances in the understanding of brain injury due to intense dynamic loads. However, the applicability of animal brain injury results to humans remains uncertain. Here, we use advanced computational models to derive a scaling law relating blast wave intensity to the mechanical response of brain tissue across species. Detailed simulations of blast effects on the brain are conducted for different mammals using image-based biofidelic models. The intensity of the stress waves computed for different external blast conditions is compared across species. It is found that mass scaling, which successfully estimates blast tolerance of the thorax, fails to capture the brain mechanical response to blast across mammals. Instead, we show that an appropriate scaling variable must account for the mass of protective tissues relative to the brain, as well as their acoustic impedance. Peak stresses transmitted to the brain tissue by the blast are then shown to be a power function of the scaling parameter for a range of blast conditions relevant to TBI. In particular, it is found that human brain vulnerability to blast is higher than for any other mammalian species, which is in distinct contrast to previously proposed scaling laws based on body or brain mass. An application of the scaling law to recent experiments on rabbits furnishes the first physics-based injury estimate for blast-induced TBI in humans. PMID:25267617

Jean, Aurelie; Nyein, Michelle K.; Zheng, James Q.; Moore, David F.; Joannopoulos, John D.; Radovitzky, Raul

2014-01-01

361

The Relativistic Three-Body Bound State in a 3D Formulation  

E-print Network

Background: The relativistic three-body problem has a long tradition in few-nucleon physics. Calculations of the triton binding energy based on the solution of the relativistic Faddeev equation in general lead to a weaker binding than the corresponding non-relativistic calculation. Purpose: In this work we solve for the three-body binding energy as well as the wave function and its momentum distribution. The effect of the different relativistic ingredients are studied in detail. Method: Relativistic invariance is incorporated within the framework of Poincar{\\'e} invariant quantum mechanics. The relativistic momentum-space Faddeev equation is formulated and directly solved in terms of momentum vectors without employing a partial-wave decomposition. Results: The relativistic calculation gives a three-body binding energy which is about 3% smaller than its non-relativistic counterpart. In the wave function, relativistic effects are manifested in the Fermi motion of the spectator particle. Conclusions: Our calcula...

Hadizadeh, M R; Polyzou, W N

2014-01-01

362

A Phased Array Approach to Rock Blasting  

SciTech Connect

A series of laboratory-scale simultaneous two-hole shots was performed in a rock simulant (mortar) to record the shock wave interference patterns produced in the material. The purpose of the project as a whole was to evaluate the usefulness of phased array techniques of blast design, using new high-precision delay technology. Despite high-speed photography, however, we were unable to detect the passage of the shock waves through the samples to determine how well they matched the expected interaction geometry. The follow-up mine-scale tests were therefore not conducted. Nevertheless, pattern analysis of the vectors that would be formed by positive interference of the shockwaves from multiple charges in an ideal continuous, homogeneous, isotropic medium indicate the potential for powerful control of blast design, given precise characterization of the target rock mass.

Leslie Gertsch; Jason Baird

2006-07-01

363

Study of TATP: blast characteristics and TNT equivalency of small charges  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Blast wave parameters including incident overpressure, impulse and duration of the positive phase of the incident blast wave and its time of arrival were experimentally determined for 50 g charges of low bulk density () dry TATP (3,3,6,6,9,9-hexamethyl-1,2,4,5,7,8-hexoxonane). The results were compared with published TNT data, and TNT equivalencies were determined, resulting in the values of 70 % based on overpressure and 55 % based on impulse of the positive phase of the blast wave. Brisance by the Hess method (lead cylinder compression) was found to be about one-third of that for TNT (at density . Detonation velocities averaged around

Pachman, J.; Matyáš, R.; Künzel, M.

2014-07-01

364

BLAST+: architecture and applications  

PubMed Central

Background Sequence similarity searching is a very important bioinformatics task. While Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) outperforms exact methods through its use of heuristics, the speed of the current BLAST software is suboptimal for very long queries or database sequences. There are also some shortcomings in the user-interface of the current command-line applications. Results We describe features and improvements of rewritten BLAST software and introduce new command-line applications. Long query sequences are broken into chunks for processing, in some cases leading to dramatically shorter run times. For long database sequences, it is possible to retrieve only the relevant parts of the sequence, reducing CPU time and memory usage for searches of short queries against databases of contigs or chromosomes. The program can now retrieve masking information for database sequences from the BLAST databases. A new modular software library can now access subject sequence data from arbitrary data sources. We introduce several new features, including strategy files that allow a user to save and reuse their favorite set of options. The strategy files can be uploaded to and downloaded from the NCBI BLAST web site. Conclusion The new BLAST command-line applications, compared to the current BLAST tools, demonstrate substantial speed improvements for long queries as well as chromosome length database sequences. We have also improved the user interface of the command-line applications. PMID:20003500

2009-01-01

365

New blast weapons.  

PubMed

Over the last decade a large number of weapon systems have appeared that use blast as their primary damage mechanism. This is a notable trend; until recently very few warheads relied on blast as their primary output. Most warheads in service use explosives to drive metal such as fragments and shaped charge jets to engage targets. New technologies are now being integrated into warheads that claim to have enhanced blast performance. Blast weapons could have been designed to fill a gap in capability; they are generally used for the attack of 'soft' targets including personnel, both in the open and within protective structures. With the increased number and range of these weapons, it is likely that UK forces will have to face them in future conflicts. This paper briefly describes fuel-air explosive blast weapons and reviews a range of enhanced blast weapons that have been developed recently. The paper concludes with a brief discussion on the reasons why enhanced blast technologies may be proliferating and how this could affect the Defence Medical Services. PMID:11307681

Dearden, P

2001-02-01

366

Blast Loading Experiments of Developed Surrogate Models for TBI Scenarios  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study aims to characterize the interaction of explosive blast waves through simulated anatomical systems. We have developed physical models and a systematic approach for testing traumatic brain injury (TBI) mechanisms and occurrences. A simplified series of models consisting of spherical PMMA shells followed by SLA prototyped skulls housing synthetic gelatins as brain simulants have been utilized. A series of experiments was conducted with the simple geometries to compare the sensitivity of the system response to mechanical properties of the simulants under high strain-rate explosive blasts. Small explosive charges were directed at the models to produce a realistic blast wave in a scaled laboratory setting. Blast profiles were measured and analyzed to compare system response severity. High-speed shadowgraph imaging captured blast wave interaction with the head model while particle tracking captured internal response for displacement and strain correlation. The results suggest amplification of shock waves inside the head due to impedance mismatches. Results from the strain correlations added to the theory of internal shearing between tissues.

Alley, Matthew; Son, Steven

2009-06-01

367

Shock Waves (2012) 22:403415 DOI 10.1007/s00193-012-0399-2  

E-print Network

. Keywords Blast wave · Shock tube · Pressure profiles · Expansion · Jet wind · Experiments · NumericalShock Waves (2012) 22:403­415 DOI 10.1007/s00193-012-0399-2 ORIGINAL ARTICLE Evolution of blast-Verlag 2012 Abstract Shock tubes have been extensively used in the study of blast traumatic brain injury due

Farritor, Shane

368

A Relativistic-Plasma Compton Maser  

E-print Network

A relativistic pair-plasma which contains a high excitation of electrostatic turbulence could produce intense radiation at brightness temperature in excess of 10^22 K by stimulated scattering. Important relativistic effects would include the broadband frequency response of the plasma and Compton-boosting of the scattered radiation. In radio-frequency relativistic plasma, the optical depth can be as small as hundreds of meters. When the plasma wave excitation and particle distributions are one-dimensional, the frequency-dependent angular distribution of the emission exhibits characteristics of pulsar emission.

James C. Weatherall

2001-08-15

369

[Blast lung injuries].  

PubMed

In armed conflicts and during terrorist attacks, explosive devices are a major cause of mortality. The lung is one of the organs most sensitive to blasts. Thus, today it is important that every GP at least knows the basics and practices regarding treatment of blast victims. We suggest, following a review of the explosions and an assessment of the current threats, detailing the lung injuries brought about by the explosions and the main treatments currently recommended. PMID:20933166

Clapson, P; Pasquier, P; Perez, J-P; Debien, B

2010-09-01

370

ESF BLAST DESIGN ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

The purpose and objective of this design analysis are to develop controls considered necessary and sufficient to implement the requirements for the controlled drilling and blasting excavation of operations support alcoves and test support alcoves in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF). The conclusions reached in this analysis will flow down into a construction specification ensuring controlled drilling and blasting excavation will be performed within the bounds established here.

E.F. fitch

1995-03-13

371

In silico investigation of intracranial blast mitigation with relevance to military traumatic brain injury.  

PubMed

Blast-induced traumatic brain injury is the most prevalent military injury in Iraq and Afghanistan, yet little is known about the mechanical effects of blasts on the human head, and still less is known about how personal protective equipment affects the brain's response to blasts. In this study we investigated the effect of the Advanced Combat Helmet (ACH) and a conceptual face shield on the propagation of stress waves within the brain tissue following blast events. We used a sophisticated computational framework for simulating coupled fluid-solid dynamic interactions and a three-dimensional biofidelic finite element model of the human head and intracranial contents combined with a detailed model of the ACH and a conceptual face shield. Simulations were conducted in which the unhelmeted head, head with helmet, and head with helmet and face shield were exposed to a frontal blast wave with incident overpressure of 10 atm. Direct transmission of stress waves into the intracranial cavity was observed in the unprotected head and head with helmet simulations. Compared to the unhelmeted head, the head with helmet experienced slight mitigation of intracranial stresses. This suggests that the existing ACH does not significantly contribute to mitigating blast effects, but does not worsen them either. By contrast, the helmet and face shield combination impeded direct transmission of stress waves to the face, resulting in a delay in the transmission of stresses to the intracranial cavity and lower intracranial stresses. This suggests a possible strategy for mitigating blast waves often associated with military concussion. PMID:21098257

Nyein, Michelle K; Jason, Amanda M; Yu, Li; Pita, Claudio M; Joannopoulos, John D; Moore, David F; Radovitzky, Raul A

2010-11-30

372

Relativistic Theory for Energy-Band Calculation  

Microsoft Academic Search

A relativistic generalization of the Green's function method for the energy-band calculation is presented. The wave function within the atomic spheres is expanded in terms of four-component spherical waves. The resulting expression which gives the relationship between E and \\\\mbi{k} is very similar to the nonrelativistic one. Matrix elements between the spherical waves can be easily computed provided structure constants

Yositaka Onodera; Makoto Okazaki

1966-01-01

373

Identifying and Characterizing Blasts from recordings at USArray stations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As the traverse of EarthScope USArray stations draws to an end, the Array Network Facility (ANF) has located nearly 60,000 seismic events in the continental U.S. since April 2004. The ANF seismic bulletin is complete to MR ~ 2.1 but does not distinguish between earthquakes and blasts. In contrast to regional seismic catalogs in the U.S. that mostly report naturally occurring seismicity with varying magnitude thresholds. Then, it is not surprising that only half of the events reported by ANF are associated with those reported by regional networks. By considering the local time of occurrence of events in the ANF bulletin, we conclude that mining blasts may comprise up to a third of the events reported. So in order to use the ANF bulletin to study naturally occurring seismicity in the continental U.S., it is important to identify blasts as such in the bulletin. Ideally, mine blasts can be identify as such in the ANF bulletin by getting ground truth information from mining operation, or by associating event origins with origins in the U.S.G.S. mining catalog. However, only a small portion of events can be identified in this manner. So by consider local time of occurrence, together with the cross correlation value of events occurring within 10 km of active mines as well as waveform characteristics from recordings at USArray stations located within 300 km to these events, we may be able to identify many more events, specially ones with lower magnitudes, as having been generated by mine blasting for a particular region. Once events have been identified as blasts, or probable blasts, we will analyze if waveform characteristics from blasts from surface or underground mines by analyzing the frequency content of waveforms at stations at similar ranges. In addition, we explore if mining blasts can provide a good data set to characterize wave propagation on different tectonic regimes in the continental U.S.

Astiz, L.; Vernon, F.; Martynov, V. G.; Tytell, J.; Cox, T. A.; Reyes, J. C.; Eakins, J. A.

2013-12-01

374

Relativistic Tennis Using Flying Mirror  

SciTech Connect

Upon reflection from a relativistic mirror, the electromagnetic pulse frequency is upshifted and the duration is shortened by the factor proportional to the relativistic gamma-factor squared due to the double Doppler effect. We present the results of the proof-of-principle experiment for frequency upshifting of the laser pulse reflected from the relativistic 'flying mirror', which is a wake wave near the breaking threshold created by a strong driver pulse propagating in underdense plasma. Experimentally, the wake wave is created by a 2 TW, 76 fs Ti:S laser pulse from the JLITE-X laser system in helium plasma with the electron density of {approx_equal}4-6x10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}. The reflected signal is observed with a grazing-incidence spectrograph in 24 shots. The wavelength of the reflected radiation ranges from 7 to 14 nm, the corresponding frequency upshifting factors are {approx}55-115, and the gamma-factors are y = 4-6. The reflected signal contains at least 3x10{sup 7} photons/sr. This effect can be used to generate coherent high-frequency ultrashort pulses that inherit temporal shape and polarization from the original (low-frequency) ones. Apart from this, the reflected radiation contains important information about the wake wave itself, e.g. location, size, phase velocity, etc.

Pirozhkov, A. S.; Kando, M.; Ma, J.; Fukuda, Y.; Chen, L.-M.; Daito, I.; Ogura, K.; Homma, T.; Hayashi, Y.; Kotaki, H.; Sagisaka, A.; Mori, M.; Koga, J. K.; Kawachi, T.; Daido, H.; Kimura, T.; Kato, Y.; Tajima, T. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 8-1 Umemidai, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Esirkepov, T. Zh. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 8-1 Umemidai, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Institutskij pereulok 9, Dolgoprudny, 141700 Moscow region (Russian Federation); Bulanov, S. V. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 8-1 Umemidai, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Institutskij pereulok 9, Dolgoprudny, 141700 Moscow region (Russian Federation); A.M. Prokhorov Institute of General Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilov Street 38, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

2008-06-24

375

Relativistic Tennis Using Flying Mirror  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Upon reflection from a relativistic mirror, the electromagnetic pulse frequency is upshifted and the duration is shortened by the factor proportional to the relativistic gamma-factor squared due to the double Doppler effect. We present the results of the proof-of-principle experiment for frequency upshifting of the laser pulse reflected from the relativistic "flying mirror", which is a wake wave near the breaking threshold created by a strong driver pulse propagating in underdense plasma. Experimentally, the wake wave is created by a 2 TW, 76 fs Ti:S laser pulse from the JLITE-X laser system in helium plasma with the electron density of ?4-6×1019 cm-3. The reflected signal is observed with a grazing-incidence spectrograph in 24 shots. The wavelength of the reflected radiation ranges from 7 to 14 nm, the corresponding frequency upshifting factors are ˜55-115, and the gamma-factors are y = 4-6. The reflected signal contains at least 3×107 photons/sr. This effect can be used to generate coherent high-frequency ultrashort pulses that inherit temporal shape and polarization from the original (low-frequency) ones. Apart from this, the reflected radiation contains important information about the wake wave itself, e.g. location, size, phase velocity, etc.

Pirozhkov, A. S.; Kando, M.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Ma, J.; Fukuda, Y.; Chen, L.-M.; Daito, I.; Ogura, K.; Homma, T.; Hayashi, Y.; Kotaki, H.; Sagisaka, A.; Mori, M.; Koga, J. K.; Kawachi, T.; Daido, H.; Bulanov, S. V.; Kimura, T.; Kato, Y.; Tajima, T.

2008-06-01

376

Relativistic distorted wave collision strengths for excitation to the 88 n = 3 and n = 4 levels in all 71 neon-like ions with 22 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 92  

SciTech Connect

Relativistic distorted wave collision strengths are given for the 88 possible transitions between the ground level and the excited levels with n = 3 and n = 4 in the 71 neon-like ions with nuclear charge number Z in the range 22 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 92. The calculations are made for the six final, or scattered, electron energies E' = 0.008, 0.04, 0.10, 0.21, 0.41 and 0.75, where E' is in units of Z/sub eff//sup 2/ Rydbergs with Z/sub eff/ = Z /minus/ 7.5. In addition, the transition energies and electric dipole oscillator strengths are given. 10 refs., 4 tabs.

Zhang, Hong Lin; Sampson, D. H.

1989-02-01

377

Diamagnetism in relativistic theory  

SciTech Connect

A unitary transformation of the Dirac operator in a magnetic field is presented, which leads to a reformulation of the interaction of a Dirac particle with a magnetic field, in which, as in nonrelativistic theory, diamagnetic and paramagnetic contributions appear naturally, but at a four-component-spinor level. The diamagnetic contribution to the magnetic susceptibility consists of two terms, each of which is evaluated as a simple expectation value with the unperturbed relativistic wave function. One of the two terms closely resembles its nonrelativistic counterpart. The proposed formalism is analyzed in the context of the direct perturbation theory of relativistic effects. It is compared with the more traditional sum-over-states approach including negative-energy states, as well as with a Fock-space formulation. In the latter, the vacuum energy depends on the external magnetic field. The creation of a particle (electron or positron) is accompanied by a change of the vacuum energy via a kind of exclusion effect. This change can be identified with the diamagnetism of the particle. The access to diamagnetism and paramagnetism based on the Gordon decomposition of the induced current density is to some extent, but not entirely, equivalent to that which results from the unitary transformation. For a physically meaningful decomposition of the current density a combination of the Gordon approach with the unitary transformation is recommended. Neither the interpretation nor the computation of diamagnetic contributions in terms of negative-energy states is encouraged.

Kutzelnigg, Werner [Lehrstuhl fuer Theoretische Chemie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

2003-03-01

378

Waves  

E-print Network

WAVES BY Mari LaCure Submitted to the graduate degree program in Visual Art and the Graduate Faculty of the University of Kansas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master’s of Fine Arts. Yoonmi Nam Chairperson... Committee members: Shawn Bitters Michael Krueger Date Defended: March 10, 2010 2 The Thesis Committee for Mari LaCure certifies that this is the approved Version of the following thesis: WAVES...

LaCure, Mari Mae

2010-04-29

379

Processes in relativistic plasmas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The establishment and maintenance of a Boltzmann distribution in particle kinetic energies is investigated for a plasma with theta = KTe/mc-squared much greater than unity, where m is the electron mass. It is shown that thermalization of the electron gas by binary collisions is not sufficiently effective to maintain the equilibrium distribution when other processes that perturb the equilibrium are taken into account. Electron-positron pair production in electron-electron and electron-ion collisions, and perturbations of a Boltzmann distribution by nonthermal processes are evaluated. Thermalization by means of other mechanisms, such as interaction with plasma waves is discussed, and the opacity of a relativistic plasma is computed for Compton scattering, pair production in the fields of electrons and ions, inverse bremsstrahlung, and synchrotron self-absorption.

Gould, R. J.

1982-01-01

380

Processes in relativistic plasmas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The establishment and maintenance of a Boltzmann distribution in particle kinetic energies is investigated for a plasma with theta = KTe/mc-squared much greater than unity, where m is the electron mass. It is shown that thermalization of the electron gas by binary collisions is not sufficiently effective to maintain the equilibrium distribution when other processes that perturb the equilibrium are taken into account. Electron-positron pair production in electron-electron and electron-ion collisions, and perturbations of a Boltzmann distribution by nonthermal processes are evaluated. Thermalization by means of other mechanisms, such as interaction with plasma waves is discussed, and the opacity of a relativistic plasma is computed for Compton scattering, pair production in the fields of electrons and ions, inverse bremsstrahlung, and synchrotron self-absorption.

Gould, R. J.

1982-03-01

381

Comment on the article 'Solitary waves and double layers in an ultra-relativistic degenerate dusty electron-positron-ion plasma'[Phys. Plasmas 19, 033705 (2012)  

SciTech Connect

More recently, Roy et al.[Phys. Plasmas 19, 033705 (2012)] have investigated the occurrence of nonlinear solitary and double-layers in an ultrarelativistic dusty electron-positron-ion degenerate plasma using a Sagdeev potential method. They have considered a full parametric examination on Mach-number criteria for existence of such nonlinear excitations using the specific degeneracy limits of Chandrasekhar equation of state (EoS) for Fermi-Dirac plasmas. In this comment, we point-out a misleading extension of polytropic EoS to study the Fermi-Dirac relativistically degenerate plasmas.

Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Azarbaijan University of Tarbiat Moallem, 51745-406 Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-06-15

382

Shock wave interaction with interfaces between materials having different acoustic impedances  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We experimentally examined interaction of blast waves with water-air/air-water interfaces through high-speed-real-time visualization and measurement of pressure across the waves. The underwater shock wave, which was expected to reflect totally at the water-air interface, was observed transmitting a shock front to air. Transmission of a blast wave from air to water was also visualized and evaluated. Underwater shock waves are used in several medical/biological procedures, where such unforeseen transmissions can result in detriments. The details provide a guideline to evaluate blast wave transmissions, which can induce tissue and brain injuries. The results explain mechanisms behind blast-induced traumatic brain injury.

Hosseini, H.; Moosavi-Nejad, S.; Akiyama, H.; Menezes, V.

2014-03-01

383

Violation of Hudson's theorem in relativistic quantum mechanics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In nonrelativistic quantum mechanics, Hudson's theorem states that a Gaussian wave function is the only pure state corresponding to a positive Wigner function (WF). We explicitly construct non-Gaussian Dirac spinors with positive relativistic WFs. These pure relativistic states are coherent superpositions of particles and antiparticles, while the existence of positive WFs exclusive composed of particles is conjectured. These observations may open new directions in relativistic quantum information theory.

Campos, Andre G.; Cabrera, Renan; Bondar, Denys I.; Rabitz, Herschel A.

2014-09-01

384

Dirac wave functions in nuclear distorted-wave calculations  

SciTech Connect

A distorted-wave formulation of simple direct nuclear reactions, using Dirac wave functions, is presented. The resulting amplitude contains interior damping due to relativistic Darwin terms. The calculations are compared with standard Schroedinger results and significant differences are found.

Rost, E.; Shepard, J.R.; Murdock, D.

1982-08-16

385

Responsibility of a Filament Eruption for the Initiation of a Flare, CME, and Blast Wave, and its Possible Transformation into a Bow Shock  

E-print Network

Multi-instrument observations of two filament eruptions on 24 February and 11 May 2011 suggest the following updated scenario for eruptive flare, CME and shock wave evolution. An initial destabilization of a filament results in stretching out of magnetic threads belonging to its body and rooted in the photosphere along the inversion line. Their reconnection leads to i) heating of parts of the filament or its environment, ii) initial development of the flare arcade cusp and ribbons, and iii) increasing similarity of the filament to a curved flux rope and its acceleration. Then the pre-eruption arcade enveloping the filament gets involved in reconnection according to the standard model and continues to form the flare arcade and ribbons. The poloidal magnetic flux in the curved rope developing from the filament progressively increases and forces its toroidal expansion. This flux rope impulsively expands and produces an MHD disturbance, which rapidly steepens into a shock. The shock passes through the arcade expa...

Grechnev, V V; Kuzmenko, I V; Kochanov, A A; Chertok, I M; Kalashnikov, S S

2014-01-01

386

Response to 'Comment on 'Solitary waves and double layers in an ultra-relativistic degenerate dusty electron-positron-ion plasma' '[Phys. Plasmas 19, 064703 (2012)  

SciTech Connect

The investigation of the occurrence of nonlinear electrostatic waves (viz., solitary waves and double layers) in degenerate plasmas was the main concern of the article presented by Roy et al.[Phys. Plasmas 19, 033705 (2012)]. The equations of state used in the article were the limits explained by Chandrasekhar [Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 170, 405 (1935)]. It was designated as 'misleading' by some authors, which is opposed in this reply with explanation.

Roy, N. [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka 1342 (Bangladesh)

2012-06-15

387

Computation of interactions of blast with responding solids using an  

Microsoft Academic Search

This thesis describes the development of a Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) methodology and its implementation to simulate a shock\\/blast wave interaction with a complex structure, to a good engineering approximation. The method allows for an easy definition of the geometry of the structure and helps to reduce the computational resource requirements. An 'embedded solid' approach, using the Brinkman Penalization Method,

Yih-Pin Liew

2007-01-01

388

Coherent states for the relativistic harmonic oscillator  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Recently we have obtained, on the basis of a group approach to quantization, a Bargmann-Fock-like realization of the Relativistic Harmonic Oscillator as well as a generalized Bargmann transform relating fock wave functions and a set of relativistic Hermite polynomials. Nevertheless, the relativistic creation and annihilation operators satisfy typical relativistic commutation relations of the Lie product (vector-z, vector-z(sup dagger)) approximately equals Energy (an SL(2,R) algebra). Here we find higher-order polarization operators on the SL(2,R) group, providing canonical creation and annihilation operators satisfying the Lie product (vector-a, vector-a(sup dagger)) = identity vector 1, the eigenstates of which are 'true' coherent states.

Aldaya, Victor; Guerrero, J.

1995-01-01

389

Relativistic vs. Non-relativistic Nuclear Models  

E-print Network

Both the relativistic and non-relativistic model explain very well low-energy nuclear phenomena, but in a physically different way from each other. There seems to be no low-energy phenomenon to answer which model is more reasonable. In order to explore a difference between two models, high momentum transfer phenomena are investigated. First it is shown that the neutron spin-orbit charge density in the relativistic model reproduces very well experimental data on elastic electron scattering which have not been explained in the non-relativistic model. Next it is predicted that the relativistic Coulomb sum value is strongly quenched, compared with the non-relativistic one. This quenching is owing to the anti-nucleon degrees of freedom, which make the nucleon size larger and equivalently the vector-meson mass smaller in nuclear medium. New experiment on the Coulomb sum values around the momentum transfer 1GeV is expected to distinguish the relativistic from the non-relativistic model.

H. Kurasawa; T. Suzuki

2002-01-16

390

Simulation of rock blasting with the SHALE code  

Microsoft Academic Search

The SHALE code and its special features for simulating rock blasting are described. SHALE first simulates the detonation of the explosive and then follows the effect of the resulting shocks and stress waves on the surrounding rock. A general description is given for SHALE as a finite-difference stress-wave-propagation code, followed by a brief discussion of numerical methods, and a section

T. F. Adams; R. B. Demuth; L. G. Margolin; B. D. Nichols

1983-01-01

391

The Relativistic Dynamics of Photon Gas Two dynamic equations are established in photon gas, which is just the carrier or medium of electromagnetic waves  

E-print Network

The carrier or medium of electromagnetic waves has been vainly searched for many years, and now it has been caught after the establishment of the dynamic equations in photon gas. The photon's rest mass has been estimated from the cosmic background temperature in space where the photon gas is at an open state of thermal equilibrium, and the photon's proper magnetic moment is calculated from the dynamic equations of photon gas too. As the carrier of electromagnetic waves, the photon gas is a discrete medium at very high frequency, and then the Bohr's electron is hardly to emit energy in wave form and can be stably rounding the nuclei in discrete orbits at lower temperature.

Jikang Chen

2010-03-01

392

Relativistic quantum Brownian motion  

E-print Network

A Wigner-Klein-Kramers equation is proposed, which merges relativistic, quantum and thermo dynamics. The relativistic effect on quantum Brownian motion is studied via the Breit-Fermi Hamiltonian applied into a dissipative Madelung hydrodynamics. A new thermo-quantum Smoluchowski equation is derived, which accounts for the relativistic correction of the Bohm quantum potential.

Roumen Tsekov

2010-03-13

393

CRCHD E-blast  

Cancer.gov

CRCHD E-blast CRCHD Web Site Updates The Center to Reduce Cancer Health Disparities (CRCHD) has recently updated some of its web pages! Please take the time to browse through these updates. Site updates include: The CRCHD 2011 Annual Report, a newly

394

CRCHD E-blast  

Cancer.gov

CRCHD E-blast CRCHD Web Site Updates The Center to Reduce Cancer Health Disparities (CRCHD) has recently updated some of its Web pages! Please take the time to browse through these updates. Site updates include: 2013 Annual Report to the Nation on

395

Dirac oscillators and the relativistic R matrix  

SciTech Connect

The Dirac oscillators are shown to be an excellent expansion basis for solutions of the Dirac equation by R-matrix techniques. The combination of the Dirac oscillator and the R-matrix approach provides a convenient formalism for reactions as well as bound-state problems. The utility of the R-matrix approach is demonstrated in relativistic impulse approximation calculations where exchange terms can be calculated exactly and scattering waves made orthogonal to bound-state wave functions.

Grineviciute, J.; Halderson, Dean [Department of Physics, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan 49008 (United States)

2009-10-15

396

Relativistic fluid equations of motion, equilibrium and stability of beams  

SciTech Connect

A general relativistic fluid formulation has been obtained by Siambis. The set of relativistic fluid equations includes a general equation of state. The use of these equations, however, is hampered by the presence of additional fluid variables resulting from relativistic corrections. The systematic expansion and associated nice variables introduced by Newcomb, have been utilized in the formulation of Siambis to yield a compact set of relativistic fluid equations which is the relativistic generalization of the well-known non-relativistic set of fluid equations. Specifically a general relativistic equation of state is obtained, which can be reduced to much simpler forms for specific cases. Equilibrium constraints are obtained and discussed. A stability analysis has been carried out for the two-stream instability including relativistic thermal corrections. A new mode of beam oscillation has been found, the thermal-relativistic mode. This mode is a fast-wave mode and it interacts resonantly, under certain conditions, with the well-known positive energy beam fast wave. 5 refs., 2 figs.

Siambis, J.G.

1983-01-01

397

Fermi Acceleration at Relativistic Shocks Guy Pelletier  

E-print Network

by introducing magnetic fluctuations with Fourier modes distributed according to a power law spectrum. The same the scattering off magnetic fluctuations as given. Even in that case, when a mean field is considered, its magnetic fluctuations at short wave lengths. The relativistic motion of the shock front let the cosmic rays

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

398

BLAST: THE REDSHIFT SURVEY  

SciTech Connect

The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) has recently surveyed approx =8.7 deg{sup 2} centered on Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-South at 250, 350, and 500 mum. In Dye et al., we presented the catalog of sources detected at 5sigma in at least one band in this field and the probable counterparts to these sources in other wavebands. In this paper, we present the results of a redshift survey in which we succeeded in measuring redshifts for 82 of these counterparts. The spectra show that the BLAST counterparts are mostly star-forming galaxies but not extreme ones when compared to those found in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Roughly one quarter of the BLAST counterparts contain an active nucleus. We have used the spectroscopic redshifts to carry out a test of the ability of photometric redshift methods to estimate the redshifts of dusty galaxies, showing that the standard methods work well even when a galaxy contains a large amount of dust. We have also investigated the cases where there are two possible counterparts to the BLAST source, finding that in at least half of these there is evidence that the two galaxies are physically associated, either because they are interacting or because they are in the same large-scale structure. Finally, we have made the first direct measurements of the luminosity function in the three BLAST bands. We find strong evolution out to z = 1, in the sense that there is a large increase in the space density of the most luminous galaxies. We have also investigated the evolution of the dust-mass function, finding similar strong evolution in the space density of the galaxies with the largest dust masses, showing that the luminosity evolution seen in many wavebands is associated with an increase in the reservoir of interstellar matter in galaxies.

Eales, Stephen; Dye, Simon; Mauskopf, Philip; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Pascale, Enzo; Raymond, Gwenifer [Cardiff University, School of Physics and Astronomy, Queens Buildings, The Parade, Cardiff, CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Chapin, Edward L.; Halpern, Mark; Marsden, Gaelen; Scott, Douglas [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Devlin, Mark J.; Rex, Marie; Semisch, Christopher; Truch, Matthew D. P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia PA, 19104 (United States); Hughes, David H. [Instituto Nacional de AstrofIsica Optica y Electronica (INAOE), Aptdo. Postal 51 y 72000 Puebla (Mexico); Netterfield, Calvin B.; Viero, Marco P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Patanchon, Guillaume [Universite Paris Diderot, Laboratoire APC, 10, rue Alice Domon et Leonie Duquet 75205 Paris (France); Siana, Brian [California Institute of Technology, MS 105-24, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2009-12-20

399

Drainage effects on shock wave propagating through aqueous foams  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mobile and easy to use barriers of aqueous foam suppress blast waves as well as the fireball that follows explosion by dissipation mechanisms and\\/or energy transfer into less destructive forms. Early investigations established that damping the capacity of these barriers depends on a number of factors that include the foam density and the characteristics of the blast wave. Since aqueous

A. Britan; G. Ben-Dor; H. Shapiro; M. Liverts; I. Shreiber

2007-01-01

400

Relativistic effects in the processes of heavy quark fragmentation  

E-print Network

In the framework based on the quasipotential method and relativistic quark model a new covariant expression for the heavy quark fragmentation amplitude to fragment into the pseudoscalar and vector S-wave heavy mesons is obtained. It contains all possible relativistic corrections including the terms connected with the transformation law of the bound state wave function to the reference frame of the moving meson. Relativistic corrections of order {\\bf p}^2/m^2 to the heavy quark fragmentation distributions into (\\bar c c), (\\bar b c) and (\\bar b b) states are calculated as functions of the longitudinal momentum fraction z and the transverse momentum p_T relative to the jet axis.

A. P. Martynenko

2005-06-30

401

Relativistic linear restoring force  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We consider two different forms for a relativistic version of a linear restoring force. The pair comes from taking Hooke’s law to be the force appearing on the right-hand side of the relativistic expressions: dp/dt or dp/d?. Either formulation recovers Hooke’s law in the non-relativistic limit. In addition to these two forces, we introduce a form of retardation appropriate for the description of a linear (in displacement) force arising from the interaction of a pair of particles with a relativistic field. The procedure is akin to replacing Coulomb’s law in electromagnetism with a retarded form (the first correction in the full relativistic case). This retardation leads to the expected oscillation, but with amplitude growth in both its relativistic and non-relativistic incarnations.

Clark, D.; Franklin, J.; Mann, N.

2012-09-01

402

Internal ballistics of the detonation products of a blast-hole charge  

SciTech Connect

The authors investigate the gasdynamic flow of the detonation products of a blast-hole charge (the expansion of the detonation products in the blast hole and the gas outflow and propagation of shock airwaves into the face space). The problem is solved by means of a numerical program for integration of partial differential equations of one-dimensional gas-dynamics. A numerical model of the internal ballistics of a blast-hole charge is presented. In addition to the variation of the thermodynamic parameters in the blast hole, the formation of the shock wave in the face space is shown, which is the source of gas ignition. Further development of the numerical model of the action of blast-hole charges is planned which will involve an analysis of a number of applied problems.

Mangush, S.K.; Garbunov, V.A.

1986-07-01

403

Time-Dependent Cylindrical and Spherical Solitary Structures and Double Layers of Dust Ion-Acoustic Waves in Ultra-Relativistic Dense Plasma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cylindrical and spherical (nonplanar) solitary waves (SWs) and double layers (DLs) in a multi-ion plasma system (containing inertial positively as well as negatively charged ions, non-inertial degenerate electrons, and negatively charged static dust) are studied by employing the standard reductive perturbation method. The modified Gardner (MG) equation describing the nonlinear propagation of the dust ion-acoustic (DIA) waves is derived, and its nonplanar SWs and DLs solutions are numerically analyzed. The parametric regimes for the existence of SWs, which are associated with both positive and negative potential, and DLs which are associated with negative potential, are obtained. The basic features of nonplanar DIA SWs, and DLs, which are found to be different from planar ones, are also identified.

Akhter, T.; M. M., Hossain; A. A., Mamun

2013-06-01

404

Non-Relativistic Positronium Spectrum in Relativistic Schroedinger Theory  

E-print Network

The lowest energy levels of positronium are studied in the non-relativistic approximation within the framework of Relativistic Schr\\"odinger Theory (RST). Since it is very difficult to find the exact solutions of the RST field equations (even in the non-relativistic limit), an approximation scheme is set up on the basis of the hydrogen-like wave functions (i.e. polynomial times exponential). For any approximation order $\\NN (\\NN=0,1,2,3,...)$ there arises a spectrum of approximate RST solutions with the associated energies, quite similarly to the conventional treatment of positronium in the standard quantum theory (Appendix). For the lowest approximation order $(\\NN=0)$ the RST prediction for the \\emph{groundstate} energy exactly agrees with the conventional prediction of the standard theory. However for the higher approximation orders $(\\NN=1,2,3)$, the corresponding RST prediction differs from the conventional result by (roughly) $0,9 [eV]$ which confirms the previous estimate of the error being due to the use of the spherically symmetric approximation. The excited states require the application of higher-order approximations $(\\NN>>3)$ and are therefore not adequately described by the present orders $(\\NN\\le 3)$.

M. Mattes; M. Sorg

2008-03-15

405

Einstein Toolkit for Relativistic Astrophysics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Einstein Toolkit is a collection of software components and tools for simulating and analyzing general relativistic astrophysical systems. Such systems include gravitational wave space-times, collisions of compact objects such as black holes or neutron stars, accretion onto compact objects, core collapse supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts. The Einstein Toolkit builds on numerous software efforts in the numerical relativity community including CactusEinstein, Whisky, and Carpet. The Einstein Toolkit currently uses the Cactus Framework as the underlying computational infrastructure that provides large-scale parallelization, general computational components, and a model for collaborative, portable code development.

Collaborative Effort

2011-02-01

406

The Importance of Systemic Response in the Pathobiology of Blast-Induced Neurotrauma  

PubMed Central

Due to complex injurious environment where multiple blast effects interact with the body parallel, blast-induced neurotrauma is a unique clinical entity induced by systemic, local, and cerebral responses. Activation of autonomous nervous system; sudden pressure increase in vital organs such as lungs and liver; and activation of neuroendocrine–immune system are among the most important mechanisms that contribute significantly to molecular changes and cascading injury mechanisms in the brain. It has been hypothesized that vagally mediated cerebral effects play a vital role in the early response to blast: this assumption has been supported by experiments where bilateral vagotomy mitigated bradycardia, hypotension, and apnea, and also prevented excessive metabolic alterations in the brain of animals exposed to blast. Clinical experience suggests specific blast–body–nervous system interactions such as (1) direct interaction with the head either through direct passage of the blast wave through the skull or by causing acceleration and/or rotation of the head; and (2) via hydraulic interaction, when the blast overpressure compresses the abdomen and chest, and transfers its kinetic energy to the body's fluid phase, initiating oscillating waves that traverse the body and reach the brain. Accumulating evidence suggests that inflammation plays important role in the pathogenesis of long-term neurological deficits due to blast. These include memory decline, motor function and balance impairments, and behavioral alterations, among others. Experiments using rigid body- or head protection in animals subjected to blast showed that head protection failed to prevent inflammation in the brain or reduce neurological deficits, whereas body protection was successful in alleviating the blast-induced functional and morphological impairments in the brain. PMID:21206523

Cernak, Ibolja

2010-01-01

407

Electron acoustic solitons in a relativistic plasma with nonthermal electrons  

SciTech Connect

Electron acoustic solitary waves (EASWs) are studied using Sagdeev's pseudopotential technique for a plasma comprising relativistic ions, cold relativistic electrons, and nonthermal hot electrons. The parametric range considered here is valid for the auroral zone. It is found that the present plasma model supports EASWs having negative potential. It is seen that the relativistic effect significantly restricts the region of existence for solitary waves. The region of existence of solitary waves also depends crucially on {alpha}, the parameter that determines the population of the energetic nonthermal electrons. For example, for {alpha}>0.18 with the soliton velocity 1.05 and u{sub 0c}/c=0.001, solitary wave solutions will not exist. We also find that for small values of {alpha}, solitary waves would exist for V<1.

Sahu, Biswajit; Roychoudhury, Rajkumar [Department of Mathematics, Dinhata College, Coochbehar-736135 (India); Physics and Applied Mathematics Unit, Indian Statistical Institute, Kolkata-700108 (India)

2006-07-15

408

Mechanics of blast loading on the head models in the study of traumatic brain injury using experimental and computational approaches.  

PubMed

Blast waves generated by improvised explosive devices can cause mild, moderate to severe traumatic brain injury in soldiers and civilians. To understand the interactions of blast waves on the head and brain and to identify the mechanisms of injury, compression-driven air shock tubes are extensively used in laboratory settings to simulate the field conditions. The overall goal of this effort is to understand the mechanics of blast wave-head interactions as the blast wave traverses the head/brain continuum. Toward this goal, surrogate head model is subjected to well-controlled blast wave profile in the shock tube environment, and the results are analyzed using combined experimental and numerical approaches. The validated numerical models are then used to investigate the spatiotemporal distribution of stresses and pressure in the human skull and brain. By detailing the results from a series of careful experiments and numerical simulations, this paper demonstrates that: (1) Geometry of the head governs the flow dynamics around the head which in turn determines the net mechanical load on the head. (2) Biomechanical loading of the brain is governed by direct wave transmission, structural deformations, and wave reflections from tissue-material interfaces. (3) Deformation and stress analysis of the skull and brain show that skull flexure and tissue cavitation are possible mechanisms of blast-induced traumatic brain injury. PMID:22832705

Ganpule, S; Alai, A; Plougonven, E; Chandra, N

2013-06-01

409

Relativistic remnants of non-relativistic electrons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Electrons obeying the Dirac equation are investigated under the non-relativistic c mapsto infty limit. General solutions are given by derivatives of relativistic invariant functions that possess discontinuity at the light-cone, yielding the delta function of (ct)^2 - {{{{x}}}}^2. This light-cone singularity does survive in this limit to show that the charge and the current densities of electrons travel at the speed of light in spite of their massiveness.

Kashiwa, Taro; Yamaguchi, Taisuke

2014-10-01

410

Bomb blast mass casualty incidents: initial triage and management of injuries.  

PubMed

Bomb blast injuries are no longer confined to battlefields. With the ever present threat of terrorism, we should always be prepared for bomb blasts. Bomb blast injuries tend to affect air-containing organs more, as the blast wave tends to exert a shearing force on air-tissue interfaces. Commonly-injured organs include the tympanic membranes, the sinuses, the lungs and the bowel. Of these, blast lung injury is the most challenging to treat. The clinical picture is a mix of acute respiratory distress syndrome and air embolism, and the institution of positive pressure ventilation in the presence of low venous pressures could cause systemic arterial air embolism. The presence of a tympanic membrane perforation is not a reliable indicator of the presence of a blast injury in the other air-containing organs elsewhere. Radiological imaging of the head, chest and abdomen help with the early identification of blast lung injury, head injury, abdominal injury, eye and sinus injuries, as well as any penetration by foreign bodies. In addition, it must be borne in mind that bomb blasts could also be used to disperse radiological and chemical agents. PMID:19224092

Goh, S H

2009-01-01