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Sample records for releasing hormone receptor

  1. Dimerization of the thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor potentiates hormone-dependent receptor phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Song, Gyun Jee; Jones, Brian W; Hinkle, Patricia M

    2007-11-13

    The G protein-coupled thyrotropin (TSH)-releasing hormone (TRH) receptor forms homodimers. Regulated receptor dimerization increases TRH-induced receptor endocytosis. These studies test whether dimerization increases receptor phosphorylation, which could potentiate internalization. Phosphorylation at residues 355-365, which is critical for internalization, was measured with a highly selective phospho-site-specific antibody. Two strategies were used to drive receptor dimerization. Dimerization of a TRH receptor-FK506-binding protein (FKBP) fusion protein was stimulated by a dimeric FKBP ligand. The chemical dimerizer caused a large increase in TRH-dependent phosphorylation within 1 min, whereas a monomeric FKBP ligand had no effect. The dimerizer did not alter phoshorylation of receptors lacking the FKBP domain. Dimerization of receptors containing an N-terminal HA epitope also was induced with anti-HA antibody. Anti-HA IgG strongly increased TRH-induced phosphorylation, whereas monomeric Fab fragments had no effect. Anti-HA antibody did not alter phosphorylation in receptors lacking an HA tag. Furthermore, two phosphorylation-defective TRH receptors functionally complemented one another and permitted phosphorylation. Receptors with a D71A mutation in the second transmembrane domain do not signal, whereas receptors with four Ala mutations in the 355-365 region signal normally but lack phosphorylation sites. When D71A- and 4Ala-TRH receptors were expressed alone, neither underwent TRH-dependent phosphorylation. When they were expressed together, D71A receptor was phosphorylated by G protein-coupled receptor kinases in response to TRH. These results suggest that the TRH receptor is phosphorylated preferentially when it is in dimers or when preexisting receptor dimers are driven into microaggregates. Increased receptor phosphorylation may amplify desensitization. PMID:17989235

  2. Activation of the chicken gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone receptor reduces gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Mamiko; Bédécarrats, Grégoy Y

    2010-06-01

    Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) is a hypothalamic peptide from the RFamide peptide family that has been identified in multiple avian species. Although GnIH has clearly been shown to reduce LH release from the anterior pituitary gland, its mechanism of action remains to be determined. The overall objectives of this study were (1) to characterize the GnIH receptor (GnIH-R) signaling pathway, (2) to evaluate potential interactions with gonadotropin releasing hormone type III receptor (GnRH-R-III) signaling, and (3) to determine the molecular mechanisms by which GnIH and GnRH regulate pituitary gonadotrope function during a reproductive cycle in the chicken. Using real-time PCR, we showed that in the chicken pituitary gland, GnIH-R mRNA levels fluctuate in an opposite manner to GnRH-R-III, with higher and lower levels observed during inactive and active reproductive stages, respectively. We demonstrated that the chicken GnIH-R signals by inhibiting adenylyl cyclase cAMP production, most likely by coupling to G(alphai). We also showed that this inhibition is sufficient to significantly reduce GnRH-induced cAMP responsive element (CRE) activation in a dose-dependent manner, and that the ratio of GnRH/GnIH receptors is a significant factor. We propose that in avian species, sexual maturation is characterized by a change in GnIH/GnRH receptor ratio, resulting in a switch in pituitary sensitivity from inhibitory (involving GnIH) to stimulatory (involving GnRH). In turn, decreasing GnIH-R signaling, combined with increasing GnRH-R-III signaling, results in significant increases in CRE activation, possibly initiating gonadotropin synthesis. PMID:20350548

  3. Pharmacological Chaperones for Misfolded Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Conn, P. Michael; Ulloa-Aguirre, Alfredo

    2011-01-01

    Structural alterations provoked by mutations or genetic variations in the gene sequence of G protein-coupled receptors may lead to abnormal function of the receptor molecule and, ultimately, to disease. While some mutations lead to changes in domains involved in agonist binding, receptor activation or coupling to effectors, others may cause misfolding and lead to retention/degradation of the protein molecule by the quality control system of the cell. Several strategies, including genetic, chemical and pharmacological approaches have been shown to rescue function of trafficking-defective misfolded G protein-coupled receptors. Among these, pharmacological strategies offer the most promising therapeutic tool to promote proper trafficking of misfolded proteins to the plasma membrane. Pharmacological chaperones or “pharmacoperones,” are small compounds that permeate the plasma membrane, enter cells, and bind selectively to misfolded proteins and correct folding allowing routing of the target protein to the plasma membrane, where the receptor may bind and respond to agonist stimulation. In this review we describe new therapeutic opportunities based on misfolding of otherwise functional human gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptors. This particular receptor is highly sensitive to single changes in chemical charge and its intracellular traffic is delicately balanced between expression at the plasma membrane or retention/degradation in the endoplasmic reticulum; it is, therefore, a particularly instructive model to understand both protein routing and the molecular mechanisms whereby pharmacoperones rescue misfolded intermediates or conformationally defective receptors. PMID:21907908

  4. Effects of retinoic acid on growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor gene expression and growth hormone secretion in rat anterior pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Maliza, Rita; Fujiwara, Ken; Tsukada, Takehiro; Azuma, Morio; Kikuchi, Motoshi; Yashiro, Takashi

    2016-06-30

    Retinoic acid (RA) is an important signaling molecule in embryonic development and adult tissue. The actions of RA are mediated by the nuclear receptors retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and retinoid X receptor (RXR), which regulate gene expression. RAR and RXR are widely expressed in the anterior pituitary gland. RA was reported to stimulate growth hormone (GH) gene expression in the anterior pituitary cells. However, current evidence is unclear on the role of RA in gene expression of growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor (Ghrh-r), growth hormone secretagogue receptor (Ghs-r) and somatostatin receptors (Sst-rs). Using isolated anterior pituitary cells of rats, we examined the effects of RA on gene expression of these receptors and GH release. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA; 10(-6) M) for 24 h increased gene expression levels of Ghrh-r and Ghs-r; however, expressions of Sst-r2 and Sst-r5 were unchanged. Combination treatment with the RAR-agonist Am80 and RXR-agonist PA024 mimicked the effects of ATRA on Ghrh-r and Ghs-r gene expressions. Exposure of isolated pituitary cells to ATRA had no effect on basal GH release. In contrast, ATRA increased growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH)- and ghrelin-stimulated GH release from cultured anterior pituitary cells. Our results suggest that expressions of Ghrh-r and Ghs-r are regulated by RA through the RAR-RXR receptor complex and that RA enhances the effects of GHRH and ghrelin on GH release from the anterior pituitary gland. PMID:27052215

  5. Discovery of growth hormone-releasing hormones and receptors in nonmammalian vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Leo T. O.; Siu, Francis K. Y.; Tam, Janice K. V.; Lau, Ivy T. Y.; Wong, Anderson O. L.; Lin, Marie C. M.; Vaudry, Hubert; Chow, Billy K. C.

    2007-01-01

    In mammals, growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) is the most important neuroendocrine factor that stimulates the release of growth hormone (GH) from the anterior pituitary. In nonmammalian vertebrates, however, the previously named GHRH-like peptides were unable to demonstrate robust GH-releasing activities. In this article, we provide evidence that these GHRH-like peptides are homologues of mammalian PACAP-related peptides (PRP). Instead, GHRH peptides encoded in cDNAs isolated from goldfish, zebrafish, and African clawed frog were identified. Moreover, receptors specific for these GHRHs were characterized from goldfish and zebrafish. These GHRHs and GHRH receptors (GHRH-Rs) are phylogenetically and structurally more similar to their mammalian counterparts than the previously named GHRH-like peptides and GHRH-like receptors. Information regarding their chromosomal locations and organization of neighboring genes confirmed that they share the same origins as the mammalian genes. Functionally, the goldfish GHRH dose-dependently activates cAMP production in receptor-transfected CHO cells as well as GH release from goldfish pituitary cells. Tissue distribution studies showed that the goldfish GHRH is expressed almost exclusively in the brain, whereas the goldfish GHRH-R is actively expressed in brain and pituitary. Taken together, these results provide evidence for a previously uncharacterized GHRH-GHRH-R axis in nonmammalian vertebrates. Based on these data, a comprehensive evolutionary scheme for GHRH, PRP-PACAP, and PHI-VIP genes in relation to three rounds of genome duplication early on in vertebrate evolution is proposed. These GHRHs, also found in flounder, Fugu, medaka, stickleback, Tetraodon, and rainbow trout, provide research directions regarding the neuroendocrine control of growth in vertebrates. PMID:17283332

  6. Substantial expression of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor type I in human uveal melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Schally, Andrew V.; Block, Norman L; Dezso, Balazs; Olah, Gabor; Rozsa, Bernadett; Fodor, Klara; Buglyo, Armin; Gardi, Janos; Berta, Andras; Halmos, Gabor

    2013-01-01

    Uveal melanoma is the most common primary intraocular malignancy in adults, with a very high mortality rate due to frequent liver metastases. Consequently, the therapy of uveal melanoma remains a major clinical challenge and new treatment approaches are needed. For improving diagnosis and designing a rational and effective therapy, it is essential to elucidate molecular characteristics of this malignancy. The aim of this study therefore was to evaluate as a potential therapeutic target the expression of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor in human uveal melanoma. The expression of LHRH ligand and LHRH receptor transcript forms was studied in 39 human uveal melanoma specimens by RT-PCR using gene specific primers. The binding charachteristics of receptors for LHRH on 10 samples were determined by ligand competition assays. The presence of LHRH receptor protein was further evaluated by immunohistochemistry. The expression of mRNA for type I LHRH receptor was detected in 18 of 39 (46%) of tissue specimens. mRNA for LHRH-I ligand could be detected in 27 of 39 (69%) of the samples. Seven of 10 samples investigated showed high affinity LHRH-I receptors. The specific presence of full length LHRH receptor protein was further confirmed by immunohistochemistry. A high percentage of uveal melanomas express mRNA and protein for type-I LHRH receptors. Our results support the merit of further investigation of LHRH receptors in human ophthalmological tumors. Since diverse analogs of LHRH are in clinical trials or are already used for the treatment of various cancers, these analogs could be considered for the LHRH receptor-based treatment of uveal melanoma. PMID:24077773

  7. Production and characterization of antibodies to gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor.

    PubMed

    Hazum, E; Schvartz, I; Popliker, M

    1987-01-15

    Antibodies to the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor of bovine pituitary membranes have been raised in rabbits by immunization with affinity-purified receptor preparations. These antibodies did not compete with 125I-labeled GnRH analog (Buserelin) for binding to the receptors but did precipitate rat and bovine solubilized receptors labeled with 125I-Buserelin. Binding of the antibodies to the receptors was also demonstrated by immunoprecipitation of 125I-labeled purified receptors and photoaffinity-labeled receptors. The antibodies did not have a GnRH-like activity but rather inhibited, in a dose-dependent manner, GnRH-stimulated luteinizing hormone release from cultured rat pituitary cells. In addition, the antibodies did not inhibit luteinizing hormone release stimulated by high K+ concentration. This suggests that the antibodies recognize domains of the receptor other than the binding site of the hormone and thereby inhibit the biological response. These GnRH receptor antibodies provide a useful tool for studying GnRH receptor structure, function, localization, and biosynthesis. PMID:3027055

  8. INHIBIN INCREASES AND PROGESTERONE DECREASES RECEPTORS FOR GONADOTROPIN-RELEASING HORMONE IN OVINE PITUITARY CULTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of progesterone (P4) and inhibin on gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor number (GnRH-R) and binding affinity were investigated using ovine pituitary cells in culture. ollowing treatment with P4 or porcine inhibin, GnRH binding was analyzed using a radioligand-rece...

  9. Binding properties of solubilized gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor: role of carboxylic groups

    SciTech Connect

    Hazum, E.

    1987-11-03

    The interaction of /sup 125/I-buserelin, a superactive agonist of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), with solubilized GnRH receptor was studied. The highest specific binding of /sup 125/I-buserelin to solubilized GnRH receptor is evident at 4/sup 0/C, and equilibrium is reached after 2 h of incubation. The soluble receptor retained 100% of the original binding activity when kept at 4 or 22/sup 0/C for 60 min. Mono- and divalent cations inhibited, in a concentration-dependent manner, the binding of /sup 125/I-buserelin to solubilized GnRH receptor. Monovalent cations require higher concentrations than divalent cations to inhibit the binding. Since the order of potency with the divalent cations was identical with that of their association constants to dicarboxylic compounds, it is suggested that there are at least two carboxylic groups of the receptor that participate in the binding of the hormone. The carboxyl groups of sialic acid residues are not absolutely required for GnRH binding since the binding of /sup 125/I-buserelin to solubilized GnRH receptor was only slightly affected by pretreatment with neuraminidase and wheat germ agglutinin. The finding that polylysines stimulate luteinizing hormone (LH) release from pituitary cell cultures with the same efficacy as GnRH suggest that simple charge interactions can induce LH release. According to these results, the authors propose that the driving force for the formation of the hormone-receptor complex is an ionic interaction between the positively charged amino acid arginine in position 8 and the carboxyl groups in the binding site.

  10. Structural and Functional Divergence of Growth Hormone-Releasing Hormone Receptors in Early Sarcopterygians: Lungfish and Xenopus

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Janice K. V.; Chow, Billy K. C.; Lee, Leo T. O.

    2013-01-01

    The evolutionary trajectories of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) receptor remain enigmatic since the discovery of physiologically functional GHRH-GHRH receptor (GHRHR) in non-mammalian vertebrates in 2007. Interestingly, subsequent studies have described the identification of a GHRHR2 in chicken in addition to the GHRHR and the closely related paralogous receptor, PACAP-related peptide (PRP) receptor (PRPR). In this article, we provide information, for the first time, on the GHRHR in sarcopterygian fish and amphibians by the cloning and characterization of GHRHRs from lungfish (P. dolloi) and X. laevis. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analyses demonstrated structural resemblance of lungfish GHRHR to their mammalian orthologs, while the X. laevis GHRHR showed the highest homology to GHRHR2 in zebrafish and chicken. Functionally, lungfish GHRHR displayed high affinity towards GHRH in triggering intracellular cAMP and calcium accumulation, while X. laevis GHRHR2 was able to react with both endogenous GHRH and PRP. Tissue distribution analyses showed that both lungfish GHRHR and X. laevis GHRHR2 had the highest expression in brain, and interestingly, X. laevis GHRHR2 also had high abundance in the reproductive organs. These findings, together with previous reports, suggest that early in the Sarcopterygii lineage, GHRHR and PRPR have already established diverged and specific affinities towards their cognate ligands. GHRHR2, which has only been found in xenopus, zebrafish and chicken hitherto, accommodates both GHRH and PRP. PMID:23308232

  11. Structural and functional divergence of growth hormone-releasing hormone receptors in early sarcopterygians: lungfish and Xenopus.

    PubMed

    Tam, Janice K V; Chow, Billy K C; Lee, Leo T O

    2013-01-01

    The evolutionary trajectories of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) receptor remain enigmatic since the discovery of physiologically functional GHRH-GHRH receptor (GHRHR) in non-mammalian vertebrates in 2007. Interestingly, subsequent studies have described the identification of a GHRHR(2) in chicken in addition to the GHRHR and the closely related paralogous receptor, PACAP-related peptide (PRP) receptor (PRPR). In this article, we provide information, for the first time, on the GHRHR in sarcopterygian fish and amphibians by the cloning and characterization of GHRHRs from lungfish (P. dolloi) and X. laevis. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analyses demonstrated structural resemblance of lungfish GHRHR to their mammalian orthologs, while the X. laevis GHRHR showed the highest homology to GHRHR(2) in zebrafish and chicken. Functionally, lungfish GHRHR displayed high affinity towards GHRH in triggering intracellular cAMP and calcium accumulation, while X. laevis GHRHR(2) was able to react with both endogenous GHRH and PRP. Tissue distribution analyses showed that both lungfish GHRHR and X. laevis GHRHR(2) had the highest expression in brain, and interestingly, X. laevis(GHRHR2) also had high abundance in the reproductive organs. These findings, together with previous reports, suggest that early in the Sarcopterygii lineage, GHRHR and PRPR have already established diverged and specific affinities towards their cognate ligands. GHRHR(2), which has only been found in xenopus, zebrafish and chicken hitherto, accommodates both GHRH and PRP. PMID:23308232

  12. Ability of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone-Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin 40 binding to LHRH receptor on human liver cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Shou-Liang; Zhao, Gang; Zhao, Hong-Guang; Lü, Wen-Tian; Liu, Guang-Wei; Zhu, Ping

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore the ability of recombinant toxin luteinizing hormone releasing hormone-Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin 40 (LHRH-PE40) and LHRH binding to LHRH receptor (LHRHR) on the membrane surface of human liver cancer HEPG cells. METHODS: LHRH was labeled by using 125I with enzymatic reaction. The affinity and receptor volume of LHRH-PE40 and LHRH binding to LHRHR on the membrane surface of human liver cancer cells were measured with radioligand receptor assay. RESULTS: The specific activity of LHRH labeled with 125I was 2.7 × 104 kBq/μL, and its radiochemical purity reached to 99.2%-99.7%. The binding of 125I to LHRH was maximal for 240 min in the warm cultivation, and this binding was stabilized. The inhibiting rates of 125I-LHRH and LHRH on the proliferation of human liver cancer HEPG cells were not significantly different. On the basis of the saturation curve of 125I-LHRH binding to the membrane LHRHR of HEPG cells, 125I-LHRH of 1 × 105 cpm was selected for radioligand receptor assay. The affinity constants (Kd) of LHRH-PE40 and LHRH binding to the membrane LHRHR of HEPG cells were 0.43 ± 0.12 nmol/L and 4.86 ± 1.47 nmol/L, respectively, and their receptor volumes were 0.37 ± 0.15 μmol/g and 0.42 ± 0.13 μmol/g, respectively. The binding of LHRH-PE40 to the membrane protein of normal liver cells was not observed. CONCLUSION: The recombinant toxin LHRH-PE40 binding to the membrane surface of LHRHR of human liver cancer HEPG cells was very strong, while the specific binding of it to normal liver cells was not observed. The results provide an important experimental basis for the clinical application of LHRH-PE. PMID:15334689

  13. Autoradiographic localization of thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) receptors in the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Manaker, S.

    1985-01-01

    Quantitative autoradiography was used to examine the distribution of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) receptors in the rat and human central nervous system (CNS). The binding of (/sup 3/H)-3-methyl-histidine/sup 2/-TRH ((/sup 3/H)-MeTRH) to TRH receptors was saturable, of a high affinity (K/sub d/ = 5 nM), and specific for TRH analogs. Studies with neurotoxins ibotenic acid and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) suggest that TRH receptors within the amygdala are predominantly located on cell bodies, and not nerve terminals. Finally, an examination was made of the concentrations of TRH receptors in spinal cords of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a degenerative disease of the motor neurons located in Lamina IX. Large decreases in TRH receptors were noted in ALS spinal cords, when compared to non-neurological controls, probably reflecting the loss of motor neurons. In addition, decreases in the TRH receptor concentration of Lamina II were observed. This finding may reflect the sensitivity of neurons throughout the CNS to the pathophysiologic mechanisms of neuronal degeneration which cause ALS.

  14. Effect of thyrotrophin releasing hormone on opiate receptors of the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Balashov, A.M.; Shchurin, M.R.

    1987-01-01

    It has recently been shown that the hypothalamic thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) has the properties of a morphine antagonist, blocking its inhibitory action on respiration and, to a lesser degree, its analgesic action. This suggests that the antagonistic effects of TRH are mediated through its interaction with opiate receptors. The aim of this paper is to study this hypothesis experimentally. Tritium-labelled enkephalins in conjunction with scintillation spectroscopy were used to assess the receptor binding behavior. The results indicate the existence of interconnections between the opiate systems and TRH. Although it is too early to reach definite conclusions on the mechanisms of this mutual influence and its physiological significance it can be tentatively suggested that TRH abolishes the pharmacological effects of morphine by modulating the functional state of opiate reception.

  15. Neither bST nor Growth Hormone Releasing Factor Alter Expression of Thyroid Hormone Receptors in Liver and Mammary Tissues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Physiological effects of thyroid hormones are mediated primarily by binding of triiodothyronine, to specific nuclear receptors. It has been hypothesized that organ-specific changes in production of triiodothyronine from its prohormone, thyroxine, target the action of thyroid hormones to the mammary...

  16. Antagonistic actions of analogs related to growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) on receptors for GHRH and vasoactive intestinal peptide on rat pituitary and pineal cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Rekasi, Zoltan; Varga, Jozsef L.; Schally, Andrew V.; Halmos, Gabor; Groot, Kate; Czompoly, Tamas

    2000-01-01

    Peptide analogs of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) can potentially interact with vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptors (VPAC1-R and VPAC2-R) because of the structural similarities of these two hormones and their receptors. We synthesized four new analogs related to GHRH (JV-1–50, JV-1–51, JV-1–52, and JV-1–53) with decreased GHRH antagonistic activity and increased VIP antagonistic potency. To characterize various peptide analogs for their antagonistic activity on receptors for GHRH and VIP, we developed assay systems based on superfusion of rat pituitary and pineal cells. Receptor-binding affinities of peptides to the membranes of these cells were also evaluated by radioligand competition assays. Previously reported GHRH antagonists JV-1–36, JV-1–38, and JV-1–42 proved to be selective for GHRH receptors, because they did not influence VIP-stimulated VPAC2 receptor-dependent prolactin release from pituitary cells or VPAC1 receptor-dependent cAMP efflux from pinealocytes but strongly inhibited GHRH-stimulated growth hormone (GH) release. Analogs JV-1–50, JV-1–51, and JV-1–52 showed various degrees of VPAC1-R and VPAC2-R antagonistic potency, although also preserving a substantial GHRH antagonistic effect. Analog JV-1–53 proved to be a highly potent VPAC1 and VPAC2 receptor antagonist, devoid of inhibitory effects on GHRH-evoked GH release. The antagonistic activity of these peptide analogs on processes mediated by receptors for GHRH and VIP was consistent with the binding affinity. The analogs with antagonistic effects on different types of receptors expressed on tumor cells could be utilized for the development of new approaches to treatment of various human cancers. PMID:10655511

  17. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor mRNA expression by human pituitary tumors in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, J M; Klibanski, A

    1994-01-01

    An important question in the pathogenesis and regulation of human gonadotroph adenomas is whether heterogeneous gonadotropin responses to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) are due to dysregulation of GnRH receptor biosynthesis and/or cell-signaling pathways. We investigated gonadotropin responsiveness to pulsatile GnRH in 13 gonadotroph adenomas. All tumors had evidence of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) beta and alpha subunit biosynthesis using reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RTPCR) techniques. Four tumors significantly increased gonadotropin and/or free subunit secretion during pulsatile 10(-8) M GnRH administration. The GnRH antagonist Antide (10(-6) to 10(-8) M) blocked secretory increases in all GnRH-responsive tumors. Gonadotropin and/or free subunit secretion increased after 60 mM KCl, confirming that GnRH nonresponsiveness was not due to intracellular gonadotropin depletion. We hypothesized that GnRH nonresponsiveness in these tumors may be due to GnRH receptor (GnRH-Rc) biosynthetic defects. RTPCR analyses detected GnRH-Rc transcripts only in responsive tumors and normal human pituitary. This is the first demonstration of a cell-surface receptor biosynthetic defect in human pituitary tumors. We conclude (a) one third of gonadotroph tumors respond to pulsatile GnRH in vitro, (b) GnRH-Rc mRNA is detected in human gonadotroph adenomas and predicts GnRH responsiveness, and (c) GnRH-Rc biosynthetic defects may underlie GnRH nonresponsiveness in gonadotroph tumors. Images PMID:8200967

  18. Cytoskeletal reorganization dependence of signaling by the gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Lindsay; Pawson, Adam J; Millar, Robert P; Maudsley, Stuart

    2004-01-16

    Activation of classical G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) like the mammalian gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR) typically stimulates heterotrimeric G protein molecules that subsequently activate downstream effectors. Receptor activation of heterotrimeric G protein pathways primarily controls intermediary cell metabolism by elevation or diminution of soluble cytoplasmic second messenger molecules. We have demonstrated here that stimulation of the GnRHR also results in a dramatic change in both cell adhesion and superstructural morphology. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor activation rapidly increases the capacity of HEK293 cells expressing the GnRHR to remain matrix-adherent in the face of fluid insults. Coinciding with this profound elevation in matrix adherence, we demonstrated a GnRH-induced alteration in both cell morphology and the de novo generation of polymerized actin structures. GnRH induction of cytoskeletal remodeling was correlated with significant increases in the tyrosine phosphorylation status of a series of cytoskeletal associated proteins, e.g. focal adhesion kinase (FAK), c-Src, and microtubule-associated protein kinase (MAPK or ERK1/2). The activation of the distal downstream effector ERK1/2 was demonstrated to be sensitive to the disrupters of cytoskeletal rearrangement, cytochalasin D and latrunculin B. In addition to the sensitivity of ERKs to cytoskeletal integrity, GnRH-induced FAK and c-Src kinase activation were sensitive to these agents and the fibronectin-integrin antagonistic RGDS peptide. Activation of ERK was dependent on its protein-protein assembly with FAK and c-Src at focal adhesion complexes. Induction of the cell remodeling event leading to this signaling complex assembly occurred primarily via GnRHR activation of the monomeric G protein Rac but not RhoA. These findings demonstrated a clear divergence of GnRHR signaling via the Rac monomeric G protein focal adhesion signaling complex assembly and

  19. Androgen receptor repression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone gene transcription via enhancer 1.

    PubMed

    Brayman, Melissa J; Pepa, Patricia A; Mellon, Pamela L

    2012-11-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) plays a major role in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, and synthesis and secretion of GnRH are regulated by gonadal steroid hormones. Disruptions in androgen levels are involved in a number of reproductive defects, including hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and polycystic ovarian syndrome. Androgens down-regulate GnRH mRNA synthesis in vivo and in vitro via an androgen receptor (AR)-dependent mechanism. Methyltrienolone (R1881), a synthetic AR agonist, represses GnRH expression through multiple sites in the proximal promoter. In this study, we show AR also represses GnRH transcription via the major enhancer (GnRH-E1). A multimer of the -1800/-1766 region was repressed by R1881 treatment. Mutation of two bases, -1792 and -1791, resulted in decreased basal activity and a loss of AR-mediated repression. AR bound to the -1796/-1791 sequence in electrophoretic mobility shift assays, indicating a direct interaction with DNA or other transcription factors in this region. We conclude that AR repression of GnRH-E1 acts via multiple AR-responsive regions, including the site at -1792/-1791. PMID:22877652

  20. Effect of gonadotropin-releasing hormone II receptor (GnRHR-II) knockdown on testosterone secretion in the boar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Unlike the classical gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH-I), the second mammalian GnRH isoform (GnRH-II; His5, Trp7, Tyr8) is a poor stimulator of gonadotropin secretion. In addition, GnRH-II is ubiquitously expressed, with transcript levels highest in tissues outside of the brain. A receptor speci...

  1. Identification of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor orthologue in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Vadakkadath Meethal, Sivan; Gallego, Miguel J; Haasl, Ryan J; Petras, Stephen J; Sgro, Jean-Yves; Atwood, Craig S

    2006-01-01

    Background The Caenorhabditis elegans genome is known to code for at least 1149 G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), but the GPCR(s) critical to the regulation of reproduction in this nematode are not yet known. This study examined whether GPCRs orthologous to human gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR) exist in C. elegans. Results Our sequence analyses indicated the presence of two proteins in C. elegans, one of 401 amino acids [GenBank: NP_491453; WormBase: F54D7.3] and another of 379 amino acids [GenBank: NP_506566; WormBase: C15H11.2] with 46.9% and 44.7% nucleotide similarity to human GnRHR1 and GnRHR2, respectively. Like human GnRHR1, structural analysis of the C. elegans GnRHR1 orthologue (Ce-GnRHR) predicted a rhodopsin family member with 7 transmembrane domains, G protein coupling sites and phosphorylation sites for protein kinase C. Of the functionally important amino acids in human GnRHR1, 56% were conserved in the C. elegans orthologue. Ce-GnRHR was actively transcribed in adult worms and immunoanalyses using antibodies generated against both human and C. elegans GnRHR indicated the presence of a 46-kDa protein, the calculated molecular mass of the immature Ce-GnRHR. Ce-GnRHR staining was specifically localized to the germline, intestine and pharynx. In the germline and intestine, Ce-GnRHR was localized specifically to nuclei as revealed by colocalization with a DNA nuclear stain. However in the pharynx, Ce-GnRHR was localized to the myofilament lattice of the pharyngeal musculature, suggesting a functional role for Ce-GnRHR signaling in the coupling of food intake with reproduction. Phylogenetic analyses support an early evolutionary origin of GnRH-like receptors, as evidenced by the hypothesized grouping of Ce-GnRHR, vertebrate GnRHRs, a molluscan GnRHR, and the adipokinetic hormone receptors (AKHRs) and corazonin receptors of arthropods. Conclusion This is the first report of a GnRHR orthologue in C. elegans, which shares significant

  2. Brain receptors for thyrotropin releasing hormone in morphine tolerant-dependent rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bhargava, H.N.; Das, S.

    1986-03-01

    The effect of chronic treatment of rats with morphine and its subsequent withdrawal on the brain receptors for thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) labeled with /sup 3/H-(3MeHis/sup 2/)TRH (MeTRH). Male Sprague Dawley rats were implanted with 4 morphine pellets (each containing 75 mg morphine base) during a 3-day period. Placebo pellet implanted rats served as controls. Both tolerance to and dependence on morphine developed as a result of this procedure. For characterization of brain TRH receptors, the animals were sacrificed 72 h after the implantation of first pellet. In another set of animals the pellets were removed and were sacrificed 24 h later. The binding of /sup 3/H-MeTRH to membranes prepared from brain without the cerebellum was determined. /sup 3/H-MeTRH bound to brain membranes prepared from placebo pellet implanted rats at a single high affinity site with a B/sub max/ value of 33.50 +/- 0.97 fmol/mg protein and a K/sub d/ of 5.18 +/- 0.21 nM. Implantation of morphine pellets did not alter the B/sub max/ value of /sup 3/H-MeTRH but decreased the K/sub d/ value significantly. Abrupt or naloxone precipitated withdrawal of morphine did not alter B/sub max/ or the K/sub d/ values. The binding of /sup 3/H-MeTRH to brain areas was also determined. The results suggest that the development of tolerance to morphine is associated with enhanced sensitivity of brain TRH receptors, however abrupt withdrawal of morphine does not change the characteristics of brain TRH receptors.

  3. Spinal cord thyrotropin releasing hormone receptors of morphine tolerant-dependent and abstinent rats

    SciTech Connect

    Rahmani, N.H.; Gulati, A.; Bhargava, H.N. )

    1990-07-01

    The effect of chronic administration of morphine and its withdrawal on the binding of 3H-(3-MeHis2)thyrotropin releasing hormone (3H-MeTRH) to membranes of the spinal cord of the rat was determined. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with either 6 placebo or 6 morphine pellets (each containing 75-mg morphine base) during a 7-day period. Two sets of animals were used. In one, the pellets were left intact at the time of sacrificing (tolerant-dependent) and in the other, the pellets were removed 16 hours prior to sacrificing (abstinent rats). In placebo-pellet-implanted rats, 3H-MeTRH bound to the spinal cord membranes at a single high affinity binding site with a Bmax of 21.3 +/- 1.6 fmol/mg protein, and an apparent dissociation constant Kd of 4.7 +/- 0.8 nM. In morphine tolerant-dependent or abstinent rats, the binding constants of 3H-MeTRH to spinal cord membranes were unaffected. Previous studies from this laboratory indicate that TRH can inhibit morphine tolerance-dependence and abstinence processes without modifying brain TRH receptors. Together with the present results, it appears that the inhibitory effect of TRH on morphine tolerance-dependence and abstinence is probably not mediated via central TRH receptors but may be due to its interaction with other neurotransmitter systems.

  4. Expression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor and effect of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogue on proliferation of cultured gastric smooth muscle cells of rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lei; He, Hong-Xuan; Sun, Xu-De; Zhao, Jing; Liu, Li-Hong; Huang, Wei-Quan; Zhang, Rong-Qing

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor and the effects of GnRH analog (alarelin) on proliferation of cultured gastric smooth muscle cells (GSMC) of rats. METHODS: Immunohistochemical ABC methods and in situ hybridization methods were used to dectect protein and mRNA expression of GnRH receptor in GSMC, respectively. Techniques of cell culture, OD value of MTT test, measure of 3H-TdR incorporation, average fluorescent values of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and flow cytometric DNA analysis were used in the experiment. RESULTS: The cultured GSMC of rats showed immunoreactivity for GnRH receptor; positive staining was located in cytoplasm. GnRH receptor mRNA hybridized signals were also detected in cytoplasm. When alarelin (10-9, 10-7, 10-5 mol/L) was administered into the medium and incubated for 24 h, OD value of MTT, 3H-TdR incorporation and average fluorescent values of PCNA all decreased significantly as compared with the control group (P < 0.05). The maximum inhibitory effect on cell proliferation was achieved a concentration of 10-5 mol/L and it acted in a dose-dependent manner. Flow cytometric DNA analysis revealed that alarelin could significantly enhance ratio of G1 phase and decrease ratio of S phase of GSMC of rats (P < 0.05).The maximum inhibitory effect on ratio of S phase was at the concentration of 10-5 mol/L and also acted in a dose-dependent manner. CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that GnRH receptor can be expressed by GSMC of rats. GnRH analogue can directly inhibit proliferation and DNA synthesis of rat GSMC through GnRH receptors. PMID:15188505

  5. Dopamine D1 and corticotrophin-releasing hormone type-2α receptors assemble into functionally interacting complexes in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Fuenzalida, J; Galaz, P; Araya, K A; Slater, P G; Blanco, E H; Campusano, J M; Ciruela, F; Gysling, K

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Dopamine and corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH; also known as corticotrophin-releasing factor) are key neurotransmitters in the interaction between stress and addiction. Repeated treatment with cocaine potentiates glutamatergic transmission in the rat basolateral amygdala/cortex pathway through a synergistic action of D1-like dopamine receptors and CRH type-2α receptors (CRF2α receptors). We hypothesized that this observed synergism could be instrumented by heteromers containing the dopamine D1 receptor and CRF2α receptor. Experimental Approach D1/CRF2α receptor heteromerization was demonstrated in HEK293T cells using co-immunoprecipitation, BRET and FRET assays, and by using the heteromer mobilization strategy. The ability of D1 receptors to signal through calcium, when singly expressed or co-expressed with CRF2α receptors, was evaluated by the calcium mobilization assay. Key Results D1/CRF2α receptor heteromers were observed in HEK293T cells. When singly expressed, D1 receptors were mostly located at the cell surface whereas CRF2α receptors accumulated intracellularly. Interestingly, co-expression of both receptors promoted D1 receptor intracellular and CRF2α receptor cell surface targeting. The heteromerization of D1/CRF2α receptors maintained the signalling through cAMP of both receptors but switched D1 receptor signalling properties, as the heteromeric D1 receptor was able to mobilize intracellular calcium upon stimulation with a D1 receptor agonist. Conclusions and Implications D1 and CRF2α receptors are capable of heterodimerization in living cells. D1/CRF2α receptor heteromerization might account, at least in part, for the complex physiological interactions established between dopamine and CRH in normal and pathological conditions such as addiction, representing a new potential pharmacological target. PMID:25073922

  6. Molecular analysis of the koala reproductive hormones and their receptors: gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH), follicle-stimulating hormone β and luteinising hormone β with localisation of GnRH.

    PubMed

    Busby, E R; Soeta, S; Sherwood, N M; Johnston, S D

    2014-12-01

    During evolution, reproductive hormones and their receptors in the brain-pituitary-gonadal axis have been altered by genetic mechanisms. To understand how the neuroendocrine control of reproduction evolved in mammals, it is important to examine marsupials, the closest group to placental mammals. We hypothesised that at least some of the hormones and receptors found in placental mammals would be present in koala, a marsupial. We examined the expression of koala mRNA for the reproductive molecules. Koala cDNAs were cloned from brain for gonadotrophin-releasing hormones (GnRH1 and GnRH2) or from pituitary for GnRH receptors, types I and II, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)β and luteinising hormone (LH)β, and from gonads for FSH and LH receptors. Deduced proteins were compared by sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis with those of other vertebrates. In conclusion, the koala expressed mRNA for these eight putative reproductive molecules, whereas at least one of these molecules is missing in some species in the amniote lineage, including humans. In addition, GnRH1 and 2 are shown by immunohistochemistry to be expressed as proteins in the brain. PMID:25200132

  7. Novel hormone "receptors".

    PubMed

    Nemere, Ilka; Hintze, Korry

    2008-02-01

    Our concepts of hormone receptors have, until recently, been narrowly defined. In the last few years, an increasing number of reports identify novel proteins, such as enzymes, acting as receptors. In this review we cover the novel receptors for the hormones atrial naturetic hormone, enterostatin, hepcidin, thyroid hormones, estradiol, progesterone, and the vitamin D metabolites 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) and 24,25(OH)(2)D(3). PMID:17546587

  8. Characterization and validation of bovine gonadotripin releasing hormone receptor (GNRHR) polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Lirón, J P; Prando, A; Ripoli, M V; Rogberg-Muñoz, A; Posik, D M; Baldo, A; Peral-García, P; Giovambattista, G

    2011-12-01

    Gonadotropin releasing hormone and its receptor (GNRHR) play a critical role in sexual differentiation and reproduction. Available evidence shows a strong genetic component in the timing of puberty. In bovines, there are significant differences within and among beef breeds in the time when bulls reach puberty. Despite its economic importance, there are not many SNPs or genetic markers associated with this characteristic. The aims of the study were to identify DNA polymorphism in the bovine GNRHR by re-sequencing analysis, determine haplotype phases, and perform a population study in a selected tag SNP in six breeds. Eight SNPs were detected, including: one in the Upstream Regulatory Region (URR), five in the coding regions, and two in non-coding regions. This polymorphism level corresponds to one variant every 249.4bp and a global nucleotide diversity of 0.385. Two haplogroups comprising nine haplotypes and two linkage blocks were detected. Despite 5 tag SNPs were required to capture all variability, just one SNP allowed to define both haplogroups, and only two SNPs were needed to differentiate the most common haplotypes. An additional taq SNP was necessary to identify both URR variants. Allele-frequency analysis of a selected taq SNP among breeds showed a geographical cline. European Bos taurus breeds had lower frequencies of the C allele than B. indicus type cattle, while Creole cattle and Wagyu breeds had intermediate frequency. There was a significant correlation between frequency profile and timing of puberty among the studied breeds, which seems to suggest that genetic variation within bovine GNRHR gene could explain at least part of the reported variability. PMID:21030057

  9. Synthesis, Receptor Binding, and CNS Pharmacological Studies of New Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone (TRH) Analogues

    PubMed Central

    Monga, Vikramdeep; Meena, Chhuttan L.; Rajput, Satyendra; Pawar, Chandrashekhar; Sharma, Shyam S.; Lu, Xinping; Gershengorn, Marvin C.

    2012-01-01

    As part of our search for selective and CNS-active thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) analogues, we synthesized a set of 44 new analogues in which His and pGlu residues were modified or replaced. The analogues were evaluated as agonists at TRH-R1 and TRH-R2 in cells in vitro, and in vivo in mice for analeptic and anticonvulsant activities. Several analogues bound to TRH-R1 and TRH-R2 with good to moderate affinities, and are full agonists at both receptor subtypes. Specifically, analogue 21 a (R = CH3) exhibited binding affinities (Ki values) of 0.17 μM for TRH-R1 and 0.016 μM for TRH-R2; it is 10-fold less potent than TRH in binding to TRH-R1 and equipotent with TRH in binding to TRH-R2. Compound 21 a, the most selective agonist, activated TRH-R2 with a potency (EC50 value) of 0.0021 μM, but activated TRH-R1 at EC50 = 0.05 μM, and exhibited 24-fold selectivity for TRH-R2 over TRH-R1. The newly synthesized TRH analogues were also evaluated in vivo to assess their potencies in antagonism of barbiturate-induced sleeping time, and several analogues displayed potent analeptic activity. Specifically, analogues 21 a,b and 22 a,b decreased sleeping time by nearly 50 % more than TRH. These analogues also displayed potent anticonvulsant activity and provided significant protection against PTZ-induced seizures, but failed to provide any protection in MES-induced seizures at 10 μmol kg−1. The results of this study provide evidence that TRH analogues that show selectivity for TRH-R2 over TRH-R1 possess potent CNS activity. PMID:21302359

  10. Fish oil enhances intestinal barrier function and inhibits corticotropin-releasing hormone/corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 signalling pathway in weaned pigs after lipopolysaccharide challenge.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huiling; Liu, Yulan; Chen, Shaokui; Wang, Xiuying; Pi, Dingan; Leng, Weibo; Chen, Feng; Zhang, Jing; Kang, Ping

    2016-06-01

    Stress induces injury in intestinal barrier function in piglets. Long-chain n-3 PUFA have been shown to exhibit potential immunomodulatory and barrier protective effects in animal models and clinical trials. In addition, corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH)/CRH receptor (CRHR) signalling pathways play an important role in stress-induced alterations of intestinal barrier function. We hypothesised that fish oil could affect intestinal barrier function and CRH/CRHR signalling pathways. In total, thirty-two weaned pigs were allocated to one of four treatments. The experiment consisted of a 2×2 factorial design, and the main factors included immunological challenge (saline or lipopolysaccharide (LPS)) and diet (5 % maize oil or 5 % fish oil). On d 19 of the trial, piglets were treated with saline or LPS. At 4 h after injection, all pigs were killed, and the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), liver, spleen and intestinal samples were collected. Fish oil decreased bacterial translocation incidence and the number of translocated micro-organisms in the MLN. Fish oil increased intestinal claudin-1 protein relative concentration and villus height, as well as improved the intestinal morphology. In addition, fish oil supplementation increased intestinal intraepithelial lymphocyte number and prevented elevations in intestinal mast cell and neutrophil numbers induced by LPS challenge. Moreover, fish oil tended to decrease the mRNA expression of intestinal CRHR1, CRH and glucocorticoid receptors. These results suggest that fish oil supplementation improves intestinal barrier function and inhibits CRH/CRHR1 signalling pathway and mast cell tissue density. PMID:27080003

  11. Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone Receptor 2 Gene Variants in Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Komuro, Hazuki; Sato, Naoko; Sasaki, Ayaka; Suzuki, Naoki; Kano, Michiko; Tanaka, Yukari; Yamaguchi-Kabata, Yumi; Kanazawa, Motoyori; Warita, Hitoshi; Aoki, Masashi; Fukudo, Shin

    2016-01-01

    Background Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) plays an important role in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and regulates the stress response through two CRH receptors (R1 and R2). Previously, we reported that a CRHR1 gene polymorphism (rs110402, rs242924, and rs7209436) and haplotypes were associated with IBS. However, the association between the CRHR2 gene and IBS was not investigated. We tested the hypothesis that genetic polymorphisms and haplotypes of CRHR2 are associated with IBS pathophysiology and negative emotion in IBS patients. Methods A total of 142 IBS patients and 142 healthy controls participated in this study. Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the CRHR2 gene (rs4722999, rs3779250, rs2240403, rs2267710, rs2190242, rs2284217, and rs2284220) were genotyped. Subjects' psychological states were evaluated using the Perceived-Stress Scale, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and the Self-Rating Depression Scale. Results We found that rs4722999 and rs3779250, located in intronic region, were associated with IBS in terms of genotype frequency (rs4722999: P = 0.037; rs3779250: P = 0.017) and that the distribution of the major allele was significantly different between patients and controls. There was a significant group effect (controls vs. IBS), and a CRHR2 genotype effect was observed for three psychological scores, but the interaction was not significant. We found a haplotype of four SNPs (rs4722999, rs3779250, rs2240403, and rs2267710) and two SNPs (rs2284217 and rs2284220) in strong linkage disequilibrium (D′ > 0.90). We also found that haplotypes of the CRHR2 gene were significantly different between IBS patients and controls and that they were associated with negative emotion. Conclusion Our findings support the hypothesis that genetic polymorphisms and haplotypes of CRHR2 are related to IBS. In addition, we found associations between CRHR2 genotypes and haplotypes and negative emotion in IBS patients and controls

  12. New therapeutic approach to heart failure due to myocardial infarction based on targeting growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor

    PubMed Central

    Schally, Andrew V.; Takeuchi, Lauro M.; Popovics, Petra; Jaszberenyi, Miklos; Vidaurre, Irving; Zarandi, Marta; Cai, Ren-Zhi; Block, Norman L.; Hare, Joshua M.; Rick, Ferenc G.

    2015-01-01

    Background We previously showed that growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) agonists are cardioprotective following myocardial infarction (MI). Here, our aim was to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo activities of highly potent new GHRH agonists, and elucidate their mechanisms of action in promoting cardiac repair. Methods and Results H9c2 cells were cultured in serum-free medium, mimicking nutritional deprivation. GHRH agonists decreased calcium influx and significantly improved cell survival. Rats with cardiac infarction were treated with GHRH agonists or placebo for four weeks. MI size was reduced by selected GHRH agonists (JI-38, MR-356, MR-409); this accompanied an increased number of cardiac c-kit+ cells, cellular mitotic divisions, and vascular density. One week post-MI, MR-409 significantly reduced plasma levels of IL-2, IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α compared to placebo. Gene expression studies revealed favorable outcomes of MR-409 treatment partially result from inhibitory activity on pro-apoptotic molecules and pro-fibrotic systems, and by elevation of bone morphogenetic proteins. Conclusions Treatment with GHRH agonists appears to reduce the inflammatory responses post-MI and may consequently improve mechanisms of healing and cardiac remod eling by regulating pathways involved in fibrosis, apoptosis and cardiac repair. Patients with cardiac dysfunction could benefit from treatment with novel GHRH agonists. PMID:25797248

  13. Functional Authentication of a Novel Gastropod Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Receptor Reveals Unusual Features and Evolutionary Insight

    PubMed Central

    Kavanaugh, Scott I.

    2016-01-01

    A gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-like molecule was previously identified in a gastropod, Aplysia californica, and named ap-GnRH. In this study, we cloned the full-length cDNA of a putative ap-GnRH receptor (ap-GnRHR) and functionally authenticated this receptor as a bona fide ap-GnRHR. This receptor contains two potential translation start sites, each accompanied by a Kozak sequence, suggesting the translation of a long and a short form of the receptor is possible. The putative ap-GnRHR maintains the conserved structural motifs of GnRHR-like receptors and shares 45% sequence identity with the octopus GnRHR. The expression of the putative ap-GnRHR short form is ubiquitous in all tissues examined, whereas the long form is only expressed in parts of the central nervous system, osphradium, small hermaphroditic duct, and ovotestis. The cDNA encoding the long or the short receptor was transfected into the Drosophila S2 cell line and subject to a radioreceptor assay using 125I-labeled ap-GnRH as the radioligand. Further, the transfected cells were treated with various concentrations of ap-GnRH and measured for the accumulation of cAMP and inositol monophosphate (IP1). Radioreceptor assay revealed that only the long receptor bound specifically to the radioligand. Further, only the long receptor responded to ap-GnRH with an increased accumulation of IP1, but not cAMP. Our studies show that despite the more prevalent expression of the short receptor, only the long receptor is the functional ap-GnRHR. Importantly, this is only the second report on the authentication of a protostome GnRHR, and based on the function and the phylogenetic grouping of ap-GnRHR, we suggest that this receptor is more similar to protostome corazonin receptors than chordate GnRHRs. PMID:27467252

  14. Functional Authentication of a Novel Gastropod Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Receptor Reveals Unusual Features and Evolutionary Insight.

    PubMed

    Kavanaugh, Scott I; Tsai, Pei-San

    2016-01-01

    A gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-like molecule was previously identified in a gastropod, Aplysia californica, and named ap-GnRH. In this study, we cloned the full-length cDNA of a putative ap-GnRH receptor (ap-GnRHR) and functionally authenticated this receptor as a bona fide ap-GnRHR. This receptor contains two potential translation start sites, each accompanied by a Kozak sequence, suggesting the translation of a long and a short form of the receptor is possible. The putative ap-GnRHR maintains the conserved structural motifs of GnRHR-like receptors and shares 45% sequence identity with the octopus GnRHR. The expression of the putative ap-GnRHR short form is ubiquitous in all tissues examined, whereas the long form is only expressed in parts of the central nervous system, osphradium, small hermaphroditic duct, and ovotestis. The cDNA encoding the long or the short receptor was transfected into the Drosophila S2 cell line and subject to a radioreceptor assay using 125I-labeled ap-GnRH as the radioligand. Further, the transfected cells were treated with various concentrations of ap-GnRH and measured for the accumulation of cAMP and inositol monophosphate (IP1). Radioreceptor assay revealed that only the long receptor bound specifically to the radioligand. Further, only the long receptor responded to ap-GnRH with an increased accumulation of IP1, but not cAMP. Our studies show that despite the more prevalent expression of the short receptor, only the long receptor is the functional ap-GnRHR. Importantly, this is only the second report on the authentication of a protostome GnRHR, and based on the function and the phylogenetic grouping of ap-GnRHR, we suggest that this receptor is more similar to protostome corazonin receptors than chordate GnRHRs. PMID:27467252

  15. Substance P (SP) induces expression of functional corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor-1 (CRHR-1) in human mast cells.

    PubMed

    Asadi, Shahrzad; Alysandratos, Konstantinos-Dionysios; Angelidou, Asimenia; Miniati, Alexandra; Sismanopoulos, Nikolaos; Vasiadi, Magdalini; Zhang, Bodi; Kalogeromitros, Dimitrios; Theoharides, Theoharis C

    2012-02-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is secreted under stress and regulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. However, CRH is also secreted outside the brain where it exerts proinflammatory effects through activation of mast cells, which are increasingly implicated in immunity and inflammation. Substance P (SP) is also involved in inflammatory diseases. Human LAD2 leukemic mast cells express only CRHR-1 mRNA weakly. Treatment of LAD2 cells with SP (0.5-2 μM) for 6 hours significantly increases corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor-1 (CRHR-1) mRNA and protein expression. Addition of CRH (1 μM) to LAD2 cells, which are "primed" with SP for 48 hours and then washed, induces synthesis and release of IL-8, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) 24 hours later. These effects are blocked by pretreatment with an NK-1 receptor antagonist. Treatment of LAD2 cells with CRH (1 μM) for 6 hours induces gene expression of NK-1 as compared with controls. However, repeated stimulation of mast cells with CRH (1 μM) leads to downregulation of CRHR-1 and upregulation in NK-1 gene expression. These results indicate that SP can stimulate mast cells and also increase expression of functional CRHR-1, whereas CRH induces NK-1 gene expression. These results may explain CRHR-1 and NK-1 expression in lesional skin of psoriatic patients. PMID:22089831

  16. Isolation and characterization of the corticotropin-releasing factor-related diuretic hormone receptor in Rhodnius prolixus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hae-Ri; Zandawala, Meet; Lange, Angela B; Orchard, Ian

    2016-09-01

    Rhodnius prolixus, the vector of human Chagas disease, is a hemipteran insect that undergoes rapid post-feeding diuresis following ingestion of a blood meal that can be up to 10 times its initial body weight. Corticotropin-releasing factor-related diuretic hormone (Rhopr-CRF/DH) and serotonin are neurohormones that are synergistic in increasing rates of fluid secretion by Malpighian tubules during this rapid post-feeding diuresis. A Rhopr-CRF/DH receptor transcript has now been isolated and characterized from fifth instar R. prolixus. The receptor is a family B1 (secretin) G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) and was deorphaned in a heterologous cellular system using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells stably expressing a promiscuous G-protein (Gα16). This assay was also used to demonstrate the presence of Rhopr-CRF/DH in the haemolymph of R. prolixus in response to blood-gorging. Two additional cell lines were used in this heterologous assay to verify that the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) pathway and not the inositol triphosphate (IP3) pathway was stimulated upon activation of the receptor. Lastly, quantitative PCR demonstrated strong receptor expression in digestive tissues, upper Malpighian tubules and reproductive tissues. Identification of the Rhopr-CRF/DH receptor now provides tools for a more detailed understanding into the precise coordination of diuresis and other physiological processes in R. prolixus. PMID:27237375

  17. Growth inhibition of tumor cells in vitro by using monoclonal antibodies against gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gregory; Ge, Bixia

    2010-07-01

    As the continuation of a previous study, synthetic peptides corresponding to the extracellular domains of human gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor were used to generate additional monoclonal antibodies which were further characterized biochemically and immunologically. Among those identified to recognize GnRH receptor, monoclonal antibodies designated as GHR-103, GHR-106 and GHR-114 were found to exhibit high affinity (Kd < or = 1 x 10(-8) M) and specificity to GnRH receptor as judged by the whole cell binding immunoassay and Western blot assay. Both anti-GnRH receptor monoclonal antibodies and GnRH were shown to compete for the same binding site of GnRH receptor on the surface of cultured cancer cells. Growth inhibitions of cancer cells cultured in vitro were demonstrated by cellular apoptosis experiments (TUNEL and MTT assays) under different conditions of treatment with GHR-106 monoclonal antibody or GnRH analogs. It was generally observed that both GnRH I and GHR-106 effectively induce the apoptosis of cultured cancer cells as determined by TUNEL and MTT assays. Consistently, suppressions of gene expressions at mRNA levels were demonstrated with several ribosomal proteins (P0, P1, P2 and L37), when cancer cells were incubated with GnRH or GHR-106. The widespread expressions of GnRH receptor in almost all of the studied human cancer cell lines were also demonstrated by RT-PCR and Western blot assay, as well as indirect immunofluorescence assay with either of these monoclonal antibodies as the primary antibody. In view of the longer half life of antibodies as compared to that of GnRH or its analogs, anti-GnRH receptor monoclonal antibodies in humanized forms could function as GnRH analogs and serve as an ideal candidate of anti-cancer drugs for therapeutic treatments of various cancers in humans as well as for fertility regulations. PMID:20182875

  18. Combined modification of intracellular and extracellular loci on human gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor provides a mechanism for enhanced expression.

    PubMed

    Maya-Núñez, G; Janovick, J A; Conn, P M

    2000-12-01

    The mammalian gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor (GnRH-R) has been a therapeutic target for human and animal medicine. This receptor is a unique G-protein-coupled receptor that lacks the intracellular C-terminal domain commonly associated with this family. Development of highthrough put screens for agents active in humans has been hampered by low expression levels of the hGnRH-R in cellular models. Two sites have attracted the interest of laboratories studying regulation of expression. The chimeric addition of the C-terminal tail from catfish GnRH-R (cfGnRH-R) to the rat GnRH-R significantly augmented receptor expression in GH3 cells. In addition, rodent GnRH-R contains 327 amino acids, but cow, sheep, and human GnRH-R (hGnRH-R) contain 328 residues, the "additional" residue being a Lys 191. Deletion of Lys 191 (del 191) from the hGnRH-R resulted in increased receptor expression levels and decreased internalization rates in both COS-7 and HEK 293 cells. In this study, the combined effect of the addition of the C-tail from cfGnRH-R and deletion of the Lys 191 from the hGnRH-R was compared to expression of the wild-type (WT) or either alteration alone in a transient expression system using primate cells. The altered receptor (hGnRH-R[del 191]-C-tail) showed significantly increased receptor expression at the cell surface compared with the WT or either modification alone. The inositol phosphate response to stimulation was also significantly elevated in response to GnRH agonist. After treatment with a GnRH agonist, the altered receptors showed a slower internalization rate. The homologous steady-state regulation of the WT and the altered receptors was similar, although the response of the altered receptors was significantly decreased. These results suggest that the conformational change in the receptor as a result of the deletion of Lys 191 and the addition of the C-terminus tail substantially increased the steady-state receptor expression and decreased

  19. A Phenotypic High Throughput Screening Assay for the Identification of Pharmacoperones for the Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Emery; Spicer, Timothy; Chase, Peter; Scampavia, Louis; Janovick, Jo Ann

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We describe a phenotypic high throughput screening (HTS) calcium flux assay designed to identify pharmacoperones for the gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR). Pharmacoperones are target-specific, small molecules that diffuse into cells, rescue misfolded protein mutants, and restore them to function. Rescue is based on correcting the trafficking of mutants that would otherwise be retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and unable to function correctly. This approach identifies drugs with a significant degree of novelty, relying on cellular mechanisms that are not currently exploited. Development of such assays is important, since the extensive use of agonist/antagonist screens alone means that useful chemical structures may be present in existing libraries but have not been previously identified using existing methods. Our assay utilizes cell lines stably expressing a GnRHR mutant under the control of a tetracycline (OFF) transactivator. This allows us to quantitate the level of functional and properly trafficked G protein coupled receptors present in each test well. Furthermore, since we are able to turn receptor expression on and off, we can rapidly eliminate the majority of false positives from our screening results. Our data show that this approach is likely to be successful in identifying hits from large chemical libraries. PMID:24831790

  20. The growth hormone receptor.

    PubMed

    Waters, Michael J

    2016-06-01

    Once thought to be present only in liver, muscle and adipose tissue, the GH receptor is now known to be ubiquitously distributed, in accord with the many pleiotropic actions of GH. These include the regulation of metabolism, postnatal growth, cognition, immune, cardiac and renal systems and gut function. GH exerts these actions primarily through alterations in gene expression, initiated by activation of its membrane receptor and the resultant activation of the associated JAK2 (Janus kinase 2) and Src family kinases. Receptor activation involves hormone initiated movements within a receptor homodimer, rather than simple receptor dimerization. We have shown that binding of the hormone realigns the orientation of the two receptors both by relative rotation and by closer apposition just above the cell membrane. This is a consequence of the asymmetric placement of the binding sites on the hormone. Binding results in a conversion of parallel receptor transmembrane domains into a rotated crossover orientation, which produces separation of the lower part of the transmembrane helices. Because the JAK2 is bound to the Box1 motif proximal to the inner membrane, receptor activation results in separation of the two associated JAK2s, and in particular the removal of the inhibitory pseudokinase domain from the kinase domain of the other JAK2 (and vice versa). This brings the two kinase domains into position for trans-activation and initiates tyrosine phosphorylation of the receptor cytoplasmic domain and other substrates such as STAT5, the key transcription factor mediating most genomic actions of GH. There are a limited number of genomic actions initiated by the Src kinase family member which also associates with the upper cytoplasmic domain of the receptor, including important immune regulatory actions to dampen exuberant innate immune activation of cells involved in transplant rejection. These findings offer insights for developing specific receptor antagonists which may be

  1. Polymorphisms of the porcine cathepsins, growth hormone-releasing hormone and leptin receptor genes and their association with meat quality traits in Ukrainian Large White breed.

    PubMed

    Balatsky, Viktor; Bankovska, Irina; Pena, Ramona N; Saienko, Artem; Buslyk, Tetyana; Korinnyi, Sergii; Doran, Olena

    2016-06-01

    Cathepsins, growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) and leptin receptor (LEPR) genes have been receiving increasing attention as potential markers for meat quality and pig performance traits. This study investigated the allele variants in four cathepsin genes (CTSB, CTSK, CTSL, CTSS), GHRH and LEPR in pure-bred Ukrainian Large White pigs and evaluated effects of the allele variants on meat quality characteristics. The study was conducted on 72 pigs. Genotyping was performed using PCR-RFLP technique. Meat quality characteristics analysed were intramuscular fat content, tenderness, total water content, ultimate pH, crude protein and ashes. A medium level of heterozygosity values was established for GHRH and LEPR genes which corresponded to very high levels of informativeness indexes. Cathepsins CTSL, CTSB and CTSK had a low level of heterozygosity, and CTSS did not segregate in this breed. Association studies established that intramuscular fat content and tenderness were affected by the allele variance in GHRH and LEPR but not by CTSB and CTSL genes. The GHRH results could be particularly relevant for the production of lean prime cuts as the A allele is associated with both, a lower meat fat content and better tenderness values, which are two attributes highly regarded by consumers. Results of this study suggest that selective breeding towards GHRH/AA genotype would be particularly useful for improving meat quality characteristics in the production systems involving lean Large White lines, which typically have less than 2 % intramuscular fat content. PMID:27075656

  2. Local corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) signals to its receptor CRHR1 during postnatal development of the mouse olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Isabella; Bhullar, Paramjit K; Tepe, Burak; Ortiz-Guzman, Joshua; Huang, Longwen; Herman, Alexander M; Chaboub, Lesley; Deneen, Benjamin; Justice, Nicholas J; Arenkiel, Benjamin R

    2016-01-01

    Neuropeptides play important physiological functions during distinct behaviors such as arousal, learning, memory, and reproduction. However, the role of local, extrahypothalamic neuropeptide signaling in shaping synapse formation and neuronal plasticity in the brain is not well understood. Here, we characterize the spatiotemporal expression profile of the neuropeptide corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and its receptor CRHR1 in the mouse OB throughout development. We found that CRH-expressing interneurons are present in the external plexiform layer, that its cognate receptor is expressed by granule cells, and show that both CRH and CRHR1 expression enriches in the postnatal period when olfaction becomes important towards olfactory-related behaviors. Further, we provide electrophysiological evidence that CRHR1-expressing granule cells functionally respond to CRH ligand, and that the physiological circuitry of CRHR1 knockout mice is abnormal, leading to impaired olfactory behaviors. Together, these data suggest a physiologically relevant role for local CRH signaling towards shaping the neuronal circuitry within the mouse OB. PMID:25224546

  3. Substance P (SP) induces expression of functional corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor-1 (CRHR-1) in human mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Asadi, Shahrzad; Alysandratos, Konstantinos-Dionysios; Angelidou, Asimenia; Miniati, Alexandra; Sismanopoulos, Nikolaos; Vasiadi, Magdalini; Zhang, Bodi; Kalogeromitros, Dimitrios; Theoharides, Theoharis C.

    2012-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is secreted under stress and regulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. However, CRH is also secreted outside the brain where it exerts pro-inflammatory effects through activation of mast cells, which are increasingly implicated in immunity and inflammation. Substance P (SP) is also involved in inflammatory diseases. Human LAD2 leukemic mast cells express only CRHR-1 mRNA weakly. Treatment of LAD2 cells with SP (0.5–2 µM) for 6 hr significantly increases CRHR-1 mRNA and protein expression. Addition of CRH (1 µM) to LAD2 cells “primed” with SP for 48 hr and then washed, induces synthesis and release of IL-8, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) 24 hr later. These effects are blocked by pretreatment with an NK-1 receptor antagonist. Treatment of LAD2 cells with CRH (1 µM) for 6 hr induces gene expression of NK-1 as compared to controls. However, repeated stimulation of mast cells with CRH (1 µM) leads to downregulation of CRHR-1 and upregulation in NK-1 gene expression. These results indicate that SP can stimulate mast cells and also increase expression of functional CRHR-1, while CRH induces NK-1 gene expression. These results may explain CRHR-1 and NK-1 expression in lesional skin of psoriatic patients. PMID:22089831

  4. Salt bridges overlapping the gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor agonist binding site reveal a coincidence detector for G protein-coupled receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Janovick, Jo Ann; Pogozheva, Irina D; Mosberg, Henry I; Conn, P Michael

    2011-08-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play central roles in most physiological functions, and mutations in them cause heritable diseases. Whereas crystal structures provide details about the structure of GPCRs, there is little information that identifies structural features that permit receptors to pass the cellular quality control system or are involved in transition from the ground state to the ligand-activated state. The gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR), because of its small size among GPCRs, is amenable to molecular biological approaches and to computer modeling. These techniques and interspecies comparisons are used to identify structural features that are important for both intracellular trafficking and GnRHR activation yet distinguish between these processes. Our model features two salt (Arg(38)-Asp(98) and Glu(90)-Lys(121)) and two disulfide (Cys(14)-Cys(200) and Cys(114)-Cys(196)) bridges, all of which are required for the human GnRHR to traffic to the plasma membrane. This study reveals that both constitutive and ligand-induced activation are associated with a "coincidence detector" that occurs when an agonist binds. The observed constitutive activation of receptors lacking Glu(90)-Lys(121), but not Arg(38)-Asp(98) ionic bridge, suggests that the role of the former connection is holding the receptor in the inactive conformation. Both the aromatic ring and hydroxyl group of Tyr(284) and the hydrogen bonding of Ser(217) are important for efficient receptor activation. Our modeling results, supported by the observed influence of Lys(191) from extracellular loop 2 (EL2) and a four-residue motif surrounding this loop on ligand binding and receptor activation, suggest that the positioning of EL2 within the seven-α-helical bundle regulates receptor stability, proper trafficking, and function. PMID:21527534

  5. Salt Bridges Overlapping the Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Receptor Agonist Binding Site Reveal a Coincidence Detector for G Protein-Coupled Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Janovick, Jo Ann; Pogozheva, Irina D.; Mosberg, Henry I.

    2011-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play central roles in most physiological functions, and mutations in them cause heritable diseases. Whereas crystal structures provide details about the structure of GPCRs, there is little information that identifies structural features that permit receptors to pass the cellular quality control system or are involved in transition from the ground state to the ligand-activated state. The gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR), because of its small size among GPCRs, is amenable to molecular biological approaches and to computer modeling. These techniques and interspecies comparisons are used to identify structural features that are important for both intracellular trafficking and GnRHR activation yet distinguish between these processes. Our model features two salt (Arg38-Asp98 and Glu90-Lys121) and two disulfide (Cys14-Cys200 and Cys114-Cys196) bridges, all of which are required for the human GnRHR to traffic to the plasma membrane. This study reveals that both constitutive and ligand-induced activation are associated with a “coincidence detector” that occurs when an agonist binds. The observed constitutive activation of receptors lacking Glu90-Lys121, but not Arg38-Asp98 ionic bridge, suggests that the role of the former connection is holding the receptor in the inactive conformation. Both the aromatic ring and hydroxyl group of Tyr284 and the hydrogen bonding of Ser217 are important for efficient receptor activation. Our modeling results, supported by the observed influence of Lys191 from extracellular loop 2 (EL2) and a four-residue motif surrounding this loop on ligand binding and receptor activation, suggest that the positioning of EL2 within the seven-α-helical bundle regulates receptor stability, proper trafficking, and function. PMID:21527534

  6. Molecular cloning and gene expression of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor in the orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, S L; Chuang, H C; Nan, F H; Ruan, Y H; Kuo, C M

    2007-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms of gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRH-R) involved in the endocrine regulation of reproduction in the orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides. The full-length cDNA encoding GnRH-R type I was successfully cloned from the pituitary by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA end (RACE) methods in the grouper. The complete GnRH-R type I cDNA is 1607 bp, which includes an open reading frame of 1092 bp encoding a protein of 364 amino acids, a seven-alpha helix transmembrane domain, a N-terminal extracellular domain, and a C-terminal cytoplasmic domain. The expression of GnRH-R type I was found to be highest in the pituitary. An intramuscular injection of various GnRH types in vivo was attempted. The expression of GnRH-R type I was stimulated by a single injection of salmon GnRH, while in the case of chicken GnRH II treatment, the expression of GnRH-R type I was inhibited. This suggests that the action of chick GnRH II is probably enhanced through the GnRH receptor of different forms. Furthermore, none of them were expressed by an injection of seabream GnRH, and this is likely attributed to the injection dose being below the threshold level, and this remains to be further examined. In conclusion, GnRHs of various types are effective in stimulating the expression of gonadotropins through various forms of the GnRH-R, and multiple forms of the receptor gene likely exist in teleosts. PMID:17329139

  7. SET Protein Interacts with Intracellular Domains of the Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone Receptor and Differentially Regulates Receptor Signaling to cAMP and Calcium in Gonadotrope Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Avet, Charlotte; Garrel, Ghislaine; Denoyelle, Chantal; Laverrière, Jean-Noël; Counis, Raymond; Cohen-Tannoudji, Joëlle; Simon, Violaine

    2013-01-01

    In mammals, the receptor of the neuropeptide gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRHR) is unique among the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family because it lacks the carboxyl-terminal tail involved in GPCR desensitization. Therefore, mechanisms involved in the regulation of GnRHR signaling are currently poorly known. Here, using immunoprecipitation and GST pull-down experiments, we demonstrated that SET interacts with GnRHR and targets the first and third intracellular loops. We delineated, by site-directed mutagenesis, SET binding sites to the basic amino acids 66KRKK69 and 246RK247, located next to sequences required for receptor signaling. The impact of SET on GnRHR signaling was assessed by decreasing endogenous expression of SET with siRNA in gonadotrope cells. Using cAMP and calcium biosensors in gonadotrope living cells, we showed that SET knockdown specifically decreases GnRHR-mediated mobilization of intracellular cAMP, whereas it increases its intracellular calcium signaling. This suggests that SET influences signal transfer between GnRHR and G proteins to enhance GnRHR signaling to cAMP. Accordingly, complexing endogenous SET by introduction of the first intracellular loop of GnRHR in αT3-1 cells significantly reduced GnRHR activation of the cAMP pathway. Furthermore, decreasing SET expression prevented cAMP-mediated GnRH stimulation of Gnrhr promoter activity, highlighting a role of SET in gonadotropin-releasing hormone regulation of gene expression. In conclusion, we identified SET as the first direct interacting partner of mammalian GnRHR and showed that SET contributes to a switch of GnRHR signaling toward the cAMP pathway. PMID:23233674

  8. Hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor neurons fire in synchrony with the female reproductive cycle

    PubMed Central

    Schauer, Christian; Tong, Tong; Petitjean, Hugues; Blum, Thomas; Peron, Sophie; Mai, Oliver; Schmitz, Frank; Boehm, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) controls mammalian reproduction via the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (hpg) axis, acting on gonadotrope cells in the pituitary gland that express the GnRH receptor (GnRHR). Cells expressing the GnRHR have also been identified in the brain. However, the mechanism by which GnRH acts on these potential target cells remains poorly understood due to the difficulty of visualizing and identifying living GnRHR neurons in the central nervous system. We have developed a mouse strain in which GnRHR neurons express a fluorescent marker, enabling the reliable identification of these cells independent of the hormonal status of the animal. In this study, we analyze the GnRHR neurons of the periventricular hypothalamic nucleus in acute brain slices prepared from adult female mice. Strikingly, we find that the action potential firing pattern of these neurons alternates in synchrony with the estrous cycle, with pronounced burst firing during the preovulatory period. We demonstrate that GnRH stimulation is sufficient to trigger the conversion from tonic to burst firing in GnRHR neurons. Furthermore, we show that this switch in the firing pattern is reversed by a potent GnRHR antagonist. These data suggest that endogenous GnRH acts on GnRHR neurons and triggers burst firing in these cells during late proestrus and estrus. Our data have important clinical implications in that they indicate a novel mode of action for GnRHR agonists and antagonists in neurons of the central nervous system that are not part of the classical hpg axis. PMID:26063780

  9. Changes in gonadotropin-releasing hormone and gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor gene expression after an increase in carbon monoxide concentration in the cavernous sinus of male wild boar and pig crossbread.

    PubMed

    Romerowicz-Misielak, M; Tabecka-Lonczynska, A; Koziol, K; Gilun, P; Stefanczyk-Krzymowska, S; Och, W; Koziorowski, M

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies indicate that there are at least a few regulatory systems involved in photoperiodic synchronisation of reproductive activity, which starts with the retina and ends at the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) pulse generator. Recently we have shown indicated that the amount of carbon monoxide (CO) released from the eye into the ophthalmic venous blood depends on the intensity of sunlight. The aim of this study was to test whether changes in the concentration of carbon monoxide in the ophthalmic venous blood may modulate reproductive activity, as measured by changes in GnRH and GnRH receptor gene expression. The animal model used was mature male swine crossbred from wild boars and domestic sows (n = 48). We conducted in vivo experiments to determine the effect of increased CO concentrations in the cavernous sinus of the mammalian perihypophyseal vascular complex on gene expression of GnRH and GnRH receptors as well as serum luteinizing hormone (LH) levels. The experiments were performed during long photoperiod days near the summer solstice (second half of June) and short photoperiod days near the winter solstice (second half of December). These crossbred swine demonstrated a seasonally-dependent marked variation in GnRH and GnRH receptor gene expression and systemic LH levels in response to changes in CO concentration in ophthalmic venous blood. These results seem to confirm the hypothesis of humoral phototransduction as a mechanism for some of bright light's effects in animal chronobiology and the effect of CO on GnRH and GnRH receptor gene expression. PMID:27512004

  10. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone and receptor distributions in the visual processing regions of four coral reef fishes.

    PubMed

    Maruska, Karen P; Tricas, Timothy C

    2007-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is widely distributed in the brain of fishes where it may function as a neuromodulator of sensory processing and behavior. Immunocytochemical and neuronal label experiments were conducted on species from four families of coral reef fishes (Chaetodontidae, butterflyfish; Pomacentridae, damselfish; Gobiidae, goby; and Labridae, wrasse) to assess conservation of GnRH targets in the visual processing retina and brain. In all species, GnRH-immunoreactive (-ir) axons from the terminal nerve project principally to the boundary between the inner plexiform (IPL) and inner nuclear (INL) layers of the retina, and are less prominent in the optic nerve, ganglion cell, IPL and INL. However, the density of GnRH innervation within the retina differed among fish species with highest concentrations in the damselfish and butterflyfish and lowest in the goby and wrasse. Experiments also show that GnRH receptors are associated with GnRH-ir axons within the fish retina primarily at the IPL-INL boundary, the region of light-dark adaptation and image processing of contrast, motion or color. GnRH-ir axons overlapped central projections of retinal ganglion cell axons primarily within the stratum album centrale and stratum griseum centrale of the tectum in all species, and were concentrated in several diencephalic visual processing centers. GnRH receptors are also localized to diencephalic visual centers and the stratum griseum periventriculare of the tectum, where motion perception and coordination of motor behavioral responses in three-dimensional space occur. This work demonstrates that the basic neural substrates for peptide-sensory convergence are conserved at multiple processing levels in the visual system of several reef fishes. Species differences in GnRH innervation to the retina and GnRH receptor distributions may be related to phylogeny, their use of vision in natural behaviors, or possibly binding properties of the antibodies. Future studies

  11. Variation in the corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1) gene modulates age effects on working memory.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Simone; Gärtner, Matti; Fuge, Philipp; Fan, Yan; Weigand, Anne; Feeser, Melanie; Aust, Sabine; Heekeren, Hauke R; Jacobs, Arthur; Heuser, Isabella; Bajbouj, Malek

    2015-02-01

    Decline in working memory (WM) functions during aging has been associated with hippocampal dysfunction mediated by age-related changes to the corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) system. Recent reports suggest that GG-homozygous individuals of single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs110402 and rs242924) in the CRH receptor 1 (CRHR1) gene show increased stress vulnerability and decreased BOLD responses in WM relevant regions. However, until now, no study investigated the interaction effects of variation in the CRHR1 gene and age on individual differences in WM. Here, young, middle-aged and old subjects (N = 466) were genotyped for rs110402 and rs242924 within the CRHR1 gene and an n-back task was used to investigate the hypothesis that vulnerable genotypes (GG-homozygotes) would show impaired WM functions that might be magnified by increased CRH production with advancing age. Our results show an impact of genotype already in middle-age with significantly better performance in AT-carriers. Working memory performance in AT-carriers did not differ between young and middle-aged subjects, but was significantly impaired in old age. In GG-homozygotes, severe working memory dysfunction occurred already in middle age. Our data indicate that GG-homozygotes of CRHR1 rs110402 and rs242924 represent a genetically driven subtype of early WM impairments due to alterations in hippocampal CRHR1 activation. Early interventions that have proven effective in delaying cognitive decline appear to be particularly important for these subjects at risk for premature memory decline, who are in the prime of their personal and professional lives. PMID:25541005

  12. Development, validation, and utilization of a novel antibody specific to the type III chicken gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, H O; Joseph, N T; Maddineni, S R; Ramachandran, R; Bédécarrats, G Y

    2011-02-01

    Two gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptors (GnRH-Rs) have been characterized in chickens to date: cGnRH-R-I and cGnRH-R-III, with cGnRH-R-III being the predominant pituitary form. The purpose of the present study was to first validate a novel antibody for the specific detection of cGnRH-R-III and second, using this antibody, detect changes in cGnRH-R-III protein levels in the pituitary gland of male and female chickens during a reproductive cycle. The localization of cGnRH-R-III within the anterior pituitary gland was also determined. Western blotting of pituitary extracts and transiently transfected COS-7 cell lysates revealed that our antibody is highly specific to cGnRH-R-III protein. Similarly, when used in immunocytochemistry, this antibody specifically detects cells expressing cGnRH-R-III and not cGnRH-R-I. Western blot analyses of chicken pituitary gland homogenates show that cGnRH-R-III protein levels are significantly greater in sexually mature birds than in immature birds or birds at the end of a reproductive cycle (P < 0.0001). A similar pattern was observed for both males and females. Additionally, the antibody was able to detect cGnRH-R-III in cells along the periphery of the cephalic and caudal lobes of the anterior pituitary where the cells containing the gonadotropins are located. In summary, we successfully validated a novel antibody to cGnRH-R-III and showed levels of cGnRH-R-III protein in the pituitary fluctuate with respect to the reproductive status in both male and female chickens. PMID:21093197

  13. Androgen regulation of corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 2 (CRHR2) mRNA expression and receptor binding in the rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Weiser, Michael J.; Goel, Nirupa; Sandau, Ursula S.; Bale, Tracy L.; Handa, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Stress-induced affective disorders, such as depression and anxiety, are more prevalent in females than in males. The reduced vulnerability to these disorders in males may be due to the presence of androgens, which are known to dampen the stress response and reduce anxiety-like behaviors. However, a neurobiological mechanism for this sex difference has yet to be elucidated. Corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 2 (CRHR2) has been implicated in regulating anxiety-type behaviors and is expressed in stress-responsive brain regions that also contain androgen receptors (AR). We hypothesized that androgen may exert its effects through actions on CRHR2 and we therefore examined the regulation of CRHR2 mRNA and receptor binding in the male rat forebrain following androgen administration. Young adult male Sprague/Dawley rats were gonadectomized (GDX) and treated with the non-aromatizable androgen, dihydrotestosterone propionate (DHTP) using hormone filled Silastic capsules. Control animals received empty capsules. Using quantitative real time RT-PCR, CRHR2 mRNA levels were determined in block dissected brain regions. DHTP treatment significantly increased CRHR2 mRNA expression in the hippocampus, hypothalamus, and lateral septum (p < 0.01) when compared to vehicle-treated controls. A similar trend was observed in amygdala (p = 0.05). Furthermore, in vitro autoradiography revealed significantly higher CRHR2 binding in the lateral septum in androgen-treated males, with the highest difference observed in the ventral lateral region. Regulation of CRHR2 mRNA by AR was also examined using an in vitro approach. Hippocampal neurons, which contain high levels of AR, were harvested from E17–18 rat fetuses, and maintained in primary culture for 14 days. Neurons were then treated with dihydrotestosterone (DHT; 1 nM), DHT plus flutamide (an androgen receptor antagonist), or vehicle for 48 hours. CRHR2 mRNA levels were measured using quantitative real time RT-PCR. Consistent with in

  14. HOMOLOGOUS UP-REGULATION OF THE GONADOTROPIN-RELEASING HORMONE RECEPTOR IN A T3-1 CELLS IS ASSOCIATED WITH UNCHANGED RECEPTOR MESSENGER RNA (MRNA) LEVELS AND ALTERED MRNA ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Depending on the concentration and duration of agonist exposure, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor number either increases or decreases in response to GnRH. he molecular basis of this regulation could involve a combination of modulation of gene transcription, RNA pro...

  15. Peripheral activities of growth hormone-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Granata, R

    2016-07-01

    Growth hormone (GH)-releasing hormone (GHRH) is produced by the hypothalamus and stimulates GH synthesis and release in the anterior pituitary gland. In addition to its endocrine role, GHRH exerts a wide range of extrapituitary effects which include stimulation of cell proliferation, survival and differentiation, and inhibition of apoptosis. Accordingly, expression of GHRH, as well as the receptor GHRH-R and its splice variants, has been demonstrated in different peripheral tissues and cell types. Among the direct peripheral activities, GHRH regulates pancreatic islet and β-cell survival and function and endometrial cell proliferation, promotes cardioprotection and wound healing, influences the immune and reproductive systems, reduces inflammation, indirectly increases lifespan and adiposity and acts on skeletal muscle cells to inhibit cell death and atrophy. Therefore, it is becoming increasingly clear that GHRH exerts important extrapituitary functions, suggesting potential therapeutic use of the peptide and its analogs in a wide range of medical settings. PMID:26891937

  16. Comparison of estrogen receptor-α, progesterone receptor and calponin expression in gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonist-sensitive and -resistant uterine fibroids

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Hee; Kim, Joo Young; Lee, Yoon Hee; Chong, Gun Oh; Park, Ji Young

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study was aimed to compare immunohistochemical expression of estrogen receptor (ER)-α, progesterone receptor (PR), and calponin in gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRH-a)-sensitive and -resistant uterine fibroids. Methods We collected data retrospectively. The sensitive group consisted of women who had reduction in uterine volume greater than 40% following GnRH-a treatment. Uterine volume was either reduced by less than 10%, or was increased in the resistant group. A tissue microarray was constructed using formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues, 31 and 26 patients for the sensitive and resistant groups, respectively. Tissue sections were immunostained with antibodies against ER-α, PR, and calponin. The intensity and area of the immunohistochemical reactions were evaluated using a semi-quantitative scoring system. The Mann-Whitney U-test, Fisher's exact test, and Spearman's rank correlation test were used for analysis of data. Results PR (P = 0.04) and calponin (P = 0.03) showed a significantly higher staining intensity in the resistant group than in the sensitive group. Both groups showed comparable expression of ER-α (P = 0.23). In correlation analysis between changes in uterine volume after GnRH-a therapy and clinicopathological factors, the immunohistochemical intensity of PR (P = 0.04) and calponin (P = 0.03) was significantly correlated with changes in uterine volume. Conclusion This study shows that GnRH-a resistance of uterine fibroids is not related to ER-α content, but the expression of PR and calponin is related with GnRH-a resistance. PMID:24678488

  17. Growth Hormone-Releaser Diet Attenuates Cognitive Dysfunction in Klotho Mutant Mice via Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Receptor Activation in a Genetic Aging Model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seok Joo; Chung, Yoon Hee; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Dang, Duy-Khanh; Nam, Yunsung; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Kim, Yong Sun; Nabeshima, Toshitaka

    2014-01-01

    Background It has been recognized that a defect in klotho gene expression accelerates the degeneration of multiple age-sensitive traits. Accumulating evidence indicates that aging is associated with declines in cognitive function and the activity of growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). Methods In this study, we examined whether a GH-releaser diet could be effective in protecting against cognitive impairment in klotho mutant mice. Results The GH-releaser diet significantly induced the expression of IGF-1 and IGF-1 receptors in the hippocampus of klotho mutant mice. Klotho mutant mice showed significant memory impairments as compared with wild-type mice. In addition, the klotho mutation significantly decreased the expression of cell survival/antiapoptotic factors, including phospho-Akt (p-Akt)/phospho-glycogen synthase kinase3β (p-GSK3β), phospho-extracellular signal-related kinase (p-ERK), and Bcl-2, but significantly increased those of cell death/proapoptotic factors, such as phospho-c-jun N-terminal kinase (p-JNK), Bax, and cleaved caspase-3 in the hippocampus. Treatment with GH-releaser diet significantly attenuated both decreases in the expression of cell survival/antiapoptotic factors and increases in the expression of cell death/proapoptotic factors in the hippocampus of klotho mutant mice. In addition, klotho mutation-induced oxidative stress was significantly attenuated by the GH-releaser diet. Consequently, a GH-releaser diet significantly improved memory function in the klotho mutant mice. GH-releaser diet-mediated actions were significantly reversed by JB-1, an IGF-1 receptor antagonist. Conclusion The results suggest that a GH-releaser diet attenuates oxidative stress, proapoptotic changes and consequent dysfunction in klotho mutant mice by promoting IGF-1 expression and IGF-1 receptor activation. PMID:25309793

  18. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) receptors. Localization by light microscopic autoradiography in rat brain using (/sup 3/H)(3-Me-His/sub 2/)TRH as the radioligand

    SciTech Connect

    Mantyh, P.W.; Hunt, S.P.

    1985-02-01

    Thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) is a putative neurotransmitter in both the central and peripheral nervous system. In the present report, we have used autoradiography coupled with densitometric analysis of tritium-sensitive film to investigate the distribution of (/sup 3/H)(3-Me-His2)TRH ((/sup 3/H)MeTRH)-binding sizes in the rat brain. Previous pharmacological reports have established that many of these (/sup 3/H)MeTRH-binding sites have a structure-activity profile consistent with being a physiological TRH receptor. A high level of TRH receptors were observed in the accessory olfactory bulb, lateral nucleus of the amygdala, dentate gyrus, and entorhinal cortex. Moderate levels of TRH receptors were observed in the rhinal cortex, hypothalamus, superior colliculus, several brainstem motor nuclei, and lamina I of the spinal trigeminal nucleus pars candalis, while low concentrations of receptors are present in the cerebral cortex, striatum and ventral horn of the spinal cord. Very low levels of receptors were observed in the globus pallidus and in most nuclei of the dorsal thalamus. Comparisons of the distribution of TRH receptors to TRH-immunoreactive content indicates that, while in some areas of the brain there is a rough correlation between levels of TRH peptide and its receptor, in most brain areas there is little obvious correlation between the two. While such a discrepancy has been observed for other peptides and their receptors, the extensive distribution of TRH receptors in the central nervous system does provide an explanation for the variety of behavioral effects observed when TRH is infused into the central nervous system.

  19. Visualization of distinct patterns of subcellular redistribution of the thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor-1 and gqalpha /G11alpha induced by agonist stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Drmota, T; Novotny, J; Gould, G W; Svoboda, P; Milligan, G

    1999-01-01

    The rat thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor-1 (TRHR-1) was modified by the addition of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and expressed stably in HEK293 cells. Extensive overlap of plasma membrane distribution of autofluorescent TRHR-1-GFP with that of the phosphoinositidase C-linked G-proteins Gqalpha/G11alpha, identified by indirect immunofluorescence, was monitored concurrently. Addition of thyrotropin-releasing hormone resulted in rapid separation of TRHR-1-GFP and Gqalpha/G11alpha signals as the receptor was internalized. This situation persisted for more than an hour. At longer time periods a fraction of the cellular Gqalpha/G11alpha was also internalized, although much of the Gqalpha/G11alpha immunoreactivity remained associated with the plasma membrane. Parallel experiments, in which the cellular distribution of TRHR-1-GFP and Gqalpha/G11alpha immunoreactivity were monitored in sucrose-gradient fractions following cell disruption, also demonstrated a rapid, agonist-induced movement of TRHR-1-GFP away from the plasma membrane to low-density vesicular fractions. At later time points, a fraction of the cellular Gqalpha/G11alpha immunoreactivity was also redistributed to overlapping, but non-identical, low-density-vesicle-containing fractions. Pretreatment of the cells with cytochalasin D or nocodazole prevented agonist-induced redistribution of G-protein but not TRHR-1-GFP, further indicating resolution of the mechanics of these two processes. The combination of a GFP-modified receptor and immunostaining of the G-proteins activated by that receptor allows, for the first time, concurrent analysis of the varying dynamics and bases of internalization and redistribution of two elements of the same signal-transduction cascade. PMID:10333499

  20. Heterooligomerization between vasotocin and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) receptors augments CRH-stimulated 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate production.

    PubMed

    Mikhailova, Marina V; Mayeux, Philip R; Jurkevich, Alexander; Kuenzel, Wayne J; Madison, Farrah; Periasamy, Ammasi; Chen, Ye; Cornett, Lawrence E

    2007-09-01

    In birds, ACTH release from the anterior pituitary gland during stress is controlled by CRH and arginine vasotocin (AVT). Using 5-wk-old male chicks, simultaneous iv injections of CRH and AVT were found to result in a greater than additive increase in plasma corticosterone levels compared with that obtained with individual administration of either peptide hormone. In order to investigate molecular mechanisms underlying this observation, the chicken CRH receptor (CRHR) and vasotocin VT2 receptor (VT2R) were fused to cyan and yellow fluorescent proteins and expressed in HeLa cells. The resulting CRHR and VT2R fusion proteins were expressed appropriately in the plasma membrane and were found to couple to downstream signal transduction pathways. Quantitative fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) analysis was used to determine whether the CRHR and VT2R formed heterodimers. In the absence of CRH and AVT, the FRET efficiency was 15-18%, and the distance between receptors was 5-6 nm. Treatment of the cells that expressed both cyan fluorescent protein-CRHR and yellow fluorescent protein-VT2R with CRH or AVT alone did not lead to a significant change in the FRET efficiency. However, simultaneous addition of these hormones increased the efficiency of the FRET signal and decreased the distance between the two receptors. In HeLa cells expressing both CRHR and VT2R, treatment with CRH and AVT resulted in a significant increase in cAMP production over that with CRH alone, indicating that heterodimer formation may enhance the ability of the CRHR to activate downstream signal transduction. PMID:17536010

  1. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone and thyrotropin-releasing hormone in human and bovine milk.

    PubMed

    Amarant, T; Fridkin, M; Koch, Y

    1982-10-01

    Two hypothalamic peptide hormones, luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), have been isolated from human milk and bovine colostrum. Acidified methanolic extracts, prepared from human milk, bovine colostrum and rat hypothalami, as well as synthetic LHRH and TRH markers were subjected to high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). The eluates were tested for the presence of LHRH and TRH by specific radioimmunoassays. It was found that milk extracts contain significant amounts of LHRH (3.9 - 11.8 ng/ml) and TRH (0.16 - 0.34 ng/ml), which comigrate with the corresponding marker hormones and with those of hypothalamic origin. The HPLC-purified LHRH from both human and bovine milk was bioactive in a dose-response manner similar to synthetic LHRH. PMID:6816590

  2. Interactions of growth hormone secretagogues and growth hormone-releasing hormone/somatostatin.

    PubMed

    Tannenbaum, G S; Bowers, C Y

    2001-02-01

    The class of novel synthetic compounds termed growth hormone secretagogues (GHSs) act in the hypothalamus through, as yet, unknown pathways. We performed physiologic and histochemical studies to further understand how the GHS system interacts with the well-established somatostatin (SRIF)/growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) neuroendocrine system for regulating pulsatile GH secretion. Comparison of the GH-releasing activities of the hexapeptide growth hormone-releasing peptide-6 (GHRP-6) and GHRH administered intravenously to conscious adult male rats showed that the pattern of GH responsiveness to GHRP-6 was markedly time-dependent, similar to that observed with GHRH. Immunoneutralization of endogenous SRIF reversed the blunted GH response to GHRP-6 at trough times, suggesting that GHRP-6 neither disrupts nor inhibits the cyclical release of endogenous hypothalamic SRIF. By striking contrast, passive immunization with anti-GHRH serum virtually obliterated the GH responses to GHRP-6, irrespective of the time of administration. These findings suggest that the GHSs do not act by altering SRIF release but, rather, stimulate GH release via GHRH-dependent pathways. Our dual chromogenic and autoradiographic in situ hybridization experiments revealed that a subpopulation of GHRH mRNA-containing neurons in the arcuate (Arc) nucleus and ventromedial nucleus (VMN) of the hypothalamus expressed the GHS receptor (GHS-R) gene. These results provide strong anatomic evidence that GHSs may directly stimulate GHRH release into hypophyseal portal blood, and thereby influence GH secretion, through interaction with the GHS-R on GHRH- containing neurons. Altogether, these findings support the notion that an additional neuroendocrine pathway may exist to regulate pulsatile GH secretion, possibly through the influence of the newly discovered GHS natural peptide, ghrelin. PMID:11322498

  3. Developmental programming: Impact of fetal exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals on gonadotropin-releasing hormone and estrogen receptor mRNA in sheep hypothalamus

    SciTech Connect

    Mahoney, Megan M.; Padmanabhan, Vasantha

    2010-09-01

    Bisphenol-A (BPA) and methoxychlor (MXC), two endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) with estrogenic and antiandrogenic effects, disrupt the reproductive system. BPA has profound effects on luteinizing hormone (LH) surge amplitude, and MXC has profound effects on on LH surge timing in sheep. The neural mechanisms involved in the differential disruption of the LH surge by these two EDCs remain to be elucidated. We tested the hypothesis that the differential effects of BPA and MXC on LH surge system involved changes in hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and estrogen receptors (ESR), ESR1 and ESR2, mRNA expression. Pregnant sheep were given daily injections of cottonseed oil (controls), MXC, or BPA (5 mg/kg/day) from day 30 to 90 of gestation (term 147 d). Offspring from these animals were euthanized as adults, during the late follicular phase following synchronization of estrus with prostaglandin F{sub 2{alpha}}, just before the expected onset of preovulatory LH surge and changes in mRNA expression of hypothalamic GnRH, ESR1, and ESR2 quantified following in situ hybridization. GnRH mRNA expression was significantly lower in both groups of EDC-treated females compared to controls. ESR1 expression was increased in prenatal BPA- but not MXC-treated females in medial preoptic area relative to controls. In contrast, ESR2 expression was reduced in the medial preoptic area of both EDC-treated groups. Differences in expression of ESR1/ESR2 receptors may contribute to the differential effects of BPA and MXC on the LH surge system. These findings provide support that prenatal exposure to EDCs alters the neural developmental trajectory leading to long-term reproductive consequences in the adult female.

  4. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone in the ovary.

    PubMed

    Metallinou, Chryssa; Asimakopoulos, Byron; Schröer, Andreas; Nikolettos, Nikos

    2007-12-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) plays a pivotal role in the physiology of reproduction in mammals. GnRH acts by binding to the GnRH receptor (GnRHR). In humans, only 1 conventional GnRH receptor subtype (type I GnRH receptor) has been found. In the human genome, 2 forms of GnRH have been identified, GnRH-I (mammal GnRH) and GnRH-II (chicken GnRH II). Both forms and their common receptor are expressed, apart from the hypothalamus, in various compartments of the human ovary. Gonadal steroids, gonadotropins, and GnRH itself controls the regulation of the GnRH/GnRHR system gene expression in the human ovary. The 2 types of GnRH acting paracrinally/autocrinally influence ovarian steroidogenesis, decrease the proliferation, and induce apoptosis of ovarian cells. In this review, the biology of GnRH/GnRHR system in humans, the potential roles of GnRH, and the direct effects of GnRH analogues in ovarian cells are discussed. PMID:18089592

  5. Internalization of gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptors (GnRHRs): does arrestin binding to the C-terminal tail target GnRHRs for dynamin-dependent internalization?

    PubMed

    Hislop, James N; Caunt, Christopher J; Sedgley, Kathleen R; Kelly, Eammon; Mundell, Stuart; Green, Lisa D; McArdle, Craig A

    2005-08-01

    Activation of seven-transmembrane receptors is typically followed by desensitization and arrestin-dependent internalization via vesicles that are pinched off by a dynamin collar. Arrestins also scaffold Src, which mediates dynamin-dependent internalization of beta2-adrenergic receptors. Type I mammalian gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptors (GnRHRs) do not rapidly desensitize or internalize (characteristics attributed to their unique lack of C-terminal tails) whereas non-mammalian GnRHRs (that have C-terminal tails) are rapidly internalized and desensitized. Moreover, internalization of Xenopus (X) GnRHRs is dynamin-dependent whereas that of human (h) GnRHRs is not, raising the possibility that binding of arrestin to the C-terminal tails of GnRHRs targets them to the dynamin-dependent internalization pathway. To test this we have compared wild-type GnRHRs with chimeric receptors (XGnRHR C-terminal tail added to the hGnRHR alone (h.XtGnRHR) or with exchange of the third intracellular loops (h.Xl.XtGnRHR)). We show that adding the XGnRHR C-terminal tail facilitates arrestin- and dynamin-dependent internalization as well as arrestin/green fluorescent protein translocation, but Src (or mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular-signal-regulated kinase kinase) inhibition does not slow internalization, and h.XtGnRHR internalization is slower than that of the hGnRHR. Moreover, arrestin expression increased XGnRHR internalization even when dynamin was inhibited and h.Xl.XtGnRHR underwent rapid arrestin-dependent internalization without signaling to G(q/11). Thus, although the C-terminal tail can direct GnRHRs for arrestin- and dynamin-dependent internalization, this effect is not dependent on Src activation and arrestin can also facilitate dynamin-independent internalization. PMID:16087731

  6. Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone Receptor Type 1 (CRHR1) Clustering with MAGUKs Is Mediated via Its C-Terminal PDZ Binding Motif

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Julia; Engeholm, Maik; Ederer, Marion S.; Breu, Johannes; Møller, Thor C.; Michalakis, Stylianos; Rasko, Tamas; Wanker, Erich E.; Biel, Martin; Martinez, Karen L.; Wurst, Wolfgang; Deussing, Jan M.

    2015-01-01

    The corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor type 1 (CRHR1) plays an important role in orchestrating neuroendocrine, behavioral, and autonomic responses to stress. To identify molecules capable of directly modulating CRHR1 signaling, we performed a yeast-two-hybrid screen using the C-terminal intracellular tail of the receptor as bait. We identified several members of the membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) family: postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95), synapse-associated protein 97 (SAP97), SAP102 and membrane associated guanylate kinase, WW and PDZ domain containing 2 (MAGI2). CRHR1 is co-expressed with the identified MAGUKs and with the additionally investigated PSD93 in neurons of the adult mouse brain and in primary hippocampal neurons, supporting the probability of a physiological interaction in vivo. The C-terminal PDZ (PSD-95, discs large, zona occludens 1) binding motif of CRHR1 is essential for its physical interaction with MAGUKs, as revealed by the CRHR1-STAVA mutant, which harbors a functionally impaired PDZ binding motif. The imitation of a phosphorylation at Thr413 within the PDZ binding motif also disrupted the interaction with MAGUKs. In contrast, distinct PDZ domains within the identified MAGUKs are involved in the interactions. Expression of CRHR1 in primary neurons demonstrated its localization throughout the neuronal plasma membrane, including the excitatory post synapse, where the receptor co-localized with PSD95 and SAP97. The co-expression of CRHR1 and respective interacting MAGUKs in HEK293 cells resulted in a clustered subcellular co-localization which required an intact PDZ binding motif. In conclusion, our study characterized the PDZ binding motif-mediated interaction of CRHR1 with multiple MAGUKs, which directly affects receptor function. PMID:26352593

  7. Alcohol-preferring rats show decreased corticotropin-releasing hormone 2 receptor expression and differences in HPA activation compared to alcohol-nonpreferring rats

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Weidong; Spence, John Paul; Eskay, Robert; Fitz, Stephanie D.; Damadzic, Ruslan; Lai, Dongbing; Foroud, Tatiana; Carr, Lucinda G.; Shekhar, Anantha; Chester, Julia A.; Heilig, Markus; Liang, Tiebing

    2014-01-01

    Background Corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) and urocortins (UCNs) bind to corticotropin releasing hormone type 2 receptor (CRH-R2), a Gs protein-coupled receptor that plays an important role in modulation of anxiety and stress responses. The Crhr2 gene maps to a quantitative trait locus (QTL) for alcohol preference on chromosome 4 previously identified in inbred alcohol-preferring (iP) and non-preferring (iNP) F2 rats. Methods and Results Crhr2 mRNA expression was determined in male alcohol-naïve iP and iNP rats in several brain regions, and lower levels of Crhr2 mRNA were observed in iP rats compared to iNP rats. To identify genetic variation that may underlie differences detected in Crhr2 expression, DNA sequencing was performed and variations were identified in the promoter region, coding region and 3’-untranslated region between the iP and iNP rats. A 7bp insertion in the Crhr2 promoter of iP rats altered expression in vitro as measured by reporter assays. While CRH-R2 binding affinity did not significantly differ between male iP and iNP receptor variants, CRH-R2 density was lower in the amygdala of iP as compared to iNP rats. Male P rats displayed decreased social interaction and significantly higher corticosterone levels directly following 30 minute restraint when compared to male NP rats. Conclusions This study identified Crhr2 as a candidate gene of interest underlying the chromosome 4 QTL for alcohol consumption that was previously identified in the P and NP model. Crhr2 promoter polymorphism reduced mRNA expression in certain brain regions, particularly the amygdala, and lowered the density of CRH-R2 in the amygdala of iP compared to iNP rats. Together, these differences between the animals may contribute to the drinking disparity as well as the anxiety differences of the P and NP animals. PMID:24611993

  8. Terminal nerve gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurones express multiple GnRH receptors in a teleost, the dwarf gourami (Colisa lalia).

    PubMed

    Hajdú, P; Ikemoto, T; Akazome, Y; Park, M K; Oka, Y

    2007-06-01

    Gonadotophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) peptide released from the terminal nerve (TN)-GnRH neurones of the dwarf gourami primarily modifies the electrical properties of various neurones, including the TN-GnRH neurones themselves. However, our knowledge on the expression of GnRH receptors (GnRHRs) in the TN-GnRH neurones is still limited. Here, we used the single-cell reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction after whole-cell patch-clamp recording to study the distribution of various GnRHR types expressed in the individual TN-GnRH neurones. We found that TN-GnRH neurones express two of the three types of GnRHRs cloned in the dwarf gourami: GnRHR1-2 and -R2, but not -R1-1. Furthermore, in agreement with our previous findings, all TN-GnRH neurones contained mRNAs of salmon GnRH but not chicken GnRH-II. PMID:17504441

  9. Analogues of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone containing cytotoxic groups.

    PubMed Central

    Janáky, T; Juhász, A; Bajusz, S; Csernus, V; Srkalovic, G; Bokser, L; Milovanovic, S; Redding, T W; Rékási, Z; Nagy, A

    1992-01-01

    In an attempt to produce better cytotoxic analogues, chemotherapeutic antineoplastic radicals including an alkylating nitrogen mustard derivative of D-phenylalanine (D-melphalan), reactive cyclopropane, anthraquinone derivatives [2-(hydroxymethyl)anthraquinone and the anticancer antibiotic doxorubicin], and an antimetabolite (methotrexate) were coupled to suitably modified agonists and antagonists of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH). Analogues with D-lysine6 and D-ornithine6 or N epsilon-(2,3-diaminopropionyl)-D-lysine and N delta-(2,3-diaminopropionyl)-D-ornithine were used as carriers for one or two cytotoxic moieties. The enhanced biological activities produced by the incorporation of D amino acids into position 6 of the agonistic analogues were further increased by the attachment of hydrophobic cytotoxic groups, resulting in compounds with 10-50 times higher activity than LH-RH. Most of the monosubstituted agonistic analogues showed high affinities for the membrane receptors of human breast cancer cells, while the receptor binding affinities of peptides containing two cytotoxic side chains were lower. Antagonistic carriers [Ac-D-Nal(2)1,D-Phe(4Cl)2,D-Trp3,Arg5,D-Lys6,D-Ala10] LH-RH [where Nal(2) is 3-(2-naphthyl)alanine], [Ac-D-Nal(2)1,D-Phe(4Cl)2,D-Trp3,Arg5,N epsilon-(2,3-diaminopropionyl)-D-Lys6,D-Ala10]LH-RH, and their D-Pal(3)3 homologs [Pal(3) is 3-(3-pyridyl)alanine] as well as [Ac-D-Nal(2)1,D-Phe(4Cl)2,D-Pal(3)3,Tyr5,N epsilon-(2,3-diamino-propionyl)-D-Lys6,D-Ala10]LH-RH were linked to cytotoxic compounds. The hybrid molecules inhibited ovulation in rats at doses of 10 micrograms and suppressed LH release in vitro. The receptor binding of cytotoxic analogues was decreased compared to the precursor peptides, although analogues with 2-(hydroxymethyl)anthraquinone hemiglutarate had high affinities. All of the cytotoxic analogues tested inhibited [3H]thymidine incorporation into DNA in cultures of human breast and prostate cancer cell lines

  10. Analog specificity of the thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor in the central nervous system: possible clinical implications

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, E.F.; Engel, W.K.

    1985-02-11

    TRH has rapid-onset (30 sec), slow-offset (1-12 days) clinical benefit in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and other motor neuron disorders. This benefit is probably receptor-mediated and may have at least 2 components. To obtain a better understanding of the various responses to TRH of the spinal lower motor neurons (LMNs) in patients, and possibly to help guide selection of additional therapeutic agents, the authors utilized rat CNS (spinal-cord and brain membranes) to analyze the ability of certain molecules to inhibit specific binding of (/sup 3/H)methyl TRH ((/sup 3/H)MeTRH) to the TRH receptor. They found: a) lack of high-affinity binding of the TRH-analog DN-1417 by spinal-cord and brain TRH receptor, despite its known strong TRH-like action physiologically on LMNs; b) lack of high-affinity binding of the TRH-product cyclo(His-Pro) by spinal cord and brain TRH receptor despite its having some strong TRH-like physiologic actions on the CNS; and c) lack of any identifiable high-affinity receptor for cyclo(His-Pro) in spinal cord and brain. From these data the authors hypothesize that the acute transmitter-like action of DN-1417, TRH, and possibly other TRH-analogs and products on LMNs is via a non-TRH receptor, such as an amine or amino acid neurotransmitter receptor, e.g. a 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor. They further postulate that the CNS TRH-receptor may modulate a trophic-like influence of TRH on LMNs.

  11. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone II receptor (GnRHR-II) knockdown reduces testis size and decreases testosterone secretion during pubertal development in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The second mammalian isoform of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH-II) functions quite differently from the classical form (GnRH-I) as it is a poor stimulator of gonadotropin release. Unlike most species, a functional GnRHR-II has been identified in swine. Our laboratory detected GnRHR-IIs on Leyd...

  12. Receptors for corticotropin-releasing hormone in human pituitary: Binding characteristics and autoradiographic localization to immunocytochemically defined proopiomelanocortin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smets, G.; Vauquelin, G.; Moons, L.; Smitz, J.; Kloeppel, G. )

    1991-08-01

    Using autoradiography combined with immunocytochemistry, the authors demonstrated that the target cells of CRH in the human pituitary were proopiomelanocortin cells. Scatchard analysis of (125I)Tyr0-oCRH saturation binding revealed the presence of one class of saturable, high affinity sites on pituitary tissue homogenate. The equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) for (125I)Tyr0-oCRH ranged from 1.1-1.6 nM, and the receptor density was between 200-350 fmol/mg protein. Fixation of cryostat sections with 4% paraformaldehyde before tracer incubation improved both tissue preservation and localization of the CRH receptor at the cellular level. Additional postfixation with 1% glutaraldehyde inhibited tracer diffusion during subsequent immunocytochemistry and autoradiography. (125I)Tyr0-oCRH was found in cytoplasmic inclusions or at the cell periphery of ACTH/beta-endorphin cells in the anterior pituitary. Single cells of the posterior pituitary were also CRH receptor positive. Cells staining for PRL or GH were CRH receptor negative. They conclude that CRH binds only to high affinity receptors on ACTH/{beta}-endorphin cells in the human pituitary.

  13. Human gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor gene transcription: up-regulation by 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate/protein kinase A pathway.

    PubMed

    Cheng, K W; Leung, P C

    2001-07-01

    Transient transfection of mouse gonadotrope-derived (alphaT3-1) cells with a 2297 bp human GnRHR promoter-luciferase construct (p2300-LucF) showed a dose- and time-dependent increase in the human gonodotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR) promoter activity after forskolin treatment. An average of 4.8-fold increase in promoter activity was observed after 12 h of 10 microM forskolin treatment. This effect was mimicked by administration of cholera toxin, cAMP analog or pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide 38 (PACAP). A specific adenylate cyclase (AC) inhibitor (ACI) or protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor (PKAI) pretreatment reversed the forskolin- and PACAP-induced increase in the human GnRHR promoter activity. These results not only confirm the stimulatory effect of Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) in human GnRHR promoter activation, but also suggest that hormones or neurotransmitters that activate adenylate cyclase in pituitary gonadotropes may increase the expression of human GnRHR gene in transcriptional level. Progressive 5' deletion assays identified a 412 bp fragment (-577 to 167) in the human GnRHR 5'-flanking region that is essential in maintaining the basal responsiveness to cAMP. Mutagenesis coupled with functional studies have identified two putative AP-1/CREB binding sites, namely hGR-AP/CRE-1 and hGR-AP/CRE-2 that participated in mediating the cAMP-stimulatory effect. Mutation of the putative hGR-AP/CRE-1 and hGR-CRE-2 resulted in a 38 and 32% decrease in the forskolin-induced stimulation. However, mutation of both binding sites did not completely abolish the cAMP-stimulatory effect, suggesting that multiple transcription factor binding sites were involved in full response in cAMP stimulation. The binding of CREB to these motifs was confirmed by gel mobility shift assay and antibody supershift assay. PMID:11476937

  14. Regulation of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone and luteinizing hormone secretion by hypothalamic amino acids.

    PubMed

    Donoso, A O; Seltzer, A M; Navarro, C E; Cabrera, R J; López, F J; Negro-Vilar, A

    1994-04-01

    1. The present review discusses the proposed roles of the amino acids glutamate and GABA in the central regulation of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) and in luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion. 2. Descriptions of the mechanisms of action of these neurotransmitters have focused on two diencephalic areas, namely, the preoptic-anterior hypothalamic area where the cell bodies of LHRH neurons are located, and the medial basal hypothalamus which contains the nerve endings of the LHRH system. Increasing endogenous GABA concentration by drugs, GABA agonists, or blockade of glutamatergic neurotransmission by selective antagonists in rats and non-human primates prevents ovulation and pulsatile LH release, and blunts the LH surges induced by estrogen or an estrogen-progesterone combination. In contrast, glutamate and different glutamate agonists such as NMDA, AMPA and kainate, can increase LHRH/LH secretion. 3. The simultaneous enhancement of glutamatergic activity and a decrease of GABAergic tone may positively influence the maturation of the pituitary-gonadal system in rats and non-human primates. Administration of glutamate receptor agonists has been shown to significantly advance the onset of puberty. Conversely, glutamate antagonists or increased endogenous GABA levels may delay the onset of puberty. The physiological regulation of LHRH/LH secretion may thus involve a GABA-glutamate interaction and a cooperative action of the various types of ionotropic glutamate receptors. 4. The inhibitory actions of GABA on LH release and ovulation may be exerted at the level of afferent nerve terminals that regulate LHRH secretion. A likely candidate is noradrenaline, as suggested by the synaptic connections between noradrenergic nerve terminals and GABAergic interneurons in the preoptic area. Recent experiments have provided complementary evidence for the physiological balance between inhibitory and excitatory transmission resulting in modulation of the action of

  15. Testicular gonadotropin-releasing hormone II receptor (GnRHR-II) knockdown constitutively impairs diurnal testosterone secretion in the boar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The second mammalian GnRH isoform (GnRH-II) and its specific receptor (GnRHR-II) are highly expressed in the testis, suggesting an important role in testis biology. Gene coding errors prevent the production of GnRH-II and GnRHR-II in many species, but both genes are functional in swine. We have demo...

  16. Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Corticotropin Releasing Hormone Receptor 1 Gene (CRHR1) Are Associated With Quantitative Trait of Event-Related Potential and Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Andrew C. H.; Manz, Niklas; Tang, Yongqiang; Rangaswamy, Madhavi; Almasy, Laura; Kuperman, Samuel; Nurnberger, John; O’Connor, Sean J.; Edenberg, Howard J.; Schuckit, Marc A.; Tischfield, Jay; Foroud, Tatiana; Bierut, Laura J.; Rohrbaugh, John; Rice, John P.; Goate, Alison; Hesselbrock, Victor; Porjesz, Bernice

    2011-01-01

    Background Endophenotypes reflect more proximal effects of genes than diagnostic categories, hence providing a more powerful strategy in searching for genes involved in complex psychiatric disorders. There is strong evidence suggesting the P3 amplitude of the event-related potential (ERP) as an endophenotype for the risk of alcoholism and other disinhibitory disorders. Recent studies demonstrated a crucial role of corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1) in the environmental stress response and ethanol self-administration in animal models. The aim of the present study was to test the potential associations between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CRHR1 gene and the quantitative trait, P3 amplitude during the processing of visual target signals in an oddball paradigm, as well as alcohol dependence diagnosis. Methods We analyzed a sample from the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA) comprising 1049 Caucasian subjects from 209 families (including 472 alcohol-dependent individuals). Quantitative transmission disequilibrium test (QTDT) and family-based association test (FBAT) were used to test the association, and false discovery rate (FDR) was applied to correct for multiple comparisons. Results Significant associations (p < 0.05) were found between the P3 amplitude and alcohol dependence with multiple SNPs in the CRHR1 gene. Conclusions Our results suggest that CRHR1 may be involved in modulating the P3 component of the ERP during information processing and in vulnerability to alcoholism. These findings underscore the utility of electrophysiology and the endophenotype approach in the genetic study of psychiatric disorders. PMID:20374216

  17. Pharmacological blockade of corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRH1R) reduces voluntary consumption of high alcohol concentrations in non-dependent Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Cippitelli, Andrea; Damadzic, Ruslan; Singley, Erick; Thorsell, Annika; Ciccocioppo, Roberto; Eskay, Robert L.; Heilig, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Background A dysregulation of the corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) system has been implicated in the development of excessive alcohol consumption and dependence. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether the CRH system is also recruited when non-dependent Wistar rats escalate to high alcohol intake in the intermittent (alternate days) model of drinking. Methods We compared intermittent and continuous access to 20% (v/v) alcohol in a two-bottle free choice drinking paradigm. Following a total of twenty 24-hour exposures for every experimental group, we assessed signs of alcohol withdrawal, including anxiety-like behavior and sensitivity to stress. The selective CRH1 receptor (CRH1R) antagonist antalarmin (0, 10, 20 mg/kg, i.p.) was tested on alcohol consumption. Results Intermittent access to 20% alcohol led non-selected Wistar rats to escalate their voluntary intake to a high and stable level, whereas continuously exposed animals maintained a lower consumption. These groups did not differ in physical withdrawal signs. In addition, no differences were found when anxiogenic-like behavior was studied, neither under basal conditions or following restraint stress. Nevertheless, sensitivity to the treatment with the CRH1R antalarmin was observed since a reduction of 20% alcohol intake was found in both groups of animals regardless of the regimen of alcohol exposure. In addition, antalarmin was effective when injected to animals exposed to intermittent 10% (v/v) alcohol whereas it failed to suppress 10% continuous alcohol intake. Conclusions Pharmacological blockade of CRH1R reduced alcohol drinking when sustained high levels of intake were achieved suggesting that the CRH system plays a key role when high doses of ethanol are consumed by non-dependent subjects. This supports the notion that CRH system not only maintains the dependent state but also engages the transition to dependence. PMID:22036774

  18. Noise stress changes mRNA expressions of corticotropin-releasing hormone, its receptors in amygdala, and anxiety-related behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Eraslan, Evren; Akyazi, Ibrahim; Ergül-Ekiz, Elif; Matur, Erdal

    2015-01-01

    Noise is a psychological, environmental stressor that activates limbic sites in the brain. Limbic sites such as the amygdala and the amygdaloid corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) system play an important role in integrating stress response. We investigated the association between noise exposures, CRH-related molecules in the amygdala, and behavioral alterations. In total 54 Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into the following three groups: Control (CON), acute noise exposure (ANE), and chronic noise exposure (CNE). The ANE group was exposed to 100 dB white noise only once in 4 h and the CNE group was exposed to the same for 4 h per day for 30 days. Expression profiles of CRH and its receptors CRH-R1 and CRH-R2 were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The same stress procedure was applied to the ANE and CNE groups for behavior testing. The anxiety responses of the animals after acute and chronic stress exposure were measured in the defensive withdrawal test. CNE upregulated CRH and CRH-R1 mRNA levels but downregulated CRH-R2 mRNA levels. ANE led to a decrease in both CRH-R1 and CRH-R2 expression. In the defensive withdrawal test, while the ANE increased, CNE reduced anxiety-like behaviors. The present study shows that the exposure of rats to white noise (100 dB) leads to behavioral alterations and molecule-specific changes in the CRH system. Behavioral alterations can be related to these molecular changes in the amygdala. PMID:25913553

  19. Diurnal and circadian oscillations in expression of kisspeptin, kisspeptin receptor and gonadotrophin-releasing hormone 2 genes in the grass puffer, a semilunar-synchronised spawner.

    PubMed

    Ando, H; Ogawa, S; Shahjahan, Md; Ikegami, T; Doi, H; Hattori, A; Parhar, I

    2014-07-01

    In seasonally breeding animals, the circadian and photoperiodic regulation of neuroendocrine system is important for precisely-timed reproduction. Kisspeptin, encoded by the Kiss1 gene, acts as a principal positive regulator of the reproductive axis by stimulating gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurone activity in vertebrates. However, the precise mechanisms underlying the cyclic regulation of the kisspeptin neuroendocrine system remain largely unknown. The grass puffer, Takifugu niphobles, exhibits a unique spawning rhythm: spawning occurs 1.5-2 h before high tide on the day of spring tide every 2 weeks, and the spawning rhythm is connected to circadian and lunar-/tide-related clock mechanisms. The grass puffer has only one kisspeptin gene (kiss2), which is expressed in a single neural population in the preoptic area (POA), and has one kisspeptin receptor gene (kiss2r), which is expressed in the POA and the nucleus dorsomedialis thalami. Both kiss2 and kiss2r show diurnal variations in expression levels, with a peak at Zeitgeber time (ZT) 6 (middle of day time) under the light/dark conditions. They also show circadian expression with a peak at circadian time 15 (beginning of subjective night-time) under constant darkness. The synchronous and diurnal oscillations of kiss2 and kiss2r expression suggest that the action of Kiss2 in the diencephalon is highly dependent on time. Moreover, midbrain GnRH2 gene (gnrh2) but not GnRH1 or GnRH3 genes show a unique semidiurnal oscillation with two peaks at ZT6 and ZT18 within a day. The cyclic expression of kiss2, kiss2r and gnrh2 may be important in the control of the precisely-timed diurnal and semilunar spawning rhythm of the grass puffer, possibly through the circadian clock and melatonin, which may transmit the photoperiodic information of daylight and moonlight to the reproductive neuroendocrine centre in the hypothalamus. PMID:24824153

  20. [Pathologic manifestations of hormonal receptor mutations].

    PubMed

    Milgrom, E

    2000-01-01

    Mutations of receptor genes are involved in various aspects of thyroid and gonadal pathology. Activating mutations of TSH and LH receptors are associated with hyperthyroidism and premature puberty. These mutations are dominant and lead to the synthesis of a constitutive receptor, i.e. a receptor active even in the absence of hormone. Inactivating mutations of TSH, gonadotropin and GnRH receptors are recessive. They determine either a hypothyroidism or a hypogonadism. In the case of alterations of gonadotropin receptors the hypogonadism is hypergonadotrophic. It is hypogonadotrophic in the case of mutations of the GnRH receptor. PMID:10989556

  1. Rapid steroid hormone actions via membrane receptors.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Nofrat; Verma, Anjali; Bivens, Caroline B; Schwartz, Zvi; Boyan, Barbara D

    2016-09-01

    Steroid hormones regulate a wide variety of physiological and developmental functions. Traditional steroid hormone signaling acts through nuclear and cytosolic receptors, altering gene transcription and subsequently regulating cellular activity. This is particularly important in hormonally-responsive cancers, where therapies that target classical steroid hormone receptors have become clinical staples in the treatment and management of disease. Much progress has been made in the last decade in detecting novel receptors and elucidating their mechanisms, particularly their rapid signaling effects and subsequent impact on tumorigenesis. Many of these receptors are membrane-bound and lack DNA-binding sites, functionally separating them from their classical cytosolic receptor counterparts. Membrane-bound receptors have been implicated in a number of pathways that disrupt the cell cycle and impact tumorigenesis. Among these are pathways that involve phospholipase D, phospholipase C, and phosphoinositide-3 kinase. The crosstalk between these pathways has been shown to affect apoptosis and proliferation in cardiac cells, osteoblasts, and chondrocytes as well as cancer cells. This review focuses on rapid signaling by 17β-estradiol and 1α,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3 to examine the integrated actions of classical and rapid steroid signaling pathways both in contrast to each other and in concert with other rapid signaling pathways. This new approach lends insight into rapid signaling by steroid hormones and its potential for use in targeted drug therapies that maximize the benefits of traditional steroid hormone-directed therapies while mitigating their less desirable effects. PMID:27288742

  2. Naloxone does not Affect the Luteinizing Hormone-Releasing Hormone-Induced Inhibition of Luteinizing Hormone Secretion in Sheep.

    PubMed

    Naylor, A M; Porter, D W; Lincoln, D W

    1989-06-01

    Abstract Injection of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (21 pmol) into the third cerebral ventricle of long-term ovariectomized ewes caused a marked inhibition of luteinizing hormone secretion. Mean luteinizing hormone levels and luteinizing hormone pulse frequency were reduced significantly when compared with the control responses to saline (50 mul). A notable characteristic of the response was the delayed and sustained nature of the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-induced inhibition. In the presence of the opioid antagonist naloxone (4 +/- 25 mg iv), the central administration of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone still produced a marked inhibition of luteinizing hormone secretion. Again, mean luteinizing hormone levels and luteinizing hormone pulse frequency were reduced significantly. When naloxone was injected iv, there was a significant rise in mean luteinizing hormone levels as a consequence of an increase in pulse frequency (in four out of five ewes) and a significant increase in luteinizing hormone pulse amplitude. In conclusion, these data suggest that central opioid pathways sensitive to blockade by naloxone are not involved in the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-induced inhibition of luteinizing hormone release. Furthermore, in the long-term ovariectomized ewe, endogenous opioid peptides exert a tonic inhibitory influence on luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone/luteinizing hormone secretion. PMID:19210459

  3. A refined model of the thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) receptor binding pocket. Novel mixed mode Monte Carlo/stochastic dynamics simulations of the complex between TRH and TRH receptor.

    PubMed

    Laakkonen, L J; Guarnieri, F; Perlman, J H; Gershengorn, M C; Osman, R

    1996-06-18

    Previous mutational and computational studies of the thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) receptor identified several residues in its binding pocket [see accompanying paper, Perlman et al. (1996) Biochemistry 35, 7643-7650]. On the basis of the initial model constructed with standard energy minimization techniques, we have conducted 15 mixed mode Monte Carlo/stochastic dynamics (MC-SD) simulations to allow for extended sampling of the conformational states of the ligand and the receptor in the complex. A simulated annealing protocol was adopted in which the complex was cooled from 600 to 310 K in segments of 30 ps of the MC-SD simulations for each change of 100 K. Analysis of the simulation results demonstrated that the mixed mode MC-SD protocol maintained the desired temperature in the constant temperature simulation segments. The elevated temperature and the repeating simulations allowed for adequate sampling of the torsional space of the complex with successful conservation of the general structure and good helicity of the receptor. For the analysis of the interaction between TRH and the binding pocket, TRH was divided into four groups consisting of pyroGlu, His, ProNH2, and the backbone. The pairwise interaction energies of the four separate portions of TRH with the corresponding residues in the receptor provide a physicochemical basis for the understanding of ligand-receptor complexes. The interaction of pyroGlu with Tyr106 shows a bimodal distribution that represents two populations: one with a H-bond and another without it. Asp195 was shown to compete with pyroGlu for the H-bond to Tyr106. Simulations in which Asp195 was interacting with Arg283, thus removing it from the vicinity of Tyr106, resulted in a stable H-bond to pyroGlu. In all simulations His showed a van der Waals attraction to Tyr282 and a weak electrostatic repulsion from Arg 306. The ProNH2 had a strong and frequent H-bonding interaction with Arg306. The backbone carbonyls show a frequent H

  4. Hormone activation of baculovirus expressed progesterone receptors.

    PubMed

    Elliston, J F; Beekman, J M; Tsai, S Y; O'Malley, B W; Tsai, M J

    1992-03-15

    Human and chicken progesterone receptors (A form) were overproduced in a baculovirus expression system. These recombinant progesterone receptors were full-length bound progesterone specifically and were recognized by monoclonal antibodies, AB52 and PR22, specific for human and chicken progesterone receptor, respectively. In gel retardation studies, binding of recombinant human and chicken progesterone receptors to their progesterone response element (PRE) was specific and was enhanced in the presence of progesterone. Binding of human progesterone receptor to the PRE was also enhanced in the presence of the antiprogestin, RU486, but very little effect was observed in the presence of estradiol, dexamethasone, testosterone, and vitamin D. In our cell-free transcription system, human progesterone receptor induced transcription in a receptor-dependent and hormone-activable manner. Receptor-stimulated transcription required the presence of the PRE in the test template and could be specifically inhibited by excess PRE oligonucleotides. Furthermore, chicken progesterone receptor also induced in vitro transcription in a hormone-activable manner. These results demonstrate that steroid receptors overexpressed in a baculovirus expression system are functional and exhibit steroid-responsive binding and transcription. These observations support our present understanding of the mechanism of steroid receptor-regulated gene expression and provide a technological format for studies of the role of hormone and antihormone in altering gene expression. PMID:1544902

  5. A homozygous R262Q mutation in the gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GNRHR) presenting as constitutional delay of growth and puberty with subsequent borderline oligospermia

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lin; Conway, Gerard S.; Hill, Nathan R.; Dattani, Mehul T.; Hindmarsh, Peter C.; Achermann, John C.

    2007-01-01

    Context The GnRH receptor plays a central role in regulating gonadotropin synthesis and release, and several mutations in the GNRHR gene have been reported in patients with idiopathic or familial forms of isolated hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH). Objective To investigate whether partial loss of function mutations in the GnRH receptor might be responsible for delayed puberty phenotypes. Patients Sibling pairs with delayed puberty (n=8) or where one brother had delayed puberty and another had hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (n=3). Methods Mutational analysis of the GNRHR gene. Results A homozygous R262Q mutation in the GnRH receptor was identified in two brothers from one family. In this kindred, the proband presented at 15 years of age with delayed puberty. Following a short course of testosterone, he seemed to be progressing through puberty appropriately and was discharged from follow up. His younger brother was also referred with delayed puberty but showed little progress following treatment. Frequent sampling revealed detectable but apulsatile LH and FSH release. His clinical progress was consistent with IHH and he requires ongoing testosterone replacement. Conclusions Homozygous partial loss of function mutations in the GnRH receptor, such as R262Q, can present with variable phenotypes including apparent delayed puberty. Ongoing clinical vigilance might be required when patients are discharged from follow-up, especially when there is a family history of delayed puberty or IHH, as oligospermia and reduced bone mineralization can occur with time. PMID:16968799

  6. Multiple aberrant hormone receptors in Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    El Ghorayeb, Nada; Bourdeau, Isabelle; Lacroix, André

    2015-10-01

    The mechanisms regulating cortisol production when ACTH of pituitary origin is suppressed in primary adrenal causes of Cushing's syndrome (CS) include diverse genetic and molecular mechanisms. These can lead either to constitutive activation of the cAMP system and steroidogenesis or to its regulation exerted by the aberrant adrenal expression of several hormone receptors, particularly G-protein coupled hormone receptors (GPCR) and their ligands. Screening for aberrant expression of GPCR in bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (BMAH) and unilateral adrenal tumors of patients with overt or subclinical CS demonstrates the frequent co-expression of several receptors. Aberrant hormone receptors can also exert their activity by regulating the paracrine secretion of ACTH or other ligands for those receptors in BMAH or unilateral tumors. The aberrant expression of hormone receptors is not limited to adrenal CS but can be implicated in other endocrine tumors including primary aldosteronism and Cushing's disease. Targeted therapies to block the aberrant receptors or their ligands could become useful in the future. PMID:25971648

  7. Sex Hormone Receptor Repertoire in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Higa, Gerald M.; Fell, Ryan G.

    2013-01-01

    Classification of breast cancer as endocrine sensitive, hormone dependent, or estrogen receptor (ER) positive refers singularly to ERα. One of the oldest recognized tumor targets, disruption of ERα-mediated signaling, is believed to be the mechanistic mode of action for all hormonal interventions used in treating this disease. Whereas ERα is widely accepted as the single most important predictive factor (for response to endocrine therapy), the presence of the receptor in tumor cells is also of prognostic value. Even though the clinical relevance of the two other sex hormone receptors, namely, ERβ and the androgen receptor remains unclear, two discordant phenomena observed in hormone-dependent breast cancers could be causally related to ERβ-mediated effects and androgenic actions. Nonetheless, our understanding of regulatory molecules and resistance mechanisms remains incomplete, further compromising our ability to develop novel therapeutic strategies that could improve disease outcomes. This review focuses on the receptor-mediated actions of the sex hormones in breast cancer. PMID:24324894

  8. Synthesis and in vitro anti-cancer evaluation of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-conjugated peptide.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xin; Qiu, Qianqian; Ma, Ke; Huang, Wenlong; Qian, Hai

    2015-11-01

    Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) is a decapeptide hormone released from the hypothalamus and shows high affinity binding to the LHRH receptors. It is reported that several cancer cells also express LHRH receptors such as breast, ovarian, prostatic, bladder and others. In this study, we linked B1, an anti-cancer peptide, to LHRH and its analogs to improve the activity against cancer cells with LHRH receptor. Biological evaluation revealed that TB1, the peptide contains triptorelin sequence, present favorable anti-cancer activity as well as plasma stability. Further investigations disclosed that TB1 trigger apoptosis by activating the mitochondria-cytochrome c-caspase apoptotic pathway, it also exhibited the anti-migratory effect on cancer cells. PMID:26058357

  9. Divergent effects of corticotropin releasing hormone on endothelial cell nitric oxide synthase are associated with different expression of CRH type 1 and 2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Cantarella, Giuseppina; Lempereur, Laurence; Lombardo, Gabriella; Chiarenza, Andrea; Pafumi, Carlo; Zappalà, Giovanna; Bernardini, Renato

    2001-01-01

    Endothelium is a target for an array of factors involved in inflammation. Endothelial cells express receptors for CRH, a neuropeptide produced during inflammation. We report both the concentration-dependent inhibitory effect of CRH upon cytokine-stimulated nitrite release by H5V murine endothelioma cells, and its stimulatory one in HUVEC cells.Western blot analysis showed that CRH inhibits cytokine-stimulated iNOS protein in H5V cells, and, instead, potentiated it in HUVEC cells.H5V cells expressed both CRH receptors (CRH-R1 and R2) mRNAs, whereas HUVEC cells expressed the CRH-R2 mRNA solely.CRH increased medium nitrites and iNOS protein expression in H5V cells pretreated with the selective CRH-R1 antagonist CP 154,526. However, the selective CRH-R2 antagonist anti-Svg-30 failed to produce similar effects. In fact, anti-Svg-30 inhibited CRH-induced increase of nitrite release and iNOS expression in HUVEC cells.Our results confirm the activating role of CRH on endothelial cells, although it suggests its possible inhibitory role in the late phase of the inflammatory response. NO-mediated effects of CRH on endothelial cells could be exploited in therapeutic strategies related to inflammatory and/or degenerative diseases. PMID:11606324

  10. First-in-class thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH)-based compound binds to a pharmacologically distinct TRH receptor subtype in human brain and is effective in neurodegenerative models.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Julie A; Boyle, Noreen T; Cole, Natalie; Slator, Gillian R; Colivicchi, M Alessandra; Stefanini, Chiara; Gobbo, Oliviero L; Scalabrino, Gaia A; Ryan, Sinead M; Elamin, Marwa; Walsh, Cathal; Vajda, Alice; Goggin, Margaret M; Campbell, Matthew; Mash, Deborah C; O'Mara, Shane M; Brayden, David J; Callanan, John J; Tipton, Keith F; Della Corte, Laura; Hunter, Jackie; O'Boyle, Kathy M; Williams, Carvell H; Hardiman, Orla

    2015-02-01

    JAK4D, a first-in-class thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH)-based compound, is a prospective therapeutic candidate offering a multifaceted approach to treating neurodegeneration and other CNS conditions. The purpose of these studies was to determine the ability of JAK4D to bind to TRH receptors in human brain and to evaluate its neuropharmacological effects in neurodegenerative animal models. Additionally, JAK4D brain permeation was examined in mouse, and initial toxicology was assessed in vivo and in vitro. We report that JAK4D bound selectively with nanomolar affinity to native TRH receptors in human hippocampal tissue and showed for the first time that these receptors are pharmacologically distinct from TRH receptors in human pituitary, thus revealing a new TRH receptor subtype which represents a promising neurotherapeutic target in human brain. Systemic administration of JAK4D elicited statistically significant and clinically-relevant neuroprotective effects in three established neurodegenerative animal models: JAK4D reduced cognitive deficits when administered post-insult in a kainate (KA)-induced rat model of neurodegeneration; it protected against free radical release and neuronal damage evoked by intrastriatal microdialysis of KA in rat; and it reduced motor decline, weight loss, and lumbar spinal cord neuronal loss in G93A-SOD1 transgenic Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis mice. Ability to cross the blood-brain barrier and a clean initial toxicology profile were also shown. In light of these findings, JAK4D is an important tool for investigating the hitherto-unidentified central TRH receptor subtype reported herein and an attractive therapeutic candidate for neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:25281210

  11. PEGylation of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GRF) analogues.

    PubMed

    Esposito, P; Barbero, L; Caccia, P; Caliceti, P; D'Antonio, M; Piquet, G; Veronese, F M

    2003-09-26

    Synthetically produced GRF1-29 (Sermorelin) has an amino acid composition identical to the N-terminal 29 amino acids sequence of the natural hypothalamic GHRH1-44 (Figure 1). It maintains bioactivity in vitro and is almost equally effective in eliciting secretion of endogenous growth hormone in vivo. The main drawbacks associated with the pharmaceutical use of hGRF1-29 relate to its short half-life in plasma, about 10-20 min in humans, which is caused mostly by renal ultrafiltration and enzymatic degradation at the N terminus. PEGylation has been considered as one valid approach to obtain more stable forms of the peptide, with a longer in vivo half-life and ultimately with increased pharmacodynamic response along the somatotropic axis (endogenous GH, IGF-1 levels). Different PEGylated GRF conjugates were obtained and their bioactivity was tested in vitro and in vivo by monitoring endogenous growth hormone (GH) serum levels after intravenous (i.v.) injection in rats, and intravenous and subcutaneous (s.c.) injection in pigs. It was found that GRF-PEG conjugates are able to bind and activate the human GRF receptor, although with different potency. The effect of PEG molecular weight, number of PEG chains bound and position of PEGylation site on GRF activity were investigated. Mono-PEGylated isomers with a PEG5000 polymer chain linked to Lys 12 or Lys 21 residues, showed high biological activity in vitro, which is similar to that of hGRF1-29, and a higher pharmacodynamic response as compared to unmodified GRF molecule. PMID:14499707

  12. DEHP reduces thyroid hormones via interacting with hormone synthesis-related proteins, deiodinases, transthyretin, receptors, and hepatic enzymes in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changjiang; Zhao, Letian; Wei, Li; Li, Lianbing

    2015-08-01

    Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is used extensively in many personal care and consumer products, resulting in widespread nonoccupational human exposure through multiple routes and media. Limited studies suggest that exposure to DEHP may be associated with altered thyroid function, but detailed mechanisms are unclear. In order to elucidate potential mechanisms by which DEHP disturbs thyroid hormone homeostasis, Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were dosed with DEHP by gavage at 0, 250, 500, and 750 mg/kg/day for 30 days and sacrificed within 24 h after the last dose. Gene expressions of thyroid hormone receptors, deiodinases, transthyretin, and hepatic enzymes were measured by RT-PCR; protein levels of transthyretin were also analyzed by Western blot. Results showed that DEHP caused histological changes in the thyroid and follicular epithelial cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia were observed. DEHP significantly reduced thyroid hormones (T3, T4) and thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) levels, whereas thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) was not affected. After exposure to DEHP, biosynthesis of thyroid hormones was suppressed, and sodium iodide symporter (NIS) and thyroid peroxidase (TPO) levels were significantly reduced. Additionally, levels of deiodinases and transthyretin were also affected. TSH receptor (TSHr) level was downregulated, while TRH receptor (TRHr) level was upregulated. Metabolism of thyroid hormones was accelerated due to elevated gene expression of hepatic enzymes (UDPGTs and CYP2B1) by DEHP. Taken together, observed findings indicate that DEHP could reduce thyroid hormones through influencing biosynthesis, biotransformation, biotransport, receptor levels, and metabolism of thyroid hormones. PMID:25913319

  13. Research resource: Gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor-mediated signaling network in LbetaT2 cells: a pathway-based web-accessible knowledgebase.

    PubMed

    Fink, Marc Y; Pincas, Hanna; Choi, Soon Gang; Nudelman, German; Sealfon, Stuart C

    2010-09-01

    The GnRH receptor (GnRHR), expressed at the cell surface of the anterior pituitary gonadotrope, is critical for normal secretion of gonadotropins LH and FSH, pubertal development, and reproduction. The signaling network downstream of the GnRHR and the molecular bases of the regulation of gonadotropin expression have been the subject of intense research. The murine LbetaT2 cell line represents a mature gonadotrope and therefore is an important model for the study of GnRHR-signaling pathways and modulation of the gonadotrope cell by physiological regulators. In order to facilitate access to the information contained in this complex and evolving literature, we have developed a pathway-based knowledgebase that is web hosted. At present, using 106 relevant primary publications, we curated a comprehensive knowledgebase of the GnRHR signaling in the LbetaT2 cell in the form of a process diagram. Positive and negative controls of gonadotropin gene expression, which included GnRH itself, hypothalamic factors, gonadal steroids and peptides, as well as other hormones, were illustrated. The knowledgebase contains 187 entities and 206 reactions. It was assembled using CellDesigner software, which provides an annotated graphic representation of interactions, stored in Systems Biology Mark-up Language. We then utilized Biological Pathway Publisher, a software suite previously developed in our laboratory, to host the knowledgebase in a web-accessible format as a public resource. In addition, the network entities were linked to a public wiki, providing a forum for discussion, updating, and error correction. The GnRHR-signaling network is openly accessible at http://tsb.mssm.edu/pathwayPublisher/GnRHR_Pathway/GnRHR_Pathway_ index.html. PMID:20592162

  14. Mapping the human growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor (GHRHR) gene to the short arm of chromosome 7(7p13-p21) near the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Vamvakopoulos, N.C. ); Kunz, J.; Olberding, U. ); Scherer, S.W. ); Sioutopoulou, O.T. ); Schneider, V.; Durkin, A.S.; Nierman, W.C. )

    1994-03-15

    In this report, the authors have assigned the human GHRHR gene to chromosome 7p13-p21, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of DNA from well-defined human-rodent somatic cell hybrids. The GHRHR gene was assigned to human chromosome 7 by discordancy analysis (data not shown) of PCR amplification products from NIGMS mapping panel Nos. 1 and 2 DNA templates. The PCR primers (p[sub f], 5[prime]-GCTGCCTCATCACGCCACTGGAGTCCAC-3[prime]; and P[sub r], 5[prime]-CAGGTTTATTGGCTCCTCTGAGCCTTGG-3[prime]) amplified a 276-bp-long fragment from the 3[prime] untranslated region of the human GHRHR gene. Subsequently, they determined the location of the GHRHR gene within human chromosome 7 by PCR amplification of genomic DNA template from somatic cell hybrids that contain deletions of this chromosome. Amplification of the 276-bp DNA fragment was seen only in the cell lines that contained an intact chromosome 7 short arm. The lack of amplification using genomic DNA from 0044 Rag 1-15 and It A9 2-21-14 maps this gene to 7p13-p21. Additionally, the appropriate amplified product was observed from the human chromosome 4 containing NIGMS panel 2 cell line GM10115. This line was reported to have retained a small region of human chromosome 7 containing the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene that is mapped to 7p12-p13. The authors conclude that the human GHRHR gene maps to the small arm of chromosome 7 within 7p13-p21 and close to the EGFR gene. This assignment is consistent with the syntenic relationship between mouse chromosome 6 and human chromosome 7 in this region.

  15. Immunoprecipitation of the parathyroid hormone receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, B.S.; Tyler, G.A.; O'Brien, R.; Caporale, L.H.; Rosenblatt, M.

    1987-01-01

    An /sup 125/I-labeled synthetic analog of bovine parathyroid hormone, (8-norleucine,18-norleucine,34-tyrosine)PTH-(1-34) amide ((Nle)PTH-(1-34)-NH/sub 2/), purified by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), was employed to label the parathyroid hormone (PTH) receptor in cell lines derived from PTH target tissues: the ROS 17/2.8 rat osteosarcoma of bone and the CV1 and COS monkey kidney lines. After incubation of the radioligand with intact cultured cells, the hormone was covalently attached to receptors by using either a photoaffinity technique or chemical (affinity) crosslinking. In each case, covalent labeling was specific, as evidenced by a reduction of labeling when excess competing nonradioactive ligand was present. After covalent attachment of radioligand, membranes were prepared form the cells and solubilized in the nonionic detergent Nonidet P-40 or octyl glucoside. Analysis of the immunoprecipitate on NaDod-SO/sub 4//polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by autoradiography revealed the presence of a doublet of apparent molecular mass 69-70 kDa. Specifically labeled bands of approximate molecular mass 95 and 28 kDa were also observed. The anti-PTH IgG was affinity purified by passage over a PTH-Sepharose column and used to made an immunoaffinity column. These studies suggest that the use of an anti-PTH antiserum that binds receptor-bound hormone is likely to be a useful step in the further physicochemical characterization and purification of the PTH receptor.

  16. Metabolism of growth hormone releasing peptides.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Andreas; Delahaut, Philippe; Krug, Oliver; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2012-12-01

    New, potentially performance enhancing compounds have frequently been introduced to licit and illicit markets and rapidly distributed via worldwide operating Internet platforms. Developing fast analytical strategies to follow these new trends is one the most challenging issues for modern doping control analysis. Even if reference compounds for the active drugs are readily obtained, their unknown metabolism complicates effective testing strategies. Recently, a new class of small C-terminally amidated peptides comprising four to seven amino acid residues received considerable attention of sports drug testing authorities due to their ability to stimulate growth hormone release from the pituitary. The most promising candidates are the growth hormone releasing peptide (GHRP)-1, -2, -4, -5, -6, hexarelin, alexamorelin, and ipamorelin. With the exemption of GHRP-2, the entity of these peptides represents nonapproved pharmaceuticals; however, via Internet providers, all compounds are readily available. To date, only limited information on the metabolism of these substances is available and merely one metabolite for GHRP-2 is established. Therefore, a comprehensive in vivo (po and iv administration in rats) and in vitro (with human serum and recombinant amidase) study was performed in order to generate information on urinary metabolites potentially useful for routine doping controls. The urine samples from the in vivo experiments were purified by mixed-mode cation-exchange solid-phase extraction and analyzed by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) separation followed by high-resolution/high-accuracy mass spectrometry. Combining the high resolution power of a benchtop Orbitrap mass analyzer for the first metabolite screening and the speed of a quadrupole/time-of-flight (Q-TOF) instrument for identification, urinary metabolites were screened by means of a sensitive full scan analysis and subsequently confirmed by high-accuracy product ion scan experiments. Two

  17. Molecular Mechanisms of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Signaling: Integrating Cyclic Nucleotides into the Network

    PubMed Central

    Perrett, Rebecca M.; McArdle, Craig A.

    2013-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is the primary regulator of mammalian reproductive function in both males and females. It acts via G-protein coupled receptors on gonadotropes to stimulate synthesis and secretion of the gonadotropin hormones luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone. These receptors couple primarily via G-proteins of the Gq/ll family, driving activation of phospholipases C and mediating GnRH effects on gonadotropin synthesis and secretion. There is also good evidence that GnRH causes activation of other heterotrimeric G-proteins (Gs and Gi) with consequent effects on cyclic AMP production, as well as for effects on the soluble and particulate guanylyl cyclases that generate cGMP. Here we provide an overview of these pathways. We emphasize mechanisms underpinning pulsatile hormone signaling and the possible interplay of GnRH and autocrine or paracrine regulatory mechanisms in control of cyclic nucleotide signaling. PMID:24312080

  18. Insulin Augments Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Induction of Translation in LβT2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Navratil, Amy M.; Song, Hyunjin; Hernandez, Jeniffer B.; Cherrington, Brian D.; Santos, Sharon J.; Low, Janine M.; Do, Minh-Ha T.; Lawson, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The integrated signaling of insulin and gonadotropin-releasing hormone in the pituitary gonadotropes may have a profound bearing on reproductive function, although the cross-receptor signaling mechanisms are unclear. We demonstrate that the insulin receptor is constitutively localized to non-caveolar lipid raft microdomains in the pituitary gonadotrope cell line LβT2. The localization to rafts is consistent with similar localization of the GnRH receptor. Insulin receptor phosphorylation occurs in raft domains and activates the downstream signaling targets Insulin Receptor Substrate1 and Akt/Protein Kinase B. Although insulin alone does not strongly activate the extracellular signal-regulated kinase second messenger cascade, co-stimulation potentiates the phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase by gonadotropin-releasing hormone. The co-stimulatory effect of insulin and gonadotropin-releasing hormone is also evident in increased activation of cap-dependent translation. In contrast, co-stimulation attenuates Akt/Protein Kinase B activation. Our results show that both gonadotropin-releasing hormone and insulin are capable of mutually altering their respective regulatory signaling cascades. We suggest that this provides a mechanism to integrate neuropeptide and energy homeostatic signals to modulate reproductive function. PMID:19632296

  19. Early postnatal development of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) expression, TRH receptor binding, and TRH responses in neurons of rat brainstem.

    PubMed

    Bayliss, D A; Viana, F; Kanter, R K; Szymeczek-Seay, C L; Berger, A J; Millhorn, D E

    1994-02-01

    We investigated the postnatal development of the thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH)-containing raphe system in the brainstem of neonatal rats. Postnatal changes in TRH expression in nucleus (n.) raphe obscurus (ROb) and n. raphe pallidus (RPa) were evaluated by in situ hybridization using an 35S-labeled oligonucleotide probe complementary to TRH precursor mRNA. TRH mRNA expression was low at birth [postnatal day 0 (P0)], but was clearly evident by P7 and increased from that time to reach sustained high levels from P14 to P28. Consistent with this postnatal increase in TRH expression, we found increases in the density of TRH-immunoreactive (IR) fibers, which are derived from ROb and RPa, in the hypoglossal nucleus (nXII). TRH-IR fibers in nXII were very sparse at P0, but increased markedly over the first 2 postnatal weeks. The change in TRH innervation of nXII was closely matched by concomitant increases in 3H-methyl-TRH binding in nXII; specific TRH binding increased from very low levels at birth to high levels of P14. Finally, we recorded intracellularly the electrophysiological responses to TRH of hypoglossal motoneurons (HMs; n = 42) of neonatal rats (P0-P21) in a brainstem slice preparation. The response of neonatal HMs to TRH, in contrast to adult HMs, was highly variable. In some neonatal HMs, even at P0, TRH caused a depolarization with a decrease in input conductance (GN) that was characteristic of the response of all adult HMs. However, in other neonatal HMs, TRH was either without effect or caused a slight depolarization with no apparent change in GN, responses that were unlike those of adult HMs. A response was considered typical (i.e., "adult-like") if GN decreased to < 85% of control. The percentage of cells responding in a typical manner increased progressively from 25% at P0-P2 to 100% after P11. In addition, we found that the density of TRH-sensitive current (normalized to cell capacitance) increased with postnatal age in HMs that responded in a

  20. Nuclear hormone receptors put immunity on sterols.

    PubMed

    Santori, Fabio R

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) are transcription factors regulated by small molecules. The functions of NHRs range from development of primary and secondary lymphoid organs, to regulation of differentiation and function of DCs, macrophages and T cells. The human genome has 48 classic (hormone and vitamin receptors) and nonclassic (all others) NHRs; 17 nonclassic receptors are orphans, meaning that the endogenous ligand is unknown. Understanding the function of orphan NHRs requires the identification of their natural ligands. The mevalonate pathway, including its sterol and nonsterol intermediates and derivatives, is a source of ligands for many classic and nonclassic NHRs. For example, cholesterol biosynthetic intermediates (CBIs) are natural ligands for RORγ/γt. CBIs are universal endogenous metabolites in mammalian cells, and to study NHRs that bind CBIs requires ligand-free reporters system in sterol auxotroph cells. Furthermore, RORγ/γt shows broad specificity to sterol lipids, suggesting that RORγ/γt is either a general sterol sensor or specificity is defined by an abundant endogenous ligand. Unlike other NHRs, which regulate specific metabolic pathways, there is no connection between the genetic programs induced by RORγ/γt and ligand biosynthesis. In this review, we summarize the roles of nonclassic NHRs and their potential ligands in the immune system. PMID:26222181

  1. The Neuroendocrine Functions of the Parathyroid Hormone 2 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Dobolyi, Arpád; Dimitrov, Eugene; Palkovits, Miklós; Usdin, Ted B.

    2012-01-01

    The G-protein coupled parathyroid hormone 2 receptor (PTH2R) is concentrated in endocrine and limbic regions in the forebrain. Its endogenous ligand, tuberoinfundibular peptide of 39 residues (TIP39), is synthesized in only two brain regions, within the posterior thalamus and the lateral pons. TIP39-expressing neurons have a widespread projection pattern, which matches the PTH2R distribution in the brain. Neuroendocrine centers including the preoptic area, the periventricular, paraventricular, and arcuate nuclei contain the highest density of PTH2R-positive networks. The administration of TIP39 and an antagonist of the PTH2R as well as the investigation of mice that lack functional TIP39 and PTH2R revealed the involvement of the PTH2R in a variety of neural and neuroendocrine functions. TIP39 acting via the PTH2R modulates several aspects of the stress response. It evokes corticosterone release by activating corticotropin-releasing hormone-containing neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. Block of TIP39 signaling elevates the anxiety state of animals and their fear response, and increases stress-induced analgesia. TIP39 has also been suggested to affect the release of additional pituitary hormones including arginine-vasopressin and growth hormone. A role of the TIP39-PTH2R system in thermoregulation was also identified. TIP39 may play a role in maintaining body temperature in a cold environment via descending excitatory pathways from the preoptic area. Anatomical and functional studies also implicated the TIP39-PTH2R system in nociceptive information processing. Finally, TIP39 induced in postpartum dams may play a role in the release of prolactin during lactation. Potential mechanisms leading to the activation of TIP39 neurons and how they influence the neuroendocrine system are also described. The unique TIP39-PTH2R neuromodulator system provides the possibility for developing drugs with a novel mechanism of action to control neuroendocrine disorders

  2. Estrogen Receptor Beta and 2-arachidonoylglycerol Mediate the Suppressive Effects of Estradiol on Frequency of Postsynaptic Currents in Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Neurons of Metestrous Mice: An Acute Slice Electrophysiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Bálint, Flóra; Liposits, Zsolt; Farkas, Imre

    2016-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons are controlled by 17β-estradiol (E2) contributing to the steroid feedback regulation of the reproductive axis. In rodents, E2 exerts a negative feedback effect upon GnRH neurons throughout the estrus-diestrus phase of the ovarian cycle. The present study was undertaken to reveal the role of estrogen receptor subtypes in the mediation of the E2 signal and elucidate the downstream molecular machinery of suppression. The effect of E2 administration at low physiological concentration (10 pM) on GnRH neurons in acute brain slices obtained from metestrous GnRH-green fluorescent protein (GFP) mice was studied under paradigms of blocking or activating estrogen receptor subtypes and interfering with retrograde 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) signaling. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings revealed that E2 significantly diminished the frequency of spontaneous postsynaptic currents (sPSCs) in GnRH neurons (49.62 ± 7.6%) which effect was abolished by application of the estrogen receptor (ER) α/β blocker Faslodex (1 μM). Pretreatment of the brain slices with cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) inverse agonist AM251 (1 μM) and intracellularly applied endocannabinoid synthesis blocker THL (10 μM) significantly attenuated the effect of E2 on the sPSCs. E2 remained effective in the presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX) indicating a direct action of E2 on GnRH cells. The ERβ specific agonist DPN (10 pM) also significantly decreased the frequency of miniature postsynaptic currents (mPSCs) in GnRH neurons. In addition, the suppressive effect of E2 was completely blocked by the selective ERβ antagonist PHTPP (1 μM) indicating that ERβ is required for the observed rapid effect of the E2. In contrast, the ERα agonist PPT (10 pM) or the membrane-associated G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPR30) agonist G1 (10 pM) had no significant effect on the frequency of mPSCs in these neurons. AM251 and tetrahydrolipstatin (THL) significantly abolished

  3. Alterations in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity and in levels of proopiomelanocortin and corticotropin-releasing hormone-receptor 1 mRNAs in the pituitary and hypothalamus of the rat during chronic 'binge' cocaine and withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Spangler, Rudolph; Schlussman, Stefan D; Ho, Ann; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2003-02-28

    Tolerance to the stimulatory effects of cocaine on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis develops after chronic 'binge' cocaine exposure in the rat. This blunting of HPA axis activity in response to cocaine is associated with a cocaine-induced reduction of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) mRNA level in the hypothalamus. There is limited information about the effects of withdrawal from chronic cocaine on HPA activity. The present studies were undertaken to determine levels of the HPA hormones adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone across 10 days of withdrawal following chronic 'binge' pattern cocaine administration (3 x 15 mg/kg/day at hourly intervals) for 14 days. Male Fischer rats showed a significantly attenuated HPA axis response to chronic 'binge' pattern cocaine administration 30 min after the last injection on the 14th day, as measured by both plasma ACTH and corticosterone levels at the nadir time point. Twenty-four hours following the final administration of 'binge' cocaine (the 1st day of withdrawal), a significant elevation of plasma ACTH levels and a modest, but significant, elevation of plasma corticosterone levels were found at the nadir time point. This acute withdrawal-related activation of the hormones of the HPA axis was no longer found on the 10th day of withdrawal. In the anterior pituitary, levels of both proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and CRH-receptor 1 (R1) mRNAs were significantly higher than saline controls on the 14th day of chronic 'binge' cocaine and were at control levels on the 4th day of withdrawal. In the neurointermediate lobe of the pituitary, a sustained reduction in POMC mRNA levels was observed on the 3rd, 7th and 14th day of chronic 'binge' cocaine, but POMC mRNA was at control levels by the 4th day of withdrawal. In the hypothalamus, POMC mRNA levels showed a transient decrease on the 1st day of 'binge' cocaine with no change during chronic 'binge' cocaine or its withdrawal. CRH mRNA levels in the

  4. Luteinizing hormone release and androgen production of avian hybrids in response to luteinizing hormone releasing hormone injection.

    PubMed

    Mathis, G F; Burke, W H; McDougald, L R

    1983-04-01

    The levels of luteinizing hormone (LH) and androgens were measured in sterile avian hybrids. Guinea fowl-chicken and peafowl-guinea fowl hybrids were bled before and after injection with LH- releasing hormone (LHRH). The preinjection LH levels for the guinea fowl-chicken hybrids were below or at the very lower limit of the assay sensitivity and the peafowl-guinea fowl hybrids averaged 1.3 ng/ml. Within 10 min after LHRH injection, LH had increased dramatically in both hybrids and then began to slowly decline. Androgen levels in the guinea fowl-chicken hybrids increased from 16.2 pg/ml to 95.2 pg/ml and continued to increase, reaching 287 pg/ml at the last bleeding 60 min after injection. PMID:6346309

  5. Regulation of pituitary MT1 melatonin receptor expression by gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and early growth response factor-1 (Egr-1): in vivo and in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Bae, Sung-Eun; Wright, Ian K; Wyse, Cathy; Samson-Desvignes, Nathalie; Le Blanc, Pascale; Laroche, Serge; Hazlerigg, David G; Johnston, Jonathan D

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin receptor expression exhibits profound developmental changes through poorly understood mechanisms. In mammals, a current model suggests that pubertal reactivation of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion down-regulates MT1 melatonin receptors in pituitary gonadotroph cells, via the induction of early growth response factor-1 (EGR-1). Here we have examined this model by testing the hypotheses that inhibition of Mt1 expression by GnRH occurs directly in gonadotroph cells, can be reversed in adulthood by blockade of GnRH receptors, and requires EGR-1. We first confirmed the endogenous expression of Mt1 mRNA in the αT3-1 gonadotroph cell line. Stimulation of these cells with a GnRH agonist resulted in a rapid increase of Egr-1 mRNA expression, which peaked after 30-60 minutes, and a more prolonged elevation of nuclear EGR-1 immunoreactivity. Moreover, the GnRH agonist significantly decreased Mt1 mRNA. We then treated adult male rats with the GnRH antagonist cetrorelix or saline. After 4 weeks of daily injections, cetrorelix significantly reduced serum LH concentration and testis weight, with histological analysis confirming absence of spermatogenesis. Despite the successful inhibition of GnRH signalling, pituitary Mt1 expression was unchanged. Next we studied the proximal region of the rat Mt1 promoter. Consistent with previous work, over-expression of the transcription factor PITX-1 increased Mt1-luciferase reporter activity; this effect was dependent on the presence of consensus PITX-1 promoter binding regions. Over-expression of EGR-1 inhibited PITX-1-stimulated activity, even following mutation of the consensus EGR-1 binding site. Finally, we studied Egr1-/- mice and observed no difference in pituitary Mt1 expression between Egr1-/- and wild-type litter mates. This work demonstrates that GnRH receptor activation directly down-regulates Mt1 expression in gonadotroph cells. However, pituitary Mt1 expression in adults is unaltered by blockade of

  6. Lipopeptide antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone with improved antitumor activities.

    PubMed

    Zarandi, Marta; Varga, Jozsef L; Schally, Andrew V; Horvath, Judit E; Toller, Gabor L; Kovacs, Magdolna; Letsch, Markus; Groot, Kate; Armatis, Patricia; Halmos, Gabor

    2006-03-21

    Antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) synthesized previously inhibit proliferation of various human cancers, but derivatisation with fatty acids could enhance their clinical efficacy. We synthesized a series of antagonists of GHRH(1-29)NH(2) acylated at the N terminus with monocarboxylic or alpha,omega-dicarboxylic acids containing six to sixteen carbon atoms. These peptides are analogs of prior potent antagonists JV-1-36, JV-1-38, and JV-1-65 with phenylacetyl group at their N terminus. Several new analogs, including MZ-J-7-46 and MZ-J-7-30, more effectively inhibited GHRH-induced GH release in vitro in a superfused rat pituitary system than their parent compound JV-1-36 and had increased binding affinities to rat pituitary GHRH receptors, but they showed weaker inhibition of GH release in vivo than JV-1-36. All antagonists acylated with fatty acids containing 8-14 carbon atoms inhibited the proliferation of MiaPaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro better than JV-1-36 or JV-1-65. GHRH antagonist MZ-J-7-114 (5 mug/day) significantly suppressed the growth of PC-3 human androgen-independent prostate cancers xenografted into nude mice and reduced serum IGF-I levels, whereas antagonist JV-1-38 had no effect at the dose of 10 mug/day. GHRH antagonists including MZ-J-7-46 and MZ-J-7-114 acylated with octanoic acid and MZ-J-7-30 and MZ-J-7-110 acylated with 1,12-dodecanedicarboxylic acid represent relevant improvements over earlier antagonists. These and previous results suggest that this class of GHRH antagonists might be effective in the treatment of various cancers. PMID:16537407

  7. Lipopeptide antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone with improved antitumor activities

    PubMed Central

    Zarandi, Marta; Varga, Jozsef L.; Schally, Andrew V.; Horvath, Judit E.; Toller, Gabor L.; Kovacs, Magdolna; Letsch, Markus; Groot, Kate; Armatis, Patricia; Halmos, Gabor

    2006-01-01

    Antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) synthesized previously inhibit proliferation of various human cancers, but derivatisation with fatty acids could enhance their clinical efficacy. We synthesized a series of antagonists of GHRH(1-29)NH2 acylated at the N terminus with monocarboxylic or α,ω-dicarboxylic acids containing six to sixteen carbon atoms. These peptides are analogs of prior potent antagonists JV-1-36, JV-1-38, and JV-1-65 with phenylacetyl group at their N terminus. Several new analogs, including MZ-J-7-46 and MZ-J-7-30, more effectively inhibited GHRH-induced GH release in vitro in a superfused rat pituitary system than their parent compound JV-1-36 and had increased binding affinities to rat pituitary GHRH receptors, but they showed weaker inhibition of GH release in vivo than JV-1-36. All antagonists acylated with fatty acids containing 8–14 carbon atoms inhibited the proliferation of MiaPaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro better than JV-1-36 or JV-1-65. GHRH antagonist MZ-J-7-114 (5 μg/day) significantly suppressed the growth of PC-3 human androgen-independent prostate cancers xenografted into nude mice and reduced serum IGF-I levels, whereas antagonist JV-1-38 had no effect at the dose of 10 μg/day. GHRH antagonists including MZ-J-7-46 and MZ-J-7-114 acylated with octanoic acid and MZ-J-7-30 and MZ-J-7-110 acylated with 1,12-dodecanedicarboxylic acid represent relevant improvements over earlier antagonists. These and previous results suggest that this class of GHRH antagonists might be effective in the treatment of various cancers. PMID:16537407

  8. Receptor guanylyl cyclases in Inka cells targeted by eclosion hormone.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jer-Cherng; Yang, Ruey-Bing; Adams, Michael E; Lu, Kuang-Hui

    2009-08-11

    A signature of eclosion hormone (EH) action in insect ecdysis is elevation of cGMP in Inka cells, leading to massive release of ecdysis triggering hormone (ETH) and ecdysis initiation. Although this aspect of EH-induced signal transduction is well known, the receptor mediating this process has not been identified. Here, we describe a receptor guanylyl cyclase BdmGC-1 and its isoform BdmGC-1B in the Oriental fruit fly Bactrocera dorsalis that are activated by EH. The B form exhibits the conserved domains and putative N-glycosylation sites found in BdmGC-1, but possesses an additional 46-amino acid insertion in the extracellular domain and lacks the C-terminal tail of BdmGC-1. Combined immunolabeling and in situ hybridization reveal that BdmGC-1 is expressed in Inka cells. Heterologous expression of BdmGC-1 in HEK cells leads to robust increases in cGMP following exposure to low picomolar concentrations of EH. The B-isoform responds only to higher EH concentrations, suggesting different physiological roles of these cyclases. We propose that BdmGC-1 and BdmGC-1B are high- and low-affinity EH receptors, respectively. PMID:19666575

  9. Signal transduction by the growth hormone receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, M.J.; Rowlinson, S.W.; Clarkson, R.W.

    1994-12-31

    It has been proposed that dimerization of identical receptor subunits by growth hormone (GH) is the mechanism of signal transduction across the cell membrane. We present here data with analogs of porcine GH (pGH), with GH receptors (GHR) mutated in the dimerization domain and with monoclonal antibodies to the GHR which indicate that dimerization is necessary but not sufficient for transduction. We also report nuclear uptake of GH both in vivo and in vitro, along with nuclear localization of the receptor and GH-binding protein (GHBP). This suggests that GH acts directly at the nucleus, and one possible target for this action is a rapid increase in transcription of C/EBP delta seen in 3T3-F442A cells in response to GH. This tyrosine kinase-dependent event may be an archetype for induction of other immediate early gene transcription factors which then interact to determine the programming of the subsequent transcriptional response to GH. 29 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  10. Mutations in Prokineticin 2 and Prokineticin receptor 2genes in Human Gonadotrophin-Releasing Hormone Deficiency: Molecular Genetics and Clinical Spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Lindsay W.; Sidis, Yisrael; Zhang, ChengKang; Quinton, Richard; Plummer, Lacey; Pignatelli, Duarte; Hughes, Virginia A.; Dwyer, Andrew A.; Raivio, Taneli; Hayes, Frances J.; Seminara, Stephanie B.; Huot, Celine; Alos, Nathalie; Speiser, Phyllis; Takeshita, Akira; VanVliet, Guy; Pearce, Simon; Crowley, William F.; Zhou, Qun-Yong; Pitteloud, Nelly

    2008-01-01

    Context: Mice deficient in prokineticin 2(PROK2) and prokineticin receptor2 (PROKR2) exhibit variable olfactory bulb dysgenesis and GnRH neuronal migration defects reminiscent of human GnRH deficiency. Objectives: We aimed to screen a large cohort of patients with Kallmann syndrome (KS) and normosmic idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) for mutations in PROK2/PROKR2, evaluate their prevalence, define the genotype/phenotype relationship, and assess the functionality of these mutant alleles in vitro. Design: Sequencing of the PROK2 and PROKR2 genes was performed in 170 KS patients and 154 nIHH. Mutations were examined using early growth response 1-luciferase assays in HEK 293 cells and aequorin assays in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Results: Four heterozygous and one homozygous PROK2 mutation (p.A24P, p.C34Y, p.I50M, p.R73C, and p.I55fsX1) were identified in five probands. Four probands had KS and one nIHH, and all had absent puberty. Each mutant peptide impaired receptor signaling in vitro except the I50M. There were 11 patients who carried a heterozygous PROKR2 mutation (p.R85C, p.Y113H, p.V115M, p.R164Q, p.L173R, p.W178S, p.S188L, p.R248Q, p.V331M, and p.R357W). Among them, six had KS, four nIHH, and one KS proband carried both a PROKR2 (p.V115M) and PROK2 (p.A24P) mutation. Reproductive phenotypes ranged from absent to partial puberty to complete reversal of GnRH deficiency after discontinuation of therapy. All mutant alleles appear to decrease intracellular calcium mobilization; seven exhibited decreased MAPK signaling, and six displayed decreased receptor expression. Nonreproductive phenotypes included fibrous dysplasia, sleep disorder, synkinesia, and epilepsy. Finally, considerable variability was evident in family members with the same mutation, including asymptomatic carriers. Conclusion: Loss-of-function mutations in PROK2 and PROKR2 underlie both KS and nIHH. PMID:18559922

  11. The onset of labor alters corticotropin-releasing hormone type 1 receptor variant expression in human myometrium: putative role of interleukin-1beta.

    PubMed

    Markovic, Danijela; Vatish, Manu; Gu, Mei; Slater, Donna; Newton, Rob; Lehnert, Hendrik; Grammatopoulos, Dimitris K

    2007-07-01

    CRH targets the human myometrium during pregnancy. The efficiency of CRH actions is determined by expression of functional receptors (CRH-R), which are dynamically regulated. Studies in myometrial tissue biopsies using quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that the onset of labor, term or preterm, is associated with a significant 2- to 3-fold increase in CRH-R1 mRNA levels. Detailed analysis of myometrial CRH-R1 mRNA variants showed a decline of the pro-CRH-R1 mRNA encoding the CRH-R1beta variant during labor and increased mRNA levels of CRH-R1d mRNA. Studies in myometrial cells identified IL-1beta as an important regulator of myometrial CRH-R1 gene expression because prolonged treatment of myometrial cells with IL-1beta (1 ng/ml) for 18 h induced expression of CRH-R1 mRNA levels by 1.5- to 2-fold but significantly attenuated CRH-R1beta mRNA expression by 70%. In contrast, IL-1beta had no effect on CRH-R1d mRNA expression. Studies using specific inhibitors suggest that ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, and downstream nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-kappaB mediate IL-1beta effects on myometrial CRH-R1 gene. However, the increased CRH-R1 mRNA expression was associated with a dampening of the receptor efficacy to activate the adenylyl cyclase/cAMP signaling cascade. Thus, our findings suggest that IL-1beta is an important regulator of CRH-R1 expression and functional activity, and this interaction might play a role in the transition of the uterus from quiescence to active contractions necessary for the onset of parturition. PMID:17431005

  12. Agonist of growth hormone-releasing hormone reduces pneumolysin-induced pulmonary permeability edema

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Rudolf; Sridhar, Supriya; Rick, Ferenc G.; Gorshkov, Boris; Umapathy, Nagavedi S.; Yang, Guang; Oseghale, Aluya; Verin, Alexander D.; Chakraborty, Trinad; Matthay, Michael A.; Zemskov, Evgeny A.; White, Richard; Block, Norman L.; Schally, Andrew V.

    2012-01-01

    Aggressive treatment with antibiotics in patients infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae induces release of the bacterial virulence factor pneumolysin (PLY). Days after lungs are sterile, this pore-forming toxin can still induce pulmonary permeability edema in patients, characterized by alveolar/capillary barrier dysfunction and impaired alveolar liquid clearance (ALC). ALC is mainly regulated through Na+ transport by the apically expressed epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) and the basolaterally expressed Na+/K+-ATPase in type II alveolar epithelial cells. Because no standard treatment is currently available to treat permeability edema, the search for novel therapeutic candidates is of high priority. We detected mRNA expression for the active receptor splice variant SV1 of the hypothalamic polypeptide growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH), as well as for GHRH itself, in human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HL-MVEC). Therefore, we have evaluated the effect of the GHRH agonist JI-34 on PLY-induced barrier and ALC dysfunction. JI-34 blunts PLY-mediated endothelial hyperpermeability in monolayers of HL-MVEC, in a cAMP-dependent manner, by means of reducing the phosphorylation of myosin light chain and vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin. In human airway epithelial H441 cells, PLY significantly impairs Na+ uptake, but JI-34 restores it to basal levels by means of increasing cAMP levels. Intratracheal instillation of PLY into C57BL6 mice causes pulmonary alveolar epithelial and endothelial hyperpermeability as well as edema formation, all of which are blunted by JI-34. These findings point toward a protective role of the GHRH signaling pathway in PLY-induced permeability edema. PMID:22308467

  13. Clinical studies with d-Trp 6-luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone in anovulatory women.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, C J; Charro-Salgado, A; Peréz-Infante, V; del Campo, G L; Botella-Llusiá, J; Coy, D H; Schally, A V

    1978-04-01

    Nine anovulatory patients with hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction were treated with d-Trp6-luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone, an analog with far greater gonadotropin-releasing activity than luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone. Four of eight patients, who were formerly unsuccessfully treated with clomiphene, human chorionic gonadotropin, and human menopausal gonadotropin, ovulated after treatment with the peptide alone or with peptide preceded by clomiphene, and three became pregnant. The ninth patient, who had amenorrhea and anovulation due to excessive loss of weight caused by anorexia nervosa, also ovulated after treatment with the analog. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of this potent analog for induction of ovulation and pregnancy and point favorably toward clinical applications. PMID:348500

  14. Effect of growth hormone-releasing factor on growth hormone release in children with radiation-induced growth hormone deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Lustig, R.H.; Schriock, E.A.; Kaplan, S.L.; Grumbach, M.M.

    1985-08-01

    Five male children who received cranial irradiation for extrahypothalamic intracranial neoplasms or leukemia and subsequently developed severe growth hormone (GH) deficiency were challenged with synthetic growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF-44), in an attempt to distinguish hypothalamic from pituitary dysfunction as a cause of their GH deficiency, and to assess the readily releasable GH reserve in the pituitary. In response to a pulse of GRF-44 (5 micrograms/kg intravenously), mean peak GH levels rose to values higher than those evoked by the pharmacologic agents L-dopa or arginine (6.4 +/- 1.3 ng/mL v 1.5 +/- 0.4 ng/mL, P less than .05). The peak GH value occurred at a mean of 26.0 minutes after administration of GRF-44. These responses were similar to those obtained in children with severe GH deficiency due to other etiologies (peak GH 6.3 +/- 1.7 ng/mL, mean 28.0 minutes). In addition, there was a trend toward an inverse relationship between peak GH response to GRF-44 and the postirradiation interval. Prolactin and somatomedin-C levels did not change significantly after the administration of a single dose of GRF-44. The results of this study support the hypothesis that cranial irradiation in children can lead to hypothalamic GRF deficiency secondary to radiation injury of hypothalamic GRF-secreting neurons. This study also lends support to the potential therapeutic usefulness of GRF-44 or an analog for GH deficiency secondary to cranial irradiation.

  15. Corticotropin-releasing hormone: Mediator of vertebrate life stage transitions?

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yugo; Grommen, Sylvia V H; De Groef, Bert

    2016-03-01

    Hormones, particularly thyroid hormones and corticosteroids, play critical roles in vertebrate life stage transitions such as amphibian metamorphosis, hatching in precocial birds, and smoltification in salmonids. Since they synergistically regulate several metabolic and developmental processes that accompany vertebrate life stage transitions, the existence of extensive cross-communication between the adrenal/interrenal and thyroidal axes is not surprising. Synergies of corticosteroids and thyroid hormones are based on effects at the level of tissue hormone sensitivity and gene regulation. In addition, in representative nonmammalian vertebrates, corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) stimulates hypophyseal thyrotropin secretion, and thus functions as a common regulator of both the adrenal/interrenal and thyroidal axes to release corticosteroids and thyroid hormones. The dual function of CRH has been speculated to control or affect the timing of vertebrate life history transitions across taxa. After a brief overview of recent insights in the molecular mechanisms behind the synergic actions of thyroid hormones and corticosteroids during life stage transitions, this review examines the evidence for a possible role of CRH in controlling vertebrate life stage transitions. PMID:26874222

  16. In vitro effect of. Delta. sup 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol to stimulate somatostatin release and block that of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone by suppression of the release of prostaglandin E sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Rettori, V.; Aguila, M.C.; McCann, S.M. ); Gimeno, M.F.; Franchi, A.M. )

    1990-12-01

    Previous in vivo studies have shown that {Delta}{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the principal active ingredient in marijuana, can suppress both luteinizing hormone (LH) and growth hormone (GH) secretion after its injection into the third ventricle of conscious male rats. The present studies were deigned to determine the mechanism of these effects. Various doses of THC were incubated with either stalk median eminence fragments (MEs) or mediobasal hypothalamic (MBH) fragments in vitro. Although THC (10 nM) did not alter basal release of LH-releasing hormone (LHRH) from MEs in vitro, it completely blocked the stimulatory action of dopamine or nonrepinephrine on LHRH release. The effective doses to block LHRH release were associated with a blockade of synthesis and release of prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) from MBH in vitro. In contrast to the suppressive effect of THC on LHRH release, somatostatin release from MEs was enhanced in a dose-related manner with a minimal effective dose of 1 nM. Since PGE{sub 2} suppresses somatostatin release, this enhancement may also be related to the suppressive effect of THC on PGE{sub 2} synthesis and release. The authors speculate that these actions are mediated by the recently discovered THC receptors in the tissue. The results indicate that the suppressive effect of THC on LH release is mediated by a blockade of LHRH release, whereas the suppressive effect of the compound on growth hormone release is mediated, at least in part, by a stimulation of somatostatin release.

  17. Fluoride Exposure, Follicle Stimulating Hormone Receptor Gene Polymorphism and Hypothalamus-pituitary-ovarian Axis Hormones in Chinese Women.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming Xu; Zhou, Guo Yu; Zhu, Jing Yuan; Gong, Biao; Hou, Jia Xiang; Zhou, Tong; Duan, Li Ju; Ding, Zhong; Cui, Liu Xin; Ba, Yue

    2015-09-01

    The effects of fluoride exposure on the functions of reproductive and endocrine systems have attracted widespread attention in academic circle nowadays. However, it is unclear whether the gene-environment interaction may modify the secretion and activity of hypothalamus-pituitary- ovarian (HPO) axis hormones. Thus, the aim of this study was to explore the influence of fluoride exposure and follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) gene polymorphism on reproductive hormones in Chinese women. A cross sectional study was conducted in seven villages of Henan Province, China during 2010-2011. A total of 679 women aged 18-48 years were recruited through cluster sampling and divided into three groups, i.e. endemic fluorosis group (EFG), defluoridation project group (DFPG), and control group (CG) based on the local fluoride concentration in drinking water. The serum levels of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and estradiol (E2) were determined respectively and the FSHR polymorphism was detected by real time PCR assay. The results provided the preliminary evidence indicating the gene-environment interaction on HPO axis hormones in women. PMID:26464260

  18. Current status of hormone therapy in patients with hormone receptor positive (HR+) advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Dalmau, Elsa; Armengol-Alonso, Alejandra; Muñoz, Montserrat; Seguí-Palmer, Miguel Ángel

    2014-12-01

    The natural history of HR+ breast cancer tends to be different from hormone receptor-negative disease in terms of time to recurrence, site of recurrence and overall aggressiveness of the disease. The developmental strategies of hormone therapy for the treatment of breast cancer have led to the classes of selective estrogen receptor modulators, selective estrogen receptor downregulators, and aromatase inhibitors. These therapeutic options have improved breast cancer outcomes in the metastatic setting, thereby delaying the need for chemotherapy. However, a subset of hormone receptor-positive breast cancers do not benefit from endocrine therapy (intrinsic resistance), and all HR+ metastatic breast cancers ultimately develop resistance to hormonal therapies (acquired resistance). Considering the multiple pathways involved in the HR network, targeting other components of pathologically activated intracellular signaling in breast cancer may prove to be a new direction in clinical research. This review focuses on current and emerging treatments for HR+ metastatic breast cancer. PMID:25311296

  19. Anti-tumor effects of peptide analogs targeting neuropeptide hormone receptors on mouse pheochromocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, C G; Ullrich, M; Schally, A V; Bergmann, R; Pietzsch, J; Gebauer, L; Gondek, K; Qin, N; Pacak, K; Ehrhart-Bornstein, M; Eisenhofer, G; Bornstein, S R

    2013-05-22

    Pheochromocytoma is a rare but potentially lethal chromaffin cell tumor with currently no effective treatment. Peptide hormone receptors are frequently overexpressed on endocrine tumor cells and can be specifically targeted by various anti-tumor peptide analogs. The present study carried out on mouse pheochromocytoma cells (MPCs) and a more aggressive mouse tumor tissue-derived (MTT) cell line revealed that these cells are characterized by pronounced expression of the somatostatin receptor 2 (sst2), growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) receptor and the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor. We further demonstrated significant anti-tumor effects mediated by cytotoxic somatostatin analogs, AN-162 and AN-238, by LHRH antagonist, Cetrorelix, by the cytotoxic LHRH analog, AN-152, and by recently developed GHRH antagonist, MIA-602, on MPC and for AN-152 and MIA-602 on MTT cells. Studies of novel anti-tumor compounds on these mouse cell lines serve as an important basis for mouse models of metastatic pheochromocytoma, which we are currently establishing. PMID:23267837

  20. Recessive resistance to thyroid hormone in mice lacking thyroid hormone receptor beta: evidence for tissue-specific modulation of receptor function.

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, D; Hanebuth, E; Smeyne, R J; Everds, N; Stewart, C L; Wehner, J M; Curran, T

    1996-01-01

    The diverse functions of thyroid hormone (T3) are presumed to be mediated by two genes encoding the related receptors, TRalpha and TRbeta. However, the in vivo functions of TRalpha and TRbeta are undefined. Here, we report that targeted inactivation of the mouse TRbeta gene results in goitre and elevated levels of thyroid hormone. Also, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), which is released by pituitary thyrotropes and which is normally suppressed by increased levels of thyroid hormone, was present at elevated levels in homozygous mutant (Thrb-/-) mice. These findings suggest a unique role for TRbeta that cannot be substituted by TRalpha in the T3-dependent feedback regulation of TSH transcription. Thrb-/- mice provide a recessive model for the human syndrome of resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) that exhibits a similar endocrine disorder but which is typically caused by dominant TRbeta mutants that are transcriptional inhibitors. It is unknown whether TRalpha, TRbeta or other receptors are targets for inhibition in dominant RTH; however, the analysis of Thrb-/- mice suggests that antagonism of TRbeta-mediated pathways underlies the disorder of the pituitary-thyroid axis. Interestingly, in the brain, the absence of TRbeta may not mimic the defects often associated with dominant RTH, since no overt behavioural or neuroanatomical abnormalities were detected in Thrb-/- mice. These data define in vivo functions for TRbeta and indicate that specificity in T3 signalling is conferred by distinct receptor genes. Images PMID:8670802

  1. Thyroid hormone resistance: a novel mutation in thyroid hormone receptor beta (THRB) gene - case report.

    PubMed

    Işık, Emregül; Beck Peccoz, Paolo; Campi, Irene; Özön, Alev; Alikaşifoğlu, Ayfer; Gönç, Nazlı; Kandemir, Nurgün

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid hormone resistance (THR) is a dominantly inherited syndrome characterized by reduced sensitivity to thyroid hormones. It is usually caused by mutations in the thyroid hormone receptor beta (THRB) gene. In the present report, we describe the clinical and laboratory characteristics and genetic analysis of patients with a novel THRB gene mutation. The index patient had been misdiagnosed as hyperthyroidism and treated with antithyroid drugs since eight days of age. Thyroid hormone results showed that thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone, TSH) was never suppressed despite elevated thyroid hormone levels, and there was no symptom suggesting hyperthyroidism. A heterozygous mutation at codon 350 located in exon 9 of the THRB gene was detected in all the affected members of the family. It is important to consider thyroid hormone levels in association with TSH levels to prevent inappropriate treatment and the potential complications, such as clinical hypothyroidism or an increase in goiter size. PMID:24217081

  2. Changes to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor extracellular loops differentially affect GnRH analog binding and activation: evidence for distinct ligand-stabilized receptor conformations.

    PubMed

    Pfleger, Kevin D G; Pawson, Adam J; Millar, Robert P

    2008-06-01

    GnRH and its structural variants bind to GnRH receptors from different species with different affinities and specificities. By investigating chimeric receptors that combine regions of mammalian and nonmammalian GnRH receptors, a greater understanding of how different domains influence ligand binding and receptor activation can be achieved. Using human-catfish and human-chicken chimeric receptors, we demonstrate the importance of extracellular loop conformation for ligand binding and agonist potency, providing further evidence for GnRH and GnRH II stabilization of distinct active receptor conformations. We demonstrate examples of GnRH receptor gain-of-function mutations that apparently improve agonist potency independently of affinity, implicating a role for extracellular loops in stabilizing the inactive receptor conformation. We also show that entire extracellular loop substitution can overcome the detrimental effects of localized mutations, thereby demonstrating the importance of considering the conformation of entire domains when drawing conclusions from point-mutation studies. Finally, we present evidence implicating the configuration of extracellular loops 2 and 3 in combination differentiating GnRH analog binding modes. Because there are two endogenous forms of GnRH ligand but only one functional form of full-length GnRH receptor in humans, understanding how GnRH and GnRH II can elicit distinct functional effects through the same receptor is likely to provide important insights into how these ligands can have differential effects in both physiological and pathological situations. PMID:18356273

  3. Structural Basis for Antibody Discrimination between Two Hormones That Recognize the Parathyroid Hormone Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    McKinstry, William J.; Polekhina, Galina; Diefenbach-Jagger, Hannelore; Ho, Patricia W. M.; Sato, Koh; Onuma, Etsuro; Gillespie, Matthew T.; Martin, T. John; Parker, Michael W.

    2009-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) plays a vital role in the embryonic development of the skeleton and other tissues. When it is produced in excess by cancers it can cause hypercalcemia, and its local production by breast cancer cells has been implicated in the pathogenesis of bone metastasis formation in that disease. Antibodies have been developed that neutralize the action of PTHrP through its receptor, parathyroid hormone receptor 1, without influencing parathyroid hormone action through the same receptor. Such neutralizing antibodies against PTHrP are therapeutically effective in animal models of the humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy and of bone metastasis formation. We have determined the crystal structure of the complex between PTHrP (residues 1–108) and a neutralizing monoclonal anti-PTHrP antibody that reveals the only point of contact is an α-helical structure extending from residues 14–29. Another striking feature is that the same residues that interact with the antibody also interact with parathyroid hormone receptor 1, showing that the antibody and the receptor binding site on the hormone closely overlap. The structure explains how the antibody discriminates between the two hormones and provides information that could be used in the development of novel agonists and antagonists of their common receptor. PMID:19346515

  4. Structural Basis for Antibody Discrimination between Two Hormones That Recognize the Parathyroid Hormone Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    McKinstry, William J.; Polekhina, Galina; Diefenbach-Jagger, Hannelore; Ho, Patricia W.M.; Sato, Koh; Onuma, Etsuro; Gillespie, Matthew T.; Martin, T. John; Parker, Michael W.

    2009-08-18

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) plays a vital role in the embryonic development of the skeleton and other tissues. When it is produced in excess by cancers it can cause hypercalcemia, and its local production by breast cancer cells has been implicated in the pathogenesis of bone metastasis formation in that disease. Antibodies have been developed that neutralize the action of PTHrP through its receptor, parathyroid hormone receptor 1, without influencing parathyroid hormone action through the same receptor. Such neutralizing antibodies against PTHrP are therapeutically effective in animal models of the humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy and of bone metastasis formation. We have determined the crystal structure of the complex between PTHrP (residues 1-108) and a neutralizing monoclonal anti-PTHrP antibody that reveals the only point of contact is an {alpha}-helical structure extending from residues 14-29. Another striking feature is that the same residues that interact with the antibody also interact with parathyroid hormone receptor 1, showing that the antibody and the receptor binding site on the hormone closely overlap. The structure explains how the antibody discriminates between the two hormones and provides information that could be used in the development of novel agonists and antagonists of their common receptor.

  5. Proteolytic activity of the purified hormone-binding subunit in the estrogen receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Molinari, A M; Abbondanza, C; Armetta, I; Medici, N; Minucci, S; Moncharmont, B; Nigro, V; Puca, G A

    1991-01-01

    The hormone-binding subunit of the calf uterus estradiol receptor was purified as a hormone-free molecule. Immunoaffinity chromatography with a specific monoclonal antibody was used as the final step. The purified subunit was specifically labeled by radioactive diisopropyl fluorophosphate. The diisopropyl fluorophosphate-labeled amino acid was serine. The purified receptor was able to release the fluorogenic or chromogenic group from synthetic peptides containing phenylalanine at the carboxyl terminus. This occurred only in the presence of estradiol and was hampered by aprotinin and diisopropyl fluorophosphate. Estradiol-dependent hydrolytic activity was also found in the eluate from gel slices after SDS/PAGE of purified receptor. This activity comigrated with the renaturable estradiol-binding activity. The estradiol antagonists 4-hydroxytamoxifen and ICI 164,384 as well as other steroid hormones were unable to activate this hydrolytic activity. Images PMID:1709742

  6. Proteolytic activity of the purified hormone-binding subunit in the estrogen receptor.

    PubMed

    Molinari, A M; Abbondanza, C; Armetta, I; Medici, N; Minucci, S; Moncharmont, B; Nigro, V; Puca, G A

    1991-05-15

    The hormone-binding subunit of the calf uterus estradiol receptor was purified as a hormone-free molecule. Immunoaffinity chromatography with a specific monoclonal antibody was used as the final step. The purified subunit was specifically labeled by radioactive diisopropyl fluorophosphate. The diisopropyl fluorophosphate-labeled amino acid was serine. The purified receptor was able to release the fluorogenic or chromogenic group from synthetic peptides containing phenylalanine at the carboxyl terminus. This occurred only in the presence of estradiol and was hampered by aprotinin and diisopropyl fluorophosphate. Estradiol-dependent hydrolytic activity was also found in the eluate from gel slices after SDS/PAGE of purified receptor. This activity comigrated with the renaturable estradiol-binding activity. The estradiol antagonists 4-hydroxytamoxifen and ICI 164,384 as well as other steroid hormones were unable to activate this hydrolytic activity. PMID:1709742

  7. Algorithmic complexity of growth hormone release in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Prank, K.; Wagner, M.; Brabant, G.

    1996-12-31

    Most hormones are secreted in an pulsatile rather than in a constant manner. This temporal pattern of pulsatile hormone release plays an important role in the regulation of cellular function and structure. In healthy humans growth hormone (GH) secretion is characterized by distinct pulses whereas patients bearing a GH producing tumor accompanied with excessive secretion (acromegaly) exhibit a highly irregular pattern of GH release. It has been hypothesized that this highly disorderly pattern of GH release in acromegaly arises from random events in the GH-producing tumor under decreased normal control of GH secretion. Using a context-free grammar complexity measure (algorithmic complexity) in conjunction with random surrogate data sets we demonstrate that the temporal pattern of GH release in acromegaly is not significantly different from a variety of stochastic processes. In contrast, normal subjects clearly exhibit deterministic structure in their temporal patterns of GH secretion. Our results support the hypothesis that GH release in acromegaly is due to random events in the GH-producing tumorous cells which might become independent from hypothalamic regulation. 17 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  8. Palbociclib in Combination With Tamoxifen as First Line Therapy for Metastatic Hormone Receptor Positive Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-05

    Hormone Receptor Positive Malignant Neoplasm of Breast; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Estrogen Receptor Positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor Positive Tumor; Metastatic Breast Cancer

  9. Identification of an estrogenic hormone receptor in Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Mimoto, Ai; Fujii, Madoka; Usami, Makoto; Shimamura, Maki; Hirabayashi, Naoko; Kaneko, Takako; Sasagawa, Noboru; Ishiura, Shoichi

    2007-12-28

    Changes in both behavior and gene expression occur in Caenorhabditis elegans following exposure to sex hormones such as estrogen and progesterone, and to bisphenol A (BPA), an estrogenic endocrine-disrupting compound. However, only one steroid hormone receptor has been identified. Of the 284 known nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) in C. elegans, we selected nhr-14, nhr-69, and nhr-121 for analysis as potential estrogenic hormone receptors, because they share sequence similarity with the human estrogen receptor. First, the genes were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and then the affinity of each protein for estrogen was determined using a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor. All three NHRs bound estrogen in a dose-dependent fashion. To evaluate the specificity of the binding, we performed a solution competition assay using an SPR biosensor. According to our results, only NHR-14 was able to interact with estrogen. Therefore, we next examined whether nhr-14 regulates estrogen signaling in vivo. To investigate whether these interactions actually control the response of C. elegans to hormones, we investigated the expression of vitellogenin, an estrogen responsive gene, in an nhr-14 mutant. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed that vitellogenin expression was significantly reduced in the mutant. This suggests that NHR-14 is a C. elegans estrogenic hormone receptor and that it controls gene expression in response to estrogen.

  10. Effect of Chlorotriazine Pesticides on Gonadotrophin Releasing Hormone in the Neuronal GT1-7 Cell Line and Hypothalamic Explants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulates the release of pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone. These pituitary hormones are necessary for normal reproductive function in both males and females. It is well recognized that disruption of nor...

  11. Corticotropin Releasing Hormone and Imaging, Rethinking the Stress Axis

    PubMed Central

    Contoreggi, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    The stress system provides integration of both neurochemical and somatic physiologic functions within organisms as an adaptive mechanism to changing environmental conditions throughout evolution. In mammals and primates the complexity and sophistication of these systems has surpassed other species in triaging neurochemical and physiologic signaling to maximize chances of survival. Corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) and its related peptides and receptors have been identified over the last three decades and are fundamental molecular initiators of the stress response. They are crucial in the top down regulatory cascade over a myriad of neurochemical, neuroendocrine and sympathetic nervous system events. From neuroscience, we’ve seen that stress activation impacts behavior, endocrine and somatic physiology and influences neurochemical events that one can capture in real time with current imaging technologies. To delineate these effects one can demonstrate how the CRH neuronal networks infiltrate critical cognitive, emotive and autonomic regions of the central nervous system (CNS) with somatic effects. Abundant preclinical and clinical studies show inter-regulatory actions of CRH with multiple neurotransmitters/peptides. Stress, both acute and chronic has epigenetic effects which magnify genetic susceptibilities to alter neurochemistry; stress system activation can add critical variables in design and interpretation of basic and clinical neuroscience and related research. This review will attempt to provide an overview of the spectrum of known functions and speculative actions of CRH and stress responses in light of imaging technology and its interpretation. Metabolic and neuroreceptor positron emission/single photon tomography (PET/SPECT), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), anatomic MRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (pMRS) are technologies that can delineate basic mechanisms of neurophysiology and pharmacology

  12. Expression of neuropeptide hormone receptors in human adrenal tumors and cell lines: antiproliferative effects of peptide analogues.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, C G; Brown, J W; Schally, A V; Erler, A; Gebauer, L; Treszl, A; Young, L; Fishman, L M; Engel, J B; Willenberg, H S; Petersenn, S; Eisenhofer, G; Ehrhart-Bornstein, M; Bornstein, S R

    2009-09-15

    Peptide analogues targeting various neuropeptide receptors have been used effectively in cancer therapy. A hallmark of adrenocortical tumor formation is the aberrant expression of peptide receptors relating to uncontrolled cell proliferation and hormone overproduction. Our microarray results have also demonstrated a differential expression of neuropeptide hormone receptors in tumor subtypes of human pheochromocytoma. In light of these findings, we performed a comprehensive analysis of relevant receptors in both human adrenomedullary and adrenocortical tumors and tested the antiproliferative effects of peptide analogues targeting these receptors. Specifically, we examined the receptor expression of somatostatin-type-2 receptor, growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) receptor or GHRH receptor splice variant-1 (SV-1) and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor at the mRNA and protein levels in normal human adrenal tissues, adrenocortical and adrenomedullary tumors, and cell lines. Cytotoxic derivatives of somatostatin AN-238 and, to a lesser extent, AN-162, reduced cell numbers of uninduced and NGF-induced adrenomedullary pheochromocytoma cells and adrenocortical cancer cells. Both the splice variant of GHRH receptor SV-1 and the LHRH receptor were also expressed in adrenocortical cancer cell lines but not in the pheochromocytoma cell line. The GHRH receptor antagonist MZ-4-71 and LHRH antagonist Cetrorelix both significantly reduced cell growth in the adrenocortical cancer cell line. In conclusion, the expression of receptors for somatostatin, GHRH, and LHRH in the normal human adrenal and in adrenal tumors, combined with the growth-inhibitory effects of the antitumor peptide analogues, may make possible improved treatment approaches to adrenal tumors. PMID:19717419

  13. Active immunization to luteinizing hormone releasing hormone to inhibit the induction of mammary tumors in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Ravdin, P.M.; Jordan, V.C.

    1988-01-01

    Immunization of female rats with a bovine serum albumin-luteinizing hormone releasing hormone conjugate results in suppression of dimethylbenzanthracene mammary tumor incidence. Tumor incidence was 1.3, and 1.29 tumors per rat in bovine serum albumin alone (n = 10) and unimmunized (n = 18) control groups, but no tumors were found in the bovine serum albumin-luteinizing hormone releasing hormone conjugate immunized animals (n = 10). In a second experiment immunization with bovine serum albumin-luteinizing hormone releasing hormone conjugates reduced tumor incidence to 0.3 tumors per rat (n = 10) from the 1.2 tumors per animal seen in the control animals (n = 10) immunized with bovine serum albumin alone. Bovine serum albumin-luteinizing hormone immunization caused the production of anti-LHRH antibodies, an interruption of estrous cycles, lowered serum estradiol and progesterone levels, and atrophy of the ovaries and uteri. Immunization BSA-hormone conjugates is a novel anti-tumor strategy.

  14. Growth hormone releasing factor-like immunoreactivity in human milk.

    PubMed

    Werner, H; Amarant, T; Fridkin, M; Koch, Y

    1986-03-28

    The presence of immunoreactive growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) in human milk has been demonstrated. By using sequential high performance liquid chromatography, it has been shown that most of the immunoreactivity co-elutes with the synthetic, hypothalamic-like, GRF (1-40). The concentrations of GRF detected (between 152 and 432 pg GRF/ml milk) exceed several fold its values in plasma. PMID:3083812

  15. Rat growth-hormone release stimulators from fenugreek seeds.

    PubMed

    Shim, Sang Hee; Lee, Eun Ju; Kim, Ju Sun; Kang, Sam Sik; Ha, Hyekyung; Lee, Ho Young; Kim, Chungsook; Lee, Je-Hyun; Son, Kun Ho

    2008-09-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of MeOH extract from fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum L.) seeds resulted in the isolation of two rat growth-hormone release stimulators in vitro, fenugreek saponin I (1) and dioscin (9), along with two new, i.e., 2 and 3, and five known analogues, i.e., 4-8. The structures of the new steroidal saponins, fenugreek saponins I, II, and III (1-3, resp.), were determined as gitogenin 3-O-beta-D-xylopyranosyl-(1-->6)-beta-D-glucopyranoside, sarsasapogenin 3-O-beta-D-xylopyranosyl-(1-->6)-beta-D-glucopyranoside, and gitogenin 3-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-beta-D-glucopyranoside, respectively. Fenugreek saponin I (1) and dioscin (9) caused ca. 12.5- and 17.7-fold stimulation of release, respectively, of rat growth hormone from rat pituitary cells, whereas gitogenin (5) showed moderate activity. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that steroidal saponins stimulate rat growth-hormone release in rat pituitary cells. PMID:18816528

  16. Immunoreactive luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone in the seminal plasma and human semen parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Izumi, S.; Makino, T.; Iizuka, R.

    1985-04-01

    A luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH)-like substance has been detected in human seminal plasma by a radioimmunoassay (RIA) with a highly specific anti-LH-RH antiserum. The seminal samples - not only the plasma itself but also the sample extracted by an acid/alcohol method - showed satisfactory displacement curves in our RIA system. The relationship between fertility and the LH-RH values in the seminal plasma was studied by comparing the peptide levels with sperm concentration and motility. By these two parameters, 103 samples were divided into four groups. In the low-concentration groups (oligozoospermic patients), the hormonal concentrations differed significantly between those specimens demonstrating good and poor motility. These data suggest that this immunoreactive LH-RH may play a role in human spermatogenesis.

  17. Pituitary self-priming actions of gonadotropin-releasing hormone. Kinetics of estradiol's potentiating effects on gonadotropin-releasing hormone-facilitated luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone release in healthy postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Veldhuis, J D; Evans, W S; Rogol, A D; Kolp, L; Thorner, M O; Stumpf, P

    1986-06-01

    We examined the kinetically distinct characteristics of estradiol's effects upon pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) release in response to pulses of exogenous gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in healthy postmenopausal individuals. The putative self-priming actions of GnRH on LH and FSH release were tested by intravenous injections of equal paired doses of GnRH (10 micrograms) before and after 1, 5, 10, and 30 d of pure estradiol-17 beta delivery via an intravaginal silastic ring. Self-priming actions of GnRH, as defined by heightened gonadotropin release in response to the second pulse of GnRH compared with the first, were completely absent in the hypoestrogenemic state. However, estradiol administration unmasked GnRH self-priming in a time-dependent fashion, with maximal expression after 5 and 10 d of steroid replacement, followed by attenuation by 30 d. Since estradiol's modulation of GnRH action was expressed differentially on LH and FSH release, we suggest that such facilitation of GnRH-stimulated pituitary LH and FSH release may provide an additional mechanism for dissociated secretion of gonadotropic hormones in health or disease. PMID:3086382

  18. Effects of chronic and subtoxic chlorobenzenes on adrenocorticotrophic hormone release.

    PubMed

    Molnár, Zsolt; Pálföldi, Regina; László, Anna; Radács, Marianna; Sepp, Krisztián; Hausinger, Péter; Tiszlavicz, László; Valkusz, Zsuzsanna; Gálfi, Márta

    2015-08-01

    Many environmental chemicals and pesticides have been found to alter neuroendocrine communication in exposed biological objects. The environmental loads have primary and secondary effects that can alter the homeostatic regulation potential. Since it is difficult to avoid human exposition, a potentially important area of research to develop in vivo and in vitro experimental models. In this context, the primary aim of this study was to demonstrate the effects of chlorobenzenes on adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) release. In our experimental study, male Wistar rats were exposed to 0.1, 1.0 and 10 μg/b.w. (body weight)kg of 1,2,4- trichlorobenzene and hexachlorobenzene (ClB) mix via gastric tube for 30, 60 or 90 days. At the endpoints of the experiment blood samples were taken and animals were decapitated. Primary, monolayer adenohypophysis cell cultures were prepared by enzymatic and mechanical digestion. The ACTH hormone content in serum and supernatant media was measured by immuno-chemiluminescence assay. The Mg(2+)-dependent ATPase activity was determined by modified method of Martin and Dotty. Significant differences were detected in the hormone release between the control and treated groups. The hormone release was enhanced characteristically in exposed groups depending upon the dose and duration of exposure. The Mg(2+)-ATPase activity enhanced after chronic and subtoxic ClB exposition. Light microscopy revealed that the adenohypophysis seemed to be more abundant. Results indicate that Wistar rats exposed to subtoxic ClB have direct and indirect effects on hypothalamus-hypophysis-adrenal axis. PMID:26257359

  19. New insights on the role of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone agonists in premenopausal early breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Del Mastro, Lucia; Rossi, Giovanni; Lambertini, Matteo; Poggio, Francesca; Pronzato, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Luteinising hormone releasing hormone agonists (LH-RHa) are effective in the treatment of advanced endocrine-sensitive breast cancer in premenopausal patients, but their role in the adjuvant setting has remained controversial for a long time. Tamoxifen for 5 years has been traditionally considered the standard endocrine therapy for premenopausal patients and this is still valid for many patients. However, the recently reported SOFT trial has suggested that adding ovarian function suppression (OFS) to tamoxifen could improve DFS in women at sufficient risk to warrant adjuvant chemotherapy and who remained premenopausal after this therapy. The administration of an aromatase inhibitor plus OFS represents an additional therapeutic option for hormone-receptor positive premenopausal breast cancer patients, according to the combined analysis of the SOFT and TEXT trials. Temporary ovarian suppression induced by LH-RHa has been recognized as an effective strategy to preserve ovarian function from the toxic effects of chemotherapy and is now recommended in young breast cancer patients with endocrine-insensitive tumors. In this review, we discuss recent data on the role of LH-RHa in combination with tamoxifen or with an aromatase inhibitor, and we comment on its role as a strategy to preserve ovarian function in young patients candidates for adjuvant or neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:26613834

  20. Ectopic and abnormal hormone receptors in adrenal Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, A; Ndiaye, N; Tremblay, J; Hamet, P

    2001-02-01

    The mechanism by which cortisol is produced in adrenal Cushing's syndrome, when ACTH is suppressed, was previously unknown and was referred to as being "autonomous." More recently, several investigators have shown that some cortisol and other steroid-producing adrenal tumors or hyperplasias are under the control of ectopic (or aberrant, illicit, inappropriate) membrane hormone receptors. These include ectopic receptors for gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP), beta-adrenergic agonists, or LH/hCG; a similar outcome can result from altered activity of eutopic receptors, such as those for vasopressin (V1-AVPR), serotonin (5-HT4), or possibly leptin. The presence of aberrant receptors places adrenal cells under stimulation by a trophic factor not negatively regulated by glucocorticoids, leading to increased steroidogenesis and possibly to the proliferative phenotype. The molecular mechanisms responsible for the abnormal expression and function of membrane hormone receptors are still largely unknown. Identification of the presence of these illicit receptors can eventually lead to new pharmacological therapies as alternatives to adrenalectomy, now demonstrated by the long-term control of ectopic P-AR- and LH/hCGR-dependent Cushing's syndrome by propanolol and leuprolide acetate. Further studies will potentially identify a larger diversity of hormone receptors capable of coupling to G proteins, adenylyl cyclase, and steroidogenesis in functional adrenal tumors and probably in other endocrine and nonendocrine tumors. PMID:11159817

  1. Thyroid Hormone Receptor Binds to a Site in the Rat Growth Hormone Promoter Required for Induction by Thyroid Hormone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Ronald J.; Brent, Gregory A.; Warne, Robert L.; Reed Larsen, P.; Moore, David D.

    1987-08-01

    Transcription of the rat growth hormone (rGH) gene in pituitary cells is increased by addition of thyroid hormone (T3). This induction is dependent on the presence of specific sequences just upstream of the rGH promoter. We have partially purified T3 receptor from rat liver and examined its interaction with these rGH sequences. We show here that T3 receptor binds specifically to a site just upstream of the basal rGH promoter. This binding site includes two copies of a 7-base-pair direct repeat, the centers of which are separated by 10 base pairs. Deletions that specifically remove the T3 receptor binding site drastically reduce response to T3 in transient transfection experiments. These results demonstrate that T3 receptor can recognize specific DNA sequences and suggest that it can act directly as a positive transcriptional regulatory factor.

  2. Rational discovery of novel nuclear hormone receptor antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schapira, Matthieu; Raaka, Bruce M.; Samuels, Herbert H.; Abagyan, Ruben

    2000-02-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors (NRs) are potential targets for therapeutic approaches to many clinical conditions, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological diseases. The crystal structure of the ligand binding domain of agonist-bound NRs enables the design of compounds with agonist activity. However, with the exception of the human estrogen receptor-, the lack of antagonist-bound "inactive" receptor structures hinders the rational design of receptor antagonists. In this study, we present a strategy for designing such antagonists. We constructed a model of the inactive conformation of human retinoic acid receptor- by using information derived from antagonist-bound estrogen receptor-α and applied a computer-based virtual screening algorithm to identify retinoic acid receptor antagonists. Thus, the currently available crystal structures of NRs may be used for the rational design of antagonists, which could lead to the development of novel drugs for a variety of diseases.

  3. Characterization of the adipokinetic hormone receptor of the anautogenous flesh fly, Sarcophaga crassipalpis.

    PubMed

    Bil, Magdalena; Timmermans, Iris; Verlinden, Heleen; Huybrechts, Roger

    2016-06-01

    Adipokinetic hormone (AKH) is an insect neuropeptide mainly involved in fat body energy mobilization. In flies (Phormia regina, Sarcophaga crassipalpis), bugs (Pyrrhocoris apterus) and cockroaches (Periplaneta americana) AKH was also demonstrated to be involved in the regulation of digestion. This makes AKH an important peptide for anautogenous female flies that need to feed on a supplementary protein meal to initiate vitellogenesis, the large scale synthesis of yolk proteins and their uptake by the developing oocytes. Flesh fly AKH, originally identified as Phormia terraenovae hypertrehalosemic hormone (PhoteHrTH), functions through activation of the AKH receptor (AKHR). This is a G protein-coupled receptor that is the orthologue of the human gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor. Pharmacological characterization indicated that the receptor can be activated by two related dipteran AKH ligands with an EC50 value in the low nanomolar range, whereas micromolar concentrations of the Tribolium castaneum AKH were needed. Consistent with the energy mobilizing function of AKH, the receptor transcript levels were most abundant in the fat body tissue. Nonetheless, Sarcophaga crassipalpis AKHR transcript levels were also high in the brain, the foregut and the hindgut. Interestingly, the receptor transcript numbers were reduced in almost all measured tissues after protein feeding. These changes may enforce the use of ingested energy carrying molecules prior to stored energy mobilization. PMID:27063262

  4. Model for growth hormone receptor activation based on subunit rotation within a receptor dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Richard J.; Adams, Julian J.; Pelekanos, Rebecca A.; Wan, Yu; McKinstry, William J.; Palethorpe, Kathryn; Seeber, Ruth M.; Monks, Thea A.; Eidne, Karin A.; Parker, Michael W.; Waters, Michael J.

    2010-07-13

    Growth hormone is believed to activate the growth hormone receptor (GHR) by dimerizing two identical receptor subunits, leading to activation of JAK2 kinase associated with the cytoplasmic domain. However, we have reported previously that dimerization alone is insufficient to activate full-length GHR. By comparing the crystal structure of the liganded and unliganded human GHR extracellular domain, we show here that there is no substantial change in its conformation on ligand binding. However, the receptor can be activated by rotation without ligand by inserting a defined number of alanine residues within the transmembrane domain. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) and coimmunoprecipitation studies suggest that receptor subunits undergo specific transmembrane interactions independent of hormone binding. We propose an activation mechanism involving a relative rotation of subunits within a dimeric receptor as a result of asymmetric placement of the receptor-binding sites on the ligand.

  5. The expression of several reproductive hormone receptors can be modified by perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    López-Doval, S; Salgado, R; Lafuente, A

    2016-07-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the possible role of several reproductive hormone receptors on the disruption of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testis (HPT) axis activity induced by perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS). The studied receptors are the gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHr), luteinizing hormone receptor (LHr), follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHr), and the androgen receptor (Ar). Adult male rats were orally treated with 1.0; 3.0 and 6.0 mg of PFOS kg(-1) d(-1) for 28 days. In general terms, PFOS can modify the relative gene and protein expressions of these receptors in several tissues of the reproductive axis. At the testicular level, apart from the expected inhibition of both gene and protein expressions of FSHr and Ar, PFOS also stimulates the GnRHr protein and the LHr gene expression. The receptors of the main hormones involved in the HPT axis may have an important role in the disruption exerted by PFOS on this axis. PMID:27151425

  6. Thyroid hormone receptors regulate adipogenesis and carcinogenesis via crosstalk signaling with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Changxue; Cheng, Sheue-Yann

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) and thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. They are ligand-dependent transcription factors that interact with their cognate hormone response elements in the promoters to regulate respective target gene expression to modulate cellular functions. While the transcription activity of each is regulated by their respective ligands, recent studies indicate that via multiple mechanisms PPARs and TRs crosstalk to affect diverse biological functions. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms and biological impact of crosstalk between these two important nuclear receptors, focusing on their roles in adipogenesis and carcinogenesis. PMID:19741045

  7. Increased activity of antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone substituted at positions 8, 9, and 10

    PubMed Central

    Varga, Jozsef L.; Schally, Andrew V.; Horvath, Judit E.; Kovacs, Magdolna; Halmos, Gabor; Groot, Kate; Toller, Gabor L.; Rekasi, Zoltan; Zarandi, Marta

    2004-01-01

    Antagonists of human growth hormone-releasing hormone (hGHRH) with increased potency and improved enzymatic and chemical stability are needed for potential clinical applications. We synthesized 21 antagonistic analogs of hGHRH(1-29)NH2, substituted at positions 8, 9, and 10 of the common core sequence {phenylacetyl-Tyr1, d-Arg2,28, para-chloro-phenylalanine 6, Arg9/homoarginine 9, Tyr10/O-methyltyrosine 10, α-aminobutyric acid 15, norleucine 27, Har29} hGHRH(1-29)NH2. Inhibitory effects on hGHRH-induced GH release were evaluated in vitro in a superfused rat pituitary system, as well as in vivo after i.v. injection into rats. The binding affinities of the peptides to pituitary GHRH receptors were also determined. Introduction of para-amidinophenylalanine 10 yielded antagonists JV-1-62 and -63 with the highest activities in vitro and lowest receptor dissociation constants (Ki = 0.057-0.062 nM). Antagonists JV-1-62 and -63 also exhibited the strongest effect in vivo, significantly (P < 0.05-0.001) inhibiting hGHRH-induced GH release for at least 1 h. Para-aminophenylalanine 10 and O-ethyltyrosine 10 substitutions yielded antagonists potent in vitro, but His10, 3,3′-diphenylalanine 10, 2-naphthylalanine 10, and cyclohexylalanine 10 modifications were detrimental. Antagonists containing citrulline 9 (in MZ-J-7-72), amidinophenylalanine 9 (in JV-1-65), His9, d-Arg9, citrulline 8, Ala8, d-Ala8, or α-aminobutyric acid 8 substituents also had high activity and receptor affinity in vitro. However, in vitro potencies of analogs with substitution in position 9 correlated poorly with acute endocrine effects in vivo, as exemplified by the weak and/or short inhibitory actions of antagonists JV-1-65 and MZ-J-7-72 on GH release in vivo. Nevertheless, antagonist JV-1-65 was more potent than JV-1-63 in tests on inhibition of the growth of human prostatic and lung cancer lines xenografted into nude mice. This indicates that oncological activity may be based on several mechanisms

  8. Pulsatile Release of Parathyroid Hormone from an Implantable Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaohua; Pettway, Glenda J.; McCauley, Laurie K.; Ma, Peter X.

    2007-01-01

    Intermittent (pulsatile) administration of parathyroid hormone (PTH) is known to improve bone micro-architecture, mineral density and strength. Therefore, daily injection of PTH has been clinically used for the treatment of osteoporosis. However, this regimen of administration is not convenient and is not a favorable choice of patients. In this study, an implantable delivery system has been developed to achieve pulsatile release of PTH. A well-defined cylindrical device was first fabricated with a biodegradable polymer, poly(lactic acid) (PLLA), using a reverse solid free form fabrication technique. Three-component polyanhydrides composed of sebacic acid, 1,3-bis(p-carboxyphenoxy) propane and poly(ethylene glycol) were synthesized and used as isolation layers. The polyanhydride isolation layers and PTH-loaded alginate layers were then stacked alternately within the delivery device. The gap between the stacked PTH-releasing core and the device frame was filled with PLLA to seal. Multi-pulse PTH release was achieved using the implantable device. The lag time between two adjacent pulses were modulated by the composition and the film thickness of the polyanhydride. The released PTH was demonstrated to be biologically active using an in vitro assay. Timed sequential release of multiple drugs has also been demonstrated. The implantable device holds promise for both systemic and local therapies. PMID:17576005

  9. Effects of plasmid-mediated growth hormone-releasing hormone in severely debilitated dogs with cancer.

    PubMed

    Draghia-Akli, Ruxandra; Hahn, Kevin A; King, Glen K; Cummings, Kathleen K; Carpenter, Robert H

    2002-12-01

    Cachexia is a common manifestation of late stage malignancy and is characterized by anemia, anorexia, muscle wasting, loss of adipose tissue, and fatigue. Although cachexia is disabling and can diminish the life expectancy of cancer patients, there are still no effective therapies for this condition. We have examined the feasibility of using a myogenic plasmid to express growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) in severely debilitated companion dogs with naturally occurring tumors. At a median of 16 days after intramuscular delivery of the plasmid, serum concentrations of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), a measure of GHRH activity, were increased in 12 of 16 dogs (P < 0.01). These increases ranged from 21 to 120% (median, 49%) of the pretreatment values and were generally sustained or higher on the final evaluation. Anemia resolved posttreatment, as indicated by significant increases in mean red blood cell count, hematocrit, and hemoglobin concentrations, and there was also a significant rise in the percentage of circulating lymphocytes. Treated dogs maintained their weights over the 56-day study and did not show any adverse effects from the GHRH gene transfer. We conclude that intramuscular injection of a GHRH-expressing plasmid is both safe and capable of stimulating the release of growth hormone and IGF-I in large animals. The observed anabolic responses to a single dose of this therapy might be beneficial in patients with cancer-associated anemia and cachexia. PMID:12498779

  10. Intranasal treatment with luteinising hormone releasing hormone agonist in women with endometriosis.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, R W; Fraser, H M; Boyle, H

    1983-01-01

    An agonist analogue of luteinising hormone releasing hormone (buserelin) was successfully used to treat women with endometriosis. A dose of 200 micrograms administered intranasally thrice daily was found to be effective in five patients, in whom the endometriotic lesions resolved after six months' treatment. Failure occurred in a sixth patient, who received only 400 micrograms once daily. Anovulation was induced in all subjects together with suppression of menstruation after the first month of treatment. Symptoms of abdominal pain, dysmenorrhoea, and dyspareunia were relieved during treatment, and one previously infertile patient conceived within two months of stopping treatment. No side effects were reported with this dosage, and the results suggest a new form of treatment for patients with endometriosis. PMID:6416542

  11. Molecular characterization of human thyroid hormone receptor β isoform 4.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Kenji; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Futawaka, Kumi; Atake, Asami; Kasahara, Masato; Tagami, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormone exerts a pleiotropic effect on development, differentiation, and metabolism through thyroid hormone receptor (TR). A novel thyroid hormone receptor β isoform (TRβ4) was cloned using PCR from a human pituitary cDNA library as a template. We report here the characterization of TRβ4 from a molecular basis. Temporal expression of TRβ4 during the fetal period is abundant in the brain and kidney, comparable with the adult pattern. Western blot analysis revealed that TRs are ubiquitination labile proteins, while TRβ1 is potentially stable. TRβ1, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR), and vitamin D receptor (VDR), which belong to class II transcription factors that function via the formation of heterodimeric complexes with retinoid X receptor (RXR), were suppressed by TRβ4 in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, TRβ4 exhibits ligand-independent transcriptional silencing, possibly as a substitute for dimerized RXR. In this study, TRβ1 and TRβ4 transcripts were detected in several cell lines. Quantitative RT-PCR assay showed that the expression of TRβ4 in human embryonic carcinoma cells of the testis was suppressed by sex hormone in a reciprocal manner to TRβ1. In contrast, TRβ4 was expressed under a high dose of triiodothyronine (T3) in a reciprocal manner to TRβ1. Finally, in transiently transfected NIH-3T3 cells, green fluorescence protein (GFP)-tagged TRβ4 was mostly nuclear in both the absence and the presence of T3. By mutating defined regions of both TRβs, we found that both TRβ1 and TRβ4 had altered nuclear/cytoplasmic distribution as compared with wild-type, and different to T3 and the nuclear receptor corepressor (NCoR). Thus, site-specific DNA binding is not essential for maintaining TRβs within the nucleus. PMID:26513165

  12. Targeting the diuretic hormone receptor to control the cotton leafworm, Spodoptera littoralis.

    PubMed

    Apone, Fabio; Ruggiero, Alessandra; Tortora, Assunta; Tito, Annalisa; Grimaldi, Maria Rosaria; Arciello, Stefania; Andrenacci, Davide; Di Lelio, Ilaria; Colucci, Gabriella

    2014-01-01

    The cotton leafworm, Spodoptera littoralis Boisduval (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), is one of the most devastating pests of crops worldwide. Several types of treatments have been used against this pest, but many of them failed because of the rapid development of genetic resistance in the different insect populations. G protein coupled receptors have vital functions in most organisms, including insects; thus, they are appealing targets for species-specific pest control strategies. Among the insect G protein coupled receptors, the diuretic hormone receptors have several key roles in development and metabolism, but their importance in vivo and their potential role as targets of novel pest control strategies are largely unexplored. With the goal of using DHR genes as targets to control S. littoralis, we cloned a corticotropin-releasing factor-like binding receptor in this species and expressed the corresponding dsRNA in tobacco plants to knock down the receptor activity in vivo through RNA interference. We also expressed the receptor in mammalian cells to study its signaling pathways. The results indicate that this diuretic hormone receptor gene has vital roles in S. littoralis and represents an excellent molecular target to protect agriculturally-important plants from this pest. PMID:25368043

  13. Highly potent antagonists of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone free of edematogenic effects.

    PubMed Central

    Bajusz, S; Kovacs, M; Gazdag, M; Bokser, L; Karashima, T; Csernus, V J; Janaky, T; Guoth, J; Schally, A V

    1988-01-01

    To eliminate the undesirable edematogenic effect of the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) antagonists containing basic D amino acids at position 6, exemplified by [Ac-D-Phe(pCl)1,2,D-Trp3,D-Arg6,D-Ala10]LH-RH [Phe(pCl) indicates 4-chlorophenylalanine], analogs with D-ureidoalkyl amino acids such as D-citrulline (D-Cit) or D-homocitrulline (D-Hci) at position 6 were synthesized and tested in several systems in vitro and in vivo. HPLC analysis revealed that the overall hydrophobicity of the D-Cit/D-Hci6 analogs was similar to that of the basic D-Arg6 antagonists. In vitro, most of the analogs completely inhibited LH-RH-mediated luteinizing hormone release in perfused rat pituitary cell systems at an antagonist to LH-RH molar ratio of 5:1. In vivo, the most active peptides, [Ac-D-Nal(2)1,D-Phe(pCl)2,D-Trp3,D-Cit6,D-Ala10]LH-RH [Nal(2) indicates 3-(2-naphthyl)alanine] and its D-Hci6 analog, caused 100% inhibition of ovulation in cycling rats in doses of 3 micrograms and suppressed the luteinizing hormone level in ovariectomized female rats for 47 hr when administered at doses of 25 micrograms. Characteristically, these peptides did not exert any edematogenic effects even at 1.5 mg/kg. These properties of the D-Cit/D-Hci6 antagonists may make them useful clinically. PMID:3278323

  14. Ammonium sulfate fractionation and assay of hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y M; Vaughn, C B

    1989-01-01

    Ammonium sulfate (AS) precipitation by consecutive steps at 10% to 50% saturation has been utilized for fractionation of cytoplasmic estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PgR). The highest percentage of both receptor activities are confined mainly in two fractions at AS saturation from 20% to 30% and 30% to 40%. The total percentages of activity of the cytoplasmic ER and PgR salted out at 50% saturation are 77% and 53%, respectively. Precipitation of hormone-receptor complexes at 50% saturation for assay of ER and PgR can be achieved, but needs improvement for efficient salting out of the receptors. ER and PgR salted out in the AS pellet are much more stable for storage than in the cytosol. PMID:2790540

  15. Prediction of nuclear hormone receptor response elements.

    PubMed

    Sandelin, Albin; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2005-03-01

    The nuclear receptor (NR) class of transcription factors controls critical regulatory events in key developmental processes, homeostasis maintenance, and medically important diseases and conditions. Identification of the members of a regulon controlled by a NR could provide an accelerated understanding of development and disease. New bioinformatics methods for the analysis of regulatory sequences are required to address the complex properties associated with known regulatory elements targeted by the receptors because the standard methods for binding site prediction fail to reflect the diverse target site configurations. We have constructed a flexible Hidden Markov Model framework capable of predicting NHR binding sites. The model allows for variable spacing and orientation of half-sites. In a genome-scale analysis enabled by the model, we show that NRs in Fugu rubripes have a significant cross-regulatory potential. The model is implemented in a web interface, freely available for academic researchers, available at http://mordor.cgb.ki.se/NHR-scan. PMID:15563547

  16. The Content of Thyroid Hormone Receptor α in Ewe Kisspeptin Neurones is not Season-Dependent.

    PubMed

    Dufourny, L; Gennetay, D; Martinet, S; Lomet, D; Caraty, A

    2016-02-01

    Seasonal reproduction is grounded in several mechanisms, among which are plasticity in both hormone synthesis and neuronal networks. Increased daylength on long days (LD) translates into local tri-iodothyronin (T3) production in the mediobasal hypothalamus that will enable the transition to the anoestrus season in sheep. The photoperiod also strongly affects the content of kisspeptin (Kiss), a hypothalamic neuropeptide exerting a potent stimulatory effect on gonadotrophin-releasing hormone release. Our hypothesis was that T3 directly inhibits Kiss release during LD. Using double immunocytochemistry, we first searched for coexpression of thyroid hormone receptor (THR)α in Kiss neurones in ewes with an active or inactive gonadotrophic axis. In both the preoptic area and the arcuate nucleus, most Kiss neurones were labelled by THR antibody under both physiological/photoperiodic conditions. These results suggest thyroid hormones may affect Kiss synthesis and release all through the year. We then attempted to assess the influence of T3 on Kiss content in hypothalamic explants sampled from ewes with an active gonadotrophic axis. Kiss produced by hypothalamic explants cultured with different doses of T3 (300 or 600 pg) and subjected to different times of incubation (2 or 24 h) was measured. No significant effects of T3 on Kiss tissular content were observed for the two doses of T3 and for the two incubation times. In light of these findings, potential reasons for the divergent effects of thyroid hormones on Kiss content are discussed. Our data emphasise that the effects of thyroid hormone on Kiss synthesis are not one-sided and may affect a wide range of functions. PMID:26644229

  17. Effects of oral chlortetracycline and dietary protein level on plasma concentrations of growth hormone and thyroid hormones in beef steers before and after challenge with a combination of thyrotropin-releasing hormone and growth hormone-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Rumsey, T S; McLeod, K; Elsasser, T H; Kahl, S; Baldwin, R L

    1999-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of a subtherapeutic level of chlortetracycline (CTC) fed to growing beef steers under conditions of limited and adequate dietary protein on plasma concentrations of GH, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), and thyroid hormones before and after an injection of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) + GHRH. Young beef steers (n = 32; average BW = 285 kg) were assigned to a 2x2 factorial arrangement of treatments of either a 10 or 13% crude protein diet (70% concentrate, 15% wheat straw, and 15% cottonseed hulls) and either a corn meal carrier or carrier + 350 mg of CTC daily top dressed on the diet. Steers were fed ad libitum amounts of diet for 56 d, and a jugular catheter was then placed in each steer in four groups (two steers from each treatment combination per group) during four consecutive days (one group per day). Each steer was injected via the jugular catheter with 1.0 microg/kg BW TRH + .1 microg/kg BW GHRH in 10 mL of saline at 0800. Blood samples were collected at -30, -15, 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 45, 60, 120, 240, and 360 min after releasing hormone injection. Plasma samples were analyzed for GH, TSH, thyroxine (T4), and triiodothyronine (T3). After 84 d on trial, the steers were slaughtered and the pituitary and samples of liver were collected and analyzed for 5'-deiodinase activity. Feeding CTC attenuated the GH response to releasing hormone challenge by 26% for both area under the response curve (P<.03) and peak response (P<.10). Likewise, CTC attenuated the TSH response to releasing hormone challenge for area under the response curve by 16% (P<.10) and peak response by 33% (P<.02), and attenuated the T4 response for area under the curve by 12% (P<.08) and peak response by 14% (P<.04). Type II deiodinase activity in the pituitary was 36% less (P<.02) in CTC-fed steers than in steers not fed CTC. The results of this study are interpreted to suggest that feeding subtherapeutic levels of CTC to young

  18. The influence of photoperiod on gonadotrophin-releasing hormone stimulated luteinising hormone release in the anoestrous mare.

    PubMed

    Nequin, L G; King, S S; Matt, K S; Jurak, R C

    1990-09-01

    The transition from anoestrus to oestrus in mares is controlled by photoperiod. The present study examined whether additional daylength would accelerate the mares' response to gonadotrophin-releasing-hormone (GnRH). Nine anoestrous mares were placed under ambient or artificial long lighting on 7th January. The four month experimental period was divided into a three-day sequence which was repeated at 21 day intervals. Ovaries were palpated rectally on Day 1; saline was injected (1 ml intravenously [iv]) on Day 2; GnRH was administered (0.59 microgram/kg bodyweight iv) on Day 3. Blood was taken at -60, 0, 15, 30, 60 and 120 mins relative to saline or GnRH treatment. Serum luteinising hormone (LH) was determined by a homologous equine radioimmunoassay (RIA). Several criteria were employed to define a positive response to GnRH and the results were analysed by Fisher's exact probability test. Treatment with artificial light allowed a response to GnRH within six weeks whereas the mares in ambient lighting took 12 weeks to respond to GnRH. The advancement in the time of response to GnRH under the long photoperiod could be related to changes in pituitary LH content, accelerated follicular activity or alterations in other brain-pituitary hormone levels. PMID:2226401

  19. Evolutionary aspects of growth hormones and prolactins and their receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Tarpey, J.F.

    1986-01-01

    The interactions of GH's, PRL's and PL's with receptors for GH and PRL were examined from a comparative and evolutionary viewpoint. The binding of /sup 125/I-bGH to membrane preparations from liver of representatives of the major classes of non-mammalian vertebrates was also studied. Only hepatic membranes from sturgeon and Gillichthys had significant bGH binding and were further characterized and compared with male rabbit liver membranes in terms of time, temperature, pH, and membrane concentration to optimize binding conditions. The binding of several members of the GH, PRL, PL family of hormones to GH receptors from liver of sturgeon, Gillichthys, rabbit, mouse and rat was investigated. in terms of hormonal specificity, the mammalian receptors and the sturgeon binding sites were similar, while Gillichthys receptors had a different pattern of hormonal specificity. The binding of /sup 125/I-oPRL to renal membranes of the turtle, Pseudemys scripta elegans, was characterized and compared to PRL binding sites of kidney membranes of the bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana, and the tiger salamander, Ambystoma tigrinum.

  20. Sex Hormones and Their Receptors Regulate Liver Energy Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Minqian; Shi, Haifei

    2015-01-01

    The liver is one of the most essential organs involved in the regulation of energy homeostasis. Hepatic steatosis, a major manifestation of metabolic syndrome, is associated with imbalance between lipid formation and breakdown, glucose production and catabolism, and cholesterol synthesis and secretion. Epidemiological studies show sex difference in the prevalence in fatty liver disease and suggest that sex hormones may play vital roles in regulating hepatic steatosis. In this review, we summarize current literature and discuss the role of estrogens and androgens and the mechanisms through which estrogen receptors and androgen receptors regulate lipid and glucose metabolism in the liver. In females, estradiol regulates liver metabolism via estrogen receptors by decreasing lipogenesis, gluconeogenesis, and fatty acid uptake, while enhancing lipolysis, cholesterol secretion, and glucose catabolism. In males, testosterone works via androgen receptors to increase insulin receptor expression and glycogen synthesis, decrease glucose uptake and lipogenesis, and promote cholesterol storage in the liver. These recent integrated concepts suggest that sex hormone receptors could be potential promising targets for the prevention of hepatic steatosis. PMID:26491440

  1. Transplacental transfer of a growth hormone-releasing hormone peptide from mother to fetus in the rat.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies showed that when growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) was administered to either pregnant rats or pigs as a plasmid-mediated therapy, pituitary weight, somatotroph and lactotroph numbers, and postnatal growth rate of the offspring increased. To determine if these responses result...

  2. Homozygosity for a dominant negative thyroid hormone receptor gene responsible for generalized resistance to thyroid hormone.

    PubMed

    Ono, S; Schwartz, I D; Mueller, O T; Root, A W; Usala, S J; Bercu, B B

    1991-11-01

    Generalized resistance to thyroid hormones (GRTH) commonly results from mutations in the T3-binding domain of the c-erbA beta thyroid hormone receptor gene. We have reported on a novel deletion mutation in c-erbA beta in a kindred, S, with GRTH. One patient from this kindred was the product of a consanguineous union from two affected members and was homozygous for the beta-receptor defect. This patient at 3.5 weeks of age had unprecedented elevations of TSH, free T4, and free T3 (TSH, 389 mU/L; free T4, 330.8 pmol/L; free T3, 82,719 fmol/L). He displayed a complex mixture of tissue-specific hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. He had delayed growth (height age, 1 3/12 yr at chronological age 2 9/12 yr) and skeletal maturation (bone age, 4 months), and developmental delay (developmental age, 8 months), but he was quite tachycardic. The homozygous patient of kindred S is markedly different from a recently reported patient with no c-erbA beta-receptor. This difference indicates that a dominant negative form of c-erbA beta in man can inhibit at least some thyroid hormone action mediated by the c-erbA alpha-receptors. PMID:1682340

  3. Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH)--a novel olfactory stimulant in fish.

    PubMed

    Andersen, O; Døving, K B

    1991-08-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the putative role of the gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH or LHRH) as an olfactory stimulant in fish. We report for the first time extreme sensitivity of the olfactory organ in the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to GnRH. Recordings of the electroolfactogram (EOG) showed an electrophysiological response to 10(-16) M GnRH four times the amplitude of the response to a fresh water control stimulus. By stimulating the olfactory epithelium with several GnRH analogs and fragments of the decapeptide, the biologically active region of GnRH could be partly elucidated. The response profile of GnRH differed from that of the positive control odorant L-alanine, suggesting that separate receptors or receptor cells are involved. We propose that this potent odorant may act as a reproductive pheromone in fish. PMID:1912479

  4. Thyroid hormones regulate levels of thyrotropin-releasing-hormone mRNA in the paraventricular nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Koller, K.J.; Wolff, R.S.; Warden, M.K.; Zoeller, R.T.

    1987-10-01

    Cellular levels of messenger RNA encoding thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) were measured in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and the reticular nucleus of the thalamus in male rats after chemical thyroidectomy and thyroid hormone, replacement. TRH mRNA levels were measured by quantitative in situ hybridization histochemistry using a /sup 35/S-labeled synthetic 48-base oligodeoxynucleotide probe and quantitative autoradiography. Chemical thyroidectomy, produced by the administration of 6-(n-propyl)-2-thiouracil (PrSur), reduced plasma thyroxine below detection limits and significantly increased TRH mRNA in the paraventricular nucleus. Treatments with exogenous L-triiodothyronine (T/sub 3/) reduced TRH mRNA to the same level in both hypothyroid and euthyroid animals. Neither PrSur treatment nor T/sub 3/ replacement influenced TRH mRNA levels in the reticular nucleus of the thalamus. Blot hybridization analysis of electrophoretically fractionated total RNA from pituitaries of these animals indicated that thyrotropin-..beta.. mRNA levels were elevated after thyroidectomy and reduced by T/sub 3/ treatment, showing that the pituitary-thyroid axis was indeed stimulated by PrSur treatment. These results suggest that thyroid hormones are involved, either directly or indirectly, in regulating the biosynthesis of TRH in the thyrotropic center of the hypothalamus.

  5. Thyroid Hormone and Estrogen Regulate Exercise-Induced Growth Hormone Release

    PubMed Central

    Ignacio, Daniele Leão; da S. Silvestre, Diego H.; Cavalcanti-de-Albuquerque, João Paulo Albuquerque; Louzada, Ruy Andrade

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) regulates whole body metabolism, and physical exercise is the most potent stimulus to induce its secretion in humans. The mechanisms underlying GH secretion after exercise remain to be defined. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of estrogen and pituitary type 1 deiodinase (D1) activation on exercise-induced GH secretion. Ten days after bilateral ovariectomy, animals were submitted to 20 min of treadmill exercise at 75% of maximum aerobic capacity and tissues were harvested immediately or 30 min after exercise. Non-exercised animals were used as controls. A significant increase in D1 activity occurred immediately after exercise (~60%) in sham-operated animals and GH was higher (~6-fold) 30 min after exercise. Estrogen deficient rats exhibited basal levels of GH and D1 activity comparable to those found in control rats. However, after exercise both D1 activity and serum GH levels were blunted compared to sedentary rats. To understand the potential cause-effect of D1 activation in exercise-induced GH release, we pharmacologically blocked D1 activity by propylthiouracil (PTU) injection into intact rats and submitted them to the acute exercise session. D1 inhibition blocked exercise-induced GH secretion, although basal levels were unaltered. In conclusion, estrogen deficiency impairs the induction of thyroid hormone activating enzyme D1 in the pituitary, and GH release by acute exercise. Also, acute D1 activation is essential for exercise-induced GH response. PMID:25874614

  6. Thyroid hormone and estrogen regulate exercise-induced growth hormone release.

    PubMed

    Ignacio, Daniele Leão; da S Silvestre, Diego H; Cavalcanti-de-Albuquerque, João Paulo Albuquerque; Louzada, Ruy Andrade; Carvalho, Denise P; Werneck-de-Castro, João Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) regulates whole body metabolism, and physical exercise is the most potent stimulus to induce its secretion in humans. The mechanisms underlying GH secretion after exercise remain to be defined. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of estrogen and pituitary type 1 deiodinase (D1) activation on exercise-induced GH secretion. Ten days after bilateral ovariectomy, animals were submitted to 20 min of treadmill exercise at 75% of maximum aerobic capacity and tissues were harvested immediately or 30 min after exercise. Non-exercised animals were used as controls. A significant increase in D1 activity occurred immediately after exercise (~60%) in sham-operated animals and GH was higher (~6-fold) 30 min after exercise. Estrogen deficient rats exhibited basal levels of GH and D1 activity comparable to those found in control rats. However, after exercise both D1 activity and serum GH levels were blunted compared to sedentary rats. To understand the potential cause-effect of D1 activation in exercise-induced GH release, we pharmacologically blocked D1 activity by propylthiouracil (PTU) injection into intact rats and submitted them to the acute exercise session. D1 inhibition blocked exercise-induced GH secretion, although basal levels were unaltered. In conclusion, estrogen deficiency impairs the induction of thyroid hormone activating enzyme D1 in the pituitary, and GH release by acute exercise. Also, acute D1 activation is essential for exercise-induced GH response. PMID:25874614

  7. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist-induced pituitary apoplexy

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Fergus; Navin, Patrick; Brett, Francesca; Dennedy, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    Summary Pituitary apoplexy represents an uncommon endocrine emergency with potentially life-threatening consequences. Drug-induced pituitary apoplexy is a rare but important consideration when evaluating patients with this presentation. We describe an unusual case of a patient with a known pituitary macroadenoma presenting with acute-onset third nerve palsy and headache secondary to tumour enlargement and apoplexy. This followed gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GNRH) agonist therapy used to treat metastatic prostate carcinoma. Following acute management, the patient underwent transphenoidal debulking of his pituitary gland with resolution of his third nerve palsy. Subsequent retrospective data interpretation revealed that this had been a secretory gonadotropinoma and GNRH agonist therapy resulted in raised gonadotropins and testosterone. Hence, further management of his prostate carcinoma required GNRH antagonist therapy and external beam radiotherapy. This case demonstrates an uncommon complication of GNRH agonist therapy in the setting of a pituitary macroadenoma. It also highlights the importance of careful, serial data interpretation in patients with pituitary adenomas. Finally, this case presents a unique insight into the challenges of managing a hormonal-dependent prostate cancer in a patient with a secretory pituitary tumour. Learning points While non-functioning gonadotropinomas represent the most common form of pituitary macroadenoma, functioning gonadotropinomas are exceedingly rare. Acute tumour enlargement, with potential pituitary apoplexy, is a rare but important adverse effect arising from GNRH agonist therapy in the presence of both functioning and non-functioning pituitary gonadotropinomas. GNRH antagonist therapy represents an alternative treatment option for patients with hormonal therapy-requiring prostate cancer, who also have diagnosed with a pituitary gonadotropinoma. PMID:27284452

  8. Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone receptor signaling and its impact on reproduction in chickens.

    PubMed

    Bédécarrats, Grégoy Y; McFarlane, Heather; Maddineni, Sreenivasa R; Ramachandran, Ramesh

    2009-09-01

    In birds, as in other vertebrates, reproduction is controlled by the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis with each component secreting specific neuropeptides or hormones. Until recently, it was believed this axis is exclusively under the stimulatory control of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone I (GnRH-I) which in turn, stimulates luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) secretion from the pituitary gland. However, the discovery of a novel inhibitory hypothalamic peptide able to reduce LH secretion (gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone: GnIH) challenged this dogma. Furthermore, with the characterization of its specific receptor (GnIHR), progress has been made to clarify the physiological relevance of GnIH in birds. This short review discusses the recent advances in GnIHR signaling at the level of the pituitary gland and the gonads. GnIHR is a member of the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) family which couples to G(alphai) and, upon activation inhibits adenylyl cyclase (AC) activity, thus reducing intracellular cAMP levels. This implies that GnIH interferes with signaling of any GPCR coupled to G(alphas), including GnRH, LH and FSH receptors. In the chicken pituitary gland, the GnRHR-II/GnIHR ratio changes during sexual maturation in favor of GnRHR-II that appears to result in hypothalamic control of gonadotropin secretion shifting from inhibitory to stimulatory, with corresponding changes in GnRH-induced cAMP levels. Within the gonads, GnIH and its receptor may act in an autocrine/paracrine manner and may interfere with LH and FSH signaling to influence ovarian follicular maturation and recruitment, as well as spermatogenesis. PMID:19332068

  9. Nuclear receptor coactivators: Essential players in steroid hormone action in brain and behavior

    PubMed Central

    Tetel, Marc J.

    2009-01-01

    Steroid hormones act in brain and throughout the body to influence behavior and physiology. Many of these effects of steroid hormones are elicited by transcriptional events mediated by their respective receptors. A variety of cell culture studies reveal that nuclear receptor coactivators are critical in modulating steroid receptor-dependent transcription. Thus, in addition to the availability of the hormone and the expression of its receptor, nuclear receptor coactivators are essential for steroid-dependent transactivation of genes. This review will discuss the mounting evidence that nuclear receptor coactivators are critical in modulating steroid hormone action in brain and the regulation of behavior. PMID:19207820

  10. Potentiation of mammary cancer inhibition by combination of antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone with docetaxel

    PubMed Central

    Buchholz, Stefan; Schally, Andrew V.; Engel, Jörg B.; Hohla, Florian; Heinrich, Elmar; Koester, Frank; Varga, Jozsef L.; Halmos, Gabor

    2007-01-01

    Antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) are being developed for the treatment of various cancers. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of treatment with GHRH antagonist JMR-132 alone and in combination with docetaxel chemotherapy in nude mice bearing MX-1 human breast cancers. Specific high-affinity binding sites for GHRH were found on MX-1 tumor membranes using ligand competition assays with 125I-labeled GHRH antagonist JV-1-42. JMR-132 displaced radiolabeled JV-1-42 with an IC50 of 0.14 nM, indicating a high affinity of JMR-132 to GHRH receptors. Treatment of nude mice bearing xenografts of MX-1 with JMR-132 at 10 μg per day s.c. for 22 days significantly (P < 0.05) inhibited tumor volume by 62.9% and tumor weight by 47.8%. Docetaxel given twice at a dose of 20 mg/kg i.p. significantly reduced tumor volume and weight by 74.1% and 58.6%, respectively. Combination treatment with JMR-132 (10 μg/day) and docetaxel (20 mg/kg i.p.) led to growth arrest of most tumors as shown by an inhibition of tumor volume and weight by 97.7% and 95.6%, respectively (P < 0.001). Because no vital cancer cells were detected in some of the excised tumors, a total regression of the tumors was achieved in some cases. Treatment with JMR-132 also strongly reduced the concentration of EGF receptors in MX-1 tumors. Our results demonstrate that GHRH antagonists might provide a therapy for breast cancer and could be combined with docetaxel chemotherapy to enhance the efficacy of treatment. PMID:17261802

  11. Luteinizing hormone/human chorionic gonadotropin receptors in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Meduri, G; Charnaux, N; Loosfelt, H; Jolivet, A; Spyratos, F; Brailly, S; Milgrom, E

    1997-03-01

    Recent studies have suggested that human choriogonadotropin (hCG), in addition to its function in regulating steroidogenesis, may also play a role as a growth factor. Immunocytochemistry using two different monoclonal antibodies (LHR29 and LHR1055) raised against the human luteinizing hormone/human chorionic gonadotropin (LH/hCG) receptor allowed us to detect this receptor in breast cancer cell lines (T47D, MCF7, and ZR75) in individual cancer biopsies and in benign breast lesions. The receptor was also present in epithelial cells of normal human and sow breast. In the latter, its concentration increased after ovulation. The presence of LH/hCG receptor mRNA was confirmed by reverse transcription-PCR using primers extending over exons 2-4, 5-11, and 9-11. The proportion of LH/hCG-receptor positive cells and the intensity of the immunolabeling varied in individual biopsies, but there was no obvious correlation with the histological type of the cancer. These results are compatible with previous studies suggesting that during pregnancy, hCG is involved in the differentiation of breast glandular epithelium and that this hormone may play an inhibitory role in mammary carcinogenesis and in the growth of breast tumors. PMID:9041186

  12. Estrogen and Progesterone hormone receptor expression in oral cavity cancer

    PubMed Central

    Biegner, Thorsten; Teriete, Peter; Hoefert, Sebastian; Krimmel, Michael; Munz, Adelheid; Reinert, Siegmar

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent studies have shown an increase in the incidence of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) in younger patients. The hypothesis that tumors could be hormonally induced during pregnancy or in young female patients without the well-known risk factors alcohol or tobacco abuse seems to be plausible. Material and Methods Estrogen Receptor alpha (ERα) and Progesterone Receptor (PR) expression were analyzed in normal oral mucosa (n=5), oral precursor lesions (simple hyperplasia, n=11; squamous intraepithelial neoplasia, SIN I-III, n=35), and OSCC specimen. OSCCs were stratified in a young female (n=7) study cohort and older patients (n=46). In the young female study cohort three patients (n=3/7) developed OSCC during or shortly after pregnancy. Breast cancer tissues were used as positive control for ERα and PR expression. Results ERα expression was found in four oral precursor lesions (squamous intraepithelial neoplasia, SIN I-III, n=4/35, 11%) and in five OSCC specimen (n=5/46, 11%). The five ERα positive OSCC samples were older male patients. All patients within the young female study cohort were negatively stained for both ERα and PR. Conclusions ER expression could be regarded as a seldom risk factor for OSCC. PR expression seems to be not relevant for the development of OSCC. Key words:Oral squamous cell carcinoma, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, hormone receptor. PMID:27475696

  13. Aberrant expression of hormone receptors in adrenal Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Christopoulos, Stavroula; Bourdeau, Isabelle; Lacroix, André

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, a novel understanding of the pathophysiology of adrenal Cushing's syndrome has emerged. The ectopic or aberrant expression of G-protein-coupled hormone receptors in the adrenal cortex was found to play a central role in the regulation of cortisol secretion in ACTH-independent macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (AIMAH) and in some unilateral adrenal adenomas. Various aberrant receptors, functionally coupled to steroidogenesis, have been reported: GIP, vasopressin, beta-adrenergic, LH/hCG, and serotonin receptors have been best characterized, but angiotensin, leptin, glucagon, IL-1 and TSH receptors have also been described. The molecular mechanisms responsible for the aberrant expression of these receptors are currently unknown. One or many of these aberrant receptors are present in most cases of AIMAH and in some cases of adrenal adenomas with overt or sub-clinical secretion of cortisol. Clinical protocols to screen for such aberrant receptors have been developed and should be performed in all patients with AIMAH. The identification of such aberrant regulation of steroidogenesis in AIMAH provides the novel opportunity to treat some of these patients with pharmacological agents that either suppress the endogenous ligand or block the aberrant receptor, thus avoiding bilateral adrenalectomy. PMID:16010457

  14. Thyroid hormone receptor can modulate retinoic acid-mediated axis formation in frog embryogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Banker, D E; Eisenman, R N

    1993-01-01

    Thyroid hormone receptor acts as a hormone-dependent transcriptional transactivator and as a transcriptional repressor in the absence of thyroid hormone. Specifically, thyroid hormone receptor can repress retinoic acid-induced gene expression through interactions with retinoic acid receptor. (Retinoic acid is a potent teratogen in the frog Xenopus laevis, acting at early embryonic stages to interfere with the formation of anterior structures. Endogenous retinoic acid is thought to act in normal anterior-posterior axis formation.) We have previously shown that thyroid hormone receptor RNA (alpha isotype) is expressed and polysome-associated during Xenopus embryogenesis preceding thyroid gland maturation and endogenous thyroid hormone production (D. E. Banker, J. Bigler, and R. N. Eisenman, Mol. Cell. Biol. 11:5079-5089, 1991). To determine whether thyroid hormone receptor might influence the effects of retinoic acid in early frog development, we have examined the results of ectopic thyroid hormone receptor expression on retinoic acid teratogenesis. We demonstrate that microinjections of full-length thyroid hormone receptor RNA protect injected embryos from retinoic acid teratogenesis. DNA binding is apparently essential to this protective function, as truncated thyroid hormone receptors, lacking DNA-binding domains but including hormone-binding and dimerization domains, do not protect from retinoic acid. We have shown that microinjections of these dominant-interfering thyroid hormone receptors, as well as anti-thyroid hormone receptor antibodies, increase retinoic acid teratogenesis in injected embryos, presumably by inactivating endogenous thyroid hormone receptor. This finding suggests that endogenous thyroid hormone receptors may act to limit retinoic acid sensitivity. On the other hand, after thyroid hormone treatment, ectopic thyroid hormone receptor mediates teratogenesis that is indistinguishable from the dorsoanterior deficiencies produced in retinoic acid

  15. Endogenous retinoid X receptors can function as hormone receptors in pituitary cells.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, K D; Berrodin, T J; Stelmach, J E; Winkler, J D; Lazar, M A

    1994-01-01

    Retinoids regulate gene transcription by interacting with both retinoic acid (RA) receptors (RARs) and retinoid X receptors (RXRs). Since unliganded RXRs can act as heterodimerization partners for RARs and other nuclear hormone receptors, it is unclear whether ligand binding by RXRs actually regulates the expression of naturally occurring genes. To address this issue, we synthesized the RXR-selective retinoid SR11237 and confirmed its specificity in transient transfection and proteolytic susceptibility assays before using it to assess the contribution of ligand-activated RXRs to retinoid action. Unlike RAR ligands, SR11237 did not increase endogenous RAR beta mRNA levels in F9 embryonal carcinoma cells, even though it activated transcription of an RXR-responsive reporter gene in these cells. Thus, it is likely that RARs mediate the induction of RAR beta gene expression by RA. In contrast, the RXR-specific ligand induced rat growth hormone mRNA in GH3 pituitary cells, indicating that the effects of RA on growth hormone gene expression at least in part involve ligand binding to endogenous RXRs in vivo. Our results indicate that in addition to serving as cofactors for other nuclear hormone receptors, endogenous RXRs can function as ligand-dependent regulators of gene expression, i.e., classical nuclear hormone receptors. Images PMID:7935425

  16. Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Agonist Therapy and Obesity in Girls

    PubMed Central

    Shiasi Arani, Kobra; Heidari, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Depot preparations of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists (GnRHa) are the gold standard drugs for the treatment of central precocious puberty. A concern about these drugs is obesity. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the effect of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists (GnRHa) therapy on body mass index (BMI) in girls with central precocious puberty (CPP). Patients and Methods: The girls with onset of puberty before eight years of age or menarche before nine years of age were studied. The weight, height, BMI, and pubertal stage were determined before and at sixth and 12th months of treatment. The GnRHa (Triptorelin) was administered intramuscularly for patients with rapidly progressive forms of CPP. Patients with slowly progressive forms of CPP were considered as control group. Results: From 110 subjects with CPP, 46 girls (41.8%) were considered as intervention and 64 (58.2%) as control groups. The mean age at initial visit was 7.46 ± 1.03 years. The BMI standard deviation scores in both groups was not significantly different at sixth and 12th months of treatment compared with baseline (P = 0.257 and P = 0.839, respectively). The prevalence of obesity was not significantly different between study groups at baseline and at and sixth and 12th months of therapy (P = 0.11, P = 0.068, and P = 0.052, respectively). Conclusions: The GnRHa therapy has no effect on BMI and the prevalence of obesity. PMID:26401141

  17. Genetic Models for the Study of Luteinizing Hormone Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Prema

    2015-01-01

    The luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin receptor (LHCGR) is essential for fertility in men and women. LHCGR binds luteinizing hormone (LH) as well as the highly homologous chorionic gonadotropin. Signaling from LHCGR is required for steroidogenesis and gametogenesis in males and females and for sexual differentiation in the male. The importance of LHCGR in reproductive physiology is underscored by the large number of naturally occurring inactivating and activating mutations in the receptor that result in reproductive disorders. Consequently, several genetically modified mouse models have been developed for the study of LHCGR function. They include targeted deletion of LH and LHCGR that mimic inactivating mutations in hormone and receptor, expression of a constitutively active mutant in LHCGR that mimics activating mutations associated with familial male-limited precocious puberty and transgenic models of LH and hCG overexpression. This review summarizes the salient findings from these models and their utility in understanding the physiological and pathological consequences of loss and gain of function in LHCGR signaling. PMID:26483755

  18. AGE-RELATED ALTERATIONS IN THE STIMULATED RELEASE IN VITRO OF CATECHOLAMINES AND LUTEINIZING HORMONE-RELEASING HORMONE FROM THE MALE RAT HYPOTHALAMUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using an in vitro perifusion system, the present study investigated the possibility that alterations in catecholamine and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) secretion from the male rat mediobasal hypothalamus are present during the period of middle-age. The results indi...

  19. Inhibition by somatostatin (growth-hormone release-inhibiting hormone, GH-RIH) of gastric acid and pepsin and G-cell release of gastrin.

    PubMed Central

    Barros D'sa, A A; Bloom, S R; Baron, J H

    1978-01-01

    Somatostatin (cyclic growth-hormone release-inhibiting hormone--GH-RIH) was infused into dogs with gastric fistulae. Somatostatin inhibited gastric acid response to four gastric stimulants--insulin, food, histamine, and pentagastrin. Histamine- and pentagastrin-stimulated pepsins were inhibited similarly to inhibition of acid. Somatostatin inhibited the gastrin response to insulin and food. PMID:348581

  20. The Splice Isoforms of the Drosophila Ecdysis Triggering Hormone Receptor Have Developmentally Distinct Roles.

    PubMed

    Diao, Feici; Mena, Wilson; Shi, Jonathan; Park, Dongkook; Diao, Fengqiu; Taghert, Paul; Ewer, John; White, Benjamin H

    2016-01-01

    To grow, insects must periodically shed their exoskeletons. This process, called ecdysis, is initiated by the endocrine release of Ecdysis Trigger Hormone (ETH) and has been extensively studied as a model for understanding the hormonal control of behavior. Understanding how ETH regulates ecdysis behavior, however, has been impeded by limited knowledge of the hormone's neuronal targets. An alternatively spliced gene encoding a G-protein-coupled receptor (ETHR) that is activated by ETH has been identified, and several lines of evidence support a role in ecdysis for its A-isoform. The function of a second ETHR isoform (ETHRB) remains unknown. Here we use the recently introduced "Trojan exon" technique to simultaneously mutate the ETHR gene and gain genetic access to the neurons that express its two isoforms. We show that ETHRA and ETHRB are expressed in largely distinct subsets of neurons and that ETHRA- but not ETHRB-expressing neurons are required for ecdysis at all developmental stages. However, both genetic and neuronal manipulations indicate an essential role for ETHRB at pupal and adult, but not larval, ecdysis. We also identify several functionally important subsets of ETHR-expressing neurons including one that coexpresses the peptide Leucokinin and regulates fluid balance to facilitate ecdysis at the pupal stage. The general strategy presented here of using a receptor gene as an entry point for genetic and neuronal manipulations should be useful in establishing patterns of functional connectivity in other hormonally regulated networks. PMID:26534952

  1. Transcriptional activation by the thyroid hormone receptor through ligand-dependent receptor recruitment and chromatin remodelling.

    PubMed

    Grøntved, Lars; Waterfall, Joshua J; Kim, Dong Wook; Baek, Songjoon; Sung, Myong-Hee; Zhao, Li; Park, Jeong Won; Nielsen, Ronni; Walker, Robert L; Zhu, Yuelin J; Meltzer, Paul S; Hager, Gordon L; Cheng, Sheue-yann

    2015-01-01

    A bimodal switch model is widely used to describe transcriptional regulation by the thyroid hormone receptor (TR). In this model, the unliganded TR forms stable, chromatin-bound complexes with transcriptional co-repressors to repress transcription. Binding of hormone dissociates co-repressors and facilitates recruitment of co-activators to activate transcription. Here we show that in addition to hormone-independent TR occupancy, ChIP-seq against endogenous TR in mouse liver tissue demonstrates considerable hormone-induced TR recruitment to chromatin associated with chromatin remodelling and activated gene transcription. Genome-wide footprinting analysis using DNase-seq provides little evidence for TR footprints both in the absence and presence of hormone, suggesting that unliganded TR engagement with repressive complexes on chromatin is, similar to activating receptor complexes, a highly dynamic process. This dynamic and ligand-dependent interaction with chromatin is likely shared by all steroid hormone receptors regardless of their capacity to repress transcription in the absence of ligand. PMID:25916672

  2. Radioiodination of chicken luteinizing hormone without affecting receptor binding potency

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, M.; Ishii, S. )

    1989-12-01

    By improving the currently used lactoperoxidase method, we were able to obtain radioiodinated chicken luteinizing hormone (LH) that shows high specific binding and low nonspecific binding to a crude plasma membrane fraction of testicular cells of the domestic fowl and the Japanese quail, and to the ovarian granulosa cells of the Japanese quail. The change we made from the original method consisted of (1) using chicken LH for radioiodination that was not only highly purified but also retained a high receptor binding potency; (2) controlling the level of incorporation of radioiodine into chicken LH molecules by employing a short reaction time and low temperature; and (3) fractionating radioiodinated chicken LH further by gel filtration using high-performance liquid chromatography. Specific radioactivity of the final {sup 125}I-labeled chicken LH preparation was 14 microCi/micrograms. When specific binding was 12-16%, nonspecific binding was as low as 2-4% in the gonadal receptors. {sup 125}I-Labeled chicken LH was displaced by chicken LH and ovine LH but not by chicken follicle-stimulating hormone. The equilibrium association constant of quail testicular receptor was 3.6 x 10(9) M-1. We concluded that chicken LH radioiodinated by the present method is useful for studies of avian LH receptors.

  3. Gonadal steroid hormone receptors and sex differences in the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis.

    PubMed

    Handa, R J; Burgess, L H; Kerr, J E; O'Keefe, J A

    1994-12-01

    The rapid activation of stress-responsive neuroendocrine systems is a basic reaction of animals to perturbations in their environment. One well-established response is that of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. In rats, corticosterone is the major adrenal steroid secreted and is released in direct response to adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) secreted from the anterior pituitary gland. ACTH in turn is regulated by the hypothalamic factor, corticotropin-releasing hormone. A sex difference exists in the response of the HPA axis to stress, with females reacting more robustly than males. It has been demonstrated that in both sexes, products of the HPA axis inhibit reproductive function. Conversely, the sex differences in HPA function are in part due to differences in the circulating gonadal steroid hormone milieu. It appears that testosterone can act to inhibit HPA function, whereas estrogen can enhance HPA function. One mechanism by which androgens and estrogens modulate stress responses is through the binding to their cognate receptors in the central nervous system. The distribution and regulation of androgen and estrogen receptors within the CNS suggest possible sites and mechanisms by which gonadal steroid hormones can influence stress responses. In the case of androgens, data suggest that the control of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus is mediated trans-synaptically. For estrogen, modulation of the HPA axis may be due to changes in glucocorticoid receptor-mediated negative feedback mechanisms. The results of a variety of studies suggest that gonadal steroid hormones, particularly testosterone, modulate HPA activity in an attempt to prevent the deleterious effects of HPA activation on reproductive function. PMID:7729815

  4. Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Stimulate Aldosterone Production in a Subset of Aldosterone-Producing Adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Kishimoto, Rui; Oki, Kenji; Yoneda, Masayasu; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E.; Ohno, Haruya; Kobuke, Kazuhiro; Itcho, Kiyotaka; Kohno, Nobuoki

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We aimed to detect novel genes associated with G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA) and elucidate the mechanisms underlying aldosterone production. Microarray analysis targeting GPCR-associated genes was conducted using APA without known mutations (APA-WT) samples (n = 3) and APA with the KCNJ5 mutation (APA-KCNJ5; n = 3). Since gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GNRHR) was the highest expression in APA-WT by microarray analysis, we investigated the effect of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulation on aldosterone production. The quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay results revealed higher GNRHR expression levels in APA-WT samples those in APA-KCNJ5 samples (P < 0.05). LHCGR levels were also significantly elevated in APA-WT samples, and there was a significant and positive correlation between GNRHR and LHCGR expression in all APA samples (r = 0.476, P < 0.05). Patients with APA-WT (n = 9), which showed higher GNRHR and LHCGR levels, had significantly higher GnRH-stimulated aldosterone response than those with APA-KCNJ5 (n = 13) (P < 0.05). Multiple regression analysis revealed that the presence of the KCNJ5 mutation was linked to GNRHR mRNA expression (β = 0.94 and P < 0.01). HAC15 cells with KCNJ5 gene carrying T158A mutation exhibited a significantly lower GNRHR expression than that in control cells (P < 0.05). We clarified increased expression of GNRHR and LHCGR in APA-WT, and the molecular analysis including the receptor expression associated with clinical findings of GnRH stimulation. PMID:27196470

  5. Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Stimulate Aldosterone Production in a Subset of Aldosterone-Producing Adenoma.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Rui; Oki, Kenji; Yoneda, Masayasu; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E; Ohno, Haruya; Kobuke, Kazuhiro; Itcho, Kiyotaka; Kohno, Nobuoki

    2016-05-01

    We aimed to detect novel genes associated with G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA) and elucidate the mechanisms underlying aldosterone production.Microarray analysis targeting GPCR-associated genes was conducted using APA without known mutations (APA-WT) samples (n = 3) and APA with the KCNJ5 mutation (APA-KCNJ5; n = 3). Since gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GNRHR) was the highest expression in APA-WT by microarray analysis, we investigated the effect of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulation on aldosterone production.The quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay results revealed higher GNRHR expression levels in APA-WT samples those in APA-KCNJ5 samples (P < 0.05). LHCGR levels were also significantly elevated in APA-WT samples, and there was a significant and positive correlation between GNRHR and LHCGR expression in all APA samples (r = 0.476, P < 0.05). Patients with APA-WT (n = 9), which showed higher GNRHR and LHCGR levels, had significantly higher GnRH-stimulated aldosterone response than those with APA-KCNJ5 (n = 13) (P < 0.05). Multiple regression analysis revealed that the presence of the KCNJ5 mutation was linked to GNRHR mRNA expression (β = 0.94 and P < 0.01). HAC15 cells with KCNJ5 gene carrying T158A mutation exhibited a significantly lower GNRHR expression than that in control cells (P < 0.05).We clarified increased expression of GNRHR and LHCGR in APA-WT, and the molecular analysis including the receptor expression associated with clinical findings of GnRH stimulation. PMID:27196470

  6. Immunization against gonadotrophin-releasing hormone: histopathological and hormonal changes in the female rat.

    PubMed Central

    Okon, E.; Livni, N.; Koch, Y.

    1980-01-01

    Immunization of female rats against gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) resulted in cessation of the oestrus cycles, undetectable serum gonadotrophin levels and a reduction of pituitary gonadotrophin stores and of hypothalamic content of GnRH. Immunization abolished the post-ovariectomy rise in serum levels and in pituitary content of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) without affecting prolactin levels. This suggests that GnRH is involved in the regulation of synthesis as well as the secretion of LH and FSH. Histopathological changes were found in the pituitary, ovaries and uterus of the immunized rats. A marked reduction in the number of gonadotrophs as well as a small decrease in the size of other cells was observed in the pituitaries of rats having high anti-GnRH titres. Rats immunized 5 weeks before castration showed a marked reduction in the number and in the size of castration cells. The ovaries exhibited various degrees of atrophy which were correlated with the anti-GnRH titres. Rats with high anti-GnRH titres revealed extensive atrophy of stromal cells with disappearance of large follicles and corpora lutea; ovaries of rats with low titres of antibodies exhibited small corpora lutea and larger follicles, some of which were cystic. Uteri of rats having high titres of anti-GnRH were severely atrophied with cystic glandular dilation. Uteri of rats with low anti-GnRH titres showed squamous-cell metaplasia and fibrosis of the endometrial stroma. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 PMID:7006665

  7. Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) polymorphisms associated with carcass traits of meat in Korean cattle

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Hyun Sub; Yoon, Du-Hak; Kim, Lyoung Hyo; Park, Byung Lae; Choi, Yoo Hyun; Chung, Eui Ryong; Cho, Yong Min; Park, Eng Woo; Cheong, Il-Cheong; Oh, Sung-Jong; Yi, Sung-Gon; Park, Taesung; Shin, Hyoung Doo

    2006-01-01

    Background Cold carcass weight (CW) and longissimus muscle area (EMA) are the major quantitative traits in beef cattle. In this study, we found several polymorphisms of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) gene and examined the association of polymorphisms with carcass traits (CW and EMA) in Korean native cattle (Hanwoo). Results By direct DNA sequencing in 24 unrelated Korean cattle, we identified 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms within the 9 kb full gene region, including the 1.5 kb promoter region. Among them, six polymorphic sites were selected for genotyping in our beef cattle (n = 428) and five marker haplotypes (frequency > 0.1) were identified. Statistical analysis revealed that -4241A>T showed significant associations with CW and EMA. Conclusion Our findings suggest that polymorphisms in GHRH might be one of the important genetic factors that influence carcass yield in beef cattle. Sequence variation/haplotype information identified in this study would provide valuable information for the production of a commercial line of beef cattle. PMID:16749938

  8. Decreased hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing hormone content and pituitary responsiveness in hypothyroidism.

    PubMed Central

    Katakami, H; Downs, T R; Frohman, L A

    1986-01-01

    The effects of thyroidectomy (Tx) and thyroxine replacement (T4Rx) on pituitary growth hormone (GH) secretion and hypothalamic GH-releasing hormone (GRH) concentration were compared to define the mechanism of hypothyroid-associated GH deficiency. Thyroidectomized rats exhibited a complete loss of pulsatile GH secretion with extensive reduction in GRH responsiveness and pituitary GH content. Cultured pituitary cells from Tx rats exhibited reduced GRH sensitivity, maximal GH responsiveness, and intracellular cyclic AMP accumulation to GRH, while somatostatin (SRIF) suppressive effects on GH secretion were increased. Hypothalamic GRH content was also markedly reduced. T4Rx completely restored hypothalamic GRH content and spontaneous GH secretion despite only partial recovery of pituitary GH content, GRH and SRIF sensitivity, and intracellular cyclic AMP response to GRH. The results indicate multiple effects of hypothyroidism on GH secretion and suggest that a critical role of T4 in maintaining normal GH secretion, in addition to restoring GH synthesis, is related to its effect on hypothalamic GRH. Images PMID:2871046

  9. Long-term effects of plasmid-mediated growth hormone releasing hormone in dogs.

    PubMed

    Tone, Catherine M; Cardoza, Dawn M; Carpenter, Robert H; Draghia-Akli, Ruxandra

    2004-05-01

    Geriatric and cancer-afflicted patients often experience decreased quality of life with cachexia, anemia, anorexia, and decreased activity level. We have studied the possibility that a myogenic plasmid that expresses growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) can prevent and/or treat these conditions. We administered plasmid to 17 geriatric and five cancer-afflicted companion dogs with an average age of 10.5+/-1.0 and 11.3+/-0.6 years at enrollment, respectively. Effects of the treatment were documented for at least 180 days post-treatment, with 10 animals followed for more than 1 year post-treatment, on average 444+/-40 days. Treated dogs showed increased IGF-I levels, and increases in scores for weight, activity level, exercise tolerance, and appetite. No adverse effects associated with the GHRH plasmid treatment were found. Most importantly, the overall assessment of the quality of life of the treated animals increased. Hematological parameters such as red blood cell count, hematocrit, and hemoglobin concentrations were improved and maintained within their normal ranges. We conclude that intramuscular injection of a GHRH-expressing plasmid is both safe and capable of improving the quality of life in animals for an extended period of time in the context of aging and disease. The observed anabolic and hematological responses to a single dose of this plasmid treatment may also be beneficial in geriatric patients or patients with cancer-associated anemia and/or cachexia. PMID:15073611

  10. Interleukin 1. alpha. inhibits prostaglandin E sub 2 release to suppress pulsatile release of luteinizing hormone but not follicle-stimulating hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Rettori, V.; McCann, S.M. ); Gimeno, M.F. ); Karara, A. ); Gonzalez, M.C. )

    1991-04-01

    Interleukin 1{alpha} (IL-1{alpha}), a powerful endogenous pyrogen released from monocytes and macrophages by bacterial endotoxin, stimulates corticotropin, prolactin, and somatotropin release and inhibits thyrotropin release by hypothalamic action. The authors injected recombinant human IL-1{alpha} into the third cerebral ventricle, to study its effect on the pulsatile release of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) in conscious, freely moving, ovariectomized rats. Intraventricular injection of 0.25 pmol of IL-1{alpha} caused an almost immediate reduction of plasma LH concentration. To determine the mechanism of the suppression of LH release, mediobasal hypothalamic fragments were incubated in vitro with IL-1{alpha} (10 pM) and the release of LH-releasing hormone (LHRH) and prostaglandin E{sub 2} into the medium was measured by RIA in the presence or absence of nonrepinephrine. 1{alpha} reduced basal LHRH release and blocked LHRH release induced by nonrepinephrine. In conclusion, IL-1{alpha} suppresses LH but not FSH release by an almost complete cessation of pulsatile release of LH in the castrated rat. The mechanism of this effect appears to be by inhibition of prostaglandin E{sub 2}-mediated release of LHRH.

  11. Protective effect of Growth Hormone-Releasing Hormone agonist in bacterial toxin-induced pulmonary barrier dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Czikora, Istvan; Sridhar, Supriya; Gorshkov, Boris; Alieva, Irina B.; Kasa, Anita; Gonzales, Joyce; Potapenko, Olena; Umapathy, Nagavedi S.; Pillich, Helena; Rick, Ferenc G.; Block, Norman L.; Verin, Alexander D.; Chakraborty, Trinad; Matthay, Michael A.; Schally, Andrew V.; Lucas, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Antibiotic treatment of patients infected with G− or G+ bacteria promotes release of the toxins lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and pneumolysin (PLY) in their lungs. Growth Hormone-releasing Hormone (GHRH) agonist JI-34 protects human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HL-MVEC), expressing splice variant 1 (SV-1) of the receptor, from PLY-induced barrier dysfunction. We investigated whether JI-34 also blunts LPS-induced hyperpermeability. Since GHRH receptor (GHRH-R) signaling can potentially stimulate both cAMP-dependent barrier-protective pathways as well as barrier-disruptive protein kinase C pathways, we studied their interaction in GHRH agonist-treated HL-MVEC, in the presence of PLY, by means of siRNA-mediated protein kinase A (PKA) depletion. Methods: Barrier function measurements were done in HL-MVEC monolayers using Electrical Cell substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS) and VE-cadherin expression by Western blotting. Capillary leak was assessed by Evans Blue dye (EBD) incorporation. Cytokine generation in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was measured by multiplex analysis. PKA and PKC-α activity were assessed by Western blotting. Results: GHRH agonist JI-34 significantly blunts LPS-induced barrier dysfunction, at least in part by preserving VE-cadherin expression, while not affecting inflammation. In addition to activating PKA, GHRH agonist also increases PKC-α activity in PLY-treated HL-MVEC. Treatment with PLY significantly decreases resistance in control siRNA-treated HL-MVEC, but does so even more in PKA-depleted monolayers. Pretreatment with GHRH agonist blunts PLY-induced permeability in control siRNA-treated HL-MVEC, but fails to improve barrier function in PKA-depleted PLY-treated monolayers. Conclusions: GHRH signaling in HL-MVEC protects from both LPS and PLY-mediated endothelial barrier dysfunction and concurrently induces a barrier-protective PKA-mediated and a barrier-disruptive PKC-α-induced pathway in the presence of PLY, the

  12. Evolution of gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone receptor and its ligand.

    PubMed

    Ubuka, Takayoshi; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2014-12-01

    Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) is a neuropeptide inhibitor of gonadotropin secretion, which was first identified in the Japanese quail hypothalamus. GnIH peptides share a C-terminal LPXRFamide (X=L or Q) motif in most vertebrates. The receptor for GnIH (GnIHR) is the seven-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor 147 (GPR147) that inhibits cAMP production. GPR147 is also named neuropeptide FF (NPFF) receptor 1 (NPFFR1), because it also binds NPFF that has a C-terminal PQRFamide motif. To understand the evolutionary history of the GnIH system in the animal kingdom, we searched for receptors structurally similar to GnIHR in the genome of six mammals (human, mouse, rat, cattle, cat, and rabbit), five birds (pigeon, chicken, turkey, budgerigar, and zebra finch), one reptile (green anole), one amphibian (Western clawed flog), six fishes (zebrafish, Nile tilapia, Fugu, coelacanth, spotted gar, and lamprey), one hemichordate (acorn worm), one echinoderm (purple sea urchin), one mollusk (California sea hare), seven insects (pea aphid, African malaria mosquito, honey bee, buff-tailed bumblebee, fruit fly, jewel wasp, and red flour beetle), one cnidarian (hydra), and constructed phylogenetic trees by neighbor joining (NJ) and maximum likelihood (ML) methods. A multiple sequence alignment of the receptors showed highly conserved seven-transmembrane domains as well as disulfide bridge sites between the first and second extracellular loops, including the receptor of hydra. Both NJ and ML analyses grouped the receptors of vertebrates into NPFFR1 and NPFFR2 (GPR74), and the receptors of insects into the receptor for SIFamide peptides that share a C-terminal YRKPPFNGSIFamide motif. Although human, quail and zebrafish GnIHR (NPFFR1) were most structurally similar to SIFamide receptor of fruit fly in the Famide peptide (FMRFamide, neuropeptide F, short neuropeptide F, drosulfakinin, myosuppressin, SIFamide) receptor families, the amino acid sequences and the peptide coding

  13. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog buserelin causes neuronal loss in rat gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Sand, Elin; Voss, Ulrikke; Hammar, Oskar; Alm, Ragnar; Fredrikson, Gunilla Nordin; Ohlsson, Bodil; Ekblad, Eva

    2013-03-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogs are given to women undergoing in vitro fertilization. Case reports describing the development of chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction and auto-antibodies against GnRH after such treatment suggest a strong association between intestinal dysfunction and GnRH analogs. No experimental model for studying such a relationship is currently at hand. Our main goal was to investigate possible enteric neurodegeneration and titers of GnRH antibodies in response to repeated administration of the GnRH analog buserelin in rat. Rats were treated for 1-4 sessions with daily subcutaneous injections of buserelin or saline for 5 days, followed by 3 weeks of recovery. Buserelin treatment caused significant loss of submucous and myenteric neurons in the fundus, ileum, and colon. The loss of enteric neurons can, at least partly, be explained by increased apoptosis. No GnRH- or GnRH-receptor-immunoreactive (IR) enteric neurons but numerous luteinizing hormone (LH)-receptor-IR neurons were detected. After buserelin treatment, the relative number of enteric LH-receptor-IR neurons decreased, whereas that of nitric-oxide-synthase-IR neurons increased. No intestinal inflammation or increased levels of circulating interleukins/cytokines were noted in response to buserelin treatment. Serum GnRH antibody titers were undetectable or extremely low in all rats. Thus, repeated administrations of buserelin induce neurodegeneration in rat gastrointestinal tract, possibly by way of LH-receptor hyperactivation. The present findings suggest that enteric neurodegenerative effects of GnRH analog treatment in man can be mimicked in rat. However, in contrast to man, no production of GnRH auto-antibodies has been noted in rat. PMID:23254679

  14. Discovery and Development of Small Molecule Allosteric Modulators of Glycoprotein Hormone Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Nataraja, Selvaraj G.; Yu, Henry N.; Palmer, Stephen S.

    2015-01-01

    Glycoprotein hormones, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) are heterodimeric proteins with a common α-subunit and hormone-specific β-subunit. These hormones are dominant regulators of reproduction and metabolic processes. Receptors for the glycoprotein hormones belong to the family of G protein-coupled receptors. FSH receptor (FSHR) and LH receptor are primarily expressed in somatic cells in ovary and testis to promote egg and sperm production in women and men, respectively. TSH receptor is expressed in thyroid cells and regulates the secretion of T3 and T4. Glycoprotein hormones bind to the large extracellular domain of the receptor and cause a conformational change in the receptor that leads to activation of more than one intracellular signaling pathway. Several small molecules have been described to activate/inhibit glycoprotein hormone receptors through allosteric sites of the receptor. Small molecule allosteric modulators have the potential to be administered orally to patients, thus improving the convenience of treatment. It has been a challenge to develop a small molecule allosteric agonist for glycoprotein hormones that can mimic the agonistic effects of the large natural ligand to activate similar signaling pathways. However, in the past few years, there have been several promising reports describing distinct chemical series with improved potency in preclinical models. In parallel, proposal of new structural model for FSHR and in silico docking studies of small molecule ligands to glycoprotein hormone receptors provide a giant leap on the understanding of the mechanism of action of the natural ligands and new chemical entities on the receptors. This review will focus on the current status of small molecule allosteric modulators of glycoprotein hormone receptors, their effects on common signaling pathways in cells, their utility for clinical application as demonstrated in preclinical models

  15. Effect of thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) on acetylcholine release from different brain areas investigated by microdialysis.

    PubMed Central

    Giovannini, M. G.; Casamenti, F.; Nistri, A.; Paoli, F.; Pepeu, G.

    1991-01-01

    1. The effect of thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) administration upon acetylcholine (ACh) release in freely moving rats was investigated by means of transversal microdialysis coupled to h.p.l.c. TRH administered either s.c. or via local perfusion increased the ACh release from cortex and hippocampus but not from the striatum. The increase in ACh release was maintained after 7 days of s.c. administration of TRH. 2. After s.c. injection of the neuropeptide, the increase in ACh release was dose-dependent and reached a maximum at 40 min after administration. The maximal percentage increases were 18, 52, 66 and 89% at doses of 1, 2.5, 5 and 10 mg kg-1 and 35, 48 and 54% at doses of 2.5, 5 and 10 mg kg-1 in the cortex and hippocampus, respectively. The effect of TRH was dependent on neuronal activity since it was completely inhibited by perfusion with tetrodotoxin (TTX), 5 X 10(-7) M. 3. Perfusion with TRH, 2.5 micrograms microliters-1, caused 198% and 150% increase in ACh release 60 and 80 min after the beginning of the perfusion in the cortex and hippocampus, respectively. After this initial peak, a 100% increase in ACh release persisted throughout the perfusion. 4. Systemic TRH administration was followed by marked hyperactivity and stereotyped behaviour that showed a time course shorter than that of the increase in ACh release. 5. These findings demonstrate that TRH exerts a strong stimulant action on cortical and hippocampal cholinergic pathways. PMID:1901747

  16. Alternative splicing of pre-mRNA in cancer: focus on G protein-coupled peptide hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Körner, Meike; Miller, Laurence J

    2009-08-01

    Through alternative splicing, multiple different transcripts can be generated from a single gene. Alternative splicing represents an important molecular mechanism of gene regulation in physiological processes such as developmental programming as well as in disease. In cancer, splicing is significantly altered. Tumors express a different collection of alternative spliceoforms than normal tissues. Many tumor-associated splice variants arise from genes with an established role in carcinogenesis or tumor progression, and their functions can be oncogenic. This raises the possibility that products of alternative splicing play a pathogenic role in cancer. Moreover, cancer-associated spliceoforms represent potential diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets. G protein-coupled peptide hormone receptors provide a good illustration of alternative splicing in cancer. The wild-type forms of these receptors have long been known to be expressed in cancer and to modulate tumor cell functions. They are also recognized as attractive clinical targets. Recently, splice variants of these receptors have been increasingly identified in various types of cancer. In particular, alternative cholecystokinin type 2, secretin, and growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor spliceoforms are expressed in tumors. Peptide hormone receptor splice variants can fundamentally differ from their wild-type receptor counterparts in pharmacological and functional characteristics, in their distribution in normal and malignant tissues, and in their potential use for clinical applications. PMID:19574427

  17. Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) antagonists inhibit the proliferation of androgen-dependent and -independent prostate cancers.

    PubMed

    Letsch, Markus; Schally, Andrew V; Busto, Rebeca; Bajo, Ana M; Varga, Jozsef L

    2003-02-01

    The antiproliferative effects of an antagonist of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) JV-1-38 were evaluated in nude mice bearing s.c. xenografts of LNCaP and MDA-PCa-2b human androgen-sensitive and DU-145 androgen-independent prostate cancers. In the androgen-sensitive models, JV-1-38 greatly potentiated the antitumor effect of androgen deprivation induced by surgical castration, but was ineffective when given alone. Thus, in castrated animals bearing MDA-PCa-2b cancers, the administration of JV-1-38 for 35 days virtually arrested tumor growth (94% inhibition vs. intact control, P < 0.01; and 75% vs. castrated control, P < 0.05). The growth of LNCaP tumors was also powerfully suppressed by JV-1-38 combined with castration (83% inhibition vs. intact control, P < 0.01; and 68% vs. castrated control, P < 0.05). However, in androgen-independent DU-145 cancers, JV-1-38 alone could inhibit tumor growth by 57% (P < 0.05) after 45 days. In animals bearing MDA-PCa-2b and LNCaP tumors, the reduction in serum prostate-specific antigen levels, after therapy with JV-1-38, paralleled the decrease in tumor volume. Inhibition of MDA-PCa-2b and DU-145 cancers was associated with the reduction in the expression of mRNA and protein levels of vascular endothelial growth factor. The mRNA expression for GHRH receptor splice variants was found in all these models of prostate cancer. Our results demonstrate that GHRH antagonists inhibit androgen-independent prostate cancers and, after combination with androgen deprivation, also androgen-sensitive tumors. Thus, the therapy with GHRH antagonist could be considered for the management of both androgen-dependent or -independent prostate cancers. PMID:12538852

  18. Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) antagonists inhibit the proliferation of androgen-dependent and -independent prostate cancers

    PubMed Central

    Letsch, Markus; Schally, Andrew V.; Busto, Rebeca; Bajo, Ana M.; Varga, Jozsef L.

    2003-01-01

    The antiproliferative effects of an antagonist of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) JV-1-38 were evaluated in nude mice bearing s.c. xenografts of LNCaP and MDA-PCa-2b human androgen-sensitive and DU-145 androgen-independent prostate cancers. In the androgen-sensitive models, JV-1-38 greatly potentiated the antitumor effect of androgen deprivation induced by surgical castration, but was ineffective when given alone. Thus, in castrated animals bearing MDA-PCa-2b cancers, the administration of JV-1-38 for 35 days virtually arrested tumor growth (94% inhibition vs. intact control, P < 0.01; and 75% vs. castrated control, P < 0.05). The growth of LNCaP tumors was also powerfully suppressed by JV-1-38 combined with castration (83% inhibition vs. intact control, P < 0.01; and 68% vs. castrated control, P < 0.05). However, in androgen-independent DU-145 cancers, JV-1-38 alone could inhibit tumor growth by 57% (P < 0.05) after 45 days. In animals bearing MDA-PCa-2b and LNCaP tumors, the reduction in serum prostate-specific antigen levels, after therapy with JV-1-38, paralleled the decrease in tumor volume. Inhibition of MDA-PCa-2b and DU-145 cancers was associated with the reduction in the expression of mRNA and protein levels of vascular endothelial growth factor. The mRNA expression for GHRH receptor splice variants was found in all these models of prostate cancer. Our results demonstrate that GHRH antagonists inhibit androgen-independent prostate cancers and, after combination with androgen deprivation, also androgen-sensitive tumors. Thus, the therapy with GHRH antagonist could be considered for the management of both androgen-dependent or -independent prostate cancers. PMID:12538852

  19. Aromatic Anchor at an Invariant Hormone-Receptor Interface

    PubMed Central

    Pandyarajan, Vijay; Smith, Brian J.; Phillips, Nelson B.; Whittaker, Linda; Cox, Gabriella P.; Wickramasinghe, Nalinda; Menting, John G.; Wan, Zhu-li; Whittaker, Jonathan; Ismail-Beigi, Faramarz; Lawrence, Michael C.; Weiss, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Crystallographic studies of insulin bound to fragments of the insulin receptor have recently defined the topography of the primary hormone-receptor interface. Here, we have investigated the role of PheB24, an invariant aromatic anchor at this interface and site of a human mutation causing diabetes mellitus. An extensive set of B24 substitutions has been constructed and tested for effects on receptor binding. Although aromaticity has long been considered a key requirement at this position, MetB24 was found to confer essentially native affinity and bioactivity. Molecular modeling suggests that this linear side chain can serve as an alternative hydrophobic anchor at the hormone-receptor interface. These findings motivated further substitution of PheB24 by cyclohexanylalanine (Cha), which contains a nonplanar aliphatic ring. Contrary to expectations, [ChaB24]insulin likewise exhibited high activity. Furthermore, its resistance to fibrillation and the rapid rate of hexamer disassembly, properties of potential therapeutic advantage, were enhanced. The crystal structure of the ChaB24 analog, determined as an R6 zinc-stabilized hexamer at a resolution of 1.5 Å, closely resembles that of wild-type insulin. The nonplanar aliphatic ring exhibits two chair conformations with partial occupancies, each recapitulating the role of PheB24 at the dimer interface. Together, these studies have defined structural requirements of an anchor residue within the B24-binding pocket of the insulin receptor; similar molecular principles are likely to pertain to insulin-related growth factors. Our results highlight in particular the utility of nonaromatic side chains as probes of the B24 pocket and suggest that the nonstandard Cha side chain may have therapeutic utility. PMID:25305014

  20. A novel GABA-mediated corticotropin-releasing hormone secretory mechanism in the median eminence.

    PubMed

    Kakizawa, Keisuke; Watanabe, Miho; Mutoh, Hiroki; Okawa, Yuta; Yamashita, Miho; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Itoi, Keiichi; Suda, Takafumi; Oki, Yutaka; Fukuda, Atsuo

    2016-08-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), which is synthesized in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus, plays an important role in the endocrine stress response. The excitability of CRH neurons is regulated by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-containing neurons projecting to the PVN. We investigated the role of GABA in the regulation of CRH release. The release of CRH was impaired, accumulating in the cell bodies of CRH neurons in heterozygous GAD67-GFP (green fluorescent protein) knock-in mice (GAD67(+/GFP)), which exhibited decreased GABA content. The GABAA receptor (GABAAR) and the Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter (NKCC1), but not the K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter (KCC2), were expressed in the terminals of the CRH neurons at the median eminence (ME). In contrast, CRH neuronal somata were enriched with KCC2 but not with NKCC1. Thus, intracellular Cl(-) concentrations ([Cl(-)]i) may be increased at the terminals of CRH neurons compared with concentrations in the cell body. Moreover, GABAergic terminals projecting from the arcuate nucleus were present in close proximity to CRH-positive nerve terminals. Furthermore, a GABAAR agonist increased the intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) levels in the CRH neuron terminals but decreased the Ca(2+) levels in their somata. In addition, the increases in Ca(2+) concentrations were prevented by an NKCC1 inhibitor. We propose a novel mechanism by which the excitatory action of GABA maintains a steady-state CRH release from axon terminals in the ME. PMID:27540587

  1. A novel GABA-mediated corticotropin-releasing hormone secretory mechanism in the median eminence

    PubMed Central

    Kakizawa, Keisuke; Watanabe, Miho; Mutoh, Hiroki; Okawa, Yuta; Yamashita, Miho; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Itoi, Keiichi; Suda, Takafumi; Oki, Yutaka; Fukuda, Atsuo

    2016-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), which is synthesized in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus, plays an important role in the endocrine stress response. The excitability of CRH neurons is regulated by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)–containing neurons projecting to the PVN. We investigated the role of GABA in the regulation of CRH release. The release of CRH was impaired, accumulating in the cell bodies of CRH neurons in heterozygous GAD67-GFP (green fluorescent protein) knock-in mice (GAD67+/GFP), which exhibited decreased GABA content. The GABAA receptor (GABAAR) and the Na+-K+-2Cl− cotransporter (NKCC1), but not the K+-Cl− cotransporter (KCC2), were expressed in the terminals of the CRH neurons at the median eminence (ME). In contrast, CRH neuronal somata were enriched with KCC2 but not with NKCC1. Thus, intracellular Cl− concentrations ([Cl−]i) may be increased at the terminals of CRH neurons compared with concentrations in the cell body. Moreover, GABAergic terminals projecting from the arcuate nucleus were present in close proximity to CRH-positive nerve terminals. Furthermore, a GABAAR agonist increased the intracellular calcium (Ca2+) levels in the CRH neuron terminals but decreased the Ca2+ levels in their somata. In addition, the increases in Ca2+ concentrations were prevented by an NKCC1 inhibitor. We propose a novel mechanism by which the excitatory action of GABA maintains a steady-state CRH release from axon terminals in the ME. PMID:27540587

  2. Sympathomimetic pressor responses to thyrotropin-releasing hormone in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Mattila, J.; Bunag, R.D.

    1986-07-01

    Cardiovascular responses to centrally administered thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) were studied in urethan-anesthetized rats to allow continuous recording of attendant changes in sympathetic nerve activity. Intracerebroventricular infusions of TRH consistently increased not only blood pressure and heart rate, but also spike frequency in splanchnic, renal, or cervical sympathetic nerves. Parasympathetic inhibition seemed unlikely because TRH responses were unaltered by cholinergic blockade with atropine, and efferent vagal nerve firing, instead of being reduced, was actually increased by TRH. An increased secretion of endogenous vasopressin also appeared unlikely, since TRH responses were essentially unaffected by either hypophysectomy or pretreatment with a vasopressin antagonist. Inasmuch as pharmacological ganglion blockade with pentolinium eliminated increases in splanchnic nerve firing but reduced the attendant tachycardia by only 50%, residual tachycardia after ganglion blockade was considered partly due to persistent sympathetic cardioaccelerator tone. On the other hand, because pressor responses to TRH were always accompanied by increased sympathetic nerve firing and were completely abolished after pentolinium-induced ganglioplegia, they were attributed solely to sympathetic hyperactivity.

  3. Promoter polymorphisms regulating corticotrophin-releasing hormone transcription in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wagner, U; Wahle, M; Moritz, F; Wagner, U; Häntzschel, H; Baerwald, C G O

    2006-02-01

    To investigate whether polymorphisms in the corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) promoter are associated with altered CRH gene regulation, we studied the reactivity of three recently described promoter variants in vitro. The 3625 bp variants A1B1, A2B1 and A2B2 of the human CRH promoter were cloned in the 5' region to a luciferase reporter gene and transiently transfected into both mouse anterior pituitary cells AtT-20D16vF2 and pheochromocytoma cells PC12. Incubation with 8-Br-cAMP alone or in combination with cytokines significantly enhanced the promoter activity in both cell lines studied by up to 22-fold. However, dexamethasone antagonised cAMP effects on CRH expression in AtT-20 cells while showing no effect on PC12 cells, indicating that tissue-specific factors play a crucial role. Among the haplotypes studied, A1B1 exhibited the greatest reactivity on various stimuli. Electric mobility shift assay (EMSA) was performed to study whether the described polymorphic nucleotide sequences in the 5' region of the hCRH gene interfere with binding of nuclear proteins. A specific DNA protein complex was detected at position -2353 bp for the wild type sequence only, possibly interfering with a binding site for the activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6). Taken together, this is the first study to demonstrate that CRH promoter reactivity varies between the compound promoter alleles. PMID:16523405

  4. Transdermal iontophoresis of gonadotropin releasing hormone (LHRH) and two analogues.

    PubMed

    Miller, L L; Kolaskie, C J; Smith, G A; Rivier, J

    1990-06-01

    Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH), as well as an antagonist [Ac-D2Nal,1 D4ClPhe,2 D3Pal,3 NicLys,5 DNicLys,6 ILys,8 DAla10] GnRH.HOAc (1) and a superagonist [DTrp6, Pro9-NHEt]GnRH (2), have been electrochemically driven across excised hairless mouse skin. Determined by HPLC analysis, the delivery rate from aqueous solution into isotonic saline at 0.5 mA cm-2 was as high as 19 nM cm-2 h-1 for 2. Because of its insolubility in water, analogue 1 could only be delivered from an acidic donor solution. Analogue 2 was also delivered in pulsatile fashion using current on/off cycles. For all three peptides, passive transport was negligible and stability is evident when in contact with the stratum corneum. Slow metabolism occurs when GnRH contacts the dermal side of hairless mouse skin. PMID:2203894

  5. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) reverses hyperglycemia in rat

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Luguang Luo, John Z.Q. Jackson, Ivor M.D.

    2008-09-12

    Hyperglycemia in thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) null mice indicates that TRH is involved in the regulation of glucose homeostasis. Further, TRH levels in the pancreas peak during the stages of late embryonic and early neonatal {beta} cell development. These observations are consistent in linking TRH to islet cell proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we examined the effect of TRH administration in damaged pancreatic rat (streptozotocin, STZ) to determine whether TRH could improve damaged pancreatic {beta} cells function. We hypothesize that TRH is able to reverse STZ-induced hyperglycemia by increasing pancreatic islet insulin content, preventing apoptosis, and potentially induce islet regeneration. It was found that following intra-peritoneal (ip) injection, TRH (10 {mu}g/kg body weight (bwt)) reverses STZ (65 mg/kg bwt)-induced hyperglycemia (TRH given 3 days after STZ injection). Increased circulating insulin levels and insulin content in extracted pancreas suggests that TRH reversed STZ-induced hyperglycemia through improving pancreatic islet {beta} cell function. Further studies show a significantly lower level of apoptosis in islets treated with TRH as well as the presence of proliferation marker nestin and Brdu, suggesting that the TRH has the potential to prevent apoptosis and stimulate islet proliferation.

  6. Regulation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Helen H

    2007-09-01

    Reproductive function is influenced by several internal and external cues, which ultimately exert their effects on the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neuron. As the final common pathway in the brain for regulating reproduction, GnRH neurons receive signals from multiple cell types, and alterations in GnRH production impact reproductive competence. Historically, the paucity of GnRH neurons and their scattered distribution in the brain have limited the study of GnRH gene expression. With transgenic technology, newer model systems (such as immortalized GnRH-expressing cell lines and GnRH-reporter gene transgenic mice) have been developed, making molecular studies possible. This article provides an update on the molecular mechanisms responsible for the regulation of GnRH gene expression, focusing on tissue-specific expression and transcriptional regulation. After an overview of GnRH gene structure, synthesis, and secretion, the model systems for studying GnRH neurons are examined. The molecular mechanisms that translate physiologic stimuli, such as nutritional status or stress, into changes in GnRH expression will be reviewed, concentrating on the regulatory regions within the GnRH gene promoter and the critical transcription factors. PMID:17710727

  7. Gastric motor effects of ghrelin and growth hormone releasing peptide 6 in diabetic mice with gastroparesis

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Wen-Cai; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Wang, Wei-Gang; Yan, Jun; Zheng, Qi

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the potential therapeutic significance of ghrelin and growth hormone releasing peptide 6 (GHRP-6) in diabetic mice with gastric motility disorders. METHODS: A diabetic mouse model was established by intraperitoneal (ip) injection of alloxan. Diabetic mice were injected ip with ghrelin or GHRP-6 (20-200 μg/kg), and the effects on gastric emptying were measured after intragastric application of phenol red. The effect of atropine, NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME) or D-Lys3-GHRP-6 (a growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R) antagonist) on the gastroprokinetic effect of ghrelin or GHRP-6 (100 μg/kg) was also investigated. The effects of ghrelin or GHRP-6 (0.01-10 μmol/L) on spontaneous or carbachol-induced contractile amplitude were also investigated in vitro, in gastric fundic circular strips taken from diabetic mice. The presence of growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a transcripts in the fundic strips of diabetic mice was detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). RESULTS: We established a diabetic mouse model with delayed gastric emptying. Ghrelin and GHRP-6 accelerated gastric emptying in diabetic mice with gastroparesis. In the presence of atropine or L-NAME, which delayed gastric emptying, ghrelin and GHRP-6 (100 μg/kg) failed to accelerate gastric emptying. D-Lys3-GHRP-6 also delayed gastric emptying induced by the GHS-R agonist. Ghrelin and GHRP-6 increased the carbachol-induced contractile amplitude in gastric fundic strips taken from diabetic mice. RT-PCR confirmed the presence of GHS-R mRNA in the strip preparations. CONCLUSION: Ghrelin and GHRP-6 increase gastric emptying in diabetic mice with gastroparesis, perhaps by activating peripheral cholinergic pathways in the enteric nervous system. PMID:18322959

  8. Liver X receptor β: new player in the regulatory network of thyroid hormone and 'browning' of white fat.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yifei; Warner, Margaret; Gustafsson, Jan-Ke

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery of browning of white adipose tissue (WAT) has raised great research interest because of its significant potential in counteracting obesity and type II diabetes. However, the mechanisms underlying browning are still poorly understood. Liver X receptors (LXRs) are one class of nuclear receptors, which play a vital role in regulating cholesterol, triglyceride and glucose metabolism. Following our previous finding that LXRs serve as repressors of UCP1 in classic brown adipose tissue in female mice, we found that LXRs, especially LXRβ, also repress the browning process of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) in male rodents fed a normal diet. Depletion of LXRs activated thyrotropin releasing hormone positive neurons in the paraventricular area of the hypothalamus, and thus stimulated secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone from the pituitary. Consequently production of thyroid hormones in the thyroid gland and circulating thyroid hormone level were increased. Moreover, the activity of thyroid signaling in SAT was markedly increased. One unexpected finding of our study is that LXRs are indispensable in the thyroid hormone negative feedback loop at the level of the hypothalamus. LXRs maintain expression of thyroid receptors in the brain and when they are inactivated there is no negative feedback of thyroid hormone in the hypothalamus. Together, our findings have uncovered the basis of increased energy expenditure in male LXR knock-out mice and provided support for targeting LXRs in treatment of obesity. PMID:27386163

  9. Fit-for-Purpose Radio Receptor Assay for the Determination of Growth Hormone Secretagogues in Urine.

    PubMed

    Ferro, P; Gutiérrez-Gallego, R; Bosch, J; Farré, M; Segura, J

    2015-12-01

    The everlasting pharmacological development is continuously producing new substances with potential doping abuse. Among these, secretagogues are very prone to misuse by athletes for their properties to release growth hormone (GH) and some limitations in the actual analytical methods to detect them. In this paper, an in-depth study on the key variables of the radio receptor method previously developed by our group is performed and a fit-for-purpose protocol is established. Thus, this sensitive and robust screening method is proposed as an intelligent and preventive antidoping method to detect new growth hormone secretagogues (GHSs) in exceptional suspicious urine samples obtained from athletes and will support the current detection methods based on liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). PMID:26160832

  10. The Effects of Gonadotrophin Releasing Hormone Administration in Early Postpartum Dairy Cows on Hormone Concentrations, Ovarian Activity and Reproductive Performance: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, K. E.

    1983-01-01

    Gonadotrophin releasing hormones have become widely used hormonal compounds in veterinary medicine, particularly with respect to bovine reproduction. The character and physiological actions of gonadotrophin releasing hormone are briefly reviewed and its clinical applications are summarized. The endocrinological research concerned with the use of gonadotrophin releasing hormone in the early postpartum period is discussed. Field trials which have been conducted to assess the effects of postpartum gonadotrophin releasing hormone administration on reproductive performance have varied widely in both design and interpretation of results. These experiments are reviewed, including the clinical trials using normal cows as well as those on cows with retained placenta. PMID:17422245

  11. The relationship between growth hormone polymorphism and growth hormone receptor genes with milk yield and reproductive performance in Holstein dairy cows

    PubMed Central

    Hadi, Z; Atashi, H; Dadpasand, M; Derakhshandeh, A; Ghahramani Seno, M. M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential association between growth hormone GH/AluI and growth hormone receptor GHR/AluI polymorphisms with milk yield and reproductive performances in Holstein dairy cows in Iran. Blood samples of 150 Holstein cows were collected and their genomic DNA was extracted using Gene-Fanavaran DNA extracting kit. Fragments of the 428 bp of exon 5 growth hormone (GH) gene and the 342 bp of exon 10 growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene were amplified using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. PCR products were digested by the AluI restriction enzyme and electrophoresed on 3% agarose gel. Continuous and categorical data were analyzed using linear mixed models through Proc MIXED and logistic regression models through Proc GENMOD of SAS software, respectively. The results showed no relationship between the examined traits and GH/AluI or GHR/AluI genes. A significant relationship was found between GH/AluI polymorphism and dystocia, but the presence of the GH-L allele reduced the incidence of dystocia. The results suggest that the GH-LL genotype reduces dystocia probably by affecting the release of growth hormone; nevertheless, further studies will be needed to examine the relationship between dystocia and GH genotypes. PMID:27175183

  12. Growth hormone responses to growth hormone-releasing hormone in Hand-Schüller-Christian Disease.

    PubMed

    Gelato, M C; Loriaux, D L; Merriam, G R

    1989-09-01

    Bolus doses of GH-releasing hormone (GHRH), 1 microgram/kg i.v., were given to two groups of adult patients with growth hormone deficiency (GHD): 9 with Hand-Schüller-Christian disease (HSCD, presumed hypothalamic GHD) and 9 with idiopathic GHD (IGHD, etiology unknown). Six patients in each group were then given further GHRH doses daily for 5 days, and the GH responses to GHRH were measured over 3 h on day 1 and day 5. Plasma levels of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) were measured twice daily on days 1 and 5 during GHRH treatment. All patients with HSCD had measurable GH responses to the first dose of GHRH, with a mean peak response of 6.4 +/- 2.1 ng/ml (mean +/- SE). Only 5 of 9 patients with IGHD had GH responses above the detection limits of the assay; their mean peak response, 1.3 +/- 0.2 ng/ml, was significantly lower than the GH responses of the HSCD patients (p less than 0.05). Responses in both groups of patients were lower than those previously observed in normal adult men (35 +/- 8 ng/ml; p less than 0.01). Five days of daily stimulation with GHRH significantly (p less than 0.01) increased the GH response in both groups of patients. The rise was greater in patients with HSCD than with IGHD (HSCD, 5.1 +/- 2.5 ng/ml on day 1, vs. 12.0 +/- 6.8 ng/ml on day 5; IGHD, 1.4 +/- 0.3 ng/ml vs. 2.9 +/- 0.6 ng/ml).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2507952

  13. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor mediates glucocorticoid effects on hormone secretion induced by volume and osmotic changes.

    PubMed

    Ruginsk, S G; Uchoa, E T; Elias, L L K; Antunes-Rodrigues, J

    2012-02-01

    The present study provides the first in vivo evidence that the cannabinoid CB(1) receptor mediates the effects of dexamethasone on hormone release induced by changes in circulating volume and osmolality. Male adult rats were administered with the CB(1) receptor antagonist rimonabant (10 mg/Kg, p.o.), followed or not in 1 hour by dexamethasone (1 mg/Kg, i.p.). Extracellular volume expansion (EVE, 2 mL/100 g of body weight, i.v.) was performed 2 hours after dexamethasone or vehicle treatment using either isotonic (I-EVE, 0.15 mol/L) or hypertonic (H-EVE, 0.30 mol/L) NaCl solution. Five minutes after EVE, animals were decapitated and trunk blood was collected for all plasma measurements. Rimonabant potentiated oxytocin (OT) secretion induced by H-EVE and completely reversed the inhibitory effects of dexamethasone in response to the same stimulus. These data suggest that glucocorticoid modulation of OT release is mediated by the CB(1) receptor. Although dexamethasone did not affect vasopressin (AVP) secretion induced by H-EVE, the administration of rimonabant potentiated AVP release in response to the same stimulus, supporting the hypothesis that the CB(1) receptor regulates AVP secretion independently of glucocorticoid-mediated signalling. Dexamethasone alone did not affect atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) release stimulated by I-EVE or H-EVE. However, pretreatment with rimonabant potentiated ANP secretion induced by H-EVE, suggesting a possible role for the CB(1) receptor in the control of peripheral factors that modulate cardiovascular function. Rimonabant also reversed the inhibitory effects of dexamethasone on H-EVE-induced corticosterone secretion, reinforcing the hypothesis that the CB(1) receptor may be involved in the negative feedback exerted by glucocorticoids on the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Collectively, the results of the present study indicate that the CB(1) receptor modulates neurohypophyseal hormone secretion and

  14. Identification of Growth Hormone Receptor in Plexiform Neurofibromas of Patients with Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Karin Soares Gonçalves; Barboza, Eliane Porto; da Fonseca, Eliene Carvalho

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of growth hormone receptor in plexiform neurofibromas of neurofibromatosis type 1 patients. INTRODUCTION The development of multiple neurofibromas is one of the major features of neurofibromatosis type 1. Since neurofibromas commonly grow during periods of hormonal change, especially during puberty and pregnancy, it has been suggested that hormones may influence neurofibromatosis type 1 neurofibromas. A recent study showed that the majority of localized neurofibromas from neurofibromatosis type 1 patients have growth hormone receptor. METHODS Growth hormone receptor expression was investigated in 5 plexiform neurofibromas using immunohistochemistry. RESULTS Four of the 5 plexiform neurofibromas were immunopositive for growth hormone receptor. CONCLUSION This study suggests that growth hormone may influence the development of plexiform neurofibromas in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1. PMID:18297205

  15. GABA Regulates Corticotropin Releasing Hormone Levels in the Paraventricular Nucleus of the Hypothalamus in Newborn Mice

    PubMed Central

    Stratton, Matthew S.; Searcy, Brian T.; Tobet, Stuart A.

    2011-01-01

    The paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) is a major regulator of stress responses via release of Corticotropin Releasing Hormone (CRH) to the pituitary gland. Dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is characteristic of individuals with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Postmortem data from individuals diagnosed with MDD show increased levels of CRH mRNA and CRH immunoreactive neurons in the PVN. In the current study, an immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis revealed increased levels of CRH in the PVN of newborn mice lacking functional GABAB receptors. There was no difference in the total number of CRH immunoreactive cells. By contrast, there was a significant increase in the amount of CRH immunoreactivity per cell. Interestingly, this increase in CRH levels in the GABAB receptor R1 subunit knockout was limited to the rostral PVN. While GABAergic regulation of the HPA axis has been previously reported in adult animals, this study provides evidence of region-specific GABA modulation of immunoreactive CRH in newborns. PMID:21236282

  16. Nuclear Receptor DHR4 Controls the Timing of Steroid Hormone Pulses During Drosophila Development

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Qiuxiang; Magico, Adam; King-Jones, Kirst

    2011-01-01

    In insects, precisely timed periodic pulses of the molting hormone ecdysone control major developmental transitions such as molts and metamorphosis. The synthesis and release of ecdysone, a steroid hormone, is itself controlled by PTTH (prothoracicotopic hormone). PTTH transcript levels oscillate with an 8 h rhythm, but its significance regarding the timing of ecdysone pulses is unclear. PTTH acts on its target tissue, the prothoracic gland (PG), by activating the Ras/Raf/ERK pathway through its receptor Torso, however direct targets of this pathway have yet to be identified. Here, we demonstrate that Drosophila Hormone Receptor 4 (DHR4), a nuclear receptor, is a key target of the PTTH pathway and establishes temporal boundaries by terminating ecdysone pulses. Specifically, we show that DHR4 oscillates between the nucleus and cytoplasm of PG cells, and that the protein is absent from PG nuclei at developmental times when low titer ecdysone pulses occur. This oscillatory behavior is blocked when PTTH or torso function is abolished, resulting in nuclear accumulation of DHR4, while hyperactivating the PTTH pathway results in cytoplasmic retention of the protein. Increasing DHR4 levels in the PG can delay or arrest development. In contrast, reducing DHR4 function in the PG triggers accelerated development, which is caused by precocious ecdysone signaling due to a failure to repress ecdysone pulses. Finally, we show that DHR4 negatively regulates the expression of a hitherto uncharacterized cytochrome P450 gene, Cyp6t3. Disruption of Cyp6t3 function causes low ecdysteroid titers and results in heterochronic phenotypes and molting defects, indicating a novel role in the ecdysone biosynthesis pathway. We propose a model whereby nuclear DHR4 controls the duration of ecdysone pulses by negatively regulating ecdysone biosynthesis through repression of Cyp6t3, and that this repressive function is temporarily overturned via the PTTH pathway by removing DHR4 from the nuclear

  17. Parathyroid hormone and parathyroid hormone type-1 receptor accelerate myocyte differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Shigemi; Yoshioka, Kowasi

    2014-01-01

    The ZHTc6-MyoD embryonic stem cell line expresses the myogenic transcriptional factor MyoD under the control of a tetracycline-inducible promoter. Following induction, most of the ZHTc6-MyoD cells differentiate to myotubes. However, a small fraction does not differentiate, instead forming colonies that retain the potential for myocyte differentiation. In our current study, we found that parathyroid hormone type 1 receptor (PTH1R) expression in colony-forming cells at 13 days after differentiation was higher than that in the undifferentiated ZHTc6-MyoD cells. We also found that PTH1R expression was required for myocyte differentiation, and that parathyroid hormone accelerated the differentiation. Our analysis of human and mouse skeletal muscle tissues showed that most cells expressing PTH1R also expressed Pax7 and CD34, which are biomarkers of satellite cells. Furthermore, we found that parathyroid hormone treatment significantly improved muscle weakness in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice. This is the first report indicating that PTH1R and PTH accelerate myocyte differentiation. PMID:24919035

  18. Inositol Trisphosphate Receptor Ca2+ Release Channels

    PubMed Central

    FOSKETT, J. KEVIN; WHITE, CARL; CHEUNG, KING-HO; MAK, DON-ON DANIEL

    2010-01-01

    The inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptors (InsP3Rs) are a family of Ca2+ release channels localized predominately in the endoplasmic reticulum of all cell types. They function to release Ca2+ into the cytoplasm in response to InsP3 produced by diverse stimuli, generating complex local and global Ca2+ signals that regulate numerous cell physiological processes ranging from gene transcription to secretion to learning and memory. The InsP3R is a calcium-selective cation channel whose gating is regulated not only by InsP3, but by other ligands as well, in particular cytoplasmic Ca2+. Over the last decade, detailed quantitative studies of InsP3R channel function and its regulation by ligands and interacting proteins have provided new insights into a remarkable richness of channel regulation and of the structural aspects that underlie signal transduction and permeation. Here, we focus on these developments and review and synthesize the literature regarding the structure and single-channel properties of the InsP3R. PMID:17429043

  19. Modulation of pancreatic islets-stress axis by hypothalamic releasing hormones and 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Janine; Ludwig, Barbara; Schally, Andrew V.; Steffen, Anja; Ziegler, Christian G.; Block, Norman L.; Koutmani, Yassemi; Brendel, Mathias D.; Karalis, Katia P.; Simeonovic, Charmaine J.; Licinio, Julio; Ehrhart-Bornstein, Monika; Bornstein, Stefan R.

    2011-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH), primarily characterized as neuroregulators of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, directly influence tissue-specific receptor-systems for CRH and GHRH in the endocrine pancreas. Here, we demonstrate the expression of mRNA for CRH and CRH-receptor type 1 (CRHR1) and of protein for CRHR1 in rat and human pancreatic islets and rat insulinoma cells. Activation of CRHR1 and GHRH-receptor significantly increased cell proliferation and reduced cell apoptosis. CRH stimulated both cellular content and release of insulin in rat islet and insulinoma cells. At the ultrastructural level, CRHR1 stimulation revealed a more active metabolic state with enlarged mitochondria. Moreover, glucocorticoids that promote glucose production are balanced by both 11b-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD) isoforms; 11β-HSD–type-1 and 11β-HSD–type-2. We demonstrated expression of mRNA for 11β-HSD-1 and 11β-HSD-2 and protein for 11β-HSD-1 in rat and human pancreatic islets and insulinoma cells. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that stimulation of CRHR1 and GHRH-receptor affects the metabolism of insulinoma cells by down-regulating 11β-HSD-1 and up-regulating 11β-HSD-2. The 11β-HSD enzyme activity was analyzed by measuring the production of cortisol from cortisone. Similarly, activation of CRHR1 resulted in reduced cortisol levels, indicating either decreased 11β-HSD-1 enzyme activity or increased 11β-HSD-2 enzyme activity; thus, activation of CRHR1 alters the glucocorticoid balance toward the inactive form. These data indicate that functional receptor systems for hypothalamic-releasing hormone agonists exist within the endocrine pancreas and influence synthesis of insulin and the pancreatic glucocorticoid shuttle. Agonists of CRHR1 and GHRH-receptor, therefore, may play an important role as novel therapeutic tools in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. PMID:21825133

  20. Effects of inorganic and organic manganese supplementation on gonadotropin-releasing hormone-I and follicle-stimulating hormone expression and reproductive performance of broiler breeder hens.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jingjing; Tian, Chuanhuan; Zhu, Yongwen; Zhang, Liyang; Lu, Lin; Luo, Xugang

    2014-04-01

    Manganese is an essential microelement. Manganese deficiency affects reproduction performance and reproductive hormones in layers. However, little is known about its effects and the possible mechanism in regulating reproduction in broiler breeder hens. In the current study, broiler breeder hens at peak production were fed with diets supplemented with 0, 120, or 240 mg of Mn/kg as MnSO4 or Mn proteinate for 13 wk. Manganese supplementation did not alter egg laying rate, egg weight, fertility, hatchability, or hatchling weight over a 13-wk trial period. However, 240 mg of Mn/kg supplementation significantly increased serum Mn (P < 0.05). Manganese supplements increased the eggshell breaking strength (P < 0.05) without affecting the eggshell thickness. There was no difference in serum cholesterol and estradiol. Expression of follicle-stimulating hormone) and gonadotropin-releasing hormone-I (GnRH-I) genes was significantly elevated by 240 mg of Mn/kg (P < 0.05). Furthermore, inorganic Mn supplementation doubled GnRH-I expression compared with supplementation with the organic form (P < 0.05), although serum Mn was comparable between these 2 supplements. No obvious difference was shown in gene expression of luteinizing hormone, prolactin, GnRH-I receptor, inducible NO synthase, and dopamine receptor D1 in the pituitary as well as tyrosine hydroxylase and inducible NO synthase in the hypothalamus. This suggests that dietary Mn supplementation could improve eggshell quality in the long term. The central mechanism of nontoxic high doses of Mn suggested the transcriptional activation of GnRH-I and follicle-stimulating hormone genes. The central effect of inorganic Mn activating GnRH-I genes compared with the reduced effect by organic Mn could possibly be due to a decreased capacity of the latter passing through the blood-brain barrier. PMID:24706974

  1. Molecular analysis of rat pituitary and hypothalamic growth hormone secretagogue receptors.

    PubMed

    McKee, K K; Palyha, O C; Feighner, S D; Hreniuk, D L; Tan, C P; Phillips, M S; Smith, R G; Van der Ploeg, L H; Howard, A D

    1997-04-01

    GH release is thought to occur under the reciprocal regulation of two hypothalamic peptides, GH releasing hormone (GHRH) and somatostatin, via their engagement with specific cell surface receptors on the anterior pituitary somatotroph. In addition, GH-releasing peptides, such as GHRP-6 and the nonpeptide mimetics, L-692,429 and MK-0677, stimulate GH release through their activation of a distinct receptor, the GH secretagogue receptor (GHS-R). The recent cloning of the GHS-R from human and swine pituitary gland identifies yet a third G protein-coupled receptor (GPC-R) involved in the control of GH release and further supports the existence of an undiscovered hormone that may activate this receptor. Using the human GHS-R as a probe, we report the isolation of a rat pituitary GHS-R cDNA derived from an unspliced, precursor mRNA. The rat cDNA encodes a protein of 364 amino acids containing seven transmembrane domains (7-TM) with >90% sequence identity to both the human and swine GHS-Rs. A single intron of approximately 2 kb divides the open reading frame into two exons encoding TM 1-5 and TM 6-7, thus placing the GHS-R into the intron-containing class of GPC-Rs. The intron maps to the site of sequence divergence between the human and swine type 1a and 1b GHS-R mRNAs. In addition, determination of the nucleotide sequence for the human GHS-R gene confirmed the position of an intron in the human GHS-R gene at this position. A full-length contiguous cDNA from rat hypothalamus was isolated and shown to be identical in its nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence to the rat pituitary GHS-R. The cloned rat GHS-R binds [35S]MK-0677 with high affinity [dissociation constant (K(D)) = 0.7 nM] and is functionally active when expressed in HEK-293 cells. Expression of the rat GHS-R was observed specifically in the pituitary and hypothalamus when compared with control tissues. PMID:9092793

  2. Differential release of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) in the amygdala during different types of stressors.

    PubMed

    Hand, Gregory A; Hewitt, Christopher B; Fulk, Laura J; Stock, Howard S; Carson, James A; Davis, J Mark; Wilson, Marlene A

    2002-09-13

    The purpose of this study was to determine if differences exist between the effects of acute treadmill running and restraint stress on corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) release within the amygdala of rats. Extracellular CRH immunoreactivity (CRH-IR) was measured in microdialysate collected from the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) during exposure to an inactivated treadmill (TC), during 1 h treadmill running to exhaustion (RUN), and 1 h restraint (RES). Extracellular CRH-IR increased from control levels during the first 20-min period for TC, RUN, and RES, with the largest increase during RES. During the second 20-min period, only RES maintained levels higher than control values. CRH release was higher than control during the third 20-min period of RES and RUN. A second experiment consisted of four groups of either cage controls (CC), TC, RUN, or RES. Immediately following the 60-min treatment, brains were removed and trunk blood collected for analysis of tissue CRH-IR and plasma corticosterone. While amygdala tissue CRH-IR was not different in the CC, TC and RUN rats, these groups had significantly lower levels than the RES animals. Hypothalamic tissue CRH-IR was not different between the CC and TC rats, but the levels were significantly higher in the RES and RUN rats than in the two control groups. Plasma corticosterone levels were elevated only in RES and RUN rats. Results from tissue analysis indicate that increased tissue CRH-IR in the amygdala and hypothalamus can be elicited by RES, while only the hypothalamus shows an increase following RUN. Further, extracellular CRH release in the CeA is increased throughout the period of RES, when rats are placed on the treadmill, and when the animals are approaching physical exhaustion. No increase is observed during the running period between placement on the treadmill and intense exertion. Overall, the data suggest that amygdala CRH release is regulated differently during treadmill running and restraint. PMID

  3. Hepatic receptors for homologous growth hormone in the eel

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, T. )

    1991-03-01

    The specific binding of 125I-labeled eel growth hormone (eGH) to liver membranes of the eel was examined. The specific binding to the 10,000g pellet was greater than that to the 600g pellet. The specific binding was linear up to about 100 mg fresh tissue, and was saturable with increasing amounts of membrane. The specific binding was pH-, temperature-, and time-dependent, with the optimum pH at 7.4, and greater specific binding was obtained at 15 and 25 degrees than at 35 degrees. Scatchard analysis of liver binding gave an association constant of 1.1 x 10(9) M-1 and a capacity of 105 fmol/mg protein. The receptor preparation was highly specific for GHs. Natural and recombinant eel GHs as well as recombinant salmon GH competed equally with 125I-eGH for the receptor sites of the 10,000g liver membrane. Ovine GH was more potent in displacing the labeled eGH than the homologous eel hormone. Tilapia GH and ovine prolactin (PRL) were needed in greater amounts (40 times) than eGH to displace the labeled eGH. Salmon and tilapia PRLs were still less potent (500 times) than eGH. There was no displacement with eel PRL. No significant change in the specific binding was seen 1 week after hypophysectomy, whereas injection of eGH into the hypophysectomized eel caused a significant reduction after 24 hr. The binding to the membrane fractions from gills, kidney, muscle, intestine, and brain was low and exclusively nonspecific, indicating the presence of specific GH receptors predominantly in the liver.

  4. Thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) affects gene expression in pancreatic beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, LuGuang; Yano, Naohiro

    2005-01-01

    Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), originally identified as a hypothalamic hormone, is expressed in the pancreas. The peptide has been shown to control glycemia, although the role of TRH in the pancreas has not yet been clarified. In quiescent INS-1 cells (rat immortalized beta-cell line), 200 nM of TRH for 24 hours significantly increased insulin levels in the culture medium and in cell extracts. In studies with gene array technology where about 60% to 75% of the 1081 genes were detected, TRH significantly stimulated multiple groups of gene expressions, including G-protein-coupled receptor and related signaling, such as insulin secretion, endoplasmic reticulum traffic mechanisms, cell-cycle regulators, protein turnover factors, DNA recombination, and growth factors. Noticeably, TRH suppressed the genes of proapoptotic Bcl-2-associated protein X, Bcl-xL/ Bcl-2-associated death promoter, and Fas. The multiple gene expressions in response to TRH in pancreatic cells suggest that the changed microenvironment brought about by TRH may influence beta-cellfunction. PMID:16392621

  5. ASSESSING OCCURRENCE, PERSISTENCE AND BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF HORMONES RELEASED FROM LIVESTOCK WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The project will determine the potential for environmental release of hormones under various waste management practices, degradation of hormones and associated activities in these practices, the persistence of residuals in transport from CAFOs, and the relative importance of d...

  6. Generalized resistance to thyroid hormone associated with a mutation in the ligand-binding domain of the human thyroid hormone receptor. beta

    SciTech Connect

    Sakurai, A.; Takeda, K.; Ain, K.; Ceccarelli, P.; Nakai, A.; Seino, S.; Bell, G.I.; Refetoff, S.; DeGroot, L.J. )

    1989-11-01

    The syndrome of generalized resistance to thyroid hormone is characterized by elevated circulating levels of thyroid hormone in the presence of an overall eumetabolic state and failure to respond normally to triiodothyronine. The authors have evaluated a family with inherited generalized resistance to thyroid hormone for abnormalities in the thyroid hormone nuclear receptors. A single guanine {yields} cytosine replacement in the codon for amino acid 340 resulted in a glycine {yields} arginine substitution in the hormone-binding domain of one of two alleles of the patient's thyroid hormone nuclear receptor {beta} gene. In vitro translation products of this mutant human thyroid hormone nuclear receptor {beta} gene did not bind triiodothyronine. Thus, generalized resistance to thyroid hormone can result from expression of an abnormal thyroid hormone nuclear receptor molecule.

  7. Genetic moderation of child maltreatment effects on depression and internalizing symptoms by serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), norepinephrine transporter (NET), and corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1) genes in African American children.

    PubMed

    Cicchetti, Dante; Rogosch, Fred A

    2014-11-01

    Genetic moderation of the effects of child maltreatment on depression and internalizing symptoms was investigated in a sample of low-income maltreated and nonmaltreated African American children (N = 1,096). Lifetime child maltreatment experiences were independently coded from Child Protective Services records and maternal report. Child depression and internalizing problems were assessed in the context of a summer research camp by self-report on the Children's Depression Inventory and adult counselor report on the Teacher Report Form. DNA was obtained from buccal cell or saliva samples and genotyped for polymorphisms of the following genes: serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), norepinephrine transporter, and corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1. Analyses of covariance with age and gender as covariates were conducted, with maltreatment status and respective polymorphism as main effects and their Gene × Environment (G × E) interactions. Maltreatment consistently was associated with higher Children's Depression Inventory and Teacher Report Form symptoms. The results for child self-report symptoms indicated a G × E interaction for BDNF and maltreatment. In addition, BDNF and triallelic 5-HTTLPR interacted with child maltreatment in a G × G × E interaction. Analyses for counselor report of child anxiety/depression symptoms on the Teacher Report Form indicated moderation of child maltreatment effects by triallelic 5-HTTLPR. These effects were elaborated based on variation in developmental timing of maltreatment experiences. Norepinephrine transporter was found to further moderate the G × E interaction of 5-HTTLPR and maltreatment status, revealing a G × G × E interaction. This G × G × E was extended by consideration of variation in maltreatment subtype experiences. Finally, G × G × E effects were observed for the co-action of BDNF and the corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1

  8. Plasma luteinizing hormone concentration in mares treated with gondotropin-releasing hormone and estradiol.

    PubMed

    Garcia, M C; Ginther, O J

    1975-11-01

    Three experiments were performed to study the luteinizing hormone (LH) and ovulatory responses to various doses and methods of administration of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in estrous pony mares and the influence of estradiol-17beta (E2-17beta) on LH response to GnRH treatment. In experiment 1, single injections of synthetic GnRH were subcutaneously given to 5 groups of estrous (day 2) mares (3 mares/group) on a body weight basis as follows: group A--isotonic saline solution; group B--GnRH, 0.14 mug/kg; group C--GnRH, 0.28 mug/kg; group D--KGnRH, 0.59 mug/kg; and group E--GnRH, 2.37 mug/kg. Significant increase of plasma LH concentration lasting for approximately 2 hours occurred only in mares of group E given the largest dose of GnRH (2.37 mug/kg). Plasma LH concentration increase at 1 hour after treatment approached significane (P less than 0.10) in mares of group D given the next smaller dose. In experiment 2, GnRH (2.37 mug/kg) was intravenously infused for 24 hours to a group of 6 mares (group F); 6 other mares (group G) were given saline solution infusion. Mean plasma LH concentration was increased at 3 hours, continued to increase until 6 hours, and remained at approximately the 6-hour concentration throughout the period of GnRH infusion. In the 3rd experiment, 3 groups of mares (4 mares/group) were subcutaneously given the following treatments on days 2 and 3 of estrus, respectively: group H--corn oil and saline solution; group I--corn oil and GnRH, 0.59 mug/kg; and group J--estradiol-17beta, 0.5 mg, and GnRH, 0.59 mug/kg. Plasma LH response was not seen in group H mares given corn oil and saline solution. Mean plasma LH concentration at 1 hour after administration of GnRH approached significance (P less than 0.10) in group I mares given corn oil and GnRH. For the mares in group J given E2-17beta and GnRH, E2-17beta pretreatment increased plasma LH after 24 horus; significnat increases of plasma LH concentration were seen from 1 to 6 hours after

  9. Targeting Thyroid Hormone Receptor Beta in Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Guowei; Gelsomino, Luca; Covington, Kyle R.; Beyer, Amanda R.; Wang, John; Rechoum, Yassine; Huffman, Kenneth; Carstens, Ryan; Ando, Sebastiano; Fuqua, Suzanne A.W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Discover novel nuclear receptor targets in triple negative breast cancer Methods Expression microarray, western blot, qRT-PCR, MTT growth assay, soft agar anchorage-independent growth assay, TRE reporter transactivation assay, statistical analysis. Results We performed microarray analysis using 227 triple negative breast tumors, and clustered the tumors into five groups according to their nuclear receptor expression. Thyroid hormone receptor beta (TRβ) was one of the most differentially expressed nuclear receptors in group 5 compared to other groups. TRβ low expressing patients were associated with poor outcome. We evaluated the role of TRβ in triple negative breast cancer cell lines representing group 5 tumors. Knockdown of TRβ increased soft agar colony and reduced sensitivity to docetaxel and doxorubicin treatment. Docetaxel or doxorubicin long-term cultured cell lines also expressed decreased TRβ protein. Microarray analysis revealed cAMP/PKA signaling was the only KEGG pathways upregulated in TRβ knockdown cells. Inhibitors of cAMP or PKA, in combination with doxorubicin further enhanced cell apoptosis and restored sensitivity to chemotherapy. TRβ-specific agonists enhanced TRβ expression, and further sensitized cells to both docetaxel and doxorubicin. Sensitization was mediated by increased apoptosis with elevated cleaved PARP and caspase 3. Conclusions TRβ represents a novel nuclear receptor target in triple negative breast cancer; low TRβ levels were associated with enhanced resistance to both docetaxel and doxorubicin treatment. TRβ-specific agonists enhance chemosensitivity to these two agents. Mechanistically enhanced cAMP/PKA signaling was associated with TRβ’s effects on response to chemotherapy. PMID:25820519

  10. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone targeted poly(methyl vinyl ether maleic acid) nanoparticles for doxorubicin delivery to MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Varshosaz, Jaleh; Jahanian-Najafabadi, Ali; Ghazzavi, Jila

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to design a targeted anti-cancer drug delivery system for breast cancer. Therefore, doxorubicin (DOX) loaded poly(methyl vinyl ether maleic acid) nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared by ionic cross-linking method using Zn(2+) ions. To optimise the effect of DOX/polymer ratio, Zn/polymer ratio, and stirrer rate a full factorial design was used and their effects on particle size, zeta potential, loading efficiency (LE, %), and release efficiency in 72 h (RE72, %) were studied. Targeted NPs were prepared by chemical coating of tiptorelin/polyallylamin conjugate on the surface of NPs by using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carboiimid HCl as cross-linking agent. Conjugation efficiency was measured by Bradford assay. Conjugated triptorelin and targeted NPs were studied by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The cytotoxicity of DOX loaded in targeted NPs and non-targeted ones were studied on MCF-7 cells which overexpress luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptors and SKOV3 cells as negative LHRH receptors using Thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide assay. The best results obtained from NPs prepared by DOX/polymer ratio of 5%, Zn/polymer ratio of 50%, and stirrer rate of 960 rpm. FTIR spectrum confirmed successful conjugation of triptorelin to NPs. The conjugation efficiency was about 70%. The targeted NPs showed significantly less IC50 for MCF-7 cells compared to free DOX and non-targeted NPs. PMID:27463791

  11. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone, estradiol, and inhibin regulation of follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone surges: implications for follicle emergence and selection in heifers.

    PubMed

    Haughian, James M; Ginther, O J; Diaz, Francisco J; Wiltbank, Milo C

    2013-06-01

    Mechanisms regulating gonadotropin surges and gonadotropin requirements for follicle emergence and selection were studied in heifers. Experiment 1 evaluated whether follicular inhibins regulate the preovulatory luteinizing hormone (LH)/follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) surges elicited by gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) injection (Hour = 0) and the subsequent periovulatory FSH surge. Treatments included control (n = 6), steroid-depleted bovine follicular fluid (bFF) at Hour -4 (n = 6), and bFF at Hour 6 (n = 6). Gonadotropins in blood were assessed hourly from Hours -6 to 36, and follicle growth tracked by ultrasound. Consistent with inhibin independence, bFF at Hour -4 did not impact the GnRH-induced preovulatory FSH surge, whereas treatment at Hour 6 delayed onset of the periovulatory FSH surge and impeded growth of a new follicular wave. Experiment 2 examined GnRH and estradiol (E2) regulation of the periovulatory FSH surge. Treatment groups were control (n = 8), GnRH-receptor antagonist (GnRHr-ant, n = 8), and E2 + GnRHr-ant (n = 4). GnRHr-ant (acyline) did not reduce the concentrations of FSH during the periovulatory surge and early follicle development (<7.0 mm) was unaffected, although subsequent growth of a dominant follicle (>8.0 mm) was prevented by GnRHr-ant. Addition of E2 delayed both the onset of the periovulatory FSH surge and emergence of a follicular wave. Failure to select a dominant follicle in the GnRHr-ant group was associated with reduced concentrations of LH but not FSH. Maximum diameter of F1 in controls (13.3 ± 0.5 mm) was greater than in both GnRHr-ant (7.7 ± 0.3 mm) and E2 + GnRHr-ant (6.7 ± 0.8 mm) groups. Results indicated that the periovulatory FSH surge stems from removal of negative stimuli (follicular E2 and inhibin), but is independent of GnRH stimulation. Emergence and early growth of follicles (until about 8 mm) requires the periovulatory FSH surge but not LH pulses. However, follicular deviation and late-stage growth of

  12. Direct and in vitro observation of growth hormone receptor molecules in A549 human lung epithelial cells by nanodiamond labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, C.-Y.; Perevedentseva, E.; Tu, J.-S.; Chung, P.-H.; Cheng, C.-L.; Liu, K.-K.; Chao, J.-I.; Chen, P.-H.; Chang, C.-C.

    2007-04-01

    This letter presents direct observation of growth hormone receptor in one single cancer cell using nanodiamond-growth hormone complex as a specific probe. The interaction of surface growth hormone receptor of A549 human lung epithelial cells with growth hormone was observed using nanodiamond's unique spectroscopic signal via confocal Raman mapping. The growth hormone molecules were covalent conjugated to 100nm diameter carboxylated nanodiamonds, which can be recognized specifically by the growth hormone receptors of A549 cell. The Raman spectroscopic signal of diamond provides direct and in vitro observation of growth hormone receptors in physiology condition in a single cell level.

  13. Absence of serum growth hormone binding protein in patients with growth hormone receptor deficiency (Laron dwarfism)

    SciTech Connect

    Daughaday, W.H.; Trivedi, B.

    1987-07-01

    It has recently been recognized that human serum contains a protein that specifically binds human growth hormone (hGH). This protein has the same restricted specificity for hGH as the membrane-bound GH receptor. To determine whether the GH-binding protein is a derivative of, or otherwise related to, the GH receptor, the authors have examined the serum of three patients with Laron-type dwarfism, a condition in which GH refractoriness has been attributed to a defect in the GH receptor. The binding of /sup 125/I-labeled hGH incubated with serum has been measured after gel filtration of the serum through an Ultrogel AcA 44 minicolumn. Results are expressed as percent of specifically bound /sup 125/I-hGH and as specific binding relative to that of a reference serum after correction is made for endogenous GH. The mean +/- SEM of specific binding of sera from eight normal adults (26-46 years of age) was 21.6 +/- 0.45%, and the relative specific binding was 101.1 +/- 8.6%. Sera from 11 normal children had lower specific binding of 12.5 +/- 1.95% and relative specific binding of 56.6 +/- 9.1%. Sera from three children with Laron-type dwarfism lacked any demonstrable GH binding, whereas sera from 10 other children with other types of nonpituitary short stature had normal relative specific binding. They suggest that the serum GH-binding protein is a soluble derivative of the GH receptor. Measurement of the serum GH-binding protein may permit recognition of other abnormalities of the GH receptor.

  14. Synthesis and biological evaluation of antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone with high and protracted in vivo activities

    PubMed Central

    Varga, József L.; Schally, Andrew V.; Csernus, Valér J.; Zarándi, Márta; Halmos, Gábor; Groot, Kate; Rékási, Zoltán

    1999-01-01

    Some antagonists of human growth hormone-releasing hormone (hGH-RH) synthesized previously were shown to inhibit in vivo proliferation of various human cancers in nude mice. However, the activity of these analogs requires an increase to assure clinical efficacy. In an attempt to prepare hGH-RH antagonists with a high and protracted activity, we synthesized and biologically tested 22 antagonistic analogs of hGH-RH(1–29)NH2. The ability of the antagonists to inhibit hGH-RH-induced GH release was evaluated in vitro in a superfused rat pituitary system, as well as in vivo after i.v. injection into rats. The binding affinity of the peptides to GH-RH receptors also was determined. All antagonistic analogs had the common core sequence [PhAc-Tyr1,d-Arg2, Phe(4-Cl)6 (para-chlorophenylalanine), Abu15 (α-aminobutyric acid),Nle27]hGH-RH(1–29)NH2 and contained Arg, d-Arg, homoarginine (Har), norleucine (Nle), and other substitutions. The following analogs were determined to have a high and/or protracted antagonistic activity: [PhAc-Tyr1,d-Arg2,Phe(4-Cl)6,Arg9,Abu15,Nle27,d-Arg29]hGH-RH(1–29)NH2 (JV-1–10), [PhAc-Tyr1,d-Arg2,Phe(4-Cl)6,Abu15,Nle27,d-Arg28,Har29]hGH-RH(1–29)NH2 (MZ-6–55), [PhAc-Tyr1,d-Arg2,Phe(4-Cl)6,Arg9,Abu15,Nle27,d-Arg28,Har29]hGH-RH(1–29)NH2 (JV-1–36), and [PhAc-Tyr1,d-Arg2,Phe(4-Cl)6,Har9,Tyr(Me)10,Abu15,Nle27,d-Arg28,Har29]hGH-RH(1–29)NH2 (JV-1–38). Among the peptides tested, analog JV-1–36 showed the highest GH-RH antagonistic activity in vitro and also induced a strong and prolonged inhibition of GH release in vivo for at least 30 min. The antagonist JV-1–38 was slightly less potent than JV-1–36 both in vitro and in vivo but proved to be very long-acting in vivo, suppressing the GH-RH-induced GH release even after 60 min. High and protracted in vivo activities of these antagonists indicate an improvement over earlier GH-RH analogs. Some of these hGH-RH antagonists could find clinical applications in the treatment of cancers

  15. Immunocytochemical and pharmacological evidence for an intrinsic cholinomimetic system modulating prolactin and growth hormone release in rat pituitary.

    PubMed

    Carmeliet, P; Denef, C

    1988-08-01

    Pituitary cells were cultured as three-dimensional reaggregates in serum-free chemically defined medium supplemented with different concentrations of dexamethasone. Immunostaining of the cells using a polyclonal antiserum and three monoclonal antibodies raised against choline acetyl transferase (CAT), revealed the presence of CAT immunoreactivity in 4-10% of anterior pituitary cells depending on the antibody used. CAT immunoreactivity was also found in freshly dispersed anterior pituitary cells. CAT-immunoreactive cells could be enriched on BSA and Percoll gradients and codistributed with ACTH-immunoreactive cells in these gradients. Perifusion of the aggregates with the potent muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine (Atr) resulted in a dose-dependent (0.1-100 nM) increase in both basal PRL and GH secretion; the response was dependent on the dexamethasone concentration in the culture medium. A similar response to Atr was observed in organ-cultured pituitaries. The specificity of the Atr effect was supported by the findings that the potent and highly specific muscarinic receptor blocker dexetimide showed a similar action, whereas its inactive enantiomer levetimide and the nicotinic receptor blocker hexamethonium failed to do so. Two other muscarinic antagonists, benzatropine and pirenzepine, showed a dose-dependent hormone-releasing action similar to that of Atr, but were less potent than the latter. Pirenzepine was only effective at high molar concentrations, suggesting that an M2 muscarinic receptor subtype was mediating the present phenomenon. Atr also potentiated GH release stimulated by the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol and PRL release stimulated by vasoactive intestinal peptide, but had no effect on GRF-stimulated GH release. The choline uptake blocker hemicholinium abolished the effect of Atr on GH and PRL release. These data suggest that certain pituitary cells can express CAT activity and that these cells exert a tonic inhibitory activity on GH and

  16. GATA2 Mediates Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone-Induced Transcriptional Activation of the Thyrotropin β Gene

    PubMed Central

    Ohba, Kenji; Sasaki, Shigekazu; Matsushita, Akio; Iwaki, Hiroyuki; Matsunaga, Hideyuki; Suzuki, Shingo; Ishizuka, Keiko; Misawa, Hiroko; Oki, Yutaka; Nakamura, Hirotoshi

    2011-01-01

    Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) activates not only the secretion of thyrotropin (TSH) but also the transcription of TSHβ and α-glycoprotein (αGSU) subunit genes. TSHβ expression is maintained by two transcription factors, Pit1 and GATA2, and is negatively regulated by thyroid hormone (T3). Our prior studies suggest that the main activator of the TSHβ gene is GATA2, not Pit1 or unliganded T3 receptor (TR). In previous studies on the mechanism of TRH-induced activation of the TSHβ gene, the involvements of Pit1 and TR have been investigated, but the role of GATA2 has not been clarified. Using kidney-derived CV1 cells and pituitary-derived GH3 and TαT1 cells, we demonstrate here that TRH signaling enhances GATA2-dependent activation of the TSHβ promoter and that TRH-induced activity is abolished by amino acid substitution in the GATA2-Zn finger domain or mutation of GATA-responsive element in the TSHβ gene. In CV1 cells transfected with TRH receptor expression plasmid, GATA2-dependent transactivation of αGSU and endothelin-1 promoters was enhanced by TRH. In the gel shift assay, TRH signal potentiated the DNA-binding capacity of GATA2. While inhibition by T3 is dominant over TRH-induced activation, unliganded TR or the putative negative T3-responsive element are not required for TRH-induced stimulation. Studies using GH3 cells showed that TRH-induced activity of the TSHβ promoter depends on protein kinase C but not the mitogen-activated protein kinase, suggesting that the signaling pathway is different from that in the prolactin gene. These results indicate that GATA2 is the principal mediator of the TRH signaling pathway in TSHβ expression. PMID:21533184

  17. Growth Hormone Response after Administration of L-dopa, Clonidine, and Growth Hormone Releasing Hormone in Children with Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pueschel, Seigfried M.

    1993-01-01

    This study of eight growth-retarded children with Down's syndrome (aged 1 to 6.5 years) found that administration of growth hormone was more effective than either L-dopa or clonidine. Results suggest that children with Down's syndrome have both anatomical and biochemical hypothalamic derangements resulting in decreased growth hormone secretion and…

  18. Resistance to thyroid hormone due to defective thyroid receptor alpha

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Carla; Chatterjee, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormones act via nuclear receptors (TRα1, TRβ1, TRβ2) with differing tissue distribution; the role of α2 protein, derived from the same gene locus as TRα1, is unclear. Resistance to thyroid hormone alpha (RTHα) is characterised by tissue-specific hypothyroidism associated with near-normal thyroid function tests. Clinical features include dysmorphic facies, skeletal dysplasia (macrocephaly, epiphyseal dysgenesis), growth retardation, constipation, dyspraxia and intellectual deficit. Biochemical abnormalities include low/low-normal T4 and high/high-normal T3 concentrations, a subnormal T4/T3 ratio, variably reduced reverse T3, raised muscle creatine kinase and mild anaemia. The disorder is mediated by heterozygous, loss-of-function, mutations involving either TRα1 alone or both TRα1 and α2, with no discernible phenotype attributable to defective α2. Whole exome sequencing and diagnostic biomarkers may enable greater ascertainment of RTHα, which is important as thyroxine therapy reverses some metabolic abnormalities and improves growth, constipation, dyspraxia and wellbeing. The genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity of RTHα and its optimal management remain to be elucidated. PMID:26303090

  19. Resistance to thyroid hormone due to defective thyroid receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Moran, Carla; Chatterjee, Krishna

    2015-08-01

    Thyroid hormones act via nuclear receptors (TRα1, TRβ1, TRβ2) with differing tissue distribution; the role of α2 protein, derived from the same gene locus as TRα1, is unclear. Resistance to thyroid hormone alpha (RTHα) is characterised by tissue-specific hypothyroidism associated with near-normal thyroid function tests. Clinical features include dysmorphic facies, skeletal dysplasia (macrocephaly, epiphyseal dysgenesis), growth retardation, constipation, dyspraxia and intellectual deficit. Biochemical abnormalities include low/low-normal T4 and high/high-normal T3 concentrations, a subnormal T4/T3 ratio, variably reduced reverse T3, raised muscle creatine kinase and mild anaemia. The disorder is mediated by heterozygous, loss-of-function, mutations involving either TRα1 alone or both TRα1 and α2, with no discernible phenotype attributable to defective α2. Whole exome sequencing and diagnostic biomarkers may enable greater ascertainment of RTHα, which is important as thyroxine therapy reverses some metabolic abnormalities and improves growth, constipation, dyspraxia and wellbeing. The genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity of RTHα and its optimal management remain to be elucidated. PMID:26303090

  20. Central estrogen action sites involved in prepubertal restraint of pulsatile luteinizing hormone release in female rats

    PubMed Central

    UENOYAMA, Yoshihisa; TANAKA, Akira; TAKASE, Kenji; YAMADA, Shunji; PHENG, Vutha; INOUE, Naoko; MAEDA, Kei-ichiro; TSUKAMURA, Hiroko

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine estrogen feedback action sites to mediate prepubertal restraint of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)/luteinizing hormone (LH) release in female rats. Wistar-Imamichi strain rats were ovariectomized (OVX) and received a local estradiol-17β (estradiol) or cholesterol microimplant in several brain areas, such as the medial preoptic area (mPOA), paraventricular nucleus, ventromedial nucleus and arcuate nucleus (ARC), at 20 or 35 days of age. Six days after receiving the estradiol microimplant, animals were bled to detect LH pulses at 26 or 41 days of age, representing the pre- or postpubertal period, respectively. Estradiol microimplants in the mPOA or ARC, but not in other brain regions, suppressed LH pulses in prepubertal OVX rats. Apparent LH pulses were found in the postpubertal period in all animals bearing estradiol or cholesterol implants. It is unlikely that pubertal changes in responsiveness to estrogen are due to a change in estrogen receptor (ER) expression, because the number of ERα-immunoreactive cells and mRNA levels of Esr1, Esr2 and Gpr30 in the mPOA and ARC were comparable between the pre- and postpubertal periods. In addition, kisspeptin or GnRH injection overrode estradiol-dependent prepubertal LH suppression, suggesting that estrogen inhibits the kisspeptin-GnRH cascade during the prepubertal period. Thus, estrogen-responsive neurons located in the mPOA and ARC may play key roles in estrogen-dependent prepubertal restraint of GnRH/LH secretion in female rats. PMID:26004302

  1. Diverse growth hormone receptor gene mutations in Laron syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, M.A.; Francke, U. ); Gracia, R.; Rosenbloom, A.; Toledo, S.P.A. ); Chernausek, S. ); Guevara-Aguirre, J. ); Hopp, M. ); Rosenbloom, A.; Argente, J. ); Toledo, S.P.A. )

    1993-05-01

    To better understand the molecular genetic basis and genetic epidemiology of Laron syndrome (growth-hormone insensitivity syndrome), the authors analysed the growth-hormone receptor (GHR) genes of seven unrelated affected individuals from the United States, South America, Europe, and Africa. They amplified all nine GHR gene exons and splice junctions from these individuals by PCR and screened the products for mutations by using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). They identified a single GHR gene fragment with abnormal DGGE results for each affected individual, sequenced this fragment, and, in each case, identified a mutation likely to cause Laron syndrome, including two nonsense mutations (R43X and R217X), two splice-junction mutations, (189-1 G to T and 71+1 G to A), and two frameshift mutations (46 del TT and 230 del TA or AT). Only one of these mutations, R43X, has been previously reported. Using haplotype analysis, they determined that this mutation, which involves a CpG dinucleotide hot spot, likely arose as a separate event in this case, relative to the two prior reports of R43X. Aside from R43X, the mutations identified are unique to patients from particular geographic regions. Ten GHR gene mutations have now been described in this disorder. The authors conclude that Laron syndrome is caused by diverse GHR gene mutations, including deletions, RNA processing defects, translational stop codons, and missense codons. All the identified mutations involve the extracellular domain of the receptor, and most are unique to particular families or geographic areas. 35 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Extrathyroidal release of thyroid hormones from thyroglobulin by J774 mouse macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Brix, K; Herzog, V

    1994-01-01

    Thyroglobulin appears in the circulation of vertebrates at species-specific concentrations. We have observed that the clearance of thyroglobulin from the circulation occurs in the liver by macrophages. Here we show that the thyroid hormones T3 and T4 were released by incubation of mouse macrophages (J774) with thyroglobulin. Thyroid hormone release was a fast process, with an initial rate of approximately 20 pmol T4/mg per min and approximately 0.6 pmol T3/mg per min, indicating that macrophages preferentially release T4. The bulk of released thyroid hormones appeared after 5 min of incubation of macrophages with thyroglobulin, whereas degradation of the protein was detectable only after several hours. During internalization of thyroglobulin, endocytic vesicles and endosomes were reached at 5 min and lysosomes at 60 min. T4 release started extracellularly by secreted proteases and continued along the endocytic pathway of thyroglobulin, whereas T3 release occurred mainly intracellularly when thyroglobulin had reached the lysosomes. This shows that the release of both hormones occurred at distinct cellular sites. Our in vitro observations suggest that macrophages in situ represent an extrathyroidal source for thyroid hormones from circulating thyroglobulin. Images PMID:8163643

  3. Characterization of soluble and particulate parathyroid hormone receptors using a biotinylated bioactive hormone analog.

    PubMed

    Brennan, D P; Levine, M A

    1987-10-25

    A bioactive biotin-containing derivative of the synthetic bovine parathyroid hormone analog [Nle8,Nle18,Tyr34]bovine parathyroid hormone-(1-34) (bPTH-(1-34] amide was prepared by reacting the peptide with N-biotinyl-epsilon-aminocaproic acid N-hydroxysuccinimide ester. The derivative was incubated with particulate renal plasma membranes or with detergent [3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate) extracts of renal cortical membranes, and two membrane components were identified. Labeling of these components was competitively inhibited by underivatized bPTH-(1-34) or bPTH-(3-34) but not by insulin, adrenocorticotropin, or oxidized rat PTH-(1-34). PTH-binding components that were immobilized on nitrocellulose could be detected by incubating the membrane with biotinyl-bPTH-(1-34). Binding components of apparent molecular mass 68, 70, and 150 kDa were specifically labeled in plasma membranes derived from canine, human, and porcine renal cortex, rat liver, and human fibroblasts. The 68-kDa binding protein was found to be consistently more acidic than the 70-kDa binding protein in human, porcine, and canine renal membranes analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis. The 68-70-kDa receptor doublet could be specifically isolated by streptavidin-agarose chromatography of solubilized membrane extracts that had first been incubated with biotinyl-BPTH-(1-34). Biotinyl-bPTH-(1-34) should be useful as a tool for further characterization and purification of the PTH receptor. PMID:2822699

  4. Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Suppresses Gonadotropin-Stimulated Estradiol Release from Zebrafish Ovarian Follicles

    PubMed Central

    Alsop, Derek; Ings, Jennifer S.; Vijayan, Mathilakath M.

    2009-01-01

    While stress is known to impact reproductive performance, the pathways involved are not entirely understood. Corticosteroid effects on the functioning of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis are thought to be a key aspect of stress-mediated reproductive dysfunction. A vital component of the stress response is the pituitary secretion of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), which binds to the melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R) in the adrenal glands and activates cortisol biosynthesis. We recently reported MC2R mRNA abundance in fish gonads leading to the hypothesis that ACTH may be directly involved in gonadal steroid modulation. Using zebrafish (Danio rerio) ovarian follicles, we tested the hypothesis that acute ACTH stimulation modulates cortisol and estradiol (E2) secretion. ACTH neither affected cortisol nor unstimulated E2 release from ovarian follicles. However, ACTH suppressed human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-stimulated E2 secretion in a dose-related manner, with a maximum decrease of 62% observed at 1 I.U. ACTH mL−1. This effect of ACTH on E2 release was not observed in the presence of either 8-bromo-cAMP or forskolin, suggesting that the mechanism(s) involved in steroid attenuation was upstream of adenylyl cyclase activation. Overall, our results suggest that a stress-induced rise in plasma ACTH levels may initiate a rapid down-regulation of acute stimulated E2 biosynthesis in the zebrafish ovary, underscoring a novel physiological role for this pituitary peptide in modulating reproductive activity. PMID:19649243

  5. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone regulates spine density via its regulatory role in hippocampal estrogen synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Prange-Kiel, Janine; Jarry, Hubertus; Schoen, Michael; Kohlmann, Patrick; Lohse, Christina; Zhou, Lepu; Rune, Gabriele M.

    2008-01-01

    Spine density in the hippocampus changes during the estrus cycle and is dependent on the activity of local aromatase, the final enzyme in estrogen synthesis. In view of the abundant gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRH-R) messenger RNA expression in the hippocampus and the direct effect of GnRH on estradiol (E2) synthesis in gonadal cells, we asked whether GnRH serves as a regulator of hippocampal E2 synthesis. In hippocampal cultures, E2 synthesis, spine synapse density, and immunoreactivity of spinophilin, a reliable spine marker, are consistently up-regulated in a dose-dependent manner at low doses of GnRH but decrease at higher doses. GnRH is ineffective in the presence of GnRH antagonists or aromatase inhibitors. Conversely, GnRH-R expression increases after inhibition of hippocampal aromatase. As we found estrus cyclicity of spine density in the hippocampus but not in the neocortex and GnRH-R expression to be fivefold higher in the hippocampus compared with the neocortex, our data strongly suggest that estrus cycle–dependent synaptogenesis in the female hippocampus results from cyclic release of GnRH. PMID:18227283

  6. Characterization of a thyroid hormone receptor expressed in human kidney and other tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Nakai, A.; Seino, S.; Sakurai, A.; Szilak, I.; Bell, G.I.; DeGroot, L.J.

    1988-04-01

    A cDNA encoding a specific form of thyroid hormone receptor expressed in human liver, kidney, placenta, and brain was isolated from a human kidney library. Identical clones were found in human placenta and HepG2 cDNA libraries. The cDNA encodes a 490-amino acid protein. When expressed and translated in vitro, the protein products binds triiodothyronine with K/sub a/ of 2.3 /times/ 10/sup 9/ M/sup /minus/1/. This protein, designated human thyroid hormone receptor type ..cap alpha..2 (hTR..cap alpha..2), has the same domain structure as other members of the v-erbA-related superfamily of receptor genes. It is similar to thyroid hormone receptor type ..cap alpha.. described in chicken and rat and less similar to human thyroid hormone receptor type ..beta.. (formerly referred to as c-erbA..beta..) from placenta. However, it is distinguished from these receptors by an extension of the C-terminal hormone binding domain making it 80 amino acids longer than rat thyroid hormone receptor type ..cap alpha..1. Different sizes of mRNA found in liver and kidney suggest that there may be tissue-specific processing of the primary transcript of this gene. Identification of human thyroid hormone receptor type ..cap alpha..2 indicates that two or more forms of thyroid hormone receptor exist in human tissues and may explain the normal variation in thyroid hormone responsiveness of various organs and the selective tissue abnormalities found in the thyroid hormone resistance syndromes.

  7. Oestradiol stimulates tyrosine phosphorylation and hormone binding activity of its own receptor in a cell-free system.

    PubMed Central

    Auricchio, F; Migliaccio, A; Di Domenico, M; Nola, E

    1987-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown that calf uterus oestrogen receptor exists in a tyrosine-phosphorylated hormone binding form and in non-phosphorylated, non-hormone binding form. We report here that physiological concentrations of oestradiol in complex with the receptor stimulate the calf uterus receptor kinase that converts the non-hormone binding receptor into hormone binding receptor through phosphorylation of the receptor on tyrosine. The activity of this enzyme has been followed by reactivation of hormone binding sites and phosphorylation on tyrosine of calf uterus phosphatase-inactivated receptor. Phosphorylation of the receptor has been demonstrated by interaction of kinase 32P-phosphorylated proteins with anti-receptor antibody followed either by sucrose gradient centrifugation or SDS-PAGE of the immunoprecipitated proteins. Hormone stimulation of the kinase is inhibited by receptor occupancy of the anti-oestrogen tamoxifen. Oestradiol-receptor complex increases the affinity of the kinase for the dephosphorylated receptor. Findings of this report are consistent with the observation that several protein tyrosine kinases that are associated with peptide hormone receptors are stimulated by the binding of the hormone to the receptor. This is the first report on the activation of a tyrosine kinase by a steroid hormone. The finding that hormones can regulate their own receptor binding activity through a tyrosine kinase is also new. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:3691476

  8. Sustained cyclic AMP production by parathyroid hormone receptor endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Ferrandon, Sébastien; Feinstein, Timothy N; Castro, Marian; Wang, Bin; Bouley, Richard; Potts, John T; Gardella, Thomas J; Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Cell signaling mediated by the G protein-coupled parathyroid hormone receptor type 1 (PTHR) is fundamental to bone and kidney physiology. It has been unclear how the two ligand systems—PTH, endocrine and homeostatic, and PTH-related peptide (PTHrP), paracrine—can effectively operate with only one receptor and trigger different durations of the cAMP responses. Here we analyze the ligand response by measuring the kinetics of activation and deactivation for each individual reaction step along the PTHR signaling cascade. We found that during the time frame of G protein coupling and cAMP production, PTHrP1–36 action was restricted to the cell surface, whereas PTH1–34 had moved to internalized compartments where it remained associated with the PTHR and Gαs, potentially as a persistent and active ternary complex. Such marked differences suggest a mechanism by which PTH and PTHrP induce differential responses, and these results indicate that the central tenet that cAMP production originates exclusively at the cell membrane must be revised. PMID:19701185

  9. The role of nuclear hormone receptors in cutaneous wound repair

    PubMed Central

    Rieger, Sandra; Zhao, Hengguang; Martin, Paige; Abe, Koichiro; Lisse, Thomas S.

    2015-01-01

    The cutaneous wound repair process involves balancing a dynamic series of events ranging from inflammation, oxidative stress, cell migration, proliferation, survival and differentiation. A complex series of secreted trophic factors, cytokines, surface and intracellular proteins are expressed in a temporospatial manner to restore skin integrity after wounding. Impaired initiation, maintenance or termination of the tissue repair processes can lead to perturbed healing, necrosis, fibrosis or even cancer. Nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) in the cutaneous environment regulate tissue repair processes such as fibroplasia and angiogenesis. Defects in functional NHRs and their ligands are associated with the clinical phenotypes of chronic non-healing wounds and skin endocrine disorders. The functional relationship between NHRs and skin niche cells such as epidermal keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts is pivotal for successful wound closure and permanent repair. The aim of this review is to delineate the cutaneous effects and cross-talk of various nuclear receptors upon injury towards functional tissue restoration. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25529612

  10. Flow cytometric monitoring of hormone receptor expression in human solid tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishan, Awtar

    2002-05-01

    Hormone receptor expression in human breast and prostate tumors is of diagnostic and therapeutic importance. With the availability of anti-estrogen, androgen and progesterone antibodies, immunohistochemistry has become a standard tool for determination of receptor expression in human tumor biopsies. However, this method is dependent on examination of a small number of cells under a microscope and the data obtained in most cases is not quantitative. As most of the commercially used anti-hormone antibodies have nuclear specificity, we have developed methods for isolation and antigen unmasking of nuclei from formalin fixed/paraffin embedded archival human tumors. After immunostaining with the antibodies and propidium iodide (for DNA content and cell cycle analysis), nuclei are analyzed by multiparametric laser flow cytometry for hormone receptor expression, DNA content, aneuploidy and cell cycle determination. These multiparametric methods are especially important for retrospective studies seeking to correlate hormone receptor expression with clinical response to anti-hormonal therapy of human breast and prostate tumors.