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Sample records for relict lake sediments

  1. Reconstructing paleo lake levels from relict shorelines along the Upper Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baedke, Steve J.; Thompson, Todd A.; Johnston, John W.; Wilcox, Douglas A.

    2004-01-01

    Shorelines of the upper Great Lakes include many embayments that contain strandplains of beach ridges. These former shoreline positions of the lakes can be used to determine changes in the elevation of the lakes through time, and they also provide information on the warping of the ground surface that is occurring in the Great Lakes after the weight of glacial ice was removed. Relative lake-level hydrographs can be created by coring the beach ridges to determine the elevation of basal foreshore (swash zone) deposits in each ridge and by obtaining radiocarbon dates of basal wetland sediments between ridges to generate an age model for the ridges. Because the relative-level hydrographs are the combination of lake-level change and vertical ground movement (isostatic rebound), the rebound must be removed to produce a graph that shows only the physical limits and timing of past lake-level fluctuations referenced to a common outlet. More than 500 vibracores of beach-ridge sediments were collected at five sites along Lake Michigan and four sites along Lake Superior. The cores showed a sequence of dune deposits overlying foreshore deposits that, in turn, overlie upper shoreface deposits. The base of the foreshore deposits is coarser and more poorly sorted than an overlying and underlying sediment and represents the plunge-point sediments at the base of the swash zone. The plunge-point deposits are a close approximation of the elevation of the lake when the beach ridge formed. More than 150 radiocarbon ages of basal wetland sediments were collected to produce age models for the sites. Currently, age models exist for all Lake Michigan sites and one Lake Superior site. By combining the elevation data with the age models, six relative lake-level hydrographs were created for the upper Great Lakes. An iterative approach was used to remove rebound from the five Lake Michigan relative hydrographs and merge the graphs into a single hydrograph. The resultant hydrograph shows long

  2. Discovery of relict subglacial lakes and their geometry and mechanism of drainage.

    PubMed

    Livingstone, Stephen J; Utting, Daniel J; Ruffell, Alastair; Clark, Chris D; Pawley, Steven; Atkinson, Nigel; Fowler, Andrew C

    2016-01-01

    Recent proxy measurements reveal that subglacial lakes beneath modern ice sheets periodically store and release large volumes of water, providing an important but poorly understood influence on contemporary ice dynamics and mass balance. This is because direct observations of how lake drainage initiates and proceeds are lacking. Here we present physical evidence of the mechanism and geometry of lake drainage from the discovery of relict subglacial lakes formed during the last glaciation in Canada. These palaeo-subglacial lakes comprised shallow (<10 m) lenses of water perched behind ridges orientated transverse to ice flow. We show that lakes periodically drained through channels incised into bed substrate (canals). Canals sometimes trend into eskers that represent the depositional imprint of the last high-magnitude lake outburst. The subglacial lakes and channels are preserved on top of glacial lineations, indicating long-term re-organization of the subglacial drainage system and coupling to ice flow. PMID:27292049

  3. Discovery of relict subglacial lakes and their geometry and mechanism of drainage

    PubMed Central

    Livingstone, Stephen J.; Utting, Daniel J.; Ruffell, Alastair; Clark, Chris D.; Pawley, Steven; Atkinson, Nigel; Fowler, Andrew C.

    2016-01-01

    Recent proxy measurements reveal that subglacial lakes beneath modern ice sheets periodically store and release large volumes of water, providing an important but poorly understood influence on contemporary ice dynamics and mass balance. This is because direct observations of how lake drainage initiates and proceeds are lacking. Here we present physical evidence of the mechanism and geometry of lake drainage from the discovery of relict subglacial lakes formed during the last glaciation in Canada. These palaeo-subglacial lakes comprised shallow (<10 m) lenses of water perched behind ridges orientated transverse to ice flow. We show that lakes periodically drained through channels incised into bed substrate (canals). Canals sometimes trend into eskers that represent the depositional imprint of the last high-magnitude lake outburst. The subglacial lakes and channels are preserved on top of glacial lineations, indicating long-term re-organization of the subglacial drainage system and coupling to ice flow. PMID:27292049

  4. GREAT LAKES CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contaminated sediments are a significant problem in the Great Lakes basin. Although discharges of toxic substances to the Great Lakes have been reduced in the last 20 years, persistent high concentrations of contaminants in the bottom sediments of rivers and harbors have raised...

  5. Pleistocene sediments of Lake Baikal: Lithology and stratigraphic correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akulov, N. I.; Mashchuk, I. M.; Akulova, V. V.

    2015-01-01

    The Cenozoic sediments of Lake Baikal penetrated by boreholes and investigated by the manned submersible Pisces, as well as coeval deposits cropping out in beach scarps, recovered by mine workings, and drilled in the coastal zone were the object of this investigation. The main attention was paid to Pleistocene bottom sediments penetrated by Borehole BDP-99-2. The investigations included the detailed analysis of the lithology (grain-size composition, immersion mineralogy of light and heavy fractions, X-ray structural analysis of clayey fraction) and palynological assemblages to specify facies features of Cenozoic sediments, correlate all their known stratigraphic units constituting the sedimentary section of the lake with their analogs in the onshore part of the Baikal rift zone, and compile the composite Cenozoic section. The following features of these sediments are noted: (1) as a whole, Pleistocene sediments are characterized by the hydromica-smectite composition of their clayey fraction with an insignificant share of kaoline; (2) the heavy fraction is dominated by the terrigenous epidote-amphibole association poorly resistant to weathering; (3) Pleistocene sediments of the lake contain siderite, vivianite, pyrite, and goethite concretions and micrometeorites, in addition to well-known ferromanganese nodules; (4) the presence of relict palynomorphs in Pleistocene sediments of Baikal is determined by their erosion from Miocene and Pliocene cavernous clays cropping out on underwater slopes of the Posol'skaya Bank and subsequent reburial along with Pleistocene palynological assemblages.

  6. Mercury dynamics in lake sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feyte, Stéphane; Gobeil, Charles; Tessier, André; Cossa, Daniel

    2012-04-01

    Triplicate porewater depth-profiles of pH and concentrations of total Hg (HgT), methylmercury (MeHg), Fe, Mn, sulfate, total sulfide, total zero-valent sulfur, organic C and major ions were determined at two sampling dates in a perennially oxygenated basin and a seasonally anoxic basin from Lake Tantaré, a Canadian Shield lake. The vertical distribution of HgT, MeHg, acid volatile sulfide, total S, Fe, Mn, Al and organic C were also determined in dated sediment cores from the same lake basins and from the deepest site of two other lakes, one also located in the Canadian Shield and the other in the Northeastern part of the Appalachian Mountains. Application of a one-dimensional transport-reaction equation to the dissolved HgT and MeHg profiles constrains the depth intervals (zones) where these species are produced or consumed in the sedimentary column and yields estimates of net reaction rates of HgT or MeHg in each of the zones as well as their fluxes at the sediment-water interface. Dissolved HgT and MeHg diffused from the overlying water into the sediments, except for MeHg at one of the sampling dates in the perennially oxygenated basin. About 97% and 50% of the MeHg flux to the sediments is presently deposited with settling particles in the perennially oxygenated and seasonally anoxic basins, respectively. Removal of porewater HgT and MeHg occurred at all dates and sampling sites. Comparison of the consumption zones of porewater HgT and MeHg with the profiles of ancillary parameters, coupled with thermodynamic calculations, suggest that pure Hg mineral phases do not form in the sediments, that HgT and MeHg adsorption onto authigenic Fe oxyhydroxides occurs in minor proportions, and that the association of HgT and MeHg to Fe sulfide phases or sulfidized organic matter is possible. Assuming that the net consumption of MeHg in the porewaters was essentially due to demethylation, an apparent first-order rate constant for MeHg demethylation of 0.04-0.8 d-1 was

  7. Recent increases in the large glacial-relict calanoid Limnocalanus macrurus in Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barbiero, R.P.; Bunnell, D.B.; Rockwell, D.C.; Tuchman, M.L.

    2009-01-01

    Since 2004, population density of the large hypolimnetic calanoid Limnocalanus macrurus Sars. has increased dramatically in Lake Michigan. The average summer biomass of this species between 2004 and 2006 was roughly three times that of the period 1984–2003, and at levels unprecedented in our 22-year dataset, making L. macrurus the dominant zooplankter in the lake in terms of biomass. These increases have been accentuated by coincident population declines of the main daphnid, Daphnia mendotae, in the lake with the result that in 2006, L. macrurus accounted for 75% and 50% of the large (> 0.9 mm) crustacean biomass in the northern and southern basins of Lake Michigan, respectively. The increases in L. macrurus populations have closely coincided with equally dramatic increases in summer water clarity. Recent extinction coefficients are among the lowest recorded for the lake, and deepening light penetration has permitted increases in the size of the deep chlorophyll layer. In addition, planktivorous fish populations have declined coincidently with the increases in L. macrurus. It seems likely that an increase in sub-epilimnetic production has resulted in increased food resources for the deep-living L. macrurus, while low planktivore abundances have reduced predation loss, permitting L. macrurus to respond to these increases in sub-epilimnetic production.

  8. Holocene sediments within lake catchments - testing sediment delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreibrodt, S.; Bork, H.-R.

    2009-04-01

    Results of detailed investigation of soils, colluvia and lake sediments in a lake catchment in northern Germany proves that the input of eroded soil (enabled by agricultural land use) is of a minor amount compared with the storage within colluvial layers. Pre-existing micro- and meso-topography and prehistorical land use patterns as well as precipitation intensity are probable to control the Holocene flux of sediments within the lake catchment area. Therefore we entertain some doubt if sediment delivery ratios- usually applied on larger spatial scales (e. g. river catchment areas)- are useful to produce reliable quantitative data of Holocene soil erosion in central Europe.

  9. Fine-Sediment Loadings to Lake Tahoe

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over the past 35 years, a trend of decreasing water clarity has been documented in Lake Tahoe, attributable in part to the delivery of fine-grained sediments emanating from upland and channel sources. The overall objective of the research reported here was to determine the amount of fine sediment de...

  10. Anthropopression markers in lake bottom sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadolna, Anna; Nowicka, Barbara

    2014-05-01

    Lakes are vulnerable to various types of anthropogenic disturbances. Responses of lake ecosystems to environmental stressors are varied and depend not only on the type of a factor but also on the lake natural resistance to degradation. Within the EULAKES project an evaluation of anthropogenic stress extent in a flow-through, postglacial, ribbon lake (Lake Charzykowskie) was carried out. It was assumed, that this impact manifests unevenly, depending on a type and degree of the pressure on the shore zones, water quality of tributaries, lake basin shape and dynamics of a water movement. It was stated, that anthropogenic markers are substances accumulated in bottom sediments as a result of allochthonous substances inflow from the catchment and atmosphere. Along the selected transects 105 samples from the top layer of sediments (about 20 cm) was collected representing the contemporary accumulation (about 15 years). The content of selected chemical elements and compounds was examined, including nutrients (TN and TP), heavy metals (arsenic, cadmium, lead, chromium, nickel, copper, zinc, mercury, iron, and manganese) and pesticides (DDT, DDD, DDE, DMDT , γ-HCH). The research was conducted in the deepest points of each lake basin and along the research transects - while choosing the spots, the increased intensity of anthropogenic impact (ports, roads with heavy traffic, wastewater discharge zones, built-up areas) was taken into consideration. The river outlets to the lake, where there are ecotonal zones between limnic and fluvial environment, were also taken into account. Analysis of the markers distribution was carried out against the diversity of chemical characteristics of limnic sediments. Ribbon shape of the lake basin and the dominant wind direction provide an opportunity of easy water mixing to a considerable depth. Intensive waving processes cause removal of the matter from the littoral zone towards lake hollows (separated by the underwater tresholds), where the

  11. New insights on water level variability for Lake Turkana for the past 15 ka and at 150 ka from relict beaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forman, S. L.; Wright, D.

    2015-12-01

    Relict beaches adjacent to Lake Turkana provide a record of water level variability for the Late Quaternary. This study focused on deciphering the geomorphology, sedimentology, stratigraphy and 14C chronology of strand plain sequences in the Kalokol and Lothagam areas. Nine >30 m oscillations in water level were documented between ca. 15 and 4 ka. The earliest oscillation between ca. 14.5 and 13 ka is not well constrained with water level to at least 70 m above the present surface and subsequently fell to at least 50 m. Lake level increased to ~ 90 m between ca. 11.2 and 10.4 ka, post Younger Dryas cooling. Water level fell by >30 m by 10.2 ka, with another potential rise at ca. 8.5 ka to >70 m above current level. Lake level regressed by > 40 m at 8.2 ka coincident with cooling in the equatorial Eastern Atlantic Ocean. Two major >70 m lake level oscillations centered at 6.6 and 5.2 ka may reflect enhanced convection with warmer sea surface temperatures in the Western Indian Ocean. The end of the African Humid Period occurred from ca. 8.0 to 4.5 ka and was characterized by variable lake level (± > 40 m), rather than one monotonic fall in water level. This lake level variability reflects a complex response to variations in the extent and intensity of the East and West African Monsoons near geographic and topographic limits within the catchment of Lake Turkana. Also, for this closed lake basin excess and deficits in water input are amplified with a cascading lake effect in the East Rift Valley and through the Chew Bahir Basin. The final regression from a high stand of > 90 m began at. 5.2 ka and water level was below 20 m by 4.5 ka; and for the remainder of the Holocene. This sustained low stand is associated with weakening of the West African Monsoon, a shift of the mean position of Congo Air Boundary west of the Lake Turkana catchment and with meter-scale variability in lake level linked to Walker circulation across the Indian Ocean. A surprising observation is

  12. Importance of elemental mercury in lake sediments.

    PubMed

    Bouffard, Ariane; Amyot, Marc

    2009-02-01

    Mercury (Hg) redox changes in sediments are poorly studied and understood, even though they potentially control Hg availability for methylation and can alter sediment-water Hg exchange. Elemental Hg (Hg(0)) concentrations in sediments of two Canadian Shield lakes were assessed by thermodesorption. Hg(0) concentrations in sediments varied between 6.3 and 60.3 pg g(-1) (wet weight) which represented 7.4-28.4% of total mercury (HgT) concentration. Hg(0) concentrations were similar in both lakes. Hg(0) was rapidly adsorbed on sediments in controlled adsorption experiments and surface sediments sampled in summer had a stronger affinity for Hg(0) than deeper sediments and sediments sampled in fall. This adsorption was positively correlated to organic matter content and negatively related to particle grain size, pH and oxygen concentration in overlying water. This study demonstrates that Hg(0) is a prevalent species in sediments, but not in porewater, because of the high sorptive capacity of sediments towards Hg(0). Its potential availability towards Hg methylating bacteria remains to be determined. PMID:19091379

  13. Archaea in Arctic Thermokarst Lake Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matheus Carnevali, P. B.; Rohrssen, M.; Dodsworth, J. A.; Kuhn, E.; Williams, M.; Adams, H. E.; Berisford, D. F.; Hand, K. P.; Priscu, J. C.; Walter Anthony, K.; Love, G. D.; Hedlund, B. P.; Murray, A. E.

    2011-12-01

    Thermokarst lakes in the Northern Slope of Alaska are known to emit ebullient methane (CH4), some of which is of biogenic origin. Thawing of permafrost in the margins and bottom of these lakes, as a result of climate change, releases sources of carbon that could be used by methanogenic Archaea. However, the composition of Archaea inhabiting these lakes is not known. We have chosen a subset of Thermokarst lakes near Barrow Alaska to determine if there are methanogenic and methane oxidizing Archaea in these lake sediments. To describe the diversity of the archaeal community in the sediments we profiled the variable 3 (v3) region of the 16S rRNA gene of Archaea. The v3 profiles indicated surprisingly high levels of diversity, with 20 to 36 bands in the 10 sample horizons over the upper 100 cm of sediments surveyed in four lakes, at two times of the year. One of v3 rRNA gene bands was common to all lakes, and most phylotypes were grouped by depth (1-40 cm or 41-105 cm) within a lake. Likewise, cluster analysis indicated partitioning of archaeal communities between lakes. To specifically detect methanogens and anaerobic methanotrophs (ANME) in the sediments, DNA was surveyed by PCR to detect the methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) gene, which is specific to the pathways of methanogenesis and anaerobic methane oxidation (AMO). An array of methanogen enrichment cultures was also set up. The expected 464-491 bp amplification product predicted for the mcrA gene was detected in all sediment samples. Assays of enrichment cultures incubated at 2 and 10 °C with substrates used in the main pathways for methanogenesis have produced positive growth and CH4 production results. Most cultures produced CH4 from carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction with hydrogen (H2), although methanol and acetate were also utilized as methanogenic substrates by a few cultures. From the experiments conducted to date we conclude that there is a great diversity of Archaea inhabiting these Thermokarst lakes

  14. Stable carbon and oxygen isotope record of central Lake Erie sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tevesz, M.J.S.; Spongberg, A.L.; Fuller, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    Stable carbon and oxygen isotope data from mollusc aragonite extracted from sediment cores provide new information on the origin and history of sedimentation in the southwestern area of the central basin of Lake Erie. Sediments infilling the Sandusky subbasin consist of three lithologic units overlying glacial deposits. The lowest of these is a soft gray mud overlain by a shell hash layer containing Sphaerium striatinum fragments. A fluid mud unit caps the shell hash layer and extends upwards to the sediment-water interface. New stable isotope data suggest that the soft gray mud unit is of postglacial, rather than proglacial, origin. These data also suggest that the shell hash layer was derived from erosional winnowing of the underlying soft gray mud layer. This winnowing event may have occurred as a result of the Nipissing flood. The Pelee-Lorain moraine, which forms the eastern boundary of the Sandusky subbasin, is an elevated area of till capped by a sand deposit that originated as a beach. The presence of both the shell hash layer and relict beach deposit strengthens the interpretation that the Nipissing flood was a critical event in the development of the southwestern area of the central basin of Lake Erie. This event, which returned drainage from the upper lakes to the Lake Erie basin, was a dominant influence on regional stratigraphy, bathymetry, and depositional setting.

  15. Sedimentation profiles in Lake Tuscaloosa, Alabama, 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stricklin, Victor E.

    2001-01-01

    Lake Tuscaloosa, created in 1969 by the impoundment of North River, is the primary water supply for the cities of Tuscaloosa and Northport, Alabama, and surrounding areas. In 1982, 17 cross-sections were established in the principal tributaries of the lake, which include North River, Dry Creek, Turkey Creek, Binion Creek, Tierce Creek, Carroll Creek, and Brush Creek. These cross-sections were resurveyed in 1986 to determine the amount of sedimentation or scour occurring in the lake at these areas. In May 2000, 14 of the 17 cross-sections were located for resurveying to determine the amount of sedimentation or scour since 1986. The maximum amount of sediment deposition determined from the 2000 survey occurred in the upper end of the Carroll Creek tributary at cross-section CC8 (3.0 feet). The maximum amount of scour occurred in the Turkey Creek tributary at cross-section TRC2 (7.0 feet). Of the 14 cross-sections, 6 indicated increased amounts of sediment deposition, 5 indicated scouring of bottom sediments, and 3 indicated little or no change.

  16. Urban lake sediment chemistry: Lake design, runoff, and watershed impact

    SciTech Connect

    Amalfi, F.A.

    1988-01-01

    Sediments of twenty-two urban lakes and stormwater discharge into five of the impoundments were analyzed for the presence of selected metallic priority pollutants, total petroleum hydrocarbons, and volatile and extractable organic compounds. The concentration (mg/kg dry weight) ranges of metals in lake sediments were: arsenic 7-29, cadmium < 0.5-0.5, chromium 14-55, lead <1-138, selenium <0.01-1.1, silver 0.2-2.1, copper 25-2760, nickel 5-40, and zinc 33.9-239. Concentrations of total petroleum hydrocarbons ranged from 30 to 4400 mg/kg (wet weight). Organic priority pollutants detected in the urban lake impoundments included tetrachlorethylene, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, trichlorofluoromethane, phthalate esters, chloroform, and dichlorobromomethane. Stormwater runoff contained measurable quantities of arsenic, chromium, lead, selenium, copper, nickel, zinc, and petroleum hydrocarbons; whereas organic priority pollutants were not detected. Stormwater runoff pollutant loads indicated that runoff provides a significant contribution of metals and petroleum hydrocarbons to lake sediments.

  17. Relationship Between Holocene Sediment Accumulation and Lake-Volume Change in a Small Coastal Lake in Southwestern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telles, F.; Pedone, V.; George, A.

    2004-12-01

    Change in lithology in a 180-cm-long lake-center core from Lake Thetis, Western Australia serves as a proxy for change in lake volume during the Holocene. Lake Thetis is located on the coastal plain 245 km north of Perth, 1.25 km inland from the Indian Ocean. It occupies a sinkhole in middle Holocene limestone. The 300-m-diameter, steep-sided, ~2-m-deep lake has a 5-m-wide marginal terrace covered by relict and living stromatolites and a bottom covered by a thick, red-purple microbial mat. Lake elevation is not monitored, but changes noted over a 25-year period of up to 0.5 m have alternately exposed and submerged the stromatolite terrace. No hydrological study has been done to determine if the lake has a subterranean connection to the sea. Limited measurements of salinity and pH are similar to or greater than those of seawater. The laminated sediment from the core is divided into three intervals based on texture. From 0 to 45 cm, the core consists of uncompacted, red-purple, organic-rich muddy sand. Very fine-grained carbonate sand forms 50% of the sediment. This interval also contains five, lighter-colored bands, where carbonate sand forms up to 90% of the sediment. From 45 to 130 cm, the core consists of laminated red-brown, muddy, very fine sand and light-red-brown, slightly muddy medium- to fine-grained sand. The frequency of medium- to fine-grained sand layers decreases, but the layer thickness increases, upward. Carbonate grains in the thickest layers are coated with iron-oxide minerals. From 130 to 180 cm, the core consists of alternating red-brown mud, light-gray-purple mud, sandy mud, and muddy very fine sand. The carbonate sand is mostly derived from erosion of the stromatolite terrace, with minor eolian contribution from coastal-plain dunes. Therefore, the mud-dominated basal unit accumulated during a time of high lake elevation, when stromatolites were submerged and actively forming. The middle sand-dominated interval accumulated during a time of low

  18. VERTICAL MIXING OF LAKE SEDIMENTS BY TUBIFICID OLIGOCHAETES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vertical mixing of lake sediments by tubificid oligochaetes was studied in laboratory experiments by using a radioactive (cesium 137 labeled sediment) marker horizon. Results from these experiments were used to develop and test a mathematical model describing tubificid sediment m...

  19. Lake-floor sediment texture and composition of a hydrothermally-active, volcanic lake, Lake Rotomahana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittari, A.; Muir, S. L.; Hendy, C. H.

    2016-03-01

    Young volcanic lakes undergo a transition from rapid, post-eruptive accumulation of volcaniclastic sediment to slower pelagic settling under stable lake conditions, and may also be influenced by sublacustrine hydrothermal systems. Lake Rotomahana is a young (129 year-old), hydrothermally-active, volcanic lake formed after the 1886 Tarawera eruption, and provides a unique insight into the early evolution of volcanic lake systems. Lake-bottom sediment cores, 20-46 cm in length, were taken along a transect across the lake and characterised with respect to stratigraphy, facies characteristics (i.e., grain size, componentry) and pore water silica concentrations. The sediments generally comprise two widespread facies: (i) a lower facies of light grey to grey, very fine lacustrine silt derived from the unconsolidated pyroclastic deposits that mantled the catchment area immediately after the eruption, which were rapidly reworked and redeposited into the lake basin; and (ii) an upper facies of dark, fine-sandy diatomaceous silt, that settled from the pelagic zone of the physically stable lake. Adjacent to sublacustrine hydrothermal vents, the upper dark facies is absent, and the upper part of the light grey to grey silt is replaced by a third localised facies comprised of hydrothermally altered pale yellow to yellowish brown, laminated silt with surface iron-rich encrustations. Microspheres, which are thought to be composed of amorphous silica, although some may be halloysite, have precipitated from pore water onto sediment grains, and are associated with a decrease in pore water silicon concentration. Lake Rotomahana is an example of a recently-stabilised volcanic lake, with respect to sedimentation, that shows signs of early sediment silicification in the presence of hydrothermal activity.

  20. Big lake records preserved in a little lake's sediment: An example from Silver Lake, Michigan, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, T.G.; Loope, W.L.; Pierce, W.; Jol, H.M.

    2007-01-01

    We reconstruct postglacial lake-level history within the Lake Michigan basin using soil stratigraphy, ground-penetrating radar (GPR), sedimentology and 14C data from the Silver Lake basin, which lies adjacent to Lake Michigan. Stratigraphy in nine vibracores recovered from the floor of Silver Lake appears to reflect fluctuation of water levels in the Lake Michigan basin. Aeolian activity within the study area from 3,000 years (cal yr. B.P.) to the present was inferred from analysis of buried soils, an aerial photograph sequence, and GPR. Sediments in and around Silver Lake appear to contain a paleoenvironmental record that spans the entire post-glacial history of the Lake Michigan basin. We suggest that (1) a pre-Nipissing rather than a Nipissing barrier separated Silver Lake basin from the Lake Michigan basin, (2) that the Nipissing transgression elevated the water table in the Silver Lake basin about 6,500 cal yr. B.P., resulting in reestablishment of a lake within the basin, and (3) that recent dune migration into Silver Lake is associated with levels of Lake Michigan.

  1. Preliminary cross section of Englebright Lake sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, Noah P.; Hampton, Margaret A.

    2003-01-01

    Overview -- The Upper Yuba River Studies Program is a CALFED-funded, multidisciplinary investigation of the feasibility of introducing anadromous fish species to the Yuba River system upstream of Englebright Dam. Englebright Lake (Figure 1 on poster) is a narrow, 14-km-long reservoir located in the northern Sierra Nevada, northeast of Marysville, CA. The dam was completed in 1941 for the primary purpose of trapping sediment derived from mining operations in the Yuba River watershed. Possible management scenarios include lowering or removing Englebright Dam, which could cause the release of stored sediments and associated contaminants, such as mercury used extensively in 19th-century hydraulic gold mining. Transport of released sediment to downstream areas could increase existing problems including flooding and mercury bioaccumulation in sport fish. To characterize the extent, grain size, and chemistry of this sediment, a coring campaign was done in Englebright Lake in May and June 2002. More than twenty holes were drilled at 7 different locations along the longitudinal axis of the reservoir (Figure 4 on poster), recovering 6 complete sequences of post-reservoir deposition and progradation. Here, a longitudinal cross section of Englebright Lake is presented (Figure 5 on poster), including pre-dam and present-day topographic profiles, and sedimentologic sections for each coring site. This figure shows the deltaic form of the reservoir deposit, with a thick upper section consisting of sand and gravel overlying silt, a steep front, and a thinner lower section dominated by silt. The methodologies used to create the reservoir cross section are discussed in the lower part of this poster.

  2. Dynamics of suspended sediment in Lake Ontario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pluhowski, E. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The suspended sediment plumes generated by the Welland Canal and the Genesee River are identifiable in most band 5 frames received from ERTS-1. In descending order of value for plume detection in Lake Ontario are bands 4, 6, and 7. Little or no information content relative to plume detection is available in band 7. The Oswego River plume was not visible during low flow periods; however, it was identifiable immediately following storms. Increased suspended sediment loading emanating from storm runoff increases turbidity levels to the point where the plume becomes visible in the ERTS-1 imagery. Despite the fact that it is detectable from high altitude (60,000 feet) photography, the Niagara River plume was not visible in any of the ERTS-1 frames. Numerous examples of shoreline erosion were evident in the December 7, 1972, imagery of western Lake Ontario. Near shore lake circulation patterns are usually apparent whenever turbidity plumes are sensed by the satellite.

  3. [Limnology of high mountain tropical lake, in Ecuador: characteristics of sediments and rate of sedimentation].

    PubMed

    Gunkel, Günter

    2003-06-01

    Equatorial high mountain lakes are a special type of lake occurring mainly in the South American Andes as well as in Central Africa and Asia. They occur at altitudes of a few thousand meters above sea level and are cold-water lakes (< 20 degrees C). Relatively little is known about them. A long-term limnological study was therefore undertaken at Lake San Pablo, Ecuador, to analyze the basic limnological processes of the lake, which has a tendency for eutrophication. Sediment quality of San Pablo Lake is given under consideration of horizontal and vertical distribution using sediment cores. Significance of sediments for eutrophication process of lakes is demonstrated using phosphorus concentration of sediments as well as the phosphorus retention capacity of the sediments by ratio Fe/P. Dating of the sediments is done using 137Cs and 210Pb, but the activity of 137Cs in the sediment was very low nearly at the detection level. Sedimentation rate is determined to be 3.5 mm/year and the sediment cores represent about 110 years. P concentration of the sediments is high (approximately 5 g/kg dry substance), and P retention capacity by Fe is insufficient (Fe/P = 4). The sediment quality did not change significantly during the past decades, and the trophic state of San Pablo Lake was already less or more eutrophic 110 years ago. The contamination of the lake sediments by heavy metals is insignificant. PMID:15162731

  4. Microplastic pollution in lakes and lake shoreline sediments - A case study on Lake Bolsena and Lake Chiusi (central Italy).

    PubMed

    Fischer, Elke Kerstin; Paglialonga, Lisa; Czech, Elisa; Tamminga, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Rivers and effluents have been identified as major pathways for microplastics of terrestrial sources. Moreover, lakes of different dimensions and even in remote locations contain microplastics in striking abundances. This study investigates concentrations of microplastic particles at two lakes in central Italy (Lake Bolsena, Lake Chiusi). A total number of six Manta Trawls have been carried out, two of them one day after heavy winds occurred on Lake Bolsena showing effects on particle distribution of fragments and fibers of varying size categories. Additionally, 36 sediment samples from lakeshores were analyzed for microplastic content. In the surface waters 2.68 to 3.36 particles/m(3) (Lake Chiusi) and 0.82 to 4.42 particles/m(3) (Lake Bolsena) were detected, respectively. Main differences between the lakes are attributed to lake characteristics such as surface and catchment area, depth and the presence of local wind patterns and tide range at Lake Bolsena. An event of heavy winds and moderate rainfall prior to one sampling led to an increase of concentrations at Lake Bolsena which is most probable related to lateral land-based and sewage effluent inputs. The abundances of microplastic particles in sediments vary from mean values of 112 (Lake Bolsena) to 234 particles/kg dry weight (Lake Chiusi). Lake Chiusi results reveal elevated fiber concentrations compared to those of Lake Bolsena what might be a result of higher organic content and a shift in grain size distribution towards the silt and clay fraction at the shallow and highly eutrophic Lake Chiusi. The distribution of particles along different beach levels revealed no significant differences. PMID:27104923

  5. Practical Implications of Quantifying Ancient Sedimentation Rates in Lakes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sediments stored in lakes represent a valuable archive that can be used to reveal the erosion history of watersheds. A portion of the soil that is moved down gradient during runoff events is deposited in lakes, and the rate at which sediment accumulates should be proportional to the rate of erosion...

  6. MERCURY IN SEDIMENT AND FISH FROM NORTH MISSISSIPPI LAKES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediments and/or fish were collected from Sardis, Enid and Grenada Lakes, which are located in three different watersheds in North Mississippi, in order to assess mercury contamination. The mean total mercury concentration in sediments from Enid Lake in 1997 was 0.154 mg Hg/kg, w...

  7. MODELLING SEDIMENT TRANSPORT FOR THE LAKE MICHIGAN MASS BALANCE PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A sediment transport model is one component of the overall ensemble of models being developed for the Lake Michigan Mass Balance. The SEDZL model is being applied to simulate the fine-grained sediment transport in Lake Michigan for the 1982-1983 and 1994-1995 periods. Model perf...

  8. Genetic differences among several species of Tricladida from the relict Lake Ohrid as revealed by enzyme electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Sywula, Tadeusz; Krstanovski, Zdravko; Tasevska, Orhideja; Sell, Jerzy; Kretowicz, Tomasz

    2003-01-01

    Six endemic and two widely distributed species living in Lake Ohrid were studied. In general, these hermaphroditic animals displayed no signs of departure from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Genetic variation in all but one of the endemic species was of the same extent as that in geographically wide ranging invertebrates. On the other hand, the Lake Ohrid population of the common European species Dendrocoelum lacteum was monomorphic at all loci examined. D. sanctinaumi, one of the endemic species, exhibited a clear genetic subdivision into spring and littoral subpopulations. The genetic differentiation of Crenobia alpina alpina and C. a. montenigrina proved commensurable to that of well separated species from other genera. The data suggest that the separation of particular lineages in the set of Lake Ohrid endemics was widely dispersed over time. PMID:14686654

  9. Mineralization of allochthonous organic carbon in lake sediments, from lake to landscape scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudasz, C.; Ask, J.; Tranvik, L. J.; Karlsson, J.

    2012-04-01

    Lake sediments are well-recognized sites for the processing as well as sequestration of organic carbon. In particular boreal lake sediments have been recognized as important sites for the sequestration of organic carbon, comparable to soils or living biomass. Lakes in the boreal zone import large amounts of terrestrially derived organic carbon. Part of this organic carbon reaches the sediment surface through flocculation and sedimentation. The microbial processing of organic carbon represents one of the main factors that regulate the balance between sequestration of organic carbon and emission of green house gasses in boreal lake sediments. Recently, it has been shown a strong constrained microbial processing of allochthonous organic carbon in boreal lake sediments. However, a clear picture about the extent of the allochthonous organic carbon influence on the mineralization of sediment organic carbon in lakes and its significance at a large scale is currently lacking. We conducted a study, which explored the effect of allochthonous organic carbon on sediment organic carbon mineralization along a gradient of lakes characterized by increasing terrestrial organic carbon influence. We show a strong negative effect on sediment mineralization in lakes with increasing allochthonous organic carbon influence, which applies to a large number of lakes in the boreal zone.

  10. REVIEW OF HISTORICAL AND RECENT MERCURY CONCENTRATIONS IN GREAT LAKES SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediments of the Great Lakes have been impacted by inputs of mercury to the lakes. The first measurements of mercury concentrations in Great Lakes sediments were for samples collected in 1968 for Lake Ontario, 1969 for Lake Huron, 1969-70 for Lake Michigan, 1970 for Lake St. Cl...

  11. The impact of proglacial lakes on downstream sediment delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogen, Jim; Xu, Mengzhen; Kennie, Patricia

    2013-04-01

    This paper discusses the impact of proglacial lakes on sediment transport of three different glaciers: Nigardsbre, Engabre and Tunsbergdalsbre. All of these lakes were developed in modern time. The recession of the Nigardsbre uncovered a 1.8 km long and on average 15 m deep proglacial lake during the years 1937 to 1968. From that time the glacier front was situated entirely on land, and the sediment input and output to the lake were measured. Sediment samples were collected 2- 4 times a day and the water discharge was recorded. The sediment transport into and out of the lake was on average 10504 t yr-1 and 2340 t yr-1during the years 1968 - 1981. Thus, 23% remained in suspension at the outlet. In 2011 an excessively high transport of 32356 t yr-1was recorded, due to several large flash floods that year. A 1.9 km long and up to 90 m deep proglacial lake downstream from Engabre glacier was uncovered during the years 1930 - 1945. The average suspended sediment load delivered from the glacier during the years 1970 - 1981 amounted to 12375 t yr-1and the transport out of the lake was 2021 t yr-1, giving an average of 16% remaining in suspension. In 2000 the sediment transport into the lake amounted to 15450 t yr-1. For the Tunsbergdalsbre glacier, measurements in the early 1970s indicated that the suspended sediment transport was on average 44000 t yr-1. From 1987 to 1993 the recession of the glacier uncovered a proglacial lake. Downstream from this 0.3 km long and around 9 m deep lake, the suspended sediment load was measured as 28 000 t yr-1in 2009, indicating that as much as 64% remained in suspension. The various factors affecting the sedimentation rates in the proglacial lakes are discussed. The low sedimentation rate of the lake in front of the Tunsbergdalsbre was due to its limited length and depth. Hence the meltwater from the glacier maintains a high flow velocity. The lake will however increase its size as the glacier recedes. The two other lakes have gone

  12. Paleomagnetism of Lake Sediments, Chew Bahir, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, U.; Brown, M. C.; Foerster, V. E.; Schäbitz, F.

    2011-12-01

    Quasi-continuous variations of the Earth's magnetic field recorded in lake sediments can provide detailed time series describing the evolution of the geomagnetic field. To make robust conclusions about underlying geodynamo processes an improvement in the global coverage of recording sites is required. Current lake data for the late Brunhes are biased towards Europe and North America with only five studies reporting paleomagnetic results from equatorial Africa. We present inclination and relative paleointensity from Chew Bahir, southern Ethiopia; a saline mudflat located in the East African Ridge System, previously covered by a ~2000 km2 lake. Discrete measurements were made on two ten meter cores, which we continuously sub-sampled at 2 cm intervals. Calibrated AMS radiocarbon ages constrain the base of the cores to ~45 ka. NRM was demagnetized in ten steps up to 100 mT and well defined characteristic remanence directions, with MAD < 3°, were determined for the majority of specimens. Secondary components of magnetization were generally removed after alternating field demagnetization to 15 mT. Inclination is compared with previously obtained directional records from Lake Turkana, northern Kenya (~60 km to the southwest of Chew Bahir), and we discuss differences between these records. The ratio of NRM to ARM intensity at 20 mT was used as a proxy for relative paleointensity. Broad similarities in variations in relative paleointensity are seen between Chew Bahir and other globally distributed sites; most evidently through the Holocene. The magnetic mineralogy of the cores has been determined using a number of rock magnetic methods and has been used to assess the fidelity of the paleomagnetic records.

  13. Sediment oxygen profiles in a super-oxygenated antarctic lake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wharton, R. A. Jr; Meyer, M. A.; McKay, C. P.; Mancinelli, R. L.; Simmons, G. M. Jr; Wharton RA, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Perennially ice-covered lakes are found in the McMurdo Dry Valleys of southern Victoria Land, Antarctica. In contrast to temperate lakes that have diurnal photic periods, antarctic (and arctic) lakes have a yearly photic period. An unusual feature of the antarctic lakes is the occurrence of O2 at supersaturated levels in certain portions of the water column. Here we report the first sediment O2 profiles obtained using a microelectrode from a perennially ice-covered antarctic lake. Sediment cores collected in January and October 1987 from Lake Hoare in Taylor Valley show oxygenation down to 15, and in some cases, 25 cm. The oxygenation of sediments several centimeters below the sediment-water interface is atypical for lake sediments and may be characteristic of perennially ice-covered lakes. There is a significant difference between the observed January and October sediment O2 profiles. Several explanations may account for the difference, including seasonality. A time-dependent model is presented which tests the feasibility of a seasonal cycle resulting from the long photoperiod and benthic primary production in sediments overlain by a highly oxygenated water column.

  14. Varves in lake sediments - a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolitschka, Bernd; Francus, Pierre; Ojala, Antti E. K.; Schimmelmann, Arndt

    2015-06-01

    Downcore counting of laminations in varved sediments offers a direct and incremental dating technique for high-resolution climatic and environmental archives with at least annual and sometimes even seasonal resolution. The pioneering definition of varves by De Geer (1912) had been restricted to rhythmically deposited proglacial clays. One century later the meaning of 'varve' has been expanded to include all annually deposited laminae in terrestrial and marine settings. Under favourable basin configurations and environmental conditions, limnic varves are formed due to seasonality of depositional processes from the lake's water column and/or transport from the catchment area. Subsequent to deposition of topmost laminae, the physical preservation of the accumulating varved sequence requires the sustained absence of sediment mixing, for example via wave action or macrobenthic bioturbation. Individual (sub)laminae in varved lake sediments typically express contrasting colours, always differ in terms of their organic, chemical and/or mineralogical compositions, and often also differ with regard to grain-size. Various predominating climatic and depositional conditions may result in clastic, biogenic or endogenic (incl. evaporitic) varved sediments and their mixtures. To reliably establish a varve chronology, the annual character of laminations needs to be determined and verified in a multidisciplinary fashion. Sources and influences of possible errors in varve chronologies are best determined and constrained by repeated varve counts, and by including radioisotopes and correlation with historically documented events. A well-established varve chronology greatly enhances the scientific value of laminated limnic archives by securely anchoring the wealth of multi-proxy palaeoenvironmental information in the form of time-series for multidisciplinary investigations. Applications of varved records are discussed with special reference to advances since the 1980s. These span fields

  15. COVERING BOTTOM SEDIMENTS AS A LAKE RESTORATION TECHNIQUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment covering to control macrophytes and sediment nutrient release is reviewed. It is concluded that fly ash application to control sediment phosphorus release presents more dangers to the lake than benefits and should not be used. Polyethylene sheeting has not had long term ...

  16. Sedimentation in Lake Tuscaloosa, Alabama, 1982-86

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slack, L.J.; Pritchett, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    Lake Tuscaloosa, created in 1969 by the impoundment of North River, provides the primary water supply for Tuscaloosa, Alabama , and surrounding areas. This report describes the rate of sedimentation in the lake from its principal tributaries. The rate of sediment deposition in the lake is low. The maximum sediment deposition from 1982 to 1986 at 17 lake cross sections was about 3.5 feet (or 0.9 foot per year) at a cross section that received drainage from Brush Creek basin. Brush Creek is an unmined basin with steep overland and channel slopes. At 15 of the 17 cross sections, the maximum sediment deposition was less than 2 feet (or 0.5 foot per year). Scour and fill processes (redistribution of the sediment) appear to be taking place at many of the cross sections. (Author 's abstract)

  17. Geochemistry of Lake Van pore water and sediment, or How to distinguish climatic from diagenetic signals?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiecien, Ola; Tomonaga, Yama; Brennwald, Matthias S.; Randlett, Marie-Eve; Peterse, Francien; Bechtel, Achim; van der Meer, Marcel; Stockhecke, Mona; Bucher, Stefan; Anselmetti, Flavio; Litt, Thomas; Schubert, Carsten J.; Kipfer, Rolf

    2014-05-01

    Lake Van is a terminal soda lake located in a semiarid region (eastern Anatolia, Turkey). Its geographical setting makes Lake Van a superb archive of paleoenvironmental changes. One of the aims of the ICDP PALEOVAN project is the reconstruction of the hydrological and climatic variability in the eastern Mediterranean region and the Near East on glacial/interglacial and millennial time scales. We applied a multi-proxy approach to distinguish the environmental synsedimentary imprint and the postsedimentary diagenetic changes. Microfaunal evidence, carbonate isotopic composition (d18O, d13C), molecular proxies (BIT, ACE) and isotopic composition of lipid biomarkers (dD) are matched with isotopic and elemental composition (d18O, dD, Mg, Ca, Sr, Cl, salinity) of sediment pore-water. An excellent correspondence between these proxies indicates that the elemental composition of pore water in Lake Van does not result from diagenetic changes, but, unlike in many cases known from marine environment, represents to some extent relicts of 'paleolake-water'. On the contrary, the stable isotopic composition of the pore water (d18O, dD) seems to reflect more recent hydrological regime dominated by precipitation/evaporation changes. As salinity and chlorine concentration changes mimic the isotopic composition of biomarkers for the last 140 ka, we use pore-water data to quantify changes in the lake level. Our reconstruction (Tomonaga et al., in review) is in line with previous studies on lake terraces (Kuzucuoglu et al., 2010) and seismic surveys (Cukur et al., 2012) showing a major transgression of up to 105 m with respect to the current lake level during the last interglacial (MIS5e), and a major regression of ~145 m at ~30 ka BP during the last glacial. Kuzucuoglu et al. (2010) Formation of the Upper Pleistocene terraces of Lake Van (Turkey). Journal of Quaternary Science 25, 1124-1137. Cukur et al. (2012) Sedimentary evolution of Lake Van (Eastern Turkey) reconstructed from high

  18. Enrichment of metals in the surface sediments of Sapanca Lake

    SciTech Connect

    Bakan, G.; Balkas, T.I.

    1999-01-01

    A comprehensive lake sediment study was performed on the Sapanca Lake of Turkey in which certain metal analyses were conducted using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. The purpose of the study was to find the enrichment of metals in the surface sediments of Sapanca Lake. A method, namely, the index of geoaccumulation, was used to define the degree of anthropogenic pollution in the Sapanca Lake basin. Results of the geoaccumulation index indicate that only enrichments of trace metals, cadmium, and lead are found.

  19. Dark Carbon Fixation: An Important Process in Lake Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Ana Lúcia; Bastviken, David; Gudasz, Cristian; Tranvik, Lars; Enrich-Prast, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Close to redox boundaries, dark carbon fixation by chemoautotrophic bacteria may be a large contributor to overall carbon fixation. Still, little is known about the relative importance of this process in lake systems, in spite the potentially high chemoautotrophic potential of lake sediments. We compared rates of dark carbon fixation, bacterial production and oxygen consumption in sediments from four Swedish boreal and seven tropical Brazilian lakes. Rates were highly variable and dark carbon fixation amounted up to 80% of the total heterotrophic bacterial production. The results indicate that non-photosynthetic carbon fixation can represent a substantial contribution to bacterial biomass production, especially in sediments with low organic matter content. PMID:23776549

  20. /sup 137/Cs radioactive dating of Lake Ontario sediment cores

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, T.E.; Breeden, J.; Komisarcik, K.; Porter, R.; Czuczwa, J.; Kaminski, R.; McVeety, B.D.

    1987-12-01

    The distribution of /sup 137/Cs in sediment cores from Lake Ontario provides estimates of the sediment accumulation rates. Geochronology with /sup 210/Pb dating and distribution of Ambrosia (ragweed) pollen compare well with /sup 137/Cs dating. These methods can determine with precision, changes in sedimentation occurring over the past 100 years or so. Typical sedimentation rates of 0.18-0.36 cm/yr were measured. 16 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Isotopic fingerprints of anthropogenic molybdenum in lake sediments.

    PubMed

    Chappaz, Anthony; Lyons, Timothy W; Gordon, Gwyneth W; Anbar, Ariel D

    2012-10-16

    We measured the molybdenum isotope compositions (δ(98)Mo) of well-dated sediment cores from two lakes in eastern Canada in an effort to distinguish between natural and anthropogenic contributions to these freshwater aquatic systems. Previously, Chappaz et al. (1) ascribed pronounced 20th-century Mo concentration enrichments in these lakes to anthropogenic inputs. δ(98)Mo values in the deeper sediments (reflecting predominantly natural Mo sources) differ dramatically between the two lakes: -0.32 ± 0.17‰ for oxic Lake Tantare and +0.64 ± 0.09‰ for anoxic Lake Vose. Sediment layers previously identified as enriched in anthropogenic Mo, however, reveal significant δ(98)Mo shifts of ± 0.3‰, resulting in isotopically heavier values of +0.05 ± 0.18‰ in Lake Tantare and lighter values of +0.31 ± 0.03‰ in Lake Vose. We argue that anthropogenic Mo modifies the isotopic composition of the recent sediments, and we determine δ(98)Mo(anthropogenic) values of 0.1 ± 0.1‰ (Lake Vose) and 0.2 ± 0.2‰ (Lake Tantare). These calculated inputs are consistent with the δ(98)Mo of molybdenite (MoS(2)) likely delivered to the lakes via smelting of porphyry copper deposits (Lake Vose) or through combustion of coal and oil also containing Mo (Lake Tantare). Our results confirm the utility of Mo isotopes as a promising fingerprint of human impacts and perhaps the specific sources of contamination. Importantly, the magnitudes of the anthropogenic inputs are large enough, relative to the natural Mo cycles in each lake, to have an impact on the microbiological communities. PMID:22970917

  2. Bioturbation enhances the aerobic respiration of lake sediments in warming lakes

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    While lakes occupy less than 2% of the total surface of the Earth, they play a substantial role in global biogeochemical cycles. For instance, shallow lakes are important sites of carbon metabolism. Aerobic respiration is one of the important drivers of the carbon metabolism in lakes. In this context, bioturbation impacts of benthic animals (biological reworking of sediment matrix and ventilation of the sediment) on sediment aerobic respiration have previously been underestimated. Biological activity is likely to change over the course of a year due to seasonal changes of water temperatures. This study uses microcosm experiments to investigate how the impact of bioturbation (by Diptera, Chironomidae larvae) on lake sediment respiration changes when temperatures increase. While at 5°C, respiration in sediments with and without chironomids did not differ, at 30°C sediment respiration in microcosms with 2000 chironomids per m2 was 4.9 times higher than in uninhabited sediments. Our results indicate that lake water temperature increases could significantly enhance lake sediment respiration, which allows us to better understand seasonal changes in lake respiration and carbon metabolism as well as the potential impacts of global warming. PMID:27484649

  3. Bioturbation enhances the aerobic respiration of lake sediments in warming lakes.

    PubMed

    Baranov, Viktor; Lewandowski, Jörg; Krause, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    While lakes occupy less than 2% of the total surface of the Earth, they play a substantial role in global biogeochemical cycles. For instance, shallow lakes are important sites of carbon metabolism. Aerobic respiration is one of the important drivers of the carbon metabolism in lakes. In this context, bioturbation impacts of benthic animals (biological reworking of sediment matrix and ventilation of the sediment) on sediment aerobic respiration have previously been underestimated. Biological activity is likely to change over the course of a year due to seasonal changes of water temperatures. This study uses microcosm experiments to investigate how the impact of bioturbation (by Diptera, Chironomidae larvae) on lake sediment respiration changes when temperatures increase. While at 5°C, respiration in sediments with and without chironomids did not differ, at 30°C sediment respiration in microcosms with 2000 chironomids per m(2) was 4.9 times higher than in uninhabited sediments. Our results indicate that lake water temperature increases could significantly enhance lake sediment respiration, which allows us to better understand seasonal changes in lake respiration and carbon metabolism as well as the potential impacts of global warming. PMID:27484649

  4. Cesium-137 and mercury contamination in lake sediments.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, T; Ueno, T; Chandradjith, R L; Amano, H; Okumura, M; Hashitani, H

    1999-07-01

    The contribution of fluvial discharge and global fallout of 137Cs and mercury to sedimentation fluxes in Lake Shinji and Lake Nakaumi, Japan, was studied. The fluvial flux through soil erosion accounted for 11 to 27% of accumulated 137Cs in the sediments in the 1950's and 1960's, which were the periods of the most extensive atmospheric input, and for 90 to 100% in the 1990's. The vertical profiles of mercury concentrations in the lake sediments studied showed a maximum between 1959 and 1963, which was originated mostly from the extensive use of mercury-agrochemicals in paddyfields of the watershed in the past. These findings are representative examples of long-term contamination of lake sediments caused by the contaminated ground soil erosion. PMID:10399844

  5. Spatial Patterns Study for Sediments from Lake Michigan

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurately understanding the distribution of sediment measurements within large water bodies such as Lake Michigan is critical for modeling and understanding of carbon, nitrogen, silica and phosphorus dynamics. Several water quality models have been formulated and applied to the ...

  6. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in lake sediments from the High Tatras.

    PubMed

    van Drooge, Barend L; López, Jordi; Fernández, Pilar; Grimalt, Joan O; Stuchlík, Evzen

    2011-05-01

    European alpine lake systems are used as indicators of air quality over the continent. Preliminary data showed high polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) loads in the High Tatras (Eastern Europe) in comparison to other mountain regions. Here, insight on the spatial distribution of PAH is provided from analysis of top-core sediments of 27 alpine lakes distributed along the High Tatras. Top-core sediment concentrations were higher than those in deep-cores, and they were higher than those observed in other European high mountain regions. The PAH profiles were uniform and comparable to those observed in aerosols and snow, indicating that atmospheric deposition was the predominant PAH input pathway to the lakes. Good agreement between estimated atmospheric deposition and sedimentation fluxes was observed. However, in several lakes in the western range higher sediment fluxes may correspond to higher PAH depositions levels. The higher concentrations may also reflect inputs from potential emission source areas. PMID:21353356

  7. Microbial Diversity in Water and Sediment of Lake Chaka, an Athalassohaline Lake in Northwestern China

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hongchen; Dong, Hailiang; Zhang, Gengxin; Yu, Bingsong; Chapman, Leah R.; Fields, Matthew W.

    2006-01-01

    We employed culture-dependent and -independent techniques to study microbial diversity in Lake Chaka, a unique hypersaline lake (32.5% salinity) in northwest China. It is situated at 3,214 m above sea level in a dry climate. The average water depth is 2 to 3 cm. Halophilic isolates were obtained from the lake water, and halotolerant isolates were obtained from the shallow sediment. The isolates exhibited resistance to UV and gamma radiation. Microbial abundance in the sediments ranged from 108 cells/g at the water-sediment interface to 107 cells/g at a sediment depth of 42 cm. A major change in the bacterial community composition was observed across the interface. In the lake water, clone sequences affiliated with the Bacteroidetes were the most abundant, whereas in the sediments, sequences related to low G+C gram-positive bacteria were predominant. A similar change was also present in the archaeal community. While all archaeal clone sequences in the lake water belonged to the Halobacteriales, the majority of the sequences in the sediments were related to those previously obtained from methanogenic soils and sediments. The observed changes in the microbial community structure across the water-sediment interface were correlated with a decrease in salinity from the lake water (32.5%) to the sediments (approximately 4%). Across the interface, the redox state also changed from oxic to anoxic and may also have contributed to the observed shift in the microbial community. PMID:16751487

  8. Purines and pyrimidines in sediments from lake erie.

    PubMed

    Van Der Velden, W; Schwartz, A W

    1974-08-23

    Quantitative analyses of purines and pyrimidines in sequential sections of cores from the central and eastern basins of Lake Erie show steeply increasing concentrations in the youngest sediments. This may be related to increased loading of nutrients and recent cultural eutrophication of the lake. The purine and pyrimidine distributions suggest the operation of a specific degradative process for uracil at an extremely early stage in, or prior to, sediment formation. PMID:17736373

  9. Seasonal variations in pore water and sediment geochemistry of littoral lake sediments (Asylum Lake, MI, USA)

    PubMed Central

    Koretsky, Carla M; Haas, Johnson R; Miller, Douglas; Ndenga, Noah T

    2006-01-01

    Background Seasonal changes in pore water and sediment redox geochemistry have been observed in many near-surface sediments. Such changes have the potential to strongly influence trace metal distribution and thus create seasonal fluctuations in metal mobility and bioavailability. Results Seasonal trends in pore water and sediment geochemistry are assessed in the upper 50 cm of littoral kettle lake sediments. Pore waters are always redox stratified, with the least compressed redox stratification observed during fall and the most compressed redox stratification observed during summer. A 2-step sequential sediment extraction yields much more Fe in the first step, targeted at amorphous Fe(III) (hydr)oxides (AEF), then in the second step, which targets Fe(II) monosulfides. Fe extracted in the second step is relatively invariant with depth or season. In contrast, AEF decreases with sediment depth, and is seasonally variable, in agreement with changes in redox stratification inferred from pore water profiles. A 5-step Tessier extraction scheme was used to assess metal association with operationally-defined exchangeable, carbonate, iron and manganese oxide (FMO), organic/sulfide and microwave-digestible residual fractions in cores collected during winter and spring. Distribution of metals in these two seasons is similar. Co, As, Cd, and U concentrations approach detection limits. Fe, Cu and Pb are mostly associated with the organics/sulfides fraction. Cr and Zn are mostly associated with FMO. Mn is primarily associated with carbonates, and Co is nearly equally distributed between the FMO and organics/sulfide fractions. Conclusion This study clearly demonstrates that near-surface lake sediment pore water redox stratification and associated solid phase geochemistry vary significantly with season. This has important ramifications for seasonal changes in the bioavailability and mobility of trace elements. Without rate measurements, it is not possible to quantify the

  10. Lake Michigan sediment lead storage and history of loads

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dated sediment box cores collected in 1994-1996 from 52 locations in Lake Michigan were analyzed for to access storage, trends, and loading history of lead. The results of this study provide information of historic lead loads to the lake for a time period for which no other info...

  11. ARSENIC SEDIMENTATION ALONG THE SLOPE OF A LAKE BASIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lake Lansing, Michigan was treated with sodium arsenite for macrophyte control in 1957. even 1.5-m sediment cores were taken along a line through the littoral zone to the deepest portion of the lake and analyzed for arsenic. n each core, arsenic concentrations going from the surf...

  12. Holocene Tephrochronology from Lake Sediments, Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiff, C. J.; Kaufman, D. S.; Wallace, K. L.

    2006-12-01

    Lake sediments in volcanically active areas provide a geological archive of tephra-fall events because sedimentation often occurs continuously and organic material for 14C dating is commonly available; lake sediments, therefore, contain valuable information about tephra fall and associated hazards. Recovering tephra-fall records from lakes requires careful site selection, core recovery, and tephra age assignments. A 5.6-m-long lake sediment core from Bear Lake, Alaska, located 22 km southeast of Redoubt Volcano, contains 67 tephra layers deposited over the last ca. 8750 cal yr BP. A previous core taken from a shallow site at Bear Lake contains 38 tephra layers suggesting that a deeper site in lakes provides a more complete sediment record as shallow sites are susceptible to remobilization and have lower sedimentation rates. We use 12 AMS 14C ages, along with the 137Cs and 210Pb activities of the top 8.5 cm of sediment, to evaluate different models to determine the age-depth relation of sediment, and to determine the age of each tephra deposit. The selected age model is based on a cubic smooth spline function that was passed through the adjusted tephra-free depth of each dated layer; the age model provides an example of how best to date lake sediment in a volcanically active area where presumably instantaneous tephra deposition compounds a simple age-depth relationship. Using the age model we find that tephra-fall frequency at Bear Lake was among the highest during the past ~500 yr, with eight tephras deposited compared to an average of 3.7 per 500 yr over the last 8500 yr. Other periods of increased tephra fall occurred ca. 2500-3500, 4500-5000, and 7000-7500 cal yr BP. Our record suggests that Bear Lake experienced extended periods (1000-2000 yr) of increased tephra fall between shorter periods (500-1000 yr) of quiescence. The Bear Lake sediment core affords the most comprehensive tephrochronology from the base of the Redoubt Volcano to date, with an average

  13. Identification of bacterial communities in sediments of Poyang Lake, the largest freshwater lake in China.

    PubMed

    Kou, Wenbo; Zhang, Jie; Lu, Xinxin; Ma, Yantian; Mou, Xiaozhen; Wu, Lan

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria play a vital role in various biogeochemical processes in lacustrine sediment ecosystems. This study is among the first to investigate the spatial distribution patterns of bacterial community composition in the sediments of Poyang Lake, the largest freshwater lake of China. Sediment samples were collected from the main basins and mouths of major rivers that discharge into the Poyang Lake in May 2011. Quantitative PCR assay and pyrosequencing analysis of 16S rRNA genes showed that the bacteria community abundance and compositions of Poyang Lake sediment varied largely among sampling sites. A total of 25 phyla and 68 bacterial orders were distinguished. Burkholderiales, Gallionellales (Beta-proteobacteria), Myxococcales, Desulfuromonadales (Delta-proteobacteria), Sphingobacteriales (Bacteroidetes), Nitrospirales (Nitrospirae), Xanthomonadales (Gamma-proteobacteria) were identified as the major taxa and collectively accounted for over half of annotated sequences. Moreover, correlation analyses suggested that higher loads of total phosphorus and heavy metals (copper, zinc and cadmium) could enhance bacterial abundance in the sediment. PMID:27047727

  14. Evaluation of micro-organic pollution in lake sediments: application to Akanoi Bay, Lake Biwa, Japan.

    PubMed

    Shimzu, Y; Matsui, S; Harada, J

    2003-07-01

    The pollution of lake sediments by organic micro-pollutants has been of growing environmental concern due to their suspected long-term effects on both human health and the surrounding ecosystem. In this research, in order to investigate and evaluate the micro-organic pollution in lake sediments, an analytical methodology consisting of freeze-drying, Soxhlet extraction with dichloromethane, concentration by rotary-evaporator, purification and fractionation by Sep-pak florigil cartridge, and quantification by GC/MS was formulated and applied to the lake sediments of Akanoi Bay, Lake Biwa in Japan. Two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) (i.e., fluoranthene and pyrene) were detected in the collected sediment samples. Based on the horizontal distribution of these two PAHs and the particle size distribution of the sediment samples, it was considered that the river inflows (the land usage in their upstream is mainly paddy field andresidential) into the bay are the major pollution sources. PMID:12916840

  15. Small ecosystem engineers as important regulators of lake's sediment respiration.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, Victor; Lewandowski, Joerg; Krause, Stefan; Romeijn, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Although shallow lakes are covering only about 1.5% of the land surface of the Earth, they are responsible for sequestration of carbon amounts similar or even larger than those sequestered in all marine sediments. One of the most important drivers of the carbon sequestration in lakes is sediment respiration. Especially in shallow lakes, bioturbation, i.e. the biogenic reworking of the sediment matrix and the transport of fluids within the sediment, severely impacts on sediment respiration. Widespread freshwater bioturbators such as chironomid larvae (Diptera, Chironomidae) are building tubes in the sediment and actively pump water through their burrows (ventilation). In the present work we study how different organism densities and temperatures (5-30°C) impact on respiration rates. In a microcosm experiment the bioreactive resazurin/resorufin smart tracer system was applied for quantifying the impacts of different densities of Chironomidae (Diptera) larvae (0, 1000, 2000 larvae/m2) on sediment respiration. Tracer transformation rates (and sediment respiration) were correlated with larval densities with highest transformation rates occurring in microcosms with highest larval densities. Respiration differences between defaunated sediment and sediment with 1000 and 2000 larvae per m2 was insignificant at 5 °C, and was progressively increasing with rising temperatures. At 30 °C respiration rates of sediment with 2000 larvae per m2 was 4.8 times higher than those of defaunated sediment. We interpret this as an effect of temperature on larval metabolic and locomotory activity. Furthermore, bacterial communities are benefiting from the combination of the high water temperatures and bioirrigation as bacterial community are able to maintain high metabolic rates due to oxygen supplied by bioirrigation. In the context of global climate change that means that chironomid ecosystem engineering activity will have a profound and increasing impact on lake sediment respiration

  16. AGGREGATION AND DISAGGREGATION OF FINE-GRAINED LAKE SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of fluid shear and sedimentation concentration on the aggregation, and especially disaggregation, of fine-grained sediments in lake waters continues to be an important research area. It has been shown in previous studies that the steady-state median floc size decrease...

  17. Mississippi oxbow lake sediment quality during an artificial flood

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface sediment quality was assessed during a 35-day artificial flood in a shallow (<1.5 m) oxbow lake along the Coldwater River, Mississippi, using Hyalella azteca 28-day bioassays. Seventeen pesticides were monitored in sediments before, during and after flooding, with increases in atrazine and ...

  18. The Stratification Analysis of Sediment Data for Lake Michigan

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research paper describes the development of spatial statistical tools that are applied to investigate the spatial trends of sediment data sets for nutrients and carbon in Lake Michigan. All of the sediment data utilized in the present study was collected over a two year per...

  19. EARLY DIAGENESIS AND CHEMICAL MASS TRANSFER IN LAKE ERIE SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vertical profiles of pore water and sediment solids chemistry were obtained from two sites in Lake Erie. Samples were collected using both gravity coring and pore water 'peeper' techniques. In general, concentrations of nutrients and toxic metals in sediment solids decreased with...

  20. Sediment Transport and Water Quality Model of Cedar Lake, Indiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, S. C.; Jones, C. A.; Roberts, J. D.; Ahlmann, M.; Bucaro, D. A.

    2006-12-01

    The EPA-supported Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code, EFDC, is used to model hydrodynamics, sediment transport, and water quality in coastal regions, estuaries, rivers, and lakes. However, the empirical formulations used for sediment transport are not always adequate to accurately characterize cohesive sediment erosion and transport. New sediment transport subroutines have been incorporated into EFDC and the new model is called SNL-EFDC. The updated model provides an improved, coupled hydrodynamics, sediment transport, and water quality framework. The newly incorporated sediment transport subroutines facilitate direct use of measured erosion rate data from the Sediment Erosion with Depth Flume (SEDflume). Erosion rates are included as functions of both depth within the sediment bed and applied shear stresses. This bypasses problems associated with empirical erosion formulations often based on disaggregated particle size. Restoration alternatives are under consideration for Cedar Lake in Indiana and SNL-EFDC models its hydrodynamics, sediment transport, and water quality. The water quality model as implemented on Cedar Lake tracks algae, oxygen, temperature, carbon, phosphorous, and nitrogen kinetics, as well as, sediment bed diagenesis. Environmental conditions, wind, temperature, rainfall, and sunlight, were based on data collected in 2005. Tributary loading was modeled using L-THIA and provided influxes of water, nutrients (phosphorous, nitrogen, etc.), and sediments. The calibrated model was used to simulate a nine month period from March to November 2005. Results suggest that the model simulates sediments transport and associated water quality correctly. The calibrated model is being used to evaluate several restoration measures throughout the lake and watershed and their effect on water quality. Because Cedar Lake is a nitrogen limited lake, changes in the level of eutrophication from each measure are being tracked by calculating the Carlson trophic state index

  1. Sediment Deposition into a Valley-Margin Lake in a Managed Floodplain, Catahoula Lake, Louisiana, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keim, R.; Latuso, K.; DeLaune, R. D.; Weindorf, D. C.

    2014-12-01

    Sediment sources to valley-margin lakes vary spatially and temporally depending on relative dominance of the main or tributary rivers. Catahoula Lake is the largest valley-margin lake in the lower Mississippi River Alluvial Valley and is hydrologically influenced by backwaters of the Mississippi and Red rivers and headwaters of the Little River. Our objective was to understand effects of hydrological management of the floodplain and the lake itself on lake sediments and recent changes in vegetation. Comparison of 137Cs profiles with prior 210Pb and 14C profiles indicates the recent deposition rate has been low (0.3 cm/yr) but triple that prior to settlement. Sediment chemistry profiles indicate dominance of acidic coastal-plain sediments from the tributary Little River in the past ~60 yr, but spatially mixed influence of acidic and neutral, Mississippi-Red sediments prior to that. We conclude that a century of increasing hydrologic management of the Mississippi and Red rivers has disconnected Catahoula Lake from their sedimentary influence and that the consequent change in chemical composition of surficial sediments may be contributing to ecologic changes in the lake.

  2. Jellyfish Lake, Palau: early diagenesis of organic matter in sediments of an anoxic marine lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orem, W.H.; Burnett, W.C.; Landing, W.M.; Lyons, W.B.; Showers, W.

    1991-01-01

    The major postdepositional change in the sedimentary organic matter is carbohydrate biodegradation. Lignin and aliphatic substances are preserved in the sediments. Dissolved organic matter in pore waters is primarily composed of carbohydrates, reflecting the degradation of sedimentary carbohydrates. Rate constants for organic carbon degradation and sulfate reduction in sediments of the lake are about 10?? lower than in other anoxic sediments. This may reflect the vascular plant source and partly degraded nature of the organic matter reaching the sediments of the lake. -from Authors

  3. Lake Hoare, Antarctica: sedimentation through a thick perennial ice cover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squyres, S. W.; Andersen, D. W.; Nedell, S. S.; Wharton, R. A. Jr; Wharton RA, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1991-01-01

    Lake Hoare in the Dry Valleys of Antarctica is covered with a perennial ice cover more than 3 m thick, yet there is a complex record of sedimentation and of growth of microbial mats on the lake bottom. Rough topography on the ice covering the lake surface traps sand that is transported by the wind. In late summer, vertical conduits form by melting and fracturing, making the ice permeable to both liquid water and gases. Cross-sections of the ice cover show that sand is able to penetrate into and apparently through it by descending through these conduits. This is the primary sedimentation mechanism in the lake. Sediment traps retrieved from the lake bottom indicate that rates of deposition can vary by large amounts over lateral scales as small as 1 m. This conclusion is supported by cores taken in a 3 x 3 grid with a spacing of 1.5 m. Despite the close spacing of the cores, the poor stratigraphic correlation that is observed indicates substantial lateral variability in sedimentation rate. Apparently, sand descends into the lake from discrete, highly localized sources in the ice that may in some cases deposit a large amount of sand into the lake in a very short time. In some locations on the lake bottom, distinctive sand mounds have been formed by this process. They are primary sedimentary structures and appear unique to the perennially ice-covered lacustrine environment. In some locations they are tens of centimetres high and gently rounded with stable slopes; in others they reach approximately 1 m in height and have a conical shape with slopes at angle of repose. A simple formation model suggests that these differences can be explained by local variations in water depth and sedimentation rate. Rapid colonization of fresh sand surfaces by microbial mats composed of cyanobacteria, eukaryotic algae, and heterotrophic bacteria produces a complex intercalation of organic and sandy layers that are a distinctive form of modern stromatolites.

  4. Protocol to Reconstruct Historical Contaminant Loading to Large Lakes: The Lake Michigan Sediment Record of Mercury

    EPA Science Inventory

    Samples of opportunity from Pb-210 dated sediment cores collected from Lake Michigan between 1994 and 1996 were analyzed for mercury. The storage of both anthropogenic and total (post-1850) mercury in the lake was calculated to be 186 and 228 metric tons, respectively. By setti...

  5. Chitinase genes in lake sediments of Ardley Island, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiang; Yin, Xuebin; Lin, Jian; Sun, Liguang; You, Ziyong; Wang, Peng; Wang, Fengping

    2005-12-01

    A sediment core spanning approximately 1,600 years was collected from a lake on Ardley Island, Antarctica. The sediment core had been greatly influenced by penguin guano. Using molecular methods, the chitinolytic bacterial community along the sediment core was studied over its entire length. Primers targeting conserved sequences of the catalytic domains of family 18 subgroup A chitinases detected group A chitinases from a wide taxonomic range of bacteria. Using quantitative competitive PCR (QC-PCR), chitinase gene copies in each 1-cm section of the whole sediment column were quantified. QC-PCR determination of the chitinase gene copies indicated significant correlation with phosphorus and total organic carbon concentration, suggesting a historical connection between chitinase gene copies and the amount of penguin guano input into the lake sediment. Most of the chitinase genes cloned from the historic sediment core were novel. Analysis of the chitinase gene diversity in selected sediment layers and in the fresh penguin deposits indicated frequent shifts in the chitinolytic bacterial community over time. Sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA genes of chitinolytic bacteria isolated from the lake sediment revealed that the isolates belonged to Janthinobacterium species, Stenotrophomonas species of gamma-Proteobacteria, Cytophaga species of the Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides group, and Streptomyces and Norcardiopsis species of Actinobacteria. Chitinase gene fragments were cloned and sequenced from these cultivated chitinolytic bacteria. The phylogeny of the chitinase genes obtained from the isolates did not correspond well to that of the isolates, suggesting acquisition via horizontal gene transfer. PMID:16332766

  6. Temperature sensitivity of organic carbon mineralization in contrasting lake sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudasz, Cristian; Sobek, Sebastian; Bastviken, David; Koehler, Birgit; Tranvik, Lars J.

    2015-07-01

    Temperature alone explains a great amount of variation in sediment organic carbon (OC) mineralization. Studies on decomposition of soil OC suggest that (1) temperature sensitivity differs between the fast and slowly decomposition OC and (2) over time, decreasing soil respiration is coupled with increase in temperature sensitivity. In lakes, autochthonous and allochthonous OC sources are generally regarded as fast and slowly decomposing OC, respectively. Lake sediments with different contributions of allochthonous and autochthonous components, however, showed similar temperature sensitivity in short-term incubation experiments. Whether the mineralization of OC in lake sediments dominated by allochthonous or autochthonous OC has different temperature sensitivity in the longer term has not been addressed. We incubated sediments from two boreal lakes that had contrasting OC origin (allochthonous versus autochthonous), and OC characteristics (C/N ratios of 21 and 10) at 1, 3, 5, 8, 13, and 21°C for five months. Compared to soil and litter mineralization, sediment OC mineralization rates were low in spite of low apparent activation energy (Ea). The fraction of the total OC pool that was lost during five months varied between 0.4 and 14.8%. We estimate that the sediment OC pool not becoming long-term preserved was degraded with average apparent turnover times between 3 and 32 years. While OC mineralization was strongly dependent on temperature as well as on OC composition and origin, temperature sensitivity was similar across lakes and over time. We suggest that the temperature sensitivity of OC mineralization in lake sediments is similar across systems within the relevant seasonal scales of OC supply and degradation.

  7. Mercury empirical relationships in sediments from three Ontario lakes.

    PubMed

    Ethier, A L M; Scheuhammer, A M; Blais, J M; Paterson, A M; Mierle, G; Ingram, R; Lean, D R S

    2010-04-01

    Total mercury (THg), methyl mercury (MeHg), total organic carbon (TOC), sediment bulk density (SBD), redox potential (Eh) and percent fines measurements were made on sediment cores collected along transects from littoral to profundal depths in Harp, Dickie, and Blue Chalk lake located on the Canadian Shield near Dorset, Ontario, Canada to determine whether empirical relationships exist among these sediment properties. MeHg was positively correlated with THg in all sediments with a MeHg:THg ratio (0.004+/-0.004) comparable to other uncontaminated profundal lakes. MeHg, MeHg:THg and TOC decreased with sediment depth within the core for all lakes, whereas THg only showed a decrease in Harp Lake. MeHg:THg ratio in surficial sediments was positively correlated with Eh and negatively correlated with TOC [MeHg:THg=-0.009 TOC (%)+0.001 Eh (mV)-1.902, p=0.026]; whereas THg was positively correlated with TOC [log THg (ppb)=0.026 TOC (%)+1.400, p<0.0001]. PMID:20138650

  8. Morphology and Sediment Transport Dynamics of the Selenga River Delta, Lake Baikal, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, T. Y.; Il'icheva, L.; Nittrouer, J. A.; Pavolv, M.

    2013-12-01

    elevation for ~60% of the delta above the modern flood stage. Progressing down the delta axis, however, there is a steady lowering of the terraces, and the downstream portion of the delta (~40% of the delta proximal to the lake) is regularly inundated by flood water. This portion of the delta therefore defines where modern development and aggradation is occurring. Using field measurements, a simple 1-D morphodynamic model is developed to calculate an annual sediment budget for the Selenga River, thus estimating sediment delivery to the delta. This model also helps define where important sediment grain size transition regions occur in relation to channel bifurcations. Overall, the Selenga delta represents a unique end-member compared to other delta systems worldwide, because the Selenga delta is undergoing an active phase of regression, occurring as a result of either a relative base level fall, or perhaps reduced sediment supply relative to transport capacity. This delta phase produces substantial local sediment sourcing through erosion of relict (terraced) delta deposits, and this cannibalization process exerts important morphological controls on the modern morphology and stratigraphy.

  9. Geochemistry of sediments in cores and sediment traps from Bear Lake, Utah and Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bischoff, James L.; Cummins, Kathleen; Shamp, Donald D.

    2005-01-01

    The present study of Bear Lake began in 1998. Initially, the study utilized sediments from three long cores (up to 5 m) previously collected in 1996 and short cores (up to 40 cm) collected in 1998. The short cores were specifically acquired to preserve the uppermost layers of sediment that may have been lost in the long cores. In addition, three arrays of sediment traps were deployed during the summer of 1998, and sediment from these traps was collected during the summers of 1999 and 2000 (see Dean and others, 2005, for core and sediment trap locations). The cores and sediment traps were sampled, and splits were distributed to various investigators for analyses of a wide variety of sediment parameters. The chemical composition of the acid-soluble component of the sediments is presented in this report. HCl or HNO3 treatment of the sediment quantitatively dissolves the authigenic component of the sediment, a component that includes carbonates, sulfates, and iron-mono sulfides. In the case of Bear Lake, CaCO3 is the major component of the sediment today and for most of the Holocene (Dean and others 2005). The chemical composition of the acid-soluble fraction gives important information on this component and, therefore, insight into the chemical conditions of the lake at the time of carbonate deposition.

  10. Modern processes of sediment formation in Lake Towuti, Indonesia, as derived from the composition of lake surface sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasberg, Ascelina; Melles, Martin; Morlock, Marina; Vogel, Hendrik; Russel, James M.; Bijaksana, Satria

    2016-04-01

    In summer 2015, a drilling operation funded by the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) was conducted at Lake Towuti (2.75°S, 121.5°E), the largest tectonically formed lake (surface area: 561 km²) of the Republic Indonesia. The Towuti Drilling Project (TDP) recovered more than 1000 meters of sediment core from three sites. At all three sites replicate cores down to 133, 154, and 174 m below lake floor have penetrated the entire lake sediment record, which is expected to comprise the past ca. 650.000 years continuously. Lake Towutís sediment record thus can provide unique information for instance concerning the climatic and environmental history in the Indo-Pacific-Warm-Pool (IPWP) and concerning the evolutionary biology in SE Asia. For a better understanding of the palaeoenvironmental proxies to be analyzed on the drill cores, the modern processes of sediment formation in the lake and in its catchment - under known environmental conditions - were investigated on a set of 84 lake sediment surface samples. Sampling was conducted by grab sampler (UWITEC Corp., Austria) in a grid of 1 to 4 km resolution that covers the entire lake. The samples were analyzed for inorganic geochemical composition (XRF powder scans and ICP-MS), magnetic susceptibility (Kappabridge), grain-size distribution (laser scanner), biogenic components (smear-slide analyses), biogenic silica contents (leaching), and carbonate, total organic carbon (TOC), nitrogen (TN), and sulfur (TS) concentrations (elemental analyzer). The sediments close to the lake shores and in front of the major river inlets are characterized by mean grain sizes coarser than average and high magnetic susceptibilities presented by high ratios of Cr, Ni, Co, and Zr. This reflects higher energies due to wave action and fluvial sediment supply, as well as the occurrence of magnetic minerals particularly in the sand and gravel fractions of the sediments. In regions of deeper waters and more distal to

  11. Covering bottom sediments as a lake restoration technique

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, G.D.

    1980-10-01

    Application of flyash to lake bottoms as a lake restoration technique is discussed. Flyash application could control microorganisms and sediment nutrients associated with eutrophication; however, use of flyash would present more environmental costs than benefits. PVC-coated screens and spun-bonded polypropylene screens are acceptable, but costly, alternatives to flyash application. Use of sand, clay, or other sheeting to retard eutrophication should be investigated. 28 references, 3 tables.

  12. Chemical lake restoration products: sediment stability and phosphorus dynamics.

    PubMed

    Egemose, Sara; Reitzel, Kasper; Andersen, Frede Ø; Flindt, Mogens R

    2010-02-01

    Laboratory experiments with sediments from three shallow Danish lakes were conducted to evaluate the effects of chemical lake restoration products during resuspension. Phosphorus (P) removal, sediment stability, sediment consolidation and color reduction were studied over time. The investigated products were aluminum (Al), Phoslock (a commercial bentonite product coated with lanthanum) and a combination of Al covered with bentonite (Al/Ben). All treatments effectively reduced the P concentration in the water. However, the treatments containing Al reduced the P concentration immediately after resuspension, whereas Phoslock required several days after resuspension to reduce the P concentration. Especially Phoslock, but also Al/Ben, increased the sediment stability threshold by 265% and 101%, respectively, whereas Al had no stabilizing effect. The fresh Al floc was resuspended 5x easier than untreated sediment. The largest consolidation of the sediment occurred with addition of Phoslock, followed by Al/Ben, while Al alone had no effect. Enhanced consolidation may be of importance for macrophyte colonisation of organic sediment. Phoslock improved the light climate moderately by removing color, whereas Al was very effective in removing color. Ben/Al showed intermediate effects on color reduction. These findings are important when decisions are made on restoration method for a specific lake, which may be more or less wind exposed. PMID:20055487

  13. HEAVY METAL ACCUMULATION IN SEDIMENT AND FRESHWATER FISH IN U.S. ARCTIC LAKES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metal concentrations in sediment and two species of freshwater fish (lake trout [Salvelinus namaycush], and grayling [Thymallus arcticus]} were examined in four Arctic lakes in Alaska. Concentrations of several metals were naturally high in the sediment relative to uncontaminated...

  14. The carbon cycle and biogeochemical dynamics in lake sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dean, W.E.

    1999-01-01

    The concentrations of organic carbon (OC) and CaCO3 in lake sediments are often inversely related. This relation occurs in surface sediments from different locations in the same lake, surface sediments from different lakes, and with depth in Holocene sediments. Where data on accumulation rates are available, the relation holds for organic carbon and CaCO3 accumulation rates as well. An increase of several percent OC is accompanied by a decrease of several tens of percent CaCO3 indicating that the inverse relation is not due to simple dilution of one component by another. It appears from core data that once the OC concentration in the sediments becomes greater than about 12%, the CO2 produced by decomposition of that OC and production of organic acids lowers the pH of anoxic pore waters enough to dissolve any CaCO3 that reaches the sediment-water interface. In a lake with a seasonally anoxic hypolimnion, processes in the water column also can produce an inverse relation between OC and CaCO3 over time. If productivity of the lake increases, the rain rate of OC from the epilimnion increases. Biogenic removal of CO2 and accompanying increase in pH also may increase the production of CaCO3. However, the decomposition of organic matter in the hypolimnion will decrease the pH of the hypolimnion causing greater dissolution of CaCO3 and therefore a decrease in the rain rate of CaCO3 to the sediment-water interface.

  15. A conduit dilation model of methane venting from lake sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scandella, Benjamin P.; Varadharajan, Charuleka; Hemond, Harold F.; Ruppel, Carolyn; Juanes, Ruben

    2011-03-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, but its effects on Earth's climate remain poorly constrained, in part due to uncertainties in global methane fluxes to the atmosphere. An important source of atmospheric methane is the methane generated in organic-rich sediments underlying surface water bodies, including lakes, wetlands, and the ocean. The fraction of the methane that reaches the atmosphere depends critically on the mode and spatiotemporal characteristics of free-gas venting from the underlying sediments. Here we propose that methane transport in lake sediments is controlled by dynamic conduits, which dilate and release gas as the falling hydrostatic pressure reduces the effective stress below the tensile strength of the sediments. We test our model against a four-month record of hydrostatic load and methane flux in Upper Mystic Lake, Mass., USA, and show that it captures the complex episodicity of methane ebullition. Our quantitative conceptualization opens the door to integrated modeling of methane transport to constrain global methane release from lakes and other shallow-water, organic-rich sediment systems, and to assess its climate feedbacks.

  16. A conduit dilation model of methane venting from lake sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scandella, B.P.; Varadharajan, C.; Hemond, Harold F.; Ruppel, C.; Juanes, R.

    2011-01-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, but its effects on Earth's climate remain poorly constrained, in part due to uncertainties in global methane fluxes to the atmosphere. An important source of atmospheric methane is the methane generated in organic-rich sediments underlying surface water bodies, including lakes, wetlands, and the ocean. The fraction of the methane that reaches the atmosphere depends critically on the mode and spatiotemporal characteristics of free-gas venting from the underlying sediments. Here we propose that methane transport in lake sediments is controlled by dynamic conduits, which dilate and release gas as the falling hydrostatic pressure reduces the effective stress below the tensile strength of the sediments. We test our model against a four-month record of hydrostatic load and methane flux in Upper Mystic Lake, Mass., USA, and show that it captures the complex episodicity of methane ebullition. Our quantitative conceptualization opens the door to integrated modeling of methane transport to constrain global methane release from lakes and other shallow-water, organic-rich sediment systems, and to assess its climate feedbacks.

  17. Sedimentation rates and pollution history of a dried lake: Al-Oteibeh Lake.

    PubMed

    Al-Masri, M S; Aba, A; Khalil, H; Al-Hares, Z

    2002-07-01

    Sediment accumulation rates as well as the distribution of selected elements in a dried Syrian lake (Al-Oteibeh Lake), near Damascus City, are reported. Five core samples from different locations of the lake were collected, and four major elements (Fe, K, Mg and Na) and six trace metals (Co, Ni, Cr, Pb, Zn, U and Cu) were analyzed. Sedimentation rates were determined applying the 210Pb dating method and found to vary between 0.100 and 0.793 cm year(-1). The results showed that the constant flux constant sedimentation rate (CF:CS) simple dating model is applicable for dating recent dried sediment and recording the past historical pollution of the last 100 years. However, the method was found to be only applicable for dating trace and major elements, which cannot be leached to deeper layers by rainwater. In addition, the obtained records can be used to verify the date of water level declining. PMID:12109471

  18. Sulfhydrolase activity in sediments of wintergreen lake, kalamazoo county, michigan.

    PubMed

    King, G M; Klug, M J

    1980-05-01

    The hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl sulfate, p-nitrocatechol sulfate, and [S]sodium dodecyl sulfate was examined in anoxic sediments of Wintergreen Lake, Michigan. Significant levels of sulfhydrolase activity were observed in littoral, transition, and profundal sediment samples. Rates of sulfate formation suggest that the sulfhydrolase system would represent a major source of sulfate within these sediments. Sulfate formed by ester sulfate hydrolysis can support dissimilatory sulfate reduction as shown by the incorporation of S from labeled sodium dodecyl sulfate into H(2)S. Sulfhydrolase activity varied with sediment depth, was greatest in the littoral zone, and was sensitive to the presence of oxygen. Estimations of ester sulfate concentrations in sediments revealed large quantities of ester sulfate ( approximately 30% of total sulfur). Both total sulfur and ester sulfate concentrations varied with the sediment type and were two to three orders of magnitude greater than the inorganic sulfur concentration. PMID:16345573

  19. PSV records from sediments of modern lakes (Aslikyl, Svir, Naroch).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzina, D.; Kosareva, L.; Nourgaliev, D.; Kosarev, V.

    2014-12-01

    During the last 20 years, our paleomagnetic group had investigated many lakes with the aim to know the behavior of the geomagnetic field during the Holocene. Lake sediments are the good presenters of the paleosecular variation (PSV) records. In this paper are presented materials from Lakes Aslikul (Russia, 54o 25' N, 54o 07' E), Svir (Belorussia, 54o 47' N; 26o 30' E), Naroch (Belorussia, 54o 51' N, 26o 51' E). Samples of lake floor sediments were collected using a piston corer designed and manufactured at the Kazan University as a prototype were used piston corer which had been designed and used by F. J. H. Mackereth. Three cores were collected from each Lake Aslikul and Svir and six cores from Lake Naroch. Cores length was between 3,5-6,5 meters. Sediments were subsampled into cubic nonmagnetic plastic boxes. Their magnetic susceptibilities were then measured using a MS2-B instrument, and their natural remanent magnetization (NRM) (module and direction) was measured using a JR-4 magnetometer. Based on this data were built generalized record for each parameter. We compared the geomagnetic field variations recorded in our study with the records reported in the literature for the sediments in the different lakes. Our data have a good PSV records correlation with other data so we can obtain age of sediments according to PSV records. The dating of lakes sediments was also improved and further detailed by radiocarbon dating that gave the same results. Some characteristic features, the B and S minima and the Y and E maxima (cf. nomenclature of Thompson and Turner, 1982) are recognized. All peaks have a wide but complicated structure. Studied lakes compared to the other European records available, it can be concluded that the PSV master curves obtained in this study can be used to model Holocene geomagnetic variations. The work is performed according to the Russian Government Program of Competitive Growth of Kazan Federal University also by RFBR research projects No. 14

  20. Antioxidant Responses of Vallisneria asiatica to Eutrophic Sediments in Lake Taihu, China.

    PubMed

    Kang, Caixia; Kuba, Takahiro; Hao, Aimin; Iseri, Yasushi

    2015-08-01

    Three kinds of representative sediments were obtained from a macrophyte-dominated bay (East Lake Taihu) and two algae-dominated regions (Western Lake Taihu and Meiliang Bay). Physiological responses of Vallisneria asiatica to these sediments were compared. Results from 20 days exposures showed no obvious differences in malondialdehyde (MDA) in roots, while the MDA content in leaves of plants exposed to Western Lake Taihu sediment was significantly (p<0.05) higher than those exposed to the other two sediments. In comparison to the other two sediments, plants exposed to Western Lake Taihu sediment showed significantly lower (p<0.05) superoxide dismutase in roots and leaves on the 10th and 40th day. On the 40th day, root catalase (CAT) activities in V. asiatica from Western Lake Taihu and Meiliang Bay sediments were lower than that from East Lake Taihu sediment, while leaf CAT activity in V. asiatica from Western Lake Taihu sediment was higher than that from East Lake Taihu sediment (p<0.05). Western Lake Taihu sediment caused more serious oxidative stress in V. asiatica than East Lake Taihu sediment. Results indicated eutrophic sediment was a contributing factor in the disappearance of V. asiatica in Western Lake Taihu. PMID:26070371

  1. Sedimentology and geomorphology of a relict lacustrine system in Tingri, Tibet, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, H.; Switzer, A. D.; Aitchison, J.

    2010-12-01

    A patchy sequence of near horizontal sedimentary deposits composed of consolidated carbonate-rich laminated gravelly sand and silt are exposed on the hill slopes near Tingri, Tibet, China. They are classified as mid- to late-Pleistocene and Holocene lacustrine deposits in Chinese geological maps, but the style and nature of lacustrine deposition and the facies associations in the sequence have never been reported. This study presents a number of sections in the locality showing the varied sedimentology of the deposits. The deposits are interpreted as relict sandy or gravelly dune ridges and plains, salt pans, prograded deltas, and lacustrine sediments. Interpretation was primarily based on a comparison with modern inland lakes in the Tibetan Plateau as analogues of processes in arid mountain lake systems. Relict dune ridges appear on the margins of many Tibetan inland lakes where the highly erosive regime allowed an abundant supply of gravels and sand to deposit along lake shorelines. The strong winds in Tibet have also allowed high to medium energy shoreline systems to develop in exposed areas. The high gravel and carbonate content in the gravelly ridges provided ample resistance to erosion and they often remain a topographically pronounced feature after lake drainage. Salt pans and gravelly or sandy ridge fields are also left after lake regression along with rare lacustrine deltas represented by the lakeward prograding beds. Laminated shelly sand or silt preserved in pockets near the valley floor characterise deposition at deeper lacustrine regimes. At Tingri the exposures of the palaeoshoreline deposits can reach 20 m in thickness and are identified at an elevation ranging from 4286 to 4404 masl. Although patchy in occurrence the sequence suggests a relatively long lived relict lake system. The timing of lake phases is poorly constrained by optically stimulated luminescence mid-to-late Pleistocene and Holocene. A number of incised channels are observed in

  2. Catchment sediment flux: a lake sediment perspective on the onset of the Anthropocene?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiverrell, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Definitions of the Anthropocene are varied but from a geomorphological perspective broadly can be described as the interval of recent Earth history during which 'humans have had an 'overwhelming' effect on the Earth system' (Brown et al., 2013). Identifying the switch to a human-dominated geomorphic process regime is actually a challenging process, with in the 'Old World' ramping up of human populations and impacts on earth surface processes since the Neolithic/Mesolithic transition and the onset of agriculture. In the terrestrial realm lakes offer a unique window on changes in human forcing of earth surface processes from a sedimentary flux perspective, because unlike alluvial and hill-slope systems sedimentation is broadly continuous and uninterrupted. Dearing and Jones (2003) showed for a global dataset of lakes a 5-10 fold increase in sediment delivery comparing pre- and post-anthropogenic disturbance. Here sediment records from several lakes in lowland agricultural landscapes are presented to examine the changes in the flux and composition of materials delivered from their catchments. By definition the lakes record the switch to a human dominated system, but not necessary in accelerated sediment accumulation rates with changes in sediment composition equally important. Data from Crose, Hatch and Peckforton Meres, in lowland northwest England are interrogated producing quantitative land-cover reconstructions from pollen spectra calculated using the REVEALS model (Sugita, 2007), geochemical evidence for changes sediment provenance and flux, and 14C and stable Pb pollutant based chronological models detecting changes in sediment accumulation rate. The lake sediment geochemistry points to several phases of heightened human impact within these small agricultural catchments. Following small-in-scale forest cover reductions and limited impacts in terms of sediment flux during the Neolithic, the Bronze to Iron Age saw the first substantial reductions in forest cover

  3. Lead in Lake Michigan and Green Bay Surficial Sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment cores were collected in 1987-1989 in Green Bay using a box corer and in 1994-1996 in Lake Michigan using a box corer and a PONAR. Core samples were segmented and dated. Historic background lead concentrations were determined for Green Bay (range=1.8-39.3 mg/kg, mean=14...

  4. Magnetic and geochemical signatures of flood layers in lake sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Støren, Eivind; Paasche, Øyvind; Hirt, Ann; Kumari, Monika

    2016-04-01

    Floods carry sediments that quickly become deposited whenever rivers meet lakes. In catchments that are subjected to repeated flooding, downstream lakes can therefore contain record of past events across multiple timescales. High-resolution core scanning analyses such as X-ray fluorescence (XRF) scanning and magnetic susceptibility (MS) return data that are frequently used to detect flood layers in soft sediment archives such as lakes, fjords and ocean basins. In order to delineate the copious information that can be extracted from soft sediment records we have explored ways in which high-resolution data can be utilized and subsequently vetted by high-precision measurements. By combining magnetic hysteresis measurements and first-order reversal curves (FORCs) with inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES) measurements of chemical elements on 36 samples, important information not only about flood dynamics and variability are acquired, but also sources of noise in high-resolution scanning techniques are identified. Specifically, we show that a lake flood record from Southern Norway containing ˜ 100 floods distributed over 10 000 years can be sub-divided into at least two groups, suggested to contain floods generated by spring snow melting and intense summer rainstorms. The temporal evolution of this pattern shows a marked shift towards spring floods around 2000 years ago compared to the earlier part of the record. The approach presented here is of universal character and should be applicable to all kinds of soft sediment archives.

  5. A Composite Depth Scale for Sediments from Crevice Lake, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenbaum, J.G.; Skipp, G.; Honke, J.; Chapman, C.

    2010-01-01

    As part of a study to derive records of past environmental change from lake sediments in the western United States, a set of cores was collected from Crevice Lake, Montana, in late February and early March 2001. Crevice Lake (latitude 45.000N, longitude 110.578W, elevation 1,713 meters) lies adjacent to the Yellowstone River at the north edge of Yellowstone National Park. The lake is more than 31 meters deep and has a surface area of 7.76 hectares. The combination of small surface area and significant depth promote anoxic bottom-water conditions that preserve annual laminations (varves) in the sediment. Three types of cores were collected through the ice. The uppermost sediments were obtained in freeze cores that preserved the sediment water interface. Two sites were cored with a 5-centimeter diameter corer. Five cores were taken with a 2-meter-long percussion piston corer. The percussion core uses a plastic core liner with an inside diameter of 9 centimeters. Coring was done at two sites. Because of the relatively large diameter of the percussion cores, samples from these cores were used for a variety of analyses including pollen, charcoal, diatoms, stable isotopes, organic and inorganic carbon, elemental analyses, and magnetic properties.

  6. Multi-Elements in Waters and Sediments of Shallow Lakes: Relationships with Water, Sediment, and Watershed Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Donna L.; Hanson, Mark A.; Herwig, Brian R.; Bowe, Shane E.; Otte, Marinus L.

    2015-01-01

    We measured concentrations of multiple elements, including rare earth elements, in waters and sediments of 38 shallow lakes of varying turbidity and macrophyte cover in the Prairie Parkland (PP) and Laurentian Mixed Forest (LMF) provinces of Minnesota. PP shallow lakes had higher element concentrations in waters and sediments compared to LMF sites. Redundancy analysis indicated that a combination of site- and watershed-scale features explained a large proportion of among-lake variability in element concentrations in lake water and sediments. Percent woodland cover in watersheds, turbidity, open water area, and macrophyte cover collectively explained 65.2 % of variation in element concentrations in lake waters. Sediment fraction smaller than 63 µm, percent woodland in watersheds, open water area, and sediment organic matter collectively explained 64.2 % of variation in element concentrations in lake sediments. In contrast to earlier work on shallow lakes, our results showed the extent to which multiple elements in shallow lake waters and sediments were influenced by a combination of variables including sediment characteristics, lake morphology, and percent land cover in watersheds. These results are informative because they help illustrate the extent of functional connectivity between shallow lakes and adjacent lands within these lake watersheds. PMID:26074657

  7. Sediment toxicity testing of Lake Orta after liming

    SciTech Connect

    Baudo, R.; Beltrami, M.; Rossi, D.; Gronda, A.; Abdel-Monem, A.M.; Burton, G.A.

    1995-12-31

    Lake Orta has been severely polluted by industrial effluents containing Cu, NH{sub 3}, Cr., Ni, and Zn. Ammonia oxidation caused a pH drop below 4. More than 60 papers have described the adverse chemical and biological changes which occurred in Lake Orta in the past several decades. In 1989, CaCO{sub 3} (10,900 tons) was added to the lake as a remedial action. The treatment was effective, improving water quality and allowing some original plankton, benthic, and fish populations to return. However, Cu and Cr are still present in the top 10 cm of sediment. The toxicity of the sediment was evaluated using multiple assays: Microtox (solid phase and pore water), Brachionus calyciflorus and Thamnocephalus platyurus Toxkits (pore water), seed germination and root elongation (solid phase and pore water). In addition, in situ and laboratory tests were conducted with Hyalella azteca and an indigenous species of Daphnia. Assays responses varied yet showed surficial sediments to be toxic. Toxicity increased with sediment in pre-liming deposition zones. Recovery of the ecosystem is evident, however the contaminated sediments may impede further improvement.

  8. Suspended-sediment loads and reservoir sediment trap efficiency for Clinton Lake, Kansas, 2010-12

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Juracek, Kyle E.

    2013-01-01

    Continuous streamflow and turbidity data collected from October 1, 2010, to September 30, 2012, at a site upstream and downstream from Clinton Lake, Kansas, were used to compute the total suspended-sediment load delivered to and released from the reservoir as well as the sediment trap efficiency for the reservoir. Ongoing sedimentation is inhibiting the ability of Clinton Lake to serve several purposes including flood control, water supply, and recreation. The inflow suspended-sediment load was substantially larger than the outflow load and most of the suspended-sediment load was delivered during short-term, high-discharge periods. Respectively, the total 2-year inflow and outflow suspended-sediment loads were computed to be 44.4 and 1.49 million pounds. Sediment trap efficiency for the reservoir was estimated to be 97 percent. The mean annual suspended-sediment yield from the upstream basin was estimated to be 60,500 pounds per square mile. Because this study was completed during a drought, the estimated inflow suspended-sediment load and suspended-sediment yield likely are substantially less than what would occur during a period of average or above average precipitation and runoff.

  9. Human land uses enhance sediment denitrification and N2O production in Yangtze lakes primarily by influencing lake water quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Yao, L.; Wang, Z.; Xiong, Z.; Liu, G.

    2015-10-01

    Sediment denitrification in lakes alleviates the effects of eutrophication through the removal of nitrogen to the atmosphere as N2O and N2. However, N2O contributes notably to the greenhouse effect and global warming. Human land uses (e.g. agricultural and urban areas) strongly affect lake water quality and sediment characteristics, which, in turn, may regulate lake sediment denitrification and N2O production. In this study, we investigated sediment denitrification and N2O production and their relationships to within-lake variables and watershed land uses in 20 lakes from the Yangtze River basin in China. The results indicated that both lake water quality and sediment characteristics were significantly influenced by watershed land uses. N2O production rates increased with increasing background denitrification rates. Background denitrification and N2O production rates were positively related to water nitrogen concentrations but were not significantly correlated with sediment characteristics and plant community structure. A significant positive relationship was observed between background denitrification rate and percentage of human-dominated land uses (HDL) in watersheds. Structural equation modelling revealed that the indirect effects of HDL on sediment denitrification and N2O production in Yangtze lakes were mediated primarily through lake water quality. Our findings also suggest that although sediments in Yangtze lakes can remove large quantities of nitrogen through denitrification, they may also be an important source of N2O, especially in lakes with high nitrogen content.

  10. Sterols of a contemporary lacustrine sediment. [in English postglacial lake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskell, S. J.; Eglinton, G.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported for detailed sterol analyses of several depths (corresponding to between zero and about 150 yr in age) in a contemporary lacustrine sediment from a freshwater lake of postglacial origin in England. Delta 5-, delta 22-, and delta 5,22-sterols are identified along with 5 alpha- and 5 beta-stanols as well as a C26 stanol with a C7 side chain. Solvent extraction yields carbon number distributions for the 5 alpha- and 5 beta-stanol sediment constituents that parallel the corresponding delta 5-sterol distributions. The amounts of 5 alpha-stanols are found to exceed those of 5 beta-stanols in the sediment, and variations in the ratio of 5 alpha- to 5 beta-stanol between sediment samples from similar depths are shown to suggest an inhomogeneity of the sediment. It is found that the sterol composition of sediment cores varies markedly with depth, reflecting both the effects of a sterol hydrogenation process and a changing input to the sediment. It is concluded that C29 sterols, of probable higher-plant origin, predominate at lower sediment depths while C27 sterols, possibly derived from autochthonous sources, are more abundant in the surface sediment.

  11. The origin and biogeochemistry of organic matter in surface sediments of Lake Shihwa and Lake Hwaong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, Eun-Ji; Cho, Hyen-Goo; Shin, Kyung-Hoon

    2007-12-01

    To understand the origin and biogeochemistry of the organic matter in surface sediments of Lake Shihwa and Lake Hwaong, organic nitrogen, inorganic nitrogen, labile organic carbon, and residual organic carbon contents as well as stable isotope ratios for carbon and nitrogen were determined by KOBr-KOH treatment. Ratios of organic carbon to organic nitrogen (Corg/Norg) (mean = 24) were much higher than ratios of organic carbon to total nitrogen (Corg/Ntot) (mean=12), indicating the presence of significant amounts of inorganic nitrogen in the surface sediments of both lakes. Stable isotope ratios for organic nitrogen were, on average, 5.2‰ heavier than ratios of inorganic nitrogen in Lake Shihwa, but those same ratios were comparable in Lake Hwaong. This might be due to differences in the origin or the degree of degradation of sedimentary organic matter between the two lakes. In addition, stable isotope ratios for labile organic carbon were, on average, 1.4‰ heavier than those for residual organic carbon, reflecting the preferential oxidation of13C-enriched organic matter. The present study demonstrates that KOBr-KOH treatment of sedimentary organic matter can provide valuable information for understanding the origin and degradation state of organic matter in marine and brackish sediments. This also suggests that the ratio of Corg/Norg and stable isotope ratios for organic nitrogen can be used as indexes of the degree of degradation of organic matter.

  12. Recent sediment geochemistry of an alkaline lake: Lake Acigöl (Denizli), SW Anatolia Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budakoglu, M.; Karaman, M.; Karabel, S. B.; Geredeli, S. G.; Bulbul, A.; Kurt, H.; Uzasci, S.; Kan, A.; Akay, A. K.; Yilmaz, F. R.; Gumus, L.; Civas, M.; Sevis, C.; Kumral, M.

    2012-04-01

    Lake Acıgöl (Denizli) is one of the largest alkaline lake in Turkey. Surface, and shallow core samples was studied to determine the effects of riverine and aeolian processes on sediment physical properties and sediment geochemistry. Total organic carbon, total nitrogen content and major and minor element geochemistry of Lake Acıgöl sediments were investigated. Major (Si, Ti, Al, Fe, Mg, Ca, K, Na, P, S) and trace elements (Mn, As, V, Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr, Y, Zr, Ba, Pb) showed significant differences in bulk chemical composition between the surface and shallow core samples. Sediment properties were examined by water content, loss-on-ignition (LOI). While most of core samples characteristic with relative LOI increase from bottom towards sediment surface, limited core samples that were taken from eastern shore of the lake show increase of LOI values from sediment surface towards bottom, suggesting shallow water levels, aeolian and dentritic riverine inputs on a regional scale. The Fe/Mn ratio was calculated to study changes in the redox potential. Distribution of Fe, Mn, and S concentration were related to redox condition of lake sediment and are due to mobilization of these elements in the pore waters. Calculated two particulate ratios (C:N and N:P) indicate predominantly lacustrine origin. Vertical changes of heavy metals occur in the all shallow downcore profiles, although the concentrations keep to ppm levels. Principal components analysis (PCA) was also used to examine all studied parameters and intercorrelations among the variables.

  13. Potential oxygen demand of sediments from Lake Erie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schloesser, D.W.; Stickel, R.G.; Bridgeman, T.B.

    2005-01-01

    Dreissenid mussels (Dreissena polymorpha and D. bugensis) biodeposit large quantities of filtered materials (i.e., feces and pseudofeces) directly on bottom substrates. These biodeposits have the potential to increase oxygen demand in sediments and overlying waters and thus contribute to hypolimnetic anoxia in Lake Erie. We hypothesized that higher potential oxygen demand of sediments would occur in areas near shore than in offshore hypolimnetic waters as a result of biodeposits carried by currents from littoral water where mussels, available foods, and biodeposits may be most abundant. To address this hypothesis, we measured potential oxygen demand (mg O2/L/120 h incubation) at six sites near shore and six sites offshore monthly June to September 2002 and August 2003. In addition, we compared, in post priori hypothesis, seven sites with and five sites without dreissenid mussels. Contrary to our hypotheses, potential oxygen demand was not significantly higher in bottles containing nearshore sediments than offshore sediments. Similarly, potential oxygen demand was not significantly higher at sites with dreissenid mussels than at sites without mussels. Data are consistent with pre-dreissenid studies which show oxygen demand and percent ash-free dry weights of sediments were higher offshore than near shore and ash-free dry weight of sediments decreased June to September. Therefore, the present study provides no evidence that dreissenid mussels have contributed directly-via biodeposition-to increased anoxia observed in Lake Erie in the mid to late 1990s.

  14. A sediment resuspension and water quality model of Lake Okeechobee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    James, R.T.; Martin, J.; Wool, T.; Wang, P.-F.

    1997-01-01

    The influence of sediment resuspension on the water quality of shallow lakes is well documented. However, a search of the literature reveals no deterministic mass-balance eutrophication models that explicitly include resuspension. We modified the Lake Okeeehobee water quality model - which uses the Water Analysis Simulation Package (WASP) to simulate algal dynamics and phosphorus, nitrogen, and oxygen cycles - to include inorganic suspended solids and algorithms that: (1) define changes in depth with changes in volume; (2) compute sediment resuspension based on bottom shear stress; (3) compute partition coefficients for ammonia and ortho-phosphorus to solids; and (4) relate light attenuation to solids concentrations. The model calibration and validation were successful with the exception of dissolved inorganic nitrogen species which did not correspond well to observed data in the validation phase. This could be attributed to an inaccurate formulation of algal nitrogen preference and/or the absence of nitrogen fixation in the model. The model correctly predicted that the lake is lightlimited from resuspended solids, and algae are primarily nitrogen limited. The model simulation suggested that biological fluxes greatly exceed external loads of dissolved nutrients; and sedimentwater interactions of organic nitrogen and phosphorus far exceed external loads. A sensitivity analysis demonstrated that parameters affecting resuspension, settling, sediment nutrient and solids concentrations, mineralization, algal productivity, and algal stoichiometry are factors requiring further study to improve our understanding of the Lake Okeechobee ecosystem.

  15. Sediment Ammonia-Oxidizing Microorganisms in Two Plateau Freshwater Lakes at Different Trophic States.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuyin; Zhang, Jingxu; Zhao, Qun; Zhou, Qiheng; Li, Ningning; Wang, Yilin; Xie, Shuguang; Liu, Yong

    2016-02-01

    Both ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) can contribute to ammonia biotransformation in freshwater lake ecosystems. However, the factors shaping the distribution of sediment AOA and AOB in plateau freshwater lake remains unclear. The present study investigated sediment AOA and AOB communities in two freshwater lakes (hypertrophic Dianchi Lake and mesotrophic Erhai Lake) on the Yunnan Plateau (China). A remarkable difference in the abundance, diversity, and composition of sediment AOA and AOB communities was observed between Dianchi Lake and Erhai Lake. AOB usually outnumbered AOA in Dianchi Lake, but AOA showed the dominance in Erhai Lake. Organic matter (OM), total nitrogen (TN), and total phosphorus (TP) might be the key determinants of AOB abundance, while AOA abundance was likely influenced by the ration of OM to TN (C/N). AOA or AOB community structure was found to be relatively similar in the same lake. TN and TP might play important roles in shaping sediment AOA and AOB compositions in Dianchi Lake and Erhai Lake. Moreover, Nitrososphaera-like AOA were detected in Dianchi Lake. Nitrosospira- and Nitrosomonas-like AOB were dominant in Dianchi Lake and Erhai Lake, respectively. Sediment AOA and AOB communities in Dianchi Lake and Erhai Lake were generally regulated by trophic state. PMID:26111964

  16. Early Eutrophication in the Lower Great Lakes: New Evidence from Biogenic Silica in Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schelske, Claire L.; Stoermer, Eugene F.; Conley, Daniel J.; Robbins, John A.; Glover, Rebecca M.

    1983-10-01

    New evidence from studies of biogenic silica and diatoms in sediment cores indicates that eutrophication in the lower Great Lakes resulted from nutrient enrichment associated with early settlement and forest clearance. Diatom production peaked from 1820 to 1850 in Lake Ontario, at about 1880 in Lake Erie, but not until 1970 in Lake Michigan. This is the first reported sediment record of the silica-depletion sequence for the Great Lakes.

  17. Enhancement of sediment phosphorus release during a tunnel construction across an urban lake (Lake Donghu, China).

    PubMed

    Wang, Siyang; Li, Hui; Xiao, Jian; Zhou, Yiyong; Song, Chunlei; Bi, Yonghong; Cao, Xiuyun

    2016-09-01

    Tunnel construction in watershed area of urban lakes would accelerate eutrophication by inputting nutrients into them, while mechanisms underlying the internal phosphorus cycling as affected by construction events are scarcely studied. Focusing on two main pathways of phosphorus releasing from sediment (enzymatic mineralization and anaerobic desorption), spatial and temporal variations in phosphorus fractionation, and activities of extracellular enzymes (alkaline phosphatase, β-1,4-glucosidase, leucine aminopeptidase, dehydrogenase, lipase) in sediment were examined, together with relevant parameters in interstitial and surface waters in a Chinese urban lake (Lake Donghu) where a subaqueous tunnel was constructed across it from October 2013 to July 2014. Higher alkaline phosphatase activity (APA) indicated phosphorus deficiency for phytoplankton, as illustrated by a significantly negative relationship between APA and concentration of dissolved total phosphorus (DTP). Noticeably, in the construction area, APAs in both sediment and surface water were significantly lower than those in other relevant basins, suggesting a phosphorus supply from some sources in this area. In parallel, its sediment gave the significantly lower iron-bound phosphorus (Fe(OOH)∼P) content, coupled with significantly higher ratio of iron (II) to total iron content (Fe(2+)/TFe) and dehydrogenase activities (DHA). Contrastingly, difference in the activities of sediment hydrolases was not significant between the construction area and other basins studied. Thus, in the construction area, subsidy of bioavailable phosphorus from sediment to surface water was attributable to the anaerobic desorption of Fe(OOH)∼P rather than enzymatic mineralization. Finally, there existed a significantly positive relationship between chlorophyll a concentration in surface water and Fe(OOH)∼P content in sediment. In short, construction activities within lakes may interrupt cycling patterns of phosphorus across

  18. Anaerobic oxidation of methane in sediments of two boreal lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rissanen, Antti J.; Karvinen, Anu; Nykänen, Hannu; Mpamah, Promise; Peura, Sari; Tiirola, Marja; Kankaala, Paula

    2014-05-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is a considerable sink for methane (CH4) in marine systems, but very little is known about the occurrence and importance of the process in freshwater systems. In addition, much about the microbial communities involved in AOM is unclear. AOM coupled with sulfate reduction is the dominant AOM process in marine systems but the scarce existing data suggest that, in freshwater systems, AOM coupled with reduction of alternative electron acceptors (nitrate/nitrite, manganese, iron) is more important. In this study, potential for AOM coupled with metal reduction was studied in boreal lake sediments. Slurries of sediment samples collected from two sites in southeastern Finland, i.e. from Lake Orivesi, Heposelkä, an vegetated littoral site, dominated by Phragmites australis (Sample Sa, sediment layer 0 - 25 cm) and from the profundal zone of a mesotrophic Lake Ätäskö (Aa, 0 - 10 cm; Ab, 10 - 30 cm; Ac, 90 - 130 cm), were incubated in laboratory in anaerobic conditions at in situ temperatures for up to 5 months. The samples were amended either 1) with 13CH4, 2) 13CH4 + manganese(II) oxide (MnO) or 3) 13CH4 + iron(III) hydroxide (Fe(OH)3), and the processes were measured by following the 13C transfer to the carbon dioxide (CO2) pool and by concentration measurements of CH4 and CO2. Changes in microbial communities were studied from DNA extracted from sediment samples before and after incubation period by next-generation sequencing (Ion Torrent) of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) - amplified bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA and methyl coenzyme-M reductase gene (mcrA) amplicons. Increase in 13C of CO2 gas confirmed that AOM took place in sediments of both study lakes. In general, 13CO2 - production was significant both at the beginning (0 - 21 days) and at the end (84 - 151 days) of incubation period. Potential AOM rates (calculated based on 13CO2 - production) varied considerably and were much lower in deep sediment (Sample Ac), 0.1 - 0

  19. Environmental Status and geochemical assessment Sediments of Lake Skadar, Montenegro.

    PubMed

    Kastratović, Vlatko; Jaćimović, Željko; Bigović, Miljan; Đurović, Dijana; Krivokapić, Slađana

    2016-08-01

    The environmental mobility and geochemical partitioning of ten metals were examined in sediments collected from the six locations around Lake Skadar in Montenegro. A three-step sequential extraction procedure was used to determine the distribution of the metals in various substrates of lacustrine sediments, and the concentrations were measured in the liquid extract by ICP-OES. The largest portion of the total amount of cadmium, strontium and manganese can be found in sediment bound to the hydrated iron and manganese oxides; cobalt, lead, copper and nickel in the oxidizable fraction and the highest portion of chromium, vanadium and zinc are in the residual fraction. The most mobilized and potentially mobile metals are strontium, cadmium and cobalt while the most immobilized metals are chromium, vanadium and zinc. Based on geochemical parameters, an assessment of sediment contamination by the investigated metals was performed and the results showed potential risks ranging from "no risk" to "low risk" to the environment. PMID:27384227

  20. AMS radiocarbon analyses from Lake Baikal, Siberia: Challenges of dating sediments from a large, oligotrophic lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colman, Steven M.; Jones, Glenn A.; Rubin, M.; King, J.W.; Peck, J.A.; Orem, W.H.

    1996-01-01

    A suite of 146 new accelerator-mass spectrometer (AMS) radiocarbon ages provides the first reliable chronology for late Quaternary sediments in Lake Baikal. In this large, highly oligotrophic lake, biogenic and authigenic carbonate are absent, and plant macrofossils are extremely rare. Total organic carbon is therefore the primary material available for dating. Several problems are associated with the TOC ages. One is the mixture of carbon sources in TOC, not all of which are syndepositional in age. This problem manifests itself in apparent ages for the sediment surface that are greater than zero. However, because most of the organic carbon in Lake Baikal sediments is algal (autochthonous) in origin, this effect is limited to about 1000+500 years, which can be corrected, at least for young deposits. The other major problem with dating Lake Baikal sediments is the very low carbon contents of glacial-age deposits, which makes them extremely susceptible to contamination with modern carbon. This problem can be minimized by careful sampling and handling procedures. The ages show almost an order of magnitude difference in sediment-accumulation rates among different sedimentary environments in Lake Baikal, from about 0.04 mm/year on isolated banks such as Academician Ridge, to nearly 0.3 mm/year in the turbidite depositional areas beneath the deep basin floors, such as the Central Basin. The new AMS ages clearly indicate that the dramatic increase in diatom productivity in the lake, as evidenced by increases in biogenic silica and organic carbon, began about 13 ka, in contrast to previous estimates of 7 ka for the age of this transition. Holocene net sedimentation rates may be less than, equal to, or greater than those in the late Pleistocene, depending on the site. This variability reflects the balance between variable terrigenous sedimentation and increased biogenic sedimentation during interglaciations. The ages reported here, and the temporal and spatial variation in

  1. Calcium Biomineralization in Sediment of Lake Acigol, an Hypersaline Lake in SW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik Balci, Nurgul; Menekse, Meryem; Sonmez, Seref; Gul Karaguler, Nevin

    2010-05-01

    The study of biomineralization in (hyper) saline environments is important for two reasons, 1-it can extend our knowledge about the earliest microbial life on Earth which may have been halophilic 2-because of the presence of hypersaline conditions on Mars, the analog environments in Earth may have implications for the possibility of life on Mars. We examine calcium biomineralization in Lake Acigol, a unique hypersaline lake in southwest Turkey by integrating geochemical and microbiological approaches. Lake Acigol is a perennial lake with a maximum salinity of about 200 g/L and covers an area of 55-60 km2and is one of the main salt reservoirs of Turkey. Water, sediment and core samples were taken from the lake and salty ponds around the lake during the field excursion. The water chemistry revealed relatively high Na and SO4 concentrations both in the lake (30 gr/L, 33.36 gr/L), and the ponds (100 mg/L, 123 mg/L). The mineralogical analyses of sediments showed gypsum, halite, carbonate (aragonite, huntite) precipitation in the lake and ponds. We employed culture-dependent (16s rRNA cloning method, enrichment culture), and -independent techniques to study microbial diversity in Lake Aci gol. Sediment samples were used to isolate Halophilic sp. (e.g. salinicoccus roseus , Dunella sp.) under salinities that were similar to those measured in the lake water to further use in the laboratory Ca-precipitation experiments. For the precipitation experiments, liquid and solid culture media with various salinities ( 6-25 %) in addition to one similar to the lake water were prepared. In order to determine effect of Mg2+-Ca2+ molar ratio on mineralogy and the rate of precipitation, media with different Ca2+and Mg2+ concentrations were also prepared. Our preliminary results indicate that the halophilic bacteria play active role in the precipitation of Ca-minerals but the geochemical conditions are clearly influential. The results also point out that in the Lake Aci gol C, N, P, Ca

  2. Physicochemical and Analytical Data for Tributary Water, Lake Water, and Lake Sediment, Lake Arrowhead, Clay and Archer Counties, Texas, 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Jennifer T.; Musgrove, MaryLynn; Haynie, Monti M.; Van Metre, Peter C.

    2008-01-01

    Lake Arrowhead is a reservoir about 24 kilometers southeast of Wichita Falls, Texas, that provides drinking water for the city of Wichita Falls and surrounding areas. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Wichita Falls, did a study in 2006 to assess conditions contributing to elevated arsenic concentrations in Lake Arrowhead. This report describes the sampling and analytical methods, quality assurance, and physicochemical and analytical data. Physiochemical properties were measured in and water samples were collected from five tributaries to Lake Arrowhead (Little Wichita River, West Little Post Oak Creek, East Little Post Oak Creek, Deer Creek, and an unnamed tributary) immediately after storms. Lake water measuring and sampling were done approximately monthly from January through September 2006 at three deep-water sites and seasonally, in January and August 2006, at three shallow-water sites. Cores of lake bottom sediment were collected from five sites on August 30, 2006. Arsenic concentrations in tributary water samples ranged from 1.5 to 6.3 and 0.5 to 4.8 micrograms per liter for unfiltered and filtered samples, respectively. The highest arsenic concentrations were in samples collected from the West Little Post Oak Creek sampling site. Physicochemical properties in lake water varied with depth and season. Dissolved arsenite plus arsenate concentrations in lake water samples generally were between 3 and 5 micrograms per liter. Arsenite concentrations typically were below the laboratory reporting level of 0.6 microgram per liter. There were no detections of monomethylarsonate or dimethylarsinate. The concentration of arsenic in lake sediment samples ranged from 4.4 to 11.2 milligrams per kilogram, with a median of 6.4 milligrams per kilogram. The median arsenic concentration of the five top-interval sediment samples was 8.8 milligrams per kilogram, which generally is higher than the concentrations estimated to be on suspended sediment in

  3. Bottom-sediment chemistry in Devil's Lake, northeast North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Komor, S.C.

    1994-01-01

    High magnesium calcite 8 mole percent MgCO3 is the most abundant carbonate at the sediment surface. With increasing depth abundances of high magnesium carbonate decrease and abundances of low magnesium calcite aragonite and dolomite increase. Carbon isotope compositions of bulk carbonates range from δ13C = -0.7 to +0.5%. These values are close to equilibrium with dissolved inorganic carbon in lake water (δ13C = -2%) but far from equilibrium with dissolved inorganic carbon in pore water (δ13C = -16.3- -10/0%). Disequilibrium between pore water and carbonates suggests that the carbonates did not recrystallize substantially in the presence of pore water. Therefore the change of carbonate mineral proportions with depth in the sediments is due mainly to temporal changes in the proportions of endogenic, detrital, and biologic carbonates that were deposited on the lake bottom rather than postdepositional carbonate diagenesis.

  4. Suspended sediment and metals removal from urban runoff by a small lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Striegl, R.G.

    1987-01-01

    A small lake in the Chicago Metropolitan Area was from 91 to 95 percent efficient in removing suspended sediment and from 76 to 94 percent efficient in removing copper, iron, lead, and zinc from urban runoff. Sediments accumulated in the lake in the form of an organic-rich mud at an average rate of 20 millimeters per year; this reduced lake storage and covered potential habitat for aquatic organisms. Copper, lead, and zinc concentrations were closely associated with suspended-sediment concentrations and with silt- and clay-sized fractions of lake sediment. Although concentrations of mercury and cadmium were near detection limits in runoff, measurable concentrations of these metals accumulated in the lake sediments.A small lake in the Chicago Metropolitan Area was from 91 to 95 percent efficient in removing suspended sediment and from 76 to 94 percent efficient in removing copper, iron, lead, and zinc from urban runoff. Sediments accumulated in the lake in the form of an organic-rich mud at an average rate of 20 millimeters per year; this reduced lake storage and covered potential habitat for aquatic organisms. Copper, lead, and zinc concentrations were closely associated with suspended sediment concentrations and with silt- and clay-sized fractions of lake sediment. Although concentrations of mercury and cadmium were near detection limits in runoff, measurable concentrations of these metals accumulated in the lake sediments.

  5. Radioisotope Concentration in Lake Sediments of Maracaibo, Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    Salas, A. Rangel; Viloria, T.; Sajo-Bohus, L.; Barros, H.; Greaves, E. D.; Palacios, D.

    2007-10-26

    Maracaibo Lake is one of the most important water basing and oil producing regions in Venezuela. Changes in the local environment have been monitored for chemical pollution in the past. For this study we selected a set of sediment samples collected in the shore and analyzed for its radioisotope content. Results show the gamma emitting isotopes distribution. Isotopes concentrations have been determined within the natural K, Th and U families.

  6. Metals associated with suspended sediments in lakes Erie and Ontario, 2000-2002.

    PubMed

    Marvin, Chris; Charlton, Murray; Milne, Jacqui; Thiessen, Lina; Schachtschneider, Joanne; Sardella, Gino; Sverko, Ed

    2007-07-01

    Sediment traps were deployed in the three major basins of Lake Erie, and the central (Mississauga) basin of Lake Ontario, and refurbished seasonally over the period 2000-2002. In Lake Ontario, sediment down-flux rates and corresponding contaminant down-flux rates were highest in winter during periods of unstratified thermal conditions, and generally increased with depth due to the influence of resuspended bottom sediments during all sampling periods. Lake Ontario suspended sediments exhibited the highest concentrations of metals; concentrations of mercury and lead frequently exceeded guideline values for bottom sediments. Contaminant levels in Lake Ontario suspended sediments were similar to concentrations in bottom sediments in the same area. There was a spatial trend toward higher suspended sediment metals concentrations from the eastern basin to the western basin of Lake Erie, which is similar to the trend in bottom sediment contamination. In the eastern basin of Lake Erie, which is the deepest area of the lake, there was no trend in down-flux rate with depth in 2001; however, down-flux rates increased with depth in 2002. Suspended sediments in the western basin of Lake Erie were determined to be largely resuspended bottom sediments; all western basin samples collected in the study exceeded the guideline value for mercury (0.486 microg/g). PMID:17057964

  7. Associations between degraded benthic communities and contaminated sediments: Sabine Lake, Lake Pontchartrain, and Choctawhatchee Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Engle, V.D.; Summers, J.K.; Macauley, J.M.

    1994-12-31

    The Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program for Estuaries (EMAP-E) in the Gulf of Mexico supplements its base sampling effort each year with localized, intensive spatial sampling in selected large estuarine systems. By selecting random locations within 70 km{sup 2} hexagonal areas, individual estuaries were sampled using EMAP methods but at four times the density as base sampling. In 1992, 19 sites were sampled in Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana. In 1 993, 18 sites were sampled in Sabine Lake, Texas and 12 sites were sampled in Choctawhatchee Bay, Florida. At all sites, sediment grabs were taken and analyzed for benthic species composition and abundance, for toxicity to Ampelisca, and for organic and inorganic sediment contaminants. An indicator of biotic integrity, the benthic index, was calculated to represent the status of benthic communities. A series of statistical techniques, such as stepwise regression analysis, were employed to determine whether the variation in the benthic index could be associated with variation in sediment contaminants, sediment toxicity, or levels of dissolved oxygen. Spatial distributions of these parameters were examined to determine the geographical co-occurrence of degraded benthic communities and environmental stressors. In Lake Pontchartrain, for example, 85% of the variation in the benthic index was associated with decreased levels of dissolved oxygen, and increased concentrations of PCBs, alkanes, copper, tin, and zinc in the sediments.

  8. Characterization of major offensive odorants released from lake sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susaya, Janice; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2011-02-01

    The amount of odorants effused from Lake Sihwa during the low tide period was estimated using sediment samples collected from various sites. A wide variety of odorants released from lake sediment were measured such as reduced sulfur compounds (RSCs), aldehydes, nitrogenous compounds, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and volatile fatty acids (VFAs). A comparison of emission rates (μg m -2 min -1) showed large mean values from such species as NH 3 (14,550), toluene (370), and DMS (106), while the lowest values were seen from VFAs and some VOCs. If their emission concentrations are converted into odor intensity (OI), the OI values were dominated by such odorants as NH 3 (2.07), H 2S (1.65), DMS (1.80), acetaldehyde (1.52), butyric acid (1.59), butyraldehyde (1.28), isovaleric acid (1.15), and valeric acid (0.78). The dilution to threshold (D/T) ratio derived on the basis of the air dilution sensory (ADS) test yielded a mean of 62 (range: 10-173); 19 out of 21 samples were seen to exceed the guideline D/T value of 15. The sum of odor intensities derived from individual odorants exhibited strong compatibilities with the D/T ratio ( r2 = 0.87; α = 0.003). The overall results of this study confirm that the sediment can play an important role in the malodor phenomenon in the area surrounding the Lake Sihwa.

  9. The vertical variation of nutrients in a sediment core of Delong Lake reveals the anthropogenic effect.

    PubMed

    Guan, Ying; Zang, Shuying; Xiao, Haifeng

    2014-05-01

    Phosphorus content and its species were studied for the core sediments of Delong Lake, using the SMT sequential extraction method, and then were correlated to the contents of total nitrogen and organic matter. According to (210)Pb and (137)Cs dating, the historical profiles of 33 cm core sediments were generated. The objective of this study was to understand how nutrients of lake sediments evolved in order to get insights into the effect of human activities on their sedimentary history. The nutrients contents in the core sediments slowly increased after 1957, showing the human activity influence the natural deposition of the lake sediment. From 1978 to 1985, various nutrients in the lake sediment rapid increased, showing that the human activities strengthened. From 2003 to now, most of nutrients in the sediment rapidly increased and significantly modified the natural deposition of the lake sediment. PMID:24468926

  10. Characterization of anaerobic heterotrophic bacteria isolated from freshwater lake sediments.

    PubMed

    Molongoski, J J; Klug, M J

    1976-01-01

    Strict anaerobic culture techniques were used to quantitatively and qualitatively evaluate the anaerobic heterotrophic bacteria present at the sediment-water interface of hyperutrophic Wintergreen Lake (Augusta, Mich.). Anaerobic plate counts remained constant from March through December, 1973, ranging from 2.4 X 10(6) to 5.7 X 10(6) organisms/g (dry weight) of sediment. The isolatable bacteria represented a small percentage of the total microbial community, which was shown by direct microscopic counts to be 2.0 X 10'' organisms/g (dry weight) of sediment during June and July. Bacteria of the genus Clostridium dominated the isolates obtained, accounting for 71.8% of the 960 isolates examined. A single species, Clostridium bifermentens, comprised 47.7% of the total. Additional bacterial groups and the percentage in which they were isolated included: Streptococcus sp. (10.8%), unidentified curved rods (9.5%y, gram-positive nonsporing rods (5.6%), and motile gram-negative rods (1.9%). Temperature growth studies demonstrated the ability of all the isolates to grow at in situ sediment temperatures. Gas-liqid radiochromatography was used to determine the soluble metabolic end products from [U-14C]glucose and a U-14C-labeled amino acid mixture by representative sedimentary clostridial isolates and by natural sediment microbial communities. At in situ temperatures the natural sediment microflora produced soluble fermentative end products characteristic of those elaborated by the clostridial isolates tested. These results are considered strong presumptive evidence that clostridia are actively metabolizing in the sediments of Wintergreen Lake. PMID:942211

  11. The Importance of Lake Sediments as a Pathway for Microcystin Dynamics in Shallow Eutrophic Lakes

    PubMed Central

    Song, Haihong; Coggins, Liah X.; Reichwaldt, Elke S.; Ghadouani, Anas

    2015-01-01

    Microcystins are toxins produced by cyanobacteria. They occur in aquatic systems across the world and their occurrence is expected to increase in frequency and magnitude. As microcystins are hazardous to humans and animals, it is essential to understand their fate in aquatic systems in order to control health risks. While the occurrence of microcystins in sediments has been widely reported, the factors influencing their occurrence, variability, and spatial distribution are not yet well understood. Especially in shallow lakes, which often develop large cyanobacterial blooms, the spatial variability of toxins in the sediments is a complex interplay between the spatial distribution of toxin producing cyanobacteria, local biological, physical and chemical processes, and the re-distribution of toxins in sediments through wind mixing. In this study, microcystin occurrence in lake sediment, and their relationship with biological and physicochemical variables were investigated in a shallow, eutrophic lake over five months. We found no significant difference in cyanobacterial biomass, temperature, pH, and salinity between the surface water and the water directly overlying the sediment (hereafter ‘overlying water’), indicating that the water column was well mixed. Microcystins were detected in all sediment samples, with concentrations ranging from 0.06 to 0.78 µg equivalent microcystin-LR/g sediments (dry mass). Microcystin concentration and cyanobacterial biomass in the sediment was different between sites in three out of five months, indicating that the spatial distribution was a complex interaction between local and mixing processes. A combination of total microcystins in the water, depth integrated cyanobacterial biomass in the water, cyanobacterial biomass in the sediment, and pH explained only 21.1% of the spatial variability of microcystins in the sediments. A more in-depth analysis that included variables representative of processes on smaller vertical or local

  12. Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Mercury Accumulation in Lacustrine Sediments Across the Laurentian Great Lakes Region

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data from 103 sediment cores from the Great Lakes and inland lakes of the Great Lakes airshed were compiled to examine and provide a synthesis of patterns of historical and recent changes in mercury (Hg) deposition. Limited data from the lower Laurentian Great Lakes shows a lega...

  13. Effects of Local Farming and Deforestation on Sediment Discharge Inferred From Sediment Accumulation Rates and Patterns in Lake Core Records From Coastal Lake Tanganyika, East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickler, M. L.; Lezzar, K. E.; Soreghan, M.; Cohen, A. S.; Swarzenski, P. W.; Berke, M.; McHeni, M.; Gunderson, K.; Allen, K.; Palke, A.; Modesta, M.; Nkotagu, H.

    2006-12-01

    Lake Tanganyika is the oldest and largest of the East African rift lakes and vital to the economy of the surrounding villages and countries. Deforestation around the lake causes many negative effects from an increased sediment flux and has changed dramatically as a function of population. Increases in inorganic sediment flux from deforested watersheds and an associated decrease in organic sediment flux may negatively impact the viability of littoral habitats in the lake. This study examines the interrelationship between deforestation on streams that feed into Lake Tanganyika and sedimentation offshore. We mapped stream morphology of two distinct streams: Kalande (Gombe Stream National Park), and Ngelwa (deforested). An offshore core was collected from the lake bottom just offshore of the deforested Ngelwa stream at a water depth of 106m and dated using 14C and 210Pb geochronologic methods. In addition, multiple laboratory analyses were performed on the core and within the streams to help constrain sedimentation and deforestation effects. Three distinct units within the core correlate to reflect changes in sedimentation (higher rates as deforestation continues) in addition to a shift from dry, low lake level conditions to wet, high lake levels as evidenced by shifts in core lithologies, diatom taxonomy and content, magnetic susceptibility, and clastic particle size. Streambed and suspended sediment analyses reflect high levels of erosion in deforested watersheds coupled with changes in dissolved nutrients in the water (silica, orthophosphate), which may suggest an overall diminished level of ecosystem function in deforested and heavily farmed watersheds.

  14. Environmental changes on the Balkans recorded in the sediments from lakes Prespa and Ohrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, B.; Vogel, H.; Zanchetta, G.; Sulpizio, R.

    2010-05-01

    Lakes Prespa and Ohrid on the Balkans are considered to be amongst the oldest lakes in Europe. Both lakes are hydraulically connected via karst aquifers. From Lake Ohrid, several up to ca. 15 m long sediment records were studied during the past years. In this study, a first long sediment record from Lake Prespa was studied in order to shed more light on the influence of Lake Prespa on Lake Ohrid and the environmental history of the region. Radiocarbon dating and the occurrence of 3 dated tephra layers provide a good age control and indicate that the 10.5 m long sediment record reaches back to 48 ka. The comparison of the results from this study with those from former studies of the Lake Ohrid cores indicates that Lake Prespa is more susceptible to environmental changes due to its lower volume and water depth. Glacial sedimentation is characterized by low organic matter contents and absence of carbonates in the sediments, which indicate oligotrophic conditions in both lakes. Holocene sedimentation is characterized by particularly high carbonate contents in Lake Ohrid and by particularly high organic matter contents in Lake Prespa, which indicate a shift towards more mesotrophic conditions in the latter. Long-term environmental changes and short-term events, such as the Heinrich events during the Pleistocene or the 8.2 cooling event during the Holocene, are well recorded in both lakes, but partly expressed in different proxies.

  15. [Vertical Distribution Characteristics and Analysis in Sediments of Xidahai Lake].

    PubMed

    Duan, Mu-chun; Xiao, Hai-feng; Zang, Shu-ying

    2015-07-01

    The organic matter (OM), total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), the morphological changes of phosphorus and the particle size in columnar sediment core of Xidahai Lake were analyzed, to discuss the vertical distribution characteristics and influencing factors. The results showed that the contents of OM, TN and TP were 0. 633% -2. 756%, 0. 150% -0. 429% and 648. 00 - 1 480.67 mg . kg-1 respectively. The contents of Ca-P, IP and OM changed less, the contents of Fe/Al-P, OP, TP and TN fluctuated from 1843 to 1970; The contents of Ca-P, IP and TP tended to decrease, the contents of Fe/Al-P, OP and OM first decreased and then increased to different degree, TN fluctuated largely from 1970 to 1996; The nutrient elements contents showed relatively large fluctuation from 1996 to 2009, the average contents of Fe/Al-P, OP and OM were the highest in the three stages. The sediment core nutrients pollution sources were mainly from industrial wastewater, sewage and the loss of fertilizers of Xidahai Lake. The ratio of C/N in the sediments showed that organic matter was mainly from aquatic organisms. The sediment particle size composition was dominated by clay and fine silt. The correlation studies showed that Ca-P, IP and TP were significantly positively correlated, showing that the contribution of Ca-P to IP and TP growth was large. PMID:26489314

  16. Ephemerality of discrete methane vents in lake sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scandella, Benjamin P.; Pillsbury, Liam; Weber, Thomas; Ruppel, Carolyn; Hemond, Harold F.; Juanes, Ruben

    2016-05-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas whose emission from sediments in inland waters and shallow oceans may both contribute to global warming and be exacerbated by it. The fraction of methane emitted by sediments that bypasses dissolution in the water column and reaches the atmosphere as bubbles depends on the mode and spatiotemporal characteristics of venting from the sediments. Earlier studies have concluded that hot spots—persistent, high-flux vents—dominate the regional ebullitive flux from submerged sediments. Here the spatial structure, persistence, and variability in the intensity of methane venting are analyzed using a high-resolution multibeam sonar record acquired at the bottom of a lake during multiple deployments over a 9 month period. We confirm that ebullition is strongly episodic, with distinct regimes of high flux and low flux largely controlled by changes in hydrostatic pressure. Our analysis shows that the spatial pattern of ebullition becomes homogeneous at the sonar's resolution over time scales of hours (for high-flux periods) or days (for low-flux periods), demonstrating that vents are ephemeral rather than persistent, and suggesting that long-term, lake-wide ebullition dynamics may be modeled without resolving the fine-scale spatial structure of venting.

  17. Ephemerality of discrete methane vents in lake sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scandella, Benjamin P.; Pillsbury, Liam; Weber, Thomas; Ruppel, Carolyn; Hemond, Harold F.; Juanes, Ruben

    2016-01-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas whose emission from sediments in inland waters and shallow oceans may both contribute to global warming and be exacerbated by it. The fraction of methane emitted by sediments that bypasses dissolution in the water column and reaches the atmosphere as bubbles depends on the mode and spatiotemporal characteristics of venting from the sediments. Earlier studies have concluded that hot spots—persistent, high-flux vents—dominate the regional ebullitive flux from submerged sediments. Here the spatial structure, persistence, and variability in the intensity of methane venting are analyzed using a high-resolution multibeam sonar record acquired at the bottom of a lake during multiple deployments over a 9 month period. We confirm that ebullition is strongly episodic, with distinct regimes of high flux and low flux largely controlled by changes in hydrostatic pressure. Our analysis shows that the spatial pattern of ebullition becomes homogeneous at the sonar's resolution over time scales of hours (for high-flux periods) or days (for low-flux periods), demonstrating that vents are ephemeral rather than persistent, and suggesting that long-term, lake-wide ebullition dynamics may be modeled without resolving the fine-scale spatial structure of venting.

  18. Factors Affecting the Distribution of Perfluorinated Compounds in Sediments from Lake Shihwa, Korea

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) are ubiquitously distributed in various environmental media including water, soil, sediment, and biota. PFCs have also been shown to biomagnify in both aquatic and terrestrial environments. Lake Shihwa is an artificial saltwater lake, located on ...

  19. Lake sediments as natural seismographs: Earthquake-related deformations (seismites) in central Canadian lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doughty, M.; Eyles, N.; Eyles, C. H.; Wallace, K.; Boyce, J. I.

    2014-11-01

    Central Canada experiences numerous intraplate earthquakes but their recurrence and source areas remain obscure due to shortness of the instrumental and historic records. Unconsolidated fine-grained sediments in lake basins are 'natural seismographs' with the potential to record ancient earthquakes during the last 10,000 years since the retreat of the Laurentide Ice Sheet. Many lake basins are cut into bedrock and are structurally-controlled by the same Precambrian basement structures (shear zones, terrane boundaries and other lineaments) implicated as the source of ongoing mid-plate earthquake activity. A regional seismic sub-bottom profiling of lakes Gull, Muskoka, Joseph, Rousseau, Ontario, Wanapitei, Fairbanks, Vermilion, Nipissing, Georgian Bay, Mazinaw, Simcoe, Timiskaming, Kipawa, Parry Sound and Lake of Bays, encompassing a total of more than 2000 kilometres of high-resolution track line data supplemented by multibeam and sidescan sonar survey records show a consistent sub-bottom stratigraphy of relatively-thick lowermost lateglacial facies composed of interbedded semi-transparent mass flow facies (debrites, slumps) and rhythmically-laminated silty-clays. Mass flows together with cratered ('kettled') lake floors and associated deformations reflect a dynamic ice-contact glaciolacustrine environment. Exceptionally thick mass flow successions in Lake Timiskaming along the floor of the Timiskaming Graben within the seismically-active Western Quebec Seismic Zone (WQSZ), point to a higher frequency of earthquakes and slope failure during deglaciation and rapid glacio-isostatic rebound though faulting continues into the postglacial. Lateglacial faulting, diapiric deformation and slumping of coeval lateglacial sediments is observed in Parry Sound, Lake Muskoka and Lake Joseph, which are all located above prominent Precambrian terrane boundaries. Lateglacial sediments are sharply overlain by relatively-thin rhythmically-laminated and often semi

  20. Fremont Lake, Wyoming--some aspects of the inflow of water and sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emmett, W.W.; Averett, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    Fremont Lake is a large (20.6 sq km), deep lake (185 m) in western Wyoming. Average annual inflow of water is about 5.1 cu meters/sec, and this discharge is equaled or exceeded about 23% of the time. Annual instantaneous peak flows of Pine Creek usually exceed 30 cu m/sec and the 100-year flood is about 80 cu m/sec. About 800 tons of sediment are delivered to the lake annually; annual deposition of sediment in the northern lake area throughout the last 10,000 years about equals contemporary values of sediment inflow. Only small quantities of fine-gradient sediment are transported beyond the delta at the northern end of the lake. Current rates of deposition in the delta are about 1 to 3 mm/yr. Sediment in the delta generally is sand size; elsewhere in the lake, sediment generally is clay and silt size. (USGS)

  1. Distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in sediments of Akaki River, Lake Awassa, and Lake Ziway, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Mekonnen, Kebede Nigussie; Chandravanshi, Bhagwan Singh; Redi-Abshiro, Mesfin; Ambushe, Abayneh Ataro; McCrindle, Robert Ian; Moyo, Stanley

    2015-07-01

    The quantification of 14 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was carried out in sediment samples collected from Akaki River, Lake Awassa, and Lake Ziway, Ethiopia. The concentration of PAHs in the samples was determined using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode, after microwave-assisted extraction (MAE), using acetone/n-hexane (1:1, v/v) mixture. The accuracy of the method was determined by extracting and analyzing New York/New Jersey waterway sediment standard reference material (SRM 1944). The measured concentrations of PAHs in SRM 1944 agreed well with the certified values. In samples from Akaki River, Lake Awassa, and Lake Ziway, the total content of PAHs determined ranged from 0 to 3070 ng/g (average 534 ng/g), 24.9 to 413 ng/g (average 169 ng/g), and 15.0 to 305 ng/g (average 175 ng/g), respectively. Source ratios indicated that the PAHs were mainly from petrogenic origin. Sediments from all sampling sites indicated negligible levels of toxicity with no risk of adverse biological effects. PMID:26122125

  2. Holocene and Late Glacial varved sediments from Czechowskie Lake (Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Florian; Brauer, Achim; Słowiński, Michał; Dulski, Peter; Plessen, Birgit; Blaszkiewicz, Miroslaw

    2013-04-01

    Annual laminated (varved) sediment records are essential for detailed paleoclimate and environmental reconstructions as they function as a natural memory beyond instrumental datasets. In order to determine Holocene inter-annual and decadal-scale variability we investigated varved Lake Czechowskie (53°52' N/ 18°14' E, 108 m asl.), northern Poland. During two coring campaigns in 2009 and 2012 we recovered several long and short cores with the longest core reaching 14.5 m. Based on correlation with a biostratigraphically and tephrochronologically dated neighboring paleolake sediment record (Trzechowskie mire) the record extends back in to the Late Glacial. Lake Czechowskie is well suited for climate reconstruction as varves are almost entirely well (88 %) or poorly (5%) preserved. Only 7 % of the sediment profile are non-varved. Detailed investigations have been carried out for the last 2000 years of the sediment profile applying micro-facies analyses combined with X-ray fluorescence element scanning (µ-XRF) at 200 µm resolution and carbon and nitrogen analyses (TOC, TC, TN) at five-varveresolution. The chronology has been established by a multiple dating approach with 137Cs (for the last ca. 50 years), AMS 14C on plant macro remains (back to 2800 cal BP) and varve counting. Varve formation and preservation ceases at the beginning of the 20th century whereas the younger sediments are again faintly varved. Micro-facies analyses reveal that the sediment consists of biogenic calcite varves with intercalated diatom rich layers. Three distinct 100 to 200 years long periods of up to threefold thicker varves (approx. 1.4 to 5.0 mm/year) are predominantly caused by an increase in the diatom sub-layers and indicate distinct short-term climatic and environmental fluctuations. Possible reasons for these changes that occurred abruptly with only few years are either changes in lake water circulation or in nutrient supply to the lake. This study is a contribution to the Virtual

  3. Geomicrobiological Features of Ferruginous Sediments from Lake Towuti, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Vuillemin, Aurèle; Friese, André; Alawi, Mashal; Henny, Cynthia; Nomosatryo, Sulung; Wagner, Dirk; Crowe, Sean A.; Kallmeyer, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Lake Towuti is a tectonic basin, surrounded by ultramafic rocks. Lateritic soils form through weathering and deliver abundant iron (oxy)hydroxides but very little sulfate to the lake and its sediment. To characterize the sediment biogeochemistry, we collected cores at three sites with increasing water depth and decreasing bottom water oxygen concentrations. Microbial cell densities were highest at the shallow site—a feature we attribute to the availability of labile organic matter (OM) and the higher abundance of electron acceptors due to oxic bottom water conditions. At the two other sites, OM degradation and reduction processes below the oxycline led to partial electron acceptor depletion. Genetic information preserved in the sediment as extracellular DNA (eDNA) provided information on aerobic and anaerobic heterotrophs related to Nitrospirae, Chloroflexi, and Thermoplasmatales. These taxa apparently played a significant role in the degradation of sinking OM. However, eDNA concentrations rapidly decreased with core depth. Despite very low sulfate concentrations, sulfate-reducing bacteria were present and viable in sediments at all three sites, as confirmed by measurement of potential sulfate reduction rates. Microbial community fingerprinting supported the presence of taxa related to Deltaproteobacteria and Firmicutes with demonstrated capacity for iron and sulfate reduction. Concomitantly, sequences of Ruminococcaceae, Clostridiales, and Methanomicrobiales indicated potential for fermentative hydrogen and methane production. Such first insights into ferruginous sediments showed that microbial populations perform successive metabolisms related to sulfur, iron, and methane. In theory, iron reduction could reoxidize reduced sulfur compounds and desorb OM from iron minerals to allow remineralization to methane. Overall, we found that biogeochemical processes in the sediments can be linked to redox differences in the bottom waters of the three sites, like oxidant

  4. Geomicrobiological Features of Ferruginous Sediments from Lake Towuti, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Vuillemin, Aurèle; Friese, André; Alawi, Mashal; Henny, Cynthia; Nomosatryo, Sulung; Wagner, Dirk; Crowe, Sean A; Kallmeyer, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Lake Towuti is a tectonic basin, surrounded by ultramafic rocks. Lateritic soils form through weathering and deliver abundant iron (oxy)hydroxides but very little sulfate to the lake and its sediment. To characterize the sediment biogeochemistry, we collected cores at three sites with increasing water depth and decreasing bottom water oxygen concentrations. Microbial cell densities were highest at the shallow site-a feature we attribute to the availability of labile organic matter (OM) and the higher abundance of electron acceptors due to oxic bottom water conditions. At the two other sites, OM degradation and reduction processes below the oxycline led to partial electron acceptor depletion. Genetic information preserved in the sediment as extracellular DNA (eDNA) provided information on aerobic and anaerobic heterotrophs related to Nitrospirae, Chloroflexi, and Thermoplasmatales. These taxa apparently played a significant role in the degradation of sinking OM. However, eDNA concentrations rapidly decreased with core depth. Despite very low sulfate concentrations, sulfate-reducing bacteria were present and viable in sediments at all three sites, as confirmed by measurement of potential sulfate reduction rates. Microbial community fingerprinting supported the presence of taxa related to Deltaproteobacteria and Firmicutes with demonstrated capacity for iron and sulfate reduction. Concomitantly, sequences of Ruminococcaceae, Clostridiales, and Methanomicrobiales indicated potential for fermentative hydrogen and methane production. Such first insights into ferruginous sediments showed that microbial populations perform successive metabolisms related to sulfur, iron, and methane. In theory, iron reduction could reoxidize reduced sulfur compounds and desorb OM from iron minerals to allow remineralization to methane. Overall, we found that biogeochemical processes in the sediments can be linked to redox differences in the bottom waters of the three sites, like oxidant

  5. Integration of Hydrologic, Sediment Yield, Sediment Delivery, Hydrodynamic and Sediment Transport Models in Large Great Lakes Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunton, A.; Nairn, R.; Selegean, J.

    2004-12-01

    Computational tools to evaluate surface and subsurface water flow and sediment transport are commonly used by environmental and engineering practitioners. However, different parts of the hydrologic system (e.g. hillslope overland flow, groundwater, river channel flow) are often treated separately and at disparate spatial and temporal scales. Overland flow models typically have no explicit channel representation and vice-versa, making integrated assessments of water and sediment delivery from catchment to channel difficult. This is problematic when appraising the influence of land use change (urbanization, modification of riparian buffer strips, changes in tillage and forestry practices etc.) on catchment sediment movement and river flood hydrographs. A 'budgetary' approach was taken to defining the sources and sinks of water and sediment within large catchments in the Great Lakes area under a variety of land uses. These budgets were derived from existing datasets including digital elevation models, river flow and sediment load records, and dam sedimentation surveys. Numerical models of watershed hydrology and sediment delivery, 2-D river flow and sediment transport were constructed to develop a general understanding of the hydrologic and geomorphic behavior of these systems, and to predict the effects of changing land use and riparian buffer zone modification. Models were calibrated against river flow and sediment transport records, reservoir sedimentation surveys and harbor dredging records. The challenges and benefits of combining these diverse approaches and their implementation in best management practices are discussed.

  6. Eutrophication History of Small Shallow Lakes in Estonia: Evidence from Multiproxy Analysis of Lake Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koff, T.; Marzecova, A.; Vandel, E.; Mikomägi, A.; Avi, E.

    2015-12-01

    Human activities have impacted aquatic systems through the release of contaminants and the regulation of surface and groundwater. Although environmental monitoring has been essential in detecting eutrophication, biodiversity loss or water quality deterioration, monitoring activities are limited in time and are thus not sufficient in their scope to identify causality and thresholds. Paleolimnological studies increasingly show that the response of lakes to climatic and human influences is complex, multidimensional, and often indirectly mediated through watershed processes. In this study we examine the history of eutrophication processes in small lakes in Estonia using the multi-proxy analysis of sediment. Study sites represent lakes with different anthropogenic stressors: urbanisation and recreational use, run-off from an oil shale mine, and fish-kills and liming measures. We have used diverse analytical methods, such as elemental analysis, stable isotopes, fossil pigments, diatoms and Cladocera remains. The information derived from sedimentary indicators broadly agrees with the historical evidence of eutrophication and pollution. Moreover, the sediment records are indispensable for identifying additional issues such as: 1) earlier onset of cultural eutrophication; 2) the significant impact of catchment erosion on the deterioration of lake quality, particularly cyanobacterial blooms; and 3) changes in sedimentation processes with significance for internal biogeochemical cycling of nutrients. Importantly, the integration of several methods has significantly improved interpretation of sedimentary data and elucidated the different strengths of various indicator types. The project findings prove to be highly relevant for both the prediction of the ecological responses of lakes to different anthropogenic impacts and the establishment of reasonable reference target conditions in restoration schemes, as well as for methodological improvements of the sediment analysis.

  7. Rockmagnetism and inorganic geochemistry of Grand Lake sediment, NE Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minyuk, P. S.; Borkhodoev, V. Y.; Subbotnikova, T. V.

    2013-12-01

    Grand Lake, located in Magadan region (51 53'E, 60 44'N), belongs to the group of Elikchan Lakes. Maximum depth of the lake is 23.2 m. 12 cores from deep and shallow parts of the lake were taken using a Livingston corer. Sediment records from Grand Lake provide a continuous archive of climate change during marine isotopic stages (MIS) 4-1. Magnetic susceptibility (MS), saturation magnetization, saturation remanence, coercive force, remanence coercivity, temperature dependence of the induced magnetization and susceptibility of sediment and magnetic extracts were analyzed. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) was used to diagnose Fe-bearing minerals. MS from cores was used for correlation between the core sections. Analysis of the complex data indicate that there are four main lithologic units of sediment. Unit 1 (MIS 1), depth 0-320 cm. Upper subunit (0-150 cm) shows negative or very low MS. Sediment has high content of organic matter and SiO2 (up to 92%) because of biogenic component. The Lower subunit (depth 150-320 cm) consists of laminated organic silt. The MS of this subunit ranges from 0 to 295 (95), 10-6 SI. The sediment shows high content of Fe2O3, P2O5, MnO indicating a redox boundary. Unit 2 (MIS 2), depth 320-627 cm. Sediment is composed of laminated silt and formed during anoxic conditions. Dark thin layers are enriched with P2O5 and MnO. The unit is characterized by low MS = 57-500 (170), 10-6, SI. Vivianite and Fe-sulfides including pyrite and greigite are found in this unit. Greigite occurs in diatom valves and as fine grained aggregates and has specific thermomagnetic curves. Unit 3 (MIS 3), depth 627-965 cm. Sediment consist of homogenous silt and that accumulated during oxic conditions. Unit has highest MS in the core section: 87-1300 (480), 10-6 SI and is enriched with CaO, Na2O, K2O, SiO2. Unite 4 (MIS 4), depth-965-1015 cm includes sand, dense silt and shows high variations of MS values. According to

  8. Are lake sediments mere archives of degraded organic matter? - evidence of rapid biotic changes tracked in sediments of pre-alpine Lake Lunz, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollaus, Lisa-Maria; Khan, Samiullah; Schelker, Jakob; Ejarque, Elisabet; Battin, Tom; Kainz, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Lake sediments are used as sentinels of changes in organic matter composition and dynamics within lakes and their catchments. In an effort to investigate how past and recent hydrological extreme events have affected organic matter composition in lake sediments, we investigated the biogeochemical composition of sediment cores and settling particles, using sediment traps in the pre-alpine, oligotrophic Lake Lunz, Austria. We assessed annual sedimentation rates using 137Cs and 210Pb, time integrated loads of settling particles, analyze stable carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotopes to track changes of carbon sources and trophic compositions, respectively, and use source-specific fatty acids as indicators of allochthonous, bacterial, and algal-derived organic matter. Preliminary results indicate that settling particles of Lake Lunz (33 m depth) contain high algae-derived organic matter, as assessed by long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA), indicating low degradation of such labile organic matter within the water column of this lake. However, LC-PUFA decreased rapidly in sediment cores below the sediment-water interface. Concentrations of phosphorous remained stable throughout the sediment cores (40 cm), suggesting that past changes in climatic forcing did not alter the load of this limiting nutrient in lakes. Ongoing work reveals dramatic biotic changes within the top layers of the sediment cores as evidenced by high numbers of small-bodied cladocerans (e.g., Bosmina) and large-bodied zooplankton (e.g., Daphnia) are only detected at lower sediment layers. Current research on these lake sediments is aimed at investigating how organic matter sources changed during the past century as a result of recorded weather changes.

  9. Lake Sediment Records on Climate Change and Human Activities in the Xingyun Lake Catchment, SW China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenxiang; Ming, Qingzhong; Shi, Zhengtao; Chen, Guangjie; Niu, Jie; Lei, Guoliang; Chang, Fengqin; Zhang, Hucai

    2014-01-01

    Sediments from Xinyun Lake in central Yunnan, southwest China, provide a record of environmental history since the Holocene. With the application of multi-proxy indicators (total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (TN), δ13C and δ15N isotopes, C/N ratio, grain size, magnetic susceptibility (MS) and CaCO3 content), as well as accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) 14C datings, four major climatic stages during the Holocene have been identified in Xingyun′s catchment. A marked increase in lacustrine palaeoproductivity occurred from 11.06 to 9.98 cal. ka BP, which likely resulted from an enhanced Asian southwest monsoon and warm-humid climate. Between 9.98 and 5.93 cal. ka BP, a gradually increased lake level might have reached the optimum water depth, causing a marked decline in coverage by aquatic plants and lake productivity of the lake. This was caused by strong Asian southwest monsoon, and coincided with the global Holocene Optimum. During the period of 5.60–1.35 cal. ka BP, it resulted in a warm and dry climate at this stage, which is comparable to the aridification of India during the mid- and late Holocene. The intensifying human activity and land-use in the lake catchment since the early Tang Dynasty (∼1.35 cal. ka BP) were associated with the ancient Dian culture within Xingyun’s catchment. The extensive deforestation and development of agriculture in the lake catchment caused heavy soil loss. Our study clearly shows that long-term human activities and land-use change have strongly impacted the evolution of the lake environment and therefore modulated the sediment records of the regional climate in central Yunnan for more than one thousand years. PMID:25033404

  10. A New Method for the Determination of Annual Sediment Fluxes from Varved Lake Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francus, P.; Massa, C.; Lapointe, F.

    2013-12-01

    Calculation of sediment mass accumulation rates instead of thickness accumulation is preferable for paleoclimatic reconstruction as it eliminates the effects of dilution and compaction. Annually laminated lake sediment sequences (varved) theoretically allow for the estimation of sediment fluxes at annual scale, but the calculation is limited by discrete bulk density measurements, often carried out at a much lower resolution (usually 1 cm) than the varves (ranging from 0.07 to 27.3 mm, average 1.84 mm according to Ojala et al. 2012). Since many years the development of automated logging instruments made available continuous and high resolution sediment property data, in a non-destructive fashion. These techniques can easily be used to extract the physical and chemical parameters of sediments at the varve scale (down to 100 μm). Here we present a robust method to calculate annual sediment fluxes from varved lake sediments by combining varves thickness measurements to core logging data, and provide an example for its applications. Several non-destructive densitometric methods applied to the Strathcona Lake sediment, northern Ellesmere Island, Canada (78°33'N; 82°05'W) were compared: Hounsfield Units from a CT-Scan, coherent/incoherent ratio and X-ray radiography (of both split core and sediment slabs, from an Itrax core Scanner), and gamma ray attenuation density. Core logging data were statistically compared to 400 discrete measurements of dry bulk density, wet bulk density and water content performed at 2 mm contiguous intervals. A very strong relationship was found between X-ray grey level on sediment slab and dry bulk density. Relative X-ray densities, at 100μm resolution, were then successfully calibrated against real densities. The final step consisted in binning the calibrated densities to the corresponding varve thickness and then to calculate the annual mass accumulation rates by multiplying the two parameters for each varve year. Strathcona Lake is

  11. Varved Sediments of Maar Lake Ranu Klindungan, East Java

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirrung, M.; Buechel, G.; Scharf, B.; Treutler, H.; Witkowski, A.

    2001-05-01

    Ranu Klindungan (7.725° S, 113.02° E, 10 m a.s.l.) is a maar lake 1550 m in diameter in the coastal lowlands at the northern foot of the Tengger Caldera in East Java, Indonesia. The southern half of the lake is surrounded by a tephra wall up to 50 m high, whereas towards the north topography rises only some meters above lake level. Fresh maar tephra consist of ash and lapilli layers with cauliflower-bombs and -lapilli. The lake has no permanent inflow but 4 effluents with a total discharge of 450 L/s which underlines the importance of groundwater access on subaquatic slopes. Echolot profiles reveal a flat central area 750 m in diameter at 126 m depth and on the steep slopes several slides are visible. The eutrophic, oligomictic lake has an epilimnion in the uppermost 5 m and an anoxic hypolimnion below 20 m. Profundal sediments are composed of diatom gyttja with frequent turbidites. In thin sections, light-dark alternation in slack water deposits reflects 1-6 mm thick cycles that have a lower, light biogenous part of intact planktonic diatom valves with an upwards increasing amount of carbonate crystals, ending with an almost pure carbonate layer, and an upper, dark terrigenous part of mineral grains and plant debris with some carbonate crystals and fragmented littoral diatom valves. These cycles are interpreted as annual varves: layers of diatoms and carbonate crystals are sedimented during the dry season June-October and terrigenous layers during the monsoon-rain season November-May. This is confirmed by 210Pb-excess ages determined after the constant initial concentration method. Distal turbidites contribute about half of the sediment thickness. This points to turbidity currents as major relief-forming process. Magnetic volume specific susceptibility is very high (maximum 1.4*10-2 SI) and clearly bound to fresh terrigenous material in turbidites. Variation of sedimentation rates and terrigenous input during the last 40 years will be discussed.

  12. Spatiotemporal variation of planktonic and sediment bacterial assemblages in two plateau freshwater lakes at different trophic status.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yu; Yang, Yuyin; Wu, Zhen; Feng, Qiuyuan; Xie, Shuguang; Liu, Yong

    2016-05-01

    Both planktonic and sediment bacterial assemblages are the important components of freshwater lake ecosystems. However, their spatiotemporal shift and the driving forces remain still elusive. Eutrotrophic Dianchi Lake and mesotrophic Erhai Lake are the largest two freshwater lakes on the Yunnan Plateau (southwestern China). The present study investigated the spatiotemporal shift in both planktonic and sediment bacterial populations in these two plateau freshwater lakes at different trophic status. For either lake, both water and sediment samples were collected from six sampling locations in spring and summer. Bacterioplankton community abundance in Dianchi Lake generally far outnumbered that in Erhai Lake. Sediment bacterial communities in Erhai Lake were found to have higher richness and diversity than those in Dianchi Lake. Sediments had higher bacterial community richness and diversity than waters. The change patterns for both planktonic and sediment bacterial communities were lake-specific and season-specific. Either planktonic or sediment bacterial community structure showed a distinct difference between in Dianchi Lake and in Erhai Lake, and an evident structure difference was also found between planktonic and sediment bacterial communities in either of these two lakes. Planktonic bacterial communities in both Dianchi Lake and Erhai Lake mainly included Proteobacteria (mainly Alpha-, Beta-, and Gammaproteobacteria), Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Cyanobacteria, and Firmicutes, while sediment bacterial communities were mainly represented by Proteobacteria (mainly Beta- and Deltaproteobacteria), Bacteroidetes, Chlorobi, Nitrospirae, Acidobacteria, and Chloroflexi. Trophic status could play important roles in shaping both planktonic and sediment bacterial communities in freshwater lakes. PMID:26711281

  13. Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane in Sediments of Two Boreal Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiirola, M. A.; Rissanen, A. J.; Karvinen, A.; Nykänen, H.; Mpamah, P.; Peura, S.; Kankaala, P.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, potential for Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled with metal reduction was studied in boreal lake sediments. Slurries of sediment samples collected from two sites in southeastern Finland, i.e. from Lake Orivesi, Heposelkä, an vegetated littoral site, dominated by Phragmites australis (Sample Sa, sediment layer 0 - 25 cm) and from the profundal zone of a mesotrophic Lake Ätäskö (Aa, 0 - 10 cm; Ab, 10 - 30 cm; Ac, 90 - 130 cm), were incubated in laboratory in anaerobic conditions at in situ temperatures for up to 5 months. The samples were amended either 1) with 13CH4, 2) 13CH4 + manganese(IV) oxide (MnO2) or 3) 13CH4 + iron(III) hydroxide (Fe(OH)3), and the processes were measured by following the 13C transfer to the carbon dioxide (CO2) pool and by concentration measurements of CH4 and CO2. Changes in microbial communities were studied from DNA extracted from sediment samples before and after incubation period by next-generation sequencing (Ion Torrent) of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) - amplified bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA and methyl coenzyme-M reductase gene (mcrA) amplicons. AOM took place in every sample except in deepest sample (Ac) with potential rates up to 2.1 nmol CH4 d-1 g-1wetsedim (~2 nmol d-1 cm-3) which are considerably lower than previously reported metal-driven AOM in marine sediments (10-40 nmol d-1 cm-3) but within a range of NO3- -driven AOM in an oligotrophic lake (0.6-3.6 nmol d-1 cm-3). AOM took place without metal additions but addition of Mn4+ increased the potential rates and this increase was especially high in 10-30 cm layer (Ab) of the profundal site (5-fold increase). The structure of the bacterial and archaeal communities changed considerably during incubation. Communities incubated with Mn4+ were especially different from those incubated with Fe3+ or without metals which were more similar with each other. Surprisingly, anaerobic methanotrophic archaea detected, ANME-2D and AOM-associated archaea (AAA

  14. Lake sediment records as earthquake catalogues: A compilation from Swiss lakes - Limitations and possibilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremer, Katrina; Reusch, Anna; Wirth, Stefanie B.; Anselmetti, Flavio S.; Girardclos, Stéphanie; Strasser, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Intraplate settings are characterized by low deformation rates and recurrence intervals of strong earthquakes that often exceed the time span covered by instrumental records. Switzerland, as an example for such settings, shows a low instrumentally recorded seismicity, in contrast to strong earthquakes (e.g. 1356 Basel earthquake, Mw=6.6 and 1601 Unterwalden earthquake, Mw=5.9) mentioned in the historical archives. As such long recurrence rates do not allow for instrumental identification of earthquake sources of these strong events, and as intense geomorphologic alterations prevent preservation of surface expressions of faults, the knowledge of active faults is very limited. Lake sediments are sensitive to seismic shaking and thus, can be used to extend the regional earthquake catalogue if the sedimentary deposits or deformation structures can be linked to an earthquake. Single lake records allow estimating local intensities of shaking while multiple lake records can furthermore be used to compare temporal and spatial distribution of earthquakes. In this study, we compile a large dataset of dated sedimentary event deposits recorded in Swiss lakes available from peer-reviewed publications and unpublished master theses. We combine these data in order to detect large prehistoric regional earthquake events or periods of intense shaking that might have affected multiple lake settings. In a second step, using empirical seismic attenuation equations, we test if lake records can be used to reconstruct magnitudes and epicentres of identified earthquakes.

  15. A preliminary magnetic study of Sawa lake sediments, Southern Iraq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ameen, Nawrass

    2016-04-01

    A preliminary magnetic study combined with chemical analyses was carried out in Sawa Lake in Al-Muthanna province, southern Iraq, about 22 km south west of Samawa city (31°18'48.80"N, 45°0'25.25"E). The lake is about 4.74 km length, 1.75 km width and 5.5 m height, it is surrounded by a salt rim which is higher than the lake water by about 2.8 m and sea water by about 18.5 m (Naqash et al., 1977 in Hassan, 2007). The lake is an elongated closed basin with no surface water available to it, it may be fed by groundwater of the Euphrates and Dammam aquifers through system of joints and cracks. This study aims to investigate the concentrations of selected heavy metals as pollutants and magnetic susceptibility (MS) and other magnetic properties of sediment samples from fifty sites collected from the bottom of the lake, the study area lies in an industrial area. The results show spatial variations of MS with mean value of about 4.58 x 10‑8 m3 kg‑1. Scanning electron microscopy and magnetic mineralogy parameters indicate the dominance of soft magnetic phase like magnetite and presence of hard magnetic phase like hematite. Spatial variations of MS combined with the concentrations of heavy metals suggests the efficiency of magnetic methods as effective, inexpensive and non-time consuming method to outlining the heavy metal pollution. References: Hassan W.F., 2007. The Physio-chemical characteristic of Sawa lake water in Samawa city-Iraq. Marine Mesopotamica, 22(2), 167-179.

  16. Arsenic fractionation and contamination assessment in sediments of thirteen lakes from the East Plain and Yungui Plateau Ecoregions, China.

    PubMed

    Zan, Fengyu; Huo, Shouliang; Zhang, Jingtian; Zhang, Li; Xi, Beidou; Zhang, Lieyu

    2014-10-01

    Arsenic (As) fractions in the sediments of seven lakes from East Plain Ecoregion and six lakes from Yungui Plateau Ecoregion, China, were investigated. Results indicated that the total As concentrations in sediment samples of lakes of the East Plain Lake Ecoregion are higher than those of Yungui Plateau Lake Ecoregion. Residual As is the main fraction in sediment samples of lakes from both ecoregions, followed by reducible As and soluble or oxidizable As. The total As is correlated to oxidizable As and residual As in sediment samples from both lake ecoregions. As distribution in sediment samples of lakes of the East Plain Ecoregion appears to be affected by human activity, while the As origin mainly comes from natural sources in sediment samples of lakes in the Yungui Plateau Ecoregion. The potential ecological risk index and geoaccumulation index values suggest "low to moderate" risk degree and "unpolluted to moderately polluted" for As in the studied lake sediments. PMID:25288540

  17. Use of hydroacoustic measurements to characterize bottom sediments and guide sampling and remediation of organic contaminants in lake sediments.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Michael A; Conkle, Jeremy L; Pacheco, Porfirio; Gan, Jay

    2013-08-01

    Sampling of bed sediment for contamination characterization is often limited by the heterogeneity in sediment properties and distribution. In this study, we explored the use of hydroacoustic measurements to characterize sediment properties and guide sediment sampling in a small lake contaminated by organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and PCBs. A dual frequency hydroacoustic survey was conducted to characterize sediment properties, distribution, and thickness in McGrath Lake, near Ventura, CA. Based upon these results, sediment core samples were collected from 15 sites on the lake, and sectioned into 20 cm intervals for sediment characterization and analysis of OCPs and PCBs. Very high concentrations of total DDT and total chlordane were found in the sediments, with mean values of 919 and 34.9 ng g(-1), respectively. Concentrations of OCPs were highest at 60-80 cm depth near the inflow at the north end of the lake. Total PCB concentrations were much lower (mean concentration of 4.5 ng g(-1)). Using the hydroacoustic and chemical data, it was estimated that nearly 30,000 m(3) of DDT- and chlordane-contaminated sediment (above effects range median values) was present in the uppermost 1.2 m of sediment in the lake. A hydroacoustic survey can be a valuable tool used to delineate sediment distribution in a lake, identify areas with deeper organic sediment where hydrophobic contaminants would likely be found, and guide sampling. Sampling and chemical analyses are nonetheless needed to quantify contaminant levels in bottom sediments. When combined with hydroacoustic measurements, this approach can reasonably estimate the distributions and volumes of contaminated sediment important in the development of remediation strategies. PMID:23644565

  18. Understanding Sediment Dynamics in a Shallow, Hypereutrophic Lake within the Middle St. Johns River: Lake Jesup, FL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, S.; Anderson, W. T.; Corbett, D. R.; Fugate, D. C.; Scinto, L. J.; Thomas, S.; Brandt-Williams, S.

    2011-12-01

    Improved knowledge of sediment dynamics within a lake system is important for understanding lake water quality. This research was focused on an assessment of the vertical sediment flux in Lake Jesup, a shallow (1.3 m average depth) hypereutrophic lake of central Florida. Sediment dynamics were assessed at varying time scales (daily to weekly) to understand the transport of sediments from external forces; wind, waves, precipitation and/or runoff. Four stations were selected within the lake based on water depth and the thicknesses of unconsolidated (floc) and consolidated sediments. At each of these stations, a 10:1 high aspect ratio trap (STHA) was deployed to collect particulate matter for a one to two week period. The water and sediment samples were collected and analyzed for total carbon (TC), total phosphorus (TP) and total nitrogen (TN). Mass accumulation rates (MAR) collected by the traps varied from 77 to 418 g m-2 d-1 over seven deployments. TN, TP and TC sediment concentrations collected by the traps were consistently higher than the sediments collected by coring the lake bottom and is most likely associated with water column biomass.

  19. High resolution analysis of northern Patagonia lake sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvis, S. W.; Croudace, I. W.; Langdon, P. G.; Rindby, A.

    2009-04-01

    Sediment cores covering the period from the last glacial maximum through the Holocene to the present have been collected from sites in the Chacubuco valley, southern Chile (around 47°08'S, 72°25'W, to the east of the North Patagonian Icecap). Cores were taken from five lakes and one recently dried lake bed. Short cores (0.2 to 0.5m), covering approximately the last two hundred years, were taken from all the lakes. Additionally, long sequences were obtained from one of the lakes and from the dried lake bed, the latter sequence extending back to the last glacial maximum as indicated by thick clay at the base. Each of the lakes are small-medium sized and are open systems situated at 300-1000m above sea level. The shorter cores comprise predominantly clastic gyttja but show a number of distinct changes in colour and chemical composition that suggest major environmental changes over the period of sediment accumulation. This is also reflected in variations in the loss on ignition of samples from the cores and in elemental profiles produced by scanning the cores with the Itrax micro-XRF corescanner at 200μm resolution. The long sequence from the dried lake bed has very low organic content glacial clay at the base, interpreted as last glacial maximum basal clay following determination in the field that this layer exceeded 2m in thickness. Similar sediments occur within a stratigraphically discrete section of approximately 14cm and may relate to a stadial event. The latter section also shows a drop in organic content and appears to be glacial clay incorporating some coarse sandy components indicative of detrital input from the catchment. The second long sequence, from a carbonate lake, includes two mineral layers indicating increased detrital input from the catchment. The deeper and thicker of these layers appears similar to the 14cm layer in the first long sequence, while the upper layer comprises a fine grain size indicative of rock flour and hence also of glacial

  20. Composition of Humic Acids of the Lake Baikal Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnyakova, O.; Chimitdorzhieva, G.; Andreeva, D.

    2012-04-01

    Humic substances are the final stage of the biogeochemical transformation of organic matter in the biosphere. Its natural compounds are found not only in soil, peat, coal, and sediments of basins. Chemical composition and properties of humic substances are determined by the functioning of the ecosystem as a whole. Therefore the study of the unique Lake Baikal sediments can provide information about their genesis, as well as the processes of organic matter transformation. For this purpose, preparations of humic acids (HA) were isolated by alkaline extraction method. The composition of HA was investigated by the elemental analyzer CHNS/O PerkinElmer Series II. Various located sediments of the Lake Baikal were the objects of the study: 1 - Chivyrkuisky Bay, 2 - Kotovo Bay, 3 - Selenga river delta near Dubinino village, 4 - Selenga river delta near Murzino village. Data on the elemental composition of HA in terms of ash-free portion show that the carbon content (CC) is of 50-53% with a maximum value in a sample 3, and minimum - in a sample 2. Such values are characteristic also for the soils with low biochemical activity. The hydrogen content is of 4,2-5,3%, a maximum value is in a sample 1. Data recalculation to the atomic percentages identified following regularities. The CC of HA is of 35-39 at. %. Hydrogen content is of 37-43 at. %. According to the content of these elements investigated substances are clearly divided into two groups: HA of the sediments of the Lake Baikal and river Selenga delta. The magnitude of the atomic ratio H/C can be seen varying degrees of condensation of the molecules of humic acids. The high atomic ratio H/C in HA of the former group indicates the predominance of aliphatic structures in the molecules. Humic acids of the later group are characterized by a low value H/C (<1), suggesting a large proportion of aromatic components in HA composition. In sediments of the Selenga river delta there is an addition of organic matter of terrigenous

  1. Diversity and Composition of Bacterial Community in Soils and Lake Sediments from an Arctic Lake Area

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Neng Fei; Zhang, Tao; Yang, Xiao; Wang, Shuang; Yu, Yong; Dong, Long Long; Guo, Yu Dong; Ma, Yong Xing; Zang, Jia Ye

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the diversity and composition of bacterial communities within soils and lake sediments from an Arctic lake area (London Island, Svalbard). A total of 2,987 operational taxonomic units were identified by high-throughput sequencing, targeting bacterial 16S rRNA gene. The samples from four sites (three samples in each site) were significantly different in geochemical properties and bacterial community composition. Proteobacteria and Acidobacteria were abundant phyla in the nine soil samples, whereas Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were abundant phyla in the three sediment samples. Furthermore, Actinobacteria, Chlorobi, Chloroflexi, Elusimicrobia, Firmicutes, Gemmatimonadetes, Nitrospirae, Planctomycetes, Proteobacteria significantly varied in their abundance among the four sampling sites. Additionally, members of the dominant genera, such as Clostridium, Luteolibacter, Methylibium, Rhodococcus, and Rhodoplanes, were significantly different in their abundance among the four sampling sites. Besides, distance-based redundancy analysis revealed that pH (p < 0.001), water content (p < 0.01), ammonium nitrogen (NH4+-N, p < 0.01), silicate silicon (SiO42--Si, p < 0.01), nitrite nitrogen (NO2--N, p < 0.05), organic carbon (p < 0.05), and organic nitrogen (p < 0.05) were the most significant factors that correlated with the bacterial community composition. The results suggest soils and sediments from a lake area in the Arctic harbor a high diversity of bacterial communities, which are influenced by many geochemical factors of Arctic environments. PMID:27516761

  2. Diversity and Composition of Bacterial Community in Soils and Lake Sediments from an Arctic Lake Area.

    PubMed

    Wang, Neng Fei; Zhang, Tao; Yang, Xiao; Wang, Shuang; Yu, Yong; Dong, Long Long; Guo, Yu Dong; Ma, Yong Xing; Zang, Jia Ye

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the diversity and composition of bacterial communities within soils and lake sediments from an Arctic lake area (London Island, Svalbard). A total of 2,987 operational taxonomic units were identified by high-throughput sequencing, targeting bacterial 16S rRNA gene. The samples from four sites (three samples in each site) were significantly different in geochemical properties and bacterial community composition. Proteobacteria and Acidobacteria were abundant phyla in the nine soil samples, whereas Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were abundant phyla in the three sediment samples. Furthermore, Actinobacteria, Chlorobi, Chloroflexi, Elusimicrobia, Firmicutes, Gemmatimonadetes, Nitrospirae, Planctomycetes, Proteobacteria significantly varied in their abundance among the four sampling sites. Additionally, members of the dominant genera, such as Clostridium, Luteolibacter, Methylibium, Rhodococcus, and Rhodoplanes, were significantly different in their abundance among the four sampling sites. Besides, distance-based redundancy analysis revealed that pH (p < 0.001), water content (p < 0.01), ammonium nitrogen ([Formula: see text]-N, p < 0.01), silicate silicon ([Formula: see text]-Si, p < 0.01), nitrite nitrogen ([Formula: see text]-N, p < 0.05), organic carbon (p < 0.05), and organic nitrogen (p < 0.05) were the most significant factors that correlated with the bacterial community composition. The results suggest soils and sediments from a lake area in the Arctic harbor a high diversity of bacterial communities, which are influenced by many geochemical factors of Arctic environments. PMID:27516761

  3. Numerical Simulation of Sediment-Associated Water Quality Processes for a Mississippi Delta Lake

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three major sediment-associated processes were presented to describe the effects of sediment on lake water quality processes: the effect of suspended sediment on the light intensity for the growth of phytoplankton (PHYTO), the adsorption–desorption of nutrients by sediment, and the release of nutrie...

  4. Quantifying methane flux from lake sediments using multibeam sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scandella, B.; Urban, P.; Delwiche, K.; Greinert, J.; Hemond, H.; Ruppel, C. D.; Juanes, R.

    2013-12-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, and the production and emission of methane from sediments in wetlands, lakes and rivers both contributes to and may be exacerbated by climate change. In some of these shallow-water settings, methane fluxes may be largely controlled by episodic venting that can be triggered by drops in hydrostatic pressure. Even with better constraints on the mechanisms for gas release, quantifying these fluxes has remained a challenge due to rapid spatiotemporal changes in the patterns of bubble emissions from the sediments. The research presented here uses a fixed-location Imagenex DeltaT 837B multibeam sonar to estimate methane-venting fluxes from organic-rich lake sediments over a large area (~400 m2) and over a multi-season deployment period with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. Simpler, single-beam sonar systems have been used in the past to estimate bubble fluxes in a variety of settings. Here we extend this methodology to a multibeam system by means of: (1) detailed calibration of the sonar signal against imposed bubble streams, and (2) validation against an in situ independent record of gas flux captured by overlying bubble traps. The calibrated sonar signals then yield estimates of the methane flux with high spatial resolution (~1 m) and temporal frequency (6 Hz) from a portion of the deepwater basin of Upper Mystic Lake, MA, USA, a temperate eutrophic kettle lake. These results in turn inform mathematical models of methane transport and release from the sediments, which reproduce with high fidelity the ebullitive response to hydrostatic pressure variations. In addition, the detailed information about spatial variability of methane flux derived from sonar records is used to estimate the uncertainty associated with upscaling flux measurements from bubble traps to the scale of the sonar observation area. Taken together, these multibeam sonar measurements and analysis provide a novel quantitative approach for the assessment of

  5. Unravelling Copenhagen's stride into the Anthropocene using lake sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Norman; Andersen, Thorbjørn J.; Frei, Robert; Ilsøe, Peter; Louchouarn, Patrick; Andersen, Kenneth; Funder, Svend; Rasmussen, Peter; Andresen, Camilla S.; Odgaard, Bent; Kjær, Kurt H.

    2014-05-01

    Industrialization including the effects of expanding energy consumption and metallurgy production as well as population growth and demographic pressure increased heavy-metal pollution loads progressively since the Industrial Revolution. Especially the burning of fossil fuels mobilizes heavy metals like lead and zinc on a large scale. By wet and dry deposition, these loads end up in the aquatic environment where sediments serve as sinks for these contaminations. In this study, we examine the pollution history of Copenhagen, Denmark. A sediment core was retrieved for the lake in the Botanical Gardens in central Copenhagen using a rod-operated piston corer. The water body used to be part of the old town's defence-wall system and was turned into a lake by terrain levelling in the mid 17th century. After initial X-ray fluorescence core scanning, element concentrations were determined using emission spectroscopy. The onset of gyttja accumulation in the lake is assumed to start immediately after the construction of the fortification in approximately AD 1645. An age model representing the last approximately 135 years for the uppermost 60cm was established by lead-210 and cesium-137 dating. The older part was dated via recognition of markedly increased levels of levoglucosan which are interpreted to be linked with recorded fires in Copenhagen. Similarly, two distinct layers interstratify the sediment column and mark pronounced increases of minerogenic material inflow which can be linked to known historical events. Significant pollution load increases are evident from the 1700s along with urban growth and extended combustion of carbon carriers fuels such as wood and coals. However, a more pronounced increase in lead and zinc deposition only begins by the mid-19th century. Maxima for the latter two pollutants are reached in the late 1970s followed by a reduction of emissions in accordance with stricter environmental regulations. Here, especially the phasing-out of tetraethyl

  6. Mississippi oxbow lake sediment quality during an artificial flood.

    PubMed

    Knight, S S; Lizotte, R E; Moore, M T; Smith, S; Shields, F D

    2009-04-01

    Surface sediment quality was assessed during a 35-day artificial flood in a shallow (<1.5 m) oxbow lake along the Coldwater River, Mississippi, using Hyalella azteca 28-day bioassays. Seventeen pesticides were monitored in sediments before, during and after flooding, with increases in atrazine and metolachlor concentrations coinciding with two unexpected storm events, 51 and 56 mm, during and after flooding, respectively. Mean 28-day H. azteca survival was >85% throughout this study. However, growth was affected at three sites during flooding with limited growth recovery after flooding. Patterns in observed growth impairment were associated with changes in atrazine (R(2)=0.524) and fipronil sulfone (R(2)=0.584) concentrations. PMID:19183821

  7. The behavior of acoustic waves in the lakes bottom sediments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krylov, Pavel; Nourgaliev, Danis; Yasonov, Pavel

    2016-04-01

    Seismic studies are used for various tasks, such as the study of the bottom sediments properties, finding sunken objects, reconstruction the reservoir history, etc. Multiple acoustic waves are an enormous obstacle in obtaining full seismic record. Multiples from the bottom of a body of water (the surface of the base of water and the rock or sediment beneath it) and the air-water surface are common in lake seismic data. Multiple reflections on the seismic cross-sections are usually located on the double distance from the air/water surface. However, sometime multiple reflections from liquid deposits cannot be generated or they reflected from the deeper horizons. It is observed the phenomenon of changes in reflectance of the water/weakly consolidated sediments acoustic boundary under the influence of the acoustic wave. This phenomenon lies in the fact that after the first acoustic impact and reflection of acoustic wave for some time the reflectance of this boundary remains close to 0. This event on a cross-section can explain by the short-term changes in the properties of bottom sediments under the influence of shock? acoustic wave, with a further reduction of these properties to the next wave generation (generation period of 2 seconds). Perhaps in these deposits occurs thixotropic process. The paper presents the seismic acoustic cross-sections of Lake Balkhash (Kazakhstan), Turgoyak (Russia). The work was carried out according to the Russia Government's Program of Competitive Growth of Kazan Federal University, supported by the grant provided to the Kazan State University for performing the state program in the field of scientific research, and partially supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic research (grants № 14-05-00785, 16-35-00452).

  8. Microbial Fe cycling and mineralization in sediments of an acidic, hypersaline lake (Lake Tyrell, Victoria, Australia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roden, E. E.; Blöthe, M.; Shelobolina, E.

    2009-12-01

    Lake Tyrrell is a variably acidic, hypersaline, Fe-rich lake located in Victoria, Australia. Terrestrial acid saline lakes like Lake Tyrrell may be analogs for ancient Martian surface environments, as well as possible extant subsurface environments. To investigate the potential for microbial Fe cycling under acidic conditions and high salt concentration, we collected sediment core samples during three field trips between 2006 and 2008 from the southern, acidic edge of the lake. Materials from the cores were used for chemical and mineralogical analyses, as well as for molecular (16S rRNA genes) and culture-based microbiological studies. Near-surface (< 1 m depth) pore fluids contained low but detectable dissolved oxygen (ca. 50 uM), significant dissolved Fe(II) (ca. 500 uM), and nearly constant pH of around 4 - conditions conducive to enzymatic Fe(II) oxidation. High concentrations of Fe(III) oxides begin accumulate at a depth of ca. 10 cm, and may reflect the starting point for formation of massive iron concretions that are evident at and beneath the sediment surface. MPN analyses revealed low (10-100 cells/mL) but detectable populations of aerobic, halophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing organisms on the sediment surface and in the near-surface ground water. With culture-dependent methods at least three different halotolerant lithoautotrophic cultures growing on Fe(II), thiosulfate, or tetrathionate from different acidic sites were obtained. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that these organisms are similar to previous described gamma proteobacteria Thiobacillus prosperus (95%), Halothiobacillus kellyi (99%), Salinisphaera shabanense (95%) and a Marinobacter species. (98%). 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing data from two different sites with a pH range between 3 and 4.5 revealed a dominance of gamma proteobacteria. 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing libraries from both cores were dominated by sequences related to the Ectothiorhodospiraceae family, which includes the taxa

  9. Relict landscape resistance to dissection by upstream migrating knickpoints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocard, Gilles Y.; Willenbring, Jane K.; Miller, Thomas E.; Scatena, Frederik N.

    2016-06-01

    Expanses of subdued topographies are common at high elevation in mountain ranges. They are often interpreted as relict landscapes and are expected to be replaced by steeper topography as erosion proceeds. Preservation of such relict fragments can merely reflect the fact that it takes time to remove any preexisting topography. However, relict fragments could also possess intrinsic characteristics that make them resilient to dissection. We document here the propagation of a wave of dissection across an uplifted relict landscape in Puerto Rico. Using 10Be-26Al burial dating on cave sediments, we show that uplift started 4 Ma and that river knickpoints have since migrated very slowly across the landscape. Modern detrital 10Be erosion rates are consistent with these long-term rates of knickpoint retreat. Analysis of knickpoint distribution, combined with visual observations along the streambeds, indicates that incision by abrasion and plucking is so slow that bedrock weathering becomes a competing process of knickpoint retreat. The studied rivers flow over a massive stock of quartz diorite surrounded by an aureole of metavolcanic rocks. Earlier studies have shown that vegetation over the relict topography efficiently limits erosion, allowing for the formation of a thick saprolite underneath. Such slow erosion reduces streambed load fluxes delivered to the knickpoints, as well as bed load grain size. Both processes limit abrasion. Compounding the effect of slow abrasion, wide joint spacing in the bedrock makes plucking infrequent. Thus, the characteristics of the relict upstream landscape have a direct effect on stream incision farther downstream, reducing the celerity at which the relict, subdued landscape is dissected. We conclude that similar top-down controls on river incision rate may help many relict landscapes to persist amidst highly dissected topographies.

  10. Dissimilatory arsenate and sulfate reduction in sediments of two hypersaline, arsenic-rich soda lakes: Mono and Searles Lakes, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kulp, T.R.; Hoeft, S.E.; Miller, L.G.; Saltikov, C.; Murphy, J.N.; Han, S.; Lanoil, B.; Oremland, R.S.

    2006-01-01

    A radioisotope method was devised to study bacterial respiratory reduction of arsenate in sediments. The following two arsenic-rich soda lakes in California were chosen for comparison on the basis of their different salinities: Mono Lake (???90 g/liter) and Searles Lake (???340 g/liter). Profiles of arsenate reduction and sulfate reduction were constructed for both lakes. Reduction of [73As] arsenate occurred at all depth intervals in the cores from Mono Lake (rate constant [k] = 0.103 to 0.04 h-1) and Searles Lake (k = 0.012 to 0.002 h-1), and the highest activities occurred in the top sections of each core. In contrast, [35S] sulfate reduction was measurable in Mono Lake (k = 7.6 ?? 104 to 3.2 ?? 10-6 h-1) but not in Searles Lake. Sediment DNA was extracted, PCR amplified, and separated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) to obtain phylogenetic markers (i.e., 16S rRNA genes) and a partial functional gene for dissimilatory arsenate reduction (arrA). The amplified arrA gene product showed a similar trend in both lakes; the signal was strongest in surface sediments and decreased to undetectable levels deeper in the sediments. More arrA gene signal was observed in Mono Lake and was detectable at a greater depth, despite the higher arsenate reduction activity observed in Searles Lake. A partial sequence (about 900 bp) was obtained for a clone (SLAS-3) that matched the dominant DGGE band found in deeper parts of the Searles Lake sample (below 3 cm), and this clone was found to be closely related to SLAS-1, a novel extremophilic arsenate respirer previously cultivated from Searles Lake. Copyright ?? 2006, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Geomicrobiology of Fe-rich crusts in Lake Superior sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittrich, M.; Monreau, L.; Quazi, S.; Raoof, B.; Chesnyuk, A.; Katsev, S.; Fulthorpe, R.

    2012-04-01

    The limnological puzzles of Lake Superior are increasingly attracting scientists, and very little is known about the sediments and their associated microflora. The sediments are organic poor (less than 5%C) and the lake is deep oligotrophic, with water temperatures at the bottom around 3C. Previous studies reveal Fe-rich layers in the sediments at multiple loccations around the lake. The origin and mechanisms of formation of this layer remain unknown. In this study we investigated geochemical and microbiological processes that may lead to the formation of a two cm thick iron layer about 10 cm below the sediment surface. Sediment cores from two stations (EM, 230m water depth and ED, 310m water depth) in the East Basin were used. We monitored oxygen and pH depth profiles with microsensors, porewater and sediment solid matter were analyzed for nutrient and metal contents. Furthermore, phosphorus and iron sequantial extractions of sediment cores have been perfomed. The total cell count was determined using DAPI epifluoresence microscopy. DNA was extracted from the sediment samples and 16S ribosonal RNA amplicons were analyzed with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). For a more in depth analysis, DNA samples from 8-10 cm and 10-12 cm were sent to the Research and Testing Lab (Texas) for pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons amplified using barcoded universal primers 27f-519r. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) images from the iron layer 10-12cm show filaments that were encrusted with spheres ca. 20 nm in diameter. SEM observations of thin sections also indicate the presence of very fine particles showing various morphologies. Analyses of the deposit material by SEM and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) indicate that bacteria cells surfaces served as nucleation surfaces for Fe-oxide formation. EDS line-scans through bacterial cells covered with precipitates reveal phosphorus and carbon peaks at interface between cell surface and Fe

  12. Australian Acid Brine Lake as a Mars Analog: An Analysis of Preserved Lipids in Shore and Lake Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, H. V.; Stern, J. C.; Baldridge, A. M.; Thomsen, B. J.

    2016-05-01

    This study investigates organic molecules preserved in sediment cores from an acid brine lake. We explore the distribution and stable isotopic composition of lipids in order to understand preservation potential in similar martian environments.

  13. MERCURY IN SEDIMENTS AND FISH FROM NORTH MISSISSIPPI LAKES AND SUBSEQUENT HUMAN HAZARD EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediments and/or fish were collected from Sardis, Enid and Grenada Lakes, which are located in three different watersheds in North Mississippi, in order to assess mercury contamination. The mean total mercury concentration in sediments from Enid Lake in 1997 was 0.154 mg Hg/kg, w...

  14. Characterization of organic phosphorus in lake sediments by sequential fractionation and enzymatic hydrolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of the phosphorus (P) fractions and their bioavailability in sediments is fundamental for understanding the biogeochemical process of P cycle and its role on eutrophication in the lake ecosystems. In this study, 18 surface sediments samples were collected from Dianchi Lake, an eutrophic la...

  15. Draft Genome of Janthinobacterium sp. RA13 Isolated from Lake Washington Sediment.

    PubMed

    McTaggart, Tami L; Shapiro, Nicole; Woyke, Tanja; Chistoserdova, Ludmila

    2015-01-01

    Sequencing the genome of Janthinobacterium sp. RA13 from Lake Washington sediment is announced. From the genome content, a versatile life-style is predicted, but not bona fide methylotrophy. With the availability of its genomic sequence, Janthinobacterium sp. RA13 presents a prospective model for studying microbial communities in lake sediments. PMID:25676775

  16. Draft Genomes of Two Strains of Flavobacterium Isolated from Lake Washington Sediment

    PubMed Central

    McTaggart, Tami L.; Shapiro, Nicole; Woyke, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    We report sequencing the genomes of two new Flavobacterium strains isolated from Lake Washington sediment. From genomic contents, versatile lifestyles were predicted but not bona fide methylotrophy. With the availability of their genomic sequences, the new Flavobacterium strains present prospective models for studying microbial communities in lake sediments. PMID:25700420

  17. Draft Genome of Pseudomonas sp. Strain 11/12A, Isolated from Lake Washington Sediment.

    PubMed

    McTaggart, Tami L; Shapiro, Nicole; Woyke, Tanja; Chistoserdova, Ludmila

    2015-01-01

    We announce here the genome sequencing of Pseudomonas sp. strain 11/12A from Lake Washington sediment. From the genome content, a versatile lifestyle is predicted but not one of bona fide methylotrophy. With the availability of its genomic sequence, Pseudomonas sp. 11/12A presents a prospective model for studying microbial communities in lake sediments. PMID:25700412

  18. Draft Genome of Pseudomonas sp. Strain 11/12A, Isolated from Lake Washington Sediment

    PubMed Central

    McTaggart, Tami L.; Shapiro, Nicole; Woyke, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    We announce here the genome sequencing of Pseudomonas sp. strain 11/12A from Lake Washington sediment. From the genome content, a versatile lifestyle is predicted but not one of bona fide methylotrophy. With the availability of its genomic sequence, Pseudomonas sp. 11/12A presents a prospective model for studying microbial communities in lake sediments. PMID:25700412

  19. Draft genomes of two strains of flavobacterium isolated from lake washington sediment.

    PubMed

    McTaggart, Tami L; Shapiro, Nicole; Woyke, Tanja; Chistoserdova, Ludmila

    2015-01-01

    We report sequencing the genomes of two new Flavobacterium strains isolated from Lake Washington sediment. From genomic contents, versatile lifestyles were predicted but not bona fide methylotrophy. With the availability of their genomic sequences, the new Flavobacterium strains present prospective models for studying microbial communities in lake sediments. PMID:25700420

  20. Draft Genome of Janthinobacterium sp. RA13 Isolated from Lake Washington Sediment

    PubMed Central

    McTaggart, Tami L.; Shapiro, Nicole; Woyke, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Sequencing the genome of Janthinobacterium sp. RA13 from Lake Washington sediment is announced. From the genome content, a versatile life-style is predicted, but not bona fide methylotrophy. With the availability of its genomic sequence, Janthinobacterium sp. RA13 presents a prospective model for studying microbial communities in lake sediments. PMID:25676775

  1. Sediment budget including the role of floodplains: the case of Lake Tana Basin (Ethiopia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemma, Hanibal; Admasu, Teshager; Dessie, Mekete; Fentie, Derbew; Poesen, Jean; Lanckriet, Sil; Adgo, Enyew; Nyssen, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Based on the collection of a large new dataset, we quantify the sediment 1) mobilized on the hillslopes surrounding Lake Tana (Ethiopia), 2) stored on the floodplains, 3) transported into the lake, 4) deposited in the lake and 5) delivered out of the lake so as to establish a sediment budget. In 2012 and 2013, suspended sediment concentration (SSC) and discharge measurements were made at 13 monitoring stations, including two lake outlets. 4635 SSC samples were collected and sediment rating curves that account for land cover conditions and rainfall seasonality were established for the 11 river stations, and mean monthly SSC was calculated for the outlets. Effects of the floodplain on rivers' sediment yield (SY) were investigated using the measurements at the upper and lower stations of Gilgel Abay, Gumara, Megech and Rib Rivers. SY from ungauged rivers was assessed using a model that includes catchment area and rainfall, whereas bedload and direct sediment input from lake shores were estimated. As a result, the gross annual SY from both gauged and ungauged rivers, bedload and lake shores was ca. 3.14 million tons, dominantly from Gilgel Abay and Gumara Rivers. The 0.48 million tons sedimentation in floodplains indicate that the floodplains serve as sediment sink. Moreover, annually about 1.09 million tons of sediment leaves the lake through the two outlets. Annual deposition in Lake Tana was about 1.56 million tons with a trapping efficiency of 60%. Furthermore, SSC and SY are generally higher at the beginning of the rainy season because soil in cultivated fields is bare and loose due to frequent ploughing and seedbed preparation. Later on in the season, increased crop and vegetation cover lead to a decrease in sediment supplies. Based on the established sediment budget and its calculated components, one can conclude that the expected lifetime of Lake Tana (20,396 years) is longer than what was anticipated in earlier studies.

  2. [Pollution Status and Migration of Mercury in the Sediments of Nansi Lake in Shandong Province].

    PubMed

    Cao, Fei-fei; Yang, Li-yuan; Pang, Xu-gui; Wang, Bing-hua; Wang, Yun-qian

    2015-05-01

    The content of mercury and fractions were determined, in order to discuss the pollution situation and migration ability of mercury in inflow rivers and surface sediments of Nansi Lake. The average content of mercury in the sediments of the Nansi Lake was 0.046 mg · kg(-1), significantly higher than the environmental background values, which showed that Nansi Lake suffered from mercury pollution. Mercury in sediments existed mainly in the residual fraction, accounting for 65. 15%. The proportion of non-residual fractions was relatively small, in the order of organic bound fraction (30.61%), extractable fraction (2.93%), and Fe/Mn oxide (1.31%). The spatial change of non-residual fractions was that Weishan Lake and Nanyang Lake had higher non-residual mercury content than Zhaoyang Lake and Dushan Lake, and the non-residual mercury had a certain potential ecological harm on Weishan Lake and Nanyang Lake. From the horizontal view, the mercury content in the surface sediments of Nansi Lake had visible difference and the pollution degree was different among sub-lakes, so horizontal migration of mercury was obvious. Vertically, the mercury content showed a trend of increasing from the bottom to the top in core sediments, which might be associated with social and economic conditions in different periods. PMID:26314107

  3. Bottom sediments of Lorence Creek Lake, San Antonio, Texas, reflect contaminant trends in an urbanizing watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ging, Patricia B.; Van Metre, P.C.; Callender, Edward

    1999-01-01

    Historical use of pesticides and rapid urbanization have left their mark on the chemistry of bottom sediments in Lorence Creek Lake (fig. 1) in the northern part of San Antonio, Tex. Several metals, organochlorine compounds (pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls [PCBs]), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) detected in bottom sediments of the lake have temporal trends indicating anthropogenic (human) sources. Lorence Creek Lake is not unique; the same metals and organic compounds are routinely found in lake sediments in urbanizing watersheds (Van Metre and Callender, in press).

  4. Abrupt climate-triggered lake ecosystem changes recorded in late glacial lake sediments in northern Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slowinski, M. M.; Zawiska, I.; Ott, F.; Noryskiewicz, A. M.; Apolinarska, K.; Lutynska, M.; Michczynska, D. J.; Brauer, A.; Wulf, S.; Skubala, P.; Blaszkiewicz, M.

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to better understand how local lake ecosystems responded to abrupt climate changes through applying multi-proxy sediment analyses. Therefore, we carried out a detailed and high-resolution case study on the late glacial sediment from the Trzechowskie palaeolake located in the eastern part of the Pomeranian Lakeland, northern Poland. We reconstructed climate induced environmental changes in the paleolake and its catchment using biotic proxies (macrofossils, pollen, cladocera, diatoms, oribatidae mite) and classical geochemical proxies (δ18O, δ13C, loss-on-ignition, CaCO3 content) in combination with high-resolution μ-XRF element core scanning. The core chronology has been established by means of biostratigraphy, AMS 14C-dating on plant macro remains, varve counting in laminated intervals and tephrochronology. The latter was possible by the discovery of the late Allerød Laacher See Tephra for the first time at such eastern location. Biogenic accumulation in the lake started rather late during the lateglacial interstadial at 13903×170 cal yrs BP. The rapid and pronounced cooling at the beginning of the Younger Dryas had a major impact on the lake and its catchment as clearly reflected by both, biotic and geochemical proxies. The depositional environment of the lake abruptly changed from a varved to massive gytjia. The pronounced warming at the demise of Younger Dryas cooling is well-reflected in all environmental indicators but with conspicuous leads and lags reflecting complex responses of lake ecosystems to climate warming. The research was supported by the National Science Centre Poland - NN306085037. This study is a contribution to the Virtual Institute ICLEA (Integrated Climate and Landscape Evolution Analysis) funded by the Helmholtz Association.

  5. The origin and distribution of subbottom sediments in southern Lake Champlain.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Freeman-Lynde, R. P.; Hutchinson, D.R.; Folger, D.W.; Wiley, B.H.; Hewett, M.J.

    1980-01-01

    3 units, correlatable with recent Lake Champlain, late-glacial marine Champlain Sea, and proglacial Lake Vermont sediments, have been identified from seismic reflection profiles and 8 piston cores. Lake Vermont deposits are nonfossiliferous and range from thin to absent nearshore and on bedrock highs to more than 126 m thick near Split Rock Point. Champlain Sea sediments contain marine foraminifers and ostracodes and are fairly uniform in thickness (20-30 m). Recent Lake Champlain sediments range in thickness from 0 to 25 m. Average sedimentation rates for Lake Vermont are considerably higher (4-8 cm/yr) than those for the Champlain Sea (0.8-1.2 cm/yr) and Lake Champlain (0.14-0.15 cm/yr). Bedrock, till, and deltaic and alluvial deposits were also identified.- from Authors

  6. Elevated sulfate reduction in metal-contaminated freshwater lake sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Gough, H.L.; Dahl, A.L.; Tribou, E.; Noble, P.A.; Gaillard, J.-F.; Stahl, D.A.

    2009-01-06

    Although sulfate-reducing prokaryotes have long been studied as agents of metals bioremediation, impacts of long-term metals exposure on biologically mediated sulfur cycling in natural systems remains poorly understood. The effects of long-term exposure to metal stress on the freshwater sulfur cycle were studied, with a focus on biologic sulfate reduction using a combination of microbial and chemical methods. To examine the effects after decades of adaptation time, a field-based experiment was conducted using multiple study sites in a natural system historically impacted by a nearby zinc smelter (Lake DePue, Illinois). Rates were highest at the most metals-contaminated sites (-35 {mu}mol/cm{sup 3}/day) and decreased with decreased pore water zinc and arsenic contamination levels, while other environmental characteristics (i.e., pH, nutrient concentrations and physical properties) showed little between-site variation. Correlations were established using an artificial neural network to evaluate potentially non-linear relationships between sulfate reduction rates (SRR) and measured environmental variables. SRR in Lake DePue were up to 50 times higher than rates previously reported for lake sediments and the chemical speciation of Zn was dominated by the presence of ZnS as shown by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). These results suggest that long-term metal stress of natural systems might alter the biogeochemical cycling of sulfur by contributing to higher rates of sulfate reduction.

  7. Assessment of Sediment Measurements in Lake Michigan as a Case Study: Implications for Monitoring and Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lake Michigan, the sixth largest freshwater lake in the world by surface area, was utilized as a water body for assessment within a case study. Field data collected at 116 sediment sampling sites throughout the lake in an intensive monitoring effort were utilized for assessment ...

  8. ASSESSING WATER QUALITY CHANGES IN THE LAKES OF THE NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATES USING SEDIMENT DIATOMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diatom assemblages were selected as indicators of lake condition and to assess historical lake water quality changes in 257 lakes in the northeastern United States. The "top" (surface sediments, present-day) and "bottom" (generally from >30 cm deep, representing historical condit...

  9. Bioavailability and preservation of organic phosphorus in freshwater sediments and its role in lake eutrophication

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lake eutrophication in China is a serious environmental concern, especially in lakes from the middle and lower reaches of Yangtze River region and Southwestern China Plateau. The dissolution of organic matter can result in release of phosphorus (P) from lake sediments and organic phosphate (Po) itse...

  10. Ferromagnetic response of a sediment record from Lake Soppensee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kind, J.; García-Rubio, I.; Gehring, A. U.

    2012-12-01

    Environmental magnetism uses the spatial and temporal occurrence of magnetic carriers as diagnostic tools to detect environmental changes. Concentration, composition, grain size, and configuration of magnetite can be indicative of the origin of this magnetic carrier. In order to reconstruct the development of Lake Soppensee (Central Switzerland) since the late Pleistocene, a detailed ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectroscopy analysis was applied. FMR is a powerful tool to probe the magnetic properties of ferrimagnetic materials. Sediments from Lake Soppensee were analyzed in order to deduce different processes causing the formation of magnetite and its preservation. Based on the occurrence of magnetite, the sediment record can be subdivided into three stages. The first stage, attributed to the deglaciation contains superparamagnetic (SP) magnetite that is detected by the low-temperature FMR analysis. The simultaneous occurrence of SP magnetite in sediments with predominant hematite is interpreted as magnetite formation in reducing interstitial voids within a prevailing oxic environment. The second stage, assigned to the Bølling/Allerød - Younger Dryas period contains stable single domain (SSD) magnetite in varying concentrations. During the Bølling/Allerød denser vegetation cover led to an increase of organic matter in the depositional environment, which accelerated the microbial activity and the consumption of oxygen and the enhanced formation of SSD magnetite. An opposite trend is found for the cold Younger Dryas period. The third stage during the fairly stable Holocene exhibits the formation of SSD magnetite solely. Even though no drastic climatic changes are documented throughout the Holocene, the magnetite content varies considerably. In sediments with high magnetite content, dispersed magnetite particles and magnetite in chain-like configuration were detected by anisotropy traits inferred from the FMR spectra. This configuration provides clear evidence

  11. Heavy metal contamination of sediments in the upper connecting channels of the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, S. Jerrine; Manny, Bruce A.; Schloesser, Donald W.; Edsall, Thomas A.

    1991-01-01

    In 1985, sampling at 250 stations throughout the St. Marys, St. Clair, and Detroit rivers and Lake St. Clair — the connecting channels of the upper Great Lakes — revealed widespread metal contamination of the sediments. Concentrations of cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, and zinc each exceeded U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sediment pollution guidelines at one or more stations throughout the study area. Sediments were polluted more frequently by copper, nickel, zinc, and lead than by cadmium, chromium, or mercury. Sediments with the highest concentrations of metals were found (in descending order) in the Detroit River, the St. Marys River, the St. Clair River, and Lake St. Clair. Although metal contamination of sediments was most common and sediment concentrations of metals were generally highest near industrial areas, substantial contamination of sediments by metals was present in sediment deposition areas up to 60 km from any known source of pollution.

  12. Suspended-sediment budget, flow distribution, and lake circulation for the Fox Chain of Lakes in Lake and McHenry Counties, Illinois, 1997-99

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schrader, David L.; Holmes, Jr., Robert R.

    2000-01-01

    The Fox Chain of Lakes is a glacial lake system in McHenry and Lake Counties in northern Illinois and southern Wisconsin. Sedimentation and nutrient overloading have occurred in the lake system since the first dam was built (1907) in McHenry to raise water levels in the lake system. Using data collected from December 1, 1997, to June 1, 1999, suspended-sediment budgets were constructed for the most upstream lake in the system, Grass Lake, and for the lakes downstream from Grass Lake. A total of 64,900 tons of suspended sediment entered Grass Lake during the study, whereas a total of 70,600 tons of suspended sediment exited the lake, indicating a net scour of 5,700 tons of sediment. A total of 44,100 tons of suspended sediment was measured exiting the Fox Chain of Lakes at Johnsburg, whereas 85,600 tons entered the system downstream from Grass Lake. These suspended-sediment loads indicate a net deposition of 41,500 tons downstream from Grass Lake, which represents a trapping efficiency of 48.5 percent. A large amount of recreational boating takes place on the Fox Chain of Lakes during summer months, and suspended-sediment load was observed to rise from 110 tons per day to 339 tons per day during the 1999 Memorial Day weekend (May 26 ?31, 1999). Presumably, this rise was the result of the boating traffic because no other hydrologic event is known to have occurred that might have caused the rise. This study covers a relatively short period and may not represent the long-term processes of the Fox Chain of Lakes system, although the sediment transport was probably higher than an average year. The bed sediments found on the bottom of the lakes are composed of mainly fine particles in the silt-clay range. The Grass Lake sediments were characterized as black peat with an organic content of between 9 and 18 percent, and the median particle size ranged from 0.000811 to 0.0013976 inches. Other bed material samples were collected at streamflow-gaging stations on the

  13. Sediment Loading from Crab Creek and Other Sources to Moses Lake, Washington, 2007 and 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Magirl, Christopher S.; Cox, Stephen E.; Mastin, Mark C.; Huffman, Raegan L.

    2010-01-01

    The average sediment-accumulation rate on the bed of Moses Lake since 1980, based on the identification of Mount St. Helens ash in lakebed cores, was 0.24 inches per year. Summed over the lake surface area, the average sediment-accumulation rate on the lakebed is 190,000 tons per year. Based on USGS stream-gaging station data, the average annual sediment load to Moses Lake from Crab Creek was 32,000 tons per year between 1943 and 2008; the post Mount St. Helens eruption annual load from Crab Creek was calculated to be 13,000 tons per year. The total mass input from Crab Creek and other fluvially derived sediment sources since 1980 has been about 20,000 tons per year. Eolian sediment loading to Moses Lake was about 50,000 tons per year before irrigation and land-use development largely stabilized the Moses Lake dune field. Currently, eolian input to the lake is less than 2,000 tons per year. Considering all sediment sources to the lake, most (from 80 to 90 percent) of post-1980 lakebed-sediment accumulation is from autochthonous, or locally formed, mineral matter, including diatom frustuals and carbonate shells, derived from biogenic production in phytoplankton and zooplankton. Suspended-sediment samples collected from Crab Creek and similar nearby waterways in 2007 and 2008 combined with other USGS data from the region indicated that a proposed Bureau of Reclamation supplemental feed of as much as 650 cubic feet per second through Crab Creek might initially contain a sediment load of as much as 1,500 tons per day. With time, however, this sediment load would decrease to about 10 tons per day in the sediment-supply-limited creek as available sediment in the channel is depleted. Sediment loads in the supplemental feed ultimately would be similar to loads in other bypass canals near Moses Lake. Considering the hydrology and geomorphology of the creek over multiple years, there is little evidence that the proposed supplemental feed would substantially increase the

  14. Comparison of oxygen isotope values from bulk lake sediment and ostracod valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, J.; Blisniuk, P.

    2012-12-01

    The oxygen isotope composition of the water in a lake is largely controlled by the isotopic composition of precipitation in the lake's catchment area, which is, in turn, controlled by a variety of geographic and climatic factors. Accordingly, the potential to reconstruct past isotopic compositions of lake water using authigenic minerals formed in isotopic equilibrium with the lake water makes lake sediments a promising target for paleoclimate reconstructions. Several different materials can be utilized to reconstruct the oxygen isotope composition of paleo-lake water. These include biogenic carbonates, such as shells of macrofossils (e.g., clams and snails), microfossils, (e.g., ostracods) and chemically precipitated carbonates in bulk lake sediment. To evaluate the suitability of different materials for the reconstruction of oxygen isotope values of past precipitation, we compared the oxygen isotope values of bulk lake sediments and ostracod microfossils that were extracted from an 800 meters thick sequence of sediments in the Zada Basin, southwestern Tibet. The sediment was wet-sieved for grain size separation, and the <63 um size fraction was used for the analysis of the bulk lake sediment. The ostracod microfossils were typically separated from the 125-500 um size fraction. Ostracod valves were cleaned using deionized water and ultrasound. When this did not successfully clean them, we used a brush under a microscope. Preliminary results of our work yielded oxygen isotope values of -2 to -22 permil for bulk lake sediment and a narrower range of -4 to -15 permil for ostracod valves (relative to PDB). In some stratigraphic levels, the oxygen isotope values differed by as much as 10 permil. These differences are significantly higher than offsets of several permil which are commonly observed as the result of species specific vital effects during biogenic calcite precipitation. A plausible explanation for this is that the lake sediment contains a significant portion

  15. Microbial sulfur transformations in sediments from Subglacial Lake Whillans.

    PubMed

    Purcell, Alicia M; Mikucki, Jill A; Achberger, Amanda M; Alekhina, Irina A; Barbante, Carlo; Christner, Brent C; Ghosh, Dhritiman; Michaud, Alexander B; Mitchell, Andrew C; Priscu, John C; Scherer, Reed; Skidmore, Mark L; Vick-Majors, Trista J; The Wissard Science Team

    2014-01-01

    Diverse microbial assemblages inhabit subglacial aquatic environments. While few of these environments have been sampled, data reveal that subglacial organisms gain energy for growth from reduced minerals containing nitrogen, iron, and sulfur. Here we investigate the role of microbially mediated sulfur transformations in sediments from Subglacial Lake Whillans (SLW), Antarctica, by examining key genes involved in dissimilatory sulfur oxidation and reduction. The presence of sulfur transformation genes throughout the top 34 cm of SLW sediments changes with depth. SLW surficial sediments were dominated by genes related to known sulfur-oxidizing chemoautotrophs. Sequences encoding the adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate (APS) reductase gene, involved in both dissimilatory sulfate reduction and sulfur oxidation, were present in all samples and clustered into 16 distinct operational taxonomic units. The majority of APS reductase sequences (74%) clustered with known sulfur oxidizers including those within the "Sideroxydans" and Thiobacillus genera. Reverse-acting dissimilatory sulfite reductase (rDSR) and 16S rRNA gene sequences further support dominance of "Sideroxydans" and Thiobacillus phylotypes in the top 2 cm of SLW sediments. The SLW microbial community has the genetic potential for sulfate reduction which is supported by experimentally measured low rates (1.4 pmol cm(-3)d(-1)) of biologically mediated sulfate reduction and the presence of APS reductase and DSR gene sequences related to Desulfobacteraceae and Desulfotomaculum. Our results also infer the presence of sulfur oxidation, which can be a significant energetic pathway for chemosynthetic biosynthesis in SLW sediments. The water in SLW ultimately flows into the Ross Sea where intermediates from subglacial sulfur transformations can influence the flux of solutes to the Southern Ocean. PMID:25477865

  16. Controlling factors on methanogenesisin the deep sediment of Lake Kinneret

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, M.; Sivan, O.; Ronen, Z.; Eckert, W.

    2012-04-01

    The main pathways of methane production (methanogenesis) are through fermentation of acetate (acetoclastic methanogenesis) and through CO2 reduction with hydrogen (hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis). In most freshwater environment the dominant pathway is through acetoclastic methanogenesis, while in marine sediments the main pathway is through CO2 reduction. Another minor pathway of methane production is through methylotrophic methanogenesis with noncompetitive substrate like methylamine etc. This study investigates the controlling parameters on methanogenesis in deep lacustrine sediments and their link to methanotrophy process. Our findings suggest that in Lake Kinneret (Israel) sediments (Station A, 38 m depth), methanogenesis is restricted to a zone between 3 and 25 cm depth and ends abruptly. This is based on a model calculation and slurry incubation experiments. Below this zone there is a sink for methane, and sets of geochemical data show that this methane sink is related to anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), which is most likely driven by iron reduction rather than sulfate reduction. In order to explore this ending of methanogenesis and its link to the deep AOM; in-situ profiles in the sediments as well as slurry incubation experiments in modified conditions were conducted. Profiles of dissolved organic carbon and acetate show increase in concentrations with depth, suggesting that the ending of methanogenesis is not trivial. Preliminary incubation of sediments from different depths show accumulation of acetate with depth concurrently to lower methane accumulation even with addition of acetate. Considering that the common substrates concentrations increase at this depth, the abrupt absence of methanogenesis is surprising. Different additions to the slurries suggest a link between methane, sulfur and iron at that depth that affects both methanogenesis and the deep AOM process.

  17. Microbial sulfur transformations in sediments from Subglacial Lake Whillans

    PubMed Central

    Purcell, Alicia M.; Mikucki, Jill A.; Achberger, Amanda M.; Alekhina, Irina A.; Barbante, Carlo; Christner, Brent C.; Ghosh, Dhritiman; Michaud, Alexander B.; Mitchell, Andrew C.; Priscu, John C.; Scherer, Reed; Skidmore, Mark L.; Vick-Majors, Trista J.; the WISSARD Science Team

    2014-01-01

    Diverse microbial assemblages inhabit subglacial aquatic environments. While few of these environments have been sampled, data reveal that subglacial organisms gain energy for growth from reduced minerals containing nitrogen, iron, and sulfur. Here we investigate the role of microbially mediated sulfur transformations in sediments from Subglacial Lake Whillans (SLW), Antarctica, by examining key genes involved in dissimilatory sulfur oxidation and reduction. The presence of sulfur transformation genes throughout the top 34 cm of SLW sediments changes with depth. SLW surficial sediments were dominated by genes related to known sulfur-oxidizing chemoautotrophs. Sequences encoding the adenosine-5′-phosphosulfate (APS) reductase gene, involved in both dissimilatory sulfate reduction and sulfur oxidation, were present in all samples and clustered into 16 distinct operational taxonomic units. The majority of APS reductase sequences (74%) clustered with known sulfur oxidizers including those within the “Sideroxydans” and Thiobacillus genera. Reverse-acting dissimilatory sulfite reductase (rDSR) and 16S rRNA gene sequences further support dominance of “Sideroxydans” and Thiobacillus phylotypes in the top 2 cm of SLW sediments. The SLW microbial community has the genetic potential for sulfate reduction which is supported by experimentally measured low rates (1.4 pmol cm-3d-1) of biologically mediated sulfate reduction and the presence of APS reductase and DSR gene sequences related to Desulfobacteraceae and Desulfotomaculum. Our results also infer the presence of sulfur oxidation, which can be a significant energetic pathway for chemosynthetic biosynthesis in SLW sediments. The water in SLW ultimately flows into the Ross Sea where intermediates from subglacial sulfur transformations can influence the flux of solutes to the Southern Ocean. PMID:25477865

  18. The magnetic susceptibility measurements of turbidity current sediments from Fuxian Lake of Yunnan Province and their correlations with earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie-Sen; Song, Xue-Liang; Sun, Ying-Lun; Zhang, Zi-Xiong; Song, Yi-De; Liu, Gang

    1999-01-01

    This paper has advanced a new method for determining historical earthquakes. Its object of study is lake sediments. The research method is environmental magnetism represented by susceptibility. The purpose is extracting historical earthquake informations from lake sediments to explore the correlation between the turbidity current sediments initiated by the earthquakes and historical earthquakes round Fuxian Lake.

  19. Sedimentological characteristics of lake sediment of the Lake Jelonek (North Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramkowski, Mateusz; Filbrandt-Czaja, Anna; Ott, Florian; Słowiński, Michał; Tjallingii, Rik; Błaszkiewicz, Mirosław; Brauer, Achim

    2016-04-01

    Lake Jelonek is located in Northern Poland (53°45'58N, 18°23'30E). The lake is surrounded by forest, covers an area of 19,9 ha and has a maximum depth of 13,8 m. In 2013 and 2014 three overlapping and parallel series of long sediment cores JEL14-A-(1445 cm), JEL14-B-(1430 cm), JEL14-C-(1435 cm) and seven short gravity cores JEL13 (K1-K7) have been recovered from the deepest part of the lake. A continuous composite profile JEL14 covering 1426 cm has been established by correlation based on 28 distinct macroscopic marker layers. The sediment sequence can be divided into 15 (I-XV) lithological units. These units comprise biochemical calcite varves, homogeneous calcite-rich gyttja, homogeneous organic-diatomaceous gyttja, and sandy layers. The chronology established so far is based on 14 AMS 14C dates from terrestrial plant remains and tephrochronology (Askja AD-1875) and covers the interval from the Younger Dryas to present times. Based on the chronology and sedimentological characteristics the composite profile has been correlated to a previous core from which a detailed pollen diagram had been established (Filbrandt-Czaja 2009). Here we present initial results from thin section analyses for two intervals from the new composite record JEL14, (I) the uppermost 0-256 cm and (II) the interval from 768-1296 cm. Intercalated between these two varved interval is a thick section (512 cm) of homogeneous organic-ditomaceous sediments. We present varve micro-facies data in combination with μ-XRF element scanning for comprehensive reconstruction of the sedimentation processes in Lake Jelonek. Preliminary varve counting reveals that the uppermost 256 cm varved sediments comprise ca 925 years (2008-1083 AD), while the lower floating varve interval covers the time period from 1850 - 10500 cal a BP. This study is a contribution to the Virtual Institute of Integrated Climate and Landscape Evolution Analysis -ICLEA- of the Helmholtz Association; grant number VH-VI-415. References

  20. Reconstruction of sediment pathways by variations in sediment characteristics within the Donggi Cona lake catchment, Tibetan Plateau, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ijmker, J.; Stauch, G.; Wünnemann, B.; Hartmann, K.; Diekmann, B.; Dietze, E.; Opitz, S.; Lehmkuhl, F.

    2009-04-01

    The Chinese Loess Plateau has been described in literature extensively and the provenance of the loess has been studied by many authors. The often bimodal grain-size distribution of Chinese loess points to sediment transport based on two transport processes, and the sand seas in the interior of China seem to be a possible source for the large amounts of loess. However, only few studies focus on aeolian deposits on the Tibetan Plateau. The aeolian sediments on the Tibetan Plateau are coarse compared to their Chinese counterparts. This suggests that the sediments are deposited closer to their source areas. This study focuses on the provenance of terrestrial (aeolian and fluvial) sediments in the Donggi Cona lake catchment. The sediments are studied after grain size using a laser counter, and after their chemical composition using X-ray analysis (Sb, Sn, Cd, Ag, Sr, Rb, Pb, Se, As, Hg, Zn, Cu, Ni, Co, Fe, Mn, Cr, V, Ti, Sc, Ca and K), laboratory analysis (Ca) and elemental analysis (C, N and S). Based on these data, the sediment pathways in the catchment will be reconstructed. Second aim is to find out if the sediments originate from local sources (in-catchment), regional sources or if the sediments are transported over longer distances. Possible in-catchment sediment source areas are the dry former lake bed and alluvial fan sediments. More distal sources could be the sand seas on the northern side of the Tibetan Plateau in China. Dating of the sediments can give an indication of the periods of (enhanced) aeolian transport on the Tibetan Plateau. Reconstruction of the sediment pathways within the catchment can be problematic, because the sediment records are short (meters, compared to hundreds of meters in central China) and the sediments are often mixed due to slope processes. Nevertheless, some deposits show several periods of soil formation that point to changing aeolian transport conditions. Future research will focus on the changing sediment pathways during time

  1. Climatic record of the Iberian peninsula from lake Moncortes' sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Min; Huguet, Carme; Rull, Valenti; Valero, Blas; Rosell-Mele, Antoni

    2014-05-01

    Climatic record of the Iberian peninsula from lake Moncortes' sediments Min Cao1, Carme Huguet1, Valenti Rull2, Blas L. Valero-Garces3, Antoni Rosell-Melé1,4 1Institut de Ciència i Tecnologia Ambientals (ICTA), Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Cerdanyola del Vallès, Catalonia, Spain; 2Institut de Botanic de Barcelona (CSIC), Passeig del Migdia s/n, 08038, Barcelona, Spain, 3 Instituto Pirenaico de Ecologıa (CSIC), Avda. Montañana 1005, 50059 Zaragoza, Spain, 4Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA), 08010 Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. The continuing buildup of industrial greenhouse gases in the atmosphere and concomitant increase in global temperatures has made much of the world's society aware that decades to centuries of environmental change lie ahead, and that these will have profound economic, political and societal impacts. The Iberian Peninsula lies in the boundary between tropical and subtropical climates and seems to amplify the climatic signals form the northern hemisphere through both atmospheric and water circulation feedbacks, making it an ideal site to monitor Northern hemisphere climate changes. This extreme sensitivity to climatic changes also makes the Iberian Peninsula extremely vulnerable to future climate changes. This is why understanding sensitivity to climate change and the consequences it will have on both climate and the hydrological cycle is key to implement preventive measures. The aim of our study is to come up with a high resolution quantitative reconstruction of climate variability (temperature, production and precipitation) in the Iberian Peninsula from lake sediments. We also want to establish the relation between those changes and the ones observed in both ice cores from Greenland and paleotemperature records from marine sediments of the continental Iberian margin. For these reasons we sampled a core in Moncortes (42.3N, 0.99E), a lake of karstic origin with an average depth of 25m and an area of 0

  2. Sinking of volcanic ash in uncompacted sediment in williams lake, washington.

    PubMed

    Anderson, R Y; Nuhfer, E B; Dean, W E

    1984-08-01

    Volcanic ash from the eruption of Mount St. Helens on 18 May 1980 fell into Williams Lake in eastern Washington and was temporarily suspended at the sediment-water interface. After several months of compaction, the ash layer broke up and sank into lower density uncompacted lake sediment. Stratigraphic time displacements of several hundred years and a failure to recognize discontinuous ash layers in sediment cores are possible consequences of this process. PMID:17750852

  3. Chemical data for bottom sediment, lake water, bottom-sediment pore water, and fish in Mountain Creek Lake, Dallas, Texas, 1994-96

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, S.A.; Van Metre, P.C.; Moring, J.B.; Braun, C.L.; Wilson, J.T.; Mahler, B.J.

    1997-01-01

    Mountain Creek Lake is a reservoir adjacent to two U.S. Department of the Navy facilities, the Naval Weapons Industrial Reserve Plant and the Naval Air Station in Dallas, Texas. A Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation found ground-water plumes containing chlorinated solvents on both facilities. These findings led to a U.S. Geological Survey study of Mountain Creek Lake adjacent to both facilities between June 1994 and August 1996. Bottom sediments, lake water, bottom-sediment pore water, and fish were collected for chemical analysis.

  4. FLOCCULATION OF FINE-GRAINED LAKE SEDIMENTS DUE TO A UNIFORM SHEAR STRESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experiments were performed to investigate the effects of fluid shear on the flocculation of fine-grained lake sediments in fresh water. In these experiments, a Couette viscometer was used to apply a uniform shear stress to a sediment suspension. he sediments were from the Detroit...

  5. Mercury in lake sediments of the Precambrian Shield near Huntsville, Ontario, Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rasmussen, P.E.; Villard, D.J.; Fortescue, J.A.C.; Gardner, H.D.; Schiff, S.L.; Shilts, W.W.

    1998-01-01

    Long sediment cores (> 1 m) were collected from eight Precambrian Shield lakes in southern Ontario, Canada and analyzed for mercury (Hg), loss-on-ignition (LOI), and a suite of 36 other elements. Results indicated at least 100-fold variation in sediment Hg concentrations between lakes in close proximity (from 450 ppb), comparable to the variation reported for lakes across the whole of Canada. Strong areal correlations between Hg concentrations and LOI (r2=0.77), between Hg and other trace element concentrations (Pb, Zn, Cd, Sb, As, Br), and similarities in the vertical concentration profiles of Hg and LOI, all point to the importance of organic matter in the release, transport and redistribution of metals in watershed systems. The spatial pattern of Hg concentrations in deep, precolonial sediments (>20 cm) was found to mirror the pattern of Hg concentrations in modern surface sediments, an observation that was confirmed in a follow-up survey (r2= 0.85; n = 25 lakes), indicating that natural processes govern the unequal distribution of Hg among these lakes. Between-lake differences in surface sediment Hg concentrations normalized to organic carbon (Hg/C) were also reflected by Hg concentrations in small-mouth bass normalized to 35 cm length (R2=0.63; n= 15 lakes). The latter relationship suggests that small-mouth bass and lake sediment indicators provide mutually supportive information regarding Hg loading to the lacustrine environment from geological sources in the watershed system.

  6. Wind influence on the course of sedimentation processes of the laminated lacustrine sediments of Lake Czechowskie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiśniewska, Daria; Kramkowski, Mateusz; Tyszkowski, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    The studies of the laminated lacustrine sediments play a very important role in the analysis of climate change. They provide valuable information related to the response of the ecosystem to changes in the environment. The condition for the development of the annual lamination is calm sedimentation, which can be compromised by the movement of water caused by waving. The depth to which this movement affects depends on the shape of the lake basin as well as the velocity and direction of the wind. During the study of sedimentary processes of laminated deposits in Lake Czechowskie (Tuchola Forest, North Poland, 53°52'N, 18°14' E, 108 m asl), the following question arose: How strong was the influence of the wind on the processes of lacustrine sedimentation? The key in getting the answers was the use of GIS techniques. Lake Czechowskie has an area of 76.6 hectares; it has two deeps separated by a threshold: a deeper one of 33 m (maximum depth of the basin) in the central-eastern part, and a shallower of 13 m in the western part. The speed of movement of water that is able to move sediment from the bottom of the lake, called the orbital wave velocity, is the basis for the designation of areas where re-suspension takes place. To calculate the wave parameters, the process of mixing, as well as the designation of re-suspension zones, the tool-script Wave Model (Rohweder et al. 2008) in the program ArsGIS 10.1 was used. The input data were wind direction and velocity from the meteorological station of Wirty about 15 km away, bathymetric data from acoustic profiling, and the Maximum Orbital Wave Velocity. The elements taken into account include maximum wind velocity of the multi-year 1996-2013, with particular emphasis on hurricanes Ksawery (December 2013) and Yoda (November 2011), during which wind velocity exceeded 120 km/h. In addition, maximum wind velocity ever recorded in the Polish Lowlands was considered. On the basis of the modelling, the authors delimited the areas

  7. The geomorphic and paleoenvironmental record in the sediments of Atlin Lake, northern British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Robert; Desloges, Joseph R.; Lamoureux, Scott F.; Serink, Andrea; Hodder, Kyle R.

    2006-09-01

    Atlin Lake in northern British Columbia and southern Yukon Territory is the largest natural lake in the North American Cordillera (791 km 2). Inflow from the Juneau Ice Field delivers large volumes of sediment to the proximal basins of Willison Bay and Llewellyn Inlet. Sediment is distributed by interflow and underflow through these basins. Based on acoustic data, each of these basins contain Holocene deposits about 120 m thick, representing mean annual accumulation since deglaciation of more than 1 cm/a. Cores confirm this, except that the formation of a small lake at the toe of Llewellyn Glacier during about the past 50 years is trapping sediment and has reduced accumulation in Llewellyn Inlet by an order of magnitude. Sills separate these basins from the main body of Atlin Lake and Torres Channel where accumulation is much less, averaging about 1-4 mm/a during the history of the lake. Late Pleistocene glacilacustrine sediment occurs as a thin, patchy deposit and is overlain by up to 10 m of Holocene lacustrine deposits. Unlike other large lakes in the Cordillera with thick late Pleistocene deposits indicating large volumes of sediment contributed by glaciers in the lakes and their basins, the pattern in Atlin Lake documents rapid retreat of glaciers from the lake and much of the drainage basin.

  8. Role of sediments in controlling the chemistry of subalpine lakes in the Sierra Nevada, California. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Amundson, R.G.; Harte, J.; Michaels, H.; Pendall, E.

    1988-12-01

    The importance of sediments in buffering lake water from acidic deposition was assessed by using a diffusion based approach to calculate the flux of alkalinity, and other chemical constituents, from sediments to lake water in three subalpine Sierran lakes. The approach requires the measurement or estimation of temperature, concentration gradients, deposition velocities, diffusion coefficients, porosity, and tortuosity within the sediments and their pore waters. During periods when water is rapidly moving through the lakes, the sediments have little influence on water chemistry. However, during periods of the year when inflows are minimal, sediments exert a greater control on the lake's water.

  9. Sediment oxygen demand in a constructed lake in south-eastern Australia.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Todd A; Ganf, George G; Brookes, Justin D

    2016-10-01

    The occurrence of hypoxia and anoxia in aquatic environments is increasing, driven by changes in land use and alteration of flow regimes. Periods of low oxygen impact biodiversity and water quality for both recreational and consumptive users. We use the Torrens Lake as a case study to assess pelagic, benthic and resuspended sediment oxygen demand, and the release of sediment bound phosphorus to determine the relative role of internal and external loading on water quality in a lake within a heavily urbanised landscape. Our results indicate temporal shifts in the dominant oxygen demanding process in the lake. During periods of no-inflow, sediment oxygen demand is the dominant process; during periods of inflow resulting from wet weather conditions, pelagic rather than sediment derived oxygen demand becomes the governing process. The inlet end of the lake is a depositional zone for stormwater borne sediments. Resuspended sediments at the inlet end of the lake exert a higher oxygen demand than those from the outlet, and represent a larger pool of potentially mobile phosphorus compared to sediments at the outlet end of the lake. However, external rather than internal loading appears to be the dominant driver of water quality in this lake. PMID:27420167

  10. Quantitative spatiotemporal characterization of methane venting from lake sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scandella, B.; Pillsbury, L.; Weber, T.; Ruppel, C. D.; Hemond, H.; Juanes, R.

    2014-12-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, and the production and emission of methane from sediments in inland waters and shallow oceans both contributes to and may be exacerbated by climate change. In some of these shallow-water settings, methane fluxes are often controlled by episodic free-gas venting. The fraction of the methane released from the sediments that bypasses dissolution in the water column and reaches the atmosphere impacts the magnitude of the climate forcing, and this fraction depends critically on the mode and spatiotemporal characteristics of the bubble releases. The spacing and persistence of the gas vents may be determined by the heterogeneity of the methane source, but within regions of uniform methanogenesis they arise from the competition between mechanisms driving lateral and vertical transport of methane in the sediments. Here, we present measurements of the spacing, persistence and variability in intensity of methane vents within a wide area of lake sediments (~400 m2) and over a multi-month period. The measurements were made using a fixed-location Imagenex DeltaT 837B multibeam sonar, which was calibrated to quantify gas fluxes with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution (~0.5 m, 6 Hz). Drops in hydrostatic pressure were a characteristic trigger for the sonar-detected ebullition events, and the episodicity of the fluxes is reproduced with a mechanistic numerical model of methane venting through dynamic conduits that dilate in response to hydrostatic unloading. The spatial characteristics of the sonar-detected vents inform conceptual and mathematical models of methane transport and release from deformable sediments, as well as the uncertainty associated with upscaling. Taken together, these results point towards a better understanding of the microscale processes controlling methane venting from deformable sediments, as well as their impact on large-scale methane fluxes from shallow-water bodies. Figure: Top: time series of daily sonar

  11. Late quaternary sediments, minerals, and inferred geochemical history of Didwana Lake, Thar Desert, India

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wasson, R.J.; Smith, G.I.; Agrawal, D.P.

    1984-01-01

    Variations in clastic sediment texture, mineralogy of both evaporites formed at the surface and precipitates formed below the lake floor, and the relative chemical activities of the major dissolved components of the chemical precipitates, have allowed reconstruction of the history of salinity and water-level changes in Didwana Lake, Thar Desert, India. Hypersaline conditions prevailed at about the Last Glacial Maximum, with little evidence of clastic sediments entering the lake. Between ca. 13,000 and 6000 B.P. the lake level fluctuated widely, the lake alternately hypersaline and fresh, and clastic sediments were delivered to the lake at a low rate. Deep-water conditions occurred ca. 6000 B.P. and clastic influx increased abruptly. The water level dropped towards 4000 B.P. when the lake dried briefly. Since 4000 B.P. the lake has been ephemeral with a lowered rate of sedimentation and mildly saline conditions rather like those of today. This sequence of changes documented in the lake parallels changes in vegetation recorded in published pollen diagrams from both the Thar and the Arabian Sea. Correlation of the various lines of evidence suggests that the climate of the Last Glacial Maximum at Didwana was dry and windy with a weak monsson circulation. The monsson was re-established between ca. 13,000 and a little before 6000 B.P., and, when winter rainfall increased ca. 6000 B.P., the lake filled to its maximum depth. ?? 1984.

  12. Possible recording of the Mono Lake Excursion in cored sediment from Clear Lake, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liddicoat, Joseph; Verosub, Kenneth

    2010-05-01

    We report the possible recording of the Mono Lake Excursion (MLE) in cored sediment from Clear Lake, CA. The locality (39.0˚N, 237.3˚E) is about 120 km north of San Francisco, CA, and 320 km northwest of the Mono Basin, CA, where the MLE first was discovered in North America (Denham and Cox, 1971). The field behaviour at Clear Lake that might be the MLE is recorded in clay and peaty clay about 50 cm below the top of the lowermost 80-cm core slug of a 21.6-m core. The coring was done by the wire-line method (Sims and Rymer, 1975) and the samples (rectangular solids 21 mm on a side and 15 mm high) were measured in a cryogenic magnetometer after demagnetization in an alternating field to 35 milliTesla (Verosub, 1977). The continuously-spaced samples record negative inclination of nearly 20˚ and northerly declination when unnormalized relative field intensity was reduced by an order of magnitude from the mean value. Those palaeomagnetic directions are followed immediately by positive inclination to about 50˚ and easterly declination of about 60˚ when the field intensity is at a relative high. That pattern of behaviour is recorded at three localities (Wilson Creek, Mill Creek, and Warm Springs) in the Mono Basin at the MLE (Liddicoat and Coe, 1979; Liddicoat, 1992). A path of the Virtual Geomagnetic Poles (VGPs) at Clear Lake form a clockwise-trending loop that is centered at 65˚N, 20˚E in the hemisphere away from the locality. The VGP that is farthest from the North Geographic Pole is at 29.3˚N, 337.1˚E, which is close to the path formed by the VGPs in the older portion of the MLE (Liddicoat and Coe, 1979; Liddicoat, 1992). The age of the sediment recording the anomalous palaeomagnetic directions in Clear Lake is about 30,000 years B.P. (Verosub, 1977). That age was determined from six (uncalibrated) radiocarbon dates, three of which are from near the base of the core (Sims and Rymer, 1975) where there are the anomalous palaeomagnetic directions, and linear

  13. Mobility and sulfidization of heavy metals in sediments of a shallow eutrophic lake, Lake Taihu, China.

    PubMed

    Huo, Shouliang; Zhang, Jingtian; Yeager, Kevin M; Xi, Beidou; Qin, Yanwen; He, Zhuoshi; Wu, Fengchang

    2015-05-01

    The technique of DGT (diffusive gradients in thin films) using three diffusive gel thicknesses was applied to estimate the mobility and bioavailability of heavy metals in sediments and porewater of Lake Taihu, China. The DGT results showed significantly positive correlations between Co, Pb, Cd and Mn, and Ni and Fe concentrations in porewater. Cu and Zn showed a significantly negative correlation with Mn, due to Cu combination with carbonates and Zn derived from agricultural pollution, respectively. The rank order of average concentrations of Co, Ni and Cd at each station was DGT1.92>DGT0.78>DGT0.39, suggesting stronger resupply from sediments to porewater when using thicker diffusive gels. Comparing centrifugation and DGT measurements, Co, Ni and Cd are highly labile; Mn and Fe are moderately labile; and Cu, Zn and Pb are slightly labile. The variations of AVS concentrations in sediment cores indicate that metal sulfides in deeper layers are easily diffused into surface sediments. PMID:25968252

  14. Sediment magnetic, paleomagnetic, and geochemical data from Quaternary lacustrine sediment in a core from Grass Lake, Siskiyou County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Best, Patti J.; Reynolds, Richard L.; Rosenbaum, Joseph G.; Drexler, John W.; Adam, David P.

    1996-01-01

    Sediment magnetic and geochemical results have been obtained from the top 60 meters of lacustrine sediments recovered in two cores from Tule Lake in northern California. The sediment magnetic and geochemical data, presented here in tabular form, complement studies of diatoms and pollen in the cores that are the bases for published paleoclimatic interpretations. This report also documents the methods used to obtain the magnetic properties and geochemical data.

  15. Sediment magnetic and geochemical data from Quaternary lacustine sediment in two cores from Tule Lake, Siskiyou County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Best, Patti J.; Reynolds, Richard L.; Rosenbaum, Joseph G.; Dean, Walter E.; Honey, Jeannine; Drexler, John W.; Adam, David P.

    1996-01-01

    Sediment magnetic and geochemical results have been obtained from the top 60 meters of lacustrine sediments recovered in two cores from Tule Lake in northern California. The sediment magnetic and geochemical data, presented here in tabular form, complement studies of diatoms and pollen in the cores that are the bases for published paleoclimatic interpretations. This report also documents the methods used to obtain the magnetic properties and geochemical data.

  16. Developing inorganic carbon-based radiocarbon chronologies for Holocene lake sediments in arid NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiawu; Ma, Xueyang; Qiang, Mingrui; Huang, Xiaozhong; Li, Shuang; Guo, Xiaoyan; Henderson, Andrew C. G.; Holmes, Jonathan A.; Chen, Fahu

    2016-07-01

    Inorganic carbonates are often used to establish radiocarbon (14C) chronologies for lake sediments when terrestrial plant remains (TPR) are rare or when bulk organic matter is insufficient for dating, a problem that is common for many lakes in arid regions. However, the reservoir effect (RE), as well as old carbon contributed from the lakes catchment make it difficult to establish reliable chronologies. Here we present a systematic study of inorganic 14C ages of two lake-sediment sequences, one from a small-enclosed saline lake - Lake Gahai in Qaidam Basin, and the other from a large freshwater lake - Lake Bosten in Xinjiang. Modern dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of the lakes, paleo-lake sediments exposed in the catchment, and mollusk shells in core sediments from Lake Gahai were dated to assess the RE and the contribution of pre-aged carbon to the old ages in the cores. We propose a statistical regression to assess more than one RE for the 14C carbonate ages within our sedimentary sequences. Old radiocarbon ages contributed by detrital carbonates were assessed by comparing the ages of mollusk shells with those of carbonates at the same sediment depths. We established the RE of the authigenic component and assessed detrital old carbon contributions to our two sites, and this was used to correct the 14C ages. Based on this approach, we developed age models for both cores, and tested them using 210Pb ages in both cores and TPR-based 14C-ages recovered from Lake Bosten. We further tested our age models by comparing carbonate-based oxygen isotope (δ18O) records from both lakes to an independently-dated regional speleothem δ18O record. Our results suggest if sedimentary sequences are densely dated and the RE and the contribution of old carbon from detrital carbonates can be ascertained, robust chronological frameworks based on carbonate-based 14C determinations can be established.

  17. Improved understanding of Diatom stratigraphy in a varved sediment through a sediment trap, lake monitoring and a catchment study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    Biological sediment remains reflect past lake surrounding conditions. Potential drivers of change in the biological sediment proxy can be environmental contributors like weather and temperature changes as well as man-made such as developments in agriculture and forestry. However we don't know how these different factors contribute to the biological sediment signal. Here we are monitoring a boreal lake with a varved sediment to understand how the biological signal of diatom remains is formed in the annually layered sediment. We compare the diatom stratigraphy with a sequential sediment trap. For a deeper understanding of the underlying mechanisms we look at three full years of bi-weekly monitoring of physical, chemical and biological parameters and 15 years of water stratification data. We seek to link the monitored in-lake processes with the yearly environmental characteristics. The diatom sediment stratigraphy of the two most abundant species Asterionella formosa and Fragilaria delicatissima indicates three periods with a contrasting trend for both species from 1975 until 2014. In the first period Asterionella formosa is almost not abundant spanning one decade (1975-1985), reaching elevated abundance with a decreasing trend in period 2 over the following 17 years to be followed by a tripling of Asterionella fromosa remains in the sediment during the third period. The opposite trend is found for Fragilaria delicatissima. Linking the recorded data with the corresponding sediment stratigraphy allows us to distinguish between weather changes and catchment disturbances as potential drivers for changes in a sedimentary diatom signal.

  18. Sedimentation in Lake Onalaska, Navigation Pool 7, Upper Mississippi River, since impoundment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Korschgen, C.E.; Jackson, G.A.; Muessig, L.F.; Southworth, D.

    1987-01-01

    Sediment accumulation was evaluated in Lake Onalaska a 2800-ha backwater impoundment on the Upper Mississippi River. Computer programs were used to process fathometric charts and generate an extensive data set on water depth for the lake. Comparison of 1983 survey data with pre-impoundment (before 1937) data showed that Lake Onalaska had lost less than 10 percent of its original mean depth in the 46 years since impoundment. Previous estimates of sedimentation rates based on Cesium-137 sediment core analysis appear to have been too high.

  19. Sedimentation in Lake Onalaska, Navigation Pool 7, upper Mississippi River, since impoundment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Korschgen, C.E.; Jackson, G.A.; Muessig, L.F.; Southworth, D.C.

    1987-01-01

    Sediment accumulation was evaluated in Lake Onalaska, a 2800-ha backwater impoundment on the Upper Mississippi River. Computer programs were used to process fathometric charts and generate an extensive data set on water depth for the lake. Comparison of 1983 survey data with pre-impoundment (before 1937) data showed that Lake Onalaska had lost less than 10 percent of its original mean depth in the 46 years since impoundment. Previous estimates of sedimentation rates based on Cesium-137 sediment core analysis appear to have been too high. (DBO)

  20. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes and amino acids in Holocene sediments of Lake Lonar, central India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, Philip; Gaye, Birgit; Wiesner, Martin; Basavaiah, Nathani; Prasad, Sushma; Stebich, Martina; Anoop, Ambili; Riedel, Nils

    2013-04-01

    Investigations on surface sediments and a sediment core from Lake Lonar in central India were carried out within the framework of the HIMPAC (Himalaya: Modern and Past Climate) programme. The aim was to understand recent productivity, sedimentation, and degradation processes and to reconstruct variations in Holocene lake conditions on the basis of biogeochemical analysis on a 10 m long sediment core retrieved from the centre of Lake Lonar. Located in India's core monsoon zone, Lake Lonar offers valuable information about the climate development of the whole region. The lake is situated at the floor of a meteorite impact structure on the Deccan plateau basalt. The modern lake is characterised by brackish water, high alkalinity, severe eutrophication, and bottom water anoxia. The lake is about 6 m deep and fed by rainfall during the SW monsoon season and three perennial streams. Since no out-flowing stream is present and no seepage loss occurs, the lake level is highly sensitive to the balance of precipitation and evaporation. Here we present C/N, carbon and nitrogen isotope, and amino acid data of bulk organic matter from modern lake and Holocene core sediments. Modern conditions are mainly related to human activity which started to have persistent influence on the biological and chemical lake properties at ~1200 cal a BP. The distribution of δ13C in the modern sediments is driven by the ratio between terrestrial and aquatic organic matter, while δ15N seems to be influenced by redox conditions at the sediment-water-interface with elevated values at shallow oxic stations. Differences in the amino acid assemblages of oxic and anoxic surface sediment samples were used to calculate an Ox/Anox ratio indicating the redox conditions during organic matter degradation. The onset of the monsoon reconstructed from the sediment core occurred at ca. 11450 cal a BP. The early Holocene core sediments are characterised by low sedimentation rate, low aquatic productivity, and

  1. Can ipids in lake sediments help to reconstruct changes in methane availability and methane fluxes in boreal and temperate lakes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoetter, T.; van Hardenbroek, M.; Rinta, P.; Schilder, J.; Schubert, C. J.; Heiri, O.

    2013-12-01

    Methane (CH4) is a major greenhouse gas and lakes are an important but poorly studied source of CH4 to the atmosphere. Lipid analysis was used before to identify and quantify CH4 oxidizing bacteria (MOB), giving insight into CH4 oxidation and production in lakes. However, few studies are available that examine how closely the distribution and the carbon isotopic signature (δ13C) of lipids are related to CH4 concentrations and fluxes in different lake ecosystems. In a multi-lake survey we quantified the relationship between lipids, mainly fatty acids (FAs), and CH4 concentrations or fluxes, with the aim of assessing whether FA analysis of lake sediment samples can provide information on past CH4 abundance and production in lakes. The study sites include small lakes in Sweden, Finland, the Netherlands, and Switzerland. Surface sediments collected in the deepest point of the lakes were examined using gas chromatography with flame ionization for determining FA concentrations, gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for identification of individual FAs, and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) for determining compound specific δ13C values. Since CH4 is significantly more depleted in 13C than other carbon sources, δ13C is a good tracer for CH4 related processes. The analysis of the acid fraction in the sediments showed that mainly three FAs, identified as C16:1ω7, C16:1ω5 and C18:1ω7, were more depleted in 13C than the others, suggesting that they may originate from MOB. Comparison with literature sources indicated that these FAs are produced by MOB, however, not exclusively. The relative abundance of these depleted FAs showed clear relations to CH4 parameters. For example, increasing abundances were observed with increasing CH4 concentrations in the sediment or with increasing CH4 flux measured at the lake surface. An explanation for these relations would be an increase in MOB biomass with increasing CH4 availability, as they use CH4 as energy and carbon

  2. Hydrocarbons in Lake Washington sediments. A 25-year retrospective in an urban lake.

    PubMed

    Wakeham, Stuart G; Forrest, James; Masiello, Caroline A; Gélinas, Yves; Alexander, Clark R; Leavitt, Peter R

    2004-01-15

    Aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and stable and radiocarbon isotope distributions are compared for dated cores from the 1970s and 2000 for a 25-year retrospective in Lake Washington, Seattle, WA (USA). Contamination of Lake Washington sediments by petrogenic aliphatic hydrocarbons and pyrolytic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons via atmospheric deposition and stormwater runoff peaked between the 1950s and 1970s and has since decreased as stormwater inputs have been reduced. Radiocarbon signatures (delta14C, per 1000) of total organic carbon decrease (increased "age") in the depth interval of highest hydrocarbon concentration. Graphitic black carbon in the year 2000 core showed a historical profile similar to that of the PAH; however high background sediments deposited before the founding of Seattle indicates a considerable nonindustrial component derived from weathering in the watershed. Unlike hydrocarbon contamination, input of terrestrial organic matter (tracked by long-chain fatty alcohols) has increased throughout the late 20th century, documenting a shift in pollutant sources away from hydrocarbons and toward anthropogenic erosion of the region's soils. PMID:14750717

  3. Bidirectional sulfate diffusion in saline-lake sediments: Evidence from Devils Lake, northeast North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Komor, S.C.

    1992-01-01

    Chemical and isotopic gradients in pore water in Devils Lake indicate that maximum rates of sulfate reduction occur between 1 and 3 cm depth in the bottom sediments. Dissolved sulfate diffuses into the sulfate-reduction zone upward from deeply buried saline pore water at an average rate of 1.4 x 10-5 μmol ⋅ cm-2 ⋅ s-1, and downward from the overlying water column at an average rate of 2.4 x 10-5 μmol ⋅ cm-2 ⋅ s-1. The result is a bidirectional flux of sulfate into the sulfate-reduction zone. Upward-diffusing sulfate provides a ready supply of electron acceptors for sulfate-reducing bacteria even at fairly great depths in the sediments. The abundance of electron acceptors enables sulfate-reducing bacteria to outcompete methanogenic bacteria for organic material and thereby suppress methane production. Suppression of methanogenesis may be widespread in sulfate-rich lakes and wetlands and may limit methane fluxes from these water bodies to the atmosphere.

  4. Microscale characterization of sulfur speciation in lake sediments.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Teng; Arnold, William A; Toner, Brandy M

    2013-02-01

    Prairie pothole lakes (PPLs) are naturally sulfur-enriched wetlands in the glaciated prairie region of North America. High sulfate levels and dynamic hydrogeochemistry in combination render PPLs a unique environment to explore the speciation of sedimentary sulfur (S). The goals of this research were to define and quantify the solid-phase S pools in PPL sediments and track seasonal dynamics of S speciation. A quantitative X-ray microprobe method was developed based on S 1s X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and multienergy X-ray fluorescence mapping. Three S pools-pyritic S, reduced organic S (organic mono- and disulfide), and oxidized S (inorganic sulfate, ester sulfate, and sulfonate)-were identified in PPL sediments. No significant seasonal variation was evident for total S, but S speciation showed a seasonal response. During the spring-summer transition, the reduced organic S decreased from 55 to 15 mol %, with a concomitant rise in the oxidized S. During the summer-fall transition, the trend reversed and the reduced organic S grew to 75 mol % at the expense of the oxidized S. The pyritic S, on the other hand, remained relatively constant (∼22 mol %) over time. The seasonal changes in S speciation have strong potential to force the cycling of elements such as mercury in prairie wetlands. PMID:23282039

  5. Spatial variability of recent sedimentation in Lake Ohrid (Albania/Macedonia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, H.; Wessels, M.; Albrecht, C.; Stich, H.-B.; Wagner, B.

    2010-10-01

    Lake Ohrid is likely of Pliocene age and thus commonly referred to as the oldest existing lake in Europe. In this study spatial variability of recent sediment composition is assessed using >50 basin wide distributed surface sediment samples. Analysis of biogeochemical bulk parameters, selected metals, pigment concentrations as well as grain size distributions revealed a significant spatial heterogeneity in surface sediment composition. It implies that sedimentation in Lake Ohrid is controlled by an interaction of multiple natural and anthropogenic factors and processes. Major factors controlling surface sediment composition are related to differences in geological catchment characteristics, anthropogenic land use, and a counterclockwise rotating surface water current. In some instances processes controlling sediment composition also seem to impact distribution patterns of biodiversity, which suggests a common interaction of processes responsible for both patterns.

  6. Matuyama/Brunhes Polarity Transition in Owens Lake, CA, Sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liddicoat, Joseph; Kravchinsky, Vadim

    2014-05-01

    The complexity of the Matuyama/Brunhes (M/B) polarity transition is becoming better understood from investigations of volcanic rocks (Coe et al., 2004), loess (Jin et al., 2012; Evans et al., 2011; Kravchinsky, 2013), and marine (Clement and Opdyke, 1982; Hartl and Tauxe, 1996; Macri et al., 2010) and lacustrine (Valet et al., 1988; Sagnotti et al., 2013) sediments. The transition appears to include a brief interval of normal polarity prior to the entry into the Brunhes Normal Chron (Coe et al., 2004; Jin et al., 2012; Evans et al., 2011), and the transition has Virtual Geomagnetic Poles rapidly moving from the Southern Hemisphere to the Northern Hemisphere (Coe et al., 2004; Jin et al., 2012; Evans et al., 2011; Sagnotti et al., 2013). The M/B polarity transition is recorded in exposed Pleistocene lake sediments near Bishop, CA, where the brief interval of normal polarity noted above is present and the change from full reverse to full normal polarity occurs rapidly. The brief interval of normal polarity is recorded at two sites separated laterally by about 150 m and is in single hand samples measured at vertical spacing of 2.0-2.5 cm using six samples per measured level and alternating field demagnetization at 20 mT (Liddicoat, 1993, Table 1 and Fig. 8). The siltstone is unweathered glacial flour from the Sierra Nevada that borders the western side of Owens Valley where the sediments were deposited in Owens Lake. In the siltstone, the majority of the samples have a percentage of about 60 percent where the grain diameter is less than 63 micrometres, and in those samples there is about a five percent fraction when the diameter is two micrometres or less. The Total Inorganic Carbon in most samples is about 0.25 percent (Bergeron, 2013), and magnetite is the dominant carrier of the magnetization (Liddicoat, 1993). The palaeomagnetic directions recording the terminus of the full M/B transition, which occurs before the field intensity is completely recovered, spans no

  7. The preglacial sediment record of Lake Ladoga, Russia - first results from a seismic survey and sediment coring in 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melles, Martin; Krastel, Sebastian; Fedorov, Grigory; Subetto, Dmitry A.; Savelieva, Larisa A.; Andreev, Andrej; Wagner, Bernd

    2014-05-01

    The new German-Russian project PLOT (Paleolimnological Transect) aims at investigating the Late Quaternary climatic and environmental history along a more than 6000 km long longitudinal transect crossing northern Eurasia. Special emphasis is put on the preglacial history. For this purpose shallow and deep seismic surveys shall be carried out on five lakes, which potentially host preglacial sediment records, followed by sediment coring based on the results of the seismic campaigns. The well-studied Lake El'gygytgyn represents the eastern-most location of the transect and acts as reference site. Within the scope of a pilot phase for the PLOT project, funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, we were able to investigate Lake Ladoga, which is located close to St. Petersburg at the western end of the transect. Lake Ladoga is the largest lake in Europe, covering an area of almost 18.000 km2. The modern sedimentation as well as the late glacial and Holocene history of the lake were already studied in detail over the past decades. The older, preglacial lake history, however, is only rudimentary known from a core transect drilled in the southern lake in the 1930th. The cores of up to about 60 m length were only briefly described and are not existing any more. The results from these cores, known from unpublished reports only, suggest the existence of marine sediments of presumably Eemian age, representing a time when Lake Lagoga was part of a precursor of the Baltic Sea, which had a connection via Ladoga and Onega Lakes to the White Sea and further to the Arctic Ocean. In late August/early September 2013 we carried out a seismic survey on Lake Ladoga using a Mini-GI-Gun and a 32-channel seismic streamer. In total, 1500 km of seismic profiles were measured, covering most parts of the lake. The seismic lines typically show acoustically well stratified Holocene muds overlaying rather transparent postglacial varves. These sediment successions can reach

  8. Assessment of Bathymetry and Sediment Accumulation of Walker Lake, PA with Multiple Frequency GPR Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachhab, A.; Booterbaugh, A.; Beren, M.

    2012-12-01

    Silting within all man-made reservoirs, can be a major problem. Exploring bathymetry with electromagnetic prospection tools is one way to identify the magnitude of sediment accumulation in lakes and reservoirs. In this study, the bathymetry and sediment accumulation of Walker Lake, PA was explored via multi-frequency ground penetrating radar (GPR) surveys. Walker Lake is located on the North Branch Middle Creek, which is a tributary to Middle Creek within the Susquehanna River basin. The technique developed in this study included two antennas positioned on a medium size inflatable boat towed by a 14' flat-bottom Jon Boat. Both 400 and 100 MHz antennas were deployed and sediment thickness and distribution throughout the lake were identified. A total of eighteen transects were taken along the entire length of the lake. A new method with multiple approaches including RADAN 7, GPR Viewer, SAS 9.1.3 and MATLAB was developed to generate three-Dimensional and contour surface of the pre-1971 Topography and bathymetry based on GPR reflection readings. As a result, depth, accumulation and rate of sedimentation in the lake were successfully measured. The lake was found to vary between 0.5 to 9 meters in depth. Sediment accumulation and distribution were calculated from the difference between the surveyed bathymetry and the 1971 pre-existent landscape topography. Sediment was found to accumulate thickest within the old channel of Middle Creek however, the bulk of the sediment volume lied outside this channel. Sediment deposition accumulates mainly upstream near the inlet to the lake and gradually decreases toward the dam inversely proportional to the depth of the lake.

  9. Tephra Deposits in Lake Mead Miocene Sediments: Characteristics, Chronology, and Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, N. W.; McIntosh, W. C.; Umhoefer, P. J.; Lamb, M. A.; Hickson, T.

    2013-12-01

    The Lake Mead extensional domain, in the east central Basin and Range Province, contains Miocene basin sediments that have undergone complex faulting and deformation. A rich tephra record in the basin sediments provides a chronological and correlation framework that can help understand the depositional and deformational processes during Miocene and post-Miocene time. The tephra layers, up to 10s of cm thick, range from white deposits containing glassy shards to bright green layers in which all original glass has been altered to the zeolite mordenite. The tephra layers range from aphyric to extremely crystal rich. Many appear to be primary ashfall deposits based on depositional geometry, uniform crystal size, and good preservation of glass or relict glass shard structures. However, some layers show evidence of reworking as evidenced by variable crystal size, and the presence of plutonic feldspar and rock fragments. Electron microprobe analyses of preserved glass reveal that compositions of almost all of the tephra layers are high silica rhyolite, typically with FeO and CaO contents of 1wt% or lower. Where present, the glass in the tephra layers is invariably hydrated, consistent with their age, but although the alkali concentrations in the glass are likely to have been modified by the hydration process, other elements, particularly Fe, Ca, Ti, and Cl appear to yield robust concentrations. The compositions of individual layers with respect to these elements are very homogeneous, based on analysis of 20-30 glass shards per sample, and can be used to correlate individual tephra layers between different parts of the sedimentary basin, although a number of layers have very similar compositions. Some higher Fe rhyolites/dacites (up to 4 wt.% FeO) are also observed. Crystal-bearing tephra layers contain some combination of quartz, one or two feldspars (typically a chemically uniform sanidine and a range of plagioclase compositions), biotite, amphibole, and magnetite

  10. Accumulation of Nitrogen in the Pore Water of Anoxic Lake Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, M. Z.; Fields, C. L.

    2005-05-01

    The impact of soil runoff nitrogen on the Silver Lake of Iowa was assessed in this study. Currently, the lake cannot support its designated uses as a recreational water body. Extensive algal blooms characterize the lake in late summer, lowering the dissolved oxygen content in water (< 2.0 mg/L). The goal of this study was to map the buildup of nitrogen in the pore water of lake sediments and come up with recommendations for restoration strategies. Sediment cores were taken from 20 sites along 5 transects in the lake. In the top 5 cm of the sediments, the pore water nitrogen ranges between 1.8 and 733.1 micro-gm of nitrate per gm of sediments. The average concentration is 94 micro-g/gm. Vertically, nitrate concentrations were measured at 90 micro-g/gm at 0-10 cm, 95 micro-g/gm at 10-20 cm, and 19 micro-g/gm at 20-30 cm. The sharp decline in nitrate below the 20 cm depth in the sediment is attributed to biochemical reduction of nitrate through denitrification in relatively older, much anoxic sediments. The above results indicate that sediments in Silver Lake are heavily contaminated with N trapped in the pore water. The primary sources of N are the surrounding croplands and an active hog lot on the southeastern lakeshore. The average rate of sedimentation in the lake has been 1 cm/year in the last 32 years. Upon sedimentation, the pore water N is slowly released to the lake water, thereby dramatically limiting the lake's capability to process incoming nutrients. The mass distribution of N in the lake was estimated as 3.66 x 103 kg (65%) in bottom sediments, 172 kg (3%) in suspended particulates, and 1.83 x 103 kg (32%) in the dissolved phase. Some of the recommendations made through this study include dredging the top 25 cm of lake sediments, applying buffer strips along the lake's northern and eastern shorelines, and reducing the application of N and P-based fertilizers.

  11. Analysis of lake-bottom sediment to estimate historical nonpoint-source phosphorus loads

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Juracek, K.E.

    1998-01-01

    Bottom sediment in Hillsdale Lake, Kansas, was analyzed to estimate the annual load of total phosphorus deposited in the lake from nonpoint sources. Topographic, bathymetric, and sediment-core data were used to estimate the total mass of phosphorus in the lake-bottom sediment. Available streamflow and water-quality data were used to compute the mean annual mass of phosphorus (dissolved plus suspended) exiting the lake. The mean annual load of phosphorus added to the lake from point sources was estimated from previous studies. A simple mass balance then was used to compute the mean annual load of phosphorus from nonpoint sources. The total mass of phosphorus in the lake-bottom sediment was estimated to be 924,000 kg, with a mean annual load of 62,000 kg. The mean annual mass of phosphorus exiting in the lake outflow was estimated to be about 8,000 kg. The mean annual loads of phosphorus added to the lake from point and nonpoint sources were estimated to be 5,000 and 65,000 kg, respectively. Thus, the contribution to the total mean annual phosphorus load in Hillsdale Lake is about 7 percent from point sources and about 93 percent from nonpoint sources.

  12. Heavy metals in bottom sediments of Lake Umbozero in Murmansk Region, Russia.

    PubMed

    Jernström, J; Lehto, J; Dauvalter, V A; Hatakka, A; Leskinen, A; Paatero, J

    2010-02-01

    Sediment cores collected from different locations of Lake Umbozero were studied with respect to concentration and mobility of trace and heavy metals Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, U, and Zn. Lake Umbozero is the second largest lake in the Murmansk Region and subjected to contamination by air-borne emissions and river transportation from the nearby metallurgical and mining industries. Unlike its neighboring, more industry-prone Lake Imandra, Lake Umbozero is relatively unexplored with respect to its state of pollution. In our study, metal distribution in sediments was found to vary with respect to the cores, although in general the concentrations were at the same level throughout the lake indicating uniform horizontal distribution of metals. When compared to Lake Imandra, the concentrations of most of the metals studied were significantly lower and represented the levels in sediments measured in lakes of Kola Peninsula located further off from industrial pollutant sources. An exception was Pb the concentration of which was at the same level as in Lake Imandra, probably due to long-distance transport. Sediment layers were subjected to four-step sequential extraction procedure to reveal the metal distribution in soluble, exchangeable, acid-soluble, and residual fractions. Indicative of their potential higher lability, Mn, U, and Zn were generally found in exchangeable fraction; as also Mn and U extensively in the acid-soluble fraction. PMID:19184485

  13. Chemical composition of lake sediments along a pollution gradient in a Subarctic watercourse.

    PubMed

    Dauvalter, Vladimir; Kashulin, Nikolay; Sandimirov, Sergey; Terentjev, Petr; Denisov, Dmitry; Amundsen, Per-Arne

    2011-01-01

    Sediment cores were collected from seven lakes in the Subarctic Pasvik watercourse, polluted by sewage waters and air emissions from the Pechenganickel Metallurgical Company, in order to study chemical composition and estimate the intensity of pollution by taking into account background concentration of elements and the vertical and spatial distribution of their contents in cores and surficial layers of sediments. Sediment samples were analysed by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry for 18 elements (Ni, Cu, Co, Zn, Cd, Pb, Hg, As, Cr, Sr, Mn, Fe, Ca, Mg, Na, K, Al, P). Maximum concentrations of all investigated heavy metals (Ni, Cu, Co, Zn, Cd, Pb, Hg, As) were found in the surficial sediment layers of Lake Kuetsjarvi situated directly below the metallurgic smelters. Decreased contents of heavy metals were observed in surficial sediment layers further downstream in the Pasvik watercourse, although pollution remained rather high. Considerable increase in the contents of the heavy metals emitted into the atmosphere in significant amounts by the Pechenganickel Company (Ni, Cu, Co, Zn), was not observed in surficial sediment layers of lakes upstream in the watercourse polluted only by air contamination and household sewage, but substantial increase of the concentrations of chalcophile elements (Pb, Cd, Hg, As) was revealed. The increase in P contents towards the sediment surface in some lakes may suggest a development of eutrophication processes. Our studies reveal that the metallurgic processing of the Pechenganickel Company has resulted in comprehensive heavy metal pollution and contaminations of lakes sediments in the Inari-Pasvik watercourse. The pollution impact on the sediments is most severe in Lake Kuetsjarvi in the vicinity of the smelters, intermediate in lake localities in the main watercourse downstream the metallurgic enterprises and least in lake localities in the upstream part of the watercourse. PMID:21847792

  14. Distribution characteristics of organic phosphorus in sediments from Lake Hulun, China.

    PubMed

    Lü, Changwei; He, Jiang; Zhou, Bin; Vogt, Rolf D; Guan, Rui; Wang, Weiying; Zuo, Le; Yan, Daohao

    2015-10-01

    The amount of organic phosphorus (OP) and its distribution among different pools in lake sediments depend on biotic and abiotic processes driving OP fractionation. The key abiotic factors governing these transformation processes between different OP fractions in sediments were studied on the basis of distribution characteristics of OP pools in sediments from Lake Hulun (HLH). The results showed the order of the size of OP pools in the surface sediments from Lake Hulun to be: Re-OP (residual OP) ≫ FAOP (fulvic acid fraction) ≥ HCl-OP (OP extracted by HCl) > HAOP (humic acid fraction) ≫ LOP (labile OP); lower concentrations of LOP were found in lake surface sediments with high pH (pH > 9) of lake overlying water indicating a governing role of pH in LOP degradation in an aquatic environment. The pattern of total OP (TOP) spatial distribution showed an obvious decreasing trend from the west to the east lake districts in surface sediments from HLH, which was attributed to the inputs of dust and dry grass driven by the prevailing wind and the finer grain size in the west lake districts. However, the spatial distribution pattern of dissolved OP (DOP) in overlying water, which presented different trends with TOP and total organic carbon (TOC) in surface sediments, indicated that the biological factors and terrestrial inputs showed a joint influence on DOP distribution in HLH. The higher levels of Re-OP and lower levels of HCl-OP observed in HLH may reveal that calcium ions and their minerals were the key governing factors of OP fractionation in sediments from HLH. This work revealed the main abiotic process or mechanism driving OP fractionation in the aquatic environment helping to understand the geochemical information archived in OP pools in lake sediments. PMID:26395387

  15. Lake ecosystem response to rapid lateglacial climate changes in lake sediments from northern Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Słowiński, Michał; Zawiska, Izabela; Ott, Florian; Noryśkiewicz, Agnieszka M.; Apolinarska, Karina; Lutyńska, Monika; Michczyńska, Danuta J.; Brauer, Achim; Wulf, Sabine; Skubała, Piotr; Błaszkiewicz, Mirosław

    2013-04-01

    During the Late Glacial Period environment changes were triggered by climatic oscillations which in turn controlled processes like, for example, permafrost thawing, vegetation development and ground water circulation. These environmental changes are ideally recorded in lake sediments and thus can be reconstructed applying a multi-poxy approach. Here, we present the results from the Trzechowskie paleolake, located in the northern Polish lowlands (eastern part of the Pomeranian Lakeland). The site is situated on the outwash plain of the Wda River, which was formed during the Pomeranian phase of the Vistulian glaciation ca 16,000 14C yrs BP. The depression of the Trzechowskie lake basin formed after melting of a buried ice block during the Allerød (13903±170 cal yrs BP). We reconstructed environmental changes in the Trzechowskie paleolake and its catchment using biotic proxies (macrofossils, pollen, cladocera, diatoms, oribatidae mite) and geochemical proxies (δ18O, δ13C, loss-on-ignition (LOI), CaCO3 content). In addition, we carried out µ-XRF element core scanning. The chronology has been established by means of biostratigraphyAMS14C dating on plant macro remains, varve counting in laminated intervals and the late Allerød Laacher See Tephra isochrone. Our results showed that biogenic accumulation in the lake started during the Bølling. Development of coniferous forest during the Allerød with dominance of Pinus sylvestris lead to leaching of carbonates in the catchment due to low pH increasing the flux of Ca ions into the lake. In consequence calcite precipitating in the lake increased as evidences by increasing CaCO3 contents. Both biotic and physical proxies clearly reflect the rapid decrease in productivity at the onset of the Younger Dryas. We compare the data from the Trzechowskie paleolake with the Meerfelder Maar and Rehwiese lake records based on tephrochronological synchronization using the Laacher See Tephra. This study is a contribution to the

  16. Laboratory-determined Phosphorus Flux from Lake Sediments as a Measure of Internal Phosphorus Loading

    PubMed Central

    Ogdahl, Mary E.; Steinman, Alan D.; Weinert, Maggie E.

    2014-01-01

    Eutrophication is a water quality issue in lakes worldwide, and there is a critical need to identify and control nutrient sources. Internal phosphorus (P) loading from lake sediments can account for a substantial portion of the total P load in eutrophic, and some mesotrophic, lakes. Laboratory determination of P release rates from sediment cores is one approach for determining the role of internal P loading and guiding management decisions. Two principal alternatives to experimental determination of sediment P release exist for estimating internal load: in situ measurements of changes in hypolimnetic P over time and P mass balance. The experimental approach using laboratory-based sediment incubations to quantify internal P load is a direct method, making it a valuable tool for lake management and restoration. Laboratory incubations of sediment cores can help determine the relative importance of internal vs. external P loads, as well as be used to answer a variety of lake management and research questions. We illustrate the use of sediment core incubations to assess the effectiveness of an aluminum sulfate (alum) treatment for reducing sediment P release. Other research questions that can be investigated using this approach include the effects of sediment resuspension and bioturbation on P release. The approach also has limitations. Assumptions must be made with respect to: extrapolating results from sediment cores to the entire lake; deciding over what time periods to measure nutrient release; and addressing possible core tube artifacts. A comprehensive dissolved oxygen monitoring strategy to assess temporal and spatial redox status in the lake provides greater confidence in annual P loads estimated from sediment core incubations. PMID:24637715

  17. Flood and sediment dynamics in Lake Mondsee: insights from a hydro-sedimentary monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kämpf, Lucas; Mueller, Philip; Swierczynski, Tina; Güntner, Andreas; Merz, Bruno; Brauer, Achim

    2014-05-01

    Detrital layers in lake sediments are increasingly exploited to establish continuous long flood chronologies. The annually laminated sediments of Lake Mondsee (486 m a.s.l., Upper Austria) provide a seasonally resolved flood layer record over the past 7000 years. However, detailed comparison of sediment and instrumental flood data revealed a partial mismatch emphasizing the need for a better understanding of hydrological and sedimentological processes leading to the formation of flood-triggered sediment layers. For this purpose, a monitoring network was set up at Lake Mondsee recording run-off and suspended sediment concentration at the outlet of the main tributary, the Griesler Ache River, and collecting sediment within the lake at three-day-time intervals by sediment traps, one located 0.9 km off the main inflow (water depth: 55 m) and one in the deepest part of the lake (61 m) in a more distal position at a distance of 2.8 km. Our monitoring data cover a period of 30 months from January 2011 to July 2013. The mean sediment flux in Lake Mondsee yields 4 g/(sqm*d) and exhibits (I) a pronounced seasonal variability and (II) a succession of 30 occasional peaks in mainly detrital sediment flux reaching values of up to 758 g/(sqm*d) at the proximal trap and 59 g/(sqm*d) at the distal trap. The comparison with runoff data revealed (I) coincidence of 83% of the sediment flux peaks with elevated runoff events spanning from 10 to 110 cbm/s, (II) empiric flood thresholds for triggering significant sediment influx in the proximal (20 cbm/s) and distal lake basin (30 cbm/s) and (III) a variable spatial sediment distribution. The latter is mainly due to the role of (i) flood duration, (ii) the existence of a thermocline in summer leading to favoured sediment transport in the upper water column and (iii) local sediment sources which episodically contribute additional detrital material. Monitoring floods of very different intensity and seasonal occurrence shows a complex

  18. Sediment Resuspension Caused by Wind-Induced Current in Lake Izunuma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeda, Makoto; Betto, Yusuke; Shindo, Kentaro

    Lake Izunuma is a shallow lake located in the north part of Miyagi prefecture, whose water quality has been extremely deteriorated. One of the phenomena that influence the water quality is behavior of sediment that has accumulated on the bottom of the lake. In this study, field measurements were conducted during the windy season of winter, when resuspension of sediment is most active. Turbidity, water velocity, wave height were continuously measured in the lake for about three weeks. From the observed data, wave height and velocity oscillation had much to do with increase in turbidity. This fact indicated that resuspension of sediment was mostly caused by wind wave turbulence, which was affected by not only wind speed but also fetch determined from the planar shape of the lake and wind direction. Considering this effect, history and distribution of turbidity during the strong wind event was reproduced with a hydrodynamic numerical modeling.

  19. Sediment Microbial Community Structure and Mercury Methylation in Mercury-Polluted Clear Lake, California

    PubMed Central

    Macalady, J. L.; Mack, E. E.; Nelson, D. C.; Scow, K. M.

    2000-01-01

    Spatial and temporal variations in sediment microbial community structure in a eutrophic lake polluted with inorganic mercury were identified using polar lipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis. Microbial community structure was strongly related to mercury methylation potential, sediment organic carbon content, and lake location. Pore water sulfate, total mercury concentrations, and organic matter C/N ratios showed no relationships with microbial community structure. Seasonal changes and changes potentially attributable to temperature regulation of bacterial membranes were detectable but were less important influences on sediment PLFA composition than were differences due to lake sampling location. Analysis of biomarker PLFAs characteristic of Desulfobacter and Desulfovibrio groups of sulfate-reducing bacteria suggests that Desulfobacter-like organisms are important mercury methylators in the sediments, especially in the Lower Arm of Clear Lake. PMID:10742230

  20. Historical change in lake sedimentation in Lake Takkobu, Kushiro Mire, northern Japan over the last 300 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Young Sang; Mizugaki, Shigeru; Nakamura, Futoshi; Nakamura, Yugo

    2006-08-01

    Environmental degradation, including shallowing, deterioration of aquatic habitat and water pollution, has arisen from the inflow of fine sediment to Lake Takkobu in northern Japan. The lake has experienced gradual environmental degradation due to agricultural development, which has introduced both fine sediment and sediment-associated nutrients into the lake. We have reconstructed the history of sediment yield to Lake Takkobu in Kushiro Mire over the last 300 years and have examined trends with reference to land-use development. Fifteen lake sediment core samples were obtained, and various physical variables of lake sediments were analyzed and dated using 137Cs and tephrochronology. The physical variables showed that all points contained mainly silt, except for two points close to the river mouths, where the mean diameter was < 35 μm. The peaks were defined as a "signal" when the physical variables were synchronous in a profile. These were created by floods and engineering works constructing drainage systems. The signal of canal construction in 1898 was detected in all core points. Lake Takkobu core samples contained two tephra layers. From the refractive indices of dehydrated glasses, the lower tephra layer was identified as Ko-c2 (1694) and the upper tephra layer as Ta-a (1739). A clear peak in the 137Cs concentration was detected at all the sampling points, except for the site close to the Takkobu River. This site showed two peaks in the 137Cs concentration, which was attributed to perturbation from flood events and a drainage project. The maximum 137Cs concentration was identified as the sediment surface from 1963, enveloped by the 1962 and 1964 signals. The sediment yield averaged over the last 300 years for Lake Takkobu was reconstructed for four periods using the signal, tephra and 137Cs as marker layers. The sediment yield under the natural erosion condition for the first two periods was 226 tons/year from 1694 to 1739 and 196 tons/year from 1739 to 1898

  1. Electricity generation by anaerobic bacteria and anoxic sediments from hypersaline soda lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, L.G.; Oremland, R.S.

    2008-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria and anoxic sediments from soda lakes produced electricity in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). No electricity was generated in the absence of bacterial metabolism. Arsenate respiring bacteria isolated from moderately hypersaline Mono Lake (Bacillus selenitireducens), and salt-saturated Searles Lake, CA (strain SLAS-1) oxidized lactate using arsenate as the electron acceptor. However, these cultures grew equally well without added arsenate using the MFC anode as their electron acceptor, and in the process oxidized lactate more efficiently. The decrease in electricity generation by consumption of added alternative electron acceptors (i.e. arsenate) which competed with the anode for available electrons proved to be a useful indicator of microbial activity and hence life in the fuel cells. Shaken sediment slurries from these two lakes also generated electricity, with or without added lactate. Hydrogen added to sediment slurries was consumed but did not stimulate electricity production. Finally, electricity was generated in statically incubated "intact" sediment cores from these lakes. More power was produced in sediment from Mono Lake than from Searles Lake, however microbial fuel cells could detect low levels of metabolism operating under moderate and extreme conditions of salt stress. ?? 2008 US Government.

  2. Comparative microfacies studies on annually laminated lake sediments from lakes of different sizes in northern Germany- Palaeolimnological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreibrodt, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The composition of annually laminated lake sediments was studied in thin sections. Investigations on recently deposited warves and microfacies indicators known from the literature were used to infer about limnological processes explaining a given mid-Holocene warve sequence. Geochemical analyses were carried out for supplemental information (e.g. aeration of the hypolimnion). The sequences of sediments deposited from ca. 4.900 to 6.900 cal BC in Lake Belau and Lake Poggensee were compared. According to the abovementioned indicators a reconstruction of the storminess (intensity of circulation), summer temperatures, and severity of winters (NAO stage) was carried out ending up with a graph of relative changes for the studied interval. Since the compared lake systems have considerably different sizes (about a magnitude) abrupt changes in sedimentation detected synchronously in both lakes but differing in shape were interpret as varying responses to climatic anomalies. These anomalies are considered to represent extraordinary cold spells during the summers at ca. 5.900 and 5.300 cal BC. Similarly, a short phase of probably unusual warm winters occurred at ca. 5.350 cal. BC. The example illustrates the potential of comparing lakes systems of different dimensions utilizing different system thresholds that result in varying limnological responses to external triggers.

  3. MERCURY IN METAL ORE DEPOSITS: AN UNRECOGNIZED, WIDESPREAD SOURCE TO LAKE SUPERIOR SEDIMENTS, CONTRIBUTION #1072

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mining operations have worked the rich mineral resources of the Lake Superior Basin for over 150 years, leaving industrially impacted regions with tailing piles and smelters. In Lake Superior sediments, mercury and copper inventories increase towards shorelines and are highly cor...

  4. Sediment quality assessment of Beasley Lake: Bioaccumulation and effects of pesticides in Hyalella azteca

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beasley Lake is a Conservation Evaluation Assessment Program (CEAP) watershed in the intensively cultivated Mississippi Delta, USA. Lake sediment quality at three sites was evaluated in 2004 and 2008 for biological impairment and uptake (viz. body residues) from 14 pesticides and three metabolites ...

  5. Agricultural pesticides in Mississippi Delta oxbow lake sediments during autumn and their effects on Hyalella azteca

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural pesticide contamination of sediments from five Mississippi Delta oxbow lakes and their effects and bioavailablity to Hyalella azteca were assessed during a low-application season, autumn. Three reference oxbow lakes were located in the White River National Wildlife Refuge (WRNWR), Arka...

  6. Investigation of Total and Methyl Mercury in Fish and Sediment of Lake Michigan

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment cores and fish collected between 1994 and 1996 as part of the Lake Michigan Mass Balance Project were analyzed for total and methyl mercury. Results of the fish analyses are being used to describe total and methyl mercury concentrations in forage fish and lake trout, re...

  7. Using SWAT to target critical source sediment and phosphorus areas in the Wister Lake Basin, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wister Lake is located in the San Bois Mountains in southeastern Oklahoma, USA. The reservoir is primarily used as a water supply and flood storage to over 40,000 residents in the area. Due to high levels of phosphorus and sediment, Wister Lake is listed as a high priority basin for the State of Okl...

  8. SEDIMENT REWORKING AND TRANSPORT IN EASTERN LAKE SUPERIOR: IN SITU RARE EARTH ELEMENT TRACER STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rare earth element (REE) tracer pellet was deployed at the floor of the Ile Parisienne basin of eastern Lake Superior to measure representative sediment reworking and transport processes in the benthic boundary layer of the prnfundal Great Lakes. Samarium oxide, a high neutron-...

  9. EARLY EUTROPHICATION IN THE LOWER GREAT LAKES: NEW EVIDENCE FROM BIOGENIC SILICA IN SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    New evidence from studies of biogenic silica and diatoms in sediment cores indicates that eutrophication in the lower Great Lakes resulted from nutrient enrichment associated with early settlement and forest clearance. Diatom production peaked from 1820 to 1850 in Lake Ontario, a...

  10. Sediment-Chlorophyll Relationship in Oxbow Lakes in the Mississippi River Alluvial Plain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During of the past century, aquatic habitats have declined worldwide, primarily due to draining and clearing for agriculture and urban development. These activities often result in increased erosion and sedimentation with detrimental impacts on stream and lake water quality. Oxbow lakes are importa...

  11. Bottom Sediment as a Source of Organic Contaminants in Lake Mead, Nevada, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Treated wastewater effluent from Las Vegas, Nevada and surrounding communities’ flow through Las Vegas Wash (LVW) into the Lake Mead National Recreational Area at Las Vegas Bay (LVB). Lake sediment is a likely sink for many hydrophobic synthetic organic compounds (SOCs); however,...

  12. NATURAL RECOVERY OF PCB - CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS IN A FRESH WATER LAKE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: An ongoing study of natural recovery of sediments contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), is being pursued at the Sangamo-Weston/Twelvemile Creek/Lake Hartwell Superfund Site (i.e., the Lake Hart...

  13. Ground-water seepage and sulfur diagenesis in acidified lake sediments

    SciTech Connect

    McIntire, P.E.

    1988-01-01

    Most sulfur diagenesis models predict that porewater SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} concentrations will decrease exponentially with increasing sediment depth and will be lower than that of the overlying water throughout the sediments. Sulfate concentrations below 0.2 mM are common in Lake Anna sediments which receive acid mine drainage; however, sediment porewater containing up to 29 mM SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} is also seen at about 20 cm below the sediment surface in this section of the lake. A decision tree was used to investigate the cause of the high SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} concentrations at depth (HSD) in the sediment. The first hypothesis was that increased ground-water flow through Lake Anna HSD sediments, relative to the non-HSD sediments, increases groundwater advection of SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} or of oxygen which would induce sulfide oxidation. Stations having HSD profiles did not have higher groundwater flow than other sites samples. Alternative explanations for the HSD profiles were that the region in which they occurred had (1) unusual sediment chemical compositions; (2) groundwater seepage containing unusually high sulfate concentrations; or (3) a lateral intrusion of high SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} water from the sulfide mines which supplied SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} to the HSD region before the lake was impounded.

  14. Effects of Drought-Induced Sediment Resuspension on Phosphorus Availability in Lake Powell, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildman, R. A.; Miller, J.; Hering, J. G.

    2006-12-01

    The damming of a large river creates a lake ecosystem that differs substantially from that of the unaltered river upstream. Unlike a natural lake, this ecosystem is subject to large perturbations resulting from reservoir management decisions. For example, significant change in water surface elevation can lead to resuspension of lakebed sediments in the inflow region of the reservoir and may have important implications for the nutrient dynamics of a reservoir. Impounded by Glen Canyon Dam, Lake Powell is a large, long, and narrow reservoir on the mainstem of the Colorado River in Arizona and Utah. A severe drought in the Rocky Mountains has significantly decreased inflows to the lake. Constant yearly dam releases have led to a precipitous drop in the surface elevation and water storage of Lake Powell, including a record low in April 2005. The incoming Colorado River now cuts through the previously-undisturbed sediment delta. Thus, much of the incoming suspended load may come from the resuspension of deltaic sediments. Since these sediments likely contain phosphorus, this deltaic resuspension could be a major new source of nutrients to the oligotrophic, phosphorus-limited lake ecosystem. To quantify the resuspension and phosphorus concentration in the Lake Powell deltaic sediments, 70 and 100 cm cores were collected from the lakebed and shore sediments of Lake Powell March and May 2006. Cores were collected at six locations along the Colorado River delta in the inflow region of the lake and at three shore locations where the former delta sediments have been exposed. Water and suspended sediment samples were also collected at various depths at the same locations as the lakebed cores. Phosphorus concentration was measured in all samples. Sequential extractions were performed to assess the distribution of phosphorus in the solid phase. Ancillary sediment analyses included organic carbon and particle size measurements. The two sampling events captured different

  15. [Suspension-sedimentation of sediment and release amount of internal load in Lake Taihu affected by wind].

    PubMed

    Pang, Yong; Yan, Run-run; Yu, Zhong-bo; Li, Yi-ping; Li, Rui-ling

    2008-09-01

    The water quality in Meiliang Bay of the Taihu Lake was totally tested five times in the four seasons. The suspension samples were obtained by using a sediment trap. The sediment settling flux and resuspended flux were calculated according to the observation data by using Gansith formula, and the relationships between these fluxes and wind speeds were established. Seven experiments were conducted in Laboratory for hydrostatic settling behavior of suspended matter affected by different wind speeds in Lake Taihu. The hydrostatic settling fluxes of suspended matter were calculated and the relationships between the fluxes and suspended matter concentrations were established. Base on these works, the suspension-sedimentation process was decomposed and generalized according to the critical wind speed of 3.7 m/s. Daily sediment resuspended amount and settling amount of the year 2005 was calculated and annual average release amount of internal load in Lake Taihu was estimated using the wind data of nearly 10 years. The results indicate that daily release amount of internal load in Lake Taihu significantly influenced by wind and have the same trend of change with wind, while the release amount of different nutrients in the same condition are different. The Lake Taihu has an annual average release amount of internal load with COD 49,600 t, TN 7773.0 t and TP 275.5 t, of which summer has the markedly highest release amount than other seasons. PMID:19068626

  16. A hydrous Ca-bearing magnesium carbonate from playa lake sediments, Salines Lake, Spain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Queralt, I.; Julia, R.; Plana, F.; Bischoff, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    Sediments of playa Lake Salines, SE, Spain, contain a carbonate mineral characterized by X-ray diffraction peaks very similar to, but systematically shifted from those of pure magnesite. Analyses (SEM, IR and Raman spectroscopy, DTA, TGA, and ICP) indicate the mineral is a hydrous Ca-bearing magnesium carbonate with the chemical formula (Mg0.92,Ca0.08)CO3??3H2O. Thermal characteristics of the mineral are similar to those of other known hydrated magnesium carbonates. X-ray and electron diffraction data suggests a monoclinic system (P21/n space group) with unit-cell parameters of a = 6.063(6), b = 10.668(5), and c = 6.014(4) A?? and ?? = 107.28??.

  17. Accumulation of polychlorinated biphenyl congeners from Lake Champlain sediments by Mysis relicta

    SciTech Connect

    Lester, D.C.; McIntosh, A. . Vermont Water Resources and Lake Studies Center)

    1994-11-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) levels in lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) from Lake Champlain often exceed the F.D.A. tolerance level of 2 [mu]g/g (wet weight). Of added concern are recent studies that suggest a relationship between the dioxin-like properties of non-ortho-substituted PCB congeners and impaired lake trout egg hatchability. Dietary accumulation of PCBs is thought to be an important exposure route for fish. The epibenthic freshwater shrimp Mysis relicta is an integral part of the benthic and pelagic food web in lake Champlain and may act as a link between PCBs in sediments and lake trout. Previous investigations have shown that diurnal migrations of mysids enhance the movement and distribution of toxic contaminants, effectively coupling the benthic and pelagic zones. The objective of this research was to examine the role contaminated sediments play in the transfer of PCBs to mysids. Bioaccumulation was assessed by exposing mysids to such sediments in two ways: (a) with organisms screened from sediments; and (b) with organisms in direct contact with sediments. Accumulation of PCBs over the course of the 24-day exposure period was examined on the following days: 0, 3, 6, 12, 21, and 24. Eighty-nine individual PCB congeners were measured in tissue and sediment. Mysids in direct contact with sediments accumulated significantly higher levels of PCBs than did organisms screened from sediments. Mysids accumulated substantial levels of PCBs, suggesting they may play an important part in the transfer of PCBs from sediments into the Lake Champlain food web. It is clear from this research that sediments can play a critical role in the accumulation of PCBs by mysids.

  18. Testing the potential of 10Be in varved sediments from two lakes for solar activity reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czymzik, Markus; Muscheler, Raimund; Brauer, Achim; Adolphi, Florian; Ott, Florian; Kienel, Ulrike; Dräger, Nadine; Slowinski, Michal; Aldahan, Ala; Possnert, Göran

    2015-04-01

    The potential of 10Be in annually laminated (varved) lake sediments for solar activity reconstruction is, to date, largely unexplored. It is hypothesized that 10Be contents in sediments from well-chosen lakes reflect the solar induced atmospheric production signal. The varved nature of these archives provides the chance to establish solar activity time-series with very high temporal precision. However, so far solar activity reconstruction from 10Be in varved lake sediments is hampered due to a lack of detailed knowledge of the process chain from production in the atmosphere to deposition on the lake floor. Calibrating 10Be time-series from varved lake sediments against complementary proxy records from the same sediment archive as well as instrumental meteorological and solar activity data will allow a process-based understanding of 10Be deposition in these lakes and a quantitative evaluation of their potential for solar activity reconstruction. 10Be concentration and flux time-series at annual resolution were constructed for the period 1983 to 2007 (approx. solar cycles 22 and 23) conducting accelerator mass spectrometry and varve chronology on varved sediments of Lakes Tiefer See and Czechowski, located on an east-west transect at a distance of about 450 km in the lowlands of northern-central Europe. 10Be concentrations vary between 0.9 and 1.8*108atoms/g, with a mean of 1.3*108atoms/g in Lake Tiefer See and between 0.6 and 1.6*108atoms/g, with a mean of 1*108atoms/g in Lake Czechowski. Calculated mean 10Be flux is 2.3*108atoms/cm2/year for Lake Tiefer See and 0.7*108atoms/cm2/year for Lake Czechowski. Calibrating the 10Be time-series against corresponding geochemical μ-XRF profiles, varve thickness and total organic carbon records as well as precipitation data from the nearby stations Schwerin for Lake Tiefer See and Koscierzyna for Lake Czechowski and a neutron monitor record of solar activity suggests (1) a complex interaction of varying processes influencing

  19. Tracking the sediment imprint of floods (in pre-Alpine Lake Mondsee) by a combined catchment and in-lake monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Philip; Kämpf, Lucas; Thoss, Heiko; Güntner, Andreas; Merz, Bruno; Brauer, Achim

    2014-05-01

    Lakes form ideal sediment traps in the landscape and continuously record land surface processes including extreme events. During floods, detrital sediment is transported via tributary streams and deposited at the lake floor as discrete layers, intercalated in autochthonous lake sediments. Lacustrine records of detrital layers are increasingly explored as flood archives for pre-instrumental periods. The annually laminated sediments of Lake Mondsee (486 m a.s.l., Upper Austria) contain a flood layer chronology over the past 7000 years with seasonal resolution. The interpretation of lacustrine flood layer records, however, requires detailed understanding of hydro-sedimentary transport and deposition processes of flood-related sediments from the catchment as a source to the lake as a sediment sink. For this purpose, a comprehensive monitoring network was set up in the catchment of Lake Mondsee. Flood and sediment transport related variables like precipitation, runoff and turbidity as a surrogate for suspended sediment concentration (SSC) are monitored at five gauges along the main tributary, the Griesler Ache River. Gauge deployment follows a nested catchment approach ranging from the headwaters to the outlet to the lake. Four monitoring buoys on the lake recording meteorological parameters as well as limno-physical variables (water temperature, turbidity, current velocity) at multiple depths of the water column are used to explore the flood-related sediment dynamics in the lake. To retrieve event-specific data on sediment deposition, two sediment trap chains were deployed, one in a proximal position to the Griesler Ache inflow and another one in a distal position in the deepest part of lake basin where sedimentation is most continuous. All units of the monitoring network collected data during the severe Central European summer flood event in June 2013. Suspended sediment concentrations could be derived from rating curves based on water samples taken automatically for

  20. Subglacial Lake Whillans, West Antarctica; Solute Dynamics and Fluxes to the Ross Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skidmore, M. L.; Michaud, A. B.; Achberger, A.; Barbante, C.; Christner, B. C.; Mikucki, J.; Mitchell, A. C.; Priscu, J. C.; Purcell, A. M.; van Gelder, W.; Vick-Majors, T.

    2014-12-01

    Subglacial Lake Whillans is located beneath the Whillans Ice Stream in West Antarctica. The lake is situated beneath 800 m of ice and ~ 70 km upstream of the grounding line where Whillans Ice Stream terminates into the Ross Sea. Subglacial Lake Whillans is a shallow lake and a component of a complex subglacial hydrological system that may resemble a large wetland along the Siple Coast of West Antarctica. Subglacial Lake Whillans drains and refills on a sub-decadal time scale discharging water towards the Ross Sea. Water and sediment samples were recovered from the lake, using clean access drilling technologies, in January, 2013. Isotopic analysis of the lake waters indicates basal meltwater from the ice sheet as the dominant water source. Geochemical analysis of the lake water reveals it is freshwater with mineral weathering as a significant solute source, with a minor contribution from sea water likely from relict marine sediments. Subglacial hydrothermal activity upstream may also contribute solutes. Nutrients N and P are present at micromolar concentrations. Sediment porewaters from shallow cores (~ 40 cm depth) of the subglacial lake sediments indicate increasing solute concentration with depth, with up to ~ five times greater solute concentrations than in the lake water. The waters and sediment contain metabolically active organisms which are likely involved in elemental cycling within the lake system. Here we will discuss solute sources to the lake, solute dynamics within the lake waters and sediment, and the fluxes of solute and nutrients to the Ross Sea and their implications for these marine ecosystems.

  1. Disruptions of stream sediment size and stability by lakes in mountain watersheds: Potential effects on periphyton biomass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Myers, A.K.; Marcarelli, A.M.; Arp, C.D.; Baker, M.A.; Wurtsbaugh, W.A.

    2007-01-01

    The location of a stream reach relative to other landforms in a watershed is an important attribute. We hypothesized that lakes disrupt the frequency of finer, more mobile sediments and thereby change sediment transport processes such that benthic substrates are more stable (i.e., less mobile) below lakes than above lakes. In turn, we hypothesized that this reduced mobility would lead to greater periphyton biomass below lakes. We tested these hypotheses in study reaches above and below lakes in 3 mountain watersheds. To expand this comparison, we analyzed the relationship between sediment attributes and periphyton biomass in one watershed with and one watershed without a lake. We hypothesized that no clear pattern or change in sediment size or chlorophyll a (chl a) would be observed over a 3-km-long study reach without a lake. In contrast, we expected a clear discontinuity in both sediment size and chl a in a 7-km-long study reach interrupted by a lake. Average median sediment size (D50) was significantly larger (p < 0.01) in lake-outlet than lake-inlet reaches (41 mm vs 10 mm). Bed sediments in lake-outlet reaches were immobile during bankfull flows, whereas sediments at lake-inlet reaches were mobile during bankfull flows. Chlorophyll a was ???10x greater in lake-outlet reaches than in lake-inlet reaches, although this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.17). The longitudinal analysis clearly showed geomorphic transitions in sediment size and mobility downstream of mountain lakes, and these geomorphic transitions might be associated with changes in periphyton biomass. Geomorphic transitions can alter sediment transport and should be considered in concert with other factors that are considered more commonly in benthic ecology, such as light, nutrients, and temperature. ?? 2007 by The North American Benthological Society.

  2. Estimating selenium removal by sedimentation from the Great Salt Lake, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oliver, W.; Fuller, C.; Naftz, D.L.; Johnson, W.P.; Diaz, X.

    2009-01-01

    The mass of Se deposited annually to sediment in the Great Salt Lake (GSL) was estimated to determine the significance of sedimentation as a permanent Se removal mechanism. Lake sediment cores were used to qualitatively delineate sedimentation regions (very high to very low), estimate mass accumulation rates (MARs) and determine sediment Se concentrations. Sedimentation regions were defined by comparison of isopach contours of Holocene sediment thicknesses to linear sedimentation rates determined via analysis of 210Pb, 226Ra, 7Be and 137Cs activity in 20 short cores (<5 cm), yielding quantifiable results in 13 cores. MARs were developed via analysis of the same radioisotopes in eight long cores (>10 cm). These MARs in the upper 1-2 cm of each long core ranged from 0.019 to 0.105 gsed/cm2/a. Surface sediment Se concentrations in the upper 1 or 2 cm of each long core ranged from 0.79 to 2.47 mg/kg. Representative MARs and Se concentrations were used to develop mean annual Se removal by sedimentation in the corresponding sedimentation region. The spatially integrated Se sedimentation rate was estimated to be 624 kg/a within a range of uncertainty between 285 and 960 kg/a. Comparison to annual Se loading and other potential removal processes suggests burial by sedimentation is not the primary removal process for Se from the GSL. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Spatial and temporal variability in metal bioavailability and toxicity of sediment from Hamilton Harbour, Lake Ontario

    SciTech Connect

    Krantzberg, G. )

    1994-10-01

    Trace metals in sediment from nearshore urban and industrialized centers of the Great Lakes are frequently at concentrations well above geological background values. Total metal content in sediment, however, is a weak predictor of sediment toxicity. This study examined the bioavailability of metals from Hamilton Harbor in Lake Ontario and considered variability in metal forms on a temporal basis. Sediment from regions within Hamilton Harbor is highly contaminated with metals; nevertheless, not all metal-contaminated sites were toxic to test organisms. Most sediment did elicit sublethal and/or lethal responses in bioassay organisms. Metal bioavailability, as measured by weak acid extractions, metal bioaccumulation by fathead minnows, and sediment toxicity, was greater in sediment collected in the fall as compared to sediment collected in the spring. Results of analyses of tissue residues in test organisms and the reduced toxicity observed in sediment collected from some stations in the spring as compared to the fall implicate trace metals and sediment oxygen demand as contributing to sediment toxicity. The suitability for colonization by benthic invertebrates of sediment in some areas of Hamilton Harbor appears to be limited by both contaminants and high sediment oxygen demand. Improving the oxygen regime of the harbor should result in improvements in the benthic invertebrate community directly, by providing a suitable oxygen regime for organisms less tolerant of temporal anoxia, and indirectly by decreasing metal bioavailability, possibly through the co-precipitation of trace metals with iron and manganese hydroxides.

  4. Stratigraphic and Paleomagnetic Study of Glacial Lake Missoula Lacustrine and Flood Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, M. A.; Barendregt, R.; Clague, J. J.; Enkin, R. J.

    2007-12-01

    During the late Wisconsinan, the Purcell Trench lobe of the Cordilleran Ice Sheet advanced south into Idaho where it dammed the Clark Fork River and formed glacial Lake Missoula in western Montana. The lake repeatedly filled and emptied through its dam between about 16,000 and 12,500 14C yr ago. The floodwaters entered glacial Lake Columbia, Washington, and spilled across the plateaux of eastern Washington. Repeated floods excavated the Channeled Scablands and deposited slackwater sediments in several valleys in Washington and in the Willamette Valley in Oregon. Stratigraphic study of the flood and slackwater sediments in Washington and Oregon, and of glacial Lake Missoula sediments near Missoula, Montana, provide evidence for at least 46 glacial Lake Missoula floods. Paleomagnetic analyses were done on oriented samples of (1) glacial Lake Missoula sediments at the Ninemile section and at a section in Missoula (348 samples); (2) interstratified flood and lacustrine sediments at the Manila Creek site in the Sanpoil Valley, Washington (615 samples); and (3) backwater sediments in the Yakima, Walla Walla, and Willamette valleys (813 samples). The sediments record strong and stable magnetic remanence carried by either magnetite or hematite. Magnetic remanence directions of flood beds and of interbedded lacustrine units show secular variation over a time span of hundreds to a few thousands of years, consistent with deposition by many tens of floods separated on average by several decades. Rock magnetic properties of the flood deposits give insight into depositional processes involved and the source of the floodwaters. We are now attempting to date the floods using radiocarbon and optically stimulated luminescence techniques, to correlate the paleomagnetic records between our study sites, which are up to 750 km apart, and to correlate them with well dated paleomagnetic records from Fish Lake, Oregon, and Mono Lake, California.

  5. Recognizing seiche and tsunami effects in lake sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marco, Shmuel; Alsop, Ian G.; Katz, Oded; Dray, Yehoshua

    2014-05-01

    The lacustrine 70-15-ka Lisan Formation outcropping around the Dead Sea contains superb examples of slump folds formed in water depths of <100 m. New structural data from individual horizons demonstrate that several of these gravity-driven slumps are coaxially refolded and reworked by folds and thrusts verging both back up and then down the palaeoslope. The uppermost folds are often truncated. A progressive increase in reworking and shearing is developed up through the folded sediment, culminating in an upward-finning breccia layer that is capped by a thin, typically graded horizon of undeformed fine-grained clasts. We interpret this sequence as a seiche-related deformation. Based on the similarity of the structures in the Lisan Formation and on additional supporting observations we interpret zigzag-shaped sand injections in artificial lake deposits on the Eastern Mediterranean shore as evidence for a tsunami, possibly associated with the earthquake of 25 November 1759. If this interpretation is correct it supports the hypothesis that onshore Dead Sea Fault earthquakes can trigger tsunamis in the Mediterranean.

  6. Impacts of flamingos on saline lake margin and shallow lacustrine sediments in the Kenya Rift Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Jennifer J.; Renaut, Robin W.; Owen, R. Bernhart

    2012-11-01

    Studies of modern, Holocene, and Pleistocene sediments around saline to hypersaline, alkaline Lake Bogoria and Lake Magadi show that evidence of flamingo activity in marginal areas of these lakes is nearly ubiquitous. Flamingos produce discrete structures such as webbed footprints (~ 9 cm long, ~ 11 cm wide) and nest mounds (~ 30 cm wide, ~ 20 cm high), and they also extensively rework sediments in delta front, delta plain, and shoreline areas. Large (~ 0.5-2 cm in diameter), pinched, 'bubble pores' and ped-like mud clumps are formed by the trampling and churning of wet clay-rich sediments in these settings. Flamingo nest mounds, although superficially similar to some thrombolite mounds, are typically internally structureless, unless formed on pre-existing sediments that preserve internal structures. The flamingo mounds consist of a dense, packed oval-shaped core, a surrounding 'body' of packed sediment, and an external layer with a ped-like texture of clumped mud. The nests may contain open holes from roots or feather shafts incorporated into the nest, and (or) burrows produced once the nests are abandoned. In areas with high densities of flamingos, lake margin sediments may be preferentially compacted, particularly at breeding sites, and become resistant to subaerial erosion and the effects of transgressive ravinement on time scales ranging from seasons to tens of thousands of years. The relatively well-compacted nest mounds and associated sediments also contribute to the stability of delta distributary channels during regressive-transgressive cycles, and can lead to the minor channelization of unconfined flows where currents are diverted around nest mounds. Pleistocene exhumed surfaces of relatively well-indurated lake margin sediments at Lake Bogoria and Lake Magadi that are interpreted as combined regressive and transgressive surfaces (flooding surface/sequence boundary) preserve evidence of flamingo activities, and are overlain by younger, porous lacustrine

  7. Improving lakebed sediment quality in an urban estuary, Presque Isle Bay, Lake Erie, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foyle, A. M.; Norton, K. P.

    2007-12-01

    Presque Isle Bay, Lake Erie, is a microtidal freshwater estuary on the North American Great Lakes. It is one of 40 remaining environmental Areas of Concern (AoCs) on the Great Lakes that have one or more water, habitat, or sediment quality impairments as defined by the International Joint Commission. In-situ natural capping using sediment from to-be-remediated watersheds and other sources is being considered as the most feasible means of remediating contaminated sediments in the estuary. A multi-decade sediment budget shows that, when localized anthropogenic effects are accounted for, the estuary net-accumulated sediment over time from three major sources: the Lake Erie littoral system (20%), streams (25%), and bank erosion and bluff recession (41%). The non-stream sources supply environmentally clean sediment from ancient coastal deposits along the shoreline, and from the modern littoral system. However, organic and metallic contaminants are supplied by streams and run-off and remain a remediation challenge. From a geological perspective, natural capping of contaminated sediment over the next several decades is a viable solution for the majority of the bay. The mechanism may not work effectively in all areas because approximately 25% of the bay floor is moderately net- erosional or accumulates sediments very slowly.

  8. Occurrence of Atrazine and Related Compounds in Sediments of Upper Great Lakes.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jiehong; Li, Zhuona; Ranasinghe, Prabha; Bonina, Solidea; Hosseini, Soheil; Corcoran, Margaret B; Smalley, Colin; Kaliappan, Rajashankar; Wu, Yan; Chen, Da; Sandy, Andy L; Wang, Yawei; Rockne, Karl J; Sturchio, Neil C; Giesy, John P; Li, An

    2016-07-19

    Surface grab and core sediment samples were collected from Lakes Michigan, Superior, and Huron from 2010 to 2012, and concentrations of herbicides atrazine, simazine, and alachlor, as well as desethylatrazine (DEA), were determined. Concentrations of atrazine in surface grabs ranged from 0.01 to 1.7 ng/g dry weight and are significantly higher in the southern basin of Lake Michigan (latitude <44°) than other parts of the three lakes. The highest concentration of alachlor was found in sediments of Saginaw Bay in Lake Huron. The inventory and net fluxes of these herbicides were found to decline exponentially from the south to the north. The concentration ratio of DEA to atrazine (DEA/ATZ) increased with latitude, suggesting degradation of atrazine to DEA during atmospheric transport. DEA/ATZ also increased with sediment depth in the sediment cores. Diffusion of deposited herbicides from the upper sediment into deeper sediments has occurred, on the basis of the observed patterns of concentrations in dated sediment cores. Concentrations of atrazine in pore water were estimated and were higher than those reported for the bulk waters, suggesting the occurrence of solid-phase deposition of atrazine through the water column and that contaminated sediments act as a source releasing atrazine to the overlying water. PMID:27322944

  9. MISSING THE STORM: PREDICTING SEDIMENT EXPORT FROM BASEFLOW CONDITIONS IN LOW-ORDER LAKE SUPERIOR WATERSHEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Midwestern streams export most of their annual sediment load during snowmelt and rainfall events, however measuring sediment export at peak stream discharges is not always possible. Watershed-level, riparian, and instream data were collected from 48 second and third order Lake S...

  10. Enhanced Sorption of PAHs in Natural-Fire-Impacted Sediments from Oriole Lake, California

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface sediment cores from Oriole Lake (CA) were analyzed for organic carbon (OC), black carbon (BC), and their δ13C isotope ratios. Sediments displayed high OC(20-25%) and increasing BC concentrations from ∼0.40% (in 1800 C.E.) to ∼0.60% dry weight (in 2000 C.E.). Petrographic...