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Sample records for relaxation time scale

  1. Truncation of scales by time relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Layton, William; Neda, Monika

    2007-01-01

    We study a time relaxation regularization of flow problems proposed and tested extensively by Stolz and Adams. The aim of the relaxation term is to drive the unresolved fluctuations in a computational simulation to zero exponentially fast by an appropriate and often problem dependent choice of its coefficient; this relaxation term is thus intermediate between a tunable numerical stabilization and a continuum modeling term. Our aim herein is to understand how this term, by itself, acts to truncate solution scales and to use this understanding to give insight into parameter selection.

  2. Resistivity scaling and electron relaxation times in metallic nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Moors, Kristof; Sorée, Bart; Magnus, Wim; T?kei, Zsolt

    2014-08-14

    We study the resistivity scaling in nanometer-sized metallic wires due to surface roughness and grain-boundaries, currently the main cause of electron scattering in nanoscaled interconnects. The resistivity has been obtained with the Boltzmann transport equation, adopting the relaxation time approximation of the distribution function and the effective mass approximation for the conducting electrons. The relaxation times are calculated exactly, using Fermi's golden rule, resulting in a correct relaxation time for every sub-band state contributing to the transport. In general, the relaxation time strongly depends on the sub-band state, something that remained unclear with the methods of previous work. The resistivity scaling is obtained for different roughness and grain-boundary properties, showing large differences in scaling behavior and relaxation times. Our model clearly indicates that the resistivity is dominated by grain-boundary scattering, easily surpassing the surface roughness contribution by a factor of 10.

  3. Role of Relaxation Time Scale in Noisy Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Maity, Alok Kumar; Chaudhury, Pinaki; Banik, Suman K

    2015-01-01

    Intra-cellular fluctuations, mainly triggered by gene expression, are an inevitable phenomenon observed in living cells. It influences generation of phenotypic diversity in genetically identical cells. Such variation of cellular components is beneficial in some contexts but detrimental in others. To quantify the fluctuations in a gene product, we undertake an analytical scheme for studying few naturally abundant linear as well as branched chain network motifs. We solve the Langevin equations associated with each motif under the purview of linear noise approximation and derive the expressions for Fano factor and mutual information in close analytical form. Both quantifiable expressions exclusively depend on the relaxation time (decay rate constant) and steady state population of the network components. We investigate the effect of relaxation time constraints on Fano factor and mutual information to indentify a time scale domain where a network can recognize the fluctuations associated with the input signal more reliably. We also show how input population affects both quantities. We extend our calculation to long chain linear motif and show that with increasing chain length, the Fano factor value increases but the mutual information processing capability decreases. In this type of motif, the intermediate components act as a noise filter that tune up input fluctuations and maintain optimum fluctuations in the output. For branched chain motifs, both quantities vary within a large scale due to their network architecture and facilitate survival of living system in diverse environmental conditions. PMID:25955500

  4. Active open boundary forcing using dual relaxation time-scales in downscaled ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzfeld, M.; Gillibrand, P. A.

    2015-05-01

    Regional models actively forced with data from larger scale models at their open boundaries often contain motion at different time-scales (e.g. tidal and low frequency). These motions are not always individually well specified in the forcing data, and one may require a more active boundary forcing while the other exert less influence on the model interior. If a single relaxation time-scale is used to relax toward these data in the boundary equation, then this may be difficult. The method of fractional steps is used to introduce dual relaxation time-scales in an open boundary local flux adjustment scheme. This allows tidal and low frequency oscillations to be relaxed independently, resulting in a better overall solution than if a single relaxation parameter is optimized for tidal (short relaxation) or low frequency (long relaxation) boundary forcing. The dual method is compared to the single relaxation method for an idealized test case where a tidal signal is superimposed on a steady state low frequency solution, and a real application where the low frequency boundary forcing component is derived from a global circulation model for a region extending over the whole Great Barrier Reef, and a tidal signal subsequently superimposed.

  5. Thermodynamic scaling of ?-relaxation time and viscosity stems from the Johari-Goldstein ?-relaxation or the primitive relaxation of the coupling model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngai, K. L.; Habasaki, J.; Prevosto, D.; Capaccioli, S.; Paluch, Marian

    2012-07-01

    By now it is well established that the structural ?-relaxation time, ??, of non-associated small molecular and polymeric glass-formers obey thermodynamic scaling. In other words, ?? is a function ? of the product variable, ??/T, where ? is the density and T the temperature. The constant ? as well as the function, ?? = ?(??/T), is material dependent. Actually this dependence of ?? on ??/T originates from the dependence on the same product variable of the Johari-Goldstein ?-relaxation time, ??, or the primitive relaxation time, ?0, of the coupling model. To support this assertion, we give evidences from various sources itemized as follows. (1) The invariance of the relation between ?? and ?? or ?0 to widely different combinations of pressure and temperature. (2) Experimental dielectric and viscosity data of glass-forming van der Waals liquids and polymer. (3) Molecular dynamics simulations of binary Lennard-Jones (LJ) models, the Lewis-Wahnström model of ortho-terphenyl, 1,4 polybutadiene, a room temperature ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium nitrate, and a molten salt 2Ca(NO3)2.3KNO3 (CKN). (4) Both diffusivity and structural relaxation time, as well as the breakdown of Stokes-Einstein relation in CKN obey thermodynamic scaling by ??/T with the same ?. (5) In polymers, the chain normal mode relaxation time, ?N, is another function of ??/T with the same ? as segmental relaxation time ??. (6) While the data of ?? from simulations for the full LJ binary mixture obey very well the thermodynamic scaling, it is strongly violated when the LJ interaction potential is truncated beyond typical inter-particle distance, although in both cases the repulsive pair potentials coincide for some distances.

  6. Thermodynamic scaling of ?-relaxation time and viscosity stems from the Johari-Goldstein ?-relaxation or the primitive relaxation of the coupling model.

    PubMed

    Ngai, K L; Habasaki, J; Prevosto, D; Capaccioli, S; Paluch, Marian

    2012-07-21

    By now it is well established that the structural ?-relaxation time, ?(?), of non-associated small molecular and polymeric glass-formers obey thermodynamic scaling. In other words, ?(?) is a function ? of the product variable, ?(?)/T, where ? is the density and T the temperature. The constant ? as well as the function, ?(?) = ?(?(?)/T), is material dependent. Actually this dependence of ?(?) on ?(?)/T originates from the dependence on the same product variable of the Johari-Goldstein ?-relaxation time, ?(?), or the primitive relaxation time, ?(0), of the coupling model. To support this assertion, we give evidences from various sources itemized as follows. (1) The invariance of the relation between ?(?) and ?(?) or ?(0) to widely different combinations of pressure and temperature. (2) Experimental dielectric and viscosity data of glass-forming van der Waals liquids and polymer. (3) Molecular dynamics simulations of binary Lennard-Jones (LJ) models, the Lewis-Wahnström model of ortho-terphenyl, 1,4 polybutadiene, a room temperature ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium nitrate, and a molten salt 2Ca(NO(3))(2)·3KNO(3) (CKN). (4) Both diffusivity and structural relaxation time, as well as the breakdown of Stokes-Einstein relation in CKN obey thermodynamic scaling by ?(?)/T with the same ?. (5) In polymers, the chain normal mode relaxation time, ?(N), is another function of ?(?)/T with the same ? as segmental relaxation time ?(?). (6) While the data of ?(?) from simulations for the full LJ binary mixture obey very well the thermodynamic scaling, it is strongly violated when the LJ interaction potential is truncated beyond typical inter-particle distance, although in both cases the repulsive pair potentials coincide for some distances. PMID:22830715

  7. A theoretical study of the stress relaxation in HMX on the picosecond time scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yao; Chen, Jun

    2015-12-01

    The stress relaxation model of ?-HMX on the picosecond time scale is studied by a theoretical approach. The relaxation of normal stress is contributed by lattice vibration, and the relaxation of shear stress is contributed by molecular rotation. Based on this model, the energy dissipation rule of the elastic wave and the profile of the shock wave are investigated. We find at low frequency the dissipation rate of the elastic wave is proportional to the power function of frequency, and under high speed shock loading the width of the stress relaxation zone is less than 0.3 ?m there is a pressure peak with a height of 14 GPa near the wave front.

  8. Coupled relaxations at the protein–water interface in the picosecond time scale

    PubMed Central

    Paciaroni, A.; Cornicchi, E.; Marconi, M.; Orecchini, A.; Petrillo, C.; Haertlein, M.; Moulin, M.; Sacchetti, F.

    2009-01-01

    The spectral behaviour of a protein and its hydration water has been investigated through neutron scattering. The availability of both hydrogenated and perdeuterated samples of maltose-binding protein (MBP) allowed us to directly measure with great accuracy the signal from the protein and the hydration water alone. Both the spectra of the MBP and its hydration water show two distinct relaxations, a behaviour that is reminiscent of glassy systems. The two components have been described using a phenomenological model that includes two Cole–Davidson functions. In MBP and its hydration water, the two relaxations take place with similar average characteristic times of approximately 10 and 0.2 ps. The common time scales of these relaxations suggest that they may be a preferential route to couple the dynamics of the water hydrogen-bond network around the protein surface with that of protein fluctuations. PMID:19640876

  9. Time scale bridging in atomistic simulation of slow dynamics: viscous relaxation and defect activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushima, A.; Eapen, J.; Li, Ju; Yip, S.; Zhu, T.

    2011-08-01

    Atomistic simulation methods are known for timescale limitations in resolving slow dynamical processes. Two well-known scenarios of slow dynamics are viscous relaxation in supercooled liquids and creep deformation in stressed solids. In both phenomena the challenge to theory and simulation is to sample the transition state pathways efficiently and follow the dynamical processes on long timescales. We present a perspective based on the biased molecular simulation methods such as metadynamics, autonomous basin climbing (ABC), strain-boost and adaptive boost simulations. Such algorithms can enable an atomic-level explanation of the temperature variation of the shear viscosity of glassy liquids, and the relaxation behavior in solids undergoing creep deformation. By discussing the dynamics of slow relaxation in two quite different areas of condensed matter science, we hope to draw attention to other complex problems where anthropological or geological-scale time behavior can be simulated at atomic resolution and understood in terms of micro-scale processes of molecular rearrangements and collective interactions. As examples of a class of phenomena that can be broadly classified as materials ageing, we point to stress corrosion cracking and cement setting as opportunities for atomistic modeling and simulations.

  10. Rotational relaxation time as unifying time scale for polymer and fiber drag reduction

    E-print Network

    Boelens, A M P

    2015-01-01

    Using hybrid Direct Numerical Simulation with Langevin dynamics, a comparison is performed between polymer and fiber stress tensors in turbulent flow. The stress tensors are found to be similar, suggesting a common drag reducing mechanism in the onset regime for both flexible polymers and rigid fibers. Since fibers do not have an elastic backbone this must be a viscous effect. Analysis of the viscosity tensor reveals that all terms are negligible, except the off-diagonal shear viscosity associated with rotation. Based on this analysis, we identify the rotational orientation time as the unifying time scale setting a new time criterion for drag reduction by both flexible polymers and rigid fibers.

  11. Nonadiabatic dynamics of electron transfer in solution: Explicit and implicit solvent treatments that include multiple relaxation time scales

    SciTech Connect

    Schwerdtfeger, Christine A.; Soudackov, Alexander V.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2014-01-21

    The development of efficient theoretical methods for describing electron transfer (ET) reactions in condensed phases is important for a variety of chemical and biological applications. Previously, dynamical dielectric continuum theory was used to derive Langevin equations for a single collective solvent coordinate describing ET in a polar solvent. In this theory, the parameters are directly related to the physical properties of the system and can be determined from experimental data or explicit molecular dynamics simulations. Herein, we combine these Langevin equations with surface hopping nonadiabatic dynamics methods to calculate the rate constants for thermal ET reactions in polar solvents for a wide range of electronic couplings and reaction free energies. Comparison of explicit and implicit solvent calculations illustrates that the mapping from explicit to implicit solvent models is valid even for solvents exhibiting complex relaxation behavior with multiple relaxation time scales and a short-time inertial response. The rate constants calculated for implicit solvent models with a single solvent relaxation time scale corresponding to water, acetonitrile, and methanol agree well with analytical theories in the Golden rule and solvent-controlled regimes, as well as in the intermediate regime. The implicit solvent models with two relaxation time scales are in qualitative agreement with the analytical theories but quantitatively overestimate the rate constants compared to these theories. Analysis of these simulations elucidates the importance of multiple relaxation time scales and the inertial component of the solvent response, as well as potential shortcomings of the analytical theories based on single time scale solvent relaxation models. This implicit solvent approach will enable the simulation of a wide range of ET reactions via the stochastic dynamics of a single collective solvent coordinate with parameters that are relevant to experimentally accessible systems.

  12. Nonadiabatic dynamics of electron transfer in solution: Explicit and implicit solvent treatments that include multiple relaxation time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwerdtfeger, Christine A.; Soudackov, Alexander V.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    The development of efficient theoretical methods for describing electron transfer (ET) reactions in condensed phases is important for a variety of chemical and biological applications. Previously, dynamical dielectric continuum theory was used to derive Langevin equations for a single collective solvent coordinate describing ET in a polar solvent. In this theory, the parameters are directly related to the physical properties of the system and can be determined from experimental data or explicit molecular dynamics simulations. Herein, we combine these Langevin equations with surface hopping nonadiabatic dynamics methods to calculate the rate constants for thermal ET reactions in polar solvents for a wide range of electronic couplings and reaction free energies. Comparison of explicit and implicit solvent calculations illustrates that the mapping from explicit to implicit solvent models is valid even for solvents exhibiting complex relaxation behavior with multiple relaxation time scales and a short-time inertial response. The rate constants calculated for implicit solvent models with a single solvent relaxation time scale corresponding to water, acetonitrile, and methanol agree well with analytical theories in the Golden rule and solvent-controlled regimes, as well as in the intermediate regime. The implicit solvent models with two relaxation time scales are in qualitative agreement with the analytical theories but quantitatively overestimate the rate constants compared to these theories. Analysis of these simulations elucidates the importance of multiple relaxation time scales and the inertial component of the solvent response, as well as potential shortcomings of the analytical theories based on single time scale solvent relaxation models. This implicit solvent approach will enable the simulation of a wide range of ET reactions via the stochastic dynamics of a single collective solvent coordinate with parameters that are relevant to experimentally accessible systems.

  13. Geometric approach to multiple-time-scale kinetics: a nonlinear master equation describing vibration-to-vibration relaxation.

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M. J.; Skodje, R. T.; Chemistry; Univ. of Colorado

    2001-01-01

    A geometric approach to the study of multiple-time-scale kinetics is taken here. The approach to equilibrium for kinetic systems is studied via low-dimensional manifolds, with an application to a nonlinear master equation for vibrational relaxation. One of our main concerns is the asymptotic (in time) behavior of the system and whether there is a well-defined rate of approach to equilibrium. One-dimensional slow manifolds provide a good means for studying such behavior in nonlinear systems, because they are the analogue of the eigenvector with least negative eigenvalue for linear kinetics.

  14. Ligand-Centred Fluorescence and Electronic Relaxation Cascade at Vibrational Time Scales in Transition-Metal Complexes.

    PubMed

    Messina, Fabrizio; Pomarico, Enrico; Silatani, Mahsa; Baranoff, Etienne; Chergui, Majed

    2015-11-19

    Using femtosecond-resolved photoluminescence up-conversion, we report the observation of the fluorescence of the high-lying ligand-centered (LC) electronic state upon 266 nm excitation of an iridium complex, Ir(ppy)3, with a lifetime of 70 ± 10 fs. It is accompanied by a simultaneous emission of all lower-lying electronic states, except the lowest triplet metal-to-ligand charge-transfer ((3)MLCT) state that shows a rise on the same time scale. Thus, we observe the departure, the intermediate steps, and the arrival of the relaxation cascade spanning ?1.6 eV from the (1)LC state to the lowest (3)MLCT state, which then yields the long-lived luminescence of the molecule. This represents the first measurement of the total relaxation time over an entire cascade of electronic states in a polyatomic molecule. We find that the relaxation cascade proceeds in ?10 fs, which is faster than some of the highest-frequency modes of the system. We invoke the participation of the latter modes in conical intersections and their overdamping to low-frequency intramolecular modes. On the basis of literature, we also conclude that this behavior is not specific to transition-metal complexes but also applies to organic molecules. PMID:26509329

  15. Orientational relaxation of aligned rod-like micelles on a time scale of 300 ms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbst, L.; Hoffmann, H.; Kalus, J.; Thurn, H.; Ibel, K.; May, R. P.

    1986-04-01

    Data on the time dependence of small-angle diffraction patterns of aligned rod-like micelles are presented. The system is a 20 mM solution of cetylpyridinium salicylate in D 2O in the presence of 20 mM NaCl. Under these conditions rod-like micelles are present which are more than 500 Å long. These micelles can be aligned by a shear gradient ?. The time dependence of the anisotropic neutron small-angle diffraction pattern is followed in time steps of 250 ms after a sudden reduction of ? to zero. The scattering curves can be fitted with a single fit parameter, the rotational diffusion coefficient D. The rotational diffusion coefficient turns out to be time dependent. This probably indicates an interaction between the charged micelles.

  16. Relaxation times estimation in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baselice, Fabio; Caivano, Rocchina; Cammarota, Aldo; Ferraioli, Giampaolo; Pascazio, Vito

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging is a very powerful techniques for soft tissue diagnosis. At the present, the clinical evaluation is mainly conducted exploiting the amplitude of the recorded MR image which, in some specific cases, is modified by using contrast enhancements. Nevertheless, spin-lattice (T1) and spin-spin (T2) relaxation times can play an important role in many pathology diagnosis, such as cancer, Alzheimer or Parkinson diseases. Different algorithms for relaxation time estimation have been proposed in literature. In particular, the two most adopted approaches are based on Least Squares (LS) and on Maximum Likelihood (ML) techniques. As the amplitude noise is not zero mean, the first one produces a biased estimator, while the ML is unbiased but at the cost of high computational effort. Recently the attention has been focused on the estimation in the complex, instead of the amplitude, domain. The advantage of working with real and imaginary decomposition of the available data is mainly the possibility of achieving higher quality estimations. Moreover, the zero mean complex noise makes the Least Square estimation unbiased, achieving low computational times. First results of complex domain relaxation times estimation on real datasets are presented. In particular, a patient with an occipital lesion has been imaged on a 3.0T scanner. Globally, the evaluation of relaxation times allow us to establish a more precise topography of biologically active foci, also with respect to contrast enhanced images.

  17. The Abridgment and Relaxation Time for a Linear Multi-Scale Model Based on Multiple Site Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuo; Cao, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Random effect in cellular systems is an important topic in systems biology and often simulated with Gillespie’s stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA). Abridgment refers to model reduction that approximates a group of reactions by a smaller group with fewer species and reactions. This paper presents a theoretical analysis, based on comparison of the first exit time, for the abridgment on a linear chain reaction model motivated by systems with multiple phosphorylation sites. The analysis shows that if the relaxation time of the fast subsystem is much smaller than the mean firing time of the slow reactions, the abridgment can be applied with little error. This analysis is further verified with numerical experiments for models of bistable switch and oscillations in which linear chain system plays a critical role. PMID:26263559

  18. First Passage Times, Lifetimes, and Relaxation Times of Unfolded Proteins.

    PubMed

    Dai, Wei; Sengupta, Anirvan M; Levy, Ronald M

    2015-07-24

    The dynamics of proteins in the unfolded state can be quantified in computer simulations by calculating a spectrum of relaxation times which describes the time scales over which the population fluctuations decay to equilibrium. If the unfolded state space is discretized, we can evaluate the relaxation time of each state. We derive a simple relation that shows the mean first passage time to any state is equal to the relaxation time of that state divided by the equilibrium population. This explains why mean first passage times from state to state within the unfolded ensemble can be very long but the energy landscape can still be smooth (minimally frustrated). In fact, when the folding kinetics is two-state, all of the unfolded state relaxation times within the unfolded free energy basin are faster than the folding time. This result supports the well-established funnel energy landscape picture and resolves an apparent contradiction between this model and the recently proposed kinetic hub model of protein folding. We validate these concepts by analyzing a Markov state model of the kinetics in the unfolded state and folding of the miniprotein NTL9 (where NTL9 is the N-terminal domain of the ribosomal protein L9), constructed from a 2.9 ms simulation provided by D. E. Shaw Research. PMID:26252709

  19. Fractal time, ultrametric topology and fast relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlad, Marcel Ovidiu

    1994-06-01

    An ultrametric model for very fast relaxation processes is suggested. We assume that a relaxation step is a succession of series- parallel elementary processes organized in a hierarchical structure formed from branches (relaxation channels) grouped in levels. The model is characterized by the following parameters: the average number < n> 0 of channels from the zeroth level of the hierarchy; the probability ? that in a given level a new channel is generated, the frequency ? 0 of an elementary process and the probability of decay p attached to an overall relaxation step. The number of relaxation channels increases exponentially with the level index; as a result the survival probability of the model, l(t), decreases much faster than the usual exponential law: l(t) = exp { - 0p[( {1}/{?})-1] [ exp[ {? 0t? }/{(1-?)}]-s1]} . Due to this double exponential decay not only all positive moments of the lifetime probability density ?(t) = - {?l(t)}/{?(t)} exist and are finite, but also all positive moments of the exponential of the lifetime, exp(? t), ?> 0, exist and are finite. The relationships among the fast relaxation (1), the exponential (Markovian) relaxation (2) and the fractal time (slow) relaxation (3) are clarified: in the succession (1) ? (2) ? (3) each relaxation law can be obtained from the preceding one through a logarithmic transformation of the time variable. These three laws can be obtained by maximizing the informational entropy of the lifetime distribution; in the succession (1) ? (2) ? (3) the isoperimetric condition corresponding to a given law can be obtained from the isoperimetric condition of the preceeding law by a logarithmic transformation of time. The fast relaxation and the fractal time laws play symmetrical roles in comparison with the Markovian relaxation. The fast relaxation corresponds to an “antifractal” behavior.

  20. Well-Posedness and Singular Limit of a Semilinear Hyperbolic Relaxation System with a Two-Scale Discontinuous Relaxation Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coquel, Frédéric; Jin, Shi; Liu, Jian-Guo; Wang, Li

    2014-08-01

    Nonlinear hyperbolic systems with relaxations may encounter different scales of relaxation time, which is a prototype multiscale phenomenon that arises in many applications. In such a problem the relaxation time is of O(1) in part of the domain and very small in the remaining domain in which the solution can be approximated by the zero relaxation limit which can be solved numerically much more efficiently. For the Jin-Xin relaxation system in such a two-scale setting, we establish its wellposedness and singular limit as the (smaller) relaxation time goes to zero. The limit is a multiscale coupling problem which couples the original Jin-Xin system on the domain when the relaxation time is O(1) with its relaxation limit in the other domain through interface conditions which can be derived by matched interface layer analysis.As a result, we also establish the well-posedness and regularity (such as boundedness in sup norm with bounded total variation and L 1-contraction) of the coupling problem, thus providing a rigorous mathematical foundation, in the general nonlinear setting, to the multiscale domain decomposition method for this two-scale problem originally proposed in Jin et al. in Math. Comp. 82, 749-779, 2013.

  1. Relaxation times of dissipative many-body quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Žnidari?, Marko

    2015-10-01

    We study relaxation times, also called mixing times, of quantum many-body systems described by a Lindblad master equation. We in particular study the scaling of the spectral gap with the system length, the so-called dynamical exponent, identifying a number of transitions in the scaling. For systems with bulk dissipation we generically observe different scaling for small and for strong dissipation strength, with a critical transition strength going to zero in the thermodynamic limit. We also study a related phase transition in the largest decay mode. For systems with only boundary dissipation we show a generic bound that the gap cannot be larger than ?1/L. In integrable systems with boundary dissipation one typically observes scaling of ?1/L^{3}, while in chaotic ones one can have faster relaxation with the gap scaling as ?1/L and thus saturating the generic bound. We also observe transition from exponential to algebraic gap in systems with localized modes. PMID:26565204

  2. Relaxation times of dissipative many-body quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žnidari?, Marko

    2015-10-01

    We study relaxation times, also called mixing times, of quantum many-body systems described by a Lindblad master equation. We in particular study the scaling of the spectral gap with the system length, the so-called dynamical exponent, identifying a number of transitions in the scaling. For systems with bulk dissipation we generically observe different scaling for small and for strong dissipation strength, with a critical transition strength going to zero in the thermodynamic limit. We also study a related phase transition in the largest decay mode. For systems with only boundary dissipation we show a generic bound that the gap cannot be larger than ˜1 /L . In integrable systems with boundary dissipation one typically observes scaling of ˜1 /L3 , while in chaotic ones one can have faster relaxation with the gap scaling as ˜1 /L and thus saturating the generic bound. We also observe transition from exponential to algebraic gap in systems with localized modes.

  3. Relaxation time of non-conformal plasma

    E-print Network

    Alex Buchel

    2009-11-27

    We study effective relaxation time of viscous hydrodynamics of strongly coupled non-conformal gauge theory plasma using gauge theory/string theory correspondence. We compute leading corrections to the conformal plasma relaxation time from the relevant deformations due to dim-2 and dim-3 operators. We discuss in details the relaxation time tau_eff of N=2^* plasma. For a certain choice of masses this theory undergoes a phase transition with divergent specific heat c_V ~ |1-T_c/T|^(-1/2). Although the bulk viscosity remains finite all the way to the critical temperature, we find that tau_eff diverges near the critical point as tau_eff ~ |1-T_c/T|^(-1/2).

  4. Alternate Forms Reliability of the Behavioral Relaxation Scale: Preliminary Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundervold, Duane A.; Dunlap, Angel L.

    2006-01-01

    Alternate forms reliability of the Behavioral Relaxation Scale (BRS; Poppen,1998), a direct observation measure of relaxed behavior, was examined. A single BRS score, based on long duration observation (5-minute), has been found to be a valid measure of relaxation and is correlated with self-report and some physiological measures. Recently,…

  5. Serpentine channels: micro -- rheometers for fluid relaxation times

    E-print Network

    Zilz, Josephine; Wagner, Christian; Poole, Robert J; Alves, Manuel A; Lindner, Anke

    2013-01-01

    We propose a novel device capable of measuring the relaxation time of viscoelastic fluids as small as 1\\,ms. In contrast to most rheometers, which by their very nature are concerned with producing viscometric or nearly-viscometric flows, here we make use of an elastic instability which occurs in the flow of viscoelastic fluids with curved streamlines. To calibrate the rheometer we combine simple scaling arguments with relaxation times obtained from first normal-stress difference data measured in a classical shear rheometer. As an additional check we also compare these relaxation times to those obtained from Zimm theory and good agreement is observed. Once calibrated, we show how the serpentine rheometer can be used to access smaller polymer concentrations and lower solvent viscosities where classical measurements become difficult or impossible to use due to inertial and/or resolution limitations. In the absence of calibration the serpentine channel can still be a very useful comparative or index device.

  6. Serpentine channels: micro -- rheometers for fluid relaxation times

    E-print Network

    Josephine Zilz; Christof Schäfer; Christian Wagner; Robert J. Poole; Manuel A. Alves; Anke Lindner

    2013-10-06

    We propose a novel device capable of measuring the relaxation time of viscoelastic fluids as small as 1\\,ms. In contrast to most rheometers, which by their very nature are concerned with producing viscometric or nearly-viscometric flows, here we make use of an elastic instability which occurs in the flow of viscoelastic fluids with curved streamlines. To calibrate the rheometer we combine simple scaling arguments with relaxation times obtained from first normal-stress difference data measured in a classical shear rheometer. As an additional check we also compare these relaxation times to those obtained from Zimm theory and good agreement is observed. Once calibrated, we show how the serpentine rheometer can be used to access smaller polymer concentrations and lower solvent viscosities where classical measurements become difficult or impossible to use due to inertial and/or resolution limitations. In the absence of calibration the serpentine channel can still be a very useful comparative or index device.

  7. Crossover time in relative fluctuations characterizes the longest relaxation time of entangled polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uneyama, Takashi; Akimoto, Takuma; Miyaguchi, Tomoshige

    2012-09-01

    In entangled polymer systems, there are several characteristic time scales, such as the entanglement time and the disengagement time. In molecular simulations, the longest relaxation time (the disengagement time) can be determined by the mean square displacement (MSD) of a segment or by the shear relaxation modulus. Here, we propose the relative fluctuation analysis method, which is originally developed for characterizing large fluctuations, to determine the longest relaxation time from the center of mass trajectories of polymer chains (the time-averaged MSDs). Applying the method to simulation data of entangled polymers (by the slip-spring model and the simple reptation model), we provide a clear evidence that the longest relaxation time is estimated as the crossover time in the relative fluctuations.

  8. Hyperpolarized Nanodiamond with Long Spin Relaxation Times

    E-print Network

    Ewa Rej; Torsten Gaebel; Thomas Boele; David E. J. Waddington; David J. Reilly

    2015-02-22

    The use of hyperpolarized agents in magnetic resonance (MR), such as 13C-labeled compounds, enables powerful new imaging and detection modalities that stem from a 10,000-fold boost in signal. A major challenge for the future of the hyperpolarizaton technique is the inherently short spin relaxation times, typically cryogenic and room temperature without the use of toxic free- radicals, and, owing to their solid-state environment, exhibit relaxation times exceeding 1 hour. Combined with the already established applications of NDs in the life-sciences as inexpensive fluorescent markers and non-cytotoxic substrates for gene and drug delivery, these results extend the theranostic capabilities of nanoscale diamonds into the domain of hyperpolarized MR.

  9. Nuclear Spin Relaxation Times for Methane-Helium ``Slush'' at 4 MHz using Pulsed NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamida, J. A.; Sullivan, N. S.

    2006-09-01

    We report measurements of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) and spin-spin relaxation times (T2) for small grains of methane suspended in liquid helium (methane-helium "slush") for temperatures 2 Krelaxation rate 1/T2 is consistent with internal diffusion as opposed to surface scattering, which has been shown to be dominant for hydrogen-helium "slush". The most interesting feature observed for methane-helium mixtures is the existence of three different time scales for samples aged at 4.2 K. The possible origins of this distribution of relaxation times are discussed.

  10. Relaxation Mode Analysis and Scale-Dependent Energy Landscape Statistics in Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Zhikun; Zhang, Yang

    2015-03-01

    In contrast to the prevailing focus on short-lived classical phonon modes in liquids, we propose a classical treatment of the relaxation modes in liquids under a framework analogous to the normal mode analysis in solids. Our relaxation mode analysis is built upon the experimentally measurable two-point density-density correlation function (e.g. using quasi-elastic and inelastic scattering experiments). We show in the Laplace-inverted relaxation frequency z-domain, the eigen relaxation modes are readily decoupled. From here, important statistics of the scale-dependent activation energy in the energy landscape as well as the scale-dependent relaxation time distribution function can be obtained. We first demonstrate this approach in the case of supercooled liquids when dynamic heterogeneity emerges in the landscape-influenced regime. And then we show, using this framework, we are able to extract the scale-dependent energy landscape statistics from neutron scattering measurements.

  11. Communication: Tracking molecular structure deformation and relaxation in real time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Liu, W. L.; Song, Y. F.; Liu, Y. Q.; Duo, L. P.; Jiang, L. L.; Yu, G. Y.; Yang, Y. Q.

    2015-08-01

    The CH3I structural deformation induced by strong laser fields is revealed by time- and frequency-resolved ro-vibrational spectra. The experimental results show that the CH3I molecule undergoes ultrafast structural deformation of CH3 "umbrella-closing" induced by the strong fs laser field (more than 1011 W/cm2) and followed by a structural relaxation of "umbrella-opening" within an exponential decay time scale of ˜620 fs. This study provides a first glimpse of the immense potential of the time- and frequency-resolved vibrational spectra in studying molecular deformation dynamics.

  12. Anomalous magnetoconductivity and relaxation times in holography

    E-print Network

    Amadeo Jimenez-Alba; Karl Landsteiner; Yan Liu; Ya-Wen Sun

    2015-05-04

    We study the magnetoconductivity induced by the axial anomaly via the chiral magnetic effect in strongly coupled holographic models. An important ingredient in our models is that the axial charge is non-conserved beyond the axial anomaly. We achieve this either by explicit symmetry breaking via a non-vanishing non-normalisable mode of an axially charged scalar or using a Stuckelberg field to make the AdS-bulk gauge field massive. The DC magnetoconductivites can be calculated analytically. They take a universal form in terms of gauge field mass at the horizon and quadratic dependence on the magnetic field. The axial charge relaxation time grows linearly with magnetic field in the large $B$ regime. Most strikingly positive magnetoconductivity is still present even when the relaxation times are short $\\tau_5 \\approx 1/(\\pi T)$ and the axial charge can not be thought of as an approximate symmetry. In the $U(1)_A$ explicit breaking model, we also observe that the axial magnetic conductivity in the limit of strong symmetry breaking approaches the same universal value as for anomalous holographic superconductors in the zero temperature limit.

  13. Anomalous magnetoconductivity and relaxation times in holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez-Alba, Amadeo; Landsteiner, Karl; Liu, Yan; Sun, Ya-Wen

    2015-07-01

    We study the magnetoconductivity induced by the axial anomaly via the chiral magnetic effect in strongly coupled holographic models. An important ingredient in our models is that the axial charge is non-conserved beyond the axial anomaly. We achieve this either by explicit symmetry breaking via a non-vanishing non-normalisable mode of an axially charged scalar or using a Stückelberg field to make the AdS-bulk gauge field massive. The DC magnetoconductivites can be calculated analytically. They take a universal form in terms of gauge field mass at the horizon and quadratic dependence on the magnetic field. The axial charge relaxation time grows linearly with magnetic field in the large B regime. Most strikingly positive magnetoconductivity is still present even when the relaxation times are short ? 5 ? 1/( ?T) and the axial charge can not be thought of as an approximate symmetry. In the U(1) A explicit breaking model, we also observe that the chiral separation conductivity and the axial magnetic conductivity for the consistent axial current vanish in the limit of strong symmetry breaking.

  14. Anomalous magnetoconductivity and relaxation times in holography

    E-print Network

    Jimenez-Alba, Amadeo; Liu, Yan; Sun, Ya-Wen

    2015-01-01

    We study the magnetoconductivity induced by the axial anomaly via the chiral magnetic effect in strongly coupled holographic models. An important ingredient in our models is that the axial charge is non-conserved beyond the axial anomaly. We achieve this either by explicit symmetry breaking via a non-vanishing non-normalisable mode of an axially charged scalar or using a Stuckelberg field to make the AdS-bulk gauge field massive. The DC magnetoconductivites can be calculated analytically. They take a universal form in terms of gauge field mass at the horizon and quadratic dependence on the magnetic field. The axial charge relaxation time grows linearly with magnetic field in the large $B$ regime. Most strikingly positive magnetoconductivity is still present even when the relaxation times are short $\\tau_5 \\approx 1/(\\pi T)$ and the axial charge can not be thought of as an approximate symmetry. In the $U(1)_A$ explicit breaking model, we also observe that the axial magnetic conductivity in the limit of strong ...

  15. Magnetic field dependence of plasma relaxation times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D.; Joyce, G.; Turner, L.

    1974-01-01

    A previously derived Fokker-Planck collision integral for an electron plasma in a dc magnetic field is examined in the limit in which the Debye length is greater than the thermal gyroradius, which is in turn greater than the mean distance of closest approach. It is demonstrated that the collision integral can be satisfactorily approximated by the classical Landau value (which ignores the presence of a dc magnetic field) if the following replacement is made: In the Coulomb logarithm, the Debye length is replaced by the gyroradius. This induces a fundamental logarithmic dependence on magnetic field in the relaxation times. Numerical comparison of the asymptotic approximations with the previously derived exact results is made, and good agreement is found. The simplification this introduces into the description of collision processes in magnetized plasma is considerable.

  16. Occupational Cohort Time Scales

    PubMed Central

    Roth, H. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study explores how highly correlated time variables (occupational cohort time scales) contribute to confounding and ambiguity of interpretation. Methods: Occupational cohort time scales were identified and organized through simple equations of three time scales (relational triads) and the connections between these triads (time scale web). The behavior of the time scales was examined when constraints were imposed on variable ranges and interrelationships. Results: Constraints on a time scale in a triad create high correlations between the other two time scales. These correlations combine with the connections between relational triads to produce association paths. High correlation between time scales leads to ambiguity of interpretation. Conclusions: Understanding the properties of occupational cohort time scales, their relational triads, and the time scale web is helpful in understanding the origins of otherwise obscure confounding bias and ambiguity of interpretation. PMID:25647318

  17. Ultrafast relaxation rates and reversal time in disordered ferrimagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, O. J.; Nieves, P.; Laroze, D.; Altbir, D.; Chubykalo-Fesenko, O.

    2015-10-01

    In response to ultrafast laser pulses, single-phase metals have been classified as "fast" (with magnetization quenching on the time scale of the order of 100 fs and recovery in the time scale of several picoseconds and below) and "slow" (with longer characteristic time scales). Disordered ferrimagnetic alloys consisting of a combination of "fast" transition (TM) and "slow" rare-earth (RE) metals have been shown to exhibit an ultrafast all-optical switching mediated by the heat mechanism. The behavior of the characteristic time scales of coupled alloys is more complicated and is influenced by many parameters such as the intersublattice exchange, doping (RE) concentration, and the temperature. Here, the longitudinal relaxation times of each sublattice are analyzed within the Landau-Lifshitz-Bloch framework. We show that for moderate intersublattice coupling strength both materials slow down as a function of slow (RE) material concentration. For larger coupling, the fast (TM) material may become faster, while the slow (RE) one is still slower. These conclusions may have important implications in the switching time of disordered ferrimagnets such as GdFeCo with partial clustering. Using atomistic modeling, we show that in the moderately coupled case, the reversal would start in the Gd-rich region, while the situation may be reversed if the coupling strength is larger.

  18. Cosmological Relaxation of the Electroweak Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Peter W.; Kaplan, David E.; Rajendran, Surjeet

    2015-11-01

    A new class of solutions to the electroweak hierarchy problem is presented that does not require either weak-scale dynamics or anthropics. Dynamical evolution during the early Universe drives the Higgs boson mass to a value much smaller than the cutoff. The simplest model has the particle content of the standard model plus a QCD axion and an inflation sector. The highest cutoff achieved in any technically natural model is 108 GeV .

  19. Analysis of anelastic relaxations controlled by a spectrum of relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cost, J. R.

    Anelastic studies, although providing an important method for investigating the mobility of point defects in solids, often were difficult to analyze when a continuous spectra of relaxation times controls the anelastic response. A new method for obtaining accurate estimates of relaxation time spectra by direct analysis (without prior assumptions) of the data using a nonlinear regression method are described. Applications to internal friction and anelastic creep results are described with emphasis upon the internal friction technique.

  20. Analysis of anelastic relaxations controlled by a spectrum of relaxation times

    SciTech Connect

    Cost, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    Anelastic studies, although they have provided an important method for investigating the mobility of point defects in solids, have often been difficult to analyze when a continuous spectra of relaxation times controls the anelastic response. This paper describes a new method for obtaining accurate estimates of relaxation time spectra by direct analysis (without prior assumptions) of the data using a nonlinear regression method. Applications to internal friction and anelastic creep results are described with emphasis upon the internal friction technique. 5 references.

  1. Multiple-Relaxation-Time Lattice Boltzmann Models in 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    dHumieres, Dominique; Ginzburg, Irina; Krafczyk, Manfred; Lallemand, Pierre; Luo, Li-Shi; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This article provides a concise exposition of the multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann equation, with examples of fifteen-velocity and nineteen-velocity models in three dimensions. Simulation of a diagonally lid-driven cavity flow in three dimensions at Re=500 and 2000 is performed. The results clearly demonstrate the superior numerical stability of the multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann equation over the popular lattice Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook equation.

  2. Viscoplasticity and large-scale chain relaxation in glassy-polymeric strain hardening

    E-print Network

    Robert S. Hoy; Corey S. O'Hern

    2010-08-06

    A simple theory for glassy polymeric mechanical response which accounts for large scale chain relaxation is presented. It captures the crossover from perfect-plastic response to strong strain hardening as the degree of polymerization $N$ increases, without invoking entanglements. By relating hardening to interactions on the scale of monomers and chain segments, we correctly predict its magnitude. Strain activated relaxation arising from the need to maintain constant chain contour length reduces the $N$ dependence of the characteristic relaxation time by a factor $\\sim \\dot\\epsilon N$ during active deformation at strain rate $\\dot\\epsilon$. This prediction is consistent with results from recent experiments and simulations, and we suggest how it may be further tested experimentally.

  3. Time-dependent corona models - Scaling laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korevaar, P.; Martens, P. C. H.

    1989-01-01

    Scaling laws are derived for the one-dimensional time-dependent Euler equations that describe the evolution of a spherically symmetric stellar atmosphere. With these scaling laws the results of the time-dependent calculations by Korevaar (1989) obtained for one star are applicable over the whole Hertzsprung-Russell diagram and even to elliptic galaxies. The scaling is exact for stars with the same M/R-ratio and a good approximation for stars with a different M/R-ratio. The global relaxation oscillation found by Korevaar (1989) is scaled to main sequence stars, a solar coronal hole, cool giants and elliptic galaxies.

  4. Evaluation of brain edema using magnetic resonance proton relaxation times

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Nishimura, S. )

    1990-01-01

    Experimental and clinical studies on the evaluation of water content in cases of brain edema were performed in vivo, using MR proton relaxation times (longitudinal relaxation time, T1; transverse relaxation time, T2). Brain edema was produced in the white matter of cats by the direct infusion method. The correlations between proton relaxation times obtained from MR images and the water content of white matter were studied both in autoserum-infused cats and in saline-infused cats. The correlations between T1 as well as T2 and the water content in human vasogenic brain edema were also examined and compared with the data obtained from the serum group. T1 and T2 showed good correlations with the water content of white matter not only in the experimental animals but also in the clinical cases. The quality of the edema fluid did not influence relaxation time and T1 seemed to represent almost solely the water content of the tissue. T2, however, was affected by the nature of existence of water and was more sensitive than T1 in detecting extravasated edema fluid. It seems feasible therefore to evaluate the water content of brain edema on the basis of T1 values.

  5. Subsecond pore-scale displacement processes and relaxation dynamics in multiphase flow

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Ryan T; Ott, Holger; Georgiadis, Apostolos; Rücker, Maja; Schwing, Alex; Berg, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    With recent advances at X-ray microcomputed tomography (?CT) synchrotron beam lines, it is now possible to study pore-scale flow in porous rock under dynamic flow conditions. The collection of four-dimensional data allows for the direct 3-D visualization of fluid-fluid displacement in porous rock as a function of time. However, even state-of-the-art fast-?CT scans require between one and a few seconds to complete and the much faster fluid movement occurring during that time interval is manifested as imaging artifacts in the reconstructed 3-D volume. We present an approach to analyze the 2-D radiograph data collected during fast-?CT to study the pore-scale displacement dynamics on the time scale of 40 ms which is near the intrinsic time scale of individual Haines jumps. We present a methodology to identify the time intervals at which pore-scale displacement events in the observed field of view occur and hence, how reconstruction intervals can be chosen to avoid fluid-movement-induced reconstruction artifacts. We further quantify the size, order, frequency, and location of fluid-fluid displacement at the millisecond time scale. We observe that after a displacement event, the pore-scale fluid distribution relaxes to (quasi-) equilibrium in cascades of pore-scale fluid rearrangements with an average relaxation time for the whole cascade between 0.5 and 2.0 s. These findings help to identify the flow regimes and intrinsic time and length scales relevant to fractional flow. While the focus of the work is in the context of multiphase flow, the approach could be applied to many different ?CT applications where morphological changes occur at a time scale less than that required for collecting a ?CT scan. PMID:25745271

  6. Measurement of cyclotron resonance relaxation time in the two-dimensional electron system

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, I. V. Muravev, V. M.; Kukushkin, I. V.; Belyanin, V. N.

    2014-11-17

    Dependence of cyclotron magneto-plasma mode relaxation time on electron concentration and temperature in the two-dimensional electron system in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells has been studied. Comparative analysis of cyclotron and transport relaxation time has been carried out. It was demonstrated that with the temperature increase transport relaxation time tends to cyclotron relaxation time. It was also shown that cyclotron relaxation time, as opposed to transport relaxation time, has a weak electron density dependence. The cyclotron time can exceed transport relaxation time by an order of magnitude in a low-density range.

  7. Nernst effect beyond the relaxation-time approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikulin, D. I.; Hou, Chang-Yu; Beenakker, C. W. J.

    2011-07-01

    Motivated by recent interest in the Nernst effect in cuprate superconductors, we calculate this magnetothermoelectric effect for an arbitrary (anisotropic) quasiparticle dispersion relation and elastic-scattering rate. The exact solution of the linearized Boltzmann equation is compared with the commonly used relaxation-time approximation. We find qualitative deficiencies in this approximation to the extent that it can get the sign wrong of the Nernst coefficient. Ziman’s improvement of the relaxation-time approximation, which becomes exact when the Fermi surface is isotropic, also cannot capture the combined effects of anisotropy in dispersion and scattering.

  8. Modeling the relaxation time of DNA confined in a nanochannel

    PubMed Central

    Tree, Douglas R.; Wang, Yanwei; Dorfman, Kevin D.

    2013-01-01

    Using a mapping between a Rouse dumbbell model and fine-grained Monte Carlo simulations, we have computed the relaxation time of ?-DNA in a high ionic strength buffer confined in a nanochannel. The relaxation time thus obtained agrees quantitatively with experimental data [Reisner et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 196101 (2005)] using only a single O(1) fitting parameter to account for the uncertainty in model parameters. In addition to validating our mapping, this agreement supports our previous estimates of the friction coefficient of DNA confined in a nanochannel [Tree et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 228105 (2012)], which have been difficult to validate due to the lack of direct experimental data. Furthermore, the model calculation shows that as the channel size passes below approximately 100?nm (or roughly the Kuhn length of DNA) there is a dramatic drop in the relaxation time. Inasmuch as the chain friction rises with decreasing channel size, the reduction in the relaxation time can be solely attributed to the sharp decline in the fluctuations of the chain extension. Practically, the low variance in the observed DNA extension in such small channels has important implications for genome mapping. PMID:24309551

  9. Electron-ion relaxation time in moderately degenerate plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vronskii, M. A.; Koryakina, Yu. V.

    2015-09-01

    A formula is derived for the electron-ion relaxation time in a partially degenerate plasma with electron-ion interaction via a central field. The resulting expression in the form of an integral of the transport cross section generalizes the well-known Landau and Brysk approximations.

  10. Phenomenological Theory of the Translational Relaxation Times in Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J.

    1999-01-01

    The exact solution to the classical equations governing the translational dispersion and absorption of sound in a gas obscures its relaxational character because of its mathematical complexity. The approach taken here is to solve the secular equation by the method of Pade approximants, which even to the relatively low order R(sub 11) yields a remarkably close approximation to the exact solution over a wide range of frequency/pressure (f/P) ratios. As a result, translational relaxation can be formulated in terms of a conventional relaxation process with well-defined relaxation times, relaxation strength, collision numbers, additivity relations, etc. To extend the theory to high values of f/P ratio, a model is proposed to account for the noncontinuum behavior of the transport coefficients (viscosity and thermal conductivity) as the molecular mean free path approaches the acoustical enclosure dimensions. The theoretical dispersion and absorption show good agreement with measurements in argon over the classical and transition regions of f/P, but a discrepancy appears at higher values of f/P, where collective propagating modes, assumed in the theory, give way to single-particle modes, prevailing in the experiments.

  11. Inversion of generalized relaxation time distributions with optimized damping parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florsch, Nicolas; Revil, André; Camerlynck, Christian

    2014-10-01

    Retrieving the Relaxation Time Distribution (RDT), the Grains Size Distribution (GSD) or the Pore Size Distribution (PSD) from low-frequency impedance spectra is a major goal in geophysics. The “Generalized RTD” generalizes parametric models like Cole-Cole and many others, but remains tricky to invert since this inverse problem is ill-posed. We propose to use generalized relaxation basis function (for instance by decomposing the spectra on basis of generalized Cole-Cole relaxation elements instead of the classical Debye basis) and to use the L-curve approach to optimize the damping parameter required to get smooth and realistic inverse solutions. We apply our algorithm to three examples, one synthetic and two real data sets, and the program includes the possibility of converting the RTD into GSD or PSD by choosing the value of the constant connecting the relaxation time to the characteristic polarization size of interest. A high frequencies (typically above 1 kHz), a dielectric term in taken into account in the model. The code is provided as an open Matlab source as a supplementary file associated with this paper.

  12. Shear viscosity, relaxation and collision times in spherically symmetric spacetimes

    E-print Network

    Roberto A Sussman

    2008-12-23

    We interpret as shear viscosity the anisotropic pressure that emerges in inhomogeneous spherically symmetric spacetimes described by the Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) metric in a comoving frame. By assuming that local isotropic pressure and energy density satisfy a generic ideal gas equation of state, we reduce the field equations to a set of evolution equations based on auxiliary quasi-local variables. We examine the transport equation of shear viscosity from Extended Irreversible Thermodynamics and use a numerical solution of the evolution equations to obtain the relaxation times for the full and "truncated" versions. Considering a gas of cold dark matter WIMPS after its decoupling from the cosmic fluid, we show that the relaxation times for the general equation are qualitatively analogous to collision times, while the truncated version is inadequate to describe transient phenomena of transition to equilibrium.

  13. Hyperpolarized nanodiamond with long spin-relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rej, Ewa; Gaebel, Torsten; Boele, Thomas; Waddington, David E. J.; Reilly, David J.

    2015-10-01

    The use of hyperpolarized agents in magnetic resonance, such as 13C-labelled compounds, enables powerful new imaging and detection modalities that stem from a 10,000-fold boost in signal. A major challenge for the future of the hyperpolarization technique is the inherently short spin-relaxation times, typically <60 s for 13C liquid-state compounds, which limit the time that the signal remains boosted. Here we demonstrate that 1.1% natural abundance 13C spins in synthetic nanodiamond can be hyperpolarized at cryogenic and room temperature without the use of free radicals, and, owing to their solid-state environment, exhibit relaxation times exceeding 1 h. Combined with the already established applications of nanodiamonds in the life sciences as inexpensive fluorescent markers and non-cytotoxic substrates for gene and drug delivery, these results extend the theranostic capabilities of nanoscale diamonds into the domain of hyperpolarized magnetic resonance.

  14. Hyperpolarized nanodiamond with long spin-relaxation times

    PubMed Central

    Rej, Ewa; Gaebel, Torsten; Boele, Thomas; Waddington, David E.J.; Reilly, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The use of hyperpolarized agents in magnetic resonance, such as 13C-labelled compounds, enables powerful new imaging and detection modalities that stem from a 10,000-fold boost in signal. A major challenge for the future of the hyperpolarization technique is the inherently short spin-relaxation times, typically <60?s for 13C liquid-state compounds, which limit the time that the signal remains boosted. Here we demonstrate that 1.1% natural abundance 13C spins in synthetic nanodiamond can be hyperpolarized at cryogenic and room temperature without the use of free radicals, and, owing to their solid-state environment, exhibit relaxation times exceeding 1?h. Combined with the already established applications of nanodiamonds in the life sciences as inexpensive fluorescent markers and non-cytotoxic substrates for gene and drug delivery, these results extend the theranostic capabilities of nanoscale diamonds into the domain of hyperpolarized magnetic resonance. PMID:26450570

  15. Hyperpolarized nanodiamond with long spin-relaxation times.

    PubMed

    Rej, Ewa; Gaebel, Torsten; Boele, Thomas; Waddington, David E J; Reilly, David J

    2015-01-01

    The use of hyperpolarized agents in magnetic resonance, such as (13)C-labelled compounds, enables powerful new imaging and detection modalities that stem from a 10,000-fold boost in signal. A major challenge for the future of the hyperpolarization technique is the inherently short spin-relaxation times, typically <60?s for (13)C liquid-state compounds, which limit the time that the signal remains boosted. Here we demonstrate that 1.1% natural abundance (13)C spins in synthetic nanodiamond can be hyperpolarized at cryogenic and room temperature without the use of free radicals, and, owing to their solid-state environment, exhibit relaxation times exceeding 1?h. Combined with the already established applications of nanodiamonds in the life sciences as inexpensive fluorescent markers and non-cytotoxic substrates for gene and drug delivery, these results extend the theranostic capabilities of nanoscale diamonds into the domain of hyperpolarized magnetic resonance. PMID:26450570

  16. Determining pore length scales and pore surface relaxivity of rock cores by internal magnetic fields modulation at 2MHz NMR.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huabing; Nogueira d'Eurydice, Marcel; Obruchkov, Sergei; Galvosas, Petrik

    2014-09-01

    Pore length scales and pore surface relaxivities of rock cores with different lithologies were studied on a 2MHz Rock Core Analyzer. To determine the pore length scales of the rock cores, the high eigenmodes of spin bearing molecules satisfying the diffusion equation were detected with optimized encoding periods in the presence of internal magnetic fields Bin. The results were confirmed using a 64MHz NMR system, which supports the feasibility of high eigenmode detection at fields as low as 2MHz. Furthermore, this methodology was combined with relaxometry measurements to a two-dimensional experiment, which provides correlation between pore length and relaxation time. This techniques also yields information on the surface relaxivity of the rock cores. The estimated surface relaxivities were then compared to the results using an independent NMR method. PMID:25123539

  17. Relaxation time measurements in frequency and time-domain photoacoustic spectroscopy of condensed phases

    E-print Network

    Mandelis, Andreas

    Relaxation time measurements in frequency and time-domain photoacoustic spectroscopy of condensed08544 (Received 8 August 1979) The use of the photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) technique to measure velocity in the transducer gas. INTRODUCTION Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) provides a method

  18. Ultrafast time-resolved broadband fluorescence studies of the benzene-tetracyanoethylene complex: solvation, vibrational relaxation, and charge recombination dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chih-Chung; Hung, Chih-Chang; Chen, Chien-Lin; Cheng, Po-Yuan

    2013-08-22

    The charge-transfer (CT) state relaxation dynamics of the benzene-tetracyanoethylene (BZ-TCNE) complex was studied with broadband ultrafast time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy implemented by optical Kerr gating in three solvents of different polarities. The CT state of the BZ-TCNE complex is reached via femtosecond laser excitation, and the subsequent temporal evolutions of the fluorescence spectra were measured. Analyses of various time-dependent spectral properties revealed rapid relaxations along solvent and vibrational coordinates in competition with charge recombination (CR). By comparing the results in solvents of different polarities, we partially separated solvation and vibrational relaxation dynamics and explored the solvent-dependent CR dynamics. Time-dependent dynamic fluorescence Stokes shift (TDFSS) measurements unveiled the solvation and vibrational relaxation contributions to the observed spectral relaxation. The biphasic and slow time scales of the vibrational contributions identified in TDFSS suggested nonstatistical and hindered intramolecular vibrational-energy redistribution that can be attributed to the unique structural properties of EDA complexes. The slowest spectral relaxation of 10-15 ps identified in TDFSS was ascribed to relaxation of the BZ(+)-TCNE(-) intermolecular vibrations, which is equivalent to a structural relaxation from the initial Franck-Condon configuration to the equilibrium CT-state structure. The time scales of vibrational relaxation indicate that a fraction of the CT-state population undergoes CR reactions before complete vibrational/structural equilibrium is achieved. In carbon tetrachloride, a nonexponential temporal profile was observed and attributed to vibrational nonequilibrium CR. In dichloromethane, polar solvation greatly accelerates CR reactions, and a slower reaction-field-induced structural relaxation gives rise to a pronounced biexponential decay. The equilibrium CR time constants of the BZ-TCNE CT state are 29 ps, 150 ps, and 68 ps in dichloromethane, carbon tetrachloride, and cyclohexane, respectively. PMID:23865400

  19. Dielectric relaxation, resonance and scaling behaviors in Sr3Co2Fe24O41 hexaferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Rujun; Jiang, Chen; Qian, Wenhu; Jian, Jie; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Haiyan; Yang, Hao

    2015-08-01

    The dielectric properties of Z-type hexaferrite Sr3Co2Fe24O41 (SCFO) have been investigated as a function of temperature from 153 to 503?K between 1 and 2?GHz. The dielectric responses of SCFO are found to be frequency dependent and thermally activated. The relaxation-type dielectric behavior is observed to be dominating in the low frequency region and resonance-type dielectric behavior is found to be dominating above 108?Hz. This frequency dependence of dielectric behavior is explained by the damped harmonic oscillator model with temperature dependent coefficients. The imaginary part of impedance (Z?) and modulus (M?) spectra show that there is a distribution of relaxation times. The scaling behaviors of Z? and M? spectra further suggest that the distribution of relaxation times is temperature independent at low frequencies. The dielectric loss spectra at different temperatures have not shown a scaling behavior above 108?Hz. A comparison between the Z? and the M? spectra indicates that the short-range charges motion dominates at low temperatures and the long-range charges motion dominates at high temperatures. The above results indicate that the dielectric dispersion mechanism in SCFO is temperature independent at low frequencies and temperature dependent at high frequencies due to the domination of resonance behavior.

  20. Dielectric relaxation, resonance and scaling behaviors in Sr3Co2Fe24O41 hexaferrite.

    PubMed

    Tang, Rujun; Jiang, Chen; Qian, Wenhu; Jian, Jie; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Haiyan; Yang, Hao

    2015-01-01

    The dielectric properties of Z-type hexaferrite Sr3Co2Fe24O41 (SCFO) have been investigated as a function of temperature from 153 to 503?K between 1 and 2?GHz. The dielectric responses of SCFO are found to be frequency dependent and thermally activated. The relaxation-type dielectric behavior is observed to be dominating in the low frequency region and resonance-type dielectric behavior is found to be dominating above 10(8)?Hz. This frequency dependence of dielectric behavior is explained by the damped harmonic oscillator model with temperature dependent coefficients. The imaginary part of impedance (Z?) and modulus (M?) spectra show that there is a distribution of relaxation times. The scaling behaviors of Z? and M? spectra further suggest that the distribution of relaxation times is temperature independent at low frequencies. The dielectric loss spectra at different temperatures have not shown a scaling behavior above 10(8)?Hz. A comparison between the Z? and the M? spectra indicates that the short-range charges motion dominates at low temperatures and the long-range charges motion dominates at high temperatures. The above results indicate that the dielectric dispersion mechanism in SCFO is temperature independent at low frequencies and temperature dependent at high frequencies due to the domination of resonance behavior. PMID:26314913

  1. Dielectric relaxation, resonance and scaling behaviors in Sr3Co2Fe24O41 hexaferrite

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Rujun; Jiang, Chen; Qian, Wenhu; Jian, Jie; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Haiyan; Yang, Hao

    2015-01-01

    The dielectric properties of Z-type hexaferrite Sr3Co2Fe24O41 (SCFO) have been investigated as a function of temperature from 153 to 503?K between 1 and 2?GHz. The dielectric responses of SCFO are found to be frequency dependent and thermally activated. The relaxation-type dielectric behavior is observed to be dominating in the low frequency region and resonance-type dielectric behavior is found to be dominating above 108?Hz. This frequency dependence of dielectric behavior is explained by the damped harmonic oscillator model with temperature dependent coefficients. The imaginary part of impedance (Z?) and modulus (M?) spectra show that there is a distribution of relaxation times. The scaling behaviors of Z? and M? spectra further suggest that the distribution of relaxation times is temperature independent at low frequencies. The dielectric loss spectra at different temperatures have not shown a scaling behavior above 108?Hz. A comparison between the Z? and the M? spectra indicates that the short-range charges motion dominates at low temperatures and the long-range charges motion dominates at high temperatures. The above results indicate that the dielectric dispersion mechanism in SCFO is temperature independent at low frequencies and temperature dependent at high frequencies due to the domination of resonance behavior. PMID:26314913

  2. Relaxation times and rheology in dense athermal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, Peter

    2015-06-01

    We study the jamming transition in a model of elastic particles under shear at zero temperature. The key quantity is the relaxation time ? which is obtained by stopping the shearing and letting energy and pressure decay to zero. At many different densities and initial shear rates we do several such relaxations to determine the average ? . We establish that ? diverges with the same exponent as the viscosity and determine another exponent from the relation between ? and the coordination number. Though most of the simulations are done for the model with dissipation due to the motion of particles relative to an affinely shearing substrate, we also examine a model, where the dissipation is instead due to velocity differences of disks in contact, and confirm that the above-mentioned exponent is the same for these two models. We also consider finite size effects on both ? and the coordination number.

  3. Single particle aerodynamic relaxation time analyzer. [for aerosol pollutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazumder, M. K.; Kirsch, K. J.

    1977-01-01

    An instrument employing a laser Doppler velocimeter and a microphone to measure the phase lag of the motion of aerosol particulates relative to the motion of the fluid medium within an acoustic field is described. The relaxation times and aerodynamic diameters of the particles or droplets are determined in real time from the measured values of phase lag; thus, the size analysis is independent of the electrostatic charges and refractive indices of the particulates. The instrument is suitable for analyzing the aerodynamic size spectrum of atmospheric particulate pollutants with aerodynamic diameters ranging from 0.1 to 10.0 microns.

  4. Dependence on chain length of NMR relaxation times in mixtures of alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed, Denise E.

    2007-05-01

    Many naturally occurring fluids, such as crude oils, consist of a very large number of components. It is often of interest to determine the composition of the fluids in situ. Diffusion coefficients and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation times can be measured in situ and depend on the size of the molecules. It has been shown [D. E. Freed et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 067602 (2005)] that the diffusion coefficient of each component in a mixture of alkanes follows a scaling law in the chain length of that molecule and in the mean chain length of the mixture, and these relations were used to determine the chain length distribution of crude oils from NMR diffusion measurements. In this paper, the behavior of NMR relaxation times in mixtures of chain molecules is addressed. The author explains why one would expect scaling laws for the transverse and longitudinal relaxation times of mixtures of short chain molecules and mixtures of alkanes, in particular. It is shown how the power law dependence on the chain length can be calculated from the scaling laws for the translational diffusion coefficients. The author fits the literature data for NMR relaxation in binary mixtures of alkanes and finds that its dependence on chain length agrees with the theory. Lastly, it is shown how the scaling laws in the chain length and the mean chain length can be used to determine the chain length distribution in crude oils that are high in saturates. A good fit is obtained between the NMR-derived chain length distributions and the ones from gas chromatography.

  5. Unified Theory of Activated Relaxation in Liquids over 14 Decades in Time

    SciTech Connect

    Mirigian, Stephen; Schweizer, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    We formulate a predictive theory at the level of forces of activated relaxation in hard-sphere fluids and thermal liquids that covers in a unified manner the apparent Arrhenius, crossover, and deeply supercooled regimes. The alpha relaxation event involves coupled cage-scale hopping and a long-range collective elastic distortion of the surrounding liquid, which results in two inter-related, but distinct, barriers. The strongly temperature and density dependent collective barrier is associated with a growing length scale, the shear modulus, and density fluctuations. Thermal liquids are mapped to an effective hard-sphere fluid based on matching long wavelength density fluctuation amplitudes, resulting in a zeroth-order quasi-universal description. The theory is devoid of fit parameters, has no divergences at finite temperature nor below jamming, and captures the key features of the alpha time of molecular liquids from picoseconds to hundreds of seconds.

  6. On the accuracy of the finite element method plus time relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connors, J.; Layton, W.

    2010-04-01

    If overline{u} denotes a local, spatial average of u , then u'=u-overline{u} is the associated fluctuation. Consider a time relaxation term added to the usual finite element method. The simplest case for the model advection equation u_{t}+overrightarrow{a}\\cdotnabla u=f(x,t) is (u_{h,t}+overrightarrow{a}\\cdotnabla u_{h},v_{h})+?(u_{h'} ,v_{h'})=(f(x,t),v_{h}). We analyze the error in this and (more importantly) higher order extensions and show that the added time relaxation term not only suppresses excess energy in marginally resolved scales but also increases the accuracy of the resulting finite element approximation.

  7. Dependence of Brownian and Néel relaxation times on magnetic field strength

    SciTech Connect

    Deissler, Robert J. Wu, Yong; Martens, Michael A.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: In magnetic particle imaging (MPI) and magnetic particle spectroscopy (MPS) the relaxation time of the magnetization in response to externally applied magnetic fields is determined by the Brownian and Néel relaxation mechanisms. Here the authors investigate the dependence of the relaxation times on the magnetic field strength and the implications for MPI and MPS. Methods: The Fokker–Planck equation with Brownian relaxation and the Fokker–Planck equation with Néel relaxation are solved numerically for a time-varying externally applied magnetic field, including a step-function, a sinusoidally varying, and a linearly ramped magnetic field. For magnetic fields that are applied as a step function, an eigenvalue approach is used to directly calculate both the Brownian and Néel relaxation times for a range of magnetic field strengths. For Néel relaxation, the eigenvalue calculations are compared to Brown's high-barrier approximation formula. Results: The relaxation times due to the Brownian or Néel mechanisms depend on the magnitude of the applied magnetic field. In particular, the Néel relaxation time is sensitive to the magnetic field strength, and varies by many orders of magnitude for nanoparticle properties and magnetic field strengths relevant for MPI and MPS. Therefore, the well-known zero-field relaxation times underestimate the actual relaxation times and, in particular, can underestimate the Néel relaxation time by many orders of magnitude. When only Néel relaxation is present—if the particles are embedded in a solid for instance—the authors found that there can be a strong magnetization response to a sinusoidal driving field, even if the period is much less than the zero-field relaxation time. For a ferrofluid in which both Brownian and Néel relaxation are present, only one relaxation mechanism may dominate depending on the magnetic field strength, the driving frequency (or ramp time), and the phase of the magnetization relative to the applied magnetic field. Conclusions: A simple treatment of Néel relaxation using the common zero-field relaxation time overestimates the relaxation time of the magnetization in situations relevant for MPI and MPS. For sinusoidally driven (or ramped) systems, whether or not a particular relaxation mechanism dominates or is even relevant depends on the magnetic field strength, the frequency (or ramp time), and the phase of the magnetization relative to the applied magnetic field.

  8. The concentration dependence of the solution viscosity and the relaxation time of the partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamides

    SciTech Connect

    Kanatharana, J.; Sukpisan, J.; Wang, S.Q.

    1995-12-01

    The dependences on the polyion concentration through the scaling relations in {eta} {alpha} c{sup {alpha}} and {Tau}{sub q} {alpha} c{sup {beta}}, where {eta} and {Tau}{sub q} are the solution viscosity and the relaxation time obtained from the dynamic light scattering respectively, are investigated for the partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamides at different degrees of hydrolysis. The scaling exponents a and {beta}, as determined in the semidilute regime, depend critically on the amount of salt added or the ionic strength. Both exponents, however, are independent of the amount of glycerol added which suggests that the excluded volume effect is relatively small in comparison with the effect of electrostatic repulsion. The salt-concentration dependence of the solution is also investigated: the corresponding scaling exponents for the 70% HPAM are insensitive to the solvent quality. The present experiment results are compared with recent scaling theories.

  9. Regarding the Néel relaxation time constant in magnetorelaxometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leliaert, J.; Coene, A.; Crevecoeur, G.; Vansteenkiste, A.; Eberbeck, D.; Wiekhorst, F.; Van Waeyenberge, B.; Dupré, L.

    2014-10-01

    Magnetorelaxometry (MRX) is a sensitive measurement technique frequently employed in biomedical applications for imaging magnetic nanoparticles (MNP). In this article, we employ a first principles model to investigate the effects of different iron oxide MNP sample properties on the Néel relaxation time constant ?N in magnetorelaxometry. Using this model, we determined that dipolar interactions start to have an impact on the MRX signal from Fe concentrations of 100 mmol/l and result in a smaller ?N. Additionally, the micromagnetic damping constant, closely related to ?N, was found to be between 0.0005 and 0.002 by comparison to an MRX measurement of iron oxide particles. This is significantly lower compared to the bulk value of 0.07 for this material.

  10. Time scales in LISA

    E-print Network

    S. Pireaux

    2007-03-23

    The LISA mission is a space interferometer aiming at the detection of gravitational waves in the [$10^{-4}$,$10^{-1}$] Hz frequency band. In order to reach the gravitational wave detection level, a Time Delay Interferometry (TDI) method must be applied to get rid of (most of) the laser frequency noise and optical bench noise. This TDI analysis is carried out in terms of the coordinate time corresponding to the Barycentric Coordinate Reference System (BCRS), TCB, whereas the data at each of the three LISA stations is recorded in terms of each station proper time. We provide here the required proper time versus BCRS time transformation. We show that the difference in rate of station proper time versus TCB is of the order of $5 10^{-8}$. The difference between station proper times and TCB exhibits an oscillatory trend with a maximum amplitude of about $10^{-3}$ s.

  11. Unified Theory of Activated Relaxation in Cold Liquids over 14 Decades in Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweizer, Kenneth; Mirigian, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    We formulate a predictive theory at the level of forces of activated relaxation in thermal liquids that covers in a unified manner the apparent Arrhenius, crossover and deeply supercooled regimes (J.Phys.Chem.Lett.4,3648(2013)). The alpha relaxation event involves coupled cage-scale hopping and a long range cooperative elastic distortion of the surrounding liquid, which results in two inter-related, but distinct, barriers. The strongly temperature and density dependent collective barrier is associated with a growing length scale, the shear modulus and density fluctuations. Thermal liquids are mapped to an effective hard sphere fluid based on matching long wavelength density fluctuation amplitudes. The theory is devoid of fit parameters, has no divergences at finite temperature nor below jamming, and captures the key features of the alpha relaxation time in molecular liquids from picoseconds to hundreds of seconds. The approach is extended to polymer liquids based on the Kuhn length as the key variable. The influence of chain length and backbone stiffness on the glass transition temperature and fragility have been studied where degree of polymerization enters via corrections to asymptotic conformational statistics.

  12. Time scale independent signal transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faltin, L.

    1980-05-01

    The paper presents a method which permits the conversion of time scale variations occurring during signal transmission into time shifts proportionally related to these variations. It is demonstrated that the method can be used to reject the adverse effects of the time scale variations (such as wow and flutter in magnetic tape recordings) and/or to determine the scale change exactly (such as would be required in Doppler signal processing). Finally, it is noted that since the system performance degrades with rising frequency of the time scale distortions, an upper bound for this frequency is derived.

  13. Growth strains and stress relaxation in alumina scales during high temperature oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, P.Y.; Paulikas, A.P.; Veal, B.W.

    2004-03-23

    A novel X-ray technique was used, exploiting synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, to investigate the growth stresses in {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. In-situ measurements of Debye-Scherrer diffraction patterns from the scale were recorded during oxidation and cooling, and the elliptical distortion of the diffraction rings was analyzed to yield the in-plane strain. Fe-28Al, Fe-40Al, Fe-40Al-0.2Hf, Fe-20Cr-10Al and Ni-50Al (at. %) were studied. Data were acquired in air at temperatures between 950-1100 C and during cool down. In all cases, the steady stage growth strain was relatively low (<0.1%) and was either tensile or compressive depending on the alloy. A higher tensile strain often existed during the initial oxidation period when transition alumina was present. Thermal stresses imposed on NiAl by reducing the sample temperature to 950 C for a period of time showed noticeable stress relaxation by creep. Different degrees of relaxation were also found during cooling depending on alloy composition and scale microstructure. On all Fe-based alloys, the first formed {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was highly textured with the degree of texture decreasing with further oxidation. The relationships between stress development, scale wrinkling, oxide phase changes, and the effect of reactive element addition on growth stresses are discussed. Results are compared with other reports of growth stresses in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scales.

  14. The effect of molecular relaxation processes in air on the rise time of sonic booms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Jongmin; Pierce, Allan D.

    1990-01-01

    A theory is developed to explain the effect of molecular relaxation processes on the rise time of sonic booms. To determine the rise time of sonic booms, both O2 and N2 relaxation processes must be included. The N2 relaxation process delays the shock pressure reaching the maximum pressure, and the O2 relaxation process causes a shock profile to have a gentle slope. The N2 relaxation controls the lower part of overpressure; the O2 relaxation controls the higher part. The constant rise time curves show that the rise times increase as the overpressures and humidity decrease. The present approach gives longer rise times than those acquired by Bass et al. for given shock overpressures.

  15. Geologic time scale bookmark

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2012-01-01

    This bookmark, designed for use with U.S. Geological Survey activities at the 2nd USA Science and Engineering Festival (April 26–29, 2012), is adapted from the more detailed Fact Sheet 2010–3059 "Divisions of Geologic Time." The information that it presents is widely sought by educators and students.

  16. Time Relaxed Monte Carlo methods for the Boltzmann equation

    E-print Network

    Russo, Giovanni

    over standard DSMC. Applications to a one-dimensional shock wave problem are also presented. 1, and a kinetic treatment of the system is very expensive, because of the large ratio of time scales between a standard kinetic treatment would be too expensive, and a pure gas dynamic approach inappropriate. Domain

  17. Relaxation-time measurement via a time-dependent helicity balance model

    SciTech Connect

    Wrobel, J. S.; Hansen, C. J.; Jarboe, T. R.; Smith, R. J.; Hossack, A. C.; Nelson, B. A.; Marklin, G. J.; Ennis, D. A.; Akcay, C.; Victor, B. S.

    2013-01-15

    A time-dependent helicity balance model applied to a spheromak helicity-injection experiment enables the measurement of the relaxation time during the sustainment phase of the spheromak. The experiment, the Helicity Injected Torus with Steady Inductive helicity injection (HIT-SI), studies spheromak formation and sustainment through inductive helicity injection. The model captures the dominant plasma behavior seen during helicity injection in HIT-SI by using an empirical helicity-decay rate, a time-dependent helicity-injection rate, and a composite Taylor state to model both the helicity content of the system and to calculate the resulting spheromak current. During single-injector operations, both the amplitude and the phase of the periodic rise and fall of the toroidal current are predicted by this model, with an exchange of helicity between the injector states and the spheromak state proposed as the causal mechanism. This phenomenon allows for the comparison of the delay between the current rises in the experiment and the numerical model, enabling a measurement of the relaxation time. The measured relaxation time of 4.8 {mu}s {+-} 2.8 {mu}s is shorter than the toroidal Alfven timescale. These results validate Hall MHD calculations of the Geospace Environmental Modeling challenge.

  18. Fundamental studies of stress distributions and stress relaxation in oxide scales on high temperature alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Shores, D.A.; Stout, J.H.; Gerberich, W.W.

    1992-06-01

    The high temperature X-ray diffraction system developed for this program is being used to measure the strains which develop during oxidation. This is being applied to Ni/NiO and Cr/Cr[sub 2]O[sub 3]. Our work suggests tat the oxide and metal crystalline texture, anisotropic elastic modulus and anisotropic thermal expansion can have a pronounced effect on strain state of these systems. Acoustic emission is being used to study oxide scale failure (fracture) during oxidation. AE data from 304 stainless steel are being used to develop a statistical model of fracture process. Strength of metal/scale interface is an important property that has been difficult to quantify. Using Nano-indentation and scratch techniques developed for characterizing thin film interfaces, an effort has begun to measure the fracture toughness of the metal/scale interface. Mathematical modelling of origin and time evolution of growth stresses is an extension and improvement of previous models. The current effort employs a more sophisticated stress analysis and expands the scope to include other stress relaxation process. The interaction between the modeling studies and the X-ray diffraction measurements provides a natural credibility check to both efforts.

  19. Universal Bound on Dynamical Relaxation Times and Black-Hole Quasinormal Ringing

    E-print Network

    Shahar Hod

    2006-11-01

    From information theory and thermodynamic considerations a universal bound on the relaxation time $\\tau$ of a perturbed system is inferred, $\\tau \\geq \\hbar/\\pi T$, where $T$ is the system's temperature. We prove that black holes comply with the bound; in fact they actually {\\it saturate} it. Thus, when judged by their relaxation properties, black holes are the most extreme objects in nature, having the maximum relaxation rate which is allowed by quantum theory.

  20. Multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann kinetic model for combustion

    E-print Network

    Aiguo Xu; Chuandong Lin; Guangcai Zhang; Yingjun Li

    2015-03-13

    To probe both the Hydrodynamic Non-Equilibrium (HNE) and Thermodynamic Non-Equilibrium (TNE) in the combustion process, a two-dimensional Multiple-Relaxation-Time (MRT) version of Lattice Boltzmann Kinetic Model(LBKM) for combustion phenomena is presented. The chemical energy released in the progress of combustion is dynamically coupled into the system by adding a chemical term to the LB kinetic equation. Beside describing the evolutions of the conserved quantities, the density, momentum and energy, which are what the Navier-Stokes model describes, the MRT-LBKM presents also a coarse-grained description on the evolutions of some non-conserved quantities. The current model works for both subsonic and supersonic flows with or without chemical reaction. In this model both the specific-heat ratio and the Prandtl number are flexible, the TNE effects are naturally presented in each simulation step. The model is verified and validated via well-known benchmark tests. As an initial application, various non-equilibrium behaviours, including the complex interplays between various HNEs, between various TNEs and between the HNE and TNE, around the detonation wave in the unsteady and steady one-dimensional detonation processes are preliminarily probed. It is found that the system viscosity (or heat conductivity) decreases the local TNE, but increase the global TNE around the detonation wave, that even locally, the system viscosity (or heat conductivity) results in two kinds of competing trends, to increase and to decrease the TNE effects. The physical reason is that the viscosity (or heat conductivity) takes part in both the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic responses.

  1. Multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann kinetic model for combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Aiguo; Lin, Chuandong; Zhang, Guangcai; Li, Yingjun

    2015-04-01

    To probe both the hydrodynamic nonequilibrium (HNE) and thermodynamic nonequilibrium (TNE) in the combustion process, a two-dimensional multiple-relaxation-time (MRT) version of lattice Boltzmann kinetic model (LBKM) for combustion phenomena is presented. The chemical energy released in the progress of combustion is dynamically coupled into the system by adding a chemical term to the LB kinetic equation. Aside from describing the evolutions of the conserved quantities, the density, momentum, and energy, which are what the Navier-Stokes model describes, the MRT-LBKM presents also a coarse-grained description on the evolutions of some nonconserved quantities. The current model works for both subsonic and supersonic flows with or without chemical reaction. In this model, both the specific-heat ratio and the Prandtl number are flexible, the TNE effects are naturally presented in each simulation step. The model is verified and validated via well-known benchmark tests. As an initial application, various nonequilibrium behaviors, including the complex interplays between various HNEs, between various TNEs, and between the HNE and TNE, around the detonation wave in the unsteady and steady one-dimensional detonation processes are preliminarily probed. It is found that the system viscosity (or heat conductivity) decreases the local TNE, but increases the global TNE around the detonation wave, that even locally, the system viscosity (or heat conductivity) results in two kinds of competing trends, to increase and to decrease the TNE effects. The physical reason is that the viscosity (or heat conductivity) takes part in both the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic responses.

  2. Multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann kinetic model for combustion.

    PubMed

    Xu, Aiguo; Lin, Chuandong; Zhang, Guangcai; Li, Yingjun

    2015-04-01

    To probe both the hydrodynamic nonequilibrium (HNE) and thermodynamic nonequilibrium (TNE) in the combustion process, a two-dimensional multiple-relaxation-time (MRT) version of lattice Boltzmann kinetic model (LBKM) for combustion phenomena is presented. The chemical energy released in the progress of combustion is dynamically coupled into the system by adding a chemical term to the LB kinetic equation. Aside from describing the evolutions of the conserved quantities, the density, momentum, and energy, which are what the Navier-Stokes model describes, the MRT-LBKM presents also a coarse-grained description on the evolutions of some nonconserved quantities. The current model works for both subsonic and supersonic flows with or without chemical reaction. In this model, both the specific-heat ratio and the Prandtl number are flexible, the TNE effects are naturally presented in each simulation step. The model is verified and validated via well-known benchmark tests. As an initial application, various nonequilibrium behaviors, including the complex interplays between various HNEs, between various TNEs, and between the HNE and TNE, around the detonation wave in the unsteady and steady one-dimensional detonation processes are preliminarily probed. It is found that the system viscosity (or heat conductivity) decreases the local TNE, but increases the global TNE around the detonation wave, that even locally, the system viscosity (or heat conductivity) results in two kinds of competing trends, to increase and to decrease the TNE effects. The physical reason is that the viscosity (or heat conductivity) takes part in both the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic responses. PMID:25974611

  3. Determining energy relaxation length scales in two-dimensional electron gases

    E-print Network

    Billiald, Jordan; Backes, Dirk; Farrer, Ian; Ritchie, David; Narayan, Vijay; König, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    We present measurements of the energy relaxation length scale l in two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs). A temperature gradient is established in the 2DEG by means of a heating current, and then the elevated electron temperature Te is estimated...

  4. A Domain Decomposition Method for Semilinear Hyperbolic Systems with Two-scale Relaxations

    E-print Network

    A Domain Decomposition Method for Semilinear Hyperbolic Systems with Two-scale Relaxations Shi Jin , Jian-guo Liu and Li Wang Abstract We present a domain decomposition method on a semilinear hyperbolic the two systems in a domain decomposition setting. A rigorous analysis, based on the Laplace Transform

  5. Dielectric relaxations of poly(acrylic acid)-graft-poly(ethylene oxide) aqueous solution: Analysis coupled with scaling approach and hydrogen-bonding complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingliang; Zhao, Kongshuang; Liu, Chunyan

    2013-04-01

    Dielectric properties of poly(acrylic acid)-graft-poly(ethylene oxide) (PAA-g-PEO) aqueous solution were measured as a function of concentration and temperature over a frequency range of 40 Hz to 110 MHz. After subtracting the contribution of electrode polarization, three relaxation processes were observed at about 20 kHz, 220 kHz, and 4 MHz, and they are named low-, mid- and high-frequency relaxation, respectively. The relaxation parameters of these three relaxations (dielectric increment ?? and relaxation time ?) showed scaling relations with the polyelectrolyte concentration. The mechanisms of the three relaxations were concluded in light of the scaling theory: The relaxations of low- and mid frequency were attributed to the fluctuation of condensed counterions, while the high-frequency relaxation was ascribed to the fluctuation of free counterions. Based on the dielectric measurements of varying temperatures, the thermodynamic parameters (enthalpy change ?H and entropy change ?S) of the three relaxations were calculated and these relaxation processes were also discussed from the microscopic thermodynamical view. In addition, the impacts of PEO side chains on the conformation of PAA-g-PEO chains were discussed. PEO side chains greatly strengthen the hydrogen-bonding interactions between PAA-g-PEO chains, resulting in the chains overlapping at a very low concentration and the formation of a hydrogen-bonding complex. Some physicochemical parameters of PAA-g-PEO molecules were calculated, including the overlap concentration, the effective charge of the chain, the friction coefficient, and the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen counterions.

  6. Scaling of spin relaxation and angular momentum dissipation in permalloy nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, T. A.; Kläui, M.; Heyne, L.; Möhrke, P.; Backes, D.; Rhensius, J.; Rüdiger, U.; Heyderman, L. J.; Thiele, J.-U.; Woltersdorf, G.; Back, C. H.; Fraile Rodríguez, A.; Nolting, F.; Mentes, T. O.; Niño, M. Á.; Locatelli, A.; Potenza, A.; Marchetto, H.; Cavill, S.; Dhesi, S. S.

    2009-10-01

    We study the relationship between the damping (?) and the nonadiabaticity of the spin transport (?) in permalloy nanowires. ? is engineered by Ho doping, and from the characteristics of the current-induced domain-wall velocity, determined by high-resolution x-ray magnetic circular-dichroism photoemission electron microscopy, ? due to spin relaxation is measured. We find that ? scales with ? and conclude that the spin relaxation that leads to nonadiabatic spin torque originates from the same underlying mechanism as the angular momentum dissipation that causes viscous damping.

  7. After stress comes relax(ation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isa, Lucio

    2015-11-01

    Viscoelastic materials take a finite time to relax and dissipate stress and this time scale is directly connected to the microstructure of the material itself. In their paper, Gomez-Solano and Bechinger (2015 New J. Phys. 17 103032) perform ‘miniaturized’ mechanical tests on a range of viscoelastic materials by dragging a micron-sized bead across them using optical tweezers. Upon switching off all the external forces, they watch the bead recoil to its original position and by tracking its motion they pinpoint the relaxation time of the material. These experiments open up a new range of possibilities to characterize stress relaxation at the microscale just by watching it.

  8. Spin relaxation time dependence on optical pumping intensity in GaAs:Mn

    SciTech Connect

    Burobina, V.; Binek, Ch.

    2014-04-28

    We analyze the dependence of electron spin relaxation time on optical pumping intensity in a partially compensated acceptor semiconductor GaAs:Mn using analytic solutions for the kinetic equations of the charge carrier concentrations. Our results are applied to previous experimental data of spin-relaxation time vs. excitation power for magnetic concentrations of approximately 10{sup 17}?cm{sup ?3}. The agreement of our analytic solutions with the experimental data supports the mechanism of the earlier-reported atypically long electron-spin relaxation time in the magnetic semiconductor.

  9. Cosmology and Astrophysics from Relaxed Galaxy Clusters III: Thermodynamic Profiles and Scaling Relations

    E-print Network

    Mantz, Adam B; Morris, R Glenn; Schmidt, Robert W

    2015-01-01

    This is the third in a series of papers studying the astrophysics and cosmology of massive, dynamically relaxed galaxy clusters. Our sample comprises 40 clusters identified as being dynamically relaxed and hot (i.e., massive) in Papers I and II of this series. Here we consider the thermodynamics of the intracluster medium, in particular the profiles of density, temperature and related quantities, as well as integrated measurements of gas mass, average temperature, total luminosity and center-excluded luminosity. We fit power-law scaling relations of each of these quantities as a function of redshift and cluster mass, which can be measured precisely and with minimal bias for these relaxed clusters. For the thermodynamic profiles, we jointly model the density and temperature and their intrinsic scatter as a function of radius, thus also capturing the behavior of the gas pressure and entropy. For the integrated quantities, we also jointly fit a multidimensional intrinsic covariance, providing the first observati...

  10. A two-time-scale, two-temperature scenario for nonlinear rheology Ludovic Berthier,1,2

    E-print Network

    Berthier, Ludovic

    A two-time-scale, two-temperature scenario for nonlinear rheology Ludovic Berthier,1,2 Jean functions become time translation invariant. The relaxation time and the response functions. The relaxation time is shown to be a decreasing function of the drive ``shear thinning'' effect . The correlation

  11. Variable thermal properties and thermal relaxation time in hyperbolic heat conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.; Mcrae, D. Scott

    1989-01-01

    Numerical solutions were obtained for a finite slab with an applied surface heat flux at one boundary using both the hyperbolic (MacCormack's method) and parabolic (Crank-Nicolson method) heat conduction equations. The effects on the temperature distributions of varying density, specific heat, and thermal relaxation time were calculated. Each of these properties had an effect on the thermal front velocity (in the hyperbolic solution) as well as the temperatures in the medium. In the hyperbolic solutions, as the density or specific heat decreased with temperature, both the temperatures within the medium and the thermal front velocity increased. The value taken for the thermal relaxation time was found to determine the 'hyperbolicity' of the heat conduction model. The use of a time dependent relaxation time allowed for solutions where the thermal energy propagated as a high temperature wave initially, but approached a diffusion process more rapidly than was possible with a constant large relaxation time.

  12. A multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model for convection heat transfer in porous media

    E-print Network

    Qing Liu; Ya-Ling He; Qing Li; Wen-Quan Tao

    2013-11-28

    In this paper, a two-dimensional (2D) multiple-relaxation-time (MRT) lattice Boltzmann (LB) model is developed for simulating convection heat transfer in porous media at the representative elementary volume scale. In the model, a MRT-LB equation is used to simulate the flow field, while another MRT-LB equation is employed to simulate the temperature field. The effect of the porous media is considered by introducing the porosity into the equilibrium moments, and adding a forcing term to the MRT-LB equation of the flow field in the moment space. The present MRT-LB model is validated by numerical simulations of several 2D convection problems in porous media. The numerical results are in good agreement with the well-documented data reported in the literature.

  13. Mesoscopic dynamics of fermionic cold atoms: Exact quantitative analysis of transport coefficients and relaxation times

    E-print Network

    Kikuchi, Yuta; Kunihiro, Teiji

    2015-01-01

    We give a quantitative analysis of the shear viscosity, heat conductivity, and viscous relaxation times, using the novel microscopic expressions derived by the renormalization group (RG) method, where the Boltzmann equation is faithfully solved to extract the hydrodynamics without recourse to any ansatz. We examine the quantum statistical effects, temperature dependence, and scattering-length dependence of the transport coefficients and the viscous relaxation times. The numerical calculation shows that the relation $\\tau_\\pi=\\eta/P$, which is derived in the relaxation-time approximation (RTA) and is used in the most literature, turns out to be satisfied quite well, while the similar relation for the viscous relaxation time $\\tau_J$ of the heat conductivity is satisfied only approximately with a considerable error.

  14. Mesoscopic dynamics of fermionic cold atoms: Exact quantitative analysis of transport coefficients and relaxation times

    E-print Network

    Yuta Kikuchi; Kyosuke Tsumura; Teiji Kunihiro

    2015-11-15

    We give a quantitative analysis of the shear viscosity, heat conductivity, and viscous relaxation times, using the novel microscopic expressions derived by the renormalization group (RG) method, where the Boltzmann equation is faithfully solved to extract the hydrodynamics without recourse to any ansatz. We examine the quantum statistical effects, temperature dependence, and scattering-length dependence of the transport coefficients and the viscous relaxation times. The numerical calculation shows that the relation $\\tau_\\pi=\\eta/P$, which is derived in the relaxation-time approximation (RTA) and is used in the most literature, turns out to be satisfied quite well, while the similar relation for the viscous relaxation time $\\tau_J$ of the heat conductivity is satisfied only approximately with a considerable error.

  15. Secondary and primary relaxations in hyperbranched polyglycerol: a comparative study in the frequency and time domains.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Bernabé, Abel; Dominguez-Espinosa, Gustavo; Diaz-Calleja, Ricardo; Riande, Evaristo; Haag, Rainer

    2007-09-28

    The non-Debye relaxation behavior of hyperbranched polyglycerol was investigated by broadband dielectric spectroscopy. A thorough study of the relaxations was carried out paying special attention to truncation effects on deconvolutions of overlapping processes. Hyperbranched polyglycerol exhibits two relaxations in the glassy state named in increasing order of frequency beta and gamma processes. The study of the evolution of these two fast processes with temperature in the time retardation spectra shows that the beta absorption is swallowed by the alpha in the glass-liquid transition, the gamma absorption being the only relaxation that remains operative in the liquid state. In heating, a temperature is reached at which the alpha absorption vanishes appearing the alphagamma relaxation. Two characteristics of alpha absorptions, decrease of the dielectric strength with increasing temperature and rather high activation energy, are displayed by the alphagamma process. Williams' ansatz seems to hold for these topologically complex macromolecules. PMID:17902934

  16. [Radiation absorption and proton relaxation times of the liver in vitro following carbon tetrachloride poisoning].

    PubMed

    Schmitt, W G; Klingebiel, T

    1987-09-01

    In 57 rats the radiation absorption or proton relaxation times were determined in vitro after single carbon tetrachloride poisoning. The inflammatory changes induced by CCl4 result in marked water absorption and moderate of fat. Histologically, there are cell necroses, toxic swellings of cells, regenerating cells rich in water content, and fatty vacuoles. These phenomena result in a reduction of radiation absorption due to the increased water and fat accumulation. Prolongation of both relaxation times is mainly due to water absorption. PMID:3677548

  17. Non-Fermi liquid behavior of thermal relaxation time in degenerate electron plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Sreemoyee; Dutt-Mazumder, Abhee K.

    2013-04-01

    The thermal relaxation time (??ee) for the degenerate electron plasma has been calculated by incorporating non-Fermi liquid corrections both for the thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity. Perturbative results are presented by making expansion in T/mD with next to leading order corrections. We see that the next to leading order non-Fermi liquid corrections further reduce the decrease in relaxation time due to the leading order corrections.

  18. Time Scales in Particulate Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Duan

    2013-06-01

    While there are many interests of studying interactions of individual particles, macroscopic collective behavior of particles are our main interest in many practical applications. In this talk, I will give a brief overview of the multiscale methods connecting the physics at individual particles to macroscopic quantities and averaged equations. The emphasis will be on dense dissipative particulate systems, such as powders. Unlike conservative particle systems, such as molecular systems, in a dissipative particle system the concept of thermodynamic equilibrium is not very useful unless in very special cases, because the only true thermodynamically equilibrium state in these systems is the state in which nothing moves. Other than idealized simple systems, mesoscale structures are common and important in many practical systems, especially in dissipative systems. Spatial correlations of these mesoscale structures, such as force chains in dense granular system, particle clusters and streamers in fluidized beds have received some recent attentions, partly because they can be visualized. This talk will emphasize the effects of time correlations related to the mesoscale structures. To consider time correlations and history information of the system, I will introduce the mathematical foundation of the Liouville equation, its applicability and limitations. I will derive the generalized Liouville equations for particulate systems with and without interstitial fluids, and then use them to study averaged transport equations and related closures. Interactions among the time scale of particle interactions, the time scale of the mesocale structures, and the time scale of the physical problem as represented by strain rate will be discussed. The effect of these interactions on the closure relations will be illustrated. I will also discuss possible numerical methods of solving the averaged equations, and multiscale numerical algorithms bridging the particle level calculations to continuum level calculations. This work was sponsored by Stockpile Safety and Surety Program, the Joint DOD/DOE Munitions Technology Development Program, and National Nuclear Security Administrations Science Campaign 2.

  19. Difference-NMR techniques for selection of components on the basis of relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Douglas J.; de Azevedo, Eduardo R.; Bonagamba, Tito J.

    2003-05-01

    This work describes a numerical methodology to obtain more efficient relaxation filters to selectively retain or remove components based on relaxation times. The procedure uses linear combinations of spectra with various recycle or filter delays to obtain components that are both quantitative and pure. Modulation profiles are calculated assuming exponential relaxation behavior. The method is general and can be applied to a wide range of solution or solid-state NMR experiments including direct-polarization (DP), or filtered cross-polarization (CP) spectra. 13C NMR experiments on isotactic poly(1-butene) and dimethyl sulfone showed the utility of the technique for selectively suppressing peaks.

  20. Double multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model for solid-liquid phase change with natural convection in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qing; He, Ya-Ling

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, a double multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model is developed for simulating transient solid-liquid phase change problems in porous media at the representative elementary volume scale. The model uses two different multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann equations, one for the flow field and the other for the temperature field with nonlinear latent heat source term. The model is based on the generalized non-Darcy formulation, and the solid-liquid interface is traced through the liquid fraction which is determined by the enthalpy-based method. The present model is validated by numerical simulations of conduction melting in a semi-infinite space, solidification in a semi-infinite corner, and convection melting in a square cavity filled with porous media. The numerical results demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of the present model for simulating transient solid-liquid phase change problems in porous media.

  1. Relativistic bulk viscosity in the relaxation time approximation: a chaotic velocities approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Perciante, A. L.; Méndez, A. R.; Sandoval-Villalbazo, A.

    2015-11-01

    In this short note, the bulk viscosity for a high temperature dilute gas is calculated by applying the Chapman-Enskog method within Marle's relaxation time approximation. The expression for the stress-tensor established in Ref.[1], using explicitly the concept of chaotic velocity, is used in order to obtain the transport coefficient. The result is compared with previous expressions obtained by other authors using similar methods and emphasis is made on the agreement when a corrected relaxation parameter is considered.

  2. Characteristic time scale of auroral electrojet data

    SciTech Connect

    Takalo, J.; Timonen, J.

    1994-04-01

    The authors study the different time scales which have been observed in the auroral electrojet (AE) data. Structure function data shows the AE time series experiences a scaling change with a time scale of approximately 2 hours. Autocorrelation measurements also reveal a characteristic time of close to two hours. The authors argue here for a relationship between these two times, and for a relationship between these two times and the time scale of breaks in the power spectrum of the AE data.

  3. Ultrafast NMR T1 relaxation measurements: probing molecular properties in real time.

    PubMed

    Smith, Pieter E S; Donovan, Kevin J; Szekely, Or; Baias, Maria; Frydman, Lucio

    2013-09-16

    The longitudinal relaxation properties of NMR active nuclei carry useful information about the site-specific chemical environments and about the mobility of molecular fragments. Molecular mobility is in turn a key parameter reporting both on stable properties, such as size, as well as on dynamic ones, such as transient interactions and irreversible aggregation. In order to fully investigate the latter, a fast sampling of the relaxation parameters of transiently formed molecular species may be needed. Nevertheless, the acquisition of longitudinal relaxation data is typically slow, being limited by the requirement that the time for which the nucleus relaxes be varied incrementally until a complete build-up curve is generated. Recently, a number of single-shot-inversion-recovery methods have been developed capable of alleviating this need; still, these may be challenged by either spectral resolution restrictions or when coping with very fast relaxing nuclei. Here, we present a new experiment to measure the T1s of multiple nuclear spins that experience fast longitudinal relaxation, while retaining full high-resolution chemical shift information. Good agreement is observed between T1s measured with conventional means and T1s measured using the new technique. The method is applied to the real-time investigation of the reaction between D-xylose and sodium borate, which is in turn elucidated with the aid of ancillary ultrafast and conventional 2D TOCSY measurements. PMID:23878001

  4. Critical dynamics of the binary system nitroethane/3-methylpentane: relaxation rate and scaling function.

    PubMed

    Iwanowski, I; Leluk, K; Rudowski, M; Kaatze, U

    2006-04-01

    Shear viscosity and dynamic light scattering measurements as well as ultrasonic spectrometry studies of the nitroethane/3-methylpentane mixture of critical composition have been performed at various temperatures near the critical temperature, T(c). A combined evaluation of the shear viscosity and mutual diffusion coefficient data yielded the amplitude, xi(0), of the fluctuation correlation length, xi, assumed to follow power law, and the relaxation rate, Gamma, or order parameter fluctuations. The latter was found to follow power law with the theoretical universal exponent. The amplitudes xi(0) = 0.23 +/- 0.02 nm and Gamma(0) = (125 +/- 5) x 10(9) s(-1) nicely agree with literature values. Using the relaxation rates resulting from the viscosity and diffusion coefficient data, the scaling function has been calculated assuming the ultrasonic spectra to be composed of a critical part and a noncritical background contribution. The experimental scaling function fits well to the predictions of the Bhattacharjee-Ferrell dynamic scaling model with scaled half-attenuation frequency, Omega(BF)1/2= 2.1. The amplitude of the sonic spectra yields the amount |g| = 0.26 of the adiabatic coupling constant, g, in fair agreement with -0.29 from another thermodynamic relation. PMID:16571033

  5. Quantitative analysis of conductivity and viscosity of ionic liquids in terms of their relaxation times.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Nakahara, Eiichiro; Koda, Shinobu

    2014-05-29

    The frequency-dependent viscosity and conductivity of various ionic liquids were measured experimentally, and their mean relaxation times were determined. The relaxation times of the viscosity and conductivity were approximately correlated with their respective zero-frequency limiting values. The Walden products, however, appeared to have no correlation with the ratio of the relaxation time of viscosity to that of conductivity in general. When the alkyl chain of the cation is as short as butyl, more viscous ionic liquids tend to show larger difference between two relaxation times and larger Walden products. Lengthening the alkyl chain of the cation decreases the Walden product while slightly increasing the relaxation time ratio, which was elucidated in terms of the decrease in the high-frequency shear modulus. In addition, the contribution of the mesoscopic structure to viscosity was suggested in the case of the ionic liquid with the longest alkyl chain studied in this work, 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide. PMID:24802550

  6. Spectrally- and time-resolved fluorescence emission of indole during solvent relaxation: a quantitative model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toptygin, Dmitri; Brand, Ludwig

    2000-06-01

    Relaxation of polar solvents around excited fluorescent solutes results in a continuous time-dependent red shift in the fluorescence spectrum. Static heterogeneous broadening can also produce time-variant fluorescence spectra. The two effects can be distinguished by a quantitative model of fluorescence during homogeneous electrostatic relaxation. The model describes the evolution of the instantaneous spectrum and the time variation of the intensity observed at any fixed wavelength. The model is in good agreement with the experimental data obtained using a solution of indole in anhydrous glycerol at 4 nm spectral and 65 ps temporal resolution.

  7. Understanding generalized inversions of nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, J.; Chandrasekera, T. C.

    2014-12-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time T2, measured using the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) experiment, is a powerful method for obtaining unique information on liquids confined in porous media. Furthermore, T2 provides structural information on the porous material itself and has many applications in petrophysics, biophysics, and chemical engineering. Robust interpretation of T2 distributions demands appropriate processing of the measured data since T2 is influenced by diffusion through magnetic field inhomogeneities occurring at the pore scale, caused by the liquid/solid susceptibility contrast. Previously, we introduced a generic model for the diffusion exponent of the form -ant_e^k (where n is the number and te the temporal separation of spin echoes, and a is a composite diffusion parameter) in order to distinguish the influence of relaxation and diffusion in CPMG data. Here, we improve the analysis by introducing an automatic search for the optimum power k that best describes the diffusion behavior. This automated method is more efficient than the manual trial-and-error grid search adopted previously, and avoids variability through subjective judgments of experimentalists. Although our method does not avoid the inherent assumption that the diffusion exponent depends on a single k value, we show through simulation and experiment that it is robust in measurements of heterogeneous systems that violate this assumption. In this way, we obtain quantitative T2 distributions from complicated porous structures and demonstrate the analysis with examples of ceramics used for filtration and catalysis, and limestone of relevance to the construction and petroleum industries.

  8. Time and Temperature Dependence of Viscoelastic Stress Relaxation in Gold and Gold Alloy Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mongkolsuttirat, Kittisun

    Radio frequency (RF) switches based on capacitive MicroElectroMechanical System (MEMS) devices have been proposed as replacements for traditional solid-state field effect transistor (FET) devices. However, one of the limitations of the existing capacitive switch designs is long-term reliability. Failure is generally attributed to electrical charging in the capacitor's dielectric layer that creates an attractive electrostatic force between a moving upper capacitor plate (a metal membrane) and the dielectric. This acts as an attractive stiction force between them that may cause the switch to stay permanently in the closed state. The force that is responsible for opening the switch is the elastic restoring force due to stress in the film membrane. If the restoring force decreases over time due to stress relaxation, the tendency for stiction failure behavior will increase. Au films have been shown to exhibit stress relaxation even at room temperature. The stress relaxation observed is a type of viscoelastic behavior that is more significant in thin metal films than in bulk materials. Metal films with a high relaxation resistance would have a lower probability of device failure due to stress relaxation. It has been shown that solid solution and oxide dispersion can strengthen a material without unacceptable decreases in electrical conductivity. In this study, the viscoelastic behavior of Au, AuV solid solution and AuV2O5 dispersion created by DC magnetron sputtering are investigated using the gas pressure bulge testing technique in the temperature range from 20 to 80°C. The effectiveness of the two strengthening approaches is compared with the pure Au in terms of relaxation modulus and 3 hour modulus decay. The time dependent relaxation curves can be fitted very well with a four-term Prony series model. From the temperature dependence of the terms of the series, activation energies have been deduced to identify the possible dominant relaxation mechanism. The measured modulus relaxation of Au films also proves that the films exhibit linear viscoelastic behavior. From this, a linear viscoelastic model is shown to fit very well to experimental steady state stress relaxation data and can predict time dependent stress for complex loading histories including the ability to predict stress-time behavior at other strain rates during loading. Two specific factors that are expected to influence the viscoelastic behavior-degree of alloying and grain size are investigated to explore the influence of V concentration in solid solution and grain size of pure Au. It is found that the normalized modulus of Au films is dependent on both concentration (C) and grain size (D) with proportionalities of C1/3 and D 2, respectively. A quantitative model of the rate-equation for dislocation glide plasticity based on Frost and Ashby is proposed and fitted well with steady state anelastic stress relaxation experimental data. The activation volume and the density of mobile dislocations is determined using repeated stress relaxation tests in order to further understand the viscoelastic relaxation mechanism. A rapid decrease of mobile dislocation density is found at the beginning of relaxation, which correlates well with a large reduction of viscoelastic modulus at the early stage of relaxation. The extracted activation volume and dislocation mobility can be ascribed to mobile dislocation loops with double kinks generated at grain boundaries, consistent with the dislocation mechanism proposed for the low activation energy measured in this study.

  9. Probing of structural relaxation times in the glassy state of sucrose and trehalose based on dynamical properties of two secondary relaxation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, K.; Adrjanowicz, K.; Paluch, M.; Kaminska, E.

    2011-06-15

    Time-dependent isothermal dielectric measurements were carried out deeply in the glassy state on two very important saccharides: sucrose and trehalose. In both compounds two prominent secondary relaxation processes were identified. The faster one is an inherent feature of the whole family of carbohydrates. The slower one can also be detected in oligo- and polysaccharides. It was shown earlier that the {beta} process is the Johari-Goldstein (JG) relaxation coupled to motions of the glycosidic linkage, while the {gamma} relaxation originates from motions of the exocyclic hydroxymethyl unit. Recently, it was shown that the JG relaxation process can be used to determine structural relaxation times in the glassy state [R. Casalini and C. M. Roland, Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 035701 (2009)]. In this paper we present the results of an analysis of the data obtained during aging using two independent approaches. The first was proposed by Casalini and Roland, and the second one is based on the variation of the dielectric strength of the secondary relaxation process during aging [J. K. Vij and G. Power, J. Non-Cryst. Solids 357, 783 (2011)]. Surprisingly, we found that the estimated structural relaxation times in the glassy state of both saccharides are almost the same, independent of the type of secondary mode. This finding calls into question the common view that secondary modes of intramolecular origin do not provide information about the dynamics of the glassy state.

  10. Conductivity and relaxation time of porous silicon using the Kramers-Kronig relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dariani, R. S.; Tavakoli, F.

    2015-01-01

    To review the dielectric characteristics of porous silicon samples with various porosities, an equivalent circuit including a capacitor and parallel resistance was used. By applying AC voltage with a constant amplitude of 200 mV to the circuit and using impedance measurements of the samples between 10-100 KHz, the variations in the capacitance, dielectric function, refractive index, and resistance for the samples at room temperature and up to 350 °C were studied. The dielectric characteristics of the samples decreased with increasing frequency. In addition, with increasing temperature, the pore diameters increased, and the dielectric characteristics varied. In this paper, we demonstrate that the relaxation time and DC conductivity could be obtained using the Kramers-Kronig function and Hilbert transformation. Our results indicate that the relaxation time and DC conductivity increase with increasing porosity, and with increasing temperature, the relaxation time decreases and the DC conductivity increases.

  11. Isospin relaxation time in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies 

    E-print Network

    Li, Ba; Ko, Che Ming.

    1998-01-01

    , Texas 77843 r 1997! studied the isospin and momentum relaxation times in e energies. It is found that only at incident l equilibrium be reached before dynamical instability n time is shorter ~longer! than that for momentum @S0556-2813~98!05204...

  12. The effects of bone on proton NMR relaxation times of surrounding liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, C. A.; Genant, H. K.; Dunham, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    Preliminary attempts by our group at UCSF to assess fat content of vertebral marrow in the lumbar spine using relaxation time information demonstrated that the presence of trabecular bone affects relaxation times. The objective of this work was a thorough study of the effects of bone on NMR relaxation characteristics of surrounding liquids. Trabecular bone from autopsy specimens was ground up and sifted into a series of powders with graded densities ranging from 0.3 gm/cc to 0.8 gm/cc. Each powder was placed first in n-saline and then in cottonseed oil. With spectroscopy, spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) and effective spin-spin relaxation times (T2*) were measured for each liquid in each bone powder. As bone density and surface to volume ratio increased, T1 decreased faster for saline than for oil. T2* decreased significantly for both water and oil as the surface to volume ratio increased. It was concluded that effects of water on T1 could be explained by a surface interaction at the bone/liquid interface, which restricted rotational and translational motion of nearby molecules. The T1s of oil were not affected since oil molecules are nonpolar, do not participate in significant intermolecular hydrogen bonding, and therefore would not be expected to interact strongly with the bone surface. Effects on T2* could be explained by local magnetic field inhomogeneities created by discontinuous magnetic susceptibility near the bone surface. These preliminary results suggest that water in contact with trabecular bone in vivo will exhibit shortened relaxation times.

  13. A multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann method for high-speed compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kai; Zhong, Cheng-Wen

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a coupling compressible model of the lattice Boltzmann method. In this model, the multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann scheme is used for the evolution of density distribution functions, whereas the modified single-relaxation-time (SRT) lattice Boltzmann scheme is applied for the evolution of potential energy distribution functions. The governing equations are discretized with the third-order Monotone Upwind Schemes for scalar conservation laws finite volume scheme. The choice of relaxation coefficients is discussed simply. Through the numerical simulations, it is found that compressible flows with strong shocks can be well simulated by present model. The numerical results agree well with the reference results and are better than that of the SRT version. Project supported by the Innovation Fund for Aerospace Science and Technology of China (Grant No. 2009200066) and the Aeronautical Science Fund of China (Grant No. 20111453012).

  14. Predicting permeability from the characteristic relaxation time and intrinsic formation factor of complex conductivity spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revil, A.; Binley, A.; Mejus, L.; Kessouri, P.

    2015-08-01

    Low-frequency quadrature conductivity spectra of siliclastic materials exhibit typically a characteristic relaxation time, which either corresponds to the peak frequency of the phase or the quadrature conductivity or a typical corner frequency, at which the quadrature conductivity starts to decrease rapidly toward lower frequencies. This characteristic relaxation time can be combined with the (intrinsic) formation factor and a diffusion coefficient to predict the permeability to flow of porous materials at saturation. The intrinsic formation factor can either be determined at several salinities using an electrical conductivity model or at a single salinity using a relationship between the surface and quadrature conductivities. The diffusion coefficient entering into the relationship between the permeability, the characteristic relaxation time, and the formation factor takes only two distinct values for isothermal conditions. For pure silica, the diffusion coefficient of cations, like sodium or potassium, in the Stern layer is equal to the diffusion coefficient of these ions in the bulk pore water, indicating weak sorption of these couterions. For clayey materials and clean sands and sandstones whose surface have been exposed to alumina (possibly iron), the diffusion coefficient of the cations in the Stern layer appears to be 350 times smaller than the diffusion coefficient of the same cations in the pore water. These values are consistent with the values of the ionic mobilities used to determine the amplitude of the low and high-frequency quadrature conductivities and surface conductivity. The database used to test the model comprises a total of 202 samples. Our analysis reveals that permeability prediction with the proposed model is usually within an order of magnitude from the measured value above 0.1 mD. We also discuss the relationship between the different time constants that have been considered in previous works as characteristic relaxation time, including the mean relaxation time obtained from a Debye decomposition of the spectra and the Cole-Cole time constant.

  15. Very short NMR relaxation times of anions in ionic liquids: New pulse sequence to eliminate the acoustic ringing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimavicius, Vytautas; Gdaniec, Zofia; Balevicius, Vytautas

    2014-11-01

    NMR relaxation processes of anions were studied in two neat imidazolium-based room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) 1-decyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bromide- and chloride. The spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxations of 81Br and 35Cl nuclei were found to be extremely fast due to very strong quadrupolar interactions. The determined relaxation rates are comparable with those observed in the solids or in some critical organic solute/water/salt systems. In order to eliminate the acoustic ringing of the probe-head during relaxation times measurements the novel pulse sequence has been devised. It is based on the conventional inversion recovery pulse sequence, however, instead of the last 90° pulse the subsequence of three 90° pulses applied along axes to fulfill the phase cycling condition is used. Using this pulse sequence it was possible to measure T1 for both studied nuclei. The viscosity measurements have been carried out and the rotational correlation times were calculated. The effective 35Cl quadrupolar coupling constant was found to be almost one order lower than that for 81Br, i.e. 1.8 MHz and 16.0 MHz, respectively. Taking into account the facts that the ratio of (Q(35Cl)/Q(81Br))2 ? 0.1 and EFG tensors on the anions are quite similar, analogous structural organizations are expected for both RTILs. The observed T1/T2 (1.27-1.44) ratios were found to be not sufficiently high to confirm the presence of long-living (on the time scale of ?10-8 s) mesoscopic structures or heterogeneities in the studied neat ionic liquids.

  16. Hot-electron energy relaxation time in Ga-doped ZnO films

    SciTech Connect

    Šermukšnis, E. Liberis, J.; Ramonas, M.; Matulionis, A.; Toporkov, M.; Liu, H. Y.; Avrutin, V.; Özgür, Ü.; Morkoç, H.

    2015-02-14

    Hot-electron energy relaxation time is deduced for Ga-doped ZnO epitaxial layers from pulsed hot-electron noise measurements at room temperature. The relaxation time increases from ?0.17 ps to ?1.8 ps when the electron density increases from 1.4?×?10{sup 17?}cm{sup ?3} to 1.3?×?10{sup 20?}cm{sup ?3}. A local minimum is resolved near an electron density of 1.4?×?10{sup 19?}cm{sup ?3}. The longest energy relaxation time (1.8 ps), observed at the highest electron density, is in good agreement with the published values obtained by optical time-resolved luminescence and absorption experiments. Monte Carlo simulations provide a qualitative interpretation of our observations if hot-phonon accumulation is taken into account. The local minimum of the electron energy relaxation time is explained by the ultrafast plasmon-assisted decay of hot phonons in the vicinity of the plasmon–LO-phonon resonance.

  17. ? relaxation and low-temperature aging in a Au-based bulk metallic glass: From elastic properties to atomic-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evenson, Z.; Naleway, S. E.; Wei, S.; Gross, O.; Kruzic, J. J.; Gallino, I.; Possart, W.; Stommel, M.; Busch, R.

    2014-05-01

    The slow ? relaxation is understood to be a universal feature of glassy dynamics. Its presence in bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) is evidence of a broad relaxation time spectrum that extends to deep within the glassy state. Despite the breadth of research devoted to this phenomenon, its microscopic origin is still not fully understood. The low-temperature aging behavior and atomic structural rearrangements of a Au49Cu26.9Si16.3Ag5.5Pd2.3 BMG are investigated in the regime of the slow ? relaxation by employing an ensemble of experimental techniques such as high-intensity synchrotron x-ray scattering, modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC), dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), impulse excitation, and dilatometry. Evidence of a distinct slow ?-relaxation regime is seen in the form of (1) an excess wing of the DMA loss modulus beginning at ˜50 ?C, (2) a crossover effect of elastic modulus with isothermal aging at 50?C, and (3) a broad, nonreversing and largely irreversible sub-Tg endotherm in the MDSC results. Atomic rearrangements occurring at the onset of the measured slow ?-relaxation temperature regime were found to be confined mainly to the short-range order length scale while no significant atomic rearrangements occur on the length scale of the medium-range order. Furthermore, evidence is presented that suggests the crossover effect in Young's modulus is due to the evolution of chemical short-range order. These results support the emergent picture of a dynamically heterogeneous glassy structure, in which low-temperature relaxation occurs through atomic rearrangements confined mostly to the short-range order length scale.

  18. Can inertial electrostatic confinement work beyond the ion-ion collisional time scale?

    SciTech Connect

    Nevins, W.M.

    1995-01-01

    Inertial electrostatic confinement systems are predicated on a non-equilibrium ion distribution function. Coulomb collisions between ions cause this distribution to relax to a Maxwellian on the ion-ion collisional time-scale. The power required to prevent this relaxation and maintain the IEC configuration for times beyond the ion-ion collisional time scale is shown to be at least an order of magnitude greater than the fusion power produced. It is concluded that IEC systems show little promise as a basis for the development of commercial electric power plants.

  19. Time derivatives of the spectrum: Relaxing the stationarity assumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, G. A.; Thomson, D. J.; Vernon, F. L.

    2005-12-01

    Spectrum analysis of seismic waveforms has played a significant role towards the understanding of multiple aspects of Earth structure and earthquake source physics. In recent years the multitaper spectrum estimation approach (Thomson, 1982) has been applied to geophysical problems providing not only reliable estimates of the spectrum, but also estimates of spectral uncertainties (Thomson and Chave, 1991). However, these improved spectral estimates were developed under the assumption of local stationarity and provide an incomplete description of the observed process. It is obvious that due to the intrinsic attenuation of the Earth, the amplitudes, and thus the frequency contents are changing with time as waves pass through a seismic station. There have been incredible improvements in different techniques to analyze non-stationary signals, including wavelet decomposition, Wigner-Ville spectrum and the dual-frequency spectrum. We apply one of the recently developed techniques, the Quadratic Inverse Theory (Thomson, 1990, 1994), combined with the multitaper technique to look at the time derivatives of the spectrum. If the spectrum is reasonably white in a certain bandwidth, using QI theory, we can estimate the derivatives of the spectrum at each frequency. We test synthetic signals to corroborate the approach and apply it the records of small earthquakes at local distances. This is a first approach to try and combine the classical spectrum analysis without the assumption of stationarity that is generally taken.

  20. Determining the structural relaxation times deep in the glassy state of the pharmaceutical Telmisartan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrjanowicz, K.; Paluch, M.; Ngai, K. L.

    2010-03-01

    By using the dielectric relaxation method proposed recently by Casalini and Roland (2009 Phys. Rev. Lett. 102 035701), we were able to determine the structural ?-relaxation times deep in the glassy state of the pharmaceutical, Telmisartan. Normally, deep in the glassy state ?? is so long that it cannot be measured but ??, which is usually much shorter, can be directly determined. The method basically takes advantage of the connection between the ?-relaxation and the secondary ?-relaxation of the Johari-Goldstein kind, including a relation between their relaxation times ?? and ??, respectively. Thus, ?? of Telmisartan were determined by monitoring the change of the dielectric ?-loss, ?'', with physical aging time at temperatures well below the vitrification temperature. The values of ?? were compared with those expected by the coupling model (CM). Unequivocal comparison cannot be made in the case of Telmisartan because its ?-loss peak is extremely broad, and the CM predicts only an order of magnitude agreement between the primitive relaxation frequency and the ?-peak frequency. We also made an attempt to analyze all isothermal and aging susceptibility data after transformation into the electric modulus representation. The ?? found in the glass state by using the method of Casalini and Roland in the modulus representation are similar to those obtained in the susceptibility representation. However, it is remarkable that the stretching parameter ?KWW - M = 0.51 in the electric modulus representation gives more precise fits to the aging data than in the susceptibility representation with ?KWW = 0.61. Our results suggest that the electric modulus representation may be useful as an alternative to analyze aging data, especially in the case of highly polar glassformers having a large ratio of low frequency and high frequency dielectric constants, such as the Telmisartan studied.

  1. Relaxation rate and scaling function of the critical system 3-methylpentane-nitroethane-cyclohexane.

    PubMed

    Iwanowski, I; Mirzaev, S Z; Kaatze, U

    2008-08-14

    The critical system 3-methylpentane-nitroethane-cyclohexane (3-MP-NE-CH) has been investigated and compared to the limiting binary systems 3-MP-NE as well as NE-CH in order to study the degree of renormalization in the critical exponents of the ternary system. The solubility curves of the 3-MP-NE-CH system have been determined at various molar ratios of the nonpolar constituents in order to obtain the plait points as a function of mixture composition. At the col point (the mixture with the lowest transition temperature) and two further plait point compositions shear viscosity, dynamic light scattering, and frequency-dependent ultrasonic attenuation coefficient measurements have been performed as a function of temperature near the critical temperatures. The fluctuation correlation length and the relaxation rate of fluctuations display power law behavior as a function of reduced temperature, with universal critical exponents nu = 0.63 and nuZ(0) = 1.928, respectively, as characteristic for binary critical mixtures. In conformity with the 3-MP-NE and NE-CH critical mixtures the scaling function in the ultrasonic spectra nicely agrees with the empirical scaling function of the Bhattacharjee-Ferrell dynamic scaling theory. Hence with respect to power laws and scaling the 3-MP-NE-CH system behaves like a quasibinary mixture. The individual amplitudes of the relaxation rate show a minimum at the col point composition, corresponding with a maximum in the background viscosity of the liquids. The amount of the adiabatic coupling constant g, derived from the amplitudes in the ultrasonic spectra, increases monotonously when going from NE-CH (/g/ = 0.1) to 3-MP-NE (/g/ = 0.26). PMID:18715094

  2. Relaxation-Time Approximation for Analytical Evaluation of Temperature Field in Thermoacoustic Stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, V.; Lotton, P.; Bailliet, H.; Job, S.; Bruneau, M.

    2000-08-01

    The problem of analytical description of temperature fields and heat fluxes in thermoacoustic devices (such as refrigerators and prime-movers) is discussed. It is demonstrated that for the precise analysis of the thermoacoustic process near the edges of the stacks and the heat exchangers, and also for the prediction of the heat fluxes between the stack and the heat exchangers, it is necessary to avoid the traditional 'mean-field' approximation. In other words, on the spatial scale of the order of a particle displacement in the standing acoustic wave, hydrodynamical (advective) transport of heat cannot be described as a diffusional transport with an effective (depending on the acoustic wave power) diffusivity. In order to get insight into the non-linear phenomena, related to axial (along the stack) advective transport of heat, the simplified description of the transverse heat exchange between the gas and the stack (the relaxation-time approximation) has been adopted in the present investigation. The analytical descriptions obtained of the temperature distribution and of the heat flux predict, in particular, that in some cases the thermoacoustic heat flux between two stacks separated by an adiabatic gap can increase with the increasing width of the gap.

  3. FEMTOSECOND TECHNOLOGIES: Measurement of coherent polarisation relaxation times in condensed media using femtosecond interferometric spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kompanets, V. O.; Matveets, Yu A.; Chekalin, Sergei V.

    2001-05-01

    An ultrafast spectrometer with a temporal resolution of 20 fs for studying the polarisation wave interference in condensed matter upon resonance excitation by femtosecond laser pulses is described. The transverse relaxation times T2 < 20 and 50 fs are measured in optical media with considerably different inhomogeneous broadenings.

  4. Relaxation Time Constants and Apparent Diffusion Coefficients of Rat Retina at 7 Tesla

    E-print Network

    Duong, Timothy Q.

    Relaxation Time Constants and Apparent Diffusion Coefficients of Rat Retina at 7 Tesla Govind Nair* and ADC of the rat eyes were measured at 50 3 50 3 800 lm at 7 Tesla. Profiles of T1, T2, T2* and ADC

  5. Commonality of Elastic Relaxation Times in Biofilms T. Shaw,1,2

    E-print Network

    Klapper, Isaac

    Commonality of Elastic Relaxation Times in Biofilms T. Shaw,1,2 M. Winston,3 C. J. Rupp,3 I, Montana 59717, USA 2 Center for Biofilm Engineering, Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana 59717, USA 23 December 2003; published 24 August 2004) Biofilms, sticky conglomerations of microorganisms

  6. Collective friction coefficients in the relaxation time approximation F. A. Ivanyuk

    E-print Network

    Pomorski, Krzysztof

    Collective friction coefficients in the relaxation time approximation F. A. Ivanyuk Institute components of the friction coefficient for various single-particle potentials and have found that the nondiagonal component of the friction coefficient depends generally on the diffuseness of the potential

  7. Capacity enhancement of wavelength/time/space asynchronous optical CDMA with relaxed cross-correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jaswinder

    2013-12-01

    The analysis of a three-dimensional (3-D) wavelength/time/space (W-T-S) asynchronous optical CDMA code family is presented considering MAI only under relaxed cross-correlation (?c ? 1). Based on the code performance, it is shown that for code-limited systems (when W and/or T are non-prime), the number of generated codes and hence the supported users can be significantly increased by relaxing the cross-correlation constraint if a slight degradation in code performance can be tolerated.

  8. Multiple time scale based reduction scheme for nonlinear chemical dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, D.; Ray, D. S.

    2013-07-01

    A chemical reaction is often characterized by multiple time scales governing the kinetics of reactants, products and intermediates. We eliminate the fast relaxing intermediates in autocatalytic reaction by transforming the original system into a new one in which the linearized part is diagonal. This allows us to reduce the dynamical system by identifying the associated time scales and subsequent adiabatic elimination of the fast modes. It has been shown that the reduced system sustains the robust qualitative signatures of the original system and at times the generic form of the return map for the chaotic system from which complex dynamics stems out in the original system can be identified. We illustrate the scheme for a three-variable cubic autocatalytic reaction and four-variable peroxidase-oxidase reaction.

  9. Influence of correlated errors on the estimation of the relaxation time spectrum in dynamic light scattering.

    PubMed

    Maier, D; Marth, M; Honerkamp, J; Weese, J

    1999-07-20

    An important step in analyzing data from dynamic light scattering is estimating the relaxation time spectrum from the correlation time function. This estimation is frequently done by regularization methods. To obtain good results with this step, the statistical errors of the correlation time function must be taken into account [J. Phys. A 6, 1897 (1973)]. So far error models assuming independent statistical errors have been used in the estimation. We show that results for the relaxation time spectrum are better if correlation between statistical errors is taken into account. There are two possible ways to obtain the error sizes and their correlations. On the one hand, they can be calculated from the correlation time function by use of a model derived by Schätzel. On the other hand, they can be computed directly from the time series of the scattered light. Simulations demonstrate that the best results are obtained with the latter method. This method requires, however, storing the time series of the scattered light during the experiment. Therefore a modified experimental setup is needed. Nevertheless the simulations also show improvement in the resulting relaxation time spectra if the error model of Schätzel is used. This improvement is confirmed when a lattice with a bimodal sphere size distribution is applied to experimental data. PMID:18323954

  10. Thermalization and possible quantum relaxation times in "classical" fluids: theory and experiment

    E-print Network

    Z. Nussinov; F. Nogueira; M. Blodgett; K. F. Kelton

    2015-09-07

    Quantum effects in material systems are often pronounced at low energies and become insignificant at high temperatures. We find that, perhaps counterintuitively, certain quantum effects may follow the opposite route and become sharp when extrapolated to high temperature within a "classical" liquid phase. In the current work, we suggest basic quantum bounds on relaxation (and thermalization) times, examine kinetic theory by taking into account such possible fundamental quantum time scales, find new general equalities connecting semi-classical dynamics and thermodynamics to Planck's constant, and compute current correlation functions. Our analysis suggests that, on average, the extrapolated high temperature dynamical viscosity of general liquids may tend to a value set by the product of the particle number density ${\\sf n}$ and Planck's constant $h$. We compare this theoretical result with experimental measurements of an ensemble of 23 metallic fluids where this seems to indeed be the case. The extrapolated high temperature viscosity of each of these liquids $\\eta$ divided (for each respective fluid by its value of ${\\sf n} h$) veers towards a Gaussian with an ensemble average value that is close to unity up to an error of size $0.6 \\%$. Inspired by the Eigenstate Thermalization Hypothesis, we suggest a relation between the lowest equilibration temperature to the melting or liquidus temperature and discuss a possible corollary concerning the absence of finite temperature "ideal glass" transitions. We suggest a general quantum mechanical derivation for the viscosity of glasses at general temperatures. We invoke similar ideas to discuss other transport properties and demonstrate how simple behaviors including resistivity saturation and linear $T$ resistivity may appear very naturally. Our approach suggests that minimal time lags may be present in fluid dynamics.

  11. Relaxation times of the two-phonon processes with spin-flip and spin-conserving in quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zi-Wu; Liu, Lei; Li, Shu-Shen

    2014-04-07

    We perform a theoretical investigation on the two-phonon processes of the spin-flip and spin-conserving relaxation in quantum dots in the frame of the Huang-Rhys' lattice relaxation model. We find that the relaxation time of the spin-flip is two orders of magnitude longer than that of the spin-conserving, which is in agreement with previous experimental measurements. Moreover, the opposite variational trends of the relaxation time as a function of the energy separation for two-phonon processes are obtained in different temperature regime. The relaxation times display the oscillatory behaviors at the demarcation point with increasing magnetic field, where the energy separation matches the optical phonon energy and results in the optical phonon resonance. These results are useful in understanding the intraband levels' relaxation in quantum dots and could be helpful in designing photoelectric and spin-memory devices.

  12. On-chip Brownian relaxation measurements of magnetic nanobeads in the time domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Rizzi, Giovanni; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2013-06-01

    We present and demonstrate a new method for on-chip Brownian relaxation measurements on magnetic nanobeads in the time domain using magnetoresistive sensors. The beads are being magnetized by the sensor self-field arising from the bias current passed through the sensors and thus no external magnetic fields are needed. First, the method is demonstrated on Brownian relaxation measurements of beads with nominal sizes of 40, 80, 130, and 250 nm. The results are found to compare well to those obtained by an already established measurement technique in the frequency domain. Next, we demonstrate the time and frequency domain methods on Brownian relaxation detection of clustering of streptavidin coated magnetic beads in the presence of different concentrations of biotin-conjugated bovine serum albumin and obtain comparable results. In the time domain, a measurement is carried out in less than 30 s, which is about six times faster than in the frequency domain. This substantial reduction of the measurement time allows for continuous monitoring of the bead dynamics vs. time and opens for time-resolved studies, e.g., of binding kinetics.

  13. Temperature dependence of 1H NMR relaxation time, T2, for intact and neoplastic plant tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewa, Czes?aw J.; Lewa, Maria

    Temperature dependences of the spin-spin proton relaxation time, T2, have been shown for normal and tumorous tissues collected from kalus culture Nicotiana tabacum and from the plant Kalanchoe daigremontiana. For neoplastic plant tissues, time T2 was increased compared to that for intact plants, a finding similar to that for animal and human tissues. The temperature dependences obtained were compared to analogous relations observed with animal tissues.

  14. Probing of structural relaxation times in the glassy state of sucrose and trehalose based on dynamical properties of two secondary relaxation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, K.; Adrjanowicz, K.; Kaminska, E.; Paluch, M.

    2011-06-01

    Time-dependent isothermal dielectric measurements were carried out deeply in the glassy state on two very important saccharides: sucrose and trehalose. In both compounds two prominent secondary relaxation processes were identified. The faster one is an inherent feature of the whole family of carbohydrates. The slower one can also be detected in oligo- and polysaccharides. It was shown earlier that the ? process is the Johari-Goldstein (JG) relaxation coupled to motions of the glycosidic linkage, while the ? relaxation originates from motions of the exocyclic hydroxymethyl unit. Recently, it was shown that the JG relaxation process can be used to determine structural relaxation times in the glassy state [R. Casalini and C. M. Roland, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.102.035701 102, 035701 (2009)]. In this paper we present the results of an analysis of the data obtained during aging using two independent approaches. The first was proposed by Casalini and Roland, and the second one is based on the variation of the dielectric strength of the secondary relaxation process during aging [J. K. Vij and G. Power, J. Non-Cryst. SolidsJNCSBJ0022-309310.1016/j.jnoncrysol.2010.07.067 357, 783 (2011)]. Surprisingly, we found that the estimated structural relaxation times in the glassy state of both saccharides are almost the same, independent of the type of secondary mode. This finding calls into question the common view that secondary modes of intramolecular origin do not provide information about the dynamics of the glassy state.

  15. Ground-state atomic polarization relaxation-time measurement of Rb filled hypocycloidal core-shaped Kagome HC-PCF

    E-print Network

    Bradley, T D; McFerran, J J; Jouin, J; Debord, B; Alharbi, M; Thomas, P; Gerome, F; Benabid, F

    2015-01-01

    We report on the measurement of ground state atomic polarization relaxation tile of Rb vapor confined in five different hypocycloidal core shape Kagome hollow core photonic crystal fibers made with uncoated silica glass. We are able to distinguish between wall-collision and transit-time effects in optical waveguide and deduce the contribution of the atom's dwell time at the core wall surface. In contrast with convetional macroscopic atomic cell configuration, and in agreement with Monte Carlo simulations, the measured relaxation times were found to be at least one order of magnitude longer than the limit set by the atom-wall collisional relaxation from thermal atoms. This extended relaxation time is explained by the combination of a stronger contribution of the slow atoms in the atomic polarization build-up, and of the relatively significant contribution of dwell time to the relaxation process of the ground state polarization.

  16. Surface NMR measurement of proton relaxation times in medium to coarse-grained sand aquifer.

    PubMed

    Shushakov, O A

    1996-01-01

    A surface NMR investigation of groundwater in the geomagnetic field is under study. To detect the surface NMR a wire loop with a diameter of about 100 m, being an antenna for both an exciting field source and the NMR signal receiver, is laid out on the ground. A sinusoidal current pulse with a rectangular envelope is passed through the loop to excite the NMR signal. The carrier frequency of the oscillating current in this pulse is equal to the Larmor frequency of protons in the Earth's magnetic field. The current amplitude is changed up to 200 amps and the pulse duration is fixed and is equal to 40 ms. The exciting pulse is followed by an induction emf signal caused by the Larmor nuclear precession in geomagnetic field. The relaxation times T1, T2, and T2* were measured by the surface NMR for both groundwater in medium to coarse-grained sand at borehole and for bulk water under the ice surface of frozen lake. To determine T1, a longitudinal interference in experiments with repeated pulses was measured. A sequence with equal period between equal excitation pulses was used. The relaxation times T1, T2, measured for bulk water under the ice of the Ob reservoir were 1.0 s and 0.7 s, respectively. To estimate an influence of dissolved oxygen T1 of the same water at the same temperature was measured by lab NMR with and without pumping of oxygen. The relaxation time T1 measured for water in the medium to coarse-grained sand is 0.65 s. The relaxation time T2 estimated by spin echo sequence is found to be equal to 0.15 s. The relaxation time T2* is found to be about 80 ms. This result contradicts published earlier phenomenological correlation between relaxation time T2* and grain size of water-bearing rock. This could be as a result of unsound approach based on grain size or influence of paramagnetic impurities. PMID:8970122

  17. Fundamental studies of stress distributions and stress relaxation in oxide scales on high temperature alloys. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Shores, D.A.; Stout, J.H.; Gerberich, W.W.

    1992-06-01

    The high temperature X-ray diffraction system developed for this program is being used to measure the strains which develop during oxidation. This is being applied to Ni/NiO and Cr/Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Our work suggests tat the oxide and metal crystalline texture, anisotropic elastic modulus and anisotropic thermal expansion can have a pronounced effect on strain state of these systems. Acoustic emission is being used to study oxide scale failure (fracture) during oxidation. AE data from 304 stainless steel are being used to develop a statistical model of fracture process. Strength of metal/scale interface is an important property that has been difficult to quantify. Using Nano-indentation and scratch techniques developed for characterizing thin film interfaces, an effort has begun to measure the fracture toughness of the metal/scale interface. Mathematical modelling of origin and time evolution of growth stresses is an extension and improvement of previous models. The current effort employs a more sophisticated stress analysis and expands the scope to include other stress relaxation process. The interaction between the modeling studies and the X-ray diffraction measurements provides a natural credibility check to both efforts.

  18. Estimation of stress relaxation time for normal and abnormal breast phantoms using optical technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udayakumar, K.; Sujatha, N.

    2015-03-01

    Many of the early occurring micro-anomalies in breast may transform into a deadliest cancer tumor in future. Probability of curing early occurring abnormalities in breast is more if rightly identified. Even in mammogram, considered as a golden standard technique for breast imaging, it is hard to pick up early occurring changes in the breast tissue due to the difference in mechanical behavior of the normal and abnormal tissue when subjected to compression prior to x-ray or laser exposure. In this paper, an attempt has been made to estimate the stress relaxation time of normal and abnormal breast mimicking phantom using laser speckle image correlation. Phantoms mimicking normal breast is prepared and subjected to precise mechanical compression. The phantom is illuminated by a Helium Neon laser and by using a CCD camera, a sequence of strained phantom speckle images are captured and correlated by the image mean intensity value at specific time intervals. From the relation between mean intensity versus time, tissue stress relaxation time is quantified. Experiments were repeated for phantoms with increased stiffness mimicking abnormal tissue for similar ranges of applied loading. Results shows that phantom with more stiffness representing abnormal tissue shows uniform relaxation for varying load of the selected range, whereas phantom with less stiffness representing normal tissue shows irregular behavior for varying loadings in the given range.

  19. Deducting the temperature dependence of the structural relaxation time in equilibrium far below the nominal Tg by aging the decoupled conductivity relaxation to equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojnarowska, Z.; Ngai, K. L.; Paluch, M.

    2014-05-01

    Using broadband dielectric spectroscopy we investigate the changes in the conductivity relaxation times ?? observed during the physical aging of the protic ionic conductor carvedilol dihydrogen phosphate (CP). Due to the large decoupling of ion diffusion from host molecule reorientation, the ion conductivity relaxation time ??(Tage,tage) can be directly measured at temperatures Tage below Tg for exceedingly long aging times tage till ??(Tage,tage) has reached the equilibrium value ? _? ^{eq} ( {T_{age} } ). The dependence of ??(Tage,tage) on tage is well described by the stretched exponential function, ? _? ( {T_{age},t_{age} } ) = Aexp[ { - ( {{t_{age} }/{? _{age ( {T_{age} } )}}} )^? } ] + ? _? ^{eq} ( {T_{age} } ), where ? is a constant and ?age(Tage) can be taken as the structural ?-relaxation time of the equilibrium liquid at T = Tage. The value of ? _? ^{eq} ( {T_{age} } ) obtained after 63 days long annealing of CP, deviates from the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann-Hesse (VFTH?) dependence of ??(T) determined from data taken above Tg and extrapolated down to Tage. Concurrently, ?age(Tage) also deviates from the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann-Hesse (VFTH?) dependence. The results help to answer the longstanding question of whether the VFTH dependence of ??(T) as well as the structural ?-relaxation time ??(T) holds or not in the equilibrium liquid state far below Tg.

  20. Deducting the temperature dependence of the structural relaxation time in equilibrium far below the nominal Tg by aging the decoupled conductivity relaxation to equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Wojnarowska, Z; Ngai, K L; Paluch, M

    2014-05-01

    Using broadband dielectric spectroscopy we investigate the changes in the conductivity relaxation times ?? observed during the physical aging of the protic ionic conductor carvedilol dihydrogen phosphate (CP). Due to the large decoupling of ion diffusion from host molecule reorientation, the ion conductivity relaxation time ??(Tage,tage) can be directly measured at temperatures Tage below Tg for exceedingly long aging times tage till ??(Tage,tage) has reached the equilibrium value ??(eq)(Tage). The dependence of ??(Tage,tage) on tage is well described by the stretched exponential function, ??(Tage, tage) = Aexp[-((tage)/(?age(Tage)))(?)] + ??(eq)(Tage), where ? is a constant and ?age(Tage) can be taken as the structural ?-relaxation time of the equilibrium liquid at T = Tage. The value of ??(eq)(Tage) obtained after 63 days long annealing of CP, deviates from the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann-Hesse (VFTH?) dependence of ??(T) determined from data taken above Tg and extrapolated down to Tage. Concurrently, ?age(Tage) also deviates from the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann-Hesse (VFTH?) dependence. The results help to answer the longstanding question of whether the VFTH dependence of ??(T) as well as the structural ?-relaxation time ??(T) holds or not in the equilibrium liquid state far below Tg. PMID:24811641

  1. Specific viscosity of neutron-rich nuclear matter from a relaxation time approach

    E-print Network

    Jun Xu

    2011-12-05

    The specific viscosity of neutron-rich nuclear matter is studied from the relaxation time approach using an isospin- and momentum-dependent interaction and the nucleon-nucleon cross sections taken as those from the experimental data modified by the in-medium effective masses as used in the IBUU transport model calculations. The relaxation time of neutrons is larger while that of protons is smaller in neutron-rich nuclear matter compared with that in symmetric nuclear matter, and this leads to a larger specific viscosity in neutron-rich nuclear matter. In addition, the specific viscosity decreases with increasing temperature because of more frequent collisions and weaker Pauli blocking effect at higher temperatures. At lower temperatures the specific viscosity increases with increasing density due to the Pauli blocking effect, while at higher temperatures it slightly decreases with increasing density as a result of smaller in-medium effective masses at higher densities.

  2. Spectral density, memory function, and mean relaxation time for resonant subsystem-reservoir interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkie, Joshua

    2001-12-01

    We show that the projection operators P usually employed to derive the Nakajima-Zwanzig master equation are non-Hermitian. As a consequence the operator QLQ which governs the dynamics of subsystem-reservoir interactions (here Q=1-P and L is the Liouville operator) is also non-Hermitian and possesses a complex temperature-dependent spectrum of resonances. We use the self-consistent Born approximation to derive a formula for the spectral density of QLQ. From this spectral density we calculate the memory function and mean relaxation time of subsystem-reservoir correlations. These formulas are compared with numerical results obtained from the spin-spin-bath model to test their accuracy. The memory function and mean relaxation time are essential ingredients for the SRA (statistical resonance approximation) theory of microscopic dissipation and decoherence. We show that the SRA master equation preserves positivity when the memory function derived in this paper is employed.

  3. Shear viscosity to relaxation time ratio in SU(3) lattice gauge theory

    E-print Network

    Yasuhiro Kohno; Masayuki Asakawa; Masakiyo Kitazawa

    2013-03-25

    We evaluate the ratio of the shear viscosity to the relaxation time of the shear flux above but near the critical temperature $T_c$ in SU(3) gauge theory on the lattice. The ratio is related to Kubo's canonical correlation of the energy-momentum tensor in Euclidean space with the relaxation time approximation and an appropriate regularization. Using this relation, the ratio is evaluated by direct measurements of the Euclidean observables on the lattice. We obtained the ratio with reasonable statistics for the range of temperature $1.3T_c \\lesssim T \\lesssim 4T_c$. We also found that the characteristic speed of the transverse plane wave in gluon media is almost constant, $v \\simeq 0.5$, for $T \\gtrsim 1.5T_c$, which is compatible with the causality in the second order dissipative hydrodynamics.

  4. Exact solutions of the (0+1)-dimensional kinetic equation in the relaxation time approximation

    E-print Network

    Ewa Maksymiuk

    2015-02-18

    We present exact solutions of the (0+1)-dimensional kinetic equation for a massive gas in the relaxation time approximation. At first, we analyse the case of classical statistics and argue that the traditional second-order hydrodynamics misses the shear-bulk coupling. In the next step, we include Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac statistics in the calculations and show that they are important for description of the effects connected with bulk viscosity.

  5. Viscosity, relaxation time, and dynamics within a model asphalt of larger molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Derek D.; Greenfield, Michael L.

    2014-01-21

    The dynamics properties of a new “next generation” model asphalt system that represents SHRP AAA-1 asphalt using larger molecules than past models is studied using molecular simulation. The system contains 72 molecules distributed over 12 molecule types that range from nonpolar branched alkanes to polar resins and asphaltenes. Molecular weights range from 290 to 890 g/mol. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations conducted at six temperatures from 298.15 to 533.15 K provide a wealth of correlation data. The modified Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts equation was regressed to reorientation time correlation functions and extrapolated to calculate average rotational relaxation times for individual molecules. The rotational relaxation rate of molecules decreased significantly with increasing size and decreasing temperature. Translational self-diffusion coefficients followed an Arrhenius dependence. Similar activation energies of ?42 kJ/mol were found for all 12 molecules in the model system, while diffusion prefactors spanned an order of magnitude. Viscosities calculated directly at 533.15 K and estimated at lower temperatures using the Debye-Stokes-Einstein relationship were consistent with experimental data for asphalts. The product of diffusion coefficient and rotational relaxation time showed only small changes with temperature above 358.15 K, indicating rotation and translation that couple self-consistently with viscosity. At lower temperatures, rotation slowed more than diffusion.

  6. Review of time scales. [Universal Time-Ephemeris Time-International Atomic Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinot, B.

    1974-01-01

    The basic time scales are presented: International Atomic Time, Universal Time, and Universal Time (Coordinated). These scales must be maintained in order to satisfy specific requirements. It is shown how they are obtained and made available at a very high level of precision.

  7. Equilibration time scales of physically relevant observables

    E-print Network

    Luis Pedro García-Pintos; Noah Linden; Artur S. L. Malabarba; Anthony J. Short; Andreas Winter

    2015-09-18

    We address the problem of understanding from first principles the conditions under which a closed quantum system equilibrates rapidly with respect to a concrete observable. Previously known general upper bounds on the time scales of equilibration were extremely long, with times scaling linearly with the dimension of the Hilbert space. Moreover, these bounds proved to be tight, since particular constructions of observables scaling in this way were found. In this paper we provide a new upper bound on the equilibration time scales which shows, in fact, equilibration is much faster under some physically reasonable conditions. In particular, we apply this result to give bounds on the time scales of equilibration for a system interacting with a thermal bath which do not scale with the size of the bath.

  8. Kalman plus weights: a time scale algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    KPW is a time scale algorithm that combines Kalman filtering with the basic time scale equation (BTSE). A single Kalman filter that estimates all clocks simultaneously is used to generate the BTSE frequency estimates, while the BTSE weights are inversely proportional to the white FM variances of the clocks. Results from simulated clock ensembles are compared to previous simulation results from other algorithms.

  9. Biogeographic Kinetics: Estimation of Relaxation Times for Avifaunas of Southwest Pacific Islands

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, Jared M.

    1972-01-01

    When species diversity S on an island is displaced from the equilibrium value by injection or removal of species, S relaxes to equilibrium by an imbalance between immigration and extinction rates. Estimates of exponential relaxation times, tr, for avifaunas of New Guinea satellite islands are calculated from analysis of four “experiments of nature”: recolonization of exploded volcanoes, contraction in island area due to rising sea level, severing of land bridges, and disappearance of landbridge relict species. tr is in the range 3,000-18,000 years for avifaunas of islands of 50-3000 square miles (130-7800 km2), and increases with island area. Immigration coefficients decrease and extinction coefficients increase with increasing S. The results may be relevant to the design of rainforest preserves. PMID:16592024

  10. Energy relaxation time in NbN and YBCO thin films under optical irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rall, D.; Probst, P.; Hofherr, M.; Wünsch, S.; Il'in, K.; Lemmer, U.; Siegel, M.

    2010-06-01

    For a systematic study of energy relaxation processes in thin NbN and YBCO films on sapphire substrates, a frequency domain technique has been set up and employed. The magnetron sputtered NbN films of 3 nm to 22 nm thickness and pulsed-laser deposited YBCO films with thicknesses between 20 nm and 45 nm were excited by amplitude-modulated optical radiation (? = 850 nm). The response spectra were analyzed on basis of the two-temperature model of the energy dynamics in the interacting electron and phonon subsystems at quasi-equilibrium conditions. An increase of the energy relaxation time with increasing film thickness has been obtained for both NbN and YBCO thin film samples.

  11. Interfacial layers from the protein HFBII hydrophobin: dynamic surface tension, dilatational elasticity and relaxation times.

    PubMed

    Alexandrov, Nikola A; Marinova, Krastanka G; Gurkov, Theodor D; Danov, Krassimir D; Kralchevsky, Peter A; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Blijdenstein, Theodorus B J; Arnaudov, Luben N; Pelan, Eddie G; Lips, Alex

    2012-06-15

    The pendant-drop method (with drop-shape analysis) and Langmuir trough are applied to investigate the characteristic relaxation times and elasticity of interfacial layers from the protein HFBII hydrophobin. Such layers undergo a transition from fluid to elastic solid films. The transition is detected as an increase in the error of the fit of the pendant-drop profile by means of the Laplace equation of capillarity. The relaxation of surface tension after interfacial expansion follows an exponential-decay law, which indicates adsorption kinetics under barrier control. The experimental data for the relaxation time suggest that the adsorption rate is determined by the balance of two opposing factors: (i) the barrier to detachment of protein molecules from bulk aggregates and (ii) the attraction of the detached molecules by the adsorption layer due to the hydrophobic surface force. The hydrophobic attraction can explain why a greater surface coverage leads to a faster adsorption. The relaxation of surface tension after interfacial compression follows a different, square-root law. Such behavior can be attributed to surface diffusion of adsorbed protein molecules that are condensing at the periphery of interfacial protein aggregates. The surface dilatational elasticity, E, is determined in experiments on quick expansion or compression of the interfacial protein layers. At lower surface pressures (<11 mN/m) the experiments on expansion, compression and oscillations give close values of E that are increasing with the rise of surface pressure. At higher surface pressures, E exhibits the opposite tendency and the data are scattered. The latter behavior can be explained with a two-dimensional condensation of adsorbed protein molecules at the higher surface pressures. The results could be important for the understanding and control of dynamic processes in foams and emulsions stabilized by hydrophobins, as well as for the modification of solid surfaces by adsorption of such proteins. PMID:22480400

  12. Longitudinal rotating frame relaxation time measurements in infarcted mouse myocardium in vivo.

    PubMed

    Musthafa, Haja-Sherief N; Dragneva, Galina; Lottonen, Line; Merentie, Mari; Petrov, Lyubomir; Heikura, Tommi; Ylä-Herttuala, Elias; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Gröhn, Olli; Liimatainen, Timo

    2013-05-01

    Longitudinal relaxation time in the rotating frame (T1?) was measured using continuous wave irradiation in normal and infarcted mouse myocardium in vivo. Significant increase in T1? was found after 7 days of infarction when compared with reference myocardium or in myocardium before infarction. Cine MRI and histology were performed to verify the severity of infarction. The time course of T1? in the infarct fits better with granulation and scar tissue formation than necrosis and edema. The results of the study show that T1? could potentially be a noninvasive quantitative marker for tissue remodeling after ischemic damage. PMID:22736543

  13. Electron spin relaxation time in (110) InGaAs/InAlAs quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Yokota, Nobuhide; Yasuda, Yusuke; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Kawaguchi, Hitoshi

    2014-07-14

    Electron spin relaxation time ?{sub s} in InGaAs/InAlAs quantum wells (QWs) grown on (110) and (100) InP substrates was investigated by pump-probe transmission measurements. Similar ?{sub s} of 0.83–1.0?ns were measured at room temperature for all the measured (110) and (100) QWs, indicating suppression of the D'yakonov-Perel' spin relaxation mechanism in (110) QWs is not effective in InGaAs/InAlAs QWs as opposed to GaAs/AlGaAs QWs. Contribution of the Bir-Aronov-Pikus mechanism dominant in (110) GaAs/AlGaAs QWs was found to be small in both the (110) and (100) InGaAs/InAlAs QWs from the weak dependences of ?{sub s} on pump intensity at room temperature. These results suggest that the spin relaxation mechanism dominant in InGaAs/InAlAs QWs at a temperature higher than 200?K is the Elliott-Yafet mechanism independent of the crystal orientation among the above three major mechanisms.

  14. PHYSICAL REVIEW E 85, 066401 (2012) Cutoff wave number for shear waves and Maxwell relaxation time in Yukawa liquids

    E-print Network

    Goree, John

    2012-01-01

    PHYSICAL REVIEW E 85, 066401 (2012) Cutoff wave number for shear waves and Maxwell relaxation time to the Maxwell relaxation time. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevE.85.066401 PACS number(s): 52.27.Gr, 52.27.Lw, 61.20.Lc, 83 to the atomic spacing, shear sound waves (i.e., transverse phonons) propagate only for very short wavelengths

  15. Dynamics of glass-forming liquids. XVIII. Does entropy control structural relaxation times?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Subarna; Richert, Ranko

    2015-01-01

    We study the dielectric dynamics of viscous glycerol in the presence of a large bias field. Apart from dielectric saturation and polarization anisotropy, we observe that the steady state structural relaxation time is longer by 2.7% in the presence of a 225 kV/cm dc-field relative to the linear response counterpart, equivalent to a field induced glass transition (Tg) shift of +84 mK. This result compares favorably with the 3.0% time constant increase predicted on the basis of a recent report [G. P. Johari, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 154503 (2013)], where the field induced reduction of the configurational entropy translates into slower dynamics by virtue of the Adam-Gibbs relation. Other models of field dependent glass transition temperatures are also discussed. Similar to observations related to the electro-optical Kerr effect, the rise time of the field induced effect is much longer than its collapse when the field is removed again. The orientational relaxation time of the plastic crystal cyclo-octanol is more sensitive to a bias field, showing a 13.5% increase at a field of 150 kV/cm, equivalent to an increase of Tg by 0.58 K.

  16. Mouse Activity across Time Scales: Fractal Scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Lima, G. Z. dos Santos; Lobão-Soares, B.; do Nascimento, G. C.; França, Arthur S. C.; Muratori, L.; Ribeiro, S.; Corso, G.

    2014-01-01

    In this work we devise a classification of mouse activity patterns based on accelerometer data using Detrended Fluctuation Analysis. We use two characteristic mouse behavioural states as benchmarks in this study: waking in free activity and slow-wave sleep (SWS). In both situations we find roughly the same pattern: for short time intervals we observe high correlation in activity - a typical 1/f complex pattern - while for large time intervals there is anti-correlation. High correlation of short intervals ( to : waking state and to : SWS) is related to highly coordinated muscle activity. In the waking state we associate high correlation both to muscle activity and to mouse stereotyped movements (grooming, waking, etc.). On the other side, the observed anti-correlation over large time scales ( to : waking state and to : SWS) during SWS appears related to a feedback autonomic response. The transition from correlated regime at short scales to an anti-correlated regime at large scales during SWS is given by the respiratory cycle interval, while during the waking state this transition occurs at the time scale corresponding to the duration of the stereotyped mouse movements. Furthermore, we find that the waking state is characterized by longer time scales than SWS and by a softer transition from correlation to anti-correlation. Moreover, this soft transition in the waking state encompass a behavioural time scale window that gives rise to a multifractal pattern. We believe that the observed multifractality in mouse activity is formed by the integration of several stereotyped movements each one with a characteristic time correlation. Finally, we compare scaling properties of body acceleration fluctuation time series during sleep and wake periods for healthy mice. Interestingly, differences between sleep and wake in the scaling exponents are comparable to previous works regarding human heartbeat. Complementarily, the nature of these sleep-wake dynamics could lead to a better understanding of neuroautonomic regulation mechanisms. PMID:25275515

  17. The Variational Calculus on Time Scales

    E-print Network

    Torres, Delfim F M

    2011-01-01

    The discrete, the quantum, and the continuous calculus of variations, have been recently unified and extended by using the theory of time scales. Such unification and extension is, however, not unique, and two approaches are followed in the literature: one dealing with minimization of delta integrals; the other dealing with minimization of nabla integrals. Here we review a more general approach to the calculus of variations on time scales that allows to obtain both delta and nabla results as particular cases.

  18. Metabolic imaging in multiple time scales.

    PubMed

    Ramanujan, V Krishnan

    2014-03-15

    We report here a novel combination of time-resolved imaging methods for probing mitochondrial metabolism in multiple time scales at the level of single cells. By exploiting a mitochondrial membrane potential reporter fluorescence we demonstrate the single cell metabolic dynamics in time scales ranging from microseconds to seconds to minutes in response to glucose metabolism and mitochondrial perturbations in real time. Our results show that in comparison with normal human mammary epithelial cells, the breast cancer cells display significant alterations in metabolic responses at all measured time scales by single cell kinetics, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and by scaling analysis of time-series data obtained from mitochondrial fluorescence fluctuations. Furthermore scaling analysis of time-series data in living cells with distinct mitochondrial dysfunction also revealed significant metabolic differences thereby suggesting the broader applicability (e.g. in mitochondrial myopathies and other metabolic disorders) of the proposed strategies beyond the scope of cancer metabolism. We discuss the scope of these findings in the context of developing portable, real-time metabolic measurement systems that can find applications in preclinical and clinical diagnostics. PMID:24013043

  19. Metabolic Imaging in Multiple Time Scales

    PubMed Central

    Ramanujan, V Krishnan

    2013-01-01

    We report here a novel combination of time-resolved imaging methods for probing mitochondrial metabolism multiple time scales at the level of single cells. By exploiting a mitochondrial membrane potential reporter fluorescence we demonstrate the single cell metabolic dynamics in time scales ranging from milliseconds to seconds to minutes in response to glucose metabolism and mitochondrial perturbations in real time. Our results show that in comparison with normal human mammary epithelial cells, the breast cancer cells display significant alterations in metabolic responses at all measured time scales by single cell kinetics, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and by scaling analysis of time-series data obtained from mitochondrial fluorescence fluctuations. Furthermore scaling analysis of time-series data in living cells with distinct mitochondrial dysfunction also revealed significant metabolic differences thereby suggesting the broader applicability (e.g. in mitochondrial myopathies and other metabolic disorders) of the proposed strategies beyond the scope of cancer metabolism. We discuss the scope of these findings in the context of developing portable, real-time metabolic measurement systems that can find applications in preclinical and clinical diagnostics. PMID:24013043

  20. Cartilage and meniscal T2 relaxation time as non-invasive biomarker for knee osteoarthritis and cartilage repair procedures

    PubMed Central

    Baum, T.; Joseph, G.B.; Karampinos, D.C.; Jungmann, P.M.; Link, T.M.; Bauer, J.S.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective The purpose of this work was to review the current literature on cartilage and meniscal T2 relaxation time. Methods Electronic searches in PubMed were performed to identify relevant studies about T2 relaxation time measurements as non-invasive biomarker for knee osteoarthritis (OA) and cartilage repair procedures. Results Initial osteoarthritic changes include proteoglycan loss, deterioration of the collagen network, and increased water content within the articular cartilage and menisci. T2 relaxation time measurements are affected by these pathophysiological processes. It was demonstrated that cartilage and meniscal T2 relaxation time values were significantly increased in subjects with compared to those without radiographic OA and focal knee lesions, respectively. Subjects with OA risk factors such as overweight/obesity showed significantly greater cartilage T2 values than normal controls. Elevated cartilage and meniscal T2 relaxation times were found in subjects with vs without knee pain. Increased cartilage T2 at baseline predicted morphologic degeneration in the cartilage, meniscus, and bone marrow over 3 years. Furthermore, cartilage repair tissue could be non-invasively assessed by using T2 mapping. Reproducibility errors for T2 measurements were reported to be smaller than the T2 differences in healthy and diseased cartilage indicating that T2 relaxation time may be a reliable discriminatory biomarker. Conclusions Cartilage and meniscal T2 mapping may be suitable as non-invasive biomarker to diagnose early stages of knee OA and to monitor therapy of OA. PMID:23896316

  1. On the relaxation time of Gauss's continued-fraction map I. The Hilbert space approach (Koopmanism)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, D.; Roepstorff, G.

    1987-04-01

    It is shown that U *, the adjoint of Koopman's isometric operator Uf(x) = f(Tx) corresponding to the map Tx=x -1 (mod 1) of the unit interval, is isomorphic to a symmetric integral operator when restricted to a Hilbert space of holomorphic functions f This result, also obtained by Babenko in a different setting, allows us to derive new trace formulas. Using generalized Temple's inequalities, we determine the relaxation time of the above system with great accuracy. In contrast to a widespread belief, it appears to be unrelated to the entropy of the map T.

  2. [Radiation absorption (CT) and proton relaxation times (MR) in tissue samples of spongy bone].

    PubMed

    Schmitt, W G

    1987-06-01

    The contents of the medullary space exercise an influence on the absorption of radiation by spongy tissue of cancellous bone. This quantifiable dependence qualifies the value of CT densitometry of the spongiosa, for the CT number alone will not allow proportionate determination of the three main components: bone mineral, haematopoietic marrow and fat marrow. CT densitometry is reliable only if one can assume constant composition of the marrow. MR reveals hitherto unknown possibilities of noninvasive determination of the fat content in cancellous bone. The present study is limited to the determination of proton relaxation times, among the wide application possibilities offered by spectroscopy. PMID:3621810

  3. Average-atom treatment of relaxation time in X-ray Thomson scattering from warm-dense matter

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Walter R

    2016-01-01

    The influence of finite relaxation times on Thomson scattering from warm-dense plasmas is examined within the framework of the average-atom approximation. To this end, the Lindhard dielectric function, commonly used to evaluate the free-electron contribution to the Thomson cross section, is replaced by the Mermin dielectric function, which includes relaxation time explicitly. The relaxation time, which is evaluated by treating the average atom as an impurity in a uniform electron gas, depends critically on the transport cross section, which is evaluated in terms of scattering phase shifts in the average-atom potential. For the examples considered here, the calculated relaxation rates agree well, over a wide range of plasma densities and temperatures, with values inferred from the Ziman formula for the static conductivity and also with rates inferred from a fit to the frequency-dependent conductivity. Transport cross sections determined by the phase-shift analysis are compared with cross sections evaluated in ...

  4. The time at the subplanckian scale

    E-print Network

    Christian Pierre

    2007-01-22

    With the theory of special relativity, time has been linked with space into a four-dimensional space-time from which a basic question must be asked: can space be really transformed into time and vice-versa? The response is affirmative if time has the same structural topological structure as space at the subplanckian quantum level in such a way that a discrete structural quantum time constitutes the time part of the space-time internal vacuum of every elementary particle. It has thus been shown that a quantum time, quantized algebraically according to a lattice of time quanta, really exists and is emergent in the sense that time quanta can be transformed into space quanta and vice-versa. Furthermore,this quantum time, only relevant at the subplanckian scale, is proved to be in one-to-one correspondence with the absolute and relative clock times.

  5. Observing Reality on Different Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alyushin, Alexey

    2005-10-01

    In the first part of the paper, I examine cases of acceleration of perception and cognition and provide my explanation of the mechanism of the effect. The explanation rests on the conception of neuronal temporal frames, or windows of simultaneity. Frames have different standard durations and yield to stretching and compressing. I suggest it to be the cause of the effect, as well as the ground for differences in perceptive time scales of living beings. In the second part, I apply the conception of temporal frames to model observation in the extended time scales that reach far beyond the temporal perceptive niche of individual living beings. Duration of a frame is taken as the basic parameter setting a particular time scale. By substituting a different frame duration, we set a hypothetical time scale and emulate observing reality in a wider or a narrower angle of embracing events in time. I discuss the status of observer in its relation to objective reality, and examine how reality does change its appearance when observed in different time scales.

  6. Time scale synchronization of chaotic oscillators

    E-print Network

    Alexander Hramov; Alexey Koronovskii

    2006-02-25

    This paper presents the result of the investigation of chaotic oscillator synchronization. A new approach for detecting of synchronized behaviour of chaotic oscillators has been proposed. This approach is based on the analysis of different time scales in the time series generated by the coupled chaotic oscillators. This approach has been applied for the coupled Rossler and Lorenz systems.

  7. On the nonlinear variation of dc conductivity with dielectric relaxation time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johari, G. P.; Andersson, Ove

    2006-09-01

    The long-known observations that dc conductivity ?dc of an ultraviscous liquid varies nonlinearly with the dielectric relaxation time ?, and the slope of the log?dc against log? plot deviates from -1 are currently seen as two of the violations of the Debye-Stokes-Einstein equation. Here we provide a formalism using a zeroth order Bjerrum description for ion association to show that in addition to its variation with temperature T and pressure P, impurity ion population varies with a liquid's equilibrium dielectric permittivity. Inclusion of this electrostatic effect modifies the Debye-Stokes-Einstein equation to log(?dc? )=constant+log?, where ? is the T and P-dependent degree of ionic dissociation of an electrolytic impurity. Variation of a liquid's shear modulus with T and P would add to the nonlinearity of ?dc-? relation, as would a nonequivalence of the shear and dielectric relaxation times, proton transfer along the hydrogen bonds, or occurrence of another chemical process. This is illustrated by using the data for ultraviscous acetaminophen-aspirin liquid.

  8. An efficient three-dimensional multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model for multiphase flows

    E-print Network

    Liang, Hong; Chai, Zhenhua

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, an efficient three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann (LB) model with multiple-relaxation-time (MRT) collision operator is developed for the simulation of multiphase flows. This model is an extension of our previous two-dimensional model (H. Liang, B. C. Shi, Z. L. Guo, and Z. H. Chai, Phys. Rev. E. 89, 053320 (2014)) to the three dimensions using the D3Q7 (seven discrete velocities in three dimensions) lattice for the Chan-Hilliard equation (CHE) and the D3Q15 lattice for the Navier-Stokes equations (NSEs). Due to the smaller lattice-velocity numbers used, the computional efficiency can be significantly improved in simulating real three-dimensional flows, and simultaneously the present model can recover to the CHE and NSEs correctly through the chapman-Enskog procedure. We compare the present MRT model with the single-relaxation-time model and the previous three-dimensional LB model using two benchmark interface-tracking problems, and numerical results show that the present MRT model can achieve a ...

  9. Theory of the ac spin valve effect: a new method to measure spin relaxation time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochan, Denis; Gmitra, Martin; Fabian, Jaroslav

    2012-02-01

    Parallel (P) and antiparallel (AP) configurations of FNF junctions have, in a dc regime, different resistivities (RAP>RP), giving rise to the giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect, which can be explained within the spin injection drift-diffusion model. We extend the model to include ac phenomena and predict new spin dynamical phenomenon; the resonant amplification and depletion of spin accumulation in the P and AP configurations, respectively. As the major new effect, the spin valve magnetoimpedance of the FNF junction oscillates with the driving ac frequency, which leads to negative GMR effect (|ZAP|<|ZP|). We show that from the spin-valve oscillation periods, measured all electrically in the GHz regime, the spin relaxation times could be extracted without any magnetic field and sample size changes (contrary to other techniques). For thin tunnel junctions the ac signal becomes pure Lorentzian, also enabling one to obtain the spin relaxation time of the N region from the signal width. This work, was published in Physical Review Letters,10, 176604 (2011).

  10. Phase-field-based multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model for incompressible multiphase flows.

    PubMed

    Liang, H; Shi, B C; Guo, Z L; Chai, Z H

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, a phase-field-based multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann (LB) model is proposed for incompressible multiphase flow systems. In this model, one distribution function is used to solve the Chan-Hilliard equation and the other is adopted to solve the Navier-Stokes equations. Unlike previous phase-field-based LB models, a proper source term is incorporated in the interfacial evolution equation such that the Chan-Hilliard equation can be derived exactly and also a pressure distribution is designed to recover the correct hydrodynamic equations. Furthermore, the pressure and velocity fields can be calculated explicitly. A series of numerical tests, including Zalesak's disk rotation, a single vortex, a deformation field, and a static droplet, have been performed to test the accuracy and stability of the present model. The results show that, compared with the previous models, the present model is more stable and achieves an overall improvement in the accuracy of the capturing interface. In addition, compared to the single-relaxation-time LB model, the present model can effectively reduce the spurious velocity and fluctuation of the kinetic energy. Finally, as an application, the Rayleigh-Taylor instability at high Reynolds numbers is investigated. PMID:25353927

  11. Long term stability of atomic time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, Gérard; Arias, Elisa Felicitas

    2012-08-01

    International Atomic Time TAI gets its stability from some 400 atomic clocks worldwide that generate the free atomic scale EA L and its accuracy from a small number of primary frequency standards (PFS) which frequency measurements are used to steer the EAL frequency. Because TAI is computed in "real - time" (every month) and has operational constraints, it is not optimal and the BIPM computes in deferred time another time scale TT(BIPM), which is based on a weighted average of the evaluations of TAI frequency by the PFS. We show that a point has been reached where the stability of atomic time scales, the accuracy of primary frequency standards, and the capabilities of frequency transfer are approximately at a similar level, in the low 10 - 16 in relative frequency. The goal is now to reach and surpass 1x10 - 16 and the three fields are in various stages of advancement towards this aim. We review the stability and accuracy recently achieved by frequency standards, focusing on primary frequency standards on one hand, and on new secondary realizations e.g. based on optical transitions on the other hand. We study how these performances can translate to the performance of atomic time scales, and the possible implications of the availability of new high - accuracy frequency standards operating on a regular basis. Finally we show how time transfer is trying to keep up with the progresses of frequency standards. Time transfer is presently the limiting factor at short averaging time (e.g. 1 - 2 weeks) but it should not be limiting the long term stability of atomic time scales, which is the main need of many applications in astronomy.

  12. Time scales of turbulent relative dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitane, Rehab; Homann, Holger; Bec, Jérémie

    2012-10-01

    Tracers in a turbulent flow separate according to the celebrated t3/2 Richardson-Obukhov law, which is usually explained by a scale-dependent effective diffusivity. Here, supported by state-of-the-art numerics, we revisit this argument. The Lagrangian correlation time of velocity differences increases too quickly for validating this approach, but acceleration differences decorrelate on dissipative time scales. Phenomenological arguments are used to relate the behavior of separations to that of a “local energy dissipation,” defined as the average ratio between the cube of the longitudinal velocity difference and the distance between the two tracers. This quantity is shown to stabilize on short time scales and this results in an asymptotic diffusion ?t1/2 of velocity differences. The time of convergence to this regime is shown to be that of deviations from Batchelor's initial ballistic regime, given by a scale-dependent energy dissipation time rather than the usual turnover time. It is finally demonstrated that the fluid flow intermittency should not affect this long-time behavior of the relative motion.

  13. The Effect of Timed Relaxation on Keyboarding Achievement. Research Bulletin No. 46-B.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Doris B.

    Research has shown that relaxation exercises produce physical changes in students. After relaxation exercises, students appear calmer, have reduced levels of anxiety, and are more responsive to instruction. In order to determine if relaxation exercises would improve the rate at which students learn keyboarding, a study was conducted in a South…

  14. Brownian motion at short time scales

    E-print Network

    Tongcang Li; Mark G. Raizen

    2012-11-07

    Brownian motion has played important roles in many different fields of science since its origin was first explained by Albert Einstein in 1905. Einstein's theory of Brownian motion, however, is only applicable at long time scales. At short time scales, Brownian motion of a suspended particle is not completely random, due to the inertia of the particle and the surrounding fluid. Moreover, the thermal force exerted on a particle suspended in a liquid is not a white noise, but is colored. Recent experimental developments in optical trapping and detection have made this new regime of Brownian motion accessible. This review summarizes related theories and recent experiments on Brownian motion at short time scales, with a focus on the measurement of the instantaneous velocity of a Brownian particle in a gas and the observation of the transition from ballistic to diffusive Brownian motion in a liquid.

  15. Dynamical theory of spin noise and relaxation: Prospects for real-time NMR measurements.

    PubMed

    Field, Timothy R

    2014-11-01

    Recent developments in theoretical aspects of spin noise and relaxation and their interrelationship reveal a modified spin density, distinct from the density matrix, as the necessary object to describe fluctuations in spin systems. These fluctuations are to be viewed as an intrinsic quantum mechanical property of such systems immersed in random magnetic environments and are observed as "spin noise" in the absence of any radio frequency excitation. With the prospect of ultrafast digitization, the role of spin noise in real-time parameter extraction for (NMR) spin systems, and the advantage over standard techniques, is of essential importance, especially for systems containing a small number of spins. In this article we outline prospects for harnessing the recent dynamical theory in terms of spin-noise measurement, with attention to real-time properties. PMID:25493776

  16. Understanding long-time vacancy aggregation in iron: A kinetic activation-relaxation technique study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brommer, Peter; Béland, Laurent Karim; Joly, Jean-François; Mousseau, Normand

    2014-10-01

    Vacancy diffusion and clustering processes in body-centered-cubic (bcc) Fe are studied using the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an off-lattice kinetic Monte Carlo method with on-the-fly catalog building capabilities. For monovacancies and divacancies, k-ART recovers previously published results while clustering in a 50-vacancy simulation box agrees with experimental estimates. Applying k-ART to the study of clustering pathways for systems containing from one to six vacancies, we find a rich set of diffusion mechanisms. In particular, we show that the path followed to reach a hexavacancy cluster influences greatly the associated mean-square displacement. Aggregation in a 50-vacancy box also shows a notable dispersion in relaxation time associated with effective barriers varying from 0.84 to 1.1 eV depending on the exact pathway selected. We isolate the effects of long-range elastic interactions between defects by comparing to simulations where those effects are deliberately suppressed. This allows us to demonstrate that in bcc Fe, suppressing long-range interactions mainly influences kinetics in the first 0.3 ms, slowing down quick energy release cascades seen more frequently in full simulations, whereas long-term behavior and final state are not significantly affected.

  17. 7Li relaxation time measurements at very low magnetic field by 1H dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeghib, Nadir; Grucker, Daniel

    2001-09-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of water protons was used to measure the relaxation time of lithium at very low magnetic field as a demonstration of the use of DNP for nuclei less abundant than water protons. Lithium (Li+) was chosen because it is an efficient treatment for manic-depressive illness, with an unknown action mechanism. After having recalled the theoretical basis of a three-spin system comprising two nuclei - the water proton of the solvent, the dissolved Li+ ion and the free electron of a free radical - we have developed a transient solution in order to optimize potential biological applications of Li DNP. The three-spin model has allowed computation of all the parameters of the system - the longitudinal relaxation rate per unit of free radical concentration, the dipolar and scalar part of the coupling between the nuclei and the electron, and the maximum signal enhancement achievable for both proton and lithium spins. All these measurements have been obtained solely through the detection of the proton resonance.

  18. The hippocampus, time, and memory across scales.

    PubMed

    Howard, Marc W; Eichenbaum, Howard

    2013-11-01

    A wealth of experimental studies with animals have offered insights about how neural networks within the hippocampus support the temporal organization of memories. These studies have revealed the existence of "time cells" that encode moments in time, much as the well-known "place cells" map locations in space. Another line of work inspired by human behavioral studies suggests that episodic memories are mediated by a state of temporal context that changes gradually over long time scales, up to at least a few thousand seconds. In this view, the "mental time travel" hypothesized to support the experience of episodic memory corresponds to a "jump back in time" in which a previous state of temporal context is recovered. We suggest that these 2 sets of findings could be different facets of a representation of temporal history that maintains a record at the last few thousand seconds of experience. The ability to represent long time scales comes at the cost of discarding precise information about when a stimulus was experienced--this uncertainty becomes greater for events further in the past. We review recent computational work that describes a mechanism that could construct such a scale-invariant representation. Taken as a whole, this suggests the hippocampus plays its role in multiple aspects of cognition by representing events embedded in a general spatiotemporal context. The representation of internal time can be useful across nonhippocampal memory systems. PMID:23915126

  19. Temperature Dependence of Spin Relaxation Time in InAs Columnar Quantum Dots at 10 to 150 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, Sota; Sasayama, Kazutoshi; Oyanagi, Yoshitsugu; Yamaguchi, Ryo; Lu, Shulong; Li, Lianhe; Fiore, Andrea; Tackeuchi, Atsushi

    2012-04-01

    We have investigated carrier spin relaxation in InAs columnar quantum dots (CQDs) using time-resolved photoluminescence measurement. The CQDs were formed by depositing a 1.8 monolayer InAs seed dot layer and a short-period GaAs/InAs superlattice (SL). The spin relaxations of the 3- and 35-period SL CQDs show double exponential decay up to 50 and 130 K, respectively. The spin relaxation times of the fast component, whose amplitudes are 4-11 times larger than that of the slow component, are around 100 ps for the two samples. For the 3-period SL CQDs, the fast spin relaxation time shows no temperature dependence up to around 50 K, indicating the relevance of the Bir-Aronov-Pikus process. The slow spin relaxation time of the 35-period SL CQDs was found to decrease from 3.42 ns at 10 K to 0.849 ns at 130 K. This large change may be explained by the Elliott-Yafet process considering acoustic phonon scattering.

  20. Modified scaling principle for rotational relaxation in a model for suspensions of rigid rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tse, Ying-Lung Steve; Andersen, Hans C.

    2013-07-01

    We have performed simulations of the model of infinitely thin rigid rods undergoing rotational and translational diffusion, subject to the restriction that no two rods can cross one another, for various concentrations well into the semidilute regime. We used a modification of the algorithm of Doi et al. [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 53, 3000 (1984)], 10.1143/JPSJ.53.3000 that simulates diffusive dynamics using a Monte Carlo method and a nonzero time step. In the limit of zero time step, this algorithm is an exact description of diffusive dynamics subject to the noncrossing restriction. For a wide range of concentrations in the semidilute regime, we report values of the long time rotational diffusion constant of the rods, extrapolated to the limit of zero time step, for various sets of values of the infinite dilution (bare) diffusion constants. These results are compared with the results of a previous simulation of the model by Doi et al. and of previous simulations of rods with finite aspect ratio by Fixman and by Cobb and Butler that had been extrapolated to the limit of infinitely thin rods. The predictions of the Doi-Edwards (DE) scaling law do not hold for this model for the concentrations studied. The simulation data for the model display two deviations from the predictions of the DE theory that have been observed in experimental systems in the semidilute regime, namely, the very slow approach toward DE scaling behavior as the concentration is increased and the large value of the prefactor in the DE scaling law. We present a modified scaling principle for this model that is consistent with the simulation results for a broad range of concentrations in the semidilute regime. The modified scaling principle takes into account two physical effects, which we call "leakage" and "drift," that were found to be important for the transport properties of a simpler model of nonrotating rods on a lattice [Y.-L. S. Tse and H. C. Andersen, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 024904 (2012)], 10.1063/1.3673791.

  1. Multiple-relaxation-time Finsler-Lagrange dynamics in a compressed Langmuir monolayer

    E-print Network

    V. Balan; H. V. Grushevskaya; N. G. Krylova; M. Neagu

    2015-12-05

    In this paper an information geometric approach has been proposed to describe the two-dimensional (2d) phase transition of the first order in a monomolecular layer (monolayer) of amphiphilic molecules deposited on air/water interface. The structurization of the monolayer was simulated as an entropy evolution of a statistical set of microscopic states with a large number of relaxation times. The electrocapillary forces are considered as information constraints on the statistical manifold. The solution curves of Euler-Lagrange equations and the Jacobi field equations point out contracting pencils of geodesic trajectories on the statistical manifold, which may change into spreading ones, and converse. It was shown that the information geometrodynamics of the first-order phase transition in the Langmuir monolayer finds an appropriate realization within the Finsler-Lagrange framework.

  2. Multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann method for immiscible fluids at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhari, Abbas; Lee, Taehun

    2013-02-01

    The lattice Boltzmann method for immiscible multiphase flows with large density ratio is extended to high Reynolds number flows using a multiple-relaxation-time (MRT) collision operator, and its stability and accuracy are assessed by simulating the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. The MRT model is successful at damping high-frequency oscillations in the kinetic energy emerging from traveling waves generated by the inclusion of curvature. Numerical results are shown to be in good agreement with prior studies using adaptive mesh refinement techniques applied to the Navier-Stokes equations. Effects of viscosity and surface tension, as well as density ratio, are investigated in terms of the Reynolds and Weber numbers. It is shown that increasing the Reynolds number results in a more chaotic interface evolution and eventually shattering of the interface, while surface tension is shown to have a stabilizing effect.

  3. Equilibrium distributions and relaxation times in gaslike economic models: An analytical derivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calbet, Xavier; López, José-Luis; López-Ruiz, Ricardo

    2011-03-01

    A step-by-step procedure to derive analytically the exact dynamical evolution equations of the probability density functions (PDFs) of well-known kinetic wealth exchange economic models is shown. This technique gives a dynamical insight into the evolution of the PDF, for example, allowing the calculation of its relaxation times. Their equilibrium PDFs can also be calculated by finding its stationary solutions. This gives as a result an integro-differential equation, which can be solved analytically in some cases and numerically in others. This should provide some guidance into the type of PDFs that can be derived from particular economic agent exchange rules or, for that matter, any other kinetic model of gases with particular collision physics.

  4. Measuring non-radiative relaxation time of fluorophores with biomedical applications by intensity-modulated laser-induced photoacoustic effect

    PubMed Central

    Soroushian, Behrouz; Yang, Xinmai

    2011-01-01

    Modulated tone-burst light was employed to measure non-radiative relaxation time of fluorophores with biomedical importance through photoacoustic effect. Non-radiative relaxation time was estimated through the frequency dependence of photoacoustic signal amplitude. Experiments were performed on solutions of new indocyanine green (IR-820), which is a near infrared dye and has biomedical applications, in two different solvents (water and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)). A 1.5 times slower non-radiative relaxation for the solution of dye in DMSO was observed comparing with the aqueous solution. This result agrees well with general finding that non-radiative relaxation of molecules in triplet state depends on viscosity of solvents in which they are dissolved. Measurements of the non-radiative relaxation time can be used as a new source of contrast mechanism in photoacoustic imaging technique. The proposed method has potential applications such as imaging tissue oxygenation and mapping of other chemophysical differences in microenvironment of exogenous biomarkers. PMID:22025981

  5. Waiting time after non-depolarizing relaxants alter muscle fasciculation response to succinylcholine.

    PubMed

    Pinchak, A C; Smith, C E; Shepard, L S; Patterson, L

    1994-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of nondepolarizing muscle relaxants and waiting time on muscle fasciculations after succinylcholine in anaesthetized patients. Adult men and women, 60-80 kg, received pretreatment doses of atracurium 5 mg (n = 160), pancuronium 1 mg (n = 123), d-tubocurarine 3 mg (n = 97), or vecuronium 1 mg (n = 62). Waiting times between pretreatment and succinylcholine, 100 mg, ranged between 0.6 and 5 min. Data points (presence or absence of fasciculations and waiting time) were entered for each patient. Waiting time response curves were obtained between the logit transformation of the probability of no fasciculations and the log waiting time for each drug. Statistical differences between wait time response curves were determined by non-overlapping of the associated 95% confidence intervals. The frequency of muscle fasciculations was reduced with increased waiting time for all nondepolarizers tested. Following wait times of three, four and five minutes, the probability of not fasciculating was greatest with d-tubocurarine (90, 97 and 99%, respectively) and atracurium (89, 93 and 96%). Corresponding values for pancuronium were 70, 82 and 88% and for vecuronium were 74, 82 and 86%. Waiting times to prevent fasciculations in 80% and 90% of patients were shorter with d-tubocurarine (2.46 and 3.02 min, respectively) or atracurium (2.16 and 3.24 min) than pancuronium (3.77 and 5.35 min) or vecuronium (3.73 and 6.36 min).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7910525

  6. On resonance phase alternated CWFP sequences for rapid and simultaneous measurement of relaxation times.

    PubMed

    Monaretto, Tatiana; Andrade, Fabiana Diuk; Moraes, Tiago Bueno; Souza, Andre Alves; deAzevedo, Eduardo Ribeiro; Colnago, Luiz Alberto

    2015-10-01

    T1 and T2 relaxation times have been frequently used as probes for physical-chemical properties in several time-domain NMR applications (TD-NMR) such as food, polymers and petroleum industries. T2 measurements are usually achieved using the traditional Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse sequence because it is a fast and robust method. On the other hand, the traditional methods for determining T1, i.e., inversion and saturation recovery, are time-consuming, driving several authors to develop rapid 1D and 2D methods to obtain T1 and T2 or T1/T2 ratio. However, these methods usually require sophisticated processing and/or high signal to noise ratio (SNR). This led us to develop simple methods for rapid and simultaneous determination of T1 and T2 using Continuous Wave Free Precession (CWFP) and Carr-Purcell Continuous Wave Free Precession (CP-CWFP) pulse sequences. Nevertheless, a drawback of these sequences is that they require specific adjustment of the frequency offset or the time interval between pulses (Tp). In this paper we present an alternative form of these sequences, named CWFPx-x, CP-CWFPx-x, where a train of ?/2 pulses with phases alternated by ? enable performing the experiments on-resonance and independently of Tp, when Tprelaxation times are determined using the magnitude of the signals after the first pulse |M0| and in the steady-state |Mss|, as well as the exponential time constant T(?) to reach the steady-state regime, as in conventional CWFP. CP-CWFPx-x shows the highest dynamic range to measure T(?) among CWFP sequences and, therefore, is the best technique to measure T1 and T2 since it is less susceptible to SNR and can be performed for any T1/T2 ratio. PMID:26363504

  7. On resonance phase alternated CWFP sequences for rapid and simultaneous measurement of relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaretto, Tatiana; Andrade, Fabiana Diuk; Moraes, Tiago Bueno; Souza, Andre Alves; deAzevedo, Eduardo Ribeiro; Colnago, Luiz Alberto

    2015-10-01

    T1 and T2 relaxation times have been frequently used as probes for physical-chemical properties in several time-domain NMR applications (TD-NMR) such as food, polymers and petroleum industries. T2 measurements are usually achieved using the traditional Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse sequence because it is a fast and robust method. On the other hand, the traditional methods for determining T1, i.e., inversion and saturation recovery, are time-consuming, driving several authors to develop rapid 1D and 2D methods to obtain T1 and T2 or T1/T2 ratio. However, these methods usually require sophisticated processing and/or high signal to noise ratio (SNR). This led us to develop simple methods for rapid and simultaneous determination of T1 and T2 using Continuous Wave Free Precession (CWFP) and Carr-Purcell Continuous Wave Free Precession (CP-CWFP) pulse sequences. Nevertheless, a drawback of these sequences is that they require specific adjustment of the frequency offset or the time interval between pulses (Tp). In this paper we present an alternative form of these sequences, named CWFPx-x, CP-CWFPx-x, where a train of ?/2 pulses with phases alternated by ? enable performing the experiments on-resonance and independently of Tp, when Tp < T2?. Moreover, a CPMG type sequence with ?/2 refocusing pulses shows similar results to CP-CWFP when the pulses are alternated between y and -y axis, CPMG90y-y. In these approaches, the relaxation times are determined using the magnitude of the signals after the first pulse |M0| and in the steady-state |Mss|, as well as the exponential time constant T? to reach the steady-state regime, as in conventional CWFP. CP-CWFPx-x shows the highest dynamic range to measure T? among CWFP sequences and, therefore, is the best technique to measure T1 and T2 since it is less susceptible to SNR and can be performed for any T1/T2 ratio.

  8. A comment on the use of flushing time, residence time, and age as transport time scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Monsen, N.E.; Cloern, J.E.; Lucas, L.V.; Monismith, Stephen G.

    2002-01-01

    Applications of transport time scales are pervasive in biological, hydrologic, and geochemical studies yet these times scales are not consistently defined and applied with rigor in the literature. We compare three transport time scales (flushing time, age, and residence time) commonly used to measure the retention of water or scalar quantities transported with water. We identify the underlying assumptions associated with each time scale, describe procedures for computing these time scales in idealized cases, and identify pitfalls when real-world systems deviate from these idealizations. We then apply the time scale definitions to a shallow 378 ha tidal lake to illustrate how deviations between real water bodies and the idealized examples can result from: (1) non-steady flow; (2) spatial variability in bathymetry, circulation, and transport time scales; and (3) tides that introduce complexities not accounted for in the idealized cases. These examples illustrate that no single transport time scale is valid for all time periods, locations, and constituents, and no one time scale describes all transport processes. We encourage aquatic scientists to rigorously define the transport time scale when it is applied, identify the underlying assumptions in the application of that concept, and ask if those assumptions are valid in the application of that approach for computing transport time scales in real systems.

  9. Time-dependent pseudo Jahn-Teller effect: Phonon-mediated long-time nonadiabatic relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Vaikjärv, Taavi Hizhnyakov, Vladimir

    2014-02-14

    Our system under theoretical consideration is an impurity center in a solid. We are considering the time evolution of the center in a quasi-degenerate electronic state. Strict quantum mechanical treatment of non-adiabadicity of the state is used. The phonon continuum is taken into account in addition to the vibration responsible for the main vibronic interaction. To describe the dynamics of the excited state a master equation has been used. The theoretical considerations are illustrated by the calculations of the long-time evolution of vibrations of the center, influenced by the emission of phonons to the bulk.

  10. Strong anisotropy of momentum-relaxation time induced by intermolecular vibrations of single-crystal organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko; Hirose, Kenji

    2013-11-01

    We present a theoretical study of the relationships between intermolecular vibrations and anisotropic transport properties of pentacene and rubrene single-crystal organic semiconductors. Using our wave-packet approach based on the Kubo formula beyond the effective-mass approximation with the assumption of an isotropic momentum-relaxation time, we find that the intermolecular vibrations induce a strong anisotropic momentum-relaxation time but moderate the anisotropy of carrier mobility much more than that of the effective mass. This clarifies the mechanism behind the deviation of the anisotropic ratio of mobility from that of effective mass observed in angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy experiments.

  11. Accuracy metrics for judging time scale algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, R. J.; Boulanger, J.-S.; Jacques, C.

    1994-01-01

    Time scales have been constructed in different ways to meet the many demands placed upon them for time accuracy, frequency accuracy, long-term stability, and robustness. Usually, no single time scale is optimum for all purposes. In the context of the impending availability of high-accuracy intermittently-operated cesium fountains, we reconsider the question of evaluating the accuracy of time scales which use an algorithm to span interruptions of the primary standard. We consider a broad class of calibration algorithms that can be evaluated and compared quantitatively for their accuracy in the presence of frequency drift and a full noise model (a mixture of white PM, flicker PM, white FM, flicker FM, and random walk FM noise). We present the analytic techniques for computing the standard uncertainty for the full noise model and this class of calibration algorithms. The simplest algorithm is evaluated to find the average-frequency uncertainty arising from the noise of the cesium fountain's local oscillator and from the noise of a hydrogen maser transfer-standard. This algorithm and known noise sources are shown to permit interlaboratory frequency transfer with a standard uncertainty of less than 10(exp -15) for periods of 30-100 days.

  12. Time Out from Tension: Teaching Young Children How To Relax. Teaching Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scully, Patricia

    2003-01-01

    Discusses how using relaxation and stress reduction activities with individual preschool and elementary school-age children during difficult periods can help them regain control, and how integrating relaxation techniques into everyday activities helps to establish positive behavior patterns to support healthy living. Presents breathing activities…

  13. Early Warning Systems at Different Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bain, C.

    2014-12-01

    Early Warning Systems (EWS) reduce the negative aspects of natural hazard impacts on vulnerable communities. Despite its frequent use as a term there is no real 'one size fits all' approach to EWS and the system may comprise of different elements depending on the time scale of the hazard, the quality of the information available to make decisions, as well as the population needs and habits. In most developing countries, the primary hydro-meteorological hazards are droughts and floods. These two hazards demand very different approaches: droughts occur over long time scales and are generally a consequence of a gradual process of reduced rainfall across a rainy season; Floods may be caused on seasonal timescales as well due to an overactive rainy season, but the most extreme consequences and loss of life are often suffered at short timescales and relate to flash flooding caused by severe thunderstorms, monsoon extremes and tropical cyclones. This presentation will address the issues around implementing successful EWS and how these can be targeted to different time scales of hazards. Case studies illustrating the benefits of early information use and action will be shown along with open questions for debate on how the science community might better engage and help develop solutions to hazard warning.

  14. Nanosecond Time Scale Motions in Proteins Revealed by High-Resolution NMR Relaxometry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the molecular determinants underlying protein function requires the characterization of both structure and dynamics at atomic resolution. Nuclear relaxation rates allow a precise characterization of protein dynamics at the Larmor frequencies of spins. This usually limits the sampling of motions to a narrow range of frequencies corresponding to high magnetic fields. At lower fields one cannot achieve sufficient sensitivity and resolution in NMR. Here, we use a fast shuttle device where the polarization builds up and the signals are detected at high field, while longitudinal relaxation takes place at low fields 0.5 < B0 < 14.1 T. The sample is propelled over a distance up to 50 cm by a blowgun-like system in about 50 ms. The analysis of nitrogen-15 relaxation in the protein ubiquitin over such a wide range of magnetic fields offers unprecedented insights into molecular dynamics. Some key regions of the protein feature structural fluctuations on nanosecond time scales, which have so far been overlooked in high-field relaxation studies. Nanosecond motions in proteins may have been underestimated by traditional high-field approaches, and slower supra-?c motions that have no effect on relaxation may have been overestimated. High-resolution relaxometry thus opens the way to a quantitative characterization of nanosecond motions in proteins. PMID:24228712

  15. Determination of Spin-Lattice Relaxation of Time Using (Super 13)C NMR: An Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gasyna, Zbigniew L.; Jurkiewicz, Antoni

    2004-01-01

    An experiment designed for the physical chemistry laboratory where (super 13)C NMR is applied to determine the spin-lattice relaxation time for carbon atoms in n-hexanol is proposed. It is concluded that students learn the principles and concepts of NMR spectroscopy as well as dynamic NMR experiments.

  16. Natural Relaxation

    E-print Network

    Marzola, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by natural inflation, we propose a relaxation mechanism consistent with inflationary cosmology that explains the hierarchy between the electroweak scale and Planck scale. The scenario predicts the near-criticality and metastability of the standard model vacuum state, explaining the Higgs boson mass observed at the LHC. Once Majorana right-handed neutrinos are introduced to provide a viable reheating channel, our framework yields a corresponding mass scale that allows for the seesaw mechanism as well as for standard thermal leptogenesis. We also argue that considering singlet scalar dark matter extensions of the proposed scenario could solve the vacuum stability problem and discuss how the cosmological constant problem is possibly addressed.

  17. Relaxing the closure assumption in single-season occupancy models: staggered arrival and departure times

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kendall, William L.; Hines, James E.; Nichols, James D.; Grant, Evan H. Campbell

    2013-01-01

    Occupancy statistical models that account for imperfect detection have proved very useful in several areas of ecology, including species distribution and spatial dynamics, disease ecology, and ecological responses to climate change. These models are based on the collection of multiple samples at each of a number of sites within a given season, during which it is assumed the species is either absent or present and available for detection while each sample is taken. However, for some species, individuals are only present or available for detection seasonally. We present a statistical model that relaxes the closure assumption within a season by permitting staggered entry and exit times for the species of interest at each site. Based on simulation, our open model eliminates bias in occupancy estimators and in some cases increases precision. The power to detect the violation of closure is high if detection probability is reasonably high. In addition to providing more robust estimation of occupancy, this model permits comparison of phenology across sites, species, or years, by modeling variation in arrival or departure probabilities. In a comparison of four species of amphibians in Maryland we found that two toad species arrived at breeding sites later in the season than a salamander and frog species, and departed from sites earlier.

  18. Relaxing the closure assumption in occupancy models: staggered arrival and departure times.

    PubMed

    Kendall, William L; Hines, James E; Nichols, James D; Grant, Evan H Campbell

    2013-03-01

    Occupancy statistical models that account for imperfect detection have proved very useful in several areas of ecology, including species distribution and spatial dynamics, disease ecology, and ecological responses to climate change. These models are based on the collection of multiple samples at each of a number of sites within a given season, during which it is assumed the species is either absent or present and available for detection while each sample is taken. However, for some species, individuals are only present or available for detection seasonally. We present a statistical model that relaxes the closure assumption within a season by permitting staggered entry and exit times for the species of interest at each site. Based on simulation, our open model eliminates bias in occupancy estimators and in some cases increases precision. The power to detect the violation of closure is high if detection probability is reasonably high. In addition to providing more robust estimation of occupancy, this model permits comparison of phenology across sites, species, or years, by modeling variation in arrival or departure probabilities. In a comparison of four species of amphibians in Maryland we found that two toad species arrived at breeding sites later in the season than a salamander and frog species, and departed from sites earlier. PMID:23687887

  19. Probe Spin-Velocity Dependent New Interactions by Spin Relaxation Times of Polarized $^{3}He$ Gas

    E-print Network

    H. Yan; G. A. Sun; S. M. Peng; Y. Zhang; C. B. Fu; Hao Guo; B. Q. Liu

    2015-09-18

    We have constrained possible new interactions which produce nonrelativistic potentials between polarized neutrons and unpolarized matter proportional to $\\alpha\\vec{\\sigma}\\cdot\\vec{v}$ where $\\vec{\\sigma}$ is the neutron spin and $\\vec{v}$ is the relative velocity. We use existing data from laboratory measurements on the very long $T_{1}$ and $T_{2}$ spin relaxation times of polarized $^{3}$He gas in glass cells.Using the best available measured $T_{2}$ of polarized $^{3}$He gas atoms as the polarized source and the earth as an unpolarized source, we obtain constraints on two new interactions. We present a new experimental upper bound on possible vector-axial-vector($V_{VA}$) type interactions for ranges between $1\\sim10^{8}$m. In combination with previous results, we set the most stringent experiment limits on $g_{V}g_{A}$ ranging from $\\sim\\mu$m to $\\sim10^{8}$m. We also report what is to our knowledge the first experimental upper limit on the possible torsion fields induced by the earth on its surface. Dedicated experiments could further improve these bounds by a factor of $\\sim100$. Our method of analysis also makes it possible to probe many velocity dependent interactions which depend on the spins of both neutrons and other particles which have never been searched for before experimentally.

  20. Measurement of the relaxation time of hot electrons in laser-solid interaction at relativistic laser intensities

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Shepherd, R; Chung, H K; Dyer, G; Faenov, A; Fournier, K B; Hansen, S B; Hunter, J; Kemp, A; Pikuz, T; Ping, Y; Widmann, K; Wilks, S C; Beiersdorfer, P

    2006-08-22

    The authors have measured the relaxation time of hot electrons in short pulse laser-solid interactions using a picosecond time-resolved x-ray spectrometer and a time-integrated electron spectrometer. Employing laser intensities of 10{sup 17}, 10{sup 18}, and 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, they find increased laser coupling to hot electrons as the laser intensity becomes relativistic and thermalization of hot electrons at timescales on the order of 10 ps at all laser intensities. They propose a simple model based on collisional coupling and plasma expansion to describe the rapid relaxation of hot electrons. The agreement between the resulting K{sub {alpha}} time-history from this model with the experiments is best at highest laser intensity and less satisfactory at the two lower laser intensities.

  1. Cratering time scales for the Galilean satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoemaker, E. M.; Wolfe, R. F.

    1982-01-01

    An attempt is made to estimate the present cratering rate for each Galilean satellite within the correct order of magnitude and to extend the cratering rates back into the geologic past on the basis of evidence from the earth-moon system. For collisions with long and short period comets, the magnitudes and size distributions of the comet nuclei, the distribution of their perihelion distances, and the completeness of discovery are addressed. The diameters and masses of cometary nuclei are assessed, as are crater diameters and cratering rates. The dynamical relations between long period and short period comets are discussed, and the population of Jupiter-crossing asteroids is assessed. Estimated present cratering rates on the Galilean satellites are compared and variations of cratering rate with time are considered. Finally, the consistency of derived cratering time scales with the cratering record of the icy Galilean satellites is discussed.

  2. Time scales in nuclear giant resonances

    E-print Network

    WD Heiss; RG Nazmitdinov; FD Smit

    2009-12-18

    We propose a general approach to characterise fluctuations of measured cross sections of nuclear giant resonances. Simulated cross sections are obtained from a particular, yet representative self-energy which contains all information about fragmentations. Using a wavelet analysis, we demonstrate the extraction of time scales of cascading decays into configurations of different complexity of the resonance. We argue that the spreading widths of collective excitations in nuclei are determined by the number of fragmentations as seen in the power spectrum. An analytic treatment of the wavelet analysis using a Fourier expansion of the cross section confirms this principle. A simple rule for the relative life times of states associated with hierarchies of different complexity is given.

  3. RADIAL TRANSPORT OF LARGE-SCALE MAGNETIC FIELDS IN ACCRETION DISKS. II. RELAXATION TO STEADY STATES

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Taku; Okuzumi, Satoshi

    2014-12-20

    We study the time evolution of a large-scale magnetic flux threading an accretion disk. The induction equation of the mean poloidal field is solved under the standard viscous disk model. Magnetic flux evolution is controlled by two timescales: one is the timescale of the inward advection of the magnetic flux, ?{sub adv}. This is induced by the dragging of the flux by the accreting gas. The other is the outward diffusion timescale of the magnetic flux ?{sub dif}. We consider diffusion due to the Ohmic resistivity. These timescales can be significantly different from the disk viscous timescale ?{sub disk}. The behaviors of the magnetic flux evolution are quite different depending on the magnitude relationship of the timescales ?{sub adv}, ?{sub dif}, and ?{sub disk}. The most interesting phenomena occur when ?{sub adv} << ?{sub dif}, ?{sub disk}. In such a case, the magnetic flux distribution approaches a quasi-steady profile much faster than the viscous evolution of the gas disk, and the magnetic flux has also been tightly bundled to the inner part of the disk. In the inner part, although the poloidal magnetic field becomes much stronger than the interstellar magnetic field, the field strength is limited to the maximum value that is analytically given by our previous work. We also find a condition for the initial large magnetic flux, which is a fossil of the magnetic field dragging during the early phase of star formation that survives for a duration in which significant gas disk evolution proceeds.

  4. The Dynamical Survival of Small-Scale Substructure in Relaxed Galaxy Clusters

    E-print Network

    Guillermo González-Casado; Gary A. Mamon; Eduard Salvador-Solé

    1994-06-24

    We consider the dynamical evolution of small-scale substructure in clusters within two extreme alternate scenarios for their possible origin: 1) the accretion of groups (or small clusters) on quasi-radial orbits, and 2) the merger of clusters of similar masses, followed by the decoupling of their dense cores. Using simple analytical arguments and checking with numerical computations, we show that objects are destroyed by the tidal field of the global cluster potential if their mean density is small compared to the mean cluster density within the radius of closest approach of the group or detached core. Accreted groups and small clusters are thus tidally disrupted in one cluster crossing. Since the cores of clusters are much denser than groups, they are considerably more robust to tides, but the least massive are destroyed or severely stripped by tides, while the others are brought to the cluster center by dynamical friction (and subsequently merge) in less than one orbit. The longest lived substructures are detached cores, roughly ten times less massive than the cluster, starting in near-circular orbits beyond $1 \\, h^{-1} \\, \\rm Mpc$ from the cluster center.

  5. Parametric instabilities in picosecond time scales

    SciTech Connect

    Baldis, H.A.; Rozmus, W.; Labaune, C.; Mounaix, Ph.; Pesme, D.; Baton, S.; Tikhonchuk, V.T.

    1993-03-01

    The coupling of intense laser light with plasmas is a rich field of plasma physics, with many applications. Among these are inertial confinement fusion (ICF), x-ray lasers, particle acceleration, and x-ray sources. Parametric instabilities have been studied for many years because of their importance to ICF; with laser pulses with duration of approximately a nanosecond, and laser intensities in the range 10{sup 14}--10{sup 15}W/cm{sup 2} these instabilities are of crucial concern because of a number of detrimental effects. Although the laser pulse duration of interest for these studies are relatively long, it has been evident in the past years that to reach an understanding of these instabilities requires their characterization and analysis in picosecond time scales. At the laser intensities of interest, the growth rate for stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) is of the order of picoseconds, and of an order of magnitude shorter for stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). In this paper the authors discuss SBS and SRS in the context of their evolution in picosecond time scales. They describe the fundamental concepts associated with their growth and saturation, and recent work on the nonlinear treatment required for the modeling of these instabilities at high laser intensities.

  6. MRI of bone marrow in the distal radius: in vivo precision of effective transverse relaxation times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grampp, S.; Majumdar, S.; Jergas, M.; Lang, P.; Gies, A.; Genant, H. K.

    1995-01-01

    The effective transverse relaxation time T2* is influenced by the presence of trabecular bone, and can potentially provide a measure of bone density as well as bone structure. We determined the in vivo precision of T2* in repeated bone marrow measurements. The T2* measurements of the bone marrow of the distal radius were performed twice within 2 weeks in six healthy young volunteers using a modified water-presaturated 3D Gradient-Recalled Acquisition at Steady State (GRASS) sequence with TE 7, 10, 12, 20, and 30; TR 67; flip angle (FA) 90 degrees. An axial volume covering a length of 5.6 cm in the distal radius was measured. Regions of interest (ROIs) were determined manually and consisted of the entire trabecular bone cross-section extending proximally from the radial subchondral endplate. Reproducibility of T2* and area measurements was expressed as the absolute precision error (standard deviation [SD] in ms or mm2) or as the relative precision error (SD/mean x 100, or coefficient of variation [CV] in %) between the two-point measurements. Short-term precision of T2* and area measurements varied depending on section thickness and location of the ROI in the distal radius. Absolute precision errors for T2* times were between 1.3 and 2.9 ms (relative precision errors 3.8-9.5 %) and for area measurements between 20 and 55 mm2 (relative precision errors 5.1-16.4%). This MR technique for quantitative assessment of trabecular bone density showed reasonable reproducibility in vivo and is a promising future tool for the assessment of osteoporosis.

  7. Relaxation times and modes of disturbed aggregate distribution in micellar solutions with fusion and fission of micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Anatoly I.; Adzhemyan, Loran Ts.; Shchekin, Alexander K.

    2015-09-01

    We have performed direct numerical calculations of the kinetics of relaxation in the system of surfactant spherical micelles under joint action of the molecular mechanism with capture and emission of individual surfactant molecules by molecular aggregates and the mechanism of fusion and fission of the aggregates. As a basis, we have taken the difference equations of aggregation and fragmentation in the form of the generalized kinetic Smoluchowski equations for aggregate concentrations. The calculations have been made with using the droplet model of molecular surfactant aggregates and two modified Smoluchowski models for the coefficients of aggregate-monomer and aggregate-aggregate fusions which take into account the effects of the aggregate size and presence of hydrophobic spots on the aggregate surface. A full set of relaxation times and corresponding relaxation modes for nonequilibrium aggregate distribution in the aggregation number has been found. The dependencies of these relaxation times and modes on the total concentration of surfactant in the solution and the special parameter controlling the probability of fusion in collisions of micelles with other micelles have been studied.

  8. Relaxation times and modes of disturbed aggregate distribution in micellar solutions with fusion and fission of micelles.

    PubMed

    Zakharov, Anatoly I; Adzhemyan, Loran Ts; Shchekin, Alexander K

    2015-09-28

    We have performed direct numerical calculations of the kinetics of relaxation in the system of surfactant spherical micelles under joint action of the molecular mechanism with capture and emission of individual surfactant molecules by molecular aggregates and the mechanism of fusion and fission of the aggregates. As a basis, we have taken the difference equations of aggregation and fragmentation in the form of the generalized kinetic Smoluchowski equations for aggregate concentrations. The calculations have been made with using the droplet model of molecular surfactant aggregates and two modified Smoluchowski models for the coefficients of aggregate-monomer and aggregate-aggregate fusions which take into account the effects of the aggregate size and presence of hydrophobic spots on the aggregate surface. A full set of relaxation times and corresponding relaxation modes for nonequilibrium aggregate distribution in the aggregation number has been found. The dependencies of these relaxation times and modes on the total concentration of surfactant in the solution and the special parameter controlling the probability of fusion in collisions of micelles with other micelles have been studied. PMID:26429036

  9. Relaxation Times and Line Widths of Isotopically-Substituted Nitroxides in Aqueous Solution at X-band

    PubMed Central

    Biller, Joshua R.; Meyer, Virginia; Elajaili, Hanan; Rosen, Gerald M.; Kao, Joseph P.Y.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eatona, Gareth R.

    2011-01-01

    Optimization of nitroxides as probes for EPR imaging requires detailed understanding of spectral properties. Spin lattice relaxation times, spin packet line widths, nuclear hyperfine splitting, and overall lineshapes were characterized for six low molecular weight nitroxides in dilute deoxygenated aqueous solution at X-band. The nitroxides included 6-member, unsaturated 5-member, or saturated 5-member rings, most of which were isotopically labeled. The spectra are near the fast tumbling limit with T1 ~ T2 in the range of 0.50 to 1.1 ?s at ambient temperature. Both spin-lattice relaxation T1 and spin-spin relaxation T2 are longer for 15N- than for 14N-nitroxides. The dominant contributions to T1 are modulation of nitrogen hyperfine anisotropy and spin rotation. Dependence of T1 on nitrogen nuclear spin state mI was observed for both 14N and 15N. Unresolved hydrogen/deuterium hyperfine couplings dominate overall line widths. Lineshapes were simulated by including all nuclear hyperfine couplings and spin packet line widths that agreed with values obtained by electron spin echo. Line widths and relaxation times are predicted to be about the same at 250 MHz as at X-band. PMID:21843961

  10. Evidences of a Common Scaling Under Cooling and Compression for Slow and Fast Relaxations: Relevance of Local Modes for the Glass Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capaccioli, S.; Kessairi, K.; Prevosto, D.; Thayyil, Md. Shahin; Lucchesi, M.; Rolla, P. A.

    The present study demonstrates, by means of broadband dielectric measurements, that the primary ?- and the secondary Johari-Goldstein (JG) ?-processes are strongly correlated, in contrast with the widespread opinion of statistical independence of these processes. This occurs for different glass-forming systems, over a wide temperature and pressure range. In fact, we found that the ratio of the ?- and ?- relaxation times is invariant when calculated at different combinations of P and T that maintain either the primary or the JG relaxation times constant. The ?-? interdependence is quantitatively confirmed by the clear dynamic scenario of two master curves (one for ?-, one for ?-relaxation) obtained when different isothermal and isobaric data are plotted together versus the reduced variable T g (P)/T, where T g is the glass transition temperature. Additionally, the ?-? mutual dependence is confirmed by the overall superposition of spectra measured at different T-P combinations but with an invariant ?-relaxation time.

  11. An optimal modification of a Kalman filter for time scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, C. A.

    2003-01-01

    The Kalman filter in question, which was implemented in the time scale algorithm TA(NIST), produces time scales with poor short-term stability. A simple modification of the error covariance matrix allows the filter to produce time scales with good stability at all averaging times, as verified by simulations of clock ensembles.

  12. Invariance of conductivity relaxation under pressure and temperature variations at constant conductivity relaxation time in 0.4 Ca (N O3)2-0.6 KN O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojnarowska, Z.; Ngai, K. L.; Paluch, M.

    2014-12-01

    The article reports the dependence of the conductivity relaxation on temperature T and pressure P in the canonical ionic glass former 0.4 Ca (N O3)2-0.6 KN O3(CKN ) . At constant conductivity relaxation time ??, the entire conductivity relaxation spectra obtained at widely different combinations of T and P superpose almost perfectly, and thus it is the ion-ion interaction but not thermodynamics that determines the frequency dispersion. Moreover, on vitrifying CKN by either elevating P or decreasing T, changes of P or T dependence of ?? at the glass transition pressure Pg and temperature Tg are observed to occur at the same value, i.e., ??(Pg) =??(Tg) , indicating that the relation between ?? and the structural relaxation time ?? is also independent of P and T.

  13. Time Horizon and Social Scale in Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krantz, D. H.

    2010-12-01

    In 2009 our center (CRED) published a first version of The Psychology of Climate Change Communication. In it, we attempted to summarize facts and concepts from psychological research that could help guide communication. While this work focused on climate change, most of the ideas are at least partly applicable for communication about a variety of natural hazards. Of the many examples in this guide, I mention three. Single-action bias is the human tendency to stop considering further actions that might be needed to deal with a given hazard, once a single action has been taken. Another example is the importance of group affiliation in motivating voluntary contributions to joint action. A third concerns the finding that group participation enhances understanding of probabilistic concepts and promotes action in the face of uncertainty. One current research direction, which goes beyond those included in the above publication, focuses on how time horizons arise in the thinking of individuals and groups, and how these time horizons might influence hazard preparedness. On the one hand, individuals sometimes appear impatient, organizations look for immediate results, and officials fail to look beyond the next election cycle. Yet under some laboratory conditions and in some subcultures, a longer time horizon is adopted. We are interested in how time horizon is influenced by group identity and by the very architecture of planning and decision making. Institutional changes, involving long-term contractual relationships among communities, developers, insurers, and governments, could greatly increase resilience in the face of natural hazards. Communication about hazards, in the context of such long-term contractual relationships might look very different from communication that is first initiated by immediate threat. Another new direction concerns the social scale of institutions and of communication about hazards. Traditionally, insurance contracts share risk among a large number of insurees: each contributes a small premium toward a fund that is adequate to cover the large losses that occasionally occur. Participatory processes are needed that extend risk sharing to larger social scales and that reduce adversarial relationships between insurers, insurees, insurance regulators, and governments that intervene or fail to intervene on an ad hoc rather than a contractual basis.

  14. Slip-flow in complex porous media as determined by a multi-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, C. J.; Prodanovic, M.; Eichhubl, P.

    2014-12-01

    The pores and throats of shales and mudrocks are predominantly found within a range of 1-100 nm, within this size range the flow of gas at reservoir conditions will fall within the slip-flow and low transition-flow regime (0.001 < Kn < 0.5). Currently, the study of slip-flows is for the most part limited to simple tube and channel geometries, however, the geometry of mudrock pores is often sponge-like (organic matter) and/or platy (clays). Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations can be used to predict slip-flow in complex geometries, but due to prohibitive computational demand are generally limited to small volumes (one to several pores). Here we present a multi-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model (LBM) parameterized for slip-flow (Guo et al. 2008) and adapted here to complex geometries. LBMs are inherently parallelizable, such that flow in complex geometries of significant (near REV-scale) volumes can be readily simulated at a fraction of the computational cost of MD simulations. At the macroscopic-scale the LBM is parameterized with local effective viscosities at each node to capture the variance of the mean-free-path of gas molecules in a bounded system. The corrected mean-free-path for each lattice node is determined using the mean distance of the node to the pore-wall and Stop's correction for mean-free-paths in an infinite parallel-plate geometry. At the microscopic-scale, a combined bounce-back specular-reflection boundary condition is applied to the pore-wall nodes to capture Maxwellian-slip. The LBM simulation results are first validated in simple tube and channel geometries, where good agreement is found for Knudsen numbers below 0.1, and fair agreement is found for Knudsen numbers between 0.1 and 0.5. More complex geometries are then examined including triangular-ducts and ellipsoid-ducts, both with constant and tapering/expanding cross-sections, as well as a clay pore-network imaged from a hydrocarbon producing shale by sequential focused ion-beam scanning electron microscopy. These results are analyzed to determine grid-independent resolutions, and used to explore the relationship between effective permeability and Knudsen number in complex geometries.

  15. Characterization of Dynamics in Complex Lyophilized Formulations: I. Comparison of Relaxation Times Measured by Isothermal Calorimetry with Data Estimated from the Width of the Glass Transition Temperature Region

    PubMed Central

    Chieng, Norman; Mizuno, Masayasu; Pikal, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The purposes of this study are to characterize the relaxation dynamics in complex freeze dried formulations and to investigate the quantitative relationship between the structural relaxation time as measured by thermal activity monitor (TAM) and that estimated from the width of the glass transition temperature (?Tg). The latter method has advantages over TAM because it is simple and quick. As part of this objective, we evaluate the accuracy in estimating relaxation time data at higher temperatures (50°C and 60°C) from TAM data at lower temperature (40°C) and glass transition region width (?Tg) data obtained by differential scanning calorimetry. Formulations studied here were hydroxyethyl starch (HES)-disaccharide, HES-polyol and HES-disaccharide-polyol at various ratios. We also re-examine, using TAM derived relaxation times, the correlation between protein stability (human growth hormone, hGH) and relaxation times explored in a previous report, which employed relaxation time data obtained from ?Tg. Results show that most of the freeze dried formulations exist in single amorphous phase, and structural relaxation times were successfully measured for these systems. We find a reasonably good correlation between TAM measured relaxation times and corresponding data obtained from estimates based on ?Tg, but the agreement is only qualitative. The comparison plot showed that TAM data is directly proportional to the 1/3 power of ?Tg data, after correcting for an offset. Nevertheless, the correlation between hGH stability and relaxation time remained qualitatively the same as found with using ?Tg derived relaxation data, and it was found that the modest extrapolation of TAM data to higher temperatures using ?Tg method and TAM data at 40°C resulted in quantitative agreement with TAM measurements made at 50 °C and 60 °C, provided the TAM experiment temperature is well below the Tg of the sample. PMID:23608636

  16. Studies about the attempt frequency influence on the effective relaxation time in a system of nanoparticles for magnetic hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacciola, M.; Osaci, M.

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a series of studies about the modality in which the attempt frequency influences the Neel relaxation time and thus the effective relaxation time, in a spherical-nanoparticle-saturated nanofluid in external magnetic field. The nanoparticles have a random distribution, and their magnetic moments have a magnetic dipole-dipole interaction, along with the distributions of sizes and anisotropy constants. In such a system, the energy of the equilibrium states depends on the total magnetic field experienced by the particle, which includes the magnetic field applied and the dipolar magnetic field produced by the surrounding particles. Because of the high complexity level of the issue, it seems useful to consider the numerical experiments by computational simulation.

  17. Dislocation-mediated relaxation in nanograined columnar palladium films revealed by on-chip time-resolved HRTEM testing

    PubMed Central

    Colla, M. -S.; Amin-Ahmadi, B.; Idrissi, H.; Malet, L.; Godet, S.; Raskin, J. -P.; Schryvers, D.; Pardoen, T.

    2015-01-01

    The high-rate sensitivity of nanostructured metallic materials demonstrated in the recent literature is related to the predominance of thermally activated deformation mechanisms favoured by a large density of internal interfaces. Here we report time-resolved high-resolution electron transmission microscopy creep tests on thin nanograined films using on-chip nanomechanical testing. Tests are performed on palladium, which exhibited unexpectedly large creep rates at room temperature. Despite the small 30-nm grain size, relaxation is found to be mediated by dislocation mechanisms. The dislocations interact with the growth nanotwins present in the grains, leading to a loss of coherency of twin boundaries. The density of stored dislocations first increases with applied deformation, and then decreases with time to drive additional deformation while no grain boundary mechanism is observed. This fast relaxation constitutes a key issue in the development of various micro- and nanotechnologies such as palladium membranes for hydrogen applications. PMID:25557273

  18. Dislocation-mediated relaxation in nanograined columnar palladium films revealed by on-chip time-resolved HRTEM testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colla, M.-S.; Amin-Ahmadi, B.; Idrissi, H.; Malet, L.; Godet, S.; Raskin, J.-P.; Schryvers, D.; Pardoen, T.

    2015-01-01

    The high-rate sensitivity of nanostructured metallic materials demonstrated in the recent literature is related to the predominance of thermally activated deformation mechanisms favoured by a large density of internal interfaces. Here we report time-resolved high-resolution electron transmission microscopy creep tests on thin nanograined films using on-chip nanomechanical testing. Tests are performed on palladium, which exhibited unexpectedly large creep rates at room temperature. Despite the small 30-nm grain size, relaxation is found to be mediated by dislocation mechanisms. The dislocations interact with the growth nanotwins present in the grains, leading to a loss of coherency of twin boundaries. The density of stored dislocations first increases with applied deformation, and then decreases with time to drive additional deformation while no grain boundary mechanism is observed. This fast relaxation constitutes a key issue in the development of various micro- and nanotechnologies such as palladium membranes for hydrogen applications.

  19. Dislocation-mediated relaxation in nanograined columnar palladium films revealed by on-chip time-resolved HRTEM testing.

    PubMed

    Colla, M-S; Amin-Ahmadi, B; Idrissi, H; Malet, L; Godet, S; Raskin, J-P; Schryvers, D; Pardoen, T

    2015-01-01

    The high-rate sensitivity of nanostructured metallic materials demonstrated in the recent literature is related to the predominance of thermally activated deformation mechanisms favoured by a large density of internal interfaces. Here we report time-resolved high-resolution electron transmission microscopy creep tests on thin nanograined films using on-chip nanomechanical testing. Tests are performed on palladium, which exhibited unexpectedly large creep rates at room temperature. Despite the small 30-nm grain size, relaxation is found to be mediated by dislocation mechanisms. The dislocations interact with the growth nanotwins present in the grains, leading to a loss of coherency of twin boundaries. The density of stored dislocations first increases with applied deformation, and then decreases with time to drive additional deformation while no grain boundary mechanism is observed. This fast relaxation constitutes a key issue in the development of various micro- and nanotechnologies such as palladium membranes for hydrogen applications. PMID:25557273

  20. Basin-scale time reversal communications.

    PubMed

    Song, H C; Kuperman, W A; Hodgkiss, W S

    2009-01-01

    During November 1994, broadband acoustic signals were transmitted from a 75-Hz source to a 20-element, 700-m vertical array at approximately 3250 km range in the eastern North Pacific Ocean as part of the acoustic engineering test (AET) of the acoustic thermometry of ocean climate program [Worcester et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 105, 3185-3201 (1999)]. The AET tomography signal can be treated as a binary-phase shift-keying communication signal with an information rate of 37.5 bitss. With the multipath arrivals spanning 5-8 sec, these data represent an extreme case of intersymbol interference. The AET array data are processed using time reversal combined with frequent channel updates to accommodate channel variations over the 20-min long reception, followed by a single channel decision-feedback equalizer. The almost error-free performance using all 20 array elements demonstrates the feasibility of time reversal communications at basin scale. Further, comparable performance of single receive element communications integrating over multiple transmissions indicates that the ocean provided temporal diversity that is as effective as the spatial diversity provided by the array. PMID:19173408

  1. Relaxation Time of Confined Aqueous Films under Ali Dhinojwala and Steve Granick*

    E-print Network

    Granick, Steve

    of Materials Science and Engineering UniVersity of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 ReceiVed September 16, 1996 in shear relaxation dynamics at solid surfacessa topic directly relevant to electrochemistry and corrosion,3-5 soil science,6 geophysics,7 and colloidal suspensions,8 and with possible ramifications

  2. Time to Talk: 5 Things to Know about Relaxation Techniques for Stress

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 5 Things To Know About Relaxation Techniques for Stress Share: When you’re under stress, your body reacts by releasing hormones that produce ... vessels narrow (restricting the flow of blood). Occasional stress is a normal coping mechanism. But over the ...

  3. Tumor T1 Relaxation Time for Assessing Response to Bevacizumab Anti-Angiogenic Therapy in a Mouse Ovarian Cancer Model

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sheela P.; Lu, Chunhua; Han, Lin; Hobbs, Brian P.; Pradeep, Sunila; Choi, Hyun J.; Bankson, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess whether T1 relaxation time of tumors may be used to assess response to bevacizumab anti-angiogenic therapy. Procedures: 12 female nude mice bearing subcutaneous SKOV3ip1-LC ovarian tumors were administered bevacizumab (6.25ug/g, n=6) or PBS (control, n=6) therapy twice a week for two weeks. T1 maps of tumors were generated before, two days, and 2 weeks after initiating therapy. Tumor weight was assessed by MR and at necropsy. Histology for microvessel density, proliferation, and apoptosis was performed. Results Bevacizumab treatment resulted in tumor growth inhibition (p<0.04, n=6), confirming therapeutic efficacy. Tumor T1 relaxation times increased in bevacizumab treated mice 2 days and 2 weeks after initiating therapy (p<.05, n=6). Microvessel density decreased 59% and cell proliferation (Ki67+) decreased 50% in the bevacizumab treatment group (p<.001, n=6), but not apoptosis. Conclusions Findings suggest that increased tumor T1 relaxation time is associated with response to bevacizumab therapy in ovarian cancer model and might serve as an early indicator of response. PMID:26098849

  4. Noether theorem for Birkhoffian systems on time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Chuan-Jing; Zhang, Yi

    2015-10-01

    Birkhoff equations on time scales and Noether theorem for Birkhoffian system on time scales are studied. First, some necessary knowledge of calculus on time scales are reviewed. Second, Birkhoff equations on time scales are obtained. Third, the conditions for invariance of Pfaff action and conserved quantities are presented under the special infinitesimal transformations and general infinitesimal transformations, respectively. Fourth, some special cases are given. And finally, an example is given to illustrate the method and results.

  5. Detection of crossover time scales in multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Erjia; Leung, Yee

    2013-04-01

    Fractal is employed in this paper as a scale-based method for the identification of the scaling behavior of time series. Many spatial and temporal processes exhibiting complex multi(mono)-scaling behaviors are fractals. One of the important concepts in fractals is crossover time scale(s) that separates distinct regimes having different fractal scaling behaviors. A common method is multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA). The detection of crossover time scale(s) is, however, relatively subjective since it has been made without rigorous statistical procedures and has generally been determined by eye balling or subjective observation. Crossover time scales such determined may be spurious and problematic. It may not reflect the genuine underlying scaling behavior of a time series. The purpose of this paper is to propose a statistical procedure to model complex fractal scaling behaviors and reliably identify the crossover time scales under MF-DFA. The scaling-identification regression model, grounded on a solid statistical foundation, is first proposed to describe multi-scaling behaviors of fractals. Through the regression analysis and statistical inference, we can (1) identify the crossover time scales that cannot be detected by eye-balling observation, (2) determine the number and locations of the genuine crossover time scales, (3) give confidence intervals for the crossover time scales, and (4) establish the statistically significant regression model depicting the underlying scaling behavior of a time series. To substantive our argument, the regression model is applied to analyze the multi-scaling behaviors of avian-influenza outbreaks, water consumption, daily mean temperature, and rainfall of Hong Kong. Through the proposed model, we can have a deeper understanding of fractals in general and a statistical approach to identify multi-scaling behavior under MF-DFA in particular.

  6. SiGe:C HBT transit time analysis based on hydrodynamic modeling using doping, composition and strained dependent SiGe:C carriers mobility and relaxation time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-Garcia, E.; Michaillat, M.; Aniel, F.; Zerounian, N.; Enciso-Aguilar, M.; Rideau, D.

    2011-07-01

    We present an original method for the detailed evaluation of different device region contributions to the whole SiGe:C heterojunction bipolar transistor transit time in the frame of modeling studies. This method is based on AC analysis with structures of several base widths. The two-dimensional hydrodynamic solver relies on analytical models of electron and hole mobilities, and of energy relaxation times, calculated from results of the Boltzmann Transport Equation in highly acceptor doped and strained SiGe:C, using a full band Monte Carlo solver. The simulation results are compared to DC and AC measurements and exhibit good agreement. The proposed transit time analysis scheme and the analytical model for mobilities and energy relaxation times may be used for device optimization, toward highest dynamic performances.

  7. Quantum physical states for describing photonic assisted chemical change: I. Torsional phenomenon at femtosecond time scale

    E-print Network

    O. Tapia

    2013-01-13

    Femtosecond torsional relaxation processes experimentally detected and recently reported by Clark et al. (Nature Phys. 8,225 (2012)) are theoretically dissected with a Hilbert/Fock quantum physical (QP) framework incorporating entanglement of photon/matter base states overcoming standard semi-classic vibrational descriptions. The quantum analysis of a generic Z/E (cis/trans) isomerization in abstract QP terms shed light to fundamental roles played by photonic spin and excited electronic singlet coupled to triplet states. It is shown that one photon activation cannot elicit femtosecond phenomenon, while a two-photon pulse would do. Estimated time scales for the two-photon case indicate the process to lie between a slower than electronic Franck-Condon-like transition yet faster than (semi-classic) vibration relaxation ones.

  8. H-1 Relaxation Times of Metabolites in Biological Samples Obtained with Nondestructive Ex-vivo Slow-MAS NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Wind, Robert A.; Rommereim, Donald N.

    2006-03-01

    Methods suitable for measuring 1H relaxation times such as T1, T2 and T1p, in small sized biological objects including live cells, excised organs and tissues, oil seeds etc., were developed in this work. This was achieved by combining inversion-recovery, spin-echo, or spin lock segment with the phase-adjusted spinning sideband (PASS) technique that was applied at slow sample spinning rate. Here, 2D-PASS was used to produce a high-resolution 1H spectrum free from the magnetic susceptibility broadening so that the relaxation parameters of individual metabolite can be determined. Because of the slow spinning employed, tissue and cell damage due to sample spinning is minimized. The methodologies were demonstrated by measuring 1H T1, T2 and T1p of metabolites in excised rat livers and sesame seeds at spinning rates of as low as 40 Hz.

  9. Anomaly in the conductivity relaxation parameters at the phase transition of ferroelectric materials: A time domain study

    SciTech Connect

    Leyet, Y.; Guerrero, F.; Amorin, H.; Guerra, J. de Los S.; Eiras, J. A.

    2010-10-18

    The influence of the ferroelectric to paraelectric transition on the relaxation parameters of conductive processes in ferroelectric materials is studied in the time domain. Three well-known ferroelectric systems were chosen with transition temperatures in different regions, these are, high-temperature PbNb{sub 2}O{sub 6}-based ceramics; nanostructured Pb(Zr{sub 0.6}Ti{sub 0.4})O{sub 3} ceramics; and submicron BaTiO{sub 3}. The thermal evolution of relaxation parameters shows clear anomalies in their typical behavior when conductivity processes arise in the temperature range where the ferroelectric transition takes place. The method here described allows obtaining information about the correlation between charge transport and the motion of the off-center ions at the phase transition.

  10. Effects of Off-Resonance Irradiation, Cross-Relaxation, and Chemical Exchange on Steady-State Magnetization and Effective Spin-Lattice Relaxation Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingsley, Peter B.; Monahan, W. Gordon

    2000-04-01

    In the presence of an off-resonance radiofrequency field, recovery of longitudinal magnetization to a steady state is not purely monoexponential. Under reasonable conditions with zero initial magnetization, recovery is nearly exponential and an effective relaxation rate constant R1eff = 1/T1eff can be obtained. Exact and approximate formulas for R1eff and steady-state magnetization are derived from the Bloch equations for spins undergoing cross-relaxation and chemical exchange between two sites in the presence of an off-resonance radiofrequency field. The relaxation formulas require that the magnetization of one spin is constant, but not necessarily zero, while the other spin relaxes. Extension to three sites with one radiofrequency field is explained. The special cases of off-resonance effects alone and with cross-relaxation or chemical exchange, cross-relaxation alone, and chemical exchange alone are compared. The inaccuracy in saturation transfer measurements of exchange rate constants by published formulas is discussed for the creatine kinase reaction.

  11. The Acute Effect of Running on Knee Articular Cartilage and Meniscus Magnetic Resonance Relaxation Times in Young Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Subburaj, Karupppasamy; Kumar, Deepak; Souza, Richard B.; Alizai, Hamza; Li, Xiaojuan; Link, Thomas M.; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2013-01-01

    Background Understanding the acute response of healthy knee cartilage to running may provide valuable insight into functional properties. In recent years, quantitative magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques (T1? and T2 relaxation measurement) have shown tremendous potential and unique ability to noninvasively and quantitatively determine cartilage response to physiologic levels of loading occurring with physiologic levels of exercise. Purpose To measure the short-term changes in MR T1? and T2 relaxation times of knee articular cartilage and meniscus in healthy individuals immediately after 30 minutes of running. Study Design Descriptive laboratory study. Methods Twenty young healthy volunteers, aged 22 to 35 years, underwent 3T MR imaging of the knee before and immediately after 30 minutes of running. Quantitative assessment of the cartilage and menisci was performed using MR images with a T1? and T2 mapping technique. After adjusting for age, sex, and body mass index, repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to determine the effects of running on MR relaxation times. Results The post-run T1? and T2 measurement showed significant reduction in all regions of cartilage except the lateral tibia when compared with the pre-run condition. The medial tibiofemoral (T1?: 9.4%, P < .0001; T2: 5.4%, P = .0049) and patellofemoral (T1?: 12.5%, P < .0001; T2: 5.7%, P = .0007) compartments experienced the greatest reduction after running. The superficial layer of the articular cartilage showed significantly higher change in relaxation times than the deep layer (?T1?: 9.6% vs 8.2%, P = .050; ?T2: 6.0% vs 3.5%, P = .069). The anterior and posterior horns of the medial meniscus (9.7%, P = .016 and 11.4%, P = .001) were the only meniscal subregions with significant changes in T1? after running. Conclusion Shorter T1? and T2 values after running suggest alteration in the water content and collagen fiber orientation of the articular cartilage. Greater changes in relaxation times of the medial compartment and patellofemoral joint cartilage indicate greater load sharing by these areas during running. PMID:22729505

  12. MRI Under Hyperbaric Air and Oxygen: Effects on Local Magnetic Field and Relaxation Times

    E-print Network

    Duong, Timothy Q.

    of hyperbaric air and hyperbaric oxygen on local magnetic field (B0) and MRI relaxation param- eters in the rat parameters, including the static magnetic field (B0), T2, T2*, and T1 (2­9). Ambient oxygen gas alters B0 with air to four atmos- pheres, while oxygen was delivered locally via nose cone. B0, T2, T2*, and T1 maps

  13. Modelling of Self-diffusion and Relaxation Time NMR in Multicompartment Systems with Cylindrical Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Weerd, Louise; Melnikov, Sergey M.; Vergeldt, Frank J.; Novikov, Eugene G.; Van As, Henk

    2002-06-01

    Multicompartment characteristics of relaxation and diffusion in a model for (plant) cells and tissues have been simulated as a means to test separating the signal into a set of these compartments. A numerical model of restricted diffusion and magnetization relaxation behavior in PFG-CPMG NMR experiments, based on Fick's second law of diffusion, has been extended for two-dimensional diffusion in systems with concentric cylindrical compartments separated by permeable walls. This model is applicable to a wide range of (cellular) systems and allows the exploration of temporal and spatial behavior of the magnetization with and without the influence of gradient pulses. Numerical simulations have been performed to show the correspondence between the obtained results and previously reported studies and to investigate the behavior of the apparent diffusion coefficients for the multicompartment systems with planar and cylindrical geometry. The results clearly demonstrate the importance of modelling two-dimensional diffusion in relation to the effect of restrictions, permeability of the membranes, and the bulk relaxation within the compartments. In addition, the consequences of analysis by multiexponential curve fitting are investigated.

  14. Surface-NMR measurements of the longitudinal relaxation time T1 in a homogeneous sandy aquifer in Skive, Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walbrecker, J.; Behroozmand, A.

    2011-12-01

    Efficient groundwater management requires reliable means of characterizing shallow groundwater aquifers. One key parameter in this respect is hydraulic conductivity. Surface nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a geophysical exploration technique that can potentially provide this type of information in a noninvasive, cost-effective way. The technique is based on measuring the precession of nuclear spins of protons in groundwater molecules. It involves large loop antennas deployed on Earth's surface to generate electromagnetic pulses tuned to specifically excite and detect groundwater proton spins. Naturally, the excited state of spins is transitory - once excited, spins relax back to their equilibrium state. This relaxation process is strongly influenced by the spin environment, which, in the case of groundwater, is defined by the aquifer. By employing empirical relations, changes in relaxation behavior can be used to identify changes in aquifer hydraulic conductivity, making the NMR relaxation signal a very important piece of information. Particularly, efforts are made to record the longitudinal relaxation parameter T1, because it is known from laboratory studies that it often reliably correlates with hydraulic conductivity, even in the presence of magnetic species. In surface NMR, T1 data are collected by recording the NMR signal amplitude following two sequential excitation pulses as a function of the delay time ? between the two pulses. In conventional acquisition, the two pulses have a mutual phase shift of ?. Based on theoretical arguments it was recently shown that T1 times acquired according to this conventional surface-NMR scheme are systematically biased. It was proposed that the bias can be minimized by cycling the phase of the two pulses between ? and zero in subsequent double-pulse experiments, and subtracting the resulting signal amplitudes (phase-cycled pseudosaturation recovery scheme, pcPSR). We present the first surface-NMR T1 data set recorded employing the pcPSR scheme and compare it to conventional T1 data. For our feasibility study we have chosen a site in Skive, Denmark, that features excellent signal/noise conditions, allowing us to collect high quality data in reasonable survey time. In addition, proximate boreholes and TEM measurements suggest a relatively homogeneous aquifer extending from 5 to more than 25m below surface. We may therefore expect roughly constant T1 relaxation times throughout the shallow aquifer, providing us a simple framework for our comparative study. We used a 50x50m surface-NMR loop and employed 16 pulse moments selected to spatially cover the shallow aquifer region. For each pulse moment, we recorded surface-NMR T1 data densely sampled at 14 delay times ? between 250 and 4'000 ms. On this high-quality data set we demonstrate that the pcPSR acquisition approach yields to a good degree homogeneous T1 relaxation times, whereas the conventional approach leads to variations in T1 that could be misinterpreted in terms of changes of aquifer characteristics. Thereby we provide first empirical evidence for the superiority of the pcPSR scheme for surface NMR T1 acquisition.

  15. Absolute calibration of the Greenland time scale: implications for Antarctic time scales and for ? 14C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shackleton, N. J.; Fairbanks, R. G.; Chiu, Tzu-chien; Parrenin, F.

    2004-07-01

    We propose a new age scale for the two ice cores (GRIP and GISP2) that were drilled at Greenland summit, based on accelerator mass spectrometry 14C dating of foraminifera in core MD95-2042 (Paleoceanography 15 (2000) 565), calibrated by means of recently obtained paired 14C and 230Th measurements on pristine corals (Marine radiocarbon calibration curve spanning 10,500 to 50,000 years BP (thousand years before present) Based on paired 230Th/ 234U/ 238U and 14C dates on Pristine Corals Geological Society of America Bulletin, 2003, submitted for publication). The record of core MD95-2042 can be correlated very precisely to the Greenland ice cores. Between 30 and 40 ka BP our scale is 1.4 ka older than the GRIP SS09sea time scale (Journal of Quaternary Science 16 (2001) 299). At the older end of Marine Isotope Stage 3 we use published 230Th dates from speleothems to calibrate the record. Using this scale we show a ? 14C record that is broadly consistent with the modelled record (Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 200 (2002) 177) and with the data of Hughen et al. (Science 303 (2004) 202), but not consistent with the high values obtained by Beck et al. (Science 292 (2001) 2453) or by Voelker et al. (Radiocarbon 40 (1998) 517). We show how a set of age scales for the Antarctic ice cores can be derived that are both fully consistent with the Greenland scale, and glaciologically reasonable.

  16. [Synergetics of hypnoid relaxation].

    PubMed

    Perlitz, Volker; Cotuk, Birol; Schiepek, Günter; Sen, Akin; Haberstock, Sandra; Schmid-Schönbein, Holger; Petzold, Ernst R; Flatten, Guido

    2004-06-01

    The Autogenic Training (AT) is a well established relaxation technique and psychotherapy tool. We report the use of nonlinear routines, the Multi-scaled Time-Frequency-Distribution (mTFD) for the graphical display of vegetative rhythms, and Post-Event-Scan (PES) for the direct visual identification of coupling between physiological subsystems. Applying these methods to time series of respiration, arterial blood pressure, and cutaneous forehead blood content fluctuations in controls (n = 11) or AT-experts (ATE, n = 11) induced psychomotor drive reduction during orthostatic stress allowed the instantaneous identification of a 0.15 Hz-rhythm. This rhythm prevailed in ATE significantly longer resulting a significantly robust 1 : 1 coupling between cutaneous blood content fluctuations and respiration. Consequently, we hypothesize that the "0.15 Hz-rhythm" in the cutaneous blood content fluctuations described previously which was associated with the subjective experience of profound psychomotor relaxation reflects an order-order transition in peripheral signals of central nervous origin. Results produced with the aid of these analytic tools support the efficacy of the AT induced, synergetic relaxation response. PMID:15164300

  17. Time-domain simulation of constitutive relations for nonlinear acoustics including relaxation for frequency power law attenuation media modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Noé; Camarena, Francisco; Redondo, Javier; Sánchez-Morcillo, Víctor; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2015-10-01

    We report a numerical method for solving the constitutive relations of nonlinear acoustics, where multiple relaxation processes are included in a generalized formulation that allows the time-domain numerical solution by an explicit finite differences scheme. Thus, the proposed physical model overcomes the limitations of the one-way Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov (KZK) type models and, due to the Lagrangian density is implicitly included in the calculation, the proposed method also overcomes the limitations of Westervelt equation in complex configurations for medical ultrasound. In order to model frequency power law attenuation and dispersion, such as observed in biological media, the relaxation parameters are fitted to both exact frequency power law attenuation/dispersion media and also empirically measured attenuation of a variety of tissues that does not fit an exact power law. Finally, a computational technique based on artificial relaxation is included to correct the non-negligible numerical dispersion of the finite difference scheme, and, on the other hand, improve stability trough artificial attenuation when shock waves are present. This technique avoids the use of high-order finite-differences schemes leading to fast calculations. The present algorithm is especially suited for practical configuration where spatial discontinuities are present in the domain (e.g. axisymmetric domains or zero normal velocity boundary conditions in general). The accuracy of the method is discussed by comparing the proposed simulation solutions to one dimensional analytical and k-space numerical solutions.

  18. Estimation of longterm basin scale evapotranspiration from streamflow time series

    E-print Network

    Jackson, Robert B.

    Estimation of longterm basin scale evapotranspiration from streamflow time series Sari Palmroth,1 longterm annual evapotranspiration (ETQ) at the watershed scale by combining continuous daily streamflow (Q), Estimation of longterm basin scale evapotranspiration from streamflow time series, Water Resour. Res., 46, W

  19. Linking Response-Time Parameters onto a Common Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.

    2010-01-01

    Although response times on test items are recorded on a natural scale, the scale for some of the parameters in the lognormal response-time model (van der Linden, 2006) is not fixed. As a result, when the model is used to periodically calibrate new items in a testing program, the parameter are not automatically mapped onto a common scale. Several…

  20. Role of entropy in the thermodynamic evolution of the time scale of molecular dynamics near the glass transition.

    PubMed

    Grzybowska, K; Grzybowski, A; Pawlus, S; Pionteck, J; Paluch, M

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate how changes in the system entropy influence the characteristic time scale of the system molecular dynamics near the glass transition. Independently of any model of thermodynamic evolution of the time scale, against some previous suppositions, we show that the system entropy S is not sufficient to govern the time scale defined by structural relaxation time ?. In the density scaling regime, we argue that the decoupling between ? and S is a consequence of different values of the scaling exponents ? and ?(S) in the density scaling laws, ?=f(?(?)/T) and S=h(?(?(S))/T), where ? and T denote density and temperature, respectively. It implies that the proper relation between ? and S requires supplementing with a density factor, u(?), i.e., ?=g(u(?)w(S)). This meaningful finding additionally demonstrates that the density scaling idea can be successfully used to separate physically relevant contributions to the time scale of molecular dynamics near the glass transition. The relation reported by us between ? and S constitutes a general pattern based on nonconfigurational quantities for describing the thermodynamic evolution of the characteristic time scale of molecular dynamics near the glass transition in the density scaling regime, which is a promising alternative to the approaches based as the Adam-Gibbs model on the configurational entropy that is difficult to evaluate in the entire thermodynamic space. As an example, we revise the Avramov entropic model of the dependence ?(T,?), giving evidence that its entropic basis has to be extended by the density dependence of the maximal energy barrier for structural relaxation. We also discuss the excess entropy S(ex), the density scaling of which is found to mimic the density scaling of the total system entropy S. PMID:26172717

  1. Role of entropy in the thermodynamic evolution of the time scale of molecular dynamics near the glass transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzybowska, K.; Grzybowski, A.; Pawlus, S.; Pionteck, J.; Paluch, M.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate how changes in the system entropy influence the characteristic time scale of the system molecular dynamics near the glass transition. Independently of any model of thermodynamic evolution of the time scale, against some previous suppositions, we show that the system entropy S is not sufficient to govern the time scale defined by structural relaxation time ?. In the density scaling regime, we argue that the decoupling between ? and S is a consequence of different values of the scaling exponents ? and ?S in the density scaling laws, ? =f (??/T ) and S =h (??S/T ) , where ? and T denote density and temperature, respectively. It implies that the proper relation between ? and S requires supplementing with a density factor, u (?), i.e., ? =g ( u (? )w (S ) ) . This meaningful finding additionally demonstrates that the density scaling idea can be successfully used to separate physically relevant contributions to the time scale of molecular dynamics near the glass transition. The relation reported by us between ? and S constitutes a general pattern based on nonconfigurational quantities for describing the thermodynamic evolution of the characteristic time scale of molecular dynamics near the glass transition in the density scaling regime, which is a promising alternative to the approaches based as the Adam-Gibbs model on the configurational entropy that is difficult to evaluate in the entire thermodynamic space. As an example, we revise the Avramov entropic model of the dependence ?(T ,?), giving evidence that its entropic basis has to be extended by the density dependence of the maximal energy barrier for structural relaxation. We also discuss the excess entropy Sex, the density scaling of which is found to mimic the density scaling of the total system entropy S .

  2. Lagrangian Relaxation for Large-Scale Multi-Agent (Extended Abstract)

    E-print Network

    Yeoh, William

    in a fleet [3] and movements of visitors in leisure destinations (such as theme parks or world expositions). In these services, users are This research is supported by the Singapore National Re- search Foundation under its.ifaamas.org). All rights reserved. typically represented by computational agents that perform real-time planning

  3. Quantum process tomography with informational incomplete data of two J-coupled heterogeneous spins relaxation in a time window much greater than T1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciel, Thiago O.; Vianna, Reinaldo O.; Sarthour, Roberto S.; Oliveira, Ivan S.

    2015-11-01

    We reconstruct the time dependent quantum map corresponding to the relaxation process of a two-spin system in liquid-state NMR at room temperature. By means of quantum tomography techniques that handle informational incomplete data, we show how to properly post-process and normalize the measurements data for the simulation of quantum information processing, overcoming the unknown number of molecules prepared in a non-equilibrium magnetization state (Nj) by an initial sequence of radiofrequency pulses. From the reconstructed quantum map, we infer both longitudinal (T1) and transversal (T2) relaxation times, and introduce the J-coupling relaxation times ({T}1J,{T}2J), which are relevant for quantum information processing simulations. We show that the map associated to the relaxation process cannot be assumed approximated unital and trace-preserving for times greater than {T}2J.

  4. Lattice-level observation of the elastic-to-plastic relaxation process with subnanosecond resolution in shock-compressed Ta using time-resolved in situ Laue diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrenberg, C. E.; Comley, A. J.; Barton, N. R.; Coppari, F.; Fratanduono, D.; Huntington, C. M.; Maddox, B. R.; Park, H.-S.; Plechaty, C.; Prisbrey, S. T.; Remington, B. A.; Rudd, R. E.

    2015-09-01

    We report direct lattice-level measurements of plastic relaxation kinetics through time-resolved, in situ Laue diffraction of shock-compressed single-crystal [001] Ta at pressures of 27-210 GPa. For a 50-GPa shock, a range of shear strains is observed extending up to the uniaxial limit for early data points (<0.6 ns), and the average shear strain relaxes to a near steady state over ˜1 ns. For 80- and 125-GPa shocks, the measured shear strains are fully relaxed already at 200 ps, consistent with rapid relaxation associated with the predicted threshold for homogeneous nucleation of dislocations occurring at shock pressure ˜65 GPa. The relaxation rate and shear stresses are used to estimate the dislocation density, and these quantities are compared to the results of other high-pressure work, flow stress models, and molecular dynamics simulations.

  5. Detecting separate time scales in genetic expression data

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Biological processes occur on a vast range of time scales, and many of them occur concurrently. As a result, system-wide measurements of gene expression have the potential to capture many of these processes simultaneously. The challenge however, is to separate these processes and time scales in the data. In many cases the number of processes and their time scales is unknown. This issue is particularly relevant to developmental biologists, who are interested in processes such as growth, segmentation and differentiation, which can all take place simultaneously, but on different time scales. Results We introduce a flexible and statistically rigorous method for detecting different time scales in time-series gene expression data, by identifying expression patterns that are temporally shifted between replicate datasets. We apply our approach to a Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell-cycle dataset and an Arabidopsis thaliana root developmental dataset. In both datasets our method successfully detects processes operating on several different time scales. Furthermore we show that many of these time scales can be associated with particular biological functions. Conclusions The spatiotemporal modules identified by our method suggest the presence of multiple biological processes, acting at distinct time scales in both the Arabidopsis root and yeast. Using similar large-scale expression datasets, the identification of biological processes acting at multiple time scales in many organisms is now possible. PMID:20565716

  6. Lifshitz quasinormal modes and relaxation from holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sybesma, Watse; Vandoren, Stefan

    2015-05-01

    We obtain relaxation times for field theories with Lifshitz scaling and with holographic duals Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton gravity theories. This is done by computing quasinormal modes of a bulk scalar field in the presence of Lifshitz black branes. We determine the relation between relaxation time and dynamical exponent z, for various values of boundary dimension d and operator scaling dimension. It is found that for d > z + 1, at zero momenta, the modes are underdamped, where as for d ? z + 1 the system is always overdamped. For d = z + 1 and zero momenta, we present analytical results.

  7. Consistent rationalization of type-2 topoisomerases' unknotting, decatenating, supercoil-relaxing actions and their scaling relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhirong; Chan, Hue Sun

    2015-09-01

    How type-2 topoisomerases discern global topology from local properties of DNA is not known precisely but the hypothesis that the enzymes selectively pass double-helix strands at hook-like juxtapositions is promising. Building upon an investigation of unknotting and decatenating using an improved wormlike DNA model, here we focus primarily on the enzymes' action in narrowing the distribution of linking number (Lk) in supercoiled DNA. Consistent with experiments, with selective passage at a hooked juxtaposition, the simulated narrowing factor RLk diminishes with decreasing DNA circle size but approaches an asymptotic RLk ? 1.7-1.8 for circle size ?3.5 kb. For the larger DNA circles, we found that (RLk - 1) ? 0.42log10RK ? 0.68log10RL and thus RK ? (RL)1.6 holds for the computed RLk and knot and catenane reduction factors RK and RL attained by selective passage at different juxtaposition geometries. Remarkably, this general scaling relation is essentially identical to that observed experimentally for several type-2 topoisomerases from a variety of organisms, indicating that the different disentangling powers of the topoisomerases likely arise from variations in the hooked geometries they select. Taken together, our results suggest strongly that type-2 topoisomerases recognize not only the curvature of the G-segment but also that of the T-segment.

  8. Consistent rationalization of type-2 topoisomerases' unknotting, decatenating, supercoil-relaxing actions and their scaling relation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhirong; Chan, Hue Sun

    2015-09-01

    How type-2 topoisomerases discern global topology from local properties of DNA is not known precisely but the hypothesis that the enzymes selectively pass double-helix strands at hook-like juxtapositions is promising. Building upon an investigation of unknotting and decatenating using an improved wormlike DNA model, here we focus primarily on the enzymes' action in narrowing the distribution of linking number (Lk) in supercoiled DNA. Consistent with experiments, with selective passage at a hooked juxtaposition, the simulated narrowing factor RLk diminishes with decreasing DNA circle size but approaches an asymptotic RLk ? 1.7-1.8 for circle size ?3.5 kb. For the larger DNA circles, we found that (RLk - 1) ? 0.42log10RK ? 0.68log10RL and thus RK ? (RL)(1.6) holds for the computed RLk and knot and catenane reduction factors RK and RL attained by selective passage at different juxtaposition geometries. Remarkably, this general scaling relation is essentially identical to that observed experimentally for several type-2 topoisomerases from a variety of organisms, indicating that the different disentangling powers of the topoisomerases likely arise from variations in the hooked geometries they select. Taken together, our results suggest strongly that type-2 topoisomerases recognize not only the curvature of the G-segment but also that of the T-segment. PMID:26291958

  9. On time scales and time synchronization using LORAN-C as a time reference signal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chi, A. R.

    1974-01-01

    The long term performance of the eight LORAN-C chains is presented in terms of the Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) of the U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO); and the use of the LORAN-C navigation system for maintaining the user's clock to a UTC scale is described. The atomic time scale and the UTC of several national laboratories and observatories relative to the international atomic time are reported. Typical performance of several NASA tracking station clocks, relative to the USNO master clock, is also presented.

  10. Multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model for incompressible miscible flow with large viscosity ratio and high Péclet number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xuhui; Guo, Zhaoli

    2015-10-01

    A lattice Boltzmann model with a multiple-relaxation-time (MRT) collision operator is proposed for incompressible miscible flow with a large viscosity ratio as well as a high Péclet number in this paper. The equilibria in the present model are motivated by the lattice kinetic scheme previously developed by Inamuro et al. [Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 360, 477 (2002), 10.1098/rsta.2001.0942]. The fluid viscosity and diffusion coefficient depend on both the corresponding relaxation times and additional adjustable parameters in this model. As a result, the corresponding relaxation times can be adjusted in proper ranges to enhance the performance of the model. Numerical validations of the Poiseuille flow and a diffusion-reaction problem demonstrate that the proposed model has second-order accuracy in space. Thereafter, the model is used to simulate flow through a porous medium, and the results show that the proposed model has the advantage to obtain a viscosity-independent permeability, which makes it a robust method for simulating flow in porous media. Finally, a set of simulations are conducted on the viscous miscible displacement between two parallel plates. The results reveal that the present model can be used to simulate, to a high level of accuracy, flows with large viscosity ratios and/or high Péclet numbers. Moreover, the present model is shown to provide superior stability in the limit of high kinematic viscosity. In summary, the numerical results indicate that the present lattice Boltzmann model is an ideal numerical tool for simulating flow with a large viscosity ratio and/or a high Péclet number.

  11. Multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model for incompressible miscible flow with large viscosity ratio and high Péclet number.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xuhui; Guo, Zhaoli

    2015-10-01

    A lattice Boltzmann model with a multiple-relaxation-time (MRT) collision operator is proposed for incompressible miscible flow with a large viscosity ratio as well as a high Péclet number in this paper. The equilibria in the present model are motivated by the lattice kinetic scheme previously developed by Inamuro et al. [Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 360, 477 (2002)PTRMAD1364-503X10.1098/rsta.2001.0942]. The fluid viscosity and diffusion coefficient depend on both the corresponding relaxation times and additional adjustable parameters in this model. As a result, the corresponding relaxation times can be adjusted in proper ranges to enhance the performance of the model. Numerical validations of the Poiseuille flow and a diffusion-reaction problem demonstrate that the proposed model has second-order accuracy in space. Thereafter, the model is used to simulate flow through a porous medium, and the results show that the proposed model has the advantage to obtain a viscosity-independent permeability, which makes it a robust method for simulating flow in porous media. Finally, a set of simulations are conducted on the viscous miscible displacement between two parallel plates. The results reveal that the present model can be used to simulate, to a high level of accuracy, flows with large viscosity ratios and/or high Péclet numbers. Moreover, the present model is shown to provide superior stability in the limit of high kinematic viscosity. In summary, the numerical results indicate that the present lattice Boltzmann model is an ideal numerical tool for simulating flow with a large viscosity ratio and/or a high Péclet number. PMID:26565362

  12. Energy and Momentum Relaxation Times of 2D Electrons Due to Near Surface Deformation Potential Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pipa, Viktor; Vasko, Fedor; Mitin, Vladimir

    1997-03-01

    The low temperature energy and momentum relaxation rates of 2D electron gas placed near the free or clamped surface of a semi-infinit sample are calculated. To describe the electron-acoustic phonon interaction with allowance of the surface effect the method of elasticity theory Green functions was used. This method allows to take into account the reflection of acoustic waves from the surface and related mutual conversion of LA and TA waves. It is shown that the strength of the deformation potential scattering at low temperatures substantially depends on the mechanical conditions at the surface: relaxation rates are suppressed for the free surface while for the rigid one the rates are enhanced. The dependence of the conductivity on the distance between the 2D layer and the surface is discussed. The effect is most pronounced in the range of temperatures 2 sl pF < T < (2 hbar s_l)/d, where pF is the Fermi momentum, sl is the velocity of LA waves, d is the width of the quantum well.

  13. Spin relaxation and linear-in-electric-field frequency shift in an arbitrary, time-independent magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, Steven Michael

    2010-12-03

    A method is presented to calculate the spin relaxation times T{sub 1}, T{sub 2} due to a nonuniform magnetic field, and the linear-in-electric-field precession frequency shift {delta}{omega}{sub E} when an electric field is present, in the diffusion approximation for spins confined to a rectangular cell. It is found that the rectangular cell geometry admits of a general result for T{sub 1}, T{sub 2}, and {delta}{omega}{sub E} in terms of the spatial cosine-transform components of the magnetic field.

  14. On the Uncertainty of the Annular Mode Time Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Junsu; Reichler, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    The proper simulation of the annular mode (AM) time scale may be regarded as an important benchmark for climate models. Previous research demonstrated that climate models systematically overestimate this time scale. As suggested by the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, this may imply that models are overly sensitive to external forcings. Previous research also made it clear that calculating the AM time scale is a slowly converging process, necessitating relatively long time series and casting doubts on the usefulness of the historical reanalysis record to constrain climate models in terms of the AM time scale. Here, we use a 4000-year-long control simulation with the GFDL climate model CM2.1 to study the effects of internal atmospheric variability on the stability of the AM time scale. In particular, we ask whether a model's AM time scale and climate sensitivity can be constrained from the 50-year-long reanalysis record. We find that internal variability attaches large uncertainty to the AM time scale when diagnosed from decadal records. Even under fixed forcing conditions, at least 100 years of data are required in order to keep the uncertainty in the AM time scale of the Northern Hemisphere to 10%; over the Southern Hemisphere the required length increases to 200 years. If nature's AM time scale is similarly variable, there is no guarantee that the historical reanalysis record is a fully representative target for model evaluation. We further use the model simulation to investigate the dynamical coupling between the stratosphere and the troposphere from the perspective of the AM time scale. Over the Northern Hemisphere we find only weak indication for influences from stratosphere-troposphere coupling on the AM time scale. The situation is very different over the Southern Hemisphere, where we find robust connections between the AM time scale in the stratosphere and that in the troposphere, confirming and extending earlier results of influences of stratospheric variability on the troposphere.

  15. Two-Time Correlations Probing the Dynamics of Dissipative Many-Body Quantum Systems: Aging and Fast Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciolla, Bruno; Poletti, Dario; Kollath, Corinna

    2015-05-01

    We use two-time correlation functions to study the complex dynamics of dissipative many-body quantum systems. In order to measure, understand, and categorize these correlations we extend the framework of the adiabatic elimination method. We show that, for the same parameters and times, two-time correlations can display two distinct behaviors depending on the observable considered: a fast exponential decay or a much slower dynamics. We exemplify these findings by studying strongly interacting bosons in a double well subjected to phase noise. While the single-particle correlations decay exponentially fast with time, the density-density correlations display slow aging dynamics. We also show that this slow relaxation regime is robust against particle losses. Additionally, we use the developed framework to show that the dynamic properties of dissipatively engineered states can be drastically different from their Hamiltonian counterparts.

  16. Observation time scale, free-energy landscapes, and molecular symmetry

    E-print Network

    Salamon, Peter

    Observation time scale, free-energy landscapes, and molecular symmetry David J. Walesa,1 and Peter structures that interconvert on a given time scale are lumped together, the corresponding free-energy surface that are connected by free-energy barriers below a certain threshold. We illustrate this time dependence for some

  17. Interest point detection and scale selection in space-time

    E-print Network

    Lindeberg, Tony

    . In this way, events that correspond to curved space-time struc- tures are emphasised, while structuresInterest point detection and scale selection in space-time Ivan Laptev and Tony Lindeberg of interesting events in space-time data. Moreover, we develop a mechanism for spatio-temporal scale selection

  18. Resonant Relaxation in Electroweak Baryogenesis

    E-print Network

    Christopher Lee; Vincenzo Cirigliano; Michael J. Ramsey-Musolf

    2004-12-23

    We compute the leading, chiral charge-changing relaxation term in the quantum transport equations that govern electroweak baryogenesis using the closed time path formulation of non-equilibrium quantum field theory. We show that the relaxation transport coefficients may be resonantly enhanced under appropriate conditions on electroweak model parameters and that such enhancements can mitigate the impact of similar enhancements in the CP-violating source terms. We also develop a power counting in the time and energy scales entering electroweak baryogenesis and include effects through second order in ratios $\\epsilon$ of the small and large scales. We illustrate the implications of the resonantly enhanced ${\\cal O}(\\epsilon^2)$ terms using the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, focusing on the interplay between the requirements of baryogenesis and constraints obtained from collider studies, precision electroweak data, and electric dipole moment searches.

  19. Stress Relaxation for Granular Materials near Jamming under Cyclic Compression.

    PubMed

    Farhadi, Somayeh; Zhu, Alex Z; Behringer, Robert P

    2015-10-30

    We have explored isotropically jammed states of semi-2D granular materials through cyclic compression. In each compression cycle, systems of either identical ellipses or bidisperse disks transition between jammed and unjammed states. We determine the evolution of the average pressure P and structure through consecutive jammed states. We observe a transition point ?_{m} above which P persists over many cycles; below ?_{m}, P relaxes slowly. The relaxation time scale associated with P increases with packing fraction, while the relaxation time scale for collective particle motion remains constant. The collective motion of the ellipses is hindered compared to disks because of the rotational constraints on elliptical particles. PMID:26565498

  20. Stress Relaxation for Granular Materials near Jamming under Cyclic Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhadi, Somayeh; Zhu, Alex Z.; Behringer, Robert P.

    2015-10-01

    We have explored isotropically jammed states of semi-2D granular materials through cyclic compression. In each compression cycle, systems of either identical ellipses or bidisperse disks transition between jammed and unjammed states. We determine the evolution of the average pressure P and structure through consecutive jammed states. We observe a transition point ?m above which P persists over many cycles; below ?m, P relaxes slowly. The relaxation time scale associated with P increases with packing fraction, while the relaxation time scale for collective particle motion remains constant. The collective motion of the ellipses is hindered compared to disks because of the rotational constraints on elliptical particles.

  1. Interface roughness mediated phonon relaxation rates in Si quantum dots.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferdous, Rifat; Hsueh, Yuling; Klimeck, Gerhard; Rahman, Rajib

    2015-03-01

    Si QDs are promising candidates for solid-state quantum computing due to long spin coherence times. However, the valley degeneracy in Si adds an additional degree of freedom to the electronic structure. Although the valley and orbital indices can be uniquely identified in an ideal Si QD, interface roughness mixes valley and orbital states in realistic dots. Such valley-orbit coupling can strongly influence T1 times in Si QDs. Recent experimental measurements of various relaxation rates differ from previous predictions of phonon relaxation in ideal Si QDs. To understand how roughness affects different relaxation rates, for example spin relaxation due to spin-valley coupling, which is a byproduct of spin-orbit and valley-orbit coupling, we need to understand the effect of valley-orbit coupling on valley relaxation first. Using a full-band atomistic tight-binding description for both the system's electron and electron-phonon hamiltonian, we analyze the effect of atomic-scale interface disorder on phonon induced valley relaxation and spin relaxation in a Si QD. We find that, the valley splitting dependence of valley relaxation rate governs the magnetic field dependence of spin relaxation rate. Our results help understand experimentally measured relaxation times.

  2. Assessment of Nanosecond Time Scale Motions in Native and Non-Native States of Ubiquitin.

    PubMed

    Morozova, Olga B; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V

    2015-10-01

    The paramagnetic relaxation times of the aromatic and ? protons of Tyr59 and His68 residues of the native ubiquitin and of Tyr59 residue of the non-native ubiquitin were determined from an analysis of chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (CIDNP) kinetics obtained during the photoreaction of the protein and 2,2'-dipyridyl excited in the triplet state. Using the paramagnetic relaxation times determined earlier for the radicals of free amino acids as an internal standard and assuming that the hyperfine interaction (HFI) anisotropy is very similar for the radicals of free amino acids and the corresponding radicals of amino acid residues in the proteins, we determined parameters that characterize the intramolecular mobility of different protons in native and two non-native states of ubiquitin. The latter are denatured at pH 2 and 57 °C, and the A-state at pH 2 in a 60%/40% methanol/water mixture. The determination of the two parameters of intramolecular mobility (i.e., the correlation time of internal motion, ?e, and the order parameter, S(2)) was only possible by analyzing paramagnetic relaxation data obtained at two magnetic fields (4.7 and 9.4 T) using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry. Intramolecular correlation times fall into the submicrosecond-microsecond time scale. Longer correlation times and higher order parameters were found for the less accessible Tyr59 residue than for the His68 residue, as well as for the more buried ? protons than for the aromatic protons for both of the protein residues in the native state. For Tyr59, intramolecular mobility increases following the loss of the tertiary structure of ubiquitin. These findings strongly support the reliability of the obtained data. PMID:26367543

  3. Helium-3 relaxation time measurements at low temperatures for the neutron electric dipole moment (nEDM) experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Qiang

    The search for the existence of a nonzero neutron electric dipole moment (nEDM) has the potential to reveal new sources of T and CP violation beyond the Standard Model and may have a significant impact on our understanding of the universe. A new experiment aiming at two orders of magnitude improvement (˜ 10--28 e·cm) over the current experimental upper limit has been proposed in the United States. In the experiment, the measurement cell will be made of dTPB-dPS coated acrylic and filled with superfluid 4He at ˜300-500 mK. The measurement of the neutron precession frequency will rely on the spin-dependence of the cross section of the nuclear reaction between polarized neutrons and 3He atoms: n?+H3 ?e ? p + t + 764 keV. Polarized 3He will also be used as a comagnetometer based on the nuclear magnetic resonance technique. The 3He polarization needs to have sufficiently long relaxation time so that little polarization is lost during the measurement period in order to achieve the proposed sensitivity. Understanding the relaxation mechanism of 3He polarization in the measurement cell under the nEDM experimental conditions and maintaining 3He polarization is crucial for the experiment. With the presence of superfluid 4He, 3He relaxation time measurements in a dTPB-dPS coated cylindrical acrylic cell at the temperature of 1.9 K and ˜400 mK have been performed at the Triangle University Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) on the campus of Duke University. The extracted depolarization probabilities of polarized 3He on the cell surface are on the order of (1 -- 2) x 10--7 at 1.9 K and ˜ 4.7 x 10--7 at ˜400 mK. The extrapolated relaxation time of polarized 3He in the nEDM cell geometry is ˜ 4870 seconds at ˜400 mK, which is sufficiently long for the nEDM experiment and further improvements are anticipated.

  4. Protein dynamics: from rattling in a cage to structural relaxation.

    PubMed

    Khodadadi, S; Sokolov, A P

    2015-07-01

    We present an overview of protein dynamics based mostly on results of neutron scattering, dielectric relaxation spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. We identify several major classes of protein motions on the time scale from faster than picoseconds to several microseconds, and discuss the coupling of these processes to solvent dynamics. Our analysis suggests that the microsecond backbone relaxation process might be the main structural relaxation of the protein that defines its glass transition temperature, while faster processes present some localized secondary relaxations. Based on the overview, we formulate a general picture of protein dynamics and discuss the challenges in this field. PMID:26027652

  5. Systematic risk and time scales Ramazan Gencay

    E-print Network

    Whitcher, Brandon

    ; Harvey, 1991), non-synchronous data issues (Scholes and Williams, 1977), time horizon of investors- ples of the concerns on the beta estimation are as follows: The stability of beta over time (Harvey (Garcia and Ghysels, 1998), the effect of world markets and volatility (Bekaert and Harvey, 1995, 1997

  6. Finite-time and finite-size scaling of the Kuramoto oscillators.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi Jin; Yi, Su Do; Kim, Beom Jun

    2014-02-21

    Phase transition in its strict sense can only be observed in an infinite system, for which equilibration takes an infinitely long time at criticality. In numerical simulations, we are often limited both by the finiteness of the system size and by the finiteness of the observation time scale. We propose that one can overcome this barrier by measuring the nonequilibrium temporal relaxation for finite systems and by applying the finite-time-finite-size scaling (FTFSS) which systematically uses two scaling variables, one temporal and the other spatial. The FTFSS method yields a smooth scaling surface, and the conventional finite-size scaling curves can be viewed as proper cross sections of the surface. The validity of our FTFSS method is tested for the synchronization transition of Kuramoto models in the globally coupled structure and in the small-world network structure. Our FTFSS method is also applied to the Monte Carlo dynamics of the globally coupled q-state clock model. PMID:24579603

  7. Simple time-variant filtering by operator scaling

    E-print Network

    Park, Choon Byong; Black, Ross A.

    1995-09-01

    A convolutional method of time?variant, band?pass filtering presented shows that a change of filter cutoff frequencies with time is achieved by frequency scaling the amplitude spectrum of a reference operator. According ...

  8. Local-time effect on small space-time scale

    E-print Network

    V. A. Panchelyuga; V. A. Kolombet; M. S. Panchelyuga; S. E. Shnoll

    2006-10-18

    The paper presents an investigation of local-time effect - one of the manifestations of macroscopic fluctuations phenomena. Was shown the existence of the named effect for longitudinal distance between locations of measurements up to 500 meters. Also a structure of intervals distribution in neighborhood of local-time peak was studied and splitting of the peak was found out. Obtained results lead to conclusion about sharp anisotropy of space-time.

  9. Johari-Goldstein secondary relaxation in methylated alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngai, K. L.

    2005-06-01

    Dielectric relaxation measurements of the methylated alkanes, 3-methylpentane, 3-methylheptane, 4-methylheptane, 2,3-dimethylpentane, and 2,4,6-trimethylheptane by S. Shahriari, A. Mandanici, L-M Wang, and R. Richert [J. Chem. Phys. 121, 8960 (2004)] have found a primary ? relaxation of these glass-forming liquids and a slow secondary ? relaxation that are in close proximity to each other on the frequency scale. These glass formers have one or more methyl groups individually attached to various carbons on the alkane chain. They cannot contribute to such a slow secondary relaxation. Hence the observed secondary relaxations is not intramolecular in origin and, similar to secondary relaxations found in rigid molecules by Johari and Goldstein, they are potentially important in the consideration of a mechanism for the glass transition. These secondary relaxations in the methylated alkanes are special and belong to the class of Johari-Goldstein in a generalized sense. The coupling model has predicted that its primitive relaxation time should be approximately the same as the relaxation time of the secondary relaxation if the latter is of the Johari-Goldstein kind. This prediction has been shown to hold in many other glass formers. The published data of the methylated alkanes provide an opportunity to test this prediction once more. The results of this work confirm the prediction.

  10. Using bio-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles and dynamic nuclear magnetic resonance to characterize the time-dependent spin-spin relaxation time for sensitive bio-detection.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shu-Hsien; Chen, Kuen-Lin; Wang, Chun-Min; Chieh, Jen-Jie; Horng, Herng-Er; Wang, Li-Min; Wu, C H; Yang, Hong-Chang

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we report the use of bio-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (BMNs) and dynamic magnetic resonance (DMR) to characterize the time-dependent spin-spin relaxation time for sensitive bio-detection. The biomarkers are the human C-reactive protein (CRP) while the BMNs are the anti-CRP bound onto dextran-coated Fe3O4 particles labeled as Fe3O4-antiCRP. It was found the time-dependent spin-spin relaxation time, T2, of protons decreases as time evolves. Additionally, the ?T2 of of protons in BMNs increases as the concentration of CRP increases. We attribute these to the formation of the magnetic clusters that deteriorate the field homogeneity of nearby protons. A sensitivity better than 0.1 ?g/mL for assaying CRP is achieved, which is much higher than that required by the clinical criteria (0.5 mg/dL). The present MR-detection platform shows promise for further use in detecting tumors, viruses, and proteins. PMID:25397920

  11. Using Bio-Functionalized Magnetic Nanoparticles and Dynamic Nuclear Magnetic Resonance to Characterize the Time-Dependent Spin-Spin Relaxation Time for Sensitive Bio-Detection

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Shu-Hsien; Chen, Kuen-Lin; Wang, Chun-Min; Chieh, Jen-Jie; Horng, Herng-Er; Wang, Li-Min; Wu, C. H.; Yang, Hong-Chang

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we report the use of bio-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (BMNs) and dynamic magnetic resonance (DMR) to characterize the time-dependent spin-spin relaxation time for sensitive bio-detection. The biomarkers are the human C-reactive protein (CRP) while the BMNs are the anti-CRP bound onto dextran-coated Fe3O4 particles labeled as Fe3O4-antiCRP. It was found the time-dependent spin-spin relaxation time, T2, of protons decreases as time evolves. Additionally, the ?T2 of of protons in BMNs increases as the concentration of CRP increases. We attribute these to the formation of the magnetic clusters that deteriorate the field homogeneity of nearby protons. A sensitivity better than 0.1 ?g/mL for assaying CRP is achieved, which is much higher than that required by the clinical criteria (0.5 mg/dL). The present MR-detection platform shows promise for further use in detecting tumors, viruses, and proteins. PMID:25397920

  12. Ion-Beam Sculpting Time Scales Derek Stein,1

    E-print Network

    Golovchenko, Jene A.

    Ion-Beam Sculpting Time Scales Derek Stein,1 Jiali Li,2 and Jene A. Golovchenko1,2 1 Division) A study of ion sculpting dynamics in SiO2 and SiN using periodically pulsed ion beams reveals material nanoscale matter transport can occur over second long time scales after the ion beam has been extinguished

  13. Singular perturbation and time scale approaches in discrete control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naidu, D. S.; Price, D. B.

    1988-01-01

    After considering a singularly perturbed discrete control system, a singular perturbation approach is used to obtain outer and correction subsystems. A time scale approach is then applied via block diagonalization transformations to decouple the system into slow and fast subsystems. To a zeroth-order approximation, the singular perturbation and time-scale approaches are found to yield equivalent results.

  14. A new generalization of Ostrowski type inequality on time scales

    E-print Network

    Wenjun Liu; Quoc Anh Ngo; Wenbin Chen

    2008-05-04

    In this paper we first extend a generalization of Ostrowski type inequality on time scales for functions whose derivatives are bounded and then unify corresponding continuous and discrete versions. We also point out some particular integral type inequalities on time scales as special cases.

  15. LINK BETWEEN COSMIC RAYS AND CLOUDS ON DIFFERENT TIME SCALES

    E-print Network

    Usoskin, Ilya G.

    LINK BETWEEN COSMIC RAYS AND CLOUDS ON DIFFERENT TIME SCALES ILYA G. USOSKIN and GENNADY A is related to a link between the cosmic ray flux and cloudiness. Here we review evidences relating terrestrial climate variability to changes of cosmic ray flux in the Earth's vicinity on different time scales

  16. Time scales of tunneling decay of a localized state

    SciTech Connect

    Ban, Yue; Muga, J. G.; Sherman, E. Ya.; Buettiker, M.

    2010-12-15

    Motivated by recent time-domain experiments on ultrafast atom ionization, we analyze the transients and time scales that characterize, aside from the relatively long lifetime, the decay of a localized state by tunneling. While the tunneling starts immediately, some time is required for the outgoing flux to develop. This short-term behavior depends strongly on the initial state. For the initial state, tightly localized so that the initial transients are dominated by over-the-barrier motion, the time scale for flux propagation through the barrier is close to the Buettiker-Landauer traversal time. Then a quasistationary, slow-decay process follows, which sets ideal conditions for observing diffraction in time at longer times and distances. To define operationally a tunneling time at the barrier edge, we extrapolate backward the propagation of the wave packet that escaped from the potential. This extrapolated time is considerably longer than the time scale of the flux and density buildup at the barrier edge.

  17. Asymptotic dependence of the relaxation time of the magnetization of a ferromagnetic particle on the anisotropy of the particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scully, C. N.; Cregg, P. J.; Crothers, D. S. F.

    1992-01-01

    It is known that the direction of the magnetization vector of very fine single-domain ferromagnetic particles fluctuates under the influence of thermal agitation. Perturbation theory is applied rigorously to a singular integral equation to derive an asymptotic formula for the relaxation time of the magnetization, for the case of uniaxial anisotropy and an applied magnetic field. The result agrees with that of Brown [Phys. Rev. 130, 1677 (1963)] as described succinctly by Aharoni [Phys. Rev. 177, 793 (1969)]. It should be emphasized that both Gilbert's equation and the earlier Landau-Lifshitz equation are merely phenomenological equations, which are used to explain the time decay of the average magnetization. Brown suggested that the Gilbert equation should be augmented by a white-noise driving term in order to explain the effect of thermal fluctuations of the surroundings on the magnetization.

  18. Unwinding relaxation dynamics of polymers

    E-print Network

    Jean-Charles Walter; Marco Baiesi; Gerard Barkema; Enrico Carlon

    2013-01-13

    The relaxation dynamics of a polymer wound around a fixed obstacle constitutes a fundamental instance of polymer with twist and torque and it is of relevance also for DNA denaturation dynamics. We investigate it by simulations and Langevin equation analysis. The latter predicts a relaxation time scaling as a power of the polymer length times a logarithmic correction related to the equilibrium fluctuations of the winding angle. The numerical data support this result and show that at short times the winding angle decreases as a power-law. This is also in agreement with the Langevin equation provided a winding-dependent friction is used, suggesting that such reduced description of the system captures the basic features of the problem.

  19. Concentration Regimes of Biopolymers Xanthan, Tara, and Clairana, Comparing Dynamic Light Scattering and Distribution of Relaxation Time

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Patrícia D.; Michel, Ricardo C.; McBride, Alan J. A.; Moreira, Angelita S.; Lomba, Rosana F. T.; Vendruscolo, Claire T.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the utilization of analysis of the distribution of relaxation time (DRT) using a dynamic light back-scattering technique as alternative method for the determination of the concentration regimes in aqueous solutions of biopolymers (xanthan, clairana and tara gums) by an analysis of the overlap (c*) and aggregation (c**) concentrations. The diffusion coefficients were obtained over a range of concentrations for each biopolymer using two methods. The first method analysed the behaviour of the diffusion coefficient as a function of the concentration of the gum solution. This method is based on the analysis of the diffusion coefficient versus the concentration curve. Using the slope of the curves, it was possible to determine the c* and c** for xanthan and tara gum. However, it was not possible to determine the concentration regimes for clairana using this method. The second method was based on an analysis of the DRTs, which showed different numbers of relaxation modes. It was observed that the concentrations at which the number of modes changed corresponded to the c* and c**. Thus, the DRT technique provided an alternative method for the determination of the critical concentrations of biopolymers. PMID:23671627

  20. Modeling orbital changes on tectonic time scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, Thomas J.

    1992-01-01

    Geologic time series indicate significant 100 ka and 400 ka pre-Pleistocene climate fluctuations, prior to the time of such fluctuations in Pleistocene ice sheets. The origin of these fluctuations must therefore depend on phenomena other than the ice sheets. In a previous set of experiments, we tested the sensitivity of an energy balance model to orbital insolation forcing, specifically focusing on the filtering effect of the Earth's geography. We found that in equatorial areas, the twice-yearly passage of the sun across the equator interacts with the precession index to generate 100 ka and 400 ka power in our modeled time series. The effect is proportional to the magnitude of land in equatorial regions. We suggest that such changes may reflect monsoonal variations in the real climate system, and the subsequent wind and weathering changes may transfer some of this signal to the marine record. A comparison with observed fluctuations of Triassic lake levels is quite favorable. A number of problems remain to be studied or clarified: (1) the EBM experiments need to be followed up by a limited number of GCM experiments; (2) the sensitivity to secular changes in orbital forcing needs to be examined; (3) the possible modifying role of sedimentary processes on geologic time series warrants considerably more study; (4) the effect of tectonic changes on Earth's rotation rate needs to be studied; and (5) astronomers need to make explicit which of their predictions are robust and geologists and astronomers have to agree on which of the predictions are most testable in the geologic record.

  1. Scaling of events spaced in time.

    PubMed

    Fetterman, J G; Stubbs, D A; Dreyfus, L R

    1986-06-01

    Pigeons were trained to peck on a key, which could be lit by red or green light, and produce feeder-light stimuli intermittently. On some trials, food followed the fourth feeder flash providing the key color was red, while on other trials food followed the sixteenth flash providing the color was green. The change in color from red to green was produced by a peck to a second, changeover key. Pigeons typically responded in the presence of red until four or more flashes occured and then, if food had not been delivered, changed the main-key color and responded on the green key. Following training, the variable-interval schedule arranging-feeder light events was changed to longer and shorter values to alter the amount of time (and number of responses) between events. Data from these test days indicate that the change from red to green was influenced by the number of events, but also by the time elapsed and/or responses emitted since the onset of a trial. The results suggest multiple sources of related information and stimulus control when events and behavior occur over time. PMID:24924863

  2. Grueneisen relaxation photoacoustic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lidai; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    The temperature-dependent property of the Grueneisen parameter has been employed in photoacoustic imaging mainly to measure tissue temperature. Here we explore this property using a different approach and develop Grueneisen-relaxation photoacoustic microscopy (GR-PAM), a technique that images non-radiative absorption with confocal optical resolution. GR-PAM sequentially delivers two identical laser pulses with a micro-second-scale time delay. The first laser pulse generates a photoacoustic signal and thermally tags the in-focus absorbers. Owing to the temperature dependence of the Grueneisen parameter, when the second laser pulse excites the tagged absorbers within the thermal relaxation time, a photoacoustic signal stronger than the first one is produced. GR-PAM detects the amplitude difference between the two co-located photoacoustic signals, confocally imaging the non-radiative absorption. We greatly improved axial resolution from 45 µm to 2.3 µm and at the same time slightly improved lateral resolution from 0.63 µm to 0.41 µm. In addition, the optical sectioning capability facilitates the measurement of the absolute absorption coefficient without fluence calibration. PMID:25379919

  3. Grueneisen Relaxation Photoacoustic Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lidai; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-10-01

    The temperature-dependent property of the Grueneisen parameter has been employed in photoacoustic imaging mainly to measure tissue temperature. Here we explore this property using a different approach and develop Grueneisen relaxation photoacoustic microscopy (GR-PAM), a technique that images nonradiative absorption with confocal optical resolution. GR-PAM sequentially delivers two identical laser pulses with a microsecond-scale time delay. The first laser pulse generates a photoacoustic signal and thermally tags the in-focus absorbers. When the second laser pulse excites the tagged absorbers within the thermal relaxation time, a photoacoustic signal stronger than the first one is produced, owing to the temperature dependence of the Grueneisen parameter. GR-PAM detects the amplitude difference between the two colocated photoacoustic signals, confocally imaging the nonradiative absorption. We greatly improved axial resolution from 45 ?m to 2.3 ?m and, at the same time, slightly improved lateral resolution from 0.63 ?m to 0.41 ?m. In addition, the optical sectioning capability facilitates the measurement of the absolute absorption coefficient without fluence calibration.

  4. Grueneisen relaxation photoacoustic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lidai; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Lihong V

    2014-10-24

    The temperature-dependent property of the Grueneisen parameter has been employed in photoacoustic imaging mainly to measure tissue temperature. Here we explore this property using a different approach and develop Grueneisen relaxation photoacoustic microscopy (GR-PAM), a technique that images nonradiative absorption with confocal optical resolution. GR-PAM sequentially delivers two identical laser pulses with a microsecond-scale time delay. The first laser pulse generates a photoacoustic signal and thermally tags the in-focus absorbers. When the second laser pulse excites the tagged absorbers within the thermal relaxation time, a photoacoustic signal stronger than the first one is produced, owing to the temperature dependence of the Grueneisen parameter. GR-PAM detects the amplitude difference between the two colocated photoacoustic signals, confocally imaging the nonradiative absorption. We greatly improved axial resolution from 45???m to 2.3???m and, at the same time, slightly improved lateral resolution from 0.63???m to 0.41???m. In addition, the optical sectioning capability facilitates the measurement of the absolute absorption coefficient without fluence calibration. PMID:25379919

  5. Allometric scaling and maximum efficiency in physiological eigen time

    PubMed Central

    Andresen, Bjarne; Shiner, J. S.; Uehlinger, Dominik E.

    2002-01-01

    General optimization results from physics indicate that maximum efficiency of a process, in the sense of minimum overall entropy production, is achieved when the rate of entropy production is constant over time, however not in ordinary clock time but on an, in general varying, “eigen timescale, intrinsic to the system. We identify the eigen time of a biological system with “physiological time,” which generally scales with the 1/4 power of body mass, M1/4, over a vast range of species. Since it is equally well established that metabolic rate scales as M3/4, it follows that organisms produce entropy at the same intrinsic rate, fulfilling a necessary condition for maximum efficiency, and are all, furthermore, equally efficient on the physiological eigen time scale. PMID:11959910

  6. Frontal plane knee mechanics and medial cartilage MR relaxation times in individuals with ACL reconstruction : A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Deepak; Kothari, Abbas; Souza, Richard B.; Wu, Samuel; Ma, C. Benjamin; Li, Xiaojuan

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate cartilage T1? and T2 relaxation times and knee mechanics during walking and drop-landing for individuals with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R). Methods Nine patients (6 men and 3 women, Age 35.8±5.4 years, BMI 23.5±2.5 kg/m2) participated 1.5±0.8 years after single-bundle two-tunnel ACL reconstruction. Peak knee adduction moment (KAM), flexion moment (KFM), extension moment (KEM), and peak varus were calculated from kinematic and kinetic data obtained during walking and drop-landing tasks. T1? and T2 times were calculated for medial femur (MF), and medial tibia (MT) cartilage and compared between subjects with low KAM and high KAM. Biomechanical variables were compared between limbs. Results The high KAM group had higher T1? for MT (p = 0.01), central MT (p = 0.05), posterior MF (p = 0.04), posterior MT (p = 0.01); and higher T2 for MT (p = 0.02), MF (p = 0.05) posterior MF (p = 0.002) and posterior MT (p = 0.01). During walking, ACL-R knees had greater flexion at initial contact (p =0.04), and lower KEM (p = 0.02). During drop-landing, the ACL-R knees had lower KAM (p = 0.03) and KFM (p = 0.002). Conclusion Patients with ACL-R who have higher KAM during walking had elevated MR relaxation times in the medial knee compartments. These data suggest that those individuals who have undergone ACL-R and have higher frontal plane loading, may be at a greater risk of knee osteoarthritis. PMID:24993277

  7. Vibrational energy relaxation of benzene dimer and trimer in the CH stretching region studied by picosecond time-resolved IR-UV pump-probe spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kusaka, Ryoji; Inokuchi, Yoshiya; Ebata, Takayuki

    2012-01-28

    Vibrational energy relaxation (VER) of the Fermi polyads in the CH stretching vibration of the benzene dimer (Bz(2)) and trimer (Bz(3)) has been investigated by picosecond (ps) time-resolved IR-UV pump-probe spectroscopy in a supersonic beam. The vibrational bands in the 3000-3100 cm(-1) region were excited by a ps IR pulse and the time evolutions at the pumped and redistributed (bath) levels were probed by resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization with a ps UV pulse. For Bz(2), a site-selective excitation in the T-shaped structure was achieved by using the isotope-substituted heterodimer hd, where h = C(6)H(6) and d = C(6)D(6), and its result was compared with that of hh homodimer. In the hd heterodimer, the two isomers, h(stem)d(top) and h(top)d(stem), show remarkable site-dependence of the lifetime of intracluster vibrational energy redistribution (IVR); the lifetime of the Stem site [h(stem)d(top), 140-170 ps] is ~2.5 times shorter than that of the Top site [h(top)d(stem), 370-400 ps]. In the transient UV spectra, a broad electronic transition due to the bath modes emerges and gradually decays with a nanosecond time scale. The broad transition shows different time profile depending on UV frequency monitored. These time profiles are described by a three-step VER model involving IVR and vibrational predissociation: initial ? bath1(intramolecular) ? bath2(intermolecular) ? fragments. This model also describes well the observed time profile of the Bz fragment. The hh homodimer shows the stepwise VER process with time constants similar to those of the hd dimer, suggesting that the excitation-exchange coupling of the vibrations between the two sites is very weak. Bz(3) also exhibited the stepwise VER process, though each step is faster than Bz(2). PMID:22299868

  8. Vibrational energy relaxation of benzene dimer and trimer in the CH stretching region studied by picosecond time-resolved IR-UV pump-probe spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusaka, Ryoji; Inokuchi, Yoshiya; Ebata, Takayuki

    2012-01-01

    Vibrational energy relaxation (VER) of the Fermi polyads in the CH stretching vibration of the benzene dimer (Bz2) and trimer (Bz3) has been investigated by picosecond (ps) time-resolved IR-UV pump-probe spectroscopy in a supersonic beam. The vibrational bands in the 3000-3100 cm-1 region were excited by a ps IR pulse and the time evolutions at the pumped and redistributed (bath) levels were probed by resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization with a ps UV pulse. For Bz2, a site-selective excitation in the T-shaped structure was achieved by using the isotope-substituted heterodimer hd, where h = C6H6 and d = C6D6, and its result was compared with that of hh homodimer. In the hd heterodimer, the two isomers, h(stem)d(top) and h(top)d(stem), show remarkable site-dependence of the lifetime of intracluster vibrational energy redistribution (IVR); the lifetime of the Stem site [h(stem)d(top), 140-170 ps] is ˜2.5 times shorter than that of the Top site [h(top)d(stem), 370-400 ps]. In the transient UV spectra, a broad electronic transition due to the bath modes emerges and gradually decays with a nanosecond time scale. The broad transition shows different time profile depending on UV frequency monitored. These time profiles are described by a three-step VER model involving IVR and vibrational predissociation: initial ? bath1(intramolecular) ? bath2(intermolecular) ? fragments. This model also describes well the observed time profile of the Bz fragment. The hh homodimer shows the stepwise VER process with time constants similar to those of the hd dimer, suggesting that the excitation-exchange coupling of the vibrations between the two sites is very weak. Bz3 also exhibited the stepwise VER process, though each step is faster than Bz2.

  9. Measurement of solute proton spin-lattice relaxation times in water using the 1,3,3,1 sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Sankar, S.S.; Mole, P.A.; Coulson, R.L.

    1986-12-01

    /sup 1/H NMR spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) of the N-CH3 proton resonances of phosphocreatine (PCr) and creatine (Cr) in water solutions were obtained using the 1,3,3,1 pulse sequence. These T1 values were equivalent to those obtained in D/sub 2/O and water using either the conventional inversion-recovery experiment or the 1,3,3,1 pulse sequence. Thus, the 1,3,3,1 sequence of proton NMR can provide an independent means along with phosphorous NMR for assess PCr and for the study of the creatine kinase reaction (PCr + ADP in equilibrium ATP + Cr) in aqueous solutions and perhaps in biological preparations.

  10. On the relaxation time of Gauss' continued-fraction map. II. The Banach space approach (transfer operator method)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, D.; Roepstorff, G.

    1988-01-01

    The spectrum of the transfer operator ? for the map Tx=1/ x-[1/ x] when restricted to a certain Banach space of holomorphic functions is shown to coincide with the spectrum of the adjoint U* of Koopman's isometric operator Uf( x)= f· T( x) when the former is restricted to the Hilbert space ?(?) introduced in part I of this work. If N denotes the operator ?- P 1 with P 1 the projector onto the eigenfunction to the dominant eigenvalue ? 1 =1 of ?, then - N is a u 0-positive operator with respect to some cone and therefore has a dominant positive, simple eigenvalue - ? 2. A minimax principle holds giving rigorous upper and lower bounds both for ? 2 and the relaxation time of the map T.

  11. Time Scaling of Chaotic Systems: Application to Secure Communications

    E-print Network

    Donatello Materassi; Michele Basso

    2007-10-25

    The paper deals with time-scaling transformations of dynamical systems. Such scaling functions operate a change of coordinates on the time axis of the system trajectories preserving its phase portrait. Exploiting this property, a chaos encryption technique to transmit a binary signal through an analog channel is proposed. The scheme is based on a suitable time-scaling function which plays the role of a private key. The encoded transmitted signal is proved to resist known decryption attacks offering a secure and reliable communication.

  12. Similarity and scaling properties in dislocation microstructures generated during high-temperature load relaxation and creep of rock salt and San Carlos olivine single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plookphol, Thawatchai

    This work explores the physical basis for Hart's [1970] mechanical equation of state behavior in rock salt and olivine. Specifically, the experiments were designed to identify a possible microstructural basis for the scaling relation and the "hardness" parameter, sigma*, associated with each load relaxation curve, which Hart interpreted to represent constant "structure." They were also designed to examine the relationship between creep and load relaxation and the significance of steady-state, power-law creep within the context of the mechanical equation of state. Constant-stress creep, stress-change, and load-relaxation experiments were conducted on synthetic rock salt (NaCl) at 400°C and 700°C and on natural San Carlos (AZ) olivine ([Mg, Fe]2 SiO4) single crystals at 1500°C and pO2 = 10-10 atm. The two minerals behaved very differently, with rock salt exhibiting classic mechanical-equation-of-state behavior and olivine, under the conditions studied, exhibiting almost no path effects. We found that in the creep of rock salt at constant stress, the material passes through a continuum of structural states during transient creep, each state represented by a constant sigma* curve measured using load-relaxation experiments. It was surmised that each load-relaxation curve corresponds to the behavior of the material at constant (or nearly constant) average subgrain diameter, and that subgrain size distributions are similar (or nearly similar) to each other. The hardness parameter is found to follow the relation sigma* ? 50Gb/DI where G is the shear modulus, b is the Burgers vector, and DI is the mean intercept diameter. In contrast, it was found that for olivine, load-relaxation data are equivalent to steady-state creep data. In olivine, as in rock salt, the density of mobile dislocations responds rapidly to changes in stress, but, unlike rock salt, subgrain formation in olivine is very slow or nonexistent under the conditions tested, resulting in the direct correspondence between creep and load relaxation.

  13. Real-time observation of anisotropic strain relaxation by three-dimensional reciprocal space mapping during InGaAs/GaAs (001) growth

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Hidetoshi; Sasaki, Takuo; Sai, Akihisa; Ohshita, Yoshio; Kamiya, Itaru; Yamaguchi, Masafumi; Takahasi, Masamitu; Fujikawa, Seiji

    2010-07-26

    Real-time three-dimensional reciprocal space mapping (3D-RSM) measurement during In{sub 0.12}Ga{sub 0.88}As/GaAs(001) molecular beam epitaxial growth has been performed to investigate anisotropy in relaxation processes along [110] and [110] directions caused by alpha and beta misfit dislocations (MDs). Anisotropies, strain relaxation, and crystal quality in both directions were simultaneously evaluated via the position and broadness of 022 diffraction in 3D-RSM. In the small-thickness region, strain relaxation caused by alpha-MDs is higher than that caused by beta-MDs, and therefore crystal quality along [110] is worse than that along [110]. Rapid relaxation along both [110] and [110] directions occurs at almost the same thickness. After rapid relaxation, anisotropy in strain relaxation gradually decreases, whereas crystal quality along [110] direction, presumably due to beta-MDs, becomes better that along [110] direction and the ratio does not decay with thickness.

  14. Structural-scaling transitions in mesodefect ensembles as mechanisms of relaxation and failure in shocked and dynamically loaded materials (experimental and theoretical study)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naimark, O. B.

    2006-08-01

    Nonlinear aspects of relaxation and failure are related to new type of critical phenomena in ensembles of mesoscopic defects - structural-scaling transitions, generation of specific collective modes of mesodefects, which subject the relaxation and kinetics of damage-failure transition. Theoretical results were supported by original experiments and allowed us to propose the explanation: the transition from the steady-state to the branching and stochastic regimes of crack dynamics, fragmentation scenario, the steady-state structure and the four power law universality of the plastic wave front, the “failure wave” phenomenon as delayed failure effect related to the excitation and propagation of mesodefects collective mode with “blow-up” damage localization kinetics.

  15. Liquidity Spillover in International Stock Markets through Distinct Time Scales

    PubMed Central

    Righi, Marcelo Brutti; Vieira, Kelmara Mendes

    2014-01-01

    This paper identifies liquidity spillovers through different time scales based on a wavelet multiscaling method. We decompose daily data from U.S., British, Brazilian and Hong Kong stock markets indices in order to calculate the scale correlation between their illiquidities. The sample is divided in order to consider non-crisis, sub-prime crisis and Eurozone crisis. We find that there are changes in correlations of distinct scales and different periods. Association in finest scales is smaller than in coarse scales. There is a rise on associations in periods of crisis. In frequencies, there is predominance for significant distinctions involving the coarsest scale, while for crises periods there is predominance for distinctions on the finest scale. PMID:24465918

  16. Liquidity spillover in international stock markets through distinct time scales.

    PubMed

    Righi, Marcelo Brutti; Vieira, Kelmara Mendes

    2014-01-01

    This paper identifies liquidity spillovers through different time scales based on a wavelet multiscaling method. We decompose daily data from U.S., British, Brazilian and Hong Kong stock markets indices in order to calculate the scale correlation between their illiquidities. The sample is divided in order to consider non-crisis, sub-prime crisis and Eurozone crisis. We find that there are changes in correlations of distinct scales and different periods. Association in finest scales is smaller than in coarse scales. There is a rise on associations in periods of crisis. In frequencies, there is predominance for significant distinctions involving the coarsest scale, while for crises periods there is predominance for distinctions on the finest scale. PMID:24465918

  17. Estimation of divergence times in litostomatean ciliates (Ciliophora: Intramacronucleata), using Bayesian relaxed clock and 18S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    V?a?ný, Peter

    2015-08-01

    The class Litostomatea comprises a diverse assemblage of free-living and endosymbiotic ciliates. To understand diversification dynamic of litostomateans, divergence times of their main groups were estimated with the Bayesian molecular dating, a technique allowing relaxation of molecular clock and incorporation of flexible calibration points. The class Litostomatea very likely emerged during the Cryogenian around 680 Mya. The origin of the subclass Rhynchostomatia is dated to about 415 Mya, while that of the subclass Haptoria to about 654 Mya. The order Pleurostomatida, emerging about 556 Mya, was recognized as the oldest group within the subclass Haptoria. The order Spathidiida appeared in the Paleozoic about 442 Mya. The three remaining haptorian orders evolved in the Paleozoic/Mesozoic periods: Didiniida about 419 Mya, Lacrymariida about 269 Mya, and Haptorida about 194 Mya. The subclass Trichostomatia originated from a spathidiid ancestor in the Mesozoic about 260 Mya. A further goal of this study was to investigate the impact of various settings on posterior divergence time estimates. The root placement and tree topology as well as the priors of the rate-drift model, birth-death process and nucleotide substitution rate, had no significant effect on calculation of posterior divergence time estimates. However, removal of calibration points could significantly change time estimates at some nodes. PMID:26204556

  18. Diffusion Time-Scale of Porous Pressure-Sensitive Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tianshu; Teduka, Norikazu; Kameda, Masaharu; Asai, Keisuke

    2001-01-01

    Pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) is an optical pressure sensor that utilizes the oxygen quenching of luminescence. PSP measurements in unsteady aerodynamic flows require fast time response of the paint. There are two characteristic time-scales that are related to the time response of PSP. One is the luminescent lifetime representing an intrinsic physical limit for the achievable temporal resolution of PSP. Another is the time-scale of oxygen diffusion across the PSP layer. When the time-scale of oxygen diffusion is much larger than the luminescent lifetime, the time response of PSP is controlled by oxygen diffusion. In a thin homogenous polymer layer where diffusion is Fickian, the oxygen concentration 1021 can be described by the diffusion equation in one-dimension.

  19. Shear Relaxations of Confined Liquids.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, George Amos, Jr.

    Ultrathin (<40 A) films of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (OMCTS), hexadecane, and dodecane were subjected to linear and non-linear oscillatory shear between flat plates. Shearing frequencies of 0.1 to 800 s^{-1} were applied at pressures from zero to 0.8 MPa using a surface rheometer only recently developed. In most cases the plates were atomically smooth mica surfaces; the role of surface interactions was examined by replacing these with alkyl chain monolayers. OMCTS and hexadecane were examined at a temperature about 5 Celsius degrees above their melting points and tended to solidify. Newtonian plateaus having enormous viscosities were observed at low shear rates. The onset of shear thinning implied relaxation times of about 0.1 s in the linear structure of the confined liquids. Large activation volumes (~80 nm ^3) suggested that shear involved large-scale collective motion. Dodecane was studied at a much higher temperature relative to its melting point and showed no signs of impending solidification though it exhibited well-defined regions of Newtonian response and power law shear thinning. When treated with molecular sieves before use, dodecane had relaxation times which were short (0.02 s) compared to hexadecane, but still exhibited large-scale collective motion. When treated with silica gel, an unexplained long -time relaxation (10 s) was seen in the Newtonian viscosity of dodecane. The relaxation time of the linear structure, 0.005 s was very small, and the storage modulus was unresolvable. The small activation volume (7nm^3) indicated a much lower level of collective motion. The activation volume remained small when dodecane was confined between tightly bound, low energy, alkyl monolayers. At low strains the storage and loss moduli became very large (>10^4 Pa), probably due to interactions with flaws in the monolayers. Dramatic signs of wall slip were observed at large strains even at low pressures.

  20. Large Deviations for Two-Time-Scale Diffusions, with Delays

    SciTech Connect

    Kushner, Harold J.

    2010-12-15

    We consider the problem of large deviations for a two-time-scale reflected diffusion process, possibly with delays in the dynamical terms. The Dupuis-Ellis weak convergence approach is used. It is perhaps the most intuitive and simplest for the problems of concern. The results have applications to the problem of approximating optimal controls for two-time-scale systems via use of the averaged equation.

  1. Time Scales in Probabilistic Models of Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-print Network

    Anatoly Manita

    2013-02-28

    We consider a stochastic model of clock synchronization in a wireless network consisting of N sensors interacting with one dedicated accurate time server. For large N we find an estimate of the final time sychronization error for global and relative synchronization. Main results concern a behavior of the network on different time scales $t=t_N \\to \\infty$, $N \\to \\infty$. We discuss existence of phase transitions and find exact time scales on which an effective clock synchronization of the system takes place.

  2. Russian national time scale long-term stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alshina, A. P.; Gaigerov, B. A.; Koshelyaevsky, N. B.; Pushkin, S. B.

    1994-01-01

    The Institute of Metrology for Time and Space NPO 'VNIIFTRI' generates the National Time Scale (NTS) of Russia -- one of the most stable time scales in the world. Its striking feature is that it is based on a free ensemble of H-masers only. During last two years the estimations of NTS longterm stability based only on H-maser intercomparison data gives a flicker floor of about (2 to 3) x 10(exp -15) for averaging times from 1 day to 1 month. Perhaps the most significant feature for a time laboratory is an extremely low possible frequency drift -- it is too difficult to estimate it reliably. The other estimations, free from possible inside the ensemble correlation phenomena, are available based on the time comparison of NTS relative to the stable enough time scale of outer laboratories. The data on NTS comparison relative to the time scale of secondary time and frequency standards at Golitzino and Irkutsk in Russia and relative to NIST, PTB and USNO using GLONASS and GPS time transfer links gives stability estimations which are close to that based on H-maser intercomparisons.

  3. Time and scale Hurst exponent analysis for financial markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matos, José A. O.; Gama, Sílvio M. A.; Ruskin, Heather J.; Sharkasi, Adel Al; Crane, Martin

    2008-06-01

    We use a new method of studying the Hurst exponent with time and scale dependency. This new approach allows us to recover the major events affecting worldwide markets (such as the September 11th terrorist attack) and analyze the way those effects propagate through the different scales. The time-scale dependence of the referred measures demonstrates the relevance of entropy measures in distinguishing the several characteristics of market indices: “effects” include early awareness, patterns of evolution as well as comparative behaviour distinctions in emergent/established markets.

  4. Over-relaxation applied to the MacCormack finite-difference scheme. [to reduce computing time in flow equation solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desideri, J.-A.; Tannehill, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    An over-relaxation procedure is applied to the MacCormack finite-difference scheme in order to reduce the computation time required to obtain a steady-state solution. The implementation of this acceleration procedure to an existing computer program using the regular MacCormack method is extremely simple and does not require additional storage. The over-relaxation procedure does not alter the steady-state solution, which is second-order accurate. The method is first applied to Burgers' equation. A stability condition and an expression for the increase in the rate of convergence are derived. The method is then applied to the calculation of the hypersonic viscous flow over a flat plate, using the complete Navier-Stokes equations, and the inviscid flow over a wedge. Reductions in computing time by factors of 3 and 1.5, respectively, are obtained by over-relaxation.

  5. Calculation of the electron spin relaxation times in InSb and InAs by the projection-reduction method

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Nam Lyong

    2014-12-07

    The electron spin relaxation times in a system of electrons interacting with piezoelectric phonons mediated through spin-orbit interactions were calculated using the formula derived from the projection-reduction method. The results showed that the temperature and magnetic field dependence of the relaxation times in InSb and InAs were similar. The piezoelectric material constants obtained by a comparison with the reported experimental result were P{sub pe}=4.0×10{sup 22}?eV/m for InSb and P{sub pe}=1.2×10{sup 23}?eV/m for InAs. The result also showed that the relaxation of the electron spin by the Elliot-Yafet process is more relevant for InSb than InAs at a low density.

  6. Investigation of the Working Principle in an Optically Coupled Hot-Carrier Solar Cell Using the Relaxation-Time Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Patterson, R.; Feng, Y.; Shrestha, S.; Huang, S.; Conibeer, G.

    2015-04-01

    Strong optical coupling is a carrier extraction method for hot-carrier solar cells, where carriers are extracted as photons from an absorber material and then reabsorbed by a conventional photovoltaic (PV) cell. The design and working principle of this kind of optically coupled device is investigated using a relaxation-time model with practical operating conditions. This investigation is performed in the so-called "down-conversion" configuration, where the band gap of the absorber material is the same as that in the final photovoltaic cell. In this configuration, carrier impact ionization rates that are faster than thermalization rates by at least 50 times are needed to effectively down-convert the hot carriers' energy to the electronic band edge. Photon emission through radiative recombination must be enhanced by more than 500 times through photonic engineering in order to reduce Auger loss during carrier extraction. The strong luminescence from the PV cell feeding back to the absorber material will further limit the optical extraction in the near-field coupled structure, reducing the overall conversion efficiency to be lower than the ideal expectation reported previously. The strong similarity between the hot-carrier down-conversion and carrier multiplication also suggests the possible application of such optical extraction for multiple-exciton-generation solar cells, making it potentially a general carrier extraction approach for third-generation solar cells.

  7. Relaxation properties in classical diamagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carati, A.; Benfenati, F.; Galgani, L.

    2011-06-01

    It is an old result of Bohr that, according to classical statistical mechanics, at equilibrium a system of electrons in a static magnetic field presents no magnetization. Thus a magnetization can occur only in an out of equilibrium state, such as that produced through the Foucault currents when a magnetic field is switched on. It was suggested by Bohr that, after the establishment of such a nonequilibrium state, the system of electrons would quickly relax back to equilibrium. In the present paper, we study numerically the relaxation to equilibrium in a modified Bohr model, which is mathematically equivalent to a billiard with obstacles, immersed in a magnetic field that is adiabatically switched on. We show that it is not guaranteed that equilibrium is attained within the typical time scales of microscopic dynamics. Depending on the values of the parameters, one has a relaxation either to equilibrium or to a diamagnetic (presumably metastable) state. The analogy with the relaxation properties in the Fermi Pasta Ulam problem is also pointed out.

  8. Multiple-time scales analysis of physiological time series under neural control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, C. K.; Hausdorff, J. M.; Havlin, S.; Mietus, J. E.; Stanley, H. E.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1998-01-01

    We discuss multiple-time scale properties of neurophysiological control mechanisms, using heart rate and gait regulation as model systems. We find that scaling exponents can be used as prognostic indicators. Furthermore, detection of more subtle degradation of scaling properties may provide a novel early warning system in subjects with a variety of pathologies including those at high risk of sudden death.

  9. Dielectric Relaxation of HCl and NaCl Solutions Investigated by Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Wenchao; Yang, Kejian; Thoma, Arne; Dekorsy, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    We have used Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) to investigate the complex dielectric function of water solutions containing different ions. Using HCl and NaCl solutions with different concentrations we study the changes of the dielectric response introduced by the ions. We find a linear increase of the real and imaginary part of the dielectric function compared with pure water with increasing ion concentrations. We use an expanded model for fitting the dielectric function based on a combination of a Debye relation and damped harmonic oscillators for the anions and cations. A good agreement between the model and the experimental results is obtained.

  10. In vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of liver metabolites in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in rats: T2 relaxation times in methylene protons.

    PubMed

    Song, Kyu-Ho; Baek, Hyeon-Man; Lee, Do-Wan; Choe, Bo-Young

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the transverse relaxation time of methylene resonance as compared to other lipid resonances. The examinations were performed using a 3.0 T scanner with a point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) sequence. Lipid relaxation time in a lipid phantom filled with canola oil was estimated with a repetition time (TR) of 6000ms and echo time (TE) of 40-550ms. For in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS), eight male Sprague-Dawley rats were given free access to a normal-chow (NC) and another eight male Sprague-Dawley rats were given free access to a high-fat (HF) diet. Both groups drank water ad libitum. T2 measurements in the rats' livers were conducted at a fixed TR of 6000ms and TE of 40-220ms. Exponential curve fitting quality was calculated through the coefficients of determination (R(2)). Chemical analyses of the phantom and livers were not performed, but T2 decay curves were acquired. The T2 relaxation time of methylene resonance was estimated as follows: NC rats, 37.1±4.3ms; HF rats, 31.4±1.8ms (p<0.05). The extrapolated M0 values were higher in HF rats than in NC rats (p<0.005). This study of (1)H MRS led to sufficient spectral resolution and signal-to-noise ratio differences to characterize the T2 relaxation times of methylene resonance. (1)H MRS relaxation times may be useful for quantitative characterization of various liver diseases, including fatty liver disease. PMID:26200917

  11. Photoacoustic Spectroscopy to determine in vitro the non radiative relaxation time of protoporphyrin IX solution containing gold metallic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez Pérez, J. L.; Cruz-Orea, A.; Ramón-Gallegos, E.; Gutierrez Fuentes, R.; Sanchez Ramirez, J. F.

    2008-01-01

    In order to compare the non radiative relaxation time (NRRT) between standard protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) and protoporphyrin PpIX(1) solution containing gold metallic nanoparticles, we measured the photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) signal phase to determine, for each solution, the NRRT by using the Rosencwaig-Gesho theory, modified to include the effect of a finite non radiative deexcitation time. A NRRT average value, obtained for each solution, is reported and compared with some NRRT of triplet states reported in the literature for molecules with the same tetrapyrrolic structure. In the study was used PpIX disodium salt (DS) solution of 25% HCL. From each solution it was obtained its optical absorption spectrum, by using a UV-Vis spectrophotometer. After this, in the maximum observed optical absorption peak (404 nm), it was obtained the Photoacoustic (PA) signal phase as a function of the light modulation frequency, from 17 to 80 Hz. Our investigations are devoted to the improvement of the thermal treatments of drugs for medical applications.

  12. Time-resolved photoelectron imaging of excited state relaxation dynamics in phenol, catechol, resorcinol, and hydroquinone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livingstone, Ruth A.; Thompson, James O. F.; Iljina, Marija; Donaldson, Ross J.; Sussman, Benjamin J.; Paterson, Martin J.; Townsend, Dave

    2012-11-01

    Time-resolved photoelectron imaging was used to investigate the dynamical evolution of the initially prepared S1 (??*) excited state of phenol (hydroxybenzene), catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene), resorcinol (1,3-dihydroxybenzene), and hydroquinone (1,4-dihydroxybenzene) following excitation at 267 nm. Our analysis was supported by ab initio calculations at the coupled-cluster and CASSCF levels of theory. In all cases, we observe rapid (<1 ps) intramolecular vibrational redistribution on the S1 potential surface. In catechol, the overall S1 state lifetime was observed to be 12.1 ps, which is 1-2 orders of magnitude shorter than in the other three molecules studied. This may be attributed to differences in the H atom tunnelling rate under the barrier formed by a conical intersection between the S1 state and the close lying S2 (??*) state, which is dissociative along the O-H stretching coordinate. Further evidence of this S1/S2 interaction is also seen in the time-dependent anisotropy of the photoelectron angular distributions we have observed. Our data analysis was assisted by a matrix inversion method for processing photoelectron images that is significantly faster than most other previously reported approaches and is extremely quick and easy to implement.

  13. Time-dependent entropy evolution in microscopic and macroscopic electromagnetic relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Baker-Jarvis, James

    2005-12-15

    This paper is a study of entropy and its evolution in the time and frequency domains upon application of electromagnetic fields to materials. An understanding of entropy and its evolution in electromagnetic interactions bridges the boundaries between electromagnetism and thermodynamics. The approach used here is a Liouville-based statistical-mechanical theory. I show that the microscopic entropy is reversible and the macroscopic entropy satisfies an H theorem. The spectral entropy development can be very useful for studying the frequency response of materials. Using a projection-operator based nonequilibrium entropy, different equations are derived for the entropy and entropy production and are applied to the polarization, magnetization, and macroscopic fields. I begin by proving an exact H theorem for the entropy, progress to application of time-dependent entropy in electromagnetics, and then apply the theory to relevant applications in electromagnetics. The paper concludes with a discussion of the relationship of the frequency-domain form of the entropy to the permittivity, permeability, and impedance.

  14. Scaling properties in time-varying networks with memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyewon; Ha, Meesoon; Jeong, Hawoong

    2015-12-01

    The formation of network structure is mainly influenced by an individual node's activity and its memory, where activity can usually be interpreted as the individual inherent property and memory can be represented by the interaction strength between nodes. In our study, we define the activity through the appearance pattern in the time-aggregated network representation, and quantify the memory through the contact pattern of empirical temporal networks. To address the role of activity and memory in epidemics on time-varying networks, we propose temporal-pattern coarsening of activity-driven growing networks with memory. In particular, we focus on the relation between time-scale coarsening and spreading dynamics in the context of dynamic scaling and finite-size scaling. Finally, we discuss the universality issue of spreading dynamics on time-varying networks for various memory-causality tests.

  15. Slow relaxation in granular compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Naim, E.; Knight, J. B.; Nowak, E. R.; Jaeger, H. M.; Nagel, S. R.

    1998-11-01

    Experimental studies show that the density of a vibrated granular material evolves from a low density initial state into a higher density final steady state. The relaxation towards the final density follows an inverse logarithmic law. As the system approaches its final state, a growing number of beads have to be rearranged to enable a local density increase. A free volume argument shows that this number grows as N = {?}/{(1-?)}. The time scale associated with such events increases exponentially ? e N, and as a result a logarithmically slow approach to the final state is found ? ? - ?(t) ? {1}/{lnt }. Furthermore, a one-dimensional toy model that captures this relaxation dynamics as well as the observed density fluctuations is discussed.

  16. Protein Conformational Relaxation and Ligand Migration in Myoglobin: A Nanosecond to Millisecond Molecular Movie from Time-Resolved Laue X-ray

    E-print Network

    Moffat, Keith

    Molecular Movie from Time-Resolved Laue X-ray Diffraction Vukica Srajer,*,,§ Zhong Ren,,§,4 Tsu-Yi Teng://pubs.acs.org/biochemistry. ABSTRACT: A time-resolved Laue X-ray diffraction technique has been used to explore protein relaxation are probed by 150 ps or 1 µs X-ray pulses at 14 laser/X-ray delay times, ranging from 1 ns to 1.9 ms. Very

  17. Thermodynamics Constrains Allometric Scaling of Optimal Development Time in Insects

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Michael E.; Frazier, Melanie R.

    2013-01-01

    Development time is a critical life-history trait that has profound effects on organism fitness and on population growth rates. For ectotherms, development time is strongly influenced by temperature and is predicted to scale with body mass to the quarter power based on 1) the ontogenetic growth model of the metabolic theory of ecology which describes a bioenergetic balance between tissue maintenance and growth given the scaling relationship between metabolism and body size, and 2) numerous studies, primarily of vertebrate endotherms, that largely support this prediction. However, few studies have investigated the allometry of development time among invertebrates, including insects. Abundant data on development of diverse insects provides an ideal opportunity to better understand the scaling of development time in this ecologically and economically important group. Insects develop more quickly at warmer temperatures until reaching a minimum development time at some optimal temperature, after which development slows. We evaluated the allometry of insect development time by compiling estimates of minimum development time and optimal developmental temperature for 361 insect species from 16 orders with body mass varying over nearly 6 orders of magnitude. Allometric scaling exponents varied with the statistical approach: standardized major axis regression supported the predicted quarter-power scaling relationship, but ordinary and phylogenetic generalized least squares did not. Regardless of the statistical approach, body size alone explained less than 28% of the variation in development time. Models that also included optimal temperature explained over 50% of the variation in development time. Warm-adapted insects developed more quickly, regardless of body size, supporting the “hotter is better” hypothesis that posits that ectotherms have a limited ability to evolutionarily compensate for the depressing effects of low temperatures on rates of biological processes. The remaining unexplained variation in development time likely reflects additional ecological and evolutionary differences among insect species. PMID:24391935

  18. MRI T2 RELAXATION TIME EVALUATION OF WRIST CARTILAGE WITH SCAPHOLUNATE LIGAMENT INJURY IN THE PRE-OPERATIVE AND POST-OPERATIVE STATE

    E-print Network

    Sturgeon, Dannica Leigh

    2011-04-27

    to be made between T2 relaxation times and articular cartilage, and the best method in which to achieve it. 26 1.4 REFERENCES 1. Atkinson LS, Baxley EG. Scapholunate dissociation. Am Fam Physician. 1994; 49:1845-1850. 2. Netter FH. Atlas of Human...

  19. Real Time Relaxation Dynamics of Macroscopically Photo-Excited Electrons toward the Fermi Degeneracy Formation in the Conduction Band of Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Hiromasa; Tomita, Norikazu; Nasu, Keiichiro

    2015-04-01

    Concerning with the recent experiment of time-resolved two-photon photo-emission spectral measurements on semiconductors (GaAs, InP), we theoretically study real time relaxation dynamics of macroscopically photo-excited electrons, toward the Fermi degeneracy formation in an originally vacant conduction band of these semiconductors. Very soon after the photo-excitation, the whole electrons are shown to exhibit a quite rapid relaxation, like an avalanching phenomenon, mainly due to successive multi-(optical and acoustic) phonon emission from them. Repeating this multi-phonon process, the whole energy distribution of the electrons is shown to become a multi-peaked structure largely elongated over the lower part of the wide conduction band. However, after around 1 ps from the excitation, this relaxation critically slows down, since the emission of a long-wave acoustic phonon from electrons around the Fermi level becomes prohibitively difficult. By using the electron temperature approximation, we show that this slow relaxation is inversely proportional to time. Thus, the formation of the complete Fermi degeneracy takes an infinite time. These theoretical results are quite consistent to the aforementioned recent experiment.

  20. Volume 160, number 1,2 FEBS 0729 August 1983 The relaxation time for a cruciform str~~ture

    E-print Network

    Vologodskii, Alexander

    is the energy increase due to the disruption of the basepair (T, is the DNA melting temperature to the equilibrium transition point between the cruciform structure and the regular double helix. This maximal va. The relaxation time 7 is: (2) We will calculate the back rate constant kz and the equilibrium constant K

  1. New Techniques for Cartilage Magnetic Resonance Imaging Relaxation Time Analysis: Texture Analysis of Flattened Cartilage and Localized Intra- and Inter-subject Comparisons

    PubMed Central

    Carballido-Gamio, Julio; Link, Thomas M.; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2010-01-01

    MR relaxation time measurements of knee cartilage have shown potential to characterize knee osteoarthritis (OA). In this work, techniques that allow localized intra- and inter-subject comparisons of cartilage relaxation times, as well as cartilage flattening for texture analysis parallel and perpendicular to the natural cartilage layers, are presented. The localized comparisons are based on the registration of bone structures and the assignment of relaxation time feature vectors to each point in the bone– cartilage interface. Cartilage flattening was accomplished with Bezier splines and warping, and texture analysis was performed with second-order texture measures using gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM). In a cohort of five normal subjects the performance and reproducibility of the techniques were evaluated using T1? maps of femoral knee cartilage. The feasibility of creating a mean cartilage relaxation time map is also presented. Successful localized intra- and inter-subject T1? comparisons were obtained with reproducibility similar to that reported in the literature for regional T2. Improvement of the reproducibility of GLCM features was obtained by flattening the T1? maps. The results indicate that the presented techniques have potential in longitudinal and population studies of knee OA at different stages of the disease. PMID:18506807

  2. RELAXATION PROCESSES IN SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Servidio, S.; Carbone, V.; Gurgiolo, C.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2014-07-10

    Based on global conservation principles, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) relaxation theory predicts the existence of several equilibria, such as the Taylor state or global dynamic alignment. These states are generally viewed as very long-time and large-scale equilibria, which emerge only after the termination of the turbulent cascade. As suggested by hydrodynamics and by recent MHD numerical simulations, relaxation processes can occur during the turbulent cascade that will manifest themselves as local patches of equilibrium-like configurations. Using multi-spacecraft analysis techniques in conjunction with Cluster data, we compute the current density and flow vorticity and for the first time demonstrate that these localized relaxation events are observed in the solar wind. Such events have important consequences for the statistics of plasma turbulence.

  3. Common scaling patterns in intertrade times of U. S. stocks.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Yuen, Ainslie; Podobnik, Boris; Lee, Youngki

    2004-05-01

    We analyze the sequence of time intervals between consecutive stock trades of thirty companies representing eight sectors of the U.S. economy over a period of 4 yrs. For all companies we find that: (i) the probability density function of intertrade times may be fit by a Weibull distribution, (ii) when appropriately rescaled the probability densities of all companies collapse onto a single curve implying a universal functional form, (iii) the intertrade times exhibit power-law correlated behavior within a trading day and a consistently greater degree of correlation over larger time scales, in agreement with the correlation behavior of the absolute price returns for the corresponding company, and (iv) the magnitude series of intertrade time increments is characterized by long-range power-law correlations suggesting the presence of nonlinear features in the trading dynamics, while the sign series is anticorrelated at small scales. Our results suggest that independent of industry sector, market capitalization and average level of trading activity, the series of intertrade times exhibit possibly universal scaling patterns, which may relate to a common mechanism underlying the trading dynamics of diverse companies. Further, our observation of long-range power-law correlations and a parallel with the crossover in the scaling of absolute price returns for each individual stock, support the hypothesis that the dynamics of transaction times may play a role in the process of price formation. PMID:15244883

  4. Stress Relaxation in Aging Soft Colloidal Glasses

    E-print Network

    Ranjini Bandyopadhyay; P. Harsha Mohan; Yogesh M. Joshi

    2010-03-25

    We investigate the stress relaxation behavior on the application of step strains to aging aqueous suspensions of the synthetic clay Laponite. The stress exhibits a two-step decay, from which the slow relaxation modes are extracted as functions of the sample ages and applied step strain deformations. Interestingly, the slow time scales that we estimate show a dramatic enhancement with increasing strain amplitudes. We argue that the system ends up exploring the deeper sections of its energy landscape following the application of the step strain.

  5. Deviations from uniform power law scaling in nonstationary time series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viswanathan, G. M.; Peng, C. K.; Stanley, H. E.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1997-01-01

    A classic problem in physics is the analysis of highly nonstationary time series that typically exhibit long-range correlations. Here we test the hypothesis that the scaling properties of the dynamics of healthy physiological systems are more stable than those of pathological systems by studying beat-to-beat fluctuations in the human heart rate. We develop techniques based on the Fano factor and Allan factor functions, as well as on detrended fluctuation analysis, for quantifying deviations from uniform power-law scaling in nonstationary time series. By analyzing extremely long data sets of up to N = 10(5) beats for 11 healthy subjects, we find that the fluctuations in the heart rate scale approximately uniformly over several temporal orders of magnitude. By contrast, we find that in data sets of comparable length for 14 subjects with heart disease, the fluctuations grow erratically, indicating a loss of scaling stability.

  6. Energy relaxation and separation of a hot electron-hole pair in organic aggregates from a time-dependent wavepacket diffusion method

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Lu; Liang, WanZhen; Zhao, Yi; Zhong, Xinxin

    2014-06-07

    The time-dependent wavepacket diffusive method [X. Zhong and Y. Zhao, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 014111 (2013)] is extended to investigate the energy relaxation and separation of a hot electron-hole pair in organic aggregates with incorporation of Coulomb interaction and electron-phonon coupling. The pair initial condition generated by laser pulse is represented by a Gaussian wavepacket with a central momentum. The results reveal that the hot electron energy relaxation is very well described by two rate processes with the fast rate much larger than the slow one, consistent with experimental observations, and an efficient electron-hole separation is accomplished accompanying the fast energy relaxation. Furthermore, although the extra energy indeed helps the separation by overcoming the Coulomb interaction, the width of initial wavepacket is much sensitive to the separation efficiency and the narrower wavepacket generates the more separated charges. This behavior may be useful to understand the experimental controversy of the hot carrier effect on charge separation.

  7. Correlated and uncorrelated heart rate fluctuations during relaxing visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papasimakis, N.; Pallikari, F.

    2010-05-01

    The heart rate variability (HRV) of healthy subjects practicing relaxing visualization is studied by use of three multiscale analysis techniques: the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), the entropy in natural time (ENT) and the average wavelet (AWC) coefficient. The scaling exponent of normal interbeat interval increments exhibits characteristics of the presence of long-range correlations. During relaxing visualization the HRV dynamics change in the sense that two new features emerge independent of each other: a respiration-induced periodicity that often dominates the HRV at short scales (<40 interbeat intervals) and the decrease of the scaling exponent at longer scales (40-512 interbeat intervals). In certain cases, the scaling exponent during relaxing visualization indicates the breakdown of long-range correlations. These characteristics have been previously seen in the HRV dynamics during non-REM sleep.

  8. Inferring Synaptic Structure in Presence of Neural Interaction Time Scales

    PubMed Central

    Capone, Cristiano; Filosa, Carla; Gigante, Guido; Ricci-Tersenghi, Federico; Del Giudice, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Biological networks display a variety of activity patterns reflecting a web of interactions that is complex both in space and time. Yet inference methods have mainly focused on reconstructing, from the network’s activity, the spatial structure, by assuming equilibrium conditions or, more recently, a probabilistic dynamics with a single arbitrary time-step. Here we show that, under this latter assumption, the inference procedure fails to reconstruct the synaptic matrix of a network of integrate-and-fire neurons when the chosen time scale of interaction does not closely match the synaptic delay or when no single time scale for the interaction can be identified; such failure, moreover, exposes a distinctive bias of the inference method that can lead to infer as inhibitory the excitatory synapses with interaction time scales longer than the model’s time-step. We therefore introduce a new two-step method, that first infers through cross-correlation profiles the delay-structure of the network and then reconstructs the synaptic matrix, and successfully test it on networks with different topologies and in different activity regimes. Although step one is able to accurately recover the delay-structure of the network, thus getting rid of any a priori guess about the time scales of the interaction, the inference method introduces nonetheless an arbitrary time scale, the time-bin dt used to binarize the spike trains. We therefore analytically and numerically study how the choice of dt affects the inference in our network model, finding that the relationship between the inferred couplings and the real synaptic efficacies, albeit being quadratic in both cases, depends critically on dt for the excitatory synapses only, whilst being basically independent of it for the inhibitory ones. PMID:25807389

  9. Inferring synaptic structure in presence of neural interaction time scales.

    PubMed

    Capone, Cristiano; Filosa, Carla; Gigante, Guido; Ricci-Tersenghi, Federico; Del Giudice, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Biological networks display a variety of activity patterns reflecting a web of interactions that is complex both in space and time. Yet inference methods have mainly focused on reconstructing, from the network's activity, the spatial structure, by assuming equilibrium conditions or, more recently, a probabilistic dynamics with a single arbitrary time-step. Here we show that, under this latter assumption, the inference procedure fails to reconstruct the synaptic matrix of a network of integrate-and-fire neurons when the chosen time scale of interaction does not closely match the synaptic delay or when no single time scale for the interaction can be identified; such failure, moreover, exposes a distinctive bias of the inference method that can lead to infer as inhibitory the excitatory synapses with interaction time scales longer than the model's time-step. We therefore introduce a new two-step method, that first infers through cross-correlation profiles the delay-structure of the network and then reconstructs the synaptic matrix, and successfully test it on networks with different topologies and in different activity regimes. Although step one is able to accurately recover the delay-structure of the network, thus getting rid of any a priori guess about the time scales of the interaction, the inference method introduces nonetheless an arbitrary time scale, the time-bin dt used to binarize the spike trains. We therefore analytically and numerically study how the choice of dt affects the inference in our network model, finding that the relationship between the inferred couplings and the real synaptic efficacies, albeit being quadratic in both cases, depends critically on dt for the excitatory synapses only, whilst being basically independent of it for the inhibitory ones. PMID:25807389

  10. Simulations of Bingham plastic flows with the multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, SongGui; Sun, QiCheng; Jin, Feng; Liu, JianGuo

    2014-03-01

    Fresh cement mortar is a type of workable paste, which can be well approximated as a Bingham plastic and whose flow behavior is of major concern in engineering. In this paper, Papanastasiou's model for Bingham fluids is solved by using the multiplerelaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model (MRT-LB). Analysis of the stress growth exponent m in Bingham fluid flow simulations shows that Papanastasiou's model provides a good approximation of realistic Bingham plastics for values of m > 108. For lower values of m, Papanastasiou's model is valid for fluids between Bingham and Newtonian fluids. The MRT-LB model is validated by two benchmark problems: 2D steady Poiseuille flows and lid-driven cavity flows. Comparing the numerical results of the velocity distributions with corresponding analytical solutions shows that the MRT-LB model is appropriate for studying Bingham fluids while also providing better numerical stability. We further apply the MRT-LB model to simulate flow through a sudden expansion channel and the flow surrounding a round particle. Besides the rich flow structures obtained in this work, the dynamics fluid force on the round particle is calculated. Results show that both the Reynolds number Re and the Bingham number Bn affect the drag coefficients C D , and a drag coefficient with Re and Bn being taken into account is proposed. The relationship of Bn and the ratio of unyielded zone thickness to particle diameter is also analyzed. Finally, the Bingham fluid flowing around a set of randomly dispersed particles is simulated to obtain the apparent viscosity and velocity fields. These results help simulation of fresh concrete flowing in porous media.

  11. Time Scales for Energy Release in Hall Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huba, J. D.; Rudakov, L. I.

    2004-05-01

    We present a study of the time scales for energy release in 2D Hall magnetic reconnection. We use the NRL Hall MHD code VooDoo for this study. We consider a 2D reversed field current layer with a magnetic perturbation that initiates the reconnection process. We use boundary conditions that allow inflow and outflow (i.e., not periodic) and let the system reach a steady state. We find that the system goes through three stages: a relatively long current layer thinning process, a fast reconnection phase, and a final steady state phase. We define the time scale for energy release as the fast reconnection period: from onset to steady state. Preliminary results indicate that the time for energy release scales as the initial thickness of the current layer. We apply these results to the magnetotail and magnetopause. Research supported by NASA and ONR.

  12. Improving the Geologic Time Scale (Jean Baptiste Lamarck Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradstein, Felix M.

    2010-05-01

    The Geologic Time Scale (GTS) provides the framework for the physical, chemical and biological processes on Earth. The time scale is the tool "par excellence" of the geological trade, and insight in its construction, strength, and limitations enhances its function and its utility. Earth scientists should understand how time scales are constructed and its myriad of physical and abstract data are calibrated, rather than merely using ages plucked from a convenient chart or card. Calibration to linear time of the succession of events recorded in the rocks on Earth has three components: (1) the standard stratigraphic divisions and their correlation in the global rock record, (2) the means of measuring linear time or elapsed durations from the rock record, and (3) the methods of effectively joining the two scales, the stratigraphic one and the linear one. Under the auspices of the International Commission on Stratigraphy (ICS), the international stratigraphic divisions and their correlative events are now largely standardized, especially using the GSSP (Global Stratigraphic Section and Point) concept. The means of measuring linear time or elapsed durations from the rock record are objectives in the EARTH TIME and GTS NEXT projects, that also are educating a new generation of GTS dedicated scientists. The U/Pb, Ar/Ar and orbital tuning methods are intercalibrated, and external error analysis improved. Existing Ar/Ar ages become almost 0.5% older, and U/Pb ages stratigraphically more realistic. The new Os/Re method has potential for directly dating more GSSP's and its correlative events. Such may reduce scaling uncertainty between the sedimentary levels of an age date and that of a stage boundary. Since 1981, six successive Phanerozoic GTS have been published, each new one achieving higher resolution and more users. The next GTS is scheduled for 2011/2012, with over 50 specialists taking part. New chapters include an expanded planetary time scale, sequence stratigraphy, Osmium, Carbon and Oxygen stratigraphy, the Cryogenian period, history of the plants, hominid prehistory, and last but not least the Anthropocene. The Cambrian Period is radically improved with 10 standard stages and detailed trilobite biochronology. Ordovician now has a stable international stages and graptolites scale. The integration of a refined 100 and 400 ka sedimentary cycles scale and a truly high-resolution U/Pb ages scale for the Mississippian is a major step towards the global Carboniferous GTS. The Devonian GTS leaves to be desired with lack of firm definitions for its upper boundary, and the long Emsian stage; it also lacks age dates. Its stages scaling is disputed. The Rhaetian and Norian stages in the Triassic and the Berriasian stage in the Cretaceous urgently require lower boundary definitions, and also boundary age dates. The single ~400 ka eccentricity component is very stable and can extend orbital tuning from the Cenozoic well into the Mesozoic portion of the GTS. Jurassic and Cretaceous now have long orbitally tuned segments. A completely astronomical-tuned Geological Time Scale (AGTS) for the Cenozoic is within reach showing unprecedented accuracy, precision and resolution. Burdigalian in the Miocene, and Lutetian, Bartonian and Priabonian stages in the Eocene still require formal definition. The K/T boundary will become about 0.5 ± 0.1 Ma older. After 25 years of research and authorship in the GTS it behoves me to especially thank my colleagues James Ogg, Frits Agterberg, John McArthur and Roger Cooper for longstanding collaboration. As a final note I urge construction of more regional time scales(like developed ‘down under') calibrated to the standard global GTS, to scale regional rock units.

  13. Evaluation of Scaling Invariance Embedded in Short Time Series

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xue; Hou, Lei; Stephen, Mutua; Yang, Huijie; Zhu, Chenping

    2014-01-01

    Scaling invariance of time series has been making great contributions in diverse research fields. But how to evaluate scaling exponent from a real-world series is still an open problem. Finite length of time series may induce unacceptable fluctuation and bias to statistical quantities and consequent invalidation of currently used standard methods. In this paper a new concept called correlation-dependent balanced estimation of diffusion entropy is developed to evaluate scale-invariance in very short time series with length . Calculations with specified Hurst exponent values of show that by using the standard central moving average de-trending procedure this method can evaluate the scaling exponents for short time series with ignorable bias () and sharp confidential interval (standard deviation ). Considering the stride series from ten volunteers along an approximate oval path of a specified length, we observe that though the averages and deviations of scaling exponents are close, their evolutionary behaviors display rich patterns. It has potential use in analyzing physiological signals, detecting early warning signals, and so on. As an emphasis, the our core contribution is that by means of the proposed method one can estimate precisely shannon entropy from limited records. PMID:25549356

  14. Time scales for molecule formation by ion-molecule reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, W. D.; Glassgold, A. E.

    1976-01-01

    Analytical solutions are obtained for nonlinear differential equations governing the time-dependence of molecular abundances in interstellar clouds. Three gas-phase reaction schemes are considered separately for the regions where each dominates. The particular case of CO, and closely related members of the Oh and CH families of molecules, is studied for given values of temperature, density, and the radiation field. Nonlinear effects and couplings with particular ions are found to be important. The time scales for CO formation range from 100,000 to a few million years, depending on the chemistry and regime. The time required for essentially complete conversion of C(+) to CO in the region where the H3(+) chemistry dominates is several million years. Because this time is longer than or comparable to dynamical time scales for dense interstellar clouds, steady-state abundances may not be observed in such clouds.

  15. Memory on multiple time-scales in an Abelian sandpile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Andrey; Melatos, Andrew; Kieu, Tien; Webster, Rachel

    2015-06-01

    We report results of a numerical analysis of the memory effects in two-dimensional Abelian sandpiles. It is found that a sandpile forgets its instantaneous configuration in two distinct stages: a fast stage and a slow stage, whose durations roughly scale as N and N2 respectively, where N is the linear size of the sandpile. We confirm the presence of the longer time-scale by an independent diagnostic based on analysing emission probabilities of a hidden Markov model applied to a time-averaged sequence of avalanche sizes. The application of hidden Markov modelling to the output of sandpiles is novel. It discriminates effectively between a sandpile time series and a shuffled control time series with the same time-averaged event statistics and hence deserves further development as a pattern-recognition tool for Abelian sandpiles.

  16. Shear Viscosity of a strongly interacting system: Green-Kubo vs. Chapman-Enskog and Relaxation Time Approximation

    E-print Network

    S. Plumari; A. Puglisi; F. Scardina; V. Greco

    2015-08-31

    The shear viscosity $\\eta$ has been calculated by using the Green-Kubo relation in the framework of a partonic transport approach solved at cascade level. We compare the numerical results for $\\eta$ obtained from the Green-Kubo correlator with the analytical formulas in both the Relaxation Time Approximation (RTA) and the Chapman-Enskog approximation (CE). We investigate and emphasize the differences between the isotropic and anisotropic cross sections and between the massless and massive particles. We show that in the range of temperature explored in a Heavy Ion collision and for pQCD-like cross section the RTA significantly underestimates the viscosity by about a factor of 2-3, while a good agreement is found between the CE approximation and Gree-Kubo relation already at first order of approximation. The agreement with the CE approximation supplies an analytical formula that allows to develop kinetic transport theory at fixed shear viscosity to entropy density ratio, $\\eta/s$. This open the possibility to explore dissipative non-equilibrium evolution of the distribution functions vs T-dependent $\\eta/s$ and particle momenta in the dynamics of the Quark-Gluon Plasma created in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions.

  17. Monitoring the non-radiative relaxation time of PpIX solution with Au nanoparticles using Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Pérez, J. L.; Cruz-Orea, A.; Alvarado, E. Maldonado; Ramirez, J. F. Sanchez; Ramón-Gallegos, E.; Mendoza-Alvarez, J. G.

    2008-11-01

    In this work we have used the Photoacoustic Spectroscopy (PAS) to determine in vitro the non-radiative relaxation time (NRRT) of a protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) standard solution and samples of PpIX(1), PpIX(2) and PpIX(3) with Au nanoparticle concentrations of 0.001008, 0.00504 and 0.01008 mmol in 25 mL of water respectively. We have used PpIX disodium salt (DS) solution of 25% HCl. The results show that the NRRT average values, obtained for each one of the solution were: ? = 29 ± 0.001, 84 ± 0.001 and 62 ± 0.009 ms for PpIX(1), PpIX(2) and PpIX(3), respectively. These values were compared with some NRRT of triplet states reported in the literature for molecules with tetrapyrrolic structure, increasing the NRRT considerably. From each solution it was obtained its PAS signal phase as a function of the light modulation frequency from 17 to 80 Hz. UV-vis spectrophotometer, photoluminescence spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) were used in order to obtain the optical absorption spectra, the photoluminescence intensities, and the gold nanoparticle sizes respectively. Our investigations are devoted to improve the thermal treatments of drugs the porphyrins as photosensitizers used in image photodynamic therapy.

  18. Nuclear spin relaxation times in hydrogen-helium and methane-helium slush at 4 MHz using pulsed NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamida, J. A.

    2005-03-01

    We compare the nuclear spin-lattice and nuclear spin-spin relaxation times observed for small grains of hydrogen suspended in liquid helium (hydrogen-helium ``slush'') with that of methane-helium ``slush.'' The transport properties of these ``slush'' materials are critical to NASA's goal of realizing atomic propellant designs for future spacecraft. Atoms of active propellants are stored cryogenically in a host matrix such as hydrogen (H2) or methane (CH4) to prevent recombination while liquid helium is ideal for holding the host matrix and for easy transportation. The host matrix must therefore be stable in liquid helium. We find that for hydrogen ``slush,'' NMR rate is consistent with scattering at grain boundaries due to the large electric quadrupole moment of hydrogen; on the other hand the ``slush'' rate for methane is consistent with internal diffusion as opposed to surface scattering. We conclude that for atomic propellants, methane is a better host than hydrogen because grains of methane are better isolated from the helium bath.

  19. Long-time relaxation of photo-induced influence on BiFeO3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jun-xing; Jin, Kui-juan; Wang, Le; He, Xu; Guo, Hai-zhong; Wang, Can; He, Meng; Yang, Guo-zhen

    2015-11-01

    An intuitively persistent enhancement of the local surface potential of BiFeO3 layers in both heterostructures of BiFeO3/SrRuO3/SrTiO3 and BiFeO3/Sr0.09Nb0.01TiO3 was observed by the Kelvin probe force microscopy technique after the illumination of 375 nm laser. This photo-induced enhanced surface potential can maintain as long as 15 h after the illumination. We attributed this super-long-time relaxation of photo-induced influence to a photo-induced depolarization in the BiFeO3 thin films, and our first-principles calculation of double-potential well further provides an instinct understanding on this depolarization process. Our findings provide a peculiar understanding into the photo-induced phenomena on the widely researched ferroelectric systems and offer an approach to tune their multifunctionality of the magnetization and polarization not only by applied magnetic and electric fields but also by optical filed.

  20. Time Scales of Conformational Gating in a Lipid-Binding Protein.

    PubMed

    Kaieda, Shuji; Halle, Bertil

    2015-06-25

    Lipid-binding proteins sequester amphiphilic molecules in a large internal cavity occupied by ?30 water molecules, some of which are displaced by the ligand. The role of these internal water molecules in lipid binding and release is not understood. We use magnetic relaxation dispersion (MRD) to directly monitor internal-water dynamics in apo and palmitate-bound rat intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (rIFABP). Specifically, we record the water (2)H and (17)O MRD profiles of the apo and holo forms of rIFABP in solution or immobilized by covalent cross-links. A global analysis of this extensive data set identifies three internal-water classes with mean survival times of ?1 ns, ?100 ns, and ?6 ?s. We associate the two longer time scales with conformational fluctuations of the gap between ?-strands D and E (?6 ?s) and of the portal at the helix-capped end of the ?-barrel (?100 ns). These fluctuations limit the exchange rates of a few highly ordered structural water molecules but not the dissociation rate of the fatty acid. The remaining 90% (apo) or 70% (holo) of cavity waters exchange among internal hydration sites on a time scale of ?1 ns but exhibit substantial orientational order, particularly in the holo form. PMID:26012957

  1. Multi-time-scale heat transfer modeling of turbid tissues exposed to short-pulsed irradiations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyunghan; Guo, Zhixiong

    2007-05-01

    A combined hyperbolic radiation and conduction heat transfer model is developed to simulate multi-time-scale heat transfer in turbid tissues exposed to short-pulsed irradiations. An initial temperature response of a tissue to an ultrashort pulse irradiation is analyzed by the volume-average method in combination with the transient discrete ordinates method for modeling the ultrafast radiation heat transfer. This response is found to reach pseudo steady state within 1 ns for the considered tissues. The single pulse result is then utilized to obtain the temperature response to pulse train irradiation at the microsecond/millisecond time scales. After that, the temperature field is predicted by the hyperbolic heat conduction model which is solved by the MacCormack's scheme with error terms correction. Finally, the hyperbolic conduction is compared with the traditional parabolic heat diffusion model. It is found that the maximum local temperatures are larger in the hyperbolic prediction than the parabolic prediction. In the modeled dermis tissue, a 7% non-dimensional temperature increase is found. After about 10 thermal relaxation times, thermal waves fade away and the predictions between the hyperbolic and parabolic models are consistent. PMID:17335934

  2. Crystallization time scales for polydisperse hard-sphere fluids.

    PubMed

    Vargas, M Cristina; Pérez-Ángel, Gabriel

    2013-04-01

    We study the evolution of crystallization in dense mono- and polydisperse hard sphere fluids, initially quenched to an amorphous configuration. We use as signatures of crystallization both the decay of the reduced pressure Z and the increase in the local and global orientational order parameters Q[over ¯](6). For a given realization of the crystallization process these parameters show sudden changes, both large and small, separated by long periods of quiescence. However, averaging over a large number of realizations, a well-defined scenario for their evolution appears. We find an initial fast relaxation to a disordered state, followed by a period of slow variation, associated to the presence of nucleation events, followed by a fast change, composed of the growth of a few crystals with different orientations, and a final and slow coarsening in a domain-growth process. No clear scaling for this whole process was found. We also find that the transition to an stable glassy fluid is quite sharp as the polydispersity is increased, showing a probable first-order phase transition behavior. A well-defined boundary between crystallizing and permanently amorphous fluids should exist, at least for a region in packing fractions. We looked for segregation at large values of polydispersity, but no effects of this type were found. PMID:23679420

  3. Dynamics symmetries of Hamiltonian system on time scales

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Keke Luo, Yiping

    2014-04-15

    In this paper, the dynamics symmetries of Hamiltonian system on time scales are studied. We study the symmetries and quantities based on the calculation of variation and Lie transformation group. Particular focus lies in: the Noether symmetry leads to the Noether conserved quantity and the Lie symmetry leads to the Noether conserved quantity if the infinitesimal transformations satisfy the structure equation. As the new application of result, at end of the article, we give a simple example of Noether symmetry and Lie symmetry on time scales.

  4. Time-scale modification of complex acoustic signals in noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quatieri, Thomas F.; Dunn, Robert B.; McAulay, Robert J.; Hanna, Thomas E.

    1994-02-01

    A new approach is introduced for time-scale modification of short-duration complex acoustic signals to improve their audibility. The method preserves an approximate time-scaled temporal envelope of a signal, thus capitalizing on the perceptual importance of the signal's temporal structure, while also maintaining the character of a noise background. The basis for the approach is a subband signal representation, derived from a filter bank analysis/synthesis, the channel phases of which are controlled to shape the temporal envelope of the time-scaled signal. Channel amplitudes and filter bank inputs are selected to shape the spectrum and correlation of the time-scaled background. The phase, amplitude, and input control are derived from locations of events that occur within filter bank outputs. A frame-based generalization of the method imposes phase consistency and background noise continuity across consecutive synthesis frames. The approach and its derivatives are applied to synthetic and actual complex acoustic signals consisting of closely spaced sequential time components.

  5. Appropriate time scales for nonlinear analyses of deterministic jump systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Tomoya

    2011-06-01

    In the real world, there are many phenomena that are derived from deterministic systems but which fluctuate with nonuniform time intervals. This paper discusses the appropriate time scales that can be applied to such systems to analyze their properties. The financial markets are an example of such systems wherein price movements fluctuate with nonuniform time intervals. However, it is common to apply uniform time scales such as 1-min data and 1-h data to study price movements. This paper examines the validity of such time scales by using surrogate data tests to ascertain whether the deterministic properties of the original system can be identified from uniform sampled data. The results show that uniform time samplings are often inappropriate for nonlinear analyses. However, for other systems such as neural spikes and Internet traffic packets, which produce similar outputs, uniform time samplings are quite effective in extracting the system properties. Nevertheless, uniform samplings often generate overlapping data, which can cause false rejections of surrogate data tests.

  6. THEORETICAL REVIEW The Hippocampus, Time, and Memory Across Scales

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Marc W.; Eichenbaum, Howard

    2014-01-01

    A wealth of experimental studies with animals have offered insights about how neural networks within the hippocampus support the temporal organization of memories. These studies have revealed the existence of “time cells” that encode moments in time, much as the well-known “place cells” map locations in space. Another line of work inspired by human behavioral studies suggests that episodic memories are mediated by a state of temporal context that changes gradually over long time scales, up to at least a few thousand seconds. In this view, the “mental time travel” hypothesized to support the experience of episodic memory corresponds to a “jump back in time” in which a previous state of temporal context is recovered. We suggest that these 2 sets of findings could be different facets of a representation of temporal history that maintains a record at the last few thousand seconds of experience. The ability to represent long time scales comes at the cost of discarding precise information about when a stimulus was experienced—this uncertainty becomes greater for events further in the past. We review recent computational work that describes a mechanism that could construct such a scale-invariant representation. Taken as a whole, this suggests the hippocampus plays its role in multiple aspects of cognition by representing events embedded in a general spatiotemporal context. The representation of internal time can be useful across nonhippocampal memory systems. PMID:23915126

  7. Relation between Direct Observation of Relaxation and Self-Reported Mindfulness and Relaxation States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hites, Lacey S.; Lundervold, Duane A.

    2013-01-01

    Forty-four individuals, 18-47 (MN 21.8, SD 5.63) years of age, took part in a study examining the magnitude and direction of the relationship between self-report and direct observation measures of relaxation and mindfulness. The Behavioral Relaxation Scale (BRS), a valid direct observation measure of relaxation, was used to assess relaxed behavior…

  8. Membrane fluidity profiles as deduced by saturation-recovery EPR measurements of spin-lattice relaxation times of spin labels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainali, Laxman; Feix, Jimmy B.; Hyde, James S.; Subczynski, Witold K.

    2011-10-01

    There are no easily obtainable EPR spectral parameters for lipid spin labels that describe profiles of membrane fluidity. The order parameter, which is most often used as a measure of membrane fluidity, describes the amplitude of wobbling motion of alkyl chains relative to the membrane normal and does not contain explicitly time or velocity. Thus, this parameter can be considered as nondynamic. The spin-lattice relaxation rate ( T1-1) obtained from saturation-recovery EPR measurements of lipid spin labels in deoxygenated samples depends primarily on the rotational correlation time of the nitroxide moiety within the lipid bilayer. Thus, T1-1 can be used as a convenient quantitative measure of membrane fluidity that reflects local membrane dynamics. T1-1 profiles obtained for 1-palmitoyl-2-( n-doxylstearoyl)phosphatidylcholine ( n-PC) spin labels in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) membranes with and without 50 mol% cholesterol are presented in parallel with profiles of the rotational diffusion coefficient, R?, obtained from simulation of EPR spectra using Freed's model. These profiles are compared with profiles of the order parameter obtained directly from EPR spectra and with profiles of the order parameter obtained from simulation of EPR spectra. It is shown that T1-1 and R? profiles reveal changes in membrane fluidity that depend on the motional properties of the lipid alkyl chain. We find that cholesterol has a rigidifying effect only to the depth occupied by the rigid steroid ring structure and a fluidizing effect at deeper locations. These effects cannot be differentiated by profiles of the order parameter. All profiles in this study were obtained at X-band (9.5 GHz).

  9. Nonlinear regression least-squares method for determining relaxation time spectra for processes with first-order kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cost, J. R.

    1983-05-01

    A simple method is shown for calculating the relaxation time spectrum which controls the rate at which a process following simple first-order kinetics takes place. The method involves unfolding a Fredholm equation of the first kind using least-squares and then using a modified nonlinear regression rather than a linear least-squares technique, thereby avoiding the highly oscillatory solutions which tend to occur with the latter with reduced mesh spacing or an increased number of bins. The validity and accuracy of the method for analyzing experimental data to reproduce various known input spectra are assessed and found to be excellent for data with no experimental error. For data with simulated experimental error with standard deviations up to ?=0.05 the method provides acceptable approximate solutions even though no exact solution is expected. Increasing the magnitude of the experimental error for a single lognormal input spectrum appears to have an increasing but nonsystematic effect upon the uncertainty of the approximate solution. Effects due to increasing the number of bins in the interval over which the spectrum is calculated are assessed and shown not to appreciably change the results, even for up to 60 bins. The methods is shown to be applicable to a wide variety of input spectra including single and double lognormal and box distributions. Importantly, in each of the cases studied the approximate solution appeared both to be unique and to converge toward the known input spectrum. Based upon this validation it is concluded that this method has applicability to a wide range of problems in which simple exponential decay is occurring with a spectrum of time constants. It may also be useful for problems with different kernals than that for first order kinetics; however, careful validation will be required.

  10. Relaxation dynamics in correlated quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Andergassen, S.; Schuricht, D.; Pletyukhov, M.; Schoeller, H.

    2014-12-04

    We study quantum many-body effects on the real-time evolution of the current through quantum dots. By using a non-equilibrium renormalization group approach, we provide analytic results for the relaxation dynamics into the stationary state and identify the microscopic cutoff scales that determine the transport rates. We find rich non-equilibrium physics induced by the interplay of the different energy scales. While the short-time limit is governed by universal dynamics, the long-time behavior features characteristic oscillations as well as an interplay of exponential and power-law decay.

  11. Internal friction and mode relaxation in a simple chain model.

    PubMed

    Fugmann, S; Sokolov, I M

    2009-12-21

    We consider the equilibrium relaxation properties of the end-to-end distance and of the principal components in a one-dimensional polymer chain model with nonlinear interaction between the beads. While for the single-well potentials these properties are similar to the ones of a Rouse chain, for the double-well interaction potentials, modeling internal friction, they differ vastly from the ones of the harmonic chain at intermediate times and intermediate temperatures. This minimal description within a one-dimensional model mimics the relaxation properties found in much more complex polymer systems. Thus, the relaxation time of the end-to-end distance may grow by orders of magnitude at intermediate temperatures. The principal components (whose directions are shown to coincide with the normal modes of the harmonic chain, whatever interaction potential is assumed) not only display larger relaxation times but also subdiffusive scaling. PMID:20025352

  12. Internal friction and mode relaxation in a simple chain model

    E-print Network

    S. Fugmann; I. M. Sokolov

    2009-10-27

    We consider equilibrium relaxation properties of the end-to-end distance and of principal components in a one-dimensional polymer chain model with nonlinear interaction between the beads. While for the single-well potentials these properties are similar to the ones of a Rouse chain, for the double-well interaction potentials, modeling internal friction, they differ vastly from the ones of the harmonic chain at intermediate times and intermediate temperatures. This minimal description within a one-dimensional model mimics the relaxation properties found in much more complex polymer systems. Thus, the relaxation time of the end-to-end distance may grow by orders of magnitude at intermediate temperatures. The principal components (whose directions are shown to coincide with the normal modes of the harmonic chain, whatever interaction potential is assumed) not only display larger relaxation times but also subdiffusive scaling.

  13. Dynamical masses, time-scales, and evolution of star clusters

    E-print Network

    Ortwin Gerhard

    2000-07-18

    This review discusses (i) dynamical methods for determining the masses of Galactic and extragalactic star clusters, (ii) dynamical processes and their time-scales for the evolution of clusters, including evaporation, mass segregation, core collapse, tidal shocks, dynamical friction and merging. These processes lead to significant evolution of globular cluster systems after their formation.

  14. Gott Time Machines, BTZ Black Hole Formation, and Choptuik Scaling

    E-print Network

    Danny Birmingham; Siddhartha Sen

    1999-08-23

    We study the formation of BTZ black holes by the collision of point particles. It is shown that the Gott time machine, originally constructed for the case of vanishing cosmological constant, provides a precise mechanism for black hole formation. As a result, one obtains an exact analytic understanding of the Choptuik scaling.

  15. Speech Compensation for Time-Scale-Modified Auditory Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogane, Rintaro; Honda, Masaaki

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine speech compensation in response to time-scale-modified auditory feedback during the transition of the semivowel for a target utterance of /ija/. Method: Each utterance session consisted of 10 control trials in the normal feedback condition followed by 20 perturbed trials in the modified auditory…

  16. Gott Time Machines, BTZ Black Hole Formation, and Choptuik Scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birmingham, Danny; Sen, Siddhartha

    2000-02-01

    We study the formation of Bañados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black holes by the collision of point particles. It is shown that the Gott time machine, originally constructed for the case of vanishing cosmological constant, provides a precise mechanism for black hole formation. As a result, one obtains an exact analytic understanding of the Choptuik scaling.

  17. MULTIPLE TIME SCALE NUMERICAL METHODS FOR THE INVERTED PENDULUM PROBLEM

    E-print Network

    Ferguson, Thomas S.

    MULTIPLE TIME SCALE NUMERICAL METHODS FOR THE INVERTED PENDULUM PROBLEM RICHARD SHARP, YEN-HSI TSAI multiscale methods (HMM) [1]. We apply the methods to compute the averaged path of the inverted pendulum approximate the averaged equation and thus compute the average path of the inverted pendulum. 1. INTRODUCTION

  18. Multiple time scale numerical methods for the inverted pendulum problem

    E-print Network

    Tsai, Yen-Hsi Richard

    Multiple time scale numerical methods for the inverted pendulum problem Richard Sharp1, Yen (HMM) [1]. We apply the methods to compute the averaged path of the inverted pendulum under a highly and thus compute the average path of the inverted pendulum. 1 Introduction The focus of this paper

  19. {sup 1}H relaxation enhancement induced by nanoparticles in solutions: Influence of magnetic properties and diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Kruk, D.; Korpa?a, A.; Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, 30-059 Kraków ; Taheri, S. Mehdizadeh; Förster, S.; Koz?owski, A.; Rössler, E. A.

    2014-05-07

    Magnetic nanoparticles that induce nuclear relaxation are the most promising materials to enhance the sensitivity in Magnetic Resonance Imaging. In order to provide a comprehensive understanding of the magnetic field dependence of the relaxation enhancement in solutions, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation for decalin and toluene solutions of various Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles was investigated. The relaxation experiments were performed in a frequency range of 10 kHz–20 MHz by applying Field Cycling method, and in the temperature range of 257–298 K, using nanoparticles differing in size and shape: spherical – 5 nm diameter, cubic – 6.5 nm diameter, and cubic – 9 nm diameter. The relaxation dispersion data were interpreted in terms of a theory of nuclear relaxation induced by magnetic crystals in solution. The approach was tested with respect to its applicability depending on the magnetic characteristics of the nanocrystals and the time-scale of translational diffusion of the solvent. The role of Curie relaxation and the contributions to the overall {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation associated with the electronic spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation was thoroughly discussed. It was demonstrated that the approach leads to consistent results providing information on the magnetic (electronic) properties of the nanocrystals, i.e., effective electron spin and relaxation times. In addition, features of the {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation resulting from the electronic properties of the crystals and the solvent diffusion were explained.

  20. Spectral decomposition of time-scales in hyporheic exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wörman, Anders; Riml, Joakim

    2015-04-01

    Hyporheic exchange of heat and solute mass in streams is manifested both in form of different exchange mechanisms and their associated distributions of residence times as well as the range of time-scales characterizing the forcing boundary conditions. A recently developed analytical technique separates the spectrum of time-scales and relates the forcing boundary fluctuations of heat and solute mass through a physical model of the hydrological transport to the response of heat and solute mass. This spectral decomposition can be done both for local (point-scale) observations in the hyporhiec zone itself as well as for transport processes on the watershed scale that can be considered 'well-behaved' in terms of knowledge of the forcing (input) quantities. This paper presents closed-form solutions in spectral form for the point-, reach- and watershed-scale and discusses their applicability to selected data of heat and solute concentration. We quantify the reliability and highlight the benefits of the spectral approach to different scenarios and, peculiarly, the importance for linking the periods in the spectral decomposition of the solute response to the distribution of transport times that arise due to the multitude of exchange mechanisms existing in a watershed. In a point-scale example the power spectra of in-stream temperature is related to the power spectrum of the temperature at a specific sediment depth by means of exact solutions of a physically based formulation of the vertical heat transport. It is shown that any frequency (?) of in-stream temperature fluctuation scales with the effective thermal diffusivity (?e) and the vertical separation distance between the pairs of temperature (É?) data as ? ? ?e/(2É?2), which implies a decreasing weight to higher frequencies (shorter periods) with depth. Similarly on the watershed-scale one can link the watershed dispersion to the damping of the concentration fluctuations in selected frequency intervals reflecting various environments responsible for the damping. The frequency-dependent parameters indicate that different environments dominate the response at different temporal scales.

  1. Characterizing Complex Time Series from the Scaling of Prediction Error.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinrichs, Brant Eric

    This thesis concerns characterizing complex time series from the scaling of prediction error. We use the global modeling technique of radial basis function approximation to build models from a state-space reconstruction of a time series that otherwise appears complicated or random (i.e. aperiodic, irregular). Prediction error as a function of prediction horizon is obtained from the model using the direct method. The relationship between the underlying dynamics of the time series and the logarithmic scaling of prediction error as a function of prediction horizon is investigated. We use this relationship to characterize the dynamics of both a model chaotic system and physical data from the optic tectum of an attentive pigeon exhibiting the important phenomena of nonstationary neuronal oscillations in response to visual stimuli.

  2. Metabolic Risk Factors are associated with Cartilage Degradation assessed by T2 Relaxation Time at the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Jungmann, Pia M.; Kraus, Mareen S.; Alizai, Hamza; Nardo, Lorenzo; Baum, Thomas; Nevitt, Michael C.; McCulloch, Chuck E.; Joseph, Gabby B.; Lynch, John A.; Link, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association of metabolic risk factors with severity and two-year progression of early degenerative cartilage changes at the knee, measured with T2 relaxation times in middle-aged subjects from the Osteoarthritis Initiative. Methods Cartilage segmentation and T2 map generation was performed in 3T knee MR images from 403, 45 – 60 year old subjects without radiographic osteoarthritis (OA). The influence of risk factors on baseline and longitudinal progression of T2 was analyzed using linear regression, adjusting for age, gender and other OA risk factors. Results Four metabolic risk factors (i) high abdominal circumference (P<0.001), (ii) hypertension (P=0.040), (iii) high fat consumption (P=0.019) and (iv) self-reported diabetes (P=0.012) were individually associated with higher baseline T2. When the four metabolic risk factors were considered in a multivariate regression model, higher T2 remained significantly associated with abdominal circumference (P<0.001) and diabetes (P=0.031) and there was a trend for high fat consumption (P=0.096). Of individual risk factors, only diabetes remained associated with higher baseline T2 after adjustment for BMI. After adjustment for BMI, baseline T2 increased in dose-reponse fashion with the number of metabolic risk factors present (P=0.032 for linear trend), and subjects with ?3 metabolic factors (versus <3) had significantly higher baseline T2 (mean difference, 1.2ms; lower 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.3ms; upper 95% CI, 2.1ms; P=0.011). Metabolic risk factors were not significantly associated with increases in T2 during follow-up. Conclusion Metabolic risk factors are associated with higher T2, suggesting that increased cartilage degeneration may be caused by modifiable metabolic disorders. PMID:23926027

  3. Tracking Primary Thermalization Events in Graphene with Photoemission at Extreme Time Scales.

    PubMed

    Gierz, I; Calegari, F; Aeschlimann, S; Chávez Cervantes, M; Cacho, C; Chapman, R T; Springate, E; Link, S; Starke, U; Ast, C R; Cavalleri, A

    2015-08-21

    Direct and inverse Auger scattering are amongst the primary processes that mediate the thermalization of hot carriers in semiconductors. These two processes involve the annihilation or generation of an electron-hole pair by exchanging energy with a third carrier, which is either accelerated or decelerated. Inverse Auger scattering is generally suppressed, as the decelerated carriers must have excess energies higher than the band gap itself. In graphene, which is gapless, inverse Auger scattering is, instead, predicted to be dominant at the earliest time delays. Here, <8??fs extreme-ultraviolet pulses are used to detect this imbalance, tracking both the number of excited electrons and their kinetic energy with time-and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Over a time window of approximately 25 fs after absorption of the pump pulse, we observe an increase in conduction band carrier density and a simultaneous decrease of the average carrier kinetic energy, revealing that relaxation is in fact dominated by inverse Auger scattering. Measurements of carrier scattering at extreme time scales by photoemission will serve as a guide to ultrafast control of electronic properties in solids for petahertz electronics. PMID:26340199

  4. Study on vibrational relaxation dynamics of phenol-water complex by picosecond time-resolved IR-UV pump-probe spectroscopy in a supersonic molecular beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Yasunori; Inokuchi, Yoshiya; Ebata, Takayuki; Petkovi?, Milena

    2013-06-01

    A comparative study of vibrational energy relaxation (VER) between the monohydrated complexes of phenol-d0 and phenol-d1 is investigated in a supersonic molecular beam. The direct time-resolved measurement of energy redistribution from the phenolic OH/OD stretching mode of the phenol-d0-H2O/phenol-d1-D2O is performed by picosecond IR-UV pump-probe spectroscopy. Two complexes follow the same relaxation process that begins with the intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution (IVR) and the intermolecular vibrational energy redistribution (IVR), which is followed by the vibrational predissociation (VP). The difference in the relaxation lifetimes between them is discussed by anharmonic force field and RRKM calculations. Anharmonic analysis implies that intra- (IVR) and intermolecular (IVR) relaxations occur in parallel in the complexes. The RRKM-predicted dissociation (VP) lifetimes show qualitative agreement with the observed results, suggesting that VP takes place after the statistical energy distribution in the complexes.

  5. Structural relaxation and self-repair behavior in nano-scaled Zr-Cu metallic glass under cyclic loading: Molecular-dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Y. C.; Chou, H. S.; Cheng, Y. T.; Huang, J. C.; Morris, James R; Liaw, Peter K

    2010-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses are generally regarded as highly brittle materials at room temperature, with deformation localized within a few principal shear bands. In this simulation work, it is demonstrated that when the Zr-Cu metallic glass is in a small size-scale, it can deform under cyclic loading in a semi-homogeneous manner without the occurrence of pronounced mature shear bands. Instead, the plastic deformation in simulated samples proceeds via the network-like shear-transition zones (STZs) by the reversible and irreversible structure-relaxations during cyclic loading. Dynamic recovery and reversible/irreversible structure rearrangements occur in the current model, along with annihilation/creation of excessive free volumes. This behavior would in-turn retard the damage growth of metallic glass. Current studies can help to understand the structural relaxation mechanism in metallic glass under loading. The results also imply that the brittle bulk metallic glasses can become ductile with the sample size being reduced. The application of metallic glasses in the form of thin film or nano pieces in micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) could be promising.

  6. Kinetic equations for hopping transport and spin relaxation in a random magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumilin, A. V.; Kabanov, V. V.

    2015-07-01

    We derive the kinetic equations for a hopping transport that take into account an electron spin and the possibility of double occupation. In the Ohmic regime, the equations are reduced to the generalized Miller-Abrahams resistor network. We apply these equations to the problem of the magnetic moment relaxation due to the interaction with the random hyperfine fields. It is shown that in a wide range of parameters the relaxation rate is governed by the hops with the similar rates as spin precession frequency. It is demonstrated that at the large time scale spin relaxation is nonexponential. We argue that the nonexponential relaxation of the magnetic moment is related to the spin of electrons in the slow-relaxing traps. Interestingly, the traps can significantly influence the spin relaxation in the infinite conducting cluster at large times.

  7. Probing Fission Time Scales with Neutrons and GDR Gamma Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, R. P.; Botting, Tye; Chubarian, G G; Wolf, K; Hurst, B J; Jabs, H; Hamelin, M; Bacak, A; Oganessian, Yuri Ts.; Itkis, M. G.; Kozulin, E M; Kondratiev, N. A.; Salamatin, V S; Pokrovsky, I V; Hanappe, F; de Goes Brennand, E.; Huck, A; Stuttge, L; Liatard, E; Beene, James R; Varner Jr, Robert L; Halbert, Melvyn L; Gan, Ning

    2003-06-01

    The time scales for nuclear fission have been explored using both pre-and postfission neutrons and GDR gamma rays. Four systems were investigated: 133-MeV 16O + 176Yb and 208Pb and 104-MeV 4He + 188Os and 209Bi. Fission fragments were measured in coincidence with PPACs. The neutrons were detected using eight detectors from the DEMON array, while gamma rays were measured using the US BaF2 array. The pre-and postfission gamma rays were determined using moving source fits parallel and perpendicular to the fission fragment emission directions. The time scales for fission for the neutrons were determined using the neutron clock technique. The gamma-ray data were fitted using a statistical model calculation based on the code CASCADE. The results of the fits from both data types were used to extract nuclear friction coefficients, ?, and fission time scales. The ? values ranged from 7 to 20, while the fission times were (31-105) 10?21 s. From Yadernaya Fizika, Vol. 66, No. 6, 2003, pp. 1199-1203.

  8. Reconstructions of solar irradiance on centennial time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivova, Natalie; Solanki, Sami K.; Dasi Espuig, Maria; Kok Leng, Yeo

    Solar irradiance is the main external source of energy to Earth's climate system. The record of direct measurements covering less than 40 years is too short to study solar influence on Earth's climate, which calls for reconstructions of solar irradiance into the past with the help of appropriate models. An obvious requirement to a competitive model is its ability to reproduce observed irradiance changes, and a successful example of such a model is presented by the SATIRE family of models. As most state-of-the-art models, SATIRE assumes that irradiance changes on time scales longer than approximately a day are caused by the evolving distribution of dark and bright magnetic features on the solar surface. The surface coverage by such features as a function of time is derived from solar observations. The choice of these depends on the time scale in question. Most accurate is the version of the model that employs full-disc spatially-resolved solar magnetograms and reproduces over 90% of the measured irradiance variation, including the overall decreasing trend in the total solar irradiance over the last four cycles. Since such magnetograms are only available for about four decades, reconstructions on time scales of centuries have to rely on disc-integrated proxies of solar magnetic activity, such as sunspot areas and numbers. Employing a surface flux transport model and sunspot observations as input, we have being able to produce synthetic magnetograms since 1700. This improves the temporal resolution of the irradiance reconstructions on centennial time scales. The most critical aspect of such reconstructions remains the uncertainty in the magnitude of the secular change.

  9. NMR T{sub 1} relaxation time measurements and calculations with translational and rotational components for liquid electrolytes containing LiBF{sub 4} and propylene carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, P. M. Voice, A. M. Ward, I. M.

    2013-12-07

    Longitudinal relaxation (T{sub 1}) measurements of {sup 19}F, {sup 7}Li, and {sup 1}H in propylene carbonate/LiBF{sub 4} liquid electrolytes are reported. Comparison of T{sub 1} values with those for the transverse relaxation time (T{sub 2}) confirm that the measurements are in the high temperature (low correlation time) limit of the T{sub 1} minimum. Using data from pulsed field gradient measurements of self-diffusion coefficients and measurements of solution viscosity measured elsewhere, it is concluded that although in general there are contributions to T{sub 1} from both translational and rotational motions. For the lithium ions, this is mainly translational, and for the fluorine ions mainly rotational.

  10. Structural Relaxation and Mode Coupling in a Simple Liquid: Depolarized Light Scattering in Benzene

    E-print Network

    Sabine Wiebel; Joachim Wuttke

    2002-04-18

    We have measured depolarized light scattering in liquid benzene over the whole accessible temperature range and over four decades in frequency. Between 40 and 180 GHz we find a susceptibility peak due to structural relaxation. This peak shows stretching and time-temperature scaling as known from $\\alpha$ relaxation in glass-forming materials. A simple mode-coupling model provides consistent fits of the entire data set. We conclude that structural relaxation in simple liquids and $\\alpha$ relaxation in glass-forming materials are physically the same. A deeper understanding of simple liquids is reached by applying concepts that were originally developed in the context of glass-transition research.

  11. Initial evaluation of hepatic T1 relaxation time as an imaging marker of liver disease associated with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD).

    PubMed

    Gao, Ying; Erokwu, Bernadette O; DeSantis, David A; Croniger, Colleen M; Schur, Rebecca M; Lu, Lan; Mariappuram, Jose; Dell, Katherine M; Flask, Chris A

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) is a potentially lethal multi-organ disease affecting both the kidneys and the liver. Unfortunately, there are currently no non-invasive methods to monitor liver disease progression in ARPKD patients, limiting the study of potential therapeutic interventions. Herein, we perform an initial investigation of T1 relaxation time as a potential imaging biomarker to quantitatively assess the two primary pathologic hallmarks of ARPKD liver disease: biliary dilatation and periportal fibrosis in the PCK rat model of ARPKD. T1 relaxation time results were obtained for five PCK rats at 3?months of age using a Look-Locker acquisition on a Bruker BioSpec 7.0?T MRI scanner. Six three-month-old Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were also scanned as controls. All animals were euthanized after the three-month scans for histological and biochemical assessments of bile duct dilatation and hepatic fibrosis for comparison. PCK rats exhibited significantly increased liver T1 values (mean?±?standard deviation?=?935?±?39?ms) compared with age-matched SD control rats (847?±?26?ms, p?=?0.01). One PCK rat exhibited severe cholangitis (mean T1 ?=?1413?ms), which occurs periodically in ARPKD patients. The observed increase in the in vivo liver T1 relaxation time correlated significantly with three histological and biochemical indicators of biliary dilatation and fibrosis: bile duct area percent (R?=?0.85, p?=?0.002), periportal fibrosis area percent (R?=?0.82, p?=?0.004), and hydroxyproline content (R?=?0.76, p?=?0.01). These results suggest that hepatic T1 relaxation time may provide a sensitive and non-invasive imaging biomarker to monitor ARPKD liver disease. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26608869

  12. Resonant relaxation in protoplanetary disks

    E-print Network

    Scott Tremaine

    1998-05-27

    Resonant relaxation is a novel form of two-body relaxation that arises in nearly Keplerian disks such as protoplanetary disks. Resonant relaxation does not affect the semimajor axes of the particles, but enhances relaxation of particle eccentricities and inclinations. The equilibrium state after resonant relaxation is a Rayleigh distribution, with the mean-square eccentricity and inclination inversely proportional to mass. The rate of resonant relaxation depends strongly on the precession rate of the disk. If the precession due to the disk's self-gravity is small compared to the total precession, then the relaxation is concentrated near the secular resonance between each pair of interacting bodies; on the other hand if the precession rate is dominated by the disk's self-gravity then relaxation occurs through coupling to the large-scale low-frequency m=1 normal modes of the disk. Depending on the disk properties, resonant relaxation may be either stronger or weaker than the usual non-resonant relaxation.

  13. Assestment of correlations and crossover scale in electroseismic time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman-Vargas, L.; Ramírez-Rojas, A.; Angulo-Brown, F.

    2009-04-01

    Evaluating complex fluctuations in electroseismic time series is an important task not only for earthquake prediction but also for understanding complex processes related to earthquake preparation. Previous studies have reported alterations, as the emergence of correlated dynamics in geoelectric potentials prior to an important earthquake (EQ). In this work, we apply the detrended fluctuation analysis and introduce a statistical procedure to characterize the presence of crossovers in scaling exponents, to analyze the fluctuations of geoelectric time series monitored in two sites located in Mexico. We find a complex behavior characterized by the presence of a crossover in the correlation exponents in the vicinity of a M=7.4 EQ occurred on Sept. 14, 1995. Finally, we apply the t-student test to evaluate the level of significance between short and large scaling exponents.

  14. Realization of a time-scale with an optical clock

    E-print Network

    Grebing, C; Dörscher, S; Häfner, S; Gerginov, V; Weyers, S; Lipphardt, B; Riehle, F; Sterr, U; Lisdat, C

    2015-01-01

    Optical clocks are not only powerful tools for prime fundamental research, but are also deemed for the re-definition of the SI base unit second as they surpass the performance of caesium atomic clocks in both accuracy and stability by more than an order of magnitude. However, an important obstacle in this transition has so far been the limited reliability of the optical clocks that made a continuous realization of a time-scale impractical. In this paper, we demonstrate how this dilemma can be resolved and that a time-scale based on an optical clock can be established that is superior to one based on even the best caesium fountain clocks. The paper also gives further proof of the international consistency of strontium lattice clocks on the $10^{-16}$ accuracy level, which is another prerequisite for a change in the definition of the second.

  15. Solar Irradiance Variations on Active Region Time Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labonte, B. J. (editor); Chapman, G. A. (editor); Hudson, H. S. (editor); Willson, R. C. (editor)

    1984-01-01

    The variations of the total solar irradiance is an important tool for studying the Sun, thanks to the development of very precise sensors such as the ACRIM instrument on board the Solar Maximum Mission. The largest variations of the total irradiance occur on time scales of a few days are caused by solar active regions, especially sunspots. Efforts were made to describe the active region effects on total and spectral irradiance.

  16. Time scale interactions and the coevolution of humans and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivapalan, Murugesu; Blöschl, Günter

    2015-09-01

    We present a coevolutionary view of hydrologic systems, revolving around feedbacks between environmental and social processes operating across different time scales. This brings to the fore an emphasis on emergent phenomena in changing water systems, such as the levee effect, adaptation to change, system lock-in, and system collapse due to resource depletion. Changing human values play a key role in the emergence of these phenomena and should therefore be considered as internal to the system. Guidance is provided for the framing and modeling of these phenomena to test alternative hypotheses about how they arose. A plurality of coevolutionary models, from stylized to comprehensive system-of-system models, may assist strategic water management for long time scales through facilitating stakeholder participation, exploring the possibility space of alternative futures, and helping to synthesize the observed dynamics in a wide range of case studies. Future research opportunities lie in exploring emergent phenomena arising from time scale interactions through historical, comparative, and process studies of human-water feedbacks.

  17. Scale dependence of the directional relationships between coupled time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirazi, Amir Hossein; Aghamohammadi, Cina; Anvari, Mehrnaz; Bahraminasab, Alireza; Rahimi Tabar, M. Reza; Peinke, Joachim; Sahimi, Muhammad; Marsili, Matteo

    2013-02-01

    Using the cross-correlation of the wavelet transformation, we propose a general method of studying the scale dependence of the direction of coupling for coupled time series. The method is first demonstrated by applying it to coupled van der Pol forced oscillators and coupled nonlinear stochastic equations. We then apply the method to the analysis of the log-return time series of the stock values of the IBM and General Electric (GE) companies. Our analysis indicates that, on average, IBM stocks react earlier to possible common sector price movements than those of GE.

  18. Scaling Brain Size, Keeping Timing: Evolutionary Preservation of Brain Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Buzsáki, György; Logothetis, Nikos; Singer, Wolf

    2014-01-01

    Despite the several-thousand-fold increase of brain volume during the course of mammalian evolution, the hierarchy of brain oscillations remains remarkably preserved, allowing for multiple-time-scale communication within and across neuronal networks at approximately the same speed, irrespective of brain size. Deployment of large-diameter axons of long-range neurons could be a key factor in the preserved time management in growing brains. We discuss the consequences of such preserved network constellation in mental disease, drug discovery, and interventional therapies. PMID:24183025

  19. Horizontal structure of winter time 250 mb jet stream variations on the fifteen day time scale 

    E-print Network

    Park, Sangwook

    1993-01-01

    The horizontal structure of the 250 mb jet stream on the fifteen-day time scale during Northern Hemisphere winter is presented. The winter season is divided into six fifteen-day periods for the 24-year NMC data set. The fifteen-day time...

  20. 5nsec Dead time multichannel scaling system for Mössbauer spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verrastro, C.; Trombetta, G.; Pita, A.; Saragovi, C.; Duhalde, S.

    1991-11-01

    A PC programmable and fast multichannel scaling module has been designed to use a commercial Mössbauer spectrometer. This module is based on a 10 single chip 8 bits microcomputer (MC6805) and on a 35 fast ALU, which allows a high performance and low cost system. The module can operate in a stand-alone mode. Data analysis are performed in real time display, on XT/AT IBM PC or compatibles. The channels are ranged between 256 and 4096, the maximum number of counts is 232-1 per channel, the dwell time is 3 ?sec and the dead time between channels is 5 nsec. A friendly software display the real time spectrum and offers menues with different options at each state.

  1. Nanosecond Relaxation Dynamics of Hydrated Proteins: Water versus protein contributions

    SciTech Connect

    Khodadadi, S; Curtis, J. E.; Sokolov, Alexei P

    2011-01-01

    We have studied picosecond to nanosecond dynamics of hydrated protein powders using dielectric spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Our analysis of hydrogen-atom single particle dynamics from MD simulations focused on main ( main tens of picoseconds) and slow ( slow nanosecond) relaxation processes that were observed in dielectric spectra of similar hydrated protein samples. Traditionally, the interpretation of these processes observed in dielectric spectra has been ascribed to the relaxation behavior of hydration water tightly bounded to a protein and not to protein atoms. Detailed analysis of the MD simulations and comparison to dielectric data indicate that the observed relaxation process in the nanosecond time range of hydrated protein spectra is mainly due to protein atoms. The relaxation processes involve the entire structure of protein including atoms in the protein backbone, side chains, and turns. Both surface and buried protein atoms contribute to the slow processes; however, surface atoms demonstrate slightly faster relaxation dynamics. Analysis of the water molecule residence and dipolar relaxation correlation behavior indicates that the hydration water relaxes at much shorter time scales.

  2. Computational Modeling of Semiconductor Dynamics at Femtosecond Time Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Govind P.; Goorjian, Peter M.

    1998-01-01

    The main objective of the Joint-Research Interchange NCC2-5149 was to develop computer codes for accurate simulation of femtosecond pulse propagation in semiconductor lasers and semiconductor amplifiers [I]. The code should take into account all relevant processes such as the interband and intraband carrier relaxation mechanisms and the many-body effects arising from the Coulomb interaction among charge carriers [2]. This objective was fully accomplished. We made use of a previously developed algorithm developed at NASA Ames [3]-[5]. The new algorithm was tested on several problems of practical importance. One such problem was related to the amplification of femtosecond optical pulses in semiconductors. These results were presented in several international conferences over a period of three years. With the help of a postdoctoral fellow, we also investigated the origin of instabilities that can lead to the formation of femtosecond pulses in different kinds of lasers. We analyzed the occurrence of absolute instabilities in lasers that contain a dispersive host material with third-order nonlinearities. Starting from the Maxwell-Bloch equations, we derived general multimode equations to distinguish between convective and absolute instabilities. We find that both self-phase modulation and intensity-dependent absorption can dramatically affect the absolute stability of such lasers. In particular, the self-pulsing threshold (the so-called second laser threshold) can occur at few times the first laser threshold even in good-cavity lasers for which no self-pulsing occurs in the absence of intensity-dependent absorption. These results were presented in an international conference and published in the form of two papers.

  3. Time Scale Hierarchies in the Functional Organization of Complex Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Perdikis, Dionysios; Huys, Raoul; Jirsa, Viktor K.

    2011-01-01

    Traditional approaches to cognitive modelling generally portray cognitive events in terms of ‘discrete’ states (point attractor dynamics) rather than in terms of processes, thereby neglecting the time structure of cognition. In contrast, more recent approaches explicitly address this temporal dimension, but typically provide no entry points into cognitive categorization of events and experiences. With the aim to incorporate both these aspects, we propose a framework for functional architectures. Our approach is grounded in the notion that arbitrary complex (human) behaviour is decomposable into functional modes (elementary units), which we conceptualize as low-dimensional dynamical objects (structured flows on manifolds). The ensemble of modes at an agent’s disposal constitutes his/her functional repertoire. The modes may be subjected to additional dynamics (termed operational signals), in particular, instantaneous inputs, and a mechanism that sequentially selects a mode so that it temporarily dominates the functional dynamics. The inputs and selection mechanisms act on faster and slower time scales then that inherent to the modes, respectively. The dynamics across the three time scales are coupled via feedback, rendering the entire architecture autonomous. We illustrate the functional architecture in the context of serial behaviour, namely cursive handwriting. Subsequently, we investigate the possibility of recovering the contributions of functional modes and operational signals from the output, which appears to be possible only when examining the output phase flow (i.e., not from trajectories in phase space or time). PMID:21980278

  4. Improvement of the relaxation time and the order parameter of nematic liquid crystal using a hybrid alignment mixture of carbon nanotube and polyimide

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyojin; Yang, Seungbin; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Soo Park, Young

    2014-05-12

    We examined the electrooptical properties of a nematic liquid crystal (LC) sample whose substrates were coated with a mixture of carbon nanotube (CNT) and polyimide (PI). The relaxation time of the sample coated with 1.5?wt.?% CNT mixture was about 35% reduced compared to the pure polyimide sample. The elastic constant and the order parameter of the CNT-mixture sample were increased and the fast relaxation of LC could be approximated to the mean-field theory. We found the CNT-mixed polyimide formed more smooth surface than the pure PI from atomic force microscopy images, indicating the increased order parameter is related to the smooth surface topology of the CNT-polyimide mixture.

  5. Relaxation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Environ Corporation's relaxation system is built around a body lounge, a kind of super easy chair that incorporates sensory devices. Computer controlled enclosure provides filtered ionized air to create a feeling of invigoration, enhanced by mood changing aromas. Occupant is also surrounded by multidimensional audio and the lighting is programmed to change colors, patterns, and intensity periodically. These and other sensory stimulators are designed to provide an environment in which the learning process is stimulated, because research has proven that while an individual is in a deep state of relaxation, the mind is more receptive to new information.

  6. Two-body relaxation in simulated cosmological haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Zant, Amr A.

    2006-08-01

    This paper aims to quantify, in a general manner that does not directly resort to large-scale calculations, discreteness effects acting on the dynamics of dark matter haloes forming in the context of cosmological simulations. By generalizing the standard formulation of two-body relaxation to the case when the size and mass distributions are variable, and parametrizing the time evolution using established empirical relations, we find that the dynamics of a million-particle halo is noise-dominated within the inner per cent of the final virial radius. Far larger particle numbers (~108) are required for the rms perturbations to the velocity to drop to the 10per cent level there. The radial scaling of the relaxation time is simple and strong: trelax ~r2, implying that numbers >>108 are required to faithfully model the very inner regions; artificial relaxation may thus constitute an important factor, contributing to the contradictory claims concerning the persistence of a power-law density cusp to the very centre. The cores of substructure haloes can be many relaxation times old. Since relaxation first causes their expansion before recontraction occurs, it may render them either more difficult or easier to disrupt, depending on their orbital parameters. This may modify the characteristics of the subhalo distribution; and if, as suggested by several authors, it is parent-satellite interactions that determine halo profiles, the overall structure of the system may be affected. We derive simple closed form formulae for the characteristic relaxation time of both parents and satellites, and an elementary argument deducing the weak N-scaling reported by Diemand et al. when the main contribution comes from relaxing subhaloes.

  7. Terrestrial Waters and Sea Level Variations on Interannual Time Scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Llovel, W.; Becker, M.; Cazenave, A.; Jevrejeva, S.; Alkama, R.; Decharme, B.; Douville, H.; Ablain, M.; Beckley, B.

    2011-01-01

    On decadal to multi-decadal time scales, thermal expansion of sea waters and land ice loss are the main contributors to sea level variations. However, modification of the terrestrial water cycle due to climate variability and direct anthropogenic forcing may also affect sea level. For the past decades, variations in land water storage and corresponding effects on sea level cannot be directly estimated from observations because these are almost non-existent at global continental scale. However, global hydrological models developed for atmospheric and climatic studies can be used for estimating total water storage. For the recent years (since mid-2002), terrestrial water storage change can be directly estimated from observations of the GRACE space gravimetry mission. In this study, we analyse the interannual variability of total land water storage, and investigate its contribution to mean sea level variability at interannual time scale. We consider three different periods that, each, depend on data availability: (1) GRACE era (2003-2009), (2) 1993-2003 and (3) 1955-1995. For the GRACE era (period 1), change in land water storage is estimated using different GRACE products over the 33 largest river basins worldwide. For periods 2 and 3, we use outputs from the ISBA-TRIP (Interactions between Soil, Biosphere, and Atmosphere-Total Runoff Integrating Pathways) global hydrological model. For each time span, we compare change in land water storage (expressed in sea level equivalent) to observed mean sea level, either from satellite altimetry (periods 1 and 2) or tide gauge records (period 3). For each data set and each time span, a trend has been removed as we focus on the interannual variability. We show that whatever the period considered, interannual variability of the mean sea level is essentially explained by interannual fluctuations in land water storage, with the largest contributions arising from tropical river basins.

  8. Relaxation and phase space singularities in time series of human magnetoencephalograms can serve as an indicator of the photosensitive epilepsy

    E-print Network

    Yulmetyev, R M; Hänggi, P; Khusaenova, E V; Shimojo, S; Yulmetyeva, D G

    2006-01-01

    To analyze the crucial role of the fluctuation and relaxational effects in the human brain functioning we have studied a some statistical quantifiers that support the informational characteristics of neuromagnetic responses of magnetoencephalographic (MEG) signals. The signals to a flickering stimulus of different color combinations has been obtained from a group of control subjects which is contrasted with those for a patient with photosensitive epilepsy (PSE). We have revealed that the existence of the specific stratification of the phase clouds and the concomitant relaxation singularities of the corresponding nonequilibrium processes of chaotic behavior of the signals in the separate areas for a patient most likely shows the pronounced zones responsible the appearance of PSE.

  9. Neonatal and infancy time scale for extension into childhood and adulthood.

    PubMed

    Paul, M H; Kardatzke, M L; Lapin, G D

    1989-12-01

    A logarithmic time scale is presented for exposition of clinical events and related data on a unified scale extending from neonatal time into childhood and adulthood. Such a scale preserves time scale proportions but has the advantage for certain applications of featuring early neonatal and infancy events. This type of time base avoids the disadvantages of a crowded and obscured linear scale or an arbitrary and non-unified split time scale. For clinical application all timed events are initially converted to a common unit such as days. A visually comprehensible logarithmic time scale can be derived by plotting the logarithmic scale (labeled in days, base 2) and then establishing conventional calendar interval marks (weeks, months, years) and the data plot points. A simple equation is presented for establishing the time scale graph markers and the plot data points for a logarithmic time scale of any scale axis length. PMID:2586131

  10. Heterogenous scaling in interevent time of on-line bookmarking

    E-print Network

    Wang, Peng; Yeung, Chi Ho; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we study the statistical properties of bookmarking behaviors in Delicious.com. We find that the interevent time distributions of bookmarking decays powerlike as interevent time increases at both individual and population level. Remarkably, we observe a significant change in the exponent when interevent time increases from intra-day to inter-day range. In addition, dependence of exponent on individual Activity is found to be different in the two ranges. These results suggests that mechanisms driving human actions are different in intra- and inter-day range. Instead of monotonically increasing with Activity, we find that inter-day exponent peaks at value around 3. We further show that less active users are more likely to resemble poisson process in bookmarking. Based on the temporal-preference model, preliminary explanations for this dependence have been given . Finally, a universal behavior in inter-day scale is observed by considering the rescaled variable.

  11. Optimal Control Modification for Time-Scale Separated Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2012-01-01

    Recently a new optimal control modification has been introduced that can achieve robust adaptation with a large adaptive gain without incurring high-frequency oscillations as with the standard model-reference adaptive control. This modification is based on an optimal control formulation to minimize the L2 norm of the tracking error. The optimal control modification adaptive law results in a stable adaptation in the presence of a large adaptive gain. This study examines the optimal control modification adaptive law in the context of a system with a time scale separation resulting from a fast plant with a slow actuator. A singular perturbation analysis is performed to derive a modification to the adaptive law by transforming the original system into a reduced-order system in slow time. A model matching conditions in the transformed time coordinate results in an increase in the actuator command that effectively compensate for the slow actuator dynamics. Simulations demonstrate effectiveness of the method.

  12. Multiple-Time Scaling and Universal Behavior of the Earthquake Interevent Time Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Bottiglieri, M.; Godano, C.; Lippiello, E.; Arcangelis, L. de

    2010-04-16

    The interevent time distribution characterizes the temporal occurrence in seismic catalogs. Universal scaling properties of this distribution have been evidenced for entire catalogs and seismic sequences. Recently, these universal features have been questioned and some criticisms have been raised. We investigate the existence of universal scaling properties by analyzing a Californian catalog and by means of numerical simulations of an epidemic-type model. We show that the interevent time distribution exhibits a universal behavior over the entire temporal range if four characteristic times are taken into account. The above analysis allows us to identify the scaling form leading to universal behavior and explains the observed deviations. Furthermore, it provides a tool to identify the dependence on the mainshock magnitude of the c parameter that fixes the onset of the power law decay in the Omori law.

  13. Defining a trend for time series using the intrinsic time-scale decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restrepo, Juan M.; Venkataramani, Shankar; Comeau, Darin; Flaschka, Hermann

    2014-08-01

    We propose criteria that define a trend for time series with inherent multi-scale features. We call this trend the tendency of a time series. The tendency is defined empirically by a set of criteria and captures the large-scale temporal variability of the original signal as well as the most frequent events in its histogram. Among other properties, the tendency has a variance no larger than that of the original signal; the histogram of the difference between the original signal and the tendency is as symmetric as possible; and with reduced complexity, the tendency captures essential features of the signal. To find the tendency we first use the intrinsic time-scale decomposition (ITD) of the signal, introduced in 2007 by Frei and Osorio, to produce a set of candidate tendencies. We then apply the criteria to each of the candidates to single out the one that best agrees with them. While the criteria for the tendency are independent of the signal decomposition scheme, it is found that the ITD is a simple and stable methodology, well suited for multi-scale signals. The ITD is a relatively new decomposition and little is known about its outcomes. In this study we take the first steps towards a probabilistic model of the ITD analysis of random time series. This analysis yields details concerning the universality and scaling properties of the components of the decomposition.

  14. Enhancement of the accuracy of determination of transverse relaxation time in solution state NMR spectroscopy by using Uhrig's dynamic decoupling sequences.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Ipsita; Chakrabarti, Arnab; Bhattacharyya, Rangeet

    2015-12-01

    Recently, a sequence with a set of non-equidistant ? pulses, often referred to as Uhrig's Dynamic Decoupling (UDD) sequence has been proposed which is shown to be more efficient in suppressing the time dependent systematic sources of dephasing originating from a bosonic bath. This work aims to investigate the potential of such non-equidistant sequences for more accurate measurement of the transverse relaxation time (T2) in liquid state NMR. We have shown experimentally that the dynamic decoupling schemes can estimate T2 more accurately than the equidistant pulse sequence by suppressing the dephasing effects of the field noise in the solution state. PMID:26584546

  15. Vibrational Relaxation and Dynamical Transitions in Atactic Polystyrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hanqing; Park, Yung; Painter, Paul

    2009-03-01

    Infrared bands and Raman lines recorded in the frequency domain have a counterpart in the time domain in the form of time-correlation functions, which are sensitive to molecular dynamics on the picosecond time scale. This is explored by calculating time correlation functions and their variation with temperature for the conformationally insensitive modes observed near 1601 cm-1 and 1583 cm-1 in the infrared spectrum of atactic polystyrene. The correlation functions were modeled by assuming that there is a fast relaxation process characterized by a single relaxation time that is inhomogeneously broadened by a slower process, also characterized by a single relaxation time. The fundamental mode, near 1583 cm-1, is inhomogeneously broadened, but the relaxation time calculated for this mode is sensitive to temperature as a result of anharmonic coupling to a combination mode. A change in the modulation of the 1583 cm-1 band becomes apparent about 10--20 degrees below the thermally measured Tg. Relaxation times at first increase then decrease and becomes negligible at temperatures near 180 degrees. These results are consistent with theories of the glass transition.

  16. Measurement of hyperpolarized gas diffusion at very short time scales

    PubMed Central

    Carl, Michael; Wilson Miller, G.; Mugler, John P.; Rohrbaugh, Scott; Tobias, William A.; Cates, Gordon D.

    2007-01-01

    We present a new pulse sequence for measuring very-short-time-scale restricted diffusion of hyperpolarized noble gases. The pulse sequence is based on concatenating a large number of bipolar diffusion-sensitizing gradients to increase the diffusion attenuation of the MR signal while maintaining a fundamentally short diffusion time. However, it differs in several respects from existing methods that use oscillating diffusion gradients for this purpose. First, a wait time is inserted between neighboring pairs of gradient pulses; second, consecutive pulse pairs may be applied along orthogonal axes; and finally, the diffusion-attenuated signal is not simply read out at the end of the gradient train but is periodically sampled during the wait times between neighboring pulse pairs. The first two features minimize systematic differences between the measured (apparent) diffusion coefficient and the actual time-dependent diffusivity, while the third feature optimizes the use of the available MR signal to improve the precision of the diffusivity measurement in the face of noise. The benefits of this technique are demonstrated using theoretical calculations, Monte-Carlo simulations of gas diffusion in simple geometries, and experimental phantom measurements in a glass sphere containing hyperpolarized 3He gas. The advantages over the conventional single-bipolar approach were found to increase with decreasing diffusion time, and thus represent a significant step toward making accurate surface-to-volume measurements in the lung airspaces. PMID:17936048

  17. Time scale algorithms for an inhomogeneous group of atomic clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacques, C.; Boulanger, J.-S.; Douglas, R. J.; Morris, D.; Cundy, S.; Lam, H. F.

    1993-01-01

    Through the past 17 years, the time scale requirements at the National Research Council (NRC) have been met by the unsteered output of its primary laboratory cesium clocks, supplemented by hydrogen masers when short-term stability better than 2 x 10(exp -12)tau(sup -1/2) has been required. NRC now operates three primary laboratory cesium clocks, three hydrogen masers, and two commercial cesium clocks. NRC has been using ensemble averages for internal purposes for the past several years, and has a realtime algorithm operating on the outputs of its high-resolution (2 x 10(exp -13) s at 1 s) phase comparators. The slow frequency drift of the hydrogen masers has presented difficulties in incorporating their short-term stability into the ensemble average, while retaining the long-term stability of the laboratory cesium frequency standards. We report on this work on algorithms for an inhomogeneous ensemble of atomic clocks, and on our initial work on time scale algorithms that could incorporate frequency calibrations at NRC from the next generation of Zacharias fountain cesium frequency standards having frequency accuracies that might surpass 10(exp -15), or from single-trapped-ion frequency standards (Ba+, Sr+,...) with even higher potential accuracies. The requirements for redundancy in all the elements (including the algorithms) of an inhomogeneous ensemble that would give a robust real-time output of the algorithms are presented and discussed.

  18. Time-Dependent Earthquake Forecasts on a Global Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundle, J. B.; Holliday, J. R.; Turcotte, D. L.; Graves, W. R.

    2014-12-01

    We develop and implement a new type of global earthquake forecast. Our forecast is a perturbation on a smoothed seismicity (Relative Intensity) spatial forecast combined with a temporal time-averaged ("Poisson") forecast. A variety of statistical and fault-system models have been discussed for use in computing forecast probabilities. An example is the Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities, which has been using fault-based models to compute conditional probabilities in California since 1988. An example of a forecast is the Epidemic-Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS), which is based on the Gutenberg-Richter (GR) magnitude-frequency law, the Omori aftershock law, and Poisson statistics. The method discussed in this talk is based on the observation that GR statistics characterize seismicity for all space and time. Small magnitude event counts (quake counts) are used as "markers" for the approach of large events. More specifically, if the GR b-value = 1, then for every 1000 M>3 earthquakes, one expects 1 M>6 earthquake. So if ~1000 M>3 events have occurred in a spatial region since the last M>6 earthquake, another M>6 earthquake should be expected soon. In physics, event count models have been called natural time models, since counts of small events represent a physical or natural time scale characterizing the system dynamics. In a previous research, we used conditional Weibull statistics to convert event counts into a temporal probability for a given fixed region. In the present paper, we move belyond a fixed region, and develop a method to compute these Natural Time Weibull (NTW) forecasts on a global scale, using an internally consistent method, in regions of arbitrary shape and size. We develop and implement these methods on a modern web-service computing platform, which can be found at www.openhazards.com and www.quakesim.org. We also discuss constraints on the User Interface (UI) that follow from practical considerations of site usability.

  19. Stability and Instability Issues for Relaxation Shock Profiles

    E-print Network

    Mascia, Corrado

    be thought as a dynamical system with two time scales: the fast one is governed mainly by the kinetic part. The aim of this chapter is to briefly present the state of the art on the analysis of stability function F is linear, system (1) is called discrete kinetic model. System (1) has a relaxation structure if

  20. Scaling in a Continuous Time Model for Biological Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Almeida, R. M. C.; Thomas, G. L.

    In this paper, we consider a generalization to the asexual version of Penna model for biological aging, where we take a continuous time limit. The genotype associated to each individual is an interval of real numbers over which Dirac ?-functions are defined, representing genetically programmed diseases to be switched on at defined ages of the individual life. We discuss two different continuous limits for the evolution equation and two different mutation protocols, to be implemented during reproduction. Exact stationary solutions are obtained and scaling properties are discussed.

  1. Origin of two time-scale regimes in potentiometric titration of metal oxides. A replica kinetic Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Zarzycki, Piotr P.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2009-06-16

    Replica Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations were used to study the characteristic time scales of potentiometric titration of the metal oxides and (oxy)hydroxides. The effect of surface heterogeneity and surface transformation on the titration kinetics were also examined. Two characteristic relaxation times are often observed experimentally, with the trailing slower part attributed to surface non-uniformity, porosity, polymerization, amorphization, and other dynamic surface processes induced by unbalanced surface charge. However, our simulations show that these two characteristic relaxation times are intrinsic to the proton binding reaction for energetically homogeneous surfaces, and therefore surface heterogeneity or transformation do not necessarily need to be invoked. However, all such second-order surface processes are found to intensify the separation and distinction of the two kinetic regimes. The effect of surface energetic-topographic non-uniformity, as well dynamic surface transformation, interface roughening/smoothing were described in a statistical fashion. Furthermore, our simulations show that a shift in the point-of-zero charge is expected from increased titration speed and the pH-dependence of the titration measurement error is in excellent agreement with experimental studies.

  2. Relaxation therapy in Tourette syndrome: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bergin, A; Waranch, H R; Brown, J; Carson, K; Singer, H S

    1998-02-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of behavioral relaxation therapy as treatment for Tourette syndrome, 23 patients were recruited from a university-based pediatric Tourette syndrome referral clinic. Individuals were randomized and stratified according to initial tic severity and the presence of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder into either relaxation therapy or a minimal therapy (control) group. Sixteen patients, mean age 11.8 years (S.D. 2.8 years), completed the 3-month study, which included weekly, hour-long, individual training sessions for 6 weeks. Individuals (n = 7) in the relaxation therapy group demonstrated a significantly increased ability to relax, compared with the minimal therapy (awareness and quiet time training) group. At 6 weeks, tic findings, based on five established tic severity scales, revealed greater improvement in the relaxation treatment group, but values failed to reach statistical significance. No difference between therapy groups was apparent at the 3-month evaluation. The acquired ability to relax did not significantly affect behavioral measures on the Child Behavioral Checklist. On the basis of this pilot study, relaxation therapy appears to have a limited role in the treatment of tics in Tourette syndrome. PMID:9535299

  3. Speed of Markovian relaxation toward the ground state

    SciTech Connect

    Vogl, Malte; Schaller, Gernot; Brandes, Tobias

    2010-01-15

    For sufficiently low reservoir temperatures, it is known that open quantum systems subject to decoherent interactions with the reservoir relax toward their ground state in the weak coupling limit. Within the framework of quantum master equations, this is formalized by the Born-Markov-secular (BMS) approximation, where one obtains the system Gibbs state with the reservoir temperature as a stationary state. When the solution to some problem is encoded in the (isolated) ground state of a system Hamiltonian, decoherence can therefore be exploited for computation. The computational complexity is then given by the scaling of the relaxation time with the system size n. We study the relaxation behavior for local and nonlocal Hamiltonians that are coupled dissipatively with local and nonlocal operators to a bosonic bath in thermal equilibrium. We find that relaxation is generally more efficient when coherences of the density matrix in the system energy eigenbasis are taken into account. In addition, the relaxation speed strongly depends on the matrix elements of the coupling operators between initial state and ground state. We show that Dicke superradiance is a special case of our relaxation models and can thus be understood as a coherence-assisted relaxation speedup.

  4. Speed of Markovian relaxation toward the ground state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogl, Malte; Schaller, Gernot; Brandes, Tobias

    2010-01-01

    For sufficiently low reservoir temperatures, it is known that open quantum systems subject to decoherent interactions with the reservoir relax toward their ground state in the weak coupling limit. Within the framework of quantum master equations, this is formalized by the Born-Markov-secular (BMS) approximation, where one obtains the system Gibbs state with the reservoir temperature as a stationary state. When the solution to some problem is encoded in the (isolated) ground state of a system Hamiltonian, decoherence can therefore be exploited for computation. The computational complexity is then given by the scaling of the relaxation time with the system size n. We study the relaxation behavior for local and nonlocal Hamiltonians that are coupled dissipatively with local and nonlocal operators to a bosonic bath in thermal equilibrium. We find that relaxation is generally more efficient when coherences of the density matrix in the system energy eigenbasis are taken into account. In addition, the relaxation speed strongly depends on the matrix elements of the coupling operators between initial state and ground state. We show that Dicke superradiance is a special case of our relaxation models and can thus be understood as a coherence-assisted relaxation speedup.

  5. The contribution of time-dependent stress relaxation in protein gels to the recoverable energy that is used as a tool to describe food texture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, Saskia; van Vliet, Ton; de Jongh, Harmen H. J.

    2015-08-01

    The recoverable energy (RE), defined as the ratio of the work exerted on a test specimen during compression and recovered upon subsequent decompression, has been shown to correlate to sensory profiling of protein-based food products. Understanding the mechanism determining the time-dependency of RE is primordial. This work aims to identify the protein-specific impact on the recoverable energy by stress dissipation via relaxation of (micro)structural rearrangements within protein gels. To this end, caseinate and gelatin gels are studied for their response to time-dependent mechanical deformation as they are known to develop structurally distinct network morphologies. This work shows that in gelatin gels no significant stress relaxation occurs on the seconds timescale, and consequently no time-dependency of the amount of energy stored in this material is observed. In caseinate gels, however, the energy dissipation via relaxation processes does contribute significantly to the time-dependency of reversible stored energy in the network. This can explain the obtained RE as a function of applied deformation at slow deformation rates. At faster deformation, an additional contribution to the dissipated energy is apparent, that increases with the deformation rate, which might point to the role of energy dissipation related to friction of the serum entrapped by the protein-network. This work shows that engineering strategies focused on controlling viscous flow in protein gels could be more effective to dictate the ability to elastically store energy in protein gels than routes that direct protein-specific aggregation and/or network-assembly.

  6. Reusable Launch Vehicle Control in Multiple Time Scale Sliding Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shtessel, Yuri

    1999-01-01

    A reusable launch vehicle control problem during ascent is addressed via multiple-time scaled continuous sliding mode control. The proposed sliding mode controller utilizes a two-loop structure and provides robust, de-coupled tracking of both orientation angle command profiles and angular rate command profiles in the presence of bounded external disturbances and plant uncertainties. Sliding mode control causes the angular rate and orientation angle tracking error dynamics to be constrained to linear, de-coupled, homogeneous, and vector valued differential equations with desired eigenvalues placement. The dual-time scale sliding mode controller was designed for the X-33 technology demonstration sub-orbital launch vehicle in the launch mode. 6DOF simulation results show that the designed controller provides robust, accurate, de-coupled tracking of the orientation angle command profiles in presence of external disturbances and vehicle inertia uncertainties. It creates possibility to operate the X-33 vehicle in an aircraft-like mode with reduced pre-launch adjustment of the control system.

  7. Reusable Launch Vehicle Control In Multiple Time Scale Sliding Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shtessel, Yuri; Hall, Charles; Jackson, Mark

    2000-01-01

    A reusable launch vehicle control problem during ascent is addressed via multiple-time scaled continuous sliding mode control. The proposed sliding mode controller utilizes a two-loop structure and provides robust, de-coupled tracking of both orientation angle command profiles and angular rate command profiles in the presence of bounded external disturbances and plant uncertainties. Sliding mode control causes the angular rate and orientation angle tracking error dynamics to be constrained to linear, de-coupled, homogeneous, and vector valued differential equations with desired eigenvalues placement. Overall stability of a two-loop control system is addressed. An optimal control allocation algorithm is designed that allocates torque commands into end-effector deflection commands, which are executed by the actuators. The dual-time scale sliding mode controller was designed for the X-33 technology demonstration sub-orbital launch vehicle in the launch mode. Simulation results show that the designed controller provides robust, accurate, de-coupled tracking of the orientation angle command profiles in presence of external disturbances and vehicle inertia uncertainties. This is a significant advancement in performance over that achieved with linear, gain scheduled control systems currently being used for launch vehicles.

  8. Complex Processes from Dynamical Architectures with Time-Scale Hierarchy

    PubMed Central

    Perdikis, Dionysios; Huys, Raoul; Jirsa, Viktor

    2011-01-01

    The idea that complex motor, perceptual, and cognitive behaviors are composed of smaller units, which are somehow brought into a meaningful relation, permeates the biological and life sciences. However, no principled framework defining the constituent elementary processes has been developed to this date. Consequently, functional configurations (or architectures) relating elementary processes and external influences are mostly piecemeal formulations suitable to particular instances only. Here, we develop a general dynamical framework for distinct functional architectures characterized by the time-scale separation of their constituents and evaluate their efficiency. Thereto, we build on the (phase) flow of a system, which prescribes the temporal evolution of its state variables. The phase flow topology allows for the unambiguous classification of qualitatively distinct processes, which we consider to represent the functional units or modes within the dynamical architecture. Using the example of a composite movement we illustrate how different architectures can be characterized by their degree of time scale separation between the internal elements of the architecture (i.e. the functional modes) and external interventions. We reveal a tradeoff of the interactions between internal and external influences, which offers a theoretical justification for the efficient composition of complex processes out of non-trivial elementary processes or functional modes. PMID:21347363

  9. Time Dilation in the Peak-to-Peak Time Scale of GRBs

    E-print Network

    Ming Deng; Bradley E. Schaefer

    1998-05-31

    We present strong evidence of time stretching in the peak-to-peak time scales in the light curves of BATSE Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). Extensive tests are performed on artificially dilated bursts to verify that the procedure for extracting the peak-to-peak time scales correctly recovers the stretching of bursts. The resulting robust algorithm is then applied to the 4B GRB database. We derive a stretching factor of $1.92 \\pm 0.13$ between the brightest burst group ($P > 7.7 photon \\cdot cm^{-2} \\cdot s^{-1}$) and the dimmest burst group ($P = 1.0 \\sim 1.4 photon \\cdot cm^{-2} \\cdot s^{-1}$) with several independent peak-to-peak time scale definitions and they agree within uncertainties. Such an agreement strongly supports the interpretation of the observed time stretching as time dilation caused by the cosmological expansion, rather than physical selection effects. We fit the result to cosmological models with $\\Lambda = 0$, $\\Omega_{0}$ from 0.2 to 1.0, and contrained the standard candle luminosity to be $L_{0}= 7.0 \\pm 2.0 \\pm 2.7 \\times 10^{56} photons \\cdot s^{-1}$. Our luminosity value is fully consistent with the value from the combined PVO and BATSE LogN-LogP curve with the BATSE bright bursts at low redshifts of $z_{bright} = 0.11 \\pm 0.02 \\pm 0.025$. This luminosity fit is definitely inconsistent with the the larger distance scale implied from associating burst density with star formation rates.

  10. Isotope labeling methods for relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Lundström, Patrik; Ahlner, Alexandra; Blissing, Annica Theresia

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic spin relaxation has emerged as a powerful technique for probing molecular dynamics. Not only is it possible to use it for determination of time constant(s) for molecular reorientation but it can also be used to characterize internal motions on time scales from picoseconds to seconds. Traditionally, uniformly (15)N labeled samples have been used for these experiments but it is clear that this limits the applications. For instance, sensitivity for large systems is dramatically increased if dynamics is probed at methyl groups and structural characterization of low-populated states requires measurements on (13)C?, (13)C? or (13)CO or (1)H?. Unfortunately, homonuclear scalar couplings may lead to artifacts in the latter types of experiments and selective isotopic labeling schemes that only label the desired position are necessary. Both selective and uniform labeling schemes for measurements of relaxation rates for a large number of positions in proteins are discussed in this chapter. PMID:23076579

  11. NOVEL THYROIDECTOMY DIFFICULTY SCALE CORRELATES WITH OPERATIVE TIMES

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, David F.; Mazeh, Haggi; Oltmann, Sarah C.; Chen, Herbert; Sippel, Rebecca S.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to evaluate a new thyroidectomy difficulty scale (TDS) for its inter-rater agreement, correspondence with operative times, and correlation with complications. Methods We developed a four item, 20-point TDS. Following cases where two board-certified surgeons participated, each surgeon completed a TDS, blinded to the other’s responses. Paired sets of TDS scores were compared. The relationship between operative time and TDS scores was analyzed with linear regression. Multiple regression evaluated the association of TDS scores and other clinical data with operative times. Results A total of 119 patients were scored using TDS. In this cohort, 22.7% suffered from hyperthyroidism, 37.8% experienced compressive symptoms, and 58.8% had cancer. The median total TDS score was 8, and both surgeons’ total scores exhibited a high degree of correlation. 87.4% of both raters’ total scores were within one point of each other. Patients with hyperthyroidism received higher median scores compared to euthyroid patients (10 vs. 8, p<0.01). Similarly, patients who suffered a complication had higher scores compared to those patients without complications (10 vs. 8, p= 0.04). TDS scores demonstrated a linear relationship with operative times (R2 = 0.36, p<0.01, Figure 1). Cases with a score of 14 or greater took 41.0% longer compared to cases with scores of five or less (p<0.01). In multiple regression analysis, TDS scores independently predicted operative time (p<0.01). Conclusion The TDS is an accurate tool, and scores correlate with more difficult thyroidectomies as measured by complications and operative times. PMID:24615607

  12. Global Precipitation Analyses at Monthly to 3-HR Time Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, Robert F.; Huffman, George; Curtis, Scott; Bolvin, David; Nelkin, Eric

    2002-01-01

    Global precipitation analysis covering the last few decades and the impact of the new TRMM precipitation observations are discussed. The 20+ year, monthly, globally complete precipitation analysis of the World Climate Research Program's (WCRP/GEWEX) Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) is used to explore global and regional variations and trends and is compared to the much shorter TRMM(Tropica1 Rainfall Measuring Mission) tropical data set. A trend pattern that is a combination of both El Nino and La Nina precipitation features is evident in the 20-year data set. This pattern is related to an increase with time in the number of combined months of El Nino and La Nina during the 20 year period. Monthly anomalies of precipitation are related to ENSO variations with clear signals extending into middle and high latitudes of both hemispheres. The GPCP daily, 1deg latitude-longitude analysis, which is available from January 1997 to the present is described and the evolution of precipitation patterns on this time scale related to El Nino and La Nina is described. Finally, a TRMM-based 3-hr analysis is described that uses TRMM to calibrate polar-orbit microwave observations from SSM/I and geosynchronous IR observations and merges the various calibrated observations into a final, 3-hr resolution map. This TRMM standard product will soon be available for the entire TRMM period (January 1998- present). A real-time version of this merged product is being produced and is available at 0.25deg latitude-longitude resolution over the latitude range from 50degN-50degS. Images from this data set can be seen at the U.S. TRMM web site (trmm.gsfc.nasa.gov). Examples will be shown, including its use in monitoring flood conditions and relating weather-scale events to climate variations.

  13. [Radiation absorption (CT) and proton relaxation times (MR) of the blood. Quantification of the effect of cell, protein, mineral and water content on total absorption].

    PubMed

    Schmitt, W G

    1987-06-01

    The exact knowledge of the physical properties of the blood is of great help in image interpretation. Accumulations of liquid with different components of protein and cells must be differentiated from neoplastic tissues. The blood with its composition will influence from the imaging point of view all other blood supplied tissues. The CT number (radiation absorption) of the entire tissue is the sum of the radiation absorption of its single components. To demonstrate this we used human blood as a "tissue model". The proton-relaxation times (T1 and T2) were measured in their dependence on the red cell concentration. PMID:3621811

  14. Picosecond Time-Resolved Cyclotron Resonance Study of Intra- and Inter-Landau Level Relaxation in InSb Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larrabee, D. C.; Khodaparast, G. A.; Kono, J.; King, D. S.; Chung, S. J.; Santos, M. B.

    2002-03-01

    We have measured the picosecond time-resolved cyclotron resonance(J. Kono et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 75), 1119 (1999). of photo-generated transient carriers in InSb quantum wells by two-color pump-probe spectroscopy in a magnetic field. The sample was grown by MBE and contained 25 periods of 35 nm InSb well separated by 50 nm of Al_0.09In_0.91Sb barrier. The strong conduction band nonparabolicity of InSb causes the average cyclotron mass of the electrons, which we monitor directly in time, to decrease as the electrons relax towards the band edge. In addition, the nonparabolicity results in multiple cyclotron resonance lines due to the strongly energy dependent mass and g-factor, allowing us to carry out a detailed study of spin-flip and spin-conserving relaxation in the time domain. We gratefully acknowledge support from NSF DMR-9970962, DMR-9973167, DMR-0080054, DMR-0134058 (CAREER), DARPA MDA972-00-1-0034, ONR N00014-94-1-1024, JST and NEDO.

  15. Single-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann scheme for advection-diffusion problems with large diffusion-coefficient heterogeneities and high-advection transport.

    PubMed

    Perko, Janez; Patel, Ravi A

    2014-05-01

    The paper presents an approach that extends the flexibility of the standard lattice Boltzmann single relaxation time scheme in terms of spatial variation of dissipative terms (e.g., diffusion coefficient) and stability for high Péclet mass transfer problems. Spatial variability of diffusion coefficient in SRT is typically accommodated through the variation of relaxation time during the collision step. This method is effective but cannot deal with large diffusion coefficient variations, which can span over several orders of magnitude in some natural systems. The approach explores an alternative way of dealing with large diffusion coefficient variations in advection-diffusion transport systems by introducing so-called diffusion velocity. The diffusion velocity is essentially an additional convective term that replaces variations in diffusion coefficients vis-à-vis a chosen reference diffusion coefficient which defines the simulation time step. Special attention is paid to the main idea behind the diffusion velocity formulation and its implementation into the lattice Boltzmann framework. Finally, the performance, stability, and accuracy of the diffusion velocity formulation are discussed via several advection-diffusion transport benchmark examples. These examples demonstrate improved stability and flexibility of the proposed scheme with marginal consequences on the numerical performance. PMID:25353916

  16. The MOND limit from space-time scale invariance

    E-print Network

    Mordehai Milgrom

    2009-06-03

    The MOND limit is shown to follow from a requirement of space-time scale invariance of the equations of motion for nonrelativistic, purely gravitational systems; i.e., invariance of the equations of motion under (t,r) goes to (qt,qr), in the limit a0 goes to infinity. It is suggested that this should replace the definition of the MOND limit based on the low-acceleration behavior of a Newtonian-MOND interpolating function. In this way, the salient, deep-MOND results--asymptotically flat rotation curves, the mass-rotational-speed relation (baryonic Tully-Fisher relation), the Faber-Jackson relation, etc.--follow from a symmetry principle. For example, asymptotic flatness of rotation curves reflects the fact that radii change under scaling, while velocities do not. I then comment on the interpretation of the deep-MOND limit as one of "zero mass": Rest masses, whose presence obstructs scaling symmetry, become negligible compared to the "phantom", dynamical masses--those that some would attribute to dark matter. Unlike the former masses, the latter transform in a way that is consistent with the symmetry. Finally, I discuss the putative MOND-cosmology connection in light of another, previously known symmetry of the deep-MOND limit. In particular, it is suggested that MOND is related to the asymptotic de Sitter geometry of our universe. It is conjectured, for example, that in an exact de Sitter cosmos, deep-MOND physics would exactly apply to local systems. I also point out, in this connection, the possible relevance of a de Sitter-conformal-field-theory (dS/CFT) duality.

  17. Glass transition and relaxation dynamics of propylene glycol-water solutions confined in clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elamin, Khalid; Björklund, Jimmy; Nyhlén, Fredrik; Yttergren, Madeleine; Mârtensson, Lena; Swenson, Jan

    2014-07-01

    The molecular dynamics of aqueous solutions of propylene glycol (PG) and propylene glycol methylether (PGME) confined in a two-dimensional layer-structured Na-vermiculite clay has been studied by broadband dielectric spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. As typical for liquids in confined geometries the intensity of the cooperative ?-relaxation becomes considerably more suppressed than the more local ?-like relaxation processes. In fact, at high water contents the calorimetric glass transition and related structural ?-relaxation cannot even be observed, due to the confinement. Thus, the intensity of the viscosity related ?-relaxation is dramatically reduced, but its time scale as well as the related glass transition temperature Tg are for both systems only weakly influenced by the confinement. In the case of the PGME-water solutions it is an important finding since in the corresponding bulk system a pronounced non-monotonic concentration dependence of the glass transition related dynamics has been observed due to the growth of hydrogen bonded relaxing entities of water bridging between PGME molecules [J. Sjöström, J. Mattsson, R. Bergman, and J. Swenson, Phys. Chem. B 115, 10013 (2011)]. The present results suggest that the same type of structural entities are formed in the quasi-two-dimensional space between the clay platelets. It is also observed that the main water relaxation cannot be distinguished from the ?-relaxation of PG or PGME in the concentration range up to intermediate water contents. This suggests that these two processes are coupled and that the water molecules affect the time scale of the ?-relaxation. However, this is most likely true also for the corresponding bulk solutions, which exhibit similar time scales of this combined relaxation process below Tg. Finally, it is found that at higher water contents the water relaxation does not merge with, or follow, the ?-relaxation above Tg, but instead crosses the ?-relaxation, indicating that the two relaxation processes are independent of each other. This can only occur if the two processes do not occur in the same parts of the confined solutions. Most likely the hydration shell of the interlayer Na+ ions is causing this water relaxation, which does not participate in the ?-relaxation at any temperature.

  18. Bulk mode piezoresistive thermal oscillators: time constants and scaling.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Subramanian; Weinstein, Dana

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents design and analysis for engineering the thermal and mechanical time constants of piezoresistive thermal oscillators. The optimal design is obtained by minimizing the threshold current density required to initiate self-sustained oscillations. Optimizing the oscillator geometry is of extreme practical importance given that the threshold current densities (GA/m(2)) are close to the breakdown current densities observed in silicon. The equivalent circuit model of the oscillator is used along with the lumped thermal, mechanical, and piezoresistive parameters to calculate the threshold current density of the oscillator. The optimal ratio of the thermal and mechanical time constants is found to be ?3 for bulkmode oscillators where the in-plane dimensions control the mechanical resonant frequency. The final frequency of oscillations is obtained as a function of the mechanical resonant frequency, quality factor (Q), and the ratio of the time constants. Results show that scaling the dimension (or frequency) has a weak sub-linear effect on the oscillator performance. Finally, we compare different bulk modes, based on the calculated threshold dc currents for a 1-GHz oscillator. PMID:26276963

  19. Variations in solar Lyman alpha irradiance on short time scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pap, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    Variations in solar UV irradiance at Lyman alpha are studied on short time scales (from days to months) after removing the long-term changes over the solar cycle. The SME/Lyman alpha irradiance is estimated from various solar indices using linear regression analysis. In order to study the nonlinear effects, Lyman alpha irradiance is modeled with a 5th-degree polynomial as well. It is shown that the full-disk equivalent width of the He line at 1083 nm, which is used as a proxy for the plages and active network, can best reproduce the changes observed in Lyman alpha. Approximately 72 percent of the solar-activity-related changes in Lyman alpha irradiance arise from plages and the network. The network contribution is estimated by the correlation analysis to be about 19 percent. It is shown that significant variability remains in Lyman alpha irradiance, with periods around 300, 27, and 13.5d, which is not explained by the solar activity indices. It is shown that the nonlinear effects cannot account for a significant part of the unexplained variation in Lyman alpha irradiance. Therefore, additional events (e.g., large-scale motions and/or a systematic difference in the area and intensity of the plages and network observed in the lines of Ca-K, He 1083, and Lyman alpha) may explain the discrepancies found between the observed and estimated irradiance values.

  20. Scale relativity and fractal space-time: theory and applications

    E-print Network

    Laurent Nottale

    2008-12-19

    In the first part of this contribution, we review the development of the theory of scale relativity and its geometric framework constructed in terms of a fractal and nondifferentiable continuous space-time. This theory leads (i) to a generalization of possible physically relevant fractal laws, written as partial differential equation acting in the space of scales, and (ii) to a new geometric foundation of quantum mechanics and gauge field theories and their possible generalisations. In the second part, we discuss some examples of application of the theory to various sciences, in particular in cases when the theoretical predictions have been validated by new or updated observational and experimental data. This includes predictions in physics and cosmology (value of the QCD coupling and of the cosmological constant), to astrophysics and gravitational structure formation (distances of extrasolar planets to their stars, of Kuiper belt objects, value of solar and solar-like star cycles), to sciences of life (log-periodic law for species punctuated evolution, human development and society evolution), to Earth sciences (log-periodic deceleration of the rate of California earthquakes and of Sichuan earthquake replicas, critical law for the arctic sea ice extent) and tentative applications to system biology.

  1. Variation of atmospheric depth profile on different time scales

    E-print Network

    B. Wilczynska; D. Gora; P. Homola; J. Pekala; M. Risse; H. Wilczynski

    2006-03-03

    The vertical profile of atmospheric depth is an important element in extensive air shower studies. The depth of shower maximum is one of the most important characteristics of the shower. In the fluorescence technique of shower detection, the geometrical reconstruction provides the altitude of shower maximum, so that an accurate profile of atmospheric depth is needed to convert this altitude to the depth of shower maximum. In this paper the temporal variation of experimentally measured profiles of atmospheric depth at different sites is studied and implications for shower reconstruction are shown. The atmospheric profiles vary on time scales from hours to years. It is shown that the daily variation of the profile is as important as its seasonal variation and should be accounted for in air shower studies. For precise shower reconstruction, the daily profiles determined locally at the site of the air shower detector are recommended.

  2. Dynamic Leidenfrost effect: relevant time- and length-scales

    E-print Network

    Shirota, Minori; Sun, Chao; Prosperetti, Andrea; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    When a liquid droplet impacts a hot solid surface, enough vapor may be generated under it as to prevent its contact with the solid. The minimum solid temperature for this so-called Leidenfrost effect to occur is termed the Leidenfrost temperature, or the dynamic Leidenfrost temperature when the droplet velocity is non-negligible. We observe the wetting/drying and the levitation dynamics of the droplet impacting on an (isothermal) smooth sapphire surface using high speed total internal reflection imaging, which enables us to observe the droplet base up to about 100 nm above the substrate surface. By this method we are able to reveal the processes responsible for the transitional regime between the fully wetting and the fully levitated droplet as the solid temperature increases, thus shedding light on the characteristic time- and length-scales setting the dynamic Leidenfrost temperature for droplet impact on an isothermal substrate.

  3. Dynamic Leidenfrost effect: relevant time- and length-scales

    E-print Network

    Minori Shirota; Michiel A. J. van Limbeek; Chao Sun; Andrea Prosperetti; Detlef Lohse

    2015-11-16

    When a liquid droplet impacts a hot solid surface, enough vapor may be generated under it as to prevent its contact with the solid. The minimum solid temperature for this so-called Leidenfrost effect to occur is termed the Leidenfrost temperature, or the dynamic Leidenfrost temperature when the droplet velocity is non-negligible. We observe the wetting/drying and the levitation dynamics of the droplet impacting on an (isothermal) smooth sapphire surface using high speed total internal reflection imaging, which enables us to observe the droplet base up to about 100 nm above the substrate surface. By this method we are able to reveal the processes responsible for the transitional regime between the fully wetting and the fully levitated droplet as the solid temperature increases, thus shedding light on the characteristic time- and length-scales setting the dynamic Leidenfrost temperature for droplet impact on an isothermal substrate.

  4. X-ray signatures: New time scales and spectral features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boldt, E. A.

    1977-01-01

    The millisecond bursts from Cyg X-1 are investigated and the overall chaotic variability for the bulk of the Cyg X-1 emission is compared to that of Sco X-1, showing that the essential character is remarkably similar (i.e. shot noise) although the fundamental time scales involved differ widely, from a fraction of a second (for Cyg X-1) to a fraction of a day (for Sco X-1). Recent OSO-8 observations of spectra features attributable to iron are reviewed. In particular, line emission is discussed within the context of a model for thermal radiation by a hot evolved gas in systems as different as supernova remnants and clusters of galaxies. Newly observed spectral structure in the emission from the X-ray pulsar Her X-1 is reported.

  5. Control of Systems With Slow Actuators Using Time Scale Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepanyan, Vehram; Nguyen, Nhan

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of controlling a nonlinear plant with a slow actuator using singular perturbation method. For the known plant-actuator cascaded system the proposed scheme achieves tracking of a given reference model with considerably less control demand than would otherwise result when using conventional design techniques. This is the consequence of excluding the small parameter from the actuator dynamics via time scale separation. The resulting tracking error is within the order of this small parameter. For the unknown system the adaptive counterpart is developed based on the prediction model, which is driven towards the reference model by the control design. It is proven that the prediction model tracks the reference model with an error proportional to the small parameter, while the prediction error converges to zero. The resulting closed-loop system with all prediction models and adaptive laws remains stable. The benefits of the approach are demonstrated in simulation studies and compared to conventional control approaches.

  6. Critical aging of Ising ferromagnets relaxing from an ordered state

    E-print Network

    Pasquale Calabrese; Andrea Gambassi; Florent Krzakala

    2006-04-18

    We investigate the nonequilibrium behavior of the d-dimensional Ising model with purely dissipative dynamics during its critical relaxation from a magnetized initial configuration. The universal scaling forms of the two-time response and correlation functions of the magnetization are derived within the field-theoretical approach and the associated scaling functions and fluctuation-dissipation ratio are computed up to first order in the epsilon-expansion. Aging behavior is clearly displayed during the critical relaxation. These results are confirmed by Monte Carlo simulations of the two-dimensional Ising model with Glauber dynamics. The crossover to the case of relaxation from a disordered state is discussed and the crossover function for the fluctuation-dissipation ratio is computed within the Gaussian approximation.

  7. Towards a stable numerical time scale for the early Paleogene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilgen, Frederik; Kuiper, Klaudia; Sierro, Francisco J.; Wotzlaw, Jorn; Schaltegger, Urs; Sahy, Diana; Condon, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    The construction of an astronomical time scale for the early Paleogene is hampered by ambiguities in the number, correlation and tuning of 405-kyr eccentricity related cycles in deep marine records from ODP cores and land-based sections. The two most competing age models result in astronomical ages for the K/Pg boundary that differ by ~750 kyr (~66.0 Ma of Vandenberghe et al. (2012) versus 65.25 Ma of Westerhold et al. (2012); these ages in turn are consistent with proposed ages for the Fish Canyon sanidine (FCs) that differ by ~300 kyr (28.201 Ma of Kuiper et al. (2008) versus 27.89 Ma of Westerhold et al. (2012)); an even older age of 28.294 Ma is proposed based on a statistical optimization model (Renne et al., 2011). The astronomically calibrated FCs age of 28.201 ± 0.046 Ma of Kuiper et al. (2008), which is consistent with the astronomical age of ~66.0 Ma for the K/Pg boundary, is currently adopted in the standard geological time scale (GTS2012). Here we combine new and published data in an attempt to solve the controversy and arrive at a stable nuemrical time scale for the early Paleogene. Supporting their younger age model, Westerhold et al. (2012) argue that the tuning of Miocene sections in the Mediterranean, which underlie the older FCs age of Kuiper et al. (2008) and, hence, the coupled older early Paleogene age model of Vandenberghe et al. (2012), might be too old by three precession cycles. We thoroughly rechecked this tuning; distinctive cycle patterns related to eccentricity and precession-obliquity interference make a younger tuning that would be consistent with the younger astronomical age of 27.89 Ma for the FCs of Westerhold et al. (2012) challenging. Next we compared youngest U/Pb zircon and astronomical ages for a number of ash beds in the tuned Miocene section of Monte dei Corvi. These ages are indistinguishable, indicating that the two independent dating methods yield the same age when the same event is dated. This is consistent with results of single crystal U/Pb zircon dating of the Fish Canyon tuff itself (Wotzlaw et al., 2013), which produced a youngest U/Pb age of 28.196 ± 0.038 Ma that is indistinguishable from the astronomically calibrated age of 28.201 ± 0.046 Ma for the FCs. Finally, youngest U/Pb zircon ages for ash layers that are found directly above the K/Pg boundary in North America are close to 65.9 Ma and thus consistent with the older astronomical age model with an age of ~66.0 Ma for the boundary. Summarizing, the new and published data summarized above unanimously favor the older option of the two alternative astronomical time scales for the early Paleogene. References Kuiper, K.F., A. Deino, F.J. Hilgen, W. Krijgsman, P.R. Renne, and J.R. Wijbrans, 2008. Synchronizing the Rock Clocks of Earth history. Science 320, 500-504. Renne, P.R., G. Balco, K.R. Ludwig, R. Mundil, and K. Min, 2011. Response to the comment by W.H. Schwarz et al. on "Joint determination of 40K decay constants and 40Ar*/40K for the Fish Canyon sanidine standard, and improved accuracy for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology". Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 75, 5097-5100. Vandenberghe, N., F.J. Hilgen, and R.P. Speijer, 2012. The Paleogene Period. In: The Geological Time Scale 2012, Gradstein, F., et al., eds., Elsevier, pp. 855-921. Westerhold, T., U. Röhl, and J. Laskar, 2012. Time scale controversy: Accurate orbital calibration of the early Paleogene. Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., 13, Q06015, doi:10.1029/2012GC004096. Wotzlaw, J.-F., U. Schaltegger, D.A. Frick, M.A. Dungan, A. Gerdes, and D. Günther, 2013. Tracking the evolution of large-volume silicic magma reservoirs from assembly to supereruption. Geology, doi:10.1130/G34366.1

  8. Modulated heterodyne light scattering set-up for measuring long relaxation time at small and wide angle

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, Nancy; Villari, Valentina; Micali, Norberto

    2012-08-15

    We present a simple, compact, and versatile experimental setup working in the heterodyne detection mode with modulation of the reference beam. The system is implemented with a collection optics based on a unimodal optical fiber coupler. This choice allows the heterodyne to be used in a wide range of scattering angles, even for very small ones, without losing the optical beating. The apparatus can be successfully used to study translational diffusive dynamics of dispersed particles at scattering angles smaller than 5 Degree-Sign and it is suitable for exploring slow relaxation processes in sub-Hertz frequency domain, for example, in glass-forming systems. It is also possible to measure the electrophoretic mobility by applying an electric field into a charged particles solution.

  9. Homogenization of historical time series on a subdaily scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocen, Renate; Brönnimann, Stefan; Breda, Leila; Spadin, Reto; Begert, Michael; Füllemann, Christine

    2010-05-01

    Homogeneous long-term climatological time series provide useful information on climate back to the preindustrial era. High temporal resolution of climate data is desirable to address trends and variability in the mean climate and in climatic extremes. For Switzerland, three long (~250 yrs) historical time series (Basel, Geneva, Gr. St. Bernhard) that were hitherto available in the form of monthly means only have recently been digitized (in cooperation with MeteoSwiss) on a subdaily scale. The digitized time series contain subdaily data (varies from 2-5 daily measurements) on temperature, precipitation/snow height, pressure and humidity, as subdaily descriptions on wind direction, wind speeds and cloud cover. Long-term climatological records often contain inhomogeneities due to non climatic changes such as station relocations, changes in instrumentation and instrument exposure, changes in observing schedules/practices and environmental changes in the proximity of the observation site. Those disturbances can distort or hide the true climatic signal and could seriously affect the correct assessment and analysis of climate trends, variability and climatic extremes. It is therefore crucial to detect and eliminate artificial shifts and trends, to the extent possible, in the climate data prior to its application. Detailed information of the station history and instruments (metadata) can be of fundamental importance in the process of homogenization in order to support the determination of the exact time of inhomogeneities and the interpretation of statistical test results. While similar methods can be used for the detection of inhomogeneities in subdaily or monthly mean data, quite different correction methods can be chosen. The wealth of information in a high temporal resolution allows more physics-based correction methods. For instance, a detected radiation error in temperature can be corrected with an error model that incorporates radiation and ventilation terms using the subdaily information on cloud cover and wind from the station. The basic approach will be demonstrated.

  10. Use of a Walk Through Time to Facilitate Student Understandings of the Geological Time Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipman, H. L.

    2004-12-01

    Students often have difficulties in appreciating just how old the earth and the universe are. While they can simply memorize a number, they really do not understand just how big that number really is, in comparison with other, more familiar student referents like the length of a human lifetime or how long it takes to eat a pizza. (See, e.g., R.D. Trend 2001, J. Research in Science Teaching 38(2): 191-221) Students, and members of the general public, also display such well-known misconceptions as the "Flintstone chronology" of believing that human beings and dinosaurs walked the earth at the same time. (In the classic American cartoon "The Flintstones," human beings used dinosaurs as draft animals. As scientists we know this is fiction, but not all members of the public understand that.) In an interdisciplinary undergraduate college class that dealt with astronomy, cosmology, and biological evolution, I used a familiar activity to try to improve student understanding of the concept of time's vastness. Students walked through a pre-determined 600-step path which provided a spatial analogy to the geological time scale. They stopped at various points and engaged in some pre-determined discussions and debates. This activity is as old as the hills, but reports of its effectiveness or lack thereof are quite scarce. This paper demonstrates that this activity was effective for a general-audience, college student population in the U.S. The growth of student understandings of the geological time scale was significant as a result of this activity. Students did develop an understanding of time's vastness and were able to articulate this understanding in various ways. This growth was monitored through keeping track of several exam questions and through pre- and post- analysis of student writings. In the pre-writings, students often stated that they had "no idea" about how to illustrate the size of the geological time scale to someone else. While some post-time walk responses simply restated what was done in the walk through time, some students were able to develop their own ways of conceptualizing the vastness of the geological time scale. A variety of findings from student understandings will be presented. This work has been supported in part by the Distinguished Scholars Program of the National Science Foundation (DUE-0308557).

  11. The evaluation of non-topological components in Berry phase and momentum relaxation time in a gapped 3D topological insulator.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Parijat; Klimeck, Gerhard; Bellotti, Enrico

    2015-08-26

    The zero gap surface states of a 3D-topological insulator host Dirac fermions with spin locked to the momentum. The gap-less Dirac fermions exhibit electronic behaviour different from those predicted in conventional materials. While calculations based on a simple linear dispersion can account for observed experimental patterns, a more accurate description of the physics of these systems and a better agreement between experimental data theoretical results can be obtained by including higher order k terms in the Hamiltonian. In this work, in presence of a time reversal symmetry breaking external magnetic field and higher order warping term, alteration to the topologically ordained Berry phase of (2n + 1)?, momentum relaxation time, and the magneto-conductivity tensors is established. The relation between scattering times and the deviations to topological Berry phase of ? is also emphasized. PMID:26241517

  12. The evaluation of non-topological components in Berry phase and momentum relaxation time in a gapped 3D topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Parijat; Klimeck, Gerhard; Bellotti, Enrico

    2015-08-01

    The zero gap surface states of a 3D-topological insulator host Dirac fermions with spin locked to the momentum. The gap-less Dirac fermions exhibit electronic behaviour different from those predicted in conventional materials. While calculations based on a simple linear dispersion can account for observed experimental patterns, a more accurate description of the physics of these systems and a better agreement between experimental data theoretical results can be obtained by including higher order k terms in the Hamiltonian. In this work, in presence of a time reversal symmetry breaking external magnetic field and higher order warping term, alteration to the topologically ordained Berry phase of (2n+1)? , momentum relaxation time, and the magneto-conductivity tensors is established. The relation between scattering times and the deviations to topological Berry phase of ? is also emphasized.

  13. PHYS 626 --Fundamentals of Plasma Physics --Section 6.8 1. The diffusion time scale

    E-print Network

    Ng, Chung-Sang

    PHYS 626 -- Fundamentals of Plasma Physics -- Section 6.8 1. The diffusion time scale R = µ0L2 time diffusion time is measured by comparing with the Alfven time A = L /VA , i.e., by looking topology in a time scale r much shorter than the resistive time, i.e., R >> r >> A . 4. The Sweet

  14. Observation of Optical Pulse and Material Dynamics on the Femtosecond Time-Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Omenetto, F.; Luce, B.; Siders, C.W.; Taylor, A.J.

    1999-09-13

    The widespread availability of lasers that generate pulses on the femtosecond scale has opened new realms of investigation in the basic and applied sciences, rendering available excitations delivering intensities well in excess of 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2}, and furnishing probes capable of resolving molecular relaxation timescales. As a consequence and a necessity, sophisticated techniques to examine the pulse behavior on the femtosecond scale have been developed and are of crucial importance to gain insight on the behavior of physical systems. These techniques will be discussed with specific application to guided pulse propagation and ionization dynamics of noble gases.

  15. The time-scale for core collapse in spherical star clusters

    E-print Network

    Gerald D. Quinlan

    1996-06-30

    The collapse time for a cluster of equal-mass stars is usually stated to be either 330 central relaxation times ($\\trc$) or 12--19 half-mass relaxation times ($\\trh$). But the first of these times applies only to the late stages of core collapse, and the second only to low-concentration clusters. To clarify how the time depends on the mass distribution, the Fokker-Planck equation is solved for the evolution of a variety of isotropic cluster models, including King models, models with power-law density cusps of $\\rho\\sim r^{-\\gamma}$, and models with nuclei. High-concentration King models collapse faster than low-concentration models if the time is measured in units of $\\trh$, but slower if it is measured in units of $\\trc$. Models with cusps evolve faster than King models, but not all of them collapse: those with $0<\\gamma<2$ expand because they start with a temperature inversion. Models with nuclei collapse or expand as the nuclei would in isolation if their central relaxation times are short; otherwise their evolution is more complicated. Suggestions are made for how the results can be applied to globular clusters, galaxies, and hypothetical clusters of dark stars in the centers of galaxies.

  16. Change in T2* relaxation time of Hoffa fat pad correlates with histologic change in a rat anterior cruciate ligament transection model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao-Ying; Tsai, Ping-Huei; Siow, Tiing Yee; Lee, Herng-Sheng; Chang, Yue-Cune; Hsu, Yi-Chih; Chiang, Shih-Wei; Lin, Ming-Huang; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Huang, Guo-Shu

    2015-09-01

    The Hoffa fat pad (infrapatellar fat pad) is a source of post-traumatic anterior knee pain, and Hoffa disease is a syndrome leading to chronic inflammation of the fat pad. Herein, change in T2* relaxation time of the fat pad was measured in a rodent anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLX) model in order to (i) examine the causal relationship of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency and Hoffa disease and (ii) demonstrate the feasibility of using T2* as an imaging biomarker to monitor disease progression. Three groups of male Sprague Dawley rats (n?=?6 each group), received either (i) no intervention; (ii) sham surgery at the right knee; or (iii) right ACLX. T2* relaxation time was measured and histology was examined in the Hoffa fat pad after surgery. At 13 and 18 weeks after surgery, T2* values were significantly higher in the right fat pad than the left (p?

  17. Selective attention to temporal features on nested time scales.

    PubMed

    Henry, Molly J; Herrmann, Björn; Obleser, Jonas

    2015-02-01

    Meaningful auditory stimuli such as speech and music often vary simultaneously along multiple time scales. Thus, listeners must selectively attend to, and selectively ignore, separate but intertwined temporal features. The current study aimed to identify and characterize the neural network specifically involved in this feature-selective attention to time. We used a novel paradigm where listeners judged either the duration or modulation rate of auditory stimuli, and in which the stimulation, working memory demands, response requirements, and task difficulty were held constant. A first analysis identified all brain regions where individual brain activation patterns were correlated with individual behavioral performance patterns, which thus supported temporal judgments generically. A second analysis then isolated those brain regions that specifically regulated selective attention to temporal features: Neural responses in a bilateral fronto-parietal network including insular cortex and basal ganglia decreased with degree of change of the attended temporal feature. Critically, response patterns in these regions were inverted when the task required selectively ignoring this feature. The results demonstrate how the neural analysis of complex acoustic stimuli with multiple temporal features depends on a fronto-parietal network that simultaneously regulates the selective gain for attended and ignored temporal features. PMID:23978652

  18. Exact dynamical coarse-graining without time-scale separation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jianfeng; Vanden-Eijnden, Eric

    2014-07-28

    A family of collective variables is proposed to perform exact dynamical coarse-graining even in systems without time scale separation. More precisely, it is shown that these variables are not slow in general, yet satisfy an overdamped Langevin equation that statistically preserves the sequence in which any regions in collective variable space are visited and permits to calculate exactly the mean first passage times from any such region to another. The role of the free energy and diffusion coefficient in this overdamped Langevin equation is discussed, along with the way they transform under any change of variable in collective variable space. These results apply both to systems with and without inertia, and they can be generalized to using several collective variables simultaneously. The view they offer on what makes collective variables and reaction coordinates optimal breaks from the standard notion that good collective variable must be slow variable, and it suggests new ways to interpret data from molecular dynamics simulations and experiments. PMID:25084883

  19. A Group Simulation of the Development of the Geologic Time Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennington, J. Bret

    2000-01-01

    Explains how to demonstrate to students that the relative dating of rock layers is redundant. Uses two column diagrams to simulate stratigraphic sequences from two different geological time scales and asks students to complete the time scale. (YDS)

  20. A generalization of Ostrowski inequality on time scales for k points

    E-print Network

    Wenjun Liu; Quoc Anh Ngo

    2008-04-21

    In this paper we first generalize the Ostrowski inequality on time scales for k points and then unify corresponding continuous and discrete versions. We also point out some particular Ostrowski type inequalities on time scales as special cases.

  1. High-field 1H T1 and T2 NMR relaxation time measurements of H2O in homeopathic preparations of quartz, sulfur, and copper sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, Stephan; Wolf, Martin; Skrabal, Peter; Bangerter, Felix; Heusser, Peter; Thurneysen, André; Wolf, Ursula

    2009-09-01

    Quantitative meta-analyses of randomized clinical trials investigating the specific therapeutic efficacy of homeopathic remedies yielded statistically significant differences compared to placebo. Since the remedies used contained mostly only very low concentrations of pharmacologically active compounds, these effects cannot be accounted for within the framework of current pharmacology. Theories to explain clinical effects of homeopathic remedies are partially based upon changes in diluent structure. To investigate the latter, we measured for the first time high-field (600/500 MHz) 1H T1 and T2 nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times of H2O in homeopathic preparations with concurrent contamination control by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Homeopathic preparations of quartz (10 c-30 c, n = 21, corresponding to iterative dilutions of 100-10-100-30), sulfur (13 x-30 x, n = 18, 10-13-10-30), and copper sulfate (11 c-30 c, n = 20, 100-11-100-30) were compared to n = 10 independent controls each (analogously agitated dilution medium) in randomized and blinded experiments. In none of the samples, the concentration of any element analyzed by ICP-MS exceeded 10 ppb. In the first measurement series (600 MHz), there was a significant increase in T1 for all samples as a function of time, and there were no significant differences between homeopathic potencies and controls. In the second measurement series (500 MHz) 1 year after preparation, we observed statistically significant increased T1 relaxation times for homeopathic sulfur preparations compared to controls. Fifteen out of 18 correlations between sample triplicates were higher for controls than for homeopathic preparations. No conclusive explanation for these phenomena can be given at present. Possible hypotheses involve differential leaching from the measurement vessel walls or a change in water molecule dynamics, i.e., in rotational correlation time and/or diffusion. Homeopathic preparations thus may exhibit specific physicochemical properties that need to be determined in detail in future investigations.

  2. Relaxed superconductors

    E-print Network

    Tomas Andrade; Simon A. Gentle

    2015-04-23

    Momentum relaxation can be built into many holographic models without sacrificing homogeneity of the bulk solution. In this paper we study two such models: one in which translational invariance is broken in the dual theory by spatially-dependent sources for massless scalar fields and another that features an additional neutral scalar field. We turn on a charged scalar field in order to explore the condensation of a charged scalar operator in the dual theories. After demonstrating that the relaxed superconductors we construct are thermodynamically relevant, we find that the finite DC electrical conductivity of the normal phase is replaced by a superfluid pole in the broken phase. Moreover, when the normal phase possesses a Drude behaviour at low frequencies, the optical conductivity of the broken phase at low frequencies can be described by a two-fluid model that is a sum of a Drude peak and a superfluid pole, as was found recently for inhomogeneous holographic superconductors. We also study cases in which this low-frequency behavior does not hold. We find that the Drude description is accurate when the retarded current-current correlator has a purely-dissipative pole that is well-separated from the rest of the excitations.

  3. Nonadiabatic coupling and hot carrier relaxation in graphene quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinastic, Jonathan; Chu, Iek-Heng; Cheng, Hai-Ping

    2015-03-01

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have many possible applications in a variety of research areas, including photovoltaics, catalysis, and sensors. Experimental research has suggested the existence of long hot carrier relaxation times on the order of 100-200 ps due to carrier-phonon interactions, however little theoretical work has examined phonon-induced relaxation and its size or geometry dependence in these systems. We examine hot carrier relaxation due to lattice vibrations in GQDs of varying size and edge type (armchair or zigzag), using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) to calculate nonadiabatic coupling between excitations. Employing the reduced density matrix method to calculate relaxation rates, we find a 100 ps relaxation time constant for low-lying excited states in a GQD with 132 carbon atoms, matching experiment. We also find that carbon-chain ligands attached to the GQD edges significantly change the nonadiabatic coupling and reduce nonradiative recombination rates to the ground state by an order of magnitude. GQDs with zigzag edges demonstrate a significantly longer hot carrier lifetime in low-lying excited states that approach the nanosecond time scale, suggesting the possibility of engineering a phonon bottleneck through geometry modification. This work is supported by DOE/BES DE-FG02-02ER45995.

  4. Rain: Relaxations in the sky

    E-print Network

    Ole Peters; Kim Christensen

    2002-04-04

    We demonstrate how, from the point of view of energy flow through an open system, rain is analogous to many other relaxational processes in Nature such as earthquakes. By identifying rain events as the basic entities of the phenomenon, we show that the number density of rain events per year is inversely proportional to the released water column raised to the power 1.4. This is the rain-equivalent of the Gutenberg-Richter law for earthquakes. The event durations and the waiting times between events are also characterised by scaling regions, where no typical time scale exists. The Hurst exponent of the rain intensity signal $H = 0.76 > 0.5$. It is valid in the temporal range from minutes up to the full duration of the signal of half a year. All of our findings are consistent with the concept of self-organised criticality, which refers to the tendency of slowly driven non-equilibrium systems towards a state of scale free behaviour.

  5. Dielectric relaxation in perovskite BaAlNbO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Alo; Sinha, T. P.

    2006-07-01

    The complex perovskite oxide barium aluminium niobate, BaAlNbO3 (BAN) is synthesized by a solid-state reaction technique for the first time. The X-ray diffraction of the sample at room temperature shows a monoclinic phase. The field dependence of dielectric response and the loss tangent of the sample are measured in a frequency range from 50 Hz to 2 MHz and in a temperature range from room temperature to 623 K. An analysis of the real and imaginary parts of impedance is performed, assuming a distribution of relaxation times as confirmed by Cole Cole plot as well as the scaling behaviour of the imaginary part of impedance spectra. This suggests that the distribution of relaxation times is temperature independent. The frequency-dependent maxima in the imaginary impedance are found to obey an Arrhenius law with an activation energy ?0.49eV. The frequency-dependent electrical data are also analysed in the framework of conductivity and electric modulus formalisms. The scaling behaviour of imaginary electric modulus shows the temperature-independent nature of the relaxation time. All these formalisms provided for qualitative similarities in the relaxation time.

  6. Computational and statistical tradeoffs via convex relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, Venkat; Jordan, Michael I.

    2013-01-01

    Modern massive datasets create a fundamental problem at the intersection of the computational and statistical sciences: how to provide guarantees on the quality of statistical inference given bounds on computational resources, such as time or space. Our approach to this problem is to define a notion of “algorithmic weakening,” in which a hierarchy of algorithms is ordered by both computational efficiency and statistical efficiency, allowing the growing strength of the data at scale to be traded off against the need for sophisticated processing. We illustrate this approach in the setting of denoising problems, using convex relaxation as the core inferential tool. Hierarchies of convex relaxations have been widely used in theoretical computer science to yield tractable approximation algorithms to many computationally intractable tasks. In the current paper, we show how to endow such hierarchies with a statistical characterization and thereby obtain concrete tradeoffs relating algorithmic runtime to amount of data. PMID:23479655

  7. Computing time scales from reaction coordinates by milestoning Tony Faradjian and Ron Elber

    E-print Network

    Elber, Ron

    1 Computing time scales from reaction coordinates by milestoning Tony Faradjian and Ron Elber to compute time scales of complex processes following pre- determined milestones along a reaction coordinate not imply a single dominant time scale. The reaction coordinate need not include a single large barrier

  8. Can primordial helium survive in diamonds on geologic time scales? Rebecca Granot and Roi Baer*

    E-print Network

    Baer, Roi

    1 Can primordial helium survive in diamonds on geologic time scales? Rebecca Granot and Roi Baer, it is unclear whether primordial helium can actually survive in di- amonds on geologic time scales (billions temperatures and geologic time scales in di- amond. Based on ab initio calculations and an atomistic tight

  9. Day-Ahead and Real-Time Models for Large-Scale Energy Storage

    E-print Network

    Day-Ahead and Real-Time Models for Large-Scale Energy Storage Final Project Report Power Systems-Ahead and Real-Time Models for Large- Scale Energy Storage Final Project Report Project Team Kory W. Hedman project titled "Day-ahead and real-time models for large-scale energy storage" (project S-61G). We express

  10. Evaluating the uncertainty of predicting future climate time series at the hourly time scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caporali, E.; Fatichi, S.; Ivanov, V. Y.

    2011-12-01

    A stochastic downscaling methodology is developed to generate hourly, point-scale time series for several meteorological variables, such as precipitation, cloud cover, shortwave radiation, air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, and atmospheric pressure. The methodology uses multi-model General Circulation Model (GCM) realizations and an hourly weather generator, AWE-GEN. Probabilistic descriptions of factors of change (a measure of climate change with respect to historic conditions) are computed for several climate statistics and different aggregation times using a Bayesian approach that weights the individual GCM contributions. The Monte Carlo method is applied to sample the factors of change from their respective distributions thereby permitting the generation of time series in an ensemble fashion, which reflects the uncertainty of climate projections of future as well as the uncertainty of the downscaling procedure. Applications of the methodology and probabilistic expressions of certainty in reproducing future climates for the periods, 2000 - 2009, 2046 - 2065 and 2081 - 2100, using the 1962 - 1992 period as the baseline, are discussed for the location of Firenze (Italy). The climate predictions for the period of 2000 - 2009 are tested against observations permitting to assess the reliability and uncertainties of the methodology in reproducing statistics of meteorological variables at different time scales.

  11. Crossover from ? to ? Relaxation in Cooperative Facilitation Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellitto, Mauro

    2015-11-01

    ? and ? relaxation processes are dynamical scaling regimes of glassy systems occurring on two separate time scales which both diverge as the glass state is approached. We study here the crossover scaling from ? to ? relaxation in the cooperative facilitation scenario (CFS) and show that it is quantitatively described, with no adjustable parameter, by the leading order asymptotic formulas for scaling predicted by the mode-coupling theory (MCT). These results establish (i) the mutual universality of the MCT and CFS, and (ii) the existence of a purely dynamic realization of MCT, which is distinct from the well-established random first order transition scenario for disordered systems. Some implications of the emerging kinetic-static duality are discussed.

  12. Scale-Invariant Extinction Time Estimates for Some Singular Diffusion Equations

    E-print Network

    Ikegami, Takashi

    Scale-Invariant Extinction Time Estimates for Some Singular Diffusion Equations Yoshikazu Giga becomes identically zero in finite time. We prove scale-invariant estimates for the extinction time, using is to prove finite-time extinction, i.e. to show that the solution becomes identically zero in finite time

  13. Phonon-mediated relaxation in doped quantum dot molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grodecka-Grad, Anna; Förstner, Jens

    2010-09-01

    We study a single quantum dot molecule doped with one electron in the presence of electron-phonon coupling. Both diagonal and off-diagonal interactions representing real and virtual processes with acoustic phonons via deformation potential and piezoelectric coupling are taken into account. We employ a non-perturbative quantum kinetic theory and show that the phonon-mediated relaxation is dominated by an electron tunneling on a picosecond time scale. A dependence of the relaxation on the temperature and the strength of the tunneling coupling is analyzed.

  14. Terahertz normal mode relaxation in pentaerythritol tetranitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereverzev, Andrey; Sewell, Thomas D.

    2011-01-01

    Normal vibrational modes for a three-dimensional defect-free crystal of the high explosive pentaerythritol tetranitrate were obtained in the framework of classical mechanics using a previously published unreactive potential-energy surface [J. Phys. Chem. B 112, 734 (2008)]. Using these results the vibrational density of states was obtained for the entire vibrational frequency range. Relaxation of selectively excited terahertz-active modes was studied using isochoric-isoergic (NVE) molecular dynamics simulations for energy and density conditions corresponding to room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Dependence of the relaxation time on the initial modal excitation was considered for five excitation energies between 10 and 500 kT and shown to be relatively weak. The terahertz absorption spectrum was constructed directly using linewidths obtained from the relaxation times of the excited modes for the case of 10 kT excitation. The spectrum shows reasonably good agreement with experimental results. Dynamics of redistribution of the excited mode energy among the other normal modes was also studied. The results indicate that, for the four terahertz-active initially excited modes considered, there is a small subset of zero wave vector (k = 0) modes that preferentially absorb the energy on a few-picosecond time scale. The majority of the excitation energy, however, is transferred nonspecifically to the bath modes of the system.

  15. Measurements of the methane relaxation times for application to the infrared emission models of the upper atmospheres of outer planets and Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halthore, Rangasayi N.; Caldwell, John J.; Allen, John E., Jr.; Burt, Jim A.; Yang, Kuanghua; Delaney, Paul

    1990-01-01

    The 7.8 micrometer emission from the nu(sub 4) band of methane (CH4) is a regularly observed feature in the stratosphere of all the giant planets and Titan. On Jupiter, enhancements in this emission are associated with the infrared hot spots in the auroral zone. Attempts to model this phenomenon in particular, and to understand the role of methane in general, have been hampered in part by a lack of adequate laboratory measurements of the collisional relaxation times for the nu(sub 3) and nu(sub 4) levels over the appropriate temperature range. To provide this needed data, a series of laboratory experiments were initiated. In the experimental arrangement the nu(sub3) band of methane is pumped at 3.3 micrometers using a pulsed infrared source (Nd:YAG/dye laser system equipped with a wave-length extender). The radiative lifetime of the nu(sub 3) level (approximately 37 ms) is much shorter than the nu(sub 4) lifetime (approximately 390 ms); however, a rapid V-V energy transfer rate ensures that the nu(sub 4) level is substantially populated. The photoacoustic technique is used to acquire relaxation rate information. The experiments are performed using a low-temperature, low-pressure cell. Experimental apparatus and technique are described. In addition some of the experimental difficulties associated with making these measurements are discussed and some preliminary results are presented.

  16. Measurements of the methane relaxation times for application to the infrared emission models of the upper atmospheres of outer planets and Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halthore, Rangasayi N.; Caldwell, John J.; Allen, John E., Jr.; Burt, Jim A.; Yang, Kuanghua; Delaney, Paul

    1990-05-01

    The 7.8 micrometer emission from the nu4 band of methane (CH4) is a regularly observed feature in the stratosphere of all the giant planets and Titan. On Jupiter, enhancements in this emission are associated with the infrared hot spots in the auroral zone. Attempts to model this phenomenon in particular, and to understand the role of methane in general, have been hampered in part by a lack of adequate laboratory measurements of the collisional relaxation times for the nu3 and nu4 levels over the appropriate temperature range. To provide this needed data, a series of laboratory experiments were initiated. In the experimental arrangement the nu(sub3) band of methane is pumped at 3.3 micrometers using a pulsed infrared source (Nd:YAG/dye laser system equipped with a wave-length extender). The radiative lifetime of the nu3 level (approximately 37 ms) is much shorter than the nu4 lifetime (approximately 390 ms); however, a rapid V-V energy transfer rate ensures that the nu4 level is substantially populated. The photoacoustic technique is used to acquire relaxation rate information. The experiments are performed using a low-temperature, low-pressure cell. Experimental apparatus and technique are described. In addition some of the experimental difficulties associated with making these measurements are discussed and some preliminary results are presented.

  17. Establishing a time-scale for plant evolution.

    PubMed

    Clarke, John T; Warnock, Rachel C M; Donoghue, Philip C J

    2011-10-01

    • Plants have utterly transformed the planet, but testing hypotheses of causality requires a reliable time-scale for plant evolution. While clock methods have been extensively developed, less attention has been paid to the correct interpretation and appropriate implementation of fossil data. • We constructed 17 calibrations, consisting of minimum constraints and soft maximum constraints, for divergences between model representatives of the major land plant lineages. Using a data set of seven plastid genes, we performed a cross-validation analysis to determine the consistency of the calibrations. Six molecular clock analyses were then conducted, one with the original calibrations, and others exploring the impact on divergence estimates of changing maxima at basal nodes, and prior probability densities within calibrations. • Cross-validation highlighted Tracheophyta and Euphyllophyta calibrations as inconsistent, either because their soft maxima were overly conservative or because of undetected rate variation. Molecular clock analyses yielded estimates ranging from 568-815 million yr before present (Ma) for crown embryophytes and from 175-240 Ma for crown angiosperms. • We reject both a post-Jurassic origin of angiosperms and a post-Cambrian origin of land plants. Our analyses also suggest that the establishment of the major embryophyte lineages occurred at a much slower tempo than suggested in most previous studies. These conclusions are entirely compatible with current palaeobotanical data, although not necessarily with their interpretation by palaeobotanists. PMID:21729086

  18. Detonation initiation on the microsecond time scale: DDTs

    SciTech Connect

    Kassoy, Dr. David R; Kuehn, Jeffery A; Nabity, Mr. Matthew W.; Clarke, Dr. John F.

    2008-01-01

    Spatially resolved, thermal power deposition of limited duration into a finite volume of reactive gas is the initiator for a deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) on the microsecond time scale. The reactive Euler equations with one-step Arrhenius kinetics are used to derive novel formulas for velocity and temperature variation that describe the physical phenomena characteristic of DDTs. A transformation of the variables is shown to yield a canonical equation system, independent of the activation energy. Numerical solutions of the reactive Euler equations are used to describe the detailed sequence of reactive gasdynamic processes leading to an overdriven planar detonation far from the power deposition location. Results are presented for deposition into a region isolated from the planar boundary of the reactive gas as well as for that adjacent to the boundary. The role of compressions and shocks reflected from the boundary into the partially reacted hot gas is described. The quantitative dependences of DDT evolution on the magnitude of thermal power deposition and activation energy are identified.

  19. Detonation initiation on the microsecond time scale: DDTs

    SciTech Connect

    Kuehn, Jeffery A; Kassoy, Dr. David R; Nabity, Mr. Matthew W.; Clarke, Dr. John F.

    2006-01-01

    Spatially resolved, thermal power deposition of limited duration into a finite volume of reactive gas is the initiator for a deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) on the microsecond time scale. The reactive Euler equations with one-step Arrhenius kinetics are used to derive novel formulas for velocity and temperature variation that describe the physical phenomena characteristic of DDTs. A nonlinear transformation of the variables is shown to yield a canonical equation system, independent of the activation energy. Numerical solutions of the reactive Euler equations are used to describe the detailed sequence of reactive gas dynamic processes leading to an overdriven planar detonation far from the power deposition location. Results are presented for deposition into a region isolated from the planar boundary of the reactive gas as well as for that adjacent to the boundary. The role of compressions and shocks reflected from the boundary into the partially reacted hot gas is described. The quantitative dependences of DDT evolution on the magnitude of thermal power deposition and activation energy are identified.

  20. Titan's evaporites structure and their formation time-scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordier, D.; Barnes, J.; Le Bahers, T.; Cornet, T.; Ferreira, A.

    2014-04-01

    Hydrocarbons lakes have been discovered in polar regions of Titan (Stofan et al. 2007) [1]. Already, Stofan et al. (2007) noticed features suggesting the occurence of an evaporation process in the recent past. Barnes et al. (2009) [2] performed a detailed study of shoreline features of Ontario Lacus, they interpreted the 5-?m brigth annulus around this lakes as a dry, low-water ice content zone, possibly corresponding to a deposit of organic condensates. Barnes et al. (2011) [3] used a sample of several lakes and lakebeds located in a region south of the Ligeia Mare. They got a strong correlation between RADAR-empty lakes and 5-?m brigth units interpreted as low-water ice content areas. On the theoretical side, Cordier et al. (2013) [4] elaborated a model for the chemical composition of the external layer of these possible organic evaporite deposits. This model was based on a simplified theory of dissolution (ideal solution and regular solution theory) and all computations were performed using a time-scale which did not enable any estimation for the depth of deposits layers.

  1. Comparison of electron spin relaxation times measured by Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill and two-pulse spin-echo sequences.

    PubMed

    Harbridge, James R; Eaton, Sandra S; Eaton, Gareth R

    2003-09-01

    Electron spin relaxation times obtained by two-pulse spin-echo and Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) experiments were compared for samples with: (i) low concentrations of nuclear spins, (ii) higher concentrations of nuclear spins and low concentrations of unpaired electrons, (iii) higher concentrations of nuclear spins and of electron spins, and (iv) dynamic averaging of inequivalent hyperfine couplings on the EPR timescale. In each case, the CPMG time constant decreased as the time between the refocusing pulses increased. For the samples with low concentrations of nuclear spins (the E' center in irradiated amorphous SiO2) the limiting value of the CPMG time constant at short interpulse spacings was similar to the Tm obtained by two-pulse spin echo at small turning angle. For the other samples, the time constants obtained by CPMG at short interpulse spacings were systematically longer than Tm obtained by two-pulse spin echo. For most of the samples, the CPMG time constant decreased with increasing electron spin concentration, which is consistent with the expectation that the CPMG sequence does not refocus dephasing due to electron-electron dipolar interaction between resonant spins. Dynamic processes that average inequivalent hyperfine couplings contributed less to the CPMG time constant than to the spin-echo decay time constant. The impact of nuclear echo envelope modulation on CPMG time constants also was examined. For a Nycomed trityl radical in glassy D2O:glycerol-d8 solution, the CPMG time constant was up to 20 times longer when the time between pulses was approximately equal to integer multiples of the reciprocal of the deuterium Larmor frequency than when the time between pulses was an odd multiple of half the reciprocal of the deuterium Larmor frequency. PMID:12932454

  2. PHYSICAL REVIEW 8 VOLUME 32, NUMBER 5 1 SEPTEMBER 1985 Role of potential-energy scaling in the low-temperature relaxation behavior

    E-print Network

    Stillinger, Frank

    collection of properties such as density, eriergy, orientation, elastic properties, and various other to be iriterconverted. The present paper is devoted to a general view of structural relaxation in condensed phases

  3. The influence of anesthetics, neurotransmitters and antibiotics on the relaxation processes in lipid membranes

    E-print Network

    Seeger, H M; Heimburg, T; Gudmundsson, Marie L.; Heimburg, Thomas; Seeger, Heiko M.

    2007-01-01

    In the proximity of melting transitions of artificial and biological membranes fluctuations in enthalpy, area, volume and concentration are enhanced. This results in domain formation, changes of the elastic constants, changes in permeability and slowing down of relaxation processes. In this study we used pressure perturbation calorimetry to investigate the relaxation time scale after a jump into the melting transition regime of artificial lipid membranes. This time corresponds to the characteristic rate of domain growth. The studies were performed on single-component large unilamellar and multilamellar vesicle systems with and without the addition of small molecules such as general anesthetics, neurotransmitters and antibiotics. These drugs interact with membranes and affect melting points and profiles. In all systems we found that heat capacity and relaxation times are related to each other in a simple manner. The maximum relaxation time depends on the cooperativity of the heat capacity profile and decreases...

  4. Two-eletron spin relaxation in double quantum dots and P donors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chia-Wei; Borhani, Massoud; Hu, Xuedong

    2011-03-01

    We study singlet-triplet relaxation of two electrons confined in a double quantum dot or bound to P donors in Silicon. Hyperfine interaction of the electrons with the host/phosphorus nuclei, in combination with the electron-phonon interaction, leads to relaxation of the triplet states. We calculate the triplet relaxation rates in the presence of an applied magnetic field. This relaxation mechanism affects, for example, the resonance peaks in current Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) experiments on P-dimers. Moreover, the estimated time scales for the spin decay put an upper bound on the gate pulses needed to perform fault-tolerant two-qubit operations in spin-based quantum computers. We have found the optimal regimes, which mitigate this relaxation mechanism, yet permit sufficiently fast two-qubit operations. We thank support by NSA/LPS thorugh ARO.

  5. Scaling law in thermal phenomena

    E-print Network

    M. Kozlowski; J. Marciak-Kozlowska

    2006-10-29

    In this paper the scaling law for the relaxation times in thermal phenomena is investigated. It is shown that dependent on the value of the parameter K=E/m(c\\alpha)^2,where E is the energy which is delivered to the system, m is the parton mass and \\alpha=1/137 for electromagnetic interaction and \\alpha=0.16 for strong interaction respectively, heat transport is diffusive, for K1. For the system with N partons the relaxation time is scaled as \\tau^N\\to N (\\hbar/(mc\\alpha)^2). Key words: Thermal phenomena, scaling

  6. Polymer Chain Dynamics: Evidence of Nonexponential Mode Relaxation Using Thermally Stimulated Depolarization Current Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrese-Igor, S.; Alegría, A.; Colmenero, J.

    2014-08-01

    The slowest (p=1) mode relaxation of several polyisoprenes has been experimentally isolated by thermally stimulated depolarization current techniques. Close to the glass transition the p=1 mode deviates from the exponential behavior assumed by Rouse and tube-reptation theories. This effect is found to be a consequence of the closeness of ?p =1 and ?-relaxation time scales. The scenario resembles that of broadened fast component dynamics in polymer blends with high dynamic asymmetry and suggests a possible general interpretation in terms of the effect of local density fluctuations (? relaxation) on chain dynamics.

  7. Simulation of yearly rainfall time series at microscale resolution with actual properties: Intermittency, scale invariance, and rainfall distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akrour, Nawal; Chazottes, Aymeric; Verrier, Sébastien; Mallet, Cécile; Barthes, Laurent

    2015-09-01

    Rainfall is a physical phenomenon resulting from the combination of numerous physical processes involving a wide range of scales, from microphysical processes to the general circulation of the atmosphere. Moreover, unlike other geophysical variables such as water vapor concentration, rainfall is characterized by a relaxation behavior that leads to an alternation of wet and dry periods. It follows that rainfall is a complex process which is highly variable both in time and space. Precipitation is thus characterized by the following features: rain/no-rain intermittency, multiple scaling regimes, and extreme events. All these properties are difficult to model simultaneously, especially when a large time and/or space scale domain is required. The aim of this paper is to develop a simulator capable of generating high-resolution rain-rate time series (15 s), the main statistical properties of which are close to an observed rain-rate time series. We also attempt to develop a model having consistent properties even when the fine-resolution-simulated time series are aggregated to a coarser resolution. In order to break the simulation problem down into subcomponents, the authors have focused their attention on several key properties of rainfall. The simulator is based on a sequential approach in which, first, the simulation of rain/no-rain durations permits the retrieval of fractal properties of the rain support. Then, the generation of rain rates through the use of a multifractal, Fractionally Integrated Flux (FIF), model enables the restitution of the rainfall's multifractal properties. This second step includes a denormalization process that was added in order to generate realistic rain-rate distributions.

  8. EON: software for long time simulations of atomic scale systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chill, Samuel T.; Welborn, Matthew; Terrell, Rye; Zhang, Liang; Berthet, Jean-Claude; Pedersen, Andreas; Jónsson, Hannes; Henkelman, Graeme

    2014-07-01

    The EON software is designed for simulations of the state-to-state evolution of atomic scale systems over timescales greatly exceeding that of direct classical dynamics. States are defined as collections of atomic configurations from which a minimization of the potential energy gives the same inherent structure. The time evolution is assumed to be governed by rare events, where transitions between states are uncorrelated and infrequent compared with the timescale of atomic vibrations. Several methods for calculating the state-to-state evolution have been implemented in EON, including parallel replica dynamics, hyperdynamics and adaptive kinetic Monte Carlo. Global optimization methods, including simulated annealing, basin hopping and minima hopping are also implemented. The software has a client/server architecture where the computationally intensive evaluations of the interatomic interactions are calculated on the client-side and the state-to-state evolution is managed by the server. The client supports optimization for different computer architectures to maximize computational efficiency. The server is written in Python so that developers have access to the high-level functionality without delving into the computationally intensive components. Communication between the server and clients is abstracted so that calculations can be deployed on a single machine, clusters using a queuing system, large parallel computers using a message passing interface, or within a distributed computing environment. A generic interface to the evaluation of the interatomic interactions is defined so that empirical potentials, such as in LAMMPS, and density functional theory as implemented in VASP and GPAW can be used interchangeably. Examples are given to demonstrate the range of systems that can be modeled, including surface diffusion and island ripening of adsorbed atoms on metal surfaces, molecular diffusion on the surface of ice and global structural optimization of nanoparticles.

  9. Collisional Time Scales in the Kuiper Disk and Their Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, S. Alan

    1995-01-01

    We explore the rate of collisions among bodies in the present-day Kuiper Disk as a function of the total mass and population size structure of the disk. We find that collisional evolution is an important evolutionary process in the disk as a whole, and indeed, that it is likely the dominant evolutionary process beyond approx. 42 AU, where dynamical instability time scales exceed the age of the solar system. Two key findings we report from this modeling work are: that unless the disk's population structure is sharply truncated for radii smaller than approx. 1-2 km, collisions between comets and smaller debris are occurring so frequently in the disk, and with high enough velocities, that the small body (i.e., KM-class object) population in the disk has probably developed into a collisional cascade, thereby implying that the Kuiper Disk comets may not all be primordial, and that the rate of collisions of smaller bodies with larger 100 less R less 400 km objects (like 1992QB(sub 1) and its cohorts) is so low that there appears to be a dilemma in explaining how QB(sub 1)s could have grown by binary accretion in the disk as we know it. Given these findings, it appears that either the present-day paradigm for the formation of Kuiper Disk is failed in some fundamental respect, or that the present-day disk is no longer representative of the ancient structure from which it evolved. This in turn suggests the intriguing possibility that the present-day Kuiper Disk evolved through a more erosional stage reminiscent of the disks around the stars Beta Pictorus, alpha PsA, and alpha Lyr.

  10. Dielectric relaxation in a protein matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, D.W.; Boxer, S.G.

    1992-06-25

    The dielectric relaxation of a sperm whale ApoMb-DANCA complex is measured by the fluorescence dynamic Stokes shift method. Emission energy increases with decreasing temperature, suggesting that the relaxation activation energies of the rate-limiting motions either depend on the conformational substrate or different types of protein motions with different frequencies participate in the reaction. Experimental data suggest that there may be relaxations on a scale of <100 ps. 61 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Nuclear magnetic relaxation induced by exchange-mediated orientational randomization: Longitudinal relaxation dispersion for a dipole-coupled spin-1/2 pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Zhiwei; Halle, Bertil

    2013-10-01

    In complex biological or colloidal samples, magnetic relaxation dispersion (MRD) experiments using the field-cycling technique can characterize molecular motions on time scales ranging from nanoseconds to microseconds, provided that a rigorous theory of nuclear spin relaxation is available. In gels, cross-linked proteins, and biological tissues, where an immobilized macromolecular component coexists with a mobile solvent phase, nuclear spins residing in solvent (or cosolvent) species relax predominantly via exchange-mediated orientational randomization (EMOR) of anisotropic nuclear (electric quadrupole or magnetic dipole) couplings. The physical or chemical exchange processes that dominate the MRD typically occur on a time scale of microseconds or longer, where the conventional perturbation theory of spin relaxation breaks down. There is thus a need for a more general relaxation theory. Such a theory, based on the stochastic Liouville equation (SLE) for the EMOR mechanism, is available for a single quadrupolar spin I = 1. Here, we present the corresponding theory for a dipole-coupled spin-1/2 pair. To our knowledge, this is the first treatment of dipolar MRD outside the motional-narrowing regime. Based on an analytical solution of the spatial part of the SLE, we show how the integral longitudinal relaxation rate can be computed efficiently. Both like and unlike spins, with selective or non-selective excitation, are treated. For the experimentally important dilute regime, where only a small fraction of the spin pairs are immobilized, we obtain simple analytical expressions for the auto-relaxation and cross-relaxation rates which generalize the well-known Solomon equations. These generalized results will be useful in biophysical studies, e.g., of intermittent protein dynamics. In addition, they represent a first step towards a rigorous theory of water 1H relaxation in biological tissues, which is a prerequisite for unravelling the molecular basis of soft-tissue contrast in clinical magnetic resonance imaging.

  12. Advances in the Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale--Developments and Integration with the Geologic Time Scale and Future Directions (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissman, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    We celebrate the 50th anniversary of the publication of the Vine-Matthews/Morley-Larochelle hypothesis (Vine and Matthews, Nature, 1963, v. 199, #4897, p. 947-949), which integrated marine magnetic anomaly data with a rapidly evolving terrestrial-based geomagnetic polarity time scale (GPTS). The five decades of research since 1963 have witnessed the expansion and refinement of the GPTS, to the point where ages of magnetochron boundaries, in particular in the Cenozoic, can be estimated with uncertainties better than 0.1%. This has come about by integrating high precision geochronology, cyclostratigraphy at different time scales, and magnetic polarity data of increased quality, allowing extension of the GPTS back into the Paleozoic. The definition of a high resolution GPTS across time intervals of major events in Earth history has been of particular interest, as a specific magnetochron boundary correlated across several localities represents a singular global datum. A prime example is the end Permian, when some 80 percent of genus-level extinctions and a range of 75 to 96 percent species- level extinctions took place in the marine environment, depending upon clade. Much our understanding of the Permian-Triassic boundary (PTB) is based on relatively slowly deposited marine sequences in Europe and Asia, yet a growing body of observations from continental sequences demonstrates a similar extinction event and new polarity data from some of these sequences are critical to refining the GPTS across the PTB and testing synchronicity of marine and terrestrial events. The data show that the end-Permian ecological crisis and the conodont calibrated biostratigraphic PTB both followed a key polarity reversal between a short interval (subchron) of reverse polarity to a considerably longer (chron) of normal polarity. Central European Basin strata (continental Permian and epicontinental Triassic) yield high-quality magnetic polarity stratigraphic records (Szurlies et al., 2003; Szurlies, 2007; and Szurlies, 2013, in press). In combination with cyclostratigraphic records, the normal polarity chron, with both the end-Permian crisis and the biostratigraphic PTB, is estimated to be ~0.7 Ma in duration, with the ecological crisis some 0.2 Ma after the reversal. The author and colleagues are currently refining the magnetic polarity stratigraphy across the PTB contained in strata of the Ochoan/Induan Dewey Lake Formation exposed in west Texas (USA) and in strata of the Beaufort Group of the central Karoo Basin (South Africa). The hematitic siltstones and mudstones of the Dewey Lake Formation yield magnetizations of high quality and are not remagnetized, thus providing an unambiguous polarity record, including what we infer as the R-N transition immediately before the PTB. A continuous core (~150 m) through the entire Dewey Lake Formation from southeast New Mexico will be available for polarity study in early September, 2013. In the Karoo Basin, a nearly continuously exposed 225 +/- m thick section (over 100 distinct sites) near Lootsberg Pass is dominated by non-hematitic siltstone but fine grained sandstone and carbonate concretions in mudstone intervals have been also sampled. At present, it remains unclear whether the Beaufort Group strata in this part of the central Karoo Basin retain a primary magnetization, as the likelihood of remagnetization by ca. 184 +/- Ma mafic sills of the Karoo Large Igneous Province remains a concern.

  13. Power-law relaxation behavior of an initially localized state in the spin-1/2 Heisenberg chain

    E-print Network

    Tetsuo Deguchi; Pulak Ranjan Giri; Ryoko Hatakeyama

    2015-07-27

    We present power-law relaxation behavior of the local magnetizations in the equilibration dynamics of the spin-1/2 Heisenberg spin chain as an isolated integrable quantum system. We perform the exact time evolution of the expectation values of the local spin operators by evaluating them with the determinant formula of the form factors. We construct such an initial quantum state that has a localized profile of the local magnetizations, and perform the exact time evolution over a very long period of time. We show that the local magnetization relaxes as some power of the time variable with no definite time scale, while the fidelity relaxes very fast with its relaxation time being proportional to the inverse of the energy width, i.e. the Boltzmann time.

  14. Power-law relaxation behavior of an initially localized state in the spin-1/2 Heisenberg chain

    E-print Network

    Deguchi, Tetsuo; Hatakeyama, Ryoko

    2015-01-01

    We present power-law relaxation behavior of the local magnetizations in the equilibration dynamics of the spin-1/2 Heisenberg spin chain as an isolated integrable quantum system. We perform the exact time evolution of the expectation values of the local spin operators by evaluating them with the determinant formula of the form factors. We construct such an initial quantum state that has a localized profile of the local magnetizations, and perform the exact time evolution over a very long period of time. We show that the local magnetization relaxes as some power of the time variable with no definite time scale, while the fidelity relaxes very fast with its relaxation time being proportional to the inverse of the energy width, i.e. the Boltzmann time.

  15. Wavelet-based spatial and temporal multiscaling: Bridging the atomistic and continuum space and time scales

    E-print Network

    Deymier, Pierre

    Wavelet-based spatial and temporal multiscaling: Bridging the atomistic and continuum space and time scales G. Frantziskonis1, * and P. Deymier2 1 Department of Civil Engineering and Engineering that naturally addresses time scaling in addition to spatial scaling. The method combines recently developed

  16. Fine Time Scaling of Purifying Selection on Human Nonsynonymous mtDNA Mutations Based on the Worldwide Population Tree and Mother-Child Pairs.

    PubMed

    Cavadas, Bruno; Soares, Pedro; Camacho, Rui; Brandão, Andreia; Costa, Marta D; Fernandes, Verónica; Pereira, Joana B; Rito, Teresa; Samuels, David C; Pereira, Luisa

    2015-11-01

    A high-resolution mtDNA phylogenetic tree allowed us to look backward in time to investigate purifying selection. Purifying selection was very strong in the last 2,500 years, continuously eliminating pathogenic mutations back until the end of the Younger Dryas (?11,000 years ago), when a large population expansion likely relaxed selection pressure. This was preceded by a phase of stable selection until another relaxation occurred in the out-of-Africa migration. Demography and selection are closely related: expansions led to relaxation of selection and higher pathogenicity mutations significantly decreased the growth of descendants. The only detectible positive selection was the recurrence of highly pathogenic nonsynonymous mutations (m.3394T>C-m.3397A>G-m.3398T>C) at interior branches of the tree, preventing the formation of a dinucleotide STR (TATATA) in the MT-ND1 gene. At the most recent time scale in 124 mother-children transmissions, purifying selection was detectable through the loss of mtDNA variants with high predicted pathogenicity. A few haplogroup-defining sites were also heteroplasmic, agreeing with a significant propensity in 349 positions in the phylogenetic tree to revert back to the ancestral variant. This nonrandom mutation property explains the observation of heteroplasmic mutations at some haplogroup-defining sites in sequencing datasets, which may not indicate poor quality as has been claimed. PMID:26252938

  17. Relaxation Assessment with Varied Structured Milieu (RELAX).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassel, Russell N.; Cassel, Susie L.

    1983-01-01

    Describes Relaxation Assessment with Varied Structured Milieu (RELAX), a clinical program designed to assess the degree to which an individual is able to demonstrate self-control for overall general relaxation. The program is designed for use with the Cassel Biosensors biofeedback equipment. (JAC)

  18. Real time density functional simulations of quantum scale conductance

    E-print Network

    Evans, Jeremy Scott

    2009-01-01

    We study electronic conductance through single molecules by subjecting a molecular junction to a time dependent potential and propagating the electronic state in real time using time-dependent density functional theory ...

  19. Rouse mode analysis of chain relaxation in homopolymer melts

    SciTech Connect

    Kalathi, Jagannathan T.; Kumar, Sanat K.; Rubinstein, Michael; Grest, Gary S.

    2014-09-15

    We use molecular dynamics simulations of the Kremer–Grest (KG) bead–spring model of polymer chains of length between 10 and 500, and a closely related analogue that allows for chain crossing, to clearly delineate the effects of entanglements on the length-scale-dependent chain relaxation in polymer melts. We analyze the resulting trajectories using the Rouse modes of the chains and find that entanglements strongly affect these modes. The relaxation rates of the chains show two limiting effective monomeric frictions, with the local modes experiencing much lower effective friction than the longer modes. The monomeric relaxation rates of longer modes vary approximately inversely with chain length due to kinetic confinement effects. The time-dependent relaxation of Rouse modes has a stretched exponential character with a minimum of stretching exponent in the vicinity of the entanglement chain length. None of these trends are found in models that allow for chain crossing. As a result, these facts, in combination, argue for the confined motion of chains for time scales between the entanglement time and their ultimate free diffusion.

  20. Rouse Mode Analysis of Chain Relaxation in Homopolymer Melts

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations of the Kremer–Grest (KG) bead–spring model of polymer chains of length between 10 and 500, and a closely related analogue that allows for chain crossing, to clearly delineate the effects of entanglements on the length-scale-dependent chain relaxation in polymer melts. We analyze the resulting trajectories using the Rouse modes of the chains and find that entanglements strongly affect these modes. The relaxation rates of the chains show two limiting effective monomeric frictions, with the local modes experiencing much lower effective friction than the longer modes. The monomeric relaxation rates of longer modes vary approximately inversely with chain length due to kinetic confinement effects. The time-dependent relaxation of Rouse modes has a stretched exponential character with a minimum of stretching exponent in the vicinity of the entanglement chain length. None of these trends are found in models that allow for chain crossing. These facts, in combination, argue for the confined motion of chains for time scales between the entanglement time and their ultimate free diffusion. PMID:25328247

  1. Rouse mode analysis of chain relaxation in homopolymer melts

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kalathi, Jagannathan T.; Kumar, Sanat K.; Rubinstein, Michael; Grest, Gary S.

    2014-09-15

    We use molecular dynamics simulations of the Kremer–Grest (KG) bead–spring model of polymer chains of length between 10 and 500, and a closely related analogue that allows for chain crossing, to clearly delineate the effects of entanglements on the length-scale-dependent chain relaxation in polymer melts. We analyze the resulting trajectories using the Rouse modes of the chains and find that entanglements strongly affect these modes. The relaxation rates of the chains show two limiting effective monomeric frictions, with the local modes experiencing much lower effective friction than the longer modes. The monomeric relaxation rates of longer modes vary approximately inverselymore »with chain length due to kinetic confinement effects. The time-dependent relaxation of Rouse modes has a stretched exponential character with a minimum of stretching exponent in the vicinity of the entanglement chain length. None of these trends are found in models that allow for chain crossing. As a result, these facts, in combination, argue for the confined motion of chains for time scales between the entanglement time and their ultimate free diffusion.« less

  2. Relaxation of quasi-two-dimensional electrons in a quantizing magnetic field probed by time-resolved cyclotron resonance

    E-print Network

    Natelson, Douglas

    -resolved cyclotron resonance G. A. Khodaparast, D. C. Larrabee, and J. Kono* Department of Electrical and Computer 16 September 2002; published 14 January 2003 We have measured the picosecond time-resolved cyclotron the average cyclotron mass of the electrons, which we monitor directly in time, to decrease as the electrons

  3. Scaling Laws at the Nano Size: The Effect of Particle Size and Shape on the Magnetism and Relaxivity of Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Smolensky, Eric D.; Park, Hee-Yun E.; Zhou, Yue; Rolla, Gabriele A.; Marja?ska, Ma?gorzata; Botta, Mauro; Pierre, Valérie C.

    2013-01-01

    The magnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles govern their relaxivities and efficacy as contrast agents for MRI. These properties are in turn determined by their composition, size and morphology. Herein we present a systematic study of the effect of particle size and shape of magnetite nanocrystals synthesized by thermal decompositions of iron salts on both their magnetism and their longitudinal and transverse relaxivities, r1 and r2, respectively. Faceted nanoparticles demonstrate superior magnetism and relaxivities than spherical nanoparticles of similar size. For faceted nanoparticles, but not for spherical ones, r1 and r2 further increase with increasing particle size up to a size of 18 nm. This observation is in accordance with increasing saturation magnetization for nanoparticles increasing in size up to 12 nm, above which a plateau is observed. The NMRD (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Dispersion) profiles of MIONs (Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles) display an increase in longitudinal relaxivity with decreasing magnetic field strength with a plateau below 1 MHz. The transverse relaxivity shows no dependence on the magnetic field strength between 20 MHz and 500 MHz. These observations translate to phantom MR images: in T1-weighted SWIFT (SWeep imaging with Fourier Transform) images MIONs have a positive contrast with little dependence on particle size, whereas in T2-weighted gradient-echo images MIONs create a negative contrast which increases in magnitude with increasing particle size. Altogether, these results will enable the development of particulate MRI contrast agents with enhanced efficacy for biomedical and clinical applications. PMID:23819021

  4. Reduction in extracellular Ca2+ attenuates endothelium-dependent relaxation more than nitroprusside-induced relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Shigehiro; Hester, R Kelly

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To quantitatively assess the effect of lowering external Ca2+ ([Ca2+]o) on both endothelium-dependent and -independent relaxations in rabbit aorta. Methods: Isometric contractions and relaxations of isolated aortae were recorded. When assessing the effect of reduced [Ca2+]o on relaxations, the normal [Ca2+]o solution was substituted with one of the reduced [Ca2+]o solutions for one aorta, while a paired aorta was replenished with normal [Ca2+]o solution. Results: The extent of acetylcholine (ACh)-induced relaxation, which is dependent on an intact endothelium, is time-dependent, and inversely related to [Ca2+]o in a range of 0.02–2 mmol/L. ACh-induced relaxations were not significantly altered by the magnitude of the precontraction induced by PGF2?. Nitroprusside-induced relaxations, which are independent of the endothelium, are also attenuated by reduced [Ca2+]o. Relaxant responses to ACh were significantly more susceptible to reduced [Ca2+]o than nitroprusside-induced relaxations. A maximally effective relaxing concentration of D600, an L-type Ca channel blocker methoxyverapamil, (10?5 mol/L) attenuated ACh-induced relaxations, whereas nitroprusside-induced relaxations were unaffected by D600. Conclusion: Thus, endothelium-dependent relaxation is more dependent on [Ca2+]o than endothelium-independent relaxation, and it seems likely that [Ca2+]o plays an important role not only in contractile processes, but also in relaxant processes as well. PMID:19915583

  5. Nanosecond excitonic spin relaxation in cubic GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tackeuchi, Atsushi; Otake, Hirotaka; Ogawa, Yusuke; Ushiyama, Takafumi; Fujita, Taisuke; Takano, Fumiyoshi; Akinaga, Hiro

    2006-04-01

    The excitonic spin relaxation process in cubic GaN is observed by spin-dependent pump and probe reflectance measurements with subpicosecond time resolution. The spin polarization presents at temperatures lower than 100K. The spin relaxation times at 15-75K are found to be longer than 5ns and short spin relaxation times on the picosecond order are not present. Although these long spin relaxation times are in striking contrast to the subpicosecond spin relaxation of A-band free excitons in hexagonal GaN, they are consistent with the dependence that spin relaxation time becomes longer for wider-band gap zinc blende semiconductors.

  6. Nanosecond excitonic spin relaxation in cubic GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tackeuchi, Atsushi; Otake, Hirotaka; Ogawa, Yusuke; Ushiyama, Takafumi; Fujita, Taisuke; Takano, Fumiyoshi; Akinaga, Hiro

    2007-04-01

    The excitonic spin relaxation in cubic GaN is observed by spin-dependent pump and probe reflectance measurements with sub-picosecond time resolution. The spin relaxation times at 15 - 75 K are found to be longer than 5 ns and short spin relaxation times on the picosecond order are not present. Although these long spin relaxation times are in striking contrast to the sub-picosecond spin relaxation of A-band free excitons in hexagonal GaN, they are consistent with the dependence that spin relaxation time becomes longer for wider-band-gap zincblende semiconductors.

  7. Slow Stress-Relaxation of Thin Sheet Folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feder, Jens; de Villiers, Simon; Malthe-Sorenssen, Anders

    2009-03-01

    We measure the slowly relaxing force required to maintain a fold in thin sheets of aluminum, copper, Mylar, and paper. The relaxation is found to be best described by a Weibull distribution of relaxation times. The exponent ? of the Weibull distribution characterizes two distinct classes of relaxation observed in metallic (?˜2) and polymeric materials (?˜1) respectively.

  8. Relaxation of the cosmological constant at inflation?

    E-print Network

    V. A. Rubakov

    1999-11-10

    We suggest that the cosmological constant has been relaxed to its present, very small value during the inflationary stage of the evolution of the Universe. This requires relatively low scale, very long duration and unconventional source of inflation. We present a concrete mechanism of the cosmological constant relaxation at the inflationary epoch.

  9. Ultrafast studies of photodissociation in solution: Dissociation, recombination and relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    King, J.C.

    1995-05-01

    Photodissociation of M(CO){sub 6} (M=Cr,Mo,W) and the formation of solvated M(CO){sub 5}{center_dot}S complex was studied in cyclohexane; rate-limiting step is vibrational energy relaxation from the new bond to the solvent. For both M=Cr and Mo, the primary relaxation occurs in 18 ps; for Cr, there is an additional vibrational relaxation (150 ps time scale) of a CO group poorly coupled to other modes. Relaxation of M=W occurs in 42 ps; several possible mechanisms for the longer cooling are discussed. Vibrational relaxation is also investigated for I{sub 2}{sup -} and IBr{sup {minus}} in nonpolar and slightly polar solvents. Attempts were made to discover the mechanism for the fast energy transfer in nonpolar solvent. The longer time scale dynamics of I{sub 3}{sup {minus}} and IBr{sub 2}{sup {minus}} were also studied; both formed a metastable complex following photodissociation and 90-95% return to ground state in 100 ps, implying a barrier to recombination of 4.3 kcal/mol and a barrier to escape of {ge}5.5 kcal/mol. The more complex photochemistry of M{sub 3}(CO){sub 12} (M=Fe,Ru) is also investigated, using visible and ultraviolet radiations, dissociation, geminate recombination, vibrational relaxation, and bridging structures and their reactions were studied. Attempts were made to extend ultrafast spectroscopy into the mid-infrared, but signal-to-noise was poor.

  10. Universal relaxation in quark-gluon plasma at strong coupling

    E-print Network

    Buchel, Alex

    2015-01-01

    We use top-down gauge theory/string theory correspondence to compute relaxation rates in strongly coupled nonconformal gauge theory plasma. We compare models with difference mechanisms of breaking the scale invariance: "hard breaking" (by relevant operators) and "soft breaking" (by marginal operators). We find that the thermalization time of the transverse traceless fluctuations of the stress-energy tensor is rather insensitive to the mechanisms of breaking the scale invariance over a large range of the scale-breaking parameter $\\delta=\\frac 13-c_s^2$. We comment on the relevance of the results to QCD quark-gluon plasma.

  11. Universal relaxation in quark-gluon plasma at strong coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchel, Alex; Day, Andrew

    2015-07-01

    We use top-down gauge theory/string theory correspondence to compute relaxation rates in strongly coupled nonconformal gauge theory plasma. We compare models with difference mechanisms of breaking the scale invariance: "hard breaking" (by relevant operators) and "soft breaking" (by marginal operators). We find that the thermalization time of the transverse traceless fluctuations of the stress-energy tensor is rather insensitive to the mechanisms of breaking the scale invariance over a large range of the scale-breaking parameter ? =1/3 -cs2. We comment on the relevance of the results to QCD quark-gluon plasma.

  12. Universal relaxation in quark-gluon plasma at strong coupling

    E-print Network

    Alex Buchel; Andrew Day

    2015-05-19

    We use top-down gauge theory/string theory correspondence to compute relaxation rates in strongly coupled nonconformal gauge theory plasma. We compare models with difference mechanisms of breaking the scale invariance: "hard breaking" (by relevant operators) and "soft breaking" (by marginal operators). We find that the thermalization time of the transverse traceless fluctuations of the stress-energy tensor is rather insensitive to the mechanisms of breaking the scale invariance over a large range of the scale-breaking parameter $\\delta=\\frac 13-c_s^2$. We comment on the relevance of the results to QCD quark-gluon plasma.

  13. Scale-Invariant Extinction Time Estimates for Some Singular Diffusion Equations

    E-print Network

    Scale-Invariant Extinction Time Estimates for Some Singular Diffusion Equations Yoshikazu Giga that the solution becomes identically zero in finite time. We prove scale-invariant estimates for the extinction and q > 1). Our goal is to prove finite-time extinction, i.e. to show that the solution becomes

  14. Structure and dating errors in the geologic time scale and periodicity in mass extinctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, Richard B.

    1989-01-01

    Structure in the geologic time scale reflects a partly paleontological origin. As a result, ages of Cenozoic and Mesozoic stage boundaries exhibit a weak 28-Myr periodicity that is similar to the strong 26-Myr periodicity detected in mass extinctions of marine life by Raup and Sepkoski. Radiometric dating errors in the geologic time scale, to which the mass extinctions are stratigraphically tied, do not necessarily lessen the likelihood of a significant periodicity in mass extinctions, but do spread the acceptable values of the period over the range 25-27 Myr for the Harland et al. time scale or 25-30 Myr for the DNAG time scale. If the Odin time scale is adopted, acceptable periods fall between 24 and 33 Myr, but are not robust against dating errors. Some indirect evidence from independently-dated flood-basalt volcanic horizons tends to favor the Odin time scale.

  15. Time resolved single photon imaging in Nanometer Scale CMOS technology 

    E-print Network

    Richardson, Justin Andrew

    2010-06-28

    Time resolved imaging is concerned with the measurement of photon arrival time. It has a wealth of emerging applications including biomedical uses such as fluorescence lifetime microscopy and positron emission tomography, ...

  16. Time-resolved infrared absorption studies of the solvent-dependent vibrational relaxation dynamics of chlorine dioxide

    E-print Network

    Reid, Philip J.

    of chlorine dioxide Joshua C. Bolinger, Teresa J. Bixby, and Philip J. Reida Box 351700, Department; published online 29 August 2005 We report a series of time-resolved infrared absorption studies on chlorine.1063/1.2000234 I. INTRODUCTION The photochemistry of chlorine dioxide OClO is of interest due to the participation

  17. The characteristic time scale for basin hydrological response using radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, Efrat; Enzel, Yehouda; Shamir, Uri; Garti, Rami

    2001-10-01

    The transformation of rainfall into runoff at a basin outlet is the combined effect of many hydrological processes, which occur at a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. However, determining the scale of the combined hydrological response of the basin is still problematic and concepts for its definition are yet to be identified. In this paper high-resolution meteorological radar data are used for the determination of a characteristic temporal scale for the hydrological response of the basin — the 'response time scale' (T s?). T s? is defined as the time scale at which the pattern of the time-averaged radar rainfall hietograph is most similar to the pattern of the measured outlet runoff hydrograph. The existence of such similarity at a relatively stable time scale for a specific basin indicates that it is an intrinsic property of the basin and is related to its hydrological response. The identification of the response time scale is carried out by analysis of observations only, without assuming a specific rainfall-runoff model. T s? is examined in four small basins (10-100 km 2) in Israel. The spatial scale is assumed as the entire basin. For all analyzed basins a stable response time scale is identified. Relatively short time scales are found for the urban and arid basins (15-30 min), while for the rural basins longer time scale are identified (90-180 min). The issues of relationship between the response time scale and basin properties and modeling at the response time scale have yet to be determined.

  18. Investigation of the shear-mechanical and dielectric relaxation processes in two mono-alcohols close to the glass transition

    E-print Network

    Bo Jakobsen; Claudio Maggi; Tage Christensen; Jeppe C. Dyre

    2008-10-03

    Shear-mechanical and dielectric measurements on the two monohydroxy (mono-alcohol) molecular glass formers 2-ethyl-1-hexanol and 2-butanol close to the glass transition temperature are presented. The shear-mechanical data are obtained using the piezoelectric shear-modulus gauge method covering frequencies from 1mHz to 10kHz. The shear-mechanical relaxation spectra show two processes, which follow the typical scenario of a structural (alpha) relaxation and an additional (Johari-Goldstein) beta relaxation. The dielectric relaxation spectra are dominated by a Debye-type peak with an additional non-Debye peak visible. This Debye-type relaxation is a common feature peculiar to mono-alcohols. The time scale of the non-Debye dielectric relaxation process is shown to correspond to the mechanical structural (alpha) relaxation. Glass-transition temperatures and fragilities are reported based on the mechanical alpha relaxation and the dielectric Debye-type process, showing that the two glass-transition temperatures differ by approximately 10K and that the fragility based on the Debye-type process is a factor of two smaller than the structural fragility. If a mechanical signature of the Debye-type relaxation exists in these liquids, its relaxation strength is at most 1% and 3% of the full relaxation strength of 2-butanol and 2-ethyl-1-hexanol respectively. These findings support the notion that it is the non-Debye dielectric relaxation process that corresponds to the structural alpha relaxation in the liquid.

  19. Longitudinal relaxation of initially straight flexible and stiff polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrakopoulos, Panagiotis; Dissanayake, Inuka

    2004-11-01

    The present talk considers the relaxation of a single flexible or stiff polymer chain from an initial straight configuration in a viscous solvent. This problem commonly arises when strong flows are turned off in both industrial and biological applications. The problem is also motivated by recent experiments with single biopolymer molecules relaxing after being fully extended by applied forces as well as by the recent development of micro-devices involving stretched tethered biopolymers. Our results are applicable to a wide array of synthetic polymers such as polyacrylamides, Kevlar and polyesters as well as biopolymers such as DNA, actin filaments, microtubules and MTV. In this talk we discuss the mechanism of the polymer relaxation as was revealed through Brownian Dynamics simulations covering a broad range of time scales and chain stiffness. After the short-time free diffusion, the chain's longitudinal reduction at early intermediate times is shown to constitute a universal behavior for any chain stiffness caused by a quasi-steady relaxation of tensions associated with the deforming action of the Brownian forces. Stiff chains are shown to exhibit a late intermediate-time longitudinal reduction associated with a relaxation of tensions affected by the deforming Brownian and the restoring bending forces. The longitudinal and transverse relaxations are shown to obey different laws, i.e. the chain relaxation is anisotropic at all times. In the talk, we show how from the knowledge of the relaxation mechanism, we can predict and explain the polymer properties including the polymer stress and the solution birefringence. In addition, a generalized stress-optic law is derived valid for any time and chain stiffness. All polymer properties which depend on the polymer length are shown to exhibit two intermediate-time behaviors with the early one to constitute a universal behavior for any chain stiffness. This work was supported in part by the Minta Martin Research Fund. The computations were performed on multiprocessor computers provided by the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) in Illinois (grant DMR000003), and by an Academic Equipment Grant from Sun Microsystems Inc.

  20. Chaos and relaxation to equilibrium in systems with long-range interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antunes, Felipe L.; Benetti, Fernanda P. C.; Pakter, Renato; Levin, Yan

    2015-11-01

    In the thermodynamic limit, systems with long-range interactions do not relax to equilibrium, but become trapped in nonequilibrium stationary states. For a finite number of particles a nonequilibrium state has a finite lifetime, so that eventually a system will relax to thermodynamic equilibrium. The time that a system remains trapped in a quasistationary state (QSS) scales with the number of particles as N?, with ? >0 , and diverges in the thermodynamic limit. In this paper we will explore the role of chaotic dynamics on the time that a system remains trapped in a QSS. We discover that chaos, measured by the Lyapunov exponents, favors faster relaxation to equilibrium. Surprisingly, weak chaos favors faster relaxation than strong chaos.