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Sample records for renal disease chronic

  1. Renal disease and chronic renal failure in dental practice.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, J J; Wilson, M H; McArdle, N S; Stassen, L F A

    2008-01-01

    Patients with renal diseases are increasingly common in dental practice. This is due to advances in medicine, and the increasing life expectancy of western populations. Chronic renal failure is a serious condition that general dental practitioners may see in their practice. This article discusses the functions of the kidney, and the causes and medical management of chronic renal failure, as well as considerations in the dental management of these patients. Common complications such as infection and bleeding are discussed. General recommendations are made, based on current evidence with respect to prescribing of medications. PMID:18986093

  2. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57... disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by medical documentation. (b)...

  3. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57... disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by medical documentation. (b)...

  4. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57... disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by medical documentation. (b)...

  5. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57... disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by medical documentation. (b)...

  6. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57 Section 79.57 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) CLAIMS UNDER THE RADIATION EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Uranium Millers § 79.57 Proof of chronic renal disease. (a) In determining whether a...

  7. Chronic Kidney Disease As a Potential Indication for Renal Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Margreet F.; Blankestijn, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Renal denervation is being used as a blood pressure lowering therapy for patients with apparent treatment resistant hypertension. However, this population does not represent a distinct disease condition in which benefit is predictable. In fact, the wide range in effectiveness of renal denervation could be a consequence of this heterogeneous pathogenesis of hypertension. Since renal denervation aims at disrupting sympathetic nerves surrounding the renal arteries, it seems obvious to focus on patients with increased afferent and/or efferent renal sympathetic nerve activity. In this review will be argued, from both a pathophysiological and a clinical point of view, that chronic kidney disease is particularly suited to renal denervation. PMID:27375498

  8. Gout secondary to chronic renal disease: studies on urate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, L F

    1980-10-01

    A report of 20 cases of gout considered to be secondary to chronic renal disease is presented. Studies of renal function and of uric acid metabolism were carried out in 16 patients. The daily production of urate remained within normal limits in the face of progressive renal dysfunction. Renal excretion of uric acid was decreased to a mean of 35.5% of the turnover. The cumulative urinary recovery of intravenously injected 14C-uric acid averaged 32.0%. In 3 patients 14C was successively retrieved in urinary allantoinand urea, in carbon dioxide of expired air, and in faeces. As in normal man, carbon dioxide and ammonia were the principal uricolytic products. The extrarenal excretion of uric acid assumes a greater role in chronic renal disease and eventually becomes the major route of elimination of uric acid. The possibility that gout may be secondary to intrinsic renal disease should be entertained when azotaemia is present. PMID:7436573

  9. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Cystic Renal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Cysts are frequently found in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and they have a different prognostic significance depending on the clinical context. Simple solitary parenchymal cysts and peripelvic cysts are very common and they have no clinical significance. At US, simple cyst appears as a round anechoic pouch with regular and thin profiles. On the other hand, hereditary polycystic disease is a frequent cause of CKD in children and adults. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) are the best known cystic hereditary diseases. ADPKD and ARPKD show a diffused cystic degeneration with cysts of different diameters derived from tubular epithelium. Medullary cystic disease may be associated with tubular defects, acidosis and lithiasis and can lead to CKD. Acquired cystic kidney disease, finally, is secondary to progressive structural end-stage kidney remodelling and may be associated with renal cell carcinoma. PMID:27169740

  10. Chronic renal failure and periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Kitsou, V K; Konstantinidis, A; Siamopoulos, K C

    2000-05-01

    In order to define the effects of chronic renal failure (CRF) in the progress of gingival inflammation, we studied 6 patients (4 male, 2 female) with CRF who were on chronic hemodialysis for 4.25 (range 1-15) years. Six healthy individuals, age and sex matched were used as controls. The protocol which we used comprised of two periods (a) a 40-day duration period of preparation and (b) a 28-day duration experimental period. During the (a) period, all subjects went through: (1) therapy of the chronic gingivitis and (2) complete control of dental plaque by oral hygiene. During the experimental period, all subjects were advised to avoid, for at least 21 days, any mechanical or chemical media of oral hygiene and went through photographing, recording of gingival index (GI), recording of plaque index (PII), and the collection and quantification of gingival crevicular fluid (GCF). On the 21st day, root planning and polishing were performed and subjects were advised to carry out oral hygiene. On the 28th day, all previous examinations (GI, PII, GCF) were repeated. In both patients and controls, GI, PII and GCF were increased on 7th, 14th and 21st day, without significant differences between the groups and returned to normal (close to zero point) on the 28th day. There are no significant differences between patients with CRF and normal controls in the evolution of experimental gingivitis. Therefore, chronic uremia has no effect on the defense of periodontal tissue against microbial plaque. PMID:10843241

  11. Managing acute and chronic renal stone disease.

    PubMed

    Moran, Conor P; Courtney, Aisling E

    2016-02-01

    Nephrolithiasis, or renal stone disease, is common and the incidence is increasing globally. In the UK the lifetime risk is estimated to be 8-10%. On a population level, the increase in stone incidence, erosion of gender disparity, and younger age of onset is likely to reflect increasing prevalence of obesity and a Western diet with a high intake of animal protein and salt. Stones can be detected by a variety of imaging techniques. The gold standard is a non-contrast CT of kidneys, ureters and bladder (CT KUB) which can identify > 99% of stones. CT KUB should be the primary mode of imaging for all patients with colic unless contraindicated. In such instances, or if a CT KUB is not available, an ultrasound KUB is an alternative. This has advantages in terms of radiation exposure and cost, but is limited in sensitivity, particularly for ureteric stones. Once diagnosed, a plain film KUB can be used for follow-up of radiopaque stones. For most patients diclofenac is a reasonable first choice of analgesia, e.g. 50-100 mg rectally, or 75 mg IM. Opioid medication can worsen nausea and be less effective, but should be used if there is a contraindication to NSAIDs. A combination of diclofenac, paracetamol, and/or codeine regularly can provide adequate pain control in many cases. Failure of this analgesic combination should prompt consideration of secondary care support. If a ureteric stone < 5 mm in diameter is identified, the expectation is that this will pass without intervention. Initially medical management is still useful for stones between 5 and 10mm in diameter, but urology input is more likely to be necessary as up to 50% of these may require intervention. Stones that are >10 mm in diameter should be discussed with the urology service as they are unlikely to pass spontaneously. PMID:27032222

  12. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Parenchymal Chronic Renal Diseases - Part 2.

    PubMed

    Petrucci, Ilaria; Samoni, Sara; Meola, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Secondary nephropathies can be associated with disreactive immunological disorders or with a non-inflammatory glomerular damage. In systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), scleroderma and rheumatoid arthritis as in other connective tissue diseases, kidney volume and cortex echogenicity are the parameters that best correlate with clinical severity of the disease, even if the morphological aspect is generally non-specific. Doppler studies in SLE document the correlation between resistance indexes (RIs) values and renal function. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV) causes different types of renal damage. At ultrasound (US), kidneys have almost a normal volume, while during superinfection they enlarge (coronal diameter >13 cm) and become globular, loosing their normal aspect. Cortex appears highly hyperechoic, uniform or patchy. Microcalcifications of renal cortex and medulla are a US sign that can suggest HIV. In amyloidosis, kidneys appear normal or increased in volume in the early stages of disease. Renal cortex is diffusely hyperechoic and pyramids can show normal size and morphology, but more often they appear poorly defined and hyperechoic. RIs are very high since the early stages of the disease. Nephromegaly with normal kidney shape is the first sign of lymphoma or multiple myeloma. In systemic vasculitis, renal cortex is diffusely hyperechoic, while pyramids appear hypoechoic and globular due to interstitial edema. When vasculitis determines advanced chronic kidney disease stages, kidneys show no specific signs. Microcirculation damage is highlighted by increased RIs values >0.70 in the chronic phase. PMID:27169551

  13. Chronic kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure - chronic; Renal failure - chronic; Chronic renal insufficiency; Chronic kidney failure; Chronic renal failure ... Chronic kidney disease (CKD) slowly gets worse over months or years. You may not notice any symptoms for some ...

  14. Acute renal failure: outcomes and risk of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Block, C A; Schoolwerth, A C

    2007-09-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is a common condition, especially among the critically ill, and confers a high mortality. The incidence of ARF is increasing. Efforts such as the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI) are being undertaken to establish a consensus definition of ARF, and to distinguish between varying degrees of acute kidney injury that might confer a different prognosis. Data are emerging to allow comparison of the epidemiology of ARF across institutions internationally. There is ongoing recognition of the important interaction between ARF and chronic kidney disease and more information regarding recovery from ARF is available. Controversy exists regarding the optimal management of ARF. Recent publications emphasize the importance of timing and dose of renal replacement therapy rather than the modality of treatment (intermittent hemodialysis vs continuous therapies). These issues are explored in this review. PMID:17912228

  15. Clinicopathologic findings associated with chronic renal disease in cats: 74 cases (1973-1984).

    PubMed

    DiBartola, S P; Rutgers, H C; Zack, P M; Tarr, M J

    1987-05-01

    The historic, physical, laboratory, and histologic findings for 74 cats with chronic renal disease were reviewed. Most cats were older, and no breed or sex predilection was detected. This most common clinical signs detected by owners were lethargy, anorexia, and weight loss. Dehydration and emaciation were common physical examination findings. Common laboratory findings were nonregenerative anemia, lymphopenia, azotemia, hypercholesterolemia, metabolic acidosis, hyperphosphatemia, and isosthenuria. The most common morphologic diagnosis was chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis of unknown cause. The other pathologic diagnoses were renal lymphosarcoma, renal amyloidosis, chronic pyelonephritis, chronic glomerulonephritis, polycystic renal disease, and pyogranulomatous nephritis secondary to feline infectious peritonitis. PMID:3583899

  16. Developments in renal pharmacogenomics and applications in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Padullés, Ariadna; Rama, Inés; Llaudó, Inés; Lloberas, Núria

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has shown an increasing prevalence in the last century. CKD encompasses a poor prognosis related to a remarkable number of comorbidities, and many patients suffer from this disease progression. Once the factors linked with CKD evolution are distinguished, it will be possible to provide and enhance a more intensive treatment to high-risk patients. In this review, we focus on the emerging markers that might be predictive or related to CKD progression physiopathology as well as those related to a different pattern of response to treatment, such as inhibitors of the renin–angiotensin system (including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers; the vitamin D receptor agonist; salt sensitivity hypertension; and progressive kidney-disease markers with identified genetic polymorphisms). Candidate-gene association studies and genome-wide association studies have analyzed the genetic basis for common renal diseases, including CKD and related factors such as diabetes and hypertension. This review will, in brief, consider genotype-based pharmacotherapy, risk prediction, drug target recognition, and personalized treatments, and will mainly focus on findings in CKD patients. An improved understanding will smooth the progress of switching from classical clinical medicine to gene-based medicine. PMID:25206311

  17. The Economic Burden of Chronic Kidney Disease and End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Virginia; Vilme, Helene; Maciejewski, Matthew L; Boulware, L Ebony

    2016-07-01

    The growing prevalence and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) raises concerns about our capacity to manage its economic burden to patients, caregivers, and society. The societal direct and indirect costs of CKD and end-stage renal disease are substantial and increase throughout disease progression. There is significant variability in the evidence about direct and indirect costs attributable to CKD and end-stage renal disease, with the most complete evidence concentrated on direct health care costs of patients with advanced to end-stage CKD. There are substantial gaps in evidence that need to be filled to inform clinical practice and policy. PMID:27475662

  18. Capillary rarefaction, hypoxia, VEGF and angiogenesis in chronic renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Gert

    2011-01-01

    Tubulointerstitial hypoxia and peritubular capillary rarefaction are typical features of chronic progressive renal disease. In response to low oxygen supply, hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are activated but until now, it is unclear if this increased expression leads to a stabilization of the disease process and thus is nephroprotective or contributes to interstitial fibrosis and/or tubular atrophy. This duality has also been described as far as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), one of the major target genes of HIFs, is concerned. On the one hand, neoangiogenesis driven by VEGF, if intact, ameliorates hypoxia, on the other, VEGF is a potent pro-inflammatory mediator and neoangiogenesis, if defective because interference by other pathologies exaggerates injury. In summary, experimental data support the idea that dependent on timing and predominant pathology, hypoxia counter-regulatory factors exert beneficial or undesirable effects. Thus, before their therapeutic potential can be fully explored, a better way to characterize the clinical and pathophysiological situation in an individual patient is mandatory. PMID:21330358

  19. Impact of Iodinated Contrast on Renal Function and Hemodynamics in Rats with Chronic Hyperglycemia and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Sheila Marques; Martins, Daniel Malisani; da Fonseca, Cassiane Dezoti; Watanabe, Mirian; Vattimo, Maria de Fátima Fernandes

    2016-01-01

    Iodinated contrast (IC) is clinically used in diagnostic and interventional procedures, but its use can result in contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI). Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and chronic hyperglycemia (CH) are important predisposing factors to CI-AKI. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of iodinated contrast on the renal function and hemodynamics in rats with chronic hyperglycemia and chronic kidney disease. A total of 30 rats were divided into six groups; Sham: control of chronic renal disease; Citrate: control of chronic hyperglycemia (CH); Nx5/6: rats with 5/6 nephrectomy; Chronic Hyperglycemia: rats receiving Streptozotocin 65 mg/kg; Nx5/6 + IC: rats Nx5/6 received 6 mL/kg of IC; CH + IC: Chronic hyperglycemia rats receiving 6 mL/kg of IC. Renal function (inulin clearance; urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, NGAL) and hemodynamics (arterial blood pressure; renal blood flow; renal vascular resistance) were evaluated. Iodinated contrast significantly increased urinary NGAL and reduced inulin clearance, while the hemodynamics parameters showed changes in arterial blood pressure, renal blood flow, and renal vascular resistance in both CKD and CH groups. The results suggest that the iodinated contrast in risk factors models has important impact on renal function and hemodynamics. NGAL was confirmed to play a role of highlight in diagnosis of CI-AKI. PMID:27034930

  20. Impact of Iodinated Contrast on Renal Function and Hemodynamics in Rats with Chronic Hyperglycemia and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Sheila Marques; Martins, Daniel Malisani; da Fonseca, Cassiane Dezoti; Watanabe, Mirian; Vattimo, Maria de Fátima Fernandes

    2016-01-01

    Iodinated contrast (IC) is clinically used in diagnostic and interventional procedures, but its use can result in contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI). Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and chronic hyperglycemia (CH) are important predisposing factors to CI-AKI. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of iodinated contrast on the renal function and hemodynamics in rats with chronic hyperglycemia and chronic kidney disease. A total of 30 rats were divided into six groups; Sham: control of chronic renal disease; Citrate: control of chronic hyperglycemia (CH); Nx5/6: rats with 5/6 nephrectomy; Chronic Hyperglycemia: rats receiving Streptozotocin 65 mg/kg; Nx5/6 + IC: rats Nx5/6 received 6 mL/kg of IC; CH + IC: Chronic hyperglycemia rats receiving 6 mL/kg of IC. Renal function (inulin clearance; urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, NGAL) and hemodynamics (arterial blood pressure; renal blood flow; renal vascular resistance) were evaluated. Iodinated contrast significantly increased urinary NGAL and reduced inulin clearance, while the hemodynamics parameters showed changes in arterial blood pressure, renal blood flow, and renal vascular resistance in both CKD and CH groups. The results suggest that the iodinated contrast in risk factors models has important impact on renal function and hemodynamics. NGAL was confirmed to play a role of highlight in diagnosis of CI-AKI. PMID:27034930

  1. [Renal disease].

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Cuevas, María de Los Ángeles

    2016-09-01

    Chronic renal failure in its various stages, requires certain nutritional restrictions associated with the accumulation of minerals and waste products that cannot be easily eliminated by the kidneys. Some of these restrictions modify the intake of proteins, sodium, and phosphorus. Milk and dairy products are sources of these nutrients. This article aims to inform the reader about the benefits including milk and dairy products relying on a scientific and critical view according to the clinical conditions and the stage of renal disease in which the patient is. PMID:27603894

  2. Predicting the effects of dietary manipulation in chronic renal disease

    SciTech Connect

    El Nahas, A.M.; Brady, S.A.; Masters-Thomas, A.; Wilkinson, V.; Hilson, A.J.W.; Moorhead, J.F.

    1984-01-01

    It has been suggested that the progressive fall in renal function in some patients with CRF is due to hyperfusion of the remnant nephrons in response to the relatively high protein diet of modern life. The authors attempted to assess this and to see what was the shortest time in which any effect could be demonstrated. In the first phase, 39 patients with CRF had their renal function followed for 6 months on their normal diet and 6 months on a low-protein diet (LPD). The patients on LPD all showed an improvement in the rate of fall of renal function. This was marked in patients with mainly tubular disease, and poor in those with glomerular and vascular disease. In the second phase, 11 of these patients (and 1 other) were started on a high protein diet (HPD) for two weeks, and then switched back to a LPD for 2 weeks. There was no change in GFR during this period, but there were marked changes in ERPF, which correlated well with the changes in renal function in the first phase (r = 0.76, rho < 0.01); 4/4 patients with tubular disease showed a rise in ERPF on HPD and a fall on LPD, while only 4/8 with glomerular or vascular disease responded. In the third phase, they assessed the effect of a single high-protein meal in normal volunteers. This showed that there are major changes in hemodynamics following a meal, such that it is not possible to make any statement about renal function using the single-shot methods. The authors conclude that a 2-week period of HPD followed by LPD allows prediction of the possible beneficial response to diet in CRF; that this is best monitored by ERPF; and that a single meal may invalidate renal function measurement.

  3. Diabetes, Renal and Cardiovascular Disease in p47phox−/− Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leiding, Jennifer W.; Marciano, Beatriz E.; Zerbe, Christa S.; DeRavin, Suk See; Malech, Harry L.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease is a rare immunodeficiency due to defects in the phagocyte NADPH oxidase. The X-linked form (gp91phox deficiency) accounts for about 70 % of cases; autosomal recessive p47phox deficiency accounts for about 25 % of cases. We identified a 10 % incidence of diabetes in p47phox deficient CGD, but none in X-linked CGD. Renal and cardiovascular diseases were also higher in p47phox deficiency. p47phox deficient CGD has noninfectious morbidities distinct from those in X-linked CGD. PMID:23386289

  4. How to differentiate renal senescence from chronic kidney disease in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Musso, Carlos G; Jauregui, Jose R

    2016-09-01

    Renal aging is frequently confused with chronic nephropathy in clinical practice, since there are some similarities between them, particularly regarding reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR). However, there are many differences between these two entities which can help any practitioner to distinguish between them, such as: GFR deterioration rate, hematocrit, renal handling of urea, creatinine and some electrolytes, tubular acidification, urinalysis, and renal imaging. Differentiation between renal aging and chronic renal disease is crucial in order to avoid unnecessary medicalization of what is a physiological change associated with the healthy aging process, and the potential harmful consequences of such overdiagnosis. A recently described equation (HUGE), as well as an adequate nephrological evaluation and follow up can help physicians to distinguish both entities. PMID:27383288

  5. Developmental Origins of Chronic Renal Disease: An Integrative Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Boubred, F.; Saint-Faust, M.; Buffat, C.; Ligi, I.; Grandvuillemin, I.; Simeoni, U.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are one of the leading causes of mortality. Hypertension (HT) is one of the principal risk factors associated with death. Chronic kidney disease (CKD), which is probably underestimated, increases the risk and the severity of adverse cardiovascular events. It is now recognized that low birth weight is a risk factor for these diseases, and this relationship is amplified by a rapid catch-up growth or overfeeding during infancy or childhood. The pathophysiological and molecular mechanisms involved in the “early programming” of CKD are multiple and partially understood. It has been proposed that the developmental programming of arterial hypertension and chronic kidney disease is related to a reduced nephron endowment. However, this mechanism is still discussed. This review discusses the complex relationship between birth weight and nephron endowment and how early growth and nutrition influence long term HT and CKD. We hypothesize that fetal environment reduces moderately the nephron number which appears insufficient by itself to induce long term diseases. Reduced nephron number constitutes a “factor of vulnerability” when additional factors, in particular a rapid postnatal growth or overfeeding, promote the early onset of diseases through a complex combination of various pathophysiological pathways. PMID:24073334

  6. Chronic renal disease in a captive two-toed sloth (Choloepus didactylus) with concurrent hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Salas, Elisa; Wolf, Tiffany; Harris, Seth

    2014-06-01

    A 13-yr-old female two-toed sloth (Choloepus didactylus) with a prolonged history of worsening azotemia was necropsied shortly after euthanasia. On necropsy, the sloth had poor body condition, bilaterally shrunken kidneys, and a large neoplastic mass replacing the right liver lobe. Histologic examination demonstrated chronic renal disease with metastatic mineralization as the cause of morbidity. The liver mass was not associated with any known clinical signs and was diagnosed as a solitary and well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of hepatocellular carcinoma diagnosed in a sloth and the first detailed description of chronic renal disease in this species. PMID:25000707

  7. Renal Impairment with Sublethal Tubular Cell Injury in a Chronic Liver Disease Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Tokiko; Kotani, Hirokazu; Miyao, Masashi; Kawai, Chihiro; Jemail, Leila; Abiru, Hitoshi; Tamaki, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of renal impairment in chronic liver diseases (CLDs) has been primarily studied in the advanced stages of hepatic injury. Meanwhile, the pathology of renal impairment in the early phase of CLDs is poorly understood, and animal models to elucidate its mechanisms are needed. Thus, we investigated whether an existing mouse model of CLD induced by 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC) shows renal impairment in the early phase. Renal injury markers, renal histology (including immunohistochemistry for tubular injury markers and transmission electron microscopy), autophagy, and oxidative stress were studied longitudinally in DDC- and standard diet–fed BALB/c mice. Slight but significant renal dysfunction was evident in DDC-fed mice from the early phase. Meanwhile, histological examinations of the kidneys with routine light microscopy did not show definitive morphological findings, and electron microscopic analyses were required to detect limited injuries such as loss of brush border microvilli and mitochondrial deformities. Limited injuries have been recently designated as sublethal tubular cell injury. As humans with renal impairment, either with or without CLD, often show almost normal tubules, sublethal injury has been of particular interest. In this study, the injuries were associated with mitochondrial aberrations and oxidative stress, a possible mechanism for sublethal injury. Intriguingly, two defense mechanisms were associated with this injury that prevent it from progressing to apparent cell death: autophagy and single-cell extrusion with regeneration. Furthermore, the renal impairment of this model progressed to chronic kidney disease with interstitial fibrosis after long-term DDC feeding. These findings indicated that DDC induces renal impairment with sublethal tubular cell injury from the early phase, leading to chronic kidney disease. Importantly, this CLD mouse model could be useful for studying the pathophysiological mechanisms

  8. Chronic renal failure in a patient with Sotos syndrome due to autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Cefle, K; Yildiz, A; Palanduz, S; Ozturk, S; Ozbey, N; Kylyçaslan, I; Colakoglu, S; Balci, C

    2002-05-01

    Sotos syndrome is characterised by accelerated growth, acromegalic appearance, mental retardation and social maladjustment. Most cases are sporadic, but familial cases have also been reported. We report a case of Sotos syndrome presenting with chronic renal failure due to autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Ultrasonographic examination of the patient, his father and other family members revealed polycystic kidneys. Renal failure was present only in the Sotos case, who also had considerably larger cysts than other family members. We suggest that the underlying mechanism responsible from the somatic overgrowth in Sotos syndrome may also be linked with the development of larger cysts and earlier onset of renal failure in ADPKD. Although Sotos syndrome has been associated with urological abnormalities, chronic renal failure is very rare. To our knowledge, Sotos syndrome associated with ADPKD has not been reported before. PMID:12074220

  9. Obstetric outcomes in women with end-stage renal disease on chronic dialysis: a review

    PubMed Central

    Yang, L Y; Thia, E W H; Tan, L K

    2010-01-01

    Pregnancies in women on chronic dialysis for end-stage renal disease are high risk, but outcomes appear to have improved with increasing experience and advances in dialysis care. This paper reviews the existing data on outcomes in such pregnancies to enable evidence-based preconception counselling and anticipation of antenatal complications.

  10. Acceptance and effects of a therapeutic renal food in pet cats with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Fritsch, Dale A; Jewell, Dennis E

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Renal foods are used to manage chronic kidney disease (CKD) in dogs and cats, but their effectiveness may be limited by the ability to transition animals to them. Material and Methods In a prospective study, pet cats with previously undiagnosed kidney disease (20 International Renal Interest Society (IRIS) 1, 61 IRIS 2, 14 IRIS 3/4, 33 at risk for CKD) were transitioned to a renal food. Markers of renal function were measured and owners answered questionnaires about their pet over one year. Results All but eight cats (120/128; 94 per cent) successfully transitioned to the renal food. Most of the time, cats moderately or extremely liked the food (89 per cent), ate at least half (73 per cent) and were moderately or extremely enthusiastic while eating (68 per cent). Cats rarely disliked the food (2 per cent) or refused to eat it (1 per cent). Markers of renal function were unchanged in IRIS 1 and 2 cats and changed little in IRIS 3/4 cats. In all groups, owner-assessed quality of life improved initially and then remained stable. Mean bodyweight did not change in cats with CKD. Conclusions Most cats with CKD successfully transitioned to the renal food. The results also support previous studies that the renal food can help stabilise cats with CKD. PMID:26587240

  11. Mild systemic thermal therapy ameliorates renal dysfunction in a rodent model of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Iwashita, Yoshihiro; Kuwabara, Takashige; Hayata, Manabu; Kakizoe, Yutaka; Izumi, Yuichiro; Iiyama, Junichi; Kitamura, Kenichiro; Mukoyama, Masashi

    2016-06-01

    Thermal therapy has become a nonpharmacological therapy in clinical settings, especially for cardiovascular diseases. However, the practical role of thermal therapy on chronic kidney disease remains elusive. We performed the present study to investigate whether a modified thermal protocol, repeated mild thermal stimulation (MTS), could affect renal damages in chronic kidney disease using a mouse renal ablation model. Mice were subjected to MTS or room temperature (RT) treatment once daily for 4 wk after subtotal nephrectomy (Nx) or sham operation (Sh). We revealed that MTS alleviated renal impairment as indicated by serum creatinine and albuminuria in Nx groups. In addition, the Nx + MTS group showed attenuated tubular histological changes and reduced urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin excretion approximately by half compared with the Nx + RT group. Increased apoptotic signaling, such as TUNEL-positive cell count and cleavage of caspase 3, as well as enhanced oxidative stress were significantly reduced in the Nx + MTS group compared with the Nx + RT group. These changes were accompanied with the restoration of kidney Mn-SOD levels by MTS. Heat shock protein 27, a key molecular chaperone, was phosphorylated by MTS only in Nx kidneys rather than in Sh kidneys. MTS also tended to increase the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and Akt in Nx kidneys, possibly associated with the activation of heat shock protein 27. Taken together, these results suggest that modified MTS can protect against renal injury in a rodent model of chronic kidney disease. PMID:27029428

  12. SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling preserves microvascular integrity and renal function in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Hao; Advani, Suzanne L; Thai, Kerri; Kabir, M Golam; Sood, Manish M; Gibson, Ian W; Yuen, Darren A; Connelly, Kim A; Marsden, Philip A; Kelly, Darren J; Gilbert, Richard E; Advani, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The progressive decline of renal function in chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by both disruption of the microvascular architecture and the accumulation of fibrotic matrix. One angiogenic pathway recently identified as playing an essential role in renal vascular development is the stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1)/CXCR4 pathway. Because similar developmental processes may be recapitulated in the disease setting, we hypothesized that the SDF-1/CXCR4 system would regulate microvascular health in CKD. Expression of CXCR4 was observed to be increased in the kidneys of subtotally nephrectomized (SNx) rats and in biopsies from patients with secondary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), a rodent model and human correlate both characterized by aberration of the renal microvessels. A reno-protective role for local SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling was indicated by i) CXCR4-dependent glomerular eNOS activation following acute SDF-1 administration; and ii) acceleration of renal function decline, capillary loss and fibrosis in SNx rats treated with chronic CXCR4 blockade. In contrast to the upregulation of CXCR4, SDF-1 transcript levels were decreased in SNx rat kidneys as well as in renal fibroblasts exposed to the pro-fibrotic cytokine transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), the latter effect being attenuated by histone deacetylase inhibition. Increased renal SDF-1 expression was, however, observed following the treatment of SNx rats with the ACE inhibitor, perindopril. Collectively, these observations indicate that local SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling functions to preserve microvascular integrity and prevent renal fibrosis. Augmentation of this pathway, either purposefully or serendipitously with either novel or existing therapies, may attenuate renal decline in CKD. PMID:24637920

  13. Effects of fasting during Ramadan on renal function of patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Mbarki, Houda; Tazi, Nada; Najdi, Adil; Tachfouti, Nabil; Arrayhani, Mohamed; Sqalli, Tarik

    2015-03-01

    Fasting during Ramadan is prohibited when an individual's health is endangered. Little work has been published in this direction in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We aimed to evaluate the impact of fasting during Ramadan on the renal function of patients with CKD, adjusting for the initial degree of renal impairment. We prospectively studied 60 patients with CKD (35 females; mean age 45.6 ± 15.8 years). All study patients were older than 15 years, being followed-up at the nephrology clinic for more than six months, having a stable CKD during the preceding six months and who had fasted during Ramadan the previous year. Patients who had a medical contra-indication for fasting were excluded from the study [severe or resistant arterial hypertension, insulin-requiring diabetes, acute renal failure (ARF), active renal disease, repetitive urolithiasis or terminal chronic renal failure]. Statistical analysis was performed in collaboration with the epidemiology lab at the Fez Medical School using the SPSS software version 17. Three of the study patients developed ARF in the first week and four of them at the end of the month of the study period. The risk of developing ARF was significantly higher for patients with baseline creatinine clearance of <60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 . However, the small sample size does not allow us to draw any firm conclusions on fasting during Ramadan in stable CKD patients. Studies on larger numbers of patients are recommended. PMID:25758882

  14. 28 CFR 79.67 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Ore Transporters § 79.67 Proof of chronic... employment as an ore transporter, the Assistant Director shall resolve all reasonable doubt in favor of...

  15. 28 CFR 79.67 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Ore Transporters § 79.67 Proof of chronic... employment as an ore transporter, the Assistant Director shall resolve all reasonable doubt in favor of...

  16. 28 CFR 79.67 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Ore Transporters § 79.67 Proof of chronic... employment as an ore transporter, the Assistant Director shall resolve all reasonable doubt in favor of...

  17. 28 CFR 79.67 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Ore Transporters § 79.67 Proof of chronic... employment as an ore transporter, the Assistant Director shall resolve all reasonable doubt in favor of...

  18. 28 CFR 79.67 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Ore Transporters § 79.67 Proof of chronic... employment as an ore transporter, the Assistant Director shall resolve all reasonable doubt in favor of...

  19. Histomorphometry of feline chronic kidney disease and correlation with markers of renal dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, S; Syme, H M; Brown, C A; Elliott, J

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is common in geriatric cats, but most cases have nonspecific renal lesions, and few studies have correlated these lesions with clinicopathological markers of renal dysfunction. The aim of this study was to identify the lesions best correlated with renal function and likely mediators of disease progression in cats with chronic kidney disease. Cats were recruited through 2 first-opinion practices between 1992 and 2010. When postmortem examinations were authorized, renal tissues were preserved in formalin. Sections were evaluated by a pathologist masked to all clinicopathological data. They were scored semiquantitatively for the severity of glomerulosclerosis, interstitial inflammation, and fibrosis. Glomerular volume was measured using image analysis; the percentage of glomeruli that were obsolescent was recorded. Sections were assessed for hyperplastic arteriolosclerosis and tubular mineralization. Kidneys from 80 cats with plasma biochemical data from the last 2 months of life were included in the study. Multivariable linear regression (P < .05) was used to assess the association of lesions with clinicopathological data obtained close to death. Interstitial fibrosis was the lesion best correlated with the severity of azotemia, hyperphosphatemia, and anemia. Proteinuria was associated with interstitial fibrosis and glomerular hypertrophy, whereas higher time-averaged systolic blood pressure was associated with glomerulosclerosis and hyperplastic arteriolosclerosis. PMID:22773469

  20. [Determinants of vascular wall stiffness in patients with chronic renal disease undergoing hemodialysis].

    PubMed

    Kharlamova, U V; Il'icheva, O E

    2012-01-01

    Examination of 109 patients with chronic renal disease undergoing hemodialysis revealed significant impairment of arterial wall distensibility (accordingly, decreased Peterson's and Young's elastic moduli, distensibility coefficient). The relative thickness of the common carotid artery and pulse wave velocity were significantly greater than in practically healthy subjects. Independent factors influencing arterial wall rigidity included age, arterial pressure, total cholesterol and homocystein, stable metabolites of nitric oxide, creatinine, calcium, phosphorus levels, calcium x phosphorus product, duration of hemodialysis, interdialytic weight gain. PMID:23516853

  1. Renal Cell Protection of Erythropoietin beyond Correcting The Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Nasri, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Currently many patients with chronic renal failure have profited from the use of erythropoietin to correct anemia (1,2). In chronic kidney disease, anemia is believed to be a surrogate index for tissue hypoxia that continues preexisting renal tissue injury (1-3). Erythropoietin is an essential glycoprotein that accelerates red blood cell maturation from erythroid progenitors and facilitates erythropoiesis. It is a 30.4 kD glycoprotein and class I cytokine containing 165 amino acids (3,4). Approximately 90% of systemic erythropoietin in adults is produced by peritubular interstitial fibroblasts in the renal cortex and outer medulla of the kidney (3-5). A feedback mechanism involving oxygen delivery to the tissues seems to regulate erythropoietin production. Hypoxia-inducible factor regulates transcription of the erythropoietin gene in the kidney, which determines erythropoietin synthesis (3-5). Erythropoietin is an essential glycoprotein that accelerates red blood cell maturation from erythroid progenitors and mediates erythropoiesis in the bone marrow (4-6). Kidney fibrosis is the last common pathway in chronic renal failure irrespective of the initial etiology (5,6). Constant inflammatory cell infiltration and pericyte-myofibroblast transition lead to renal fibrosis and insufficiency which result in decreased production of erythropoietin (4-7). Thus far, therapeutic efforts to treat patients with chronic renal failure by administering erythropoietin have been made only to correct anemia and putative hypoxic tissue damage. The introduction of recombinant human erythropoietin has marked a significant advance in the management of anemia associated with chronic renal failure (6-9). With an increasing number of patients with chronic renal failure receiving erythropoietin treatment, emerging evidence suggests that erythropoietin not only has an erythropoietic function, but also has renoprotective potential. In fact, in recent years, the additional non

  2. l-Carnitine improves cognitive and renal functions in a rat model of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Abu Ahmad, Nur; Armaly, Zaher; Berman, Sylvia; Jabour, Adel; Aga-Mizrachi, Shlomit; Mosenego-Ornan, Efrat; Avital, Avi

    2016-10-01

    Over the past decade, the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) has reached epidemic proportions. The search for novel pharmacological treatment for CKD has become an area of intensive clinical research. l-Carnitine, considered as the "gatekeeper" responsible for admitting long chain fatty acids into cell mitochondria. l-Carnitine synthesis and turnover are regulated mainly by the kidney and its levels inversely correlate with serum creatinine of normal subjects and CKD patients. Previous studies showed that l-carnitine administration to elderly people is improving and preserving cognitive function. As yet, there are no clinical intervention studies that investigated the effect of l-carnitine administration on cognitive impairment evidenced in CKD patients. Thus, we aimed to investigate the effects of l-carnitine treatment on renal function and on the cognitive performance in a rat model of progressive CKD. To assess the role of l-carnitine on CKD condition, we estimated the renal function and cognitive abilities in a CKD rat model. We found that all CKD animals exhibited renal function deterioration, as indicated by elevated serum creatinine, BUN, and ample histopathological abnormalities. l-Carnitine treatment of CKD rats significantly reduced serum creatinine and BUN, attenuated renal hypertrophy and decreased renal tissue damage. In addition, in the two way shuttle avoidance learning, CKD animals showed cognitive impairment which recovered by the administration of l-carnitine. We conclude that in a rat model of CKD, l-carnitine administration significantly improved cognitive and renal functions. PMID:27241631

  3. Renal transplantation in a patient with chronic granulomatous disease: case report.

    PubMed

    Caliskan, B; Yazici, H; Gulluoglu, M; Caliskan, Y; Turkmen, A; Sever, M S

    2015-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a genetic disease caused by structural mutations in the enzyme NADPH oxidase that results in severe immunodeficiency. End-stage renal disease occurs in this patient population and is attributed to various factors, including infections, amyloidosis, and nephrotoxic anti-infective agents. In this report, we present our experience in transplantation for a patient with CGD complicated by isolated hepatic tuberculosis abscess. The course of the case demonstrates the absolute requirements for a multidisciplinary and compulsive approach before, during, and after transplantation. This case report also highlights the unexpectedly benign effects of immunosuppressive therapy in this patient population. PMID:25480525

  4. TLR4 mutant mice are protected from renal fibrosis and chronic kidney disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Ana C P; Tsuji, Takayuki; Baranova, Irina N; Bocharov, Alexander V; Wilkins, Kenneth J; Street, Jonathan M; Alvarez-Prats, Alejandro; Hu, Xuzhen; Eggerman, Thomas; Yuen, Peter S T; Star, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with persistent low-grade inflammation and immunosuppression. In this study we tested the role of Toll-like receptor 4, the main receptor for endotoxin (LPS), in a mouse model of renal fibrosis and in a model of progressive CKD that better resembles the human disease. C3HeJ (TLR4 mutant) mice have a missense point mutation in the TLR4 gene, rendering the receptor nonfunctional. In a model of renal fibrosis after folic acid injection, TLR4 mutant mice developed less interstititial fibrosis in comparison to wild-type (WT) mice. Furthermore, 4 weeks after 5/6 nephrectomy with continuous low-dose angiotensin II infusion, C3HeOuJ (TLR4 WT) mice developed progressive CKD with albuminuria, increased serum levels of BUN and creatinine, glomerulosclerosis, and interstitial fibrosis, whereas TLR4 mutant mice were significantly protected from CKD progression. TLR4 WT mice also developed low-grade systemic inflammation, splenocyte apoptosis and increased expression of the immune inhibitory receptor PD-1 in the spleen, which were not observed in TLR4 mutant mice. In vitro, endotoxin (LPS) directly upregulated NLRP3 inflammasome expression in renal epithelial cells via TLR4. In summary, TLR4 contributes to renal fibrosis and CKD progression, at least in part, via inflammasome activation in renal epithelial cells, and may also participate in the dysregulated immune response that is associated with CKD. PMID:26416975

  5. Kyrle's disease in a patient of diabetes mellitus and chronic renal failure on dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Pragya A.; Jivani, Nidhi B.; Diwan, Nilofar G.

    2015-01-01

    Kyrle's disease (KD) is an acquired perforating dermatosis associated with an underlying disorder such as diabetes mellitus or chronic renal failure. It presents as multiple discrete, eruptive papules with a central crust or plug, often on the lower extremities. A keratotic plug is seen histologically in an atrophic epidermis and may penetrate the papillary dermis with transepidermal elimination of keratotic debris without collagen or elastic fibers. Various therapies have been reported that include cryotherapy, laser therapy, narrow-band ultraviolet B and use of topical or systemic retinoids. Hereby a case of 64-year-old male, a known case of diabetes mellitus, hypertension and chronic renal failure who developed KD is presented. PMID:25949985

  6. Mechanisms of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids to improve cardiac remodeling in chronic renal failure disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Wang, Ju; Zhang, Huanji; Chen, Jie; Zuo, Zhiyi; Wang, Jingfeng; Huang, Hui

    2013-02-15

    Both clinical and basic science studies have demonstrated that cardiac remodeling in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) is very common. It is a key feature during the course of heart failure and an important risk factor for subsequent cardiac mortality. Traditional drugs or therapies rarely have effects on cardiac regression of CRF and cardiovascular events are still the first cause of death. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are the products of arachidonic acids metabolized by cytochrome P450 epoxygenases. It has been found that EETs have important biological effects including anti-hypertension and anti-inflammation. Recent data suggest that EETs are involved in regulating cardiomyocyte injury, renal dysfunction, chronic kidney disease (CKD)-related risk factors and signaling pathways, all of which play key roles in cardiac remodeling induced by CRF. This review analyzes the literature to identify the possible mechanisms for EETs to improve cardiac remodeling induced by CRF and indicates the therapeutic potential of EETs in it. PMID:23313758

  7. The Potential Role of Catheter-Based Renal Sympathetic Denervation in Chronic and End-Stage Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Sata, Yusuke; Schlaich, Markus P

    2016-07-01

    Sympathetic activation is a hallmark of chronic and end-stage renal disease and adversely affects cardiovascular prognosis. Hypertension is present in the vast majority of these patients and plays a key role in the progressive deterioration of renal function and the high rate of cardiovascular events in this patient cohort. Augmentation of renin release, tubular sodium reabsorption, and renal vascular resistance are direct consequences of efferent renal sympathetic nerve stimulation and the major components of neural regulation of renal function. Renal afferent nerve activity directly influences sympathetic outflow to the kidneys and other highly innervated organs involved in blood pressure control via hypothalamic integration. Renal denervation of the kidney has been shown to reduce blood pressure in many experimental models of hypertension. Targeting the renal nerves directly may therefore be specifically useful in patients with chronic and end-stage renal disease. In this review, we will discuss the potential role of catheter-based renal denervation in patients with impaired kidney function and also reflect on the potential impact on other cardiovascular conditions commonly associated with chronic kidney disease such as heart failure and arrhythmias. PMID:26740184

  8. Con: Nutritional vitamin D replacement in chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rajiv; Georgianos, Panagiotis I

    2016-05-01

    Insufficiency of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] is highly prevalent among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) or end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and is a critical component in the pathogenesis of secondary hyperparathyroidism. Accordingly, current National Kidney Foundation-Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative and Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines recommend the correction of hypovitaminosis D through nutritional vitamin D replacement as a first-step therapeutic approach targeting secondary hyperparathyroidism. In this Polar Views debate, we summarize the existing evidence, aiming to defend the position that nutritional vitamin D replacement is not evidence-based and should not be applied to patients with CKD. This position is supported by the following: (i) our meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials shows that whereas nutritional vitamin D significantly increases serum 25(OH)D levels relative to placebo, there is no evidence either in predialysis CKD or in ESRD that parathyroid hormone (PTH) is lowered; (ii) on the other hand, in randomized head-to-head comparisons, nutritional vitamin D is shown to be inferior to activated vitamin D analogs in reducing PTH levels; (iii) nutritional vitamin D is reported to exert minimal to no beneficial actions in a series of surrogate risk factors, including aortic stiffness, left ventricular mass index (LVMI), epoetin utilization and immune function among others; and (iv) there is no evidence to support a benefit of nutritional vitamin D on survival and other 'hard' clinical outcomes. Whereas nutritional vitamin D replacement may restore 25(OH)D concentration to near normal, the real target of treating vitamin D insufficiency is to treat secondary hyperparathyroidism, which is untouched by nutritional vitamin D. Furthermore, the pleotropic benefits of nutritional vitamin D remain to be proven. Thus, there is little, if any, benefit of nutritional vitamin D replacement in CKD. PMID:27190392

  9. Postoperative oxycodone toxicity in a patient with chronic pain and end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Tran, Bryant W; Kohan, Lynn R; Vorenkamp, Kevin E

    2015-02-15

    We present this case to review the metabolism of oxycodone and the effects of end-stage renal disease on the elimination of oxycodone and its metabolites. A 42-year-old female with end-stage renal disease who was dependent on hemodialysis presented for left hamstring posterior capsule release. She had been receiving methadone for 2 years for chronic leg pain. On postoperative day 1, the patient's medication was changed from IV hydromorphone to oral oxycodone to treat breakthrough pain. By the next day, the patient was unarousable with notable respiratory depression. She did not fully recover after urgent hemodialysis but did have full recovery after receiving an IV naloxone infusion for 22 hours. Further study of the safety of oxycodone in hemodialysis patients is warranted. PMID:25689360

  10. Family Stress with Chronic Childhood Illness: Cystic Fibrosis, Neuromuscular Disease, and Renal Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holroyd, Jean; Guthrie, Donald

    1986-01-01

    Parents of children with neuromuscular disease, cystic fibrosis, and renal disease were compared with parents of control subjects matched by age to the clinical cases. The three clinical groups exhibited different patterns of stressful response, consistent with the nature of their illnesses and the requirements for care imposed on the families.…

  11. Inhibition of lysosomal protease cathepsin D reduces renal fibrosis in murine chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Christopher; Cocchiaro, Pasquale; Oakley, Fiona; Howarth, Rachel; Callaghan, Krystena; Leslie, Jack; Luli, Saimir; Wood, Katrina M.; Genovese, Federica; Sheerin, Neil S.; Moles, Anna

    2016-01-01

    During chronic kidney disease (CKD) there is a dysregulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) homeostasis leading to renal fibrosis. Lysosomal proteases such as cathepsins (Cts) regulate this process in other organs, however, their role in CKD is still unknown. Here we describe a novel role for cathepsins in CKD. CtsD and B were located in distal and proximal tubular cells respectively in human disease. Administration of CtsD (Pepstatin A) but not B inhibitor (Ca074-Me), in two mouse CKD models, UUO and chronic ischemia reperfusion injury, led to a reduction in fibrosis. No changes in collagen transcription or myofibroblasts numbers were observed. Pepstatin A administration resulted in increased extracellular urokinase and collagen degradation. In vitro and in vivo administration of chloroquine, an endo/lysosomal inhibitor, mimicked Pepstatin A effect on renal fibrosis. Therefore, we propose a mechanism by which CtsD inhibition leads to increased collagenolytic activity due to an impairment in lysosomal recycling. This results in increased extracellular activity of enzymes such as urokinase, triggering a proteolytic cascade, which culminates in more ECM degradation. Taken together these results suggest that inhibition of lysosomal proteases, such as CtsD, could be a new therapeutic approach to reduce renal fibrosis and slow progression of CKD. PMID:26831567

  12. Inhibition of lysosomal protease cathepsin D reduces renal fibrosis in murine chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Fox, Christopher; Cocchiaro, Pasquale; Oakley, Fiona; Howarth, Rachel; Callaghan, Krystena; Leslie, Jack; Luli, Saimir; Wood, Katrina M; Genovese, Federica; Sheerin, Neil S; Moles, Anna

    2016-01-01

    During chronic kidney disease (CKD) there is a dysregulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) homeostasis leading to renal fibrosis. Lysosomal proteases such as cathepsins (Cts) regulate this process in other organs, however, their role in CKD is still unknown. Here we describe a novel role for cathepsins in CKD. CtsD and B were located in distal and proximal tubular cells respectively in human disease. Administration of CtsD (Pepstatin A) but not B inhibitor (Ca074-Me), in two mouse CKD models, UUO and chronic ischemia reperfusion injury, led to a reduction in fibrosis. No changes in collagen transcription or myofibroblasts numbers were observed. Pepstatin A administration resulted in increased extracellular urokinase and collagen degradation. In vitro and in vivo administration of chloroquine, an endo/lysosomal inhibitor, mimicked Pepstatin A effect on renal fibrosis. Therefore, we propose a mechanism by which CtsD inhibition leads to increased collagenolytic activity due to an impairment in lysosomal recycling. This results in increased extracellular activity of enzymes such as urokinase, triggering a proteolytic cascade, which culminates in more ECM degradation. Taken together these results suggest that inhibition of lysosomal proteases, such as CtsD, could be a new therapeutic approach to reduce renal fibrosis and slow progression of CKD. PMID:26831567

  13. Protein biomarkers associated with acute renal failure and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Perco, P; Pleban, C; Kainz, A; Lukas, A; Mayer, G; Mayer, B; Oberbauer, R

    2006-11-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) as well as chronic kidney disease (CKD) are currently categorized according to serum creatinine concentrations. Serum creatinine, however, has shortcomings because of its low predictive values. The need for novel markers for the early diagnosis and prognosis of renal diseases is imminent, particularly for markers reflecting intrinsic organ injury in stages when glomerular filtration is not impaired. This review summarizes protein markers discussed in the context of ARF as well as CKD, and provides an overview on currently available discovery results following 'omics' techniques. The identified set of candidate marker proteins is discussed in their cellular and functional context. The systematic review of proteomics and genomics studies revealed 56 genes to be associated with acute or chronic kidney disease. Context analysis, i.e. correlation of biological processes and molecular functions of reported kidney markers, revealed that 15 genes on the candidate list were assigned to the most significant ontology groups: immunity and defence. Other significantly enriched groups were cell communication (14 genes), signal transduction (22 genes) and apoptosis (seven genes). Among 24 candidate protein markers, nine proteins were also identified by gene expression studies. Next generation candidate marker proteins with improved diagnostic and prognostic values for kidney diseases will be derived from whole genome scans and protemics approaches. Prospective validation still remains elusive for all proposed candidates. PMID:17032342

  14. Renal expression of hypoxia inducible factor-1α in patients with chronic kidney disease: a clinicopathologic study from nephrectomized kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Tung-Wei, Hung; Jia-Hung, Liou; Kun-Tu, Yeh; Jen-Pi, Tsai; Sheng-Wen, Wu; Hui-Chun, Tai; Wei-Tse, Kao; Shu-Hui, Lin; Ya-Wen, Cheng; Horng-Rong, Chang

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) has been shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of renal interstitial fibrosis. However, the relationship of HIF-1α expression intensity in human renal tissue with the degree of renal function or renal fibrosis has not been investigated. We therefore, undertook this study to assess the relationship between HIF-1α expression and degree of renal impairment and renal fibrosis using renal tissue from nephrectomized kidneys from patients with chronic kidney disease. Methods: This retrospective study was performed with 70 patients undergoing unilateral or bilateral nephrectomy because of renal cell carcinoma, urothelial cell carcinoma, or renal abscess. Immunohistochemical analysis of HIF-1α expression in non-tumourous or non-abscess renal parenchyma was performed. The patients were divided into two groups: group 1 (n=37) with low intensity HIF-1α expression and group 2 (n=33) with high intensity HIF-1α expression. Results: The intensity of renal HIF-1α expression was significantly associated with serum creatinine level (P=0.005), estimated glomerular filtration rate (P=0.02), fibrosis score of the interstitium (P=0.004) and glomerular sclerosis (P=0.013). A high intensity of HIF-1α expression tended to be associated with lower serum creatinine, higher estimated glomerular filtration rate, low interstitial fibrosis score and low glomerular sclerosis. In addition, multivariate analysis by step-wise logistic regression demonstrated that interstitial fibrosis was the only independent factor associated with the intensity of renal HIF-1α expression (OR 4.107, CI 1.535-11.313, P=0.005). Interpretation & conclusions: This study demonstrated a correlation between intensity of HIF-1α expression and degree of renal interstitial fibrosis. The association demonstrated an elevated HIF-1α expression in less severe kidney disease. The intensity of HIF-1α renal expression plays a role in the pathogenesis of

  15. Total Joint Arthroplasty in Patients with Chronic Renal Disease: Is It Worth the Risk?

    PubMed

    Warth, Lucian C; Pugely, Andrew J; Martin, Christopher T; Gao, Yubo; Callaghan, John J

    2015-09-01

    26-27% of patients with end stage hip and knee arthritis requiring TJR have chronic renal disease. A multi-center, prospective clinical registry was queried for TJA's from 2006 to 2012, and 74,300 cases were analyzed. Renal impairment was quantified using estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) to stratify each patient by stage of CRD (1-5). There was a significantly greater rate of overall complications in patients with moderate to severe CRD (6.1% vs. 7.6%, P<0.001). In those with CRD (Stage 3-5), mortality was twice as high (0.26% vs. 0.48%, P<0.001). Patients with Stage 4 and 5 CRD had a 213% increased risk of any complication (OR 2.13, 95% CI: 1.73-2.62). Surgeons may use these findings to discuss the risk-benefit ratio of elective TJR in patients with CRD. PMID:26122111

  16. Renal cell carcinomas of chronic kidney disease patients harbor the mutational signature of carcinogenic aristolochic acid.

    PubMed

    Jelaković, Bojan; Castells, Xavier; Tomić, Karla; Ardin, Maude; Karanović, Sandra; Zavadil, Jiri

    2015-06-15

    Aristolochic acid (AA) is a potent dietary cytotoxin and carcinogen, and an established etiological agent underlying severe human nephropathies and associated upper urinary tract urothelial cancers, collectively designated aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN). Its genome-wide mutational signature, marked by predominant A:T > T:A transversions occurring in the 5'-CpApG-3' trinucleotide context and enriched on the nontranscribed gene strand, has been identified in human upper urinary tract urothelial carcinomas from East Asian patients and in experimental systems. Here we report a whole-exome sequencing screen performed on DNA from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded renal cell carcinomas (RCC) arising in chronic renal disease patients from a Balkan endemic nephropathy (EN) region. In the EN regions, the disease results from the consumption of bread made from wheat contaminated by seeds of Aristolochia clematitis, an AA-containing plant. In five of eight (62.5%) tested RCC tumor specimens, we observed the characteristic global mutational signature consistent with the mutagenic effects of AA. This signature was absent in the control RCC samples obtained from patients from a nonendemic, metropolitan region. By identifying a new tumor type associated with the AA-driven genome-wide mutagenic process in the context of renal disease, our results suggest new epidemiological and public health implications for the RCC incidence worldwide, particularly for the high-risk regions with unregulated use of AA-containing traditional herbal medicines. PMID:25403517

  17. Renal cell carcinomas of chronic kidney disease patients harbor the mutational signature of carcinogenic aristolochic acid

    PubMed Central

    Jelaković, Bojan; Castells, Xavier; Tomić, Karla; Ardin, Maude; Karanović, Sandra; Zavadil, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Aristolochic acid (AA) is a potent dietary cytotoxin and carcinogen, and an established etiological agent underlying severe human nephropathies and associated upper urinary tract urothelial cancers, collectively designated aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN). Its genome-wide mutational signature, marked by predominant A:T > T:A transversions occurring in the 5′-CpApG-3′ trinucleotide context and enriched on the nontranscribed gene strand, has been identified in human upper urinary tract urothelial carcinomas from East Asian patients and in experimental systems. Here we report a whole-exome sequencing screen performed on DNA from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded renal cell carcinomas (RCC) arising in chronic renal disease patients from a Balkan endemic nephropathy (EN) region. In the EN regions, the disease results from the consumption of bread made from wheat contaminated by seeds of Aristolochia clematitis, an AA-containing plant. In five of eight (62.5%) tested RCC tumor specimens, we observed the characteristic global mutational signature consistent with the mutagenic effects of AA. This signature was absent in the control RCC samples obtained from patients from a nonendemic, metropolitan region. By identifying a new tumor type associated with the AA-driven genome-wide mutagenic process in the context of renal disease, our results suggest new epidemiological and public health implications for the RCC incidence worldwide, particularly for the high-risk regions with unregulated use of AA-containing traditional herbal medicines. PMID:25403517

  18. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Kidneys' Structural Changes in End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Acquired cystic kidney disease (ACKD) and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) are the most important manifestations of end-stage kidneys' structural changes. ACKD is caused by kidney damage or scarring and it is characterized by the presence of small, multiple cortical and medullary cysts filled with a fluid similar to preurine. ACKD prevalence varies according to predialysis and dialysis age and its pathogenesis is unknown, although it is stated that progressive destruction of renal tissue induces hypertrophy/compensatory hyperplasia of residual nephrons and may trigger the degenerative process. ACKD is almost asymptomatic, but it can lead to several complications (bleeding, rupture, infections, RCC). Ultrasound (US) is the first level imaging technique in ACKD, because of its sensitivity and reliability. The most serious complication of ACKD is RCC, which is stimulated by the same growth factors and proto-oncogenes that lead to the genesis of cysts. Two different histological types of RCC have been identified: (1) RCC associated with ACKD and (2) papillary renal clear cell carcinoma. Tumors in end-stage kidneys are mainly small, multifocal and bilateral, with a papillary structure and a low degree of malignancy. At US, RCC appears as a small inhomogeneous nodule (<3 cm), clearly outlined from the renal profile and hypoechoic if compared with sclerotic parenchyma. In some cases, tumor appears as a homogeneous and hyperechoic multifocal mass. The most specific US sign of a small tumor in end-stage kidney is the important arterial vascularization, in contrast with renal parenchymal vascular sclerosis. PMID:27169876

  19. Marked increase of asymmetric dimethylarginine in patients with incipient primary chronic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Kielstein, Jan T; Böger, Rainer H; Bode-Böger, Stefanie M; Frölich, Jürgen C; Haller, Hermann; Ritz, Eberhard; Fliser, Danilo

    2002-01-01

    In patients with uremia, increased blood concentrations of the endogenous nitric oxide synthase inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) have been linked to the severity of atherosclerosis and to excess cardiovascular mortality. The ADMA levels and several traditional cardiovascular risk factors were assessed in 44 untreated nonsmoking patients with confirmed primary chronic renal disease at different stages of renal disease. True GFR was assessed by means of the inulin-clearance technique. For comparison, nonsmoking subjects matched with respect to age, gender, and body-mass index were examined. Mean plasma ADMA concentration was markedly higher (P < 0.0001) in all patients combined (4.2 +/- 0.9 micromol/L) than in control subjects (n = 16; age 45 +/- 10 yr; serum creatinine 1.0 +/- 0.1 mg/dl; ADMA 1.4 +/- 0.7 micromol/L). However, mean ADMA levels were similar in patients with normal renal function (n = 16; age 41 +/- 9 yr; serum creatinine 1.1 +/- 0.1 mg/dl; GFR 120 +/- 14 ml x min(-1) x 1.73 m2; ADMA 4.0 +/- 0.7 micromol/L), in patients with moderate renal failure (n = 15; 47 +/- 7 yr; 1.8 +/- 0.3 mg/dl; 65 +/- 10 ml x min(-1) x 1.73 m2; 3.8 +/- 0.6 micromol/L) and in patients with advanced renal failure (n = 13; 46 +/- 9 yr; 4.2 +/- 0.9 mg/dl; 25 +/- 4 ml x min(-1) x 1.73 m2; 4.7 +/- 1.2 micromol/L). Furthermore, ADMA levels were increased to the same extent in normotensive (n = 17; 4.0 +/- 0.8 micromol/L) and in hypertensive (n = 27; 4.2 +/- 0.9 micromol/L) patients. In contrast to ADMA, mean total plasma homocysteine concentration were similar in control subjects (10.6 +/- 2.9 micromol/L) and in patients with normal GFR (11.0 +/- 2.9 micromol/L), but were significantly higher in patients with moderate renal failure (17.7 +/- 4.1 micromol/L) and particularly in patients with advanced renal failure (28.2 +/- 10.6 micromol/L). Finally, mean total serum cholesterol concentrations were comparable in the control group and in the three groups of patients with

  20. Predicting Renal Failure Progression in Chronic Kidney Disease Using Integrated Intelligent Fuzzy Expert System

    PubMed Central

    Norouzi, Jamshid; Mirbagheri, Seyed Ahmad; Mazdeh, Mitra Mahdavi; Hosseini, Seyed Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Background. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a covert disease. Accurate prediction of CKD progression over time is necessary for reducing its costs and mortality rates. The present study proposes an adaptive neurofuzzy inference system (ANFIS) for predicting the renal failure timeframe of CKD based on real clinical data. Methods. This study used 10-year clinical records of newly diagnosed CKD patients. The threshold value of 15 cc/kg/min/1.73 m2 of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was used as the marker of renal failure. A Takagi-Sugeno type ANFIS model was used to predict GFR values. Variables of age, sex, weight, underlying diseases, diastolic blood pressure, creatinine, calcium, phosphorus, uric acid, and GFR were initially selected for the predicting model. Results. Weight, diastolic blood pressure, diabetes mellitus as underlying disease, and current GFR(t) showed significant correlation with GFRs and were selected as the inputs of model. The comparisons of the predicted values with the real data showed that the ANFIS model could accurately estimate GFR variations in all sequential periods (Normalized Mean Absolute Error lower than 5%). Conclusions. Despite the high uncertainties of human body and dynamic nature of CKD progression, our model can accurately predict the GFR variations at long future periods. PMID:27022406

  1. The effect of ONCE Renal on minerals and electrolytes in predialysis patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Satirapoj, Bancha; Prapakorn, Janjira; Punpanich, Dollapas; Pongsuparbchon, Chantima; Supasyndh, Ouppatham

    2016-01-01

    Background Malnutrition is one common adverse consequence in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD), and most patients have a lower-than-normal dietary energy intake. The present study was undertaken to examine whether orally administered ONCE Renal formula (ORF) supplement would improve energy intake without minerals and electrolytes disturbances in predialysis patients with CKD. Methods All eligible nondiabetic patients with CKD received ORF supplement for 1 week. Nutrition markers, renal function, and minerals and electrolytes were evaluated before and after supplementing. All patients kept a 3-day food record and were interviewed by a registered dietitian. Results A total of 29 patients with mean age 64.9±13.3 years were included. Mean estimated glomerular filtration rate was 37.7±12.1 mL/min/1.73 m2. A significant increase was observed in amount of energy, fat, fiber, calcium, and magnesium intake after 1 week of ORF supplement. Moreover, in comparison with baseline values, the patients displayed decreased dietary protein intake and blood urea nitrogen and increased serum magnesium. However, no significant change was found in renal function, nutritional markers (body weight, prealbumin, albumin, and protein equivalence of total nitrogen appearance), serum calcium, phosphorus, sodium, potassium, and bicarbonate. Conclusion In patients with CKD, ingestion of ORF was well tolerated and had a positive effect with an increase in dietary energy, fat, and fiber intake, as well as a decreased dietary protein intake. No mineral or electrolyte abnormalities were observed during the study. PMID:27103839

  2. Renal function assessment in atrial fibrillation: Usefulness of chronic kidney disease epidemiology collaboration vs re-expressed 4 variable modification of diet in renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Abumuaileq, Rami Riziq-Yousef; Abu-Assi, Emad; López-López, Andrea; Raposeiras-Roubin, Sergio; Rodríguez-Mañero, Moisés; Martínez-Sande, Luis; García-Seara, Francisco Javier; Fernandez-López, Xesus Alberte; González-Juanatey, Jose Ramón

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare the performance of the re-expressed Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation vs the new Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. METHODS: We studied 911 consecutive patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation on vitamin-K antagonist. The performance of the re-expressed Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation vs the new Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation with respect to either a composite endpoint of major bleeding, thromboembolic events and all-cause mortality or each individual component of the composite endpoint was assessed using continuous and categorical ≥ 60, 59-30, and < 30 mL/min per 1.73 m2 estimated glomerular filtration rate. RESULTS: During 10 ± 3 mo, the composite endpoint occurred in 98 (10.8%) patients: 30 patients developed major bleeding, 18 had thromboembolic events, and 60 died. The new equation provided lower prevalence of renal dysfunction < 60 mL/min per 1.73 m2 (32.9%), compared with the re-expressed equation (34.1%). Estimated glomerular filtration rate from both equations was independent predictor of composite endpoint (HR = 0.98 and 0.97 for the re-expressed and the new equation, respectively; P < 0.0001) and all-cause mortality (HR = 0.98 for both equations, P < 0.01). Strong association with thromboembolic events was observed only when estimated glomerular filtration rate was < 30 mL/min per 1.73 m2: HR is 5.1 for the re-expressed equation, and HR = 5.0 for the new equation. No significant association with major bleeding was observed for both equations. CONCLUSION: The new equation reduced the prevalence of renal dysfunction. Both equations performed similarly in predicting major adverse outcomes. PMID:26516423

  3. Serum aldosterone and death, end-stage renal disease, and cardiovascular events in blacks and whites: findings from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study.

    PubMed

    Deo, Rajat; Yang, Wei; Khan, Abigail M; Bansal, Nisha; Zhang, Xiaoming; Leonard, Mary B; Keane, Martin G; Soliman, Elsayed Z; Steigerwalt, Susan; Townsend, Raymond R; Shlipak, Michael G; Feldman, Harold I

    2014-07-01

    Prior studies have demonstrated that elevated aldosterone concentrations are an independent risk factor for death in patients with cardiovascular disease. Limited studies, however, have evaluated systematically the association between serum aldosterone and adverse events in the setting of chronic kidney disease. We investigated the association between serum aldosterone and death and end-stage renal disease in 3866 participants from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort. We also evaluated the association between aldosterone and incident congestive heart failure and atherosclerotic events in participants without baseline cardiovascular disease. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate independent associations between elevated aldosterone concentrations and each outcome. Interactions were hypothesized and explored between aldosterone and sex, race, and the use of loop diuretics and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors. During a median follow-up period of 5.4 years, 587 participants died, 743 developed end-stage renal disease, 187 developed congestive heart failure, and 177 experienced an atherosclerotic event. Aldosterone concentrations (per SD of the log-transformed aldosterone) were not an independent risk factor for death (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.00; 95% confidence interval, 0.93-1.12), end-stage renal disease (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.07; 95% confidence interval, 0.99-1.17), or atherosclerotic events (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 0.85-1.18). Aldosterone was associated with congestive heart failure (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.21; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.35). Among participants with chronic kidney disease, higher aldosterone concentrations were independently associated with the development of congestive heart failure but not for death, end-stage renal disease, or atherosclerotic events. Further studies should evaluate whether mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists may reduce adverse events in individuals with

  4. Disseminated coccidioidomycosis in a captive Indochinese tiger (Panthera tigris corbetti) with chronic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Helmick, Kelly E; Koplos, Peter; Raymond, James

    2006-12-01

    A 19-yr-old, 78.2-kg captive female Indochinese tiger (Panthera tigris corbetti) from the El Paso Zoo (El Paso, Texas, USA) with chronic renal disease was euthanized after a 10-day course of anorexia, depression, progressive rear limb weakness, muscle fasciculations, and head tremors. Postmortem findings included pericardial effusion, generalized lymphadenopathy, glomerulosclerosis, glomerular atrophy with membranous glomerulonephropathy, and pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Pyogranulomatous pneumonia, pericarditis, and lymphadenitis were associated with fungal spherules histomorphologically consistent with Coccidioides immitis. Rising antibodies to C. immitis were detected on samples obtained perimortem and 2 mo before euthanasia. Retrospective serology was negative for two additional Indochinese tigers, two Iranian leopards (Panthera pardus saxicolor), two jaguars (Panthera onca), two bobcats (Lynx rufus texensis), two ocelots (Leopardus pardalis), and three Amur leopards (Panthera pardus orientalis) housed at the zoo over an 8-yr period. Despite being located within the endemic region for C. immitis, this is only the second case of coccidioidomycosis reported from this institution. PMID:17315442

  5. The epidemiology and outcome of acute renal failure and the impact on chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Block, Clay A; Schoolwerth, Anton C

    2006-01-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is a common condition, especially among the critically ill, and confers a high mortality. Recent publications have highlighted changes in the epidemiology and improvement in mortality that was long thought to be static despite improvements in clinical care. The incidence of ARF is increasing. Efforts, such as the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative, are being undertaken to establish a consensus definition of ARF, and to distinguish between varying degrees of acute kidney injury. Data are emerging to allow comparison of the epidemiology of ARF across institutions internationally. There is ongoing recognition of the important interaction between ARF and chronic kidney disease. Two brief case reports are offered to help frame the context and clinical impact of this disorder, followed by a review of some of the recent literature that addresses these points. PMID:17150044

  6. The French Chronic Kidney Disease-Renal Epidemiology and Information Network (CKD-REIN) cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Stengel, Bénédicte; Combe, Christian; Jacquelinet, Christian; Briançon, Serge; Fouque, Denis; Laville, Maurice; Frimat, Luc; Pascal, Christophe; Herpe, Yves-Edouard; Deleuze, Jean-François; Schanstra, Joost; Pisoni, Ron L.; Robinson, Bruce M.; Massy, Ziad A.

    2014-01-01

    Background While much has been learned about the epidemiology and treatment of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the last 30 years, chronic kidney disease (CKD) before the end-stage has been less investigated. Not enough is known about factors associated with CKD progression and complications, as well as its transition to ESRD. We designed the CKD-renal epidemiology and information network (REIN) cohort to provide a research platform to address these key questions and to assess clinical practices and costs in patients with moderate or advanced CKD. Methods A total of 46 clinic sites and 4 renal care networks participate in the cohort. A stratified selection of clinic sites yields a sample that represents a diversity of settings, e.g. geographic region, and public versus for-profit and non-for-profit private clinics. In each site, 60–90 patients with CKD are enrolled at a routine clinic visit during a 12-month enrolment phase: 3600 total, including 1800 with Stage 3 and 1800 with Stage 4 CKD. Follow-up will continue for 5 years, including after initiation of renal replacement therapy. Data will be collected from medical records at inclusion and at yearly intervals, as well as from self-administered patient questionnaires and provider-level questionnaires. Patients will also be interviewed at baseline, and at 1, 3 and 5 years. Healthcare costs will also be determined. Blood and urine samples will be collected and stored for future studies on all patients at enrolment and at study end, and at 1 and 3 years in a subsample of 1200. Conclusions The CKD-REIN cohort will serve to improve our understanding of the biological, clinical and healthcare system determinants associated with CKD progression and adverse outcomes as well as of international variations in collaboration with the CKD Outcome and Practice Pattern Study (CKDopps). It will foster CKD epidemiology and outcomes research and provide evidence to improve the health and quality of life of patients with CKD and

  7. Cardiovascular Disease Among Hispanics and Non-Hispanics in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Ricardo, Ana C.; Fischer, Michael J.; Lora, Claudia M.; Budoff, Matthew; Keane, Martin G.; Kusek, John W.; Martinez, Monica; Nessel, Lisa; Stamos, Thomas; Ojo, Akinlolu; Rahman, Mahboob; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Yang, Wei; Feldman, Harold I.; Go, Alan S.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Hispanics are the largest minority group in the United States. The leading cause of death in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is cardiovascular disease (CVD), yet little is known about its prevalence among Hispanics with CKD. Design, setting, participants, & measurements We conducted cross-sectional analyses of prevalent self-reported clinical and subclinical measures of CVD among 497 Hispanics, 1638 non-Hispanic Caucasians, and 1650 non-Hispanic African Americans, aged 21 to 74 years, with mild-to-moderate CKD at enrollment in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) and Hispanic CRIC (HCRIC) studies. Measures of subclinical CVD included left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), coronary artery calcification (CAC), and ankle-brachial index. Results Self-reported coronary heart disease (CHD) was lower in Hispanics compared with non-Hispanic Caucasians (18% versus 23%, P = 0.02). Compared with non-Hispanic Caucasians, Hispanics had a lower prevalence of CAC >100 (41% versus 34%, P = 0.03) and CAC >400 (26% versus 19%, P = 0.02). However, after adjusting for sociodemographic factors, these differences were no longer significant. In adjusted analyses, Hispanics had a higher odds of LVH compared with non-Hispanic Caucasians (odds ratio 1.97, 95% confidence interval, 1.22 to 3.17, P = 0.005), and a higher odds of CAC >400 compared with non-Hispanic African Americans (odds ratio, 2.49, 95% confidence interval, 1.11 to 5.58, P = 0.03). Hispanic ethnicity was not independently associated with any other CVD measures. Conclusions Prevalent LVH was more common among Hispanics than non-Hispanic Caucasians, and elevated CAC score was more common among Hispanics than non-Hispanic African Americans. Understanding reasons for these racial/ethnic differences and their association with long-term clinical outcomes is needed. PMID:21896829

  8. Direct conscious telemetry recordings demonstrate increased renal sympathetic nerve activity in rats with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Salman, Ibrahim M.; Sarma Kandukuri, Divya; Harrison, Joanne L.; Hildreth, Cara M.; Phillips, Jacqueline K.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with sympathetic hyperactivity and impaired blood pressure control reflex responses, yet direct evidence demonstrating these features of autonomic dysfunction in conscious animals is still lacking. Here we measured renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) using telemetry-based recordings in a rat model of CKD, the Lewis Polycystic Kidney (LPK) rat, and assessed responses to chemoreflex activation and acute stress. Male LPK and Lewis control animals (total n = 16) were instrumented for telemetric recording of RSNA and MAP. At 12–13 weeks-of-age, resting RSNA and MAP, sympathetic and haemodynamic responses to both peripheral (hypoxia: 10% O2) and central chemoreflex (hypercapnia: 7% CO2) activation and acute stress (open-field exposure), were measured. As indicators of renal function, urinary protein (UPro) and creatinine (UCr) levels were assessed. LPK rats had higher resting RSNA (1.2 ± 0.1 vs. 0.6 ± 0.1 μV, p < 0.05) and MAP (151 ± 8 vs. 97 ± 2 mmHg, p < 0.05) compared to Lewis. MAP was negatively correlated with UCr (r = −0.80, p = 0.002) and positively correlated with RSNA (r = 0.66, p = 0.014), with multiple linear regression modeling indicating the strongest correlation was with Ucr. RSNA and MAP responses to activation of the central chemoreflex and open-field stress were reduced in the LPK relative to the Lewis (all p < 0.05). This is the first description of dual conscious telemetry recording of RSNA and MAP in a genetic rodent model of CKD. Elevated RSNA is likely a key contributor to the marked hypertension in this model, while attenuated RSNA and MAP responses to central chemoreflex activation and acute stress in the LPK indicate possible deficits in the neural processing of autonomic outflows evoked by these sympathoexcitatory pathways. PMID:26300784

  9. Aortic Pulse Pressure Is Associated With Carotid IMT in Chronic Kidney Disease: Report From Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort

    PubMed Central

    DeLoach, S.S.; Appel, L.J.; Chen, J.; Joffe, M.M.; Gadegbeku, C.A.; Mohler, E.R.; Parsa, A.; Perumal, K.; Rafey, M.A.; Steigerwalt, S.P.; Teal, V.; Townsend, R.R.; Rosas, Sylvia E.

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a disproportionate risk of cardiovascular disease. This study was designed to assess the association between two noninvasive measures of cardiovascular risk, pulse wave analysis (PWA), and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), in a cohort of CKD patients enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study. Methods Three hundred and sixty-seven subjects with CKD enrolled in the CRIC study at the University of Pennsylvania site (mean age 59.9 years, blood pressure 129/74 mm Hg, estimated glomerular filtration rate 48 ml/min/1.73 m2, IMT 0.8 mm) had both carotid IMT and PWA measurements. Carotid ultrasound was also used to determine the presence of plaque. PWA was used to determine augmentation index (AI), amplification ratio (AMPR), aortic pulse pressure (C_PP), and central aortic systolic pressure (C_SP). Results IMT was significantly associated with all PWA-derived measures. However, on multivariable linear regression analysis, only AMPR (regression coefficient −0.072, P = 0.006), C_PP (regression coefficient 0.0025, P < 0.001), and C_SP (regression coefficient 0.0017, P < 0.001) remained significantly associated with IMT. The prevalence of carotid plaque in the cohort was 59%. Of the PWA-derived measures, only C_PP was significantly associated with the presence of carotid plaque (P < 0.001). Conclusions PWA-derived measures are associated with carotid IMT and plaque in the CKD. Of these measures, C_PP was most associated with carotid IMT and plaque. PMID:19779470

  10. Candidate Gene Association Study of Coronary Artery Calcification in Chronic Kidney Disease: Findings from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Jane F; Matthews, Gregory J; Townsend, Raymond R; Raj, Dominic S; Kanetsky, Peter A.; Budoff, Matthew; Fischer, Michael J; Rosas, Sylvia E; Kanthety, Radhika; Rahman, Mahboob; Master, Stephen R; Qasim, Atif; Li, Mingyao; Mehta, Nehal N.; Shen, Haiqing; Mitchell, Braxton D; O’Connell, Jeffrey R; Shuldiner, Alan R; Ho, Weang Kee; Young, Robin; Rasheed, Asif; Danesh, John; He, Jiang; Kusek, John W; Ojo, Akinlolu O; Flack, John; Go, Alan S; Gadegbeku, Crystal A; Wright, Jackson T; Saleheen, Danish; Feldman, Harold I; Rader, Daniel J; Foulkes, Andrea S; Reilly, Muredach P

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To identify loci for coronary artery calcification (CAC) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Background CKD is associated with increased CAC and subsequent coronary heart disease (CHD) but the mechanisms remain poorly defined. Genetic studies of CAC in CKD may provide a useful strategy for identifying novel pathways in CHD. Methods We performed a candidate gene study (~2,100 genes; ~50,000 SNPs) of CAC within the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study (n=1,509; 57% European, 43% African ancestry). SNPs with preliminary evidence of association with CAC in CRIC were examined for association with CAC in PennCAC (n=2,560) and Amish Family Calcification Study (AFCS; n=784) samples. SNPs with suggestive replication were further analyzed for association with myocardial infarction (MI) in the Pakistan Risk of Myocardial Infarction study (PROMIS) (n=14,885). Results Of 268 SNPs reaching P <5×10−4 for CAC in CRIC, 28 SNPs in 23 loci had nominal support (P <0.05 and in same direction) for CAC in PennCAC or AFCS. Besides chr9p21 and COL4A1, known loci for CHD, these included SNPs having reported GWAS association with hypertension (e.g., ATP2B1). In PROMIS, four of the 23 suggestive CAC loci (chr9p21, COL4A1, ATP2B1 and ABCA4) had significant associations with MI consistent with their direction of effect on CAC. Conclusions We identified several loci associated with CAC in CKD that also relate to MI in a general population sample. CKD imparts a high risk of CHD and may provide a useful setting for discovery of novel CHD genes and pathways. PMID:23727086

  11. Delusional Infestation in a Patient with Renal Failure, Metabolic Syndrome, and Chronic Cerebrovascular Disease Treated with Aripiprazole: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Carpiniello, Bernardo; Pinna, Federica; Tuveri, Raffaella

    2011-01-01

    Delusional infestation is an aspecific psychiatric condition manifested either as a primary psychotic disorder or a secondary disorder induced by a wide range of very different medical conditions. Both primary and secondary delusional infestations seem to respond to typical and atypical antipsychotics. The latter are considered the first-line treatment although the use of second-generation antipsychotics featuring a higher metabolic, cardiovascular, and renal tolerability is preferable in secondary cases, which often occur in patients with multiple, severe medical conditions. We report a case of a 72-year-old patient affected by delusional infestation associated with severe renal failure, metabolic syndrome, hypertensive cardiopathy, and chronic cerebrovascular disease. PMID:22174718

  12. Hyperparathyroidism of Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Noah K; Ananthakrishnan, Shubha; Campbell, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Renal hyperparathyroidism (rHPT) is a common complication of chronic kidney disease characterized by elevated parathyroid hormone levels secondary to derangements in the homeostasis of calcium, phosphate, and vitamin D. Patients with rHPT experience increased rates of cardiovascular problems and bone disease. The Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines recommend that screening and management of rHPT be initiated for all patients with chronic kidney disease stage 3 (estimated glomerular filtration rate, < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2). Since the 1990s, improving medical management with vitamin D analogs, phosphate binders, and calcimimetic drugs has expanded the treatment options for patients with rHPT, but some patients still require a parathyroidectomy to mitigate the sequelae of this challenging disease. PMID:27479950

  13. Arterial and Aortic Valve Calcification Abolished by Elastolytic Cathepsin S Deficiency in Chronic Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aikawa, Elena; Aikawa, Masanori; Libby, Peter; Figueiredo, Jose-Luiz; Rusanescu, Gabriel; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Fukuda, Daiju; Kohler, Rainer H.; Shi, Guo-Ping; Jaffer, Farouc A.; Weissleder, Ralph

    2009-01-01

    Background Clinical studies have demonstrated that 50% of individuals with chronic renal disease (CRD) die of cardiovascular causes, including advanced calcific arterial and valvular disease; however, the mechanisms of accelerated calcification in CRD remain obscure, and no therapies can prevent disease progression. We recently demonstrated in vivo that inflammation triggers cardiovascular calcification. In vitro evidence also indicates that elastin degradation products may promote osteogenesis. Here, we used genetically modified mice and molecular imaging to test the hypothesis in vivo that cathepsin S (catS), a potent elastolytic proteinase, accelerates calcification in atherosclerotic mice with CRD induced by 5/6 nephrectomy. Methods and Results Apolipoprotein-deficient (apoE−/−)/catS+/+ (n = 24) and apoE−/−/catS−/− (n = 24) mice were assigned to CRD and control groups. CRD mice had significantly higher serum phosphate, creatinine, and cystatin C levels than those without CRD. To visualize catS activity and osteogenesis in vivo, we coadministered catS-activatable and calcification-targeted molecular imaging agents 10 weeks after nephrectomy. Imaging coregistered increased catS and osteogenic activities in the CRD apoE−/−/catS+/+ cohort, whereas CRD apoE−/−/catS−/− mice exhibited less calcification. Quantitative histology demonstrated greater catS-associated elastin fragmentation and calcification in CRD apoE−/−/catS+/+ than CRD apoE−/−/catS−/− aortas and aortic valves. Notably, catS deletion did not cause compensatory increases in RNA levels of other elastolytic cathepsins or matrix metalloproteinases. Elastin peptide and recombinant catS significantly increased calcification in smooth muscle cells in vitro, a process further amplified in phosphate-enriched culture medium. Conclusions The present study provides direct in vivo evidence that catS-induced elastolysis accelerates arterial and aortic valve calcification in CRD

  14. CHRONIOUS: an open, ubiquitous and adaptive chronic disease management platform for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), chronic kidney disease (CKD) and renal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Rosso, R; Munaro, G; Salvetti, O; Colantonio, S; Ciancitto, F

    2010-01-01

    CHRONIOUS is an highly innovative Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) research Initiative that aspires to implement its vision for ubiquitous health and lifestyle monitoring. The 17 European project partners are strictly working together since February 2008 to realize and open platform to manage and monitor elderly patients with chronic diseases and many difficulties to reach hospital centers for routine controls. The testing activities will be done in Italy and Spain involving COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease) and CKD (Chronic Kidney Disease) patients, these being widespread and highly expensive in terms of social and economic costs. Patients, equipped by wearable technologies and sensors and interacting with lifestyle interfaces, will be assisted by healthcare personnel able to check the health record and critical conditions through the Chronious platform data analysis and decision support system. Additionally, the new ontology based literature search engine will help the clinicians in the standardization of care delivery process. This paper is to present the main project objectives and its principal components from the intelligent system point of view. PMID:21096301

  15. Recruitment of Hispanics into an observational study of chronic kidney disease: the Hispanic Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study experience.

    PubMed

    Lora, Claudia M; Ricardo, Ana C; Brecklin, Carolyn S; Fischer, Michael J; Rosman, Robert T; Carmona, Eunice; Lopez, Amada; Balaram, Manjunath; Nessel, Lisa; Tao, Kaixiang Kelvin; Xie, Dawei; Kusek, John W; Go, Alan S; Lash, James P

    2012-11-01

    Despite the large burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in Hispanics, this population has been underrepresented in research studies. We describe the recruitment strategies employed by the Hispanic Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study, which led to the successful enrollment of a large population of Hispanic adults with CKD into a prospective observational cohort study. Recruitment efforts by bilingual staff focused on community clinics with Hispanic providers in high-density Hispanic neighborhoods in Chicago, academic medical centers, and private nephrology practices. Methods of publicizing the study included church meetings, local Hispanic print media, Spanish television and radio stations, and local health fairs. From October 2005 to July 2008, we recruited 327 Hispanics aged 21-74 years with mild-to-moderate CKD as determined by age-specific estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Of 716 individuals completing a screening visit, 49% did not meet eGFR inclusion criteria and 46% completed a baseline visit. The mean age at enrollment was 57.1 and 67.1% of participants were male. Approximately 75% of enrolled individuals were Mexican American, 15% Puerto Rican, and 10% had other Latin American ancestry. Eighty two percent of participants were Spanish-speakers. Community-based and academic primary care clinics yielded the highest percentage of participants screened (45.9% and 22.4%) and enrolled (38.2% and 24.5%). However, academic and community-based specialty clinics achieved the highest enrollment yield from individuals screened (61.9% to 71.4%). A strategy focused on primary care and nephrology clinics and the use of bilingual recruiters allowed us to overcome barriers to the recruitment of Hispanics with CKD. PMID:22841929

  16. Renal disease in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Rafael Alberto

    2006-01-01

    Chronic renal disease represents a problem of public health in Colombia. Its prevalence has increased in last decade, with a prevalence of 44.7 patients per million (ppm) in 1993 to 294.6 ppm in 2004, considering that only 56.2% of the population has access to the health. This increase complies with the implementation of Law 100 of 1993, offering greater coverage of health services to the Colombian population. The cost of these pathologies is equivalent to the 2.49% of the budget for health of the nation. The three most common causes of renal failure are diabetes mellitus (DM; 30%), arterial hypertension (30%), and glomerulonephritis (7.85%). In incident patients, the DM accounts for 32.9%. The rate of global mortality is 15.8%, 17.4% in hemodialysis and 15.1% in peritoneal dialysis. In 2004, 467 renal transplants were made, 381 of deceased donor with an incidence of 10.3 ppm. The excessive cost of these pathologies can cause the nation's health care system to collapse if preventative steps are not taken. In December of 2004, the Colombian Association of Nephrology with the participation of the Latin American Society of Nephrology and Arterial Hypertension wrote the "Declaration of Bogotá," committing the state's scientific societies and promotional health companies to develop a model of attention for renal health that, in addition to implementing national registries, continues to manage renal disease. PMID:17162422

  17. Etiology and management of dyslipidemia in children with chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Mona; Silverstein, Douglas M

    2015-12-01

    Lipids are essential components of cell membranes, contributing to cell fuel, myelin formation, subcellular organelle function, and steroid hormone synthesis. Children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) exhibit various co-morbidities, including dyslipidemia. The prevalence of dyslipidemias in children with CKD and ESRD is high, being present in 39-65% of patients. Elevated lipid levels in children without renal disease are a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), while the risk for CVD in pediatric CKD/ESRD is unclear. The pathogenesis of dyslipidemia in CKD features various factors, including increased levels of triglycerides, triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, apolipoprotein C3 (ApoC-III), decreased levels of cholesterylester transfer protein and high-density lipoproteins, and aberrations in serum very low-density and intermediate-density lipoproteins. If initial risk assessment indicates that a child with advanced CKD has 2 or more co-morbidities for CVD, first-line treatment should consist of non-pharmacologic management such as therapeutic lifestyle changes and dietary counseling. Pharmacologic treatment of dyslipidemia may reduce the incidence of CVD in children with CKD/ESRD, but randomized trials are lacking. Statins are the only class of lipid-lowering drugs currently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in the pediatric population. FDA-approved pediatric labeling for these drugs is based on results from placebo-controlled trial results, showing 30-50% reductions in baseline low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Although statins are generally well tolerated in adults, a spectrum of adverse events has been reported with their use in both the clinical trial and post-marketing settings. PMID:25801207

  18. RIPK3-Mediated Necroptosis and Apoptosis Contributes to Renal Tubular Cell Progressive Loss and Chronic Kidney Disease Progression in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yongjun; Cui, Hongwang; Xia, Yunfeng; Gan, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Tubulointerstitial fibrosis (TIF) is caused by the progressive loss of renal tubular cells and the consequent replacement of the extracellular matrix. The progressive depletion of renal tubular cells results from apoptosis and necroptosis; however, the relative significance of each of these cell death mechanisms at different stages during the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) remains unclear. We sought to explore the mechanisms of renal tubular cell death during the early and intermediate stages of chronic renal damage of subtotal nephrectomied (SNx) rats. The results of tissue histological assays indicated that the numbers of necrotic dying cells and apoptotic cells were significantly higher in kidney tissues derived from a rat model of CKD. In addition, there was a significant increase in necroptosis observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and an increase in the proportion of TUNEL-positive cells in kidney tissues from SNx rats compared with control rats, and necrostatin-1 (Nec-1) could inhibit necroptosis and reduce the proportion of TUNEL-positive cells. More importantly, we observed a significant increase in the incidence of necroptosis compared with apoptosis by TEM in vivo and in vitro and a significant increase in the proportion of TUNEL-positive tubular epithelial cells that did not express caspase-3 compared with those expressing cleaved caspase-3 in vitro. Furthermore, treatment with Nec-1 and zVAD strongly reduced necroptosis- and apoptosis-mediated renal tubular cell death and decreased the levels of blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine and tubular damage scores of SNx rats. These results suggest that necroptotic cell death plays a more significant role than apoptosis in mediating the loss of renal tubular cells in SNx rats and that effectively blocking both necroptosis and apoptosis improves renal function and tubular damage at early and intermediate stages of CKD. PMID:27281190

  19. Inherited renal cystic diseases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bohyun; King, Bernard F; Vrtiska, Terri J; Irazabal, Maria V; Torres, Vicente E; Harris, Peter C

    2016-06-01

    A number of inherited renal diseases present with renal cysts and often lead to end-stage renal disease. With recent advances in genetics, increasing number of genes and mutations have been associated with cystic renal diseases. Although genetic testing can provide a definite diagnosis, it is often reserved for equivocal cases or for ongoing investigational research. Therefore, imaging findings are essential in the routine diagnosis, follow-up, and detection of complications in patients with inherited cystic renal diseases. In this article, the most recent classification, genetic analysis, clinical presentations, and imaging findings of inherited cystic renal diseases will be discussed. PMID:27167233

  20. Compliance Index, a Marker of Peripheral Arterial Stiffness, may Predict Renal Function Decline in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Te-Hui; Yang, Deng-Chi; Lin, Wei-Hung; Tseng, Chin-Chung; Chen, Ju-Yi; Ho, Chin-Shan; Cheng, Meng-Fu; Tsai, Wei-Chuan; Wang, Ming-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Background: Compliance index derived from digital volume pulse (CI-DVP), measuring the relationship between volume and pressure changes in fingertip, is a surrogate marker of peripheral arterial stiffness. This study investigated if CI-DVP can predict renal function deterioration, cardiovascular events and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods: In this prospective observational study, 149 CKD patients were included for final analysis. CI-DVP and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) were measured, decline in renal function was assessed by the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) slope. Composite renal and cardiovascular outcomes were evaluated, including ≥50% eGFR decline, start of renal replacement therapy, and major adverse events. Results: Patients in CKD stages 3b to 5 had higher baPWV and lower CI-DVP values than those in patients with CKD stages 1 to 3a. Stepwise multivariate linear regression analysis showed that lower CI-DVP (p =0.0001) and greater proteinuria (p =0.0023) were independent determinants of higher eGFR decline rate. Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that CI-DVP (HR 0.68, 95% CI 0.46-1.00), baseline eGFR (HR 0.96, 95% CI 0.94-0.98) and serum albumin (HR 0.17, 95% CI 0.07-0.42) were independent predictors for composite renal and cardiovascular outcomes. Conclusions: Compliance index, CI-DVP, was significantly associated with renal function decline in patients with CKD. A higher CI-DVP may have independent prognostic value in slower renal function decline and better composite renal and cardiovascular outcomes in CKD patients. PMID:26180508

  1. Prevalence and Prognostic Significance of Apparent Treatment Resistant Hypertension in Chronic Kidney Disease: Report From the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Thomas, George; Xie, Dawei; Chen, Hsiang-Yu; Anderson, Amanda H; Appel, Lawrence J; Bodana, Shirisha; Brecklin, Carolyn S; Drawz, Paul; Flack, John M; Miller, Edgar R; Steigerwalt, Susan P; Townsend, Raymond R; Weir, Matthew R; Wright, Jackson T; Rahman, Mahboob

    2016-02-01

    The association between apparent treatment resistant hypertension (ATRH) and clinical outcomes is not well studied in chronic kidney disease. We analyzed data on 3367 hypertensive participants in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) to determine prevalence, associations, and clinical outcomes of ATRH in nondialysis chronic kidney disease patients. ATRH was defined as blood pressure ≥140/90 mm Hg on ≥3 antihypertensives, or use of ≥4 antihypertensives with blood pressure at goal at baseline visit. Prevalence of ATRH was 40.4%. Older age, male sex, black race, diabetes mellitus, and higher body mass index were independently associated with higher odds of having ATRH. Participants with ATRH had a higher risk of clinical events than participants without ATRH-composite of myocardial infarction, stroke, peripheral arterial disease, congestive heart failure (CHF), and all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval], 1.38 [1.22-1.56]); renal events (1.28 [1.11-1.46]); CHF (1.66 [1.38-2.00]); and all-cause mortality (1.24 [1.06-1.45]). The subset of participants with ATRH and blood pressure at goal on ≥4 medications also had higher risk for composite of myocardial infarction, stroke, peripheral arterial disease, CHF, and all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval], (1.30 [1.12-1.51]) and CHF (1.59 [1.28-1.99]) than those without ATRH. ATRH was associated with significantly higher risk for CHF and renal events only among those with estimated glomerular filtration rate ≥30 mL/min per 1.73 m(2). Our findings show that ATRH is common and associated with high risk of adverse outcomes in a cohort of patients with chronic kidney disease. This underscores the need for early identification and management of patients with ATRH and chronic kidney disease. PMID:26711738

  2. Cardiovascular and Renal Effects of Bromocriptine in Diabetic Patients with Stage 4 Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mejía-Rodríguez, Oliva; Herrera-Abarca, Jorge E.; Ceballos-Reyes, Guillermo; Avila-Diaz, Marcela; Prado-Uribe, Carmen; Belio-Caro, Francisco; Salinas-González, Antonio; Vega-Gomez, Helios; Alvarez-Aguilar, Cleto; Lindholm, Bengt; García-López, Elvia; Paniagua, Ramón

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of bromocriptine (BEC) on left ventricular mass index (LVMI) and residual renal function (RRF) in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Research Design and Methods. A 6-month double-blind randomized controlled trial was conducted in 28 patients with T2D and stage 4 CKD with increased LVMI. Fourteen patients received BEC (2.5 mg, initially 1 tablet with subsequent increase to three times a day) and 14 received a placebo (PBO; initially 1 tablet with subsequent increase to three times a day). Cardiovascular changes were assessed by monitoring 24 h ambulatory blood pressure, two-dimensional-guided M-mode echocardiography, and N-terminal brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) plasma levels. RRF was evaluated by creatinine clearance and cystatin-C plasma levels. Results. Both BEC and PBO groups decreased blood pressure—but the effect was more pronounced in the BEC group. Average 24 h, diurnal and nocturnal blood pressures, and circadian profile showed improved values compared to the PBO group; LVMI decreased by 14% in BEC and increased by 8% in PBO group. NT-proBNP decreased in BEC (0.54 ± 0.15 to 0.32 ± 0.17 pg/mL) and increased in PBO (0.37 ± 0.15 to 0.64 ± 0.17 pg/mL). Creatinine clearance did not change in the BEC group and decreased in the PBO group. Conclusions. BEC resulted in a decrease on blood pressure and LVMI. BEC also prevented the progression of CKD while maintaining the creatinine clearance unchanged. PMID:23984312

  3. Erythropoietin production in renal cell carcinoma and renal cysts in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease in a chronic dialysis patient with polycythemia: A case report.

    PubMed

    Ito, Keiichi; Asano, Takako; Tominaga, Susumu; Yoshii, Hidehiko; Sawazaki, Harutake; Asano, Tomohiko

    2014-11-01

    In patients undergoing chronic hemodialysis (HD), erythropoietin (EPO) production from the kidney generally decreases and renal anemia develops. Patients without anemia, but with high serum EPO (sEPO) levels are rare among HD patients. The current study presents the case of a 67-year-old female HD patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and renal cell carcinoma (RCC), manifesting polycythemia with elevated sEPO levels. A radical nephrectomy was performed, which diminished the polycythemia, but the sEPO levels remained high. To determine the origin of the EPO production, immunohistochemistry was performed to detect EPO in the RCC and the renal cysts of the surgically resected kidney. In addition, the sEPO and EPO levels in a renal cyst were determined by enzyme immunoassay. EPO expression was demonstrated in RCC and cyst epithelial cells using immunohistochemistry, revealing extremely high EPO levels in the cyst fluid. Due to the remission of polycythemia following the nephrectomy, EPO production from the resected kidney appeared to have been the cause of the polycythemia. Positive EPO staining of the renal cysts in the resected polycystic kidney and sustained sEPO elevation following nephrectomy led to the hypothesis of EPO production in the renal cysts of the contralateral polycystic kidney. Although the postoperative EPO level was higher than the normal range, the hematocrit (Hct) level gradually decreased and recombinant human EPO was required again three months following the nephrectomy. Eight months after the nephrectomy, the Hct level was 30.2% with the use of rHuEPO. In conclusion, EPO production from RCC and renal cysts in ADPKD appeared to cause polycythemia in the HD patient. PMID:25295086

  4. Effect of pentoxifylline on renal outcomes in chronic kidney disease patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Leporini, Christian; Pisano, Anna; Russo, Emilio; D'Arrigo, Graziella; de Sarro, Giovambattista; Coppolino, Giuseppe; Bolignano, Davide

    2016-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) represents an important health problem worldwide and the search for new therapeutic approaches for retarding CKD progression is a timely issue. Recent evidence suggest that the anti-inflammatory and hemorrheologic drug Pentoxifylline (PTX), may produce favorable effects on kidney function. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to ascertain whether PTX derivatives, alone or in combination to other treatments, may be useful in slowing down disease progression in patients with diabetic or non-diabetic CKD. We found 26 studies (1518 subjects) matching our search criteria. Information on the effects of PTX on hard renal outcomes (doubling of serum creatinine or need for chronic dialysis) were lacking in all the reviewed trials. Conversely, PTX was effective in reducing proteinuria compared to control, a benefit that was more evident in patients with type-1 diabetes mellitus, higher proteinuria at baseline and early renal impairment. An improvement in renal function (eGFR/creatinine clearance) was observed particularly in patients with more advanced CKD stage and in studies with longer follow-up. Conversely, cumulative analyses did not reveal any evident reduction in urinary albumin excretion, even in diabetic patients. The use of PTX was relatively safe as most trials recorded only minor gastrointestinal adverse effects. Although these findings point at some reno-protective effects of PTX, there is no conclusive evidence proving the usefulness of this agent for improving renal outcomes in subjects with chronic kidney disease of various etiology. Future trials adequately powered and designed on hard clinical end-points are needed. PMID:26995301

  5. Patient and disease characteristics associated with activation for self-management in patients with diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, chronic heart failure and chronic renal disease: a cross-sectional survey study.

    PubMed

    Bos-Touwen, Irene; Schuurmans, Marieke; Monninkhof, Evelyn M; Korpershoek, Yvonne; Spruit-Bentvelzen, Lotte; Ertugrul-van der Graaf, Inge; de Wit, Niek; Trappenburg, Jaap

    2015-01-01

    A substantial proportion of chronic disease patients do not respond to self-management interventions, which suggests that one size interventions do not fit all, demanding more tailored interventions. To compose more individualized strategies, we aim to increase our understanding of characteristics associated with patient activation for self-management and to evaluate whether these are disease-transcending. A cross-sectional survey study was conducted in primary and secondary care in patients with type-2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM-II), Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), Chronic Heart Failure (CHF) and Chronic Renal Disease (CRD). Using multiple linear regression analysis, we analyzed associations between self-management activation (13-item Patient Activation Measure; PAM-13) and a wide range of socio-demographic, clinical, and psychosocial determinants. Furthermore, we assessed whether the associations between the determinants and the PAM were disease-transcending by testing whether disease was an effect modifier. In addition, we identified determinants associated with low activation for self-management using logistic regression analysis. We included 1154 patients (53% response rate); 422 DM-II patients, 290 COPD patients, 223 HF patients and 219 CRD patients. Mean age was 69.6±10.9. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed 9 explanatory determinants of activation for self-management: age, BMI, educational level, financial distress, physical health status, depression, illness perception, social support and underlying disease, explaining a variance of 16.3%. All associations, except for social support, were disease transcending. This study explored factors associated with varying levels of activation for self-management. These results are a first step in supporting clinicians and researchers to identify subpopulations of chronic disease patients less likely to be engaged in self-management. Increased scientific efforts are needed to explain the greater

  6. Proteomics and glomerulonephritis: A complementary approach in renal pathology for the identification of chronic kidney disease related markers.

    PubMed

    L'Imperio, Vincenzo; Smith, Andrew; Chinello, Clizia; Pagni, Fabio; Magni, Fulvio

    2016-04-01

    Glomerulonephritis (GN) is one of the most common origins of chronic kidney disease and its careful evaluation is crucial for prognostic and therapeutic purposes, with the renal biopsy still playing a central role for the diagnosis. However, due to its invasiveness, it is not devoid of complications and many investigations have focused on identifying biomarkers for chronic kidney diseases using less-invasive and easy-to-collect samples, such as urine and blood. In this context, proteomics has played a crucial role in determining the molecular changes related to disease progression and early pathological glomerular modifications. Here, we report a review of selected literature for each GN, based on selected works published in the last 10 years, showing how these approaches have generated clinically relevant findings in the study of glomerulonephritis. We also describe several proteomic strategies, highlighting their technical advantages and limitations, future perspectives for proteomic applications in the study of GNs, and their possible application in routine practice. PMID:26642820

  7. The effect of renal diet in association with enalapril or benazepril on proteinuria in dogs with proteinuric chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Zatelli, A; Roura, X; D'Ippolito, P; Berlanda, M; Zini, E

    2016-01-01

    Treating proteinuria in dogs reduces the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD); renal diets and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitors are cornerstones of treatment. Whether different ACE-inhibitors have distinct kidney protective effects is unknown; it is therefore hypothesized that renal diets and enalapril or benazepril have different beneficial effects in proteinuric CKD dogs. Forty-four dogs with proteinuric CKD (IRIS stages 1-4) were enrolled in the study and were fed renal diet for 30 days. Thereafter, they were randomly assigned to one of 2 groups. Dogs in group A (n=22) received enalapril (0.5 mg/kg, q12h) and in group B (n=22) benazepril (0.5 mg/kg, q24h); in both groups, dogs were fed the same renal diet. After randomization, dogs were monitored for 120 days. Body weight and body condition score (BCS), serum concentrations of creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), albumin and total proteins, and urine protein-to-creatinine (UPC) ratio were compared at different time-points. After 30 days of renal diet, creatinine, BUN and UPC ratio decreased significantly (p<0.0001). Compared to randomization, body weight, BCS, albumin, total proteins, creatinine and BUN did not vary during follow-up in the 44 dogs and differences between group A and B were not observed. However, the UPC ratio of group A at day 60, 90 and 150 was significantly lower than in group B and compared to randomization (p<0.05). In group B it did not vary overtime. It is concluded that the renal diet is beneficial to decrease creatinine, BUN and UPC ratio in proteinuric CKD dogs. Enalapril further ameliorates proteinuria if administered along with renal diet. PMID:27540513

  8. The effect of renal diet in association with enalapril or benazepril on proteinuria in dogs with proteinuric chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Zatelli, A.; Roura, X.; D’Ippolito, P.; Berlanda, M.; Zini, E.

    2016-01-01

    Treating proteinuria in dogs reduces the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD); renal diets and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitors are cornerstones of treatment. Whether different ACE-inhibitors have distinct kidney protective effects is unknown; it is therefore hypothesized that renal diets and enalapril or benazepril have different beneficial effects in proteinuric CKD dogs. Forty-four dogs with proteinuric CKD (IRIS stages 1-4) were enrolled in the study and were fed renal diet for 30 days. Thereafter, they were randomly assigned to one of 2 groups. Dogs in group A (n=22) received enalapril (0.5 mg/kg, q12h) and in group B (n=22) benazepril (0.5 mg/kg, q24h); in both groups, dogs were fed the same renal diet. After randomization, dogs were monitored for 120 days. Body weight and body condition score (BCS), serum concentrations of creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), albumin and total proteins, and urine protein-to-creatinine (UPC) ratio were compared at different time-points. After 30 days of renal diet, creatinine, BUN and UPC ratio decreased significantly (p<0.0001). Compared to randomization, body weight, BCS, albumin, total proteins, creatinine and BUN did not vary during follow-up in the 44 dogs and differences between group A and B were not observed. However, the UPC ratio of group A at day 60, 90 and 150 was significantly lower than in group B and compared to randomization (p<0.05). In group B it did not vary overtime. It is concluded that the renal diet is beneficial to decrease creatinine, BUN and UPC ratio in proteinuric CKD dogs. Enalapril further ameliorates proteinuria if administered along with renal diet. PMID:27540513

  9. Controversies in Veterinary Nephrology: Renal Diets Are Indicated for Cats with International Renal Interest Society Chronic Kidney Disease Stages 2 to 4: The Con View.

    PubMed

    Scherk, Margie A; Laflamme, Dottie P

    2016-11-01

    Renal diets typically incorporate protein and phosphorus restriction, supplement with potassium and Omega-3 fatty acids, and address metabolic acidosis. Compared to "maintenance" diets, these modifications appear to benefit cats with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, there is limited data in cats justifying the specific amounts of the nutrients used in these diets, and there is little evidence supporting protein restriction in cats with CKD. Energy intake, maintenance of body weight, and muscle and body condition need to be addressed, and may take precedence over special diets. Further research is needed to better define optimum diets for cats with CKD. PMID:27593575

  10. Renal cystic disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, D.S.

    1988-01-01

    The book begins with an overview of renal cystic disease and a presentation of simple renal cysts. Subsequent chapters cover cystic disease in association with renal neoplasms and medullary sponge kidney. The chapters addressing autosomal-dominant and autosomal-recessive polycystic kidney disease discuss and differentiate the infantile and adult forms of the disease. There are also separate discussions of medullary cystic disease, multicystic dysplastic kidney, and cysts of the renarenal sinus.

  11. A 44 year-old lady with chronic renal disease and intractable ulcers: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Pujar, Thejeswi; Spinello, Irene M

    2009-01-01

    Calciphylaxis is a rare but potentially fatal condition occurring in patients with end stage renal disease on dialysis. Due to interplay of various factors, disturbances occur in the metabolism of calcium and phosphate leading to calcification within the vessel walls. The net result is tissue ischemia and necrosis. Clinically this presents as painful non-healing skin ulcers, which contribute to significant morbidity and mortality due to septic progression of the lesion. In this case report, we highlight the rapidly progressive nature of this disease, its etiopathogenesis and the role of early diagnosis in preventing life-threatening complications. PMID:19646226

  12. Use of procalcitonin in patients with various degrees of chronic kidney disease including renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Grace, Eddie; Turner, R Mackenzie

    2014-12-15

    Procalcitonin (PCT) has been shown to be a useful surrogate marker in identifying patients with various bacterial infections. PCT has been studied as a diagnostic marker in differentiating bacterial pneumonia from other respiratory conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations or viral pneumonia. Differentiating bacterial from nonbacterial pneumonia using PCT has shown to reduce antibiotic usage, length of stay, and antibiotic-related adverse effects. PCT has also been studied in patients with sepsis in an effort to reduce unnecessary antibiotic usage and decrease the length of antibiotic therapy. This article focuses on the use of PCT in patients with various degrees of chronic kidney disease in addition to various forms of dialysis, as chronic kidney disease may alter baseline levels of PCT and thus result in inappropriate use of PCT in this population. PMID:25228701

  13. Aortic Arch Calcification Predicts the Renal Function Progression in Patients with Stage 3 to 5 Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yueh-Ting; Chou, Chia-An; Lee, Chien-Te

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The presence of aortic arch calcification (AoAC) and cardiomegaly on chest radiography has been demonstrated as important risk factors for cardiovascular mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, the interrelationship among AoAC, cardiomegaly, and renal function progression remains unclear. The aim of this study is to assess whether AoAC and cardiomegaly are independently associated with the renal function progression in patients with stages 3–5 CKD. Methods. We retrospectively determined AoAC and cardiomegaly by chest X-ray in 237 patients, followed up for at least three years without entering dialysis and classified into 4 groups according to the presence or absence of AoAC and cardiomegaly. The change in renal function was measured by the slope of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Results. Of the 237 patients, the rate of eGFR decline was significantly higher in the group with coexistence of AoAC and cardiomegaly than any other groups. Baseline AoAC and proteinuria were independently associated with eGFR decline. AoAC were independently determined by age, eGFR slope, and cardiomegaly. Conclusions. The coexistence of AoAC and cardiomegaly is associated with faster eGFR decline. AoAC is an independent determinant of renal outcomes in patients with CKD stages 3–5. PMID:25695046

  14. Chronic kidney disease in type 2 diabetes: lessons from the Renal Insufficiency And Cardiovascular Events (RIACE) Italian Multicentre Study.

    PubMed

    Pugliese, G; Solini, A; Bonora, E; Fondelli, C; Orsi, E; Nicolucci, A; Penno, G

    2014-08-01

    The Renal Insufficiency And Cardiovascular Events (RIACE) Italian Multicentre Study is an ongoing observational survey that examines the role of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) as an independent predictor of cardiovascular and renal outcomes in 15,773 Italian subjects with type 2 diabetes. The analysis of data collected at the enrollment visit provided a picture of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its association with other complications, risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and treatments in a large contemporary cohort. Main results of this analysis were that (a) non-albuminuric renal impairment is the predominant clinical phenotype in patients, particularly women, with reduced eGFR; (b) concordance between CKD and diabetic retinopathy is low, with only a minority of patients with renal dysfunction presenting with any or advanced retinal lesions; (c) the non-albuminuric form is associated with a significant prevalence of CVD, especially at the level of the coronary vascular bed; (d) CKD is associated with hemoglobin (Hb) A1c variability more than with average HbA1c, whereas retinopathy and CVD are not; (e) in elderly individuals with moderate-to-severe eGFR reduction, use of agents which are not recommended, such as sulphonylureas and metformin, is still frequent; and (f) though complications are generally more prevalent in men (except non-albuminuric renal impairment) women show a less favorable CVD risk profile and achieve therapeutic targets to a lesser extent than men, despite the fact that treatment intensity is not lower. These data update existing information on the natural history of CKD in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:24780515

  15. Renal function recovery in chronic dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Chu, Jay K; Folkert, Vaughn W

    2010-01-01

    Renal function recovery (RFR) from acute kidney injury requiring dialysis occurs at a high frequency. RFR from chronic dialysis, on the other hand, is an uncommon but well-recognized phenomenon, occurring at a rate of 1.0-2.4% according to data from large observational studies. The underlying etiology of renal failure is the single most important predicting factor of RFR in chronic dialysis patients. The disease types with the highest RFR rates are atheroembolic renal disease, systemic autoimmune disease, renovascular diseases, and scleroderma. The disease types with the lowest RFR rates are diabetic nephropathy and cystic kidney disease. Initial dialysis modality does not appear to influence RFR. Careful observation and history taking are needed to recognize the often nonspecific clinical and laboratory signs of RFR. When RFR is suspected in a chronic dialysis patient, a 24-hour urine urea and creatinine clearance should be measured. Based on the renal clearance, along with other clinical factors, the dialysis prescription may be gradually reduced until a complete discontinuation of dialysis. After RFR from maintenance dialysis, patients require close follow-up in an office setting for chronic kidney disease management. PMID:21166875

  16. Sevelamer revisited: pleiotropic effects on endothelial and cardiovascular risk factors in chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction underlies multiple cardiovascular consequences of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and antecedent diabetes or hypertension. Endothelial insults in CKD or end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients include uremic toxins, serum uric acid, hyperphosphatemia, reactive oxygen species, and advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs). Sevelamer carbonate, a calcium-free intestinally nonabsorbed polymer, is approved for hyperphosphatemic dialysis patients in the US and hyperphosphatemic stage 3–5 CKD patients in many other countries. Sevelamer has been observed investigationally to reduce absorption of AGEs, bacterial toxins, and bile acids, suggesting that it may reduce inflammatory, oxidative, and atherogenic stimuli in addition to its on-label action of lowering serum phosphate. Some studies also suggest that noncalcium binders may contribute less to vascular calcification than calcium-based binders. Exploratory sevelamer carbonate use in patients with stages 2–4 diabetic CKD significantly reduced HbA1c, AGEs, fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-23, and total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol versus calcium carbonate; inflammatory markers decreased and defenses against AGEs increased. Sevelamer has also been observed to reduce circulating FGF-23, potentially reducing risk of left ventricular hypertrophy. Sevelamer but not calcium-based binders in exploratory studies increases flow-mediated vasodilation, a marker of improved endothelial function, in patients with CKD. In contrast, lanthanum carbonate and calcium carbonate effects on FMV did not differ in hemodialysis recipients. The recent INDEPENDENT-CKD randomized trial compared sevelamer versus calcium carbonate in predialysis CKD patients (investigational in the US, on-label in European participants); sevelamer reduced 36-month mortality and the composite endpoint of mortality or dialysis inception. Similarly, INDEPENDENT-HD in incident dialysis patients showed improved survival with 24 months

  17. [Renal failure and cystic kidney diseases].

    PubMed

    Correas, J-M; Joly, D; Chauveau, D; Richard, S; Hélénon, O

    2011-04-01

    Cystic kidney diseases often are discovered at the time of initial work-up of renal failure through ultrasound or family history, or incidentally at the time of an imaging test. Hereditary diseases include autosomal dominant or recessive polycystic kidney disease (PKD), tuberous sclerosis (TS) and medullary cystic kidney disease (MCKD). Autosomal dominant PKD is characterized by large renal cysts developing in young adults. Renal failure is progressive and becomes severe around 50-60 years of age. Atypical cysts (hemorrhagic or hyperdense) are frequent on CT and MRI examinations. Imaging plays a valuable role in the management of acute complications such as cyst hemorrhage or infection. Autosomal recessive PKD is often detected in neonates, infants or young adults. It is characterized by renal enlargement due to the presence of small cysts and liver disease (fibrosis and biliary ductal dilatation). Late manifestation or slow progression of autosomal recessive PKD may be more difficult to distinguish from autosomal dominant PKD. These cystic kidney diseases should not be confused with non-hereditary incidental multiple renal cysts. In tuberous sclerosis, renal cysts are associated with angiomyolipomas and sometimes pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis. Renal failure is inconstant. Other hereditary cystic kidney diseases, including MCKD and nephronophtisis, are usually associated with renal failure. Non-hereditary cystic kidney diseases include multicystic renal dysplasia (due to complete pelvi-ureteric atresia or hydronephrosis), acquired multicystic kidney disease (chronic renal failure, chronic hemodialysis) and varied cystic kidney diseases (multicystic renal disease, glomerulocystic kidney disease, microcystic kidney disease). PMID:21549887

  18. Cost-effectiveness of kidney transplantation compared with chronic dialysis in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Rosselli, Diego; Rueda, Juan-David; Diaz, Carlos Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    To estimate the costs and effectiveness measured in quality-adjusted life years (QALY) of kidney transplantation compared with dialysis in adults suffering from end-stage renal disease from the perspective of the Colombian healthcare system, we designed a Markov model with monthly cycles over a five-year time horizon and eight transitional states, including death as an absorbing state. Transition probabilities were obtained from international registries, costs from different local sources [case studies, official tariffs (ISS 2001 + 35%) for procedures and SISMED for medications]. Data were validated by an expert panel and we performed univariate, multivariate and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Effectiveness indicators were months of life gained, months of dialysis averted and deaths prevented. The annual discount rate was 3% and the cost-utility threshold (willingness to pay) was three times gross domestic product (GDP) = USD 20,000 per QALY. The costs were adopted in US dollars (USD) using the 2012 average exchange rate (1 USD = COP$ 1798). The discounted average total cost for five years was USD 76,718 for transplantation and USD 76,891 for dialysis, with utilities 2.98 and 2.10 QALY, respectively. Additionally, renal transplantation represented 6.9 months gained, 35 months in dialysis averted per patient and one death averted for each of the five patients transplanted in five years. We conclude that renal transplantation improves the overall survival rates and quality of life and is a cost-saving alternative compared with dialysis. PMID:26178546

  19. Management of chronic hepatitis C virus infection in patients with end-stage renal disease: a review

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre Valadez, Jonathan; García Juárez, Ignacio; Rincón Pedrero, Rodolfo; Torre, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    Infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is highly prevalent in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, mainly in those on hemodialysis (HD). The seroprevalence of HCV in developing countries ranges between 7% and 40%. Risk factors for this infection in the CKD population include the number of blood transfusions, duration of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and prevalence of HCV in HD. Chronic HCV infection in patients with ESRD is associated with an increase in morbidity and mortality in the pre and post kidney transplant periods. The increase in mortality is directly associated with liver complications and an elevated cardiovascular risk in HCV-infected patients on hemodialysis. Antiviral treatment may improve the prognosis of patients with HCV, and standard interferon remains the cornerstone of treatment. Treatment of HCV in patients with CKD is complex, but achieving a sustained viral response may decrease the frequency of complications after transplantation. It appears that HCV-infected patients who remain on maintenance dialysis are at increased risk of death compared with HCV patients undergoing renal transplantation. PMID:25767389

  20. Serum Trimethylamine-N-Oxide Is Strongly Related to Renal Function and Predicts Outcome in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Missailidis, Catharina; Hällqvist, Jenny; Qureshi, Abdel Rashid; Barany, Peter; Heimbürger, Olof; Lindholm, Bengt

    2016-01-01

    Background The microbial metabolite Trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) has been linked to adverse cardiovascular outcome and mortality in the general population. Objective To assess the contribution of TMAO to inflammation and mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients ranging from mild-moderate to end-stage disease and 1) associations with glomerular filtration rate (GFR) 2) effect of dialysis and renal transplantation (Rtx) 3) association with inflammatory biomarkers and 4) its predictive value for all-cause mortality. Methods Levels of metabolites were quantified by a novel liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry-based method in fasting plasma samples from 80 controls and 179 CKD 3–5 patients. Comorbidities, nutritional status, biomarkers of inflammation and GFR were assessed. Results GFR was the dominant variable affecting TMAO (β = -0.41; p<0.001), choline (β = -0.38; p<0.001), and betaine (β = 0.45; p<0.001) levels. A longitudinal study of 74 CKD 5 patients starting renal replacement therapy demonstrated that whereas dialysis treatment did not affect TMAO, Rtx reduced levels of TMAO to that of controls (p<0.001). Following Rtx choline and betaine levels continued to increase. In CKD 3–5, TMAO levels were associated with IL-6 (Rho = 0.42; p<0.0001), fibrinogen (Rho = 0.43; p<0.0001) and hsCRP (Rho = 0.17; p = 0.022). Higher TMAO levels were associated with an increased risk for all-cause mortality that remained significant after multivariate adjustment (HR 4.32, 95% CI 1.32–14.2; p = 0.016). Conclusion Elevated TMAO levels are strongly associated with degree of renal function in CKD and normalize after renal transplantation. TMAO levels correlates with increased systemic inflammation and is an independent predictor of mortality in CKD 3–5 patients. PMID:26751065

  1. P Wave Dispersion and Maximum P Wave Duration Are Associated with Renal Outcomes in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiun-Chi; Wei, Shu-Yi; Chen, Szu-Chia; Chang, Jer-Ming; Hung, Chi-Chih; Su, Ho-Ming; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2014-01-01

    P wave parameters measured by 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) are commonly used as a noninvasive tool to evaluate left atrial enlargement. This study was designed to assess whether P wave parameters were associated with renal outcomes in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. This longitudinal study enrolled 439 patients with CKD stages 3–5. Renal end points were defined as the commencement of dialysis or death. Change in renal function was measured using the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) slope. We measured two ECG P wave parameters corrected for heart rate, i.e., corrected P wave dispersion and corrected maximum P wave duration. The values of P wave dispersion and maximum P wave duration were 88.8±21.7 ms and 153.3±21.7 ms, respectively. During the follow-up period (mean, 25.2 months), 95 patients (21.6%) started hemodialysis and 30 deaths (6.8%) were recorded. Multivariate Cox regression analysis identified that increased P wave dispersion [hazard ratio (HR), 1.020; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.009–1.032; P<0.001] and maximum P wave duration (HR, 1.013; 95% CI, 1.003–1.024; P = 0.012) were associated with progression to renal end points. Furthermore, increased P wave dispersion (unstandardized coefficient β = –0.016; P = 0.037) and maximum P wave duration (unstandardized coefficient β = –0.014; P = 0.040) were negatively associated with the eGFR slope. We demonstrated that increased P wave dispersion and maximum P wave duration were associated with progression to the renal end points of dialysis or death and faster renal function decline in CKD patients. Screening CKD patients on the basis of P wave dispersion and maximum P wave duration may help identify patients at high risk for worse renal outcomes. PMID:25006682

  2. Contemporary Management of Coronary Artery Disease and Acute Coronary Syndrome in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease and End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chin-Chou; Chen, Jaw-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have emerged as a worldwide public health problem. Due to the remarkably higher incidence and prevalence of this chronic disease in Taiwan than in other countries, CKD/ESRD has contributed to a significant health burden in Taiwan. Patients with CKD/ESRD have an increased risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) and acute coronary syndrome (ACS) compared to the normal population. Patients with ACS alone can present differently than patients with ACS and CKD/ESRD. Also, due to the lower prevalence of chest pain and ST-segment elevation, CKD/ESRD patients were more difficult to diagnose than other patients. Furthermore, whether advances in ACS management with medical therapy and an early invasive approach could improve patient outcomes with CKD/ESRD is not known. The use of antiplatelets such as aspirin and other antithrombotic agents might reduce the incidence of ACS or stroke in CKD patients. However, such use could also increase bleeding risk and even increase the likelihood of mortality, especially in dialysis patients. While recent clinical data suggest the potential benefit of aggressive management with coronary intervention for CAD and ACS in this category of patients, further clinical studies are still indicated for the proper medical strategy and revascularization therapy to improve the outcomes of CAD and ACS in CKD/ESRD patients, both in Taiwan and worldwide. PMID:27122697

  3. Dental management of people with renal disease and renal transplants.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, C A; Whyman, R A

    1998-09-01

    Chronic renal failure is the result of progressive loss of functioning nephrons leading to loss of renal function and accumulation of excretory products. Loss of the regulatory and excretory functions of the kidneys causes oral manifestations and multiple complications which have implications for dental care. Dental management of patients with renal failure and renal transplants involves consideration of specific haematological and cardiovascular effects, and implications for the prescribing and use of pharmaceuticals. It also requires the dentist to appreciate the potential for involvement of multiple organ systems in the disease process and the implications this has for dental care. The orofacial manifestations of chronic renal failure are secondary to systemic manifestations and are not specific to the diagnosis of end-stage renal disease. PMID:9775650

  4. Nuclear medicine in acute and chronic renal failure

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, R.A.; Byun, K.J.

    1982-07-01

    The diagnostic value of renal scintiscans in patients with acute or chronic renal failure has not been emphasized other than for the estimation of renal size. /sup 131/I OIH, /sup 67/gallium, /sup 99m/TcDTPA, glucoheptonate and DMSA all may be valuable in a variety of specific settings. Acute renal failure due to acute tubular necrosis, hepatorenal syndrome, acute interstitial nephritis, cortical necrosis, renal artery embolism, or acute pyelonephritis may be recognized. Data useful in the diagnosis and management of the patient with obstructive or reflux nephropathy may be obtained. Radionuclide studies in patients with chronic renal failure may help make apparent such causes as renal artery stenosis, chronic pyelonephritis or lymphomatous kidney infiltration. Future correlation of scanning results with renal pathology promises to further expand nuclear medicine's utility in the noninvasive diagnosis of renal disease.

  5. Relative risks of Chronic Kidney Disease for mortality and End Stage Renal Disease across races is similar

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Chi-Pang; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Coresh, Josef; Iseki, Kunitoshi; Islam, Muhammad; Katz, Ronit; McClellan, William; Peralta, Carmen A; Wang, HaiYan; de Zeeuw, Dick; Astor, Brad C; Gansevoort, Ron T; Levey, Andrew S; Levin, Adeera

    2014-01-01

    Some suggest race-specific cutpoints for kidney measures to define and stage chronic kidney disease (CKD), but evidence for race-specific clinical impact is limited. To address this issue, we compared hazard ratios of estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR) and albuminuria across races using meta-regression in 1.1 million adults (75% Asians, 21% whites, and 4% blacks) from 45 cohorts. Results came mainly from 25 general population cohorts comprising 0.9 million individuals. The associations of lower eGFR and higher albuminuria with mortality and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) were largely similar across races. For example, in Asians, whites, and blacks, the adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) for eGFR 45–59 vs. 90–104 ml/min/1.73m2 were 1.3 (1.2–1.3), 1.1 (1.0–1.2) and 1.3 (1.1–1.7) for all-cause mortality, 1.6 (1.5–1.8), 1.4 (1.2–1.7), and 1.4 (0.7–2.9) for cardiovascular mortality, and 27.6 (11.1–68.7), 11.2 (6.0–20.9), and 4.1 (2.2–7.5) for ESRD, respectively. The corresponding hazard ratios for urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio 30–299 mg/g or dipstick 1-positive vs. an albumin-to-creatinine ratio under 10 or dipstick negative were 1.6 (1.4–1.8), 1.7 (1.5–1.9) and 1.8 (1.7–2.1) for all-cause mortality, 1.7 (1.4–2.0), 1.8 (1.5–2.1), and 2.8 (2.2–3.6) for cardiovascular mortality, and 7.4 (2.0–27.6), 4.0 (2.8–5.9), and 5.6 (3.4–9.2) for ESRD, respectively. Thus, the relative mortality or ESRD risks of lower eGFR and higher albuminuria were largely similar among three major races, supporting similar clinical approach to CKD definition and staging, across races. PMID:24522492

  6. Hepcidin-25 in Diabetic Chronic Kidney Disease Is Predictive for Mortality and Progression to End Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Martin; Ashby, Damien R.; Kurtz, Caroline; Alam, Ahsan; Busbridge, Mark; Raff, Ulrike; Zimmermann, Josef; Heuschmann, Peter U.; Wanner, Christoph; Schramm, Lothar

    2015-01-01

    Background Anemia is common and is associated with impaired clinical outcomes in diabetic chronic kidney disease (CKD). It may be explained by reduced erythropoietin (EPO) synthesis, but recent data suggest that EPO-resistance and diminished iron availability due to inflammation contribute significantly. In this cohort study, we evaluated the impact of hepcidin-25—the key hormone of iron-metabolism—on clinical outcomes in diabetic patients with CKD along with endogenous EPO levels. Methods 249 diabetic patients with CKD of any stage, excluding end-stage renal disease (ESRD), were enrolled (2003–2005), if they were not on EPO-stimulating agent and iron therapy. Hepcidin-25 levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. The association of hepcidin-25 at baseline with clinical variables was investigated using linear regression models. All-cause mortality and a composite endpoint of CKD progression (ESRD or doubling of serum creatinine) were analyzed by Cox proportional hazards models. Results Patients (age 67 yrs, 53% male, GFR 51 ml/min, hemoglobin 131 g/L, EPO 13.5 U/L, hepcidin-25 62.0 ng/ml) were followed for a median time of 4.2 yrs. Forty-nine patients died (19.7%) and forty (16.1%) patients reached the composite endpoint. Elevated hepcidin levels were independently associated with higher ferritin-levels, lower EPO-levels and impaired kidney function (all p<0.05). Hepcidin was related to mortality, along with its interaction with EPO, older age, greater proteinuria and elevated CRP (all p<0.05). Hepcidin was also predictive for progression of CKD, aside from baseline GFR, proteinuria, low albumin- and hemoglobin-levels and a history of CVD (all p<0.05). Conclusions We found hepcidin-25 to be associated with EPO and impaired kidney function in diabetic CKD. Elevated hepcidin-25 and EPO-levels were independent predictors of mortality, while hepcidin-25 was also predictive for progression of CKD. Both hepcidin-25 and EPO may represent important prognostic factors

  7. [Ultrasonographic study on kidneys in patients with chronic renal failure. Part II. Acquired cystic disease of the kidneys].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, S; Fujii, H; Kaneko, S; Yachiku, S; Anzai, T; Inada, F; Kobayashi, T; Furuta, K; Ishida, H

    1990-08-01

    Ultrasonic examination of the kidney was performed on 280 patients undergoing chronic dialysis. Acquired cystic disease of the kidney (ACDK) was detected in 107 of 529 kidneys (20.2%). This paper presents an analysis of ultrasonotomograms of ACDK. Ultrasonic measurement of the size of ACDK was 72.5 +/- 15.2 mm in length and 41.7 +/- 9.8 mm in thickness. The size of ACDK was significantly greater than that of contracted kidneys by ultrasonographic diagnosis. With regard to sex distinction the length and thickness of ACDK were significantly greater in males than in females. As for laboratory data, patients with ACDK showed significantly higher values of red blood cell count, hematocrit and serum creatinine concentration compared with contracted kidneys. Prolongation of the dialysis peirod increased the incidence of ACDK. The size of ACDK showed a tendency to increase with duration of dialysis. However, no correlation was noted statistically between the incidence of ACDK and duration of dialysis and between the size of ACDK and duration of dialysis. There was a significantly lower incidence of ACDK in patients with diabetic nephropathy than those with chronic glomerulonephritis. A sonographic feature of ACDK is irregularity of the renal contour because of cystic transformation. Renal imaging, identification of the corticomedullary border, identification of the central echoes and increased parenchymal echogenicity were similar to other dialyzed kidneys. The main complications of ACDK are hemorrhage and tumor formation. We observed two retroperitoneal hematomas and one renal cell carcinoma developed within two years after this examination. The incidence of complications of ACDK was 5.1 per cent. We believe that patients with ACDK should be watched carefully by regular ultrasonic examination for early diagnosis and treatment of these complications. PMID:2232409

  8. Inflammatory Markers and Procoagulants in Chronic Renal Disease Stages 1-4

    PubMed Central

    Muslimovic, Alma; Rasic, Senija; Tulumovic, Denijal; Hasanspahic, Senad; Rebic, Damir

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Starting from the point that the chronic kidney disease (CKD) is chronic, inflammatory and hypercoagulable state characterized by an increase in procoagulant and inflammatory markers high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in these patients could be explained. Aim: The aim of the research was to monitor inflammatory markers and procoagulants in various stages of kidney disease (stage 1-4). Materials and Methods: The research included 120 subjects older than 18 years with CKD stages 1-4 examined and monitored in Clinic of Nephrology, University Clinical Centre Sarajevo over a period of 24 months. The research included determining the following laboratory parameters: serum creatinine, serum albumin, C-reactive protein, leukocytes in the blood, plasma fibrinogen, D-dimer, antithrombin III, coagulation factors VII (FC VII) and coagulation factor VIII (FC VIII). Results: With the progression of kidney disease (CKD stages 1-4), there was a significant increase of inflammatory and procoagulant markers: CRP, fibrinogen and coagulation factor VIII, and an increase in the average values of leukocytes and a reduction in the value of antithrombin III, but without statistical significance. Also, there were no significant differences in the values of D-dimer and coagulation factor VII. Conclusion: The progression of kidney disease is significantly associated with inflammation, which could in the future be useful in prognostic and therapeutic purposes. Connection of CKD with inflammation and proven connection of inflammation with cardiovascular risk indicates the potential value of some biomarkers, which could in the future identify as predictors of outcome and could have the benefit in the early diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular disease in CKD. PMID:26622082

  9. Ligand trap for the activin type IIA receptor protects against vascular disease and renal fibrosis in mice with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Agapova, Olga A; Fang, Yifu; Sugatani, Toshifumi; Seifert, Michael E; Hruska, Keith A

    2016-06-01

    The causes of cardiovascular mortality associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are partly attributed to the CKD-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD). The causes of the early CKD-MBD are not well known. Our discovery of Wnt (portmanteau of wingless and int) inhibitors, especially Dickkopf 1, produced during renal repair as participating in the pathogenesis of the vascular and skeletal components of the CKD-MBD implied that additional pathogenic factors are critical. In the search for such factors, we studied the effects of activin receptor type IIA (ActRIIA) signaling by using a ligand trap for the receptor, RAP-011 (a soluble extracellular domain of ActRIIA fused to a murine IgG-Fc fragment). In a mouse model of CKD that stimulated atherosclerotic calcification, RAP-011 significantly increased aortic ActRIIA signaling assessed by the levels of phosphorylated Smad2/3. Furthermore, RAP-011 treatment significantly reversed CKD-induced vascular smooth muscle dedifferentiation as assessed by smooth muscle 22α levels, osteoblastic transition, and neointimal plaque calcification. In the diseased kidneys, RAP-011 significantly stimulated αklotho levels and it inhibited ActRIIA signaling and decreased renal fibrosis and proteinuria. RAP-011 treatment significantly decreased both renal and circulating Dickkopf 1 levels, showing that Wnt activation was downstream of ActRIIA. Thus, ActRIIA signaling in CKD contributes to the CKD-MBD and renal fibrosis. ActRIIA signaling may be a potential therapeutic target in CKD. PMID:27165838

  10. New insights into diuretic use in patients with chronic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Christopher S

    2002-03-01

    Patients with chronic renal insufficiency (CRI) or the nephrotic syndrome frequently manifest diuretic resistance. Factors limiting diuretic responsiveness in patients with CRI may include a reduced basal level of fractional Na(+) reabsorption that places an upper limit on diuretic response, and enhanced NaCl reabsorption in downstream segments, combined with a reduced delivery of diuretic to the kidney. Diuretics are secreted by the recently characterized organic anion transporters (OATs), which are expressed in proximal tubule cells. Secretion may be inhibited by retained organic anions, urate, or acidosis. These limitations necessitate an increased diuretic dosage, up to a defined ceiling level, and consideration of the use of a nonrenally metabolized loop diuretic rather than furosemide. Diuretic responsiveness in patients with the nephrotic syndrome is limited by avid Na(+) reabsorption by the terminal nephron. Experimental studies have shown that a reduced serum albumin concentration can increase the volume of distribution of loop diuretics, reduce their tubular secretion, and enhance the inactivation of furosemide within the kidney by glucuronidization. Binding of loop diuretics can curtail their action in the loop of Henle. Recent clinical investigations have challenged the importance of some of these mechanisms that were identified in animal models. Strategies to improve loop diuretic responsiveness include increasing diuretic dosage, concurrent use of a thiazide diuretic to inhibit downstream NaCl reabsorption and attempts to maximally reduce albumin excretion. Strategies to limit albumin excretion include the use of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or an angiotensin receptor blocker and appropriate limitation of protein intake. These measures are more logical, effective, and less expensive than infusion of albumin solutions. PMID:11856788

  11. Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Bradley P.; Hulbert, John C.; Bissler, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Although not as common as other genetic renal diseases such as autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, patients with tuberous sclerosis complex frequently have significant renal involvement. Recent revelations in the cell biology of these renal disease manifestations as well as effective therapies for tuberous sclerosis complex-related renal issues have heralded hope of improved renal survival and improved quality of life for the TSC patient. This review specifically addresses some of the major renal manifestations of this disease. PMID:21071977

  12. Markers of Bone Metabolism Are Affected by Renal Function and Growth Hormone Therapy in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Doyon, Anke; Fischer, Dagmar-Christiane; Bayazit, Aysun Karabay; Canpolat, Nur; Duzova, Ali; Sözeri, Betül; Bacchetta, Justine; Balat, Ayse; Büscher, Anja; Candan, Cengiz; Cakar, Nilgun; Donmez, Osman; Dusek, Jiri; Heckel, Martina; Klaus, Günter; Mir, Sevgi; Özcelik, Gül; Sever, Lale; Shroff, Rukshana; Vidal, Enrico; Wühl, Elke; Gondan, Matthias; Melk, Anette; Querfeld, Uwe; Haffner, Dieter; Schaefer, Franz

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The extent and relevance of altered bone metabolism for statural growth in children with chronic kidney disease is controversial. We analyzed the impact of renal dysfunction and recombinant growth hormone therapy on a panel of serum markers of bone metabolism in a large pediatric chronic kidney disease cohort. Methods Bone alkaline phosphatase (BAP), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRAP5b), sclerostin and C-terminal FGF-23 (cFGF23) normalized for age and sex were analyzed in 556 children aged 6–18 years with an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of 10–60 ml/min/1.73m2. 41 children receiving recombinant growth hormone therapy were compared to an untreated matched control group. Results Standardized levels of BAP, TRAP5b and cFGF-23 were increased whereas sclerostin was reduced. BAP was correlated positively and cFGF-23 inversely with eGFR. Intact serum parathormone was an independent positive predictor of BAP and TRAP5b and negatively associated with sclerostin. BAP and TRAP5B were negatively affected by increased C-reactive protein levels. In children receiving recombinant growth hormone, BAP was higher and TRAP5b lower than in untreated controls. Sclerostin levels were in the normal range and higher than in untreated controls. Serum sclerostin and cFGF-23 independently predicted height standard deviation score, and BAP and TRAP5b the prospective change in height standard deviation score. Conclusion Markers of bone metabolism indicate a high-bone turnover state in children with chronic kidney disease. Growth hormone induces an osteoanabolic pattern and normalizes osteocyte activity. The osteocyte markers cFGF23 and sclerostin are associated with standardized height, and the markers of bone turnover predict height velocity. PMID:25659076

  13. Long-Term Follow-Up Evaluation of Renal Function in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease Undergoing Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kamei, Felipe Kenji Oshiro; do Nascimento, Tarcísia Karoline; Abou Ismail, Anas; Herbas Palomo, Jurema da Silva; da Silva Magro, Marcia Cristina; Ferreira, Fátima Gil; de Oliveira, Larissa Bertacchini; Baldacin Rodrigues, Adriano Rogério; Galvão de Lima, José Jayme

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication of cardiac surgery but its long-term consequences, in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), are not known. Methods. We compared the long-term prognoses of CKD patients who developed (n = 23) and did not develop (n = 35) AKI during the period of hospitalization after undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG). Fifty-eight patients who survived (69.6 ± 8.4 years old, 72% males, 83% Whites, 52% diabetics, baseline GFR: 46 ± 16 mL/min) were followed up for 47.8 ± 16.4 months and treated for secondary prevention of events. Results. There were 6 deaths, 4 in the AKI+ and 2 in the AKI− group (Log-rank = 0.218), two attributed to CV causes. At the end of the study, renal function was similar in the two groups. One AKI− patient was started on dialysis. Only 4 patients had an increase in serum creatinine ≥ 0.5 mg/dL during follow-up. Conclusion. CKD patients developing AKI that survived the early perioperative period of coronary intervention present good renal and nonrenal long-term prognosis, compared to patients who did not develop AKI.

  14. Fasting during the month of Ramadan among patients with chronic kidney disease: renal and cardiovascular outcomes

    PubMed Central

    NasrAllah, Mohamed M.; Osman, Noha A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Fasting during the month of Ramadan is a religious obligation for Muslims who represent 20% of the world population. This study explores the safety of fasting for a whole month among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) with the possible risk of dehydration and hyperviscosity leading to deterioration of kidney functions and vascular thrombosis. Methods We followed CKD patients with stable kidney function who chose to fast during the month of Ramadan. A group of nonfasting CKD patients served as controls. Serum creatinine was recorded at the beginning of the month, after 1 week of fasting, at the end of the month and 3 months later. Patients were followed for major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE). Results A total of 131 CKD patients were recruited and included in two groups: fasting and nonfasting (mean baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate 27.7, SD 13 and 21.5, SD 11.8 mL/min/1.73 m2, respectively). A rise of serum creatinine was noted during fasting in 60.4% of patients by Day 7 and was associated with intake of renin angiotensin aldosterone system antagonists [relative risk (RR) 2, P = 0.002]. Adverse cardiovascular events were observed in six patients in the fasting cohort and were associated with a rise of serum creatinine after 1 week of fasting (P = 0.009) and the presence of pre-existing cardiovascular disease (RR 15, P = 0.001); the latter association was confirmed by logistic regression analysis. Only one event was recorded in the nonfasting group, P = 0.036. Conclusions MACE occurred more frequently among fasting CKD patients with pre-existing cardiovascular disease and were predicted by an early rise of serum creatinine. PMID:25349694

  15. Parasites and chronic renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi Manesh, Reza; Hosseini Safa, Ahmad; Sharafi, Seyedeh Maryam; Jafari, Rasool; Bahadoran, Mehran; Yousefi, Morteza; Nasri, Hamid; Yousofi Darani, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Suppression of the human immune system results in an increase in susceptibility to infection by various infectious agents. Conditions such as AIDS, organ transplantation and chronic renal insufficiency (CRI) are the most important cause of insufficient immune response against infections. Long term renal disorders result in uremia, which can suppress human immune system. Parasitic infections are one of the most important factors indicating the public health problems of the societies. These infections can be more hostile and life threatening in susceptible individuals than in the normal people. In these patients some parasitic infections such as blastocystiosis, cryptosporidiosis and toxoplasmosis have been reported to be more prevalent. This review aimed to give an overview about parasitic infections in patients with renal disorders. PMID:25610885

  16. Time-updated systolic blood pressure and the progression of chronic kidney disease: Findings from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Amanda H; Yang, Wei; Townsend, Raymond R; Pan, Qiang; Chertow, Glenn M; Kusek, John W; Charleston, Jeanne; He, Jiang; Kallem, RadhaKrishna; Lash, James P; Miller, Edgar R; Rahman, Mahboob; Steigerwalt, Susan; Weir, Matthew; Wright, Jackson T; Feldman, Harold I

    2015-01-01

    Background Blood pressure (BP) is often inadequately controlled in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Previous reports of the longitudinal association between achieved level of BP and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have not incorporated time-updated BP with appropriate adjustment for known confounders. Objective To assess the association between baseline and time-updated systolic BP (SBP) with the progression of CKD. Design Observational, prospective cohort study (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00304148) Setting Seven US clinical centers Patients Participants of the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study (N=3,708) followed for a median (25th, 75th percentiles) of 5.7 (4.6, 6.7) years Measurements The mean of three seated SBP measurements were used as the visit-specific SBP. SBP was time-updated as the mean of that visit and all prior visits. Outcomes were ESRD and the composite renal endpoint of ESRD (dialysis or transplantation) or halving of the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Analyses investigating baseline and time-updated SBP utilized traditional Cox proportional hazards models and marginal structural models, respectively. Results SBP was ≥130 mmHg at all study visits in 19.2% of participants, and ≥140 mmHg in 10.6%. The hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) for ESRD among participants with SBP 130–139 mmHg, compared to SBP <120 mmHg, was 1.46 (1.13–1.88) using only baseline data, and was 2.37 (1.48–3.80) using all available time-updated data. Among those with SBP ≥140 mmHg, corresponding hazard ratios were 1.46 (1.18–1.88) and 3.37 (2.26–5.03), respectively. Limitations SBP was measured once annually, and the CRIC Study cohort is not a random sample. Conclusions Among participants in the CRIC Study, time-updated SBP over 130 mmHg was more strongly associated with progression of CKD than analyses based on baseline SBP. Funding The CRIC Study is funded under cooperative agreements from the National Institute of

  17. Advances in Ethical, Social, and Economic Aspects of Chronic Renal Disease in Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Arze, S; Paz Zambrana, S

    2016-03-01

    Since 2005, great progress has been made in health care provision to patients with terminal renal failure in Bolivia. Access to dialysis and transplantation is regulated by the Ministry of Health, based on clinical criteria, applied equitably, without favoritism or discrimination based on race, sex, economic means, or political power. Until December 2013, there were no restrictions in dialysis and transplantation in Health Insurance institutions, but they covered only 30% of the population. Now the remaining 70% has access to free dialysis funded by the communities where patients live, with funds coming from the government and taxes on oil products. More than 2,231 people are getting dialysis, reaching a population growth of >60% annually. The number of hemodialysis units has increased by >200% (60 units), making access easier for end-stage renal failure patients. Treatment protocols have been drawn up to guarantee the best quality of life for the patients. The Law on Donation and Transplantation was enacted in 1996, and Supplementary Regulations were enacted in 1997 with various amendments over the past 5 years. A National Transplant Coordination Board, working under the National Renal Health Program, supervises and regulates transplants and promotes deceased-donor transplantation in an attempt to cover the demand for donors. Rules have been drawn up for accreditation of transplant centers and teams to guarantee the best possible conditions and maximum guaranties. Since January 2014, the National Renal Health Program has been providing free kidney transplants from living donors. PMID:27110002

  18. Association between the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system and renal injury in chronic kidney disease of dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Mitani, Sawane; Yabuki, Akira; Taniguchi, Kazuyuki; Yamato, Osamu

    2013-02-01

    The association of renin and angiotensin II, which are potent components of the renin-angiotensin system, with the severity of chronic renal disease was investigated immunohistochemically in dogs and cats. Immunoreactivities of renin and angiotensin II were evaluated quantitatively, and their correlations with the degrees of glomerulosclerosis, glomerular hypertrophy, interstitial cell infiltration and interstitial fibrosis were statistically analyzed. Immunoreactivities for renin were detected in afferent arteries in both dogs and cats. The score of renin-positive signals showed no correlation with plasma creatinine concentration or any of the histopathological parameters, except for the diameter of glomeruli in dogs. Immunoreactivities for angiotensin II were detected in tubules (primarily proximal tubules) and interstitial mononuclear cells in both dogs and cats. The score of tubular angiotensin II correlated with glomerulosclerosis and cell infiltration in cats but not in dogs. The score of interstitial angiotensin II correlated with plasma creatinine concentration, glomerulosclerosis, cell infiltration and fibrosis in dogs and with glomerulosclerosis and cell infiltration in cats. In conclusion, the results of the study suggest that intrarenal renin-angiotensin system is correlated with the severity of kidney disease, with the underlying mechanism differing between dogs and cats. PMID:22986274

  19. Geographic Variation of Chronic Kidney Disease Prevalence: Correlation with the Incidence of Renal Cell Carcinoma or Urothelial Carcinoma?

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Yit-Sheung; Chuang, Kai-Wen; Chiang, Chun-Ju; Chuang, Hung-Yi; Lu, Sheng-Nan

    2015-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether geographic variations in the prevalence of late-stage chronic kidney disease (CKD) exist and are associated with incidence rates of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC), or lower tract urothelial carcinoma (LTUC). Methods. Prevalence rates of late-stage CKD for 366 townships (n > 30) in Taiwan were calculated for 1,518,241 and 1,645,151 subjects aged 40 years or older in years 2010 and 2009, respectively. Late-stage CKD prevalence in year 2010 was used as a training set and its age-adjusted standardized morbidity rates (ASMR) were divided into three groups as defined <1.76%, 1.76% ≤ ASMR < 2.64%, and ≥2.64%, respectively. Year 2009, defined as the validation set, was used to validate the results. Results. The ASMR of late-stage CKD in years 2010 and 2009 were 1.76%, and 2.09%, respectively. Geographic variations were observed, with notably higher rates of disease in areas of the central, southwestern mountainside, and southeastern seaboard. There were no significant differences among different combined risk groups of RCC, UTUC, and LTUC incidence. Conclusion. The substantial geographic variations in the prevalence of late-stage CKD exist, but are not correlated with RCC, UTUC, or LTUC incidence. PMID:26605329

  20. Sex and gender differences in chronic kidney disease: progression to end-stage renal disease and haemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Cobo, Gabriela; Hecking, Manfred; Port, Friedrich K; Exner, Isabella; Lindholm, Bengt; Stenvinkel, Peter; Carrero, Juan Jesús

    2016-07-01

    Sex and gender differences are of fundamental importance in most diseases, including chronic kidney disease (CKD). Men and women with CKD differ with regard to the underlying pathophysiology of the disease and its complications, present different symptoms and signs, respond differently to therapy and tolerate/cope with the disease differently. Yet an approach using gender in the prevention and treatment of CKD, implementation of clinical practice guidelines and in research has been largely neglected. The present review highlights some sex- and gender-specific evidence in the field of CKD, starting with a critical appraisal of the lack of inclusion of women in randomized clinical trials in nephrology, and thereafter revisits sex/gender differences in kidney pathophysiology, kidney disease progression, outcomes and management of haemodialysis care. In each case we critically consider whether apparent discrepancies are likely to be explained by biological or psycho-socioeconomic factors. In some cases (a few), these findings have resulted in the discovery of disease pathways and/or therapeutic opportunities for improvement. In most cases, they have been reported as merely anecdotal findings. The aim of the present review is to expose some of the stimulating hypotheses arising from these observations as a preamble for stricter approaches using gender for the prevention and treatment of CKD and its complications. PMID:27252402

  1. Mycophenolate mofetil and curcumin provide comparable therapeutic benefit in experimental chronic kidney disease: role of Nrf2-Keap1 and renal dopamine pathways.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Edilia; García-Arroyo, Fernando; Silverio, Octaviano; Rodríguez-Alcocer, Alma N; Jiménez-Flores, Ana B; Cristobal, Magdalena; Arellano, Abraham S; Soto, Virgilia; Osorio-Alonso, Horacio; Molina-Jijón, Eduardo; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Sanchez-Lozada, Laura G

    2016-07-01

    Increased oxidative stress and inflammation have an important role in the pathophysiology of chronic kidney disease (CKD). On the other hand, more affordable therapeutic alternatives for treating this disease are urgently needed. Therefore, we compared the therapeutic efficacy of curcumin and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) in 5/6 nephrectomy (5/6 Nx) model of CKD. Also, we evaluated whether both compounds provide benefit through the preservation of similar antioxidant mechanisms. Four groups of male Wistar were studied over a period of 4 wk. Control sham group (n= 12), 5/6 Nx (n = 12), 5/6 Nx + MMF (30 mg/k BW/day, n = 11) and 5/6 Nx + Curcumin (120 mg/k BW/day, n = 12). Renal function and markers of oxidative stress and inflammation were evaluated. Also Nrf2-Keap1 and renal dopamine, antioxidant pathways were assessed. 5/6 Nx induced an altered renal autoregulation response, proteinuria, and hypertension; these effects were in association with increased oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction and renal inflammation. The mechanisms associated with these alterations included a reduced nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and hyperphosphorylation of dopamine D1 receptor with a concurrent overactivation of renal NADPH oxidase. Treatments with MMF and curcumin provided equivalent therapeutic efficacy as both prevented functional renal alterations as well as preserved antioxidant capacity and avoided renal inflammatory infiltration. Moreover, both treatments preserved Nrf2-Keap1 and renal dopamine antioxidant pathways. In summary, therapeutic strategies aimed to preserve renal antioxidant pathways can help to retard the progression of CKD. PMID:27050624

  2. Comparative palatability of five supplements designed for cats suffering from chronic renal disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Intestinal phosphate binders, uremic toxin binders and some other types of supplements are an integral part of the management of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in various species, including cats. This pathology in domestic carnivores requires life-long nutritional and medical management. In this context, the compliance of owners and patients cannot be achieved without an adequate level of palatability for oral medication or supplementation. Knowing that hyporexia and anorexia are among the most commonly seen clinical signs in cats suffering from CKD this is already, in itself, a serious obstacle to acceptable compliance in sick animals. The aim of the present study was to investigate the palatability of four commercially available products designed for cats suffering from CKD: Ipakitine® (Vetoquinol, France), Azodyl® (Vetoquinol, USA), Renalzin® (Bayer, France), Rubenal® (Vetoquinol, France) and an additional recently developed product: Pronefra® (Virbac, France). The study was performed with a group of previously-characterised cats, all living in an enriched and well-being securing environment of an independent centre housing panels of pets expert in palatability measurement. In total 172 monadic testings were performed. The palatability of each product was assessed by measuring their rates of prehension and consumption, and the consumption proportions were also analysed. Results The most palatable presentation (based on useful consumption) was Pronefra®, which was significantly higher than Azodyl® (p = 0.046), Ipakitine® (p < 0.0001), Renalzin® (p < 0.0001) and Rubenal® (p < 0.0001). The product with the highest rate of prehension was also Pronefra®, which was significantly higher than Azodyl® (p = 0.0019), Ipakitine® (p = 0.0023), Renalzin® (p = 0.0008) and Rubenal® (p < 0.0001). Conclusion Pronefra® was the most palatable presentation tested, meaning it may be useful for improving ease of supplementation

  3. Autophagy in renal diseases.

    PubMed

    De Rechter, Stéphanie; Decuypere, Jean-Paul; Ivanova, Ekaterina; van den Heuvel, Lambertus P; De Smedt, Humbert; Levtchenko, Elena; Mekahli, Djalila

    2016-05-01

    Autophagy is the cell biology process in which cytoplasmic components are degraded in lysosomes to maintain cellular homeostasis and energy production. In the healthy kidney, autophagy plays an important role in the homeostasis and viability of renal cells such as podocytes and tubular epithelial cells and of immune cells. Recently, evidence is mounting that (dys)regulation of autophagy is implicated in the pathogenesis of various renal diseases, and might be an attractive target for new renoprotective therapies. In this review, we provide an overview of the role of autophagy in kidney physiology and kidney diseases. PMID:26141928

  4. Pharmacokinetics in renal disease.

    PubMed

    Levy, G

    1977-04-01

    The physiologic perturbations associated with renal disease can have a pronounced effect on the kinetics of elimination of drugs and their metabolites from the body. Drugs are ordinarily cleared from the body by a number of routes, each of which can be characterized by a clearance value. The sum of these clearances (renal, hepatic, etc.) is the total or body clearance which is inversely proportional to the steady-state plasma concentration produced by a given drug dosage regimen. The quantitative contribution of each route of elimination to the metabolic fate of a drug is proportional to the clearance value of that route relative to the body clearance. As a first approximation, the reduction in the renal clearance of a drug caused by renal disease is proportional to the reduction in the renal clearance of creatinine. The metabolic (biotransformation) clearance of many extensively plasma protein bound drugs is proportional to their free fraction (ratio of concentrations of free to total drug) in plasma. Since severe renal disease causes a reduction in the plasma protein binding of many drugs, the metabolic clearance of such drugs will be increased. The contribution of hemodialysis to the total clearance of a drug depends on the magnitude of the clearance obtained by hemodialysis relative to the magnitude of the body clearance of the drug on a day between dialyses. To compensate for the increased elimination of a drug during hemodialysis, the dosing rate (i.e., the dose per unit of time) must be increased by the factor (hemodialysis clearance and body clearance):body clearance, where body clearance is that during a day between dialyses. Further dosage compensation may be needed if body clearance is increased during hemodialysis due to decreased plasma protein binding of the drug. Under certain conditions, an increased accumulation of pharmacologically active drug metabolites during renal failure becomes a matter of serious concern. PMID:851113

  5. Prevalence and severity of pain in adult end-stage renal disease patients on chronic intermittent hemodialysis: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Brkovic, Tonci; Burilovic, Eliana; Puljak, Livia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Understanding the epidemiology of pain in patients on hemodialysis (HD) is crucial for further improvement in managing pain. The aim of this study was to systematically review available evidence on the prevalence and severity of pain in adult end-stage renal disease patients on chronic intermittent HD. Materials and methods We carried out a systematic review of the literature and developed a comprehensive search strategy based on search terms on pain and HD. We searched the databases MEDLINE, Scopus, PsycINFO, and CINAHL from the earliest date of each database to July 24, 2014. Manuscripts in all languages were taken into consideration. Two authors performed each step independently, and all disagreements were resolved after discussion with the third author. The quality of studies was estimated using the STROBE checklist and Cochrane risk-of-bias tool. Results We included 52 studies with 6,917 participants. The prevalence of acute and chronic pain in HD patients was up to 82% and 92%, respectively. A considerable number of patients suffered from severe pain. Various locations and causes of pain were described, with most of the studies reporting pain in general, pain related to arteriovenous access, headache, and musculoskeletal pain. Conclusion The findings of this systematic review indicate high prevalence of pain in HD patients and considerable gaps and limitations in the available evidence. Pain in this population should be recognized as a considerable health concern, and the nephrology community should promote pain management in HD patients as a clinical and research priority to improve patients’ quality of life and pain-related disability. PMID:27382261

  6. Isaac Albeniz (1860-1909): Spanish musician who died of chronic renal disease.

    PubMed

    García-Nieto, Víctor M; Peralta-Aros, Carolina

    2013-02-01

    Isaac Albéniz was a Spanish musician and pianist who was best known in France and England. One of his last works for piano, the suite Iberia, is well-known and identifies his country of origin. He died with terminal uraemia following longstanding chronic intestinal and kidney symptoms. Suggestions as to pathology include amyloidosis complicated by kidney stones and hypertension that sometimes manifested itself in the form of hypertensive crisis, accompanied by obesity. PMID:23610225

  7. ADVANCE: Study to Evaluate Cinacalcet Plus Low Dose Vitamin D on Vascular Calcification in Subjects With Chronic Kidney Disease Receiving Hemodialysis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-14

    Chronic Kidney Disease; End Stage Renal Disease; Coronary Artery Calcification; Vascular Calcification; Calcification; Cardiovascular Disease; Chronic Renal Failure; Hyperparathyroidism; Kidney Disease; Nephrology; Secondary Hyperparathyroidism

  8. Switching from allopurinol to febuxostat for the treatment of hyperuricemia and renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Tsuruta, Yuki; Mochizuki, Toshio; Moriyama, Takahito; Itabashi, Mitsuyo; Takei, Takashi; Tsuchiya, Ken; Nitta, Kosaku

    2014-11-01

    Hyperuricemia is a frequent complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Febuxostat is a novel xanthine oxidase inhibitor that is metabolized by many metabolic pathways in the kidney and the liver. We performed a 1-year cohort study of 73 hyperuricemic patients who had an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) below 45 ml/min and were being treated with urate-lowering therapy. In 51 patients, treatment was changed from allopurinol to febuxostat, and the other 22 patients were continued on allopurinol. The serum levels of uric acid (UA) level, creatinine, and other biochemical parameters were measured at baseline and after 3, 6, 9, and 12 months of treatment. The serum UA levels significantly decreased from 6.1 ± 1.0 to 5.7 ± 1.2 mg/dl in the febuxostat group and significantly increased from 6.2 ± 1.1 to 6.6 ± 1.1 mg/dl in the allopurinol group. The eGFR decreased 27.3 to 25.7 ml/min in the febuxostat group and from 26.1 to 19.9 ml/min in the allopurinol group. The switch from allopurinol to febuxostat was significantly associated with the changes in eGFR according to a multiple regression analysis (β = -0.22145, P < 0.05). Febuxostat reduced the serum UA levels and slowed the progression of renal disease in our CKD cohort in comparison with allopurinol. PMID:25048744

  9. Treatment of Autonomous Hyperparathyroidism in Post Renal Transplant Recipients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-23

    Chronic Allograft Nephropathy; Chronic Kidney Disease; Chronic Renal Failure; Disordered Mineral Metabolism; End Stage Renal Disease; Hyperparathyroidism; Hypophosphatemia; Kidney Disease; Kidney Transplantation; Post Renal Transplantation

  10. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Chronic Tubulointerstitial Diseases.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Chronic tubulointerstitial diseases are a common final pathway toward chronic renal failure regardless the primary damage (glomerular, vascular or directly the tubulointerstitium). Chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis (CTN) is characterized by interstitial scarring, fibrosis and tubule atrophy, resulting in progressive chronic kidney disease. Most frequent causes of CTN are drugs, heavy metals, obstructive uropathy, nephrolithiasis, reflux disease, immunologic diseases, neoplasia, ischemia, metabolic diseases, genetics and miscellaneous. At ultrasound (US), kidneys' morphological aspect is similar in all forms of chronic interstitial nephropathy and only chronic pyelonephritis with or without reflux shows distinguishing characteristics. In interstitial nephropathy, kidneys' profiles are finely irregular and corticomedullary differentiation is altered because of a diffused hyperechogenicity. The only indirect sign of chronic interstitial damage can be derived from the value of intrarenal resistive indexes that hardly overcome 0.75. US is mandatory in clinical chronic pyelonephritis work-up because it provides information on kidney's diameter and on growth nomogram in children. Renal profiles can be more or less altered depending on the number of cortical scars and the presence of pseudonodular areas of segmental compensatory hypertrophy. In the early stages, US diagnosis of renal tuberculosis is difficult because parenchymal lesions are non-specific. US sensitivity in the diagnosis of hydronephrosis is very high, close to 100% and, finally, US is the first choice imaging technique in the diagnosis of urinary lithiasis. PMID:27169608

  11. Metabolomics and Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Eugene P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review This review summarizes recent metabolomics studies of renal disease, outlining some of the limitations of the literature to date. Recent findings The application of metabolomics in nephrology research has expanded from initial analyses of uremia to include both cross-sectional and longitudinal studies of earlier stages of kidney disease. Although these studies have nominated several potential markers of incident CKD and CKD progression, lack of overlap in metabolite coverage has limited the ability to synthesize results across groups. Further, direct examination of renal metabolite handling has underscored the substantial impact kidney function has on these potential markers (and many other circulating metabolites). In experimental studies, metabolomics has been used to identify a signature of decreased mitochondrial function in diabetic nephropathy and a preference for aerobic glucose metabolism in PKD; in each case, these studies have outlined novel therapeutic opportunities. Finally, as a complement to the longstanding interest in renal metabolite clearance, the microbiome has been increasingly recognized as the source of many plasma metabolites, including some with potential functional relevance to CKD and its complications. Summary The high-throughput, high-resolution phenotyping enabled by metabolomics technologies has begun to provide insight on renal disease in clinical, physiologic, and experimental contexts. PMID:26050125

  12. Madelung's disease in a patient with chronic renal insufficiency: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Bergler-Czop, Beata; Wcisło-Dziadecka, Dominika; Brzezińska-Wcisło, Ligia

    2014-05-01

    Madelung's disease (benign symmetric lipomatosis, Launois-Bensaude syndrome) was described for the first time in the middle of the 19(th) century. This disorder concerns mainly men between 30 and 60 years of age. Patients often suffer from coexisting ailments, such as hepatic function disorders, polyneuropathy, diabetes, gynecomastia, hyperuricemia and deviations of lipid management parameters. Treatment of benign symmetric lipomatosis consists mainly in fat tissue sucking or injection lipolysis. Patients often have to wear special clothes correcting the deformed figure. We are presenting a case of a female patient with diagnosed Madelung's disease, without alcohol abuse. Such abuse is reported in 90% of patients with this disease. Nevertheless, the patient has other typical (and described in the literature) hepatic and pancreatic function impairments, but also glomerular nephritis, which very rarely co-exists with benign symmetric lipomatosis. PMID:25097480

  13. Madelung's disease in a patient with chronic renal insufficiency: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Wcisło-Dziadecka, Dominika; Brzezińska-Wcisło, Ligia

    2014-01-01

    Madelung's disease (benign symmetric lipomatosis, Launois-Bensaude syndrome) was described for the first time in the middle of the 19th century. This disorder concerns mainly men between 30 and 60 years of age. Patients often suffer from coexisting ailments, such as hepatic function disorders, polyneuropathy, diabetes, gynecomastia, hyperuricemia and deviations of lipid management parameters. Treatment of benign symmetric lipomatosis consists mainly in fat tissue sucking or injection lipolysis. Patients often have to wear special clothes correcting the deformed figure. We are presenting a case of a female patient with diagnosed Madelung's disease, without alcohol abuse. Such abuse is reported in 90% of patients with this disease. Nevertheless, the patient has other typical (and described in the literature) hepatic and pancreatic function impairments, but also glomerular nephritis, which very rarely co-exists with benign symmetric lipomatosis. PMID:25097480

  14. Identification of human nephron progenitors capable of generation of kidney structures and functional repair of chronic renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Harari-Steinberg, Orit; Metsuyanim, Sally; Omer, Dorit; Gnatek, Yehudit; Gershon, Rotem; Pri-Chen, Sara; Ozdemir, Derya D; Lerenthal, Yaniv; Noiman, Tzahi; Ben-Hur, Herzel; Vaknin, Zvi; Schneider, David F; Aronow, Bruce J; Goldstein, Ronald S; Hohenstein, Peter; Dekel, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Identification of tissue-specific renal stem/progenitor cells with nephrogenic potential is a critical step in developing cell-based therapies for renal disease. In the human kidney, stem/progenitor cells are induced into the nephrogenic pathway to form nephrons until the 34 week of gestation, and no equivalent cell types can be traced in the adult kidney. Human nephron progenitor cells (hNPCs) have yet to be isolated. Here we show that growth of human foetal kidneys in serum-free defined conditions and prospective isolation of NCAM1+ cells selects for nephron lineage that includes the SIX2-positive cap mesenchyme cells identifying a mitotically active population with in vitro clonogenic and stem/progenitor properties. After transplantation in the chick embryo, these cells—but not differentiated counterparts—efficiently formed various nephron tubule types. hNPCs engrafted and integrated in diseased murine kidneys and treatment of renal failure in the 5/6 nephrectomy kidney injury model had beneficial effects on renal function halting disease progression. These findings constitute the first definition of an intrinsic nephron precursor population, with major potential for cell-based therapeutic strategies and modelling of kidney disease. PMID:23996934

  15. Assessment of Metabolomic and Proteomic Biomarkers in Detection and Prognosis of Progression of Renal Function in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nkuipou-Kenfack, Esther; Duranton, Flore; Gayrard, Nathalie; Argilés, Àngel; Lundin, Ulrika; Weinberger, Klaus M.; Dakna, Mohammed; Delles, Christian; Mullen, William; Husi, Holger; Klein, Julie; Koeck, Thomas; Zürbig, Petra; Mischak, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is part of a number of systemic and renal diseases and may reach epidemic proportions over the next decade. Efforts have been made to improve diagnosis and management of CKD. We hypothesised that combining metabolomic and proteomic approaches could generate a more systemic and complete view of the disease mechanisms. To test this approach, we examined samples from a cohort of 49 patients representing different stages of CKD. Urine samples were analysed for proteomic changes using capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry and urine and plasma samples for metabolomic changes using different mass spectrometry-based techniques. The training set included 20 CKD patients selected according to their estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at mild (59.9±16.5 mL/min/1.73 m2; n = 10) or advanced (8.9±4.5 mL/min/1.73 m2; n = 10) CKD and the remaining 29 patients left for the test set. We identified a panel of 76 statistically significant metabolites and peptides that correlated with CKD in the training set. We combined these biomarkers in different classifiers and then performed correlation analyses with eGFR at baseline and follow-up after 2.8±0.8 years in the test set. A solely plasma metabolite biomarker-based classifier significantly correlated with the loss of kidney function in the test set at baseline and follow-up (ρ = −0.8031; p<0.0001 and ρ = −0.6009; p = 0.0019, respectively). Similarly, a urinary metabolite biomarker-based classifier did reveal significant association to kidney function (ρ = −0.6557; p = 0.0001 and ρ = −0.6574; p = 0.0005). A classifier utilising 46 identified urinary peptide biomarkers performed statistically equivalent to the urinary and plasma metabolite classifier (ρ = −0.7752; p<0.0001 and ρ = −0.8400; p<0.0001). The combination of both urinary proteomic and urinary and plasma metabolic biomarkers did not improve the correlation with eGFR. In

  16. Sickle cell disease: renal manifestations and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Karl A.; Hebbel, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) substantially alters renal structure and function, and causes various renal syndromes and diseases. Such diverse renal outcomes reflect the uniquely complex vascular pathobiology of SCD and the propensity of red blood cells to sickle in the renal medulla because of its hypoxic, acidotic, and hyperosmolar conditions. Renal complications and involvement in sickle cell nephropathy (SCN) include altered haemodynamics, hypertrophy, assorted glomerulopathies, chronic kidney disease, acute kidney injury, impaired urinary concentrating ability, distal nephron dysfunction, haematuria, and increased risks of urinary tract infections and renal medullary carcinoma. SCN largely reflects an underlying vasculopathy characterized by cortical hyperperfusion, medullary hypoperfusion, and an increased, stress-induced vasoconstrictive response. Renal involvement is usually more severe in homozygous disease (sickle cell anaemia, HbSS) than in compound heterozygous types of SCD (for example HbSC and HbSβ+-thalassaemia), and is typically mild, albeit prevalent, in the heterozygous state (sickle cell trait, HbAS). Renal involvement contributes substantially to the diminished life expectancy of patients with SCD, accounting for 16–18% of mortality. As improved clinical care promotes survival into adulthood, SCN imposes a growing burden on both individual health and health system costs. This Review addresses the renal manifestations of SCD and focuses on their underlying mechanisms. PMID:25668001

  17. Seeking an optimal renal replacement therapy for the chronic kidney disease epidemic: the case for on-line hemodiafiltration.

    PubMed

    Gatti, Emanuele; Ronco, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) can be expected to increase dramatically in the foreseeable future, with suggestions that it has already reached epidemic proportions. The inadequate supply of donor organs, aggravated by an aging patient population, necessitates provision of sustainable dialysis treatment modalities. These treatment modalities must not only be of established clinical efficacy and effectiveness, but must simultaneously circumvent any potential treatment disparities due to geographical, social or other concurring factors. Home therapies might represent a partial solution to the complex issue of seeking optimal strategies to cope with the CKD epidemic. However, self-care renal replacement therapy (RRT), such as peritoneal dialysis (PD) and home therapies, can only be applied to a limited portion of the CKD population. Consequently, in preparation for coping with this CKD epidemic, specific large-scale plans need to be made that involve optimization of treatments already in use for the majority of the population requiring RRT, e.g. hemodialysis (HD). Extracorporeal chronic HD relies heavily on technology for its clinical success. Like the choice of the treatment modality and the complete medical approach to CKD patient care, the particular selection of the various components of the extracorporeal circuit has a significant impact on the well-being and survival of the patients. We present a medical-technological assessment of how best to treat vast numbers of dialysis patients under the financial restraints that are predicted to become even more severe as CKD entrenches itself as a more 'permanent epidemic'. A treatment modality is proposed that optimally addresses--and resolves--the debilitating effects of uremia, as well as of key clinical conditions closely linked to it. This treatment modality successfully tackles the issues of patient well-being, efficacy, effectiveness, safety and patient-nursing staff convenience--all in relation to

  18. Renal impairment with chronic hydrocarbon exposure.

    PubMed

    Yaqoob, M; Bell, G M; Stevenson, A; Mason, H; Percy, D F

    1993-03-01

    Occupational hydrocarbon exposure is believed by some investigators to play an important role in the development of several non-neoplastic renal diseases. In view of the continuing debate in this area of nephrology we adopted a cross-sectional approach by investigating the prevalence of clinical or sub-clinical renal dysfunction in subjects chronically exposed to hydrocarbons at their work site. Three groups of healthy men working in different and separate areas of a major car manufacturing plant in the North-west of England participated in the study. Group 1 comprised 112 paint sprayers with exposure to paint-based hydrocarbons, group 2 comprised 101 volunteers working in the transmission area of the plant with exposure to petroleum-based mineral oils, and group 3 comprised 92 automated press operators with minimal background exposure to lubricants who acted as internal controls. Early markers of renal dysfunction such as serum creatinine, urinary total protein, albumin, transferrin, retinol binding protein, N-acetyl-glucosaminidase, gamma-glutamyl transferase, and leucine-amino-peptidase excretion were measured. Upper reference values of the parameters measured were derived from 105 comparable laboratory based controls with no occupational exposure to hydrocarbons or heavy metals. Group 1 had a significantly higher prevalence of elevated serum creatinine than the other groups and a higher prevalence of abnormal urinary total protein, N-acetyl-glucosaminidase, gamma-glutamyl transferase, and leucine-amino-peptidase excretion than groups 2 and 3. Group 2 had normal serum creatinine but a significantly higher prevalence of abnormal urinary total protein, transferrin, retinol binding protein, N-acetyl-glucosaminidase, and leucine-amino-peptidase excretion than group 3. Serum albumin was similar in all groups. There was some clustering of abnormal findings but the markers of renal dysfunction used in the study identified 37 individuals in group 1 and 31 subjects in

  19. Proximal tubular efflux transporters involved in renal excretion of p-cresyl sulfate and p-cresyl glucuronide: Implications for chronic kidney disease pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Mutsaers, Henricus A M; Caetano-Pinto, Pedro; Seegers, Andries E M; Dankers, Anita C A; van den Broek, Petra H H; Wetzels, Jack F M; van den Brand, Jan A J G; van den Heuvel, Lambertus P; Hoenderop, Joost G; Wilmer, Martijn J G; Masereeuw, Rosalinde

    2015-10-01

    The uremic solutes p-cresyl sulfate (pCS) and p-cresyl glucuronide (pCG) accumulate in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and might contribute to disease progression. Moreover, retention of these solutes may directly be related to renal tubular function. Here, we investigated the role of the efflux transporters Multidrug Resistance Protein 4 (MRP4) and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP) in pCS and pCG excretion, and studied the impact of both solutes on the phenotype of human conditionally immortalized renal proximal tubule epithelial cells (ciPTEC). Our results show that p-cresol metabolites accumulate during CKD, with a shift from sulfation to glucuronidation upon progression. Moreover, pCS inhibited the activity of MRP4 by 40% and BCRP by 25%, whereas pCG only reduced MRP4 activity by 75%. Moreover, BCRP-mediated transport of both solutes was demonstrated. Exposure of ciPTEC to pCG caused epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, indicated by increased expression of vimentin and Bcl-2, and diminished E-cadherin. This was associated with altered expression of key tubular transporters. In conclusion, BCRP is likely involved in the renal excretion of both solutes, and pCG promotes phenotypical changes in ciPTEC, supporting the notion that uremic toxins may be involved in CKD progression by negatively affecting renal tubule cell phenotype and functionality. PMID:26216510

  20. Baseline chronic kidney disease is associated with toxicity and survival in patients treated with targeted therapies for metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nouhaud, François-Xavier; Pfister, Christian; Defortescu, Guillaume; Giwerc, Anthony; Charbit, David; Gouerant, Sophie; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Di Fiore, Frédéric

    2015-09-01

    To assess the impact of baseline chronic kidney disease on targeted therapy (TT)-induced toxicities and survival in patients treated for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Data from patients receiving first-line TT from January 2006 to June 2012 were collected retrospectively. TT side effects, time to treatment failure (TTF), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed according to the baseline glomerular filtration rate (GFR) calculated using the modification diet in renal disease formula. Hundred and two patients treated with sunitinib (N=67), sorafenib (N=24), or temsirolimus (N=11) were included. Forty-two patients (41%) had baseline chronic kidney disease with GFR less than 60 ml/min/1.73 m. Patients with GFR less than 60 were more likely to encounter severe (grade 3-4) TT-induced toxicities (79 vs. 32%, P<0.0001). Moreover, renal function impairment was significantly associated with higher median TTF and OS (respectively, 12 vs. 6 months for TTF, P=0.003; and 33 vs. 13 months for OS, P=0.001). On multivariate analysis, GFR less than 60 was identified as the only factor associated with a higher rate of severe toxicity: odds ratio=4.74 (1.67-13.41), P=0.003. Severe toxicity (P=0.05) was identified as an independent prognostic factor for OS and TTF. Baseline chronic kidney disease was associated with higher TT-induced toxicities, which were identified as a prognostic factor of higher survival in mRCC treatment. These results suggest that GFR measurement could be used to optimize the efficacy of TT in patients treated for an mRCC. PMID:26020808

  1. The John F. Maher Award Recipient Lecture 2006. The continuum of chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease: challenges and opportunities for chronic peritoneal dialysis in the United States.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Rajnish

    2007-01-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients undergoing renal replacement therapy have a high mortality rate and suffer from considerable morbidity. Degree of nutritional decline, disordered mineral metabolism, and vascular calcification are some of the abnormalities that predict an adverse outcome for ESRD patients. All these abnormalities begin early during the course of chronic kidney disease (CKD), long before the need for maintenance dialysis. Thus, CKD represents a continuum of metabolic and vascular abnormalities. Treatment of these abnormalities early during the course of CKD and a timely initiation of dialysis have the potential of improving patient outcomes. However, the thesis that successful management of these abnormalities will favorably modify the outcomes of dialysis patients remains untested. The proportion of incident USA ESRD patients starting chronic peritoneal dialysis (CPD) has historically been low. Limited physician training and inadequate predialysis patient education appear to underlie the low CPD take-on in the USA. Furthermore, two key changes have occurred in the USA: steep decline in CPD take-on and progressive increase in the use of automated peritoneal dialysis. The decline in CPD take-on has afflicted virtually every subgroup examined and has occurred, paradoxically, when the CPD outcomes in the country have improved. Understanding the reasons for historically low CPD take-on and recent steep declines in utilization may allow the development of plans to reverse these trends. PMID:17299144

  2. Microcirculation in Acute and Chronic Kidney Diseases.

    PubMed

    Zafrani, Lara; Ince, Can

    2015-12-01

    The renal microvasculature is emerging as a key player in acute and chronic kidney diseases. Renal microvascular disease involves alterations in endothelial barrier permeability, exaggerated inflammation, impairment of endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation involving the nitric oxide system, increased oxidative stress, and loss of angiogenic factors. Moreover, evidence suggests that there is a microvascular component to the pathogenesis of renal scarring. New technology is being developed to explore renal microcirculation in vivo in experimental models and humans. This technology will provide a better understanding of the pathogenesis of kidney diseases and will help guide specific therapeutic strategies aimed at restoring the renal microcirculation. This article reviews the cellular and molecular mechanisms of renal microvascular dysfunction in acute and chronic kidney diseases and the potential diagnostic and therapeutic implications of these findings. Recent developments in the monitoring of renal microcirculation are described with respect to their advantages and limitations, and future directions are outlined. PMID:26231789

  3. Renal Perfusion Index Reflects Cardiac Systolic Function in Chronic Cardio-Renal Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lubas, Arkadiusz; Ryczek, Robert; Kade, Grzegorz; Niemczyk, Stanisław

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiac dysfunction can modify renal perfusion, which is crucial to maintain sufficient kidney tissue oxygenation. Renal cortex perfusion assessed by dynamic ultrasound method is related both to renal function and cardiac hemodynamics. The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that Renal Perfusion Index (RPI) can more closely reflect cardiac hemodynamics and differentiate etiology of chronic cardio-renal syndrome. Material/Methods Twenty-four patients with hypertension and chronic kidney disease (CKD) at 2–4 stage (12 with hypertensive nephropathy and 12 with CKD prior to hypertension) were enrolled in the study. Blood tests, 24-h ABPM, echocardiography, and ultrasonography with estimation of Total renal Cortical Perfusion intensity and Renal Perfusion Index (RPI) were performed. Results In the group of all patients, RPI correlated with left ventricular stoke volume (LVSV), and cardiac index, but not with markers of renal function. In multiple stepwise regression analysis CKD-EPI(Cys-Cr) (b=−0.360), LVSV (b=0.924) and MAP (b=0.376) together independently influenced RPI (R2=0.74; p<0.0001). RPI<0.567 allowed for the identification of patients with chronic cardio-renal syndrome with sensitivity of 41.7% and specificity of 83.3%. Conclusions Renal perfusion index relates more strongly to cardiac output than to renal function, and could be helpful in recognizing chronic cardio-renal syndrome. Applicability of RPI in diagnosing early abnormalities in the cardio-renal axis requires further investigation. PMID:25881555

  4. The prodromal phase of obesity-related chronic kidney disease: early alterations in cardiovascular and renal function in obese children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Doyon, Anke; Schaefer, Franz

    2013-11-01

    Childhood overweight and obesity is a relevant health condition with multi-organ involvement. Obesity shows significant tracking into adult life and is associated with an increased risk of serious adverse health outcomes both during childhood and later adulthood. The classical sequelae of obesity such as hypertension, metabolic syndrome and inflammation do develop at a paediatric age. Cardiovascular consequences, such as increased carotid intima-media thickness, and left ventricular hypertrophy, as well as functional alterations of the heart and arteries, are commonly traceable at an early age. Renal involvement can occur at a young age and is associated with a high probability of progressive chronic kidney disease. There is solid evidence suggesting that consequent treatment including both lifestyle changes and pharmacological therapy can reduce cardiovascular, metabolic and renal risks in obese children and adolescents. PMID:23975744

  5. [Skin and chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Raffaella; Mancini, Elena; Santoro, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Kidneys and skin are seldom considered associated, but their relationship is more closer than generally believed. In some immunological diseases (SLE...) and genetic syndromes (tuberous sclerosis, Fabrys disease...) the cutaneous manifestations are integral parts of the clinical picture. In advanced uremia, besides the well-known itching skin lesions, calciphylaxis may appear, a typical example of cutaneous involvement secondary to the metabolic complications (calcium-phosphate imbalance) of the renal disease. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis appears only in patients with renal failure and it has a very severe prognosis due to the systemic organ involvement. Moreover, there is a heterogeneous group of metabolic diseases, with renal involvement, that may be accompanied by skin lesions, either related to the disease itself or to its complications (diabetes mellitus, porphyrias). In systemic amyloidosis, fibrils may deposit even in dermis leading to different skin lesions. In some heroin abusers, in the presence of suppurative lesions in the sites of needle insertion, renal amyloidosis should be suspected, secondary to the chronic inflammation. Atheroembolic disease is nowadays frequently observed, as a consequence of the increasing number of invasive intravascular manoeuvres. Skin manifestations like livedo reticularis or the blue toe syndrome are the most typical signs, but often renal dysfunction is also present. In all these conditions, the skin lesion may be a first sign, a warning, that should arouse the suspicion of a more complex pathology, even with renal involvement. Being aware of this relationship is fundamental to accelerate the diagnostic process. PMID:25315722

  6. Efficacy and safety of low molecular weight heparin compared to unfractionated heparin for chronic outpatient hemodialysis in end stage renal disease: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Palamaner Subash Shantha, Ghanshyam; Kumar, Anita Ashok; Sethi, Mansha; Khanna, Rohit C; Pancholy, Samir Bipin

    2015-01-01

    Background. Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) is an effective anti-coagulant for thrombotic events. However, due to its predominant renal clearance, there are concerns that it might be associated with increased bleeding in patients with renal disease. Objectives. We systematically evaluated the efficacy and safety of LMWH compared to unfractionated heparin (UH) in end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Search Methods. Pubmed, Embase and cochrane central were searched for eligible citations. Selection Criteria. Randomized controlled trials, comparing LMWH and UH, involving adult (age > 18 years), ESRD patients receiving outpatient, chronic, intermittent hemodialysis were included. Data Collection and Analysis. Two independent reviewers performed independent data abstraction. I2 statistic was used to assess heterogeneity. Random effects model was used for meta-analysis. Results. Nineteen studies were included for systematic review and 4 were included for meta-analysis. There were no significant differences between LMWH and UFH for extracorporeal circuit thrombosis [risk ratio: 1 (95% CI [0.62-1.62])] and bleeding complications [risk ratio: 1.16 (95% CI [0.62-2.15])]. Conclusions. LMWH is as safe and effective as UFH. Considering the poor quality of studies included for the review, larger well conducted RCTs are required before conclusions can be drawn. PMID:25780780

  7. Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... have immunity to this disease Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  8. Myocardial Calcinosis in Chronic Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kempf, Ashley E.; Momeni, Maryam Golshan; Saremi, Farhood

    2009-01-01

    The authors are presenting an 18 year old male with history of end stage renal disease and rejected renal transplant. In his workup echocardiogram and non contract CT of chest revealed diffuse endocardial and myocardial calcifications. Extensive cardiac calcification is a rare but important entity in relation to end stage renal disease as it may cause complications such as valvular dysfunction and fatal arrhythmia. PMID:22470643

  9. Gut Microbiota-Dependent Trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) Pathway Contributes to Both Development of Renal Insufficiency and Mortality Risk in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wilson Tang, W. H.; Wang, Zeneng; Kennedy, David J.; Wu, Yuping; Buffa, Jennifer A.; Agatisa-Boyle, Brendan; Li, Xinmin S.; Levison, Bruce S.; Hazen, Stanley L.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), a gut microbial-dependent metabolite of dietary choline, phosphatidylcholine (lecithin) and L-carnitine, is elevated in chronic kidney diseases (CKD) and associated with coronary artery disease pathogenesis. Objective To both investigate the clinical prognostic value of TMAO in subjects with versus without CKD, and to test the hypothesis that TMAO plays a direct contributory role in the development and progression of renal dysfunction. Methods and Results We first examined the relationship between fasting plasma TMAO and all-cause mortality over 5-year follow-up in 521 stable subjects with CKD (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] <60 ml/min/1.73m2). Median TMAO level among CKD subjects was 7.9 μM (interquartile range 5.2–12.4μM), which was markedly higher (P<0.001) than in non-CKD subjects (n=3,166). Within CKD subjects, higher (4th vs. 1st quartile) plasma TMAO level was associated with a 2.8-fold increased mortality risk. Following adjustments for traditional risk factors, hsCRP and eGFR, elevated TMAO levels remained predictive of 5-year mortality risk (HR 1.93 [95%CI 1.13–3.29], p<0.05). TMAO provided significant incremental prognostic value (net reclassification index 17.26%, p<0.001; and differences in area under Receiver Operator Characteristic curve, 63.26% vs. 65.95 %, p=0.036). Among non-CKD subjects, elevated TMAO levels portend poorer prognosis within cohorts of high and low cystatin C. In animal models, elevated dietary choline or TMAO directly led to progressive renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis and dysfunction. Conclusion Plasma TMAO levels are both elevated in patients with CKD and portend poorer long-term survival. Chronic dietary exposures that increase TMAO appear to directly contribute to progressive renal fibrosis and dysfunction. PMID:25599331

  10. The Relationship between Renal Function and Plasma Concentration of the Cachectic Factor Zinc-Alpha2-Glycoprotein (ZAG) in Adult Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kalbacher, Emilie; Croze, Marine L.; Hadj-Aissa, Aoumeur; Fouque, Denis; Guebre-Egziabher, Fitsum; Soulage, Christophe O.

    2014-01-01

    Zinc-α2-glycoprotein (ZAG), a potent cachectic factor, is increased in patients undergoing maintenance dialysis. However, there is no data for patients before initiation of renal replacement therapy. The purpose of the present study was to assess the relationship between plasma ZAG concentration and renal function in patients with a large range of glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Plasma ZAG concentration and its relationship to GFR were investigated in 71 patients with a chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 1 to 5, 17 chronic hemodialysis (HD), 8 peritoneal dialysis (PD) and 18 non-CKD patients. Plasma ZAG concentration was 2.3-fold higher in CKD stage 5 patients and 3-fold higher in HD and PD patients compared to non-CKD controls (P<0.01). The hemodialysis session further increased plasma ZAG concentration (+39%, P<0.01). An inverse relationship was found between ZAG levels and plasma protein (rs = −0.284; P<0.01), albumin (rs = −0.282, P<0.05), hemoglobin (rs = −0.267, P<0.05) and HDL-cholesterol (rs = −0.264, P<0.05) and a positive correlation were seen with plasma urea (rs = 0.283; P<0.01). In multiple regression analyses, plasma urea and HDL-cholesterol were the only variables associated with plasma ZAG (r2 = 0.406, P<0.001). In CKD-5 patients, plasma accumulation of ZAG was not correlated with protein energy wasting. Further prospective studies are however needed to better elucidate the potential role of ZAG in end-stage renal disease. PMID:25076420

  11. Renal Function Outcomes and Risk Factors for Risk Factors for Stage 3B Chronic Kidney Disease after Urinary Diversion in Patients with Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hatakeyama, Shingo; Koie, Takuya; Narita, Takuma; Hosogoe, Shogo; Yamamoto, Hayato; Tobisawa, Yuki; Yoneyama, Tohru; Yoneyama, Takahiro; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Ohyama, Chikara

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the effects of urinary diversion on renal function, we retrospectively investigated renal function over 5 years after urinary diversion using a propensity score matching strategy. Methods Between May 1996 and November 2013, 345 consecutive adult patients underwent radical cystectomy and urinary diversion in our hospital; one hundred and fifteen patients with more than a 5-year follow-up were enrolled. Propensity scores were calculated using logistic analysis, and the data used in the analyses included age, gender, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Performance Status (ECOG-PS), clinical tumor stage, presence of cardiovascular disease; hypertension; and type 2 diabetes and preoperative eGFR at the initial visit. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to assess the risk factors for stage 3B chronic kidney disease (CKD) after the different types of urinary diversion. Results Continent and incontinent diversion were performed in 68 and 47 patients, respectively. The mean preoperative eGFR was significantly lower in the incontinent than in the continent group (P < 0.001). In propensity score-matched patients (n = 34 each), no significant differences were observed in pre- and postoperative eGFR and 5-year eGFR decrease rates between the groups. In the incontinent group, the number of postoperative stage 3B CKD patients was significantly increased than the continent group. Using multivariate analysis, independent risk factors significantly associated with stage 3B CKD at 5 years after surgery were older age, eGFR before surgery, incontinent diversion (cutaneous ureterostomy), and postoperative hydronephrosis. Conclusions The types of urinary diversion had no significant impact on renal function decline, whereas older age, preexisting impaired renal function, postoperative hydronephrosis, and cutaneous ureterostomy were independent risk factors for stage 3B CKD at 5 years after radical cystectomy. PMID:26901860

  12. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000091.htm Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common lung disease. Having COPD ...

  13. Pseudomelanosis duodeni associated with chronic renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Marcia Henriques de Magalhães; Pegado, Maria da Gloria Fernandes; Vargas, Cleber; Castro, Maria Elizabeth C; Madi, Kalil; Nunes, Tiago; Zaltman, Cyrla

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomelanosis duodeni (PD) is a rare dark speckled appearance of the duodenum associated with gastrointestinal bleeding, hypertension, chronic heart failure, chronic renal failure and consumption of different drugs. We report four cases of PD associated with chronic renal failure admitted to the gastroenterology outpatient unit due to epigastric pain, nausea, melena and progressive reduction of hemoglobin index. Gastroduodenal endoscopy revealed erosions in the esophagus and stomach, with no active bleeding at the moment. In addition, the duodenal mucosa presented marked signs of melanosis; later confirmed by histopathological study. Even though PD is usually regarded as a benign condition, its pathogenesis and clinical significance is yet to be defined. PMID:22493558

  14. Apocynin improving cardiac remodeling in chronic renal failure disease is associated with up-regulation of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jie; Cai, Qingqing; Wang, Jingfeng; Huang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac remodeling is one of the most common cardiac abnormalities and associated with a high mortality in chronic renal failure (CRF) patients. Apocynin, a nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase inhibitor, has been showed cardio-protective effects. However, whether apocynin can improve cardiac remodeling in CRF and what is the underlying mechanism are unclear. In the present study, we enrolled 94 participants. In addition, we used 5/6 nephrectomized rats to mimic cardiac remodeling in CRF. Serum levels of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and its mainly metabolic enzyme-soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) were measured. The results showed that the serum levels of EETs were significantly decreased in renocardiac syndrome participants (P < 0.05). In 5/6 nephrectomized CRF model, the ratio of left ventricular weight /body weight, left ventricular posterior wall thickness, and cardiac interstitial fibrosis were significantly increased while ejection fraction significantly decreased (P < 0.05). All these effects could partly be reversed by apocynin. Meanwhile, we found during the process of cardiac remodeling in CRF, apocynin significantly increased the reduced serum levels of EETs and decreased the mRNA and protein expressions of sEH in the heart (P < 0.05). Our findings indicated that the protective effect of apocynin on cardiac remodeling in CRF was associated with the up-regulation of EETs. EETs may be a new mediator for the injury of kidney-heart interactions. PMID:26322503

  15. Apocynin improving cardiac remodeling in chronic renal failure disease is associated with up-regulation of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Liu, Yu; Liu, Xiaoqiang; Chen, Jie; Cai, Qingqing; Wang, Jingfeng; Huang, Hui

    2015-09-22

    Cardiac remodeling is one of the most common cardiac abnormalities and associated with a high mortality in chronic renal failure (CRF) patients. Apocynin, a nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase inhibitor, has been showed cardio-protective effects. However, whether apocynin can improve cardiac remodeling in CRF and what is the underlying mechanism are unclear. In the present study, we enrolled 94 participants. In addition, we used 5/6 nephrectomized rats to mimic cardiac remodeling in CRF. Serum levels of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and its mainly metabolic enzyme-soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) were measured. The results showed that the serum levels of EETs were significantly decreased in renocardiac syndrome participants (P < 0.05). In 5/6 nephrectomized CRF model, the ratio of left ventricular weight / body weight, left ventricular posterior wall thickness, and cardiac interstitial fibrosis were significantly increased while ejection fraction significantly decreased (P < 0.05). All these effects could partly be reversed by apocynin. Meanwhile, we found during the process of cardiac remodeling in CRF, apocynin significantly increased the reduced serum levels of EETs and decreased the mRNA and protein expressions of sEH in the heart (P < 0.05). Our findings indicated that the protective effect of apocynin on cardiac remodeling in CRF was associated with the up-regulation of EETs. EETs may be a new mediator for the injury of kidney-heart interactions. PMID:26322503

  16. Oral and dental aspects of chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Proctor, R; Kumar, N; Stein, A; Moles, D; Porter, S

    2005-03-01

    The present article reviews, in detail, the current knowledge of the oral and dental aspects of chronic renal failure (CRF). Worldwide, increasing numbers of persons have CRF; thus, oral health care staffs are increasingly likely to provide care for patients with such disease. Chronic renal failure can give rise to a wide spectrum of oral manifestations, affecting the hard or soft tissues of the mouth. The majority of affected individuals have disease that does not complicate oral health care; nevertheless, the dental management of such individuals does require that the clinician understand the multiple systems that can be affected. The clinician should also consider the adverse side-effects of drug therapy and appropriate prescribing, in view of compromised renal clearance. PMID:15723858

  17. Reversed Dipper Blood-Pressure Pattern Is Closely Related to Severe Renal and Cardiovascular Damage in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xun; Li, Cuicui; Ye, Zengchun; Peng, Hui; Chen, Zhujiang; Lou, Tanqi

    2013-01-01

    Background A non-dipper blood pressure (BP) pattern is very common in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients and affects the progression and development of cardiovascular disease. However, data on the reversed dipper BP pattern on target-organ damage in Chinese CKD patients are lacking. Methods A total of 540 CKD patients were enrolled. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM), clinical BP, ultrasonographic assessment and other clinical data were collected. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to ascertain the relationship between ABPM results and clinical parameters. Results A total of 21.9% CKD patients had a reversed dipper BP pattern, 42% of patients had a non-dipper BP pattern and 36.1% of patients had a dipper BP pattern. Patients with reversed dipper BP pattern had the worst renal function and most severe cardiovascular damages among these CKD patients (p<0.05). The estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and left ventricular mass index (LVMI) correlated significantly with the rate of decline of nocturnal BP. A reversed dipper BP pattern was an independent factor affecting kidney damage and left ventricular hypertrophy. Age, lower hemoglobin level, higher 24-h systolic BP from ABPM, and higher serum phosphate levels were independent associated with a reversed dipper BP pattern after multivariate logistic regression analyses. Conclusion The reversed dipper BP pattern is closely related to severe renal damage and cardiovascular injuries in CKD patients, and special attention should be given to these CKD patients. PMID:23393577

  18. Chronic Kidney Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Chronic Kidney Diseases KidsHealth > For Kids > Chronic Kidney Diseases Print ... re talking about your kidneys. What Are the Kidneys? Your kidneys are tucked under your lower ribs ...

  19. Chronic kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic kidney disease is the slow loss of kidney function over time. The main job of the kidneys is to ... Chronic kidney disease (CKD) slowly gets worse over months or years. You may not notice any symptoms for some time. ...

  20. Chronic granulomatous disease

    MedlinePlus

    CGD; Fatal granulomatosis of childhood; Chronic granulomatous disease of childhood; Progressive septic granulomatosis ... In chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), immune system cells called ... some types of bacteria and fungi. This disorder leads to long- ...

  1. Contrast Medium Exposure During Computed Tomography and Risk of Development of End-Stage Renal Disease in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Ming-Shun; Chiu, Chien-Shan; How, Chorng-Kuang; Chiang, Jen-Huai; Sheu, Meei-Ling; Chen, Wen-Chi; Lin, Hsuan-Jen; Hsieh, Vivian Chia-Rong; Hu, Sung-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to investigate the long-term association between contrast medium exposure during computed tomography (CT) and the subsequent development of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We conducted a population-based cohort study using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. A total of 7100 patients with nonadvanced CKD who underwent contrast medium-enhanced CT were identified and served as the study cohort. To avoid selection bias, we used the propensity score to match 7100 nonadvanced CKD patients, who underwent noncontrast medium-enhanced CT to serve as the comparison cohort. The age, sex, index year, and frequency of undergoing CTs were also matched between the study and comparison cohorts. Participants were followed until a new diagnosis of ESRD or December 31, 2011. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were calculated using the Cox proportional hazards regression. Contrast medium exposure was not identified as a risk factor for developing ESRD in nonadvanced CKD patients after confounders adjustment (adjusted HR = 0.91; 95% CI, 0.66–1.26; P = 0.580). We further divided the patients who underwent CTs with contrast medium use into ≤1 exposure per year on average, >1 and <2 exposure per year on average, and ≥2 exposure per year on average. After adjusting for confounders, we identified a much higher risk for developing ESRD in the 2 groups of >1 and <2 exposure per year on average and ≥2 exposure per year on average (adjusted HR = 8.13; 95% CI, 5.57–11.87 and adjusted HR = 12.08; 95% CI, 7.39–19.75, respectively) compared with the patients who underwent CTs without contrast medium use. This long-term follow-up study demonstrated that contrast medium exposure was not associated with an increased risk of ESRD development in nonadvanced CKD patients. PMID:27100424

  2. Brief Report: APOL1 Renal Risk Variants Are Associated With Chronic Kidney Disease in Children and Youth With Perinatal HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Purswani, Murli U; Patel, Kunjal; Winkler, Cheryl A; Spector, Stephen A; Hazra, Rohan; Seage, George R; Mofenson, Lynne; Karalius, Brad; Scott, Gwendolyn B; Van Dyke, Russell B; Kopp, Jeffrey B

    2016-09-01

    APOL1 renal risk alleles are associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) in adults, with the strongest effect being for HIV-associated nephropathy. Their role in youth with perinatal HIV-1 infection (PHIV) has not been studied. In a nested case-control study of 451 PHIV participants in the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study, we found a 3.5-fold increased odds of CKD in those carrying high-risk APOL1 genotypes using a recessive model [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.2 to 10.0]. We report an unadjusted incidence of 1.2 CKD cases/100 person-years (95% CI: 0.5 to 2.5) in PHIV youth carrying APOL1 high-risk genotypes, with important implications for sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:27035887

  3. Relationship of dietary phosphate intake with risk of end stage renal disease and mortality in chronic kidney disease stage 3-5: A Modification of Diet in Renal Disease study

    PubMed Central

    Selamet, Umut; Tighiouart, Hocine; Sarnak, Mark J.; Beck, Gerald; Levey, Andrew S.; Block, Geoffrey; Ix, Joachim H.

    2015-01-01

    KDIGO guidelines recommend dietary phosphate restriction to lower serum phosphate levels in CKD stage 3-5. Recent studies suggest that dietary phosphate intake is only weakly linked to its serum concentration, and the relationship of phosphate intake with adverse outcomes is uncertain. To further evaluate this, we used Cox proportional hazards models to assess associations of baseline 24 hour urine phosphate excretion with risk of end stage renal disease (ESRD), all-cause mortality, and mortality subtypes (cardiovascular disease (CVD) and non-CVD) using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease data. Models were adjusted for demographics, CVD risk factors, iothalamate GFR, and urine protein and nitrogen excretion. Phosphate excretion was modestly inversely correlated with serum phosphate concentrations. There was no association of 24 hour urinary phosphate excretion with risk of ESRD, CVD-, non-CVD- or all-cause mortality. For comparison, higher serum phosphate concentrations were associated with all-cause mortality (hazard ratio per 0.7 mg/dL higher, 1.15 [95% CI 1.01, 1.30]). Thus, phosphate intake is not tightly linked with serum phosphate concentrations in CKD stage 3-5, and there was no evidence that greater phosphate intake, assessed by 24 hour phosphate excretion, is associated with ESRD, CVD-, non CVD-, or all-cause mortality in CKD stage 3-5. Hence, factors other than dietary intake may be key determinants of serum phosphate concentrations and require additional investigation. PMID:26422502

  4. Renal kallikrein in chronic hypoxic rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, C F; Chen, L W; Chien, C T; Wu, M S; Tsai, T J

    1996-09-01

    1. We have studied the role of kallikrein (KK) in the maintenance of renal function in chronic hypoxic rats (high altitude; HA), compared with control rats kept at sea level (SL). Hypoxia was induced by placing female Wistar rats (198-290 g) in an altitude chamber (5500 m) 15 h/day for 4 weeks. Experiments were also conducted to study the interaction of KK with renal nerve activity and endothelin (ET), two parameters previously shown to be altered in this model. 2. It was found that renal cortex tissue KK activity (TKA) was not significantly different in 10 SL and 10 HA rats. However, the urinary KK activity (UKA) was reduced nearly to half (from 35.2 +/- 4.6 to 18.5 +/- 1.7 pkat/min) in HA rats after 4 weeks of chronic hypoxia. 3. Acute renal denervated diuresis was accompanied by a significant increase in UKA (from 9 +/- 2 to 14 +/- 2 pkat/min in HA and denervated HA rats, respectively; P < 0.05) in HA rats. Intrarenal arterial pretreatment of aprotinin reduced the denervated diuresis. 4. Endothelin (600 ng/kg per h) reduced urine flow, sodium and potassium excretion in the ipsilateral kidney in another 10 SL and 10 HA rats. The extent of the drop of these parameters was significantly less in HA rats. Urinary KK activity was correlated significantly with the measured renal functional parameters (r ranging from 0.472 to 0.612) in SL rats, but was insignificant in HA rats (r ranging from 0.032 to 0.192). 5. We have demonstrated that chronic exposure to hypoxia decreases urinary KK excretion and that KK is involved in acute renal denervated diuresis generated in these animals. The present study suggests that KK plays a partial role in the maintenance of renal function in chronic hypoxic rats. PMID:8911720

  5. [Chronic kidney disease and nutrition].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takuya; Kumagai, Hiromichi

    2016-03-01

    Abnormalities of mineral metabolism develop with decline of renal function in chronic kidney disease (CKD), and it is called as a CKD-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD). The standard approach for management of CKD-MBD is to keep serum phosphorus, calcium, and parathyroid hormone in the reference range by dietary intervention and medications. It has been recently pointed out that starting the treatment from early CKD is important for suppressing CKD-MBD. PMID:26923973

  6. Imaging in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) diagnosis and staging are based on estimated or calculated glomerular filtration rate (GFR), urinalysis and kidney structure at renal imaging techniques. Ultrasound (US) has a key role in evaluating both morphological changes (by means of B-Mode) and patterns of vascularization (by means of color-Doppler and contrast-enhanced US), thus contributing to CKD diagnosis and to the follow-up of its progression. In CKD, conventional US allows measuring longitudinal diameter and cortical thickness and evaluating renal echogenicity and urinary tract status. Maximum renal length is usually considered a morphological marker of CKD, as it decreases contemporarily to GFR, and should be systematically recorded in US reports. More recently, it has been found to be a significant correlation of both renal longitudinal diameter and cortical thickness with renal function. Conventional US should be integrated by color Doppler, which shows parenchymal perfusion and patency of veins and arteries, and by spectral Doppler, which is crucial for the diagnosis of renal artery stenosis and provides important information about intrarenal microcirculation. Different values of renal resistive indexes (RIs) have been associated with different primary diseases, as they reflect vascular compliance. Since RIs significantly correlate with renal function, they have been proposed to be independent risk factors for CKD progression, besides proteinuria, low GFR and arterial hypertension. Despite several new applications, US and color Doppler contribute to a definite diagnosis in <50% of cases of CKD, because of the lack of specific US patterns, especially in cases of advanced CKD. However, US is useful to evaluate CKD progression and to screen patients at risk for CKD. The indications and the recommended frequency of color Doppler US could differ in each case and the follow-up should be tailored. PMID:27170301

  7. Efficacy & safety of continuous erythropoietin receptor activator (CERA) in treating renal anaemia in diabetic patients with chronic kidney disease not on dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Vankar, Sameer G.; Dutta, Pinaki; Kohli, H.S.; Bhansali, Anil

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients on dialysis regularly receive erythropoiesis stimulating agent (ESA) for treating renal anaemia during their dialysis unlike those who are not on dialysis. In such patients, the longer acting ESA can be helpful in reducing their frequent visits to the health care facilities and improving their compliance. This study was aimed to examine the efficacy and safety of continuous erythropoietin receptor activator (CERA), a long acting ESA in treating renal anaemia in patients with diabetic CKD not on dialysis. Methods: In this prospective, open-labelled, pilot clinical study, 35 adult type 2 diabetes patients with nephropathy and renal anaemia, who were not on dialysis nor receiving treatment with ESA were administered CERA subcutaneously once in two weeks for a period of 24 weeks. The primary efficacy end point was to evaluate the Hb response (Hb rise of ≥1 g/dl above the baseline or Hb level ≥11 g/dl) during the study period. Results: All patients showed Hb rise ≥1 g/dl during the study period and 80 per cent patients could achieve Hb value ≥11 g/dl. The maximum median Hb rise of 1.2 g/dl occurred in the initial 6 weeks after starting the treatment. The mean creatinine clearance (CrCl) improved by 2.8 ml/min, with mean Hb rise of 2.6 g/dl from the baseline after administration of CERA. Worsening of blood pressure (BP) control (42.9%) was the most common adverse event. Interpretation & conclusions: CERA once in two weeks was found to be efficacious in correcting anaemia in the ESA-naïve patients with diabetic nephropathy who are not on dialysis. However, regular monitoring of blood pressure is required while on treatment with CERA. PMID:24604046

  8. Oxygen radicals and renal diseases.

    PubMed

    Klahr, S

    1997-01-01

    Reactive oxygen metabolites (superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radical, and hypochlorous acid) are important mediators of renal damage in acute renal failure and glomerular and tubulointerstitial diseases. The role of these oxygen metabolites in the above entities is discussed, and the effects of antioxidants and scavengers of O2 radicals are considered. The role of oxygen radicals in the regulation of gene transcription is also considered. PMID:9387104

  9. End-stage renal disease and thrombophilia.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Alexander; Limperger, Verena; Nowak-Göttl, Ulrike

    2016-05-10

    Chronic kidney disease is an established risk factor for arterial and venous thromboembolism (TE). Whereas the overall risk of TE in moderately decreased kidney function is approximately 2.5-fold higher compared to patients with normal renal function, the risk increase is 5.5-fold in patients with severe renal dysfunction. In patients with renal dysfunction and arterial thrombosis (OR: 4.9), malignancy (OR: 5.8) surgery (OR: 14.0) or thrombophilia (OR: 4.3) the risk to suffer from venous TE is higher compared to the risk associated to the baseline renal dysfunction alone. The treatment options for end-stage renal diseases include hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis and kidney transplantation. During all treatment modalities thrombotic complications have been described, namely catheter malfunction and shunt thrombosis in patients undergoing hemodialysis in up to 25% of patients, and TE, pulmonary embolism or graft vessel thrombosis in approximately 8% of patients. The reported incidence of reno-vascular thrombosis following renal transplantation leading to hemorrhagic infarction with organ rejection or organ loss varied between 2-12%. Keeping in mind the multifactorial etiology of TE in patients with kidney dysfunction a general screening for thrombophilia in this patient group is not indicated. Selected screening on an individual patient basis should be discussed if the family history for TE is positive or the patient itself had suffered one thrombosis before the onset of the renal disease or multiple TEs during hemodialysis or post kidney transplantation in patients waiting for living donor kidney transplantation. PMID:25639843

  10. New Directions in Chronic Disease Management

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hun-Sung; Cho, Jae-Hyoung

    2015-01-01

    A worldwide epidemic of chronic disease, and complications thereof, is underway, with no sign of abatement. Healthcare costs have increased tremendously, principally because of the need to treat chronic complications of non-communicable diseases including cardiovascular disease, blindness, end-stage renal disease, and amputation of extremities. Current healthcare systems fail to provide an appropriate quality of care to prevent the development of chronic complications without additional healthcare costs. A new paradigm for prevention and treatment of chronic disease and the complications thereof is urgently required. Several clinical studies have clearly shown that frequent communication between physicians and patients, based on electronic data transmission from medical devices, greatly assists in the management of chronic disease. However, for various reasons, these advantages have not translated effectively into real clinical practice. In the present review, we describe current relevant studies, and trends in the use of information technology for chronic disease management. We also discuss limitations and future directions. PMID:26194075

  11. Influence of Malondialdehyde and Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 on Progression of Carotid Atherosclerosis in Chronic Renal Disease with Cardiometabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rašić, Senija; Rebić, Damir; Hasić, Sabaheta; Rašić, Ismar; Delić Šarac, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Objective was to assess whether the concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA) as a marker of lipid peroxidation and serum concentration of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) are involved in the process of atherosclerosis in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients nondialysis-dependent and those on peritoneal dialysis (PD), both with signs of cardiometabolic syndrome (CMS). Thirty CKD and 22 PD patients were included in a study. All observed patients were divided into three subgroups depending on the degree of atherosclerotic changes in the carotid arteries (CA). Severity of atherosclerotic changes in the CA was evaluated by ultrasonography. We confirmed significantly lower level of serum MDA throughout all the stages of atherosclerosis in PD patients compared with observed CKD patients (P < 0.05) and increased serum concentration of MDA and MMP-9 with the progression of severity atherosclerotic changes in both groups of patients. The multiple regression analysis revealed that MDA and MMP-9 are significant predictors of changes in IMT-CA CKD patients (P < 0.05) and plaque score on CA in these patients (P < 0.05). The results suggest that MDA and MMP-9 could be mediators of CKD-related vascular remodeling in CMS. PMID:26538831

  12. Chronic kidney disease - pediatric risk factors.

    PubMed

    Tasic, Velibor; Janchevska, Aleksandra; Emini, Nora; Sahpazova, Emilija; Gucev, Zoran; Polenakovic, Momir

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge about the progression of chronic kidney disease is an important issue for every pediatric nephrologist and pediatrician in order to implement appropriate measures to prevent wasting of renal function and the final consequence - end stage renal disease with the need for the dialysis and transplantation. Therefore it is important to know, treat or ameliorate the standard risk factors such as hypertension, proteinuria, anemia, hyperparathyroidism etc. In this review devoted to the World Kidney Day 2016 we will pay attention to the low birth parameters, obesity, hyperuricemia and smoking which emerged as particularly important risk factors for children and adolescent with chronic kidney disease. PMID:27442412

  13. Renal Nitric Oxide Deficiency and Chronic Kidney Disease in Young Sheep Born with a Solitary Functioning Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Reetu R.; Easton, Lawrence K.; Booth, Lindsea C.; Schlaich, Markus P.; Head, Geoffrey A.; Moritz, Karen M.; Denton, Kate M.

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that renal hemodynamic responses to nitric oxide (NO) inhibition were attenuated in aged, hypertensive sheep born with a solitary functioning kidney (SFK). NO is an important regulator of renal function, particularly, in the postnatal period. We hypothesized that the onset of renal dysfunction and hypertension in individuals with a SFK is associated with NO deficiency early in life. In this study, renal and cardiovascular responses to L-NAME infusion (Nw-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester) were examined in 6-month old lambs born with a SFK, induced by fetal unilateral nephrectomy (uni-x). Renal responses to L-NAME were attenuated in uni-x sheep with the fall in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and urinary sodium excretion (UNaV) being less in the uni-x compared to sham lambs (%ΔGFR; −41 ± 3 vs −54 ± 4: P = 0.03, %ΔUNaV; −48 ± 5 vs −76 ± 3, P = 0.0008). 24 hour-basal urinary nitrate and nitrite (NOx) excretion was less in the uni-x animals compared to the sham (NOx excretion μM/min/kg; sham: 57 ± 7; uni-x: 38 ± 4, P = 0.02). L-NAME treatment reduced urinary NOx to undetectable levels in both groups. A reduction in NO bioavailability in early life may contribute to the initiation of glomerular and tubular dysfunction that promotes development and progression of hypertension in offspring with a congenital nephron deficit, including those with a SFK. PMID:27226113

  14. Renal Nitric Oxide Deficiency and Chronic Kidney Disease in Young Sheep Born with a Solitary Functioning Kidney.

    PubMed

    Singh, Reetu R; Easton, Lawrence K; Booth, Lindsea C; Schlaich, Markus P; Head, Geoffrey A; Moritz, Karen M; Denton, Kate M

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that renal hemodynamic responses to nitric oxide (NO) inhibition were attenuated in aged, hypertensive sheep born with a solitary functioning kidney (SFK). NO is an important regulator of renal function, particularly, in the postnatal period. We hypothesized that the onset of renal dysfunction and hypertension in individuals with a SFK is associated with NO deficiency early in life. In this study, renal and cardiovascular responses to L-NAME infusion (N(w)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester) were examined in 6-month old lambs born with a SFK, induced by fetal unilateral nephrectomy (uni-x). Renal responses to L-NAME were attenuated in uni-x sheep with the fall in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and urinary sodium excretion (UNaV) being less in the uni-x compared to sham lambs (%ΔGFR; -41 ± 3 vs -54 ± 4: P = 0.03, %ΔUNaV; -48 ± 5 vs -76 ± 3, P = 0.0008). 24 hour-basal urinary nitrate and nitrite (NOx) excretion was less in the uni-x animals compared to the sham (NOx excretion μM/min/kg; sham: 57 ± 7; uni-x: 38 ± 4, P = 0.02). L-NAME treatment reduced urinary NOx to undetectable levels in both groups. A reduction in NO bioavailability in early life may contribute to the initiation of glomerular and tubular dysfunction that promotes development and progression of hypertension in offspring with a congenital nephron deficit, including those with a SFK. PMID:27226113

  15. Baseline Predictors of Mortality among Predominantly Rural-Dwelling End-Stage Renal Disease Patients on Chronic Dialysis Therapies in Limpopo, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Mapiye, Darlington; Swanepoel, Charles R.; Bello, Aminu K.; Ratsela, Andrew R.; Okpechi, Ikechi G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Dialysis therapy for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) continues to be the readily available renal replacement option in developing countries. While the impact of rural/remote dwelling on mortality among dialysis patients in developed countries is known, it remains to be defined in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods A single-center database of end-stage renal disease patients on chronic dialysis therapies treated between 2007 and 2014 at the Polokwane Kidney and Dialysis Centre (PKDC) of the Pietersburg Provincial Hospital, Limpopo South Africa, was retrospectively reviewed. All-cause, cardiovascular, and infection-related mortalities were assessed and associated baseline predictors determined. Results Of the 340 patients reviewed, 52.1% were male, 92.9% were black Africans, 1.8% were positive for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and 87.5% were rural dwellers. The average distance travelled to the dialysis centre was 112.3 ± 73.4 Km while 67.6% of patients lived in formal housing. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at dialysis initiation was 7.1 ± 3.7 mls/min while hemodialysis (HD) was the predominant modality offered (57.1%). Ninety-two (92) deaths were recorded over the duration of follow-up with the majority (34.8%) of deaths arising from infection-related causes. Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) was a significant predictor of all-cause mortality (HR: 1.62, CI: 1.07–2.46) and infection-related mortality (HR: 2.27, CI: 1.13–4.60). On multivariable cox regression, CAPD remained a significant predictor of all-cause mortality (HR: 2.00, CI: 1.29–3.10) while the risk of death among CAPD patients was also significantly modified by diabetes mellitus (DM) status (HR: 4.99, CI: 2.13–11.71). Conclusion CAPD among predominantly rural dwelling patients in the Limpopo province of South Africa is associated with an increased risk of death from all-causes and infection-related causes. PMID:27300372

  16. Systemic conditions, oral findings and dental management of chronic renal failure patients: general considerations and case report.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Mahmud Juma Abdalla Abdel; Dummer, Claus Dieter; Pinto, Lourenço Schmidt

    2006-01-01

    Chronic renal failure is a relatively common systemic disease. Systemic abnormalities such as anemia, platelet disorders and hypertension as well as oral manifestations including xerostomia, uremic stomatitis, periodontal disease and maxillary and mandibular radiographic alterations can be observed in individuals with chronic renal disease. In view of its frequent occurrence and the need of knowledge by dentists dealing with this condition, this paper discusses the most important issues regarding chronic renal failure, addressing its systemic and oral manifestations and the dental management of chronic renal patients. A case report is presented. PMID:16924347

  17. Pathophysiology and management of progressive renal disease.

    PubMed

    Brown, S A; Crowell, W A; Brown, C A; Barsanti, J A; Finco, D R

    1997-09-01

    Recently, the hypothesis that all renal diseases are inherently progressive and self-perpetuating has focused attention on adaptive changes in renal structure and function that occur whenever renal function is reduced. These glomerular adaptations to renal disease include increases in filtration rate, capillary pressure and size, and are referred to as glomerular hyperfiltration, glomerular hypertension and glomerular hypertrophy, respectively. Extrarenal changes, such as dietary phosphate excess, systemic hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, acidosis and hyperparathyroidism occur in animals with renal disease and may be contributors to progression of renal disease. Emphasis in the management of companion animals with renal disease has shifted to identifying, understanding and controlling those processes that play a role in the progression from early to end-stage renal failure. Advances made by veterinary nephrologists in the past 15 years permit resolution of old controversies, formulation of new hypotheses and discussion of unresolved issues about the nature of progressive renal disease in dogs and cats. PMID:9308397

  18. Plasma amino and keto acids in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Langer, K; Fröhling, P T; Diederich, J; Brandl, M; Lindenau, K; Fekl, W

    1988-01-01

    During both early and late stages of chronic renal insufficiency the response of BCKA to the disease state, as indicated by plasma levels, differs from that of BCAA. Val is the only BCAA whose concentration changes under the conditions of our study, and this only during the more advanced stages of disease. In contrast, all three BCKA declined, KIVA and KICA even in mild renal failure, showing that already during the early stages of the disease these BCKA levels are decreased. BCKA are more sensitive parameters than the corresponding amino acids with regard to the metabolic dysfunctions characteristic of this disease. Modern analytical methods allow more exact and reliable knowledge of these indicators and thus a better understanding of biochemical mechanisms, possibly resulting in better therapy. PMID:3168462

  19. Nephrology Update: Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sharmeela; Rahman, Mahboob

    2016-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects more than 1 in 10 individuals in the United States. The care of these patients must be managed by family physicians and nephrology subspecialists. The kidneys often are affected by systemic processes such as diabetes and hypertension, and optimal management of these conditions is critical to slow decline in renal function in CKD patients. These patients are at high risk of cardiovascular disease, and statin therapy is recommended for adults with CKD who are at least age 50 years and not receiving dialysis. Patients with CKD and anemia can be treated with iron therapy and often with an erythropoietin-stimulating agent. Electrolyte abnormalities are managed with dietary changes and drugs. Sodium restriction and modification of dietary protein intake also may be needed. Consultation with a renal dietitian may be helpful. Because many drugs are metabolized by the kidneys, physicians should ensure that drug dosages are appropriate for the level of renal function. Early consultation with or referral to a nephrology subspecialist for patients with reduced renal function, resistant hypertension or electrolyte levels, and other conditions have been associated with improved outcomes in CKD patients. PMID:27163761

  20. Angiogenesis and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The number of patients requiring renal replacement therapy due to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is increasing worldwide. The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD), and the importance of CKD as a risk factor in development of ESRD and in complicating cardiovascular disease (CVD) have been confirmed. In recent years, the involvement of angiogenesis-related factors in the progression of CKD has been studied, and the potential therapeutic effects on CKD of modulating these factors have been identified. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, a potent pro-angiogenic factor, is involved in the development of the kidney, in maintenance of the glomerular capillary structure and filtration barrier, and in the renal repair process after injury. VEGF-A is also involved in the development of early diabetic nephropathy, demonstrated by the therapeutic effects of anti-VEGF-A antibody. Angiopoietin (Ang)-1 induces the maturation of newly formed blood vessels, and the therapeutic effects of Ang-1 in diabetic nephropathy have been described. In experimental models of diabetic nephropathy, the therapeutic effects of angiogenesis inhibitors, including angiostatin, endostatin and tumstatin peptides, the isocoumarin NM-3, and vasohibin-1, have been reported. Further analysis of the involvement of angiogenesis-related factors in the development of CKD is required. Determining the disease stage at which therapy is most effective and developing an effective drug delivery system targeting the kidney will be essential for pro-or anti-angiogenic strategies for patients with CKD. PMID:20687922

  1. Management of diabetic renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Eboh, Cecil

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of end stage renal failure (ESRF) worldwide, representing over 50% of patients on renal replacement therapy in some parts of the world. The condition is common in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, although the incidence appears to be declining, especially in type 1 diabetes. More than 1 in 3 people with type 2 diabetes have impaired kidney function. Advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis and natural history of the condition have enabled us to consider earlier therapy aimed at renal preservation and reduction in cardiovascular morbidity. Microalbuminuria is now established as the earliest risk marker for nephropathy in type 1 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes. This review examines the current concepts in the pathogenesis and management of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:26244141

  2. Increased Risk of End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Requiring Chronic Dialysis is Associated With Use of Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs)

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Kang; Liu, Jia-Sin; Hsu, Yueh-Han; Tarng, Der-Cherng; Hsu, Chih-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Abstract It is known that many medical adverse events can be caused by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs); however, epidemiologic evidence has not granted an affirmative relationship between NSAID use and the risk of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). We aimed to investigate the relationship in a Chinese population between short-term NSAID use and development of ESRD requiring chronic dialysis. A retrospective case-crossover design was used in this study. Using the Taiwanese National Health Insurance database, we identified 109,400 incident chronic ESRD patients with dialysis initiation from 1998 to 2009. For each patient, we defined the case period as 1 to 14 days and the control period as 105 to 118 days, respectively, before the first dialysis date. The washout period was 90 days between the case and control period. Detailed information about NSAID use was compared between the case and control periods. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using a conditional logistic regression model. NSAID use was found to be a significant risk factor associated with dialysis commencement. The adjusted OR was 2.73 (95% CI: 2.62–2.84) for nonselective NSAIDs and 2.17 (95% CI: 1.83–2.57) for celecoxib. The OR reached 3.05 for the use of acetic acid derivatives. Compared with the oral forms, significantly higher risks were seen in parenteral NSAID use (OR: 8.66, 95% CI: 6.12–20.19). NSAIDs should be prescribed with caution, especially for those in ESRD high-risk groups. PMID:26402800

  3. Renal erythropoietin-producing cells in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Souma, Tomokazu; Suzuki, Norio; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo) is an indispensable erythropoietic hormone primarily produced from renal Epo-producing cells (REPs). Epo production in REPs is tightly regulated in a hypoxia-inducible manner to maintain tissue oxygen homeostasis. Insufficient Epo production by REPs causes renal anemia and anemia associated with chronic disorders. Recent studies have broadened our understanding of REPs from prototypic hypoxia-responsive cells to dynamic fibrogenic cells. In chronic kidney disease, REPs are the major source of scar-forming myofibroblasts and actively produce fibrogenic molecules, including inflammatory cytokines. Notably, myofibroblast-transformed REPs (MF-REPs) recover their original physiological properties after resolution of the disease insults, suggesting that renal anemia and fibrosis could be reversible to some extent. Therefore, understanding the plasticity of REPs will lead to the development of novel targeted therapeutics for both renal fibrosis and anemia. This review summarizes the regulatory mechanisms how hypoxia-inducible Epo gene expression is attained in health and disease conditions. PMID:26089800

  4. Chemokines as Potential Markers in Pediatric Renal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Simões e Silva, Ana Cristina; Pereira, André Barreto; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Teixeira, Antônio Lúcio

    2014-01-01

    Glomerular diseases and obstructive uropathies are the two most frequent causes of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in children. Recently, biomarkers have become a focus of clinical research as potentially useful diagnostic tools in pediatric renal diseases. Among several putative biomarkers, chemokines emerge as promising molecules since they play relevant roles in the pathophysiology of pediatric renal diseases. The evaluation of these inflammatory mediators might help in the management of diverse renal diseases in children and the detection of patients at high risk to develop CKD. The aim of this paper is to revise general aspects of chemokines and the potential link between chemokines and the most common pediatric renal diseases by including experimental and clinical evidence. PMID:24692841

  5. NAFLD and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Marcuccilli, Morgan; Chonchol, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in developed countries and it is now considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Evidence linking NAFLD to the development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is emerging as a popular area of scientific interest. The rise in simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation as well as the significant cost associated with the presence of chronic kidney disease in the NAFLD population make this entity a worthwhile target for screening and therapeutic intervention. While several cross-sectional and case control studies have been published to substantiate these theories, very little data exists on the underlying cause of NAFLD and CKD. In this review, we will discuss the most recent publications on the diagnosis of NAFLD as well new evidence regarding the pathophysiology of NAFLD and CKD as an inflammatory disorder. These mechanisms include the role of obesity, the renin-angiotensin system, and dysregulation of fructose metabolism and lipogenesis in the development of both disorders. Further investigation of these pathways may lead to novel therapies that aim to target the NAFLD and CKD. However, more prospective studies that include information on both renal and liver histology will be necessary in order to understand the relationship between these diseases. PMID:27089331

  6. Oxidant Mechanisms in Renal Injury and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ratliff, Brian B.; Abdulmahdi, Wasan; Pawar, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Significance: A common link between all forms of acute and chronic kidney injuries, regardless of species, is enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) during injury/disease progression. While low levels of ROS and RNS are required for prosurvival signaling, cell proliferation and growth, and vasoreactivity regulation, an imbalance of ROS and RNS generation and elimination leads to inflammation, cell death, tissue damage, and disease/injury progression. Recent Advances: Many aspects of renal oxidative stress still require investigation, including clarification of the mechanisms which prompt ROS/RNS generation and subsequent renal damage. However, we currently have a basic understanding of the major features of oxidative stress pathology and its link to kidney injury/disease, which this review summarizes. Critical Issues: The review summarizes the critical sources of oxidative stress in the kidney during injury/disease, including generation of ROS and RNS from mitochondria, NADPH oxidase, and inducible nitric oxide synthase. The review next summarizes the renal antioxidant systems that protect against oxidative stress, including superoxide dismutase and catalase, the glutathione and thioredoxin systems, and others. Next, we describe how oxidative stress affects kidney function and promotes damage in every nephron segment, including the renal vessels, glomeruli, and tubules. Future Directions: Despite the limited success associated with the application of antioxidants for treatment of kidney injury/disease thus far, preventing the generation and accumulation of ROS and RNS provides an ideal target for potential therapeutic treatments. The review discusses the shortcomings of antioxidant treatments previously used and the potential promise of new ones. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 119–146. PMID:26906267

  7. Arterial disease in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Moody, William E; Edwards, Nicola C; Chue, Colin D; Ferro, Charles J; Townend, Jonathan N

    2013-03-01

    End stage renal disease is associated with a very high risk of premature cardiovascular death and morbidity. Early stage chronic kidney disease (CKD) is also associated with an increased frequency of cardiovascular events and is a common but poorly recognised and undertreated risk factor. Cardiovascular disease in CKD can be attributed to two distinct but overlapping pathological processes, namely atherosclerosis and arteriosclerosis. While the risk of athero-thrombotic events such as myocardial infarction is elevated, arteriosclerosis is the predominant pathophysiological process involving fibrosis and thickening of the medial arterial layer. This results in increased arterial stiffness causing left ventricular hypertrophy and fibrosis and the exposure of vulnerable vascular beds such as the brain and kidney to high pressure fluctuations causing small vessel disease. These pathophysiological features are manifest by a high risk of lethal arrhythmia, congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction and stroke. Recent work has highlighted the importance of aldosterone and disordered bone mineral metabolism. PMID:23118349

  8. Early diagnosis of renal disease and renal failure.

    PubMed

    Lees, George E

    2004-07-01

    The main goal of early diagnosis of renal disease and renal failure in dogs and cats is to enable timely application of therapeutic interventions that may slow or halt disease progression. Strategies for early diagnosis of renal disease use urine tests that detect proteinuria that is a manifestation of altered glomerular permselectivity or impaired urine-concentrating ability as well blood tests to evaluate plasma creatinine concentration. Animals with progressive renal disease should be carefully investigated and treated appropriately. Animals with mild, possibly nonprogressive, renal disease should be monitored adequately to detect any worsening trends,which should lead to further investigation and treatment even if the increments of change are small. PMID:15223206

  9. Decrease rate of the renal diameter in chronic hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, Teiichiro; Tachibana, Masaaki; Naganuma, Shinji

    2013-01-01

    We here present the results of ultrasonographic (US) evaluations on the alteration of renal diameter of chronic HD patients. Of 109 outpatient HD patients who had neither severe acquired cystic disease of the kidney nor hereditary polycystic kidney disease, we performed US two or three times to measure their maximum renal diameter (mean of both kidneys), and the yearly alteration rate was calculated. The average interval of the two measurements was 35.9 months, and the average HD duration from the HD induction to the first measurement was 29.5 months. The average decrease rate of renal diameter was 4.34 ± 0.4 (SE) mm/year. No statistical difference was seen on the decrease rate in relation to gender, age and original disease (among three groups, glomerulonephritis and IgA nephropathy, diabetes, and others including hypertension). However, the decrease rate was large when the first measurement was close to the induction of hemodialysis, suggesting that the alteration rate reduced according to the hemodialysis vintage (5.3 ± 0.8 mm/year, first measurement not more than 10 months after induction of HD and 1.5 ± 1.6 mm/year, first measurement more than 80 months after induction of HD). Renal diameter decreased approximately 4.3 mm each year, and the decrease rate slowed as the length of time on dialysis increased. PMID:24967236

  10. Chronic Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Lantos, Paul M

    2015-06-01

    Chronic Lyme disease is a poorly defined diagnosis that is usually given to patients with prolonged, unexplained symptoms or with alternative medical diagnoses. Data do not support the proposition that chronic, treatment-refractory infection with Borrelia burgdorferi is responsible for the many conditions that get labeled as chronic Lyme disease. Prolonged symptoms after successful treatment of Lyme disease are uncommon, but in rare cases may be severe. Prolonged courses of antibiotics neither prevent nor ameliorate these symptoms and are associated with considerable harm. PMID:25999227

  11. Oral piretanide in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, I S; Beattie, T J; Kennedy, A C; Dombey, S L

    1982-01-01

    1 The effects of high doses of piretanide, a new diuretic agent chemically related to frusemide and bumetanide were evaluated in twelve patients with severe chronic renal insufficiency (creatinine clearance below 25 ml/min). 2 Patients received either 30 mg or 60 mg piretanide orally after a water load of 11. Urine volume and the excretion of electrolytes, creatinine, urea and uric acid were measured over the subsequent 24 h. 3 Piretanide produced an effective diuresis and natriuresis in these patients, its action being broadly similar to those of bumetanide and frusemide observed in previous studies. PMID:7150461

  12. Chronic wasting disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an emerging prion disease of deer, elk, and moose in North America. This fatal neurodegenerative disease was first recognized 50 years ago and its distribution was limited to the Rocky Mountains for several decades. In the past few years, CWD has been found in the ea...

  13. Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    You have two kidneys, each about the size of your fist. Their main job is to filter wastes and excess water out of ... help control blood pressure, and make hormones. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) means that your kidneys are damaged ...

  14. Sleep and Chronic Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Sleep and Sleep Disorders Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... CDC.gov . Sleep About Us About Sleep Key Sleep Disorders Sleep and Chronic Disease How Much Sleep Do ...

  15. Chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto disease)

    MedlinePlus

    ... gland that often results in reduced thyroid function ( hypothyroidism ). Causes Chronic thyroiditis or Hashimoto disease is a ... TSH). This condition is also known as subclinical hypothyroidism. If there is no evidence of thyroid hormone ...

  16. Anemia of chronic disease

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia of inflammation; AOCD; ACD ... Anemia is a lower-than-normal number of red blood cells in the blood. Some conditions can lead to anemia of chronic disease include: Autoimmune disorders , such as ...

  17. The Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study: Design and Methods.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Harold I; Appel, Lawrence J; Chertow, Glenn M; Cifelli, Denise; Cizman, Borut; Daugirdas, John; Fink, Jeffrey C; Franklin-Becker, Eunice D; Go, Alan S; Hamm, L Lee; He, Jiang; Hostetter, Tom; Hsu, Chi-Yuan; Jamerson, Kenneth; Joffe, Marshall; Kusek, John W; Landis, J Richard; Lash, James P; Miller, Edgar R; Mohler, Emile R; Muntner, Paul; Ojo, Akinlolu O; Rahman, Mahboob; Townsend, Raymond R; Wright, Jackson T

    2003-07-01

    Insights into end-stage renal disease have emerged from many investigations but less is known about the epidemiology of chronic renal insufficiency (CRI) and its relationship to cardiovascular disease (CVD). The Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study was established to examine risk factors for progression of CRI and CVD among CRI patients and develop models to identify high-risk subgroups, informing future treatment trials, and increasing application of preventive therapies. CRIC will enroll approximately 3000 individuals at seven sites and follow participants for up to 5 yr. CRIC will include a racially and ethnically diverse group of adults aged 21 to 74 yr with a broad spectrum of renal disease severity, half of whom have diagnosed diabetes mellitus. CRIC will exclude subjects with polycystic kidney disease and those on active immunosuppression for glomerulonephritis. Subjects will undergo extensive clinical evaluation at baseline and at annual clinic visits and via telephone at 6 mo intervals. Data on quality of life, dietary assessment, physical activity, health behaviors, depression, cognitive function, health care resource utilization, as well as blood and urine specimens will be collected annually. (125)I-iothalamate clearances and CVD evaluations including a 12-lead surface electrocardiogram, an echocardiogram, and coronary electron beam or spiral CT will be performed serially. Analyses planned in CRIC will provide important information on potential risk factors for progressive CRI and CVD. Insights from CRIC should lead to the formulation of hypotheses regarding therapy that will serve as the basis for targeted interventional trials focused on reducing the burden of CRI and CVD. PMID:12819321

  18. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Hattab, Yousef; Alhassan, Sulaiman; Balaan, Marvin; Lega, Mark; Singh, Anil C

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic smoking-related lung disease associated with significant mortality and morbidity. It carries an enormous economic burden on the health care system. This results in a significant social impact on affected patients and their families. In this article, we review COPD in general, critical care management of patients presenting with acute exacerbation of COPD, and methods of prevention. PMID:26919673

  19. Effect of Advancing Age and Multiple Chronic Conditions on Mortality in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease after Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Placement

    PubMed Central

    Krishnaswami, Ashok; Kiley, Mary-Lou; Anthony, Faith F; Chen, Yuexin; Chen, Jason; Rajagopal, Sumanth; Liu, Taylor I; Young, Charlie; Paxton, Elizabeth W

    2016-01-01

    Context: There is insufficient information on the effect that advancing age and multiple chronic conditions (MCC) have on mortality after placement of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) vs non-ESRD. Objective: To assess whether a differential effect of age and MCC exists between ESRD and non-ESRD. Design: Population-based, retrospective cohort study using data from the national Kaiser Permanente Cardiac Device Registry of patients who underwent placement of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2013. Main Outcome Measures: All-cause mortality. Results: Of 7825 patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillator placement, ESRD-affected patients constituted 4.0% of the cohort (n = 311), were similar in age (p = 0.91), and presented with a larger comorbidity burden (3.3 ± 1.3 vs 2.4 ± 1.5, p < 0.001). The effect of advancing age (every 5 years) on mortality in the ESRD cohort (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.11, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.03–1.20) was less than in the non-ESRD cohort (HR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.25–1.32). Similarly, the effect of each additional comorbidity in the ESRD cohort was less (HR = 1.04, 95% CI = 0.91–1.19) than in the non-ESRD group (HR = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.16–1.25). Lastly, ESRD was independently associated with a 3-fold greater hazard of mortality. Conclusions: Advancing age and increasing number of MCC have a differential effect on mortality risk in patients with ESRD compared with their non-ESRD counterparts. Future studies should focus on assessment of nonlinear relationships of age, MCC, and naturally occurring clusters of MCC on mortality. PMID:26562307

  20. Adropin and irisin levels in relation to nutrition, body composition, and insulin resistance in patients with end-stage renal disease on chronic hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Kałużna, Małgorzata; Hoppe, Krzysztof; Schwermer, Krzysztof; Ibrahim, Aisha Y; Pawlaczyk, Krzysztof; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna

    2016-07-25

    INTRODUCTION    Newly discovered myokines, adropin, and irisin, are regulators of energy homeostasis and metabolism in humans. In end-stage renal disease (ESRD), the significance and role of irisin and adropin as metabolism regulators are still unclear. OBJECTIVES    The aim of this study was to evaluate serum adropin and irisin levels and establish their relation to insulin resistance, nutritional status, and hydration status in patients on chronic hemodialysis (HD) and on peritoneal dialysis (PD). PATIENTS AND METHODS    The study consisted of 71 subjects, including 48 patients (18 women, 30 men; median age, 56.5 years; range, 26-84 years) either on HD (n = 41) or PD (n = 7) and 36 healthy controls matched for age and sex. We measured the serum levels of adropin, irisin, creatinine, albumin, glucose, and insulin, as well as the plasma levels of lipids. The bioimpedance method was used to evaluate the body composition and overhydration in patients with ESRD. RESULTS    Irisin levels were significantly lower in patients with ESRD compared with controls, but there were no differences in adropin levels between both study groups. Adropin levels were inversely correlated with body mass, lean tissue mass, total, intracellular, and extracellular water, and albumin concentrations in patients with ESRD. Irisin levels were positively correlated with glucose levels and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance. No significant correlations were observed between adropin and irisin concentrations and overhydration. CONCLUSIONS    Adropin may be considered as a new marker of nutritional status in patients with ESRD. The significance and cause of low irisin levels characteristic for these patients are still unclear. Adropin and irisin should be further investigated as possible markers of cachexia and insulin resistance in patients with ESRD. PMID:27452672

  1. Preemptive Renal Transplantation-The Best Treatment Option for Terminal Chronic Renal Failure.

    PubMed

    Arze Aimaretti, L; Arze, S

    2016-03-01

    Renal transplantation is the best therapeutic option for end-stage chronic renal disease. Assuming that it is more advisable if performed early, we aimed to show the clinical, social, and economic advantages in 70% of our patients who were dialyzed only for a short period. For this purpose, we retrospectively collected data over 28 years in 142 kidney transplants performed in patients with <6 weeks on dialysis. 66% of our patients were 30-60 years old; 98% of the patients had living donors. At transplantation, 64% of our patients had no public support; however, 64% of them returned to work and got health insurance 2 months later. Full rehabilitation was achieved in all cases, including integration to the family, return to full-time work, school and university, sports, and reproduction. Immunosuppression consisted of 3 drugs, including steroids, cyclosporine, and azathioprine or mycophenolate. The cost in the 1st year, including patient and donor evaluation, surgery, immunosuppression, and follow-up, was $13,300 USD versus $22,320 for hemodialysis. We conclude that preemptive renal transplantation with <6 weeks on dialysis is the best therapeutic option for end-stage renal failure, especially in developing countries such as Bolivia, where until last year, full public support for renal replacement therapy was unavailable. PMID:27110013

  2. Chronic kidney disease: Statins in chronic kidney disease: time to move on?

    PubMed

    Haynes, Richard; Wanner, Christoph

    2015-05-01

    Statins reduce the risk of atherosclerotic vascular disease in healthy individuals and those with chronic kidney disease (CKD); however, clinical trials have suggested a minimal effect of statins on CKD progression. The PLANET trials compared the renal effects of rosuvastatin and atorvastatin, but the findings leave many questions unanswered. PMID:25802077

  3. Distribution of cardiovascular disease and retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes according to different classification systems for chronic kidney disease: a cross-sectional analysis of the renal insufficiency and cardiovascular events (RIACE) Italian multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The National Kidney Foundation’s Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (NKF’s KDOQI) staging system for chronic kidney disease (CKD) is based primarily on estimated GFR (eGFR). This study aimed at assessing whether reclassification of subjects with type 2 diabetes using two recent classifications based on both eGFR and albuminuria, the Alberta Kidney Disease Network (AKDN) and the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO), provides a better definition of burden from cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetic retinopathy (DR) than the NKF’s KDOQI classification. Methods This is a cross-sectional analysis of patients with type 2 diabetes (n = 15,773) from the Renal Insufficiency And Cardiovascular Events Italian Multicenter Study, consecutively visiting 19 Diabetes Clinics throughout Italy in years 2007-2008. Exclusion criteria were dialysis or renal transplantation. CKD was defined based on eGFR, as calculated from serum creatinine by the simplified Modification of Diet in Renal Disease Study equation, and albuminuria, as measured by immunonephelometry or immunoturbidimetry. DR was assessed by dilated fundoscopy. Prevalent CVD, total and by vascular bed, was assessed from medical history by recording previous documented major acute events. Results Though prevalence of complications increased with increasing CKD severity with all three classifications, it differed significantly between NKF’s KDOQI stages and AKDN or KDIGO risk categories. The AKDN and KDIGO systems resulted in appropriate reclassification of uncomplicated patients in the lowest risk categories and a more graded independent association with CVD and DR than the NKF’s KDOQI classification. However, CVD, but not DR prevalence was higher in the lowest risk categories of the new classifications than in the lowest stages of the NKF’s KDOQI, due to the inclusion of subjects with reduced eGFR without albuminuria. CVD prevalence differed also among eGFR and albuminuria

  4. Cyst infection in unilateral renal cystic disease and the role of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Takase, Yasukazu; Kodama, Koichi; Motoi, Isamu; Saito, Katsuhiko

    2012-11-01

    In multicystic renal diseases, cyst infection is a complex issue because of the absence of validated diagnostic methods. Unilateral renal cystic disease is a rare multicystic disease, believed to have an acquired maldevelopmental origin. Unilateral renal cystic disease is often confused with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease but has some distinguishing characteristics: unilateral localization, negative family history, and no progression to chronic renal failure. We describe a case of unilateral renal cystic disease with cyst infection that could be detected by diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, but not by conventional imaging techniques. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging can be useful for detecting infected cysts, especially in multicystic renal diseases. PMID:22990058

  5. Left ventricular function in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, B S; Milne, F J; Goldberg, B

    1976-01-01

    Left ventricular function was studied in 14 patients with end-stage chronic renal failure using non-invasive methods (echocardiography and systolic time intervals). Patients were divided into 3 groups. Group 1 consisted of 5 patients who were normotensive at the time of study and group 2 of 7 patients who were hypertensive when studied. Group 3 consisted of 2 patients: one was receiving propranolol and the other, studied 302 days after renal transplantation, was receiving digitalis for recurrent episodes of cardiac failure. All except the patient receiving propranolol had normal left ventricular function in systole with normal measurements of fractional fibre shortening (% delta S, EF) and normal measurements relating to the velocity of ventricular contraction (mean Vcf, mean velocity of posterior wall motion). Stroke volume and cardiac output were normal in some patients but were increased in patients with fluid overload. Early diastolic compliance of the left ventricle seemed to be normal except in the patient with recurrent cardiac failure. The study provided no evidence for the existence of a specific uraemic cardiomyopathy. PMID:1008967

  6. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Peter J; Burney, Peter G J; Silverman, Edwin K; Celli, Bartolome R; Vestbo, Jørgen; Wedzicha, Jadwiga A; Wouters, Emiel F M

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common disease with high global morbidity and mortality. COPD is characterized by poorly reversible airway obstruction, which is confirmed by spirometry, and includes obstruction of the small airways (chronic obstructive bronchiolitis) and emphysema, which lead to air trapping and shortness of breath in response to physical exertion. The most common risk factor for the development of COPD is cigarette smoking, but other environmental factors, such as exposure to indoor air pollutants - especially in developing countries - might influence COPD risk. Not all smokers develop COPD and the reasons for disease susceptibility in these individuals have not been fully elucidated. Although the mechanisms underlying COPD remain poorly understood, the disease is associated with chronic inflammation that is usually corticosteroid resistant. In addition, COPD involves accelerated ageing of the lungs and an abnormal repair mechanism that might be driven by oxidative stress. Acute exacerbations, which are mainly triggered by viral or bacterial infections, are important as they are linked to a poor prognosis. The mainstay of the management of stable disease is the use of inhaled long-acting bronchodilators, whereas corticosteroids are beneficial primarily in patients who have coexisting features of asthma, such as eosinophilic inflammation and more reversibility of airway obstruction. Apart from smoking cessation, no treatments reduce disease progression. More research is needed to better understand disease mechanisms and to develop new treatments that reduce disease activity and progression. PMID:27189863

  7. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a preventable and treatable disease that makes it difficult to empty air out of the lungs. This difficulty in ...

  8. Renal Response to Chronic Centrifugation in Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, Rudy M.; Wang, T. J.; Corbin, B. J.; Wade, C. E.; Hargens, Alan R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Previously reported effects of chronic centrifugation on renal function in mammals are contradictory. The present study was conducted as an effort to provide a comprehensive analysis of renal response to chronic centrifugation (12 days at +2 Gz). Sixteen male Sprague-Dawley rats (210-230 g) were used: eight centrifuged (EC) and eight off centrifuge controls (OCC). During centrifugation EC had lower body weight and food consumption. EC showed a decrease (72%) in water intake for the first two days (T1 and T2) followed by significant increases from T4-T6. EC urine output increased two-fold over the first four days, returning to baseline by T9. EC urea excretion was elevated on T3 through T5. Creatinine, Na(+), K(+), and osmolar excretion were lower than OCC over the last four days of the study. Assuming constant plasma osmolarity and creatinine levels, EC free water clearance (C(sub H2O)) was elevated significantly on T4 when the peak urine output was exhibited. EC also had a greater C(sub H2O) over the last four days, associated with a significantly lower osmolar clearance and GFR. The initial diuresis exhibited during centrifugation can be attributed to a reduced water resorption and increased urea excretion. This diuresis was mediated independent of changes in GFR over the first eight days. However, differences in excretion seen after eight days of centrifugation are probably GFR mediated which would imply animals established a new homeostatic setpoint by that time. Centrifugation elicites an acute alteration in fluid homeostasis followed by adaptation within a week.

  9. High-resolution three-dimensional digital imaging of the human renal microcirculation: An aid to evaluating microvascular alterations in chronic kidney disease in humans.

    PubMed

    Uesugi, Noriko; Shimazu, Yoshihito; Aoba, Takaaki; Kikuchi, Kazunori; Nagata, Michio

    2015-11-01

    We have developed a new virtual microscopy method, with two- and three-dimensional (2D, 3D) synchronization, that enables visualization of the human renal microvasculature. The method was used to evaluate 120-150 serially cut sections of paraffin-embedded human renal tissue from nephrectomized samples. Virtual microscopy images of sections double-immunostained with antibodies against CD34 (an endothelium marker) and smooth muscle actin (an arterial media marker) and stained with periodic acid-Schiff were processed using digital imaging analysis software. Image registration was conducted to generate 3D displays with red-green-blue color segmentation. The reconstructed images of the microvasculature, including the interlobular arteries and the glomeruli, allowed visualization of 3D structures and direct glomerular connections. Synchronizing these 3D images with the corresponding 2D images revealed the relationships between arteriosclerotic lesions and downstream glomeruli. Thus, interlobular arteries with moderate intimal thickening and afferent arterioles with segmental hyalinosis/sclerosis, as seen on the 2D images, exhibited wall irregularities on the corresponding 3D images. However, these lesions were not directly influenced by lesions in downstream glomeruli, such as sclerotic lesions. Our virtual-slide method based on 2D and 3D image synchronization provides a comprehensive view of the renal microcirculation and therefore novel insights into the pathogenesis of vascular-associated renal diseases. PMID:26289029

  10. Renal

    MedlinePlus

    ... term "renal" refers to the kidney. For example, renal failure means kidney failure. Related topics: Kidney disease Kidney disease - diet Kidney failure Kidney function tests Renal scan Kidney transplant

  11. Multiple facets of HIV-associated renal disease

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, D.R.; Gluz, I.C.; Kurz, J.; Thomé, G.G.; Zancan, R.; Bringhenti, R.N.; Schaefer, P.G.; dos Santos, M.; Barros, E.J.G.; Veronese, F.V.

    2016-01-01

    HIV infection has a broad spectrum of renal manifestations. This study examined the clinical and histological manifestations of HIV-associated renal disease, and predictors of renal outcomes. Sixty-one (64% male, mean age 45 years) HIV patients were retrospectively evaluated. Clinical presentation and renal histopathology were assessed, as well as CD4 T-cell count and viral load. The predictive value of histological lesion, baseline CD4 cell count and viral load for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) or death were determined using the Cox regression model. The outcomes of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and ESRD or death were evaluated by baseline CD4 cell count. The percent distribution at initial clinical presentation was non-nephrotic proteinuria (54%), acute kidney injury (28%), nephrotic syndrome (23%), and chronic kidney disease (22%). Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (28%), mainly the collapsing form (HIVAN), acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) (26%), and immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis (ICGN) (25%) were the predominant renal histology. Baseline CD4 cell count ≥200 cells/mm3 was a protective factor against CKD (hazard ratio=0.997; 95%CI=0.994-0.999; P=0.012). At last follow-up, 64% of patients with baseline CD4 ≥200 cells/mm3 had eGFR >60 mL·min-1·(1.73 m2)-1 compared to the other 35% of patients who presented with CD4 <200 cells/mm3 (log rank=9.043, P=0.003). In conclusion, the main histological lesion of HIV-associated renal disease was HIVAN, followed by AIN and ICGN. These findings reinforce the need to biopsy HIV patients with kidney impairment and/or proteinuria. Baseline CD4 cell count ≥200 cells/mm3 was associated with better renal function after 2 years of follow-up. PMID:27007656

  12. Obesity, hypertension, and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Michael E; do Carmo, Jussara M; da Silva, Alexandre A; Juncos, Luis A; Wang, Zhen; Hall, John E

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for essential hypertension, diabetes, and other comorbid conditions that contribute to development of chronic kidney disease. Obesity raises blood pressure by increasing renal tubular sodium reabsorption, impairing pressure natriuresis, and causing volume expansion via activation of the sympathetic nervous system and renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system and by physical compression of the kidneys, especially when there is increased visceral adiposity. Other factors such as inflammation, oxidative stress, and lipotoxicity may also contribute to obesity-mediated hypertension and renal dysfunction. Initially, obesity causes renal vasodilation and glomerular hyperfiltration, which act as compensatory mechanisms to maintain sodium balance despite increased tubular reabsorption. However, these compensations, along with increased arterial pressure and metabolic abnormalities, may ultimately lead to glomerular injury and initiate a slowly developing vicious cycle that exacerbates hypertension and worsens renal injury. Body weight reduction, via caloric restriction and increased physical activity, is an important first step for management of obesity, hypertension, and chronic kidney disease. However, this strategy may not be effective in producing long-term weight loss or in preventing cardiorenal and metabolic consequences in many obese patients. The majority of obese patients require medical therapy for obesity-associated hypertension, metabolic disorders, and renal disease, and morbidly obese patients may require surgical interventions to produce sustained weight loss. PMID:24600241

  13. Autoantibodies against oxidized LDL in chronic renal failure: role of renal function, diet, and lipids.

    PubMed

    Bergesio, F; Monzani, G; Ciuti, R; Cirami, C; Martinelli, F; Salvadori, M; Tosi, P L

    2001-02-01

    Lipid peroxidation (LP) has recently been suggested to trigger the atherosclerotic process as well as to worsen the progression of renal disease. Autoantibodies against oxidized low-density lipoproteins (Ox-LDLAb) were considered to provide a sensitive marker to detect LDL oxidation in vivo. To date few studies have been reported on Ox-LDLAb levels in patients with different degrees of renal failure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influences of renal function, dietary manipulation, and lipids on Ox-LDLAb concentrations in uremic patients either on conservative or replacement therapy. Seventy-one patients (42 males, 29 females) aged 60 +/- 19 years with chronic renal failure (CRF) of different etiology and degree were divided into four groups according to serum creatinine levels [sCr(mg/dl)] and diet: CRF I > or = 1.5-3.0, CRF II > 3.0-5.5, and CRF III > 5.5 were all patients on a conventional low-protein diet, while a fourth group included patients on a vegetarian diet supplemented with keto analogues and amino acids (CRF SD >3.0). A further group was represented by patients on dialysis therapy. All patients were examined for Ox-LDLAb, triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol, HDL and LDL cholesterol, and apolipoproteins Apo A1, Apo B, and Lp(a). The results were compared with those of 20 controls (9 males and 11 females) aged 52 +/- 11 years with sCr <1.5 mg/dl. Ox-LDLAb increased, although not significantly, with TG and Lp(a) from the early stages of CRF along with the deterioration of renal function. However, TG and Lp(a) levels were significantly higher in all groups of patients except those on vegetarian diet (CRF SD). This group also showed the lowest Ox-LDLAb levels. No relationship was observed between lipids or apolipoproteins and Ox-LDLAb. Hyperlipidemic patients did not show higher Ox-LDLAb levels than normolipidemics. Our results show a progressive increase of LP as the renal function declines, which may account for the increased risk of

  14. Spectrum of Renal and Urinary Tract Diseases in Kashmiri Children

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Virender; Bano, Rifat Ara; Wani, Khursheed Ahmed; Ahmed, Javed; Ahmed, Kaisar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Definite paucity of data pertaining to spectrum of renal and urinary tract diseases in our state and in various parts of India forms the basis of this study. Available data has emphasized more on specific clinical syndromes and chronic renal diseases rather than over all spectrums of renal and urinary tract diseases, that too in adult population. Aim The present study a retrospective analysis, forms one of the basic data of paediatric nephrology and urology related disorders in our state. Materials and Methods Retrospective analysis of the case records of all the hospitalized patients with renal and urinary tract diseases between 2012 and 2013 were performed. Case records were analysed and categorized into various groups like; Urinary Tract Infections (UTI), Acute Kidney Injury (AKI), Acute Glomerulonephritis (AGN), Nephrotic Syndrome (NS), haematuria, Polycystic Kidney Disease (PCKD), Posterior Urethral Valve (PUV), Vesicoureteric Reflux (VUR), Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD), Congenital Anomalies of Kidney and Urinary Iract (CAKUT) and others. These groups were divided into subgroups to get more insight about the pattern of these diseases. Results Out of 28114 patients hospitalized between 2012 and 2013 years, 447 (232 males and 215 females) patients were diagnosed of renal and urinary tract diseases which forms 1.58% the total admitted patients. Among these patients 32.9% (147/447) were diagnosed Acute Kidney Injury (AKI); 24.1% (108/447): Urinary Tract Infection (UTI); 9.6% (43/447): Acute Glomerulonephritis (AGN); 5.6% (25/447): bilateral hydronephrosis with UTI; 4.47% (20/447): nephrotic syndrome (NS); 3.5% (16/447): haematuria; and 4% (18/447) were having CAKUT (Congenital Anomalies Of Kidney And Urinary Tract). In addition to this there were 17 cases of Renal Tubular Acidosis (RTA), 3 cases of Barter syndrome and one case of Liddle syndrome. Conclusion A substantial number of children are hospitalized with renal and urinary tract diseases with

  15. Chemerin in renal dysfunction and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Bonomini, Mario; Pandolfi, Assunta

    2016-02-01

    The potential involvement of chemerin in cardiovascular and renal dysfunction has recently been acknowledged. There are indeed many links between this protein and inflammation, atherosclerosis, and multiple obesity- and diabetes-related parameters such as body mass index, insulin resistance, and blood levels of insulin, cholesterol, triglycerides, and glucose. In addition, in the last few years, several reports have investigated the circulating chemerin levels and their pathophysiologic significance in chronic kidney disease populations. However, there are still gaps in our understanding of this matter, in particular as to whether elevated chemerin might be the cause behind, or simply mirror, a reduced renal function. The limitations of the present knowledge on chemerin may partly relate to the lack of specific antibodies for assessing the different active isoforms of the protein. Measuring its bioactive serum concentration, and achieving a precise overall pattern of the tissue-specific formation of different isoforms, with the use of suitable technology, will ultimately help define the role of chemerin in disease pathophysiology, or as a diagnostic or therapeutic marker. PMID:26545628

  16. Down syndrome with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Kute, Vivek B; Vanikar, Aruna V; Shah, Pankaj R; Gumber, Manoj R; Patel, Himanshu V; Engineer, Divyesh P; Thakkar, Umang G; Trivedi, Hargovind L

    2013-10-01

    Down syndrome is one of the most common genetic causes of learning disabilities in children. Although the incidence of renal and urological involvement in Down syndrome is not very common, monitoring of patients with Down syndrome for renal diseases should be done regularly as patient's age into the second and third decades. With increased survival, it appears that a growing number of these patients present with chronic renal failure. Down syndrome patients are apparently not suited for peritoneal dialysis because of lacking cooperation. This procedure can be prone to failure, mainly because of an increased risk of peritonitis. Handling such patients especially those on peritoneal dialysis is challenging. Here we report a case of Down syndrome with end-stage renal disease treated with hemodialysis for 6 months. To the best of our knowledge and current literature review this is the first case report of a patient with Down syndrome undergoing hemodialysis. PMID:24426250

  17. Psychiatric aspects of chronic disease in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Magen, J

    1990-06-01

    In adolescents with chronic illnesses, the rate of behavioral disorders is 10% to 20% higher than that in their well peers. Rheumatoid arthritis, chronic renal disease, cystic fibrosis, cancer, and many other chronic illnesses constitute risk factors for behavioral disorders in adolescents. Because they are now living longer, more productive lives, adolescents with chronic illnesses are more often seen by their primary care physicians with behavioral disorders that can interfere with disease control. Risk-taking behaviors, difficulties with parents, noncompliance, depression, and isolation may all be manifestations of behavioral disorders. Parents and siblings may also be at risk for disorder. Particular constellations of family and individual characteristics may be associated with behavior disorder. So that these behaviors may be discovered as early as possible, it is important that the primary care physician conceptualize chronically ill adolescents and their families as "at risk." PMID:2190958

  18. Acetylcholinesterase activity in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Prall, Y G; Gambhir, K K; Cruz, I A; Blassingale, J; Ampy, F R

    2000-01-21

    Twenty healthy subjects and 39 Chronic Renal Failure patients (CRF-patients) maintained on chronic hemodialysis were used in this investigation to study the changes in acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity of red blood cells (RBCs). The CRF-patients were all undergoing hemodialysis treatment. AChE activity from the CRF-patients was determined before and after dialysis. An additional objective was to study the effect of chronic renal failure on human red blood cell aging. Blood samples were drawn from controls and CRF-patients in tubes containing EDTA or sodium heparin as an anticoagulant. Red blood cells were purified to avoid interference with monocytes, reticulocytes and leukocytes. The purified RBCs were subfractionated into young (y) (1.08-1.09), mid (m) (1.09-1.11) and old (o) (1.11-1.12) percoll density (g/mL) fractions using a discontinous percoll gradient. The mean +/- SD AChE per gram hemoglobin (U/g Hgb) activities in whole blood (WB), purified human red blood cells (PRBCs), young human red blood cells (y-RBCs), mid age human red blood cells (m-RBCs) and old human red blood cells (o-RBCs) in CRF-patients were 31.2+/-3.43, 29.3+/-3.26, 30.4+/-3.91, 25.1+/-5.25, 17.1+/-6.02 in females and 29.8+/-5.39, 28.8+/-5.29, 28.7+/-5.29, 23.7+/-5.39 and 16.0+/-5.60 in males. AChE activity from CRF-patients were higher than that found in the control subjects. The aging of human RBCs in both the controls and CRF-patients showed a progressive reduction in AChE activity. AChE activity of RBCs from female CRF-patients were significantly higher (p < 0.05) than that of the female control subjects. The RBCs isolated from male CRF-patients showed a higher AChE activity than control males, but a significant difference was only observed with the mid-age-cells. These studies further indicate that AChE activity remained insignificantly different in the various density based age subfractions of RBCs of both CRF-patients and controls. PMID:10698358

  19. Developing a provisional and national renal disease registry for Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ajami, Sima; Askarianzadeh, Mahdi; Mortazavi, Mojgan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Disease registry is a database that includes information about people suffering a special kind of disease. The aim of this study was to first identify and compare the National Renal Disease Registry (NRDR) characteristics in some countries with Iran; and second, develop a provisional and NRDR for Iran. Materials and Methods: Retrieval of data of the NRDR was performed by scholars responsible in related agencies, including the Ministry of Health and Medical Education, Renal Disease charity, and data registries in the United States, United Kingdom, Malaysia, and Iran. This research was applied, and the study was descriptive-comparative. The study population consisted of the NRDR in selected countries in which data were collected by forms that were designed according to the study objectives. Sources of data were researchers, articles, books, journals, databases, websites, related documents, and people who are active in this regard, and related agencies, including the Ministry of Health and Medical Education, and patient support charity. The researchers collected data for each country based on the study objectives and then put them in comparative tables. Data were analyzed by descriptive, comparative, and theoretical methods. Results: Most of the renal transplant teams report their own results as a single center experiences. America and Britain have a preeminent national registry of renal disease compared to other countries. Conclusion: Given that control, prevention, and treatment of chronic renal diseases incur high expenses and the disease is one of leading mortality factors in Iran and across the world and since national registry system for chronic renal diseases can provide better tools and strategies to manage and evaluate patients’ characteristics as well as risk factors which eventually leads to making better decisions. PMID:26109970

  20. Chronic Wasting Disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richards, Bryan

    2007-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an always-fatal, neurological illness occurring in North American cervids (members of the deer family), including white-tailed deer, mule deer, elk and moose. Since its discovery in 1967, CWD has spread geographically and increased in prevalence locally. CWD is contagious; it can be transmitted freely within and among free-ranging populations. It is likely that diseased animals can transmit CWD to healthy animals long before they become clinically ill. Managing CWD in free-ranging populations is extremely difficult, therefore preventative measures designed to reduce the chance for disease spread are critically important.

  1. Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... our online catalog. Alternate Language URL Español Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines: What You Need to Know Page ... you need to know Because you have chronic kidney disease, you should take steps to protect your kidneys. ...

  2. Renal complications in chronic lymphocytic leukemia and monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis: the Mayo Clinic experience

    PubMed Central

    Strati, Paolo; Nasr, Samih H.; Leung, Nelson; Hanson, Curtis A.; Chaffee, Kari G.; Schwager, Susan M.; Achenbach, Sara J.; Call, Timothy G.; Parikh, Sameer A.; Ding, Wei; Kay, Neil E.; Shanafelt, Tait D.

    2015-01-01

    While the renal complications of plasma cell dyscrasia have been well-described, most information in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis is derived from case reports. This is a retrospective analysis of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia or monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis who underwent kidney biopsy for renal insufficiency and/or nephrotic syndrome. Between January 1995 and June 2014, 49 of 4,024 (1.2%) patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (n=44) or monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (n=5) had a renal biopsy: 34 (69%) for renal insufficiency and 15 (31%) for nephrotic syndrome. The most common findings on biopsy were: membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (n=10, 20%), chronic lymphocytic leukemia interstitial infiltration as primary etiology (n=6, 12%), thrombotic microangiopathy (n=6, 12%), and minimal change disease (n=5, 10%). All five membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis patients treated with rituximab, cyclophosphamide and prednisone-based regimens had recovery of renal function compared to 0/3 patients treated with rituximab with or without steroids. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia infiltration as the primary cause of renal abnormalities was typically observed in relapsed/refractory patients (4/6). Thrombotic microangiopathy primarily occurred as a treatment-related toxicity of pentostatin (4/6 cases), and resolved with drug discontinuation. All cases of minimal change disease resolved with immunosuppressive agents only. Renal biopsy plays an important role in the management of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia or monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis who develop renal failure and/or nephrotic syndrome. PMID:26088927

  3. Renal complications in chronic lymphocytic leukemia and monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis: the Mayo Clinic experience.

    PubMed

    Strati, Paolo; Nasr, Samih H; Leung, Nelson; Hanson, Curtis A; Chaffee, Kari G; Schwager, Susan M; Achenbach, Sara J; Call, Timothy G; Parikh, Sameer A; Ding, Wei; Kay, Neil E; Shanafelt, Tait D

    2015-09-01

    While the renal complications of plasma cell dyscrasia have been well-described, most information in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis is derived from case reports. This is a retrospective analysis of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia or monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis who underwent kidney biopsy for renal insufficiency and/or nephrotic syndrome. Between January 1995 and June 2014, 49 of 4,024 (1.2%) patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (n=44) or monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (n=5) had a renal biopsy: 34 (69%) for renal insufficiency and 15 (31%) for nephrotic syndrome. The most common findings on biopsy were: membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (n=10, 20%), chronic lymphocytic leukemia interstitial infiltration as primary etiology (n=6, 12%), thrombotic microangiopathy (n=6, 12%), and minimal change disease (n=5, 10%). All five membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis patients treated with rituximab, cyclophosphamide and prednisone-based regimens had recovery of renal function compared to 0/3 patients treated with rituximab with or without steroids. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia infiltration as the primary cause of renal abnormalities was typically observed in relapsed/refractory patients (4/6). Thrombotic microangiopathy primarily occurred as a treatment-related toxicity of pentostatin (4/6 cases), and resolved with drug discontinuation. All cases of minimal change disease resolved with immunosuppressive agents only. Renal biopsy plays an important role in the management of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia or monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis who develop renal failure and/or nephrotic syndrome. PMID:26088927

  4. Chronic renal failure in a patient with bilateral ureterocele

    PubMed Central

    Dada, Samuel A.; Rafiu, Mojeed O.; Olanrewaju, Timothy O.

    2015-01-01

    Ureterocele is a congenital anomaly, in which there is mal-development of the caudal segments of the ureter. There is a female preponderance with most cases seen in Caucasians. Among the reported complications of this condition, chronic renal failure occurring in the setting of ureterocele has not been well documented. We report a case of a young girl with bilateral ureterocele presenting with chronic renal failure, whose management presented a diagnostic failure and inadequate treatment. PMID:26108593

  5. [Chronic renal insufficiency. A permanent public health problem].

    PubMed

    Legrain, M; Jacobs, C

    1999-01-01

    Chronic renal insufficiency raises an ever-increasing public-health problem due to its permanent growth among the general population and the escalating cost of renal replacement therapies. By the end of 1995 there were close to 33,700 patients with end-stage renal failure maintained alive with renal replacement methods in France. About 11,200 had a functioning kidney graft, whereas 22,500 were treated with various dialysis techniques, in and out-of-center hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis. An optimal health policy should contribute both to prevent renal insufficiency and offer each patient his/her best specific mode of treatment at the lowest cost for the community. Renal transplantation should be much more widely promoted and utilized through measures aiming at reducing the too high refusal rates of organ donation in subjects with brain-death. Promotion and extension of out-of-center dialysis techniques are also necessary. Design of reliable epidemiological studies dealing not only with end-stage renal failure patients but with the early stage and time-course of renal insufficiency is also mandatory. A deeper investigation in the area of renal-risk factors and a qualified follow-up of patients with mild/moderate renal insufficiency are essential to avoid or delay an evolution towards end-stage renal failure. Prevention of renal fibrosis has a central role in such a long-term public health-policy. PMID:10371761

  6. Tuberculosis-associated chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Jobson Lopes; da Silva Junior, Geraldo Bezerra; Daher, Elizabeth De Francesco

    2011-06-01

    Extrapulmonary tuberculosis (TB) account for approximately 15-20% of TB cases in immunocompetent patients. The genitourinary system is the third most commonly affected site. We report the case of a 20-year-old man admitted with fever, chills, dry cough, right flank pain, and oliguria who developed renal function loss. The pyelogram evidenced silence of the right kidney, and the abdominal and pelvic magnetic resonance showed significant dilation of the right pyelocaliceal system and proximal ureter. Biopsies of renal cortex and retroperitoneal lymph nodes showed caseous granuloma consistent with TB. Treatment was started with rifampicin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol, and the patient presented a favorable outcome but with non-dialytic chronic kidney disease. This case illustrates a case of chronic kidney disease secondary to TB in a young, otherwise healthy man. PMID:21633015

  7. Purinergic signaling in inflammatory renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Arulkumaran, Nishkantha; Turner, Clare M.; Sixma, Marije L.; Singer, Mervyn; Unwin, Robert; Tam, Frederick W. K.

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular purines have a role in renal physiology and adaption to inflammation. However, inflammatory renal disease may be mediated by extracellular purines, resulting in renal injury. The role of purinergic signaling is dependent on the concentrations of extracellular purines. Low basal levels of purines are important in normal homeostasis and growth. Concentrations of extracellular purines are significantly elevated during inflammation and mediate either an adaptive role or propagate local inflammation. Adenosine signaling mediates alterations in regional renal blood flow by regulation of the renal microcirculation, tubulo-glomerular feedback, and tubular transport of sodium and water. Increased extracellular ATP and renal P2 receptor-mediated inflammation are associated with various renal diseases, including hypertension, diabetic nephropathy, and glomerulonephritis. Experimental data suggests P2 receptor deficiency or receptor antagonism is associated with amelioration of antibody-mediated nephritis, suggesting a pathogenic (rather than adaptive) role of purinergic signaling. We discuss the role of extracellular nucleotides in adaptation to ischemic renal injury and in the pathogenesis of inflammatory renal disease. PMID:23908631

  8. [Ultrasonographic study on kidneys in patients with chronic renal failure. Part I. Ultrasonic measurement of renal size and analysis of renal ultrasonotomograms].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, S; Fujii, H; Kaneko, S; Yachiku, S; Anzai, T; Inada, F; Kobayashi, T; Furuta, K; Ishida, H

    1990-08-01

    Ultrasonograms of 546 kidneys were obtained in 280 patients undergoing chronic dialysis. Dialysed kidneys could be detected in 529 of the 546 kidneys (96.9%) by ultrasonic examination. The ultrasonic diagnoses on dialysed kidneys were contracted kidney in 313 kidneys (59.2%) and acquired cystic disease of the kidney in 107 kidneys (20.2%). Ultrasonic measurement of the size of kidney (length and thickness) revealed that the kidneys in patients with chronic renal failure were much smaller than normal ones. But the kidneys in patients undergoing dialysis for more than 8 years gradually increased in size with incidence of acquired renal cysts. The kidneys in patients with diabetic nephropathy were greater in length and thickness than those with chronic glomerulonephritis. Sonographic features of dialysed kidneys were unclear renal imaging, unidentified central echoes, cortico-medulla + border and increased parenchymal echogenicity. Irregularity of the renal contour had a tendency to increase in number with incidence of cysts in long-term dialysis patients. The ultrasonograms of the kidneys with diabetic nephropathy showed fewer changes than normal ones. No major complication of the kidney was detected in the present study. However, two retroperitoneal hematomas and one renal cell carcinoma developed within two years after this examination. We believe that regular screening of the kidneys by ultrasonic examination is mandatory in patients on chronic dialysis for early diagnosis and treatment of these complications. PMID:2232408

  9. Intermittent Hemodialysis in Terminal Chronic Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, L. E.; Mandin, H.; Davidman, M.; Ulan, R.; Lakey, W. H.

    1966-01-01

    Seven patients with chronic renal failure underwent intermittent hemodialysis for five to 37 months (111 patient-months on a twice-weekly basis) employing arteriovenous Teflon-Silastic cannulas and the modified two-layer Kiil hemodialyzer. A single-pass 37° C. dialysate system has been used. One patient died of an indirectly related cause. All other patients have been successfully rehabilitated and now carry on normal activity of moderate sedentary type. Complications included recurring infection and clotting of arteriovenous cannulas. Hypertension and anemia were common complications requiring careful control. Peripheral neuropathy was noted in five of the seven patients but was of clinical significance in only one patient. Metastatic calcification, osteoporosis and urolithiasis also occurred in this patient. Peptic ulcers with hemorrhage developed in two patients. The degree of rehabilitation and psychological adjustment achieved by this group of patients strongly indicates the need for expansion of dialysis facilities and further research into the medical and economic aspects of dialysis. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:5903169

  10. [Pathomechanism of hyperlipoproteinemia in chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, Bolesław; Łososowska, Renata; Król, Ewa; Kisielnicka, Ewa; Zdrojewski, Zbigniew; Szołkiewicz, Marek; Niewegłowski, Tomasz; Chmielewski, Michał; Sucajtys, Elzbieta; Swierczyński, Julian; Korczyńska, Justyna; Stelmańska, Ewa; Goyke, Elzbieta; Bogusławski, Wojciech

    2003-10-01

    Lipid disorders are one of the known metabolic changes associated with chronic renal failure (CRF) [1, 2]. They are present as: hypertriglyceridemia--existed in 60% of CRF patients and hypercholesterolemia observed in 20-30% of people with this syndrome. These disorders, what was shown also in our own studies, are existing in different intensity in patients treated with maintenance haemodialysis [3], peritoneal dialysis [4] and after renal transplantation as well [5]. Mechanism of hypertriglyceridemia, despite over thirty years of studies, is still not finally elucidated. The opinion that it is a result of impaired triglyceride removal (due to decreased activities of both lipoprotein and hepatic lipases) is well documented, however the role of lipogenesis in its development is obscure [6, 7]. The reports concerning this problem contain contradictory data. In our studies performed several years ago we have shown that lipogenesis rate in white adipose tissue of uremic rats is significantly augmented [8, 9, 10] due to activation of free fatty acid synthase. Therefore, recently we paid once again our attention on the activity of this lipogenesis rate limiting enzyme responsible for the long term regulation. We measured its activity, protein abundance and mRNA level in liver and epididymal white adipose tissue of rats with surgically induced renal failure (two-stage subtotal nephrectomy). The results support the thesis that lipogenesis takes a part in a hypertriglyceridemia found in renal failure. There have been observed a significant increase in plasma triglyceride and VLDL concentrations in uremic animals and it was associated with the increase of FAS activity, FAS protein abundance and FAS mRNA. The results were similar in both studied tissues. Moreover, there have been also observed the increased activities of malic enzyme, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase. All these enzymes participate in NADPH production, which is a necessary

  11. Early origin of adult renal disease.

    PubMed

    Maringhini, Silvio; Corrado, Ciro; Maringhini, Guido; Cusumano, Rosa; Azzolina, Vitalba; Leone, Francesco

    2010-10-01

    Observational studies in humans and experimental studies in animals have clearly shown that renal failure may start early in life. 'Fetal programming' is regulated by adaptations occurring in uterus including maternal nutrition, placental blood supply, and epigenetic changes. Low birth weight predisposes to hypertension and renal insufficiency. Congenital abnormalities of the kidney and urinary tract, adverse postnatal events, wrong nutritional habits may produce renal damage that will become clinically relevant in adulthood. Prevention should start early in children at risk of renal disease. PMID:20822331

  12. [Chronic renal failure in sickle cell disease: A retrospective analysis of 100 adults sickle cell patients from black Africa].

    PubMed

    Ackoundou-N'Guessan, Clément; Guei, Cyr Monley; Lagou, Delphine Amélie; Gbekedi, Serges; Tia, Mélanie Weu; Coulibaly, Pessa Albert; Nzoue, Sita; Konan, Serges; Koffi, Gustave; Gnionsahe, Daze Apollinaire

    2016-06-01

    The prevalence of chronic renal failure (CRF) in sickle cell disease (SCD) patients could vary from one country to another depending on the modalities of management. The aim of the present study was to appreciate the epidemiology of CRF in SCD patients from black Africa in order to search for promoting factors. One hundred SCD adult patients have been considered for the study. The glomerular filtration rate (GFR) has been estimated according to the CKD-EPI formula. Three groups of patients have been identified according to the value of their GFR. The mean age of the patients was 30.84±8.26 years. Male gender has represented 51% of the study population. The mean GFR value was 175.4±86.2 mL/min/1.73 m(2). The prevalence of CRF was 11%. About 3% of them had severe CRF. Subjects with normal GFR were 20%. Subjects with glomerular hyperfiltration (HF) were 69%. By univariate analysis, when subjects with HF were compared with those presenting normal GFR, the following factors have appeared to be significantly associated: female gender (female 60.9% versus male 39.1%; P<0.01), weight <60 kg (weight <60 kg; 53.67±9.45 kg versus weight >60 kg; 59.9±9.41 kg; P<0.008), age <30 years (younger age 29.36±7.9 years versus older age 35.14±8.02 years; P<0.001), lower hemoglobin value (9.38±2,3 g/dL versus 10.33±2.61 g/dL; P<0.04). By logistic regression analysis, age <30 years (age >30 years; OR=0.12 [CI95% 0.03-04]; P<0.001), female gender (male gender; OR=0.17 [0.04-0.64]; P<0.01), weight <60 kg (weight >60 kg; OR=0.19 [CI95% 0.05-0.72]; P<0.01) were associated with HF. By univariate analysis, when subjects with CRF were compared with those presenting normal GFR, a lower hemoglobin value was significantly associated with CRF (7.92±2.7 g/dL versus 10.43±2.5 g/dL; P<0.009). There was a trend for subjects not being under maintenance therapy to more experience CRF (36.4% versus 70%; P<0.07). By logistic regression analysis, only a low hemoglobin value was

  13. Renal failure in a calf secondary to chronic enteritis.

    PubMed

    Mechor, G D; Cebra, C; Blue, J

    1993-10-01

    This clinical report describes a case of renal failure in a Holstein calf. It is suggested that the renal failure was hemodynamically-mediated. The combination of a chronic enteritis and failure to ingest adequate fluids produced the hyponatremia, hypochloremia, and metabolic acidosis. The elevated BUN, creatinine, FENa, and isosthenuria confirmed the diagnosis of renal failure. Continued testing of the heifer demonstrated persistence of the renal failure even though the heifer appeared normal on clinical examination. Monitoring the growth rate of the heifer calf demonstrated a severe reduction when compared to age-matched herdmates. PMID:8306655

  14. Cystic Renal Disease in the Domestic Ferret

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Courtnye N; Rogers, Arlin B; Maurer, Kirk J; Lofgren, Jennifer LS; Fox, James G; Marini, Robert P

    2008-01-01

    Cystic renal diseases in domestic ferrets are a common anecdotal finding but have received scant systematic assessment. We performed a 17-y, case-control retrospective analysis of the medical records of 97 ferrets housed at our institution between 1987 and 2004, to determine the prevalence and morphotypes of cystic renal diseases in this species. Histologic sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin, Masson trichrome, or periodic acid–Schiff were evaluated by a comparative pathologist, and statistical analysis of hematologic and serum chemistry values was correlated with morphologic diagnosis. Of the 97 available records, 43 were eliminated due to lack of accompanying tissues. Of the 54 remaining cases, 37 (69% prevalence) had documented renal cysts, and 14 of the 54 ferrets (26%) had primary polycystic disease consisting of either polycystic kidney disease affecting renal tubules or, more commonly, glomerulocystic kidney disease. Secondary polycystic lesions were identified in 11 ferrets (20%), and 12 ferrets (22%) exhibited focal or isolated tubular cysts only as an incidental necropsy finding. Ferrets with secondary renal cysts associated with other developmental anomalies, mesangial glomerulopathy, or end-stage kidney disease had hyperphosphatemia and elevated BUN in comparison with those with primary cystic disease and elevated BUN compared with those without renal lesions. Although reflecting institutional bias, these results implicate primary and secondary cystic renal diseases as highly prevalent and underreported in the domestic ferret. In addition to the clinical implications for ferrets as research subjects and pets, these findings suggest a potential value for ferrets as a model of human cystic renal diseases. PMID:18524174

  15. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease Page Content On this page: What is anemia? ... should. [ Top ] How is anemia related to chronic kidney disease? Anemia commonly occurs in people with chronic kidney ...

  16. [Chronic kidney disease, an often underestimated complication of diabetes].

    PubMed

    Sauvanet, Jean-Pierre

    2015-03-01

    Diabetic kidney chronic kidney disease, an often underestimated complication of diabetes. Diabetic kidney disease is a serious complication which can evolve into severe chronic kidney disease (CKD), or even end-stage renal disease (ESRD). It impacts on the patient's quality of life and that of their family and significantly increases the cost of care. The development and progression of chronic kidney disease is prevented by strictly controlling blood sugar levels and cardiovascular risk factors as well as monitoring the markers of kidney disease. In the case of CKD, treatment may need to be adapted. PMID:26036123

  17. Stem cell technology for the treatment of acute and chronic renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Pino, Christopher J.; Humes, H. David

    2010-01-01

    Acute and chronic renal failure are disorders with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Current treatment is based upon conventional dialysis to provide volume regulation and small solute clearance. There is growing recognition that renal failure is a complex disease state requiring a multifactorial therapy to address the short-comings of the conventional monofactorial approach. Kidney transplantation remains the most effective treatment, however, organ availability lags far behind demand. Many key kidney functions including gluconeogenesis, ammoniagenesis, metabolism of glutathione, catabolism of important peptide hormones, growth factors, and cytokines critical to multiorgan homeostasis and immunomodulation are provided by renal tubule cells. Therefore, cell-based therapies are promising multifactorial treatment approaches. In this review, current stem cell technologies including adult stem cells, embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells will be discussed as cell sources for the treatment of acute and chronic renal failure. PMID:20801413

  18. Chronic kidney disease in disadvantaged populations

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Garcia, G.; Jha, V.

    2015-01-01

    The increased burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in disadvantaged populations is due to both global factors and population-specific issues. Low socioeconomic status and poor access to care contribute to health care disparities and exacerbate the negative effects of genetic or biological predisposition. Provision of appropriate renal care to these populations requires a two-pronged approach: expanding the reach of dialysis through development of low-cost alternatives that can be practiced in remote locations, and implementation and evaluation of cost-effective prevention strategies. Kidney transplantation should be promoted by expansion of deceased donor transplant programs and use of inexpensive, generic immunosuppressive drugs. The message of World Kidney Day 2015 is that a concerted attack against the diseases that lead to end-stage renal disease, by increasing community outreach, better education, improved economic opportunity, and access to preventive medicine for those at highest risk, could end the unacceptable relationship between CKD and disadvantage in these communities. PMID:25760025

  19. Chronic kidney disease in disadvantaged populations.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Garcia, G; Jha, V

    2015-05-01

    The increased burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in disadvantaged populations is due to both global factors and population-specific issues. Low socioeconomic status and poor access to care contribute to health care disparities and exacerbate the negative effects of genetic or biological predisposition. Provision of appropriate renal care to these populations requires a two-pronged approach: expanding the reach of dialysis through development of low-cost alternatives that can be practiced in remote locations, and implementation and evaluation of cost-effective prevention strategies. Kidney transplantation should be promoted by expansion of deceased donor transplant programs and use of inexpensive, generic immunosuppressive drugs. The message of World Kidney Day 2015 is that a concerted attack against the diseases that lead to end-stage renal disease, by increasing community outreach, better education, improved economic opportunity, and access to preventive medicine for those at highest risk, could end the unacceptable relationship between CKD and disadvantage in these communities. PMID:25760025

  20. Smaller caliber renal arteries are a novel feature of uromodulin-associated kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Prejbisz, Aleksander; Sellin, Lorenz; Szwench-Pietrasz, Elżbieta; Woznowski, Magdalena; Michałowska, Ilona; Blondin, Dirk; Sajnaga, Dariusz; Epplen, Jorg T; Litwin, Mieczysław; Dekomien, Gabriele; Januszewicz, Magdalena; Helmchen, Udo; Matuszkiewicz-Rowińska, Joanna; Adamczak, Marcin; Więcek, Andrzej; Januszewicz, Andrzej; Rump, Lars C

    2015-07-01

    Hyperuricemia is very common in industrialized countries and known to promote vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. Juvenile hyperuricemia is a hallmark of uromodulin-associated kidney disease characterized by progressive interstitial renal fibrosis leading to end-stage renal disease within decades. Here we describe a member of a Polish-German family with a history of familial background of chronic kidney disease, hyperuricemia, and gout. This patient had hypertension because of bilateral small renal arteries, hyperuricemia, and chronic kidney disease. Clinical and molecular studies were subsequently performed in 39 family members, which included a physical examination, Duplex ultrasound of the kidneys, laboratory tests for renal function, and urine analysis. In eight family members contrast-enhanced renal artery imaging by computed tomography-angiography or magnetic resonance imaging was conducted and showed that bilateral non-arteriosclerotic small caliber renal arteries were associated with hyperuricemia and chronic kidney disease. Of the 26 family members who underwent genotyping, 11 possessed the P236R mutation (c.707C>G) of the uromodulin gene. All family members with a small caliber renal artery carried the uromodulin P236R mutation. Statistical analysis showed a strong correlation between reduced renal artery lumen and decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate. Thus, bilateral small caliber renal arteries are a new clinical phenotype associated with an uromodulin mutation. PMID:25671765

  1. Stop chronic kidney disease progression: Time is approaching.

    PubMed

    Sharaf El Din, Usama Abdel Azim; Salem, Mona Mansour; Abdulazim, Dina Ossama

    2016-05-01

    Progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is inevitable. However, the last decade has witnessed tremendous achievements in this field. Today we are optimistic; the dream of withholding this progression is about to be realistic. The recent discoveries in the field of CKD management involved most of the individual diseases leading the patients to end-stage renal disease. Most of these advances involved patients suffering diabetic kidney disease, chronic glomerulonephritis, polycystic kidney disease, renal amyloidosis and chronic tubulointerstitial disease. The chronic systemic inflammatory status and increased oxidative stress were also investigated. This inflammatory status influences the anti-senescence Klotho gene expression. The role of Klotho in CKD progression together with its therapeutic value are explored. The role of gut as a major source of inflammation, the pathogenesis of intestinal mucosal barrier damage, the role of intestinal alkaline phosphatase and the dietary and therapeutic implications add a novel therapeutic tool to delay CKD progression. PMID:27152262

  2. Stop chronic kidney disease progression: Time is approaching

    PubMed Central

    Sharaf El Din, Usama Abdel Azim; Salem, Mona Mansour; Abdulazim, Dina Ossama

    2016-01-01

    Progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is inevitable. However, the last decade has witnessed tremendous achievements in this field. Today we are optimistic; the dream of withholding this progression is about to be realistic. The recent discoveries in the field of CKD management involved most of the individual diseases leading the patients to end-stage renal disease. Most of these advances involved patients suffering diabetic kidney disease, chronic glomerulonephritis, polycystic kidney disease, renal amyloidosis and chronic tubulointerstitial disease. The chronic systemic inflammatory status and increased oxidative stress were also investigated. This inflammatory status influences the anti-senescence Klotho gene expression. The role of Klotho in CKD progression together with its therapeutic value are explored. The role of gut as a major source of inflammation, the pathogenesis of intestinal mucosal barrier damage, the role of intestinal alkaline phosphatase and the dietary and therapeutic implications add a novel therapeutic tool to delay CKD progression. PMID:27152262

  3. Pattern of renal diseases in children: A developing country experience.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Shankar Prasad; Shah, Gauri Shankar; Mishra, Om Prakash; Baral, Nirmal

    2016-03-01

    Spectrum of renal disease varies in different ethnic population, geographical location, and by environmental factors. The purpose of this study was to find out the clinical spectrum and occurrence of different pediatric renal diseases at a teaching hospital in the Eastern part of Nepal. All cases of renal diseases from one month to 15 years of age, attending the pediatric renal outpatient department and/or were admitted to the wards during the period of February 2012 to January 2013, were included in the study. Detailed clinical and laboratory evaluations were performed on all patients. Diseases were categorized as per standard definitions and managed with hospital protocols. Renal diseases accounted to be 206 cases (6.9%) of total annual pediatric admissions, of which (58%) were male and (42%) female. Acute glomerulonephritis (AGN) was the most common disorder (37.7%) followed by nephrotic syndrome (26.1%), urinary tract infection (21.3%), acute kidney injury (AKI) (17.9%), obstructive uropathy (1.9%), chronic kidney disease (CKD) (1.2%), and others. In AGN group, the most common cause was post-infectious glomerulonephritis (PIGN) (32.9%) followed by lupus nephritis (4%) and Henoch-Schonlein purpura nephritis (0.8%). Urine culture was positive in (9.22%) and the most common organism was Escherichia coli (57.9%). The causes of AKI were urosepsis, septicemia, and AGN (18.9%) each, followed by dehydration (13.5%). Mortality was found in 5% of cases and the etiologies were AKI in (72.7%), PIGN (18.1%), and CKD (9%). Renal diseases are a significant problem among children and are one of the common causes of hospital admission. These patients need comprehensive services for early identification and management. PMID:26997393

  4. Renal disease associated with colic in horses.

    PubMed

    Seanor, J W; Byars, T D; Boutcher, J K

    1984-05-01

    Renal dysfunction secondary to GI disorders may be relatively common in horses. Persistent dehydration of 8-10% of body weight can lead to prerenal azotemia, which may result in renal ischemia and renal disease if uncorrected. Dehydrated azotemic horses with a urine specific gravity less than 1.018 may have renal disease. Urine specific gravity readings greater than 1.025 usually indicate normal kidney function. A urine Na level less than 20 mEq/L and a urine/plasma creatinine ratio greater than or equal to 20:1 indicate prerenal problems. Use of nephrotoxic drugs should be avoided in septicemic or dehydrated horses. Salmonellosis and proximal enteritis often lead to renal complications. Renal disease associated with DIC warrants a poor prognosis. Treatment of acute renal failure is aimed at eliminating the underlying cause and correcting metabolic abnormalities. Use of IV fluids, dopamine, prostaglandin inhibitors, fresh and electrolyte-spiked water ad libitum, water-soluble vitamins and high-P diets is beneficial. Success of therapy should be judged by laboratory results rather than clinical impressions. PMID:6738502

  5. Roles of organic anion transporters in the progression of chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Enomoto, Atsushi; Niwa, Toshimitsu

    2007-10-01

    Renal proximal and distal tubules carry out specialized directional transport of various solutes. The family of organic anion transporters (OATs), which belongs to the major facilitator superfamily (SLC22A), are expressed in the renal epithelial cells to regulate the excretion and the reabsorption of endogenous and exogenous organic anions that include various kinds of drugs and their metabolites. In recent years, it is revealed that indoxyl sulfate, one of uremic toxins, is a novel physiological substrate for OAT family, and its accumulation within the renal tubules via OATs induces renal dysfunction. The OATs are also expressed in the blood-brain barrier, muscle cells, and bone osteoblasts, which hint at various pathogenic roles of OAT-mediated transport of uremic toxins. In this review, we introduce and discuss the function of OATs in the context of their roles in the progression of chronic renal disease. PMID:17976081

  6. Effects of Single Pill-Based Combination Therapy of Amlodipine and Atorvastatin on Within-Visit Blood Pressure Variability and Parameters of Renal and Vascular Function in Hypertensive Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Azushima, Kengo; Uneda, Kazushi; Wakui, Hiromichi; Ohsawa, Masato; Kobayashi, Ryu; Dejima, Toru; Kanaoka, Tomohiko; Maeda, Akinobu; Toya, Yoshiyuki; Umemura, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Both strict blood pressure (BP) control and improvements in BP profile such as BP variability are important for suppression of renal deterioration and cardiovascular complication in hypertension and chronic kidney disease (CKD). In the present study, we examined the beneficial effects of the single pill-based combination therapy of amlodipine and atorvastatin on achievement of the target BP and clinic BP profile, as well as markers of vascular and renal damages in twenty hypertensive CKD patients. The combination therapy with amlodipine and atorvastatin for 16 weeks significantly decreased clinic BP, and achievement of target BP control was attained in an average of 45% after the combination therapy in spite of the presence of no achievement at baseline. In addition, the combination therapy significantly decreased the within-visit BP variability. With respect to the effects on renal damage markers, combination therapy with amlodipine and atorvastatin for 16 weeks significantly decreased albuminuria (urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio, 1034 ± 1480 versus 733 ± 1218 mg/g-Cr, P < 0.05) without decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate. Concerning parameters of vascular function, the combination therapy significantly improved both brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) and central systolic BP (cSBP) (baPWV, 1903 ± 353 versus 1786 ± 382 cm/s, P < 0.05; cSBP, 148 ± 19 versus 129 ± 23 mmHg, P < 0.01). Collectively, these results suggest that the combination therapy with amlodipine and atorvastatin may exert additional beneficial effects on renal and vascular damages as well as BP profile in addition to BP lowering in hypertension with CKD. PMID:24809050

  7. Effects of single pill-based combination therapy of amlodipine and atorvastatin on within-visit blood pressure variability and parameters of renal and vascular function in hypertensive patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Azushima, Kengo; Uneda, Kazushi; Tamura, Kouichi; Wakui, Hiromichi; Ohsawa, Masato; Kobayashi, Ryu; Dejima, Toru; Kanaoka, Tomohiko; Maeda, Akinobu; Toya, Yoshiyuki; Umemura, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Both strict blood pressure (BP) control and improvements in BP profile such as BP variability are important for suppression of renal deterioration and cardiovascular complication in hypertension and chronic kidney disease (CKD). In the present study, we examined the beneficial effects of the single pill-based combination therapy of amlodipine and atorvastatin on achievement of the target BP and clinic BP profile, as well as markers of vascular and renal damages in twenty hypertensive CKD patients. The combination therapy with amlodipine and atorvastatin for 16 weeks significantly decreased clinic BP, and achievement of target BP control was attained in an average of 45% after the combination therapy in spite of the presence of no achievement at baseline. In addition, the combination therapy significantly decreased the within-visit BP variability. With respect to the effects on renal damage markers, combination therapy with amlodipine and atorvastatin for 16 weeks significantly decreased albuminuria (urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio, 1034 ± 1480 versus 733 ± 1218 mg/g-Cr, P < 0.05) without decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate. Concerning parameters of vascular function, the combination therapy significantly improved both brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) and central systolic BP (cSBP) (baPWV, 1903 ± 353 versus 1786 ± 382 cm/s, P < 0.05; cSBP, 148 ± 19 versus 129 ± 23 mmHg, P < 0.01). Collectively, these results suggest that the combination therapy with amlodipine and atorvastatin may exert additional beneficial effects on renal and vascular damages as well as BP profile in addition to BP lowering in hypertension with CKD. PMID:24809050

  8. Premature development of erosive osteoarthritis of hands in patients with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, I J; Hurst, N P; Sebben, R; Milazzo, S C; Disney, A

    1990-01-01

    The prevalence of grade III or IV osteoarthritis was determined in 210 patients with chronic renal failure, of whom 94 were receiving chronic haemodialysis and 116 had functioning renal transplants. The prevalence of grade III or IV osteoarthritis was three times greater in patients under 65 than in a control population, and all but two affected patients also had erosion of subchondral bone in at least one affected joint. The excess of osteoarthritis was apparent in both the transplant recipients and those receiving haemodialysis. Over the age of 65 there was no significant difference in prevalence. Metabolic bone disease, including osteopenia, might contribute to the development of erosive osteoarthritis in chronic renal failure. Images PMID:2383060

  9. Salt-Induced Changes in Cardiac Phosphoproteome in a Rat Model of Chronic Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Su, Zhengxiu; Zhu, Hongguo; Zhang, Menghuan; Wang, Liangliang; He, Hanchang; Jiang, Shaoling; Hou, Fan Fan; Li, Aiqing

    2014-01-01

    Heart damage is widely present in patients with chronic kidney disease. Salt diet is the most important environmental factor affecting development of chronic renal failure and cardiovascular diseases. The proteins involved in chronic kidney disease -induced heart damage, especially their posttranslational modifications, remain largely unknown to date. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 5/6 nephrectomy (chronic renal failure model) or sham operation were treated for 2 weeks with a normal-(0.4% NaCl), or high-salt (4% NaCl) diet. We employed TiO2 enrichment, iTRAQ labeling and liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry strategy for phosphoproteomic profiling of left ventricular free walls in these animals. A total of 1724 unique phosphopeptides representing 2551 non-redundant phosphorylation sites corresponding to 763 phosphoproteins were identified. During normal salt feeding, 89 (54%) phosphopeptides upregulated and 76 (46%) phosphopeptides downregulated in chronic renal failure rats relative to sham rats. In chronic renal failure rats, high salt intake induced upregulation of 84 (49%) phosphopeptides and downregulation of 88 (51%) phosphopeptides. Database searches revealed that most of the identified phospholproteins were important signaling molecules such as protein kinases, receptors and phosphatases. These phospholproteins were involved in energy metabolism, cell communication, cell differentiation, cell death and other biological processes. The Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes analysis revealed functional links among 15 significantly regulated phosphoproteins in chronic renal failure rats compared to sham group, and 23 altered phosphoproteins induced by high salt intake. The altered phosphorylation levels of two proteins involved in heart damage, lamin A and phospholamban were validated. Expression of the downstream genes of these two proteins, desmin and SERCA2a, were also analyzed. PMID:24945867

  10. Renal Artery Embolization Controls Intractable Pain in a Patient with Polycystic Kidney Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Seong Tai; Park, Seog Hee; Lee, Jae Mun; Kim, Choon-Yul; Chang, Yoon Sik

    1999-09-15

    A 65-year-old man with adult polycystic kidney disease (APKD) and chronic renal failure suffered from intractable abdominal pain and distension for 2 weeks. Meperidine infusion did not alleviate his pain. However, pain and abdominal distension were successfully controlled by embolization of both renal arteries.

  11. Skin manifestations of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Robles-Mendez, J C; Vazquez-Martinez, O; Ocampo-Candiani, J

    2015-10-01

    Skin manifestations associated with chronic kidney disease are very common. Most of these conditions present in the end stages and may affect the patient's quality of life. Knowledge of these entities can contribute to establishing an accurate diagnosis and prognosis. Severe renal pruritus is associated with increased mortality and a poor prognosis. Nail exploration can provide clues about albumin and urea levels. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a preventable disease associated with gadolinium contrast. Comorbidities, such as diabetes mellitus and secondary hyperparathyroidism, can lead to acquired perforating dermatosis and calciphylaxis, respectively. Effective and innovative treatments are available for all of these conditions. PMID:26093993

  12. [Diagnosis and management of chronic renal failure in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Segalen, Isabelle; Le Meur, Yannick

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of chronic renal failure in the elderly is rising due to the ageing of the general population. Its management, and notably nephroprotective therapies, must be adapted to the elderly person who is often frail and with multiple pathologies. The decision to start extra-renal purification does not depend on the patient's chronological age but on their physiological age and requires dialogue between the patient and their family, the geriatrician and the nephrologist. PMID:26805640

  13. Effects of chronic oral L-arginine administration on the L-arginine/NO pathway in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease or coronary artery disease: L-Arginine prevents renal loss of nitrite, the major NO reservoir.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jessica Y; Rothmann, Sabine; Schröder, Frank; Langen, Jennifer; Lücke, Thomas; Mariotti, François; Huneau, Jean François; Frölich, Jürgen C; Tsikas, Dimitrios

    2015-09-01

    Despite saturation of nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) by its substrate L-arginine (Arg), oral and intravenous supplementation of Arg may enhance NO synthesis, a phenomenon known as "The L-arginine paradox". Yet, Arg is not only a source of NO, but is also a source for guanidine-methylated (N (G)) arginine derivatives which are all inhibitors of NOS activity. Therefore, Arg supplementation may not always result in enhanced NO synthesis. Concomitant synthesis of N (G)-monomethyl arginine (MMA), N (G),N (G)-dimethylarginine (asymmetric dimethylarginine, ADMA) and N (G),N (G´)-dimethylarginine (symmetric dimethylarginine, SDMA) from supplemented Arg may outweigh and even outbalance the positive effects of Arg on NO. Another possible, yet little investigated effect of Arg supplementation may be alteration of renal function, notably the influence on the excretion of nitrite in the urine. Nitrite is the autoxidation product of NO and the major reservoir of NO in the circulation. Nitrite and Arg are reabsorbed in the proximal tubule of the nephron and this reabsorption is coupled, at least in part, to the renal carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity. In the present placebo-controlled studies, we investigated the effect of chronic oral Arg supplementation of 10 g/day for 3 or 6 months in patients suffering from peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) or coronary artery disease (CAD) on the urinary excretion of nitrite relative to nitrate. We determined the urinary nitrate-to-nitrite molar ratio (UNOxR), which is a measure of nitrite-dependent renal CA activity before and after oral intake of Arg or placebo by the patients. The UNOxR was also determined in 6 children who underwent the Arg test, i.e., intravenous infusion of Arg (0.5 g Arg/kg bodyweight) for 30 min. Arg was well tolerated by the patients of the three studies. Oral Arg supplementation increased Arg (plasma and urine) and ADMA (urine) concentrations. No appreciable changes were seen in NO (in PAOD and CAD) and

  14. Mass spectrometry in Chronic Kidney Disease research

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Proteomics has evolved into an invaluable tool for biomedical research and for research on renal diseases. A central player in the proteomic revolution is the mass spectrometer and its application to analyze biological samples. Our need to understand both the identity of proteins and their abundance has led to improvements in mass spectrometers and their ability to analyze complex tryptic peptide mixtures with high sensitivity and high mass accuracy in a high throughput fashion (such as the LTQ-Orbitrap). It should not be surprising that this occurred coincident with dramatic improvements in our understanding chronic kidney disease (CKD), the mechanisms through which CKD progresses and the development of candidate CKD biomarkers. This review attempts to present a basic framework for the operational components of mass spectrometers, basic insight into how they are used in renal research and a discussion of CKD research that was driven by mass spectrometry. PMID:21044768

  15. Chronic inflammatory systemic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Rainer H.; Schradin, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    It has been recognized that during chronic inflammatory systemic diseases (CIDs) maladaptations of the immune, nervous, endocrine and reproductive system occur. Maladaptation leads to disease sequelae in CIDs. The ultimate reason of disease sequelae in CIDs remained unclear because clinicians do not consider bodily energy trade-offs and evolutionary medicine. We review the evolution of physiological supersystems, fitness consequences of genes involved in CIDs during different life-history stages, environmental factors of CIDs, energy trade-offs during inflammatory episodes and the non-specificity of CIDs. Incorporating bodily energy regulation into evolutionary medicine builds a framework to better understand pathophysiology of CIDs by considering that genes and networks used are positively selected if they serve acute, highly energy-consuming inflammation. It is predicted that genes that protect energy stores are positively selected (as immune memory). This could explain why energy-demanding inflammatory episodes like infectious diseases must be terminated within 3–8 weeks to be adaptive, and otherwise become maladaptive. Considering energy regulation as an evolved adaptive trait explains why many known sequelae of different CIDs must be uniform. These are, e.g. sickness behavior/fatigue/depressive symptoms, sleep disturbance, anorexia, malnutrition, muscle wasting—cachexia, cachectic obesity, insulin resistance with hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia, alterations of steroid hormone axes, disturbances of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, hypertension, bone loss and hypercoagulability. Considering evolved energy trade-offs helps us to understand how an energy imbalance can lead to the disease sequelae of CIDs. In the future, clinicians must translate this knowledge into early diagnosis and symptomatic treatment in CIDs. PMID:26817483

  16. Effect of Renal Function on Prognosis in Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Löffler, Adrián I.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Fang, James; Hetzel, Scott J.; Kadlec, Andrew; Astor, Brad; Sweitzer, Nancy K.

    2014-01-01

    Renal dysfunction (RD) is associated with increased mortality in heart failure (HF). The aim of this study was to identify whether worsened or improved renal function during mid-term follow-up is associated with worsened outcomes in chronic HF patients. 892 participants from a multicenter cohort study of chronic HF were followed over 3.1±1.9 years of enrollment. Worsened and improved renal function were tested with multivariable models as independent predictors of HF hospitalization and mortality. While 12% of subjects experienced a ≥25% decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), 17% experienced a ≥25% increase in eGFR, and there was stability of kidney function observed in the cohort as a whole. The quartile with the worst RD at any point in time had increased risk of HF hospitalization and mortality. Worsened eGFR was associated with HF outcomes in the unadjusted (HR=1.71 (95%CI 1.04-2.81), p=0.035), but not the adjusted analysis. Improvement in eGFR was not associated with outcome (p=0.453). In chronic HF, the severity of RD predicts risk of poor outcome better than changes in renal function during mid-term follow-up. This suggests that in patients with appropriately treated chronic HF, worsening renal function in itself does not yield useful prognostic information and may not reflect poor outcome. PMID:25465925

  17. Chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Drawz, Paul; Rahman, Mahboob

    2015-06-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of chronic kidney disease, focusing on prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and patient information. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including ACP Smart Medicine and MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic from these primary sources in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of science writers and physician writers. Editorial consultants from ACP Smart Medicine and MKSAP provide expert review of the content. Readers who are interested in these primary resources for more detail can consult http://smartmedicine.acponline.org, http://mksap.acponline.org, and other resources referenced in each issue of In the Clinic. PMID:26030647

  18. Surgical management of patients receiving haemodialysis for chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Yassin, S; Ezz, M

    1995-10-01

    This study was carried out on 22 patients seeking dental extractions of one molar tooth. The first group consisted of 12 patients suffering from chronic renal failure undergoing haemodialysis, while the other group consisted of 10 apparently healthy dental patients acting as a control group. The scope of this work is based on the proper handling and management of chronic renal failure patients receiving haemodialysis and undergoing an oral surgical procedure. Complete blood picture, screening of bleeding and coagulation and postextraction complications were monitored for the two groups. PMID:9497692

  19. Sodium intake, RAAS-blockade and progressive renal disease.

    PubMed

    de Borst, Martin H; Navis, Gerjan

    2016-05-01

    Pharmacological blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) by angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers is the current standard treatment to prevent progressive renal function loss in patients with chronic kidney disease. Yet in many patients the renal protective effect of RAAS-blockade is incomplete. Short-term clinical studies have demonstrated that dietary sodium restriction potentiates the antiproteinuric effect of RAAS-blockade. More recently, it was shown that this effect is accompanied by a lower risk of end-stage renal disease and adverse cardiovascular outcomes. The modulation of RAAS-blockade efficacy by sodium intake is likely multifactorial, and is mediated by effects of sodium on local tissue RAAS in kidney, vasculature and brain, and by effects on the immune system. Despite the evidence showing the beneficial effects of even a moderate sodium restriction (∼2.5g/d), it remains difficult to realize in clinical practice. In an analysis based on 24-h urinary sodium excretion data from more than 10,000 CKD patients and renal transplant recipients, we found that sodium intake in these patients is on average 3.8g/d, closely resembling the global general population (3.95g/d). Behavioral approaches including the use of online dietary coaching (ehealth) and feedback using data from 24-h urine collections may be useful to successfully lower dietary sodium intake, aiming to improve cardio-renal outcomes in patients with CKD. PMID:27041482

  20. The epidermal growth factor receptor pathway in chronic kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Harskamp, Laura R; Gansevoort, Ron T; van Goor, Harry; Meijer, Esther

    2016-08-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway has a critical role in renal development, tissue repair and electrolyte handling. Numerous studies have reported an association between dysregulation of this pathway and the initiation and progression of various chronic kidney diseases such as diabetic nephropathy, chronic allograft nephropathy and polycystic kidney disease through the promotion of renal cell proliferation, fibrosis and inflammation. In the oncological setting, compounds that target the EGFR pathway are already in clinical use or have been evaluated in clinical trials; in the renal setting, therapeutic interventions targeting this pathway by decreasing ligand availability with disintegrin and metalloproteinase inhibitors or with ligand-neutralizing antibodies, or by inhibiting receptor activation with tyrosine kinase inhibitors or monoclonal antibodies are only just starting to be explored in animal models of chronic kidney disease and in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. In this Review we focus on the role of the EGFR signalling pathway in the kidney under physiological conditions and during the pathophysiology of chronic kidney diseases and explore the clinical potential of interventions in this pathway to treat chronic renal diseases. PMID:27374915

  1. Systemic and renal lipids in kidney disease development and progression.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Patricia; Ducasa, Gloria Michelle; Fornoni, Alessia

    2016-03-15

    Altered lipid metabolism characterizes proteinuria and chronic kidney diseases. While it is thought that dyslipidemia is a consequence of kidney disease, a large body of clinical and experimental studies support that altered lipid metabolism may contribute to the pathogenesis and progression of kidney disease. In fact, accumulation of renal lipids has been observed in several conditions of genetic and nongenetic origins, linking local fat to the pathogenesis of kidney disease. Statins, which target cholesterol synthesis, have not been proven beneficial to slow the progression of chronic kidney disease. Therefore, other therapeutic strategies to reduce cholesterol accumulation in peripheral organs, such as the kidney, warrant further investigation. Recent advances in the understanding of the biology of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) have revealed that functional HDL, rather than total HDL per se, may protect from both cardiovascular and kidney diseases, strongly supporting a role for altered cholesterol efflux in the pathogenesis of kidney disease. Although the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for lipid-induced renal damage have yet to be uncovered, several studies suggest novel mechanisms by which cholesterol, free fatty acids, and sphingolipids may affect glomerular and tubular cell function. This review will focus on the clinical and experimental evidence supporting a causative role of lipids in the pathogenesis of proteinuria and kidney disease, with a primary focus on podocytes. PMID:26697982

  2. Pregnancy in end-stage renal disease patients on dialysis: how to achieve a successful delivery

    PubMed Central

    Manisco, Gianfranco; Potì’, Marcello; Maggiulli, Giuseppe; Di Tullio, Massimo; Losappio, Vincenzo; Vernaglione, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy in women with chronic kidney disease has always been considered as a challenging event both for the mother and the fetus. Over the years, several improvements have been achieved in the outcome of pregnant chronic renal patients with increasing rates of successful deliveries. To date, evidence suggests that the stage of renal failure is the main predictive factor of worsening residual kidney function and complications in pregnant women. Moreover, the possibility of success of the pregnancy depends on adequate depurative and pharmacological strategies in patients with end-stage renal disease. In this paper, we propose a review of the current literature about this topic presenting our experience as well. PMID:26034591

  3. Thyroid Dysfunction in Chronic Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Victoria Sy; Fang, Victor S.; Katz, Adrian I.; Refetoff, Samuel

    1977-01-01

    Thyroid function was evaluated in 46 patients with end-stage kidney disease and 42 normal subjects. Patients were studied before and after the institution of maintenance hemodialysis (HD) and after renal transplantation (RT). Serum total triiodothyronine concentrations (TT3, ng/100 ml, mean±SD) were 63±17 and 83±22 in the non-HD and HD groups, respectively. Values from normal subjects were 128±25 and from RT patients 134±20. The TT3 was in the hypothyroid range (<78 ng/100 ml; 2 SD below normal mean) in 80% of non-HD and 43% of HD patients. Mean serum total thyroxine concentration (TT4), although within the normal range, was lower than the control value. T4-binding globulin capacity was also slightly lower but the difference was not statistically significant. Among patients whose TT4 was 1 SD below the normal mean, the free T4 index was equally depressed, suggesting that factors other than decreased binding capacity might be responsible for the low TT4. In addition, there was a 37% incidence of goiter. Mean serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) was not elevated and the TSH response to thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) was distinctly blunted, suggesting the possibility of pituitary dysfunction as well. In vivo 125I-l-T4 and 131I-l-T3 kinetics during 0.2 mg/day of l-T4 replacement showed marked reduction in T3 turnover rate in the uremic patients, both before and during HD; the values (μg T3/day, mean±SD) for the different groups were as follows: normal, 33.8±6.1; non-HD, 13.5±2.6; HD, 12.9±3.1; and RT, 30.3±7.1. The low T3 turnover rate was due to impaired extrathyroidal conversion of T4 to T3. The mean percent±SD of metabolized T4 converted to T3 was 37.2±5.8 in normal subjects, 15.7±3.1 in non-HD, 12.8±1.7 in HD, and 34.0±14.7 in RT patients. In contrast, thyroidal T3 secretion rate was not different between the control and the three patient groups. Thus, it appears that uremia affects thyroid function at several levels: (a) subnormal pituitary

  4. Cystic renal neoplasms and renal neoplasms associated with cystic renal diseases in adults: cross-sectional imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Katabathina, Venkata S; Garg, Deepak; Prasad, Srinivasa R; Vikram, Raghu

    2012-01-01

    Cystic renal neoplasms in adults are a heterogeneous group of tumors with characteristic histogenesis, pathological findings, and variable biological profiles. They include disparate entities that are either biologically benign (lymphangioma, cystic nephroma, and mixed epithelial and stromal tumor) or malignant (cystic renal cell carcinoma, multilocular cystic renal cell carcinoma, and primary renal synovial sarcoma). Renal cystic diseases are characterized by cystic changes of the kidneys due to hereditary, developmental, or acquired etiology. Cystic renal diseases such as acquired cystic kidney disease, von Hippel-Lindau disease, and tuberous sclerosis are associated with the development of a wide spectrum of benign and malignant renal neoplasms. Most cystic renal tumors and cystic disease-associated renal neoplasms show characteristic cross-sectional imaging findings that permit accurate diagnosis. In addition, cross-sectional imaging is pivotal in the follow-up and surveillance of adult cystic tumors of the kidney. PMID:23192202

  5. Niacin and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Taketani, Yutaka; Masuda, Masashi; Yamanaka-Okumura, Hisami; Tatsumi, Sawako; Segawa, Hiroko; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi; Takeda, Eiji; Yamamoto, Hironori

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an increasing problem worldwide. The number of end-stage renal disease patients requiring treatment by dialysis is estimated to be increasing by 10,000 patients per year in Japan. Furthermore, an estimated 13 million people are living with CKD in Japan. Various complications are associated with CKD, including cardiovascular disease (CVD). More than one-third of CKD patients die from CVD. Thus, prevention of CVD is a primary concern for the treatment of CKD patients. CKD-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) is a serious complication that typically leads to CVD. Hyperphosphatemia is thought to be a central-risk factor for CKD-MBD. Therefore, managing hyperphosphatemia is crucial to prevent CKD-MBD and CVD. It is difficult to achieve the target serum phosphate level through dietary modifications alone in patients with hyperphosphatemia, because most foods contain phosphate. Thus, phosphate binders such as calcium carbonate are commonly prescribed to CKD patients with hyperphosphatemia, but these have undesirable side effects. Inhibition of intestinal phosphate transport activity has also been investigated as an alternative approach for controlling serum phosphate levels in CKD patients. Nicotinamide, which is the amide of niacin, can inhibit intestinal phosphate transport. Niacin and related compounds have also been developed as drugs for hyperlipidemia conditions, especially hypertriglyceridemia with low high-density lipoprotein. This type of dyslipidemia is frequently observed in CKD patients and is a modifiable risk factor for CVD. Thus, niacin and related compounds may have utility for the treatment of both hyperphosphatemia and dyslipidemia in CKD patients to prevent CVD. PMID:26598845

  6. Relationship of MTHFR gene polymorphisms with renal and cardiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Trovato, Francesca M; Catalano, Daniela; Ragusa, Angela; Martines, G Fabio; Pirri, Clara; Buccheri, Maria Antonietta; Di Nora, Concetta; Trovato, Guglielmo M

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of different methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) 677C>T gene polymorphism and hyperhomocysteinemia for the development of renal failure and cardiovascular events, which are controversial. METHODS: We challenged the relationship, if any, of MTHFR 677C>T and MTHFR 1298A>C polymorphisms with renal and heart function. The present article is a reappraisal of these concepts, investigating within a larger population, and including a subgroup of dialysis patients, if the two most common MTHFR polymorphisms, C677T and A1298C, as homozygous, heterozygous or with a compound heterozygous state, show different association with chronic renal failure requiring hemodialysis. MTHFR polymorphism could be a favorable evolutionary factor, i.e., a protective factor for many ominous conditions, like cancer and renal failure. A similar finding was reported in fatty liver disease in which it is suggested that MTHFR polymorphisms could have maintained and maintain their persistence by an heterozygosis advantage mechanism. We studied a total of 630 Italian Caucasian subject aged 54.60 ± 16.35 years, addressing to the increased hazard of hemodialysis, if any, according to the studied MTHFR genetic polymorphisms. RESULTS: A favorable association with normal renal function of MTHFR polymorphisms, and notably of MTHFR C677T is present independently of the negative effects of left ventricular hypertrophy, increased Intra-Renal arterial Resistance and hyperparathyroidism. CONCLUSION: MTHFR gene polymorphisms could have a protective role on renal function as suggested by their lower frequency among our dialysis patients in end-stage renal failure; differently, the association with left ventricular hypertrophy and reduced left ventricular relaxation suggest some type of indirect, or concurrent mechanism. PMID:25664255

  7. Diagnostic imaging in pediatric renal inflammatory disease

    SciTech Connect

    Sty, J.R.; Wells, R.G.; Schroeder, B.A.; Starshak, R.J.

    1986-08-15

    Some form of imaging procedure should be used to document the presence of infection of the upper urinary tract in troublesome cases in children. During the past several years, sonography, nuclear radiology, and computed tomography (CT) have had a significant influence on renal imaging. The purpose of this article is to reevaluate the noninvasive imaging procedures that can be used to diagnose pediatric renal inflammatory disease and to assess the relative value of each modality in the various types of renal infection. The authors will not discuss the radiologic evaluation of the child who has had a previous renal infection, in whom cortical scarring or reflux nephropathy is a possibility; these are different clinical problems and require different diagnostic evaluation.

  8. Distal, intermediate, and proximal mediators of racial disparities in renal disease mortality in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Assari, Shervin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Kidney failure and associated mortality is one of the major components of racial disparities in the United States. Objectives: The current study aimed to investigate the role of distal (socioeconomic status, SES), intermediate (chronic medical diseases), and proximal (health behaviors) factors that may explain Black-White disparities in mortality due to renal diseases. Patients and Methods: This is a nationally representative prospective cohort with 25 years of follow up. Data came from the Americans’ Changing Lives (ACL) study, 1986 to 2011. The study included 3361 Black (n = 1156) or White (n = 2205) adults who were followed for up to 25 years. Race was the main predictor and death due to renal disease was the outcome. SES, chronic medical disease (diabetes, hypertension, obesity), and health behaviors (smoking, drinking, and exercise) at baseline were potential mediators. We used Cox proportional hazards models for data analysis. Results: In age and gender adjusted models, Blacks had higher risk of death due to renal disease over the follow up period. Separate models suggested that SES, health behaviors and chronic medical disease fully explained the effect of race on renal disease mortality. Conclusions: Black-White disparities in rate of death due to renal diseases in the United States are not genuine but secondary to racial differences in income, health behaviors, hypertension, and diabetes. As distal, intermediate, and proximal factors contribute to racial disparities in renal disease mortality, elimination of such disparities requires a wide range of policies and programs that target income, medical conditions, and health behaviors. PMID:27047811

  9. Hypertension and chronic kidney disease in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Sengul, Sule; Erdem, Yunus; Batuman, Vecihi; Erturk, Sehsuvar

    2013-12-01

    Worldwide, both hypertension and chronic kidney disease are major public health problems, due to their epidemic proportions and their association with high cardiovascular mortality. In 2003, the first Prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension in Turkey (the PatenT) study was conducted in a nationally representative population (n=4910) by the Turkish Society of Hypertension and Renal Diseases, and showed that overall age- and sex-adjusted prevalence of hypertension in Turkey was 31.8%. The PatenT study also reported that overall awareness (40.7%), treatment (31.1%), and control rates (8.1%) of hypertension were strikingly low. Only 20.7% of the patients who were aware of their hypertension and receiving treatment had their blood pressure controlled to <140/90 mm Hg. In the Chronic Renal Disease in Turkey (CREDIT) study (n=10,748), the overall prevalence of chronic kidney (including all stages) disease was 15.7% and increased with advancing age. In the same population, the prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, obesity, and metabolic syndrome were reported as 32.7%, 12.7%, 76.3%, 20.1%, and 31.3%, respectively. The prevalence and awareness of hypertension in CREDIT population was 32.7% and 48.6%, respectively. According to the data obtained from national surveys, the prevalence of hypertension and chronic kidney disease in Turkey is alarmingly high. To improve prevention, early diagnosis, and treatment of these major public health problems, appropriate health strategies should be implemented by the government, together with medical societies, non-governmental organizations, industry, health-care providers, and academia. PMID:25019009

  10. Chronic Renal Transplant Rejection and Possible Anti-Proliferative Drug Targets.

    PubMed

    Bhatti, Adnan Bashir; Usman, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    The global prevalence of renal transplants is increasing with time, and renal transplantation is the only definite treatment for end-stage renal disease. We have limited the acute and late acute rejection of kidney allografts, but the long-term survival of renal tissues still remains a difficult and unanswered question as most of the renal transplants undergo failure within a decade of their transplantation. Among various histopathological changes that signify chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN), tubular atrophy, fibrous thickening of the arteries, fibrosis of the kidney interstitium, and glomerulosclerosis are the most important. Moreover, these structural changes are followed by a decline in the kidney function as well. The underlying mechanism that triggers the long-term rejection of renal transplants involves both humoral and cell-mediated immunity. T cells, with their related cytokines, cause tissue damage. In addition, CD 20+ B cells and their antibodies play an important role in the long-term graft rejection. Other risk factors that predispose a recipient to long-term graft rejection include HLA-mismatching, acute episodes of graft rejection, mismatch in donor-recipient age, and smoking. The purpose of this review article is the analyze current literature and find different anti-proliferative agents that can suppress the immune system and can thus contribute to the long-term survival of renal transplants. The findings of this review paper can be helpful in understanding the long-term survival of renal transplants and various ways to improve it. PMID:26677426

  11. Chronic Renal Transplant Rejection and Possible Anti-Proliferative Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Usman, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    The global prevalence of renal transplants is increasing with time, and renal transplantation is the only definite treatment for end-stage renal disease. We have limited the acute and late acute rejection of kidney allografts, but the long-term survival of renal tissues still remains a difficult and unanswered question as most of the renal transplants undergo failure within a decade of their transplantation. Among various histopathological changes that signify chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN), tubular atrophy, fibrous thickening of the arteries, fibrosis of the kidney interstitium, and glomerulosclerosis are the most important. Moreover, these structural changes are followed by a decline in the kidney function as well. The underlying mechanism that triggers the long-term rejection of renal transplants involves both humoral and cell-mediated immunity. T cells, with their related cytokines, cause tissue damage. In addition, CD 20+ B cells and their antibodies play an important role in the long-term graft rejection. Other risk factors that predispose a recipient to long-term graft rejection include HLA-mismatching, acute episodes of graft rejection, mismatch in donor-recipient age, and smoking. The purpose of this review article is the analyze current literature and find different anti-proliferative agents that can suppress the immune system and can thus contribute to the long-term survival of renal transplants. The findings of this review paper can be helpful in understanding the long-term survival of renal transplants and various ways to improve it. PMID:26677426

  12. Renal alterations in feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-infected cats: a natural model of lentivirus-induced renal disease changes.

    PubMed

    Poli, Alessandro; Tozon, Natasa; Guidi, Grazia; Pistello, Mauro

    2012-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is associated with several renal syndromes including acute and chronic renal failures, but the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are unclear. HIV and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) share numerous biological and pathological features, including renal alterations. We investigated and compared the morphological changes of renal tissue of 51 experimentally and 21 naturally infected cats. Compared to the latter, the experimentally infected cats exhibited some mesangial widening and glomerulonephritis, milder proteinuria, and lower tubular and interstitial alterations. The numbers of giant protein tubular casts and tubular microcysts were also lower. In contrast, diffuse interstitial infiltrates and glomerular and interstitial amyloidosis were detected only in naturally infected cats. Similar alterations are found in HIV infected patients, thus supporting the idea of a causative role of FIV infection in renal disease, and underlining the relevance of the FIV and its natural host as an animal model for investigating lentivirus-associated nephropathy. PMID:23170163

  13. Renal Alterations in Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV)-Infected Cats: A Natural Model of Lentivirus-Induced Renal Disease Changes

    PubMed Central

    Poli, Alessandro; Tozon, Natasa; Guidi, Grazia; Pistello, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is associated with several renal syndromes including acute and chronic renal failures, but the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are unclear. HIV and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) share numerous biological and pathological features, including renal alterations. We investigated and compared the morphological changes of renal tissue of 51 experimentally and 21 naturally infected cats. Compared to the latter, the experimentally infected cats exhibited some mesangial widening and glomerulonephritis, milder proteinuria, and lower tubular and interstitial alterations. The numbers of giant protein tubular casts and tubular microcysts were also lower. In contrast, diffuse interstitial infiltrates and glomerular and interstitial amyloidosis were detected only in naturally infected cats. Similar alterations are found in HIV infected patients, thus supporting the idea of a causative role of FIV infection in renal disease, and underlining the relevance of the FIV and its natural host as an animal model for investigating lentivirus-associated nephropathy. PMID:23170163

  14. Renal biopsy and pathologic evaluation of glomerular disease.

    PubMed

    Lees, George E; Cianciolo, Rachel E; Clubb, Fred J

    2011-08-01

    Presence of suspected primary glomerular disease is the most common and compelling reason to consider renal biopsy. Pathologic findings in samples from animals with nephritic or nephrotic glomerulopathies, as well as from animals with persistent subclinical glomerular proteinuria that is not associated with advanced chronic kidney disease, frequently guide treatment decisions and inform prognosis when suitable specimens are obtained and examined appropriately. Ultrasound-guided needle biopsy techniques generally are satisfactory; however, other methods of locating or approaching the kidney, such as manual palpation (e.g., in cats), laparoscopy, or open surgery, also can be used. Visual assessment of the tissue content of needle biopsy samples to verify that they are renal cortex (i.e., contain glomeruli) as they are obtained is a key step that minimizes the submission of uninformative samples for examination. Adequate planning for a renal biopsy also requires prior procurement of the fixatives and preservatives needed to process and submit samples that will be suitable for electron microscopic examination and immunostaining, as well as for light microscopic evaluation. Finally, to be optimally informative, renal biopsy specimens must be processed by laboratories that routinely perform the required specialized examinations and then be evaluated by experienced veterinary nephropathologists. The pathologic findings must be carefully integrated with one another and with information derived from the clinical investigation of the patient's illness to formulate the correct diagnosis and most informative guidance for therapeutic management of the animal's glomerular disease. PMID:21782145

  15. Neprilysin inhibition in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Judge, Parminder; Haynes, Richard; Landray, Martin J.; Baigent, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Despite current practice, patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at increased risk of progression to end-stage renal disease and cardiovascular events. Neprilysin inhibition (NEPi) is a new therapeutic strategy with potential to improve outcomes for patients with CKD. NEPi enhances the activity of natriuretic peptide systems leading to natriuresis, diuresis and inhibition of the renin–angiotensin system (RAS), which could act as a potentially beneficial counter-regulatory system in states of RAS activation such as chronic heart failure (HF) and CKD. Early NEPi drugs were combined with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors but were associated with unacceptable rates of angioedema and, therefore, withdrawn. However, one such agent (omapatrilat) showed promise of NEP/RAS inhibition in treating CKD in animal models, producing greater reductions in proteinuria, glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial fibrosis compared with isolated RAS inhibition. A new class of drug called angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor (ARNi) has been developed. One such drug, LCZ696, has shown substantial benefits in trials in hypertension and HF. In CKD, HF is common due to a range of mechanisms including hypertension and structural heart disease (including left ventricular hypertrophy), suggesting that ARNi could benefit patients with CKD by both retarding the progression of CKD (hence delaying the need for renal replacement therapy) and reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease. LCZ696 is now being studied in a CKD population. PMID:25140014

  16. Neprilysin inhibition in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Judge, Parminder; Haynes, Richard; Landray, Martin J; Baigent, Colin

    2015-05-01

    Despite current practice, patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at increased risk of progression to end-stage renal disease and cardiovascular events. Neprilysin inhibition (NEPi) is a new therapeutic strategy with potential to improve outcomes for patients with CKD. NEPi enhances the activity of natriuretic peptide systems leading to natriuresis, diuresis and inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), which could act as a potentially beneficial counter-regulatory system in states of RAS activation such as chronic heart failure (HF) and CKD. Early NEPi drugs were combined with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors but were associated with unacceptable rates of angioedema and, therefore, withdrawn. However, one such agent (omapatrilat) showed promise of NEP/RAS inhibition in treating CKD in animal models, producing greater reductions in proteinuria, glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial fibrosis compared with isolated RAS inhibition. A new class of drug called angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor (ARNi) has been developed. One such drug, LCZ696, has shown substantial benefits in trials in hypertension and HF. In CKD, HF is common due to a range of mechanisms including hypertension and structural heart disease (including left ventricular hypertrophy), suggesting that ARNi could benefit patients with CKD by both retarding the progression of CKD (hence delaying the need for renal replacement therapy) and reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease. LCZ696 is now being studied in a CKD population. PMID:25140014

  17. Contrast Medium Exposure During Computed Tomography and Risk of Development of End-Stage Renal Disease in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease: A Nationwide Population-Based, Propensity Score-Matched, Longitudinal Follow-Up Study.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ming-Shun; Chiu, Chien-Shan; How, Chorng-Kuang; Chiang, Jen-Huai; Sheu, Meei-Ling; Chen, Wen-Chi; Lin, Hsuan-Jen; Hsieh, Vivian Chia-Rong; Hu, Sung-Yuan

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the long-term association between contrast medium exposure during computed tomography (CT) and the subsequent development of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD).We conducted a population-based cohort study using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. A total of 7100 patients with nonadvanced CKD who underwent contrast medium-enhanced CT were identified and served as the study cohort. To avoid selection bias, we used the propensity score to match 7100 nonadvanced CKD patients, who underwent noncontrast medium-enhanced CT to serve as the comparison cohort. The age, sex, index year, and frequency of undergoing CTs were also matched between the study and comparison cohorts. Participants were followed until a new diagnosis of ESRD or December 31, 2011. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were calculated using the Cox proportional hazards regression.Contrast medium exposure was not identified as a risk factor for developing ESRD in nonadvanced CKD patients after confounders adjustment (adjusted HR = 0.91; 95% CI, 0.66-1.26; P = 0.580). We further divided the patients who underwent CTs with contrast medium use into ≤1 exposure per year on average, >1 and <2 exposure per year on average, and ≥2 exposure per year on average. After adjusting for confounders, we identified a much higher risk for developing ESRD in the 2 groups of >1 and <2 exposure per year on average and ≥2 exposure per year on average (adjusted HR = 8.13; 95% CI, 5.57-11.87 and adjusted HR = 12.08; 95% CI, 7.39-19.75, respectively) compared with the patients who underwent CTs without contrast medium use.This long-term follow-up study demonstrated that contrast medium exposure was not associated with an increased risk of ESRD development in nonadvanced CKD patients. PMID:27100424

  18. Two Brothers with Bardet-Biedl Syndrome Presenting with Chronic Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Cem; Huddam, Bulent; Akbaba, Gulhan; Tunca, Hasan; Koca, Emine; Levent, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Bardet-Biedl Syndrome (BBS) is a rarely seen autosomal recessive transfer disease characterised by retinal dystrophy, obesity, extremity deformities, mental retardation, and renal and genital system anomalies. BBS shows heterogenic transfer. To date, 18 genes (BBS1–18) and 7 BBS proteins have been defined as related to BBS. All of the defined BBS genes have been shown to be related to the biogenesis or function of cilia. Renal failure accompanying the syndrome, especially in the advanced stages, is the most common cause of mortality. Therefore, as one of the major diagnostic criteria, renal damage is of great importance in early diagnosis. This paper presents the cases of two brothers with BBS who presented with chronic renal failure. PMID:25960897

  19. Chronic Granulomatous Disease.

    PubMed

    Rawat, Amit; Bhattad, Sagar; Singh, Surjit

    2016-04-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is the most common symptomatic phagocytic defect. It is caused by mutations in genes encoding protein subunits of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase complex. CGD is characterized by a defective intracellular killing of phagocytosed organisms due to a defective oxidative burst in the neutrophils and macrophages. It is inherited in either X-linked recessive or autosomal recessive pattern. Staphylococcus aureus and Aspergillus species are the most common organisms reported. Infections with Burkholderia, Serratia, and Nocardia warrant a screen for CGD. Suppurative lymphadenitis, cutaneous abscesses, pneumonia and diarrhea constitute the most common problems in children with CGD. A small percentage of children develop autoimmune manifestations (e.g., rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, colitis, autoimmune hepatitis) and warrant immunosuppression. X-linked carriers of CGD are at an increased risk of developing autoimmune diseases. Nitroblue-tetrazolium dye reduction test and dihydro-rhodamine assay by flow cytometry are the screening tests for this disorder. While most children do well on long term antibiotic and antifungal prophylaxis, those with severe forms warrant hematopoietic stem cell transplant. The role of regular interferon-γ injections is debatable. Evidence for white cell transfusions is sparse, and gene therapy is under trial.This current review highlights various aspects and studies in CGD. X-linked form of CGD has been noted to carry a poorer prognosis compared to autosomal recessive variants. However, recent evidence suggests that outcome in CGD is determined by the amount of residual NADPH oxidase activity irrespective of mode of inheritance. PMID:26865172

  20. Plasma homocysteine concentration in children with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Merouani, A; Lambert, M; Delvin, E E; Genest, J; Robitaille, P; Rozen, R

    2001-10-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia, a risk factor for vascular disease, is commonly found in adult patients with end-stage renal disease. Major determinants of elevated plasma homocysteine levels in these patients include deficiencies in folate and vitamin B12, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) genotype and renal function. Little information is available for children with chronic renal failure (CRF). The prevalence and the factors that affect plasma homocysteine concentration were determined in children. Twenty-nine children with various degrees of CRF (15 were dialyzed, 14 were not dialyzed) were compared with 57 age- and sex-matched healthy children. Homocysteine concentrations were higher in patients than controls (17.3 micromol/l vs 6.8 micromol/l, P<0.0001) and hyperhomocysteinemia (>95th percentile for controls: 14.0 micromol/l) was seen in 62.0% of patients and 5.2% of controls. Folate concentrations were lower in patients (9.9 nmol/l) than controls (13.5 nmol/l), P<0.01. Vitamin B12 was similar in patients (322 pmol/l) and controls (284 pmol/l). Dialyzed patients have a higher prevalence of hyperhomocysteinemia than nondialyzed patients (87% vs 35%). Dialyzed patients with MTHFR mutation have higher plasma homocysteine (28.5 micromol/l) than nondialyzed patients with the mutation (10.7 micromol/l), P<0.002. In our study, differences between controls and patients in plasma homocysteine concentrations are observed when age is greater then 92 months, folate less than 21.6 nmol/l and vitamin B12 less than 522 pmol/l. Our study shows that hyperhomocysteinemia is common in children with CRF and is associated with low folate and normal vitamin B12 status, compared to normal children. Among the patients, the dialyzed patients with the MTHFR mutation are particularly at risk for hyperhomocysteinemia. Further studies are needed to investigate therapeutic interventions and the potential link with vascular complications in these patients. PMID:11605787

  1. Chronic Granulomatous Disease.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Shreya

    2015-05-01

    Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD) is an inherited immunodeficiency disorder characterized by defective functioning of NADPH oxidase enzyme in the phagocytes. This leads to recurrent infections by catalase positive organisms and later, granuloma formation in multiple organs. This condition usually presents in the age group of 2-5 y and is uncommon in neonates. In this case report, we describe a rare case of CGD in a 40-day-old male child who initially presented with a history of erythematous pustular rash on left forearm and refusal to feeds. He remained unresponsive to regular antibiotics. CT chest and abdomen revealed multiple ill-defined lesions suggestive of granulomas or developing abscesses. Immunodeficiency workup showed negative Nitroblue Tetrazolium test and positive Dihydrorhodamine test (flow cytometry). A diagnosis of CGD was then made and treated accordingly. The aim of this report is to highlight the fact that although it is rare for CGD to present at such an early age, but in a neonate with multiple granulomas or abscesses, it should be considered as a differential and worked up accordingly. Early diagnosis and treatment can significantly improve the prognosis. PMID:26155526

  2. Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD) is an inherited immunodeficiency disorder characterized by defective functioning of NADPH oxidase enzyme in the phagocytes. This leads to recurrent infections by catalase positive organisms and later, granuloma formation in multiple organs. This condition usually presents in the age group of 2-5 y and is uncommon in neonates. In this case report, we describe a rare case of CGD in a 40-day-old male child who initially presented with a history of erythematous pustular rash on left forearm and refusal to feeds. He remained unresponsive to regular antibiotics. CT chest and abdomen revealed multiple ill-defined lesions suggestive of granulomas or developing abscesses. Immunodeficiency workup showed negative Nitroblue Tetrazolium test and positive Dihydrorhodamine test (flow cytometry). A diagnosis of CGD was then made and treated accordingly. The aim of this report is to highlight the fact that although it is rare for CGD to present at such an early age, but in a neonate with multiple granulomas or abscesses, it should be considered as a differential and worked up accordingly. Early diagnosis and treatment can significantly improve the prognosis. PMID:26155526

  3. Arterial Stiffness and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Garnier, Anne-Sophie; Briet, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major public health concern due to the high prevalence of associated cardiovascular (CV) disease. CV mortality is 10-30 times higher in end-stage renal disease patients than in the age-adjusted general population. The last 20 years have been marked by a huge effort in the characterization of the vascular remodeling process associated with CKD and its consequences on the renal, CV and general prognosis. By comparison with patients with normal renal function, with or without hypertension, an increase in large artery stiffness has been described in end-stage renal disease as well as in CKD stages 2-5. Most clinical studies are consistent with the observation that damage to large arteries may contribute to the high incidence of CV disease. By contrast, the impact of large artery stiffening and remodeling on CKD progression is still a matter of debate. Concomitant exposure to other CV risk factors, including diabetes, seems to play a major role in the association between aortic stiffness and estimated GFR. The conflicting results obtained from longitudinal studies designed to evaluate the impact of baseline aortic stiffness on GFR progression are detailed in the present review. Only pulse pressure, central and peripheral, is almost constantly associated with incident CKD and GFR decline. Kidney transplantation improves patients’ CV prognosis, but its impact on arterial stiffness is still controversial. Donor age, living kidney donation and mean blood pressure appear to be the main determinants of improvement in aortic stiffness after kidney transplantation. PMID:27195244

  4. Mitochondrial Sirtuin 3 and Renal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Perico, Luca; Morigi, Marina; Benigni, Ariela

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles whose functions are tightly regulated at multiple levels to maintain proper cellular homeostasis. Mitochondrial Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3), which belongs to an evolutionary conserved family of NAD+-dependent deacetylases, is a key regulator of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, ATP production, and fatty acid β-oxidation, and it exerts an antioxidant activity. Changes in SIRT3 expression are critical in the pathophysiology of several diseases, such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes, cancer, and aging. In experimental acute kidney injury (AKI), impairment of renal function and development of tubular injury are associated with SIRT3 reduction and mitochondrial dysfunction in proximal tubuli. SIRT3-deficient mice are more susceptible to AKI and die. Pharmacological manipulations able to increase SIRT3 preserve mitochondrial integrity, markedly limit renal injury, and accelerate functional recovery. This review highlights all the selective rescue mechanisms that point to the key role of SIRT3 as a new therapeutic target for curing renal diseases. PMID:27362524

  5. Haemostasis in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Jens; Menke, Julia; Sollinger, Daniel; Schinzel, Helmut; Thürmel, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    The coagulation system has gained much interest again as new anticoagulatory substances have been introduced into clinical practice. Especially patients with renal failure are likely candidates for such a therapy as they often experience significant comorbidity including cardiovascular diseases that require anticoagulation. Patients with renal failure on new anticoagulants have experienced excessive bleeding which can be related to a changed pharmacokinetic profile of the compounds. However, the coagulation system itself, even without any interference with coagulation modifying drugs, is already profoundly changed during renal failure. Coagulation disorders with either episodes of severe bleeding or thrombosis represent an important cause for the morbidity and mortality of such patients. The underlying reasons for these coagulation disorders involve the changed interaction of different components of the coagulation system such as the coagulation cascade, the platelets and the vessel wall in the metabolic conditions of renal failure. Recent work provides evidence that new factors such as microparticles (MPs) can influence the coagulation system in patients with renal insufficiency through their potent procoagulatory effects. Interestingly, MPs may also contain microRNAs thus inhibiting the function of platelets, resulting in bleeding episodes. This review comprises the findings on the complex pathophysiology of coagulation disorders including new factors such as MPs and microRNAs in patients with renal insufficiency. PMID:24132242

  6. Immunization in children with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Laube, Guido F; Berger, Christoph; Goetschel, Philippe; Leumann, Ernst; Neuhaus, Thomas J

    2002-08-01

    Infections jeopardize children on immunosuppression after organ transplantation. Immunization is protective in healthy children. The aims of this study were to analyze the rate and efficacy of immunization in 62 children undergoing dialysis and renal transplantation (RTPL) between 1987 and 2000. The analysis was based on clinical findings, vaccination certificates, and measurement of specific serum antibodies. A member of the renal unit administered vaccinations. All 62 patients were immunized against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, poliomyelitis, measles, mumps, rubella, and hepatitis B. Since introduction in 1991 and 1995, 44 and 42 children were also vaccinated against influenza and Hemophilus influenzae type b, respectively. Of 16 patients with a negative history, 14 were given varicella vaccine; 16 children on peritoneal dialysis (PD) or with nephrotic syndrome were immunized against Streptococcus pneumoniae. All vaccinated patients had detectable serum antibodies against measles, mumps, rubella, varicella, hepatitis B, H. influenzae, and S. pneumoniae. There were 3 infections despite vaccination; 1 patient developed varicella after RTPL and 1 patient on PD had 2 episodes of peritonitis caused by H. influenzae and S. pneumoniae. In conclusion, monitoring and administration of the vaccines by the renal team enabled a high immunization rate. Whether vaccines, as documented by antibody titers, or by the low prevalence in the general population promoted the low prevalence of infections remains open, as there were at least a few vaccination failures. PMID:12185473

  7. Chronic Liver Disease and Hispanic Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... Population Profiles > Hispanic/Latino > Chronic Liver Disease Chronic Liver Disease and Hispanic Americans Among the Hispanic/Latino population, chronic liver disease is a leading cause of death. While the ...

  8. Renal involvement in autoimmune connective tissue diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Connective tissue diseases (CTDs) are a heterogeneous group of disorders that share certain clinical presentations and a disturbed immunoregulation, leading to autoantibody production. Subclinical or overt renal manifestations are frequently observed and complicate the clinical course of CTDs. Alterations of kidney function in Sjögren syndrome, systemic scleroderma (SSc), auto-immune myopathies (dermatomyositis and polymyositis), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), antiphospholipid syndrome nephropathy (APSN) as well as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are frequently present and physicians should be aware of that. In SLE, renal prognosis significantly improved based on specific classification and treatment strategies adjusted to kidney biopsy findings. Patients with scleroderma renal crisis (SRC), which is usually characterized by severe hypertension, progressive decline of renal function and thrombotic microangiopathy, show a significant benefit of early angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitor use in particular and strict blood pressure control in general. Treatment of the underlying autoimmune disorder or discontinuation of specific therapeutic agents improves kidney function in most patients with Sjögren syndrome, auto-immune myopathies, APSN and RA. In this review we focus on impairment of renal function in relation to underlying disease or adverse drug effects and implications on treatment decisions. PMID:23557013

  9. Genetic Considerations in Pediatric Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Harshman, Lyndsay A; Zepeda-Orozco, Diana

    2016-03-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in children is an irreversible process that, in some cases, may lead to end-stage renal disease. The majority of children with CKD have a congenital disorder of the kidney or urological tract arising from birth. There is strong evidence for both a genetic and epigenetic component to progression of CKD. Utilization of gene-mapping strategies, ranging from genome-wide association studies to single-nucleotide polymorphism analysis, serves to identify potential genetic variants that may lend to disease variation. Genome-wide association studies evaluating population-based data have identified different loci associated with CKD progression. Analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms on an individual level suggests that secondary systemic sequelae of CKD are closely related to dysfunction of the cardiovascular-inflammatory axis and may lead to advanced cardiovascular disease through abnormal vascular calcification and activation of the renin-angiotensin system. Similarly, genetic variants affecting cytokine control, fibrosis, and parenchymal development may modulate CKD through development and acceleration of renal interstitial fibrosis. Epigenetic studies evaluate modification of the genome through DNA methylation, histone modification, or RNA interference, which may be directly influenced by external or environmental factors directing genomic expression. Lastly, improved understanding of the genetic and epigenetic contribution to CKD progression may allow providers to identify a population at accelerated risk for disease progression and apply novel therapies targeted at the genetic mechanism of disease. PMID:27617141

  10. Castleman Disease Presenting as Renal Hilar Mass

    PubMed Central

    Radfar, Mohammad Hadi; Torbati, Peyman

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: We report a case of unicentric Castleman disease, a rare type of benign proliferation of lymphoid tissue. We present an uncommon disease that was managed effectively using laparoscopy. Case Presentation: A 32-year-old woman presented with left-sided flank pain. A large retroperitoneal mass was detected in the left renal hilum close to the renal vessels. Laparoscopic removal of the mass was effectively performed. The pathologic examination was in favor of a rare type of benign proliferation of lymphoid tissue compatible with Castleman disease. The patient was cured with no evidence of recurrence in 1-year follow-up. Conclusion: Transperitoneal laparoscopic approach is feasible and effective in the management of this disease and is curative.

  11. Kielin/Chordin-Like Protein Attenuates both Acute and Chronic Renal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Soofi, Abdul; Zhang, Peng

    2013-01-01

    The secreted kielin/chordin-like (KCP) protein, one of a family of cysteine-rich proteins, suppresses TGF-β signaling by sequestering the ligand from its receptor, but it enhances bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling by promoting ligand-receptor interactions. Given the critical roles for TGF-β and BMP proteins in enhancing or suppressing renal interstitial fibrosis, respectively, we examined whether secreted KCP could attenuate renal fibrosis in mouse models of chronic and acute disease. Transgenic mice that express KCP in adult kidneys showed significantly less expression of collagen IV, α-smooth muscle actin, and other markers of disease progression in the unilateral ureteral obstruction model of renal interstitial fibrosis. In the folic acid nephrotoxicity model of acute tubular necrosis, mice expressing KCP survived high doses of folic acid that were lethal for wild-type mice. With a lower dose of folic acid, mice expressing KCP exhibited improved renal recovery compared with wild-type mice. Thus, these data suggest that extracellular regulation of the TGF-β/BMP signaling axis by KCP, and by extension possibly other cysteine-rich domain proteins, can attenuate both acute and chronic renal injury. PMID:23539757

  12. Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bortoletto, Pietro; Lyman, Kyle; Camacho, Andres; Fricchione, Marielle; Khanolkar, Aaruni

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an uncommon primary immunodeficiency that can be inherited in an X-linked (XL) or an autosomal recessive (AR) manner. We reviewed our large, single-center US experience with CGD. Methods: We reviewed 27 patients at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago from March 1985 to November 2013. Fisher exact test was used to compare differences in categorical variables, and Student t test was used to compare means for continuous variables. Serious infections were defined as those requiring intravenous antibiotics or hospitalization. Results: There were 23 males and 4 females; 19 were XL and 8 were AR. The average age at diagnosis was 3.0 years; 2.1 years for XL and 5.3 years for AR inheritance (P = 0.02). There were 128 serious infections. The most frequent infectious agents were Staphylococcus aureus (n = 13), Serratia (n = 11), Klebsiella (n = 7), Aspergillus (n = 6) and Burkholderia (n = 4). The most common serious infections were pneumonia (n = 38), abscess (n = 32) and lymphadenitis (n = 29). Thirteen patients had granulomatous complications. Five patients were below the 5th percentile for height and 4 were below the 5th percentile for weight. Average length of follow-up after diagnosis was 10.1 years. Twenty-four patients were compliant and maintained on interferon-γ, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and an azole. The serious infection rate was 0.62 per patient-year. Twenty-three patients are alive (1 was lost to follow-up). Conclusions: We present a large, single-center US experience with CGD. Twenty-three of 27 patients are alive after 3276 patient-months of follow-up (1 has been lost to follow-up), and our serious infection rate was 0.62 per patient-year. PMID:26181896

  13. Chronic autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Litta Modignani, R; Barantani, E; Mazzolari, M; Pincetti Nervi, M; Macchi, R

    1991-01-01

    A total of 67 patients with chronic autoimmune thyroid disease were followed, mainly as outpatients, for a period of a few months to over 15 years. The diagnosis was euthyroidism (n = 16, 23.8%), subclinical hypothyroidism (n = 20, 29.8%), primary hypothyroidism (n = 28, 41.7%) or hashitoxicosis (n = 3, 4.47%). Patients with goiters fit Hashimoto's original description of "struma lymphomatosa". The diagnosis was made on clinical grounds and the usual laboratory hormonal tests. Histological examination was carried out at surgery or by fine needle aspiration in 35 patients (52.2%), and a clinical diagnosis was made in 32 (47.7%). Three patients had juvenile Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Most patients were in the fourth, fifth or sixth decade (64.8%), and of these 12 (18%) had subclinical hypothyroidism, which should be suspected when thyrotropin (TSH) is twice the upper normal limit. In these cases thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) testing and evaluation of anti-thyroglobulin antibodies (TgAb) and anti-microsomal antigen antibodies (MsAb) are mandatory. Hypothyroidism with few symptoms develops insidiously in young or elderly patients; the most sensitive test is TSH assay in conjunction with tests for TgAb and MsAb. L-thyroxine administration may be harmful in older patients with late diagnosed primary hypothyroidism. Thyroid supplementation is suggested for patients with subclinical hypothyroidism if TSH values are above 10 mU/L; otherwise they should be followed up annually, as should patients with positive thyroid autoantibodies who are still euthyroid. PMID:1804288

  14. 42 CFR 441.40 - End-stage renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false End-stage renal disease. 441.40 Section 441.40... General Provisions § 441.40 End-stage renal disease. FFP in expenditures for services described in subpart A of part 440 is available for facility treatment of end-stage renal disease only if the...

  15. 42 CFR 441.40 - End-stage renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false End-stage renal disease. 441.40 Section 441.40... General Provisions § 441.40 End-stage renal disease. FFP in expenditures for services described in subpart A of part 440 is available for facility treatment of end-stage renal disease only if the...

  16. 42 CFR 441.40 - End-stage renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false End-stage renal disease. 441.40 Section 441.40... General Provisions § 441.40 End-stage renal disease. FFP in expenditures for services described in subpart A of part 440 is available for facility treatment of end-stage renal disease only if the...

  17. 42 CFR 441.40 - End-stage renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false End-stage renal disease. 441.40 Section 441.40... General Provisions § 441.40 End-stage renal disease. FFP in expenditures for services described in subpart A of part 440 is available for facility treatment of end-stage renal disease only if the...

  18. 42 CFR 441.40 - End-stage renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false End-stage renal disease. 441.40 Section 441.40... General Provisions § 441.40 End-stage renal disease. FFP in expenditures for services described in subpart A of part 440 is available for facility treatment of end-stage renal disease only if the...

  19. Dental considerations for the patient with renal disease receiving hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    De Rossi, S S; Glick, M

    1996-02-01

    An increasing number of Americans are living with end-stage renal disease. This disease has many implications for dentistry, in terms of oral manifestations and management of afflicted patients. The authors present pertinent information to help dentists treat patients who exhibit the oral and systemic manifestations of renal disease, from the onset of renal impairment through hemodialysis. PMID:8682990

  20. Fetal environment, epigenetics, and pediatric renal disease.

    PubMed

    Woroniecki, Robert; Gaikwad, Anil Bhanudas; Susztak, Katalin

    2011-05-01

    The notion that some adult diseases may have their origins in utero has recently captured scientists' attention. Some of these effects persist across generations and may involve epigenetic mechanisms. Epigenetic modifications, DNA methylation together with covalent modifications of histones, alter chromatin density and accessibility of DNA to cellular machinery, modulating the transcriptional potential of the underlying DNA sequence. Here, we will discuss the different epigenetic modifications and their potential role in and contribution to renal disease development. PMID:21174217

  1. Changes in Renal Function and Blood Pressure in Patients with Stone Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worcester, Elaine M.

    2007-04-01

    Stone disease is a rare cause of renal failure, but a history of kidney stones is associated with an increased risk for chronic kidney disease, particularly in overweight patients. Loss of renal function seems especially notable for patients with stones associated with cystinuria, hyperoxaluria, and renal tubular acidosis, in whom the renal pathology shows deposits of mineral obstructing inner medullary collecting ducts, often diffusely. However, even idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers have a mild but significant decrease in renal function, compared to age, sex and weight-matched normals, and appear to lose renal function with age at a slightly faster rate than non-stone formers. There is also an increased incidence of hypertension among stone formers, although women are more likely to be affected than men.

  2. Role of Myeloperoxidase in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kisic, Bojana; Miric, Dijana; Dragojevic, Ilija; Rasic, Julijana; Popovic, Ljiljana

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem. Patients with CKD have a number of disorders in the organism, and the presence of oxidative stress and systemic inflammation in these patients is the subject of numerous studies. Chronic inflammation joined with oxidative stress contributes to the development of numerous complications: accelerated atherosclerosis process and cardiovascular disease, emergence of Type 2 diabetes mellitus, development of malnutrition, anaemia, hyperparathyroidism, and so forth, affecting the prognosis and quality of life of patients with CKD. In this review we presented the potential role of the myeloperoxidase enzyme in the production of reactive/chlorinating intermediates and their role in oxidative damage to biomolecules in the body of patients with chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. In addition, we discussed the role of modified lipoprotein particles under the influence of prooxidant MPO intermediates in the development of endothelial changes and cardiovascular complications in renal failure. PMID:27127544

  3. [X-ray skeletal changes in children with chronic renal insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Ponhold, W; Balzar, E

    1983-01-01

    The typical changes of renal osteopathy are shown in the X-rays of 7 children with end-stage renal disease treated with chronic intermittent hemodialysis. The exact evaluation of the granular structural changes of the cranium, the evidence of osteomalacia because of the hazy appearance of the vertebrae and the broadening of the sacroiliac joints depend highly on subjective judgement and the technical X-ray procedures used. Unmistakable radiological diagnoses can be made when a broadening of the metaphyseal zones, epiphysiolysis as well as characteristic changes in the finger phalanges (acro-osteolyses, spicula, tunnelation) are present. PMID:6646792

  4. Is chronic renal failure a risk factor for the development of erosive osteoarthritis?

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, I J; Hurst, N P; Disney, A; Sebben, R; Milazzo, S C

    1989-01-01

    Erosive osteoarthritis of the hands of unusually early onset and severity was seen in two patients treated for chronic renal failure by long term haemodialysis and renal homograft respectively. The significance of this observation is discussed in the light of previous studies of erosive arthropathy in patients with chronic renal failure. Factors associated with chronic renal failure may predispose to the development of erosive osteoarthritis. Images PMID:2649026

  5. C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) deficiency ameliorates renal fibrosis in unilateral ureteral obstructive kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ching-Chia; Guan, Siao-Syun; Chen, Li-Ping; Chiang, Chih-Kang

    2016-01-01

    Renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis is an important pathogenic feature in chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease, regardless of the initiating insults. A recent study has shown that CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) homologous protein (CHOP) is involved in acute ischemia/reperfusion-related acute kidney injury through oxidative stress induction. However, the influence of CHOP on chronic kidney disease-correlated renal fibrosis remains unclear. Here, we investigated the role of CHOP in unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO)-induced experimental chronic tubulointerstital fibrosis. The CHOP knockout and wild type mice with or without UUO were used. The results showed that the increased expressions of renal fibrosis markers collagen I, fibronectin, α-smooth muscle actin, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in the kidneys of UUO-treated wild type mice were dramatically attenuated in the kidneys of UUO-treated CHOP knockout mice. CHOP deficiency could also ameliorate lipid peroxidation and endogenous antioxidant enzymes depletion, tubular apoptosis, and inflammatory cells infiltration in the UUO kidneys. These results suggest that CHOP deficiency not only attenuates apoptotic death and oxidative stress in experimental renal fibrosis, but also reduces local inflammation, leading to diminish UUO-induced renal fibrosis. Our findings support that CHOP may be an important signaling molecule in the progression of chronic kidney disease. PMID:26942460

  6. C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) deficiency ameliorates renal fibrosis in unilateral ureteral obstructive kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shing-Hwa; Wu, Cheng-Tien; Huang, Kuo-How; Wang, Ching-Chia; Guan, Siao-Syun; Chen, Li-Ping; Chiang, Chih-Kang

    2016-04-19

    Renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis is an important pathogenic feature in chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease, regardless of the initiating insults. A recent study has shown that CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) homologous protein (CHOP) is involved in acute ischemia/reperfusion-related acute kidney injury through oxidative stress induction. However, the influence of CHOP on chronic kidney disease-correlated renal fibrosis remains unclear. Here, we investigated the role of CHOP in unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO)-induced experimental chronic tubulointerstital fibrosis. The CHOP knockout and wild type mice with or without UUO were used. The results showed that the increased expressions of renal fibrosis markers collagen I, fibronectin, α-smooth muscle actin, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in the kidneys of UUO-treated wild type mice were dramatically attenuated in the kidneys of UUO-treated CHOP knockout mice. CHOP deficiency could also ameliorate lipid peroxidation and endogenous antioxidant enzymes depletion, tubular apoptosis, and inflammatory cells infiltration in the UUO kidneys. These results suggest that CHOP deficiency not only attenuates apoptotic death and oxidative stress in experimental renal fibrosis, but also reduces local inflammation, leading to diminish UUO-induced renal fibrosis. Our findings support that CHOP may be an important signaling molecule in the progression of chronic kidney disease. PMID:26942460

  7. Extra-renal manifestations of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD): considerations for routine screening and management.

    PubMed

    Luciano, Randy L; Dahl, Neera K

    2014-02-01

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a systemic disease, marked by progressive increase of bilateral renal cysts, resulting in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and often leading to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Apart from renal cysts, patients often have extra-renal disease, involving the liver, heart and vasculature. Other less common but equally important extra-renal manifestations of ADPKD include diverticular disease, hernias, male infertility and pain. Extra-renal disease burden is often asymptomatic, but may result in increased morbidity and mortality. If the disease burden is significant, screening may prove beneficial. We review the rationale for current screening recommendations and propose some guidelines for screening and management of ADPKD patients. PMID:24215018

  8. Acute toxic effects of sustained-release verapamil in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Pritza, D R; Bierman, M H; Hammeke, M D

    1991-10-01

    Four hypertensive patients with chronic renal insufficiency or end-stage renal disease who were treated with sustained-release verapamil hydrochloride subsequently developed acute toxic effects. All four patients developed varying degrees of atrioventricular heart block, hypotension, hyperkalemia, metabolic acidosis, and hepatic dysfunction. Supportive treatment consisted of intravenous catecholamines, sodium polystyrene sulfonate, and dialysis, and all patients recovered completely without any residual hepatic or cardiac disease. Patients with renal impairment who are treated with sustained-release verapamil may accumulate verapamil or its metabolites and develop toxic side effects. We conclude that sustained-release verapamil should be used with caution in this patient population and that patients should be closely monitored for adverse cardiovascular, metabolic, and hepatic side effects. PMID:1843183

  9. Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alternate Language URL Español Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines: What You Need to Know Page Content What ... pharmacist and provider need to know about your medicine and supplement use Your kidneys do not filter ...

  10. Regulation of renal sympathetic neurotransmission by renal α2A-adrenoceptors is impaired in chronic renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Hoch, Henning; Stegbauer, Johannes; Potthoff, Sebastian A; Hein, Lutz; Quack, Ivo; Rump, Lars Christian; Vonend, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The mechanisms underlying increased renal noradrenaline in renal failure are still unclear. In this study, the role of α2A-adrenoceptors in controlling sympathetic neurotransmission in chronic renal failure was evaluated in a subtotal nephrectomy model. Also, the influence of this receptor subtype on angiotensin II (Ang II)-mediated noradrenaline release was evaluated. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH α2A-Adrenoceptor-knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice underwent subtotal (5/6) nephrectomy (SNx) or SHAM-operation (SHAM). Kidneys of WT and KO mice were isolated and perfused. Renal nerves were stimulated with platinum electrodes and noradrenaline release was measured by HPLC. KEY RESULTS Noradrenaline release induced by renal nerve stimulation (RNS) was significantly increased in WT mice after SNx. RNS-induced noradrenaline release was significantly higher in SHAM-KO compared with SHAM-WT, but no further increase in noradrenaline release could be observed in SNx-KO. α-Adrenoceptor antagonists increased RNS-induced noradrenaline release in SHAM-WT but not in SHAM-KO. After SNx, the effect of α2-adrenoceptor blockade on renal noradrenaline release was attenuated in WT mice. The mRNA expression of α2A-adrenoceptors was not altered, but the inhibitory effect of α2-adrenoceptor agonists on cAMP formation was abolished after SNx. Ang II facilitated RNS-induced noradrenaline release in SHAM-WT but not in SHAM-KO and SNx-WT. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS In our model of renal failure autoregulation of renal sympathetic neurotransmission was impaired. Presynaptic inhibition of noradrenaline release was diminished and the facilitatory effect of presynaptic angiotensin AT1 receptors on noradrenaline release was markedly decreased in renal failure and depended on functioning α2A-adrenoceptors. PMID:21244368

  11. Pattern and outcome of renal diseases in hospitalized children in Khartoum State, Sudan*

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Amal H. A; Karrar, Zein A.

    2012-01-01

    In developing countries, renal diseases in children constitute important causes of morbidity and mortality. In Sudan, data about patterns and outcome of these disorders is generally scanty. We conducted this study to provide basic renal data that may be utilized by researchers and health planners in a resource poor setting. A retrospective record review of all pediatric patients, followed in four teaching hospitals in Khartoum State over a five-year period (January 2000-June 2004), was achieved. In 150 hospitalized children a total of 200 renal diagnoses were recorded. Urinary tract infection (UTI), occurring with other underlying renal morbidities or isolated, was the commonest renal diagnosis (20%). The second common renal disorders were nephrotic syndrome (NS) and urolithiasis/stones accounting for 16% and 15.5% of cases, respectively. Acute glomerulonephritis (AGN) and congenital anomalies were relatively less common (12% and 10.5%, respectively). Other less frequently detected diseases were acute renal failure (ARF) in 6%, chronic renal failure (CRF) in 4%, hereditary nephropathies in 3.5% and renal tumors in 2.5%. There was a significant correlation between the pattern of renal diseases and age of patients (P =0.001) but not their gender or social class (P = 0.211 and 0.34, respectively). On follow up, 99 out of 150 patients (66%) recovered their normal renal function, 6/150 (4%) remained with persistent proteinuria, 30/150 (20%) progressed to CRF, 10/150 (6.7%) died, and 5/150 (3.3%) were referred to radiotherapy department for further management. Our data reflects geographical variations of patterns of renal diseases in Sudanese children as in other countries. Many of these diseases are preventable or potentially curable. Therefore, improvement of pediatric renal services and training of health workers would help in early detection and treatment of these conditions leading to reduction in their morbidity and mortality.

  12. Asymmetric Dimethylarginine, Endothelial Dysfunction and Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aldámiz-Echevarría, Luis; Andrade, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    l-Arginine (Arg) is oxidized to l-citrulline and nitric oxide (NO) by the action of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS). In contrast, protein-incorporated Arg residues can be methylated with subsequent proteolysis giving rise to methylarginine compounds, such as asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) that competes with Arg for binding to NOS. Most ADMA is degraded by dimethylarginine dimethyaminohydrolase (DDAH), distributed widely throughout the body and regulates ADMA levels and, therefore, NO synthesis. In recent years, several studies have suggested that increased ADMA levels are a marker of atherosclerotic change, and can be used to assess cardiovascular risk, consistent with ADMA being predominantly absorbed by endothelial cells. NO is an important messenger molecule involved in numerous biological processes, and its activity is essential to understand both pathogenic and therapeutic mechanisms in kidney disease and renal transplantation. NO production is reduced in renal patients because of their elevated ADMA levels with associated reduced DDAH activity. These factors contribute to endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress and the progression of renal damage, but there are treatments that may effectively reduce ADMA levels in patients with kidney disease. Available data on ADMA levels in controls and renal patients, both in adults and children, also are summarized in this review. PMID:23109853

  13. Is Progressive Chronic Kidney Disease a Slow Acute Kidney Injury?

    PubMed

    Cowgill, Larry D; Polzin, David J; Elliott, Jonathan; Nabity, Mary B; Segev, Gilad; Grauer, Gregory F; Brown, Scott; Langston, Cathy; van Dongen, Astrid M

    2016-11-01

    International Renal Interest Society chronic kidney disease Stage 1 and acute kidney injury Grade I categorizations of kidney disease are often confused or ignored because patients are nonazotemic and generally asymptomatic. Recent evidence suggests these seemingly disparate conditions may be mechanistically linked and interrelated. Active kidney injury biomarkers have the potential to establish a new understanding for traditional views of chronic kidney disease, including its early identification and possible mediators of its progression, which, if validated, would establish a new and sophisticated paradigm for the understanding and approach to the diagnostic evaluation, and treatment of urinary disease in dogs and cats. PMID:27593574

  14. Recurrent and de novo disease after renal transplantation: a report from the Renal Allograft Disease Registry.

    PubMed

    Hariharan, Sundaram; Savin, Virginia J

    2004-08-01

    Recurrent and de novo disease is an increasing problem and is known to negatively impact transplant graft survival. Immunosuppressive medications have not had an impact on the prevalence of recurrent and de novo disease. Renal Allograft Disease Registry (RADR) was established to study the prevalence, impact and risk factors for the development of recurrent and de novo disease. Retrospective and prospective study on recurrent disease is discussed in this manuscript. PMID:15265160

  15. Lipoprotein X Causes Renal Disease in LCAT Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Thacker, Seth G.; Vaisman, Boris; Pryor, Milton; Freeman, Lita A.; Brantner, Christine A.; Baranova, Irina; Francone, Nicolás O.; Demosky, Stephen J.; Vitali, Cecilia; Locatelli, Monica; Abbate, Mauro; Zoja, Carlamaria; Franceschini, Guido; Calabresi, Laura; Remaley, Alan T.

    2016-01-01

    Human familial lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) deficiency (FLD) is characterized by low HDL, accumulation of an abnormal cholesterol-rich multilamellar particle called lipoprotein-X (LpX) in plasma, and renal disease. The aim of our study was to determine if LpX is nephrotoxic and to gain insight into the pathogenesis of FLD renal disease. We administered a synthetic LpX, nearly identical to endogenous LpX in its physical, chemical and biologic characteristics, to wild-type and Lcat-/- mice. Our in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated an apoA-I and LCAT-dependent pathway for LpX conversion to HDL-like particles, which likely mediates normal plasma clearance of LpX. Plasma clearance of exogenous LpX was markedly delayed in Lcat-/- mice, which have low HDL, but only minimal amounts of endogenous LpX and do not spontaneously develop renal disease. Chronically administered exogenous LpX deposited in all renal glomerular cellular and matrical compartments of Lcat-/- mice, and induced proteinuria and nephrotoxic gene changes, as well as all of the hallmarks of FLD renal disease as assessed by histological, TEM, and SEM analyses. Extensive in vivo EM studies revealed LpX uptake by macropinocytosis into mouse glomerular endothelial cells, podocytes, and mesangial cells and delivery to lysosomes where it was degraded. Endocytosed LpX appeared to be degraded by both human podocyte and mesangial cell lysosomal PLA2 and induced podocyte secretion of pro-inflammatory IL-6 in vitro and renal Cxl10 expression in Lcat-/- mice. In conclusion, LpX is a nephrotoxic particle that in the absence of Lcat induces all of the histological and functional hallmarks of FLD and hence may serve as a biomarker for monitoring recombinant LCAT therapy. In addition, our studies suggest that LpX-induced loss of endothelial barrier function and release of cytokines by renal glomerular cells likely plays a role in the initiation and progression of FLD nephrosis. PMID:26919698

  16. Lipoprotein X Causes Renal Disease in LCAT Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ossoli, Alice; Neufeld, Edward B; Thacker, Seth G; Vaisman, Boris; Pryor, Milton; Freeman, Lita A; Brantner, Christine A; Baranova, Irina; Francone, Nicolás O; Demosky, Stephen J; Vitali, Cecilia; Locatelli, Monica; Abbate, Mauro; Zoja, Carlamaria; Franceschini, Guido; Calabresi, Laura; Remaley, Alan T

    2016-01-01

    Human familial lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) deficiency (FLD) is characterized by low HDL, accumulation of an abnormal cholesterol-rich multilamellar particle called lipoprotein-X (LpX) in plasma, and renal disease. The aim of our study was to determine if LpX is nephrotoxic and to gain insight into the pathogenesis of FLD renal disease. We administered a synthetic LpX, nearly identical to endogenous LpX in its physical, chemical and biologic characteristics, to wild-type and Lcat-/- mice. Our in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated an apoA-I and LCAT-dependent pathway for LpX conversion to HDL-like particles, which likely mediates normal plasma clearance of LpX. Plasma clearance of exogenous LpX was markedly delayed in Lcat-/- mice, which have low HDL, but only minimal amounts of endogenous LpX and do not spontaneously develop renal disease. Chronically administered exogenous LpX deposited in all renal glomerular cellular and matrical compartments of Lcat-/- mice, and induced proteinuria and nephrotoxic gene changes, as well as all of the hallmarks of FLD renal disease as assessed by histological, TEM, and SEM analyses. Extensive in vivo EM studies revealed LpX uptake by macropinocytosis into mouse glomerular endothelial cells, podocytes, and mesangial cells and delivery to lysosomes where it was degraded. Endocytosed LpX appeared to be degraded by both human podocyte and mesangial cell lysosomal PLA2 and induced podocyte secretion of pro-inflammatory IL-6 in vitro and renal Cxl10 expression in Lcat-/- mice. In conclusion, LpX is a nephrotoxic particle that in the absence of Lcat induces all of the histological and functional hallmarks of FLD and hence may serve as a biomarker for monitoring recombinant LCAT therapy. In addition, our studies suggest that LpX-induced loss of endothelial barrier function and release of cytokines by renal glomerular cells likely plays a role in the initiation and progression of FLD nephrosis. PMID:26919698

  17. Image diagnosis of parathyroid glands in chronic renal failure

    SciTech Connect

    Takagi, H.; Tominaga, Y.; Uchida, K.; Yamada, N.; Morimoto, T.; Yasue, M.

    1983-07-01

    Twenty-two out of 31 patients with chronic renal failure and secondary hyperparathyroidism who underwent parathyroidectomy before operation underwent non-invasive image diagnosis of parathyroid glands by computed tomography (CT), scintigraphy with /sup 201/TlCl and /sup 99m/TcO/sup 4 +/, and/or ultrasonography. CT visualized 39 of 45 parathyroid glands (86.7%), weighing more than 500 mg. Scintigraphy with a subtraction method using a computer performed the diagnosis in 19 of 27 glands (70.4%). Ultrasonography detected 21 of 27 glands (77.8%). Image diagnosis was also useful in the postoperative follow-up study. The non-invasive image diagnosis of parathyroid glands in patients with chronic renal failure is thus valuable for 1) definite diagnosis of secondary hyperparathyroidism, 2) localization, and 3) diagnosis for effectiveness of conservative treatment.

  18. [Carbonyl stress and oxidatively modified proteins in chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Bargnoux, A-S; Morena, M; Badiou, S; Dupuy, A-M; Canaud, B; Cristol, J-P

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress is commonly observed in chronic renal failure patients resulting from an unbalance between overproduction of reactive oxygen species and impairement of defense mechanisms. Proteins appear as potential targets of uremia-induced oxidative stress and may undergo qualitative modifications. Proteins could be directly modified by reactive oxygen species which leads to amino acid oxydation and cross-linking. Proteins could be indirectly modified by reactive carbonyl compounds produced by glycoxidation and lipo-peroxidation. The resulting post-traductional modifications are known as carbonyl stress. In addition, thiols could be oxidized or could react with homocystein leading to homocysteinylation. Finally, tyrosin could be oxidized by myeloperoxidase leading to advanced oxidative protein products (AOPP). Oxidatively modified proteins are increased in chronic renal failure patients and may contribute to exacerbate the oxidative stress/inflammation syndrome. They have been involved in long term complications of uremia such as amyloidosis and accelerated atherosclerosis. PMID:19297289

  19. Effects of long-term training on the progression of chronic renal failure in rats.

    PubMed

    Bergamaschi, C T; Boim, M A; Moura, L A; Piçarro, I C; Schor, N

    1997-02-01

    To evaluate the effects of long-term exercise on the progression of chronic renal failure (CRF), adult Munich-Wistar rats with 5/6 renal mass ablation were submitted to treadmill exercise for 30 min 5 times/wk for 60 d. Whole kidney function and glomerular hemodynamics, proteinuria, and glomerular sclerosis were evaluated in 4 groups: Control, Sham trained (Sham + Ex), rats submitted to 5/6 nephrectomy (CRF) and maintained sedentary, and rats with 5/6 nephrectomy and trained (CRF + Ex). The groups with chronic renal failure (sedentary and trained) presented a reduction in total glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and in renal plasma flow (RPF), accompanied by an increase in single nephron GFR (SNGFR) and glomerular plasma flow (QA). However, the CRF + EX group did not show the glomerular hypertension observed in the CRF group. Despite the normalization of glomerular hypertension, proteinuria and sclerosis index were not different from the CRF sedentary group. Physical training provoked a vasodilatation of efferent arterioles, which induced the normalization of glomerular hypertension. These results suggest that the reduction alone of glomerular hypertension induced by exercise does not prevent the progression of renal disease, indicating the participation of other associated factors in this experimental model. PMID:9044218

  20. Chronic Beryllium Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... an immune response or “allergy” to beryllium metal, ceramic or alloy, termed beryllium sensitization (BeS). Beryllium sensitization ... Mroz MM, Newman LS. Beryllium disease screening in ceramics industry: Blood test performance and exposure-disease relations. ...

  1. Albuminuria and chronic kidney disease in association with the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ninomiya, Toshiharu; Kiyohara, Yutaka

    2007-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a worldwide public health problem because it is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and premature death. The metabolic syndrome, which is characterized by abdominal obesity, high blood pressure, impaired glucose tolerance, and dyslipidemia, is also an increasingly common disorder and a major risk factor for diabetes and cardiovascular disease. A close association has been found between the metabolic syndrome and the risk for developing renal impairment, clinically expressed in the form of microalbuminuria or chronic kidney disease. Several potential mechanisms, including insulin resistance, renal atherosclerosis, and inflammation, induce the deterioration of renal function. Despite the close association between the metabolic syndrome and renal impairment, it is still unclear whether and to what extent treating the metabolic syndrome will prevent renal impairment. A clinical trial is needed to clarify whether the effect of preventing and treating metabolic syndrome components will result in improved renal prognosis. PMID:17684460

  2. The pharmacokinetics of nortriptyline in patients with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Dawlilng, S; Lynn, K; Rosser, R; Braithwaite, R

    1981-01-01

    1 The pharmacokinetics of single oral doses of nortriptyline were studied in twenty patients with chronic renal failure, eight of whom were receiving treatment with haemodialysis. 2 The median nortriptyline half-life was 25.2 h (range 14.5-140.0 h) and the median nortriptyline clearance was 32.3 l/h (range 8.1-122.0 l/h). 3 No differences were observed between the dialysed and non-dialysed groups. 4 Comparisons of nortriptyline half-life and clearance between the patients and groups of physically healthy subjects revealed no significant differences. 5 There was no significant linear correlation between age and either of these measurements. In the twelve patients not receiving haemodialysis there was no correlation between nortriptyline clearance and glomerular filtration rate. 6 Chronic renal failure is not associated with a significant alteration in nortriptyline metabolism as measured by its half-life or clearance, but the drug should nonetheless be used with caution, and monitored whenever possible. However, the marked inter-individual differences observed in nortriptyline half-life and clearance in patients with chronic renal failure may not be solely responsible for their unpredictable response to tricyclic antidepressant therapy, and other possible contributory factors are discussed. PMID:7248140

  3. Children, Sports, and Chronic Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Barry

    1990-01-01

    Discusses four chronic diseases (cystic fibrosis, congenital heart disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and asthma) that affect American children. Many have their physical activities unnecessarily restricted, though sports and exercise can actually alleviate symptoms and improve their psychosocial development. Physicians are encouraged to prescribe…

  4. Nutrition in the critical care settings of renal diseases.

    PubMed

    Moore, L W; Acchiardo, S R; Smith, S O; Gaber, A O

    1996-07-01

    Acute catabolic events during the course of renal dysfunction lead to exacerbation of nutritional abnormalities often present in these patients. Whether the renal failure is acute or chronic, the nutritional management of these patients is extremely challenging. Traditional methods of nutritional assessment must be extrapolated to include the effects of the renal dysfunction and renal replacement therapy being used. Cases of patients with acute renal failure, chronic renal failure with an acute insult, pancreas-kidney transplant recipient with delayed graft function, and a liver transplant recipient who developed renal failure are reviewed with emphasis on the nutritional management during the course of illness. Monitoring techniques are reviewed, and comparisons are made to other nutrition support protocols. PMID:8827206

  5. Aluminium toxicity in chronic renal insufficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Savory, J.; Bertholf, R.L.; Wills, M.R.

    1985-08-01

    Aluminium is a ubiquitous element in the environment and has been demonstrated to be toxic, especially in individuals with impaired renal function. Not much is known about the biochemistry of aluminium and the mechanisms of its toxic effects. Most of the interest in aluminium has been in the clinical setting of the hemodialysis unit. Here aluminium toxicity occurs due to contamination of dialysis solutions, and treatment of the patients with aluminium-containing phosphate binding gels. Aluminium has been shown to be the major contributor to the dialysis encephalopathy syndrome and an osteomalacic component of dialysis osteodystrophy. Other clinical disturbances associated with aluminium toxicity are a microcytic anemia and metastatic extraskeletal calcification. Aluminium overload can be treated effectively by chelation therapy with desferrioxamine and hemodialysis. Aluminium is readily transferred from the dialysate to the patient's -bloodstream during hemodialysis. Once transferred, the aluminium is tightly bound to non-dialysable plasma constituents. Very low concentrations of dialysate aluminium in the range of 10-15 micrograms/l are recommended to guard against toxic effects. Very few studies have been directed towards the separation of the various plasma species which bind eluminium. Gel filtration chromatography has been used to identify five major fractions, one of which is of low molecular weight and the others appear to be protein-aluminium complexes. Recommendations on aluminium monitoring have been published and provide safe and toxic concentrations. Also, the frequency of monitoring has been addressed. Major problems exist with the analytical methods for measuring aluminium which result from inaccurate techniques and contamination difficulties. 136 references.

  6. Renal Autoregulation in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Carlström, Mattias; Wilcox, Christopher S.; Arendshorst, William J.

    2015-01-01

    . Reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide are modulators of myogenic and MD-TGF mechanisms. Attenuated renal autoregulation contributes to renal damage in many, but not all, models of renal, diabetic, and hypertensive diseases. This review provides a summary of our current knowledge regarding underlying mechanisms enabling renal autoregulation in health and disease and methods used for its study. PMID:25834230

  7. Depressive Symptomatology in Children and Adolescents with Chronic Renal Insufficiency Undergoing Chronic Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Edith G.; Loza, Reyner; Vargas, Horacio; Jara, Mercedes F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a descriptive study, using the Birleson Scale to determine the frequency of depressive symptomatology in children and adolescents with chronic renal insufficiency (CRI) undergoing hemodialysis (HD) and chronic peritoneal dialysis (CPD). There were 67 patients (40 female and 27 male) with a mean age of 14.76 ± 2.71 years, duration of illness ≥3 months, 43 (64.18%) patients with CPD and 24 (35.82%) undergoing HD. The frequency of high occurrence, low occurrence, and absence of depressive symptomatology was 10.45% (n = 7), 43.28% (n = 29), and 46.27% (n = 31), respectively; all of the seven (100%) patients with high occurrence of depressive symptomatology were female (P = 0.04), and none of these (0%) had a friend to confide in (P = 0.03). Depressive symptomatology in patients with CPD was associated with a lower weekly Kt/V compared to those without depressive symptomatology (2.15 ± 0.68 versus 2.52 ± 0.65; P = 0.01). There was no association with patient age, caregiver, time and dialysis type, anemia, bone disease, nutritional or financial status, origin, schooling, or employment. PMID:21941654

  8. [Decline in renal function in old age : Part of physiological aging versus age-related disease].

    PubMed

    Braun, F; Brinkkötter, P T

    2016-08-01

    The incidence and prevalence of chronic renal disease (CKD) in elderly patients are continuously increasing worldwide. Loss of renal function is not only considered to be part of the aging process itself but also reflects the multimorbidity of many geriatric patients. Calculating the glomerular filtration rate using specific algorithms validated for the elderly population and measuring the amount of proteinuria allow an estimation of renal function in elderly patients with high accuracy. Chronic renal failure has many clinical consequences and not only results in a delayed excretion of toxins cleared by the kidneys but also affects hematogenesis, water and electrolyte balance as well as mineral bone metabolism. Furthermore, CKD directly leads to and aggravates geriatric syndromes and in particular the onset of frailty. Therapeutic strategies to halt progression of CKD not only comprise treatment of the underlying disease but also efficient blood pressure and diabetic control and the avoidance of nephrotoxic medications. PMID:27457360

  9. Pulmonary function in chronic renal failure: effects of dialysis and transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Bush, A; Gabriel, R

    1991-01-01

    Many possible pulmonary complications of renal disease have been described, but little is known of their physiological importance or the effects on them of different forms of renal replacement therapy. Four groups were recruited, each containing 20 patients. The groups consisted of patients with chronic renal failure before dialysis (group 1); patients receiving continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis, never having received a transplant (group 2); patients receiving haemodialysis, never having received a transplant (group 3); and patients after their first successful cadaveric renal transplant (group 4). All were attending the same regional dialysis and transplant unit. None was known to have clinically important lung or chest wall disease. Flow-volume loops were recorded before and after 400 micrograms of salbutamol, and plethysmographic lung volumes and airway conductance and single breath carbon monoxide transfer factor were measured. Only nine of 80 patients had normal lung function. The reductions in spirometric values were minor. Whole lung carbon monoxide transfer factor was reduced in all groups (mean % predicted with 95% confidence intervals: group 1 81.7% (74-89%); group 2 69.7% (62-77%); group 3 87.5% (80-96%); group 4 82.5% (78-87%]. The values were significantly lower in those having continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (group 2). Residual volume was reduced significantly in the group who had undergone renal transplantation (85.7%, 77-94%). There was no correlation between these changes and smoking habit, age, duration or severity of renal failure, duration of treatment, or biochemical derangement. It is concluded that abnormal lung function is common in renal disease. The main change is a reduction in carbon monoxide transfer that persists after transplantation. The likeliest explanation is that subclinical pulmonary oedema progresses to fibrosis before transplantation. The fibrosis may worsen further to cause the reduced residual volume in the

  10. Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... on ClinicalTrials.gov . Related Links​ Primary Immune Deficiency Diseases (PIDDs) Immune System National Library of Medicine, Genetics Home Reference ​​​ Javascript Error Your browser JavaScript is turned off causing certain ... and Infectious Diseases web site to work incorrectly. Please visit your ...

  11. Ramadan fasting and patients with renal diseases: A mini review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Emami-Naini, Afsoon; Roomizadeh, Peyman; Baradaran, Azar; Abedini, Amin; Abtahi, Mohammad

    2013-08-01

    Fasting during the month of Ramadan is one of the five pillars of Islam. During this month, adult Muslims are obligated to refrain from eating and drinking from dawn to dusk. Although based on Islamic principles patients are exempted from fasting, each year, many Muslim patients express their willingness to observe the fast in Ramadan month to respect the cultural customs. There are concerns about the impact of fluid restriction and dehydration during Ramadan fasting for patients with renal diseases. In this study, we reviewed the PubMed, Google Scholar, EBSCO, SCIRUS, Embase, and DOAJ data sources to identify the published studies on the impact of Ramadan fasting on patients with renal diseases. Our review on published reports on renal transplant recipients revealed no injurious effect of Ramadan fasting for the renal graft function. Nearly all studies on this topic suggest that Ramadan fasting is safe when the function of the renal graft is acceptable and stable. Regarding the impact of Ramadan fasting on patients with chronic kidney disease, there is concern about the role of renal hypoperfusion in developing tubular cell injury. Finally, there is controversy between studies about the risk of dehydration in Ramadan in developing renal stones. There are uncertainties about the change in the incidence of renal colic in Ramadan month compared with the other periods of the year. Despite such discrepancies, nearly all studies are in agreement on consuming adequate amounts of water from dusk to dawn to reduce the risk of renal stone formation. PMID:24379850

  12. Management of the oral and maxillofacial surgery patient with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Ziccardi, V B; Saini, J; Demas, P N; Braun, T W

    1992-11-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) is the consequence of a multitude of diseases that cause permanent destruction of the nephron. Concurrent with renal failure are a host of changes affecting the homeostatic functioning of the individual. This report outlines the pathophysiology of CRF and highlights its effects on surgical manipulation of the oral and maxillofacial region in this patient population. In addition, some of the common physical findings and alterations in blood chemistries frequently observed in these patients are discussed. PMID:1403277

  13. End-stage renal disease in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Naicker, Saraladevi

    2009-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is at least 3-4 times more frequent in Africa than in developed countries. Hypertension affects approximately 25% of the adult population and is the cause of chronic kidney failure in 21% of patients on renal replacement therapy in the South African Registry. The prevalence of diabetic nephropathy is estimated to be 14%-16% in South Africa, 23.8% in Zambia, 12.4% in Egypt, 9% in Sudan, and 6.1% in Ethiopia. The current dialysis treatment rate ranges from 70 per million population (pmp) in South Africa to < 20 pmp in the most of sub-Saharan Africa. The transplant rate in Africa averages 4 pmp and is 9.2 pmp in South Africa. The goal for sub-Saharan Africa should be to have a circumscribed chronic dialysis program, with as short a time on dialysis as possible, and to increase the availability of transplantation (both living related and cadaver) and promotion of prevention strategies at all levels of health care. Screening for kidney disease in high-risk populations, eg, patients with hypertension and diabetes mellitus and a family history of kidney disease, should be instituted as the first step in kidney disease prevention in developing countries. PMID:19484867

  14. Iohexol clearance is superior to creatinine-based renal function estimating equations in detecting short-term renal function decline in chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Cvan Trobec, Katja; Kerec Kos, Mojca; von Haehling, Stephan; Anker, Stefan D.; Macdougall, Iain C.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Lainscak, Mitja

    2015-01-01

    Aim To compare the performance of iohexol plasma clearance and creatinine-based renal function estimating equations in monitoring longitudinal renal function changes in chronic heart failure (CHF) patients, and to assess the effects of body composition on the equation performance. Methods Iohexol plasma clearance was measured in 43 CHF patients at baseline and after at least 6 months. Simultaneously, renal function was estimated with five creatinine-based equations (four- and six-variable Modification of Diet in Renal Disease, Cockcroft-Gault, Cockcroft-Gault adjusted for lean body mass, Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation) and body composition was assessed using bioimpedance and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Results Over a median follow-up of 7.5 months (range 6-17 months), iohexol clearance significantly declined (52.8 vs 44.4 mL/[min ×1.73 m2], P = 0.001). This decline was significantly higher in patients receiving mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists at baseline (mean decline -22% of baseline value vs -3%, P = 0.037). Mean serum creatinine concentration did not change significantly during follow-up and no creatinine-based renal function estimating equation was able to detect the significant longitudinal decline of renal function determined by iohexol clearance. After accounting for body composition, the accuracy of the equations improved, but not their ability to detect renal function decline. Conclusions Renal function measured with iohexol plasma clearance showed relevant decline in CHF patients, particularly in those treated with mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists. None of the equations for renal function estimation was able to detect these changes. ClinicalTrials.gov registration number NCT01829880 PMID:26718759

  15. Diagnosing and treating renal disease in cirrhotic patients.

    PubMed

    Wong, Florence

    2016-09-01

    Renal dysfunction in cirrhosis is mostly related to the development of acute kidney injury (AKI), precipitated by either an acute disturbance of hemodynamics, or acute structural damage to the kidneys. The incidence of chronic renal failure is rising, due to increasing prevalence of conditions such as diabetes, viral hepatitis, which can be associated with renal damage. AKI is defined as a rise in serum creatinine of 0.3 mg/dL in <48 hours or by 50% from baseline within the past 3 months without setting a threshold for the final serum creatinine. Stages 1, 2, and 3 of AKI are defined as 150%, 200% and 300% of baseline serum creatinine respectively, which allows for assessment of AKI progression. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate of <60 mL/min for >3 months. Treatment of AKI consists of removal of precipitating factors and replenishment of the intravascular volume using colloids such as albumin. Frequently, AKI can be reversed using these measures alone. Non-responders to removal of precipitating factors and volume challenge can receive vasoconstrictors such as terlipressin or norepinephrine together with albumin. Midodrine is inferior in efficacy as a vasoconstrictor when compared to terlipressin. Liver transplantation is the definitive treatment for type 1 hepatorenal syndrome with liver failure. Delay in receiving a liver transplant can result in non-recovery of renal function post transplant. Treatment of CKD in cirrhosis is unsatisfactory, mostly aimed at optimizing management of comorbid conditions, or treating the underlying refractory ascites in patients with type 2 hepatorenal syndrome. PMID:27096702

  16. [Chronic Kidney Disease and Bone].

    PubMed

    James, Junichiro

    2016-08-01

    Both bone and kidney are members of the physiological network sharing a purpose of systemic mineral metabolism. In patients with chronic kidney disease whose kidney function is lost, the organ functions of other mineral metabolism network member including bone fail into uncontrollable due to dysregulated feedback system. This is the concept of Chronic Kidney Disease(related)- Mineral and Bone Disorder(CKD-MBD). However, the bone metabolic abnormalities in patients with chronic kidney disease cannot be explained merely by the framework of this mineral metabolism network. Although dialysis patients show several times higher hip fracture risk than general population, the main pathogenesis seems not to be their disordered mineral metabolism. We need to consider "uremic osteoporosis" characterized by deteriorated bone material properties due to uremic condition. PMID:27461505

  17. Homocystein as a Risk Factor for Developing Complications in Chronic Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Jakovljevic, Biljana; Gasic, Branislav; Kovacevic, Pedja; Rajkovaca, Zvezdana; Kovacevic, Tijana

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Cardiovascular diseases are leading cause of death in patients with chronic renal failure. The aim of our study was to establish connection between levels of homocysteine and traditional and nontraditional risk factors for developing cardiovascular diseases in dialysis and pre dialysis patients. Methods: We included 33 pre dialysis (23 in stage three and 10 in stage four of chronic kidney disease) and 43 patients receiving hemodialysis longer than six months. Besides standard laboratory parameters, levels of homocysteine and blood pressure were measured in all patients. Glomerular filtration rate was measured in pre dialysis patients and dialysis quality parameters in dialysis patients. Results: Homocysteine levels were elevated in all patients (19±5.42mmol/l). The connection between homocysteine levels and other cardiovascular diseases risk factors was not established in pre dialysis patients. In patients treated with hemodialysis we found negative correlation between homocysteine levels and patients’ age (p<0.05) and positive correlation between homocysteine levels and length of dialysis (p<0.01) as well as between homocysteine and anemia parameters (erythrocytes, hemoglobin), (p<0.01). Homocysteine and LDL (and total cholesterol) were in negative correlation (p<0.01). Conclusion: Homocysteine, as one of nontraditional cardiovascular diseases risk factors, is elevated in all patients with chronic renal failure and it’s positive correlation with some other risk factors was found. PMID:26005384

  18. Genetic link between renal birth defects and congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    San Agustin, Jovenal T.; Klena, Nikolai; Granath, Kristi; Panigrahy, Ashok; Stewart, Eileen; Devine, William; Strittmatter, Lara; Jonassen, Julie A.; Liu, Xiaoqin; Lo, Cecilia W.; Pazour, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    Structural birth defects in the kidney and urinary tract are observed in 0.5% of live births and are a major cause of end-stage renal disease, but their genetic aetiology is not well understood. Here we analyse 135 lines of mice identified in large-scale mouse mutagenesis screen and show that 29% of mutations causing congenital heart disease (CHD) also cause renal anomalies. The renal anomalies included duplex and multiplex kidneys, renal agenesis, hydronephrosis and cystic kidney disease. To assess the clinical relevance of these findings, we examined patients with CHD and observed a 30% co-occurrence of renal anomalies of a similar spectrum. Together, these findings demonstrate a common shared genetic aetiology for CHD and renal anomalies, indicating that CHD patients are at increased risk for complications from renal anomalies. This collection of mutant mouse models provides a resource for further studies to elucidate the developmental link between renal anomalies and CHD. PMID:27002738

  19. Genetic link between renal birth defects and congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    San Agustin, Jovenal T; Klena, Nikolai; Granath, Kristi; Panigrahy, Ashok; Stewart, Eileen; Devine, William; Strittmatter, Lara; Jonassen, Julie A; Liu, Xiaoqin; Lo, Cecilia W; Pazour, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    Structural birth defects in the kidney and urinary tract are observed in 0.5% of live births and are a major cause of end-stage renal disease, but their genetic aetiology is not well understood. Here we analyse 135 lines of mice identified in large-scale mouse mutagenesis screen and show that 29% of mutations causing congenital heart disease (CHD) also cause renal anomalies. The renal anomalies included duplex and multiplex kidneys, renal agenesis, hydronephrosis and cystic kidney disease. To assess the clinical relevance of these findings, we examined patients with CHD and observed a 30% co-occurrence of renal anomalies of a similar spectrum. Together, these findings demonstrate a common shared genetic aetiology for CHD and renal anomalies, indicating that CHD patients are at increased risk for complications from renal anomalies. This collection of mutant mouse models provides a resource for further studies to elucidate the developmental link between renal anomalies and CHD. PMID:27002738

  20. Chronic granulomatous disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... immune system cells called phagocytes are unable to kill some types of bacteria and fungi. This disorder ... diagnose the disease and find out whether the mother is a carrier Genetic testing to confirm the ...

  1. About Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  2. Diet and Chronic Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Factors that improve insulin sensitivity usually lead to improvements in risk factors associated with the metabolic syndrome, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Naturally occurring bioactive compounds that have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity include chromium and polyphenols found in c...

  3. Role of NADPH Oxidase in Metabolic Disease-Related Renal Injury: An Update.

    PubMed

    Wan, Cheng; Su, Hua; Zhang, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome has been linked to an increased risk of chronic kidney disease. The underlying pathogenesis of metabolic disease-related renal injury remains obscure. Accumulating evidence has shown that NADPH oxidase is a major source of intrarenal oxidative stress and is upregulated by metabolic factors leading to overproduction of ROS in podocytes, endothelial cells, and mesangial cells in glomeruli, which is closely associated with the initiation and progression of glomerular diseases. This review focuses on the role of NADPH oxidase-induced oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of metabolic disease-related renal injury. Understanding of the mechanism may help find potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:27597884

  4. Role of NADPH Oxidase in Metabolic Disease-Related Renal Injury: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome has been linked to an increased risk of chronic kidney disease. The underlying pathogenesis of metabolic disease-related renal injury remains obscure. Accumulating evidence has shown that NADPH oxidase is a major source of intrarenal oxidative stress and is upregulated by metabolic factors leading to overproduction of ROS in podocytes, endothelial cells, and mesangial cells in glomeruli, which is closely associated with the initiation and progression of glomerular diseases. This review focuses on the role of NADPH oxidase-induced oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of metabolic disease-related renal injury. Understanding of the mechanism may help find potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:27597884

  5. Clinical value of natriuretic peptides in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Santos-Araújo, Carla; Leite-Moreira, Adelino; Pestana, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    According to several lines of evidence, natriuretic peptides (NP) are the main components of a cardiac-renal axis that operate in clinical conditions of decreased cardiac hemodynamic tolerance to regulate sodium homeostasis, blood pressure and vascular function. Even though it is reasonable to assume that NP may exert a relevant role in the adaptive response to renal mass ablation, evidence gathered so far suggest that this contribution is probably complex and dependent on the type and degree of the functional mass loss. In the last years NP have been increasingly used to diagnose, monitor treatment and define the prognosis of several cardiovascular (CV) diseases. However, in many clinical settings, like chronic kidney disease (CKD), the predictive value of these biomarkers has been questioned. In fact, it is now well established that renal function significantly affects the plasmatic levels of NP and that renal failure is the clinical condition associated with the highest plasmatic levels of these peptides. The complexity of the relation between NP plasmatic levels and CV and renal functions has obvious consequences, as it may limit the predictive value of NP in CV assessment of CKD patients and be a demanding exercise for clinicians involved in the daily management of these patients. This review describes the role of NP in the regulatory response to renal function loss and addresses the main factors involved in the clinical valorization of the peptides in the context of significant renal failure. PMID:26299165

  6. Antiviral treatment for chronic hepatitis B in renal transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Ridruejo, Ezequiel

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B infection is frequent in renal transplant patients. It negatively impacts long term outcomes reducing graft and patient survival. Current guidelines clearly define who needs treatment, when to start, what is the first line therapy, how to monitor treatment response, when to stop, and how patients must be controlled for its safety. There is some data showing a favorable safety and efficacy profile of nucleos(t)ide analogue (NUC) treatment in the renal transplant setting. Entecavir, a drug without major signs of nephrotoxicity, appears to be the first option for NUC naïve patients and tenofovir remains the preferred choice for patients with previous resistance to lamivudine or any other NUC. Renal transplant recipients under antiHBV therapy should be monitored for its efficacy against HBV but also for its safety with a close renal monitoring. Studies including a large number of patients with long term treatment and follow up are still needed to better demonstrate the safety and efficacy of newer NUCs in this population. PMID:25729474

  7. Osteoporosis across chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Guarino, M; Loperto, I; Camera, S; Cossiga, V; Di Somma, C; Colao, A; Caporaso, N; Morisco, F

    2016-06-01

    Osteoporosis is a complication of chronic liver disease, with impact on morbidity, quality of life, and survival. The progress of medicine and the new therapies stretched the disease's natural history and improved the survival of patients with liver disease. So, it is fundamental to make better the quality of life and to prevent complications. Metabolic bone disorders are common complications of chronic liver disease (CLD). Patients with CLD have an increased risk of bone fractures, with significant impact on morbidity, quality of life, and even on survival. Bone diseases, including osteomalacia, osteoporosis, and osteopenia, are frequently observed in many types of liver disease. The pathogenesis of damage and the mechanisms of bone loss are different in relation to the specific liver disease. The relevance of these conditions induced many authors to create a new nosographic entity known as "hepatic osteodystrophy", although this term is rarely used anymore and it is now commonly referred to as osteopenia or osteoporosis associated with chronic liver disease. This review is based on the personal experiences of the authors and upon research done of the available literature on this subject matter. The authors searched the PubMed database for publications containing the term "liver disease" in combination with "bone disease", "hepatic osteodistrophy", "osteoporosis", "osteopenia", "osteomalacia", and "fractures". They selected publications from the past 10 years but did not exclude older seminal publications, especially for colestatic liver diseases. This review of literature shows that osteoporosis crosses all CLD. It is important to underline that the progress of medicine and the new therapies stretched the disease's natural history and improved the survival of patients with CLD. It is fundamental to make better the quality of life and it is mandatory to prevent complications and in particular the osteoporotic ones, especially fractures. PMID:26846777

  8. Chronic Bronchitis and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Criner, Gerard J.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic bronchitis (CB) is a common but variable phenomenon in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). It has numerous clinical consequences, including an accelerated decline in lung function, greater risk of the development of airflow obstruction in smokers, a predisposition to lower respiratory tract infection, higher exacerbation frequency, and worse overall mortality. CB is caused by overproduction and hypersecretion of mucus by goblet cells, which leads to worsening airflow obstruction by luminal obstruction of small airways, epithelial remodeling, and alteration of airway surface tension predisposing to collapse. Despite its clinical sequelae, little is known about the pathophysiology of CB and goblet cell hyperplasia in COPD, and treatment options are limited. In addition, it is becoming increasingly apparent that in the classic COPD spectrum, with emphysema on one end and CB on the other, most patients lie somewhere in the middle. It is known now that many patients with severe emphysema can develop CB, and small airway pathology has been linked to worse clinical outcomes, such as increased mortality and lesser improvement in lung function after lung volume reduction surgery. However, in recent years, a greater understanding of the importance of CB as a phenotype to identify patients with a beneficial response to therapy has been described. Herein we review the epidemiology of CB, the evidence behind its clinical consequences, the current understanding of the pathophysiology of goblet cell hyperplasia in COPD, and current therapies for CB. PMID:23204254

  9. Central blood pressure and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Yoichi; Kanno, Yoshihiko; Takenaka, Tsuneo

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we focused on the relationship between central blood pressure and chronic kidney diseases (CKD). Wave reflection is a major mechanism that determines central blood pressure in patients with CKD. Recent medical technology advances have enabled non-invasive central blood pressure measurements. Clinical trials have demonstrated that compared with brachial blood pressure, central blood pressure is a stronger risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) and renal diseases. CKD is characterized by a diminished renal autoregulatory ability, an augmented direct transmission of systemic blood pressure to glomeruli, and an increase in proteinuria. Any elevation in central blood pressure accelerates CKD progression. In the kidney, interstitial inflammation induces oxidative stress to handle proteinuria. Oxidative stress facilitates atherogenesis, increases arterial stiffness and central blood pressure, and worsens the CV prognosis in patients with CKD. A vicious cycle exists between CKD and central blood pressure. To stop this cycle, vasodilator antihypertensive drugs and statins can reduce central blood pressure and oxidative stress. Even in early-stage CKD, mineral and bone disorders (MBD) may develop. MBD promotes oxidative stress, arteriosclerosis, and elevated central blood pressure in patients with CKD. Early intervention or prevention seems necessary to maintain vascular health in patients with CKD. PMID:26788468

  10. Chronic kidney disease and the skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Paul D

    2014-01-01

    Fractures across the stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) could be due to osteoporosis, some form of renal osteodystrophy defined by specific quantitative histomorphometry or chronic kidney disease–mineral and bone disorder (CKD–MBD). CKD–MBD is a systemic disease that links disorders of mineral and bone metabolism due to CKD to either one or all of the following: abnormalities of calcium, phosphorus, parathyroid hormone or vitamin D metabolism; abnormalities in bone turnover, mineralization, volume, linear growth or strength; or vascular or other soft-tissue calcification. Osteoporosis, as defined by the National Institutes of Health, may coexist with renal osteodystrophy or CKD–MBD. Differentiation among these disorders is required to manage correctly the correct disorder to reduce the risk of fractures. While the World Health Organization (WHO) bone mineral density (BMD) criteria for osteoporosis can be used in patients with stages 1–3 CKD, the disorders of bone turnover become so aberrant by stages 4 and 5 CKD that neither the WHO criteria nor the occurrence of a fragility fracture can be used for the diagnosis of osteoporosis. The diagnosis of osteoporosis in stages 4 and 5 CKD is one of the exclusion—excluding either renal osteodystrophy or CKD–MBD as the cause of low BMD or fragility fractures. Differentiations among the disorders of renal osteodystrophy, CKD–MBD or osteoporosis are dependent on the measurement of specific biochemical markers, including serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) and/or quantitative bone histomorphometry. Management of fractures in stages 1–3 CKD does not differ in persons with or without CKD with osteoporosis assuming that there is no evidence for CKD–MBD, clinically suspected by elevated PTH, hyperphosphatemia or fibroblast growth factor 23 due to CKD. Treatment of fractures in persons with osteoporosis and stages 4 and 5 CKD is not evidence-based, with the exception of post-hoc analysis suggesting efficacy and

  11. Interdisciplinary care clinics in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Johns, Tanya S; Yee, Jerry; Smith-Jules, Terrian; Campbell, Ruth C; Bauer, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    The burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is substantial, and is associated with high hospitalization rates, premature deaths, and considerable health care costs. These factors provide strong rationale for quality improvement initiatives in CKD care. The interdisciplinary care clinic (IDC) has emerged as one solution to improving CKD care. The IDC team may include other physicians, advanced practice providers, nurses, dietitians, pharmacists, and social workers--all working together to provide effective care to patients with chronic kidney disease. Studies suggest that IDCs may improve patient education and preparedness prior to kidney failure, both of which have been associated with improved health outcomes. Interdisciplinary care may also delay the progression to end-stage renal disease and reduce mortality. While most studies suggest that IDC services are likely cost-effective, financing IDCs is challenging and many insurance providers do not pay for all of the services. There are also no robust long-term studies demonstrating the cost-effectiveness of IDCs. This review discusses IDC models and its potential impact on CKD care as well as some of the challenges that may be associated with implementing these clinics. PMID:26458811

  12. Protective effects of genetic inhibition of Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 in experimental renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Kerroch, Monique; Alfieri, Carlo; Dorison, Aude; Boffa, Jean-Jacques; Chatziantoniou, Christos; Dussaule, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a progressive incurable pathology affecting millions of people. Intensive investigations aim to identify targets for therapy. We have previously demonstrated that abnormal expression of the Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 (DDR1) is a key factor of renal disease by promoting inflammation and fibrosis. The present study investigates whether blocking the expression of DDR1 after the initiation of renal disease can delay or arrest the progression of this pathology. Severe renal disease was induced by either injecting nephrotoxic serum (NTS) or performing unilateral ureteral obstruction in mice, and the expression of DDR1 was inhibited by administering antisense oligodeoxynucleotides either at 4 or 8 days after NTS (corresponding to early or more established phases of disease, respectively), or at day 2 after ligation. DDR1 antisense administration at day 4 stopped the increase of proteinuria and protected animals against the progression of glomeruloneprhitis, as evidenced by functional, structural and cellular indexes. Antisense administration at day 8 delayed progression –but to a smaller degree- of renal disease. Similar beneficial effects on renal structure and inflammation were observed with the antisense administration of DDR1 after ureteral ligation. Thus, targeting DDR1 can be a promising strategy in the treatment of chronic kidney disease. PMID:26880216

  13. Protective effects of genetic inhibition of Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 in experimental renal disease.

    PubMed

    Kerroch, Monique; Alfieri, Carlo; Dorison, Aude; Boffa, Jean-Jacques; Chatziantoniou, Christos; Dussaule, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a progressive incurable pathology affecting millions of people. Intensive investigations aim to identify targets for therapy. We have previously demonstrated that abnormal expression of the Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 (DDR1) is a key factor of renal disease by promoting inflammation and fibrosis. The present study investigates whether blocking the expression of DDR1 after the initiation of renal disease can delay or arrest the progression of this pathology. Severe renal disease was induced by either injecting nephrotoxic serum (NTS) or performing unilateral ureteral obstruction in mice, and the expression of DDR1 was inhibited by administering antisense oligodeoxynucleotides either at 4 or 8 days after NTS (corresponding to early or more established phases of disease, respectively), or at day 2 after ligation. DDR1 antisense administration at day 4 stopped the increase of proteinuria and protected animals against the progression of glomeruloneprhitis, as evidenced by functional, structural and cellular indexes. Antisense administration at day 8 delayed progression -but to a smaller degree- of renal disease. Similar beneficial effects on renal structure and inflammation were observed with the antisense administration of DDR1 after ureteral ligation. Thus, targeting DDR1 can be a promising strategy in the treatment of chronic kidney disease. PMID:26880216

  14. End stage renal disease and its dental management.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Dileep C G; Pradeep, A R

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, the incidence of renal disease has become more common in middle-aged to geriatric patients. This has led to greater exposure of dental surgeons to patients with renal disease and on hemodialysis. This article highlights the clinical features of patients with end-stage renal disease, the oral manifestations and the precautions to be taken while managing them in a dental setting. PMID:17378316

  15. Risk of sudden cardiac death in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Poulikakos, Dimitrios; Banerjee, Debasish; Malik, Marek

    2014-02-01

    The review discusses the epidemiology and the possible underlying mechanisms of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in chronic kidney disease (CKD), and highlights the unmet clinical need for noninvasive risk stratification strategies in these patients. Although renal dysfunction shares common risk factors and often coexists with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, the presence of renal impairment increases the risk of arrhythmic complications to an extent that cannot be explained by the severity of the atherosclerotic process. Renal impairment is an independent risk factor for SCD from the early stages of CKD; the risk increases as renal function declines and reaches very high levels in patients with end-stage renal disease on dialysis. Autonomic imbalance, uremic cardiomyopathy, and electrolyte disturbances likely play a role in increasing the arrhythmic risk and can be potential targets for treatment. Cardioverter defibrillator treatment could be offered as lifesaving treatment in selected patients, although selection strategies for this treatment mode are presently problematic in dialyzed patients. The review also examines the current experience with risk stratification tools in renal patients and suggests that noninvasive electrophysiological testing during dialysis may be of clinical value as it provides the necessary standardized environment for reproducible measurements for risk stratification purposes. PMID:24256575

  16. Renovascular disease, microcirculation, and the progression of renal injury: role of angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chade, Alejandro R

    2011-04-01

    Emerging evidence supports the pivotal role of renal microvascular disease as a determinant of tubulo-interstitial and glomerular fibrosis in chronic kidney disease. An intact microcirculation is vital to restore blood flow to the injured tissues, which is a crucial step to achieve a successful repair response. The purpose of this review is to discuss the impact and mechanisms of the functional and structural changes of the renal microvascular network, as well as the role of these changes in the progression and irreversibility of renal injury. Damage of the renal microcirculation and deterioration of the angiogenic response may constitute early steps in the complex pathways involved in progressive renal injury. There is limited but provocative evidence that stimulation of vascular proliferation and repair may stabilize renal function and slow the progression of renal disease. The feasibility of novel potential therapeutic interventions for stabilizing the renal microvasculature is also discussed. Targeted interventions to enhance endogenous renoprotective mechanisms focused on the microcirculation, such as cell-based therapy or the use of angiogenic cytokines have shown promising results in some experimental and clinical settings. PMID:21307362

  17. Mechanisms of progression of chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) occurs in all age groups, including children. Regardless of the underlying cause, CKD is characterized by progressive scarring that ultimately affects all structures of the kidney. The relentless progression of CKD is postulated to result from a self-perpetuating vicious cycle of fibrosis activated after initial injury. We will review possible mechanisms of progressive renal damage, including systemic and glomerular hypertension, various cytokines and growth factors, with special emphasis on the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS), podocyte loss, dyslipidemia and proteinuria. We will also discuss possible specific mechanisms of tubulointerstitial fibrosis that are not dependent on glomerulosclerosis, and possible underlying predispositions for CKD, such as genetic factors and low nephron number. PMID:17647026

  18. Insomnia in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Anett V; Novak, Marta; Bohra, Miqdad; Mucsi, Istvan

    2015-07-01

    Insomnia and poor self-perceived sleep are very common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Poor sleep is associated with fatigue, sleepiness, impaired daytime functioning, impaired health-related quality of life, and increased morbidity and mortality. Many illness- and treatment-related factors (metabolic changes, inflammation, altered sleep regulatory mechanisms, symptoms and complications of CKD, comorbid conditions, medications, and renal replacement therapies) may disturb sleep and contribute to the high prevalence of insomnia in this patient population. Accordingly, the approach to both diagnosing and treating this condition is quite complex. Although sleep-related problems are very important for patients with CKD, they largely are under-recognized and undertreated. Very few intervention trials provide an evidence base to support treatment decisions in this particular patient population. With this review we hope to increase awareness of insomnia among professionals involved in the management of patients with CKD and to provide guidance in recognizing and treating this important condition. PMID:26355254

  19. Differentiation of acute renal failure and chronic renal failure by 2-dimensional analysis of urinary dipeptidase versus serum creatinine.

    PubMed

    Lee, S H; Kang, B Y; We, J S; Park, S K; Park, H S

    1999-03-01

    The differential diagnosis of acute renal failure (ARF) and chronic renal failure (CRF) may be possible by measuring urinary dipeptidase (Udpase) activity and serum creatinine (Scr) concentration. When the mass test of 246 individuals was examined on a 2-dimensional plot of Udpase (y-axis) versus Scr (x-axis) with the data obtained from healthy volunteers (n = 189), ARF (n = 19) and CRF (n = 38) patients, the characteristic distribution of each group was obvious. It is summarized by the mean values of healthy volunteers (1.44 +/- 0.39 mg/dL, 1.19 (0.59 mU/mL), ARF (6.04 +/- 5.04 mg/dL, 0.12 +/- 0.08 mU/mL), and CRF patients (8.72 +/- 2.93 mg/dL, 0.81 +/- 0.44 mU/mL). The healthy volunteers are distributed along the y-axis and the ARF patients the x-axis, thus separating the two groups 90 degrees apart. The CRF patients are scattered away from both x-, and y-axis. This 2-dimensional approach is thought to be very useful for the differential diagnosis of ARF suggesting Udpase as a new member of the marker enzymes of renal disease. PMID:10088177

  20. Adult renal cystic disease: a genetic, biological, and developmental primer.

    PubMed

    Katabathina, Venkata S; Kota, Gopi; Dasyam, Anil K; Shanbhogue, Alampady K P; Prasad, Srinivasa R

    2010-10-01

    Renal cystic diseases in adults are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by the presence of multiple cysts in the kidneys. These diseases may be categorized as hereditary, acquired, or developmental on the basis of their pathogenesis. Hereditary conditions include autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, medullary cystic kidney disease, von Hippel-Lindau disease, and tuberous sclerosis. Acquired conditions include cystic kidney disease, which develops in patients with end-stage renal disease. Developmental cystic diseases of the adult kidney include localized renal cystic disease, multicystic dysplastic kidney, and medullary sponge kidney. In recent years, many molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of renal cystic diseases have been identified. Hereditary renal cystic diseases are characterized by genetic mutations that lead to defects in the structure and function of the primary cilia of renal tubular epithelial cells, abnormal proliferation of tubular epithelium, and increased fluid secretion, all of which ultimately result in the development of renal cysts. A better understanding of these pathophysiologic mechanisms is now providing the basis for the development of more targeted therapeutic drugs for some of these disorders. Cross-sectional imaging provides useful information for diagnosis, surveillance, prognostication, and evaluation of treatment response in renal cystic diseases. PMID:21071372

  1. Multiple sites of calciphylaxis in a patient with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Ramy Magdy; Nabil, Joseph Riad; Lopez, Eduardo A; Corry, Dalila B; Wilson, James

    2015-03-01

    Calciphylaxis has seldom been reported in patients with acute renal failure or in pre-dialysis patients. It also has been reported at lower calcium phosphorous products and in patients with adynamic bone disease. We report a pre-hemodialysis (HD) patient with acute renal failure and biopsy-proven calciphylaxis involving multiple cutaneous sites with calcification of the perineal area resulting in dry gangrene of the penis that necessitated a partial penectomy. The patient had elevated serum calcium, phosphorous and parathyroid hormone level of 612 pg/mL. The same patient suffered subsequently from a calcium embolus that occluded his left ophthalmic artery and resulted in left eye blindness. Calciphylaxis is a devastating phenomenon and physicians should have a high clinical suspicion for it in HD patients as well as in patients with late stages of chronic kidney disease. PMID:25758887

  2. Nosogogy: when the learner is a patient with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Ballerini, L; Paris, V

    2006-11-01

    Patient education approaches are currently derived from a biomedical 'acute' model characterized by the sequence of health, disease, and recovery resulting from our professional intervention. Unfortunately, this model proves to be totally inadequate when applied to a chronic disease such as kidney failure. Our patients never fully regain their health and may continue to worsen under our care, even after many state-of-the-art treatments. The solution is represented in acquiring a new professional identity, shifting from the 'biomedical' acute model to a 'bio-psycho-social-educational model'. Within this model, a Therapeutic Education approach in predialysis has been proven to provide both short- and long-term positive results for renal patients. There is a tremendous difference between the learning processes in children and adults and two different sciences have already been described. 'Pedagogy' deals with child learning and 'Andragogy' with adult learning. Nevertheless, when the learner is a patient with a chronic disease, we believe that new considerations must be taken into account. We propose to create a novel science and to call it 'Nosogogy', derived from the ancient Greek word (see text), meaning 'disease'. Nosogogy could be defined as the science of teaching adults affected by chronic disease. The new educator is someone deeply involved in renal care who knows and understands the characteristic conflicts and dynamics that arise in the renal patient, and possesses adequate communication skills to deal with him. In our experience, we prefer to have educational sessions run by nephrologists and nurses who have great experience in the field. PMID:17080103

  3. Chronic renal failure and macrogenitalia associated with genitourinary neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Dündar, Bumin Nuri; Oktem, Faruk; Armağan, Abdullah; Dündar, Nihal Olgaç; Bircan, Sema; Yesildag, Ahmet

    2010-02-01

    Neurofibromatosis (NF) is a genetic disorder of the nervous system that primarily affects the development and growth of neural cell tissues. This disorder is characterized by the development of various tumors, including neurofibromas, neuroniomas, malignant and benign peripheral nerve sheath tumors, and meningiomas. Accompanying skin changes and bone deformities are also common in NF. However, genitourinary involvement in NF is a rare condition, and penile enlargement has been reported only in a few males with plexiform NF. We report a 6-year-old boy with chronic renal failure associated with plexiform neurofibromas of the bladder and prostatic urethra which led to urinary obstruction and macrogenitalia due to genitourinary NF. PMID:19826840

  4. [Ultrasound and color Doppler applications in chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) encompasses all clinical features and complications during the progression of various kidney conditions towards end-stage renal disease. These conditions include immune and inflammatory diseases such as primary and HCV-related glomerulonephritis; infectious diseases such as pyelonephritis with or without reflux and tuberculosis; vascular diseases such as chronic ischemic nephropathy; hereditary and congenital diseases such as polycystic disease and congenital cystic dysplasia; metabolic diseases including diabetes and hyperuricemia; and systemic diseases (collagen disease, vasculitis, myeloma). During the progression of CKD, ultrasound imaging can differentiate the nature of the renal damage in only 50-70% of cases. Infact, the end-stage kidney appears shrunken, reduced in volume (Ø <9 cm), unstructured, amorphous, with acquired cystic degeneration (small and multiple cysts involving the cortex and medulla) or nephrocalcinosis, but there are rare exceptions, such as polycystic kidney disease, diabetic nephropathy, and secondary inflammatory nephropathies. The main difficulties in the differential diagnosis are encountered in multifactorial CKD, which is commonly presented to the nephrologist at stage 4-5, when the kidney is shrunken, unstructured and amorphous. As in acute renal injury and despite the lack of sensitivity, ultrasonography is essential for assessing the progression of the renal damage and related complications, and for evaluating all conditions that increase the risk of CKD, such as lithiasis, recurrent urinary tract infections, vesicoureteral reflux, polycystic kidney disease and obstructive nephropathy. The timing and frequency of ultrasound scans in CKD patients should be evaluated case by case. In this review we will consider the morphofunctional features of the kidney in all nephropathies that may lead to progressive CKD. PMID:23229668

  5. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Brusasco, Vito; Martinez, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    COPD is characterized by airflow limitation that is not fully reversible. The morphological basis for airflow obstruction results from a varying combination of obstructive changes in peripheral conducting airways and destructive changes in respiratory bronchioles, alveolar ducts, and alveoli. A reduction of vascularity within the alveolar septa has been reported in emphysema. Typical physiological changes reflect these structural abnormalities. Spirometry documents airflow obstruction when the FEV1/FVC ratio is reduced below the lower limit of normality, although in early disease stages FEV1 and airway conductance are not affected. Current guidelines recommend testing for bronchoreversibility at least once and the postbronchodilator FEV1/FVC be used for COPD diagnosis; the nature of bronchodilator response remains controversial, however. One major functional consequence of altered lung mechanics is lung hyperinflation. FRC may increase as a result of static or dynamic mechanisms, or both. The link between dynamic lung hyperinflation and expiratory flow limitation during tidal breathing has been demonstrated. Hyperinflation may increase the load on inspiratory muscles, with resulting length adaptation of diaphragm. Reduction of exercise tolerance is frequently noted, with compelling evidence that breathlessness and altered lung mechanics play a major role. Lung function measurements have been traditionally used as prognostic indices and to monitor disease progression; FEV1 has been most widely used. An increase in FVC is also considered as proof of bronchodilatation. Decades of work has provided insight into the histological, functional, and biological features of COPD. This has provided a clearer understanding of important pathobiological processes and has provided additional therapeutic options. PMID:24692133

  6. Nephrology Update: End-Stage Renal Disease and Renal Replacement Therapy.

    PubMed

    Desai, Niraj; Rahman, Mahboob

    2016-05-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality, and increased health care use. Optimal management of patients with ESRD requires close collaboration among primary care physicians, nephrology subspecialists, and other subspecialists. Critical issues for the family physician include helping patients transition from chronic kidney disease to ESRD, recognizing and managing common issues in patients receiving dialysis or after kidney transplantation, and understanding palliative care for patients with ESRD. Dialysis typically is initiated for patients with a glomerular filtration rate less than 15 mL/min/1.73 m(2) if they are symptomatic due to uremia or if medical management of metabolic conditions is unsuccessful. Kidney transplantation is the optimal form of renal replacement therapy in suitable patients. The choice between hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis often is based on patient preference and coexisting conditions. Meticulous monitoring of volume status is necessary to achieve and maintain control of blood pressure. Sleep disorders and pruritus are common and can be managed by optimization of metabolic parameters, adequacy of dialysis, and drugs. PMID:27163762

  7. [Chronic prostatitis and Bechterew's disease].

    PubMed

    Kohlicek, J; Svec, V

    1977-11-01

    A group of patients between 35 and 65 years old with chronic prostatitis were examined for the presence of Becherew's disease. In this connection the New York and Roman criterions for morbus Bechterew were applied. There were found one ankyosing spondylarthritis, one ankylosis of the sacroiliac joint, and 11 times a tentative sacroileitis were stated. Altogether the proved and tentative findings were only 3.68 per cent of all examinations. In our countries the morbus Bechterew is found in 0,21 per cent of the normal population. So the protion of the Bechterew's disease in patients with chronic prostatitis is indeed a little higher than average, but not so frequent as often pretended in recent times. After a second series 58 patients being treated because of Bechterew's disease of different stages and different terms were examined for the possibility of a simultaneously elapsing chronic prostatitis. A chronic prostatitis was found in 38 per cent of these patients which correspondents to the incidence published in literature for the medium-age manhood. Nobody of the test persons had complaints on the part of the urologenital tract. PMID:602457

  8. MRI appearance of massive renal replacement lipomatosis in the absence of renal calculus disease

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, E; Melamed, J; Taneja, S S; Rosenkrantz, A B

    2011-01-01

    Renal replacement lipomatosis is a rare benign entity in which extensive fibrofatty proliferation of the renal sinus is associated with marked renal atrophy. In this report, we present a case of massive renal replacement lipomatosis demonstrated on MRI. The presentation was atypical given an absence of associated renal calculus disease, and an initial CT scan was interpreted as suspicious for a liposarcoma. The differential diagnosis and key MRI findings that served to establish this specific diagnosis are reviewed. Histopathological correlation is also presented, as the patient underwent nephroureterectomy. PMID:21257835

  9. Prevalence of renal artery disease and its prognostic significance in patients undergoing coronary bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Aboyans, Victor; Tanguy, Benedicte; Desormais, Ileana; Bonnet, Vincent; Chonchol, Michel; Laskar, Marc; Mohty, Dania; Lacroix, Philippe

    2014-10-01

    Several studies demonstrated the prognostic importance of renal failure and peripheral artery disease in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), but data regarding the prognostic value of renal artery disease in this context are scarce. We aimed to study the prevalence and prognostic value of renal artery disease in patients undergoing CABG. We assessed by duplex ultrasound the renal arteries of 429 consecutive patients who underwent CABG, of whom 401 had satisfactory imaging quality to detect >60% renal artery stenosis (RAS) and/or an elevated resistive index (ERI>0.80). Of the 401 subjects included (age 68±10 years, 83% men), 40 (10%) had RAS and 35 (9%) had ERI. Nine patients (2.2%) had both conditions. Patients were followed up for 12.4±7.0 months. The primary outcome was composite, including 30-day death, stroke, and/or myocardial infarction. In a multivariate model adjusted for age, gender, cardiovascular (CV) risk factors, renal function, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the use of off-pump CABG, CV co-morbidities, and drugs, the presence of ERI was strongly associated with the occurrence of the composite outcome (odds ratio 4.3, 95% confidence interval 1.7 to 9.9, p=0.0006). Similarly, ERI, not RAS, was significantly associated with the 30-day acute kidney disease and the midterm mortality, as well as fatal and nonfatal CV events. In conclusion, regardless of renal function and other factors, the renal resistive index is a strong predictor of CV and renal events after CABG. Renal duplex ultrasound can identify a subgroup of patients at high risk of CABG. PMID:25150754

  10. [The role of zinc in chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Tatsuo

    2016-07-01

    Renal anemia is one of the most important complication as a cause of cardiovascular event in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The status of renal anemia has been ameliorated by using recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO), however, the EPO resistant anemia is sometimes seen in high stage CKD patients. Heavy metal deficiency including zinc deficiency is one of the cause of EPO resistant anemia. Recently, it is reported that zinc deficiency is seen in patients with CKD. In this article, we describe zinc deficiency in patients with CKD. The ability that zinc supplementation improves their anemia in CKD patients is also described. PMID:27455803

  11. Pregnancy in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Vellanki, Kavitha

    2013-05-01

    Despite vast improvements in fetal outcomes, pregnancy in women with CKD is fraught with hazards; worsening of renal function and complications like preeclampsia and premature delivery are common. To date, there is no accurate formula to calculate glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Also, whether the current CKD classification is better than the older classification at predicting outcomes in pregnant women with CKD is unknown. Women with an estimated GFR ≥1.4 mg/dL are at increased risk of progressive worsening of renal function regardless of the cause of the underlying kidney disease. Preeclampsia is difficult to diagnose in pregnant women with underlying CKD, and serum markers such as soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (sFlt1) and placental growth factor (PIGF) may lead the way for definitive diagnosis. New-onset lupus or lupus flare is an indication for kidney biopsy during pregnancy; cyclosporine is safe and is the most effective agent that can be used during pregnancy. Women with adult polycystic kidney disease are at increased risk of hypertension and preeclampsia during pregnancy, as well as hepatic cysts later in life, the latter occurring with multiple pregnancies. Strict blood pressure control is important in pregnant women with diabetic nephropathy. A multidisciplinary team that includes nephrologists and obstetricians who deal with high-risk pregnancies should be involved in the care of pregnant women with CKD for successful pregnancy outcomes. PMID:23928386

  12. Chronic renal failure with gout: a marker of chronic lead poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Craswell, P.W.; Price, J.; Boyle, P.D.; Heazlewood, V.J.; Baddeley, H.; Lloyd, H.M.; Thomas, B.J.; Thomas, B.W.

    1984-09-01

    EDTA (calcium disodium edetate) lead mobilization and x-ray fluorescence (XRF) finger bone lead tests were done in 42 patients with chronic renal failure and without persisting lead intoxication. Nineteen of 23 patients with gout and 8 of 19 without gout had positive EDTA lead mobilization tests. Those patients with gout excreted significantly more excess lead chelate than those without gout. In the gout group 17 patients denied any childhood or industrial exposure to lead. They had a greater number of positive tests and excreted significantly more excess lead chelate than 14 patients with neither gout nor lead exposure. These results confirm that gout in the presence of chronic renal failure is a useful marker of chronic lead poisoning. Of 27 patients with positive lead mobilization tests, only 13 had elevated XRF finger bone lead concentrations (sensitivity 48%). Three of 15 patients with negative lead mobilization tests had elevated XRF finger bone lead concentrations (specificity 80%). Although the XRF finger bone lead test is a convenient noninvasive addition to the diagnostic evaluation of patients with chronic renal failure and gout, its application is limited due to the lack of sensitivity of the method.

  13. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Includes: Chronic Bronchitis and Emphysema

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1.5 MB] More Data Age-adjusted death rates for selected causes of death, by sex, race, and Hispanic origin (chronic lower respiratory disease includes chronic bronchitis, emphysema, asthma, and other ...

  14. Dental management for children with chronic renal failure undergoing hemodialysis therapy.

    PubMed

    Chow, M H; Peterson, D S

    1979-07-01

    Patients with chronic renal failure who are undergoing hemodialysis therapy demonstrate problems of significant importance for dental treatment. A case is presented in which secondard hyperparathyroidism, resulting from renal failure and hemodialysis, was noted in a child. Other relationships between renal failure, hemodialysis, and dental care were also presented. PMID:287985

  15. Pericytes in chronic lung disease.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Jessica E; Johnson, Jill R

    2014-01-01

    Pericytes are mesenchymal cells embedded within the abluminal surface of the endothelium of microvessels such as capillaries, pre-capillary arterioles, post-capillary and collecting venules, where they maintain microvascular homeostasis and participate in angiogenesis. In addition to their roles in supporting the vasculature and facilitating leukocyte extravasation, pericytes have been recently investigated as a subpopulation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) due to their capacity to differentiate into numerous cell types including the classic MSC triad, i.e. osteocytes, chondrocytes and adipocytes. Other studies in models of fibrotic inflammatory disease of the lung have demonstrated a vital role of pericytes in myofibroblast activation, collagen deposition and microvascular remodelling, which are hallmark features of chronic lung diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension. Further studies into the mechanisms of the pericyte-to-myofibroblast transition and migration to fibrotic foci will hopefully clarify the role of these cells in chronic lung disease and confirm the importance of pericytes in human fibrotic pulmonary disease. PMID:25034005

  16. Cardiovascular disease in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    McQuarrie, Emily P; Fellström, Bengt C; Holdaas, Hallvard; Jardine, Alan G

    2010-05-01

    Renal transplant recipients have a markedly increased risk of premature cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared with the general population, although considerably lower than that of patients receiving maintenance haemodialysis. CVD in transplant recipients is poorly characterised and differs from the nonrenal population, with a much higher proportion of fatal to nonfatal cardiac events. In addition to traditional ischaemic heart disease risk factors such as age, gender, diabetes and smoking, there are additional factors to consider in this population such as the importance of hypertension, left ventricular hypertrophy and uraemic cardiomyopathy. There are factors specific to transplantation such immunosuppressive therapies and graft dysfunction which contribute to this altered risk profile. However, understanding and treatment is limited by the absence of large randomised intervention trials addressing risk factor modification, with the exception of the ALERT study. The approach to managing these patients should begin early and be multifactorial in nature. PMID:20586909

  17. [Biomarkers for chronic inflammatory diseases].

    PubMed

    Holzinger, D; Föll, D

    2015-12-01

    Inflammatory disorders of childhood, such as juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are a challenge for laboratory diagnostics. Firstly, the classical inflammatory markers, such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) often inadequately reflect disease activity but on the other hand there are few specific biomarkers that can be helpful in managing these diseases. Acute phase proteins reflect the systemic inflammatory response insufficiently as their increase is only the indirect result of local inflammatory processes. Modern inflammation diagnostics aim to reflect these local processes and to allow precise monitoring of disease activity. Experimental biomarkers, such as S100 proteins can detect subclinical inflammatory activity. In addition, established laboratory parameters exist for JIA [antinuclear antibodies (ANA), rheumatoid factor (RF), antibodies against cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP)] and for chronic IBD (fecal calprotectin) that are useful in the treatment of these diseases. PMID:26608264

  18. Effect of chronic alcohol feeding on physiological and molecular parameters of renal thiamin transport

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Veedamali S.; Subramanya, Sandeep B.; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu

    2010-01-01

    The renal thiamin reabsorption process plays an important role in regulating thiamin body homeostasis and involves both thiamin transporters-1 and -2 (THTR1 and THTR2). Chronic alcohol use is associated with thiamin deficiency. Although a variety of factors contribute to the development of this deficiency, effects of chronic alcohol use on renal thiamin transport have not been thoroughly examined. We addressed this issue by examining the effect of chronic alcohol feeding of rats with liquid diet on physiological and molecular parameters of renal thiamin transport. Chronic alcohol feeding caused a significant inhibition in carrier-mediated thiamin transport across the renal brush-border membrane and was evident as early as 2 wk after initiation of alcohol feeding. Similarly, thiamin transport across the renal basolateral membrane was significantly inhibited by chronic alcohol feeding. The inhibition in renal thiamin transport was associated with a marked decrease in the level of expression of THTR1 and -2 proteins, mRNAs, and heterogeneous nuclear RNAs. Chronic alcohol feeding also caused a significant reduction in the level of expression of thiamin pyrophosphokinase but not that of the mitochondrial thiamin pyrophosphate transporter. These studies show that chronic alcohol feeding inhibits the entry and exit of thiamin in the polarized renal epithelial cells and that the effect is, at least in part, mediated at the transcriptional level. These findings also suggest that chronic alcohol feeding interferes with the normal homeostasis of thiamin in renal epithelial cells. PMID:20427470

  19. Neocytolysis contributes to the anemia of renal disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, L.; Alfrey, C. P.; Driscoll, T.; Whitley, C. E.; Hachey, D. L.; Suki, W.

    1999-01-01

    Neocytolysis is a recently described physiological process affecting the selective hemolysis of young red blood cells in circumstances of plethora. Erythropoietin (EPO) depression appears to initiate the process, providing the rationale to investigate its contributions to the anemia of renal disease. When EPO therapy was withheld, four of five stable hemodialysis patients showed chromium 51 (51Cr)-red cell survival patterns indicative of neocytolysis; red cell survival was short in the first 9 days, then normalized. Two of these four patients received oral 13C-glycine and 15N-glycine, and there was a suggestion of pathological isotope enrichment of stool porphyrins when EPO therapy was held, again supporting selective hemolysis of newly released red cells that take up the isotope (one patient had chronic hemolysis indicated by isotope studies of blood and stool). Thus, neocytolysis can contribute to the anemia of renal disease and explain some unresolved issues about such anemia. One implication is the prediction that intravenous bolus EPO therapy is metabolically and economically inefficient compared with lower doses administered more frequently subcutaneously.

  20. Neocytolysis Contributes to the Anemia of Renal Disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Lawrence; Alfrey, Clarence P.; Driscoll, Theda; Whitley, Carl E.; Hachey, David; Suki, Wadi

    1997-01-01

    Neocytolysis is a recently described physiologic process effecting selective hemolysis of young red blood cells in circumstances of plethora. Erythropoietin depression appears to initiate the process, providing rationale to investigate its contributions to the anemia of renal disease. When erythropoietin therapy was withheld, four of five stable hemodialysis patients demonstrated Cr-51 red cell survival patterns indicative of neocytolysis; red cell survival was short in the first 9 days, then normalized. Two of these patients received oral (13)C-glycine and (15)N-glycine and showed pathologic enrichment of stool porphyrins by the most recently ingested isotope when EPO therapy was held. This confirms selective hemolysis of newly-released red cells. (One patient had chronic hemolysis by isotope studies of blood and stool.) Thus, neocytolysis can contribute to the anemia of renal disease and explains some unresolved issues about such anemia. One implication is the prediction that intravenous bolus erythropoietin therapy is metabolically and economically inefficient compared to lower doses given more frequently subcutaneously.

  1. The knowledge, awareness, and acceptability of renal transplantation among patients with end-stage renal disease in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Takure, A O; Jinadu, Y O; Adebayo, S A; Shittu, O B; Salako, B L; Kadiri, S

    2016-01-01

    Renal transplantation is well established in the USA, Europe, India, and South Africa. However, it is still in its infancy in Nigeria. The objective of our study is to determine the knowledge, awareness, and acceptability of renal transplant among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and the factors which are responsible for the low level of transplantation in Ibadan, Nigeria. A 15-item pilot-tested questionnaire was administered to willing patients with ESRD seen at the medical outpatient clinic of the University Teaching Hospital, from January to December 2011. There was 81% participation rate of the respondents. Exactly 90.1% had formal education and 44% earned <50,000 naira per month. Seventy-nine percent of respondents was aware of renal transplantation, 70.4% would recommend it to others, and 66.7% accepted renal transplantation; 77.8% would maintain a close relationship with their donors. About 61.7% considered it very expensive, while 33.3% did not know the cost for transplantation. Of the reason for the low level of kidney transplantation in Nigeria, 39.5% had no idea and in 27.2% of the respondents, the fear of death by potential donors may be responsible. Eleven percent of responded that recipients had no money for kidney transplantation and another 11% thought the potential donors would like to be paid for donating their kidneys. Most of the respondents with ESRD were knowledgeable, aware of, and accepted renal transplantation as the next step to treat chronic renal failure. However, majority of these patients could not afford the cost for renal transplantation. PMID:27424696

  2. Hyperphosphatemia in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Indridason, Olafur S; Quarles, L Darryl

    2002-07-01

    Hyperphosphatemia occurs universally in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) unless efforts are made to prevent positive phosphate balance. Positive phosphate balance results from the loss of renal elimination of phosphate and continued obligatory intestinal absorption of dietary phosphate. Increased efflux of phosphate from bone because of excess parathyroid hormone-mediated bone resorption can also contribute to increased serum phosphate concentrations in the setting of severe hyperparathyroidism. It is important to treat hyperphosphatemia because it contributes to the pathogenesis of hyperparathyroidism, vascular calcifications, and increased cardiovascular mortality in ESRD patients. Attaining a neutral phosphate balance, which is the key to the management of hyperphosphatemia in ESRD, is a challenge. Control of phosphorus depends on its removal during dialysis and the limitation of gastrointestinal absorption by dietary phosphate restriction and chelation of phosphate. Knowledge of the quantitative aspects of phosphate balance is useful in optimizing our use of phosphate binders, dialysis frequency, and vitamin D sterols. The development of new phosphate binders and efforts to find new ways to inhibit gastrointestinal absorption of phosphate will lead to improvements in the control of serum phosphate levels in ESRD. PMID:12203200

  3. Clinical imaging of vascular disease in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Sag, Alan A; Covic, Adrian; London, Gerard; Vervloet, Marc; Goldsmith, David; Gorriz, Jose Luis; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2016-06-01

    Arterial wall calcification, once considered an incidental finding, is now known to be a consistent and strong predictor of cardiovascular events in patients with chronic renal insufficiency. It is also commonly encountered in radiologic examinations as an incidental finding. Forthcoming bench, translational, and clinical data seek to establish this and pre-calcification changes as surrogate imaging biomarkers for noninvasive prognostication and treatment follow-up. Emerging paradigms seek to establish vascular calcification as a surrogate marker of disease. Imaging of pre-calcification and decalcification events may prove more important than imaging of the calcification itself. Data-driven approaches to screening will be necessary to limit radiation exposure and prevent over-utilization of expensive imaging techniques. PMID:26898824

  4. Biodegradable Magnesium (Mg) Implantation Does Not Impose Related Metabolic Disorders in Rats with Chronic Renal Failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiali; Xu, Jiankun; Liu, Waiching; Li, Yangde; Qin, Ling

    2016-05-01

    Mg and its alloys have been considered as one of the most promising biodegradable medical devices, but it was still unclear whether hypermagnesemia involved health risks would occur in persons with kidney disease due to their deteriorated kidney function for Mg ions excretion from their body. In this study, we established a chronic renal failure (CRF) model in rats induced by adenine administration prior to Mg implantation, aiming to predict if CRF patients are suitable for the use of Mg implants. The results showed that Mg levels in serum, urine, feces and internal organs had no significant changes after Mg implantation for both normal and CRF rats. Biochemical indices detection and histopathological analysis in kidney, liver and heart tissue confirmed that Mg implants did not induce any extra damage in animals even with renal failure. Our study indicates that Mg based orthopaedic medical device may be considered for use in CRF patients without biosafety concerns.

  5. Biodegradable Magnesium (Mg) Implantation Does Not Impose Related Metabolic Disorders in Rats with Chronic Renal Failure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiali; Xu, Jiankun; Liu, Waiching; Li, Yangde; Qin, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Mg and its alloys have been considered as one of the most promising biodegradable medical devices, but it was still unclear whether hypermagnesemia involved health risks would occur in persons with kidney disease due to their deteriorated kidney function for Mg ions excretion from their body. In this study, we established a chronic renal failure (CRF) model in rats induced by adenine administration prior to Mg implantation, aiming to predict if CRF patients are suitable for the use of Mg implants. The results showed that Mg levels in serum, urine, feces and internal organs had no significant changes after Mg implantation for both normal and CRF rats. Biochemical indices detection and histopathological analysis in kidney, liver and heart tissue confirmed that Mg implants did not induce any extra damage in animals even with renal failure. Our study indicates that Mg based orthopaedic medical device may be considered for use in CRF patients without biosafety concerns. PMID:27210744

  6. Biodegradable Magnesium (Mg) Implantation Does Not Impose Related Metabolic Disorders in Rats with Chronic Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiali; Xu, Jiankun; Liu, Waiching; Li, Yangde; Qin, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Mg and its alloys have been considered as one of the most promising biodegradable medical devices, but it was still unclear whether hypermagnesemia involved health risks would occur in persons with kidney disease due to their deteriorated kidney function for Mg ions excretion from their body. In this study, we established a chronic renal failure (CRF) model in rats induced by adenine administration prior to Mg implantation, aiming to predict if CRF patients are suitable for the use of Mg implants. The results showed that Mg levels in serum, urine, feces and internal organs had no significant changes after Mg implantation for both normal and CRF rats. Biochemical indices detection and histopathological analysis in kidney, liver and heart tissue confirmed that Mg implants did not induce any extra damage in animals even with renal failure. Our study indicates that Mg based orthopaedic medical device may be considered for use in CRF patients without biosafety concerns. PMID:27210744

  7. The effect of chronic renal failure on the benzoylecgonine blood level: a case report.

    PubMed

    Guillaud, Daniel A; Jones, Prentiss; Prahlow, Joseph A

    2015-06-01

    Chronic renal failure results in reduced elimination of a variety of substances within the blood, including numerous drugs and their metabolites. This report describes a case of a man who died in jail, after less than 48 hours of being incarcerated, wherein postmortem toxicology testing revealed a blood benzoylecgonine level of 0.25 mg/L with no cocaine detected, suggesting possible recent cocaine use in jail. Autopsy and investigation revealed severe underlying cardiovascular disease and dialysis-dependent CRF, thus accounting for the elevated benzoylecgonine levels and allaying concerns that the man obtained and used cocaine in jail. PMID:25881815

  8. A practical approach to the management of patients with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, J T

    1999-03-01

    The number of patients with significant chronic renal failure is expanding rapidly in the United States. All physicians and medical-care providers will have an increasingly important role in the detection and management of renal failure in patients who are not undergoing dialysis. Patients with diabetes or hypertension should be carefully monitored for the development of renal insufficiency by using screening tools such as blood pressure measurement, determination of serum creatinine, urinalysis, and determination of 24-hour urinary microalbuminuria. In order to slow the progression of renal disease, attenuate uremic complications, and prepare patients with renal failure for renal replacement therapy, all medical-care providers should "take care of the BEANS." Blood pressure should be maintained in a target range lower than 130/85 mm Hg, and in many patients, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors may be beneficial. Erythropoietin should be used to maintain the hemoglobin level at 10 to 12 g/dL. Access for long-term dialysis should be created when the serum creatinine value increases above 4.0 mg/dL or the glomerular filtration rate declines below 20 mL/min. Nutritional status must be closely monitored in order to avoid protein malnutrition and to initiate dialysis before the patient's nutritional status has deteriorated. Nutritional care also involves correction of acidosis, prevention and treatment of hyperphosphatemia, and administration of vitamin supplements to provide folic acid. Specialty referral to nephrology should occur when the creatinine level increases above 3.0 mg/dL or when the involvement of a nephrologist would be beneficial for ongoing management of the patient. PMID:10089997

  9. Placental Origins of Chronic Disease.

    PubMed

    Burton, Graham J; Fowden, Abigail L; Thornburg, Kent L

    2016-10-01

    Epidemiological evidence links an individual's susceptibility to chronic disease in adult life to events during their intrauterine phase of development. Biologically this should not be unexpected, for organ systems are at their most plastic when progenitor cells are proliferating and differentiating. Influences operating at this time can permanently affect their structure and functional capacity, and the activity of enzyme systems and endocrine axes. It is now appreciated that such effects lay the foundations for a diverse array of diseases that become manifest many years later, often in response to secondary environmental stressors. Fetal development is underpinned by the placenta, the organ that forms the interface between the fetus and its mother. All nutrients and oxygen reaching the fetus must pass through this organ. The placenta also has major endocrine functions, orchestrating maternal adaptations to pregnancy and mobilizing resources for fetal use. In addition, it acts as a selective barrier, creating a protective milieu by minimizing exposure of the fetus to maternal hormones, such as glucocorticoids, xenobiotics, pathogens, and parasites. The placenta shows a remarkable capacity to adapt to adverse environmental cues and lessen their impact on the fetus. However, if placental function is impaired, or its capacity to adapt is exceeded, then fetal development may be compromised. Here, we explore the complex relationships between the placental phenotype and developmental programming of chronic disease in the offspring. Ensuring optimal placentation offers a new approach to the prevention of disorders such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and obesity, which are reaching epidemic proportions. PMID:27604528

  10. Heritability of chronic venous disease

    PubMed Central

    Krusche, Petra; Wolf, Andreas; Krawczak, Michael; Timm, Birgitt; Nikolaus, Susanna; Frings, Norbert; Schreiber, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Varicose veins without skin changes have a prevalence of approximately 20% in Northern and Western Europe whereas advanced chronic venous insufficiency affects about 3% of the population. Genetic risk factors are thought to play an important role in the aetiology of both these chronic venous diseases (CVD). We evaluated the relative genetic and environmental impact upon CVD risk by estimating the heritability of the disease in 4,033 nuclear families, comprising 16,434 individuals from all over Germany. Upon clinical examination, patients were classified according to the CEAP guidelines as either C2 (simple varicose veins), C3 (oedema), C4 (skin changes without ulceration), C5 (healed ulceration), or C6 (active ulcers). The narrow-sense heritability (h2) of CVD equals 17.3% (standard error 2.5%, likelihood ratio test P = 1.4 × 10−13). The proportion of disease risk attributable to age (at ascertainment) and sex, the two main risk factors for CVD, was estimated as 10.7% (Kullback–Leibler deviance R2). The heritability of CVD is high, thereby suggesting a notable genetic component in the aetiology of the disease. Systematic population-based searches for CVD susceptibility genes are therefore warranted. PMID:20354728

  11. Addressing Health Disparities in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Ta-Chien; Fan, I.-Chun; Liu, Michael Shi-Yung; Su, Ming-Daw; Chiang, Po-Huang

    2014-01-01

    According to the official health statistics, Taiwan has the highest prevalence of end stage renal disease (ESRD) in the world. Each year, around 60,000 ESRD patients in Taiwan consume 6% of the national insurance budget for dialysis treatment. The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been climbing during 2008–2012. However, the spatial disparities and clustering of CKD at the public health level have rarely been discussed. The aims of this study are to explore the possible population level risk factors and identify any clusters of CKD, using the national health insurance database. The results show that the ESRD prevalence in females is higher than that in males. ESRD medical expenditure constitutes 87% of total CKD medical expenditure. Pre-CKD and pre-ESRD disease management might slow the progression from CKD to ESRD. After applying ordinary least-squares regression, the percentages of high education status and the elderly in the townships are positively correlated with CKD prevalence. Geographically weighted regression and Local Moran’s I are used for identifying the clusters in southern Taiwan. The findings can be important evidence for earlier and targeted community interventions and reducing the health disparities of CKD. PMID:25514144

  12. Soluble Urokinase Receptor and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hayek, Salim S.; Sever, Sanja; Ko, Yi-An; Trachtman, Howard; Awad, Mosaab; Wadhwani, Shikha; Altintas, Mehmet M.; Wei, Changli; Hotton, Anna L.; French, Audrey L.; Sperling, Laurence S.; Lerakis, Stamatios; Quyyumi, Arshed A.; Reiser, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Relatively high plasma levels of soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) have been associated with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and poor clinical outcomes in patients with various conditions. It is unknown whether elevated suPAR levels in patients with normal kidney function are associated with future decline in the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and with incident chronic kidney disease. METHODS We measured plasma suPAR levels in 3683 persons enrolled in the Emory Cardiovascular Biobank (mean age, 63 years; 65% men; median suPAR level, 3040 pg per milliliter) and determined renal function at enrollment and at subsequent visits in 2292 persons. The relationship between suPAR levels and the eGFR at baseline, the change in the eGFR over time, and the development of chronic kidney disease (eGFR <60 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 of body-surface area) were analyzed with the use of linear mixed models and Cox regression after adjustment for demographic and clinical variables. RESULTS A higher suPAR level at baseline was associated with a greater decline in the eGFR during follow-up; the annual change in the eGFR was −0.9 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 among participants in the lowest quartile of suPAR levels as compared with −4.2 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 among participants in the highest quartile (P<0.001). The 921 participants with a normal eGFR (≥90 ml per minute per 1.73 m2) at baseline had the largest suPAR-related decline in the eGFR. In 1335 participants with a baseline eGFR of at least 60 ml per minute per 1.73 m2, the risk of progression to chronic kidney disease in the highest quartile of suPAR levels was 3.13 times as high (95% confidence interval, 2.11 to 4.65) as that in the lowest quartile. CONCLUSIONS An elevated level of suPAR was independently associated with incident chronic kidney disease and an accelerated decline in the eGFR in the groups studied. (Funded by the Abraham J. and Phyllis Katz Foundation

  13. Changes in serum type I and III procollagen levels in children with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Cinaz, P; Buyan, N; Gökçora, N; Elbeg, S; Hasanoğlu, E

    1996-01-01

    Serum levels of carboxyterminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PICP) and aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP) can be used as markers of bone formation and the evaluation of children with growth disorders. We measured the serum levels of these collagens with radioimmunoassay in 24 children aged between 4 and 14 years with chronic renal failure (CRF; n = 12 dialysis, n = 12 nondialysis) and 12 age-matched healthy controls, to find out whether these parameters have a prognostic or therapeutic value in monitoring the growth retardation in CRF. Mean serum PIIINP levels in the dialysis patients were higher than in the control group; the difference between the groups was statistically significant (p < 0.05). It seemed that the pubertal stage of the patients did not affect the levels of PICP and PIIINP. There was no significant correlation between PICP and PIIINP in any patients. Neither PICP nor PIIINP correlated with the height z-score or bone age. It was concluded that the increased serum PIIINP levels in renal patients might be accepted as a poor prognostic factor leading to progressive renal failure and end-stage renal disease. Further investigations into the effects of these collagens on growth failure associated with CRF are needed. PMID:8684525

  14. Chronic kidney disease and venous thromboembolism: epidemiology and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Wattanakit, Keattiyoat; Cushman, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review An estimated 13% of Americans have kidney disease. We sought to describe the association of kidney disease with risk of venous thromboembolism and discuss possible mechanisms explaining this association. Recent findings All severities of kidney disease appear to increase the risk of venous thromboembolism. In the general population the risk associated with mild to moderate kidney disease is 1.3–2-fold increased, and present even for microalbuminuria, although stage 1 chronic kidney disease itself has not been studied. End-stage renal disease is also associated with a 2.3-fold increased risk, compared to the general population. Although data are limited, risk increases after kidney transplant and with nephrotic syndrome as well. Summary Rates of kidney disease are increasing rapidly in the population and kidney disease is a risk factor for venous thromboembolism. An improved understanding of mechanisms linking kidney disease with venous thromboembolism will allow further study of best prevention efforts. PMID:19561505

  15. Why do young people with chronic kidney disease die early?

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shankar; Bogle, Richard; Banerjee, Debasish

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease poses the greatest risk of premature death seen among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Up to 50% of mortality risk in the dialysis population is attributable to cardiovascular disease and the largest relative excess mortality is observed in younger patients. In early CKD, occlusive thrombotic coronary disease is common, but those who survive to reach end-stage renal failure requiring dialysis are more prone to sudden death attributable mostly to sudden arrhythmic events and heart failure related to left ventricular hypertrophy, coronary vascular calcification and electrolyte disturbances. In this review, we discuss the basis of the interaction of traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease with various pathological processes such as endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress, low grade chronic inflammation, neurohormonal changes and vascular calcification and stiffness which account for the structural and functional cardiac changes that predispose to excess morbidity and mortality in young people with CKD. PMID:25374808

  16. Chronic kidney disease in pregnancy: Maternal and fetal outcomes and progression of kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Wolski, Penny; Callaway, Leonie K; Barrett, Helen L; Fagermo, Narelle; Lust, Karin; Shakhovskoy, Rebekah E

    2015-01-01

    Background There is a paucity of Australian data regarding renal disease in pregnancy. We undertook a retrospective cohort study at a tertiary institution to examine the impact of renal disease on pregnancy outcomes and the effect of pregnancy on disease progression. Methods A total of 55 pregnancies of patients with renal disease admitted from 2003 to 2010 to the Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital were analysed. Pre-conception variables, fetal/delivery and maternal outcomes were analysed in this group and in a control group of women with normal kidney function pre-pregnancy. Results Of the 55 pregnancies, 71% experienced pre-term delivery, 38% had intra-uterine growth restriction and 62% required caesarean section. Of all, 60% of neonates required neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission and six perinatal deaths occurred. Of all, 67% of women suffered preeclampsia, 47% anaemia and 3 patients required dialysis in pregnancy. Postpartum deterioration of renal function occurred in patients with pre-conception chronic kidney disease stage 3–5. Conclusions Chronic kidney disease of all stages is a risk factor for adverse pregnancy outcomes. In a tertiary institution however, there is a high rate of successful pregnancy (84%).

  17. The emerging role of hepatocyte growth factor in renal diseases.

    PubMed

    Mao, Song; Zhang, Jianhua

    2016-06-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), a kringle-containing polypeptide, acts on various epithelial cells to regulate cell growth, cell motility, and morphogenesis. HGF also accelerates tissue regeneration of injured organs and is regarded as a key molecule in organ regeneration. Besides the regeneration of the liver, HGF also plays a role in the renal regeneration. In addition, an adaptive alteration of HGF status in various renal diseases occurs. However, the precise role of HGF in various renal diseases remains elusive. The signaling pathways of HGF may be associated with renal diseases. In this review, we will try to provide an in-depth understanding of the underlying role of HGF and its possible interactions with other molecules in renal diseases. PMID:26460681

  18. Palliative care for patients with advance chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Douglas, C A

    2014-01-01

    Over the past three decades there has been a dramatic rise in the number of patients with advanced chronic kidney disease. The fastest expanding group receiving dialysis has been the elderly. However, for those patients who are very elderly with co-morbidity, dialysis may not offer a survival advantage. Therefore, active conservative management is a growing service offered by many renal units in the UK and focuses on non-dialytic correction of fluid and electrolyes, management of renal anaemia, and assessment and management of symptoms. The five-year survival of a patient over 75 years of age starting dialysis is 20% and if a patient is over 75 years, has co-morbidity, or a poor performance status, dialysis may not offer any survival advantage. Whether a patient is managed by dialysis or by conservative management the symptom burden suffered is high. These symptoms are under-recognised and often managed poorly because of increased drug toxicity in renal failure. This complex group of patients require close working between renal, palliative care, medicine for the elderly, and community teams, to allow best quality of life and end of life care. This review describes some of the challenges in providing Advanced Care Planning for dialysis and conservatively managed patients, highlights the symptom burden of patients with advanced chronic kidney disease, and offers guidance in how to manage the symptoms effectively. PMID:25318401

  19. Chronic Sleep Restriction during Pregnancy - Repercussion on Cardiovascular and Renal Functioning of Male Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Ingrid L. B.; Rodrigues, Aline F. A. C.; Bergamaschi, Cássia T.; Campos, Ruy R.; Hirata, Aparecida E.; Tufik, Sergio; Xylaras, Beatriz D. P.; Visniauskas, Bruna; Chagas, Jair R.; Gomes, Guiomar N.

    2014-01-01

    Changes in the maternal environment can induce fetal adaptations that result in the progression of chronic diseases in the offspring. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of maternal chronic sleep restriction on blood pressure, renal function and cardiac baroreflex response on male offspring at adult age. Female 3-month-old Wistar rats were divided in two experimental groups: control (C) and chronic sleep restricted (CSR). Pregnancy was confirmed by vaginal smear. Chronic sleep restricted females were subjected to sleep restriction by the multiple platform technique for 20 h daily, between the 1st and 20th day of pregnancy. After birth, the litters were reduced to 6 rats per mother, and were designated as offspring from control (OC) and offspring from chronic sleep restricted (OCSR). Indirect blood pressure (BPi – tail cuff) was measured by plethysmography in male offspring at 3 months old. Following, the renal function and cardiac baroreflex response were analyzed. Values of BPi in OCSR were significantly higher compared to OC [OC: 127±2.6 (19); OCSR: 144±2.5 (17) mmHg]. The baroreflex sensitivity to the increase of blood pressure was reduced in OCSR [Slope: OC: −2.6±0.15 (9); OCRS: −1.6±0.13 (9)]. Hypothalamic activity of ACE2 was significantly reduced in OCSR compared to OC [OC: 97.4±15 (18); OSR: 60.2±3.6 (16) UAF/min/protein mg]. Renal function alteration was noticed by the increase in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) observed in OCSR [OC: 6.4±0.2 (10); OCSR: 7.4±0.3 (7)]. Chronic sleep restriction during pregnancy caused in the offspring hypertension, altered cardiac baroreflex response, reduced ACE-2 activity in the hypothalamus and renal alterations. Our data suggest that the reduction of sleeping time along the pregnancy is able to modify maternal homeostasis leading to functional alterations in offspring. PMID:25405471

  20. Pattern of biopsy proven renal diseases at PNS SHIFA, Karachi: A cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Sabir, Sohail; Mubarak, Muhammed; Ul-Haq, Irfan; Bibi, Aisha

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Percutaneous renal biopsy (RB) is an invaluable diagnostic procedure in patients with medical renal diseases.Objectives: To determine the pattern of biopsy proven renal disease (BPRD) from a tertiary care naval hospital in Karachi, Pakistan. Methods and Materials: All the renal biopsies in adult patients (≥18 years) performed at our hospital from 2008 to 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. The biopsies were evaluated by light microscopy and immunofluorescence. Results: A total 60 cases were analyzed. The mean age was 33.3±12.9 years (range: 18 to 72 years).The male to female ratio was 3:1. The most common indication of renal biopsy was nephrotic syndrome (43.3%), followed by renal failure (26.6%) and non-nephrotic proteinuria (23.3%). Primary glomerulonephritides (PGN) were predominant overall lesions, found in 46 (76.6%) of the total biopsies. Among PGN, the most common lesion was focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), followed by membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN), IgA nephropathy (IgAN) and chronic sclerosing glomerulonephritis (CSGN) and a variety of rare lesions. Secondary glomerulonephritides (SGN) were found in only three (5%) cases. There were two cases of amyloidosis and one of lupus nephritis (LN). Tubulointerstitial disease (TID) and vascular disease were rare. Conclusion: This study provides information about the epidemiology of BPRD in a large tertiary care naval center in Southern Pakistan. PMID:25340152

  1. Did Ugo Foscolo suffer from chronic renal insufficiency?

    PubMed

    Stamatiou, Konstantinos; Sgouridou, Maria; Christopoulos, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Ugo Foscolo, was an Italian poet whose works rank among the masterpieces of Italian literature. Talented and well educated in philosophy, classics, and Italian literature, Foscolo gave literary expression to his ideological aspirations and to the numerous amorous experiences in odes, sonnets, plays, poems and an epistolary novel. Concurrent with his rich literary output, Foscolo's correspondence represents a unique perspective from which to monitor his literary and political views and investigate aspects of his everyday life. Among other interesting information, one can find elements of Foscolo's medical history which is generally unknown. Based on his testimonies we suggest that he suffered of longstanding bladder outlet obstruction presumably due to urethral stricture. In the present article we investigate the possibility that chronic bladder outlet obstruction and the consequent renal insufficiency was attributed to the death of Ugo Foscolo. PMID:26885466

  2. Antioxidant Effect of Erythropoietin during Experimental Chronic Renal Failure.

    PubMed

    Osikov, M V; Telesheva, L F; Ageev, Yu I

    2015-12-01

    The effects of erythropoietin (Epokrin, 900 U/kg) on the parameters of free radical oxidation in the plasma and lymphocytes of peripheral blood were studied in rats with chronic renal failure. We observed accumulation of primary (diene conjugates) and secondary (ketodienes, and conjugated trienes) LPO products in the heptane and isopropanol fractions of blood plasma and a decrease in superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in blood plasma. In lymphocytes, the concentration of primary, secondary and end-products (Schiff bases) of LPO increased in the isopropanol fraction of lipid extract. Treatment with erythropoietin was followed by a decrease in the level of primary and end-products of LPO in the isopropanol fraction of lipid extract of the plasma and lymphocytes and an increase in of superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in the plasma. The content of primary LPO products in the isopropanol fraction of the plasma progressively decreased with increasing superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in the plasma. PMID:26639466

  3. [Clinical study on niaodujing in treating chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Wang, Y J; Xu, L; Cheng, X X

    1996-11-01

    One hundred and five chronic renal failure patients were divided randomly into two groups, 75 cases of Niaodujing (NDJ) treatment group and 30 cases of control group treated with aldehyde coated oxystarch. The effects were compared between two groups and within the same group before and after the entry. Results indicated that the total effective rate and markely effecive rate of NDJ group (74.1% and 44.0%) were better than those of the control group (56.6% and 23.3%) respectively (P < 0.05). The serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen and middle molecular substance were decreased and creatinine clearance rate was increased significantly after NDJ treatment as compared with before treatment (P < 0.05-0.01). In comparison of two groups, the decrement of creatinine clearance rate and middle molecular substance and the increment of creatinine in NDJ group were higher than that in control group (P < 0.05-0.01). NDJ was especially effective in patients with azotemia or early renal failure. PMID:9772612

  4. Renal disease in patients infected with hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Jaryal, Ajay; Kumar, Vivek; Sharma, Vishal

    2015-01-01

    Infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) can result in hepatic diseases which may include an asymptomatic non-replicative carrier state, immunotolerant phase characterized by high DNA levels without significant hepatic injury, immune-reactive phase characterized by occurrence of chronic hepatitis and fibrosis in the liver, or complications like cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. Extrahepatic manifestations may also accompany HBV infection. These may include serum sickness syndrome, polyarthralgia, polyarthritis, dermatologic manifestations like pitted keratolysis, urticaria, purpura, oral lichen planus or Gianotti-Crosti syndrome-a childhood papular eruption. Renal involvement may occur with HBV infection and usually involves glomerular or vascular injury. Various morphologic forms of renal injury have been reported with HBV infection, the commonest being membranous glomerulonephritis. The manifestations may include swelling over face and body, pedal edema, and urinary abnormalities. Evaluation may detect proteinuria, hematuria and reduction in estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR). The management options include use of antiviral drugs targeting HBV infection with or without concomitant immunosuppressive medication. With availability of newer drugs like entecavir and tenofovir, these have become the first line agents as they have a high barrier to resistance. Sole use of immunosuppression is not recommended for lack of clear benefit and the possible risk of HBV reactivation or flare. PMID:27509699

  5. BMP-7 is an efficacious treatment of vascular calcification in a murine model of atherosclerosis and chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Davies, Matthew R; Lund, Richard J; Hruska, Keith A

    2003-06-01

    Chronic renal failure is complicated by high cardiovascular mortality. One key contributor to this mortality is vascular calcification, for which no therapy currently exists. Bone morphogenetic protein 7 is an essential renal morphogen that maintains renal tubular differentiation in the adult and is downregulated in renal failure. Several studies have demonstrated its efficacy in treating various renal diseases in rodents, and it was hypothesized that it would also be an effective treatment of vascular calcification in this setting. Uremia was imposed on LDL receptor null mice (a model of atherosclerosis), which were then treated with bone morphogenetic protein 7 for 15 wk. Uremic animals had increased vascular calcification by histology and chemical analysis. Calcification in treated animals was similar to or less than non-uremic control animals. Cells exhibiting an osteoblast-like phenotype in the vessel wall may be important in the etiology of vascular calcification. Expression of osteocalcin was assessed as a marker of osteoblastic function, and it is shown that it is increased in untreated uremic animals but downregulated to levels similar to non-uremic control animals with treatment. The data are compatible with bone morphogenetic protein 7 deficiency as a pathophysiologic factor in chronic renal failure, and they demonstrate its efficacy as a potential treatment of vascular calcification. PMID:12761256

  6. Current MRI Techniques for the Assessment of Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Takamune; Wang, Feng; Quarles, Christopher C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Over the past decade a variety of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods have been developed and applied to many kidney diseases. These MRI techniques show great promise, enabling the noninvasive assessment of renal structure, function, and injury in individual subjects. This review will highlight current applications of functional MRI techniques for the assessment of renal disease and discuss future directions. Recent findings Many pathological (functional and structural) changes or factors in renal disease can be assessed by advanced MRI techniques. These include renal vascular structure and function (contrast-enhanced MRI, arterial spin labeling), tissue oxygenation (blood oxygen level-dependent MRI), renal tissue injury and fibrosis (diffusion or magnetization transfer imaging, MR elastography), renal metabolism (chemical exchange saturation transfer, spectroscopic imaging), nephron endowment (cationic-contrast imaging), sodium concentration (23Na-MRI), and molecular events (targeted-contrast imaging). Summary Current advances in MRI techniques have enabled the non-invasive investigation of renal disease. Further development, evaluation, and application of the MRI techniques should facilitate better understanding and assessment of renal disease and the development of new imaging biomarkers, enabling the intensified treatment to high-risk populations and a more rapid interrogation of novel therapeutic agents and protocols. PMID:26066472

  7. Chronic Disease and Childhood Development: Kidney Disease and Transplantation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Susan D.; Simmons, Roberta G.

    As part of a larger study of transplantation and chronic disease and the family, 124 children (10-18 years old) who were chronically ill with kidney disease (n=72) or were a year or more post-transplant (n=52) were included in a study focusing on the effects of chronic kidney disease and transplantation on children's psychosocial development. Ss…

  8. The Genetics of Ultra-Rare Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Muff-Luett, Melissa; Nester, Carla M

    2016-03-01

    The complement-mediated renal diseases are a group of ultra-rare renal diseases that disproportionately affect children and young adults and frequently lead to irreversible renal failure. Genetic mutations in alternate pathway of complement genes are pathomechanistically involved in a significant number of these unique diseases. Here, we review our current understanding of the role of genetics in the primary complement-mediated renal diseases affecting children, with a focus on atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome and C3 glomerulopathy. Also, included is a brief discussion of the related diseases whose relationship to complement abnormality has been suspected but not yet confirmed. Advances in genetics have transformed both treatment and outcomes in these historically difficult to treat, highly morbid diseases. PMID:27617140

  9. Imaging Manifestations of Hematologic Diseases with Renal and Perinephric Involvement.

    PubMed

    Purysko, Andrei S; Westphalen, Antonio C; Remer, Erick M; Coppa, Christopher P; Leão Filho, Hilton M; Herts, Brian R

    2016-01-01

    The kidneys and perinephric tissues can be affected by a variety of hematologic disorders, which usually occur in the setting of multisystem involvement. In many of these disorders, imaging is used to evaluate the extent of disease, guide biopsy, and/or monitor disease activity and patient response to therapy. Lymphoma, leukemia, and multiple myeloma commonly manifest as multiple parenchymal or perinephric lesions. Erdheim-Chester disease and Rosai-Dorfman disease, rare forms of multisystemic histiocytosis, are often identified as perinephric and periureteral masses. Renal abnormalities depicted at imaging in patients with sickle cell disease include renal enlargement, papillary necrosis, and renal medullary carcinoma. Sickle cell disease, along with other causes of intravascular hemolysis, can also lead to hemosiderosis of the renal cortex. Thrombosis of renal veins is sometimes seen in patients with coagulation disorders but more often occurs in association with certain malignancies and nephrotic syndrome. Immunoglobulin G4-related sclerosing disease is another multisystem process that often produces focal renal lesions, seen along with involvement of more characteristic organs such as the pancreas. Perinephric lesions with calcifications should raise the possibility of secondary amyloidosis, especially in patients with a history of lymphoma and multiple myeloma. Although the imaging patterns of renal and perinephric involvement are usually not specific for a single entity, and the same entity can manifest with different or overlapping patterns, familiarity with these patterns and key clinical and histopathologic features may help to narrow the differential diagnosis and determine the next step of care. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27257766

  10. Overview: end-stage renal disease in the developing world.

    PubMed

    Barsoum, Rashad S

    2002-09-01

    Although the vast majority of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) worldwide live in what is called the developing world, little is known about its epidemiology and management. With the current paucity of credible and adequately representative registries, it is justified to resort to innovative means of obtaining information. In this attempt, world-renowned leading nephrologists in 10 developing countries collaborated in filling a 103-item questionnaire addressing epidemiology, etiology, and management of ESRD in their respective countries on the basis of integrating available data from different sources. Through this joint effort, it was possible to identify a number of important trends. These include the expected high prevalence of ESRD, despite the limited access to renal replacement therapy, and the dependence of prevalence on wealth. Glomerulonephritis, rather than diabetes, remains as the main cause of ESRD with significant geographical variations in the prevailing histopathological types. The implementation of different modalities of renal replacement therapy (RRT) is inhibited by the lack of funding, although governments, insurance companies, and donations usually constitute the major sponsors. Hemodialysis is the preferred modality in most countries with the exception of Mexico where chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) takes the lead. In several other countries, dialysis is available only for those on the transplant waiting list. Dialysis is associated with a high frequency of complications particularly HBV and HCV infections. Data on HIV are lacking. Aluminum intoxication remains as a major problem in a number of countries. Treatment withdrawal is common for socioeconomic reasons. Transplantation is offered to an average of 4 per million population (pmp). Recipient exclusion criteria are minimal. Donor selection criteria are generally loose regarding tissue typing, remote viral infection, and, in some countries, blood-relation to the

  11. Economic aspects of chronic diseases in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Van Minh, Hoang; Lan Huong, Dao; Bao Giang, Kim; Byass, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Introduction There remains a lack of information on economic aspects of chronic diseases. This paper, by gathering available and relevant research findings, aims to report and discuss current evidence on economic aspects of chronic diseases in Vietnam. Methods Data used in this paper were obtained from various information sources: international and national journal articles and studies, government documents and publications, web-based statistics and fact sheets. Results In Vietnam, chronic diseases were shown to be leading causes of deaths, accounting for 66% of all deaths in 2002. The burdens caused by chronic disease morbidity and risk factors are also substantial. Poorer people in Vietnam are more vulnerable to chronic diseases and their risk factors, other than being overweight. The estimated economic loss caused by chronic diseases for Vietnam in 2005 was about US$20 million (0.033% of annual national GDP). Chronic diseases were also shown to cause economic losses for families and individuals in Vietnam. Both population-wide and high-risk individual interventions against chronic disease were shown to be cost-effective in Vietnam. Conclusion Given the evidence from this study, actions to prevent chronic diseases in Vietnam are clearly urgent. Further research findings are required to give greater insights into economic aspects of chronic diseases in Vietnam. PMID:20057939

  12. Chronic kidney disease and erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Etsu; Nishimatsu, Hiroaki; Oba, Shigeyoshi; Takahashi, Masao; Homma, Yukio

    2014-11-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common condition among male chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Its prevalence is estimated to be approximately 80% among these patients. It has been well established that the production of nitric oxide from the cavernous nerve and vascular endothelium and the subsequent production of cyclic GMP are critically important in initiating and maintaining erection. Factors affecting these pathways can induce ED. The etiology of ED in CKD patients is multifactorial. Factors including abnormalities in gonadal-pituitary system, disturbance in autonomic nervous system, endothelial dysfunction, anemia (and erythropoietin deficiency), secondary hyperparathyroidism, drugs, zinc deficiency, and psychological problems are implicated in the occurrence of ED. An improvement of general conditions is the first step of treatment. Sufficient dialysis and adequate nutritional intake are necessary. In addition, control of anemia and secondary hyperparathyroidism is required. Changes of drugs that potentially affect erectile function may be necessary. Further, zinc supplementation may be necessary when zinc deficiency is suspected. Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5Is) are commonly used for treating ED in CKD patients, and their efficacy was confirmed by many studies. Testosterone replacement therapy in addition to PDE5Is may be useful, particularly for CKD patients with hypogonadism. Renal transplantation may restore erectile function. ED is an early marker of cardiovascular disease (CVD), which it frequently precedes; therefore, it is crucial to examine the presence of ED in CKD patients not only for the improvement of the quality of life but also for the prevention of CVD attack. PMID:25374815

  13. Chronic kidney disease alters intestinal microbial flora.

    PubMed

    Vaziri, Nosratola D; Wong, Jakk; Pahl, Madeleine; Piceno, Yvette M; Yuan, Jun; DeSantis, Todd Z; Ni, Zhenmin; Nguyen, Tien-Hung; Andersen, Gary L

    2013-02-01

    The population of microbes (microbiome) in the intestine is a symbiotic ecosystem conferring trophic and protective functions. Since the biochemical environment shapes the structure and function of the microbiome, we tested whether uremia and/or dietary and pharmacologic interventions in chronic kidney disease alters the microbiome. To identify different microbial populations, microbial DNA was isolated from the stools of 24 patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and 12 healthy persons, and analyzed by phylogenetic microarray. There were marked differences in the abundance of 190 bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) between the ESRD and control groups. OTUs from Brachybacterium, Catenibacterium, Enterobacteriaceae, Halomonadaceae, Moraxellaceae, Nesterenkonia, Polyangiaceae, Pseudomonadaceae, and Thiothrix families were markedly increased in patients with ESRD. To isolate the effect of uremia from inter-individual variations, comorbid conditions, and dietary and medicinal interventions, rats were studied 8 weeks post 5/6 nephrectomy or sham operation. This showed a significant difference in the abundance of 175 bacterial OTUs between the uremic and control animals, most notably as decreases in the Lactobacillaceae and Prevotellaceae families. Thus, uremia profoundly alters the composition of the gut microbiome. The biological impact of this phenomenon is unknown and awaits further investigation. PMID:22992469

  14. Chronic kidney disease and erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Etsu; Nishimatsu, Hiroaki; Oba, Shigeyoshi; Takahashi, Masao; Homma, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common condition among male chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Its prevalence is estimated to be approximately 80% among these patients. It has been well established that the production of nitric oxide from the cavernous nerve and vascular endothelium and the subsequent production of cyclic GMP are critically important in initiating and maintaining erection. Factors affecting these pathways can induce ED. The etiology of ED in CKD patients is multifactorial. Factors including abnormalities in gonadal-pituitary system, disturbance in autonomic nervous system, endothelial dysfunction, anemia (and erythropoietin deficiency), secondary hyperparathyroidism, drugs, zinc deficiency, and psychological problems are implicated in the occurrence of ED. An improvement of general conditions is the first step of treatment. Sufficient dialysis and adequate nutritional intake are necessary. In addition, control of anemia and secondary hyperparathyroidism is required. Changes of drugs that potentially affect erectile function may be necessary. Further, zinc supplementation may be necessary when zinc deficiency is suspected. Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5Is) are commonly used for treating ED in CKD patients, and their efficacy was confirmed by many studies. Testosterone replacement therapy in addition to PDE5Is may be useful, particularly for CKD patients with hypogonadism. Renal transplantation may restore erectile function. ED is an early marker of cardiovascular disease (CVD), which it frequently precedes; therefore, it is crucial to examine the presence of ED in CKD patients not only for the improvement of the quality of life but also for the prevention of CVD attack. PMID:25374815

  15. Blood, urine and faecal metabolite profiles in the study of adult renal disease.

    PubMed

    Barrios, Clara; Spector, Tim D; Menni, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major public health burden and to date traditional biomarkers of renal function (such as serum creatinine and cystatin C) are unable to identify at-risk individuals before the disease process is well under way. To help preventive strategies and maximize the potential for effective interventions, it is important to characterise the molecular changes that take place in the development of renal damage. Metabolomics is a promising tool to identify markers of renal disease since the kidneys are involved in the handling of major biochemical classes of metabolites. These metabolite levels capture a snap-shot of the metabolic profile of the individual, allowing for the potential identification of early biomarkers, and the monitoring of real-time kidney function. In this review, we describe the current status of the identification of blood/urine/faecal metabolic biomarkers in different entities of kidney diseases including: acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease, renal transplant, diabetic nephropathy and other disorders. PMID:26476344

  16. Chronic kidney disease in children

    PubMed Central

    Becherucci, Francesca; Roperto, Rosa Maria; Materassi, Marco; Romagnani, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major health problem worldwide. Although relatively uncommon in children, it can be a devastating illness with many long-term consequences. CKD presents unique features in childhood and may be considered, at least in part, as a stand-alone nosologic entity. Moreover, some typical features of paediatric CKD, such as the disease aetiology or cardiovascular complications, will not only influence the child's health, but also have long-term impact on the life of the adult that they will become. In this review we will focus on the unique issues of paediatric CKD, in terms of aetiology, clinical features and treatment. In addition, we will discuss factors related to CKD that start during childhood and require appropriate treatments in order to optimize health outcomes and transition to nephrologist management in adult life. PMID:27478602

  17. Chronic kidney disease in an adult with propionic acidemia.

    PubMed

    Vernon, H J; Bagnasco, S; Hamosh, A; Sperati, C J

    2014-01-01

    We report an adult male with classic propionic acidemia (PA) who developed chronic kidney disease in the third decade of his life. This diagnosis was recognized by an increasing serum creatinine and confirmed by reduced glomerular filtration on a (99m)Tc-diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (DTPA) scan. Histopathology of the kidney showed moderate glomerulo- and tubulointerstitial fibrosis with very segmental mesangial IgA deposits. This is the second reported case of kidney disease in an individual with propionic acidemia possibly indicating that chronic kidney disease may be a late-stage complication of propionic acidemia. Additionally, this is the first description of the histopathology of kidney disease in an individual with propionic acidemia. As more cases emerge, the clinical course and spectrum of renal pathology in this disorder will be better defined. PMID:23756992

  18. Managing pregnancy in chronic kidney disease: improving outcomes for mother and baby.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Alyssa; Mohammadi, Fadak; Jesudason, Shilpanjali

    2016-01-01

    Parenthood is a central focus for women with chronic kidney disease, but raises important fears and uncertainties about risks to their own and their baby's health. Pregnancy in women with background kidney disease, women receiving dialysis, or those with a functioning kidney transplant poses a challenging clinical scenario, associated with high maternal-fetal morbidity and potential impact on maternal renal health. Improvements in care over recent decades have led to a paradigm shift with cautious optimism and growing interest regarding pregnancies in women with chronic kidney disease. In this review, we discuss obstetric and renal outcomes, and practical aspects of management of pregnancy in this complex cohort. PMID:27471410

  19. Managing pregnancy in chronic kidney disease: improving outcomes for mother and baby

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Alyssa; Mohammadi, Fadak; Jesudason, Shilpanjali

    2016-01-01

    Parenthood is a central focus for women with chronic kidney disease, but raises important fears and uncertainties about risks to their own and their baby’s health. Pregnancy in women with background kidney disease, women receiving dialysis, or those with a functioning kidney transplant poses a challenging clinical scenario, associated with high maternal–fetal morbidity and potential impact on maternal renal health. Improvements in care over recent decades have led to a paradigm shift with cautious optimism and growing interest regarding pregnancies in women with chronic kidney disease. In this review, we discuss obstetric and renal outcomes, and practical aspects of management of pregnancy in this complex cohort. PMID:27471410

  20. Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy of chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    SciTech Connect

    Oppenheimer, D.A.; Jones, H.H.

    1982-12-01

    The case of a 14-year old girl with painful periostitis and ulcerative colitis is reported. The association of chronic inflammatory bowel disease with osteoarthropathy is rare and has previously been reported in eight patients. The periosteal reaction found in association with inflammatory bowel disease is apparently related to a chronic disease course and may cause extreme localized pain.

  1. Atherosclerosis in chronic kidney disease: the role of macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kon, Valentina; Linton, MacRae F.; Fazio, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at increased risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and loss of renal parenchyma accelerates atherosclerosis in animal models. Macrophages are central to atherogenesis because they regulate cholesterol traffic and inflammation in the arterial wall. CKD influences macrophage behavior at multiple levels, rendering them proatherogenic. Even at normal creatinine levels, macrophages from uninephrectomized Apoe−/− mice are enriched in cholesterol owing to downregulation of cholesterol transporter ATP-binding cassette subfamily A member 1 levels and activation of nuclear factor κB, which leads to impaired cholesterol efflux. Interestingly, treatment with an angiotensin-II-receptor blocker (ARB) improves these effects. Moreover, atherosclerotic aortas from Apoe−/− mice transplanted into renal-ablated normocholesterolemic recipients show plaque progression and increased macrophage content instead of the substantial regression seen in recipient mice with intact kidneys. ARBs reduce atherosclerosis development in mice with partial renal ablation. These results, combined with the clinical benefits of angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and ARBs in patients with CKD, suggest an important role for the angiotensin system in the enhanced susceptibility to atherosclerosis seen across the spectrum of CKD. The role of macrophages could explain why these therapies may be effective in end-stage renal disease, one of the few conditions in which statins show no clinical benefit. PMID:21102540

  2. Chronic non-communicable diseases.

    PubMed

    Unwin, N; Alberti, K G M M

    2006-01-01

    Chronic non-communicable diseases (NCD) account for almost 60% of global mortality, and 80% of deaths from NCD occur in low- and middle-income countries. One quarter of these deaths--almost 9 million in 2005--are in men and women aged <60 years. Taken together, NCD represent globally the single largest cause of mortality in people of working age, and their incidences in younger adults are substantially higher in the poor countries of the world than in the rich. The major causes of NCD-attributable mortality are cardiovascular disease (30% of total global mortality), cancers (13%), chronic respiratory disease (7%) and diabetes (2%). These conditions share a small number of behavioural risk factors, which include a diet high in saturated fat and low in fresh fruit and vegetables, physical inactivity, tobacco smoking, and alcohol excess. In low- and middle-income countries such risk factors tend to be concentrated in urban areas and their prevalences are increasing as a result of rapid urbanization and the increasing globalisation of the food, tobacco and alcohol industries. Because NCD have a major impact on men and women of working age and their elderly dependents, they result in lost income, lost opportunities for investment, and overall lower levels of economic development. Reductions in the incidences of many NCD and their complications are, however, already possible. Up to 80% of all cases of cardiovascular disease or type-2 diabetes and 40% of all cases of cancer, for example, are probably preventable based on current knowledge. In addition, highly cost-effective measures exist for the prevention of some of the complications of established cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Achieving these gains will require a broad range of integrated, population-based interventions as well as measures focused on the individuals at high risk. At present, the international-assistance community provides scant resources for the control of NCD in poor countries, partly, at least

  3. [Diabetic renal disease: the World Kidney Day in Chile].

    PubMed

    Ardiles, Leopoldo; Mezzano, Sergio

    2010-04-01

    The third version of the World Kidney Day will be held on May 13, 2010 in Chile and will be focused in diabetic renal damage, the main cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Currently, we are living a pandemic of CKD, a progressive and irreversible condition with high social and economic impact. In Chile, we have 857 patients per million inhabitants in hemodialysis and 35% are secondary to diabetes. Our general prevalence of diabetes is 4.2%, rising to 15% in people aged more than 64 years. With a 34% prevalence of hypertension, an aging population, high prevalence of obesity, and a sedentary lifestyle, there is an estimation of a rise in 85% of the prevalence of diabetes in South-America, for the next decades. The steps to be taken are clear: campaigns should be aimed at (1) prevention of type 2 diabetes; (2) screening for early diabetic kidney disease; (3) increasing patient awareness of kidney disease; (4) using medications of proven strategy and finally (5) research on new therapies. These concepts must be included in community and professional education to reduce the effects of this pandemic. PMID:20668785

  4. Chronic Activation of Heme Free Guanylate Cyclase Leads to Renal Protection in Dahl Salt-Sensitive Rats.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Linda S; Kretschmer, Axel; Lawrenz, Bettina; Hocher, Berthold; Stasch, Johannes-Peter

    2015-01-01

    The nitric oxide (NO)/soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC)/cyclic guanosine monophasphate (cGMP)-signalling pathway is impaired under oxidative stress conditions due to oxidation and subsequent loss of the prosthetic sGC heme group as observed in particular in chronic renal failure. Thus, the pool of heme free sGC is increased under pathological conditions. sGC activators such as cinaciguat selectively activate the heme free form of sGC and target the disease associated enzyme. In this study, a therapeutic effect of long-term activation of heme free sGC by the sGC activator cinaciguat was investigated in an experimental model of salt-sensitive hypertension, a condition that is associated with increased oxidative stress, heme loss from sGC and development of chronic renal failure. For that purpose Dahl/ss rats, which develop severe hypertension upon high salt intake, were fed a high salt diet (8% NaCl) containing either placebo or cinaciguat for 21 weeks. Cinaciguat markedly improved survival and ameliorated the salt-induced increase in blood pressure upon treatment with cinaciguat compared to placebo. Renal function was significantly improved in the cinaciguat group compared to the placebo group as indicated by a significantly improved glomerular filtration rate and reduced urinary protein excretion. This was due to anti-fibrotic and anti-inflammatory effects of the cinaciguat treatment. Taken together, this is the first study showing that long-term activation of heme free sGC leads to renal protection in an experimental model of hypertension and chronic kidney disease. These results underline the promising potential of cinaciguat to treat renal diseases by targeting the disease associated heme free form of sGC. PMID:26717150

  5. Chronic Activation of Heme Free Guanylate Cyclase Leads to Renal Protection in Dahl Salt-Sensitive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Linda S.; Kretschmer, Axel; Lawrenz, Bettina; Hocher, Berthold; Stasch, Johannes-Peter

    2015-01-01

    The nitric oxide (NO)/soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC)/cyclic guanosine monophasphate (cGMP)-signalling pathway is impaired under oxidative stress conditions due to oxidation and subsequent loss of the prosthetic sGC heme group as observed in particular in chronic renal failure. Thus, the pool of heme free sGC is increased under pathological conditions. sGC activators such as cinaciguat selectively activate the heme free form of sGC and target the disease associated enzyme. In this study, a therapeutic effect of long-term activation of heme free sGC by the sGC activator cinaciguat was investigated in an experimental model of salt-sensitive hypertension, a condition that is associated with increased oxidative stress, heme loss from sGC and development of chronic renal failure. For that purpose Dahl/ss rats, which develop severe hypertension upon high salt intake, were fed a high salt diet (8% NaCl) containing either placebo or cinaciguat for 21 weeks. Cinaciguat markedly improved survival and ameliorated the salt-induced increase in blood pressure upon treatment with cinaciguat compared to placebo. Renal function was significantly improved in the cinaciguat group compared to the placebo group as indicated by a significantly improved glomerular filtration rate and reduced urinary protein excretion. This was due to anti-fibrotic and anti-inflammatory effects of the cinaciguat treatment. Taken together, this is the first study showing that long-term activation of heme free sGC leads to renal protection in an experimental model of hypertension and chronic kidney disease. These results underline the promising potential of cinaciguat to treat renal diseases by targeting the disease associated heme free form of sGC. PMID:26717150

  6. Importance of Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin in Differential Diagnosis of Acute and Chronic Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Ozkan, Seda; Durukan, Polat; Kavalci, Cemil; Duman, Ali; Sayhan, Mustafa Burak; Salt, Omer; Ipekci, Afsin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Neutrophil Gelatinase-associated Lipocalin (NGAL) protein is easily detected in the blood and urine soon after acute renal injury. NGAL gains features of an early, sensitive and noninvasive biomarker for acute renal injury. Recent evidences suggest that its expression is also increased in CRF reflecting the severity of disease. Objectives: In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether blood NGAL level plays a role in the differential diagnosis of acute and chronic renal failure. Patients and Methods: This was a prospective case-control study. Fifty patients presented to emergency department with acute renal failure (ARF), 30 with chronic renal failure (CRF) and 20 healthy individuals as control group were included in this study. Blood pH, HCO3-, BUN, creatinine and potassium values were evaluated in all patients. Blood NGAL values were evaluated in all groups. BUN, serum creatinine and NGAL values were statistically compared between patients and controls. Results: Median NGAL levels in patients was 304.50 (29), and 60 (0) in control, which was statistically significant between the two groups (Z = -6.477, P < 0.001). The median NGAL values were 261.50 ± 291 in ARF group and 428.50 ± 294 in CRF group. There was a significant difference in NGAL level between ARF and CRF groups (Z = -2.52, P = 0.012). Median BUN values were 153.46 ± 82.47 in ARF group and 169.40 ± 93.94 in CRF group. There was no significant difference in BUN value between ARF and CRF groups (P > 0.05). Median creatinine values were 2.84 ± 2.95 in ARF group and 4.78 ± 4.32 in CRF group. In serum creatinine values, a significant difference was found between ARF and CRF groups (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Serum NGAL levels of ARF and CRF patients were significantly higher than healthy individuals. In addition, NGAL values of patients with CRF were significantly higher than those of ARF. Serum NGAL values can be used to detect renal injury and differentiate ARF and CRF. PMID:25389480

  7. Functional and histological improvement after everolimus rescue of chronic allograft dysfunction in renal transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Kai Ming; Szeto, Cheuk Chun; Lai, Fernand Mac-Moune; Luk, Cathy Choi-Wan; Kwan, Bonnie Ching-Ha; Leung, Chi Bon; Li, Philip Kam-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Background We tested the strategy of mTOR inhibitors with calcineurin inhibitor minimization in renal transplant recipients with known chronic allograft dysfunction. Methods In this open-label, single-arm study, renal transplant patients were recruited after biopsy-confirmed chronic allograft dysfunction in the absence of acute rejection episode within 2 months, with proteinuria <0.8 g/day, and serum creatinine <220 μmol/L or estimated glomerular filtration rate >40 mL/min/1.73 m2. They were converted to everolimus (aiming for trough everolimus level 3–8 ng/mL) with cyclosporine minimization, to assess the effect on renal function, rate of glomerular filtration rate decline, and longitudinal transplant biopsy at 12 months. Results Seventeen Chinese patients (median transplant duration, 4.2 years) were recruited; no patients discontinued study medication. The mean slope of the glomerular filtration rate over time was −4.31±6.65 mL/min/1.73 m2 per year in the year before everolimus, as compared with 1.29±5.84 mL/min/1.73 m2 per year in the 12 months of everolimus therapy, a difference of 5.61 mL/min/1.73 m2 per year (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.40–10.8) favoring everolimus therapy (P=0.036). Serial renal biopsy histology showed significant decrease of tubular atrophy (15.7%±11.3% versus 7.1%±7.3%, P=0.005) and interstitial fibrosis (14.8%±11.5% versus 7.2%±8.2%, P=0.013). Intrarenal expression of TGF-β1 mRNA showed a nonsignificant decrease after everolimus treatment. Conclusion In renal transplant recipients with biopsy-confirmed chronic allograft dysfunction, we found a significant beneficial effect of everolimus rescue therapy and calcineurin inhibitor minimization strategy on the improvement of glomerular filtration rate decline rate. In secondary analysis, everolimus was shown to slow down the disease progression by reducing the tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis scoring. PMID:26056462

  8. End-Stage Renal Disease in an Infant With Hajdu-Cheney Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Battelino, Nina; Writzl, Karin; Bratanič, Nevenka; Irving, Melita D; Novljan, Gregor

    2016-06-01

    Hajdu-Cheney syndrome (HJCYS) is a rare, autosomal dominant, skeletal disorder caused by mutations in the NOTCH2 signaling pathway for which genetic testing has recently become available. Renal abnormalities are associated in at least 10% of cases. We present an 8-year-old Caucasian boy, born with multiple dysmorphic features consistent with HJCYS. Imaging of the urinary tract revealed bilateral cystic dysplastic kidneys with associated vesicoureteral reflux. Renal function has been impaired since birth and deteriorated progressively to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) by the age of two and a half years, when peritoneal dialysis was initiated and only recently renal transplantation was performed. Additional congenital abnormalities and multisystem involvement in HJCYS further complicated management, and he developed refractory anemia. Molecular diagnosis was confirmed by identification of a truncating mutation in exon 34 of NOTCH2. Although, renal abnormalities are considered an integral part of the HJCYS, published reports on ESRD are scarce. In those few published cases, where ESRD was recognized, renal failure developed either in late adolescence or adulthood. This is the first report of early ESRD occurring in a child. Patients with HJCYS may need chronic renal replacement therapy even in early childhood. The management of these children can be challenging given the multisystemic manifestations of HJCYS. PMID:27312922

  9. Treatment of chronic kidney diseases with histone deacetylase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Na; Zhuang, Shougang

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) induce deacetylation of both histone and non-histone proteins and play a critical role in the modulation of physiological and pathological gene expression. Pharmacological inhibition of HDAC has been reported to attenuate progression of renal fibrogenesis in obstructed kidney and reduce cyst formation in polycystic kidney disease. HDAC inhibitors (HDACis) are also able to ameliorate renal lesions in diabetes nephropathy, lupus nephritis, aristolochic acid nephropathy, and transplant nephropathy. The beneficial effects of HDACis are associated with their anti-fibrosis, anti-inflammation, and immunosuppressant effects. In this review, we summarize recent advances on the treatment of various chronic kidney diseases with HDACis in pre-clinical models. PMID:25972812

  10. SORCS1 contributes to the development of renal disease in rats and humans

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Jozef; O'Meara, Caitlin C.; Sarkis, Allison B.; Prisco, Sasha Z.; Xu, Haiyan; Fox, Caroline S.; Chen, Ming-Huei; Broeckel, Ulrich; Arnett, Donna K.; Moreno, Carol; Provoost, Abraham P.

    2013-01-01

    Many lines of evidence demonstrate that genetic variability contributes to chronic kidney disease susceptibility in humans as well as rodent models. Little progress has been made in discovering causal kidney disease genes in humans mainly due to genetic complexity. Here, we use a minimal congenic mapping strategy in the FHH (fawn hooded hypertensive) rat to identify Sorcs1 as a novel renal disease candidate gene. We investigated the hypothesis that genetic variation in Sorcs1 influences renal disease susceptibility in both rat and human. Sorcs1 is expressed in the kidney, and knocking out this gene in a rat strain with a sensitized genome background produced increased proteinuria. In vitro knockdown of Sorcs1 in proximal tubule cells impaired protein trafficking, suggesting a mechanism for the observed proteinuria in the FHH rat. Since Sorcs1 influences renal function in the rat, we went on to test this gene in humans. We identified associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms in SORCS1 and renal function in large cohorts of European and African ancestry. The experimental data from the rat combined with association results from different ethnic groups indicates a role for SORCS1 in maintaining proper renal function. PMID:23780848

  11. Macroscopic Hydatiduria: An Uncommon Pathognomonic Presentation of Renal Hydatid Disease

    PubMed Central

    HAMIDI MADANI, Ali; ENSHAEI, Ahmad; POURREZA, Farshid; ESMAEILI, Samaneh; HAMIDI MADANI, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Isolated renal hydatid disease is a rare endemic infestation caused by larval form of Echinococcus granulosus. Hydatiduria is an uncommon presentation of renal hydatid disease. In 2012 a 34-year-old female referred to Razi Hospital, Rasht, Iran with complaints of right flank pain and grape-like material in urine. Diagnosis was made by ultrasonography and CT scan. The patient was treated surgically with nephrectomy in combination with perioperative chemotherapy with albendazol. PMID:26587504

  12. Macroscopic Hydatiduria: An Uncommon Pathognomonic Presentation of Renal Hydatid Disease.

    PubMed

    Hamidi Madani, Ali; Enshaei, Ahmad; Pourreza, Farshid; Esmaeili, Samaneh; Hamidi Madani, Mohammad

    2015-09-01

    Isolated renal hydatid disease is a rare endemic infestation caused by larval form of Echinococcus granulosus. Hydatiduria is an uncommon presentation of renal hydatid disease. In 2012 a 34-year-old female referred to Razi Hospital, Rasht, Iran with complaints of right flank pain and grape-like material in urine. Diagnosis was made by ultrasonography and CT scan. The patient was treated surgically with nephrectomy in combination with perioperative chemotherapy with albendazol. PMID:26587504

  13. A Novel Mutation of the HNF1B Gene Associated With Hypoplastic Glomerulocystic Kidney Disease and Neonatal Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Alvelos, Maria Inês; Rodrigues, Magda; Lobo, Luísa; Medeira, Ana; Sousa, Ana Berta; Simão, Carla; Lemos, Manuel Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 beta (HNF1B) plays an important role in embryonic development, namely in the kidney, pancreas, liver, genital tract, and gut. Heterozygous germline mutations of HNF1B are associated with the renal cysts and diabetes syndrome (RCAD). Affected individuals may present a variety of renal developmental abnormalities and/or maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY). A Portuguese 19-month-old male infant was evaluated due to hypoplastic glomerulocystic kidney disease and renal dysfunction diagnosed in the neonatal period that progressed to stage 5 chronic renal disease during the first year of life. His mother was diagnosed with a solitary hypoplastic microcystic left kidney at age 20, with stage 2 chronic renal disease established at age 35, and presented bicornuate uterus, pancreatic atrophy, and gestational diabetes. DNA sequence analysis of HNF1B revealed a novel germline frameshift insertion (c.110_111insC or c.110dupC) in both the child and the mother. A review of the literature revealed a total of 106 different HNF1B mutations, in 236 mutation-positive families, comprising gross deletions (34%), missense mutations (31%), frameshift deletions or insertions (15%), nonsense mutations (11%), and splice-site mutations (8%). The study of this family with an unusual presentation of hypoplastic glomerulocystic kidney disease with neonatal renal dysfunction identified a previously unreported mutation of the HNF1B gene, thereby expanding the spectrum of known mutations associated with renal developmental disorders. PMID:25700310

  14. Corticosteroids in Patients with IgA Nephropathy and Severe Chronic Renal Damage

    PubMed Central

    Pozzi, Claudio; Ferrario, Francesca; Visciano, Bianca; Del Vecchio, Lucia

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the utility of treating patients with advanced IgA nephropathy (IgAN). From 2001 to 2005, four patients came to our observation because of serum creatinine higher than 3 mg/dL, proteinuria ranging from 1.8 to 5.1 g/day, and a histological picture of diffuse sclerotic lesions. A corticosteroid course of 12 months was given. Patients were observed for a mean follow up of 84 months. At the end of the steroid course, proteinuria lowered quickly below 1 g/day in two patients, whereas the other two experienced a slower and less persistent decrease of proteinuria. Despite similar lesion severity at renal biopsy, renal function stabilized only in these two ones. In conclusion, these preliminary observations suggest a possible efficacy of corticosteroids in slowing down the progression of renal disease and in postponing the need of dialysis in IgAN patients with stage IV CKD and severe chronic histological lesions. PMID:24533200

  15. Renal replacement therapy in Latin American end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Rosa-Diez, Guillermo; Gonzalez-Bedat, Maria; Pecoits-Filho, Roberto; Marinovich, Sergio; Fernandez, Sdenka; Lugon, Jocemir; Poblete-Badal, Hugo; Elgueta-Miranda, Susana; Gomez, Rafael; Cerdas-Calderon, Manuel; Almaguer-Lopez, Miguel; Freire, Nelly; Leiva-Merino, Ricardo; Rodriguez, Gaspar; Luna-Guerra, Jorge; Bochicchio, Tomasso; Garcia-Garcia, Guillermo; Cano, Nuria; Iron, Norman; Cuero, Cesar; Cuevas, Dario; Tapia, Carlos; Cangiano, Jose; Rodriguez, Sandra; Gonzalez, Haydee; Duro-Garcia, Valter

    2014-08-01

    prevalence of RRT continues to increase, particularly in countries with 100% public health or insurance coverage for RRT, where it approaches rates comparable to those displayed by developed countries with a better GNI. The incidence also continues to increase in both countries that have not yet extended its coverage to 100% of the population as well as in those that have an adequate program for timely detection and treatment of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its associated risk factors. PD is still an underutilized strategy for RRT in the region. Even though renal Tx is feasible, its growth rate is still not as fast as it should be in order to compensate for the increased prevalence of patients on waiting lists. Diagnostic and prevention programs for hypertension and diabetes, appropriate policies promoting the expansion of PD and organ procurement as well as transplantation as cost-effective forms of RRT are needed in the region. Regional cooperation among Latin American countries, allowing the more developed to guide and train others in starting registries and CKD programs, may be one of the key initiatives to address this deficit. PMID:25349696

  16. Renal replacement therapy in Latin American end-stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Rosa-Diez, Guillermo; Gonzalez-Bedat, Maria; Pecoits-Filho, Roberto; Marinovich, Sergio; Fernandez, Sdenka; Lugon, Jocemir; Poblete-Badal, Hugo; Elgueta-Miranda, Susana; Gomez, Rafael; Cerdas-Calderon, Manuel; Almaguer-Lopez, Miguel; Freire, Nelly; Leiva-Merino, Ricardo; Rodriguez, Gaspar; Luna-Guerra, Jorge; Bochicchio, Tomasso; Garcia-Garcia, Guillermo; Cano, Nuria; Iron, Norman; Cuero, Cesar; Cuevas, Dario; Tapia, Carlos; Cangiano, Jose; Rodriguez, Sandra; Gonzalez, Haydee; Duro-Garcia, Valter

    2014-01-01

    prevalence of RRT continues to increase, particularly in countries with 100% public health or insurance coverage for RRT, where it approaches rates comparable to those displayed by developed countries with a better GNI. The incidence also continues to increase in both countries that have not yet extended its coverage to 100% of the population as well as in those that have an adequate program for timely detection and treatment of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its associated risk factors. PD is still an underutilized strategy for RRT in the region. Even though renal Tx is feasible, its growth rate is still not as fast as it should be in order to compensate for the increased prevalence of patients on waiting lists. Diagnostic and prevention programs for hypertension and diabetes, appropriate policies promoting the expansion of PD and organ procurement as well as transplantation as cost-effective forms of RRT are needed in the region. Regional cooperation among Latin American countries, allowing the more developed to guide and train others in starting registries and CKD programs, may be one of the key initiatives to address this deficit. PMID:25349696

  17. EFFECTS OF CADMIUM ON RENAL AGING: A CHRONIC CADMIUM FEEDING STUDY IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cadmium (Cd) is known to accumulate preferentially in the renal proximal tubules. Animal and human autopsy studies have shown that damage to the renal proximal tubular cells is associated with toxicity from chronic Cd exposure. The present study was undertaken to determine if Cd ...

  18. [Chronic kidney disease: therapy and care].

    PubMed

    Noel, Natacha; Gaha, Khaled; Rieu, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major public health problem. It is therefore important to slow its progression and to treat its complications. Regardless of the causal nephropathy, arterial hypertension and proteinuria are the major progression factors of CKD. Thus, optimal control of blood pressure, reduction of proteinuria by using rennin angiotension system inhibitors can slow the progression of CKD. This effect can be enhanced by reducing sodium intake. The recent recommendations suggest that blood pressure should not be higher than 130/80 mmHg and proteinuria should not exceed 0,5 g/day. The consequences of advanced stages of the CKD have to be diagnosed and treated early: anemia, abnormal bone metabolism, hyperkalemia, fluid overload, metabolic acidosis... A particular emphasis has to be given to cardiovascular complications and risk factors. Monitoring data are well defined by the actual recommandations. Nephrologist can provide a set of recommended intervention to the primary care physician. The most accepted criterion of initiation of dialysis, in absence of clinic uremic manifestation is a glomerular filtration rate lower than 7 ml/min/1,73m2. Psychological and medical preparation of the patient to dialysis is essential. The possibility of renal transplantation should be evaluated during the following of patient with CKD PMID:22335066

  19. Resistant Hypertension in Nondialysis Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stanzione, Giovanna; Conte, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Resistant hypertension (RH) is defined as blood pressure (BP) that remains above the target of less than 140/90 mmHg in the general population and 130/80 mmHg in people with diabetes mellitus or chronic kidney disease (CKD) in spite of the use of at least three full-dose antihypertensive drugs including a diuretic or as BP that reaches the target by means of four or more drugs. In CKD, RH is a common condition due to a combination of factors including sodium retention, increased activity of the renin-angiotensin system, and enhanced activity of the sympathetic nervous system. Before defining the hypertensive patient as resistant it is mandatory to exclude the so-called “pseudoresistance.” This condition, which refers to the apparent failure to reach BP target in spite of an appropriate antihypertensive treatment, is mainly caused by white coat hypertension that is prevalent (30%) in CKD patients. Recently we have demonstrated that “true” RH represents an independent risk factor for renal and cardiovascular outcomes in CKD patients. PMID:23710342

  20. Chronic diseases in captive geriatric female Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Nunamaker, Elizabeth A; Lee, D Rick; Lammey, Michael L

    2012-04-01

    The current aging population of captive chimpanzees is expected to develop age-related diseases and present new challenges to providing their veterinary care. Spontaneous heart disease and sudden cardiac death are the main causes of death in chimpanzees (especially of male animals), but little is known about the relative frequency of other chronic diseases. Furthermore, female chimpanzees appear to outlive the males and scant literature addresses clinical conditions that affect female chimpanzees. Here we characterize the types and prevalence of chronic disease seen in geriatric (older than 35 y) female chimpanzees in the colony at Alamogordo Primate Facility. Of the 16 female chimpanzees that fit the age category, 87.5% had some form of chronic age-related disease. Cardiovascular-related disease was the most common (81.25%) followed by metabolic syndrome (43.75%) and renal disease (31.25%). These data show the incidence of disease in geriatric female chimpanzees and predict likely medical management challenges associated with maintaining an aging chimpanzee population. PMID:22546920

  1. [Treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus in patients with chronic kidney disease. Grupo de Trabajo para el Documento de Consenso sobre el tratamiento de la diabetes tipo 2 en el paciente con enfermedad renal crónica].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Huelgas, Ricardo; Martínez-Castelao, Alberto; Artola, Sara; Górriz, José Luis; Menéndez, Edelmiro

    2014-01-21

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are highly prevalent chronic diseases, which represent an important public health problem and require a multidisciplinary management. T2DM is the main cause of CKD and it also causes a significant comorbidity with regard to non-diabetic nephropathy. Patients with diabetes and kidney disease represent a special risk group as they have higher morbi-mortality as well as higher risk of hypoglycemia than diabetic individuals with a normal kidney function. Treatment of T2DM in patients with CKD is controversial because of the scarcity of available evidence. The current consensus report aims to ease the appropriate selection and dosage of antidiabetic treatments as well as the establishment of safety objectives of glycemic control in patients with CKD. PMID:24268912

  2. The case for disease management in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Randolph A; Scott, Susan; Mattern, William D; Mohini, Ravinder; Nissenson, Allen R

    2006-04-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a growing epidemic in the United States and worldwide, with nearly two thirds of CKD patients also having diabetes, hypertension, or both. Morbidity and mortality among patients with CKD are high, as are the costs associated with care, which is highly fragmented. Disease management (DM) programs are designed to coordinate the delivery of care to patients, improve clinical outcomes, and reduce costs along the continuum of care. The goals of DM programs in CKD patients are to fill the gaps in current care by focusing on four key areas: (1) slowing the progression of CKD, (2) identifying and managing the complications of CKD, (3) identifying and managing associated comorbid conditions, and (4) smoothing the transition to renal replacement therapy (RRT). To be successful, this approach requires multidisciplinary collaboration among physicians (eg, primary care physicians, endocrinologists, cardiologists, nephrologists, surgeons) and participating caregivers including nurses, dieticians, social workers, and pharmacists. Patient identification, limited reimbursement, late patient referral, and lack of primary care physician and nephrologist knowledge about the importance and details of CKD management are all barriers that must be overcome for such programs to be successfully implemented. Considering the magnitude of the opportunity, DM applied to CKD is a promising approach to the care of this vulnerable population. PMID:16620194

  3. BEYOND GENETICS: EPIGENETIC CODE IN CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Rama S.; Herman, James G.; McCaffrey, Timothy; Raj, Dominic SC

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetics refers to a heritable change in the pattern of gene expression that is mediated by a mechanism specifically not due to alterations in the primary nucleotide sequence. Well known epigenetic mechanisms encompass DNA methylation, chromatin remodeling (histone modifications) and RNA interference. Functionally, epigenetics provides an extra layer of transcriptional control and plays a crucial role in normal physiological development, as well as in pathological conditions. Aberrant DNA methylation is implicated in immune dysfunction, inflammation and insulin resistance. Epigenetic changes may be responsible for “metabolic memory” and development of micro- and macrovascular complications of diabetes. MicroRNAs are critical in the maintenance of glomerular homeostasis and hence RNA interference may be important in the progression of renal disease. Recent studies have shown that epigenetic modifications orchestrate the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and eventually fibrosis of the renal tissue. Oxidative stress, inflammation, hyperhomocysteinemia and uremic toxins could induce epimutations in chronic kidney disease. Epigenetic alterations are associated with inflammation and cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease. Reversible nature of the epigenetic changes gives an unique opportunity to halt or even reverse the disease process through targeted therapeutic strategies. PMID:20881938

  4. Parathyroidectomy in the treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Kostakis, A; Vaiopoulos, G; Kostantopoulos, K; Zavos, G; Bocos, I; Sgouromalis, S

    1997-01-01

    During the period 1983-1995, 200 chronic renal failure patients (115 males and 85 females) were parathyroidectomized for hyperparathyroidism in our Department. In all of them, the presenting clinical symptoms, physical signs, biochemical and radiological tests were typically those of hyperparathyroidism. One hundred ninety patients were operated for the first time whereas 10 were re-operated due to relapse of the disease; 3 of these cases were primary hyperparathyroidism, 182 secondary and 5 tertiary. All three primary hyperparathyroidism cases underwent removal of the adenoma; in the group of secondary hyperparathyroidism, 50 underwent removal of all the parathyroid glands found, 25 underwent total parathyroidectomy with forearm or deltoid autograft and 60 subtotal parathyroidectomy whereas in 39 and 8 patients only 3 and 2 parathyroid glands were found respectively. In the group of tertiary hyperparathyroidism, we removed only the hyperplastic gland detected as the operative detection of the rest was not possible. Ten cases were re-operated for removal of the remaining glands. No complications were noted postoperatively, apart from severe hypocalcemia in 20 cases, treated successfully by Calcium and Vitamin D administration. The highest relapse rate was noted among the 8 patients with only the 2 parathyroid glands removed. It seems that total or subtotal parathyroidectomy represents the most successful methods for surgical treatment of hyperparathyroidism complicating chronic renal failure. PMID:9189811

  5. Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Organizations (PDF, 270 KB). Alternate Language URL Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease Page Content On ... Nutrition Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is anemia? Anemia is a condition in which a person ...

  6. Retrospective evaluation of renal disease in captive black howler monkeys (Alouatta caraya).

    PubMed

    Fontenot, Deidre K; Gregory, Christopher R; Lamberski, Nadine

    2004-09-01

    Six of 15 (40%) inactive medical records of adult black howler monkeys (Alouatta caraya) at one zoological institution included either a pre- or postmortem diagnosis of renal disease. In these six cases, significantly abnormal hematologic and serum chemistry values were reported at onset of azotemia, onset of clinical signs, and at euthanasia. Average age of onset of azotemia was 14.8 +/- 2.9 yr, with clinical signs of disease noted at 17 +/- 4.7 yr. In four of the cases (66.6%), azotemia was documented earlier than the onset of clinical signs of renal disease. Average duration of clinical disease was 2.83 +/- 1.6 yr, with an average age at euthanasia of 18 +/- 4.7 yr. Chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis with secondary glomerular sclerosis was present in all cases. Thirteen of an additional 20 institutions in the United States that have held Alouatta caraya responded to a survey for prevalence of renal disease. These institutions showed a lower prevalence (15.1%) of renal disease in complete, inactive records, a higher prevalence of glomerulonephritis, and similar significant clinicopathologic values. PMID:15526883

  7. Sevelamer carbonate experience in Indian end stage renal disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, G.; Kher, V.; Saxena, S.; Jayakumar, M.; Chafekar, D.; Pargaonkar, P.; Shetty, M.; Reddy, Y. N. V.; Reddy, Y. N. V.

    2012-01-01

    This open label, multicentric, comparative clinical trial was done to compare the efficacy and tolerability of two sevelamer formulations, sevelamer carbonate, and sevelamer hydrochloride, in the treatment of hyperphosphatemia in Indian end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. A total of 97 ESRD patients on hemodialysis, were enrolled. Patients were randomized to receive either sevelamer carbonate or sevelamer hydrochloride. All patients were evaluated every week for 6 weeks for efficacy and safety variables. Total 88 patients completed the study. After 6 weeks of therapy, there were similar reductions (P<0.0001) in mean serum phosphorus and the CaxP product both the groups. The responder rates for test and reference groups were 75%, 68.18% respectively (P=0.3474). The adverse events reported were nausea, abdominal pain/discomfort, heartburn, constipation, diarrhea, increased prothrombin time, and severe arthritis. No serious adverse events were reported. There was no significant difference between the groups for adverse events and the laboratory parameters. From the results of this multicentric, comparative, randomized clinical study on sevelamer carbonate we can recommend that sevelamer carbonate may be used as a phosphate binder in Indian chronic kidney disease patients. PMID:23087553

  8. Chronic kidney disease in human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Fabian, J; Katz, I; Gerntholtz, T; Goetsch, S; Naicker, S

    2007-06-01

    -uninfected transplant recipients. However, high rates of acute and chronic rejection have been observed among HIV-infected kidney transplant recipients. The Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) published guidelines in 2005, recommending that all individuals be assessed for kidney disease at the time of diagnosis of HIV infection with a screening urinalysis for proteinuria and a calculated estimate of renal function. Therefore any patient with persistent proteinuria, persistent haematuria or glomerular filtration rate < 60 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) should be referred to an institution where a specialist can evaluate this patient for further investigations. An integrated plan to reduce the progression to kidney failure together with lifestyle measures, focusing also on high risk groups with effective management at all levels of chronic kidney disease remains essential. PMID:17625482

  9. Female cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus) develop chronic anemia with renal inflammation and cystic changes.

    PubMed

    Ichii, Osamu; Nakamura, Teppei; Irie, Takao; Kouguchi, Hirokazu; Nakamura, Daisuke; Nakamura, Saori; Sato, Shinobu; Yokoyama, Keisuke; Horino, Taro; Sunden, Yuji; Elewa, Yaser Hosny Ali; Kon, Yasuhiro

    2016-09-01

    The cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus) is a laboratory rodent that has been used for studies on human infectious diseases. In the present study, we observed that female cotton rats, not the male cotton rats, developed chronic anemia characterized by reduced red blood cell, hemoglobin, and hematocrit levels from 5 to 9 months of age without any changes in the mean corpuscular hemoglobin and volume levels. In peripheral blood, the reticulocyte count did not increase in response to anemia in female cotton rats, and no extramedullary hematopoiesis was observed in the liver or spleen. Further, the serum levels of urea nitrogen and creatinine increased from 5 to 9 months of age in female cotton rats compared to male cotton rats, and these increases became more prominent from 10 months of age onward, indicating chronic kidney disease. Histopathologically, female cotton rats manifested tubulointerstitial lesions characterized by the infiltration of mononuclear cells, including plasma cells and CD3(+) T-cells, as well as the dilation of calbindin-D28k(+) distal tubules from 5 to 9 months of age. The severity of these lesions progressed from 10 months of age onward, and renal fibrotic features and numerous tubular cysts appeared without any obvious glomerular lesions. A significant decrease in the erythropoietin protein levels was observed in the kidney of aged female cotton rats, and significant correlations were detected between anemia and tubulointerstitial damage. These results suggest that aged female cotton rats chronically develop renal anemia, and this rodent may serve as a novel model to elucidate its pathogenesis. PMID:27099161

  10. [Troponins and chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Di Lullo, Luca; Barbera, Vincenzo; Santoboni, Alberto; Bellasi, Antonio; Cozzolino, Mario; De Pascalis, Antonio; Rivera, Rodolfo; Balducci, Alessandro; Russo, Domenico; Ronco, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Coronary thrombosis was recognized since 19th century as clinical entity with bad outcomes; only in 1912 it was reported that acute myocardial infarction had to been distinguished from angina pectoris. First diagnostic test was electrocardiogram, while white blood cells count and erythrocytes sedimentation rate were the only available laboratory tests. Late in the 60s and 70s glutammic oxaloacetic and glutamic pyravate transaminase, lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase were added to biomarkers pool to provide a diagnosis of myocardial infarction related to myocardial cells injury. Only in 1987 assays for cardiac troponin were developed to assess structural damage of myocardial cells and in 2010 high sensibility troponins first dosage kits became available. It is well known that the population with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is at greater risk for cardiovascular disease and death than the general population. The use and interpretation of high sensitivity cardiac troponin (hs-cTn) assays have been particularly challenging in these patients with the majority having elevated levels at baseline. Aim of this review is to evaluate hs-cTn in patients with CKD for the diagnosis of AMI and for the prognostic significance of elevated levels in CKD patients without AMI. PMID:26252257

  11. Aluminium intoxication in undialysed adults with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Russo, L S; Beale, G; Sandroni, S; Ballinger, W E

    1992-01-01

    The dialysis encephalopathy syndrome (DES) consists of altered mental status, communication difficulty, seizures and myoclonus. It has been attributed to elevated serum aluminium (A1) levels. Two undialysed patients with chronic renal failure who presented with the characteristic syndrome are reported. The first, a 48 year old female, had used A1 containing phosphate binders for two years. Her serum A1 level was 25.34 mumol/L. Despite treatment with desferoximine and dialysis, she died. Necropsy revealed elevated A1 levels in the cerebral cortex (19 mcg/gm) and spongioform change in the outer three cortical layers. The second patient, a 46 year old woman, had a serum A1 of 8.70 mumol/L. She had never taken A1 containing phosphate binders but had taken several grams/day of citrate for at least six months. Treatment with haemodialysis and discontinuation of the citrate produced a resolution of symptoms and return of the A1 level to normal. During two years of haemodialysis there has been no recurrence. Images PMID:1527541

  12. Pharmacokinetics of iothalamate in endstage renal disease

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.R.; Cutler, R.E.; Forland, S.C.

    1988-09-01

    Some nephrologists make alterations in routine peritoneal and hemodialysis schedules after diagnostic studies that use radiographic contrast agents. A study to determine the pharmacokinetics of one contrast agent, iothalamate, is reported. The plasma (total body) clearance of iothalamate was measured in seven patients who had endstage renal disease (ESRD) and who received maintenance hemodialysis. During an interdialytic period, plasma clearance of iothalamate varied from 0.7 to 5.2 mL/min (3.1 +/- 1.8 mL/min, mean +/- SD) with an elimination rate constant (beta) of 0.0164 +/- 0.01 hr-1, a terminal half-life of 61 +/- 42 hours, and an estimated distribution volume of 11 +/- 3.9 L. Hemodialysis clearance of iothalamate was 104 +/- 54 mL/min. With the assumption that iothalamate is mainly distributed in the extracellular fluid (ECF) compartment, the theoretical fluid shift from the intracellular fluid (ICF) compartment to the ECF compartment was 323 mL after administration of the largest dose (2.1 mL/kg or 1.6 mmol/kg of body weight) of 60% meglumine iothalamate solution. The average maximum serum osmolarity change was less than expected, suggesting some type of internal buffering of meglumine iothalamate. In the first few hours after radiocontrast administration in four patients, the average change in serum osmolarity was 5 mmol/L; the average change in serum sodium concentration during this same time was a decrease of 0.5 mmol/L. The minor increase in ECF volume induced by hyperosmolar contrast agents does not require immediate dialysis in most patients. When needed, however, for contrast-related adverse effects, hemodialysis is efficient in rapidly removing iothalamate.

  13. Nephropathy in dietary hyperoxaluria: A potentially preventable acute or chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Glew, Robert H; Sun, Yijuan; Horowitz, Bruce L; Konstantinov, Konstantin N; Barry, Marc; Fair, Joanna R; Massie, Larry; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H

    2014-01-01

    Hyperoxaluria can cause not only nephrolithiasis and nephrocalcinosis, but also renal parenchymal disease histologically characterized by deposition of calcium oxalate crystals throughout the renal parenchyma, profound tubular damage and interstitial inflammation and fibrosis. Hyperoxaluric nephropathy presents clinically as acute or chronic renal failure that may progress to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). This sequence of events, well recognized in the past in primary and enteric hyperoxalurias, has also been documented in a few cases of dietary hyperoxaluria. Estimates of oxalate intake in patients with chronic dietary hyperoxaluria who developed chronic kidney disease or ESRD were comparable to the reported average oxalate content of the diets of certain populations worldwide, thus raising the question whether dietary hyperoxaluria is a primary cause of ESRD in these regions. Studies addressing this question have the potential of improving population health and should be undertaken, alongside ongoing studies which are yielding fresh insights into the mechanisms of intestinal absorption and renal excretion of oxalate, and into the mechanisms of development of oxalate-induced renal parenchymal disease. Novel preventive and therapeutic strategies for treating all types of hyperoxaluria are expected to develop from these studies. PMID:25374807

  14. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Prevalence and Mortality

    EPA Science Inventory

    This indicator describes data on chronic pulmonary disease (COPD) prevalence and deaths across the U.S. for the time periods 1997-2009 and 1979-2007, respectively. COPD, also known as chronic lung disease, may be partly caused or exacerbated by environmental exposures such as ...

  15. Stroke and Chronic Kidney Disease: Epidemiology, Pathogenesis, and Management Across Kidney Disease Stages

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Daniel E.; Dad, Taimur

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cerebrovascular disease and stroke are very common at all stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD), likely representing both shared risk factors as well as synergy among risk factors. More subtle ischemic brain lesions may be particularly common in the CKD population, with subtle manifestations including cognitive impairment. For individuals with nondialysis CKD, the prevention, approach to, diagnosis, and management of stroke is similar to the general, non-CKD population. For individuals with end-stage renal disease, far less is known regarding the prevention of stroke. Stroke prophylaxis using warfarin in dialysis patients with atrial fibrillation in particular remains of uncertain benefit. End-stage renal disease patients can be managed aggressively in the setting of acute stroke. Outcomes after stroke at all stages of CKD are poor, and improving these outcomes should be the subject of future clinical trials. PMID:26355250

  16. Impaired renal function impacts negatively on vascular stiffness in patients with coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and coronary artery disease (CAD) are independently associated with increased vascular stiffness. We examined whether renal function contributes to vascular stiffness independently of CAD status. Methods We studied 160 patients with CAD and 169 subjects without CAD. The 4-variable MDRD formula was used to estimate glomerular filtration rate (eGFR); impaired renal function was defined as eGFR <60 mL/min. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured with the SphygmoCor® device. Circulating biomarkers were assessed in plasma using xMAP® multiplexing technology. Results Patients with CAD and impaired renal function had greater PWV compared to those with CAD and normal renal function (10.2 [9.1;11.2] vs 7.3 [6.9;7.7] m/s; P < 0.001). In all patients, PWV was a function of eGFR (β = −0.293; P < 0.001) even after adjustment for age, sex, systolic blood pressure, body mass index and presence or absence of CAD. Patients with CAD and impaired renal function had higher levels of adhesion and inflammatory molecules including E-selectin and osteopontin (all P < 0.05) compared to those with CAD alone, but had similar levels of markers of oxidative stress. Conclusions Renal function is a determinant of vascular stiffness even in patients with severe atherosclerotic disease. This was paralleled by differences in markers of cell adhesion and inflammation. Increased vascular stiffness may therefore be linked to inflammatory remodeling of the vasculature in people with impaired renal function, irrespective of concomitant atherosclerotic disease. PMID:23937620

  17. Renal handling of free sialic acid in normal humans and patients with Salla disease or renal disease.

    PubMed

    Seppala, R; Renlund, M; Bernardini, I; Tietze, F; Gahl, W A

    1990-08-01

    The renal handling of free sialic acid, a negatively charged sugar, was investigated in normal humans and in patients with impaired sialic acid metabolism or impaired renal function. A sensitive assay for sialic acid, based upon the specific degradation of free sialic acid by N-acetylneuraminic acid aldolase, was developed to measure small amounts of sialic acid in human plasma. Using this assay on plasma from patients with disorders of sialic acid metabolism, we determined that the fractional excretion of sialic acid was maintained at approximately 98% over a wide range of filtered loads, i.e., from 40 to 2617 nmoles/minute. In other patients with different degrees of renal insufficiency, free sialic acid clearance varied directly with creatinine clearance, indicating filtration of this sugar by renal glomeruli. In patients with renal Fanconi syndrome, the urinary excretion of free sialic acid was independent of the severity of the generalized tubular defect, indicating that sialic acid was not reabsorbed by renal tubular cells. These findings indicate that sialic acid is filtered but not reabsorbed by the human kidney, in contrast with the handling of other sugars known to be reabsorbed by renal tubular cells. In addition, three of eight patients with Salla disease, a storage disorder due to impaired lysosomal transport of free sialic acid, were found to have reduced creatinine clearances, but all Salla disease patients had entirely normal renal tubular function. PMID:2381164

  18. Epidemic renal disease of unknown etiology in the Zuni Indians

    SciTech Connect

    Hoy, W.E.; Megill, D.M.; Hughson, M.D.

    1987-06-01

    An epidemic of renal disease is occurring among the Zuni Indians in western New Mexico. In 1985, 1.6% of Zunis had clinically recognized renal disease and 1% had renal insufficiency. The incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in 1984 and 1985 was 14 times the rate for US whites, and three times the rates of other Indians in ESRD network 6. One third of the cases of renal disease and ESRD is due to type 2 diabetes, but the etiology of disease in most of the remainder is unknown. Affected subjects range from early childhood to old age. Early signs are hematuria, mild to moderate proteinuria, normal BP, and low total hemolytic complement, normal or low C3 and C4 levels, in about 40% of the cases. The clinical course varies from benign to rapidly progressive renal failure. Biopsies usually reflect an immune-complex mediated mesangiopathic glomerulonephritis, with IgA, IgG, IgM, and C3 variably present in the mesangium. In some cases, there is a very strong familial pattern suggesting autosomal dominant inheritance or a marked communal exposure effect. This may be a genetic disease educed by the consanguinity in the ethnically homogeneous Zuni population. Mesangiopathic renal disease is common in some Oriental populations, and this phenomenon may reflect the American Indians' Oriental ancestry. This disease may also be due to toxic exposures related to jewelry-making, potting, Zuni water, Zuni salt, or herbal or other products used for medicinal or religious purposes. This epidemic is causing much morbidity and generating huge costs for ESRD treatment. Further study is needed to better understand its etiology.

  19. Right Ventricular Dysfunction in Chronic Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kolb, Todd M.; Hassoun, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    Right ventricular dysfunction arises in chronic lung disease when chronic hypoxemia and disruption of pulmonary vascular beds contribute to increase ventricular afterload, and is generally defined by hypertrophy with preserved myocardial contractility and cardiac output. Although the exact prevalence is unknown, right ventricular hypertrophy appears to be a common complication of chronic lung disease, and more frequently complicates advanced lung disease. Right ventricular failure is rare, except during acute exacerbations of chronic lung disease or when multiple co-morbidities are present. Treatment is targeted at correcting hypoxia and improving pulmonary gas exchange and mechanics. There are presently no convincing data to support the use of pulmonary hypertension-specific therapies in patients with right ventricular dysfunction secondary to chronic lung disease. PMID:22548815

  20. Association of Chronic Renal Insufficiency With In-Hospital Outcomes After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Tanush; Paul, Neha; Kolte, Dhaval; Harikrishnan, Prakash; Khera, Sahil; Aronow, Wilbert S; Mujib, Marjan; Palaniswamy, Chandrasekar; Sule, Sachin; Jain, Diwakar; Ahmed, Ali; Cooper, Howard A; Frishman, William H; Bhatt, Deepak L; Fonarow, Gregg C; Panza, Julio A

    2015-01-01

    Background The association of chronic renal insufficiency with outcomes after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in the current era of drug-eluting stents and modern antithrombotic therapy has not been well characterized. Methods and Results We queried the 2007–2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample databases to identify all patients aged ≥18 years who underwent PCI. Multivariable logistic regression was used to compare in-hospital outcomes among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and those without CKD or ESRD. Of 3 187 404 patients who underwent PCI, 89% had no CKD/ESRD; 8.6% had CKD; and 2.4% had ESRD. Compared to patients with no CKD/ESRD, patients with CKD and patients with ESRD had higher in-hospital mortality (1.4% versus 2.7% versus 4.4%, respectively; adjusted odds ratio for CKD 1.15, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.19, P<0.001; adjusted odds ratio for ESRD 2.29, 95% CI 2.19 to 2.40, P<0.001), higher incidence of postprocedure hemorrhage (3.5% versus 5.4% versus 6.0%, respectively; adjusted odds ratio for CKD 1.21, 95% CI 1.18 to 1.23, P<0.001; adjusted odds ratio for ESRD 1.27, 95% CI 1.23 to 1.32, P<0.001), longer average length of stay (2.9 days versus 5.0 days versus 6.4 days, respectively; P<0.001), and higher average total hospital charges ($60 526 versus $77 324 versus $97 102, respectively; P<0.001). Similar results were seen in subgroups of patients undergoing PCI for acute coronary syndrome or stable ischemic heart disease. Conclusions In patients undergoing PCI, chronic renal insufficiency is associated with higher in-hospital mortality, higher postprocedure hemorrhage, longer average length of stay, and higher average hospital charges. PMID:26080814

  1. Vitamin D for health and in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Holick, Michael F

    2005-01-01

    Vitamin D is taken for granted and is not appreciated for its importance in overall health and well-being. Vitamin D, known as the sunshine vitamin, is appreciated as being important for the prevention of rickets in children. It is now recognized that vitamin D is important for not only the growing skeleton, but for the maintenance of a healthy musculoskeletal system throughout life. Vitamin D deficiency in adults precipitates and exacerbates osteoporosis and causes the painful bone disease osteomalacia. The revelation that vitamin D is biologically inactive and requires sequential hydroxylations in the liver and kidney to form 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D helps explain why patients with renal failure are often resistant to vitamin D and suffer from secondary hyperparathyroidism and renal osteodystrophy. In addition to its role in maintaining calcium and phosphorus homeostasis, vitamin D is now being recognized as important for maintaining maximum muscle strength and for the prevention of many chronic diseases, including type I diabetes, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, hypertension, cardiovascular heart disease, and many common cancers. Vitamin D status is best determined by the measurement of circulating levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Vigilance for maintaining a 25-hydroxyvitamin D level of at least 20 ng/ml and preferably 30-50 ng/ml has important benefits for both healthy children and adults, as well as children and adults suffering from chronic kidney disease. PMID:16076348

  2. Defining end-stage renal disease in clinical trials: a framework for adjudication.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rajiv

    2016-06-01

    Unlike definition of stroke and myocardial infarction, there is no uniformly agreed upon definition to adjudicate end-stage renal disease (ESRD). ESRD remains the most unambiguous and clinically relevant end point for clinical trialists, regulators, payers and patients with chronic kidney disease. The prescription of dialysis to patients with advanced chronic kidney disease is subjective and great variations exist among physicians and countries. Given the difficulties in diagnosing ESRD, the presence of estimated GFR <15 mL/min/1.7 3m(2) itself has been suggested as an end point. However, this definition is still a surrogate since many patients may live years without being symptomatic or needing dialysis. The purpose of this report is to describe a framework to define when the kidney function ends and when ESRD can be adjudicated. Discussed in this report are (i) the importance of diagnosing symptomatic uremia or advanced asymptomatic uremia thus establishing the need for dialysis; (ii) establishing the chronicity of dialysis so as to distinguish it from acute dialysis; (iii) establishing ESRD when dialysis is unavailable, refused or considered futile and (iv) the adjudication process. Several challenges and ambiguities that emerge in clinical trials and their possible solutions are provided. The criteria proposed herein may help to standardize the definition of ESRD and reduce the variability in adjudicating the most important renal end point in clinical trials of chronic kidney disease. PMID:26264780

  3. Toll-Like Receptor Family Polymorphisms Are Associated with Primary Renal Diseases but Not with Renal Outcomes Following Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Damman, Jeffrey; Leuvenink, Henri G. D.; van Goor, Harry; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Hepkema, Bouke G.; Snieder, Harold; van den Born, Jacob; de Borst, Martin H.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Navis, Gerjan J.; Ploeg, Rutger J.; Florquin, Sandrine; Seelen, Marc; Leemans, Jaklien C.

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a crucial role in innate- and adaptive immunity. The TLR pathways were shown to play key functional roles in experimental acute and chronic kidney injury, including the allo-immune response after experimental renal transplantation. Data about the precise impact of TLRs and their negative regulators on human renal transplant outcomes however are limited and contradictory. We studied twelve non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of which eleven in TLR1-8 and one in SIGIRR in a final cohort comprising 1116 matching donors and recipients. TLR3 p.Leu412Phe and SIGIRR p.Gln312Arg significantly deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and were excluded. The frequency distribution of the minor alleles of the remaining 10 TLR variants were compared between patients with end-stage renal disease (recipients) and controls (kidney donors) in a case-control study. Secondly, the associations between the minor allele frequency of the TLR variants and delayed graft function, biopsy-proven acute rejection and death-censored graft failure after transplantation were investigated with Cox regression. Carrier frequencies of the minor alleles of TLR1 p.His305Leu (OR = 4.79, 95% CI = 2.35–9.75, P = 0.0002), TLR1 p.Asn248Ser (OR = 1.26, 95% CI = 1.07–1.47, P = 0.04) and TLR8 p.Met1Val (OR = 1.37, 95% CI = 1.14–1.64, P = 0.008) were significantly higher in patients with ESRD, with little specificity for the underlying renal disease entity (adjusted for age, gender and donor-recipient relatedness). The minor allele frequency of none of the TLR variants significantly associated with the surrogate and definite outcomes, even when multivariable models were created that could account for TLR gene redundancy. In conclusion, genetic variants in TLR genes were associated with the prevalence of ESRD but not renal transplant outcomes. Therefore, our data suggests that specific TLR signaling routes might play a role in the final common pathway of

  4. Reversible renal impairment caused by thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Chakera, Aron; Paul, Hans-Joerg; O'Callaghan, Chris A

    2010-04-01

    Renal impairment is a common finding in clinical practice and is increasingly recognized with the routine reporting of estimated glomerular filtration rates. Clinical assessment is essential to determine which of the many possible investigations are appropriate. Thyroid hormones regulate many cellular functions, and abnormalities of the active thyroid hormones, thyroxine (T(4)) and tri-iodothyronine (T(3)), can influence serum creatinine levels. Evaluation of thyroid function is easily overlooked, but important in this context, as hypothyroidism is common and can cause renal impairment, which is typically reversible. Renal dysfunction may also be more frequent in hyperthyroidism than is recognized. This report describe how a dramatic elevation in serum creatinine paralleled the development of hyperthyroidism, with a return of the creatinine to normal following treatment of the hyperthyroid state. PMID:20199343

  5. Growth arrest-specific gene 6 (Gas6) levels are elevated in patients with chronic renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Iris J.; Hilliard, Brendan; Swami, Abhishek; Madara, John C.; Rao, Swati; Patel, Tapan; Gaughan, John P.; Lee, Jean; Gadegbeku, Crystal A.; Choi, Eric T.; Cohen, Philip L.

    2012-01-01

    Background The TAM receptors (tyro3, axl and mer) and their ligands (vitamin K-dependent proteins—Gas6 and Protein S) are crucial modulators of inflammation, which may be relevant in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Gas6 and axl have multiple roles in mediating vascular atherosclerosis and injury, thrombosis and inflammation, yet nothing is known about the Gas6–axl pathway in humans with CKD. Given the prevalence of chronic inflammation and vascular disease in this population, we measured TAM ligands in patients with various levels of renal function. Methods Gas6 and protein S were quantified in the plasma by ELISA in three patient groups: end-stage renal disease on chronic hemodialysis (HD), CKD and normal controls. Results Significantly increased levels of Gas6 and protein S were found in CKD patients compared with normal controls (P < 0.01 and <0.001, respectively). In HD patients, Gas6 levels were elevated compared with controls (P < 0.001) and positively associated with low albumin (r= 0.33; P = 0.01), dialysis vintage (r= 0.36; P = 0.008) and IV iron administration (r= 0.33; P = 0.01). The levels of Gas6 rose with CKD stage and were inversely associated with estimated GFR (P < 0.0001). Conclusions Dysregulation of circulating Gas6 is associated with renal disease and inversely proportional to renal function. Low albumin and higher IV iron administration were associated with higher Gas6 levels, suggesting a possible connection between inflammation and oxidative stress mediated by iron. Protein S levels were also elevated in CKD patients, but the relevance of this finding needs to be further investigated. PMID:22907951

  6. Deaths from Occlusive Arterial Disease in Renal Allograft Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Ibels, L. S.; Stewart, J. H.; Mahony, J. F.; Sheil, A. G. R.

    1974-01-01

    In a series of 325 recipients of cadaveric renal transplants sudden occlusive arterial disease was found to be responsible for 12% of deaths. Acute myocardial infarction (9%) occurred 25 times more than expected in the normal population and cerebral thrombosis (3%) 300 times more. The greatest loss was in the initial three-month period after transplantation. Patients with renal failure due to essential hypertension were especially at risk, accounting for six of the 12 deaths. PMID:4606408

  7. Aortic PWV in Chronic Kidney Disease: A CRIC Ancillary Study

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Raymond R.; Wimmer, Neil J.; Chirinos, Julio A.; Parsa, Afshin; Weir, Matthew; Perumal, Kalyani; Lash, James P.; Chen, Jing; Steigerwalt, Susan P.; Flack, John; Go, Alan S.; Rafey, Mohammed; Rahman, Mahboob; Sheridan, Angela; Gadegbeku, Crystal A.; Robinson, Nancy A.; Joffe, Marshall

    2009-01-01

    Background Aortic PWV is a measure of arterial stiffness and has proved useful in predicting cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in several populations of patients, including the healthy elderly, hypertensives and those with end stage renal disease receiving hemodialysis. Little data exist characterizing aortic stiffness in patients with chronic kidney disease who are not receiving dialysis, and in particular the effect of reduced kidney function on aortic PWV. Methods We performed measurements of aortic PWV in a cross-sectional cohort of participants enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study to determine factors which predict increased aortic PWV in chronic kidney disease. Results PWV measurements were obtained in 2564 participants. The tertiles of aortic PWV (adjusted for waist circumference) were < 7.7 m/sec, 7.7–10.2 m/sec and > 10.2 m/sec with an overall mean (± S.D.) value of 9.48 ± 3.03 m/sec [95% CI = 9.35–9.61 m/sec]. Multivariable regression identified significant independent positive associations of age, blood glucose concentrations, race, waist circumference, mean arterial blood pressure, gender, and presence of diabetes with aortic PWV and a significant negative association with the level of kidney function. Conclusions The large size of this unique cohort, and the targeted enrollment of chronic kidney disease participants provides an ideal situation to study the role of reduced kidney function as a determinant of arterial stiffness. Arterial stiffness may be a significant component of the enhanced cardiovascular risk associated with kidney failure. PMID:20019670

  8. Anemia of chronic kidney disease: when normalcy becomes undesirable.

    PubMed

    Demirjian, Sevag G; Nurko, Saul

    2008-05-01

    In patients with chronic kidney disease and renal failure, hemoglobin levels have been rising in parallel with more intensive use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs). However, several recent studies indicate that raising hemoglobin to normal levels with ESAs can be too much of a good thing. Compared with partial correction, normalization of hemoglobin did not improve outcome, and it may have led to more frequent adverse events. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) now recommends a hemoglobin goal in the range of 10 to 12 g/dL. PMID:18556877

  9. Effect of vitamin C on endothelial function of children with chronic renal failure: An experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Sabri, Mohammad Reza; Tavana, Esfandiar Najafi; Ahmadi, Alireza; Gheissari, Alaleh

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is well established that improvement of endothelial dysfunction (ED) could prevent or delay the occurrence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and its related morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). In this study we investigated whether administration of vitamin C could be effective by improving brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and intima media thickness (IMT), two surrogate markers of ED, in children with CKD or chronic renal failure (CRF). Materials and Methods: In this analytic-experimental study children aged 3-18 years with a diagnosis of CRF and a group of healthy children were enrolled. Vitamin C (250 mg/day) administrated for the two studied groups for 1 month. Endothelial function was evaluated by FMD and IMT measurement using vascular Doppler ultrasonography, before and after trial. Results: In this study 18 patients with CRF and 19 normal children as the control group were studied. At baseline mean of IMT and FMD was not different in the two studied groups (P > 0.05). After vitamin C administration IMT decreased significantly in the two studied groups (P < 0.05). FMD increased in the two studied groups but the difference was significant in the control group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The findings of this interventional trial have demonstrated that vitamin C could have protective effect on ED of patients with CRF possibly in those with severe form of the disease but for obtaining more conclusive results larger sample size is needed. PMID:26918242

  10. Controversies in the pathogenesis of HIV-associated renal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bruggeman, Leslie A.; Nelson, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    The two most common HIV-associated renal diseases, HIV-associated nephropathy and HIV-immune-complex kidney disease, share the common pathologic finding of hyperplasia within the glomerulus. Podocyte injury is central to the pathogenesis of these diseases; however, the source of the proliferating glomerular epithelial cell remains a topic of debate. Parenchymal injury has been linked to direct infection of renal epithelial cells by HIV-1, although the mechanism of viral entry into this non-lymphoid compartment is unclear. Although transgenic rodent models have provided insight into viral proteins responsible for inducing renal disease, such models have important limitations. Rodent HIV-1 models, for instance, cannot replicate all aspects of immune activation, a process that could have an important role in the pathogenesis PMID:19776779

  11. Emotional trauma associated with renal disease and natural disasters.

    PubMed

    McClellan, M J

    2001-10-01

    Emotional trauma frequently follows any disaster such as fire, flood, earthquake, accidents, war, bombings, and life-threatening disease. One such disease is end stage renal disease (ESRD), an irreversible, progressive loss of renal function (Lancaster, 1995). Since this is a "do or die" situation, it requires artificial methods of hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, or transplant, which require learned coping skills. Emotional trauma may occur pre or post-disaster and may include flashbacks when events trigger suppressed memories or unresolved emotions. Aftercare of disasters requires dedicated professionals to guide patients toward essential lifelines. PMID:12143429

  12. High urinary sulfate concentration is associated with reduced risk of renal disease progression in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    van den Born, Joost C; Frenay, Anne-Roos S; Bakker, Stephan J L; Pasch, Andreas; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo J; van Goor, Harry

    2016-05-01

    Diabetes is associated with a high incidence of microvascular disease, including nephropathy. Diabetic nephropathy is the most common cause of chronic kidney disease in the Western world. Sulfate in the urine is the metabolic end product of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a recent discovered gaseous signaling molecule. Urinary sulfate has earlier shown beneficial predictive properties in renal transplant recipients. Based on the protective role of exogenous H2S in experimental models of diabetic nephropathy, we aimed to cross-sectionally investigate the association of sulfate with renal risk markers, and to prospectively investigate its predictive value for renal events in patients with diabetic nephropathy. Post-hoc analysis on data of the sulodexide macroalbuminuria (Sun-MACRO) trial and the Prevention of Renal and Vascular End-Stage Disease (PREVEND) study was performed. A total of 1004 patients with type 2 diabetes were included. Urinary sulfate concentration was measured and cross-sectionally associated to renal risk markers by linear regression. Multivariable Cox regression analysis was performed to assess the prospective association of sulfate with renal events, which was defined as end stage renal disease or a doubling of baseline serum creatinine. Mean age was 63 ± 9 years, median sulfate concentration was 8.0 (IQR 5.8-11.4) mmol/L. Urinary sulfate positively associated with male gender, hemoglobin, and negatively associated with albuminuria at baseline. During follow-up for 12 (IQR 6-18) months, 38 renal events occurred. Each doubling of urinary sulfate was associated with a 19% (95%CI 1%-34%) lower risk of renal events, independent of adjustment for potential confounders, including age, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and albuminuria. To conclude, higher urinary sulfate concentration is associated with a more beneficial profile of renal risk markers, and is independently associated with a reduced risk for renal events in type 2 diabetes patients

  13. Chronic Kidney Disease, Fluid Overload and Diuretics: A Complicated Triangle

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Yusra Habib; Sarriff, Azmi; Adnan, Azreen Syazril; Khan, Amer Hayat; Mallhi, Tauqeer Hussain

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite promising role of diuretics to manage fluid overload among chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, their use is associated with adverse renal outcomes. Current study aimed to determine the extent of renal deterioration with diuretic therapy. Methods A total 312 non-dialysis dependent CKD (NDD-CKD) patients were prospectively followed-up for one year. Fluid overload was assessed via bioimpedance spectroscopy. Estimated GFR (eGFR) was calculated from serum creatinine values by using Chronic Kidney Disease- Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation. Results Out of 312 patients, 64 (20.5%) were hypovolemic while euvolemia and hypervolemia were observed in 113 (36.1%) and 135 (43.4%) patients. Overall 144 patients were using diuretics among which 98 (72.6%) were hypervolemic, 35 (30.9%) euvolemic and 11 (17.2%) were hypovolemic. The mean decline in estimated GFR of entire cohort was -2.5 ± 1.4 ml/min/1.73m2 at the end of follow up. The use of diuretics was significantly associated with decline in eGFR. A total of 36 (11.5%) patients initiated renal replacement therapy (RRT) and need of RRT was more profound among diuretic users. Conclusions The use of diuretics was associated with adverse renal outcomes indicated by decline in eGFR and increasing risk of RRT initiation in our cohort of NDD-CKD patients. Therefore, it is cautiously suggested to carefully prescribe diuretics by keeping in view benefit versus harm for each patient. PMID:27442587

  14. Hypoxia: The Force that Drives Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qiangwei; Colgan, Sean P; Shelley, Carl Simon

    2016-01-01

    In the United States the prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) reached epidemic proportions in 2012 with over 600,000 patients being treated. The rates of ESRD among the elderly are disproportionally high. Consequently, as life expectancy increases and the baby-boom generation reaches retirement age, the already heavy burden imposed by ESRD on the US health care system is set to increase dramatically. ESRD represents the terminal stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD). A large body of evidence indicating that CKD is driven by renal tissue hypoxia has led to the development of therapeutic strategies that increase kidney oxygenation and the contention that chronic hypoxia is the final common pathway to end-stage renal failure. Numerous studies have demonstrated that one of the most potent means by which hypoxic conditions within the kidney produce CKD is by inducing a sustained inflammatory attack by infiltrating leukocytes. Indispensable to this attack is the acquisition by leukocytes of an adhesive phenotype. It was thought that this process resulted exclusively from leukocytes responding to cytokines released from ischemic renal endothelium. However, recently it has been demonstrated that leukocytes also become activated independent of the hypoxic response of endothelial cells. It was found that this endothelium-independent mechanism involves leukocytes directly sensing hypoxia and responding by transcriptional induction of the genes that encode the β2-integrin family of adhesion molecules. This induction likely maintains the long-term inflammation by which hypoxia drives the pathogenesis of CKD. Consequently, targeting these transcriptional mechanisms would appear to represent a promising new therapeutic strategy. PMID:26847481

  15. Hypoxia: The Force that Drives Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiangwei; Colgan, Sean P; Shelley, Carl Simon

    2016-03-01

    In the United States the prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) reached epidemic proportions in 2012 with over 600,000 patients being treated. The rates of ESRD among the elderly are disproportionally high. Consequently, as life expectancy increases and the baby-boom generation reaches retirement age, the already heavy burden imposed by ESRD on the US health care system is set to increase dramatically. ESRD represents the terminal stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD). A large body of evidence indicating that CKD is driven by renal tissue hypoxia has led to the development of therapeutic strategies that increase kidney oxygenation and the contention that chronic hypoxia is the final common pathway to end-stage renal failure. Numerous studies have demonstrated that one of the most potent means by which hypoxic conditions within the kidney produce CKD is by inducing a sustained inflammatory attack by infiltrating leukocytes. Indispensable to this attack is the acquisition by leukocytes of an adhesive phenotype. It was thought that this process resulted exclusively from leukocytes responding to cytokines released from ischemic renal endothelium. However, recently it has been demonstrated that leukocytes also become activated independent of the hypoxic response of endothelial cells. It was found that this endothelium-independent mechanism involves leukocytes directly sensing hypoxia and responding by transcriptional induction of the genes that encode the β2-integrin family of adhesion molecules. This induction likely maintains the long-term inflammation by which hypoxia drives the pathogenesis of CKD. Consequently, targeting these transcriptional mechanisms would appear to represent a promising new therapeutic strategy. PMID:26847481

  16. [Obesity in children and its relationship with chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Zurita-Cruz, Jessie Nallely; Villasís-Keever, Miguel Ángel

    2016-01-01

    In the last decades, obesity and chronic kidney disease (CKD) have increased worldwide, in parallel. This article focuses on the current issues of obesity on renal damage, with special emphasis on what happens at pediatric ages. While obesity has been linked closely with type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension, reduced insulin sensitivity is a direct mechanism for renal damage. The pathophysiologic mechanisms on renal damage include glomerular hyperfiltration and hypertrophy, hypercellularity and broadening of the mesangial regions, while the lack of sensitivity to insulin increases the effects of angiotensin II, exacerbates proteinuria and induces the production of inflammatory cytokines. Many epidemiological studies have documented the relationship of increased BMI with the development of ERC, but most of these studies have been conducted in adults. In children, the information is scarce, but is consistent with findings in adults. In contrast, there are studies which show that interventions aimed to improve weight loss and limit renal damage and proteinuria is reduced, the blood pressure and glomerular filtration rate. Allthe above make us think on the need to improve efforts to reduce the prevalence of obesity from the early stages of life, which could reduce the number of patients with CKD in the future. PMID:27197109

  17. Association between urinary sodium, creatinine, albumin, and long-term survival in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    McQuarrie, Emily P; Traynor, Jamie P; Taylor, Alison H; Freel, E Marie; Fox, Jonathan G; Jardine, Alan G; Mark, Patrick B

    2014-07-01

    Dietary sodium intake is associated with hypertension and cardiovascular risk in the general population. In patients with chronic kidney disease, sodium intake has been associated with progressive renal disease, but not independently of proteinuria. We studied the relationship between urinary sodium (UNa) excretion and UNa to creatinine ratio and mortality or requirement for renal replacement therapy in chronic kidney disease. Adult patients attending a renal clinic who had ≥1 24-hour UNa measurement were identified. Twenty-four-hour UNa measures were collected and UNa to creatinine ratio calculated. Time to renal replacement therapy or death was recorded. Four hundred twenty-three patients were identified with mean estimated glomerular filtration rate of 48 mL/min per 1.73 m(2). Ninety patients required renal replacement therapy and 102 patients died. Mean slope decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate was -2.8 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) per year. Median follow-up was 8.5 years. Patients who died or required renal replacement therapy had significantly higher UNa excretion and UNa to creatinine ratio, but the association with these parameters and poor outcome was not independent of renal function, age, and albuminuria. When stratified by albuminuria, UNa to creatinine ratio was a significant cumulative additional risk for mortality, even in patients with low-level albuminuria. There was no association between low UNa and risk, as observed in some studies. This study demonstrates an association between UNa excretion and mortality in chronic kidney disease, with a cumulative relationship between sodium excretion, albuminuria, and reduced survival. These data support reducing dietary sodium intake in chronic kidney disease, but additional study is required to determine the target sodium intake. PMID:24732890

  18. Exploration of novel predictive markers in rat plasma of the early stages of chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Toshihiro; Matsumura, Yuriko; Ozawa, Toshihiko; Yanai, Hiroyuki; Iwasawa, Atsuo; Kamachi, Toshiaki; Fujiwara, Kouichi; Tanaka, Noriaki; Kohno, Masahiro

    2014-02-01

    To identify blood markers for early stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD), blood samples were collected from rats with adenine-induced CKD over 28 days. Plasma samples were subjected to metabolomic profiling by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, followed by multivariate analyses. In addition to already-identified uremic toxins, we found that plasma concentrations of N6-succinyl adenosine, lysophosphatidylethanolamine 20:4, and glycocholic acid were altered, and that these changes during early CKD were more sensitive markers than creatinine concentration, a universal indicator of renal dysfunction. Moreover, the increase in plasma indoxyl sulfate concentration occurred earlier than increases in phenyl sulfate and p-cresol sulfate. These novel metabolites may serve as biomarkers in identifying early stage CKD. PMID:24232639

  19. Relationship of Estimated GFR and Coronary Artery Calcification in the (CRIC) Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Budoff, Matthew J; Rader, Daniel J; Reilly, Muredach P.; Mohler, Emile R.; Lash, Jim; Yang, Wei; Rosen, Leigh; Glenn, Melanie; Teal, Valerie; Feldman, Harold I.

    2011-01-01

    Background Coronary artery calcification (CAC) is associated with increased mortality risk in the general population. Although individuals with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at markedly increased mortality risk, the incidence, prevalence, and prognosis of CAC in CKD is not well-understood. Study Design Cross-sectional observational study. Setting and Participants Analysis of 1,908 participants who underwent coronary calcium scanning as part of the multi-ethnic CRIC (Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort) Study. Predictor Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) computed using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) Study equation, stratified by race, sex and diabetic status. eGFR was treated as a continous variable and a categorical variable compared to the reference range of >60 ml/min/1.73 m2 Measurements CAC detected using CT scans using either an Imatron C-300 electron beam computed tomography scanner or multi-detector CT scanner. CAC was computed using the Agatston score, as a categorical variable. Analyses were performed using ordinal logistic regression. Results We found a strong and graded relationship between lower eGFR and increasing CAC. In unadjusted models, ORs increased from 1.68 (95% CI, 1.23–2.31) for eGFR from 50–59 to 2.82 (95% CI, 2.06–3.85) for eGFR of <30. Multivariable adjustment only partially attenuated the results (OR, 1.53; 95% CI, 1.07–2.20) for eGFR<30. Limitations Use of eGFR rather than measured GFR. Conclusions We demonstrated a graded relationship between severity of CKD and CAC, independent of traditional risk factors. These findings supports recent guidelines that state that if vascular calcification is present, it should be considered as a complementary component to be included in the decision making required for individualizing treatment of CKD. PMID:21783289

  20. Chronic Kidney Disease Screening Methods and Its Implication for Malaysia: An in Depth Review

    PubMed Central

    Almualm, Yasmin; Huri, Hasniza Zaman

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Kidney Disease has become a public health problem, imposing heath, social and human cost on societies worldwide. Chronic Kidney Disease remains asymptomatic till late stage when intervention cannot stop the progression of the disease. Therefore, there is an urgent need to detect the disease early. Despite the high prevalence of Chronic Kidney Disease in Malaysia, screening is still lacking behind. This review discusses the strengths and limitations of current screening methods for Chronic Kidney Disease from a Malaysian point of view. Diabetic Kidney Disease was chosen as focal point as Diabetes is the leading cause of Chronic Kidney Disease in Malaysia. Screening for Chronic Kidney Disease in Malaysia includes a urine test for albuminuria and a blood test for serum creatinine. Recent literature indicates that albuminuria is not always present in Diabetic Kidney Disease patients and serum creatinine is only raised after substantial kidney damage has occurred. Recently, cystatin C was proposed as a potential marker for kidney disease but this has not been studied thoroughly in Malaysia. Glomerular Filtration Rate is the best method for measuring kidney function and is widely estimated using the Modification of Diet for Renal Disease equation. Another equation, the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration Creatinine equation was introduced in 2009. The new equation retained the precision and accuracy of the Modification of Diet for Renal Disease equation at GFR < 60ml/min/1.73m2, showed less bias and improved precision at GFR>60ml/min/1.73m2. In Asian countries, adding an ethnic coefficient to the equation enhanced its performance. In Malaysia, a multi-ethnic Asian population, the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation should be validated and the Glomerular Filtration Rate should be reported whenever serum creatinine is ordered. Reporting estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate will help diagnose patients who would have been

  1. End-stage renal disease in sub-Saharan and South Africa.

    PubMed

    Naicker, Saraladevi

    2003-02-01

    The major health problems in Africa are AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria, gastroenteritis and hypertension; hypertension affects about 20% of the adult population. Renal disease, especially glomerular disease, is more prevalent in Africa and seems to be of a more severe form than that found in Western countries. The most common mode of presentation is the nephrotic syndrome, with the age of onset at five to eight years. It is estimated that 2 to 3% of medical admissions in tropical countries are due to renal-related complaints, the majority being the glomerulonephritides. There are no reliable statistics for ESRD in all African countries. Statistics of the South African Dialysis and Transplant Registry (SADTR) reflect the patients selected for renal replacement therapy (RRT) and do not accurately reflect the etiology of chronic renal failure (CRF), where public sector state facilities will offer RRT only to patients who are eligible for a transplant. In 1994, glomerulonephritis was recorded as the cause of ESRD in 1771 (52.1%) and hypertension in 1549 (45.6%) of patients by the SADTR. In a six-year study of 3632 patients with ESRD, based on SADTR statistics, hypertension was reported to be the cause of ESRD in 4.3% of whites, 34.6% of blacks, 20.9% mixed race group and 13.8% of Indians. Malignant hypertension is an important cause of morbidity and mortality among urban black South Africans, with hypertension accounting for 16% of all hospital admissions. In a ten-year study of 368 patients with chronic renal failure in Nigeria, the etiology of renal failure was undetermined in 62%. Of the remaining patients whose etiology was ascertained, hypertension accounted for 61%, diabetes mellitus for 11% and chronic glomerulonephritis for 5.9%. Patients with CRF constituted 10% of all medical admissions in this center. Chronic glomerulonephritis and hypertension are principal causes of CRF in tropical Africa and East Africa, together with diabetes mellitus and obstructive

  2. HIV/AIDS, chronic diseases and globalisation.

    PubMed

    Colvin, Christopher J

    2011-01-01

    HIV/AIDS has always been one of the most thoroughly global of diseases. In the era of widely available anti-retroviral therapy (ART), it is also commonly recognised as a chronic disease that can be successfully managed on a long-term basis. This article examines the chronic character of the HIV/AIDS pandemic and highlights some of the changes we might expect to see at the global level as HIV is increasingly normalised as "just another chronic disease". The article also addresses the use of this language of chronicity to interpret the HIV/AIDS pandemic and calls into question some of the consequences of an uncritical acceptance of concepts of chronicity. PMID:21871074

  3. Renal Primordia Activate Kidney Regenerative Events in a Rat Model of Progressive Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Imberti, Barbara; Corna, Daniela; Rizzo, Paola; Xinaris, Christodoulos; Abbate, Mauro; Longaretti, Lorena; Cassis, Paola; Benedetti, Valentina; Benigni, Ariela; Zoja, Carlamaria; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Morigi, Marina

    2015-01-01

    New intervention tools for severely damaged kidneys are in great demand to provide patients with a valid alternative to whole organ replacement. For repairing or replacing injured tissues, emerging approaches focus on using stem and progenitor cells. Embryonic kidneys represent an interesting option because, when transplanted to sites such as the renal capsule of healthy animals, they originate new renal structures. Here, we studied whether metanephroi possess developmental capacity when transplanted under the kidney capsule of MWF male rats, a model of spontaneous nephropathy. We found that six weeks post-transplantation, renal primordia developed glomeruli and tubuli able to filter blood and to produce urine in cyst-like structures. Newly developed metanephroi were able to initiate a regenerative-like process in host renal tissues adjacent to the graft in MWF male rats as indicated by an increase in cell proliferation and vascular density, accompanied by mRNA and protein upregulation of VEGF, FGF2, HGF, IGF-1 and Pax-2. The expression of SMP30 and NCAM was induced in tubular cells. Oxidative stress and apoptosis markedly decreased. Our study shows that embryonic kidneys generate functional nephrons when transplanted into animals with severe renal disease and at the same time activate events at least partly mimicking those observed in kidney tissues during renal regeneration. PMID:25811887

  4. Renal primordia activate kidney regenerative events in a rat model of progressive renal disease.