Science.gov

Sample records for release direct coal liquefaction

  1. Design of generic coal conversion facilities: Process release---Direct coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The direct liquefaction portion of the PETC generic direct coal liquefaction process development unit (PDU) is being designed to provide maximum operating flexibility. The PDU design will permit catalytic and non-catalytic liquefaction concepts to be investigated at their proof-of-the-concept stages before any larger scale operations are attempted. The principal variations from concept to concept are reactor configurations and types. These include thermal reactor, ebullating bed reactor, slurry phase reactor and fixed bed reactor, as well as different types of catalyst. All of these operating modes are necessary to define and identify the optimum process conditions and configurations for determining improved economical liquefaction technology.

  2. Reaction engineering in direct coal liquefaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Y. T.

    Processes for direct coal liquefaction by solvent extraction are considered along with the structure and properties of coal and the mechanism of coal liquefaction, heteroatom removal during liquefaction, kinetic models for donor-solvent coal liquefaction, the design of coal liquefaction reactors, and the refining of coal liquids. Attention is given to the catalytic hydrogenation of coal in the presence of a solvent, the origin and character of coal, laboratory reactors for rate measurements, reaction networks based on lumped fractions, free-radical reaction models, reactor types, the compatibility of coal-derived liquids and petroleum fuels, the stability of coal liquids, thermal cracking, catalytic hydrotreating, catalytic cracking, and catalytic reforming.

  3. Direct coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Rindt, John R.; Hetland, Melanie D.

    1993-01-01

    An improved multistep liquefaction process for organic carbonaceous mater which produces a virtually completely solvent-soluble carbonaceous liquid product. The solubilized product may be more amenable to further processing than liquid products produced by current methods. In the initial processing step, the finely divided organic carbonaceous material is treated with a hydrocarbonaceous pasting solvent containing from 10% and 100% by weight process-derived phenolic species at a temperature within the range of 300.degree. C. to 400.degree. C. for typically from 2 minutes to 120 minutes in the presence of a carbon monoxide reductant and an optional hydrogen sulfide reaction promoter in an amount ranging from 0 to 10% by weight of the moisture- and ash-free organic carbonaceous material fed to the system. As a result, hydrogen is generated via the water/gas shift reaction at a rate necessary to prevent condensation reactions. In a second step, the reaction product of the first step is hydrogenated.

  4. Direct coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Rindt, J.R.; Hetland, M.D.

    1993-10-26

    An improved multistep liquefaction process for organic carbonaceous mater which produces a virtually completely solvent-soluble carbonaceous liquid product. The solubilized product may be more amenable to further processing than liquid products produced by current methods. In the initial processing step, the finely divided organic carbonaceous material is treated with a hydrocarbonaceous pasting solvent containing from 10% and 100% by weight process-derived phenolic species at a temperature within the range of 300 C to 400 C for typically from 2 minutes to 120 minutes in the presence of a carbon monoxide reductant and an optional hydrogen sulfide reaction promoter in an amount ranging from 0 to 10% by weight of the moisture- and ash-free organic carbonaceous material fed to the system. As a result, hydrogen is generated via the water/gas shift reaction at a rate necessary to prevent condensation reactions. In a second step, the reaction product of the first step is hydrogenated.

  5. Advanced direct coal liquefaction concepts - appendix

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, D.J.; Parker, R.J.; Simpson, P.L.

    1994-07-01

    This detailed appendix presents the results of direct coal liquefaction studies performed by the contractor. Several hundred tables summarizing the chemical compostion for runs of a bench scale reactor are presented.

  6. Advanced progress concepts for direct coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.; Derbyshire, F.; Givens, E.

    1995-09-01

    Given the low cost of petroleum crude, direct coal liquefaction is still not an economically viable process. The DOE objectives are to further reduce the cost of coal liquefaction to a more competitive level. In this project the primary focus is on the use of low-rank coal feedstocks. A particular strength is the use of process-derived liquids rather than model compound solvents. The original concepts are illustrated in Figure 1, where they are shown on a schematic of the Wilsonville pilot plant operation. Wilsonville operating data have been used to define a base case scenario using run {number_sign}263J, and Wilsonville process materials have been used in experimental work. The CAER has investigated: low severity CO pretreatment of coal for oxygen rejection, increasing coal reactivity and mg inhibiting the propensity for regressive reactions; the application of more active. Low-cost Fe and Mo dispersed catalysts; and the possible use of fluid coking for solids rejection and to generate an overhead product for recycle. CONSOL has investigated: oil agglomeration for coal ash rejection, for the possible rejection of ash in the recycled resid, and for catalyst addition and recovery; and distillate dewaxing to remove naphthenes and paraffins, and to generate an improved quality feed for recycle distillate hydrogenation. At Sandia, research has been concerned with the production of active hydrogen donor distillate solvent fractions produced by the hydrogenation of dewaxed distillates and by fluid coking via low severity reaction with H{sub 2}/CO/H{sub 2}O mixtures using hydrous metal oxide and other catalysts.

  7. Coal liquefaction

    DOEpatents

    Schindler, Harvey D.

    1985-01-01

    In a two-stage liquefaction wherein coal, hydrogen and liquefaction solvent are contacted in a first thermal liquefaction zone, followed by recovery of an essentially ash free liquid and a pumpable stream of insoluble material, which includes 850.degree. F.+ liquid, with the essentially ash free liquid then being further upgraded in a second liquefaction zone, the liquefaction solvent for the first stage includes the pumpable stream of insoluble material from the first liquefaction stage, and 850.degree. F.+ liquid from the second liquefaction stage.

  8. Case studies on direct liquefaction of low rank Wyoming coal

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, P.; Kramer, S.J.; Poddar, S.K.

    1995-12-31

    Previous Studies have developed process designs, costs, and economics for the direct liquefaction of Illinois No. 6 and Wyoming Black Thunder coals at mine-mouth plants. This investigation concerns two case studies related to the liquefaction of Wyoming Black Thunder coal. The first study showed that reducing the coal liquefaction reactor design pressure from 3300 to 1000 psig could reduce the crude oil equivalent price by 2.1 $/bbl provided equivalent performing catalysts can be developed. The second one showed that incentives may exist for locating a facility that liquifies Wyoming coal on the Gulf Coast because of lower construction costs and higher labor productivity. These incentives are dependent upon the relative values of the cost of shipping the coal to the Gulf Coast and the increased product revenues that may be obtained by distributing the liquid products among several nearby refineries.

  9. Recent progress in the direct liquefaction of coal.

    PubMed

    Lumpkin, R E

    1988-02-19

    Interest in direct coal liquefaction steadily decreased during the 1980s as the price of crude oil dropped; there is now only one integrated coal liquefaction pilot plant active full time in the United States. The economics derived early in the decade established the price of transportation fuels from coal at $80 per barrel or higher. However, there have been dramatic improvements in the technology since 1983 that have not been widely appreciated. Recent designs and cost estimates show that a 60 percent decrease in the cost of liquid fuels from coal to an equivalent of $35 per barrel for crude oil. Although this cost is not low enough to justify immediate commercialization, additional improvements have been identified that could make direct liquefaction an attractive way to produce gasoline and other conventional fuels. PMID:17759033

  10. STUDY OF SOLVENT AND CATALYST INTERACTIONS IN DIRECT COAL LIQUEFACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Michael T. Klein

    2000-01-01

    Using a reactor in which the coal is physically separated from the solid catalyst by a porous wall permeable to the hydrogen donor solvent, it was shown that direct contact between the catalyst and the coal is not required for catalyzed coal liquefaction. This occurs however only when there is a hydrogen atmosphere, as liquefaction with catalyst participation does not occur in a nitrogen atmosphere. Liquefaction by hydrogen transfer from the donor solvent itself does occur. This suggests that there is transfer of hydrogen from the catalyst to the coal via the solvent. The character of the solvent makes a significant difference, the better solvents being good hydrogen donors. These results indicate that the role of the catalyst may be to regenerate the spent hydrogen donor solvent during the liquefaction process. The peak temperature for volatiles evolution has been shown to be a reproducible measure of the coal rank. This was shown by an excellent correlation (R2 = 0.998) between peak volatiles temperatures (by TGA) and vitrinite reflectance. Using TG/MS, the volatiles contents of coals of a wide range of ranks was determined. The low rank coals emit largely phenols and some other oxygen compounds and olefins. The higher rank coals emit largely aromatic hydrocarbons and some olefins.

  11. The application of advanced analytical techniques to direct coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.; Robbins, G.A.

    1991-12-31

    Consol is coordinating a program designed to bridge the gap between the advanced, modern techniques of the analytical chemist and the application of those techniques by the direct coal liquefaction process developer, and to advance our knowledge of the process chemistry of direct coal liquefaction. The program is designed to provide well-documented samples to researchers who are utilizing techniques potentially useful for the analysis of coal derived samples. The choice of samples and techniques was based on an extensive survey made by Consol of the present status of analytical methodology associated with direct coal liquefaction technology. Sources of information included process developers and analytical chemists. Identified in the survey are a number of broadly characterizable needs. These categories include a need for: A better understanding of the nature of the high molecular weight, non-distillable residual materials (both soluble and insoluble) in the process streams; improved techniques for molecular characterization, heteroatom and hydrogen speciation and a knowledge of the hydrocarbon structural changes across coal liquefaction systems; better methods for sample separation; application of advanced data analysis methods; the use of more advanced predictive models; on-line analytical techniques; and better methods for catalyst monitoring.

  12. Direct liquefaction of plastics and coprocessing of coal with plastics

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, G.P.; Feng, Z.; Mahajan, V.

    1995-12-31

    The objectives of this work were to optimize reaction conditions for the direct liquefaction of waste plastics and the coprocessing of coal with waste plastics. In previous work, the direct liquefaction of medium and high density polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PPE), poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET), and a mixed plastic waste, and the coliquefaction of these plastics with coals of three different ranks was studied. The results established that a solid acid catalyst (HZSM-5 zeolite) was highly active for the liquefaction of the plastics alone, typically giving oil yields of 80-95% and total conversions of 90-100% at temperatures of 430-450 {degrees}C. In the coliquefaction experiments, 50:50 mixtures of plastic and coal were used with a tetralin solvent (tetralin:solid = 3:2). Using approximately 1% of the HZSM-5 catalyst and a nanoscale iron catalyst, oil yields of 50-70% and total conversion of 80-90% were typical. In the current year, further investigations were conducted of the liquefaction of PE, PPE, and a commingled waste plastic obtained from the American Plastics Council (APC), and the coprocessing of PE, PPE and the APC plastic with Black Thunder subbituminous coal. Several different catalysts were used in these studies.

  13. Direct use of methane in coal liquefaction

    DOEpatents

    Sundaram, Muthu S.; Steinberg, Meyer

    1987-01-01

    This invention relates to a process for converting solid carbonaceous material, such as coal, to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons utilizing methane, generally at a residence time of about 20-120 minutes at a temperature of 250.degree.-750.degree. C., preferably 350.degree.-450.degree. C., pressurized up to 6000 psi, and preferably in the 1000-2500 psi range, preferably directly utilizing methane 50-100% by volume in a mix of methane and hydrogen. A hydrogen donor solvent or liquid vehicle such as tetralin, tetrahydroquinoline, piperidine, and pyrolidine may be used in a slurry mix where the solvent feed is 0-100% by weight of the coal or carbonaceous feed. Carbonaceous feed material can either be natural, such as coal, wood, oil shale, petroleum, tar sands, etc., or man-made residual oils, tars, and heavy hydrocarbon residues from other processing systems.

  14. Direct use of methane in coal liquefaction

    DOEpatents

    Sundaram, M.S.; Steinberg, M.

    1985-06-19

    This invention relates to a process for converting solid carbonaceous material, such as coal, to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons utilizing methane, generally at a residence time of about 20 to 120 minutes at a temperature of 250 to 750/sup 0/C, preferably 350 to 450/sup 0/C, pressurized up to 6000 psi, and preferably in the 1000 to 2500 psi range, preferably directly utilizing methane 50 to 100% by volume in a mix of methane and hydrogen. A hydrogen donor solvent or liquid vehicle such as tetralin, tetrahydroquinoline, piperidine, and pyrolidine may be used in a slurry mix where the solvent feed is 0 to 100% by weight of the coal or carbonaceous feed. Carbonaceous feed material can either be natural, such as coal, wood, oil shale, petroleum, tar sands, etc., or man-made residual oils, tars, and heavy hydrocarbon residues from other processing systems. 1 fig.

  15. Some thoughts on the strategy of direct coal liquefaction -- Partial liquefaction and utilization of heavy liquefaction products

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Z.; Yang, J.

    1998-12-31

    Hydrogenation has long been the only goal of coal liquefaction. However, analysis show that partial hydrogenation along with carbon rejection may be a better strategy for coal liquefaction, which reduces hydrogen consumption and reaction severity, eliminates the necessity for expensive catalyst, and may results in better economy for overall liquefaction. The hydrogenation and carbon rejection approach can be called partial liquefaction of coal. This paper presents analysis supporting the strategy of partial coal liquefaction based on the point of view of mass and energy balance, chemical reaction kinetics, reactivity of coal constituents and possible use of the heavy liquefaction products.

  16. STUDY OF SOLVENT AND CATALYST INTERACTIONS IN DIRECT COAL LIQUEFACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Michael T. Klein; William H. Calkins; Jasna Tomic

    2000-10-04

    To provide a better understanding of the roles of a solid catalyst and the solvent in Direct Coal Liquefaction, a small reactor was equipped with a porous-walled basket which was permeable to the solvent but was not permeable to the coal or solid catalyst. With this equipment and a high volatile bituminous coal it was found that direct contact between the catalyst in the basket and the coal outside the basket is not required for catalyzed coal liquefaction. The character of the solvent in this system makes a significant difference in the conversion of the coal, the better solvents being strong donor solvents. Because of the extensive use of thermogravimetric analysis in this laboratory, it was noted that the peak temperature for volatiles evolution from coal was a reliable measure of coal rank. Because of this observation, a variety of coals of a range of ranks was investigated. It was shown in this work that measuring the peak temperature for volatiles evolution was a quite precise indicator of rank and correlated closely with the rank value obtained by measuring vitrinite reflectance, a more difficult measurement to make. This prompted the desire to know the composition of the volatile material evolved as a function of coal rank. This was then measured by coupling a TGA to a mass spectrometer using laser activation and photoionization detection TG-PI-MS. The predominant species in volatiles of low rank coal turned out to be phenols with some alkenes. As the rank increases, the relative amounts of alkene and aromatic hydrocarbons increases and the oxygenated species decrease. It was shown that these volatiles were actually pyrolytic products and not volatilization products of the coal. Solvent extraction experiments coupled with Thermogravimetric-photoionization-mass spectrometry (TG-PI-MS) indicated that the low boiling and more extractable material are essentially similar in chemical types to the non-extractable portions but apparently higher molecular weight

  17. Short Contact Time Direct Coal Liquefaction Using a Novel Batch Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    He Huang; Michael T. Klein; William H. Calkins

    1997-01-30

    The primary objective of this research is to optimize the design and operation of the bench scale batch reactor (SCTBR) for studying direct coal liquefaction at short contact times (.01 to 10 minutes or longer). Additional objectives are to study the kinetics of direct coal liquefaction particularly at short reaction times and to investigate the role of organic oxygen components of coal and their reaction pathways during coal liquefaction. Many of those objectives have already been achieved. This quarterly report discusses further kinetic studies of the liquefaction in tetralin of a Montana Lignite, Wyodak-Anderson subbituminous coal, Illinois #6 hv bituminous coal, Pittsburgh #8 hv bituminous coals, and Pocohontas lV bituminous coal at short contact times. All of these coals showed a distinct extraction stage. Further work has also been done to attempt to clarify the role of the liquefaction solvent in the direct liquefaction process.

  18. Subtask 3.9 - Direct Coal Liquefaction Process Development

    SciTech Connect

    Aulich, Ted; Sharma, Ramesh

    2012-07-01

    The Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC), in partnership with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Accelergy Corporation, an advanced fuels developer with technologies exclusively licensed from ExxonMobil, undertook Subtask 3.9 to design, build, and preliminarily operate a bench-scale direct coal liquefaction (DCL) system capable of converting 45 pounds/hour of pulverized, dried coal to a liquid suitable for upgrading to fuels and/or chemicals. Fabrication and installation of the DCL system and an accompanying distillation system for off-line fractionation of raw coal liquids into 1) a naphtha middle distillate stream for upgrading and 2) a recycle stream was completed in May 2012. Shakedown of the system was initiated in July 2012. In addition to completing fabrication of the DCL system, the project also produced a 500-milliliter sample of jet fuel derived in part from direct liquefaction of Illinois No. 6 coal, and submitted the sample to the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) at Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, Ohio, for evaluation. The sample was confirmed by AFRL to be in compliance with all U.S. Air Force-prescribed alternative aviation fuel initial screening criteria.

  19. Status of health and environmental research relative to direct coal liquefaction: 1976 to the present

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, R.H.; Cowser, K.E.

    1982-06-01

    This document describes the status of health and environmental research efforts, supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE), to assist in the development of environmentally acceptable coal liquefaction processes. Four major direct coal liquefaction processes are currently in (or have been investigated at) the pilot plant stage of development. Two solvent refined coal processes (SRC-I and -II), H-coal (a catalytic liquefaction process) and Exxon donor solvent (EDS). The Pacific Northwest Laboratory was assigned responsibility for evaluating SRC process materials and prepared comprehensive health and environmental effects research program plans for SRC-I and -II. A similar program plan was prepared for H-coal process materials by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A program has been developed for EDS process materials by Exxon Research and Engineering Co. The program includes short-term screening of coal-derived materials for potential health and ecological effects. Longer-term assays are used to evaluate materials considered most representative of potential commercial practice and with greatest potential for human exposure or release to the environment. Effects of process modification, control technologies and changing operational conditions on potential health and ecological effects are also being evaluated. These assessments are being conducted to assist in formulating cost-effective environmental research programs and to estimate health and environmental risks associated with a large-scale coal liquefaction industry. Significant results of DOE's health and environmental research efforts relative to coal liquefaction include the following: chemical characterization, health effects, ecological fate and effects, amelioration and risk assessment.

  20. Short Contact Time Direct Coal Liquefaction Using a Novel Batch Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    He Huang; Michael T. Klein; William H. Calkins

    1997-04-03

    The primary objective of this research is to optimize the design and operation of the bench scale batch reactor (SCTBR) for studying direct coal liquefaction at short contact times (.01 to 10 minutes or longer) . An additional objective is to study the kinetics of direct coal liquefaction particularly at short reaction times. Both of these objectives have been nearly achieved, however this work has shown the great importance of the liquefaction solvent characteristics and the solvent-catalyst interaction on the liquefaction process. This has prompted us to do a preliminary investigation of solvents and the solvent-catalyst systems in coal liquefaction. SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS 1) Conversion vs time data have been extended to 5 coals of ranks from lignite to low volatile bituminous coal. A broad range of reaction rates have been observed with a maximum in the high volatile bituminous range. 2) A series of direct coal liquefaction runs have been made using a range of nitrogen containing solvents that given high liquefaction conversions of coal. These runs are now being analyzed. 3) The coalification process has been shown by TGA to go through an intermediate stage which may account for the greater reactivity of bituminous coals in the direct coal liquefaction process. 4) It was shown that coal rank can be accurately determined by thermogravimetric analysis

  1. Cooperative research program in coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, G.P.; Sendlein, L.V.A.

    1991-01-01

    This report is a coordinated effort of the Consortium for Fossil Fuel Liquefaction Science. The topics concerning coal liquefaction discussed are: sulfate promoted metal oxides as direct coal liquefaction catalysts; low temperature depolymerization and liquefaction of premium R.S. coal samples; construction of continuous flow-through gas reactor for liquefaction investigations; generic structural characterization and liquefaction research; macerals, model compounds and iron catalyst dispersion; coal structure/liquefaction yield correlation by means of advanced NMR techniques; GC/MS of model compound mixtures; catalytic cracking, hydrogenation and liquefaction of coals under milder conditions; ENDOR investigations of coal liquefaction under mild conditions; catalytic dehydrogenation of model compounds in relation to direct coal liquefaction; surface characterization of catalyst added coal samples; computational chemistry of model compounds and molecular fragments of relevance to coal liquefaction; chemical characterization and hydrogenation reactions of single coal particles; thermolytic cleavage of selected coal-related linkages at mild temperatures; solvent sorption and FTIR studies on the effect of catalytic depolymerization reactions in coal; bioprocessing of coal; chemical routes to breaking bonds; novel liquefaction concepts cyclic olefins: novel new donors for coal liquefaction; better hydrogen transfer in coal liquefaction; catalytic hydropyrolysis and energized extraction of coals; gallium catalyst in mild coal liquefaction; potential of temperature microscope in coal liquefaction; evaluation of nitride catalysts for hydrotreatment and coal liquefaction; coprocessing and coal liquefaction with novel catalysts.

  2. Use of ultrasound for enhanced direct coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Bendale, P.G. ); Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I. . Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering)

    1989-01-01

    The objective of this project is to investigate whether high- intensity ultrasound is capable of inducing coal liquefaction under mild conditions of temperature and pressure in the presence of a solvent and in the presence or absence of a liquefaction catalyst. The role of high-intensity ultrasound in effective dispersion of solids and/or activation of catalyst will also be investigated using an appropriate liquefaction catalyst. The study is being conducted in two parts. In the first part, model compounds are being subjected to high-intensity ultrasound to determine if any chemical bonds are broken under the action of ultrasound. In the second part of the study, the effect of ultrasound on both catalyzed and noncatalyzed coal liquefaction will be determined. Two coals (sub-bituminous and bituminous) will be studied using an appropriate hydrogen donor solvent and molybdenum sulfide as catalyst. 4 refs., 2 tabs.

  3. Cooperative research program in coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, G.P.; Sendlein, L.V.A.

    1990-01-01

    Cooperative research in coal liquefaction is presented. Topics include: Sulfate-promoted metal oxides as direct coal liquefaction catalysts; low temperature depolymerization and liquefaction of premium US coal samples; construction of continuous flow-through gas reactor for liquefaction investigations; examination of ferric sulfide as a liquefaction catalyst; generic structural characterization and liquefaction research; spectroscopic studies of coal macerals depolymerization catalyzed by iron chloride; characterization of catalysts used in coal hydrogenation systems; coal structure/liquefaction yield correlation by means of advanced NMR techniques; mass spectrometry of coal derived liquids: determination of molecular weight distributions; catalyst cracking, hydrogenation and liquefaction of coals under milder conditions; ENDOR investigations of coal liquefaction under mild conditions; direct determination of hydroaromatic structures in coal and coal conversion products by catalytic dehydrogenation; surface characterization of APCSB coals by XPS; computation chemistry of model compounds and molecular fragments of relevance to coal liquefaction; chemical characterization and hydrogenation reactions of single coal particles; the role of hydrogen during liquefaction using donor and non-donor solvents; solvent sorption and FTIR studies on the effect of catalytic depolymerization reactions in coal; bioprocessing of coal; chemical routes to breaking bonds: new approaches to low-temperature liquefaction; an investigation into the reactivity of isotetralin and tetralin using molecular orbital calculations; coal liquefaction modification for enhanced reactivity; catalytic hydropyrolysis and energized extraction of coals; gallium catalyst in mild coal liquefaction -- potential of temperature microscope in coal liquefaction; evaluation of nitride catalysts for hydrotreatment and coal liquefaction; and improved catalysts for coal liquefaction and coprocessing.

  4. Novel use of residue from direct coal liquefaction process

    SciTech Connect

    Jianli Yang; Zhaixia Wang; Zhenyu Liu; Yuzhen Zhang

    2009-09-15

    Direct coal liquefaction residue (DCLR) is, commonly, designed to be used as a feed stock for gasification or combustion. Use of DCLR as a value added product is very important for improving overall economy of direct coal liquefaction processes. This study shows that the DCLR may be used as a pavement asphalt modifier. The modification ability is similar to that of Trinidad Lake Asphalt (TLA), a superior commercial modifier. Asphalts modified by two DCLRs meet the specifications of ASTM D5710 and BSI BS-3690 designated for the TLA-modified asphalts. The required addition amount for the DCLRs tested is less than that for TLA due possibly to the high content of asphaltene in DCLRs. Different compatibility was observed for the asphalts with the same penetration grade but from the different origin. Different components in the DCLR play different roles in the modification. Positive synergetic effects among the fractions were observed, which may due to the formation of the stable colloid structure. Unlike polymer-type modifier, the structure of asphalt-type modifier has a similarity with petroleum asphalts which favors the formation of a stable dispersed polar fluid (DPF) colloid structure and improves the performance of pavement asphalt. 12 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  5. SHORT CONTACT TIME DIRECT COAL LIQUEFACTION USING A NOVEL BATCH REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Michael T. Klein; William H. Calkins

    1997-10-29

    The overall goal of this research is to develop an understanding of the Direct Coal Liquefaction process at the molecular level. Many approaches have been used to study this process including kinetic studies, study of the liquefaction products, study of the effect of reaction variables, such as temperature, solvent type and composition, the changing nature and composition of the coal during liquefaction, and the distribution in the liquefaction products of the hydrogen consumed. While all these studies have contributed to our growing knowledge of the liquefaction process, an adequate understanding of direct liquefaction still eludes us. This is due to many reasons including: the complexity and variable nature of coal itself and the many different chemical reactions which are occurring simultaneously during direct coal liquefaction. We believe that a study of the liquefaction process at the very early stages will avoid the complexities of secondary reactions associated with free radical high temperature processes that are clearly involved in direct coal liquefaction. This prompted us to devise a reactor system which avoids long heat up and cool-down times associated with previous kinetic studies, and allows kinetic measurements even at as short as the first few seconds of the liquefaction reaction.

  6. Continuous bench-scale slurry catalyst testing direct coal liquefaction rawhide sub-bituminous coal

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, R.F.; Coless, L.A.; Davis, S.M.

    1995-12-31

    In 1992, the Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored research to demonstrate a dispersed catalyst system using a combination of molybdenum and iron precursors for direct coal liquefaction. This dispersed catalyst system was successfully demonstrated using Black Thunder sub-bituminous coal at Wilsonville, Alabama by Southern Electric International, Inc. The DOE sponsored research continues at Exxon Research and Development Laboratories (ERDL). A six month continuous bench-scale program using ERDL`s Recycle Coal Liquefaction Unit (RCLU) is planned, three months in 1994 and three months in 1995. The initial conditions in RCLU reflect experience gained from the Wilsonville facility in their Test Run 263. Rawhide sub-bituminous coal which is similar to the Black Thunder coal tested at Wilsonville was used as the feed coal. A slate of five dispersed catalysts for direct coal liquefaction of Rawhide sub-bituminous coal has been tested. Throughout the experiments, the molybdenum addition rate was held constant at 100 wppm while the iron oxide addition rate was varied from 0.25 to 1.0 weight percent (dry coal basis). This report covers the 1994 operations and accomplishments.

  7. STUDY OF SOLVENT AND CATALYST INTERACTIONS IN DIRECT COAL LIQUEFACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Michael T. Klein

    1998-10-01

    Major objectives of the present project are to develop a better understanding of the roles of the catalyst and the liquefaction solvent in the coal liquefaction process. An open question concerning the role of the catalyst is whether intimate contact between the catalyst and the coal particles is important or required. To answer this question, it had been planned to coat an active catalyst with a porous silica coating which was found to retain catalyst activity while preventing actual contact between catalyst and coal. Consultation with people in DuPont who coat catalysts for increasing abrasion resistance have indicated that only portions of the catalyst are coated by their process (spray drying) and that sections of uncoated catalyst remain. For that reason, it was decided to suspend the catalyst in a basket separated from the coal in the reactor. The basket walls were to be permeable to the liquefaction solvent but not to the coal particles. Several such baskets were constructed of stainless steel with holes which would not permit passage of coal particles larger than 30 mesh. Liquefactions run with the coal of greater than 30 mesh size gave normal conversion of coal to liquid in the absence of catalyst in the basket, but substantially increased conversion when Ni/Mo on alumina catalyst was in the basket. While this result is interesting and suggestive of some kind of mass transfer of soluble material occurring between the catalyst and the coal, it does not eliminate the possibility of breakdown of the coal particle into particle sizes permeable to the basket. Indeed, a small amount of fine coal has been found inside the basket. To determine whether fine coal from breakdown of the coal particles is responsible for the conversion, a new basket is being prepared with 0.5{micro}m pore size.

  8. Direct coal liquefaction baseline design and system analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    The primary objective of the study is to develop a computer model for a base line direct coal liquefaction design based on two stage direct coupled catalytic reactors. This primary objective is to be accomplished by completing the following: a base line design based on previous DOE/PETC results from Wilsonville pilot plant and other engineering evaluations; a cost estimate and economic analysis; a computer model incorporating the above two steps over a wide range of capacities and selected process alternatives; a comprehensive training program for DOE/PETC Staff to understand and use the computer model; a thorough documentation of all underlying assumptions for baseline economics; and a user manual and training material which will facilitate updating of the model in the future.

  9. Direct coal liquefaction baseline design and system analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The primary objective of the study is to develop a computer model for a base line direct coal liquefaction design based on two stage direct coupled catalytic reactors. This primary objective is to be accomplished by completing the following: a base line design based on previous DOE/PETC results from Wilsonville pilot plant and other engineering evaluations; a cost estimate and economic analysis; a computer model incorporating the above two steps over a wide range of capacities and selected process alternatives; a comprehensive training program for DOE/PETC Staff to understand and use the computer model; a thorough documentation of all underlying assumptions for baseline economics; and a user manual and training material which will facilitate updating of the model in the future.

  10. Direct coal liquefaction baseline design and system analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    The primary objective of the study is to develop a computer model for a base line direct coal liquefaction design based on two stage direct coupled catalytic reactors. This primary objective is to be accomplished by completing the following: a base line design based on previous DOE/PETC results from Wilsonville pilot plant and other engineering evaluations; a cost estimate and economic analysis; a computer model incorporating the above two steps over a wide range of capacities and selected process alternatives; a comprehensive training program for DOE/PETC Staff to understand and use the computer model; a thorough documentation of all underlying assumptions for baseline economics; and a user manual and training material which will facilitate updating of the model in the future.

  11. Direct coal liquefaction baseline design and system analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    The primary objective of the study is to develop a computer model for a base line direct coal liquefaction design based on two stage direct coupled catalytic reactors. This primary objective is to be accomplished by completing the following: a base line design based on previous DOE/PETC results from Wilsonville pilot plant and other engineering evaluations; a cost estimate and economic analysis; a computer model incorporating the above two steps over a wide range of capacities and selected process alternatives; a comprehensive training program for DOE/PETC Staff to understand and use the computer model; a thorough documentation of all underlying assumptions for baseline economics; and a user manual and training material which will facilitate updating of the model in the future.

  12. Use of ultrasound for enhanced direct coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Bendale, P.G.; Joseph, S. ); Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I. . Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this project is to investigate whether high-intensity ultrasound is capable of inducing coal liquefaction under mild conditions of temperature and pressure, in the presence of a solvent, and in the presence or absence of a liquefaction catalyst. The role of high-intensity ultrasound in effective dispersion of solids and/or activation of catalyst was also investigated. Model compounds which represent coal such as bibenzyl, benzyl ether and anisole in the presence of tetralin or 9,10-dihydroanthracene as a hydrogen donor solvent, were subjected to high-intensity ultrasound to determine if any chemical bonds are broken under the action of ultrasound. Two step liquefaction experiments were carried out to study the effect of ultrasound on both catalyzed and non-catalyzed coal liquefaction (utilizing a bituminous and subbituminous coal). Soluble catalysts such as molybdenum naphthenate or molybdenum carbonyl were used as catalyst precursors along with stoichiometric amounts of elemental sulfur. The results of these experiments with model compounds and with coal are discussed in detail. 25 refs., 6 figs., 16 tabs.

  13. Short contact time direct coal liquefaction using a novel batch reactor. Quarterly report, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, M.T.; Calkins, W.H.; Huang, H.

    1996-05-01

    The objective of this research is to optimize the design and operation of the bench scale batch reactor (SCTBR) for coal liquefaction at short contact times (0.01 to 10 minutes or longer). Additional objectives are to study the kinetics of direct coal liquefaction particularly at short reaction times, and to investigate the role of the organic oxygen components of coal and their reaction pathways during liquefaction. Many of those objectives have already been achieved and others are still in progress. This quarterly report covers further progress toward those objectives. Much of the previous quarterly report was concerned mainly in the retrograde reactions occurring during the liquefaction process. This report is largely devoted to the kinetics and mechanisms of the liquefaction process itself and the influence of the liquefaction solvents.

  14. Use of dispersed catalysts for direct coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschon, A.S.; Kim, S.; Wilson, R.B.; Ghaly, O.

    1996-12-31

    With dwindling supplies of petroleum products, efforts to utilize alternative energy feedstocks such as coal, is essential. Several areas in coal conversion technology have been identified that, if improved, could make coal liquefaction more cost competitive with petroleum. The objectives of this project are to address possible improvements in the economics by utilizing low-rank coals, new precursors to dispersed catalysts, and processing variations such as using syngas atmospheres. The purpose of the dispersed catalysts is to better control retrogressive reactions and avoid char formation, while the purpose of the carbon monoxide atmosphere is to improve the economics by simplifying or totally eliminating a separate water-gas-shift step, and perhaps help remove oxygen in the product slate. These possible improvements are being examined and evaluated for potential use in a 2-stage liquefaction process with the goal of converting coal to distillable liquids at a cost competitive to petroleum of $25/bbl. To evaluate our catalysts and process conditions, we used three types of laboratory-scale operations. In the first operation, we compared the reaction chemistry of various ranks of coals and catalysts in synthetic solvents such as hexadecane. This method allowed us to better compare our catalysts without the complications of solvent initiated chemistry. Once the catalysts were tested in this manner, they were examined for the conversions of a Black Thunder subbituminous coal using a recycle vehicle derived from the same coal as the solvent. Finally, we upgraded selected first-stage conversion products using a conventional hydrotreating catalyst to compare with recent results in two-stage coal liquefaction development. The results were evaluated for economic feasibility through a subcontract with Bechtel Corp.

  15. Chemical and toxicologic characterization of co-processing and two-stage direct coal liquefaction materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, C.W.; Stewart, D.L.; Mahlum, D.D.; Chess, E.K.; Wilson, B.W.

    1986-03-01

    Recent advances in coal liquefaction have included two-stage direct coal liquefaction processes and petroleum resid/coal co-processing technology. Two-stage coal liquefaction processes are generally comprised of a first-stage thermal or liquefaction reactor followed by a second-stage hydrogenation step. Petroleum resids and coal are simultaneously converted to liquefaction products in co-processing technology. The purpose of this paper is to report the prelimianry results of the chemical analysis and toxicological testing of a coal liquefaction co-processing sample set, and to compare these results to those obtained from two-stage coal liquefaction materials. Samples were chemically characterized by chemical class fractionation, gas chromatography, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and low-voltage probe-inlet mass spectrometry. Toxicological activity was measured using the standard histidine reversion microbial mutagenicity test and an initiation/promotion assay for mouse skin tumorigenesis. A brief description of these methods are presented and results are discussed. 9 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Subtask 3.3 - Feasibility of Direct Coal Liquefaction in the Modern Economic Climate

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin Oster; Joshua Strege; Marc Kurz; Anthony Snyder; Melanie Jensen

    2009-06-15

    Coal liquefaction provides an alternative to petroleum for the production of liquid hydrocarbon-based fuels. There are two main processes to liquefy coal: direct coal liquefaction (DCL) and indirect coal liquefaction (ICL). Because ICL has been demonstrated to a greater extent than DCL, ICL may be viewed as the lower-risk option when it comes to building a coal liquefaction facility. However, a closer look, based on conversion efficiencies and economics, is necessary to determine the optimal technology. This report summarizes historical DCL efforts in the United States, describes the technical challenges facing DCL, overviews Shenhua's current DCL project in China, provides a DCL conceptual cost estimate based on a literature review, and compares the carbon dioxide emissions from a DCL facility to those from an ICL facility.

  17. Premium distillate products from direct liquefaction of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, P.Z.; Winschel, R.A.; Klunder, E.B. |

    1994-08-01

    The net liquid products from modern coal liquefaction processes are lower boiling and have much lower end points (mostly under 400{degree}C) than crude petroleum. Coal liquids have very low concentrations of heteroatoms, particularly S, and metals, and are free of resids and asphaltenes. High yields of low-S (0.01--0.03 wt %) naphtha, kerosene, and diesel fuel fractions can be obtained simply by atmospheric distillation, with a total yield of light fuel fractions ranging from 68 to 82 LV% (W260D exclusive). The coal naphtha has a low aromatics content (5--13 LV%), readily meeting projected year-2000 requirements. Its low Reid vapor pressure allows light components from other sources to be blended. The coal light distillate of in appropriate boiling range will be a good low-S blending stock for the light diesel fuel pool. The heavy distillate can be refined into a low-S No. 4 diesel fuel/fuel oil. This fraction, along with the >343{degree}C atmospheric bottoms, can be catalytically cracked or hydrocracked to make light liquid fuels. Thus, modern coal liquids should no longer be envisioned as thick liquids (or even solids) with high concentrations of aromatics and asphaltenes. Products obtained from advanced coal liquefaction technologies are more like light naphthene-base petroleum, but with lower heteroatoms and metals contents, and they are free of resids. Coal liquids are likely to be co-refined in existing petroleum refineries; and hydroprocessing of various severities would be needed for different fractions to produce quality blending stocks for refinery fuel pools.

  18. Preconversion processing of bituminous coals: New directions to improved direct catalytic coal liquefaction. [Effect of pretreatment before liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    The main task of this quarter was to install reactors to conduct preconversion and liquefaction of coal. Coal and coal liquids were collected. The anaerobic chamber (Model 855-AC; Plas Labs, inc.) was procured and set up to store coal samples under an inert gas. Equipment to treat products was assembled, including Soxhlet extraction units, fractionation columns, a distillation column, and a rotary evaporator. Two gas chromatographs for analysis of gases and liquid were adjusted. Two reactor systems were installed for the experimental apparatus. One was Model 4576 high-temperature and high-pressure autoclave (Parr Instrument, 500{degrees}C and 5000 psi) (see Figure 1); the other was a 27 ml of microreactors. The autoclave was obtained from the manufacturer and assembled. The experimental set-up of microreactors are shown in Figure 2.

  19. The role of recycle oil in direct coal liquefaction process development

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, F.P.

    1995-08-01

    It has long been recognized that use of a recycle oil is a convenient and perhaps necessary feature of a practical direct coal liquefaction process. The recycle oil performs a number of important functions. It serves as a vehicle to convey coal into the liquefaction reactor and products from the reactor. It is a medium for mass and heat transfer among the solid, liquid, and gaseous components of the reactor inventory. It can act as a reactant or intermediate in the liquefaction process. Therefore, the nature of the recycle oil can have a determining effect on process configuration and performance, and the characterization of recycle oil composition and chemistry has been the subject of considerable interest. This paper discusses recycle oil characterization and its influence on the industrial development of coal liquefaction technology,

  20. Separation of solids from coal liquefaction products using sonic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Slomka, B.J.

    1994-10-01

    Product streams containing solids are generated in both direct and indirect coal liquefaction processes. This project seeks to improve the effectiveness of coal liquefaction by novel application of sonic and ultrasonic energy to separation of solids from coal liquefaction streams.

  1. Coal liquefaction and hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Schindler, Harvey D.; Chen, James M.

    1985-01-01

    Disclosed is a coal liquefaction process using two stages. The first stage liquefies the coal and maximizes the product while the second stage hydrocracks the remainder of the coal liquid to produce solvent.

  2. Preconversion processing of bituminous coals: New directions to improved direct catalytic coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The near equal conversions were obtained even with high coal/liquid ratio (1/3--1/2) for two-step wise high-temperature soaking and the first stage liquefaction. Expected conversions were not observed when vacuum distillation after soaking was used in stead of cyclohexane extraction. This is presumably due to the difficulty with redispersion of vacuum distillated bottoms in the coal liquid, because a batch wise procedure was taken by using glasswares. It is suggested that the proposed procedure in the previous quarter should be tested by a continuous procedure under enough heating conditions to keep low viscosity of the bottoms.

  3. Advanced direct coal liquefaction concepts. Final report, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, D.J.; Parker, R.J.; Simpson, P.L.

    1994-07-01

    Integration of innovative steps into new advanced processes have the potential to reduce costs for producing liquid fuels. In this program, objective is to develop a new approach to liquefaction that generates an all distillate product slate at a reduced cost of about US$25/barrel of crude oil equivalent. A Counterflow Reactor was developed in cooperation with GfK mbH, Germany. Advantages are low hydrogen recycle rates and low feed preheating requirements. Coal/heavy oil slurry is injected into the top of the reactor while the recycle gas and make up hydrogen is introduced into the bottom; hydrogenation products are withdrawn from the top. PU study resulted in distillable oil yields up to 74 wt % on feed (dry ash free) from coprocessing feed slurries containing 40 wt % Vesta subbituminous coal and 60 wt % Cold Lake heavy vacuum tower bottoms. Technologies developed separately by CED and ARC were combined. A 1-kg/hr integrated continuous flow bench scale unit was constructed at the ARC site in Devon, Alberta, based on modifications to a unit at Nisku, Alberta (the modified unit was used in the preliminary economic evaluation).

  4. Conversion of Low-Rank Wyoming Coals into Gasoline by Direct Liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Polyakov, Oleg

    2013-12-31

    Under the cooperative agreement program of DOE and funding from Wyoming State’s Clean Coal Task Force, Western Research Institute and Thermosolv LLC studied the direct conversion of Wyoming coals and coal-lignin mixed feeds into liquid fuels in conditions highly relevant to practice. During the Phase I, catalytic direct liquefaction of sub-bituminous Wyoming coals was investigated. The process conditions and catalysts were identified that lead to a significant increase of desirable oil fraction in the products. The Phase II work focused on systematic study of solvothermal depolymerization (STD) and direct liquefaction (DCL) of carbonaceous feedstocks. The effect of the reaction conditions (the nature of solvent, solvent/lignin ratio, temperature, pressure, heating rate, and residence time) on STD was investigated. The effect of a number of various additives (including lignin, model lignin compounds, lignin-derivable chemicals, and inorganic radical initiators), solvents, and catalysts on DCL has been studied. Although a significant progress has been achieved in developing solvothermal depolymerization, the side reactions – formation of considerable amounts of char and gaseous products – as well as other drawbacks do not render aqueous media as the most appropriate choice for commercial implementation of STD for processing coals and lignins. The trends and effects discovered in DCL point at the specific features of liquefaction mechanism that are currently underutilized yet could be exploited to intensify the process. A judicious choice of catalysts, solvents, and additives might enable practical and economically efficient direct conversion of Wyoming coals into liquid fuels.

  5. Coal liquefaction quenching process

    DOEpatents

    Thorogood, Robert M.; Yeh, Chung-Liang; Donath, Ernest E.

    1983-01-01

    There is described an improved coal liquefaction quenching process which prevents the formation of coke with a minimum reduction of thermal efficiency of the coal liquefaction process. In the process, the rapid cooling of the liquid/solid products of the coal liquefaction reaction is performed without the cooling of the associated vapor stream to thereby prevent formation of coke and the occurrence of retrograde reactions. The rapid cooling is achieved by recycling a subcooled portion of the liquid/solid mixture to the lower section of a phase separator that separates the vapor from the liquid/solid products leaving the coal reactor.

  6. Cooperative research program in coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, G.P.

    1992-01-01

    Research continues on coal liquefaction in the following areas: (1) Iron Based Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction; (2) Exploratory Research on Coal Conversion; (3) Novel Coal Liquefaction Concepts; (4) Novel Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction. (VC)

  7. Cooperative research program in coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, G.P.

    1991-01-01

    This Quarterly Report on coal liquefaction research includes discussion in the areas of (1) Iron Based Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction; (2) Exploratory Research on Coal Conversion; (3) Novel Coal Liquefaction Concepts; (4) Novel Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction. (VC)

  8. Role of iron-based catalyst and hydrogen transfer in direct coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Xian Li; Shuxun Hu; Lijun Jin; Haoquan Hu

    2008-03-15

    The aim of this research is to understand the major function of iron-based catalysts on direct coal liquefaction (DCL). Pyrolysis and direct liquefaction of Shenhua bituminous coal were carried out to investigate the effect of three solvents (wash-oil from coal-tar, cycle-oil from coal liquefaction, and tetralin) in a N{sub 2} or a H{sub 2} atmosphere and with or without catalyst. The hydrogen content in the solvent and liquid product and the H{sub 2} consumption for every run were calculated to understand the hydrogen transfer approach in DCL. The results showed that the iron-based catalyst promotes the coal pyrolysis, and the dominating function of the catalyst in DCL is to promote the formation of activated hydrogen and to accelerate the secondary distribution of H in the reaction system including the gas, liquid, and solid phases. The major transfer approach of the activated hydrogen is from molecular hydrogen to solvent and then from solvent to coal, and the solvent takes on the role of a 'bridge' in the hydrogen transfer approach. 31 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Integrated coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Effron, Edward

    1978-01-01

    In a process for the liquefaction of coal in which coal liquids containing phenols and other oxygenated compounds are produced during the liquefaction step and later hydrogenated, oxygenated compounds are removed from at least part of the coal liquids in the naphtha and gas oil boiling range prior to the hydrogenation step and employed as a feed stream for the manufacture of a synthesis gas or for other purposes.

  10. Investigations into coal coprocessing and coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Guffey, F.D.; Netzel, D.A.; Miknis, F.P.; Thomas, K.P.; Zhang, Tiejun; Haynes, H.W. Jr.

    1994-06-01

    The conversion of coal to liquid suitable as feedstock to a petroleum refinery is dependent upon several process variables. These variables include temperature, pressure, coal rank, catalyst type, nature of the feed to the reactor, type of process, etc. Western Research Institute (WRI) has initiated a research program in the area of coal liquefaction to address the impact of some of these variables upon the yield and quality of the coal-derived liquid. The principal goal of this research is to improve the efficiency of the coal liquefaction process. Two different approaches are currently being investigated. These include the coprocessing of a heavy liquid, such as crude oil, and coal using a dispersed catalyst and the direct liquefaction of coal using a supported catalyst. Another important consideration in coal liquefaction is the utilization of hydrogen, including both externally- and internally-supplied hydrogen. Because the incorporation of externally-supplied hydrogen during conversion of this very aromatic fossil fuel to, for example, transportation fuels is very expensive, improved utilization of internally-supplied hydrogen can lead to reducing processing costs. The objectives of this investigation, which is Task 3.3.4, Coal Coprocessing, of the 1991--1992 Annual Research Plan, are: (1) to evaluate coal/oil pretreatment conditions that are expected to improve the liquid yield through more efficient dispersion of an oil-soluble, iron-based catalyst, (2) to characterize the coke deposits on novel, supported catalysts after coal liquefaction experiments and to correlate the carbon skeletal structure parameters of the coke deposit with catalyst performance as measured by coal liquefaction product yield, and (3) to determine the modes of hydrogen utilization during coal liquefaction and coprocessing. Experimental results are discussed in this report.

  11. Advanced direct coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical progress report No. 2, December 1983-February 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Paranjape, A.S.

    1984-04-30

    Five Bench-Scale coal liquefaction runs were completed with Wyoming subbituminous coal in a two-stage process scheme. In this process scheme, LDAR, the lighter fraction of ash-free resid, was fed to the catalytic stage prior to its recycle to the thermal stage, whereas DAR, the heavy fraction of the deashed resid, was directly recycled to the thermal stage without any intermediate processing step. The results indicate that increasing coal space rate in the dissolver resulted in lower coal conversion and reduced distillate yield in this process configuration. The coal conversions decreased from 92 wt% to 89 wt% (MAF coal) and the distillate yield was reduced from 50 wt% to less than 40 wt% (MAF coal), as the coal space velocity increased. Attempts to duplicate the yields of Run 32, at comparable process conditions in Runs 37 and 38, were unsuccessful. Several process parameters were investigated but failed to show why the yields of Run 32 could not be duplicated. Valuable process related information was gained as a result of process parameter studies completed during these runs. At comparable process conditions, coal conversions were lower by about 3 to 4 relative percent and were only in the 87 wt% (MAF coal) range. Similarly, the distillate yield was about 40 wt% (MAF coal) which is about 10 wt% lower than observed in Run 32. Although no exact cause for these results could be determined, it appeared that the H/C atomic ratio of the solvent and possibly the flow pattern (plug-flow versus back-mixed) could have affected the coal conversion and quantity of distillate product produced. A significant decrease in coal conversion of 4 to 5 wt% was observed when the disposable catalyst (iron oxide) was removed from the reaction mixture and therefore substantiates the need for a disposable catalyst in the liquefaction of Wyoming subbituminous coal.

  12. Coal Liquefaction Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yen, T. F.

    1979-01-01

    Described is a graduate level engineering course offered at the University of Southern California on coal liquefaction processes. Lecture topics and course requirements are discussed. A 64-item bibliography of papers used in place of a textbook is included. (BT)

  13. Coal liquefaction process

    SciTech Connect

    Minami, R.; Hosoi, T.; Kanou, T.; Okamura, S.; Sunami, Y.

    1984-03-20

    A coal liquefaction process and apparatus therefor are disclosed. According to this invention, a finely divided coal slurry and a solvent are contacted with molecular hydrogen in the presence of a catalyst, the slurry is separated into a gaseous component, a liquid component and a solid residue, the solid residue (which is the liquefaction residue) is then supplied to a molten metal bath together with oxygen gas to generate a gas entraining fine powdery solids, and the thus recovered fine powdery solids are returned to the liquefaction process as a catalyst.

  14. Coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Carr, Norman L.; Moon, William G.; Prudich, Michael E.

    1983-01-01

    A C.sub.5 -900.degree. F. (C.sub.5 -482.degree. C.) liquid yield greater than 50 weight percent MAF feed coal is obtained in a coal liquefaction process wherein a selected combination of higher hydrogen partial pressure, longer slurry residence time and increased recycle ash content of the feed slurry are controlled within defined ranges.

  15. Method for coal liquefaction

    DOEpatents

    Wiser, Wendell H.; Oblad, Alex G.; Shabtai, Joseph S.

    1994-01-01

    A process is disclosed for coal liquefaction in which minute particles of coal in intimate contact with a hydrogenation catalyst and hydrogen arc reacted for a very short time at a temperature in excess of 400.degree. C. at a pressure of at least 1500 psi to yield over 50% liquids with a liquid to gaseous hydrocarbon ratio in excess of 8:1.

  16. Coal liquefaction and hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Schindler, Harvey D.

    1985-01-01

    The coal liquefaction process disclosed uses three stages. The first stage is a liquefaction. The second and third stages are hydrogenation stages at different temperatures and in parallel or in series. One stage is within 650.degree.-795.degree. F. and optimizes solvent production. The other stage is within 800.degree.-840.degree. F. and optimizes the C.sub.5 -850.degree. F. product.

  17. Novel supports for coal liquefaction catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, H.W. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This research is divided into three parts: (1) Evaluation of Alkaline-Earth-Promoted CoMo/Alumina Catalysts in a Bench Scale Hydrotreater, (2) Development of a Novel Catalytic Coal Liquefaction Microreactor (CCLM) Unit, and (3) Evaluation of Novel Catalyst Preparations for Direct Coal Liquefaction. (VC)

  18. Cooperative research in coal liquefaction infratechnology and generic technology development

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, G.P.; Sendlein, L.V.A.

    1990-01-01

    A summary of research is presented on coal liquefaction. Programs include: bioprocessing of coal, University of Kentucky; materials characterization study of coal liquefaction processes, University of Kentucky; novel approaches to catalysis in coprocessing and in direct liquefaction of coal, University of Pittsburgh; liquefaction research in pyrolysis, catalysis and coal dissolution, West Virginia University; enhanced reactivity and selectivity in coal liquefaction and coprocessing systems, Auburn University; integrated liquefaction/characterization, University of Utah; basic process/resource evaluation task, center for applied energy research; and project integration and database development, University of Kentucky.

  19. Coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Karr, Jr., Clarence

    1977-04-19

    An improved coal liquefaction process is provided which enables conversion of a coal-oil slurry to a synthetic crude refinable to produce larger yields of gasoline and diesel oil. The process is characterized by a two-step operation applied to the slurry prior to catalytic desulfurization and hydrogenation in which the slurry undergoes partial hydrogenation to crack and hydrogenate asphaltenes and the partially hydrogenated slurry is filtered to remove minerals prior to subsequent catalytic hydrogenation.

  20. Coal Liquefaction desulfurization process

    DOEpatents

    Givens, Edwin N.

    1983-01-01

    In a solvent refined coal liquefaction process, more effective desulfurization of the high boiling point components is effected by first stripping the solvent-coal reacted slurry of lower boiling point components, particularly including hydrogen sulfide and low molecular weight sulfur compounds, and then reacting the slurry with a solid sulfur getter material, such as iron. The sulfur getter compound, with reacted sulfur included, is then removed with other solids in the slurry.

  1. Method for coal liquefaction

    DOEpatents

    Wiser, W.H.; Oblad, A.G.; Shabtai, J.S.

    1994-05-03

    A process is disclosed for coal liquefaction in which minute particles of coal in intimate contact with a hydrogenation catalyst and hydrogen arc reacted for a very short time at a temperature in excess of 400 C at a pressure of at least 1500 psi to yield over 50% liquids with a liquid to gaseous hydrocarbon ratio in excess of 8:1. 1 figures.

  2. The kinetics of catalytic hydrogenation of pyrene-implications for direct coal liquefaction processing

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, H.P.; Chapman, R.N.

    1983-01-01

    Although recycling heavy solvents has recently re-emerged as a key to cutting the cost of direct coal liquefaction, little data for the hydrogenation of heavy solvent donors have been reported. This study addresses the kinetic and thermodynamic aspects of catalytic hydrogenation of pyrene, a donor solvent precursor thought to play an important role in coal liquefaction processes that use heavy recycle solvents. In the presence of a catalyst, pyrene (Py) is hydrogenated to di- (H/sub 2/Py), tetra- (H/sub 4/Py), hexa- (H/sub 6/Py), deca- (H/sub 10/Py) and perhydro- (H/sub 16/Py) species via a complex mechanism involving a network of reversible parallel and series reactions. Though several studies have dealt with aspects of pyrene hydrogenation, including hydrocracking reactions, reaction product distributions and thermodynamic properties, the kinetics of hydrogenation have not been previously reported. Ultimate application of kinetic and thermodynamic data to direct coal liquefaction must take into consideration the conditions imposed by the particular process used. However, two generalizations may be made regarding hydrogen supplied by the dihydropyrene component of donor solvents: (1) Increasing hydrogen partial pressure increases both the rate at which H/sub 2/Py is formed and the equilibrium concentration of H/sub 2/Py. Therefore, pyrene rehydrogenation should be done at as high a pressure as is cost effective. Although an increase in temperature favors the rate of attainment of equilibrium between Py and H/sub 2/Py, the position of the equilibrium is shifted toward pyrene. Temperature must therefore be adjusted to achieve an optimum trade-off between rate of formation and maximum possible concentration of H/sub 2/Py.

  3. Studies of the initial reactions that occur during direct coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Stohl, F.V.

    1989-01-01

    Reactions that occur during preconversion processing of coal in direct liquefaction can be either beneficial or harmful. The objectives of this work are to identify the types of compounds and process conditions that give rise to retrogressive reactions during preconversion processing. Experiments have been performed to evaluate the impacts of temperature, catalysts, mineral matter, and hydrogen donors on these reactions. Initial studies have been carried out using dibenzyl ether (DBE) because ether linkages represent one type of bonding believed to be present in coal (1). Previous studies have analyzed the kinetics and mechanisms of thermolysis of DBE (2,3) and have also used DBE to study effects of process variables in coal liquefaction (4). Results of thermal reactions with DBE have shown that the main reaction products are toluene, benzaldehyde, benzyl alcohol and benzene (2). In the presence of catalysts such as ZnCl/sub 2/, the product distributions are more complicated and can obtain significant amounts of material with higher molecular weights than DBE (5,6). 8 refs., 2 tabs.

  4. Coal liquefaction with coal tar solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Gir, S.; Rhodes, D.E.

    1986-12-16

    A method is described of liquefying coal, comprising: mixing solid coal with a process solvent comprising coal tar material which has been at least partially hydrogenated under conditions which selectively hydrogenate aromatic coal tar components to hydroaromatics and which preserve the integrity of organonitrogen coal tar components, to produce a coal-solvent slurry; treating the coal-solvent slurry under coal-liquefying conditions in a liquefaction zone to produce a solution containing coal liquefaction products; and recovering coal liquefaction products from the solution.

  5. Use of ultrasound for enhanced direct coal liquefaction: Quarterly report, August 1988--December 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The objective of this project is to investigate whether high-intensity ultrasound is capable of inducing coal liquefaction under mild conditions of temperature and pressure in the presence of a solvent and in the presence or absence of a liquefaction catalyst. The role of high-intensity ultrasound in effective dispersion of solids and/or activation of catalysts will also be investigated using an appropriate liquefaction catalyst. The study will be conducted in two parts. First model compounds (bibenzyl and benzyl phenyl ether) will be subjected to high-intensity ultrasound to determine if any chemical bonds are broken under the action of ultrasound. In the second part, the effect of ultrasound on both catalyzed and non-catalyzed coal liquefaction will be determined. Two coals (sub-bituminous and bituminous) will be studied using tetralin as a hydrogen donating solvent and molybdenum sulfide as catalyst. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Wright, C.H.

    1986-02-11

    A process is described for the liquefaction of coal wherein raw feed coal is dissolved in recycle solvent with a slurry containing recycle coal minerals in the presence of added hydrogen at elevated temperature and pressure. The highest boiling distillable dissolved liquid fraction is obtained from a vacuum distillation zone and is entirely recycled to extinction. Lower boiling distillable dissolved liquid is removed in vapor phase from the dissolver zone and passed without purification and essentially without reduction in pressure to a catalytic hydrogenation zone where it is converted to an essentially colorless liquid product boiling in the transportation fuel range. 1 fig.

  7. Coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Wright, Charles H.

    1986-01-01

    A process for the liquefaction of coal wherein raw feed coal is dissolved in recycle solvent with a slurry containing recycle coal minerals in the presence of added hydrogen at elevated temperature and pressure. The highest boiling distillable dissolved liquid fraction is obtained from a vacuum distillation zone and is entirely recycled to extinction. Lower boiling distillable dissolved liquid is removed in vapor phase from the dissolver zone and passed without purification and essentially without reduction in pressure to a catalytic hydrogenation zone where it is converted to an essentially colorless liquid product boiling in the transportation fuel range.

  8. Coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Maa, Peter S.

    1978-01-01

    A process for liquefying a particulate coal feed to produce useful petroleum-like liquid products which comprises contacting; in a series of two or more coal liquefaction zones, or stages, graded with respect to temperature, an admixture of a polar compound; or compounds, a hydrogen donor solvent and particulate coal, the total effluent being passed in each instance from a low temperature zone, or stage to the next succeeding higher temperature zone, or stage, of the series. The temperature within the initial zone, or stage, of the series is maintained about 70.degree. F and 750.degree. F and the temperature within the final zone, or stage, is maintained between about 750.degree. F and 950.degree. F. The residence time within the first zone, or stage, ranges, generally, from about 20 to about 150 minutes and residence time within each of the remaining zones, or stages, of the series ranges, generally, from about 10 minutes to about 70 minutes. Further steps of the process include: separating the product from the liquefaction zone into fractions inclusive of a liquid solvent fraction; hydrotreating said liquid solvent fraction in a hydrogenation zone; and recycling the hydrogenated liquid solvent mixture to said coal liquefaction zones.

  9. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.; Robbins, G.A.

    1991-09-01

    Consol R D is conducting a three-year program to characterize process and product streams from direct coal liquefaction process development projects. The program objectives are two-fold: (1) to obtain and provide appropriate samples of coal liquids for the evaluation of analytical methodology, and (2) to support ongoing DOE-sponsored coal liquefaction process development efforts. The two broad objectives have considerable overlap and together serve to provide a bridge between process development and analytical chemistry.

  10. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1992-03-01

    CONSOL R D is conducting a three-year program to characterize process and product streams from direct coal liquefaction process development projects. The program objectives are two-fold: (1) to obtain and provide appropriate samples of coal liquids for the evaluation of analytical methodology, and (2) to support ongoing DOE-sponsored coal liquefaction process development efforts. The two broad objectives have considerable overlap and together serve to provide a bridge between process development and analytical chemistry.

  11. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1991-11-01

    Consol R D is conducting a three-year program to characterize process and product streams from direct coal liquefaction process development projects. The program objectives are two-fold: (1) to obtain and provide appropriate samples of coal liquids for the evaluation of analytical methodology, and (2) to support ongoing DOE-sponsored coal liquefaction process development efforts. The two broad objectives have considerable overlap and together serve to provide a bridge between process development and analytical chemistry.

  12. Preconversion processing of bituminous coals: New directions to improved direct catalytic coal liquefaction. [Effect of preconversion heat soak with coal liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    A study of the high-temperature soaking started in this quarter, following the installation of reactors in the previous quarter. Two high-volatile bituminous coals and three coal liquids, which were identified in the previous report, were used. A cross-linked, three-dimensional macromolecular model has been widely accepted f or the structure of coal, but there is no direct evidence to prove this model. The conventional coal structure model has been recently re-examined by this investigator because of the importance of relatively strong intra- and intermolecular interactions in bituminous coals. It was reasonable to deduce that significant portions were physically associated after a study of multistep extractions, associative equilibria, the irreversibility and the dependence of coal concentration on solvent swelling, and consideration of the monophase concept. Physical dissociation which may be significant above 300{degree}C should be utilized for the treatment before liquefaction. The high-temperature soaking in a recycle oil was proposed to dissociate coal complexes.

  13. Direct coal liquefaction baseline design and system analysis. Quarterly report, April--June 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    The primary objective of the study is to develop a computer model for a base line direct coal liquefaction design based on two stage direct coupled catalytic reactors. This primary objective is to be accomplished by completing the following: a base line design based on previous DOE/PETC results from Wilsonville pilot plant and other engineering evaluations; a cost estimate and economic analysis; a computer model incorporating the above two steps over a wide range of capacities and selected process alternatives; a comprehensive training program for DOE/PETC Staff to understand and use the computer model; a thorough documentation of all underlying assumptions for baseline economics; and a user manual and training material which will facilitate updating of the model in the future.

  14. Direct coal liquefaction baseline design and system analysis. Quarterly report, September--December 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The primary objective of the study is to develop a computer model for a base line direct coal liquefaction design based on two stage direct coupled catalytic reactors. This primary objective is to be accomplished by completing the following: a base line design based on previous DOE/PETC results from Wilsonville pilot plant and other engineering evaluations; a cost estimate and economic analysis; a computer model incorporating the above two steps over a wide range of capacities and selected process alternatives; a comprehensive training program for DOE/PETC Staff to understand and use the computer model; a thorough documentation of all underlying assumptions for baseline economics; and a user manual and training material which will facilitate updating of the model in the future.

  15. Production and Optimization of Direct Coal Liquefaction derived Low Carbon-Footprint Transportation Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Markovich

    2010-06-30

    This report summarizes works conducted under DOE Contract No. DE-FC26-05NT42448. The work scope was divided into two categories - (a) experimental program to pretreat and refine a coal derived syncrude sample to meet transportation fuels requirements; (b) system analysis of a commercial scale direct coal liquefaction facility. The coal syncrude was derived from a bituminous coal by Headwaters CTL, while the refining study was carried out under a subcontract to Axens North America. The system analysis included H{sub 2} production cost via six different options, conceptual process design, utilities requirements, CO{sub 2} emission and overall plant economy. As part of the system analysis, impact of various H{sub 2} production options was evaluated. For consistence the comparison was carried out using the DOE H2A model. However, assumptions in the model were updated using Headwaters database. Results of Tier 2 jet fuel specifications evaluation by the Fuels & Energy Branch, US Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/RZPF) located at Wright Patterson Air Force Base (Ohio) are also discussed in this report.

  16. Fuel-blending stocks from the hydrotreatment of a distillate formed by direct coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Andile B. Mzinyati

    2007-09-15

    The direct liquefaction of coal in the iron-catalyzed Suplex process was evaluated as a technology complementary to Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. A distinguishing feature of the Suplex process, from other direct liquefaction processes, is the use of a combination of light- and heavy-oil fractions as the slurrying solvent. This results in a product slate with a small residue fraction, a distillate/naphtha mass ratio of 6, and a 65.8 mass % yield of liquid fuel product on a dry, ash-free coal basis. The densities of the resulting naphtha (C{sub 5}-200{sup o}C) and distillate (200-400{sup o}C) fractions from the hydroprocessing of the straight-run Suplex distillate fraction were high (0.86 and 1.04 kg/L, respectively). The aromaticity of the distillate fraction was found to be typical of coal liquefaction liquids, at 60-65%, with a Ramsbottom carbon residue content of 0.38 mass %. Hydrotreatment of the distillate fraction under severe conditions (200{sup o}C, 20.3 MPa, and 0.41 g{sub feed} h{sup -1} g{sub catalyst}{sup -1}) with a NiMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst gave a product with a phenol content of {lt}1 ppm, a nitrogen content {lt}200 ppm, and a sulfur content {lt}25 ppm. The temperature was found to be the main factor affecting diesel fraction selectivity when operating at conditions of WHSV = 0.41 g{sub feed} h{sup -1} g{sub catalyst}{sup -1} and PH{sub 2} = 20.3 MPa, with excessively high temperatures (T {gt} 420{sup o}C) leading to a decrease in diesel selectivity. The fuels produced by the hydroprocessing of the straight-run Suplex distillate fraction have properties that make them desirable as blending components, with the diesel fraction having a cetane number of 48 and a density of 0.90 kg/L. The gasoline fraction was found to have a research octane number (RON) of 66 and (N + 2A) value of 100, making it ideal as a feedstock for catalytic reforming and further blending with Fischer-Tropsch liquids. 44 refs., 9 figs., 12 tabs.

  17. Viscosity Depressants for Coal Liquefaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalfayan, S. H.

    1983-01-01

    Proposed process modification incorporates viscosity depressants to prevent coal from solidifying during liquefaction. Depressants reduce amount of heat needed to liquefy coal. Possible depressants are metallic soaps, such as stearate, and amides, such as stearamide and dimer acid amides.

  18. Effect of solvent characteristics on coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, He; Wang, Shaojie; Wang, Keyu; Klein, M.T.; Calkins, W.H.

    1996-12-31

    It has been known for a long time that the characteristics of the liquefaction solvent has a profound effect on direct coal liquefaction. The amount of hydrogen consumed during the liquefaction process, the degree and quantity of retrograde reactions that occur, and the quality of the liquid products are all influenced by the process solvent. A number of analytical approaches have been developed to determine the important characteristics of the solvent for coal liquefaction. The hydrogen donor ability has clearly been important. However, such other characteristics of a liquefaction solvent as solubility parameter, content and type of higher aromatic hydrocarbons, and phenolic content have also been found to be significant. Finseth et al. have shown that the bulk of the hydrogen consumed from an uncatalyzed donor solvent liquefaction above 400{degrees}C is consumed in gas generation, heteroatom removal and hydrogenolysis of the coal matrix. Wilson et al. have also shown that the major role of hydrogen in uncatalyzed liquefaction is consumed by alkyl fission and hydrogenolysis reactions and not with hydrogenating aromatic rings. McMillan et al. have postulated that a radical hydrogen transfer process along with donor solvent capping of thermally produced radicals from the coal as possible processes involved with the hydroaromatic donor solvents in coal liquefaction. With the development of a short contact time batch reactor (SCTBR), determining the influence of the processing solvent on the liquefaction rates, conversion profiles and the quality of the liquid product at a particular time became possible. The influence of type of solvent, combined with other effects, such as gas atmosphere (i.e., in hydrogen and in nitrogen) and catalyst, on the coal liquefaction is reported in this paper.

  19. Coal liquefaction and gas conversion: Proceedings. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    Volume I contains papers presented at the following sessions: AR-Coal Liquefaction; Gas to Liquids; and Direct Liquefaction. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  20. Cooperative research in coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, G.P.; Sendlein, L.V.A.

    1991-05-28

    Significant progress was made in the May 1990--May 1991 contract period in three primary coal liquefaction research areas: catalysis, structure-reactivity studies, and novel liquefaction processes. A brief summary of the accomplishments in the past year in each of these areas is given.

  1. Short contact time direct coal liquefaction using a novel batch reactor. Quarterly technical progress report, September 15, 1995--January 15, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, M.T.; Calkins, W.H.; Huang, He

    1996-01-26

    The objective of this research is to optimize the design and operation of the bench scale batch reactor (SCTBR) f or coal liquefaction at short contact times (0.01 to 10 minutes or longer). Additional objectives are to study the kinetics of direct coal liquefaction particularly at short reaction times, and to investigate the role of the organic oxygen components of coal and their reaction pathways during liquefaction. Many of those objectives have already been achieved and others are still in progress. This quarterly report covers further progress toward those objectives.

  2. Two stage liquefaction of coal

    DOEpatents

    Neuworth, Martin B.

    1981-01-01

    A two stage coal liquefaction process and apparatus comprising hydrogen donor solvent extracting, solvent deashing, and catalytic hydrocracking. Preferrably, the catalytic hydrocracking is performed in an ebullating bed hydrocracker.

  3. Steam pretreatment for coal liquefaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanenko, Olga

    The objectives of this work are to test the application of steam pretreatment to direct coal liquefaction, to investigate the reaction of model compounds with water, and to explore the use of zeolites in these processes. Previous work demonstrated the effectiveness of steam pretreatment in a subsequent flash pyrolysis. Apparently, subcritical steam ruptures nearly all of the ether cross links, leaving a partially depolymerized structure. It was postulated that very rapid heating of the pretreated coal to liquefaction conditions would be required to preserve the effects of such treatment. Accordingly, a method was adopted in which coal slurry is injected into a hot autoclave containing solvent. Since oxygen is capable of destroying the pretreatment effect, precautions were taken for its rigorous exclusion. Tests were conducted with Illinois No. 6 coal steam treated at 340sp°C, 750 psia for 15 minutes. Both raw and pretreated samples were liquified in deoxygenated tetralin at high severity (400sp°C, 30 min.) and low severity (a: 350sp°C, 30 min., and b: 385sp°C, 15 min.) conditions under 1500 psia hydrogen. Substantial improvement in liquid product quality was obtained and the need for rapid heating and oxygen exclusion demonstrated. Under low severity conditions, the oil yield was more than doubled, going from 12.5 to 29 wt%. Also chemistry of the pretreatment process was studied using aromatic ethers as model compounds. alpha-Benzylnaphthyl ether (alpha-BNE), alpha-naphthylmethyl phenyl (alpha-NMPE), and 9-phenoxyphenanthrene were exposed to steam and inert gas at pretreatment conditions and in some cases to liquid water at 315sp°C. alpha-BNE and alpha-NMPE showed little difference in conversion in inert gas and in steam. Hence, these compounds are poor models for coal in steam pretreatment. Thermally stable 9-phenoxyphenanthrene, however, was completely converted in one hour by liquid water at 315sp°C. At pretreatment conditions mostly rearranged starting

  4. DIRECT LIQUEFACTION PROOF-OF-CONCEPT PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    A.G. Comolli; T.L.K. Lee; J. Hu; G. Popper; M.D. Elwell; J. Miller; D. Parfitt; P. Zhou

    1999-12-30

    This report presents the results of the bench-scale work, Bench Run PB-09, HTI Run Number 227-106, conducted under the DOE Proof-of-Concept Option Program indirect coal liquefaction at Hydrocarbon Technologies Inc. in Lawrenceville, New Jersey. Bench Run PB-09 was conducted using two types of Chinese coal, Shenhua No.2 and Shenhua No.3, and had several goals. One goal was to study the liquefaction performance of Shenhua No.2 and Shenhua No.3 with respect to coal conversion and distillate production. Another goal of Bench Run PB-09 was to study the effect of different GelCatw formulations and loadings. At the same time, the space velocity and the temperature of the fmt reactor, K-1, were varied to optimize the liquefaction of the two Chinese coals. The promoter-modified HTI GelCat{trademark} catalyst was very effective in the direct liquefaction of coal with nearly 92% maf coal conversion with Shenhua No.3 and 93% maf coal conversion with 9 Shenhua No.2. Distillate yields (CQ-524 C)varied from 52-68% maf for Shenhua No.3 coal to 54-63% maf for Shenhua No.2 coal. The primary conclusion from Bench Run PB-09 is that Shenhua No.3 coal is superior to Shenhua No.2 coal in direct liquefaction due to its greater distillate production, although coal conversion is slightly lower and C{sub 1}-C{sub 3} light gas production is higher for Shenhua No.3. The new promoter modified GelCat{trademark} proved successful in converting the two 9 Chinese coals and, under some conditions, producing good distillate yields for a coal-only bench run. Run PB-09 demonstrated significantly better performance of China Shenhua coal using HTI's coal direct liquefaction technology and GelCat{trademark} catalyst than that obtained at China Coal Research Institute (CCRI, coal conversion 88% and distillate yield 61%).

  5. Coal liquefaction and gas conversion contractors review conference: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    This volume contains 55 papers presented at the conference. They are divided into the following topical sections: Direct liquefaction; Indirect liquefaction; Gas conversion (methane conversion); and Advanced research liquefaction. Papers in this last section deal mostly with coprocessing of coal with petroleum, plastics, and waste tires, and catalyst studies. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  6. Preconversion processing of bituminous coals: New directions to improved direct catalytic coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    A study of the high-temperature soaking started in this quarter, following the installation of reactors in the previous quarter. Two high-volatile bituminous coals and three coal liquids, which were identified in the previous report, were used. A cross-linked, three-dimensional macromolecular model has been widely accepted f or the structure of coal, but there is no direct evidence to prove this model. The conventional coal structure model has been recently re-examined by this investigator because of the importance of relatively strong intra- and intermolecular interactions in bituminous coals. It was reasonable to deduce that significant portions were physically associated after a study of multistep extractions, associative equilibria, the irreversibility and the dependence of coal concentration on solvent swelling, and consideration of the monophase concept. Physical dissociation which may be significant above 300{degree}C should be utilized for the treatment before liquefaction. The high-temperature soaking in a recycle oil was proposed to dissociate coal complexes.

  7. Short contact time direct coal liquefaction using a novel batch reactor. Progress report, May 16, 1994--September 15, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, M.T.; Calkins, W.H.

    1994-09-30

    The objective of this research is to optimize the design and operation of the bench scale batch reactor (SCTBR) for coal liquefaction at short contact times (0.01 to 10 minutes or longer). This reactor is simple enough and low enough in cost to serve as a suitable replacement for the traditional tubing-bomb reactors for many coal liquefaction and other high-pressure, high-temperature reaction studies. The liquefaction of selected Argonne Premium coals and the role of organic oxygen components of the coal and their reaction pathways at very low conversions are being investigated.

  8. Advanced direct coal liquefaction concepts. Quarterly report, April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, D.J.; Parker, R.J.; Simpson, P.L. |

    1993-11-01

    Construction and commissioning of the bench unit for operation of the first stage of the process was completed. Solubilization of Black Thunder coal using carbon monoxide and steam was successfully demonstrated in the counterflow reactor system. The results were comparable with those obtained in the autoclave with the exception that coal solubilization at the same nominal residence times was slightly lower. The bench unit has now been modified for two stage operation. The Wilsonville process derived solvent for Black Thunder coal (V-1074) was found to be essentially as stable as the previous solvent used in the autoclave runs (V-178 + 320) at reactor conditions. This solvent (V-1074) is, therefore, being used in the bench unit tests. Carbon monoxide may be replaced by synthesis gas for the coal solubilization step in the process. However, in autoclave tests, coal conversion was found to be dependent on the amount of carbon monoxide present in the synthesis gas. Coal conversions ranged from 88% for pure carbon monoxide to 67% for a 25:75 carbon monoxide/hydrogen mixture at equivalent conditions. Two stage liquefaction tests were completed in the autoclave using a disposable catalyst (FeS) and hydrogen in the second stage. Increased coal conversion, higher gas and oil and lower asphaltene and preasphaltene yields were observed as expected. However, no hydrogen consumption was observed in the second stage. Other conditions, in particular, alternate catalyst systems will be explored.

  9. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1991-01-01

    The efficient production of environmentally acceptable distillate fuels requires catalysts for hydrogenation and cleavage of the coal macromolecules and removal of oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur heteroatoms. The goal of the proposed research is to develop new catalysts for the direct liquefaction of coal. This type of catalyst consists of fine clay particles that have been treated with reagents which form pillaring structures between the aluminosilicate layers of the clay. The pillars not only hold the layers apart but also constitute the active catalytic sites for hydrogenation of the coal and the solvent used in the liquefaction. The pillaring catalytic sites are composed of pyrrhotite, which has been previously demonstrated to be active for coal liquefaction. The pyrrhotite sites are generated in situ by sulfiding the corresponding oxyiron species. The size of the catalyst will be less than 40 nm in order to promote intimate contact with the coal material. Since the clays and reagents for pillaring and activating the clays are inexpensive, the catalysts can be discarded after use, rather than regenerated by a costly process. The proposed work will evaluate methods for preparing the fine particle iron-pillared clay dispersions and for activating the particles to generate the catalysts. Characterization studies of the pillared clays and activated catalysts will be performed. The effectiveness of the pillared clay dispersion for hydrogenation and coal liquefaction will be determined in several types of testing.

  10. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1991-01-01

    The efficient production of environmentally acceptable distillate fuels requires catalysts for hydrogenation and cleavage of the coal macromolecules and removal of oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur heteroatoms. The goal of the proposed research is to develop new catalysts for the direct liquefaction of coal. This type of catalyst consists of fine clay particles that have been treated with reagents which form pillaring structures between the aluminosilicate layers of the clay. The pillars not only hold the layers apart but also constitute the active catalytic sites for hydrogenation of the coal and solvent used in the liquefaction. The pillaring catalytic sites are composed of pyrrhotite, which has been previously demonstrated to be active for coal liquefaction. The pyrrhotite sites are generated in situ by sulfiding the corresponding oxyiron species. The size of the catalyst will be less than 40 nm in order to promote intimate contact with the coal material. Since the clays and reagents for pillaring and activating the clays are inexpensive, the catalysts can be discarded after use, rather than regenerated by a costly process. The proposed work will evaluate methods for preparing the fine particle iron-pillared clay dispersions and for activating the particles to generate the catalysts. Characterization studies of the pillared clays and activated catalysts will performed. The effectiveness of the pillared clay dispersion for hydrogenation and coal liquefaction will be determined in several types of testing. 5 refs., 1 tab.

  11. Studies of the initial reactions that occur during direct coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Stohl, F.V.

    1989-01-01

    The objectives of this work are to identify the types of compounds and process conditions that give rise to retrogressive reactions during preconversion processing. Experiments have been performed to evaluate the impacts of temperature, pressure, catalysts, mineral matter, and hydrogen donor on these reactions. Initial studies have been carried out using dibenzyl ether (DBE) because ether linkages represent one type of bonding believed to be present in coal. Previous studies have analyzed the kinetics and mechanism of thermolysis of DBE and have also used DBE to study effects of process variables in coal liquefaction. Results of thermal reactions with DBE have shown that the main reaction products are toluene, benzaldehyde, benzyl alcohol and benzene. In the presence of catalysts such as ZnCl{sub 2}, the product distributions are more complicated and can contain significant amounts of material with higher molecular weights than DBE. 8 refs., 8 figs.

  12. Liquefaction of sub-bituminous coal

    DOEpatents

    Schindler, Harvey D.; Chen, James M.

    1986-01-01

    Sub-bituminous coal is directly liquefied in two stages by use of a liquefaction solvent containing insoluble material as well as 850.degree. F.+ material and 850.degree. F.- material derived from the second stage, and controlled temperature and conversion in the second stage. The process is in hydrogen balance.

  13. Surfactant-Assisted Coal Liquefaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, Gregory S.; Sharma, Pramod K.

    1993-01-01

    Obtaining liquid fuels from coal which are economically competitive with those obtained from petroleum based sources is a significant challenge for the researcher as well as the chemical industry. Presently, the economics of coal liquefaction are not favorable because of relatively intense processing conditions (temperatures of 430 degrees C and pressures of 2200 psig), use of a costly catalyst, and a low quality product slate of relatively high boiling fractions. The economics could be made more favorable by achieving adequate coal conversions at less intense processing conditions and improving the product slate. A study has been carried out to examine the effect of a surfactant in reducing particle agglomeration and improving hydrodynamics in the coal liquefaction reactor to increase coal conversions...

  14. Preconversion processing of bituminous coals: New directions to improved direct catalytic coal liquefaction. Final report, September 20, 1991--September 19, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    One of the main goals for competitive coal liquefaction is to decrease gas yields to reduce hydrogen consumption. Complexing this element as methane and ethane decreases process efficiently and is less cost effective. To decrease the gas yield and increase the liquid yield, an effective preconversion process has been explored on the basis of the physically associated molecular nature of coal. Activities have been focused on two issues: (1) maximizing the dissolution of associated coal and (2) defining the different reactivity associated with a wide molecular weight distribution. Two-step soaking at 350{degrees}C and 400{degrees}C in a recycle oil was found to be very effective for coal solubilization. No additional chemicals, catalysts, and hydrogen are required for this preconversion process. High-volatile bituminous coals tested before liquefaction showed 80--90% conversion with 50--55% oil yields. New preconversion steps suggested are as follows: (1) dissolution of coal with two-step high-temperature soaking, (2) separation into oil and heavy fractions of dissolved coal with vacuum distillation, and (3) selective liquefaction of the separated heavy fractions under relatively mild conditions. Laboratory scale tests of the proposed procedure mode using a small autoclave showed a 30% increase in the oil yield with a 15--20% decrease in the gas yield. This batch operation projects a substantial reduction in the ultimate cost of coal liquefaction.

  15. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF COAL LIQUEFACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes results of a study of the environmental aspects of 14 of the most prominent coal liquefaction systems, in terms of background, process description, major operations, input and output streams, status, and schedule of system development. As a result of the stu...

  16. Surfactant-assisted coal liquefaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, G. C.

    1977-01-01

    Improved process of coal liquefaction utilizing nonaqueous surfactant has increased oil yield from 50 to about 80%. Asphaltene molecule formation of colloid particles is prevented by surfactant. Separated molecules present more surface area for hydrogenation reaction. Lower requirements for temperature, pressure, and hydrogen lead to reduction in capital and operation costs.

  17. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, G.A.; Winshel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1990-10-01

    Consol R D is conducting a three-year program to characterize process and product streams from direct coal liquefaction process development projects. The program objectives are two-fold: (1) to obtain and provide appropriate samples of coal liquids for the evaluation of analytical methodology, and (2) to support ongoing DOE-sponsored coal liquefaction process development efforts. The first objective will utilize analytical techniques which have not been fully demonstrated; the second objective involves more previously proven methods. This quarter, two feed coals and 39 process oils from Wilsonville Run 258 were analyzed to provide information on process performance. Run 258 was operated in the thermal/catalytic Close-Coupled Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction (CC-ITSL) mode with ash recycle. The subbituminous feed coals were from the Spring Creek Mine (Anderson and Dietz seams) and from the Black Thunder Mine (Wyodak and Anderson seams). Shell 324 catalyst was used in the second stage. Various coal samples related to Wilsonville Run 259 were analyzed for chemical and petrographic composition. These results will be given in a future report, which covers all of Run 259. 18 figs., 24 tabs.

  18. A Characterization and Evaluation of Coal Liquefaction Process Streams

    SciTech Connect

    G. A. Robbins; R. A. Winschel; S. D. Brandes

    1998-06-09

    CONSOL characterized 38 process strea m samples from HTI Run PB- 04, in which Black Thunder Mine Coal, Hondo vacuum resid, autom obile shredder residue (ASR), and virgin plastics were used as liquefaction feedstocks with dispersed catalyst. A paper on kinetic modeling of resid reactivity was presented at the DOE Coal Lique -faction and Solid Fuels Contractors Review Conference, September 3- 4, 1997, i n Pittsburgh, PA. The paper, "The Reactivity of Direct Coal Liquefaction Resids", i s appended (Appendix 1). Three papers on characterization of samples from coal/ resid/ waste p lastics co- liquefaction were presented or submitted for presen tation at conferences. Because of their similarity, only one of the papers is appended to this report. The paper, "Characterization o f Process Samples From Co- Liquefaction of Coal and Waste Polymers", (Appendix 2) was presented at the DOE Coal Liquefaction and Solid Fuels C ontractors Review Conference, September 3- 4, 1997, in Pittsburgh, PA. The paper, "Characterization of Process Stream Samples From Bench- Scale Co -Liquefaction Runs That Utilized Waste Polymers as Feedstocks" was presented at the 214th National Meeting of the Ameri can Chemical Society, September 7- 11, 1997, in Las Vegas, NV. The paper, "Characterization of Process Oils from Coal/ Waste Co- Liquefaction" wa s submitted for presentation at the 14th Japan/ U. S. Joint Technical Meeting on Coa l Liquefaction and Materials for Coal Liquefaction on October 28, 1997, in Tokyo, Japan. A joint Burns and Roe Services Corp. and CONSOL pap er on crude oil assays of product oils from HTI Run PB- 03 was presented at the DOE Coal Liquefaction and Solid Fuel s Contractors Review Conference, September 3- 4, 1997, in Pittsburgh, PA. The paper , "Characterization of Liquid Products from All- Slurry Mode Liquefaction", is appende d (Appendix 3).

  19. Iron catalyzed coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Garg, Diwakar; Givens, Edwin N.

    1983-01-01

    A process is described for the solvent refining of coal into a gas product, a liquid product and a normally solid dissolved product. Particulate coal and a unique co-catalyst system are suspended in a coal solvent and processed in a coal liquefaction reactor, preferably an ebullated bed reactor. The co-catalyst system comprises a combination of a stoichiometric excess of iron oxide and pyrite which reduce predominantly to active iron sulfide catalysts in the reaction zone. This catalyst system results in increased catalytic activity with attendant improved coal conversion and enhanced oil product distribution as well as reduced sulfide effluent. Iron oxide is used in a stoichiometric excess of that required to react with sulfur indigenous to the feed coal and that produced during reduction of the pyrite catalyst to iron sulfide.

  20. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.A.; Linehan, J.C.; Robins, W.H. )

    1992-07-01

    Under contract from the DOE , and in association with CONSOL Inc., Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated four principal and several complementary techniques for the analysis of non-distillable direct coal liquefaction materials in support of process development. Field desorption mass spectrometry (FDMS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic methods were examined for potential usefulness as techniques to elucidate the chemical structure of residual (nondistillable) direct coal liquefaction derived materials. Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and supercritical fluid chromatography/mass spectrometry (SFC/MS) were evaluated for effectiveness in compound-class separation and identification of residual materials. Liquid chromatography (including microcolumn) separation techniques, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (MS/MS), and GC/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy methods were applied to supercritical fluid extracts. The full report authored by the PNL researchers is presented here. The following assessment briefly highlights the major findings of the project, and evaluates the potential of the methods for application to coal liquefaction materials. These results will be incorporated by CONSOL into a general overview of the application of novel analytical techniques to coal-derived materials at the conclusion of CONSOL's contract.

  1. Coal liquefaction with molybdenum catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, P.L.

    1983-01-01

    Coal liquefaction experiments were carried out in a stirred autoclave under nitrogen. Tetralin was employed as solvent, and the catalyst, when used, was ammonium heptamolybdate (impregnated on coal) or stannous chloride (powdered). Production of pentane soluble oil was higher in the runs with catalyst, but net hydrogen transfer from tetralin to coal was less when catalyst was used. Coal and powdered stannous chloride exhibited a marked synergistic effect on the dehydrogenation of tetralin. A free radical mechanism was suggested to explain this effect, and model experiments with bibenzyl (but no coal) gave results that were consistent with this mechanism. An apparent synergistic effect of coal and impregnated ammonium heptamolybdate was shown to be attributed simply to improved distribution (higher surface area) of the impregnated catalyst, the coal acting as a high-area support. Comparison of the results from autoclave experiments (under nitrogen) with those from tubing bomb experiments (under air) indicated major differences in coal conversion and hydrogen transfer. The conversion was 62% in the autoclave and 81% in the tubing bomb, and the hydrogen transfer was 0.7% in the autoclave and 2.93% in the tubing bomb, when 1% of Mo (based on coal) was impregnated on coal in a preliminary step.

  2. Coal liquefaction with preasphaltene recycle

    DOEpatents

    Weimer, Robert F.; Miller, Robert N.

    1986-01-01

    A coal liquefaction system is disclosed with a novel preasphaltene recycle from a supercritical extraction unit to the slurry mix tank wherein the recycle stream contains at least 90% preasphaltenes (benzene insoluble, pyridine soluble organics) with other residual materials such as unconverted coal and ash. This subject process results in the production of asphaltene materials which can be subjected to hydrotreating to acquire a substitute for No. 6 fuel oil. The preasphaltene-predominant recycle reduces the hydrogen consumption for a process where asphaltene material is being sought.

  3. Coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Skinner, Ronald W.; Tao, John C.; Znaimer, Samuel

    1985-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved process for the production of liquid carbonaceous fuels and solvents from carbonaceous solid fuels, especially coal. The claimed improved process includes the hydrocracking of the light SRC mixed with a suitable hydrocracker solvent. The recycle of the resulting hydrocracked product, after separation and distillation, is used to produce a solvent for the hydrocracking of the light solvent refined coal.

  4. Coal-derived promoters for the liquefaction of Illinois coal

    SciTech Connect

    Carty, R.H.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this program is to investigate the use of liquids derived from coal either by mild gasification or supercritical extraction (SCE) to promote direct liquefaction of Illinois coal. Some organic sulfur-, nitrogen-, and oxygen-containing compounds have been found to enhance liquefaction reactions. The use of Illinois coal to produce liquid fractions rich in these types of compounds could increase the rates of liquefaction reactions, thus improving the process economics. An integrated process combining direct liquefaction with mild gasification or SCE of coal is being developed by IGT. The approach taken in this two-year program is to use recently developed molecular probe techniques to assess the reactivity of three coal-derived liquids with respect to (A) hydrogen transfer rate, (B) carbon-carbon bond cleavage rate, (C) free radical flux, and (D) hydrocracking activity. Sample liquids from Illinois Basin Coal IBC-106 are prepared by three methods: mild gasification in an isothermal free-fall reactor (IFFR), steam treatment followed by mild gasification in a fixed-bed reactor (ST/FBR), and SCE using toluene in a batch autoclave. During the first year of the program, the IFFR and ST/FBR coal liquids were produced and characterized, and the IFFR liquid was assessed by the four molecular-probe methods. During the first quarter of the second year, reactivity testing and data analysis on the ST/FBR coal liquid was completed. For the ST/FBR liquid, hydrogen transfer rate showed a mean increase of 7%, C-C bond cleavage selectivity increased by 27%, free radical flux increased 101%, and data indicated a 227% increase in hydrocracking activity. 12 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  5. EXPLORATORY RESEARCH ON NOVEL COAL LIQUEFACTION CONCEPT

    SciTech Connect

    Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.

    1998-11-30

    The report presents a summary the work performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-95PC95050. Investigations performed under Task 4--Integrated Flow Sheet Testing are detailed. In this program, a novel direct coal liquefaction technology was investigated by CONSOL Inc. with the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and LDP Associates. The process concept explored consists of a first-stage coal dissolution step in which the coal is solubilized by hydride ion donation. In the second stage, the products are catalytically upgraded to refinery feedstocks. Integrated first-stage and solids-separation steps were used to prepare feedstocks for second-stage catalytic upgrading. An engineering and economic evaluation was conducted concurrently with experimental work throughout the program. Approaches to reduce costs for a conceptual commercial plant were recommended at the conclusion of Task 3. These approaches were investigated in Task 4. The economic analysis of the process as it was defined at the conclusion of Task 4, indicates that the production of refined product (gasoline) via this novel direct liquefaction technology is higher than the cost associated with conventional two-stage liquefaction technologies.

  6. Advanced direct coal liquefaction concepts. Quarterly report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, D.J.; Parker, R.J.; Simpson, P.L.

    1993-12-31

    Six runs on the bench unit were successfully completed this quarter. The runs covered twenty five different operating conditions and yield periods, and involved 336 hours of operation. In the bench unit, increased temperature of first stage operation (410{degree}C) and direct addition of the powdered solid sodium aluminate to the feed as first stage catalyst improved both coal and carbon monoxide conversion. To achieve 90%+ overall coal conversion, temperatures of 430{degree}C+ were required in the second stage. Oil yields (pentane soluble liquid product) in excess of 65 wt % based on MAF Black Thunder coal, were achieved both with iron oxide/dimethyl disulfide and ammonium molybdate/carbon disulfide second stage catalysts. C{sub l}-C{sub 3} hydrogen gas yields were modest, generally 7-8 wt % on MAF coal, and overall hydrogen consumption (including first stage shift hydrogen) was in the order of 7-8 wt % on MAF coal. The ammonium molybdate catalyst system appeared to give slightly higher oil yields and hydrogen consumption, as was expected, but the differences may not be significant.

  7. Catalytic coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Garg, Diwakar; Sunder, Swaminathan

    1986-01-01

    An improved process for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a solvent comprises using as catalyst a mixture of a 1,2- or 1,4-quinone and an alkaline compound, selected from ammonium, alkali metal, and alkaline earth metal oxides, hydroxides or salts of weak acids.

  8. Catalytic coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Garg, D.; Sunder, S.

    1986-12-02

    An improved process for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a solvent comprises using as catalyst a mixture of a 1,2- or 1,4-quinone and an alkaline compound, selected from ammonium, alkali metal, and alkaline earth metal oxides, hydroxides or salts of weak acids. 1 fig.

  9. Continuous bench-scale slurry catalyst testing: Direct coal liquefaction of rawhide sub-bituminous coal. Final topical report, June 1994--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Coless, L.A.; Poole, M.C.; Wen, M.Y.

    1995-11-21

    Supported catalysts, either in fixed bed or ebullating bed reactors, are subject to deactivation with time, especially if the feed contains deactivating species, such as metals and coke precursors. Dispersed catalyst systems avoid significant catalyst deactivation because there are no catalyst pores to plug, hence no pore mouth plugging, and hopefully, no relevant decline of catalyst surface area or pore volume. The tests carried out in 1994, at the Exxon Research and Development Laboratories (ERDL) for DOE covered a slate of 5 dispersed catalysts for direct coal liquefaction of Rawhide sub-bituminous coal, which is similar to the Black Thunder coal tested earlier at Wilsonville. The catalysts included three iron and two molybdenum types. The Bailey iron oxide and the two molybdenum catalysts have previously been tested in DOE-sponsored research. These known catalysts will be used to help provide a base line and tie-in to previous work. The two new catalysts, Bayferrox PK 5210 and Mach-1`s Nanocat are very finely divided iron oxides. The iron oxide addition rate was varied from 1.0 to 0.25 wt % (dry coal basis) but the molybdenum addition rate remained constant at 100 wppm throughout the experiments. The effect of changing recycle rate, sulfur and iron oxide addition rates, first stage reactor temperature, mass velocity and catalyst type were tested in the 1994 operations of ERDL`s recycle coal liquefaction unit (RCLU). DOE will use these results to update economics and plan future work. The test program will resume in mid 1995, with another 2-3 months of pilot plant testing.

  10. Cooperative research in coal liquefaction. Final report, May 1, 1990-- April 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, G.P.

    1992-02-15

    The Consortium for Fossil Fuel Liquefaction Science (CFFLS) is currently engaged in a three year contract with the US Department of Energy investigating a range of research topics dealing with direct coal liquefaction. This report summarizes the results of this program in its second year, from May 1, 1990 to April 30, 1991. Accomplishments for this period are presented for the following tasks: Iron-based catalysts for coal liquefaction, exploratory research on coal conversion, novel coal liquefaction concepts, and novel catalysts for coal liquefaction.

  11. Surfactant studies for coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, G.C.

    1990-12-20

    Objectives of this project include: select economical/practical surfactants for use in coal liquefaction; screen surfactants for the proposed work through simple laboratory screening tests; and check the survivability of the selected surfactants at 350{degrees}C and 2000 psi using a 1-hour residence time for the thermal treatment in a stirred autoclave. Surfactant screening studies have shown the lignin sulfonate salt being the best candidate studied. Based upon the findings from the screening studies and practical considerations (e.g., potential cost, thermal survivability and recycling recovery), two surfactant choices in the anionic and nonionic categories were tested further in the autoclave reactor and engineering experiments at JPL. The goal of the autoclave work was to engineering experiments at JPL. The goal of the autoclave work was to determine the effects of surfactants on coal liquefaction performance and to test surfactant survivability. A eight of (8) autoclave experiments using 100 grams of as-received coal were performed. Two commercial surfactant choices were evaluated. They were: Sodium Lignin Sulfonate (LS) as a colloidal (heterogenous) surfactant of anionic type; and Triton X-100 (TRI) (trade name of a polyoxyethylated tert-octyphenol) as a liquid (homogenous) surfactant of nonionic type. Two additional reference tests were performed. 10 refs., 15 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. Preconversion processing of bituminous coals: New directions to improved direct catalytic coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The near equal conversions were obtained even with high coal/liquid ratio (1/3--1/2) for two-step wise high-temperature soaking and the first stage liquefaction. Expected conversions were not observed when vacuum distillation after soaking was used in stead of cyclohexane extraction. This is presumably due to the difficulty with redispersion of vacuum distillated bottoms in the coal liquid, because a batch wise procedure was taken by using glasswares. It is suggested that the proposed procedure in the previous quarter should be tested by a continuous procedure under enough heating conditions to keep low viscosity of the bottoms.

  13. Preconversion processing of bituminous coals: New directions to improved direct catalytic coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, September 20, 1991--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    The main task of this quarter was to install reactors to conduct preconversion and liquefaction of coal. Coal and coal liquids were collected. The anaerobic chamber (Model 855-AC; Plas Labs, inc.) was procured and set up to store coal samples under an inert gas. Equipment to treat products was assembled, including Soxhlet extraction units, fractionation columns, a distillation column, and a rotary evaporator. Two gas chromatographs for analysis of gases and liquid were adjusted. Two reactor systems were installed for the experimental apparatus. One was Model 4576 high-temperature and high-pressure autoclave (Parr Instrument, 500{degrees}C and 5000 psi) (see Figure 1); the other was a 27 ml of microreactors. The autoclave was obtained from the manufacturer and assembled. The experimental set-up of microreactors are shown in Figure 2.

  14. DIRECT LIQUEFACTION PROOF OF CONCEPT

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    The eighth bench scale test of POC program, Run PB-08, was successfully completed from August 8 to August 26, 1997. A total of five operating conditions were tested aiming at evaluating the reactivity of different pyrolysis oils in liquefaction of a Wyoming sub-bituminous coal (Black Thunder coal). For the first time, water soluble promoters were incorporated into the iron-based GelCat to improve the dispersion of the promoter metals in the feed blend. The concentration of the active metals, Mo and Fe, was 100 and 1000 ppm of moisture-free coal, respectively. Black Thunder coal used in this run was the same batch as tested in HTI�s Run POC-02. Similar to Runs PB-01 through 7, this run employed two back mixed slurry reactors, an interstage gas/slurry separator and a direct-coupled hydrotreater. In addition to the hot vapor from the second stage separator, the first stage separator overhead liquid was also fed to the hydrotreater, which was packed with Criterion C-411 hydrotreating catalyst. Pyrolysis oil was produced off-line from a pyrolysis unit acquired from University of Wyoming. Solids rejection was achieved by purging out pressure filter solid. The recycle solvents consisted of O-6 separator bottoms and pressure filter liquid (PFL). The Run PB-08 proceeded very smoothly without any interruptions. Coal conversion consistently above 90W% was achieved. High resid conversion and distillate yield have been obtained from co-processing of coal and 343°C+ (650°F+) pyrolysis oil. Light gas (C1-C3 ) yield was minimized and hydrogen consumption was reduced due to the introduction of pyrolysis oil, compared with conventional coal-derived solvent. Catalytic activity was improved by incorporating a promoter metal into the iron-based GelCat. It seemed that lowering the first stage temperature to 435°C might increase the hydrogenation function of the promoter metal. In comparison with previous coal-waste coprocessing run (PB-06), significant

  15. Fractionally distilled SRC-I, SRC-II, EDS, H-Coal and ITSL direct coal liquefaction process materials: a comparative summary of chemical analysis and biological testing

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, C.W.; Later, D.W.; Dauble, D.D.; Wilson, B.W.

    1985-07-01

    This document reports and compares the results compiled from chemical analyses and biological testing of coal liquefaction process materials which were fractionally distilled, after production, into various comparable boiling-point range cuts. Comparative analyses were performed on solvent refined coal (SRC)-I, SRC-II, H-Coal, EDS an integrated two-stage liquefaction (ITSL) distillate materials. Mutagenicity and carcinogenicity assays were conducted in conjunction with chromatographic and mass spectrometric analyses to provide detailed, comparative, chemical and biological assessments. Where possible, results obtained from the distillate cuts are compared to those from coal liquefaction materials with limited boiling ranges. Work reported here was conducted by investigators in the Biology and Chemistry Department at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), Richland, WA. 38 refs., 16 figs., 27 tabs.

  16. Cooperative Research Program in coal liquefaction. Technical report, May 1, 1994--October 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    Progress reports are presented for the following tasks: coliquefaction of coal with waste materials; catalysts for coal liquefaction to clean transportation fuels; fundamental research in coal liquefaction; and in situ analytical techniques for coal liquefaction and coal liquefaction catalysts.

  17. Cooperative research program in coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, November 1, 1991--January 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, G.P.

    1992-06-01

    Research continues on coal liquefaction in the following areas: (1) Iron Based Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction; (2) Exploratory Research on Coal Conversion; (3) Novel Coal Liquefaction Concepts; (4) Novel Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction. (VC)

  18. Cooperative research program in coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, August 1, 1991--October 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, G.P.

    1991-12-31

    This Quarterly Report on coal liquefaction research includes discussion in the areas of (1) Iron Based Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction; (2) Exploratory Research on Coal Conversion; (3) Novel Coal Liquefaction Concepts; (4) Novel Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction. (VC)

  19. Chemical analysis and mutational assay of distilled oils from the H-coal direct liquefaction process: a status report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, B.W.; Later, D.W.; Wright, C.W.; Stewart, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    Samples from the H-Coal process, a catalytic, single-stage, coal liquefaction technology, were chemically characterized and screened for microbial mutagenicity. For these investigations, a blend of light and heavy H-Coal process oils was fractionally distilled into 50/sup 0/F boiling point cuts. The chemical analyses and biological testing results presented in this status report deal primarily with the blended material and the distillate fractions boiling above 650/sup 0/F. Results from the microbial mutagenicity assays indicated that onset of biological activity in the crude materials occurred above 700/sup 0/F. Similar trends have been observed for Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) I, SRC II, Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction (ITSL) and Exxon EDS process materials. After chemical class fractionation, the primary source of microbial mutagenicity of the crude boiling point cuts was the nitrogen-containing polycyclic aromatic compound (N-PAC) fractions. Amino polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (amino-PAH) were present at sufficient concentration levels in the N-PAC fractions to account for the observed mutagenic responses. In general, the chemical composition of the H-Coal materials studied was similar to that of other single-stage liquefaction materials. The degree of alkylation in these materials was determined to be greater than in the SRC and less than in the EDS process distillate cuts. 13 references, 8 figures, 11 tables.

  20. Catalytic coal liquefaction. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, S W

    1981-01-01

    Monolith catalysts of MoO/sub 3/-CoO-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ were prepared and tested for coal liquefaction in a stirred autoclave. In general, the monolith catalysts were not as good as particulate catalysts prepared on Corning alumina supports. Measurement of O/sub 2/ chemisorption and BET surface area has been made on a series of Co/Mo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts obtained from PETC. The catalysts were derived from Cyanamid 1442A and had been tested for coal liquefaction in batch autoclaves and continuous flow units. MoO/sub 3/-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts over the loading range 3.9 to 14.9 wt % MoO/sub 3/ have been studied with respect to BET surface (before and after reduction), O/sub 2/ chemisorption at -78/sup 0/C, redox behavior at 500/sup 0/C, and activity for cyclohexane dehydrogenation at 500/sup 0/C. In connection with the fate of tin catalysts during coal liquefaction, calculations have been made of the relative thermodynamic stability of SnCl/sub 2/, Sn, SnO/sub 2/, and SnS in the presence of H/sub 2/, HCl, H/sub 2/S and H/sub 2/O. Ferrous sulfate dispersed in methylnaphthalene has been shown to be reduced to ferrous sulfide under typical coal hydroliquefaction conditions (1 hour, 450/sup 0/C, 1000 psi initial p/sub H/sub 2//). This suggests that ferrous sulfide may be the common catalytic ingredient when either (a) ferrous sulfate impregnated on powdered coal, or (b) finely divided iron pyrite is used as the catalyst. Old research on impregnated ferrous sulfate, impregnated ferrous halides, and pyrite is consistent with this assumption. Eight Co/Mo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts from commercial suppliers, along with SnCl/sub 2/, have been studied for the hydrotreating of 1-methylnaphthalene (1-MN) in a stirred autoclave at 450 and 500/sup 0/C.

  1. Fundamental studies of coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    The authors have examined the pyrolysis of Argonne samples of Wyodak and Illinois No. 6 coal in argon, undecane, Tetralin, and water. The effects of the pyrolysis on individual particles of coal were monitored visually in a cell with diamond windows capable of operation to temperature and pressures in excess of 500{degrees}C and 3000 psi. The changes in the particles from ambient to 460{degrees}C were recorded in real time on video tape, and images were then taken from the tape record and analyzed. The study showed that in argon both coals developed tars at 350{degrees}-370{degrees}C. The tars then quickly evaporated, leaving core particles remarkably similar in size and shape to the initial particles. These observations suggest that coal does not melt nor become fully liquid when heated. Nor does the softened coal undergo crosslinking to generate coke. Rather the simple loss of volatiles leaves behind the core residue as coke. Contrary to the common view, there appears to be no link between the bond-breaking processes yielding tar and the interaction of the coal with H-donors leading to liquefaction. Water as a medium was surprising in its effect. Both coals began to shrink at 300{degrees}-350{degrees}C, with the effect appearing to be more of an erosion rather than a uniform loss of substance as seen in Tetralin. The Wyodak continued to shrink to 460{degrees}C to about half its initial size. With the Illinois No. 6 coal, however, the process reversed at around 420{degrees}C, and the particles appeared to grow with the evolution of a tar, continuing to 460{degrees}C. The authors submit that this final observation is evidence for hydrothermal synthesis of hydrocarbons at these conditions.

  2. Short contact time direct coal liquefaction using a novel batch reactor. Progress report, September 27, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, M.T.; Calkins, W.H.

    1994-01-19

    The objective for this research is to optimize the design and operation of the bench scale batch reactor (STBR) for coat liquefaction at short contact times (0.01 to 10 minutes). This reactor is simple and low enough in cost to serve as a suitable replacement for the traditional tubing-bomb reactors for coal liquefaction and other high-pressure, high-temperature reaction studies. The details of the reactor system are shown in Figure 2. The heating bath used is a Techne IFB-52 industrial fluidized sand bath, which maintains a reaction temperature of {plus_minus}2{degrees}C. The 30 cm{sup 3} reactor is capable of containing up to 17 MPa (2500 psi) pressure at temperatures up to 550{degrees}C. The tubing used for preheater and precooler was 1/4in. 316 stainless steel with wall thickness of 0.035in. The lengths of the preheater and precooler are selected based on the particular process being studied. Since a gas (e.g. hydrogen or nitrogen) is bubbled through the reaction mixture under pressure and out through a letdown valve, a small water cooled condenser above the reactor before the let-down valve is added to avoid loss of solvent or other low boiling components. Coal liquefaction runs are made by preparing slurries of coal in reagent grade tetralin. Various ratios of tetralin to coal are used, and in some cases, a catalyst such as Ni/Mo on alumina is added.

  3. U.S. DOE indirect coal liquefaction program: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, J.; Schmetz, E.; Winslow, J.; Tischer, R.; Srivastava, R.

    1997-12-31

    Coal is the most abundant domestic energy resource in the United States. The Fossil Energy Organization within the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been supporting a coal liquefaction program to develop improved technologies to convert coal to clean and cost-effective liquid fuels to complement the dwindling supply of domestic petroleum crude. The goal of this program is to produce coal liquids that are competitive with crude at $20 to $25 per barrel. Indirect and direct liquefaction routes are the two technologies being pursued under the DOE coal liquefaction program. This paper will give an overview of the DOE indirect liquefaction program. More detailed discussions will be given to the F-T diesel and DME fuels which have shown great promises as clean burning alternative diesel fuels. The authors also will briefly discuss the economics of indirect liquefaction and the hurdles and opportunities for the early commercial deployment of these technologies. Discussions will be preceded by two brief reviews on the liquid versus gas phase reactors and the natural gas versus coal based indirect liquefaction.

  4. Hydrogen-donor coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Jr., Edward L.; Mitchell, Willard N.

    1980-01-01

    Improved liquid yields are obtained during the hydrogen-donor solvent liquefaction of coal and similar carbonaceous solids by maintaining a higher concentration of material having hydrogenation catalytic activity in the downstream section of the liquefaction reactor system than in the upstream section of the system.

  5. Solid superacids as coal liquefaction catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.

    1989-01-01

    Direct coal liquefaction under mild conditions can be achieved by the use of strong acid catalysts. This research is aimed at exploring the possibility of mile coal liquefaction in the presence of solid superacids, especially oxides of iron, titanium, zirconium, and hafnium treated with sulfate ions. Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} has been shown to be an impressively active catalyst in coal conversion at 400{degree}C. Our objective is to find conditions under which Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} and similar systems catalyze the conversion of coal at mild conditions of temperature and pressure. To date, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, Ti{sub 2}/SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, ZrO{sub 2}/SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} catalysts have been synthesized and characterized by XRD, BET, IR, acidity measurement, and sulfur analysis, and a comparison of the relative reactivity of these superacids for n- pentane isomerization and conversion of diphenyl ether and diphenylmethane in both batch and fixed bed reactor systems has been carried out. In this quarter we extended our study of pentane conversion and tested the above catalysts in hydrocracking of longer linear alkanes. We investigated the conversion of coal model compounds including diphenylmethane, dibenyl ether and phenyl benzyl ether at room temperature. We have started work on the conversion of coal at 400{degree}C under hydrogen pressure using an Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} catalyst. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1992-08-01

    This is the tenth Quarterly Technical Progress Report under DOE Contract DE-AC22-89PC89883. Process oils from Wilsonville Run 262 were analyzed to provide information on process performance. Run 262 was operated from July 10 through September 30, 1991, in the thermal/catalytic Close-Coupled Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction (CC-ITSL) configuration with ash recycle. The feed coal was Black Thunder Mine subbituminous coal. The high/low temperature sequence was used. Each reactor was operated at 50% of the available reactor volume. The interstage separator was in use throughout the run. The second-stage reactor was charged with aged Criterion 324 catalyst (Ni/Mo on 1/16 inch alumina extrudate support). Slurry catalysts and sulfiding agent were fed to the first-stage reactor. Molyvan L is an organometallic compound which contains 8.1% Mo, and is commercially available as an oil-soluble lubricant additive. It was used in Run 262 as a dispersed hydrogenation catalyst precursor, primarily to alleviate deposition problems which plagued past runs with Black Thunder coal. One test was made with little supported catalyst in the second stage. The role of phenolic groups in donor solvent properties was examined. In this study, four samples from direct liquefaction process oils were subjected to O-methylation of the phenolic groups, followed by chemical analysis and solvent quality testing.

  7. Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W. ); Gutterman, C. ); Chander, S. )

    1992-08-26

    Research in this project centers upon developing a new approach to the direct liquefaction of coal to produce an all-distillate product slate at a sizable cost reduction over current technology. The approach integrates all aspects of the coal liquefaction process including coal selection, pretreatment, coal swelling with catalyst impregnation, coal liquefaction experimentation, product recovery with characterization, alternate bottoms processing, and a technical assessment including an economic evaluation. The project is being carried out under contract to the United States Department of Energy. On May 28, 1992, the Department of Energy authorized starting the experimental aspects of this projects; therefore, experimentation at Amoco started late in this quarterly report period. Research contracts with Auburn University, Pennsylvania State University, and Foster Wheeler Development Corporation were signed during June, 1992, so their work was just getting underway. Their work will be summarized in future quarterly reports. A set of coal samples were sent to Hazen Research for beneficiation. The samples were received and have been analyzed. The literature search covering coal swelling has been up-dated, and preliminary coal swelling experiments were carried out. Further swelling experimentation is underway. An up-date of the literature on the liquefaction of coal using dispersed catalysts is nearing completion; it will be included in the next quarterly report.

  8. Catalyst for coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Huibers, Derk T. A.; Kang, Chia-Chen C.

    1984-01-01

    An improved catalyst for a coal liquefaction process; e.g., the H-Coal Process, for converting coal into liquid fuels, and where the conversion is carried out in an ebullated-catalyst-bed reactor wherein the coal contacts catalyst particles and is converted, in addition to liquid fuels, to gas and residual oil which includes preasphaltenes and asphaltenes. The improvement comprises a catalyst selected from the group consisting of the oxides of nickel molybdenum, cobalt molybdenum, cobalt tungsten, and nickel tungsten on a carrier of alumina, silica, or a combination of alumina and silica. The catalyst has a total pore volume of about 0.500 to about 0.900 cc/g and the pore volume comprises micropores, intermediate pores and macropores, the surface of the intermediate pores being sufficiently large to convert the preasphaltenes to asphaltenes and lighter molecules. The conversion of the asphaltenes takes place on the surface of micropores. The macropores are for metal deposition and to prevent catalyst agglomeration. The micropores have diameters between about 50 and about 200 angstroms (.ANG.) and comprise from about 50 to about 80% of the pore volume, whereas the intermediate pores have diameters between about 200 and 2000 angstroms (.ANG.) and comprise from about 10 to about 25% of the pore volume, and the macropores have diameters between about 2000 and about 10,000 angstroms (.ANG.) and comprise from about 10 to about 25% of the pore volume. The catalysts are further improved where they contain promoters. Such promoters include the oxides of vanadium, tungsten, copper, iron and barium, tin chloride, tin fluoride and rare earth metals.

  9. Coal-derived promoters for the liquefaction of Illinois coal. [Quarterly] technical report, December 1, 1991--February 29, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Carty, R.H.; Knight, R.A.

    1992-08-01

    The objective of this program is to investigate the use of liquids derived from coal either by mild gasification or supercritical extraction (SCE) to promote direct liquefaction of Illinois coal. Some organic sulfur-, nitrogen-, and oxygen-containing compounds have been found to enhance liquefaction reactions. The use of Illinois coal to produce liquid fractions rich in these types of compounds could increase the rates of liquefaction reactions, thus improving the process economics. An integrated process combining direct liquefaction with mild gasification or SCE of coal is being developed by IGT.

  10. Advanced direct coal liquefaction concepts. Quarterly report, January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, D.J.; Parker, R.J.; Simpson, P.L.

    1993-07-01

    Five barrels of a Wilsonville process derived solvent (V-1074) from Black Thunder coal were obtained. This material boils within the preferred gas oil range, is more aromatic than previous solvents, and will therefore be used for the bench unit studies. Several repeat runs were performed in the autoclave to confirm the results of the matrix study. In addition, runs were carried out with different catalysts, with agglomerates and with the V-1074 solvent. The results of the autoclave runs were analyzed with respect to coal conversion, CO conversion, oil yield, hydrogen consumption and oxygen removal. It was concluded that the best operating conditions for the first stage operation was a temperature of at least 390{degrees}C, residence time of at least 30 minutes, cold CO pressure of at least 600 psig and potassium carbonate catalyst (2% wt on total feed). The data also indicated however, that the coal conversion goes through a maximum, and too high a severity leads to retrograde reaction and lower coal solubilization. The scope for increasing temperature and time is therefore limited. Petrographic examination of the THF insoluble resids from the autoclave program indicated a maximum coal conversion of about 90% for Black Thunder coal. The bench unit construction was also essentially completed and the bench unit program to be carded out in the next twelve months was defined.

  11. Cooperative research in coal liquefaction infratechnology and generic technology development: Final report, October 1, 1985 to December 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Sendlein, L.V.A.

    1987-06-29

    During the first year of its research program, the Consortium for Fossil Fuel Liquefaction Science has made significant progress in many areas of coal liquefaction and coal structure research. Research topics for which substantial progress has been made include integrated coal structure and liquefaction studies, investigation of differential liquefaction processes, development and application of sophisticated techniques for structural analysis, computer analysis of multivariate data, biodesulfurization of coal, catalysis studies, co-processing of coal and crude oil, coal dissolution and extraction processes, coal depolymerization, determination of the liquefaction characteristics of many US coals for use in a liquefaction database, and completion of a retrospective technology assessment for direct coal liquefaction. These and related topics are discussed in considerably more detail in the remainder of this report. Individual projects are processed separately for the data base.

  12. Experience in feeding coal into a liquefaction process development unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akhtar, S.; Friedman, S.; Mazzocco, N. J.; Yavorsky, P. M.

    1977-01-01

    A system for preparing coal slurry and feeding it into a high pressure liquefaction plant is described. The system was developed to provide supporting research and development for the Bureau of Mines coal liquefaction pilot plant. Operating experiences are included.

  13. Low Severity Coal Liquefaction Promoted by Cyclic Olefins

    SciTech Connect

    Christine W. Curtis

    1998-04-09

    The development of the donor solvent technology for coal liquefaction has drawn a good deal of attention over the last three decades. The search for better hydrogen donors led investigators to a class of compounds known as cyclic olefins. Cyclic olefins are analogues of the conventional hydroaromatic donor species but do not contain aromatic rings. The cyclic olefins are highly reactive compounds which readily release their hydrogen at temperatures of 200 C or higher. Considerable effort has been o expended toward understanding the process of hydrogen donation. Most of this work was conducted in bomb reactors, with product analysis being carried out after the reaction was complete. Efforts directed towards fundamental studies of these reactions in situ are rare. The current work employs a high temperature and high pressure infrared cell to monitor in situ the concentrations of reactants and products during hydrogen release from hydrogen donor compounds.

  14. Coal liquefaction process with enhanced process solvent

    DOEpatents

    Givens, Edwin N.; Kang, Dohee

    1984-01-01

    In an improved coal liquefaction process, including a critical solvent deashing stage, high value product recovery is improved and enhanced process-derived solvent is provided by recycling second separator underflow in the critical solvent deashing stage to the coal slurry mix, for inclusion in the process solvent pool.

  15. EXXON donor solvent coal liquefaction process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epperly, W. R.; Swabb, L. E., Jr.; Tauton, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    A solvent coal liquefaction process to produce low-sulfur liquid products from a wide range of coals is described. An integrated program of laboratory and engineering research and development in conjunction with operation of a 250 T/D pilot plant is discussed.

  16. Coal liquefaction process research quarterly report, October-December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Bickel, T.C.; Curlee, R.M.; Granoff, B.; Stohl, F.V.; Thomas, M.G.

    1980-03-01

    This quarterly report summarizes the activities of Sandia's continuing program in coal liquefaction process research. The overall objectives are to: (1) provide a fundamental understanding of the chemistry of coal liquefaction; (2) determine the role of catalysts in coal liquefaction; and (3) determine the mechanism(s) of catalyst deactivation. The program is composed of three major projects: short-contact-time coal liquefaction, mineral effects, and catalyst studies. These projects are interdependent and overlap significantly.

  17. The direct liquefaction proof of concept program

    SciTech Connect

    Comolli, A.G.; Lee, L.K.; Pradhan, V.R.; Stalzer, R.H.

    1995-12-31

    The goal of the Proof of Concept (POC) Program is to develop Direct Coal Liquefaction and associated transitional technologies towards commercial readiness for economically producing premium liquid fuels from coal in an environmentally acceptable manner. The program focuses on developing the two-stage liquefaction (TSL) process by utilizing geographically strategic feedstocks, commercially feasible catalysts, new prototype equipment, and testing co-processing or alternate feedstocks and improved process configurations. Other high priority objectives include dispersed catalyst studies, demonstrating low rank coal liquefaction without solids deposition, improving distillate yields on a unit reactor volume basis, demonstrating ebullated bed operations while obtaining scale-up data, demonstrating optimum catalyst consumption using new concepts (e.g. regeneration, cascading), producing premium products through on-line hydrotreating, demonstrating improved hydrogen utilization for low rank coals using novel heteroatom removal methods, defining and demonstrating two-stage product properties for upgrading; demonstrating efficient and economic solid separation methods, examining the merits of integrated coal cleaning, demonstrating co-processing, studying interactions between the preheater and first and second-stage reactors, improving process operability by testing and incorporating advanced equipment and instrumentation, and demonstrating operation with alternate coal feedstocks. During the past two years major PDU Proof of Concept runs were completed. POC-1 with Illinois No. 6 coal and POC-2 with Black Thunder sub-bituminous coal. Results from these operations are continuing under review and the products are being further refined and upgraded. This paper will update the results from these operations and discuss future plans for the POC program.

  18. Coal liquefaction with subsequent bottoms pyrolysis

    DOEpatents

    Walchuk, George P.

    1978-01-01

    In a coal liquefaction process wherein heavy bottoms produced in a liquefaction zone are upgraded by coking or a similar pyrolysis step, pyrolysis liquids boiling in excess of about 1000.degree. F. are further reacted with molecular hydrogen in a reaction zone external of the liquefaction zone, the resulting effluent is fractionated to produce one or more distillate fractions and a bottoms fraction, a portion of this bottoms fraction is recycled to the reaction zone, and the remaining portion of the bottoms fraction is recycled to the pyrolysis step.

  19. Advanced direct coal liquefaction concepts. Quarterly report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, D.J.; Parker, R.J.; Simpson, P.L.

    1993-12-31

    The bench unit was operated in the two stage configuration during this quarter, and two runs (DOE-008 and DOE-009), which included eight mass balance periods were completed. Addition of potassium carbonate, although the best catalyst for promoting the shift reaction in the first stage, led to severe plugging problems particularly between the first and second stage reactors. Therefore, sodium aluminate, less effective as a shift catalyst, but better for unit operation, was used as an alternate. Ammonium tetrathiomolybdate was used throughout as a second stage catalyst, with and without sodium aluminate as shift catalyst. Overall coal conversions under the conditions studied were approximately 80% wt on MAF coal and C{sub 1}--C{sub 4} gas yields were about 10% wt. Conditions in both stages need to be optimized to improve coal conversion and maximize distillable oil yield. The results so far indicate that increased severity and better carbon monoxide shift conversion are required in the first stage, while maximum pressure ({approximately}2,500 psi) is needed in the second stage. The effects of other catalysts also need to be determined, including the establishment of optimum conditions for operation with those catalysts. Ammonium tetrathiomolybdate was shown to possess no measurable activity as a shift catalyst at the level used (600 ppM on total feed) in either the bench unit or autoclave tests. However, in autoclave tests, the addition of ammonium tetrathiomolybdate did improve asphaltene and preasphaltene conversion to oils (and therefore, product quality) in both one and two stage tests when compared with iron sulfide.

  20. Effect of hydrogen pressure on free radicals in direct coal liquefaction/coprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Seehra, M.S.; Ibrahim, M.M.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this study was to investigate the coprocessing of coal with waste tires and commingled plastics and to characterize the relevant catalysts, using high pressure/high temperature in-situ ESR (Electron Spin Resonance) spectroscopy. The recent results from high pressure ESR spectroscopy are emphasized. During this period, considerable progress was made in developing the high pressure capabilities in in-situ ESR spectroscopy and new results carried out in 1000 psi of H{sub 2}gas are presented. In these experiments, sapphire tubes were used to contain the high pressures at temperatures up to 500{degrees}C. Results of the experiments carried out under 1000 psi of H{sub 2} are compared with those under 1000 psi of non-interacting argon and with the earlier experiments in flowing H{sub 2} gas where the volatiles are removed by the flowing gas. In these experiments, the free radical density N of the Blind Canyon coal was measured at each temperature and pressure by double integration of the ESR signal and calibrating it against a standard. The details of the experimental apparatus and procedures have been described in earlier publications.

  1. Cooperative research program in coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, May 1, 1993--October 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, G.P.

    1994-07-01

    This report summarizes progress in four areas of research under the general heading of Coal Liquefaction. Results of studies concerning the coliquefaction of coal with waste organic polymers or chemical products of these polymers were reported. Secondly, studies of catalytic systems for the production of clean transportation fuels from coal were discussed. Thirdly, investigations of the chemical composition of coals and their dehydrogenated counterparts were presented. These studies were directed toward elucidation of coal liquefaction processes on the chemical level. Finally, analytical methodologies developed for in situ monitoring of coal liquefaction were reported. Techniques utilizing model reactions and methods based on XAFS, ESR, and GC/MS are discussed.

  2. Two-stage, close coupled catalytic liquefaction of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Lee, T.L.K.; Popper, G.A.; Stalzer, R.H.

    1992-04-01

    This quarterly report covers activities of the Two-Stage, Close- Coupled Catalytic Liquefaction of Coal program during the period January 1,--March 31,1992, at Hydrocarbon Research, Inc. in Lawrenceville and Princeton, New Jersey. This DOE contract period is from October 1, 1988 to September 30, 1992. The overall purpose of the program is to achieve higher yields of better quality transportation and turbine fuels and to lower the capital and production costs in order to make the products from direct coal liquefaction competitive with other fossil fuel products. The quarterly report covers work on Laboratory Testing, PDU Activities and Administration.

  3. Fired heater for coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Ying, David H. S.; McDermott, Wayne T.; Givens, Edwin N.

    1985-01-01

    A fired heater for a coal liquefaction process is operated under conditions to maximize the slurry slug frequency and thereby improve the heat transfer efficiency. The operating conditions controlled are (1) the pipe diameter and pipe arrangement, (2) the minimum coal/solvent slurry velocity, (3) the maximum gas superficial velocity, and (4) the range of the volumetric flow velocity ratio of gas to coal/solvent slurry.

  4. Fundamental studies of retrograde reactions in direct liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Serio, M.A.; Solomon, P.R.; Bassilakis, R.; Kroo, E.

    1989-01-01

    Most of the proposed processing schemes for improving liquefaction yields involve favoring bond-breaking and radical stabilization reactions over the retrograde reactions. The retrograde reactions are often encountered before liquefaction temperatures are reached. The objective of this program is to elucidate and model the retrograde reaction chemistry in direct coal liquefaction through the application of experimental techniques and theoretical models which have been successfully employed at Advanced Fuel Research (AFR) and SRI International (a subcontractor) to understand and predict coal reaction behavior. The study of retrograde reactions is being done using an integrated approach using extensive characterization of the liquefaction chemistry of three kinds of systems: (1) model polymers; (2) coal; and (3) modified coals.

  5. Polyethylene degradation in a coal liquefaction environment

    SciTech Connect

    Rothenberger, K.S.; Cugini, A.V.; Thompson, R.L.

    1996-12-31

    The coprocessing of coal with waste materials such as plastic has shown promise as an economical means to recover the inherent value of the wastes while producing useful products. Polyethylene (PE) is one of the dominant plastic materials; recent statistics indicate that low- and high-density PE together make up about half of all municipal plastic waste. The degradation of PE in a pyrolysis environment has been well studied, and pyrolysis-based methods for the conversion of PE to fuels have been published. However, recent studies have shown that PE is among the most difficult plastics to convert in the traditional liquefaction environment, particularly in the presence of coal and/or donor solvents. The coal liquefaction environment is quite different than that encountered during thermal or catalytic pyrolysis. Understanding the degradation behavior of PE in the liquefaction environment is important to development of a successful scheme for coprocessing coal with plastics. In this paper, a novel analytical method has been developed to recover incompletely reacted PE from coprocessing product streams. Once separated from the coal-derived material, gel permeation chromatography, a conventional polymer characterization technique, was applied to the recovered material to ascertain the nature of the changes that occurred to the PE upon processing in a bench-scale continuous liquefaction unit. In a separate phase of the project, 1-L semi-batch reactions were performed to investigate the reactivity of PE and coal-PE mixtures as a function of temperature.

  6. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1995-08-01

    In an effort to develop new disposable catalysts for direct coal liquefaction, several types of clay-supported pyrrhotite catalysts were prepared and tested. These included iron-pillared montmorillonite, mixed iron/alumina-pillared montmorillonite, iron-impregnated montmorillonite, and iron oxometallate-impregnated montmorillonite.

  7. Liquefaction Of Coal With Surfactant And Disposable Catalyst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, Gregory S.; Sharma, Pramod K.

    1996-01-01

    Fuels derived from coal more competitive with petroleum products. Improved coal-liquefaction process exploits synergistic effects of disposable iron oxide catalyst and cheap anionic surfactant. Efficiency of conversion achieved in significantly higher than efficiencies obtained with addition of either surfactant or catalyst alone. No costly pretreatment necessary, and increase in conversion achieved under processing conditions milder than those used heretofore in liquefaction of coal. Quality of distillates obtained after liquefaction in process expected superior to distillates obtained after liquefaction by older techniques.

  8. Catalytic direct liquefaction of high-sulfur coals and their blends with asphaltite in the absence of a solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Omer Gul; Parvana Gafarova; Arif Hesenov; Harold H. Schobert; Oktay Erbatur

    2007-08-15

    Two high-sulfur Turkish coals (Mengen and Kangal) and an asphaltite (Avgamasya) were liquefied with and without the catalyst precursors ammonium heptamolybdate (AHM) and ammonium tetrathiomolybdate (ATTM) at 300, 350, 400, and 450{sup o}C. Blends of these coals with the asphaltite were also liquefied using ATTM. Effective conversions of both coals into oils and into asphaltene and preasphaltene fractions were achieved with both catalyst precursors, although ATTM was more effective than AHM. Maximum conversion for Mengen coal with ATTM (89.2%) was achieved at 400{sup o}C, although the maximum yield of oils (56.9%) was obtained at 450{sup o}C. Kangal, in the presence of ATTM, gave maximum conversion (87.7%) at 400{sup o}C; the corresponding oil yield (49.6%) was not much less than that obtained at 450{sup o}C (49.9%). Some retrogressive reactions toward the formation of aromatics were observed during liquefaction at 450{sup o}C in the presence of AHM or ATTM with both coals. Also, using these catalyst precursors results in effective hydrogenation of two-ring or higher condensed aromatics and effective hydrogenolysis of the alicyclic part of hydroaromatic structures. On the other hand, these catalyst precursors do not provide effective saturation of monoaromatic rings, although the use of ATTM yielded partial reduction of these compounds. The distribution of main product fractions obtained from these reactions and the detailed analysis of oils obtained are reported. 118 refs., 4 figs., 15 tabs.

  9. Impact of hydrodynamics on coal liquefaction. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, D.; Ying, D.H.S.; Givens, E.N.

    1983-09-01

    We have attempted to determine the hydrodynamic effects of various reactor configurations on coal liquefaction, to help select the optimal reactor configuration and to provide additional understanding of coal liquefaction reaction kinetics, which cannot be definitively determined by a CSTR alone. Only a qualitative understanding of the fluid dynamic effects on product yields has been perceived by operating various sizes of open-column tubular reactors, because the fluid-dynamic characteristics of these reactors were not clearly understood and could not be varied significantly. Indirect studies, by cold-flow simulation, have been of little help in defining the fluid dynamic impact on coal liquefaction. Comparison of actual coal liquefaction data from both the plug-flow reactor and the CSTR showed that the plug-flow configuration had various advantages. Reactor yields improved significantly, especially the primary product conversions. At 840/sup 0/F and residence times of 29 and 40 min, coal and preasphaltene conversions were enhanced approximately 6 and 10%, respectively. At these conditions, the plug-flow reactor also yielded about 10% more oils than the CSTR with significant increase in hydrogen utilization. Also, this study provided an opportunity to examine the soundness of APCI/ICRC's sequential kinetic model, by interfacing the plug-flow and CSTR yield data. Transforming CSTR yields to plug-flow data showed that product yields deviated considerably from the measured plug-flow data, suggesting the need to improve the existing reaction model. Having both CSTR and plug-flow reactor data bases is important for developing a sound coal reaction model and for determining hydrodynamic effects on coal liquefaction in a direct way. The results will lead to an optimized reactor configuration as well as optimized operation. 5 references, 23 figures, 20 tables.

  10. Integrated coal cleaning, liquefaction, and gasification process

    DOEpatents

    Chervenak, Michael C.

    1980-01-01

    Coal is finely ground and cleaned so as to preferentially remove denser ash-containing particles along with some coal. The resulting cleaned coal portion having reduced ash content is then fed to a coal hydrogenation system for the production of desirable hydrocarbon gases and liquid products. The remaining ash-enriched coal portion is gasified to produce a synthesis gas, the ash is removed from the gasifier usually as slag, and the synthesis gas is shift converted with steam and purified to produce the high purity hydrogen needed in the coal hydrogenation system. This overall process increases the utilization of as-mined coal, reduces the problems associated with ash in the liquefaction-hydrogenation system, and permits a desirable simplification of a liquids-solids separation step otherwise required in the coal hydrogenation system.

  11. Fired heater for coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Ying, David H. S.

    1984-01-01

    A fired heater for a coal liquefaction process is constructed with a heat transfer tube having U-bends at regular intervals along the length thereof to increase the slug frequency of the multi-phase mixture flowing therethrough to thereby improve the heat transfer efficiency.

  12. Process for coal liquefaction employing selective coal feed

    DOEpatents

    Hoover, David S.; Givens, Edwin N.

    1983-01-01

    An improved coal liquefaction process is provided whereby coal conversion is improved and yields of pentane soluble liquefaction products are increased. In this process, selected feed coal is pulverized and slurried with a process derived solvent, passed through a preheater and one or more dissolvers in the presence of hydrogen-rich gases at elevated temperatures and pressures, following which solids, including mineral ash and unconverted coal macerals, are separated from the condensed reactor effluent. The selected feed coals comprise washed coals having a substantial amount of mineral matter, preferably from about 25-75%, by weight, based upon run-of-mine coal, removed with at least 1.0% by weight of pyritic sulfur remaining and exhibiting vitrinite reflectance of less than about 0.70%.

  13. A Characterization and Evaluation of Coal Liquefaction Process Streams The Kinetics of Coal Liquefaction Distillation Resid Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    D.Campbell; D.G. Nichols; D.J. Pazuchanics; H.Huang; M.T.Klein; R.A. Winschel; S.D. Brandes; S.Wang; W.H. Calkins

    1998-06-04

    Under subcontract from CONSOL Inc. (DOE Contract N o. DE- AC22- 94PC93054), the University of Delaware studied the mechanism and kinetics of coal liquefaction resid conversion. Th e program at Delaware was conducted be tween August 15, 1994, and April 30, 1997. It consisted of two primary tasks. The first task was to develop an empirical test to measure the reactivit y toward hydrocracking of coal- derived distillation resids. The second task was to formulate a computer model to represent the structure of the resids and a kinetic and mechanistic model of resid reactivity based on the structural representations. An Introduction and Summary of th e project authored by CONSOL and a report of the program findings authored by the University of Delaware researchers are presented here. INTRODUCTION Resid hydrocracking is a key reaction of modern (i. e., distillate- producing) coal liquefactio n processes. Coals are readily converted to resid a nd lighter products in the liquefaction process. The resid is combined with fr esh coal in a ratio often greater than 1: 1, and some vacuum gas oil and is recycled to be further converted. Understanding the chemistry of resids and resi d reactivity is important to improve direct liquefaction process design and to achieve economi c objectives for direct coal liquefaction. Computational models that predict resid conversion from the chemical characteristics of the resids and reaction conditions would be a cost- efficient way to explore process variables. Implementation of such models could aid in the design an d operation of liquefaction facilities.

  14. Two-stage coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Skinner, Ronald W.; Tao, John C.; Znaimer, Samuel

    1985-01-01

    An improved SRC-I two-stage coal liquefaction process which improves the product slate is provided. Substantially all of the net yield of 650.degree.-850.degree. F. heavy distillate from the LC-Finer is combined with the SRC process solvent, substantially all of the net 400.degree.-650.degree. F. middle distillate from the SRC section is combined with the hydrocracker solvent in the LC-Finer, and the initial boiling point of the SRC process solvent is increased sufficiently high to produce a net yield of 650.degree.-850.degree. F. heavy distillate of zero for the two-stage liquefaction process.

  15. Optimization of reactor configuration in coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Lee, L.K.; Stalzer, R.M.

    1992-12-01

    This quarterly report covers activities of optimization of Reactor Configuration in Coal Liquefaction during the period July 1--September 30, 1992, at Hydrocarbon Research, Inc. in Lawrenceville and Princeton, New Jersey. This DOE contract period is from October 1, 1991 to September 30, 1993. The overall objective of the program is to achieve a new approach to liquefaction that generates an all distillates product slate at reduced cost of about $25 per barrel of crude oil equivalent. The quarterly report covers work on Laboratory Support, Laboratory Scale Operations, Technical Assessment, and Project Management.

  16. Pillared montmorillonite catalysts for coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, R.K.; Olson, E.S.

    1994-12-31

    Pillared clays contain large micropores and have considerable potential for catalytic hydrogenation and cleavage of coal macromolecules. Pillared montmorillonite-supported catalysts were prepared by the intercalation of polynuclear hydroxychromium cations and subsequent impregnation of nickel and molybdenum. Infrared and thermogravimetric studies of pyridine-adsorbed catalysts indicated the presence of both Lewis and Bronsted acid sites. Thus, the catalysts have both acidic properties that can aid in hydrocracking and cleavage of carbon-heteroatom bonds as well as hydrogen-activating bimetallic sites. These catalysts were applied to the hydrodesulfurization and liquefaction of coal-derived intermediates. The reactions of model organosulfur compounds and coal liquids were carried out at 300{degrees}-400{degrees}C for 3 hours in the presence of 1000 psi of molecular hydrogen. Reaction products were analyzed by GC/FT-IR/MS/AED. The catalysts have been found to be very effective in removing sulfur from model compounds as well as liquefaction products.

  17. Polyethylene degradation in a coal liquefaction environment

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, R.L.; Rothenberger, K.S.; Cugini, A.V.

    1996-12-31

    The coprocessing of coal with waste materials such as plastic has shown promise as an economical means to recover the inherent value of the wastes while producing useful products. Polyethylene (PE) is one of the dominant plastics on the market; recent statistics indicate that low- and high-density PE together make up about half of all municipal plastic waste. However, recent studies have shown that PE is also among the most difficult plastics to convert in the traditional liquefaction environment, particularly in the presence of coal and/or donor solvents. The coal liquefaction environment is quite different than that encountered during thermal or catalytic pyrolysis. In this paper, a novel analytical method has been developed to recover incompletely reacted PE from coprocessing product streams. Once separated from the coal-derived material, gel permeation chromatography (GPC) was applied to the recovered material to ascertain the nature of the changes that occurred to the PE upon processing in a bench-scale continuous liquefaction unit. Also, 1-L semi-batch reactions were performed to investigate the reactivity of PE and coal-PE mixtures as a function of temperature.

  18. Technology for advanced liquefaction processes: Coal/waste coprocessing studies

    SciTech Connect

    Cugini, A.V.; Rothenberger, K.S.; Ciocco, M.V.

    1995-12-31

    The efforts in this project are directed toward three areas: (1) novel catalyst (supported and unsupported) research and development, (2) study and optimization of major operating parameters (specifically pressure), and (3) coal/waste coprocessing. The novel catalyst research and development activity has involved testing supported catalysts, dispersed catalysts, and use of catalyst testing units to investigate the effects of operating parameters (the second area) with both supported and unsupported catalysts. Several supported catalysts were tested in a simulated first stage coal liquefaction application at 404{degrees}C during this performance period. A Ni-Mo hydrous titanate catalyst on an Amocat support prepared by Sandia National laboratories was tested. Other baseline experiments using AO-60 and Amocat, both Ni-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} supported catalysts, were also made. These experiments were short duration (approximately 12 days) and monitored the initial activity of the catalysts. The results of these tests indicate that the Sandia catalyst performed as well as the commercially prepared catalysts. Future tests are planned with other Sandia preparations. The dispersed catalysts tested include sulfated iron oxide, Bayferrox iron oxide (iron oxide from Miles, Inc.), and Bailey iron oxide (micronized iron oxide from Bailey, Inc.). The effects of space velocity, temperature, and solvent-to-coal ratio on coal liquefaction activity with the dispersed catalysts were investigated. A comparison of the coal liquefaction activity of these catalysts relative to iron catalysts tested earlier, including FeOOH-impregnated coal, was made. These studies are discussed.

  19. Effects of coal rank on the chemical composition and toxicological activity of coal liquefaction materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, C.W.; Dauble, D.D.

    1986-05-01

    This report presents data from the chemical analysis and toxicological testing of coal liquefaction materials from the EDS and H-Coal processes operated using different ranks of coal. Samples of recycle solvent from the bottoms recycle mode of the EDS direct coal liquefaction process derived from bituminous, sub-bituminous, and lignite coals were analyzed. In addition, the H-Coal heavy fuel oils derived from bituminous and sub-bituminous coals were analyzed. Chemical methods of analysis included adsoprtion column chromatography, high-resolution gas chromatography, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, and low-voltage probe-inlet mass spectrometry. The toxicological activity of selected samples was evaluated using the standard microbial mutagenicity assay, an initiation/promotion assay for mouse-skin tumorigenicity, and a static bioassy with Daphnia magna for aquatic toxicity of the water-soluble fractions. 22 refs., 16 figs., 14 tabs.

  20. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation:

    SciTech Connect

    Malhotra, R.; McMillen, D.F. ); Burke, F.P.; Winschel, R.A.; Brandes, S.D. . Research and Development Dept.)

    1992-01-01

    SRI International evaluated two analytical methods for application to coal liquefaction. These included field ionization mass spectrometry and a technique employing iodotrimethylsilane for the derivatization of oxygen bound to alkyl carbon (alkyl ethers). The full report authored by the SRI researchers is presented here. The following assessment briefly highlights the major findings of the project, and evaluates the potential of the methods for application to coal-derived materials. These results will be incorporated by Consol into a general overview of the application of novel analytical techniques to coal-derived materials at the conclusion of this contract. (VC)

  1. Free-radical kinetics of coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.; Smith, J.M.; McCoy, B.J.

    1994-07-16

    A rate expression with first- and second-order terms in the concentration of extractable compounds in solid coal particles is derived from a fundamental free-radical mechanism. The expression was suggested empirically by prior experiments for coal liquefaction in the presence of a hydrogen-donor solvent. Radical reactions are considered to occur in both coal and in solvent. The long-chain approximation justifies the neglect of initiation, hydrogen abstraction, and termination rates as quantitatively insignificant relative to propagation reaction rates.

  2. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Quarterly technical progresss report, January 1--March 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.; Robbins, G.A.

    1991-09-01

    Consol R&D is conducting a three-year program to characterize process and product streams from direct coal liquefaction process development projects. The program objectives are two-fold: (1) to obtain and provide appropriate samples of coal liquids for the evaluation of analytical methodology, and (2) to support ongoing DOE-sponsored coal liquefaction process development efforts. The two broad objectives have considerable overlap and together serve to provide a bridge between process development and analytical chemistry.

  3. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1992-03-01

    CONSOL R&D is conducting a three-year program to characterize process and product streams from direct coal liquefaction process development projects. The program objectives are two-fold: (1) to obtain and provide appropriate samples of coal liquids for the evaluation of analytical methodology, and (2) to support ongoing DOE-sponsored coal liquefaction process development efforts. The two broad objectives have considerable overlap and together serve to provide a bridge between process development and analytical chemistry.

  4. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1991-11-01

    Consol R&D is conducting a three-year program to characterize process and product streams from direct coal liquefaction process development projects. The program objectives are two-fold: (1) to obtain and provide appropriate samples of coal liquids for the evaluation of analytical methodology, and (2) to support ongoing DOE-sponsored coal liquefaction process development efforts. The two broad objectives have considerable overlap and together serve to provide a bridge between process development and analytical chemistry.

  5. Prevention of deleterious deposits in a coal liquefaction system

    DOEpatents

    Carr, Norman L.; Prudich, Michael E.; King, Jr., William E.; Moon, William G.

    1984-07-03

    A process for preventing the formation of deleterious coke deposits on the walls of coal liquefaction reactor vessels involves passing hydrogen and a feed slurry comprising feed coal and recycle liquid solvent to a coal liquefaction reaction zone while imparting a critical mixing energy of at least 3500 ergs per cubic centimeter of reaction zone volume per second to the reacting slurry.

  6. Direct liquefaction proof-of-concept facility

    SciTech Connect

    Alfred G. Comolli; Peizheng Zhou; HTI Staff

    2000-01-01

    The main objective of the U.S. DOE, Office of Fossil Energy, is to ensure the US a secure energy supply at an affordable price. An integral part of this program was the demonstration of fully developed coal liquefaction processes that could be implemented if market and supply considerations so required, Demonstration of the technology, even if not commercialized, provides a security factor for the country if it is known that the coal to liquid processes are proven and readily available. Direct liquefaction breaks down and rearranges complex hydrocarbon molecules from coal, adds hydrogen, and cracks the large molecules to those in the fuel range, removes hetero-atoms and gives the liquids characteristics comparable to petroleum derived fuels. The current processes being scaled and demonstrated are based on two reactor stages that increase conversion efficiency and improve quality by providing the flexibility to adjust process conditions to accommodate favorable reactions. The first stage conditions promote hydrogenation and some oxygen, sulfur and nitrogen removal. The second stage hydrocracks and speeds the conversion to liquids while removing the remaining sulfur and nitrogen. A third hydrotreatment stage can be used to upgrade the liquids to clean specification fuels.

  7. A characterization and evaluation of coal liquefaction process streams. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.

    1997-03-01

    The objectives of this project are to support the DOE direct coal liquefaction process development program and to improve the useful application of chemical analyses to direct coal liquefaction process development. Independent analyses by well-established methods are obtained of samples produced in direct coal liquefaction processes under evaluation by DOE. Additionally, new analytical instruments and techniques to examine coal-derived samples are being evaluated. The data obtained form this study are used to guide process development and to develop an improved data base on coal and coal liquids properties. A sample bank, established and maintained for use in this project, is available for use by other researchers. The reactivity of the non-distillable resids toward hydrocracking at liquefaction conditions (i.e., resid reactivity) is being examined. From the literature and experimental data, a kinetic model of resid conversion will be constructed. Such a model will provide insights to improve process performance and the economics of direct coal liquefaction.

  8. Hydrogen donor solvent coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Plumlee, Karl W.

    1978-01-01

    An indigenous hydrocarbon product stream boiling within a range of from about C.sub.1 -700.degree. F., preferably C.sub.1 -400.degree. F., is treated to produce an upgraded hydrocarbon fuel component and a component which can be recycled, with a suitable donor solvent, to a coal liquefaction zone to catalyze the reaction. In accordance therewith, a liquid hydrocarbon fraction with a high end boiling point range up to about 700.degree. F., preferably up to about 400.degree. F., is separated from a coal liquefaction zone effluent, the separated fraction is contacted with an alkaline medium to provide a hydrocarbon phase and an aqueous extract phase, the aqueous phase is neutralized, and contacted with a peroxygen compound to convert indigenous components of the aqueous phase of said hydrocarbon fraction into catalytic components, such that the aqueous stream is suitable for recycle to the coal liquefaction zone. Naturally occurring phenols and alkyl substituted phenols, found in the aqueous phase, are converted, by the addition of hydroxyl constituents to phenols, to dihydroxy benzenes which, as disclosed in copending Application Ser. Nos. 686,813 now U.S. Pat. No. 4,049,536; 686,814 now U.S. Pat. No. 4,049,537; 686,827 now U.S. Pat. No. 4,051,012 and 686,828, K. W. Plumlee et al, filed May 17, 1976, are suitable hydrogen transfer catalysts.

  9. CAMD studies of coal structure and coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Faulon, J.L.; Carlson, G.A.

    1994-10-01

    The macromolecular structure of coal is essential to understand the mechanisms occurring during coal liquefaction. Many attempts to model coal structure can be found in the literature. More specifically for high volatile bituminous coal, the subject of interest the most commonly quoted models are the models of Given, Wiser, Solomon, and Shinn. In past work, the authors`s have used computer-aided molecular design (CAMD) to develop three-dimensional representations for the above coal models. The three-dimensional structures were energy minimized using molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics. True density and micopore volume were evaluated for each model. With the exception of Given`s model, the computed density values were found to be in agreement with the corresponding experimental results. The above coal models were constructed by a trial and error technique consisting of a manual fitting of the-analytical data. It is obvious that for each model the amount of data is small compared to the actual complexity of coal, and for all of the models more than one structure can be built. Hence, the process by which one structure is chosen instead of another is not clear. In fact, all the authors agree that the structure they derived was only intended to represent an {open_quotes}average{close_quotes} coal model rather than a unique correct structure. The purpose of this program is further develop CAMD techniques to increase the understanding of coal structure and its relationship to coal liquefaction.

  10. Coal liquefaction with preasphaltene recycle

    SciTech Connect

    Weimer, R.F.; Miller, R.N.

    1986-09-02

    A process is described for solvent refining coal to yield an asphaltene-rich product stream by forming a slurry of finely divided coal and a process solvent therefor, which process comprises the steps of: (1) contacting the slurry with a hydrogen-rich gas; (2) heating the slurry in the presence of the hydrogen-rich gas. (3) permitting the heated slurry to react and to dissolve at least some of the coal. (4) adding fresh hydrogen as required to form a liquefied coal slurry; (5) passing the liquefied coal slurry to a separator in which a vapor product stream and a condensed product stream are separated; (6) passing the condensed product stream to a vacuum distillation still; (7) removing from the vacuum distillation still a residual bottoms product, wherein the residual bottoms product from the still is mixed with a suitable extractions solvent and is passed to supercritical extraction system to separate an asphaltene-rich stream comprised of pentane solubles and benzene solubles from a preasphaltene-rich stream which includes solids residue material, the preasphaltene-rich stream comprised of benzene insolubles, pyridine solubles, pyridine insolubles and ash; (8) recycling at least a portion of the preasphaltene-rich stream together with the solid residue material as process solvent, with less than 10 percent of the process solvent comprising asphaltenes; (9) withdrawing the asphaltene-rich stream and passing the asphaltene-rich stream to a solvent recovery system to yield an asphaltene-rich product stream and an extraction solvent stream.

  11. Two-stage coal liquefaction without gas-phase hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Stephens, H.P.

    1986-06-05

    A process is provided for the production of a hydrogen-donor solvent useful in the liquefaction of coal, wherein the water-gas shift reaction is used to produce hydrogen while simultaneously hydrogenating a donor solvent. A process for the liquefaction of coal using said solvent is also provided. The process enables avoiding the use of a separate water-gas shift reactor as well as high pressure equipment for liquefaction. 3 tabs.

  12. One-Step Coal Liquefaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qader, S. A.

    1984-01-01

    Steam injection improves yield and quality of product. Single step process for liquefying coal increases liquid yield and reduces hydrogen consumption. Principal difference between this and earlier processes includes injection of steam into reactor. Steam lowers viscosity of liquid product, so further upgrading unnecessary.

  13. Catalysts for coal liquefaction processes

    DOEpatents

    Garg, D.

    1986-10-14

    Improved catalysts for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a hydrogen donor solvent comprise a combination of zinc or copper, or a compound thereof, and a Group VI or non-ferrous Group VIII metal, or a compound thereof.

  14. Catalysts for coal liquefaction processes

    DOEpatents

    Garg, Diwakar

    1986-01-01

    Improved catalysts for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a hydrogen donor solvent comprise a combination of zinc or copper, or a compound thereof, and a Group VI or non-ferrous Group VIII metal, or a compound thereof.

  15. Process for coal liquefaction in staged dissolvers

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, George W.; Givens, Edwin N.; Skinner, Ronald W.

    1983-01-01

    There is described an improved liquefaction process by which coal is converted to a low ash and low sulfur carbonaceous material that can be used as a fuel in an environmentally acceptable manner without costly gas scrubbing equipment. In the process, coal is slurried with a pasting oil, passed through a preheater and at least two dissolvers in series in the presence of hydrogen-rich gases at elevated temperatures and pressures. Solids, including mineral ash and unconverted coal macerals, are separated from the condensed reactor effluent. In accordance with the improved process, the first dissolver is operated at a higher temperature than the second dissolver. This temperature sequence produces improved product selectivity and permits the incorporation of sufficient hydrogen in the solvent for adequate recycle operations.

  16. Coal liquefaction: A research and development needs assessment: Final report, Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Schindler, H.D.; Burke, F.P.; Chao, K.C.; Davis, B.H.; Gorbaty, M.L.; Klier, K.; Kruse, C.W.; Larsen, J.W.; Lumpkin, R.E.; McIlwain, M.E.; Wender, I.; Stewart, N.

    1989-03-01

    The DOE Coal Liquefaction Research Needs (COLIRN) Panel reviewed, developed, and assessed R and D needs for the development of coal liquefaction for the production of transportation fuels. Technical, economics, and environmental considerations were important components of the panel's deliberations. The panel examined in some depth each of the following technologies: direct liquefaction of coal, indirect liquefaction via conversion of coal-derived synthesis gas, pyrolysis, coprocessing of combined coal/oil feedstocks, and bioconversion of coal and coal-derived materials. In this assessment particular attention was given to highlighting the fundamental and applied research which has revealed new and improved liquefaction mechanisms, the potentially promising innovative processes currently emerging, and the technological and engineering improvements necessary for significant cost reductions. As the result of this assessment, the COLIRN panel developed a list of prioritized research recommendations needed to bring coal liquefaction to technical and economic readiness in the next 5--20 years. The findings and the research recommendations generated by the COLIRN panel are summarized in this publication. 107 figs., 63 tabs.

  17. Coal liquefaction laboratory studies. Volume 1. Two-stage variations - bituminous coal

    SciTech Connect

    Bynum, R.; Carver, J.M.; Gir, S.; Paranjape, A.S.; Rhodes, D.E.

    1985-07-01

    Laboratory studies were conducted to provide guidance in the selection of process variable levels for the Liquefaction-section of the continuous coal liquefaction bench-scale unit operated at Kerr-McGee Cimarron Facility. Using the results of batch reactor tests made with Illinois No. 6 coal, an empirical correlation was developed to predict the distillate yield from a thermal-liquefaction at 825/sup 0/F reaction-temperature as a linear function of the reaction-time, recycle resid to MAF coal ratio and the initial hydrogen pressure. Several single-ring and multi-ring organonitrogen compounds were evaluated as liquefaction solvents. Data indicate that basic organonitrogen compounds, saturated or partially saturated, have a more pronounced effect on the conversion results and particularly on toluene-soluble coal conversions, thereby suggesting that the primary driving force for good conversions may be the unshared pair of electrons associated with the nitrogen atom in these compounds. A study of microautoclaves indicated that sufficient mixing of the contents is necessary to obtain good conversions. The THF-soluble coal conversions were studied as a function of the hydrogen donor concentration in the liquid phase. Variations in product work-up procedures could result in significant differences in the observed THF-soluble and/or toluene-soluble results. A direct comparison of data from different sources should be done with caution and should take into consideration the differences between the equipment and product work-up procedures used. 17 figs., 73 tabs.

  18. Coal liquefaction process with increased naphtha yields

    DOEpatents

    Ryan, Daniel F.

    1986-01-01

    An improved process for liquefying solid carbonaceous materials wherein the solid carbonaceous material is slurried with a suitable solvent and then subjected to liquefaction at elevated temperature and pressure to produce a normally gaseous product, a normally liquid product and a normally solid product. The normally liquid product is further separated into a naphtha boiling range product, a solvent boiling range product and a vacuum gas-oil boiling range product. At least a portion of the solvent boiling-range product and the vacuum gas-oil boiling range product are then combined and passed to a hydrotreater where the mixture is hydrotreated at relatively severe hydrotreating conditions and the liquid product from the hydrotreater then passed to a catalytic cracker. In the catalytic cracker, the hydrotreater effluent is converted partially to a naphtha boiling range product and to a solvent boiling range product. The naphtha boiling range product is added to the naphtha boiling range product from coal liquefaction to thereby significantly increase the production of naphtha boiling range materials. At least a portion of the solvent boiling range product, on the other hand, is separately hydrogenated and used as solvent for the liquefaction. Use of this material as at least a portion of the solvent significantly reduces the amount of saturated materials in said solvent.

  19. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: Analysis of coal-derived synthetic crude from HRI CTSL Run CC-15 and HRI Run CMSL-2

    SciTech Connect

    Sturm, G.P. Jr.; Kim, J.; Shay, J.

    1994-01-01

    Under subcontract from CONSOL Inc. (US DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-89PC89883), IIT Research Institute, National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research applied a suite of petroleum inspection tests to two direct coal liquefactions net product oils produced in two direct coal liquefaction processing runs. Two technical reports, authored by NIPER, are presented here. The following assessment briefly describes the two coal liquefaction runs and highlights the major findings of the project. It generally is concluded that the methods used in these studies can help define the value of liquefaction products and the requirements for further processing. The application of these methods adds substantially to our understanding of the coal liquefaction process and the chemistry of coal-derived materials. These results will be incorporated by CONSOL into a general overview of the application of novel analytical techniques to coal-derived materials at the conclusion of this contract.

  20. Liquefaction of calcium-containing subbituminous coals and coals of lower rank

    DOEpatents

    Brunson, Roy J.

    1979-01-01

    An improved process for the treatment of a calcium-containing subbituminous coal and coals of lower rank to form insoluble, thermally stable calcium salts which remain within the solids portions of the residue on liquefaction of the coal, thereby suppressing the formation of scale, made up largely of calcium carbonate which normally forms within the coal liquefaction reactor (i.e., coal liquefaction zone), e.g., on reactor surfaces, lines, auxiliary equipment and the like. An oxide of sulfur, in liquid phase, is contacted with a coal feed sufficient to impregnate the pores of the coal. The impregnated coal, in particulate form, can thereafter be liquefied in a coal liquefaction reactor (reaction zone) at coal liquefaction conditions without significant formation of scale.

  1. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: The preliminary evaluation of the kinetics of coal liquefaction distillation resid conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, M.T.; Calkins, W.H.; Huang, He

    1994-02-01

    This study evaluated the use of a novel laboratory-scale batch reactor, designed by the University of Delaware, to study the kinetics of coal liquefaction resid reactivity. The short time batch reactor (STBR) is capable of conducting reactions at temperatures up to 450{degrees}C and pressures up to 2500 psi at well-defined reaction times from a few seconds to 30 min or longer. Sixty experiments were conducted with the STBR in this project. The products of the resid/tetralin/hydrogen reaction were separated by solubility, and several analytical procedures were used to evaluate the reaction products, including thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Changes were monitored in the boiling ranges of the products, as a function of process conditions (time, temperature, and tetralin donor solvent-to-resid ratio), with and without catalysts. Two distillation resid samples were studied; Sample 1 is the resid of the second stage product stream from Wilsonville Run 259 which used Pittsburgh seam coal (Ireland mine) bituminous coal, and Sample 2 is the resid of the same streak from Wilsonville Run 260 which used Wyodak and Anderson (Black Thunder Mine) subbituminous coal. It was determined that the resid reactivity was different for the two samples studied. The results demonstrate that further development of this experimental method is warranted to empirically assess resid reactivity and to provide data for use in the construction of an empirical model of coal conversion in the direct liquefaction process.

  2. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Volume 1, Base program activities

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1994-05-01

    This 4.5-year project consisted of routine analytical support to DOE`s direct liquefaction process development effort (the Base Program), and an extensive effort to develop, demonstrate, and apply new analytical methods for the characterization of liquefaction process streams (the Participants Program). The objective of the Base Program was to support the on-going DOE direct coal liquefaction process development program. Feed, process, and product samples were used to assess process operations, product quality, and the effects of process variables, and to direct future testing. The primary objective of the Participants Program was to identify and demonstrate analytical methods for use in support of liquefaction process development, and in so doing, provide a bridge between process design, and development, and operation and analytical chemistry. To achieve this objective, novel analytical methods were evaluated for application to direct coal liquefaction-derived materials. CONSOL teamed with 24 research groups in the program. Well-defined and characterized samples of coal liquefaction process-derived materials were provided to each group. CONSOL made an evaluation of each analytical technique. During the performance of this project, we obtained analyses on samples from numerous process development and research programs and we evaluated a variety of analytical techniques for their usefulness in supporting liquefaction process development. Because of the diverse nature of this program, we provide here an annotated bibliography of the technical reports, publications, and formal presentations that resulted from this program to serve as a comprehensive summary of contract activities.

  3. Solvent recyclability in a multistep direct liquefaction process

    SciTech Connect

    Hetland, M.D.; Rindt, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    Direct liquefaction research at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has, for a number of years, concentrated on developing a direct liquefaction process specifically for low-rank coals (LRCs) through the use of hydrogen-donating solvents and solvents similar to coal-derived liquids, the water/gas shift reaction, and lower-severity reaction conditions. The underlying assumption of all of the research was that advantage could be taken of the reactivity and specific qualities of LRCs to produce a tetrahydrofuran (THF)-soluble material that might be easier to upgrade than the soluble residuum produced during direct liquefaction of high-rank coals. A multistep approach was taken to produce the THF-soluble material, consisting of (1) preconversion treatment to prepare the coal for solubilization, (2) solubilization of the coal in the solvent, and (3) polishing to complete solubilization of the remaining material. The product of these three steps can then be upgraded during a traditional hydrotreatment step. The results of the EERC`s research indicated that additional studies to develop this process more fully were justified. Two areas were targeted for further research: (1) determination of the recyclability of the solvent used during solubilization and (2) determination of the minimum severity required for hydrotreatment of the liquid product. The current project was funded to investigate these two areas.

  4. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1992-11-01

    This is the twelfth Quarterly Technical Progress Report under DOE Contract DE-AC22-89PC89883. Major topics reported are: Summaries of the final reports produced by Lehigh University, West Virginia University, and Vander Sande Associates under the Participants Program are presented. Analytical data produced by CONSOL are provided in Appendix I for all samples employed in the Participants Program and issued with the samples to research groups in the Participants Program. A paper was presented at the 1992 US Department of Energy Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center Liquefaction Contractors' Review Conference, held in Pittsburgh September 23--24, 1992, entitled The Chemical Nature of Coal Liquid Resids and the Implications for Process Development''. It appears as Appendix 2 in this report.

  5. Direct liquefaction proof-of-concept program. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Comolli, A.G.; Lee, L.K.; Pradhan, V.R.

    1996-12-01

    This report presents the results of work conducted under the DOE Proof-of-Concept Program in direct coal liquefaction at Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. in Lawrenceville, New Jersey, from February 1994 through April 1995. The work includes modifications to HRI`s existing 3 ton per day Process Development Unit (PDU) and completion of the second PDU run (POC Run 2) under the Program. The 45-day POC Run 2 demonstrated scale up of the Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL Process) for a subbituminous Wyoming Black Thunder Mine coal to produce distillate liquid products at a rate of up to 4 barrels per ton of moisture-ash-free coal. The combined processing of organic hydrocarbon wastes, such as waste plastics and used tire rubber, with coal was also successfully demonstrated during the last nine days of operations of Run POC-02. Prior to the first PDU run (POC-01) in this program, a major effort was made to modify the PDU to improve reliability and to provide the flexibility to operate in several alternative modes. The Kerr McGee Rose-SR{sup SM} unit from Wilsonville, Alabama, was redesigned and installed next to the U.S. Filter installation to allow a comparison of the two solids removal systems. The 45-day CTSL Wyoming Black Thunder Mine coal demonstration run achieved several milestones in the effort to further reduce the cost of liquid fuels from coal. The primary objective of PDU Run POC-02 was to scale-up the CTSL extinction recycle process for subbituminous coal to produce a total distillate product using an in-line fixed-bed hydrotreater. Of major concern was whether calcium-carbon deposits would occur in the system as has happened in other low rank coal conversion processes. An additional objective of major importance was to study the co-liquefaction of plastics with coal and waste tire rubber with coal.

  6. Highly dispersed catalysts for coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschon, A.S.; Wilson, R.B. Jr.

    1992-06-08

    Iron and molybdenum complexes were studied as precursors to high dispersion catalysts for coal liquefaction. The precursors were either organometallic complexes or water soluble salts and were impregnated into coals of various ranks. The molybdenum catalysts were found to be very effective for conversion of an Illinois {number sign}6 bituminous coal whereas the iron catalysts were not. In contrast, the iron catalysts were found to be very effective for lignite conversions. A H-donor and a non-donor conversion system were compared, using tetralin and n-hexadecane, respectively. In each case the organometallic precursor gave greater yields of toluene soluble material, with differences being most dramatic in the hexadecane system. The yields using the organometallic molybdenum precursors in hexadecane were found to be almost as great as those in the tetralin system, indicating that good catalyst precursors do not require donor solvents. The impregnation techniques were evaluated by comparing conversion yields and analyzing the products using Field Ionization Mass Spectroscopy (f.i.m.s) and FT-IR.

  7. Coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, July-September 1979

    SciTech Connect

    1980-07-01

    The status of coal liquefaction pilot plants supported by US DOE is reviewed under the following headings: company involved, location, contract, funding, process name, process description, flowsheet, history and progress during the July-September 1979 quarter. Supporting projects such as test facilities, refining and upgrading coal liquids, catalyst development, and gasification of residues from coal gasification plants are discussed similarly. (LTN)

  8. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: FT-IR methods for characterization of coal liquefaction products

    SciTech Connect

    Serio, M.A.; Teng, H.; Bassilakis, R.; Solomon, P.R.

    1992-04-01

    This study was designed to demonstrate the use of two FTIR techniques for the analysis of direct coal liquefaction process-derived materials. The two methods were quantitative FTIR analysis and themogravimetric (TG) analysis with FTIR analysis of evolved products (TG-FTIR). The quantitative FTIR analyses of both whole resids and THF-soluble resids provided quantitation of total hydrogen, aliphatic and aromatic hydrogen, total carbon, total oxygen, hydroxyl and etheric oxygen, and ash contents. The FTIR results were usually in agreement with values derived by other, more conventional methods. However, the accuracies of specific measurements, in comparisons with results from conventional methods, ranged from good to poor. The TG-FTIR method provided approximate analyses of coals and resids. The data provided included the time dependent evolution profiles of the volatile species and the elemental composition of the char. Reproducible data of gaseous species and pyrolysis tar yields for whole resid samples larger than 10 mg were obtainable. The yields and evolution profiles of certain volatiles (tar, CO, and methane) provided structural information on the samples. There were some experimental and interpretational difficulties associated with both techniques. Optimization of the curve-resolving routine for coal-liquefaction samples would improve the quantitative FTIR accuracy. Aerosol formation limited the full application of the TG-FTIR technique with the THF-soluble resid samples. At this time, further development of these analytical methods as process development tools will be required before their use for that purpose can be recommended. The use of FTIR as an on-line analytical technique for coal liquefaction process streams requires demonstration before it can be recommended; however, such a demonstration may be warranted.

  9. Microbial recovery of metals from spent coal liquefaction catalysts. Quarterly report, January 1994--March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Sandbeck, K.A.; Cleveland, D.H.

    1994-07-01

    Mo release from spent coal liquefaction catalysts has been shown to be dependent upon many parameters, but release is dominated by microbial growth. The microbial Mo release is a rapid process requiring less than one week for 90% of the releaseable Mo to be solubilized from whole washed (THF) catalyst. It could be expected that the rates would be even greater with crushed catalyst. Efforts are now centering on optimizing the parameters that stimulate microbial growth and action.

  10. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: Electron microscopy observations of resids obtained from coal liquefaction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Vander Sande, J.B.

    1992-11-01

    The study demonstrated the feasibility of using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) spectroscopy accompanied by energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy for the examination of the (THF)-insoluble portion of distillation resid materials derived from direct coal liquefaction. The technique was able to determine the distribution, morphology and elemental composition of dispersed catalyst components in the insoluble portion of the distillation resids. An attempt was made to use transmission electron microscopy (TEM) on these samples; however, detailed compositional information could not be obtained. Further development of STEM and EDX as aids to process development are justified based on these results.

  11. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: [sup 13]C-NMR analysis of CONSOL THF-soluble residual materials from the Wilsonville coal liquefaction process

    SciTech Connect

    Solum, M.S.; Pugmire, R.J. )

    1992-11-01

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of using CP/MAS [sup 13]C-NMR spectroscopy for the chemical structural examination of distillation resid materials derived from direct coal liquefaction. A set of twelve carbon skeletal-structure parameters and eight molecular structural descriptors were derived from the NMR data. The technique was used previously to determine these parameters for coal and char, and in the construction of a coal pyrolysis model. The method was applied successfully to the tetrahydrofuran (THF)-soluble portion of eleven 850[degrees]F[sup +] distillation resids and one 850[degrees]F[sup +] distillation resid which contained ash and insoluble organic material (IOM). The results of this study demonstrate that this analytical method can provide data for construction of a model of direct coal liquefaction. Its further development and use is justified based on these results.

  12. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: {sup 13}C-NMR analysis of CONSOL THF-soluble residual materials from the Wilsonville coal liquefaction process

    SciTech Connect

    Solum, M.S.; Pugmire, R.J.

    1992-11-01

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of using CP/MAS {sup 13}C-NMR spectroscopy for the chemical structural examination of distillation resid materials derived from direct coal liquefaction. A set of twelve carbon skeletal-structure parameters and eight molecular structural descriptors were derived from the NMR data. The technique was used previously to determine these parameters for coal and char, and in the construction of a coal pyrolysis model. The method was applied successfully to the tetrahydrofuran (THF)-soluble portion of eleven 850{degrees}F{sup +} distillation resids and one 850{degrees}F{sup +} distillation resid which contained ash and insoluble organic material (IOM). The results of this study demonstrate that this analytical method can provide data for construction of a model of direct coal liquefaction. Its further development and use is justified based on these results.

  13. Changes in organic sulfur compounds in coal macerals during liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Winans, R.E.; Joseph, J.T.; Fisher, R.B.

    1994-12-31

    Environmentally sound use of coal for energy production involves effective sulfur removal from the feed coal and/or coal-derived products. Physical cleaning of coal is effective in removing substantial quantities of inorganic sulfur compounds such a pyrite. However, removal of organic sulfur by physical means has not been extremely successful. It is likely that only chemical methods will be useful in substantial removal of organic sulfur. A thorough knowledge of the chemistry of organic sulfur in coal will be valuable in attempts to remove organic sulfur from coal or its liquefaction or pyrolysis products by chemical methods. Since different coal macerals have different liquefaction reactivities, the analysis of sulfur functionalities on separated macerals is deemed to be more meaningful than studying the whole coal. Liquefaction behavior and organic sulfur speciation of the macerals separated from Lewiston-Stockton coal (Argonne Premium Coal Sample bank, APCS-7) by XPS, XANES, and HRMS has been previously described. This paper describes the preliminary speciation of sulfur compounds in the asphaltene fraction of the liquefaction products from these macerals.

  14. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Brandes, S.D.; Lancet, M.S.; Robbins, G.A.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1992-11-01

    This is the eleventh Quarterly Technical Progress Report under DOE Contract DE-AC22-89PC89883. Major topics reported are: (1) The results of a study designed to determine the effects of the conditions employed at the Wilsonville slurry preheater vessel on coal conversion is described. (2) Stable carbon isotope ratios were determined and used to source the carbon of three product samples from Period 49 of UOP bench-scale coprocessing Run 37. The results from this coprocessing run agree with the general trends observed in other coprocessing runs that we have studied. (3) Microautoclave tests and chemical analyses were performed to calibrate'' the reactivity of the standard coal used for determining donor solvent quality of process oils in this contract. (4) Several aspects of Wilsonville Close-Coupled Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction (CC-ITSL) resid conversion kinetics were investigated; results are presented. Error limits associated with calculations of deactivation rate constants previously reported for Runs 258 and 261 are revised and discussed. A new procedure is described that relates the conversions of 850[degrees]F[sup +] , 1050[degrees]F[sup +], and 850 [times] 1050[degrees]F material. Resid conversions and kinetic constants previously reported for Run 260 were incorrect; corrected data and discussion are found in Appendix I of this report.

  15. Corrosion coupon studies at coal liquefaction pilot plants

    SciTech Connect

    Keiser, J.R.; Baylor, V.B.; Howell, M.; Newsome, J.F.

    1983-09-01

    As part of the Fossil Energy Materials Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, we have supplied corrosion coupons to coal-liquefaction pilot plants for exposure in selected vessels. These vessels were chosen on the basis of previous corrosion experience, anticipated corrosion behavior (especially important when operating conditions were changed), accessibility, and availability. Alloys exposed were selected to give a series with a corrosion resistance ranging from less than to greater than that thought to be needed for each application. Corrosion rates calculated from weight changes of the exposed coupons provide information useful in selecting materials for coal-liquefaction plants. The results presented are from coupons exposed in the Wilsonville, Alabama, and Fort Lewis, Washington, Solvent Refined Coal pilot plants; the Catlettsburg, Kentucky, H-Coal Pilot Plant; and the Baytown, Texas, Exxon Coal Liquefaction Pilot Plant.

  16. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT DATA BASE FOR COAL LIQUEFACTION TECHNOLOGY: VOLUME I. SYSTEMS FOR 14 LIQUEFACTION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The two-volume report, prepared as part of an overall environmental assessment (EA) program for the technology involved in the conversion of coal to clean liquid fuels, and the Standards of Practice Manual for the Solvent Refined Coal Liquefaction Process (EPA-600/7-78-091) repre...

  17. Advanced concepts in coal liquefaction: Optimization of reactor configuration in coal liquefaction. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pradhan, V.R.; Comolli, A.G.; Lee, L.K.

    1994-11-01

    The overall objective of this Project was to find the ways to effectively reduce the cost of coal liquids to about dollar 25 per barrel of crude oil equivalent. The work described herein is primarily concerned with the testing at the laboratory scale of three reactor configuration concepts, namely (1) a fixed-bed plug-flow reactor as a ``finishing reactor`` in coal liquefaction, (2) three-stage well-mixed reactors in series, and (3) interstage stream concentration/product separation. The three reactor configurations listed above were tested during this project using a 20 cc tubing microreactor, a fixed-bed plug flow reactor, and a two-stage modified Robinson-Mahoney reactor system. The reactor schemes were first evaluated based on theoretical modelling studies, then experimentally evaluated at the microautoclave level and laboratory scale continuous operations. The fixed-bed ``finishing reactor`` concept was evaluated in both the upflow and the downflow modes of operation using a partially converted coal-solvent slurry as feed. For most of the testing of concepts at the microautoclave level, simulated coal, recycle oil, and slurry feedstocks were either specially prepared (to represent a specific state of coal/resid conversion) and/or obtained from HRI`s other ongoing bench-scale and PDU scale coal liquefaction experiments. The three-stage continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR) and interstage product stream separation/concentration concepts were tested using a simulated three-stage CSTR system by employing a laboratory-scale ebullated-bed system and a modified version of the HRI`s existing Robinson-Mahoney fixed catalyst basket reactor system. This testing was conducted as a fourteen day long continuous run, divided into four Conditions to allow for a comparison of the new three-stage CSTR and interstage product concentration concepts with a two-stage CSTR baseline configuration.

  18. Liquefaction of calcium-containing subbituminous coals and coals of lower rank

    DOEpatents

    Gorbaty, Martin L.; Taunton, John W.

    1980-01-01

    A process for the treatment of a calcium-containing subbituminous coal and coals of lower rank to form insoluble, thermally stable calcium salts which remain within the solids portions of the residue on liquefaction of the coal, thereby suppressing the formation scale, made up largely of calcium carbonate deposits, e.g., vaterite, which normally forms within the coal liquefaction reactor (i.e., coal liquefaction zone), e.g., on reactor surfaces, lines, auxiliary equipment and the like. A solution of a compound or salt characterized by the formula MX, where M is a Group IA metal of the Periodic Table of the Elements, and X is an anion which is capable of forming water-insoluble, thermally stable calcium compounds, is maintained in contact with a particulate coal feed sufficient to impregnate said salt or compound into the pores of the coal. On separation of the impregnated particulate coal from the solution, the coal can be liquefied in a coal liquefaction reactor (reaction zone) at coal liquefaction conditions without significant formation of vaterite or other forms of calcium carbonate on reactor surfaces, auxiliary equipment and the like; and the Group IA metal which remains within the liquefaction bottoms catalyzes the reaction when the liquefaction bottoms are subjected to a gasification reaction.

  19. Activity and selectivity of molybdenum catalysts in coal liquefaction reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.; Pellegrino, J.L. )

    1988-06-01

    During coal liquefaction, coal fragments forming a liquid product with reduced heteroatom content. Coal can be considered to be a large network of polynuclear aromatic species connected by heteroatoms and alkyl bridging structures. Predominant heteroatoms contained in coal are sulfur, oxygen, and nitrogen. Predominant alkyl bridges are methylene and ethylene structures. The purpose of this work is to evaluate how effectively three different molybdenum catalysts promote reactions involving heteroatom removal and cleavage of alkyl bridge structures. The reactions studied include: hydrogenation (HYD), hydrodeoxygenation (HDO), hydrosulfurization (HDS), hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) and hydrocracking (HYC). Both model and coal liquefaction reactions were performed to test the activity and selectivity of three different molybdenum catalysts. The three catalysts used were molybdenum napththenate, molybdenum supported on gamma alumina (Mo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/) and precipitated, poorly crystalline molybdenum disulfide (MoS/sub 2/). The model compounds, chosen to mimic coal structure, on which the effectiveness of the catalysts for the model reactions was tested were: 1-methylnaphthalene, representing aromatic hydrocarbons, for hydrogenation; 1-naphthol, representing oxygen containing compounds, for deoxygenation; benzothiophene, representing sulfur containing compounds, for desulfurization; indole, representing nitrogen containing compounds, for denitrogenation; and bibenzyl, representing alkyl bridging structures, for hydrocracking. Catalytic reactions of combinations of reactants were performed to simulate a complex coal matrix. Thermal and catalytic coal liquefaction reactions were performed using Illinois No. 6 coal with anthracene as a solvent. The efficacy of the catalysts was determined by comparing the product and compound class fractions obtained from the liquefaction reactions.

  20. Enhanced coal liquefaction by pyrolysis in supercritical fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Paulaitis, M.E.; Klein, M.T.; Sandler, S.I.

    1990-11-19

    A fundamental investigation of a novel coal liquefaction process was undertaken which combines pyrolysis and supercritical-fluid solvent extraction. The experimental work consisted of determining: (1) coal pyrolysis reaction pathways, kinetics and mechanisms; (2) equilibrium solubilities of coal-related compounds in supercritical water. Experiments involving model coal compounds (tetralin and 1-methylnaphthalene, phenethyl phenyl ether, 1,3-diphenylpropane, benzyl phenyl ether, benzylamine). 8 refs., 6 figs., 9 tabs.

  1. Geological occurrence response to trace elemental migration in coal liquefaction based on SPSS: take no. 11 coalbed in Antaibao mine for example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Xiaohong; Qin, Yong; Yang, Weifeng

    2013-03-01

    Coal liquefaction is an adoptable method to transfer the solid fossil energy into liquid oil in large scale, but the dirty material in which will migrate to different step of liquefaction. The migration rule of some trace elements is response to the react activity of macerals in coal and the geological occurrence of the element nature of itself. In this paper, from the SPSS data correlation analysis and hierarchical clustering dendrogram about the trace elements with macerals respond to coal liquefaction yield, it shows the trace elements in No.11 Antaibao coal seam originated from some of lithophile and sulphophle elements. Correlation coefficient between liquefaction yield of three organic macerals and migration of the elements in liquefaction residue indicated that the lithophile are easy to transfer to residue, while sulphophle are apt to in the liquid products. The activated macerals are response to sulphophle trace elements. The conclusion is useful to the coal blending and environmental effects on coal direct liquefaction.

  2. Progress in donor assisted coal liquefaction: Hydroaromatic compound formation

    SciTech Connect

    Kottenstette, R.J.; Stephens, H.P.

    1993-12-31

    The role of hydrogen donor compounds in coal liquefaction has been extensively investigated since the mid 1960`s using model compounds and process derived hydrogen donor solvents. Our recent research and that of other investigators have shown that two model compounds in particular have great efficacy in solvating low rank coals. 1,2,3,10b tetrahydrofluoranthene (H{sub 4}Fl) and 1,2,3,6,7,8 hexahydropyrene (H{sub 6}Py) have been used to dissolve Wyodak coal to > 95% soluble material as measured by tetrahydrofuran (THF). Although these hydrogen donors are very effective, they may not be found in any significant concentrations in actual liquefaction process recycle solvents. Therefore, studies with process derived recycle materials are necessary to understand donor solvent chemistry. The objective of this paper is to present results of solvent hydrogenation experiments using heavy distillate solvents produced during testing at the Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Test Facility. We evaluated the impact of hydrogenation conditions upon hydrogen donor formation in process derived distillates and compared these process derived solvents with the highly effective H{sub 4}Fl and H{sub 6}Py donors in coal liquefaction tests. This paper presents data on reaction conditions used for distillate hydrotreating and subsequent coal liquefaction, with an aim toward understanding the relationship between reaction conditions and donor solvent quality in recycle distillates.

  3. Exploratory Research on Novel Coal Liquefaction Concept - Task 2: Evaluation of Process Steps.

    SciTech Connect

    Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.

    1997-05-01

    A novel direct coal liquefaction technology is being investigated in a program being conducted by CONSOL Inc. with the University of Kentucky, Center for Applied Energy Research and LDP Associates under DOE Contract DE-AC22-95PC95050. The novel concept consists of a new approach to coal liquefaction chemistry which avoids some of the inherent limitations of current high-temperature thermal liquefaction processes. The chemistry employed is based on hydride ion donation to solubilize coal at temperatures (350-400{degrees}C) significantly lower than those typically used in conventional coal liquefaction. The process concept being explored consists of two reaction stages. In the first stage, the coal is solubilized by hydride ion donation. In the second, the products are catalytically upgraded to acceptable refinery feedstocks. The program explores not only the initial solubilization step, but integration of the subsequent processing steps, including an interstage solids-separation step, to produce distillate products. A unique feature of the process concept is that many of the individual reaction steps can be decoupled, because little recycle around the liquefaction system is expected. This allows for considerable latitude in the process design. Furthermore, this has allowed for each key element in the process to be explored independently in laboratory work conducted under Task 2 of the program.

  4. Fundamental studies of retrograde reactions in direct liquefaction. Topical report, September 30, 1988--September 30, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Serio, M.A.; Solomon, P.R.; Bassilakis, R.; Kroo, E.

    1989-12-31

    Most of the proposed processing schemes for improving liquefaction yields involve favoring bond-breaking and radical stabilization reactions over the retrograde reactions. The retrograde reactions are often encountered before liquefaction temperatures are reached. The objective of this program is to elucidate and model the retrograde reaction chemistry in direct coal liquefaction through the application of experimental techniques and theoretical models which have been successfully employed at Advanced Fuel Research (AFR) and SRI International (a subcontractor) to understand and predict coal reaction behavior. The study of retrograde reactions is being done using an integrated approach using extensive characterization of the liquefaction chemistry of three kinds of systems: (1) model polymers; (2) coal; and (3) modified coals.

  5. New catalysts for coal liquefaction and new nanocrystalline catalysts synthesis methods

    SciTech Connect

    Linehan, J.C.; Matson, D.W.; Darab, J.G.

    1994-09-01

    The use of coal as a source of transportation fuel is currently economically unfavorable due to an abundant world petroleum supply and the relatively high cost of coal liquefaction. Consequently, a reduction in the cost of coal liquefaction, for example by using less and/or less costly catalysts or lower liquefaction temperatures, must be accomplished if coal is to play an significant role as a source of liquid feedstock for the petrochemical industry. The authors and others have investigated the applicability of using inexpensive iron-based catalysts in place of more costly and environmentally hazardous metal catalysts for direct coal liquefaction. Iron-based catalysts can be effective in liquefying coal and in promoting carbon-carbon bond cleavage in model compounds. The authors have been involved in an ongoing effort to develop and optimize iron-based powders for use in coal liquefaction and related petrochemical applications. Research efforts in this area have been directed at three general areas. The authors have explored ways to optimize the effectiveness of catalyst precursor species through use of nanocrystalline materials and/or finely divided powders. In this effort, the authors have developed two new nanophase material production techniques, Modified Reverse Micelle (MRM) and the Rapid Thermal Decomposition of precursors in Solution (RTDS). A second effort has been aimed at optimizing the effectiveness of catalysts by variations in other factors. To this, the authors have investigated the effect that the crystalline phase has on the capacity of iron-based oxide and oxyhydroxide powders to be effectively converted to an active catalyst phase under liquefaction conditions. And finally, the authors have developed methods to produce active catalyst precursor powders in quantities sufficient for pilot-scale testing. Major results in these three areas are summarized.

  6. Novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for temperature-programmed coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Chunshan; Schobert, H.H.

    1993-02-01

    Development of new catalysts is a promising approach to more efficient coal liquefaction. It has been recognized that catalysts are superior to supported catalysts for primary liquefaction of coals, because the control of initial coal dissolution or depolymerization requires intimate contact between the catalyst and coal. This research is a fundamental and exploratory study on catalytic coal liquefaction, with the emphasis on the development of novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for temperature-programmed liquefaction. The ultimate goal of the present research is to develop novel catalytic hydroliquefaction process using highly active dispersed catalysts. The primary objective of this research is to develop novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts from organometallic molecular that can be used in low precursors concentrations (< 1 %) but exhibit high activity for efficient hydroliquefaction of coals under temperature-programmed conditions. The major technical approaches are, first, to prepare the desired heteronuclear organometallic molecules as catalyst precursors that contain covalently bound, two different metal atoms and sulfur in a single molecule. Such precursors will generate finely dispersed bimetallic catalysts such as Fe-Mo, Co-Mo and Ni-Mo binary sulfides upon thermal decomposition. The second major technical approach is to perform the liquefaction of coals unpregnated with the organometallic precursors under temperature-programmed conditions, where the programmed heat-up serves as a step for both catalyst activation and coal pretreatment or preconversion. Two to three different complexes for each of the Fe-Mo, Co-Mo, and Ni-Mo combinations will be prepared. Initial catalyst screening tests will be conducted using a subbituminous coal and a bituminous coal. Effects of coal rank and solvents will be examined with the selected bimetallic catalysts which showed much higher activity than the dispersed catalysts from conventional precursors.

  7. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Volume 2, Participants program final summary evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Brandes, S.D.; Robbins, G.A.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1994-05-01

    This 4.5-year project consisted of routine analytical support to DOE`s direct liquefaction process development effort (the Base Program), and an extensive effort to develop, demonstate, and apply new analytical methods for the characterization of liquefaction process streams (the Participants Program). The objective of the Base Program was to support the on-going DOE direct coal liquefaction process development program. Feed, process, and product samples were used to assess process operations, product quality, and the effects of process variables, and to direct future testing. The primary objective of the Participants Program was to identify and demonstrate analytical methods for use in support of liquefaction process develpment, and in so doing, provide a bridge between process design, development, and operation and analytical chemistry. To achieve this direct coal liquefaction-derived materials. CONSOL made an evaluation of each analytical technique. During the performance of this project, we obtained analyses on samples from numerous process development and research programs and we evaluated a variety of analytical techniques for their usefulness in supporting liquefaction process development. Because of the diverse nature of this program, we provide here an annotated bibliography of the technical reports, publications, and formal presentations that resulted from this program to serve as a comprehensive summary of contract activities.

  8. Characteristics and Thermal Behaviour of Low Rank Malaysian Coals towards Liquefaction Performance via Thermogravimetric Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishak, M. A. M.; Ismail, K.; Nawawi, W. I.; Jawad, A. H.; Abdullah, M. F.; Kasim, M. N.; Ani, A. Y.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, thermal behaviour of two low-rank Malaysian coals namely Mukah Balingian (MB) and Batu Arang (BA) were obtained under pyrolysis conditions via Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) at a heating rate of 20°C min-1. The thermal characteristics of the coals were investigated prior to direct liquefaction in order to determine the liquefaction performance, i.e. coal conversion and oil yield. The differential weight loss (DTG) results for both coals showed that there are three main stages evolved which consists of moisture, volatile matter and heavier hydrocarbons that correspond to temperature range of 150, 200-500 and 550-800°C, respectively. Apparently, the DTG curves of BA coal reveals a similar pattern of thermal evolution profile in comparison to that of the MB coal. However, the calculated mean reactivity of BA coal is higher than that of MB, which implied that BA would probably enhance coal conversion and oil yield in comparison to MB coal. Interestingly, results showed that under the same liquefaction conditions (i.e. at 4MPa pressure and 420°C), conversion and oil yield of both coals were well correlated with their reactivity and petrofactor value obtained.

  9. Environmental studies of materials from the H-coal liquefaction process development unit

    SciTech Connect

    Cada, G.F.

    1982-12-01

    H-coal is a process for the direct liquefaction of coal to produce synthetic fuels. Its development has progressed from bench-scale testing through operation of a 2.7 Mg/d (3 ton/d) Process Development Unit. A large-scale H-Coal pilot plant is presently operating at Catlettsburg, Kentucky, and there are plans for the construction of a commercial H-Coal liquefaction facility by the end of the decade. Two of the environmental concerns of the developing direct coal liquefaction industry are accidental spills of synthetic oils and treatment/storage of solid wastes. As a means of obtaining preliminary information on the severity of these potential impacts well in advance of commercialization, samples of product oils and solid wastes were obtained from the H-Coal Process Development Unit (PDU). These samples were subjected to a battery of rapid screening tests, including chemical characterization and bioassays with a variety of aquatic and terrestrial organisms. Water-soluble fraction (WSFs) of H-Coal PDU oils had considerably higher concentrations of phenols and anilines and were commonly one to two orders of magnitude more toxic to aquatic organisms than WSFs of analogous petroleum crude oil. Whole H-Coal PDU oils were also more toxic to the cricket than petroleum-based oils, and some H-Coal samples showed evidence of teratogenicity. Leachates from H-Coal PDU solid wastes, on the other hand, had relatively low concentrations of selected elements and had essentially no acute toxicity to a variety of aquatic and terrestrial species. These studies indicate that environmental effects of product oil spills from a commercial H-Coal liquefaction plant are likely to be more severe than those of conventional petroleum spills. Product upgrading or special transportation and storage techniques may be needed to ensure environmentally sound commercialization of the H-Coal process.

  10. Exploratory research on novel coal liquefaction concept. [Quarterly report], May 24--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, F.P.; Winschel, R.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Derbyshire, F.J.; Kimber, G.; Anderson, R.K.; Carter, S.D.; Peluso, M.

    1995-11-08

    CONSOL Inc., the University of Kentucky/Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), and LDP Associates are conducting a three-year research program to explore the technical and economic feasibility of a novel direct coal liquefaction concept. The purpose of this research program is to explore a new approach to direct coal liquefaction in which the primary coal dissolution step is effected by chemical rather than thermal cleavage of bonds in the coal. This is done at a temperature which is significantly lower than that typically used in conventional coal liquefaction. Reaction at this low temperature results in high conversion of the coal to a solubilized form, with little hydrocarbon gas make, and avoids the thermally induced retrograde reactions which are unavoidable in conventional thermal processes. In addition, for low-rank coals, a substantial portion of the oxygen in the coal is removed as CO and CO{sub 2} during the dissolution. The higher selectivity to liquid products and rejection of oxygen as carbon oxides should result in improved hydrogen utilization. The basis of the novel concept is the discovery made by CONSOL R&D that certain hydride transfer agents are very active for coal dissolution at temperatures in the range of 350{degree}C. Because of the exploratory nature of the research, the project is divided into sequential tasks that are designed to first evaluate key elements of the process is presented for the following tasks: management plan; evaluation of process steps; engineering and economic study and reporting.

  11. Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques. Quarterly progress report, July--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.; Gutterman, C.; Chander, S.

    1993-12-31

    The overall objective of this project is to develop a new approach for the direct liquefaction of coal to produce an all-distillate product slate at a sizable cost reduction over current technology. The approach integrates coal selection, pretreatment, coal swelling with catalyst impregnation, liquefaction, product recovery with characterization, alternate bottoms processing, and carrying out a technical assessment including an economic evaluation. The primary coal of this program, Black Thunder subbituminous coal, can be effectively beneficiated to about 3.5 wt % ash using aqueous sulfurous acid pretreatment. This treated coal can be further beneficiated to about 2 wt % ash using commercially available procedures. All three coals used in this study (Black Thunder, Burning Star bituminous, and Martin Lake lignite) are effectively swelled by a number of solvents. The most effective solvents are those having hetero-functionality. laboratory- and bench-scale liquefaction experimentation is underway using swelled and catalyst impregnated coal samples. Higher coal conversions were observed for the SO{sub 2}-treated subbituminous coal than the raw coal, regardless of catalyst type. Conversions of swelled coal were highest when Molyvan L, molybdenum naphthenate, and nickel octoate, respectively, were added to the liquefaction solvent. The study of bottoms processing consists of combining the ASCOT process which consists of coupling solvent deasphalting with delayed coking to maximize the production of coal-derived liquids while rejecting solids within the coke drum. The asphalt production phase has been completed; representative product has been evaluated. The solvent system for the deasphalting process has been established. Two ASCOT tests produced overall liquid yields (63.3 wt % and 61.5 wt %) that exceeded the combined liquid yields from the vacuum tower and ROSE process.

  12. Surface Modified Coals for Enhanced Catalyst Dispersion and Liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Yaw D. Yeboah

    1998-12-04

    The aim of this study is to enhance catalyst loading and dispersion in coal for improved liquefaction by preadsorption of surfactants and catalysts on to the coal. During this reporting period, liquefaction experiments were conducted with the raw coal and catalyst loaded samples. Pretreatment of the coal and catalyst-loaded samples were done using the surfactants presented in previous reports. Liquefaction samples were tested using 6.6 g of solvent, 3.3 g coal, 6.9 MPa ambient hydrogen pressure, 425 0 C and 30 minutes. The liquid and solid products were removed from the reactor using tetrahydrofuran (THF). Coal conversions were calculated based on THF and heptane solubility. The results showed that in the absence of a catalyst, 33.8% heptane solubles was obtained with the parent coal compared to 27.8% and 27.3% with the SDS and DDAB surfactants. The presence of molybdenum, as expected, resulted in enhanced heptane solubles with or without surfactants. In the absence of surfactants, 50% heptane solubles was obtained compared to 40-47% with surfactants. Thus, it appears that pretreatment, unexpectedly, had a negative effect on liquefaction activity. It is unclear if the observed differences in results are significant. Clearly, additional experiments are needed before any firm deductions and conclusions can be drawn from the results.

  13. Solvent treatment of coal for improved liquefaction

    DOEpatents

    Appell, Herbert R.; Narain, Nand K.; Utz, Bruce R.

    1986-05-06

    Increased liquefaction yield is obtained by pretreating a slurry of solid carbonaceous material and a liquid hydrocarbonaceous solvent at a temperature above 200.degree. C. but below 350.degree. C. for a period of 10 minutes to four hours prior to exposure to liquefaction temperatures.

  14. Microbial recovery of metals from spent coal liquefaction catalysts. Quarterly report, October 1993--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Sandbeck, K.A.; Joffe, P.M.

    1993-12-31

    The project objectives outlined in the previous reports involved defining conditions and cultures best suited to achieve the most effective metal release from spent coal liquefaction catalysts by microbial processes. The continuity of the research program was maintained during the period of principal investigator replacement. This transition period allowed the project data to be reviewed and research plans were formulated to gain new insights into the mechanisms involved in metals release. Various microbiological and physiochemical parameters which may be important in microbial release of metals from spent coal liquefaction catalysts continue to be investigated so that this technology can be optimized. Mo release from spent coal liquefaction catalysts has been shown to be dependent upon many parameters, but release is dominated by microbial growth. The microbial Mo release is a rapid process requiring less than one week for 90% of the releasable Mo to be solubilized from whole washed (THF) catalyst. It could be expected that the rates would be even greater with crushed catalyst. Efforts are now centering on optimizing the parameters that stimulate microbial growth and action.

  15. Reducing viscosity of coal-liquefaction products with additives

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, T.S.; Kutta H.W.; Smith, A.C. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A research program to investigate the cause of high viscosity of coal liquefaction products and to improve this critical property was carried out at Harvey Technical Center under the joint sponsorship by Electric Power Research Institute and Atlantic Richfield Company. Prior to this joint program an in-house project was also initiated by Atlantic Richfield to determine causes and remedies for high viscosity of coal liquefaction products. One result of these programs is the discovery that certain chemical compounds, when used at concentrations of 1 to 10%, are effective in reducing the melt viscosity and softening temperature of these coal liquefaction products. These compounds can be divided into two groups, reactive and unreactive additives. Acids, anhydrides, amides and epoxides fall in the reactive group, while pyrrolidines and compounds belonging to the chemical classes of amides, phosphoramides, lactams and ketones belong to the unreactive additives. This paper summarizes findings on this subject and explains the mechanism of action involved.

  16. Short Contact Time Direct Coal Liquefactionn Using a Novel Batch Reactor. Quarterly Report. May 16 - August 15, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    He Huang; Michael T. Klein; William H. Calkins

    1996-08-30

    The objective of this research is to optimize the design and operation of the bench scale batch reactor (SCTBR) for studying direct coal liquefaction at short contact times (.01 to 10 minutes or longer). Additional objectives are to study the kinetics of direct coal liquefaction particularly at short reaction times and to investigate the role of organic oxygen components of coal and their reaction pathways during coal liquefaction. Many of those objectives have already been achieved. This quarterly report discusses further kinetic studies of the liquefaction of Illinois #6 bituminous coal, Wyodak-Anderson subbituminous coal, and Pittsburgh #8 bituminous coal. The thermodynamic characteristics of the extraction stage at the start of the liquefaction process in the liquefaction of Illinois #6 coal is also discussed. Further work has also been done to attempt to clarify the role of the liquefaction solvent in the direct liquefaction process.

  17. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical report, May 9, 1991--August 8, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1991-12-31

    The efficient production of environmentally acceptable distillate fuels requires catalysts for hydrogenation and cleavage of the coal macromolecules and removal of oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur heteroatoms. The goal of the proposed research is to develop new catalysts for the direct liquefaction of coal. This type of catalyst consists of fine clay particles that have been treated with reagents which form pillaring structures between the aluminosilicate layers of the clay. The pillars not only hold the layers apart but also constitute the active catalytic sites for hydrogenation of the coal and the solvent used in the liquefaction. The pillaring catalytic sites are composed of pyrrhotite, which has been previously demonstrated to be active for coal liquefaction. The pyrrhotite sites are generated in situ by sulfiding the corresponding oxyiron species. The size of the catalyst will be less than 40 nm in order to promote intimate contact with the coal material. Since the clays and reagents for pillaring and activating the clays are inexpensive, the catalysts can be discarded after use, rather than regenerated by a costly process. The proposed work will evaluate methods for preparing the fine particle iron-pillared clay dispersions and for activating the particles to generate the catalysts. Characterization studies of the pillared clays and activated catalysts will be performed. The effectiveness of the pillared clay dispersion for hydrogenation and coal liquefaction will be determined in several types of testing.

  18. Evaluation of the donor ability of coal liquefaction solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Bockrath, B.C.; Noceti, R.P.

    1981-03-29

    A test was devised to evaluate the donor ability of coal liquefaction solvents. This test embodies the main features of the free radical mechanism of coal liquefaction. Benzyl radicals generated by the thermolysis of a convenient precursor at relatively low temperatures behave like the free radicals generated by the thermolysis of coal at liquefaction temperatures. As precursors for this test, dibenzyldiazene and dibenzylmercury were selected. When benzyl radicals are generated in a donor solvent, the relative amounts of toluene and bibenzyl produced reflect the relative ability of the solvent to donate hydrogen and to prevent recombination. A variable amount of benzyl radical is also lost, which presumably represents that amount which adds to or combines with the solvent. Experimental evidences have shown that an additional mode of action of donor solvent is that of free radical scavenger by combination and addition reactions. Accordingly, three indices were devised to compare donor solvents: the donor, the scavenger, and combined index. The three solvent indices were determined for the decomposition of dibenzylmercury for several solvent mixtures made from different amounts of tetralin (solvent) in t-butyl benzene. The data show that the donor index increases with increasing tetralin concentration. A series of model compounds were evaluated using dibenzyldiazene as the source of benzyl radical, and results are tabulated. Another table is presented which show the donor indices obtained for several coal-derived liquefaction solvents. Taken together, these data indicate that there is good qualitative agreement between liquefaction performance and the donor index of solvents.

  19. SURFACE-MODIFIED COALS FOR ENHANCED CATALYST DISPERSION AND LIQUEFACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Yaw D. Yeboah

    1999-09-01

    This is the final report of the Department of Energy Sponsored project DE-FGF22-95PC95229 entitled, surface modified coals for enhanced catalyst dispersion and liquefaction. The aims of the study were to enhance catalyst loading and dispersion in coal for improved liquefaction by preadsorption of surfactants and catalysts on the coal and to train and educate minority scientists in catalysts and separation science. Illinois No. 6 Coal (DEC-24) was selected for the study. The surfactants investigated included dodecyl dimethyl ethyl ammonium bromide (DDAB), a cationic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate, an anionic surfactant, and Triton x-100, a neutral surfactant. Ammonium molybdate tetrahydrate was used as the molybdenum catalyst precursor. Zeta potential, BET, FTIR, AFM, UV-Vis and luminescence intensity measurements were undertaken to assess the surface properties and the liquefaction activities of the coal. The parent coal had a net negative surface charge over the pH range 2-12. However, in the presence of DDAB the negativity of the surface charge decreased. At higher concentrations of DDAB, a positive surface charge resulted. In contrast to the effect of DDAB, the zeta potential of the coal became more negative than the parent coal in the presence of SDS. Adsorption of Triton reduced the net negative charge density of the coal samples. The measured surface area of the coal surface was about 30 m{sup 2}/g compared to 77m{sup 2}/g after being washed with deionized water. Addition of the surfactants decreased the surface area of the samples. Adsorption of the molybdenum catalyst increased the surface area of the coal sample. The adsorption of molybdenum on the coal was significantly promoted by preadsorption of DDAB and SDS. Molybdenum adsorption showed that, over a wide range of concentrations and pH values, the DDAB treated coal adsorbed a higher amount of molybdenum than the samples treated with SDS. The infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and the atomic force

  20. Low-rank coal research: Volume 1, Control technology, liquefaction, and gasification: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, G.F.; Collings, M.E.; Schelkoph, G.L.; Steadman, E.N.; Moretti, C.J.; Henke, K.R.; Rindt, J.R.; Hetland, M.D.; Knudson, C.L.; Willson, W.G.

    1987-04-01

    Volume I contains articles on SO/sub x//NO/sub x/ control, waste management, low-rank direct liquefaction, hydrogen production from low-rank coals, and advanced wastewater treatment. These articles have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  1. Coal liquefaction: A research and development needs assessment: Final report, Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Schindler, H.D.; Burke, F.P.; Chao, K.C.; Davis, B.H.; Gorbaty, M.L.; Klier, K.; Kruse, C.W.; Larsen, J.W.; Lumpkin, R.E.; McIlwain, M.E.; Wender, I.; Stewart, N.

    1989-03-01

    Volume II of this report on an assessment of research needs for coal liquefaction contains reviews of the five liquefaction technologies---direct, indirect, pyrolysis, coprocessing, and bioconversion. These reviews are not meant to be encyclopedic; several outstanding reviews of liquefaction have appeared in recent years and the reader is referred to these whenever applicable. Instead, these chapters contain reviews of selected topics that serve to support the panel's recommendations or to illustrate recent accomplishments, work in progress, or areas of major research interest. At the beginning of each of these chapters is a brief introduction and a summary of the most important research recommendations brought out during the panel discussions and supported by the material presented in the review. A review of liquefaction developments outside the US is included. 594 refs., 100 figs., 60 tabs.

  2. Health effects research in direct coal liquefaction. Studies of H-coal distillates: Phase I. PDU samples - the effects of hydrotreatment

    SciTech Connect

    Epler, J.L.; Fry, R.J.M.; Larimer, F.W.

    1981-11-01

    A multi-divisional effort aimed at the integrated assessment of the health and environmental effects of various coal conversion and shale oil technologies is being carried out. The feasibility of using health effects bioassays to predict the potential biohazard of various H-Coal derived test materials is examined in a coupled chemical and biological approach. The primary focus of the research is the use of preliminary chemical characterizations and preparation for bioassay, followed by testing in short-term assays in order to rapidly ascertain the potential biohazard. Mammalian toxicological assays parallel the testing. Raw and hydrotreated product liquids from process development units of H-Coal and the pilot plant solvent refined coal process were examined for acute toxicity monitored as population growth impairment of Tetrahymena exposed to aqueous extracts and for mutagenic activity monitored as revertants of Salmonella exposed to metabolically activated chemical class fractions. Medium to high severity hydrotreatment appears to be an effective means of reducing biological activity, presumably by reducing the aromaticity and heteroatom content. Five basic mammalian, acute toxicity tests have been conducted with selected H-coal samples and shale oil derivatives. The data show that H-Coal samples are moderately toxic whereas the toxicity of shale oil derived products is slight and comparable to samples obtained from naturally occurring petroleums. No overt skin or eye toxicity was found. The present data reveal that coal-derived distillates generated by the H-coal process are highly carcinogenic to mouse skin. An extreme form of neurotoxicity associated with dermal exposure to one of the lighter, minimally carcinogenic, materials was noted. (DMC)

  3. Controlled short residence time coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Raymond P.; Schmalzer, David K.; Wright, Charles H.

    1982-05-04

    Normally solid dissolved coal product and a distillate liquid product are produced by continuously passing a feed slurry comprising raw feed coal and a recycle solvent oil and/or slurry together with hydrogen to a preheating-reaction zone (26, alone, or 26 together with 42), the hydrogen pressure in the preheating-reaction zone being at least 1500 psig (105 kg/cm.sup.2), reacting the slurry in the preheating-reaction zone (26, or 26 with 42) at a temperature in the range of between about 455.degree. and about 500.degree. C. to dissolve the coal to form normally liquid coal and normally solid dissolved coal. A total slurry residence time is maintained in the reaction zone ranging from a finite value from about 0 to about 0.2 hour, and reaction effluent is continuously and directly contacted with a quenching fluid (40, 68) to substantially immediately reduce the temperature of the reaction effluent to below 425.degree. C. to substantially inhibit polymerization so that the yield of insoluble organic matter comprises less than 9 weight percent of said feed coal on a moisture-free basis. The reaction is performed under conditions of temperature, hydrogen pressure and residence time such that the quantity of distillate liquid boiling within the range C.sub.5 -455.degree. C. is an amount at least equal to that obtainable by performing the process under the same conditions except for a longer total slurry residence time, e.g., 0.3 hour. Solvent boiling range liquid is separated from the reaction effluent and recycled as process solvent.

  4. Cooperative research in coal liquefaction. Technical progress report, May 1, 1993--April 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, G.P.

    1994-10-01

    Accomplishments for the past year are presented for the following tasks: coliquefaction of coal with waste materials; catalysts for coal liquefaction to clean transportation fuels; fundamental research in coal liquefaction; and in situ analytical techniques for coal liquefaction and coal liquefaction catalysts some of the highlights are: very promising results have been obtained from the liquefaction of plastics, rubber tires, paper and other wastes, and the coliquefaction of wastes with coal; a number of water soluble coal liquefaction catalysts, iron, cobalt, nickel and molybdenum, have been comparatively tested; mossbauer spectroscopy, XAFS spectroscopy, TEM and XPS have been used to characterize a variety of catalysts and other samples from numerous consortium and DOE liquefaction projects and in situ ESR measurements of the free radical density have been conducted at temperatures from 100 to 600{degrees}C and H{sub 2} pressures up to 600 psi.

  5. A characterization and evaluation of coal liquefaction process streams. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1996--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1996-07-01

    The objectives of this project are to support the DOE direct coal liquefaction process development program and to improve the useful application of analytical chemistry to direct coal liquefaction process development. This project builds on work performed in DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-89PC89883. Independent analyses by well-established methods are obtained of samples produced in direct coal liquefaction processes under evaluation by DOE. Additionally, analytical instruments and techniques which are currently under utilized for the purpose of examining coal-derived samples are being evaluated. The data obtained from this study is used to help guide current process development and to develop an improved data base on coal and coal liquids properties. A sample bank, established and maintained for use in this project, is available for use by other researchers. The reactivity of the non-distillable resids toward hydrocracking at liquefaction conditions (i.e., resid reactivity) is being examined. From the literature and data experimentally obtained, a mathematical kinetic model of resid conversion will be constructed. It is anticipated that such a model will provide insights useful for improving process performance and thus the economics of direct coal liquefaction.

  6. A characterization and evaluation of coal liquefaction process streams. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1995-09-01

    The objectives of this project are to support the DOE direct coal liquefaction process development program and to improve the useful application of analytical chemistry to direct coal liquefaction process development. Independent analyses by well-established methods will be obtained of samples produced in direct coal liquefaction processes under evaluation by DOE. Additionally, analytical instruments and techniques which are currently underutilized for the purpose of examining coal-derived samples will be evaluated. The data obtained from this study will be used to help guide current process development and to develop an improved data base on coal and coal liquids properties. A sample bank will be established and maintained for use in this project and will be available for use by other researchers. The reactivity of the non-distillable resids toward hydrocracking at liquefaction conditions (i.e., resid reactivity) will be examined. From the literature and data experimentally obtained, a mathematical kinetic model of resid conversion will be constructed. It is anticipated that such a model will provide insights useful for improving process performance and thus the economics of direct coal liquefaction. The paper describes activities carried out this quarter. 11 refs., 21 figs., 17 tabs.

  7. A characterization and evaluation of coal liquefaction process streams. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, through March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    The objectives of this project are to support the DOE direct coal liquefaction process development program and to improve the useful application of analytical chemistry to direct coal liquefaction process development. Independent analyses by well-established methods will be obtained of samples produced in direct coal liquefaction processes under evaluation by DOE. Additionally, analytical instruments and techniques which are currently underutilized for the purpose of examining coal-derived samples will be evaluated. The data obtained from this study will be used to help guide current process development and to develop an improved data base on coal and coal liquids properties. A sample bank will be established and maintained for use in this project and will be available for use by other researchers. The reactivity of the non-distillable resids toward hydrocracking at liquefaction conditions (i.e., resid reactivity) will be examined. From the literature and data experimentally obtained, a mathematical kinetic model of resid conversion will be constructed. It is anticipated that such a model will provide insights useful for improving process performance and thus the economics of direct coal liquefaction. Accomplishments for this quarter are described.

  8. EDS coal liquefaction process development. Phase V. Monthly technical progress report, June 1-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Epperly, W.R.

    1980-07-01

    High pressure bottoms recycle operations were conducted on the 50 pounds/day Recycle Coal Liquefaction Unit (RCLU) with Texas lignite from the Big Brown mine. Results indicate that significant conversion, yield and unit operability advantages can be obtained with Big Brown lignite by operating in the bottoms recycle mode, as compared to coal only operation. Yield data obtained from the one ton-per-day Coal Liquefaction Pilot Plant (CLPP) showed that the C/sub 4/-1000/sup 0/F distillate yield was approximately 44% based on dry, ash-free coal compared to 47% for Wyoming subbituminous coal. No unusual coal-specific problems were noted. Preliminary results from liquefaction of neat bottoms on the Once Through Coal Liquefaction Unit (OTCLU) showed significantly higher (C/sub 4/-1000/sup 0/F) liquid make and 1000/sup 0/F/sup +/ conversion for single pass CLPP bottoms when compared with equilibrium CLPP recycle bottoms. Work began on an engineering screening study to determine the impact of high pressure bottoms recycle on the relative economics of various bottoms processing options. A screening study was undertaken to evaluate various methods of calculating the Required Initial Selling Price (RISP) of coal liquids. Heat and material balances were completed to simulate high pressure vacuum bottoms recycle operations at ECLP within the fuel gas treating and DEA regeneration areas of the plant. A research guidance study was initiated to select preferred bottoms recycle operating conditions for subsequent CLPP operations with Wyoming (Wyodak mine) coal. Fluid bed combustion of vacuum bottoms to supply high-level process heat provides incentives comparable to hybrid boilers, another direct combustion option. Research and development on coal slurry fired heaters, conducted by outside organizations, is currently being reviewed.

  9. Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques. Quarterly technical progress report No. 7, April 1993--June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.; Chander, S.; Gutterman, C.

    1994-09-01

    The overall objective of this project is to develop a new approach for the direct liquefaction of coal to produce an all-distillate product slate at a sizable cost reduction over current technology. The approach integrates coal selection, pretreatment, coal swelling with catalyst impregnation, liquefaction, product recovery with characterization, alternate bottoms processing, and carrying out a technical assessment including an economic evaluation. The project is being carried out under contract to the United States Department of Energy. All three coals used in this study (Black Thunder, Burning Star bituminous, and Martin Lake lignite) are effectively swelled by a number of solvents. The most effective solvents are those having hetero-functionality. In addition, a synergistic effect has been demonstrated, in which solvent blends are more effective for coal swelling than the pure solvents alone. Therefore, it will be necessary to use only low levels of swelling agents and yet promote the impregnation of catalyst precursors. The rate of the impregnation of catalyst precursors into swollen coal increases greatly as the effectiveness of the solvent to swell the coal increases. This effect is also demonstrated by improved catalyst precursor impregnation with increased contact temperature. Laboratory- and bench-scale liquefaction experimentation is underway using swelled and catalyst impregnated coal samples. Higher coal conversions were observed for the SO{sub 2}-treated coal than the raw coal, regardless of catalyst type. Conversions of swelled coal were highest when Molyvan-L, molybdenum naphthenate, and nickel octoate, respectively, were added to the liquefaction solvent.

  10. Mild coal pretreatment to improve liquefaction reactivity. Final technical report, September 1990--February 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.L.; Shams, K.G.

    1994-07-01

    Recent research efforts in direct coal liquefaction are focused on lowering the level of reaction severity, identification and determination of the causes of retrogressive reactions, and improving the economics of the process. Ambient pretreatment of coals using methanol and a trace amount of hydrochloric acid was extensively studied in connection with low severity coal liquefaction. Ambient pretreatment of eight Argonne coals using methanol/HCl improved THF-soluble conversions 24.5 wt % (maf basis) for Wyodak subbituminous coal and 28.4 wt % for Beulah-Zap lignite with an average increase of 14.9 wt % for the eight Argonne coals at 623 K (350{degrees}C) reaction temperature and 30 minutes reaction time. Optimal pretreatment conditions were determined using Wyodak and Illinois No. 6 coals. Acid concentration was the most important pretreatment variable studied; liquefaction reactivity increased with increasing acid concentration up to 2 vol %. The FTIR spectra of treated and untreated Wyodak coal samples demonstrated formation of carboxylic functional groups during pretreatment, a result of divalent (Ca, Mg) cationic bridge destruction. The extent of liquefaction reactivity directly correlated with the amount of calcium removed during pretreatment, and results from calcium ``addback`` experiments supported the observation that calcium adversely affected coal reactivity at low severity reaction conditions. Model compound studies using benzyl phenyl ether demonstrated that calcium cations catalyzed retrogressive reactions, inhibited hydrogenation reactions at low severity reaction conditions, and were more active at higher reaction temperatures. Based on kinetic data, mechanisms for hydrogenation-based inhibition and base-catalyzed retrogressive reactions are proposed. The base-catalyzed retrogressive reactions are shown to occur via a hydrogen abstraction mechanism where hydrogenation inhibition reactions are shown to take place via a surface quenching mechanism.

  11. Toxicity of a coal liquefaction product to aquatic organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Giddings, J.M.; Parkhurst, B.R.; Gehrs, C.W.; Millemann, R.E.

    1980-07-01

    Using acute bioassay tests a representative coal liquefaction product was compared with a petroleum derived residual fuel oil and a diesel fuel. The acute toxicity of water soluble fractions of the oils to two freshwater algae and one freshwater crustacean was determined.

  12. Catalytic multi-stage liquefaction of coal. Ninth quarterly report, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Comolli, A.G.; Johnson, E.S.; Lee, L.K.

    1995-06-01

    This quarterly report covers the activities of Catalytic Multi-Stage Liquefaction of Coal during the Period October 1 - December 31, 1994, at Hydrocarbon Research, Inc. in Lawrenceville and Princeton, New Jersey. This DOE Contract Period was from December 8, 1992 to December 7, 1994 and has been extended to September 30, 1995. The overall objective of this program is to produce liquid fuels from coal by direct liquefaction at a cost that is competitive with conventional fuels. Specifically, this continuous bench-scale program contains provisions to examine new ideas in areas such as: low temperature pretreatments, more effective catalysts, on-line hydrotreating, new coal feedstocks, other hydrogen sources, more concentrated coal feeds and other highly responsive process improvements while assessing the design and economics of the bench-scale results. This quarterly report covers work on Laboratory Scale Studies, Continuous Bench-Scale Operations, Technical Assessment and Project Management.

  13. Slurry Phase Iron Catalysts for Indirect Coal Liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Abhaya K. Datye

    1998-09-10

    This report describes research conducted to support the DOE program in indirect coal liquefaction. Specifically, we have studied the attrition behavior of Iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, their interaction with the silica binder and the evolution of iron phases in a synthesis gas conversion process. The results provide significant insight into factors that should be considered in the design of catalysts for the conversion of coal-derived synthesis gas into liquid fuels.

  14. SLURRY PHASE IRON CATALYSTS FOR INDIRECT COAL LIQUEFACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Abhaya K. Datye

    1998-11-19

    This report describes research conducted to support the DOE program in indirect coal liquefaction. Specifically, they have studied the attrition behavior of iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, their interaction with the silica binder and the evolution of iron phases in a synthesis gas conversion process. The results provide significant insight into factors that should be considered in the design of catalysts for converting coal based syngas into liquid fuels.

  15. Control of pyrite addition in coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Schmid, Bruce K.; Junkin, James E.

    1982-12-21

    Pyrite addition to a coal liquefaction process (22, 26) is controlled (118) in inverse proportion to the calcium content of the feed coal to maximize the C.sub.5 --900.degree. F. (482.degree. C.) liquid yield per unit weight of pyrite added (110). The pyrite addition is controlled in this manner so as to minimize the amount of pyrite used and thus reduce pyrite contribution to the slurry pumping load and disposal problems connected with pyrite produced slag.

  16. Coal-derived promoters for the liquefaction of Illinois coal. Technical report, September 1, 1991--November 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Carty, R.H.

    1991-12-31

    The objective of this program is to investigate the use of liquids derived from coal either by mild gasification or supercritical extraction (SCE) to promote direct liquefaction of Illinois coal. Some organic sulfur-, nitrogen-, and oxygen-containing compounds have been found to enhance liquefaction reactions. The use of Illinois coal to produce liquid fractions rich in these types of compounds could increase the rates of liquefaction reactions, thus improving the process economics. An integrated process combining direct liquefaction with mild gasification or SCE of coal is being developed by IGT. The approach taken in this two-year program is to use recently developed molecular probe techniques to assess the reactivity of three coal-derived liquids with respect to (A) hydrogen transfer rate, (B) carbon-carbon bond cleavage rate, (C) free radical flux, and (D) hydrocracking activity. Sample liquids from Illinois Basin Coal IBC-106 are prepared by three methods: mild gasification in an isothermal free-fall reactor (IFFR), steam treatment followed by mild gasification in a fixed-bed reactor (ST/FBR), and SCE using toluene in a batch autoclave. During the first year of the program, the IFFR and ST/FBR coal liquids were produced and characterized, and the IFFR liquid was assessed by the four molecular-probe methods. During the first quarter of the second year, reactivity testing and data analysis on the ST/FBR coal liquid was completed. For the ST/FBR liquid, hydrogen transfer rate showed a mean increase of 7%, C-C bond cleavage selectivity increased by 27%, free radical flux increased 101%, and data indicated a 227% increase in hydrocracking activity. 12 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  17. SUMMARY REPORT OF THE DOE DIRECT LIQUEFACTION PROCESS DEVELOPMENT CAMPAIGN OF THE LATE TWENTIETH CENTURY

    SciTech Connect

    F.P. Burke; S.D. Brandes; D.C. McCoy; R.A. Winschel; D. Gray; G. Tomlinson

    2001-07-01

    Following the petroleum price and supply disruptions of 1973, the U.S. government began a substantial program to fund the development of alternative fuels. Direct coal liquefaction was one of the potential routes to alternative fuels. The direct coal liquefaction program was funded at substantial levels through 1982, and at much lower levels thereafter. Those processes that were of most interest during this period were designed to produce primarily distillate fuels. By 1999, U.S. government funding for the development of direct coal liquefaction ended. Now that the end of this campaign has arrived, it is appropriate to summarize the process learnings derived from it. This report is a summary of the process learnings derived from the DOE direct coal liquefaction process development campaign of the late twentieth century. The report concentrates on those process development programs that were designed to produce primarily distillate fuels and were largely funded by DOE and its predecessors in response to the petroleum supply and price disruptions of the 1970s. The report is structured as chapters written by different authors on most of the major individual DOE-funded process development programs. The focus of the report is process learnings, as opposed to, say, fundamental coal liquefaction science or equipment design. As detailed in the overview (Chapter 2), DOE's direct coal liquefaction campaign made substantial progress in improving the process yields and the quality of the distillate product. Much of the progress was made after termination by 1983 of the major demonstration programs of the ''first generation'' (SRC-II, H-Coal, EDS) processes.

  18. Advanced direct liquefaction concepts for PETC generic units

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    In the Advance Coal Liquefaction Concept Proposal (ACLCP) carbon monoxide (CO) and water have been proposed as the primary reagents in the pretreatment process. The main objective of this project is to develop a methodology for pretreating coal under mild conditions based on a combination of existing processes which have shown great promise in liquefaction, extraction and pyrolysis studies. The aim of this pretreatment process is to partially depolymerise the coal, eliminate oxygen and diminish the propensity for retograde reactions during subsequent liquefaction. The desirable outcome of the CO pretreatment step should be: (1) enhanced liquefaction activity and/or selectivity toward products of higher quality due to chemical modification of the coal structure; (2) cleaner downstream products; (3) overall improvement in operability and process economics.

  19. Integrated coal liquefaction, gasification and electricity production process

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, S.

    1986-06-10

    A method is described for the physical and operational integration of a carbonaceous gasification plant, a gas fuel synthesis plant and a power generation station to economically produce synfuel and electric power consisting of: (a) producing synthesis gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen from carbonaceous raw materials in a gasification unit under endothermic reaction conditions wherein the gasification unit utilizes exhaust steam from step (f) effective to provide at least a portion of the endothermic heat of reaction necessary for the reaction and wherein the gas from the gasification unit is passed to a coal liquefaction stage; (b) liquefying and hydrogenating coal under exothermic reaction conditions with the synthesis gas from the gasification unit as a source of hydrogen thereby producing a synthetic hydrocarbonaceous fuel and tail gases; (c) providing water to the liquefaction stage in an indirect heat exchange relationship to remove at least a portion of the exothermic heat of reaction from the coal liquefaction stage by generating high pressure steam from the water and passing the high pressure steam to a power generation unit; (d) continuously purging the tail gases from the liquefaction stage, feeding the tail gases to the power generation unit and burning the tail gases with or without additional fuel sources to superheat the high pressure steam; (e) passing the superheated steam to a turbine-generator means within the power generating unit to produce electricity and exhaust steam; and (f) feeding at least a portion of the exhaust steam from the power generating unit to the gasification unit.

  20. Activity and selectivity of molybdenum catalysts in coal liquefaction reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.; Pellegrino, J.L. )

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate how effectively three different molybdenum catalysts promote reactions involving heteroatom removal and cleavage of alkyl bridge hydrodeoxygenation (HDO), hydrodesulfurization (HDS), hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) and hydrocracking (HYC). Both model and coal liquefaction reactions were performed to test the activity and selectivity of three different molybdenum catalysts. The three catalysts used were molybdenum naphthenate, molybdenum supported on gamma alumina (Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and precipitated, poorly crystalline molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}). The model compounds, chosen to mimic coal structure, on which the effectiveness of the catalysts for the model reactions was tested were: 1-methylnaphthalene, representing aromatic hydrocarbons, for hydrogenation; 1-naphthol, representing oxygen containing compounds, for deoxygenation; benzothiophene, representing sulfur containing compounds, for desulfurization; indole, representing nitrogen containing compounds, for denitrogenation; and bibenzyl, representing alkyl bridging structures, for hydrocracking. Catalytic reactions of combinations of reactants were performed to simulate a complex coal matrix. Thermal and catalytic coal liquefaction reactions were performed using Illinois No. 6 coal with anthracene as a solvent. The efficacy of the catalysts was determined by comparing the product and compound class fractions obtained from the liquefaction reactions.

  1. Coal liquefaction in an inorganic-organic medium

    DOEpatents

    Vermeulen, Theodore; Grens, II, Edward A.; Holten, Ronald R.

    1982-01-01

    Improved process for liquefaction of coal by contacting pulverized coal in an inorganic-organic medium solvent system containing a ZnCl.sub.2 catalyst, a polar solvent with the structure RX where X is one of the elements O, N, S or P, and R is hydrogen or a lower hydrocarbon radical; the solvent system can contain a hydrogen donor solvent (and must when RX is water) which is immiscible in the ZnCl.sub.2 and is a hydroaromatic hydrocarbon, selected from tetralin, dihydrophenanthrene, dihydroanthracene or a hydrogenated coal derived hydroaromatic hydrocarbon distillate fraction.

  2. Rationale for continuing R&D in indirect coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, D.; Tomlinson, G.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this analysis is to use the world energy demand/supply model developed at MITRE to examine future liquid fuels supply scenarios both for the world and for the United States. This analysis has determined the probable extent of future oil resource shortages and the likely time frame in which the shortages will occur. The role that coal liquefaction could play in helping to alleviate this liquid fuels shortfall is also examined. The importance of continuing R&D to improve process performance and reduce the costs of coal-derived transportation fuel is quantified in terms of reducing the time when coal liquids will become competitive with petroleum.

  3. Donor solvent coal liquefaction with bottoms recycle at elevated pressure

    DOEpatents

    Bauman, Richard F.; Taunton, John W.; Anderson, George H.; Trachte, Ken L.; Hsia, Steve J.

    1982-01-01

    An improved process for liquefying solid carbonaceous materials wherein increased naphtha yields are achieved by effecting the liquefaction at a pressure within the range from about 1750 to about 2800 psig in the presence of recycled bottoms and a hydrogen-donor solvent containing at least 0.8 wt % donatable hydrogen. The liquefaction is accomplished at a temperature within the range from about 700.degree. to about 950.degree. F. The coal:bottoms ratio in the feed to liquefaction will be within the range from about 1:1 to about 5:1 and the solvent or diluent to total solids ratio will be at least 1.5:1 and preferably within the range from about 1.6:1 to about 3:1. The yield of naphtha boiling range materials increases as the pressure increases but generally reaches a maximum at a pressure within the range from about 2000 to about 2500 psig.

  4. A characterization and evaluation of coal liquefaction process streams. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1995-05-01

    The objectives of this project are to support the DOE direct coal liquefaction process development program and to improve the useful application of analytical chemistry to direct coal liquefaction process development. Independent analyses by well-established methods will be obtained of samples produced in direct coal liquefaction processes under evaluation by DOE. Additionally, analytical instruments and techniques which are currently underutilized for the purpose of examining coal-derived samples will be evaluated. The data obtained from this study will be used to help guide current process development and to develop an improved data base on coal and coal liquids properties. A sample bank will be established and maintained for use in this project and will be available for use by other researchers. The reactivity of the non-distillable resids toward hydrocracking at liquefaction conditions (i.e., resid reactivity) will be examined. From the literature and data experimentally obtained, a mathematical kinetic model of resid conversion will be constructed. It is anticipated that such a model will provide insights useful for improving process performance and thus the economics of direct coal liquefaction. During this quarter, analyses were completed on 65 process samples from representative periods of HRI Run POC-2 in which coal, coal/plastics, and coal/rubber were the feedstocks. A sample of the oil phase of the oil/water separator from HRI Run POC-1 was analyzed to determine the types and concentrations of phenolic compounds. Chemical analyses and microautoclave tests were performed to monitor the oxidation and measure the reactivity of the standard coal (Old Ben Mine No. 1) which has been used for the last six years to determine solvent quality of process oils analyzed in this and previous DOE contracts.

  5. Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.; Gutterman, C.; Chander, S.

    1992-08-26

    Research in this project centers upon developing a new approach to the direct liquefaction of coal to produce an all-distillate product slate at a sizable cost reduction over current technology. The approach integrates all aspects of the coal liquefaction process including coal selection, pretreatment, coal swelling with catalyst impregnation, coal liquefaction experimentation, product recovery with characterization, alternate bottoms processing, and a technical assessment including an economic evaluation. The project is being carried out under contract to the United States Department of Energy. On May 28, 1992, the Department of Energy authorized starting the experimental aspects of this projects; therefore, experimentation at Amoco started late in this quarterly report period. Research contracts with Auburn University, Pennsylvania State University, and Foster Wheeler Development Corporation were signed during June, 1992, so their work was just getting underway. Their work will be summarized in future quarterly reports. A set of coal samples were sent to Hazen Research for beneficiation. The samples were received and have been analyzed. The literature search covering coal swelling has been up-dated, and preliminary coal swelling experiments were carried out. Further swelling experimentation is underway. An up-date of the literature on the liquefaction of coal using dispersed catalysts is nearing completion; it will be included in the next quarterly report.

  6. Construction of a 150 t/d pilot plant for bituminous coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ishibashi, Hirohito; Kobayashi, Masatoshi; Suzuki, Satoru

    1994-12-31

    This present paper covers bituminous coal liquefaction R and D carried out by Nippon Coal Oil Co., Ltd. (NCOL). Construction of a 150 ton/day bituminous coal liquefaction pilot plant will be presented. The NEDOL process is characterized by the wide applicability of various coal grades, such as low-rank bituminous coal, subbituminous coal and low-rank subbituminous coal, and a single-stage liquefaction method that combines the advantages of a hydrogen-donor solvent and a fine iron catalyst. A vacuum distillation system for solid-liquid separation is used to improve reliability. The simplicity of this process ensures a high degree of stability.

  7. Design, synthesis, and characterization of novel fine-particle, unsupported catalysts for coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, M.T.

    1991-12-30

    The purpose of this work is to investigate the kinetics-assisted design, synthesis and characterization of fme-pardcle, unsupported catalysts for coal liquefaction. The goal is to develop a fundamental understanding of coal catalysis and catalysts that will, in turn, allow for the specification of a novel optimal catalyst for coal liquefaction.

  8. Coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, January-March 1979. [US DOE supported

    SciTech Connect

    1980-01-01

    Progress in DOE-supported coal liquefaction pilot plant projects is reported: company, location, contract, funding, process description, history and progress in the current quarter. Related projects discussed are: coking and gasification of liquefaction plant residues, filtration of coal liquids and refining of coal liquids by hydrogenation. (LTN)

  9. Design, synthesis, and characterization of novel fine-particle, unsupported catalysts for coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, M.T.; Foley, H.C.

    1992-03-23

    The purpose of this work is to investigate the kinetics-assisted design, synthesis and characterization of fine-particle, unsupported catalysts for coal liquefaction. The goal is to develop a fundamental understanding of coal catalysis and catalysts that will, in turn, allow for the specification of a novel optical catalyst for coal liquefaction.

  10. A characterization and evaluation of coal liquefaction process streams. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1995-12-01

    The objectives of this project are to support the DOE direct coal liquefaction process development program and to improve the useful application of analytical chemistry to direct coal liquefaction process development. Independent analyses by well-established methods will be obtained of samples produced in direct coal liquefaction processes under evaluation by DOE. Additionally, analytical instruments and techniques which are currently underutilized for the purpose of examining coal-derived samples will be evaluated. The data obtained from this study will be used to help guide current process development and to develop an improved data base on coal and coal liquids properties. A sample bank will be established and maintained for use in this project and will be available for use by other researchers. The reactivity of the non-distillable resids toward hydrocracking at liquefaction conditions (i.e., resid reactivity) will be examined. From the literature and data experimentally obtained, a mathematical kinetic model of resid conversion will be constructed. It is anticipated that such a model will provide insights useful for improving process performance and thus the economics of direct coal liquefaction. Some of the contract activities for this quarter are: We completed many of the analyses on the 81 samples received from HTI bench-scale run CMSL-9, in which coal, coal/mixed plastics, and coal/high density polyethylene were fed; Liquid chromatographic separations of the 15 samples in the University of Delaware sample set were completed; and WRI completed CP/MAS {sup 13}C-NMR analyses on the Delaware sample set.