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Sample records for renal excretory mechanisms

  1. Functional consequences of prenatal methylmercury exposure: effects on renal and hepatic responses to trophic stimuli and on renal excretory mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Slotkin, T.A.; Kavlock, R.J.; Cowdery, T.; Orband, L.; Bartolome, M.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of prenatal exposure to methylmercury on the functional development of renal and hepatic response systems was examined in the developing rat. Methylmercury produced an elevation of basal activity of renal ornithine decarboxylase (ODC, an enzyme involved in regulation of cellular maturation) and an eventual relative hypertrophy; liver ODC was reduced and hypertrophy was not evident. In contrast, the reactivity of liver ODC to trophic stimulants (vasopressin, isoproterenol) was markedly enhanced by prenatal methylmercury exposure, whereas renal ODC responses were much less affected (vasopressin) or actually reduced (isoproterenol). Targeted actions of methylmercury on renal excretory function were also prominent, with increased fractional excretions urea and electrolytes and an eventual reduction in glomerular filtration as assessed by creatinine clearance. These studies show that doses of methylmercury ordinarily associated with selective actions on development of neurobehavioral patterns also influence the functional ontogeny of other organ systems; furthermore, the fact that the target tissues are different for prenatal vs postnatal methylmercury exposure, indicates that the functional teratology of methylmercury exhibits critical periods of sensitivity.

  2. FUNCTIONAL CONSEQUENCES OF PRENATAL METHYLMERCURY EXPOSURE: EFFECTS ON RENAL AND HEPATIC RESPONSES TO TROPHIC STIMULI AND ON RENAL EXCRETORY MECHANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of prenatal exposure to methylmercury on the functional development of renal and hepatic response systems was examined in the developing rat. Methylmercury produced an elevation of basal activity of renal ornithine decarboxylase (ODC, an enzyme involved in regulation ...

  3. Renal haemodynamic and excretory responses to bradykinin in anaesthetized dogs.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Y; Tadano, K; Yamasaki, T

    1999-08-01

    1. Effects of bradykinin (BK) on renal haemodynamics and urine formation were examined in anaesthetized dogs. 2. Renal arterial infusion of BK at doses of 5 or 50 ng/kg per min produced dose-dependent increases in renal blood flow (RBF), without affecting systemic arterial pressure or glomerular filtration rate. There were also significant and dose-dependent increases in urine flow (UF), urinary excretion of sodium (UNaV) and fractional excretion of sodium (FENa) and decreases in urine osmolality during BK infusion. 3. Renal haemodynamic and excretory responses to the BK infusion were completely abolished by the simultaneous administration of Hoe 140 (icatibant, 100 ng/kg per min intrarenally), a selective BK B2-receptor antagonist. 4. In the presence of NG-nitro-L-arginine (NOARG; 40 micrograms/kg per min intrarenally), a nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor, BK-induced renal vasodilative and natriuretic effects were markedly attenuated, although responses of UF and urine osmolality to BK remained unchanged. The water diuretic effect of BK was abolished in dogs given both NOARG and ibuprofen (12.5 mg/kg bolus injection plus 12.5 mg/kg per h of sustained infusion intravenously), a cyclooxygenase inhibitor. 5. These results clearly indicate that renal haemodynamic and excretory responses to BK were mediated exclusively by the B2-receptor. Renal vasodilative and natriuretic responses are mainly linked to NO generation, while both NO and prostaglandin biosynthesis are involved in the BK-induced water diuresis. PMID:10474781

  4. [Capacities of examination of renal function at excretory urography].

    PubMed

    Bosin, V Iu; Zyrianov, V Iu

    2004-01-01

    The study was undertaken to enhance the diagnostic capacities of excretory urography in evaluating renal function, by determining the renal clearance of a contrast medium. The main task of the study was to develop bloodless and rather reliable ways of estimating the volume of the body's distributed contrast medium and its urinary concentration in the patient at urography. Excretory urography was performed in 248 patients aged 12 to 75 years. The specific gravity of excreted urine was determined with a standard laboratory urometer to 0.001 g/cm3. Absoption spectrophotometry was used to determine the serum concentration of contrast medium in 67 patients. The values of concentrations were plotted in the semilogarithmic ordinate system, followed by extrapolation of the initial segment of the plot to the so-called zero point determining the value of the concentration of contrast medium at the moment of its complete distribution in the intercellular space. The derived value was compared with the medium's dose coming into the body, which made it possible to determine the degree of dilution of the substance, i.e. the volume of its distribution in the organism. There was a linear relationship between the concentrations of renally eliminated contrast medium and the specific gravity of excreted urine. The numerical value of the constant reflecting this relationship is equal to 6. There was evidence for that such studies could be made by routine urometry. A high correlation was found between the body mass and the volume of distribution of contrast medium in the intercellular space. The discovery of the above regularities permitted the procedure for measuring the values of two most important physiological renal process (glomerular filtration and trabecular water reabsorption) to be simplified and widely available. The paper outlines the great promises for using excretory urography as a scanning functional test during a primary study and a follow-up of the patient's status. PMID

  5. Role of renal nerves in excretory responses to administration of kappa agonists in conscious spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Kapusta, D R; Jones, S Y; DiBona, G F

    1989-10-01

    The present study examined whether the renal sympathetic nerves contribute to the renal excretory responses produced by kappa opioid receptor agonist administration in conscious spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Intravenous infusion of the kappa opioid receptor agonists, ketocyclazocine (KC) and U-50488H, produced increases in urine flow rate. KC and U-50488H infusion also resulted in a marked and sustained antinatriuresis which was promptly reversed by low-dose naloxone (50 micrograms/kg i.v.), thus suggesting an opioid receptor-mediated action of both agonists. Although these kappa agonists did not produce changes in glomerular filtration rate or renal plasma flow, efferent renal sympathetic nerve activity increased with the same time course as the antinatriuretic response. To investigate whether the decrease in urinary sodium excretion was mediated via the increase in efferent renal sympathetic nerve activity, experiments were repeated in SHR with prior bilateral renal denervation. These studies demonstrated that similar renal excretory responses (diuresis and a naloxone reversible antiinatriuresis occurred during infusion of KC and U-50488H in renal denervated as were seen in intact SHR. These studies indicate that the renal excretory responses to the kappa opioid agonists KC and U-50488H are not mediated through changes in renal hemodynamics or via a pathway requiring intact renal innervation. Because an antinatriuretic response was observed in renal denervated SHR, this suggests that kappa opioid receptor agonists may influence the renal tubular reabsorption of sodium by additional naloxone-sensitive mechanisms independent of intact renal innervation. PMID:2552076

  6. Role of renal nerves in excretory responses to exogenous and endogenous opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Kapusta, D R; Jones, S Y; Kopp, U C; Dibona, G F

    1989-03-01

    The present study was designed to investigate opioid peptide-mediated changes in renal function in conscious Sprague-Dawley rats after administration of the native opioid agonist methionine enkephalin (ME), its synthetic analog D-Ala2-methionine enkephalinamide (DALA) and the opioid antagonist naloxone. Intravenous infusion of DALA (25 micrograms/kg/min) and ME (75 micrograms/kg/min) produced no changes in mean arterial pressure, heart rate, glomerular filtration rate or effective renal plasma flow in rats with intact or bilaterally denervated kidneys. In contrast, i.v. infusion of these opioid agonists produced differing effects on the renal excretion of water and sodium; DALA produced an increase in urinary flow rate and sodium excretion and ME produced a decrease in these parameters. Changes in renal sympathetic nerve activity were not involved in producing these effects as supported by measurements of renal sympathetic nerve activity and the finding that prior bilateral renal denervation did not alter the renal responses to either agonist. The renal excretory responses to both DALA and ME infusion were prevented by pretreatment with the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone, thus suggesting an opioid receptor-mediated effect of both agonists. Intravenous bolus injections of naloxone alone produced a dose-dependent diuresis and natriuresis without producing changes in systemic or renal hemodynamics or renal sympathetic nerve activity. These studies, therefore, provide evidence that the administration of opioid receptor agonists and antagonists produce changes in the renal excretion of water and sodium via an action on renal tubular reabsorptive mechanisms which are independent of changes in systemic or renal hemodynamics or renal sympathetic nerve activity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2703962

  7. Comprehensive renal scintillation procedures in spinal cord injury: comparison with excretory urography

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, L.K.; Dubovsky, E.V.; Bueschen, A.J.; Witten, D.M.; Scott, J.W.; Kuhlemeier, K.; Stover, S.L.

    1981-07-01

    A /sup 131/iodine orthoiodohippurate comprehensive renal scintillation procedure was performed and compared to results of excretory urography in 200 spinal cord injury patients. No severe urographic abnormalities were undetected by the comprehensive renal scintillation procedure. Only 1.4 per cent of renal units had greater than minimal pyelocaliectasis or ureterectasis in the presence of a normal radionuclide examination. A relatively large number of abnormalities were detected on the renal scintillation procedure when the excretory urogram was normal. Serial followup will be required to determine the significance of these findings but present data suggest that a comprehensive renal scintillation procedure and a plain film of the kidneys, ureters and bladder may be used for screening upper urinary tract abnormalities in lieu of an excretory urogram. This is particularly advantageous for the spinal cord injury population, since there have been no toxic or allergic reactions reported, no bowel preparation or dehydration is required and there is relatively low radiation exposure.

  8. 99mtechnetium-dimercapto-succinic acid renal scanning and excretory urography in diagnosis of renal scars in children

    SciTech Connect

    McLorie, G.A.; Aliabadi, H.; Churchill, B.M.; Ash, J.M.; Gilday, D.L. )

    1989-09-01

    We compared the ability of excretory urography (without tomography) and 99mtechnetium-dimercapto-succinic acid renal scanning to detect renal scars in 32 children with primary vesicoureteral reflux. These children did not have hydronephrosis, renal failure or urinary tract obstruction. In all cases both studies were conducted within a 10-month period. The findings from both modalities were in agreement for 51 of the 64 renal units evaluated (80%). Evaluation of the excretory urogram indicated 6 cases of diffuse and 2 of focal scarring that were not detected by evaluation of the renal scan. The sensitivity of excretory urography to detect renal scars was 84% and the specificity was 83%. The 99mtechnetium-dimercapto-succinic acid renal scan showed 5 cases of focal renal scarring not detected by excretory urography. The sensitivity of the renal scan to detect renal scars was 77% and the specificity was 75%. We conclude that neither study alone could effectively replace the other for the detection of renal scars, and recommend that both be included in the initial evaluation and followup of patients with renal scars.

  9. Renal Heme Oxygenase-1 Induction with Hemin Augments Renal Hemodynamics, Renal Autoregulation, and Excretory Function

    PubMed Central

    Botros, Fady T.; Dobrowolski, Leszek; Navar, L. Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    Heme oxygenases (HO-1; HO-2) catalyze conversion of heme to free iron, carbon monoxide, and biliverdin/bilirubin. To determine the effects of renal HO-1 induction on blood pressure and renal function, normal control rats (n = 7) and hemin-treated rats (n = 6) were studied. Renal clearance studies were performed on anesthetized rats to assess renal function; renal blood flow (RBF) was measured using a transonic flow probe placed around the left renal artery. Hemin treatment significantly induced renal HO-1. Mean arterial pressure and heart rate were not different (115 ± 5 mmHg versus 112 ± 4 mmHg and 331 ± 16 versus 346 ± 10 bpm). However, RBF was significantly higher (9.1 ± 0.8 versus 7.0 ± 0.5 mL/min/g, P < 0.05), and renal vascular resistance was significantly lower (13.0 ± 0.9 versus 16.6 ± 1.4 [mmHg/(mL/min/g)], P < 0.05). Likewise, glomerular filtration rate was significantly elevated (1.4 ± 0.2 versus 1.0 ± 0.1 mL/min/g, P < 0.05), and urine flow and sodium excretion were also higher (18.9 ± 3.9 versus 8.2 ± 1.0 μL/min/g, P < 0.05 and 1.9 ± 0.6 versus 0.2 ± 0.1 μmol/min/g, P < 0.05, resp.). The plateau of the autoregulation relationship was elevated, and renal vascular responses to acute angiotensin II infusion were attenuated in hemin-treated rats reflecting the vasodilatory effect of HO-1 induction. We conclude that renal HO-1 induction augments renal function which may contribute to the antihypertensive effects of HO-1 induction observed in hypertension models. PMID:22518281

  10. Renal parenchymal appearance on /sup 123/iodine-hippurate renoscintigrams and excretory urograms

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, J.B.; Taagehoj-Jensen, F.; Andresen, J.H.; Jorgensen, T.M.; Djurhuus, J.C.; Sorensen, S.S.; Charles, P.

    1985-02-01

    In 61 patients with vesicoureteral reflux renal scar formation was diagnosed by excretory urography and /sup 123/iodine-hippurate scintigrams. Scar formation on the nephrograms was detected in the upper, middle and lower zones of the kidneys on tomography exposures. Scintigraphic detection of scars was performed on the computerized uptake of the parenchymal phase. Maximal time elapse between the 2 investigations was 1 year. Excretory urography revealed 37 kidneys with a total of 74 regional scars. On scintigraphy 57 kidneys were judged to have 102 scars. There were 281 regions judged to be identical on the scintigram and the nephrogram. A true positive ratio (sensitivity) of 0.46 and a true negative ratio (specificity) of 0.90 were noted for the excretory urogram, compared to a sensitivity of 0.64 and a specificity of 0.81 for renography. The study confirms an over-representation of scars judged from scintigrams, which calls for further investigation of scar formation detection.

  11. Attenuation of renal excretory responses to ANG II during inhibition of superoxide dismutase in anesthetized rats

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Md. Abdul Hye; Islam, Mohammed Toriqul; Castillo, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    To examine the functional interaction between superoxide dismutase (SOD) and NADPH oxidase activity, we assessed renal responses to acute intra-arterial infusion of ANG II (0.5 ng·kg−1·min−1) before and during administration of a SOD inhibitor, diethyldithiocarbamate (DETC, 0.5 mg·kg−1·min−1), in enalaprilat-pretreated (33 μg·kg−1·min−1) rats (n = 11). Total (RBF) and regional (cortical, CBF; medullary; MBF) renal blood flows were determined by Transonic and laser-Doppler flowmetry, respectively. Renal cortical and medullary tissue NADPH oxidase activity in vitro was determined using the lucigenin-chemiluminescence method. DETC treatment alone resulted in decreases in RBF, CBF, MBF, glomerular filtration rate (GFR), urine flow (V), and sodium excretion (UNaV) as reported previously. Before DETC, ANG II infusion decreased RBF (−18 ± 3%), CBF (−16 ± 3%), MBF [−5 ± 6%; P = not significant (NS)], GFR (−31 ± 4%), V (−34 ± 2%), and UNaV (−53 ± 3%). During DETC infusion, ANG II also caused similar reductions in RBF (−20 ± 4%), CBF (−19 ± 3%), MBF (−2 ± 2; P = NS), and in GFR (−22 ± 7%), whereas renal excretory responses (V; −12 ± 2%; UNaV; −24 ± 4%) were significantly attenuated compared with those before DETC. In in vitro experiments, ANG II (100 μM) enhanced NADPH oxidase activity both in cortical [13,194 ± 1,651 vs. 20,914 ± 2,769 relative light units (RLU)/mg protein] and in medullary (21,296 ± 2,244 vs. 30,597 ± 4,250 RLU/mg protein) tissue. Application of DETC (1 mM) reduced the basal levels and prevented ANG II-induced increases in NADPH oxidase activity in both tissues. These results demonstrate that renal excretory responses to acute ANG II administration are attenuated during SOD inhibition, which seems related to a downregulation of NADPH oxidase in the deficient condition of SOD activity. PMID:19923406

  12. Hydrogen sulphide and tempol treatments improve the blood pressure and renal excretory responses in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Fiaz Ud Din; Sattar, Munavvar A; Rathore, Hassaan A; Tan, Yong Chia; Akhtar, Safia; Jin, Oh Hui; Pei, Yen Pei; Abdullah, Nor A; Johns, Edward J

    2014-05-01

    Oxidative stress and suppressed H2S production lead to increased renal vascular resistance, disturbed glomerular hemodynamics, and abnormal renal sodium and water handling, contribute to the pathogenesis and maintenance of essential hypertension in man and the spontaneously hypertensive rat. This study investigated the impact of H2S and tempol alone and in combination on blood pressure and renal hemodynamics and excretory functions in the SHR. Groups of WKY rats or SHR (n=6) were treated for 4 weeks either as controls or received NaHS (SHR+NaHS), tempol (SHR+Tempol), or NaHS plus tempol (SHR+NaHS +Tempol). Metabolic studies were performed on days 0, 14, and 28, thereafter animals were anaesthetized to measure renal hemodynamics and plasma oxidative and antioxidant markers. SHR control rats had higher mean arterial blood pressure (140.0 ± 2 vs. 100.0 ± 3 mmHg), lower plasma and urinary H2S, creatinine clearance, urine flow rate and urinary sodium excretion, and oxidative stress compared to WKY (all p<0.05). Treatment either with NaHS or with tempol alone decreased blood pressure and oxidative stress and improved renal hemodynamic and excretory function compared to untreated SHR. Combined NaHS and tempol therapy in SHRs caused larger decreases in blood pressure (∼20-22% vs. ∼11-15% and ∼10-14%), increases in creatinine clearance, urinary sodium excretion and fractional sodium excretion and up-regulated the antioxidant status compared to each agent alone (all p<0.05). These findings demonstrated that H2S and tempol together resulted in greater reductions in blood pressure and normalization of kidney function compared with either compound alone. PMID:24502512

  13. Early enhancement of fluid transport in rabbit proximal straight tubules after loss of contralateral renal excretory function.

    PubMed Central

    Tabei, K; Levenson, D J; Brenner, B M

    1983-01-01

    To assess the renal functional adaptation to reduced excretory capacity, we studied whole kidney and single nephron function in anesthetized volume-replete rabbits after unilateral (left kidney) nephrectomy (UNX), ureteral obstruction (UO), or ureteroperitoneostomy (UP). At 24 h, despite the absence of measurable hypertrophy of the contralateral (right) kidney, these procedures significantly increased p-aminohippurate clearance (45-54%) and inulin clearance (CIN) (64-110%) compared with sham-operated control animals. In each group, whole kidney sodium reabsorption increased in proportion to the rise in CIN. To determine whether the intrinsic transport capacity of proximal tubule segments is altered by these maneuvers, we measured fluid volume reabsorption rate (Jv) in isolated superficial proximal straight tubule (PST) segments perfused in vitro, comparing each control tubule (obtained by biopsy of the left kidney immediately before an experimental maneuver) with a corresponding tubule segment obtained 24 h or 7 d later from the contralateral kidney. Control tubule Jv in sham-24 h animals averaged 0.48 +/- 0.04 nl/(min X mm). Jv did not change significantly at 24 h or 7 d after sham maneuvers but increased significantly at 24 h after UNX [delta Jv = 0.13 +/- 0.03 nl/(min X mm)], UO [delta Jv = 0.10 +/- 0.04 nl/(min X mm)], and UP [delta Jv = 0.13 +/- 0.04 nl/(min X mm)]. Jv remained increased by similar amounts at 7 d after UNX and UO. To evaluate whether an increase in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) might be the stimulus to this augmentation in Jv values, methylprednisolone (MP) (15 mg/kg per d) was administered daily to sham-operated animals, a maneuver which induced a 73% rise in CIN by day 5. This procedure also produced a significant increase in Jv in PST at 5 d [delta Jv = 0.16 +/- 0.05 nl/(min X mm)]. The increase in Jv evident in each group at 5 or 7 d was paralleled by an equivalent change in tubule cell volume and apparent tubule luminal surface area in

  14. Modification of the relationship between blood pressure and renal albumin permeability by impaired excretory function and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fotheringham, James; Odudu, Aghogho; McKane, William; Ellam, Timothy

    2015-03-01

    In animal models, reduced nephron mass impairs renal arteriolar autoregulation, increasing vulnerability of the remaining nephrons to elevated systemic blood pressure (BP). A feature of the resulting glomerular capillary hypertension is an increase in glomerular permeability. We sought evidence of a similar remnant nephron effect in human chronic kidney disease. In participants from the United States National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys 1999 to 2010 (N=23 710), we examined the effect of reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) on the relationship between brachial artery BP and albumin permeability. Renal albumin permeability increased exponentially with systolic BP >110 mm Hg, and this association was modified by independent interactions with both excretory impairment and diabetes mellitus. Each 10 mm Hg increase in systolic BP was accompanied by an increase in fractional albumin excretion of 1.10-, 1.11-, 1.17-, 1.22-, and 1.38-fold for participants with eGFR≥90, 90>eGFR≥60, 60>eGFR≥45, 45>eGFR≥30, and eGFR<30 mL/min/1.73 m(2), respectively, adjusted for age, sex, race, antihypertensive use, eGFR category, diabetes mellitus, smoking, history of cardiovascular disease, body mass index, and C-reactive protein. A 10 mm Hg systolic BP increment was associated with increases in fractional albumin excretion of 1.10- and 1.21-fold in nondiabetic and diabetic participants, respectively. Using urine albumin creatinine ratio as an alternative measure of albumin leak in eGFR-adjusted analyses gave the same conclusions. Our findings are consistent with the presence of a remnant nephron effect in human kidney disease. Future trials should consider the nephroprotective benefits of systolic BP lowering in kidney disease populations stratified by eGFR. PMID:25489062

  15. Combination Therapy with Losartan and α-Tocopherol in Acute Ureteral Obstruction-Induced Renal Excretory Dysfunction and Acidification Defect

    PubMed Central

    Gheitasi, Izadpanah; Moosavi, Seyed Mostafa

    2014-01-01

    Background: Previous study by the authors showed that a-tocopherol prevents oxidative stress but would not improve depressed excretory variables in post-obstructed kidney (POK) after release of 24-h unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO). This study is a supplementary investigation on the effects of a-tocopherol combined with an antagonist of angiotensin-II type-1 (AT1) receptor on renal dysfunction following release of acute UUO. Methods: The left ureter was ligated in different groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats that received normal saline, losartan or losartan/a-tocopherol (n=6 in each group). After releasing 24-h UUO, urine of each kidney was separately collected under paraffin during 1-3 h of post-release period and then both kidneys were removed for measuring malondialdehyde (MDA) and ferric reducing/antioxidant power (FRAP). Results: Losartan-treatment decreased MDA and increased FRAP, creatinine-clearance and sodium-reabsorption in POK, while co-treatment with losartan and a-tocopherol not only augmented improvement in these variables but also elevated potassium-excretion, free-water reabsorption and urine-osmolality. However, UUO-induced fall in urinary pCO2 and rise in pH and bicarbonate-excretion of POK were ameliorated equally with losartan and losartan/a-tocopherol. Conclusion: Activation of AT1-receptor contributes to the development of renal distal acidification defect induced by acute ureteral obstruction. The co-treatment with losartan and a-tocopherol showed that their effects on preventing oxidative stress along with ameliorating glomerular filtration and tubular fluid-delivery in POK could lead to improvement in tubular transport of sodium and potassium as well as urine-concentrating ability at the early post-release period. PMID:25031488

  16. Dietary creatine supplementation during pregnancy: a study on the effects of creatine supplementation on creatine homeostasis and renal excretory function in spiny mice.

    PubMed

    Ellery, Stacey J; LaRosa, Domenic A; Kett, Michelle M; Della Gatta, Paul A; Snow, Rod J; Walker, David W; Dickinson, Hayley

    2016-08-01

    Recent evidence obtained from a rodent model of birth asphyxia shows that supplementation of the maternal diet with creatine during pregnancy protects the neonate from multi-organ damage. However, the effect of increasing creatine intake on creatine homeostasis and biosynthesis in females, particularly during pregnancy, is unknown. This study assessed the impact of creatine supplementation on creatine homeostasis, body composition, capacity for de novo creatine synthesis and renal excretory function in non-pregnant and pregnant spiny mice. Mid-gestation pregnant and virgin spiny mice were fed normal chow or chow supplemented with 5 % w/w creatine for 18 days. Weight gain, urinary creatine and electrolyte excretion were assessed during supplementation. At post mortem, body composition was assessed by Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, or tissues were collected to assess creatine content and mRNA expression of the creatine synthesising enzymes arginine:glycine amidinotransferase (AGAT) and guanidinoacetate methyltransferase (GAMT) and the creatine transporter (CrT1). Protein expression of AGAT and GAMT was also assessed by Western blot. Key findings of this study include no changes in body weight or composition with creatine supplementation; increased urinary creatine excretion in supplemented spiny mice, with increased sodium (P < 0.001) and chloride (P < 0.05) excretion in pregnant dams after 3 days of supplementation; lowered renal AGAT mRNA (P < 0.001) and protein (P < 0.001) expressions, and lowered CrT1 mRNA expression in the kidney (P < 0.01) and brain (P < 0.001). Creatine supplementation had minimal impact on creatine homeostasis in either non-pregnant or pregnant spiny mice. Increasing maternal dietary creatine consumption could be a useful treatment for birth asphyxia. PMID:26695944

  17. Changing indications for excretory urography

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.; Schreiber, M.H.

    1985-07-19

    Most individuals suspected of having renovascular hypertension, men with benign prostatic enlargement, women with recurrent infections of the urinary tract or urinary stress incontinence, women undergoing hysterectomy, uremic and diabetic patients, and patients with renal transplant or adult polycystic kidney disease should not, as a rule, undergo routine excretory urography (EU). Possible morbidity and mortality and unwarranted cost do not justify the study, since the majority of individuals in any of these situations do not benefit from the information obtained from the study. Excretory urography must be performed selectively, rather than routinely, in such persons. As the authors emphasize, modified EU, often using only two to three films, may be performed under many clinical situations to reduce radiation exposure, toxic effects, and cost to the patient.

  18. Immediate renal imaging and renography with /sup 99m/Tc methylene diphosphonate to assess renal blood flow, excretory function, and anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, E.C.; DeNardo, G.L.; Hines, H.H.

    1980-04-01

    /sup 99m/Tc methylene diphosphonate (/sup 99m/Tc MDP) was evaluated as a clinical renal imaging agent in 20 patients referred for bone scintigraphy. Sequential scintigraphy, which was started immediately after injection, yielded blood flow studies of high quality, and subsequent images accurately delineated renal anatomy and excretion in nonazotemic patients. In comparison with delayed images, early images were vastly superior in quality and demonstrated improved target-to-nontarget activity ratios (p < 0.001) and improved lesion detectability (p < 0.01). Renal imaging performed incidental to bone scintigraphy with MDP can be greatly enhanced by initiating sequential scintigraphy immediately after injection.

  19. Mechanisms of compensatory renal growth.

    PubMed

    Cleper, Roxana

    2012-11-01

    Congenitally reduced renal mass- as with agenesis of one kidney, unilateral multicystic dysplastic kidney or with premature birth with early arrest of nephrogenesis- as well as acquired loss of a significant part of kidney tissue- as with kidney donation, after surgery for tumor etc- set in motion compensatory processes with main target to meet metabolic body needs. The sensors for reduced renal mass have not yet been identified. The effectors of the compensatory process include a wide range of growth factors- IGF1, TGF-b1, HGF- and signaling molecules-mTOR- which has intricate reciprocal interactions. As nephrogenesis stops at 34-36 weeks of gestation and can't be restarted thereafter, the main result of this compensatory process is increase in glomerular size (glomerulomegaly) and tubular hypertrophy. Renal volume evaluation by ultrasound is a practical noninvasive tool for assessment of compensatory kidney growth. The increased nephron and kidney size induced by the compensatory process have potential detrimental long-term effect through stretch-induced glomerular cell activation of profibrogenic and vasoconstrictor pathways as well as tubular cell nephrotoxicity caused by abnormal activation of reabsorptive mechanisms including GLUT1 and megalin. Deep understanding of these potentially damage process might help in timely implementation of protective strategies. PMID:23469392

  20. Sickle cell disease: renal manifestations and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Karl A.; Hebbel, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) substantially alters renal structure and function, and causes various renal syndromes and diseases. Such diverse renal outcomes reflect the uniquely complex vascular pathobiology of SCD and the propensity of red blood cells to sickle in the renal medulla because of its hypoxic, acidotic, and hyperosmolar conditions. Renal complications and involvement in sickle cell nephropathy (SCN) include altered haemodynamics, hypertrophy, assorted glomerulopathies, chronic kidney disease, acute kidney injury, impaired urinary concentrating ability, distal nephron dysfunction, haematuria, and increased risks of urinary tract infections and renal medullary carcinoma. SCN largely reflects an underlying vasculopathy characterized by cortical hyperperfusion, medullary hypoperfusion, and an increased, stress-induced vasoconstrictive response. Renal involvement is usually more severe in homozygous disease (sickle cell anaemia, HbSS) than in compound heterozygous types of SCD (for example HbSC and HbSβ+-thalassaemia), and is typically mild, albeit prevalent, in the heterozygous state (sickle cell trait, HbAS). Renal involvement contributes substantially to the diminished life expectancy of patients with SCD, accounting for 16–18% of mortality. As improved clinical care promotes survival into adulthood, SCN imposes a growing burden on both individual health and health system costs. This Review addresses the renal manifestations of SCD and focuses on their underlying mechanisms. PMID:25668001

  1. Molecular Mechanisms of Renal Ischemic Conditioning Strategies.

    PubMed

    Kierulf-Lassen, Casper; Nieuwenhuijs-Moeke, Gertrude J; Krogstrup, Nicoline V; Oltean, Mihai; Jespersen, Bente; Dor, Frank J M F

    2015-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury is the leading cause of acute kidney injury in a variety of clinical settings such as renal transplantation and hypovolemic and/or septic shock. Strategies to reduce ischemia-reperfusion injury are obviously clinically relevant. Ischemic conditioning is an inherent part of the renal defense mechanism against ischemia and can be triggered by short periods of intermittent ischemia and reperfusion. Understanding the signaling transduction pathways of renal ischemic conditioning can promote further clinical translation and pharmacological advancements in this era. This review summarizes research on the molecular mechanisms underlying both local and remote ischemic pre-, per- and postconditioning of the kidney. The different types of conditioning strategies in the kidney recruit similar powerful pro-survival mechanisms. Likewise, renal ischemic conditioning mobilizes many of the same protective signaling pathways as in other organs, but differences are recognized. PMID:26330099

  2. Molecular Mechanisms of Renal Ammonia Transport

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, I. David; Hamm, L. Lee

    2015-01-01

    Acid-base homeostasis to a great extent relies on renal ammonia metabolism. In the past several years, seminal studies have generated important new insights into the mechanisms of renal ammonia transport. In particular, the theory that ammonia transport occurs almost exclusively through nonionic NH3 diffusion and NH4+ trapping has given way to a model postulating that a variety of proteins specifically transport NH3 and NH4+ and that this transport is critical for normal ammonia metabolism. Many of these proteins transport primarily H+ or K+ but also transport NH4+. Nonerythroid Rh glycoproteins transport ammonia and may represent critical facilitators of ammonia transport in the kidney. This review discusses the underlying aspects of renal ammonia transport as well as specific proteins with important roles in renal ammonia transport. PMID:17002591

  3. Oxidant Mechanisms in Renal Injury and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ratliff, Brian B.; Abdulmahdi, Wasan; Pawar, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Significance: A common link between all forms of acute and chronic kidney injuries, regardless of species, is enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) during injury/disease progression. While low levels of ROS and RNS are required for prosurvival signaling, cell proliferation and growth, and vasoreactivity regulation, an imbalance of ROS and RNS generation and elimination leads to inflammation, cell death, tissue damage, and disease/injury progression. Recent Advances: Many aspects of renal oxidative stress still require investigation, including clarification of the mechanisms which prompt ROS/RNS generation and subsequent renal damage. However, we currently have a basic understanding of the major features of oxidative stress pathology and its link to kidney injury/disease, which this review summarizes. Critical Issues: The review summarizes the critical sources of oxidative stress in the kidney during injury/disease, including generation of ROS and RNS from mitochondria, NADPH oxidase, and inducible nitric oxide synthase. The review next summarizes the renal antioxidant systems that protect against oxidative stress, including superoxide dismutase and catalase, the glutathione and thioredoxin systems, and others. Next, we describe how oxidative stress affects kidney function and promotes damage in every nephron segment, including the renal vessels, glomeruli, and tubules. Future Directions: Despite the limited success associated with the application of antioxidants for treatment of kidney injury/disease thus far, preventing the generation and accumulation of ROS and RNS provides an ideal target for potential therapeutic treatments. The review discusses the shortcomings of antioxidant treatments previously used and the potential promise of new ones. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 119–146. PMID:26906267

  4. A regulatory program for excretory system regeneration in planarians

    PubMed Central

    Scimone, M. Lucila; Srivastava, Mansi; Bell, George W.; Reddien, Peter W.

    2011-01-01

    Planarians can regenerate any missing body part, requiring mechanisms for the production of organ systems in the adult, including their prominent tubule-based filtration excretory system called protonephridia. Here, we identify a set of genes, Six1/2-2, POU2/3, hunchback, Eya and Sall, that encode transcription regulatory proteins that are required for planarian protonephridia regeneration. During regeneration, planarian stem cells are induced to form a cell population in regeneration blastemas expressing Six1/2-2, POU2/3, Eya, Sall and Osr that is required for excretory system formation. POU2/3 and Six1/2-2 are essential for these precursor cells to form. Eya, Six1/2-2, Sall, Osr and POU2/3-related genes are required for vertebrate kidney development. We determined that planarian and vertebrate excretory cells express homologous proteins involved in reabsorption and waste modification. Furthermore, we identified novel nephridia genes. Our results identify a transcriptional program and cellular mechanisms for the regeneration of an excretory organ and suggest that metazoan excretory systems are regulated by genetic programs that share a common evolutionary origin. PMID:21937596

  5. RENAL INSUFFICIENCY FOLLOWING TRYPSIN INJECTION INTO THE RENAL ARTERIES.

    PubMed

    Friedman, M; Katz, L N

    1938-09-30

    1. The injection of trypsin into both renal arteries of the dog was found to cause an acute necrosis of large sections of the kidney, an immediate excretory insufficiency, and a transient hypertension. 2. Dogs surviving the acute phase of the trypsin injection, developed a chronic renal excretory insufficiency with no hypertension, despite the severity and duration of the renal excretory insufficiency. 3. The application of a Goldblatt clamp to the renal artery of one of the two kidneys, previously injected with trypsin, led to a rise in blood pressure which returned at once to normal when the ischemic kidney was removed, even though the pre-existing renal excretory insufficiency was augmented. This experience demonstrated unequivocally that chronic renal excretory insufficiency and hypertension are not directly related. 4. The application of a Goldblatt clamp to the renal artery of one kidney and the simultaneous injection of trypsin into the other led to a hypertension. The later removal of the ischemic kidney led to a severe renal excretory insufficiency, at the same time the pre-existing hypertension disappeared. This indicated again that renal excretory insufficiency and renal ischemia produced different phenomena and that the former had no direct relation to hypertension. PMID:19870800

  6. Renal mu opioid receptor mechanisms in regulation of renal function in rats.

    PubMed

    Kapusta, D R; Jones, S Y; DiBona, G F

    1991-07-01

    Studies were performed in pentobarbital anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats to determine whether mu opioid receptor agonists produce changes in renal function via intrarenal mechanisms. Left renal artery infusion of isotonic saline vehicle or the selective mu opioid receptor agonist, dermorphin (0.5 nmol/kg/min), did not alter mean arterial pressure or heart rate. In contrast, left renal artery dermorphin administration produced a significant decrease in left kidney urinary flow rate and sodium excretion without altering glomerular filtration rate or effective renal plasma flow; function of the right kidney was unaffected. Pretreatment of the left kidney with the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone, 50 micrograms/kg into left renal artery, prevented changes in urinary flow rate and sodium excretion induced by subsequent left renal artery dermorphin administration. Prior bilateral renal denervation abolished the antidiuretic and antinatriuretic responses to left renal artery dermorphin administration. These results suggest that mu opioid receptor agonists participate in the process of renal tubular sodium and water reabsorption via an intrarenal action that is dependent on an interaction with renal sympathetic nerves. This may occur via an action of mu opioid receptor agonists to facilitate the nerve terminal release and/or the direct tubular action of norepinephrine to affect renal tubular sodium and water reabsorption. PMID:1677034

  7. Renal branching morphogenesis: morphogenetic and signaling mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Blake, Joshua; Rosenblum, Norman D

    2014-12-01

    The human kidney is composed of an arborized network of collecting ducts, calyces and urinary pelvis that facilitate urine excretion and regulate urine composition. The renal collecting system is formed in utero, completed by the 34th week of gestation in humans, and dictates final nephron complement. The renal collecting system arises from the ureteric bud, a derivative of the intermediate-mesoderm derived nephric duct that responds to inductive signals from adjacent tissues via a process termed ureteric induction. The ureteric bud subsequently undergoes a series of iterative branching and remodeling events in a process called renal branching morphogenesis. Altered signaling that disrupts patterning of the nephric duct, ureteric induction, or renal branching morphogenesis leads to varied malformations of the renal collecting system collectively known as congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) and is the most frequently detected congenital renal aberration in infants. Here, we describe critical morphogenetic and cellular events that govern nephric duct specification, ureteric bud induction, renal branching morphogenesis, and cessation of renal branching morphogenesis. We also highlight salient molecular signaling pathways that govern these processes, and the investigative techniques used to interrogate them. PMID:25080023

  8. Diabetic nephropathy: mechanisms of renal disease progression.

    PubMed

    Kanwar, Yashpal S; Wada, Jun; Sun, Lin; Xie, Ping; Wallner, Elisabeth I; Chen, Sheldon; Chugh, Sumant; Danesh, Farhad R

    2008-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is characterized by excessive amassing of extracellular matrix (ECM) with thickening of glomerular and tubular basement membranes and increased amount of mesangial matrix, which ultimately progress to glomerulosclerosis and tubulo-interstitial fibrosis. In view of this outcome, it would mean that all the kidney cellular elements, i.e., glomerular endothelia, mesangial cells, podocytes, and tubular epithelia, are targets of hyperglycemic injury. Conceivably, high glucose activates various pathways via similar mechanisms in different cell types of the kidney except for minor exceptions that are related to the selective expression of a given molecule in a particular renal compartment. To begin with, there is an obligatory excessive channeling of glucose intermediaries into various metabolic pathways with generation of advanced glycation products (AGEs), activation of protein kinase C (PKC), increased expression of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), GTP-binding proteins, and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The ROS seem to be the common denominator in various pathways and are central to the pathogenesis of hyperglycemic injury. In addition, there are marked alterations in intraglomerular hemodynamics, i.e., hyperfiltration, and this along with metabolic derangements adversely compounds the hyperglycemia-induced injury. Here, the information compiled under various subtitles of this article is derived from an enormous amount of data summarized in several excellent literature reviews, and thus their further reading is suggested to gain in-depth knowledge of each of the subject matter. PMID:18156300

  9. Circadian regulation of renal function.

    PubMed

    Firsov, Dmitri; Bonny, Olivier

    2010-10-01

    Urinary excretion of water and all major electrolytes exhibit robust circadian oscillations. The 24-h periodicity has been well documented for several important determinants of urine formation, including renal blood flow, glomerular filtration, tubular reabsorption, and tubular secretion. Disturbance of the renal circadian rhythms is increasingly recognized as a risk factor for hypertension, polyuria, and other diseases and may contribute to renal fibrosis. The origin of these rhythms has been attributed to the reactive response of the kidney to circadian changes in volume and/or in the composition of extracellular fluids that are entrained by rest/activity and feeding/fasting cycles. However, numerous studies have shown that most of the renal excretory rhythms persist for long periods of time, even in the absence of periodic environmental cues. These observations led to the hypothesis of the existence of a self-sustained mechanism, enabling the kidney to anticipate various predictable circadian challenges to homeostasis. The molecular basis of this mechanism remained unknown until the recent discovery of the mammalian circadian clock made of a system of autoregulatory transcriptional/translational feedback loops, which have been found in all tissues studied, including the kidney. Here, we present a review of the growing evidence showing the involvement of the molecular clock in the generation of renal excretory rhythms. PMID:20664559

  10. Chromatin-based Mechanisms of Renal Epithelial Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Successful regenerative renal medicine depends on understanding the molecular mechanisms by which diverse phenotypes of epithelial cells differentiate from metanephric mesenchyme to populate nephrons. Whereas many genes are maintained in a poised state within the population of pluripotent progenitors, specialized epithelial functions reflect the selective expression of a subset of genes and the repression of all others. Here we highlight some common mechanisms of cell differentiation and epigenetic regulation to discuss their implications for renal epithelial development, repair, and disease. PMID:21700830

  11. New insights on molecular mechanisms of renal aging.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, R; Melk, A

    2012-11-01

    Long-term transplant outcome is importantly influenced by the age of the organ donor. The mechanisms how age carries out its pathophysiological impact on graft survival are still not understood. One major contributing factor for the observed poor performance of old donor kidneys seems in particular the age-related loss in renal regenerative capacity. In this review, we will summarize recent findings about the molecular basis of renal aging with specific focus on the potential role of somatic cellular senescence and mitochondrial aging in renal transplant outcome. PMID:22882799

  12. Bladder Tumor Diagnosis—Improved Excretory Cystograms

    PubMed Central

    Amar, Arjan D.

    1967-01-01

    The correct precystoscopic diagnosis of bladder tumor was made in 20 of 23 patients with this disease, among more than 1,000 persons studied by double-dose excretory urography. There was no increase in the incidence of untoward effects. Double-dose excretory urography with delayed bladder films is recommended as the primary urographic procedure in all patients with gross or microscopic hematuria in whom bladder tumor is suspected. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3. PMID:6044290

  13. Mechanisms of renal hyporesponsiveness to BNP in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Egom, Emmanuel E; Feridooni, Tiam; Hotchkiss, Adam; Kruzliak, Peter; Pasumarthi, Kishore B S

    2015-06-01

    The B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), a member of the family of vasoactive peptides, is a potent natriuretic, diuretic, and vasodilatory peptide that contributes to blood pressure and volume homeostasis. These attributes make BNP an ideal drug that could aid in diuresing a fluid-overloaded patient who had poor or worsening renal function. Despite the potential benefits of BNP, accumulating evidence suggests that simply increasing the amount of circulating BNP does not necessarily increase natriuresis in patients with heart failure (HF). Moreover, despite high BNP levels, natriuresis falls when HF progresses from a compensated to a decompensated state, suggesting the emergence of renal resistance to BNP. Although likely multifactorial, several mechanisms have been proposed to explain renal hyporesponsiveness in HF, including, but not limited to, decreased renal BNP availability, down-regulation of natriuretic peptide receptors, and altered BNP intracellular signal transduction pathways. Thus, a better understanding of renal hyporesponsiveness in HF is required to devise strategies to develop novel agents and technologies that directly restore renal BNP efficiency. It is hoped that development of these new therapeutic approaches will serve to limit sodium retention in patients with HF, which may ultimately delay the progression to overt HF. PMID:25881664

  14. Mechanisms and regulation of renal magnesium transport.

    PubMed

    Houillier, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium's most important role is in the release of chemical energy. Although most magnesium is stored outside of the extracellular fluid compartment, the regulated value is blood magnesium concentration. Cellular magnesium and bone magnesium do not play a major role in the defense of blood magnesium concentration; the major role is played by the kidney, where the renal tubule matches the urinary magnesium excretion and the net entry of magnesium into the extracellular fluid. In the kidney, magnesium is reabsorbed in the proximal tubule, the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle, and the distal convoluted tubule. Magnesium absorption is mainly paracellular in the proximal tubule and in the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle, whereas it is transcellular in the distal convoluted tubule. Several hormones and extracellular magnesium itself alter the distal tubular handling of magnesium, but the hormone(s) regulating extracellular magnesium concentration remains unknown. PMID:24512082

  15. The renal concentrating mechanism: fundamental theoretical concepts.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, J L

    1983-05-15

    Five theoretical principles that follow from qualitative consideration of renal architecture and tubular permeabilities are proposed to explain the concentration of urine in the mammalian kidney. These are: 1) The medullary loop of the doubly folded S-shaped configuration of the nephron permits solute supplied by ascending Henle's limb (AHL) to extract water from descending Henle's limb (DHL) and collecting duct (CD). 2) The cortical loop allows the diluted AHL fluid to return to isotonicity with cortical plasma before returning to the medulla. 3) The folded vasa recta and surrounding interstitium (the central core) provide an expansion chamber for the performance of osmotic work and a mixing chamber for salt and urea. This mixing induces passive salt transport out of AHL. 4) Overall, the system acts as a solute cycling multiplier from the AHL to vascular core and the osmotically equilibrated DHL and CD. 5) The short-looped nephrons provide urea to drive salt transport out of AHL of long nephrons in the inner medulla. PMID:6840288

  16. Renal

    MedlinePlus

    ... term "renal" refers to the kidney. For example, renal failure means kidney failure. Related topics: Kidney disease Kidney disease - diet Kidney failure Kidney function tests Renal scan Kidney transplant

  17. Comparative physiology of renal tubular transport mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Long, S.; Giebisch, G.

    1979-01-01

    This manuscript discusses current concepts of glomerular filtration and tubular transport of sodium, water, potassium, and urinary acidification by vertebrate kidneys in a comparative context. Work in mammalian and amphibian nephrons receives major emphasis due to our interest in application of new techniques for investigation of cellular mechanisms; when available, data from other vertebrate classes are discussed. Images FIG. 3 PMID:395765

  18. Mechanisms mediating renal sympathetic nerve activation in obesity-related hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chen, W; Leo, S; Weng, C; Yang, X; Wu, Y; Tang, X

    2015-04-01

    Excessive renal sympathetic nerve activation may be one of the mechanisms underlying obesity-related hypertension. Impaired baroreflex sensitivity, adipokine disorders-such as leptin, adiponectin, and resistin-activation of the renin-angiotensin system, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and renal sodium retention present in obesity increase renal sympathetic nerve activity, thus contributing to the development of hypertension. Renal sympathetic denervation reduces both renal sympathetic activity and blood pressure in patients with obesity-related hypertension. PMID:24609799

  19. Mechanisms by which heme oxygenase rescue renal dysfunction in obesity

    PubMed Central

    Ndisang, Joseph Fomusi; Tiwari, Shuchita

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and excessive inflammation/oxidative stress are pathophysiological forces associated with kidney dysfunction. Although we recently showed that heme-oxygenase (HO) improves renal functions, the mechanisms are largely unclear. Moreover, the effects of the HO-system on podocyte cytoskeletal proteins like podocin, podocalyxin, CD2-associated-protein (CD2AP) and proteins of regeneration/repair like beta-catenin, Oct3/4, WT1 and Pax2 in renal tissue from normoglycemic obese Zucker-fatty rats (ZFs) have not been reported. Treatment with hemin reduced renal histo-pathological lesions including glomerular-hypertrophy, tubular-cast, tubular-atrophy and mononuclear cell-infiltration in ZFs. These were associated with enhanced expression of beta-catenin, Oct3/4, WT1, Pax2 and nephrin, an essential transmembrane protein required for the formation of the scaffoldings of the podocyte slit-diaphragm, permitting the filtration of small ions, but not massive excretion of proteins, hence proteinuria. Besides nephrin, hemin also enhanced other important podocyte-regulators including, podocalyxin, podocin and CD2AP. Correspondingly, important markers of renal dysfunction such as albuminuria and proteinuria were reduced, while creatinine clearance increased, suggesting improved renal function in hemin-treated ZFs. The renoprotection by hemin was accompanied by the reduction of inflammatory/oxidative mediators including, macrophage-inflammatory-protein-1α, macrophage-chemoattractant-protein-1 and 8-isoprostane, whereas HO-1, HO-activity and the total-anti-oxidant-capacity increased. Contrarily, the HO-inhibitor, stannous-mesoporphyrin nullified the reno-protection by hemin. Collectively, these data suggest that hemin ameliorates nephropathy by potentiating the expression of proteins of repair/regeneration, abating oxidative/inflammatory mediators, reducing renal histo-pathological lesions, while enhancing nephrin, podocin, podocalyxin, CD2AP and creatinine clearance, with

  20. Obesity-induced hypertension: interaction of neurohumoral and renal mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hall, John E; do Carmo, Jussara M; da Silva, Alexandre A; Wang, Zhen; Hall, Michael E

    2015-03-13

    Excess weight gain, especially when associated with increased visceral adiposity, is a major cause of hypertension, accounting for 65% to 75% of the risk for human primary (essential) hypertension. Increased renal tubular sodium reabsorption impairs pressure natriuresis and plays an important role in initiating obesity hypertension. The mediators of abnormal kidney function and increased blood pressure during development of obesity hypertension include (1) physical compression of the kidneys by fat in and around the kidneys, (2) activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, and (3) increased sympathetic nervous system activity. Activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system is likely due, in part, to renal compression, as well as sympathetic nervous system activation. However, obesity also causes mineralocorticoid receptor activation independent of aldosterone or angiotensin II. The mechanisms for sympathetic nervous system activation in obesity have not been fully elucidated but may require leptin and activation of the brain melanocortin system. With prolonged obesity and development of target organ injury, especially renal injury, obesity-associated hypertension becomes more difficult to control, often requiring multiple antihypertensive drugs and treatment of other risk factors, including dyslipidemia, insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus, and inflammation. Unless effective antiobesity drugs are developed, the effect of obesity on hypertension and related cardiovascular, renal and metabolic disorders is likely to become even more important in the future as the prevalence of obesity continues to increase. PMID:25767285

  1. OBESITY-INDUCED HYPERTENSION: INTERACTION OF NEUROHUMORAL AND RENAL MECHANISMS

    PubMed Central

    Hall, John E.; do Carmo, Jussara M.; da Silva, Alexandre A.; Wang, Zhen; Hall, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Excess weight gain, especially when associated with increased visceral adiposity, is a major cause of hypertension, accounting for 65–75% of the risk for human primary (essential) hypertension. Increased renal tubular sodium reabsorption impairs pressure natriuresis and plays an important role in initiating obesity hypertension. The mediators of abnormal kidney function and increased blood pressure during development of obesity hypertension include 1) physical compression of the kidneys by fat in and around the kidneys, 2) activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), and 3) increased sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity. Activation of the RAAS system is likely due, in part, to renal compression as well as SNS activation. However, obesity also causes mineralocorticoid receptor activation independent of aldosterone or angiotensin II. The mechanisms for SNS activation in obesity have not been fully elucidated but appear to require leptin and activation of the brain melanocortin system. With prolonged obesity and development of target organ injury, especially renal injury, obesity-associated hypertension becomes more difficult to control, often requiring multiple antihypertensive drugs and treatment of other risk factors, including dyslipidemia, insulin resistance and diabetes, and inflammation. Unless effective anti-obesity drugs are developed, the impact of obesity on hypertension and related cardiovascular, renal and metabolic disorders is likely to become even more important in the future as the prevalence of obesity continues to increase. PMID:25767285

  2. Patterning the Renal Vascular Bed

    PubMed Central

    Herzlinger, Doris; Hurtado, Romulo

    2015-01-01

    The renal vascular bed has a stereotypic architecture that is essential for the kidney’s role in excreting metabolic waste and regulating the volume and composition of body fluids. The kidney’s excretory functions are dependent on the delivery of the majority of renal blood flow to the glomerular capillaries, which filter plasma removing from it metabolic waste, as well as vast quantities of solutes and fluids. The renal tubules reabsorb from the glomerular filtrate solutes and fluids required for homeostasis, while the post-glomerular capillary beds return these essential substances back into the systemic circulation. Thus, the kidney’s regulatory functions are dependent on the close proximity or alignment of the post-glomerular capillary beds with the renal tubules. This review will focus on our current knowledge of the mechanisms controlling the embryonic development of the renal vasculature. An understanding of this process is critical for developing novel therapies to prevent vessel rarefaction and will be essential for engineering renal tissues suitable for restoring kidney function to the ever-increasing population of patients with end stage renal disease. PMID:25128732

  3. Diagnostic value of combined static-excretory MR Urography in children with hydronephrosis

    PubMed Central

    Emad-Eldin, Sally; Abdelaziz, Omar; El-Diasty, Tarek A.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility, accuracy and diagnostic potential of combined static-excretory MR Urography in children with sonographically detected hydronephrosis. We prospectively evaluated 28 children (11 girls and 17 boys), mean age 8.3 years (range 2 months–16 years). Static-excretory MR Urography was performed in all cases. The results of MR Urography were compared with the results of other imaging modalities, cystoscopy and surgery. In 28 children, 61 renal units were evaluated by MR Urography (the renal unit is the kidney and its draining ureter). The final diagnoses included: normal renal units (n = 23); uretropelvic junction obstruction (n = 14); megaureter (n = 8); midureteric stricture (n = 1), complicated duplicated systems (n = 5), post ESWL non-obstructive dilation (n = 2), extrarenal pelvis (n = 4), dysplastic kidney (n = 4). Complex pathology and more than one disease entity in were found in 7 children. The MRI diagnosis correlated with the final diagnosis in 57 units, with diagnostic accuracy 93.4%. In conclusions static and excretory MRU give both morphological and functional information in a single examination without exposure to ionizing radiation and iodinated contrast agent. It is a valuable imaging technique for children with upper urinary tract dilatation; especially in cases of complex congenital pathologies and severely hydronephrotic kidney. PMID:25750748

  4. The Caenorhabditis elegans Excretory System: A Model for Tubulogenesis, Cell Fate Specification, and Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Meera V; Buechner, Matthew

    2016-05-01

    The excretory system of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a superb model of tubular organogenesis involving a minimum of cells. The system consists of just three unicellular tubes (canal, duct, and pore), a secretory gland, and two associated neurons. Just as in more complex organs, cells of the excretory system must first adopt specific identities and then coordinate diverse processes to form tubes of appropriate topology, shape, connectivity, and physiological function. The unicellular topology of excretory tubes, their varied and sometimes complex shapes, and the dynamic reprogramming of cell identity and remodeling of tube connectivity that occur during larval development are particularly fascinating features of this organ. The physiological roles of the excretory system in osmoregulation and other aspects of the animal's life cycle are only beginning to be explored. The cellular mechanisms and molecular pathways used to build and shape excretory tubes appear similar to those used in both unicellular and multicellular tubes in more complex organs, such as the vertebrate vascular system and kidney, making this simple organ system a useful model for understanding disease processes. PMID:27183565

  5. Molecular Mechanisms of Renal Cellular Nephrotoxicity due to Radiocontrast Media

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Ashour; Faga, Teresa; Pisani, Antonio; Sabbatini, Massimo; Navarra, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Modern iodinated radiocontrast media are all based on the triiodinated benzene ring with various chemical modifications having been made over the last few decades in order to reduce their toxicity. However, CIN remains a problem especially in patients with pre-existing renal failure. In vitro studies have demonstrated that all RCM are cytotoxic. RCM administration in vivo may lead to a decrease in renal medullary oxygenation leading to the generation of reactive oxygen species that may cause harmful effects to renal tissue. In addition, endothelin and adenosine release and decreased nitric oxide levels may worsen the hypoxic milieu. In vitro cell culture studies together with sparse in vivo rat model data have shown that important cell signalling pathways are affected by RCM. In particular, the prosurvival and proproliferative kinases Akt and ERK1/2 have been shown to be dephosphorylated (deactivated), whilst proinflammatory/cell death molecules such as the p38 and JNK kinases and the transcription factor NF-κB may be activated by RCM, accompanied by activation of apoptotic mediators such as caspases. Increasing our knowledge of the mechanisms of RCM action may help to develop future therapies for CIN. PMID:24745009

  6. Molecular mechanisms of renal cellular nephrotoxicity due to radiocontrast media.

    PubMed

    Michael, Ashour; Faga, Teresa; Pisani, Antonio; Riccio, Eleonora; Bramanti, Placido; Sabbatini, Massimo; Navarra, Michele; Andreucci, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Modern iodinated radiocontrast media are all based on the triiodinated benzene ring with various chemical modifications having been made over the last few decades in order to reduce their toxicity. However, CIN remains a problem especially in patients with pre-existing renal failure. In vitro studies have demonstrated that all RCM are cytotoxic. RCM administration in vivo may lead to a decrease in renal medullary oxygenation leading to the generation of reactive oxygen species that may cause harmful effects to renal tissue. In addition, endothelin and adenosine release and decreased nitric oxide levels may worsen the hypoxic milieu. In vitro cell culture studies together with sparse in vivo rat model data have shown that important cell signalling pathways are affected by RCM. In particular, the prosurvival and proproliferative kinases Akt and ERK1/2 have been shown to be dephosphorylated (deactivated), whilst proinflammatory/cell death molecules such as the p38 and JNK kinases and the transcription factor NF- κ B may be activated by RCM, accompanied by activation of apoptotic mediators such as caspases. Increasing our knowledge of the mechanisms of RCM action may help to develop future therapies for CIN. PMID:24745009

  7. Stem cells and fluid flow drive cyst formation in an invertebrate excretory organ.

    PubMed

    Thi-Kim Vu, Hanh; Rink, Jochen C; McKinney, Sean A; McClain, Melainia; Lakshmanaperumal, Naharajan; Alexander, Richard; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Cystic kidney diseases (CKDs) affect millions of people worldwide. The defining pathological features are fluid-filled cysts developing from nephric tubules due to defective flow sensing, cell proliferation and differentiation. The underlying molecular mechanisms, however, remain poorly understood, and the derived excretory systems of established invertebrate models (Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster) are unsuitable to model CKDs. Systematic structure/function comparisons revealed that the combination of ultrafiltration and flow-associated filtrate modification that is central to CKD etiology is remarkably conserved between the planarian excretory system and the vertebrate nephron. Consistently, both RNA-mediated genetic interference (RNAi) of planarian orthologues of human CKD genes and inhibition of tubule flow led to tubular cystogenesis that share many features with vertebrate CKDs, suggesting deep mechanistic conservation. Our results demonstrate a common evolutionary origin of animal excretory systems and establish planarians as a novel and experimentally accessible invertebrate model for the study of human kidney pathologies. PMID:26057828

  8. Hyperglycemia and mechanical stress: targeting the renal podocyte.

    PubMed

    Lewko, Barbara; Stepinski, Jan

    2009-11-01

    Hyperglycemia and deriving from glomerular hypertension mechanical stress are the key factors underlying pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Multiple direct and secondary effects of both these factors are mediated by complex signaling pathways with extensive interactions. The common signaling pathways stimulated by high glucose and mechanical insult may act in an additive manner, thereby accelerating the cell damage. Podocytes, the cells covering the outer aspect of glomerular basement membrane (GBM), are subjected not only to the load of filtered glucose but also to diverse mechanical forces. Bulging into the Bowman's space, they have no support from the apical side, which makes them particularly susceptible to the effects of mechanical strain. Both high glucose and mechanical stress may impair the protein systems anchoring the podocyte foot processes in GBM, therefore blunting resistance of these cells to mechanical forces. Modulation by these factors of expression and activity of numerous structural and functional proteins results in the (auto)inflammatory responses, dysfunction, apoptosis or necrosis of the podocytes. Loss of the podocytes is irreversible due to their inability to proliferate and to replenish damaged cells. Podocytes are injured early in the course of DN, which, most likely, underlies further glomerular and renal damage in diabetes. This review summarizes the effects of elevated glucose and mechanical stress that seem to be involved in podocyte impairment in diabetes, with particular focus on the possible interactions between these factors. PMID:19562677

  9. Dental management of people with renal disease and renal transplants.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, C A; Whyman, R A

    1998-09-01

    Chronic renal failure is the result of progressive loss of functioning nephrons leading to loss of renal function and accumulation of excretory products. Loss of the regulatory and excretory functions of the kidneys causes oral manifestations and multiple complications which have implications for dental care. Dental management of patients with renal failure and renal transplants involves consideration of specific haematological and cardiovascular effects, and implications for the prescribing and use of pharmaceuticals. It also requires the dentist to appreciate the potential for involvement of multiple organ systems in the disease process and the implications this has for dental care. The orofacial manifestations of chronic renal failure are secondary to systemic manifestations and are not specific to the diagnosis of end-stage renal disease. PMID:9775650

  10. Renal electrolyte circadian rhythms - Independence from feeding and activity patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore-Ede, M. C.; Herd, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on six unanesthetized chair-acclimatized adult male squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) weighing 600-900 g to determine whether internal synchronization is the result of simple passive dependence of renal excretory rhythms on endogenous rhythms of those variable that influence electrolyte excretion such as dietary intake and muscular activity. Independence of the urinary rhythms from diurnal variations in feeding, drinking, and activity was secured by depriving the animals of food, water, and training them to perform a two-hourly schedule of feeding, drinking, and activity throughout day and night. Results indicate that the internal synchronization which is normally observed between the behavioral and urinary rhythms cannot be explained by any direct dependence of renal function on behavioral patterns. The most probable mechanism for circadian internal synchronization is that the various behavioral and renal rhythms are controlled by potentially independent separate oscillators which are normally kept in synchrony with one another.

  11. Excretory system of representatives from family Diplozoidae (Monogenea).

    PubMed

    Konstanzová, V; Koubková, B; Kašný, M; Ilgová, J; Dzika, E; Gelnar, M

    2016-04-01

    Diplozoons are representatives of blood-feeding ectoparasites from the family Diplozoidae (Polyopisthocotylea, Monogenea). Although these worms have been the subject of numerous taxonomical, phylogenetic, and ecological studies, the detailed study of their excretory system has remained relatively neglected. Our observations focused on the morphological and ultrastructural features of the excretory apparatus of four diplozoid species: Diplozoon paradoxum, Eudiplozoon nipponicum, Paradiplozoon bliccae, and Paradiplozoon homoion. Observations were obtained using two microscope methods: light microscopy, equipped with differential interference contrast (Nomarski DIC) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The ultrastructure of two basic compartments which forms the excretory apparatus, flame cells with filtration apparatus, and canal cells forming the protonephridial ducts is revealed in this study. A unique consecutive sequence of longitudinal semi-thin sections of the excretory pore of E. nipponicum is visualized there for the first time. PMID:26677096

  12. Mechanisms of fetal and neonatal renal impairment by pharmacologic inhibition of angiotensin.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Robert L

    2012-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system is highly conserved through evolutionary history, and has multiple functions in addition to maintaining cardiovascular homeostasis: these include the regulation of renal cell survival and cell death, and development of the kidney. The importance of angiotensin (ANG) in normal kidney development was first recognized in infants with renal maldevelopment born to mothers treated with angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or with ANG AT1 receptor blockers. The molecular role of ANG in renal development has been elucidated using gene targeting in mice, revealing major effects in branching morphogenesis, vasculogenesis, development of the papilla and renal concentrating mechanism. Although exposure of the fetus to ANG inhibitors is potentially harmful throughout pregnancy, effects are greater in late compared to early gestation. Significant differences between humans and rodents in placental transfer of ANG and timing of renal development contributed to initial delays in recognizing the teratogenic effects of ANG inhibitors. Although administration of ACE or AT1 receptor inhibitors can slow progression of renal disease in older children, ANG inhibition in the neonatal period can aggravate renal injury due to congenital urinary tract obstruction. Neonates are also far more sensitive than older children to the hypotensive actions these agents and doses must be markedly reduced to avoid precipitating oliguria. Understanding the complex interactions of the maturing renin-angiotensin system in the perinatal period is essential in the use of ANG or renin inhibitors in women during childbearing years or in neonates with cardiovascular or renal disease. PMID:22876894

  13. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein expression in the male excretory duct system during development.

    PubMed

    Marcorelles, Pascale; Gillet, Danièle; Friocourt, Gaëlle; Ledé, Françoise; Samaison, Laura; Huguen, Geneviève; Ferec, Claude

    2012-03-01

    Sterility due to bilateral destruction in utero or in early infancy resulting in congenital absence of the vas deferens is the rule in male patients with cystic fibrosis. To understand the developmental pattern of this anomaly, the microscopic morphology of the male excretory system was analyzed during development and the expression of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein was explored by immunohistochemistry. We observed that cystic fibrosis fetuses had no excretory ducts agenesis or obstruction until 22 weeks of gestation. However, a focal inflammatory pattern and mucinous plugs in the oldest cystic fibrosis case suggested a disruptive mechanism. Immunolabeling of cytoplasmic epithelial cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein was demonstrated in all cystic fibrosis and control cases with a similar pattern of expression of the protein between age-matched controls and cystic fibrosis cases. At midgestation, an apical intensification appeared in both cystic fibrosis and control cases and was stable during the remainder of fetal life. No gradient of intensity could be detected between the different segments of the excretory tract. These findings are different from those reported in adults. The absence of any morphologic anomaly until 22 weeks of gestation, the focal destruction of the epithelial structures during the second trimester, and the chronological pattern of expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator are of interest for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of this disease. PMID:21840567

  14. Stem cells and fluid flow drive cyst formation in an invertebrate excretory organ

    PubMed Central

    Thi-Kim Vu, Hanh; Rink, Jochen C; McKinney, Sean A; McClain, Melainia; Lakshmanaperumal, Naharajan; Alexander, Richard; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Cystic kidney diseases (CKDs) affect millions of people worldwide. The defining pathological features are fluid-filled cysts developing from nephric tubules due to defective flow sensing, cell proliferation and differentiation. The underlying molecular mechanisms, however, remain poorly understood, and the derived excretory systems of established invertebrate models (Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster) are unsuitable to model CKDs. Systematic structure/function comparisons revealed that the combination of ultrafiltration and flow-associated filtrate modification that is central to CKD etiology is remarkably conserved between the planarian excretory system and the vertebrate nephron. Consistently, both RNA-mediated genetic interference (RNAi) of planarian orthologues of human CKD genes and inhibition of tubule flow led to tubular cystogenesis that share many features with vertebrate CKDs, suggesting deep mechanistic conservation. Our results demonstrate a common evolutionary origin of animal excretory systems and establish planarians as a novel and experimentally accessible invertebrate model for the study of human kidney pathologies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07405.001 PMID:26057828

  15. Renal tubular receptor imaging with iodine-131-labeled peanut lectin: pharmacokinetics and renal clearance mechanism in animals

    SciTech Connect

    Boniface, G.R.; Suresh, M.R.; Willans, D.J.; Tam, Y.K.; Shysh, A.; Longenecker, B.M.; Noujaim, A.A.

    1986-05-01

    Intravenously administered peanut lectin (PNA), iodinated with /sup 131/I ((/sup 131/I)PNA), is rapidly cleared from the plasma by the kidneys in dogs (clearance (total body) = 17.52 +/- 8.74 ml/min). Dynamic gamma camera renal scintigraphy demonstrated renal accumulation and excretion phases of the (/sup 131/I)PNA renogram in dogs and rabbits (% injection dose-at-peak = 21.8 +/- 3.3% and 19.6 +/- 4.3%, time-to-peak = 44.6 +/- 4.8 min and 37.2 +/- 6.9 min, respectively). Immunoperoxidase staining of kidney sections, following i.v. administered PNA, demonstrated predominant accumulation by the proximal tubules of mice, rabbits, and dogs. The basement membrane was intensely stained at early times p.i. while intracellular and luminal PNA was evident within 1 hr. Urine analysis confirmed the presence of intact (/sup 131/I)PNA in the bladder contents, while protein degradation products, and a small percentage of the free iodide (less than 5%) were noted within 1 hr p.i. The relative proportion of free iodide increased at later times p.i. (greater than 6 hr). A receptor mediated excretion mechanism is proposed for the clearance of PNA and may be useful for the study of renal tubular function.

  16. The renal concentrating mechanism and the clinical consequences of its loss

    PubMed Central

    Agaba, Emmanuel I.; Rohrscheib, Mark; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H.

    2012-01-01

    The integrity of the renal concentrating mechanism is maintained by the anatomical and functional arrangements of the renal transport mechanisms for solute (sodium, potassium, urea, etc) and water and by the function of the regulatory hormone for renal concentration, vasopressin. The discovery of aquaporins (water channels) in the cell membranes of the renal tubular epithelial cells has elucidated the mechanisms of renal actions of vasopressin. Loss of the concentrating mechanism results in uncontrolled polyuria with low urine osmolality and, if the patient is unable to consume (appropriately) large volumes of water, hypernatremia with dire neurological consequences. Loss of concentrating mechanism can be the consequence of defective secretion of vasopressin from the posterior pituitary gland (congenital or acquired central diabetes insipidus) or poor response of the target organ to vasopressin (congenital or nephrogenic diabetes insipidus). The differentiation between the three major states producing polyuria with low urine osmolality (central diabetes insipidus, nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and primary polydipsia) is done by a standardized water deprivation test. Proper diagnosis is essential for the management, which differs between these three conditions. PMID:23293407

  17. Excretory/secretory products of the carcinogenic liver fluke are endocytosed by human cholangiocytes and drive cell proliferation and IL6 production.

    PubMed

    Chaiyadet, Sujittra; Smout, Michael; Johnson, Michael; Whitchurch, Cynthia; Turnbull, Lynne; Kaewkes, Sasithorn; Sotillo, Javier; Loukas, Alex; Sripa, Banchob

    2015-10-01

    Liver fluke infection caused by Opisthorchis viverrini remains a major public health problem in many parts of Asia including Thailand, Lao PDR, Vietnam and Cambodia, where there is a strikingly high incidence of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA - hepatic cancer of the bile duct epithelium). Among other factors, uptake of O. viverrini excretory/secretory products (OvES) by biliary epithelial cells has been postulated to be responsible for chronic inflammation and proliferation of cholangiocytes, but the mechanisms by which cells internalise O. viverrini excretory/secretory products are still unknown. Herein we incubated normal human cholangiocytes (H69), human cholangiocarcinoma cells (KKU-100, KKU-M156) and human colon cancer (Caco-2) cells with O. viverrini excretory/secretory products and analysed the effects of different endocytic inhibitors to address the mechanism of cellular uptake of ES proteins. Opisthorchis viverrini excretory/secretory products was internalised preferentially by liver cell lines, and most efficiently/rapidly by H69 cells. There was no evidence for trafficking of ES proteins to cholangiocyte organelles, and most of the fluorescence was detected in the cytoplasm. Pretreatment with clathrin inhibitors significantly reduced the uptake of O. viverrini excretory/secretory products, particularly by H69 cells. Opisthorchis viverrini excretory/secretory products induced proliferation of liver cells (H69 and CCA lines) but not intestinal (Caco-2) cells, and proliferation was blocked using inhibitors of the classical endocytic pathways (clathrin and caveolae). Opisthorchis viverrini excretory/secretory products drove IL6 secretion by H69 cells but not Caco-2 cells, and cytokine secretion was significantly reduced by endocytosis inhibitors. This the first known study to address the endocytosis of helminth ES proteins by host epithelial cells and sheds light on the pathways by which this parasite causes one of the most devastating forms of cancer in south

  18. Mechanisms of renal repair and survival following acute injury.

    PubMed

    Safirstein, R; DiMari, J; Megyesi, J; Price, P

    1998-09-01

    The reaction of the renal epithelium to injury is heterogenous. Some cells die, others survive apparently intact, while others commit to repair. The determinants of these responses appear to depend on signal transduction pathways and molecular responses that is segment specific and interactive. The kidney, as do cells in culture exposed to various noxious stimuli, react in a typical manner referred to as the stress response. The response is comprised of kinases and their molecular targets as well as cell cycle-specific factors that determine whether a cell survives the injury or not. We propose that this response can be modified by survival factors which upregulate those aspects of the response that are cytoprotective and which downregulate those that are cytoreductive. Preliminary data will be presented to demonstrate the feasibility of this approach. PMID:9754604

  19. Macrophage-derived Lipocalin-2 contributes to ischemic resistance mechanisms by protecting from renal injury

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Michaela; Brüne, Bernhard; Hotter, Georgina; Sola, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Renal ischemia-reperfusion injury triggers an inflammatory response associated to infiltrating macrophages which determines the further outcome of disease. Brown Norway rats are known to show endogenous resistance to ischemia-induced renal damage. By contrast, Sprague Dawley rats exhibit a higher susceptibility to ischemic injury. In order to ascertain cytoprotective mechanisms, we focused on the implication of lipocalin-2 protein in main resistance mechanisms in renal ischemia/reperfusion injury by using adoptive macrophage administration, genetically modified ex vivo either to overexpress or to knockdown lipocalin-2. In vitro experiments with bone marrow-derived macrophages both from Brown Norway rats and from Sprague Dawley rats under hypoxic conditions showed endogenous differences regarding cytokine and lipocalin-2 expression profile in the two strains. Most interestingly, we observed that macrophages of the resistant strain express significantly more lipocalin-2. In vivo studies showed that tubular epithelial cell apoptosis and renal injury significantly increased and reparative markers decreased in Brown Norway rats after injection of lipocalin-2-knockdown macrophages, while the administration of lipocalin-2-overexpressing cells significantly decreased Sprague Dawley susceptibility. These data point to a crucial role of macrophage-derived lipocalin-2 in endogenous cytoprotective mechanisms. We conclude that expression of lipocalin-2 in tissue-infiltrating macrophages is pivotal for kidney-intrinsic cytoprotective pathways during ischemia reperfusion injury. PMID:26911537

  20. Renal Protective Effect of Probucol in Rats with Contrast-Induced Nephropathy and its Underlying Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Na; Wei, Ri-bao; Li, Qing-ping; Yang, Xi; Li, Ping; Huang, Meng-jie; Wang, Rui; Cai, Guang-yan; Chen, Xiang-mei

    2015-01-01

    Background Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) refers to acute renal damage that occurs after the use of contrast agents. This study investigated the renal protective effect of probucol in a rat model of contrast-induced nephropathy and the mechanism of its effect. Material/Methods Twenty-eight Wistar rats were randomly divided into the control group, model group, N-acetylcysteine(NAC) group, and probucol group. We used a rat model of iopromide-induced CIN. One day prior to modeling, the rats received gavage. At 24 h after the modeling, blood biochemistry and urine protein were assessed. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were measured in renal tissue. Kidney sections were created for histopathological examination. Results The model group of rats showed significantly elevated levels of blood creatinine, urea nitrogen, 24-h urine protein, histopathological scores, and parameters of oxidative stress (P<0.05). Both the NAC and probucol groups demonstrated significantly lower Scr, BUN, and urine protein levels compared to the model group (P<0.05), with no significant difference between these 2 groups. The NAC group and the probucol group had significantly lower MDA and higher SOD than the model group at 24 h after modeling (P<0.05). The 8-OHdG-positive tubule of the probucol group and NAC group were significantly lower than those of the model group (p=0.046, P=0.0008), with significant difference between these 2 groups (P=0.024). Conclusions Probucol can effectively reduce kidney damage caused by contrast agent. The underlying mechanism may be that probucol accelerates the recovery of renal function and renal pathology by reducing local renal oxidative stress. PMID:26408630

  1. Renal Safety Pharmacology in Drug Discovery and Development.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Amanda; Nogueira da Costa, Andre; Delaunois, Annie; Rosseels, Marie-Luce; Valentin, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The kidney is a complex excretory organ playing a crucial role in various physiological processes such as fluid and electrolyte balance, control of blood pressure, removal of waste products, and drug disposition. Drug-induced kidney injury (DIKI) remains a significant cause of candidate drug attrition during drug development. However, the incidence of renal toxicities in preclinical studies is low, and the mechanisms by which drugs induce kidney injury are still poorly understood. Although some in vitro investigational tools have been developed, the in vivo assessment of renal function remains the most widely used methodology to identify DIKI. Stand-alone safety pharmacology studies usually include assessment of glomerular and hemodynamic function, coupled with urine and plasma analyses. However, as renal function is not part of the ICH S7A core battery, such studies are not routinely conducted by pharmaceutical companies. The most common approach consists in integrating renal/urinary measurements in repeat-dose toxicity studies. In addition to the standard analyses and histopathological examination of kidneys, novel promising urinary biomarkers have emerged over the last decade, offering greater sensitivity and specificity than traditional renal parameters. Seven of these biomarkers have been qualified by regulatory agencies for use in rat toxicity studies. PMID:26091646

  2. Ultrasound strain elastography in assessment of cortical mechanical behavior in acute renal vein occlusion: in vivo animal model.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jing; He, Wen; Cheng, Ling-Gang; Li, Xiao-Ya; Zhang, Xiou-Ru; Juluru, Krishna; Al Khori, Noor; Coya, Adrienne; Min, Robert

    2015-01-01

    To assess the correlation of quantitative ultrasound strain parameters with the severity of cortical edema in renal vein occlusion, we prospectively performed ultrasound strain elastography on a canine acute renal vein occlusion model prior to and following 10, 20, and 40min of renal vein ligation. Strain and strain relaxation time representing the deformation and relaxation of the renal cortices and reference soft tissue were produced by the external compression with the ultrasound transducer and estimated using commercially available 2-D speckle tracking software. Cortical thickness was additionally measured. Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to examine the difference in cortical thickness, strain ratio (mean cortical strain divided by mean reference tissue strain), and strain relaxation time ratio (cortical relaxation time divided by reference tissue relaxation time) prior to and after renal vein ligation. Pearson's correlation coefficient was applied to test the relationship between strain parameters and the time of the renal vein ligation. There was a strong positive correlation between the duration of renal vein ligation and strain (R(2)=0.97) and strain relaxation time (R(2)=0.98) ratios. Significant differences in strain and strain relaxation time ratios were found at all measured timepoints (all P≪.001). Cortical thickness, however, showed no significant difference between timepoints (P=.065). Our result suggest that strain and strain relaxation time ratios may be used as quantitative markers for the assessment of the renal cortical mechanical behavior in subclinical acute renal vein occlusion. PMID:25481219

  3. Mineralocorticoid-induced sodium appetite and renal salt retention: evidence for common signaling and effector mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yiling; Vallon, Volker

    2014-01-01

    An increase in renal sodium chloride (salt) retention and an increase in sodium appetite are the body's responses to salt restriction or depletion in order to restore salt balance. Renal salt retention and increased sodium appetite can also be maladaptive and sustain the pathophysiology in conditions like salt-sensitive hypertension and chronic heart failure. Here we review the central role of the mineralocorticoid aldosterone in both the increase in renal salt reabsorption and sodium appetite. We discuss the working hypothesis that aldosterone activates similar signaling and effector mechanisms in the kidney and brain, including the mineralocorticoid receptor, the serum- and glucocorticoid-induced kinase SGK1, the ubiquitin ligase NEDD4-2, and the epithelial sodium channel ENaC. The latter also mediates the gustatory salt sensing in the tongue, which is required for the manifestation of increased salt intake. Effects of aldosterone on both the brain and kidney synergize with the effects of angiotensin II. Thus, mineralocorticoids appear to induce similar molecular pathways in the kidney, brain, and possibly tongue, which could provide opportunities for more effective therapeutic interventions. Inhibition of renal salt reabsorption is compensated by stimulation of salt appetite and vice versa; targeting both mechanisms should be more effective. Inhibiting the arousal to consume salty food may improve a patient's compliance to reducing salt intake. While a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms is needed and will provide new therapeutic options, current pharmacological interventions that target both salt retention and sodium appetite include mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists and potentially inhibitors of angiotensin II and ENaC. PMID:25376899

  4. Mineralocorticoid-induced sodium appetite and renal salt retention: Evidence for common signaling and effector mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yiling; Vallon, Volker

    2014-01-01

    An increase in renal sodium chloride (salt) retention and an increase in sodium appetite is the body's response to salt restriction or depletion in order to restore salt balance. Renal salt retention and increased sodium appetite can also be maladaptive and sustain the pathophysiology in conditions like salt-sensitive hypertension and chronic heart failure. Here we review the central role of the mineralocorticoid aldosterone in both the increase in renal salt reabsorption and sodium appetite. We discuss the working hypothesis that aldosterone activates similar signaling and effector mechanisms in the kidney and brain, including the mineralocorticoid receptor, the serum-and-glucocorticoid-induced kinase SGK1, the ubiquitin ligase NEDD4-2, and the epithelial sodium channel ENaC. The latter also mediates the gustatory salt sensing in the tongue, which is required for the manifestation of increased salt intake. Effects of aldosterone on both brain and kidney synergize with the effects of angiotensin II. Thus, mineralocorticoids appear to induce similar molecular pathways in the kidney, brain, and possibly tongue, which could provide opportunities for more effective therapeutic interventions. Inhibition of renal salt reabsorption is compensated by stimulation of salt appetite and vice versa; targeting both mechanisms should be more effective. Inhibiting the arousal to consume salty food may improve a patient's compliance to reducing salt intake. While a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms is needed and will provide new options, current pharmacological interventions that target both salt retention and sodium appetite include mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists and potentially inhibitors of angiotensin II and ENaC. PMID:25376899

  5. Interventional mechanisms of herbs or herbal extracts on renal interstitial fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jia; He, Li-Qun; Su, Xiao

    2016-05-01

    Renal interstitial fibrosis (RIF) is a common development in chronic renal diseases that can lead to uremia and be life-threatening. The RIF pathology has complicated extracellular and intercellular mechanisms, involving many cells and cytokines, resulting in an incomplete mechanistic understanding of the disease. Finding effective herbs or herbal extracts for prevention and treatment of RIF is crucial because current medical approaches do not reliably slow or reverse RIF. In recent years, many experts have worked to identify herbs or herbal extracts to combat RIF both in vivo and in vitro, with some success. This review attempts to summarize the possible interventional mechanisms of herbs or herbal extracts involved in protecting and reversing RIF. The authors found some herbs and their extracts that may ameliorate renal impairments through anti-inflammation, anti-fibrogenesis and stabilization of extra cellular matrix. Among them, tetramethylpyrazine/ligustrazine, curcumin and polyglucoside of Tripterygium have experimentally shown good potential for improving RIF. However, conclusive evidence is still needed, especially in randomized controlled clinical trials. We expect that herbs or herbal extracts will play an important role in RIF treatment and reversal in the future. PMID:27181123

  6. Mechanisms of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids to improve cardiac remodeling in chronic renal failure disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Wang, Ju; Zhang, Huanji; Chen, Jie; Zuo, Zhiyi; Wang, Jingfeng; Huang, Hui

    2013-02-15

    Both clinical and basic science studies have demonstrated that cardiac remodeling in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) is very common. It is a key feature during the course of heart failure and an important risk factor for subsequent cardiac mortality. Traditional drugs or therapies rarely have effects on cardiac regression of CRF and cardiovascular events are still the first cause of death. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are the products of arachidonic acids metabolized by cytochrome P450 epoxygenases. It has been found that EETs have important biological effects including anti-hypertension and anti-inflammation. Recent data suggest that EETs are involved in regulating cardiomyocyte injury, renal dysfunction, chronic kidney disease (CKD)-related risk factors and signaling pathways, all of which play key roles in cardiac remodeling induced by CRF. This review analyzes the literature to identify the possible mechanisms for EETs to improve cardiac remodeling induced by CRF and indicates the therapeutic potential of EETs in it. PMID:23313758

  7. Characterization of the effects of erythromycin estolate and erythromycin base on the excretory function of the isolated rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Gaeta, G.B.; Utili, R.; Adinolfi, L.E.; Abernathy, C.O.; Giusti, G.

    1985-09-15

    To investigate the mechanisms of erythromycin cholestasis, the effects of erythromycin estolate (EE) on the excretory function of the isolated perfused rat liver and on liver plasma membrane (LM) preparations were studied and compared to those of erythromycin base (EB) and lauryl sulfate (LS), added alone or in combination. EE (at 125 to 200 microM) caused dose-dependent reductions of bile and perfusate flows, bile acid (BA) excretion, and biliary BA concentration. The alterations of the excretory function were only in part due to the decreased perfusate flow. In contrast, both 200 and 300 microM concentrations of EB elicited similar choleretic responses, which were presumably related to the osmotic activity of the drug excreted in the bile. LS did not affect hepatic excretory functions. However, the simultaneous addition of EB and LS resulted in a rate of bile flow lower than that observed with EB alone. EE, but not EB, increased canalicular permeability to (/sup 14/C)sucrose as measured by bile to plasma (B:P) ratio. Neither drugs altered (/sup 14/C)erythritol B:P ratio. In LM preparations both Na+,K+- and Mg2+-ATPase activities were inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by EE, but not by EB. The data suggest that EE could affect bile flow by inhibiting cotransport of Na+ and BA and by altering LM permeability and support the view that the effect of erythromycins on the liver may be related to their surface activity.

  8. Renal accumulation of salicylate and phenacetin: possible mechanisms in the nephropathy of analgesic abuse

    PubMed Central

    Bluemle, Lewis W.; Goldberg, Martin

    1968-01-01

    Since either aspirin or phenacetin might be causative in the nephropathy of analgesic abuse, studies were designed to examine the renal accumulation and distribution of the major metabolic products of these compounds, salicylate and N-acetyl-p-aminophenol (APAP) respectively, in dogs. Nineteen hydropenic animals were studied, of which seven were given phenacetin, nine received acetyl salicylic acid, two were given both aspirin and phenacetin, and one received APAP directly. Two of three hydrated animals were given phenacetin and one was given aspirin. During peak blood levels of salicylate and (or) APAP, the kidneys were rapidly removed, frozen, sliced from cortex to papillary tip, and analyzed for water, urea, APAP, and salicylate. No renal medullary gradient for salicylate was demonstrable during both hydropenic and hydrated states. In contrast, both free and conjugated APAP concentrations rose sharply in the inner medulla during hydropenia, reaching a mean maximal value at the papillary tip exceeding 10 times the cortical concentration (P < 0.001), a distribution similar to that of urea. Salicylate had no effect on the APAP gradient, but hydration markedly reduced both the APAP and urea gradients in the medulla. The data indicate that APAP probably shares the same renal mechanisms of transport and accumulation as urea and acetamide, and that papillary necrosis from excessive phenacetin may be related to high papillary concentration of APAP. PMID:5813230

  9. Mechanisms of HO-1 mediated attenuation of renal immune injury: a gene profiling study.

    PubMed

    Duann, Pu; Lianos, Elias A

    2011-10-01

    Using a mouse model of immune injury directed against the renal glomerular vasculature and resembling human forms of glomerulonephritis (GN), we assessed the effect of targeted expression of the cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase (HO)-1. A human (h) HO-1 complementary DNAN (cDNA) sequence was targeted to glomerular epithelial cells (GECs) using a GEC-specific murine nephrin promoter. Injury by administration of antibody against the glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) to transgenic (TG) mice with GEC-targeted hHO-1 was attenuated compared with wild-type (WT) controls. To explore changes in the expression of genes that could mediate this salutary effect, we performed gene expression profiling using a microarray analysis of RNA isolated from the renal cortex of WT or TG mice with or without anti-GBM antibody-induced injury. Significant increases in expression were detected in 9 major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-class II genes, 2 interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-inducible guanosine triphosphate (GTP)ases, and 3 genes of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. The increase in MHC-class II and proteasome gene expression in TG mice with injury was validated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or Western blot analysis. The observations point to novel mechanisms underlying the cytoprotective effect of HO-1 in renal immune injury. PMID:21925121

  10. Resistance to sunitinib in renal cell carcinoma: From molecular mechanisms to predictive markers and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Joosten, S C; Hamming, L; Soetekouw, P M; Aarts, M J; Veeck, J; van Engeland, M; Tjan-Heijnen, V C

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of agents that inhibit tumor angiogenesis by targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling has made a significant impact on the survival of patients with metastasized renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Sunitinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor of the VEGF receptor, has become the mainstay of treatment for these patients. Although treatment with sunitinib substantially improved patient outcome, the initial success is overshadowed by the occurrence of resistance. The mechanisms of resistance are poorly understood. Insight into the molecular mechanisms of resistance will help to better understand the biology of RCC and can ultimately aid the development of more effective therapies for patients with this infaust disease. In this review we comprehensively discuss molecular mechanisms of resistance to sunitinib and the involved biological processes, summarize potential biomarkers that predict response and resistance to treatment with sunitinib, and elaborate on future perspectives in the treatment of metastasized RCC. PMID:25446042

  11. The body composition and excretory burden of lean, obese, and severely obese individuals has implications for the assessment of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Fotheringham, James; Weatherley, Nicholas; Kawar, Bisher; Fogarty, Damian G; Ellam, Timothy

    2014-12-01

    Obesity could affect associations between creatinine generation, estimated body surface area, and excretory burden, with effects on chronic kidney disease assessment. We therefore examined the impact of obesity on the performances of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), the urine albumin:creatinine ratio (ACR), and excretory burden in 3611 participants of the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort. Urine creatinine excretion significantly increased with body mass index (BMI) (34 and 31% greater at 40 kg/m(2) or more versus the normal of 18.5-25 kg/m(2)) in men and women, respectively, such that patients with a normal BMI and an ACR of 30 mg/g had the same 24-h albuminuria as severely obese patients with ACR 23 mg/g. The bias of eGFR (referenced to body surface area-indexed iothalamate (i-)GFR) had a U-shaped relationship to obesity in men but progressively increased in women. Nevertheless, obesity-associated body surface area increases were accompanied by a greater absolute (non-indexed) iGFR for a given eGFR, particularly in men. Two men with eGFRs of 45 ml/min per 1.73 m(2), height 1.76 m, and BMI 22 or 45 kg/m(2) had absolute iGFRs of 46 and 62 ml/min, respectively. The excretory burden, assessed as urine urea nitrogen and estimated dietary phosphorus, sodium, and potassium intakes, also increased in obesity. However, obese men had lower odds of anemia, hyperkalemia, and hyperphosphatemia. Thus, for a given ACR and eGFR, obese individuals have greater albuminuria, absolute GFR, and excretory burden. This has implications for chronic kidney disease management, screening, and research. PMID:24717300

  12. Basolateral EGF receptor sorting regulated by functionally distinct mechanisms in renal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cotton, Calvin U; Hobert, Michael E; Ryan, Sean; Carlin, Cathleen R

    2013-03-01

    Proliferation of epithelial tissues is controlled by polarized distribution of signaling receptors including the EGF receptor (EGFR). In kidney, EGFRs are segregated from soluble ligands present in apical fluid of nephrons by selective targeting to basolateral membranes. We have shown previously that the epithelial-specific clathrin adaptor AP1B mediates basolateral EGFR sorting in established epithelia. Here we show that protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent phosphorylation of Thr654 regulates EGFR polarity as epithelial cells form new cell-cell junctional complexes. The AP1B-dependent pathway does not override a PKC-resistant T654A mutation, and conversely AP1B-defective EGFRs sort basolaterally by a PKC-dependent mechanism, in polarizing cells. Surprisingly, EGFR mutations that interfere with these different sorting pathways also produce very distinct phenotypes in three-dimensional organotypic cultures. Thus EGFRs execute different functions depending on the basolateral sorting route. Many renal disorders have defects in cell polarity and the notion that apically mislocalized EGFRs promote proliferation is still an attractive model to explain many aspects of polycystic kidney disease. Our data suggest EGFR also integrates various aspects of polarity by switching between different basolateral sorting programs in developing epithelial cells. Fundamental knowledge of basic mechanisms governing EGFR sorting therefore provides new insights into pathogenesis and advances drug discovery for these renal disorders. PMID:23205726

  13. Basolateral EGF receptor sorting regulated by functionally distinct mechanisms in renal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Cotton, Calvin U.; Hobert, Michael E.; Ryan, Sean; Carlin, Cathleen R.

    2014-01-01

    Proliferation of epithelial tissues is controlled by polarized distribution of signaling receptors including the EGF receptor (EGFR). In kidney, EGFRs are segregated from soluble ligands present in apical fluid of nephrons by selective targeting to basolateral membranes. We have shown previously that the epithelial-specific clathrin adaptor AP1B mediates basolateral EGFR sorting in established epithelia. Here we show that protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent phosphorylation of Thr654 regulates EGFR polarity as epithelial cells form new cell-cell junctional complexes. The AP1B-dependent pathway does not override a PKC-resistant T654A mutation, and conversely AP1B-defective EGFRs sort basolaterally by a PKC-dependent mechanism, in polarizing cells. Surprisingly, EGFR mutations that interfere with these different sorting pathways also produce very distinct phenotypes in three-dimensional organotypic cultures. Thus EGFRs execute different functions depending on the basolateral sorting route. Many renal disorders have defects in cell polarity and the notion that apically mislocalized EGFRs promote proliferation is still an attractive model to explain many aspects of polycystic kidney disease. Our data suggest EGFR also integrates various aspects of polarity by switching between different BL sorting programs in developing epithelial cells. Fundamental knowledge of basic mechanisms governing EGFR sorting therefore provides new insights into pathogenesis and advances drug discovery for these renal disorders. PMID:23205726

  14. Renal Effects and Underlying Molecular Mechanisms of Long-Term Salt Content Diets in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Rebeca Caldeira Machado; Vassallo, Paula Frizera; Crajoinas, Renato de Oliveira; Oliveira, Marilene Luzia; Martins, Flávia Letícia; Nogueira, Breno Valentim; Motta-Santos, Daisy; Araújo, Isabella Binotti; Forechi, Ludimila; Girardi, Adriana Castello Costa; Santos, Robson Augusto Souza; Mill, José Geraldo

    2015-01-01

    Several evidences have shown that salt excess is an important determinant of cardiovascular and renal derangement in hypertension. The present study aimed to investigate the renal effects of chronic high or low salt intake in the context of hypertension and to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying such effects. To this end, newly weaned male SHR were fed with diets only differing in NaCl content: normal salt (NS: 0.3%), low salt (LS: 0.03%), and high salt diet (HS: 3%) until 7 months of age. Analysis of renal function, morphology, and evaluation of the expression of the main molecular components involved in the renal handling of albumin, including podocyte slit-diaphragm proteins and proximal tubule endocytic receptors were performed. The relationship between diets and the balance of the renal angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and ACE2 enzymes was also examined. HS produced glomerular hypertrophy and decreased ACE2 and nephrin expressions, loss of morphological integrity of the podocyte processes, and increased proteinuria, characterized by loss of albumin and high molecular weight proteins. Conversely, severe hypertension was attenuated and renal dysfunction was prevented by LS since proteinuria was much lower than in the NS SHRs. This was associated with a decrease in kidney ACE/ACE2 protein and activity ratio and increased cubilin renal expression. Taken together, these results suggest that LS attenuates hypertension progression in SHRs and preserves renal function. The mechanisms partially explaining these findings include modulation of the intrarenal ACE/ACE2 balance and the increased cubilin expression. Importantly, HS worsens hypertensive kidney injury and decreases the expression nephrin, a key component of the slit diaphragm. PMID:26495970

  15. Molecular Mechanism of Renal Tubular Secretion of the Antimalarial Drug Chloroquine ▿

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Fabian; König, Jörg; Glaeser, Hartmut; Schmidt, Ingrid; Zolk, Oliver; Fromm, Martin F.; Maas, Renke

    2011-01-01

    The antimalarial drug chloroquine is eliminated to a significant extent by renal tubular secretion. The molecular mechanism of renal chloroquine secretion remains unknown. We hypothesized that organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2) and multidrug and toxin extrusion protein 1 (MATE1), localized in the basolateral and luminal membranes of proximal tubule cells, respectively, are involved in chloroquine transport. The interaction of chloroquine with both transporters was investigated using single-transfected human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293)-MATE1 cells in uptake experiments and single-transfected Madin-Darby canine kidney II (MDCK)-OCT2 and MDCK-MATE1 cells as well as double-transfected MDCK-OCT2-MATE1 cells grown as polarized monolayers on transwell filters. In HEK293-MATE1 cells, chloroquine competitively inhibited MATE1-mediated metformin uptake (Ki = 2.8 μM). Cellular accumulation of chloroquine was significantly lower (P < 0.001) and transcellular chloroquine transport was significantly increased (P < 0.001) in MDCK-MATE1 and MDCK-OCT2-MATE1 cells compared to vector control cells after basal addition of chloroquine (0.1 to 10 μM). In contrast, no difference in cellular accumulation or transcellular transport of chloroquine was observed between MDCK-OCT2 and vector control cells. In line with an oppositely directed proton gradient acting as a driving force for MATE1, basal-to-apical transport of chloroquine by MDCK-OCT2-MATE1 cells increased with decreasing apical pH from 7.8 to 6.0. Transcellular transport of chloroquine by MDCK-OCT2-MATE1 cells was inhibited by cimetidine, trimethoprim, and amitriptyline. Our data demonstrate that chloroquine is a substrate and potent competitive inhibitor of MATE1, whereas OCT2 seems to play no role in chloroquine uptake. Concomitantly administered MATE1 inhibitors are likely to modify the renal secretion of chloroquine. PMID:21518836

  16. The renal quantitative scintillation camera study for determination of renal function

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, I.M. Jr.; Boineau, F.G.; Evans, B.B.; Schlegel, J.U.

    1983-03-01

    The renal quantitative scintillation camera study assesses glomerular filtration rate and effective renal plasma flow based upon renal uptake of 99mtechnetium-iron ascorbate and 131iodine-hippuran, respectively. The method was compared to inulin, para-aminohippuric acid and creatinine clearance studies in 7 normal subjects and 9 patients with various degrees of reduced renal function. The reproducibility of the technique was determined in 15 randomly selected pediatric patients. The values of glomerular filtration rate and effective renal plasma flow were not significantly different from those of inulin and para-aminohippuric acid studies. The reproducibility of the technique was comparable to that of inulin and para-aminohippuric acid studies. Patient acceptance of the technique is excellent and the cost is minimal. Renal morphology and excretory dynamics also are demonstrated. The technique is advocated as a clinical measure of renal function.

  17. Imaging in acute renal infection in children

    SciTech Connect

    Sty, J.R.; Wells, R.G.; Starshak, R.J.; Schroeder, B.A.

    1987-03-01

    Infection is the most common disease of the urinary tract in children, and various imaging techniques have been used to verify its presence and location. On retrospective analysis, 50 consecutive children with documented upper urinary tract infection had abnormal findings on renal cortical scintigraphy with 99mTc-glucoheptonate. The infection involved the renal poles only in 38 and the poles plus other renal cortical areas in eight. Four had abnormalities that spared the poles. Renal sonograms were abnormal in 32 of 50 children. Excretory urograms were abnormal in six of 23 children in whom they were obtained. Vesicoureteral reflux was found in 34 of 40 children in whom voiding cystourethrography was performed. These data show the high sensitivity of renal cortical scintigraphy with 99mTc-glucoheptonate in documenting upper urinary tract infection. The location of the abnormalities detected suggests that renal infections spread via an ascending mode and implies that intrarenal reflux is a major contributing factor.

  18. Grape seed proanthocyanidins prevent DOCA-salt hypertension-induced renal injury and its mechanisms in rats.

    PubMed

    Lan, Chao-Zong; Ding, Ling; Su, Yi-Lin; Guo, Kun; Wang, Li; Kan, Hong-Wei; Ou, Yu-Rong; Gao, Shan

    2015-07-01

    Renal dysfunction is one of the major effects of DOCA (deoxycorticosterone acetate)-salt hypertension and there is an increasing amount of evidence that oxidative stress damages the function of the kidney. Grape seed proanthocyanidins (GSPE) have been reported to be potent anti-oxidants and free radical scavengers. The present study sought to investigate the ability of GSPE to prevent renal injury in DOCA-salt hypertensive rats and to explore the molecular mechanisms underlying its protective effects. A total of 54 Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into 7 groups: Sham group (n = 7), UnX-sham group (n = 8), DOCA-salt group (n = 8), GSPE150 group (150 mg kg(-1), n = 7), GSPE240 group (240 mg kg(-1), n = 8), GSPE384 group (384 mg kg(-1), n = 8) and ALM (amlodipine besylate tablets) group (5 mg kg(-1), n = 8), and treated for 4 weeks. Compared to sham group rats, renal injury was observed in DOCA-salt hypertensive group rats as the urine protein, KW/BW (kidney weight/body weight), degree of renal fibrosis, renal MDA (malondialdehyde) and Hyp (hydroxyproline) contents significantly increased (P < 0.01). Moreover, SOD (Superoxide Dismutase) activities decreased in the model group (P < 0.01). In contrast, DOCA-salt hypertensive rats treated with different dose of GSPE or ALM showed a significant improvement of renal injury with decreased urine protein, KW/BW, degree of renal fibrosis, renal total MDA and Hyp contents compared to the untreated group. In addition, SOD activities increased in the treatment group. Since the experimental modeling time was short, kidney damage occurs to a lesser extent. BUN (Blood Urea Nitrogen), Scr (Serum Creatinine) and UA (Uric Acid) contents did not appear significantly changed in all groups. Finally, the activation of JNK and p38 kinases in the kidney was suppressed in rats treated with GSPEs or ALM compared to the untreated group, suggesting that the inhibition of these kinase pathways by GSPE contributes to the improvement

  19. Proliferation inhibition and the underlying molecular mechanisms of microRNA-30d in renal carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    YU, HONGSHENG; LIN, XIALU; WANG, FANG; ZHANG, BURONG; WANG, WEIHUA; SHI, HONGBO; ZOU, BAOBO; ZHAO, JINSHUN

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the inhibitory effects of microRNA-30d (miR-30d) on renal carcinoma cell proliferation and the underlying molecular mechanisms, miR-30d expression in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) specimens was analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The inhibition of the proliferation of miR-30d on renal carcinoma cells (ACHN cell line) was analyzed by MTT and colony formation assays. The effects of miR-30d on cyclin E2 expression were detected by the luciferase activity of the reporter gene. In addition, the effects of miR-30d on endogenous cyclin E2 expression at the RNA and protein levels were investigated by qPCR and western blot analysis, respectively. Cell cycles were analyzed by flow cytometry. The results showed the following: i) Expression of miR-30d was significantly downregulated in renal carcinoma tissues compared with paraneoplastic tissues; ii) overexpression of miR-30d inhibited renal carcinoma cell proliferation and colony formation; iii) miR-30d inhibited cyclin E2 3′ untranslated region-mediated reporter gene expression; and iv) overexpression of miR-30d downregulated endogenous cyclin E2 expression and blocked the cell cycle at the G1 phase. In conclusion, miR-30d functions as a tumor suppressor gene in RCC and inhibits renal carcinoma cell proliferation. Cell cycle regulatory factor cyclin E2 is a target gene of miR-30d. miR-30d inhibits renal carcinoma cell proliferation via the regulation of cyclin E2 expression at the post-transcriptional level. PMID:24520297

  20. [Protective effect of Angelica sinensis polysaccharides on subacute renal damages induced by D-galactose in mice and its mechanism].

    PubMed

    Fan, Yan-ling; Xia, Jie-yu; Jia, Dao-yong; Zhang, Meng-si; Zhang, Yan-yan; Wang, Lu; Huang, Guo-ning; Wang, Ya-ping

    2015-11-01

    To explore the protective effect of Angelica sinensis polysaccharides(ASP) on subacute renal damages induced by D-galactose in mice and its mechanism. Male C57BL/6J mice were randomly divided into 3 groups, with 10 mice in each group. The D-galactose model group was subcutaneously injected with D-galactose (120 mg x kg(-1)), qd x 42; the ASP + D-galactose model group was intraperitoneally injected with ASP since the 8th day of the replication of the D-galactose model, qd x 35; and the normal control group was subcutaneously injected with saline at the same dose and time. On the 2nd day of after the injection, the peripheral blood was collected to measure the content of BUN, Crea, UA, Cys-C; paraffin sections were made to observe the renal histomorphology by HE staining; senescence-associated β-g-alactosidase (SA-β-Gal) stain was used to observe the relative optical density (ROD) in renal tissues; transmission electron microscopy was assayed to observe the renal ultrastructure; the renal tissue homogenate was prepared to measure the content of SOD, GSH-PX, MDA; the content of AGEs and 8-OH-dG were measured by ELISA. According to the result, compared with the D-galactose model group, the ASP + D-galactose model group showed obviously decreases in the content of BUN, Crea, UA, Cysc, AGES, 8-OH-dG, the number of hardening renal corpuscle, renal capsular space and renal tubular lumen, ROD of SA-β-Gal staining positive kidney cells, mesangial cells, basement membrane thickness, podocyte secondary processes fusion and MDA and increases in the number of normal renal corpuscle, ribosome and rough endoplasmic reticulum in podocytes, the activity of SOD and GSH-PX. In Conclusion, A. sinensis polysaccharides can antagonize kidney subacute damages induced by D-galactose in mice. Its protective mechanism may be correlated with the inhibition of the oxidative stress injury. PMID:27071262

  1. Trichinella spiralis Excretory-Secretory Products Protect against Polymicrobial Sepsis by Suppressing MyD88 via Mannose Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Du, Linlin; Liu, Lihua; Yu, Yang; Shan, Hui; Li, Leiqing

    2014-01-01

    Trichinella spiralis (T. spiralis) or its excretory-secretory products (TsES) protect hosts from autoimmune diseases, which depend on inducing host T helper (Th) 2 immune response and inhibiting inflammatory factors. Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) evoked by infection. Little is known about the effects of helminths or their excretory-secretory products on sepsis. Here, we investigated the effects of TsES in a mice model of polymicrobial sepsis. TsES improved survival, reduced organ injury, and enhanced bacterial clearance in septic mice. To investigate the molecular mechanism, macrophages from septic patients or the control group were incubated with TsES. TsES reduced sepsis-inducing inflammatory cytokines mediated by Toll-like receptors (TLR) in vitro by suppressing TLR adaptor-transducer myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) and nuclear factor- (NF-)-κB. Furthermore, TsES upregulated mannose receptor (MR) expression during sepsis. MR blocking attenuated the effects of TsES on MyD88 and NF-κB expression. In vivo, MR RNAi reduced the survival rate of septic mice treated with TsES, suggesting that TsES-mediated protection against polymicrobial sepsis is dependent on MR. Thus, TsES administration might be a potential therapeutic strategy for treating sepsis. PMID:25054155

  2. Molecular Physiology of an Extra-renal Cl(-) Uptake Mechanism for Body Fluid Cl(-) Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Fang; Yan, Jia-Jiun; Tseng, Yung-Che; Chen, Ruo-Dong; Hwang, Pung-Pung

    2015-01-01

    The development of an ion regulatory mechanism for body fluid homeostasis was an important trait for vertebrates during the evolution from aquatic to terrestrial life. The homeostatic mechanism of Cl(-) in aquatic fish appears to be similar to that of terrestrial vertebrates; however, the mechanism in non-mammalian vertebrates is poorly understood. Unlike in mammals, in which the kidney plays a central role, in most fish species, the gill is responsible for the maintenance of Cl(-) homeostasis via Cl(-) transport uptake mechanisms. Previous studies in zebrafish identified Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter (NCC) 2b-expressing cells in the gills and skin as the major ionocytes responsible for Cl(-) uptake, similar to distal convoluted tubular cells in mammalian kidney. However, the mechanism by which basolateral ions exit from NCC cells is still unclear. Of the in situ hybridization signals of twelve members of the clc Cl(-) channel family, only that of clc-2c exhibited an ionocyte pattern in the gill and embryonic skin. Double in situ hybridization/immunocytochemistry confirmed colocalization of apical NCC2b with basolateral CLC-2c. Acclimation to a low Cl(-) environment increased mRNA expression of both clc-2c and ncc2b, and also the protein expression of CLC-2c in embryos and adult gills. Loss-of-function of clc-2c resulted in a significant decrease in whole body Cl(-) content in zebrafish embryos, a phenotype similar to that of ncc2b mutants; this finding suggests a role for CLC-2c in Cl(-) uptake. Translational knockdown of clc-2c stimulated ncc2b mRNA expression and vice versa, revealing cooperation between these two transporters in the context of zebrafish Cl(-) homeostasis. Further comparative genomic and phylogenetic analyses revealed that zebrafish CLC-2c is a fish-specific isoform that diverged from a kidney-predominant homologue, in the same manner as NCC2b and its counterparts (NCCs). Several lines of molecular and cellular physiological evidences demonstrated

  3. Molecular Physiology of an Extra-renal Cl- Uptake Mechanism for Body Fluid Cl- Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Fang; Yan, Jia-Jiun; Tseng, Yung-Che; Chen, Ruo-Dong; Hwang, Pung-Pung

    2015-01-01

    The development of an ion regulatory mechanism for body fluid homeostasis was an important trait for vertebrates during the evolution from aquatic to terrestrial life. The homeostatic mechanism of Cl- in aquatic fish appears to be similar to that of terrestrial vertebrates; however, the mechanism in non-mammalian vertebrates is poorly understood. Unlike in mammals, in which the kidney plays a central role, in most fish species, the gill is responsible for the maintenance of Cl- homeostasis via Cl- transport uptake mechanisms. Previous studies in zebrafish identified Na+-Cl- cotransporter (NCC) 2b-expressing cells in the gills and skin as the major ionocytes responsible for Cl- uptake, similar to distal convoluted tubular cells in mammalian kidney. However, the mechanism by which basolateral ions exit from NCC cells is still unclear. Of the in situ hybridization signals of twelve members of the clc Cl- channel family, only that of clc-2c exhibited an ionocyte pattern in the gill and embryonic skin. Double in situ hybridization/immunocytochemistry confirmed colocalization of apical NCC2b with basolateral CLC-2c. Acclimation to a low Cl- environment increased mRNA expression of both clc-2c and ncc2b, and also the protein expression of CLC-2c in embryos and adult gills. Loss-of-function of clc-2c resulted in a significant decrease in whole body Cl- content in zebrafish embryos, a phenotype similar to that of ncc2b mutants; this finding suggests a role for CLC-2c in Cl- uptake. Translational knockdown of clc-2c stimulated ncc2b mRNA expression and vice versa, revealing cooperation between these two transporters in the context of zebrafish Cl- homeostasis. Further comparative genomic and phylogenetic analyses revealed that zebrafish CLC-2c is a fish-specific isoform that diverged from a kidney-predominant homologue, in the same manner as NCC2b and its counterparts (NCCs). Several lines of molecular and cellular physiological evidences demonstrated the cofunctional role

  4. Obesity and hypertension: mechanisms, cardio-renal consequences, and therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Reisin, Efrain; Jack, Avanelle V

    2009-05-01

    The increasing prevalence of obesity in the industrialized world is causing an alarming epidemic. Almost 70% of American adults are overweight or obese. The link between increasing body weight and hypertension is well established. Obesity hypertension through metabolic, endocrinic, and systemic hemodynamic alteration causes structural vascular and cardiac adaptations that trigger concentric, eccentric left ventricular hypertrophy and electrophysiological changes, which may increase the risk for congestive heart failure and sudden cardiac death as a result of arrhythmias. The increased renal blood flow in conjunction with a decreased renal vascular resistance causes renal hyperperfusion and hyperfiltration. Such changes lead to glomerulomegaly, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, tubulointerstitial inflammation, and fibrosis that characterize the renal damage in obese hypertensive subjects. We propose that weight reduction, with the addition of other nonpharmacological approaches that included exercise and reduction in alcohol intake, should be the first choice to treat obesity hypertension. Salt restriction may be helpful only in salt-sensitive patients. The benefits of diet in obese patients include improvement of insulin sensitivity, reduction in sympathetic nervous and renin angiotensin system activities, and restoration of leptin sensitivity. As a consequence of these and other metabolic changes, the previously described systemic and renal hemodynamic alterations improved and the cardiovascular and renal morphological changes induced by obesity were lessened. After reviewing the medications available, we believe that owing to the cardiovascular and renal morbidity and mortality that characterized obesity hypertension, the ACEI or ARBs offer the best cardio-renal protection and should be the pharmacologic treatment of choice. If these alone do not control BP adequately, then a low-dose diuretic should be added as a second approach. Although we strongly believe

  5. Gene expression and cell turnover in human renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Woolf, A S; Winyard, P J

    2000-01-01

    Kidney malformations are common causes of chronic renal failure in children. Dysplastic kidneys represent a unique model of perturbed epithelial-mesenchymal interaction which leads to the formation of malformed branching tubules surrounded by undifferentiated and metaplastic mesenchymal cells. We have found that human dysplastic epithelia express PAX2 (a transcription factor), BCL2 (a survival factor) and galectin-3 (a cell adhesion/signaling molecule). These genes are implicated in oncogenesis and their persistent expression may drive proliferation of dysplastic cysts, hence explaining the massive growth of some multicystic dysplastic kidneys. We have also detected prominent apoptosis in undifferentiated tissues around dysplastic epithelia, and this may provide a potential mechanism for the well-documented regression of dysplastic kidneys. Hence, although these kidneys may not have any excretory function, it is incorrect to consider them as 'end stage organs' because they are highly active in terms of cell turnover and gene expression; furthermore, these processes can be correlated with patterns of tissue growth and involution. Further elucidation of 'molecular lesions' in renal malformations may lead to novel therapies to enhance the differentiation of progenitor cells. PMID:10668206

  6. Up-regulation of renal Na+, K+-ATPase: the possible novel mechanism of leptin-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bełtowski, Jerzy; Jamroz-Wiśniewska, Anna; Borkowska, Ewelina; Wójcicka, Grazyna

    2004-01-01

    Hyperleptinemia may be involved in the pathogenesis of obesity-associated hypertension, however, the mechanism of hypertensive effect of leptin has not been elucidated. We investigated the effect of experimental hyperleptinemia on renal function, renal Na(+), K(+)-ATPase and ouabain-sensitive H(+), K(+)-ATPase activities in the rat. Leptin administered for 7 days (0.25 mg/kg twice daily sc) decreased food intake on 6th and 7th day of treatment but had no effect on body weight. Systolic blood pressure was 30.5% higher in leptin-treated animals. Urinary excretion of sodium decreased by 35.0% following leptin treatment. Leptin had no effect on potassium and phosphate excretion as well as on creatinine clearance. The activity of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase in the renal cortex and medulla was higher in leptin-treated rats by 32.4% and 84.2%, respectively. In contrast, leptin had no effect on either cortical or medullary ouabain-sensitive H(+), K(+)-ATPase. In pair-fed group, in which food intake was reduced to the level observed in leptin-treated group, no changes in sodium metabolism and renal Na(+), K(+)-ATPase were observed. Leptin decreased urinary excretion of nitric oxide metabolites by 55.0% and urinary excretion of cGMP by 26.3%. Plasma concentration of atrial natriuretic peptide tended to be higher and urinary excretion of urodilatin was 64.9% higher in leptin-treated animals. These data suggest that hyperleptinemia decreases natriuresis by up-regulating Na(+), K(+)-ATPase and stimulating tubular sodium reabsorption. This effect is mediated, at least in part, by deficiency of nitric oxide (NO). Abnormal renal sodium retention and vasoconstriction associated with NO deficiency may contribute to leptin-induced hypertension and to blood pressure elevation in hypertensive obese individuals. PMID:15156072

  7. Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Stimulates Dopamine Tubular Transport by Organic Cation Transporters: A Novel Mechanism to Enhance Renal Sodium Excretion

    PubMed Central

    Kouyoumdzian, Nicolás M.; Rukavina Mikusic, Natalia L.; Kravetz, María C.; Lee, Brenda M.; Carranza, Andrea; Del Mauro, Julieta S.; Pandolfo, Marcela; Gironacci, Mariela M.; Gorzalczany, Susana; Toblli, Jorge E.; Fernández, Belisario E.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on organic cation transporters (OCTs) expression and activity, and its consequences on dopamine urinary levels, Na+, K+-ATPase activity and renal function. Male Sprague Dawley rats were infused with isotonic saline solution during 120 minutes and randomized in nine different groups: control, pargyline plus tolcapone (P+T), ANP, dopamine (DA), D-22, DA+D-22, ANP+D-22, ANP+DA and ANP+DA+D-22. Renal functional parameters were determined and urinary dopamine concentration was quantified by HPLC. Expression of OCTs and D1-receptor in membrane preparations from renal cortex tissues were determined by western blot and Na+, K+-ATPase activity was determined using in vitro enzyme assay. 3H-DA renal uptake was determined in vitro. Compared to P+T group, ANP and dopamine infusion increased diuresis, urinary sodium and dopamine excretion significantly. These effects were more pronounced in ANP+DA group and reversed by OCTs blockade by D-22, demonstrating that OCTs are implied in ANP stimulated-DA uptake and transport in renal tissues. The activity of Na+, K+-ATPase exhibited a similar fashion when it was measured in the same experimental groups. Although OCTs and D1-receptor protein expression were not modified by ANP, OCTs-dependent-dopamine tubular uptake was increased by ANP through activation of NPR-A receptor and protein kinase G as signaling pathway. This effect was reflected by an increase in urinary dopamine excretion, natriuresis, diuresis and decreased Na+, K+-ATPase activity. OCTs represent a novel target that links the activity of ANP and dopamine together in a common mechanism to enhance their natriuretic and diuretic effects. PMID:27392042

  8. Renal Response to Volume Expansion: Learning the Experimental Approach in the Context of Integrative Physiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kline, Robert L.; Dukacz, Stephen A. W.; Stavraky, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Describes a laboratory experience for upper-level science students that provides a hands-on approach to understanding the basics of experimental physiology. Students design an experiment to determine the relative importance of dilution of plasma proteins in the overall renal excretory response following volume expansion with intravenous saline.…

  9. Accuracy of radionuclide imaging in distinguishing renal masses from normal variants

    SciTech Connect

    Older, R.A.; Korobkin, M.; Workman, J.; Cleeve, D.M.; Cleeve, L.K.; Sullivan, D.; Webster, G.D.

    1980-08-01

    To determine the accuracy of scintigraphy in distinguishing true renal masses from normal variants, 40 patients with excretory urographic findings indicating a possible, but not definite, mass lesion were studied. Scintigraphy correctly identified 17 true masses and 17 normal variants. Four false positive and two false negative results were obtained.

  10. The diagnostic approach to ectopic ureterocele and the renal duplication complex

    SciTech Connect

    Geringer, A.M.; Berdon, W.E.; Seldin, D.W.; Hensle, T.W.

    1983-03-01

    The child with ectopic ureterocele frequently presents a diagnostic challenge. The use of standard excretory urography combined with newer modalities, such as ultrasonography and radionuclide renal scanning, provides an orderly diagnostic approach to ectopic ureterocele. This integrated approach should ensure the highest yield in a diagnostic sense and aid in assessing upper tract function, thus, helping with the selection of the proper surgical management.

  11. RENAL RETENTION OF LIPID MICROBUBBLES: A POTENTIAL MECHANISM FOR FLANK DISCOMFORT DURING ULTRASOUND CONTRAST ADMINISTRATION

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ya Ni; Khangura, Jaspreet; Xie, Aris; Belcik, J. Todd; Qi, Yue; Davidson, Brian P.; Zhao, Yan; Kim, Sajeevani; Inaba, Yoichi; Lindner, Jonathan R.

    2013-01-01

    Background The etiology for flank pain sometimes experienced during administration of ultrasound contrast agents is unknown. We investigated whether microbubble ultrasound contrast agents are retained within the renal microcirculation which could lead to either flow disturbance or local release of vasoactive and pain mediators downstream from complement activation. Methods Retention of lipid-shelled microbubbles in the renal microcirculation of mice was assessed by confocal fluorescent microscopy and contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEU) imaging with dose-escalating intravenous injection. Studies were performed with size-segregated microbubbles to investigate physical entrapment, after glycocalyx degradation, and in wild-type and C3-deficient mice to investigate complement-mediated retention. Urinary bradykinin was measured before and after microbubbles. Renal CEU in human subjects (n=13) was performed 7–10 min after completion of lipid microbubble administration. Results In both mice and humans, microbubble retention was detected in the renal cortex by persistent CEU signal enhancement. Microbubble retention in mice was linearly related to dose and occurred almost exclusively in cortical glomerular microvessels. Microbubble retention did not affect microsphere-derived renal blood flow. Microbubble retention was not influenced by glycocalyx degradation nor by microbubble size, thereby excluding lodging, but was reduced by 90% (p<0.01) in C3-deficient mice. Urinary bradykinin increased by 65% five minutes after microbubble injection. Conclusion Lipid-shelled microbubbles are retained in the renal cortex due to complement-mediated interactions with glomerular microvascular endothelium. Microbubble retention does not adversely affect renal perfusion but does generate complement-related intermediates that are known to mediate nociception and could be responsible for flank pain. PMID:24035699

  12. Mechanisms of disease: hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer--a distinct form of hereditary kidney cancer.

    PubMed

    Sudarshan, Sunil; Pinto, Peter A; Neckers, Len; Linehan, W Marston

    2007-02-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) represents a group of diseases linked by their primary site of origin, the kidney. Studies of families with a genetic predisposition to the development of kidney cancer have revealed that multiple genes are involved in the molecular pathogenesis of RCC. Germline mutations in a gene that encodes a Krebs cycle enzyme have been found to result in a distinct clinical entity referred to as hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC). HLRCC is inherited in an autosomal-dominant fashion. Affected individuals in HLRCC families are at risk for the development of leiomyomas of the skin and uterus as well as renal cancers. HLRCC-associated kidney tumors are often biologically aggressive. Linkage analysis has identified germline alterations in the fumarate hydratase (FH) gene associated with HLRCC. While the mechanisms of molecular carcinogenesis are not entirely understood, several lines of evidence derived from clinical and basic research suggest that pseudohypoxia might drive cellular transformation. The role of FH mutations in sporadic tumors seems to be limited. Nevertheless, continued investigation of HLRCC should provide further insight into the mechanisms of kidney cancer development, and could potentially identify targets for new therapeutic approaches to RCC. PMID:17287871

  13. Mechanisms of Cardiac and Renal Dysfunction in Patients Dying of Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Takasu, Osamu; Gaut, Joseph P.; Watanabe, Eizo; To, Kathleen; Fagley, R. Eliot; Sato, Brian; Jarman, Steve; Efimov, Igor R.; Janks, Deborah L.; Srivastava, Anil; Bhayani, Sam B.; Drewry, Anne; Swanson, Paul E.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: The mechanistic basis for cardiac and renal dysfunction in sepsis is unknown. In particular, the degree and type of cell death is undefined. Objectives: To evaluate the degree of sepsis-induced cardiomyocyte and renal tubular cell injury and death. Methods: Light and electron microscopy and immunohistochemical staining for markers of cellular injury and stress, including connexin-43 and kidney-injury-molecule-1 (Kim-1), were used in this study. Measurements and Main Results: Rapid postmortem cardiac and renal harvest was performed in 44 septic patients. Control hearts were obtained from 12 transplant and 13 brain-dead patients. Control kidneys were obtained from 20 trauma patients and eight patients with cancer. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated low levels of apoptotic cardiomyocytes (<1–2 cells per thousand) in septic and control subjects and revealed redistribution of connexin-43 to lateral membranes in sepsis (P < 0.020). Electron microscopy showed hydropic mitochondria only in septic specimens, whereas mitochondrial membrane injury and autophagolysosomes were present equally in control and septic specimens. Control kidneys appeared relatively normal by light microscopy; 3 of 20 specimens showed focal injury in approximately 1% of renal cortical tubules. Conversely, focal acute tubular injury was present in 78% of septic kidneys, occurring in 10.3 ± 9.5% and 32.3 ± 17.8% of corticomedullary-junction tubules by conventional light microscopy and Kim-1 immunostains, respectively (P < 0.01). Electron microscopy revealed increased tubular injury in sepsis, including hydropic mitochondria and increased autophagosomes. Conclusions: Cell death is rare in sepsis-induced cardiac dysfunction, but cardiomyocyte injury occurs. Renal tubular injury is common in sepsis but presents focally; most renal tubular cells appear normal. The degree of cell injury and death does not account for severity of sepsis-induced organ dysfunction. PMID:23348975

  14. Mechanism of Effect of Prostaglandin E1 on Renal Water Excretion

    PubMed Central

    Berl, T.; Schrier, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    The present study examined the effect of prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) on renal water excretion in the anesthetized dog. Renal perfusion pressure was kept constant by adjustment of a suprarenal aortic clamp. In seven experiments the intravenous administration of PGE1 (7 μg/min) significantly increased urinary osmolality from 76 to 381 mosmol (P < 0.001) and decreased free water clearance from 2.2 to - 0.02 ml/min (P < 0.001). These effects promptly were reversed with cessation of the infusion. This antidiuretic effect occurred both in innervated and denervated kidneys and was not associated with changes in glomerular filtration rate, renal vascular resistance, or solute excretion rate. In 10 experiments in hypophysectomized dogs no effect of intravenous PGE1 on free water clearance and urinary osmolality was observed. The intrarenal administration of PGE1 (1 μg/min) to six water-loaded and two hypophysectomized dogs caused no systemic vascular changes and increased rather than decreased free water clearance (2.83 to 4.08 ml/min, P < 0.001). No significant change in urinary osmolality occurred. Glomerular filtration rate was not altered by the intrarenal infusion, but reversible changes in solute excretion rate and renal vascular resistance occurred. These results thus indicate that the antidiuresis associated with intravenous PGE1 is mediated primarily by the release of vasopressin rather than alterations in renal hemodynamics or solute excretion. The diuretic effect of intrarenal PGE1 occurs in the absence of vasopressin and is most likely mediated primarily by increased distal delivery of tubular fluid to the diluting segment of the nephron rather than changes in water permeability of the renal tubular epithelium. PMID:4683884

  15. Influence of dosage and chemical restraints on feline excretory urography.

    PubMed

    Ajadi, R A; Adetunji, A; Omoerah, V O; Okoh, J U

    2006-12-01

    Three series of trials involving 10 domestic short-haired cats were carried out to determine the influence of dosage of contrast media or type of chemical restraint on feline excretory urography. The 1st series (group A) involved 5 cats sedated with 2.0 mg/kg intramuscular (i.m) injection of 2% xylazine and receiving 800 mg/kg of 76 % meglumine diatrizoate (urografin). The 2nd series (group B) involved another 5 cats sedated with 2.0 mg/kg (i.m) injection of 2% xylazine and receiving 1200 mg/kg of 76% urografin. The 3rd series (group C) involved the repeat urography of the group B cats but sedated with 15 mg/kg (i.m) injection of 5% ketamine hydrochloride. Ventrodorsal radiographs were obtained immediately, 5, 15 and 40 minutes after the injection of 76% urografin. Scores were assigned to nephrographic opacification as described in the literature. The heart rates, respiratory rates and rectal temperatures of the cats were also determined before sedation, after sedation, immediately after the injection of 76% urografin and at 15-minute intervals over a period of 60 minutes. In this study, there were significant differences (P < 0.05) in the nephrographic opacification scores between the group A and group B cats at times 0 and 40 minutes post-administration of urografin. Group A cats had good initial nephrographic opacification which faded later while the nephrographic opacification of group B cats progressively increased. Similarly, nephrographic opacification was significantly (P < 0.05) higher in the xylazine-sedated cats (groups A and B) than the ketamine-sedated cats (group C). However, there were no significant differences (P > 0.05) in heart rates, respiratory rates and rectal temperatures between the 3 groups of cats. It was therefore concluded that increasing the dosage of urografin above 800 mg/kg in cats does not provide additional beneficial effects on the nephrograms produced. Xylazine sedation was observed to produce better nephrographic opacification

  16. [Identification of serological antigens in excretory-secretory antigens of Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae].

    PubMed

    Huang, Xuegui; He, Lifang; Yuan, Shishan; Liu, Hui; Wang, Xin

    2016-05-01

    Objective To isolate and identify serological antigens in the excretory-secretory antigens of Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae by the combination of co-immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometric technology. Methods The serum IgG of New Zealand rabbits infected with Trichinella spiralis was isolated by ammonium sulfate precipitation. Muscle larvaes were isolated from the infected muscle, and then purified and cultured to collect excretory-secretory antigens. Serological antigens in excretory-secretory antigens were isolated by co-immunoprecipitation and SDS-PAGE, and analyzed by Western blotting. Moreover, the protein bands in New Zealand rabbit sera infected with Trichinella spiralis were identified by mass spectrometric technology. Results Indirect ELISA showed that the titer of serum antibody of New Zealand rabbits infected with Trichinella spiralis was 1:6400. The rabbit serum IgG was effectively isolated by ammonium sulfate precipitation. A total of four clear protein bands of the excretory-secretory antigens of Trichinella spiralis were obtained by electrophoresis. Among them, three clear protein bands with relative molecular mass (Mr) being 40 kDa, 50 kDa and 83 kDa were recognized by the rabbit sera infected with Trichinella spiralis but not recognized by the normal rabbit sera. The obtained four protein molecules were confirmed as serine protease, specific serine protease of muscle larvae, 43 kDa secreted glycoprotein and 53 kDa excretory-secretory antigen. Conclusion Four proteins were obtained from the excretory-secretory antigens of Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae by combination of co-immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometric technique analysis, which provided new sources and insights for the diagnosis and vaccine candidates of Trichinellosis. PMID:27126943

  17. The mechanism of increased renal susceptibility to toxic substances in the elderly. Part I. The role of increased vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Jerkić, M; Vojvodić, S; López-Novoa, J M

    2001-01-01

    The mechanisms of increased susceptibility to nephrotoxins in aging are complex and incompletely understood. It is very important to try to increase our knowledge of them because adults become increasingly vulnerable to nephrotoxic substances, as they grow older. In addition, the percentage of elderly people will increase markedly in the near future, at least in the developed countries. Drugs such as diuretics, laxatives, NSAIDs, aminoglycosides and other nephrotoxic antibiotics, and converting enzyme inhibitors are used a lot by aging people and can produce severe renal problems. Beside drugs, the clinical use of radiocontrast agents also rises in older patients. It seems that the main mechanism of the increased renal susceptibility to toxic substances in the elderly is a disbalance between vasoconstrictor and vasodilator factors (in favor of vasoconstrictor ones). Increased propensity to vasoconstriction (to Ang II, ET and PAF), as well as increased levels of oxidatively modified biomolecules in the elderly, may enhance susceptibility of old kidney to toxic substances. In addition, all mechanisms that influence both mesangial and fibroblast cell proliferation and over-production of extracellular matrix might also be involved in the processes that make the old kidney prone to drug-induced chronic toxic injury. PMID:11989542

  18. Polarized exocyst-mediated vesicle fusion directs intracellular lumenogenesis within the C. elegans excretory cell

    PubMed Central

    Armenti, Stephen T.; Chan, Emily; Nance, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Lumenogenesis of small seamless tubes occurs through intracellular membrane growth and directed vesicle fusion events. Within the C. elegans excretory cell, which forms seamless intracellular tubes (canals) that mediate osmoregulation, lumens grow in length and diameter when vesicles fuse with the expanding lumenal surface. Here, we show that lumenal vesicle fusion depends on the small GTPase RAL-1, which localizes to vesicles and acts through the exocyst vesicle-tethering complex. Loss of either the exocyst or RAL-1 prevents excretory canal lumen extension. Within the excretory canal and other polarized cells, the exocyst co-localizes with the PAR polarity proteins PAR-3, PAR-6 and PKC-3. Using early embryonic cells to determine the functional relationships between the exocyst and PAR proteins, we show that RAL-1 recruits the exocyst to the membrane, while PAR proteins concentrate membrane-localized exocyst proteins to a polarized domain. These findings reveal that RAL-1 and the exocyst direct the polarized vesicle fusion events required for intracellular lumenogenesis of the excretory cell, suggesting mechanistic similarities in the formation of topologically distinct multicellular and intracellular lumens. PMID:25102190

  19. Bilingual Skills Training Program. Barbering/Cosmetology. Module 8.0: Excretory System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northern New Mexico Community Coll., El Rito.

    This module on the excretory system is the eighth (CE 028 308-318) in the barbering/cosmetology course of a bilingual skills training program. (A Vocabulary Development Workbook for modules 6-10 is available as CE 028 313.) The course is designed to furnish theoretical and laboratory experience. Module objectives are for students to develop…

  20. Antigenic analyses of tissues and excretory and secretory products from Strongylus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Wynne, E; Slocombe, J O; Wilkie, B N

    1981-07-01

    Rabbit antisera were prepared against veronal buffered saline extracts of L4 and L5 Strongylus vulgaris, adult S. vulgaris and adult Strongylus equinus retrieved from naturally infected horses. In agar gel diffusion with these antisera, adult S vulgaris and S. equinus each appeared to have at least one unique antigen; larval S. vulgaris appeared to have two species-specific and two stage-specific antigens. There were several common antigens. Excretory and secretory products were collected also from L4 and L5 an maintained over several days in tissue culture fluid. In agar gel diffusion against the above rabbit antisera, a stage-specific antigen was found also in excretory and secretory products. In addition, excretory and secretory products had three antigens in common with adult and larval S. vulgaris, but only one of these was common to adult S. equinus. The excretory and secretory products appear, therefore, to have two species-specific and one stage-specific antigens. PMID:6804070

  1. Antigenic analyses of tissues and excretory and secretory products from Strongylus vulgaris.

    PubMed Central

    Wynne, E; Slocombe, J O; Wilkie, B N

    1981-01-01

    Rabbit antisera were prepared against veronal buffered saline extracts of L4 and L5 Strongylus vulgaris, adult S. vulgaris and adult Strongylus equinus retrieved from naturally infected horses. In agar gel diffusion with these antisera, adult S vulgaris and S. equinus each appeared to have at least one unique antigen; larval S. vulgaris appeared to have two species-specific and two stage-specific antigens. There were several common antigens. Excretory and secretory products were collected also from L4 and L5 an maintained over several days in tissue culture fluid. In agar gel diffusion against the above rabbit antisera, a stage-specific antigen was found also in excretory and secretory products. In addition, excretory and secretory products had three antigens in common with adult and larval S. vulgaris, but only one of these was common to adult S. equinus. The excretory and secretory products appear, therefore, to have two species-specific and one stage-specific antigens. Images Fig. 1 a and b. Fig. 2 a and b. Fig. 3 a and b. Fig. 4 a and b. Fig. 5 a and b. Fig. 6 a and b. Fig. 7 a and b. Fig. 8 a and b. PMID:6804070

  2. Polarized exocyst-mediated vesicle fusion directs intracellular lumenogenesis within the C. elegans excretory cell.

    PubMed

    Armenti, Stephen T; Chan, Emily; Nance, Jeremy

    2014-10-01

    Lumenogenesis of small seamless tubes occurs through intracellular membrane growth and directed vesicle fusion events. Within the Caenorhabditis elegans excretory cell, which forms seamless intracellular tubes (canals) that mediate osmoregulation, lumens grow in length and diameter when vesicles fuse with the expanding lumenal surface. Here, we show that lumenal vesicle fusion depends on the small GTPase RAL-1, which localizes to vesicles and acts through the exocyst vesicle-tethering complex. Loss of either the exocyst or RAL-1 prevents excretory canal lumen extension. Within the excretory canal and other polarized cells, the exocyst co-localizes with the PAR polarity proteins PAR-3, PAR-6 and PKC-3. Using early embryonic cells to determine the functional relationships between the exocyst and PAR proteins, we show that RAL-1 recruits the exocyst to the membrane, while PAR proteins concentrate membrane-localized exocyst proteins to a polarized domain. These findings reveal that RAL-1 and the exocyst direct the polarized vesicle fusion events required for intracellular lumenogenesis of the excretory cell, suggesting mechanistic similarities in the formation of topologically distinct multicellular and intracellular lumens. PMID:25102190

  3. Update on Mechanisms of Renal Tubule Injury Caused by Advanced Glycation End Products

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hong; Yuan, Yang; Sun, Zilin

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) caused by advanced glycation end products (AGEs) may be associated with lipid accumulation in the kidneys. This study was designed to investigate whether Nε-(carboxymethyl) lysine (CML, a member of the AGEs family) increases lipid accumulation in a human renal tubular epithelial cell line (HK-2) via increasing cholesterol synthesis and uptake and reducing cholesterol efflux through endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS). Our results showed that CML disrupts cholesterol metabolism in HK-2 cells by activating sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2 (SREBP-2) and liver X receptor (LXR), followed by an increase in 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoAR) mediated cholesterol synthesis and low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr) mediated cholesterol uptake and a reduction in ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) mediated cholesterol efflux, ultimately causing lipid accumulation in HK-2 cells. All of these responses could be suppressed by an ERS inhibitor, which suggests that CML causes lipid accumulation in renal tubule cells through ERS and that the inhibition of ERS is a potential novel approach to treating CML-induced renal tubular foam cell formation. PMID:27034941

  4. Stage- and Gender-Specific Proteomic Analysis of Brugia malayi Excretory-Secretory Products

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Yovany; Geary, Timothy G.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction While we lack a complete understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which parasites establish and achieve protection from host immune responses, it is accepted that many of these processes are mediated by products, primarily proteins, released from the parasite. Parasitic nematodes occur in different life stages and anatomical compartments within the host. Little is known about the composition and variability of products released at different developmental stages and their contribution to parasite survival and progression of the infection. Methodology/Principal Findings To gain a deeper understanding on these aspects, we collected and analyzed through 1D-SDS PAGE and LC-MS/MS the Excretory-Secretory Products (ESP) of adult female, adult male and microfilariae of the filarial nematode Brugia malayi, one of the etiological agents of human lymphatic filariasis. This proteomic analysis led to the identification of 228 proteins. The list includes 76 proteins with unknown function as well as also proteins with potential immunoregulatory properties, such as protease inhibitors, cytokine homologues and carbohydrate-binding proteins. Larval and adult ESP differed in composition. Only 32 proteins were shared between all three stages/genders. Consistent with this observation, different gene ontology profiles were associated with the different ESP. Conclusions/Significance A comparative analysis of the proteins released in vitro by different forms of a parasitic nematode dwelling in the same host is presented. The catalog of secreted proteins reflects different stage- and gender-specific related processes and different strategies of immune evasion, providing valuable insights on the contribution of each form of the parasite for establishing the host–parasite interaction. PMID:18958170

  5. Biliary copper excretion by hepatocyte lysosomes in the rat. Major excretory pathway in experimental copper overload

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, J.B. Jr.; Myers, B.M.; Kost, L.J.; Kuntz, S.M.; LaRusso, N.F.

    1989-01-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that lysosomes are the main source of biliary copper in conditions of hepatic copper overload. We used a rat model of oral copper loading and studied the relationship between the biliary output of copper and lysosomal hydrolases. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given tap water with or without 0.125% copper acetate for up to 36 wk. Copper loading produced a 23-fold increase in the hepatic copper concentration and a 30-65% increase in hepatic lysosomal enzyme activity. Acid phosphatase histochemistry showed that copper-loaded livers contained an increased number of hepatocyte lysosomes; increased copper concentration of these organelles was confirmed directly by both x ray microanalysis and tissue fractionation. The copper-loaded rats showed a 16-fold increase in biliary copper output and a 50-300% increase in biliary lysosomal enzyme output. In the basal state, excretory profiles over time were similar for biliary outputs of lysosomal enzymes and copper in the copper-loaded animals but not in controls. After pharmacologic stimulation of lysosomal exocytosis, biliary outputs of copper and lysosomal hydrolases in the copper-loaded animals remained coupled: injection of colchicine or vinblastine produced an acute rise in the biliary output of both lysosomal enzymes and copper to 150-250% of baseline rates. After these same drugs, control animals showed only the expected increase in lysosomal enzyme output without a corresponding increase in copper output. We conclude that the hepatocyte responds to an increased copper load by sequestering excess copper in an increased number of lysosomes that then empty their contents directly into bile. The results provide direct evidence that exocytosis of lysosomal contents into biliary canaliculi is the major mechanism for biliary copper excretion in hepatic copper overload.

  6. Suppression of ovine lymphocyte activation by Teladorsagia circumcincta larval excretory-secretory products

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Teladorsagia circumcincta is an important pathogenic nematode of sheep. It has been demonstrated previously that stimulation of murine T lymphocytes with excretory-secretory (ES) products derived from fourth stage larvae of T. circumcincta (Tci-L4-ES) results in de novo expression of Foxp3, a transcription factor intimately involved in regulatory T cell function. In the current study, Foxp3+ T cell responses in the abomasum and the effects of Tci-L4-ES on ovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) following T. circumcincta infection were investigated. T. circumcincta infection resulted in a significant increase in numbers of abomasal Foxp3+ T cells, but not an increase in the proportion of T cells expressing Foxp3. Unlike in mice, Tci-L4-ES was incapable of inducing T cell Foxp3 expression but instead suppressed mitogen-induced and antigen-specific activation and proliferation of ovine PBMC in vitro. This effect was heat labile, suggesting that it is mediated by protein(s). Suppression was associated with up-regulation of interleukin-10 (IL-10) mRNA, and specific monoclonal antibody neutralisation of IL-10 resulted in a 50% reduction in suppression, indicating involvement of the IL-10 signaling pathway. Suppression was significantly reduced in PBMC isolated from T. circumcincta infected vs. helminth-naïve lambs, and this reduction in suppression was associated with an increase in Tci-L4-ES antigen-specific T cells within the PBMC. In conclusion, we have identified a mechanism by which T. circumcincta may modulate the host adaptive immune response, potentially assisting survival of the parasite within the host. However, the impact of Tci-L4-ES-mediated lymphocyte suppression during T. circumcincta infection remains to be determined. PMID:23964850

  7. Hyperpolarized 13C urea relaxation mechanism reveals renal changes in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Stokholm Nørlinger, Thomas; Christoffer Hansen, David; Qi, Haiyun; Mose Nielsen, Per; Bonde Bertelsen, Lotte; Henrik Ardenkjaer‐Larsen, Jan; Stødkilde Jørgensen, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Our aim was to assess a novel 13C radial fast spin echo golden ratio single shot method for interrogating early renal changes in the diabetic kidney, using hyperpolarized (HP) [13C,15N2]urea as a T2 relaxation based contrast bio‐probe. Methods A novel HP 13C MR contrast experiment was conducted in a group of streptozotocin type‐1 diabetic rat model and age matched controls. Results A significantly different relaxation time (P = 0.004) was found in the diabetic kidney (0.49 ± 0.03 s) compared with the controls (0.64 ± 0.02 s) and secondly, a strong correlation between the blood oxygen saturation level and the relaxation times were observed in the healthy controls. Conclusion HP [13C,15N2]urea apparent T2 mapping may be a useful for interrogating local renal pO2 status and renal tissue alterations. Magn Reson Med, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution‐NonCommercial‐NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non‐commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made. Magn Reson Med 75:515–518, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. PMID:26584247

  8. Epigenomics of clear cell renal cell carcinoma: mechanisms and potential use in molecular pathology

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Tianying

    2016-01-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is one frequent form of urologic malignancy with numerous genetic and epigenetic alterations. This review summarizes the recent major findings of epigenetic alterations including DNA methylation, histone modifications, microRNAs and recently identified long noncoding RNAs in the development and progression of ccRCC. These epigenetic profilings can provide a promising means of prognostication and early diagnosis for patients with ccRCCs. With the developed high-throughput technologies nowadays, the epigenetic analyses will have possible clinical applications in the molecular pathology of ccRCC. PMID:27041930

  9. Different Modulatory Mechanisms of Renal FXYD12 for Na+-K+-ATPase between Two Closely Related Medakas upon Salinity Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wen-Kai; Kang, Chao-Kai; Hsu, An-Di; Lin, Chia-Hao; Lee, Tsung-Han

    2016-01-01

    Upon salinity challenge, the Na+-K+-ATPase (NKA) of fish kidney plays a crucial role in maintaining ion and water balance. Moreover, the FXYD protein family was found to be a regulator of NKA. Our preliminary results revealed that fxyd12 was highly expressed in the kidneys of the two closely related euryhaline medaka species (Oryzias dancena and O. latipes) from different natural habitats (brackish water and fresh water). In this study, we investigated the expression and association of renal FXYD12 and NKA α-subunit as well as potential functions of FXYD12 in the two medakas. These findings illustrated and compared the regulatory roles of FXYD12 for NKA in kidneys of the two medakas in response to salinity changes. In this study, at the mRNA and/or protein level, the expression patterns were similar for renal FXYD12 and NKA in the two medakas. However, different patterns of NKA activities and different interaction levels between FXYD12 and NKA were found in the kidneys of these two medakas. The results revealed that different strategies were used in the kidneys of the two medaka species upon salinity challenge. On the other hand, gene knockdown experiments demonstrated that the function of O. dancena FXYD12 allowed maintenance of a high level of NKA activity. The results of the present study indicated that the kidneys of the examined euryhaline medakas originating from brackish water and fresh water exhibited different modulatory mechanisms through which renal FXYD12 enhanced NKA activity to maintain internal homeostasis. Our findings broadened the knowledge of expression and functions of FXYD proteins, the modulators of NKA, in vertebrates. PMID:27194950

  10. Different Modulatory Mechanisms of Renal FXYD12 for Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase between Two Closely Related Medakas upon Salinity Challenge.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen-Kai; Kang, Chao-Kai; Hsu, An-Di; Lin, Chia-Hao; Lee, Tsung-Han

    2016-01-01

    Upon salinity challenge, the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase (NKA) of fish kidney plays a crucial role in maintaining ion and water balance. Moreover, the FXYD protein family was found to be a regulator of NKA. Our preliminary results revealed that fxyd12 was highly expressed in the kidneys of the two closely related euryhaline medaka species (Oryzias dancena and O. latipes) from different natural habitats (brackish water and fresh water). In this study, we investigated the expression and association of renal FXYD12 and NKA α-subunit as well as potential functions of FXYD12 in the two medakas. These findings illustrated and compared the regulatory roles of FXYD12 for NKA in kidneys of the two medakas in response to salinity changes. In this study, at the mRNA and/or protein level, the expression patterns were similar for renal FXYD12 and NKA in the two medakas. However, different patterns of NKA activities and different interaction levels between FXYD12 and NKA were found in the kidneys of these two medakas. The results revealed that different strategies were used in the kidneys of the two medaka species upon salinity challenge. On the other hand, gene knockdown experiments demonstrated that the function of O. dancena FXYD12 allowed maintenance of a high level of NKA activity. The results of the present study indicated that the kidneys of the examined euryhaline medakas originating from brackish water and fresh water exhibited different modulatory mechanisms through which renal FXYD12 enhanced NKA activity to maintain internal homeostasis. Our findings broadened the knowledge of expression and functions of FXYD proteins, the modulators of NKA, in vertebrates. PMID:27194950

  11. Heat-processed Panax ginseng and diabetic renal damage: active components and action mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ki Sung; Ham, Jungyeob; Kim, Young-Joo; Park, Jeong Hill; Cho, Eun-Ju; Yamabe, Noriko

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is one of the serious complications in patients with either type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus but current treatments remain unsatisfactory. Results of clinical research studies demonstrate that Panax ginseng can help adjust blood pressure and reduce blood sugar and may be advantageous in the treatment of tuberculosis and kidney damage in people with diabetes. The heat-processing method to strengthen the efficacy of P. ginseng has been well-defined based on a long history of ethnopharmacological evidence. The protective effects of P. ginseng on pathological conditions and renal damage associated with diabetic nephropathy in the animal models were markedly improved by heat-processing. The concentrations of less-polar ginsenosides (20(S)-Rg3, 20(R)-Rg3, Rg5, and Rk1) and maltol in P. ginseng were significantly increased in a heat-processing temperature-dependent manner. Based on researches in animal models of diabetes, ginsenoside 20(S)-Rg3 and maltol were evaluated to have therapeutic potential against diabetic renal damage. These effects were achieved through the inhibition of inflammatory pathway activated by oxidative stress and advanced glycation endproducts. These findings indicate that ginsenoside 20(S)-Rg3 and maltol are important bioactive constituents of heat-processed ginseng in the control of pathological conditions associated with diabetic nephropathy. PMID:24233065

  12. The cardiovascular and renal functional responses to the 5-HT1A receptor agonist flesinoxan in two rat models of hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Chamienia, A. L.; Johns, E. J.

    1996-01-01

    1. This study investigated the importance of renal sympathetic nerves in regulating sodium and water excretion from the kidneys of stroke prone spontaneously hypertensive and 2K1C Goldblatt hypertensive rats anaesthetized with chloralose/urethane (17.5/300 mg initially and supplemented at regular intervals), and prepared for measurement of renal function. 2. In stroke prone spontaneously hypertensive rats, flesinoxan, 30-1000 micrograms kg-1, i.v., caused graded reductions in blood pressure and heart rate of 74 +/- 5 mmHg and 63 +/- 9 beats min-1, respectively at the highest dose (P < 0.001). Renal blood flow did not change at any dose of drug while glomerular filtration rate fell by some 20% (P < 0.001) at the highest dose of drug, absolute and fractional sodium excretions, approximately doubled at 100 micrograms kg-1, and thereafter fell to below the baseline level at 1000 micrograms kg-1. 3. This pattern of excretory response was abolished following acute renal denervation when flesinoxan caused dose-related reductions in urine flow and sodium excretion, similar to that obtained by a mechanical reduction of renal perfusion pressure. 4. Flesinoxan administration (30-1000 micrograms kg-1, i.v.) into 2K1C Goldblatt hypertensive rats caused a maximum decrease in blood pressure and heart rate (both P < 0.001) of 34 +/- 3 mmHg and 20 +/- 6 beats min-1 and while renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate were autoregulated, from 160 to 125 mmHg, there were dose-related decreases in urine volume and sodium excretion from the clipped and non-clipped kidneys of approximately 50-60% at the highest dose. 5. These findings suggest that in the stroke prone spontaneously hypertensive rat the renal nerves importantly control sodium and water reabsorption at the level of the tubules, whereas in 2K1C Goldblatt hypertensive rats, they play a minor role. PMID:8864520

  13. Renoprotective Mechanism of Remote Ischemic Preconditioning Based on Transcriptomic Analysis in a Porcine Renal Ischemia Reperfusion Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sook Young; Cho, Young In; Lee, Kwang Suk; Kim, Kwang Hyun; Yang, Seung Choul; Han, Woong Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) is a well-known phenomenon in which tissues are exposed to a brief period of ischemia prior to a longer ischemic event. This technique produces tissue tolerance to ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI). Currently, IPC’s mechanism of action is poorly understood. Using a porcine single kidney model, we performed remote IPC with renal IRI and evaluated the IPC mechanism of action. Following left nephrectomy, 15 female Yorkshire pigs were divided into three groups: no IPC and 90 minutes of warm ischemia (control), remote IPC immediately followed by 90 minutes of warm ischemia (rIPCe), and remote IPC with 90 minutes of warm ischemia performed 24 hours later (rIPCl). Differential gene expression analysis was performed using a porcine-specific microarray. The microarray analysis of porcine renal tissues identified 1,053 differentially expressed probes in preconditioned pigs. Among these, 179 genes had altered expression in both the rIPCe and rIPCl groups. The genes were largely related to oxidation reduction, apoptosis, and inflammatory response. In the rIPCl group, an additional 848 genes had altered expression levels. These genes were primarily related to immune response and inflammation, including those coding for cytokines and cytokine receptors and those that play roles in the complement system and coagulation cascade. In the complement system, the membrane attack complex was determined to be sublytic, because it colocalized with phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase. Furthermore, alpha 2 macroglobulin, tissue plasminogen activator, uterine plasmin trypsin inhibitor, and arginase-1 mRNA levels were elevated in the rIPCl group. These findings indicate that remote IPC produces renoprotective effects through multiple mechanisms, and these effects develop over a long timeframe rather than immediately following IPC. PMID:26489007

  14. A Blueberry-Enriched Diet Improves Renal Function and Reduces Oxidative Stress in Metabolic Syndrome Animals: Potential Mechanism of TLR4-MAPK Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Anand R.; Elks, Carrie M.; Vila, Jorge; Del Piero, Fabio; Paulsen, Daniel B.; Francis, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is characterized by a cluster of health factors that indicate a higher risk for cardio-renal diseases. Recent evidence indicates that antioxidants from berries are alternative to attenuate oxidative stress and inflammation. We tested the hypothesis that inflammation-induced renal damage is triggered by the activation of TLR4, and subsequent modulation of redox-sensitive molecules and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Methods Five-week old lean and obese Zucker rats (LZR and OZR) were fed a blueberry-enriched diet or an isocaloric control diet for 15 weeks. A glucose tolerance test and acute renal clearance experiments were performed. Gene and protein expression levels for TLR4, cytokines and phosphorylation of ERK and p38MAPK were measured. Kidney redox status and urinary albumin levels were quantified. Renal pathology was evaluated histologically. Results Control OZR exhibited lower glucose tolerance; exacerbated renal function parameters; increased oxidative stress. Gene and protein expression levels of TLR4 were higher and this was accompanied by increased renal pathology with extensive albuminuria and deterioration in antioxidant levels in OZR. In addition, OZR had increased phosphorylation of ERK and p38MAPK. Blueberry-fed OZR exhibited significant improvements in all these parameters compared to OZR. Conclusion TLR4-MAPK signaling pathway is a key to the renal structural injury and dysfunction in MetS and blueberry (BB) protect against this damage by inhibiting TLR4. Significance This is the first study to put forth a potential mechanism of TLR4-induced kidney damage in a model of MetS and to elucidate a downstream mechanism by which blueberry exert their reno-protective effects. PMID:25372283

  15. Structure, Mechanism, and Substrate Profile for Sco3058: The Closest Bacterial Homologue to Human Renal Dipeptidase

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, J.; Nguyen, T; Fedorov, A; Kolb, P; Xu, C; Fedorov, E; Shoichet, B; Barondeau, D; Almo, S; Raushel, F

    2010-01-01

    Human renal dipeptidase, an enzyme associated with glutathione metabolism and the hydrolysis of {beta}-lactams, is similar in sequence to a cluster of 400 microbial proteins currently annotated as nonspecific dipeptidases within the amidohydrolase superfamily. The closest homologue to the human renal dipeptidase from a fully sequenced microbe is Sco3058 from Streptomyces coelicolor. Dipeptide substrates of Sco3058 were identified by screening a comprehensive series of L-Xaa-L-Xaa, L-Xaa-D-Xaa, and D-Xaa-L-Xaa dipeptide libraries. The substrate specificity profile shows that Sco3058 hydrolyzes a broad range of dipeptides with a marked preference for an l-amino acid at the N-terminus and a d-amino acid at the C-terminus. The best substrate identified was L-Arg-D-Asp (k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 7.6 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}). The three-dimensional structure of Sco3058 was determined in the absence and presence of the inhibitors citrate and a phosphinate mimic of L-Ala-D-Asp. The enzyme folds as a ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8} barrel, and two zinc ions are bound in the active site. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to probe the importance of specific residues that have direct interactions with the substrate analogues in the active site (Asp-22, His-150, Arg-223, and Asp-320). The solvent viscosity and kinetic effects of D{sub 2}O indicate that substrate binding is relatively sticky and that proton transfers do not occurr during the rate-limiting step. A bell-shaped pH-rate profile for k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} indicated that one group needs to be deprotonated and a second group must be protonated for optimal turnover. Computational docking of high-energy intermediate forms of L/D-Ala-L/D-Ala to the three-dimensional structure of Sco3058 identified the structural determinants for the stereochemical preferences for substrate binding and turnover.

  16. Bioprosthetic versus mechanical prostheses for valve replacement in end-stage renal disease patients: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dong Fang; Zhou, Jessie J.; Karagaratnam, Aran; Phan, Steven; Yan, Tristan D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) indicated for dialysis are increasingly requiring cardiac valve surgery. The choice of bioprosthetic or mechanic valve prosthesis for such patients requires careful risk assessment. A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to assess current evidence available. Methods A comprehensive search from six electronic databases was performed from their inception to February 2015. Results from patients with ESRD undergoing cardiac surgery for bioprosthetic or mechanical valve replacement were identified. Results Sixteen studies with 8,483 patients with ESRD undergoing cardiac valve replacement surgery were included. No evidence of publication bias was detected. Prior angioplasty by percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery was significantly higher in the bioprosthetic group compared to the mechanical group (16.0% vs. 12.0%, P=0.04); all other preoperative baseline patient characteristics were similar. There was no significant difference in 30-day mortality or all-cause mortality between the two comparisons. Compared with the mechanical group, the frequency of bleeding (5.2% vs. 6.4%, P=0.04) and risk of thromboembolism (2.7% vs. 12.8%, P=0.02) were significantly lower in the bioprosthetic group. There were similar rates of reoperation and valve endocarditis. Conclusions The present study demonstrated that patients with ESRD undergoing bioprosthetic or mechanical valve replacement had similar mid-long term survival. The bioprosthetic group had lower rates of bleeding and thromboembolism. Further studies are required to differentiate the impact of valve location. The presented results may be applicable for ESRD patients requiring prosthetic valve replacement. PMID:27162649

  17. Perfluorooctanesulfonate Mediates Renal Tubular Cell Apoptosis through PPARgamma Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Hsiu-Chu; Chang, Chih-Cheng; Lo, Hau-Yin; Juan, Shu-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) are ubiquitously distributed in the environments including stainless pan-coating, raincoat, fire extinguisher, and semiconductor products. The PPAR family has been shown to contribute to the toxic effects of PFCs in thymus, immune and excretory systems. Herein, we demonstrated that perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) caused cell apoptosis through increasing ratio of Bcl-xS/xL, cytosolic cytochrome C, and caspase 3 activation in renal tubular cells (RTCs). In addition, PFOS increased transcription of inflammatory cytokines (i.e., TNFα, ICAM1, and MCP1) by NFκB activation. Conversely, PFOS reduced the mRNA levels of antioxidative enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase, as a result of reduced PPARγ transactivational activity by using reporter and chromatin immuoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. PFOS reduced the protein interaction between PPARγ and PPARγ coactivator-1 alpha (PGC1α) by PPARγ deacetylation through Sirt1 upregulation, of which the binding of PPARγ and PGC1α to a peroxisome proliferator response element (PPRE) in the promoter regions of these antioxidative enzymes was alleviated in the ChIP assay. Furthermore, Sirt1 also deacetylated p53 and then increased the binding of p53 to Bax, resulting in increased cytosolic cytochrome C. The effect of PPARγ inactivation by PFOS was validated using the PPARγ antagonist GW9662, whereas the adverse effects of PFOS were prevented by PPARγ overexpression and activators, rosiglitozone and L-carnitine, in RTCs. The in vitro finding of protective effect of L-carnitine was substantiated in vivo using Balb/c mice model subjected to PFOS challenge. Altogether, we provide in vivo and in vitro evidence for the protective mechanism of L-carnitine in eliminating PFOS-mediated renal injury, at least partially, through PPARγ activation. PMID:27171144

  18. Perfluorooctanesulfonate Mediates Renal Tubular Cell Apoptosis through PPARgamma Inactivation.

    PubMed

    Wen, Li-Li; Lin, Chien-Yu; Chou, Hsiu-Chu; Chang, Chih-Cheng; Lo, Hau-Yin; Juan, Shu-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) are ubiquitously distributed in the environments including stainless pan-coating, raincoat, fire extinguisher, and semiconductor products. The PPAR family has been shown to contribute to the toxic effects of PFCs in thymus, immune and excretory systems. Herein, we demonstrated that perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) caused cell apoptosis through increasing ratio of Bcl-xS/xL, cytosolic cytochrome C, and caspase 3 activation in renal tubular cells (RTCs). In addition, PFOS increased transcription of inflammatory cytokines (i.e., TNFα, ICAM1, and MCP1) by NFκB activation. Conversely, PFOS reduced the mRNA levels of antioxidative enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase, as a result of reduced PPARγ transactivational activity by using reporter and chromatin immuoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. PFOS reduced the protein interaction between PPARγ and PPARγ coactivator-1 alpha (PGC1α) by PPARγ deacetylation through Sirt1 upregulation, of which the binding of PPARγ and PGC1α to a peroxisome proliferator response element (PPRE) in the promoter regions of these antioxidative enzymes was alleviated in the ChIP assay. Furthermore, Sirt1 also deacetylated p53 and then increased the binding of p53 to Bax, resulting in increased cytosolic cytochrome C. The effect of PPARγ inactivation by PFOS was validated using the PPARγ antagonist GW9662, whereas the adverse effects of PFOS were prevented by PPARγ overexpression and activators, rosiglitozone and L-carnitine, in RTCs. The in vitro finding of protective effect of L-carnitine was substantiated in vivo using Balb/c mice model subjected to PFOS challenge. Altogether, we provide in vivo and in vitro evidence for the protective mechanism of L-carnitine in eliminating PFOS-mediated renal injury, at least partially, through PPARγ activation. PMID:27171144

  19. Mechanisms responsible for postmenopausal hypertension in a rat model: Roles of the renal sympathetic nervous system and the renin-angiotensin system.

    PubMed

    Maranon, Rodrigo O; Reckelhoff, Jane F

    2016-02-01

    Hypertension in postmenopausal women is less well controlled than in age-matched men. The aging female SHR is a model of postmenopausal hypertension that is mediated in part by activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and by the renal sympathetic nervous system. In this study, the hypothesis was tested that renal denervation would lower the blood pressure in old female SHR and would attenuate the antihypertensive effects of AT1 receptor antagonism. Retired breeder female SHR were subjected to right uninephrectomy (UNX) and left renal denervation (RD) or UNX and sham, and 2 weeks later, baseline mean arterial pressure (MAP; radiotelemetry) was measured for 4 days, and then rats were treated with angiotensin (AT1) receptor antagonist, losartan (40 mg/kg/day po) for 6 days. Renal denervation reduced MAP in old females compared to sham (172 ± 6 vs. 193 ± 6 mm Hg; P < 0.05). Losartan reduced MAP in both sham and RD rats similarly (numerically and by percentage) (142 ± 10 vs. 161 ± 6 mm Hg; P < 0.05 vs. RD, P < 0.05 vs. baseline). However, female SHR rats remained significantly hypertensive despite both pharmacological intervention and RD. The data suggest that both the renal sympathetic nervous system and the RAS have independent effects to control the blood pressure in old female SHR. Since the denervated rats treated with losartan remained hypertensive, the data also suggest that other mechanisms than the RAS and renal sympathetic nervous system contribute to the hypertension in old female SHR. The data also suggest that multiple mechanisms may mediate the elevated blood pressure in postmenopausal women. PMID:26811052

  20. Development of the excretory system in a polyplacophoran mollusc: stages in metanephridial system development

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Two types of excretory systems, protonephridia and metanephridial systems are common among bilaterians. The homology of protonephridia of lophotrochozoan taxa has been widely accepted. In contrast, the homology of metanephridial systems – including coelomic cavities as functional units – among taxa as well as the homology between the two excretory systems is a matter of ongoing discussion. This particularly concerns the molluscan kidneys, which are mostly regarded as being derived convergently to the metanephridia of e.g. annelids because of different ontogenetic origin. A reinvestigation of nephrogenesis in polyplacophorans, which carry many primitive traits within molluscs, could shed light on these questions. Results The metanephridial system of Lepidochitona corrugata develops rapidly in the early juvenile phase. It is formed from a coelomic anlage that soon achieves endothelial organization. The pericardium and heart are formed from the central portion of the anlage. The nephridial components are formed by outgrowth from lateral differentiations of the anlage. Simultaneously with formation of the heart, podocytes appear in the atrial wall of the pericardium. In addition, renopericardial ducts, kidneys and efferent nephroducts, all showing downstream ciliation towards the internal lumen, become differentiated (specimen length: 0.62 mm). Further development consists of elongation of the kidney and reinforcement of filtration and reabsorptive structures. Conclusions During development and in fully formed condition the metanephridial system of Lepidochitona corrugata shares many detailed traits (cellular and overall organization) with the protonephridia of the same species. Accordingly, we suggest a serial homology of various cell types and between the two excretory systems and the organs as a whole. The formation of the metanephridial system varies significantly within Mollusca, thus the mode of formation cannot be used as a homology criterion

  1. In vitro production of Toxocara canis excretory-secretory (TES) antigen.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Divyamol; Jeyathilakan, N; Abdul Basith, S; Senthilkumar, T M A

    2016-09-01

    Toxocara canis is a widespread gastrointestinal nematode parasite of dogs and cause Toxocara larva migrans, an important zoonotic disease in humans on ingestion of infective eggs. Toxocarosis is one of the few human parasitic diseases whose serodiagnosis uses a standardized antigen, T. canis excretory secretory antigen (TES). The present study describes collection of T. canis adult worm, collection and embryonation of T. canis eggs, hatching and separation of T. canis larvae, in vitro maintenance of T. canis second stage larvae for production of TES, concentration of culture fluid TES and yield of TES in correlation with various methods cited in literature. PMID:27605834

  2. High-Dose Estradiol-Replacement Therapy Enhances the Renal Vascular Response to Angiotensin II via an AT2-Receptor Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Safari, Tahereh; Nematbakhsh, Mehdi; Evans, Roger G.; Denton, Kate M.

    2015-01-01

    Physiological levels of estrogen appear to enhance angiotensin type 2 receptor- (AT2R-) mediated vasodilatation. However, the effects of supraphysiological levels of estrogen, analogous to those achieved with high-dose estrogen replacement therapy in postmenopausal women, remain unknown. Therefore, we pretreated ovariectomized rats with a relatively high dose of estrogen (0.5 mg/kg/week) for two weeks. Subsequently, renal hemodynamic responses to intravenous angiotensin II (Ang II, 30–300 ng/kg/min) were tested under anesthesia, while renal perfusion pressure was held constant. The role of AT2R was examined by pretreating groups of rats with PD123319 or its vehicle. Renal blood flow (RBF) decreased in a dose-related manner in response to Ang II. Responses to Ang II were enhanced by pretreatment with estradiol. For example, at 300 ng kg−1 min−1, Ang II reduced RBF by 45.7 ± 1.9% in estradiol-treated rats but only by 27.3 ± 5.1% in vehicle-treated rats. Pretreatment with PD123319 blunted the response of RBF to Ang II in estradiol-treated rats, so that reductions in RBF were similar to those in rats not treated with estradiol. We conclude that supraphysiological levels of estrogen promote AT2R-mediated renal vasoconstriction. This mechanism could potentially contribute to the increased risk of cardiovascular disease associated with hormone replacement therapy using high-dose estrogen. PMID:26681937

  3. The maintenance and regeneration of the planarian excretory system are regulated by EGFR signaling.

    PubMed

    Rink, Jochen C; Vu, Hanh Thi-Kim; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2011-09-01

    The maintenance of organs and their regeneration in case of injury are crucial to the survival of all animals. High rates of tissue turnover and nearly unlimited regenerative capabilities make planarian flatworms an ideal system with which to investigate these important processes, yet little is known about the cell biology and anatomy of their organs. Here we focus on the planarian excretory system, which consists of internal protonephridial tubules. We find that these assemble into complex branching patterns with a stereotyped succession of cell types along their length. Organ regeneration is likely to originate from a precursor structure arising in the blastema, which undergoes extensive branching morphogenesis. In an RNAi screen of signaling molecules, we identified an EGF receptor (Smed-EGFR-5) as a crucial regulator of branching morphogenesis and maintenance. Overall, our characterization of the planarian protonephridial system establishes a new paradigm for regenerative organogenesis and provides a platform for exploring its functional and evolutionary homologies with vertebrate excretory systems. PMID:21828097

  4. Renal mechanisms in the cardiovascular effects of chronic exposure to inorganic mercury in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Carmignani, M; Boscolo, P; Artese, L; Del Rosso, G; Porcelli, G; Felaco, M; Volpe, A R; Giuliano, G

    1992-01-01

    Male weanling Wistar rats received 200 micrograms/ml of mercury (Hg), as HgCl2, in drinking water for 180 days. At the end of the treatment, systemic arterial blood pressure was augmented, cardiac inotropism was reduced, and heart rate was unchanged. Light and electron microscopical studies of the kidney showed a mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis in about 80% of the glomeruli. Tubular cells showed reduction of the acid phosphatase activity, which was related to functional abnormalities of the lysosomes. In the 24 hour urine samples of the Hg exposed rats, there was slight reduction of kallikrein activity, but evident proteinuria was not present in all samples. Plasma renin activity was reduced, that of angiotensin I-converting enzyme was augmented, and plasma aldosterone concentrations were unchanged. Mercury was accumulated mostly in the kidney of the Hg treated animals; and the content of Hg in the heart was higher than in the brain. These data show that chronic exposure to Hg acts on the kidney with complex mechanisms of toxicity; these contribute to modify systemic haemodynamics. Images PMID:1571292

  5. Mechanisms of alpha-adrenergic regulation of the renal sodium/proton antiporter

    SciTech Connect

    Gesek, F.A.

    1988-01-01

    Some controversy exists concerning the relative roles of the {alpha}-adrenoceptor subtypes which mediate proximal tubular Na reabsorption. We hypothesized both {alpha}{sub 1} and {alpha}{sub 2} adrenoceptors may act to stimulate Na transport. We improved upon existing isolation techniques to obtain a highly enriched fraction of rat proximal tubule segments with which to test our hypothesis. Oxygen consumption measurements were first used to monitor alterations in transcellular transport stimulated by selective {alpha}{sub 1} and {alpha}{sub 2} adrenergic agonists and demonstrated both adrenoceptor subtypes increased transcellular Na transport. To examine if the enhancement of Na transport by {alpha}-adrenergic agonists were through a luminal Na//H exchange mechanism, the uptake of {sup 22}Na which was suppressible by the Na/H inhibitor, ethylisopropyl amiloride was utilized. The final sequence of experiments were designed to examine why {alpha}{sub 2} specific adrenoceptor agonists produced a range of stimulation extending from 22% with guanabenz to 98% with B-HT 933. After inhibition of a guanine nucleotide binding protein with pertussis toxin pretreatment, we were able to attenuate the {alpha}{sub 2} agonists responses. However, when a phorbol ester was used to stimulate Na/H exchange directly by activation of protein kinase C, the uptake of {sup 22}Na was inhibited by guanabenz.

  6. Mechanism of chloroform-induced renal toxicity: Non-involvement of hepatic cytochrome P450-dependent metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Fang Cheng; Behr, Melissa; Xie Fang; Lu Shijun; Doret, Meghan; Luo Hongxiu; Yang Weizhu; Aldous, Kenneth; Ding Xinxin; Gu Jun

    2008-02-15

    Chloroform causes hepatic and renal toxicity in a number of species. In vitro studies have indicated that chloroform can be metabolized by P450 enzymes in the kidney to nephrotoxic intermediate, although direct in vivo evidence for the role of renal P450 in the nephrotoxicity has not been reported. This study was to determine whether chloroform renal toxicity persists in a mouse model with a liver-specific deletion of the P450 reductase (Cpr) gene (liver-Cpr-null). Chloroform-induced renal toxicity and chloroform tissue levels were compared between the liver-Cpr-null and wild-type mice at 24 h following differing doses of chloroform. At a chloroform dose of 150 mg/kg, the levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) were five times higher in the exposed group than in the vehicle-treated one for the liver-Cpr-null mice, but they were only slightly higher in the exposed group than in the vehicle-treated group for the wild-type mice. Severe lesions were found in the kidney of the liver-Cpr-null mice, while only mild lesions were found in the wild-type mice. At a chloroform dose of 300 mg/kg, severe kidney lesions were observed in both strains, yet the BUN levels were still higher in the liver-Cpr-null than in the wild-type mice. Higher chloroform levels were found in the tissues of the liver-Cpr-null mice. These findings indicated that loss of hepatic P450-dependent chloroform metabolism does not protect against chloroform-induced renal toxicity, suggesting that renal P450 enzymes play an essential role in chloroform renal toxicity.

  7. Renal arteriography

    MedlinePlus

    ... Read More Acute arterial occlusion - kidney Acute kidney failure Aneurysm Atheroembolic renal disease Blood clots Renal cell carcinoma Renal venogram X-ray Update Date 4/7/2014 Updated by: Jason ... Failure Kidney Tests X-Rays Browse the Encyclopedia A. ...

  8. Renal venogram

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2008:chap 6. Rankin S. Renal parenchymal disease, including renal failure, renovascular disease and transportation. In: Grainger RC, Allison D, Adam, Dixon AK, eds. Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 5th ed. New York, NY: Churchill Livingstone; 2008:chap 39. Read ... arteriography Renal vein thrombosis Tumor Venogram Wilms ...

  9. The role of AT1 and AT2 angiotensin receptors in the mechanism of apoptosis in renal tubular cells after physical exercise.

    PubMed

    Podhorska-Okołów, M; Dziegiel, P; Gomułkiewicz, A; Dolińska-Krajewska, B; Murawska-Ciałowicz, E; Jethon, Z; Zabel, M

    2004-01-01

    Intensive physical exercise disturbs the entire homeostasis in the body and leads to changes in haemodynamic and metabolic alterations not only in skeletal muscles but also in many distant organs. In response to acute physical exercise, a decrease of the glomerular filtration may occur, followed by stimulation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Recent studies have shown that both AT1 and AT2 angiotensin receptors may play a role in mediating the apoptotic process in the kidney. Our previous studies have demonstrated an occurrence of apoptosis in rat renal tubular cells after an excessive exercise. The aim of the present study was to determine the possible mechanism of exercise-induced apoptosis in rat kidney. The analysis was performed on kidneys of rats, subjected to treadmill running until exhaustion. Apoptosis was detected in paraffin sections by the TUNEL technique. The expression of AT1 and AT2 receptors in renal tubular cells was examined by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Our results confirmed that apoptosis after physical exercise is present in renal distal tubular cells. Moreover, there was an increased expression of AT1 and AT2 receptors in distal tubular cells. These studies suggest that physical exercise may induce apoptosis by a mechanism, involving the activation of angiotensin AT1 and AT2 receptors. PMID:15638358

  10. In situ assessment of the renal microcirculation in mechanically ventilated rats using sidestream dark-field imaging.

    PubMed

    Astapenko, D; Jor, O; Lehmann, C; Cerny, V

    2015-02-01

    For microcirculation research there is a need for baseline data and feasibility protocols describing microcirculation of various organs. The aim of our study was to examine the reliability and reproducibility of sidestream dark-field (SDF) imaging within the renal cortical microcirculation in rats. Renal microcirculation was observed using SDF probe placed on the exposed renal surface via the upper midline laparotomy. Video sequences recorded intermittently in short apneic pauses were analyzed off-line by using AVA 3.0 software (MicroVision Medical, Amsterdam, the Netherlands). Results are expressed as mean (SD) or median (25-75% percentiles). We obtained 60 clear sequences from all recorded analyzable videos from all the animals. The total small vessel and all vessel density (in mm.mm(-2) ) were (28.79 ± 0.40) and (28.95 ± 0.40), respectively. The perfused small and all vessel density were (28.79 ± 0.40) and (28.95 ± 0.40), respectively. The DeBacker Score was (19.14 ± 0.43), the proportion of perfused vessels was 100% (100-100%) and the microvascular flow index was 3.49 (3-3.75). We conclude SDF imaging provides a reliable method to examine the renal microvascular bed in vivo and thus can be used for the study of the renal cortical vascular network in various experimental diseases models and clinical settings. PMID:25545609

  11. In-vitro renal epithelial cell infection reveals a viral kidney tropism as a potential mechanism for acute renal failure during Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) Coronavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) causes symptoms similar to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV), yet involving an additional component of acute renal failure (ARF) according to several published case reports. Impairment of the kidney is not typically seen in Coronavirus infections. The role of kidney infection in MERS is not understood. Findings A systematic review of communicated and peer-reviewed case reports revealed differences in descriptions of kidney involvement in MERS versus SARS patients. In particular, ARF in MERS patients occurred considerably earlier after a median time to onset of 11 days (SD ±2,0 days) as opposed to 20 days for SARS, according to the literature. In-situ histological staining of the respective cellular receptors for MERS- and SARS-Coronavirus showed highly similar staining patterns with a focus of a receptor-specific signal in kidney epithelial cells. Comparative infection experiments with SARS- and MERS-CoV in primary human kidney cells versus primary human bronchial epithelial cells showed cytopathogenic infection only in kidney cells, and only if infected with MERS-CoV. Kidney epithelial cells produced almost 1000-fold more infectious MERS-CoV progeny than bronchial epithelial cells, while only a small difference was seen between cell types when infected with SARS-CoV. Conclusion Epidemiological studies should analyze kidney impairment and its characteristics in MERS-CoV. Virus replication in the kidney with potential shedding in urine might constitute a way of transmission, and could explain untraceable transmission chains leading to new cases. Individual patients might benefit from early induction of renoprotective treatment. PMID:24364985

  12. Sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of excretory secretory antigens in humans with fascioliasis.

    PubMed Central

    Espino, A M; Finlay, C M

    1994-01-01

    A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay has been developed for the detection of Fasciola hepatica excretory secretory (ES) antigens in stool specimens of infected humans. The assay uses antibodies against F. hepatica ES antigens. A monoclonal antibody (ES78, mouse immunoglobulin G2a) was used to capture ES antigens, and a rabbit polyclonal antibody, peroxidase conjugate, was used to identify ES antigens. Thirteen of 14 patients with parasitological evidence of fascioliasis had a detectable concentration of ES antigens (more than 15 ng/ml). None of the stool specimens from controls and from patients with parasites other than F. hepatica showed a positive reaction, suggesting the absence of cross-reactions in this assay. When the 14 patients were retested 2 months after treatment, all of the specimens from the 11 parasitologically cured patients were negative by the antigen detection assay while the specimens from the 3 patients with persisting F. hepatica eggs in their stools remained positive. PMID:8126178

  13. Microanatomy and ultrastructure of the excretory system of two pelagic opisthobranch species (Gastropoda: Gymnosomata and Thecosomata).

    PubMed

    Fahrner, A; Haszprunar, G

    2000-04-01

    The microanatomy and ultrastructure of the excretory system of Pneumoderma sp. (Gymnosomata) and Creseis virgula Rang, 1828 (Thecosomata) have been investigated by means of semithin serial sections, reconstructions and transmission electron microscopy. The studies revealed a functional metanephridial system consisting of a heart with a single ventricle and auricle in a pericardial cavity and a single kidney in both species. Podocytes in the atrial wall of the pericardial epithelium are the site of ultrafiltration, whereas the flat epithelium of the kidney with numerous basal infoldings and a dense microvillous border on the luminal surface suggests modification of the ultrafiltrate. In Pneumoderma sp., additional loci of ultrafiltration with identical fine structure (meandering slits with diaphragms covered by extracellular matrix) occur in the solitary rhogocytes (pore cells). The presence of podocytes situated on the atrial wall in representatives of two higher opisthobranch taxa contradicts former ideas on the loss of the primary site of ultrafiltration in the ancestors of the Opisthobranchia. PMID:11085207

  14. The effect of altered sodium balance upon renal vascular reactivity to angiotensin II and norepinephrine in the dog. Mechanism of variation in angiotensin responses.

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, J A; Cannon, P J

    1978-01-01

    The mechanism whereby the vasoconstrictor response to angiotensin II (AII) is influenced by sodium balance or disease is unclear. To explore this question, the renal vascular responses (RVR) to intrarenal injections of subpressor doses of AII and norepinephrine were studied in dogs with an electromagnetic flowmeter. Acute and chronic sodium depletion increased plasma renin activity (PRA) and blunted the RVR to AII, while acute sodium repletion and chronic sodium excess plus desoxycorticosterone acetate decreased PRA and enhanced the RVR to AII. The magnitude of the RVR to AII was inversely related to PRA. The RVR to norepinephrine was unaffected by sodium balance and was not related to PRA. Inhibition of the conversion of angiotensin I to AII by SQ 20,881 during sodium depletion lowered mean arterial blood pressure (MABP), increased renal blood flow (RBF), and enhanced the RVR to AII but not to norepinephrine. Administration of bradykinin to chronically sodium-depleted dogs also lowered the MABP and increased RBF but had no effect on the RVR to AII. SQ 20,881 had no effect on MABP, RBF, or the RVR to AII in the dogs with chronic sodium excess and desoxycorticosterone acetate. Administration of indomethacin to chronically sodium-depleted dogs lowered RBF but did not influence the RVR to AII. The results indicate that the RVR to AII is selectively influenced by sodium balance and that the magnitude of the response is inversely related to the availability of endogenous AII. The data did not suggest that the variations in the RVR to AII were because of direct effects of sodium on vascular contraction, changes in the number of vascular AII receptors, or the renal prostaglandins. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that the vasoconstrictor effect of AII in the renal vasculature is primarily dependent upon the degree to which the AII vascular receptors are occupied by endogenous hormone. PMID:641142

  15. Epigenetic Regulation of MicroRNAs Controlling CLDN14 Expression as a Mechanism for Renal Calcium Handling

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yongfeng; Himmerkus, Nina; Plain, Allein; Bleich, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The kidney has a major role in extracellular calcium homeostasis. Multiple genetic linkage and association studies identified three tight junction genes from the kidney—claudin-14, -16, and -19—as critical for calcium imbalance diseases. Despite the compelling biologic evidence that the claudin-14/16/19 proteins form a regulated paracellular pathway for calcium reabsorption, approaches to regulate this transport pathway are largely unavailable, hindering the development of therapies to correct calcium transport abnormalities. Here, we report that treatment with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors downregulates renal CLDN14 mRNA and dramatically reduces urinary calcium excretion in mice. Furthermore, treatment of mice with HDAC inhibitors stimulated the transcription of renal microRNA-9 (miR-9) and miR-374 genes, which have been shown to repress the expression of claudin-14, the negative regulator of the paracellular pathway. With renal clearance and tubule perfusion techniques, we showed that HDAC inhibitors transiently increase the paracellular cation conductance in the thick ascending limb. Genetic ablation of claudin-14 or the use of a loop diuretic in mice abrogated HDAC inhibitor-induced hypocalciuria. The genetic mutations in the calcium-sensing receptor from patients with autosomal dominant hypocalcemia (ADH) repressed the transcription of miR-9 and miR-374 genes, and treatment with an HDAC inhibitor rescued the phenotypes of cell and animal models of ADH. Furthermore, systemic treatment of mice with antagomiRs against these miRs relieved claudin-14 gene silencing and caused an ADH-like phenotype. Together, our findings provide proof of concept for a novel therapeutic principle on the basis of epigenetic regulation of renal miRs to treat hypercalciuric diseases. PMID:25071082

  16. An integrated lipidomics and metabolomics reveal nephroprotective effect and biochemical mechanism of Rheum officinale in chronic renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-Hao; Vaziri, Nosratola D.; Wei, Feng; Cheng, Xian-Long; Bai, Xu; Zhao, Ying-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) is a major public health problem worldwide. Earlier studies have revealed salutary effects of rhubarb extracts in CRF. In this study, we employed lipidomic and metabolomic approaches to identify the plasma biomarkers and to determine the effect of treatment with petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and n-butanol extracts of rhubarb in a rat model of CRF with adenine-induced chronic tubulointerstitial nephropathy. In addition, clinical biochemistry, histological evaluation and pro-fibrotic protein expression were analyzed. Significant changes were found between the CRF and control groups representing characteristic phenotypes of rats with CRF. Treatment with the three rhubarb extracts improved renal injury and dysfunction, either fully or partially reversed the plasma metabolites abnormalities and attenuated upregulation of pro-fibrotic proteins including TGF-β1, α-SMA, PAI-1, CTGF, FN and collagen-1. The nephroprotective effect of ethyl acetate extract was better than other extracts. The differential metabolites were closely associated with glycerophospholipid, fatty acid and amino acid metabolisms. The results revealed a strong link between renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis and glycerophospholipid metabolism and L-carnitine metabolism in the development of CRF. Amelioration of CRF with the three rhubarb extracts was associated with the delayed development and/or reversal the disorders in key metabolites associated with adenine-induced CRF. PMID:26903149

  17. Neural regulation of the kidney function in rats with cisplatin induced renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Goulding, Niamh E.; Johns, Edward J.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is often associated with a disturbed cardiovascular homeostasis. This investigation explored the role of the renal innervation in mediating deranged baroreflex control of renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and renal excretory function in cisplatin-induced renal failure. Methods: Rats were either intact or bilaterally renally denervated 4 days prior to receiving cisplatin (5 mg/kg i.p.) and entered a chronic metabolic study for 8 days. At day 8, other groups of rats were prepared for acute measurement of RSNA or renal function with either intact or denervated kidneys. Results: Following the cisplatin challenge, creatinine clearance was 50% lower while fractional sodium excretion and renal cortical and medullary TGF-β1 concentrations were 3–4 fold higher in both intact and renally denervated rats compared to control rats. In cisplatin-treated rats, the maximal gain of the high-pressure baroreflex curve was only 20% that of control rats, but following renal denervation not different from that of renally denervated control rats. Volume expansion reduced RSNA by 50% in control and in cisplatin-treated rats but only following bilateral renal denervation. The volume expansion mediated natriuresis/diuresis was absent in the cisplatin-treated rats but was normalized following renal denervation. Conclusions: Cisplatin-induced renal injury impaired renal function and caused a sympatho-excitation with blunting of high and low pressure baroreflex regulation of RSNA, which was dependent on the renal innervation. It is suggested that in man with CKD there is a dysregulation of the neural control of the kidney mediated by its sensory innervation. PMID:26175693

  18. Renal adaptation during hibernation

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Sandra L.; Jain, Swati; Keys, Daniel; Edelstein, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    Hibernators periodically undergo profound physiological changes including dramatic reductions in metabolic, heart, and respiratory rates and core body temperature. This review discusses the effect of hypoperfusion and hypothermia observed during hibernation on glomerular filtration and renal plasma flow, as well as specific adaptations in renal architecture, vasculature, the renin-angiotensin system, and upregulation of possible protective mechanisms during the extreme conditions endured by hibernating mammals. Understanding the mechanisms of protection against organ injury during hibernation may provide insights into potential therapies for organ injury during cold storage and reimplantation during transplantation. PMID:24049148

  19. Nuclear medicine and complementary modalities in renal trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, B.C. Jr.

    1982-07-01

    The diagnosis of renal trauma for many years was achieved through history, clinical findings, the performance of a survey film of the abdomen, urinalysis, excretory urography, aortography, and selective renal artery arteriography. The development of the scintillation camera and the availability of /sup 99m/Tc, as well as /sup 99m/Tc labeled pharmaceuticals, approximately fifteen years ago has widened this diagnostic horizon. Exquisite new imaging modalities have become available recently. As a result of constantly improving technology, these techniques--including computed tomography, sonography, with real time enhancement, and digital video subtraction angiography--are utilized more and more frequently. The full impact of these newest wonders is not yet realized. Cost-effectiveness, radiation exposure, accumulative drug side-effects, availability of facilities and personnel and professional and technical training have become major considerations.

  20. Drug-induced renal disorders.

    PubMed

    Ghane Shahrbaf, Fatemeh; Assadi, Farahnak

    2015-01-01

    Drug-induced nephrotoxicity are more common among infants and young children and in certain clinical situations such as underlying renal dysfunction and cardiovascular disease. Drugs can cause acute renal injury, intrarenal obstruction, interstitial nephritis, nephrotic syndrome, and acid-base and fluid electrolytes disorders. Certain drugs can cause alteration in intraglomerular hemodynamics, inflammatory changes in renal tubular cells, leading to acute kidney injury (AKI), tubulointerstitial disease and renal scarring. Drug-induced nephrotoxicity tends to occur more frequently in patients with intravascular volume depletion, diabetes, congestive heart failure, chronic kidney disease, and sepsis. Therefore, early detection of drugs adverse effects is important to prevent progression to end-stage renal disease. Preventive measures requires knowledge of mechanisms of drug-induced nephrotoxicity, understanding patients and drug-related risk factors coupled with therapeutic intervention by correcting risk factors, assessing baseline renal function before initiation of therapy, adjusting the drug dosage and avoiding use of nephrotoxic drug combinations. PMID:26468475

  1. N-Acetyl-Seryl-Aspartyl-Lysyl-Proline: mechanisms of renal protection in mouse model of systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Tang-Dong; Nakagawa, Pablo; Janic, Branislava; D'Ambrosio, Martin; Worou, Morel E.; Peterson, Edward L.; Rhaleb, Nour-Eddine; Yang, Xiao-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disease characterized by the development of auto antibodies against a variety of self-antigens and deposition of immune complexes that lead to inflammation, fibrosis, and end-organ damage. Up to 60% of lupus patients develop nephritis and renal dysfunction leading to kidney failure. N-acetyl-seryl-aspartyl-lysyl-proline, i.e., Ac-SDKP, is a natural tetrapeptide that in hypertension prevents inflammation and fibrosis in heart, kidney, and vasculature. In experimental autoimmune myocarditis, Ac-SDKP prevents cardiac dysfunction by decreasing innate and adaptive immunity. It has also been reported that Ac-SDKP ameliorates lupus nephritis in mice. We hypothesize that Ac-SDKP prevents lupus nephritis in mice by decreasing complement C5-9, proinflammatory cytokines, and immune cell infiltration. Lupus mice treated with Ac-SDKP for 20 wk had significantly lower renal levels of macrophage and T cell infiltration and proinflammatory chemokine/cytokines. In addition, our data demonstrate for the first time that in lupus mouse Ac-SDKP prevented the increase in complement C5-9, RANTES, MCP-5, and ICAM-1 kidney expression and it prevented the decline of glomerular filtration rate. Ac-SDKP-treated lupus mice had a significant improvement in renal function and lower levels of glomerular damage. Ac-SDKP had no effect on the production of autoantibodies. The protective Ac-SDKP effect is most likely achieved by targeting the expression of proinflammatory chemokines/cytokines, ICAM-1, and immune cell infiltration in the kidney, either directly or via C5-9 proinflammatory arm of complement system. PMID:25740596

  2. N-Acetyl-Seryl-Aspartyl-Lysyl-Proline: mechanisms of renal protection in mouse model of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Liao, Tang-Dong; Nakagawa, Pablo; Janic, Branislava; D'Ambrosio, Martin; Worou, Morel E; Peterson, Edward L; Rhaleb, Nour-Eddine; Yang, Xiao-Ping; Carretero, Oscar A

    2015-05-15

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disease characterized by the development of auto antibodies against a variety of self-antigens and deposition of immune complexes that lead to inflammation, fibrosis, and end-organ damage. Up to 60% of lupus patients develop nephritis and renal dysfunction leading to kidney failure. N-acetyl-seryl-aspartyl-lysyl-proline, i.e., Ac-SDKP, is a natural tetrapeptide that in hypertension prevents inflammation and fibrosis in heart, kidney, and vasculature. In experimental autoimmune myocarditis, Ac-SDKP prevents cardiac dysfunction by decreasing innate and adaptive immunity. It has also been reported that Ac-SDKP ameliorates lupus nephritis in mice. We hypothesize that Ac-SDKP prevents lupus nephritis in mice by decreasing complement C5-9, proinflammatory cytokines, and immune cell infiltration. Lupus mice treated with Ac-SDKP for 20 wk had significantly lower renal levels of macrophage and T cell infiltration and proinflammatory chemokine/cytokines. In addition, our data demonstrate for the first time that in lupus mouse Ac-SDKP prevented the increase in complement C5-9, RANTES, MCP-5, and ICAM-1 kidney expression and it prevented the decline of glomerular filtration rate. Ac-SDKP-treated lupus mice had a significant improvement in renal function and lower levels of glomerular damage. Ac-SDKP had no effect on the production of autoantibodies. The protective Ac-SDKP effect is most likely achieved by targeting the expression of proinflammatory chemokines/cytokines, ICAM-1, and immune cell infiltration in the kidney, either directly or via C5-9 proinflammatory arm of complement system. PMID:25740596

  3. [Renal elastography].

    PubMed

    Correas, Jean-Michel; Anglicheau, Dany; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael

    2016-04-01

    Renal elastography has become available with the development of noninvasive quantitative techniques (including shear-wave elastography), following the rapidly growing field of diagnosis and quantification of liver fibrosis, which has a demonstrated major clinical impact. Ultrasound or even magnetic resonance techniques are leaving the pure research area to reach the routine clinical use. With the increased incidence of chronic kidney disease and its specific morbidity and mortality, the noninvasive diagnosis of renal fibrosis can be of critical value. However, it is difficult to simply extend the application from one organ to the other due to a large number of anatomical and technical issues. Indeed, the kidney exhibits various features that make stiffness assessment more complex, such as the presence of various tissue types (cortex, medulla), high spatial orientation (anisotropy), local blood flow, fatty sinus with variable volume and echotexture, perirenal space with variable fatty content, and the variable depth of the organ. Furthermore, the stiffness changes of the renal parenchyma are not exclusively related to fibrosis, as renal perfusion or hydronephrosis will impact the local elasticity. Renal elastography might be able to diagnose acute or chronic obstruction, or to renal tumor or pseudotumor characterization. Today, renal elastography appears as a promising application that still requires optimization and validation, which is the contrary for liver stiffness assessment. PMID:26976058

  4. In vitro culture of Mesocestoides corti metacestodes and isolation of immunomodulatory excretory-secretory products.

    PubMed

    Vendelova, E; Hrčková, G; Lutz, M B; Brehm, K; Nono Komguep, J

    2016-07-01

    Cestode-mediated diseases hold the interesting feature of persisting metacestode larvae dwelling within the host tissues, in the midst of the immune response. Excretory-secretory (ES) products of the metacestode larval stage modulate the host immune response and modify the outcome of the disease. Therefore, isolation and analysis of axenic metacestode ES products are crucial to study their properties. Here, we report the development of a system for long-term in vitro cultivation of the metacestode of the parasitic cestode Mesocestoides corti (syn. Mesocestoides vogae). Although feeder cells and host serum supported the early growth of the parasite, long-term survival was not dependent on host serum or host-derived factors enabling the collection of parasite released products in serum-free medium. Functionally, these axenic ES products recapitulated M. corti tetrathyridia's ability to inhibit LPS-driven IL-12p70 secretion by dendritic cells. Thus, our new axenic culture system will simplify the identification and characterization of M. corti-derived immunomodulatory factors that will indirectly enable the identification and characterization of corresponding factors in the metacestode larvae of medically relevant cestodes such as Echinococcus multilocularis that are not yet amenable to serum-free cultivation. PMID:27120409

  5. In vitro culture of Parascaris equorum larvae and initial investigation of parasite excretory-secretory products.

    PubMed

    Burk, Steffanie V; Dangoudoubiyam, Sriveny; Brewster-Barnes, Tammy; Bryant, Uneeda K; Howe, Daniel K; Carter, Craig N; Vanzant, Eric S; Harmon, Robert J; Kazacos, Kevin R; Rossano, Mary G

    2014-11-01

    Currently, diagnosis of Parascaris equorum infection in equids is limited to patent infections. The goals of this study were to culture P. equorum larvae in vitro and identify excretory-secretory (ES) products for prepatent diagnostic testing. Parascaris equorum L2/L3 larvae were hatched and cultured for up to 3 weeks for ES product collection. Fifth stage (L5) P. equorum were also cultured for ES product collection. Examination of ES fractions by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and silver stain revealed L2/L3 products ranging from 12-94 kDa and L5 products ranging from 12-189 kDa. Western blot analyses were conducted using polyclonal antibodies produced against P. equorum or Baylisascaris procyonis L2/L3 ES products, sera from rabbits inoculated with B. procyonis or Toxocara canis eggs, and sera from animals naturally infected with P. equorum or T. canis. Western blot results indicated parasite antigens migrating at 19 and 34 kDa may be useful for specifically detecting P. equorum infections. PMID:25209615

  6. Equine antibody response to larval Parascaris equorum excretory-secretory products.

    PubMed

    Burk, Steffanie V; Dangoudoubiyam, Sriveny; Brewster-Barnes, Tammy; Howe, Daniel K; Carter, Craig N; Bryant, Uneeda K; Rossano, Mary G

    2016-08-15

    Parascaris equorum is an intestinal nematode of foals and young horses that can produce mild to severe pathology. Current diagnosis is limited to detection of patent infections, when parasite eggs are identified during fecal examinations. This study examined the use of larval P. equorum excretory-secretory (ES) products in a western blot test for diagnosis of prepatent equine P. equorum infection. Sera from adult mares negative for patent P. equorum infections, foals prior to consuming colostrum, and P. equorum infected foals were used as controls in this study. Study samples included sera from 18 broodmares prior to parturition and sera from their foals throughout the process of natural infection. Sera from study horses were examined for IgG(T) antibody recognition of ES products. Foals naturally infected with P. equorum possessed IgG(T) antibodies against 19kDa, 22kDa, 26kDa, and 34kDa ES products. However, passive transfer of colostral antibodies from mares was shown to preclude the use of the crude larval ES product-based western blot test for diagnosis of prepatent P. equorum infections in foals. PMID:27514890

  7. Serodiagnosis of fasciolosis by fast protein liquid chromatography-fractionated excretory/secretory antigens.

    PubMed

    Mokhtarian, Kobra; Akhlaghi, Lame; Meamar, Ahmad Reza; Razmjou, Elham; Manouchehri Naeini, Kourosh; Gholami, Samaneh; Najafi Samei, Masoomeh; Falak, Reza

    2016-08-01

    In several studies, different antigenic preparations and diverse immunological tests were applied for serodiagnosis of Fasciola hepatica infections. Most of these preparations showed cross-reactivity with proteins of other parasites. Application of purified antigens might reduce these cross-reactivities. Here, we used fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC)-fractionated extracts of F. hepatica excretory/secretory antigens (E/S Ags) for serodiagnosis of human and sheep fasciolosis. To develop an improved diagnostic method, we fractionated F. hepatica E/S Ags by anion exchange chromatography on a Sepharose CL-6B column and then tested the serodiagnostic values of the fractions. We used sera from F. hepatica-infected human and sheep as positive controls. Sera from patients with hydatidosis and strongyloidiasis were used for cross-reactivity studies. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) of the second FPLC peak, containing 20, 25, and 70 kDa proteins, discriminated between F. hepatica-infected and uninfected human and sheep samples. Fractionation of F. hepatica E/S Ags by FPLC is a fast and reproducible way of obtaining antigens useful for serodiagnosis of human and sheep fasciolosis with acceptable sensitivity and specificity. Graphical abstract ᅟ. PMID:27130320

  8. Filarial Excretory-Secretory Products Induce Human Monocytes to Produce Lymphangiogenic Mediators

    PubMed Central

    Weinkopff, Tiffany; Mackenzie, Charles; Eversole, Rob; Lammie, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    The nematodes Wuchereria bancrofti and Brugia spp. infect over 120 million people worldwide, causing lymphedema, elephantiasis and hydrocele, collectively known as lymphatic filariasis. Most infected individuals appear to be asymptomatic, but many exhibit sub-clinical manifestations including the lymphangiectasia that likely contributes to the development of lymphedema and elephantiasis. As adult worm excretory-secretory products (ES) do not directly activate lymphatic endothelial cells (LEC), we investigated the role of monocyte/macrophage-derived soluble factors in the development of filarial lymphatic pathology. We analyzed the production of IL-8, IL-6 and VEGF-A by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from naïve donors following stimulation with filarial ES products. ES-stimulated PBMCs produced significantly more IL-8, IL-6 and VEGF-A compared to cells cultured in medium alone; CD14+ monocytes appear to be the primary producers of IL-8 and VEGF-A, but not IL-6. Furthermore, IL-8, IL-6 and VEGF-A induced in vitro tubule formation in LEC Matrigel cultures. Matrigel plugs supplemented with IL-8, IL-6, VEGF-A, or with supernatants from ES-stimulated PBMCs and implanted in vivo stimulated lymphangiogenesis. Collectively, these data support the hypothesis that monocytes/macrophages exposed to filarial ES products may modulate lymphatic function through the secretion of soluble factors that stimulate the vessel growth associated with the pathogenesis of filarial disease. PMID:25010672

  9. Proteomic Analysis of Trichinella spiralis Muscle Larval Excretory-Secretory Proteins Recognized by Early Infection Sera

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Wang, Zhong Quan; Hu, Dan Dan; Cui, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Although the excretory-secretory (ES) proteins of Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae are the most commonly used diagnostic antigens for trichinellosis, their main disadvantage is the false negative results during the early stage of infection and cross-reaction of their main components (43, 45, 49, and 53 kDa) with sera of patients with other helminthiasis. The aim of this study was to identify early specific diagnostic antigens in T. spiralis ES proteins with 30–40 kDa. The ES proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE), and a total of approximately 150 proteins spots were detected with isoelectric point (pI) varying from 4 to 7 and molecular weight from 14 to 66 kDa. When probed with sera from infected mice at 18 days postinfection, ten protein spots with molecular weight of 30–40 kDa were recognized and identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS. All of ten spots were successfully identified and characterized to correlate with five different proteins, including two potential serine proteases, one antigen targeted by protective antibodies, one deoxyribonuclease (DNase) II, and one conserved hypothetical protein. These proteins might be the early specific diagnostic antigens for trichinellosis. PMID:23844355

  10. ZO-2 silencing induces renal hypertrophy through a cell cycle mechanism and the activation of YAP and the mTOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Calderón, Alaide; Ávila-Flores, Antonia; Ponce, Arturo; López-Bayghen, Esther; Calderón-Salinas, José-Víctor; Luis Reyes, José; Chávez-Munguía, Bibiana; Segovia, José; Angulo, Carla; Ramírez, Leticia; Gallego-Gutiérrez, Helios; Alarcón, Lourdes; Martín-Tapia, Dolores; Bautista-García, Pablo; González-Mariscal, Lorenza

    2016-05-15

    Renal compensatory hypertrophy (RCH) restores normal kidney function after disease or loss of kidney tissue and is characterized by an increase in organ size due to cell enlargement and not to cell proliferation. In MDCK renal epithelial cells, silencing of the tight junction protein zona occludens 2 (ZO-2 KD) induces cell hypertrophy by two mechanisms: prolonging the time that cells spend at the G1 phase of the cell cycle due to an increase in cyclin D1 level, and augmenting the rate of protein synthesis. The latter is triggered by the nuclear accumulation and increased transcriptional activity of Yes-associated protein (YAP), the main target of the Hippo pathway, which results in decreased expression of phosphatase and tensin homologue. This in turn increased the level of phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphosphate, which transactivates the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, leading to activation of the kinase S6K1 and increased synthesis of proteins and cell size. In agreement, in a rat model of uninephrectomy, RCH is accompanied by decreased expression of ZO-2 and nuclear expression of YAP. Our results reveal a novel role of ZO-2 as a modulator of cell size. PMID:27009203

  11. ZO-2 silencing induces renal hypertrophy through a cell cycle mechanism and the activation of YAP and the mTOR pathway

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez-Calderón, Alaide; Ávila-Flores, Antonia; Ponce, Arturo; López-Bayghen, Esther; Calderón-Salinas, José-Víctor; Luis Reyes, José; Chávez-Munguía, Bibiana; Segovia, José; Angulo, Carla; Ramírez, Leticia; Gallego-Gutiérrez, Helios; Alarcón, Lourdes; Martín-Tapia, Dolores; Bautista-García, Pablo; González-Mariscal, Lorenza

    2016-01-01

    Renal compensatory hypertrophy (RCH) restores normal kidney function after disease or loss of kidney tissue and is characterized by an increase in organ size due to cell enlargement and not to cell proliferation. In MDCK renal epithelial cells, silencing of the tight junction protein zona occludens 2 (ZO-2 KD) induces cell hypertrophy by two mechanisms: prolonging the time that cells spend at the G1 phase of the cell cycle due to an increase in cyclin D1 level, and augmenting the rate of protein synthesis. The latter is triggered by the nuclear accumulation and increased transcriptional activity of Yes-associated protein (YAP), the main target of the Hippo pathway, which results in decreased expression of phosphatase and tensin homologue. This in turn increased the level of phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphosphate, which transactivates the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, leading to activation of the kinase S6K1 and increased synthesis of proteins and cell size. In agreement, in a rat model of uninephrectomy, RCH is accompanied by decreased expression of ZO-2 and nuclear expression of YAP. Our results reveal a novel role of ZO-2 as a modulator of cell size. PMID:27009203

  12. Opisthorchis viverrini excretory/secretory products induce Toll-like receptor 4 upregulation and production of interleukin 6 and 8 in cholangiocyte

    PubMed Central

    Ninlawan, Kantima; O’Hara, Steve P.; Splinter, Patrick L.; Yongvanit, Puangrat; Kaewkes, Sasithorn; Surapaitoon, Arpa; LaRusso, Nicholas F.; Sripa, Banchob

    2011-01-01

    Biliary tract infection with the Group I carcinogenic liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini is associated with severe inflammation leading to cholangiocarcinoma – a major biliary cancer in Southeast Asia. However, mechanism(s) by which the liver fluke induces host mucosal immune/inflammatory responses are unclear. In the present study we address whether a normal immortalized human cholangiocyte cell line (H69 cells) recognizes and responds to O. viverrini excretory/secretory products (OVES). Expression of multiple TLRs, activation of NF-κB, and expression of proinflammatory cytokines were monitored in the presence and absence of OVES. Our results showed that OVES induced increased cholangiocyte TLR4 mRNA expression, induced IκB-α degradation in a MyD88-dependent manner, and activated NF-κB nuclear translocation. Moreover, OVES induced expression and secretion of the strong chemoattractant chemokine interleukin 8 (IL-8) and pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6. These results demonstrate that secreted/excreted products of O. viverrini are recognized by human cholangiocytes and initiate innate mucosal immunity/inflammatory cascades, a primary event in the pathogenesis of opisthorchiasis and cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:20887801

  13. Opisthorchis viverrini excretory/secretory products induce toll-like receptor 4 upregulation and production of interleukin 6 and 8 in cholangiocyte.

    PubMed

    Ninlawan, Kantima; O'Hara, Steve P; Splinter, Patrick L; Yongvanit, Puangrat; Kaewkes, Sasithorn; Surapaitoon, Arpa; LaRusso, Nicholas F; Sripa, Banchob

    2010-12-01

    Biliary tract infection with the Group I carcinogenic liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini is associated with severe inflammation leading to cholangiocarcinoma--a major biliary cancer in Southeast Asia. However, mechanism(s) by which the liver fluke induces host mucosal immune/inflammatory responses is unclear. In the present study we address whether a normal immortalized human cholangiocyte cell line (H69 cells) recognizes and responds to O. viverrini excretory/secretory products (OVES). Expression of multiple TLRs, activation of NF-κB, and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines were monitored in the presence and absence of OVES. Our results showed that OVES induced increased cholangiocyte TLR4 mRNA expression, induced IκB-α degradation in a MyD88-dependent manner, and activated NF-κB nuclear translocation. Moreover, OVES induced expression and secretion of the strong chemoattractant chemokine interleukin 8 (IL-8) and pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6. These results demonstrate that secreted/excreted products of O. viverrini are recognized by human cholangiocytes and initiate innate mucosal immunity/inflammatory cascades, a primary event in the pathogenesis of opisthorchiasis and cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:20887801

  14. Tofacitinab in Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zand, Martin S.

    2013-01-01

    Tofacitinib (tositinib, CP-690,550) is a small molecule inhibitor of Janus associated kinases, primarily JAK3 and JAK2, which inhibits cytokine signaling through the IL-2Rγ chain. In this article, we review the mechanism of action of tofacitinib, and pre-clinical and clinical data regarding its use in solid organ transplantation thus far. It is hoped that tofacitinib may form the basis for calcineurin-free immunosuppression, improving renal function while eliminating calcineurin inhibitor renal toxicity. Current studies suggest that tofacitinib is an effective immunosuppressive agent for renal transplantation, but it's use in current protocols carries an increased risk of CMV, BK, and EBV viral infection, anemia and leukopenia, and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder. PMID:23849222

  15. Histones from Dying Renal Cells Aggravate Kidney Injury via TLR2 and TLR4

    PubMed Central

    Allam, Ramanjaneyulu; Scherbaum, Christina Rebecca; Darisipudi, Murthy Narayana; Mulay, Shrikant R.; Hägele, Holger; Lichtnekert, Julia; Hagemann, Jan Henrik; Rupanagudi, Khader Valli; Ryu, Mi; Schwarzenberger, Claudia; Hohenstein, Bernd; Hugo, Christian; Uhl, Bernd; Reichel, Christoph A.; Krombach, Fritz; Monestier, Marc; Liapis, Helen; Moreth, Kristin; Schaefer, Liliana

    2012-01-01

    In AKI, dying renal cells release intracellular molecules that stimulate immune cells to secrete proinflammatory cytokines, which trigger leukocyte recruitment and renal inflammation. Whether the release of histones, specifically, from dying cells contributes to the inflammation of AKI is unknown. In this study, we found that dying tubular epithelial cells released histones into the extracellular space, which directly interacted with Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 (TLR2) and TLR4 to induce MyD88, NF-κB, and mitogen activated protein kinase signaling. Extracellular histones also had directly toxic effects on renal endothelial cells and tubular epithelial cells in vitro. In addition, direct injection of histones into the renal arteries of mice demonstrated that histones induce leukocyte recruitment, microvascular vascular leakage, renal inflammation, and structural features of AKI in a TLR2/TLR4-dependent manner. Antihistone IgG, which neutralizes the immunostimulatory effects of histones, suppressed intrarenal inflammation, neutrophil infiltration, and tubular cell necrosis and improved excretory renal function. In summary, the release of histones from dying cells aggravates AKI via both its direct toxicity to renal cells and its proinflammatory effects. Because the induction of proinflammatory cytokines in dendritic cells requires TLR2 and TLR4, these results support the concept that renal damage triggers an innate immune response, which contributes to the pathogenesis of AKI. PMID:22677551

  16. Renal consequences of obesity.

    PubMed

    Naumnik, Beata; Myśliwiec, Michał

    2010-08-01

    The worldwide prevalence of obesity and its associated metabolic and cardiovascular disorders has risen dramatically within the past 2 decades. Our objective is to review the mechanisms that link obesity with altered kidney function. Current evidence suggests that excess weight gain may be responsible for 65-75% of the risk for arterial hypertension. Impaired renal pressure natriuresis, initially due to increased renal tubular sodium reabsorption, is a key factor linking obesity with hypertension. Obesity increases renal sodium reabsorption by activating the renin-angiotensin and sympathetic nervous systems, and by altering intrarenal physical forces. Adipose tissue functions as an endocrine organ, secreting hormones/cytokines (e.g., leptin) which may trigger sodium retention and hypertension. Additionally, excess visceral adipose tissue may physically compress the kidneys, increasing intrarenal pressures and tubular reabsorption. Eventually, sustained obesity via hyperinsulinemia, due to resistance to insulin, causes hyperfiltration, resulting in structural changes in the kidneys--glomerular hyperthrophy and occasionally focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. The consequences of kidney injury are continuous loss of glomerular filtration rate, further increase of arterial pressure and escalation of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. There is a growing awareness of the renal consequences of obesity, and considerable progress is being made in understanding its pathophysiology. Weight reduction results in lowered proteinuria. Aside from low sodium diet and exercises, more widespread use of renoprotective therapy (e.g., ACE inhibitors and statins) in treatment of hypertension in obese subjects should be advocated. Renal protection should result in reducing the cardiovascular complications of obesity. PMID:20671624

  17. Berberine activates Nrf2 nuclear translocation and inhibits apoptosis induced by high glucose in renal tubular epithelial cells through a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiuli; Liang, Dan; Lian, Xu; Jiang, Yan; He, Hui; Liang, Wei; Zhao, Yue; Chi, Zhi-Hong

    2016-06-01

    Apoptosis of tubular epithelial cells is a major feature of diabetic kidney disease, and hyperglycemia triggers the generation of free radicals and oxidant stress in tubular cells. Berberine (BBR) is identified as a potential anti-diabetic herbal medicine due to its beneficial effects on insulin sensitivity, glucose metabolism and glycolysis. In this study, the underlying mechanisms involved in the protective effects of BBR on high glucose-induced apoptosis were explored using cultured renal tubular epithelial cells (NRK-52E cells) and human kidney proximal tubular cell line (HK-2 cells). We identified the pivotal role of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt in BBR cellular defense mechanisms and revealed the novel effect of BBR on nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-related factor-2 (Nrf2) and heme oxygenase (HO)-1 in NRK-52E and HK-2 cells. BBR attenuated reactive oxygen species production, antioxidant defense (GSH and SOD) and oxidant-sensitive proteins (Nrf2 and HO-1), which also were blocked by LY294002 (an inhibitor of PI3K) in HG-treated NRK-52E and HK-2 cells. Furthermore, BBR improved mitochondrial function by increasing mitochondrial membrane potential. BBR-induced anti-apoptotic function was demonstrated by decreasing apoptotic proteins (cytochrome c, Bax, caspase3 and caspase9). All these findings suggest that BBR exerts the anti-apoptosis effects through activation of PI3K/Akt signal pathways and leads to activation of Nrf2 and induction of Nrf2 target genes, and consequently protecting the renal tubular epithelial cells from HG-induced apoptosis. PMID:26979714

  18. Hypertension in children. Increased efficacy of technetium Tc/sup 99m/ succimer in screening for renal disease

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, P.R.; Treves, S.; Ingelfinger, J.

    1985-02-01

    Renal scintigraphy with technetium Tc-99m succimer (DMSA) and technetium Tc-99m pentetate (DTPA) was used to study 80 hypertensive pediatric and adolescent patients. Renal abnormalities such as asymmetry of function, size, or shape were identified in 13 patients. Both excretory urography and technetium Tc-99m pentetate studies were successful in detecting 54% of the abnormalities in patients studied; technetium Tc-99m succimer identified 92%. The accuracy of the latter was 96%, with a specificity of 97%. The ability of technetium Tc-99m succimer renal scintigraphy to identify accurately the presence or absence of renal abnormalities warrants its inclusion in the initial examination of pediatric and adolescent patients with hypertension.

  19. The Identification of Novel Potential Injury Mechanisms and Candidate Biomarkers in Renal Allograft Rejection by Quantitative Proteomics*

    PubMed Central

    Sigdel, Tara K.; Salomonis, Nathan; Nicora, Carrie D.; Ryu, Soyoung; He, Jintang; Dinh, Van; Orton, Daniel J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Hsieh, Szu-Chuan; Dai, Hong; Thien-Vu, Minh; Xiao, Wenzhong; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Camp, David G.; Sarwal, Minnie M.

    2014-01-01

    Early transplant dysfunction and failure because of immunological and nonimmunological factors still presents a significant clinical problem for transplant recipients. A critical unmet need is the noninvasive detection and prediction of immune injury such that acute injury can be reversed by proactive immunosuppression titration. In this study, we used iTRAQ -based proteomic discovery and targeted ELISA validation to discover and validate candidate urine protein biomarkers from 262 renal allograft recipients with biopsy-confirmed allograft injury. Urine samples were randomly split into a training set of 108 patients and an independent validation set of 154 patients, which comprised the clinical biopsy-confirmed phenotypes of acute rejection (AR) (n = 74), stable graft (STA) (n = 74), chronic allograft injury (CAI) (n = 58), BK virus nephritis (BKVN) (n = 38), nephrotic syndrome (NS) (n = 8), and healthy, normal control (HC) (n = 10). A total of 389 proteins were measured that displayed differential abundances across urine specimens of the injury types (p < 0.05) with a significant finding that SUMO2 (small ubiquitin-related modifier 2) was identified as a “hub” protein for graft injury irrespective of causation. Sixty-nine urine proteins had differences in abundance (p < 0.01) in AR compared with stable graft, of which 12 proteins were up-regulated in AR with a mean fold increase of 2.8. Nine urine proteins were highly specific for AR because of their significant differences (p < 0.01; fold increase >1.5) from all other transplant categories (HLA class II protein HLA-DRB1, KRT14, HIST1H4B, FGG, ACTB, FGB, FGA, KRT7, DPP4). Increased levels of three of these proteins, fibrinogen beta (FGB; p = 0.04), fibrinogen gamma (FGG; p = 0.03), and HLA DRB1 (p = 0.003) were validated by ELISA in AR using an independent sample set. The fibrinogen proteins further segregated AR from BK virus nephritis (FGB p = 0.03, FGG p = 0.02), a finding that supports the utility of

  20. Amygdalin blocks the in vitro adhesion and invasion of renal cell carcinoma cells by an integrin-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Juengel, Eva; Afschar, Masud; Makarević, Jasmina; Rutz, Jochen; Tsaur, Igor; Mani, Jens; Nelson, Karen; Haferkamp, Axel; Blaheta, Roman A

    2016-03-01

    Information about the natural compound amygdalin, which is employed as an antitumor agent, is sparse and thus its efficacy remains controversial. In this study, to determine whether amygdalin exerts antitumor effects on renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cells, its impact on RCC metastatic activity was investigated. The RCC cell lines, Caki-1, KTC-26 and A498, were exposed to amygdalin from apricot kernels, and adhesion to human vascular endothelium, immobilized collagen or fibronectin was investigated. The influence of amygdalin on chemotactic and invasive activity was also determined, as was the influence of amygdalin on surface and total cellular α and β integrin expression, which are involved in metastasis. We noted that amygdalin caused significant reductions in chemotactic activity, invasion and adhesion to endothelium, collagen and fibronectin. Using FACScan analysis, we noted that amygdalin also induced reductions, particularly in integrins α5 and α6, in all three cell lines. Functional blocking of α5 resulted in significantly diminished adhesion of KTC-26 and A498 to collagen and also in decreased chemotactic behavior in all three cell lines. Blocking α6 integrin significantly reduced chemotactic activity in all three cell lines. Thus, we suggest that exposing RCC cells to amygdalin inhibits metastatic spread and is associated with downregulation of α5 and α6 integrins. Therefore, we posit that amygdalin exerts antitumor activity in vitro, and this may be linked to integrin regulation. PMID:26781971

  1. Molecular cloning and characterisation of two kinds of proteins in excretory-secretory products of Trichinella pseudospiralis.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Isao; Wu, Zhiliang; Boonmars, Thidarut; Takahashi, Yuzo

    2004-03-29

    Two genes encoding Trichinella pseudospiralis excretory-secretory proteins related to the Trichinella spiralis glycoproteins were cloned and the excretory-secretory proteins were characterised. A cloned gene, designated Tp38 (Ts43), contained a cDNA transcript of 1035 bp, and the predicted amino acid sequence of the Tp38 (Ts43) pro-protein had a similarity of about 84% to that of the T. spiralis 43 kDa glycoprotein. A cloned gene, designated Tp53 (Ts53), contained a cDNA transcript of 1239 bp, and the predicted amino acid sequence of the Tp53 (Ts53) pro-protein had a similarity of about 68% to that of the T. spiralis 53 kDa glycoprotein. Southern blots indicated that the Tp38 (Ts43) and Tp53 (Ts53) genes were encoded in a single copy within the T. pseudospiralis genome. Western blots showed that T. pseudospiralis-infected sera recognised the Tp53 (Ts53) recombinant protein, but did not recognise the Tp38 (Ts43) recombinant protein. The Tp38 (Ts43) and Tp53 (Ts53) proteins in the excretory-secretory product were 3 and 9 kDa greater than the expected molecular mass, respectively, and had three isoforms with a similar molecular size. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction results showed that the production of the mRNA transcript for the Tp38 (Ts43) or Tp53 (Ts53) gene was restricted predominantly to muscle larvae. Western blots confirmed that the gene products were predominantly expressed by muscle-stage larvae. An immunolocalisation study showed the Tp38 (Ts43) and Tp53 (Ts53) proteins were present within the alpha-stichocyte and the beta-stichocyte of muscle larvae, respectively. PMID:15013739

  2. [Renal colic].

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, J M

    1999-01-01

    The appropriate approach to renal colic, which should be known by the family doctor, is presented. The incidence of this condition in the emergency department of a large general hospital is described as well as the physiopathology of pain, its clinical aspects and the therapeutic attitudes. Renal colic is frequent, it is often possible to diagnose the clinical aspects and general practitioners have the competence for treatment. The use of analgesic drugs, in the correct dosage, is enough to relieve pain and suffering in most of the patients. PMID:10423866

  3. [Renal disease].

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Cuevas, María de Los Ángeles

    2016-09-01

    Chronic renal failure in its various stages, requires certain nutritional restrictions associated with the accumulation of minerals and waste products that cannot be easily eliminated by the kidneys. Some of these restrictions modify the intake of proteins, sodium, and phosphorus. Milk and dairy products are sources of these nutrients. This article aims to inform the reader about the benefits including milk and dairy products relying on a scientific and critical view according to the clinical conditions and the stage of renal disease in which the patient is. PMID:27603894

  4. Renal organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of chronic kidney disease in the absence of new treatment modalities has become a strong driver for innovation in nephrology. An increasing understanding of stem cell biology has kindled the prospects of regenerative options for kidney disease. However, the kidney itself is not a regenerative organ, as all the nephrons are formed during embryonic development. Here, we will investigate advances in the molecular genetics of renal organogenesis, including what this can tell us about lineage relationships, and discuss how this may serve to inform us about both the normal processes of renal repair and options for regenerative therapies. PMID:22198432

  5. Integrity of Narrow Epithelial Tubes in the C. elegans Excretory System Requires a Transient Luminal Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Ayala-Figueroa, Jesus; Parry, Jean M.; Pu, Pu; Hall, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Most epithelial cells secrete a glycoprotein-rich apical extracellular matrix that can have diverse but still poorly understood roles in development and physiology. Zona Pellucida (ZP) domain glycoproteins are common constituents of these matrices, and their loss in humans is associated with a number of diseases. Understanding of the functions, organization and regulation of apical matrices has been hampered by difficulties in imaging them both in vivo and ex vivo. We identified the PAN-Apple, mucin and ZP domain glycoprotein LET-653 as an early and transient apical matrix component that shapes developing epithelia in C. elegans. LET-653 has modest effects on shaping of the vulva and epidermis, but is essential to prevent lumen fragmentation in the very narrow, unicellular excretory duct tube. We were able to image the transient LET-653 matrix by both live confocal imaging and transmission electron microscopy. Structure/function and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching studies revealed that LET-653 exists in two separate luminal matrix pools, a loose fibrillar matrix in the central core of the lumen, to which it binds dynamically via its PAN domains, and an apical-membrane-associated matrix, to which it binds stably via its ZP domain. The PAN domains are both necessary and sufficient to confer a cyclic pattern of duct lumen localization that precedes each molt, while the ZP domain is required for lumen integrity. Ectopic expression of full-length LET-653, but not the PAN domains alone, could expand lumen diameter in the developing gut tube, where LET-653 is not normally expressed. Together, these data support a model in which the PAN domains regulate the ability of the LET-653 ZP domain to interact with other factors at the apical membrane, and this ZP domain interaction promotes expansion and maintenance of lumen diameter. These data identify a transient apical matrix component present prior to cuticle secretion in C. elegans, demonstrate critical roles for

  6. Integrity of Narrow Epithelial Tubes in the C. elegans Excretory System Requires a Transient Luminal Matrix.

    PubMed

    Gill, Hasreet K; Cohen, Jennifer D; Ayala-Figueroa, Jesus; Forman-Rubinsky, Rachel; Poggioli, Corey; Bickard, Kevin; Parry, Jean M; Pu, Pu; Hall, David H; Sundaram, Meera V

    2016-08-01

    Most epithelial cells secrete a glycoprotein-rich apical extracellular matrix that can have diverse but still poorly understood roles in development and physiology. Zona Pellucida (ZP) domain glycoproteins are common constituents of these matrices, and their loss in humans is associated with a number of diseases. Understanding of the functions, organization and regulation of apical matrices has been hampered by difficulties in imaging them both in vivo and ex vivo. We identified the PAN-Apple, mucin and ZP domain glycoprotein LET-653 as an early and transient apical matrix component that shapes developing epithelia in C. elegans. LET-653 has modest effects on shaping of the vulva and epidermis, but is essential to prevent lumen fragmentation in the very narrow, unicellular excretory duct tube. We were able to image the transient LET-653 matrix by both live confocal imaging and transmission electron microscopy. Structure/function and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching studies revealed that LET-653 exists in two separate luminal matrix pools, a loose fibrillar matrix in the central core of the lumen, to which it binds dynamically via its PAN domains, and an apical-membrane-associated matrix, to which it binds stably via its ZP domain. The PAN domains are both necessary and sufficient to confer a cyclic pattern of duct lumen localization that precedes each molt, while the ZP domain is required for lumen integrity. Ectopic expression of full-length LET-653, but not the PAN domains alone, could expand lumen diameter in the developing gut tube, where LET-653 is not normally expressed. Together, these data support a model in which the PAN domains regulate the ability of the LET-653 ZP domain to interact with other factors at the apical membrane, and this ZP domain interaction promotes expansion and maintenance of lumen diameter. These data identify a transient apical matrix component present prior to cuticle secretion in C. elegans, demonstrate critical roles for

  7. Renal dysfunction associated with liver transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, R. M.; Popescu, I.

    1995-01-01

    It has been known for some time that a variety of liver diseases affect kidney function, but renal dysfunction associated with orthotopic liver transplantation has received scant attention. Although the mechanisms mediating these abnormalities are incompletely defined, advances in the understanding of renal pathophysiology after liver transplantation have made it possible to develop new treatment strategies. Aggressive and early intervention to diagnose and treat renal complications associated with liver transplantation should be the goal for transplant centres. PMID:7479462

  8. Renal Calculi

    PubMed Central

    Yendt, E. R.

    1970-01-01

    The pathogenesis of renal calculi is reviewed in general terms followed by the results of investigation of 439 patients with renal calculi studied by the author at Toronto General Hospital over a 13-year period. Abnormalities of probable pathogenetic significance were encountered in 76% of patients. Idiopathic hypercalciuria was encountered in 42% of patients, primary hyperparathyroidism in 11%, urinary infection in 8% and miscellaneous disorders in 8%. The incidence of uric acid stones and cystinuria was 5% and 2% respectively. In the remaining 24% of patients in whom no definite abnormalities were encountered the mean urinary magnesium excretion was less than normal. Of 180 patients with idiopathic hypercalciuria, only 24 were females. In the diagnosis of hyperparathyroidism, the importance of detecting minimal degrees of hypercalcemia is stressed; attention is also drawn to the new observation that the upper limit of normal for serum calcium is slightly lower in females than in males. The efficacy of various measures advocated for the prevention of renal calculi is also reviewed. In the author's experience the administration of thiazides has been particularly effective in the prevention of calcium stones. Thiazides cause a sustained reduction in urinary calcium excretion and increase in urinary magnesium excretion. These agents also appear to affect the skeleton by diminishing bone resorption and slowing down bone turnover. PMID:5438766

  9. Renal Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Zeisberg, Michael; Maeshima, Yohei; Mosterman, Barbara; Kalluri, Raghu

    2002-01-01

    During progression of chronic renal disease, qualitative and quantitative changes in the composition of tubular basement membranes (TBMs) and interstitial matrix occur. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-mediated activation of tubular epithelial cells (TECs) is speculated to be a key contributor to the progression of tubulointerstitial fibrosis. To further understand the pathogenesis associated with renal fibrosis, we developed an in vitro Boyden chamber system using renal basement membranes that partially mimics in vivo conditions of TECs during health and disease. Direct stimulation of TECs with TGF-β1/epithelial growth factor results in an increased migratory capacity across bovine TBM preparations. This is associated with increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) production, namely MMP-2 and MMP-9. Indirect chemotactic stimulation by TGF-β1/EGF or collagen type I was insufficient in inducing migration of untreated TECs across bovine TBM preparation, suggesting that basement membrane integrity and composition play an important role in protecting TECs from interstitial fibrotic stimuli. Additionally, neutralization of MMPs by COL-3 inhibitor dramatically decreases the capacity of TGF-β1-stimulated TECs to migrate through bovine TBM preparation. Collectively, these results demonstrate that basement membrane structure, integrity, and composition play an important role in determining interstitial influences on TECs and subsequent impact on potential aberrant cell-matrix interactions. PMID:12057905

  10. Contribution of the organic anion transporter OAT2 to the renal active tubular secretion of creatinine and mechanism for serum creatinine elevations caused by cobicistat

    PubMed Central

    Lepist, Eve-Irene; Zhang, Xuexiang; Hao, Jia; Huang, Jane; Kosaka, Alan; Birkus, Gabriel; Murray, Bernard P; Bannister, Roy; Cihlar, Tomas; Huang, Yong; Ray, Adrian S

    2014-01-01

    Many xenobiotics including the pharmacoenhancer cobicistat increase serum creatinine by inhibiting its renal active tubular secretion without affecting the glomerular filtration rate. This study aimed to define the transporters involved in creatinine secretion, applying that knowledge to establish the mechanism for xenobiotic-induced effects. The basolateral uptake transporters organic anion transporter OAT2 and organic cation transporters OCT2 and OCT3 were found to transport creatinine. At physiologic creatinine concentrations, the specific activity of OAT2 transport was over twofold higher than OCT2 or OCT3, establishing OAT2 as a likely relevant creatinine transporter and further challenging the traditional view that creatinine is solely transported by a cationic pathway. The apical multidrug and toxin extrusion transporters MATE1 and MATE2-K demonstrated low-affinity and high-capacity transport. All drugs known to affect creatinine inhibited OCT2 and MATE1. Similar to cimetidine and ritonavir, cobicistat had the greatest effect on MATE1 with a 50% inhibition constant of 0.99 μM for creatinine transport. Trimethoprim potently inhibited MATE2-K, whereas dolutegravir preferentially inhibited OCT2. Cimetidine was unique, inhibiting all transporters that interact with creatinine. Thus, the clinical observation of elevated serum creatinine in patients taking cobicistat is likely a result of OCT2 transport, facilitating intracellular accumulation, and MATE1 inhibition. PMID:24646860

  11. Cellular Responses to Mechanical Stress Selected Contribution: A Three-Dimensional Model for Assessment of in Vitro Toxicity in Balaena Mysticetus Renal Tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, T. J.; Coate-Li, L.; Linnehan, R. M.; Hammond, T. G.

    2000-01-01

    This study established two- and three-dimensional renal proximal tubular cell cultures of the endangered species bowhead whale (Balaena mysticetus), developed SV40-transfected cultures, and cloned the 61-amino acid open reading frame for the metallothionein protein, the primary binding site for heavy metal contamination in mammals. Microgravity research, modulations in mechanical culture conditions (modeled microgravity), and shear stress have spawned innovative approaches to understanding the dynamics of cellular interactions, gene expression, and differentiation in several cellular systems. These investigations have led to the creation of ex vivo tissue models capable of serving as physiological research analogs for three-dimensional cellular interactions. These models are enabling studies in immune function, tissue modeling for basic research, and neoplasia. Three-dimensional cellular models emulate aspects of in vivo cellular architecture and physiology and may facilitate environmental toxicological studies aimed at elucidating biological functions and responses at the cellular level. Marine mammals occupy a significant ecological niche (72% of the Earth's surface is water) in terms of the potential for information on bioaccumulation and transport of terrestrial and marine environmental toxins in high-order vertebrates. Few ex vivo models of marine mammal physiology exist in vitro to accomplish the aforementioned studies. Techniques developed in this investigation, based on previous tissue modeling successes, may serve to facilitate similar research in other marine mammals.

  12. [Inhibitory Effect of the Excretory/Scretory Proteins of Trichinella spiralis on Proliferation of Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma HepG2 Cell line].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying-jie; Xu, Jing; Huang, Hong-ying; Xu, Guo-qiang

    2015-08-01

    Human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 Cell line were cultured with different concentrations of excretory/secretory proteins from Trichinella spiralis, and MTT assay was used to evaluate the cell inhibition rate. After co-cultured with 300 µg/ml excretory/secretory proteins for 24 h, the HepG2 cells were observed under a fluorescence microscope with AO and EB staining. When co-cultured with 75 µg/ml excretory/secretory proteins for 24 h, the HepG2 cells were quantified by flow cytometry using Annexin V-FITC/PI stain, and the expression of cleaved-caspase 9 was detected by immunofluorescence assay. The proliferation of HepG2 cells was inhibited significantly by excretory/secretory proteins in a dosage dependant manner. Under fluorescence microscope, some HepG2 cells presented typical apoptotic morphologic changes and the cleaved-caspase 9 protein expression was higher than that of the control. The early and late apoptotic cells and necrotic ones occupied 17.9%, 7.3%, and 6.6%, respectively. PMID:26672230

  13. Proximal renal tubular acidosis

    MedlinePlus

    Renal tubular acidosis - proximal; Type II RTA; RTA - proximal; Renal tubular acidosis type II ... by alkaline substances, mainly bicarbonate. Proximal renal tubular acidosis (Type II RTA) occurs when bicarbonate is not ...

  14. Focus on renal congestion in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Afsar, Baris; Ortiz, Alberto; Covic, Adrian; Solak, Yalcin; Goldsmith, David; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Hospitalizations due to heart failure are increasing steadily despite advances in medicine. Patients hospitalized for worsening heart failure have high mortality in hospital and within the months following discharge. Kidney dysfunction is associated with adverse outcomes in heart failure patients. Recent evidence suggests that both deterioration in kidney function and renal congestion are important prognostic factors in heart failure. Kidney congestion in heart failure results from low cardiac output (forward failure), tubuloglomerular feedback, increased intra-abdominal pressure or increased venous pressure. Regardless of the cause, renal congestion is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in heart failure. The impact on outcomes of renal decongestion strategies that do not compromise renal function should be explored in heart failure. These studies require novel diagnostic markers that identify early renal damage and renal congestion and allow monitoring of treatment responses in order to avoid severe worsening of renal function. In addition, there is an unmet need regarding evidence-based therapeutic management of renal congestion and worsening renal function. In the present review, we summarize the mechanisms, diagnosis, outcomes, prognostic markers and treatment options of renal congestion in heart failure. PMID:26798459

  15. Effect of a 30-day isolation stress on calcium, phosphorus and other excretory products in an unrestrained chimpanzee.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabbot, I. M.; Mcnew, J. J.; Hoshizaki, T.; Sedgwick, C. J.; Adey, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    An unrestrained chimpanzee was studied in an isolation chamber and in his home cage environment. The study consisted of 49 urine collection days (14 days pre-, 5 days post- and 30 days of isolation), and then of 10 days in the home cage. Dietary intake, urine and fecal data were obtained. The effect of isolation on various excretory parameters was studied. Urine samples were analyzed for volume, osmolarity, creatinine, creatine, urea-N, 17-hydroxy corticosteroids, VMA, calcium and inorganic phosphorus. One way analyses of variance performed on the urinary excretion parameters showed all except creatinine excretion to vary significantly during periods of the study. The changes observed in calcium and phosphorus were highly significant. The data suggests that the calcium to phosphorus excretion ratio might serve as a physiological stress indicator of Selye's adaptation syndrome (period of resistance).

  16. Screening and characterization of early diagnostic antigens in excretory-secretory proteins from Trichinella spiralis intestinal infective larvae by immunoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruo Dan; Jiang, Peng; Wen, Hui; Duan, Jiang Yang; Wang, Li Ang; Li, Jie Feng; Liu, Chun Ying; Sun, Ge Ge; Wang, Zhong Quan; Cui, Jing

    2016-02-01

    The excretory-secretory (ES) antigens from Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae are the most commonly used diagnostic antigens for trichinellosis, but specific IgG antibodies were not detected in early stage of infection. The aim of this study was to identify early diagnostic antigens from ES proteins of intestinal infective larvae (IIL), the first invasive stage of T. spiralis. Six bands (92, 52, 45, 35, 32, and 29 kDa) of IIL ES proteins were recognized by infection sera in Western blotting as early as 10 days post infection. Total of 54 T. spiralis proteins in six bands were identified by shotgun LC-MS/MS, 30 proteins were annotated, and 27 had hydrolase activity. Several proteins (serine protease, putative trypsin, deoxyribonuclease II family protein, etc.) could be considered as the potential early diagnostic antigens for trichinellosis. Our study provides new insights for screening early diagnostic antigens from intestinal worms of T. spiralis. PMID:26468148

  17. Segmental aplasia of the uterine horn with ipsilateral renal agenesis in a cat.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jinhwa; Jung, Joo-hyun; Yoon, Junghee; Choi, Min-cheol; Park, Jae Hak; Seo, Kang-Moon; Jeong, Seong Mok

    2008-06-01

    A nine-month-old domestic short haired cat was admitted with the history of acute vomiting, depression and shivering. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed minimum enlargement of the right uterine horn filled with anechoic fluid. On excretory urography, functionally and anatomically normal, enlarged left kidney was found, but right kidney was absent. It was preliminary diagnosed as hydrometra with right renal agenesis. Aiming at the correction of hydrometra, we performed ovariohysterectomy. During spaying, we found a missing segment of distal part of the right uterine horn and absence of ipsilateral kidney and ureter. Compressed uterine structure and segmental aplasia of right uterine horn were found in histopathological investigation. Taken together, it was diagnosed as a segmental aplasia of uterine horn with ipsilateral renal agenesis. PMID:18628611

  18. Renal Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Persu, Alexandre; Renkin, Jean; Thijs, Lutgarde; Staessen, Jan A.

    2013-01-01

    The term “ultima ratio” has multiple, though related, meanings. The motto “ultima ratio regum,” cast on the cannons of the French army of King Louis XIV, meant that war is the last argument of kings, that is, the one to be used after all diplomatic arguments have failed. Along similar lines, we propose that, given the current evidence, renal denervation should be used as a last resort, after state-of-the-art drug treatment optimized at expert centers failed to control blood pressure. PMID:22851728

  19. Proteomics analysis of the excretory/secretory component of the blood-feeding stage of the hookworm, Ancylostoma caninum.

    PubMed

    Mulvenna, Jason; Hamilton, Brett; Nagaraj, Shivashankar H; Smyth, Danielle; Loukas, Alex; Gorman, Jeffrey J

    2009-01-01

    Hookworms are blood-feeding intestinal parasites of mammalian hosts and are one of the major human ailments affecting approximately 600 million people worldwide. These parasites form an intimate association with the host and are able to avoid vigorous immune responses in many ways including skewing of the response phenotype to promote parasite survival and longevity. The primary interface between the parasite and the host is the excretory/secretory component, a complex mixture of proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids secreted from the surface or oral openings of the parasite. The composition of this complex mixture is for the most part unknown but is likely to contain proteins important for the parasitic lifestyle and hence suitable as drug or vaccine targets. Using a strategy combining the traditional technology of one-dimensional SDS-PAGE and the newer fractionation technology of OFFGEL electrophoresis we identified 105 proteins from the excretory/secretory products of the blood-feeding stage of the dog hookworm, Ancylostoma caninum. Highly represented among the identified proteins were lectins, including three C-type lectins and three beta-galactoside-specific S-type galectins, as well as a number of proteases belonging to the three major classes found in nematodes, aspartic, cysteine, and metalloproteases. Interestingly 28% of the identified proteins were homologous to activation-associated secreted proteins, a family of cysteine-rich secreted proteins belonging to the sterol carrier protein/Tpx-1/Ag5/PR-1/Sc-7 (TAPS) superfamily. Thirty-four of these proteins were identified suggesting an important role in host-parasite interactions. Other protein families identified included hyaluronidases, lysozyme-like proteins, and transthyretin-like proteins. This work identified a suite of proteins important for the parasitic lifestyle and provides new insight into the biology of hookworm infection. PMID:18753127

  20. Identification of early diagnostic antigens from major excretory-secretory proteins of Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae using immunoproteomics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The excretory-secretory (ES) proteins of Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae (ML) come mainly from the excretory granules of the stichosome and the cuticles (membrane proteins), are directly exposed to the host’s immune system, and are the main target antigens, which induce the immune responses. Although the ES proteins are the most commonly used diagnostic antigens for trichinellosis, their main disadvantage are the false negative results during the early stage of infection. The aim of this study was to identify early specific diagnostic antigens from the main components of T. spiralis muscle larval ES proteins. Methods Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) combined with Western blot were used to screen the early diagnostic antigens from the main components of T. spiralis muscle larval ES proteins. The protein spots recognized by the sera from BALB/c mice infected with T. spiralis at 18 days post-infection (dpi) were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS and putatively annotated using GO terms obtained from the InterPro databases. Results The ES proteins were analyzed by 2-DE, and more than 33 protein spots were detected with molecular weight varying from 40 to 60 kDa and isoelectric point (pI) from 4 to 7. When probed with the sera from infected mice at 18 dpi, 21 protein spots were recognized and then identified, and they were characterized to correlate with five different proteins of T. spiralis, including two serine proteases, one deoxyribonuclease (DNase) II, and two kinds of trypsin. The five proteins were functionally categorized into molecular function and biological process according to GO hierarchy. Conclusions 2-DE and Western blot combined with MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS were used to screen the diagnostic antigens from the main components of T. spiralis muscle larval ES proteins. The five proteins of T. spiralis identified (two serine proteases, DNase II and two kinds of trypsin) might be the early specific diagnostic antigens of trichinellosis. PMID

  1. Effect of S-nitrosoglutathione on renal mitochondrial function: a new mechanism for reversible regulation of manganese superoxide dismutase activity?

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Naeem K.; Saba, Hamida; MacMillan-Crow, Lee Ann

    2016-01-01

    major highlight of these studies is the fact that dithiothreitol can restore MnSOD activity after GSNO treatment. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing that MnSOD activity can be reversibly regulated in vivo, through a mechanism involving thiol residues. PMID:23246566

  2. Compensatory regeneration as a mechanism for renal tubule carcinogenesis of fumonisin B1 in the F344/N/Nctr BR rat.

    PubMed Central

    Howard, P C; Warbritton, A; Voss, K A; Lorentzen, R J; Thurman, J D; Kovach, R M; Bucci, T J

    2001-01-01

    Fumonisin B1(FB1) is a fungal metabolite of Fusarium verticillioides (= F. moniliforme), a fungus that grows on many crops worldwide. Previous studies demonstrated that male BD IX rats consuming diets containing 50 ppm fumonisin B1 developed hepatocellular carcinomas. In our recent studies, diets containing FB1 at 50 ppm or higher concentrations induced renal tubule carcinomas in male F344/N/Nctr BR rats and hepatocellular carcinomas in female B6C3F1/Nctr BR mice. The carcinogenicity of FB1 in rats and mice is not due to DNA damage, as several laboratories have demonstrated that FB1 is not a genotoxin. FB1 induces apoptosis in cells in vitro. Including FB1 in the diets of rats results in increased hepatocellular and renal tubule epithelial cell apoptosis. In studies with F344/N/Nctr BR rats consuming diets containing up to 484 ppm FB1 for 28 days, female rats demonstrated more sensitivity than male rats in the induction of hepatocellular apoptosis and mitosis. Conversely, induction of renal tubule apoptosis and regeneration were more pronounced in male than in female rats. Induction of renal tubule apoptosis and hyperplasia correlated with the incidence of renal tubule carcinomas that developed in the 2-year feeding study with FB1 in the F344/N/Nctr BR rats. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that the induction of renal tubule carcinomas in male rats could be partly due to the continuous compensatory regeneration of renal tubule epithelial cells in response to the induction of apoptosis by fumonisin B1. PMID:11359700

  3. Production and Actions of the Anandamide Metabolite Prostamide E2 in the Renal Medulla

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cao; Xia, Min; Poklis, Justin L.; Lichtman, Aron H.; Abdullah, Rehab A.; Dewey, William L.; Li, Pin-Lan

    2012-01-01

    Medullipin has been proposed to be an antihypertensive lipid hormone released from the renal medulla in response to increased arterial pressure and renal medullary blood flow. Because anandamide (AEA) possesses characteristics of this purported hormone, the present study tested the hypothesis that AEA or one of its metabolites represents medullipin. AEA was demonstrated to be enriched in the kidney medulla compared with cortex. Western blotting and enzymatic analyses of renal cortical and medullary microsomes revealed opposite patterns of enrichment of two AEA-metabolizing enzymes, with fatty acid amide hydrolase higher in the renal cortex and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) higher in the renal medulla. In COX-2 reactions with renal medullary microsomes, prostamide E2, the ethanolamide of prostaglandin E2, was the major product detected. Intramedullarily infused AEA dose-dependently increased urine volume and sodium and potassium excretion (15–60 nmol/kg/min) but had little effect on mean arterial pressure (MAP). The renal excretory effects of AEA were blocked by intravenous infusion of celecoxib (0.1 μg/kg/min), a selective COX-2 inhibitor, suggesting the involvement of a prostamide intermediate. Plasma kinetic analysis revealed longer elimination half-lives for AEA and prostamide E2 compared with prostaglandin E2. Intravenous prostamide E2 reduced MAP and increased renal blood flow (RBF), actions opposite to those of angiotensin II. Coinfusion of prostamide E2 inhibited angiotensin II effects on MAP and RBF. These results suggest that AEA and/or its prostamide metabolites in the renal medulla may represent medullipin and function as a regulator of body fluid and MAP. PMID:22685343

  4. Hypermagnesemia and progression of renal failure associated with renacidin therapy.

    PubMed

    Wilson, C; Azmy, A F; Beattie, T J; Murphy, A V

    1986-05-01

    Renacidin is a urinary stone dissolving agent composed primarily of gluconic and citric acids and their magnesium salts, buffered to a pH of 4. We describe its use in a child with oxalosis, disabling renal colic and deteriorating renal function in whom its use was associated with hypermagnesemia and rapid progression of the renal failure. Possible mechanisms for the deterioration in renal function are discussed. PMID:3720036

  5. [Renal physiology].

    PubMed

    Gueutin, Victor; Deray, Gilbert; Isnard-Bagnis, Corinne

    2012-03-01

    The kidneys are responsible for the urinary excretion of uremic toxins and the regulation of several body systems such as intra and extracellular volume status, acid-base status, calcium and phosphate metabolism or erythropoiesis. They adapt quantitative and qualitative composition of the urine to keep these systems in balance. The flow of plasma is filtered in the range of 120 mL/min, and depends on the systemic and renal hemodynamics which is subject to self-regulation. The original urine will then be modified in successive segments of the nephron. The proximal nephron is to lead the massive reabsorption of water and essential elements such as sodium, bicarbonates, amino-acids and glucose. The distal nephron includes the distal convoluted tubule, the connector tube and the collecting duct. Its role is to adapt the quality composition of urine to the needs of the body. PMID:22157516

  6. Cystic dysplasia of the epididymis: a disorder of mesonephric differentiation associated with renal maldevelopment.

    PubMed

    Nistal, Manuel; González-Peramato, Pilar; Sousa, Grevelyn; García-Cabezas, Miguel Angel; Rodríguez, José Ignacio; Cajaiba, Mariana M

    2010-06-01

    The occurrence of congenital epididymal malformations with a cystic component has not been fully characterized. Most epididymal cysts occur later in life and are likely acquired. In addition, congenital malformations of the male excretory system are extremely uncommon in fetuses and neonates, and epididymal dysplastic changes have not been reported in these cases. In this study, we report 20 cases (including 19 fetal/neonatal autopsies and one surgical specimen from an older child) showing the same spectrum of histological findings in the epididymis, characterized by cystic ductal dilation with dysplastic ducts of variable diameters and irregular shapes, with ill-defined walls. Efferent ductules also showed dysplastic features. In addition, 18 cases had either renal and/or urinary tract anomalies, including renal dysplasia (eight), pelvicaliceal dilation (eight), renal agenesis (four) and hypoplasia (one), ureteral agenesis (two) and hypoplasia (one), urethra and bladder agenesis (two), prostate agenesis (two), and autosomal recessive polycystic renal disease (two). Our observations led to the recognition of a peculiar, not previously described congenital lesion of the epididymis, and we propose the term cystic dysplasia of the epididymis for this anomaly. Similar to what is observed in other male genital system anomalies (including malformations of the rete testis, vas deferens, and seminal vesicles), most lesions occurred in association with renal and/or urinary tract malformations, suggesting a spectrum of congenital malformations. The shared embryological origin of these structures may explain their simultaneous occurrence, possibly related to disrupted mesonephric duct development. PMID:20361206

  7. Epigenetics mechanisms in renal development.

    PubMed

    Hilliard, Sylvia A; El-Dahr, Samir S

    2016-07-01

    Appreciation for the role of epigenetic modifications in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases is fast gaining attention. Treatment of chronic kidney disease stemming from diabetes or hypertension as well as Wilms tumor will all profit from knowledge of the changes in the epigenomic landscapes. To do so, it is essential to characterize the epigenomic modifiers and their modifications under normal physiological conditions. The transcription factor Pax2 was identified as a major epigenetic player in the early specification of the kidney. Notably, the progenitors of all nephrons that reside in the cap mesenchyme display a unique bivalent histone signature (expressing repressive epigenetic marks alongside activation marks) on lineage-specific genes. These cells are deemed poised for differentiation and commitment to the nephrogenic lineage. In response to the appropriate inducing signal, these genes lose their repressive histone marks, which allow for their expression in nascent nephron precursors. Such knowledge of the epigenetic landscape and the resultant cell fate or behavior in the developing kidney will greatly improve the overall success in designing regenerative strategies and tissue reprogramming methodologies from pluripotent cells. PMID:26493068

  8. Compensatory biliary and urinary excretion of gadobenate ion after administration of gadobenate dimeglumine (MultiHance®) in cases of impaired hepatic or renal function: a mechanism that may aid in the prevention of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis?

    PubMed Central

    Lorusso, V; Pirovano, G

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether increased elimination of gadobenate ion via the hepatobiliary pathway might compensate for reduced/absent elimination via the urinary pathway in the event of compromised renal function, as a possible protective mechanism against nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF). Methods: 15 male Crl:CD® R(SD)Br rats (Charles River Italia, Como, Italy) randomized to three treatment groups: (1) animals with occluded bile ducts, (2) animals with occluded renal vessels and (3) control animals, each received 0.25 mmol kg−1 of bodyweight of gadobenate dimeglumine (MultiHance®; Bracco Imaging SpA, Milan, Italy). Urine and bile were collected from 0−30, 30−60, 60−120, 120−240 and 240−480 min after gadobenate dimeglumine administration prior to exsanguination. Determinations of gadobenate ion in blood, bile and urine were performed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Gadolinium (Gd3+) levels in excised liver and kidneys were determined by X-ray fluorescence. Results: The recovery of gadobenate ion in the urine of rats with bile duct occlusion was significantly higher than that in the urine of normal rats (89.1 ± 4.2% vs 60.6 ± 2.8%; p < 0.0001). Conversely, mean recovery in the bile of rats with renal vessel occlusion was significantly higher than that in the bile of normal rats (96.16 ± 0.55% vs 33.5 ± 4.7%; p < 0.0001). Gadobenate ion was not quantifiable in any group 8 h post-injection. Conclusion: Compensatory elimination may be an effective means to overcome compromised renal or hepatobiliary elimination. Advances in knowledge: The absence of NSF in at-risk patients administered with gadobenate dimeglumine may in part reflect greater Gd3+ elimination via the hepatobiliary route. PMID:25651409

  9. Inherited renal cystic diseases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bohyun; King, Bernard F; Vrtiska, Terri J; Irazabal, Maria V; Torres, Vicente E; Harris, Peter C

    2016-06-01

    A number of inherited renal diseases present with renal cysts and often lead to end-stage renal disease. With recent advances in genetics, increasing number of genes and mutations have been associated with cystic renal diseases. Although genetic testing can provide a definite diagnosis, it is often reserved for equivocal cases or for ongoing investigational research. Therefore, imaging findings are essential in the routine diagnosis, follow-up, and detection of complications in patients with inherited cystic renal diseases. In this article, the most recent classification, genetic analysis, clinical presentations, and imaging findings of inherited cystic renal diseases will be discussed. PMID:27167233

  10. iTRAQ-based comparative proteomic analysis of excretory-secretory proteins of schistosomula and adult worms of Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaodan; Fu, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Min; Han, Yanhui; Han, Hongxiao; Han, Qian; Lu, Ke; Hong, Yang; Lin, Jiaojiao

    2016-04-14

    Schistosomiasis remains a serious public health problem with 200 million people infected and 779 million people at risk worldwide. The schistosomulum and adult worm are two stages of the complex lifecycle of Schistosoma japonicum and excretory/secretory proteins (ESPs) play a major role in host-parasite interactions. In this study, iTRAQ-coupled LC-MS/MS was used to investigate the proteome of ESPs obtained from schistosomula and adult worms of S. japonicum, and 298 differential ESPs were identified. Bioinformatics analysis of differential ESPs in the two developmental stages showed that 161 ESPs upregulated in schistosomula were associated with stress responses, carbohydrate metabolism and protein degradation, whereas ESPs upregulated in adult worms were mainly related to immunoregulation and purine metabolism. Recombinant heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and thioredoxin peroxidase (TPx), two differential proteins identified in this study, were expressed. Further studies showed that rSjHSP70 and rSjTPx stimulated macrophages expressing high levels of the anti-inflammatory factors TGF-β, IL-10 and Arg-1, and suppressed the expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and iNOS in LPS-induced macrophages. This study provides new insights into the survival and development of schistosomes in the final host and helps identify vaccine candidates or new diagnostic reagents for schistosomiasis. PMID:26915583

  11. MICROANATOMY, ULTRASTRUCTURE, AND SYSTEMATIC SIGNIFICANCE OF THE EXCRETORY SYSTEM AND MANTLE CAVITY OF AN ACOCHLIDIAN GASTROPOD (OPISTHOBRANCHIA).

    PubMed

    Fahrner, A.; Haszprunar, G.

    2002-05-01

    The microanatomy and ultrastructure of the excretory system of an undescribed mesopsammic gastropod of the genus Hedylopsis have been examined by means of semithin serial sections, reconstructions, and transmission electron microscopy. The functional metanephridial system comprises a monotocardian heart with a single ventricle and auricle in a spacious pericardium as well as a single, large kidney. Podocytes in the auricular epicardium represent the site of ultrafiltration and formation of the primary urine, whereas the flat epithelium of the kidney with extensive basal infoldings, large vacuoles and the apical microvillous border indicates modification of the primary filtrate. Solitary rhogocytes (pore cells) represent additional loci of ultrafiltration with an identical fine-structure as those of the podocytes (meandering slits with diaphragms covered by extracellular matrix). The presence of podocytes situated in the epicardial wall of the auricle is regarded as plesiomorphic for the Opisthobranchia and is confirmed for the Acochlidia for the first time. Kidney and rectum both open into a small, yet distinct mantle cavity. Within the Acochlidia this condition represents a plesiomorphic character only known from one further Hedylopsis species until now. Special cells (here termed microvillous pit-cells) with a presumed absorptive function are interspersed between the epithelial cells of the mantle cavity. They are mainly characterized by a prominent invagination of the apical border with densely arranged, very large microvilli. The presence of a mantle cavity that has been lost in all other acochlidian genera supports the systematic placement of the Hedylopsidae at the base of the Achochlidia. PMID:12011235

  12. Identification of excretory-secretory products of larval and adult Ostertagia ostertagi by immunoscreening of cDNA libraries.

    PubMed

    Vercauteren, Isabel; Geldhof, Peter; Peelaers, Iris; Claerebout, Edwin; Berx, Geert; Vercruysse, Jozef

    2003-02-01

    Excretory-secretory (ES) products of Ostertagia ostertagi, an abomasal nematode of cattle, are considered to be important for the development and survival of the parasite within the host. To gain insight in the composition of these ES products of both larval (L3, L4) and adult life stages of Ostertagia cDNA libraries of the parasite were immunoscreened with polyclonal rabbit serum raised against these ES products. This approach led to the identification of 41 proteins, amongst which are structural proteins such as actin, kinesin and vitellogenin, housekeeping proteins such as those involved in protein folding, different metabolic pathways or mitochondrial functioning and proteins associated with stress (heat shock protein) or antioxidantia (thioredoxin peroxidase). A large number of the isolated proteins were similar to hypothetical proteins of the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Because somatic proteins can be non-specifically released during in vitro culturing as nematodes deteriorate, it was checked if the isolated proteins are genuinely secreted. The amino acid sequences of the translated cDNAs were investigated for signal peptides and monospecific antibodies against the isolated proteins were purified and used to develop Western blots of ES and somatic extracts. In this manner it could be proven that 15 cDNAs code for genuine secreted proteins. The identification of these ES antigens allows to select proteins with potential protective capacities, which are targets for vaccine development. PMID:12615319

  13. Genome analysis of Excretory/Secretory proteins in Taenia solium reveals their Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR).

    PubMed

    Gomez, Sandra; Adalid-Peralta, Laura; Palafox-Fonseca, Hector; Cantu-Robles, Vito Adrian; Soberón, Xavier; Sciutto, Edda; Fragoso, Gladis; Bobes, Raúl J; Laclette, Juan P; Yauner, Luis del Pozo; Ochoa-Leyva, Adrián

    2015-01-01

    Excretory/Secretory (ES) proteins play an important role in the host-parasite interactions. Experimental identification of ES proteins is time-consuming and expensive. Alternative bioinformatics approaches are cost-effective and can be used to prioritize the experimental analysis of therapeutic targets for parasitic diseases. Here we predicted and functionally annotated the ES proteins in T. solium genome using an integration of bioinformatics tools. Additionally, we developed a novel measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of T. solium secretome using sequence length and number of antigenic regions of ES proteins. This measurement was formalized as the Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR) value. AAR value for secretome showed a similar value to that obtained for a set of experimentally determined antigenic proteins and was different to the calculated value for the non-ES proteins of T. solium genome. Furthermore, we calculated the AAR values for known helminth secretomes and they were similar to that obtained for T. solium. The results reveal the utility of AAR value as a novel genomic measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of secretomes. This comprehensive analysis of T. solium secretome provides functional information for future experimental studies, including the identification of novel ES proteins of therapeutic, diagnosis and immunological interest. PMID:25989346

  14. Immunomodulatory effects of adult Haemonchus contortus excretory/secretory products on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Z U; Knight, J S; Koolaard, J; Simpson, H V; Pernthaner, A

    2015-12-01

    The levels of expression of surface molecules and release of cytokines and chemokines of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells were determined after their exposure to adult H. contortus excretory/secretory (ES) products or a combination of ES products and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Worm products provoked a weak response and only partial maturation of the dendritic cells, consistent with the hyporesponsiveness and more tolerogenic immune environment present in parasitized animals and humans. Co-stimulation with LPS demonstrated that H. contortus secretions, like those of other helminths, contain immunomodulators capable of reducing some aspects of the strong T(H)1/T(H)2 response evoked by bacterial LPS. There were significant reductions in the release of some cytokine/chemokines by LPS-stimulated mdDCs and a trend (although not significant at P < 0.05) for reduced expression levels of CD40, CD80 and HLA-DR. A prominent feature was the variability in responses of dendritic cells from the four donors, even on different days in repeat experiments, suggesting that generalized conclusions may be difficult to make, except in genetically related animals. Such observations may therefore be applicable only to restricted populations. In addition, previous exposure to parasites in a target population for immunomodulatory therapy may be an important factor in assessing the likelihood of adverse reactions or failures in the treatment to worm therapy. PMID:26457886

  15. Molecular cloning and characterization of an Rcd1-like protein in excretory-secretory products of Trichinella pseudospiralis.

    PubMed

    Nagano, I; Wu, Z; Takahashi, Y

    2006-12-01

    A cDNA library was constructed from muscle larvae of Trichinella pseudospiralis. A cDNA clone, designated as Tp8 contained a cDNA transcript of 1326 bp length with a single open reading frame, which encoded 303 amino acid residues (34,187 Da, estimated molecular mass). The predicted amino acid sequence of the clone had an identity of approximately 60% to the Rcd1 (Required cell differentiation 1) -like proteins among a wide range of organisms. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction results showed that the transcription level of Tp8 gene reached the highest value in adult worms, and that the transcription level in muscle larvae before stichosome formation was higher than in muscle larvae after stichosome formation. The recombinant Tp8 protein migrated at 37 kDa and reacted to antibody against T. pseudospiralis excretory-secretory (E-S) products and sera from mice infected with T. pseudospiralis. An antibody against the Tp8 recombinant protein could stain proteins migrating at approximately 34 kDa (which is the expected size from the sequence) on Western blotting of E-S products from muscle larvae. An immunocytochemical study showed that the Tp8 protein was present within the stichocyte of muscle larvae and adults worms. PMID:16899141

  16. Genome analysis of Excretory/Secretory proteins in Taenia solium reveals their Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR)

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Sandra; Adalid-Peralta, Laura; Palafox-Fonseca, Hector; Cantu-Robles, Vito Adrian; Soberón, Xavier; Sciutto, Edda; Fragoso, Gladis; Bobes, Raúl J.; Laclette, Juan P.; Yauner, Luis del Pozo; Ochoa-Leyva, Adrián

    2015-01-01

    Excretory/Secretory (ES) proteins play an important role in the host-parasite interactions. Experimental identification of ES proteins is time-consuming and expensive. Alternative bioinformatics approaches are cost-effective and can be used to prioritize the experimental analysis of therapeutic targets for parasitic diseases. Here we predicted and functionally annotated the ES proteins in T. solium genome using an integration of bioinformatics tools. Additionally, we developed a novel measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of T. solium secretome using sequence length and number of antigenic regions of ES proteins. This measurement was formalized as the Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR) value. AAR value for secretome showed a similar value to that obtained for a set of experimentally determined antigenic proteins and was different to the calculated value for the non-ES proteins of T. solium genome. Furthermore, we calculated the AAR values for known helminth secretomes and they were similar to that obtained for T. solium. The results reveal the utility of AAR value as a novel genomic measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of secretomes. This comprehensive analysis of T. solium secretome provides functional information for future experimental studies, including the identification of novel ES proteins of therapeutic, diagnosis and immunological interest. PMID:25989346

  17. A Review on Renal Toxicity Profile of Common Abusive Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Varun Parkash; Singh, Nirmal

    2013-01-01

    Drug abuse has become a major social problem of the modern world and majority of these abusive drugs or their metabolites are excreted through the kidneys and, thus, the renal complications of these drugs are very common. Morphine, heroin, cocaine, nicotine and alcohol are the most commonly abused drugs, and their use is associated with various types of renal toxicity. The renal complications include a wide range of glomerular, interstitial and vascular diseases leading to acute or chronic renal failure. The present review discusses the renal toxicity profile and possible mechanisms of commonly abused drugs including morphine, heroin, cocaine, nicotine, caffeine and alcohol. PMID:23946695

  18. [Regulative mechanism of renal inflammatory-related p38MAPK signaling pathway in diabetic nephropathy and interventional effects of Chinese herbal medicine].

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao-Li; Wan, Yi-Gang; Zhao, Qing; Huang, Yan-Ru; Shi, Xi-Miao; Meng, Xian-Jie; Yao, Jian

    2013-07-01

    It is reported, in the process of diabetic nephropathy (DN), inflammatory-related p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway has a close relationship with renal injury. On the one hand,many factors in the upstream including hyperglycemia, abnormal hemodynamics, oxidative stress, and pro-inflammatory cytokines could activate p38MAPK signaling pathway. On the other hand,the activated p38MAPK signaling pathway could lead to renal damage via activating inflammatory cells, inducing the expression of inflammatory mediators, and intervening cytokines production. CHM could intervene p38MAPK signaling pathway through multi-ways, including inhibiting inflammatory cytokines expression, regulating phosphorylated p38MAPK (p-p38MAPK) expression, and reducing fibrogenic factors expression. PMID:24199552

  19. Renal vein thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the kidneys. Possible Complications Complications may include: Acute renal failure (especially if thrombosis occurs in a dehydrated child) ... Saunders; 2012:chap 34. Read More Acute kidney failure Arteriogram Blood ... embolus Renal Tumor Update Date 5/19/2015 Updated by: ...

  20. Renal papillary necrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... your provider. Alternative Names Necrosis - renal papillae; Renal medullary necrosis Images Kidney anatomy Kidney - blood and urine flow References Ruggenenti P, Cravedi P, Remuzzi G. Microvascular and macrovascular diseases of the kidney. In: Taal MW, Chertow GM, ...

  1. Kidney (Renal) Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... renal function using ureteral stenting, nephrostomy, surgery or dialysis. What is kidney (renal) failure? How is kidney ... as a urinary stent or kidney stone removal. Dialysis , including hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis: These procedures remove ...

  2. Renal papillary necrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... renal papillary necrosis, especially after taking over-the-counter pain medicines ... diabetes or sickle cell anemia may reduce your risk. To prevent renal ... over-the-counter pain relievers. Do not take more than the ...

  3. Renal tubular secretion of pramipexole.

    PubMed

    Knop, Jana; Hoier, Eva; Ebner, Thomas; Fromm, Martin F; Müller, Fabian

    2015-11-15

    The dopamine agonist pramipexole is cleared predominantly by the kidney with a major contribution of active renal secretion. Previously the organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2) was shown to be involved in the uptake of pramipexole by renal tubular cells, while the mechanism underlying efflux into tubular lumen remains unclear. Cimetidine, a potent inhibitor of multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins 1 (MATE1) and 2-K (MATE2-K), decreases renal pramipexole clearance in humans. We hypothesized that, in addition to OCT2, pramipexole may be a substrate of MATE-mediated transport. Pramipexole uptake was investigated using MDCK or HEK cells overexpressing OCT2, MATE1 or MATE2-K and the respective vector controls (Co). Transcellular pramipexole transport was investigated in MDCK cells single- or double-transfected with OCT2 and/or MATE1 and in Co cells, separating a basal from an apical compartment in a model for renal tubular secretion. Pramipexole uptake was 1.6-, 1.1-, or 1.6-folds in cells overexpressing OCT2, MATE1 or MATE2-K, respectively as compared to Co cells (p<0.05). In transcellular transport experiments, intracellular pramipexole accumulation was 1.7-folds in MDCK-OCT2 (p<0.001), and transcellular pramipexole transport was 2.2- and 4.0-folds in MDCK-MATE1 and MDCK-OCT2-MATE1 cells as compared to Co cells (p<0.001). Transcellular pramipexole transport was pH dependent and inhibited by cimetidine with IC50 values of 12μM and 5.5μM in MATE1 and OCT2-MATE1 cells, respectively. Taken together, coordinate activity of OCT2-mediated uptake and MATE-mediated efflux determines pramipexole renal secretion. Reduced OCT2 or MATE transport activity due to genetic variation or drug-drug interactions may affect pramipexole renal secretion. PMID:26360835

  4. Cardio-renal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gnanaraj, Joseph; Radhakrishnan, Jai

    2016-01-01

    Cardio-renal syndrome is a commonly encountered problem in clinical practice. Its pathogenesis is not fully understood. The purpose of this article is to highlight the interaction between the cardiovascular system and the renal system and how their interaction results in the complex syndrome of cardio-renal dysfunction. Additionally, we outline the available therapeutic strategies to manage this complex syndrome.

  5. Vampire bat, shrew, and bear: comparative physiology and chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Singer, Michael A

    2002-06-01

    In the typical mammal, energy flux, protein metabolism, and renal excretory processes constitute a set of closely linked and quantitatively matched functions. However, this matching has limits, and these limits become apparent when animals adapt to unusual circumstances. The vampire bat and shrew have an extremely high protein intake, and the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is not commensurate with the large urea load to be excreted. The vampire bat is chronically azotemic (blood urea concentration 27-57 mmol/l); yet there is no information as to how this animal has adjusted to such an azotemic internal environment. A high protein intake should also lead to chronic glomerular hyperfiltration; yet neither animal appears to develop progressive renal failure. The American black bear, on the other hand, has adapted to a prolonged period without intake or urine output. Despite continued amino acid catabolism with urea production, this mammal is able to completely salvage and reutilize urea nitrogen for protein synthesis, although the signals that initiate this metabolic adaptation are not known. The vampire bat, shrew, and bear are natural models adapted to circumstances analogous to chronic renal failure. Unraveling these adaptations could lead to new interventions for the prevention/treatment of chronic renal failure. PMID:12010738

  6. Renal Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Tao; Guo, Jin-he; Teng, Gao-jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a group of metabolic diseases of multiple etiologies. Although great progress has been made, researchers are still working on the pathogenesis of T2DM and how to best use the treatments available. Aside from several novel pharmacological approaches, catheter-based sympathetic renal denervation (RDN) has gained a significant role in resistant hypertension, as well as improvements in glycemic control in T2DM. In this article, we will summarize herein the role sympathetic activation plays in the progression of T2DM and review the recent clinical RDN experience in glucose metabolism. We performed systematic review in online databases, including PubMed, EmBase, and Web of Science, from inception until 2015. Studies were included if a statistical relationship was investigated between RDN and T2DM. The quality of each included study was assessed by Newcastle–Ottawa scale score. To synthesize these studies, a random-effects model or a fixed-effects model was applied as appropriate. Then, we calculated heterogeneity, performed sensitivity analysis, tested publication bias, and did meta-regression analysis. Finally, we identified 4 eligible articles. In most studies, RDN achieved via novel catheter-based approach using radiofrequency energy has gained a significant role in resistant hypertension, as well as improvements in glycemic control in T2DM. But the DREAMS-Study showed that RDN did not change median insulin sensitivity nor systemic sympathetic activity. Firstly, the current published studies lacked a proper control group, along with the sample capacity was small. Also, data obtained in the subgroups of diabetic patients were not separately analyzed and the follow-up period was very short. In addition, a reduction in blood pressure accounts for the improvements in glucose metabolism and insulin resistance cannot be excluded. If the favorable result of better glucose metabolism is confirmed in large-scale, randomized studies

  7. [Pain therapy in acute renal colic.].

    PubMed

    Tschuschke, C; Müller, S C; Hertle, L

    1993-09-01

    The severe pain of a renal colic is an emergency and requires a fast and sufficient analgesic therapy with few side-effects. The release of the ureteral obstruction is secondary to this initial treatment. Inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis directly interferes with the mechanism of renal colic pain. Dipyrone, indomethacin and diclofenac are the drugs of choice. They should be administered intravenously if possible. Narcotic agents and their derivatives are the second choice. Spasmolytic agents are unnecessary in the treatment of renal colic. PMID:18415401

  8. Distal Renal Tubular Acidosis and Calcium Nephrolithiasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moe, Orson W.; Fuster, Daniel G.; Xie, Xiao-Song

    2008-09-01

    Calcium stones are commonly encountered in patients with congenital distal renal tubular acidosis, a disease of renal acidification caused by mutations in either the vacuolar H+-ATPase (B1 or a4 subunit), anion exchanger-1, or carbonic anhydrase II. Based on the existing database, we present two hypotheses. First, heterozygotes with mutations in B1 subunit of H+-ATPase are not normal but may harbor biochemical abnormalities such as renal acidification defects, hypercalciuria, and hypocitraturia which can predispose them to kidney stone formation. Second, we propose at least two mechanisms by which mutant B1 subunit can impair H+-ATPase: defective pump assembly and defective pump activity.

  9. Identification and characterization of an immunogenic antigen, enolase 2, among excretory/secretory antigens (ESA) of Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Xue, Jun-Xin; Liu, Ying-Chun; Li, Tao; Han, Xian-Gan; Wang, Shao-Hui; Chen, Yong-Jun; Qi, Jingjing; Yu, Sheng-Qing; Wang, Quan

    2016-11-01

    An immunogenic protein, enolase 2, was identified among the secreted excretory/secretory antigens (ESAs) from Toxoplasma gondii strain RH using immunoproteomics based on matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Enolase 2 was cloned, sequenced, and heterologously expressed. BLAST analysis revealed 75-96% similarity with enolases from other parasites. Immunoblotting demonstrated good immunoreactivity of recombinant T. gondii enolase (Tg-enolase 2) to T. gondii-infected animal serum. Purified Tg-enolase 2 was found to catalyze dehydration of 2-phospho-d-glycerate to phosphoenolpyruvate. In vitro studies revealed maximal activity at pH 7.5 and 37 °C, and activity was inhibited by K(+), Ni(2+), Al(3+), Na(+), Cu(2+) and Cr(3+). A monoclonal antibody against Tg-enolase 2 was prepared, 1D6, with the isotype IgG2a/κ. Western blotting revealed that 1D6 reacts with Tg-enolase 2 and native enolase 2, present among T. gondii ESAs. The indirect immunofluorescence assays showed that enolase 2 could be specifically detected on the growing T. gondii tachyzoites. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed the surface and intracellular locations of enolase 2 on T. gondii cells. In conclusion, our results clearly show that the enzymatic activity of T. gondii enolase 2 is ion dependent and that it could be influenced by environmental factors. We also provide evidence that enolase 2 is an important immunogenic protein of ESAs from T. gondii and that it is a surface-exposed protein with strong antigenicity and immunogenicity. Our findings indicate that enolase 2 could play important roles in metabolism, immunogenicity and pathogenicity and that it may serve as a novel drug target and candidate vaccine against T. gondii infection. PMID:27450536

  10. Characterization of the DMAE-modified juvenile excretory-secretory protein Juv-p120 of Litomosoides sigmodontis.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Ulrike; Hirzmann, Jörg; Hintz, Martin; Beck, Ewald; Geyer, Rudolf; Hobom, Gerd; Taubert, Anja; Zahner, Horst

    2011-04-01

    Juv-p120 is an excretory-secretory 160 kDa glycoprotein of juvenile female Litomosoides sigmodontis and exhibits features typical for mucins. 50% of its molecular mass is attributed to posttranslational modifications with the unusual substituent dimethylaminoethanol (DMAE). By that Juv-p120 corresponds to the surface proteins of the microfilarial sheath, Shp3 and Shp3a. The secreted protein consists of 697 amino acids, organized in two different domains of repeat elements separated by a stretch of polar residues. The N-terminal domain shows fourteen P/S/T/F-rich repeat elements highly modified with phospho-DMAE substituted O-glycans confering a negative charge to the protein. The C-terminal domain is extremely rich in glutamine (35%) and leucine (25%) in less organized repeats and may play a role in oligomerization of Juv-p120 monomers. A protein family with a similar Q/L-rich region and conserved core promoter region was identified in Brugia malayi by homology screening and in Wuchereria bancrofti and Loa loa by database similarity search. One of the Q/L-rich proteins in each genus has an extended S/T-rich region and due to this feature is supposed to be a putative Juv-p120 ortholog. The corresponding modification of Juv-p120 and the microfilarial sheath surface antigens Shp3/3a explains the appearance of anti-sheath antibodies before the release of microfilariae. The function of Juv-p120 is unknown. PMID:21241743

  11. Transcriptome Profiles of the Protoscoleces of Echinococcus granulosus Reveal that Excretory-Secretory Products Are Essential to Metabolic Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Wei; Shen, Yujuan; Han, Xiuming; Wang, Ying; Liu, Hua; Jiang, Yanyan; Zhang, Yumei; Wang, Yanjuan; Xu, Yuxin; Cao, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Background Cystic hydatid disease (CHD) is caused by the larval stages of the cestode and affects humans and domestic animals worldwide. Protoscoleces (PSCs) are one component of the larval stages that can interact with both definitive and intermediate hosts. Previous genomic and transcriptomic data have provided an overall snapshot of the genomics of the growth and development of this parasite. However, our understanding of how PSCs subvert the immune response of hosts and maintains metabolic adaptation remains unclear. In this study, we used Roche 454 sequencing technology and in silico secretome analysis to explore the transcriptome profiles of the PSCs from E. granulosus and elucidate the potential functions of the excretory-secretory proteins (ESPs) released by the parasite. Methodology/Principal Findings A large number of nonredundant sequences as unigenes were generated (26,514), of which 22,910 (86.4%) were mapped to the newly published E. granulosus genome and 17,705 (66.8%) were distributed within the coding sequence (CDS) regions. Of the 2,280 ESPs predicted from the transcriptome, 138 ESPs were inferred to be involved in the metabolism of carbohydrates, while 124 ESPs were inferred to be involved in the metabolism of protein. Eleven ESPs were identified as intracellular enzymes that regulate glycolysis/gluconeogenesis (GL/GN) pathways, while a further 44 antigenic proteins, 25 molecular chaperones and four proteases were highly represented. Many proteins were also found to be significantly enriched in development-related signaling pathways, such as the TGF-β receptor pathways and insulin pathways. Conclusions/Significance This study provides valuable information on the metabolic adaptation of parasites to their hosts that can be used to aid the development of novel intervention targets for hydatid treatment and control. PMID:25500817

  12. New diagnostic antigens for early trichinellosis: the excretory-secretory antigens of Trichinella spiralis intestinal infective larvae.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ge Ge; Liu, Ruo Dan; Wang, Zhong Quan; Jiang, Peng; Wang, Li; Liu, Xiao Lin; Liu, Chun Yin; Zhang, Xi; Cui, Jing

    2015-12-01

    The excretory-secretory (ES) antigens from Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae (ML) are the most commonly used diagnostic antigens for trichinellosis, but anti-Trichinella IgG antibodies cannot be detected until 2-3 weeks after infection; there is an obvious window period between Trichinella infection and antibody positivity. Intestinal infective larvae (IIL) are the first invasive stage during Trichinella infection, and their ES antigens are firstly exposed to the immune system and might be the early diagnostic markers of trichinellosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the early diagnostic values of IIL ES antigens for trichinellosis. The IIL were collected from intestines of infected mice at 6 h postinfection (hpi), and IIL ES antigens were prepared by incubation for 18 h. Anti-Trichinella IgG antibodies in mice infected with 100 ML were detectable by ELISA with IIL ES antigens as soon as 10 days postinfection (dpi), but ELISA with ML ES antigens did not permit detection of infected mice before 12 dpi. When the sera of patients with trichinellosis at 19 dpi were assayed, the sensitivity (100 %) of ELISA with IIL ES antigens was evidently higher than 75 % of ELISA with ML ES antigens (P < 0.05) The specificity (96.86 %) of ELISA with IIL ES antigens was also higher than 89.31 % of ELISA with ML ES antigens (P < 0.05). The IIL ES antigens provided a new source of diagnostic antigens and could be considered as a potential early diagnostic antigen for trichinellosis. PMID:26342828

  13. Species-specific antibody responses to the recombinant 53-kilodalton excretory and secretory proteins in mice infected with Trichinella spp.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Isao; Wu, Zhiliang; Takahashi, Yuzo

    2008-03-01

    The 53-kDa proteins in larval excretory and secretory (E-S) products were expressed from five Trichinella species (T. spiralis, T. britovi, T. nativa, T. pseudospiralis, and T. papuae), using the Escherichia coli expression system, and the antibody responses to the 53-kDa recombinant proteins in mice infected with Trichinella spp. were analyzed by Western blotting. The 53-kDa protein is conserved among the five Trichinella species, with >60% similarity in amino acid sequences. The 53-kDa recombinant proteins of T. spiralis and T. pseudospiralis reacted to sera from mice infected with T. spiralis and T. pseudospiralis at 8 days postinfection (p.i.), respectively. An antibody against the 53-kDa recombinant protein of T. spiralis recognized the 53-kDa protein in the crude extracts from adult worms and 30-day p.i. muscle larvae and E-S products from muscle larvae of T. spiralis but did not recognize any proteins from T. pseudospiralis. The sera from the mice infected with T. spiralis strongly reacted with the 53-kDa recombinant protein of T. spiralis but did not react with the 53-kDa recombinant proteins of T. britovi, T. nativa, T. pseudospiralis, and T. papuae. Similarly, the sera from mice infected with T. britovi, T. nativa, T. pseudospiralis, or T. papuae strongly reacted with the 53-kDa recombinant proteins of T. britovi, T. nativa, T. pseudospiralis, or T. papuae, respectively. These results showed that the 53-kDa recombinant proteins provide early and species-specific antibody responses in mice infected with Trichinella spp. PMID:18184826

  14. Proteomic Analysis of the Excretory-Secretory Products from Larval Stages of Ascaris suum Reveals High Abundance of Glycosyl Hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Van Steendam, Katleen; Dhaenens, Maarten; Vlaminck, Johnny; Deforce, Dieter; Jex, Aaron R.; Gasser, Robin B.; Geldhof, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background Ascaris lumbricoides and Ascaris suum are socioeconomically important and widespread parasites of humans and pigs, respectively. The excretory-secretory (ES) molecules produced and presented at the parasite-host interface during the different phases of tissue invasion and migration are likely to play critical roles in the induction and development of protective immune and other host responses. Methodology/Principal Findings The aim of this study was to identify the ES proteins of the different larval stages (L3-egg, L3-lung and L4) by LC-MS/MS. In total, 106 different proteins were identified, 20 in L3-egg, 45 in L3-lung stage and 58 in L4. Although most of the proteins identified were stage-specific, 15 were identified in the ES products of at least two stages. Two proteins, i.e. a 14-3-3-like protein and a serpin-like protein, were present in the ES products from the three different larval stages investigated. Interestingly, a comparison of ES products from L4 with those of L3-egg and L3-lung showed an abundance of metabolic enzymes, particularly glycosyl hydrolases. Further study indicated that most of these glycolytic enzymes were transcriptionally upregulated from L4 onwards, with a peak in the adult stage, particularly in intestinal tissue. This was also confirmed by enzymatic assays, showing the highest glycosidase activity in protein extracts from adult worms gut. Conclusions/Significance The present proteomic analysis provides important information on the host-parasite interaction and the biology of the migratory stages of A. suum. In particular, the high transcriptional upregulation of glycosyl hydrolases from the L4 stage onwards reveals that the degradation of complex carbohydrates forms an essential part of the energy metabolism of this parasite once it establishes in the small intestine. PMID:24098821

  15. Renal Ablation Update

    PubMed Central

    Khiatani, Vishal; Dixon, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal ablative technologies have evolved considerably in the recent past and are now an important component of current clinical guidelines for the treatment of small renal masses. Both radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation have intermediate-term oncologic control that rivals surgical options, with favorable complication profiles. Studies comparing cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation show no significant difference in oncologic control or complication profile between the two modalities. Early data from small series with microwave ablation have shown similar promising results. Newer technologies including irreversible electroporation and high-intensity–focused ultrasound have theoretical advantages, but will require further research before becoming a routine part of the ablation armamentarium. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the current ablative technologies available, briefly review their mechanisms of action, discuss technical aspects of each, and provide current data supporting their use. PMID:25049445

  16. Renal ablation update.

    PubMed

    Khiatani, Vishal; Dixon, Robert G

    2014-06-01

    Thermal ablative technologies have evolved considerably in the recent past and are now an important component of current clinical guidelines for the treatment of small renal masses. Both radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation have intermediate-term oncologic control that rivals surgical options, with favorable complication profiles. Studies comparing cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation show no significant difference in oncologic control or complication profile between the two modalities. Early data from small series with microwave ablation have shown similar promising results. Newer technologies including irreversible electroporation and high-intensity-focused ultrasound have theoretical advantages, but will require further research before becoming a routine part of the ablation armamentarium. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the current ablative technologies available, briefly review their mechanisms of action, discuss technical aspects of each, and provide current data supporting their use. PMID:25049445

  17. Challenges and intriguing problems in comparative renal physiology.

    PubMed

    Dantzler, William H

    2005-02-01

    The comparative approach has proved important many times in understanding renal function and continues to offer possible approaches to unsolved problems today, in three general areas. (1) Quantification of glomerular ultrafiltration. In contrast to the complex capillary network in the mammalian glomerulus, the glomerulus of the superficial loopless (reptilian-type) avian nephrons consists of a single capillary loop. This structure, in an avian species where it can be approached directly, should for the first time permit accurate determinations of the pressure profiles and the capillary area involved in glomerular ultrafiltration in an animal with high arterial pressure. (2) Fluid reabsorption by proximal renal tubules. In some reptilian proximal renal tubules, isolated and perfused in vitro, isosmotic fluid reabsorption can occur at control rates when lithium replaces sodium or when some other substance replaces sodium or chloride or both in the perfusate and bathing medium simultaneously. Reabsorption at the control rates, regardless of the composition of the perfusate and bathing medium, can be at least partially inhibited by cold and cyanide, but not by blockers of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase. It is also independent of the buffer system used, but it is reduced about 20% by removal of colloid from the peritubular fluid. During the substitutions, the surface area of the proximal tubule cells increases dramatically and might permit some insignificant force to be more effective in the reabsorptive process. Understanding the process involved in this, apparently unique coupling of solute and fluid transport, certainly would be very valuable in understanding coupled transport of solutes and water across epithelia in general. (3) Urate secretion by proximal renal tubules. Urate is the major excretory end product of nitrogen metabolism in birds, most reptiles, and a few amphibians. It undergoes net secretion by the renal tubules. It has been possible to learn much about the

  18. Role of renal sensory nerves in physiological and pathophysiological conditions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Whether activation of afferent renal nerves contributes to the regulation of arterial pressure and sodium balance has been long overlooked. In normotensive rats, activating renal mechanosensory nerves decrease efferent renal sympathetic nerve activity (ERSNA) and increase urinary sodium excretion, an inhibitory renorenal reflex. There is an interaction between efferent and afferent renal nerves, whereby increases in ERSNA increase afferent renal nerve activity (ARNA), leading to decreases in ERSNA by activation of the renorenal reflexes to maintain low ERSNA to minimize sodium retention. High-sodium diet enhances the responsiveness of the renal sensory nerves, while low dietary sodium reduces the responsiveness of the renal sensory nerves, thus producing physiologically appropriate responses to maintain sodium balance. Increased renal ANG II reduces the responsiveness of the renal sensory nerves in physiological and pathophysiological conditions, including hypertension, congestive heart failure, and ischemia-induced acute renal failure. Impairment of inhibitory renorenal reflexes in these pathological states would contribute to the hypertension and sodium retention. When the inhibitory renorenal reflexes are suppressed, excitatory reflexes may prevail. Renal denervation reduces arterial pressure in experimental hypertension and in treatment-resistant hypertensive patients. The fall in arterial pressure is associated with a fall in muscle sympathetic nerve activity, suggesting that increased ARNA contributes to increased arterial pressure in these patients. Although removal of both renal sympathetic and afferent renal sensory nerves most likely contributes to the arterial pressure reduction initially, additional mechanisms may be involved in long-term arterial pressure reduction since sympathetic and sensory nerves reinnervate renal tissue in a similar time-dependent fashion following renal denervation. PMID:25411364

  19. Hibiscus sabdariffa polyphenols alleviate insulin resistance and renal epithelial to mesenchymal transition: a novel action mechanism mediated by type 4 dipeptidyl peptidase.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chiung-Huei; Yang, Yi-Sun; Chan, Kuei-Chuan; Wang, Chau-Jong; Chen, Mu-Lin; Huang, Chien-Ning

    2014-10-01

    The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is important in renal fibrosis. Ser307 phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1 (S307)) is a hallmark of insulin resistance. We report that polyphenol extracts of Hibiscus sabdariffa (HPE) ameliorate diabetic nephropathy and EMT. Recently it has been observed that type 4 dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP-4) inhibitor linagliptin is effective for treating type 2 diabetes and albuminuria. We investigated if DPP-4 and insulin resistance are involved in renal EMT and explored the role of HPE. In high glucose-stimulated tubular cells, HPE, like linagliptin, inhibited DPP-4 activation, thereby regulating vimentin (EMT marker) and IRS-1 (S307). IRS-1 knockdown revealed its essential role in mediating downstream EMT. In type 2 diabetic rats, pIRS-1 (S307) abundantly surrounds the tubular region, with increased vimentin in kidney. Both the expressions were reduced by HPE. In conclusion, HPE exerts effects similar to those of linagliptin, which improves insulin resistance and EMT, and could be an adjuvant to prevent diabetic nephropathy. PMID:25226384

  20. Race and mortality after acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Waikar, Sushrut S; Curhan, Gary C; Ayanian, John Z; Chertow, Glenn M

    2007-10-01

    Black patients receiving dialysis for end-stage renal disease in the United States have lower mortality rates than white patients. Whether racial differences exist in mortality after acute renal failure is not known. We studied acute renal failure in patients hospitalized between 2000 and 2003 using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample and found that black patients had an 18% (95% confidence interval [CI] 16 to 21%) lower odds of death than white patients after adjusting for age, sex, comorbidity, and the need for mechanical ventilation. Similarly, among those with acute renal failure requiring dialysis, black patients had a 16% (95% CI 10 to 22%) lower odds of death than white patients. In stratified analyses of patients with acute renal failure, black patients had significantly lower adjusted odds of death than white patients in settings of coronary artery bypass grafting, cardiac catheterization, acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, pneumonia, sepsis, and gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Black patients were more likely than white patients to be treated in hospitals that care for a larger number of patients with acute renal failure, and black patients had lower in-hospital mortality than white patients in all four quartiles of hospital volume. In conclusion, in-hospital mortality is lower for black patients with acute renal failure than white patients. Future studies should assess the reasons for this difference. PMID:17855647

  1. Severe antenatally diagnosed renal disorders: background, prognosis and practical approach.

    PubMed

    Aulbert, Wiebke; Kemper, Markus J

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays most renal disorders, especially urinary tract malformations and renal cystic disease, are diagnosed antenatally. In cases of severe bilateral disease, intrauterine renal dysfunction may lead to renal oligohydramnios (ROH), resulting in pulmonary hypoplasia which affects perinatal mortality and morbidity as well as the long-term outcome. However, some infants may only have mild pulmonary and renal disease, and advances in postnatal and dialysis treatment have resulted in improved short- and long-term outcome even in those infants with severe ROH. Here, we review the current state of knowledge and clinical experience of patients presenting antenatally with severe bilateral renal disorders and ROH. By addressing underlying mechanisms, intrauterine tools of diagnosis and treatment as well as published outcome data, we hope to improve antenatal counselling and postnatal care. KEY SUMMARY POINTS: 1. Nowadays most renal disorders are diagnosed antenatally, especially urinary tract malformations and renal cystic disease. 2. Severe kidney dysfunction may lead to renal oligohydramnios, which can cause pulmonary hypoplasia and is a risk factor of perinatal mortality and postnatal renal outcome. However, as considerable clinical heterogeneity is present, outcome predictions need to be treated with caution. 3. Advances in postnatal and dialysis treatment have resulted in improved short- and long-term outcomes even in infants with severe renal oligohydramnios. 4. A multidisciplinary approach with specialist input is required when counselling a family with an ROH-affected fetus as the decision-making process is very challenging. PMID:26081158

  2. Regulation of renal sympathetic neurotransmission by renal α2A-adrenoceptors is impaired in chronic renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Hoch, Henning; Stegbauer, Johannes; Potthoff, Sebastian A; Hein, Lutz; Quack, Ivo; Rump, Lars Christian; Vonend, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The mechanisms underlying increased renal noradrenaline in renal failure are still unclear. In this study, the role of α2A-adrenoceptors in controlling sympathetic neurotransmission in chronic renal failure was evaluated in a subtotal nephrectomy model. Also, the influence of this receptor subtype on angiotensin II (Ang II)-mediated noradrenaline release was evaluated. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH α2A-Adrenoceptor-knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice underwent subtotal (5/6) nephrectomy (SNx) or SHAM-operation (SHAM). Kidneys of WT and KO mice were isolated and perfused. Renal nerves were stimulated with platinum electrodes and noradrenaline release was measured by HPLC. KEY RESULTS Noradrenaline release induced by renal nerve stimulation (RNS) was significantly increased in WT mice after SNx. RNS-induced noradrenaline release was significantly higher in SHAM-KO compared with SHAM-WT, but no further increase in noradrenaline release could be observed in SNx-KO. α-Adrenoceptor antagonists increased RNS-induced noradrenaline release in SHAM-WT but not in SHAM-KO. After SNx, the effect of α2-adrenoceptor blockade on renal noradrenaline release was attenuated in WT mice. The mRNA expression of α2A-adrenoceptors was not altered, but the inhibitory effect of α2-adrenoceptor agonists on cAMP formation was abolished after SNx. Ang II facilitated RNS-induced noradrenaline release in SHAM-WT but not in SHAM-KO and SNx-WT. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS In our model of renal failure autoregulation of renal sympathetic neurotransmission was impaired. Presynaptic inhibition of noradrenaline release was diminished and the facilitatory effect of presynaptic angiotensin AT1 receptors on noradrenaline release was markedly decreased in renal failure and depended on functioning α2A-adrenoceptors. PMID:21244368

  3. Recurrent renal giant leiomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Öziş, Salih Erpulat; Gülpınar, Kamil; Şahlı, Zafer; Konak, Baha Burak; Keskin, Mete; Özdemir, Süleyman; Ataoğlu, Ömür

    2016-01-01

    Primary renal leiomyosarcomas are rare, aggressive tumors. They constitute 1–2% of adult malignant renal tumors. Although leiomyosarcomas are the most common histological type (50–60%) of renal sarcomas, information on renal leiomyosarcoma is limited. Local or systemic recurrences are common. The radiological appearance of renal leiomyosarcomas is not specific, therefore renal leiomyosarcoma cannot be distinguished from renal cell carcinoma by imaging methods in all patients. A 74-year-old female patient presented to our clinic complaining of a palpable mass on the right side of her abdomen in November 2012. The abdominal magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass, 25 × 24 × 23 cm in size. Her past medical history revealed that she has undergone right radical nephrectomy in 2007, due to a 11 × 12 × 13 cm renal mass that was then reported as renal cell carcinoma on abdominal magnetic resonance imaging, but the pathological diagnosis was low-grade renal leiomyosarcoma. The most recent follow-up of the patient was in 2011, with no signs of local recurrence or distant metastases within this four-year period. The patient underwent laparotomy on November 2012, and a 35 cm retroperitoneal mass was excised. The pathological examination of the mass was reported as high-grade leiomyosarcoma. The formation of this giant retroperitoneal mass in 1 year can be explained by the transformation of the lesion’s pathology from low-grade to a high-grade tumor.

  4. A contribution to the history of renal structure knowledge (from Galen to Malpighi).

    PubMed

    Mezzogiorno, V; Mezzogiorno, A; Passiatore, C

    1993-10-01

    This work documents the progressive gain in knowledge on renal anatomy acquired by anatomists from Galen to Malpighi. Galen, with albeit his rather imaginative explanations, was the first anatomist to recognize the urine producing function of the kidney. His influence was felt up to the Middle Ages; his followers imagined the presence of two cavities within the kidney that were separated by a porous membrane that they called the "colatorium" which was capable of filtering the urine from the blood. It was only later that Berengario da Carpi, divorcing himself from Galenic dogmatism, finally dismissed the presence of the colatorium. He described the renal papillae and gave the first elementary model of renal vascularization. Further important progress was due to the studies of Falloppius and Eustachius who brought contemporary understanding of renal structure to the limit of what could be seen with the unaided eye. They distinguished the difference between the unilobar canine kidney and the human multilobar organ, they also described the minor and major calyces and, furthermore, guessed at the canalicular structure of its parenchyma. Highmore was then responsible for the description of the archiform vessels which he hypothesized as an arterio-venous anastomotic net between the renal cortex and medulla. With the invention of the microscope, new doors opened for the study of renal structure. Bellini proved the canalicular organization of the parenchyma and, moreover, described the interlobular vessels. Malpighi then described the glomerulus and its relation to the intrarenal excretory ducts. The basis had now been laid for the beginning of modern nephrology. PMID:8250268

  5. Prospective radionuclide renal function evaluation and its correlation with radiological findings in patients with Kock pouch urinary diversion

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.K.; Chang, L.S.; Chen, M.T.; Yeh, S.H. )

    1991-05-01

    In an attempt to understand better the status of renal function after Kock pouch urinary diversion we conducted a prospective evaluation of renal function in 25 patients using the radionuclide 131iodine-hippurate. Studies were done before, and at 1 month and every 6 months for 30 months postoperatively. The radionuclide results were then compared to excretory urography and contrast study of the reservoir. Our renal function study included the determination of individual and total effective renal plasma flow (ml. per minute), the time to maximal radioactivity over the kidney (peak time in minutes) and a renogram. The mean total (both kidneys) effective renal plasma flow rates before (25 patients) and at month 1 (19), month 6 (14), month 12 (12), month 18 (6), month 24 (6) and month 30 (7) after operation were 385.5 +/- 112.2, 310.5 +/- 109.9, 362.7 +/- 69.2, 442.0 +/- 97.5, 468.2 +/- 82.5, 405.7 +/- 70.6 and 414.0 +/- 65.1, respectively. A comparison of individual and total effective renal plasma flow before and after operation revealed that only the change of the flow at each or both sides of the kidney before and at 1 month after the operation reached statistically significant differences, respectively (p less than 0.05, paired t test). Postoperatively 5 of 6 patients with hydronephrosis had abnormal peak time and a third segment on the renogram was performed on the corresponding side of the kidney. No reflux was noted on contrast study of the reservoir of any patient followed for up to 30 months. In conclusion, the radionuclide renal function evaluation showed a significant decrease of renal function 1 month after Kock pouch diversion, then it resumed and remained stable (neither improved nor deteriorated) for 30 months. Also the abnormal peak time and third segment on the renogram usually implicated a dilated upper urinary tract.

  6. [A comparative study of excretory and sensory apparatus of two cercariae of Diplodiscus parasites of European and African Amphibians (Trematoda, Diploidiscidae) (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Bayssade-Dufour, C; Albaret, J L; Grabda-Kazubska, B; Kulo, S D

    1978-01-01

    The comparative study of the excretory system provides new data on the number of flame cells of two cercariae of Diplodiscus from Poland and Togo but does not allow to distinguish them. On the other hand, the comparison of the superficial sensory apparatus shows significant differences. The cercariae from Togo differ from these of Poland by a much lower number of all the cephalic papillae and papillae of cycle Cv, a higher number of acetabular papillae, and the presence of 9 to 12 pairs of dorsal papillae in the median part of the tail. Therefore the African Diplodicus is not D. subclavatus. We identify it as D. fischthalicus. PMID:754617

  7. Mesoscale Nanoparticles Selectively Target the Renal Proximal Tubule Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Ryan M.; Shah, Janki; Ng, Brandon D.; Minton, Denise R.; Gudas, Lorraine J.; Park, Christopher Y.; Heller, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    We synthesized “mesoscale” nanoparticles, approximately 400 nm in diameter, which unexpectedly localized selectively in renal proximal tubules and up to 7 times more efficiently in the kidney than other organs. Although nanoparticles typically localize in the liver and spleen, modulating their size and opsonization potential allowed for stable targeting of the kidneys through a new proposed uptake mechanism. Applying this kidney targeting strategy, we anticipate use in the treatment of renal disease and the study of renal physiology. PMID:25811353

  8. Acute SGLT inhibition normalizes O2 tension in the renal cortex but causes hypoxia in the renal medulla in anaesthetized control and diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Julie; Fasching, Angelica; Pihl, Liselotte; Patinha, Daniela; Franzén, Stephanie; Palm, Fredrik

    2015-08-01

    Early stage diabetic nephropathy is characterized by glomerular hyperfiltration and reduced renal tissue Po2. Recent observations have indicated that increased tubular Na(+)-glucose linked transport (SGLT) plays a role in the development of diabetes-induced hyperfiltration. The aim of the present study was to determine how inhibition of SLGT impacts upon Po2 in the diabetic rat kidney. Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin in Sprague-Dawley rats 2 wk before experimentation. Renal hemodynamics, excretory function, and renal O2 homeostasis were measured in anesthetized control and diabetic rats during baseline and after acute SGLT inhibition using phlorizin (200 mg/kg ip). Baseline arterial pressure was similar in both groups and unaffected by SGLT inhibition. Diabetic animals displayed reduced baseline Po2 in both the cortex and medulla. SGLT inhibition improved cortical Po2 in the diabetic kidney, whereas it reduced medullary Po2 in both groups. SGLT inhibition reduced Na(+) transport efficiency [tubular Na(+) transport (TNa)/renal O2 consumption (Qo2)] in the control kidney, whereas the already reduced TNa/Qo2 in the diabetic kidney was unaffected by SGLT inhibition. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that when SGLT is inhibited, renal cortex Po2 in the diabetic rat kidney is normalized, which implies that increased proximal tubule transport contributes to the development of hypoxia in the diabetic kidney. The reduction in medullary Po2 in both control and diabetic kidneys during the inhibition of proximal Na(+) reabsorption suggests the redistribution of active Na(+) transport to less efficient nephron segments, such as the medullary thick ascending limb, which results in medullary hypoxia. PMID:26041448

  9. Presurgical Pulmonary Evaluation in Renal Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sahni, Sonu; Molmenti, Ernesto; Bhaskaran, Madhu C.; Ali, Nicole; Basu, Amit; Talwar, Arunabh

    2014-01-01

    Patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) due to various mechanisms are prone to significant pulmonary comorbidities. With the improvements in renal replacement therapy (RRT), patients with CRF are now expected to live longer, and thus may develop complications in the lung from these processes. The preferred treatment of CRF is kidney transplantation and patients who are selected to undergo transplant must have a thorough preoperative pulmonary evaluation to assess pulmonary status and to determine risk of postoperative pulmonary complications. A MEDLINE®/PubMed® search was performed to identify all articles outlining the course of pre-surgical pulmonary evaluation with an emphasis on patients with CRF who have been selected for renal transplant. Literature review concluded that in addition to generic pre-surgical evaluation, renal transplant patients must also undergo a full cardiopulmonary and sleep evaluation to investigate possible existing pulmonary pathologies. Presence of any risk factor should then be aggressively managed or treated prior to surgery. PMID:25599047

  10. Renal Artery Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Sauk, Steven; Zuckerman, Darryl A.

    2011-01-01

    Renal artery embolization (RAE) is an effective minimally invasive alternative procedure for the treatment of a variety of conditions. Since the 1970s when RAE was first developed, technical advances and growing experience have expanded the indications to not only include treatment of conditions such as symptomatic hematuria and palliation for metastatic renal cancer, but also preoperative infarction of renal tumors, treatment of angiomyolipomas, vascular malformations, medical renal disease, and complications following renal transplantation. With the drastically improved morbidity associated with this technique in part due to the introduction of more precise embolic agents and smaller delivery catheters, RAE continues to gain popularity for various urologic conditions. The indications and techniques for renal artery embolization are reviewed in the following sections. PMID:23204638

  11. Renal cystic disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, D.S.

    1988-01-01

    The book begins with an overview of renal cystic disease and a presentation of simple renal cysts. Subsequent chapters cover cystic disease in association with renal neoplasms and medullary sponge kidney. The chapters addressing autosomal-dominant and autosomal-recessive polycystic kidney disease discuss and differentiate the infantile and adult forms of the disease. There are also separate discussions of medullary cystic disease, multicystic dysplastic kidney, and cysts of the renarenal sinus.

  12. Calcified renal oncocytoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, N.F.; Ewing, S.L.

    1983-10-01

    Renal oncocytoma, a neoplasm thought to derive from cells of the proximal convoluted tubules, exhibits benign clinical features. Its preoperative distinction from typical renal cell carcinoma would enable the surgeon to perform a more limited procedure. In a patient who is a poor operative candidate, surgery might be deferred. However, preoperative diagnosis has been elusive. A rare case of bilateral renal oncocytoma is reported. One of these tumors represents the first reported oncocytoma showing radiologically demonstrable calcification.

  13. [Hereditary renal cell carcinomas].

    PubMed

    Hartmann, A; Stöhr, C G; Junker, K

    2010-10-01

    Renal cell carcinomas occur in several hereditary tumor syndromes. These renal tumors frequently have a specific histopathological appearance which can be a sign for a hereditary cause of the disease. The genetic alterations responsible for most of these tumor syndromes were identified in recent years. Interestingly, renal cell carcinomas show specific histopathological features in each of the hereditary renal cancer syndromes. Clear cell and often cystic renal cell carcinomas occur in von Hippel-Lindau syndrome (VHL), while oncocytomas and chromophobe renal cell carcinomas are found in the Birt-Hugg-Dube syndrome, often also as hybrid tumors. Well differentiated papillary carcinomas (Type 1 according to the WHO) are found in the hereditary papillary renal cell carcinoma (HPRC). In contrast, poorly diffentiated papillary renal cell carcinomas (Type 2 according to the WHO) occur in combination with leiomyomas and leiomyosarcomas of the skin and uterus in hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma syndrome (HLRCC). The various genetic causes for these hereditary tumor syndromes open up new therapeutic possibilities, some of which are already being investigated in clinical studies. PMID:20960197

  14. Effects of opioid peptides on neural control of renal function in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Kapusta, D R; Jones, S Y; DiBona, G F

    1990-06-01

    The aims of the present study were to examine the effects of opioid receptor agonists and antagonists on the renal vascular (renal blood flow) and tubular (urinary sodium excretion) responses to renal nerve stimulation and norepinephrine in anesthetized spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Graded frequency renal nerve stimulation (0.5-4.0 Hz) and doses of norepinephrine (10-80 ng/kg) produced frequency and dose-dependent decreases in renal blood flow. The renal vasoconstrictor responses were not altered by intravenous infusion of the opioid receptor agonists methionine enkephalin (mu and delta, 75 micrograms/kg/min) or U-50488H (kappa, 20 micrograms/kg/min) or administration of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (1 mg/kg i.v.). The antinatriuretic response to low frequency (less than 1.0 Hz) electrical renal nerve stimulation was prevented by naloxone but not affected by methionine enkephalin administration without changes in glomerular filtration rate or effective renal plasma flow. These studies suggest that endogenous opioid receptor mechanisms are involved in the increased renal tubular sodium reabsorption response to low frequency renal nerve stimulation but not in the renal vasoconstrictor response to either renal nerve stimulation or norepinephrine. This might occur by facilitation of the renal nerve terminal release, the direct renal tubular action, or both, of norepinephrine to influence renal tubular sodium reabsorption. PMID:2351429

  15. Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Bradley P.; Hulbert, John C.; Bissler, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Although not as common as other genetic renal diseases such as autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, patients with tuberous sclerosis complex frequently have significant renal involvement. Recent revelations in the cell biology of these renal disease manifestations as well as effective therapies for tuberous sclerosis complex-related renal issues have heralded hope of improved renal survival and improved quality of life for the TSC patient. This review specifically addresses some of the major renal manifestations of this disease. PMID:21071977

  16. Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis: current status.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soon Hyo; Lerman, Lilach O

    2015-05-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS) remains a major cause of secondary hypertension and kidney failure. Randomized prospective trials show that medical treatment should constitute the main therapeutic approach in ARAS. Regardless of intensive treatment and adequate blood pressure control, however, renal and extrarenal complications are not uncommon. Yet, the precise mechanisms, accurate detection, and optimal treatment in ARAS remain elusive. Strategies oriented to early detection and targeting these pathogenic pathways might prevent development of clinical end points. Here, we review the results of recent clinical trials, current understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms, novel imaging techniques to assess kidney damage in ARAS, and treatment options. PMID:25908472

  17. Renal P2 receptors and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Menzies, R I; Unwin, R J; Bailey, M A

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of extracellular fluid volume is a key component of blood pressure homeostasis. Long-term blood pressure is stabilized by the acute pressure natriuresis response by which changes in renal perfusion pressure evoke corresponding changes in renal sodium excretion. A wealth of experimental evidence suggests that a defect in the pressure natriuresis response contributes to the development and maintenance of hypertension. The mechanisms underlying the relationship between renal perfusion pressure and sodium excretion are incompletely understood. Increased blood flow through the vasa recta increases renal interstitial hydrostatic pressure, thereby reducing the driving force for transepithelial sodium reabsorption. Paracrine signalling also contributes to the overall natriuretic response by inhibiting tubular sodium reabsorption in several nephron segments. In this brief review, we discuss the role of purinergic signalling in the renal control of blood pressure. ATP is released from renal tubule and vascular cells in response to increased flow and can activate P2 receptor subtypes expressed in both epithelial and vascular endothelial/smooth muscle cells. In concert, these effects integrate the vascular and tubular responses to increased perfusion pressure and targeting P2 receptors, particularly P2X7, may prove beneficial for treatment of hypertension. PMID:25345692

  18. Severe Uncompensated Metabolic Alkalosis due to Plasma Exchange in a Patient with Pulmonary-Renal Syndrome: A Clinician's Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Ijaz, Mohsin; Abbas, Naeem; Lvovsky, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic alkalosis secondary to citrate toxicity from plasma exchange is very uncommon in patients with normal renal function. In patients with advanced renal disease this can be a fatal event. We describe a case of middle-aged woman with Goodpasture's syndrome treated with plasma exchange who developed severe metabolic alkalosis. High citrate load in plasma exchange fluid is the underlying etiology. Citrate metabolism generates bicarbonate and once its level exceeds the excretory capacity of kidneys, the severe metabolic alkalosis ensues. Our patient presented with generalized weakness, fever, and oliguria and developed rapidly progressive renal failure. Patient had positive serology for antineutrophilic cytoplasmic antibodies myeloperoxidase (ANCA-MPO) and anti-glomerular basement membrane antibodies (anti-GBM). Renal biopsy showed diffuse necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis with linear glomerular basement membrane staining. Patient did not respond to intravenous steroids. Plasma exchange was started with fresh frozen plasma but patient developed severe metabolic alkalosis. This metabolic alkalosis normalized with cessation of plasma exchange and initiation of low bicarbonate hemodialysis. ANCA-MPO and anti-GBM antibodies levels normalized within 2 weeks and remained undetectable at 3 months. Patient still required maintenance hemodialysis. PMID:26167308

  19. Cultured Human Renal Cortical Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    During the STS-90 shuttle flight in April 1998, cultured renal cortical cells revealed new information about genes. Timothy Hammond, an investigator in NASA's microgravity biotechnology program was interested in culturing kidney tissue to study the expression of proteins useful in the treatment of kidney diseases. Protein expression is linked to the level of differentiation of the kidney cells, and Hammond had difficulty maintaining differentiated cells in vitro. Intrigued by the improvement in cell differentiation that he observed in rat renal cells cultured in NASA's rotating wall vessel (a bioreactor that simulates some aspects of microgravity) and during an experiment performed on the Russian Space Station Mir, Hammond decided to sleuth out which genes were responsible for controlling differentiation of kidney cells. To do this, he compared the gene activity of human renal cells in a variety of gravitational environments, including the microgravity of the space shuttle and the high-gravity environment of a centrifuge. Hammond found that 1,632 genes out of 10,000 analyzed changed their activity level in microgravity, more than in any of the other environments. These results have important implications for kidney research as well as for understanding the basic mechanism for controlling cell differentiation.

  20. [Immune tolerance after renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Krajewska, Magdalena; Weyde, Wacław; Klinger, Marian

    2006-01-01

    Progress in immunosuppressive therapy has improved short-term survival of renal allografts by decreasing the frequency of acute rejections. However, the long-term survival of renal grafts has not improved. Transplanted kidneys are lost in the late period after transplantation as a result of vasculopathy and chronic rejection. Immunological tolerance means the lack of immunological activity towards certain antigens while the response towards others remains correct. The induction of immunological tolerance of donor antigens (transplant tolerance) is examined intensively to work out treatment methods which will allow prevention of chronic allograft rejection. The paper includes an overview of current knowledge on allograft tolerance. Immune response to alloantigens is described and the mechanisms of immunological tolerance induction (including clonal deletion, anergy connected with the microchimerism phenomenon, and active suppression caused by regulatory lymphocytes) are characterized. The role of dendritic cells in the process of inducing and maintaining tolerance is highlighted. Tolerance-inducing strategies in renal transplant recipients and clinically applied evaluation methods are presented. At present, optimizing recipient matching is used to decrease the risk of graft rejection. Hopefully, gene therapy will be possible in the near future. However, before introducing such a procedure into clinical studies, optimal therapy conditions and risk evaluation must be defined in tests on animals. PMID:16552396

  1. MDCT findings of renal cell carcinoma associated with Xp11.2 translocation and TFE3 gene fusion and papillary renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Woo, Sungmin; Kim, Sang Youn; Lee, Myoung Seok; Moon, Kyung Chul; Kim, See Hyung; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Kim, Seung Hyup

    2015-03-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to compare the MDCT features of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) associated with Xp11.2 translocation and TFE3 gene fusion (Xp11 RCC) and papillary RCC. MATERIALS AND METHODS. The study included 19 and 39 patients with histologically proven Xp11 RCC and papillary RCC, respectively, who underwent multiphase renal MDCT before nephrectomy. CT findings were compared between Xp11 RCC and papillary RCC using the Student t test and chi-square test. Subgroup analyses of small (< 4 cm) renal masses for these features were performed. RESULTS. Patients with Xp11 RCC were younger (p < 0.001), and it was more prevalent in women (p = 0.007). Tumor size was greater in Xp11 RCC (p = 0.004) and more common in cystic change (p < 0.001). Calcification and unenhanced high-attenuating areas were more frequent in Xp11 RCC (p = 0.001 and 0.026, respectively). Xp11 RCCs were more prevalent in lymph node and distant metastasis (p < 0.001 and p = 0.031, respectively). Xp11 RCC and papillary RCC showed no significant difference in epicenter, margin, and venous and collecting duct invasion (p = 0.403-1.000). Although Xp11 RCC and papillary RCC had lower attenuation than the renal cortex on corticomedullary and early excretory phases (p < 0.001), only Xp11 RCCs were hyperattenuating to the cortex on the unenhanced phase (p < 0.001). Xp11 RCCs had significantly higher attenuation compared with papillary RCCs on all phases (p ≤ 0.02). Regarding small masses, cystic change, calcification, and lymph node metastasis were still more frequent in Xp11 RCCs (p ≤ 0.016). CONCLUSION. Greater size, more cystic change, calcification, high-attenuating areas on unenhanced imaging, and lymph node and distant metastasis were helpful for differentiating Xp11 RCC from papillary RCC. PMID:25714283

  2. [Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis].

    PubMed

    Sauguet, A; Honton, B

    2014-12-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis can cause ischaemic nephropathy and arterial hypertension. Renal artery stenosis (RAS) continues to be a problem for clinicians, with no clear consensus on how to investigate and assess the clinical significance of stenotic lesions and manage the findings. RAS caused by fibromuscular dysplasia is probably commoner than previously appreciated, should be actively looked for in younger hypertensive patients and can be managed successfully with angioplasty. Atheromatous RAS is associated with increased incidence of cardiovascular events and increased cardiovascular mortality, and is likely to be seen with increasing frequency. Many patients with RAS may be managed effectively with medical therapy for several years without endovascular stenting, as demonstrated by randomized, prospective trials including the cardiovascular outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions (CORAL) trial, the Angioplasty and Stenting for Renal Artery Lesions (ASTRAL) trial. These trials share the limitation of excluding subsets of patients with high-risk clinical presentations, including episodic pulmonary edema and rapidly progressing renal failure and hypertension. Blood pressure control and medication adjustment may become more difficult with declining renal function and may prevent the use of angiotensin receptor blocker and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. The objective of this review is to evaluate the current management of RAS for cardiologists in the context of recent randomized clinical trials. There is now interest in looking more closely at patient selection for intervention, with focus on intervening only in patients with the highest-risk presentations such as flash pulmonary edema, rapidly declining renal function and severe resistant hypertension. PMID:25450992

  3. Cadmium and renal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Il'yasova, Dora; Schwartz, Gary G. . E-mail: gschwart@wfubmc.edu

    2005-09-01

    Background: Rates of renal cancer have increased steadily during the past two decades, and these increases are not explicable solely by advances in imaging modalities. Cadmium, a widespread environmental pollutant, is a carcinogen that accumulates in the kidney cortex and is a cause of end-stage renal disease. Several observations suggest that cadmium may be a cause of renal cancer. Methods: We performed a systematic review of the literature on cadmium and renal cancer using MEDLINE for the years 1966-2003. We reviewed seven epidemiological and eleven clinical studies. Results: Despite different methodologies, three large epidemiologic studies indicate that occupational exposure to cadmium is associated with increased risk renal cancer, with odds ratios varying from 1.2 to 5.0. Six of seven studies that compared the cadmium content of kidneys from patients with kidney cancer to that of patients without kidney cancer found lower concentrations of cadmium in renal cancer tissues. Conclusions: Exposure to cadmium appears to be associated with renal cancer, although this conclusion is tempered by the inability of studies to assess cumulative cadmium exposure from all sources including smoking and diet. The paradoxical findings of lower cadmium content in kidney tissues from patients with renal cancer may be caused by dilution of cadmium in rapidly dividing cells. This and other methodological problems limit the interpretation of studies of cadmium in clinical samples. Whether cadmium is a cause of renal cancer may be answered more definitively by future studies that employ biomarkers of cadmium exposure, such as cadmium levels in blood and urine.

  4. Interspecies scaling of excretory amounts using allometry - retrospective analysis with rifapentine, aztreonam, carumonam, pefloxacin, miloxacin, trovafloxacin, doripenem, imipenem, cefozopran, ceftazidime, linezolid for urinary excretion and rifapentine, cabotegravir, and dolutegravir for fecal excretion.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Nuggehally R

    2016-09-01

    1. Interspecies allometry scaling for prediction of human excretory amounts in urine or feces was performed for numerous antibacterials. Antibacterials used for urinary scaling were: rifapentine, pefloxacin, trovafloxacin (Gr1/low; <10%); miloxacin, linezolid, PNU-142300 (Gr2/medium; 10-40%); aztreonam, carumonam, cefozopran, doripenem, imipenem, and ceftazidime (Gr3/high; >50%). Rifapentine, cabotegravir, and dolutegravir was used for fecal scaling (high; >50%). 2. The employment of allometry equation: Y = aW(b) enabled scaling of urine/fecal amounts from animal species. Corresponding predicted amounts were converted into % recovery by considering the respective human dose. Comparison of predicted/observed values enabled fold difference and error calculations (mean absolute error [MAE] and root mean square error [RMSE]). Comparisons were made for urinary/fecal data; and qualitative assessment was made amongst Gr1/Gr2/Gr3 for urine. 3. Average correlation coefficient for the allometry scaling was >0.995. Excretory amount predictions were largely within 0.75- to 1.5-fold differences. Average MAE and RMSE were within ±22% and 23%, respectively. Although robust predictions were achieved for higher urinary/fecal excretion (>50%), interspecies scaling was applicable for low/medium excretory drugs. 4. Based on the data, interspecies scaling of urine or fecal excretory amounts may be potentially used as a tool to understand the significance of either urinary or fecal routes of elimination in humans in early development. PMID:26711252

  5. Effect of Pneumoperitoneum on Renal Function and Physiology in Patients Undergoing Robotic Renal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sodha, Serena; Nazarian, Scarlet; Adshead, James M.; Vasdev, Nikhil; Mohan-S, Gowrie

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic and minimally-invasive robotic access has transformed the delivery of urological surgery. While associated with numerous desirable outcomes including shorter post-operative stay and faster return to preoperative function, these techniques have also been associated with increased morbidity such as reduced renal blood flow and post-operative renal dysfunction. The mechanisms leading to these renal effects complex and multifactorial, and have not been fully elucidated. However they are likely to include direct effects from raised intra-abdominal pressure, and indirect effects secondary to carbon dioxide absorption, neuroendocrine factors and tissue damage from oxidative stress. This review summarises these factors, and highlights the need for further work in this area, to direct novel therapies and guide alterations in technique with the aim of reducing renal dysfunction post-laparoscopic and robotic surgery. PMID:26989363

  6. Multicystic renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, V P; Ratnakar, K S

    2001-07-01

    Multicystic renal dysplasia, the most common form of cystic renal disease in the newborn period, is a clinically important consequence of abnormal nephrogenesis. It usually presents as an abdominal mass. The dysplasias are usually unilateral, but it can be bilateral, segmental or focal. The clinical presentation usually depends on the extent of the dysplastic involvement and the degree of the associated urinary obstruction. Here, we present a case of histologically multicystic renal dysplasia, which is ?bilateral. The left kidney showed typical radiological, gross and histopathological features of multicystic dysplasia, but the right kidney showed only radiological features of dysplastic cystic kidney. PMID:11479648

  7. Renal Replacement Therapy.

    PubMed

    Villa, Gianluca; Ricci, Zaccaria; Ronco, Claudio

    2015-10-01

    Renal replacement therapy (RRT) is a cornerstone in the clinical management of patients with acute kidney injury. Results from different studies agree that early renal support therapy (aimed to support the residual kidney function during early phases of organ dysfunction) may reduce mortality with respect to late RRT (aimed to substitute the complete loss of function during the advanced kidney insufficiency). Although it seems plausible that a timely initiation of RRT may be associated with improved renal and nonrenal outcomes in these patients, there is scarce evidence in literature to exactly identify the most adequate onset timing for RRT. PMID:26410148

  8. Renal Autoregulation in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Carlström, Mattias; Wilcox, Christopher S.; Arendshorst, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Intrarenal autoregulatory mechanisms maintain renal blood flow (RBF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) independent of renal perfusion pressure (RPP) over a defined range (80–180 mmHg). Such autoregulation is mediated largely by the myogenic and the macula densa-tubuloglomerular feedback (MD-TGF) responses that regulate preglomerular vasomotor tone primarily of the afferent arteriole. Differences in response times allow separation of these mechanisms in the time and frequency domains. Mechanotransduction initiating the myogenic response requires a sensing mechanism activated by stretch of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and coupled to intracellular signaling pathways eliciting plasma membrane depolarization and a rise in cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). Proposed mechanosensors include epithelial sodium channels (ENaC), integrins, and/or transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. Increased [Ca2+]i occurs predominantly by Ca2+ influx through L-type voltage-operated Ca2+ channels (VOCC). Increased [Ca2+]i activates inositol trisphosphate receptors (IP3R) and ryanodine receptors (RyR) to mobilize Ca2+ from sarcoplasmic reticular stores. Myogenic vasoconstriction is sustained by increased Ca2+ sensitivity, mediated by protein kinase C and Rho/Rho-kinase that favors a positive balance between myosin light-chain kinase and phosphatase. Increased RPP activates MD-TGF by transducing a signal of epithelial MD salt reabsorption to adjust afferent arteriolar vasoconstriction. A combination of vascular and tubular mechanisms, novel to the kidney, provides for high autoregulatory efficiency that maintains RBF and GFR, stabilizes sodium excretion, and buffers transmission of RPP to sensitive glomerular capillaries, thereby protecting against hypertensive barotrauma. A unique aspect of the myogenic response in the renal vasculature is modulation of its strength and speed by the MD-TGF and by a connecting tubule glomerular feedback (CT-GF) mechanism

  9. [NEPHROPROTECTIVE PROPERTIES OF 5-HT3 RECEPTOR BLOCKER RU-63 IN EXPERIMENTAL ACUTE RENAL FAILURE UNDER HYPERGRAVITY CONDITIONS].

    PubMed

    Zaitseva, E N; Dubishchev, A V; Yakovlev, D S; Anisimova, V A

    2016-01-01

    The effective diuretic dose of 5-HT3 receptor blocker RU-63 (1 mg/kg) was found in experiments on white rats. It is established that the diuretic and saluretic effects of compound RU-63 increase on the background of impact of the gravitational factor. Compound RU-63 (1 mg/kg, subcutaneously) administered daily under hypergravity conditions (3 g in the direction of centrifugal force toward the kidneys) in animals with model ischemic acute renal failure increased excretory function of kidneys, glomerular filtration rate, and creatininuresis (on average by 180%; p < 0.05), and decreased serum creatinine, urinary excretion of protein, lactate dehydrogenase, and g-glutamyl transferase (on average by 49%; p < 0.05) as compared to the untreated control. Under similar conditions, the diuretic hydrochlorothiazide (in a dose of 20 mg/kg, intragastric) produced a more pronounced creatininuretic action than that of RU-63 (by 358%; p < 0.05). PMID:27455574

  10. Renal effects of anti-gravity suit inflation in man in relation to cardiovascular and hormonal changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geelen, G.; Kravik, S. E.; Hadj-Aissa, A.; Vincent, M.; Sem-Jacobsen, C. W.; Greenleaf, J.; Gharib, C.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that inflation for 3 hr of an antigravity suit that covered the legs and abdomen of normal standing subjects results in significant increases in urine flow, osmolar and free water clearances, total and fractional sodium excretion, and potassium excretion, while glomerular filtration rate and renal plasma flow are transiently increased. Such changes in kidney function are the consequence of the increase in thoracic blood volume induced by inflation which also results in an immediate increase in blood pressure and reflex bradycardia, together with a progressive lowering of plasma renin activity and aldosterone. The changes in kidney excretory patterns brought about by suit inflation appear to be similar in nature and magnitude to those observed during water immersion or in the early phase of bed rest, situations known to result in a headward redistribution of blood.