Science.gov

Sample records for remote memory access

  1. Remote direct memory access

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J.; Blocksome, Michael A.

    2012-12-11

    Methods, parallel computers, and computer program products are disclosed for remote direct memory access. Embodiments include transmitting, from an origin DMA engine on an origin compute node to a plurality target DMA engines on target compute nodes, a request to send message, the request to send message specifying a data to be transferred from the origin DMA engine to data storage on each target compute node; receiving, by each target DMA engine on each target compute node, the request to send message; preparing, by each target DMA engine, to store data according to the data storage reference and the data length, including assigning a base storage address for the data storage reference; sending, by one or more of the target DMA engines, an acknowledgment message acknowledging that all the target DMA engines are prepared to receive a data transmission from the origin DMA engine; receiving, by the origin DMA engine, the acknowledgement message from the one or more of the target DMA engines; and transferring, by the origin DMA engine, data to data storage on each of the target compute nodes according to the data storage reference using a single direct put operation.

  2. Remote direct memory access over datagrams

    DOEpatents

    Grant, Ryan Eric; Rashti, Mohammad Javad; Balaji, Pavan; Afsahi, Ahmad

    2014-12-02

    A communication stack for providing remote direct memory access (RDMA) over a datagram network is disclosed. The communication stack has a user level interface configured to accept datagram related input and communicate with an RDMA enabled network interface card (NIC) via an NIC driver. The communication stack also has an RDMA protocol layer configured to supply one or more data transfer primitives for the datagram related input of the user level. The communication stack further has a direct data placement (DDP) layer configured to transfer the datagram related input from a user storage to a transport layer based on the one or more data transfer primitives by way of a lower layer protocol (LLP) over the datagram network.

  3. Scaling Linear Algebra Kernels using Remote Memory Access

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Manoj Kumar; Lewis, Robert R.; Vishnu, Abhinav

    2010-09-13

    This paper describes the scalability of linear algebra kernels based on remote memory access approach. The current approach differs from the other linear algebra algorithms by the explicit use of shared memory and remote memory access (RMA) communication rather than message passing. It is suitable for clusters and scalable shared memory systems. The experimental results on large scale systems (Linux-Infiniband cluster, Cray XT) demonstrate consistent performance advantages over ScaLAPACK suite, the leading implementation of parallel linear algebra algorithms used today. For example, on a Cray XT4 for a matrix size of 102400, our RMA-based matrix multiplication achieved over 55 teraflops while ScaLAPACK’s pdgemm measured close to 42 teraflops on 10000 processes.

  4. Administering an epoch initiated for remote memory access

    DOEpatents

    Blocksome, Michael A; Miller, Douglas R

    2012-10-23

    Methods, systems, and products are disclosed for administering an epoch initiated for remote memory access that include: initiating, by an origin application messaging module on an origin compute node, one or more data transfers to a target compute node for the epoch; initiating, by the origin application messaging module after initiating the data transfers, a closing stage for the epoch, including rejecting any new data transfers after initiating the closing stage for the epoch; determining, by the origin application messaging module, whether the data transfers have completed; and closing, by the origin application messaging module, the epoch if the data transfers have completed.

  5. Administering an epoch initiated for remote memory access

    DOEpatents

    Blocksome, Michael A.; Miller, Douglas R.

    2013-01-01

    Methods, systems, and products are disclosed for administering an epoch initiated for remote memory access that include: initiating, by an origin application messaging module on an origin compute node, one or more data transfers to a target compute node for the epoch; initiating, by the origin application messaging module after initiating the data transfers, a closing stage for the epoch, including rejecting any new data transfers after initiating the closing stage for the epoch; determining, by the origin application messaging module, whether the data transfers have completed; and closing, by the origin application messaging module, the epoch if the data transfers have completed.

  6. Administering an epoch initiated for remote memory access

    SciTech Connect

    Blocksome, Michael A; Miller, Douglas R

    2014-03-18

    Methods, systems, and products are disclosed for administering an epoch initiated for remote memory access that include: initiating, by an origin application messaging module on an origin compute node, one or more data transfers to a target compute node for the epoch; initiating, by the origin application messaging module after initiating the data transfers, a closing stage for the epoch, including rejecting any new data transfers after initiating the closing stage for the epoch; determining, by the origin application messaging module, whether the data transfers have completed; and closing, by the origin application messaging module, the epoch if the data transfers have completed.

  7. Performance Evaluation of Remote Memory Access (RMA) Programming on Shared Memory Parallel Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Hao-Qiang; Jost, Gabriele; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of remote memory access (RMA) programming on shared memory parallel computers. We discuss different RMA based implementations of selected CFD application benchmark kernels and compare them to corresponding message passing based codes. For the message-passing implementation we use MPI point-to-point and global communication routines. For the RMA based approach we consider two different libraries supporting this programming model. One is a shared memory parallelization library (SMPlib) developed at NASA Ames, the other is the MPI-2 extensions to the MPI Standard. We give timing comparisons for the different implementation strategies and discuss the performance.

  8. Remote Memory Access Protocol Target Node Intellectual Property

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddad, Omar

    2013-01-01

    The MagnetoSpheric Multiscale (MMS) mission had a requirement to use the Remote Memory Access Protocol (RMAP) over its SpaceWire network. At the time, no known intellectual property (IP) cores were available for purchase. Additionally, MMS preferred to implement the RMAP functionality with control over the low-level details of the design. For example, not all the RMAP standard functionality was needed, and it was desired to implement only the portions of the RMAP protocol that were needed. RMAP functionality had been previously implemented in commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) products, but the IP core was not available for purchase. The RMAP Target IP core is a VHDL (VHSIC Hardware Description Language description of a digital logic design suitable for implementation in an FPGA (field-programmable gate array) or ASIC (application-specific integrated circuit) that parses SpaceWire packets that conform to the RMAP standard. The RMAP packet protocol allows a network host to access and control a target device using address mapping. This capability allows SpaceWire devices to be managed in a standardized way that simplifies the hardware design of the device, as well as the development of the software that controls the device. The RMAP Target IP core has some features that are unique and not specified in the RMAP standard. One such feature is the ability to automatically abort transactions if the back-end logic does not respond to read/write requests within a predefined time. When a request times out, the RMAP Target IP core automatically retracts the request and returns a command response with an appropriate status in the response packet s header. Another such feature is the ability to control the SpaceWire node or router using RMAP transactions in the extended address range. This allows the SpaceWire network host to manage the SpaceWire network elements using RMAP packets, which reduces the number of protocols that the network host needs to support.

  9. Symmetric Data Objects and Remote Memory Access Communication for Fortran 95-Applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Nieplocha, Jarek; Baxter, Douglas J.; Tipparaju, Vinod; Rasmussen, Craig; Numrich, Robert W.

    2005-08-01

    Symmetric data objects have been introduced by Cray Inc. in context of SHMEM remote memory access communication on Cray T3D/E systems and later adopted by SGI for their Origin servers. Symmetric data objects greatly simplify parallel programming by allowing to reference remote instance of a data structure by specifying address of the local counterpart. The current paper describes how symmetric data objects and remote memory access communication could be implemented in Fortran-95 without requiring specialized hardware or compiler support. NAS Multi-Grid parallel benchmark was used as an application example and demonstrated competitive performance to the standard MPI implementation

  10. Optimizing NEURON Simulation Environment Using Remote Memory Access with Recursive Doubling on Distributed Memory Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bozkuş, Zeki

    2016-01-01

    Increase in complexity of neuronal network models escalated the efforts to make NEURON simulation environment efficient. The computational neuroscientists divided the equations into subnets amongst multiple processors for achieving better hardware performance. On parallel machines for neuronal networks, interprocessor spikes exchange consumes large section of overall simulation time. In NEURON for communication between processors Message Passing Interface (MPI) is used. MPI_Allgather collective is exercised for spikes exchange after each interval across distributed memory systems. The increase in number of processors though results in achieving concurrency and better performance but it inversely affects MPI_Allgather which increases communication time between processors. This necessitates improving communication methodology to decrease the spikes exchange time over distributed memory systems. This work has improved MPI_Allgather method using Remote Memory Access (RMA) by moving two-sided communication to one-sided communication, and use of recursive doubling mechanism facilitates achieving efficient communication between the processors in precise steps. This approach enhanced communication concurrency and has improved overall runtime making NEURON more efficient for simulation of large neuronal network models. PMID:27413363

  11. Optimizing NEURON Simulation Environment Using Remote Memory Access with Recursive Doubling on Distributed Memory Systems.

    PubMed

    Shehzad, Danish; Bozkuş, Zeki

    2016-01-01

    Increase in complexity of neuronal network models escalated the efforts to make NEURON simulation environment efficient. The computational neuroscientists divided the equations into subnets amongst multiple processors for achieving better hardware performance. On parallel machines for neuronal networks, interprocessor spikes exchange consumes large section of overall simulation time. In NEURON for communication between processors Message Passing Interface (MPI) is used. MPI_Allgather collective is exercised for spikes exchange after each interval across distributed memory systems. The increase in number of processors though results in achieving concurrency and better performance but it inversely affects MPI_Allgather which increases communication time between processors. This necessitates improving communication methodology to decrease the spikes exchange time over distributed memory systems. This work has improved MPI_Allgather method using Remote Memory Access (RMA) by moving two-sided communication to one-sided communication, and use of recursive doubling mechanism facilitates achieving efficient communication between the processors in precise steps. This approach enhanced communication concurrency and has improved overall runtime making NEURON more efficient for simulation of large neuronal network models. PMID:27413363

  12. Evaluation of Remote Memory Access Communication on the Cray XT3

    SciTech Connect

    Kot, Andriy; Tipparaju, Vinod; Nieplocha, Jarek; Bruggencate, Monika T.; Chrisochoides, Nikos

    2007-03-26

    This paper evaluates remote memory access (RMA) communication capabilities and performance on the Cray XT3. We discuss properties of the network hardware and Portals networking software layer and corresponding implementation issues for SHMEM and ARMCI portable RMA interfaces. The performance of these interfaces is studied and compared to MPI performance

  13. Analyzing the Energy and Power Consumption of Remote Memory Accesses in the OpenSHMEM Model

    SciTech Connect

    Jana, Siddhartha; Hernandez, Oscar R; Poole, Stephen W; Hsu, Chung-Hsing; Chapman, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    PGAS models like OpenSHMEM provide interfaces to explicitly initiate one-sided remote memory accesses among processes. In addition, the model also provides synchronizing barriers to ensure a consistent view of the distributed memory at different phases of an application. The incorrect use of such interfaces affects the scalability achievable while using a parallel programming model. This study aims at understanding the effects of these constructs on the energy and power consumption behavior of OpenSHMEM applications. Our experiments show that cost incurred in terms of the total energy and power consumed depends on multiple factors across the software and hardware stack. We conclude that there is a significant impact on the power consumed by the CPU and DRAM due to multiple factors including the design of the data transfer patterns within an application, the design of the communication protocols within a middleware, the architectural constraints laid by the interconnect solutions, and also the levels of memory hierarchy within a compute node. This work motivates treating energy and power consumption as important factors while designing compute solutions for current and future distributed systems.

  14. Towards scalable parellelism in Monte Carlo particle transport codes using remote memory access

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, Paul K; Brown, Forrest B; Forget, Benoit

    2010-01-01

    One forthcoming challenge in the area of high-performance computing is having the ability to run large-scale problems while coping with less memory per compute node. In this work, they investigate a novel data decomposition method that would allow Monte Carlo transport calculations to be performed on systems with limited memory per compute node. In this method, each compute node remotely retrieves a small set of geometry and cross-section data as needed and remotely accumulates local tallies when crossing the boundary of the local spatial domain. initial results demonstrate that while the method does allow large problems to be run in a memory-limited environment, achieving scalability may be difficult due to inefficiencies in the current implementation of RMA operations.

  15. Demystifying Remote Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Grant

    2009-01-01

    With money tight, more and more districts are considering remote access as a way to reduce expenses and budget information technology costs more effectively. Remote access allows staff members to work with a hosted software application from any school campus without being tied to a specific physical location. Each school can access critical…

  16. Computer memory access technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zottarelli, L. J.

    1967-01-01

    Computer memory access commutator and steering gate configuration produces bipolar current pulses while still employing only the diodes and magnetic cores of the classic commutator, thereby appreciably reducing the complexity of the memory assembly.

  17. Aggregate Remote Memory Copy Interface

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2006-02-23

    The purpose of the Aggregate Remote Memory Copy (ARMCI) library is to provide a general- purpose, efficient, and Widely portable remote memory access (RMA) operations (one-sided communication) optimized for Contiguous and noncontiguous (strided, scatter/gather, I/O vector) data transfers. In addition, ARMCI includes a set of atomic and mutual exclusion operations. The development ARMCI is driven by the need to support the global-addres space communication model in context of distributed regular or irregular distributed data structures,more » communication libraries, and compilers. ARMCI is a standalone system that could be used to support user-level libraries and applications that use MPI or PVM.« less

  18. Remote access thyroid surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Parisha; Mohamed, Hossam Eldin; Kadi, Abida; Walvekar, Rohan R.

    2015-01-01

    Robot assisted thyroid surgery has been the latest advance in the evolution of thyroid surgery after endoscopy assisted procedures. The advantage of a superior field vision and technical advancements of robotic technology have permitted novel remote access (trans-axillary and retro-auricular) surgical approaches. Interestingly, several remote access surgical ports using robot surgical system and endoscopic technique have been customized to avoid the social stigma of a visible scar. Current literature has displayed their various advantages in terms of post-operative outcomes; however, the associated financial burden and also additional training and expertise necessary hinder its widespread adoption into endocrine surgery practices. These approaches offer excellent cosmesis, with a shorter learning curve and reduce discomfort to surgeons operating ergonomically through a robotic console. This review aims to provide details of various remote access techniques that are being offered for thyroid resection. Though these have been reported to be safe and feasible approaches for thyroid surgery, further evaluation for their efficacy still remains. PMID:26425450

  19. Remote access astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beare, Richard; Bowdley, David; Newsam, Andrew; Roche, Paul

    2003-05-01

    There is still nothing to beat the excitement and fulfilment that you can get from observing celestial bodies on a clear dark night, in a remote location away from the seemingly ever increasing light pollution from cities. However, it is also the specific requirements for good observing that can sometimes prevent teachers from offering this opportunity to their students. Compromises for a town-based school or college might be to view only bright objects such as planets, or stars of magnitude 4 or brighter because of light pollution, but you would still require a knowledgeable teacher or astronomer and equipment to take outside with the students. Remote access astronomy using robotic telescopes can partly provide a solution to these problems and also opens up the doors to exciting projects that may otherwise be inaccessible to schools and colleges.

  20. Remote Data Access with IDL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galloy, Michael

    2013-01-01

    A tool based on IDL (Interactive Data Language) and DAP (Data Access Protocol) has been developed for user-friendly remote data access. A difficulty for many NASA researchers using IDL is that often the data to analyze are located remotely and are too large to transfer for local analysis. Researchers have developed a protocol for accessing remote data, DAP, which is used for both SOHO and STEREO data sets. Server-side side analysis via IDL routine is available through DAP.

  1. Atomic memory access hardware implementations

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Jung Ho; Erez, Mattan; Dally, William J

    2015-02-17

    Atomic memory access requests are handled using a variety of systems and methods. According to one example method, a data-processing circuit having an address-request generator that issues requests to a common memory implements a method of processing the requests using a memory-access intervention circuit coupled between the generator and the common memory. The method identifies a current atomic-memory access request from a plurality of memory access requests. A data set is stored that corresponds to the current atomic-memory access request in a data storage circuit within the intervention circuit. It is determined whether the current atomic-memory access request corresponds to at least one previously-stored atomic-memory access request. In response to determining correspondence, the current request is implemented by retrieving data from the common memory. The data is modified in response to the current request and at least one other access request in the memory-access intervention circuit.

  2. Is random access memory random?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    Most software is contructed on the assumption that the programs and data are stored in random access memory (RAM). Physical limitations on the relative speeds of processor and memory elements lead to a variety of memory organizations that match processor addressing rate with memory service rate. These include interleaved and cached memory. A very high fraction of a processor's address requests can be satified from the cache without reference to the main memory. The cache requests information from main memory in blocks that can be transferred at the full memory speed. Programmers who organize algorithms for locality can realize the highest performance from these computers.

  3. Ferroelectric random access memories.

    PubMed

    Ishiwara, Hiroshi

    2012-10-01

    Ferroelectric random access memory (FeRAM) is a nonvolatile memory, in which data are stored using hysteretic P-E (polarization vs. electric field) characteristics in a ferroelectric film. In this review, history and characteristics of FeRAMs are first introduced. It is described that there are two types of FeRAMs, capacitor-type and FET-type, and that only the capacitor-type FeRAM is now commercially available. In chapter 2, properties of ferroelectric films are discussed from a viewpoint of FeRAM application, in which particular attention is paid to those of Pb(Zr,Ti)O3, SrBi2Ta2O9, and BiFeO3. Then, cell structures and operation principle of the capacitor-type FeRAMs are discussed in chapter 3. It is described that the stacked technology of ferroelectric capacitors and development of new materials with large remanent polarization are important for fabricating high-density memories. Finally, in chapter 4, the optimized gate structure in ferroelectric-gate field-effect transistors is discussed and experimental results showing excellent data retention characteristics are presented. PMID:23421123

  4. REMEM: REmote MEMory as Checkpointing Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Hui; Sun, Xian-He; Chen, Yong; Ke, Tao

    2010-01-01

    Checkpointing is a widely used mechanism for supporting fault tolerance, but notorious in its high-cost disk access. The idea of memory-based checkpointing has been extensively studied in research but made little success in practice due to its complexity and potential reliability concerns. In this study we present the design and implementation of REMEM, a REmote MEMory checkpointing system to extend the checkpointing storage from disk to remote memory. A unique feature of REMEM is that it can be integrated into existing disk-based checkpointing systems seamlessly. A user can flexibly switch between REMEM and disk as checkpointing storage to balance the efficiency and reliability. The implementation of REMEM on Open MPI is also introduced. The experimental results confirm that REMEM and the proposed adaptive checkpointing storage selection are promising in both performance, reliability and scalability.

  5. Preparing for the New Remote Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, William E.

    1997-01-01

    Integrated remote access servers support many different types of access. Remote access has been integrated as a strategic tool as application developers build remote access capabilities into their software. Discusses demands of using remote access as a strategic component and management matters. (AEF)

  6. Remote Access Astronomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beare, Richard; Bowdley, David; Newsam, Andrew; Roche, Paul

    2003-01-01

    There is still nothing to beat the excitement and fulfilment that you can get from observing celestial bodies on a clear dark night, in a remote location away from the seemingly ever increasing light pollution from cities. However, it is also the specific requirements for good observing that can sometimes prevent teachers from offering this…

  7. Nonvolatile random access memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jiin-Chuan (Inventor); Stadler, Henry L. (Inventor); Katti, Romney R. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A nonvolatile magnetic random access memory can be achieved by an array of magnet-Hall effect (M-H) elements. The storage function is realized with a rectangular thin-film ferromagnetic material having an in-plane, uniaxial anisotropy and inplane bipolar remanent magnetization states. The thin-film magnetic element is magnetized by a local applied field, whose direction is used to form either a 0 or 1 state. The element remains in the 0 or 1 state until a switching field is applied to change its state. The stored information is detcted by a Hall-effect sensor which senses the fringing field from the magnetic storage element. The circuit design for addressing each cell includes transistor switches for providing a current of selected polarity to store a binary digit through a separate conductor overlying the magnetic element of the cell. To read out a stored binary digit, transistor switches are employed to provide a current through a row of Hall-effect sensors connected in series and enabling a differential voltage amplifier connected to all Hall-effect sensors of a column in series. To avoid read-out voltage errors due to shunt currents through resistive loads of the Hall-effect sensors of other cells in the same column, at least one transistor switch is provided between every pair of adjacent cells in every row which are not turned on except in the row of the selected cell.

  8. Garnet Random-Access Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, Romney R.

    1995-01-01

    Random-access memory (RAM) devices of proposed type exploit magneto-optical properties of magnetic garnets exhibiting perpendicular anisotropy. Magnetic writing and optical readout used. Provides nonvolatile storage and resists damage by ionizing radiation. Because of basic architecture and pinout requirements, most likely useful as small-capacity memory devices.

  9. Plated wire random access memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gouldin, L. D.

    1975-01-01

    A program was conducted to construct 4096-work by 18-bit random access, NDRO-plated wire memory units. The memory units were subjected to comprehensive functional and environmental tests at the end-item level to verify comformance with the specified requirements. A technical description of the unit is given, along with acceptance test data sheets.

  10. Remotely Accessible Management System (RAMS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Rex

    Oakland Schools, an Intermediate School District for Administration, operates a Remotely Accessible Management System (RAMS). RAMS is composed of over 100 computer programs, each of which performs procedures on the files of the 28 local school districts comprising the constituency of Oakland Schools. This regional service agency covers 900 square…

  11. Memory availability and referential access

    PubMed Central

    Johns, Clinton L.; Gordon, Peter C.; Long, Debra L.; Swaab, Tamara Y.

    2013-01-01

    Most theories of coreference specify linguistic factors that modulate antecedent accessibility in memory; however, whether non-linguistic factors also affect coreferential access is unknown. Here we examined the impact of a non-linguistic generation task (letter transposition) on the repeated-name penalty, a processing difficulty observed when coreferential repeated names refer to syntactically prominent (and thus more accessible) antecedents. In Experiment 1, generation improved online (event-related potentials) and offline (recognition memory) accessibility of names in word lists. In Experiment 2, we manipulated generation and syntactic prominence of antecedent names in sentences; both improved online and offline accessibility, but only syntactic prominence elicited a repeated-name penalty. Our results have three important implications: first, the form of a referential expression interacts with an antecedent’s status in the discourse model during coreference; second, availability in memory and referential accessibility are separable; and finally, theories of coreference must better integrate known properties of the human memory system. PMID:24443621

  12. Runtime and Programming Support for Memory Adaptation in Scientific Applications via Local Disk and Remote Memory

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Richard T; Yue, Chuan; Andreas, Stathopoulos; Nikolopoulos, Dimitrios S

    2007-01-01

    The ever increasing memory demands of many scientific applications and the complexity of today's shared computational resources still require the occasional use of virtual memory, network memory, or even out-of-core implementations, with well known drawbacks in performance and usability. In Mills et al. (Adapting to memory pressure from within scientific applications on multiprogrammed COWS. In: International Parallel and Distributed Processing Symposium, IPDPS, Santa Fe, NM, 2004), we introduced a basic framework for a runtime, user-level library, MMlib, in which DRAM is treated as a dynamic size cache for large memory objects residing on local disk. Application developers can specify and access these objects through MMlib, enabling their application to execute optimally under variable memory availability, using as much DRAM as fluctuating memory levels will allow. In this paper, we first extend our earlier MMlib prototype from a proof of concept to a usable, robust, and flexible library. We present a general framework that enables fully customizable memory malleability in a wide variety of scientific applications. We provide several necessary enhancements to the environment sensing capabilities of MMlib, and introduce a remote memory capability, based on MPI communication of cached memory blocks between 'compute nodes' and designated memory servers. The increasing speed of interconnection networks makes a remote memory approach attractive, especially at the large granularity present in large scientific applications. We show experimental results from three important scientific applications that require the general MMlib framework. The memory-adaptive versions perform nearly optimally under constant memory pressure and execute harmoniously with other applications competing for memory, without thrashing the memory system. Under constant memory pressure, we observe execution time improvements of factors between three and

  13. Dynamic computing random access memory.

    PubMed

    Traversa, F L; Bonani, F; Pershin, Y V; Di Ventra, M

    2014-07-18

    The present von Neumann computing paradigm involves a significant amount of information transfer between a central processing unit and memory, with concomitant limitations in the actual execution speed. However, it has been recently argued that a different form of computation, dubbed memcomputing (Di Ventra and Pershin 2013 Nat. Phys. 9 200-2) and inspired by the operation of our brain, can resolve the intrinsic limitations of present day architectures by allowing for computing and storing of information on the same physical platform. Here we show a simple and practical realization of memcomputing that utilizes easy-to-build memcapacitive systems. We name this architecture dynamic computing random access memory (DCRAM). We show that DCRAM provides massively-parallel and polymorphic digital logic, namely it allows for different logic operations with the same architecture, by varying only the control signals. In addition, by taking into account realistic parameters, its energy expenditures can be as low as a few fJ per operation. DCRAM is fully compatible with CMOS technology, can be realized with current fabrication facilities, and therefore can really serve as an alternative to the present computing technology. PMID:24972387

  14. Dynamic computing random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traversa, F. L.; Bonani, F.; Pershin, Y. V.; Di Ventra, M.

    2014-07-01

    The present von Neumann computing paradigm involves a significant amount of information transfer between a central processing unit and memory, with concomitant limitations in the actual execution speed. However, it has been recently argued that a different form of computation, dubbed memcomputing (Di Ventra and Pershin 2013 Nat. Phys. 9 200-2) and inspired by the operation of our brain, can resolve the intrinsic limitations of present day architectures by allowing for computing and storing of information on the same physical platform. Here we show a simple and practical realization of memcomputing that utilizes easy-to-build memcapacitive systems. We name this architecture dynamic computing random access memory (DCRAM). We show that DCRAM provides massively-parallel and polymorphic digital logic, namely it allows for different logic operations with the same architecture, by varying only the control signals. In addition, by taking into account realistic parameters, its energy expenditures can be as low as a few fJ per operation. DCRAM is fully compatible with CMOS technology, can be realized with current fabrication facilities, and therefore can really serve as an alternative to the present computing technology.

  15. Memory access in shared virtual memory

    SciTech Connect

    Berrendorf, R. )

    1992-01-01

    Shared virtual memory (SVM) is a virtual memory layer with a single address space on top of a distributed real memory on parallel computers. We examine the behavior and performance of SVM running a parallel program with medium-grained, loop-level parallelism on top of it. A simulator for the underlying parallel architecture can be used to examine the behavior of SVM more deeply. The influence of several parameters, such as the number of processors, page size, cold or warm start, and restricted page replication, is studied.

  16. Memory access in shared virtual memory

    SciTech Connect

    Berrendorf, R.

    1992-09-01

    Shared virtual memory (SVM) is a virtual memory layer with a single address space on top of a distributed real memory on parallel computers. We examine the behavior and performance of SVM running a parallel program with medium-grained, loop-level parallelism on top of it. A simulator for the underlying parallel architecture can be used to examine the behavior of SVM more deeply. The influence of several parameters, such as the number of processors, page size, cold or warm start, and restricted page replication, is studied.

  17. Remote Access Laboratories in Australia and Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ku, H.; Ahfock, T.; Yusaf, T.

    2011-01-01

    Remote access laboratories (RALs) were first developed in 1994 in Australia and Switzerland. The main purposes of developing them are to enable students to do their experiments at their own pace, time and locations and to enable students and teaching staff to get access to facilities beyond their institutions. Currently, most of the experiments…

  18. Magnetic Analog Random-Access Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, Romney R.; Wu, Jiin-Chuan; Stadler, Henry L.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed integrated, solid-state, analog random-access memory base on principle of magnetic writing and magnetoresistive reading. Current in writing conductor magnetizes storage layer. Remanent magnetization in storage layer penetrates readout layer and detected by magnetoresistive effect or Hall effect. Memory cells are part of integrated circuit including associated reading and writing transistors. Intended to provide high storage density and rapid access, nonvolatile, consumes little power, and relatively invulnerable to ionizing radiation.

  19. Access to Service: Rural and Remote Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Robert

    This paper discusses public library services to remote communities in Australia, focusing on New South Wales (NSW). The first section presents background on the public library network in NSW, including statistics, descriptors/characteristics of public libraries, and funding to establish public Internet access. The second section addresses regional…

  20. Remote Preparation of an Atomic Quantum Memory

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfeld, Wenjamin; Berner, Stefan; Volz, Juergen; Weber, Markus; Weinfurter, Harald

    2007-02-02

    Storage and distribution of quantum information are key elements of quantum information processing and future quantum communication networks. Here, using atom-photon entanglement as the main physical resource, we experimentally demonstrate the preparation of a distant atomic quantum memory. Applying a quantum teleportation protocol on a locally prepared state of a photonic qubit, we realized this so-called remote state preparation on a single, optically trapped {sup 87}Rb atom. We evaluated the performance of this scheme by the full tomography of the prepared atomic state, reaching an average fidelity of 82%.

  1. A Simple Solution to Providing Remote Access to CD-ROM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garnham, Carla T.; Brodie, Kent

    1990-01-01

    A pilot project at the Medical College of Wisconsin illustrates how even small computing organizations with limited financial and staff resources can provide remote access to CD-ROM (Compact Disc-Read-Only-Memory) databases, and that providing such convenient access to a vast array of useful information can greatly benefit faculty and students.…

  2. Low latency memory access and synchronization

    DOEpatents

    Blumrich, Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul W.; Gara, Alan G.; Giampapa, Mark E.; Heidelberger, Philip; Hoenicke, Dirk; Ohmacht, Martin; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D.; Takken, Todd E.; Vranas, Pavlos M.

    2007-02-06

    A low latency memory system access is provided in association with a weakly-ordered multiprocessor system. Each processor in the multiprocessor shares resources, and each shared resource has an associated lock within a locking device that provides support for synchronization between the multiple processors in the multiprocessor and the orderly sharing of the resources. A processor only has permission to access a resource when it owns the lock associated with that resource, and an attempt by a processor to own a lock requires only a single load operation, rather than a traditional atomic load followed by store, such that the processor only performs a read operation and the hardware locking device performs a subsequent write operation rather than the processor. A simple prefetching for non-contiguous data structures is also disclosed. A memory line is redefined so that in addition to the normal physical memory data, every line includes a pointer that is large enough to point to any other line in the memory, wherein the pointers to determine which memory line to prefetch rather than some other predictive algorithm. This enables hardware to effectively prefetch memory access patterns that are non-contiguous, but repetitive.

  3. Low latency memory access and synchronization

    DOEpatents

    Blumrich, Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul W.; Gara, Alan G.; Giampapa, Mark E.; Heidelberger, Philip; Hoenicke, Dirk; Ohmacht, Martin; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D.; Takken, Todd E. , Vranas; Pavlos M.

    2010-10-19

    A low latency memory system access is provided in association with a weakly-ordered multiprocessor system. Bach processor in the multiprocessor shares resources, and each shared resource has an associated lock within a locking device that provides support for synchronization between the multiple processors in the multiprocessor and the orderly sharing of the resources. A processor only has permission to access a resource when it owns the lock associated with that resource, and an attempt by a processor to own a lock requires only a single load operation, rather than a traditional atomic load followed by store, such that the processor only performs a read operation and the hardware locking device performs a subsequent write operation rather than the processor. A simple prefetching for non-contiguous data structures is also disclosed. A memory line is redefined so that in addition to the normal physical memory data, every line includes a pointer that is large enough to point to any other line in the memory, wherein the pointers to determine which memory line to prefetch rather than some other predictive algorithm. This enables hardware to effectively prefetch memory access patterns that are non-contiguous, but repetitive.

  4. Neural mechanism underlying autobiographical memory modulated by remoteness and emotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Ruiyang; Fu, Yan; Wang, DaHua; Yao, Li; Long, Zhiying

    2012-03-01

    Autobiographical memory is the ability to recollect past events from one's own life. Both emotional tone and memory remoteness can influence autobiographical memory retrieval along the time axis of one's life. Although numerous studies have been performed to investigate brain regions involved in retrieving processes of autobiographical memory, the effect of emotional tone and memory age on autobiographical memory retrieval remains to be clarified. Moreover, whether the involvement of hippocampus in consolidation of autobiographical events is time dependent or independent has been controversial. In this study, we investigated the effect of memory remoteness (factor1: recent and remote) and emotional valence (factor2: positive and negative) on neural correlates underlying autobiographical memory by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique. Although all four conditions activated some common regions known as "core" regions in autobiographical memory retrieval, there are some other regions showing significantly different activation for recent versus remote and positive versus negative memories. In particular, we found that bilateral hippocampal regions were activated in the four conditions regardless of memory remoteness and emotional valence. Thus, our study confirmed some findings of previous studies and provided further evidence to support the multi-trace theory which believes that the role of hippocampus involved in autobiographical memory retrieval is time-independent and permanent in memory consolidation.

  5. Non-volatile magnetic random access memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, Romney R. (Inventor); Stadler, Henry L. (Inventor); Wu, Jiin-Chuan (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Improvements are made in a non-volatile magnetic random access memory. Such a memory is comprised of an array of unit cells, each having a Hall-effect sensor and a thin-film magnetic element made of material having an in-plane, uniaxial anisotropy and in-plane, bipolar remanent magnetization states. The Hall-effect sensor is made more sensitive by using a 1 m thick molecular beam epitaxy grown InAs layer on a silicon substrate by employing a GaAs/AlGaAs/InAlAs superlattice buffering layer. One improvement avoids current shunting problems of matrix architecture. Another improvement reduces the required magnetizing current for the micromagnets. Another improvement relates to the use of GaAs technology wherein high electron-mobility GaAs MESFETs provide faster switching times. Still another improvement relates to a method for configuring the invention as a three-dimensional random access memory.

  6. An integrated solution for remote data access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapunenko, Vladimir; D'Urso, Domenico; dell'Agnello, Luca; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Duranti, Matteo

    2015-12-01

    Data management constitutes one of the major challenges that a geographically- distributed e-Infrastructure has to face, especially when remote data access is involved. We discuss an integrated solution which enables transparent and efficient access to on-line and near-line data through high latency networks. The solution is based on the joint use of the General Parallel File System (GPFS) and of the Tivoli Storage Manager (TSM). Both products, developed by IBM, are well known and extensively used in the HEP computing community. Owing to a new feature introduced in GPFS 3.5, so-called Active File Management (AFM), the definition of a single, geographically-distributed namespace, characterised by automated data flow management between different locations, becomes possible. As a practical example, we present the implementation of AFM-based remote data access between two data centres located in Bologna and Rome, demonstrating the validity of the solution for the use case of the AMS experiment, an astro-particle experiment supported by the INFN CNAF data centre with the large disk space requirements (more than 1.5 PB).

  7. Remote access laboratories in Australia and Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, H.; Ahfock, T.; Yusaf, T.

    2011-06-01

    Remote access laboratories (RALs) were first developed in 1994 in Australia and Switzerland. The main purposes of developing them are to enable students to do their experiments at their own pace, time and locations and to enable students and teaching staff to get access to facilities beyond their institutions. Currently, most of the experiments carried out through RALs in Australia are heavily biased towards electrical, electronic and computer engineering disciplines. However, the experiments carried out through RALs in Europe had more variety, in addition to the traditional electrical, electronic and computer engineering disciplines, there were experiments in mechanical and mechatronic disciplines. It was found that RALs are now being developed aggressively in Australia and Europe and it can be argued that RALs will develop further and faster in the future with improving Internet technology. The rising costs of real experimental equipment will also speed up their development because by making the equipment remotely accessible, the cost can be shared by more universities or institutions and this will improve their cost-effectiveness. Their development would be particularly rapid in large countries with small populations such as Australia, Canada and Russia, because of the scale of economy. Reusability of software, interoperability in software implementation, computer supported collaborative learning and convergence with learning management systems are the required development of future RALs.

  8. Stability of Recent and Remote Contextual Fear Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frankland, Paul W.; Ding, Hoi-Ki; Takahashi, Eiki; Suzuki, Akinobu; Kida, Satoshi; Silva, Alcino J.

    2006-01-01

    Following initial encoding, memories undergo a prolonged period of reorganization. While such reorganization may occur in many different memory systems, its purpose is not clear. Previously, we have shown that recall of recent contextual fear memories engages the dorsal hippocampus (dHPC). In contrast, recall of remote contextual fear memories…

  9. Remoteness and Access to Learning Opportunities in the Pacific Region.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacific Region Educational Lab., Honolulu, HI.

    The Remoteness and Access to Learning Opportunities in the Pacific Region Study was carried out to investigate whether access to learning opportunities (ALO) is related to the remoteness and isolation of many schools in the Pacific region. The study also profiles the conditions of remote and isolated schools and the ALO for Pacific students. Seven…

  10. A Web-Based Remote Access Laboratory Using SCADA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydogmus, Z.; Aydogmus, O.

    2009-01-01

    The Internet provides an opportunity for students to access laboratories from outside the campus. This paper presents a Web-based remote access real-time laboratory using SCADA (supervisory control and data acquisition) control. The control of an induction motor is used as an example to demonstrate the effectiveness of this remote laboratory,…

  11. Remotely accessible laboratory for MEMS testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakumar, Ganapathy; Mulsow, Matthew; Melinger, Aaron; Lacouture, Shelby; Dallas, Tim E.

    2010-02-01

    We report on the construction of a remotely accessible and interactive laboratory for testing microdevices (aka: MicroElectroMechancial Systems - MEMS). Enabling expanded utilization of microdevices for research, commercial, and educational purposes is very important for driving the creation of future MEMS devices and applications. Unfortunately, the relatively high costs associated with MEMS devices and testing infrastructure makes widespread access to the world of MEMS difficult. The creation of a virtual lab to control and actuate MEMS devices over the internet helps spread knowledge to a larger audience. A host laboratory has been established that contains a digital microscope, microdevices, controllers, and computers that can be logged into through the internet. The overall layout of the tele-operated MEMS laboratory system can be divided into two major parts: the server side and the client side. The server-side is present at Texas Tech University, and hosts a server machine that runs the Linux operating system and is used for interfacing the MEMS lab with the outside world via internet. The controls from the clients are transferred to the lab side through the server interface. The server interacts with the electronics required to drive the MEMS devices using a range of National Instruments hardware and LabView Virtual Instruments. An optical microscope (100 ×) with a CCD video camera is used to capture images of the operating MEMS. The server broadcasts the live video stream over the internet to the clients through the website. When the button is pressed on the website, the MEMS device responds and the video stream shows the movement in close to real time.

  12. Education Access: National Inquiry into Rural and Remote Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balsamo, Fabienne

    This report examines limits on access to education in Australia. Accessibility must be available without discrimination because of physical or economic limitations. Chapters are devoted to nine different types of limited accessibility, affecting: children with disabilities, especially in remote areas without alternative local schools; children…

  13. Direct memory access transfer completion notification

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Dong; Giampapa, Mark E.; Heidelberger, Philip; Kumar, Sameer; Parker, Jeffrey J.; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D.; Vranas, Pavlos

    2010-07-27

    Methods, compute nodes, and computer program products are provided for direct memory access (`DMA`) transfer completion notification. Embodiments include determining, by an origin DMA engine on an origin compute node, whether a data descriptor for an application message to be sent to a target compute node is currently in an injection first-in-first-out (`FIFO`) buffer in dependence upon a sequence number previously associated with the data descriptor, the total number of descriptors currently in the injection FIFO buffer, and the current sequence number for the newest data descriptor stored in the injection FIFO buffer; and notifying a processor core on the origin DMA engine that the message has been sent if the data descriptor for the message is not currently in the injection FIFO buffer.

  14. Parallel Optical Random Access Memory (PORAM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alphonse, G. A.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that the need to minimize component count, power and size, and to maximize packing density require a parallel optical random access memory to be designed in a two-level hierarchy: a modular level and an interconnect level. Three module designs are proposed, in the order of research and development requirements. The first uses state-of-the-art components, including individually addressed laser diode arrays, acousto-optic (AO) deflectors and magneto-optic (MO) storage medium, aimed at moderate size, moderate power, and high packing density. The next design level uses an electron-trapping (ET) medium to reduce optical power requirements. The third design uses a beam-steering grating surface emitter (GSE) array to reduce size further and minimize the number of components.

  15. Conductance Quantization in Resistive Random Access Memory.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Long, Shibing; Liu, Yang; Hu, Chen; Teng, Jiao; Liu, Qi; Lv, Hangbing; Suñé, Jordi; Liu, Ming

    2015-12-01

    The intrinsic scaling-down ability, simple metal-insulator-metal (MIM) sandwich structure, excellent performances, and complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology-compatible fabrication processes make resistive random access memory (RRAM) one of the most promising candidates for the next-generation memory. The RRAM device also exhibits rich electrical, thermal, magnetic, and optical effects, in close correlation with the abundant resistive switching (RS) materials, metal-oxide interface, and multiple RS mechanisms including the formation/rupture of nanoscale to atomic-sized conductive filament (CF) incorporated in RS layer. Conductance quantization effect has been observed in the atomic-sized CF in RRAM, which provides a good opportunity to deeply investigate the RS mechanism in mesoscopic dimension. In this review paper, the operating principles of RRAM are introduced first, followed by the summarization of the basic conductance quantization phenomenon in RRAM and the related RS mechanisms, device structures, and material system. Then, we discuss the theory and modeling of quantum transport in RRAM. Finally, we present the opportunities and challenges in quantized RRAM devices and our views on the future prospects. PMID:26501832

  16. Conductance Quantization in Resistive Random Access Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Long, Shibing; Liu, Yang; Hu, Chen; Teng, Jiao; Liu, Qi; Lv, Hangbing; Suñé, Jordi; Liu, Ming

    2015-10-01

    The intrinsic scaling-down ability, simple metal-insulator-metal (MIM) sandwich structure, excellent performances, and complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology-compatible fabrication processes make resistive random access memory (RRAM) one of the most promising candidates for the next-generation memory. The RRAM device also exhibits rich electrical, thermal, magnetic, and optical effects, in close correlation with the abundant resistive switching (RS) materials, metal-oxide interface, and multiple RS mechanisms including the formation/rupture of nanoscale to atomic-sized conductive filament (CF) incorporated in RS layer. Conductance quantization effect has been observed in the atomic-sized CF in RRAM, which provides a good opportunity to deeply investigate the RS mechanism in mesoscopic dimension. In this review paper, the operating principles of RRAM are introduced first, followed by the summarization of the basic conductance quantization phenomenon in RRAM and the related RS mechanisms, device structures, and material system. Then, we discuss the theory and modeling of quantum transport in RRAM. Finally, we present the opportunities and challenges in quantized RRAM devices and our views on the future prospects.

  17. CameraCast: flexible access to remote video sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Jiantao; Ganev, Ivan; Schwan, Karsten; Widener, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    New applications like remote surveillance and online environmental or traffic monitoring are making it increasingly important to provide flexible and protected access to remote video sensor devices. Current systems use application-level codes like web-based solutions to provide such access. This requires adherence to user-level APIs provided by such services, access to remote video information through given application-specific service and server topologies, and that the data being captured and distributed is manipulated by third party service codes. CameraCast is a simple, easily used system-level solution to remote video access. It provides a logical device API so that an application can identically operate on local vs. remote video sensor devices, using its own service and server topologies. In addition, the application can take advantage of API enhancements to protect remote video information, using a capability-based model for differential data protection that offers fine grain control over the information made available to specific codes or machines, thereby limiting their ability to violate privacy or security constraints. Experimental evaluations of CameraCast show that the performance of accessing remote video information approximates that of accesses to local devices, given sufficient networking resources. High performance is also attained when protection restrictions are enforced, due to an efficient kernel-level realization of differential data protection.

  18. 76 FR 55417 - In the Matter of Certain Dynamic Random Access Memory and Nand Flash Memory Devices and Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Dynamic Random Access Memory and Nand Flash Memory Devices and Products... States after importation of certain dynamic random access memory and NAND flash memory devices and... the sale within the United States after importation of certain dynamic random access memory and...

  19. Generation-based memory synchronization in a multiprocessor system with weakly consistent memory accesses

    DOEpatents

    Ohmacht, Martin

    2014-09-09

    In a multiprocessor system, a central memory synchronization module coordinates memory synchronization requests responsive to memory access requests in flight, a generation counter, and a reclaim pointer. The central module communicates via point-to-point communication. The module includes a global OR reduce tree for each memory access requesting device, for detecting memory access requests in flight. An interface unit is implemented associated with each processor requesting synchronization. The interface unit includes multiple generation completion detectors. The generation count and reclaim pointer do not pass one another.

  20. Extinction Partially Reverts Structural Changes Associated with Remote Fear Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vetere, Gisella; Restivo, Leonardo; Novembre, Giovanni; Aceti, Massimiliano; Lumaca, Massimo; Ammassari-Teule, Martine

    2011-01-01

    Structural synaptic changes occur in medial prefrontal cortex circuits during remote memory formation. Whether extinction reverts or further reshapes these circuits is, however, unknown. Here we show that the number and the size of spines were enhanced in anterior cingulate (aCC) and infralimbic (ILC) cortices 36 d following contextual fear…

  1. Remote semantic memory is impoverished in hippocampal amnesia.

    PubMed

    Klooster, Nathaniel B; Duff, Melissa C

    2015-12-01

    The necessity of the hippocampus for acquiring new semantic concepts is a topic of considerable debate. However, it is generally accepted that any role the hippocampus plays in semantic memory is time limited and that previously acquired information becomes independent of the hippocampus over time. This view, along with intact naming and word-definition matching performance in amnesia, has led to the notion that remote semantic memory is intact in patients with hippocampal amnesia. Motivated by perspectives of word learning as a protracted process where additional features and senses of a word are added over time, and by recent discoveries about the time course of hippocampal contributions to on-line relational processing, reconsolidation, and the flexible integration of information, we revisit the notion that remote semantic memory is intact in amnesia. Using measures of semantic richness and vocabulary depth from psycholinguistics and first and second language-learning studies, we examined how much information is associated with previously acquired, highly familiar words in a group of patients with bilateral hippocampal damage and amnesia. Relative to healthy demographically matched comparison participants and a group of brain-damaged comparison participants, the patients with hippocampal amnesia performed significantly worse on both productive and receptive measures of vocabulary depth and semantic richness. These findings suggest that remote semantic memory is impoverished in patients with hippocampal amnesia and that the hippocampus may play a role in the maintenance and updating of semantic memory beyond its initial acquisition. PMID:26474741

  2. Remotely Accessed Vehicle Traffic Management System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Alawi, Raida

    2010-06-01

    The ever increasing number of vehicles in most metropolitan cities around the world and the limitation in altering the transportation infrastructure, led to serious traffic congestion and an increase in the travelling time. In this work we exploit the emergence of novel technologies such as the internet, to design an intelligent Traffic Management System (TMS) that can remotely monitor and control a network of traffic light controllers located at different sites. The system is based on utilizing Embedded Web Servers (EWS) technology to design a web-based TMS. The EWS located at each intersection uses IP technology for communicating remotely with a Central Traffic Management Unit (CTMU) located at the traffic department authority. Friendly GUI software installed at the CTMU will be able to monitor the sequence of operation of the traffic lights and the presence of traffic at each intersection as well as remotely controlling the operation of the signals. The system has been validated by constructing a prototype that resembles the real application.

  3. BCH codes for large IC random-access memory systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, S.; Costello, D. J., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    In this report some shortened BCH codes for possible applications to large IC random-access memory systems are presented. These codes are given by their parity-check matrices. Encoding and decoding of these codes are discussed.

  4. Radiation Effects of Commercial Resistive Random Access Memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Dakai; LaBel, Kenneth; Berg, Melanie; Wilcox, Edward; Kim, Hak; Phan, Anthony; Figueiredo, Marco; Buchner, Stephen; Khachatrian, Ani; Roche, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    We present results for the single-event effect response of commercial production-level resistive random access memories. We found that the resistive memory arrays are immune to heavy ion-induced upsets. However, the devices were susceptible to single-event functional interrupts, due to upsets from the control circuits. The intrinsic radiation tolerant nature of resistive memory makes the technology an attractive consideration for future space applications.

  5. The Dynamics of Access to Groups in Working Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Simon; Lelievre, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The finding that participants leave a pause between groups when attempting serial recall of temporally grouped lists has been taken to indicate access to a hierarchical representation of the list in working memory. An alternative explanation is that the dynamics of serial recall solely reflect output (rather than memorial) processes, with the…

  6. Remote I/O : fast access to distant storage.

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, I.; Kohr, D., Jr.; Krishnaiyer, R.; Mogill, J.

    1997-12-17

    As high-speed networks make it easier to use distributed resources, it becomes increasingly common that applications and their data are not colocated. Users have traditionally addressed this problem by manually staging data to and from remote computers. We argue instead for a new remote I/O paradigm in which programs use familiar parallel I/O interfaces to access remote file systems. In addition to simplifying remote execution, remote I/O can improve performance relative to staging by overlapping computation and data transfer or by reducing communication requirements. However, remote I/O also introduces new technical challenges in the areas of portability, performance, and integration with distributed computing systems. We propose techniques designed to address these challenges and describe a remote I/O library called RIO that we have developed to evaluate the effectiveness of these techniques. RIO addresses issues of portability by adopting the quasi-standard MPI-IO interface and by defining a RIO device and RIO server within the ADIO abstract I/O device architecture. It addresses performance issues by providing traditional I/O optimizations such as asynchronous operations and through implementation techniques such as buffering and message forwarding to off load communication overheads. RIO uses the Nexus communication library to obtain access to configuration and security mechanisms provided by the Globus wide area computing tool kit. Microbenchmarks and application experiments demonstrate that our techniques achieve acceptable performance in most situations and can improve turnaround time relative to staging.

  7. Direct access inter-process shared memory

    DOEpatents

    Brightwell, Ronald B; Pedretti, Kevin; Hudson, Trammell B

    2013-10-22

    A technique for directly sharing physical memory between processes executing on processor cores is described. The technique includes loading a plurality of processes into the physical memory for execution on a corresponding plurality of processor cores sharing the physical memory. An address space is mapped to each of the processes by populating a first entry in a top level virtual address table for each of the processes. The address space of each of the processes is cross-mapped into each of the processes by populating one or more subsequent entries of the top level virtual address table with the first entry in the top level virtual address table from other processes.

  8. Memory for recently accessed visual attributes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuhong V; Shupe, Joshua M; Swallow, Khena M; Tan, Deborah H

    2016-08-01

    Recent reports have suggested that the attended features of an item may be rapidly forgotten once they are no longer relevant for an ongoing task (attribute amnesia). This finding relies on a surprise memory procedure that places high demands on declarative memory. We used intertrial priming to examine whether the representation of an item's identity is lost completely once it becomes task irrelevant. If so, then the identity of a target on one trial should not influence performance on the next trial. In 3 experiments, we replicated the finding that a target's identity is poorly recognized in a surprise memory test. However, we also observed location and identity repetition priming across consecutive trials. These data suggest that, although explicit recognition on a surprise memory test may be impaired, some information about a particular target's identity can be retained after it is no longer needed for a task. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26844575

  9. Integrated semiconductor-magnetic random access memory system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, Romney R. (Inventor); Blaes, Brent R. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present disclosure describes a non-volatile magnetic random access memory (RAM) system having a semiconductor control circuit and a magnetic array element. The integrated magnetic RAM system uses CMOS control circuit to read and write data magnetoresistively. The system provides a fast access, non-volatile, radiation hard, high density RAM for high speed computing.

  10. Reversible Hippocampal Lesions Disrupt Water Maze Performance during Both Recent and Remote Memory Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadbent, Nicola J.; Squire, Larry R.; Clark, Robert E.

    2006-01-01

    Conventional lesion methods have shown that damage to the rodent hippocampus can impair previously acquired spatial memory in tasks such as the water maze. In contrast, work with reversible lesion methods using a different spatial task has found remote memory to be spared. To determine whether the finding of spared remote spatial memory depends on…

  11. Quantum teleportation between remote atomic-ensemble quantum memories.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xiao-Hui; Xu, Xiao-Fan; Li, Che-Ming; Yuan, Zhen-Sheng; Lu, Chao-Yang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2012-12-11

    Quantum teleportation and quantum memory are two crucial elements for large-scale quantum networks. With the help of prior distributed entanglement as a "quantum channel," quantum teleportation provides an intriguing means to faithfully transfer quantum states among distant locations without actual transmission of the physical carriers [Bennett CH, et al. (1993) Phys Rev Lett 70(13):1895-1899]. Quantum memory enables controlled storage and retrieval of fast-flying photonic quantum bits with stationary matter systems, which is essential to achieve the scalability required for large-scale quantum networks. Combining these two capabilities, here we realize quantum teleportation between two remote atomic-ensemble quantum memory nodes, each composed of ∼10(8) rubidium atoms and connected by a 150-m optical fiber. The spin wave state of one atomic ensemble is mapped to a propagating photon and subjected to Bell state measurements with another single photon that is entangled with the spin wave state of the other ensemble. Two-photon detection events herald the success of teleportation with an average fidelity of 88(7)%. Besides its fundamental interest as a teleportation between two remote macroscopic objects, our technique may be useful for quantum information transfer between different nodes in quantum networks and distributed quantum computing. PMID:23144222

  12. Quantum teleportation between remote atomic-ensemble quantum memories

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Xiao-Hui; Xu, Xiao-Fan; Li, Che-Ming; Yuan, Zhen-Sheng; Lu, Chao-Yang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2012-01-01

    Quantum teleportation and quantum memory are two crucial elements for large-scale quantum networks. With the help of prior distributed entanglement as a “quantum channel,” quantum teleportation provides an intriguing means to faithfully transfer quantum states among distant locations without actual transmission of the physical carriers [Bennett CH, et al. (1993) Phys Rev Lett 70(13):1895–1899]. Quantum memory enables controlled storage and retrieval of fast-flying photonic quantum bits with stationary matter systems, which is essential to achieve the scalability required for large-scale quantum networks. Combining these two capabilities, here we realize quantum teleportation between two remote atomic-ensemble quantum memory nodes, each composed of ∼108 rubidium atoms and connected by a 150-m optical fiber. The spin wave state of one atomic ensemble is mapped to a propagating photon and subjected to Bell state measurements with another single photon that is entangled with the spin wave state of the other ensemble. Two-photon detection events herald the success of teleportation with an average fidelity of 88(7)%. Besides its fundamental interest as a teleportation between two remote macroscopic objects, our technique may be useful for quantum information transfer between different nodes in quantum networks and distributed quantum computing. PMID:23144222

  13. Remote access for NAS: Supercomputing in a university environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, G.; Olson, B.; Swisshelm, J.; Pryor, D.; Ziebarth, J.

    1986-01-01

    The experiment was designed to assist the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Project Office in the testing and evaluation of long haul communications for remote users. The objectives of this work were to: (1) use foreign workstations to remotely access the NAS system; (2) provide NAS with a link to a large university-based computing facility which can serve as a model for a regional node of the Long-Haul Communications Subsystem (LHCS); and (3) provide a tail circuit to the University of Colorado a Boulder thereby simulating the complete communications path from NAS through a regional node to an end-user.

  14. A Cerebellar-model Associative Memory as a Generalized Random-access Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanerva, Pentti

    1989-01-01

    A versatile neural-net model is explained in terms familiar to computer scientists and engineers. It is called the sparse distributed memory, and it is a random-access memory for very long words (for patterns with thousands of bits). Its potential utility is the result of several factors: (1) a large pattern representing an object or a scene or a moment can encode a large amount of information about what it represents; (2) this information can serve as an address to the memory, and it can also serve as data; (3) the memory is noise tolerant--the information need not be exact; (4) the memory can be made arbitrarily large and hence an arbitrary amount of information can be stored in it; and (5) the architecture is inherently parallel, allowing large memories to be fast. Such memories can become important components of future computers.

  15. Enabling Remote Access to Fieldwork: Gaining Insight into the Pedagogic Effectiveness of "Direct" and "Remote" Field Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokes, Alison; Collins, Trevor; Maskall, John; Lea, John; Lunt, Paul; Davies, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    This study considers the pedagogical effectiveness of remote access to fieldwork locations. Forty-one students from across the GEES disciplines (geography, earth and environmental sciences) undertook a fieldwork exercise, supported by two lecturers. Twenty students accessed the field site directly and the remainder accessed the site remotely using…

  16. 75 FR 14467 - In the Matter of: Certain Dynamic Random Access Memory Semiconductors and Products Containing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-25

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of: Certain Dynamic Random Access Memory Semiconductors and Products Containing Same... random access memory semiconductors and products containing same, including memory modules, by reason of... after importation of certain dynamic random access memory semiconductors or products containing the...

  17. Effects of Sleep Deprivation and Aging on Long-Term and Remote Memory in Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vecsey, Christopher G.; Park, Alan J.; Khatib, Nora; Abel, Ted

    2015-01-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) following hippocampus-dependent learning in young mice impairs memory when tested the following day. Here, we examined the effects of SD on remote memory in both young and aged mice. In young mice, we found that memory is still impaired 1 mo after training. SD also impaired memory in aged mice 1 d after training, but, by a…

  18. Secure Remote Access Issues in a Control Center Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, Lee; McNair, Ann R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The ISS finally reached an operational state and exists for local and remote users. Onboard payload systems are managed by the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC). Users access HOSC systems by internet protocols in support of daily operations, preflight simulation, and test. In support of this diverse user community, a modem security architecture has been implemented. The architecture has evolved over time from an isolated but open system to a system which supports local and remote access to the ISS over broad geographic regions. This has been accomplished through the use of an evolved security strategy, PKI, and custom design. Through this paper, descriptions of the migration process and the lessons learned are presented. This will include product decision criteria, rationale, and the use of commodity products in the end architecture. This paper will also stress the need for interoperability of various products and the effects of seemingly insignificant details.

  19. Direct memory access transfer completion notification

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J.; Blocksome, Michael A.; Parker, Jeffrey J.

    2011-02-15

    DMA transfer completion notification includes: inserting, by an origin DMA engine on an origin node in an injection first-in-first-out (`FIFO`) buffer, a data descriptor for an application message to be transferred to a target node on behalf of an application on the origin node; inserting, by the origin DMA engine, a completion notification descriptor in the injection FIFO buffer after the data descriptor for the message, the completion notification descriptor specifying a packet header for a completion notification packet; transferring, by the origin DMA engine to the target node, the message in dependence upon the data descriptor; sending, by the origin DMA engine, the completion notification packet to a local reception FIFO buffer using a local memory FIFO transfer operation; and notifying, by the origin DMA engine, the application that transfer of the message is complete in response to receiving the completion notification packet in the local reception FIFO buffer.

  20. Magnetic Random Access Memory (MRAM) Device Development

    SciTech Connect

    Cerjan, C; Law, B P

    2000-01-18

    The recent discovery of materials that have anomalous magneto-resistive properties has generated renewed commercial interest in metal-based fast memory storage as an alternative to the currently used semiconductor-based devices. One particularly promising ternary alloy, fabricated at LLNL, appeared to have exceptional field response. This proposal extended the investigation of this class of materials by examining the scaling properties of test structures made from this material that could definitively verify the preliminary observations of high field sensitivity. Although the expected scaling was observed, technical issues, such as excessive oxidation, prevented a definitive assessment of the effect. Despite the difficulties encountered, several test structures demonstrated superior performance in a ''spin-valve'' configuration that might have applications for very high density recording heads.

  1. Direct memory access transfer completion notification

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J. , Blocksome; Michael A. , Parker; Jeffrey J.

    2011-02-15

    Methods, systems, and products are disclosed for DMA transfer completion notification that include: inserting, by an origin DMA on an origin node in an origin injection FIFO, a data descriptor for an application message; inserting, by the origin DMA, a reflection descriptor in the origin injection FIFO, the reflection descriptor specifying a remote get operation for injecting a completion notification descriptor in a reflection injection FIFO on a reflection node; transferring, by the origin DMA to a target node, the message in dependence upon the data descriptor; in response to completing the message transfer, transferring, by the origin DMA to the reflection node, the completion notification descriptor in dependence upon the reflection descriptor; receiving, by the origin DMA from the reflection node, a completion packet; and notifying, by the origin DMA in response to receiving the completion packet, the origin node's processing core that the message transfer is complete.

  2. Access Analysis-Based Tight Localization of Abstract Memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Hakjoo; Brutschy, Lucas; Yi, Kwangkeun

    On-the-fly localization of abstract memory states is vital for economical abstract interpretation of imperative programs. Such localization is sometimes called "abstract garbage collection" or "framing". In this article we present a new memory localization technique that is more effective than the conventional reachability-based approach. Our technique is based on a key observation that collecting the reachable memory parts is too conservative and the accessed parts are usually tiny subsets of the reachable. Our technique first estimates, by an efficient pre-analysis, the set of locations that will be accessed during the analysis of each code block. Then the main analysis uses the access-set results to trim the memory entries before analyzing code blocks. In experiments with an industrial-strength global C static analyzer, the technique is applied right before analyzing each procedure's body and reduces the average analysis time and memory by 92.1% and 71.2%, respectively, without sacrificing the analysis precision. Localizing more frequently such as at loop bodies and basic blocks as well as procedure bodies, the generalized localization additionally reduces analysis time by an average of 31.8%.

  3. Remoteness modulates the effects of emotional valence on the neural network of autobiographical memory in older females.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xianmin; Fu, Yan; Wang, Dahua; Franz, Elizabeth; Long, Zhiying

    2014-01-01

    To better understand the effects of emotional valence on autobiographical memory (AM), the present study compared behavioral performance and neural activation in positive and negative AMs at different levels of remoteness (the time-interval between encoding and retrieving) in a sample of Chinese older females. The behavioral results revealed that older females held a positivity bias in emotional AM in the form of an obvious trend of higher level of vividness when retrieving positive AMs compared with negative AMs. At the neural level, a de-lateralized neural network, covering the core AM system and the affect processing system, was found to be associated with emotional AM. Within the network, increased activation of a prefrontal cortex/anterior cingulate cortex (PFC/ACC) control system was found when processing negative recent AMs compared with positive recent AMs; increased activation of the somatosensory area was found with positive remote AMs compared with negative remote AMs. On the basis of these results, we suggest that the positivity bias of the older adults in recent AMs may be due to the use of an emotion regulation or control system (involving PFC/ACC) against negative AMs; in contrast, for remote AMs, the positivity bias may be due to better access to the positive remote memory details than the negative remote memory details. PMID:25486718

  4. Remoteness modulates the effects of emotional valence on the neural network of autobiographical memory in older females.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xianmin; Fu, Yan; Wang, Dahua; Franz, Elizabeth; Long, Zhiying

    2014-01-01

    To better understand the effects of emotional valence on autobiographical memory (AM), the present study compared behavioral performance and neural activation in positive and negative AMs at different levels of remoteness (the time-interval between encoding and retrieving) in a sample of Chinese older females. The behavioral results revealed that older females held a positivity bias in emotional AM in the form of an obvious trend of higher level of vividness when retrieving positive AMs compared with negative AMs. At the neural level, a de-lateralized neural network, covering the core AM system and the affect processing system, was found to be associated with emotional AM. Within the network, increased activation of a prefrontal cortex/anterior cingulate cortex (PFC/ACC) control system was found when processing negative recent AMs compared with positive recent AMs; increased activation of the somatosensory area was found with positive remote AMs compared with negative remote AMs. On the basis of these results, we suggest that the positivity bias of the older adults in recent AMs may be due to the use of an emotion regulation or control system (involving PFC/ACC) against negative AMs; in contrast, for remote AMs, the positivity bias may be due to better access to the positive remote memory details than the negative remote memory details. PMID:25508849

  5. Quantifying Locality in the Memory Access Patterns of HPCApplications

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, Jonathan; Snavely, Allan; McCracken, Michael O.; Strohmaier, Erich

    2005-07-25

    Several benchmarks for measuring memory performance of HPC systems along dimensions of spatial and temporal memory locality have recently been proposed. However, little is understood about the relationships of these benchmarks to real applications and to each other. In this paper, we propose a methodology for producing architecture-neutral characterizations of the spatial and temporal locality exhibited by the memory access patterns of applications. We demonstrate that the results track intuitive notions of spatial and temporal locality on several synthetic and application benchmarks. We employ the methodology to analyze the memory performance components of the HPC Challenge Benchmarks, the Apex-MAP benchmark, and their relationships to each other and other benchmarks and applications. We show that this analysis can be used to both increase understanding of the benchmarks and enhance their usefulness by mapping them, along with applications, to a 2-D space along axes of spatial and temporal locality.

  6. Real-time Data Access From Remote Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detrick, D. L.; Lutz, L. F.; Etter, J. E.; Rosenberg, T. J.; Weatherwax, A. T.

    2006-12-01

    Real-time access to solar-terrestrial data is becoming increasingly important, not only because it is now possible to acquire and access data rapidly via the internet, but also because of the need for timely publication of real-time data for analysis and modeling efforts. Currently, engineering-scaled summary data are available routinely on a daily basis from many observatories, but only when the observatories have continuous, or at least daily network access. Increasingly, the upgrading of remote data acquisition hardware makes it possible to provide data in real-time, and it is becoming normal to expect timely access to data products. The NSF- supported PENGUIn/AGO constellation of autonomous Antarctic research observatories has provided real-time data since December, 2002, when Iridium satellite modems were installed at three sites. The Iridium telecommunications links are maintained continuously, transferring data between the remote observatories and a U.S.-based data acquisition site. The time-limiting factor with this scenario is now the delay in completing a data record before transmission, which can be as short as minutes depending on the sampling rate. The single-channel data throughput of the current systems is 20-MB/day (megabytes per day), but planned installations will be capable of operating with multiple modem channels. The data records are currently posted immediately to a web site accessible by anonymous FTP client software, for use by the instruments' principal investigators, and survey plots of selected signals are published daily. The web publication facilities are being upgraded, in order to allow other interested researchers rapid access to engineering-scaled data products, in several common formats, as well as providing interactive plotting capabilities. The web site will provide access to data from other collaborating observatories (including South Pole and McMurdo Stations), as well as ancillary data accessible from public sites (e.g., Kp

  7. Kokkos: Enabling manycore performance portability through polymorphic memory access patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Carter Edwards, H.; Trott, Christian R.; Sunderland, Daniel

    2014-07-22

    The manycore revolution can be characterized by increasing thread counts, decreasing memory per thread, and diversity of continually evolving manycore architectures. High performance computing (HPC) applications and libraries must exploit increasingly finer levels of parallelism within their codes to sustain scalability on these devices. We found that a major obstacle to performance portability is the diverse and conflicting set of constraints on memory access patterns across devices. Contemporary portable programming models address manycore parallelism (e.g., OpenMP, OpenACC, OpenCL) but fail to address memory access patterns. The Kokkos C++ library enables applications and domain libraries to achieve performance portability on diverse manycore architectures by unifying abstractions for both fine-grain data parallelism and memory access patterns. In this paper we describe Kokkos’ abstractions, summarize its application programmer interface (API), present performance results for unit-test kernels and mini-applications, and outline an incremental strategy for migrating legacy C++ codes to Kokkos. Furthermore, the Kokkos library is under active research and development to incorporate capabilities from new generations of manycore architectures, and to address a growing list of applications and domain libraries.

  8. Kokkos: Enabling manycore performance portability through polymorphic memory access patterns

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Carter Edwards, H.; Trott, Christian R.; Sunderland, Daniel

    2014-07-22

    The manycore revolution can be characterized by increasing thread counts, decreasing memory per thread, and diversity of continually evolving manycore architectures. High performance computing (HPC) applications and libraries must exploit increasingly finer levels of parallelism within their codes to sustain scalability on these devices. We found that a major obstacle to performance portability is the diverse and conflicting set of constraints on memory access patterns across devices. Contemporary portable programming models address manycore parallelism (e.g., OpenMP, OpenACC, OpenCL) but fail to address memory access patterns. The Kokkos C++ library enables applications and domain libraries to achieve performance portability on diversemore » manycore architectures by unifying abstractions for both fine-grain data parallelism and memory access patterns. In this paper we describe Kokkos’ abstractions, summarize its application programmer interface (API), present performance results for unit-test kernels and mini-applications, and outline an incremental strategy for migrating legacy C++ codes to Kokkos. Furthermore, the Kokkos library is under active research and development to incorporate capabilities from new generations of manycore architectures, and to address a growing list of applications and domain libraries.« less

  9. Integrated, nonvolatile, high-speed analog random access memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, Romney R. (Inventor); Wu, Jiin-Chuan (Inventor); Stadler, Henry L. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    This invention provides an integrated, non-volatile, high-speed random access memory. A magnetically switchable ferromagnetic or ferrimagnetic layer is sandwiched between an electrical conductor which provides the ability to magnetize the magnetically switchable layer and a magneto resistive or Hall effect material which allows sensing the magnetic field which emanates from the magnetization of the magnetically switchable layer. By using this integrated three-layer form, the writing process, which is controlled by the conductor, is separated from the storage medium in the magnetic layer and from the readback process which is controlled by the magnetoresistive layer. A circuit for implementing the memory in CMOS or the like is disclosed.

  10. Resistive random access memory utilizing ferritin protein with Pt nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uenuma, Mutsunori; Kawano, Kentaro; Zheng, Bin; Okamoto, Naofumi; Horita, Masahiro; Yoshii, Shigeo; Yamashita, Ichiro; Uraoka, Yukiharu

    2011-05-01

    This study reports controlled single conductive paths found in resistive random access memory (ReRAM) formed by embedding Pt nanoparticles (Pt NPs) in NiO film. Homogeneous Pt NPs produced and placed by ferritin protein produce electric field convergence which leads to controlled conductive path formation. The ReRAM with Pt NPs shows stable switching behavior. A Pt NP density decrease results in an increase of OFF state resistance and decrease of forming voltage, whereas ON resistance was independent of the Pt NP density, which indicates that a single metal NP in a memory cell will achieve low power and stable operation.

  11. Magnet/Hall-Effect Random-Access Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jiin-Chuan; Stadler, Henry L.; Katti, Romney R.

    1991-01-01

    In proposed magnet/Hall-effect random-access memory (MHRAM), bits of data stored magnetically in Perm-alloy (or equivalent)-film memory elements and read out by using Hall-effect sensors to detect magnetization. Value of each bit represented by polarity of magnetization. Retains data for indefinite time or until data rewritten. Speed of Hall-effect sensors in MHRAM results in readout times of about 100 nanoseconds. Other characteristics include high immunity to ionizing radiation and storage densities of order 10(Sup6)bits/cm(Sup 2) or more.

  12. Paging memory from random access memory to backing storage in a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Inglett, Todd A; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2013-05-21

    Paging memory from random access memory (`RAM`) to backing storage in a parallel computer that includes a plurality of compute nodes, including: executing a data processing application on a virtual machine operating system in a virtual machine on a first compute node; providing, by a second compute node, backing storage for the contents of RAM on the first compute node; and swapping, by the virtual machine operating system in the virtual machine on the first compute node, a page of memory from RAM on the first compute node to the backing storage on the second compute node.

  13. Establishing a Secure Data Center with Remote Access: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Gonder, J.; Burton, E.; Murakami, E.

    2012-04-01

    Access to existing travel data is critical for many analysis efforts that lack the time or resources to support detailed data collection. High-resolution data sets provide particular value, but also present a challenge for preserving the anonymity of the original survey participants. To address this dilemma of providing data access while preserving privacy, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the U.S. Department of Transportation have launched the Transportation Secure Data Center (TSDC). TSDC data sets include those from regional travel surveys and studies that increasingly use global positioning system devices. Data provided by different collecting agencies varies with respect to formatting, elements included and level of processing conducted in support of the original purpose. The TSDC relies on a number of geospatial and other analysis tools to ensure data quality and to generate useful information outputs. TSDC users can access the processed data in two different ways. The first is by downloading summary results and second-by-second vehicle speed profiles (with latitude/longitude information removed) from a publicly-accessible website. The second method involves applying for a remote connection account to a controlled-access environment where spatial analysis can be conducted, but raw data cannot be removed.

  14. Effects of sleep deprivation and aging on long-term and remote memory in mice

    PubMed Central

    Vecsey, Christopher G.; Park, Alan J.; Khatib, Nora

    2015-01-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) following hippocampus-dependent learning in young mice impairs memory when tested the following day. Here, we examined the effects of SD on remote memory in both young and aged mice. In young mice, we found that memory is still impaired 1 mo after training. SD also impaired memory in aged mice 1 d after training, but, by a month after training, sleep-deprived and control aged animals performed similarly, primarily due to remote memory decay in the control aged animals. Gene expression analysis supported the finding that SD has similar effects on the hippocampus in young and aged mice. PMID:25776037

  15. 76 FR 73676 - Certain Dynamic Random Access Memory Devices, and Products Containing Same; Receipt of Complaint...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-29

    ... COMMISSION Certain Dynamic Random Access Memory Devices, and Products Containing Same; Receipt of Complaint... complaint entitled In Re Certain Dynamic Random Access Memory Devices, and Products Containing Same, DN 2859... within the United States after importation of certain dynamic random access memory devices, and...

  16. 76 FR 80964 - Certain Dynamic Random Access Memory Devices, and Products Containing Same; Institution of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-27

    ... COMMISSION Certain Dynamic Random Access Memory Devices, and Products Containing Same; Institution of... States after importation of certain dynamic random access memory devices, and products containing same by... dynamic random access memory devices, and products containing same that infringe one or more of claims...

  17. Remote Access to Wireless Communications Systems Laboratory--New Technology Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kafadarova, Nadezhda; Sotirov, Sotir; Milev, Mihail

    2012-01-01

    Technology nowadays enables the remote access to laboratory equipment and instruments via Internet. This is especially useful in engineering education, where students can conduct laboratory experiment remotely. Such remote laboratory access can enable students to use expensive laboratory equipment, which is not usually available to students. In…

  18. Method and device for maximizing memory system bandwidth by accessing data in a dynamically determined order

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wulf, William A. (Inventor); McKee, Sally A. (Inventor); Klenke, Robert (Inventor); Schwab, Andrew J. (Inventor); Moyer, Stephen A. (Inventor); Aylor, James (Inventor); Hitchcock, Charles Young (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A data processing system is disclosed which comprises a data processor and memory control device for controlling the access of information from the memory. The memory control device includes temporary storage and decision ability for determining what order to execute the memory accesses. The compiler detects the requirements of the data processor and selects the data to stream to the memory control device which determines a memory access order. The order in which to access said information is selected based on the location of information stored in the memory. The information is repeatedly accessed from memory and stored in the temporary storage until all streamed information is accessed. The information is stored until required by the data processor. The selection of the order in which to access information maximizes bandwidth and decreases the retrieval time.

  19. Nonvolatile GaAs Random-Access Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, Romney R.; Stadler, Henry L.; Wu, Jiin-Chuan

    1994-01-01

    Proposed random-access integrated-circuit electronic memory offers nonvolatile magnetic storage. Bits stored magnetically and read out with Hall-effect sensors. Advantages include short reading and writing times and high degree of immunity to both single-event upsets and permanent damage by ionizing radiation. Use of same basic material for both transistors and sensors simplifies fabrication process, with consequent benefits in increased yield and reduced cost.

  20. If memory serves, will language? Later verbal accessibility of early memories.

    PubMed

    Bauer, P J; Kroupina, M G; Schwade, J A; Dropik, P L; Wewerka, S S

    1998-01-01

    Of major interest to those concerned with early mnemonic process and function is the question of whether early memories likely encoded without the benefit of language later are accessible to verbal report. In the context of a controlled laboratory study, we examined this question in children who were 16 and 20 months at the time of exposure to specific target events and who subsequently were tested for their memories of the events after a delay of either 6 or 12 months (at 22-32 months) and then again at 3 years. At the first delayed-recall test, children evidenced memory both nonverbally and verbally. Nonverbal mnemonic expression was related to age at the time of test; verbal mnemonic expression was related to verbal fluency at the time of test. At the second delayed-recall test, children evidenced continued accessibility of their early memories. Verbal mnemonic expression was related to previous mnemonic expression, both nonverbal and verbal, each of which contributed unique variance. The relevance of these findings on memory for controlled laboratory events for issues of memory for traumatic experiences is discussed. PMID:9886220

  1. Remotely Accessible Testbed for Software Defined Radio Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lux, James P.; Lang, Minh; Peters, Kenneth J.; Taylor, Gregory H.

    2012-01-01

    Previous development testbeds have assumed that the developer was physically present in front of the hardware being used. No provision for remote operation of basic functions (power on/off or reset) was made, because the developer/operator was sitting in front of the hardware, and could just push the button manually. In this innovation, a completely remotely accessible testbed has been created, with all diagnostic equipment and tools set up for remote access, and using standardized interfaces so that failed equipment can be quickly replaced. In this testbed, over 95% of the operating hours were used for testing without the developer being physically present. The testbed includes a pair of personal computers, one running Linux and one running Windows. A variety of peripherals is connected via Ethernet and USB (universal serial bus) interfaces. A private internal Ethernet is used to connect to test instruments and other devices, so that the sole connection to the outside world is via the two PCs. An important design consideration was that all of the instruments and interfaces used stable, long-lived industry standards, such as Ethernet, USB, and GPIB (general purpose interface bus). There are no plug-in cards for the two PCs, so there are no problems with finding replacement computers with matching interfaces, device drivers, and installation. The only thing unique to the two PCs is the locally developed software, which is not specific to computer or operating system version. If a device (including one of the computers) were to fail or become unavailable (e.g., a test instrument needed to be recalibrated), replacing it is a straightforward process with a standard, off-the-shelf device.

  2. Transient News Events Test: feasibility in assessment of post-temporal lobectomy remote memory deficits.

    PubMed

    Leeman, Beth A; Macklin, Eric A; Schomer, Donald L; O'Connor, Margaret G

    2009-09-01

    Although anterograde memory deficits are well documented in patients with epilepsy, the extent to which remote memory deficits occur is less clear. This is due in part to a lack of reliable methods for assessment. The present study examined the feasibility of using the Transient News Events Test (TNET) to assess remote memory in subjects status post anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) for the treatment of refractory seizures. Results indicated significantly poorer performance of the patient group compared to healthy controls. The decrement in performance within the patient group was evident only for items from more recent time periods. Reasons for an apparent stability of the most remote memories with ATL and implications regarding hippocampal function are reviewed. In conclusion, the TNET provides a feasible method for assessment of remote memory function in patients with epilepsy, with decrements in performance noted in comparison to a healthy control group in this retrospective study. PMID:19643674

  3. Vortex-Core Reversal Dynamics: Towards Vortex Random Access Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Koog

    2011-03-01

    An energy-efficient, ultrahigh-density, ultrafast, and nonvolatile solid-state universal memory is a long-held dream in the field of information-storage technology. The magnetic random access memory (MRAM) along with a spin-transfer-torque switching mechanism is a strong candidate-means of realizing that dream, given its nonvolatility, infinite endurance, and fast random access. Magnetic vortices in patterned soft magnetic dots promise ground-breaking applications in information-storage devices, owing to the very stable twofold ground states of either their upward or downward core magnetization orientation and plausible core switching by in-plane alternating magnetic fields or spin-polarized currents. However, two technologically most important but very challenging issues --- low-power recording and reliable selection of each memory cell with already existing cross-point architectures --- have not yet been resolved for the basic operations in information storage, that is, writing (recording) and readout. Here, we experimentally demonstrate a magnetic vortex random access memory (VRAM) in the basic cross-point architecture. This unique VRAM offers reliable cell selection and low-power-consumption control of switching of out-of-plane core magnetizations using specially designed rotating magnetic fields generated by two orthogonal and unipolar Gaussian-pulse currents along with optimized pulse width and time delay. Our achievement of a new device based on a new material, that is, a medium composed of patterned vortex-state disks, together with the new physics on ultrafast vortex-core switching dynamics, can stimulate further fruitful research on MRAMs that are based on vortex-state dot arrays.

  4. On the resilience of remote traumatic memories against exposure therapy-mediated attenuation.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Li-Huei; Gräff, Johannes

    2014-08-01

    How to attenuate traumatic memories has long been the focus of intensive research efforts, as traumatic memories are extremely persistent and heavily impinge on the quality of life. Despite the fact that traumatic memories are often not readily amenable to immediate intervention, surprisingly few studies have investigated treatment options for remote traumata in animal models. The few that have unanimously concluded that exposure therapy-based approaches, the most successful behavioral intervention for the attenuation of recent forms of traumata in humans, fail to effectively reduce remote fear memories. Here, we provide an overview of these animal studies with an emphasis on why remote traumatic memories might be refractory to behavioral interventions: A lack of neuroplasticity in brain areas relevant for learning and memory emerges as a common denominator of such resilience. We then outline the findings of a recent study in mice showing that by combining exposure therapy-like approaches with small molecule inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDACis), even remote memories can be persistently attenuated. This pharmacological intervention reinstated neuroplasticity to levels comparable to those found upon successful attenuation of recent memories. Thus, HDACis-or any other agent capable of heightening neuroplasticity-in conjunction with exposure therapy-based treatments might constitute a promising approach to overcome remote traumata. PMID:25027989

  5. On the resilience of remote traumatic memories against exposure therapy-mediated attenuation

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Li-Huei; Gräff, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    How to attenuate traumatic memories has long been the focus of intensive research efforts, as traumatic memories are extremely persistent and heavily impinge on the quality of life. Despite the fact that traumatic memories are often not readily amenable to immediate intervention, surprisingly few studies have investigated treatment options for remote traumata in animal models. The few that have unanimously concluded that exposure therapy-based approaches, the most successful behavioral intervention for the attenuation of recent forms of traumata in humans, fail to effectively reduce remote fear memories. Here, we provide an overview of these animal studies with an emphasis on why remote traumatic memories might be refractory to behavioral interventions: A lack of neuroplasticity in brain areas relevant for learning and memory emerges as a common denominator of such resilience. We then outline the findings of a recent study in mice showing that by combining exposure therapy-like approaches with small molecule inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDACis), even remote memories can be persistently attenuated. This pharmacological intervention reinstated neuroplasticity to levels comparable to those found upon successful attenuation of recent memories. Thus, HDACis—or any other agent capable of heightening neuroplasticity—in conjunction with exposure therapy-based treatments might constitute a promising approach to overcome remote traumata. PMID:25027989

  6. Complex dynamics of semantic memory access in reading.

    PubMed

    Baggio, Giosué; Fonseca, André

    2012-02-01

    Understanding a word in context relies on a cascade of perceptual and conceptual processes, starting with modality-specific input decoding, and leading to the unification of the word's meaning into a discourse model. One critical cognitive event, turning a sensory stimulus into a meaningful linguistic sign, is the access of a semantic representation from memory. Little is known about the changes that activating a word's meaning brings about in cortical dynamics. We recorded the electroencephalogram (EEG) while participants read sentences that could contain a contextually unexpected word, such as 'cold' in 'In July it is very cold outside'. We reconstructed trajectories in phase space from single-trial EEG time series, and we applied three nonlinear measures of predictability and complexity to each side of the semantic access boundary, estimated as the onset time of the N400 effect evoked by critical words. Relative to controls, unexpected words were associated with larger prediction errors preceding the onset of the N400. Accessing the meaning of such words produced a phase transition to lower entropy states, in which cortical processing becomes more predictable and more regular. Our study sheds new light on the dynamics of information flow through interfaces between sensory and memory systems during language processing. PMID:21715401

  7. Brain region-specific activity patterns after recent or remote memory retrieval of auditory conditioned fear.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jeong-Tae; Jhang, Jinho; Kim, Hyung-Su; Lee, Sujin; Han, Jin-Hee

    2012-01-01

    Memory is thought to be sparsely encoded throughout multiple brain regions forming unique memory trace. Although evidence has established that the amygdala is a key brain site for memory storage and retrieval of auditory conditioned fear memory, it remains elusive whether the auditory brain regions may be involved in fear memory storage or retrieval. To investigate this possibility, we systematically imaged the brain activity patterns in the lateral amygdala, MGm/PIN, and AuV/TeA using activity-dependent induction of immediate early gene zif268 after recent and remote memory retrieval of auditory conditioned fear. Consistent with the critical role of the amygdala in fear memory, the zif268 activity in the lateral amygdala was significantly increased after both recent and remote memory retrieval. Interesting, however, the density of zif268 (+) neurons in both MGm/PIN and AuV/TeA, particularly in layers IV and VI, was increased only after remote but not recent fear memory retrieval compared to control groups. Further analysis of zif268 signals in AuV/TeA revealed that conditioned tone induced stronger zif268 induction compared to familiar tone in each individual zif268 (+) neuron after recent memory retrieval. Taken together, our results support that the lateral amygdala is a key brain site for permanent fear memory storage and suggest that MGm/PIN and AuV/TeA might play a role for remote memory storage or retrieval of auditory conditioned fear, or, alternatively, that these auditory brain regions might have a different way of processing for familiar or conditioned tone information at recent and remote time phases. PMID:22993170

  8. Remote Semantic Memory for Public Figures in HIV Infection, Alcoholism, and their Comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Fama, Rosemary; Rosenbloom, Margaret J.; Sassoon, Stephanie A.; Thompson, Megan A.; Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Sullivan, Edith V.

    2010-01-01

    Background Impairments in component processes of working and episodic memory mark both HIV infection and chronic alcoholism, with compounded deficits often observed in individuals comorbid for these conditions. Remote semantic memory processes, however, have only seldom been studied in these diagnostic groups. Examination of remote semantic memory could provide insight into the underlying processes associated with storage and retrieval of learned information over extended time periods while elucidating spared and impaired cognitive functions in these clinical groups. Methods We examined component processes of remote semantic memory in HIV infection and chronic alcoholism in 4 subject groups (HIV, ALC, HIV+ALC, and age matched healthy adults) using a modified version of the Presidents Test. Free recall, recognition, and sequencing of presidential candidates and election dates were assessed. In addition, component processes of working, episodic, and semantic memory were assessed with ancillary cognitive tests. Results The comorbid group (HIV+ALC) was significantly impaired on sequencing of remote semantic information compared with age matched healthy adults. Free recall of remote semantic information was also modestly impaired in the HIV+ALC group, but normal performance for recognition of this information was observed. Few differences were observed between the single diagnosis groups (HIV, ALC) and healthy adults, although examination of the component processes underlying remote semantic memory scores elicited differences between the HIV and ALC groups. Selective remote memory processes were related to lifetime alcohol consumption in the ALC group and to viral load and depression level in the HIV group. Hepatitis C diagnosis was associated with lower remote semantic memory scores in all three clinical groups. Education level did not account for group differences reported. Conclusions This study provides behavioral support for the existence of adverse effects

  9. Resistive random access memory enabled by carbon nanotube crossbar electrodes.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Cheng-Lin; Xiong, Feng; Pop, Eric; Shim, Moonsub

    2013-06-25

    We use single-walled carbon nanotube (CNT) crossbar electrodes to probe sub-5 nm memory domains of thin AlOx films. Both metallic and semiconducting CNTs effectively switch AlOx bits between memory states with high and low resistance. The low-resistance state scales linearly with CNT series resistance down to ∼10 MΩ, at which point the ON-state resistance of the AlOx filament becomes the limiting factor. Dependence of switching behavior on the number of cross-points suggests a single channel to dominate the overall characteristics in multi-crossbar devices. We demonstrate ON/OFF ratios up to 5 × 10(5) and programming currents of 1 to 100 nA with few-volt set/reset voltages. Remarkably low reset currents enable a switching power of 10-100 nW and estimated switching energy as low as 0.1-10 fJ per bit. These results are essential for understanding the ultimate scaling limits of resistive random access memory at single-nanometer bit dimensions. PMID:23705675

  10. Efficient Memory Access with NumPy Global Arrays using Local Memory Access

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, Jeffrey A.; Berghofer, Dan C.

    2013-08-03

    This paper discusses the work completed working with Global Arrays of data on distributed multi-computer systems and improving their performance. The tasks completed were done at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in the Science Undergrad Laboratory Internship program in the summer of 2013 for the Data Intensive Computing Group in the Fundamental and Computational Sciences DIrectorate. This work was done on the Global Arrays Toolkit developed by this group. This toolkit is an interface for programmers to more easily create arrays of data on networks of computers. This is useful because scientific computation is often done on large amounts of data sometimes so large that individual computers cannot hold all of it. This data is held in array form and can best be processed on supercomputers which often consist of a network of individual computers doing their computation in parallel. One major challenge for this sort of programming is that operations on arrays on multiple computers is very complex and an interface is needed so that these arrays seem like they are on a single computer. This is what global arrays does. The work done here is to use more efficient operations on that data that requires less copying of data to be completed. This saves a lot of time because copying data on many different computers is time intensive. The way this challenge was solved is when data to be operated on with binary operations are on the same computer, they are not copied when they are accessed. When they are on separate computers, only one set is copied when accessed. This saves time because of less copying done although more data access operations were done.

  11. Putting a Medical Library Online: Phase III--Remote Access to CD-ROMs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kittle, Paul

    1989-01-01

    Describes the implementation of a project that provides dial-up access to MEDLINE on remote optical data disk (CD-ROM) using software that enables callers to use programs like Wordstar, Lotus, and dBase. Highlights include networking CD-ROM databases, hardware considerations, advantages and disadvantages of remote access, and future plans. A…

  12. Protocols and Strategies for Optimizing Performance of Remote Memory Operations on Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Nieplocha, Jaroslaw; Tipparaju, Vinod; Saify, Amina; Panda, Dhabaleswar

    2002-04-15

    The paper describes software architecture for supporting remote memory operations on clusters equipped with high-performance networks such as Myrinet and Giganet/Emulex cLAN. It presents protocols and strategies that bridge the gap between user-level API requirements and low-level network-specific interfaces such as GM and VIA. In particular, the issues of memory registration, management of network resources and memory consumption on the host, are discussed and solved to achieve an efficient implementation.

  13. Optimizing Synchronization Operations for Remote Memory Communication Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Buntinas, Darius; Saify, Amina; Panda, Dhabaleswar K.; Nieplocha, Jarek; Bob Werner

    2003-04-22

    Synchronization operations, such as fence and locking, are used in many parallel operations accessing shared memory. However, a process which is blocked waiting for a fence operation to complete, or for a lock to be acquired, cannot perform useful computation. It is therefore critical that these operations be implemented as efficiently as possible to reduce the time a process waits idle. These operations also impact the scalability of the overall system. As system sizes get larger, the number of processes potentially requesting a lock increases. In this paper we describe the design and implementation of an optimized operation which combines a global fence operation and a barrier synchronization operation. We also describe our implementation of an optimized lock algorithm. The optimizations have been incorporated into the ARMCI communication library. The global fence and barrier operation gives a factor of improvement of up to 9 over the current implementation in a 16 node system, while the optimized lock implementation gives up to 1.25 factor of improvement. These optimizations allow for more efficient and scalable applications

  14. Becoming a better person: temporal remoteness biases autobiographical memories for moral events

    PubMed Central

    Escobedo, Jessica R.; Adolphs, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Our autobiographical self depends on the differential recollection of our personal past, notably including memories of morally laden events. While both emotion and temporal recency are well known to influence memory, very little is known about how we remember moral events, and in particular about the distribution in time of memories for events that were blameworthy or praiseworthy. To investigate this issue in detail, we collected a novel database of 758 confidential, autobiographical narratives for personal moral events from 100 well-characterized healthy adults. Negatively valenced moral memories were significantly more remote than positively valenced memories, both as measured by the valence of the cue word that evoked the memory as well as by the content of the memory itself. The effect was independent of chronological age, ethnicity, gender, or personality, arguing for a general emotional bias in how we construct our moral autobiography. PMID:20677868

  15. Spin-Hall-assisted magnetic random access memory

    SciTech Connect

    Brink, A. van den Swagten, H. J. M.; Koopmans, B.; Cosemans, S.; Manfrini, M.; Van Roy, W.; Min, T.; Cornelissen, S.; Vaysset, A.; Departement elektrotechniek , KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 10, B-3001 Heverlee

    2014-01-06

    We propose a write scheme for perpendicular spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory that significantly reduces the required tunnel current density and write energy. A sub-nanosecond in-plane polarized spin current pulse is generated using the spin-Hall effect, disturbing the stable magnetic state. Subsequent switching using out-of-plane polarized spin current becomes highly efficient. Through evaluation of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation, we quantitatively assess the viability of this write scheme for a wide range of system parameters. A typical example shows an eight-fold reduction in tunnel current density, corresponding to a fifty-fold reduction in write energy, while maintaining a 1 ns write time.

  16. Complementary resistive switching behavior for conductive bridge random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Hao-Xuan; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chang, Kuan-Chang; Tsai, Tsung-Ming; Shih, Chih-Cheng; Zhang, Rui; Chen, Kai-Huang; Wang, Ming-Hui; Zheng, Jin-Cheng; Lo, Ikai; Wu, Cheng-Hsien; Tseng, Yi-Ting; Sze, Simon M.

    2016-06-01

    In this study, a structure of Pt/Cu18Si12O70/TiN has been investigated. By co-sputtering the Cu and SiO2 targets in the switching layer, we can measure the operation mechanism of complementary resistive switching (CRS). This differs from conventional conductive bridge random access memory (CBRAM) that tends to use Cu electrodes rather than Cu18Si12O70. By changing the voltage and compliance current, we can control device operating characteristics. Because Cu distributes differently in the device depending on this setting, the operating end can be located at either the top or bottom electrode. Device current–voltage (I–V) curves are used to demonstrate that the CRS in the CBRAM device is a double-electrode operation.

  17. Materials selection for oxide-based resistive random access memories

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Yuzheng; Robertson, John

    2014-12-01

    The energies of atomic processes in resistive random access memories (RRAMs) are calculated for four typical oxides, HfO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}, Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, to define a materials selection process. O vacancies have the lowest defect formation energy in the O-poor limit and dominate the processes. A band diagram defines the operating Fermi energy and O chemical potential range. It is shown how the scavenger metal can be used to vary the O vacancy formation energy, via controlling the O chemical potential, and the mean Fermi energy. The high endurance of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} RRAM is related to its more stable amorphous phase and the adaptive lattice rearrangements of its O vacancy.

  18. Taxing Working Memory during Retrieval of Emotional Memories Does Not Reduce Memory Accessibility When Cued with Reminders

    PubMed Central

    van Schie, Kevin; Engelhard, Iris M.; van den Hout, Marcel A.

    2015-01-01

    Earlier studies have shown that when individuals recall an emotional memory while simultaneously doing a demanding dual-task [e.g., playing Tetris, mental arithmetic, making eye movements (EM)], this reduces self-reported vividness and emotionality of the memory. These effects have been found up to 1 week later, but have largely been confined to self-report ratings. This study examined whether this dual-tasking intervention reduces memory performance (i.e., accessibility of emotional memories). Undergraduates (N = 60) studied word-image pairs and rated the retrieved image on vividness and emotionality when cued with the word. Then they viewed the cues and recalled the images with or without making EM. Finally, they re-rated the images on vividness and emotionality. Additionally, fragments from images from all conditions were presented and participants identified which fragment was paired earlier with which cue. Findings showed no effect of the dual-task manipulation on self-reported ratings and latency responses. Several possible explanations for the lack of effects are discussed, but the cued recall procedure in our experiment seems to explain the absence of effects best. The study demonstrates boundaries to the effects of the “dual-tasking” procedure. PMID:25729370

  19. Dissociation of the Role of Infralimbic Cortex in Learning and Consolidation of Extinction of Recent and Remote Aversion Memory.

    PubMed

    Awad, Walaa; Ferreira, Guillaume; Maroun, Mouna

    2015-10-01

    Medial prefrontal circuits have been reported to undergo a major reorganization over time and gradually take a more important role for remote emotional memories such as contextual fear memory or food aversion memory. The medial prefrontal cortex, and specifically its ventral subregion, the infralimbic cortex (IL), was also reported to be critical for recent memory extinction of contextual fear conditioning and conditioned odor aversion. However, its exact role in the extinction of remotely acquired information is still not clear. Using postretrieval blockade of protein synthesis or inactivation of the IL, we showed that the IL is similarly required for extinction consolidation of recent and remote fear memory. However, in odor aversion memory, the IL was only involved in extinction consolidation of recent, but not remote, memory. In contrast, only remote retrieval of aversion memory induced c-Fos activation in the IL and preretrieval inactivation of the IL with lidocaine impaired subsequent extinction of remote but not recent memory, indicating IL is necessary for extinction learning of remote aversion memory. In contrast to the effects in odor aversion, our data show that the involvement of the IL in the consolidation of fear extinction does not depend on the memory age. More importantly, our data indicate that the IL is implicated in the extinction of fear and nonfear-based associations and suggest dissociation in the engagement of the IL in the learning and consolidation of food aversion extinction over time. PMID:25872918

  20. Accessibility versus Accuracy in Retrieving Spatial Memory: Evidence for Suboptimal Assumed Headings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yerramsetti, Ashok; Marchette, Steven A.; Shelton, Amy L.

    2013-01-01

    Orientation dependence in spatial memory has often been interpreted in terms of accessibility: Object locations are encoded relative to a reference orientation that affords the most accurate access to spatial memory. An open question, however, is whether people naturally use this "preferred" orientation whenever recalling the space. We…

  1. 75 FR 44989 - In the Matter of Certain Semiconductor Chips Having Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-30

    ... December 10, 2008, based on a complaint filed by Rambus, Inc. of Los Altos, California (``Rambus''). 73 FR... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Semiconductor Chips Having Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory... chips having synchronous dynamic random access memory controllers and product containing the same...

  2. The Cost of Accessing an Object's Feature Stored in Visual Working Memory

    PubMed Central

    Woodman, Geoffrey F.; Vecera, Shaun P.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of accessing or retrieving information held in working memory are poorly understood compared to what we know about the nature of information storage in this limited-capacity memory system. Previous studies of object-based attention have often relied upon memory-demanding tasks, and this work could indicate that accessing a piece of information in visual working memory may have deleterious effects upon the other representations being maintained. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that accessing a feature of an object represented in visual working memory degrades the representations of the other stored objects’ features. Our findings support this hypothesis and point to important new questions about the nature of effects resulting from accessing information stored in visual working memory. PMID:21221413

  3. Brain structural, functional, and cognitive correlates of recent versus remote autobiographical memories in amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Tomadesso, Clémence; Perrotin, Audrey; Mutlu, Justine; Mézenge, Florence; Landeau, Brigitte; Egret, Stéphanie; de la Sayette, Vincent; Jonin, Pierre-Yves; Eustache, Francis; Desgranges, Béatrice; Chételat, Gaël

    2015-01-01

    Deficits in autobiographical memory appear earlier for recent than for remote life periods over the course of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The present study aims to further our understanding of this graded effect by investigating the cognitive and neural substrates of recent versus remote autobiographical memories in patients with amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment (aMCI) thanks to an autobiographical fluency task. 20 aMCI patients and 25 Healthy elderly Controls (HC) underwent neuropsychological tests assessing remote (20-to-30 years old) and recent (the ten last years) autobiographical memory as well as episodic and semantic memory, executive function and global cognition. All patients also had a structural MRI and an FDG-PET scan. Correlations were assessed between each autobiographical memory score and the other tests as well as grey matter volume and metabolism. Within the aMCI, performances for the remote period correlated with personal semantic memory and episodic memory retrieval whereas performances for the recent period only correlated with episodic memory retrieval. Neuroimaging analyses revealed significant correlations between performances for the remote period and temporal pole and temporo-parietal cortex volumes and anterior cingulate gyrus metabolism, while performances for the recent period correlated with hippocampal volume and posterior cingulate, medial prefrontal and hippocampus metabolism. The brain regions related with the retrieval of events from the recent period showed greater atrophy/hypometabolism in aMCI patients compared to HC than those involved in remote memories. Recall of recent memories essentially relies on episodic memory processes and brain network while remote memories also involve other processes such as semantic memory. This is consistent with the semanticization of memories with time and may explain the better resistance of remote memory in AD. PMID:26106572

  4. Working memory capacity and retrieval limitations from long-term memory: an examination of differences in accessibility.

    PubMed

    Unsworth, Nash; Spillers, Gregory J; Brewer, Gene A

    2012-01-01

    In two experiments, the locus of individual differences in working memory capacity and long-term memory recall was examined. Participants performed categorical cued and free recall tasks, and individual differences in the dynamics of recall were interpreted in terms of a hierarchical-search framework. The results from this study are in accordance with recent theorizing suggesting a strong relation between working memory capacity and retrieval from long-term memory. Furthermore, the results also indicate that individual differences in categorical recall are partially due to differences in accessibility. In terms of accessibility of target information, two important factors drive the difference between high- and low-working-memory-capacity participants. Low-working-memory-capacity participants fail to utilize appropriate retrieval strategies to access cues, and they also have difficulty resolving cue overload. Thus, when low-working-memory-capacity participants were given specific cues that activated a smaller set of potential targets, their recall performance was the same as that of high-working-memory-capacity participants. PMID:22800472

  5. Remote Dial-In Patron Access to CD-ROM LANs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQueen, Howard

    1990-01-01

    Examines technical and support issues that impact on libraries' decisions to provide patrons with remote communication access to CD-ROM local area networks. Areas discussed include licensing costs for CD-ROM, remote control communications software, dedicated hardware, system maintenance, computer security, and the provision of quality, user…

  6. Mapping virtual addresses to different physical addresses for value disambiguation for thread memory access requests

    DOEpatents

    Gala, Alan; Ohmacht, Martin

    2014-09-02

    A multiprocessor system includes nodes. Each node includes a data path that includes a core, a TLB, and a first level cache implementing disambiguation. The system also includes at least one second level cache and a main memory. For thread memory access requests, the core uses an address associated with an instruction format of the core. The first level cache uses an address format related to the size of the main memory plus an offset corresponding to hardware thread meta data. The second level cache uses a physical main memory address plus software thread meta data to store the memory access request. The second level cache accesses the main memory using the physical address with neither the offset nor the thread meta data after resolving speculation. In short, this system includes mapping of a virtual address to a different physical addresses for value disambiguation for different threads.

  7. Radiation dosimetry using three-dimensional optical random access memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moscovitch, M.; Phillips, G. W.

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional optical random access memories (3D ORAMs) are a new generation of high-density data storage devices. Binary information is stored and retrieved via a light induced reversible transformation of an ensemble of bistable photochromic molecules embedded in a polymer matrix. This paper describes the application of 3D ORAM materials to radiation dosimetry. It is shown both theoretically and experimentally, that ionizing radiation in the form of heavy charged particles is capable of changing the information originally stored on the ORAM material. The magnitude and spatial distribution of these changes are used as a measure of the absorbed dose, particle type and energy. The effects of exposure on 3D ORAM materials have been investigated for a variety of particle types and energies, including protons, alpha particles and 12C ions. The exposed materials are observed to fluoresce when exposed to laser light. The intensity and the depth of the fluorescence is dependent on the type and energy of the particle to which the materials were exposed. It is shown that these effects can be modeled using Monte Carlo calculations. The model provides a better understanding of the properties of these materials. which should prove useful for developing systems for charged particle and neutron dosimetry/detector applications. c2001 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  8. Viable chemical approach for patterning nanoscale magnetoresistive random access memory

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Taeseung; Kim, Younghee; Chen, Jack Kun-Chieh; Chang, Jane P.

    2015-03-15

    A reactive ion etching process with alternating Cl{sub 2} and H{sub 2} exposures has been shown to chemically etch CoFe film that is an integral component in magnetoresistive random access memory (MRAM). Starting with systematic thermodynamic calculations assessing various chemistries and reaction pathways leading to the highest possible vapor pressure of the etch products reactions, the potential chemical combinations were verified by etch rate investigation and surface chemistry analysis in plasma treated CoFe films. An ∼20% enhancement in etch rate was observed with the alternating use of Cl{sub 2} and H{sub 2} plasmas, in comparison with the use of only Cl{sub 2} plasma. This chemical combination was effective in removing metal chloride layers, thus maintaining the desired magnetic properties of the CoFe films. Scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy showed visually and spectroscopically that the metal chloride layers generated by Cl{sub 2} plasma were eliminated with H{sub 2} plasma to yield a clean etch profile. This work suggests that the selected chemistries can be used to etch magnetic metal alloys with a smooth etch profile and this general strategy can be applied to design chemically based etch processes to enable the fabrication of highly integrated nanoscale MRAM devices.

  9. Performance Issues Related to Web Service Usage for Remote Data Access

    SciTech Connect

    Pais, V. F.; Stancalie, V.; Mihailescu, F. A.; Totolici, M. C.

    2008-04-07

    Web services are starting to be widely used in applications for remotely accessing data. This is of special interest for research based on small and medium scale fusion devices, since scientists participating remotely to experiments are accessing large amounts of data over the Internet. Recent tests were conducted to see how the new network traffic, generated by the use of web services, can be integrated in the existing infrastructure and what would be the impact over existing applications, especially those used in a remote participation scenario.

  10. Predicting fluctuations in widespread interest: memory decay and goal-related memory accessibility in internet search trends.

    PubMed

    Masicampo, E J; Ambady, Nalini

    2014-02-01

    Memory and interest respond in similar ways to people's shifting needs and motivations. We therefore tested whether memory and interest might produce similar, observable patterns in people's responses over time. Specifically, the present studies examined whether fluctuations in widespread interest (as measured by Internet search trends) resemble two well-established memory patterns: memory decay and goal-related memory accessibility. We examined national and international events (e.g., Nobel Prize selections, holidays) that produced spikes in widespread interest in certain people and foods. When the events that triggered widespread interest were incidental (e.g., the death of a celebrity), widespread interest conformed to memory decay patterns: It rose quickly, fell slowly according to a power function, and was higher after the event than before it. When the events that triggered widespread interest were goal related (e.g., political elections), widespread interest conformed to patterns of goal-related memory accessibility: It rose slowly, fell quickly according to a sigmoid function, and was lower after the event than before it. Fluctuations in widespread interest over time are thus similar to standard memory patterns observed at the individual level due perhaps to common mechanisms and functions. PMID:23127417

  11. Adult Age Differences in Accessing and Retrieving Information from Long-Term Memory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petros, Thomas V.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Investigated adult age differences in accessing and retrieving information from long-term memory. Results showed that older adults (N=26) were slower than younger adults (N=35) at feature extraction, lexical access, and accessing category information. The age deficit was proportionally greater when retrieval of category information was required.…

  12. Differential effects of dorsal hippocampal inactivation on expression of recent and remote drug and fear memory.

    PubMed

    Raybuck, J D; Lattal, K M

    2014-05-21

    Drugs of abuse generate strong drug-context associations, which can evoke powerful drug cravings that are linked to reinstatement in animal models and to relapse in humans. Work in learning and memory has demonstrated that contextual memories become more distributed over time, shifting from dependence on the hippocampus for retrieval to dependence on cortical structures. Implications for such changes in the structure of memory retrieval to addiction are unknown. Thus, to determine if the passage of time alters the substrates of conditioned place preference (CPP) memory retrieval, we investigated the effects of inactivation of the dorsal hippocampus (DH) with the GABA-A receptor agonist muscimol on expression of recent or remote CPP. We compared these effects with the same manipulation on expression of contextual fear conditioning. DH inactivation produced similar deficits in expression of both recent and remote CPP, but blocked expression of recent but not remote contextual fear memory. We describe the implications of these findings for mechanisms underlying long-term storage of contextual information. PMID:24686177

  13. Remote Student Access to Education via Satellite Delivery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boylan, Colin; Wallace, Andrew; Richmond, Wayne

    2000-01-01

    In response to the expense and unreliability of radio and telephone communications, the New South Wales (Australia) Department of Education and Training undertook a trial of satellite technology to deliver interactive lessons to elementary students in remote areas. The Gilat satellite system developed in Israel is described, including equipment,…

  14. Quantifying Access to Services in Remote and Rural Australia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, Dennis

    Each year commonwealth, state, and territory governments allocate millions of dollars to alleviate differing kinds of disadvantages among local communities in Australia. This paper is concerned with the allocation of resources to remote and rural areas by the Commonwealth Government on a national basis. Current formulas and resource allocation…

  15. Healthcare Access and Health Beliefs of the Indigenous Peoples in Remote Amazonian Peru

    PubMed Central

    Brierley, Charlotte K.; Suarez, Nicolas; Arora, Gitanjli; Graham, Devon

    2014-01-01

    Little is published about the health issues of traditional communities in the remote Peruvian Amazon. This study assessed healthcare access, health perceptions, and beliefs of the indigenous population along the Ampiyacu and Yaguasyacu rivers in north-eastern Peru. One hundred and seventy-nine adult inhabitants of 10 remote settlements attending health clinics were interviewed during a medical services trip in April 2012. Demographics, health status, access to healthcare, health education, sanitation, alcohol use, and smoke exposure were recorded. Our findings indicate that poverty, household overcrowding, and poor sanitation remain commonplace in this group. Furthermore, there are poor levels of health education and on-going barriers to accessing healthcare. Healthcare access and health education remain poor in the remote Peruvian Amazon. This combined with poverty and its sequelae render this population vulnerable to disease. PMID:24277789

  16. Healthcare access and health beliefs of the indigenous peoples in remote Amazonian Peru.

    PubMed

    Brierley, Charlotte K; Suarez, Nicolas; Arora, Gitanjli; Graham, Devon

    2014-01-01

    Little is published about the health issues of traditional communities in the remote Peruvian Amazon. This study assessed healthcare access, health perceptions, and beliefs of the indigenous population along the Ampiyacu and Yaguasyacu rivers in north-eastern Peru. One hundred and seventy-nine adult inhabitants of 10 remote settlements attending health clinics were interviewed during a medical services trip in April 2012. Demographics, health status, access to healthcare, health education, sanitation, alcohol use, and smoke exposure were recorded. Our findings indicate that poverty, household overcrowding, and poor sanitation remain commonplace in this group. Furthermore, there are poor levels of health education and on-going barriers to accessing healthcare. Healthcare access and health education remain poor in the remote Peruvian Amazon. This combined with poverty and its sequelae render this population vulnerable to disease. PMID:24277789

  17. RAPID: A random access picture digitizer, display, and memory system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yakimovsky, Y.; Rayfield, M.; Eskenazi, R.

    1976-01-01

    RAPID is a system capable of providing convenient digital analysis of video data in real-time. It has two modes of operation. The first allows for continuous digitization of an EIA RS-170 video signal. Each frame in the video signal is digitized and written in 1/30 of a second into RAPID's internal memory. The second mode leaves the content of the internal memory independent of the current input video. In both modes of operation the image contained in the memory is used to generate an EIA RS-170 composite video output signal representing the digitized image in the memory so that it can be displayed on a monitor.

  18. Proposal for Fermilab remote access via ISDN (Ver. 1.0)

    SciTech Connect

    Lidinsky, W.P.; Martin, D.E.

    1993-07-02

    Currently, most users at remote sites connect to the Fermilab network via dial-up over analog modems using a dumb terminal or a personal computer emulating a dumb terminal. This level of connectivity is suitable for accessing a single, character-based application. The power of personal computers that are becoming ubiquitous is under-utilized. National HEPnet Management (NHM) has been monitoring and experimenting with remote access via the integrated services digital network (ISDN) for over two years. Members of NHM felt that basic rate ISDN had the potential for providing excellent remote access capability. Initially ISDN was not able to achieve this, but recently the situation has improved. The authors feel that ISDN can now provide, at a remote site such as a user`s home, a computing environment very similar to that which is available at Fermilab. Such an environment can include direct LAN access, windowing systems, graphics, networked file systems, and demanding software applications. This paper proposes using ethernet bridging over ISDN for remote connectivity. With ISDN remote bridging, a remote Macintosh, PC, X-terminal, workstation, or other computer will be transparently connected to the Fermilab LAN. Except for a slight speed difference, the remote machine should function just as if it were on the LAN at Fermilab, with all network services-file sharing, printer sharing, X-windows, etc. - fully available. There are two additional reasons for exploring technologies such as ISDN. First, by mid-decade environmental legislation such as the Federal Clean Air Act of 1990 and Illinois Senate Bill 2177 will likely force increased remote-worker arrangements. Second, recent pilot programs and studies have shown that for many types of work there may be a substantial cost benefits to supporting work away from the site.

  19. Development of Curie point switching for thin film, random access, memory device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, G. W.; Tchernev, D. I.

    1967-01-01

    Managanese bismuthide films are used in the development of a random access memory device of high packing density and nondestructive readout capability. Memory entry is by Curie point switching using a laser beam. Readout is accomplished by microoptical or micromagnetic scanning.

  20. Control of Access to Memory: The Use of Task Interference as a Behavioral Probe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loft, Shayne; Humphreys, Michael S.; Whitney, Susannah J.

    2008-01-01

    Directed forgetting and prospective memory methods were combined to examine differences in the control of memory access. Between studying two lists of target words, participants were either instructed to forget the first list, or to continue remembering the first list. After study participants performed a lexical decision task with an additional…

  1. Efficient teleportation between remote single-atom quantum memories.

    PubMed

    Nölleke, Christian; Neuzner, Andreas; Reiserer, Andreas; Hahn, Carolin; Rempe, Gerhard; Ritter, Stephan

    2013-04-01

    We demonstrate teleportation of quantum bits between two single atoms in distant laboratories. Using a time-resolved photonic Bell-state measurement, we achieve a teleportation fidelity of (88.0 ± 1.5)%, largely determined by our entanglement fidelity. The low photon collection efficiency in free space is overcome by trapping each atom in an optical cavity. The resulting success probability of 0.1% is almost 5 orders of magnitude larger than in previous experiments with remote material qubits. It is mainly limited by photon propagation and detection losses and can be enhanced with a cavity-based deterministic Bell-state measurement. PMID:25166964

  2. Analysis of Solar Census Remote Solar Access Value Calculation Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Nangle, J.; Dean, J.; Van Geet, O.

    2015-03-01

    The costs of photovoltaic (PV) system hardware (PV panels, inverters, racking, etc.) have fallen dramatically over the past few years. Nonhardware (soft) costs, however, have failed to keep pace with the decrease in hardware costs, and soft costs have become a major driver of U.S. PV system prices. Upfront or 'sunken' customer acquisition costs make up a portion of an installation's soft costs and can be addressed through software solutions that aim to streamline sales and system design aspects of customer acquisition. One of the key soft costs associated with sales and system design is collecting information on solar access for a particular site. Solar access, reported in solar access values (SAVs), is a measurement of the available clear sky over a site and is used to characterize the impacts of local shading objects. Historically, onsite shading studies have been required to characterize the SAV of the proposed array and determine the potential energy production of a photovoltaic system.

  3. Remote semantic memory in patients with Korsakoff's syndrome and herpes encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Kopelman, Michael D; Bright, Peter; Fulker, Helena; Hinton, Nicola; Morrison, Amy; Verfaellie, Mieke

    2009-03-01

    Performance of patients with Korsakoff's syndrome and herpes encephalitis was compared on a retrograde amnesia (RA) test, asking subjects to recall and recognize the definitions of words that had come into the language at different time periods. Performance was also compared on a related test in which participants were asked to produce the words to definitions they were given in free recall and cued recall versions. It was hypothesized that, if the temporal gradient in remote memory results from a shift of information from episodic to semantic memory, then there should be a temporal gradient on these tasks, possibly steeper (i.e., greater relative sparing of early memories) in the patients in the Korsakoff group than in the herpes encephalitis group, who have widespread temporal lobe damage. Furthermore, in comparing semantic and episodic remote memory tests, consolidation theory would predict uniform temporal gradients across such tasks, whereas multiple trace theory would predict a differential pattern. The results showed that patients with Korsakoff's syndrome and patients with herpes encephalitis were significantly impaired across all time periods on the vocabulary tests, with only minimal evidence of temporal gradients, relative to healthy participants, and there was no evidence of a differential pattern of impairment between the two patient groups. Comparison with performance on measures of episodic retrograde amnesia, in which there was a differential pattern of temporal gradient, suggests that the relative preservation of early episodic remote memories in patients with Korsakoff's syndrome does not result from an episodic-to-semantic shift in the quality with which memories are stored. These findings are discussed in relation to existing theories of RA and to the patients' underlying patterns of neuropathology. PMID:19254087

  4. Centralized Library and Learning Resources: A Remote Access Demonstration Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shamel, Cynthia L.

    2001-01-01

    Describes a program instituted by a consortium of San Diego County (California) community colleges that provided distance learners with access to library reference services. States that the program included telephone, e-mail, and real time chat service and used an off-site, contract librarian. Reports on variable results. (Contains 8 references.)…

  5. Scaling constraints in nanoelectronic random-access memories.

    PubMed

    Amsinck, Christian J; Di Spigna, Neil H; Nackashi, David P; Franzon, Paul D

    2005-10-01

    Nanoelectronic molecular and magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) MRAM crossbar memory systems have the potential to present significant area advantages (4 to 6F(2)) compared to CMOS-based systems. The scalability of these conductivity-switched RAM arrays is examined by establishing criteria for correct functionality based on the readout margin. Using a combined circuit theoretical modelling and simulation approach, the impact of both the device and interconnect architecture on the scalability of a conductivity-state memory system is quantified. This establishes criteria showing the conditions and on/off ratios for the large-scale integration of molecular devices, guiding molecular device design. With 10% readout margin on the resistive load, a memory device needs to have an on/off ratio of at least 7 to be integrated into a 64 x 64 array, while an on/off ratio of 43 is necessary to scale the memory to 512 x 512. PMID:20818005

  6. The structured memory access architecture: An implementation and performance-evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Cyr, J.B.

    1986-08-01

    The Structured Memory Access (SMS) architecture implementation presented in this thesis is formulated with the intention of alleviating two well-known inefficiencies that exist in current scalar computer architectures: address generation overhead and memory bandwidth utilization. Furthermore, the SMA architecture introduces an additional level of parallelism which is not present in current pipelined supercomputers, namely, overlapped execution of the access process and execute process on two distinct special-purpose, asynchronously-coupled processors. Each processor executes a separate instruction stream to perform its specific task which, together, are functionally equivalent in a conventional program. Our simulation results show that, for typical numerical programs, the access processor (MAP) is capable of achieving slip, i.e., running sufficiently ahead of the execute processor (CP) so that operand fetch requests for data items required by the CP are issued early enough and rapidly enough for the CP rarely to experience any memory access wait time. In this manner the SMA tolerates long memory access time, albeit high bandwidth, paths to memory without sacrificing performance. Speedups relative to the Cray-1 in scalar mode often exceed two, due to dual processing and reductions in memory wait time. 17 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Integration of lead zirconium titanate thin films for high density ferroelectric random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kinam; Lee, Sungyung

    2006-09-01

    Interests are being focused on types of nonvolatile memories such as ferroelectric random access memory (FRAM), phase change random access memory, or magnetoresistance random access memory due to their distinct memory properties such as excellent write performance which conventional nonvolatile memories do not possess. Among these types of nonvolatile memories, FRAM whose cell structure and operation are almost identical to dynamic random access memory (DRAM) can ideally realize cell size and speed of DRAM. Thus FRAM is the most appropriate candidate for future universal memory where all memory functions are performed with a single chip solution. Due to the poor ferroelectric properties of downscaled ultrathin lead zirconium titanate (PZT) capacitors as well as technical issues such as hydrogen and plasma related degradation arising from embedding ferroelectric metal-insulator-metal capacitors into conventional complementary metal oxide semiconductor processes, current FRAM still falls far below its ideally attainable cell size and performance. In this paper, based upon PZT capacitor, current mass-productive one pass transistor and one storage capacitor (1T1C), capacitor over bit line (COB) cell technologies are introduced upon which cell size of 0.937μm2 at 250nm minimum feature size technology node has been realized. And then, most recent 1T1C, COB cell technologies are discussed from which cell size of 0.27μm2 at 150nm minimum feature size technology node has been realized, and finally future three dimensional capacitor technologies for the FRAM with cell size of less than 0.08μm2 beyond 100nm minimum feature size technology node are suggested.

  8. Dynamic Optical Gratings Accessed by Reversible Shape Memory.

    PubMed

    Tippets, Cary A; Li, Qiaoxi; Fu, Yulan; Donev, Eugenii U; Zhou, Jing; Turner, Sara A; Jackson, Anne-Martine S; Ashby, Valerie Sheares; Sheiko, Sergei S; Lopez, Rene

    2015-07-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) have been shown to accurately replicate photonic structures that produce tunable optical responses, but in practice, these responses are limited by the irreversibility of conventional shape memory processes. Here, we report the intensity modulation of a diffraction grating utilizing two-way reversible shape changes. Reversible shifting of the grating height was accomplished through partial melting and recrystallization of semicrystalline poly(octylene adipate). The concurrent variations of the grating shape and diffraction intensity were monitored via atomic force microscopy and first order diffraction measurements, respectively. A maximum reversibility of the diffraction intensity of 36% was repeatable over multiple cycles. To that end, the reversible shape memory process is shown to broaden the functionality of SMP-based optical devices. PMID:26081101

  9. High speed magneto-resistive random access memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jiin-Chuan (Inventor); Stadler, Henry L. (Inventor); Katti, Romney R. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A high speed read MRAM memory element is configured from a sandwich of magnetizable, ferromagnetic film surrounding a magneto-resistive film which may be ferromagnetic or not. One outer ferromagnetic film has a higher coercive force than the other and therefore remains magnetized in one sense while the other may be switched in sense by a switching magnetic field. The magneto-resistive film is therefore sensitive to the amplitude of the resultant field between the outer ferromagnetic films and may be constructed of a high resistivity, high magneto-resistive material capable of higher sensing currents. This permits higher read voltages and therefore faster read operations. Alternate embodiments with perpendicular anisotropy, and in-plane anisotropy are shown, including an embodiment which uses high permeability guides to direct the closing flux path through the magneto-resistive material. High density, high speed, radiation hard, memory matrices may be constructed from these memory elements.

  10. Remote access and operation of telescopes by the scientific users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, P. G.; Amy, S.; Brodrick, D.; Carretti, E.; Hoyle, S.; Indermuehle, B.; McConnell, D.; Mader, S.; Mirtschin, P.; Preisig, B.; Smith, M.; Stevens, J.; Wark, R.; Wieringa, M.; Wu, X.

    2014-08-01

    The Australia Telescope National Facility operates three radio telescopes: the Parkes 64m Telescope, the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), and the Mopra 22m Telescope. Scientific operation of all these is conducted by members of the investigating teams rather than by professional operators. All three can now be accessed and controlled from any location served by the internet, the telescopes themselves being unattended for part or all of the time. Here we describe the rationale, advantages, and means of implementing this operational model.

  11. Coupling Prefix Caching and Collective Downloads for Remote Data Access

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Xiaosong; Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S; Freeh, Vincent W; Simon, Tyler A; Yang, Tao; Scott, Stephen L

    2006-01-01

    Scientific datasets are typically archived at mass storage systems or data centers close to supercomputers/instruments. Endusers of these datasets, however, usually perform parts of their workflows at their local computers. In such cases, client-side caching can offer significant gains by reducing the cost of widearea data movement. Scientific data caches, however, traditionally cache entire datasets, which may not be necessary. In this paper, we propose a novel combination of prefix caching and collective download. Prefix caching allows the bootstrapping of dataset downloads by caching only a prefix of the dataset, while collective download facilitates efficient parallel patching of the missing suffix from an external data source. To estimate the optimal prefix size, we further present an analytical model that considers both the initial download overhead and the downloading speed. We implemented our proposed approach in the FreeLoader distributed cache prototype. Experimental results (using multiple scientific data repositories and data transfer tools, as well as a real-world scientific dataset access trace) demonstrate that prefix caching and collective download can be implemented efficiently, our model can select an appropriate prefix size, and the cache hit rate can be improved significantly without hurting the local access rate of cached datasets.

  12. Remote access to crystallography beamlines at SSRL: novel tools for training, education and collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Clyde A.; Card, Graeme L.; Cohen, Aina E.; Doukov, Tzanko I.; Eriksson, Thomas; Gonzalez, Ana M.; McPhillips, Scott E.; Dunten, Pete W.; Mathews, Irimpan I.; Song, Jinhu; Soltis, S. Michael

    2010-01-01

    For the past five years, the Structural Molecular Biology group at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) has provided general users of the facility with fully remote access to the macromolecular crystallography beamlines. This was made possible by implementing fully automated beamlines with a flexible control system and an intuitive user interface, and by the development of the robust and efficient Stanford automated mounting robotic sample-changing system. The ability to control a synchrotron beamline remotely from the comfort of the home laboratory has set a new paradigm for the collection of high-quality X-ray diffraction data and has fostered new collaborative research, whereby a number of remote users from different institutions can be connected at the same time to the SSRL beamlines. The use of remote access has revolutionized the way in which scientists interact with synchrotron beamlines and collect diffraction data, and has also triggered a shift in the way crystallography students are introduced to synchrotron data collection and trained in the best methods for collecting high-quality data. SSRL provides expert crystallographic and engineering staff, state-of-the-art crystallography beamlines, and a number of accessible tools to facilitate data collection and in-house remote training, and encourages the use of these facilities for education, training, outreach and collaborative research. PMID:22184477

  13. Hybrid Flexible Resistive Random Access Memory-Gated Transistor for Novel Nonvolatile Data Storage.

    PubMed

    Han, Su-Ting; Zhou, Ye; Chen, Bo; Wang, Chundong; Zhou, Li; Yan, Yan; Zhuang, Jiaqing; Sun, Qijun; Zhang, Hua; Roy, V A L

    2016-01-20

    Here, a single-device demonstration of novel hybrid architecture is reported to achieve programmable transistor nodes which have analogies to flash memory by incorporating a resistive switching random access memory (RRAM) device as a resistive switch gate for field effect transistor (FET) on a flexible substrate. A high performance flexible RRAM with a three-layered structure is fabricated by utilizing solution-processed MoS2 nanosheets sandwiched between poly(methyl methacrylate) polymer layers. Gate coupling with the pentacene-based transistor can be controlled by the RRAM memory state to produce a nonprogrammed state (inactive) and a programmed state (active) with a well-defined memory window. Compared to the reference flash memory device based on the MoS2 floating gate, the hybrid device presents robust access speed and retention ability. Furthermore, the hybrid RRAM-gated FET is used to build an integrated logic circuit and a wide logic window in inverter logic is achieved. The controllable, well-defined memory window, long retention time, and fast access speed of this novel hybrid device may open up new possibilities of realizing fully functional nonvolatile memory for high-performance flexible electronics. PMID:26578160

  14. Asymmetrical access to color and location in visual working memory.

    PubMed

    Rajsic, Jason; Wilson, Daryl E

    2014-10-01

    Models of visual working memory (VWM) have benefitted greatly from the use of the delayed-matching paradigm. However, in this task, the ability to recall a probed feature is confounded with the ability to maintain the proper binding between the feature that is to be reported and the feature (typically location) that is used to cue a particular item for report. Given that location is typically used as a cue-feature, we used the delayed-estimation paradigm to compare memory for location to memory for color, rotating which feature was used as a cue and which was reported. Our results revealed several novel findings: 1) the likelihood of reporting a probed object's feature was superior when reporting location with a color cue than when reporting color with a location cue; 2) location report errors were composed entirely of swap errors, with little to no random location reports; and 3) both colour and location reports greatly benefitted from the presence of nonprobed items at test. This last finding suggests that it is uncertainty over the bindings between locations and colors at memory retrieval that drive swap errors, not at encoding. We interpret our findings as consistent with a representational architecture that nests remembered object features within remembered locations. PMID:25190322

  15. Universal Access to Preschool Education: Approaches to Integrating Preschool with School in Rural and Remote Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dockett, Sue; Perry, Bob

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, the government of South Australia responded to Federal agreements aimed at universal access to preschool education for children in the year before starting formal schooling by introducing a trial designed to "integrate" preschool children into first year of school programmes in rural and remote areas of the state. This paper…

  16. Access when and where They Want It: Using EZproxy to Serve Our Remote Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Peg

    2009-01-01

    In these days of distance learners, virtual libraries, and electronic information, no library can be without some way of providing remote access to affiliated users, whether they are distance students, online students, or local students and faculty members working from home. Libraries subscribe to any number of electronic resources and journals,…

  17. Involvement of the Anterior Cingulate Cortex in Formation, Consolidation, and Reconsolidation of Recent and Remote Contextual Fear Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Einarsson, Einar O.; Nader, Karim

    2012-01-01

    It has been suggested that memories become more stable and less susceptible to the disruption of reconsolidation over weeks after learning. Here, we test this by targeting the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and test its involvement in the formation, consolidation, and reconsolidation of recent and remote contextual fear memory. We found that…

  18. Remote access to ACNUC nucleotide and protein sequence databases at PBIL.

    PubMed

    Gouy, Manolo; Delmotte, Stéphane

    2008-04-01

    The ACNUC biological sequence database system provides powerful and fast query and extraction capabilities to a variety of nucleotide and protein sequence databases. The collection of ACNUC databases served by the Pôle Bio-Informatique Lyonnais includes the EMBL, GenBank, RefSeq and UniProt nucleotide and protein sequence databases and a series of other sequence databases that support comparative genomics analyses: HOVERGEN and HOGENOM containing families of homologous protein-coding genes from vertebrate and prokaryotic genomes, respectively; Ensembl and Genome Reviews for analyses of prokaryotic and of selected eukaryotic genomes. This report describes the main features of the ACNUC system and the access to ACNUC databases from any internet-connected computer. Such access was made possible by the definition of a remote ACNUC access protocol and the implementation of Application Programming Interfaces between the C, Python and R languages and this communication protocol. Two retrieval programs for ACNUC databases, Query_win, with a graphical user interface and raa_query, with a command line interface, are also described. Altogether, these bioinformatics tools provide users with either ready-to-use means of querying remote sequence databases through a variety of selection criteria, or a simple way to endow application programs with an extensive access to these databases. Remote access to ACNUC databases is open to all and fully documented (http://pbil.univ-lyon1.fr/databases/acnuc/acnuc.html). PMID:17825976

  19. Chronic ethanol consumption impairs spatial remote memory in rats but does not affect cortical cholinergic parameters.

    PubMed

    Pereira, S R; Menezes, G A; Franco, G C; Costa, A E; Ribeiro, A M

    1998-06-01

    We have studied learning, memory and cortical cholinergic parameters after oral administration of 20% v/v ethanol solution to male Fisher rats for 6 months. A group of rats were trained to behave efficiently in an eight-arm radial maze and after that split into two subgroups submitted to ethanol or control treatment. Ethanol-treated rats had more difficulty in relearning the same task 1 year later, compared to ethanol-untreated rats (control). Differences in working memory performance were found, but only in the first 10 training sessions. Another group of rats, which had not been pretrained, was also split into two subgroups submitted to ethanol or control treatment. After that, these rats were trained in the radial maze task for the first time. No significant difference was found between the reference memory performance of the untreated subgroup and the treated one. These two subgroups did not significantly differ in their working memory performance either. Moreover, there were no significant differences between treated and control subjects in the following biochemical brain cortical parameters: in vitro acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, and stimulated acetylcholine (ACh) release. This work presents an experimental design that allows assessment of remote memory performance after ethanol chronic consumption and shows that the experimental subject is able to retain the behaviors learned 1 year before. It was concluded that chronic ethanol treatment may cause retrograde amnesia, which does not seem to be linked with a cortical cholinergic deficit. PMID:9632211

  20. Histone H2A.Z subunit exchange controls consolidation of recent and remote memory.

    PubMed

    Zovkic, Iva B; Paulukaitis, Brynna S; Day, Jeremy J; Etikala, Deepa M; Sweatt, J David

    2014-11-27

    Memory formation is a multi-stage process that initially requires cellular consolidation in the hippocampus, after which memories are downloaded to the cortex for maintenance, in a process termed systems consolidation. Epigenetic mechanisms regulate both types of consolidation, but histone variant exchange, in which canonical histones are replaced with their variant counterparts, is an entire branch of epigenetics that has received limited attention in the brain and has never, to our knowledge, been studied in relation to cognitive function. Here we show that histone H2A.Z, a variant of histone H2A, is actively exchanged in response to fear conditioning in the hippocampus and the cortex, where it mediates gene expression and restrains the formation of recent and remote memory. Our data provide evidence for H2A.Z involvement in cognitive function and specifically implicate H2A.Z as a negative regulator of hippocampal consolidation and systems consolidation, probably through downstream effects on gene expression. Moreover, alterations in H2A.Z binding at later stages of systems consolidation suggest that this histone has the capacity to mediate stable molecular modifications required for memory retention. Overall, our data introduce histone variant exchange as a novel mechanism contributing to the molecular basis of cognitive function and implicate H2A.Z as a potential therapeutic target for memory disorders. PMID:25219850

  1. Phase-change Random Access Memory: A Scalable Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Raoux, S.; Burr, G; Breitwisch, M; Rettner, C; Chen, Y; Shelby, R; Salinga, M; Krebs, D; Chen, S; Lung, H

    2008-01-01

    Nonvolatile RAM using resistance contrast in phase-change materials [or phase-change RAM (PCRAM)] is a promising technology for future storage-class memory. However, such a technology can succeed only if it can scale smaller in size, given the increasingly tiny memory cells that are projected for future technology nodes (i.e., generations). We first discuss the critical aspects that may affect the scaling of PCRAM, including materials properties, power consumption during programming and read operations, thermal cross-talk between memory cells, and failure mechanisms. We then discuss experiments that directly address the scaling properties of the phase-change materials themselves, including studies of phase transitions in both nanoparticles and ultrathin films as a function of particle size and film thickness. This work in materials directly motivated the successful creation of a series of prototype PCRAM devices, which have been fabricated and tested at phase-change material cross-sections with extremely small dimensions as low as 3 nm x 20 nm. These device measurements provide a clear demonstration of the excellent scaling potential offered by this technology, and they are also consistent with the scaling behavior predicted by extensive device simulations. Finally, we discuss issues of device integration and cell design, manufacturability, and reliability.

  2. Optical interconnection network for parallel access to multi-rank memory in future computing systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kang; Gu, Huaxi; Yang, Yintang; Wang, Kun

    2015-08-10

    With the number of cores increasing, there is an emerging need for a high-bandwidth low-latency interconnection network, serving core-to-memory communication. In this paper, aiming at the goal of simultaneous access to multi-rank memory, we propose an optical interconnection network for core-to-memory communication. In the proposed network, the wavelength usage is delicately arranged so that cores can communicate with different ranks at the same time and broadcast for flow control can be achieved. A distributed memory controller architecture that works in a pipeline mode is also designed for efficient optical communication and transaction address processes. The scaling method and wavelength assignment for the proposed network are investigated. Compared with traditional electronic bus-based core-to-memory communication, the simulation results based on the PARSEC benchmark show that the bandwidth enhancement and latency reduction are apparent. PMID:26367901

  3. Spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory technologies for normally off computing (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, K. Yuasa, S.; Fujita, S.; Ito, J.; Yoda, H.; Suzuki, Y.; Nakatani, Y.; Miyazaki, T.

    2014-05-07

    Most parts of present computer systems are made of volatile devices, and the power to supply them to avoid information loss causes huge energy losses. We can eliminate this meaningless energy loss by utilizing the non-volatile function of advanced spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory (STT-MRAM) technology and create a new type of computer, i.e., normally off computers. Critical tasks to achieve normally off computers are implementations of STT-MRAM technologies in the main memory and low-level cache memories. STT-MRAM technology for applications to the main memory has been successfully developed by using perpendicular STT-MRAMs, and faster STT-MRAM technologies for applications to the cache memory are now being developed. The present status of STT-MRAMs and challenges that remain for normally off computers are discussed.

  4. Evaluating existing access opportunities for disabled persons at remote shoreline recreation sites

    SciTech Connect

    Bley, M.R.; Kearns, M.T.

    1995-12-31

    Draft guidelines for providing outdoor recreation access opportunities for disabled persons have been recommended by the Recreation Access Advisory Committee and in the Universal Access to Outdoor Recreation: A Design Guide. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission requires applicants for new hydropower licenses to consider access opportunities for disabled persons at existing hydropower projects. A process for evaluating existing access opportunities for disabled persons at remote shoreline recreation sites at hydropower projects is described. The process includes five steps: (1) preparing a preliminary map of existing recreation sites; (2) data collection in the field; (3) evaluating compliance of existing facilities; (4) feasibility of enhancing existing facilities; and (5) designing enhancements. The process will be refined when final standards and processes are approved by the appropriate agencies and organizations.

  5. A packetised remote visual access data system for space station interactive payload operations.

    PubMed

    Carvell, R P

    1987-09-01

    Potential users of the pressurised Columbus elements, (the Attached Pressurised Module and the Man-Tended Free Flyer), were consulted in order to establish the requirements necessary to achieve effective and efficient remote interactive payload operations. These are briefly described and clearly indicate that the key to such operations is a versatile remote visual access (video) system which is well-tuned to the requirements of the users in both the on-board and ground segments. A packetised remote visual access data system is proposed which accommodates these requirements and offers a very flexible operational environment. It incorporates a scheme for optimising users' remote visual access to their experiments. Methods of implementing the necessary multiplexing and compression aspects of the system are discussed. A scheme for centralized on-board monitoring, which is complicated by the wide range of video sources required by the users, is outlined and aspects of the ground segment, in particular the problem is link delays, are considered. PMID:11542957

  6. Accessing and Utilizing Remote Sensing Data for Vectorborne Infectious Diseases Surveillance and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiang, Richard; Adimi, Farida; Kempler, Steven

    2008-01-01

    Background: The transmission of vectorborne infectious diseases is often influenced by environmental, meteorological and climatic parameters, because the vector life cycle depends on these factors. For example, the geophysical parameters relevant to malaria transmission include precipitation, surface temperature, humidity, elevation, and vegetation type. Because these parameters are routinely measured by satellites, remote sensing is an important technological tool for predicting, preventing, and containing a number of vectorborne infectious diseases, such as malaria, dengue, West Nile virus, etc. Methods: A variety of NASA remote sensing data can be used for modeling vectorborne infectious disease transmission. We will discuss both the well known and less known remote sensing data, including Landsat, AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer), MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer), TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission), ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer), EO-1 (Earth Observing One) ALI (Advanced Land Imager), and SIESIP (Seasonal to Interannual Earth Science Information Partner) dataset. Giovanni is a Web-based application developed by the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center. It provides a simple and intuitive way to visualize, analyze, and access vast amounts of Earth science remote sensing data. After remote sensing data is obtained, a variety of techniques, including generalized linear models and artificial intelligence oriented methods, t 3 can be used to model the dependency of disease transmission on these parameters. Results: The processes of accessing, visualizing and utilizing precipitation data using Giovanni, and acquiring other data at additional websites are illustrated. Malaria incidence time series for some parts of Thailand and Indonesia are used to demonstrate that malaria incidences are reasonably well modeled with generalized linear models and artificial

  7. Prenatal Stress Produces Persistence of Remote Memory and Disrupts Functional Connectivity in the Hippocampal-Prefrontal Cortex Axis.

    PubMed

    Negrón-Oyarzo, Ignacio; Neira, David; Espinosa, Nelson; Fuentealba, Pablo; Aboitiz, Francisco

    2015-09-01

    Prenatal stress is a risk factor for the development of neuropsychiatric disorders, many of which are commonly characterized by an increased persistence of aversive remote memory. Here, we addressed the effect of prenatal stress on both memory consolidation and functional connectivity in the hippocampal-prefrontal cortex axis, a dynamical interplay that is critical for mnemonic processing. Pregnant mice of the C57BL6 strain were subjected to restraint stressed during the last week of pregnancy, and male offspring were behaviorally tested at adulthood for recent and remote spatial memory performance in the Barnes Maze test under an aversive context. Prenatal stress did not affect the acquisition or recall of recent memory. In contrast, it produced the persistence of remote spatial memory. Memory persistence was not associated with alterations in major network rhythms, such as hippocampal sharp-wave ripples (SWRs) or neocortical spindles. Instead, it was associated with a large decrease in the basal discharge activity of identified principal neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) as measured in urethane anesthetized mice. Furthermore, functional connectivity was disrupted, as the temporal coupling between neuronal discharge in the mPFC and hippocampal SWRs was decreased by prenatal stress. These results could be relevant to understand the biological basis of the persistence of aversive remote memories in stress-related disorders. PMID:24860018

  8. Knowledge Accessibility, Achievement Goals, and Memory Strategy Maintenance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Escribe, Christian; Huet, Nathalie

    2005-01-01

    Background: An important aim of educational psychology is to account for the difficulties in cognitive strategy maintenance. Possible explanations may be found in developmental studies concerning the interdependence of knowledge accessibility and strategy use, and in current achievement goal models which assume that individuals with a learning…

  9. Program partitioning for NUMA multiprocessor computer systems. [Nonuniform memory access

    SciTech Connect

    Wolski, R.M.; Feo, J.T. )

    1993-11-01

    Program partitioning and scheduling are essential steps in programming non-shared-memory computer systems. Partitioning is the separation of program operations into sequential tasks, and scheduling is the assignment of tasks to processors. To be effective, automatic methods require an accurate representation of the model of computation and the target architecture. Current partitioning methods assume today's most prevalent models -- macro dataflow and a homogeneous/two-level multicomputer system. Based on communication channels, neither model represents well the emerging class of NUMA multiprocessor computer systems consisting of hierarchical read/write memories. Consequently, the partitions generated by extant methods do not execute well on these systems. In this paper, the authors extend the conventional graph representation of the macro-dataflow model to enable mapping heuristics to consider the complex communication options supported by NUMA architectures. They describe two such heuristics. Simulated execution times of program graphs show that the model and heuristics generate higher quality program mappings than current methods for NUMA architectures.

  10. Electrical Evaluation of RCA MWS5501D Random Access Memory, Volume 2, Appendix a

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klute, A.

    1979-01-01

    The electrical characterization and qualification test results are presented for the RCA MWS5001D random access memory. The tests included functional tests, AC and DC parametric tests, AC parametric worst-case pattern selection test, determination of worst-case transition for setup and hold times, and a series of schmoo plots. The address access time, address readout time, the data hold time, and the data setup time are some of the results surveyed.

  11. Remote light energy harvesting and actuation using shape memory alloy—piezoelectric hybrid transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avirovik, Dragan; Kumar, Ashok; Bodnar, Robert J.; Priya, Shashank

    2013-05-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) exhibit a memory effect which causes the alloy to return to its original shape when heated beyond the transformation temperature. In this study, we show that SMA can be heated remotely by laser and the resulting deformation can be converted into electricity through a piezoelectric bimorph. In addition, the laser actuated SMA deformation can also be used to provide controlled actuation. We provide experimental results demonstrating both the power harvesting and actuation behavior as a function of laser pulse rate. SMA used in this study exhibited higher absorption in the ultraviolet region which progressively decreased as the absorption wavelength increased. Raman analysis revealed TiO2 formation on the surface of SMA, whose concentration increased irreversibly with temperature. Negligible changes in the surface oxidation were detected in the working temperature range (<150 °C).

  12. Quantifying Access Disadvantage and Gathering Information in Rural and Remote Localities: The Griffith Service Access Frame.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, Dennis A.

    2003-01-01

    A purely geographic classification is not the best way to measure rural disadvantage in Australia. A service access model is described that incorporates the following elements: population center size; distance, time, and cost of travel to the service center; and a measure of the economic capacity of residents to overcome the cost of travel.…

  13. Remote access to neurosurgical ICU physiological data using the World Wide Web.

    PubMed

    Nenov, V; Klopp, J

    1996-01-01

    There is a significant demand by physicians and clinical researchers for remote access to continuously acquired physiological patient data. Until recently such access was technically unfeasible. However, with the recent development of Internet-based World Wide Web (WWW) client/server applications and underlying communication protocols, there is now a real possibility for the development of cost-effective, platform independent solutions to this problem. We have devised a way using existing WWW tools and minimal startup costs to provide access to current as well as previously acquired physiological patient data. Physicians and clinical researchers can obtain access to these data through personal computers located in the office, at home or even through portable computers while traveling to conferences or while on vacation. PMID:10163756

  14. Increasing Access and Usability of Remote Sensing Data: The NASA Protected Area Archive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geller, Gary N.

    2004-01-01

    Although remote sensing data are now widely available, much of it at low or no-cost, many managers of protected conservation areas do not have the expertise or tools to view or analyze it. Thus access to it by the protected area management community is effectively blocked. The Protected Area Archive will increase access to remote sensing data by creating collections of satellite images of protected areas and packaging them with simple-to-use visualization and analytical tools. The user can easily locate the area and image of interest on a map, then display, roam, and zoom the image. A set of simple tools will be provided so the user can explore the data and employ it to assist in management and monitoring of their area. The 'Phase 1 ' version requires only a Windows-based computer and basic computer skills, and may be of particular help to protected area managers in developing countries.

  15. Remotely amplified combined ring-tree dense access network architecture using reflective RSOA-based ONU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazaro, Jose A.; Bock, Carlos; Polo, Victor; Martinez, Reynaldo I.; Prat, Josep

    2007-06-01

    A highly scalable access architecture achieving high density and featuring resiliency, centralized light-generation control, remote amplification, and colorless optical network unit with reflective semiconductor optical amplifier (RSOA) for upstream modulation is presented and experimentally demonstrated. It is based on a user-single-fiber completely passive outside plant and provides broadband connections to >1000 users distributed along large distances. It is believed to represent an intermediate step toward metro-access convergence and offers flexible configurations covering high- and low-density population areas.

  16. Making Physical Activity Accessible to Older Adults with Memory Loss: A Feasibility Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logsdon, Rebecca G.; McCurry, Susan M.; Pike, Kenneth C.; Teri, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: For individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), memory loss may prevent successful engagement in exercise, a key factor in preventing additional disability. The Resources and Activities for Life Long Independence (RALLI) program uses behavioral principles to make exercise more accessible for these individuals. Exercises are broken…

  17. 77 FR 26789 - Certain Semiconductor Chips Having Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory Controllers and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-07

    ... violation of section 337 in the infringement of certain patents. 73 FR 75131. The principal respondent was... order. 75 FR 44989-90 (July 30, 2010). The Commission also issued cease and desist orders against those... COMMISSION Certain Semiconductor Chips Having Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory Controllers...

  18. 76 FR 2336 - Dynamic Random Access Memory Semiconductors From the Republic of Korea: Final Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-13

    ...On September 14, 2010, the Department of Commerce published in the Federal Register its preliminary results of administrative review of the countervailing duty order on dynamic random access memory semiconductors from the Republic of Korea for the period January 1, 2008, through August 10, 2008. We provided interested parties with an opportunity to comment on the preliminary results. Our......

  19. Fencing direct memory access data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Blocksome, Michael A.; Mamidala, Amith R.

    2013-09-03

    Fencing direct memory access (`DMA`) data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI including data communications endpoints, each endpoint including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, the endpoints coupled for data communications through the PAMI and through DMA controllers operatively coupled to segments of shared random access memory through which the DMA controllers deliver data communications deterministically, including initiating execution through the PAMI of an ordered sequence of active DMA instructions for DMA data transfers between two endpoints, effecting deterministic DMA data transfers through a DMA controller and a segment of shared memory; and executing through the PAMI, with no FENCE accounting for DMA data transfers, an active FENCE instruction, the FENCE instruction completing execution only after completion of all DMA instructions initiated prior to execution of the FENCE instruction for DMA data transfers between the two endpoints.

  20. Fencing direct memory access data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Blocksome, Michael A; Mamidala, Amith R

    2014-02-11

    Fencing direct memory access (`DMA`) data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI including data communications endpoints, each endpoint including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, the endpoints coupled for data communications through the PAMI and through DMA controllers operatively coupled to segments of shared random access memory through which the DMA controllers deliver data communications deterministically, including initiating execution through the PAMI of an ordered sequence of active DMA instructions for DMA data transfers between two endpoints, effecting deterministic DMA data transfers through a DMA controller and a segment of shared memory; and executing through the PAMI, with no FENCE accounting for DMA data transfers, an active FENCE instruction, the FENCE instruction completing execution only after completion of all DMA instructions initiated prior to execution of the FENCE instruction for DMA data transfers between the two endpoints.

  1. Robotic observatories. A handbook of remote-access personal-computer astronomy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genet, R. M.; Hayes, D. S.; Epand, D. H.; Boyd, L. J.; Keller, D. F.

    Contents: 1. Astronomy while you sleep. 2. Remote-access automatic telescopes. 3. The next step. 4. Automatic telescopes in space. 5. An automatic observatory system. 6. Automatic telescopes. 7. Telescope control. 8. Instruments for automatic telescopes. 9. CCD cameras. 10. Automatic observatories. 11. Manual telescope control. 12. Automatic telescope instruction set (ATIS). 13. Automatic telescope control. 14. Differential photometry file generator. 15. Differential photometry data reduction. 16. Quality-control photometry.

  2. 75 FR 20564 - Dynamic Random Access Memory Semiconductors from the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time Limit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-20

    ... Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Administrative Reviews and Requests for Revocation in Part, 74 FR 48224... International Trade Administration Dynamic Random Access Memory Semiconductors from the Republic of Korea... administrative review of the countervailing duty order on dynamic random access memory semiconductors from...

  3. 75 FR 44283 - In the Matter of Certain Dynamic Random Access Memory Semiconductors and Products Containing Same...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-28

    ... America Corp. of Milpitas, California (collectively ``complainants''). 75 FR 14467-68 (March 25, 2010... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Dynamic Random Access Memory Semiconductors and Products Containing Same... within the United States after importation of certain dynamic random access memory semiconductors...

  4. Shared direct memory access on the Explorer 2-LX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musgrave, Jeffrey L.

    1990-01-01

    Advances in Expert System technology and Artificial Intelligence have provided a framework for applying automated Intelligence to the solution of problems which were generally perceived as intractable using more classical approaches. As a result, hybrid architectures and parallel processing capability have become more common in computing environments. The Texas Instruments Explorer II-LX is an example of a machine which combines a symbolic processing environment, and a computationally oriented environment in a single chassis for integrated problem solutions. This user's manual is an attempt to make these capabilities more accessible to a wider range of engineers and programmers with problems well suited to solution in such an environment.

  5. Functional neuroanatomy of remote episodic, semantic and spatial memory: a unified account based on multiple trace theory

    PubMed Central

    Moscovitch, Morris; Rosenbaum, R Shayna; Gilboa, Asaf; Addis, Donna Rose; Westmacott, Robyn; Grady, Cheryl; McAndrews, Mary Pat; Levine, Brian; Black, Sandra; Winocur, Gordon; Nadel, Lynn

    2005-01-01

    We review lesion and neuroimaging evidence on the role of the hippocampus, and other structures, in retention and retrieval of recent and remote memories. We examine episodic, semantic and spatial memory, and show that important distinctions exist among different types of these memories and the structures that mediate them. We argue that retention and retrieval of detailed, vivid autobiographical memories depend on the hippocampal system no matter how long ago they were acquired. Semantic memories, on the other hand, benefit from hippocampal contribution for some time before they can be retrieved independently of the hippocampus. Even semantic memories, however, can have episodic elements associated with them that continue to depend on the hippocampus. Likewise, we distinguish between experientially detailed spatial memories (akin to episodic memory) and more schematic memories (akin to semantic memory) that are sufficient for navigation but not for re-experiencing the environment in which they were acquired. Like their episodic and semantic counterparts, the former type of spatial memory is dependent on the hippocampus no matter how long ago it was acquired, whereas the latter can survive independently of the hippocampus and is represented in extra-hippocampal structures. In short, the evidence reviewed suggests strongly that the function of the hippocampus (and possibly that of related limbic structures) is to help encode, retain, and retrieve experiences, no matter how long ago the events comprising the experience occurred, and no matter whether the memories are episodic or spatial. We conclude that the evidence favours a multiple trace theory (MTT) of memory over two other models: (1) traditional consolidation models which posit that the hippocampus is a time-limited memory structure for all forms of memory; and (2) versions of cognitive map theory which posit that the hippocampus is needed for representing all forms of allocentric space in memory. PMID

  6. Remote Use of CD-ROM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzwater, Diana; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Describes the use of a telecommunications program called "PC Anywhere" to afford users remote access to compact disc ready-only-memory (CD-ROM) systems. Describes hardware requirements and benefits to libraries and users. (DMM)

  7. Primary health care accessibility challenges in remote indigenous communities in Canada's North

    PubMed Central

    Oosterveer, Tim Michiel; Kue Young, T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite many improvements, health disparities between indigenous and non-indigenous populations in Canada's North persist. While a strong primary health care (PHC) system improves the health of a population, the majority of indigenous communities are very remote, and their access to PHC services is likely reduced. Understanding the challenges in accessing PHC services in these communities is necessary to improve the health of the population. Objective The objective of the study was to document and analyze the challenges in accessing PHC services by indigenous people in remote communities in Canada's Northwest Territories (NWT) from the perspectives of users and providers of PHC services. Methods Using explorative, qualitative methods, our study involved 14 semi-structured interviews with PHC service providers (SPs) and service users (SUs) in 5 communities across the NWT which varied according to population, remoteness, ethnic composition and health care resources. The interview guide was developed after key informant consultations. Results Both SPs and SUs understood the constraints in providing equitable access to PHC services in remote communities. The provision of emergency care was found to be particularly challenging, because of the lack of qualified staff in the community and the dependence on aeromedical evacuations. Wider dissemination of first aid skills among community members was seen to cover some gaps and also increase self-confidence. For non-emergency care, the need to travel outside the community was generally disliked. All recognized the need for more preventive services which were often postponed or delayed because of the overwhelming demand for acute care. As long as services were provided in a community, the satisfaction was high among SUs. SPs appreciated the orientation they received and the ability to build rapport with the community. Conclusions Northern SUs and SPs generally acknowledge the health consequences of living in remote

  8. Grey and White Matter Correlates of Recent and Remote Autobiographical Memory Retrieval – Insights from the Dementias

    PubMed Central

    Irish, Muireann; Hornberger, Michael; El Wahsh, Shadi; Lam, Bonnie Y. K.; Lah, Suncica; Miller, Laurie; Hsieh, Sharpley; Hodges, John R.; Piguet, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The capacity to remember self-referential past events relies on the integrity of a distributed neural network. Controversy exists, however, regarding the involvement of specific brain structures for the retrieval of recently experienced versus more distant events. Here, we explored how characteristic patterns of atrophy in neurodegenerative disorders differentially disrupt remote versus recent autobiographical memory. Eleven behavioural-variant frontotemporal dementia, 10 semantic dementia, 15 Alzheimer's disease patients and 14 healthy older Controls completed the Autobiographical Interview. All patient groups displayed significant remote memory impairments relative to Controls. Similarly, recent period retrieval was significantly compromised in behavioural-variant frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer's disease, yet semantic dementia patients scored in line with Controls. Voxel-based morphometry and diffusion tensor imaging analyses, for all participants combined, were conducted to investigate grey and white matter correlates of remote and recent autobiographical memory retrieval. Neural correlates common to both recent and remote time periods were identified, including the hippocampus, medial prefrontal, and frontopolar cortices, and the forceps minor and left hippocampal portion of the cingulum bundle. Regions exclusively implicated in each time period were also identified. The integrity of the anterior temporal cortices was related to the retrieval of remote memories, whereas the posterior cingulate cortex emerged as a structure significantly associated with recent autobiographical memory retrieval. This study represents the first investigation of the grey and white matter correlates of remote and recent autobiographical memory retrieval in neurodegenerative disorders. Our findings demonstrate the importance of core brain structures, including the medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, irrespective of time period, and point towards the contribution of

  9. Fast-earth: A global image caching architecture for fast access to remote-sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbot, B. G.; Talbot, L. M.

    We introduce Fast-Earth, a novel server architecture that enables rapid access to remote sensing data. Fast-Earth subdivides a WGS-84 model of the earth into small 400 × 400 meter regions with fixed locations, called plats. The resulting 3,187,932,913 indexed plats are accessed with a rapid look-up algorithm. Whereas many traditional databases store large original images as a series by collection time, requiring long searches and slow access times for user queries, the Fast-Earth architecture enables rapid access. We have prototyped a system in conjunction with a Fast-Responder mobile app to demonstrate and evaluate the concepts. We found that new data could be indexed rapidly in about 10 minutes/terabyte, high-resolution images could be chipped in less than a second, and 250 kB image chips could be delivered over a 3G network in about 3 seconds. The prototype server implemented on a very small computer could handle 100 users, but the concept is scalable. Fast-Earth enables dramatic advances in rapid dissemination of remote sensing data for mobile platforms as well as desktop enterprises.

  10. Medial temporal and neocortical contributions to remote memory for semantic narratives: evidence from amnesia.

    PubMed

    Verfaellie, Mieke; Bousquet, Kathryn; Keane, Margaret M

    2014-08-01

    Studies of remote memory for semantic facts and concepts suggest that hippocampal lesions lead to a temporally graded impairment that extends no more than ten years prior to the onset of amnesia. Such findings have led to the notion that once consolidated, semantic memories are represented neocortically and are no longer dependent on the hippocampus. Here, we examined the fate of well-established semantic narratives following medial temporal lobe (MTL) lesions. Seven amnesic patients, five with lesions restricted to the MTL and two with lesions extending into lateral temporal cortex (MTL+), were asked to recount fairy tales and bible stories that they rated as familiar. Narratives were scored for number and type of details, number of main thematic elements, and order in which the main thematic elements were recounted. In comparison to controls, patients with MTL lesions produced fewer details, but the number and order of main thematic elements generated was intact. By contrast, patients with MTL+ lesions showed a pervasive impairment, affecting not only the generation of details, but also the generation and ordering of main steps. These findings challenge the notion that, once consolidated, semantic memories are no longer dependent on the hippocampus for retrieval. Possible hippocampal contributions to the retrieval of detailed semantic narratives are discussed. PMID:24953960

  11. Medial Temporal and Neocortical Contributions to Remote Memory for Semantic Narratives: Evidence from Amnesia

    PubMed Central

    Verfaellie, Mieke; Bousquet, Kathryn; Keane, Margaret M.

    2014-01-01

    Studies of remote memory for semantic facts and concepts suggest that hippocampal lesions lead to a temporally graded impairment that extends no more than ten years prior to the onset of amnesia. Such findings have led to the notion that once consolidated, semantic memories are represented neocortically and are no longer dependent on the hippocampus. Here, we examined the fate of well-established semantic narratives following medial temporal lobe (MTL) lesions. Seven amnesic patients, five with lesions restricted to the MTL and two with lesions extending into lateral temporal cortex (MTL+), were asked to recount fairy tales and bible stories that they rated as familiar. Narratives were scored for number and type of details, number of main thematic elements, and order in which the main thematic elements were recounted. In comparison to controls, patients with MTL lesions produced fewer details, but the number and order of main thematic elements generated was intact. By contrast, patients with MTL+ lesions showed a pervasive impairment, affecting not only the generation of details, but also the generation and ordering of main steps. These findings challenge the notion that, once consolidated, semantic memories are no longer dependent on the hippocampus for retrieval. Possible hippocampal contributions to the retrieval of detailed semantic narratives are discussed. PMID:24953960

  12. Optical Shared Memory Computing and Multiple Access Protocols for Photonic Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kuang-Yu.

    In this research we investigate potential applications of optics in massively parallel computer systems, especially focusing on design issues in three-dimensional optical data storage and free-space photonic networks. An optical implementation of a shared memory uses a single photorefractive crystal and can realize the set of memory modules in a digital shared memory computer. A complete instruction set consists of R sc EAD, W sc RITE, S sc ELECTIVE E sc RASE, and R sc EFRESH, which can be applied to any memory module independent of (and in parallel with) instructions to the other memory modules. In addition, a memory module can execute a sequence of R sc EAD operations simultaneously with the execution of a W sc RITE operation to accommodate differences in optical recording and readout times common to optical volume storage media. An experimental shared memory system is demonstrated and its projected performance is analyzed. A multiplexing technique is presented to significantly reduce both grating- and beam-degeneracy crosstalk in volume holographic systems, by incorporating space, angle, and wavelength as the multiplexing parameters. In this approach, each hologram, which results from the interference between a single input node and an object array, partially overlaps with the other holograms in its neighborhood. This technique can offer improved interconnection density, optical throughput, signal fidelity, and space-bandwidth product utilization. Design principles and numerical simulation results are presented. A free-space photonic cellular hypercube parallel computer, with emphasis on the design of a collisionless multiple access protocol, is presented. This design incorporates wavelength-, space-, and time-multiplexing to achieve multiple access, wavelength reuse, dense connectivity, collisionless communications, and a simple control mechanism. Analytic models based on semi-Markov processes are employed to analyze this protocol. The performance of the

  13. Academic and Non-Profit Accessibility to Commercial Remote Sensing Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, A. S.; Farr, B.

    2013-12-01

    Remote Sensing as a topic of teaching and research at the university and college level continues to increase. As more data is made freely available and software becomes easier to use, more and more academic and non-profits institutions are turning to remote sensing to solve their tough and large spatial scale problems. Exelis Visual Information Solutions (VIS) has been supporting teaching and research endeavors for over 30 years with a special emphasis over the last 5 years with scientifically proven software and accessible training materials. The Exelis VIS academic program extends to US and Canadian 2 year and 4 year colleges and universities with tools for analyzing aerial and satellite multispectral and hyperspectral imagery, airborne LiDAR and Synthetic Aperture Radar. The Exelis VIS academic programs, using the ENVI Platform, enables labs and classrooms to be outfitted with software and makes software accessible to students. The ENVI software provides students hands on experience with remote sensing software, an easy teaching platform for professors and allows researchers scientifically vetted software they can trust. Training materials are provided at no additional cost and can either serve as a basis for course curriculum development or self paced learning. Non-profit organizations like The Nature Conservancy (TNC) and CGIAR have deployed ENVI and IDL enterprise wide licensing allowing researchers all over the world to have cost effective access COTS software for their research. Exelis VIS has also contributed licenses to the NASA DEVELOP program. Exelis VIS is committed to supporting the academic and NGO community with affordable enterprise licensing, access to training materials, and technical expertise to help researchers tackle today's Earth and Planetary science big data challenges.

  14. A new laterally conductive bridge random access memory by fully CMOS logic compatible process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Min-Che; Chin, Yung-Wen; Lin, Yu-Cheng; Chih, Yu-Der; Tsai, Kan-Hsueh; Tsai, Ming-Jinn; King, Ya-Chin; Lin, Chrong Jung

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel laterally conductive bridge random access memory (L-CBRAM) module using a fully CMOS logic compatible process. A contact buffer layer between the poly-Si and contact plug enables the lateral Ti-based atomic layer to provide on/off resistance ratio via bipolar operations. The proposed device reached more than 100 pulse cycles with an on/off ratio over 10 and very stable data retention under high temperature operations. These results make this Ti-based L-CBRAM cell a promising solution for advanced embedded multi-time programmable (MTP) memory applications.

  15. Multilevel Cell Storage and Resistance Variability in Resistive Random Access Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantelis, D. I.; Karakizis, P. N.; Dragatogiannis, D. A.; Charitidis, C. A.

    2016-06-01

    Multilevel per cell (MLC) storage in resistive random access memory (ReRAM) is attractive in achieving high-density and low-cost memory and will be required in future. In this chapter, MLC storage and resistance variability and reliability of multilevel in ReRAM are discussed. Different MLC operation schemes with their physical mechanisms and a comprehensive analysis of resistance variability have been provided. Various factors that can induce variability and their effect on the resistance margin between the multiple resistance levels are assessed. The reliability characteristics and the impact on MLC storage have also been assessed.

  16. Effects of erbium doping of indium tin oxide electrode in resistive random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Po-Hsun; Chang, Kuan-Chang; Chang, Ting-Chang; Tsai, Tsung-Ming; Pan, Chih-Hung; Lin, Chih-Yang; Jin, Fu-Yuan; Chen, Min-Chen; Huang, Hui-Chun; Lo, Ikai; Zheng, Jin-Cheng; Sze, Simon M.

    2016-03-01

    Identical insulators and bottom electrodes were fabricated and capped by an indium tin oxide (ITO) film, either undoped or doped with erbium (Er), as a top electrode. This distinctive top electrode dramatically altered the resistive random access memory (RRAM) characteristics, for example, lowering the operation current and enlarging the memory window. In addition, the RESET voltage increased, whereas the SET voltage remained almost the same. A conduction model of Er-doped ITO is proposed through current-voltage (I-V) measurement and current fitting to explain the resistance switching mechanism of Er-doped ITO RRAM and is confirmed by material analysis and reliability tests.

  17. A role for adult hippocampal neurogenesis at multiple time scales: A study of recent and remote memory in humans.

    PubMed

    Déry, Nicolas; Goldstein, Aaron; Becker, Suzanna

    2015-08-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN) is downregulated by numerous lifestyle factors including chronic stress. While the functional significance of AHN remains elusive, computational models and empirical evidence implicate immature neurons in minimizing interference between similar memories-a process termed pattern separation. The role of neurogenesis in remote memory is less clear. Some have proposed that neurogenesis promotes the clearance of old memories from the hippocampus, while others have proposed that neurogenesis promotes long-term retention of memories within the hippocampus. We used a modified version of the behavioral pattern separation task originally described by Kirwan and Stark (2007). In this task, some objects are repeated across trials, some are similar lures and the rest are novel. Participants are asked to classify each object as old, new, or similar. The correct classification of lures as similar may tax pattern separation processes in the hippocampus and AHN. To investigate the potential role of AHN in remote memory, we introduced a 2-week delay between the presentation and recognition of certain stimuli. As in previous studies, we found that those with higher depression scores made significantly more errors at identifying lures as similar when presentation and recognition were separated by a brief delay. When presentation and recognition trials were separated by a longer delay, the correct classification of lures dropped to chance levels for all groups, but now lower stress and depression scores were associated with superior identification of exact repetitions. Our data suggest a role for AHN in the stabilization of remote memories. PMID:26076341

  18. On-line scalable image access for medical remote collaborative meetings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarando, Sebastian R.; Lucidarme, Olivier; Grenier, Philippe; Fetita, Catalin

    2015-03-01

    The increasing need of remote medical investigation services in the framework of collaborative multidisciplinary meetings (e.g. cancer follow-up) raises the challenge of on-line remote access of (large amount of) radiologic data in a limited period of time. This paper proposes a scalable compression framework of DICOM images providing low-latency display through low speed networks. The developed approach relies on useless information removal from images (i.e. not related with the patient body) and the exploitation of the JPEG2000 standard to achieve progressive quality encoding and access of the data. This mechanism also allows the efficient exploitation of any idle times (corresponding to on-line visual image analysis) to download the remaining data at lossless quality in a way transparent to the user, thus minimizing the perceived latency. The experiments performed in comparison with exchanging uncompressed or JPEGlossless compressed DICOM data, showed the benefit of the proposed approach for collaborative on-line remote diagnosis and follow-up services.

  19. VisPortal: Increasing Scientific Productivity by Simplifying Access to and Use of Remote Computational Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Siegerist, Cristina; Shalf, John; Bethel, E. Wes

    2004-01-01

    Our goal is to simplify and streamline the process of using remotely located visual data analysis software tools. This discussion presents an example of an easy-to-use interface that mediates access to and use of diverse and powerful visual data analysis resources. The interface is presented via a standard web browser, which is ubiquitous and a part of every researchers work environment. Through the web interface, a few mouse clicks are all that is needed to take advantage of powerful, remotely located software resources. The VisPortal project is the software that provides diverse services to remotely located users through their web browser. Using standard Globus-grid middleware and off-the-shelf web automation, the VisPortal hides the underlying complexity of resource selection and distributed application management. The portal automates complex workflows that would otherwise require a substantial amount of manual effort on the part of the researcher. With a few mouse clicks, a researcher can quickly perform complex tasks like creating MPEG movies, scheduling file transfers, launching components of a distributed application, and accessing specialized resources.

  20. A mobile agent approach to access and represent remote spatial information in LBS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Zhixiang; Li, Qingquan; Luo, Zhi; Geng, Xuexian

    2005-10-01

    The mobile computing based Location based Service (LBS) technology has been increasingly grown in the past decade; however there still exist some important constraints that complicate work with a mobile spatial information system. The limited resources in the mobile computing terminals would restrict some features that are available on the traditional computing technology. This paper will explores the use of a cooperative, distributed multi-agent systems (Java Agent Development Framework, JADE) to improve the efficiency of accessing and represent remote spatial information in mobile terminals and fixed terminal which support Java runtime environment (JRE), because that JADE system has following features: distributed agent platform, graphical user interface to manage several agents and agent containers form remote host, supporting to execution of multiple, parallel and concurrent agent activities via behavior model, FIPA-compliant platform including AMS (Agent Management System), DF (Directory Facilitator) and ACC (Agent Communication Channel), Efficient transport of ACL messages inside same agent system, library of FIPA interaction protocols ready to be used, FIPA-compliant naming service and supporting for application-defined content languages and ontology. An agile and flexible agent based approach for accessing and representing remote spatial information is proposed in this paper, mobile agent system architecture in LBS is presented, and a prototype system is given to shown that JADE makes this approach feasible and effective.

  1. Large Capacity of Conscious Access for Incidental Memories in Natural Scenes.

    PubMed

    Kaunitz, Lisandro N; Rowe, Elise G; Tsuchiya, Naotsugu

    2016-09-01

    When searching a crowd, people can detect a target face only by direct fixation and attention. Once the target is found, it is consciously experienced and remembered, but what is the perceptual fate of the fixated nontarget faces? Whereas introspection suggests that one may remember nontargets, previous studies have proposed that almost no memory should be retained. Using a gaze-contingent paradigm, we asked subjects to visually search for a target face within a crowded natural scene and then tested their memory for nontarget faces, as well as their confidence in those memories. Subjects remembered up to seven fixated, nontarget faces with more than 70% accuracy. Memory accuracy was correlated with trial-by-trial confidence ratings, which implies that the memory was consciously maintained and accessed. When the search scene was inverted, no more than three nontarget faces were remembered. These findings imply that incidental memory for faces, such as those recalled by eyewitnesses, is more reliable than is usually assumed. PMID:27507869

  2. Redefining nondiscriminatory access to remote sensing imagery and its impact on global transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aten, Michelle L.

    2003-04-01

    Global transparency is founded on the Open Skies philosophy and its precept of non-discriminatory access. Global transparency implies that anyone can have anytime, anyplace access to a wide-array of remotely sensed imagery. The custom of non-discriminatory access requires that datasets of interest must be affordable, usable, and obtainable in a timely fashion devoid of political, economic or technical obstacles. Thus, an assessment of the correlation between the availability of satellite imagery and changes in governmental policies, pricing fluctuations of data, and advances in technology is critical to assessing the viability of global transparency. The Open Skies philosophy was originally proposed at the 1955 Geneva Summit to advocate mutually beneficial aerial reconnaissance missions over the USSR and the US as a verification tool for arms control and non-proliferation agreements. However, due to Cold War tensions, this philosophy and the custom of non-discriminatory were not widely adopted in the civilian remote sensing community until the commissioning of the Landsat Program in 1972. Since this time, commercial high-resolution satellites have drastically changed the circumstances on which the fundamental tenets of this philosophy are based. Since the successful launch of the first of this satellite class, the IKONOS satellite, high-resolution imagery is now available to non-US governments and an unlimited set of non-state actors. As more advanced capabilities are added to the growing assortment of remote sensing satellites, the reality of global transparency will rapidly evolve. This assessment includes an overview of historical precedents and a brief explanation of relevant US policy decisions that define non-discriminatory access with respect to US government and US based corporate assets. It also presents the dynamics of the political, economic, and technical barriers that may dictate or influence the remote sensing community's access to satellite data. In

  3. Remote collaboration and data access at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Schissel, D.P.

    1998-09-01

    As the number of on-site and remote collaborators has increased, the demands on the DIII-D National Program`s computational infrastructure has become more severe. The Director of the DIII-D Program recognized the increased importance of computers in carrying out the DIII-D mission and in late 1997 formed the Data Analysis Programming Group. Utilizing both software and hardware improvements, this new group has been charged with increasing the DIII-D data analysis throughput and data retrieval rate. Understanding the importance of the remote collaborators, this group has developed a long term plan that will allow for fast 24 hour data access (7x24) with complete documentation and a set of data viewing and analysis tools that can be run either on the collaborators` or DIII-D`s computer systems. This paper presents the group`s long term plan and progress to date.

  4. Role of adult neurogenesis in hippocampus-dependent memory, contextual fear extinction and remote contextual memory: new insights from ERK5 MAP kinase.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yung-Wei; Storm, Daniel R; Xia, Zhengui

    2013-10-01

    Adult neurogenesis occurs in two discrete regions of the adult mammalian brain, the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG) and the subventricular zone (SVZ) along the lateral ventricles. Signaling mechanisms regulating adult neurogenesis in the SGZ are currently an active area of investigation. Adult-born neurons in the DG functionally integrate into the hippocampal circuitry and form functional synapses, suggesting a role for these neurons in hippocampus-dependent memory formation. Although results from earlier behavioral studies addressing this issue were inconsistent, recent advances in conditional gene targeting technology, viral injection and optogenetic approaches have provided convincing evidence supporting a role for adult-born neurons in the more challenging forms of hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. Here, we briefly summarize these recent studies with a focus on extra signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 5, a MAP kinase whose expression in the adult brain is restricted to the neurogenic regions including the SGZ and SVZ. We review evidence identifying ERK5 as a novel endogenous signaling pathway that regulates the pro-neural transcription factor Neurogenin 2, is activated by neurotrophins and is critical for adult neurogenesis. We discuss studies demonstrating that specific deletion of ERK5 in the adult neurogenic regions impairs several forms of hippocampus-dependent memory formation in mice. These include contextual fear memory extinction, the establishment and maintenance of remote contextual fear memory, and several other challenging forms of hippocampus-dependent memory formation including 48h memory for novel object recognition, contextual fear memory established by a weak foot shock, pattern separation, and reversal of spatial learning and memory. We also briefly discuss current evidence that increasing adult neurogenesis, by small molecules or genetic manipulation, improves memory formation and long-term memory. PMID:23871742

  5. Pattern imprinting in deep sub-micron static random access memories induced by total dose irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qi-Wen; Yu, Xue-Feng; Cui, Jiang-Wei; Guo, Qi; Ren, Di-Yuan; Cong, Zhong-Chao; Zhou, Hang

    2014-10-01

    Pattern imprinting in deep sub-micron static random access memories (SRAMs) during total dose irradiation is investigated in detail. As the dose accumulates, the data pattern of memory cells loading during irradiation is gradually imprinted on their background data pattern. We build a relationship between the memory cell's static noise margin (SNM) and the background data, and study the influence of irradiation on the probability density function of ΔSNM, which is the difference between two data sides' SNMs, to discuss the reason for pattern imprinting. Finally, we demonstrate that, for micron and deep sub-micron devices, the mechanism of pattern imprinting is the bias-dependent threshold shift of the transistor, but for a deep sub-micron device the shift results from charge trapping in the shallow trench isolation (STI) oxide rather than from the gate oxide of the micron-device.

  6. Design of Unstructured Adaptive (UA) NAS Parallel Benchmark Featuring Irregular, Dynamic Memory Accesses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Hui-Yu; VanderWijngaart, Rob; Biswas, Rupak; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We describe the design of a new method for the measurement of the performance of modern computer systems when solving scientific problems featuring irregular, dynamic memory accesses. The method involves the solution of a stylized heat transfer problem on an unstructured, adaptive grid. A Spectral Element Method (SEM) with an adaptive, nonconforming mesh is selected to discretize the transport equation. The relatively high order of the SEM lowers the fraction of wall clock time spent on inter-processor communication, which eases the load balancing task and allows us to concentrate on the memory accesses. The benchmark is designed to be three-dimensional. Parallelization and load balance issues of a reference implementation will be described in detail in future reports.

  7. Dramatic reduction of read disturb through pulse width control in spin torque random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zihui; Wang, Xiaobin; Gan, Huadong; Jung, Dongha; Satoh, Kimihiro; Lin, Tsann; Zhou, Yuchen; Zhang, Jing; Huai, Yiming; Chang, Yao-Jen; Wu, Te-ho

    2013-09-01

    Magnetizations dynamic effect in low current read disturb region is studied both experimentally and theoretically. Dramatic read error rate reduction through read pulse width control is theoretically predicted and experimentally observed. The strong dependence of read error rate upon pulse width contrasts conventional energy barrier approach and can only be obtained considering detailed magnetization dynamics at long time thermal magnetization reversal region. Our study provides a design possibility for ultra-fast low current spin torque random access memory.

  8. Electrical Evaluation of RCA MWS5001D Random Access Memory, Volume 5, Appendix D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klute, A.

    1979-01-01

    The electrical characterization and qualification test results are presented for the RCA MWS 5001D random access memory. The tests included functional tests, AC and DC parametric tests, AC parametric worst-case pattern selection test, determination of worst-case transition for setup and hold times, and a series of schmoo plots. Average input high current, worst case input high current, output low current, and data setup time are some of the results presented.

  9. Electrical Evaluation of RCA MWS5001D Random Access Memory, Volume 4, Appendix C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klute, A.

    1979-01-01

    The electrical characterization and qualification test results are presented for the RCA MWS5001D random access memory. The tests included functional tests, AC and DC parametric tests, AC parametric worst-case pattern selection test, determination of worst-case transition for setup and hold times, and a series of schmoo plots. Statistical analysis data is supplied along with write pulse width, read cycle time, write cycle time, and chip enable time data.

  10. Vibroacoustic Payload Environment Prediction System (VAPEPS): VAPEPS management center remote access guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, J. P.; Mills, D.

    1991-01-01

    A Vibroacoustic Payload Environment Prediction System (VAPEPS) Management Center was established at the JPL. The center utilizes the VAPEPS software package to manage a data base of Space Shuttle and expendable launch vehicle payload flight and ground test data. Remote terminal access over telephone lines to the computer system, where the program resides, was established to provide the payload community a convenient means of querying the global VAPEPS data base. This guide describes the functions of the VAPEPS Management Center and contains instructions for utilizing the resources of the center.

  11. Vibroacoustic payload environment prediction system (VAPEPS): Data base management center remote access guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, V. C.

    1986-01-01

    A Vibroacoustic Data Base Management Center has been established at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The center utilizes the Vibroacoustic Payload Environment Prediction System (VAPEPS) software package to manage a data base of shuttle and expendable launch vehicle flight and ground test data. Remote terminal access over telephone lines to a dedicated VAPEPS computer system has been established to provide the payload community a convenient means of querying the global VAPEPS data base. This guide describes the functions of the JPL Data Base Management Center and contains instructions for utilizing the resources of the center.

  12. Immigration, language proficiency, and autobiographical memories: Lifespan distribution and second-language access.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Alena G; Baker-Ward, Lynne

    2016-08-01

    This investigation examined two controversies in the autobiographical literature: how cross-language immigration affects the distribution of autobiographical memories across the lifespan and under what circumstances language-dependent recall is observed. Both Spanish/English bilingual immigrants and English monolingual non-immigrants participated in a cue word study, with the bilingual sample taking part in a within-subject language manipulation. The expected bump in the number of memories from early life was observed for non-immigrants but not immigrants, who reported more memories for events surrounding immigration. Aspects of the methodology addressed possible reasons for past discrepant findings. Language-dependent recall was influenced by second-language proficiency. Results were interpreted as evidence that bilinguals with high second-language proficiency, in contrast to those with lower second-language proficiency, access a single conceptual store through either language. The final multi-level model predicting language-dependent recall, including second-language proficiency, age of immigration, internal language, and cue word language, explained ¾ of the between-person variance and (1)/5 of the within-person variance. We arrive at two conclusions. First, major life transitions influence the distribution of memories. Second, concept representation across multiple languages follows a developmental model. In addition, the results underscore the importance of considering language experience in research involving memory reports. PMID:26274061

  13. Ge2Sb2Te5 Confined Structures and Integration of 64 Mb Phase-Change Random Access Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeung, Fai; Ahn, Su-Jin; Hwang, Young-Nam; Jeong, Chang-Wook; Song, Yoon-Jong; Lee, Su-Youn; Lee, Se-Ho; Ryoo, Kyung-Chang; Park, Jae-Hyun; Shin, Jae-Min; Jeong, Won-Cheol; Kim, Young-Tae; Koh, Gwan-Hyeob; Jeong, Gi-Tae; Jeong, Hong-Sik; Kim, Kinam

    2005-04-01

    Phase-change random access memory is considered a potential challenger for conventional memories, such as dynamic random access memory and flash memory due to its numerous advantages. Nevertheless, high reset current is the ultimate problem in developing high-density phase-change random access memory (PRAM). We focus on the adoption of Ge2Sb2Te5 confined structures to achieve lower reset currents. By changing from a normal to a GST confined structure, the reset current drops to as low as 0.8 mA. Eventually, our integrated 64 Mb PRAM based on 0.18 μm CMOS technology offers a large sensing margin: Rreset ˜200 kΩ and Rset ˜2 kΩ, as well as reasonable reliability: an endurance of 1.0× 109 cycles and a retention time of 2 years at 85°C.

  14. Towards a Low-Cost Remote Memory Attestation for the Smart Grid.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinyu; He, Xiaofei; Yu, Wei; Lin, Jie; Li, Rui; Yang, Qingyu; Song, Houbing

    2015-01-01

    In the smart grid, measurement devices may be compromised by adversaries, and their operations could be disrupted by attacks. A number of schemes to efficiently and accurately detect these compromised devices remotely have been proposed. Nonetheless, most of the existing schemes detecting compromised devices depend on the incremental response time in the attestation process, which are sensitive to data transmission delay and lead to high computation and network overhead. To address the issue, in this paper, we propose a low-cost remote memory attestation scheme (LRMA), which can efficiently and accurately detect compromised smart meters considering real-time network delay and achieve low computation and network overhead. In LRMA, the impact of real-time network delay on detecting compromised nodes can be eliminated via investigating the time differences reported from relay nodes. Furthermore, the attestation frequency in LRMA is dynamically adjusted with the compromised probability of each node, and then, the total number of attestations could be reduced while low computation and network overhead can be achieved. Through a combination of extensive theoretical analysis and evaluations, our data demonstrate that our proposed scheme can achieve better detection capacity and lower computation and network overhead in comparison to existing schemes. PMID:26307998

  15. Towards a Low-Cost Remote Memory Attestation for the Smart Grid

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xinyu; He, Xiaofei; Yu, Wei; Lin, Jie; Li, Rui; Yang, Qingyu; Song, Houbing

    2015-01-01

    In the smart grid, measurement devices may be compromised by adversaries, and their operations could be disrupted by attacks. A number of schemes to efficiently and accurately detect these compromised devices remotely have been proposed. Nonetheless, most of the existing schemes detecting compromised devices depend on the incremental response time in the attestation process, which are sensitive to data transmission delay and lead to high computation and network overhead. To address the issue, in this paper, we propose a low-cost remote memory attestation scheme (LRMA), which can efficiently and accurately detect compromised smart meters considering real-time network delay and achieve low computation and network overhead. In LRMA, the impact of real-time network delay on detecting compromised nodes can be eliminated via investigating the time differences reported from relay nodes. Furthermore, the attestation frequency in LRMA is dynamically adjusted with the compromised probability of each node, and then, the total number of attestations could be reduced while low computation and network overhead can be achieved. Through a combination of extensive theoretical analysis and evaluations, our data demonstrate that our proposed scheme can achieve better detection capacity and lower computation and network overhead in comparison to existing schemes. PMID:26307998

  16. Remote access to an interferometric fringes stabilization active system via RENATA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espitia-Gómez, Javier; Ángel-Toro, Luciano

    2013-11-01

    The Advanced Technology National Network (RENATA, for its acronym in Spanish) is a Colombian, collaborative work tool, linked to other networks worldwide, in which take participation researchers, teachers and students, by sharing laboratory resources located in different universities, institutes and research centers throughout the country. In the Universidad EAFIT (Medellín, Colombia) it has been designed an interferometric fringes stabilization active system, which can be accessed remotely via the RENATA network. A Mach-Zehnder interferometer was implemented, with independent piezoelectric actuators in each arm, with which the lengths of optical path of light that goes over in each of them can be modified. Using these actuators, one can simultaneously perturb the system and compensate the phase differences caused by that perturbation. This allows us to experiment with different disturbs, and analyze the system response to each one of them. This can be made from any location worldwide, and especially from those regions in which optical and optoelectronic components required for the implementation of the interferometer or for the stabilization system are not available. The device can also be used as a platform in order to conduct diverse experiments, involving optical and controlling aspects, constituting with this in a pedagogic tool. For the future, it can be predicted that remote access to available applications would be possible, as well as modifications of the implemented code in labVIEW™, so that researchers and teachers can adapt and improve their functionalities or develop new applications, based on the collaborative work.

  17. Comprehension of Linguistic Dependencies: Speed-Accuracy Tradeoff Evidence for Direct-Access Retrieval From Memory

    PubMed Central

    Foraker, Stephani; McElree, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Comprehenders can rapidly and efficiently interpret expressions with various types of non-adjacent dependencies. In the sentence The boy that the teacher warned fell, boy is readily interpreted as the subject of the verb fall despite the fact that a relative clause, that the teacher warned, intervenes between the two dependent elements. We review research investigating three memory operations proposed for resolving this and other types of non-adjacent dependencies: serial search retrieval, in which the dependent constituent is recovered by a search process through representations in memory, direct-access retrieval in which the dependent constituent is recovered directly by retrieval cue operations without search, and active maintenance of the dependent constituent in focal attention. Studies using speed-accuracy tradeoff methodology to examine the full timecourse of interpreting a wide range of non-adjacent dependencies indicate that comprehenders retrieve dependent constituents with a direct-access operation, consistent with the claim that representations formed during comprehension are accessed with a cue-driven, content-addressable retrieval process. The observed timecourse profiles are inconsistent with a broad class of models based on several search operations for retrieval. The profiles are also inconsistent with active maintenance of a constituent while concurrently processing subsequent material, and suggest that, with few exceptions, direct-access retrieval is required to process non-adjacent dependencies. PMID:22448181

  18. Daily Access to Sucrose Impairs Aspects of Spatial Memory Tasks Reliant on Pattern Separation and Neural Proliferation in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichelt, Amy C.; Morris, Margaret J.; Westbrook, Reginald Frederick

    2016-01-01

    High sugar diets reduce hippocampal neurogenesis, which is required for minimizing interference between memories, a process that involves "pattern separation." We provided rats with 2 h daily access to a sucrose solution for 28 d and assessed their performance on a spatial memory task. Sucrose consuming rats discriminated between objects…

  19. Encoding and Retrieval Processes Involved in the Access of Source Information in the Absence of Item Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, B. Hunter; DeWitt, Michael R.; Knight, Justin B.; Hicks, Jason L.

    2014-01-01

    The current study sought to examine the relative contributions of encoding and retrieval processes in accessing contextual information in the absence of item memory using an extralist cuing procedure in which the retrieval cues used to query memory for contextual information were "related" to the target item but never actually studied.…

  20. Personal Memories for Remote Historical Events: Accuracy and Clarity of Flashbulb Memories Related to World War II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berntsen, Dorthe; Thomsen, Dorthe K.

    2005-01-01

    One hundred forty-five Danes between 72 and 89 years of age were asked for their memories of their reception of the news of the Danish occupation (April 1940) and liberation (May 1945) and for their most negative and most positive personal memories from World War II. Almost all reported memories for the invasion and liberation. Their answers to…

  1. Fingerprint authentication via joint transform correlator and its application in remote access control of a 3D microscopic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wenqi; Lai, Hongji; Wang, Meng; Liu, Zeyi; Yin, Yongkai; Peng, Xiang

    2014-05-01

    We present a fingerprint authentication scheme based on the optical joint transform correlator (JTC) and further describe its application to the remote access control of a Network-based Remote Laboratory (NRL). It is built to share a 3D microscopy system of our realistic laboratory in Shenzhen University with the remote co-researchers in Stuttgart University. In this article, we would like to focus on the involved security issues, mainly on the verification of various remote visitors to our NRL. By making use of the JTC-based optical pattern recognition technique as well as the Personal Identification Number (PIN), we are able to achieve the aim of authentication and access control for any remote visitors. Note that only the authorized remote visitors could be guided to the Virtual Network Computer (VNC), a cross-platform software, which allows the remote visitor to access the desktop applications and visually manipulate the instruments of our NRL through the internet. Specifically to say, when a remote visitor attempts to access to our NRL, a PIN is mandatory required in advance, which is followed by fingerprint capturing and verification. Only if both the PIN and the fingerprint are correct, can one be regarded as an authorized visitor, and then he/she would get the authority to visit our NRL by the VNC. It is also worth noting that the aforementioned "two-step verification" strategy could be further applied to verify the identity levels of various remote visitors, and therefore realize the purpose of diversified visitor management.

  2. Interleaved synchronous bus access protocol for a shared memory multi-processor system

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, W.T.

    1989-01-10

    A method is described for providing asynchronous processors with inter-processor communication and access to several memory modules over a common bus which includes a first bus and a second bus, comprising: providing clock pulses on the common bus, each pulse having a period; asserting a request signal and placing priority signal on the common bus; polling the processors during the first period to determine whether the processors request access to the common bus and to determine which one processor has priority; sending a destination address from the one processor to a destination during a second period, the destination being chosen from the processors and the several memory modules; performing one of reading input data between the destination and the processor; multiplexing priority and reading input data signals on the first bus, and multiplexing address and writing output data signals on the second bus; generating poll inhibit signals prior to each reading input data signal and prior to each memory address signal preceding a writing output data operation; and queuing the input data in a first-in-first-out manner for each of the processors when the input data indicates an interprocessor interrupt.

  3. Brain Region-Specific Activity Patterns after Recent or Remote Memory Retrieval of Auditory Conditioned Fear

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwon, Jeong-Tae; Jhang, Jinho; Kim, Hyung-Su; Lee, Sujin; Han, Jin-Hee

    2012-01-01

    Memory is thought to be sparsely encoded throughout multiple brain regions forming unique memory trace. Although evidence has established that the amygdala is a key brain site for memory storage and retrieval of auditory conditioned fear memory, it remains elusive whether the auditory brain regions may be involved in fear memory storage or…

  4. Low-power resistive random access memory by confining the formation of conducting filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi-Jen; Shen, Tzu-Hsien; Lee, Lan-Hsuan; Wen, Cheng-Yen; Lee, Si-Chen

    2016-06-01

    Owing to their small physical size and low power consumption, resistive random access memory (RRAM) devices are potential for future memory and logic applications in microelectronics. In this study, a new resistive switching material structure, TiOx/silver nanoparticles/TiOx/AlTiOx, fabricated between the fluorine-doped tin oxide bottom electrode and the indium tin oxide top electrode is demonstrated. The device exhibits excellent memory performances, such as low operation voltage (<±1 V), low operation power, small variation in resistance, reliable data retention, and a large memory window. The current-voltage measurement shows that the conducting mechanism in the device at the high resistance state is via electron hopping between oxygen vacancies in the resistive switching material. When the device is switched to the low resistance state, conducting filaments are formed in the resistive switching material as a result of accumulation of oxygen vacancies. The bottom AlTiOx layer in the device structure limits the formation of conducting filaments; therefore, the current and power consumption of device operation are significantly reduced.

  5. A secure WDM ring access network employing silicon micro-ring based remote node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Jiun-Yu; Chow, Chi-Wai; Yeh, Chien-Hung; Xu, Ke; Hsu, Chin-Wei; Su, Hong-Quan; Tsang, Hon-Ki

    2014-08-01

    A secure and scalable wavelength-division-multiplexing (WDM) ring-based access network is proposed and demonstrated using proof-of-concept experiments. In the remote node (RN), wavelength hopping for specific optical networking unit (ONU) is deployed by using silicon micro-ring resonators (SMR). Using silicon-based devices could be cost-effective for the cost-sensitive access network. Hence the optical physical layer security is introduced. The issues of denial of service (DOS) attacks, eavesdropping and masquerading can be made more difficult in the proposed WDM ring-based access network. Besides, the SMRs with different dropped wavelengths can be cascaded, such that the signals pass through the preceding SMRs can be dropped by a succeeding SMR. This can increase the scalability of the RN for supporting more ONUs for future upgrade. Here, error-free 10 Gb/s downlink and 1.25 Gb/s uplink transmission are demonstrated to show the feasibility of the proposed network.

  6. Extremely small test cell structure for resistive random access memory element with removable bottom electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Koh, Sang-Gyu; Kishida, Satoru; Kinoshita, Kentaro

    2014-02-24

    We established a method of preparing an extremely small memory cell by fabricating a resistive random access memory (ReRAM) structure on the tip of a cantilever of an atomic force microscope. This structure has the high robustness against the drift of the cantilever, and the effective cell size was estimated to be less than 10 nm in diameter due to the electric field concentration at the tip of the cantilever, which was confirmed using electric field simulation. The proposed structure, which has a removable bottom electrode, enables not only the preparation of a tiny ReRAM structure but also the performance of unique experiments, by making the most of its high robustness against the drift of the cantilever.

  7. Bipolar resistive switching characteristics in tantalum nitride-based resistive random access memory devices

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Myung Ju; Jeon, Dong Su; Park, Ju Hyun; Kim, Tae Geun

    2015-05-18

    This paper reports the bipolar resistive switching characteristics of TaN{sub x}-based resistive random access memory (ReRAM). The conduction mechanism is explained by formation and rupture of conductive filaments caused by migration of nitrogen ions and vacancies; this mechanism is in good agreement with either Ohmic conduction or the Poole-Frenkel emission model. The devices exhibit that the reset voltage varies from −0.82 V to −0.62 V, whereas the set voltage ranges from 1.01 V to 1.30 V for 120 DC sweep cycles. In terms of reliability, the devices exhibit good retention (>10{sup 5 }s) and pulse-switching endurance (>10{sup 6} cycles) properties. These results indicate that TaN{sub x}-based ReRAM devices have a potential for future nonvolatile memory devices.

  8. Ratioless full-complementary 12-transistor static random access memory for ultra low supply voltage operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Hiromasa; Hoketsu, Satoko; Imi, Hitoshi; Okamura, Hitoshi; Nakamura, Kazuyuki

    2015-04-01

    In this study, a ratioless full-complementary 12-transistor static random access memory (SRAM) was developed and measured to evaluate its operation under an ultra low supply voltage range. The ratioless SRAM design concept enables a memory cell design that is free from the consideration of the static noise margin (SNM). Furthermore, it enables a SRAM function without the restriction of transistor parameter (W/L) settings and the dependence on the variability of device characteristics. The test chips that include both conventional 6-transistor SRAM cells and the ratioless full-complementary 12-transistor SRAM cells were developed by a 180 nm CMOS process to compare their stable operations under an ultralow supply voltage condition. The measured results show that the ratioless full-complementary 12-transistor SRAM has superior immunity to device variability, and its inherent operating ability at the supply voltage of 0.22 V was experimentally confirmed.

  9. High-density magnetoresistive random access memory operating at ultralow voltage at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jia-Mian; Li, Zheng; Chen, Long-Qing; Nan, Ce-Wen

    2011-01-01

    The main bottlenecks limiting the practical applications of current magnetoresistive random access memory (MRAM) technology are its low storage density and high writing energy consumption. Although a number of proposals have been reported for voltage-controlled memory device in recent years, none of them simultaneously satisfy the important device attributes: high storage capacity, low power consumption and room temperature operation. Here we present, using phase-field simulations, a simple and new pathway towards high-performance MRAMs that display significant improvements over existing MRAM technologies or proposed concepts. The proposed nanoscale MRAM device simultaneously exhibits ultrahigh storage capacity of up to 88 Gb inch−2, ultralow power dissipation as low as 0.16 fJ per bit and room temperature high-speed operation below 10 ns. PMID:22109527

  10. The effect of ultraviolet irradiation on data retention characteristics of resistive random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Kentaro; Kimura, Kouhei; Ohmi, Koutoku; Kishida, Satoru

    It is getting more and more serious to generate soft-errors by cosmic radiation, with increasing the density of memory devices. Therefore, the irradiation resistance of resistance random access memory (ReRAM) to cosmic radiation has to be elucidated for practical use. In this paper, we investigated the data retention characteristics against ultraviolet irradiation to ReRAM with Pt/NiO/ITO structure. Soft-errors were confirmed to be caused by ultraviolet irradiation in both low and high resistance states. The analysis of irradiation frequency dependence of data retention characteristics suggested that electronic excitation by the irradiation caused the errors. Based on a statistically estimated soft-error rate, the errors were suggested to be caused by aggregation and dispersion of oxygen vacancies due to the generation of electron-hole pairs and valence change by the ultraviolet irradiation.

  11. Gate controllable resistive random access memory devices using reduced graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazra, Preetam; Resmi, A. N.; Jinesh, K. B.

    2016-04-01

    The biggest challenge in the resistive random access memory (ReRAM) technology is that the basic operational parameters, such as the set and reset voltages, the current on-off ratios (hence the power), and their operational speeds, strongly depend on the active and electrode materials and their processing methods. Therefore, for its actual technological implementations, the unification of the operational parameters of the ReRAM devices appears to be a difficult task. In this letter, we show that by fabricating a resistive memory device in a thin film transistor configuration and thus applying an external gate bias, we can control the switching voltage very accurately. Taking partially reduced graphene oxide, the gate controllable switching is demonstrated, and the possible mechanisms are discussed.

  12. Self-assembled tin dioxide for forming-free resistive random-access memory application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Ying-Jhan; Wang, Tsang-Hsuan; Wei, Shih-Yuan; Chang, Pin; Yew, Tri-Rung

    2016-06-01

    A novel resistive switching structure, tin-doped indium oxide (ITO)/SnO2‑ x (defined as SnO2 with oxygen vacancies)/SnS was demonstrated with a set voltage of 0.38 V, a reset voltage of ‑0.15 V, a ratio of high resistance to low resistance of 544, and forming-free and nonlinear current–voltage (I–V) characteristics. The interface of the ITO and the self-assembled SnO2‑ x contributed to the resistive switching behavior. This device showed great potential for resistive random access memory (RRAM) application and solving the sneak path problem in cross-bar memory arrays. Furthermore, a nanostructured resistive switching device was demonstrated successfully.

  13. Peripheral orthopaedic surgery down-regulates hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor and impairs remote memory in mouse.

    PubMed

    Fidalgo, A R; Cibelli, M; White, J P M; Nagy, I; Noormohamed, F; Benzonana, L; Maze, M; Ma, D

    2011-09-01

    Peripheral orthopaedic surgery induces a profound inflammatory response. This includes a substantial increase in cytokines and, especially, in the level of interleukin (IL)-1β in the hippocampus, which has been shown to impair hippocampal-dependent memory in mice. We have employed two tests of contextual remote memory to demonstrate that the inflammatory response to surgical insult in mice also results in impairment of remote memory associated with prefrontal cortex (PFC). We have also found that, under the conditions presented in the social interaction test, peripheral orthopaedic surgery does not increase anxiety-like behaviour in our animal model. Although such surgery induces an increase in the level of IL-1β in the hippocampus, it fails to do so in the PFC. Peripheral orthopaedic surgery also results in a reduction in the level of hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and this may contribute, in part, to the memory impairment found after such surgery. Our data suggest that a reduction in the level of hippocampal BDNF and an increase in the level of hippocampal IL-1β following surgery may affect the transference of fear memory in the mouse brain. PMID:21699962

  14. Non-volatile, high density, high speed, Micromagnet-Hall effect Random Access Memory (MHRAM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jiin C.; Katti, Romney R.; Stadler, Henry L.

    1991-01-01

    The micromagnetic Hall effect random access memory (MHRAM) has the potential of replacing ROMs, EPROMs, EEPROMs, and SRAMs because of its ability to achieve non-volatility, radiation hardness, high density, and fast access times, simultaneously. Information is stored magnetically in small magnetic elements (micromagnets), allowing unlimited data retention time, unlimited numbers of rewrite cycles, and inherent radiation hardness and SEU immunity, making the MHRAM suitable for ground based as well as spaceflight applications. The MHRAM device design is not affected by areal property fluctuations in the micromagnet, so high operating margins and high yield can be achieved in large scale integrated circuit (IC) fabrication. The MHRAM has short access times (less than 100 nsec). Write access time is short because on-chip transistors are used to gate current quickly, and magnetization reversal in the micromagnet can occur in a matter of a few nanoseconds. Read access time is short because the high electron mobility sensor (InAs or InSb) produces a large signal voltage in response to the fringing magnetic field from the micromagnet. High storage density is achieved since a unit cell consists only of two transistors and one micromagnet Hall effect element. By comparison, a DRAM unit cell has one transistor and one capacitor, and a SRAM unit cell has six transistors.

  15. A random access memory immune to single event upset using a T-Resistor

    DOEpatents

    Ochoa, A. Jr.

    1987-10-28

    In a random access memory cell, a resistance ''T'' decoupling network in each leg of the cell reduces random errors caused by the interaction of energetic ions with the semiconductor material forming the cell. The cell comprises two parallel legs each containing a series pair of complementary MOS transistors having a common gate connected to the node between the transistors of the opposite leg. The decoupling network in each leg is formed by a series pair of resistors between the transistors together with a third resistor interconnecting the junction between the pair of resistors and the gate of the transistor pair forming the opposite leg of the cell. 4 figs.

  16. Complementary resistive switching behavior induced by varying forming current compliance in resistance random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Yi-Ting; Tsai, Tsung-Ming; Chang, Ting-Chang; Shih, Chih-Cheng; Chang, Kuan-Chang; Zhang, Rui; Chen, Kai-Huang; Chen, Jung-Hui; Li, Yu-Chiuan; Lin, Chih-Yang; Hung, Ya-Chi; Syu, Yong-En; Zheng, Jin-Cheng; Sze, Simon M.

    2015-05-01

    In this study of resistance random access memory in a resistive switching film, the breakdown degree was controlled by varying forming current compliance. A SiOx layer was introduced into the ZnO layer of the structure to induce both typical bipolar resistive switching (RS) and complementary resistive switching (CRS). In addition, the SiOx layer-generated vacuum spaces in typical bipolar RS can be verified by electrical characteristics. Changing forming current compliance strikingly modifies the oxygen storage capacity of the inserted SiOx layer. CRS can be achieved, therefore, by tuning the oxygen ion storage behavior made possible by the SiOx layer.

  17. Hydrogen induced redox mechanism in amorphous carbon resistive random access memory

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the bipolar resistive switching characteristics of the resistive random access memory (RRAM) device with amorphous carbon layer. Applying a forming voltage, the amorphous carbon layer was carbonized to form a conjugation double bond conductive filament. We proposed a hydrogen redox model to clarify the resistive switch mechanism of high/low resistance states (HRS/LRS) in carbon RRAM. The electrical conduction mechanism of LRS is attributed to conductive sp2 carbon filament with conjugation double bonds by dehydrogenation, while the electrical conduction of HRS resulted from the formation of insulating sp3-type carbon filament through hydrogenation process. PMID:24475979

  18. A stochastic simulation method for the assessment of resistive random access memory retention reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Berco, Dan Tseng, Tseung-Yuen

    2015-12-21

    This study presents an evaluation method for resistive random access memory retention reliability based on the Metropolis Monte Carlo algorithm and Gibbs free energy. The method, which does not rely on a time evolution, provides an extremely efficient way to compare the relative retention properties of metal-insulator-metal structures. It requires a small number of iterations and may be used for statistical analysis. The presented approach is used to compare the relative robustness of a single layer ZrO{sub 2} device with a double layer ZnO/ZrO{sub 2} one, and obtain results which are in good agreement with experimental data.

  19. One electron-controlled multiple-valued dynamic random-access-memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kye, H. W.; Song, B. N.; Lee, S. E.; Kim, J. S.; Shin, S. J.; Choi, J. B.; Yu, Y.-S.; Takahashi, Y.

    2016-02-01

    We propose a new architecture for a dynamic random-access-memory (DRAM) capable of storing multiple values by using a single-electron transistor (SET). The gate of a SET is designed to be connected to a plurality of DRAM unit cells that are arrayed at intersections of word lines and bitlines. In this SET-DRAM hybrid scheme, the multiple switching characteristics of SET enables multiple value data stored in a DRAM unit cell, and this increases the storage functionality of the device. Moreover, since refreshing data requires only a small amount of SET driving current, this enables device operating with low standby power consumption.

  20. Conductive Filament Expansion in TaOx Bipolar Resistive Random Access Memory during Pulse Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninomiya, Takeki; Katayama, Koji; Muraoka, Shunsaku; Yasuhara, Ryutaro; Mikawa, Takumi; Wei, Zhiqiang

    2013-11-01

    The post-cycling data retention of filamentary operated resistive random access memory (ReRAM) can be improved by minimizing conductive filament expansion during pulse cycling. We find that filament size gradually grows with increasing pulse cycles due to oxygen diffusion from the region surrounding each filament. To achieve long term use of ReRAM while suppressing filament expansion, the key is to control both electric power and pulse width input during switching. We minimize CF expansion based on this concept and demonstrate long data retention even after 106 pulse switchings under optimized reset conditions.

  1. Spin-transfer-torque efficiency enhanced by edge-damage of perpendicular magnetic random access memories

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Kyungmi; Lee, Kyung-Jin

    2015-08-07

    We numerically investigate the effect of magnetic and electrical damages at the edge of a perpendicular magnetic random access memory (MRAM) cell on the spin-transfer-torque (STT) efficiency that is defined by the ratio of thermal stability factor to switching current. We find that the switching mode of an edge-damaged cell is different from that of an undamaged cell, which results in a sizable reduction in the switching current. Together with a marginal reduction of the thermal stability factor of an edge-damaged cell, this feature makes the STT efficiency large. Our results suggest that a precise edge control is viable for the optimization of STT-MRAM.

  2. Analysis and modeling of resistive switching mechanisms oriented to resistive random-access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Da; Wu, Jun-Jie; Tang, Yu-Hua

    2013-03-01

    With the progress of the semiconductor industry, the resistive random-access memory (RAM) has drawn increasing attention. The discovery of the memristor has brought much attention to this study. Research has focused on the resistive switching characteristics of different materials and the analysis of resistive switching mechanisms. We discuss the resistive switching mechanisms of different materials in this paper and analyze the differences of those mechanisms from the view point of circuitry to establish their respective circuit models. Finally, simulations are presented. We give the prospect of using different materials in resistive RAM on account of their resistive switching mechanisms, which are applied to explain their resistive switchings.

  3. Optical and electronic error correction schemes for highly parallel access memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neifeld, Mark A.; Hayes, Jerry D.

    1993-11-01

    We have fabricated and tested an optically addressed, parallel electronic Reed-Solomon decoder for use with parallel access optical memories. A comparison with various serial implementations has demonstrated that for many instances of code block size and error correction capability, the parallel approach is superior from the perspectives of VLSI layout area and decoding latency. The demonstrated Reed-Solomon parallel pipeline decoder operates on 60 bit input words and has been demonstrated at a clock rate of 5 MHz yielding a demonstrated data rate of 300 Mbps.

  4. Random access memory immune to single event upset using a T-resistor

    DOEpatents

    Ochoa, Jr., Agustin

    1989-01-01

    In a random access memory cell, a resistance "T" decoupling network in each leg of the cell reduces random errors caused by the interaction of energetic ions with the semiconductor material forming the cell. The cell comprises two parallel legs each containing a series pair of complementary MOS transistors having a common gate connected to the node between the transistors of the opposite leg. The decoupling network in each leg is formed by a series pair of resistors between the transistors together with a third resistor interconnecting the junction between the pair of resistors and the gate of the transistor pair forming the opposite leg of the cell.

  5. Hydrogen doping in HfO2 resistance change random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, D.; Magyari-Köpe, B.; Nishi, Y.

    2016-01-01

    The structures and energies of hydrogen-doped monoclinic hafnium dioxide were calculated using density-functional theory. The electronic interactions are described within the LDA + U formalism, where on-site Coulomb corrections are applied to the 5d orbital electrons of Hf atoms and 2p orbital electrons of the O atoms. The effects of charge state, defect-defect interactions, and hydrogenation are investigated and compared with experiment. It is found that hydrogenation of HfO2 resistance-change random access memory devices energetically stabilizes the formation of oxygen vacancies and conductive vacancy filaments through multiple mechanisms, leading to improved switching characteristic and device yield.

  6. A stochastic simulation method for the assessment of resistive random access memory retention reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berco, Dan; Tseng, Tseung-Yuen

    2015-12-01

    This study presents an evaluation method for resistive random access memory retention reliability based on the Metropolis Monte Carlo algorithm and Gibbs free energy. The method, which does not rely on a time evolution, provides an extremely efficient way to compare the relative retention properties of metal-insulator-metal structures. It requires a small number of iterations and may be used for statistical analysis. The presented approach is used to compare the relative robustness of a single layer ZrO2 device with a double layer ZnO/ZrO2 one, and obtain results which are in good agreement with experimental data.

  7. TiO2 thin film based transparent flexible resistive switching random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Kim Ngoc; Dung Hoang, Van; Tran, Cao Vinh; Thang Phan, Bach

    2016-03-01

    In our work we have fabricated TiO2 based resistive switching devices both on transparent substrates (ITO, IGZO/glass) and transparent flexible substrate (ITO/PET). All devices demonstrate the reproducibility of forming free bipolar resistive switching with high transparency in the visible light range (∼80% at the wavelength of 550 nm). Particularly, transparent and flexible device exhibits stable resistive switching performance at the initial state (flat) and even after bending state up to 500 times with curvature radius of 10% compared to flat state. The achieved characteristics of resistive switching of TiO2 thin films seem to be promising for transparent flexible random access memory.

  8. Microstructural Characterization in Reliability Measurement of Phase Change Random Access Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Junsoo; Hwang, Kyuman; Park, Kwangho; Jeon, Seongbu; Kang, Dae-hwan; Park, Soonoh; Ahn, Juhyeon; Kim, Seoksik; Jeong, Gitae; Chung, Chilhee

    2011-04-01

    The cell failures after cycling endurance in phase-change random access memory (PRAM) have been classified into three groups, which have been analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Both stuck reset of the set state (D0) and stuck set of the reset state (D1) are due to a void created inside GeSbTe (GST) film or thereby lowering density of GST film. The decrease of the both set and reset resistances that leads to the tails from the reset distribution are induced from the Sb increase with cycles.

  9. Using the Remote Access Protocol for usability evaluation in X Windows

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, T.; Bauer, K.; Allen, H.

    1996-12-31

    The automatic evaluation of graphical user interfaces can help reduce development costs in the creation of new designs or modification of existing designs. Several standards for the X Window System have been proposed or implemented that could greatly reduce the time spent evaluating GUIs. We implemented a User Interface Testbed (UseIT) based on the proposed Remote Access Protocol (RAP) standard. UseIT was created to automatically record an end user`s interaction with a Motif GUI application without modification or re-linking of existing code. The recorded interaction could then be replayed or displayed visually for interpretation by a human factors specialist. The end goal was to recreate the GUI and automatically recommend design changes based upon the interactions.

  10. AquaUsers: Improving access to remotely sensed data for non-specialists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, Oliver; Walker, Peter; Calton, Ben; Miller, Peter

    2015-04-01

    In recent years more and more complex remotely sensed data have been made available to the public by national and international agencies. These data are also reprocessed by different organisations to produce secondary products that are of specific need to a community. For instance the production of chlorophyll concentration maps from ocean colour data provided by NASA for the marine community. Providing access to such data has normally been focused on simply making the data available with appropriate metadata so that domain specialists can make use of it. One area that has seen significant investment, both of time and money, has been in the production of web based data portals. Primarily these have focused on spatial data. By providing a web map visualisation users are able to quickly assess both spatial coverage and data values. Data portal improvements have been possible thanks to advancements in back end data servers such as Thredds and ncWMS as well as improvements in front-end libraries for data visualisation including OpenLayers and D3. Data portals that make use of these technological advancements have aimed at improving the access and use of data by trained scientific domain specialists. There is now a push to improve access to these systems by non-scientific domain specialists through several European Commission funded projects, including OPEC and AquaUsers. These projects have improved upon an open source web GIS portal created by Plymouth Marine Laboratory [https://github.com/pmlrsg/GISportal]. We will present the latest version of our GIS portal, discuss the designs steps taken to achieve the latest build and share user stories as to how non-domain specialists are now able to utilise the system and get benefits from remotely sensed data. A first version was produced and disseminated to end users for feedback. At this stage the end users included government advisors, fish farmers and scientific groups with no specific GIS training or knowledge. This