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Sample records for renal dynamic imaging

  1. Dynamic Positron Emission Tomography Imaging of Renal Clearable Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng; Goel, Shreya; Hernandez, Reinier; Graves, Stephen A; Shi, Sixiang; Nickles, Robert J; Cai, Weibo

    2016-05-01

    Optical imaging has been the primary imaging modality for nearly all of the renal clearable nanoparticles since 2007. Due to the tissue depth penetration limitation, providing accurate organ kinetics non-invasively has long been a huge challenge. Although a more quantitative imaging technique has been developed by labeling nanoparticles with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) isotopes, the low temporal resolution of SPECT still limits its potential for visualizing the rapid dynamic process of renal clearable nanoparticles in vivo. The dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of renal clearable gold (Au) nanoparticles by labeling them with copper-64 ((64) Cu) to form (64) Cu-NOTA-Au-GSH is reported. Systematic nanoparticle synthesis and characterizations are performed to demonstrate the efficient renal clearance of as-prepared nanoparticles. A rapid renal clearance of (64) Cu-NOTA-Au-GSH is observed (>75%ID at 24 h post-injection) with its elimination half-life calculated to be less than 6 min, over 130 times shorter than previously reported similar nanoparticles. Dynamic PET imaging not only addresses the current challenges in accurately and non-invasively acquiring the organ kinetics, but also potentially provides a highly useful tool for studying renal clearance mechanism of other ultra-small nanoparticles, as well as the diagnosis of kidney diseases in the near future. PMID:27062146

  2. Dynamic noninvasive monitoring of renal function in vivo by fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goiffon, Reece J.; Akers, Walter J.; Berezin, Mikhail Y.; Lee, Hyeran; Achilefu, Samuel

    2009-03-01

    Kidneys normally filter the blood of excess salts and metabolic products, such as urea, while retaining plasma proteins. In diseases such as multiple myeloma and diabetes mellitus, the renal function is compromised and protein escapes into the urine. In this study, we present the use of fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLI) to image excess serum protein in urine (proteinuria). The near-infrared fluorescent dye LS-288 has distinct lifetimes when bound to protein versus free in solution, providing contrast between the protein-rich viscera and the mostly protein-free bladder. FLI with LS-288 in mice revealed that fluorescence lifetime (FLT) differences in the bladder relative to surrounding tissues was due to the fractional contributions of the bound and unbound dye molecules. The FLT of LS-288 decreased in the case of proteinuria while fluorescence intensity was unchanged. The results show that FLI can be useful for the dynamic imaging of protein-losing nephropathy due to diabetes mellitus and other renal diseases and suggest the potential use of the FLI to distinguish tumors from fluid-filled cysts in the body.

  3. Renal imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Hierholzer, K; Hierholzer, J

    1997-01-01

    The ancient approach to obtain an image of the kidneys (and other internal organs) was 'section-inspection-imaging' by drawing, painting, sculpturing, and modelling. The present study follows chronologically the development and use of sectioning techniques from ancient (often forbidden) methods to modern microdissection and maceration of silicone-rubber-injected tubules. Inspection evolved from the use of the naked eye to magnifying lenses, microscopes and finally electron microscopy. Pertinent examples such as the description of the kidneys as the site of urine formation, the visualization of loop structures in the renal medulla and the imaging of tight junction strands are discussed. Inspection or visualization of renal structure and function has been revolutionized by modern noninvasive techniques, such as X-ray imaging, imaging by radioisotopes, ultrasound, computer tomography and nuclear magnetic resonance. Pertinent examples are given demonstrating the potency of the various techniques. The contribution of computerized data evaluation is discussed. The development of micropuncture and microperfusion techniques has opened the field for direct imaging not only of renal (sub)structural details but also of functional parameters such as transtubular reabsorption rates, single glomerular capillary filtration and conductance of the paracellular pathway. We focus particularly on techniques specifically designed to visualize renal hemodynamic and transport parameters. PMID:9189257

  4. Dynamic Contrast-enhanced MR Imaging in Renal Cell Carcinoma: Reproducibility of Histogram Analysis on Pharmacokinetic Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai-yi; Su, Zi-hua; Xu, Xiao; Sun, Zhi-peng; Duan, Fei-xue; Song, Yuan-yuan; Li, Lu; Wang, Ying-wei; Ma, Xin; Guo, Ai-tao; Ma, Lin; Ye, Hui-yi

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) have been increasingly used to evaluate the permeability of tumor vessel. Histogram metrics are a recognized promising method of quantitative MR imaging that has been recently introduced in analysis of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters in oncology due to tumor heterogeneity. In this study, 21 patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) underwent paired DCE-MRI studies on a 3.0 T MR system. Extended Tofts model and population-based arterial input function were used to calculate kinetic parameters of RCC tumors. Mean value and histogram metrics (Mode, Skewness and Kurtosis) of each pharmacokinetic parameter were generated automatically using ImageJ software. Intra- and inter-observer reproducibility and scan–rescan reproducibility were evaluated using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) and coefficient of variation (CoV). Our results demonstrated that the histogram method (Mode, Skewness and Kurtosis) was not superior to the conventional Mean value method in reproducibility evaluation on DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters (K trans & Ve) in renal cell carcinoma, especially for Skewness and Kurtosis which showed lower intra-, inter-observer and scan-rescan reproducibility than Mean value. Our findings suggest that additional studies are necessary before wide incorporation of histogram metrics in quantitative analysis of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters. PMID:27380733

  5. Dynamic Contrast-enhanced MR Imaging in Renal Cell Carcinoma: Reproducibility of Histogram Analysis on Pharmacokinetic Parameters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Yi; Su, Zi-Hua; Xu, Xiao; Sun, Zhi-Peng; Duan, Fei-Xue; Song, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Lu; Wang, Ying-Wei; Ma, Xin; Guo, Ai-Tao; Ma, Lin; Ye, Hui-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) have been increasingly used to evaluate the permeability of tumor vessel. Histogram metrics are a recognized promising method of quantitative MR imaging that has been recently introduced in analysis of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters in oncology due to tumor heterogeneity. In this study, 21 patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) underwent paired DCE-MRI studies on a 3.0 T MR system. Extended Tofts model and population-based arterial input function were used to calculate kinetic parameters of RCC tumors. Mean value and histogram metrics (Mode, Skewness and Kurtosis) of each pharmacokinetic parameter were generated automatically using ImageJ software. Intra- and inter-observer reproducibility and scan-rescan reproducibility were evaluated using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) and coefficient of variation (CoV). Our results demonstrated that the histogram method (Mode, Skewness and Kurtosis) was not superior to the conventional Mean value method in reproducibility evaluation on DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters (K( trans) &Ve) in renal cell carcinoma, especially for Skewness and Kurtosis which showed lower intra-, inter-observer and scan-rescan reproducibility than Mean value. Our findings suggest that additional studies are necessary before wide incorporation of histogram metrics in quantitative analysis of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters. PMID:27380733

  6. Assessment of Semiquantitative Parameters of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Perfusion MR Imaging in Differentiation of Subtypes of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Abdel Razek, Ahmed Abdel Khalek; Mousa, Amani; Farouk, Ahmed; Nabil, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background To assess semiquantitative parameters of dynamic contrast-enhanced perfusion MR imaging (DCE) in differentiation of subtypes of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Material/Methods Prospective study conducted upon 34 patients (27 M, 7 F, aged 25–72 ys: mean 45 ys) with RCC. Abdominal dynamic contrast-enhanced gradient-recalled echo MR sequence after administration of gadopentetate dimeglumine was obtained. The time signal intensity curve (TIC) of the lesion was created with calculation of enhancement ratio (ER), and washout ratio (WR). Results The subtypes of RCC were as follows: clear cell carcinomas (n=23), papillary carcinomas (n=6), and chromophobe carcinomas (n=5). The mean ER of clear cell, papillary and chromophobe RCC were 188±49.7, 35±8.9, and 120±41.6 respectively. The mean WR of clear cell, papillary and chromophobe RCCs were 28.6±6.8, 47.6±5.7 and 42.7±10, respectively. There was a significant difference in ER (P=0.001) and WR (P=0.001) between clear cell RCC and other subtypes of RCC. The threshold values of ER and WR used for differentiating clear cell RCC from other subtypes of RCC were 142 and 38 with areas under the curve of 0.937 and 0.895, respectively. Conclusions We concluded that ER and WR are semiquantitative perfusion parameters useful in differentiation of clear cell RCC from chromophobe and papillary RCCs. PMID:27026793

  7. Imaging patients with renal impairment.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Mahan; Weinreb, Jeffrey C

    2016-06-01

    Imaging with intravascular contrast media is generally considered safe, particularly in patients without renal failure. However, as renal function deteriorates, the potential risk of nonallergic-type adverse events increases. This presents a unique challenge, particularly when the use of intravenous contrast media is deemed essential for diagnostic purposes. Following a discussion regarding the definition and epidemiology of kidney injury, this review focuses on the evolving understanding of both contrast-induced nephropathy and nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and discusses preventative strategies aimed at minimizing the risk of developing these entities. Alternative non-contrast imaging techniques are also discussed. PMID:27015867

  8. Pitfalls and Limitations of Radionuclide Renal Imaging in Adults.

    PubMed

    Keramida, Georgia; James, Jacqueline M; Prescott, Mary C; Peters, Adrien Michael

    2015-09-01

    To understand pitfalls and limitations in adult renography, it is necessary to understand firstly the physiology of the kidney, especially the magnitude and control of renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate and tubular fluid flow rate, and secondly the pharmacokinetics and renal handling of the three most often used tracers, Tc-99m-mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG3), Tc-99m-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) and Tc-99m-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA). The kidneys may be imaged dynamically with Tc-99m-MAG3 or Tc-99m-DTPA, with or without diuretic challenge, or by static imaging with Tc-99m-DMSA. Protocols are different according to whether the kidney is native or transplanted. Quantitative analysis of dynamic data includes measurement of renal vascularity (important for the transplanted kidney), absolute tracer clearance rates, differential renal function (DRF) and response to diuretic challenge. Static image reveals functional renal parenchymal damage, both focal and global, is useful in the clinical management of obstructive uropathy, renal stone disease and hypertension (under angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition), and is the preferred technique for determining DRF. Diagnosis based on morphological appearances is important in transplant management. Even though nuclear medicine is now in the era of hybrid imaging, renal imaging remains an important subspecialty in nuclear medicine and requires a sound basing in applied physiology, the classical supporting discipline of nuclear medicine. PMID:26278854

  9. Imaging of haemodialysis: renal and extrarenal findings.

    PubMed

    Degrassi, Ferruccio; Quaia, Emilio; Martingano, Paola; Cavallaro, Marco; Cova, Maria Assunta

    2015-06-01

    Electrolyte alterations and extra-renal disorders are quite frequent in patients undergoing haemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. The native kidneys may be the site of important pathologies in patients undergoing dialysis, especially in the form of acquired renal cystic disease with frequent malignant transformation. Renal neoplasms represents an important complication of haemodialysis-associated acquired cystic kidney disease and imaging surveillance is suggested. Extra-renal complications include renal osteodistrophy, brown tumours, and thoracic and cardiovascular complications. Other important fields in which imaging techniques may provide important informations are arteriovenous fistula and graft complications. Teaching points • Renal neoplasms represent a dreaded complication of haemodialysis.• In renal osteodystrophy bone resorption typically manifests along the middle phalanges.• Brown tumours are well-defined lytic lesions radiographically, possibly causing bone expansion.• Vascular calcifications are very common in patients undergoing haemodialysis.• Principal complications of the AV fistula consist of thrombosis, aneurysms and pseudoaneurysms. PMID:25680325

  10. Imaging in acute renal infection in children

    SciTech Connect

    Sty, J.R.; Wells, R.G.; Starshak, R.J.; Schroeder, B.A.

    1987-03-01

    Infection is the most common disease of the urinary tract in children, and various imaging techniques have been used to verify its presence and location. On retrospective analysis, 50 consecutive children with documented upper urinary tract infection had abnormal findings on renal cortical scintigraphy with 99mTc-glucoheptonate. The infection involved the renal poles only in 38 and the poles plus other renal cortical areas in eight. Four had abnormalities that spared the poles. Renal sonograms were abnormal in 32 of 50 children. Excretory urograms were abnormal in six of 23 children in whom they were obtained. Vesicoureteral reflux was found in 34 of 40 children in whom voiding cystourethrography was performed. These data show the high sensitivity of renal cortical scintigraphy with 99mTc-glucoheptonate in documenting upper urinary tract infection. The location of the abnormalities detected suggests that renal infections spread via an ascending mode and implies that intrarenal reflux is a major contributing factor.

  11. Renal relevant radiology: renal functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Behzad; Textor, Stephen C; Lerman, Lilach O

    2014-02-01

    Because of its noninvasive nature and provision of quantitative measures of a wide variety of physiologic parameters, functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) shows great potential for research and clinical applications. Over the past decade, application of functional MRI extended beyond detection of cerebral activity, and techniques for abdominal functional MRI evolved. Assessment of renal perfusion, glomerular filtration, interstitial diffusion, and parenchymal oxygenation turned this modality into an essential research and potentially diagnostic tool. Variations in many renal physiologic markers can be detected using functional MRI before morphologic changes become evident in anatomic magnetic resonance images. Moreover, the framework of functional MRI opened a window of opportunity to develop novel pathophysiologic markers. This article reviews applications of some well validated functional MRI techniques, including perfusion, diffusion-weighted imaging, and blood oxygen level-dependent MRI, as well as some emerging new techniques such as magnetic resonance elastography, which might evolve into clinically useful tools. PMID:24370767

  12. Diagnostic imaging in pediatric renal inflammatory disease

    SciTech Connect

    Sty, J.R.; Wells, R.G.; Schroeder, B.A.; Starshak, R.J.

    1986-08-15

    Some form of imaging procedure should be used to document the presence of infection of the upper urinary tract in troublesome cases in children. During the past several years, sonography, nuclear radiology, and computed tomography (CT) have had a significant influence on renal imaging. The purpose of this article is to reevaluate the noninvasive imaging procedures that can be used to diagnose pediatric renal inflammatory disease and to assess the relative value of each modality in the various types of renal infection. The authors will not discuss the radiologic evaluation of the child who has had a previous renal infection, in whom cortical scarring or reflux nephropathy is a possibility; these are different clinical problems and require different diagnostic evaluation.

  13. Hyperpolarized Renal Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Potential and Pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Laustsen, Christoffer

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (d-DNP) technology has enabled a new paradigm for renal imaging investigations. It allows standard magnetic resonance imaging complementary renal metabolic and functional fingerprints within seconds without the use of ionizing radiation. Increasing evidence supports its utility in preclinical research in which the real-time interrogation of metabolic turnover can aid the physiological and pathophysiological metabolic and functional effects in ex vivo and in vivo models. The method has already been translated to humans, although the clinical value of this technology is unknown. In this paper, I review the potential benefits and pitfalls associated with dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization in preclinical research and its translation to renal patients. PMID:26973539

  14. Hyperpolarized Renal Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Potential and Pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Laustsen, Christoffer

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (d-DNP) technology has enabled a new paradigm for renal imaging investigations. It allows standard magnetic resonance imaging complementary renal metabolic and functional fingerprints within seconds without the use of ionizing radiation. Increasing evidence supports its utility in preclinical research in which the real-time interrogation of metabolic turnover can aid the physiological and pathophysiological metabolic and functional effects in ex vivo and in vivo models. The method has already been translated to humans, although the clinical value of this technology is unknown. In this paper, I review the potential benefits and pitfalls associated with dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization in preclinical research and its translation to renal patients. PMID:26973539

  15. Image-Guided Adrenal and Renal Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Karun V.; Venkatesan, Aradhana M.; Swerdlow, Daniel; DaSilva, Daniel; Beck, Avi; Jain, Nidhi; Wood, Bradford J.

    2010-01-01

    Image-guided biopsy is a safe and well-established technique that is familiar to most interventional radiologists (IRs). Improvements in image-guidance, biopsy tools and biopsy techniques now routinely allow for safe biopsy of renal and adrenal lesions which traditionally were considered difficult to reach or technically challenging. Image-guided biopsy is used to establish the definitive tissue diagnosis in adrenal mass lesions that can not be fully characterized with imaging or laboratory tests alone. It is also used to establish definitive diagnosis in some cases of renal parenchymal disease and has an expanding role in diagnosis and characterization of renal masses prior to treatment. Although basic principles and techniques for image-guided needle biopsy are similar regardless of organ, this paper will highlight some technical considerations, indications and complications which are unique to the adrenal gland and kidney because of their anatomic location and physiologic features. PMID:20540919

  16. Gallium-68 EDTA PET/CT for Renal Imaging.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Michael S; Hicks, Rodney J

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear medicine renal imaging provides important functional data to assist in the diagnosis and management of patients with a variety of renal disorders. Physiologically stable metal chelates like ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and diethylenetriamine penta-acetate (DTPA) are excreted by glomerular filtration and have been radiolabelled with a variety of isotopes for imaging glomerular filtration and quantitative assessment of glomerular filtration rate. Gallium-68 ((68)Ga) EDTA PET usage predates Technetium-99m ((99m)Tc) renal imaging, but virtually disappeared with the widespread adoption of gamma camera technology that was not optimal for imaging positron decay. There is now a reemergence of interest in (68)Ga owing to the greater availability of PET technology and use of (68)Ga to label other radiotracers. (68)Ga EDTA can be used a substitute for (99m)Tc DTPA for wide variety of clinical indications. A key advantage of PET for renal imaging over conventional scintigraphy is 3-dimensional dynamic imaging, which is particularly helpful in patients with complex anatomy in whom planar imaging may be nondiagnostic or difficult to interpret owing to overlying structures containing radioactive urine that cannot be differentiated. Other advantages include accurate and absolute (rather than relative) camera-based quantification, superior spatial and temporal resolution and integrated multislice CT providing anatomical correlation. Furthermore, the (68)Ga generator enables on-demand production at low cost, with no additional patient radiation exposure compared with conventional scintigraphy. Over the past decade, we have employed (68)Ga EDTA PET/CT primarily to answer difficult clinical questions in patients in whom other modalities have failed, particularly when it was envisaged that dynamic 3D imaging would be of assistance. We have also used it as a substitute for (99m)Tc DTPA if unavailable owing to supply issues, and have additionally examined the role of

  17. Diagnostic value of routine bone scintigraphy renal imaging in renal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chancellor, M.B.; Konnak, J.W.; Grossman, H.B.

    1989-05-01

    Technetium-99m-phosphate compounds used in bone scanning are excreted by the kidney, and excellent renal images can be obtained on routine bone scintigrams. The preoperative bone scans of 49 patients who underwent radical nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma between 1981 and 1985 were reviewed for renal imaging. Ninety-four percent of the patients had abnormal bone scan renal images (82% had focal decreased uptake, and 12% had focal increased uptake). Six percent of the renal images were symmetrical bilaterally. When bone scans are employed in the postoperative follow-up of patients with renal cancer, they can be used to assess the status of the remaining kidney.

  18. Improved automatic separation of renal parenchyma and pelvis in dynamic renal scintigraphy using fuzzy regions of interest.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, H; Dworak, E; König, B; Mostbeck, A; Sámal, M

    1999-08-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the physiological relevance of factors produced by a modified procedure for factor analysis of dynamic renal studies. Factor analysis has been applied locally to subsets of dynamic renal data which were well defined in both space and time domains. Optimised factor images resulting from different subsets were used as fuzzy regions of interest (ROIs) for the extraction of time-activity curves corresponding to renal parenchyma, renal pelvis, vascular and spatially homogeneous background. The original procedure employed the factor images of renal parenchyma and pelvis resulting from an analysis of the interval between the peaks of parenchymal and pelvic curves. In an attempt to improve the separation of renal parenchyma and pelvis, new fuzzy ROIs were used. They correspond to the factor image of renal uptake obtained from the analysis of the early phase of the study, and to the factor image of the renal pelvis obtained from the outflow phase. The curves generated with the new fuzzy ROIs were compared with those of the original procedure and tested for the presence of known artefacts inconsistent with the expected physiological behaviour. Unlike with the original procedure, no such artefacts were found. The most striking difference was that the pelvic factor curves did not start from zero time of the study but exhibited a physiologically correct initial horizontal zero segment the length of which correlated closely with the minimum parenchymal transit time (r=0.79, n=46, P<0.001). The new method permits easy and reliable application of factor analysis to dynamic renal studies. Problems which remain to be solved are user-independent identification of the optimum factors and suboptimal performance of the method under extreme conditions. Our results provide additional evidence that factor analysis can extract physiologically relevant information quantitatively from dynamic scintigraphic data. PMID:10436196

  19. Cystic renal neoplasms and renal neoplasms associated with cystic renal diseases in adults: cross-sectional imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Katabathina, Venkata S; Garg, Deepak; Prasad, Srinivasa R; Vikram, Raghu

    2012-01-01

    Cystic renal neoplasms in adults are a heterogeneous group of tumors with characteristic histogenesis, pathological findings, and variable biological profiles. They include disparate entities that are either biologically benign (lymphangioma, cystic nephroma, and mixed epithelial and stromal tumor) or malignant (cystic renal cell carcinoma, multilocular cystic renal cell carcinoma, and primary renal synovial sarcoma). Renal cystic diseases are characterized by cystic changes of the kidneys due to hereditary, developmental, or acquired etiology. Cystic renal diseases such as acquired cystic kidney disease, von Hippel-Lindau disease, and tuberous sclerosis are associated with the development of a wide spectrum of benign and malignant renal neoplasms. Most cystic renal tumors and cystic disease-associated renal neoplasms show characteristic cross-sectional imaging findings that permit accurate diagnosis. In addition, cross-sectional imaging is pivotal in the follow-up and surveillance of adult cystic tumors of the kidney. PMID:23192202

  20. Renal compartment segmentation in DCE-MRI images.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Le Minh, Hung; Tim Cheng, Kwang-Ting; Sung, Kyung Hyun; Liu, Wenyu

    2016-08-01

    Renal compartment segmentation from Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) images is an important task for functional kidney evaluation. Despite advancement in segmentation methods, most of them focus on segmenting an entire kidney on CT images, there still lacks effective and automatic solutions for accurate segmentation of internal renal structures (i.e. cortex, medulla and renal pelvis) from DCE-MRI images. In this paper, we introduce a method for renal compartment segmentation which can robustly achieve high segmentation accuracy for a wide range of DCE-MRI data, and meanwhile requires little manual operations and parameter settings. The proposed method consists of five main steps. First, we pre-process the image time series to reduce the motion artifacts caused by the movement of the patients during the scans and enhance the kidney regions. Second, the kidney is segmented as a whole based on the concept of Maximally Stable Temporal Volume (MSTV). The proposed MSTV detects anatomical structures that are homogeneous in the spatial domain and stable in terms of temporal dynamics. MSTV-based kidney segmentation is robust to noises and does not require a training phase. It can well adapt to kidney shape variations caused by renal dysfunction. Third, voxels in the segmented kidney are described by principal components (PCs) to remove temporal redundancy and noises. And then k-means clustering of PCs is applied to separate voxels into multiple clusters. Fourth, the clusters are automatically labeled as cortex, medulla and pelvis based on voxels' geometric locations and intensity distribution. Finally, an iterative refinement method is introduced to further remove noises in each segmented compartment. Experiments on 14 real clinical kidney datasets and 12 synthetic dataset demonstrate that results produced by our method match very well with those segmented manually and the performance of our method is superior to the other five existing methods. PMID:27236222

  1. Imaging of adrenal and renal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Nancy A; Lostumbo, Antonella; Adam, Sharon Z; Remer, Erick M; Nikolaidis, Paul; Yaghmai, Vahid; Berggruen, Senta M; Miller, Frank H

    2015-10-01

    Hemorrhage of the kidneys and adrenal glands has many etiologies. In the adrenal glands, trauma, anticoagulation, stress, sepsis, surgery, and neoplasms are common causes of hemorrhage. In the kidneys, reasons for hemorrhage include trauma, bleeding diathesis, vascular diseases, infection, infarction, hemorrhagic cyst rupture, the Antopol-Goldman lesion, and neoplasms. Angiomyolipoma and renal cell carcinoma are the neoplasms most commonly associated with hemorrhage in the kidneys and adrenal cortical carcinoma, metastases, and pheochromocytoma are associated with hemorrhage in the adrenal glands. Understanding the computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging features, and causes of hemorrhage in the kidneys and adrenal glands is critical. It is also important to keep in mind that mimickers of hemorrhage exist, including lymphoma in both the kidneys and adrenal glands, and melanoma metastases in the adrenal glands. Appropriate imaging follow-up of renal and adrenal hemorrhage should occur to exclude an underlying malignancy as the cause. If there is suspicion for malignancy that cannot be definitively diagnosed on imaging, surgery or biopsy may be warranted. Angiography may be indicated when there is a suspected underlying vascular disease. Unnecessary intervention, such as nephrectomy, may be avoided in patients with benign causes or no underlying disease. Appropriate management is dependent on accurate diagnosis of the cause of renal or adrenal hemorrhage and it is incumbent upon the radiologist to determine the etiology. PMID:26036792

  2. A biphasic parameter estimation method for quantitative analysis of dynamic renal scintigraphic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, T. S.; Zhang, Jeff L.; Ong, C. K.; Shuter, B.

    2006-06-01

    Dynamic renal scintigraphy is an established method in nuclear medicine, commonly used for the assessment of renal function. In this paper, a biphasic model fitting method is proposed for simultaneous estimation of both vascular and parenchymal parameters from renal scintigraphic data. These parameters include the renal plasma flow, vascular and parenchymal mean transit times, and the glomerular extraction rate. Monte Carlo simulation was used to evaluate the stability and confidence of the parameter estimates obtained by the proposed biphasic method, before applying the method on actual patient study cases to compare with the conventional fitting approach and other established renal indices. The various parameter estimates obtained using the proposed method were found to be consistent with the respective pathologies of the study cases. The renal plasma flow and extraction rate estimated by the proposed method were in good agreement with those previously obtained using dynamic computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

  3. Quantitative planar imaging in renal scintigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lárraga, J. M.; Martínez-Dávalos, A.; Martínez-Duncker, C.; Rodríguez, R. Herrera

    2002-08-01

    In this work we show the results of the implementation of the double energy window method (DEW) to correct for scatter and geometric mean of opposite image to correct for attenuation of radiation within the patient for absolute quantification of radiotracer in renal scintigraphy studies. We show that DEW method subestimates the scatter radiation within main energy window and that result in a 11% of maximun error for the determination of true activity of a renal kidney phantom. Moreover, in order to avoid transmission scans of patients we perform a Monte Carlo simulation (MC) for the determination of scatter component of the main energy window. The results of the MC simulation was validated with experimental data of emission studies.

  4. High sensitive volumetric imaging of renal microcirculation in vivo using ultrahigh sensitive optical microangiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi, Zhongwei; Jung, Yeongri; Jia, Yali; An, Lin; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2011-03-01

    We present a non-invasive, label-free imaging technique called Ultrahigh Sensitive Optical Microangiography (UHSOMAG) for high sensitive volumetric imaging of renal microcirculation. The UHS-OMAG imaging system is based on spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), which uses a 47000 A-line scan rate CCD camera to perform an imaging speed of 150 frames per second that takes only ~7 seconds to acquire a 3D image. The technique, capable of measuring slow blood flow down to 4 um/s, is sensitive enough to image capillary networks, such as peritubular capillaries and glomerulus within renal cortex. We show superior performance of UHS-OMAG in providing depthresolved volumetric images of rich renal microcirculation. We monitored the dynamics of renal microvasculature during renal ischemia and reperfusion. Obvious reduction of renal microvascular density due to renal ischemia was visualized and quantitatively analyzed. This technique can be helpful for the assessment of chronic kidney disease (CKD) which relates to abnormal microvasculature.

  5. Contrast medium administration and image acquisition parameters in renal CT angiography: what radiologists need to know

    PubMed Central

    Saade, Charbel; Deeb, Ibrahim Alsheikh; Mohamad, Maha; Al-Mohiy, Hussain; El-Merhi, Fadi

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, exponential advances in computed tomography (CT) technology have resulted in improved spatial and temporal resolution. Faster image acquisition enabled renal CT angiography to become a viable and effective noninvasive alternative in diagnosing renal vascular pathologies. However, with these advances, new challenges in contrast media administration have emerged. Poor synchronization between scanner and contrast media administration have reduced the consistency in image quality with poor spatial and contrast resolution. Comprehensive understanding of contrast media dynamics is essential in the design and implementation of contrast administration and image acquisition protocols. This review includes an overview of the parameters affecting renal artery opacification and current protocol strategies to achieve optimal image quality during renal CT angiography with iodinated contrast media, with current safety issues highlighted. PMID:26728701

  6. Renal trauma: imaging evaluation and implications for clinical management.

    PubMed

    Chong, Suzanne T; Cherry-Bukowiec, Jill R; Willatt, Jonathon M G; Kielar, Ania Z

    2016-08-01

    Severe renal injuries are usually associated with multisystem injuries, may require interventional radiology to control hemorrhage and improve the chances for renal salvage, and are more likely to fail nonoperative management. However, most renal injuries are mild in severity and successfully managed conservatively. The AAST classification is the most widely used system to describe renal injuries and carries management and prognostic implications. CT with intravenous contrast is the imaging test of choice to assess for renal injuries. Contrast extravasation indicating active bleeding should be mentioned as its presence is predictive for failure of nonoperative management. Radiologists play a critical role in identifying renal injuries and should make every effort to describe renal injuries according to the AAST grading scheme to better inform the surgeon's management decisions. PMID:27108132

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging as a Biomarker for Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yan; Kwon, Young Suk; Labib, Mina; Foran, David J.; Singer, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    As the most common neoplasm arising from the kidney, renal cell carcinoma (RCC) continues to have a significant impact on global health. Conventional cross-sectional imaging has always served an important role in the staging of RCC. However, with recent advances in imaging techniques and postprocessing analysis, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) now has the capability to function as a diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic biomarker for RCC. For this narrative literature review, a PubMed search was conducted to collect the most relevant and impactful studies from our perspectives as urologic oncologists, radiologists, and computational imaging specialists. We seek to cover advanced MR imaging and image analysis techniques that may improve the management of patients with small renal mass or metastatic renal cell carcinoma. PMID:26609190

  8. Imaging Manifestations of Hematologic Diseases with Renal and Perinephric Involvement.

    PubMed

    Purysko, Andrei S; Westphalen, Antonio C; Remer, Erick M; Coppa, Christopher P; Leão Filho, Hilton M; Herts, Brian R

    2016-01-01

    The kidneys and perinephric tissues can be affected by a variety of hematologic disorders, which usually occur in the setting of multisystem involvement. In many of these disorders, imaging is used to evaluate the extent of disease, guide biopsy, and/or monitor disease activity and patient response to therapy. Lymphoma, leukemia, and multiple myeloma commonly manifest as multiple parenchymal or perinephric lesions. Erdheim-Chester disease and Rosai-Dorfman disease, rare forms of multisystemic histiocytosis, are often identified as perinephric and periureteral masses. Renal abnormalities depicted at imaging in patients with sickle cell disease include renal enlargement, papillary necrosis, and renal medullary carcinoma. Sickle cell disease, along with other causes of intravascular hemolysis, can also lead to hemosiderosis of the renal cortex. Thrombosis of renal veins is sometimes seen in patients with coagulation disorders but more often occurs in association with certain malignancies and nephrotic syndrome. Immunoglobulin G4-related sclerosing disease is another multisystem process that often produces focal renal lesions, seen along with involvement of more characteristic organs such as the pancreas. Perinephric lesions with calcifications should raise the possibility of secondary amyloidosis, especially in patients with a history of lymphoma and multiple myeloma. Although the imaging patterns of renal and perinephric involvement are usually not specific for a single entity, and the same entity can manifest with different or overlapping patterns, familiarity with these patterns and key clinical and histopathologic features may help to narrow the differential diagnosis and determine the next step of care. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27257766

  9. /sup 97/Ru-DMSA for delayed renal imaging. [Dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Oster, Z.H.; Som, P.; Gil, M.C.; Goldman, A.G.; Fairchild, R.G.; Meinken, G.E.; Srivastava, S.C.; Atkins, H.L.; Richards, P.; Brill, A.B.

    1981-01-01

    Dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) was labeled with /sup 97/Ru both with and without the addition of SnCl.2H/sub 2/O. The tin-containing preparation was found to induce higher cortical deposition of /sup 97/Ru-DMSA than the tin-free preparation. Visualization of the renal cortex was excellent 4 to 48 hours after injection in normal dogs with renal insufficiency. It is concluded that /sup 97/Ru-(Sn+/sup 2/)-DMSA is a potentially useful renal imaging agent when delayed scintigraphy is necessary because of decompensaton of the kidneys.

  10. /sup 97/Ru-DMSA for delayed renal imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Oster, Z.H.; Som, P.; Gil, M.C.

    1981-10-01

    Dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) was labeled with /sup 97/Ru both with and without the addition of SnCl-2H/sub 2/O. The tin-containing preparation was found to induce higher cortical deposition of /sup 97/Ru-DMSA than the tin-free preparation. Visualization of the renal cortex was excellent 4 to 48 hours after injection in normal dogs and in dogs with renal insufficiency. It is concluded that /sup 97/Ru-(SN/sup 2 +/)-DMSA is a potentially useful renal imaging agent when delayed scintigraphy is necessary because of decompensation of the kidneys.

  11. Renal masses in children. An integrated imaging approach to diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfson, B.J.; Gainey, M.A.; Faerber, E.N.; Capitanio, M.A.

    1985-11-01

    In view of the continuing technologic advancements in the development and availability of diagnostic imaging modalities, it is appropriate to assess periodically the currently accepted approaches to the evaluation of renal masses in children. The roles, advantages, and disadvantages of plain film, intravenous urography, ultrasonography, radionuclide scintigraphy, computed tomography, angiography, and magnetic resonance imaging in the approach to the evaluation of renal masses in children are discussed. An integrated imaging approach that provides the most accurate and necessary information for diagnosis and treatment is recommended. 70 references.

  12. Appraisal of lupus nephritis by renal imaging with gallium-67

    SciTech Connect

    Bakir, A.A.; Lopez-Majano, V.; Hryhorczuk, D.O.; Rhee, H.L.; Dunea, G.

    1985-08-01

    To assess the activity of lupus nephritis, 43 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were studied by gallium imaging. Delayed renal visualization 48 hours after the gallium injection, a positive result, was noted in 25 of 48 scans. Active renal disease was defined by the presence of hematuria, pyuria (10 or more red blood cells or white blood cells per high-power field), proteinuria (1 g or more per 24 hours), a rising serum creatinine level, or a recent biopsy specimen showing proliferative and/or necrotizing lesions involving more than 20 percent of glomeruli. Renal disease was active in 18 instances, inactive in 23, and undetermined in seven (a total of 48 scans). Sixteen of the 18 scans (89 percent) in patients with active renal disease showed positive findings, as compared with only four of 23 scans (17 percent) in patients with inactive renal disease (p less than 0.001). Patients with positive scanning results had a higher rate of hypertension (p = 0.02), nephrotic proteinuria (p = 0.01), and progressive renal failure (p = 0.02). Mild mesangial nephritis (World Health Organization classes I and II) was noted only in the patients with negative scanning results (p = 0.02) who, however, showed a higher incidence of severe extrarenal SLE (p = 0.04). It is concluded that gallium imaging is a useful tool in evaluating the activity of lupus nephritis.

  13. Renal cell carcinoma in a transplanted kidney: MR imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Leonardou, Polytimi; Semelka, Richard C; Mastropasqua, Maria; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Woosley, John T

    2003-07-01

    We report the MR findings of a 42-year-old man who developed renal cell carcinoma in an allograft kidney, 10 years after transplantation. The lower pole of the transplant kidney showed a solid lesion which was well shown on the post gadolinium fat suppressed images as a heterogeneously enhancing 2 cm mass lesion. PMID:12915202

  14. Dynamics of Urinary Calprotectin after Renal Ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Ebbing, Jan; Seibert, Felix S.; Pagonas, Nikolaos; Bauer, Frederic; Miller, Kurt; Kempkensteffen, Carsten; Günzel, Karsten; Bachmann, Alexander; Seifert, Hans H.; Rentsch, Cyrill A.; Ardelt, Peter; Wetterauer, Christian; Amico, Patrizia; Babel, Nina; Westhoff, Timm H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Urinary calprotectin has been identified as a promising biomarker for acute kidney injury. To date, however, the time-dependent changes of this parameter during acute kidney injury remain elusive. The aim of the present work was to define the time-course of urinary calprotectin secretion after ischaemia/reperfusion-induced kidney injury in comparison to neutrophil gelatinase—associated lipocalin, thereby monitoring the extent of tubular damage in nephron sparing surgery for kidney tumours. Methods: The study population consisted of 42 patients. Thirty-two patients underwent either open or endoscopic nephron sparing surgery for kidney tumours. During the surgery, the renal arterial pedicle was clamped with a median ischaemic time of 13 minutes (interquartile range, 4.5–20.3 minutes) in 26 patients. Ten retro-peritoneoscopic living donor nephrectomy patients and 6 nephron sparing surgery patients in whom the renal artery was not clamped served as controls. Urinary calprotectin and neutrophil gelatinase—associated lipocalin concentrations were repeatedly measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and assessed according to renal function parameters. Results: Urinary concentrations of calprotectin and neutrophil gelatinase—associated lipocalin increased significantly after ischaemia/reperfusion injury, whereas concentrations remained unchanged after nephron sparing surgery without ischaemia/reperfusion injury and after kidney donation. Calprotectin and neutrophil gelatinase—associated lipocalin levels were significantly increased 2 and 8 hours, respectively, post-ischaemia. Both proteins reached maximal concentrations after 48 hours, followed by a subsequent persistent decrease. Maximal neutrophil gelatinase—associated lipocalin and calprotectin concentrations were 9-fold and 69-fold higher than their respective baseline values. The glomerular filtration rate was only transiently impaired at the first post-operative day after ischaemia

  15. Renal

    MedlinePlus

    ... term "renal" refers to the kidney. For example, renal failure means kidney failure. Related topics: Kidney disease Kidney disease - diet Kidney failure Kidney function tests Renal scan Kidney transplant

  16. Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis in the post-CORAL era part 1: the renal penumbra concept and next-generation functional diagnostic imaging.

    PubMed

    Sag, Alan Alper; Inal, Ibrahim; Okcuoglu, John; Rossignol, Patrick; Ortiz, Alberto; Afsar, Baris; Sos, Thomas A; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2016-04-01

    After three neutral trials in which renal artery stenting failed to improve renal function or reduce cardiovascular and renal events, the controversy surrounding diagnosis and treatment of atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis and renovascular hypertension has led to paradigm shifts in the diagnostic algorithm. Noninvasive determination of earlier events (cortex hypoxia and renal artery hemodynamic changes) will supersede late sequelae (calcific stenosis, renal cortical thinning). Therefore, this review proposes the concept of renal penumbra in defining at-risk ischemic renal parenchyma. The complex field of functional renal magnetic resonance imaging will be reviewed succinctly in a clinician-directed fashion. PMID:26944791

  17. Image diagnosis of parathyroid glands in chronic renal failure

    SciTech Connect

    Takagi, H.; Tominaga, Y.; Uchida, K.; Yamada, N.; Morimoto, T.; Yasue, M.

    1983-07-01

    Twenty-two out of 31 patients with chronic renal failure and secondary hyperparathyroidism who underwent parathyroidectomy before operation underwent non-invasive image diagnosis of parathyroid glands by computed tomography (CT), scintigraphy with /sup 201/TlCl and /sup 99m/TcO/sup 4 +/, and/or ultrasonography. CT visualized 39 of 45 parathyroid glands (86.7%), weighing more than 500 mg. Scintigraphy with a subtraction method using a computer performed the diagnosis in 19 of 27 glands (70.4%). Ultrasonography detected 21 of 27 glands (77.8%). Image diagnosis was also useful in the postoperative follow-up study. The non-invasive image diagnosis of parathyroid glands in patients with chronic renal failure is thus valuable for 1) definite diagnosis of secondary hyperparathyroidism, 2) localization, and 3) diagnosis for effectiveness of conservative treatment.

  18. Renal Papillary Necrosis Appearing as Bladder Cancer on Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Dagrosa, Lawrence M.; Gormley, Elizabeth Ann

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A 79-year-old woman with a history of diabetes mellitus and recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) presented with acute onset left lower quadrant pain, left-sided back pain, vomiting, and dysuria. Abdominopelvic CT scan revealed left hydroureteronephrosis to the level of the left ureterovesical junction (UVJ) where a bladder mass appeared to be obstructing the left ureteral orifice. The obstruction was ultimately found to be the result of a sloughed renal papilla lodged in the distal ureter, which created an inflammatory mass at the UVJ. Her history of diabetes and frequent UTIs likely predisposed her to the development of renal papillary necrosis (RPN) that resulted in sloughing of a renal papilla, distal ureteral obstruction with subsequent bladder inflammation that mimicked a bladder mass on imaging. RPN is a condition associated with many etiologies and likely represents a common final pathway of several diseases. Although several hypotheses exist, it is primarily thought to be ischemic in nature and is related to the underlying physiology of the renal papillae. We present a case of hydroureteronephrosis and bladder mass secondary to a sloughed renal papilla from RPN.

  19. Imaging regional renal function parameters using radionuclide tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Yi

    A compartmental model is given for evaluating kidney function accurately and noninvasively. This model is cast into a parallel multi-compartment structure and each pixel region (picture element) of kidneys is considered as a single kidney compartment. The loss of radionuclide tracers from the blood to the kidney and from the kidney to the bladder are modelled in great detail. Both the uptake function and the excretion function of the kidneys can be evaluated pixel by pixel, and regional diagnostic information on renal function is obtained. Gamma Camera image data are required by this model and a screening test based renal function measurement is provided. The regional blood background is subtracted from the kidney region of interest (ROI) and the kidney regional rate constants are estimated analytically using the Kuhn-Pucker multiplier method in convex programming by considering the input/output behavior of the kidney compartments. The detailed physiological model of the peripheral compartments of the system, which is not available for most radionuclide tracers, is not required in the determination of the kidney regional rate constants and the regional blood background factors within the kidney ROI. Moreover, the statistical significance of measurements is considered to assure the improved statistical properties of the estimated kidney rate constants. The relations between various renal function parameters and the kidney rate constants are established. Multiple renal function measurements can be found from the renal compartmental model. The blood radioactivity curve and the regional (or total) radiorenogram determining the regional (or total) summed behavior of the kidneys are obtained analytically with the consideration of the statistical significance of measurements using convex programming methods for a single peripheral compartment system. In addition, a new technique for the determination of 'initial conditions' in both the blood compartment and the kidney

  20. Radiologic imaging of the renal parenchyma structure and function.

    PubMed

    Grenier, Nicolas; Merville, Pierre; Combe, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Radiologic imaging has the potential to identify several functional and/or structural biomarkers of acute and chronic kidney diseases that are useful diagnostics to guide patient management. A renal ultrasound examination can provide information regarding the gross anatomy and macrostructure of the renal parenchyma, and ultrasound imaging modalities based on Doppler or elastography techniques can provide haemodynamic and structural information, respectively. CT is also able to combine morphological and functional information, but the use of CT is limited due to the required exposure to X-ray irradiation and a risk of contrast-induced nephropathy following intravenous injection of a radio-contrast agent. MRI can be used to identify a wide range of anatomical and physiological parameters at the tissue and even cellular level, such as tissue perfusion, oxygenation, water diffusion, cellular phagocytic activity, tissue stiffness, and level of renal filtration. The ability of MRI to provide valuable information for most of these parameters within a renal context is still in development and requires more clinical experience, harmonization of technical procedures, and an evaluation of reliability and validity on a large scale. PMID:27067530

  1. Regional evaluation of renal dynamics in post transplant kidneys with Tc-99m DTPA and scinti-camera

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, T.; Akuta, K.; Aoki, S.; Furunishi, H.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, T.; Nakane, Y.; Pak, K.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to analyze the regional renal dynamic process (renal perfusion, accumulation and clearance) using Tc-99m DTPA and assess for the regional renal indices from this analysis early to detect acute tubular necrosis and acute rejection of post transplant kidneys. The subjects were 6 normal donors and 10 post renal transplant patients. Tc-99m DTPA (20 mCi) was injected into the vein by a bolus, and its activity change in the kidney was measured by a scintillation camera, and stored each 1 sec. for 20 sec. following each 15 sec. for 20 min. in the computer, to calculate the renal functional indices: the perfusion index, the blood flow mean transit time, the accumulation rate and the clearance rate in the cortex, medulla and pelvis, whose R.O.I. regions were separated in the early and late scinti-images. The accumulation ratio, a new parameter, which is the second upslope part of Tc-99m DTPA renogram, and the clearance rate were calculated from H/A method. The authors made the functional images of these indices to estimate their regional distribution. The accumulation rate and the clearance rate only in the cortex were markedly decreased in the acute tubular necrosis and the rejection, which functional images showed irregular distributions. It was possible to evaluate the renal perfusion with Tc-99m DTPA, separated from the renal accumulation and clearance process. The authors' method gave the assessment of the regional renal disorders with the functional images; the renal disorders in acute tubular necrosis and acute rejection exist mainly in the cortex.

  2. Imaging-based diagnosis of acute renal allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Thölking, Gerold; Schuette-Nuetgen, Katharina; Kentrup, Dominik; Pawelski, Helga; Reuter, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the best available treatment for patients with end stage renal disease. Despite the introduction of effective immunosuppressant drugs, episodes of acute allograft rejection still endanger graft survival. Since efficient treatment of acute rejection is available, rapid diagnosis of this reversible graft injury is essential. For diagnosis of rejection, invasive core needle biopsy of the graft is the “gold-standard”. However, biopsy carries the risk of significant graft injury and is not immediately feasible in patients taking anticoagulants. Therefore, a non-invasive tool assessing the whole organ for specific and fast detection of acute allograft rejection is desirable. We herein review current imaging-based state of the art approaches for non-invasive diagnostics of acute renal transplant rejection. We especially focus on new positron emission tomography-based as well as targeted ultrasound-based methods. PMID:27011915

  3. Renal Graft Fibrosis and Inflammation Quantification by an Automated Fourier-Transform Infrared Imaging Technique.

    PubMed

    Vuiblet, Vincent; Fere, Michael; Gobinet, Cyril; Birembaut, Philippe; Piot, Olivier; Rieu, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    Renal interstitial fibrosis and interstitial active inflammation are the main histologic features of renal allograft biopsy specimens. Fibrosis is currently assessed by semiquantitative subjective analysis, and color image analysis has been developed to improve the reliability and repeatability of this evaluation. However, these techniques fail to distinguish fibrosis from constitutive collagen or active inflammation. We developed an automatic, reproducible Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) imaging-based technique for simultaneous quantification of fibrosis and inflammation in renal allograft biopsy specimens. We generated and validated a classification model using 49 renal biopsy specimens and subsequently tested the robustness of this classification algorithm on 166 renal grafts. Finally, we explored the clinical relevance of fibrosis quantification using FTIR imaging by comparing results with renal function at 3 months after transplantation (M3) and the variation of renal function between M3 and M12. We showed excellent robustness for fibrosis and inflammation classification, with >90% of renal biopsy specimens adequately classified by FTIR imaging. Finally, fibrosis quantification by FTIR imaging correlated with renal function at M3, and the variation in fibrosis between M3 and M12 correlated well with the variation in renal function over the same period. This study shows that FTIR-based analysis of renal graft biopsy specimens is a reproducible and reliable label-free technique for quantifying fibrosis and active inflammation. This technique seems to be more relevant than digital image analysis and promising for both research studies and routine clinical practice. PMID:26683669

  4. CT and MR imaging for evaluation of cystic renal lesions and diseases.

    PubMed

    Wood, Cecil G; Stromberg, LeRoy J; Harmath, Carla B; Horowitz, Jeanne M; Feng, Chun; Hammond, Nancy A; Casalino, David D; Goodhartz, Lori A; Miller, Frank H; Nikolaidis, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Cystic renal lesions are commonly encountered in abdominal imaging. Although most cystic renal lesions are benign simple cysts, complex renal cysts, infectious cystic renal disease, and multifocal cystic renal disease are also common phenomena. The Bosniak classification system provides a useful means of categorizing cystic renal lesions but places less emphasis on their underlying pathophysiology. Cystic renal diseases can be categorized as focal, multifocal, or infectious lesions. Diseases that manifest with focal lesions, such as cystic renal cell carcinoma, mixed epithelial and stromal tumor, and cystic nephroma, are often difficult to differentiate but have differing implications for follow-up after resection. Multifocal cystic renal lesions can be categorized as acquired or heritable. Acquired entities, such as glomerulocystic kidney disease, lithium-induced nephrotoxicity, acquired cystic kidney disease, multicystic dysplastic kidney, and localized cystic renal disease, often have distinct imaging and clinical features that allow definitive diagnosis. Heritable diseases, such as autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, von Hippel-Lindau disease, and tuberous sclerosis, are usually easily identified and have various implications for patient management. Infectious diseases have varied imaging appearances, and the possibility of infection must not be overlooked when assessing a cystic renal lesion. A thorough understanding of the spectrum of cystic renal disease will allow the radiologist to make a more specific diagnosis and provide the clinician with optimal recommendations for further diagnostic testing and follow-up imaging. PMID:25590393

  5. Objective improvement in renal function post-Dietl's crisis: Documented on renal dynamic scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Parida, Girish Kumar; Tripathi, Madhavi; Kumar, Kunal; Damle, Nishikant

    2016-01-01

    Dietl's crisis is one of the treatable causes of intermittent abdominal pain. The pain is due to acute hydronephrosis that leads to stretching of the pelvis. The most common cause of this intermittent hydronephrosis is aberrant renal vessel at lower pole that causes pelvi-ureteric junction obstruction.(PUJO). High insertion of the ureter is one of the other rare causes. We present a case of 5-year-old boy with intermittent abdominal pain and distension with ultrasonography features of gross left hydronephrosis. Renal dynamic scan.(RDS) with ethylene dicysteine showed negligible functioning left kidney. On third follow-up day, the patient passed a lot of urine with decrease in abdominal pain and distension. Then, again the patient was sent to us 8.days after the first study for repeat RDS, which showed significant improvement in function and decreased in the size of left kidney though with persistent PUJO. On exploration high insertion of the ureter at pelvis was found to be the cause and was treated. PMID:27385903

  6. Objective improvement in renal function post-Dietl's crisis: Documented on renal dynamic scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    Parida, Girish Kumar; Tripathi, Madhavi; Kumar, Kunal; Damle, Nishikant

    2016-01-01

    Dietl's crisis is one of the treatable causes of intermittent abdominal pain. The pain is due to acute hydronephrosis that leads to stretching of the pelvis. The most common cause of this intermittent hydronephrosis is aberrant renal vessel at lower pole that causes pelvi-ureteric junction obstruction.(PUJO). High insertion of the ureter is one of the other rare causes. We present a case of 5-year-old boy with intermittent abdominal pain and distension with ultrasonography features of gross left hydronephrosis. Renal dynamic scan.(RDS) with ethylene dicysteine showed negligible functioning left kidney. On third follow-up day, the patient passed a lot of urine with decrease in abdominal pain and distension. Then, again the patient was sent to us 8.days after the first study for repeat RDS, which showed significant improvement in function and decreased in the size of left kidney though with persistent PUJO. On exploration high insertion of the ureter at pelvis was found to be the cause and was treated. PMID:27385903

  7. Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging and radionuclide imaging in the evaluation of renal transplant failure

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, M.S.; Tanasescu, D.E.; Waxman, A.D.; Crues, J.V. III

    1988-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was compared with radionuclide scintigraphy (RNS) in 16 patients with renal transplants undergoing renal failure to determine which modality could best discriminate between rejection, acute tubular necrosis (ATN), and cyclosporin nephrotoxicity (CN). Although all rejecting transplants had reduced corticomedullary differentiation (CMD) on T1-weighted MR images, four of five cases of ATN had appearances that could not be distinguished from rejection. A normal CMD suggests nonrejection, but diminished CMD is nonspecific. Tc-99m DTPA/I-131 hippuran RNS was superior to MRI in differentiating rejection from ATN. Although ATN and CN have similar RNS patterns, this distinction can usually be made based on the clinical time course. Other potential uses of MRI in the evaluation of the renal transplants are discussed.

  8. Detection of urinary extravasation by delayed technetium-99m DTPA renal imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Taki, J.; Tonami, N.; Aburano, T.; Hisada, K.

    1986-08-01

    Delayed imaging with Tc-99m DTPA renal scintigraphy demonstrated urinary extravasation in a patient with acute anuria in whom early sequential imaging showed no abnormal extrarenal radionuclide accumulation.

  9. Value of obtaining renal images following brain scintigraphy with technetium-99m glucoheptonate

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, A.J.; Rodriguez, A.A.; Spicer, M.J.; Jackson, R.E.; Byrd, B.F.; Turnbull, G.L.

    1986-08-01

    The value of adding an extra view of the kidneys immediately following brain imaging with Tc-99m glucoheptonate was investigated in a two-year retrospective study at our institution. Between October 1982 and October 1984, 561 individuals underwent Tc-99m glucoheptonate brain imaging with the added renal view. Twenty-nine of these individuals (5.2%) demonstrated renal abnormalities. The abnormal renal findings were clinically correlated in 24 of these persons. Sixteen (67%) of these 24 individuals were unaware of any renal abnormality. Useful information can be obtained from renal images incidental to brain imaging at no added expense or radiation exposure to the patient, and at a minimal cost in time to the imaging clinic.

  10. Dynamic granularity of imaging systems

    SciTech Connect

    Geissel, Matthias; Smith, Ian C.; Shores, Jonathon E.; Porter, John L.

    2015-11-04

    Imaging systems that include a specific source, imaging concept, geometry, and detector have unique properties such as signal-to-noise ratio, dynamic range, spatial resolution, distortions, and contrast. Some of these properties are inherently connected, particularly dynamic range and spatial resolution. It must be emphasized that spatial resolution is not a single number but must be seen in the context of dynamic range and consequently is better described by a function or distribution. We introduce the “dynamic granularity” Gdyn as a standardized, objective relation between a detector’s spatial resolution (granularity) and dynamic range for complex imaging systems in a given environment rather than the widely found characterization of detectors such as cameras or films by themselves. We found that this relation can partly be explained through consideration of the signal’s photon statistics, background noise, and detector sensitivity, but a comprehensive description including some unpredictable data such as dust, damages, or an unknown spectral distribution will ultimately have to be based on measurements. Measured dynamic granularities can be objectively used to assess the limits of an imaging system’s performance including all contributing noise sources and to qualify the influence of alternative components within an imaging system. Our article explains the construction criteria to formulate a dynamic granularity and compares measured dynamic granularities for different detectors used in the X-ray backlighting scheme employed at Sandia’s Z-Backlighter facility.

  11. Dynamic granularity of imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissel, Matthias; Smith, Ian C.; Shores, Jonathon E.; Porter, John L.

    2015-11-01

    Imaging systems that include a specific source, imaging concept, geometry, and detector have unique properties such as signal-to-noise ratio, dynamic range, spatial resolution, distortions, and contrast. Some of these properties are inherently connected, particularly dynamic range and spatial resolution. It must be emphasized that spatial resolution is not a single number but must be seen in the context of dynamic range and consequently is better described by a function or distribution. We introduce the "dynamic granularity" G dyn as a standardized, objective relation between a detector's spatial resolution (granularity) and dynamic range for complex imaging systems in a given environment rather than the widely found characterization of detectors such as cameras or films by themselves. This relation can partly be explained through consideration of the signal's photon statistics, background noise, and detector sensitivity, but a comprehensive description including some unpredictable data such as dust, damages, or an unknown spectral distribution will ultimately have to be based on measurements. Measured dynamic granularities can be objectively used to assess the limits of an imaging system's performance including all contributing noise sources and to qualify the influence of alternative components within an imaging system. This article explains the construction criteria to formulate a dynamic granularity and compares measured dynamic granularities for different detectors used in the X-ray backlighting scheme employed at Sandia's Z-Backlighter facility.

  12. Dynamic granularity of imaging systems

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Geissel, Matthias; Smith, Ian C.; Shores, Jonathon E.; Porter, John L.

    2015-11-04

    Imaging systems that include a specific source, imaging concept, geometry, and detector have unique properties such as signal-to-noise ratio, dynamic range, spatial resolution, distortions, and contrast. Some of these properties are inherently connected, particularly dynamic range and spatial resolution. It must be emphasized that spatial resolution is not a single number but must be seen in the context of dynamic range and consequently is better described by a function or distribution. We introduce the “dynamic granularity” Gdyn as a standardized, objective relation between a detector’s spatial resolution (granularity) and dynamic range for complex imaging systems in a given environment rathermore » than the widely found characterization of detectors such as cameras or films by themselves. We found that this relation can partly be explained through consideration of the signal’s photon statistics, background noise, and detector sensitivity, but a comprehensive description including some unpredictable data such as dust, damages, or an unknown spectral distribution will ultimately have to be based on measurements. Measured dynamic granularities can be objectively used to assess the limits of an imaging system’s performance including all contributing noise sources and to qualify the influence of alternative components within an imaging system. Our article explains the construction criteria to formulate a dynamic granularity and compares measured dynamic granularities for different detectors used in the X-ray backlighting scheme employed at Sandia’s Z-Backlighter facility.« less

  13. Image-based retrieval system and computer-aided diagnosis system for renal cortical scintigraphy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumcuoğlu, Erkan; Nar, Fatih; Uğur, Omer; Bozkurt, M. Fani; Aslan, Mehmet

    2008-03-01

    Cortical renal (kidney) scintigraphy images are 2D images (256x256) acquired in three projection angles (posterior, right-posterior-oblique and left-posterior-oblique). These images are used by nuclear medicine specialists to examine the functional morphology of kidney parenchyma. The main visual features examined in reading the images are: size, location, shape and activity distribution (pixel intensity distribution within the boundary of each kidney). Among the above features, activity distribution (in finding scars if any) was found to have the least interobserver reproducibility. Therefore, in this study, we developed an image-based retrieval (IBR) and a computer-based diagnosis (CAD) system, focused on this feature in particular. The developed IBR and CAD algorithms start with automatic segmentation, boundary and landmark detection. Then, shape and activity distribution features are computed. Activity distribution feature is obtained using the acquired image and image set statistics of the normal patients. Active Shape Model (ASM) technique is used for more accurate kidney segmentation. In the training step of ASM, normal patient images are used. Retrieval performance is evaluated by calculating precision and recall. CAD performance is evaluated by specificity and sensitivity. To our knowledge, this paper is the first IBR or CAD system reported in the literature on renal cortical scintigraphy images.

  14. Nonoperative management of blunt renal trauma: Is routine early follow-up imaging necessary?

    PubMed Central

    Malcolm, John B; Derweesh, Ithaar H; Mehrazin, Reza; DiBlasio, Christopher J; Vance, David D; Joshi, Salil; Wake, Robert W; Gold, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Background There is no consensus on the role of routine follow-up imaging during nonoperative management of blunt renal trauma. We reviewed our experience with nonoperative management of blunt renal injuries in order to evaluate the utility of routine early follow-up imaging. Methods We reviewed all cases of blunt renal injury admitted for nonoperative management at our institution between 1/2002 and 1/2006. Data were compiled from chart review, and clinical outcomes were correlated with CT imaging results. Results 207 patients were identified (210 renal units). American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST) grades I, II, III, IV, and V were assigned to 35 (16%), 66 (31%), 81 (39%), 26 (13%), and 2 (1%) renal units, respectively. 177 (84%) renal units underwent routine follow-up imaging 24–48 hours after admission. In three cases of grade IV renal injury, a ureteral stent was placed after serial imaging demonstrated persistent extravasation. In no other cases did follow-up imaging independently alter clinical management. There were no urologic complications among cases for which follow-up imaging was not obtained. Conclusion Routine follow-up imaging is unnecessary for blunt renal injuries of grades I-III. Grade IV renovascular injuries can be followed clinically without routine early follow-up imaging, but urine extravasation necessitates serial imaging to guide management decisions. The volume of grade V renal injuries in this study is not sufficient to support or contest the need for routine follow-up imaging. PMID:18768088

  15. Superparamagnetic And Paramagnetic MRI Contrast Agents: Application Of Rapid Magnetic Resonance Imaging To Assess Renal Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvlin, Mark J.; Renshaw, Perry F.; Arger, Peter; Kundel, Harold L.; Dougherty, Larry; Axel, Leon; Kassab, Eleanor; Moore, Bethanne

    1988-06-01

    The paramagnetic chelate complex, gadolinium-diethylene-triamine-pentaacetic acid, Gd-DTPA, and superparamagnetic particles, such as those composed of dextran coated magnetite, function as magnetic resonance contrast agents by changing the relaxation rates, 1/T1 and 1/T2. The effects that these agents have upon MR signal intensity are determined by: the inherent biophysical properties of the tissue being imaged, the concentration of the contrast agent and the data acquisition scheme (pulse sequence parameters) employed. Following the time course of MR signal change in the first minutes after the injection of contrast agent(s) allows a dynamic assessment of organ functions in a manner analogous to certain nuclear medicine studies. In order to study renal function, sequential MR fast scan images, gradient echo (TR=35/TE=7 msec, flip angle=25 degrees), were acquired, one every 12 seconds, after intravenous injection of Gd-DTPA and/or dextran-magnetite. Gd-DTPA, which is freely filtered at the glomerulus and is neither secreted nor reabsorbed, provides information concerning renal perfusion, glomerular filtration and tubular concentrating ability. Dextran-magnetite (200 A diameter), which is primarily contained within the intravascular space shortly after injection, provides information on blood flow to and distribution within the kidney. The MR signal change observed after administration of contrast agents varied dramatically depending upon the agents injected and the imaging parameters used. Hence a broad range of physiolgic processes may be described using these techniques, i.e. contrast agent enhanced functional MR examinations.

  16. Diagnostic utility of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in two common renal tumors

    PubMed Central

    WEN, ZHAOXIA; SUN, ZHENCHAO; WANG, YUXING

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the utility of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) in the diagnosis of common renal tumors. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging and DWI were performed on 85 patients with renal lesions (54 renal carcinoma and 31 renal angiomyolipoma cases). The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values in each case at b=800 sec/mm2 were measured in the ADC maps using a statistical software package. The 54 cases of renal cell carcinoma showed a high signal intensity in the parenchyma, and the 31 renal angiomyolipoma cases showed a well-defined mixed signal intensity on DWI. The soft-tissue component showed a high signal intensity and the fat tissue showed a low signal intensity on DWI. When the b-value was set to 800 sec/mm2, the mean ADC was significantly lower in the renal carcinoma cases than in the renal angiomyolipoma cases. In conclusion, the measurement of ADC on DWI can reveal the structure of renal tumors, which is beneficial in diagnosing and determining the prognosis of benign and malignant renal tumors. PMID:26622890

  17. Cyst infection in unilateral renal cystic disease and the role of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Takase, Yasukazu; Kodama, Koichi; Motoi, Isamu; Saito, Katsuhiko

    2012-11-01

    In multicystic renal diseases, cyst infection is a complex issue because of the absence of validated diagnostic methods. Unilateral renal cystic disease is a rare multicystic disease, believed to have an acquired maldevelopmental origin. Unilateral renal cystic disease is often confused with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease but has some distinguishing characteristics: unilateral localization, negative family history, and no progression to chronic renal failure. We describe a case of unilateral renal cystic disease with cyst infection that could be detected by diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, but not by conventional imaging techniques. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging can be useful for detecting infected cysts, especially in multicystic renal diseases. PMID:22990058

  18. Horseshoe kidney mimicking cross-fused ectopia on 99mTc-EC renal dynamic scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Krishan Kant; Karunanithi, Sellam; Jain, Sachin; Tripathi, Madhavi

    2014-01-01

    The ‘horseshoe kidney’ is the most common renal fusion anomaly. In this disorder, two developed kidneys are connected to each other at the lower part and grow together. We report a case of horseshoe kidney mimicking cross-fused ectopia in 99mTc-EC renal dynamic scintigraphy. PMID:24761069

  19. Immediate renal imaging and renography with /sup 99m/Tc methylene diphosphonate to assess renal blood flow, excretory function, and anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, E.C.; DeNardo, G.L.; Hines, H.H.

    1980-04-01

    /sup 99m/Tc methylene diphosphonate (/sup 99m/Tc MDP) was evaluated as a clinical renal imaging agent in 20 patients referred for bone scintigraphy. Sequential scintigraphy, which was started immediately after injection, yielded blood flow studies of high quality, and subsequent images accurately delineated renal anatomy and excretion in nonazotemic patients. In comparison with delayed images, early images were vastly superior in quality and demonstrated improved target-to-nontarget activity ratios (p < 0.001) and improved lesion detectability (p < 0.01). Renal imaging performed incidental to bone scintigraphy with MDP can be greatly enhanced by initiating sequential scintigraphy immediately after injection.

  20. Imaging Findings of Common Benign Renal Tumors in the Era of Small Renal Masses: Differential Diagnosis from Small Renal Cell Carcinoma: Current Status and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Sungmin

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of small renal masses (SRM) has risen, paralleling the increased usage of cross-sectional imaging. A large proportion of these SRMs are not malignant, and do not require invasive treatment such as nephrectomy. Therefore, differentation between early renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and benign SRM is critical to achieve proper management. This article reviews the radiological features of benign SRMs, with focus on two of the most common benign entities, angiomyolipoma and oncocytoma, in terms of their common imaging findings and differential features from RCC. Furthermore, the role of percutaneous biopsy is discussed as imaging is yet imperfect, therefore necessitating biopsy in certain circumstances to confirm the benignity of SRMs. PMID:25598678

  1. Renal nerves dynamically regulate renal blood flow in conscious, healthy rabbits.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Alicia M; Pellegrino, Peter R; Zucker, Irving H

    2016-01-15

    Despite significant clinical interest in renal denervation as a therapy, the role of the renal nerves in the physiological regulation of renal blood flow (RBF) remains debated. We hypothesized that the renal nerves physiologically regulate beat-to-beat RBF variability (RBFV). This was tested in chronically instrumented, healthy rabbits that underwent either bilateral surgical renal denervation (DDNx) or a sham denervation procedure (INV). Artifact-free segments of RBF and arterial pressure (AP) from calmly resting, conscious rabbits were used to extract RBFV and AP variability for time-domain, frequency-domain, and nonlinear analysis. Whereas steady-state measures of RBF, AP, and heart rate did not statistically differ between groups, DDNx rabbits had greater RBFV than INV rabbits. AP-RBF transfer function analysis showed greater admittance gain in DDNx rabbits than in INV rabbits, particularly in the low-frequency (LF) range where systemic sympathetic vasomotion gives rise to AP oscillations. In the LF range, INV rabbits exhibited a negative AP-RBF phase shift and low coherence, consistent with the presence of an active control system. Neither of these features were present in the LF range of DDNx rabbits, which showed no phase shift and high coherence, consistent with a passive, Ohm's law pressure-flow relationship. Renal denervation did not significantly affect nonlinear RBFV measures of chaos, self-affinity, or complexity, nor did it significantly affect glomerular filtration rate or extracellular fluid volume. Cumulatively, these data suggest that the renal nerves mediate LF renal sympathetic vasomotion, which buffers RBF from LF AP oscillations in conscious, healthy rabbits. PMID:26538235

  2. Image-guided ablation of primary liver and renal tumours.

    PubMed

    Breen, David J; Lencioni, Riccardo

    2015-03-01

    Image-guided ablation (IGA) techniques have evolved considerably over the past 20 years and are increasingly used to definitively treat small primary cancers of the liver and kidney. IGA is recommended by most guidelines as the best therapeutic choice for patients with early stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)-defined as either a single tumour smaller than 5 cm or up to three nodules smaller than 3 cm-when surgical options are precluded, and has potential as first-line therapy, in lieu of surgery, for patients with very early stage tumours smaller than 2 cm. With regard to renal cell carcinoma, despite the absence of any randomized trial comparing the outcomes of IGA with those of standard partial nephrectomy, a growing amount of data demonstrate robust oncological outcomes for this minimally invasive approach and testify to its potential as a standard-of-care treatment. Herein, we review the various ablation techniques, the supporting evidence, and clinical application of IGA in the treatment of primary liver and kidney cancers. PMID:25601446

  3. Dynamic imaging of brain function

    PubMed Central

    Hyder, Fahmeed

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there have been unprecedented methodological advances in the dynamic imaging of brain activities. Electrophysiological, optical, and magnetic resonance methods now allow mapping of functional activation (or deactivation) by measurement of neuronal activity (e.g., membrane potential, ion flux, neurotransmitter flux), energy metabolism (e.g., glucose consumption, oxygen consumption, creatine kinase flux), and functional hyperemia (e.g., blood oxygenation, blood flow, blood volume). Properties of the glutamatergic synapse are used as a model to reveal activities at the nerve terminal and their associated changes in energy demand and blood flow. This approach reveals that each method measures different tissue- and/or cell-specific components with specified spatiotemporal resolution. While advantages and disadvantages of different methods are apparent and often used to supersede one another in terms of specificity and/or sensitivity, no particular technique is the optimal dynamic brain imaging method because each method is unique in some respect. Because the demand for energy substrates is a fundamental requirement for function, energy-based methods may allow quantitative dynamic imaging in vivo. However there are exclusive neurobiological insights gained by combining some of these different dynamic imaging techniques. PMID:18839085

  4. Miniature forward-viewing common-path OCT probe for imaging the renal pelvis

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiaoyong; Patel, Dhruti; Zhu, Hui; MacLennan, Gregory; Wang, Yves T; Jenkins, Michael W; Rollins, Andrew M

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate an ultrathin flexible cone-scanning forward-viewing OCT probe which can fit through the working channel of a flexible ureteroscope for renal pelvis imaging. The probe is fabricated by splicing a 200 µm section of core-less fiber and a 150 µm section of gradient-index (GRIN) fiber to the end of a single mode (SM) fiber. The probe is designed for common-path OCT imaging where the back-reflection of the GRIN fiber/air interface is used as the reference signal. Optimum sensitivity was achieved with a 2 degree polished probe tip. A correlation algorithm was used to correct image distortion caused by non-uniform rotation of the probe. The probe is demonstrated by imaging human skin in vivo and porcine renal pelvis ex vivo and is suitable for imaging the renal pelvis in vivo for cancer staging. PMID:25909002

  5. Dynamic imaging with electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Geoffrey; McKeown, Joe; Santala, Melissa

    2014-02-20

    Livermore researchers have perfected an electron microscope to study fast-evolving material processes and chemical reactions. By applying engineering, microscopy, and laser expertise to the decades-old technology of electron microscopy, the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) team has developed a technique that can capture images of phenomena that are both very small and very fast. DTEM uses a precisely timed laser pulse to achieve a short but intense electron beam for imaging. When synchronized with a dynamic event in the microscope's field of view, DTEM allows scientists to record and measure material changes in action. A new movie-mode capability, which earned a 2013 R&D 100 Award from R&D Magazine, uses up to nine laser pulses to sequentially capture fast, irreversible, even one-of-a-kind material changes at the nanometer scale. DTEM projects are advancing basic and applied materials research, including such areas as nanostructure growth, phase transformations, and chemical reactions.

  6. Dynamic imaging with electron microscopy

    ScienceCinema

    Campbell, Geoffrey; McKeown, Joe; Santala, Melissa

    2014-05-30

    Livermore researchers have perfected an electron microscope to study fast-evolving material processes and chemical reactions. By applying engineering, microscopy, and laser expertise to the decades-old technology of electron microscopy, the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) team has developed a technique that can capture images of phenomena that are both very small and very fast. DTEM uses a precisely timed laser pulse to achieve a short but intense electron beam for imaging. When synchronized with a dynamic event in the microscope's field of view, DTEM allows scientists to record and measure material changes in action. A new movie-mode capability, which earned a 2013 R&D 100 Award from R&D Magazine, uses up to nine laser pulses to sequentially capture fast, irreversible, even one-of-a-kind material changes at the nanometer scale. DTEM projects are advancing basic and applied materials research, including such areas as nanostructure growth, phase transformations, and chemical reactions.

  7. Transient impairment of dynamic renal autoregulation in early diabetes mellitus in rats.

    PubMed

    Mitrou, Nicholas; Morrison, Sidney; Mousavi, Paymon; Braam, Branko; Cupples, William A

    2015-10-15

    Renal autoregulation is impaired in early (1 wk) diabetes mellitus (DM) induced by streptozotocin, but effective in established DM (4 wk). Furthermore nitric oxide synthesis (NOS) inhibition with N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) significantly improved autoregulation in early DM but not in established DM. We hypothesized that autoregulation is transiently impaired in early DM because of increased NO availability in the kidney. Because of the conflicting evidence available for a role of NO in DM, we tested the hypothesis that DM reduces autoregulation effectiveness by reducing the spatial similarity of autoregulation. Male Long-Evans rats were divided into control (CON) and diabetic (DM; streptozotocin) groups and followed for either 1 wk (CON1, n = 6; DM1, n = 5) or 4 wk (CON4, n = 7; DM4, n = 7). At the end of the experiment, dynamic autoregulation was assessed in isoflurane-anesthetized rats by whole kidney RBF during baseline, NOS1 inhibition, and nonselective NOS inhibition. Kidney surface perfusion, monitored with laser speckle contrast imaging, was used to assess spatial heterogeneity of autoregulation. Autoregulation was significantly impaired in DM1 rats and not impaired in DM4 rats. L-NAME caused strong renal vasoconstriction in all rats, but did not significantly affect autoregulation dynamics. Autoregulation was more spatially heterogeneous in DM1, but not DM4. Therefore, our results, which are consistent with transient impairment of autoregulation in DM, argue against the hypothesis that this impairment is NO-dependent, and suggest that spatial properties of autoregulation may also contribute to reduced autoregulatory effectiveness in DM1. PMID:26246507

  8. Estimation of Response Functions Based on Variational Bayes Algorithm in Dynamic Images Sequences

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We proposed a nonparametric Bayesian model based on variational Bayes algorithm to estimate the response functions in dynamic medical imaging. In dynamic renal scintigraphy, the impulse response or retention functions are rather complicated and finding a suitable parametric form is problematic. In this paper, we estimated the response functions using nonparametric Bayesian priors. These priors were designed to favor desirable properties of the functions, such as sparsity or smoothness. These assumptions were used within hierarchical priors of the variational Bayes algorithm. We performed our algorithm on the real online dataset of dynamic renal scintigraphy. The results demonstrated that this algorithm improved the estimation of response functions with nonparametric priors.

  9. Renal tubular receptor imaging with iodine-131-labeled peanut lectin: pharmacokinetics and renal clearance mechanism in animals

    SciTech Connect

    Boniface, G.R.; Suresh, M.R.; Willans, D.J.; Tam, Y.K.; Shysh, A.; Longenecker, B.M.; Noujaim, A.A.

    1986-05-01

    Intravenously administered peanut lectin (PNA), iodinated with /sup 131/I ((/sup 131/I)PNA), is rapidly cleared from the plasma by the kidneys in dogs (clearance (total body) = 17.52 +/- 8.74 ml/min). Dynamic gamma camera renal scintigraphy demonstrated renal accumulation and excretion phases of the (/sup 131/I)PNA renogram in dogs and rabbits (% injection dose-at-peak = 21.8 +/- 3.3% and 19.6 +/- 4.3%, time-to-peak = 44.6 +/- 4.8 min and 37.2 +/- 6.9 min, respectively). Immunoperoxidase staining of kidney sections, following i.v. administered PNA, demonstrated predominant accumulation by the proximal tubules of mice, rabbits, and dogs. The basement membrane was intensely stained at early times p.i. while intracellular and luminal PNA was evident within 1 hr. Urine analysis confirmed the presence of intact (/sup 131/I)PNA in the bladder contents, while protein degradation products, and a small percentage of the free iodide (less than 5%) were noted within 1 hr p.i. The relative proportion of free iodide increased at later times p.i. (greater than 6 hr). A receptor mediated excretion mechanism is proposed for the clearance of PNA and may be useful for the study of renal tubular function.

  10. Renal uptake of Tl-201 in hypertensive patients undergoing myocardial perfusion imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hurwitz, G.A.; Mattar, A.G.; Bhargava, R.; Driedger, A.A.; Hogendoorn, P.; Wesolowski, C.A. )

    1990-02-01

    The detection of renovascular disease (RVD) has particular relevance in hypertensive patients (HP) who have symptoms of target organ damage. To evaluate the possibility of RVD in HP undergoing myocardial perfusion scintigraphy for chest pain symptoms, posterior renal images were obtained at 1-3 hours after Tl-201 injection. Analog and computer images were obtained for 5 minutes in 45 HP; 12 patients with no history of hypertension or renal disease served as normal controls. For qualitative analysis, images were coded and read by three observers as to symmetry of renal uptake. Differential renal uptake of Tl-201 (DRU) was quantitated on computer images. In normal controls, uptake was agreed on as symmetric. In HP, 6 patients had marked asymmetry of DRU and 4 had possibly significant asymmetry; 2 had decreased uptake in both kidneys suggesting bilateral RVD or nephrosclerosis. Objective correlation with DRU was obtained in 10 HP who had contrast angiography, confirming 4 cases of unilateral RVD and 2 of bilateral RVD. Thirteen patients also had renography with Tc-99m DTPA; differential renal function by this modality correlated well with DRU of Tl-201 (r = 0.98). Thus, DRU of Tl-201 can be used as a supplement to myocardial scintigraphy to identify HP who require further evaluation and treatment of RVD.

  11. Renal aspergillosis after liver transplantation: Clinical and imaging manifestations in two cases

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xiao-Chun; Jiang, Ting; Yi, Shu-Hong; Xie, Pei-Yi; Guo, Yue-Fei; Quan, Li; Zhou, Jing; Zhu, Kang-Shun; Shan, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Renal aspergillosis (RAsp) is a rare complication in liver transplant (LT) recipients. Here we report RAsp in two LT recipients. In both patients, RAsp occurred more than 90 d after allogenetic orthotropic LT, and all the clinical findings were unspecific. RAsp involved unilateral kidney in Case one and bilateral kidneys in Case two. Both computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed renal abscesses, with progressively enhanced walls and separations and unenhanced alveolate areas after contrast agent administration. On unenhanced CT images they showed inhomogeneous hypo-attenuation. On fat-suppressed T2-weighted images (T2WIs), the walls and separations of the abscesses showed slightly low signal intensity and the central parts of the lesions showed slightly high signal intensity. Both on CT and MRI, there were some hints of renal infarction or chronic ischemia. Both cases were treated by radical nephrectomy followed by adjuvant antifungal treatment. They all recovered well. PMID:25561822

  12. Computer-Aided Detection of Exophytic Renal Lesions on Non-Contrast CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianfei; Wang, Shijun; Linguraru, Marius George; Yao, Jianhua; Summers, Ronald M.

    2014-01-01

    Renal lesions are important extracolonic findings on computed tomographic colonography (CTC). They are difficult to detect on non-contrast CTC images due to low image contrast with surrounding objects. In this paper, we developed a novel computer-aided diagnosis system to detect a subset of renal lesions, exophytic lesions, by 1) exploiting efficient belief propagation to segment kidneys, 2) establishing an intrinsic manifold diffusion on kidney surface, 3) searching for potential lesion-caused protrusions with local maximum diffusion response, and 4) exploring novel shape descriptors, including multi-scale diffusion response, with machine learning to classify exophytic renal lesions. Experimental results on the validation dataset with 167 patients revealed that manifold diffusion significantly outperformed conventional shape features (p < 1e − 3) and resulted in 95% sensitivity with 15 false positives per patient for detecting exophytic renal lesions. Five-fold cross-validation also demonstrated that our method could stably detect exophytic renal lesions. These encouraging results demonstrated that manifold diffusion is a key means to enable accurate computer-aided diagnosis of renal lesions. PMID:25189363

  13. Technetium-99m pyrophosphate imaging in acute renal failure associated with nontraumatic rhabdomyolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, R.; Mishkin, F.S.

    1986-10-01

    Technetium-99m pyrophosphate (Tc-PYP) imaging was performed in five patients with acute renal failure associated with nontraumatic rhabdomyolysis. Four patients had phencyclidine intoxication and one had viral pneumonia. During the acute phase, marked uptake of pyrophosphate was seen in all patients in several muscle groups, but always in the thigh adductors. The results show that phencyclidine intoxication can result in diffuse muscle uptake of Tc-PYP without overt evidence of muscle injury. Tc-PYP imaging may provide a clue to the cause of acute renal failure in patients with suspected rhabdomyolysis in whom elevations of serum creatine phosphokinase concentrations are equivocal.

  14. Image-guided percutaneous microwave ablation of small renal tumours: short- and mid-term outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Genson, Pierre-Yves; Mourey, Eric; Moulin, Morgan; Favelier, Sylvain; Di Marco, Lucy; Chevallier, Olivier; Cercueil, Jean-Pierre; Krausé, Denis; Cormier, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose is to assess the short- and mid-term outcomes of microwave ablation (MWA) of small renal tumours in selected patients. Methods From August 2012 to February 2015, 29 renal tumours in 23 patients (17 male, 6 female, mean age 75 years) were treated by percutaneous MWA under imaging guidance. The tumours were 1-4.7 cm in diameter (mean size, 2.7 cm). Therapeutic effects were assessed at follow-up with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). All patients were followed up for 2-25 months (mean, 12.2 months) to observe the therapeutic effects and complications. Changes in renal function at day 1 after treatment were statistically analyzed using the Student paired t-test or the paired Wilcoxon test. Results Technical success was achieved in all cases. One severe bleeding complication post-procedure occurred leading to death. No other unexpected side effects were observed after the MWA procedures. Clinical effectiveness was 100%. None of the patients showed recurrence on MRI imaging follow-up. No significant changes in renal function were noted after treatment (P=0.57). Conclusions Our preliminary study demonstrates that the use of MWA for the treatment of small renal tumours can be applied as safely and efficiently as other ablative techniques in selected patients not eligible for surgery. PMID:26682134

  15. The role of imaging in the diagnosis and management of renal stone disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Masselli, G; Weston, M; Spencer, J

    2015-12-01

    The distinction of pain in pregnancy due to urolithiasis from that related to physiological dilation of the renal tract is a common conundrum as renal colic is one of the commonest causes for non-obstetric pain in pregnancy. Ultrasound is the first-line imaging test but although it may demonstrate renal dilation, it may not show the cause. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is able to make the distinction. Physiological dilation will show smooth tapering of the ureter in the middle third as it is compressed between the gravid uterus and the retroperitoneum. Obstruction due to calculi causes renal enlargement and perinephric oedema. When a stone is lodged in the lower ureter, a standing column of dilated ureter will be seen below the physiological constriction. The stone itself may be shown. Computed tomography (CT) is an acceptable alternative if there is a contraindication to MRI, but even low-dose regimes involve some ionising radiation. This paper serves to highlight the role of MRI compared to US and CT in the imaging of renal colic in pregnancy. Multidisciplinary collaboration between obstetricians, urologists, and radiologists is required for effective management. PMID:26454345

  16. [Dynamic renal scintigraphy in assessing kidney function in patients with nonspecific colitis].

    PubMed

    Topchiĭ, T V; Moskalenko, N I; Man'kovskaia, O L; Morozova, N L

    1990-11-01

    Research into the morphofunctional status of the kidneys was conducted in patients with nonspecific colitis-NC (nonspecific ulcerative colitis-NUC and Crohn's disease). Urodynamics and partial function of the kidneys were assessed in 74 NC patients (51 NUC patients and 23 patients with Crohn's disease) on the basis of the findings of two-nuclide dynamic renal scintigraphy with 131I-hippuran and 99mTc-pentatech. Despite the absence of clinical symptomatology of urinary tract lesions, marked dysfunction of the kidneys of various degree (depending on severity of disease, tactics of its treatment and a type of surgical intervention) was noted in NC patients. In most cases changes of renal function were without visible clinical manifestations and were frequently undetectable by routine laboratory tests. Therefore dynamic renal scintigraphy was found necessary for investigation on NC patients. PMID:2259285

  17. Diagnostic effects of edge sharpening filtration and magnification on digitally subtracted renal images.

    PubMed

    Kimme-Smith, C; Gomes, A S; Cochran, S T; Barbaric, Z L; Lois, J F

    1986-01-01

    The improved appearance of digital radiographs filtered to improve local contrast and sharpen edges has not increased acceptance of these images by radiologists. Furthermore, many radiologists assert that correct diagnosis is not improved with these filtered images. This study was designed to test this assertion for digital subtraction angiograms (DSA) of renal images. Four experiments are described. First, phantom studies identified filters and their parameters thought likely to be acceptable and useful in diagnosing renal images formed by DSA. Second, these filters and parameters were then tested on medical images to assess their acceptance by radiologists. Third, display modes of windowing, positive/negative presentation, and magnification were varied for filtered and unfiltered images to assess preferences of radiologists. Fourth, filtered and unfiltered magnified images were used to test improved diagnosis. In the final experiment, 148 images from 33 renal studies (15 normal, 18 abnormal) were magnified, gray level windowed, and filtered. Diagnosis was not improved by the two edge sharpening filters tested. PMID:3540567

  18. MDCT imaging following nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma: Protocol optimization and patterns of tumor recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Coquia, Stephanie F; Johnson, Pamela T; Ahmed, Sameer; Fishman, Elliot K

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this pictorial essay is to review the common and uncommon sites of renal cell carcinoma recurrence throughout the body by examining their appearances on computerized tomography (CT). CT imaging protocols will be discussed. The sites of recurrence have been categorized into 4 groups: chest and mediastinum, abdomen and pelvis, musculoskeletal, and neurological. For each site of recurrence, a representative CT image correlate with discussion is provided. The unique CT appearance of renal cell carcinoma recurrence and how it can be used in lesion detection will be discussed. Renal cell carcinoma recurrences are hypervascular like the primary tumor, which can aid in not only lesion detection but also in some cases, differentiation from other primary tumors. Through CT case review of various sites of recurrence, lesions are shown to be easily seen on arterial phase while sometimes being nearly inconspicuous on venous or delayed phases. Coronal and sagittal reconstructions can also improve diagnostic sensitivity. CT is the most commonly used imaging tool for surveillance of renal cell carcinoma recurrence after nephrectomy. Knowledge of sites of recurrence as well as the utility of arterial phase imaging and multiplanar reconstructions will aid in optimizing detection of disease recurrence. PMID:24349648

  19. Renal venogram

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2008:chap 6. Rankin S. Renal parenchymal disease, including renal failure, renovascular disease and transportation. In: Grainger RC, Allison D, Adam, Dixon AK, eds. Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 5th ed. New York, NY: Churchill Livingstone; 2008:chap 39. Read ... arteriography Renal vein thrombosis Tumor Venogram Wilms ...

  20. Segmentation of Individual Renal Cysts from MR Images in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Kyungsoo; Park, Bumwoo; Sun, Hongliang; Wang, Jinhong; Tao, Cheng; Chapman, Arlene B.; Torres, Vicente E.; Grantham, Jared J.; Mrug, Michal; Bennett, William M.; Flessner, Michael F.; Landsittel, Doug P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Objective To evaluate the performance of a semi-automated method for the segmentation of individual renal cysts from magnetic resonance (MR) images in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Design, setting, participants, & measurements This semi-automated method was based on a morphologic watershed technique with shape-detection level set for segmentation of renal cysts from MR images. T2-weighted MR image sets of 40 kidneys were selected from 20 patients with mild to moderate renal cyst burden (kidney volume < 1500 ml) in the Consortium for Radiologic Imaging Studies of Polycystic Kidney Disease (CRISP). The performance of the semi-automated method was assessed in terms of two reference metrics in each kidney: the total number of cysts measured by manual counting and the total volume of cysts measured with a region-based thresholding method. The proposed and reference measurements were compared using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman analysis. Results Individual renal cysts were successfully segmented with the semi-automated method in all 20 cases. The total number of cysts in each kidney measured with the two methods correlated well (ICC, 0.99), with a very small relative bias (0.3% increase with the semi-automated method; limits of agreement, 15.2% reduction to 17.2% increase). The total volume of cysts measured using both methods also correlated well (ICC, 1.00), with a small relative bias of <10% (9.0% decrease in the semi-automated method; limits of agreement, 17.1% increase to 43.3% decrease). Conclusion This semi-automated method to segment individual renal cysts in ADPKD kidneys provides a quantitative indicator of severity in early and moderate stages of the disease. PMID:23520042

  1. Semantic interpretation of robust imaging features for Fuhrman grading of renal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Champion, Andrew; Lu, Guolan; Walker, Marcus; Kothari, Sonal; Osunkoya, Adeboye O.; Wang, May D.

    2016-01-01

    Pattern recognition in tissue biopsy images can assist in clinical diagnosis and identify relevant image characteristics linked with various biological characteristics. Although previous work suggests several informative imaging features for pattern recognition, there exists a semantic gap between characteristics of these features and pathologists’ interpretation of histopathological images. To address this challenge, we develop a clinical decision support system for automated Fuhrman grading of renal carcinoma biopsy images. We extract 1316 color, shape, texture and topology features and develop one vs. all models for four Fuhrman grades. Our models are highly accurate with 90.4% accuracy in a four-class prediction. Predictivity analysis suggests good generalization of the model development methodology through robustness to dataset sampling in cross-validation. We provide a semantic interpretation for the imaging features used in these models by linking features to pathologists’ grading criteria. Our study identifies novel imaging features that are semantically linked to Fuhrman grading criteria. PMID:25571472

  2. Shadow Attenuation With High Dynamic Range Images

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shadow often interferes with accurate image analysis. To mitigate shadow effects in near-earth imagery (2 m above ground level), we created high dynamic range (HDR) nadir images and used them to measure grassland ground cover. HDR composites were created by merging three differentially-exposed image...

  3. Live-Animal Imaging of Renal Function by Multiphoton Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Kenneth W.; Sutton, Timothy A.; Sandoval, Ruben M.

    2015-01-01

    Intravital microscopy, microscopy of living animals, is a powerful research technique that combines the resolution and sensitivity found in microscopic studies of cultured cells with the relevance and systemic influences of cells in the context of the intact animal. The power of intravital microscopy has recently been extended with the development of multiphoton fluorescence microscopy systems capable of collecting optical sections from deep within the kidney at subcellular resolution, supporting high-resolution characterizations of the structure and function of glomeruli, tubules, and vasculature in the living kidney. Fluorescent probes are administered to an anesthetized, surgically prepared animal, followed by image acquisition for up to 3 hr. Images are transferred via a high-speed network to specialized computer systems for digital image analysis. This general approach can be used with different combinations of fluorescent probes to evaluate processes such as glomerular permeability, proximal tubule endocytosis, microvascular flow, vascular permeability, mitochondrial function, and cellular apoptosis/necrosis. PMID:23042524

  4. Groupwise Image Registration Guided by a Dynamic Digraph of Images.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhenyu; Fan, Yong

    2016-04-01

    For groupwise image registration, graph theoretic methods have been adopted for discovering the manifold of images to be registered so that accurate registration of images to a group center image can be achieved by aligning similar images that are linked by the shortest graph paths. However, the image similarity measures adopted to build a graph of images in the extant methods are essentially pairwise measures, not effective for capturing the groupwise similarity among multiple images. To overcome this problem, we present a groupwise image similarity measure that is built on sparse coding for characterizing image similarity among all input images and build a directed graph (digraph) of images so that similar images are connected by the shortest paths of the digraph. Following the shortest paths determined according to the digraph, images are registered to a group center image in an iterative manner by decomposing a large anatomical deformation field required to register an image to the group center image into a series of small ones between similar images. During the iterative image registration, the digraph of images evolves dynamically at each iteration step to pursue an accurate estimation of the image manifold. Moreover, an adaptive dictionary strategy is adopted in the groupwise image similarity measure to ensure fast convergence of the iterative registration procedure. The proposed method has been validated based on both simulated and real brain images, and experiment results have demonstrated that our method was more effective for learning the manifold of input images and achieved higher registration accuracy than state-of-the-art groupwise image registration methods. PMID:26585712

  5. Comparative imaging study in ultrasound, MRI, CT, and DSA using a multimodality renal artery phantom

    SciTech Connect

    King, Deirdre M.; Fagan, Andrew J.; Moran, Carmel M.; Browne, Jacinta E.

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: A range of anatomically realistic multimodality renal artery phantoms consisting of vessels with varying degrees of stenosis was developed and evaluated using four imaging techniques currently used to detect renal artery stenosis (RAS). The spatial resolution required to visualize vascular geometry and the velocity detection performance required to adequately characterize blood flow in patients suffering from RAS are currently ill-defined, with the result that no one imaging modality has emerged as a gold standard technique for screening for this disease. Methods: The phantoms, which contained a range of stenosis values (0%, 30%, 50%, 70%, and 85%), were designed for use with ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, x-ray computed tomography, and x-ray digital subtraction angiography. The construction materials used were optimized with respect to their ultrasonic speed of sound and attenuation coefficient, MR relaxometry (T{sub 1},T{sub 2}) properties, and Hounsfield number/x-ray attenuation coefficient, with a design capable of tolerating high-pressure pulsatile flow. Fiducial targets, incorporated into the phantoms to allow for registration of images among modalities, were chosen to minimize geometric distortions. Results: High quality distortion-free images of the phantoms with good contrast between vessel lumen, fiducial markers, and background tissue to visualize all stenoses were obtained with each modality. Quantitative assessments of the grade of stenosis revealed significant discrepancies between modalities, with each underestimating the stenosis severity for the higher-stenosed phantoms (70% and 85%) by up to 14%, with the greatest discrepancy attributable to DSA. Conclusions: The design and construction of a range of anatomically realistic renal artery phantoms containing varying degrees of stenosis is described. Images obtained using the main four diagnostic techniques used to detect RAS were free from artifacts and exhibited adequate contrast

  6. Correlating Preoperative Imaging with Histologic Subtypes of Renal Cell Carcinoma and Common Mimickers.

    PubMed

    Gordetsky, Jennifer; Zarzour, Jessica

    2016-07-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) consists of distinct subtypes that have unique pathologic and imaging features as well as specific cytogenetic and molecular characteristics. As the prognosis and therapeutic strategies may differ for each subtype, correlation of the preoperative imaging with the pathologic findings is of great clinical relevance. In addition, differentiation of RCC from benign entities is ideal in order to prevent overtreatment. However, a noninvasive diagnosis with imaging alone is not always straightforward due to the overlapping appearance of RCC with benign lesions such as fat-poor angiomyolipoma and oncocytoma. With new imaging modalities, there have been significant improvements in correlating preoperative imaging with pathologic characteristics. These new discoveries are able to aid in a more specific, noninvasive, diagnosis that in turn helps direct patient management. PMID:27154238

  7. Analysis of the Sensitivity and Specificity of Noninvasive Imaging Tests for the Diagnosis of Renal Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Borelli, Flavio Antonio de Oliveira; Pinto, Ibraim M. F.; Amodeo, Celso; Smanio, Paola E. P.; Kambara, Antonio M.; Petisco, Ana Claudia G.; Moreira, Samuel M.; Paiva, Ricardo Calil; Lopes, Hugo Belotti; Sousa, Amanda G. M. R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Aging and atherosclerosis are related to renovascular hypertension in elderly individuals. Regardless of comorbidities, renal artery stenosis is itself an important cause of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Objective To define the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of noninvasive imaging tests used in the diagnosis of renal artery stenosis. Methods In a group of 61 patients recruited, 122 arteries were analized, thus permitting the definition of sensitivity, specificity, and the relative contribution of each imaging study performed (Doppler, scintigraphy and computed tomographic angiography in comparison to renal arteriography). Results The mean age was 65.43 years (standard deviation: 8.7). Of the variables related to the study population that were compared to arteriography, two correlated with renal artery stenosis, renal dysfunction and triglycerides. The median glomerular filtration rate was 52.8 mL/min/m2. Doppler showed sensitivity of 82.90%, specificity of 70%, a positive predictive value of 85% and negative predictive value of 66.70%. For tomography, sensitivity was 66.70%, specificity 80%, positive predictive value 87.50% and negative predictive value 55.20%. With these findings, we could identify the imaging tests that best detected stenosis. Conclusion Tomography and Doppler showed good quality and efficacy in the diagnosis of renal artery stenosis, with Doppler having the advantage of not requiring the use of contrast medium for the assessment of a disease that is common in diabetics and is associated with renal dysfunction and severe left ventricular dysfunction. PMID:24061685

  8. Tip cells act as dynamic cellular anchors in the morphogenesis of looped renal tubules in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Weavers, Helen; Skaer, Helen

    2013-11-11

    Tissue morphogenesis involves both the sculpting of tissue shape and the positioning of tissues relative to one another in the body. Using the renal tubules of Drosophila, we show that a specific distal tubule cell regulates both tissue architecture and position in the body cavity. Focusing on the anterior tubules, we demonstrate that tip cells make transient contacts with alary muscles at abdominal segment boundaries, moving progressively forward as convergent extension movements lengthen the tubule. Tip cell anchorage antagonizes forward-directed, TGF-β-guided tubule elongation, thereby ensuring the looped morphology characteristic of renal tubules from worms to humans. Distinctive tip cell exploratory behavior, adhesion, and basement membrane clearing underlie target recognition and dynamic interactions. Defects in these features obliterate tip cell anchorage, producing misshapen and misplaced tubules with impaired physiological function. PMID:24229645

  9. Automated 3D renal segmentation based on image partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeghiazaryan, Varduhi; Voiculescu, Irina D.

    2016-03-01

    Despite several decades of research into segmentation techniques, automated medical image segmentation is barely usable in a clinical context, and still at vast user time expense. This paper illustrates unsupervised organ segmentation through the use of a novel automated labelling approximation algorithm followed by a hypersurface front propagation method. The approximation stage relies on a pre-computed image partition forest obtained directly from CT scan data. We have implemented all procedures to operate directly on 3D volumes, rather than slice-by-slice, because our algorithms are dimensionality-independent. The results picture segmentations which identify kidneys, but can easily be extrapolated to other body parts. Quantitative analysis of our automated segmentation compared against hand-segmented gold standards indicates an average Dice similarity coefficient of 90%. Results were obtained over volumes of CT data with 9 kidneys, computing both volume-based similarity measures (such as the Dice and Jaccard coefficients, true positive volume fraction) and size-based measures (such as the relative volume difference). The analysis considered both healthy and diseased kidneys, although extreme pathological cases were excluded from the overall count. Such cases are difficult to segment both manually and automatically due to the large amplitude of Hounsfield unit distribution in the scan, and the wide spread of the tumorous tissue inside the abdomen. In the case of kidneys that have maintained their shape, the similarity range lies around the values obtained for inter-operator variability. Whilst the procedure is fully automated, our tools also provide a light level of manual editing.

  10. In vivo imaging of cellular proliferation in renal cell carcinoma using 18F-fluorothymidine PET

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Peter K.; Lee, Sze Ting; Murone, Carmel; Eng, John; Lawrentschuk, Nathan; Berlangieri, Salvatore U.; Pathmaraj, Kunthi; O’Keefe, Graeme J.; Sachinidis, John; Byrne, Amanda J.; Bolton, Damien M.; Davis, Ian D.; Scott, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): The ability to measure cellular proliferation non-invasively in renal cell carcinoma may allow prediction of tumour aggressiveness and response to therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the uptake of 18F-fluorothymidine (FLT) PET in renal cell carcinoma (RCC), and to compare this to 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), and to an immunohistochemical measure of cellular proliferation (Ki-67). Methods: Twenty seven patients (16 male, 11 females; age 42-77) with newly diagnosed renal cell carcinoma suitable for resection were prospectively enrolled. All patients had preoperative FLT and FDG PET scans. Visual identification of tumour using FLT PET compared to normal kidney was facilitated by the use of a pre-operative contrast enhanced CT scan. After surgery tumour was taken for histologic analysis and immunohistochemical staining by Ki-67. Results: The SUVmax (maximum standardized uptake value) mean±SD for FLT in tumour was 2.59±1.27, compared to normal kidney (2.47±0.34). The mean SUVmax for FDG in tumour was similar to FLT (2.60±1.08). There was a significant correlation between FLT uptake and the immunohistochemical marker Ki-67 (r=0.72, P<0.0001) in RCC. Ki-67 proliferative index was mean ± SD of 13.3%±9.2 (range 2.2% - 36.3%). Conclusion: There is detectable uptake of FLT in primary renal cell carcinoma, which correlates with cellular proliferation as assessed by Ki-67 labelling index. This finding has relevance to the use of FLT PET in molecular imaging studies of renal cell carcinoma biology.

  11. Virtual center for renal support: technological approach to patient physiological image.

    PubMed

    Prado, Manuel; Roa, Laura; Reina-Tosina, Javier; Palma, Alfonso; Milán, José Antonio

    2002-12-01

    The patient physiological image (PPI) is a novel concept which manages the knowledge of the virtual center for renal support (VCRS), currently being developed by the Biomedical Engineering Group of the University of Seville. PPI is a virtual "replica" of the patient, built by means of a mathematical model, which represents several physiological subsystems of a renal patient. From a technical point of view, PPI is a component-oriented software module based on cutting-edge modeling and simulation technology. This paper provides a methodological and technological approach to the PPI. Computational architecture of PPI-based VCRS is also described. This is a multi-tier and multi-protocol system. Data are managed by several ORDBMS instances. Communications design is based on the virtual private network (VPN) concept. Renal patients have a minimum reliable access to the VCRS through a public switch telephone network--X.25 gateway. Design complies with the universal access requirement, allowing an efficient and inexpensive connection even in rural environments and reducing computational requirements in the patient's remote access unit. VCRS provides support for renal patients' healthcare, increasing the quality and quantity of monitored biomedical signals, predicting events as hypotension or low dialysis dose, assisting further to avoid them by an online therapy modification and easing diagnostic tasks. An online therapy adjustment experiment simulation is presented. Finally, the presented system serves as a computational aid for research in renal physiology. This is achieved by an open and reusable modeling and simulation architecture which allows the interaction among models and data from different scales and computer platforms, and a faster transference of investigation models toward clinical applications. PMID:12542237

  12. Detection of Superior Vena Cava Obstruction on Dynamic 99mTc-DTPA Renal Transplant Scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Pirayesh, Elahe; Hashemifard, Hamidreza; Assadi, Majid

    2016-02-01

    We present an asymptomatic patient with a history of prolonged hemodialysis through a right internal jugular vein catheter who was diagnosed with superior vena cava (SVC) obstruction on 99mTechnetium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid renal transplant scintigraphy. During the angiographic phase, an unusual vascular filling pattern was detected on the anterior view of the abdomen. Angioscintigraphic imaging of the chest wall was suggestive of SVC obstruction. The SVC obstruction in our patient was related to the long-term use of an indwelling catheter in the central venous system, which is a well-known complication of such a procedure. There is also evidence of a hypercoagulable state in dialyzed uremic cases; therefore, our patient may have been more susceptible to an SVC thrombosis. Acquired compensatory dilatation of the azygos vein is rather a rare finding. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing an asymptomatic patient with SVC obstruction who was diagnosed by renal scintigraphy. PMID:27299287

  13. Imaging of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome: a potential bioterrorism agent of military significance.

    PubMed

    Bui-Mansfield, Liem T; Cressler, Dana K

    2011-11-01

    Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) is a potentially fatal infectious disease with worldwide distribution. Its etiologic agents are viruses of the genus Hantavirus of the virus family Bunyaviridae. Hypothetical ease of production and distribution of these agents, with their propensity to incapacitate victims and overwhelm health care resources, lend themselves as significant potential biological agents of terrorism. HFRS has protean clinical manifestations, which may mimic upper respiratory tract infection, nephrolithiasis, and Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome and may delay proper treatment. Sequelae of HFRS, such as hemorrhage, acute renal failure, retroperitoneal edema, pancreatitis, pulmonary edema, and neurologic symptoms, can be detected by different imaging modalities. Medical providers caring for HFRS patients must be aware of its radiologic features, which may help to confirm its clinical diagnosis. In this article, the authors review the epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and complications of HFRS. PMID:22165665

  14. Optical imaging with dynamic contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qingshan; Wei, Alexander

    2011-01-24

    Biological imaging applications often employ molecular probes or nanoparticles for enhanced contrast. However, resolution and detection are still often limited by the intrinsic heterogeneity of the sample, which can produce high levels of background that obscure the signals of interest. Herein, we describe approaches to overcome this obstacle based on the concept of dynamic contrast: a strategy for elucidating signals by the suppression or removal of background noise. Dynamic contrast mechanisms can greatly reduce the loading requirement of contrast agents, and may be especially useful for single-probe imaging. Dynamic contrast modalities are also platform-independent, and can enhance the performance of sophisticated biomedical imaging systems or simple optical microscopes alike. Dynamic contrast is performed in two stages: 1) a signal modulation scheme to introduce time-dependent changes in amplitude or phase, and 2) a demodulation step for signal recovery. Optical signals can be coupled with magnetic nanoparticles, photoswitchable probes, or plasmon-resonant nanostructures for modulation by magnetomotive, photonic, or photothermal mechanisms, respectively. With respect to image demodulation, many of the strategies developed for signal processing in electronics and communication technologies can also be applied toward the editing of digital images. The image-processing step can be as simple as differential imaging, or may involve multiple reference points for deconvolution by using cross-correlation algorithms. Periodic signals are particularly amenable to image demodulation strategies based on Fourier transform; the contrast of the demodulated signal increases with acquisition time, and modulation frequencies in the kHz range are possible. Dynamic contrast is an emerging topic with considerable room for development, both with respect to molecular or nanoscale probes for signal modulation, and also to methods for more efficient image processing and editing. PMID

  15. Robust detection of renal calculi from non-contract CT images using TV-flow and MSER features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianfei; Wang, Shijun; Linguraru, Marius George; Summers, Ronald M.

    2013-03-01

    Renal calculi are one of the most painful urologic disorders causing 3 million treatments per year in the United States. The objective of this paper is the automated detection of renal calculi from CT colonography (CTC) images on which they are one of the major extracolonic findings. However, the primary purpose of the CTC protocols is not for the detection of renal calculi, but for screening of colon cancer. The kidneys are imaged with significant amounts of noise in the non-contrast CTC images, which makes the detection of renal calculi extremely challenging. We propose a computer-aided diagnosis method to detect renal calculi in CTC images. It is built on three novel techniques: 1) total variation (TV) flow to reduce image noise while keeping calculi, 2) maximally stable extremal region (MSER) features to find calculus candidates, 3) salient feature descriptors based on intensity properties to train a support vector machine classifier and filter false positives. We selected 23 CTC cases with 36 renal calculi to analyze the detection algorithm. The calculus size ranged from 1.0mm to 6.8mm. Fifteen cases were selected as the training dataset, and the remaining eight cases were used for the testing dataset. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) values were 0.92 in the training datasets and 0.93 in the testing datasets. The testing dataset confidence interval for AUC reported by ROCKIT was [0.8799, 0.9591] and the training dataset was [0.8974, 0.9642]. These encouraging results demonstrated that our detection algorithm can robustly and accurately identify renal calculi from CTC images.

  16. Sequential cytokine dynamics in chronic rejection of rat renal allografts: roles for cytokines RANTES and MCP-1.

    PubMed Central

    Nadeau, K C; Azuma, H; Tilney, N L

    1995-01-01

    Chronic rejection, the most important cause of long-term graft failure, is thought to result from both alloantigen-dependent and -independent factors. To examine these influences, cytokine dynamics were assessed by semiquantitative competitive reverse transcriptase-PCR and by immunohistology in an established rat model of chronic rejection lf renal allografts. Isograft controls develop morphologic and immunohistologic changes that are similar to renal allograft changes, although quantitatively less intense and at a delayed speed; these are thought to occur secondary to antigen-independent events. Sequential cytokine expression was determined throughout the process. During an early reversible allograft rejection episode, both T-cell associated [interleukin (IL) 2, IL-2 receptor, IL-4, and interferon gamma] and macrophage (IL-1 alpha, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and IL-6) products were up-regulated despite transient immunosuppression. RANTES (regulated upon activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted) peaked at 2 weeks; intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1) was maximally expressed at 6 weeks. Macrophage products such as monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1) increased dramatically (to 10 times), presaging intense peak macrophage infiltration at 16 weeks. In contrast, in isografts, ICAM-1 peaked at 24 weeks. MCP-1 was maximally expressed at 52 weeks, commensurate with a progressive increase in infiltrating macrophages. Cytokine expression in the spleen of allograft and isograft recipients was insignificant. We conclude that chronic rejection of kidney allografts in rats is predominantly a local macrophage-dependent event with intense up-regulation of macrophage products such as MCP-1, IL-6, and inducible nitric oxide synthase. The cytokine expression in isografts emphasizes the contribution of antigen-independent events. The dynamics of RANTES expression between early and late phases of chronic rejection suggest a key role in mediating the events of the

  17. Dynamic contrast-enhanced quantitative susceptibility mapping with ultrashort echo time MRI for evaluating renal function.

    PubMed

    Xie, Luke; Layton, Anita T; Wang, Nian; Larson, Peder E Z; Zhang, Jeff L; Lee, Vivian S; Liu, Chunlei; Johnson, G Allan

    2016-01-15

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI can provide key insight into renal function. DCE MRI is typically achieved through an injection of a gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agent, which has desirable T1 quenching and tracer kinetics. However, significant T2* blooming effects and signal voids can arise when Gd becomes very concentrated, especially in the renal medulla and pelvis. One MRI sequence designed to alleviate T2* effects is the ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequence. In the present study, we observed T2* blooming in the inner medulla of the mouse kidney, despite using UTE at an echo time of 20 microseconds and a low dose of 0.03 mmol/kg Gd. We applied quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) and resolved the signal void into a positive susceptibility signal. The susceptibility values [in parts per million (ppm)] were converted into molar concentrations of Gd using a calibration curve. We determined the concentrating mechanism (referred to as the concentrating index) as a ratio of maximum Gd concentration in the inner medulla to the renal artery. The concentrating index was assessed longitudinally over a 17-wk course (3, 5, 7, 9, 13, 17 wk of age). We conclude that the UTE-based DCE method is limited in resolving extreme T2* content caused by the kidney's strong concentrating mechanism. QSM was able to resolve and confirm the source of the blooming effect to be the large positive susceptibility of concentrated Gd. UTE with QSM can complement traditional magnitude UTE and offer a powerful tool to study renal pathophysiology. PMID:26447222

  18. Management of Renal Tumors by Image-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation: Experience in 105 Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Breen, David J. Rutherford, Elizabeth E.; Stedman, Brian; Roy-Choudhury, Shuvro H.; Cast, James E. I.; Hayes, Matthew C.; Smart, Christopher J.

    2007-09-15

    Aims. In this article we present our experience with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in the treatment of 105 renal tumors. Materials and Methods. RFA was performed on 105 renal tumors in 97 patients, with a mean tumor size of 32 mm (11-68 mm). The mean patient age was 71.7 years (range, 36-89 years). The ablations were carried out under ultrasound (n = 43) or CT (n = 62) guidance. Imaging follow-up was by contrast-enhanced CT within 10 days and then at 6-monthly intervals. Multivariate analysis was performed to determine variables associated with procedural outcome. Results. Eighty-three tumors were completely treated at a single sitting (79%). Twelve of the remaining tumors were successfully re-treated and a clinical decision was made not to re-treat seven patients. A patient with a small residual crescent of tumor is under follow-up and may require further treatment. In another patient, re-treatment was abandoned due to complicating pneumothorax and difficult access. One patient is awaiting further re-treatment. The overall technical success rate was 90.5%. Multivariate analysis revealed tumor size to be the only significant variable affecting procedural outcome. (p = 0.007, Pearson {chi}{sup 2}) Five patients had complications. There have been no local recurrences. Conclusion. Our experience to date suggests that RFA is a safe and effective, minimally invasive treatment for small renal tumors.

  19. Imaging Renal Urea Handling in Rats at Millimeter Resolution using Hyperpolarized Magnetic Resonance Relaxometry

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Galen D.; von Morze, Cornelius; Verkman, Alan S.; Koelsch, Bertram L.; Chaumeil, Myriam M.; Lustig, Michael; Ronen, Sabrina M.; Bok, Robert A.; Sands, Jeff M.; Larson, Peder E. Z.; Wang, Zhen J.; Larsen, Jan Henrik Ardenkjær; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2016-01-01

    In vivo spin spin relaxation time (T2) heterogeneity of hyperpolarized [13C,15N2]urea in the rat kidney was investigated. Selective quenching of the vascular hyperpolarized 13C signal with a macromolecular relaxation agent revealed that a long-T2 component of the [13C,15N2]urea signal originated from the renal extravascular space, thus allowing the vascular and renal filtrate contrast agent pools of the [13C,15N2]urea to be distinguished via multi-exponential analysis. The T2 response to induced diuresis and antidiuresis was performed with two imaging agents: hyperpolarized [13C,15N2]urea and a control agent hyperpolarized bis-1,1-(hydroxymethyl)-1-13C-cyclopropane-2H8. Large T2 increases in the inner-medullar and papilla were observed with the former agent and not the latter during antidiuresis. Therefore, [13C,15N2]urea relaxometry is sensitive to two steps of the renal urea handling process: glomerular filtration and the inner-medullary urea transporter (UT)-A1 and UT-A3 mediated urea concentrating process. Simple motion correction and subspace denoising algorithms are presented to aid in the multi exponential data analysis. Furthermore, a T2-edited, ultra long echo time sequence was developed for sub-2 mm3 resolution 3D encoding of urea by exploiting relaxation differences in the vascular and filtrate pools. PMID:27570835

  20. Automated assessment of renal cortical surface roughness from computerized tomography images and its association with age

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xinhui; Rule, Andrew D.; Elsherbiny, Hisham E.; Vrtiska, Terri J.; Avula, Ramesh T.; Alexander, Mariam P.; Lerman, Lilach O.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Nephrosclerosis occurs with aging and is characterized by increased kidney sub-capsular surface irregularities at autopsy. Assessments of cortical roughness in-vivo could provide an important measure of nephrosclerosis. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate an image-processing algorithm for quantifying renal cortical surface roughness in-vivo and determine its association with age. Materials and methods Renal cortical surface roughness was measured on contrast-enhanced abdominal CT images of potential living kidney donors. A roughness index was calculated based on geometric curvature of each kidney from 3D images, and compared with visual observation scores. Cortical roughness was compared between the oldest and youngest donors, and its interaction with cortical volume and age assessed. Results The developed quantitative roughness index identified significant differences in kidneys with visual surface roughness scores of 0 (minimal), 1 (mild), and 2 (moderate) (p<0.001) in a random sample of 200 potential kidney donors. Cortical roughness was significantly higher in the 94 oldest (64–75y) versus 91 youngest (18–25y) potential kidney donors (p<0.001). Lower cortical volume was associated with older age but not with roughness (r=−0.03, p=0.75). The association of oldest age group with roughness (OR=1.8 per SD of roughness index) remained significant after adjustment for total cortex volume (OR=2.0 per SD of roughness index). Conclusion A new algorithm to measure renal cortical surface roughness from CT scans detected rougher surface in older compared to younger kidneys, independent of cortical volume loss. This novel index may allow quantitative evaluation of nephrosclerosis in vivo using contrast-enhanced CT. PMID:25086950

  1. Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis Risk After Liver Magnetic Resonance Imaging With Gadoxetate Disodium in Patients With Moderate to Severe Renal Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Lauenstein, Thomas; Ramirez-Garrido, Francisco; Kim, Young Hoon; Rha, Sung Eun; Ricke, Jens; Phongkitkarun, Sith; Boettcher, Joachim; Gupta, Rajan T.; Korpraphong, Pornpim; Tanomkiat, Wiwatana; Furtner, Julia; Liu, Peter S.; Henry, Maren; Endrikat, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to assess the risk of gadoxetate disodium in liver imaging for the development of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) in patients with moderate to severe renal impairment. Materials and Methods We performed a prospective, multicenter, nonrandomized, open-label phase 4 study in 35 centers from May 2009 to July 2013. The study population consisted of patients with moderate to severe renal impairment scheduled for liver imaging with gadoxetate disodium. All patients received a single intravenous bolus injection of 0.025-mmol/kg body weight of liver-specific gadoxetate disodium. The primary target variable was the number of patients who develop NSF within a 2-year follow-up period. Results A total of 357 patients were included, with 85 patients with severe and 193 patients with moderate renal impairment, which were the clinically most relevant groups. The mean time period from diagnosis of renal disease to liver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was 1.53 and 5.46 years in the moderate and severe renal impairment cohort, respectively. Overall, 101 patients (28%) underwent additional contrast-enhanced MRI with other gadolinium-based MRI contrast agents within 12 months before the start of the study or in the follow-up. No patient developed symptoms conclusive of NSF within the 2-year follow-up. Conclusions Gadoxetate disodium in patients with moderate to severe renal impairment did not raise any clinically significant safety concern. No NSF cases were observed. PMID:25756684

  2. Assessment of renal oxygenation during partial nephrectomy using DLP hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, Sara L.; Thapa, Abhas; Holzer, Michael S.; Jackson, Neil; Mir, Saad A.; Donnally, Chester J.; Wehner, Eleanor; Raj, Ganesh V.; Livingston, Edward; Cadeddu, Jeffrey A.; Zuzak, Karel J.

    2011-03-01

    Digital Light Processing (DLP®) hyperspectral imaging (HsI) is a non-invasive method used to construct a highly sensitive, real-time tissue oxygenation map through the measurement of the percentage of oxyhemoglobin. We have demonstrated that this technology can detect the oxyhemoglobin in the blood vessels on the surface of the kidney and we have used this to monitor renal perfusion during kidney cancer operations, where the blood supply to the kidney is interrupted for a period of time. This technology may allow us to "personalize" surgery based on the oxygenation profile.

  3. The Role of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Quantification in Differentiating Benign and Malignant Renal Masses by 3 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Göya, Cemil; Hamidi, Cihad; Bozkurt, Yaşar; Yavuz, Alpaslan; Kuday, Suzan; Gümüş, Hatice; Türkçü, Gül; Hattapoğlu, Salih; Bilici, Aslan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) is a widely-accepted diagnostic modality whose efficacy has been investigated by numerous past studies in the differentiation of malignant lesions from benign entities. Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the characterization of renal lesions. Study Design: Diagnostic accuracy study. Methods: A total of 137 patients with renal lesions were included in this study. The median apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values as well as the b 800 and b 1600 signal intensities of normal kidneys, solid components of mixed renal masses, and total cystic lesions were evaluated. Results: There were significant differences between the ADC values of lesions and normal renal parenchyma, and between the ADC values of benign and malignant renal lesions on DWIs at b values of 800 and 1600 s/mm2 (p<0.001 and p<0.001, respectively). There were significant differences between the ADC values of Bosniak Category 1 and 2 cysts and the ADC values of Bosniak Category 1 and 3 cysts on DWIs at b values of 800 s/mm2 (p<0.001) and 1600 s/mm2 (p<0.001). A cutoff value of 1.902 × 10−3 mm2/s for the ADC with a b value of 800 s/mm2 provided 88% sensitivity and 96% specificity for differentiation between benign and malignant renal lesions. A cutoff value of 1.623 × 10−3 mm2/s for the ADC with a b value of 1600 s/mm2 provided 79% sensitivity and 96% specificity (p<0.001) for the differentiation between benign and malignant renal lesions. Conclusion: Accurate assessment of renal masses is important for determining the necessity for surgical intervention. DWI provides additional value by differentiating benign from malignant renal tumors and can be added to routine kidney MRI protocols. PMID:26185715

  4. Understanding synthesis imaging dynamic range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, R.

    2013-03-01

    We develop a general framework for quantifying the many different contributions to the noise budget of an image made with an array of dishes or aperture array stations. Each noise contribution to the visibility data is associated with a relevant correlation timescale and frequency bandwidth so that the net impact on a complete observation can be assessed when a particular effect is not captured in the instrumental calibration. All quantities are parameterised as function of observing frequency and the visibility baseline length. We apply the resulting noise budget analysis to a wide range of existing and planned telescope systems that will operate between about 100 MHz and 5 GHz to ascertain the magnitude of the calibration challenges that they must overcome to achieve thermal noise limited performance. We conclude that calibration challenges are increased in several respects by small dimensions of the dishes or aperture array stations. It will be more challenging to achieve thermal noise limited performance using 15 m class dishes rather than the 25 m dishes of current arrays. Some of the performance risks are mitigated by the deployment of phased array feeds and more with the choice of an (alt,az,pol) mount, although a larger dish diameter offers the best prospects for risk mitigation. Many improvements to imaging performance can be anticipated at the expense of greater complexity in calibration algorithms. However, a fundamental limitation is ultimately imposed by an insufficient number of data constraints relative to calibration variables. The upcoming aperture array systems will be operating in a regime that has never previously been addressed, where a wide range of effects are expected to exceed the thermal noise by two to three orders of magnitude. Achieving routine thermal noise limited imaging performance with these systems presents an extreme challenge. The magnitude of that challenge is inversely related to the aperture array station diameter.

  5. Dynamical Spectral Unmixing of Multitemporal Hyperspectral Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrot, Simon; Chanussot, Jocelyn; Jutten, Christian

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of unmixing a time series of hyperspectral images. We propose a dynamical model based on linear mixing processes at each time instant. The spectral signatures and fractional abundances of the pure materials in the scene are seen as latent variables, and assumed to follow a general dynamical structure. Based on a simplified version of this model, we derive an efficient spectral unmixing algorithm to estimate the latent variables by performing alternating minimizations. The performance of the proposed approach is demonstrated on synthetic and real multitemporal hyperspectral images.

  6. Dynamic metamaterial aperture for microwave imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Sleasman, Timothy; Imani, Mohammadreza F.; Gollub, Jonah N.; Smith, David R.

    2015-11-16

    We present a dynamic metamaterial aperture for use in computational imaging schemes at microwave frequencies. The aperture consists of an array of complementary, resonant metamaterial elements patterned into the upper conductor of a microstrip line. Each metamaterial element contains two diodes connected to an external control circuit such that the resonance of the metamaterial element can be damped by application of a bias voltage. Through applying different voltages to the control circuit, select subsets of the elements can be switched on to create unique radiation patterns that illuminate the scene. Spatial information of an imaging domain can thus be encoded onto this set of radiation patterns, or measurements, which can be processed to reconstruct the targets in the scene using compressive sensing algorithms. We discuss the design and operation of a metamaterial imaging system and demonstrate reconstructed images with a 10:1 compression ratio. Dynamic metamaterial apertures can potentially be of benefit in microwave or millimeter wave systems such as those used in security screening and through-wall imaging. In addition, feature-specific or adaptive imaging can be facilitated through the use of the dynamic aperture.

  7. Dynamic metamaterial aperture for microwave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleasman, Timothy; F. Imani, Mohammadreza; Gollub, Jonah N.; Smith, David R.

    2015-11-01

    We present a dynamic metamaterial aperture for use in computational imaging schemes at microwave frequencies. The aperture consists of an array of complementary, resonant metamaterial elements patterned into the upper conductor of a microstrip line. Each metamaterial element contains two diodes connected to an external control circuit such that the resonance of the metamaterial element can be damped by application of a bias voltage. Through applying different voltages to the control circuit, select subsets of the elements can be switched on to create unique radiation patterns that illuminate the scene. Spatial information of an imaging domain can thus be encoded onto this set of radiation patterns, or measurements, which can be processed to reconstruct the targets in the scene using compressive sensing algorithms. We discuss the design and operation of a metamaterial imaging system and demonstrate reconstructed images with a 10:1 compression ratio. Dynamic metamaterial apertures can potentially be of benefit in microwave or millimeter wave systems such as those used in security screening and through-wall imaging. In addition, feature-specific or adaptive imaging can be facilitated through the use of the dynamic aperture.

  8. When is contrast-enhanced sonography preferable over conventional ultrasound combined with Doppler imaging in renal transplantation?

    PubMed Central

    Zeisbrich, Markus; Kihm, Lars P.; Drüschler, Felix; Zeier, Martin; Schwenger, Vedat

    2015-01-01

    Conventional ultrasound in combination with colour Doppler imaging is still the standard diagnostic procedure for patients after renal transplantation. However, while conventional ultrasound in combination with Doppler imaging can diagnose renal artery stenosis and vein thrombosis, it is not possible to display subtle microvascular tissue perfusion, which is crucial for the evaluation of acute and chronic allograft dysfunctions. In contrast, real-time contrast-enhanced sonography (CES) uses gas-filled microbubbles not only to visualize but also to quantify renal blood flow and perfusion even in the small renal arterioles and capillaries. It is an easy to perform and non-invasive imaging technique that augments diagnostic capabilities in patients after renal transplantation. Specifically in the postoperative setting, CES has been shown to be superior to conventional ultrasound in combination with Doppler imaging in uncovering even subtle microvascular disturbances in the allograft perfusion. In addition, quantitative perfusion parameters derived from CES show predictive capability regarding long-term kidney function. PMID:26413289

  9. Dynamic 99mTc-MAG3 renography: images for quality control obtained by combining pharmacokinetic modelling, an anthropomorphic computer phantom and Monte Carlo simulated scintillation camera imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brolin, Gustav; Sjögreen Gleisner, Katarina; Ljungberg, Michael

    2013-05-01

    In dynamic renal scintigraphy, the main interest is the radiopharmaceutical redistribution as a function of time. Quality control (QC) of renal procedures often relies on phantom experiments to compare image-based results with the measurement setup. A phantom with a realistic anatomy and time-varying activity distribution is therefore desirable. This work describes a pharmacokinetic (PK) compartment model for 99mTc-MAG3, used for defining a dynamic whole-body activity distribution within a digital phantom (XCAT) for accurate Monte Carlo (MC)-based images for QC. Each phantom structure is assigned a time-activity curve provided by the PK model, employing parameter values consistent with MAG3 pharmacokinetics. This approach ensures that the total amount of tracer in the phantom is preserved between time points, and it allows for modifications of the pharmacokinetics in a controlled fashion. By adjusting parameter values in the PK model, different clinically realistic scenarios can be mimicked, regarding, e.g., the relative renal uptake and renal transit time. Using the MC code SIMIND, a complete set of renography images including effects of photon attenuation, scattering, limited spatial resolution and noise, are simulated. The obtained image data can be used to evaluate quantitative techniques and computer software in clinical renography.

  10. Automatic image segmentation by dynamic region merging.

    PubMed

    Peng, Bo; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, David

    2011-12-01

    This paper addresses the automatic image segmentation problem in a region merging style. With an initially oversegmented image, in which many regions (or superpixels) with homogeneous color are detected, an image segmentation is performed by iteratively merging the regions according to a statistical test. There are two essential issues in a region-merging algorithm: order of merging and the stopping criterion. In the proposed algorithm, these two issues are solved by a novel predicate, which is defined by the sequential probability ratio test and the minimal cost criterion. Starting from an oversegmented image, neighboring regions are progressively merged if there is an evidence for merging according to this predicate. We show that the merging order follows the principle of dynamic programming. This formulates the image segmentation as an inference problem, where the final segmentation is established based on the observed image. We also prove that the produced segmentation satisfies certain global properties. In addition, a faster algorithm is developed to accelerate the region-merging process, which maintains a nearest neighbor graph in each iteration. Experiments on real natural images are conducted to demonstrate the performance of the proposed dynamic region-merging algorithm. PMID:21609885

  11. Diagnostic accuracy of pre-operative imaging findings in presumed clinical T1a renal cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    NAKASHIMA, KAZUFUMI; KITAGAWA, YASUHIDE; IZUMI, KOUJI; MIZOKAMI, ATSUSHI; GABATA, TOSHIFUMI; NAMIKI, MIKIO

    2016-01-01

    Despite the development of recent imaging modalities, certain pathological misdiagnoses remain for surgical specimens of presumed small renal cell carcinomas (RCCs). In the present study, a retrospective analysis of benign pathological lesions diagnosed as small RCC prior to surgery was performed. In total, the cases of 196 sporadic renal tumors that was surgically treated as clinical T1a RCCs were reviewed, and the accuracy of the pathological diagnoses was calculated. The pre-operative findings for benign pathological lesions was investigated, and the lesions were observed in 13 (6.63%) of the 196 tumors. Pre-operative computed tomography images were obtained in all cases, and magnetic resonance images were available in 10 cases. The diagnostic accuracy of imaging modalities was significantly lower in the tumors with a diameter of ≤20 mm. In all cases, the possible pathological diagnosis of RCC could not be excluded even by retrospective imaging analysis. Several benign pathological lesions were found in small renal masses presumed to be clinical T1a RCC. In conclusion, there may be limitations to the pre-operative imaging for certain types of small renal mass. PMID:27123087

  12. Fetal and Postnatal Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Unilateral Cystic Renal Dysplasia in a Neonate with Tuberous Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Vineet; Bornstein, Eran; Schacht, Robert; Lala, Shailee; Milla, Sarah

    2014-02-01

    Tuberous sclerosis (TS) is an autosomal dominant condition associated with mutations in the TSC1 and/or TSC2 genes. Clinical manifestations are multisystemic, and they often include lesions in the brain, skin, heart, kidneys, and bones. TSC2 gene mutations can be seen concomitantly with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease gene mutations. We present a case of a fetus with prenatal diagnosis of TS that had unique asymmetrical distribution of renal cystic disease. We describe the extensive work up with both fetal and neonatal magnetic resonance imaging with correlating images of the unilateral polycystic renal disease in addition to typical TS brain findings. PMID:24495558

  13. Multimodal Imaging of Dynamic Functional Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Tagliazucchi, Enzo; Laufs, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    The study of large-scale functional interactions in the human brain with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) extends almost to the first applications of this technology. Due to historical reasons and preconceptions about the limitations of this brain imaging method, most studies have focused on assessing connectivity over extended periods of time. It is now clear that fMRI can resolve the temporal dynamics of functional connectivity, like other faster imaging techniques such as electroencephalography and magnetoencephalography (albeit on a different temporal scale). However, the indirect nature of fMRI measurements can hinder the interpretability of the results. After briefly summarizing recent advances in the field, we discuss how the simultaneous combination of fMRI with electrophysiological activity measurements can contribute to a better understanding of dynamic functional connectivity in humans both during rest and task, wakefulness, and other brain states. PMID:25762977

  14. Cardiovascular and pulmonary dynamics by quantitative imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, E. H.

    1976-01-01

    The accuracy and range of studies on cardiovascular and pulmonary functions can be greatly facilitated if the motions of the underlying organ systems throughout individual cycles can be directly visualized and readily measured with minimum or preferably no effect on these motions. Achievement of this objective requires development of techniques for quantitative noninvasive or minimally invasive dynamic and stop-action imaging of the organ systems. A review of advances in dynamic quantitative imaging of moving organs reveals that the revolutionary value of cross-sectional and three-dimensional images produced by various types of radiant energy such as X-rays and gamma rays, positrons, electrons, protons, light, and ultrasound for clinical diagnostic and biomedical research applications is just beginning to be realized. The fabrication of a clinically useful cross-section reconstruction device with sensing capabilities for both anatomical structural composition and chemical composition may be possible and awaits future development.

  15. Three new renal simulators for use in nuclear medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dullius, Marcos; Fonseca, Mateus; Botelho, Marcelo; Cunha, Clêdison; Souza, Divanízia

    2014-03-01

    Renal scintigraphy is useful to provide both functional and anatomic information of renal flow of cortical functions and evaluation of pathological collecting system. The objective of this study was develop and evaluate the performance of three renal phantoms: Two anthropomorphic static and another dynamic. The static images of the anthropomorphic phantoms were used for comparison with static renal scintigraphy with 99mTc-DMSA in different concentrations. These static phantoms were manufactured in two ways: one was made of acrylic using as mold a human kidney preserved in formaldehyde and the second was built with ABS (acrylonitrile butadiene styrene) in a 3D printer. The dynamic renal phantom was constructed of acrylic to simulate renal dynamics in scintigraphy with 99mTc-DTPA. These phantoms were scanned with static and dynamic protocols and compared with clinical data. Using these phantoms it is possible to acquire similar renal images as in the clinical scintigraphy. Therefore, these new renal phantoms can be very effective for use in the quality control of renal scintigraphy, and image processing systems.

  16. Overcoming Dynamic Disturbances in Imaging Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Eric W.; Dente, Gregory C.; Lyon, Richard G.; Chesters, Dennis; Gong, Qian

    2000-01-01

    We develop and discuss a methodology with the potential to yield a significant reduction in complexity, cost, and risk of space-borne optical systems in the presence of dynamic disturbances. More robust systems almost certainly will be a result as well. Many future space-based and ground-based optical systems will employ optical control systems to enhance imaging performance. The goal of the optical control subsystem is to determine the wavefront aberrations and remove them. Ideally reducing an aberrated image of the object under investigation to a sufficiently clear (usually diffraction-limited) image. Control will likely be distributed over several elements. These elements may include telescope primary segments, telescope secondary, telescope tertiary, deformable mirror(s), fine steering mirror(s), etc. The last two elements, in particular, may have to provide dynamic control. These control subsystems may become elaborate indeed. But robust system performance will require evaluation of the image quality over a substantial range and in a dynamic environment. Candidate systems for improvement in the Earth Sciences Enterprise could include next generation Landsat systems or atmospheric sensors for dynamic imaging of individual, severe storms. The technology developed here could have a substantial impact on the development of new systems in the Space Science Enterprise; such as the Next Generation Space Telescope(NGST) and its follow-on the Next NGST. Large Interferometric Systems of non-zero field, such as Planet Finder and Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure, could benefit. These systems most likely will contain large, flexible optormechanical structures subject to dynamic disturbance. Furthermore, large systems for high resolution imaging of planets or the sun from space may also benefit. Tactical and Strategic Defense systems will need to image very small targets as well and could benefit from the technology developed here. We discuss a novel

  17. Overcoming Dynamic Disturbances in Imaging Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Eric W.; Dente, Gregory C.; Lyon, Richard G.; Chesters, Dennis; Gong, Qian

    2000-01-01

    We develop and discuss a methodology with the potential to yield a significant reduction in complexity, cost, and risk of space-borne optical systems in the presence of dynamic disturbances. More robust systems almost certainly will be a result as well. Many future space-based and ground-based optical systems will employ optical control systems to enhance imaging performance. The goal of the optical control subsystem is to determine the wavefront aberrations and remove them. Ideally reducing an aberrated image of the object under investigation to a sufficiently clear (usually diffraction-limited) image. Control will likely be distributed over several elements. These elements may include telescope primary segments, telescope secondary, telescope tertiary, deformable mirror(s), fine steering mirror(s), etc. The last two elements, in particular, may have to provide dynamic control. These control subsystems may become elaborate indeed. But robust system performance will require evaluation of the image quality over a substantial range and in a dynamic environment. Candidate systems for improvement in the Earth Sciences Enterprise could include next generation Landsat systems or atmospheric sensors for dynamic imaging of individual, severe storms. The technology developed here could have a substantial impact on the development of new systems in the Space Science Enterprise; such as the Next Generation Space Telescope(NGST) and its follow-on the Next NGST. Large Interferometric Systems of non-zero field, such as Planet Finder and Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure, could benefit. These systems most likely will contain large, flexible optomechanical structures subject to dynamic disturbance. Furthermore, large systems for high resolution imaging of planets or the sun from space may also benefit. Tactical and Strategic Defense systems will need to image very small targets as well and could benefit from the technology developed here. We discuss a novel

  18. Spatiotemporal-atlas-based dynamic speech imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Maojing; Woo, Jonghye; Liang, Zhi-Pei; Sutton, Bradley P.

    2016-03-01

    Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (DS-MRI) has been recognized as a promising method for visualizing articulatory motion of speech in scientific research and clinical applications. However, characterization of the gestural and acoustical properties of the vocal tract remains a challenging task for DS-MRI because it requires: 1) reconstructing high-quality spatiotemporal images by incorporating stronger prior knowledge; and 2) quantitatively interpreting the reconstructed images that contain great motion variability. This work presents a novel imaging method that simultaneously meets both requirements by integrating a spatiotemporal atlas into a Partial Separability (PS) model-based imaging framework. Through the use of an atlas-driven sparsity constraint, this method is capable of capturing high-quality articulatory dynamics at an imaging speed of 102 frames per second and a spatial resolution of 2.2 × 2.2 mm2. Moreover, the proposed method enables quantitative characterization of variability of speech motion, compared to the generic motion pattern across all subjects, through the spatial residual components.

  19. Image fusion for dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Twellmann, Thorsten; Saalbach, Axel; Gerstung, Olaf; Leach, Martin O; Nattkemper, Tim W

    2004-01-01

    Background Multivariate imaging techniques such as dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) have been shown to provide valuable information for medical diagnosis. Even though these techniques provide new information, integrating and evaluating the much wider range of information is a challenging task for the human observer. This task may be assisted with the use of image fusion algorithms. Methods In this paper, image fusion based on Kernel Principal Component Analysis (KPCA) is proposed for the first time. It is demonstrated that a priori knowledge about the data domain can be easily incorporated into the parametrisation of the KPCA, leading to task-oriented visualisations of the multivariate data. The results of the fusion process are compared with those of the well-known and established standard linear Principal Component Analysis (PCA) by means of temporal sequences of 3D MRI volumes from six patients who took part in a breast cancer screening study. Results The PCA and KPCA algorithms are able to integrate information from a sequence of MRI volumes into informative gray value or colour images. By incorporating a priori knowledge, the fusion process can be automated and optimised in order to visualise suspicious lesions with high contrast to normal tissue. Conclusion Our machine learning based image fusion approach maps the full signal space of a temporal DCE-MRI sequence to a single meaningful visualisation with good tissue/lesion contrast and thus supports the radiologist during manual image evaluation. PMID:15494072

  20. Review of Source Images is Necessary for the Evaluation of Gadolinium-Enhanced MR Angiography for Renal Artery Stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wehrschuetz, M. Aschauer, M.; Portugaller, H.; Stix, A.; Wehrschuetz-Sigl, E.; Hausegger, K.; Ebner, F.

    2004-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess interobserver variability and accuracy in the evaluation of renal artery stenosis (RAS) with gadolinium-enhanced MR angiography (MRA) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in patients with hypertension. The authors found that source images are more accurate than maximum intensity projection (MIP) for depicting renal artery stenosis. Two independent radiologists reviewed MRA and DSA from 38 patients with hypertension. Studies were postprocessed to display images in MIP and source images. DSA was the standard for comparison in each patient. For each main renal artery, percentage stenosis was estimated for any stenosis detected by the two radiologists. To calculate sensitivity, specificity and accuracy, MRA studies and stenoses were categorized as normal, mild (1-39%), moderate (40-69%) or severe ({>=}70%), or occluded. DSA stenosis estimates of 70% or greater were considered hemodynamically significant. Analysis of variance demonstrated that MIP estimates of stenosis were greater than source image estimates for both readers. Differences in estimates for MIP versus DSA reached significance in one reader. The interobserver variance for MIP, source images and DSA was excellent (0.80< {kappa}{<=} 0.90). The specificity of source images was high (97%) but less for MIP (87%); average accuracy was 92% for MIP and 98% for source images. In this study, source images are significantly more accurate than MIP images in one reader with a similar trend was observed in the second reader. The interobserver variability was excellent. When renal artery stenosis is a consideration, high accuracy can only be obtained when source images are examined.

  1. Renal Denervation: A Novel Therapy at the Crossroads of Imaging, Intervention, and Innovation.

    PubMed

    Moriarty, John M; Tung, Roderick; Bradfield, Jason S; McWilliams, Justin; Lee, Edward W; Kuo, Michael D

    2016-04-01

    Hypertension (HTN) is one of the most significant medical problems affecting society today. The estimated 76 million Americans with hypertension represent a significant public health problem, contributing to cardiac, vascular, renal, and neurovascular morbidity and mortality. HTN is the most common indication for lifelong pharmacologic treatment, mainly because of the incontrovertible reductions in cardiovascular events with blood pressure (BP) reduction and control. However, despite the availability and potency of multiple different antihypertensive drugs, up to half of American patients have BPs above the recommended target. Given the overwhelming evidence of both the cost to society of HTN and the benefits that are accrued from improved BP control, alternatives or adjuncts to current management options have been sought to aid in treatment of these patients. Over the past few years, a device-based approach involving modulation of the autonomic nervous system, termed renal denervation, has evolved to meet this challenge. With early trials showing startlingly good results, with few side effects, multiple devices were fast-tracked to clinical trials and hence to the market. However, larger trials have shone an unfavorable light on the field, with concerns about the short- and long-term effectiveness, diverting attention back to operational and procedural details. Despite this, image-guided manipulation of the sympathetic nervous system to treat HTN remains a fertile area of laboratory and clinical research. PMID:26384401

  2. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma imaging evaluation in the era of anti-angiogenic therapies.

    PubMed

    Sirous, Reza; Henegan, John C; Zhang, Xu; Howard, Candace M; Souza, Frederico; Smith, Andrew D

    2016-06-01

    During the last decade, the arsenal of anti-angiogenic (AAG) agents used to treat metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has grown and revolutionized the treatment of metastatic RCC, leading to improved overall survival compared to conventional chemotherapy and traditional immunotherapy agents. AAG agents include inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor signaling pathways and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors. Both of these classes of targeted agents are considered cytostatic rather than cytotoxic, inducing tumor stabilization rather than marked tumor shrinkage. As a result, decreases in tumor size alone are often minimal and/or occur late in the course of successful AAG therapy, while tumor devascularization is a distinct feature of AAG therapy. In successful AAG therapy, tumor devascularization manifests on computed tomography images as a composite of a decrease in tumor size, a decrease in tumor attenuation, and the development of tumor necrosis. In this article, we review Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST)-the current standard of care for tumor treatment response assessment which is based merely on changes in tumor length-and its assessment of metastatic RCC tumor response in the era of AAG therapies. We then review the features of an ideal tumor imaging biomarker for predicting metastatic RCC response to a particular AAG agent and serving as a longitudinal tumor response assessment tool. Finally, a discussion of the more recently proposed imaging response criteria and new imaging trends in metastatic RCC response assessment will be reviewed. PMID:27193601

  3. Some Renal Masses Did Not "Read the Book": A Case of a High Grade Hybrid Renal Tumor Masquerading as a Renal Cyst on Non-contrast Imaging.

    PubMed

    Kominsky, Hal D; Parker, Daniel C; Gohil, Dharam; Musial, Rachel; Edwards, Kristin; Kutikov, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    Hybrid renal tumors (HRT) are rare neoplasms that contain both benign and malignant components. Sporadic solitary HRT that contain high-grade malignant pathology appear to be extremely rare [1]. We describe a case at our institution of a tumor that was characterized as a type-2 papillary RCC and atypical oncocytoma hybrid that mimicked a simple cyst on non-contrast computed tomography. PMID:26793558

  4. In situ assessment of the renal microcirculation in mechanically ventilated rats using sidestream dark-field imaging.

    PubMed

    Astapenko, D; Jor, O; Lehmann, C; Cerny, V

    2015-02-01

    For microcirculation research there is a need for baseline data and feasibility protocols describing microcirculation of various organs. The aim of our study was to examine the reliability and reproducibility of sidestream dark-field (SDF) imaging within the renal cortical microcirculation in rats. Renal microcirculation was observed using SDF probe placed on the exposed renal surface via the upper midline laparotomy. Video sequences recorded intermittently in short apneic pauses were analyzed off-line by using AVA 3.0 software (MicroVision Medical, Amsterdam, the Netherlands). Results are expressed as mean (SD) or median (25-75% percentiles). We obtained 60 clear sequences from all recorded analyzable videos from all the animals. The total small vessel and all vessel density (in mm.mm(-2) ) were (28.79 ± 0.40) and (28.95 ± 0.40), respectively. The perfused small and all vessel density were (28.79 ± 0.40) and (28.95 ± 0.40), respectively. The DeBacker Score was (19.14 ± 0.43), the proportion of perfused vessels was 100% (100-100%) and the microvascular flow index was 3.49 (3-3.75). We conclude SDF imaging provides a reliable method to examine the renal microvascular bed in vivo and thus can be used for the study of the renal cortical vascular network in various experimental diseases models and clinical settings. PMID:25545609

  5. Erythrocyte flow and dynamic hematocrit in the renal papilla of the rat.

    PubMed

    Zimmerhackl, B; Dussel, R; Steinhausen, M

    1985-12-01

    The microcirculation of the renal papilla was investigated in 32 vasa recta of Wistar rats. Using fluorescence microscopy in combination with a high-sensitivity television system we measured the velocity and flux of fluorescent-tagged erythrocytes in descending (DVR) and ascending vasa recta (AVR). After staining the plasma with fluorescent high molecular weight dextran we determined the diameters of DVR and AVR. Red cell flux (Qrbc) was determined from the ratio of the frequency of fluorescent-tagged red cells detected per unit time (fFITC) to the number of fluorescent-tagged red cells per nanoliter packed red cells (NFITC). From red cell velocity (Vrbc) and vessel diameter (D) we calculated the volume flow (Vapp). The dynamic hematocrit was directly derived as the ratio of Qrbc to Vapp. During antidiuresis Vrbc was 1.35 +/- 0.15 mm X s-1 (mean +/- SE) in DVR and 0.47 +/- 0.07 mm X s-1 in AVR. Qrbc in the same vessels averaged 3.26 +/- 0.9 and 1.72 +/- 0.35 nl X min-1, respectively. The diameter in DVR was 14.3 +/- 0.9 and in AVR 17.9 +/- 0.9 micron. From these values we calculated a dynamic hematocrit of 26 +/- 4 in DVR and 25 +/- 4% in AVR. The systemic hematocrit was 44 +/- 1%. The dynamic hematocrit in vasa recta represented 59 +/- 9 and 57 +/- 8% of the value in the systemic circulation, respectively. PMID:4073272

  6. Dynamic targeting image-guided radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Huntzinger, Calvin; Munro, Peter; Johnson, Scott; Miettinen, Mika; Zankowski, Corey; Ahlstrom, Greg; Glettig, Reto; Filliberti, Reto; Kaissl, Wolfgang; Kamber, Martin; Amstutz, Martin; Bouchet, Lionel; Klebanov, Dan; Mostafavi, Hassan; Stark, Richard

    2006-07-01

    Volumetric imaging and planning for 3-dimensional (3D) conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) have highlighted the need to the oncology community to better understand the geometric uncertainties inherent in the radiotherapy delivery process, including setup error (interfraction) as well as organ motion during treatment (intrafraction). This has ushered in the development of emerging technologies and clinical processes, collectively referred to as image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). The goal of IGRT is to provide the tools needed to manage both inter- and intrafraction motion to improve the accuracy of treatment delivery. Like IMRT, IGRT is a process involving all steps in the radiotherapy treatment process, including patient immobilization, computed tomogaphy (CT) simulation, treatment planning, plan verification, patient setup verification and correction, delivery, and quality assurance. The technology and capability of the Dynamic Targeting{sup TM} IGRT system developed by Varian Medical Systems is presented. The core of this system is a Clinac (registered) or Trilogy{sup TM} accelerator equipped with a gantry-mounted imaging system known as the On-Board Imager{sup TM} (OBI). This includes a kilovoltage (kV) x-ray source, an amorphous silicon kV digital image detector, and 2 robotic arms that independently position the kV source and imager orthogonal to the treatment beam. A similar robotic arm positions the PortalVision{sup TM} megavoltage (MV) portal digital image detector, allowing both to be used in concert. The system is designed to support a variety of imaging modalities. The following applications and how they fit in the overall clinical process are described: kV and MV planar radiographic imaging for patient repositioning, kV volumetric cone beam CT imaging for patient repositioning, and kV planar fluoroscopic imaging for gating verification. Achieving image-guided motion management throughout the radiation oncology process

  7. Digital Image Correlation with Dynamic Subset Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Ghulam Mubashar; MacNish, Cara; Dyskin, Arcady; Shufrin, Igor

    2016-09-01

    The quality of the surface pattern and selection of subset size play a critical role in achieving high accuracy in Digital Image Correlation (DIC). The subset size in DIC is normally selected by testing different subset sizes across the entire image, which is a laborious procedure. This also leads to the problem that the worst region of the surface pattern influences the performance of DIC across the entire image. In order to avoid these limitations, a Dynamic Subset Selection (DSS) algorithm is proposed in this paper to optimize the subset size for each point in an image before optimizing the correlation parameters. The proposed DSS algorithm uses the local pattern around the point of interest to calculate a parameter called the Intensity Variation Ratio (Λ), which is used to optimize the subset size. The performance of the DSS algorithm is analyzed using numerically generated images and is compared with the results of traditional DIC. Images obtained from laboratory experiments are also used to demonstrate the utility of the DSS algorithm. Results illustrate that the DSS algorithm provides a better alternative to subset size "guessing" and finds an appropriate subset size for each point of interest according to the local pattern.

  8. Motility Contrast Imaging and Tissue Dynamics Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolte, David D.; An, Ran; Turek, John

    Motion is the defining physiological characteristic of living matter. If we are interested in how things function, then the way they move is most informative. Motion provides an endogenous and functional suite of biomarkers that are sensitive to subtle changes that occur under applied pharmacological doses or cellular stresses. This chapter reviews the application of biodynamic imaging to measure cellular dynamics in three-dimensional tissue culture for drug screening applications. Nanoscale and microscale motions are detected through statistical fluctuations in dynamic speckle across an ensemble of cells within each resolution voxel. Tissue dynamics spectroscopy generates drug-response spectrograms that serve as phenotypic fingerprints of drug action and can differentiate responses from heterogeneous regions of tumor tissue.

  9. Dynamic Environmental Photosynthetic Imaging Reveals Emergent Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Jeffrey A; Savage, Linda J; Zegarac, Robert; Hall, Christopher C; Satoh-Cruz, Mio; Davis, Geoffry A; Kovac, William Kent; Chen, Jin; Kramer, David M

    2016-06-22

    Understanding and improving the productivity and robustness of plant photosynthesis requires high-throughput phenotyping under environmental conditions that are relevant to the field. Here we demonstrate the dynamic environmental photosynthesis imager (DEPI), an experimental platform for integrated, continuous, and high-throughput measurements of photosynthetic parameters during plant growth under reproducible yet dynamic environmental conditions. Using parallel imagers obviates the need to move plants or sensors, reducing artifacts and allowing simultaneous measurement on large numbers of plants. As a result, DEPI can reveal phenotypes that are not evident under standard laboratory conditions but emerge under progressively more dynamic illumination. We show examples in mutants of Arabidopsis of such "emergent phenotypes" that are highly transient and heterogeneous, appearing in different leaves under different conditions and depending in complex ways on both environmental conditions and plant developmental age. These emergent phenotypes appear to be caused by a range of phenomena, suggesting that such previously unseen processes are critical for plant responses to dynamic environments. PMID:27336966

  10. Obstacle penetrating dynamic radar imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Romero, Carlos E.; Zumstein, James E.; Chang, John T.; Leach, Jr.. Richard R.

    2006-12-12

    An obstacle penetrating dynamic radar imaging system for the detection, tracking, and imaging of an individual, animal, or object comprising a multiplicity of low power ultra wideband radar units that produce a set of return radar signals from the individual, animal, or object, and a processing system for said set of return radar signals for detection, tracking, and imaging of the individual, animal, or object. The system provides a radar video system for detecting and tracking an individual, animal, or object by producing a set of return radar signals from the individual, animal, or object with a multiplicity of low power ultra wideband radar units, and processing said set of return radar signals for detecting and tracking of the individual, animal, or object.

  11. Neutron Imaging Reveals Internal Plant Hydraulic Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Jeffrey; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Kang, Misun; Voisin, Sophie; Cheng, Chu-Lin; Horita, Jusuke; Perfect, Edmund

    2013-01-01

    Many terrestrial ecosystem processes are constrained by water availability and transport within the soil. Knowledge of plant water fluxes is thus critical for assessing mechanistic processes linked to biogeochemical cycles, yet resolution of root structure and xylem water transport dynamics has been a particularly daunting task for the ecologist. Through neutron imaging, we demonstrate the ability to non-invasively monitor individual root functionality and water fluxes within Zea mays L. (maize) and Panicum virgatum L. (switchgrass) seedlings growing in a sandy medium. Root structure and growth were readily imaged by neutron radiography and neutron computed tomography. Seedlings were irrigated with water or deuterium oxide and imaged through time as a growth lamp was cycled on to alter leaf demand for water. Sub-millimeter scale resolution reveals timing and magnitudes of root water uptake, redistribution within the roots, and root-shoot hydraulic linkages, relationships not well characterized by other techniques.

  12. Renal papillary necrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... your provider. Alternative Names Necrosis - renal papillae; Renal medullary necrosis Images Kidney anatomy Kidney - blood and urine flow References Ruggenenti P, Cravedi P, Remuzzi G. Microvascular and macrovascular diseases of the kidney. In: Taal MW, Chertow GM, ...

  13. Dynamic cardiac volume imaging using area detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruder, Herbert; Hoelzel, Arne; Stierstorfer, Karl; Rauscher, Annabella; Flohr, Thomas

    2003-05-01

    We present a reconstruction scheme for dynamic cardiac volume imaging using Area Detector Computed Tomography (CT) named Multi-Sector Cardiac Volume Reconstruction (MCVR) which is based on a 3D-backprojection of the Feldkamp-type. It is intended for circular scanning using area detectors covering the whole heart volume, but the method can easily be extended to cardiac spiral imaging using multi-slice CT. In cardiac imaging with multi-slice CT continuous data acquisition combined with the parallel recording of the patient's ECG enables retrospective gating of data segments for image reconstruction. Using consecutive heart cycles MCVR identifies complementary and time consistent projection data segments <= π using temporal information of the ECG. After a row by row parallel rebinning and temporal rebinning the projection data have to be filtered using conventional convolution kernels and finally reconstructed to image space using a 3D-backprojection. A dynamic anthropomorphic computer model of the human heart was developed in order to validate the MCVR approach. A 256-slice detector system with 0.5mm slice collimation was simulated operating in a circular scanning mode at a gantry rotation time of 330ms and compared to state-of-the-art 16-slice technology. At enddiastole the coronary anatomy can be visualized with excellent image quality. Although an area detector with large cone angling covering the entire heart volume was used no cone-artifacts could be observed. Using a 2-sector approach a nearly motion free 3D visualization of the heart chambers was obtained even at endsystole.

  14. Inherited renal cystic diseases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bohyun; King, Bernard F; Vrtiska, Terri J; Irazabal, Maria V; Torres, Vicente E; Harris, Peter C

    2016-06-01

    A number of inherited renal diseases present with renal cysts and often lead to end-stage renal disease. With recent advances in genetics, increasing number of genes and mutations have been associated with cystic renal diseases. Although genetic testing can provide a definite diagnosis, it is often reserved for equivocal cases or for ongoing investigational research. Therefore, imaging findings are essential in the routine diagnosis, follow-up, and detection of complications in patients with inherited cystic renal diseases. In this article, the most recent classification, genetic analysis, clinical presentations, and imaging findings of inherited cystic renal diseases will be discussed. PMID:27167233

  15. Computer-aided detection of renal calculi from noncontrast CT images using TV-flow and MSER features

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianfei; Wang, Shijun; Turkbey, Evrim B.; Linguraru, Marius George; Yao, Jianhua; Summers, Ronald M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Renal calculi are common extracolonic incidental findings on computed tomographic colonography (CTC). This work aims to develop a fully automated computer-aided diagnosis system to accurately detect renal calculi on CTC images. Methods: The authors developed a total variation (TV) flow method to reduce image noise within the kidneys while maintaining the characteristic appearance of renal calculi. Maximally stable extremal region (MSER) features were then calculated to robustly identify calculi candidates. Finally, the authors computed texture and shape features that were imported to support vector machines for calculus classification. The method was validated on a dataset of 192 patients and compared to a baseline approach that detects calculi by thresholding. The authors also compared their method with the detection approaches using anisotropic diffusion and nonsmoothing. Results: At a false positive rate of 8 per patient, the sensitivities of the new method and the baseline thresholding approach were 69% and 35% (p < 1e − 3) on all calculi from 1 to 433 mm3 in the testing dataset. The sensitivities of the detection methods using anisotropic diffusion and nonsmoothing were 36% and 0%, respectively. The sensitivity of the new method increased to 90% if only larger and more clinically relevant calculi were considered. Conclusions: Experimental results demonstrated that TV-flow and MSER features are efficient means to robustly and accurately detect renal calculi on low-dose, high noise CTC images. Thus, the proposed method can potentially improve diagnosis. PMID:25563255

  16. Computer-aided detection of renal calculi from noncontrast CT images using TV-flow and MSER features

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jianfei; Wang, Shijun; Turkbey, Evrim B.; Yao, Jianhua; Summers, Ronald M.; Linguraru, Marius George

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Renal calculi are common extracolonic incidental findings on computed tomographic colonography (CTC). This work aims to develop a fully automated computer-aided diagnosis system to accurately detect renal calculi on CTC images. Methods: The authors developed a total variation (TV) flow method to reduce image noise within the kidneys while maintaining the characteristic appearance of renal calculi. Maximally stable extremal region (MSER) features were then calculated to robustly identify calculi candidates. Finally, the authors computed texture and shape features that were imported to support vector machines for calculus classification. The method was validated on a dataset of 192 patients and compared to a baseline approach that detects calculi by thresholding. The authors also compared their method with the detection approaches using anisotropic diffusion and nonsmoothing. Results: At a false positive rate of 8 per patient, the sensitivities of the new method and the baseline thresholding approach were 69% and 35% (p < 1e − 3) on all calculi from 1 to 433 mm{sup 3} in the testing dataset. The sensitivities of the detection methods using anisotropic diffusion and nonsmoothing were 36% and 0%, respectively. The sensitivity of the new method increased to 90% if only larger and more clinically relevant calculi were considered. Conclusions: Experimental results demonstrated that TV-flow and MSER features are efficient means to robustly and accurately detect renal calculi on low-dose, high noise CTC images. Thus, the proposed method can potentially improve diagnosis.

  17. Phase correlation imaging of unlabeled cell dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lihong; Rajshekhar, Gannavarpu; Wang, Ru; Bhaduri, Basanta; Sridharan, Shamira; Mir, Mustafa; Chakraborty, Arindam; Iyer, Rajashekar; Prasanth, Supriya; Millet, Larry; Gillette, Martha U; Popescu, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    We present phase correlation imaging (PCI) as a novel approach to study cell dynamics in a spatially-resolved manner. PCI relies on quantitative phase imaging time-lapse data and, as such, functions in label-free mode, without the limitations associated with exogenous markers. The correlation time map outputted in PCI informs on the dynamics of the intracellular mass transport. Specifically, we show that PCI can extract quantitatively the diffusion coefficient map associated with live cells, as well as standard Brownian particles. Due to its high sensitivity to mass transport, PCI can be applied to studying the integrity of actin polymerization dynamics. Our results indicate that the cyto-D treatment blocking the actin polymerization has a dominant effect at the large spatial scales, in the region surrounding the cell. We found that PCI can distinguish between senescent and quiescent cells, which is extremely difficult without using specific markers currently. We anticipate that PCI will be used alongside established, fluorescence-based techniques to enable valuable new studies of cell function. PMID:27615512

  18. Evidence of a heterogeneous tissue oxygenation: renal ischemia/reperfusion injury in a large animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Nicole J.; Huffman, Scott W.; Alemozaffar, Mehrdad; Gage, Frederick A.; Levin, Ira W.; Elster, Eric A.

    2013-03-01

    Renal ischemia that occurs intraoperatively during procedures requiring clamping of the renal artery (such as renal procurement for transplantation and partial nephrectomy for renal cancer) is known to have a significant impact on the viability of that kidney. To better understand the dynamics of intraoperative renal ischemia and recovery of renal oxygenation during reperfusion, a visible reflectance imaging system (VRIS) was developed to measure renal oxygenation during renal artery clamping in both cooled and warm porcine kidneys. For all kidneys, normothermic and hypothermic, visible reflectance imaging demonstrated a spatially distinct decrease in the relative oxy-hemoglobin concentration (%HbO2) of the superior pole of the kidney compared to the middle or inferior pole. Mean relative oxy-hemoglobin concentrations decrease more significantly during ischemia for normothermic kidneys compared to hypothermic kidneys. VRIS may be broadly applicable to provide an indicator of organ ischemia during open and laparoscopic procedures.

  19. Advancing Cardiovascular, Neurovascular, and Renal Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Small Rodents Using Cryogenic Radiofrequency Coil Technology

    PubMed Central

    Niendorf, Thoralf; Pohlmann, Andreas; Reimann, Henning M.; Waiczies, Helmar; Peper, Eva; Huelnhagen, Till; Seeliger, Erdmann; Schreiber, Adrian; Kettritz, Ralph; Strobel, Klaus; Ku, Min-Chi; Waiczies, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Research in pathologies of the brain, heart and kidney have gained immensely from the plethora of studies that have helped shape new methods in magnetic resonance (MR) for characterizing preclinical disease models. Methodical probing into preclinical animal models by MR is invaluable since it allows a careful interpretation and extrapolation of data derived from these models to human disease. In this review we will focus on the applications of cryogenic radiofrequency (RF) coils in small animal MR as a means of boosting image quality (e.g., by supporting MR microscopy) and making data acquisition more efficient (e.g., by reducing measuring time); both being important constituents for thorough investigational studies on animal models of disease. This review attempts to make the (bio)medical imaging, molecular medicine, and pharmaceutical communities aware of this productive ferment and its outstanding significance for anatomical and functional MR in small rodents. The goal is to inspire a more intense interdisciplinary collaboration across the fields to further advance and progress non-invasive MR methods that ultimately support thorough (patho)physiological characterization of animal disease models. In this review, current and potential future applications for the RF coil technology in cardiovascular, neurovascular, and renal disease will be discussed. PMID:26617515

  20. Electromagnetic imaging of dynamic brain activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.; Leahy, R. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Lewis, P.; Lewine, J.; George, J. ); Singh, M. . Dept. of Radiology)

    1991-01-01

    Neural activity in the brain produces weak dynamic electromagnetic fields that can be measured by an array of sensors. Using a spatio-temporal modeling framework, we have developed a new approach to localization of multiple neural sources. This approach is based on the MUSIC algorithm originally developed for estimating the direction of arrival of signals impinging on a sensor array. We present applications of this technique to magnetic field measurements of a phantom and of a human evoked somatosensory response. The results of the somatosensory localization are mapped onto the brain anatomy obtained from magnetic resonance images.

  1. Electromagnetic imaging of dynamic brain activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.; Leahy, R.; Lewis, P.; Lewine, J.; George, J.; Singh, M.

    1991-12-31

    Neural activity in the brain produces weak dynamic electromagnetic fields that can be measured by an array of sensors. Using a spatio-temporal modeling framework, we have developed a new approach to localization of multiple neural sources. This approach is based on the MUSIC algorithm originally developed for estimating the direction of arrival of signals impinging on a sensor array. We present applications of this technique to magnetic field measurements of a phantom and of a human evoked somatosensory response. The results of the somatosensory localization are mapped onto the brain anatomy obtained from magnetic resonance images.

  2. The incidence and location of prostatic calculi on noncontrast computed tomography images in patients with renal calculi.

    PubMed

    Balasar, Mehmet; Poyraz, Necdet; Göğer, Yunus Emre; Unal, Yunus; Pişkin, Mehmet Mesut

    2015-08-01

    In this study, the incidence and location of prostatic calculi on noncontrast abdominal computed tomography (NCACT) images of patients with and without renal stones were investigated. Between 2006 and 2013, NCACT images were taken of 133 patients treated for renal stones (Group I) and of 100 age-matched control patients with putative urinary stone disease (Group II) in our clinic. The incidence and location of prostatic calculi on these images were determined. The location of prostatic calculus was classified as type A if they were located in the main prostatic ducts, and type B if they were located outside the ducts. Prostatic calculi were present in 44.4% of patients in Group I and 21.0% of patients in Group II. The incidence of prostatic calculi was significantly higher in patients with urinary stones compared with those without (P<0.001). The location of prostatic calculi in Group I included 74.6% type A and 25.4% type B while in Group II the locations were 76.2% type A and 23.8% type B. The incidence of prostatic calculi is more prevalent in patients with renal stones. On NCACT images, prostatic calculi were mostly detected in the main prostatic ducts, which were defined as type A. PMID:25991494

  3. Dynamic MEG imaging of focal neuronal sources

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.W.; Leahy R.M.; Mosher, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    We describe inverse methods for using the magnetoencephalogram (MEG) to image neural current sources associated with functional activation in the cerebral cortex. A Bayesian formulation is presented that is based on a Gibbs prior which reflects the sparse, focal nature of neural activation. The model includes a dynamic component so that we can utilize the full spatio-temporal data record to reconstruct a sequence of images reflecting changes in the current source amplitudes during activation. The model consists of the product of a binary field, representing the areas of activation in the cerebral cortex, and a time series at each site which represents the dynamic changes in the source amplitudes at the active sites. Our estimation methods are based on the optimization of three different functions of the posterior density. Each of these methods requires the estimation of a binary field which we compute using a mean field annealing method. We demonstrate and compare our methods in application to computer generated and experimental phantom data.

  4. Monitoring dynamic systems with multiparameter fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Kudryavtsev, Volodymyr; Felekyan, Suren; Woźniak, Anna K; König, Marcelle; Sandhagen, Carl; Kühnemuth, Ralf; Seidel, Claus A M; Oesterhelt, Filipp

    2007-01-01

    A new general strategy based on the use of multiparameter fluorescence detection (MFD) to register and quantitatively analyse fluorescence images is introduced. Multiparameter fluorescence imaging (MFDi) uses pulsed excitation, time-correlated single-photon counting and a special pixel clock to simultaneously monitor the changes in the eight-dimensional fluorescence information (fundamental anisotropy, fluorescence lifetime, fluorescence intensity, time, excitation spectrum, fluorescence spectrum, fluorescence quantum yield, distance between fluorophores) in real time. The three spatial coordinates are also stored. The most statistically efficient techniques known from single-molecule spectroscopy are used to estimate fluorescence parameters of interest for all pixels, not just for the regions of interest. Their statistical significance is judged from a stack of two-dimensional histograms. In this way, specific pixels can be selected for subsequent pixel-based subensemble analysis in order to improve the statistical accuracy of the parameters estimated. MFDi avoids the need for sequential measurements, because the registered data allow one to perform many analysis techniques, such as fluorescence-intensity distribution analysis (FIDA) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), in an off-line mode. The limitations of FCS for counting molecules and monitoring dynamics are discussed. To demonstrate the ability of our technique, we analysed two systems: (i) interactions of the fluorescent dye Rhodamine 110 inside and outside of a glutathione sepharose bead, and (ii) microtubule dynamics in live yeast cells of Schizosaccharomyces pombe using a fusion protein of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) with Minichromosome Altered Loss Protein 3 (Mal3), which is involved in the dynamic cycle of polymerising and depolymerising microtubules. PMID:17160654

  5. Fluorescence Ratio Imaging Of Dynamic Intracellular Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harootunian, Alec T.; Kao, J. P.; Tsien, Roger Y.

    1989-12-01

    Traditional biochemical assays of cellular messengers require grinding up thousands or millions of cells for each data point. Such destructive measurements use up large amounts of tissue, have poor time resolution, and cannot assess heterogeneity between individual cells or dynamic spatial localizations. Recent technical advances now enable important ionic signals to be continuously imaged inside individual living cells with micron spatial resolution and subsecond time resolution. This methodology relies on the molecular engineering of indicator dyes whose fluorescence is strong and highly sensitive to ions such as Ca2+, H+, or Na+. Binding of these ions shifts the fluorescence excitation spectrum of the corresponding indicator. The ratio of excitation amplitudes at two wavelengths measures the free ion concentration while canceling out intensity variations due to nonuniform cell thickness or dye content. By rapidly alternating between the two ion-sensitive excitation wavelengths, a fluorescence microscope equipped with a low-light television camera and digital image processor can produce dynamic images of intracellular messenger levels. In many populations of cells traditionally assumed to be homogeneous, we find that neighboring individual cells can differ enormously in their cytosolic Ca2+ response to agonist stimulation, some ignoring the stimulus, others raising cytosolic Ca2+ transiently, others showing oscillations. Oscillations have been speculated to be important as a basis for frequency-coding of oscillations. Oscillations have been speculated to be important as a basis for frequency-coding of graded inputs; we are investigating the mechanism of their generation using light flashes to generate pulses of intracellular messengers. Spatial gradients of cytosolic Ca t+ within single cells have been observed in embryos during fertilization and development, neurons exposed to electrical or drug stimulation and in cytotoxic T lymphocytes during killing of target

  6. Homogeneous T1 Hyperintense Renal Lesions with Smooth Borders: Is Contrast-enhanced MR Imaging Needed?

    PubMed

    Davarpanah, Amir H; Spektor, Michael; Mathur, Mahan; Israel, Gary M

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To retrospectively determine if homogeneous high T1 signal intensity (SI) masses with smooth borders on unenhanced magnetic resonance (MR) images can be characterized as benign. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approval was obtained for this HIPAA-compliant retrospective study, with waiver of informed consent. MR images in 84 patients with hemorrhagic or proteinaceous cysts and 50 patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) were evaluated. Sixty-three cysts and 49 RCCs underwent unenhanced computed tomography (CT). SI ratio and CT attenuation were determined. Two radiologists evaluated lesions as follows: score 1, homogeneous with smooth borders; score 2, mildly heterogeneous with mildly lobulated borders; score 3, moderately heterogeneous and irregular borders; and score 4, markedly heterogeneous with markedly irregular borders. Statistical analysis was performed by using multivariable logistic regression, Welch t test, Z test, Fisher-exact test, Shapiro-Wilk test, and receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. A diagnostic criterion was formulated by using classification and regression tree analysis. Results SI ratio and attenuation of hemorrhagic or proteinaceous cysts were significantly higher than those of RCCs (SI ratio: cyst 2.4 ± 0.8, RCC 1.5 ± 0.3; attenuation: cyst 51.9 ± 21.5, RCC: 34.8 ± 10.0). Reader 1 scored morphology of 68 (81%) hemorrhagic or proteinaceous cysts as score 1 on MR images and as score 45 (71%) on CT scans. Reader 2 scored morphology of 59 (70%) hemorrhagic or proteinaceous cysts as score 1 on MR images and as score 43 (68%) on CT scans. Two-step classification tree suggested that homogeneous high T1 SI lesions with smooth borders and SI ratio of greater than 1.6 predict the lesion as benign cysts. Similar algorithm for CT suggested threshold of 51 HU. Increasing threshold to 2.5 for SI ratio and 66 for Hounsfield units resulted in 99.9% confidence for characterizing benign cysts. Conclusion The

  7. Dynamic changes of early-stage aortic lipid deposition in chronic renal failure rats and effects of decorin gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    MA, HONG-BO; WANG, RONG; YU, KE-ZHOU; YU, CHE

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to clarify the association between lipid metabolism and the atherosclerosis in early-stage chronic renal failure at the molecular level and to explore the efficacy of decorin on chronic renal failure. Sprague Dawley rats receiving 5/6 nephrectomy and Sham surgery were divided into control and experimental groups. Sprague Dawley rats receiving 5/6 nephrectomy were divided into control and experimental groups, and the experimental group was further subdivided into rats receiving treatment with fibroblasts (FBs) transfected either with empty vector and with a decorin (DCN) gene. The dynamic levels of triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (T-Ch) and total phospholipid (T-PL) were detected on the 10th, 30th and 60th days. The body weight, blood lipid levels, renal function and renal tissue were observed after four weeks, and transforming growth factor-βl and protein expression was detected by immunohistochemistry. In total, 4 weeks after treatment, the DCN expression in the renal tissue of rats treated with DCN-transfected FBs was significantly increased compared to that in the control rats. The results showed that the levels of the three lipids in the aortic arches were slightly elevated on the 10th day compared with those in the control group, and the TG level was significantly increased on the 30th day. The levels of T-Ch, TG and T-PL in the aortic arches were significantly elevated on the 60th day. The TG and T-Ch levels in the plasma and aortic tissues of Sprague Dawley rats receiving 5/6 nephrectomy without any treatment and after receiving treatment with FBs transfected with empty vector were significantly increased compared with those in the control group. The increased T-Ch and decreased T-PL levels in the erythrocyte membrane increased the rigidity of the erythrocyte and decreased erythrocyte deformability. In conclusion, highly expressed DCN mitigated renal fibrosis and thus delayed renal failure as well as mitigating the

  8. Calcium dynamics underlying the myogenic response of the renal afferent arteriole

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Aurélie

    2013-01-01

    The renal afferent arteriole reacts to an elevation in blood pressure with an increase in muscle tone and a decrease in luminal diameter. This effect, known as the myogenic response, is believed to stabilize glomerular filtration and to protect the glomerulus from systolic blood pressure increases, especially in hypertension. To study the mechanisms underlying the myogenic response, we developed a mathematical model of intracellular Ca2+ signaling in an afferent arteriole smooth muscle cell. The model represents detailed transmembrane ionic transport, intracellular Ca2+ dynamics, the kinetics of myosin light chain phosphorylation, and the mechanical behavior of the cell. It assumes that the myogenic response is initiated by pressure-induced changes in the activity of nonselective cation channels. Our model predicts spontaneous vasomotion at physiological luminal pressures and KCl- and diltiazem-induced diameter changes comparable to experimental findings. The time-periodic oscillations stem from the dynamic exchange of Ca2+ between the cytosol and the sarcoplasmic reticulum, coupled to the stimulation of Ca2+-activated potassium (KCa) and chloride (ClCa) channels, and the modulation of voltage-activated L-type channels; blocking sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ pumps, ryanodine receptors (RyR), KCa, ClCa, or L-type channels abolishes these oscillations. Our results indicate that the profile of the myogenic response is also strongly dependent on the conductance of ClCa and L-type channels, as well as the activity of plasmalemmal Ca2+ pumps. Furthermore, inhibition of KCa is not necessary to induce myogenic contraction. Lastly, our model suggests that the kinetic behavior of L-type channels results in myogenic kinetics that are substantially faster during constriction than during dilation, consistent with in vitro observations (Loutzenhiser R, Bidani A, Chilton L. Circ. Res. 90: 1316–1324, 2002). PMID:24173354

  9. Comparison of imaging methods for diagnosing enlarged parathyroid glands in chronic renal failure

    SciTech Connect

    Takagi, H.; Tominaga, Y.; Uchida, K.; Yamada, N.; Kano, T.; Kawai, M.; Morimoto, T.

    1985-07-01

    Three noninvasive imaging methods, CT, scintigraphy with /sup 201/TlCl and /sup 99m/TcO4-, and ultrasonography, were performed on 36 patients with chronic renal failure and secondary hyperparathyroidism. The patients subsequently underwent total parathyroidectomy and parathyroid autograft. The detection rates of the three methods for the 143 excised parathyroid glands were compared according to gland weight and location. Computed tomography detected 53.8% of all glands and 77.6% of 76 glands weighing more than 500 mg. Scintigraphy detected 51.0% of all glands and 77.6% of glands heavier than 500 mg. Ultrasonography detected 42.7% of all glands and 65.8% of glands heavier than 500 mg. The detection rate of upper glands was best with CT (53.5 and 87.9%): that of lower glands was best with scintigraphy (62.0 and 78.6%). Although the combination of the three methods diagnosed 66.4% of all glands and 89.5% of glands heavier than 500 mg, CT and scintigraphy, the best two combinations, visualized 64.3 and 88.2%.

  10. Identification of Protein Markers Specific for Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma Using Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Na, Chan Hyun; Hong, Ji Hye; Kim, Wan Sup; Shanta, Selina Rahman; Bang, Joo Yong; Park, Dongmin; Kim, Hark Kyun; Kim, Kwang Pyo

    2015-01-01

    Since the emergence of proteomics methods, many proteins specific for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) have been identified. Despite their usefulness for the specific diagnosis of RCC, such proteins do not provide spatial information on the diseased tissue. Therefore, the identification of cancer-specific proteins that include information on their specific location is needed. Recently, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) based imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) has emerged as a new tool for the analysis of spatial distribution as well as identification of either proteins or small molecules in tissues. In this report, surgical tissue sections of papillary RCC were analyzed using MALDI-IMS. Statistical analysis revealed several discriminative cancer-specific m/z-species between normal and diseased tissues. Among these m/z-species, two particular proteins, S100A11 and ferritin light chain, which are specific for papillary RCC cancer regions, were successfully identified using LC-MS/MS following protein extraction from independent RCC samples. The expressions of S100A11 and ferritin light chain were further validated by immunohistochemistry of human tissues and tissue microarrays (TMAs) of RCC. In conclusion, MALDI-IMS followed by LC-MS/MS analysis in human tissue identified that S100A11 and ferritin light chain are differentially expressed proteins in papillary RCC cancer regions. PMID:26062552

  11. Image-Guided Embolization Coil Placement for Identification of an Endophytic, Isoechoic Renal Mass During Robotic Partial Nephrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Forauer, Andrew; Seigne, John D.; Hyams, Elias S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Intraoperative ultrasonography has proven to be a useful tool for tumor identification during robot-assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (RALPN). However, its utility is limited in renal tumors that are completely endophytic and isoechoic in nature. We present a novel approach to intraoperative tumor identification using preoperative percutaneous intratumoral embolization coil placement that may be utilized in the management of such cases. Case Presentation: A 42-year-old Caucasian male was referred with an incidentally discovered right renal mass that was posterior and completely endophytic. He desired a RALPN; however, preoperative renal ultrasound demonstrated an isoechoic lesion. Thus, the patient underwent preoperative image-guided placement of an embolization coil within the tumor. This facilitated identification of the tumor intraoperatively using intracorporeal ultrasound centered on the coil and enabled resection with negative margins. Conclusion: Utilizing a novel approach analogous to preoperative localization of other solid malignancies, such as breast cancer, we were able to effectively identify and resect an isoechoic renal mass during RALPN.

  12. Diffusion-weighted MRI with parallel imaging technique: apparent diffusion coefficient determination in normal kidneys and in nonmalignant renal diseases.

    PubMed

    Macarini, Luca; Stoppino, Luca Pio; Milillo, Paola; Ciuffreda, Pierpaolo; Fortunato, Francesca; Vinci, Roberta

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the capability and the reliability of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements in the evaluation of different benign renal abnormalities. Twenty-five healthy volunteers and 31 patients, divided into seven different groups (A-G) according to pathology, underwent diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW MRI) of the kidneys using 1.5-T system. DW images were obtained in the axial plane with a spin-echo echo planar imaging single-shot sequence with three b values (0, 300, and 600 s/mm²). Before acquisition of DW sequences, we performed in each patient a morphological study of the kidneys. ADC was 2.40±0.20×10⁻³ mm² s⁻¹ in volunteers. A significant difference was found between Groups A (cysts=3.39±0.51×10⁻³ mm² s⁻¹) and B (acute/chronic renal failure=1.38±0.40×10⁻³ mm² s⁻¹) and between Groups A and C (chronic pyelonephritis=1.53±0.21×10⁻³ mm² s⁻¹) (P<.05). An important difference was also observed among Group D (hydronephrosis=4.82±0.35×10⁻³ mm² s⁻¹) and Groups A, B, and C (P<.05), whereas no differences were found between Groups B and C (P>.05). A considerable correlation between glomerular filtration rate and ADC was found (P=.04). In conclusion, significant differences were detected among different patient groups, and this suggests that ADC measurements can be useful in differentiating normal renal parenchyma from most commonly encountered nonmalignant renal lesions. PMID:21092872

  13. Imaging via complete cantilever dynamic detection: general dynamic mode imaging and spectroscopy in scanning probe microscopy.

    PubMed

    Somnath, Suhas; Collins, Liam; Matheson, Michael A; Sukumar, Sreenivas R; Kalinin, Sergei V; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-10-14

    We develop and implement a multifrequency spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging mode, referred to as general dynamic mode (GDM), that captures the complete spatially- and stimulus dependent information on nonlinear cantilever dynamics in scanning probe microscopy (SPM). GDM acquires the cantilever response including harmonics and mode mixing products across the entire broadband cantilever spectrum as a function of excitation frequency. GDM spectra substitute the classical measurements in SPM, e.g. amplitude and phase in lock-in detection. Here, GDM is used to investigate the response of a purely capacitively driven cantilever. We use information theory techniques to mine the data and verify the findings with governing equations and classical lock-in based approaches. We explore the dependence of the cantilever dynamics on the tip-sample distance, AC and DC driving bias. This approach can be applied to investigate the dynamic behavior of other systems within and beyond dynamic SPM. GDM is expected to be useful for separating the contribution of different physical phenomena in the cantilever response and understanding the role of cantilever dynamics in dynamic AFM techniques. PMID:27607339

  14. Imaging via complete cantilever dynamic detection: General dynamic mode imaging and spectroscopy in scanning probe microscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Somnath, Suhas; Collins, Liam; Matheson, Michael A.; Sukumar, Sreenivas R.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-09-08

    We develop and implement a multifrequency spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging mode, referred to as general dynamic mode (GDM), that captures the complete spatially- and stimulus dependent information on nonlinear cantilever dynamics in scanning probe microscopy (SPM). GDM acquires the cantilever response including harmonics and mode mixing products across the entire broadband cantilever spectrum as a function of excitation frequency. GDM spectra substitute the classical measurements in SPM, e.g. amplitude and phase in lock-in detection. Here, GDM is used to investigate the response of a purely capacitively driven cantilever. We use information theory techniques to mine the data and verify themore » findings with governing equations and classical lock-in based approaches. We explore the dependence of the cantilever dynamics on the tip–sample distance, AC and DC driving bias. This approach can be applied to investigate the dynamic behavior of other systems within and beyond dynamic SPM. In conclusion, GDM is expected to be useful for separating the contribution of different physical phenomena in the cantilever response and understanding the role of cantilever dynamics in dynamic AFM techniques.« less

  15. Optical imaging of tumor hypoxia dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Gregory M.; Fontanella, Andrew N.; Zhang, Guoqing; Hanna, Gabi; Fraser, Cassandra L.; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2010-11-01

    The influence of the tumor microenvironment and hypoxia plays a significant role in determining cancer progression, treatment response, and treatment resistance. That the tumor microenvironment is highly heterogeneous with significant intratumor and intertumor variability presents a significant challenge in developing effective cancer therapies. Critical to understanding the role of the tumor microenvironment is the ability to dynamically quantify oxygen levels in the vasculature and tissue in order to elucidate the roles of oxygen supply and consumption, spatially and temporally. To this end, we describe the use of hyperspectral imaging to characterize hemoglobin absorption to quantify hemoglobin content and oxygen saturation, as well as dual emissive fluorescent/phosphorescent boron nanoparticles, which serve as ratiometric indicators of tissue oxygen tension. Applying these techniques to a window-chamber tumor model illustrates the role of fluctuations in hemoglobin saturation in driving changes in tissue oxygenation, the two being significantly correlated (r = 0.77). Finally, a green-fluorescence-protein reporter for hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) provides an endpoint for hypoxic stress in the tumor, which is used to demonstrate a significant association between tumor hypoxia dynamics and HIF-1 activity in an in vivo demonstration of the technique.

  16. BK Nephritis and Venous Thrombosis in Renal Transplant Recipient Detected by 111In Leukocyte Imaging.

    PubMed

    Pucar, Darko; Klein, Kandace; Corley, James; Williams, Hadyn T

    2015-07-01

    Three months after deceased donor kidney transplant, a patient who presented with proteinuric renal dysfunction and fever of undetermined origin was found to have BK viruria by quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis. An ¹¹¹In leukocyte scan showed increased renal transplant uptake consistent with nephritis and linear uptake in the knee. Venous duplex ultrasound revealed acute occlusive thrombosis in the superficial right lesser saphenous vein in the area of increased radiolabeled leukocyte uptake. This ¹¹¹In leukocyte scan performed for fever of undetermined origin demonstrated findings of BK nephritis in a renal transplant patient and associated acute venous thrombosis related to leukocyte colonization. PMID:26018698

  17. Fluid dynamic modelling of renal pelvic pressure during endoscopic stone removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oratis, Alexandros; Subasic, John; Bird, James; Eisner, Brian

    2015-11-01

    Endoscopic kidney stone removal procedures are known to increase internal pressure in the renal pelvis, the kidney's urinary collecting system. High renal pelvic pressure incites systemic absorption of irrigation fluid, which can increase the risk of postoperative fever and sepsis or the unwanted absorption of electrolytes. Urologists choose the appropriate surgical procedure based on patient history and kidney stone size. However, no study has been conducted to compare the pressure profiles of each procedure, nor is there a precise sense of how the renal pelvic pressure scales with various operational parameters. Here we develop physical models for the flow rates and renal pelvic pressure for various procedures. We show that the results of our models are consistent with existing urological data on each procedure and that the models can predict pressure profiles where data is unavailable.

  18. 3D element imaging using NSECT for the detection of renal cancer: a simulation study in MCNP.

    PubMed

    Viana, R S; Agasthya, G A; Yoriyaz, H; Kapadia, A J

    2013-09-01

    This work describes a simulation study investigating the application of neutron stimulated emission computed tomography (NSECT) for noninvasive 3D imaging of renal cancer in vivo. Using MCNP5 simulations, we describe a method of diagnosing renal cancer in the body by mapping the 3D distribution of elements present in tumors using the NSECT technique. A human phantom containing the kidneys and other major organs was modeled in MCNP5. The element composition of each organ was based on values reported in literature. The two kidneys were modeled to contain elements reported in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and healthy kidney tissue. Simulated NSECT scans were executed to determine the 3D element distribution of the phantom body. Elements specific to RCC and healthy kidney tissue were then analyzed to identify the locations of the diseased and healthy kidneys and generate tomographic images of the tumor. The extent of the RCC lesion inside the kidney was determined using 3D volume rendering. A similar procedure was used to generate images of each individual organ in the body. Six isotopes were studied in this work - (32)S, (12)C, (23)Na, (14)N, (31)P and (39)K. The results demonstrated that through a single NSECT scan performed in vivo, it is possible to identify the location of the kidneys and other organs within the body, determine the extent of the tumor within the organ, and to quantify the differences between cancer and healthy tissue-related isotopes with p ≤ 0.05. All of the images demonstrated appropriate concentration changes between the organs, with some discrepancy observed in (31)P, (39)K and (23)Na. The discrepancies were likely due to the low concentration of the elements in the tissue that were below the current detection sensitivity of the NSECT technique. PMID:23920157

  19. 3D element imaging using NSECT for the detection of renal cancer: a simulation study in MCNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viana, R. S.; Agasthya, G. A.; Yoriyaz, H.; Kapadia, A. J.

    2013-09-01

    This work describes a simulation study investigating the application of neutron stimulated emission computed tomography (NSECT) for noninvasive 3D imaging of renal cancer in vivo. Using MCNP5 simulations, we describe a method of diagnosing renal cancer in the body by mapping the 3D distribution of elements present in tumors using the NSECT technique. A human phantom containing the kidneys and other major organs was modeled in MCNP5. The element composition of each organ was based on values reported in literature. The two kidneys were modeled to contain elements reported in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and healthy kidney tissue. Simulated NSECT scans were executed to determine the 3D element distribution of the phantom body. Elements specific to RCC and healthy kidney tissue were then analyzed to identify the locations of the diseased and healthy kidneys and generate tomographic images of the tumor. The extent of the RCC lesion inside the kidney was determined using 3D volume rendering. A similar procedure was used to generate images of each individual organ in the body. Six isotopes were studied in this work—32S, 12C, 23Na, 14N, 31P and 39K. The results demonstrated that through a single NSECT scan performed in vivo, it is possible to identify the location of the kidneys and other organs within the body, determine the extent of the tumor within the organ, and to quantify the differences between cancer and healthy tissue-related isotopes with p ≤ 0.05. All of the images demonstrated appropriate concentration changes between the organs, with some discrepancy observed in 31P, 39K and 23Na. The discrepancies were likely due to the low concentration of the elements in the tissue that were below the current detection sensitivity of the NSECT technique.

  20. Dynamic infrared imaging for skin cancer screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godoy, Sebastián E.; Ramirez, David A.; Myers, Stephen A.; von Winckel, Greg; Krishna, Sanchita; Berwick, Marianne; Padilla, R. Steven; Sen, Pradeep; Krishna, Sanjay

    2015-05-01

    Dynamic thermal imaging (DTI) with infrared cameras is a non-invasive technique with the ability to detect the most common types of skin cancer. We discuss and propose a standardized analysis method for DTI of actual patient data, which achieves high levels of sensitivity and specificity by judiciously selecting pixels with the same initial temperature. This process compensates the intrinsic limitations of the cooling unit and is the key enabling tool in the DTI data analysis. We have extensively tested the methodology on human subjects using thermal infrared image sequences from a pilot study conducted jointly with the University of New Mexico Dermatology Clinic in Albuquerque, New Mexico (ClinicalTrials ID number NCT02154451). All individuals were adult subjects who were scheduled for biopsy or adult volunteers with clinically diagnosed benign condition. The sample size was 102 subjects for the present study. Statistically significant results were obtained that allowed us to distinguish between benign and malignant skin conditions. The sensitivity and specificity was 95% (with a 95% confidence interval of [87.8% 100.0%]) and 83% (with a 95% confidence interval of [73.4% 92.5%]), respectively, and with an area under the curve of 95%. Our results lead us to conclude that the DTI approach in conjunction with the judicious selection of pixels has the potential to provide a fast, accurate, non-contact, and non-invasive way to screen for common types of skin cancer. As such, it has the potential to significantly reduce the number of biopsies performed on suspicious lesions.

  1. Dynamic infrared imaging for the detection of malignancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Button, Terry M.; Li, Haifang; Fisher, Paul; Rosenblatt, Ruth; Dulaimy, Khaldoon; Li, Song; O'Hea, Brian; Salvitti, Mathew; Geronimo, Veronica; Geronimo, Christine; Jambawalikar, Sachin; Carvelli, Paola; Weiss, Richard

    2004-07-01

    The potential for malignancy detection using dynamic infrared imaging (DIRI) has been investigated in an animal model of human malignancy. Malignancy was apparent in images formed at the vasomotor and cardiogenic frequencies of tumour bearing mice. The observation of malignancy was removed by the administration of an agent that blocks vasodilation caused by nitric oxide (NO). Image patterns similar to those that characterize malignancy could be mimicked in normal mice using an NO producing agent. Apparently DIRI allows for cancer detection in this model through vasodilation caused by malignancy generated NO. Dynamic infrared detection of vasomotor and cardiogenic surface perfusion was validated in human subjects by a comparison with laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). Dynamic infrared imaging technology was then applied to breast cancer detection. It is shown that dynamic infrared images formed at the vasomotor and cardiogenic frequencies of the normal and malignant breast have image pattern differences, which may allow for breast cancer detection.

  2. High-resolution three-dimensional digital imaging of the human renal microcirculation: An aid to evaluating microvascular alterations in chronic kidney disease in humans.

    PubMed

    Uesugi, Noriko; Shimazu, Yoshihito; Aoba, Takaaki; Kikuchi, Kazunori; Nagata, Michio

    2015-11-01

    We have developed a new virtual microscopy method, with two- and three-dimensional (2D, 3D) synchronization, that enables visualization of the human renal microvasculature. The method was used to evaluate 120-150 serially cut sections of paraffin-embedded human renal tissue from nephrectomized samples. Virtual microscopy images of sections double-immunostained with antibodies against CD34 (an endothelium marker) and smooth muscle actin (an arterial media marker) and stained with periodic acid-Schiff were processed using digital imaging analysis software. Image registration was conducted to generate 3D displays with red-green-blue color segmentation. The reconstructed images of the microvasculature, including the interlobular arteries and the glomeruli, allowed visualization of 3D structures and direct glomerular connections. Synchronizing these 3D images with the corresponding 2D images revealed the relationships between arteriosclerotic lesions and downstream glomeruli. Thus, interlobular arteries with moderate intimal thickening and afferent arterioles with segmental hyalinosis/sclerosis, as seen on the 2D images, exhibited wall irregularities on the corresponding 3D images. However, these lesions were not directly influenced by lesions in downstream glomeruli, such as sclerotic lesions. Our virtual-slide method based on 2D and 3D image synchronization provides a comprehensive view of the renal microcirculation and therefore novel insights into the pathogenesis of vascular-associated renal diseases. PMID:26289029

  3. Contrast-enhanced 3D MRA with centric ordering in k space: a preliminary clinical experience in imaging the abdominal aorta and renal and peripheral arterial vasculature.

    PubMed

    Shetty, A N; Bis, K G; Vrachliotis, T G; Kirsch, M; Shirkhoda, A; Ellwood, R

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the clinical utility of a contrast-enhanced, centric reordered, three-dimensional (3D) MR angiography (MRA) pulse sequence in imaging the abdominal aorta and renal and peripheral lower extremity arteries. Twenty-eight MRA studies were performed on 23 patients and four volunteers at 1.5 T using a 3D contrast-enhanced, centric reordered pulse sequence. In 20 patients, the abdominal aorta and renal arteries were imaged, and in seven patients, the lower extremity arteries were imaged. In 19 patients, a total of 51 renal vessels were evaluated (33 renal arteries using .1 mmol/kg of gadopentetate dimeglumine and 18 renal arteries using .2 mmol/kg of gadoteridol). A total of 70 peripheral arterial segments were assessed using .2 mmol/kg of gadoteridol. Correlation with conventional angiography was made for the following 14 cases: renal artery stenosis (four cases), abdominal aortic stenosis (one case), arteriovenous fistula in a transplant kidney (one case), renal arteriovenous malformation (one case), common iliac artery aneurysms (one case), and peripheral lower extremity (six cases). Of the 70 peripheral arterial segments evaluated, in 35, there was correlation with x-ray angiography. The mean percent of aortic signal enhancement was significantly higher in the .2 mmol/kg dose group (370.8 +/- 190.3) than in the .1 mmol/kg dose group (184.5 +/- 128.9) (P = .02). However, there was no apparent difference between the two doses for visualization of the renal and accessory renal arteries. There was concordance between the contrast-enhanced 3D MRA studies and conventional angiography in all cases of renal artery and peripheral arterial stenoses and occlusions, including visualization of reconstituted peripheral arterial segments. There was no evidence of spin dephasing effects at sites of stenoses on the 3D contrast-enhanced MRA studies. Contrast-enhanced, centric reordered, 3D MRA can rapidly image the abdominal aorta and renal

  4. Local dynamic range compensation for scanning electron microscope imaging system.

    PubMed

    Sim, K S; Huang, Y H

    2015-01-01

    This is the extended project by introducing the modified dynamic range histogram modification (MDRHM) and is presented in this paper. This technique is used to enhance the scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging system. By comparing with the conventional histogram modification compensators, this technique utilizes histogram profiling by extending the dynamic range of each tile of an image to the limit of 0-255 range while retains its histogram shape. The proposed technique yields better image compensation compared to conventional methods. PMID:25969945

  5. Real-time extended dynamic range imaging in shearography

    SciTech Connect

    Groves, Roger M.; Pedrini, Giancarlo; Osten, Wolfgang

    2008-10-20

    Extended dynamic range (EDR) imaging is a postprocessing technique commonly associated with photography. Multiple images of a scene are recorded by the camera using different shutter settings and are merged into a single higher dynamic range image. Speckle interferometry and holography techniques require a well-modulated intensity signal to extract the phase information, and of these techniques shearography is most sensitive to different object surface reflectivities as it uses self-referencing from a sheared image. In this paper the authors demonstrate real-time EDR imaging in shearography and present experimental results from a difficult surface reflectivity sample: a wooden panel painting containing gold and dark earth color paint.

  6. Real-time extended dynamic range imaging in shearography.

    PubMed

    Groves, Roger M; Pedrini, Giancarlo; Osten, Wolfgang

    2008-10-20

    Extended dynamic range (EDR) imaging is a postprocessing technique commonly associated with photography. Multiple images of a scene are recorded by the camera using different shutter settings and are merged into a single higher dynamic range image. Speckle interferometry and holography techniques require a well-modulated intensity signal to extract the phase information, and of these techniques shearography is most sensitive to different object surface reflectivities as it uses self-referencing from a sheared image. In this paper the authors demonstrate real-time EDR imaging in shearography and present experimental results from a difficult surface reflectivity sample: a wooden panel painting containing gold and dark earth color paint. PMID:18936802

  7. New Magnetic Resonance Imaging Index for Renal Fibrosis Assessment: A Comparison between Diffusion-Weighted Imaging and T1 Mapping with Histological Validation

    PubMed Central

    Friedli, I.; Crowe, L. A.; Berchtold, L.; Moll, S.; Hadaya, K.; de Perrot, T.; Vesin, C.; Martin, P.-Y.; de Seigneux, S.; Vallée, J.-P.

    2016-01-01

    A need exists to noninvasively assess renal interstitial fibrosis, a common process to all kidney diseases and predictive of renal prognosis. In this translational study, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) T1 mapping and a new segmented Diffusion-Weighted Imaging (DWI) technique, for Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC), were first compared to renal fibrosis in two well-controlled animal models to assess detection limits. Validation against biopsy was then performed in 33 kidney allograft recipients (KARs). Predictive MRI indices, ΔT1 and ΔADC (defined as the cortico-medullary differences), were compared to histology. In rats, both T1 and ADC correlated well with fibrosis and inflammation showing a difference between normal and diseased kidneys. In KARs, MRI indices were not sensitive to interstitial inflammation. By contrast, ΔADC outperformed ΔT1 with a stronger negative correlation to fibrosis (R2 = 0.64 against R2 = 0.29 p < 0.001). ΔADC tends to negative values in KARs harboring cortical fibrosis of more than 40%. Using a discriminant analysis method, the ΔADC, as a marker to detect such level of fibrosis or higher, led to a specificity and sensitivity of 100% and 71%, respectively. This new index has potential for noninvasive assessment of fibrosis in the clinical setting. PMID:27439482

  8. New Magnetic Resonance Imaging Index for Renal Fibrosis Assessment: A Comparison between Diffusion-Weighted Imaging and T1 Mapping with Histological Validation.

    PubMed

    Friedli, I; Crowe, L A; Berchtold, L; Moll, S; Hadaya, K; de Perrot, T; Vesin, C; Martin, P-Y; de Seigneux, S; Vallée, J-P

    2016-01-01

    A need exists to noninvasively assess renal interstitial fibrosis, a common process to all kidney diseases and predictive of renal prognosis. In this translational study, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) T1 mapping and a new segmented Diffusion-Weighted Imaging (DWI) technique, for Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC), were first compared to renal fibrosis in two well-controlled animal models to assess detection limits. Validation against biopsy was then performed in 33 kidney allograft recipients (KARs). Predictive MRI indices, ΔT1 and ΔADC (defined as the cortico-medullary differences), were compared to histology. In rats, both T1 and ADC correlated well with fibrosis and inflammation showing a difference between normal and diseased kidneys. In KARs, MRI indices were not sensitive to interstitial inflammation. By contrast, ΔADC outperformed ΔT1 with a stronger negative correlation to fibrosis (R(2) = 0.64 against R(2) = 0.29 p < 0.001). ΔADC tends to negative values in KARs harboring cortical fibrosis of more than 40%. Using a discriminant analysis method, the ΔADC, as a marker to detect such level of fibrosis or higher, led to a specificity and sensitivity of 100% and 71%, respectively. This new index has potential for noninvasive assessment of fibrosis in the clinical setting. PMID:27439482

  9. True dynamic imaging and image composition by the optical translational projector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, F.; Liu, Y.; He, S.

    2016-04-01

    Based on transformation optics, a novel shell (an optical translational projector (OTP)) that can be utilized for true dynamic imaging is designed. Our OTP has several notable features: Firstly OTP can form an image without a scanning process, which results in fast imaging. Secondly, the object to be imaged by the OTP can move inside the OTP, which means that we can achieve dynamic real-time imaging. Thirdly, we can achieve an image composition effect by using two OTPs that form two images in a common spatial region. The OTP will lead a new way to future true 3D volumetric display technologies.

  10. Dynamic flat panel detector versus image intensifier in cardiac imaging: dose and image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vano, E.; Geiger, B.; Schreiner, A.; Back, C.; Beissel, J.

    2005-12-01

    The practical aspects of the dosimetric and imaging performance of a digital x-ray system for cardiology procedures were evaluated. The system was configured with an image intensifier (II) and later upgraded to a dynamic flat panel detector (FD). Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) to phantoms of 16, 20, 24 and 28 cm of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and the image quality of a test object were measured. Images were evaluated directly on the monitor and with numerical methods (noise and signal-to-noise ratio). Information contained in the DICOM header for dosimetry audit purposes was also tested. ESAK values per frame (or kerma rate) for the most commonly used cine and fluoroscopy modes for different PMMA thicknesses and for field sizes of 17 and 23 cm for II, and 20 and 25 cm for FD, produced similar results in the evaluated system with both technologies, ranging between 19 and 589 µGy/frame (cine) and 5 and 95 mGy min-1 (fluoroscopy). Image quality for these dose settings was better for the FD version. The 'study dosimetric report' is comprehensive, and its numerical content is sufficiently accurate. There is potential in the future to set those systems with dynamic FD to lower doses than are possible in the current II versions, especially for digital cine runs, or to benefit from improved image quality.

  11. Effects of exercise and excitement on mesenteric and renal dynamics in conscious, unrestrained baboons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatner, S. F.

    1978-01-01

    Radiotelemetry was used to measure arterial pressure and mesenteric and renal blood flows from nine unrestrained, conscious baboons during periods of rest, moderate exercise, and extreme excitement. A description of the experiments hardware is presented, including artificial depressants phenylcyclidine hydrochloride, 0.5-1.0 mg/kg, and pentobarbital sodium, 15 mg/kg, and an ultrasonic telemetry flow meter. Results showed rising heart rate and arterial pressure coupled with a reduction of mesenteric and renal flows as the level of exercise was increased. These findings are compared with mesenteric and renal flows somewhat above control level, but relatively stable heart rate and arterial pressure, postprandially. Attention is given to a quantitative analysis of the experimental results.

  12. Accurate diagnosis of renal transplant rejection by indium-111 platelet imaging despite postoperative cyclosporin therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Collier, B.D.; Adams, M.B.; Kauffman, H.M.; Trembath, L.; Hoffmann, R.G.; Tisdale, P.L.; Rao, S.A.; Hellman, R.S.; Isitman, A.T.

    1988-08-01

    Previous reports indicate that In-111 platelet scintigraphy (IPS) is a reliable test for the early diagnosis of acute post-operative renal transplant rejection (TR). However, the recent introduction of cyclosporin for post-transplantation immunosuppression requires that the diagnostic efficacy of IPS once again be established. Therefore, a prospective IPS study of 73 post-operative renal transplant recipients was conducted. Fourty-nine patients received cyclosporin and 24 patients did not receive this drug. Between these two patient groups, there were no significant differences in the diagnostic sensitivities (0.86 vs 0.80) and specificities (0.93 vs 0.84) with which TR was identified. We conclude that during the first two weeks following renal transplantation the cyclosporin treatment regimen used at our institution does not limit the reliability of IPS as a test for TR.

  13. Renal ablation using magnetic resonance-guided high intensity focused ultrasound: Magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology assessment

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Maythem; Krug, Roland; Do, Loi; Hetts, Steven W; Wilson, Mark W

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To use magnetic resonance-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MRg-HIFU), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histopathology for noninvasively ablating, quantifying and characterizing ablated renal tissue. METHODS: Six anesthetized/mechanically-ventilated pigs underwent single/double renal sonication (n = 24) using a 3T-MRg-HIFU (1.1 MHz frequency and 3000J-4400J energies). T2-weighted fast spin echo (T2-W), perfusion saturation recovery gradient echo and contrast enhanced (CE) T1-weighted (T1-W) sequences were used for treatment planning, temperature monitoring, lesion visualization, characterization and quantification, respectively. Histopathology was conducted in excised kidneys to quantify and characterize cellular and vascular changes. Paired Student’s t-test was used and a P-value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS: Ablated renal parenchyma could not be differentiated from normal parenchyma on T2-W or non-CE T1-W sequences. Ablated renal lesions were visible as hypoenhanced regions on perfusion and CE T1-W MRI sequences, suggesting perfusion deficits and necrosis. Volumes of ablated parenchyma on CE T1-W images in vivo (0.12-0.36 cm3 for single sonication 3000J, 0.50-0.84 cm3, for double 3000J, 0.75-0.78 cm3 for single 4400J and 0.12-2.65 cm3 for double 4400J) and at postmortem (0.23-0.52 cm3, 0.25-0.82 cm3, 0.45-0.68 cm3 and 0.29-1.80 cm3, respectively) were comparable. The ablated volumes on 3000J and 4400J double sonication were significantly larger than single (P < 0.01), thus, the volume and depth of ablated tissue depends on the applied energy and number of sonication. Macroscopic and microscopic examinations confirmed the locations and presence of coagulation necrosis, vascular damage and interstitial hemorrhage, respectively. CONCLUSION: Contrast enhanced MRI provides assessment of MRg-HIFU renal ablation. Histopathology demonstrated coagulation necrosis, vascular damage and confirmed the volume of damage seen on MRI

  14. Imaging features of left ovarian and renal venous aneurysms: two case reports and literature review.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jeongin; Park, Sung Bin; Shin, Mack; Lee, Eun Sun; Park, Hyun Jeong; Lee, Jong Beum; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2016-01-01

    Venous aneurysms rarely occur in the visceral veins. We report two extremely rare cases of venous aneurysms, one of the ovarian vein and the other one of the renal vein. The aneurysms were depicted on grayscale and color Doppler ultrasonography as anechoic saccular structures with compressibility and blood flow. Pulsed Doppler ultrasonography showed venous flow. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed aneurysmal venous dilatation. We diagnosed left ovarian and renal venous aneurysms. We also review the clinical presentation and implications of visceral venous aneurysms. PMID:27317200

  15. Neutron Imaging Reveals Internal Plant Hydraulic Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, J.; Bilheux, H.; Kang, M.; Voisin, S.; Cheng, C.; Horita, J.; Perfect, E.

    2011-12-01

    In situ quantification of soil-plant water fluxes have not been fully successful due to a lack of non-destructive techniques capable of revealing roots or water fluxes at relevant spatial scales. Neutron imaging is a unique non-invasive tool that can assess sub-millimeter scale material properties and transport in situ, and which has been successfully applied to characterize soil and plant water status. Here, we have applied neutron radiography and tomography to quantify water transport through individual maize roots in response to internal plant demand. Zea mays seedlings were grown for 10 days in Flint silica sand within 2.6 cm diameter Al chambers. Using a reactor-based neutron source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (HFIR), water fluxes were tracked through the maize soil-root systems by collecting consecutive neutron radiographs over a 12 h period following irrigation with D2O. D has a much lower neutron attenuation than H, thus D2O displacement of existing H2O within the plant vascular system, or influx of D2O into previously dry tissue or soil is readily tracked by changes in image intensity through time. Plant water release and uptake was regulated by periodically cycling on a high-intensity grow light. From each maize replicate, selected regions of interest (ROI) were delineated around individual roots, root free soil, stem and leaf segments. Changes in ROI were tracked through time to reveal patterns of water flux. The hydration of root and stem tissue cycled in response to illumination; root water content often increased during darkness, then decreased with illumination as water was transported from the root into the stem. Relative root-shoot hydration through time illustrates the balance between demand, storage capacity and uptake, which varies depending on root characteristics and its localized soil environment. The dynamic transport of water between soil, individual roots, stems and leaves was readily visualized and quantified illustrating the value

  16. Dynamics of Renal Histamine in Normal Rat Kidney and in Nephrosis Induced by Aminonucleoside of Puromycin

    PubMed Central

    Abboud, Hanna E.; Ou, S. L.; Velosa, J. A.; Shah, Sudhir V.; Dousa, Thomas P.

    1982-01-01

    Histamine is known to have a profound effect on capillary permeability in nonrenal tissues and this effect is presumably mediated by cyclic (c)AMP. Because in our previous experiments we found that histamine stimulates cAMP accumulation in glomeruli (Torres, V. E., T. E. Northryn, R. M. Edwards, S. V. Shah, and T. P. Dousa. 1978. Modulation of cyclic nucleotides in isolated rat glomeruli. J. Clin. Invest.62: 1334.), we now explored whether this amine is formed in renal tissue, namely in glomeruli, and whether its renal metabolism is altered in experimental nephrosis induced by puromycin aminonucleoside (PA) in rats. In normal rats, histamine content was higher (Δ + 240%) in cortex than in medulla. In glomeruli isolated from renal cortex, histamine content was significantly higher (Δ + 260%) than in tubules. Incubation of isolated glomeruli with l-histidine resulted in a time-dependent increase of histamine content in glomeruli, but no change was found in tubules. The increase in glomerular histamine was blocked by the histidine decarboxylase inhibitor bromocresine. In rats with PA nephrosis induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of PA (15 mg/100 g body wt) urinary excretion of histamine was markedly increased (>Δ + 200%), but control rats did not differ from rats with PA nephrosis in urinary excretions of l-histidine and of creatinine. At the peak of proteinuria (day 9 after injection of PA) the plasma level of histamine was slightly elevated, and plasma histidine slightly decreased in animals that developed PA nephrosis. The content of histamine was markedly higher and the level of histidine was significantly lower in the renal cortex of PA-nephrotic rats as compared with controls; PA-nephrotic and control rats did not differ in the content of histidine and histamine in the liver. In addition, the content of histamine was higher in glomeruli isolated from PA-nephrotic rats; lesser difference was found in cortical tubules. The results further indicate

  17. Differential uptake of Tc-99m DMSA and Tc-99m EC in renal tubular disorders: Report of two cases and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Reddy Gorla, Arun Kumar; Agrawal, Kanhaiyalal; Sood, Ashwani; Bhattacharya, Anish; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2014-01-01

    Tc-99m DMSA and Tc-99m EC studies are invaluable functional imaging modalities for renal structural and functional assessment. Normally, the relative renal function estimated by the two methods correlates well with each other. We here present two patients with renal tubular acidosis who showed impaired/altered DMSA uptake with normal EC renal dynamic study depicting the pitfall of DMSA imaging in tubular disorders. The two presented cases also depict distinct pattern of Tc-99m DMSA scintigraphic findings in patients with proximal and distal renal tubular acidosis, thus highlighting the factors affecting DMSA kinetics. PMID:25210282

  18. Content-adaptive ghost imaging of dynamic scenes.

    PubMed

    Li, Ziwei; Suo, Jinli; Hu, Xuemei; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-04-01

    Limited by long acquisition time of 2D ghost imaging, current ghost imaging systems are so far inapplicable for dynamic scenes. However, it's been demonstrated that nature images are spatiotemporally redundant and the redundancy is scene dependent. Inspired by that, we propose a content-adaptive computational ghost imaging approach to achieve high reconstruction quality under a small number of measurements, and thus achieve ghost imaging of dynamic scenes. To utilize content-adaptive inter-frame redundancy, we put the reconstruction under an iterative reweighted optimization, with non-uniform weight computed from temporal-correlated frame sequences. The proposed approach can achieve dynamic imaging at 16fps with 64×64-pixel resolution. PMID:27137022

  19. Recurrent renal giant leiomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Öziş, Salih Erpulat; Gülpınar, Kamil; Şahlı, Zafer; Konak, Baha Burak; Keskin, Mete; Özdemir, Süleyman; Ataoğlu, Ömür

    2016-01-01

    Primary renal leiomyosarcomas are rare, aggressive tumors. They constitute 1–2% of adult malignant renal tumors. Although leiomyosarcomas are the most common histological type (50–60%) of renal sarcomas, information on renal leiomyosarcoma is limited. Local or systemic recurrences are common. The radiological appearance of renal leiomyosarcomas is not specific, therefore renal leiomyosarcoma cannot be distinguished from renal cell carcinoma by imaging methods in all patients. A 74-year-old female patient presented to our clinic complaining of a palpable mass on the right side of her abdomen in November 2012. The abdominal magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass, 25 × 24 × 23 cm in size. Her past medical history revealed that she has undergone right radical nephrectomy in 2007, due to a 11 × 12 × 13 cm renal mass that was then reported as renal cell carcinoma on abdominal magnetic resonance imaging, but the pathological diagnosis was low-grade renal leiomyosarcoma. The most recent follow-up of the patient was in 2011, with no signs of local recurrence or distant metastases within this four-year period. The patient underwent laparotomy on November 2012, and a 35 cm retroperitoneal mass was excised. The pathological examination of the mass was reported as high-grade leiomyosarcoma. The formation of this giant retroperitoneal mass in 1 year can be explained by the transformation of the lesion’s pathology from low-grade to a high-grade tumor.

  20. Diagnostic Utility of Diffusion-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Differentiating Small Solid Renal Tumors (≤4 cm) at 3.0T Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Han-Mei; Wu, Ying-Hua; Gan, Qi; Lyu, Xiao; Zhu, Xiang-Lan; Kuang, Min; Liu, Rong-Bo; Huang, Zi-Xing; Yuan, Fang; Liu, Xi-Jiao; Song, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to assess the performance of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurement obtained with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) to distinguish renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) from small benign solid renal tumors (≤4 cm). Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 49 consecutive patients with histopathologically confirmed small solid renal tumors, and seven healthy volunteers were imaged using nonenhanced MRI and DW-MRI. The ADC map was calculated using the b values of 0, 50, 400, and 600 s/mm2 and values compared via the Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney tests. The utility of ADC for differentiating RCCs and benign lesions was assessed using a receiver operating characteristic curve. Multiple nonenhanced MRI features were analyzed by Logistic regression. Results: The tumors consisted of 33 cases of clear-cell RCCs (ccRCCs) and 16 cases of benign tumors, including 14 cases of minimal fat angiomyolipomas and 2 cases of oncocytomas. The ADCs showed significant differences among benign tumors ([0.90 ± 0.52] × 10−3 mm2/s), ccRCCs ([1.53 ± 0.31] × 10−3 mm2/s) and the normal renal parenchyma ([2.22 ± 0.12] × 10−3 mm2/s) (P < 0.001). Moreover, there was statistically significant difference between high and low-grade ccRCCs (P = 0.004). Using a cut-off ADC of 1.36 × 10−3 mm2/s, DW-MRI resulted in an area under the curve (AUC), sensitivity, and specificity equal to 0.839, 75.8%, and 87.5%, respectively. Nonenhanced MRI alone and the combination of imaging methods led to an AUC, sensitivity and specificity equal to 0.919, 93.9%, and 81.2%, 0.998, 97%, and 100%, respectively. The Logistic regression showed that the location of the center of the tumor (inside the contour of the kidney) and appearance of stiff blood vessel were significantly helpful for diagnosing ccRCCs. Conclusions: DW-MRI has potential in distinguishing ccRCCs from benign lesions in human small solid renal tumors (≤4 cm), and in

  1. Joint focus stacking and high dynamic range imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Qinchun; Gunturk, Bahadir K.; Batur, Aziz U.

    2013-01-01

    Focus stacking and high dynamic range (HDR) imaging are two paradigms of computational photography. Focus stacking aims to produce an image with greater depth of field (DOF) from a set of images taken with different focus distances, whereas HDR imaging aims to produce an image with higher dynamic range from a set of images taken with different exposure settings. In this paper, we present an algorithm which combines focus stacking and HDR imaging in order to produce an image with both higher dynamic range and greater DOF than any of the input images. The proposed algorithm includes two main parts: (i) joint photometric and geometric registration and (ii) joint focus stacking and HDR image creation. In the first part, images are first photometrically registered using an algorithm that is insensitive to small geometric variations, and then geometrically registered using an optical flow algorithm. In the second part, images are merged through weighted averaging, where the weights depend on both local sharpness and exposure information. We provide experimental results with real data to illustrate the algorithm. The algorithm is also implemented on a smartphone with Android operating system.

  2. Renal Blood Oxygenation Level-dependent Imaging in Longitudinal Follow-up of Donated and Remaining Kidneys.

    PubMed

    Seif, Maryam; Eisenberger, Ute; Binser, Tobias; Thoeny, Harriet C; Krauer, Fabienne; Rusch, Aurelia; Boesch, Chris; Vogt, Bruno; Vermathen, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Purpose To determine renal oxygenation changes associated with uninephrectomy and transplantation in both native donor kidneys and transplanted kidneys by using blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) MR imaging. Materials and Methods The study protocol was approved by the local ethics committee. Thirteen healthy kidney donors and their corresponding recipients underwent kidney BOLD MR imaging with a 3-T imager. Written informed consent was obtained from each subject. BOLD MR imaging was performed in donors before uninephrectomy and in donors and recipients 8 days, 3 months, and 12 months after transplantation. R2* values, which are inversely related to tissue partial pressure of oxygen, were determined in the cortex and medulla. Longitudinal R2* changes were statistically analyzed by using repeated measures one-way analysis of variance with post hoc pair-wise comparisons. Results R2* values in the remaining kidneys significantly decreased early after uninephrectomy in both the medulla and cortex (P < .003), from 28.9 sec(-1) ± 2.3 to 26.4 sec(-1) ± 2.5 in the medulla and from 18.3 sec(-1) ± 1.5 to 16.3 sec(-1) ± 1.0 in the cortex, indicating increased oxygen content. In donors, R2* remained significantly decreased in both the medulla and cortex at 3 (P < .01) and 12 (P < .01) months. In transplanted kidneys, R2* remained stable during the first year after transplantation, with no significant change. Among donors, cortical R2* was found to be negatively correlated with estimated glomerular filtration rate (R = -0.47, P < .001). Conclusion The results suggest that BOLD MR imaging may potentially be used to monitor renal functional changes in both remaining and corresponding transplanted kidneys. (©) RSNA, 2016. PMID:26744926

  3. Accuracy of radionuclide imaging in distinguishing renal masses from normal variants

    SciTech Connect

    Older, R.A.; Korobkin, M.; Workman, J.; Cleeve, D.M.; Cleeve, L.K.; Sullivan, D.; Webster, G.D.

    1980-08-01

    To determine the accuracy of scintigraphy in distinguishing true renal masses from normal variants, 40 patients with excretory urographic findings indicating a possible, but not definite, mass lesion were studied. Scintigraphy correctly identified 17 true masses and 17 normal variants. Four false positive and two false negative results were obtained.

  4. Evaluation of Renal Oxygenation Level Changes after Water Loading Using Susceptibility-Weighted Imaging and T2* Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jiule; Wu, Dongmei; Chen, Jie; Pan, Liang; Sun, Jun; Xing, Shijun; Dai, Yongming

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the feasibility of susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) while monitoring changes in renal oxygenation level after water loading. Materials and Methods Thirty-two volunteers (age, 28.0 ± 2.2 years) were enrolled in this study. SWI and multi-echo gradient echo sequence-based T2* mapping were used to cover the kidney before and after water loading. Cortical and medullary parameters were measured using small regions of interest, and their relative changes due to water loading were calculated based on baseline and post-water loading data. An intraclass correlation coefficient analysis was used to assess inter-observer reliability of each parameter. A receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was conducted to compare the performance of the two methods for detecting renal oxygenation changes due to water loading. Results Both medullary phase and medullary T2* values increased after water loading (p < 0.001), although poor correlations were found between the phase changes and the T2* changes (p > 0.05). Interobserver reliability was excellent for the T2* values, good for SWI cortical phase values, and moderate for the SWI medullary phase values. The area under receiver operating characteristic curve of the SWI medullary phase values was 0.85 and was not different from the medullary T2* value (0.84). Conclusion Susceptibility-weighted imaging enabled monitoring changes in the oxygenation level in the medulla after water loading, and may allow comparable feasibility to detect renal oxygenation level changes due to water loading compared with that of T2* mapping. PMID:26175582

  5. Dynamic Chest Image Analysis: Model-Based Perfusion Analysis in Dynamic Pulmonary Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jianming; Järvi, Timo; Kiuru, Aaro; Kormano, Martti; Svedström, Erkki

    2003-12-01

    The "Dynamic Chest Image Analysis" project aims to develop model-based computer analysis and visualization methods for showing focal and general abnormalities of lung ventilation and perfusion based on a sequence of digital chest fluoroscopy frames collected with the dynamic pulmonary imaging technique. We have proposed and evaluated a multiresolutional method with an explicit ventilation model for ventilation analysis. This paper presents a new model-based method for pulmonary perfusion analysis. According to perfusion properties, we first devise a novel mathematical function to form a perfusion model. A simple yet accurate approach is further introduced to extract cardiac systolic and diastolic phases from the heart, so that this cardiac information may be utilized to accelerate the perfusion analysis and improve its sensitivity in detecting pulmonary perfusion abnormalities. This makes perfusion analysis not only fast but also robust in computation; consequently, perfusion analysis becomes computationally feasible without using contrast media. Our clinical case studies with 52 patients show that this technique is effective for pulmonary embolism even without using contrast media, demonstrating consistent correlations with computed tomography (CT) and nuclear medicine (NM) studies. This fluoroscopical examination takes only about 2 seconds for perfusion study with only low radiation dose to patient, involving no preparation, no radioactive isotopes, and no contrast media.

  6. The accuracy of quantitative parameters in (99m) Tc-MAG3 dynamic renography: a national audit based on virtual image data.

    PubMed

    Brolin, Gustav; Edenbrandt, Lars; Granerus, Göran; Olsson, Anna; Afzelius, David; Gustafsson, Agneta; Jonsson, Cathrine; Hagerman, Jessica; Johansson, Lena; Riklund, Katrine; Ljungberg, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Assessment of image analysis methods and computer software used in (99m) Tc-MAG3 dynamic renography is important to ensure reliable study results and ultimately the best possible care for patients. In this work, we present a national multicentre study of the quantification accuracy in (99m) Tc-MAG3 renography, utilizing virtual dynamic scintigraphic data obtained by Monte Carlo-simulated scintillation camera imaging of digital phantoms with time-varying activity distributions. Three digital phantom studies were distributed to the participating departments, and quantitative evaluation was performed with standard clinical software according to local routines. The differential renal function (DRF) and time to maximum renal activity (Tmax ) were reported by 21 of the 28 Swedish departments performing (99m) Tc-MAG3 studies as of 2012. The reported DRF estimates showed a significantly lower precision for the phantom with impaired renal uptake than for the phantom with normal uptake. The Tmax estimates showed a similar trend, but the difference was only significant for the right kidney. There was a significant bias in the measured DRF for all phantoms caused by different positions of the left and right kidney in the anterior-posterior direction. In conclusion, this study shows that virtual scintigraphic studies are applicable for quality assurance and that there is a considerable uncertainty associated with standard quantitative parameters in dynamic (99m) Tc-MAG3 renography, especially for patients with impaired renal function. PMID:25348641

  7. Imaging of vascular dynamics within the foot using dynamic diffuse optical tomography to diagnose peripheral arterial disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, M. A.; Kim, H. K.; Hoi, J. W.; Kim, I.; Dayal, R.; Shrikande, G.; Hielscher, A. H.

    2013-03-01

    Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD) is the narrowing of the functional area of the artery generally due to atherosclerosis. It affects between 8-12 million people in the United States and if untreated this can lead to ulceration, gangrene and ultimately amputation. The current diagnostic method for PAD is the ankle-brachial index (ABI). The ABI is a ratio of the patient's systolic blood pressure in the foot to that of the brachial artery in the arm, a ratio below 0.9 is indicative of affected vasculature. However, this method is ineffective in patients with calcified arteries (diabetic and end-stage renal failure patients), which falsely elevates the ABI recording resulting in a false negative reading. In this paper we present our results in a pilot study to deduce optical tomography's ability to detect poor blood perfusion in the foot. We performed an IRB approved 30 patient study, where we imaged the feet of the enrolled patients during a five stage dynamic imaging sequence. The patients were split up into three groups: 10 healthy subjects, 10 PAD patients and 10 PAD patients with diabetes and they were imaged while applying a pressure cuff to their thigh. Differences in the magnitude of blood pooling in the foot and rate at which the blood pools in the foot are all indicative of arterial disease.

  8. Non-destructive Faraday imaging of dynamically controlled ultracold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajdacz, Miroslav; Pedersen, Poul; Mørch, Troels; Hilliard, Andrew; Arlt, Jan; Sherson, Jacob

    2013-05-01

    We investigate non-destructive measurements of ultra-cold atomic clouds based on dark field imaging of spatially resolved Faraday rotation. In particular, we pursue applications to dynamically controlled ultracold atoms. The dependence of the Faraday signal on laser detuning, atomic density and temperature is characterized in a detailed comparison with theory. In particular the destructivity per measurement is extremely low and we illustrate this by imaging the same cloud up to 2000 times. The technique is applied to avoid the effect of shot-to-shot fluctuations in atom number calibration. Adding dynamic changes to system parameters, we demonstrate single-run vector magnetic field imaging and single-run spatial imaging of the system's dynamic behavior. The method can be implemented particularly easily in standard imaging systems by the insertion of an extra polarizing beam splitter. These results are steps towards quantum state engineering using feedback control of ultracold atoms.

  9. Imaging the molecular dynamics of dissociative electron attachment to water

    SciTech Connect

    Adaniya, Hidihito; Rudek, B.; Osipov, Timur; Haxton, Dan; Weber, Thorsten; Rescigno, Thomas N.; McCurdy, C.W.; Belkacem, Ali

    2009-10-19

    Momentum imaging experiments on dissociative electron attachment to the water molecule are combined with ab initio theoretical calculations of the angular dependence of the quantum mechanical amplitude for electron attachment to provide a detailed picture of the molecular dynamics of dissociation attachment via the two lowest energy Feshbach resonances. The combination of momentum imaging experiments and theory can reveal dissociation dynamics for which the axial recoil approximation breaks down and thus provides a powerful reaction microscope for DEA to polyatomics.

  10. Renal Medullary and Cortical Correlates in Fibrosis, Epithelial Mass, Microvascularity, and Microanatomy Using Whole Slide Image Analysis Morphometry.

    PubMed

    Farris, Alton B; Ellis, Carla L; Rogers, Thomas E; Lawson, Diane; Cohen, Cynthia; Rosen, Seymour

    2016-01-01

    Renal tubulointerstitial injury often leads to interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy (IF/TA). IF/TA is typically assessed in the renal cortex and can be objectively quantitated with computerized image analysis (IA). However, the human medulla accounts for a substantial proportion of the nephron; therefore, medullary scarring will have important cortical consequences and may parallel overall chronic renal injury. Trichrome, periodic acid-Schiff (PAS), and collagen III immunohistochemistry (IHC) were visually examined and quantitated on scanned whole slide images (WSIs) (N = 67 cases). When tuned to measure fibrosis, IA of trichrome and Trichrome-PAS (T-P) WSIs correlated for all anatomic compartments (among cortex, medulla, and entire tissue, r = 0.84 to 0.89, P all <0.0001); and collagen III deposition correlated between compartments (r = 0.69 to 0.89, P <0.0001 to 0.0002); however, trichrome and T-P measures did not correlate with collagen deposition, suggesting heterogeneous contributions to extracellular matrix deposition. Epithelial cell mass (EPCM) correlated between cortex and medulla when measured with cytokeratin IHC and with the trichrome red portion (r = 0.85 and 0.66, respectively, all P < 0.0001). Visual assessment also correlated between compartments for fibrosis and EPCM. Correlations were found between increasing medullary inner stripe (IS) width and fibrosis in all of the tissue and the medulla by trichrome morphometry (r = 0.56, P < 0.0001, and r = 0.48, P = 0.00008, respectively). Weak correlations were found between increasing IS width and decreasing visual assessment of all tissue EPCM. Microvessel density (MVD) and microvessel area (MVA) measured using a MVD algorithm applied to CD34 IHC correlated significantly between all compartments (r = 0.76 to 0.87 for MVD and 0.71 to 0.87 for MVA, P all < 0.0001). Overall, these findings demonstrate the interrelatedness of the cortex and medulla and the importance of considering the renal parenchyma

  11. Renal Medullary and Cortical Correlates in Fibrosis, Epithelial Mass, Microvascularity, and Microanatomy Using Whole Slide Image Analysis Morphometry

    PubMed Central

    Farris, Alton B.; Ellis, Carla L.; Rogers, Thomas E.; Lawson, Diane; Cohen, Cynthia; Rosen, Seymour

    2016-01-01

    Renal tubulointerstitial injury often leads to interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy (IF/TA). IF/TA is typically assessed in the renal cortex and can be objectively quantitated with computerized image analysis (IA). However, the human medulla accounts for a substantial proportion of the nephron; therefore, medullary scarring will have important cortical consequences and may parallel overall chronic renal injury. Trichrome, periodic acid–Schiff (PAS), and collagen III immunohistochemistry (IHC) were visually examined and quantitated on scanned whole slide images (WSIs) (N = 67 cases). When tuned to measure fibrosis, IA of trichrome and Trichrome-PAS (T-P) WSIs correlated for all anatomic compartments (among cortex, medulla, and entire tissue, r = 0.84 to 0.89, P all <0.0001); and collagen III deposition correlated between compartments (r = 0.69 to 0.89, P <0.0001 to 0.0002); however, trichrome and T-P measures did not correlate with collagen deposition, suggesting heterogeneous contributions to extracellular matrix deposition. Epithelial cell mass (EPCM) correlated between cortex and medulla when measured with cytokeratin IHC and with the trichrome red portion (r = 0.85 and 0.66, respectively, all P < 0.0001). Visual assessment also correlated between compartments for fibrosis and EPCM. Correlations were found between increasing medullary inner stripe (IS) width and fibrosis in all of the tissue and the medulla by trichrome morphometry (r = 0.56, P < 0.0001, and r = 0.48, P = 0.00008, respectively). Weak correlations were found between increasing IS width and decreasing visual assessment of all tissue EPCM. Microvessel density (MVD) and microvessel area (MVA) measured using a MVD algorithm applied to CD34 IHC correlated significantly between all compartments (r = 0.76 to 0.87 for MVD and 0.71 to 0.87 for MVA, P all < 0.0001). Overall, these findings demonstrate the interrelatedness of the cortex and medulla and the importance of considering the renal

  12. Remote histology learning from static versus dynamic microscopic images.

    PubMed

    Mione, Sylvia; Valcke, Martin; Cornelissen, Maria

    2016-05-01

    Histology is the study of microscopic structures in normal tissue sections. Curriculum redesign in medicine has led to a decrease in the use of optical microscopes during practical classes. Other imaging solutions have been implemented to facilitate remote learning. With advancements in imaging technologies, learning material can now be digitized. Digitized microscopy images can be presented in either a static or dynamic format. This study of remote histology education identifies whether dynamic pictures are superior to static images for the acquisition of histological knowledge. Test results of two cohorts of second-year Bachelor in Medicine students at Ghent University were analyzed in two consecutive academic years: Cohort 1 (n = 190) and Cohort 2 (n = 174). Students in Cohort 1 worked with static images whereas students in Cohort 2 were presented with dynamic images. ANCOVA was applied to study differences in microscopy performance scores between the two cohorts, taking into account any possible initial differences in prior knowledge. The results show that practical histology scores are significantly higher with dynamic images as compared to static images (F (1,361) = 15.14, P < 0.01), regardless of student's gender and performance level. Several reasons for this finding can be explained in accordance with cognitivist learning theory. Since the findings suggest that knowledge construction with dynamic pictures is stronger as compared to static images, dynamic images should be introduced in a remote setting for microscopy education. Further implementation within a larger electronic learning management system needs to be explored in future research. Anat Sci Educ 9: 222-230. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists. PMID:26441000

  13. Optical imaging of fast, dynamic neurophysiological function.

    SciTech Connect

    Rector, D. M.; Carter, K. M.; Yao, X.; George, J. S.

    2002-01-01

    Fast evoked responses were imaged from rat dorsal medulla and whisker barrel cortex. To investigate the biophysical mechanisms involved, fast optical responses associated with isolated crustacean nerve stimulation were recorded using birefringence and scattered light. Such studies allow optimization of non-invasive imaging techniques being developed for use in humans.

  14. Fast content-based image retrieval using dynamic cluster tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jinyan; Sun, Jizhou; Wu, Rongteng; Zhang, Yaping

    2008-03-01

    A novel content-based image retrieval data structure is developed in present work. It can improve the searching efficiency significantly. All images are organized into a tree, in which every node is comprised of images with similar features. Images in a children node have more similarity (less variance) within themselves in relative to its parent. It means that every node is a cluster and each of its children nodes is a sub-cluster. Information contained in a node includes not only the number of images, but also the center and the variance of these images. Upon the addition of new images, the tree structure is capable of dynamically changing to ensure the minimization of total variance of the tree. Subsequently, a heuristic method has been designed to retrieve the information from this tree. Given a sample image, the probability of a tree node that contains the similar images is computed using the center of the node and its variance. If the probability is higher than a certain threshold, this node will be recursively checked to locate the similar images. So will its children nodes if their probability is also higher than that threshold. If no sufficient similar images were founded, a reduced threshold value would be adopted to initiate a new seeking from the root node. The search terminates when it found sufficient similar images or the threshold value is too low to give meaningful sense. Experiments have shown that the proposed dynamic cluster tree is able to improve the searching efficiency notably.

  15. Estimation of low dynamic range images from single Bayer image using exposure look-up table for high dynamic range image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tae-Hyoung; Kyung, Wang-Jun; Lee, Cheol-Hee; Ha, Yeong-Ho

    2011-01-01

    High dynamic range(HDR) imaging is a technique to represent the wider range of luminance from the lightest and darkest area of an image than normal digital imaging techniques. These techniques merge multiple images, called as LDR(low dynamic range) or SDR(standard dynamic range) images which have proper luminance with different exposure steps, to cover the entire dynamic range of real scenes. In the initial techniques, a series of acquisition process for LDR images according to exposure steps are required. However, several acquisition process of LDR images induce ghost artifact for HDR images due to moving objects. Recent researches have tried to reduce the number of LDR images with optimal exposure steps to eliminate the ghost artifacts. Nevertheless, they still require more than three times of acquisition processes, resulting ghosting artifacts. In this paper, we propose an HDR imaging from a single Bayer image with arbitrary exposures without additional acquisition processes. This method first generates new LDR images which are corresponding to each average luminance from user choices, based on Exposure LUTs(look-up tables). Since the LUTs contains relationship between uniform-gray patches and their average luminances according to whole exposure steps in a camera, new exposure steps for any average luminance can be easily estimated by applying average luminance of camera-output image and corresponding exposure step to LUTs. Then, objective LDR images are generated with new exposure steps from the current input image. Additionally, we compensate the color generation of saturated area by considering different sensitivity of each RGB channel from neighbor pixels in the Bayer image. Resulting HDR images are then merged by general method using captured images and estimated images for comparison. Observer's preference test shows that HDR images from the proposed method provides similar appearance with the result images using captured images.

  16. Design of a dynamic dual-foveated imaging system.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiaoyu; Chang, Jun; Zhang, Yunqiang; Wang, Xi; Zhang, Bochuan; Gao, Lei; Xiao, Liping

    2015-10-01

    A new kind of dynamic dual-foveated imaging system in the infrared band is designed and optimized in this paper. Dual-foveated imaging refers to the variation in spatial resolution at the two selected fields across the image. Such variable resolution imaging system is suitable for a variety of applications including monitoring, recognition, and remote operation of unmanned aerial vehicle. In this system, a transmissive spatial light modulator (SLM) is used as an active optical element which is located near the image plane instead of pupil plane creatively in order to divide the two selected fields. PMID:26480118

  17. Dynamic imaging of gut function: allowing the blind to see

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Bishnu P.; Wang, Thomas D.

    2015-01-01

    Improved methods are needed to dynamically image gut behaviour to assess for neuromuscular degenerative diseases. So-called nanonaps (soluble nanoformulated naphthalocyanines) have been developed for oral administration to pass through the intestines and provide high contrast for visualizing bowel motion on photoacoustic imaging. Moreover, radiotracer labelling of these nanoparticles facilitates multimodal detection using PET. PMID:25157622

  18. Dynamic Ultrasound Imaging Applications to Quantify Musculoskeletal Function

    PubMed Central

    Sikdar, Siddhartha; Wei, Qi; Cortes, Nelson

    2014-01-01

    Advances in imaging methods have led to new capability to study muscle and tendon motion in vivo. Direct measurements of muscle and tendon kinematics using imaging may lead to improved understanding of musculoskeletal function. This review presents quantitative ultrasound methods for muscle dynamics that can be used to assess in vivo musculoskeletal function when integrated with other conventional biomechanical measurements. PMID:24949846

  19. On image sensor dynamic range utilized by security cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannesson, Anders

    2012-03-01

    The dynamic range is an important quantity used to describe an image sensor. Wide/High/Extended dynamic range is often brought forward as an important feature to compare one device to another. The dynamic range of an image sensor is normally given as a single number, which is often insufficient since a single number will not fully describe the dynamic capabilities of the sensor. A camera is ideally based on a sensor that can cope with the dynamic range of the scene. Otherwise it has to sacrifice some part of the available data. For a security camera the latter may be critical since important objects might be hidden in the sacrificed part of the scene. In this paper we compare the dynamic capabilities of some image sensors utilizing a visual tool. The comparison is based on the use case, common in surveillance, where low contrast objects may appear in any part of a scene that through its uneven illumination, span a high dynamic range. The investigation is based on real sensor data that has been measured in our lab and a synthetic test scene is used to mimic the low contrast objects. With this technique it is possible to compare sensors with different intrinsic dynamic properties as well as some capture techniques used to create an effect of increased dynamic range.

  20. Blurred Star Image Processing for Star Sensors under Dynamic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weina; Quan, Wei; Guo, Lei

    2012-01-01

    The precision of star point location is significant to identify the star map and to acquire the aircraft attitude for star sensors. Under dynamic conditions, star images are not only corrupted by various noises, but also blurred due to the angular rate of the star sensor. According to different angular rates under dynamic conditions, a novel method is proposed in this article, which includes a denoising method based on adaptive wavelet threshold and a restoration method based on the large angular rate. The adaptive threshold is adopted for denoising the star image when the angular rate is in the dynamic range. Then, the mathematical model of motion blur is deduced so as to restore the blurred star map due to large angular rate. Simulation results validate the effectiveness of the proposed method, which is suitable for blurred star image processing and practical for attitude determination of satellites under dynamic conditions. PMID:22778666

  1. Undersampled dynamic magnetic resonance imaging using kernel principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanhua; Ying, Leslie

    2014-01-01

    Compressed sensing (CS) is a promising approach to accelerate dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Most existing CS methods employ linear sparsifying transforms. The recent developments in non-linear or kernel-based sparse representations have been shown to outperform the linear transforms. In this paper, we present an iterative non-linear CS dynamic MRI reconstruction framework that uses the kernel principal component analysis (KPCA) to exploit the sparseness of the dynamic image sequence in the feature space. Specifically, we apply KPCA to represent the temporal profiles of each spatial location and reconstruct the images through a modified pre-image problem. The underlying optimization algorithm is based on variable splitting and fixed-point iteration method. Simulation results show that the proposed method outperforms conventional CS method in terms of aliasing artifact reduction and kinetic information preservation. PMID:25570262

  2. Unsupervised analysis of small animal dynamic Cerenkov luminescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinelli, Antonello E.; Boschi, Federico

    2011-12-01

    Clustering analysis (CA) and principal component analysis (PCA) were applied to dynamic Cerenkov luminescence images (dCLI). In order to investigate the performances of the proposed approaches, two distinct dynamic data sets obtained by injecting mice with 32P-ATP and 18F-FDG were acquired using the IVIS 200 optical imager. The k-means clustering algorithm has been applied to dCLI and was implemented using interactive data language 8.1. We show that cluster analysis allows us to obtain good agreement between the clustered and the corresponding emission regions like the bladder, the liver, and the tumor. We also show a good correspondence between the time activity curves of the different regions obtained by using CA and manual region of interest analysis on dCLIT and PCA images. We conclude that CA provides an automatic unsupervised method for the analysis of preclinical dynamic Cerenkov luminescence image data.

  3. Computerized image analysis of cell-cell interactions in human renal tissue by using multi-channel immunoflourescent confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yahui; Jiang, Yulei; Liarski, Vladimir M.; Kaverina, Natalya; Clark, Marcus R.; Giger, Maryellen L.

    2012-03-01

    Analysis of interactions between B and T cells in tubulointerstitial inflammation is important for understanding human lupus nephritis. We developed a computer technique to perform this analysis, and compared it with manual analysis. Multi-channel immunoflourescent-microscopy images were acquired from 207 regions of interest in 40 renal tissue sections of 19 patients diagnosed with lupus nephritis. Fresh-frozen renal tissue sections were stained with combinations of immunoflourescent antibodies to membrane proteins and counter-stained with a cell nuclear marker. Manual delineation of the antibodies was considered as the reference standard. We first segmented cell nuclei and cell membrane markers, and then determined corresponding cell types based on the distances between cell nuclei and specific cell-membrane marker combinations. Subsequently, the distribution of the shortest distance from T cell nuclei to B cell nuclei was obtained and used as a surrogate indicator of cell-cell interactions. The computer and manual analyses results were concordant. The average absolute difference was 1.1+/-1.2% between the computer and manual analysis results in the number of cell-cell distances of 3 μm or less as a percentage of the total number of cell-cell distances. Our computerized analysis of cell-cell distances could be used as a surrogate for quantifying cell-cell interactions as either an automated and quantitative analysis or for independent confirmation of manual analysis.

  4. High dynamic range infrared radiometry and imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coon, Darryl D.; Karunasiri, R. P. G.; Bandara, K. M. S. V.

    1988-01-01

    The use is described of cryogenically cooled, extrinsic silicon infrared detectors in an unconventional mode of operation which offers an unusually large dynamic range. The system performs intensity-to-frequency conversion at the focal plane via simple circuits with very low power consumption. The incident IR intensity controls the repetition rate of short duration output pulses over a pulse rate dynamic range of about 10(6). Theory indicates the possibility of monotonic and approx. linear response over the full dynamic range. A comparison between the theoretical and the experimental results shows that the model provides a reasonably good description of experimental data. Some measurements of survivability with a very intense IR source were made on these devices and found to be very encouraging. Evidence continues to indicate that some variations in interpulse time intervals are deterministic rather than probabilistic.

  5. Dynamic image fusion and general observer preference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burks, Stephen D.; Doe, Joshua M.

    2010-04-01

    Recent developments in image fusion give the user community many options for ways of presenting the imagery to an end-user. Individuals at the US Army RDECOM CERDEC Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate have developed an electronic system that allows users to quickly and efficiently determine optimal image fusion algorithms and color parameters based upon collected imagery and videos from environments that are typical to observers in a military environment. After performing multiple multi-band data collections in a variety of military-like scenarios, different waveband, fusion algorithm, image post-processing, and color choices are presented to observers as an output of the fusion system. The observer preferences can give guidelines as to how specific scenarios should affect the presentation of fused imagery.

  6. Efficient sinogram smoothing for dynamic neuroreceptor PET imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xiaochuan; La Riviere, Patrick J.; Ye, James; Mukherjee, J.; Chen, Chin-Tu

    1997-05-01

    We have developed image-restoration techniques applicable to dynamic positron emission tomography that improve the visual quality and quantitative accuracy of neuroreceptor images. Starting wit data from a study of dopamine D-2 receptors in rhesus monkey striata using selective radioligands such as fallypride, we performed a novel effective 3D smoothing of the dynamic sinogram at a much lower computational cost than a truly 3D, adaptive smoothing. The processed sinogram was then input to a standard filtered back-projection algorithm and the resulting images were sharper and less noisy than images reconstructed from the unprocessed sinogram. Simulations were performed and the radioligand binding curves extracted from the restored images were found to be smoother and more accurate than those extracted form the unprocessed reconstructions. Comparison was also made to reconstructions from sinograms processed by the principal component analysis/projection onto convex sets algorithm.

  7. Non-destructive Faraday imaging of dynamically controlled ultracold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajdacz, Miroslav; Pedersen, Poul L.; Mørch, Troels; Hilliard, Andrew J.; Arlt, Jan; Sherson, Jacob F.

    2013-08-01

    We describe an easily implementable method for non-destructive measurements of ultracold atomic clouds based on dark field imaging of spatially resolved Faraday rotation. The signal-to-noise ratio is analyzed theoretically and, in the absence of experimental imperfections, the sensitivity limit is found to be identical to other conventional dispersive imaging techniques. The dependence on laser detuning, atomic density, and temperature is characterized in a detailed comparison with theory. Due to low destructiveness, spatially resolved images of the same cloud can be acquired up to 2000 times. The technique is applied to avoid the effect of shot-to-shot fluctuations in atom number calibration, to demonstrate single-run vector magnetic field imaging and single-run spatial imaging of the system's dynamic behavior. This demonstrates that the method is a useful tool for the characterization of static and dynamically changing properties of ultracold atomic clouds.

  8. Non-destructive Faraday imaging of dynamically controlled ultracold atoms.

    PubMed

    Gajdacz, Miroslav; Pedersen, Poul L; Mørch, Troels; Hilliard, Andrew J; Arlt, Jan; Sherson, Jacob F

    2013-08-01

    We describe an easily implementable method for non-destructive measurements of ultracold atomic clouds based on dark field imaging of spatially resolved Faraday rotation. The signal-to-noise ratio is analyzed theoretically and, in the absence of experimental imperfections, the sensitivity limit is found to be identical to other conventional dispersive imaging techniques. The dependence on laser detuning, atomic density, and temperature is characterized in a detailed comparison with theory. Due to low destructiveness, spatially resolved images of the same cloud can be acquired up to 2000 times. The technique is applied to avoid the effect of shot-to-shot fluctuations in atom number calibration, to demonstrate single-run vector magnetic field imaging and single-run spatial imaging of the system's dynamic behavior. This demonstrates that the method is a useful tool for the characterization of static and dynamically changing properties of ultracold atomic clouds. PMID:24007051

  9. Evaluation of a novel laparoscopic camera for characterization of renal ischemia in a porcine model using digital light processing (DLP) hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olweny, Ephrem O.; Tan, Yung K.; Faddegon, Stephen; Jackson, Neil; Wehner, Eleanor F.; Best, Sara L.; Park, Samuel K.; Thapa, Abhas; Cadeddu, Jeffrey A.; Zuzak, Karel J.

    2012-03-01

    Digital light processing hyperspectral imaging (DLP® HSI) was adapted for use during laparoscopic surgery by coupling a conventional laparoscopic light guide with a DLP-based Agile Light source (OL 490, Optronic Laboratories, Orlando, FL), incorporating a 0° laparoscope, and a customized digital CCD camera (DVC, Austin, TX). The system was used to characterize renal ischemia in a porcine model.

  10. Dynamic reprogramming of DNA methylation in SETD2-deregulated renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tiedemann, Rochelle L.; Hlady, Ryan A.; Hanavan, Paul D.; Lake, Douglas F.; Tibes, Raoul; Lee, Jeong-Heon; Choi, Jeong-Hyeon; Ho, Thai H.; Robertson, Keith D.

    2016-01-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) harbor frequent mutations in epigenetic modifiers including SETD2, the H3K36me3 writer. We profiled DNA methylation (5mC) across the genome in cell line-based models of SETD2 inactivation and SETD2 mutant primary tumors because 5mC has been linked to H3K36me3 and is therapeutically targetable. SETD2 depleted cell line models (long-term and acute) exhibited a DNA hypermethylation phenotype coinciding with ectopic gains in H3K36me3 centered across intergenic regions adjacent to low expressing genes, which became upregulated upon dysregulation of the epigenome. Poised enhancers of developmental genes were prominent hypermethylation targets. SETD2 mutant primary ccRCCs, papillary renal cell carcinomas, and lung adenocarcinomas all demonstrated a DNA hypermethylation phenotype that segregated tumors by SETD2 genotype and advanced grade. These findings collectively demonstrate that SETD2 mutations drive tumorigenesis by coordinated disruption of the epigenome and transcriptome,and they have important implications for future therapeutic strategies targeting chromatin regulator mutant tumors. PMID:26646321

  11. Advances in fluorescence labeling strategies for dynamic cellular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Kevin M; Palmer, Amy E

    2014-01-01

    Synergistic advances in optical physics, probe design, molecular biology, labeling techniques and computational analysis have propelled fluorescence imaging into new realms of spatiotemporal resolution and sensitivity. This review aims to discuss advances in fluorescent probes and live-cell labeling strategies, two areas that remain pivotal for future advances in imaging technology. Fluorescent protein– and bio-orthogonal–based methods for protein and RNA imaging are discussed as well as emerging bioengineering techniques that enable their expression at specific genomic loci (for example, CRISPR and TALENs). Important attributes that contribute to the success of each technique are emphasized, providing a guideline for future advances in dynamic live-cell imaging. PMID:24937069

  12. Unsupervised Deconvolution of Dynamic Imaging Reveals Intratumor Vascular Heterogeneity and Repopulation Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Choyke, Peter L.; Wang, Niya; Clarke, Robert; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.; Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.; Wang, Ge; Wang, Yue

    2014-01-01

    With the existence of biologically distinctive malignant cells originated within the same tumor, intratumor functional heterogeneity is present in many cancers and is often manifested by the intermingled vascular compartments with distinct pharmacokinetics. However, intratumor vascular heterogeneity cannot be resolved directly by most in vivo dynamic imaging. We developed multi-tissue compartment modeling (MTCM), a completely unsupervised method of deconvoluting dynamic imaging series from heterogeneous tumors that can improve vascular characterization in many biological contexts. Applying MTCM to dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of breast cancers revealed characteristic intratumor vascular heterogeneity and therapeutic responses that were otherwise undetectable. MTCM is readily applicable to other dynamic imaging modalities for studying intratumor functional and phenotypic heterogeneity, together with a variety of foreseeable applications in the clinic. PMID:25379705

  13. High Dynamic Range Digital Imaging of Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Brian A.; Chalmers, Alan; Debattista, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    The ability to capture engineering imagery with a wide degree of dynamic range during rocket launches is critical for post launch processing and analysis [USC03, NNC86]. Rocket launches often present an extreme range of lightness, particularly during night launches. Night launches present a two-fold problem: capturing detail of the vehicle and scene that is masked by darkness, while also capturing detail in the engine plume.

  14. Dynamic imaging model and parameter optimization for a star tracker.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jinyun; Jiang, Jie; Zhang, Guangjun

    2016-03-21

    Under dynamic conditions, star spots move across the image plane of a star tracker and form a smeared star image. This smearing effect increases errors in star position estimation and degrades attitude accuracy. First, an analytical energy distribution model of a smeared star spot is established based on a line segment spread function because the dynamic imaging process of a star tracker is equivalent to the static imaging process of linear light sources. The proposed model, which has a clear physical meaning, explicitly reflects the key parameters of the imaging process, including incident flux, exposure time, velocity of a star spot in an image plane, and Gaussian radius. Furthermore, an analytical expression of the centroiding error of the smeared star spot is derived using the proposed model. An accurate and comprehensive evaluation of centroiding accuracy is obtained based on the expression. Moreover, analytical solutions of the optimal parameters are derived to achieve the best performance in centroid estimation. Finally, we perform numerical simulations and a night sky experiment to validate the correctness of the dynamic imaging model, the centroiding error expression, and the optimal parameters. PMID:27136791

  15. Ship dynamics for maritime ISAR imaging.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2008-02-01

    Demand is increasing for imaging ships at sea. Conventional SAR fails because the ships are usually in motion, both with a forward velocity, and other linear and angular motions that accompany sea travel. Because the target itself is moving, this becomes an Inverse- SAR, or ISAR problem. Developing useful ISAR techniques and algorithms is considerably aided by first understanding the nature and characteristics of ship motion. Consequently, a brief study of some principles of naval architecture sheds useful light on this problem. We attempt to do so here. Ship motions are analyzed for their impact on range-Doppler imaging using Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (ISAR). A framework for analysis is developed, and limitations of simple ISAR systems are discussed.

  16. Spectral imaging of microvascular function in a renal cell carcinoma after treatment with a vascular disrupting agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wankhede, Mamta; deDeugd, Casey; Siemann, Dietmar W.; Sorg, Brian S.

    2009-02-01

    Tumors are highly metabolically active and thus require ample oxygen and nutrients to proliferate. Neovasculature generated by angiogenesis is required for tumors to grow beyond a size of about 1-2mm. Functional tumor vasculature also provides an access point for development of distant metastases. Due to the importance of the microvasculature for tumor growth, proliferation, and metastasis, the microvasculature has emerged as a therapeutic target for treatment of solid tumors. We employed spectral imaging in a rodent window chamber model to observe and measure the oxygen transport function of tumor microvasculature in a human renal cell carcinoma after treatment with a fast acting vascular disrupting agent. Human Caki-1 cells were grown in a dorsal skin-fold window chamber in athymic nude mice. Spectral imaging was used to measure hemoglobin saturation immediately before, immediately after and also at 2, 4, 6, 8, 24 and 48 hours after administration of the tubulin binding agent OXi4503. Up to 4 hours after treatment, tumor microvasculature was disrupted from the tumor core towards the periphery as seen in deoxygenation as well as structural changes of the vasculature. Reoxygenation and neovascularization commenced from the periphery towards the core from 6 - 48 hours after treatment. The timing of the effects of vascular disrupting agents can influence scheduling of repeat treatments and combinatorial treatments such as chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Spectral imaging can potentially provide this information in certain laboratory models from endogenous signals with microvessel resolution.

  17. Image findings of monomorphic non-hogdkin lymphoproliferative disorder in a post renal transplant patient diagnosed with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kamaleshwaran, Koramadai Karuppusamy; Rajasekar, Thirugnanam; Shibu, Deepu; Radhakrishnan, Edathurthy Kalarikal; Shinto, Ajit Sugunan

    2014-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a heterogeneous group of lymphoid proliferations caused by immunosuppression after solid organ or bone marrow transplantation. PTLD is categorized by early lesion, polymorphic PTLD and monomorphic PTLD. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18 FDG-PET/CT) scans have clinical significance in the evaluation of PTLD following renal transplantation. We report imaging findings of a monomorphic non-Hodgkin lymphoma, post renal transplant seen on FDG PET/CT in a 32-year-old lactating woman. Whole body FDG- ET/CT demonstrated uptake in right external iliac and inguinal lymph nodes. PMID:25210292

  18. Image findings of monomorphic non-hogdkin lymphoproliferative disorder in a post renal transplant patient diagnosed with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kamaleshwaran, Koramadai Karuppusamy; Rajasekar, Thirugnanam; Shibu, Deepu; Radhakrishnan, Edathurthy Kalarikal; Shinto, Ajit Sugunan

    2014-07-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a heterogeneous group of lymphoid proliferations caused by immunosuppression after solid organ or bone marrow transplantation. PTLD is categorized by early lesion, polymorphic PTLD and monomorphic PTLD. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18 FDG-PET/CT) scans have clinical significance in the evaluation of PTLD following renal transplantation. We report imaging findings of a monomorphic non-Hodgkin lymphoma, post renal transplant seen on FDG PET/CT in a 32-year-old lactating woman. Whole body FDG- ET/CT demonstrated uptake in right external iliac and inguinal lymph nodes. PMID:25210292

  19. Direct Estimation of Kinetic Parametric Images for Dynamic PET

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guobao; Qi, Jinyi

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) can monitor spatiotemporal distribution of radiotracer in vivo. The spatiotemporal information can be used to estimate parametric images of radiotracer kinetics that are of physiological and biochemical interests. Direct estimation of parametric images from raw projection data allows accurate noise modeling and has been shown to offer better image quality than conventional indirect methods, which reconstruct a sequence of PET images first and then perform tracer kinetic modeling pixel-by-pixel. Direct reconstruction of parametric images has gained increasing interests with the advances in computing hardware. Many direct reconstruction algorithms have been developed for different kinetic models. In this paper we review the recent progress in the development of direct reconstruction algorithms for parametric image estimation. Algorithms for linear and nonlinear kinetic models are described and their properties are discussed. PMID:24396500

  20. Segmentation and volumetric measurement of renal cysts and parenchyma from MR images of polycystic kidneys using multi-spectral analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, K. T.; Commean, P. K.; Brunsden, B. S.; Baumgarten, D. A.; King, B. F., Jr.; Wetzel, L. H.; Kenney, P. J.; Chapman, A. B.; Torres, V. E.; Grantham, J. J.; Guay-Woodford, L. M.; Tao, C.; Miller, J. P.; Meyers, C. M.; Bennett, W. M.

    2008-03-01

    For segmentation and volume measurement of renal cysts and parenchyma from kidney MR images in subjects with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), a semi-automated, multi-spectral anaylsis (MSA) method was developed and applied to T1- and T2-weighted MR images. In this method, renal cysts and parenchyma were characterized and segmented for their characteristic T1 and T2 signal intensity differences. The performance of the MSA segmentation method was tested on ADPKD phantoms and patients. Segmented renal cysts and parenchyma volumes were measured and compared with reference standard measurements by fluid displacement method in the phantoms and stereology and region-based thresholding methods in patients, respectively. As results, renal cysts and parenchyma were segmented successfully with the MSA method. The volume measurements obtained with MSA were in good agreement with the measurements by other segmentation methods for both phantoms and subjects. The MSA method, however, was more time-consuming than the other segmentation methods because it required pre-segmentation, image registration and tissue classification-determination steps.

  1. High-resolution dynamic speech imaging with deformation estimation.

    PubMed

    Maojing Fu; Barlaz, Marissa S; Shosted, Ryan K; Zhi-Pei Liang; Sutton, Bradley P

    2015-08-01

    Dynamic speech magnetic resonance imaging (DSMRI) is a promising technique for visualizing articulatory motion in real time. However, many existing applications of DSMRI have been limited by slow imaging speed and the lack of quantitative motion analysis. In this paper, we present a novel DS-MRI technique to simultaneously estimate dynamic image sequence of speech and the associated deformation field. Extending on our previous Partial Separability (PS) model-based methods, the proposed technique visualizes both speech motion and deformation with a spatial resolution of 2.2 × 2.2 mm(2) and a nominal frame rate of 100 fps. Also, the technique enables direct analysis of articulatory motion through the deformation fields. Effectiveness of the method is systematically examined via in vivo experiments. Utilizing the obtained high-resolution images and deformation fields, we also performed a phonetics study on Brazilian Portuguese to show the method's practical utility. PMID:26736572

  2. State-selected imaging studies of formic acid photodissociation dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Cunshun; Yang Xueming; Zhang Cuimei

    2010-04-21

    The photodissociation dynamics of formic acid have been studied using the velocity map ion imaging at the UV region. The measurements were made with resonance enhancement multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectroscopy and dc slicing ion imaging. The OH REMPI spectrum from the photodissociation of formic acid at 244 nm has been recorded. The spectrum shows low rotational excitation (N{<=}4). By fixing the probe laser at the specific rotational transitions, the resulting OH images from various dissociation wavelengths have been accumulated. The translational energy distributions derived from the OH images imply that about half of the available energies go to the photofragments internal excitation. The dissociation dynamics of formic acid were also discussed in view of the recent theoretical calculations.

  3. Imaging Brain Dynamics Using Independent Component Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Tzyy-Ping; Makeig, Scott; McKeown, Martin J.; Bell, Anthony J.; Lee, Te-Won; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2010-01-01

    The analysis of electroencephalographic (EEG) and magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recordings is important both for basic brain research and for medical diagnosis and treatment. Independent component analysis (ICA) is an effective method for removing artifacts and separating sources of the brain signals from these recordings. A similar approach is proving useful for analyzing functional magnetic resonance brain imaging (fMRI) data. In this paper, we outline the assumptions underlying ICA and demonstrate its application to a variety of electrical and hemodynamic recordings from the human brain. PMID:20824156

  4. Dynamic imaging of preimplantation embryos in the murine oviduct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Jason C.; Wang, Shang; Larina, Irina V.

    2015-03-01

    Studying the dynamic events involved in early preimplantation embryo development during their transport from the ovary to the uterus is of great significance to improve the understanding of infertility, and eventually to help reduce the infertility rate. The mouse is a widely used mammalian model in reproductive biology, however, dynamic imaging studies of mouse preimplantation embryos have been very limited due to the lack of proper imaging tools for such analysis. Here, we introduce an innovative approach, which can potentially be used for three-dimensional imaging and tracking of murine oocytes with optical coherence tomography (OCT) as they exit the ovary and migrate through the oviduct to the uterus. The imaging is performed with spectral-domain OCT system operating at 70 kHz A-scan rate. The preimplantation embryos and surrounding cumulus cells can be clearly visualized. Results from our experiments indicate that OCT has great potential for dynamic imaging of the oviduct and oocyte tracking, which provides the foundation for future investigations aimed at understanding dynamic events during preimplantation stages in normal development as well as in mouse models of infertility.

  5. Systematic De-saturation of Images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in the Solar Dynamics Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, R. A.; Torre, G.; Piana, M.

    2014-10-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images of solar flares provided by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) are often affected by saturation effects in their core, physically most interesting, region. We introduce an image reconstruction procedure that allows recovering information in the primary saturation domain using the secondary images produced by the diffraction fringes as input data. Such a procedure is based on standard image-processing tools like correlation, convolution, and back-projection. Its effectiveness is tested in the case of AIA/SDO observations of the 2013 July 8 flaring event.

  6. SYSTEMATIC DE-SATURATION OF IMAGES FROM THE ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY IN THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, R. A.; Torre, G.; Piana, M. E-mail: torre@dima.unige.it

    2014-10-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images of solar flares provided by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) are often affected by saturation effects in their core, physically most interesting, region. We introduce an image reconstruction procedure that allows recovering information in the primary saturation domain using the secondary images produced by the diffraction fringes as input data. Such a procedure is based on standard image-processing tools like correlation, convolution, and back-projection. Its effectiveness is tested in the case of AIA/SDO observations of the 2013 July 8 flaring event.

  7. A microfluidic system for dynamic yeast cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Philip J; Helman, Noah C; Lim, Wendell A; Hung, Paul J

    2008-01-01

    The investigation of cellular processes and gene regulatory networks within living cells requires the development of improved technology for dynamic, single cell imaging. Here, we demonstrate a microfluidic system capable of mechanical trapping of yeast cells with continuous flow and flow switching capability during time-lapse high magnification fluorescence imaging. The novel functionality of the system was validated by observing the response of pheromone-induced expression of GFP in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:18254385

  8. 3D imaging using projected dynamic fringes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Michael M.; Atkinson, John T.; Harvey, David M.; Hobson, Clifford A.; Lalor, Michael J.

    1994-12-01

    An instrument capable of highly accurate, non-contact range measurement has been developed, which is based upon the principle of projected rotating fringes. More usually known as dynamic fringe projection, it is this technique which is exploited in the dynamic automated range transducer (DART). The intensity waveform seen at the target and sensed by the detector, contains all the information required to accurately determine the fringe order. This, in turn, allows the range to be evaluated by the substitution of the fringe order into a simple algebraic expression. Various techniques for the analysis of the received intensity signals from the surface of the target have been investigated. The accuracy to which the range can be determined ultimately depends upon the accuracy to which the fringe order can be evaluated from the received intensity waveform. It is extremely important to be able to closely determine the fractional fringe order value, to achieve any meaningful results. This paper describes a number of techniques which have been used to analyze the intensity waveform, and critically appraises their suitability in terms of accuracy and required speed of operation. This work also examines the development of this instrument for three-dimensional measurements based on single or two beam systems. Using CCD array detectors, a 3-D range map of the object's surface may be produced.

  9. Hemodynamic analysis of renal artery stenosis using computational fluid dynamics technology based on unenhanced steady-state free precession magnetic resonance angiography: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weisheng; Qian, Yi; Lin, Jiang; Lv, Peng; Karunanithi, Kaavya; Zeng, Mengsu

    2014-02-01

    This study aims to evaluate the feasibility of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technology in analysis of renal artery stenosis (RAS) based on unenhanced MR angiography (MRA). Thirty hypertensive patients with unilateral RAS, and 10 normal volunteers, underwent unenhanced MRA on a 1.5 T MR scanner. 12 of 30 patients also underwent ultrasound (US) to detect peak systolic velocity. The patient-specific CFD based on MRA was carried out thereafter. Stenosis grades and hemodynamic variables at the stenosis of main renal artery, including pressure difference (PD), velocity and mass flow rate (MFR), were analysed. And the hemodynamic indices of stenoses were compared with the parameters of normal renal arteries and available US velocity profile. High intraclass correlation coefficient (value 0.995) and no significant difference (p > 0.05) was shown between maximum velocity of CFD and peak systolic velocity of US in 12 patients. For normal renal arteries, the average PD, velocity and MFR were all in the reported normal physiological range. However, for stenotic arteries, the translesional PD and velocity of main renal arteries increased with the severity of stenotic degrees, while the MFR decreased. 50 % diameter stenosis was the threshold at which all three hemodynamic parameters experienced significant changes (p < 0.01). This preliminary study shows that unenhanced-MRA-based CFD can be utilized to noninvasively analyse hemodynamic parameters of RAS. The acquired variables may provide meaningful information regarding stratification of the stenosis and further therapeutic treatment. PMID:24318538

  10. Using surface deformation to image reservoir dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Vasco, D.W.; Karasaki, K.; Doughty, C.

    2000-02-01

    The inversion of surface deformation data such as tilt, displacement, or strain provides a noninvasive method for monitoring subsurface volume change. Reservoir volume change is related directly to processes such as pressure variations induced by injection and withdrawal. The inversion procedure is illustrated by an application to tiltmeter data from the Hijiori test site in Japan. An inversion of surface tilt data allows one to image flow processes in a fractured granodiorite. Approximately 650 barrels of water, injected 2 km below the surface, produces a peak surface tilt of the order of 0.8 microradians. The authors find that the pattern of volume change in the granodiorite is very asymmetrical, elongated in a north-northwesterly direction, and the maximum volume change is offset by more than 0.7 km to the east of the pumping well. The inversion of a suite of leveling data from the Wilmington oil field in Long Beach, California, images large-scale reservoir volume changes in 12 one- to two-year increments from 1976 to 1996. The influence of various production strategies is seen in the reservoir volume changes. In particular, a steam flood in fault block 2 in the northwest portion of the field produced a sudden decrease in reservoir volume.

  11. Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization amplification of NMR flow imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingwood, Mark D.; Sederman, Andrew J.; Mantle, Mick D.; Gladden, Lynn F.; Han, Songi

    2012-03-01

    We describe the first study comparing the ability of phase shift velocity imaging and Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced imaging to generate contrast for visualizing the flow of water. Prepolarization of water by the Overhauser DNP mechanism is performed in the 0.35 T fringe field of an unshielded 2.0 T non-clinical MRI magnet, followed by the rapid transfer of polarization-enhanced water to the 2.0 T imaging location. This technique, previously named remotely enhanced liquids for image contrast (RELIC), produces a continuous flow of hyperpolarized water and gives up to an -8.2-fold enhanced signal within the image with respect to thermally polarized signal at 2.0 T. Using flow through a cylindrical expansion phantom as a model system, spin-echo intensity images with DNP are compared to 3D phase shift velocity images to illustrate the complementary information available from the two techniques. The spin-echo intensity images enhanced with DNP show that the levels of enhancement provide an estimate of the transient propagation of flow, while the phase shift velocity images quantitatively measure the velocity of each imaging voxel. Phase shift velocity images acquired with and without DNP show that DNP weights velocity values towards those of the inflowing (DNP-enhanced) water, while velocity images without DNP more accurately reflect the average steady-state velocity of each voxel. We conclude that imaging with DNP prepolarized water better captures the transient path of water shortly after injection, while phase shift velocity imaging is best for quantifying the steady-state flow of water throughout the entire phantom.

  12. High signal intensity in dentate nucleus and globus pallidus on unenhanced T1-weighted MR images in three patients with impaired renal function and vascular calcification.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Sebastiano; Schroeder, Christophe; Froehlich, Johannes M; Pasch, Andreas; Thoeny, Harriet C

    2016-05-01

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents (primarily those with linear chelates) are associated with a dose-dependent signal hyperintensity in the dentate nucleus and the globus pallidus on unenhanced T1-weighted MRI following administration to selected patients with normal renal function. The accumulation of gadolinium has also been reported in the skin, heart, liver, lung, and kidney of patients with impaired renal function suffering from nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF). Here we report on three patients with impaired renal function and vascular calcification (two with confirmed NSF) whose unenhanced T1-weighted MRIs showed conspicuous high signal intensity in the dentate nucleus and the globus pallidus after they had been exposed to relatively low doses of linear gadolinium-based contrast agents (0.27, 0.45, and 0.68 mmol/kg). Signal ratios between dentate nucleus and pons and between globus pallidus and thalamus were comparable with previously reported measurements in subjects without renal impairment. Of note, all three analysed patients suffered from transient signs of neurological disorders of undetermined cause. In conclusion, the exposure to 0.27-0.68 mmol/kg of linear gadolinium-based contrast agent was associated with probable gadolinium accumulation in the brain of three patients suffering from impaired renal function and vascular calcification. © 2016 The Authors. Contrast Media & Molecular Imaging published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26929131

  13. A new method using multiphoton imaging and morphometric analysis for differentiating chromophobe renal cell carcinoma and oncocytoma kidney tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Binlin; Mukherjee, Sushmita; Jain, Manu

    2016-03-01

    Distinguishing chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (chRCC) from oncocytoma on hematoxylin and eosin images may be difficult and require time-consuming ancillary procedures. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM), an optical imaging modality, was used to rapidly generate sub-cellular histological resolution images from formalin-fixed unstained tissue sections from chRCC and oncocytoma.Tissues were excited using 780nm wavelength and emission signals (including second harmonic generation and autofluorescence) were collected in different channels between 390 nm and 650 nm. Granular structure in the cell cytoplasm was observed in both chRCC and oncocytoma. Quantitative morphometric analysis was conducted to distinguish chRCC and oncocytoma. To perform the analysis, cytoplasm and granules in tumor cells were segmented from the images. Their area and fluorescence intensity were found in different channels. Multiple features were measured to quantify the morphological and fluorescence properties. Linear support vector machine (SVM) was used for classification. Re-substitution validation, cross validation and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve were implemented to evaluate the efficacy of the SVM classifier. A wrapper feature algorithm was used to select the optimal features which provided the best predictive performance in separating the two tissue types (classes). Statistical measures such as sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and area under curve (AUC) of ROC were calculated to evaluate the efficacy of the classification. Over 80% accuracy was achieved as the predictive performance. This method, if validated on a larger and more diverse sample set, may serve as an automated rapid diagnostic tool to differentiate between chRCC and oncocytoma. An advantage of such automated methods are that they are free from investigator bias and variability.

  14. Automatic image segmentation by dynamic region growth and multiresolution merging.

    PubMed

    Ugarriza, Luis Garcia; Saber, Eli; Vantaram, Sreenath Rao; Amuso, Vincent; Shaw, Mark; Bhaskar, Ranjit

    2009-10-01

    Image segmentation is a fundamental task in many computer vision applications. In this paper, we propose a new unsupervised color image segmentation algorithm, which exploits the information obtained from detecting edges in color images in the CIE L *a *b * color space. To this effect, by using a color gradient detection technique, pixels without edges are clustered and labeled individually to identify some initial portion of the input image content. Elements that contain higher gradient densities are included by the dynamic generation of clusters as the algorithm progresses. Texture modeling is performed by color quantization and local entropy computation of the quantized image. The obtained texture and color information along with a region growth map consisting of all fully grown regions are used to perform a unique multiresolution merging procedure to blend regions with similar characteristics. Experimental results obtained in comparison to published segmentation techniques demonstrate the performance advantages of the proposed method. PMID:19535323

  15. The Michelson Interferometer for Airglow Dynamics Imaging (MIADI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langille, J.; Nakamura, T.; Ward, W. E.

    2009-05-01

    The Michelson Interferometer for Airglow Dynamics Imaging (MIADI) is a new implementation of the imaging field-widened Michelson interferometer concept which images airglow signatures in the mesopause region and simultaneously records wind and intensity images. The scientific purpose of this instrument is to provide unambiguous information on gravity waves since the background horizontal wind and irradiance variations will be simultaneously obtained. Calibration and characterization of instrument parameters has been completed at a field site in Shigaraki Japan and initial observations have been taken. Co-located alongside MIADI are the MU radar, Na Lidar and several All-Sky Imagers. Observation campaigns are ongoing to acquire simultaneous data sets from these instruments. In this paper, the calibration and characterization results will be summarized. The initial measurements of winds and intensity will be presented and the scientific goals of the current observing campaign outlined.

  16. Dynamic x-ray imaging of laser-driven nanoplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fennel, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    A major promise of current x-ray science at free electron lasers is the realization of unprecedented imaging capabilities for resolving the structure and ultrafast dynamics of matter with nanometer spatial and femtosecond temporal resolution or even below via single-shot x-ray diffraction. Laser-driven atomic clusters and nanoparticles provide an ideal platform for developing and demonstrating the required technology to extract the ultrafast transient spatiotemporal dynamics from the diffraction images. In this talk, the perspectives and challenges of dynamic x-ray imaging will be discussed using complete self-consistent microscopic electromagnetic simulations of IR pump x-ray probe imaging for the example of clusters. The results of the microscopic particle-in-cell simulations (MicPIC) enable the simulation-assisted reconstruction of corresponding experimental data. This capability is demonstrated by converting recently measured LCLS data into a ultrahigh resolution movie of laser-induced plasma expansion. Finally, routes towards reaching attosecond time resolution in the visualization of complex dynamical processes in matter by x-ray diffraction will be discussed.

  17. Imaging transcription dynamics at endogenous genes in living Drosophila tissues.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jie; Zobeck, Katie L; Lis, John T; Webb, Watt W

    2008-07-01

    How transcription of individual genes is regulated in a single, intact, three-dimensionally organized cell nucleus remains mysterious. Recently, live cell imaging has become an essential tool to dissect the in vivo mechanisms of gene transcription. It not only examines functions of transcription factors at their gene targets within the chromatin context, but it also provides a non-disruptive approach for observing the dynamics of a transcription cycle in real time. However, the identification of any endogenous gene loci and their associated transcription factors remains technically difficult. Here, we describe the method of imaging the transcriptional dynamics of heat shock genes in Drosophila polytene chromosomes in living salivary gland tissues by multiphoton microscopy (MPM). This method has provided the experimental capability to visualize the assembly and dynamics of individual transcription factors and regulators and to dissect their functions at their endogenous gene targets in living cells. PMID:18586105

  18. Real-Time, Holographic, Dynamic Image-Storage Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Raymond C.; Lafleur, Sharon S.

    1995-01-01

    Solid-state device developed for high-speed acquisition, dynamic storage, and amplification of three-dimensional holographic images. Holograms generated via four-wave mixing in two or more photorefractive crystals (or subelements of single crystal) to create single-crystal or multicrystal oscillator. Apparatus provides dynamic storage of holographic image of object after electronic shutter closed to turn off object beam. Provides capability to store, amplify, process, and transmit time-varying, two-dimensional, spatial information. Developments include sensors, actuators, and optical computers operating at speeds on order of speed of light. Potential in applications in which need for high-speed acquisition and storage of three-dimensional holographic images.

  19. Renal vascular perfusion index in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Shau, Yio-Wha; Pao, Sun-Hua; Chou, Nai-Kuan; Chang, King-Jen; Shyu, Jeou-Jong

    2009-01-01

    Decreased renal perfusion plays an important role in the progression toward renal failure. In this study, a novel measure was proposed to quantify renal perfusion using canine model. Serial renal vascular images at different vascular areas including the whole vascular tree, interlobar, arcuate and interlobular vessels were captured. Image processing software was designed to analyze the changes of power Doppler intensity of colored pixels within regions-of-interest (ROI). For a given ROI, the power Doppler vascular index (PDVI) was found to fluctuate with the cardiac cycle. It was also noted that the power Doppler signals generated by arterial vessels have different fluctuating waveforms and different phase compared with the signal derived from venous vessels. A power Doppler correlation-map was developed to differentiate the arteries and veins in the ROI. Using the serial power Doppler images and the derived flow direction information, the interlobular perfusion can be strongly quantified. The renal vascular perfusion index (RVPI) defined as the ratio of PDVI(max) versus PDVI(min) was significantly higher in the interlobular vessel areas than three other areas for seven healthy dogs. The RVPI resembles the systolic/diastolic (S/D) ratio that commonly reflects arterial hemodynamics. RVPI and power Doppler correlation-map reveal more "dynamic" sense of vascular perfusion and provide a novel approach for the examination of renal function in clinical practice. PMID:18805627

  20. Imaging Anisotropic Nanoplasma Dynamics in Superfluid Helium Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacellar, Camila; Chatterley, Adam; Lackner, Florian; Pemmaraju, Sri; Tanyag, Rico; Bernando, Charles; Verma, Deepak; O'Connell, Sean; Osipiv, Timur; Ray, Dipanwita; Ferguson, Kenneth; Gorkhover, Tais; Swiggers, Michele; Bucher, Maximilian; Vilesov, Andrey; Bostedt, Christoph; Gessner, Oliver

    2016-05-01

    The dynamics of strong-field induced nanoplasmas inside superfluid helium droplets are studied using single-shot, single-particle femtosecond time-resolved X-ray coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Intense (~ 1015 W/ cm2, ~ 50 fs) 800 nm laser pulses are employed to initiate nanoplasma formation in sub-micron (200 nm - 600 nm) sized helium droplets. The dynamics of the nanoplasma formation and subsequent droplet evolution are probed by x-rays pulses (~ 100 fs, 600 eV) that are delayed with respect to the near-infrared (NIR) pulses by 10's of femtoseconds to hundreds of picoseconds. Pump-probe time-delay dependent effects in the CDI patterns reveal distinct dynamics evolving on multiple timescales. Very fast (<100 fs) appearing features are possibly indicative of electronic dynamics, while slower (>= 1 ps) dynamics are likely associated with structural changes correlated to nuclear motion including droplet disintegration. In particular, the CDI images exhibit strong indications for anisotropic dynamics governed by the NIR polarization axis, providing previously inaccessible insight into the mechanisms of nanoplasma formation and evolution.

  1. Dynamic support region-based astronomical image deconvolution algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Ze-xun; Chen, Bo; Xu, Qing; Zhang, Bao-ming; Gong, Zhi-hui

    2008-07-01

    The performance of high-resolution imaging with large optical instruments is severely limited by atmospheric turbulence, and an image deconvolution is required for reaching the diffraction limit. A new astronomical image deconvolution algorithm is proposed, which incorporates dynamic support region and improved cost function to NAS-RIF algorithm. The enhanced NAS-RIF (ENAS-RIF) method takes into account the noise in the image and can dynamically shrink support region (SR) in application. In restoration process, initial SR is set to approximate counter of the true object, and then SR automatically contracts with iteration going. The approximate counter of interested object is detected by means of beamlet transform detecting edge. The ENAS-RIF algorithm is applied to the restorations of in-door Laser point source and long exposure extended object images. The experimental results demonstrate that the ENAS-RIF algorithm works better than classical NAS-RIF algorithm in deconvolution of the degraded image with low SNR and convergence speed is faster.

  2. SIMA: Python software for analysis of dynamic fluorescence imaging data

    PubMed Central

    Kaifosh, Patrick; Zaremba, Jeffrey D.; Danielson, Nathan B.; Losonczy, Attila

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging is a powerful method for monitoring dynamic signals in the nervous system. However, analysis of dynamic fluorescence imaging data remains burdensome, in part due to the shortage of available software tools. To address this need, we have developed SIMA, an open source Python package that facilitates common analysis tasks related to fluorescence imaging. Functionality of this package includes correction of motion artifacts occurring during in vivo imaging with laser-scanning microscopy, segmentation of imaged fields into regions of interest (ROIs), and extraction of signals from the segmented ROIs. We have also developed a graphical user interface (GUI) for manual editing of the automatically segmented ROIs and automated registration of ROIs across multiple imaging datasets. This software has been designed with flexibility in mind to allow for future extension with different analysis methods and potential integration with other packages. Software, documentation, and source code for the SIMA package and ROI Buddy GUI are freely available at http://www.losonczylab.org/sima/. PMID:25295002

  3. Shadow correction in high dynamic range images for generating orthophotos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Hideo; Chikatsu, Hirofumi

    2011-07-01

    High dynamic range imagery is widely used in remote sensing. With the widespread use of aerial digital cameras such as the DMC, ADS40, RMK-D, and UltraCamD, high dynamic range imaging is generally expected for generating minuteness orthophotos in digital aerial photogrammetry. However, high dynamic range images (12-bit, 4,096 gray levels) are generally compressed into an 8-bit depth digital image (256 gray levels) owing to huge amount of data and interface with peripherals such as monitors and printers. This means that a great deal of image data is eliminated from the original image, and this introduces a new shadow problem. In particular, the influence of shadows in urban areas causes serious problems when generating minuteness orthophotos and performing house detection. Therefore, shadow problems can be solved by addressing the image compression problems. There is a large body of literature on image compression techniques such as logarithmic compression and tone mapping algorithms. However, logarithmic compression tends to cause loss of details in dark and/or light areas. Furthermore, the logarithmic method intends to operate on the full scene. This means that high-resolution luminance information can not be obtained. Even though tone mapping algorithms have the ability to operate over both full scene and local scene, background knowledge is required. To resolve the shadow problem in digital aerial photogrammetry, shadow areas should be recognized and corrected automatically without the loss of luminance information. To this end, a practical shadow correction method using 12-bit real data acquired by DMC is investigated in this paper.

  4. Free viewpoint image generation using multi-pass dynamic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Norishige; Yendo, Tomohiro; Fujii, Toshiaki; Tanimoto, Masayuki

    2007-02-01

    Ray-Space is categorized by Image-Based Rendering (IBR), thus generated views have photo-realistic quality. While this method has the performance of high quality imaging, this needs a lot of images or cameras. The reason why that is Ray-Space requires various direction's and position's views instead of 3D depth information. In this paper, we reduce that flood of information using view-centered ray interpolation. View-centered interpolation means estimating view dependent depth value (or disparity map) at generating view-point and interpolating that of pixel values using multi-view images and depth information. The combination of depth estimation and interpolation realizes the rendering photo-realistic images effectively. Unfortunately, however, if depth estimation is week or mistake, a lot of artifacts appear in creating images. Thus powerful depth estimation method is required. When we render the free viewpoint images video, we perform the depth estimation at every frame. Thus we want to keep a lid on computing cost. Our depth estimation method is based on dynamic programming (DP). This method optimizes and solves depth images at the weak matching area with high-speed performance. But scan-line noises become appeared because of the limit of DP. So, we perform the DP multi-direction pass and sum-up the result of multi-passed DPs. Our method fulfills the low computation cost and high depth estimation performance.

  5. Enhanced dynamic electron paramagnetic resonance imaging of in vivo physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redler, Gage

    It is well established that low oxygen concentration (hypoxia) in tumors strongly affects their malignant state and resistance to therapy. The importance of tumor oxygenation status has led to increased interest in the development of robust oxygen imaging modalities. One such method is electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI). EPRI has provided a non-invasive, quantitative imaging modality with sensitivity deep in tissues, capable of investigating static oxygen concentration (pO2) in vivo and has helped to corroborate the correlation between chronic states of hypoxia and tumor malignancy. However, when studying the complicated physiology of a living animal, the situation tends to be inherently dynamic. It has been found that in certain tumor regions there may exist steady states of hypoxia, or chronic hypoxia, whereas in other regions there may exist transient states of hypoxia, or acute hypoxia. It has been postulated that the negative prognostic implications associated with hypoxic tumors may be amplified for acutely hypoxic tumors. However, controversial data and a current lack in methods with the capability to noninvasively image tumor pO2 in vivo with sufficient spatial, temporal, and pO 2 resolution preclude definitive conclusions on the relationships between the different forms of hypoxia and the differences in their clinical implications. A particularly promising oxygen imaging modality that can help to study both chronic and acute hypoxia and elucidate important physiological and clinical differences is rapid Dynamic EPRI. The focus of this work is the development of methods enabling Dynamic EPRI of in vivo physiology as well as its potential applications. This work describes methods which enhance various aspects of EPRI in order to establish a more robust Dynamic EPRI capable of noninvasively studying and quantifying acute hypoxia in vivo. These enhancements are achieved through improvements that span from methods for the acquisition of individual

  6. Ablative therapies for renal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Rajan; Leveillee, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Owing to an increased use of diagnostic imaging for evaluating patients with other abdominal conditions, incidentally discovered kidney masses now account for a majority of renal tumors. Renal ablative therapy is assuming a more important role in patients with borderline renal impairment. Renal ablation uses heat or cold to bring about cell death. Radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation are two such procedures, and 5-year results are now emerging from both modalities. Renal biopsy at the time of ablation is extremely important in order to establish tissue diagnosis. Real-time temperature monitoring at the time of radiofrequency ablation is very useful to ensure adequacy of ablation. PMID:21789083

  7. Dynamic Biodistribution of Extracellular Vesicles In Vivo Using a Multimodal Imaging Reporter

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Charles P.; Mardini, Osama; Ericsson, Maria; Prabhakar, Shilpa; Maguire, Casey; Chen, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are nano-sized vesicles released by normal and diseased cells as a novel form of intercellular communication, and can serve as an effective therapeutic vehicle for genes and drugs. Yet, much remains unknown about the in vivo properties of EVs such as tissue distribution, and blood levels and urine clearance - important parameters that will define their therapeutic effectiveness and potential toxicity. Here we combined Gaussia luciferase and metabolic biotinylation to create a sensitive EV reporter (EV-GlucB) for multimodal imaging in vivo, as well as monitoring of EV levels in the organs and biofluids ex vivo after administration of EVs. Bioluminescence and fluorescence-mediated tomography imaging on mice displayed a predominant localization of intravenously administered EVs in the spleen followed by the liver. Monitoring EV signal in the organs, blood and urine further revealed that the EVs first undergo a rapid distribution phase followed by a longer elimination phase via hepatic and renal routes within six hours, which are both faster than previously reported using dye-labeled EVs. Moreover, we demonstrate systemically injected EVs can be delivered to tumor sites within an hour following injection. Altogether, we show the EVs are dynamically processed in vivo with accurate spatiotemporal resolution, and target a number of normal organs as well as tumors with implications for disease pathology and therapeutic design. PMID:24383518

  8. High dynamic range CMOS image sensor with pixel level ADC and in-situ image enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harton, Austin V.; Ahmed, Mohamed I.; Beuhler, Allyson; Castro, Francisco; Dawson, Linda M.; Herold, Barry W.; Kujawa, Gregory; Lee, King F.; Mareachen, Russell D.; Scaminaci, Tony J.

    2005-03-01

    We describe a CMOS image sensor with pixel level analog to digital conversion (ADC) having high dynamic range (>100db) and the capability of performing many image processing functions at the pixel level during image capture. The sensor has a 102x98 pixel array and is implemented in a 0.18um CMOS process technology. Each pixel is 15.5um x15.5um with 15% fill factor and is comprised of a comparator, two 10 bit memory registers and control logic. A digital to analog converter and system processor are located off-chip. The photodetector produces a photocurrent yielding a photo-voltage proportional to the impinging light intensity. Once the photo-voltage is less than a predetermined global reference voltage; a global code value is latched into the pixel data buffer. This process prevents voltage saturation resulting in high dynamic range imaging. Upon completion of image capture, a digital representation of the image exists at the pixel array, thereby, allowing image data to be accessed in a parallel fashion from the focal plane array. It is demonstrated that by appropriate variation of the global reference voltage with time, it is possible to perform, during image capture, thresholding and image enhancement operations, such as, contrast stretching in a parallel manner.

  9. Emergency department imaging protocol for suspected acute renal colic: re-evaluating our service

    PubMed Central

    Patatas, K; Panditaratne, N; Wah, T M; Weston, M J; Irving, H C

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The objective of our study is to determine the positive rate for urolithiasis in male and female patients, and evaluate whether there has been any change at our institution in the use and outcome of unenhanced multidetector CT (CT KUB) performed in the emergency department (ER) for patients presenting with suspected acute renal colic. Methods A retrospective review of all 1357 consecutive cases between August 2007 and August 2009 admitted to the ER and investigated with CT KUB. Results The positive rate for urolithiasis was 47.5% and the rate of other significant findings was 10%. Female patients had a significantly lower positive rate than male patients (26.8% vs 61.6%, p<0.001). Urological intervention was required in 37% and these patients had a larger average stone size. In young female patients with a significantly sized ureteric calculus (>4 mm), the presence of hydronephrosis vs no hydronephrosis was 83% vs 17%, respectively. Among them, only three patients required ureteroscopy for stone removal. Conclusion Contrary to other studies there has been no “indication creep” in the use of CT KUB at our institution. However, the young female patient presenting with suspected urolithiasis presents a particular diagnostic problem, and the significant percentage of negative examinations in females implies that an improvement in current practice is needed. The indiscriminate use of CT KUB in all female patients with flank pain should be avoided, and it is suggested that they should be initially evaluated with ultrasound to detect the presence of hydronephrosis. PMID:22496069

  10. Imaging of acquired cystic disease-associated renal cell carcinoma by contrast-enhanced ultrasonography with perflubutane microbubbles and positron emission tomography-computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Isao; Morita, Kyoko; Hayama, Satoshi; Nakazawa, Tetsuya; Araki, Ichiro; Higashi, Kotaro; Miyazawa, Katsuhito; Suzuki, Koji; Nojima, Takayuki

    2011-02-01

    The preoperative assessment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) complicated with acquired renal cystic disease in a 63-year-old male patient on long-term hemodialysis (30 years and 8 months) that was difficult because of no or poor contrast enhancement by dynamic CT scan is reported. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography with perflubutane microbubbles and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) with 18F-fluorodeoxy glucose (FDG) in addition to dynamic CT were effective and useful for preoperative assessment of this patient. The pathological subtype of RCC in this patient was acquired cystic disease-associated RCC (ACD-associated RCC), which has been newly defined by Tickoo et al. (Am J Surg Pathol 30:141-153, 2006). PMID:20824295