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Sample records for relativistic klystron two-beam

  1. Design of inductively detuned RF extraction cavities for the Relativistic Klystron Two Beam Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Henestroza, E.; Yu, S.S.; Li, H.

    1995-04-01

    An inductively detuned traveling wave cavity for the Relativistic Klystron Two Beam Accelerator expected to extract high RF power at 11. 424 GHz for the 1 TeV Center of Mass Next Linear Collider has been designed. Longitudinal beam dynamics studies led to the following requirements on cavity design: (a) Extraction of 360 MW of RF power with RF component of the current being 1.15 kAmps at 11.424 GHz, (b) Inductively detuned traveling wave cavity with wave phase velocity equal to 4/3 the speed of light, (c) Output cavity with appropriate Q{sub ext} and eigenfrequency for proper matching. Furthermore, transverse beam dynamics require low shunt impedances to avoid the beam break-up instability. We describe the design effort to meet these criteria based on frequency-domain and time-domain computations using 2D- and 3D- electromagnetic codes.

  2. Design of a 1-MV induction injector for the Relativistic Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.E.; Eylon, S.; Lidia, S.; Reginato, L.; Vanecek, D.; Yu, S.; Houck, T.; Westenskow, G.A.; Henestroza, E.

    1997-05-01

    A Relativistic Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator (RK-TBA) is envisioned as a rf power source upgrade of the Next Linear Collider. Construction of a prototype, called the RTA, based on the RK-TBA concept has commenced at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This prototype will be used to study physics, engineering, and costing issues involved in the application of the RK-TBA concept to linear colliders. The first half of the injector, a 1 MeV, 1.2 kA, 300 ns induction electron gun, has been built and is presently being tested. The design of the injector cells and the pulsed power drive units are presented in this paper.

  3. Relativistic-Klystron two-beam accelerator as a power source for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Lidia, S. M.; Anderson, D. E.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Vanecek, D. L.; Yu, S. S.; Houck, T. L.; Westenskow, G. A.

    1999-05-07

    The technical challenge for making two-beam accelerators into realizable power sources for high-energy colliders lies in the creation of the drive beam and in its propagation over long distances through multiple extraction sections. This year we have been constructing a 1.2-kA, 1-MeV, induction gun for a prototype relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA). The electron source will be a 8.9 cm diameter, thermionic, flat-surface cathode with a maximum shroud field stress of approximately 165 kV/cm. Additional design parameters for the injector include a pulse length of over 150-ns flat top (1% energy variation), and a normalized edge emittance of less than 300 pi-mm-mr. The prototype accelerator will be used to study, physics, engineering, and costing issues involved in the application of the RK-TBA concept to linear colliders. We have also been studying optimization parameters, such as frequency, for the application of the RK-TBA concept to multi-TeV linear colliders. As an rf power source the RK-TBA scales favorably up to frequencies around 35 GHz. An overview of this work with details of the design and performance of the prototype injector, beam line, and diagnostics will be presented.

  4. Relativistic-Klystron two-beam accelerator as a power source for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Lidia, S.M.; Anderson, D.E.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Vanecek, D.L.; Yu, S.S.; Westenskow, G.A.

    1999-05-01

    The technical challenge for making two-beam accelerators into realizable power sources for high-energy colliders lies in the creation of the drive beam and in its propagation over long distances through multiple extraction sections. This year we have been constructing a 1.2-kA, 1-MeV, induction gun for a prototype relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA). The electron source will be a 8.9 cm diameter, thermionic, flat-surface cathode with a maximum shroud field stress of approximately 165 kV/cm. Additional design parameters for the injector include a pulse length of over 150-ns flat top (1{percent} energy variation), and a normalized edge emittance of less than 300 pi-mm-mr. The prototype accelerator will be used to study, physics, engineering, and costing issues involved in the application of the RK-TBA concept to linear colliders. We have also been studying optimization parameters, such as frequency, for the application of the RK-TBA concept to multi-TeV linear colliders. As an rf power source the RK-TBA scales favorably up to frequencies around 35 GHz. An overview of this work with details of the design and performance of the prototype injector, beam line, and diagnostics will be presented. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Relativistic-klystron two-beam accelerator as a power source for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D E; Eylon, S; Henestroza, E; Houck, T L; Lidia, M; Vanecek, D L; Westenskow, G A; Yu, S S

    1998-10-05

    The technical challenge for making two-beam accelerators into realizable power sources for high-energy colliders lies in the creation of the drive beam and in its propagation over long distances through multiple extraction sections. This year we have been constructing a 1.2&A, l-MeV, induction gun for a prototype relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA). The electron source will be a 8.9 cm diameter, thermionic, flat-surface cathode with a maximum shroud field stress of approximately 165 kV/cm. Additional design parameters for the injector include a pulse length of over 150-ns flat top (1% energy variation), and a normalized edge emittance of less than 300 pi-mm-n-n. The prototype accelerator will be used to study physics, engineering, and costing issues involved in the application of the RK-TBA concept to linear colliders. We have also been studying optimization parameters, such as frequency, for the application of the RK-TBA concept to multi-TeV linear colliders. As an rf power source the RK-TBA scales favorably up to frequencies around 35 GHz. An overview of this work with details of the design and performance of the prototype injector, beam line, and diagnostics will be presented.

  6. The two-beam accelerator and the relativistic klystron power source

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1988-04-01

    This paper discusses the concept of a two-beam accelerator. Two versions are discussed; one employing a free electron laser, the second employing a branched beam sent through ''transfer cavities'' as in a klystron. 14 refs., 26 figs., 1 tab. (LSP)

  7. Studies of beam dynamics in relativistic klystron two-beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Lidia, Steven M.

    1999-11-01

    Two-beam accelerators (TBAs) based upon free-electron lasers (FELs) or relativistic klystrons (RK-TBAs) have been proposed as efficient power sources for next generation high-energy linear colliders. Studies have demonstrated the possibility of building TBAs from X-band ({approximately}8-12 GHz) through Ka band ({approximately} 30-35 GHz) frequency regions. Provided that further prototyping shows stable beam propagation with minimal current loss and production of good quality, high-power rf fields, this technology is compatible with current schemes for electron-positron colliders in the multi-TeV center-of-mass scale. A new method of simulating the beam dynamics in accelerators of this type has been developed in this dissertation. There are three main components to this simulation. The first is a tracking algorithm to generate nonlinear transfer maps for pushing noninteracting particles through the external fields. The second component is a 3D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) algorithm that solves a set of Helmholtz equations for the self-fields, including the conducting boundary condition, and generates impulses that are interleaved with the nonlinear maps by means of a split-operation algorithm. The Helmholtz equations are solved by a multi-grid algorithm. The third component is an equivalent circuit equation solver that advances the modal rf cavity fields in time due to excitation by the modulated beam. The RTA project is described, and the simulation code is used to design the latter portions of the experiment. Detailed calculations of the beam dynamics and of the rf cavity output are presented and discussed. A beamline design is presented that will generate nearly 1.2 GW of power from 40 input, gain, and output rv cavities over a 10 m distance. The simulations show that beam current losses are acceptable, and that longitudinal and transverse focusing techniques are sufficient capable of maintaining a high degree of beam quality along the entire beamline. Additional

  8. Relativistic klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.A.; Azuma, O.; Callin, R.S.; Deruyter, H.; Eppley, K.R.; Fant, K.S.; Fowkes, W.R.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Hoag, H.A.; Koontz, R.F.

    1989-03-01

    Experimental work is underway by a SLAC-LLNL-LBL collaboration to investigate the feasibility of using relativistic klystrons as a power source for future high gradient accelerators. Two different relativistic klystron configurations have been built and tested to date: a high grain multicavity klystron at 11.4 GHz and a low gain two cavity subharmonic buncher driven at 5.7 GHz. In both configurations power is extracted at 11.4 GHz. In order to understand the basic physics issues involved in extracting RF from a high power beam, we have used both a single resonant cavity and a multi-cell traveling wave structure for energy extraction. We have learned how to overcome our previously reported problem of high power RF pulse shortening, and have achieved peak RF power levels of 170 MW with the RF pulse of the same duration as the beam current pulse. 6 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Low-field permanent magnet quadrupoles in a new relativistic-klystron two-beam accelerator design

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.; Sessler, A.

    1995-02-01

    Permanent magnets play a central role in the new relativistic klystron two-beam-accelerator design. The two key goals of this new design, low cost and the suppression of beam break-up instability are both intimately tied to the permanent magnet quadrupole focusing system. A recently completed systems study by a joint LBL-LLNL team concludes that a power source for a 1 TeV center-of-mass Next Linear Collider based on the new TBA design can be as low as $1 billion, and the efficiency (wall plug to rf) is estimated to be 36%. End-to-end simulations of longitudinal and transverse beam dynamics show that the drive beam is stable over the entire TBA unit.

  10. Design study of longitudinal dynamics of the drive beam in 1 TeV relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Yu, S.S.; Sessler, A.M.

    1994-10-01

    In this paper the authors present a design study on the longitudinal dynamics of a relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA) scheme which has been proposed as a power source candidate for a 1 TeV next linear collider (NLC). They address the issue of maintaining stable power output at desired level for a 300-m long TBA with 150 extraction cavities and present their simulation results to demonstrate that it can be achieved by inductively detuning the extraction cavities to counter the space charge debunching effect on the drive beam. They then carry out simulation study to show that the beam bunches desired by the RK-TBA can be efficiently obtained by first chopping an initially uniform beam of low energy into a train of beam bunches with modest longitudinal dimension and then using the {open_quotes}adiabatic capture{close_quotes} scheme to bunch and accelerate these beam bunches into tight bunches at the operating energy of the drive beam. The authors have also examined the {open_quotes}after burner{close_quotes} scheme which is implemented in their RK-TBA design for efficiency enhancement.

  11. Relativistic-klystron two-beam-accelerator as a power source for a 1 TeV next linear collider: A systems study

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.; Goffeney, N.; Deadrick, F.

    1994-10-01

    A physics, engineering, and costing study has been conducted to explore the feasibility of a relativistic-klystron two-beam-accelerator system as a power source candidate for a 1 TeV linear collider. We present a point design example which has acceptable transverse and longitudinal beam stability properties. Preliminary ``bottom-up`` cost estimate yields the full power source system at less than 1 billion dollars. The overall efficiency for rf production is estimated to be 36%.

  12. Design study of beam dynamics issues for 1 TeV next linear collider based upon the relativistic-klystron two-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Goffeney, N.; Henestroza, E.; Sessler, A.; Yu, S.; Houck, T.; Westenskow, G.

    1994-11-01

    A design study has recently been conducted for exploring the feasibility of a relativistic-klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA) system as a rf power source for a 1 TeV linear collider. The author present, in this paper, the beam dynamics part of this study. They have achieved in their design study acceptable transverse and longitudinal beam stability properties for the resulting high efficiency and low cost RK-TBA.

  13. Preliminary design report of a relativistic-Klystron two-beam-accelerator based power source for a 1 TeV center-of-mass next linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.; Goffeney, N.; Henestroza, E.

    1995-02-22

    A preliminary point design for an 11.4 GHz power source for a 1 TeV center-of-mass Next Linear Collider (NLC) based on the Relativistic-Klystron Two-Beam-Accelerator (RK-TBA) concept is presented. The present report is the result of a joint LBL-LLNL systems study. consisting of three major thrust areas: physics, engineering, and costing. The new RK-TBA point design, together with our findings in each of these areas, are reported.

  14. Relativistic klystron afterburner simulation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, R.D.; Jong, R.A.; Westenskow, G.A.; Yu, S.S.

    1990-01-24

    We are developing computer codes for the numerical simulations of relativistic klystrons and relativistic klystron afterburners''. The purpose of this note is to discuss the main features of our numerical model. A relativistic klystron afterburner'' is a scheme to extract power from a spent FEL electron beam. Power is extracted from the beam by passing it through klystron output cavities. To study the feasibility of this concept, we are developing computer codes for the numerical simulation of relativistic klystrons and afterburners. The purpose of this note is to discuss the main features of our numerical model.

  15. Relativistic klystron research for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Deruyter, H.; Eppley, K.R.; Fant, K.S.; Fowkes, W.R.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Higo, T.; Hoag, H.A.; Koontz, R.F.

    1988-09-01

    Relativistic klystrons are being developed as a power source for high gradient accelerator applications which include large linear electron-positron colliders, compact accelerators, and FEL sources. We have attained 200 MW peak power at 11.4 GHz from a relativistic klystron, and 140 MV/m longitudinal gradient in a short 11.4 GHz accelerator section. We report here on the design of our relativistic klystrons, the results of our experiments so far, and some of our plans for the near future. 5 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  16. A theory of the two-beam klystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhm, Han S.

    1993-08-01

    A theoretical model is developed for the two-beam klystron, where two concentric annular electron beams propagate through a grounded conducting tube. The beams premodulated at the first cavity enter the second cavity, exciting it. The induced voltage at the second cavity returns a part of the inner beam toward the first cavity, establishing a mutual communication between two cavities. The in-phase condition of the return current is obtained in terms of the intercavity distance. The maximum current-modulation condition at the second cavity is also obtained. These two conditions determine an optimum intercavity distance. The oscillation behavior of the first cavity is investigated, including influence of the intercavity distance on the induced gap voltage appearing on the cavity opening. The relationship between the induced voltage and the modulated return current in the opening is found from an equivalent circuit representation of the cavity impedance. The boundary between the oscillator and amplifier regions is described in the parameter space defined by the normalized return-current strength h and intercavity distance represented by the phase angle α. In the amplifier region (h sin α<1), the amplification occurs only for a narrow range of the phase angle α. The induced voltage grows exponentially in the oscillator region satisfying h sin α≳1. Introducing a nonlinear saturation term into the return current, the induced voltage is bounded in the oscillator operation.

  17. Relativistic klystron research at SLAC and LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Deruyter, H.; Eppley, K.R.; Fowkes, W.R.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Higo, T.; Hoag, H.A.; Lavine, T.L.; Lee, T.G.; Loew, G.A.; Miller, R.H.; Morton, P.L.; Palmer, R.B.; Paterson, J.M.; Ruth, R.D.; Schwarz, H.D.; Takeuchi, Y.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wang, J.W.; Wilson, P.B.; Hopkins, D.B.; Sessler, A.M.; Barletta, W.A.; Birx, D.L.; Boyd, J.K.; Houck, T.; Westenskow, G.A.; Yu, S.S.

    1988-06-01

    We are developing relativistic klystrons as a power source for high gradient accelerator applications such as large linear electron-positron colliders and compact accelerators. We have attained 200 MW peak power at 11.4 GHz from a relativistic klystron, and 140 MV/m longitudinal gradient in a short 11.4 GHz accelerator section. We report here briefly on our experiments so far. 5 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  18. Relativistic klystron research for high gradient accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Deruyter, H.; Eppley, K.R.; Fowkes, W.R.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Higo, T.; Hoag, H.A.; Lavine, T.L.; Lee, T.G.

    1988-06-01

    Relativistic klystrons are being developed as a power source for high gradient accelerator applications which include large linear electron--positron colliders, compact accelerators, and FEL sources. We have attained 200MW peak power at 11.4 GHz from a relativistic klystron, and 140 MV/m longitudinal gradient in a short 11.4 GHz accelerator section. We report here on the design of our first klystrons, the results of our experiments so far, and some of our plans for the near future. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Recent progress in relativistic klystron research

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Deruyter, H.; Eppley, K.R.; Fant, K.S.; Fowkes, W.R.; Hoag, H.A.; Koontz, R.F.; Lavine, T.L.; Loew, G.A.; Miller, R.H.; Ruth, R.D.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wang, J.W.; Aalberts, D.P.; Boyd, J.K.; Houck, T.; Ryne, R.D.; Westenskow, G.A.; Yu, S.S.; Hopkins, D.B.; Sessler, A.M.; Haimson, J.; Mecklenburg, B.; Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (US

    1989-08-01

    Experimental work is now under way by collaborators at LLNL, SLAC, and LBL to investigate relativistic klystrons as a possible rf power source for future high-gradient accelerators. We have learned how to overcome our previously reported problem of high-power rf pulse shortening and have achieved peak rf power levels of 290 MW. We have used the rf from a relativistic klystron to power a short, 11.4-GHz high-gradient accelerator. The measured momentum spectrum of the accelerated electron beam corresponds to an accelerating gradient of 84 MV/m. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Relativistic klystrons for high-gradient accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Westenskow, G.A.; Aalberts, D.P.; Boyd, J.K.; Deis, G.A.; Houck, T.L.; Orzechowski, T.J.; Ryne, R.D.; Yu, S.S. ); Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Deruyter, H.; Eppley, K.R.; Fant, K.S.; Fowkes, W.R.; Hoag, H.A.; Koontz, R.F.; Lavine, T.L.; Loew, G.A.; Miller, R.H.; Ruth, R.D.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wang, J.W. ); Haimson, J.; Mecklen

    1990-09-05

    Experimental work is being performed by collaborators at LLNL, SLAC, and LBL to investigate relativistic klystrons as a possible rf power source for future high-gradient accelerators. We have learned how to overcome or previously reported problem of high power rf pulse shortening and have achieved peak rf power levels of 330 MW using an 11.4-GHz high-gain tube with multiple output structures. In these experiments the rf pulse is of the same duration as the beam current pulse. In addition, experiments have been performed on two short sections of a high-gradient accelerator using the rf power from a relativistic klystron. An average accelerating gradient of 84 MV/m has been achieved with 80-MW of rf power.

  1. An X-band overmoded relativistic klystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Renzhen; Chen, Changhua; Deng, Yuqun; Li, Jiawei; Bai, Xianchen

    2014-11-01

    An X-band overmoded relativistic klystron is proposed, the operation mode of which is the TM02 mode. The drift tube could not cut off the TM01 mode; isolating the buncher cavity from the input cavity is achieved by introducing a sectional RF lossy material. Microwaves are extracted from the modulated electron beam using a cylindrical waveguide, rather than a coaxial waveguide; thereby, the output structure is significantly simplified. Particle-in-cell simulations show that microwaves with power of 1.28 GW and frequency of 9.30 GHz can be obtained, corresponding to an efficiency of 32% and relative bandwidth of about 8%.

  2. An X-band overmoded relativistic klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Renzhen; Chen, Changhua; Li, Jiawei; Bai, Xianchen; Deng, Yuqun

    2014-11-15

    An X-band overmoded relativistic klystron is proposed, the operation mode of which is the TM{sub 02} mode. The drift tube could not cut off the TM{sub 01} mode; isolating the buncher cavity from the input cavity is achieved by introducing a sectional RF lossy material. Microwaves are extracted from the modulated electron beam using a cylindrical waveguide, rather than a coaxial waveguide; thereby, the output structure is significantly simplified. Particle-in-cell simulations show that microwaves with power of 1.28 GW and frequency of 9.30 GHz can be obtained, corresponding to an efficiency of 32% and relative bandwidth of about 8%.

  3. Anomalous electron loading in SLAC 5045 klystron and relativistic klystron input cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Koontz, R.F.; Fowkes, R.W.; Lavine, T.L.; Miller, R.H.; Vlieks, A.E.

    1989-03-01

    Recent studies of RF breakup and instability in the SLAC 5045 klystrons have revealed that many production klystrons show loading of the input cavity by low energy electrons even under cold cathode no beam conditions. Sometime after the onset of the RF drive pulse, the input cavity absorbs a portion of the incident RF drive that would otherwise be reflected from the not-beam-loaded cavity. This power absorption is a function of drive level, and of axial magnetic field surrounding the cavity. No power absorption is present when the axial magnetic field is zero. This same phenomenon has been observed in the input cavity of relativistic klystron experiments being conducted as part of the SLAC-LBL-LLNL development program. The phenomenon may be associated with RF breakup and RF instability in SLAC 5045 klystrons, and with unstable pulse shortening in the relativistic klystron experiments. This paper outlines some old and new observations of microwave beam device malfunctions that probably are associated with low energy electron fluxes in the vacuum environments of microwave power devices. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  4. High-current relativistic klystron research at Physics International

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, J.S.; Harteneck, B.D.; Lam, S.K.; Parks, C.W.

    1994-12-31

    The authors are developing an L-band (1.3 GHz) high-current relativistic klystron (5 kA, 500 kV) for repetitive (200 pps) pulsing. They have designed and tested an extraction cavity that removes energy from the modulated electron beam and radiates it into an anechoic chamber in the TM{sub 01} mode. Peak power in excess of 450 MW has been measured for a single shot and 275 MW for a sustained burst producing 3.3 kW of average power. This klystron is now being transitioned to a long pulse (> 500 ns), single shot facility.

  5. Simulation of pulse shortening in a relativistic klystron oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Verboncoeur, J.P.; Mardahl, P.J.; Cartwright, K.L.; Birdsall, C.K.

    1996-12-31

    The relativistic klystron is a strong candidate for a high power microwave source for a number of applications, including accelerators and electronic warfare. In this work, the authors simulate a high power, high perveance relativistic klystron oscillator using a 2d PIC-MCC code. The experimental klystron is currently operating as an injection-locked oscillator at 1.25--1.35 GHz, with up to 1 GW rms output power for a 100 ns pulse. The beam voltage is 500 kV, with current of 10 kA, and a beam pulse length of 300 ns. Experimental evidence indicates the klystron behavior is azimuthally symmetric. Of particular interest for this device is the shortening of the rf pulse compared to the current pulse, which may be related to plasma formation near the extractor gap. Various gases liberated form the porous graphite beam dump may reach substantial pressures locally. The authors investigate the formation of plasma due to photoionization and electron impact ionization of the gas constituents, and its impact on the rf power output. The simulations are compared to the experimental data where available.

  6. Spontaneous emission and spectral properties of radiation by relativistic electrons in a gyro-klystron and optical-klystron undulator.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Bramha; Mishra, Ganeswar; Khullar, Roma

    2016-03-01

    In this paper spontaneous emission of radiation by relativistic electrons in a gyro-klystron is studied. The scheme consists of two solenoid sections separated by a dispersive section. In the dispersive section the electrons are made non-resonant with the radiation. The dispersive section transforms a small change of the velocity into changes of the phases of the electrons. This leads to enhanced radiation due to klystron-type modulation as compared with a conventional gyrotron-type device driven by cyclotron maser interaction. It is shown that the klystron-modulated spectrum depends on the dispersive field strength, finite perpendicular velocity component and length of the solenoids but is independent of the axial magnetic field strength. A simple scheme to design a gyro-klystron is discussed. PMID:26917129

  7. Using traveling wave structures to extract power from relativistic klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, R.D.; Yu, S.S.

    1990-09-19

    The purpose of this note is to analyze the excitation of traveling wave (TW) output structures by an RF current. Such structures are being used in relativistic klystron experiments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. First we will preset a set of difference equations that describes the excitation of the cells of a TW structure. Next we will restrict our attention to structures that have identical cells, except possibly for the first and last cells. Under these circumstances one can obtain difference equations that have constant coefficients, and we will present the general solution of these equations. Lastly we will apply our results to the analysis of a TW output structure. We will show that, by appropriate choice of the quality factors (Qs) and eigenfrequencies of the first and last cells, it is possible to obtain a traveling wave solution for which there is no reflected wave and where the excitation grows linearly with cell number.

  8. Three-dimensional simulation analysis of the standing-wave free- electron laser two beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.; Sessler, A.

    1993-01-01

    We have modified a two-dimensional relativistic klystron code, developed by Ryne and Yu, to simulate both the standing-wave free- electron laser two-beam accelerator and the relativistic klystron two- beam accelerator. In this paper, the code is used to study a standing-wave free-electron laser with three cavities. The effect of the radius of the electron beam on the RF output power; namely, a three-dimensional effect is examined.

  9. High efficiency coaxial klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator with a premodulation cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao Renzhen; Teng Yan; Chen Changhua; Sun Jun

    2011-11-15

    The klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO) combines the transition radiation with Cerenkov radiation and has demonstrated microwave output of high power and high efficiency. The coaxial slow wave structure device can produce microwave with a lower frequency in a smaller cross section. For the purpose of high efficiency, low frequency, and miniaturization, a coaxial klystron-like RBWO with a premodulation cavity is presented. Particle-in-cell simulations show that a microwave with power of 1.15 GW and frequency of 2.1 GHz is generated with conversion efficiency of 48%, whereas for the device with a reflector, the efficiency is 38%.

  10. Long pulse and high repetition rate operation of a relativistic klystron amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, J.S.; Harteneck, B.D.

    1994-12-31

    The authors are developing an L-band (1.3 GHz) high current relativistic klystron amplifier for both long pulse ({ge} 500 ns) and high repetition rate ({ge} 200 pps) capabilities. In repetitive operation, it has produced 3.3 kW of average power in 80 ns FWHM pulses of 250 MW peak power at 200 pps. They are currently transferring this same klystron to a single-shot, long-pulse driver to demonstrate its operation with a {ge} 500 ns electrical pulse.

  11. Spontaneous emission of radiation by relativistic electrons in a gyro-klystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, G.; Prakash, Bramha; Sharma, Geetanjali

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we study spontaneous emission of radiation by relativistic electrons in a gyro-klystron. The scheme consists of two solenoid sections separated by a dispersive section. In the dispersive section the electrons are made non resonant with the radiation. The dispersive section transforms a small change of the velocity into changes of the phases of the electrons.This leads to enhanced radiation as compared to a conventional gyrotron type device driven by cyclotron maser interaction. It is shown that the klystron modulated spectrum depends on the dispersive field strength, finite perpendicular velocity component and length of the solenoids but do not depend on the axial magnetic field strength. The analysis is further extended to include the combined effects of the undulator aided gyrotron klystron radiation.

  12. Relativistic klystron driven compact high gradient accelerator as an injector to an X-ray synchrotron radiation ring

    DOEpatents

    Yu, David U. L.

    1990-01-01

    A compact high gradient accelerator driven by a relativistic klystron is utilized to inject high energy electrons into an X-ray synchrotron radiation ring. The high gradients provided by the relativistic klystron enables accelerator structure to be much shorter (typically 3 meters) than conventional injectors. This in turn enables manufacturers which utilize high energy, high intensity X-rays to produce various devices, such as computer chips, to do so on a cost effective basis.

  13. Investigation of an X-band gigawatt long pulse multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhenbang; Huang, Hua; Lei, Lurong; Jin, Xiao; Zhu, Lei; Wang, Ganping; He, Hu; Wu, Yao; Ge, Yi; Yuan, Huan; Chen, Zhaofu

    2015-09-01

    To achieve a gigawatt-level long pulse radiation power in X-band, a multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier is proposed and studied experimentally. By introducing 18 electron drift tubes and extended interaction cavities, the power capacity of the device is increased. A radiation power of 1.23 GW with efficiency of 41% and amplifier gain of 46 dB is obtained in the particle-in-cell simulation. Under conditions of a 10 Hz repeat frequency and an input RF power of 30 kW, a radiation power of 0.9 GW, frequency of 9.405 GHz, pulse duration of 105 ns, and efficiency of 30% is generated in the experiment, and the amplifier gain is about 45 dB. Both the simulation and the experiment prove that the multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier can generate a long pulse GW-level radiation power in X-band.

  14. Design of a C-band relativistic extended interaction klystron with coaxial output cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wu; Zhao, De-Kui; Chen, Yong-Dong

    2015-07-01

    In order to overcome the disadvantages of conventional high frequency relativistic klystron amplifiers in power capability and RF conversion efficiency, a C-band relativistic extended interaction klystron amplifier with coaxial output cavity is designed with the aid of PIC code MAGIC. In the device, disk-loaded cavities are introduced in the input and intermediate cavity to increase the beam modulation depth, and a coaxial disk-loaded cavity is employed in the output cavity to enhance the RF conversion efficiency. In PIC simulation, when the beam voltage is 680 kV and current is 4 kA, the device can generate 1.11 GW output power at 5.64 GHz with an efficiency of 40.8%.

  15. High power operation of an X-band coaxial multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhenbang; Huang, Hua; Jin, Xiao; Zhao, Yucong; He, Hu; Lei, Lurong; Chen, Zhaofu

    2013-11-15

    An X-band coaxial multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier is designed in order to increase output microwave power and operating frequency of the amplifier tube. The experiment is performed on a Tesla-type accelerator. The amplifier is driven by an electron beam of 2.8 kA at 720 kV, and a microwave power of 30 kW and frequency of 9.384 GHz is injected into an input cavity by means of an external source, then a microwave power of over 800 MW is extracted, the amplifier gain is about 44 dB, and conversion efficiency is 40%. The experiment proves that output power of nearly GWs can be generated with the X-band coaxial multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier driven by a kW-level input power.

  16. High power operation of an X-band coaxial multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhenbang; Huang, Hua; Jin, Xiao; Zhao, Yucong; He, Hu; Lei, Lurong; Chen, Zhaofu

    2013-11-01

    An X-band coaxial multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier is designed in order to increase output microwave power and operating frequency of the amplifier tube. The experiment is performed on a Tesla-type accelerator. The amplifier is driven by an electron beam of 2.8 kA at 720 kV, and a microwave power of 30 kW and frequency of 9.384 GHz is injected into an input cavity by means of an external source, then a microwave power of over 800 MW is extracted, the amplifier gain is about 44 dB, and conversion efficiency is 40%. The experiment proves that output power of nearly GWs can be generated with the X-band coaxial multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier driven by a kW-level input power.

  17. Study of nonlinear interaction between bunched beam and intermediate cavities in a relativistic klystron amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Li, Z. H.; Tang, C. X.

    2012-07-15

    In intermediate cavities of a relativistic klystron amplifier (RKA) driven by intense relativistic electron beam, the equivalent circuit model, which is widely adopted to investigate the interaction between bunched beam and the intermediate cavity in a conventional klystron design, is invalid due to the high gap voltage and the nonlinear beam loading in a RKA. According to Maxwell equations and Lorentz equation, the self-consistent equations for beam-wave interaction in the intermediate cavity are introduced to study the nonlinear interaction between bunched beam and the intermediate cavity in a RKA. Based on the equations, the effects of modulation depth and modulation frequency of the beam on the gap voltage amplitude and its phase are obtained. It is shown that the gap voltage is significantly lower than that estimated by the equivalent circuit model when the beam modulation is high. And the bandwidth becomes wider as the beam modulation depth increases. An S-band high gain relativistic klystron amplifier is designed based on the result. And the corresponding experiment is carried out on the linear transformer driver accelerator. The peak output power has achieved 1.2 GW with an efficiency of 28.6% and a gain of 46 dB in the corresponding experiment.

  18. A high efficiency Ku-band radial line relativistic klystron amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Fangchao; Zhang, Xiaoping; Zhong, Huihuang; Zhang, Jun; Ju, Jinchuan

    2016-07-01

    To achieve the gigawatt-level microwave amplification output at Ku-band, a radial-line relativistic klystron amplifier is proposed and investigated in this paper. Different from the annular electron beam in conventional axial relativistic klystron amplifiers, a radial-radiated electron beam is employed in this proposed klystron. Owing to its radially spreading speciality, the electron density and space charge effect are markedly weakened during the propagation in the radial line drift tube. Additionally, the power capacity, especially in the output cavity, is enhanced significantly because of its large volume, which is profitable for the long pulse operation. Particle-in-cell simulation results demonstrate that a high power microwave with the power of 3 GW and the frequency of 14.25 GHz is generated with a 500 kV, 12 kA electron beam excitation and the 30 kW radio-frequency signal injection. The power conversion efficiency is 50%, and the gain is about 50 dB. Meanwhile, there is insignificant electron beam self-excitation in the proposed structure by the adoption of two transverse electromagnetic reflectors. The relative phase difference between the injected signals and output microwaves keeps stable after the amplifier saturates.

  19. Suppression of higher mode excitation in a high gain relativistic klystron amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Jin, X.; Li, Z. H.; Tang, C. X.

    2012-02-01

    Suppressing higher mode excitation is very important in the high gain relativistic klystron amplifier because higher mode can seriously degrade klystron performance and cause pulse shortening. The mechanism of higher mode self-excitation is explored in the PIC simulation, and it is shown the coupling between cavities is the main cause of higher mode self-excitation. The coupling forms the positive feedback loop for higher mode to be excited just like that in the oscillator circuit. The formula for startup current of higher mode self-excitation is developed based on the coupling between cavities. And the corresponding methods are taken to avoid higher mode self-excitation. Finally, mode control is realized in the RKA with output power up to 1.02 GW when driven power is only few kilowatts.

  20. Recent experimental results from a long-pulse J-band relativistic klystron amplifier developmental effort

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, K.G.; Crouch, D.D.; Sar, D.R.; Speciale, R.A.; Carlsten, B.E.; Fazio, M.V.; Haynes, W.B.; Stringfield, R.M.

    1994-12-31

    Recent experimental results, supporting simulations, and design modeling are presented from a developmental effort to a produce a long pulse ({approximately}1{mu}s) J-band (5.85-8.2 GHz) relativistic klystron amplifier (RKA) of the high current NRL genealogy. This RKA is designed to operate at approximately 6.6 GHz, with a desired RF output {approximately}700 MW. Conversion of electron beam energy to microwave energy is obtained by a mock magnetically insulated coaxial converter which, in various incarnations, can be made to be either a cavity gap extractor or an inverse cathode.

  1. Investigation of an X-band gigawatt long pulse multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhenbang; Huang, Hua; Lei, Lurong; Jin, Xiao; Zhu, Lei; Wang, Ganping; He, Hu; Wu, Yao; Ge, Yi; Yuan, Huan; Chen, Zhaofu

    2015-09-15

    To achieve a gigawatt-level long pulse radiation power in X-band, a multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier is proposed and studied experimentally. By introducing 18 electron drift tubes and extended interaction cavities, the power capacity of the device is increased. A radiation power of 1.23 GW with efficiency of 41% and amplifier gain of 46 dB is obtained in the particle-in-cell simulation. Under conditions of a 10 Hz repeat frequency and an input RF power of 30 kW, a radiation power of 0.9 GW, frequency of 9.405 GHz, pulse duration of 105 ns, and efficiency of 30% is generated in the experiment, and the amplifier gain is about 45 dB. Both the simulation and the experiment prove that the multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier can generate a long pulse GW-level radiation power in X-band.

  2. Utilization of a Vircator to drive a High Power Relativistic Klystron Amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardelle, J.; Bardy, J.; Cassany, B.; Desanlis, T.; Eyl, P.; Galtié, A.; Modin, P.; Voisin, L.; Balleyguier, P.; Gouard, P.; Donohue, J.

    2002-11-01

    At CESTA, we have been producing electron beams for some fifteen years by using induction accelerators and pulse diodes. First we had performed Frre-Electron Lasers experiments and we are currently studying the production of High-Power microwaves in the S-band. Among the possible sources we have chosen to perform Relativistic Klystron (RK) experiments with a pulse diode capable of generating a 700kV, 15 kA, 100 ns annular electron beam. In an amplifier configuration, we are testing the idea of using a Vircator as the driver for the first cavity of the klystron. This Vircator uses a simple electrical generator (Marx capacitor bank) which operates in the S-band in the GW class. By reducing the power level to about 100 MW, a 200 ns reliable and reproducible input driver pulse is obtained. First, we present the results of a preliminary experiment for which a coaxial cavity has been built in order to be fed by the Vircator emission at 2.45 GHz. Secondly, we give the experimental results in an oscillator configuration which corresponds to the fisrt step of our RK studies. Comparisons with the results of numerical simulations performed with MAGIC and MAFIA will be given for both experiments.

  3. The long-pulse, high-current relativistic klystron at 500 MW and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Fazio, M.V.; Haynes, W.B.; Carlsten, B.E.; Stringfield, R.M.

    1994-10-01

    This paper describes the development of an L-band annular beam, high-current relativistic klystron for producing a peak power of 1 GW at a pulse length of 1 {mu}s. The tube consists of three cavities: the input cavity driven by a 300 kW magnetron, an idler cavity, and an output cavity. The tube has produced 475 MW and an energy per pulse of 160 J. The microwave output pulse terminates prematurely, before the peak power in the electron beam pulse is reached. The pulse shortening is believed to be caused by too high a voltage across the gap of the output cavity. The result is electron reflection in the output gap leading to beam disruption and high voltage breakdown across the gap. Current experimental results are presented with an emphasis on the design of output cavities for coupling microwave power from high current, very low impedance modulated electron beams.

  4. An S-band high gain relativistic klystron amplifier with high phase stability

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Li, Z. H.; Xu, Z.; Ma, Q. S.; Xie, H. Q.

    2014-11-15

    For the purpose of coherent high power microwave combining, an S-band high gain relativistic klystron amplifier with high phase stability is presented and studied. By the aid of 3D particle-in-cell code and circuit simulation software, the mechanism of parasitic oscillation in the device is investigated. And the RF lossy material is adopted in the simulation and experiment to suppress the oscillation. The experimental results show that with an input RF power of 10 kW, a microwave pulse with power of 1.8 GW is generated with a gain of 52.6 dB. And the relative phase difference fluctuation between output microwave and input RF signal is less than ±10° in 90 ns.

  5. Design and analysis of a radio frequency extractor in an S-band relativistic klystron amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Zehai; Zhang Jun; Shu Ting; Qi Zumin

    2012-09-15

    A radio frequency (RF) extractor converts the energy of a strongly modulated intense relativistic electron beam (IREB) into the energy of high power microwave in relativistic klystron amplifier (RKA). In the aim of efficiently extracting the energy of the modulated IREB, a RF extractor with all round coupling structure is proposed. Due to the all round structure, the operating transverse magnetic mode can be established easily and its resonant property can be investigated with an approach of group delay time. Furthermore, the external quality factor can be low enough. The design and analysis of the extractor applied in an S-band RKA are carried out, and the performance of the extractor is validated with three-dimensional (3D) particle-in-cell simulations. The extraction efficiency reaches 27% in the simulation with a totally 3D model of the whole RKA. The primary experiments are also carried out and the results show that the RF extractor with the external quality factor of 7.9 extracted 22% of the beam power and transformed it into the high power microwave. Better results are expected after the parasitic mode between the input and middle cavities is suppressed.

  6. Design and analysis of a radio frequency extractor in an S-band relativistic klystron amplifier.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zehai; Zhang, Jun; Shu, Ting; Qi, Zumin

    2012-09-01

    A radio frequency (RF) extractor converts the energy of a strongly modulated intense relativistic electron beam (IREB) into the energy of high power microwave in relativistic klystron amplifier (RKA). In the aim of efficiently extracting the energy of the modulated IREB, a RF extractor with all round coupling structure is proposed. Due to the all round structure, the operating transverse magnetic mode can be established easily and its resonant property can be investigated with an approach of group delay time. Furthermore, the external quality factor can be low enough. The design and analysis of the extractor applied in an S-band RKA are carried out, and the performance of the extractor is validated with three-dimensional (3D) particle-in-cell simulations. The extraction efficiency reaches 27% in the simulation with a totally 3D model of the whole RKA. The primary experiments are also carried out and the results show that the RF extractor with the external quality factor of 7.9 extracted 22% of the beam power and transformed it into the high power microwave. Better results are expected after the parasitic mode between the input and middle cavities is suppressed. PMID:23020400

  7. Design and analysis of a radio frequency extractor in an S-band relativistic klystron amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zehai; Zhang, Jun; Shu, Ting; Qi, Zumin

    2012-09-01

    A radio frequency (RF) extractor converts the energy of a strongly modulated intense relativistic electron beam (IREB) into the energy of high power microwave in relativistic klystron amplifier (RKA). In the aim of efficiently extracting the energy of the modulated IREB, a RF extractor with all round coupling structure is proposed. Due to the all round structure, the operating transverse magnetic mode can be established easily and its resonant property can be investigated with an approach of group delay time. Furthermore, the external quality factor can be low enough. The design and analysis of the extractor applied in an S-band RKA are carried out, and the performance of the extractor is validated with three-dimensional (3D) particle-in-cell simulations. The extraction efficiency reaches 27% in the simulation with a totally 3D model of the whole RKA. The primary experiments are also carried out and the results show that the RF extractor with the external quality factor of 7.9 extracted 22% of the beam power and transformed it into the high power microwave. Better results are expected after the parasitic mode between the input and middle cavities is suppressed.

  8. A study on the high-order mode oscillation in a four-cavity intense relativistic klystron amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ying-Hui; Niu, Xin-Jian; Jia, Nan; Li, Zheng-Hong; Wang, Hui; Cheng, Hui; Yang, Xiao-Chuan; Duan, Yaoyong

    2016-07-01

    The high-order mode oscillation is studied in designing a four-cavity intense relativistic klystron amplifier. The reason for the oscillation caused by high-order modes and a method to suppress these kinds of spurious modes are found through theoretical analyses and the study on the influence of major parameters of a high frequency structure (such as the oscillation frequency of cavities, the cavity Q value, the length of drift tube section, and the characteristic impedance). Based on much simulation, a four-cavity intense relativistic klystron amplifier with a superior performance has been designed, built, and tested. An output power of 2.22 GW corresponding to 27.4% efficiency and 61 dB gain has been obtained. Moreover, the high-order mode oscillation is suppressed effectively, and an output power of 1.95 GW corresponding to 26% efficiency and 62 dB gain has been obtained in our laboratory.

  9. Experimental study on parasitic mode suppression using FeSiAl in relativistic klystron amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zehai

    2015-03-01

    Experimental study of parasitic mode suppression using electromagnetic attenuate material FeSiAl in an S-band Relativistic Klystron Amplifier (RKA) is presented in this paper. The FeSiAl powder is coated and sintered onto the inner surface of a drift tube which locates between the input and the middle cavity of the RKA. Cold tests show that the attenuate rate of the tube against parasitic mode TE11 is about 50%. Experiments carried out on the Torch-01 accelerator present that the tube is effective in suppressing the parasitic mode. Two typical outputs are obtained. When the diode voltage is on a moderate level, the RKA operates well and the parasitic mode is totally suppressed. The pulse length of the High Power Microwave (HPM) almost equals the electron beam pulse length and the HPM average output power is about 300 MW, with a power efficiency of 10%. When the diode voltage is on a higher level, the output power and efficiency rise but the parasitic mode oscillation occurred and the pulse length is shortened. By contrast, the parasitic mode oscillation is too strong for the RKA to operate normally with un-sintered drift tube. The experimental study implies that FeSiAl is effective in suppressing the parasitic mode oscillation in a certain extent. However, total suppression needs a deeper attenuate rate and further investigation.

  10. Experimental study on parasitic mode suppression using FeSiAl in Relativistic Klystron Amplifier.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zehai

    2015-03-01

    Experimental study of parasitic mode suppression using electromagnetic attenuate material FeSiAl in an S-band Relativistic Klystron Amplifier (RKA) is presented in this paper. The FeSiAl powder is coated and sintered onto the inner surface of a drift tube which locates between the input and the middle cavity of the RKA. Cold tests show that the attenuate rate of the tube against parasitic mode TE11 is about 50%. Experiments carried out on the Torch-01 accelerator present that the tube is effective in suppressing the parasitic mode. Two typical outputs are obtained. When the diode voltage is on a moderate level, the RKA operates well and the parasitic mode is totally suppressed. The pulse length of the High Power Microwave (HPM) almost equals the electron beam pulse length and the HPM average output power is about 300 MW, with a power efficiency of 10%. When the diode voltage is on a higher level, the output power and efficiency rise but the parasitic mode oscillation occurred and the pulse length is shortened. By contrast, the parasitic mode oscillation is too strong for the RKA to operate normally with un-sintered drift tube. The experimental study implies that FeSiAl is effective in suppressing the parasitic mode oscillation in a certain extent. However, total suppression needs a deeper attenuate rate and further investigation. PMID:25832258

  11. Factors influencing the microwave pulse duration in a klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao Renzhen; Zhang Xiaowei; Zhang Ligang; Li Xiaoze; Zhang Lijun

    2012-07-15

    In this paper, we analyze the factors that affect the microwave pulse duration in a klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO), including the diode voltage, the guiding magnetic field, the electron beam collector, the extraction cavity, and the gap between the electron beam and the slow wave structure (SWS). The results show that the microwave pulse duration increases with the diode voltage until breakdown occurs on the surface of the extraction cavity. The pulse duration at low guiding magnetic field is generally 5-10 ns smaller than that at high magnetic field due to the asymmetric electron emission and the larger energy spread of the electron beam. The electron beam collector can affect the microwave pulse duration significantly because of the anode plasma generated by bombardment of the electron beam on the collector surface. The introduction of the extraction cavity only slightly changes the pulse duration. The decrease of the gap between the electron beam and the SWS can increase the microwave pulse duration greatly.

  12. Experimental study of a low radio frequency power driven relativistic klystron amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhenghong

    2010-02-15

    Using particle in cell simulation codes, a low radio frequency (rf) power driven relativistic klystron amplifier is designed according to the beam with current of 7.5 kA and voltage of 750 kV with special measures to avoid the mode competition. Simulated power reaches 1.7 GW when the driven rf power is 7.0 kW, the corresponding gain is 53.9 dB. Also the experiment is carried out on a telsa-typed accelerator, whose beam is with current of 8 kA and voltage of 800 kV. The measured rf output power reaches 2.04 GW in the experiment when the input rf power is 62 kW and frequency 2.850 GHz, the corresponding gain is 45.1 dB and efficiency is 32%. The maximum gain reaches 46.7 dB when the input decreases to 39 kW, the corresponding output rf power is 1.84 GW.

  13. Experimental study on parasitic mode suppression using FeSiAl in relativistic klystron amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zehai

    2015-03-15

    Experimental study of parasitic mode suppression using electromagnetic attenuate material FeSiAl in an S-band Relativistic Klystron Amplifier (RKA) is presented in this paper. The FeSiAl powder is coated and sintered onto the inner surface of a drift tube which locates between the input and the middle cavity of the RKA. Cold tests show that the attenuate rate of the tube against parasitic mode TE{sub 11} is about 50%. Experiments carried out on the Torch-01 accelerator present that the tube is effective in suppressing the parasitic mode. Two typical outputs are obtained. When the diode voltage is on a moderate level, the RKA operates well and the parasitic mode is totally suppressed. The pulse length of the High Power Microwave (HPM) almost equals the electron beam pulse length and the HPM average output power is about 300 MW, with a power efficiency of 10%. When the diode voltage is on a higher level, the output power and efficiency rise but the parasitic mode oscillation occurred and the pulse length is shortened. By contrast, the parasitic mode oscillation is too strong for the RKA to operate normally with un-sintered drift tube. The experimental study implies that FeSiAl is effective in suppressing the parasitic mode oscillation in a certain extent. However, total suppression needs a deeper attenuate rate and further investigation.

  14. An X-band high-impedance relativistic klystron amplifier with an annular explosive cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Danni; Zhang, Jun; Zhong, Huihuang; Qi, Zumin

    2015-11-01

    The feasibility of employing an annular beam instead of a solid one in the X-band high-impedance relativistic klystron amplifier (RKA) is investigated in theory and simulation. Small-signal theory analysis indicates that the optimum bunching distance, fundamental current modulation depth, beam-coupling coefficient, and beam-loaded quality factor of annular beams are all larger than the corresponding parameters of solid beams at the same beam voltage and current. An annular beam RKA and a solid beam RKA with almost the same geometric parameters are compared in particle-in-cell simulation. Output microwave power of 100 MW, gain of 50 dB, and power conversion efficiency of 42% are obtained in an annular beam RKA. The annular beam needs a 15% lower uniform guiding magnetic field than the solid beam. Our investigations demonstrate that we are able to use a simple annular explosive cathode immersed in a lower uniform magnetic field instead of a solid thermionic cathode in a complicated partially shielding magnetic field for designing high-impedance RKA, which avoids high temperature requirement, complicated electron-optical system, large area convergence, high current density, and emission uniformity for the solid beam. An equivalent method for the annular beam and the solid beam on bunching features is proposed and agrees with the simulation. The annular beam has the primary advantages over the solid beam that it can employ the immersing uniform magnetic field avoiding the complicated shielding magnetic field system and needs a lower optimum guiding field due to the smaller space charge effect.

  15. An X-band high-impedance relativistic klystron amplifier with an annular explosive cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Danni; Zhang, Jun Zhong, Huihuang; Qi, Zumin

    2015-11-15

    The feasibility of employing an annular beam instead of a solid one in the X-band high-impedance relativistic klystron amplifier (RKA) is investigated in theory and simulation. Small-signal theory analysis indicates that the optimum bunching distance, fundamental current modulation depth, beam-coupling coefficient, and beam-loaded quality factor of annular beams are all larger than the corresponding parameters of solid beams at the same beam voltage and current. An annular beam RKA and a solid beam RKA with almost the same geometric parameters are compared in particle-in-cell simulation. Output microwave power of 100 MW, gain of 50 dB, and power conversion efficiency of 42% are obtained in an annular beam RKA. The annular beam needs a 15% lower uniform guiding magnetic field than the solid beam. Our investigations demonstrate that we are able to use a simple annular explosive cathode immersed in a lower uniform magnetic field instead of a solid thermionic cathode in a complicated partially shielding magnetic field for designing high-impedance RKA, which avoids high temperature requirement, complicated electron-optical system, large area convergence, high current density, and emission uniformity for the solid beam. An equivalent method for the annular beam and the solid beam on bunching features is proposed and agrees with the simulation. The annular beam has the primary advantages over the solid beam that it can employ the immersing uniform magnetic field avoiding the complicated shielding magnetic field system and needs a lower optimum guiding field due to the smaller space charge effect.

  16. Three-dimensional relativistic field-electron interaction in a multicavity high-power klystron. Part 2: Working Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmahl, H. G.

    1982-01-01

    A high power multicavity klystron amplifier was designed and a computation package containing all equations and procedures needed is presented. The rigorously derived three dimensional relativistic axisymmetric equations of motion are used to compute the bunched current and the induced RF gap voltage for all interaction cavities except the input and second cavities, where the linear space charge wave theory data are employed in order to reduce the computation time. Both distance step and time step integration methods are used to compute the Fourier coefficients of both the beam current and induced current.

  17. Gigawatt peak power generation in a relativistic klystron amplifier driven by 1 kW seed-power

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Xie, H. Q.; Li, Z. H.; Zhang, Y. J.; Ma, Q. S.

    2013-11-15

    An S-band high gain relativistic klystron amplifier driven by kW-level RF power is proposed and studied experimentally. In the device, the RF lossy material is introduced to suppress higher mode excitation. An output power of 1.95 GW with a gain of 62.8 dB is obtained in the simulation. Under conditions of an input RF power of 1.38 kW, a microwave pulse with power of 1.9 GW, frequency of 2.86 GHz, and duration of 105 ns is generated in the experiment, and the corresponding gain is 61.4 dB.

  18. Mechanism of phase control in a klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator by an input signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Renzhen; Song, Zhimin; Deng, Yuqun; Chen, Changhua

    2014-09-01

    Theoretical analyses and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations are carried out to understand the mechanism of microwave phase control realized by the external RF signal in a klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO). Theoretical calculations show that a modulated electron beam can lead the microwave field with an arbitrary initial phase to the same equilibrium phase, which is determined by the phase factor of the modulated current, and the difference between them is fixed. Furthermore, PIC simulations demonstrate that the phase of input signal has a close relation to that of modulated current, which initiates the phase of the irregularly microwave during the build-up of oscillation. Since the microwave field is weak during the early time of starting oscillation, it is easy to be induced, and a small input signal is sufficient to control the phase of output microwave. For the klystron-like RBWO with two pre-modulation cavities and a reentrant input cavity, an input signal with 100 kW power and 4.21 GHz frequency can control the phase of 5 GW output microwave with relative phase difference less than 6% when the diode voltage is 760 kV, and beam current is 9.8 kA, corresponding to a power ratio of output microwave to input signal of 47 dB.

  19. Mechanism of phase control in a klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator by an input signal

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Renzhen; Song, Zhimin; Deng, Yuqun; Chen, Changhua

    2014-09-15

    Theoretical analyses and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations are carried out to understand the mechanism of microwave phase control realized by the external RF signal in a klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO). Theoretical calculations show that a modulated electron beam can lead the microwave field with an arbitrary initial phase to the same equilibrium phase, which is determined by the phase factor of the modulated current, and the difference between them is fixed. Furthermore, PIC simulations demonstrate that the phase of input signal has a close relation to that of modulated current, which initiates the phase of the irregularly microwave during the build-up of oscillation. Since the microwave field is weak during the early time of starting oscillation, it is easy to be induced, and a small input signal is sufficient to control the phase of output microwave. For the klystron-like RBWO with two pre-modulation cavities and a reentrant input cavity, an input signal with 100 kW power and 4.21 GHz frequency can control the phase of 5 GW output microwave with relative phase difference less than 6% when the diode voltage is 760 kV, and beam current is 9.8 kA, corresponding to a power ratio of output microwave to input signal of 47 dB.

  20. Improved power capacity in a high efficiency klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator by distributed energy extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Renzhen; Chen, Changhua; Cao, Yibing; Sun, Jun

    2013-12-07

    With the efficiency increase of a klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator, the maximum axial electric field and harmonic current simultaneously appear at the end of the beam-wave interaction region, leading to a highly centralized energy exchange in the dual-cavity extractor and a very high electric field on the cavity surface. Thus, we present a method of distributed energy extraction in this kind of devices. Particle-in-cell simulations show that with the microwave power of 5.1 GW and efficiency of 70%, the maximum axial electric field is decreased from 2.26 MV/cm to 1.28 MV/cm, indicating a threefold increase in the power capacity.

  1. A high-efficiency overmoded klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator with low guiding magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao Renzhen; Tan Weibing; Li Xiaoze; Song Zhimin; Sun Jun; Chen Changhua

    2012-09-15

    A klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator with a ratio of transverse dimension to free-space wavelength being about four is presented. In the beam-wave interaction region, the electron beam interacts with surface wave and volume wave simultaneously. The cathode holder plays an important role in the reflection of backward waves. A guard electrode, an electron collector ring, and a reflection ring are used to optimize the beam-wave interaction. The particle in cell simulation results reveal that microwaves with a power of 2 GW and a frequency of 12.3 GHz are generated with an efficiency of 42% when the diode voltage is 400 kV, the beam current 12 kA, and the magnetic field 0.48 T.

  2. Three-dimensional relativistic field-electron interaction in a multicavity high-power klystron. 1: Basic theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmahl, H. G.

    1982-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of three dimensional relativistic klystron action is described. The relativistic axisymmetric equations of motion are derived from the time-dependent Lagrangian function for a charged particle in electromagnetic fields. An analytical expression of the fringing RF electric and magnetic fields within and in the vicinity of the interaction gap and the space-charge forces between axially and radially elastic deformable rings of charges are both included in the formulation. This makes an accurate computation of electron motion through the tunnel of the cavities and the drift tube spaces possible. Method of analysis is based on Lagrangian formulation. Bunching is computed using a disk model of electron stream in which the electron stream is divided into axisymmetric disks of equal charge and each disk is assumed to consist of a number of concentric rings of equal charges. The Individual representative groups of electrons are followed through the interaction gaps and drift tube spaces. Induced currents and voltages in interacting cavities are calculated by invoking the Shockley-Ramo theorem.

  3. A second report on the experimental progress of the one microsecond, one kilojoule per pulse L-band relativistic klystron at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, W.B.; Carlsten, B.E.; Faehl, R.J.; Fazio, M.V.; Kwan, T.J.T.; Stringfield, R.M.

    1994-02-01

    Work is continuing on a high-current relativistic klystron amplifier (RKA) with the goal of producing 1 kJ per pulse with a 1 {mu}s pulsewidth and a peak power of 1 GW. The three cavity tube has already produced pulses with more than 150 J and over 450 MW peak power. The original output cavity was thought to be limiting the performance, and a new cavity has been designed, built, and is now on-line and being conditioned up towards high power. Current experimental results are presented.

  4. System parameters germane to relativistic klystron amplifiers: how the utility of pulse energy depends on pulse duration, the target, and the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, John M.

    1994-05-01

    Relativistic klystron amplifiers (RKAs) at a variety of carrier wavelengths and pulse durations appear feasible to supply microwave pulses to an array of antennas acting as a beam weapon against targets at or above 100 km in altitude. In order to avoid voltage breakdown in the atmosphere, the array area must be large enough to converge the beam, producing a higher energy flux on target than at intermediate altitudes susceptible to breakdown. The area required depends on the physics of atmospheric ionization and on the pulse duration and the carrier wavelength of the RKA. A quantitative statement of the dependence of array area on relevant parameters is presented. The energy per RKA pulse that is usable without delay lines is determined here as a function of RKA pulse duration and wavelength. Changing the pulse length from 160 ns to 1 microsecond(s) and shortening the wavelength raise the energy usable without delay lines by a factor of 1000.

  5. Development status of an intense beam klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, P.D.; Lemke, R.W.; Hendricks, K.J.; Arman, M.J.; Bowers, L.A.

    1994-10-01

    Investigations are being performed on a high current (16 kA), mildly relativistic (400kV), L-band klystron source. Experiments are in an early stage, and thus far have progressed to beam modulation studies. This paper discusses general klystron design considerations, beam propagation results, initial modulation results, and various extraction techniques being considered.

  6. Halo formation in high-power klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Pakter, R.; Chen, C.

    1999-07-01

    Beam losses and radio-frequency (rf) pulse shortening are important issues in the development of high-power microwave (HPM) sources such as high-power klystrons and relativistic magnetrons. In this paper, the authors explore the formation and characteristics of halos around intense relativistic electron beams in a Periodic Permanent Magnet focusing klystron as well as in a uniform solenoidal focusing klystron. A self-consistent electrostatic model is used to investigate intense relativistic electron beam transport as an rf field induced mismatch between the electron beam and the focusing field develops. To model the effect of such mismatch in the PPM klystron experiment, they initialize the beam with an envelope mismatch. For zero canonical angular momentum and an initial mismatch of 100 percent, for example, the preliminary results show halo particles with a maximum radius extending up to several core radii at the rf output section. Transient effects and the influence of finite canonical angular momentum are being studied.

  7. Prospects for a soft x-ray FEL powered by a relativistic-klystron high-gradient accelerator (RK-HGA)

    SciTech Connect

    Shay, H.D.; Barletta, W.A.; Yu, S.S.; Schlueter, R.; Deis, G.A.

    1989-09-28

    We present here the concept of x-ray FELs using high gain, single-pass amplifiers with electron beams accelerated in high gradient structures powered by relativistic klystrons. Other authors have also considered x-ray FELs; the unique aspect of this paper is the use of high gradient acceleration. One of the authors has previously presented preliminary studies on this concept. The intent in this paper is to display the results of a top level design study on a high gain FEL, to present its sensitivity to a variety of fabrication and tuning errors, to discuss several mechanisms for increasing gain yet more, and to present explicitly the output characteristics of such an FEL. The philosophy of the design study is to find a plausible operating point which employs existing or nearly existing state-of-the-art technologies while minimizing the accelerator and wiggler lengths. The notion is to distribute the technical risk as evenly as possible over the several technologies so that each must advance only slightly in order to make this design feasible. This study entailed no systematic investigation of possible costs so that, for example, the sole criterion for balancing the trade-off between beam energy and wiggler length is that the two components have comparable lengths. 20 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Phase locking of an S-band wide-gap klystron amplifier with high power injection driven by a relativistic backward wave oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Bai Xianchen; Zhang Jiande; Yang Jianhua; Jin Zhenxing

    2012-12-15

    Theoretical analyses and preliminary experiments on the phase-locking characteristics of an inductively loaded 2-cavity wide-gap klystron amplifier (WKA) with high power injection driven by a GW-class relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO) are presented. Electric power of the amplifier and oscillator is supplied by a single accelerator being capable of producing dual electron beams. The well phase-locking effect of the RBWO-WKA system requires the oscillator have good frequency reproducibility and stability from pulse to pulse. Thus, the main switch of the accelerator is externally triggered to stabilize the diode voltage and then the working frequency. In the experiment, frequency of the WKA is linearly locked by the RBWO. With a diode voltage of 530 kV and an input power of {approx}22 MW, an output power of {approx}230 MW with the power gain of {approx}10.2 dB is obtained from the WKA. As the main switch is triggered, the relative phase difference between the RBWO and the WKA is less than {+-}15 Degree-Sign in a single shot, and phase jitter of {+-}11 Degree-Sign is obtained within a series of shots with duration of about 40 ns.

  9. Phase locking of an S-band wide-gap klystron amplifier with high power injection driven by a relativistic backward wave oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xianchen; Zhang, Jiande; Yang, Jianhua; Jin, Zhenxing

    2012-12-01

    Theoretical analyses and preliminary experiments on the phase-locking characteristics of an inductively loaded 2-cavity wide-gap klystron amplifier (WKA) with high power injection driven by a GW-class relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO) are presented. Electric power of the amplifier and oscillator is supplied by a single accelerator being capable of producing dual electron beams. The well phase-locking effect of the RBWO-WKA system requires the oscillator have good frequency reproducibility and stability from pulse to pulse. Thus, the main switch of the accelerator is externally triggered to stabilize the diode voltage and then the working frequency. In the experiment, frequency of the WKA is linearly locked by the RBWO. With a diode voltage of 530 kV and an input power of ˜22 MW, an output power of ˜230 MW with the power gain of ˜10.2 dB is obtained from the WKA. As the main switch is triggered, the relative phase difference between the RBWO and the WKA is less than ±15° in a single shot, and phase jitter of ±11° is obtained within a series of shots with duration of about 40 ns.

  10. Design and 3D simulation of a two-cavity wide-gap relativistic klystron amplifier with high power injection

    SciTech Connect

    Bai Xianchen; Yang Jianhua; Zhang Jiande

    2012-08-15

    By using an electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) code, an S-band two-cavity wide-gap klystron amplifier (WKA) loaded with washers/rods structure is designed and investigated for high power injection application. Influences of the washers/rods structure on the high frequency characteristics and the basic operation of the amplifier are presented. Generally, the rod structure has great impacts on the space-charge potential depression and the resonant frequency of the cavities. Nevertheless, if only the resonant frequency is tuned to the desired operation frequency, effects of the rod size on the basic operation of the amplifier are expected to be very weak. The 3-dimension (3-D) PIC simulation results show an output power of 0.98 GW corresponding to an efficiency of 33% for the WKA, with a 594 keV, 5 kA electron beam guided by an external magnetic field of 1.5 Tesla. Moreover, if a conductive plane is placed near the output gap, such as the electron collector, the beam potential energy can be further released, and the RF power can be increased to about 1.07 GW with the conversion efficiency of about 36%.

  11. Design and 3D simulation of a two-cavity wide-gap relativistic klystron amplifier with high power injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xianchen; Yang, Jianhua; Zhang, Jiande

    2012-08-01

    By using an electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) code, an S-band two-cavity wide-gap klystron amplifier (WKA) loaded with washers/rods structure is designed and investigated for high power injection application. Influences of the washers/rods structure on the high frequency characteristics and the basic operation of the amplifier are presented. Generally, the rod structure has great impacts on the space-charge potential depression and the resonant frequency of the cavities. Nevertheless, if only the resonant frequency is tuned to the desired operation frequency, effects of the rod size on the basic operation of the amplifier are expected to be very weak. The 3-dimension (3-D) PIC simulation results show an output power of 0.98 GW corresponding to an efficiency of 33% for the WKA, with a 594 keV, 5 kA electron beam guided by an external magnetic field of 1.5 Tesla. Moreover, if a conductive plane is placed near the output gap, such as the electron collector, the beam potential energy can be further released, and the RF power can be increased to about 1.07 GW with the conversion efficiency of about 36%.

  12. Multibeam klystron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vancil, Bernard K. (Inventor); Wintucky, Edwin G. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A multibeam, electrostatically focused klystron includes a plurality of conductive members, ones of which are recessed to provide input and output sections of microwave cavities, wherein focusing voltage is applied between those sections. The conductive members are either spaced along the path of multiple beams, or stacked in insulated relation, in either case being supported by glass rods within a glass envelope.

  13. Optical klystron SASE at FERMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penco, G.; Allaria, E. M.; De Ninno, G.; Ferrari, E.; Giannessi, L.

    2015-05-01

    The optical klystron enhancement to a self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free electron laser (FEL) has been deeply studied in theory and in simulations. In this FEL scheme, a relativistic electron beam passes through two undulators, separated by a dispersive section. The latter converts the electron-beam energy modulation produced in the first undulator in density modulation, thus enhancing the free-electron laser gain. We report the first experiment that has been carried out at the FERMI facility in Trieste, of enhancement to a SASE FEL by using the optical klystron scheme. XUV photons have been produced with an intensity several orders of magnitude larger than in pure SASE mode. The impact of the uncorrelated energy spread of the electron beam on the optical klystron SASE performance has been also investigated.

  14. Triggering Klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan, Kelton D.; /Purdue U. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    To determine if klystrons will perform to the specifications of the LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source) project, a new digital trigger controller is needed for the Klystron/Microwave Department Test Laboratory. The controller needed to be programmed and Windows based user interface software needed to be written to interface with the device over a USB (Universal Serial Bus). Programming the device consisted of writing logic in VHDL (VHSIC (Very High Speed Integrated Circuits) hardware description language), and the Windows interface software was written in C++. Xilinx ISE (Integrated Software Environment) was used to compile the VHDL code and program the device, and Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 was used to compile the C++ based Windows software. The device was programmed in such a way as to easily allow read/write operations to it using a simple addressing model, and Windows software was developed to interface with the device over a USB connection. A method of setting configuration registers in the trigger device is absolutely necessary to the development of a new triggering system, and the method developed will fulfill this need adequately. More work is needed before the new trigger system is ready for use. The configuration registers in the device need to be fully integrated with the logic that will generate the RF signals, and this system will need to be tested extensively to determine if it meets the requirements for low noise trigger outputs.

  15. Theoretical examination of transfer cavities in a standing-wave free- electron laser Two-Beam Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Govil, R.; Sessler, A.

    1993-01-01

    Recent analysis of the Two-Beam Accelerator (TBA) by Wurtele, Whittum and Sessler has shown that the transfer cavities, both in the relativistic klystron version (RK/TBA) and the standing-wave free-electron laser version (SWFEL/TBA), can be characterized by a simple coupling impedance. In the two cases the radiation process is very similar: Only the modes that couple to the electron beam are different. As a result, computer programs that are able to handle realistic cavities (with beam ports and coupling ports, etc.) can be employed to evaluate the performance of either version of the TBA. We have employed the code URMEL to study the proper coupling impedance for a number of realistic cavities for a SWFEL.

  16. Two-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Selph, F.B.

    1984-09-01

    In the two-beam accelerator (TBA) concept, an electron linear accelerator structure is established in which two beams propagate. One is an intense low energy beam that is made to undergo free electron lasing to produce microwaves. These microwaves are then coupled to another part of the structure where they act to produce a high longitudinal electric gradient that is used to accelerate a second relatively low intensity electron beam to very high energies. The TBA was originally suggested by Sessler as a possible means for economically achieving linear collider energies of 100 GeV and above. Although still in a conceptual stage, the TBA is an inherently plausible concept that combines the free electron laser (FEL) with several well-known technologies - high current induction linacs, microwave waveguides, and traveling-wave linac structures - in a novel and interesting way. Two characteristics of the TBA that make it a particularly suitable candidate for achieving high energies are its ability to operate at higher frequencies than typical present-day linacs (say 30 GHz as compared with 3 GHz), and to be an efficient means for delivering power to a hitherto unattainable high-gradient structure (say 250 MV/m) that the higher frequency makes possible. These high accelerating gradients will permit much shorter linac structures for a given energy.

  17. Klystron-linac combination

    DOEpatents

    Stein, W.E.

    1980-04-24

    A combination klystron-linear accelerator which utilizes anti-bunch electrons generated in the klystron section as a source of electrons to be accelerated in the accelerator section. Electron beam current is controlled by second harmonic bunching, constrictor aperture size and magnetic focusing. Rf coupling is achieved by internal and external coupling.

  18. Towards coherent combining of X-band high power microwaves: phase-locked long pulse radiations by a relativistic triaxial klystron amplifier

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Jinchuan; Zhang, Jun; Qi, Zumin; Yang, Jianhua; Shu, Ting; Zhang, Jiande; Zhong, Huihuang

    2016-01-01

    The radio-frequency breakdown due to ultrahigh electric field strength essentially limits power handling capability of an individual high power microwave (HPM) generator, and this issue becomes more challenging for high frequency bands. Coherent power combining therefore provides an alternative approach to achieve an equivalent peak power of the order of ∼100 GW, which consequently provides opportunities to explore microwave related physics at extremes. The triaxial klystron amplifier (TKA) is a promising candidate for coherent power combing in high frequency bands owing to its intrinsic merit of high power capacity, nevertheless phase-locked long pulse radiation from TKA has not yet been obtained experimentally as the coaxial structure of TKA can easily lead to self-excitation of parasitic modes. In this paper, we present investigations into an X-band TKA capable of producing 1.1 GW HPMs with pulse duration of about 103 ns at the frequency of 9.375 GHz in experiment. Furthermore, the shot-to-shot fluctuation standard deviation of the phase shifts between the input and output microwaves is demonstrated to be less than 10°. The reported achievements open up prospects for accomplishing coherent power combining of X-band HPMs in the near future, and might also excite new development interests concerning high frequency TKAs. PMID:27481661

  19. Towards coherent combining of X-band high power microwaves: phase-locked long pulse radiations by a relativistic triaxial klystron amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Jinchuan; Zhang, Jun; Qi, Zumin; Yang, Jianhua; Shu, Ting; Zhang, Jiande; Zhong, Huihuang

    2016-08-01

    The radio-frequency breakdown due to ultrahigh electric field strength essentially limits power handling capability of an individual high power microwave (HPM) generator, and this issue becomes more challenging for high frequency bands. Coherent power combining therefore provides an alternative approach to achieve an equivalent peak power of the order of ∼100 GW, which consequently provides opportunities to explore microwave related physics at extremes. The triaxial klystron amplifier (TKA) is a promising candidate for coherent power combing in high frequency bands owing to its intrinsic merit of high power capacity, nevertheless phase-locked long pulse radiation from TKA has not yet been obtained experimentally as the coaxial structure of TKA can easily lead to self-excitation of parasitic modes. In this paper, we present investigations into an X-band TKA capable of producing 1.1 GW HPMs with pulse duration of about 103 ns at the frequency of 9.375 GHz in experiment. Furthermore, the shot-to-shot fluctuation standard deviation of the phase shifts between the input and output microwaves is demonstrated to be less than 10°. The reported achievements open up prospects for accomplishing coherent power combining of X-band HPMs in the near future, and might also excite new development interests concerning high frequency TKAs.

  20. Towards coherent combining of X-band high power microwaves: phase-locked long pulse radiations by a relativistic triaxial klystron amplifier.

    PubMed

    Ju, Jinchuan; Zhang, Jun; Qi, Zumin; Yang, Jianhua; Shu, Ting; Zhang, Jiande; Zhong, Huihuang

    2016-01-01

    The radio-frequency breakdown due to ultrahigh electric field strength essentially limits power handling capability of an individual high power microwave (HPM) generator, and this issue becomes more challenging for high frequency bands. Coherent power combining therefore provides an alternative approach to achieve an equivalent peak power of the order of ∼100 GW, which consequently provides opportunities to explore microwave related physics at extremes. The triaxial klystron amplifier (TKA) is a promising candidate for coherent power combing in high frequency bands owing to its intrinsic merit of high power capacity, nevertheless phase-locked long pulse radiation from TKA has not yet been obtained experimentally as the coaxial structure of TKA can easily lead to self-excitation of parasitic modes. In this paper, we present investigations into an X-band TKA capable of producing 1.1 GW HPMs with pulse duration of about 103 ns at the frequency of 9.375 GHz in experiment. Furthermore, the shot-to-shot fluctuation standard deviation of the phase shifts between the input and output microwaves is demonstrated to be less than 10°. The reported achievements open up prospects for accomplishing coherent power combining of X-band HPMs in the near future, and might also excite new development interests concerning high frequency TKAs. PMID:27481661

  1. Mean life of klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Sands, M.

    1985-10-30

    It would be useful to have the best possible estimate of this mean life-time of our new klystrons based on the most recent, available operating experience. A simple formula is given for this best estimate, based on the maximum likelihood method. This method also provides an indication of the reliability of the estimated lifetime. The results given here apply uniquely to a uniform klystron population for which we can assume that deaths occur randomly, and independently of the previous history (operating time) of any one klystron.

  2. METHOD FOR STABILIZING KLYSTRONS

    DOEpatents

    Magnuson, D.W.; Smith, D.F.

    1959-04-14

    High-frequency oscillators for the generation of microwaves, particularly a system for stabilizing frequency-modulated klystron oscillators of the reflex type, are described. The system takos advantage of the fact that a change in oscillator frequency will alter the normal phase displacement between the cavity and its modulator, creating an error voltage which is utilized to regulate the frequency of the oscillator and stabilize it.

  3. Klystron equalization for RF feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Corredoura, P.

    1993-01-01

    The next generation of colliding beam storage rings support higher luminosities by significantly increasing the number of bunches and decreasing the spacing between respective bunches. The heavy beam loading requires large RF cavity detuning which drives several lower coupled bunch modes very strongly. One technique which has proven to be very successful in reducing the coupled bunch mode driving impedance is RF feedback around the klystron-cavity combination. The gain and bandwidth of the feedback loop is limited by the group delay around the feedback loop. Existing klystrons on the world market have not been optimized for this application and contribute a large portion of the total loop group delay. This paper describes a technique to reduce klystron group delay by adding an equalizing filter to the klystron RF drive. Such a filter was built and tested on a 500 kill klystron as part of the on going PEP-II R D effort here at SLAC.

  4. Klystron equalization for RF feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Corredoura, P.

    1993-01-01

    The next generation of colliding beam storage rings support higher luminosities by significantly increasing the number of bunches and decreasing the spacing between respective bunches. The heavy beam loading requires large RF cavity detuning which drives several lower coupled bunch modes very strongly. One technique which has proven to be very successful in reducing the coupled bunch mode driving impedance is RF feedback around the klystron-cavity combination. The gain and bandwidth of the feedback loop is limited by the group delay around the feedback loop. Existing klystrons on the world market have not been optimized for this application and contribute a large portion of the total loop group delay. This paper describes a technique to reduce klystron group delay by adding an equalizing filter to the klystron RF drive. Such a filter was built and tested on a 500 kill klystron as part of the on going PEP-II R&D effort here at SLAC.

  5. Effects of angular misalignment on optical klystron undulator radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, G.; Prakash, Bramh; Gehlot, Mona

    2015-11-01

    In this paper ,we analyze the important effects of optical klystron undulator radiation with an angular offset of the relativistic electron beam in the second undulator section. An anlytical expression for the undulator radiation is obtained through a transparent and simple procedure.It is shown that the effects of the angular offset is more severe for longer undulator lengths and with higher dispersive field strengths.Both these effects are less pronounced for undulators with large K values.

  6. The Triaxial Klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Pasour, J.; Smithe, D.; Friedman, M.

    1999-05-01

    We describe a high-power, annular beam klystron, the Triaxial Klystron, that promises high efficiency at GW power levels and frequencies up to X band. Higher frequency operation should be possible at reduced power levels. The device consists of a thin annular electron beam propagating in an annular drift region, with cavity structures located inside and outside the beam. So long as the width of the drift region is less than half a wavelength (to cut off TM modes), the beam diameter can be as large as necessary to accommodate the required current and to reduce the RF surface fields to tolerable levels. Beam transport and stability are also facilitated in the annular channel. Simulations at X-band (using MRC{close_quote}s particle-in-cell code, MAGIC) show strong beam bunching and efficient energy extraction from specially designed radial cavity structures. Initial experiments at the Naval Research Laboratory have demonstrated transport of a 16-kA, 400-keV beam over a distance of {approximately}1 m with no evidence of instability or asymmetry. Strong bunching of such a beam has been produced at X band using a coaxially-driven input cavity and a multi-gap buncher cavity structure. The peak-to-peak modulated current amplitude from this simple structure exceeds the injected current amplitude and is stable throughout the 150 nsec pulse. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. One-dimensional disk model simulation for klystron design

    SciTech Connect

    Yonezawa, H.; Okazaki, Y.

    1984-05-01

    In 1982, one of the authors (Okazaki), of Toshiba Corporation, wrote a one-dimensional, rigid-disk model computer program <1> to serve as a reliable design tool for the 150 MW klystron development project. This is an introductory note for the users of this program. While reviewing the so-called disk programs presently available, hypotheses such as gridded interaction gaps, a linear relation between phase and position, and so on, were found. These hypotheses bring serious limitations and uncertainties into the computational results. JPNDISK was developed to eliminate these defects, to follow the equations of motion as rigorously as possible, and to obtain self-consistent solutions for the gap voltages and the electron motion. Although some inaccuracy may be present in the relativistic region, JPNDISK, in its present form, seems a most suitable tool for klystron design; it is both easy and inexpensive to use.

  8. Klystron beam-bunching lecture

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.

    1996-10-01

    Electron beam current modulation in a klystron is the key phenomenon that accounts for klystron gain and rf power generation. Current modulation results from the beams` interaction with the rf fields in a cavity, and in turn is responsible for driving modulation in the next rf cavity. To understand the impact of the current modulation in a klystron, we have to understand both the mechanism leading to the generation of the current modulation and the interaction of a current-modulated electron beam with an rf cavity. The cavity interaction is subtle, because the fields in the cavity modify the bunching of the beam within the cavity itself (usually very dramatically). We will establish the necessary formalism to understand klystron bunching phenomena which can be used to describe rf accelerator cavity/beam interactions. This formalism is strictly steady-state; no transient behavior will be considered. In particular, we will discuss the following: general description of klystron operation; beam harmonic current; how beam velocity modulation induced by an rf cavity leads to current modulation in both the ballistic and space-charge dominated regimes; use of Ramo`s theorem to define the power transfer between a bunched electron beam and the cavity; general cavity model with external coupling (including an external generator if needed), used to describe the input cavity, idler cavities, and the output cavity, including the definition of beam loaded-cavity impedance. Although all these are conceptually straight-forward, they represent a fair amount of physics, and to derive some elements of the formalism from first principles requires excessive steps. Our approach will be to present a self-consistent set of equations to provide a mechanism that leads to a quantifiable description of klystron behavior; derivations for moderately complex formulas will be outlined, and a relatively complex derivation of the self-consistent set of equations can be found in the Appendix. 6 figs.

  9. High power radial klystron oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Arman, M.J.

    1995-11-01

    The advantages of the radial klystron amplifier over the conventional klystron amplifier have been reported by Arman et al. Briefly, the radial structure of this design allows for much smaller impedances and thus higher power, the beam-cavity coupling is stronger because the beam travels inside the cavity, and the source is much more compact because there is no need for external magnetic fields. Here the author reports on possible advantages of the radial klystron oscillator over the radial klystron amplifier. The amplifying nature of certain HPM sources is often mandated by the requirement for synchronization and phase-locking of a number of sources in specific applications. In situations where amplification is solely adhered to for the purpose of achieving higher powers, the oscillator will be a better choice if a mechanism can be found to grow the desired mode at the required frequency. By switching to the oscillator mode there will be no need for priming the cavity or maintaining the phase. This simplifies the design and reduces the operational and maintenance cost of the source. Here he reports that an oscillator version of the radial klystron is possible and in fact more suitable for many applications. The mechanism for exciting and growing the mode will be transit-time effects thus providing all the beneficial features of the transit-time oscillators. The complications due to the presence of thin foils in the radial design still persist and will be dealt with in subsequent works. Numerical simulations using the PIC codes MAGIC and SOS indicate the radial klystron oscillator is a viable and efficient means of rf generation.

  10. Sheet Beam Klystron Instability Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K.L.F.; Jensen, A.; Li, Z.; Stupakov, G.; Adolphsen, C.; /SLAC

    2009-05-08

    Using the principle of energy balance we develop a 2D theory for calculating growth rates of instability in a two-cavity model of a sheet beam klystron. An important ingredient is a TE-like mode in the gap that also gives a longitudinal kick to the beam. When compared with a self-consistent particle-in-cell calculation, with sheet beam klystron-type parameters, agreement is quite good up to half the design current, 65 A; at full current, however, other, current-dependent effects come in and the results deviate significantly.

  11. High power W-band klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Caryotakis, George; Scheitrum, Glenn; Jongewaard, Erik; Vlieks, Arnold; Fowkes, Randy; Li, Jeff

    1999-05-01

    The development of W-band klystrons is discussed. Modeling of the klystron performance predicts 100 kW output power from a single klystron. The permanent magnet focusing and small size of the circuit permit combination of multiple klystrons in a module. A six-klystron module in a single vacuum envelope is expected to produce 500 kW peak power and up to 5 kW average power. The critical issues in the W-band klystron development are the electron beam transport and the fabrication of the klystron circuit. Two microfabrication techniques, EDM and LIGA, are being evaluated to produce the W-band circuit. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Klystron Gun Arcing and Modulator Protection

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, S

    2004-05-04

    The demand for 500 kV and 265 amperes peak to power an X-Band klystron brings up protection issues for klystron faults and the energy dumped into the arc from the modulator. This situation is made worse when more than one klystron will be driven from a single modulator, such as the existing schemes for running two and eight klystrons. High power pulsed klystrons have traditionally be powered by line type modulators which match the driving impedance with the load impedance and therefore current limit at twice the operating current. Multiple klystrons have the added problems of a lower modulator source impedance and added stray capacitance, which converts into appreciable energy at high voltages like 500kV. SLAC has measured the energy dumped into klystron arcs in a single and dual klystron configuration at the 400 to 450 kV level and found interesting characteristics in the arc formation. The author will present measured data from klystron arcs powered from line-type modulators in several configurations. The questions arise as to how the newly designed solid-state modulators, running multiple tubes, will react to a klystron arc and how much energy will be dumped into the arc.

  13. An immersed field cluster klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Eppley, K.R.

    1989-08-01

    Future linear colliders have a need for high power, high frequency, and short-pulse radio frequency sources. The proposed ''cluster klystron'' should give over 1 GW of 12 GHz radio frequency power, can employ direct current or a long high-voltage pulse, but can be gated to give pulses down to a few tens of nanoseconds. The device consists of 42 parallel 100 A channels. Each channel is fed from an individual magnetron-type gun employing a common 50 kV mod-anode. The beams are accelerated to 400 kV in common dc accelerating gaps and fed into the 42 separate klystron channels. Focusing of all channels is achieved by a single overall 4 kG magnetic field. Simulations of expected performance suggest that the efficiency could be above 70%. 10 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. High efficiency SPS klystron design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalos, E. J.

    1980-01-01

    The most likely compact configuration to realize both high efficiency and high gain is a 5-6 cavity design focused by an electromagnet. An outline of a potential klystron configuration is given. The selected power output of 70 kW CW resulted from a maximum assumed operating voltage of 40 kV. The basic klystron efficiency cannot be expected to exceed 70-75% without collector depression. Although impressive gains were achieved in raising the basic efficiency from 50% to 70% or so with a multi-stage collector, the estimated efficiency improvement due to 5-stage collector at the 75% level is only about 8% resulting in an overall efficiency of about 83%.

  15. Self-consistent klystron simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.E.; Tallerico, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    A numerical analysis of large-signal klystron behavior based on general wave-particle interaction theory is presented. The computer code presented is tailored for the minimum amount of complexity needed in klystron simulation. The code includes self-consistent electron motion, space-charge fields, and intermediate and output fields. It also includes use of time periodicity to simplify the problem, accurate representation of the space-charge fields, accurate representation of the cavity standing-wave fields, and a sophisticated particle-pushing routine. In the paper, examples are given that show the effects of cavity detunings, of varying the magnetic field profile, of electron beam asymmetries from the gun, and of variations in external load impedance. 4 refs., 7 figs.

  16. Hardware upgrade for klystrons in the SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Jobe, R.K.; Browne, M.J.; Slattery, K.P.

    1985-05-01

    The control and monitoring of the klystrons in the first third of the SLAC linear accelerator has been commissioned, and a program to complete installation by summer 1985 is in progress. A general overview of the new control system for SLAC klystrons is presented along with a detailed description of the Modulator Klystron Support Unit. The MKSU contains all the devices necessary to interface klystron monitoring and control to the SLC control system through a dedicated intelligent CAMAC module. Controlled devices include RF phase and drive controls, the high power modulator status, associated RF signals, waterflow and magnet controls.

  17. Pulse to pulse klystron diagnosis system

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, J.; Davidson, V.; Genova, L.; Johnson, R.; Reagan, D.

    1981-03-01

    This report describes a system used to study the behavior of SLAC high powered klystrons operating with a twice normal pulse width of 5 ..mu..s. At present, up to eight of the klystrons installed along the accelerator can be operated with long pulses and monitored by this system. The report will also discuss some of the recent findings and investigations.

  18. High efficiency SPS klystron design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalos, E. J.

    1980-01-01

    The most likely compact configuration to realize both high efficiency and high gain (approx. 40 dB) is a 5-6 cavity design focused by an electromagnet. The basic klystron efficiency cannot be expected to exceed 70-75% without collector depression. It was estimated that the net benefit of a 5 stage collector over a 2 stage collector is between 1.5 and 3.5 kW per tube. A modulating anode is incorporated in the design to enable rapid shutoff of the beam current in case the r.f. drive should be removed.

  19. Periodic permanent magnet focused klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, Patrick; Read, Michael; Ives, R Lawrence

    2015-04-21

    A periodic permanent magnet (PPM) klystron has beam transport structures and RF cavity structures, each of which has permanent magnets placed substantially equidistant from a beam tunnel formed about the central axis, and which are also outside the extent of a cooling chamber. The RF cavity sections also have permanent magnets which are placed substantially equidistant from the beam tunnel, but which include an RF cavity coupling to the beam tunnel for enhancement of RF carried by an electron beam in the beam tunnel.

  20. Reliability and lifetime predictions of SLC klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Fowkes, W.R.; Lee, T.G.; Vlieks, A.E.

    1989-03-01

    The energy upgrade of SLAC, with the first of the new 67 MW SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) klystrons, began over four years ago. Today there are over 200 of these klystrons in operation. As a result, there is a wealth klystron performance and failure information that enables reasonable predictions to be made on life expectancy and reliability. Data from initial tests, follow-up tests and daily operation monitoring on the accelerator is stores for analysis. Presented here are life expectancy predictions with particular emphasis on cathode life. Also, based on this data, we will discuss some of the principal modes of failure. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  1. X-BAND KLYSTRON DEVELOPMENT AT SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Vlieks, Arnold E.; /SLAC

    2009-08-03

    The development of X-band klystrons at SLAC originated with the idea of building an X-band Linear Collider in the late 1980's. Since then much effort has been expended in developing a reliable X-band Power source capable of delivering >50 MW RF power in pulse widths >1.5 {micro}s. I will report on some of the technical issues and design strategies which have led to the current SLAC klystron designs.

  2. A new high-power klystron for the DSN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldfinger, A.; Gregg, M. A.; Hartop, R.

    1982-01-01

    A very high reliability 100 kW klystron for the Deep Space Network (DSN) high power transmitters in support of spacecrafts to the distant planets was studied. The last phases included electron gun fabrication and beam analyzer evaluation and klystron prototype fabrication, mechanical and electrical design improvements resulted in the delivery of a prototype klystron meeting all requirements. It is concluded that the development of a new high power klystron for the DSN was very successful as demonstrated by the prototype results.

  3. On a theory of two-beam mechanisms of charged particle acceleration in electrodynamic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrovsky, A.O.

    1993-09-01

    This work is devoted to the theoretical studies of two-beam mechanisms of charged particle acceleration in electronic structures. The first section continues the outline of results of theoretical studies commenced in the intermediate report and considers the two-beam scheme of acceleration in the plasma waveguide. According to this scheme the strong current relativistic electron beam (REB) excites the intensive plasma waves accelerating the electrons of the second beam. The driving beam is assumed to be density-modulated. The preliminary modulation of the driving REB is shown to enhance substantially the acceleration efficiency of relativistic electrons of the driven beam. The second section deals with the two-beam acceleration in the vacuum corrugated waveguide. According to this scheme the excitation of electromagnetic waves and acceleration of driven beam electrons by them is accomplished under different Cherenkov resonances between the particles of beams and the corrugated waveguide field. The electromagnetic field in the periodic structure is known to be the superposition of spatial harmonics. With the small depth of the periodic nonuniformity the amplitudes of these harmonics decrease fast with their number increasing. Therefore, if the driving beam is in the Cherenkov resonance with the first spatial harmonic and the driven beam is in resonance with the zero space harmonic then the force accelerating the driven beam would be considerably bigger than the force decelerating the driving beam electrons.

  4. 1.5-GW S-band relativistic klystron amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Patrick E.

    1992-04-01

    There is a strong symbiotic relationship between a developing technology and its applications. New technologies can generate applications previously either unrealizable or impractical. Conversely, applications can demand the development of new technological capability. Examples of both types of development can be found in the evolution of HPM. The high power and energy output made possible by HPM have created a technology driven interest in directed energy weapons and short pulse radar. On the other hand, the requirements for heating of fusion plasmas have resulted in an application driven program to develop high average power microwave devices. In this paper we address these and other applications such as RF electron linacs, laser pumping, and beaming of power. Emerging applications, such as ionispheric modification and environmental cleanup, are also touched upon. The approach of this paper will be to review each application separately and then compare the requirements of the applications in terms of the power, frequency and other key requirements necessary for HPM to usefully address the application.

  5. High power rf klystrons for linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Konrad, G.T.

    1984-04-01

    Recent klystron developments at SLAC are described. The standard 40 MW klyston, which typically operates at 35 MW on the SLAC linac, is the starting point for the push to higher peak and average power. The standard tube is capable of a 2.5 ..mu..s rf pulse width at 360 pps. For the SLC a 50 MW klystron capable of 5 ..mu..s pulse width at 180 pps is under development. Another tube currently being worked on is a 150 MW klystron capable of 1 ..mu..s rf and 180 pps. Design criteria and actual operating experience for both developmental tubes are described. 10 references, 11 figures, 3 tables.

  6. Large-signal klystron simulations using KLSC

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.E.; Ferguson, P.

    1997-10-01

    The authors describe large-signal klystron simulations using the particle-in-cell code KLSC. This code uses the induced-current model to describe the steady-state cavity modulations and resulting rf fields, and advances the space-charge fields through maxwell`s equations. In this paper, an eight-cavity, high-power S-band klystron simulation is used to highlight various aspects of this simulation technique. In particular, there are specific issues associated with modeling the input cavity, the gain circuit, and the large-signal circuit (including the output cavities), that have to be treated carefully.

  7. A 75 MW S-Band Klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, Patrick; Read, Michael; Ives, Robert Lawrence; Marsden, David

    2013-12-16

    This program performed computational and preliminary mechanical design for a klystron producing 75 MW at 2.856 GHz using periodic permanent magnet (PPM) focusing. The performance specifications achieved were those for the Matter-Radiation Interactions in the Extremes (MaRIE) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The klystron is designed to provide 10 microsecond pulses at 60 Hz with 56 dB gain. The PPM-Focusing eliminates requirements for solenoids and their associated power supplies, cooling systems, interlocks, control and diagnostic instrumentation, and maintenance. The represents a significant in both acquisition and operating costs. It also increases reliability by eliminating many potential failure modes.

  8. APS linac klystron and accelerating structure gain measurements and klystron PFN voltage regulation requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Sereno, N.S.

    1997-07-01

    This note details measurements of the APS positron linac klystron and accelerating structure gain and presents an analysis of the data using fits to simple mathematical models. The models are used to investigate the sensitivity of the energy dependence of the output positron beam to klystron parameters. The gain measurements are separated into two parts: first, the energy gains of the accelerating structures of the positron linac are measured as a function of output power of the klystron; second, the klystron output power is measured as a function of input drive power and pulse forming network (PFN) voltage. This note concentrates on the positron linac rf and its performance as it directly affects the energy stability of the positron beam injected into the positron accumulator ring (PAR). Ultimately it is important to be able to minimize beam energy variations to maximize the PAR accumulation efficiency.

  9. High-Efficiency Klystron For Television Transmitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramins, Peter; Dayton, James; Mccune, Earl, Sr.; Kosmahl, Henry

    1990-01-01

    Improved klystron designed for use as final amplifier in ultrahigh-frequency (UHF) television transmitter. New device incorporates multistage depressed collector (MSDC) of advanced design to increase efficiency by recovering, from spent electron beam, some of residual kinetic energy otherwise dissipated as heat. Concept applied to increase efficiencies of microwave communication, equipment, radar systems, and particle-beam accelerators.

  10. Retrofitting the 5045 Klystron for Higher Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Aaron; Fazio, Michael; Haase, Andy; Jongewaard, Erik; Kemp, Mark; Neilson, Jeff

    2015-04-15

    The 5045 klystron has been in production and accelerating particles at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory for over 25 years. Although the design has undergone some changes there are still significant opportunities for improvement in performance. Retrofitting the 5045 for higher efficiencies and a more mono-energetic spent beam profile is presented.

  11. Klystron control software in the SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Jobe, R.K.; Thompson, K.; Phinney, N.

    1985-05-01

    Triggering, control, and monitoring of 240 high-power klystrons will be supported by the SLC control system this summer. The control software is distributed among a VAX host computer, a local microprocessor cluster, and a dedicated intelligent CAMAC module. The functions performed by these three components and the algorithms used are discussed.

  12. High efficiency klystron for the SPS application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larue, A. D.

    1980-01-01

    The enhancement of klystron efficiency through the use of collector depression, that is by recovering energy from the spent electron beam after microwave amplification, was investigated. Design considerations included noise, harmonics, cooling, and service life. The mod anode, to be employed for beam control, and the depressed collector, used in spent electron beam energy recovery, are described.

  13. Klystron having electrostatic quadrupole focusing arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Maschke, Alfred W.

    1983-08-30

    A klystron includes a source for emitting at least one electron beam, and an accelerator for accelarating the beam in a given direction through a number of drift tube sections successively aligned relative to one another in the direction of the beam. A number of electrostatic quadrupole arrays are successively aligned relative to one another along at least one of the drift tube sections in the beam direction for focusing the electron beam. Each of the electrostatic quadrupole arrays forms a different quadrupole for each electron beam. Two or more electron beams can be maintained in parallel relationship by the quadrupole arrays, thereby enabling space charge limitations encountered with conventional single beam klystrons to be overcome.

  14. Klystron having electrostatic quadrupole focusing arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Maschke, A.W.

    1983-08-30

    A klystron includes a source for emitting at least one electron beam, and an accelerator for accelerating the beam in a given direction through a number of drift tube sections successively aligned relative to one another in the direction of the beam. A number of electrostatic quadrupole arrays are successively aligned relative to one another along at least one of the drift tube sections in the beam direction for focusing the electron beam. Each of the electrostatic quadrupole arrays forms a different quadrupole for each electron beam. Two or more electron beams can be maintained in parallel relationship by the quadrupole arrays, thereby enabling space charge limitations encountered with conventional single beam klystrons to be overcome. 4 figs.

  15. A crowbarless power supply for klystrons.

    PubMed

    Kozu, H; Jumonji, Y; Yamazaki, C; Shoji, Y; Hashimoto, S; Ando, A

    1998-05-01

    A new crowbarless power supply is to be installed at the New SUBARU storage ring. A high-power switching inverter unit eliminates the need for expensive and unstable crowbar circuits for the klystron power supply. It also realizes a very small voltage ripple in the low-frequency region. This is an important characteristic, especially in a quasi-isochronous storage ring such as New SUBARU. PMID:15263515

  16. FPGA Trigger System to Run Klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Darius; /Texas A-M /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    The Klystron Department is in need of a new trigger system to update the laboratory capabilities. The objective of the research is to develop the trigger system using Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) technology with a user interface that will allow one to communicate with the FPGA via a Universal Serial Bus (USB). This trigger system will be used for the testing of klystrons. The key materials used consists of the Xilinx Integrated Software Environment (ISE) Foundation, a Programmable Read Only Memory (Prom) XCF04S, a Xilinx Spartan 3E 35S500E FPGA, Xilinx Platform Cable USB II, a Printed Circuit Board (PCB), a 100 MHz oscillator, and an oscilloscope. Key considerations include eight triggers, two of which have variable phase shifting capabilities. Once the project was completed the output signals were able to be manipulated via a Graphical User Interface by varying the delay and width of the signal. This was as planned; however, the ability to vary the phase was not completed. Future work could consist of being able to vary the phase. This project will give the operators in the Klystron Department more flexibility to run various tests.

  17. Investigation of the effects of returning electrons on klystron performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roybal, William Thomas

    The klystron, as part of an RF distribution system for an accelerator, is one of the most important components contributing to the cost, reliability, and longevity of the overall system. Operating cost is one of the primary concerns for klystrons. Achieving high direct current (DC) to radio frequency (RF) conversion efficiency, free of instabilities is very important. There is uncertainty concerning the effects of returning electrons within the klystron and the impact that they have on klystron performance. The effects of reverse traveling electrons on klystron performance, such as efficiency, are poorly defined. Classical and even modern klystron design avoids the consideration of return electrons, and thus the effects have not been numerically analyzed and quantified. A better understanding of the electron beam-to-RF conversion process and the effects of return electrons within the klystron output circuit is needed. Accurate klystron modeling and simulation of return electron effects are required to better understand the implications of the problem. This analysis identifies the influence that returning electrons have on the overall beam dynamics and self-consistent cavity voltages. Closer examination of the harmonic content within the reverse beam current, along with comparison to the nominal klystron design, reveals the effects that reverse flowing electrons can have on klystron performance and design. The results of this work include a description of the electron beam dynamics for a beam decelerated in the output cavity, with separation occurring between forward and reverse electrons. Varying the output parameter of the klystron causes an unexpected response in return current quantity and bunching quality, yielding periodic correlations and responses to two-stream interaction.

  18. Design of a 50 MW klystron at X-band

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, E.; Callin, R.; Caryotakis, G.

    1995-07-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of the XL-1 klystron; a 50 MW klystron operating at a frequency of 11.424 GHz for use on the SLAC Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA). Problems associated with the development of high-power rf sources for NLC, and the solutions implemented on XL-1 are discussed.

  19. Apparatus makes klystron operating frequency adjustable from remote point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauss, R. C.

    1967-01-01

    Apparatus makes possible proper frequency adjustment in a receiver using a pump klystron for a traveling-wave master. It incorporates a tunable overcoupled cavity with irises of appropriate size to accomplish frequency spread over the desired range and to maintain the Q of the klystron circuit at the optimum value.

  20. Modification of the control modulator (for a klystron)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heine, Eric

    The modulators of the klystron units for pulse injection into an accelerator were modified in order to increase the peak power of the klystrons. The modulators were modified from 4 MW RF power out and 50 micro pulses to 10 MW RF power out and 5 microsec. The required modifications of the operator interface programming are explained.

  1. The Klynac: An Integrated Klystron and Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, J. M.; Schwellenbach, D.

    2013-04-01

    The Klynac concept integrates an electron gun, a radio frequency (RF) power source, and a coupled-cavity linear accelerator into a single resonant system. The klystron is essentially a conventional klystron structure with an input cavity, some number of intermediate cavities and an output cavity. The accelerator structure is, likewise, a conventional on-axis coupled structure. The uniqueness is the means of coupling the klystron output cavity to the accelerator. The coupler is a resonant coupler rather than an ordinary transmission line. The geometry of such a system need not be coaxial. However, if the klystron and accelerator are coaxial we can eliminate the need for a separate cathode for the accelerator by injecting some of the klystron beam into the accelerator. Such a device can be made cylindrical which is ideal for some applications.

  2. 250-kW CW klystron amplifier for planetary radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cormier, Reginald A.; Mizuhara, Albert

    1992-01-01

    The design, construction, and performance testing is described of two Varian klystrons, model VKX-7864A, which replaced the aging and less efficient VA-949J klystrons in the X band planetary radar transmitter on the Goldstone, CA, 70 meter antenna. The project was carried out jointly by the JPL and Varian Assoc. Output power was increased from 200 to 250 kW continuous wave per klystron, and full dc beam power is dissipated in the collector (it was not possible to operate the VA-949J klystrons without RF drive because of limited collector dissipation capability). Replacement were made with a minimum of transmitter modifciations. The planetary radar transmitter is now operating successfully with these two klystrons.

  3. The Klynac: An integrated klystron and linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, James M.; Schwellenbach, David; Meidinger, Alfred

    2013-04-19

    The Klynac concept integrates an electron gun, a radio frequency (RF) power source, and a coupled-cavity linear accelerator into a single resonant system. The klystron is essentially a conventional klystron structure with an input cavity, some number of intermediate cavities and an output cavity. The accelerator structure is, likewise, a conventional on-axis coupled structure. The uniqueness is the means of coupling the klystron output cavity to the accelerator. The coupler is a resonant coupler rather than an ordinary transmission line. The geometry of such a system need not be coaxial. However, if the klystron and accelerator are coaxial we can eliminate the need for a separate cathode for the accelerator by injecting some of the klystron beam into the accelerator. Such a device can be made cylindrical which is ideal for some applications.

  4. Performance of a 150-MW S-band klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Sprehn, D.; Phillips, R.M.; Caryotakis, G.

    1994-09-01

    As part of an international collaboration, the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) klystron group has designed, fabricated, and tested a 60-Hz, 3-{mu}s, 150-MW S-band klystron built for Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY). A test diode with a 535-kV, 700-A electron beam was constructed to verify the gun operation. The first klystron was built and successfully met design specifications. The 375-MW electron beam represents a new record for SLAC accelerator klystrons in terms of voltage, current, energy, and ruggedness of design. The rf output power is a 150% increase over the S-band tubes currently used in the two-mile-long linear accelerator at SLAC. This paper discusses design issues and experimental results of the diode and klystron.

  5. W-Band Sheet Beam Klystron Design

    SciTech Connect

    Scheitrum, G.; Caryotakis, G.; Burke, A.; Jensen, A.; Jongewaard, E.a Krasnykh, A.; Neubauer, M.; Phillips, R.; Rauenbuehler, K.; /SLAC

    2011-11-11

    Sheet beam devices provide important advantages for very high power, narrow bandwidth RF sources like accelerator klystrons [1]. Reduced current density and increased surface area result in increased power capabi1ity, reduced magnetic fields for focusing and reduced cathode loading. These advantages are offset by increased complexity, beam formation and transport issues and potential for mode competition in the ovennoded cavities and drift tube. This paper will describe the design issues encountered in developing a 100 kW peak and 2 kW average power sheet beam k1ystron at W-band including beam formation, beam transport, circuit design, circuit fabrication and mode competition.

  6. Nonlinear harmonic generation in distributed optical klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    H.P. Freund; George R. Neil

    2001-12-01

    A distributed optical klystron has the potential for dramatically shortening the total interaction length in high-gain free-electron lasers (INP 77-59, Novosibirsk, 1977; Nucl. Instr. and Meth A 304 (1991) 463) in comparison to a single-wiggler-segment configuration. This shortening can be even more dramatic if a nonlinear harmonic generation mechanism is used to reach the desired wavelength. An example operating at a 4.5{angstrom} fundamental and a 1.5{angstrom} harmonic is discussed.

  7. Adaptive control system for pulsed megawatt klystrons

    DOEpatents

    Bolie, Victor W.

    1992-01-01

    The invention provides an arrangement for reducing waveform errors such as errors in phase or amplitude in output pulses produced by pulsed power output devices such as klystrons by generating an error voltage representing the extent of error still present in the trailing edge of the previous output pulse, using the error voltage to provide a stored control voltage, and applying the stored control voltage to the pulsed power output device to limit the extent of error in the leading edge of the next output pulse.

  8. Efficiency enhancement of a two-beam free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Rouhani, M. H.; Maraghechi, B.; Saberi, H.

    2009-12-15

    A local and nonlinear simulation of two-beam and tapered free-electron laser (FEL) is presented self-consistently. The slippage of the electromagnetic wave with respect to the electron beam is ignored and the relativistic electron beams are assumed to be cold. The fundamental resonance and the third harmonic radiation of the beam with lower energy are considered, in which the third harmonic is at the fundamental resonance of the beam with higher energy. The wiggler field is set to decrease linearly when the radiation of the third harmonic saturates. The optimum starting point of tapering and the slope of the reduction in the amplitude of wiggler are found by successive run of the code. Using the slowly varying envelope approximation, a set of nonlinear equations is derived which describes this system. These equations are solved numerically by the Runge-Kutta method. This method can be used to improve the efficiency of the two-beam FEL in the extreme ultraviolet and x-ray regions of spectrum.

  9. Wavelength switching in an optical klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, K.W.; Smith, T.I.

    1995-12-31

    A symmetric optical klystron consists of two identical undulator sections separated a dispersive section. For a device of a given length, an optical klystron is capable of producing much more bunching, and therefore more gain, than a traditional undulator. Another consequence of introducing dispersion between two undulator sections is that the overall spontaneous radiation pattern results from the interference between the two undulator sections, and as such resembles a standard undulator radiation pattern modulated by a sinusoidal interference term. The presence of several wavelength peaks in the spontaneous lineshape implies an equal number of peaks in the gain spectrum. If the strength of the dispersion section is adjusted to provide nearly equal gain on the two largest of these peaks, then they will compete, and the FEL may switch wavelengths based on noise, cavity length, or other perturbations. We provide the first observations of this behavior, using the FIREFLY system at the Stanford Picosecond FEL Center. In FIREFLY, relative wavelength switching by more than 3%--more than twice the laser linewidth-has been observed by varying dispersion section strength, while at intermediate points stable switching has also been observed as a function of cavity length.

  10. W-band sheet beam klystron simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Colby, E.R.; Caryotakis, G.; Fowkes, W.R.; Smithe, D.N.

    1999-05-01

    With the development of ever higher energy particle accelerators comes the need for compactness and high gradient, which in turn require very high frequency high power rf sources. Recent development work in W-band accelerating techniques has spurred the development of a high-power W-band source. Axisymmetric sources suffer from fundamental power output limitations (P{sub sat}{approximately}{lambda}{sup 2}) brought on by the conflicting requirements of small beam sizes and high beam current. The sheet beam klystron allows for an increase in beam current without substantial increase in the beam current density, allowing for reduced cathode current densities and focussing field strengths. Initial simulations of a 20:1 aspect ratio sheet beam/cavity interaction using the 3 dimensional particle-in-cell code Magic3D have demonstrated a 35{percent} beam-power to RF power extraction efficiency. Calculational work and numerical simulations leading to a prototype W-band sheet beam klystron will be presented, together with preliminary cold test structure studies of a proposed RF cavity geometry. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. W-Band Sheet Beam Klystron Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Colby, E.R.; Caryotakis, G.; Fowkes, W.R.; Smithe, D.N.; /Mission Res., Newington

    2005-09-12

    With the development of ever higher energy particle accelerators comes the need for compactness and high gradient, which in turn require very high frequency high power rf sources. Recent development work in W-band accelerating techniques has spurred the development of a high-power W-band source. Axisymmetric sources suffer from fundamental power output limitations (P{sub sat} {approx} {lambda}{sup 2}) brought on by the conflicting requirements of small beam sizes and high beam current. The sheet beam klystron allows for an increase in beam current without substantial increase in the beam current density, allowing for reduced cathode current densities and focusing field strengths. Initial simulations of a 20:1 aspect ratio sheet beam/cavity interaction using the 3 dimensional particle-in-cell code Magic3D have demonstrated a 35% beam-power to RF power extraction efficiency. Calculational work and numerical simulations leading to a prototype W-band sheet beam klystron will be presented, together with preliminary cold test structure studies of a proposed RF cavity geometry.

  12. A Unique Power Supply for the PEPII Klystron at SLAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassel, R. L.; Nguyen, M. N.

    1997-05-01

    Each of the eight 1.2 MW RF klystrons for the PEP-II storage rings require a 2.5 MVA DC power supply of 83 kv at 23 amps. The design for the supply was base on three factors low cost, small size to fit existing substation pads, and good protection against damage to the klystron including klystron gun arcs. The supply uses a 12 pulse 12.5 KV primary thyristor ``star point controller'' with primary filter inductor to provide rapid voltage control, good voltage regulation, and fast turn off during klystron tube faults. The supply also uses a unique secondary rectifier, filter capacitor configuration to minimize the energy available under a klystron fault. The voltage control is from 0-90 KV with a regulation of < 0.1 % and voltage ripple of < 1 % P-P, (< 0.2 % RMS.) above 60 KV. The supply utilizes a thyristor crowbar, which under a klystron tube arc limits the energy in the klystron arc to < 5 joules. If the thyristor crowbar is disabled the energy supplied is < 40 joules into the arc. The size of the supply was reduced small enough to fit the existing PEP transformer yard pads. The cost of the power supply was < $ 140 per KVA.

  13. The klystron: A microwave source of surprising range and endurance

    SciTech Connect

    Caryotakis, G.

    1998-04-01

    This year marks the 60th anniversary of the birth of the klystron at Stanford University. The tube was the first practical source of microwaves and its invention initiated a search for increasingly more powerful sources, which continues to this day. This paper reviews the scientific uses of the klystron and outlines its operating principles. The history of the device is traced, from its scientific beginnings, to its role in World War II and the Cold War, and to its current resurgence as the key component in a major accelerator project. Finally, the paper describes the development of a modular klystron, which may someday power future accelerators at millimeter wavelengths.

  14. Phase synchronization of multiple klystrons in RF system

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, S.; Regan, A.; Wang, Y.M.; Rohlev, T.

    1998-12-31

    The Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) being constructed at Los Alamos National Laboratory will serve as the prototype for the low energy section of the Acceleration Production of Tritium (APT) accelerator. The first LEDA RF system includes three, 1.2 MW, 350 MHz, continuous wave, klystrons driving a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ). A phase control loop is necessary for each individual klystron in order to guarantee the phase matching of these klystrons. To meet this objective, they propose adaptive PI controllers which are based on simple adaptive control. These controllers guarantee not only phase matching but also amplitude matching.

  15. Evaluation of the effects of optical klystrons on the selene free electron laser oscillator. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, E.A.

    1995-06-01

    Lasers have been incorporated into many parts of society including heavy industrial work military defense, light displays, scientific research, and everyday household appliances. Free Electron Lasers (FELs) use relativistic electrons traveling in an alternating magnetic field to produce coherent radiation. One particular application for a FEL is to beam power to satellites. The United States and Russia have agreed to pursue this effort together. The installation in the United States is the SpacE Laser ENErgy (SELENE) project scheduled for installation at China Lake, California. The SELENE laser system consists of an oscillator and a radiator. The electrons are bunched in the oscillator in preparation for entering the radiator. The use of a three-section optical klystron has been proposed for the SELENE oscillator. An optical klystron FEL is composed of multiple undulator sections, each separated from the next by a dispersive section. The dispersive section allows for larger gain from a shorter total length of undulator. The effects of the optical klystrons in the SELENE oscillator using the proposed SELENE FEL parameters will be investigated through the use of simulations of two and three-section undulators.

  16. Numerical Simulation of Transient and Steady State Nonlinear Beam-Cavity Dynamics in High Power Klystrons.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zambre, Yadunath Bhagvantrao

    1988-03-01

    A 2-1over2 dimensional analysis of klystrons, assuming cylindrical space symmetry but retaining all velocity effects, is presented. The model handles all relativistic, electromagnetic, and non-linear effects. The klystron geometry is viewed as a conducting cylinder (the tube) to which are attached a number of resonant cavities at various locations. Within this tube, particle in cell plasma simulation techniques are used to model the electron beam dynamics and electromagnetic fields. The effects of the cavities are then "patched in" by the use of eigenmode expansions over the cavity geometries. These expansions reduce the effects of the cavity fields into relatively simple time varying boundary conditions on the tube. The plasma simulation in the tube is carried out using a number of "macroparticles," each representing many electrons and each obeying the equations of motion for an electron. A time centered cycloid fitting algorithm is used to move the particles. A time centered spectral method using Fourier series in z and Chebyschev polynomials in r is used to advance the fields. A non-uniform grid permits the use of FFT's to carry out the Chebyschev expansions. A method for finding time periodic solutions is also presented. This method will compute a qualitatively correct transient solution and yield a quantitatively correct steady state solution.

  17. Engineering Features: Klystron Tubes and Utilidors Clear Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Engineering Features: Klystron Tubes and Utilidors - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  18. Optical Klystron Enhancement to SASE X-ray FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Yuantao; Emma, Paul; Huang, Zhirong; Kumar, Vinit

    2006-04-07

    The optical klystron enhancement to self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free electron lasers (FELs) is studied in theory and in simulations. In contrast to a seeded FEL, the optical klystron gain in a SASE FEL is not sensitive to any phase mismatch between the radiation and the microbunched electron beam. The FEL performance with the addition of four optical klystrons located at the undulator long breaks in the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) shows significant improvement if the uncorrelated energy spread at the undulator entrance can be controlled to a very small level. In addition, FEL saturation at shorter x-ray wavelengths (around 1.0 A) within the LCLS undulator length becomes possible. We also discuss the application of the optical klystron in a compact x-ray FEL design that employs relatively low electron beam energy together with a shorter-period undulator.

  19. Klystron 'efficiency loop' for the ALS storage ring RF system

    SciTech Connect

    Kwiatkowski, Slawomir; Julian, Jim; Baptiste, Kenneth

    2002-05-20

    The recent energy crisis in California has led us to investigate the high power RF systems at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in order to decrease the energy consumption and power costs. We found the Storage Ring Klystron Power Amplifier system operating as designed but with significant power waste. A simple proportional-integrator (PI) analog loop, which controls the klystron collector beam current, as a function of the output RF power, has been designed and installed. The design considerations, besides efficiency improvement, were to interface to the existing system without major expense. They were to also avoid the klystron cathode power supply filter's resonance in the loop's dynamics, and prevent a conflict with the existing Cavity RF Amplitude Loop dynamics. This efficiency loop will allow us to save up to 700 MW-hours of electrical energy per year and increase the lifetime of the klystron.

  20. Experimental demonstration of enhanced self-amplified spontaneous emission by an optical klystron.

    PubMed

    Penco, G; Allaria, E; De Ninno, G; Ferrari, E; Giannessi, L

    2015-01-01

    We report the first experimental evidence of enhancement of self-amplified spontaneous emission, due to the use of an optical klystron. In this free-electron laser scheme, a relativistic electron beam passes through two undulators, separated by a dispersive section. The latter converts the electron-beam energy modulation produced in the first undulator in density modulation, thus enhancing the free-electron laser gain. The experiment has been carried out at the FERMI facility in Trieste. Powerful radiation has been produced in the extreme ultraviolet range, with an intensity a few orders of magnitude larger than in pure self-amplified spontaneous emission mode. Data have been benchmarked with an existing theoretical model. PMID:25615469

  1. Experimental Demonstration of Enhanced Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission by an Optical Klystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penco, G.; Allaria, E.; De Ninno, G.; Ferrari, E.; Giannessi, L.

    2015-01-01

    We report the first experimental evidence of enhancement of self-amplified spontaneous emission, due to the use of an optical klystron. In this free-electron laser scheme, a relativistic electron beam passes through two undulators, separated by a dispersive section. The latter converts the electron-beam energy modulation produced in the first undulator in density modulation, thus enhancing the free-electron laser gain. The experiment has been carried out at the FERMI facility in Trieste. Powerful radiation has been produced in the extreme ultraviolet range, with an intensity a few orders of magnitude larger than in pure self-amplified spontaneous emission mode. Data have been benchmarked with an existing theoretical model.

  2. Thermal effect on prebunched two-beam free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Mirian, N. S.; Maraghechi, B.

    2013-08-15

    A numerical simulation in one-dimension is conducted to study the two-beam free electron laser. The fundamental resonance of the fast electron beam coincides with the fifth harmonic of the slow electron beam in order to generate extreme ultraviolet radiation. Thermal effect in the form of the longitudinal velocity spread is included in the analysis. In order to reduce the length of the wiggler, prebunched slow electron beam is considered. The evaluation of the radiation power, bunching parameter, distribution function of energy, and the distribution function of the pondermotive phase is studied. Sensitivity of the power of the fifth harmonic to the jitter in the energy difference between the two beams is also studied. A phase space is presented that shows the trapped electrons at the saturation point.

  3. 100 MW klystron development at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Vlieks, A.E.; Callin, R.S.; Caryotakis, G.; Fant, K.S.; Fowkes, W.R.; Lee, T.G.; Wright, E.L.

    1991-05-01

    A klystron designed to operate at 11.4 GHz and 440 kV is presently SLAC's strongest rf power source candidate for the Next Linear Collider. It is expected to provide 100 MW of rf power with a pulse width of 1 microsecond. Many of the conventional tube technologies are being pushed to their limits. High electron beam power densities, rf electric gradients in cavity gaps and stresses on the ceramic rf output windows are among the most severe problems to be dealt with. This paper describes progress in the development of this device including results from single and double gap output cavities and various styles of rf output windows. 6 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. CARM-klystron amplifier for accelerator applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gold, Steven H.; Fliflet, Arne W.

    2001-05-01

    We consider the possibility of a cyclotron-autoresonance-maser (CARM) klystron configuration for accelerator applications as an alternative to the gyroklystron amplifier. The potential advantages, compared to gyroklystrons, include: 1) comparable efficiencies at lower values of the electron beam pitch ratio α, which should improve the beam quality and make the device substantially more stable against the excitation of parasitic mode, 2) operation far from cutoff, which should reduce the fields at cavity walls, allowing higher power operation, and 3) operation at lower magnetic fields for the same cyclotron harmonic number. However, there are two significant issues associated with the design of efficient, high-power CARMs. First, because of the higher value of kZ, compared to gyroklystrons, CARMs are substantially more sensitive to parallel velocity spread (pitch-angle spread). Second, conventional cavities support a variety of near-cutoff modes, which can compete with the CARM interaction. Therefore, one must consider either Bragg resonators or quasioptical cavity configurations.

  5. Two-beam interferometer for fourier spectroscopy with rigid pendulum

    SciTech Connect

    Burkert, P.

    1983-05-17

    A two-beam interferometer for fourier spectroscopy includes a rigid pendulum structure mounting at least one of the movable retroreflectors in a fully compensated optical system immune to tilt and lateral movement distortions. The swing of the rotatably journaled pendulum accurately confines the retroreflector(s) to movement in a single plane during scanning and, due to the low heat generated in the pendulum bearings, the simple and compact structure is well adapted to be housed in a cryostat aboard a spacecraft.

  6. 66. Building 102, view of Klystron tubes located in test ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    66. Building 102, view of Klystron tubes located in test systems located at first floor level with top of tubes protruding through second floor and ready to be lit and installed through top of Klystron tube vaults to ready position. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  7. FPGA-based klystron linearization implementations in scope of ILC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omet, M.; Michizono, S.; Matsumoto, T.; Miura, T.; Qiu, F.; Chase, B.; Varghese, P.; Schlarb, H.; Branlard, J.; Cichalewski, W.

    2015-04-01

    We report the development and implementation of four FPGA-based predistortion-type klystron linearization algorithms. Klystron linearization is essential for the realization of ILC, since it is required to operate the klystrons 7% in power below their saturation. The work presented was performed in international collaborations at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), USA and the Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY), Germany. With the newly developed algorithms, the generation of correction factors on the FPGA was improved compared to past algorithms, avoiding quantization and decreasing memory requirements. At FNAL, three algorithms were tested at the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA), demonstrating a successful implementation for one algorithm and a proof of principle for two algorithms. The functionality of the algorithm implemented at DESY was demonstrated successfully in a simulation. Besides this, a proof of principle of an FPGA-based klystron and cavity simulator implemented at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Japan was demonstrated. Its purpose is to allow the development and test of digital LLRF control systems including klystron linearization algorithms when no actual klystron and cavity are available.

  8. FPGA-based klystron linearization implementations in scope of ILC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omet, M.; Michizono, S.; Matsumoto, T.; Miura, T.; Qiu, F.; Chase, B.; Varghese, P.; Schlarb, H.; Branlard, J.; Cichalewski, W.

    2014-12-01

    We report the development and implementation of four FPGA-based predistortion-type klystron linearization algorithms. Klystron linearization is essential for the realization of ILC, since it is required to operate the klystrons 7% in power below their saturation. The work presented was performed in international collaborations at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), USA and the Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY), Germany. With the newly developed algorithms, the generation of correction factors on the FPGA was improved compared to past algorithms, avoiding quantization and decreasing memory requirements. At FNAL, three algorithms were tested at the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA), demonstrating a successful implementation for one algorithm and a proof of principle for two algorithms. The functionality of the algorithm implemented at DESY was demonstrated successfully in a simulation. Besides this, a proof of principle of an FPGA-based klystron and cavity simulator implemented at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Japan, was demonstrated. Its purpose is to allow the development and test of digital LLRF control systems including klystron linearization algorithms when no actual klystron and cavity are available.

  9. A non-uniform three-gap buncher cavity with suppression of transverse-electromagnetic mode leakage in the triaxial klystron amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Zumin; Zhang, Jun Zhong, Huihuang; Zhu, Danni; Qiu, Yongfeng

    2014-01-15

    The triaxial klystron amplifier is an efficient high power relativistic klystron amplifier operating at high frequencies due to its coaxial structure with large radius. However, the coaxial structures result in coupling problems among the cavities as the TEM mode is not cut-off in the coaxial tube. Therefore, the suppression of the TEM mode leakage, especially the leakage from the buncher cavity to the input cavity, is crucial in the design of a triaxial klystron amplifier. In this paper, a non-uniform three-gap buncher cavity is proposed to suppress the TEM mode leakage. The cold cavity analysis shows that the non-uniform three-gap buncher cavity can significantly suppress the TEM mode generation compared to a uniform three-gap buncher cavity. Particle-in-cell simulation shows that the power leakage to the input cavity is less than 1.5‰ of the negative power in the buncher cavity and the buncher cavity can efficiently modulate an intense relativistic electron beam free of self-oscillations. A fundamental current modulation depth of 117% is achieved by employing the proposed non-uniform buncher cavity into an X-band triaxial amplifier, which results in the high efficiency generation of high power microwave.

  10. Evaluation of two-beam spectroscopy as a plasma diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Billard, B.D.

    1980-04-01

    A two-beam spectroscopy (TBS) system is evaluated theoretically and experimentally. This new spectroscopic technique uses correlations between components of emitted light separated by a small difference in angle of propagation. It is thus a non-perturbing plasma diagnostic which is shown to provide local (as opposed to line-of-sight averaged) information about fluctuations in the density of light sources within a plasma - information not obtainable by the usual spectroscopic methods. The present design is an improvement on earlier systems proposed in a thesis by Rostler.

  11. The X-band klystron program at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Caryotakis, G.

    1996-04-01

    The X-band rf source development at SLAC can be considered a qualified success. A total of twelve klystrons were built. Six of them are still in use. The latest tube, XL4, produced 75 MW at an efficiency of 47.5 percent. However, victory cannot be declared as yet, since an NLC prototype has not been fully designed and the decision between permanent magnet focusing and a super-conducting solenoid has not been formally made. Daryl Sprehn`s paper will present the status of the PPM klystron development. The authors believe that a PPM X-band source will work, at 50 as well as at 75 megawatts. But they are prepared to adapt the XL4 design to a super-conducting solenoid, should the PPM klystron develop unexpected problems. The SLAC program is now in its seventh year. It may well be the longest and most expensive microwave tube development on record, in a government laboratory or in industry. Direct and related costs for the total effort are probably of the order of $10 million. In these circumstances it is perhaps not surprising that it has been possible to produce a klystron with the performance of XL4. At the same time, it must be said that the necessary leap in technology from the SLAC 60-megawatt S-band production klystrons to a klystron of comparable performance at four times the frequency could not be realized without some very careful experimentation and, most importantly, without the infrastructure for tube fabrication and testing available at SLAC. The design of an 11.4 GHz 50--100 MW klystron, with microsecond pulses and a pulse repetition frequency of 180 Hz presents a number of technical challenges which are listed here.

  12. A theory of two-beam acceleration of charged particles in a plasma waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrovsky, A.O.

    1993-11-01

    The progress made in recent years in the field of high-current relativistic electron beam (REB) generation has aroused a considerable interest in studying REB potentialities for charged particle acceleration with a high acceleration rate T = 100MeV/m. It was proposed, in particular, to employ high-current REB in two-beam acceleration schemes (TBA). In these schemes high current REB (driving beam) excites intense electromagnetic waves in the electrodynamic structure which, in their turn, accelerate particles of the other beam (driven beam). The TBA schemes can be divided into two groups. The first group includes the schemes, where the two beams (driving and driven) propagate in different electrodynamic structures coupled with each other through the waveguides which ensure the microwave power transmission to accelerate driven beam particles. The second group includes the TBA schemes, where the driving and driven beams propagate in one electrodynamic structure. The main aim of this work is to demonstrate by theory the possibility of realizing effectively the TBA scheme in the plasma waveguide. The physical model of the TBA scheme under study is formulated. A set of equations describing the excitation of RF fields by a high-current REB and the acceleration of driven beam electrons is also derived. Results are presented on the the linear theory of plasma wave amplification by the driving beam. The range of system parameters, at which the plasma-beam instability develops, is defined. Results of numerical simulation of the TBA scheme under study are also presented. The same section gives the description of the dynamics of accelerated particle bunching in the high-current REB-excited field. Estimates are given for the accelerating field intensities in the plasma and electron acceleration rates.

  13. High-gradient two-beam electron accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2014-11-04

    The main goal for this project was to design, build, and evaluate a detuned-cavity, collinear, two-beam accelerator structure. Testing was to be at the Yale University Beam Physics Laboratory, under terms of a sub-grant from Omega-P to Yale. Facilities available at Yale for this project include a 6-MeV S-band RF gun and associated beam line for forming and transporting a ~1 A drive beam , a 300 kV beam source for use as a test beam, and a full panoply of laboratory infrastructure and test equipment. During the first year of this project, availability and functionality of the 6-MeV drive beam and 300 kV test beam were confirmed, and the beam line was restored to a layout to be used with the two-beam accelerator project. Major efforts during the first year were also focused on computational design and simulation of the accelerator structure itself, on beam dynamics, and on beam transport. Effort during the second year was focussed on building and preparing to test the structure, including extensive cold testing. Detailed results from work under this project have been published in twelve archival journal articles, listed in Section IV of the technical report.

  14. 3-D simulations of multiple beam klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Smithe, David N.; Bettenhausen, Mike; Ludeking, Larry; Caryotakis, G.; Sprehn, Daryl; Scheitrum, Glenn

    1999-05-07

    The MAGIC3D simulation code is being used to assess the multi-dimensional physics issues relating to the design and operation of multiple beam klystrons. Investigations, to date, include a detailed study of the mode structure of the cavities in the 19-beam hexagonally packed geometry and a study of the velocity spread caused by the cavity mode's field profile. Some attempts to minimize this effect are investigated. Additional simulations have provided quantification of the beam loading Q in a dual input cavity, and optimization of a dual output cavity. An important goal of the simulations is an accurate picture of beam transport along the length of the MBK. We have quantified the magnitude and spatial variation of the beam-line space charge interactions within a cavity gap. Present simulations have demonstrated the transport of the beam through three cavities (the present limits of our simulation size) without difficulty; additional length simulations are expected. We have also examined unbalanced beam-line scenarios, e.g., one beam-line suppressed, and find little disturbance to the transport in individual cavity tests, with results for multiple cavity transport expected.

  15. Development of X-band klystron technology at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Caryotakis, G.

    1997-05-01

    The SLAC design for a 1-TeV collider (NLC) requires klystrons with a performance which is well beyond the state-of-the-art for microwave tubes in the United States or abroad. The electrical specifications for the NLC klystrons are not fully established, but they are approximately as follows: Frequency, 11.4 GHz; Peak Power, 75 MW; Pulse Length, 1.5 {mu}s; Repetition Rate, 180 Hz; Gain, 50 dB; Efficiency, (including beam focusing) 50%. SLAC is in the seventh year of a program to develop these klystrons. The choice of X-band as the operating frequency, along with the sheer size of the NLC, have resulted in some new, most demanding standards for the klystrons which may power this future machine. These are related to the overall efficiency required, to the high rf gradients that must be supported at the output circuit without vacuum breakdown, and to the manufacturing cost of the 5,000-10,000 klystrons needed for the collider.

  16. Latest Results in SLAC 75-MW PPM Klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Sprehn, D.; Caryotakis, G.; Haase, A.; Jongewaard, E.; Laurent, L.; Pearson, C.; Phillips, R.; /SLAC

    2006-03-06

    75 MW X-band klystrons utilizing Periodic Permanent Magnet (PPM) focusing have been undergoing design, fabrication and testing at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) for almost nine years. The klystron development has been geared toward realizing the necessary components for the construction of the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The PPM devices built to date which fit this class of operation consist of a variety of 50 MW and 75 MW devices constructed by SLAC, KEK (Tsukuba, Japan) and industry. All these tubes follow from the successful SLAC design of a 50 MW PPM klystron in 1996. In 2004 the latest two klystrons were constructed and tested with preliminary results reported at EPAC2004. The first of these two devices was tested to the full NLC specifications of 75 MW, 1.6 microseconds pulse length, and 120 Hz. This 14.4 kW average power operation came with a tube efficiency >50%. The most recent testing of these last two devices will be presented here. Design and manufacturing issues of the latest klystron, due to be tested by the Fall of 2005, are also discussed.

  17. Development of a 50 MW Multiple Beam Klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, R Lawrence; Ferguson, Patrick; Read, Michael; Collins, George

    2007-10-31

    The goal of this program was to develop a 50 MW, multiple beam klystron at 11.424 GHz. The device uses eight electron guns and beam lines to achieve the required power level at a beam voltage of 190 kV, consistent with solid state power supplies. The electron gun operates with confined flow focusing, which is unique among current multiple beam sources, and allows operation at power levels consistent with producing 10s of MWs of pulsed RF power. The circuit consists of a ring resonator input cavity, eight sets of buncher cavities, and a ring resonator output cavity. The RF output power is coupled into four rectangular waveguides equally spaced around the klystron. Eight individual collectors absorb the spent beam power in each beam. The klystron operates in a solenoid. The principle challenges in the design included development of the beam optics using confined flow focusing, shaping of the magnetic field in the gun region to avoid beam spiraling, coupling input power equally to all eight beam lines from a single input, and obtaining the required frequency and Q in the output cavity. The mechanical design was particularly complex due to the large parts count, number of braze and weld joints, and close proximity of the beam lines that limited access. Addressing vacuum leaks and cold testing the complex structures was particularly troublesome. At the conclusion of the program, the klystron is experiencing several vacuum leaks that are under repair. Efforts will continue to seal and test the klystron.

  18. Refocusing of the spent axisymmetric beam in klystron tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branch, G. M.; Neugebauer, W.

    1972-01-01

    Analytic methods were developed and employed to optimize the magnetic field transition region between the output interaction gap of a klystron and a multi-stage depressed potential electrostatic beam collector, in order to enhance the power conversion efficiency of satellite-borne broadcast transmitters. Permanent magnet structures were designed to provide the magnetic field distributions required to expand and recollimate the spent electron beam of the power amplifier klystron for proper entry into the beam collector. These design criteria for magnetic field distributions for expanding and recollimating spent-beam electrons for optimal entry into a multi-stage depressed potential collector are generally applicable to traveling-wave tubes as well as klystrons.

  19. FPGA-based Klystron linearization implementations in scope of ILC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Omet, M.; Michizono, S.; Matsumoto, T.; Miura, T.; Qiu, F.; Chase, B.; Varghese, P.; Schlarb, H.; Branlard, J.; Cichalewski, W.

    2015-01-23

    We report the development and implementation of four FPGA-based predistortion-type klystron linearization algorithms. Klystron linearization is essential for the realization of ILC, since it is required to operate the klystrons 7% in power below their saturation. The work presented was performed in international collaborations at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), USA and the Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY), Germany. With the newly developed algorithms, the generation of correction factors on the FPGA was improved compared to past algorithms, avoiding quantization and decreasing memory requirements. At FNAL, three algorithms were tested at the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA), demonstrating a successfulmore » implementation for one algorithm and a proof of principle for two algorithms. Furthermore, the functionality of the algorithm implemented at DESY was demonstrated successfully in a simulation.« less

  20. The klystron: A microwave source of surprising range and endurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caryotakis, George

    1998-05-01

    This year marks the 60th anniversary of the birth of the klystron at Stanford University. The tube was the first practical source of microwaves and its invention initiated a search for increasingly more powerful sources, which continues to this day. This paper reviews the scientific uses of the klystron and outlines its operating principles. The history of the device is traced from its scientific beginnings to its role in WWII and the Cold War, its subsequent decline in use for military systems, and to its current resurgence as the key component in a major accelerator project. Finally, the paper describes the development of a modular klystron, which may someday power future accelerators at millimeter wavelengths.

  1. FPGA-based Klystron linearization implementations in scope of ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Omet, M.; Michizono, S.; Varghese, P.; Schlarb, H.; Branlard, J.; Cichalewski, W.

    2015-01-23

    We report the development and implementation of four FPGA-based predistortion-type klystron linearization algorithms. Klystron linearization is essential for the realization of ILC, since it is required to operate the klystrons 7% in power below their saturation. The work presented was performed in international collaborations at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), USA and the Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY), Germany. With the newly developed algorithms, the generation of correction factors on the FPGA was improved compared to past algorithms, avoiding quantization and decreasing memory requirements. At FNAL, three algorithms were tested at the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA), demonstrating a successful implementation for one algorithm and a proof of principle for two algorithms. Furthermore, the functionality of the algorithm implemented at DESY was demonstrated successfully in a simulation.

  2. Experimental demonstration of dielectric structure based two beam acceleration.

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, W.; Conde, M. E.; Konecny, R.; Power, J. G.; Schoessow, P.; Sun, X.; Zou, P.

    2000-11-28

    We report on the experimental results of the dielectric based two beam accelerator (step-up transformer). By using a single high charge beam, we have generated and extracted a high power RF pulse from a 7.8 GHz primary dielectric structure and then subsequently transferred to a second accelerating structure with higher dielectric constant and smaller transverse dimensions. We have measured the energy change of a second (witness) beam passing through the acceleration stage. The measured gradient is >4 times the deceleration gradient. The detailed experiment of set-up and results of the measurements are dimmed. Future plans for the development of a 100 MeV demonstration accelerator based on this technique is presented.

  3. Two-beam, Multi-mode Detuned Accelerating Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kazakov, S. Yu.; Kuzikov, S. V.; Yakovlev, V. P.; Hirshfield, J. L.

    2009-01-22

    A two-beam accelerator structure is described having several novel features including all metal construction, no transfer structures required between the drive and accelerator channels, symmetric fields at the axes of each channel, RF micropulse widths on cavity irises that are less than half those for a conventional cavity at the same fundamental frequency by virtue of using several harmonically-related cavity modes, and a transformer ratio much greater than unity by the use of detuned cavities. Detuning is also shown to allow either parallel or anti-parallel directions for the drive and accelerated beams. A preliminary calculation for the dilution of emittance due to short-range wakes for drive beam parameters similar to those for CLIC shows this effect to be acceptably small.

  4. A Solid State Modulator for Driving SLAC 5045 Klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Lamare, Jeffrey E

    2002-09-19

    A test is ongoing at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) where a solid state induction modulator is driving a SLAC 5045 klystron. The modulator generates 22 kV, 6 kA pulses that are stepped up by a 15.1 transformer that is a part of the klystron's pulse tank. The modulator's pulse duration is adjustable up to the volt-second limit of its cores, and it is capable of a pulse repetition frequency up to 120 Hz. The modulator's design, construction, and experimental results are the focus of this paper.

  5. High Power Klystrons: Theory and Practice at the Stanford Linear Accelerator CenterPart I

    SciTech Connect

    Caryotakis, G.

    2004-12-15

    This is Part I of a two-part report on design and manufacturing methods used at SLAC to produce accelerator klystrons. Chapter 1 begins with the history and applications for klystrons, in both of which Stanford University was extensively involved. The remaining chapters review the theory of klystron operation, derive the principal formulae used in their design, and discuss the assumptions that they involve. These formulae are subsequently used in small-signal calculations of the frequency response of a particular klystron, whose performance is also simulated by two different computer codes. The results of calculations and simulations are compared to the actual performance of the klystron.

  6. Amended proposal for R&D on a cluster klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Fernow, R.C.; Fischer, J.; Gallardo, J.C.; Kirk, H.G.; Ko, S.K.; Palmer, R.B.; Ulc, S.; Wang, H.

    1993-01-01

    This Proposal is an updated version of FWP submitted in March 1992. Significant work has been done since the original proposal, and much of this is reported on in this update. In addition there have been several changes made, some in response to suggestions made by the three reviews sent to us in December, 1992. The new information and changes include: Technical information on the proposed design of the magnetron gun, the magnet, acceleration gap, and electrical system (including a comment on efficiency loss due to high-voltage leakage current). Modification of the phase I and II tests to allow operation of the gun and klystron off the axis of the magnet, thus simulating the magnet situation when multiple beams are used. Modification of phases III and IV to test a cluster of three beams: first a three beam gun, and then three beams with a klystron on one of them. We have added a phase V which would be the testing of a full three-beam demonstration klystron. The mod-anode pulser would now be located on the high voltage deck instead of externally. Power for the pulser and other high voltage components would now be provided by an isolation transformer instead of from a lead battery. We believe these changes have improved the proposed program and thank the reviewers for their constructive suggestions. The design is still evolving. Relatively little work has been done on the detailed klystron design, and none on the beam dump.

  7. Klystron based high power rf system for proton accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Pande, Manjiri; Shrotriya, Sandip; Sharma, Sonal; Patel, Niranjan; Handu, Verander E-mail: manjiri08@gmail.com

    2011-07-01

    As a part of ADS program a proton accelerator (20 MeV, 30 mA) and its high power RF systems (HPRF) are being developed in BARC. This paper explains design details of this klystron based HPRF system. (author)

  8. Intracavity Single Lens for Focusing of a Klystron Electron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daumenov, T. D.; Khizirova, M. A.

    2016-05-01

    The possibility of application of a single lens for focusing in the vertical direction of an electron flux in superhigh frequency klystron-type devices is shown. This problem is considered in the first approximation by solving a differential equation for the trajectory of particles moving in an electrostatic field with rotational symmetry.

  9. Pulsed klystrons with feedback controlled mod-anode modulators

    SciTech Connect

    Reass, William A; Baca, David M; Jerry, Davis L; Rees, Daniel E

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a fast rise and fall, totem-pole mod-anode modulators for klystron application. Details of these systems as recently installed utilizing a beam switch tube ''on-deck'' and a planar triode ''off-deck'' in a grid-catch feedback regulated configuration will be provided. The grid-catch configuration regulates the klystron mod-anode voltage at a specified set-point during switching as well as providing a control mechanism that flat-top regulates the klystron beam current during the pulse. This flat-topped klystron beam current is maintained while the capacitor bank droops. In addition, we will review more modern on-deck designs using a high gain, high voltage planar triode as a regulating and switching element. These designs are being developed, tested, and implemented for the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator refurbishment project, ''LANSCE-R''. An advantage of the planar triode is that the tube can be directly operated with solid state linear components and provides for a very compact design. The tubes are inexpensive compared to stacked semiconductor switching assemblies and also provide a linear control capability. Details of these designs are provided as well as operational and developmental results.

  10. Inverse Marx modulators for self-biasing klystron depressed collectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, Mark A.

    2014-07-31

    A novel pulsed depressed collector biasing scheme is proposed. This topology feeds forward energy recovered during one RF pulse for use on the following RF pulse. The presented ''inverse'' Marx charges biasing capacitors in series, and discharges them in parallel. Simulations are shown along with experimental demonstration on a 62kW klystron.

  11. 72. View of test system showing Klystron tube installed in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    72. View of test system showing Klystron tube installed in test position on first floor of transmitter building no. 102. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  12. 65. Building 102, view of Klystron tube in amplifier housing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    65. Building 102, view of Klystron tube in amplifier housing showing top of tube connecting conductors. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  13. 64. Building 102, view of Klystron tube amplifier housing with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    64. Building 102, view of Klystron tube amplifier housing with tube removed and showing waveguide entrances at top of photograph. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  14. A Gridded Electron Gun for a Sheet Beam Klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Read, M.E.; Miram, G.; Ives, R.L.; Ivanov, V.; Krasnykh, A.; /SLAC

    2008-04-25

    This paper describes the development of an electron gun for a sheet beam klystron. Initially intended for accelerator applications, the gun can operate at a higher perveance than one with a cylindrically symmetric beam. Results of 2D and 3D simulations are discussed.

  15. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE BEAM MONITOR FOR THE CLUSTER KLYSTRON.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHAO,Y.

    2001-08-21

    The cluster klystron project required a beam monitor to check the quality of the hollow beam shape. Since the power density of the beam is very large, a common phosphorescent screen doesn't work. We investigated varies types of monitors. The related problems were also discussed.

  16. 63. View of Klystron tube cutaway exhibit located at mezzanine ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    63. View of Klystron tube cut-away exhibit located at mezzanine level transmitter building no. 102, directly above RF power generation systems located on first floor. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  17. Klystron Linearizer for Use with 1.2 MW 476 MHz Klystrons in PEP-II RF Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.; Mastorides, T.; Teytelman, D.; Van Winkle, D.; Zhou, Y.; Gallo, A.; /Frascati

    2005-06-15

    The direct and comb loop feedback around the RF cavities in PEP-II is critical in reducing longitudinal instabilities driven by the cavity impedance. The non-linear 1.2 MW klystron is in the signal path for these feedback loops. As a result, the effective small-signal gain of the klystron at 85% saturation reduces the impedance control by factors of 5 to 20 as compared to a linear power amplifier. A klystron linearizer circuit has been developed which operates in series with the power amplifier and acts to equalize the small and large signal gains through the combination. The technique must implement a 1 MHz linear control bandwidth over roughly 15 dB of RF signal level variation. The dynamics of this system is operating point dependent, and the channel must have dynamic gain compensation to keep the linearity compensation loop stable over changes in operating point. The design of this non-linear signal processing channel (incorporating RF and DSP techniques) and measured results from full-power klystron testing are presented.

  18. Design for a One-Gigawatt, Annular-Beam Klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Arfin, Bernard

    2001-01-23

    A one-gigawatt, annular beam klystron (ABK) is being developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory in collaboration with the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The pulse length is 1 {micro}s, the pulse repetition frequency is 5 Hz, and the operating frequency is 1.3 GHz. The beam voltage and current are 800 kV and 4 kA. Since the electron beam parameters are considerably beyond the state-of the-art, an aggressive cathode and electron gun design is required. The magnetron injection gun (MIG) configuration was chosen over the standard Pierce geometry that is typically used in klystrons. The tube design, design issues, and status are presented.

  19. NLC Reliability Analysis Notes: Klystron-Modulator System (LCC-0029)

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Z.

    2004-03-23

    This paper address the reliability and availability issues to be faced in deploying and operating the klystron modulator assemblies proposed for the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The rf power sources are a major system of the NLC and require a high uptime in order to reach the goal of 0.85 availability. Since the NLC is made up of several systems, not just klystron-modulator assemblies, the availability goal for the assemblies must be higher than 0.85. Currently this goal is at least 0.95. This short paper summarizes the analysis currently under way to determine whether the design of the rf power system will meet the design availability goal.

  20. Development and Production of a 201 MHz, 5.0 MW Peak Power Klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Aymar, Galen; Eisen, Edward; Stockwell, Brad; Begum, rasheda; Lenci, Steve; Eisner, Rick; Cesca, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Communications & Power Industries LLC has designed and manufactured the VKP-8201A, a high peak power, high gain, VHF band klystron. The klystron operates at 201.25 MHz, with 5.0 MW peak output power, 34 kW average output power, and a gain of 36 dB. The klystron is designed to operate between 1.0 MW and 4.5 MW in the linear range of the transfer curve. The klystron utilizes a unique magnetic field which enables the use of a proven electron gun design with a larger electron beam requirement. Experimental and predicted performance data are compared.

  1. Periodic permanent magnet development for linear collider X-band klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Sprehn, D.; Caryotakis, G.; Jongewaard, E.; Phillips, R.

    1999-05-01

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) klystron group is currently designing, fabricating and testing 11.424 GHz klystrons with peak output powers from 50 to 75 MW at 1 to 2 {mu}s rf pulsewidths as part of an effort to realize components necessary for the construction of the Next Linear Collider (NLC). In order to eliminate the projected operational-year energy bill for klystron solenoids, Periodic Permanent Magnet (PPM) focusing has been employed on our latest X-band klystron designs. A PPM beam tester has operated at the same repetition rate, voltage and average beam power required for a 75-MW NLC klystron. Prototype 50 and 75-MW PPM klystrons were built and tested during 1996 and 1997 which operate from 50 to 70 MW at efficiencies greater than 55{percent}. Construction and testing of 75-MW research klystrons will continue while the design and reliability is perfected. This paper will discuss the design of these PPM klystrons and the results of testing to date along with future plans for the development of a low-cost Design for Manufacture (DFM) 75-MW klystron and invitation for industry participation. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Periodic permanent magnet development for linear collider X-band klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Sprehn, D.; Caryotakis, G.; Jongewaard, E.; Phillips, R.

    1999-05-07

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) klystron group is currently designing, fabricating and testing 11.424 GHz klystrons with peak output powers from 50 to 75 MW at 1 to 2 {mu}s rf pulsewidths as part of an effort to realize components necessary for the construction of the Next Linear Collider (NLC). In order to eliminate the projected operational-year energy bill for klystron solenoids, Periodic Permanent Magnet (PPM) focusing has been employed on our latest X-band klystron designs. A PPM beam tester has operated at the same repetition rate, voltage and average beam power required for a 75-MW NLC klystron. Prototype 50 and 75-MW PPM klystrons were built and tested during 1996 and 1997 which operate from 50 to 70 MW at efficiencies greater than 55%. Construction and testing of 75-MW research klystrons will continue while the design and reliability is perfected. This paper will discuss the design of these PPM klystrons and the results of testing to date along with future plans for the development of a low-cost Design for Manufacture (DFM) 75-MW klystron and invitation for industry participation.

  3. Design of a Ku band miniature multiple beam klystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Ayan Kumar; Pal, Debasish; Saini, Anil; Kant, Deepender; Saha, Sukalyan; Joshi, Lalit Mohan

    2016-03-01

    The design of a miniature multiple beam klystron (MBK) working in the Ku-band frequency range is presented in this article. Starting from the main design parameters, design of the electron gun, the input and output couplers and radio frequency section (RF-section) are presented. The design methodology using state of the art commercial electromagnetic design tools, analytical formulae as well as noncommercial design tools are briefly presented in this article.

  4. Klystron Cluster Scheme for ILC High Power RF Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Nantista, Christopher; Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC

    2009-07-06

    We present a concept for powering the main linacs of the International Linear Collider (ILC) by delivering high power RF from the surface via overmoded, low-loss waveguides at widely spaced intervals. The baseline design employs a two-tunnel layout, with klystrons and modulators evenly distributed along a service tunnel running parallel to the accelerator tunnel. This new idea eliminates the need for the service tunnel. It also brings most of the warm heat load to the surface, dramatically reducing the tunnel water cooling and HVAC requirements. In the envisioned configuration, groups of 70 klystrons and modulators are clustered in surface buildings every 2.5 km. Their outputs are combined into two half-meter diameter circular TE{sub 01} mode evacuated waveguides. These are directed via special bends through a deep shaft and along the tunnel, one upstream and one downstream. Each feeds approximately 1.25 km of linac with power tapped off in 10 MW portions at 38 m intervals. The power is extracted through a novel coaxial tap-off (CTO), after which the local distribution is as it would be from a klystron. The tap-off design is also employed in reverse for the initial combining.

  5. Advanced Klystrons for High Efficiency Accelerator Systems - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Read, Michael; Ives, Robert Lawrence

    2014-03-26

    This program explored tailoring of RF pulses used to drive accelerator cavities. Simulations indicated that properly shaping the pulse risetime to match accelerator cavity characteristics reduced reflected power and increased total efficiency. Tailoring the pulse requires a high power, gridded, klystron to shape the risetime while also controlling the beam current. The Phase I program generated a preliminary design of a gridded electron gun for a klystron producing 5-10 MW of RF power. This required design of a segmented cathode using Controlled Porosity Reservoir cathodes to limit power deposition on the grid. The program was successful in computationally designing a gun producing a high quality electron beam with grid control. Additional analysis of pulse tailoring indicated that technique would only be useful for cavity drive pulses that were less than approximately 2-3 times the risetime. Otherwise, the efficiency gained during the risetime of the pulse became insignificant when considering the efficiency over the entire pulse. Consequently, it was determined that a Phase II program would not provide sufficient return to justify the cost. Never the less, other applications for a high power gridded gun are currently being pursued. This klystron, for example, would facilitate development inverse Comptom x-ray sources by providing a high repetition rate (10 -100 kHz) RF source.

  6. Relativistic diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haba, Z.

    2009-02-01

    We discuss relativistic diffusion in proper time in the approach of Schay (Ph.D. thesis, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, 1961) and Dudley [Ark. Mat. 6, 241 (1965)]. We derive (Langevin) stochastic differential equations in various coordinates. We show that in some coordinates the stochastic differential equations become linear. We obtain momentum probability distribution in an explicit form. We discuss a relativistic particle diffusing in an external electromagnetic field. We solve the Langevin equations in the case of parallel electric and magnetic fields. We derive a kinetic equation for the evolution of the probability distribution. We discuss drag terms leading to an equilibrium distribution. The relativistic analog of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process is not unique. We show that if the drag comes from a diffusion approximation to the master equation then its form is strongly restricted. The drag leading to the Tsallis equilibrium distribution satisfies this restriction whereas the one of the Jüttner distribution does not. We show that any function of the relativistic energy can be the equilibrium distribution for a particle in a static electric field. A preliminary study of the time evolution with friction is presented. It is shown that the problem is equivalent to quantum mechanics of a particle moving on a hyperboloid with a potential determined by the drag. A relation to diffusions appearing in heavy ion collisions is briefly discussed.

  7. Relativistic diffusion.

    PubMed

    Haba, Z

    2009-02-01

    We discuss relativistic diffusion in proper time in the approach of Schay (Ph.D. thesis, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, 1961) and Dudley [Ark. Mat. 6, 241 (1965)]. We derive (Langevin) stochastic differential equations in various coordinates. We show that in some coordinates the stochastic differential equations become linear. We obtain momentum probability distribution in an explicit form. We discuss a relativistic particle diffusing in an external electromagnetic field. We solve the Langevin equations in the case of parallel electric and magnetic fields. We derive a kinetic equation for the evolution of the probability distribution. We discuss drag terms leading to an equilibrium distribution. The relativistic analog of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process is not unique. We show that if the drag comes from a diffusion approximation to the master equation then its form is strongly restricted. The drag leading to the Tsallis equilibrium distribution satisfies this restriction whereas the one of the Jüttner distribution does not. We show that any function of the relativistic energy can be the equilibrium distribution for a particle in a static electric field. A preliminary study of the time evolution with friction is presented. It is shown that the problem is equivalent to quantum mechanics of a particle moving on a hyperboloid with a potential determined by the drag. A relation to diffusions appearing in heavy ion collisions is briefly discussed. PMID:19391727

  8. Charge density harmonics generation in free-electron relativistic parametric devices.

    PubMed

    Baccaro, S; Demartini, F; Ghigo, A

    1982-04-01

    A single-particle theory of the evolution of the harmonic content of a bunched beam in a relativistic optical klystron is reported. The equations of motion of the electrons in the dispersive-magnetic-drift space are solved analytically, including the effects of the energy and angular spreads of the beam. The theory enables one to predict the optical efficiency of a coherent relativistic scatterer designed for the generation of the third harmonics of the charge density wave (lambda(sc) = 1766 A) induced on the electron beam of the Frascati storage ring, Adone, with gamma = 1200. PMID:19710862

  9. Design and Operation of a 100 kW CW X-band Klystron for Spacecraft Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balkcum, Adam; Mizuhara, Al; Stockwell, Brad; Begum, Rasheda; Cox, Lydia; Forrest, Scott; Perrin, Mark; Zitelli, Lou; Hoppe, Dan; Britcliffe, Mike; Vodonos, Yakov; Liou, R. Roland; Stone, Ernest

    2012-01-01

    A 7.19 GHz klystron producing 100 kW CW of output power over 90 MHz of bandwidth has been designed and three klystrons manufactured for use in a new JPL/NASA transmitter for spacecraft communications. The klystron was fully characterized including its phase pushing figures.

  10. The 5K70SK automatically tuned, high power, S-band klystron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldfinger, A.

    1977-01-01

    Primary objectives include delivery of 44 5K70SK klystron amplifier tubes and 26 remote tuner assemblies with spare parts kits. Results of a reliability demonstration on a klystron test cavity are discussed, along with reliability tests performed on a remote tuning unit. Production problems and one design modification are reported and discussed. Results of PAT and DVT are included.

  11. SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE SUPERCONDUCTING LINAC KLYSTRON TO CAVITY MISMATCH EFFECTS AND COMPENSATION*

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, Mike; Kim, Sang-Ho; Crofford, Mark T

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Observations of several of the 81 klystron output waveforms into their respective superconducting cavities do not correspond with their rectangular klystron inputs in open loop mode. This can't be completely explained by a drooping high voltage power supply especially when the waveform is parabolic. Some possible causes and effects of these anomalies are presented.

  12. Analysis of optical klystron wave guide free electron laser with betatron oscillation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Deepi; Mishra, G.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we analyze the effect of the betatron oscillation on spontaneous emission and gain spectrum of an optical klystron wave guide free electron laser. The analysis also includes the effects of length mismatch of the two undulator sections of the klystron configuration. We observe that intensity and gain can be change with length mismatch parameter without changing the central emission frequency.

  13. S-Band Waveguide Reconfiguration Options for the LCLS RF Gun and L0 Klystron Feeds

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, P.

    2005-01-28

    This note highlights the possible re-configuration options for the existing WR284 S-band waveguide in the klystron gallery, to enable those existing 5045 klystrons to power the RF Gun and the L0 accelerating structures for LCLS. A reconfiguration decision based on the pros and cons for each option is subsequently identified.

  14. SLAC 5045 klystron technical specification SC-700-866-45-R3 (Engineering Materials)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-05-09

    The purpose of this specification is to define the performance characteristics of improved klystrons for operation at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Each klystron shall be capable of supplying 50 megawatts peak, 45 kilowatts average rf power at 2856 Megahertz. It is expected that over the next few years, existing SLAC klystrons will be replaced by the improved klystrons covered by this specification. It is desirable that the klystrons covered by this specification be usable with magnets designed by SLAC under specification No. SC-700-866-46. Recently SLAC has been able to achieve a klystron efficiency in excess of 45% and design information of tubes which have exhibited this efficiency is available. It must be emphasized that one of the most important features of tubes designed to operate to these specifications must be long life. The overall economy of the SLAC linear accelerator program is strongly influenced by klystron life and it is expected that the design of this tube can lead to a minimum operating life equal to that experienced with the older klystrons. In order to increase the probability of long life, SLAC expects to operate the tubes conservatively at 315 kV beam voltage which is approximately 5 kV below the maximum allowed by the specifications. However, it is expected that from time to time, as required by physics experiments, the tubes will be operated at the maximum power allowed.

  15. Improvements in X-band transmitter phase stability through Klystron body temperature regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    This article describes the techniques used and experimental results obtained in improving transmitter stability by control of the klystron body temperature. Related work in the measurement of klystron phase control parameters (pushing factors) is also discussed. The contribution of wave guide temperature excursions to uplink phase stability is presented. Suggestions are made as to the direction of future work in this area.

  16. Improvements in X-band transmitter phase stability through klystron body temperature regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    This article describes the techniques used and experimental results obtained in improving transmitter stability by control of the klystron body temperature. Related work in the measurement of klystron phase control parameters (pushing factors) is also discussed. The contribution of waveguide temperature excursions to uplink phase stability is presented. Suggestions are made as to the direction of future work in this area.

  17. X-Band Multi-Beam Klystron Design and Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Aaron; Neilson, Jeff; Tantawi, Sami

    2015-04-15

    Progress on the development of a 5MW 16 beam x-band multi-beam klystron is presented. The power from each of the 16 klystrons is combined using a matched waveguide network. Mechanical and electric models and simulations are discussed. The status of procuring and assembling parts is presented.

  18. A 12 GHZ 50 MW Klystron for Support of Accelerator Research

    SciTech Connect

    Sprehn, Daryl; Haase, Andrew; Jensen, Aaron; Jongewaard, Erik; Nantista, Christopher; Vlieks, Arnold; /SLAC

    2011-05-31

    A 12 GHz 50MW X-band klystron is under development at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Klystron Department. The klystron will be fabricated to support programs currently underway at three European Labs; CERN, PSI, and INFN Trieste. The choice of frequency selection was due to the CLIC RF frequency changing from 30 GHz to the European X-band frequency of 11.99 GHz in 2008. Since the Klystron Department currently builds 50MW klystrons at 11.424 GHz known collectively as the XL4 klystrons, it was deemed cost-effective to utilize many XL4 components by leaving the gun, electron beam transport, solenoid magnet and collector unchanged. To realize the rf parameters required, the rf cavities and rf output hardware were necessarily altered. Some improvements to the rf design have been made to reduce operating gradients and increase reliability. Changes in the multi-cell output structure, waveguide components, and the window will be discussed along with testing of the devices. Five klystrons known as XL5 klystrons are scheduled for production over the next two years.

  19. Development of a 10 MW Sheet Beam Klystron for the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Sprehn, D.; Jongewaard, E.; Haase, A.; Jensen, A.; Martin, D.; Burke, A.; /SAIC, Sunnyvale

    2009-05-07

    SLAC is developing a 10 MW, 5 Hz, 1.6 ms, L-band (1.3 GHz) Sheet-Beam Klystron as a less expensive and more compact alternative to the ILC baseline Multiple-Beam Klystron. The Klystron is intended as a plug-compatible device of the same beam current and operating voltage as existing Multiple-Beam Klystrons. At this time, a beam tester has been constructed and currently is in test. The beam tester includes an intercepting cup for making beam quality measurements of the 130 A, 40-to-1 aspect ratio beam. Measurements will be made of the electrostatic beam and of the beam after transporting through a drift tube and magnetic focusing system. General theory of operation, design trade-offs, and manufacturing considerations of both the beam tester and klystron will be discussed.

  20. Simulation of conditions for the maximal efficiency of decimeter-wave klystrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baikov, A. Yu.; Grushina, O. A.; Strikhanov, M. N.

    2014-03-01

    Using the mathematical model of electron beam transformation in a narrow tube developed by the authors and the KlypWin program suite, conditions for the maximal efficiency of decimeter-wave klystrons having from three to six amplification stages are simulated. Simulation is based on a real electron-optical system and real parameters of the cavities. It is shown that the maximal efficiency (across the load) is 83% for a four-cavity klystron, 86% for a five-cavity klystron, 88% for a six-cavity klystron, and 90% for a seven-cavity one. The electronic efficiency of the simulated seven-cavity klystron equals 94%, which implies the achievement of a global extremum.

  1. The 250-kW CW klystron amplifier for planetary radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cormier, R.; Mizuhara, A.

    1992-01-01

    The design, construction, and performance testing is described of two Varian klystrons, model VKX-7864A, which replaced the aging and less efficient VA-949J klystrons in the X band planetary radar transmitter on the Goldstone, CA, 70 meter antenna. The project was carried out jointly by the JPL and Varian Assoc. Output power was increased from 200 to 250 kW continuous wave per klystron, and full dc beam power is dissipated in the collector (it was not possible to operate the VA-949J klystrons without RF drive because of limited collector dissipation capability). Replacements were made with a minimum of transmitter modifications. The planetary radar transmitter is now operating successfully with these two klystrons.

  2. Development of a 10 kW, 2.815 GHz Klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, Robert Lawrence; Read, Michael; Patrick, Ferguson

    2015-05-15

    Development of a Periodic Permanent Magnet (PPM) focused klystron is described. The klystron was designed to produce 10 kW CW at 2.815 GHz. The program developed an innovative PPM circuit that provided extremely uniform magnetic fields at the electron beam location while providing unprecedented access to the RF circuit for tuners and water cooling. Simulations indicated the klystron would produce more than 11 kW with an efficiency exceeding 65%. Problems with the mechanical design prevented successful testing of the initial prototype; however, a new design was successfully developed and implemented in a 6 MW klystron developed in a follow-on program. Funding is being pursued to rebuild the 10 kW RF circuit and complete the klystron development.

  3. Study program for design improvements of the X-3060 klystron. Phase 3: Electron gun fabrication and beam analyzer evaluation. Phase 4: Klystron prototype fabrication and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldfinger, A.

    1981-01-01

    A full scale model was produced to verify suggested design changes. Through beam analyzer study, the correct electron beam diameter and cross sectional profile were established in conjunction with the desired confining magnetic field. Comparative data on the performance of the X-3060 klystron, design predictions for the improved klystron, and performance data taken during acceptance testing of the prototype VKS-8274 JPL are presented.

  4. Relativistic geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flury, J.

    2016-06-01

    Quantum metrology enables new applications in geodesy, including relativistic geodesy. The recent progress in optical atomic clocks and in long-distance frequency transfer by optical fiber together pave the way for using measurements of the gravitational frequency redshift for geodesy. The remote comparison of frequencies generated by calibrated clocks will allow for a purely relativistic determination of differences in gravitational potential and height between stations on Earth surface (chronometric leveling). The long-term perspective is to tie potential and height differences to atomic standards in order to overcome the weaknesses and inhomogeneity of height systems determined by classical spirit leveling. Complementarily, gravity measurements with atom interferometric setups, and satellite gravimetry with space borne laser interferometers allow for new sensitivities in the measurement of the Earth's gravity field.

  5. Relativistic Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Bernard J. T.; Markovic, Dragoljub

    1997-06-01

    Preface; Prologue: Conference overview Bernard Carr; Part I. The Universe At Large and Very Large Redshifts: 2. The size and age of the Universe Gustav A. Tammann; 3. Active galaxies at large redshifts Malcolm S. Longair; 4. Observational cosmology with the cosmic microwave background George F. Smoot; 5. Future prospects in measuring the CMB power spectrum Philip M. Lubin; 6. Inflationary cosmology Michael S. Turner; 7. The signature of the Universe Bernard J. T. Jones; 8. Theory of large-scale structure Sergei F. Shandarin; 9. The origin of matter in the universe Lev A. Kofman; 10. New guises for cold-dark matter suspects Edward W. Kolb; Part II. Physics and Astrophysics Of Relativistic Compact Objects: 11. On the unification of gravitational and inertial forces Donald Lynden-Bell; 12. Internal structure of astrophysical black holes Werner Israel; 13. Black hole entropy: external facade and internal reality Valery Frolov; 14. Accretion disks around black holes Marek A. Abramowicz; 15. Black hole X-ray transients J. Craig Wheeler; 16. X-rays and gamma rays from active galactic nuclei Roland Svensson; 17. Gamma-ray bursts: a challenge to relativistic astrophysics Martin Rees; 18. Probing black holes and other exotic objects with gravitational waves Kip Thorne; Epilogue: the past and future of relativistic astrophysics Igor D. Novikov; I. D. Novikov's scientific papers and books.

  6. Preliminary performance of the MKII 17 GHz traveling wave relativistic klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Haimson, J.; Mecklenburg, B.; Stowell, G.; Kreischer, K.E.; Mastovsky, I.

    1999-05-01

    Initial test results are presented of an upgraded RF source developed for high peak power 17 GHz linear accelerator applications. The objectives of this upgrade program were (a) to increase the output capability of the existing vacuum demountable prototype tube so that RF power could also be supplied to a future 2 MeV photoinjector system without appreciable loss of input power to the 17 GHz linac and (b) to investigate the performance of a new design traveling wave output circuit incorporating a racetrack shaped dual output coupler with 5{percent} bandwidth high peak power ceramic RF windows. These recently installed devices are presently being conditioned and tested at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Preliminary performance of the MKII 17 GHz traveling wave relativistic klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Haimson, J.; Mecklenburg, B.; Stowell, G.; Kreischer, K. E.; Mastovsky, I.

    1999-05-07

    Initial test results are presented of an upgraded RF source developed for high peak power 17 GHz linear accelerator applications. The objectives of this upgrade program were (a) to increase the output capability of the existing vacuum demountable prototype tube so that RF power could also be supplied to a future 2 MeV photoinjector system without appreciable loss of input power to the 17 GHz linac and (b) to investigate the performance of a new design traveling wave output circuit incorporating a racetrack shaped dual output coupler with 5% bandwidth high peak power ceramic RF windows. These recently installed devices are presently being conditioned and tested at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center.

  8. A Gridded Electron Gun for a Sheet Beam Klystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, M. E.; Miram, G.; Ives, R. L.; Ivanov, V.; Krasnykh, A.

    2003-12-01

    Calabazas Creek Research, Inc.(CCR) is developing rectangular, gridded, thermionic, dispenser-cathode guns for sheet beam devices. The first application is expected to be klystrons for advanced particle accelerators and colliders. The current generation of accelerators typically use klystrons with a cylindrical beam generated by a Pierce-type electron gun. As RF power is pushed to higher levels, space charge forces in the electron beam limit the amount of current that can be transmitted at a given voltage. The options are to increase the beam voltage, leading to problems with X-Ray shielding and modulator and power supply design, or to develop new techniques for lowering the space charge forces in the electron beam. In this device, the beam has a rectangular cross section. The thickness is constrained as it would in a normal, cylindrically symmetric klystron with a Pierce gun. However, the width of the beam is many times the thickness, and the resulting cross sectional area is much larger than in the conventional device. This allows much higher current and/or a lower voltage before space charge forces become too high. The current program addresses issues related to beam formation at the emitter surface, design and implementation of shadow and control grids in a rectangular geometry. It is directed toward a robust, cost-effective, and reliable mechanical design. A prototype device will be developed that will operate at 415 kV, 250 A for an 80 MW, X-Band, sheet-beam klystron. The cathode will have 100 cm2 of cathode area with an average cathode current loading of 2.5 A/cm2. For short pulse formation, the use of a grid was chosen. The gun has been designed with a combination of 2-D and 3-D codes. 2-D codes were used to determine the starting point for the electrodes to produce the compression (which is in only 1 direction.) These results showed that a very high quality beam could be achieved even in the presence of the shadow grid. 3-D results have shown that the

  9. Theoretical and experimental research on multi-beam klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Ding Yaogen; Peng Jun; Zhu Yunshu; Shi Shaoming

    1999-05-07

    Theoretical and experimental research work on multi-beam klystron (MBK) conducted in Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IECAS) is described in this paper. Research progress on Interaction between multi-electron beam and microwave electric field, multi-beam cavity, filter loaded double gap cavity broadband output circuit, multi-beam electron gun, and periodic reversal focusing system is presented. Performance and measurement results of five types of MBK are also given out. The key technical problems for present MBK are discussed in this paper.

  10. High-Q toroidal cavities for high frequency klystrons.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branch, G. M.

    1972-01-01

    A toroidal cavity developed for a 4-KW 12 GHz satellite-borne television transmitter klystron is described. The cavity has an internal Q 40% higher than that of a conventional cylindrical doubly reentrant cavity, thus yielding higher circuit efficiency and conserving energy which cannot be recovered in multistage depressed potential beam collectors. As a result of optimization studies with a digital computer program for obtaining cavity field distributions by a relaxation method and for computing the intrinsic cavity parameters, a particular cavity configuration with conical reentrant tunnel tips and toroidal walls is shown to provide good thermal characteristics and mechanical rigidity as well as low internal losses.

  11. Towards intense attosecond pulses: using two beams for high order harmonic generation from solid targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasevitch, A. P.; Kohn, R.; von der Linde, D.

    2009-07-01

    The advantages of using two beam high order harmonic generation (HOHG) from solids are discussed. The two-pulse technique allows additional control of the parameters essential for the attosecond pulse generation. We show that spectral filtering is not necessary for the generation of attosecond pulses. The simple oscillating mirror model is in qualitative agreement with the computer simulations. We present the results of first experiments using two beams for HOHG.

  12. A Sheet-Beam Klystron Paper Design Development of a Sheet-Beam Klystron for the NLC

    SciTech Connect

    Caryotakis, G

    2004-03-25

    What may be the first detailed cold test and computer simulation analysis of a Double Sheet Beam Klystron (DSBK) was performed at SLAC. The device was conceptually designed mechanically, and evaluated electrically for beam formation, gain, stability and efficiency. It is believed that the DSBK can be built at a relatively low cost for a future NLC collider and can produce at least 150 MW at 11.4 GHz with PPM focusing. Voltage and current are 450 kV and 640 A, respectively.

  13. Fifty megawatt klystron for the Stanford Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.G.; Lebacqz, J.V.; Konrad, G.T.

    1983-09-01

    The proposed Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) has been designed to provide 50 on 50 GeV electron-positron collisions. The performance of the 240 klystrons driving the two-mile long linac must be upgraded to achieve at least 50 Megawatts of peak power output at a pulse of 5 ..mu..sec and a pulse repetition frequency of 180 pulses per second. The operating frequency of the upgraded linac will continue to be 2856 MHz. A klystron amplifier meeting these new requirements has been designed to operate at 315 kV, ..mu..k = 2, with a computed efficiency of slightly greater than 50%. Initial tests indicate the achievement of the basic power objectives; however, observed parasitic instabilities make beam focusing, RF drive frequency and drive level extremely critical. High electric fields in the electron gun, output gap and output window are all potential problems. Steps taken in the design to overcome these problems are discussed and test results are presented.

  14. Low Beam Voltage, 10 MW, L-Band Cluster Klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Teryaev, V.; Yakovlev, V.P.; Kazakov, S.; Hirshfield, J.L.; /Yale U. /Omega-P, New Haven

    2009-05-01

    Conceptual design of a multi-beam klystron (MBK) for possible ILC and Project X applications is presented. The chief distinction between this MBK design and existing 10-MW MBK's is the low operating voltage of 60 kV. There are at least four compelling reasons that justify development at this time of a low-voltage MBK, namely (1) no pulse transformer; (2) no oil tank for high-voltage components and for the tube socket; (3) no high-voltage cables; and (4) modulator would be a compact 60-kV IGBT switching circuit. The proposed klystron consists of four clusters containing six beams each. The tube has common input and output cavities for all 24 beams, and individual gain cavities for each cluster. A closely related optional configuration, also for a 10 MW tube, would involve four totally independent cavity clusters with four independent input cavities and four 2.5 MW output ports, all within a common magnetic circuit. This option has appeal because the output waveguides would not require a controlled atmosphere, and because it would be easier to achieve phase and amplitude stability as required in individual SC accelerator cavities.

  15. Investigation of a 94 GHz Pseudospark-Sourced Klystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowes, David; Yin, Huabi; Cross, Adrian; He, Wenlong; Phelps, Alan; Ronald, Kevin; Chen, Xiaodong; Li, Daohui

    2010-11-01

    Work is ongoing at the University of Strathclyde to design, construct and test a klystron amplifier with an operating frequency of 94 GHz using a pseudospark discharge beam source. A pseudospark is a form of low-pressure, high-current discharge which produces an electron beam possessing high brightness and self-focusing properties during the final stages of the discharge. Single-gap pseudospark experiments were performed in order to assess the feasibility of scaling down in size previous work carried out at the University of Strathclyde. Using 1mm cathode and anode apertures with 3mm separation, a 10kV voltage applied at a pressure of 100mTorr resulted in a 4 A beam current, which compares favourably with previous discharges. A 3-cavity 94 GHz klystron has been simulated with the particle-in-cell code MAGIC-2D with pulsed voltage and current inputs in keeping with possible pseudospark discharge traces. Efficiency and gain were simulated at 7.38% and 16.5 dB respectively.

  16. A unique power supply for the PEP II klystron at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Cassel, R.; Nguyen, M.N.

    1997-07-01

    Each of the eight 1.2 MW RF klystrons for the PEP-II storage rings require a 2.5 MVA DC power supply of 83 Kv at 23 amps. The design for the supply was base on three factors, low cost, small size to fit existing substation pads, and good protection against damage to the klystron including klystron gun arcs. The supply uses a 12 pulse 12.5 KV primary thyristor star point controller with primary filter inductor to provide rapid voltage control, good voltage regulation, and fast turn off during klystron tube faults. The supply also uses a unique secondary rectifier, filter capacitor configuration to minimize the energy available under a klystron fault. The voltage control is from 0--90 KV with a regulation of < 0.1% and voltage ripple of < 1% P-P, (< 0.2% RMS) above 60 KV. The supply utilizes a thyristor crowbar, which under a klystron tube arc limits the energy in the klystron arc to < 5 joules. If the thyristor crowbar is disabled the energy supplied is < 40 joules into the arc. The size of the supply was reduced small enough to fit the existing PEP transformer yard pads. The cost of the power supply was < $140 per KVA.

  17. 1.2 MW klystron for Asymmetric Storage Ring B Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Fowkes, W.R.; Caryotakis, G.; Doyle, E.

    1995-03-01

    A cw klystron operating at 476 MHz has been developed jointly by SLAC and Varian Associates. The unique set of characteristics of this tube were strongly guided by requirements of the fast feedback necessary to prevent oscillations of the storage ring beams caused by the detuned accelerating cavity. This requires a combination of bandwidth and short group delay within the klystron. The RF feedback stabilization scheme also requires amplitude modulation making it necessary to operate the klystron about 10% below saturation. Performance specifications and initial operating results are presented.

  18. Spectral modulation of higher harmonic spontaneous emission from an optical klystron.

    PubMed

    Sei, Norihiro; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Yamada, Kawakatsu; Koike, Masaki; Ohgaki, Hideaki

    2014-07-01

    Higher harmonics of spontaneous emission from an optical klystron have been observed. The modulation factor of the spontaneous emission spectrum for the higher harmonics can be described by considering the observation system. When the dispersive gap of the optical klystron was fixed, the microstructure interval of the spontaneous emission spectrum at a certain resonant wavelength became narrower as the order of the higher harmonic became larger. Some unique characteristics of the higher harmonics have been clarified, and these studies are likely to contribute to the development of free-electron lasers using higher harmonics of an optical klystron in the shorter-wavelengths region. PMID:24971958

  19. Generation of dissipative temporal solitons in ring self-oscillating systems with amplifier klystrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishin, S. V.; Dmitriev, B. S.; Skorokhodov, V. N.; Sharaevskii, Yu. P.

    2015-09-01

    Theoretical and experimental results are presented that show the possibility of forming periodic pulsed signal sequences with a profile similar to that of bright solitons in a ring self-oscillating system with an amplifier klystron. The generated pulse sequences are dissipative temporal solitons formed in the ring due to the establishment of balance both between gain and loss and between time dispersion and cubic nonlinearity of the klystron. Analytical solutions have been obtained for a generator model with a two-cavity amplifier klystron and an additional cavity resonator, which confirm the possibility of forming these dissipative structures.

  20. Relativistic causality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valente, Giovanni; Owen Weatherall, James

    2014-11-01

    Relativity theory is often taken to include, or to imply, a prohibition on superluminal propagation of causal processes. Yet, what exactly the prohibition on superluminal propagation amounts to and how one should deal with its possible violation have remained open philosophical problems, both in the context of the metaphysics of causation and the foundations of physics. In particular, recent work in philosophy of physics has focused on the causal structure of spacetime in relativity theory and on how this causal structure manifests itself in our most fundamental theories of matter. These topics were the subject of a workshop on "Relativistic Causality in Quantum Field Theory and General Relativity" that we organized (along with John Earman) at the Center for Philosophy of Science in Pittsburgh on April 5-7, 2013. The present Special Issue comprises contributions by speakers in that workshop as well as several other experts exploring different aspects of relativistic causality. We are grateful to the journal for hosting this Special Issue, to the journal's managing editor, Femke Kuiling, for her help and support in putting the issue together, and to the authors and the referees for their excellent work.

  1. 50-MW X-band klystron sources for the next generation of linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Caryotakis, G.; Eppley, K.; Fant, K.; Fowkes, R.; Phillips, R.; Tantawi, S.; Vlieks, A.; Wright, E.

    1994-06-01

    The first in a new series of high-power pulsed klystrons has been tested with the following results: Frequency = 11.4 GHz, beam voltage = 415 kV, power output = 51 MW, pulse length = 1.5 {mu}s, and efficiency = 37%. Several tubes of this type will be used in the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) at SLAC. The rf performance of the klystron, which employs a standing-wave extended-interaction output circuit, is closely approximated by simulations performed with the SLAC CONDOR code. The same code predicts considerably higher efficiency, using a traveling-wave output circuit. A klystron with such a circuit will be constructed in the future. Another klystron is also planned in which beam confinement is accomplished by a periodic permanent magnet (PPM) stack, for which simulations also predict good performance.

  2. PPM focused X-band klystron development at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Sprehn, D.; Caryotakis, G.; Eppley, K.; Phillips, R.M.

    1996-07-01

    X-band klystrons capable of 50 MW and utilizing Periodic Permanent Magnet (PPM) focusing are undergoing design and fabrication at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The klystron development is part of an effort to realize components necessary for the construction of the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The first klystron to be tested this year has a 0.6 microK beam at 465 kV, a 5 cells traveling wave output structure and a predicted efficiency of 63%. A 465 kV, 190 A beam stick with 12 periods of PPM focusing has recently operated to verify the gun optics and transmission of the beam in the absence of rf bunching. Beam transmission greater than 99.8% has been measured. Design and simulation of the beam stick and klystron are discussed, along with performance of the beam stick under confined flow and shielded conditions.

  3. Computer control of the energy output of a klystron in the SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Jobe, R.K.; Browne, M.J.; Flores, M.; Phinney, N.; Schwarz, H.D.; Sheppard, J.C.

    1987-02-01

    Hardware and software have been developed to permit computer control of the output of high power klystrons on a pulsed basis. Control of the klystron output is accomplished by varying the input drive via a pulsed rf attenuator. Careful power calibrations permit accurate calculation of the available energy, as seen by the beam, over the full range of the klystron output. The ability to control precisely the energy output allows for energy feed-forward as well as energy feedback applications. Motivation for this work has been the need to adjust the energy of beams launched into various regions of the SLC. Vernier klystrons play a crucial role in the energy delivered from the SLC injector, linac, and positron source. This paper discusses the hardware development, energy calculations, and software implementation. Operational results are presented.

  4. Relativistic fluid dynamics. Proceedings.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anile, A. M.; Choquet-Bruhat, Y.

    Contents: 1. Covariant theory of conductivity in ideal fluid or solid media (B. Carter). 2. Hamiltonian techniques for relativistic fluid dynamics and stability theory (D. D. Holm). 3. Covariant fluid mechanics and thermodynamics: an introduction (W. Israel). 4. Relativistic plasmas (H. Weitzner). 5. An improved relativistic warm plasma model (A. M. Anile, S. Pennisi). 6. Relativistic extended thermodynamics II (I. Müller). 7. Relativistic extended thermodynamics: general assumptions and mathematical procedure (T. Ruggeri). 8. Relativistic hydrodynamics and heavy ion reactions (D. Strottman). 9. Some problems in relativistic hydrodynamics (C. G. van Weert).

  5. Multi-stage Depressed Collectors (MDC) for efficiency improvements of UHF broadcast klystrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmahl, H. G.

    1982-01-01

    The consumed primary power is reduced and the efficiency of traveling wave tubes is raised through the use of depressed collectors which passively convert potential energy into electric energy. Efficiency was kept with constant within a 3 dB range while the output power varied by 10 dB. Aspects to be considered in transferring this technology to UHF klystrons are the electron energy spectrum of the klystron and the magnitude of the injection angle required.

  6. Investigation of a klystron with a pseudospark-sourced electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowes, D.; Yin, H.; Cross, A. W.; He, W.; Phelps, A. D. R.; Ronald, K.; Chen, X.; Li, D.

    2014-05-01

    Investigation has been undertaken at the University of Strathclyde to simulate, design and construct a klystron amplifier with an operating frequency of 94 GHz. A novel beam source shall be utilized in the form of a pseudospark discharge, a form of low-pressure, high-current plasma discharge which produces an electron beam possessing high brightness as well as self-focusing properties. The seed signal for the klystron will be fed in using a tapered dielectric-lined iris coupling system.

  7. Final Design of the SLAC P2 Marx Klystron Modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, M.A.; Benwell, A.; Burkhart, C.; Larsen, R.; MacNair, D.; Nguyen, M.; Olsen, J.; /SLAC

    2011-11-08

    The SLAC P2 Marx has been under development for two years, and follows on the P1 Marx as an alternative to the baseline klystron modulator for the International Linear Collider. The P2 Marx utilizes a redundant architecture, air-insulation, a control system with abundant diagnostic access, and a novel nested droop correction scheme. This paper is an overview of the design of this modulator. There are several points of emphasis for the P2 Marx design. First, the modulator must be compatible with the ILC two-tunnel design. In this scheme, the modulator and klystron are located within a service tunnel with limited access and available footprint for a modulator. Access to the modulator is only practical from one side. Second, the modulator must have high availability. Robust components are not sufficient alone to achieve availability much higher than 99%. Therefore, redundant architectures are necessary. Third, the modulator must be relatively low cost. Because of the large number of stations in the ILC, the investment needed for the modulator components is significant. High-volume construction techniques which take advantage of an economy of scale must be utilized. Fourth, the modulator must be simple and efficient to maintain. If a modulator does become inoperable, the MTTR must be small. Fifth, even though the present application for the modulator is for the ILC, future accelerators can also take advantage of this development effort. The hardware, software, and concepts developed in this project should be designed such that further development time necessary for other applications is minimal.

  8. Current Status of the Next Linear Collider X-Band Klystron Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Caryotakis, G.; Haase, A.A.; Jongewaard, E.N.; Pearson, C.; Sprehn, D.W.; /SLAC

    2005-05-09

    Klystrons capable of driving accelerator sections in the Next Linear Collider (NLC) have been developed at SLAC during the last decade. In addition to fourteen 50 MW solenoid-focused devices and a 50 MW Periodic Permanent Magnet focused (PPM) klystron, a 500 kV 75 MW PPM klystron was tested in 1999 to 80 MW with 3 {micro}s pulses, but very low duty. Subsequent 75 MW prototypes aimed for low-cost manufacture by employing reusable focusing structures external to the vacuum, similar to a solenoid electromagnet. During the PPM klystron development, several partners (CPI, EEV and Toshiba) have participated by constructing partial or complete PPM klystrons. After early failures during testing of the first two devices, SLAC has recently tested this design (XP3-3) to the full NLC specifications of 75 MW, 1.6 {micro}s pulse length, and 120 Hz. This 14.4 kW average power operation came with an efficiency of 50%. The XP3-3 average and peak output power, together with the focusing method, arguably makes it the most advanced high power klystron ever built anywhere in the world. Design considerations and test results for these latest prototypes will be presented.

  9. Final Report 200 MW L-Band Annular Beam Klystron for Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Read, Michael; Ferguson, Patrick; Ives, Lawrence; Song, Liqun; Carlsten, Bruce; Fazio, Michael

    2009-02-11

    This program developed a 200 MW, 1.3 GHz, Annular Beam Klystron (ABK) for accelerator systems. An ABK provides lower impedance than a conventional klystron, making it possible to produce higher RF powers with lower voltages. With a higher power per unit, fewer klystrons would be required for a large accelerator. Lower voltage also simplifies and reduces the cost of the power supply system. Both features will significantly lower the cost of an RF system. This device operates at 475 kV. The klystron uses a magnetron injection gun producing 1100 A in one microsecond pulses. Power is extracted into fundamental rectangular waveguide through two output windows. The predicted gain is approximately 45 dB with estimated efficiency of 45%. The klystron was assembled, but no facility was available for testing. Consequently, no high power performance measurements are available. Because the assembled klystron is approximately 15 feet long, it was disassembled for storage. It can be reassembled should a use materialize.

  10. Investigation of the Long-Term Performance of the 324 MHz Klystrons for Achieving the Efficient Operation of the Linac at J-PARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, T.; Shinozaki, S.; Chishiro, E.; Sato, F.; Kawamura, M.; Futatsukawa, K.; Fukui, Y.; Oguri, H.

    As a part of the researches of the reliability and life time of klystrons, the cathode performance test of 324 MHz klystrons operated for 32000 hours on line has been performed at the klystron test stand. The experimental results coincide approximately with the data both reported in the literature for the cathode performance and the one obtained from the data base of RF data acquisition system. In this test, two parameters such as klystron beam perveance and knee-point were used to investigate the emission performance. It turned out that klystron beam perveance is most suitable parameter for understanding the klystron performance under operating condition on line.

  11. Two-beam high-order harmonics from solids: Coupling mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasevitch, A.; Wieczorek, J.; Kohn, R.; Bovensiepen, U.; Linde, D. von der

    2010-11-15

    The polarization of the two beam (driver-probe) high-order harmonic generation from solids is measured. The experiments, together with computer simulations, allow us to distinguish two different coupling mechanisms of the driver and the probe, resulting in different harmonic efficiencies and spectral slopes. We find that in the nonrelativistic regime the coupling is mostly due to the nonlinear plasma density modulation.

  12. Relativistic electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Mooney, L.J.; Hyatt, H.M.

    1975-11-11

    A relativistic electron beam generator for laser media excitation is described. The device employs a diode type relativistic electron beam source having a cathode shape which provides a rectangular output beam with uniform current density.

  13. W-band LiGA fabricated klystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Liqun

    2002-01-01

    Klystrino-W-band klystron was proposed by scientists at SLAC to satisfy recent applications in advanced accelerators, medical treatment, radars and communications. LiGA (a German acronym for lithographe, galvanoformung, and abformung) is introduced in the fabrication of klystrino for the first time in the history of microwave tube fabrication. The cold test experiments show that LiGA fabrication yields best surface smoothness compared with an alternative way EDM (Electrical Discharge Machining). Resultantly LiGA fabricated klystrino has the smallest wall loss which maximizes the circuit efficiency of the output structure. A multiple-gap coupled cavity is motivated to be employed as the klystrino output cavity for maximizing the efficiency. Klytrino is simulated by 1-D, 2-D and 3-D simulation codes. Particularly a complete klystrino is simulated intensively using 2-D MAGIC Particle-in-Cell (PIC) code either for beam absence or beam presence. Many simulation techniques are developed such as model transformation from 3-D to 2-D, circuit parameter simulation, dispersion characteristic analysis, pre bunched electron beam mode and so on. Klystrino, as a 3-D structure, is modeled by 3-D MAFIA for analyzing the cold circuit properties. 3-D MAGIC is explored to simulate klystrino for the actual structure analysis and actual beam interaction process observation.

  14. Recent Upgrade of the Klystron Modulator at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, M.N.; Burkhart, C.P.; Lam, B.K.; Morris, B.; /SLAC

    2011-11-04

    The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory employs 244 klystron modulators on its two-mile-long linear accelerator that has been operational since the early days of the SLAC establishment in the sixties. Each of these original modulators was designed to provide 250 kV, 262 A and 3.5 {mu}S at up to 360 pps using an inductance-capacitance resonant charging system, a modified type-E pulse-forming network (PFN), and a pulse transformer. The modulator internal control comprised of large step-start resistor-contactors, vacuum-tube amplifiers, and 120 Vac relays for logical signals. A major, power-component-only upgrade, which began in 1983 to accommodate the required beam energy of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) project, raised the modulator peak output capacity to 360 kV, 420 A and 5.0 {mu}S at a reduced pulse repetition rate of 120 pps. In an effort to improve safety, performance, reliability and maintainability of the modulator, this recent upgrade focuses on the remaining three-phase AC power input and modulator controls. The upgrade includes the utilization of primary SCR phase control rectifiers, integrated fault protection and voltage regulation circuitries, and programmable logic controllers (PLC) -- with an emphasis on component physical layouts for safety and maintainability concerns. In this paper, we will describe the design and implementation of each upgraded component in the modulator control system. We will also report the testing and present status of the modified modulators.

  15. Phase locking and frequency locking of a 140 GHz klystron and a 280 GHz carcinotron

    SciTech Connect

    Sprehn, D.W.; Rettig, C.L.; Luhmann, N.C. Jr. )

    1992-10-01

    A phase and frequency-locked loop to synchronize two microwave tube oscillators for a high density plasma collective scattering diagnostic has been designed, assembled, and tested. A Varian (VRT2121A16) reflex klystron was down converted by mixing with the eighth harmonic of a 17.437 GHz phase-locked Gunn oscillator, and the resulting baseband was used to lock the klystron phase to a 200 MHz crystal. The down-converted 140 GHz klystron frequency spectrum shows a linewidth {lt}50 Hz and sideband power {lt}50 dB below the carrier (dBc). Frequency locking of a Thomson CSF TH4224S 280 GHz carcinotron was performed and the klystron was then down converted by the stabilized carcinotron and phase locked to the 200 MHz crystal. The klystron would track the frequency excursions of the carcinotron when the system was perturbed by direct modulation with frequencies of up to 10 MHz and remained locked as long as modulation sidebands were kept {lt}15 dBc. The locked states of both configurations show 3 to 4 orders of magnitude improvement in short and long term stability over the unlocked states.

  16. Design of a multi beam klystron cavity from its single beam parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kant, Deepender; Joshi, L. M.; Janyani, Vijay

    2016-03-01

    The klystron is a well-known microwave amplifier which uses kinetic energy of an electron beam for amplification of the RF signal. There are some limitations of conventional single beam klystron such as high operating voltage, low efficiency and bulky size at higher power levels, which are very effectively handled in Multi Beam Klystron (MBK) that uses multiple low purveyance electron beams for RF interaction. Each beam propagates along its individual transit path through a resonant cavity structure. Multi-Beam klystron cavity design is a critical task due to asymmetric cavity structure and can be simulated by 3D code only. The present paper shall discuss the design of multi beam RF cavities for klystrons operating at 2856 MHz (S-band) and 5 GHz (C-band) respectively. The design approach uses some scaling laws for finding the electron beam parameters of the multi beam device from their single beam counter parts. The scaled beam parameters are then used for finding the design parameters of the multi beam cavities. Design of the desired multi beam cavity can be optimized through iterative simulations in CST Microwave Studio.

  17. Time-dependent simulation of prebunched one and two-beam free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Mirian, N. S.; Maraghechi, B.

    2014-04-15

    A numerical simulation in one-dimension is conducted to study the slippage effects on prebunched free electron laser. A technique for the simulation of time dependent free electron lasers (FEL) to model the slippage effects is introduced, and the slowly varying envelope approximation in both z and t is used to illustrate the temporal behaviour in the prebunched FEL. Slippage effect on prebunched two-beam FEL is compared with the one-beam modeling. The evaluation of the radiation pulse energy, thermal and phase distribution, and radiation pulse shape in one-beam and two-beam modeling is studied. It was shown that the performance is considerably undermined when the slippage time is comparable to the pulse duration. However, prebunching reduces the slippage. Prebunching also leads to the radiation pulse with a single smooth spike.

  18. Demonstration of two-beam acceleration and 30 GHz power production in the CLIC Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bossart, R.; Braun, H. H.; Carron, G.; Chanudet, M.; Chautard, F.; Delahaye, J. P.; Godot, J. C.; Hutchins, S.; Martinez, C.; Suberlucq, G.; Tenenbaum, P.; Thorndahl, L.; Trautner, H.; Valentini, M.; Wilson, I.; Wuensch, W.

    1999-05-07

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) Test Facility (CTF II) at CERN has recently demonstrated Two-Beam power production and acceleration at 30 GHz. With 41 MW of 30 GHz power produced in 14 ns pulses at a repetition rate of 5 Hz, the main beam has been accelerated by 28 MeV. The 30 GHz RF power is extracted in low impedance decelerating structures from a low-energy, high-current 'drive beam' which runs parallel to the main beam. The average current in the drive-beam train is 25 A, while the peak current exceeds 2 kA. Crosschecks between measured drive-beam charge, 30 GHz power and main-beam energy gain are in good agreement. In this paper, some relevant experimental and technical issues on drive-beam generation, two-beam power production and acceleration are presented.

  19. Numerical Verification of the Power Transfer and Wakefield Coupling in the Clic Two-Beam Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Candel, Arno; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Rawat, V.; Schussman, G.; Ko, K.; Syratchev, I.; Grudiev, A.; Wuensch, W.; /CERN

    2011-08-19

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) provides a path to a multi-TeV accelerator to explore the energy frontier of High Energy Physics. Its two-beam accelerator (TBA) concept envisions complex 3D structures, which must be modeled to high accuracy so that simulation results can be directly used to prepare CAD drawings for machining. The required simulations include not only the fundamental mode properties of the accelerating structures but also the Power Extraction and Transfer Structure (PETS), as well as the coupling between the two systems. Time-domain simulations will be performed to understand pulse formation, wakefield damping, fundamental power transfer and wakefield coupling in these structures. Applying SLAC's parallel finite element code suite, these large-scale problems will be solved on some of the largest supercomputers available. The results will help to identify potential issues and provide new insights on the design, leading to further improvements on the novel two-beam accelerator scheme.

  20. Resolving two beams in beam splitters with a beam position monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, S.

    2002-01-01

    The beam transport system for the Advanced Hydrotest Facility (AHF) anticipates multiple beam splitters. Monitoring two separated beams in a common beam pipe in the splitter sections imposes certain requirements on diagnostics for these sections. In this note we explore a two-beam system in a generic beam monitor and study the feasibility of resolving the positions of the two beams with a single diagnostic device. In the Advanced Hydrotest Facility (AHF), 20-ns beam pulses (bunches) are extracted from the 50-GeV main proton synchrotron and then are transported to the target by an elaborated transport system. The beam transport system splits the beam bunches into equal parts in its splitting sections so that up to 12 synchronous beam pulses can be delivered to the target for the multi-axis proton radiography. Information about the transverse positions of the beams in the splitters, and possibly the bunch longitudinal profile, should be delivered by some diagnostic devices. Possible candidates are the circular wall current monitors in the circular pipes connecting the splitter elements, or the conventional stripline BPMs. In any case, we need some estimates on how well the transverse positions of the two beams can be resolved by these monitors.

  1. Spontaneous emission of the Super-ACO fel optical klystron domino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couprie, M. E.; Bazin, C.; Billardon, M.; Velghe, M.

    1989-12-01

    New free electron laser experiments are planned on the Orsay storage ring Super-ACO, which has been commisioned in 1987 at LURE (Laboratoire d'Utilisation du Rayonnement Electromagnétique). For this purpose, a new insertion device, DOMINO, was set up on Super-ACO in January 1988; it consists of a permanent magnet optical klystron composed of two undulators separated by a dispersive section; the magnetic gaps can be changed independently. Here, the parameters of the optical klystron are specified, and the main steps of the optimization are described. Then, the effect of the insertion device on the stored beam is discussed. The spontaneous emission of the optical klystron has been observed and analysed. Consequently, with the ring parameters measurements, the free electron laser gain versus the current can be evaluated.

  2. Test Results of a Compact Conventional Modulator for Two-Klystron Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, S

    2004-05-04

    Modulator technology has not advanced greatly over the last 30 years. Today, with the advent of the High Voltage, High Power IGBT there are several approaches for a solid state ON/OFF switched modulator. Klystron and accelerator technology is forcing voltages and peak powers higher such as the demand for 500 kV and 500 amperes peak to power two X-Band klystrons. Conventional technology (line-type modulators) were never overly concerned about rise time and efficiency. A few years ago, the klystron department at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) undertook an investigation into what could be done in a conventional modulator at 500 kV. We have reported on test bed measurements and shown both conceptual and hardware pictures during design and construction. We have now completed the modulator tank.

  3. Calculation of the frequency spectrum of an electron beam in a klystron with premodulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, Iu. K.; Kostienko, A. I.

    1982-12-01

    The combined modulation of the electron beam in a klystron with a triode gun is considered. Amplitude modulation of current density (static control) is followed by modulation of electron velocities (dynamic control). The spectral characteristics of the convection current at the input of the energy-extraction device are calculated for large ratios of the dynamic and static control frequencies. Calculations point to the possibility of using low-frequency preliminary amplitude modulation to enhance the electronic efficiency of pulsed klystrons, operating both in the amplification and frequency-multiplication modes.

  4. Measurement of klystron phase modulation due to ac-powered filaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finnegan, E. J.

    1977-01-01

    A technique for determining the intermodulation components in the RF spectrum of the S-band radar transmitter generated by having the klystron filaments heated by 400-Hz ac power is described. When the klystron is being operated with 400-Hz (ac) on the filament, the IPM is buried in the 400-Hz equipment interference noise. The modulation sidebands were separated and identified and found to be-67 db below the main carrier. This is well below the transmitter specifications, and operating the filaments on ac would not degrade the spectrum to where it would be detrimental to the radiated RF.

  5. Solar power satellite 50 kW VKS-7773 cw klystron evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larue, A. D.

    1977-01-01

    A test program for evaluating the electrical characteristics of a cw, 50 kW power output klystron at 2.45 GHz is described. The tube tested was an 8-cavity klystron, the VKS-7773 which had been in storage for seven years. Tests included preliminary testing of the tube, cold tests of microwave components, tests of the electromagnet, and first and second hot tests of the tube. During the second hot test, the tuner in the fifth cavity went down to air, preventing any further testing. Cause of failure is not known, and recommendations are to repair and modify the tube, then proceed with testing as before to meet program objectives.

  6. Recent performance, lifetime, and failure modes of the 5045 klystron population at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Koontz, R.F.; Lee, T.G.; Pearson, C.; Vlieks, A.E.

    1992-08-01

    The 65 MW S-Band klystrons (5045) used to power SLC have been in service for over seven years. Currently, 244 of these tubes are in place on the accelerator, operating full power at 120 pulses per second. Enough tubes have now reached end of life, or experienced other failures to allow a good analysis of failure modes, and to project average lifetime for this type of tube. This paper describes the various modes of failure seen in klystrons rammed from SLC service, and provides data on expected lifetime from current production based on accumulated SLC operating experience.

  7. Relativistic Guiding Center Equations

    SciTech Connect

    White, R. B.; Gobbin, M.

    2014-10-01

    In toroidal fusion devices it is relatively easy that electrons achieve relativistic velocities, so to simulate runaway electrons and other high energy phenomena a nonrelativistic guiding center formalism is not sufficient. Relativistic guiding center equations including flute mode time dependent field perturbations are derived. The same variables as used in a previous nonrelativistic guiding center code are adopted, so that a straightforward modifications of those equations can produce a relativistic version.

  8. Relativistic Linear Restoring Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, D.; Franklin, J.; Mann, N.

    2012-01-01

    We consider two different forms for a relativistic version of a linear restoring force. The pair comes from taking Hooke's law to be the force appearing on the right-hand side of the relativistic expressions: d"p"/d"t" or d"p"/d["tau"]. Either formulation recovers Hooke's law in the non-relativistic limit. In addition to these two forces, we…

  9. A possible pole problem in the formula for klystron gap fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmahl, H. G.

    1977-01-01

    In isolated cases a pole may be encountered in a previously published solution for the fields in a klystron gap. Formulas, permitting the critical combinations of parameters to be defined, are presented. It is noted that the region of inaccuracy surrounding the pole is sufficiently small and that a 0.1% change in the field changing parameter is enough to avoid it.

  10. Three-dimensional evaluation of energy extraction in output cavities of klystron amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmahl, H. G.; Albers, L. U.

    1973-01-01

    Description of an accurate three-dimensional mathematical model and computer program for calculating electronic interaction, electron trajectories, beam interception, and efficiency in the output cavity of a klystron amplifier. The highest computed efficiency for an optimally bunched beam was 80.3% with 6% ideal interception. Efficiency is shown to increase initially with interception.