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Sample records for removable epoxy foam

  1. SREF - a Simple Removable Epoxy Foam decomposition chemistry model.

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, Michael L.

    2003-12-01

    A Simple Removable Epoxy Foam (SREF) decomposition chemistry model has been developed to predict the decomposition behavior of an epoxy foam encapsulant exposed to high temperatures. The foam is composed of an epoxy polymer, blowing agent, and surfactant. The model is based on a simple four-step mass loss model using distributed Arrhenius reaction rates. A single reaction was used to describe desorption of the blowing agent and surfactant (BAS). Three of the reactions were used to describe degradation of the polymer. The coordination number of the polymeric lattice was determined from the chemical structure of the polymer; and a lattice statistics model was used to describe the evolution of polymer fragments. The model lattice was composed of sites connected by octamethylcylotetrasiloxane (OS) bridges, mixed product (MP) bridges, and bisphenol-A (BPA) bridges. The mixed products were treated as a single species, but are likely composed of phenols, cresols, and furan-type products. Eleven species are considered in the SREF model - (1) BAS, (2) OS, (3) MP, (4) BPA, (5) 2-mers, (6) 3-mers, (7) 4-mers, (8) nonvolatile carbon residue, (9) nonvolatile OS residue, (10) L-mers, and (11) XL-mers. The first seven of these species (VLE species) can either be in the condensed-phase or gas-phase as determined by a vapor-liquid equilibrium model based on the Rachford-Rice equation. The last four species always remain in the condensed-phase. The 2-mers, 3-mers, and 4-mers are polymer fragments that contain two, three, or four sites, respectively. The residue can contain C, H, N, O, and/or Si. The L-mer fraction consists of polymer fragments that contain at least five sites (5-mer) up to a user defined maximum mer size. The XL-mer fraction consists of polymer fragments greater than the user specified maximum mer size and can contain the infinite lattice if the bridge population is less than the critical bridge population. Model predictions are compared to 133-thermogravimetric

  2. Response of removable epoxy foam exposed to fire using an element death model.

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, Michael L.

    2004-09-01

    Response of removable epoxy foam (REF) to high heat fluxes is described using a decomposition chemistry model [1] in conjunction with a finite element heat conduction code [2] that supports chemical kinetics and dynamic radiation enclosures. The chemistry model [1] describes the temporal transformation of virgin foam into carbonaceous residue by considering breakdown of the foam polymer structure, desorption of gases not associated with the foam polymer, mass transport of decomposition products from the reaction site to the bulk gas, and phase equilibrium. The finite element foam response model considers the spatial behavior of the foam by using measured and predicted thermophysical properties in combination with the decomposition chemistry model. Foam elements are removed from the computational domain when the condensed mass fractions of the foam elements are close to zero. Element removal, referred to as element death, creates a space within the metal confinement causing radiation to be the dominant mode of heat transfer between the surface of the remaining foam elements and the interior walls of the confining metal skin. Predictions were compared to front locations extrapolated from radiographs of foam cylinders enclosed in metal containers that were heated with quartz lamps [3,4]. The effects of the maximum temperature of the metal container, density of the foam, the foam orientation, venting of the decomposition products, pressurization of the metal container, and the presence or absence of embedded components are discussed.

  3. Epoxy Foam Encapsulants: Processing and Dielectric Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Linda Domeier; Marion Hunter

    1999-01-01

    The dielectric performance of epoxy foams was investigated to determine if such materials might provide advantages over more standard polyurethane foams in the encapsulation of electronic assemblies. Comparisons of the dielectric characteristics of epoxy and urethane encapsulant foams found no significant differences between the two resin types and no significant difference between as-molded and machined foams. This study specifically evaluated the formulation and processing of epoxy foams using simple methylhydrosiloxanes as the flowing agent and compared the dielectric performance of those to urethane foams of similar density.

  4. Method for epoxy foam production using a liquid anhydride

    DOEpatents

    Celina, Mathias

    2012-06-05

    An epoxy resin mixture with at least one epoxy resin of between approximately 50 wt % and 100 wt %, an anhydride cure agent of between approximately 0 wt % and approximately 50 wt %, a tert-butoxycarbonyl anhydride foaming agent of between proximately 0.1-20 wt %, a surfactant and an imidazole or similar catalyst of less than approximately 2 wt %, where the resin mixture is formed from at least one epoxy resin with a 1-10 wt % tert-butoxycarbonyl anhydride compound and an imidazole catalyst at a temperature sufficient to keep the resin in a suitable viscosity range, the resin mixture reacting to form a foaming resin which in the presence of an epoxy curative can then be cured at a temperature greater than 50.degree. C. to form an epoxy foam.

  5. Method of making thermally removable epoxies

    DOEpatents

    Loy, Douglas A.; Wheeler, David R.; Russick, Edward M.; McElhanon, James R.; Saunders, Randall S.

    2002-01-01

    A method of making a thermally-removable epoxy by mixing a bis(maleimide) compound to a monomeric furan compound containing an oxirane group to form a di-epoxy mixture and then adding a curing agent at temperatures from approximately room temperature to less than approximately 90.degree. C. to form a thermally-removable epoxy. The thermally-removable epoxy can be easily removed within approximately an hour by heating to temperatures greater than approximately 90.degree. C. in a polar solvent. The epoxy material can be used in protecting electronic components that may require subsequent removal of the solid material for component repair, modification or quality control.

  6. Epoxy foams using multiple resins and curing agents

    DOEpatents

    Russick, Edward M.; Rand, Peter B.

    2000-01-01

    An epoxy foam comprising a plurality of resins, a plurality of curing agents, at least one blowing agent, at least one surfactant and optionally at least one filler and the process for making. Preferred is an epoxy foam comprising two resins of different reactivities, two curing agents, a blowing agent, a surfactant, and a filler. According to the present invention, an epoxy foam is prepared with tailorable reactivity, exotherm, and pore size by a process of admixing a plurality of resins with a plurality of curing agents, a surfactant and blowing agent, whereby a foamable mixture is formed and heating said foamable mixture at a temperature greater than the boiling temperature of the blowing agent whereby said mixture is foamed and cured.

  7. Thermal degradation of new and aged urethane foam and epon 826 epoxy.

    SciTech Connect

    Kruizenga, Alan Michael; Mills, Bernice E.

    2013-08-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy was used to monitor the decomposition as a function of temperature for the foam and epoxy as a function of temperature in the range of 60C to 170C. Samples were studied with one day holds at each of the studied temperatures. Both new (FoamN and EpoxyN) and aged (FoamP and EpoxyP) samples were studied. During these ~10 day experiments, the foam samples lost 11 to 13% of their weight and the EpoxyN lost 10% of its weight. The amount of weight lost was difficult to quantify for EpoxyP because of its inert filler. The onset of the appearance of organic degradation products from FoamP began at 110C. Similar products did not appear until 120C for FoamN, suggesting some effect of the previous decades of storage for FoamP. In the case of the epoxies, the corresponding temperatures were 120C for EpoxyP and 110C for EpoxyN. Suggestions for why the aged epoxy seems more stable than newer sample include the possibility of incomplete curing or differences in composition. Recommendation to limit use temperature to 90-100C for both epoxy and foam.

  8. Thermo-mechanical behavior of epoxy shape memory polymer foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Prima, M. A.; Lesniewski, M.; Gall, K.; McDowell, D. L.; Sanderson, T.; Campbell, D.

    2007-12-01

    Shape memory polymer foams have significant potential in biomedical and aerospace applications, but their thermo-mechanical behavior under relevant deformation conditions is not well understood. In this paper we examine the thermo-mechanical behavior of epoxy shape memory polymer foams with an average relative density of nearly 20%. These foams are deformed under conditions of varying stress, strain, and temperature. The glass transition temperature of the foam was measured to be approximately 90 °C and compression and tensile tests were performed at temperatures ranging from 25 to 125 °C. Various shape recovery tests were used to measure recovery properties under different thermo-mechanical conditions. Tensile strain to failure was measured as a function of temperature to probe the maximum recovery limits of the foam in both temperature and strain space. Compression tests were performed to examine compressibility of the material as a function of temperature; these foams can be compacted as much as 80% and still experience full strain recovery over multiple cycles. Furthermore, both tensile strain to failure tests and cyclic compression recovery tests revealed that deforming at a temperature of 80 °C maximizes macroscopic strain recovery. Deformation temperatures above or below this optimal value lead to lower failure strains in tension and the accumulation of non-recoverable strains in cyclic compression. Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) scans of the foam at various compressed states were used to understand foam deformation mechanisms. The micro-CT studies revealed the bending, buckling, and collapse of cells with increasing compression, consistent with results from published numerical simulations.

  9. Development and Characterization of a New Epoxy Foam Encapsulant as an Ablefoam Replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, P.B.; Russick, E.M.

    1998-12-01

    A new epoxy foam encapsulant, EF-ARIO/20, has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) as a replacement for Ablefoam", an epoxy foam encapsulant used in the W76 Arming, Fusing, and Firing (Al%@) system. Since it contained toxic ingredients including a known carcinogen, Ablefoarn" is no longer commercially available. It has been demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) that the microstructure of the new epoxy foam is similar to that of Ablefoam@. Mechanical properties of tensile and compressive strength, and tensile and compressive modulus, and thermal properties of glass transition temperature (.TJ, and coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) have been measured for the new foam. Electrical properties of dielectric constant, dissipation factors, volume resistivity, and dielectric strength were also measured. These property measurements are comparable to those of Ablefoam@. Development and characterization of the new foam will be discusse~ and a comparison of mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties for the new epoxy foam and Ablefoam@ will be reported.

  10. Compaction of Expancel Microspheres and Epoxy Foam to 3 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, S R; Bonner, B P; Ryerson, F J; Chow, C S

    2006-01-30

    Pressure-volume relationships were measured for unexpanded Expancel microspheres, epoxy foam and one specimen of crushed foam powder. The specimens were jacketed in tin canisters and compressed at ambient temperature and low strain rates to 3 GPa in a solid medium press. Pressures were corrected for friction, and specimen volumes were calculated relative to a nickel standard. The pressure-volume curves for each material show large volume reductions at pressures below 0.1 GPa. The curves stiffen sharply at or near full density. Relatively little volume reduction is observed above 0.1 GPa, and most is recovered on unloading. The energy expended in compressing the materials to 3 GPa and the energy recovered on unloading were determined by numerically integrating the pressure-volume curves. The net energy, which includes absorbed energy, was found to be small. Compressibilities and bulk moduli were determined from the slopes of the pressure-volume curves. The Expancel bulk modulus above 0.1 GPa was found to be similar to that of isopentane. The pressure-volume data were fit to a model from the ceramics literature (Kawakita and Ludde, 1970). The model fits provided estimates of the initial specimen porosities and room pressure bulk moduli.

  11. Light-Weight Silver Plating Foam and Carbon Nanotube Hybridized Epoxy Composite Foams with Exceptional Conductivity and Electromagnetic Shielding Property.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yu; Li, Ying; Hua, Wei; Zhang, Aiming; Bao, Jianjun

    2016-09-14

    Herein, light-weight and exceptionally conductive epoxy composite foams were innovatively fabricated for electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding applications using multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and 3D silver-coated melamine foam (SF) as conductive frameworks. A novel and nontraditional polymer microsphere was used to reduce the material density. The preformed, highly porous, and electrically conductive SF provided channels for fast electron transport. The MWCNTs were used to offset the decrease in conductive pathways due to the crystal defects of the silver layer and the insulating epoxy resin. Consequently, an exceptional conductivity of 253.4 S m(-1), a remarkable EMI shielding effectiveness of above 68 dB at 0.05-18 GHz, and a thermal conductivity of 0.305 W mK(-1) were achieved in these novel foams employing only 2 wt % of MWCNTs and 3.7 wt % of silver due to the synergistic effects that originated in the MWCNT and SF. These parameters are substantially higher than that achieved for the foam containing 2 wt % MWCNTs. Also, the SF exhibited little weakening in the foamability of the epoxy blends and the compression properties of resulting foams. All the results indicated that this effort provided a novel, simple, low-cost, and easily industrialized concept for fabricating light-weight, high-strength epoxy composite foams for high-performance EMI shielding applications. PMID:27553528

  12. Method of preparation of removable syntactic foam

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Jr., Charles; Derzon, Dora K.; Nelson, Jill S.; Rand, Peter B.

    1995-01-01

    Easily removable, environmentally safe, low-density, syntactic foams are disclosed which are prepared by mixing insoluble microballoons with a solution of water and/or alcohol-soluble polymer to produce a pourable slurry, optionally vacuum filtering the slurry in varying degrees to remove unwanted solvent and solute polymer, and drying to remove residual solvent. The properties of the foams can be controlled by the concentration and physical properties of the polymer, and by the size and properties of the microballoons. The suggested solute polymers are non-toxic and soluble in environmentally safe solvents such as water or low-molecular weight alcohols. The syntactic foams produced by this process are particularly useful in those applications where ease of removability is beneficial, and could find use in packaging recoverable electronic components, in drilling and mining applications, in building trades, in art works, in the entertainment industry for special effects, in manufacturing as temporary fixtures, in agriculture as temporary supports and containers and for delivery of fertilizer, in medicine as casts and splints, as temporary thermal barriers, as temporary protective covers for fragile objects, as filters for particulate matter, which matter may be easily recovered upon exposure to a solvent, as in-situ valves (for one-time use) which go from maximum to minimum impedance when solvent flows through, and for the automatic opening or closing of spring-loaded, mechanical switches upon exposure to a solvent, among other applications.

  13. Method of preparation of removable syntactic foam

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, C. Jr.; Derzon, D.K.; Nelson, J.S.; Rand, P.B.

    1995-07-11

    Easily removable, environmentally safe, low-density, syntactic foams are disclosed which are prepared by mixing insoluble microballoons with a solution of water and/or alcohol-soluble polymer to produce a pourable slurry, optionally vacuum filtering the slurry in varying degrees to remove unwanted solvent and solute polymer, and drying to remove residual solvent. The properties of the foams can be controlled by the concentration and physical properties of the polymer, and by the size and properties of the microballoons. The suggested solute polymers are non-toxic and soluble in environmentally safe solvents such as water or low-molecular weight alcohols. The syntactic foams produced by this process are particularly useful in those applications where ease of removability is beneficial, and could find use in packaging recoverable electronic components, in drilling and mining applications, in building trades, in art works, in the entertainment industry for special effects, in manufacturing as temporary fixtures, in agriculture as temporary supports and containers and for delivery of fertilizer, in medicine as casts and splints, as temporary thermal barriers, as temporary protective covers for fragile objects, as filters for particulate matter, which matter may be easily recovered upon exposure to a solvent, as in-situ valves (for one-time use) which go from maximum to minimum impedance when solvent flows through, and for the automatic opening or closing of spring-loaded, mechanical switches upon exposure to a solvent, among other applications. 1 fig.

  14. Experimental investigation on influence of foam mobility on polychlorinated biphenyl removal in foam flushing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Chen, Jiajun

    2014-01-01

    Foam flushing is an in situ soil remediation technology based on the traditional surfactant flushing method. The mobility control by introduction of foam is helpful in improving this technology. In this study, foam flushing ofpolychlorinatedbiphenyl (PCB)-contaminated media was performed to evaluate the effect of foam mobility on PCB removal. The conductivity and sweep efficiency (SE) of foam with different Triton X-100 concentrations and gas contents through two sands (with permeability of 15 darcy and 120 darcy) were tested. The results indicate that the presence of foam can not only reduce the mobility and increase the SE values of washing agent in single media, but can also reduce the discrepancy of fluid mobility and SE values between different sands, primarily due to the additional capillary resistance arising from the Jamin effect. The increases of PCB removal by foam agreed with the increases of SE values: foam (5.00 g/L) flushing increased the PCB removal from 79.4% by solution flushing to 85.1% for coarse sand, and increased the value from 64.2% to 79.1% for fine sand. When surfactant concentration and gas-liquid ratio vary, the variation of PCB removal showed the same trend with the change of SE, and an opposite trend with the change of foam mobility. High concentration of surfactant (5.00 g/L) and a foam quality of 97.0% are most favourable for the reduction of foam mobility. On the other hand, the negative effect of foam caused by the reduction of effective cross-section will reduce the foam remediation efficiency, especially under a low Triton X-100 concentration condition. PMID:24645483

  15. Epoxy-functionalized mesostructured cellular foams as effective support for covalent immobilization of penicillin G acylase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Ping; Xu, Fang; Xu, Lidong

    2008-12-01

    The epoxy-functionalized mesoporous cellular foams (G-MCFs) with high specific surface area (˜400 m 2/g) and large-size mesopores (˜17 nm) were obtained by condensation of 3-glycidoxypropyltriethoxysilane (GPTS) and the surface silanol groups of mesoporous cellular foams (MCFs) and used as the support for immobilization of penicillin G acylase (PGA). The structural properties of G-MCF were characterized by FT-IR, N 2 adsorption, TG-DTA and 29Si MAS NMR. The studies indicated that the glycidoxypropyl groups were chemically bonded to the silicon atoms on the surface of MCF. The epoxy-functionalized mesoporous cellular foams can provide the microenvironments suitable for the immobilization of PGA, and the enzyme molecules could be immobilized covalently onto the G-MCF under mild conditions by reaction between the amino groups of the enzyme molecules and the epoxy groups on the surface of G-MCF. The PGA immobilized on G-MCF (PGA/G-MCF) exhibited the apparent activity of 1782 IU/g and 46.6% of activity recovery for hydrolyzing penicillin G potassium to produce 6-aminopenicillanic acid at 37 °C which were higher than that of PGA on pure silica MCF (1521 IU/g and 39.8%, respectively). The kinetic study also indicated that PGA immobilized on G-MCF has a Km of 2.1 × 10 -2 mol/L lower than that of PGA immobilized on the pure silica MCF (5.0 × 10 -2 mol/L). These may be attributed to the enhanced surface affinity between G-MCF support and the substrate molecules. Due to the covalent immobilization of PGA molecules on the surface of G-MCF, the immobilized PGA with considerable operational stability was achieved. The activity of PGA/G-MCF is still about 91.4% of its initial activity at the 10th cycle reuse while that of PGA/MCF only remains 41.5% of its initial activity at the same reuse numbers. In addition, the investigation results show the thermal stability and durability on acid or basic medium of PGA immobilized on G-MCF were improved remarkably.

  16. Carbon nanofiber reinforced epoxy matrix composites and syntactic foams - mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poveda, Ronald Leonel

    The tailorability of composite materials is crucial for use in a wide array of real-world applications, which range from heat-sensitive computer components to fuselage reinforcement on commercial aircraft. The mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties of composites are highly dependent on their material composition, method of fabrication, inclusion orientation, and constituent percentages. The focus of this work is to explore carbon nanofibers (CNFs) as potential nanoscale reinforcement for hollow particle filled polymer composites referred to as syntactic foams. In the present study, polymer composites with high weight fractions of CNFs, ranging from 1-10 wt.%, are used for quasi-static and high strain rate compression analysis, as well as for evaluation and characterization of thermal and electrical properties. It is shown that during compressive characterization of vapor grown carbon nanofiber (CNF)/epoxy composites in the strain rate range of 10-4-2800 s-1, a difference in the fiber failure mechanism is identified based on the strain rate. Results from compression analyses show that the addition of fractions of CNFs and glass microballoons varies the compressive strength and elastic modulus of epoxy composites by as much as 53.6% and 39.9%. The compressive strength and modulus of the syntactic foams is also shown to generally increase by a factor of 3.41 and 2.96, respectively, with increasing strain rate when quasi-static and high strain rate testing data are compared, proving strain rate sensitivity of these reinforced composites. Exposure to moisture over a 6 month period of time is found to reduce the quasi-static and high strain rate strength and modulus, with a maximum of 7% weight gain with select grades of CNF/syntactic foam. The degradation of glass microballoons due to dealkalization is found to be the primary mechanism for reduced mechanical properties, as well as moisture diffusion and weight gain. In terms of thermal analysis results, the

  17. Analysis and Tests of Reinforced Carbon-Epoxy/Foam-Core Sandwich Panels with Cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Donald J.; Rogers, Charles

    1996-01-01

    The results of a study of a low-cost structurally efficient minimum-gage shear-panel design that can be used in light helicopters are presented. The shear-panel design is based on an integrally stiffened syntactic-foam stabilized-skin with an all-bias-ply tape construction for stabilized-skin concept with an all-bias-ply tape construction for the skins. This sandwich concept is an economical way to increase the panel bending stiffness weight penalty. The panels considered in the study were designed to be buckling resistant up to 100 lbs/in. of shear load and to have an ultimate strength of 300 lbs/in. The panel concept uses unidirectional carbon-epoxy tape on a syntactic adhesive as a stiffener that is co-cured with the skin and is an effective concept for improving panel buckling strength. The panel concept also uses pultruded carbon-epoxy rods embedded in a syntactic adhesive and over-wrapped with a bias-ply carbon-epoxy tape to form a reinforcing beam which is an effective method for redistributing load around rectangular cutout. The buckling strength of the reinforced panels is 83 to 90 percent of the predicted buckling strength based on a linear buckling analysis. The maximum experimental deflection exceeds the maximum deflection predicted by a nonlinear analysis by approximately one panel thickness. The failure strength of the reinforced panels was two and a half to seven times of the buckling strength. This efficient shear-panel design concept exceeds the required ultimate strength requirement of 300 lbs/in by more than 100 percent.

  18. Removal of color from textile dyeing wastewater by foam separation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ke; Zhang, Xiao-Long; Zhao, Yan-Li; Wu, Zhao-Liang

    2010-10-15

    The feasibility of foam separation for color removal from direct dyes-containing wastewater was assessed using actual textile wastewater as the research system and cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) as the collector. The influences of liquid loading volume, air flow rate, surfactant concentration, and initial pH on the removal efficiency and reuse of CTAB in the foamate were studied. The results indicated that using CTAB as a collector for foam separation can provide good foaming quality and effectively remove color from textile wastewater. Under optimum operational conditions (liquid loading volume 450 mL, gas flow rate of 500 mL/min, CTAB concentration 20 mg/L, and an initial pH of 7.0), the removal efficiency reached 88.9%. The residual dye content met the discharge standard for the dyeing and finishing textile industry (GB4287-92) published by the Ministry of Environmental Protection of the People's Republic of China. Using recycled foamate in untreated wastewater, the removal efficiency of 87.5% was obtained with CTAB concentration 10 mg/L of the wastewater. PMID:20599321

  19. Thermal characterization and model free kinetics of aged epoxies and foams using TGA and DSC methods.

    SciTech Connect

    Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel; Kruizenga, Alan Michael; Nissen, April

    2013-10-01

    Two classes of materials, poly(methylene diphenyl diisocyanate) or PMDI foam, and cross-linked epoxy resins, were characterized using thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), to help understand the effects of aging and %E2%80%9Cbake-out%E2%80%9D. The materials were evaluated for mass loss and the onset of decomposition. In some experiments, volatile materials released during heating were analyzed via mass spectroscopy. In all, over twenty materials were evaluated to compare the mass loss and onset temperature for decomposition. Model free kinetic (MFK) measurements, acquired using variable heating rate TGA experiments, were used to calculate the apparent activation energy of thermal decomposition. From these compiled data the effects of aging, bake-out, and sample history on the thermal stability of materials were compared. No significant differences between aged and unaged materials were detected. Bake-out did slightly affect the onset temperature of decomposition but only at the highest bake-out temperatures. Finally, some recommendations for future handling are made.

  20. Removal of Mercury by Foam Fractionation Using Surfactin, a Biosurfactant

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hau-Ren; Chen, Chien-Cheng; Reddy, A. Satyanarayana; Chen, Chien-Yen; Li, Wun Rong; Tseng, Min-Jen; Liu, Hung-Tsan; Pan, Wei; Maity, Jyoti Prakash; Atla, Shashi B.

    2011-01-01

    The separation of mercury ions from artificially contaminated water by the foam fractionation process using a biosurfactant (surfactin) and chemical surfactants (SDS and Tween-80) was investigated in this study. Parameters such as surfactant and mercury concentration, pH, foam volume, and digestion time were varied and their effects on the efficiency of mercury removal were investigated. The recovery efficiency of mercury ions was highly sensitive to the concentration of the surfactant. The highest mercury ion recovery by surfactin was obtained using a surfactin concentration of 10 × CMC, while recovery using SDS required < 10 × CMC and Tween-80 >10 × CMC. However, the enrichment of mercury ions in the foam was superior with surfactin, the mercury enrichment value corresponding to the highest metal recovery (10.4%) by surfactin being 1.53. Dilute solutions (2-mg L−1 Hg2+) resulted in better separation (36.4%), while concentrated solutions (100 mg L−1) enabled only a 2.3% recovery using surfactin. An increase in the digestion time of the metal solution with surfactin yielded better separation as compared with a freshly-prepared solution, and an increase in the airflow rate increased bubble production, resulting in higher metal recovery but low enrichment. Basic solutions yielded higher mercury separation as compared with acidic solutions due to the precipitation of surfactin under acidic conditions. PMID:22174661

  1. Improved wetting behavior and thermal conductivity of the three-dimensional nickel foam/epoxy composites with graphene oxide as interfacial modifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Liang; Zhu, Pengli; Li, Gang; Sun, Rong

    2016-05-01

    The partial reduced graphene oxide (P-rGO) sheets-wrapped nickel foams (NF@P-rGO) were prepared by hydrothermal method, and then their epoxy composites were fabricated via a simple drop-wetting process. The P-rGO sheets on the metal networks could effectively improve the compatibility between nickel foam and epoxy resin, thus greatly accelerate the wetting of epoxy resin on the foams and avoid cracks in the network-polymer interface. Owing to the existence of high-efficiency conductive metal networks, the NF@P-rGO/epoxy composite has a high thermal conductivity of 0.584 W m-1 K-1, which is 2.6 times higher than that of neat epoxy resin. Additionally, owing to the improved wetting ability, NF@P-rGO-10 wt% boron nitride (BN) microsheets/epoxy composites could be fabricated and have a further higher thermal conductivity of 0.71 W m-1 K-1. We believe the use of P-rGO as a novel surface modifier and the following liquid polymer drop-wetting could be an effective method to obtain novel and outstanding metal foam/polymer composites.

  2. Active Debris Removal System Based on Polyurethane Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzitelli, Federico; Valdatta, Marcelo; Bellini, Niccolo; Candini Gian, Paolo; Rastelli, Davide; Romei, Fedrico; Locarini, Alfredo; Spadanuda, Antonio; Bagassi, Sara

    2013-08-01

    Space debris is an increasing problem. The exponential increase of satellite launches in the last 50 years has determined the problem of space debris especially in LEO. The remains of past missions are dangerous for both operative satellites and human activity in space. But not only: it has been shown that uncontrolled impacts between space objects can lead to a potentially dangerous situation for civil people on Earth. It is possible to reach a situation of instability where the big amount of debris could cause a cascade of collisions, the so called Kessler syndrome, resulting in the infeasibility of new space missions for many generations. Currently new technologies for the mitigation of space debris are under study: for what concerning the removal of debris the use of laser to give a little impulse to the object and push it in a graveyard orbit or to be destroyed in the atmosphere. Another solution is the use of a satellite to rendezvous with the space junk and then use a net to capture it and destroy it in the reentry phase. In a parallel way the research is addressed to the study of deorbiting solutions to prevent the formation of new space junk. The project presented in this paper faces the problem of how to deorbit an existing debris, applying the studies about the use of polyurethane foam developed by Space Robotic Group of University of Bologna. The research is started with the Redemption experiment part of last ESA Rexus program. The foam is composed by two liquid components that, once properly mixed, trig an expansive reaction leading to an increase of volume whose entity depends on the chemical composition of the two starting components. It is possible to perform two kind of mission: 1) Not controlled removal: the two components are designed to react producing a low density, high expanded, spongy foam that incorporates the debris. The A/m ratio of the debris is increased and in this way also the ballistic parameter. As a consequence, the effect of

  3. Removal of High Concentration Chromium by a Foam-separating Technique Using Casein Proteins as a Foaming Reagent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Futoshi

    Foam separation of high concentration chromium in leather tanning wastewater was investigated using casein protein as a foaming reagent5mL of5w/v% ammonium acetate buffer was added to the sample chromium water. After adjusting the pH to 9.0,4g/L concentrations of casein and gelatin solution were added to recovery the coagulating flocs of chromium resulting foam separation. The sample water containing chromium flocs was incased in reactor, then mixed with distilled water and 1mL of ethanol to sum 200mL total. The foam separation was performed at time intervals of 3min with an air flow rate of 300mL/min. With casein reagent, the removal rate of chromium was not influenced by the presence of NaCl, however, the rate decreased tendency using with the use of gelatin. The proposed method, utilizing 4g/L of casein solution with water, was not influenced by the presence of calcium (<34mM), magnesium (<1mM), carbonate (<0.5mM), bicarbonate (<1.2mM) nor sulfate (<350mM) ions, and is ideal for foam separation in chromium concentrations of about 100mgCr/L.

  4. Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornick, Marc

    Phenolic foam is a unique cellular material that can be utilized in either a fully open cell structure or a completely closed cell structure in a diversity of applications such as open cellular material for floral foam, soil propagation media and/or orthopedic use, and closed cell phenolic foam primarily for thermal insulation. Thus, phenolic foam is much more versatile than other competitive organic foams such as polystyrene and polyurethane with the latter materials being more heavily involved in thermal insulation. Foam processing can consider batch, semi-continuous, or continuous conditions, and the features and weaknesses of the appropriate processes are discussed along with continuous mix heads involving high and low pressure conditions.

  5. Surfactant foam technology for in situ removal of heavy chlorinated compounds-DNAPLs.

    PubMed

    Maire, Julien; Coyer, Amandine; Fatin-Rouge, Nicolas

    2015-12-15

    The use of surfactant foam for the remediation of a saturated soil contaminated with a dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) was investigated at bench-scale. Despite the presence of the DNAPL, high foam stability was obtained for a mixture of cocamidopropyl betaïne and dodecylsulfate at 0.05%. Foams were assessed in different injection conditions and were compared to commonly used remediation methods. Strong foams improved significantly the DNAPL recovery yield, which amounted up to 98%, owing to the propagation of a flat foam front, with low dissolution (<0.5 g l(-1)) and surfactant consumption (<10 g kg(-1) DNAPL recovered). The effects of important parameters (gas to liquid ratio, injection velocity, gas nature) and methods for foam production on pressure gradient (∇P), remediation efficiency and surfactant consumption were investigated. Even for low injection velocities (4×10(-4) ms(-1)), capillary numbers were high enough (∼8×10(-3)) to push the DNAPL efficiently. DNAPL lowered ∇P for foam propagation because of its destabilising effect. The use of CO2 as gas reduced the ∇Ps for foam propagation by 35%. ∇P were also decreased by 25% for gas to liquid ratios lower than 75%, whereas, DNAPL removal remained high. This technology should lower spreading risks and treatment costs. PMID:26291781

  6. Removal of lead ions in aqueous solution by hydroxyapatite/polyurethane composite foams.

    PubMed

    Jang, Suk Hyun; Min, Byung Gil; Jeong, Young Gyu; Lyoo, Won Seok; Lee, Sang Cheol

    2008-04-15

    We have prepared hydroxyapatite/polyurehthane (HAp/PU) composite foams with two different HAp contents of 20 and 50 wt.% and investigated their removal capability of Pb2+ ions from aqueous solutions with various initial Pb2+ ion concentrations and pH values of 2-6. HAp/PU composite foams synthesized exhibited well-developed open pore structures which provide paths for the aqueous solution and adsorption sites for Pb2+ ions. With increasing the HAp content in the composites, the removal capability of Pb2+ ions by the composite foams increases owing to the higher adsorption capacity, whereas the removal rate is slower due to the less uniform dispersity of HAp in composite foams. The removal rate of Pb2+ ions is also slower with increasing the initial Pb2+ ion concentration in aqueous solutions. The removal mechanism of Pb2+ ion by the composites is varied, depending on the pH value of aqueous solution: the dissolution of HAp and precipitation of hydroypyromorphite is dominant at lower pH 2-3, the adsorption of Pb2+ ions on the HAp/PU composite surface and ion exchange reaction between Ca2+ of HAp and Pb2+ in aqueous solution is dominant at higher pH 5-6, and two removal mechanisms compete at pH 4. The equilibrium removal process of Pb2+ ions by the HAp/PU composite foam at pH 5 was described well with the Langmuir isotherm model, resulting in the maximum adsorption capacity of 150 mg/g for the composite foam with 50 wt.% HAp content. PMID:17850963

  7. The effects on tensile, shear, and adhesive mechanical properties when recycled epoxy/fiberglass is used as an alternative for glass microballoons in fiberglass foam core sandwiches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Dru Matthew

    The problem of this study was to determine whether fiberglass foam core sandwiches made with recycled epoxy/fiberglass have equal or better flatwise tension, shear, and peel (adhesion) mechanical properties when compared with composite sandwiches made with industry standard glass microballoons. Recycling epoxy/fiberglass could save money by: (1) reusing cured composite materials, (2) consuming less virgin composite materials, (3) spending less on transportation and disposing of unusable composites, and (4) possibly enabling companies to sell their recycled composite powder to other manufacturers. This study used three mechanical property tests, which included: flatwise tensile test, shear test, and peel (adhesion) test. Each test used 300 samples for a combined total of 900 sandwich test samples for this study. A factorial design with three independent variables was used. The first variable, filler type, had three levels: no filler, microballoon filler, and recycled epoxy/fiberglass filler. The second variable, foam density, had four levels: 3 lb/ft³, 4 lb/ft³, 5 lb/ft³, and 6 lb/ft³. The third variable, filler percentage ratio, had eight levels: 0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40%, 50%, 60%, and 70%. The results of this study revealed two primary conclusions. The first conclusion was that sandwich test panels produced with recycled epoxy/fiberglass powder were equal or significantly better in tensile, shear, and peel (adhesion) strength than sandwiches produced with hollow glass microballoons. The second conclusion was that sandwich test panels produced with recycled epoxy/fiberglass powder were equal or significantly lighter in weight than sandwiches produced with hollow glass microballoons.

  8. Lead and copper removal from aqueous solutions using carbon foam derived from phenol resin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Gu; Jeon, Jun-Woo; Hwang, Min-Jin; Ahn, Kyu-Hong; Park, Chanhyuk; Choi, Jae-Woo; Lee, Sang-Hyup

    2015-07-01

    Phenolic resin-based carbon foam was prepared as an adsorbent for removing heavy metals from aqueous solutions. The surface of the produced carbon foam had a well-developed open cell structure and the specific surface area according to the BET model was 458.59m(2)g(-1). Batch experiments showed that removal ratio increased in the order of copper (19.83%), zinc (34.35%), cadmium (59.82%), and lead (73.99%) in mixed solutions with the same initial concentration (50mgL(-1)). The results indicated that the Sips isotherm model was the most suitable for describing the experimental data of lead and copper. The maximum adsorption capacity of lead and copper determined to Sips model were 491mgg(-1) and 247mgg(-1). The obtained pore diffusion coefficients for lead and copper were found to be 1.02×10(-6) and 2.42×10(-7)m(2)s(-1), respectively. Post-sorption characteristics indicated that surface precipitation was the primary mechanism of lead and copper removal by the carbon foam, while the functional groups on the surface of the foam did not affect metal adsorption. PMID:25819762

  9. Forming foam structures with carbon foam substrates

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, Richard L.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Coronado, Paul R.; Baumann, Theodore F.

    2012-11-06

    The invention provides foams of desired cell sizes formed from metal or ceramic materials that coat the surfaces of carbon foams which are subsequently removed. For example, metal is located over a sol-gel foam monolith. The metal is melted to produce a metal/sol-gel composition. The sol-gel foam monolith is removed, leaving a metal foam.

  10. Removal of trace Cd2+ from aqueous solution by foam fractionation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jian; Li, Ying; Zhang, Sen; Sun, Yange

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, aqueous foam was known as an efficient technique with high potential on being used to remove heavy metal ions from the polluted water, not only because of the low cost, simple operation, but also ascribed to the high removal efficiency of trace heavy metal ions and would not cause secondary pollution to the environment. In this paper, the removal of Cd(2+) from aqueous solution by aqueous foam stabilized by a kind of novel anionic-nonionic surfactant sodium trideceth-4 carboxylate (AEC) was investigated. The effect of conditions such as surfactant/metal ions molar ratio, surfactant concentration on the removal efficiency was studied. In large concentration range of surfactant, the removal rate was higher than 90%, and could reach up to 99.8% under the optimum conditions. The Zeta potential of gas bubbles in the AEC solutions was determined to verify the combination between the negative charged group heads of surfactant molecules and heavy metal ions, and isothermal titration calorimeter (ITC) determination was utilized to demonstrate the interaction, which helped to understand the mechanisms more clearly. PMID:25603296

  11. Removal of heavy metals from a chelated solution with electrolytic foam separation

    SciTech Connect

    Min-Her Leu; Juu-En Chang; Ming-Sheng Ko

    1994-11-01

    An experimental study was conducted on the chelation and electrolytic foam separation of trace amounts of copper, nickel, zinc, and cadmium from a synthetic chelated metal wastewater. Sodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA), citrate, sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (NDDTC), and potassium ethyl xanthate (KEtX) were used with sodium dodecylsulfate (NaDS) as a foam-producing agent. Experimental results from an electrolytic foam separation process showed that chelating agents NDDTC and KEtX, due to their higher chelating strength and hydrophobic property, can efficiently separate Cu and Ni from chelated compounds (Cu, Ni/EDTA, and Cu, Ni/citrate). In a Cu-EDTA-NDDTC system with a chelating agent/metal ratio of 4, the residual Cu(II) concentration is 0.7 mg/L. The effects of chelating agent types and different chelating agents concentrations on the removal of metal ions were studied. The effect of NaDS dosage on flotation behavior and the efficiency of metal removal were also investigated.

  12. Removal of organic compounds from water by using a gold nanoparticle-poly(dimethylsiloxane) nanocomposite foam.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ritu; Kulkarni, Giridhar U

    2011-06-20

    A low density, highly compressible, porous foam of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) incorporated with Au nanoparticles (10-50 nm) has been synthesized by using a single-step process with water as a medium. It exhibits high swelling ability (≈600%) against benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX)-a property that has been exploited in the removal of oil spills from water. It is resistant to harsh chemical environments. It is also effective against odorous sulfur containing contaminants such as thioanisole. It works repeatedly and efficiently over many cycles. The regeneration of the foam is rather simple: heating in air to 300 °C for short time brings back its original activity. The fascinating properties of Au nanoparticles could be mingled with those of PDMS to provide a sustainable and practical solution for water treatment. It is also demonstrated to work effectively for deodorizing garlic extract with a promise as a food packaging material. PMID:21567977

  13. Controlled Contamination of Epoxy Composites with PDMS and Removal by Laser Ablation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmieri, Frank; Ledesma, Rodolfo; Cataldo, Daniel; Lin, Yi; Wohl, Christopher; Gupta, Mool; Connell, John

    2016-01-01

    Surface preparation is critical to the performance of adhesively bonded composites. During manufacturing, minute quantities of mold release compounds are inevitably deposited on faying surfaces and may compromise bond performance. To ensure safety, mechanical fasteners and other crack arrest features must be installed in the bondlines of primary structures, which negates some advantages of adhesively bonded construction. Laser ablation is an automated, repeatable, and scalable process with high potential for the surface preparation of metals and composites in critical applications such as primary airframe structures. In this study, laser ablation is evaluated on composite surfaces for the removal of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a common mold release material. Composite panels were contaminated uniformly with PDMS film thicknesses as low as 6.0 nm as measured by variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry. Bond performance was assessed by mechanical testing using a 250 F cure, epoxy adhesive and compared with pre-bond surface inspection results. Water contact angle, optically stimulated electron emission, and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy were used to characterize contaminated and laser ablated surfaces. The failure mode obtained from double cantilever beam tests correlated well with surface characterization data. The test results indicated that even low levels of PDMS were not completely removed by laser ablation.

  14. Hierarchical Assembly of Tungsten Spheres and Epoxy Composites in Three-Dimensional Graphene Foam and Its Enhanced Acoustic Performance as a Backing Material.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yunfeng; Liu, Jingjing; Lu, Yue; Zhang, Rui; Cao, Wenwu; Hu, PingAn

    2016-07-20

    Backing materials play important role in enhancing the acoustic performance of an ultrasonic transducer. Most backing materials prepared by conventional methods failed to show both high acoustic impedance and attenuation, which however determine the bandwidth and axial resolution of acoustic transducer, respectively. In the present work, taking advantage of the structural feature of 3D graphene foam as a confined space for dense packing of tungsten spheres with the assistance of centrifugal force, the desired structural requirement for high impedance is obtained. Meanwhile, superior thermal conductivity of graphene contributes to the acoustic attenuation via the conversion of acoustic waves to thermal energy. The tight contact between tungstate spheres, epoxy matrix, or graphene makes the acoustic wave depleted easily for the absence of air barrier. The as-prepared 3DG/W80 wt %/epoxy film in 1 mm, prepared using ∼41 μm W spheres in diameter, not only displays acoustic impedance of 13.05 ± 0.11 MRayl but also illustrates acoustic attenuation of 110.15 ± 1.23 dB/cm MHz. Additionally, the composite film exhibits a high acoustic absorption coefficient, which is 94.4% at 1 MHz and 100% at 3 MHz, respectively. Present composite film outperforms most of the reported backing materials consisting of metal fillers/polymer blending in terms of the acoustic impedance and attenuation. PMID:27352024

  15. A vibrating razor blade machining tool for material removal on low- density foams

    SciTech Connect

    Hillyer, D.F. Jr.

    1990-10-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed an accurate method of machining low-density foams into rectangular blank shapes by using a commercial oscillating razor blade machining tool concept marketed as a Vibratome. Since 1970, Vibratome has been used by medical laboratories to section fresh or fixed animal and plant tissues without freezing or embedding. By employing a vibrating razor blade principle, Vibratome sectioning avoids the alteration of morphology and the destruction of enzyme activities. The patented vibrating blade principle moves the sectioning razor blade in a reciprocating arcuate path as it penetrates the specimen. Sectioning takes place in a liquid bath using an ordinary injector-type razor blade. Although other commercial products may accomplish the same task, the Vibratome concept is currently being used at LLNL to obtain improved foam surface qualities from razor machining by combining state-of-the-art air bearing hardware with precise linear motion and an electrodynamic exciter that generates sinusoidal excitation. Razor cut foam surfaces of less than 25 {mu}m (0.001 in.) flatness are achieved over areas of 8.75 in.{sup 2} (2.5 {times} 3.5 in.). Razor machining of wide or narrow foam surfaces is generally characterized by a continuous curl chip for the full length of the material removed. This continuous chip facilitates flatness and prevents increased surface densities caused by material chip collection often left in the surface cells by conventional machine tools. This report covers the design evolution of razor machining of non-metallic soft materials. Hardware that maintains close dimensional tolerances and concurrently leaves the machined surface free of physical property changes is described. 20 figs.

  16. Removal of trace levels of aromatic amines from aqueous solution by foam flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Nyssen, G.A.; White, J.S. ); Bibring, P.; Wilson, D.J. )

    1990-04-01

    Aromatic amines, including 4-(t-butyl)pyridine, 4-(n-butyl)-aniline, benzylamine, 4-aminobiphenyl, 1- and 2-aminonaphthalene, and 2,6-xylidine were effectively removed from water by foam flotation with the anionic surfactant sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS). With initial amine concentrations of 10 mg/L or less, residual amine concentrations of less than 0.1 mg/L were generally obtained after 10-30 min of flotation. The SDS concentration and flotation time are directly related to the amount of amine removed. Amine removal is most efficient at pH values low enough so that the amine is protonated (usually about 3), and at low ionic strength. Alcohols up to 10% by volume do not appreciably affect amine removal. The mechanism of removal is dominated by ion-ion attraction between the surfactant and the protonated amine; there is also apparently some contribution from ion-dipole attraction. Benzidine is not removed effectively; evidently it is insufficiently hydrophobic.

  17. Simultaneous removal of heavy metal ions from wastewater by foam separation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, S.D.; Huang, M.K.; Gua, J.Y.; Wu, T.P.; Huang, J.Y.

    1988-04-01

    The objective of the present work is to extend the application of adsorbing colloid flotation techniques to remove mixtures of metal ions. The systems studied are: 1) Co(II) and Cr(VI); 2) Co(II), Ni(II), and Cr(VI); 3) Cr(VI), Cu(II), and Zn(II); 4) Cr(VI), Cu(II), Zn(II), and Ni(II); 5) Cd(II), Pd(II), and Cu(II). Ferric hydroxide and aluminum hydroxide were used as the coprecipitant, and sodium lauryl sulfate was used as the collector and frother. The ionic strength of the solution was adjusted with NaNO/sub 3/ or Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. It was found that all the heavy metals can be removed effectively by a single step foam flotation treatment.

  18. Colloid-chemical properties of surfactant solutions used to remove hydrocarbon liquids from solid surfaces by means of foams

    SciTech Connect

    Kruglitskii, N.N.; Goncharov, V.N.; Tikhomirov, V.K.

    1986-07-01

    The results are reported of an investigation of some of the colloid-chemical properties of anionically active surfactant solutions (surface-tension isotherms, initial spreading and penetration coefficients, foam-forming power, and foam stability, including that at an interface with a gas condensate, etc.) in connection with the devising of a surfactant composition for the foam cleansing of main gas pipelines from a gas condensate (GC). The best results as regards the rate of GC removal are obtained when using solutions of the alkyl sulphates (AS) of a C/sub 10/-C/sub 13/ fraction with addition of higher aliphatic alcohols (HAA), and this correlates with data obtained for the foam-forming power of the solutions in question in presence of a condensate. Solutions (1%) of the sulfethoxylates of a C/sub 10/-C/sub 13/ fraction are also acceptable for cleansing gas pipelines from GC.

  19. Epoxy resin

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Glenn R.; Salyer, Ival O.; Ball, III, George L.

    1976-07-13

    By mixing one part of a prepolymer containing a polyamine partially polymerized with an organic epoxide and subsequently reacted with a fatty acid containing from 8 to 32 carbon atoms, and then reacting this prepolymer mixture with 3 parts of an organic epoxide, a composition was obtained which made a gas frothable, shear-stable, room temperature curing, low density foam. A particularly advantageous prepolymer was prepared using a polyamine selected from the group consisting of diethylenetriamine, triethylenetetramine, and tetraethylenepentamine, partially polymerized with an organic epoxide having an average molecular weight of about 350 and having an epoxide equivalent of 185 to 192, and reacted with 2-10 weight percent linoleic acid. When one part of this prepolymer was reacted with about three parts of epoxy, and frothed by whipping in air or nitrogen an epoxy foam was produced which could be troweled onto surfaces and into corners or crevices, and subsequently cured, at near ambient temperature, to a strong dimensionally stable foam product.

  20. Application of carbon foam for heavy metal removal from industrial plating wastewater and toxicity evaluation of the adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Gu; Song, Mi-Kyung; Ryu, Jae-Chun; Park, Chanhyuk; Choi, Jae-Woo; Lee, Sang-Hyup

    2016-06-01

    Electroplating wastewater contains various types of toxic substances, such as heavy metals, solvents, and cleaning agents. Carbon foam was used as an adsorbent for the removal of heavy metals from real industrial plating wastewater. Its sorption capacity was compared with those of a commercial ion-exchange resin (BC258) and a heavy metal adsorbent (CupriSorb™) in a batch system. The experimental carbon foam has a considerably higher sorption capacity for Cr and Cu than commercial adsorbents for acid/alkali wastewater and cyanide wastewater. Additionally, cytotoxicity test showed that the newly developed adsorbent has low cytotoxic effects on three kinds of human cells. In a pilot plant, the carbon foam had higher sorption capacity for Cr (73.64 g kg(-1)) than for Cu (14.86 g kg(-1)) and Ni (7.74 g kg(-1)) during 350 h of operation time. Oxidation pretreatments using UV/hydrogen peroxide enhance heavy metal removal from plating wastewater containing cyanide compounds. PMID:26999028

  1. Removal of 2-butoxyethanol gaseous emissions by biotrickling filtration packed with polyurethane foam.

    PubMed

    Pérez, M C; Álvarez-Hornos, F J; Engesser, K H; Dobslaw, D; Gabaldón, C

    2016-03-25

    The removal of 2-butoxyethanol from gaseous emissions was studied using two biotrickling filters (BTF1 and BTF2) packed with polyurethane foam. Two different inoculum sources were used: a pure culture of Pseudomonas sp. BOE200 (BTF1) and activated sludge from a municipal wastewater treatment plant (BTF2). The bioreactors were operated at inlet loads (ILs) of 130 and 195 g m(-3) hour(-1) and at an empty bed residence time (EBRT) of 12.5s. Under an IL of ∼130 g m(-3) hour(-1), BTF1 presented higher elimination capacities (ECs) than BTF2, with average values of 106±7 and 68±8 g m(-3) hour(-1), respectively. However, differences in ECs between BTFs were decreased by reducing the irrigation intervals from 1 min every 12 min to 1 min every 2 hours in BTF2. Average values of EC were 111±25 and 90±7 g m(-3) hour(-1) for BTF1 and BTF2, respectively, when working at an IL of ∼195 g m(-3) hour(-1). Microbial analysis revealed a significant shift in the microbial community of BTF1 inoculated with Pseudomonas sp. BOE200. At the end of the experiment, the species Microbacterium sp., Chryseobacterium sp., Acinetobacter sp., Pseudomonas sp. and Mycobacterium sp. were detected. In BTF2 inoculated with activated sludge, the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) technique showed a diverse microbial community including species that was able to use 2-butoxyethanol as its carbon source, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida as representative species. Although BTF1 inoculated with Pseudomonas sp. BOE200 and higher gas velocity (probably greater gas/liquid mass transfer rate) showed a slight improvement in performance, the use of activated sludge as inoculum seems to be a more feasible option for the industrial application of this technology. PMID:26596886

  2. Polyurethane-Foam Maskant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodemeijer, R.

    1985-01-01

    Brown wax previously used to mask hardware replaced with polyurethane foam in electroplating and electroforming operations. Foam easier to apply and remove than wax and does not contaminate electrolytes.

  3. Development of a removable conformal coating through the synthetic incorporation of Diels-Adler thermally reversible adducts into an epoxy resin.

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, James Henry; Sawyer, Patricia Sue; Tallant, David Robert; Garcia, Manuel Joseph

    2005-02-01

    An epoxy-based conformal coating with a very low modulus has been developed for the environmental protection of electronic devices and for stress relief of those devices. The coating was designed to be removable by incorporating thermally-reversible Diels-Alder (D-A) adducts into the epoxy resin utilized in the formulation. The removability of the coating allows us to recover expensive components during development, to rebuild during production, to upgrade the components during their lifetime, to perform surveillance after deployment, and it aids in dismantlement of the components after their lifetime. The removability is the unique feature of this coating and was characterized by modulus versus temperature measurements, dissolution experiments, viscosity quench experiments, and FTIR. Both the viscosity quench experiments and the FTIR measurements allowed us to estimate the equilibrium constant of the D-A adducts in a temperature range from room temperature to 90 C.

  4. Magnetically driven floating foams for the removal of oil contaminants from water.

    PubMed

    Calcagnile, Paola; Fragouli, Despina; Bayer, Ilker S; Anyfantis, George C; Martiradonna, Luigi; Cozzoli, P Davide; Cingolani, Roberto; Athanassiou, Athanassia

    2012-06-26

    In this study, we present a novel composite material based on commercially available polyurethane foams functionalized with colloidal superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and submicrometer polytetrafluoroethylene particles, which can efficiently separate oil from water. Untreated foam surfaces are inherently hydrophobic and oleophobic, but they can be rendered water-repellent and oil-absorbing by a solvent-free, electrostatic polytetrafluoroethylene particle deposition technique. It was found that combined functionalization of the polytetrafluoroethylene-treated foam surfaces with colloidal iron oxide nanoparticles significantly increases the speed of oil absorption. Detailed microscopic and wettability studies reveal that the combined effects of the surface morphology and of the chemistry of the functionalized foams greatly affect the oil-absorption dynamics. In particular, nanoparticle capping molecules are found to play a major role in this mechanism. In addition to the water-repellent and oil-absorbing capabilities, the functionalized foams exhibit also magnetic responsivity. Finally, due to their light weight, they float easily on water. Hence, by simply moving them around oil-polluted waters using a magnet, they can absorb the floating oil from the polluted regions, thereby purifying the water underneath. This low-cost process can easily be scaled up to clean large-area oil spills in water. PMID:22577733

  5. Novel biopolymer-coated hydroxyapatite foams for removing heavy-metals from polluted water.

    PubMed

    Vila, M; Sánchez-Salcedo, S; Cicuéndez, M; Izquierdo-Barba, I; Vallet-Regí, María

    2011-08-15

    3D-macroporous biopolymer-coated hydroxyapatite (HA) foams have been developed as potential devices for the treatment of lead, cadmium and copper contamination of consumable waters. These foams have exhibited a fast and effective ion metal immobilization into the HA structure after an in vitro treatment mimicking a serious water contamination case. To improve HA foam stability at contaminated aqueous solutions pH, as well as its handling and shape integrity the 3D-macroporous foams have been coated with biopolymers polycaprolactone (PCL) and gelatine cross-linked with glutaraldehyde (G/Glu). Metal ion immobilization tests have shown higher and fast heavy metals captured as function of hydrophilicity rate of biopolymer used. After an in vitro treatment, foam morphology integrity is guaranteed and the uptake of heavy metal ions rises up to 405 μmol/g in the case of Pb(2+), 378 μmol/g of Cu(2+) and 316 μmol/g of Cd(2+). These novel materials promise a feasible advance in development of new, easy to handle and low cost water purifying methods. PMID:21616595

  6. Low density microcellular foams

    DOEpatents

    LeMay, J.D.

    1991-11-19

    Disclosed is a process of producing microcellular foam which comprises the steps of: (a) selecting a multifunctional epoxy oligomer resin; (b) mixing said epoxy resin with a non-reactive diluent to form a resin-diluent mixture; (c) forming a diluent containing cross-linked epoxy gel from said resin-diluent mixture; (d) replacing said diluent with a solvent therefore; (e) replacing said solvent with liquid carbon dioxide; and (f) vaporizing off said liquid carbon dioxide under supercritical conditions, whereby a foam having a density in the range of 35-150 mg/cc and cell diameters less than about 1 [mu]m is produced. Also disclosed are the foams produced by the process. 8 figures.

  7. Low density microcellular foams

    DOEpatents

    LeMay, James D.

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed is a process of producing microcellular foam which comprises the steps of: (a) selecting a multifunctional epoxy oligomer resin; (b) mixing said epoxy resin with a non-reactive diluent to form a resin-diluent mixture; (c) forming a diluent containing cross-linked epoxy gel from said resin-diluent mixture; (d) replacing said diluent with a solvent therefore; (e) replacing said solvent with liquid carbon dioxide; and (f) vaporizing off said liquid carbon dioxide under supercritical conditions, whereby a foam having a density in the range of 35-150 mg/cc and cell diameters less than about 1 .mu.m is produced. Also disclosed are the foams produced by the process.

  8. Removal of toluene and benzene from flue gas by a biotrickling filtration system which uses an urethane foam filter

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, Shigeki; Kitagawa, Mashayoshi

    1998-12-31

    A lab-scale research was conducted to study the toluene/benzene removal performance of a biotrickling filtration system. Urethane foam, which constituted a lattice-like structure internally, was used as the microbial carrier for the removal. This structure was found to be effective for minimizing drops in pressure (due to clogging), even under high space velocity conditions. The large specific surface area of the carrier (1200 m2/m3) also contributed to better removal performance. The space velocity (versus the packed bed) at 500 h-1(100 h-1 for most conventional biofiltration systems). Provided the target removal performance is obtained by such configuration, it may become possible to reduce the size of the biofiltration packed bed to one-fifth of that of conventional biofiltration systems. The test apparatus included a hard vinyl chloride column into which the microbial carrier was charged (layer of 500 mm). A nutrient solution, consisting of tap water mixed with nitrogen and phosphorus, was intermittently supplied into the column. The supply of nitrogen sources for microbial growth was regulated (ratio by weight versus the organic carbon load: Nitrogen:Carbon = 15:100) for improving removal performance. The temperature inside the column was maintained at 25. The flue gas was prepared by using reagent grade chemicals. The concentration of toluene and benzene was set at about 30 ppm. Following treatment of two months, the average removal percentages of toluene and benzene were 82% and 62%, respectively. On the other hand, average pressure drops (due to clogging) of the same were small, 12.8 mmH{sub 2}O/m and 7.2 mmH{sub 2}O/m, respectively. Such results indicated that this biotrickling filtration system using urethane foam has great potential as a considerably downsized system.

  9. Porous three-dimensional graphene foam/Prussian blue composite for efficient removal of radioactive 137Cs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Sung-Chan; Haldorai, Yuvaraj; Lee, Go-Woon; Hwang, Seung-Kyu; Han, Young-Kyu; Roh, Changhyun; Huh, Yun Suk

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a simple one-step hydrothermal reaction is developed to prepare composite based on Prussian blue (PB)/reduced graphene oxide foam (RGOF) for efficient removal of radioactive cesium (137Cs) from contaminated water. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy show that cubic PB nanoparticles are decorated on the RGO surface. Owing to the combined benefits of RGOF and PB, the composite shows excellent removal efficiency (99.5%) of 137Cs from the contaminated water. The maximum adsorption capacity is calculated to be 18.67 mg/g. An adsorption isotherm fit-well the Langmuir model with a linear regression correlation value of 0.97. This type of composite is believed to hold great promise for the clean-up of 137Cs from contaminated water around nuclear plants and/or after nuclear accidents.

  10. Porous three-dimensional graphene foam/Prussian blue composite for efficient removal of radioactive (137)Cs.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sung-Chan; Haldorai, Yuvaraj; Lee, Go-Woon; Hwang, Seung-Kyu; Han, Young-Kyu; Roh, Changhyun; Huh, Yun Suk

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a simple one-step hydrothermal reaction is developed to prepare composite based on Prussian blue (PB)/reduced graphene oxide foam (RGOF) for efficient removal of radioactive cesium ((137)Cs) from contaminated water. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy show that cubic PB nanoparticles are decorated on the RGO surface. Owing to the combined benefits of RGOF and PB, the composite shows excellent removal efficiency (99.5%) of (137)Cs from the contaminated water. The maximum adsorption capacity is calculated to be 18.67 mg/g. An adsorption isotherm fit-well the Langmuir model with a linear regression correlation value of 0.97. This type of composite is believed to hold great promise for the clean-up of (137)Cs from contaminated water around nuclear plants and/or after nuclear accidents. PMID:26670798

  11. Porous three-dimensional graphene foam/Prussian blue composite for efficient removal of radioactive 137Cs

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sung-Chan; Haldorai, Yuvaraj; Lee, Go-Woon; Hwang, Seung-Kyu; Han, Young-Kyu; Roh, Changhyun; Huh, Yun Suk

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a simple one-step hydrothermal reaction is developed to prepare composite based on Prussian blue (PB)/reduced graphene oxide foam (RGOF) for efficient removal of radioactive cesium (137Cs) from contaminated water. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy show that cubic PB nanoparticles are decorated on the RGO surface. Owing to the combined benefits of RGOF and PB, the composite shows excellent removal efficiency (99.5%) of 137Cs from the contaminated water. The maximum adsorption capacity is calculated to be 18.67 mg/g. An adsorption isotherm fit-well the Langmuir model with a linear regression correlation value of 0.97. This type of composite is believed to hold great promise for the clean-up of 137Cs from contaminated water around nuclear plants and/or after nuclear accidents. PMID:26670798

  12. Comparison of porous poly (vinyl alcohol)/hydroxyapatite composite cryogels and cryogels immobilized on poly (vinyl alcohol) and polyurethane foams for removal of cadmium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Min, Byung Gil

    2008-08-15

    Three novel adsorbents of hydroxyapatite/poly (vinyl alcohol) (HAp/PVA) cryogel, HAp/PVA cryogel immobilized on PVA foam and HAp/PVA cryogel immobilized on polyurethane (PU) foam have been investigated to compare the morphology and sorption performances for removal of cadmium. The adsorption kinetics was interpreted by double-exponential model, pseudo-first-order model and pseudo-second-order models. The equilibrium time was found to be 36, 24, and 12 h for cryogel, cryogel immobilized on PVA foam and PU foam, respectively. The adsorption was found to follow Langmuir isotherm model and the maximum sorption capacity was estimated to be 53.3, 53.1 and 47.7 mg g(-1) for cryogel, cryogel immobilized on PVA foam and PU foam. The effects of HAp/PVA ratio and drying method on cadmium sorption were also studied. The difference of adsorption kinetics model and equilibrium time among the three adsorbents was suggested to be ascribed to different pore size. Oven-dried HAp/PVA cryogel immobilized on PU foam was preferable due to short equilibrium time and good sorption ability. PMID:18262348

  13. Foam patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhry, Anil R; Dzugan, Robert; Harrington, Richard M; Neece, Faurice D; Singh, Nipendra P; Westendorf, Travis

    2013-11-26

    A method of creating a foam pattern comprises mixing a polyol component and an isocyanate component to form a liquid mixture. The method further comprises placing a temporary core having a shape corresponding to a desired internal feature in a cavity of a mold and inserting the mixture into the cavity of the mold so that the mixture surrounds a portion of the temporary core. The method optionally further comprises using supporting pins made of foam to support the core in the mold cavity, with such pins becoming integral part of the pattern material simplifying subsequent processing. The method further comprises waiting for a predetermined time sufficient for a reaction from the mixture to form a foam pattern structure corresponding to the cavity of the mold, wherein the foam pattern structure encloses a portion of the temporary core and removing the temporary core from the pattern independent of chemical leaching.

  14. Development of multifunctional shape memory polymer foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Janice J.; Srivastava, Ijya; Naguib, Hani E.

    2015-05-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMP) are a class of stimuli-responsive materials which are able to respond to external stimulus such as temperature and deformation by changing their shape, and return to their original shape upon reversal or removal of the external stimulus. Although SMP materials have been studied extensively and have been used in a wide range of applications such as medicine, aerospace, and robotics, only few studies have looked at the potential of designing multifunctional SMP foams and blends. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of a design of SMP foam materials and blends. The actuator construct will contain a core SMP epoxy and blend of polylactic acid and polyurethane. The effects of the processing parameters of shape memory polymer (SMP) foams on the shape memory effect (SME) were investigated. The solid state foaming technique was employed to obtain the desired foamed cellular structure. One particular point of interest is to understand how the processing parameters affect the SMP and its glass transition temperature (Tg). By correctly tailoring these parameters it is possible to modify the SMP to have an improved shape memory effect SME.

  15. Foam, Foam-resin composite and method of making a foam-resin composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cranston, John A. (Inventor); MacArthur, Doug E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    This invention relates to a foam, a foam-resin composite and a method of making foam-resin composites. The foam set forth in this invention comprises a urethane modified polyisocyanurate derived from an aromatic amino polyol and a polyether polyol. In addition to the polyisocyanurate foam, the composite of this invention further contains a resin layer, wherein the resin may be epoxy, bismaleimide, or phenolic resin. Such resins generally require cure or post-cure temperatures of at least 350.degree. F.

  16. Enhancing oil removal from water by immobilizing multi-wall carbon nanotubes on the surface of polyurethane foam.

    PubMed

    Keshavarz, Alireza; Zilouei, Hamid; Abdolmaleki, Amir; Asadinezhad, Ahmad

    2015-07-01

    A surface modification method was carried out to enhance the light crude oil sorption capacity of polyurethane foam (PUF) through immobilization of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) on the foam surface at various concentrations. The developed sorbent was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and tensile elongation test. The results obtained from thermogravimetric and tensile elongation tests showed the improvement of thermal and mechanical resistance of surface-modified foam. The experimental data also revealed that the immobilization of MWCNT on PUF surface enhanced the sorption capacity of light crude oil and reduced water sorption. The highest oil removal capacity was obtained for 1 wt% MWCNT on PUF surface which was 21.44% enhancement in light crude oil sorption compared to the blank PUF. The reusability of surface modified PUF was determined through four cycles of chemical regeneration using petroleum ether. The adsorption of light crude oil with 30 g initial mass showed that 85.45% of the initial oil sorption capacity of this modified sorbent was remained after four regeneration cycles. Equilibrium isotherms for adsorption of oil were analyzed by the Freundlich, Langmuir, Temkin, and Redlich-Peterson models through linear and non-linear regression methods. Results of equilibrium revealed that Langmuir isotherm is the best fitting model and non-linear method is a more accurate way to predict the parameters involved in the isotherms. The overall findings suggested the promising potentials of the developed sorbent in order to be efficiently used in large-scale oil spill cleanup. PMID:25917559

  17. Controllable Synthesis of Tetraethylenepentamine Modified Graphene Foam (TEPA-GF) for the Removal of Lead ions

    PubMed Central

    Han, Zhuo; Tang, Zhihong; Sun, Yuhang; Yang, Junhe; Zhi, Linjie

    2015-01-01

    3D graphene foam for water purification has become pervasive recently, not only because it has high specific surface area for adsorption capacity, but also it is easily separated from solution after adsorption. However, it is still challenging because it is hard to improve the adsorption capacity as well as maintain the high mechanical strength. To overcome the challenge, Tetraethylenepentamine modified Graphene Foam (TEPA-GF) was synthesized via a one-step hydrothermal method by using GO and TEPA as raw materials. TEPA acted as both cross-linker to combine GO sheets together and reductant of GO during hydrothermal process. Results indicated that the resultant hydrogel’s formation was highly dependent on the mass ratio of TEPA to GO, they cross-linked into a stable hydrogel with perfect cylindrical only when MTEPA: MGO ≥ 1. What’s more, the highest mechanical strength of GF happened at the mass ratio of MTEPA: MGO = 3, which was up to 0.58 kPa. It was worth noting that TEPA-GF demonstrated high adsorption capacity for lead ions, which reached as high as 304.9 mg g−1, much higher than that of other absorbents. Furthermore, TEPA-GF was easily separated from water after adsorption of Pb2+, making it a great potential material for water purification. PMID:26581493

  18. Low density microcellular foams

    DOEpatents

    LeMay, James D.

    1992-01-01

    Disclosed is a process of producing microcellular from which comprises the steps of: (a) selecting a multifunctional epoxy oligomer resin; (b) mixing said epoxy resin with a non-reactive diluent to form a resin-diluent mixture; (c) forming a diluent containing cross-linked epoxy gel from said resin-diluent mixture; (d) replacing said diluent with a solvent therefore; (e) replacing said solvent with liquid carbon dioxide; and (f) vaporizing off said liquid carbon dioxide under supercritical conditions, whereby a foam having a density in the range of 35-150 mg/cc and cell diameters less than about 1 .mu.m is produced. Also disclosed are the foams produced by the process.

  19. Use of foam flotation to remove tert-butylphenol from water

    SciTech Connect

    Wungrattanasopon, P.; Scamehorn, J.F.; Harwell, J.H.

    1996-06-01

    The surfactants cetyl pyridinium chloride (CPC) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) were used in a study of an adsorptive bubble flotation process in batch mode to remove tert-butylphenol (TBP) from water. The TBP removal is maximized when the surfactant concentration is around the critical micelle concentration (CMC). Since micelles form above the CMC, this indicate that the higher the surfactant monomer concentration, the better the removal, but the micelles compete with the air/water interface for the TBP, resulting in micelles reducing removal efficiency. The addition of NaCl to the feed solution results in a significant reduction of the ability of CPC to remove TBP, while it improves the ability of SDS to remove TBP.

  20. Temper Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Fabricated by Expanded Rubber & Plastics Corporation, Temper Foam provides better impact protection for airplane passengers and enhances passenger comfort on long flights because it distributes body weight and pressure evenly over the entire contact area. Called a "memory foam" it matches the contour of the body pressing against it and returns to its original shape once the pressure is removed. As a shock absorber, a three-inch foam pad has the ability to absorb the impact of a 10-foot fall by an adult. Applications include seat cushioning for transportation vehicles, padding for furniture and a variety of athletic equipment medical applications including wheelchair padding, artificial limb socket lining, finger splint and hand padding for burn patients, special mattresses for the bedridden and dental stools. Production and sales rights are owned by Temper Foam, Inc. Material is manufactured under license by the Dewey and Almy Division of Grace Chemical Corporation. Distributors of the product are Kees Goebel Medical Specialties, Inc. and Alimed, Inc. They sell Temper Foam in bulk to the fabricators who trim it to shapes required by their customers.

  1. Fabrication of three-dimensional graphene foam with high electrical conductivity and large adsorption capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guiqiang; Liu, Yanxia; Liu, Fei; Zhang, Xiao

    2014-08-01

    A three-dimensional (3D), free-standing graphene foam was prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition on nickel-foam. The prepared graphene foam was found to consist of few-layered vertically-aligned graphene sheets with highly graphite structure. Owing to the 3D interconnected porous nanostructures, the graphene foam exhibited a high electrical conductivity of 125 S/cm and a large surface area of 625.4 cm2/g. For practical application, we prepared the graphene foam/epoxy composites showing a maximum conductivity of 196 S/m at 2.5 vol.% filler loading, and a rather low percolation threshold of 0.18 vol.%. Furthermore, the derived graphene oxide foam exhibited an excellent absorption capability (177.6 mg/g for As(V), 399.3 mg/g for Pb(II)) and recyclability (above 90% removal efficiency after five cycles) for the removal of heavy metal ions. The present study reveals that the multifunctional graphene foam may broaden the graphene-based materials for the applications in electrically conductive composites and environmental cleanup.

  2. Repairing Foam Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corbin, J.; Buras, D.

    1986-01-01

    Large holes in polyurethane foam insulation repaired reliably by simple method. Little skill needed to apply method, used for overhead repairs as well as for those in other orientations. Plug positioned in hole to be filled and held in place with mounting fixture. Fresh liquid foam injected through plug to bond it in place. As foam cures and expands, it displaces plug outward. Protrusion later removed.

  3. Graphite Foam Heat Exchangers for Thermal Management

    SciTech Connect

    Klett, J.W.

    2004-06-07

    Improved thermal management is needed to increase the power density of electronic and more effectively cool electronic enclosures that are envisioned in future aircraft, spacecraft and surface ships. Typically, heat exchanger cores must increase in size to more effectively dissipate increased heat loads, this would be impossible in many cases, thus improved heat exchanger cores will be required. In this Phase I investigation, MRi aimed to demonstrate improved thermal management using graphite foam (Gr-foam) core heat exchangers. The proposed design was to combine Gr-foams from POCO with MRi's innovative low temperature, active metal joining process (S-Bond{trademark}) to bond Gr-foam to aluminum, copper and aluminum/SiC composite faceplates. The results were very favorable, so a Phase II SBIR with the MDA was initiated. This had primarily 5 tasks: (1) bonding, (2) thermal modeling, (3) cooling chip scale packages, (4) evaporative cooling techniques and (5) IGBT cold plate development. The bonding tests showed that the ''reflow'' technique with S-Bond{reg_sign}-220 resulted in the best and most consistent bond. Then, thermal modeling was used to design different chip scale packages and IGBT cold plates. These designs were used to fabricate many finned graphite foam heat sinks specifically for two standard type IC packages, the 423 and 478 pin chips. These results demonstrated several advantages with the foam. First, the heat sinks with the foam were lighter than the copper/aluminum sinks used as standards. The sinks for the 423 design made from foam were not as good as the standard sinks. However, the sinks made from foam for the 478 pin chips were better than the standard heat sinks used today. However, this improvement was marginal (in the 10-20% better regime). However, another important note was that the epoxy bonding technique resulted in heat sinks with similar results as that with the S-bond{reg_sign}, slightly worse than the S-bond{reg_sign}, but still

  4. Foam Cushioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    One innovation developed by a contractor at Ames Research Center was an open cell polymeric foam material with unusual properties. Intended as padding for aircraft seats the material offered better impact protection against accidents, and also enhanced passenger comfort because it distributed body weight evenly over the entire contact area. Called a slow springback foam, it flows to match the contour of the body pressing against it, and returns to its original shape once the pressure is removed. It has many applications including aircraft cushions and padding, dental stools, and athletic equipment. Now it's used by Dynamic Systems, Inc. for medical applications such as wheel chairs for severely disabled people which allow them to sit for 3-8 hours where they used to be uncomfortable in 15-30 minutes.

  5. Effects of packing rates of cubic-shaped polyurethane foam carriers on the microbial community and the removal of organics and nitrogen in moving bed biofilm reactors.

    PubMed

    Feng, Quan; Wang, Yuxiao; Wang, Tianmin; Zheng, Hao; Chu, Libing; Zhang, Chong; Chen, Hongzhang; Kong, Xiuqin; Xing, Xin-Hui

    2012-08-01

    The effects of packing rates (20%, 30%, and 40%) of polyurethane foam (PUF) to the removal of organics and nitrogen were investigated by continuously feeding artificial sewage in three aerobic moving bed biofilm reactors. The results indicated that the packing rate of the PUF carriers had little influence on the COD removal efficiency (81% on average). However, ammonium removal was affected by the packing rates, which was presumably due to the different relative abundances of nitrifying bacteria. A high ammonium removal efficiency of 96.3% at a hydraulic retention time of 5h was achieved in 40% packing rate reactor, compared with 37.4% in 20% packing rate. Microprofiles of dissolved oxygen and nitrate revealed that dense biofilm limits the DO transfer distance and nitrate diffusion. Pyrosequencing analysis of the biofilm showed that Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Verrucomicrobia were the three most abundant phyla, but the proportions of the microbial community varied with the packing rate of the PUF carriers. PMID:22621807

  6. Liquid organic foams for formulation optimization : an assessment of foam linear viscoelasticity and its temporal dependence.

    SciTech Connect

    Kropka, Jamie Michael; Celina, Mathias Christopher; Mondy, Lisa Ann

    2010-03-01

    Liquid foams are viscoelastic liquids, exhibiting a fast relaxation attributed to local bubble motions and a slow response due to structural evolution of the intrinsically unstable system. In this work, these processes are examined in unique organic foams that differ from the typically investigated aqueous systems in two major ways: the organic foams (1) posses a much higher continuous phase viscosity and (2) exhibit a coarsening response that involves coalescence of cells. The transient and dynamic relaxation responses of the organic foams are evaluated and discussed in relation to the response of aqueous foams. The change in the foam response with increasing gas fraction, from that of a Newtonian liquid to one that is strongly viscoelastic, is also presented. In addition, the temporal dependencies of the linear viscoelastic response are assessed in the context of the foam structural evolution. These foams and characterization techniques provide a basis for testing stabilization mechanisms in epoxy-based foams for encapsulation applications.

  7. H2S removal and bacterial structure along a full-scale biofilter bed packed with polyurethane foam in a landfill site.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Han, Yunping; Yan, Xu; Liu, Junxin

    2013-11-01

    Hydrogen sulfide accumulated under a cover film in a landfill site was treated for 7 months by a full-scale biofilter packed with polyurethane foam cubes. Sampling ports were set along the biofilter bed to investigate H2S removal and microbial characteristics in the biofilter. The H2S was removed effectively by the biofilter, and over 90% removal efficiency was achieved in steady state. Average elimination capacity of H2S was 2.21 g m(-3) h(-1) in lower part (LPB) and 0.41 g m(-3) h(-1) in upper part (UPB) of the biofilter. Most H2S was eliminated in LPB. H2S concentration varied along the polyurethane foam packed bed, the structure of the bacterial communities showed spatial variation in the biofilter, and H2S removal as well as products distribution changed accordingly. The introduction of odorants into the biofilter shifted the distribution of the existing microbial populations toward a specific culture that could metabolize the target odors. PMID:23989036

  8. Foam Dispenser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    William G. Simpson, a NASA/Marshall employee, invented and patented a foam mixing dispensing device. He is supplying his Simpson mixer to a number of foam applications where it is used to apply foam for insulation purposes.

  9. Optimization of HIPE Foams

    SciTech Connect

    Steckle, W.P. Jr.; Smith, M.E.; Sebring, R.J.; Nobile, A. Jr.

    2004-03-15

    High Internal Phase Emulsion (HIPE) polystyrene foams have been made at LANL for the past decade. It is a robust system that offers flexibility in tailoring density and the incorporation of halogens and metals. As target designs become more complex the demands placed on the foams are more stringent. Parts are machined from 30 mg/cm{sup 3} foams to thicknesses of 50 {mu}m. At three percent of full density these foams are to withstand extraction with ethanol to remove the wax utilized as a machining aid and not allow shrinkage or warpage. In order to accomplish this the formulation of the HIPE foam had to be modified. Recently some new processing issues have arisen. At low densities voids have become a problem. To determine a formulation that reduces void content and allows minimum shrinkage, experimental design was utilized. We also developed image analysis techniques that allow us to quantify the amount of voids in the system. These techniques also allow us to evaluate the surface finish of the foam. In order to machine these low density foams to the tolerance required with an optimum surface finish the foams are backfilled with Brij 78, an alcohol soluble wax. After the part is machined, the Brij is leached out. Recent batches of Brij have exhibited high shrinkage, which in turn affects the surface finish of the foam.

  10. Studies on thio-substituted polyurethane foam (T-PUF) as a new efficient separation medium for the removal of inorganic/organic mercury from industrial effluents and solid wastes.

    PubMed

    Anjaneyulu, Y; Marayya, R; Rao, T H

    1993-01-01

    Novel thio-substituted flexible polyurethane foam (T-PUF) was synthesised by addition polymerisation of mercaptan with the precursors of an open-cell polyurethane foam, which can be used as a highly selective sorbent for inorganic and organic mercury from complex matrices. The percentage extraction of inorganic mercury was studied at different flow-rates, over a wide pH range at different concentrations ranging from 1 ppm, to 100 ppm. The break-through capacity and total capacity of unmodified and thio-foams were determined for inorganic and organic mercurials. The absorption efficiency of thio-foam was far superior to other sorbent media, such as activated carbon, polymeric ion-exchange resins and reagent-loaded polyurethane foams. It was observed that even at the 1000 ppm level, divalent ions like Cu, Mg, Ca, Zn do not appreciably influence the per cent extraction of inorganic mercury at the 10 ppm level. These matrix levels are the most concentrated ones which are likely to occur, both in local sewage and effluent waters. Further, the efficiency of this foam was sufficiently high at 10-100 ppm levels of Hg, even from 5-10 litres of effluent volumes using 50 g of thio-foam packed into different columns in series. Thio-foams were found to possess excellent abilities to remove and recover mercury even at low levels from industrial effluents and brine mud of chlor-alkali industry after pre-acid extraction. This makes it a highly efficient sorbent for possible application in effluent treatment. Model schemes for the removal and recovery of mercury from industrial effluents and municipal sewage (100-1000 litre) by a dynamic method are proposed and the costs incurred in a full-scale application method are indicated to show that the use of thio-foam could be commercially attractive. PMID:15091891

  11. Fiber reinforced hybrid phenolic foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Amit

    Hybrid composites in recent times have been developed by using more than one type of fiber reinforcement to bestow synergistic properties of the chosen filler and matrix and also facilitating the design of materials with specific properties matched to end use. However, the studies for hybrid foams have been very limited because of problems related to fiber dispersion in matrix, non uniform mixing due to presence of more than one filler and partially cured foams. An effective approach to synthesize hybrid phenolic foam has been proposed and investigated here. Hybrid composite phenolic foams were reinforced with chopped glass and aramid fibers in varied proportions. On assessing mechanical properties in compression and shear several interesting facts surfaced but overall hybrid phenolic foams exhibited a more graceful failure, greater resistance to cracking and were significantly stiffer and stronger than foams with only glass and aramid fibers. The optimum fiber ratio for the reinforced hybrid phenolic foam system was found to be 1:1 ratio of glass to aramid fibers. Also, the properties of hybrid foam were found to deviate from rule of mixture (ROM) and thus the existing theories of fiber reinforcement fell short in explaining their complex behavior. In an attempt to describe and predict mechanical behavior of hybrid foams a statistical design tool using analysis of variance technique was employed. The utilization of a statistical model for predicting foam properties was found to be an appropriate tool that affords a global perspective of the influence of process variables such as fiber weight fraction, fiber length etc. on foam properties (elastic modulus and strength). Similar approach could be extended to study other fiber composite foam systems such as polyurethane, epoxy etc. and doing so will reduce the number of experimental iterations needed to optimize foam properties and identify critical process variables. Diffusivity, accelerated aging and flammability

  12. Springback Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A decade ago, NASA's Ames Research Center developed a new foam material for protective padding of airplane seats. Now known as Temper Foam, the material has become one of the most widely-used spinoffs. Latest application is a line of Temper Foam cushioning produced by Edmont-Wilson, Coshocton, Ohio for office and medical furniture. The example pictured is the Classic Dental Stool, manufactured by Dentsply International, Inc., York, Pennsylvania, one of four models which use Edmont-Wilson Temper Foam. Temper Foam is an open-cell, flameresistant foam with unique qualities.

  13. Outgassing Studies of Foams for the W80 LEP (FY05)

    SciTech Connect

    Alviso, C; Harvey, C; Vance, A

    2005-11-23

    Removable epoxy foam (REF) is a novel material developed by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories to simplify the removal of encapsulants from electronic components [McElhanon, et al., Journal of Applied Polymer Science, 2002, 85, 1496-1502]. The material is based on a resin that includes a thermally reversible chemical bond. When the material is heated at relatively mild temperatures ({approx}50-90 C) in the presence of appropriate solvents, the reversible bonds are broken, and the material is easily rinsed away. In order to ease the removal of the encapsulant for surveillance purposes, it was proposed to use REF in the W80 LEP in place of the polyurethane TDI (toluene diisocyanate), which is being phased out at the Kansas City Plant due to toxicity concerns. Colleagues at Sandia noted that REF exhibited especially high outgassing of the liquid fluorinert, FC-72, which is used at a level of 5 wt% as the blowing agent in the foaming process. After obtaining a sample of the material from Sandia, headspace solid phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME GC/MS) measurements were performed. These measurements revealed significant outgassing of fluorinert as well as other solvents and siloxanes [Memo, Vance, 3/3/05 & Vance, Foam PRT presentation UCRL-PRES-212462]. This report is intended to summarize foam outgassing studies performed at LLNL in support of the W80 LEP.

  14. Foam For Filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Like nature's honeycomb, foam is a structure of many-sided cells, apparently solid but actually only three percent material and 97 percent air. Foam is made by a heat-producing chemical reaction which expands a plastic material in a manner somewhat akin to the heat-induced rising of a loaf of bread. The resulting structure of interconnected cells is flexible yet strong and extremely versatile in applicati6n. Foam can, for example, be a sound absorber in one form, while in another it allows sound to pass through it. It can be a very soft powder puff material and at the same time a highly abrasive scrubber. A sampling of foam uses includes stereo speaker grilles, applying postage meter ink, filtering lawnmower carburetor air; deadening noise in trucks and tractors, applying cosmetics, releasing fabric softener and antistatic agents in home clothes dryers, painting, filtering factory heating and ventilating systems, shining shoes, polishing cars, sponge-mopping floors, acting as pre-operative surgical scrubbers-the list is virtually limitless. The process by which foam is made produces "windows," thin plastic membranes connecting the cell walls. Windowed foam is used in many applications but for certain others-filtering, for example-it is desirable to have a completely open network. Scott Paper Company's Foam Division, Chester, Pennsylvania, improved a patented method of "removing the windows," to create an open structure that affords special utility in filtering applications. NASA technology contributed to Scott's improvement.

  15. Lightweight Forms for Epoxy/Aramid Ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mix, E. W.; Anderson, A. N.; Bedford, Donald L., Sr.

    1986-01-01

    Aluminum mandrels easy to remove. Lightweight aluminum mandrel for shaping epoxy/aramid ducts simplifies and speeds production. In new process, glass-reinforced epoxy/aramid cloth wrapped on aluminum mandrel. Stainless-steel flanges and other hardware fitted on duct and held by simple tooling. Entire assembly placed in oven to cure epoxy. After curing, assembly placed in alkaline bath dissolves aluminum mandrel in about 4 hours. Epoxy/aramid shell ready for use as duct. Aluminum mandrel used to make ducts of various inside diameters up to 6 in. Standard aluminum forms used. Conventional tube-bending equipment produces requisite curves in mandrels.

  16. Structure of Porous Starch Microcellular Foam Particles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A relatively new starch product with various novel applications is a porous microcellular foam. The foam product is made by dehydrating a starch hydrogel in a solvent such as ethanol and then removing the solvent to form a foam product. The process involves heating an aqueous slurry of starch (8% w/...

  17. Efficient continuous dryer for flexible polyurethane foam and cleaning apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Jody, Bassam; Daniels, Edward; Libera, Joseph A.

    1999-01-01

    A method of cleaning polyurethane foams where the material is transported through a wash station while alternately soaking the polyurethane foam in an organic solvent and squeezing solvent from the polyurethane foam a number of times. Then the polyurethane foam is sent through a rinse or solvent transfer station for reducing the concentration of solvent in the foam. The rinsed polyurethane foam is sent to a drying station wherein the foam is repeatedly squeezed while being exposed to hot air to remove wet air from the foam.

  18. Efficient continuous dryer for flexible polyurethane foam and cleaning apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Jody, B.; Daniels, E.; Libera, J.A.

    1999-03-16

    A method of cleaning polyurethane foams where the material is transported through a wash station while alternately soaking the polyurethane foam in an organic solvent and squeezing solvent from the polyurethane foam a number of times. Then the polyurethane foam is sent through a rinse or solvent transfer station for reducing the concentration of solvent in the foam. The rinsed polyurethane foam is sent to a drying station wherein the foam is repeatedly squeezed while being exposed to hot air to remove wet air from the foam. 4 figs.

  19. Foaming volume and foam stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Sydney

    1947-01-01

    A method of measuring foaming volume is described and investigated to establish the critical factors in its operation. Data on foaming volumes and foam stabilities are given for a series of hydrocarbons and for a range of concentrations of aqueous ethylene-glycol solutions. It is shown that the amount of foam formed depends on the machinery of its production as well as on properties of the liquid, whereas the stability of the foam produced, within specified mechanical limitations, is primarily a function of the liquid.

  20. 3-D foam adhesive deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemons, C. R.; Salmassy, O. K.

    1976-01-01

    Bonding method, which reduces amount and weight of adhesive, is applicable to foam-filled honeycomb constructions. Novel features of process include temperature-viscosity control and removal of excess adhesive by transfer to cellophane film.

  1. Use of Microcellular Foam Particles for Encapsulation of Viscous fluids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A relatively new starch product with various novel applications is a porous microcellular foam [1,2]. The foam product is made by dehydrating a starch hydrogel in a solvent such as ethanol and then removing the solvent to form a foam product [1,2]. Starch microcellular foam has very small pores and ...

  2. Three-dimensional honeycomb-like structured zero-valent iron/chitosan composite foams for effective removal of inorganic arsenic in water.

    PubMed

    Su, Fengchao; Zhou, Hongjian; Zhang, Yunxia; Wang, Guozhong

    2016-09-15

    A facile freeze-drying method was presented to fabricate three dimensional (3D) honeycomb-like structured nanoscale zero-valent iron/chitosan composite foams (ICCFs) for effective removal of inorganic arsenic in water. It was found that freezing temperature has important influence on the formation of 3D network structure of ICCFs. The ICCFs obtained at freeze temperature of -80°C exhibits oriented porous structure with good mechanical property than that at -20°C, thus improved excellent removal capability of As(III) and As(V) up to 114.9mgg(-1) and 86.87mgg(-1), respectively. Further, the adsorption kinetics of ICCFs on As(III) and As(V) can be described by pseudo-second order model and their adsorption isotherms follow Langmuir adsorption model. The superior removal performance of ICCFs on As(III) and As(V) can be ascribed to its oriented porous structure with abundant adsorption active sites resulted from nZVI and O, N-containing functional groups in ICCFs. Importantly, it was found that the O, N-containing functional groups of chitosan in ICCFs can adequately bind with the dissolved Fe(3+) ions from oxidation of nZVI to form Fe(3+)-Chitosan complex during removal of As(III) and As(V), thus effectively avoiding the dissolved Fe(3+) ions into solution to produce secondary pollution. A possible adsorption-coupled reduction mechanism of ICCFs on As(III) and As(V) was also proposed based on the experimental results. We believe that this work would be helpful to develop low-cost and abundant chitosan-based materials as high performance adsorbents for environmental remediation applications. PMID:27362398

  3. Washing Off Polyurethane Foam Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, Richard K.; Fogel, Irving

    1990-01-01

    Jet of hot water removes material quickly and safely. Simple, environmentally sound technique found to remove polyurethane foam insulation from metal parts. Developed for (but not limited to) use during rebuilding of fuel system of Space Shuttle main engine, during which insulation must be removed for penetrant inspection of metal parts.

  4. Removal of copper and iron by polyurethane foam column in FIA system for the determination of nickel in pierced ring.

    PubMed

    Vongboot, Monnapat; Suesoonthon, Monrudee

    2015-01-01

    Polyurethane foam (PUF) mini-column was used to eliminate copper and iron for the determination of nickel in pierced rings. The PUF mini-column was connected to FIA system for on-line sorption of copper and iron in complexes form of CuSCN(+) and FeSCN(2+). For this season, the acid solution containing a mixture of Ni(II), Fe(III), Cu(II) and SCN(-) ions was firstly flew into the PUF column. Then, the percolated solution which Fe(III) and Cu(II) ions is separated from analysis was injected into FIA system to react with 4-(2-pyridylazo) resorcinol (PAR) reagent in basic condition which this method is called pH gradient technique. The Ni-PAR complexes obtained were measured theirs absorbance at 500 nm by UV visible spectrophotometer. In this study, it was found that Cu(II) and Fe(III) were completely to form complexes with 400 mmol/L KSCN and entirely to eliminate in acidic condition at pH 3.0. In the optimum condition of these experiments, the method provided the linear relationship between absorbance and the concentration of Ni(II) in the range from 5.00 to 30.00 mg/L. Linear equation is y=0.0134x+0.0033 (R(2)=0.9948). Precision, assessed in the term of the relative standard deviation, RSD, and accuracy for multiple determinations obtained in values of 0.77-1.73% and 97.4%, respectively. The level of an average amount of Ni(II) in six piercing rings was evaluated to be 14.78 mg/g. PMID:25281109

  5. Polyimide foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, John (Inventor); Lee, Raymond (Inventor); Sorathia, Usman A. K. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    Copolyimide foams derived from a diester of 3,3',4,4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid, an aromatic diamine, and a heterocyclic diamine. A molar concentration of the heterocyclic diamine approaching but not exceeding 0.42 is employed. This results in a flexible foam with a homogeneous cellular structure and a reduced compression set loss.

  6. Polyimide foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, John (Inventor); Lee, Raymond (Inventor); Sorathia, Usman A. K. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    Copolymide foams derived from a diester of 3,3',4,4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid, an aromatic diamine, and a heterocyclic diamine. A molar concentration of the heterocyclic diamine approaching but not exceeding 0.42 is employed. This results in a flexible foam with a homogeneous cellular structure and a reduced compression set loss.

  7. Polyimide foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, John (Inventor); Lee, Raymond (Inventor); Sorathia, Usman A. K. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    Copolyimide foams derived from a diester of 3,3',4,4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid, an aromatic diamine, and a heterocyclic diamine. A molar concentration of the heterocyclic diamine approaching but not exceeding 0.42 is employed. This results in a flexible foam with a homogeneous cellular structure and a reduced compression set loss.

  8. Composite foams

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Jr., Joel M.; Nyitray, Alice M.; Wilkerson, Mark H.

    1990-01-01

    Composite foams are provided comprising a first rigid, microcellular, open-celled organic polymer foam having a density of from about 0.015 g/cm.sup.3 to about 0.20 g/cm.sup.3 and a pore size of from about 1 micron to about 30 microns, said first foam containing a second polymer having a density of from about 0.015 g/cm.sup.3 to about 0.20 g/cm.sup.3 or a second polymer foam having a density of from about 0.015 g/cm.sup.3 to about 0.20 g/cm.sup.3 and a pore size of from about 0.01 microns to about 1.0 micron within the open cells of said first foam.

  9. Composite foams

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Jr., Joel M.; Nyitray, Alice M.; Wilkerson, Mark H.

    1991-01-01

    Composite foams are provided comprising a first rigid, microcellular, open-celled organic polymer foam having a density of from about 0.015 g/cm.sup.3 to about 0.20 g/cm.sup.3 and a pore size of from about 1 micron to about 30 microns, said first foam containing a second polymer having a density of from about 0.015 g/cm.sup.3 to about 0.20 g/cm.sup.3 or a second polymer foam having a density of from about 0.015 g/cm.sup.3 to about 0.20 g/cm.sup.3 and a pore size of from about 0.01 microns to about 1.0 micron within the open cells of said first foam.

  10. Analysis of the possibilities of using dielectric foam in the construction of composite high voltage post-insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mączka, T.; Paściak, G.; Jarski, A.; Piątek, M.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the construction and basic performance parameters of the innovative tubular construction of high voltage composite insulator filled with the lightweight foamed electroinsulating material. The possibility of using of the commercially available expanding foams for preparing the lightweight foamed dielectric materials was analysed. The expanding foams of silicone RTV and compositions based on epoxy resin and LSR silicone were taken into account. The lightweight foamed dielectric materials were prepared according to the own foaming technology. In this work the experimental results on the use of the selected foams for the preparing of the lightweight filling materials to the tubular structure of composite insulator of 110 kV are presented.

  11. Water transport into epoxy resins and composites

    SciTech Connect

    Tsou, H.S.

    1987-01-01

    The processing-property relationships were established for the epoxy system of tetraglycidyl 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl methane (TGDDM) cured with diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS). The TGDDM-DDS epoxy system was selected for analysis as the ensuing polymer matrix is most common in high-performance fiber-reinforced epoxy composites. Experiments on water transport in epoxy resins with varying compositions were performed and a relaxation-coupled transport behavior was observed in these epoxy resins. By post-curing vitrified epoxy resins, the additional free volume usually measured in them was removed and maximum water uptake was reduced. Since epoxy resins were in a quasi-equilibrium glassy state after the post-cure, Fick's law with a constant diffusion coefficient could adequately describe the water sorption behavior. A network formation model based on the branching theory was developed, taking into account the difference in reactivities of primary and secondary amines and the etherification reaction. Using this network formation model, water uptake in post-cured epoxy resins was found to be proportional to tertiary amine concentration.

  12. Radiation curing of epoxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, Lawrence W.; Singh, Ajit

    The literature on radiation polymerization of epoxy compounds has been reviewed to assess the potential use of radiation for curing these industrially important monomers. Chemical curing of epoxies may proceed by either cationic or anionic mechanisms depending on the nature of the curing agent, but most epoxies polymerize by cationic mechanisms under the influence of high-energy radiation. Radiation-induced cationic polymerization of epoxy compounds is inhibited by trace quantities of water because of proton transfer from the chain-propagating epoxy cation to water. Several different methods with potential for obtaining high molecular weight polymers by curing epoxies with high-energy radiation have been studied. Polymeric products with epoxy-like properties have been produced by radiation curing of epoxy oligomers with terminal acrylate groups and mixtures of epoxies with vinyl monomers. Both of these types of resin have good potential for industrial-scale curing by radiation treatment.

  13. Negative pressure wound therapy-associated tissue trauma and pain: a controlled in vivo study comparing foam and gauze dressing removal by immunohistochemistry for substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide in the wound edge.

    PubMed

    Malmsjö, Malin; Gustafsson, Lotta; Lindstedt, Sandra; Ingemansson, Richard

    2011-12-01

    Pain upon negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) dressing removal has been reported and is believed to be associated with the observation that granulation tissue grows into foam. Wound tissue damage upon removal of the foam may cause the reported pain. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P are neuropeptides that cause inflammation and signal pain and are known to be released when tissue trauma occurs. The aim of this controlled in vivo study was to compare the expression of CGRP and substance P in the wound bed in control wounds and following NPWT and foam or gauze dressing removal. Eight pigs with two wounds each were treated with open-pore structure polyurethane foam or AMD gauze and NPWT of 0 (control) or -80 mm Hg for 72 hours. Following removal of the wound filler, the expression of CGRP and substance P was measured, using arbitrary units, in sections of biopsies from the wound bed using immunofluorescence techniques. Substance P and CGRP were more abundant in the wound edge following the removal of foam than of gauze dressings and least abundant in control wounds. The immunofluorescence staining of the wound edge for CGRP was 52 ± 3 au after the removal of gauze and 97 ± 5 au after the removal of foam (P <0.001). For substance P, the staining was 55 ± 3 au after gauze removal and 95 ± 4 au after foam removal (P <0.001). CGRP and substance P staining was primarily located to nerves and leukocytes. The increase in CGRP and substance P immunofluorescence was especially prominent in the dermis but also was seen in subcutaneous and muscle tissue. Using gauze may be one way of reducing NPWT dressing change-related pain. New wound fillers designed to optimize granulation tissue formation and minimize pain issues presumably will be developed in the near future. PMID:22156176

  14. Foam Microrheology

    SciTech Connect

    KRAYNIK,ANDREW M.; LOEWENBERG,MICHAEL; REINELT,DOUGLAS A.

    1999-09-01

    The microrheology of liquid foams is discussed for two different regimes: static equilibrium where the capillary number Ca is zero, and the viscous regime where viscosity and surface tension are important and Ca is finite. The Surface Evolver is used to calculate the equilibrium structure of wet Kelvin foams and dry soap froths with random structure, i.e., topological disorder. The distributions of polyhedra and faces are compared with the experimental data of Matzke. Simple shearing flow of a random foam under quasistatic conditions is also described. Viscous phenomena are explored in the context of uniform expansion of 2D and 3D foams at low Reynolds number. Boundary integral methods are used to calculate the influence of Ca on the evolution of foam microstructure, which includes bubble shape and the distribution of liquid between films, Plateau borders, and (in 3D) the nodes where Plateau borders meet. The micromechanical point of view guides the development of structure-property-processing relationships for foams.

  15. Foam Transport in Porous Media - A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. F.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Zhong, Lirong

    2009-11-11

    Amendment solutions with or without surfactants have been used to remove contaminants from soil. However, it has drawbacks such that the amendment solution often mobilizes the plume, and its movement is controlled by gravity and preferential flow paths. Foam is an emulsion-like, two-phase system in which gas cells are dispersed in a liquid and separated by thin liquid films called lamellae. Potential advantages of using foams in sub-surface remediation include providing better control on the volume of fluids injected, uniformity of contact, and the ability to contain the migration of contaminant laden liquids. It is expected that foam can serve as a carrier of amendments for vadose zone remediation, e.g., at the Hanford Site. As part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s EM-20 program, a numerical simulation capability will be added to the Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) flow simulator. The primary purpose of this document is to review the modeling approaches of foam transport in porous media. However, as an aid to understanding the simulation approaches, some experiments under unsaturated conditions and the processes of foam transport are also reviewed. Foam may be formed when the surfactant concentration is above the critical micelle concentration. There are two main types of foams – the ball foam (microfoam) and the polyhedral foam. The characteristics of bulk foam are described by the properties such as foam quality, texture, stability, density, surface tension, disjoining pressure, etc. Foam has been used to flush contaminants such as metals, organics, and nonaqueous phase liquids from unsaturated soil. Ball foam, or colloidal gas aphrons, reportedly have been used for soil flushing in contaminated site remediation and was found to be more efficient than surfactant solutions on the basis of weight of contaminant removed per gram of surfactant. Experiments also indicate that the polyhedral foam can be used to enhance soil remediation. The

  16. Foam Micromechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Kraynik, A.M.; Neilsen, M.K.; Reinelt, D.A.; Warren, W.E.

    1998-11-03

    Foam evokes many different images: waves breaking at the seashore, the head on a pint of Guinness, an elegant dessert, shaving, the comfortable cushion on which you may be seated... From the mundane to the high tech, foams, emulsions, and cellular solids encompass a broad range of materials and applications. Soap suds, mayonnaise, and foamed polymers provide practical motivation and only hint at the variety of materials at issue. Typical of mukiphase materiaIs, the rheoIogy or mechanical behavior of foams is more complicated than that of the constituent phases alone, which may be gas, liquid, or solid. For example, a soap froth exhibits a static shear modulus-a hallmark of an elastic solid-even though it is composed primarily of two Newtonian fluids (water and air), which have no shear modulus. This apparent paradox is easily resolved. Soap froth contains a small amount of surfactant that stabilizes the delicate network of thin liq- uid films against rupture. The soap-film network deforms in response to a macroscopic strain; this increases interracial area and the corresponding sur- face energy, and provides the strain energy of classical elasticity theory [1]. This physical mechanism is easily imagined but very challenging to quantify for a realistic three-dimensional soap froth in view of its complex geome- try. Foam micromechanics addresses the connection between constituent properties, cell-level structure, and macroscopic mechanical behavior. This article is a survey of micromechanics applied to gas-liquid foams, liquid-liquid emulsions, and cellular solids. We will focus on static response where the foam deformation is very slow and rate-dependent phenomena such as viscous flow can be neglected. This includes nonlinear elasticity when deformations are large but reversible. We will also discuss elastic- plastic behavior, which involves yield phenomena. Foam structures based on polyhedra packed to fill space provide a unify- ing geometrical theme. Because a two

  17. Injectable Foams for Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Edna M.; Page, Jonathan M.; Harmata, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    The design of injectable biomaterials has attracted considerable attention in recent years. Many injectable biomaterials, such as hydrogels and calcium phosphate cements, have nanoscale pores that limit the rate of cellular migration and proliferation. While introduction of macroporosity has been suggested to increase cellular infiltration and tissue healing, many conventional methods for generating macropores often require harsh processing conditions that preclude their use in injectable foams. In recent years, processes such as porogen leaching, gas foaming, and emulsion-templating have been adapted to generate macroporosity in injectable calcium phosphate cements, hydrogels, and hydrophobic polymers. While some of the more mature injectable foam technologies have been evaluated in clinical trials, there are challenges remaining to be addressed, such as the biocompatibility and ultimate fate of the sacrificial phase used to generate pores within the foam after it sets in situ. Furthermore, while implantable scaffolds can be washed extensively to remove undesirable impurities, all of the components required to synthesize injectable foams must be injected into the defect. Thus, every compound in the foam must be biocompatible and non-cytotoxic at the concentrations utilized. As future research addresses these critical challenges, injectable macroporous foams are anticipated to have an increasingly significant impact on improving patient outcomes for a number of clinical procedures. PMID:24127230

  18. Metal-doped organic foam

    DOEpatents

    Rinde, James A.

    1982-01-01

    Organic foams having a low density and very small cell size and method for producing same in either a metal-loaded or unloaded (nonmetal loaded) form are described. Metal-doped foams are produced by soaking a polymer gel in an aqueous solution of desired metal salt, soaking the gel successively in a solvent series of decreasing polarity to remove water from the gel and replace it with a solvent of lower polarity with each successive solvent in the series being miscible with the solvents on each side and being saturated with the desired metal salt, and removing the last of the solvents from the gel to produce the desired metal-doped foam having desired density cell size, and metal loading. The unloaded or metal-doped foams can be utilized in a variety of applications requiring low density, small cell size foam. For example, rubidium-doped foam made in accordance with the invention has utility in special applications, such as in x-ray lasers.

  19. Microcellular foams via phase separation

    SciTech Connect

    Young, A.T.

    1985-01-01

    A study of wide variety of processes for making plastic foams shows that phase separation processes for polymers from solutions offers the most viable methods for obtaining rigid plastic foams which met the physical requirements for fusion target designs. Four general phase separation methods have been shown to give polymer foams with densities less than 0.1 g/cm/sup 3/ and cell sizes of 30..mu..m or less. These methods involve the utilization of non-solvent, chemical or thermal cooling processes to achieve a controlled phase separation wherein either two distinct phases are obtained where the polymer phase is a continuous phase or two bicontinuous phases are obtained where both the polymer and solvent are interpenetrating, continuous, labyrinthine phases. Subsequent removal of the solvent gives the final foam structure.

  20. Large boron--epoxy filament-wound pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, W. M.; Bailey, R. L.; Knoell, A. C.

    1973-01-01

    Advanced composite material used to fabricate pressure vessel is prepeg (partially cured) consisting of continuous, parallel boron filaments in epoxy resin matrix arranged to form tape. To fabricate chamber, tape is wound on form which must be removable after composite has been cured. Configuration of boron--epoxy composite pressure vessel was determined by computer program.

  1. Process for preparing silicon carbide foam

    DOEpatents

    Whinnery, L.L.; Nichols, M.C.; Wheeler, D.R.; Loy, D.A.

    1997-09-16

    A method of preparing near net shape, monolithic, porous SiC foams is disclosed. Organosilicon precursors are used to produce polymeric gels by thermally induced phase separation, wherein, a sufficiently concentrated solution of an organosilicon polymer is cooled below its solidification temperature to form a gel. Following solvent removal from the gel, the polymer foam is pretreated in an oxygen plasma in order to raise its glass transition temperature. The pretreated foam is then pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere to form a SiC foam. 9 figs.

  2. Process for preparing silicon carbide foam

    DOEpatents

    Whinnery, LeRoy Louis; Nichols, Monte Carl; Wheeler, David Roger; Loy, Douglas Anson

    1997-01-01

    A method of preparing near net shape, monolithic, porous SiC foams is disclosed. Organosilicon precursors are used to produce polymeric gels by thermally induced phase separation, wherein, a sufficiently concentrated solution of an organosilicon polymer is cooled below its solidification temperature to form a gel. Following solvent removal from the gel, the polymer foam is pretreated in an oxygen plasma in order to raise its glass transition temperature. The pretreated foam is then pyrolized in an inert atmosphere to form a SiC foam.

  3. Plasma-Spray Metal Coating On Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cranston, J.

    1994-01-01

    Molds, forms, and other substrates made of foams coated with metals by plasma spraying. Foam might be ceramic, carbon, metallic, organic, or inorganic. After coat applied by plasma spraying, foam left intact or removed by acid leaching, conventional machining, water-jet cutting, or another suitable technique. Cores or vessels made of various foam materials plasma-coated with metals according to method useful as thermally insulating containers for foods, liquids, or gases, or as mandrels for making composite-material (matrix/fiber) parts, or making thermally insulating firewalls in automobiles.

  4. Polyimide Foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vazquez, Juan M. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A fully imidized, solvent-free polyimide foam having excellent mechanical, acoustic, thermal, and flame resistant properties is produced. A first solution is provided, which includes one or more aromatic dianhydrides or derivatives of aromatic dianhydrides, and may include one or more aromatic diamines, dissolved in one or more polar solvents, along with an effective amount of one or more blowing agents. This first solution may also advantageously include effective amounts respectively of one or mores catalysts, one or more surfactants, and one or more fire retardants. A second solution is also provided which includes one or more isocyanates. The first and second solutions are rapidly and thoroughly mixed to produce an admixture, which is allowed to foam-in an open container, or in a closed mold-under ambient conditions to completion produce a foamed product. This foamed product is then cured by high frequency electromagnetic radiation, thermal energy, or a combination thereof. Alternatively, the process is adapted for spraying or extrusion.

  5. Polyimide foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vazquez, Juan M. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A fully imidized, solvent-free polyimide foam having excellent mechanical, acoustic, thermal, and flame resistant properties is produced. A first solution is provided, which includes one or more aromatic dianhydrides or derivatives of aromatic dianhydrides, and may include one or more aromatic diamines, dissolved in one or more polar solvents, along with an effective amount of one or more blowing agents. This first solution may also advantageously include effective amounts respectively of one or mores catalysts, one or more surfactants, and one or more fire retardants. A second solution is also provided which includes one or more isocyanates. The first and second solutions are rapidly and thoroughly mixed to produce an admixture, which is allowed to foam?in an open container, or in a closed mold?under ambient conditions to completion produce a foamed product. This foamed product is then cured by high frequency electromagnetic radiation, thermal energy, or a combination thereof. Alternatively, the process is adapted for spraying or extrusion.

  6. Polyimide foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vazquez, Juan M. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A fully imidized, solvent-free polyimide foam having excellent mechanical, acoustic, thermal, and flame resistant properties is produced. A first solution is provided, which includes one or more aromatic dianhydrides or derivatives of aromatic dianhydrides, and may include one or more aromatic diamines, dissolved in one or more polar solvents, along with an effective amount of one or more blowing agents. This first solution may also advantageously include effective amounts respectively of one or mores catalysts, one or more surfactants, and one or more fire retardants. A second solution is also provided which includes one or more isocyanates. The first and second solutions are rapidly and thoroughly mixed to produce an admixture, which is allowed to foam--in an open container, or in a closed mold--under ambient conditions to completion produce a foamed product. This foamed product is then cured by high frequency electromagnetic radiation, thermal energy, or a combination thereof. Alternatively, the process is adapted for spraying or extrusion.

  7. Interconnected porous epoxy monoliths prepared by concentrated emulsion templating.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianli; Du, Zhongjie; Li, Hangquan; Xiang, Aimin; Zhang, Chen

    2009-10-01

    Porous epoxy monoliths were prepared via a step polymerization in a concentrated emulsion stabilized by non-ionic emulsifiers and colloidal silica. A solution in 4-methyl-2-pentanon was used as the continuous phase, which contained glycidyl amino epoxy monomer (GAE), curing agent, and an emulsifier. An aqueous suspension of colloidal silica was used as the dispersed phase of the concentrated emulsion. After the continuous phase was completely polymerized, the dispersed phase was removed and a porous epoxy was obtained. An optimal HLB value of emulsifier for the GAE concentrated emulsion was determined. In addition, the morphology of the porous epoxy was observed by SEM. The effect of the colloidal silica, the emulsifier, the curing of the epoxy, and the volume fraction of the dispersed phase on the morphology of porous epoxy are systematically discussed. PMID:19595357

  8. Flame Retardant Epoxy Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, C. M.; Smith, J. G., Jr.; Connell, J. W.; Hergenrother, P. M.; Lyon, R. E.

    2004-01-01

    As part of a program to develop fire resistant exterior composite structures for future subsonic commercial aircraft, flame retardant epoxy resins are under investigation. Epoxies and their curing agents (aromatic diamines) containing phosphorus were synthesized and used to prepare epoxy formulations. Phosphorus was incorporated within the backbone of the epoxy resin and not used as an additive. The resulting cured epoxies were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, propane torch test, elemental analysis and microscale combustion calorimetry. Several formulations showed excellent flame retardation with phosphorous contents as low as 1.5% by weight. The fracture toughness of plaques of several cured formulations was determined on single-edge notched bend specimens. The chemistry and properties of these new epoxy formulations are discussed.

  9. Infiltrated carbon foam composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, Rick D. (Inventor); Danford, Harry E. (Inventor); Plucinski, Janusz W. (Inventor); Merriman, Douglas J. (Inventor); Blacker, Jesse M. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An infiltrated carbon foam composite and method for making the composite is described. The infiltrated carbon foam composite may include a carbonized carbon aerogel in cells of a carbon foam body and a resin is infiltrated into the carbon foam body filling the cells of the carbon foam body and spaces around the carbonized carbon aerogel. The infiltrated carbon foam composites may be useful for mid-density ablative thermal protection systems.

  10. Epoxy-rubber interactions

    SciTech Connect

    McGarry, F.J.; Rosner, R.B.

    1993-12-31

    Films containing amine-terminated butadiene-acrylonitrile (ATBN) rubber and diglycidal ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) epoxy, cross-linked with amine curing agent, exhibit tensile extensibility over the composition range of 50-600 parts by weight rubber to 100 parts by weight epoxy. This tensile extensibility suggests the presence of ductile behavior in the second-phase particles of ATBN rubber-toughened DGEBA epoxy systems, even if the particles contain substantial amounts of epoxy. Such cured films also are capable of absorbing large additional amounts of liquid epoxy that contains the cure agent. When the epoxy is cured in situ, the film tensile behavior is consistent with the overall proportions of rubber and epoxy present. The solubility behavior also suggests that the glassy epoxy matrix immediately surrounding a precipated particle contains rubber in solid solution and thereby can plastically yield under shear-stress action. As observations confirm, such flow would be heat recoverable. 15 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Vacuum applications of metal foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, B. R. F.

    1980-01-01

    Several vacuum applications of copper foams in the density range 2-5% and pore sizes of 0.5-0.7 mm are discussed, such as a foreline hydrocarbon trap in a mechanical vacuum pump, a molecular-flow resistor, a diffuser, and a water injector. Other suggested applications include the use of foam copper in the form of an externally heated plug to remove traces of oxygen from inert gases bled into a vacuum system through a stainless steel line and the use of the porous surface for minimizing release of secondary electrons from electrodes in the path of charged particle beams.

  12. Quantum Foam

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-10-24

    The laws of quantum mechanics and relativity are quite perplexing however it is when the two theories are merged that things get really confusing. This combined theory predicts that empty space isn’t empty at all – it’s a seething and bubbling cauldron of matter and antimatter particles springing into existence before disappearing back into nothingness. Scientists call this complicated state of affairs “quantum foam.” In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln discusses this mind-bending idea and sketches some of the experiments that have convinced scientists that this crazy prediction is actually true.

  13. Foam sclerotherapy.

    PubMed

    Alder, Glen; Lees, Tim

    2015-11-01

    Foam sclerotherapy is a minimally invasive treatment for lower limb varicose veins. Current evidence indicates that its efficacy may not be as high as surgery or endovenous ablation. The minimally invasive nature of the treatment however means that it has a wide application, and it can be particularly useful in patients who are not suitable for other types of treatment. NICE guidelines recommend its use as a second line after endovenous ablation. Complication rates are low and most of these are of little clinical consequence. PMID:26556698

  14. Low density microcellular carbon foams and method of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, C. Jr.; Aubert, J.H.; Clough, R.L.; Rand, P.B.; Sylwester, A.P.

    1988-06-20

    A low density, open-celled microcellular carbon foam is disclosed which is prepared by dissolving a carbonizable polymer or copolymer in a solvent, pouring the solution into a mold, cooling the solution, removing the solvent, and then carbonizing the polymer or copolymer in a high temperature oven to produce the foam. If desired, an additive can be introduced in order to produce a doped carbon foam, and the foams can be made isotropic by selection of a suitable solvent. The low density, microcellular foams produced by this process are particularly useful in the fabrication of inertial confinement fusion targets, but can also be used as catalysts, absorbents, and electrodes.

  15. Low density microcellular carbon foams and method of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Jr., Charles; Aubert, James H.; Clough, Roger L.; Rand, Peter B.; Sylwester, Alan P.

    1989-01-01

    A low density, open-celled microcellular carbon foam is disclosed which is prepared by dissolving a carbonizable polymer or copolymer in a solvent, pouring the solution into a mold, cooling the solution, removing the solvent, and then carbonizing the polymer or copolymer in a high temperature oven to produce the foam. If desired, an additive can be introduced in order to produce a doped carbon foam, and the foams can be made isotropic by selection of a suitable solvent. The low density, microcellular foams produced by this process are particularly useful in the fabrication of inertial confinement fusion targets, but can also be used as catalysts, absorbents, and electrodes.

  16. Preparation of high porosity metal foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jee, C. S. Y.; Guo, Z. X.; Evans, J. R. G.; Özgüven, N.

    2000-12-01

    Metal foams with porosities greater than 90 pct were prepared by a novel powder metallurgy route using a polymeric vehicle. Coarse titanium powder and fine carbonyl iron powder were tested. The powders were blended with each component of a two-part polyol-isocyanate foaming system, and the resulting suspensions were mixed and allowed to expand. Although the resulting polymer-metal foam was closed cell, particles were not retained in the windows. Upon pyrolysis to remove the resin, the windows opened and the final sintered metal foam was reticulated. Such foams present very low sintered density and are correspondingly weak after sintering but offer a fine reticulated structure with cell diameters in the region of 100 to 200 µm. They may have applications in the areas of catalysis, biomaterials, and composites.

  17. Responsive aqueous foams.

    PubMed

    Fameau, Anne-Laure; Carl, Adrian; Saint-Jalmes, Arnaud; von Klitzing, Regine

    2015-01-12

    Remarkable properties have emerged recently for aqueous foams, including ultrastability and responsiveness. Responsive aqueous foams refer to foams for which the stability can be switched between stable and unstable states with a change in environment or with external stimuli. Responsive foams have been obtained from various foam stabilizers, such as surfactants, proteins, polymers, and particles, and with various stimuli. Different strategies have been developed to design this type of soft material. We briefly review the two main approaches used to obtain responsive foams. The first approach is based on the responsiveness of the interfacial layer surrounding the gas bubbles, which leads to responsive foams. The second approach is based on modifications that occur in the aqueous phase inside the foam liquid channels to tune the foam stability. We will highlight the most sophisticated approaches, which use light, temperature, and magnetic fields and lead to switchable foam stability. PMID:25384466

  18. Microcellular foams prepared from demixed polymer solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, J.H.

    1990-01-01

    Low-density, microcellular polymer foams have numerous applications as structural supports in high-energy physics experiments, in catalysis, ion exchange, and filtration, and for a variety of biomedical uses. A versatile method to prepare such foams is by thermally-induced phase separation (TIPS) of polymer solutions. Demixed solutions can be transformed into a foam by freezing the demixed solution and removing the solvent by freeze-drying. The morphology of these foams is determined by the the thermodynamics and kinetics of phase separation. A model of both the early and late stage structure development for demixed polymer solutions will be presented. For semi-crystalline polymers, gels can be prepared by crystallizing the polymer from solution, either a homogeneous solution or a demixed solution. Foams can be prepared from these gels by the supercritical extraction of the solvent. By understanding and utilizing the phase separation behavior of polymer solutions, engineered microcellular foams can be prepared. To design the foams for any application one must be able to characterize their morphology. Results will be presented on the morphological characterization of these foams and the relationship of the morphology to their processing history. 14 refs., 12 figs.

  19. Foam stability in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandewalle, N.; Caps, H.; Delon, G.; Saint-Jalmes, A.; Rio, E.; Saulnier, L.; Adler, M.; Biance, A. L.; Pitois, O.; Cohen Addad, S.; Hohler, R.; Weaire, D.; Hutzler, S.; Langevin, D.

    2011-12-01

    Within the context of the ESA FOAM project, we have studied the stability of aqueous and non-aqueous foams both on Earth and in microgravity. Foams are dispersions of gas into liquid or solid. On Earth, the lifetime of a foam is limited by the free drainage. By drainage, we are referring to the irreversible flow of liquid through the foam (leading to the accumulation of liquid at the foam bottom, and to a global liquid content decreases within the foam). When the liquid films become thinner, they eventually break, and the foam collapses. In microgravity, this process is no more present and foams containing large amounts of liquid can be studied for longer time. While the difference between foaming and not-foaming solutions is clear, the case of slightly-foaming solutions is more complicated. On Earth, such mixtures are observed to produce unstable froth for a couple of seconds. However, these latter solutions may produce foam in microgravity. We have studied both configurations for different solutions composed of common surfactant, proteins, anti-foaming agents or silicon oil. Surprising results have been obtained, emphasizing the role played by gravity on the foam stabilization process.

  20. [Foam sclerotherapy].

    PubMed

    Partsch, Bernhard

    2011-03-01

    Leg ulcers are often caused by varicose veins, with only little or no tendency to spontaneous healing. Compression therapy is the main treatment for this ailment, but even with optimal compression by short stretch bandages healing rates are rarely better than 70 - 80 % after 6 months. Experience shows, that healing times can be shortened significantly by elimination of superficial venous refluxes. For different reasons varicose vein surgery is rarely performed in patients with open leg ulcers. The increased age of ulcer patients with frequent comorbidities or the fear of an increased intraoperative risk of infection are reasons to avoid an operative elimination of refluxes. Foam sclerotherapy is a simple alternative to an operation, which can be performed irrespective of the existence of a venous leg ulcer. PMID:21360462

  1. Aging of polyurethane foam insulation in simulated refrigerator walls

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkes, K.E.; Yarbrough, D.W.; Weaver, F.J.

    1997-10-01

    Laboratory data are presented on the thermal conductivity of polyurethane foam insulation in composite test panels that simulate refrigerator walls. The test panels consisted of a steel skin, an ABS plastic liner, and a polyurethane foam core. Foam cores were produced with three different blowing agents (CFC-11, HCFC-141b, and a HCFC-142/22 blend). Periodic thermal measurements have been made on these panels over a three and one half year period in an effort to detect aging processes. Data obtained on foam encased in the panels were compared with measurements on thin foam slices that were removed from similar panels. The data show that the encapsulation of the foam in the solid boundary materials greatly reduces the aging rate. The plan is presented for a follow-on project that is being conducted on the aging of foams blown with HCFC-141b, HFC-134a, HFC-245fa, and cyclopentane.

  2. Pitch based foam with particulate

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James W.

    2001-01-01

    A thermally conductive, pitch based foam composite having a particulate content. The particulate alters the mechanical characteristics of the foam without severely degrading the foam thermal conductivity. The composite is formed by mixing the particulate with pitch prior to foaming.

  3. Mission STS-134: Results of Shape Memory Foam Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santo, Loredana; Quadrini, Fabrizio; Mascetti, Gabriele; Dolce, Ferdinando; Zolesi, Valfredo

    2013-10-01

    Shape memory epoxy foams were used for an experiment aboard the International Space Station (ISS) to evaluate the feasibility of their use for building light actuators and expandable/deployable structures. The experiment named I-FOAM was performed by an autonomous device contained in the BIOKON container (by Kayser Italia) which was in turn composed of control and heating system, battery pack and data acquisition system. To simulate the actuation of simple devices in micro-gravity conditions, three different configurations (compression, bending and torsion) were chosen during the memory step of the foams so as to produce their recovery on ISS. Micro-gravity does not affect the ability of the foams to recover their shape but it poses limits for the heating system design because of the difference in heat transfer on Earth and in orbit. A recovery about 70% was measured at a temperature of 110 °C for the bending and torsion configuration whereas poor recovery was observed for the compression case. Thanks to these results, a new experiment has been developed for a future mission by the same device: for the first time a shape memory composite will be recovered, and the actuation load during time will be measured during the recovery of an epoxy foam sample.

  4. Multiple-Nozzle Spray Head Applies Foam Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walls, Joe T.

    1993-01-01

    Spray head equipped with four-nozzle turret mixes two reactive components of polyurethane and polyisocyanurate foam insulating material and sprays reacting mixture onto surface to be insulated. If nozzle in use becomes clogged, fresh one automatically rotated into position, with minimal interruption of spraying process. Incorporates features recirculating and controlling pressures of reactive components to maintain quality of foam by ensuring proper blend at outset. Also used to spray protective coats on or in ships, aircraft, and pipelines. Sprays such reactive adhesives as epoxy/polyurethane mixtures. Components of spray contain solid-particle fillers for strength, fire retardance, toughness, resistance to abrasion, or radar absorption.

  5. Design and testing of thermal-expansion-molded graphite-epoxy hat-stiffened sandwich panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn C.

    1989-01-01

    Minimum weight configurations for two types of graphite-epoxy hat-stiffened compression-loaded panels fabricated by the thermal-expansion-molding (TEM) manufacturing process were evaluated analytically and experimentally for designs with load index Nx/L values ranging from 100 to 800. The two types of panels contain graphite-epoxy face sheets with a foam core and hat stiffeners which are either open or filled with foam. Constraints on the extensional and shear stiffnesses are imposed on the design so that the panels will satisfy typical constraints for aircraft wing structures. Optimal structurally efficient TEM panels are compared to commercially available aluminum aircraft structures. Predicted load-strain relationships agree well with experimental results. Significant impact damage to the unstiffened face sheet and foam core does not noticeably reduce the load carrying ability of the panels, but damage to the stiffened face sheet reduces the failure load by 20 percent compared to unimpacted panels.

  6. Fire retardant polyisocyanurate foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riccitiello, S. R.; Parker, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    Fire retardant properties of low density polymer foam are increased. Foam has pendant nitrile groups which form thermally-stable heterocyclic structures at temperature below degradation temperature of urethane linkages.

  7. Viscoelastic foam cushion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubokawa, C. C.; Yost, C.

    1977-01-01

    Foam is viscous and elastic with unusual and useful temperature, humidity, and compression responses. Applied weight and pressure distributed equally along entire interface with foam eliminates any pressure points. Flexible urethane foam is ideal for orthopedic and prosthetic devices, sports equipment, furniture, and crash protection.

  8. Metallized polymeric foam material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birnbaum, B. A.; Bilow, N.

    1974-01-01

    Open-celled polyurethane foams can be coated uniformly with thin film of metal by vapor deposition of aluminum or by sensitization of foam followed by electroless deposition of nickel or copper. Foam can be further processed to increase thickness of metal overcoat to impart rigidity or to provide inert surface with only modest increase in weight.

  9. Cobalt ion-containing epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St.clair, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    Varying concentrations of an organometallic cobalt complex were added to an epoxy system currently used by the aerospace industry as a composite matrix resin. Methods for combining cobalt (III) acetylacetonate with a tetraglycidyl 4,4 prime - diaminodiphenylmethane-based epoxy were investigated. The effects of increasing cobalt ion concentration on the epoxy cure were demonstrated by epoxy gel times and differential scanning calorimetry cure exotherms. Analysis on cured cobalt-containing epoxy castings included determination of glass transition temperatures by thermomechanical analysis, thermooxidative stabilities by thermogravimetric analysis, and densities in a density gradient column. Flexural strength and stiffness were also measured on the neat resin castings.

  10. Structural graphitic carbon foams

    SciTech Connect

    Kearns, K.M.; Anderson, H.J.

    1998-12-31

    Graphitic carbon foams are a unique material form with very high structural and thermal properties at a light weight. A process has been developed to produce microcellular, open-celled graphitic foams. The process includes heating a mesophase pitch preform above the pitch melting temperature in a pressurized reactor. At the appropriate time, the pressure is released, the gas nucleates bubbles, and these bubbles grow forming the pitch into the foam structure. The resultant foamed pitch is then stabilized in an oxygen environment. At this point a rigid structure exists with some mechanical integrity. The foam is then carbonized to 800 C followed by a graphitization to 2700 C. The shear action from the growing bubbles aligns the graphitic planes along the foam struts to provide the ideal structure for good mechanical properties. Some of these properties have been characterized for some of the foam materials. It is known that variations of the blowing temperature, blowing pressure and saturation time result in foams of variously sized with mostly open pores; however, the mechanism of bubble nucleation is not known. Therefore foams were blown with various gases to begin to determine the nucleation method. These gases are comprised of a variety of molecular weights as well as a range of various solubility levels. By examining the resultant structures of the foam, differences were noted to develop an explanation of the foaming mechanism.

  11. Foam process models.

    SciTech Connect

    Moffat, Harry K.; Noble, David R.; Baer, Thomas A.; Adolf, Douglas Brian; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Mondy, Lisa Ann

    2008-09-01

    In this report, we summarize our work on developing a production level foam processing computational model suitable for predicting the self-expansion of foam in complex geometries. The model is based on a finite element representation of the equations of motion, with the movement of the free surface represented using the level set method, and has been implemented in SIERRA/ARIA. An empirically based time- and temperature-dependent density model is used to encapsulate the complex physics of foam nucleation and growth in a numerically tractable model. The change in density with time is at the heart of the foam self-expansion as it creates the motion of the foam. This continuum-level model uses an homogenized description of foam, which does not include the gas explicitly. Results from the model are compared to temperature-instrumented flow visualization experiments giving the location of the foam front as a function of time for our EFAR model system.

  12. Orbital fabrication of aluminum foam and apparatus therefore

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A process for producing foamed aluminum in space comprising the steps of: heating aluminum until it is molten; applying the force of gravity to the molten aluminum; injecting gas into the molten aluminum to produce molten foamed aluminum; and allowing the molten foamed aluminum to cool to below melting temperature. The apparatus for carrying out this invention comprises: a furnace which rotates to simulate the force of gravity and heats the aluminum until it is molten; a door on the furnace, which is opened for charging the aluminum into the furnace, closed for processing and opened again for removal of the foamed aluminum; a gas injection apparatus for injecting gas into the molten aluminum within the furnace; and an extraction apparatus adjacent the door for removing the foamed aluminum from the furnace.

  13. Method for foam encapsulating laser targets

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D.

    1977-01-01

    Foam encapsulated laser fusion targets are made by positioning a fusion fuel-filled sphere within a mold cavity of suitable configuration and dimensions, and then filling the cavity with a material capable of producing a low density, microcellular foam, such as cellulose acetate dissolved in an acetone-based solvent. The mold assembly is dipped into an ice water bath to gel the material and thereafter soaked in the water bath to leach out undesired components, after which the gel is frozen, then freeze-dried wherein water and solvents sublime and the gel structure solidifies into a low-density microcellular foam, thereafter the resulting foam encapsulated target is removed from the mold cavity. The fuel-filled sphere is surrounded by foam having a thickness of about 10 to 100 .mu.m, a cell size of less than 2 .mu.m, and density of 0.065 to 0.6 .times. 10.sup.3 kg/m.sup.3. Various configured foam-encapsulated targets capable of being made by this encapsulation method are illustrated.

  14. Preliminary study on the development of syntactic foams for marine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salleh, Z.; Islam, M. M.; Ku, H.

    2013-08-01

    This paper focuses on the comparison of various types of matrix materials and their mechanical properties for development of syntactic foams for marine applications. Generally, syntactic foams are close pore foams fabricated by the mechanical mixing of hollow microsphere particles in a polymeric matrix resin. From the literature review, it was found that there are several polymeric resins that have been used for development of syntactic foams such as epoxy, cyanate ester, polypropylene, polysialate and vinyl ester. In this paper, a comparative discussion is presented on the mechanical properties of hollow glass particles mixing with polymeric resins for development of syntactic foams for the use of these composites in bulk applications such as marine structures.

  15. An experimental study of natural convection in open-cell aluminum foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Jaeger, P.; Reynders, R.; De Schampheleire, S.; T'Joen, C.; Huisseune, H.; Amee, B.; De Paepe, M.

    2012-11-01

    Natural convecton n air-saturated alumnum foam has been measured. A carefully designed experimental setup is built for his ask. The calibraton is done by comparing he results of a flat plate wh literature data, revealing excellent agreement. The nvestigated foams have a pore densiy of 10 and 20 PPI. The bondng of the foam is performed via brazing, or by applying a single epoxy which is enriched wh highly conductve alumna particles. The Rayleigh number is varied between 2500 and 6000, wh he rato of he surface area o he perimeter of he substrate as characteristc length. The foam height is varied between 12 and 25.4 mm. A major difference between both he bondng methods is observed. The brazed samples showed a beter heat ransfer n all cases. Furthermore, when ncreasing he foam height, a clear augmentaton of he heat ransfer is observed. Based on hese results, a correlaton is presented.

  16. Nanoporous Gyroid-Structured Epoxy from Block Copolymer Templates for High Protein Adsorbability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Bo; Lin, Tze-Chung; Hsueh, Han-Yu; Lin, Shih-Chieh; He, Xiao-Dong; Ho, Rong-Ming

    2016-06-28

    Nanoporous epoxy with gyroid texture is fabricated by using a nanoporous polymer with gyroid-forming nanochannels as a template for polymerization of epoxy. The nanoporous polymer template is obtained from the self-assembly of degradable block copolymer, polystyrene-b-poly(l-lactide) (PS-PLLA), followed by hydrolysis of PLLA blocks. Templated polymerization can be conducted under ambient conditions to create well-defined, bicontinuous epoxy networks in a PS matrix. By taking advantage of multistep curing of epoxy, well-ordered robust nanoporous epoxy can be obtained after removal of PS template, giving robust porous materials. The through-hole nanoporous epoxy in the film state can be used as a coated layer to enhance the adsorbability for both lysozyme and bovine serum albumin. PMID:27245380

  17. Orbital foamed material extruder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    This invention is a process for producing foamed material in space comprising the steps of: rotating the material to simulate the force of gravity; heating the rotating material until it is molten; extruding the rotating, molten material; injecting gas into the extruded, rotating, molten material to produce molten foamed material; allowing the molten foamed material to cool to below melting temperature to produce the foamed material. The surface of the extruded foam may be heated to above melting temperature and allowed to cool to below melting temperature. The extruded foam may also be cut to predetermined length. The starting material may be metal or glass. Heating may be accomplished by electrical heating elements or by solar heating.

  18. Structure of random foam.

    SciTech Connect

    Reinelt, Douglas A.; van Swol, Frank B.; Kraynik, Andrew Michael

    2004-06-01

    The Surface Evolver was used to compute the equilibrium microstructure of dry soap foams with random structure and a wide range of cell-size distributions. Topological and geometric properties of foams and individual cells were evaluated. The theory for isotropic Plateau polyhedra describes the dependence of cell geometric properties on their volume and number of faces. The surface area of all cells is about 10% greater than a sphere of equal volume; this leads to a simple but accurate theory for the surface free energy density of foam. A novel parameter based on the surface-volume mean bubble radius R32 is used to characterize foam polydispersity. The foam energy, total cell edge length, and average number of faces per cell all decrease with increasing polydispersity. Pentagonal faces are the most common in monodisperse foam but quadrilaterals take over in highly polydisperse structures.

  19. The science of foaming.

    PubMed

    Drenckhan, Wiebke; Saint-Jalmes, Arnaud

    2015-08-01

    The generation of liquid foams is at the heart of numerous natural, technical or scientific processes. Even though the subject of foam generation has a long-standing history, many recent progresses have been made in an attempt to elucidate the fundamental processes at play. We review the subject by providing an overview of the relevant key mechanisms of bubble generation within a coherent hydrodynamic context; and we discuss different foaming techniques which exploit these mechanisms. PMID:26056064

  20. Thermosetting Fluoropolymer Foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sheng Yen

    1987-01-01

    New process makes fluoropolymer foams with controllable amounts of inert-gas fillings in foam cells. Thermosetting fluoropolymers do not require foaming additives leaving undesirable residues and do not have to be molded and sintered at temperatures of about 240 to 400 degree C. Consequently, better for use with electronic or other parts sensitive to high temperatures or residues. Uses include coatings, electrical insulation, and structural parts.

  1. High performance polymeric foams

    SciTech Connect

    Gargiulo, M.; Sorrentino, L.; Iannace, S.

    2008-08-28

    The aim of this work was to investigate the foamability of high-performance polymers (polyethersulfone, polyphenylsulfone, polyetherimide and polyethylenenaphtalate). Two different methods have been used to prepare the foam samples: high temperature expansion and two-stage batch process. The effects of processing parameters (saturation time and pressure, foaming temperature) on the densities and microcellular structures of these foams were analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy.

  2. Interlaboratory comparison of thin section epoxy impregnation procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, M.D.; Byrnes, A.P.

    1987-05-01

    Evidence of the ineffective blue-dye epoxy impregnation is encountered all too commonly in thin sections. A study involving ceramic disks was conducted to compare the efficiencies of a variety of epoxy impregnation procedures used by major laboratories. Disks were sent to five commercial and four major oil company thin section laboratories which then impregnated the disks and returned them for analysis. Porcelain disks were used because of their high degree of uniformity, white color, rocklike composition and pore geometry, uniform pore size, and high pore connectivity. Impregnation efficiency was determined by calculating the pore volume invaded using helium porosimetry and by determining the areas and distances of invasion based on extent of blue-dye invasion in cross-sectional cuts through the disks. Techniques which proved very highly effective are vacuum or vacuum/pressure impregnation in which the epoxy was added to the sample container subsequent to evacuation. Relatively ineffective are vacuum techniques, at room or elevated temperatures, where the sample is submerged in epoxy prior to evacuation. The key to effective impregnation is to remove air from the sample before it is covered by epoxy. Factors which have little or no influence on the effectiveness of impregnation include type of blue dye, epoxy type, and presence of fluorescent dye. High-quality thin sections can be prepared using less-effective techniques if care is taken to prepare them from the outer edge of the impregnated sample.

  3. Metal ion-containing epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St.clair, A. K.

    1982-01-01

    A variety of metallic and organometallic complexes to be used as potential additives for an epoxy used by the aerospace industry as a composite matrix resin were investigated. A total of 9 complexes were screened for compatibility and for their ability to accelerate or inhibit the cure of a highly crosslinkable epoxy resin. Methods for combining the metallic complexes with the resin were investigated, gel times recorded, and cure exotherms studied by differential scanning calorimetry. Glass transition temperatures of cured metal ion containing epoxy castings were determined by thermomechanical analysis. Thermal stabilities of the castings were determined by thermogravimetric analysis. Mechanical strength and stiffness of these doped epoxies were also measured.

  4. Shape memory polymer foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santo, Loredana

    2016-02-01

    Recent advances in shape memory polymer (SMP) foam research are reviewed. The SMPs belong to a new class of smart polymers which can have interesting applications in microelectromechanical systems, actuators and biomedical devices. They can respond to specific external stimulus changing their configuration and then remember the original shape. In the form of foams, the shape memory behaviour can be enhanced because they generally have higher compressibility. Considering also the low weight, and recovery force, the SMP foams are expected to have great potential applications primarily in aerospace. This review highlights the recent progress in characterization, evaluation, and proposed applications of SMP foams mainly for aerospace applications.

  5. Making classifying selectors work for foam elimination in the activated-sludge process.

    PubMed

    Parker, Denny; Geary, Steve; Jones, Garr; McIntyre, Lori; Oppenheim, Stuart; Pedregon, Vick; Pope, Rod; Richards, Tyler; Voigt, Christine; Volpe, Gary; Willis, John; Witzgall, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Classifying selectors are used to control the population of foam-causing organisms in activated-sludge plants to prevent the development of nuisance foams. The term, classifying selector, refers to the physical mechanism by which these organisms are selected against; foam-causing organisms are enriched into the solids in the foam and their rapid removal controls their population at low levels in the mixed liquor. Foam-causing organisms are wasted "first" rather than accumulating on the surface of tanks and thereby being wasted "last", which is typical of the process. This concept originated in South Africa, where pilot studies showed that placement of a flotation tank for foam removal prior to secondary clarifiers would eliminate foam-causing organisms. It was later simplified in the United States by using the aeration in aeration tanks or aerated channels coupled with simple baffling and adjustable weirs to make continuous separation of nuisance organisms from the mixed liquor. PMID:12683467

  6. Open-cell silicon foam for ultralightweight mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortini, Arthur J.

    1999-09-01

    Elemental silicon is a lightweight material that shows great promise for optical applications. Specifically, open-cell silicon foam can be used as a core material for ultralightweight mirrors by bonding single-crystal silicon faceplates to the foam. Not only does silicon have a low density, but it also has a low thermal expansion coefficient and a high thermal conductivity. Further, because of its widespread use in the semiconductor industry, it is an extremely well-characterized material. The fabrication of silicon foam begins with open-cell polyurethane foam, which is available in a wide variety of cell sizes ranging from 3 to 100 pores per linear inch. After chemical conversion to a glassy carbon foam, the individual ligaments are coated with silicon by chemical vapor deposition/infiltration (CVD/CVI), and the carbon cores are removed by oxidation. The end result is an open-cell foam composed exclusively of silicon. CVD/CVI is a very versatile process because it allows the amount of silicon in the foam to be varied. As the relative density of the foam increase, so does its strength and stiffness. Consequently, the mechanical properties of the foam can be tailored to meet the needs of a given application. For example, for space-based applications where light weight is critical, lower density foams can be used. For terrestrial applications requiring high stiffness, higher density foams can be used. In all cases, the relative density of the foam is a parameter that can be optimized to meet the needs of a particular application.

  7. High Temperature Structural Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Erik S.; Baillif, Faye F.; Grimsley, Brian W.; Marchello, Joseph M.

    1997-01-01

    The Aerospace Industry is experiencing growing demand for high performance polymer foam. The X-33 program needs structural foam insulation capable of retaining its strength over a wide range of environmental conditions. The High Speed Research Program has a need for low density core splice and potting materials. This paper reviews the state of the art in foam materials and describes experimental work to fabricate low density, high shear strength foam which can withstand temperatures from -220 C to 220 C. Commercially available polymer foams exhibit a wide range of physical properties. Some with densities as low as 0.066 g/cc are capable of co-curing at temperatures as high as 182 C. Rohacell foams can be resin transfer molded at temperatures up to 180 C. They have moduli of elasticity of 0.19 MPa, tensile strengths of 3.7 Mpa and compressive strengths of 3.6 MPa. The Rohacell foams cannot withstand liquid hydrogen temperatures, however Imi-Tech markets Solimide (trademark) foams which withstand temperatures from -250 C to 200 C, but they do not have the required structural integrity. The research activity at NASA Langley Research Center focuses on using chemical blowing agents to produce polyimide thermoplastic foams capable of meeting the above performance requirements. The combination of blowing agents that decompose at the minimum melt viscosity temperature together with plasticizers to lower the viscosity has been used to produce foams by both extrusion and oven heating. The foams produced exhibit good environmental stability while maintaining structural properties.

  8. Variables Affecting the Foam Separation of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Bretz, H. W.; Wang, S. L.; Grieves, R. B.

    1966-01-01

    The removal of washed and standardized Escherichia coli from distilled-water suspension by foam separation with nitrogen gas and 30 μg/ml of ethylhexadecyldimethylammonium bromide surfactant was increased by increasing the gas rate from 4.3 to 9.3 liters per min and by lowering the port level at which foam was removed from 60.4 to 20.4 cm, but with concomitant increases in foam volumes. The concentrations of cells and of surfactant in the residual suspensions were related to foam volumes; a given number of cells adsorbed a constant amount of surfactant. The addition of from 10 to 500 μg/ml of inorganic salts decreased the total cell removal, with magnesium sulfate producing an anomalously large effect. The addition of surfactant in several doses (compared with a single dose) together with an increase in foaming time from 10 to 24 min produced residual suspensions with lower cell concentrations, and, when salts were present in the initial suspensions, produced lower foam volumes and more concentrated foams. PMID:5339303

  9. Micromodel foam flow study

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, K.T.; Radke, C.J.

    1990-10-01

    Foams are often utilized as part of enhanced oil recovery techniques. This report presents the results of a micromodel foam flow study. Micromodels are valuable tools in uncovering capillary phenomena responsible for lamellae generation and coalescence during foam flow in porous media. Among the mechanisms observed are snap-off, weeping-flow breakup, and lamella division and leave behind. Coalescence mechanisms include dynamic capillary-pressure-induced lamella drainage and gas diffusion. These phenomena are sensitive to the mode of injection, the local capillary environment, and the geometry of the pore structure. An important consideration in presenting a tractable model of foam flow behavior is the ability to identify the pore-level mechanisms having the greatest impact on foam texture. The predominant mechanisms will vary depending upon the application for foam as an enhanced oil recovery (EOR) fluid. Both simultaneous gas and surfactant injection and surfactant alternating with gas injection (SAG) have been used to create foam for mobility control in EOR projects. The model developed is based on simultaneous gas and surfactant injection during steady-state conditions into a Berea sandstone core. The lamellae generation and coalescence mechanisms included in this model are snap-off, lamella division, and dynamic capillary-pressure-induced lamella drainage. This simplified steady-state model serves as a foundation for developing more complete rate expressions and for extending the population balance to handle transient foam flow behavior. 70 refs., 30 figs.

  10. Evaluating foam heterogeneity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, D. W.; Lee, W. M.

    1972-01-01

    New analytical tool is available to calculate the degree of foam heterogeneity based on the measurement of gas diffusivity values. Diffusion characteristics of plastic foam are described by a system of differential equations based on conventional diffusion theory. This approach saves research and computation time in studying mass or heat diffusion problems.

  11. Chronicles of foam films.

    PubMed

    Gochev, G; Platikanov, D; Miller, R

    2016-07-01

    The history of the scientific research on foam films, traditionally known as soap films, dates back to as early as the late 17th century when Boyle and Hooke paid special attention to the colours of soap bubbles. Their inspiration was transferred to Newton, who began systematic study of the science of foam films. Over the next centuries, a number of scientists dealt with the open questions of the drainage, stability and thickness of foam films. The significant contributions of Plateau and Gibbs in the middle/late 19th century are particularly recognized. After the "colours" method of Newton, Reinold and Rücker as well as Johhonnot developed optical methods for measuring the thickness of the thinner "non-colour" films (first order black) that are still in use today. At the beginning of the 20th century, various aspects of the foam film science were elucidated by the works of Dewar and Perrin and later by Mysels. Undoubtedly, the introduction of the disjoining pressure by Derjaguin and the manifestation of the DLVO theory in describing the film stability are considered as milestones in the theoretical development of foam films. The study of foam films gained momentum with the introduction of the microscopic foam film methodology by Scheludko and Exerowa, which is widely used today. This historical perspective serves as a guide through the chronological development of knowledge on foam films achieved over several centuries. PMID:26361708

  12. Epoxy resin holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Limón, B.; Wetzel, G. B. J.; Olivares Pérez, A.; Ponce-Lee, E. L.; Ramos-Garcia, R.; Toxqui López, S.; Hernández-Garay, M. P.; Fuentes-Tapia, I.

    2006-02-01

    We observed that a commercial epoxy resin (Comex (R) is enable to record images by means of lithography techniques. We can generate a hologram using a digital image and a computer simulation program and transferred it on our resin by microlithography techniques to get a phase hologram and increase its efficiency. The exposition to the heat produce temperature gradients and the information in the mask is transferred to the material by the refraction index changes, thus the film is recorded. At the same time the hologram is cured.

  13. Foamed Bulk Metallic Glass (Foam) Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This soldering iron has an evacuated copper capsule at the tip that contains a pellet of Bulk Metallic Glass (BMG) aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Prior to flight, researchers sealed a pellet of bulk metallic glass mixed with microscopic gas-generating particles into the copper ampoule under vacuum. Once heated in space, such as in this photograph, the particles generated gas and the BMG becomes a viscous liquid. The released gas made the sample foam within the capsule where each microscopic particle formed a gas-filled pore within the foam. The inset image shows the oxidation of the sample after several minutes of applying heat. Although hidden within the brass sleeve, the sample retained the foam shape when cooled, because the viscosity increased during cooling until it was solid.

  14. Interaction of water with epoxy.

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, Dana Auburn

    2009-07-01

    The chemistries of reactants, plasticizers, solvents and additives in an epoxy paint are discussed. Polyamide additives may play an important role in the absorption of molecular iodine by epoxy paints. It is recommended that the unsaturation of the polyamide additive in the epoxy cure be determined. Experimental studies of water absorption by epoxy resins are discussed. These studies show that absorption can disrupt hydrogen bonds among segments of the polymers and cause swelling of the polymer. The water absorption increases the diffusion coefficient of water within the polymer. Permanent damage to the polymer can result if water causes hydrolysis of ether linkages. Water desorption studies are recommended to ascertain how water absorption affects epoxy paint.

  15. Cells on foam and fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Clyde, R.

    1995-11-01

    Cells growing on high area foam and when a screen is put around the foam, it is made heavier so it can be fluidized. When foam is rotated in a half full RBC, drops are formed and mass transfer of oxygen to drops in much faster. Most fungi and some mammalian cells need oxygen. Corrugated fibers with holes in the valleys also produce drops. White rot fungus needs oxygen and it degrades many chlorine compounds, azo dyes, and TNT. Old cardboard boxes are readily available and when buried in soil, oxygen is entrapped. In a lake, the boxes expose high area. Fibers have high surface area for immobilizing cells and when the fibers are rotated, fast reactions occur, converting one chemical to another. Sugar has been fermented to alcohol in 10-15 minutes. Ethanol has high octane and does not need lead. Old cars and trucks still use lead and high levels have been found in the drinking water of several large cities. Bacteria on fibers can remove lead in a few seconds. When an RBC of plain fiber discs is rotated and a light shone in the top the light hits a thin moving film to degrade chlorine compounds. Microbes and light remove sulfur from oil. Calcium magnesium acetate is a non corrosive road deicer. Salt on roads causes millions of dollars damage to bridges and cars. An inexpensive reactor has been made for organization studies of mammalian and plant cells. A magnet is near the bottom but not touching and oxygen is put on the top where there is no seal that can leak.

  16. Development and Mechanical Behavior of FML/Aluminium Foam Sandwiches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baştürk, S. B.; Tanoğlu, M.

    2013-10-01

    In this study, the Fiber-Metal Laminates (FMLs) containing glass fiber reinforced polypropylene (GFPP) and aluminum (Al) sheet were consolidated with Al foam cores for preparing the sandwich panels. The aim of this article is the comparison of the flexural properties of FML/Al foam sandwich panels bonded with various surface modification approaches (silane treatment and combination of silane treatment with polypropylene (PP) based film addition). The FML/foam sandwich systems were fabricated by laminating the components in a mould at 200 °C under 1.5 MPa pressure. The energy absorbtion capacities and flexural mechanical properties of the prepared sandwich systems were evaluated by mechanical tests. Experiments were performed on samples of varying foam thicknesses (8, 20 and 30 mm). The bonding among the sandwich components were achieved by various surface modification techniques. The Al sheet/Al foam sandwiches were also consolidated by bonding the components with an epoxy adhesive to reveal the effect of GFPP on the flexural performance of the sandwich structures.

  17. Toughening of phenolic foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Hongbin

    2003-06-01

    Phenolic foam has excellent FST performance with relatively low cost, and thus is an attractive material for many applications. However, it is extremely brittle and fragile, precluding it from load-bearing applications. In order to make it tougher and more viable for structural purposes, an effective approach has been proposed and investigated in this study. Composite phenolic foam with short fiber reinforcements resulted in significant improvement in mechanical performance while retaining FST properties comparable to conventional phenolic foam. For example, composite phenolic foam with aramid fibers exhibited a seven-fold increase in peel resistance together with a five-fold reduction in friability. In shear tests, aramid composite foam endured prolonged loading to high levels of strain, indicating the potential for use in structural applications. On the other hand, glass fiber-reinforced phenolic foam produced substantial improvement in the stiffness and strength relative to the unreinforced counterpart. In particular, the Young's modulus of the glass fiber composite foam was increased by as much as 100% relative to the plain phenolic foam in the foam rise direction. In addition, different mechanical behavior was observed for aramid and glass fiber-reinforced foams. In an attempt to understand the mechanical behavior of composite foam, a novel NDT technique, micro-CT, was used to acquire information on fiber length distribution (FLD) and fiber orientation distribution (FOD). Results from micro-CT measurements were compared with theoretical distribution models, achieving various degrees of agreement. Despite some limitations of current micro-CT technology, the realistic observation and measurement of cellular morphology and fiber distribution within composite foams portend future advances in modeling of reinforced polymer foam. To explain the discrepancy observed in shear stiffness between traditional shear test results and those by the short sandwich beam test, a

  18. Electrically conductive rigid polyurethane foam

    DOEpatents

    Neet, Thomas E.; Spieker, David A.

    1985-03-19

    A rigid, polyurethane foam comprises about 2-10 weight percent, based on the total foam weight, of a carbon black which is CONDUCTEX CC-40-220 or CONDUCTEX SC, whereby the rigid polyurethane foam is electrically conductive and has essentially the same mechanical properties as the same foam without carbon black added.

  19. Electrically conductive rigid polyurethane foam

    DOEpatents

    Neet, T.E.; Spieker, D.A.

    1983-12-08

    A rigid, moldable polyurethane foam comprises about 2 to 10 weight percent, based on the total foam weight, of a carbon black which is CONDUCTEX CC-40-220 or CONDUCTEX SC, whereby the rigid polyurethane foam is electrically conductive and has essentially the same mechanical properties as the same foam without carbon black added.

  20. Unusually stable liquid foams.

    PubMed

    Rio, Emmanuelle; Drenckhan, Wiebke; Salonen, Anniina; Langevin, Dominique

    2014-03-01

    Obtaining stable liquid foams is an important issue in view of their numerous applications. In some of these, the liquid foam in itself is of interest, in others, the liquid foam acts as a precursor for the generation of solid foam. In this short review, we will make a survey of the existing results in the area. This will include foams stabilised by surfactants, proteins and particles. The origin of the stability is related to the slowing down of coarsening, drainage or coalescence, and eventually to their arrest. The three effects are frequently coupled and in many cases, they act simultaneously and enhance one another. Drainage can be arrested if the liquid of the foam either gels or solidifies. Coalescence is slowed down by gelified foam films, and it can be arrested if the films become very thick and/or rigid. These mechanisms are thus qualitatively easy to identify, but they are less easy to model in order to obtain quantitative predictions. The slowing down of coarsening requests either very thick or small films, and its arrest was observed in cases where the surface compression modulus was large. The detail of the mechanisms at play remains unclear. PMID:24342735

  1. Preparation and characterization of shape memory composite foams with interpenetrating polymer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yongtao; Zhou, Tianyang; Yang, Cheng; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2016-03-01

    The present study reports a feasible approach of fabricating shape memory composite foams with an interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) based on polyurethane (PU) and shape memory epoxy resin (SMER) via a simultaneous polymerization technique. The PU component is capable of constructing a foam structure and the SMER is grafted on the PU network to offer its shape memory property in the final IPN foams. A series of IPN foams without phase separation were produced due to good compatibility and a tight chemical interaction between PU and SMER components. The relationships of the geometry of the foam cell were investigated via varying compositions of PU and SMER. The physical property and shape memory property were also evaluated. The stimulus temperature of IPN shape memory composite foams, glass temperature (Tg), could be tunable by varying the constituents and Tg of PU and SMER. The mechanism of the shape memory effect of IPN foams has been proposed. The shape memory composite foam with IPN developed in this study has the potential to extend its application field.

  2. Low density microcellular foams

    DOEpatents

    Aubert, James H.; Clough, Roger L.; Curro, John G.; Quintana, Carlos A.; Russick, Edward M.; Shaw, Montgomery T.

    1987-01-01

    Low density, microporous polymer foams are provided by a process which comprises forming a solution of polymer and a suitable solvent followed by rapid cooling of the solution to form a phase-separated system and freeze the phase-separated system. The phase-separated system comprises a polymer phase and a solvent phase, each of which is substantially continuous within the other. The morphology of the polymer phase prior to and subsequent to freezing determine the morphology of the resultant foam. Both isotropic and anisotropic foams can be produced. If isotropic foams are produced, the polymer and solvent are tailored such that the solution spontaneously phase-separates prior to the point at which any component freezes. The morphology of the resultant polymer phase determines the morphology of the resultant foam and the morphology of the polymer phase is retained by cooling the system at a rate sufficient to freeze one or both components of the system before a change in morphology can occur. Anisotropic foams are produced by forming a solution of polymer and solvent that will not phase separate prior to freezing of one or both components of the solution. In such a process, the solvent typically freezes before phase separation occurs. The morphology of the resultant frozen two-phase system determines the morphology of the resultant foam. The process involves subjecting the solution to essentially one-dimensional cooling. Means for subjecting such a solvent to one-dimensional cooling are also provided. Foams having a density of less than 0.1 g/cc and a uniform cell size of less than 10 .mu.m and a volume such that the foams have a length greater than 1 cm are provided.

  3. Low density microcellular foams

    DOEpatents

    Aubert, J.H.; Clough, R.L.; Curro, J.G.; Quintana, C.A.; Russick, E.M.; Shaw, M.T.

    1985-10-02

    Low density, microporous polymer foams are provided by a process which comprises forming a solution of polymer and a suitable solvent followed by rapid cooling of the solution to form a phase-separated system and freeze the phase-separated system. The phase-separated system comprises a polymer phase and a solvent phase, each of which is substantially continuous within the other. The morphology of the polymer phase prior to and subsequent to freezing determine the morphology of the resultant foam. Both isotropic and anisotropic foams can be produced. If isotropic foams are produced, the polymer and solvent are tailored such that the solution spontaneously phase-separates prior to the point at which any component freezes. The morphology of the resultant polymer phase determines the morphology of the reusltant foam and the morphology of the polymer phase is retained by cooling the system at a rate sufficient to freeze one or both components of the system before a change in morphology can occur. Anisotropic foams are produced by forming a solution of polymer and solvent that will not phase separate prior to freezing of one or both components of the solution. In such a process, the solvent typically freezes before phase separation occurs. The morphology of the resultant frozen two-phase system determines the morphology of the resultant foam. The process involves subjecting the solution to essentially one-dimensional cooling. Foams having a density of less than 0.1 g/cc and a uniform cell size of less than 10 ..mu..m and a volume such that the foams have a length greater than 1 cm are provided.

  4. Imide modified epoxy matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scola, D. A.; Pater, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    High char yield epoxy using novel bisimide amines (BIA's) as curing agents with a state of the art epoxy resin was developed. Stoichiometric quantities of the epoxy resin and the BIA's were studied to determine the cure cycle required for preparation of resin specimens. The bisimide cured epoxies were designated IME's (imide modified epoxy). The physical, thermal and mechanical properties of these novel resins were determined. The levels of moisture absorption exhibited by the bisimide amine cured expoxies (IME's) were considerably lower than the state of the art epoxies. The strain-to-failure of the control resin system was improved 25% by replacement of DDS with 6F-DDS. Each BIA containing resin exhibited twice the char yield of the control resin MY 720/DDS. Graphite fiber reinforced control (C) and IME resins were fabricated and characterized. Two of the composite systems showed superior properties compared to the other Celion 6000/IME composite systems and state of the art graphite epoxy systems. The two systems exhibited excellent wet shear and flexural strengths and moduli at 300 and 350 F.

  5. The foaming of lavas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okeefe, J. A.; Walton, W.

    1976-01-01

    Foaming is of great practical and theoretical significance for volcanic processes on the earth, the moon, and perhaps the meteorite parent bodies. The theory of foams agrees with steelmaking experience to indicate that their presence depends on the existence of solutes in the lavas which reduce the surface tension, and are not saturated. These solutes concentrate at the surface, and are called surfactants. The surfactant responsible for the formation of volcanic ash was not identified; it appears to be related to the oxygen partial pressure above the lava. This fact may explain why lunar and meteoritic melts are not observed to foam. Experimental studies are needed to clarify the process.

  6. Dry sand foam generator

    SciTech Connect

    Edgley, K.D.; Stromberg, J.L.

    1988-10-25

    A method of generating a foam containing particulate material for treating a subsurface earth formation penetrated by a well bore, the method comprising: (a) introducing a first stream of pressurized gas having dry particulate material entrained therein into a vessel, the particulate material flowing vertically downward into the vessel, at least in part due to the action of gravity; (b) introducing a second stream of liquid into the vessel; (c) varying the second stream into a self-impinging conical jet; (d) impinging the conical jet onto the first stream and thereby forming a foam containing particulate material; and (e) injecting such a foam into the well bore.

  7. Foam encapsulated targets

    DOEpatents

    Nuckolls, John H.; Thiessen, Albert R.; Dahlbacka, Glen H.

    1983-01-01

    Foam encapsulated laser-fusion targets wherein a quantity of thermonuclear fuel is embedded in low density, microcellular foam which serves as an electron conduction channel for symmetrical implosion of the fuel by illumination of the target by one or more laser beams. The fuel, such as DT, is contained within a hollow shell constructed of glass, for example, with the foam having a cell size of preferably no greater than 2 .mu.m, a density of 0.065 to 0.6.times.10.sup.3 kg/m.sup.3, and external diameter of less than 200 .mu.m.

  8. Foamed energy cell

    SciTech Connect

    Brotz, G.R.

    1990-02-13

    This patent describes an electric current generating cell. It comprises: a container; an open-cellular foamed material held within the container; a coating on the interior of the cells of the foam of a semiconductor or other type photoelectric junction material; a first pole electrode interconnected to the coating, the pole extending out of the container; a fluid or gaseous activating material entered into the open cells in the foam adapted to interact therewith for the production of an electric current; and a second pole electrode in the container in contact with the activating material, the pole extending out of the container.

  9. Dynamics of poroelastic foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forterre, Yoel; Sobac, Benjamin

    2010-11-01

    Soft poroelastic structures are widespread in biological tissues such as cartilaginous joints in bones, blood-filled placentae or plant organs. Here we investigate the dynamics of open elastic foams immersed in viscous fluids, as model soft poroelastic materials. The experiment consists in slowly compacting blocs of polyurethane solid foam embedded in silicon oil-tanks and studying their relaxation to equilibrium when the confining stress is suddenly released. Measurements of the local fluid pressure and foam velocity field are compared with a simple two-phase flow approach. For small initial compactions, the results show quantitative agreement with the classical diffusion theory of soil consolidation (Terzaghi, Biot). On the other hand, for large initial compactions, the dynamics exhibits long relaxation times and decompaction fronts, which are mainly controlled by the highly non-linear mechanical response of the foam. The analogy between this process and the evaporation of a polymer melt close to the glass transition will be briefly discussed.

  10. Rheology of aqueous foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dollet, Benjamin; Raufaste, Christophe

    2014-10-01

    Aqueous foams are suspensions of bubbles inside aqueous phases. Their multiphasic composition leads to a complex rheological behavior that is useful in numerous applications, from oil recovery to food/cosmetic processing. Their structure is very similar to the one of emulsions, so that both materials share common mechanical properties. In particular, the presence of surfactants at the gas-liquid interfaces leads to peculiar interfacial and dissipative properties. Foam rheology has been an active research topics and is already reported in several reviews, most of them covering rheometry measurements at the scale of the foam, coupled with interpretations at the local scale of bubbles or interfaces. In this review, we start following this approach, then we try to cover the multiscale features of aqueous foam flows, emphasizing regimes where intermediate length scales need to be taken into account or regimes fast enough regarding internal time scales so that the flow goes beyond the quasi-static limit. xml:lang="fr"

  11. Ocean foam generation and modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, R. A.; Bechis, K. P.

    1976-01-01

    A laboratory investigation was conducted to determine the physical and microwave properties of ocean foam. Special foam generators were designed and fabricated, using porous glass sheets, known as glass frits, as the principal element. The glass frit was sealed into a water-tight vertical box, a few centimeters from the bottom. Compressed air, applied to the lower chamber, created ocean foam from sea water lying on the frit. Foam heights of 30 cm were readily achieved, with relatively low air pressures. Special photographic techniques and analytical procedures were employed to determine foam bubble size distributions. In addition, the percentage water content of ocean foam was determined with the aid of a particulate sampling procedure. A glass frit foam generator, with pore diameters in the range 70 - 100 micrometers, produced foam with bubble distributions very similar to those found on the surface of natural ocean foam patches.

  12. Responsive foams for nanoparticle delivery.

    PubMed

    Tang, Christina; Xiao, Edward; Sinko, Patrick J; Szekely, Zoltan; Prud'homme, Robert K

    2015-09-01

    We have developed responsive foam systems for nanoparticle delivery. The foams are easy to make, stable at room temperature, and can be engineered to break in response to temperature or moisture. Temperature-responsive foams are based on the phase transition of long chain alcohols and could be produced using medical grade nitrous oxide as a propellant. These temperature-sensitive foams could be used for polyacrylic acid (PAA)-based nanoparticle delivery. We also discuss moisture-responsive foams made with soap pump dispensers. Polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based nanoparticles or PMMA latex nanoparticles were loaded into Tween 20 foams and the particle size was not affected by the foam formulation or foam break. Using biocompatible detergents, we anticipate this will be a versatile and simple approach to producing foams for nanoparticle delivery with many potential pharmaceutical and personal care applications. PMID:26091943

  13. Rigid molecular foams

    SciTech Connect

    Steckle, W.P. Jr.; Mitchell, M.A.; Aspen, P.G.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Organic analogues to inorganic zeolites would be a significant step forward in engineered porous materials and would provide advantages in range, selectivity, tailorability, and processing. Rigid molecular foams or {open_quotes}organic zeolites{close_quotes} would not be crystalline materials and could be tailored over a broader range of pore sizes and volumes. A novel process for preparing hypercrosslinked polymeric foams has been developed via a Friedel-Crafts polycondensation reaction. A series of rigid hypercrosslinked foams have been prepared using simple rigid polyaromatic hydrocarbons including benzene, biphenyl, m-terphenyl, diphenylmethane, and polystyrene, with dichloroxylene (DCX) as the pore size. After drying the foams are robust and rigid. Densities of the resulting foams can range from 0.15 g/cc to 0.75 g/cc. Nitrogen adsorption studies have shown that by judiciously selecting monomers and the crosslinking agent along with the level of crosslinking and the cure time of the resulting gel, the pore size, pore size distribution, and the total surface area of the foam can be tailored. Surface areas range from 160 to 1,200 m{sup 2}/g with pore sizes ranging from 6 {angstrom} to 2,000 {angstrom}.

  14. Ultralight metal foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Bin; He, Chunnian; Zhao, Naiqin; Nash, Philip; Shi, Chunsheng; Wang, Zejun

    2015-09-01

    Ultralight (<10 mg/cm3) cellular materials are desirable for thermal insulation; battery electrodes; catalyst supports; and acoustic, vibration, or shock energy damping. However, most of these ultralight materials, especially ultralight metal foams, are fabricated using either expensive materials or complicated procedures, which greatly limit their large-scale production and practical applications. Here we report a simple and versatile method to obtain ultralight monolithic metal foams. These materials are fabricated with a low-cost polymeric template and the method is based on the traditional silver mirror reaction and electroless plating. We have produced ultralight monolithic metal foams, such as silver, nickel, cobalt, and copper via this method. The resultant ultralight monolithic metal foams have remarkably low densities down to 7.4 mg/cm3 or 99.9% porosity. The metal foams have a long flat stress-train curve in compression tests and the densification strain ɛD of the Ni/Ag foam with a porosity of 99.8% can reach 82%. The plateau stress σpl was measured and found to be in agreement with the value predicted by the cellular solids theory.

  15. Ultralight metal foams.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bin; He, Chunnian; Zhao, Naiqin; Nash, Philip; Shi, Chunsheng; Wang, Zejun

    2015-01-01

    Ultralight (<10 mg/cm3) cellular materials are desirable for thermal insulation; battery electrodes; catalyst supports; and acoustic, vibration, or shock energy damping. However, most of these ultralight materials, especially ultralight metal foams, are fabricated using either expensive materials or complicated procedures, which greatly limit their large-scale production and practical applications. Here we report a simple and versatile method to obtain ultralight monolithic metal foams. These materials are fabricated with a low-cost polymeric template and the method is based on the traditional silver mirror reaction and electroless plating. We have produced ultralight monolithic metal foams, such as silver, nickel, cobalt, and copper via this method. The resultant ultralight monolithic metal foams have remarkably low densities down to 7.4 mg/cm3 or 99.9% porosity. The metal foams have a long flat stress-train curve in compression tests and the densification strain εD of the Ni/Ag foam with a porosity of 99.8% can reach 82%. The plateau stress σpl was measured and found to be in agreement with the value predicted by the cellular solids theory. PMID:26349002

  16. Foam Optics and Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durian, Douglas J.; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    2002-01-01

    The Foam Optics and Mechanics (FOAM) project will exploit the microgravity environment to more accurately measure the rheological and optical characteristics of wet aqueous foams. Using both rheology and laser light scattering diagnostics, the goal is to quantify the unusual elastic character of foams in terms of their underlying microscopic structure and dynamics. Of particular interest is determining how the elastic character vanishes, i.e., how the foam 'melts' into a simple viscous liquid, as a function of both increasing liquid content and increasing shear strain rate. The unusual elastic character of foams will be quantified macroscopically by measurement of the shear stress as a function of shear strain rate and of time following a step strain. Such data will be analyzed in terms of a yield stress, shear moduli, and dynamical time scales. Microscopic information about bubble packing and rearrangement dynamics, from which the macroscopic non-Newtonian properties ultimately arise, will be obtained non-invasively by multiple-light scattering: diffuse transmission spectroscopy (DTS) and diffusing wave spectroscopy (DWS). Quantitative trends with materials parameters, most importantly average bubble size and liquid content, will be sought in order to elucidate the fundamental connection between the microscopic structure and dynamics and the macroscopic rheology.

  17. Aromatic Polyimide Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Echigo, Yoshiaki (Inventor); Kaneshiro, Hisayasu (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A mechanically undensified aromatic polyimide foam is made from an aromatic polyimide precursor solid residuum and has the following combination of properties: a density according to ASTM D-3574A of about 0.5 pounds/cu.ft to about 20 pounds/cu.ft; a compression strength according to ASTM D-3574C of about 1.5 psi to about 1500 psi; and a limiting oxygen index according to ASTM D-2863 of about 35% oxygen to about 75% oxygen at atmospheric pressure. The aromatic polyimide foam has no appreciable solid inorganic contaminants which are residues of inorganic blowing agents. The aromatic polyimide which constitutes the aromatic polyimide foam has a glass transition temperature (Tg) by differential scanning calorimetry of about 235 C to about 400 C; and a thermal stability of 0 to about 1% weight loss at 204 C as determined by thermogravinietric analysis (TGA). The aromatic polyimide foam has utility as foam insulation and as structural foam, for example, for aeronautical, aerospace and maritime applications.

  18. Ultralight metal foams

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Bin; He, Chunnian; Zhao, Naiqin; Nash, Philip; Shi, Chunsheng; Wang, Zejun

    2015-01-01

    Ultralight (<10 mg/cm3) cellular materials are desirable for thermal insulation; battery electrodes; catalyst supports; and acoustic, vibration, or shock energy damping. However, most of these ultralight materials, especially ultralight metal foams, are fabricated using either expensive materials or complicated procedures, which greatly limit their large-scale production and practical applications. Here we report a simple and versatile method to obtain ultralight monolithic metal foams. These materials are fabricated with a low-cost polymeric template and the method is based on the traditional silver mirror reaction and electroless plating. We have produced ultralight monolithic metal foams, such as silver, nickel, cobalt, and copper via this method. The resultant ultralight monolithic metal foams have remarkably low densities down to 7.4 mg/cm3 or 99.9% porosity. The metal foams have a long flat stress-train curve in compression tests and the densification strain εD of the Ni/Ag foam with a porosity of 99.8% can reach 82%. The plateau stress σpl was measured and found to be in agreement with the value predicted by the cellular solids theory. PMID:26349002

  19. Ambient cure polyimide foams. [thermal resistant foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawko, P. M.; Riccitiello, S. R.; Hamermesh, C. L. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Flame and temperature resistant polyimide foams are prepared by the reaction of an aromatic dianhydride, (pyromellitic dianhydride) with an aromatic polyisocyanate, (polymethylene polyphenylisocyanate), in the presence of an inorganic acid and furfuryl alcohol. Usable acids include dilute sulfuric acid, dilute nitric acid, hydrochloric acid, polyphosphoric acid, and phosphoric acid, with the latter being preferred. The dianhydride and the isocyanate in about equimolar proportions constitute about 50% of the reaction mixture, the rest being made up with the acid and the alcohol in a ratio of about 1:10. An exothermic reaction between the acid and the alcohol provides the heat necessary for the other components to polymerize without recourse to external heat sources. The mixture can be sprayed on any surface to form polymeric foam in locations where the application of heat is not practical or possible, for instance, between walls or on mine tunnel surfaces.

  20. Rigid zeolite containing polyurethane foams

    DOEpatents

    Frost, Charles B.

    1985-01-01

    A closed cell rigid polyurethane foam has been prepared which contains up to about 60% by weight of molecular sieves capable of sorbing molecules with effective critical diameters of up to about 10 .ANG.. The molecular sieve component of the foam can be preloaded with catalysts or with reactive compounds that can be released upon activation of the foam to control and complete crosslinking after the foam is formed. The foam can also be loaded with water or other flame-retarding agents, after completion. Up to about 50% of the weight of the isocyanate component of the foam can be replaced by polyimide resin precursors for incorporation into the final polymeric network.

  1. Rigid zeolite containing polyurethane foams

    DOEpatents

    Frost, C.B.

    1984-05-18

    A closed cell rigid polyurethane foam has been prepared which contains up to about 60% by weight of molecular sieves capable of sorbing molecules with effective critical diameters of up to about 10 A. The molecular sieve component of the foam can be preloaded with catalysts or with reactive compounds that can be released upon activation of the foam to control and complete crosslinking after the foam is formed. The foam can also be loaded with water or other flame-retarding agents, after completion. Up to about 50% of the weight of the isocyanate component of the foam can be replaced by polyimide resin precursors for incorporation into the final polymeric network.

  2. Impacts on foam stabilised composite structures: Experimental and numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivallant, S.; Ferrero, J. F.; Barrau, J. J.

    2003-09-01

    A dropweight tester is used to make low velocity tests on specific sandwich type structures. Sandwich are made of glass-epoxy skin and polyurethane foam core. The skins can be straight or little curved, and impact direction is the global skin direction. The aim of these tests is to study the initiation of rupture in such structures: local buckling of skin and foam core rupture. Experimental results are given. They show the evolution of buckling critical stress in the skin when impact velocity increases. The rupture mode in curved skin specimen is also studied: rupture is no more provoked by buckling. A numerical analysis is proposed to model the behaviour of the structure and the rupture initiation. Finally, a method is developed, in order to predict the propagation of skin debonding during impact: an element layer under the skin is damaged with a specific law to simulate debonding.

  3. Development, testing, and numerical modeling of a foam sandwich biocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chachra, Ricky

    This study develops a novel sandwich composite material using plant based materials for potential use in nonstructural building applications. The face sheets comprise woven hemp fabric and a sap based epoxy, while the core comprises castor oil based foam with waste rice hulls as reinforcement. Mechanical properties of the individual materials are tested in uniaxial compression and tension for the foam and hemp, respectively. The sandwich composite is tested in 3 point bending. Flexural results are compared to a finite element model developed in the commercial software Abaqus, and the validated model is then used to investigate alternate sandwich geometries. Sandwich model responses are compared to existing standards for nonstructural building panels, showing that the novel material is roughly half the strength of equally thick drywall. When space limitations are not an issue, a double thickness sandwich biocomposite is found to be a structurally acceptable replacement for standard gypsum drywall.

  4. Acoustic Radiation from Smart Foam for Various Foam Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivakumar, Nishkala

    2011-10-01

    Smart foam is an emerging active-passive noise control technology with many applications. Smart foam consists of passive foam with an embedded curved piezoelectric (PZT) film. We experimented with three geometries of varying film curvatures and a constant cross-sectional area of 58 cm^2, constructed using melamine foam covered with 28 μm thick polyvinylidene fluoride (piezoelectric) films with Cu-Ni surface electrodes. An AC voltage provided by a signal generator and amplifier drives the smart foam. An omnidirectional microphone mounted at a distance 100mm from the foam surface measured the sound level (dB) and harmonic distortion generated by the smart foam. Experiments were repeated for voltages, 40V-140V, and frequencies, 300Hz-2000Hz. The result show that the sound level generated by the smart foams has a characteristic frequency response common to all geometries and a peak sound level between 900 to 1,100 Hz.

  5. Synthesis of polyoxometalate-loaded epoxy composites

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Benjamin J

    2014-10-07

    The synthesis of a polyoxometalate-loaded epoxy uses a one-step cure by applying an external stimulus to release the acid from the polyoxometalate and thereby catalyze the cure reaction of the epoxy resin. Such polyoxometalate-loaded epoxy composites afford the cured epoxy unique properties imparted by the intrinsic properties of the polyoxometalate. For example, polyoxometalate-loaded epoxy composites can be used as corrosion resistant epoxy coatings, for encapsulation of electronics with improved dielectric properties, and for structural applications with improved mechanical properties.

  6. Integrated foam fractionation for heterologous rhamnolipid production with recombinant Pseudomonas putida in a bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Beuker, Janina; Steier, Anke; Wittgens, Andreas; Rosenau, Frank; Henkel, Marius; Hausmann, Rudolf

    2016-03-01

    Heterologeous production of rhamnolipids in Pseudomonas putida is characterized by advantages of a non-pathogenic host and avoidance of the native quorum sensing regulation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Yet, downstream processing is a major problem in rhamnolipid production and increases in complexity at low rhamnolipid titers and when using chemical foam control. This leaves the necessity of a simple concentrating and purification method. Foam fractionation is an elegant method for in situ product removal when producing microbial surfactants. However, up to now in situ foam fractionation is nearly exclusively reported for the production of surfactin with Bacillus subtilis. So far no cultivation integrated foam fractionation process for rhamnolipid production has been reported. This is probably due to excessive bacterial foam enrichment in that system. In this article a simple integrated foam fractionation process is reported for heterologous rhamnolipid production in a bioreactor with easily manageable bacterial foam enrichments. Rhamnolipids were highly concentrated in the foam during the cultivation process with enrichment factors up to 200. The described process was evaluated at different pH, media compositions and temperatures. Foam fractionation processes were characterized by calculating procedural parameter including rhamnolipid and bacterial enrichment, rhamnolipid recovery, YX/S, YP/X, and specific as well as volumetric productivities. Comparing foam fractionation parameters of the rhamnolipid process with the surfactin process a high effectiveness of the integrated foam fractionation for rhamnolipid production was demonstrated. PMID:26860613

  7. Shock Hugoniot measurements in foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petel, O. E.; Ouellet, S.; Frost, D. L.; Higgins, A. J.

    2014-05-01

    The present study outlines a new approach to collecting shock Hugoniot data in foams using photonic Doppler velocimetry to perform mid-plane measurements of the foam deformation. Plate impact experiments were carried out to investigate wave propagation in a closed-cell polymeric foam and an open-cell aluminum foam. Dual-wave structures were observed in both materials with the leading precursor wave determined to be an elastic wave. The discussion of the results focuses on the nature of foam compression under high-rate loading, particularly the difference between the strain history in a foam undergoing uniform stress compaction and uniaxial strain compression. These results are discussed in reference to the current interpretations of Taylor-Hopkinson bar experiments on similar metallic foams. The importance of gas-filtration driven flows in the wave dynamics of open-cell foams is discussed in relation to the nature of the precursor waves.

  8. Foam Insulation for Cryogenic Flowlines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonju, T. R.; Carbone, R. L.; Oves, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    Welded stainless-steel vacuum jackets on cryogenic ducts replaced by plastic foam-insulation jackets that weigh 12 percent less. Foam insulation has 85 percent of insulating ability of stainless-steel jacketing enclosing vacuum of 10 microns of mercury. Foam insulation easier to install than vacuum jacket. Moreover, foam less sensitive to damage and requires minimal maintenance. Resists vibration and expected to have service life of at least 10 years.

  9. Low density metal hydride foams

    DOEpatents

    Maienschein, Jon L.; Barry, Patrick E.

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed is a low density foam having a porosity of from 0 to 98% and a density less than about 0.67 gm/cc, prepared by heating a mixture of powered lithium hydride and beryllium hydride in an inert atmosphere at a temperature ranging from about 455 to about 490 K for a period of time sufficient to cause foaming of said mixture, and cooling the foam thus produced. Also disclosed is the process of making the foam.

  10. Method of making metal-doped organic foam products

    DOEpatents

    Rinde, James A.

    1981-01-01

    Organic foams having a low density and very small cell size and method for roducing same in either a metal-loaded or unloaded (nonmetal loaded) form are described. Metal-doped foams are produced by soaking a polymer gel in an aqueous solution of desired metal salt, soaking the gel successively in a solvent series of decreasing polarity to remove water from the gel and replace it with a solvent of lower polarity with each successive solvent in the series being miscible with the solvents on each side and being saturated with the desired metal salt, and removing the last of the solvents from the gel to produce the desired metal-doped foam having desired density cell size, and metal loading. The unloaded or metal-doped foams can be utilized in a variety of applications requiring low density, small cell size foam. For example, rubidium-doped foam made in accordance with the invention has utility in special applications, such as in x-ray lasers.

  11. Foaming in stout beers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. T.; Devereux, M. G.

    2011-10-01

    We review the differences between bubble formation in champagne and other carbonated drinks, and stout beers which contain a mixture of dissolved nitrogen and carbon dioxide. The presence of dissolved nitrogen in stout beers gives them several properties of interest to connoisseurs and physicists. These remarkable properties come at a price: stout beers do not foam spontaneously and special technology, such as the widgets used in cans, is needed to promote foaming. Nevertheless, the same mechanism, nucleation by gas pockets trapped in cellulose fibers, responsible for foaming in carbonated drinks is active in stout beers, but at an impractically slow rate. This gentle rate of bubble nucleation makes stout beers an excellent model system for investigating the nucleation of gas bubbles. The equipment needed is modest, putting such experiments within reach of undergraduate laboratories. We also consider the suggestion that a widget could be constructed by coating the inside of a beer can with cellulose fibers.

  12. Foams in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Marsden, S.S.

    1986-07-01

    In 1978 a literature search on selective blocking of fluid flow in porous media was done by Professor S.S. Marsden and two of his graduate students, Tom Elson and Kern Huppy. This was presented as SUPRI Report No. TR-3 entitled ''Literature Preview of the Selected Blockage of Fluids in Thermal Recovery Projects.'' Since then a lot of research on foam in porous media has been done on the SUPRI project and a great deal of new information has appeared in the literature. Therefore we believed that a new, up-to-date search should be done on foam alone, one which would be helpful to our students and perhaps of interest to others. This is a chronological survey showing the development of foam flow, blockage and use in porous media, starting with laboratory studies and eventually getting into field tests and demonstrations. It is arbitrarily divided into five-year time periods. 81 refs.

  13. Ambient curing fire resistant foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamermesh, C. L.; Hogenson, P. A.; Tung, C. Y.; Sawko, P. M.; Riccitiello, S. R.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of development of an ambient curing foam is described. The thermal stability and flame spread index of the foams were found to be comparable to those of the high-temperature cured polyimide foams by Monsanto two-foot tunnel test and NASA T-3 Fire test. Adaptation of the material to spray in place applications is described

  14. Spin Foam and Regge Calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gionti, S. J. Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    Recent results in Local Regge Calculus are confronted with Spin Foam Formalism. Introducing Barrett-Crane Quantization in Local Regge Calculus makes it possible to associate a unique Spin jh with an hinge h, fulfilling one of the requirements of Spin Foam definition. It is shown that inter-twiner terms of Spin Foam can follow from the closure constraint in Local Regge Calculus.

  15. Surfactant monitoring by foam generation

    DOEpatents

    Mullen, Ken I.

    1997-01-01

    A device for monitoring the presence or absence of active surfactant or other surface active agents in a solution or flowing stream based on the formation of foam or bubbles is presented. The device detects the formation of foam with a light beam or conductivity measurement. The height or density of the foam can be correlated to the concentration of the active surfactant present.

  16. Fiber-reinforced syntactic foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi-Jen

    Long fibers are generally preferred for reinforcing foams for performance reasons. However, uniform dispersion is difficult to achieve because they must be mixed with liquid resin prior to foam expansion. New approaches aiming to overcome such problem have been developed at USC's Composites Center. Fiber-reinforced syntactic foams with long fibers (over 6 mm in length) manufactured at USC's Composites Center have achieved promising mechanical properties and demonstrated lower density relative to conventional composite foams. Fiber-reinforced syntactic foams were synthesized from thermosetting polymeric microspheres (amino and phenolic microspheres), as well as thermoplastic PVC heat expandable microspheres (HEMs). Carbon and/or aramid fibers were used to reinforce the syntactic foams. Basic mechanical properties, including shear, tensile, and compression, were measured in syntactic foams and fiber-reinforced syntactic foams. Microstructure and crack propagation behavior were investigated by scanning electron microscope and light microscopy. Failure mechanisms and reinforcing mechanisms of fiber-reinforced syntactic foams were also analyzed. As expected, additions of fiber reinforcements to foams enhanced both tensile and shear properties. However, only limited enhancement in compression properties was observed, and fiber reinforcement was of limited benefit in this regard. Therefore, a hybrid foam design was explored and evaluated in an attempt to enhance compression properties. HEMs were blended with glass microspheres to produce hybrid foams, and hybrid foams were subsequently reinforced with continuous aramid fibers to produce fiber-reinforced hybrid foams. Mechanical properties of these foams were evaluated. Findings indicated that the production of hybrid foams was an effective way to enhance the compressive properties of syntactic foams, while the addition of fiber reinforcements enhanced the shear and tensile performance of syntactic foams. Another approach

  17. Multifunctional epoxy composites with natural Moroccan clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsif, M.; Zerouale, A.; Kandri, N. Idrissi; Allali, F.; Sgarbossa, P.; Bartolozzi, A.; Tamburini, S.; Bertani, R.

    2016-05-01

    Two natural Moroccan clays, here firstly completely characterized, have been used as fillers without modification in epoxy composites. Mechanical properties resulted to be improved and a significant antibacterial activity is exhibited by the epoxy composite containing the C2 clay.

  18. Long lasting decontamination foam

    DOEpatents

    Demmer, Ricky L.; Peterman, Dean R.; Tripp, Julia L.; Cooper, David C.; Wright, Karen E.

    2010-12-07

    Compositions and methods for decontaminating surfaces are disclosed. More specifically, compositions and methods for decontamination using a composition capable of generating a long lasting foam are disclosed. Compositions may include a surfactant and gelatin and have a pH of less than about 6. Such compositions may further include affinity-shifting chemicals. Methods may include decontaminating a contaminated surface with a composition or a foam that may include a surfactant and gelatin and have a pH of less than about 6.

  19. Composite foam structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian E. (Inventor); Brockmeyer, Jerry (Inventor); Tuffias, Robert H. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A composite rigid foam structure that has a skin or coating on at least one of its surfaces. The skin is formed in situ by thermal spray techniques. The skin is bonded substantially throughout the surface of the porous substrate to the peripheries of the pores. The skin on the average does not penetrate the surface of the substrate by more than the depth of about 2 to 5 pores. Thus, thermal spraying the skin onto the rigid foam produces a composite that is tightly and uniformly bonded together without unduly increasing the weight of the composite structure. Both thermal conductivity and bonding are excellent.

  20. Space Time Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garattini, Remo

    In the context of a model of space-time foam, made by N wormholes we discuss the possibility of having a foam formed by different configurations. An equivalence between Schwarzschild and Schwarzschild-Anti-de Sitter wormholes in terms of Casimir energy is shown. An argument to discriminate which configuration could represent a foamy vacuum coming from Schwarzschild black hole transition frequencies is used. The case of a positive cosmological constant is also discussed. Finally, a discussion involving charged wormholes leads to the conclusion that they cannot be used to represent a ground state of the foamy type.

  1. Thermal conductivity of weathered polyurethane foam roofing. Final report Jan 71-Nov 81

    SciTech Connect

    Zarate, D.A.; Alumbaugh, R.L.

    1982-09-01

    An investigation of the decay in the thermal conductivity of polyurethane foam (PUF) with time is presented. The polyurethane foams studied included samples removed from sprayed PUF roofing systems on structures at Guam, Marianas Islands; Subic Bay, Republic of the Phillipines; Denver, Colorado; Clifton, New Jersey; and Port Hueneme, California. Thermal conductivity results closely agree with those predicted for a foam aged at 25 C in a controlled atmosphere. Results also indicate that the foam can provide good insulation characteristics in spite of poor application.

  2. Epoxy bond and stop etch fabrication method

    DOEpatents

    Simmons, Jerry A.; Weckwerth, Mark V.; Baca, Wes E.

    2000-01-01

    A class of epoxy bond and stop etch (EBASE) microelectronic fabrication techniques is disclosed. The essence of such techniques is to grow circuit components on top of a stop etch layer grown on a first substrate. The first substrate and a host substrate are then bonded together so that the circuit components are attached to the host substrate by the bonding agent. The first substrate is then removed, e.g., by a chemical or physical etching process to which the stop etch layer is resistant. EBASE fabrication methods allow access to regions of a device structure which are usually blocked by the presence of a substrate, and are of particular utility in the fabrication of ultrafast electronic and optoelectronic devices and circuits.

  3. Measuring the Electrical Properties of Epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sergent, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    Two techniques rapidly determine low-frequency resistivity of conductive epoxies and high-frequency dielectric properties of insulating epoxies. Conductive epoxy is molded in channels in plastic block. Four-point ohmmeter is used to apply current and sense voltage; it reads out resistance. Because mold has precise and stable dimensions, it produces accurate consistent measurements.

  4. Convective Instabilities in Liquid Foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veretennikov, Igor; Glazier, James A.

    2004-01-01

    The main goal of this work is to better understand foam behavior both on the Earth and in microgravity conditions and to determine the relation between a foam's structure and wetness and its rheological properties. Our experiments focused on the effects of the bubble size distribution (BSD) on the foam behavior under gradual or stepwise in the liquid flow rate and on the onset of the convective instability. We were able to show experimentally, that the BSD affects foam rheology very strongly so any theory must take foam texture into account.

  5. Separation of cobalt from synthetic intermediate and decontamination radioactive wastes using polyurethane foam

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, S.V.S.; Lal, K.B.; Narasimhan, S.V.; Ahmed, J.

    1997-12-01

    Studies have been carried out on the removal of radioactive cobalt ({sup 60}Co) from synthetic intermediate level waste (ILW) and decontamination waste using neat polyurethane (PU) foam as well as n-tributyl phosphate-polyurethane (TBP-PU) foam. The radioactive cobalt has been extracted on the PU foam as cobalt thiocyanate from the ILW. Maximum removal of cobalt has been observed when the concentration of thiocyanate in the solution is about 0.4 M. Cobalt can be separated from decontamination waste containing ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and iron(II). The extent of extraction of cobalt is slow and the separation of iron and cobalt is better with the neat PU foam compared to the TBP-PU foam. The presence of iron in the decontamination waste facilitates the extraction of cobalt thiocyanate on the PU foam. Column studies have been carried out in order to extend these studies to the plant scale. The capacities of the PU foams for cobalt have been determined. The effect of density and the surface area of PU foam have been investigated. Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectral studies have been conducted to find out the interaction between PU foam and cobalt thiocyanate species.

  6. Piezoelectric nanoparticle-polymer composite foams.

    PubMed

    McCall, William R; Kim, Kanguk; Heath, Cory; La Pierre, Gina; Sirbuly, Donald J

    2014-11-26

    Piezoelectric polymer composite foams are synthesized using different sugar-templating strategies. By incorporating sugar grains directly into polydimethylsiloxane mixtures containing barium titanate nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes, followed by removal of the sugar after polymer curing, highly compliant materials with excellent piezoelectric properties can be fabricated. Porosities and elasticity are tuned by simply adjusting the sugar/polymer mass ratio which gave an upper bound on the porosity of 73% and a lower bound on the elastic coefficient of 32 kPa. The electrical performance of the foams showed a direct relationship between porosity and the piezoelectric outputs, giving piezoelectric coefficient values of ∼112 pC/N and a power output of ∼18 mW/cm3 under a load of 10 N for the highest porosity samples. These novel materials should find exciting use in a variety of applications including energy scavenging platforms, biosensors, and acoustic actuators. PMID:25353687

  7. Face-Centered-Cubic Nanostructured Polymer Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, C.; Baughman, R. H.; Liu, L. M.; Zakhidov, A. A.; Khayrullin, I. I.

    1998-03-01

    Beautifully iridescent polymer foams having Fm-3m cubic symmetry and periodicities on the scale of the wavelength of light have been synthesized by the templating of porous synthetic opals. These fabrication processes involve the filling of porous SiO2 opals (with typical cubic lattice parameters of 250 nm) with either polymers or polymer precursors, polymerization of the precursors if necessary, and removal of the fcc array of SiO2 balls to provide an all-polymer structure. The structures of these foams are similar to periodic minimal surfaces, although the Gaussian curvature can have both positive and negative values. Depending upon whether the internal surfaces of the opal are polymer filled or polymer coated, the polymer replica has either one or two sets of independent channels. We fill these channels with semiconductors, metals, or superconductors to provide electronic and optical materials with novel properties dependent on the nanoscale periodicity.

  8. Casting of 3-dimensional footwear prints in snow with foam blocks.

    PubMed

    Petraco, Nicholas; Sherman, Hal; Dumitra, Aurora; Roberts, Marcel

    2016-06-01

    Commercially available foam blocks are presented as an alternative material for the casting and preservation of 3-dimensional footwear impressions located in snow. The method generates highly detailed foam casts of questioned footwear impressions. These casts can be compared to the known outsole standards made from the suspects' footwear. Modification of the commercially available foam casting blocks is simple and fast. The foam block is removed and a piece of cardboard is secured to one side of the block with painter's masking tape. The prepared foam block is then placed back into its original box, marked appropriately, closed and stored until needed. When required the foam block is carefully removed from its storage box and gently placed, foam side down, over the questioned footwear impression. Next, the crime scene technician's hands are placed on top of the cardboard and pressure is gently applied by firmly pressing down onto the impression. The foam cast is removed, dried and placed back into its original container and sealed. The resulting 3D impressions can be directly compared to the outsole of known suspected item(s) of footwear. PMID:27124876

  9. Epoxy Grout With Silica Thickener

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclung, C. E.

    1984-01-01

    Grout cures quickly, even in presence of hydraulic oil. Grout is mixture of aggregate particles, finely-divided silica, epoxy resin, and triethylenetetramine curing agent, with mixture containing about 85 percent silica and aggregate particle sand 15 percent resin and curing agent. Silica is thickening agent and keeps grout from sagging.

  10. Fire-retardant epoxy polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akawie, R. I.; Bilow, N.; Giants, T. W.

    1978-01-01

    Phosphorus atoms in molecular structure of epoxies make them fire-retardant without degrading their adhesive strength. Moreover, polymers are transparent, unlike compounds that contain arsenic or other inorganics. They have been used to bond polyvinylfluoride and polyether sulfone films onto polyimide glass laminates.

  11. FOAM FLOTATION TREATMENT OF HEAVY METALS AND FLUORIDE-BEARING INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory studies demonstrated that the floc foam flotation techniques are effective in removing lead, cadmium, mercury, copper, zinc, arsenic, and fluoride from dilute wastewaters to very low levels. Simulated as well as real industrial wastewaters were studied. Industrial wast...

  12. Tapered plug foam spray apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Peter B. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A two-component foam spray gun is readily disassembled for cleaning. It includes a body (1) with reactant (12, 14) and purge gas (16) inlet ports. A moldable valve packing (32) inside the body has a tapered conical interior surface (142), and apertures which match the reactant ports. A valve/tip (40) has a conical outer surface (48) which mates with the valve packing (32). The valve/tip (40) is held in place by a moldable packing washer (34), held at non-constant pressure by a screw (36, 38). The interior of the valve/tip (40) houses a removable mixing chamber (50). The mixing chamber (50) has direct flow orifices (60) and an auxiliary flow path (58, 60) which ameliorate pressure surges. The spray gun can be disassembled for cleaning without disturbing the seal, by removing the valve/tip (40) to the rear, thereby breaking it free of the conical packing. Rotation of the valve/tip (40) relative to the body (1) shuts off the reactant flow, and starts the purge gas flow.

  13. Composites of Graphene Nanoribbon Stacks and Epoxy for Joule Heating and Deicing of Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Raji, Abdul-Rahman O; Varadhachary, Tanvi; Nan, Kewang; Wang, Tuo; Lin, Jian; Ji, Yongsung; Genorio, Bostjan; Zhu, Yu; Kittrell, Carter; Tour, James M

    2016-02-10

    A conductive composite of graphene nanoribbon (GNR) stacks and epoxy is fabricated. The epoxy is filled with the GNR stacks, which serve as a conductive additive. The GNR stacks are on average 30 nm thick, 250 nm wide, and 30 μm long. The GNR-filled epoxy composite exhibits a conductivity >100 S/m at 5 wt % GNR content. This permits application of the GNR-epoxy composite for deicing of surfaces through Joule (voltage-induced) heating generated by the voltage across the composite. A power density of 0.5 W/cm(2) was delivered to remove ∼1 cm-thick (14 g) monolith of ice from a static helicopter rotor blade surface in a -20 °C environment. PMID:26780972

  14. Milestone 5 test report. Task 5, subtask 5.2: Tile to foam strength tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, H. S.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes work that has been performed to date on the strength of a cryotank insulation system using Rohacell foam and TUFI-coated AETB-12 ceramic tiles directly bonded to a simulated graphite-epoxy tank wall. Testing utilized a custom specimen design which consists of a long tensile specimen with eccentric loading to induce curvature similar to the curvature expected due to 'pillowing' of the tank when pressurized. A finite element model was constructed to predict the specific element strains in the test article, and to assist with design of the test specimen to meet the specific goals of curvature and laminate strain. The results indicate that the heat treated 3.25-pcf density Rohacell foam does not provide sufficient strength for the induced stresses due to curvature and stress concentration at the RTV bondline to the TUFI tile. The test was repeated using higher density non-heat treated Rohacell foam (6.9 pcf) without foam failure. The finite element model was shown to predict specimen behavior, and validation of the model was successful. It is pertinent to mention that the analyses described herein accurately predicted the failure of the heat treated foams and based on this analysis method it is expected that the untreated 3.25 pcf Rohacell foam will be successful.

  15. Milestone 5 test report. Task 5, subtask 5.2: Tile to foam strength tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, H. S.

    1994-12-01

    This report summarizes work that has been performed to date on the strength of a cryotank insulation system using Rohacell foam and TUFI-coated AETB-12 ceramic tiles directly bonded to a simulated graphite-epoxy tank wall. Testing utilized a custom specimen design which consists of a long tensile specimen with eccentric loading to induce curvature similar to the curvature expected due to 'pillowing' of the tank when pressurized. A finite element model was constructed to predict the specific element strains in the test article, and to assist with design of the test specimen to meet the specific goals of curvature and laminate strain. The results indicate that the heat treated 3.25-pcf density Rohacell foam does not provide sufficient strength for the induced stresses due to curvature and stress concentration at the RTV bondline to the TUFI tile. The test was repeated using higher density non-heat treated Rohacell foam (6.9 pcf) without foam failure. The finite element model was shown to predict specimen behavior, and validation of the model was successful. It is pertinent to mention that the analyses described herein accurately predicted the failure of the heat treated foams and based on this analysis method it is expected that the untreated 3.25 pcf Rohacell foam will be successful.

  16. Flight-and ground-test evaluation of pyrrone foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclain, A. G.; Kelliher, W. C.

    1972-01-01

    Two Pyrrone materials, pure Pyrrone foam with a density of 481 kg/cu m and hollow glass microsphere-Pyrrone composite with a density of 962 kg/cu m, were tested in the Langley 20-inch hypersonic arc heated tunnel at pressure levels from 0.06 to 0.27 atm and heating rates from 1.14 to 11.4 MW/sq m. The 481-kg/cu m Pyrrone foam was also flight tested as an experiment aboard a Pacemaker test vehicle. The results of the ground tests indicated that the thermal effectiveness of the 481-kg/cu m Pyrrone foam was superior to the 962-kg/cu m glass sphere-Pyrrone composite. The 481-kg/cu m Pyrrone foam had approximately one-half the thermal effectiveness of low density phenolic nylon. The 481-kg/cu m Pyrrone foam experienced random mechanical char removal over the entire range of test conditions. Char thermal property inputs for an ablation computer program were developed from the ground test data of the 481-kg/cu m Pyrrone foam. The computer program using these developed char thermal properties, as well as the measured uncharred material properties, adequately predicted the in-depth temperature histories measured during the Pacemaker flight.

  17. Foam injection molding of thermoplastic elastomers: Blowing agents, foaming process and characterization of structural foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ries, S.; Spoerrer, A.; Altstaedt, V.

    2014-05-01

    Polymer foams play an important role caused by the steadily increasing demand to light weight design. In case of soft polymers, like thermoplastic elastomers (TPE), the haptic feeling of the surface is affected by the inner foam structure. Foam injection molding of TPEs leads to so called structural foam, consisting of two compact skin layers and a cellular core. The properties of soft structural foams like soft-touch, elastic and plastic behavior are affected by the resulting foam structure, e.g. thickness of the compact skins and the foam core or density. This inner structure can considerably be influenced by different processing parameters and the chosen blowing agent. This paper is focused on the selection and characterization of suitable blowing agents for foam injection molding of a TPE-blend. The aim was a high density reduction and a decent inner structure. Therefore DSC and TGA measurements were performed on different blowing agents to find out which one is appropriate for the used TPE. Moreover a new analyzing method for the description of processing characteristics by temperature dependent expansion measurements was developed. After choosing suitable blowing agents structural foams were molded with different types of blowing agents and combinations and with the breathing mold technology in order to get lower densities. The foam structure was analyzed to show the influence of the different blowing agents and combinations. Finally compression tests were performed to estimate the influence of the used blowing agent and the density reduction on the compression modulus.

  18. Metal Foam Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper compares the ballistic performance of metallic foam sandwich structures with honeycomb structures. Honeycomb sandwich structures, consisting of metallic or composite facesheets and honeycomb cores, are often used in spacecraft construction due to their light-weight and structural stiffness. Honeycomb panels, however, are considered rather poor candidates for protection from micrometeoroid orbital debris (MMOD) particles because the honeycomb channels the debris cloud from MMOD impacts on outer facesheet causing a concentrated load on the second facesheet. Sandwich structures with light-weight, open-cell metallic cores and metal or composite facesheets provide improved MMOD protection because channeling does not occur and because the core is more effective at disrupting hypervelocity impacts then honeycomb. This paper describes hypervelocity impact tests on metallic foam sandwich structures (aluminum and titanium) with metallic facesheets, compare them to equivalent mass and thickness honeycomb panels, based on the results of hypervelocity impact tests.

  19. Development of nonflammable cellulosic foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luttinger, M.

    1972-01-01

    The development of a moldable cellulosic foam for use in Skylab instrument storage cushions is considered. Requirements include density of 10 lb cu ft or less, minimal friability with normal handling, and nonflammability in an atmosphere of 70 percent oxygen and 30 percent nitrogen at 6.2 psia. A study of halogenated foam components was made, including more highly chlorinated binders, halogen-containing additives, and halogenation of the cellulose. The immediate objective was to reduce the density of the foam through reduction in inorganic phosphate without sacrificing flame-retarding properties of the foams. The use of frothing techniques was investigated, with particular emphasis on a urea-formaldehyde foam. Halogen-containing flame retardants were deemphasized in favor of inorganic salts and the preparation of phosphate and sulphate esters of cellulose. Utilization of foam products for civilian applications was also considered.

  20. Shock Hugoniot Measurements in Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petel, Oren; Ouellet, Simon; Frost, David; Higgins, Andrew

    2013-06-01

    Foams are found in a variety of protective equipment, including those used in applications involving high-speed impact and blast waves. Despite their exposure to shock wave loadings, there is a considerable lack of shock Hugoniot data for these materials. Typical characterizations of foams have involved the use of split-Hopkinson pressure bars or quasi-static compression machines to determine the stress-strain relationship in the foams. As such, the elastic-plastic response of foam at intermediate pressure ranges continues to be a source of confusion. In the present study, Photonic Doppler Velocimetry is used to measure the shock Hugoniot of a foam for a comparison to its quasi-static compression curves. The deviation of these two curves will be discussed and compared to common plasticity models used to describe dynamic foam behaviour in the literature.

  1. Foam and gel decontamination techniques

    SciTech Connect

    McGlynn, J.F.; Rankin, W.N.

    1989-01-01

    The Savannah River Site is investigating decontamination technology to improve current decontamination techniques, and thereby reduce radiation exposure to plant personnel, reduce uptake of radioactive material, and improve safety during decontamination and decommissioning activities. When decontamination chemicals are applied as foam and gels, the contact time and cleaning ability of the chemical increases. Foam and gel applicators apply foam or gel that adheres to the surface being decontaminated for periods ranging from fifteen minutes (foam) to infinite contact (gel). This equipment was started up in a cold environment. The desired foam and gel consistency was achieved, operators were trained in its proper maintenance and operation, and the foam and gel were applied to walls, ceilings, and hard to reach surfaces. 17 figs.

  2. Pourable Foam Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, James A.; Butler, John M.; Chartoff, Richard P.

    1989-01-01

    Report describes search for polyisocyanurate/polyurethane foam insulation with superior characteristics. Discusses chemistry of current formulations. Tests of formulations, of individual ingredients and or alternative new formulations described. Search revealed commercially available formulations exhibiting increased thermal stability at temperatures up to 600 degree C, pours readily before curing, presents good appearance after curing, and remains securely bonded to aluminum at cryogenic temperatures. Total of 42 different formulations investigated, 10 found to meet requirements.

  3. Formation of porous epoxy monolith via concentrated emulsion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianli; Zhang, Chen; Du, Zhongjie; Xiang, Aiming; Li, Hangquan

    2008-09-15

    Step polymerization was introduced into the concentrated emulsion templating method and was illustrated with the preparation of porous epoxy monolith. A solution of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA), its curing agent low molecular weight polyamide resin, and surfactant nonyl phenol polyoxyethylene ether in 4-methyl-2-pentanon as a solvent was used as the continuous phase, an aqueous suspension of colloidal silica as the dispersed phase of the concentrated emulsion. After the continuous phase polymerized and the dispersed phase removed, a porous material is obtained. The key point in this work is to find a compromise between the rates of curing and phase separating and thus achieve a kinetic stability of the concentrated emulsion. The effects of loading of colloidal silica, the pre-curing of the epoxy precursors, and the volume fraction of the dispersed phase were systematically investigated. PMID:18571192

  4. Mechanical Characterization of Composites and Foams for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veazie, D. R.; Glinsey, C.; Webb, M. M.; Norman, M.; Meador, Michael A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Experimental studies to investigate the mechanical properties of ultra-lightweight polyimide foams for space applications, compression after impact (CAI) properties for low velocity impact of sandwich composites, and aspen fiber/polypropylene composites containing an interface adhesive additive, Maleic Anhydride Grafted Polypropylene (MAPP), were performed at Clark Atlanta University. Tensile, compression, flexural, and shear modulus tests were performed on TEEK foams categorized by their densities and relative cost according to ASTM specifications. Results showed that the mechanical properties of the foams increased as a function of higher price and increasing density. The CAI properties of Nomex/phenolic honeycomb core, fiberglass/epoxy facesheet sandwich composites for two damage arrangements were compared using different levels of impact energy ranging from 0 - 452 Joules. Impact on the thin side showed slightly more retention of CAI strength at low impact levels, whereas higher residual compressive strength was observed from impact on the thick side at higher impact levels. The aspen fiber/polypropylene composites studied are composed of various percentages (by weight) of aspen fiber and polypropylene ranging from 30%-60% and 40%-100%, respectively. Results showed that the MAPP increases tensile and flexural strength, while having no significant influence on tensile and flexural modulus.

  5. Complications of foam sclerotherapy.

    PubMed

    Cavezzi, A; Parsi, K

    2012-03-01

    Foam sclerotherapy may result in drug and/or gas-related complications of a generalized or localized nature. Significant complications include anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reactions (very rare), deep vein thrombosis (1-3%), stroke (0.01%), superficial venous thrombosis (4.4%), tissue necrosis (variable frequency), oedema (0.5%) and nerve damage (0.2%). Cosmetic complications include telangiectatic matting (15-24%) and pigmentation (10-30%). Patent foramen ovale and other cardio-pulmonary right-to-left shunts seem to play a role in the systemic gas-related complications. In conclusion, foam sclerotherapy is characterized by an overall high degree of safety, though special attention should be given to the embolic and thrombotic complications. Good technique, adequate imaging, general precautions and compliance with post-treatment instructions may help avoid some of the adverse events and an appropriate early intervention may minimize possible sequelae. Higher volumes of sclerosant foam have been attributed to local and distant thrombotic complications and should be avoided. PMID:22312067

  6. Polyimide Foams Offer Superior Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    At Langley Research Center, Erik Weiser and his colleagues in the Advanced Materials and Processing Branch were working with a new substance for fabricating composites for use in supersonic aircraft. The team, however, was experiencing some frustration. Every time they tried to create a solid composite from the polyimide (an advanced polymer) material, it bubbled and foamed. It seemed like the team had reached a dead end in their research - until they had another idea. "We said, This isn t going to work for composites, but maybe we could make a foam out of it," Weiser says. "That was kind of our eureka moment, to see if we could go in a whole other direction. And it worked." Weiser and his colleagues invented a new kind of polyimide foam insulation they named TEEK. The innovation displayed a host of advantages over existing insulation options. Compared to other commercial foams, Weiser explains, polyimide foams perform well across a broad range of temperatures, noting that the NASA TEEK foams provide effective structural insulation up to 600 F and down to cryogenic temperatures. The foam does not burn or off-gas toxic fumes, and even at -423 F - the temperature of liquid hydrogen - the material stays flexible. The inventors could produce the TEEK foam at a range of densities, from 0.5 pounds per cubic foot up to 20 pounds per cubic foot, making the foam ideal for a range of applications, including as insulation for reusable launch vehicles and for cryogenic tanks and lines. They also developed a unique, friable balloon format for manufacturing the foam, producing it as hollow microspheres that allowed the foam to be molded and then cured into any desired shape - perfect for insulating pipes of different sizes and configurations. The team s originally unplanned invention won an "R&D 100" award, and a later form of the foam, called LaRC FPF-44 (Spinoff 2009), was named "NASA Invention of the Year" in 2007.

  7. Cryogenic foam insulation: Abstracted publications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, F. R.

    1977-01-01

    A group of documents were chosen and abstracted which contain information on the properties of foam materials and on the use of foams as thermal insulation at cryogenic temperatures. The properties include thermal properties, mechanical properties, and compatibility properties with oxygen and other cryogenic fluids. Uses of foams include applications as thermal insulation for spacecraft propellant tanks, and for liquefied natural gas storage tanks and pipelines.

  8. Materials for foam type insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, W. E.

    1971-01-01

    An internal foam fabrication is one of the concepts being considered for cryogenic insulation on the hydrogen tanks of the shuttle vehicle. The three-dimensional polyurethane used on the S-4 B tanks failed to meet the higher temperature requirements of the shuttle vehicle, however, and other foams under consideration include polyisocyanurates, polyphenylene oxides, polyimides, and polybenzimidazoles. Improved adhesive systems for attaching the foams to the interior tank wall are under study.

  9. Application of low density foam pigs offshore Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, P.C.R.; Alves, S.J.

    1995-12-31

    In complex offshore installations, such as in the Campos Basin, it is relatively common to encounter pipeline systems where conventional pigs can not be run due to several factors. Changing pipe diameters, and presence of wet X-mas trees and manifolds are the most troublesome ones. In this work a new successful concept of using low cost and low density foam pigs for both liquid removal in wet-gas pipelines, and paraffin removal in oil and multiphase flow pipelines, is presented. Experimental work conducted in a 4 in laboratory facility, including a small scale glass manifold and a 6 in steel manifold, proved these pigs to be very effective. The performance of almost all kind of flexible polyurethane foams manufactured in Brazil is evaluated. Three field tests are also reported. The first low density foam pig operation was performed on a 127 mile long, 16 in diameter wet-gas offshore pipeline where the foam pig showed even higher liquid removal efficiency than the conventional inflatable spheres. The second operation was performed on a 6 mile long, 12 in diameter multiphase production offshore pipeline, which has never been pigged during its 9 year operation, and resulted in the removal of approximately 200 tons of paraffin. Finally, the third successful case is the cleaning of a 2 mile long flexible flow line of a subsea completed satellite well, in which the foam pigs were sent through a 2.5 in gas lift line, through a wet x-mas tree, not designed to be pigged, and then back through the 4 in production flow line. In spite of the fact that this paper is focusing on condensate and paraffin removal in pipeline, the basic principles can be applied to several kinds of operations: general pipeline cleaning; products separation in pipeline; corrosion evaluation; chemical product application.

  10. Imide modified epoxy matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scola, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    Results of a program designed to develop tough imide modified epoxy (IME) resins cured by bisimide amine (BIA) hardeners are presented. State of the art epoxy resin, MY720, was used. Three aromatic bisimide amines and one aromatic aliphatic BIA were evaluated. BIA's derived from 6F anhydride (3,3 prime 4,4 prime-(hexafluoro isopropyl idene) bis (phthalic anhydride) and diamines, 3,3 prime-diam nodiphenyl sulfone (3,3 prime-DDS), 4,4 prime-diamino diphenyl sulfone (4,4 prime-DDS), 1.12-dodecane diamine (1,12-DDA) were used. BIA's were abbreviated 6F-3,3 prime-DDS, 6F-4,4 prime-DDS, 6F-3,3 prime-DDS-4,4 prime DDS, and 6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA corresponding to 6F anhydride and diamines mentioned. Epoxy resin and BIA's (MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-4,4 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA and a 50:50 mixture of a BIA and parent diamine, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS/3,3 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-4,4 prime-DDS/3,3 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA/3,3 prime-DDS were studied to determine effect of structure and composition. Effect of the addition of two commercial epoxies, glyamine 200 and glyamine 100 on the properties of several formulations was evaluated. Bisimide amine cured epoxies were designated IME's (imide modified epoxy). Physical, thermal and mechanical properties of these resins were determined. Moisture absorption in boiling water exhibited by several of the IME's was considerably lower than the state of the art epoxies (from 3.2% for the control and state of the art to 2.0 wt% moisture absorption). Char yields are increased from 20% for control and state of the art epoxies to 40% for IME resins. Relative toughness characteristics of IME resins were measured by 10 deg off axis tensile tests of Celion 6000/IME composites. Results show that IME's containing 6F-3,3 prime-DDS or 6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA improved the "toughness" characteristics of composites by about 35% (tensile strength), about 35% (intralaminar shear

  11. Evaluation of experimental epoxy monomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, W. T.; St.clair, T. L.; Pratt, J. R.; Ficklin, R.

    1985-01-01

    Future generation aircraft need higher performance polymer matrices to fully achieve the weight savings possible with composite materials. New resins are being formulated in an effort to understand basic polymer behavior and to develop improved resins. Some polymer/curing agent combinations that could be useful are difficult to process. In the area of epoxies, a major problem is that some components have physical properties which make them difficult to utilize as matrix resins. A previous study showed that the use of ultrasonic energy can be advantageous in the mixing of curing agents into a standard epoxy resin, such as MY 720 (Ciba-Geigy designation). This work is expanded to include three novel epoxides.

  12. Preparation of highly uniform low density polystyrene foams and their characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Steckle, W. P. , Jr.; Smith, M. E.; Sebring, R. J.; Wilson, K. V.; Nobile, A. , Jr.

    2004-01-01

    High Internal Phase Emulsion polystyrene foams have been made at Los Alamos National Laboratory for the past decade. As target designs become more complex the demands placed on the foams are more stringent. Parts need to be machined from 30 mg/cm{sup 3} foams to a thickness of 50 {micro}m within a couple of microns. Containing upwards of 97% air, these foams are to withstand extraction with ethanol to remove the wax utilized as a machining aid yet retain their dimensional stability. At low densities, less than 50 mg/cm{sup 3}, voids are a problem. To determine a formulation that reduces void content and allows minimum shrinkage, experimental design was utilized. We also developed image analysis techniques that allow us to quantify the amount of voids in the system and the surface finish of the foam. In order to machine these low density foams to the tolerance required with an optimum surface finish, the foams are backfilled with Brij{reg_sign} 78, an alcohol soluble wax. After a part is machined the Brij{reg_sign} is leached out with ethanol. The dimensional stability of the foam was found to be independent of the formulation of the foam. The filler that was used to aid in machining did have a significant impact on the final properties of a machined part.

  13. Foam pigs solve pipe cleaning problems offshore Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, P.C.R.; Neto, S.J.A.

    1995-10-02

    Pipeline systems in which conventional pigs cannot be run are common in such complex offshore installations as are found in Brazil`s Campos basin. These systems may contain changing pipe diameters or wet christmas trees and manifolds. A new concept for using low cost, low-density foam pigs for both liquid removal in wet-gas pipelines and paraffin removal in oil and multiphase pipelines has been successfully tested offshore Brazil. Although the present discussion focuses on condensate and paraffin removal in pipelines, the principles can be applied to several kinds of operations including general pipeline cleaning, product removal or separation in pipeline, corrosion evaluation, and chemical product application.

  14. Application of a drainage film reduces fibroblast ingrowth into large-pored polyurethane foam during negative-pressure wound therapy in an in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, Cornelia; Springer, Steffen; Abel, Martin; Wesarg, Falko; Ruth, Peter; Hipler, Uta-Christina

    2013-01-01

    Negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is an advantageous treatment option in wound management to promote healing and reduce the risk of complications. NPWT is mainly carried out using open-cell polyurethane (PU) foams that stimulate granulation tissue formation. However, growth of wound bed tissue into foam material, leading to disruption of newly formed tissue upon dressing removal, has been observed. Consequently, it would be of clinical interest to preserve the positive effects of open-cell PU foams while avoiding cellular ingrowth. The study presented analyzed effects of NPWT using large-pored PU foam, fine-pored PU foam, and the combination of large-pored foam with drainage film on human dermal fibroblasts grown in a collagen matrix. The results showed no difference between the dressings in stimulating cellular migration during NPWT. However, when NPWT was applied using a large-pored PU foam, the fibroblasts continued to migrate into the dressing. This led to significant breaches in the cell layers upon removal of the samples after vacuum treatment. In contrast, cell migration stopped at the collagen matrix edge when fine-pored PU foam was used, as well as with the combination of PU foam and drainage film. In conclusion, placing a drainage film between collagen matrix and the large-pored PU foam dressing reduced the ingrowth of cells into the foam significantly. Moreover, positive effects on cellular migration were not affected, and the effect of the foam on tissue surface roughness in vitro was also reduced. PMID:23937617

  15. THIRD-GENERATION FOAM BLOWING AGENTS FOR FOAM INSULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of third-generation blowing agents for foam insulation. (NOTE: the search for third-generation foam blowing agents has led to the realization that, as the number of potential substitutes increases, new concerns, such as their potential to act a...

  16. Flammability of Epoxy Resins Containing Phosphorus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M.; Thompson, C. M.; Smith, J. G.; Connell, J. W.; Hinkley, J. A.

    2005-01-01

    As part of a program to develop fire-resistant exterior composite structures for future subsonic commercial and general aviation aircraft, flame-retardant epoxy resins are under investigation. Epoxies and their curing agents (aromatic diamines) containing phosphorus were synthesized and used to prepare epoxy formulations. Phosphorus was incorporated within the backbone of the epoxy resin and not used as an additive. The resulting cured neat epoxy formulations were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, propane torch test, elemental analysis, microscale combustion calorimetry, and fire calorimetry. Several formulations showed excellent flame retardation with phosphorous contents as low as 1.5% by weight. The fracture toughness and compressive strength of several cured formulations showed no detrimental effect due to phosphorus content. The chemistry and properties of these new epoxy formulations are discussed.

  17. Epoxy resins in the construction industry.

    PubMed

    Spee, Ton; Van Duivenbooden, Cor; Terwoert, Jeroen

    2006-09-01

    Epoxy resins are used as coatings, adhesives, and in wood and concrete repair. However, epoxy resins can be highly irritating to the skin and are strong sensitizers. Some hardeners are carcinogenic. Based on the results of earlier Dutch studies, an international project on "best practices,"--Epoxy Code--with epoxy products was started. Partners were from Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands, and the UK. The "Code" deals with substitution, safe working procedures, safer tools, and skin protection. The feasibility of an internationally agreed "ranking system" for the health risks of epoxy products was studied. Such a ranking system should inform the user of the harmfulness of different epoxies and stimulate research on less harmful products by product developers. PMID:17119222

  18. A randomized, controlled trial of negative pressure wound therapy of pressure ulcers via a novel polyurethane foam.

    PubMed

    Wagstaff, Marcus James Dermot; Driver, Sara; Coghlan, Patrick; Greenwood, John Edward

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of the study were (1) to look for any local, clinically apparent response, within and around a debrided wound, to a novel biocompatible polyurethane foam during repeated, short-term implantation, and (2) to assess the material's efficacy as a negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) interface compared with a widely used, commercially available foam. Twenty pressure ulcers in 18 patients underwent surgical debridement, then randomization to receive novel treatment or control foam as the wound interface for NPWT. Dressing changes every 2-3 days allowed qualitative wound assessment and quantitative measurement to compare outcomes. No adverse reaction was observed in any patient receiving the new foam. The new "novel foam" performed as a NPWT interface as effectively as the control "standard foam." In deep wounds, the new foam was easier to remove, fragmented less, and showed less retention than the control foam. No marginal in-growth occurred, making removal less traumatic and reducing bleeding from cavity wall granulations. The results support previous large animal studies, and independent ISO10993 testing, that the new foam is safe and biocompatible. Its efficacy as an NPWT interface, nontraumatic removal with low fragmentation and retention rate, favors the new material, especially in deep cavity wounds. PMID:24635170

  19. Enhancement Of Water-Jet Stripping Of Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosby, Steven A.; Shockney, Charles H.; Bates, Keith E.; Shalala, John P.; Daniels, Larry S.

    1995-01-01

    Improved robotic high-pressure-water-jet system strips foam insulation from parts without removing adjacent coating materials like paints, primers, and sealants. Even injects water into crevices and blind holes to clean out foam, without harming adjacent areas. Eliminates both cost of full stripping and recoating and problem of disposing of toxic solutions used in preparation for coating. Developed for postflight refurbishing of aft skirts of booster rockets. System includes six-axis robot provided with special end effector and specially written control software, called Aftfoam. Adaptable to cleaning and stripping in other industrial settings.

  20. High char imide-modified epoxy matrix resins. [for graphite-epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafini, T. T.; Delvigs, P.; Vannucci, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    The synthesis of a class of bis(imide-amine) curing agents for epoxy matrix resins is discussed. Glass transition temperatures and char yield data of an epoxy cured with various bis(imide-amines) are presented. The room temperature and 350 F mechanical properties, and char yields of unidirectional graphite fiber laminates prepared with conventional epoxy and imide-modified epoxy resins are presented.

  1. Treatment of volatile organic compounds from polyurethane and epoxy manufacture by a trickle-bed air biofilter.

    PubMed

    Chang, K; Lu, C; Lin, M

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of a trickle-bed air biofilter (TBAB) for the removal of volatile organic compound (VOC) produced during polyurethane (PU) and epoxy manufacture. The major VOCs emitted are ethyl acetate (EA) for PU and EA and xylene for epoxy production. For the treatment of VOCs emitted during PU production, the employed coal carbon appears to be efficient as a VOC concentration buffer in the biofiltration of waste gases. Based on the results of EA and total hydrocarbon (THC) removal, it was concluded that the TBAB is suitable for controlling VOC emission during PU manufacture. For the treatment of VOCs emitted during epoxy production, it was found that the performance of the TBAB is relatively poor due to the lack of VOC sources. However, this problem could be easily solved by mixing the VOCs emitted during PU and epoxy manufacture. PMID:16233071

  2. Nonmetallic materials handbook. Volume 1: Epoxy materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podlaseck, S. E.

    1979-01-01

    Thermochemical and other properties data is presented for the following types of epoxy materials: adhesives, coatings finishes, inks, electrical insulation, encapsulants, sealants, composite laminates, tapes, and thermal insulators.

  3. High temperature lightweight foamed cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi.

    1989-10-03

    Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed. 3 figs.

  4. High temperature lightweight foamed cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1989-01-01

    Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed.

  5. Starch-Lignin Baked Foams

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starch-kraft lignin foams were prepared by a baking process. Replacing up to 20% of the starch with lignin has no effect on foam density or overall morphology. At 10% replacement, lignin marginally increases water resistance and modulus of elasticity but decreases strain at maximum stress. At 20% re...

  6. High temperature ablative foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Matthew T. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An ablative foam composition is formed of approximately 150 to 250 parts by weight polymeric isocyanate having an isocyanate functionality of 2.6 to 3.2; approximately 15 to 30 parts by weight reactive flame retardant having a hydroxyl number range from 200-260; approximately 10 to 40 parts by weight non-reactive flame retardant; approximately 10 to 40 parts by weight nonhydrolyzable silicone copolymer having a hydroxyl number range from 75-205; and approximately 3 to 16 parts by weight amine initiated polyether resin having an isocyanate functionality greater than or equal to 3.0 and a hydroxyl number range from 400-800.

  7. Flame Resistant Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Solimide manufactured by Imi-Tech Corporation, is a lightweight fire resistant material produced under a manufacturing process that allows it to be uniformly foamed. Can be produced in a variety of densities and structural configurations and remains resilient under exposure to temperatures ranging from minus 300 to plus 500 degrees Fahrenheit. Is resistant to open flame and generates virtually no smoke or toxic by-products. Used in aircraft for its superior damping characteristics, lighter weight and fire barrier properties, it's also applicable to ships and surface transportation systems such as transit cars, trains, buses and automobiles.

  8. Closed cell metal foam method

    DOEpatents

    Patten, James W.

    1978-01-01

    Foamed metals and metal alloys which have a closed cellular structure are prepared by heating a metal body containing entrapped inert gas uniformly distributed throughout to a temperature above the melting point of the metal and maintaining the body at this temperature a period of time sufficient to permit the entrapped gas to expand, forming individual cells within the molten metal, thus expanding and foaming the molten metal. After cell formation has reached the desired amount, the foamed molten metal body is cooled to below the melting temperature of the metal. The void area or density of the foamed metal is controlled by predetermining the amount of inert gas entrapped in the metal body and by the period of time the metal body is maintained in the molten state. This method is useful for preparing foamed metals and metal alloys from any metal or other material of which a body containing entrapped inert gas can be prepared.

  9. Structure of random bidisperse foam.

    SciTech Connect

    Reinelt, Douglas A.; van Swol, Frank B.; Kraynik, Andrew Michael

    2005-02-01

    The Surface Evolver was used to compute the equilibrium microstructure of random soap foams with bidisperse cell-size distributions and to evaluate topological and geometric properties of the foams and individual cells. The simulations agree with the experimental data of Matzke and Nestler for the probability {rho}(F) of finding cells with F faces and its dependence on the fraction of large cells. The simulations also agree with the theory for isotropic Plateau polyhedra (IPP), which describes the F-dependence of cell geometric properties, such as surface area, edge length, and mean curvature (diffusive growth rate); this is consistent with results for polydisperse foams. Cell surface areas are about 10% greater than spheres of equal volume, which leads to a simple but accurate relation for the surface free energy density of foams. The Aboav-Weaire law is not valid for bidisperse foams.

  10. Fire Chemistry Testing of Spray-On Foam Insulation (SOFI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    An experimental study was initiated that included the long-term testing of the following SOFI materials, which make up the majority of the Thermal Protection System of the Shuttle External Tank: NCFI 24-124 (acreage foam) and BX-265 (close-out foam, including the intertank flange and bipod areas). A potential alternate material, NCFI 27-68 (acreage foam with flame retardant removed), was also tested. Fire chemistry testing was completed on samples that were retrieved after aging/weathering at intervals of 3, 6, and 12 months. The testing included three standard test methods: limiting oxygen index (ASTM G125), radiant panel (ASTM E162), and cone calorimeter (ASTM E1354).

  11. Cryogenic Moisture Analysis of Spray-On Foam Insulation (SOFI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The NASA Cryogenics Test Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center conducted long-term testing of SOFI materials under actual-use cryogenic conditions. The lab tested NCFI 24-124 (acreage foam), BX-265 (close-out foam, including intertank flange and bipod areas), and a potential alternate material, NCFI 27-68 (acreage foam with the flame retardant removed). Specimens of all three materials were placed at a site that simulated aging (the Vehicle Assembly Building [VAB]) and a site that simulated weathering (Atmospheric Exposure Test Site [beach site]). After aging/ weathering intervals of 3, 6, and 12 months, the samples were retrieved and tested for their ability to absorb moisture under conditions similar to those experienced by the Space Shuttle External Tank (ET) during the loading of cryogenic propellants.

  12. Graphene oxide/chitin nanofibril composite foams as column adsorbents for aqueous pollutants.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhongshi; Liu, Dagang; Zhu, Yi; Li, Zehui; Li, Zhenxuan; Tian, Huafeng; Liu, Haiqing

    2016-06-25

    A novel graphene oxide/chitin nanofibrils (GO-CNF) composite foam as a column adsorbent was prepared for aqueous contaminant disposal. The structures, morphologies and properties of composite foams supported by nanofibrils were characterized. As a special case, the adsorption of methylene blue (MB) on GO-CNF was investigated regarding the static adsorption and column adsorption-desorption tests. Results from equilibrium adsorption isotherms indicated that the adsorption behavior was well-fitted to Langmuir model. The composite foams reinforced by CNF were dimensionally stable during the column adsorption process and could be reused after elution. The removal efficiency of MB was still nearly 90% after 3 cycles. Furthermore, other inorganic or organic pollutants adsorbed by composite foams were also explored. Therefore, this novel composite foam with remarkable properties such as dimensional stability, universal adsorbent for cationic pollutants, high adsorption capacity, and ease of regeneration was a desirable adsorbent in the future practical application of water pollutant treatment. PMID:27083813

  13. Metal foam heat exchangers for thermal management of fuel cell systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odabaee, M.; Hooman, K.

    2012-05-01

    The present study explores the possibility of using metal foams for thermal management of fuel cells so that air-cooled fuel cell stacks can be commercialized as replacements for currently-available water-cooled counterparts. Experimental studies have been conducted to examine the heat transfer enhancement from a thin metal foam layer sandwiched between two bipolar plates of a cell. To do this, effects of the key parameters including the free stream velocity and characteristics of metal foam such as porosity, permeability, and form drag coefficient on heat and fluid flow are investigated. The improvements as a result of the application of metal foam layers on fuel cell systems efficiency have been analyzed and discussed. Non-optimized results have shown that to remove the same amount of generated heat, the air-cooled fuel cell systems using aluminum foams require half of the pumping power compared to water-cooled fuel cell systems.

  14. Liquid oil that flows in spaces of aqueous foam without defoaming.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, Junko; Sakai, Takaya; Inomata, Yukio

    2014-08-01

    A very interesting phenomenon has been observed in which foam formed from an aqueous fatty acid potassium salt solution spontaneously absorbs liquid oil immediately upon contact without defoaming. Although this phenomenon initially appeared to be based on capillary action, it was clarified that the liquid oil that flows in foam film did not wet the air/water interface. In this study, it is discussed why aqueous foam can spontaneously soak up liquid oil without defoaming using equilibrium surface tension, dynamic oil/water interfacial tension, and image analysis techniques. The penetration of oil was attributed both to the dynamic decrease in the surface tension at the oil/water interface and to Laplace pressure, depending on the curvature of the plateau border. Therefore, the foam does not absorb the oil, but the oil spontaneously penetrates the foam. This interesting behavior can be expected to be applied to aqueous detergents for liquid oil removal. PMID:25019527

  15. Recovery of proteins and microorganisms from cultivation media by foam flotation.

    PubMed

    Schügerl, K

    2000-01-01

    Foaming is often present in aerated bioreactors. It is undesired, because it removes the cells and the cultivation medium from the reactor and blocks the sterile filter. However, it can be used for the recovery of proteins and microorganisms from the cultivation medium. The present review deals with the characterization of model protein foams and foams of various cultivation media. The suppression of foaming by antifoam agents and their effect on the oxygen transfer rate, microbial cell growth and product formation are discussed. The influence of process variables on the recovery of proteins by flotation without and with surfactants and mathematical models for protein flotation are presented. The effect of cultivation conditions, flotation equipment and operational parameters on foam flotation of microorganisms is reviewed. Floatable and non-floatable microorganisms are characterized by their surface envelope properties. A mathematical model for cell recovery by flotation is presented. Possible application areas of cell recovery by flotation are discussed. PMID:11036688

  16. Foam structure :from soap froth to solid foams.

    SciTech Connect

    Kraynik, Andrew Michael

    2003-01-01

    The properties of solid foams depend on their structure, which usually evolves in the fluid state as gas bubbles expand to form polyhedral cells. The characteristic feature of foam structure-randomly packed cells of different sizes and shapes-is examined in this article by considering soap froth. This material can be modeled as a network of minimal surfaces that divide space into polyhedral cells. The cell-level geometry of random soap froth is calculated with Brakke's Surface Evolver software. The distribution of cell volumes ranges from monodisperse to highly polydisperse. Topological and geometric properties, such as surface area and edge length, of the entire foam and individual cells, are discussed. The shape of struts in solid foams is related to Plateau borders in liquid foams and calculated for different volume fractions of material. The models of soap froth are used as templates to produce finite element models of open-cell foams. Three-dimensional images of open-cell foams obtained with x-ray microtomography allow virtual reconstruction of skeletal structures that compare well with the Surface Evolver simulations of soap-froth geometry.

  17. EPOXI at Comet Hartley 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    A'Hearn, Michael F.; Belton, Michael J. S.; Delamere, W. Alan; Feaga, Lori M.; Hampton, Donald; Kissel, Jochen; Klaasen, Kenneth P.; McFadden, Jessica M.; Meech, Karen J.; Melosh, H. Jay; Schultz, Peter H.; Sunshine, Jessica M.; Thomas, Peter C.; Veverka, Joseph; Wellnitz, Dennis D.; Yeomans, Donald K.; Besse, Sebastien; Bodewits, Dennis; Bowling, Timothy J.; Carcish, Brian T.; Collins, Steven M.; Farnham, Tony F.; Groussin, Oliver; Hermalyn, Brendan; Kelley, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding how comets work, i,e., what drives their activity, is crucial to using comets to study the early solar system. EPOXI flew past comet 103P/Hartley 2, one with an unusually small but very active nucleus. taking both images and spectra. Unlike large, relatively inactive nuclei, this nncleus is outgassing primarily due to CO2, which drags chnnks of ice out of the nnclens. It also shows significant differences in the relative abundance of volatiles from various parts of the nucleus.

  18. The response of human tissues to carbon reinforced epoxy resin.

    PubMed

    Howard, C B; Tayton, K J; Gibbs, A

    1985-08-01

    The tissue surrounding carbon fibre reinforced epoxy resin plates applied to forearm and tibial fractures was biopsied in 32 patients at the time the plates were removed. The reaction was minimal and was compared with that in a control group of 16 similar patients in whom stainless steel plates were used. No significant histological differences were found. A series of experiments on rats, in which the histology was studied from 2 to 78 weeks, also showed that there was very little reaction to carbon fibre reinforced plastic. PMID:4030870

  19. Impact behavior of graphite-epoxy simulated fan blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, T. S.; Preston, J. L., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The response of a graphite-epoxy material, Modmor II/PR-286, to foreign object impact was investigated by impacting spherical projectiles of three different materials - gelatin, ice, and steel - on simulated blade specimens. Visual and metallographic inspection revealed three damage mechanisms: penetration, leading edge bending failure, and stress wave delamination and cracking. The steel projectiles caused penetration damage regardless of the impact location and angle. For the ice and gelatin particles impacting the leading edge, failure was due to large local bending strains, resulting in significant material removal and delamination damage.

  20. Mechanical Characterization of Rigid Polyurethane Foams.

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Wei-Yang

    2014-12-01

    Foam materials are used to protect sensitive components from impact loading. In order to predict and simulate the foam performance under various loading conditions, a validated foam model is needed and the mechanical properties of foams need to be characterized. Uniaxial compression and tension tests were conducted for different densities of foams under various temperatures and loading rates. Crush stress, tensile strength, and elastic modulus were obtained. A newly developed confined compression experiment provided data for investigating the foam flow direction. A biaxial tension experiment was also developed to explore the damage surface of a rigid polyurethane foam.

  1. Thermoset epoxy polymers from renewable resources

    DOEpatents

    East, Anthony; Jaffe, Michael; Zhang, Yi; Catalani, Luiz H

    2009-11-17

    Novel thermoset epoxy polymers using the bisglycidyl ethers of anhydrosugars, such as isosorbide, isomannide, and isoidide, are disclosed. The bisglycidyl ethers are useful as substitutes for bisphenol A in the manufacture of thermoset epoxy ethers. The anhydrosugars are derived from renewable sources and the bisglycidyl ethers are not xenoestrogenic and the thermoset curing agents are likewise derived form renewable resources.

  2. Carbon foams from different coals

    SciTech Connect

    Montserrat Calvo; Roberto Garcia; Sabino R. Moinelo

    2008-09-15

    Carbon foams were obtained from several bituminous coals with different plasticity and volatile matter content by a two-stage thermal process. The first stage, a controlled carbonization treatment under pressure at 450-500 {sup o}C, is responsible for the final textural properties of the foam. In the second stage, the carbonization product was baked at 1100{sup o}C. The foams produced display a macroporous texture with fluidity, volatile matter content, and maceral composition of the precursor coals, having an influence on the apparent density and the pore size of the resultant porous products. Coals with low fluidity, volatile matter content, and liptinite content give rise to foams with lower pore size and lower apparent density. In the case of high fluidity coals, their foams display an increase of flexural strength with the increasing relative density. In general, the carbon foams obtained in this study display good electrical properties (electrical resistivity comparable to that of commercial foams). 27 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Drainage in a rising foam.

    PubMed

    Yazhgur, Pavel; Rio, Emmanuelle; Rouyer, Florence; Pigeonneau, Franck; Salonen, Anniina

    2016-01-21

    Rising foams created by continuously blowing gas into a surfactant solution are widely used in many technical processes, such as flotation. The prediction of the liquid fraction profile in such flowing foams is of particular importance since this parameter controls the stability and the rheology of the final product. Using drift flux analysis and recently developed semi-empirical expressions for foam permeability and osmotic pressure, we build a model predicting the liquid fraction profile as a function of height. The theoretical profiles are very different if the interfaces are considered as mobile or rigid, but all of our experimental profiles are described by the model with mobile interfaces. Even the systems with dodecanol are well known to behave as rigid in forced drainage experiments. This is because in rising foams the liquid fraction profile is fixed by the flux at the bottom of the foam. Here the foam is wet with higher permeability and the interfaces are not in equilibrium. These results demonstrate once again that it is not only the surfactant system that controls the mobility of the interface, but also the hydrodynamic problem under consideration. For example liquid flow through the foam during generation or in forced drainage is intrinsically different. PMID:26554500

  4. Structural Performance of a Compressively Loaded Foam-Core Hat-Stiffened Textile Composite Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R.; Dexter, Benson H.

    1996-01-01

    A structurally efficient hat-stiffened panel concept that utilizes a structural foam as a stiffener core material has been designed and developed for aircraft primary structural applications. This stiffener concept is fabricated from textile composite material forms with a resin transfer molding process. This foam-filled hat-stiffener concept is structurally more efficient than most other prismatically stiffened panel configurations in a load range that is typical for both fuselage and wing structures. The panel design is based on woven/stitched and braided graphite-fiber textile preforms, an epoxy resin system, and Rohacell foam core. The structural response of this panel design was evaluated for its buckling and postbuckling behavior with and without low-speed impact damage. The results from single-stiffener and multi-stiffener specimen tests suggest that this structural concept responds to loading as anticipated and has excellent damage tolerance characteristics compared to a similar panel design made from preimpregnated graphite-epoxy tape material.

  5. Method of casting pitch based foam

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James W.

    2002-01-01

    A process for producing molded pitch based foam is disclosed which minimizes cracking. The process includes forming a viscous pitch foam in a container, and then transferring the viscous pitch foam from the container into a mold. The viscous pitch foam in the mold is hardened to provide a carbon foam having a relatively uniform distribution of pore sizes and a highly aligned graphic structure in the struts.

  6. Simulation of the densification of real open-celled foam microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brydon, A. D.; Bardenhagen, S. G.; Miller, E. A.; Seidler, G. T.

    2005-12-01

    Ubiquitous in nature and finding applications in engineering systems, cellular solids are an increasingly important class of materials. Foams are an important subclass of cellular solids with applications as packing materials and energy absorbers due to their unique properties. A better understanding of foam mechanical properties and their dependence on microstructural details would facilitate manufacture of tailored materials and development of constitutive models for their bulk response. Numerical simulation of these materials, while offering great promise toward furthering understanding, has also served to convincingly demonstrate the inherent complexity and associated modeling challenges. The large range of deformations which foams are subjected to in routine engineering applications is a fundamental source of complication in modeling the details of foam deformation on the scale of foam struts. It requires accurate handling of large material deformations and complex contact mechanics, both well established numerical challenges. A further complication is the replication of complex foam microstructure geometry in numerical simulations. Here various advantages of certain particle methods, in particular their compatibility with the determination of three-dimensional geometry via X-ray microtomography, are exploited to simulate the compression of "real" foam microstructures into densification. With attention paid to representative volume element size, predictions are made regarding bulk response, dynamic effects, and deformed microstructural character, for real polymeric, open-cell foams. These predictions include a negative Poisson's ratio in the stress plateau, and increased difficulty in removing residual porosity during densification.

  7. Microgravity foam structure and rheology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durian, Douglas J.; Gopal, Anthony D.

    1994-01-01

    Our long-range objective is to establish the fundamental interrelationship between the microscopic structure and dynamics of foams and their macroscopic stability and rheology. Foam structure and dynamics are to be measured directly and noninvasively through the use and development of novel multiple light scattering techniques such as diffusing-wave spectroscopy (DWS). Foam rheology is to be measured in a custom rheometer which allows simultaneous optical access for multiple light drainage of liquid from in between gas bubbles as the liquid:gas volume fraction in increased towards the rigidity-loss transition.

  8. Improved EOS for Describing High-Temperature Off-Hugoniot States in Epoxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulford, R. N.; Swift, D. C.; Lanier, N. E.; Workman, J.; Holmes, R. L.; Graham, P.; Moore, A.

    2007-12-01

    Modelling of off-Hugoniot states in an expanding interface subjected to a shock reveals the importance of a chemically complete description of the materials. Hydrodynamic experiments typically rely on pre-shot target characterization to predict how initial perturbations will affect the late-time hydrodynamic mixing. However, it is the condition of these perturbations at the time of shock arrival that dominates their eventual late-time evolution. In some cases these perturbations are heated prior to the arrival of the main shock. Correctly modelling how temperature and density gradients will develop in the pre-heated material requires an understanding of the equation-of-state. In the experiment modelled, an epoxy/foam layered package was subjected to tin L-shell radiation, producing an expanding assembly at a well-defined temperature. This assembly was then subjected to a controlled shock, and the evolution of the epoxy-foam interface imaged with x-ray radiography. Modelling of the data with the hydrodynamics code RAGE was unsuccessful under certain shock conditions, unless condensation of chemical species from the plasma is explicitly included. The EOS code Cheetah was used to prepare suitable EOS for input into the hydrodynamics modelling.

  9. Improved EOS for describing high-temperature off-hugoniot states in epoxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulford, R. N.; Lanier, N. E.; Swift, D.; Workman, J.; Graham, Peter; Moore, Alastair

    2007-06-01

    Modeling of off-hugoniot states in an expanding interface subjected to a shock reveals the importance of a chemically complete description of the materials. Hydrodynamic experiments typically rely on pre-shot target characterization to predict how initial perturbations will affect the late-time hydrodynamic mixing. However, it is the condition of these perturbations at the time of shock arrival that dominates their eventual late-time evolution. In some cases these perturbations are heated prior to the arrival of the main shock. Correctly modeling how temperature and density gradients will develop in the pre-heated material requires an understanding of the equation-of-state. In the experiment modelled, an epoxy/foam layered package was subjected to tin L-shell radiation, producing an expanding assembly at a well-defined temperature. This assembly was then subjected to a controlled shock, and the evolution of the epoxy-foam interface imaged with x-ray radiography. Modeling of the data with the hydrodynamics code RAGE is unsuccessful under certain shock conditions, unless condensation of chemical species from the plasma is explicitly included. The EOS code CHEETAH was used to prepare suitable EOS for input into the hydrodynamics modeling.

  10. Simple surface foam application enhances bioremediation of oil-contaminated soil in cold conditions.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seung-Woo; Jeong, Jongshin; Kim, Jaisoo

    2015-04-01

    Landfarming of oil-contaminated soil is ineffective at low temperatures, because the number and activity of micro-organisms declines. This study presents a simple and versatile technique for bioremediation of diesel-contaminated soil, which involves spraying foam on the soil surface without additional works such as tilling, or supply of water and air. Surfactant foam containing psychrophilic oil-degrading microbes and nutrients was sprayed twice daily over diesel-contaminated soil at 6 °C. Removal efficiencies in total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) at 30 days were 46.3% for landfarming and 73.7% for foam-spraying. The first-order kinetic biodegradation rates for landfarming and foam-spraying were calculated as 0.019 d(-1) and 0.044 d(-1), respectively. Foam acted as an insulating medium, keeping the soil 2 °C warmer than ambient air. Sprayed foam was slowly converted to aqueous solution within 10-12h and infiltrated the soil, providing microbes, nutrients, water, and air for bioaugmentation. Furthermore, surfactant present in the aqueous solution accelerated the dissolution of oil from the soil, resulting in readily biodegradable aqueous form. Significant reductions in hydrocarbon concentration were simultaneously observed in both semi-volatile and non-volatile fractions. As the initial soil TPH concentration increased, the TPH removal rate of the foam-spraying method also increased. PMID:25577318

  11. Ultrafast Synthesis of Multifunctional N-Doped Graphene Foam in an Ethanol Flame.

    PubMed

    Du, Xusheng; Liu, Hong-Yuan; Mai, Yiu-Wing

    2016-01-26

    A hard template method to prepare N-doped graphene foams (NGF) with superfast template removal was developed through a pyrolyzing commercial polyurethane (PU) sponge coated with graphene oxide (GO) sheets in an ethanol flame. The removal of the template was fast and facile, and could be completed in less than 60 s in an open environment. The synthesized graphene foams consisted of a unique structure of 3D interconnected hollow struts with highly wrinkled surfaces, and the morphology of the hollow struts could be tuned by controlling the GO dispersion concentration. The foams showed high hydrophobicity and were used as absorbents for a variety of organic solvents and oils. The unique NGF structure afforded a high absorption rate and capacity, and a remarkable 98.7% pore volume of the foam could be utilized for absorption of hexane, exhibiting one of the highest capacity values among existing absorptive counterparts. The N-doping brought higher capacitive performance than conventional graphene foams prepared by chemical vapor deposition on nickel foam templates. The NGFs also displayed high elasticity and could recover completely after 50% compressive strain. Owing to easy availability and reduction environment of the flame, complete thermal decomposition of the PU sponge and highly porous open-cell structure, and flame resistance of the graphene foam, the present flame method was demonstrated to be a simple, effective, and ultrafast approach to fabricate ultra-low-density NGFs with good electromechanical response, excellent organic liquid absorption, and high-energy dissipation capabilities. PMID:26635121

  12. Imide modified epoxy matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scola, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a program designed to develop tough imide modified epoxy resins cured by bisimide amine (BIA) hardeners are described. State-of-the-art epoxides MY720 and DER383 were used, and four bismide amines were evaluated. These were the BIA's derived from the 6F anhydride (4,4'-(hexafluoroisopropylidene) bis(phthalic anhydride) and the diamines 3,3'-diaminodiphynyl sulfone, 4,4'-oxygianiline, 4,4'-methylene dianiline, and 1,12-dodecane diamine. A key intermediate, designated 6F anhydride, is required for the synthesis of the bisimide amines. Reaction parameters to synthesize a precursor to the 6F anhydride (6FHC) in high yields were investigated. The catalyst trifluoromethane sulfonic acid was studied. Although small scale runs yielded the 6FHC in 50 percent yield, efforts to ranslate these results to a larger scale synthesis gave the 6FHC in only 9 percent yield. Results show that the concept of using bisimide amine as curing agents to improve the toughness properties of epoxies is valid.

  13. Method of neutralizing the corrosive surface of amine-cured epoxy resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. Y. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    The corrosive alkaline surface layer of an epoxy resin product formed by the curing of the epoxy with an aliphatic amine is eliminated by first applying a non-solvent to remove most or all of the free unreacted amine and then applying a layer of a chemical reagent to neutralize the unused amine or amine functional groups by forming a substituted urea. The surface then may be rinsed with acetone and then with alcohol. The non-solvent may be an alcohol. The neutralizing chemical reagent is a mono-isocyanate or a mono-isothiocyanate. Preferred is an aromatic mono-isocyanate such as phenyl isocyanate, nitrophenyl isocyanate and naplthyl isocyanate.

  14. Composite carbon foam electrode

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1997-05-06

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granulated materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy. 1 fig.

  15. Composite carbon foam electrode

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Steven T.; Pekala, Richard W.; Kaschmitter, James L.

    1997-01-01

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivty and power to system energy.

  16. Mussel-inspired polydopamine coated hollow carbon microspheres, a novel versatile filler for fabrication of high performance syntactic foams.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liying; Roy, Sunanda; Chen, Ye; Chua, Eng Kee; See, Kye Yak; Hu, Xiao; Liu, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Syntactic foams, which can be synthesized by mechanical mixing of hollow microspheres with a matrix material, are a special class of lightweight composite materials. Developing of high-performance syntactic foams remains challenges. In this work, a facile and environmentally friendly surface modification method employing polydopamine (PDA) as a surface treatment agent for hollow carbon microspheres (HCMs) was used, aiming to extend the application of syntactic foams to seldom touched areas. The PDA coating was used as a strategy for interfacial interaction enhancement and also as a platform for further metal coating meant for electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding. The stronger interfacial interaction between microspheres and polymer matrix provided effective interfacial stress transfer, as a result of the syntactic foams with high strength to weight ratio. Furthermore, the PDA coating on HCMs served as a versatile platform for the growth of noble metals on the surface of PDA-HCMs. Silver nanoparticles was grown by PDA medium. The silver coated HCMs (Ag-PDA-HCMs) impacted the complex permittivity of the syntactic foams leading to high EMI shielding effectiveness (SE). The specific EMI SE reached up to 46.3 dB·cm(3)/g, demonstrated the Ag-PDA-HCMs/epoxy syntactic foam as a promising candidate for lightweight high-performance EMI shielding material. PMID:25286083

  17. CPUF - a chemical-structure-based polyurethane foam decomposition and foam response model.

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, Thomas H. (Brigham Young University, Provo, UT); Thompson, Kyle Richard; Erickson, Kenneth L.; Dowding, Kevin J.; Clayton, Daniel (Brigham Young University, Provo, UT); Chu, Tze Yao; Hobbs, Michael L.; Borek, Theodore Thaddeus III

    2003-07-01

    A Chemical-structure-based PolyUrethane Foam (CPUF) decomposition model has been developed to predict the fire-induced response of rigid, closed-cell polyurethane foam-filled systems. The model, developed for the B-61 and W-80 fireset foam, is based on a cascade of bondbreaking reactions that produce CO2. Percolation theory is used to dynamically quantify polymer fragment populations of the thermally degrading foam. The partition between condensed-phase polymer fragments and gas-phase polymer fragments (i.e. vapor-liquid split) was determined using a vapor-liquid equilibrium model. The CPUF decomposition model was implemented into the finite element (FE) heat conduction codes COYOTE and CALORE, which support chemical kinetics and enclosure radiation. Elements were removed from the computational domain when the calculated solid mass fractions within the individual finite element decrease below a set criterion. Element removal, referred to as ?element death,? creates a radiation enclosure (assumed to be non-participating) as well as a decomposition front, which separates the condensed-phase encapsulant from the gas-filled enclosure. All of the chemistry parameters as well as thermophysical properties for the CPUF model were obtained from small-scale laboratory experiments. The CPUF model was evaluated by comparing predictions to measurements. The validation experiments included several thermogravimetric experiments at pressures ranging from ambient pressure to 30 bars. Larger, component-scale experiments were also used to validate the foam response model. The effects of heat flux, bulk density, orientation, embedded components, confinement and pressure were measured and compared to model predictions. Uncertainties in the model results were evaluated using a mean value approach. The measured mass loss in the TGA experiments and the measured location of the decomposition front were within the 95% prediction limit determined using the CPUF model for all of the

  18. High temperature adhesive silicone foam composition, foam generating system and method of generating foam

    DOEpatents

    Mead, Judith W.; Montoya, Orelio J.; Rand, Peter B.; Willan, Vernon O.

    1984-01-01

    Access to a space is impeded by generation of a sticky foam from a silicone polymer and a low boiling solvent such as a halogenated hydrocarbon. In a preferred aspect, the formulation is polydimethylsiloxane gel mixed with F502 Freon as a solvent and blowing agent, and pressurized with CO.sub.2 in a vessel to about 250 PSI, whereby when the vessel is opened, a sticky and solvent resistant foam is deployed. The foam is deployable, over a wide range of temperatures, adhering to wet surfaces as well as dry, is stable over long periods of time and does not propagate flame or lose adhesive properties during an externally supported burn.

  19. Absorption Optics of Aqueous Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Ranjini; Gittings, Alex; Durian, D. J.

    2002-11-01

    Aqueous foams are composed of gas bubbles packed together in a small volume of soapy water. The large number of gas-liquid interfaces in foams results in very strong scattering of light, which explains the opaque nature of conventional aqueous foams such as shaving foams and mousse. For dry foams, the interfaces can take the following three forms: the soap films where two bubbles meet, the triangular plateau borders where three soap films meet and the vertices where four plateau borders meet. Previous experiments have shown that most of the scattering occurs from the plateau borders 2,3 and the transport mean free path of light (l*), the bubble radius (R) and the liquid fraction of foam (epsilon) is related through the relation l*=R/(epsilon0.5). To understand the reflection and scattering of light at the gas-bubble interfaces, we study the absorption of photons in the liquid network as a function of the foam absorptivity. We do this to confirm if the time spent by the photons in the liquid phase is proportional to the liquid fraction of the foam. Our results indicate that for a specific range of liquid fractions (0.05 is less than e is less than 0.1), the photons seem to get trapped in the liquid network. This result is independent of the absorptivity of the foam and leads us to conclude that under appropriate conditions, an aqueous foam behaves very much like an optical fiber network. Aqueous foam is generated in the lab by the method of turbulent mixing of N2 gas with a jet of alpha-olefin-sulfonate (AOS) solution. The foam has been made absorbing by dissolving small quantities of rhodamine dye (R = 0.005 g/l, R = 0.01 g/l and R = 0.0124 g/l) in the AOS solution. The transmission of photons through the foams of liquid fractions 0.0297 is less than e is less than 0.35 has been studied using Diffuse Transmission Spectroscopy (DTS). For each liquid fraction, the transport mean free path l* (the length over which the photon travels before it gets completely

  20. Amorphous microcellular polytetrafluoroethylene foam film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chongzheng

    1991-11-01

    We report herein the preparation of novel low-density ultramicrocellular fluorocarbon foams and their application. These fluorocarbon foams are of interest for the biochemistry arena in numerous applications including foodstuff, pharmacy, wine making, beer brewery, fermentation medical laboratory, and other processing factories. All of those require good quality processing programs in which, after eliminating bacterium and virus, compressed air is needed. Ordinarily, compressed air contains bacterium and virus, its size is 0.01 - 2 micrometers fluorocarbon foam films. Having average porous diameter 0.04 - 0.1 micrometers , these are stable to high temperature (280 degree(s)C) and chemical environments, and generally have good engineering and mechanical properties (e.g., low coefficient of thermal expansion, high modulus, and good dimensional stability). Our new process for preparing low density fluorocarbon foams provides materials with unique properties. As such, they offer the possibility for being superior to earlier materials for a number of the filter applications mentioned.

  1. Ceramic Foams for TPS Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stockpoole, Mairead

    2003-01-01

    Ceramic foams have potential in many areas of Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) including acreage and tile leading edges as well as being suitable as a repair approach for re-entry vehicles. NASA Ames is conducting ongoing research in developing lower-density foams from pre-ceramic polymer routes. One of the key factors to investigate, when developing new materials for re-entry applications, is their oxidation behavior in the appropriate re-entry environment which can be simulated using ground based arc jet (plasma jet) testing. Arc jet testing is required to provide the appropriate conditions (stagnation pressures, heat fluxes, enthalpies, heat loads and atmospheres) encountered during flight. This work looks at the response of ceramic foams (Si systems) exposed to simulated reentry environments and investigates the influence of microstructure and composition on the material? response. Other foam properties (mechanical and thermal) will also be presented.

  2. Synthesis & Biological, Physical, & Adhesive Properties of Epoxy Sucroses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Raw sugar was converted in two steps to epoxy allyl sucroses (EAS), epoxy crotyl sucroses (ECS), and epoxy methallyl sucroses (EMS) respectively, in 82, 91, and 91.5 % overall yields. EAS, ECS, and EMS are regio and diastereo isomeric epoxy monomers that are liquids at room temperature. The averag...

  3. The Melting of Aqueous Foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durian, Douglas J.; Gopal, Anthony D.; Vera, Moin U.; Langer, Stephen A.

    1996-01-01

    Diffusing-wave spectroscopy measurements show that ordinarily solid aqueous foams flow by a series of stick-slip avalanche-like rearrangements of neighboring bubbles from one tight packing configuration to another. Contrary to a recent prediction, the distribution of avalanche sizes do not obey a power-law distribution characteristic of self-organized criticality. This can be understood from a simple model of foam mechanics based on bubble-bubble interactions.

  4. Process for making carbon foam

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James W.

    2000-01-01

    The process obviates the need for conventional oxidative stabilization. The process employs mesophase or isotropic pitch and a simplified process using a single mold. The foam has a relatively uniform distribution of pore sizes and a highly aligned graphic structure in the struts. The foam material can be made into a composite which is useful in high temperature sandwich panels for both thermal and structural applications.

  5. Advances in cryogenic foam insulations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemons, C. R.; Salmassy, O. K.; Watts, C. R.

    1971-01-01

    Description of a discretely oriented thread-reinforced polyurethane foam thermal insulation system for liquid hydrogen fuel tanks. The 3-D foam and glass liner composite is designed to be adhesively bonded to the inside surface of the tank wall and to be in direct contact with liquid hydrogen. All elements of this insulation composite are capable of sustaining the loads and environmental conditions imposed by testing under simulated Space Shuttle vehicle requirements at temperatures between -423 and +350 F.

  6. Supercapacitors based on carbon foams

    DOEpatents

    Kaschmitter, James L.; Mayer, Steven T.; Pekala, Richard W.

    1993-01-01

    A high energy density capacitor incorporating a variety of carbon foam electrodes is described. The foams, derived from the pyrolysis of resorcinol-formaldehyde and related polymers, are high density (0.1 g/cc-1.0 g/cc) electrically conductive and have high surface areas (400 m.sup.2 /g-1000 m.sup.2 /g). Capacitances on the order of several tens of farad per gram of electrode are achieved.

  7. Supercapacitors based on carbon foams

    DOEpatents

    Kaschmitter, J.L.; Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.

    1993-11-09

    A high energy density capacitor incorporating a variety of carbon foam electrodes is described. The foams, derived from the pyrolysis of resorcinol-formaldehyde and related polymers, are high density (0.1 g/cc-1.0 g/cc) electrically conductive and have high surface areas (400 m[sup 2]/g-1000 m[sup 2]/g). Capacitances on the order of several tens of farad per gram of electrode are achieved. 9 figures.

  8. Epoxy-paint stripping using TEA CO2 laser: Determination of threshold fluence and the process parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Manoj; Bhargava, P.; Biswas, A. K.; Sahu, Shasikiran; Mandloi, V.; Ittoop, M. O.; Khattak, B. Q.; Tiwari, M. K.; Kukreja, L. M.

    2013-03-01

    It is shown that the threshold fluence for laser paint stripping can be accurately estimated from the heat of gasification and the absorption coefficient of the epoxy-paint. The threshold fluence determined experimentally by stripping of the epoxy-paint on a substrate using a TEA CO2 laser matches closely with the calculated value. The calculated threshold fluence and the measured absorption coefficient of the paint allowed us to determine the epoxy paint thickness that would be removed per pulse at a given laser fluence even without experimental trials. This was used to predict the optimum scan speed required to strip the epoxy-paint of a given thickness using a high average power TEA CO2 laser. Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) studies were also carried out on laser paint-stripped concrete substrate to show high efficacy of this modality.

  9. Specific surface area model for foam permeability.

    PubMed

    Pitois, O; Lorenceau, E; Louvet, N; Rouyer, F

    2009-01-01

    Liquid foams were recognized early to be porous materials, as liquid flowed between the gas bubbles. Drainage theories have been established, and foam permeability has been modeled from the microscopic description of the equivalent pores geometry, emphasizing similarities with their solid counterparts. But to what extent can the theoretical work devoted to the permeability of solid porous materials be useful to liquid foams? In this article, the applicability of the Carman-Kozeny model on foam is investigated. We performed measurements of the permeability of foams with nonmobile surfactants, and we show that, in introducing an equivalent specific surface area for the foam, the model accurately describes the experimental data over two orders of magnitude for the foam liquid fraction, without any additional parameters. Finally, it is shown that this model includes the previous permeability models derived for foams in the dry foams limit. PMID:19032030

  10. Stability of metallic foams studied under microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wübben, Th; Stanzick, H.; Banhart, J.; Odenbach, S.

    2003-01-01

    Metal foams are prepared by mixing a metal powder and a gas-releasing blowing agent, by densifying the mix to a dense precursor and finally foaming by melting the powder compact. The foaming process of aluminium foams is monitored in situ by x-ray radioscopy. One observes that foam evolution is accompanied by film rupture processes which lead to foam coalescence. In order to elucidate the importance of oxides for foam stability, lead foams were manufactured from lead powders having two different oxide contents. The two foam types were generated on Earth and under weightlessness during parabolic flights. The measurements show that the main function of oxide particles is to prevent coalescence, while their influence on bulk viscosity of the melt is of secondary importance.

  11. Microgravity studies of aqueous wet foams.

    PubMed

    Langevin, D; Vignes-Adler, M

    2014-03-01

    Foams and foaming pose important questions and problems for both fundamental research and practical applications. Despite the fact that foams have been extensively studied, many aspects of foam physics and chemistry still remain unclear. Experiments on foams performed under microgravity can be extended far beyond their counterpart where gravity is fully present (i.e. most experiments on Earth). They allow, in particular, observation of the wet foams obtained during the foaming process; on Earth, foams at this stage evolve too quickly due to gravity drainage and cannot be studied. This paper reviews the existing studies of foams under microgravity, which include studies in parabolic flights, in sounding rockets and in the International Space Station. PMID:24652241

  12. Foam shell project: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Overturf, G.; Reibold, B.; Cook, B.; Schroen-Carey, D.

    1994-03-25

    The authors report on their work to produce a foam shell target for two possible applications: (1) as liquid-layered cryogenic target on Omega Upgrade, and (2) as a back-up design for the NIF. This target consists of a roughly 1 mm diameter and 100 {mu}m thick spherical low-density foam shell surrounding a central void. The foam will be slightly overfilled with liquid D{sub 2} or DT, the overfilled excess being symmetrically distributed on the inside of the shell and supported by thermal gradient techniques. The outside of the foam is overcoated with full density polymer which must be topologically smooth. The technology for manufacturing this style of foam shell involves microencapsulation techniques and has been developed by the Japanese at ILE. Their goal is to determine whether this technology can be successfully adapted to meet US ICF objectives. To this end a program of foam shell development has been initiated at LLNL in collaboration with both the General Atomics DOE Target Fabrication Contract Corporation and the Target Fabrication Group at LLE.

  13. Development of advanced foams in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Moreno, Francisco; Babcsan, Norbert; Banhart, John; Andersson, Martin; Pugh, Robert J.; Kronberg, Bengt; Saint-Jalmes, Arnaud; Marze, Sébastien; Langevin, Dominique; Brunke, Oliver; Odenbach, Stefan; Cox, Simon; Hutzler, Stefan; Drenckhan, Wiebke; Weaire, Denis; Baumgärtner, Frank; Seeliger, Wolfgang; Argillier, Jean-François; Lange, Dieter

    2005-10-01

    Metallic and aqueous foams are challenging materials for both fundamental and applied research. They distinguish themselves from other materials by their very low density and, especially in the case of metallic foams, by high specific stiffness, good damping and high-energy absorption capability. They are therefore becoming increasingly popular for industrial applications. Driven by industry demand, efforts have been made in recent years to improve foam quality. Microgravity conditions are essential for further analysis and improvement of aqueous and metallic foams. Experimental devices for in situ and ex situ analysis were developed within this MAP project. Foam properties such as drainage, rupture events and foam density were analysed quantitatively, as well as the influence of external conditions like gas pressure and foaming gas. Hardness and wetting angles for different stabilising particles were compared; mica is proposed as a suitable candidate for aluminium foams. In the case of aqueous foams, surfactants and proteins are found to have a different microscopic origin of stabilisation. A monodisperse aqueous foam generator will be adapted for metallic foams. Foam stabilisation mechanisms and foam evolution simulations were performed. 2-D X-ray foam images were successfully simulated.

  14. Mechanical behaviors of hyberbranched epoxy toughened bisphenol F epoxy resin for cryogenic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingwen; Wu, Zhixiong; Huang, Chuanjun; Huang, Rongjin; Li, Laifeng

    2014-01-01

    Epoxy resins have been widely employed in cryogenic engineering fields. In this work, bisphenol F epoxy resin was modified by an aromatic polyester hyperbranched epoxy resin (HTDE-2). Mechanical behaviors of the modified epoxy resins in terms of tensile properties and impact property were studied at both room and cryogenic temperatures. Moreover, the toughening mechanism was discussed by fracture surface morphology analysis. The results demonstrated that, the mechanical properties of composites initially increased until reaches the maximum value with increasing the mass content of the HTDE-2, and then decreased at both room temperature (RT) and 77K. Especially, the impact strength at 77 K was improved 40.7% compared with the pure epoxy matrix when 10 wt% HTDE-2 was introduced. The findings suggest that the HTDE-2 will be an effective toughener for the brittle bisphenol F epoxy resin for cryogenic applications.

  15. Breakdown properties of epoxy nanodielectric

    SciTech Connect

    Tuncer, Enis; Cantoni, Claudia; More, Karren Leslie; James, David Randy; Polyzos, Georgios; Sauers, Isidor; Ellis, Alvin R

    2010-01-01

    Recent developments in polymeric dielectric nanocomposites have shown that these novel materials can improve design of high voltage (hv) components and systems. Some of the improvements can be listed as reduction in size (compact hv systems), better reliability, high energy density, voltage endurance, and multifunctionality. Nanodielectric systems demonstrated specific improvements that have been published in the literature by different groups working with electrical insulation materials. In this paper we focus on the influence of in-situ synthesized titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles on the dielectric breakdown characteristics of an epoxy-based nanocomposite system. The in-situ synthesis of the particles creates small nanoparticles on the order of 10 nm with narrow size distribution and uniform particle dispersion in the matrix. The breakdown strength of the nanocomposite was studied as a function of TiO{sub 2} concentration at cryogenic temperatures. It was observed that between 2 and 6wt% yields high breakdown values for the nanodielectric.

  16. Strain compatibility tests for sprayed foam cryogenic insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, W. L.; Kimberlin, D. O.

    1970-01-01

    Mechanical stress applied to foam-coated aluminum alloy specimens maintained at cryogenic temperature simulates actual use conditions of the foam insulation. The testing reveals defects in the polyurethane foam or in the foam to metal bond.

  17. Development of drilling foams for geothermal applications

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, W.J.; Remont, L.J.; Rehm, W.A.; Chenevert, M.E.

    1980-01-01

    The use of foam drilling fluids in geothermal applications is addressed. A description of foams - what they are, how they are used, their properties, equipment required to use them, the advantages and disadvantages of foams, etc. - is presented. Geothermal applications are discussed. Results of industry interviews presented indicate significant potential for foams, but also indicate significant technical problems to be solved to achieve this potential. Testing procedures and results of tests on representative foams provide a basis for work to develop high-temperature foams.

  18. MECHANISTIC STUDIES OF IMPROVED FOAM EOR PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    William R. Rossen

    2005-03-16

    The objective of this research is to widen the application of foam to enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by investigating fundamental mechanisms of foams in porous media. This research is to lay the groundwork for more-applied research on foams for improved sweep efficiency in miscible gas, steam and surfactant-based EOR. Task 1 investigates the pore-scale interactions between foam bubbles and polymer molecules. Task 2 examines the mechanisms of gas trapping, and interaction between gas trapping and foam effectiveness. Task 3 investigates mechanisms of foam generation in porous media.

  19. Development of Defoamers for Confinenment Foam

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D M; Mitchell, A R

    2005-08-10

    Aqueous foam concentrate (AFC) 380 foam was developed by Sandia National Laboratory as a blast mitigation foam for unexploded ordnance (UXO) and its ''engineered foam structure'' is reported to be able to ''envelop chemical or biological aerosols'' [1]. It is similar to commercial fire-fighting foams, consisting mostly of water with small amounts of two alcohols, an ether and surfactant. It also contains xanthan gum, probably, to strengthen the foam film and delay drainage. The concentrate is normally diluted in a 6:94 ratio with water for foaming applications. The diluted solution is normally foamed with air to an expansion factor of about 100 (density 0.01 g/cc), which is called ''dry'' foam. Higher density foam (0.18 > {rho} > 0.03 g/cc) was discovered which had quite different characteristics from ''dry'' foam and was called ''wet'' foam. Some characterization of these foams has also been carried out, but the major effort described in this document is the evaluation, at the small and medium scale, of chemical, mechanical and thermal approaches to defoaming AFC 380 foam. Several chemical approaches to defoaming were evaluated including oxidation and precipitation of the xanthan, use of commercial oil-emulsion or suspension defoamers, pH modification, and cation exchange with the surfactant. Of these the commercial defoamers were most effective. Two mechanical approaches to defoaming were evaluated: pressure and foam rupture with very fine particles. Pressure and vacuum techniques were considered too difficult for field applications but high surface area silica particles worked very well on dry foam. Finally simple thermal techniques were evaluated. An order-disorder transition occurs in xanthan solutions at about 60 C, which may be responsible for the effectiveness of hot air as a defoamer. During defoaming of 55 gallons of foam with hot air, after about 70% of the AFC 380 foam had been defoamed, the effectiveness of hot air was dramatically reduced

  20. MECHANISTIC STUDIES OF IMPROVED FOAM EOR PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    William R. Rossen

    2005-01-05

    The objective of this research is to widen the application of foam to enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by investigating fundamental mechanisms of foams in porous media. This research will lay the groundwork for more applied research on foams for improved sweep efficiency in miscible gas, steam and surfactant-based EOR. Task 1 investigates the pore-scale interactions between foam bubbles and polymer molecules. Task 2 examines the mechanisms of gas trapping, and interaction between gas trapping and foam effectiveness. Task 3 investigates mechanisms of foam generation in porous media.

  1. Biopolymer foams - Relationship between material characteristics and foaming behavior of cellulose based foams

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, F. E-mail: anja.schneider@ict.fraunhofer.de; Schneider, A. E-mail: anja.schneider@ict.fraunhofer.de; Elsner, P.

    2014-05-15

    Biopolymers are becoming increasingly important to both industry and consumers. With regard to waste management, CO{sub 2} balance and the conservation of petrochemical resources, increasing efforts are being made to replace standard plastics with bio-based polymers. Nowadays biopolymers can be built for example of cellulose, lactic acid, starch, lignin or bio mass. The paper will present material properties of selected cellulose based polymers (cellulose propionate [CP], cellulose acetate butyrate [CAB]) and corresponding processing conditions for particle foams as well as characterization of produced parts. Special focus is given to the raw material properties by analyzing thermal behavior (differential scanning calorimetry), melt strength (Rheotens test) and molecular weight distribution (gel-permeation chromatography). These results will be correlated with the foaming behavior in a continuous extrusion process with physical blowing agents and underwater pelletizer. Process set-up regarding particle foam technology, including extrusion foaming and pre-foaming, will be shown. The characteristics of the resulting foam beads will be analyzed regarding part density, cell morphology and geometry. The molded parts will be tested on thermal conductivity as well as compression behavior (E-modulus, compression strength)

  2. Biopolymer foams - Relationship between material characteristics and foaming behavior of cellulose based foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, F.; Schneider, A.; Elsner, P.

    2014-05-01

    Biopolymers are becoming increasingly important to both industry and consumers. With regard to waste management, CO2 balance and the conservation of petrochemical resources, increasing efforts are being made to replace standard plastics with bio-based polymers. Nowadays biopolymers can be built for example of cellulose, lactic acid, starch, lignin or bio mass. The paper will present material properties of selected cellulose based polymers (cellulose propionate [CP], cellulose acetate butyrate [CAB]) and corresponding processing conditions for particle foams as well as characterization of produced parts. Special focus is given to the raw material properties by analyzing thermal behavior (differential scanning calorimetry), melt strength (Rheotens test) and molecular weight distribution (gel-permeation chromatography). These results will be correlated with the foaming behavior in a continuous extrusion process with physical blowing agents and underwater pelletizer. Process set-up regarding particle foam technology, including extrusion foaming and pre-foaming, will be shown. The characteristics of the resulting foam beads will be analyzed regarding part density, cell morphology and geometry. The molded parts will be tested on thermal conductivity as well as compression behavior (E-modulus, compression strength).

  3. Several factors influencing the fabrication of rigid foam-film solar concentrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubaidullaev, A. K.; Kagan, M. B.; Ataullaev, O. Kh.; Sobirov, O. Iu.; Rabbimov, R. T.

    The strength of adhesion between the reflecting film base of an expanded-sheet concentrator and a fixative coating (epoxy resin or polyurethane foam) is studied. According to experiments on the separation of the reflecting surface of a metallized polyethylene terephthalate film from a rigid polymer coating, the stressed state of the inflated reflecting film base before the application of the coating is one cause of adhesion loss. Other important factors identified were the thermal expansion coefficients of the aluminum substrate and polymer coating, as well as the contact temperature. Increased adhesion was obtained with additions of 10-12 percent chromium oxide or 12-18 percent aluminum oxide.

  4. Physical aging in graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kong, E. S. W.

    1983-01-01

    Sub-Tg annealing has been found to affect the properties of graphite/epoxy composites. The network epoxy studied was based on the chemistry of tetraglycidyl 4,4'-diamino-diphenyl methane (TGDDM) crosslinked by 4,4'-diamino-diphenyl sulfone (DDS). Differential scanning calorimetry, thermal mechanical analysis, and solid-state cross-polarized magic-angle-spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy have been utilized in order to characterize this process of recovery towards thermodynamic equilibrium. The volume and enthalpy recovery as well as the 'thermoreversibility' aspects of the physical aging are discussed. This nonequilibrium and time-dependent behavior of network epoxies are considered in view of the increasingly wide applications of TGDDM-DDS epoxies as matrix materials of structural composites in the aerospace industry.

  5. Foaming of mixtures of pure hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, J. V.; Woods, W. W.

    1950-01-01

    Mixtures of pure liquid hydrocarbons are capable of foaming. Nine hydrocarbons were mixed in pairs, in all possible combinations, and four proportions of each combination. These mixtures were sealed in glass tubes, and the foaming was tested by shaking. Mixtures of aliphatic with other aliphatic hydrocarbons, or of alkyl benzenes with other alkyl benzenes, did not foam. Mixtures of aliphatic hydrocarbons with alkyl benzenes did foam. The proportions of the mixtures greatly affected the foaming, the maximum foaming of 12 of 20 pairs being at the composition 20 percent aliphatic hydrocarbon, 80 percent alkyl benzene. Six seconds was the maximum foam lifetime of any of these mixtures. Aeroshell 120 lubricating oil was fractionated into 52 fractions and a residue by extraction with acetone in a fractionating extractor. The index of refraction, foam lifetime, color, and viscosity of these fractions were measured. Low viscosity and high index fractions were extracted first. The viscosity of the fractions extracted rose and the index decreased as fractionation proceeded. Foam lifetimes and color were lowest in the middle fractions. Significance is attached to the observation that none of the foam lifetimes of the fractions or residue is as high as the foam lifetime of the original Aeroshell, indicating that the foaming is not due to a particular foaming constituent, but rather to the entire mixture.

  6. Accelerated Aging of BKC 44306-10 Rigid Polyurethane Foam: FT-IR Spectroscopy, Dimensional Analysis, and Micro Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbertson, Robert D.; Patterson, Brian M.; Smith, Zachary

    2014-01-02

    An accelerated aging study of BKC 44306-10 rigid polyurethane foam was carried out. Foam samples were aged in a nitrogen atmosphere at three different temperatures: 50 °C, 65 °C, and 80 °C. Foam samples were periodically removed from the aging canisters at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15 month intervals when FT-IR spectroscopy, dimensional analysis, and mechanical testing experiments were performed. Micro Computed Tomography imaging was also employed to study the morphology of the foams. Over the course of the aging study the foams the decreased in size by a magnitude of 0.001 inches per inch of foam. Micro CT showed the heterogeneous nature of the foam structure likely resulting from flow effects during the molding process. The effect of aging on the compression and tensile strength of the foam was minor and no cause for concern. FT-IR spectroscopy was used to follow the foam chemistry. However, it was difficult to draw definitive conclusions about the changes in chemical nature of the materials due to large variability throughout the samples.

  7. MECHANISTIC STUDIES OF IMPROVED FOAM EOR PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    William R. Rossen

    2004-06-14

    The objective of this research is to widen the application of foam to enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by investigating fundamental mechanisms of foams in porous media. This research will lay the groundwork for more applied research on foams for improved sweep efficiency in miscible gas, steam and surfactant-based EOR. Task 1 investigates the pore-scale interactions between foam bubbles and polymer molecules. Task 2 examines the mechanisms of gas trapping, and interaction between gas trapping and foam effectiveness. Task 3 investigates mechanisms of foam generation in porous media. Significant progress was made during this period on all three Tasks. Regarding Task 1, we continued comparisons of foam behavior in sandpacks with and without polymer and oil. As in our previous results, decane was moderately destabilizing to foam. Xanthan polymer did not stabilize foam in the presence of decane in this case. Rather, it appears to have destabilized foam, so that pressure gradient decreased in spite of the increase in aqueous-phase viscosity. Research on Task 2 included the first shake-down experiments with our new apparatus for gas-phase tracer tests for direct measurement of trapped-gas saturation with foam. In addition, we began to analyze CT images of gas-phase tracer in foam displacements, which offers an independent measure of trapped-gas fraction and insights into the roles of convection of tracer in flowing gas and diffusion into trapped gas. Research on Task 3 included foam generation experiments in heterogeneous sandpacks and beadpacks and modeling of discontinuous changes in state such as foam generation. The experiments found the same three regimes (coarse foam, strong foam, and intermediate regime) in heterogeneous sandpacks previously identified in homogeneous porous media. One implication is that there may be a minimum flow rate required for foam generation in even heterogeneous porous media. The dynamics in SAG foam processes in heterogeneous media are complex

  8. Investigation of paramagnetic response of metallic epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, R. L.; Chegini, H.

    1986-01-01

    The paramagnetic properties of epoxies which were impregnated with metal ions were examined as the primary task in this research. A major conclusion was that the quality control of the epoxies was insufficient to permit reliable evaluation. Subsequently, a new set of specimens is being prepared. As an additional task, a new method is investigated for estimating heats of combustion for saturated hydrocarbons. The results of that investigation have shown that the empirical approach is a promising method for on-line measurements.

  9. Impregnating magnetic components with MDA free epoxy

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, R.O.; Domeier, L.; Gunewardena, S.

    1995-08-01

    This paper describes the use of {open_quotes}Formula 456{close_quotes} an aliphatic amine cured epoxy for impregnating coils. Methylene dianiline (MDA) has been used for more than 20 years as the curing agent for various epoxy formulations throughout the Department of Energy. Sandia National Laboratories began the process of replacing MDA with other formulations because of regulations imposed by OSHA on the use of MDA.

  10. Electrical properties of epoxies and film resistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sergent, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    The reliability of hybrid microcircuits has been enhanced in recent years by the use of organic adhesives as a replacement for solder and eutectics. The epoxies have been the most effective and widely used material for this application. Methods for measuring the electrical and mechanical properties of epoxies are developed. Data are given for selected conductive adhesives at high and low frequencies. The temperature coefficients of resistance of thick film resistors are presented.

  11. System Description for the K-25/K-27 D&D Project Polyurethane Foam Delivery System, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Boris, G.

    2008-02-21

    The Foam Delivery System used in the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) project for the K-25/K-27 Buildings at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) is comprised of a trailer-mounted Gusmer{reg_sign} H20/35 Pro-TEC Proportioning Unit and the associated equipment to convey electrical power, air, and foam component material to the unit. This high-pressure, plural-component polyurethane foam pouring system will be used to fill process gas and non-process equipment/piping (PGE/P) within the K-25/K-27 Buildings with polyurethane foam to immobilize contaminants prior to removal. The system creates foam by mixing isocyanate and polyol resin (Resin) component materials. Currently, the project plans to utilize up to six foaming units simultaneously during peak foaming activities. Also included in this system description are the foam component material storage containers that will be used for storage of the component material drums in a staging area outside of the K-25/K-27 Buildings. The Foam Delivery System and foam component material storage enclosures (i.e., Foaming Component Protective Enclosures) used to store polymeric methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (PMDI) component material are identified as Safety Significant (SS) Structures, Systems and Components (SSC) in the Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) for the project, Documented Safety Analysis for the K-25 and K-27 Facilities at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, DSA-ET-K-25/K-27-0001.

  12. Investigation of the Dielectric Strength of Syntactic Foam at 77 K under DC Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkel, D.; Puffer, R.; Schnettler, A.

    2014-05-01

    Liquid nitrogen (LN2) based electrical insulation systems for superconducting equipment of electrical power distribution networks are state of the art. Since LN2 is a cryogenic liquid it has some disadvantages when used as insulation. This paper deals with syntactic foam as an alternative insulation system for superconducting apparatus. Syntactic foam is a composite material consisting of a polymeric matrix and embedded hollow microspheres with diameters of several 10 μp?. As hollow microspheres are gas-filled, using those as filling material features significant reductions of the relative permittivity and of the thermal contraction due to cooling the material to liquid nitrogen temperature (LNT, T = 77 K). In this study both an epoxy resin (ER) and an unsaturated polyester resin (UPR) serve as matrix material. The hollow microspheres used in this investigation are made of untreated and silanized glass. The results of measurements of the dielectric DC strength show, that the dielectric strength of all investigated syntactic foam compositions are significantly higher at LNT compared to ambient temperature (AT). Furthermore, the effect of a higher dielectric strength of syntactic foam with silanized glass spheres at ambient temperature vanishes at LNT. Hence, the dielectric strength at LNT is unaffected by silanization of glass microspheres.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of Ti-Ta-Nb-Mn foams.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, C; Guerra, C; Lascano, S; Guzman, D; Rojas, P A; Thirumurugan, M; Bejar, L; Medina, A

    2016-01-01

    The unprecedented increase in human life expectancy have produced profound changes in the prevailing patterns of disease, like the observed increased in degenerative disc diseases, which cause degradation of the bones. Ti-Nb-Ta alloys are promising materials to replace the damaged bone due to their excellent mechanical and corrosion resistance properties. In general metallic foams are widely used for medical application due to their lower elastic moduli compare to bulk materials. In this work we studied the synthesis of 34Nb-29Ta-xMn (x: 2, 4 and 6 wt.% Mn) alloy foams (50% v/v) using ammonium hydrogen carbonate as a space holder. Alloys were produced through mechanical alloying in a planetary mill for 50h. Green compacts were obtained by applying 430 MPa pressure. To remove the space holder from the matrix the green compacts were heated to 180 °C for 1.5h and after sintered at 1300 °C for 3h. Foams were characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning, transmission electron microscopy and optical microscopy. The elastic modulus of the foam was measured as ~30 GPa, and the values are almost equal to the values predicted using various theoretical models. PMID:26478329

  14. Panelized wall system with foam core insulation

    DOEpatents

    Kosny, Jan; Gaskin, Sally

    2009-10-20

    A wall system includes a plurality of wall members, the wall members having a first metal panel, a second metal panel, and an insulating core between the first panel and the second panel. At least one of the first panel and the second panel include ridge portions. The insulating core can be a foam, such as a polyurethane foam. The foam can include at least one opacifier to improve the k-factor of the foam.

  15. Metal-doped organic foam and method of making same. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Rinde, J.A.

    Organic foams having a low density and very small cell size and method for producing same in either a metal-loaded or unloaded (nonmetal loaded) form are described. Metal-doped foams are produced by soaking a polymer gel in an aqueous solution of desired metal salt, soaking the gel successively in a solvent series of decreasing polarity to remove water from the gel and replace it with a solvent of lower polarity with each successive solvent in the series being miscible with the solvents on each side and being saturated with the desired metal salt, and removing the last of the solvents from the gel to produce the desired metal-doped foam having desired density cell size, and metal loading. The unloaded or metal-doped foams can be utilized in a variety of applications requiring low density, small cell size foam. For example, rubidium-doped foam made in accordance with the invention has utility in special applications, such as in x-ray lasers.

  16. Structure design of and experimental research on a two-stage laval foam breaker for foam fluid recycling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin-song; Cao, Pin-lu; Yin, Kun

    2015-07-01

    Environmental, economical and efficient antifoaming technology is the basis for achievement of foam drilling fluid recycling. The present study designed a novel two-stage laval mechanical foam breaker that primarily uses vacuum generated by Coanda effect and Laval principle to break foam. Numerical simulation results showed that the value and distribution of negative pressure of two-stage laval foam breaker were larger than that of the normal foam breaker. Experimental results showed that foam-breaking efficiency of two-stage laval foam breaker was higher than that of normal foam breaker, when gas-to-liquid ratio and liquid flow rate changed. The foam-breaking efficiency of normal foam breaker decreased rapidly with increasing foam stability, whereas the two-stage laval foam breaker remained unchanged. Foam base fluid would be recycled using two-stage laval foam breaker, which would reduce the foam drilling cost sharply and waste disposals that adverse by affect the environment. PMID:26387358

  17. The modifications of epoxy resin and their crystalline polymer particle filled epoxies

    SciTech Connect

    Huei-Hsiung Wang

    1996-12-31

    The chemical linking of the modifier to the epoxy network was overcome by using Bisphenol A, 4,4`-diaminodiphenyl sulphone or benzophenone-tetracarboxylic dianhydride as a coupling agent between the PU and the epoxy oligomer. From the experimental results, it was shown that the values of fracture energy, G{sub IC} for PU-modified epoxy were dependent on the macroglycols and the coupling agents. Scanning electron microscopy and the glass transition temperature were used to assess the morphology and their compatibility of these modified epoxies. It revealed that the ether type (PTMG) of PU modified epoxy showed the present of an aggregated separated phase. However, the ester type (PBA) PU-modified epoxy resin showed a homogenous morphology. In addition, the {Beta}-relaxation of cured epoxy resin showed a more clear two-phase separation existed in Bis-A as a coupling agents. The additive of the semi-crystalline PBT powder was more efficient in fracture energies of epoxy network than that of the Nylon 6,6 powder.

  18. Dynamics of Aqueous Foam Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akhatov, Iskander; McDaniel, J. Gregory; Holt, R. Glynn

    2001-01-01

    We develop a model for the nonlinear oscillations of spherical drops composed of aqueous foam. Beginning with a simple mixture law, and utilizing a mass-conserving bubble-in-cell scheme, we obtain a Rayleigh-Plesset-like equation for the dynamics of bubbles in a foam mixture. The dispersion relation for sound waves in a bubbly liquid is then coupled with a normal modes expansion to derive expressions for the frequencies of eigenmodal oscillations. These eigenmodal (breathing plus higher-order shape modes) frequencies are elicited as a function of the void fraction of the foam. A Mathieu-like equation is obtained for the dynamics of the higher-order shape modes and their parametric coupling to the breathing mode. The proposed model is used to explain recently obtained experimental data.

  19. Foam formation in low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessling, Francis C.; Mcmanus, Samuel P.; Matthews, John; Patel, Darayas

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus that produced the first polyurethane foam in low gravity has been described. The chemicals were mixed together in an apparatus designed for operation in low gravity. Mixing was by means of stirring the chemicals with an electric motor and propeller in a mixing chamber. The apparatus was flown on Consort 1, the first low-gravity materials payload launched by a commercial rocket launch team. The sounding rocket flight produced over 7 min of low gravity during which a polyurethane spheroidal foam of approximately 2300 cu cm was formed. Photographs of the formation of the foam during the flight show the development of the spheroidal form. This begins as a small sphere and grows to approximately a 17-cm-diam spheroid. The apparatus will be flown again on subsequent low-gravity flights.

  20. Microcellular carbon foam and method

    DOEpatents

    Simandl, R.F.; Brown, J.D.

    1993-05-04

    A microcellular carbon foam is characterized by a density in the range of about 30 to 1,000 mg/cm[sup 3], substantially uniform distribution of cell sizes of diameters less than 100 [mu]m with a majority of the cells being of a diameter of less than about 10 [mu]m. The foam has a well interconnected strut morphology providing open porosity, and an expanded d(002) X-ray turbostatic spacing greater than 3.50 angstroms. The precursor for the carbon foam is prepared by the phase inversion of polyacrylonitrile in a solution consisting essentially of at least one alkali metal halide and a phase inversion solvent for the polyacrylonitrile.

  1. Foam: The "Right Stuff" for Extreme Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Imi-Tech Corporation, in cooperation with Johnson Space Center, introduced the Solimide AC-500 series of polyimide foam products designed to meet the needs of the aircraft/aerospace industry. These foams accomodate the requirements of state-of-the-art insulation systems. Solimide polyimide foams are currently used in defense, industrial and commercial applications.

  2. Foams for barriers and nonlethal weapons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rand, Peter B.

    1997-01-01

    Our times demand better solutions to conflict resolution than simply shooting someone. Because of this, police and military interest in non-lethal concepts is high. Already in use are pepper sprays, bean-bag guns, flash-bang grenades, and rubber bullets. At Sandia we got a head start on non- lethal weapon concepts. Protection of nuclear materials required systems that went way beyond the traditional back vault. Dispensable deterrents were used to allow a graduated response to a threat. Sticky foams and stabilized aqueous foams were developed to provide access delay. Foams won out for security systems simply because you could get a large volume from a small container. For polymeric foams the expansion ratio is thirty to fifty to one. In aqueous foams expansion ratios of one thousand to ne are easily obtained. Recent development work on sticky foams has included a changeover to environmentally friendly solvents, foams with very low toxicity, and the development of non-flammable silicone resin based foams. High expansion aqueous foams are useful visual and aural obscurants. Our recent aqueous foam development has concentrated on using very low toxicity foaming agents combined with oleoresin capsicum irritant to provide a safe but highly irritating foam.

  3. Highly concentrated foam formulation for blast mitigation

    DOEpatents

    Tucker, Mark D.; Gao, Huizhen

    2010-12-14

    A highly concentrated foam formulation for blast suppression and dispersion mitigation for use in responding to a terrorism incident involving a radiological dispersion device. The foam formulation is more concentrated and more stable than the current blast suppression foam (AFC-380), which reduces the logistics burden on the user.

  4. Foam vessel for cryogenic fluid storage

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, Jonathan D

    2011-07-05

    Cryogenic storage and separator vessels made of polyolefin foams are disclosed, as are methods of storing and separating cryogenic fluids and fluid mixtures using these vessels. In one embodiment, the polyolefin foams may be cross-linked, closed-cell polyethylene foams with a density of from about 2 pounds per cubic foot to a density of about 4 pounds per cubic foot.

  5. Process for Preparing Epoxy-Reinforced Silica Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    One-pot reaction process for preparing epoxy-reinforced monolithic silica aerogels comprising the reaction of at least one silicon compound selected from the group consisting of alkoxysilanes, orthosilicates and combination thereof in any ratio with effective amounts of an epoxy monomer and an aminoalkoxy silane to obtain an epoxy monomer-silica sol in solution, subsequently preparing an epoxy-monomer silica gel from said silica sol solution followed by initiating polymerization of the epoxy monomer to obtain the epoxy-reinforced monolithic silica aerogel.

  6. Evaluation of roughness and micromorphology of epoxy paint on cobalt-chromium alloy before and after thermal cycling.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Alessandra Cardoso da Silva; Muzilli, Carlos Alberto; Miranda, Milton Edson; Flório, Flávia Martão; Basting, Roberta Tarkany

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that the epoxy paint used to coat metal substrates in industrial electrostatic painting applications could also be used to mask metal clasps in removable dental prostheses (RDP). The purpose of this study was to evaluate both the influence of thermal cycling and the in vitro roughness of a surface after application of epoxy paint, as well as to assess the micromorphology of a cobalt-chromium (CoCr) based metal structure. Sixty test specimens were fabricated from a CoCr alloy. The specimens were separated into three groups (n = 20) according to surface treatment: Group 1 (Pol) - polished with abrasive stone and rubbers; Group 2 (Pol+Epo) - polished and coated with epoxy paint; Group 3 (Epo) - air-abraded with aluminum oxide particles and coated with epoxy paint. The surface roughness was evaluated before and after 1000 thermal cycles (5°C and 50°C). The surface micromorphology was verified by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The two-way repeated measures ANOVA showed significant differences among surface treatments (p < 0.0001), but no difference was found before and after thermal cycling (p = 0.6638). The CoCr-based metal alloy surfaces treated with epoxy paint (Groups 2 and 3) were rougher than the surfaces that were only polished (Group 1). Thermal cycling did not influence surface roughness, or lead to chipping or detachment of the epoxy paint. PMID:23538429

  7. Physical aging and its influence on the reliability of network epoxies and epoxy-matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinemann, K.

    1983-01-01

    The matrix-dominated physical and mechanical properties of a carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composite and a neat epoxy resin were found to be affected by sub-Tg annealing in nitrogen and dark atmosphere. Postcured specimens of Thornel 300 carbon-fiber/Fiberite 934 epoxy as well as Fiberite 934 epoxy resin were quenched from above Tg and given annealing at 140 C, 110 C, or 80 C, for time up to one-hundred thousand minutes. No weight loss was observed during annealing at these temperatures. Significant variations were found in density, modulus, hardness, damping, moisture absorption ability, thermal expansivity. Moisture-epoxy interactious were also studied. The kinetics of aging as well as the molecular aggregation during this densification process were monitored by differential scanning calorimetry, dynamic mechanical analysis, density gradient column, microhardness tester, Instron, and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  8. OpenFOAM for beginners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedyalkov, Ivaylo; Wosnik, Martin

    2015-11-01

    OpenFOAM has gained significant popularity in academia and industry, but is still not widely introduced to CFD novices - e.g., undergraduate students. This is likely due to the steep learning curve of the software. A relatively short tutorial was developed to introduce students to the basic features of OpenFOAM, allowing them to modify and create simulations, and to better understand other online resources. The tutorial has been successfully introduced to students working on undergraduate capstone projects at the University of New Hampshire and parts of it were presented at a tech-camp for K-12 students.

  9. Thermal Expansion of Polyurethane Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, Bradley A.; Sullivan, Roy M.

    2006-01-01

    Closed cell foams are often used for thermal insulation. In the case of the Space Shuttle, the External Tank uses several thermal protection systems to maintain the temperature of the cryogenic fuels. A few of these systems are polyurethane, closed cell foams. In an attempt to better understand the foam behavior on the tank, we are in the process of developing and improving thermal-mechanical models for the foams. These models will start at the microstructural level and progress to the overall structural behavior of the foams on the tank. One of the key properties for model characterization and verification is thermal expansion. Since the foam is not a material, but a structure, the modeling of the expansion is complex. It is also exacerbated by the anisoptropy of the material. During the spraying and foaming process, the cells become elongated in the rise direction and this imparts different properties in the rise direction than in the transverse directions. Our approach is to treat the foam as a two part structure consisting of the polymeric cell structure and the gas inside the cells. The polymeric skeleton has a thermal expansion of its own which is derived from the basic polymer chemistry. However, a major contributor to the thermal expansion is the volume change associated with the gas inside of the closed cells. As this gas expands it exerts pressure on the cell walls and changes the shape and size of the cells. The amount that this occurs depends on the elastic and viscoplastic properties of the polymer skeleton. The more compliant the polymeric skeleton, the more influence the gas pressure has on the expansion. An additional influence on the expansion process is that the polymeric skeleton begins to breakdown at elevated temperatures and releases additional gas species into the cell interiors, adding to the gas pressure. The fact that this is such a complex process makes thermal expansion ideal for testing the models. This report focuses on the thermal

  10. Heat exchanger using graphite foam

    SciTech Connect

    Campagna, Michael Joseph; Callas, James John

    2012-09-25

    A heat exchanger is disclosed. The heat exchanger may have an inlet configured to receive a first fluid and an outlet configured to discharge the first fluid. The heat exchanger may further have at least one passageway configured to conduct the first fluid from the inlet to the outlet. The at least one passageway may be composed of a graphite foam and a layer of graphite material on the exterior of the graphite foam. The layer of graphite material may form at least a partial barrier between the first fluid and a second fluid external to the at least one passageway.

  11. Microcellular carbon foam and method

    DOEpatents

    Simandl, R.F.; Brown, J.D.

    1993-12-07

    A microcellular carbon foam is characterized by a density in the range of about 30 to 1000 mg/cm[sup 3], substantially uniform distribution of cell sizes of diameters less than 100 [mu]m with a majority of the cells being of a diameter of less than about 10 [mu]m, well interconnected strut morphology providing open porosity, and an expanded d(002) X-ray turbostatic spacing greater than 3.50 angstroms. The precursor for the carbon foam is prepared by the phase inversion of polyacrylonitrile in a solution consisting essentially of at least one alkali metal halide and a phase inversion solvent for the polyacrylonitrile.

  12. Microcellular carbon foam and method

    DOEpatents

    Simandl, Ronald F.; Brown, John D.

    1993-01-01

    A microcellular carbon foam characterized by a density in the range of about 30 to 1000 mg/cm.sup.3, substantially uniform distribution of cell sizes of diameters less than 100 .mu.m with a majority of the cells being of a diameter of less than about 10 .mu.m, well interconnected strut morphology providing open porosity, and an expanded d(002) X-ray turbostatic spacing greater than 3.50 angstroms. The precursor for the carbon foam is prepared by the phase inversion of polyacrylonitrile in a solution consisting essentially of at least one alkali metal halide and a phase inversion solvent for the polyacrylonitrile.

  13. Microcellular carbon foam and method

    DOEpatents

    Simandl, Ronald F.; Brown, John D.

    1994-01-01

    A microcellular carbon foam characterized by a density in the range of about 30 to 1000 mg/cm.sup.3, substantially uniform distribution of cell sizes of diameters less than 100 .mu.m with a majority of the cells being of a diameter of less than about 10 .mu.m, well interconnected strut morphology providing open porosity, and an expanded d(002) X-ray turbostatic spacing greater than 3.50 angstroms. The precursor for the carbon foam is prepared by the phase inversion of polyacrylonitrile in a solution consisting essentially of at least one alkali metal halide and a phase inversion solvent for the polyacrylonitrile.

  14. Processing and properties of advanced metallic foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brothers, Alan Harold

    Since the development of the first aluminum foams in the middle of the 20th century [178], great advances have been made in the processing and fundamental understanding of metallic foams. As a result of these advances, metallic foams are now penetrating a number of applications where their unique suite of properties makes them superior to solid materials, such as lightweight structures, packaging and impact protection, and filtration and catalysis [3]. The purpose of this work is to extend the use of metallic foams in such applications by expanding their processing to include more sophisticated base alloys and architectures. The first four chapters discuss replacement of conventional crystalline metal foams with ones made from high-strength, low-melting amorphous metals, a substitution that offers potential for achieving mechanical properties superior to those of the best crystalline metal foams, without sacrificing the simplicity of processing methods made for low-melting crystalline alloys. Three different amorphous metal foams are developed in these chapters, and their structures and properties characterized. It is shown for the first time that amorphous metal foams, due to stabilization of shear bands during bending of their small strut-like features, are capable of compressive ductility comparable to that of ductile crystalline metal foams. A two-fold improvement in mechanical energy absorption relative to crystalline aluminum foams is shown experimentally to result from this stabilization. The last two chapters discuss modifications in foam processing that are designed to introduce controllable and continuous gradients in local foam density, which should improve mass efficiency by mimicking the optimized structures found in natural cellular materials [64], as well as facilitate the bonding and joining of foams with solid materials in higher-order structures. Two new processing methods are developed, one based on replication of nonuniformly-compressed polymer

  15. Low density, microcellular foams, preparation, and articles

    DOEpatents

    Young, Ainslie T.; Marsters, Robert G.; Moreno, Dawn K.

    1984-01-01

    A microcellular low density foam of poly(4-methyl-1-pentene) which is particularly useful for forming targets for inertial confinement fusion has been developed. Articles made from the foam have been machined to tolerances of 0.0001 inch, although the densities of the fragile foam are low (about 10 to about 100 mg/cc) and the cell sizes are small (about 10 to about 30 .mu.m). Methods for forming the foam and articles are given; and the yield strength of the foam of the invention is higher than was obtained in other structures of this same material.

  16. Foaming dynamics in Hele-Shaw cells.

    PubMed

    Caps, H; Vandewalle, N; Broze, G

    2006-06-01

    We have studied foaming dynamics in Hele-Shaw cells partially filled with a soap and water mixture. A series of upside-down flips produces an intermittent wetting of the cell and leads to foam formation. As a function of the number of flips, an increasing number of bubbles composes the foam, until saturation is observed. Statistical analysis shows that the bubble size follows a Gamma distribution. Contrary to common belief, this foaming dynamics by "shaking" creates homogeneous foam, even though the system may pass through transient heterogeneous configurations. A mechanistic interpretation is proposed and included into a theoretical model. PMID:16906898

  17. Fluid Physics of Foam Evolution and Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aref, H.; Thoroddsen, S. T.; Sullivan, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    The grant supported theoretical, numerical and experimental work focused on the elucidation of the fluid physics of foam structure, evolution and flow. The experimental work concentrated on these subject areas: (a) Measurements of the speed of reconnections within a foam; (b) statistics of bubble rearrangements; and (c) three-dimensional reconstruction of the foam structure. On the numerical simulation and theory side our efforts concentrated on the subjects: (a) simulation techniques for 2D and 3D foams; (b) phase transition in a compressible foam; and (c) TCP structures.

  18. Low density, microcellular foams, preparation, and articles

    DOEpatents

    Young, A.T.

    1982-03-03

    A microcellular low-density foam of poly(4-methyl-1-pentene) particularly useful for forming targets for inertial confinement fusion has been developed. Articles made from the foam have been machined to tolerances of 0.0001 inch, although the densities of the fragile foam are low (about 10 to about 100 mg/cc) and the cell sizes are small (about 10 to about 30 ..mu..m). Methods for forming the foam and articles are given. The yield strength of the foam of the invention is higher than was obtained in other structures of this same material.

  19. High temperature structural, polymeric foams from high internal emulsion polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Hoisington, M.A.; Duke, J.R.; Apen, P.G.

    1996-02-01

    In 1982, a high internal phase emulsion (HIPE) polymerization process to manufacture microcellular, polymeric foam systems was patented by Unilever. This patent discloses a polymerization process that occurs in a water-in-oil emulsion in which the water represents at least 76% of the emulsion by volume. The oil phase consists of vinyl monomers such as styrene and acrylates that are crosslinked by divinyl monomers during polymerization. After polymerization and drying to remove the water phase, the result is a crosslinked polymer foam with an open cell microstructure that is homogeneous throughout in terms of morphology, density, and mechanical properties. Since 1982, numerous patents have examined various HIPE polymerized foam processing techniques and applications that include absorbents for body fluids, cleaning materials, and ion exchange systems. All the published HIPE polymerized foams have concentrated on materials for low temperature applications. Copolymerization of styrene with maleic anhydride and N-substituted maleimides to produce heat resistant thermoplastics has been studied extensively. These investigations have shown that styrene will free radically copolymerize with N-substituted maleimides to create an alternating thermoplastic copolymer with a Tg of approximately 200{degrees}C. However, there are many difficulties in attempting the maleimide styrene copolymerization in a HIPE such as lower polymerization temperatures, maleimide solubility difficulties in both styrene and water, and difficulty obtaining a stable HIPE with a styrene/maleimide oil phase. This work describes the preparation of copolymer foams from N-ethylmaleimide and Bis(3-ethyl-5-methyl-4-maleimide-phenyl)methane with styrene based monomers and crosslinking agents.

  20. Evaluation of atomic oxygen resistant protective coatings for fiberglass-epoxy composites in LEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.; Paulsen, Phillip E.; Brady, Joyce A.

    1989-01-01

    Fiberglass-epoxy composite masts are the prime structural members for the Space Station Freedom solar array. At the altitude where Space Station Freedom will operate, atomic oxygen atoms are the most predominant species. Atomic oxygen is highly reactive and has been shown to oxidize organic and some metallic materials. Tests with random and directed atomic oxygen exposure have shown that the epoxy is removed from the composite exposing brittle glass fibers which could be easily removed from the surface where they could contaminate Space Station Freedom Systems. Protection or fiber containment systems; inorganic based paints, aluminum braid, and a metal coating; were evaluated for resistance to atomic oxygen, vacuum ultraviolet radiation, thermal cycling, and mechanical flexing. All appeared to protect well against atomic oxygen and provide fiber containment except for the single aluminum braid covering. UV radiation resistance was acceptable and in general, thermal cycling and flexure had little to no effect on the mass loss rate for most coatings.

  1. Bio-based Polymer Foam from Soyoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnaillie, Laetitia M.; Wool, Richard P.

    2006-03-01

    The growing bio-based polymeric foam industry is presently lead by plant oil-based polyols for polyurethanes and starch foams. We developed a new resilient, thermosetting foam system with a bio-based content higher than 80%. The acrylated epoxidized soybean oil and its fatty acid monomers is foamed with pressurized carbon dioxide and cured with free-radical initiators. The foam structure and pore dynamics are highly dependent on the temperature, viscosity and extent of reaction. Low-temperature cure hinds the destructive pore coalescence and the application of a controlled vacuum results in foams with lower densities ˜ 0.1 g/cc, but larger cells. We analyze the physics of foam formation and stability, as well as the structure and mechanical properties of the cured foam using rigidity percolation theory. The parameters studied include temperature, vacuum applied, and cross-link density. Additives bring additional improvements: nucleating agents and surfactants help produce foams with a high concentration of small cells and low bulk density. Hard and soft thermosetting foams with a bio content superior to 80% are successfully produced and tested. Potential applications include foam-core composites for hurricane-resistant housing, structural reinforcement for windmill blades, and tissue scaffolds.

  2. Pressure-Induced Foaming of Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Moreno, Francisco; Mukherjee, Manas; Jiménez, Catalina; Banhart, John

    2015-05-01

    Pressure-induced foaming (PIF) of metals is a foaming technique in which blowing agent free compacted metal powders are foamed. The method consists of heating hot-compacted metallic precursors to above their melting temperature under gas overpressure and foaming them by pressure release. This study focuses on PIF of Al99.7 and AlSi7 alloys under both air or Ar and overpressures up to 9 bar. In situ x-ray radioscopy allows us to follow the foaming process and to perform quantitative analyses of expansion, foam morphology, and coalescence rate. Mass spectrometry helps to identify hydrogen as the foaming gas. Adsorbates on the former powder particles are found to be the primary gas source. Various advantages of this new method are identified and discussed.

  3. Foam shell cryogenic ICF target

    DOEpatents

    Darling, Dale H.

    1987-01-01

    A uniform cryogenic layer of DT fuel is maintained in a fusion target having a low density, small pore size, low Z rigid foam shell saturated with liquid DT fuel. Capillary action prevents gravitational slumping of the fuel layer. The saturated shell may be cooled to produce a solid fuel layer.

  4. Open-celled polyurethane foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, L. W.

    1970-01-01

    Open-celled polyurethane foam has a density of 8.3 pounds per cubic foot and a compressive strength of 295 to 325 psi. It is useful as a porous spacer in layered insulation and as an insulation material in vacuum tight systems.

  5. "Grinding" cavities in polyurethane foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brower, J. R.; Davey, R. E.; Dixon, W. F.; Robb, P. H.; Zebus, P. P.

    1980-01-01

    Grinding tool installed on conventional milling machine cuts precise cavities in foam blocks. Method is well suited for prototype or midsize production runs and can be adapted to computer control for mass production. Method saves time and materials compared to bonding or hot wire techniques.

  6. Multiscale modelling of evolving foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saye, R. I.; Sethian, J. A.

    2016-06-01

    We present a set of multi-scale interlinked algorithms to model the dynamics of evolving foams. These algorithms couple the key effects of macroscopic bubble rearrangement, thin film drainage, and membrane rupture. For each of the mechanisms, we construct consistent and accurate algorithms, and couple them together to work across the wide range of space and time scales that occur in foam dynamics. These algorithms include second order finite difference projection methods for computing incompressible fluid flow on the macroscale, second order finite element methods to solve thin film drainage equations in the lamellae and Plateau borders, multiphase Voronoi Implicit Interface Methods to track interconnected membrane boundaries and capture topological changes, and Lagrangian particle methods for conservative liquid redistribution during rearrangement and rupture. We derive a full set of numerical approximations that are coupled via interface jump conditions and flux boundary conditions, and show convergence for the individual mechanisms. We demonstrate our approach by computing a variety of foam dynamics, including coupled evolution of three-dimensional bubble clusters attached to an anchored membrane and collapse of a foam cluster.

  7. Positivity of spin foam amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baez, John C.; Christensen, J. Daniel

    2002-04-01

    The amplitude for a spin foam in the Barrett-Crane model of Riemannian quantum gravity is given as a product over its vertices, edges and faces, with one factor of the Riemannian 10j symbols appearing for each vertex, and simpler factors for the edges and faces. We prove that these amplitudes are always nonnegative for closed spin foams. As a corollary, all open spin foams going between a fixed pair of spin networks have real amplitudes of the same sign. This means one can use the Metropolis algorithm to compute expectation values of observables in the Riemannian Barrett-Crane model, as in statistical mechanics, even though this theory is based on a real-time (eiS) rather than imaginary-time e-S path integral. Our proof uses the fact that when the Riemannian 10j symbols are nonzero, their sign is positive or negative depending on whether the sum of the ten spins is an integer or half-integer. For the product of 10j symbols appearing in the amplitude for a closed spin foam, these signs cancel. We conclude with some numerical evidence suggesting that the Lorentzian 10j symbols are always nonnegative, which would imply similar results for the Lorentzian Barrett-Crane model.

  8. Electrical properties of epoxies used in hybrid microelectronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stout, C. W.

    1976-01-01

    The electrical properties and basic characteristics of the structure of conductive epoxies were studied. The results of the experimental work performed to measure the electrical properties of epoxies are presented.

  9. Laser-based coatings removal

    SciTech Connect

    Freiwald, J.G.; Freiwald, D.A.

    1995-10-01

    Over the years as building and equipment surfaces became contaminated with low levels of uranium or plutonium dust, coats of paint were applied to stabilize the contaminants in place. Most of the earlier paint used was lead-based paint. More recently, various non-lead-based paints, such as two-part epoxy, are used. For D&D (decontamination and decommissioning), it is desirable to remove the paints or other coatings rather than having to tear down and dispose of the entire building. This report describes the use of pulse-repetetion laser systems for the removal of paints and coatings.

  10. RADIATION EFFECTS ON EPOXY CARBON FIBER COMPOSITE

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E

    2008-05-30

    Carbon fiber-reinforced bisphenol-A epoxy matrix composite was evaluated for gamma radiation resistance. The composite was exposed to total gamma doses of 50, 100, and 200 Mrad. Irradiated and baseline samples were tested for tensile strength, hardness and evaluated using FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) spectroscopy and DSC (differential scanning calorimetry) for structural changes. Scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate microstructural behavior. Mechanical testing of the composite bars revealed no apparent change in modulus, strain to failure, or fracture strength after exposures. However, testing of only the epoxy matrix revealed changes in hardness, thermal properties, and FTIR results with increasing gamma irradiation. The results suggest the epoxy within the composite can be affected by exposure to gamma irradiation.

  11. Free-volume characteristics of epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Eftekhari, Abe; Shultz, William J.; St.clair, Terry L.

    1992-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy was used to measure free-volume characteristics of selected epoxies. Fluorene resins, a new family of high-temperature thermosetting resins, were selected as the test medium. Experimental results indicate that the free-volume cell size V sub f varies with the molecular weight between the cross-links M sub c according to an equation of the form V sub f = AM sub c sup B, where A and B are structural constants. In two of the samples, the concentration of bulky fluorene groups was increased in the network backbone by replacement of some of the conventional bisphenol A epoxy resin with fluorene-derived epoxy resin. This resulted in an increase in their glass transition temperature for a given level of cross-linking. It was found that in these samples, the Doppler broadening of the annihilation peak decreases with the increasing fluorene content, presumably due to enhanced damping of the chain motions.

  12. Microwave assisted pultrusion of an epoxy composite

    SciTech Connect

    Methven, J.M.; Abidin, A.Z.

    1995-12-01

    A 6mm diameter cylindrical profile based on E-glass fibers and a BF{sub 3}-triamine-epoxy resin system has been manufactured by Microwave Assisted Pultrusion (MAP) using a single mode resonant microwave cavity operating in a TM{sub 010} mode at 2450 MHz. Power transfer is at least 70% and pulling speeds of more than 2m/minute have been achieved for a power input of about 800W. The results are consistent with earlier MAP studies using unsaturated polyesters, epoxies urethane acrylates and vinyl esters. The results provide a sound basis for proposing the use of this type of epoxy system as a material that is suitable for a high speed gel-cure pultrusion process that uses both a microwave heating cavity and a conventional pultrusion die.

  13. Physical aging in graphite epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kong, E. S. W.

    1981-01-01

    The matrix dominated mechanical behavior of a graphite epoxy composite was found to be affected by sub Tg annealing. Postcured + or - 45 deg 4S specimens of Thornel 300 graphite/Narmco 5208 epoxy were quenched from above Tg and given a sub Tg annealing at 140 C for times up to 10 to the 5th power min. The ultimate tensile strength, strain to break, and toughness of the composite material were found to decrease as functions of sub Tg annealing time. No weight loss was observed during the sub Tg annealing. The time dependent change in mechanical behavior is explained on the basis of free volume changes that are related to the physical aging of the nonequilibrium glassy network epoxy. The results imply possible changes in composite properties with service time.

  14. Free-volume characteristics of epoxies

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, J.J.; Eftekhari, A.; Shultz, W.J.; St.Clair, T.L.

    1992-09-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy was used to measure free-volume characteristics of selected epoxies. Fluorene resins, a new family of high-temperature thermosetting resins, were selected as the test medium. Experimental results indicate that the free-volume cell size V sub f varies with the molecular weight between the cross-links M sub c according to an equation of the form V sub f = AM sub c sup B, where A and B are structural constants. In two of the samples, the concentration of bulky fluorene groups was increased in the network backbone by replacement of some of the conventional bisphenol A epoxy resin with fluorene-derived epoxy resin. This resulted in an increase in their glass transition temperature for a given level of cross-linking. It was found that in these samples, the Doppler broadening of the annihilation peak decreases with the increasing fluorene content, presumably due to enhanced damping of the chain motions.

  15. Biodegradable Epoxy Networks Cured with Polypeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Shigeo; Kramer, Edward J.

    2006-03-01

    Epoxy resins are used widely for adhesives as well as coatings. However, once cured they are usually highly cross-linked and are not biodegradable. To obtain potentially biodegradable polypeptides that can cure with epoxy resins and achieve as good properties as the conventional phenol novolac hardeners, poly(succinimide-co-tyrosine) was synthesized by thermal polycondensation of L-aspartic acid and L-tyrosine with phosphoric acid under reduced pressure. The tyrosine/succinimide ratio in the polypeptide was always lower than the tyrosine/(aspartic acid) feed ratio and was influenced by the synthesis conditions. Poly(succinimide-tyrosine- phenylalanine) was also synthesized from L-aspartic acid, L- tyrosine and L-phenylalanine. The thermal and mechanical properties of epoxy resins cured with these polypeptides are comparable to those of similar resins cured with conventional hardeners. In addition, enzymatic degradability tests showed that Chymotrypsin or Subtilisin A could cleave cured films in an alkaline borate buffer.

  16. Chromium Ions Improve Moisure Resistance of Epoxy Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, A. K.; St. Clair, T. L.; Stoakley, D. M.; Singh, J. J.; Sprinkle, D. R.

    1986-01-01

    Broad spectrum of thermosetting epoxy resins used on commercial and military aircraft, primarily as composite matrices and adhesives. In new technique, chromium-ion containing epoxy with improved resistance to moisture produced where chromium ions believed to prevent absorption of water molecules by coordinating themselves to hydroxyl groups on epoxy chain. Anticipated that improved epoxy formulation useful as composite matrix resin, adhesive, or casting resin for applications on commercial and advanced aircraft. Improvement made without sacrifice in mechanical properties of polymer.

  17. Thermal properties of epoxy composites filled with boric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visakh, P. M.; Nazarenko, O. B.; Amelkovich, Yu A.; Melnikova, T. V.

    2015-04-01

    The thermal properties of epoxy composites filled with boric acid fine powder at different percentage were studied. Epoxy composites were prepared using epoxy resin ED-20, boric acid as flame-retardant filler, hexamethylenediamine as a curing agent. The prepared samples and starting materials were examined using methods of thermal analysis, scanning electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy. It was found that the incorporation of boric acid fine powder enhances the thermal stability of epoxy composites.

  18. Evaluation of epoxy systems for use in SBASI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coultas, T. J.

    1971-01-01

    The purpose of the test program was to evaluate the performance of different epoxy systems as replacements for existing epoxy systems in the SBASI. The three areas of investigation were the connector shell potting, the epoxy tape under the charge cup, and the epoxy impregnated fiberglass over the output charge. Factors considered, in addition to performance, were availability, shelf life, pot life, and effect on producibility and cost.

  19. Effects of epoxy/hardener stoichiometry on structures and properties of a diethanolamine-cured epoxy encapsulant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. F.; Xiao, M. Z.; Wu, Z.; Peng, K.; Han, C. M.; Xiang, W.; Dai, J. Y.

    2016-07-01

    For the epoxy encapsulant cured by diethanolamine, optimal epoxy/hardener stoichiometry could hardly be predicted due to the complex curing mechanisms. In this paper, the influences of stoichiometry were investigated by FTIR, DMA and tensile testing. The results showed that stoichiometry has a dominating effect on both Tg and tensile properties of the cured epoxy. The largest Tg , highest crosslink density as well as excellent ductility appeared in epoxy encapsulant cured with 14 wt% diethanolmine. When the content of diethanolamine was lower than 14 wt%, epoxy encapsulants showed smaller glycidyl conversion even with long-duration post-cure. Larger tensile strength and modulus were also observed in the glycidyl-rich epoxies, which could be explained by anti-plasticization effect. The amine-rich epoxy, however, had extremely high glycidyl conversion and presented brittle tensile behavior. A diethanolamine content of 12-14 wt% for the epoxy encapsulant is suggested to obtain optimal thermal and tensile properties.

  20. Microstructural characterization of in situ MXCT images of high density foams under large strains

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Brian M; Gleiman, Seth; Marks, Trevor G; Milstein, Fredrick

    2009-01-01

    examples of their application to the MXCT images of foams. Operations of the computer program include noise removal (smoothing), thresholding [7], edge detection [8], distance transformation [9, 10], pore detection via a Hough transformation [11], and skeletonization [12]. Strut parameters, such as the strut cross-sectional area and strut arrangement, are calculated from a skeleton-based model of the MXCT images. The Hough transform is a feature detection method used primarily in image analysis applications. We use this transform to detect and calculate pore parameters, such as pore arrangement and pore size distribution. The experiments and calculations are performed in order to develop data for the formulation of theory that links foam mechanical behavior specifically to the microstructure of high relative-density foams, not just simply to the relative-density of the foam.

  1. A novel technique for evaluating foam dynamics in anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Park, C; Hermanowicz, S W; Jolis, D

    2013-01-01

    Foaming in anaerobic digesters has severe impacts on process efficiency and operational costs. In this study, we present an experimental method to determine foam behaviour and stability for various foaming solutions. This novel technique measured foam conductivity at different heights along a foam column allowing changes in foam composition to be monitored in time. We analysed foam stability which is primarily dependent on the foam drainage velocity, a quantity that can be determined from forced drainage experiments. The drainage velocity increased in the presence of anaerobic digester sludge, compared to simple surfactant foam. We proposed a new understanding of the effect of sludge particles on the foam stability. Both physical properties (foam physical constant, β) of foam and bubble surface interactions by applying stable and unstable foam in addition of surfactants are also evaluated and discussed. PMID:23752394

  2. 40 CFR 721.2752 - Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Epoxy resin containing phosphorus... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2752 Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic). (a) Chemical substance... epoxy resin containing phosphorus (PMN P-00-912) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  3. 40 CFR 721.2752 - Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Epoxy resin containing phosphorus... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2752 Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic). (a) Chemical substance... epoxy resin containing phosphorus (PMN P-00-912) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  4. 40 CFR 721.2752 - Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Epoxy resin containing phosphorus... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2752 Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic). (a) Chemical substance... epoxy resin containing phosphorus (PMN P-00-912) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  5. 40 CFR 721.3140 - Vinyl epoxy ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Vinyl epoxy ester. 721.3140 Section... Substances § 721.3140 Vinyl epoxy ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance vinyl epoxy ester (PMN P-85-527) is subject to reporting under...

  6. 40 CFR 721.3140 - Vinyl epoxy ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Vinyl epoxy ester. 721.3140 Section... Substances § 721.3140 Vinyl epoxy ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance vinyl epoxy ester (PMN P-85-527) is subject to reporting under...

  7. 40 CFR 721.3140 - Vinyl epoxy ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Vinyl epoxy ester. 721.3140 Section... Substances § 721.3140 Vinyl epoxy ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance vinyl epoxy ester (PMN P-85-527) is subject to reporting under...

  8. Kevlar 49/Epoxy COPV Aging Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, James K.; Salem, Jonathan L.; Thesken, John C.; Russell, Richard W.; Littell, Justin; Ruggeri, Charles; Leifeste, Mark R.

    2008-01-01

    NASA initiated an effort to determine if the aging of Kevlar 49/Epoxy composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPV) affected their performance. This study briefly reviews the history and certification of composite pressure vessels employed on NASA Orbiters. Tests to evaluate overwrap tensile strength changes compared 30 year old samples from Orbiter vessels to new Kevlar/Epoxy pressure vessel materials. Other tests include transverse compression and thermal analyses (glass transition and moduli). Results from these tests do not indicate a noticeable effect due to aging of the overwrap materials.

  9. Control of pore size in epoxy systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, Patricia Sue; Lenhart, Joseph Ludlow; Lee, Elizabeth; Kallam, Alekhya; Majumdar, Partha; Dirk, Shawn M.; Gubbins, Nathan; Chisholm, Bret J.; Celina, Mathias Christopher; Bahr, James; Klein, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Both conventional and combinatorial approaches were used to study the pore formation process in epoxy based polymer systems. Sandia National Laboratories conducted the initial work and collaborated with North Dakota State University (NDSU) using a combinatorial research approach to produce a library of novel monomers and crosslinkers capable of forming porous polymers. The library was screened to determine the physical factors that control porosity, such as porogen loading, polymer-porogen interactions, and polymer crosslink density. We have identified the physical and chemical factors that control the average porosity, pore size, and pore size distribution within epoxy based systems.

  10. Electroactive polymer gels based on epoxy resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samui, A. B.; Jayakumar, S.; Jayalakshmi, C. G.; Pandey, K.; Sivaraman, P.

    2007-04-01

    Five types of epoxy gels have been synthesized from common epoxy resins and hardeners. Fumed silica and nanoclay, respectively, were used as fillers and butyl methacrylate/acrylamide were used as monomer(s) for making interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs) in three compositions. Swelling study, tensile property evaluation, dynamic mechanical thermal analysis, thermo-gravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy and electroactive property evaluation were done. The gels have sufficient mechanical strength and the time taken for bending to 20° was found to be 22 min for forward bias whereas it was just 12 min for reverse bias.

  11. Interphase tailoring in graphite-epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramanian, R. V.; Sanadi, A. R.; Crasto, A. S.

    1988-01-01

    The fiber-matrix interphase in graphite fiber-epoxy matrix composites is presently modified through the electrodeposition of a coating of the polymer poly(styrene-comaleic anhydride), or 'SMA' on the graphite fibers; optimum conditions have been established for the achievement of the requisite thin, uniform coatings, as verified by SEM. A single-fiber composite test has shown the SMA coating to result in an interfacial shear strength to improve by 50 percent over commercially treated fibers without sacrifice in impact strength. It is suggested that the epoxy resin's superior penetration into the SMA interphase results in a tougher fiber/matrix interface which possesses intrinsic energy-absorbing mechanisms.

  12. Glycolysis of carbon fiber-epoxy unidirectional mat catalysed by sodium hydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaini, Mariana Binti Mohd; Badri, Khairiah Haji

    2014-09-01

    This study was conducted to recycle carbon fibre-epoxy (CFRP) composite in woven sheet/ mat form. The CFRP was recycled through glycolysis with polyethlyene glycol (PEG 200) as the solvent. The CFRP was loaded into the solvent at a ratio of 4:1 (w/w). PEG200 was diluted with water to a ratio of 80:20 (v/v). This reaction was catalysed by sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution with varying concentrations at 1.5, 1.7 and 1.9% (w/v). The glycolysis was conducted at 180-190 °C. The recovered CF (rCF) was analysed using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray (EDX) while the degraded solution was analysed using FTIR and the epoxy content was determined. The FTIR spectrum of the rCF exhibited the disappearance of the COC peak belonged to epoxy and supported by the SEM micrographs that showed clear rCF. On the other hand, the analysed filtrate detected the disappearance of oxygen peak element in the EDX spectrum for all rCF samples. This gave an indication that the epoxy resin has been removed from the surface of the carbon fiber.

  13. Glycolysis of carbon fiber-epoxy unidirectional mat catalysed by sodium hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Zaini, Mariana Binti Mohd; Badri, Khairiah Haji

    2014-09-03

    This study was conducted to recycle carbon fibre-epoxy (CFRP) composite in woven sheet/ mat form. The CFRP was recycled through glycolysis with polyethlyene glycol (PEG 200) as the solvent. The CFRP was loaded into the solvent at a ratio of 4:1 (w/w). PEG200 was diluted with water to a ratio of 80:20 (v/v). This reaction was catalysed by sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution with varying concentrations at 1.5, 1.7 and 1.9% (w/v). The glycolysis was conducted at 180-190 °C. The recovered CF (rCF) was analysed using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray (EDX) while the degraded solution was analysed using FTIR and the epoxy content was determined. The FTIR spectrum of the rCF exhibited the disappearance of the COC peak belonged to epoxy and supported by the SEM micrographs that showed clear rCF. On the other hand, the analysed filtrate detected the disappearance of oxygen peak element in the EDX spectrum for all rCF samples. This gave an indication that the epoxy resin has been removed from the surface of the carbon fiber.

  14. 46 CFR 108.463 - Foam rate: Protein.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Foam rate: Protein. 108.463 Section 108.463 Shipping... EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Foam Extinguishing Systems § 108.463 Foam rate: Protein. (a) If the outlets of a protein foam extinguishing system are in a space, the foam rate at each outlet must be...

  15. 46 CFR 108.463 - Foam rate: Protein.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Foam rate: Protein. 108.463 Section 108.463 Shipping... EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Foam Extinguishing Systems § 108.463 Foam rate: Protein. (a) If the outlets of a protein foam extinguishing system are in a space, the foam rate at each outlet must be...

  16. 46 CFR 108.463 - Foam rate: Protein.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Foam rate: Protein. 108.463 Section 108.463 Shipping... EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Foam Extinguishing Systems § 108.463 Foam rate: Protein. (a) If the outlets of a protein foam extinguishing system are in a space, the foam rate at each outlet must be...

  17. 46 CFR 108.463 - Foam rate: Protein.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Foam rate: Protein. 108.463 Section 108.463 Shipping... EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Foam Extinguishing Systems § 108.463 Foam rate: Protein. (a) If the outlets of a protein foam extinguishing system are in a space, the foam rate at each outlet must be...

  18. 46 CFR 108.463 - Foam rate: Protein.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Foam rate: Protein. 108.463 Section 108.463 Shipping... EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Foam Extinguishing Systems § 108.463 Foam rate: Protein. (a) If the outlets of a protein foam extinguishing system are in a space, the foam rate at each outlet must be...

  19. 46 CFR 108.473 - Foam system components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Foam system components. 108.473 Section 108.473 Shipping... EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Foam Extinguishing Systems § 108.473 Foam system components. (a) Each foam agent, each tank for a foam agent, each discharge outlet, each control, and each valve for...

  20. 46 CFR 108.473 - Foam system components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Foam system components. 108.473 Section 108.473 Shipping... EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Foam Extinguishing Systems § 108.473 Foam system components. (a) Each foam agent, each tank for a foam agent, each discharge outlet, each control, and each valve for...

  1. 46 CFR 108.473 - Foam system components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Foam system components. 108.473 Section 108.473 Shipping... EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Foam Extinguishing Systems § 108.473 Foam system components. (a) Each foam agent, each tank for a foam agent, each discharge outlet, each control, and each valve for...

  2. 46 CFR 108.473 - Foam system components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Foam system components. 108.473 Section 108.473 Shipping... EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Foam Extinguishing Systems § 108.473 Foam system components. (a) Each foam agent, each tank for a foam agent, each discharge outlet, each control, and each valve for...

  3. 46 CFR 108.473 - Foam system components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Foam system components. 108.473 Section 108.473 Shipping... EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Foam Extinguishing Systems § 108.473 Foam system components. (a) Each foam agent, each tank for a foam agent, each discharge outlet, each control, and each valve for...

  4. Advanced Metal Foam Structures for Outer Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanan, Jay; Johnson, William; Peker, Atakan

    2005-01-01

    A document discusses a proposal to use advanced materials especially bulk metallic glass (BMG) foams in structural components of spacecraft, lunar habitats, and the like. BMG foams, which are already used on Earth in some consumer products, are superior to conventional metal foams: BMG foams have exceptionally low mass densities and high strength-to-weight ratios and are more readily processable into strong, lightweight objects of various sizes and shapes. These and other attractive properties of BMG foams would be exploited, according to the proposal, to enable in situ processing of BMG foams for erecting and repairing panels, shells, containers, and other objects. The in situ processing could include (1) generation of BMG foams inside prefabricated deployable skins that would define the sizes and shapes of the objects thus formed and (2) thermoplastic deformation of BMG foams. Typically, the generation of BMG foams would involve mixtures of precursor chemicals that would be subjected to suitable pressure and temperature schedules. In addition to serving as structural components, objects containing or consisting of BMG foams could perform such functions as thermal management, shielding against radiation, and shielding against hypervelocity impacts of micrometeors and small debris particles.

  5. A constitutive theory for rigid polyurethane foam

    SciTech Connect

    Neilsen, M.K.; Krieg, R.D.; Schreyer, H.L.

    1992-12-31

    Rigid, closed-cell, polyurethane foam consists of interconnected polyurethane plates which form cells. When this foam is compressed, it exhibits an initial elastic regime which is followed by a plateau regime in which the load required to compress the foam remains nearly constant. In the plateau regime, cell walls are damaged and large permanent volume changes are generated. As additional load is applied, cell walls are compressed against neighboring cell walls, and the stiffness of the foam increases and approaches a value equal to that of solid polyurethane. When the foam is loaded in tension, the cell walls are damaged and the foam fractures. A constitutive theory for rigid polyurethane foam has been developed. This theory is based on a decomposition of the foam into two parts: a skeleton and a nonlinear elastic continuum in parallel. The skeleton accounts for the foam behavior in the elastic and plateau regimes and is described using a coupled plasticity with continuum damage theory. The nonlinear elastic continuum accounts for the lock-up of the foam due to internal gas pressure and cell wall interactions. This new constitutive theory has been implemented in both static and dynamic finite element codes. Numerical simulations performed using the new constitutive theory are presented.

  6. Mechanisms of foam formation in anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Bhargavi; Pagilla, Krishna R

    2015-02-01

    An anaerobic digester (AD) is the most essential step to generate energy in the form of biogas from waste. AD foaming is widespread and leads to deterioration of the AD process and operation. In extreme conditions, AD foaming poses a significant safety risk and considerable economic impacts. It is, therefore, necessary to understand the fundamentals of AD foaming to develop effective strategies that can help minimize the foaming impacts. Several aspects of AD foaming have attracted considerable research attention, however, the focused has been mainly on site specific causes and prevention. Here, the available three-phase foam literature is reviewed with an emphasis on the fundamental aspects of bubble formation in AD: similarities between AD foams and other "desirable" foams, surface rheology, physico-chemical aspects of carbon dioxide (CO2) in digesters, dynamics of the gas-phase, pH, alkalinity and certain relationships between these factors are discussed. All of the abovementioned fundamental aspects seem to be involved in AD foam formation. However, the detailed relationship between these uncontrolled and controlled factors, foam formation and its implications for process and operation of AD is still inconclusive. PMID:25487880

  7. Linear elastic behavior of dry soap foams

    SciTech Connect

    Kraynik, A.M.; Reinelt, D.A.

    1996-08-10

    Linear elastic constants are computed for three dry foams that have crystal symmetry, bubbles with equal volume V, and films with uniform surface tension T. The Kelvin, Williams, and Weaire-Phelan foams contain one, two, and eight bubbles in the unit cell, respectively. All three foams have 14-sided bubbles, but these tetrakaidecahedra have different topology; the Weaire-Phelan foam also contains pentagonal dodecahedra. In addition to the bulk modulus for volume compression, the authors calculate two shear moduli for the Kelvin and Weaire-Phelan foams, which have cubic symmetry, and four shear moduli for the Williams foam, which has tetragonal symmetry. The Williams foam has five elastic constants, not six, because the stress remains isotropic for uniform expansion; this is not guaranteed by symmetry alone. The two shear moduli for the Weaire-Phelan foam differ by less than 5%. The other two foams exhibit much greater elastic anisotropy; their shear moduli differ by a factor of 2. An effective isotropic shear modulus {bar G}, which represents the response averaged over all orientations, is evaluated for each foam. Scaled by T/V{sup 1/3}, {bar G} is 0.8070, 0.7955, and 0.8684 for the Kelvin, Williams, and Weaire-Phelan foams, respectively. When extrapolated to the dry limit, the shear modulus data of Princen and Kiss (for concentrated oil-in-water emulsions with polydisperse drop-size distributions) fall within the range of the calculations. The Surface Evolver program, developed by Brakke, was used to compute minimal surfaces for the dry foams. Also reported for each undeformed foam are various geometric constants relating to interfacial energy density, cell edge length, and bubble pressure.

  8. Cell Structure Evolution of Aluminum Foams Under Reduced Pressure Foaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhuokun; Yu, Yang; Li, Min; Luo, Hongjie

    2016-07-01

    Ti-H particles are used to increase the gas content in aluminum melts for reduced pressure foaming. This paper reports on the RPF process of AlCa alloy by adding TiH2, but in smaller amounts compared to traditional process. TiH2 is completely decomposed by stirring the melt, following which reduced pressure is applied. TiH2 is not added as the blowing agent; instead, it is added for increasing the H2 concentration in the liquid AlCa melt. It is shown that pressure change induces further release of hydrogen from Ti phase. It is also found that foam collapse is caused by the fast bubble coalescing during pressure reducing procedure, and the instability of liquid film is related to the significant increase in critical thickness of film rupture. A combination of lower amounts of TiH2, coupled with reduced pressure, is another way of increasing hydrogen content in the liquid aluminum. A key benefit of this process is that it provides time to transfer the molten metal to a mold and then apply the reduced pressure to produce net shape foam parts.

  9. Cell Structure Evolution of Aluminum Foams Under Reduced Pressure Foaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhuokun; Yu, Yang; Li, Min; Luo, Hongjie

    2016-09-01

    Ti-H particles are used to increase the gas content in aluminum melts for reduced pressure foaming. This paper reports on the RPF process of AlCa alloy by adding TiH2, but in smaller amounts compared to traditional process. TiH2 is completely decomposed by stirring the melt, following which reduced pressure is applied. TiH2 is not added as the blowing agent; instead, it is added for increasing the H2 concentration in the liquid AlCa melt. It is shown that pressure change induces further release of hydrogen from Ti phase. It is also found that foam collapse is caused by the fast bubble coalescing during pressure reducing procedure, and the instability of liquid film is related to the significant increase in critical thickness of film rupture. A combination of lower amounts of TiH2, coupled with reduced pressure, is another way of increasing hydrogen content in the liquid aluminum. A key benefit of this process is that it provides time to transfer the molten metal to a mold and then apply the reduced pressure to produce net shape foam parts.

  10. Characterization of Epoxy Functionalized Graphite Nanoparticles and the Physical Properties of Epoxy Matrix Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Bauer, Jonathan L.; Maryanski, Michael J.; Heimann, Paula J.; Barlow, Jeremy P.; Gosau, Jan-Michael; Allred, Ronald E.

    2010-01-01

    This work presents a novel approach to the functionalization of graphite nanoparticles. The technique provides a mechanism for covalent bonding between the filler and matrix, with minimal disruption to the sp2 hybridization of the pristine graphene sheet. Functionalization proceeded by covalently bonding an epoxy monomer to the surface of expanded graphite, via a coupling agent, such that the epoxy concentration was measured as approximately 4 wt.%. The impact of dispersing this material into an epoxy resin was evaluated with respect to the mechanical properties and electrical conductivity of the graphite-epoxy nanocomposite. At a loading as low as 0.5 wt.%, the electrical conductivity was increased by five orders of magnitude relative to the base resin. The material yield strength was increased by 30% and Young s modulus by 50%. These results were realized without compromise to the resin toughness.

  11. Mechanical behavior of open cell aluminum foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jikou

    Open cell metallic foams are relatively new materials with increasingly applications due to their attractive combinations of physical, chemical, mechanical and optical properties. Since plastic deformation in the struts involves dislocation motion, dislocation slip bands are used to track the initiation/propagation and locations of plastic deformation in individual struts. We find that the onset of plastic deformation in struts is far beyond the observable strut/cell shape changes, and both plastic bending and buckling are strut deformation modes. To measure the strut mechanical properties, an existing micro-scale tensile tester was updated to test the individual struts extracted from foams using electro-discharged machining. The micro-tensile testing results show that the foam struts are typically more ductile and one time stronger than the corresponding fully dense alloy. To integrate the measured strut and foam properties, a four-strut structure unit is identified as a structural representative of the open cell foam structure. Based on the observed strut deformation modes, mechanics analysis is performed on the structure unit to predict the foam stiffness and strength. The predictions are in good agreement with the measured data, suggesting the significance of the studies on the foam strut properties and deformation. This model also predicts the bounds of the foam strengths. Under cyclic compression, foams fail due to damage accumulation in individual struts, in which surface cracks initiate and grow. At low stress levels, surface cracks are formed in multiple struts that are distributed across the foam block. This results in an abrupt strain jump due to the crush of foam block, upon foam failure. To meet applications requirements, open cell aluminum foams are usually annealed or strengthened. The studies are carried out in the foams in the as-fabricated (F), annealed (O) and T6-strengthed (T6) conditions. We find that annealing and T6 strengthening

  12. Rigid closed-cell polyimide foams for aircraft applications and foam-in-place technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, J.; Straub, P.; Gagliani, J., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Significant accomplishments generated are summarized. Testing of closed cell foams, which has resulted in the characterization of compositions which produce rigid foams for use in galley structure applications is reported. It is shown that the density, compressive strength and shear strength of the foams are directly related to the concentrations of the microballoons. The same properties are also directly related to the resin loading. Prototype samples of rigid closed cell foams meeting the requirements of the program were submitted. Investigation of the apparatus to produce polyimide foams using foam in place techniques, resulted in the selection of a spray gun apparatus, capable to deliver a mixture of microballoons and resin binder on substrates which cures to yield a closed cell foam. It is found that the adhesion of the foam on aluminum, titanium and steel substrates is satisfactory. It is concluded that the material meets the mechanical and thermal requirements of the program.

  13. Effect of Liquid-Crystalline Epoxy Backbone Structure on Thermal Conductivity of Epoxy-Alumina Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giang, Thanhkieu; Kim, Jinhwan

    2016-06-01

    In a series of papers published recently, we clearly demonstrated that the most important factor governing the thermal conductivity of epoxy-Al2O3 composites is the backbone structure of the epoxy. In this study, three more epoxies based on diglycidyl ester-terminated liquid-crystalline epoxy (LCE) have been synthesized to draw conclusions regarding the effect of the epoxy backbone structure on the thermal conductivity of epoxy-alumina composites. The synthesized structures were characterized by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, and optical microscopy were also employed to examine the thermal and optical properties of the synthesized LCEs and the cured composites. All three LCE resins exhibited typical liquid-crystalline behaviors: clear solid crystalline state below the melting temperature (T m), sharp crystalline melting at T m, and transition to nematic phase above T m with consequent isotropic phase above the isotropic temperature (T i). The LCE resins displayed distinct nematic liquid-crystalline phase over a wide temperature range and retained liquid-crystalline phase after curing, with high thermal conductivity of the resulting composite. The thermal conductivity values ranged from 3.09 W/m-K to 3.89 W/m-K for LCE-Al2O3 composites with 50 vol.% filler loading. The steric effect played a governing role in the difference. The neat epoxy resin thermal conductivity was obtained as 0.35 W/m-K to 0.49 W/m-K based on analysis using the Agari-Uno model. The results clearly support the objective of this study in that the thermal conductivity of the LCE-containing networks strongly depended on the epoxy backbone structure and the degree of ordering in the cured network.

  14. Uniform Foam Crush Testing for Multi-Mission Earth Entry Vehicle Impact Attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Byron W.; Glaab, Louis J.

    2012-01-01

    Multi-Mission Earth Entry Vehicles (MMEEVs) are blunt-body vehicles designed with the purpose of transporting payloads from outer space to the surface of the Earth. To achieve high-reliability and minimum weight, MMEEVs avoid use of limited-reliability systems, such as parachutes and retro-rockets, instead using built-in impact attenuators to absorb energy remaining at impact to meet landing loads requirements. The Multi-Mission Systems Analysis for Planetary Entry (M-SAPE) parametric design tool is used to facilitate the design of MMEEVs and develop the trade space. Testing was conducted to characterize the material properties of several candidate impact foam attenuators to enhance M-SAPE analysis. In the current effort, four different Rohacell foams are tested at three different, uniform, strain rates (approximately 0.17, approximately 100, approximately 13,600%/s). The primary data analysis method uses a global data smoothing technique in the frequency domain to remove noise and system natural frequencies. The results from the data indicate that the filter and smoothing technique are successful in identifying the foam crush event and removing aberrations. The effect of strain rate increases with increasing foam density. The 71-WF-HT foam may support Mars Sample Return requirements. Several recommendations to improve the drop tower test technique are identified.

  15. Thermal modeling of an epoxy encapsulation process

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, R.G.; Schutt, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    The encapsulation of components is a widely used process at Sandia National Laboratories for packaging components to withstand structural loads. Epoxy encapsulants are also used for their outstanding dielectric strength characteristics. The production of high voltage assemblies requires the encapsulation of ceramic and electrical components (such as transformers). Separation of the encapsulant from internal contact surfaces or voids within the encapsulant itself in regions near the mold base have caused high voltage breakdown failures during production testing. In order to understand the failure mechanisms, a methodology was developed to predict both the thermal response and gel front progression of the epoxy the encapsulation process. A thermal model constructed with PATRAN Plus (1) and solved with the P/THERMAL (2) analysis system was used to predict the thermal response of the encapsulant. This paper discusses the incorporation of an Arrhenius kinetics model into Q/TRAN (2) to model the complex volumetric heat generation of the epoxy during the encapsulation process. As the epoxy begins to cure, it generates heat and shrinks. The total cure time of the encapsulant (transformation from a viscous liquid to solid) is dependent on both the initial temperature and the entire temperature history. Because the rate of cure is temperature dependent, the cure rate accelerates with a temperature increase and, likewise, the cure rate is quenched if the temperature is reduced. The temperature and conversion predictions compared well against experimental data. The thermal simulation results were used to modify the temperature cure process of the encapsulant and improve production yields.

  16. Some experiences with epoxy resin grouting compounds.

    PubMed

    Hosein, H R

    1980-07-01

    Epoxy resin systems are used in tiling and grouting in the construction industry. Because of the nature of the application, skin contact is the primary hazard. The most prevalent reaction was reddening of the forearms, followed by whole body reddening and loss of appetite, these latter two being associated with smoking while applying the resin. PMID:7415974

  17. Polymeric Additives For Graphite/Epoxy Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Nir, Z.

    1990-01-01

    Report describes experimental studies of properties of several graphite/epoxy composites containing polymeric additives as flexibilizing or toughening agents. Emphasizes effects of brominated polymeric additives (BPA's) with or without carboxy-terminated butadiene acrylonitrile rubber. Reviews effects of individual and combined additives on fracture toughnesses, environmental stabilities, hot/wet strengths, thermomechanical behaviors, and other mechanical properties of composites.

  18. Development of Graphite/Epoxy Corner Fittings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faile, G.; Hollis, R.; Ledbetter, F.; Maldonado, J.; Sledd, J.; Stuckey, J.; Waggoner, G.; Engler, E.

    1986-01-01

    Report documents development project aimed at improving design and load-carrying ability of complicated corner fitting for optical bench. New fitting made of graphite filaments in epoxy-resin matrix. Composite material selected as replacement for titanium because lighter and dimensions change little with temperature variations.

  19. Microcellular carbon foam and method

    DOEpatents

    Simandl, R.F.; Brown, J.D.

    1994-04-05

    A microcellular carbon foam is described which is characterized by a density in the range of about 30 to 1000 mg/cm[sup 3], substantially uniform distribution of cell sizes of diameters less than 100 [mu]m with a majority of the cells being of a diameter of less than about 10 [mu]m, well interconnected strut morphology providing open porosity, and an expanded d(002) X-ray turbostatic spacing greater than 3.50 angstroms. The precursor for the carbon foam is prepared by the phase inversion of polyacrylonitrile in a solution consisting essentially of at least one alkali metal halide and a phase inversion solvent for the polyacrylonitrile.

  20. Microstructural effects in foam fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Peter; Davis, Stephen; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

    2015-11-01

    We examine the fracture of a quasi two-dimensional aqueous foam under an applied driving pressure, using a network modelling approach developed for metallic foams by Stewart & Davis (J. Rheol., vol. 56, 2012, p. 543). In agreement with experiments, we observe two distinct mechanisms of failure analogous to those observed in a crystalline solid: a slow ductile mode when the driving pressure is applied slowly, where the void propagates as bubbles interchange neighbours through the T1 process, and a rapid brittle mode for faster application of pressures, where the void advances by successive rupture of liquid films driven by Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The simulations allow detailed insight into the mechanics of the fracturing medium and the role of its microstructure. In particular, we examine the stress distribution around the crack tip and investigate how brittle fracture localizes into a single line of breakages. We also confirm that pre-existing microstructural defects can alter the course of fracture.

  1. Foam Core Shielding for Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Marc

    2007-01-01

    A foam core shield (FCS) system is now being developed to supplant multilayer insulation (MLI) systems heretofore installed on spacecraft for thermal management and protection against meteoroid impacts. A typical FCS system consists of a core sandwiched between a face sheet and a back sheet. The core can consist of any of a variety of low-to-medium-density polymeric or inorganic foams chosen to satisfy application-specific requirements regarding heat transfer and temperature. The face sheet serves to shock and thereby shatter incident meteoroids, and is coated on its outer surface to optimize its absorptance and emittance for regulation of temperature. The back sheet can be dimpled to minimize undesired thermal contact with the underlying spacecraft component and can be metallized on the surface facing the component to optimize its absorptance and emittance. The FCS systems can perform better than do MLI systems, at lower mass and lower cost and with greater volumetric efficiency.

  2. Match-mold process for foam insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumenapp, H. E.; Liskay, G. G.; Wang, D. S.

    1978-01-01

    Process, using fast-setting putty-type thixotropic epoxy material, eliminates need for leakproof enclosures. Method reduces cure time from 15 to 4 hours. Epoxy masters are stronger and do not require special coating for storage. Manufacturers of form-fitted insulation or packaging forms will find this process to be of interest.

  3. The mechanical behavior of microcellular foams

    SciTech Connect

    Ozkul, M.H.; Mark, J.E. ); Aubert, J.H. )

    1990-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of microcellular open-cell foams prepared by a thermally induced phase separation process are investigated. The foams studied were prepared from isotactic polystyrene, polyacrylonitrile, and poly(4-methyl-1-pentene) (rigid foams), and polyurethane and Lycra (elastomeric foams). Their densities were in the range 0.04--0.27 g/cm3. Conventional polystyrene foams were used for comparison. The moduli and collapse stresses of these foams were measured in compression and compared with the current constitutive laws which relate mechanical properties to densities. A reinforcement technique based on the in-situ precipitation of silica was used to improve the mechanical properties. 13 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Crosslinked polyethylene foams, via EB radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, E. C. L.; Lugão, A. B.; Andrade E. Silva, L. G.

    1998-06-01

    Polyethylene foams, produced by radio-induced crosslinking, show a smooth and homogeneous surface, when compared to chemical crosslinking method using peroxide as crosslinking agent. This process fosters excellent adhesive and printability properties. Besides that, closed cells, intrinsic to theses foams, imparts opitmum mechanical, shocks and insulation resistance, indicating these foams to some markets segments as: automotive and transport; buoyancy, flotation and marine: building and insulation: packaging: domestic sports and leisure goods. We were in search of an ideal foam, by adding 5 to 15% of blowing agent in LDPE. A series of preliminary trials defined 203° C as the right blowing agent decomposition temperature. At a 22.7 kGy/dose ratio, the lowest dose for providing an efficient foam was 30 kGy, for a formulation comprising 10% of azodicarbonamide in LDPE, within a 10 minutes foaming time.

  5. Application and future of solid foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bienvenu, Yves

    2014-10-01

    To conclude this series of chapters on solid foam materials, a review of industrial current applications and of mid-term market perspectives centred on manmade foams is given, making reference to natural cellular materials. Although the polymeric foam industrial development overwhelms the rest and finds applications on many market segments, more attention will be paid to the emerging market of inorganic-especially metallic-foams (and cellular materials) and their applications, present or upcoming. It is shown that the final applications of solid foams are primarily linked to transport and the present-day development of the different classes of solid foams is contrasted between functional applications and structural applications. xml:lang="fr"

  6. Blast mitigation capabilities of aqueous foam.

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, William Franklin; Larsen, Marvin Elwood; Boughton, Bruce A.

    2006-02-01

    A series of tests involving detonation of high explosive blanketed by aqueous foam (conducted from 1982 to 1984) are described in primarily terms of recorded peak pressure, positive phase specific impulse, and time of arrival. The investigation showed that optimal blast mitigation occurs for foams with an expansion ratio of about 60:1. Simple analyses representing the foam as a shocked single phase mixture are presented and shown inadequate. The experimental data demonstrate that foam slows down and broadens the propagated pressure disturbance relative to a shock in air. Shaped charges and flyer plates were evaluated for operation in foam and appreciable degradation was observed for the flyer plates due to drag created by the foam.

  7. Nanostructured metal foams: synthesis and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Luther, Erik P; Tappan, Bryce; Mueller, Alex; Mihaila, Bogdan; Volz, Heather; Cardenas, Andreas; Papin, Pallas; Veauthier, Jackie; Stan, Marius

    2009-01-01

    Fabrication of monolithic metallic nanoporous materials is difficult using conventional methodology. Here they report a relatively simple method of synthesizing monolithic, ultralow density, nanostructured metal foams utilizing self-propagating combustion synthesis of novel metal complexes containing high nitrogen energetic ligands. Nanostructured metal foams are formed in a post flame-front dynamic assembly with densities as low as 0.011 g/cc and surface areas as high as 270 m{sup 2}/g. They have produced metal foams via this method of titanium, iron, cobalt, nickel, zirconium, copper, palladium, silver, hafnium, platinum and gold. Microstructural features vary as a function of composition and process parameters. Applications for the metal foams are discussed including hydrogen absorption in palladium foams. A model for the sorption kinetics of hydrogen in the foams is presented.

  8. Activated, coal-based carbon foam

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, Darren Kenneth; Plucinski, Janusz Wladyslaw

    2004-12-21

    An ablation resistant, monolithic, activated, carbon foam produced by the activation of a coal-based carbon foam through the action of carbon dioxide, ozone or some similar oxidative agent that pits and/or partially oxidizes the carbon foam skeleton, thereby significantly increasing its overall surface area and concurrently increasing its filtering ability. Such activated carbon foams are suitable for application in virtually all areas where particulate or gel form activated carbon materials have been used. Such an activated carbon foam can be fabricated, i.e. sawed, machined and otherwise shaped to fit virtually any required filtering location by simple insertion and without the need for handling the "dirty" and friable particulate activated carbon foam materials of the prior art.

  9. Domain Growth Kinetics in Stratifying Foam Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yiran; Sharma, Vivek

    2015-03-01

    Baking bread, brewing cappuccino, pouring beer, washing dishes, shaving, shampooing, whipping eggs and blowing bubbles all involve creation of aqueous foam films. Typical foam films consist of two surfactant-laden surfaces that are μ 5 nm - 10 micron apart. Sandwiched between these interfacial layers is a fluid that drains primarily under the influence of viscous and interfacial forces, including disjoining pressure. Interestingly, for certain low molecular weight surfactants, a layered ordering of micelles inside the foam films (thickness <100 nm) leads to a stepwise thinning phenomena called stratification. We experimentally elucidate the influence of these different driving forces, and confinement on drainage kinetics of horizontal stratifying foam films. Thinner, darker domains spontaneously grow within foam films. Quantitative characterization of domain growth visualized in a using Scheludko-type thin film cell and a theoretical model based on lubrication analysis, provide critical insights into hydrodynamics of thin foam films, and the strength and nature of surface forces, including supramolecular oscillatory structural forces.

  10. Activated, coal-based carbon foam

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Darren Kenneth; Plucinski, Janusz Wladyslaw

    2009-06-09

    An ablation resistant, monolithic, activated, carbon foam produced by the activation of a coal-based carbon foam through the action of carbon dioxide, ozone or some similar oxidative agent that pits and/or partially oxidizes the carbon foam skeleton, thereby significantly increasing its overall surface area and concurrently increasing its filtering ability. Such activated carbon foams are suitable for application in virtually all areas where particulate or gel form activated carbon materials have been used. Such an activated carbon foam can be fabricated, i.e. sawed, machined and otherwise shaped to fit virtually any required filtering location by simple insertion and without the need for handling the "dirty" and friable particulate activated carbon foam materials of the prior art.

  11. Cellulose nanocrystals reinforced foamed nitrile rubber nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yukun; Zhang, Yuanbing; Xu, Chuanhui; Cao, Xiaodong

    2015-10-01

    Research on foamed nitrile rubber (NBR)/cellulose nanocrystals (CNs) nanocomposites is rarely found in the literatures. In this paper, CNs suspension and NBR latex was mixed to prepared the foamed NBR/CNs nanocomposites. We found that the CNs mainly located in the cell walls, effectively reinforcing the foamed NBR. The strong interaction between the CNs and NBR matrix restricted the mobility of NBR chains surrounding the CNs, hence increasing the crosslink density of the NBR matrix. CNs exhibited excellent reinforcement on the foamed NBR: a remarkable increase nearly 76% in the tensile strength of the foamed nanocomposites was achieved with a load of only 15 phr CNs. Enhanced mechanical properties make the foamed NBR/CNs nanocomposites a promising damping material for industrial applications with a potential to reduce the petroleum consumption. PMID:26076611

  12. Protein separation by differential drainage from foam.

    PubMed

    Mohan, S B; Lyddiatt, A

    1994-11-20

    Commercially available beer, which is a dilute solution containing components of yeast, malt, and hop used in the manufacture of the beer, was used as a model system to demonstrate the potential of foam fractionation beyond the primary foaming stage. Most of the components present in the beer concentrated in the initial foam, but they drained differentially in the subsequent collapsed foam collected over a period of 30 min. This resulted in further enrichment, in particular, of components which were present in low concentration in the original beer, Preferential drainage from foam, hence, might provide a novel way of fractionating further the proteins concentrated initially in the liquid films of foam. (c) 1994 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:18618553

  13. Optical Tomography of Polydisperse Dry Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chieco, Anthony; Feitosa, Klebert; Korda, P. T.; Roth, A. E.; Durian, D. J.

    2011-11-01

    Dry foam is a disordered packing of bubbles that distort into familiar polyhedral shapes. We have implemented a method that uses optical axial tomography to reconstruct the internal structure of a dry foam in three dimensions. The technique consists of taking a series of photographs of the dry foam against a uniformly illuminated background at successive angles. By summing the projections we create images of the cross section of the foam and analyze them to locate the Plateau borders and vertices. The vertices are then connected according to Plateau's rules to reconstruct the internal structure of the foam. Using this technique we are able to visualize a large number of bubbles of real 3D foams and obtain statistics of faces and edges. We gratefully acknowledge support from DOD-ASSURE/NSF-REU grant # DMR-0851367.

  14. Entropy from the Foam II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garattini, Remo

    A simple model of space-time foam, made by two different types of wormholes in a semiclassical approximation, is taken under examination: one type is a collection of Nw Schwarzschild wormholes, while the other one is made by Schwarzschild-Anti-de Sitter wormholes. The area quantization related to the entropy via the Bekenstein-Hawking formula hints a possible selection between the two configurations. Application to the charged black hole are discussed.

  15. Thermo-mechanical and micro-structural characterization of shape memory polymer foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Prima, Matthew Allen

    The need for a set of design criteria, models, and limits for the use of shape memory polymer foams was proposed. The effect of temperature and strain on the mechanical behavior; compression, tensile, cyclic compression, constrained recovery, and free strain recovery of the material was used to determine the operational limits of the material. Next, the damage mechanism and viscoelastic effects in compressive cycling were determined through further mechanical testing and with the incorporation of three dimensional structure mapping via micro-CT scanning. The influence of microstructure was determined by testing the basic thermomechanical, viscoelactic, and shape recovery behavior of foams with relative densities of 20, 30, and 40 percent. A similar suite of tests were then performed with the base epoxy material to generate the material properties for computational modeling. This data was then combined with three dimensional microstructures generated from micro-CT scans to develop material models for shape memory foams. These models were then validated by comparing model results to the experimental results under similar conditions.

  16. Microgravity Foam Structure and Rheology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durian, Douglas J.

    1997-01-01

    To exploit rheological and multiple-light scattering techniques, and ultimately microgravity conditions, in order to quantify and elucidate the unusual elastic character of foams in terms of their underlying microscopic structure and dynamics. Special interest is in determining how this elastic character vanishes, i.e. how the foam melts into a simple viscous liquid, as a function of both increasing liquid content and shear strain rate. The unusual elastic character of foams will be quantified macroscopically by measurement of the shear stress as a function of static shear strain, shear strain rate, and time following a step strain; such data will be analyzed in terms of a yield stress, a static shear modulus, and dynamical time scales. Microscopic information about bubble packing and rearrangement dynamics, from which these macroscopic non-Newtonian properties presumably arise, will be obtained non-invasively by novel multiple-light scattering diagnostics such as Diffusing-Wave Spectroscopy (DWS). Quantitative trends with materials parameters, such as average bubble size, and liquid content, will be sought in order to elucidate the fundamental connection between the microscopic structure and dynamics and the macroscopic rheology.

  17. Superalloy Foams for Aeroshell Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John; Padula, Santo, II

    2001-01-01

    Current thermal protection systems for reentry from space, such as that employed on the space shuttle, rely on ceramic tiles with ultra-low conductivity. These materials provide excellent thermal protection but are extremely fragile, easily degraded by environmental attack, and carry no structural loads. Future thermal protection systems being proposed in NASAs MITAS Program will attempt to combine thermal protection with improved durability and structural capability without significant increases in vehicle weight. This may be accomplished by combining several materials in a layered structure to obtain the desired function for aeroshell applications. One class of materials being considered for inclusion in this concept are high temperature metal foam. The objective of this paper was to fabricate low density, superalloy foams and conduct limited testing to evaluate their thermal and structural capabilities. Superalloys were chosen for evaluation as they possesses good strength and excellent environmental endurance over a wide range of temperatures. Utilizing superalloys as low density foams, with porosity contents greater than 90%, minimizes weight and thermal conductivity.

  18. Pitch-based carbon foam and composites

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James W.

    2001-01-01

    A process for producing carbon foam or a composite is disclosed which obviates the need for conventional oxidative stabilization. The process employs mesophase or isotropic pitch and a simplified process using a single mold. The foam has a relatively uniform distribution of pore sizes and a highly aligned graphic structure in the struts. The foam material can be made into a composite which is useful in high temperature sandwich panels for both thermal and structural applications.

  19. Pitch-based carbon foam and composites

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James W.

    2002-01-01

    A process for producing carbon foam or a composite is disclosed which obviates the need for conventional oxidative stabilization. The process employs mesophase or isotropic pitch and a simplified process using a single mold. The foam has a relatively uniform distribution of pore sizes and a highly aligned graphic structure in the struts. The foam material can be made into a composite which is useful in high temperature sandwich panels for both thermal and structural applications.

  20. Aqueous foam toxicology evaluation and hazard review

    SciTech Connect

    Archuleta, M.M.

    1995-10-01

    Aqueous foams are aggregates of bubbles mechanically generated by passing air or other gases through a net, screen, or other porous medium that is wetted by an aqueous solution of surface-active foaming agents (surfactants). Aqueous foams are important in modem fire-fighting technology, as well as for military uses for area denial and riot or crowd control. An aqueous foam is currently being developed and evaluated by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) as a Less-Than-Lethal Weapon for the National Institute of Justice (NIJ). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the toxicity of the aqueous foam developed for the NIJ and to determine whether there are any significant adverse health effects associated with completely immersing individuals without protective equipment in the foam. The toxicity of the aqueous foam formulation developed for NIJ is determined by evaluating the toxicity of the individual components of the foam. The foam is made from a 2--5% solution of Steol CA-330 surfactant in water generated at expansion ratios ranging from 500:1 to 1000:1. SteoI CA-330 is a 35% ammonium laureth sulfate in water and is produced by Stepan Chemical Company and containing trace amounts (<0.1%) of 1,4-dioxane. The results of this study indicate that Steol CA-330 is a non-toxic, mildly irritating, surfactant that is used extensively in the cosmetics industry for hair care and bath products. Inhalation or dermal exposure to this material in aqueous foam is not expected to produce significant irritation or systemic toxicity to exposed individuals, even after prolonged exposure. The amount of 1,4-dioxane in the surfactant, and subsequently in the foam, is negligible and therefore, the toxicity associated with dioxane exposure is not significant. In general, immersion in similar aqueous foams has not resulted in acute, immediately life-threatening effects, or chronic, long-term, non-reversible effects following exposure.

  1. System Acquires Data On Reactivities Of Foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walls, Joe T.

    1994-01-01

    Data-acquisition and -plotting system, called DAPS(TM), developed enabling accurate and objective determination of physical properties related to reactivities of polyurethane and polyisocyanurate foams. Automated, computer-controlled test apparatus that acquires data on rates of rise, rise profiles, exothermic temperatures, and internal pressures of foams prepared from both manual and machine-mixed batches. Data used to determine minute differences between reaction kinetics and exothermic profiles of foam formulations, properties of end products which are statistically undifferentiated.

  2. Carbon microsphere-filled Pyrrone foams.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimmel, B. G.

    1973-01-01

    Syntactic foam formulations were prepared from mixtures of Pyrrone prepolymers and hollow carbon microspheres. Very low curing shrinkages were obtained for high volume loadings of microspheres. The resulting syntactic foams were found to be remarkably stable over a wide range in temperature. A technique was developed for the emplacement of these foam formulations in polyimide-fiberglass, titanium alloy and stainless steel honeycomb without sacrificing low curing shrinkage or thermal stability.

  3. Pitch-based carbon foam and composites

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James W.

    2003-12-02

    A process for producing carbon foam or a composite is disclosed which obviates the need for conventional oxidative stabilization. The process employs mesophase or isotropic pitch and a simplified process using a single mold. The foam has a relatively uniform distribution of pore sizes and a highly aligned graphic structure in the struts. The foam material can be made into a composite which is useful in high temperature sandwich panels for both thermal and structural applications.

  4. Pitch-based carbon foam and composites

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James W.

    2003-12-16

    A process for producing carbon foam or a composite is disclosed which obviates the need for conventional oxidative stabilization. The process employs mesophase or isotropic pitch and a simplified process using a single mold. The foam has a relatively uniform distribution of pore sizes and a highly aligned graphic structure in the struts. The foam material can be made into a composite which is useful in high temperature sandwich panels for both thermal and structural applications.

  5. Oxidation and protection of fiberglass-epoxy composite masts for photovoltaic arrays in the low earth orbital environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.; Ciancone, Michael L.; Paulsen, Phillip E.; Brady, Joyce A.

    1988-01-01

    The extent of degradation of fiberglass-epoxy composite masts of the Space Station solar array panel, when these are exposed to atomic oxygen environment of the low-earth orbit, was investigated in ground testing of fiberglass-epoxy composites in an RF plasma asher. In addition, several methods of protecting the composite structures were evaluated, including an aluminum braid covering, an In-Sn eutectic, and a silicone based paint. It was found that, during exposure, the epoxy at the surface of the composite was oxidized, exposing individual glass fibers which could easily be removed. The results of mass measurements and SEM examination carried out after thermal cycling and flexing of exposed composite samples indicated that coatings such as In-Sn eutectic may provide adequate protection by containing the glass fibers, even though mass loss still occurs.

  6. Starch/fiber/poly(lactic acid) foam and compressed foam composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Composites of starch, fiber, and poly(lactic acid) (PLA) were made using a foam substrate formed by dehydrating starch or starch/fiber gels. PLA was infiltrated into the dry foam to provide better moisture resistance. Foam composites were compressed into plastics using force ranging from 4-76MPa. Te...

  7. From Foam Rubber to Volcanoes: The Physical Chemistry of Foam Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Lee D.; McCarlie, V. Wallace

    2004-11-01

    Principles of physical chemistry and physical properties are used to describe foam formation. Foams are common in nature and in consumer products. The process of foam formation can be used to understand a wide variety of phenomena from exploding volcanoes to popping popcorn and making shoe soles.

  8. FOAM: NOVEL DELIVERY TECHNOLOGY FOR REMEDIATION OF VADOSE ZONE ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Jansik, Danielle P.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Zhong, Lirong; Wu, Yuxin; Foote, Martin; Zhang, Z. F.; Hubbard, Susan

    2011-07-05

    Deep vadose zone environments can be a primary source and pathway for contaminant migration to groundwater. These environments present unique characterization and remediation challenges that necessitate scrutiny and research. The thickness, depth, and intricacies of the deep vadose zone, combined with a lack of understanding of the key subsurface processes (e.g., biogeochemical and hydrologic) affecting contaminant migration, make it difficult to create validated conceptual and predictive models of subsurface flow dynamics and contaminant behavior across multiple scales. These factors also make it difficult to design and deploy sustainable remedial approaches and monitor long-term contaminant behavior after remedial actions. Functionally, the methods for addressing contamination must remove and/or reduce transport of contaminants. This problem is particularly challenging in the arid western United States where the vadose zone is hundreds of feet thick, rendering transitional excavation methods exceedingly costly and ineffective. Delivery of remedial amendments is one of the most challenging and critical aspects for all remedy-based approaches. The conventional approach for delivery is through injection of aqueous remedial solutions. However, heterogeneous deep vadose zone environments present hydrologic and geochemical challenges which limit the effectiveness. Because the flow of solution infiltration is dominantly controlled by gravity and suction, injected liquid preferentially percolates through highly permeable pathways, by-passing low-permeability zones which frequently contain the majority of contamination. Moreover, the wetting front can readily mobilize and enhance contaminant transport to the underlying aquifer prior to stabilization. Development of innovative, in-situ technologies may be the only way to meet remedial action objectives and long-term stewardship goals. Surfactants can be used to lower the liquid surface tension and create stabile foams

  9. Composite sandwich construction with syntactic foam core - A practical assessment of post-impact damage and residual strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiel, C.; Dittman, D.; Ishai, O.

    1993-01-01

    An account is given of an inspection method that has been successfully used to assess the postimpact damage and residual strength of syntactic (glass microspheres in epoxy matrix) foam-core sandwich panels with hybrid (carbon and glass fiber-reinforced) composite skins, which inherently possess high damage tolerance. SEM establishes that the crushing of the microspheres is responsible for the absorption of most of the impact energy. Damage tolerance is a function of the localization of damage by that high impact energy absorption.

  10. Foam drainage placed on a porous substrate.

    PubMed

    Arjmandi-Tash, O; Kovalchuk, N; Trybala, A; Starov, V

    2015-05-14

    A model for drainage/imbibition of a foam placed on the top of a porous substrate is presented. The equation of liquid imbibition into the porous substrate is coupled with a foam drainage equation at the foam/porous substrate interface. The deduced dimensionless equations are solved using a finite element method. It was found that the kinetics of foam drainage/imbibition depends on three dimensionless numbers and the initial liquid volume fraction. The result shows that there are three different regimes of the process. Each regime starts after initial rapid decrease of a liquid volume fraction at the foam/porous substrate interface: (i) rapid imbibition: the liquid volume fraction inside the foam at the foam/porous substrate interface remains constant close to a final liquid volume fraction; (ii) intermediate imbibition: the liquid volume fraction at the interface with the porous substrate experiences a peak point and imbibition into the porous substrate is slower as compared with the drainage; (iii) slow imbibition: the liquid volume fraction at the foam/porous substrate interface increases to a maximum limiting value and a free liquid layer is formed between the foam and the porous substrate. However, the free liquid layer disappears after some time. The transition points between these three different drainage/imbibition regimes were delineated by introducing two dimensionless numbers. PMID:25811970

  11. TEPIC - A New High Temperature Structural Foam

    SciTech Connect

    Whinner, L L; Goods, S H; Tootle, M L; Neuschwanger, C L

    1998-10-01

    The formulation, processing characteristics, microstructure and mechanical properties of a new structural foam, suitable for use at service temperatures up to 200 degrees C, are reported. In each of the respects, the foam is compared to an existing material, called APO-BMI that is currently in use. When these two foams are directly compared, the new foam, called TEPIC, is found to be superior in its mechanical performance. TEPIC is formulated from a non-carcinogenic isocyanate, a di-functional epoxide, and glass microballoons. Compared to APO-BMI processing, TEPIC processing is facile and economical.

  12. Couette flow of two-dimensional foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katgert, G.; Tighe, B. P.; Möbius, M. E.; van Hecke, M.

    2010-06-01

    We experimentally investigate flow of quasi-two-dimensional disordered foams in Couette geometries, both for foams squeezed below a top plate and for freely floating foams (bubble rafts). With the top plate, the flows are strongly localized and rate dependent. For the bubble rafts the flow profiles become essentially rate independent, the local and global rheology do not match, and in particular the foam flows in regions where the stress is below the global yield stress. We attribute this to nonlocal effects and show that the "fluidity" model recently introduced by Goyon et al. (Nature, 454 (2008) 84) captures the essential features of flow both with and without a top plate.

  13. Does water foam exist in microgravity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caps, H.; Delon, G.; Vandewalle, N.; Guillermic, R. M.; Pitois, O.; Biance, A. L.; Saulnier, L.; Yazhgur, P.; Rio, E.; Salonen, A.; Langevin, D.

    2014-05-01

    Liquid foams are omnipresent in everyday life, but little is understood about their properties. On Earth, the liquid rapidly drains out of the foam because of gravity, leading to rupture of the thin liquid films between bubbles. Several questions arise: are liquid foams more stable in microgravity environments? Can pure liquids, such as water, form stable foams in microgravity whereas they do not on Earth? In order to answer these questions, we performed experiments both in parabolic flights and in the International Space Station.

  14. Effect of Salts on Drainage of Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sett, Soumyadip; Karakashev, Stoyan; Smoukov, Stoyan; Yarin, Alexander

    Gravitational drainage from thin planar vertical sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) films in the presence of inorganic salts was experimentally studied. Strong ion-specific effects of the counter ions were found to affect the stability and the rate of drainage of the planar foam films as a function of concentration of the inorganic salts. The counter-ions can either stabilize (below the critical concentration) or destabilize the foam films. We found that the strongest foam stabilizer salt became the strongest foam destabilizer beyond its critical concentration.

  15. MECHANISTIC STUDIES OF IMPROVED FOAM EOR PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    William R. Rossen

    2003-03-31

    The objective of this research is to widen the application of foam to enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by investigating fundamental mechanisms of foams in porous media. This research will lay the groundwork for more applied research on foams for improved sweep efficiency in miscible gas, steam and surfactant-based EOR. Task 1 investigates the pore-scale interactions between foam bubbles and polymer molecules. Task 2 examines the mechanisms of gas trapping, and interaction between gas trapping and foam effectiveness. Task 3 investigates mechanisms of foam generation in porous media. The most significant progress during this period was made on Tasks 2 and 3. Research on Task 2 focused on experiments on gas trapping during liquid injection. A novel apparatus, similar to that in Kibodeaux and Rossen (1997), monitors average water saturation in a core moment-by-moment by weighing the core. Our experiments find that water saturation increases more during liquid injection than previously conjectured--in other words, less gas is trapped by liquid injection than previously thought. A number of unexpected trends in behavior were observed. It appears that these can be reconciled to previous theory of gas trapping by foam (Cheng et al., 2001) given that the experimental conditions were different from previous experiments. Results will be described in detail in the PhD dissertation of Qiang Xu, expected to be completed in early 2003. Regarding Task 3, recent laboratory research in a wide range of porous media shows that creating foam in steady flow in homogeneous media requires exceeding a minimum pressure gradient (Gauglitz et al., 2002). Data fit trends predicted by a theory in which foam generation depends on attaining sufficient {del}p to mobilize liquid lenses present before foam generation. Data show three regimes: a coarse-foam regime at low {del}p, strong foam at high {del}p, and, in between, a transient regime alternating between weaker and stronger foam. We for the first

  16. Verification of a model for foam flotation column operation

    SciTech Connect

    Kiefer, J.E.; Rodriguez, J.; McIntyre, G.; Thackston, E.L.; Wilson, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    We report experimental data testing the validity of a mathematical model for the time-dependent operation of a continuous-flow foam floating column.Sodium lauryl sulfate was the surfactant being removed. The responses of the column in steady-state operation and under the influence of rectangular pulses in sodium lauryl sulfates concentration and in hydraulic loading rate were investigated and compared with the results of computer simulation.Effluent surfactant concentrations were well simulated under all conditions. It was found that the fraction of liquid in the Plateau borders varies somewhat with the hydraulic loading rate, which causes some discrepancy between calculated and observed collapsed foamate flow rates.

  17. Foam-Driven Fractures of an Elastic Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Ching-Yao; Smiddy, Sam; Stone, Howard

    2015-11-01

    We report an experimental study of foam-driven fractures in an elastic matrix. When a pressurized foam is constantly injected into a gelatin matrix with a constant flow rate, the foam generates a disc-like fracture which is commonly observed in liquid-driven fractures. Compare to liquid-driven fractures, foam-driven fractures grow faster with time. We investigate how the rheological behaviour of foams affects the fracture characteristics by varying the air volume fraction of the foam, the types and concentration of surfactants in the foam. Foam-fracturing reduces the environmental costs of hydraulic fracturing, which inspires this laboratory study.

  18. MECHANISTIC STUDIES OF IMPROVED FOAM EOR PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    William R. Rossen

    2003-03-31

    The objective of this research is to widen the application of foam to enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by investigating fundamental mechanisms of foams in porous media. This research will lay the groundwork for more applied research on foams for improved sweep efficiency in miscible gas, steam and surfactant-based EOR. Task 1 investigates the pore-scale interactions between foam bubbles and polymer molecules. Task 2 examines the mechanisms of gas trapping, and interaction between gas trapping and foam effectiveness. Task 3 investigates mechanisms of foam generation in porous media. Significant progress was made during this period on all three Tasks. Regarding Task 1, we studied the behavior of foam made without polymer, with low-molecular-weight and high-molecular-weight polyacrylamide, and with xanthan polymer in sandpacks. Results consistently showed that polymer does not stabilize foam in porous media per se. Rather, it destabilizes foam to some extent, but may increase the viscosity of water sufficiently to increase the resistance to flow in spite of the lower intrinsic stability of the foam. This is consistent with the hypothesis the motivated our study. Results also showed that polymer shifts behavior from the high-quality foam-flow regime toward the low-quality regime, consistent with our initial hypothesis. Other aspects of the experimental results were puzzling and are discussed in the text of this report. Research on Task 2 included building an apparatus for gas-phase tracer tests for direct measurement of trapped-gas saturation with foam. We also investigated the nature of the low-quality foam regime, which is thought to be controlled by gas trapping and mobilization. In both the studies of polymers and foam and separate studies of CO{sub 2} foam, we observed behavior that seems to be related to the low-quality regime, but shows unexpected trends: specifically, a decrease in pressure gradient with increasing liquid injection rate, at fixed gas injection rate

  19. Investigation for the selection of foaming agents to produce steel foams

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.J.; Eifert, H.H.; Knuewer, M.; Weber, M.; Baumeister, J.

    1998-12-31

    During earlier investigators conducted at the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Materials Research (IFAM), concentrating on the metal foaming technology using the powder metallurgy process, it was shown that some steel alloys are foamable with Fraunhofer`s patented powder technology approach. To further investigate the foamability of steel alloys, suitable foaming agents need to be identified and characterized. This article reports the finding of two metallic compounds used for steel foaming. The foaming behaviors of the selected foaming agents in the steel powder compacts are also evaluated in terms of different alloying elements.

  20. Fabrication of a graphite/epoxy composite leading edge for laminar flow control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beall, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    Lockheed, under NASA contract, has recently completed the first phase of a program to evaluate laminar flow control concepts for transport aircraft. Achievement of laminar flow over a wing surface requires a system of slots, metering holes, ducts and pumps to be used to remove the turbulent air adjacent to the surface. This requirement poses severe restrictions on conventional metallic structure. Graphite/epoxy composite with its unique properties appears to be the material that might solve the very complex structural problems associated with a laminar flow control aircraft. A six-foot span graphite/epoxy test article incorporating provisions for leading edge cleaning, deicing and laminar flow control was designed, fabricated and tested.

  1. Detailed investigation of the microbial community in foaming activated sludge reveals novel foam formers

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Feng; Wang, Zhi-Ping; Yu, Ke; Zhang, T.

    2015-01-01

    Foaming of activated sludge (AS) causes adverse impacts on wastewater treatment operation and hygiene. In this study, we investigated the microbial communities of foam, foaming AS and non-foaming AS in a sewage treatment plant via deep-sequencing of the taxonomic marker genes 16S rRNA and mycobacterial rpoB and a metagenomic approach. In addition to Actinobacteria, many genera (e.g., Clostridium XI, Arcobacter, Flavobacterium) were more abundant in the foam than in the AS. On the other hand, deep-sequencing of rpoB did not detect any obligate pathogenic mycobacteria in the foam. We found that unknown factors other than the abundance of Gordonia sp. could determine the foaming process, because abundance of the same species was stable before and after a foaming event over six months. More interestingly, although the dominant Gordonia foam former was the closest with G. amarae, it was identified as an undescribed Gordonia species by referring to the 16S rRNA gene, gyrB and, most convincingly, the reconstructed draft genome from metagenomic reads. Our results, based on metagenomics and deep sequencing, reveal that foams are derived from diverse taxa, which expands previous understanding and provides new insight into the underlying complications of the foaming phenomenon in AS. PMID:25560234

  2. Detailed investigation of the microbial community in foaming activated sludge reveals novel foam formers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Feng; Wang, Zhi-Ping; Yu, Ke; Zhang, T.

    2015-01-01

    Foaming of activated sludge (AS) causes adverse impacts on wastewater treatment operation and hygiene. In this study, we investigated the microbial communities of foam, foaming AS and non-foaming AS in a sewage treatment plant via deep-sequencing of the taxonomic marker genes 16S rRNA and mycobacterial rpoB and a metagenomic approach. In addition to Actinobacteria, many genera (e.g., Clostridium XI, Arcobacter, Flavobacterium) were more abundant in the foam than in the AS. On the other hand, deep-sequencing of rpoB did not detect any obligate pathogenic mycobacteria in the foam. We found that unknown factors other than the abundance of Gordonia sp. could determine the foaming process, because abundance of the same species was stable before and after a foaming event over six months. More interestingly, although the dominant Gordonia foam former was the closest with G. amarae, it was identified as an undescribed Gordonia species by referring to the 16S rRNA gene, gyrB and, most convincingly, the reconstructed draft genome from metagenomic reads. Our results, based on metagenomics and deep sequencing, reveal that foams are derived from diverse taxa, which expands previous understanding and provides new insight into the underlying complications of the foaming phenomenon in AS.

  3. Sandwich Composite, Syntactic Foam Core Based, Application for Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, Andrew J.; Kaul, Raj K.; McMahon, William M.; Reinarts, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    The current Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) launch vehicle has several metal based components that require a Thermal Protective System (TPS) be applied to the exterior surface to ensure its structural integrity and to protect the interior hardware from aerodynamic heating. TPS materials have distinct disadvantages associated with their use. One disadvantage to the application of TPS is that it can act as a debris source to the Space Shuttle Orbiter during flight and it also adds weight to the system without directly contributing any structural strength. One of the specific areas examined under this program was to replace a metal/TPS system with polymer based composites. A polymer matrix based sandwich composite was developed which had both structural and insulative properties to meet the high aerodynamic structural and heating load survival requirements. The SRB Nose Cap was selected as a candidate for this application. The sandwich system being qualified for this application is a carbon/epoxy outer and inner skin with a high strength-low thermal conductivity syntactic foam core.

  4. FOAM GLASS INSULATION FROM WASTE GLASS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Waste glass has proven to be effective for the production of foam glass insulation both in the bulk or rigid board form and pellet form. Problems inherent with the use of water, carbon black and calcium carbonate as the foaming agents, have been identified and many have been solv...

  5. Development of Steel Foam Materials and Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth Kremer; Anthony Liszkiewicz; James Adkins

    2004-10-20

    In the past few years there has been a growing interest in lightweight metal foams. Demands for weight reduction, improved fuel efficiency, and increased passenger safety in automobiles now has manufacturers seriously considering the use of metal foams, in contrast to a few years ago, when the same materials would have been ruled out for technical or economical reasons. The objective of this program was to advance the development and use of steel foam materials, by demonstrating the advantages of these novel lightweight materials in selected generic applications. Progress was made in defining materials and process parameters; characterization of physical and mechanical properties; and fabrication and testing of generic steel foam-filled shapes with compositions from 2.5 wt.% to 0.7 wt.% carbon. A means of producing steel foam shapes with uniform long range porosity levels of 50 to 60 percent was demonstrated and verified with NDE methods. Steel foam integrated beams, cylinders and plates were mechanically tested and demonstrated advantages in bend stiffness, bend resistance, and crush energy absorption. Methods of joining by welding, adhesive bonding, and mechanical fastening were investigated. It is important to keep in mind that steel foam is a conventional material in an unconventional form. A substantial amount of physical and mechanical properties are presented throughout the report and in a properties database at the end of the report to support designer's in applying steel foam in unconventional ways.

  6. Urethane foam process improvements. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, D.R.

    1995-03-01

    A study was completed to evaluate the foam molding process for environmental and technical improvements. The investigation led to a replacement for chlorinated solvent usage, a potential permanent mold release coating, improved tooling design, and shrinkage characterization of foams filled with varying levels of aluminum oxide.

  7. Method of foaming a liquid metal

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Albert K.; Johnson, Carl E.

    1980-01-01

    The addition of a small quantity of barium to liquid metal NaK or sodium has been found to promote foam formation and improve bubble retention in the liquid metal. A stable liquid metal foam will provide a more homogeneous liquid metal flow through the channel of a two-phase liquid metal MHD power generator to improve operating efficiency.

  8. Foam-Mixing-And-Dispensing Machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chong, Keith Y.; Toombs, Gordon R.; Jackson, Richard J.

    1996-01-01

    Time-and-money-saving machine produces consistent, homogeneously mixed foam, enhancing production efficiency. Automatically mixes and dispenses polyurethane foam in quantities specified by weight. Consists of cart-mounted, air-driven proportioning unit; air-activated mechanical mixing gun; programmable timer/counter, and controller.

  9. Measuring Rind Thickness on Polyurethane Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C.; Miller, J.; Brown, H.

    1985-01-01

    Nondestructive test determines rind thickness of polyurethane foam. Surface harness of foam measured by Shore durometer method: hardness on Shore D scale correlates well with rind thickness. Shore D hardness of 20, for example, indicates rind thickness of 0.04 inch (1 millimeter). New hardness test makes it easy to determine rind thickness of sample nondestructively and to adjust fabrication variables accordingly.

  10. Foam core materials for structural sandwich panels

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Jongshin.

    1991-01-01

    The author first investigates the creep of polymer foam cores. Models for the creep of linear and nonlinear viscoelastic polymer foams are proposed. Experimental results for the creep of a rigid polyurethane foam are compared to the mode; agreement is good. The results indicate that creep can limit the design of building panels with polymer foam cores. Next, he studies the potential of using ceramic foams as a core material in building panels. Ceramic foams have a high stiffness, high creep resistance, low cost, and are incombustible. Ceramic foams, however, have a low fracture toughness and tensile strength. Assuming that the variability of cell wall modulus of rupture follows a Weibull distribution, there is a cell size effect on both the fracture toughness and tensile strength. Both the tensile strength and fracture toughness of ceramic foams can be improved by controlling the cell size. Since cell wall deformation of cellular materials is primarily by bending, the mechanical properties of cellular materials may be improved by making cell walls into sandwich structures. Hollow-sphere composites are made by introducing thin-walled hollow spheres into a matrix.

  11. Damping of liquid sloshing by foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauret, A.; Boulogne, F.; Cappello, J.; Dressaire, E.; Stone, H. A.

    2015-02-01

    When a container is set in motion, the free surface of the liquid starts to oscillate or slosh. Such effects can be observed when a glass of water is handled carelessly and the fluid sloshes or even spills over the rims of the container. However, beer does not slosh as readily as water, which suggests that foam could be used to damp sloshing. In this work, we study experimentally the effect on sloshing of a liquid foam placed on top of a liquid bath. We generate a monodisperse two-dimensional liquid foam in a rectangular container and track the motion of the foam. The influence of the foam on the sloshing dynamics is experimentally characterized: only a few layers of bubbles are sufficient to significantly damp the oscillations. We rationalize our experimental findings with a model that describes the foam contribution to the damping coefficient through viscous dissipation on the walls of the container. Then we extend our study to confined three-dimensional liquid foam and observe that the behavior of 2D and confined 3D systems are very similar. Thus, we conclude that only the bubbles close to the walls have a significant impact on the dissipation of energy. The possibility to damp liquid sloshing using foam is promising in numerous industrial applications such as the transport of liquefied gas in tankers or for propellants in rocket engines.

  12. Low-density carbonized resorcinol-formaldehyde foams. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, F.M.; Buckley, S.R.; Giles, C.L. Jr.; Haendler, B.L.; Hair, L.M.; Letts, S.A.; Overturf, G.E. III; Price, C.W.; Cook, R.C.

    1991-07-04

    This report documents research and development on resorcinol- formaldehyde-based foam materials conducted between 1986 and June 1990, when the effort was discontinued. The foams discussed are resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) foam, carbonized RF (CRF) foam, and two composite foams, a polystyrene/RF (PS/RF) foam and its carbonized derivative (CPR). The RF foams are synthesized by the polycondensation of resorcinol with formaldehyde in a slightly basic solution. Their structure and density depend strongly on the concentration of the sodium carbonate catalyst. The have an interconnected bead structure similar to that of silica aerogels; bead sizes range from 30 to 130 {Angstrom}, and cell sizes are less than 0.1 {mu}m. We have achieved densities of 16 to 200 mg/cm{sup 3}. The RF foams can be pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere to form a vitreous carbon foam (CRF), which has a similar microstructure but much higher mechanical strength. The PS/RF foams are obtained by filling the 2- to 3-{mu}m cells of PS foam (a low-density hydrocarbon foam we have developed) with RF. The resultant foams have the outstanding handling and machinability of the PS foam matrix and the small cell size of RF. Pyrolyzing PS/RF foams causes depolymerization and loss of the PS; the resulting CPR foams have a structure similar to the PS foams in which CRF both replicates and fills the PS cells.

  13. Low-density carbonized resorcinol-formaldehyde foams

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, F.M.; Buckley, S.R.; Giles, C.L. Jr.; Haendler, B.L.; Hair, L.M.; Letts, S.A.; Overturf, G.E. III; Price, C.W.; Cook, R.C.

    1991-07-04

    This report documents research and development on resorcinol- formaldehyde-based foam materials conducted between 1986 and June 1990, when the effort was discontinued. The foams discussed are resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) foam, carbonized RF (CRF) foam, and two composite foams, a polystyrene/RF (PS/RF) foam and its carbonized derivative (CPR). The RF foams are synthesized by the polycondensation of resorcinol with formaldehyde in a slightly basic solution. Their structure and density depend strongly on the concentration of the sodium carbonate catalyst. The have an interconnected bead structure similar to that of silica aerogels; bead sizes range from 30 to 130 {Angstrom}, and cell sizes are less than 0.1 {mu}m. We have achieved densities of 16 to 200 mg/cm{sup 3}. The RF foams can be pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere to form a vitreous carbon foam (CRF), which has a similar microstructure but much higher mechanical strength. The PS/RF foams are obtained by filling the 2- to 3-{mu}m cells of PS foam (a low-density hydrocarbon foam we have developed) with RF. The resultant foams have the outstanding handling and machinability of the PS foam matrix and the small cell size of RF. Pyrolyzing PS/RF foams causes depolymerization and loss of the PS; the resulting CPR foams have a structure similar to the PS foams in which CRF both replicates and fills the PS cells.

  14. Tensile properties of nanoclay reinforced epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, H.; Trada, Mohan

    2013-08-01

    Kinetic epoxy resin was filled with nanoclay to increase tensile properties of the composite for civil and structural. This project manufactured samples with different percentages by weight of nanoclay in the composites in steps of 1 wt %, which were then post-cured in an oven. The samples were then subjected to tensile tests. The results showed that the composite with 3 wt % of nanoclay produced the highest yield and tensile strengths. However, the Young's modulus increased with increasing nanoparticulate loading. It is hoped that the discussion and results in this work would not only contribute towards the further development of nanoclay reinforced epoxy composites with enhanced material properties, but also provide useful information for the studies of fracture toughness, tensile properties and flexural properties of other composites.

  15. Synthesis of liquid crystalline epoxy monomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabia, J.; Galina, H.; Mossety-Leszczak, B.; Ulanski, J.; Wojciechowski, Piotr; Wlochowicz, Andrzej

    2002-06-01

    A two-stage method of synthesis of liquid-crystalline diepoxy monomers has been developed. In the first stage, esterification of 4-hydroxyphenyl-4-hydroxybenzoate or 4,4'- biphenol or 4,4'-dihydroxyazobenzene was carried out using 4-penetenoic acid. The resulting olefinic precursors were oxidized with m-chloroperoxybenzoic acid to introduce the epoxy groups. The structure of products was confirmed by FT- IR and 1H NMR. Examinations on a polarization microscope with a hot plate confirmed the presence of mesomorphic phases in both the precursors and monomers. The phase transition temperatures were in the range of 73.5 (at cooling) to 128.0 degree(s)C for olefinic precursors and in the range 57.1 (at cooling) to 143 degree(s)C for epoxy compounds, as determined by DSC and thermo-optical analysis (TOA).

  16. Engineered carbon foam for temperature control applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almajali, Mohammad Rajab

    The need for advanced thermal management materials is well recognized in the electronics and communication industries. An overall reduction in size of electronic components has lead to higher power dissipation and increased the necessity for innovative cooling designs. In response, material suppliers have developed and are continuing to develop, an increasing number of light weight thermal management materials. The new carbon foam is a low density and high thermal conductivity material which has the potential to radically improve heat transfer, thereby reducing size and weight of equipment while simultaneously increasing its efficiency and capabilities. However, carbon foam exhibits low strength and low heat capacity. The present work is intended to overcome these two main drawbacks using a combinatorial approach: (i) initially, copper coating was carried out to improve the thermo-mechanical properties of carbon foam. The thermal and mechanical properties of coated foam were measured using laser flash technique and compression test, respectively. An analytical model was developed to calculate the effective thermal conductivity. It was observed that the copper-coated carbon foam with 50% porosity can attain a thermal conductivity of 180 W/mK. The results from the analytical model were in a very good agreement with experimental results. The modulus increased from 4.5 MPa to 8.6 MPa and the plateau stress increased from 54 kPa to 171 kPa. The relationships between the measured properties and the copper weight ratio were determined. The above analyses demonstrated the significance of copper coating in tailoring carbon foam properties. (ii) Numerical and experimental studies were performed to analyze the phase change behavior of wax/foam composite encapsulated in metal casing. A two-energy equation model was solved using computational fluid dynamics software (CFD). Interfacial effects at the casing-composite junction and between the wax-foam surfaces and the capillary

  17. Glass/Epoxy Door Panel for Automobiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, J. L. JR.

    1985-01-01

    Lightweight panel cost-effective. Integrally-molded intrusion strap key feature of composite outer door panel. Strap replaces bulky and heavy steel instrusion beam of conventional door. Standard steel inner panel used for demonstration purposes. Door redesigned to exploit advantages of composite outer panel thinner. Outer panel for automobilie door, made of glass/epoxy composite material, lighter than conventional steel door panel, meets same strength requirements, and less expensive.

  18. Autoclave foam concrete: Structure and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mestnikov, Alexei; Semenov, Semen; Strokova, Valeria; Nelubova, Viktoria

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the technology and properties of autoclaved foam concrete taking into account practical experience and laboratory studies. The results of study of raw materials and analysis of structure and properties of foam-concrete before and after autoclave treatment are basic in this work. Experimental studies of structure and properties of foam concrete are carried out according to up-to-date methods and equipment on the base of the shared knowledge centers. Results of experimental studies give a deep understanding of properties of raw materials, possible changes and new formations in inner layers of porous material providing the improvement of constructional and operational properties of autoclaved foam concrete. Principal directions of technology enhancement as well as developing of production of autoclave foam concretes under cold-weather conditions in Russia climate are justified.

  19. Surface Roughness Reduction on Divinylbenzene Foam Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streit, Jon; Karnes, John; Motta, Brian; Petta, Nicole

    2009-11-01

    Inertial fusion energy targets for the Naval Research Laboratory's High Average Power Laser Program require millimeter-scale, low density foam capsules with a gas permeation barrier and an outer surface roughness less than 50 nm RMS. Divinylbenzene (DVB) foam is a candidate for the capsule wall material, but its porous, open celled surface has been both too rough and difficult to seal. To overcome this difficulty we have repurposed a previously reported dual stage initiator emulsion microencapsulation method, adding an additional step that enhances the surface of the foam capsules. Using both low and high temperature initiators allows the DVB foam to gel in the low temperature stage and a water soluble monomer to be added and polymerized during the high temperature stage without breaking down the emulsion. This method forms a submicron skin that covers the open celled DVB foam surface, resulting in a superior substrate for gas permeation barrier deposition.

  20. Foam generator and viscometer apparatus and process

    DOEpatents

    Reed, Troy D.; Pickell, Mark B.; Volk, Leonard J.

    2004-10-26

    An apparatus and process to generate a liquid-gas-surfactant foam and to measure its viscosity and enable optical and or electronic measurements of physical properties. The process includes the steps of pumping selected and measured liquids and measured gases into a mixing cell. The mixing cell is pressurized to a desired pressure and maintained at a desired pressure. Liquids and gas are mixed in the mixing cell to produce a foam of desired consistency. The temperature of the foam in the mixing cell is controlled. Foam is delivered from the mixing cell through a viscometer under controlled pressure and temperature conditions where the viscous and physical properties of the foam are measured and observed.

  1. Method for extruding pitch based foam

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James W.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for extruding pitch based foam is disclosed. The method includes the steps of: forming a viscous pitch foam; passing the precursor through an extrusion tube; and subjecting the precursor in said extrusion tube to a temperature gradient which varies along the length of the extrusion tube to form an extruded carbon foam. The apparatus includes an extrusion tube having a passageway communicatively connected to a chamber in which a viscous pitch foam formed in the chamber paring through the extrusion tube, and a heating mechanism in thermal communication with the tube for heating the viscous pitch foam along the length of the tube in accordance with a predetermined temperature gradient.

  2. Macroporous polymer foams by hydrocarbon templating.

    PubMed

    Shastri, V P; Martin, I; Langer, R

    2000-02-29

    Porous polymeric media (polymer foams) are utilized in a wide range of applications, such as thermal and mechanical insulators, solid supports for catalysis, and medical devices. A process for the production of polymer foams has been developed. This process, which is applicable to a wide range of polymers, uses a hydrocarbon particulate phase as a template for the precipitation of the polymer phase and subsequent pore formation. The use of a hydrocarbon template allows for enhanced control over pore structure, porosity, and other structural and bulk characteristics of the polymer foam. Polymer foams with densities as low as 120 mg/cc, porosity as high as 87%, and high surface areas (20 m(2)/g) have been produced. Foams of poly(l-lactic acid), a biodegradable polymer, produced by this process have been used to engineer a variety of different structures, including tissues with complex geometries such as in the likeness of a human nose. PMID:10696111

  3. Modeling Decomposition of Unconfined Rigid Polyurethane Foam

    SciTech Connect

    CHU,TZE YAO; ERICKSON,KENNETH L.; HOBBS,MICHAEL L.

    1999-11-01

    The decomposition of unconfined rigid polyurethane foam has been modeled by a kinetic bond-breaking scheme describing degradation of a primary polymer and formation of a thermally stable secondary polymer. The bond-breaking scheme is resolved using percolation theory to describe evolving polymer fragments. The polymer fragments vaporize according to individual vapor pressures. Kinetic parameters for the model were obtained from Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA). The chemical structure of the foam was determined from the preparation techniques and ingredients used to synthesize the foam. Scale-up effects were investigated by simulating the response of an incident heat flux of 25 W/cm{sup 2} on a partially confined 8.8-cm diameter by 15-cm long right circular cylinder of foam which contained an encapsulated component. Predictions of center, midradial, and component temperatures, as well as regression of the foam surface, were in agreement with measurements using thermocouples and X-ray imaging.

  4. Elimination of toxicity from polyurethane foam plugs used for plant culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, R. M.; Schwartzkopf, S. H.; Tibbitts, T. W.; Langhans, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    Polyurethane foam plugs commonly are used as collars or supports to grow plants in solution culture. Despite their utility, these foam plugs can be quite toxic to plants, particularly to small seedlings. We have observed tissue injury in tests using plugs to support lettuce, red beet, and potato plants in solution culture. Typically, the injury is initiated on the hypocotyl or stem tissue in direct contact with the foam, and appears within 30 hr as a brownish discoloration on the tissue surface. This discoloration can be followed by complete collapse of affected tissue and eventual death of the seedling. When injury does not progress beyond surface browning, the seedling survives but growth is slowed. In this paper, we report on different treatments that can be used to remove the toxicity of these plugs so they can be used in plant research.

  5. Elimination of toxicity from polyurethane foam plugs used for plant culture.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, R M; Schwartzkopf, S H; Tibbitts, T W; Langhans, R W

    1985-06-01

    Polyurethane foam plugs commonly are used as collars or supports to grow plants in solution culture. Despite their utility, these foam plugs can be quite toxic to plants, particularly to small seedlings. We have observed tissue injury in tests using plugs to support lettuce, red beet, and potato plants in solution culture. Typically, the injury is initiated on the hypocotyl or stem tissue in direct contact with the foam, and appears within 30 hr as a brownish discoloration on the tissue surface. This discoloration can be followed by complete collapse of affected tissue and eventual death of the seedling. When injury does not progress beyond surface browning, the seedling survives but growth is slowed. In this paper, we report on different treatments that can be used to remove the toxicity of these plugs so they can be used in plant research. PMID:11539821

  6. Safe epoxy encapsulant for high voltage magnetics

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, R.O.; Archer, W.E.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the use of Formula 456, an aliphatic amine cured epoxy for impregnating coils and high voltage transformers. Sandia has evaluated a number of MDA-free epoxy encapsulants which relied on either anhydride or other aromatic amine curing agents. The use of aliphatic amine curing agents was more recently evaluated and has resulted in the definition of Formula 456 resin. Methylene dianiline (MDA) has been used for more than 20 years as the curing agent for various epoxy formulations throughout the Department of Energy and much of industry. Sandia National Laboratories began the process of replacing MDA with other formulations because of regulations imposed by OSHA on the use of MDA. OSHA has regulated MDA because it is a suspect carcinogen. Typically the elimination of OSHA-regulated materials provides a rare opportunity to qualify new formulations in a range of demanding applications. It was important to take full advantage of that opportunity, although the associated materials qualification effort was costly. Small high voltage transformers are one of those demanding applications. The successful implementation of the new formulation for high reliability transformers will be described. The test results that demonstrate the parts are qualified for use in DOE weapon systems will be presented.

  7. Morphology development of rubber-modified epoxy thermosets

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, O.; Ward, T.C.

    1996-12-31

    Epoxy thermosets have been widely used as high performance adhesives and matrix resins for composites due to their outstanding mechanical and thermal properties, such as high modulus and tensile strength, high glass transition temperature, high thermal stability, and moisture resistance. Incorporation of a secondary rubbery phase into the glassy epoxy matrix can improve impact and fracture toughness of epoxy thermosets without sacrificing the other desirable properties of the neat epoxy thermoset. During the curing process, the initial homogeneous solution of epoxy resin-curing agent-rubber generally forms rubber-rich and epoxy-rich phases by a phase separation process which is arrested by gelation or vitrification. The final morphology developed by the cure depends on relative rates of cure reaction and phase separation. Cure conditions and the initial rubber composition control the morphology of the system and thus control the mechanical properties of the system.

  8. Biobased Epoxy Nanocomposites Derived from Lignin-Based Monomers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shou; Abu-Omar, Mahdi M

    2015-07-13

    Biobased epoxy nanocomposites were synthesized based on 2-methoxy-4-propylphenol (dihydroeugenol, DHE), a molecule that has been obtained from the lignin component of biomass. To increase the content of hydroxyl groups, DHE was o-demethylated using aqueous HBr to yield propylcatechol (DHEO), which was subsequently glycidylated to epoxy monomer. Optimal conditions in terms of yield and epoxy equivalent weight were found to be 60 °C with equal NaOH/phenolic hydroxyl molar ratio. The structural evolution from DHE to cured epoxy was followed by (1)H NMR and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The nano-montmorillonite modified DHEO epoxy exhibited improved storage modulus and thermal stability as determined from dynamic mechanical analysis and thermogravimetric analysis. This study widens the synthesis routes of biobased epoxy thermosets from lignin-based molecules. PMID:26135389

  9. Nature of the adhesion bond between epoxy adhesive and steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vettegren', V. I.; Mamalimov, R. I.; Savitskii, A. V.; Shcherbakov, I. P.; Sytov, V. V.; Sytov, V. A.

    2014-03-01

    The potential difference that appears in the epoxy resin located between two grade 3 steel plates is studied. One of them is stored in epoxy resin to reach equilibrium, and the second plate is coated with an asprepared mixture of epoxy resin with a hardener. It is found that the potential difference decreases in time because of charge transfer by Fe2+ ions through epoxy resin. The luminescence and infrared absorption spectra of the epoxy adhesive on the grade 3 steel surface are recorded. An analysis of these spectra shows that Fe2+ ions penetrate into the as-prepared mixture of epoxy resin with the hardener, and interact with CN groups in the mixture, and form coordination compounds. As a result, a diffusion layer saturated by the coordination compounds forms at the interface between the steel and the adhesive.

  10. Epoxy thermoset networks derived from vegetable oils and their blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Chang; Ravalli, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    Epoxidized vegetable oils (EVOs), such as epoxidized soybean oil and linseed oils were prepared by the partial oxidation of the unsaturated double bonds in vegetable oils and used as monomers for preparing epoxy thermoset materials based on the cationic polymerization. These EVOs have been used to prepare epoxy thermosets of different network densities by cationic polymerization using onium salt catalyst. The crosslinked epoxy thermosets provide an ideal platform to study the structure-property-relationships of networked polymers. In particular, rheological studies on the epoxidized vegetable oil thermosets have been performed to measure the molecular weights between crosslinks (Mx) in the epoxy thermosets and to ultimately elucidate the role of functionality of epoxy groups in EVO on the mechanical and thermophysical properties of the epoxy thermoset materials. NSF DMR POLYMERS 1308617.

  11. Rate dependent response and failure of a ductile epoxy and carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composite

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Eric N; Rae, Philip J; Dattelbaum, Dana M; Stahl, David B

    2010-01-01

    An extensive characterization suite has been performed on the response and failure of a ductile epoxy 55A and uniaxial carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composite of IM7 fibers in 55A resin from the quasistatic to shock regime. The quasistatic and intermediate strain rate response, including elastic modulus, yield and failure have are characterized by quasistatic, SHPB, and DMA measurements as a function of fiber orientation and temperature. The high strain rate shock effect of fiber orientation in the composite and response of the pure resin are presented for plate impact experiments. It has previously been shown that at lower impact velocities the shock velocity is strongly dependent on fiber orientation but at higher impact velocity the in-plane and through thickness Hugoniots converge. The current results are compared with previous studies of the shock response of carbon fiber composites with more conventional brittle epoxy matrices. The spall response of the composite is measured and compared with quasistatic fracture toughness measurements.

  12. Preparation of graphene foam with high performance by modified self-assembly method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenhui; Sun, Youyi; Liu, Tantan; Li, Diansen; Hou, Chunlin; Gao, Li; Liu, Yaqing

    2016-03-01

    Recently, self-assembly method was applied for preparation of graphene foam. However, it is still a great challenge to obtain a three-dimensional graphene network with high performance (e.g., low density, high mechanical strength and high conductivity together) for the self-assembly method. Herein, a modified self-assembly method applied for preparation of graphene foam was investigated, in which, L-ascorbic acid and HI were firstly chosen as the reducing agent, and further reduced by hydrazine hydrate. The results demonstrated that the graphene foam showed high compressive strength (ca. 320 kPa), high electrical conductivity (20.6 S/m) and low density (14.7 mg/cm-1). Especially, the obtained compressive strength (ca. 320 kPa) is the highest value compared to the data of graphene foam reported in previous works. This phenomenon may be due to following three reasons: (1) the reaction between hydrazine hydrate and graphene brought some covalent bonds among graphene sheets; (2) graphene foam was achieved by high hydrophobicity and electrostatic repulsion which inhibit the restacking of graphene sheets; (3) the removal of the oxygen groups by hydrazine hydrate efficiently restores conjugation of sp2 regions and the π-π interaction in the cross-linking sites, which tightly bonds the sheets together. The obtained graphene foam not only had good porous structure and mechanical strength, but also showed excellent satisfactory double-layer capacitive behavior with good electrochemical cyclic stability and high specific capacitance of 171.0 F/g for application in electrode of supercapacitors and absorption capacities for the removal of various oils and dyes from water.

  13. Laser-based coatings removal

    SciTech Connect

    Freiwald, J.G.; Freiwald, D.

    1995-12-01

    Over the years as building and equipment surfaces became contaminated with low levels of uranium or plutonium dust, coats of paint were applied to stabilize the contaminants in place. Most of the earlier paint used was lead-based paint. More recently, various non-lead-based paints, such as two-part epoxy, are used. For D & D (decontamination and decommissioning), it is desirable to remove the paints or other coatings rather than having to tear down and dispose of the entire building.

  14. Hybrid Deployable Foam Antennas and Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivellini, Tommaso; Willis, Paul; Hodges, Richard; Spitz, Suzanne

    2006-01-01

    Hybrid deployable radio antennas and reflectors of a proposed type would feature rigid narrower apertures plus wider adjoining apertures comprising reflective surfaces supported by open-cell polymeric foam structures (see figure). The open-cell foam structure of such an antenna would be compressed for compact stowage during transport. To initiate deployment of the antenna, the foam structure would simply be released from its stowage mechanical restraint. The elasticity of the foam would drive the expansion of the foam structure to its full size and shape. There are several alternatives for fabricating a reflective surface supported by a polymeric foam structure. One approach would be to coat the foam with a metal. Another approach would be to attach a metal film or a metal-coated polymeric membrane to the foam. Yet another approach would be to attach a metal mesh to the foam. The hybrid antenna design and deployment concept as proposed offers significant advantages over other concepts for deployable antennas: 1) In the unlikely event of failure to deploy, the rigid narrow portion of the antenna would still function, providing a minimum level of assured performance. In contrast, most other concepts for deploying a large antenna from compact stowage are of an "all or nothing" nature: the antenna is not useful at all until and unless it is fully deployed. 2) Stowage and deployment would not depend on complex mechanisms or actuators, nor would it involve the use of inflatable structures. Therefore, relative to antennas deployed by use of mechanisms, actuators, or inflation systems, this antenna could be lighter, cheaper, amenable to stowage in a smaller volume, and more reliable. An open-cell polymeric (e.g., polyurethane) foam offers several advantages for use as a compressible/expandable structural material to support a large antenna or reflector aperture. A few of these advantages are the following: 3) The open cellular structure is amenable to compression to a very

  15. A Robust and Cost-Effective Superhydrophobic Graphene Foam for Efficient Oil and Organic Solvent Recovery.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Haiguang; Chen, Dongyun; An, Wei; Li, Najun; Xu, Qingfeng; Li, Hua; He, Jinghui; Lu, Jianmei

    2015-10-21

    Water pollution caused by chemical reagent leaking, industrial wastewater discharging, and crude oil spills has raised global concerns on environmental sustainability, calling for high-performance absorbent materials for effective treatments. However, low-cost materials capable of effectively separating oils and organic solvents from water with a high adsorption capacity and good recyclability are rare on the market. Here, a cost-effective method is reported to fabricate high-performance graphene modified absorbents through the facile thermal reduction of graphene oxide on the skeletons of melamine foam. By integrating the high porosity, superior elasticity, and mechanical stability of raw sponge with the chemical stability and hydrophobicity of graphene sheets, the as-fabricated graphene foam not only possesses a rough and superhydrophobic surface, but also exhibits an excellent adsorption performance and extraordinary recyclability for various oils and organic solvents. It is worth mentioning that the superhydrophobic surface also endows the graphene foam with an excellent efficiency for oil/water separation. More importantly, the cost-effective fabrication method without involving expensive raw materials and sophisticated equipment permits a scale-up of the graphene foam for pollution disposal. All these features make the graphene foam an ideal candidate for removal and collection of oils and organic solvents from water. PMID:26265103

  16. New studies on basil (Ocimum bacilicum L.) seed gum: Part II-Emulsifying and foaming characterization.

    PubMed

    Naji-Tabasi, Sara; Razavi, Seyed Mohammad Ali

    2016-09-20

    BSG is composed of two major fractions with different molecular weight: PER-BSG (5980kgmol(-1)) and SUPER-BSG (1045kgmol(-1)). In the present work, the emulsifying and foaming properties of BSG and its fractions were investigated as a function of molecular weight, chain flexibility and physicochemical features (protein and acid uronic content). BSG prevented creaming of emulsion for 4 weeks. This high stabilization may be related to formation a solid-like structure and viscoelastic film of BSG around oil droplets which protected oil droplets against aggregation. The low molecular weight fraction (SUPER-BSG) created more stable emulsion than high molecular weight fraction (PER-BSG). The foam capacity and stability of albumin solution increased by adding BSG. The highest foam stability was observed at the highest gum concentration (0.3% w/v). Removing protein moieties of BSG led to emulsion and foam stabilization properties of BSG weakened, which presents the importance of protein in emulsifying and foaming properties of BSG. PMID:27261739

  17. Enhanced Remedial Amendment Delivery to Subsurface Using Shear Thinning Fluid and Aqueous Foam

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Lirong; Szecsody, James E.; Oostrom, Martinus; Truex, Michael J.; Shen, Xin; Li, Xiqing

    2011-04-23

    A major issue with in situ subsurface remediation is the ability to achieve an even spatial distribution of remedial amendments to the contamination zones in an aquifer or vadose zone. Delivery of amendment to the aquifer using shear thinning fluid and to the vadose zone using aqueous foam has the potential to enhance the amendment distribution into desired locations and improve the remediation. 2-D saturated flow cell experiments were conducted to evaluate the enhanced sweeping, contaminant removal, and amendment persistence achieved by shear thinning fluid delivery. Bio-polymer xanthan gum solution was used as the shear thinning fluid. Unsaturated 1-D column and 2-D flow cell experiments were conducted to evaluate the mitigation of contaminant mobilization, amendment uniform distribution enhancement, and lateral delivery improvement by foam delivery. Surfactant sodium lauryl ether sulfate was used as the foaming agent. It was demonstrated that the shear thinning fluid injection enhanced the fluid sweeping over a heterogeneous system and increased the delivery of remedial amendment into low-permeability zones. The persistence of the amendment distributed into the low-perm zones by the shear thinning fluid was prolonged compared to that of amendment distributed by water injection. Foam delivery of amendment was shown to mitigate the mobilization of highly mobile contaminant from sediments under vadose zone conditions. Foam delivery also achieved more uniform amendment distribution in a heterogeneous unsaturated system, and demonstrated remarkable increasing in lateral distribution of the injected liquid compared to direct liquid injection.

  18. Effect of the porous structure of polymer foams on the remediation of oil spills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Javier; Athanassiou, Athanassia; Fragouli, Despina

    2016-04-01

    Current approaches for the remediation of oil spills propose the utilization of functionalized polymeric foams as efficient oil absorbents. However, for the majority of the materials employed, the studies are focused on sophisticated surface treatments while the significant role of the morphological parameters of the porous structure of the pristine foams remains unexplored. Herein, we prove that the structural parameters of the pores of the polymeric foams play a fundamental role for the efficient removal of oil from water. The presented experimental and theoretical study shows that pristine polyurethane foams with highly interconnected open porous structures, and pore sizes below 500 μm are able to reach oil absorption capacities as high as 30 gr of oil per gr of polyurethane. Chemical functionalization of the porous structure does not increase further the oil absorption efficiency but it significantly contributes to the increase of the selectivity of the process. The current findings demonstrate the importance of the right choice of the pristine foams for the fabrication of cost-effective absorbents with high water-oil separation performance.

  19. Analysis of clinically relevant mechanical and thermal characteristics of titanium foam spinal implants during drilling.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kiyoshi; Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Murata, Takahiro; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2015-09-01

    Although high biocompatibility promotes the use of titanium (Ti) alloy in spinal implants, this material shows high stiffness, which is an issue for removal by drilling. The recently developed, porous Ti foam implants, which have shown enhanced osteoformation, may overcome this flaw. Thus, this study aimed to compare the mechanical and thermal characteristics of Ti-foam (80 % porosity) and conventional Ti alloy (0 % porosity) implants drilled in clinically relevant conditions. Mechanical properties were analyzed by measuring axial and torque forces using a pressure sensor with a drill of 2.5-mm diameter at a rotation frequency of 20 Hz. Thermography was used to evaluate the heat generated by a diamond burr attached to a high-speed (80,000 rpm) drill. The torque and axial strengths of Ti foam (13.63 ± 1.43 and 82.60 ± 7.78 N, respectively) were significantly lower (P = 0.001) than those of Ti alloy (73.58 ± 13.60 and 850.72 ± 146.99 N, respectively). Furthermore, irrigation reduced the area of local heating for Ti foam to 56-82 % of that for Ti alloy, indicating lower thermal conductivity. These data suggest that the use of Ti foam implants may be advantageous in cases with a probability of implant drilling in the future. PMID:26395362

  20. Cobalt Ions Improve the Strength of Epoxy Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St. Clair, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Technique developed for improving mechanical strength of epoxy resins by adding cobalt ions in form of tris(acetylacetonato)cobalt (III) complex. Solid cast disks prepared from cobalt ion-containing epoxy resins tested for flexural strength and stiffness. Incorporation of cobalt ions into epoxies increased flexural strength of resins by 10 to 95 percent. Suitable resins for this technique include any liquid or solid TGMDA resins. Improved epoxy formulation proves useful as composite matrix resin, adhesive, or casting resin for applications on commercial and advanced aircraft.

  1. Toughened epoxy resin system and a method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Janke, Christopher J.; Dorsey, George F.; Havens, Stephen J.; Lopata, Vincent J.

    1998-01-01

    Mixtures of epoxy resins with cationic initiators are curable under high energy ionizing radiation such as electron beam radiation, X-ray radiation, and gamma radiation. The composition of this process consists of an epoxy resin, a cationic initiator such as a diaryliodonium or triarylsulfonium salt of specific anions, and a toughening agent such as a thermoplastic, hydroxy-containing thermoplastic oligomer, epoxy-containing thermoplastic oligomer, reactive flexibilizer, rubber, elastomer, or mixture thereof. Cured compositions have high glass transition temperatures, good mechanical properties, and good toughness. These properties are comparable to those of similar thermally cured epoxies.

  2. Toughened epoxy resin system and a method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Janke, C.J.; Dorsey, G.F.; Havens, S.J.; Lopata, V.J.

    1998-03-10

    Mixtures of epoxy resins with cationic initiators are curable under high energy ionizing radiation such as electron beam radiation, X-ray radiation, and gamma radiation. The composition of this process consists of an epoxy resin, a cationic initiator such as a diaryliodonium or triarylsulfonium salt of specific anions, and a toughening agent such as a thermoplastic, hydroxy-containing thermoplastic oligomer, epoxy-containing thermoplastic oligomer, reactive flexibilizer, rubber, elastomer, or mixture thereof. Cured compositions have high glass transition temperatures, good mechanical properties, and good toughness. These properties are comparable to those of similar thermally cured epoxies.

  3. Space environmental effects on graphite-epoxy compressive properties and epoxy tensile properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Derek J.; Sykes, George F., Jr.; Herakovich, Carl T.

    1987-01-01

    This study characterizes the effects of electron radiation and temperature on a graphite-epoxy composite material. Compressive properties of the T300/934 material system were obtained at -250 F (-157 C), room temperature, and 250 F (121 C). Tensile specimens of the Fiberite 934 epoxy resin were fabricated and tested at room temperature and 250 F (121 C). Testing was conducted in the baseline (nonirradiated) and irradiated conditions. The radiation exposure was designed to simulate 30 year, worst-case exposure in geosynchronous Earth orbit. Mechanical properties tended to degrade at elevated temperature and improve at cryogenic temperature. Irradiation generally degraded properties at all temperatures.

  4. 46 CFR 108.474 - Aqueous film forming foam systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Aqueous film forming foam systems. 108.474 Section 108... DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Foam Extinguishing Systems § 108.474 Aqueous film forming foam systems. Aqueous film forming foam systems may be installed if approved by the Commandant....

  5. 46 CFR 108.474 - Aqueous film forming foam systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Aqueous film forming foam systems. 108.474 Section 108... DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Foam Extinguishing Systems § 108.474 Aqueous film forming foam systems. Aqueous film forming foam systems may be installed if approved by the Commandant....

  6. 46 CFR 108.474 - Aqueous film forming foam systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Aqueous film forming foam systems. 108.474 Section 108... DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Foam Extinguishing Systems § 108.474 Aqueous film forming foam systems. Aqueous film forming foam systems may be installed if approved by the Commandant....

  7. 46 CFR 108.474 - Aqueous film forming foam systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Aqueous film forming foam systems. 108.474 Section 108... DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Foam Extinguishing Systems § 108.474 Aqueous film forming foam systems. Aqueous film forming foam systems may be installed if approved by the Commandant....

  8. 46 CFR 108.474 - Aqueous film forming foam systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Aqueous film forming foam systems. 108.474 Section 108... DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Foam Extinguishing Systems § 108.474 Aqueous film forming foam systems. Aqueous film forming foam systems may be installed if approved by the Commandant....

  9. Method for making one-container rigid foam

    DOEpatents

    Aubert, James H.

    2005-04-12

    A method of making a one-container foam by dissolving a polymer in liquified gas at a pressure greater than the vapor pressure of the liquified gas and than rapidly decreasing the pressure within approximately 60 seconds to foam a foam. The foam can be rigid and also have adhesive properties. The liquified gas used is CF₃ l or mixtures thereof.

  10. 40 CFR 63.1301 - Standards for rebond foam production.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1301 Standards for rebond foam production. Each owner or operator of a new or existing rebond foam... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Standards for rebond foam...

  11. 40 CFR 63.1301 - Standards for rebond foam production.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1301 Standards for rebond foam production. Each owner or operator of a new or existing rebond foam... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards for rebond foam...

  12. 46 CFR 95.17-5 - Quantity of foam required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Quantity of foam required. 95.17-5 Section 95.17-5... PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Foam Extinguishing Systems, Details § 95.17-5 Quantity of foam required. (a) Area... blanket of foam over the entire tank top or bilge of the space protected. The arrangement of piping...

  13. 46 CFR 76.17-5 - Quantity of foam required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Quantity of foam required. 76.17-5 Section 76.17-5... EQUIPMENT Foam Extinguishing Systems, Details § 76.17-5 Quantity of foam required. (a) Area protected. (1... of foam over the entire tank top or bilge of the space protected. The arrangement of piping shall...

  14. 46 CFR 76.17-5 - Quantity of foam required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Quantity of foam required. 76.17-5 Section 76.17-5... EQUIPMENT Foam Extinguishing Systems, Details § 76.17-5 Quantity of foam required. (a) Area protected. (1... of foam over the entire tank top or bilge of the space protected. The arrangement of piping shall...

  15. 46 CFR 95.17-5 - Quantity of foam required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Quantity of foam required. 95.17-5 Section 95.17-5... PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Foam Extinguishing Systems, Details § 95.17-5 Quantity of foam required. (a) Area... blanket of foam over the entire tank top or bilge of the space protected. The arrangement of piping...

  16. 46 CFR 76.17-5 - Quantity of foam required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Quantity of foam required. 76.17-5 Section 76.17-5... EQUIPMENT Foam Extinguishing Systems, Details § 76.17-5 Quantity of foam required. (a) Area protected. (1... of foam over the entire tank top or bilge of the space protected. The arrangement of piping shall...

  17. 46 CFR 95.17-5 - Quantity of foam required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Quantity of foam required. 95.17-5 Section 95.17-5... PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Foam Extinguishing Systems, Details § 95.17-5 Quantity of foam required. (a) Area... blanket of foam over the entire tank top or bilge of the space protected. The arrangement of piping...

  18. 46 CFR 76.17-5 - Quantity of foam required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Quantity of foam required. 76.17-5 Section 76.17-5... EQUIPMENT Foam Extinguishing Systems, Details § 76.17-5 Quantity of foam required. (a) Area protected. (1... of foam over the entire tank top or bilge of the space protected. The arrangement of piping shall...

  19. 46 CFR 95.17-5 - Quantity of foam required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Quantity of foam required. 95.17-5 Section 95.17-5... PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Foam Extinguishing Systems, Details § 95.17-5 Quantity of foam required. (a) Area... blanket of foam over the entire tank top or bilge of the space protected. The arrangement of piping...

  20. 46 CFR 95.17-5 - Quantity of foam required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Quantity of foam required. 95.17-5 Section 95.17-5... PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Foam Extinguishing Systems, Details § 95.17-5 Quantity of foam required. (a) Area... blanket of foam over the entire tank top or bilge of the space protected. The arrangement of piping...