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  1. Acute Cardiac Tamponade: An Unusual Cause of Acute Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Phadke, Gautam; Whaley-Connell, Adam; Dalal, Pranavkumar; Markley, John; Rich, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    We are reporting a case of acute renal failure after cardiac surgery due to acute pericardial effusion. The patient had normal baseline renal function but developed acute oliguric renal failure with a significant increase in serum creatinine postoperatively. Pericardiotomy led to an improvement in blood pressure, immediate diuresis and quick recovery of renal function back to baseline. Pericardial tamponade should be included in the consideration of causes of the cardiorenal syndrome. PMID:22619656

  2. [Acute renal failure caused by phenazopyridine].

    PubMed

    Vega, Jorge

    2003-05-01

    A 27 years old woman was admitted due to abdominal cramps, jaundice and oligoanuria, starting 48 hours after eating Chinese food. Hepatic biochemical tests, abdominal ultrasound and retrograde pyelography were normal. The urine was intensely orange colored and microscopic analysis was normal. The serum creatinine and urea nitrogen on admission were 4.59 and 42.5 mg/dl and rose to 13.5 and 72.4 mg/dl, respectively, at the 6th hospital day. Oliguria lasted only 48 hours. Dialysis was not used, since the patient was in good general condition and uremic symptoms were absent. On the 7th day, azotemia began to subside and at the 14th day, serum creatinine was 1.0 mg/dl. Before hospital discharge, she confessed the ingestion of 2.000 mg of phenazopyridine, during a nervous breakdown, aiming to sleep deeply. Remarkable was the persistence of the orange color of her urine during several days and the dissociation between the rate of increase of serum creatinine with respect to urea nitrogen. This is an unusual case of acute renal failure caused by an overdose of a drug, commonly prescribed for urinary tract infections. PMID:12879816

  3. Leptospirosis: an ignored cause of acute renal failure in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Yang, C W; Pan, M J; Wu, M S; Chen, Y M; Tsen, Y T; Lin, C L; Wu, C H; Huang, C C

    1997-12-01

    Leptospirosis, caused by a spirochete, is the most common zoonosis in domestic or wild animals. Animals excrete infected urine in soil or water and may cause human infections through abrased wound, mucosa, conjunctiva, or by swallowing contaminated water. Clinical presentations of leptospirosis are mostly subclinical. Five to ten percent of leptospirosis are fatal, causing fever, hemorrhage, jaundice, and acute renal failure (Weil's syndrome). Leptospirosis has been ignored as a cause of acute renal failure in Taiwan. We report two patients with leptospirosis who presented with high fever, abdominal pain, jaundice, and acute renal failure. Patient 1 died on day 12 of admission of multiple organ failure associated with pancytopenia, hypogammaglobulinemia, and reactive hemophagocytosis. Leptospirosis was recognized after death. Patient 2 was admitted with similar presentations 2 weeks later. Penicillin and doxycycline were given early in the course, and azotemia, jaundice, respiratory failure, and aseptic meningitis gradually improved. Renal biopsy showed interstitial nephritis. Several tubular clearance tests showed proximal tubular defect with severe bicarbonate wasting (FeHCO3- 20.9%) and incomplete type II renal tubular acidosis without affecting the distal nephron. After 80 days of treatment, this patient was discharged with recovery of conscious level and renal function. This is the first leptospirosis patient with detailed tubular functional and morphological studies of the kidney. Diagnosis of leptospirosis was made by microscopic agglutination test (MAT) for antibody to leptospira and by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for leptospira DNA in blood and urine (interrogans serogroup australis in case 1 and Leptospira borgpetersenii serogroup ballum in case 2). Because active surveillance has resulted in 13 cases diagnosed as leptospirosis islandwide thereafter, underestimation and ignorance of leptospirosis as a cause of acute renal failure may occur in Taiwan

  4. [Acetaminophen (paracetamol) causing renal failure: report on 3 pediatric cases].

    PubMed

    Le Vaillant, J; Pellerin, L; Brouard, J; Eckart, P

    2013-06-01

    Renal failure secondary to acetaminophen poisoning is rare and occurs in approximately 1-2 % of patients with acetaminophen overdose. The pathophysiology is still being debated, and renal acetaminophen toxicity consists of acute tubular necrosis, without complication if treated promptly. Renal involvement can sometimes occur without prior liver disease, and early renal manifestations usually occur between the 2nd and 7th day after the acute acetaminophen poisoning. While therapy is exclusively symptomatic, sometimes serious metabolic complications can be observed. The monitoring of renal function should therefore be considered as an integral part of the management of children with acute, severe acetaminophen intoxication. We report 3 cases of adolescents who presented with acute renal failure as a result of voluntary drug intoxication with acetaminophen. One of these 3 girls developed severe renal injury without elevated hepatic transaminases. None of the 3 girls' renal function required hemodialysis, but one of the 3 patients had metabolic complications after her acetaminophen poisoning. PMID:23628119

  5. [Unexpected cause of acute renal failure in an 85-year-old woman].

    PubMed

    Fabbian, F; Stabellini, N; Catizone, L

    2008-01-01

    Acute postinfectious glomerulonephritis (APIGN) is usually diagnosed in young people, while in elderly people rapidly progressive forms appear to be the most important glomerular disease causing acute renal failure. We report on a 85-year-old woman with acute renal failure due to APIGN. An 85-year-old woman with a history of hypertension and cerebrovascular disease was hospitalized because of diarrhea and syncope associated with atrial fibrillation. She was found to have left lower lobe pneumonia. Serum creatinine was over 2 mg/dL. Fluids were given, without improvement in renal function but leading to volume overload instead. Within a few days serum creatinine reached a level of 5.4 mg/dL with reduction of urine output despite administration of diuretics. The patient developed hematuria and purpura of the feet. Serum IgA was high and the urine sediment showed casts. Methylprednisolone 125 mg i.v. was given for three days followed by prednisone 50 mg daily. The patient's clinical condition gradually improved and serum creatinine decreased to 1.9 mg/dL. Renal biopsy showed APIGN. During hospitalization, three major complications occurred: hemodynamic instability due to atrial fibrillation, Clostridium difficile colitis and urinary tract infections due to Enterococcus faecalis and Candida tropicans, all successfully treated. APIGN should be taken into account as a cause of acute renal failure in hospitalized elderly patients with many comorbidities. PMID:19048577

  6. Primary Hyperoxaluria Type 1: A Cause for Infantile Renal Failure and Massive Nephrocalcinosis.

    PubMed

    Kurt-Sukur, E D; Özçakar, Z B; Fitöz, S; Yilmaz, S; Hoppe, B; Yalçinkaya, F

    2015-09-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria type 1 is a rare autosomal-recessive disease caused by the deficient activity of the liver specific enzyme alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase. Increased endogenous oxalate production induces severe hyperoxaluria, recurrent urolithiasis, progressive nephrocalcinosis and renal failure. Here we report a 6 month old boy who presented with vomiting and decreased urine volume. He was diagnosed with chronic kidney failure at 4 months of age and peritoneal dialysis was introduced at a local hospital. His parents were third degree cousins and family history revealed 2 maternal cousins who developed end stage renal disease during childhood. When he was admitted to our hospital, laboratory studies were consistent with end stage renal disease, ultrasound showed bilateral massive nephrocalcinosis. As clinical presentation was suggestive for primary hyperoxaluria type 1, plasma oxalate was determined and found extremely elevated. Genetic testing proved diagnosis by showing a disease causing homozygous mutation (AGXT-gene: c.971_972delT). The patient was put on pyridoxine treatment and aggressive dialysis programme. In conclusion; progressive renal failure in infancy with massive nephrocalcinosis, especially if accompanied by consanguinity and family history, should always raise the suspicion of PH type 1. Increased awareness of the disease would help physicians in both treating the patients and guiding the families who have diseased children and plan to have further pregnancies. PMID:26090995

  7. [Familial juvenile nephronophthisis--a cause of chronic renal failure in childhood].

    PubMed

    Vergesslich, K A; Ponhold, W; Balzar, E; Syrè, G; Ulrich, W

    1986-05-30

    Familial juvenile nephronophthisis (FJN) represents an important cause of chronic renal insufficiency in the first two decades of life. Its frequency is reported to vary between 7 and 20% of all cases of terminal renal failure in childhood. Usually the onset is insidious, with polyuria, polydipsia and anaemia being the main clinical features. The diagnosis is based on clinical, laboratory and pathological findings. The purpose of our report is to emphasize the importance of this pathological entity with respect to the clinical symptoms and signs and diagnostic approach on the basis of the case reports of four patients. PMID:3524015

  8. Hyperprolactinemia as a rare cause of hypertension in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Gulleroglu, Kaan; Olgac, Asburce; Bayrakci, Umut; Erdogan, Ozlem; Kinik, Sibel Tulgar; Baskin, Esra

    2012-01-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) is associated with a high risk for hypertension. An individualized treatment should be initiated after the diagnosis of hypertension and underlying etiology. Many metabolic and endocrinal abnormalities are encountered in CRF. We present an 11-year-old boy with CRF developing galactorrhea and hyperprolactinemia associated with α-methyldopa, defective dopaminergic control, and resistance to multi-antihypertensive therapy. Cabergoline, a dopamine receptor agonist, was effectively used in the treatment of hypertension. It is important to remember that sometimes treatment of an illness becomes the cause of this illness. PMID:22462393

  9. Djenkol bean poisoning (djenkolism): an unusual cause of acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Segasothy, M; Swaminathan, M; Kong, N C; Bennett, W M

    1995-01-01

    This report describes a patient with acute renal failure that resulted from the ingestion of djenkol beans. Features of acute djenkolism include nausea, vomiting, bilateral loin pain, gross hematuria, and oliguria. The blood urea level was 16.2 mmol/L and the serum creatinine was 460 mumol/L. Phase contrast microscopy of the urinary sediment indicated that the hematuria was nonglomerular. Ultrasound of the kidneys showed slightly enlarged kidneys with no features of obstruction. Renal biopsy showed acute tubular necrosis similar to the single animal study reported in the literature. With conservative therapy, which included rehydration with normal saline and alkalinization of the urine with sodium bicarbonate, the acute renal failure resolved. Based on its chemistry, djenkol bean-associated acute renal failure may be analogous to acute uric acid nephropathy. PMID:7810535

  10. Kidney (Renal) Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... renal function using ureteral stenting, nephrostomy, surgery or dialysis. What is kidney (renal) failure? How is kidney ... as a urinary stent or kidney stone removal. Dialysis , including hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis: These procedures remove ...

  11. Acute Renal Failure after Uterine Artery Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Rastogi, Sachin; Wu, Yu-Hsin; Shlansky-Goldberg, Richard D.; Stavropoulos, S. William

    2004-09-15

    Renal failure is a potential complication of any endovascular procedure using iodinated contrast, including uterine artery embolization (UAE). In this report we present a case of acute renal failure (ARF) following UAE performed as a treatment for uterine fibroids. The likely causes of ARF in this patient are explored and the possible etiologies of renal failure in patients undergoing UAE are reviewed.

  12. Urea distribution in renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Blackmore, D. J.; Elder, W. J.; Bowden, C. H.

    1963-01-01

    An assessment of intracellular urea removed during haemodialysis has been made from urea extraction and plasma urea estimations. An apparent wide variation in the movement of intracellular urea in patients with acute renal failure from obstetric and traumatic causes and with chronic renal failure is reported. A method for the estimation of red cell water urea is presented. In two patients with chronic renal failure the red cell urea level was much higher than would have been expected from the plasma urea level before dialysis. In two obstetric patients there was no such discrepancy. The conclusion is drawn that research should be directed to variations of intracellular metabolism in renal failure before a more rational approach can be made to its management. PMID:16811009

  13. Regression of long standing anorexia nervosa following acute renal failure caused by gentamicin intoxication.

    PubMed

    Chodorowski, Zygmunt; Rutkowski, Bolesław; Sein Anand, Jacek; Rutkowski, Przemysław

    2005-01-01

    A female patient aged 22 with fully developed symptoms of anorexia nervosa presented the following metabolic disturbances: persistent hyperuricemia, hyponatruria, (sometimes with sodium lack in urine) as well as frequent hyponatremia and hyper-uricosuria. The patient's low arterial blood pressure (70/40 mm Hg on average) was not improved by pharmacological treatment, and only high oral doses of table salt (20-70 g/24 h) did prove effective in the therapy. The subject passed seven renal calculi composed of sodium urate and uric acid. Numerous urinalyses did not reveal any changes, and bacterial cultures of the urine were also negative. After 14 years of anorexia nervosa, the patient was treated for pneumonia with gentamicin at doses of 2 x 80 mg/24 h. Following third dose of the antibiotic, the patient developed acute renal failure and was treated by haemodialysis for six weeks. The renal function came gradually to the norm. Simultaneously, all the anorexia nervosa symptoms subsided along with sodium metabolism disturbances, while purine metabolism disorders got considerably alleviated. The patient started to have her menstrual cycles again, gained 12 kg in body weight, and one year afterwards bore a son. A further 10-year follow-up period was free of any pathological changes except for a slight hyperuricemia. To the best of our knowledge, the similar case has not been reported in the medical literature and electronic data bases. PMID:16225114

  14. Non catheter-related bacteremia caused by Pseudomonas oryzihabitans in an adolescent with chronic renal failure undergoing peritoneal dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Karampatakis, T; Sevastidou, A; Argyropoulou, E; Printza, N; Tsivitanidou, M; Siaka, E

    2012-01-01

    A Pseudomonas oryzihabitans clinical isolate was recovered from a blood sample. The patient, a 14-year-old-adolescent underwent parathyroidectomy due to secondary hyperparathyroidism. The patient had been going peritoneal dialysis because of chronic renal failure. According to the susceptibility testing conducted with phenotypic methods the microorganism was sensitive to the vast majority of the antibiotics. The isolation of this rare species of Pseudomonas combined with the patient's medical history stimulated as to focus on the causes of the bacteremia, which was non catheter-related. PMID:23930068

  15. Non catheter-related bacteremia caused by Pseudomonas oryzihabitans in an adolescent with chronic renal failure undergoing peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Karampatakis, T; Sevastidou, A; Argyropoulou, E; Printza, N; Tsivitanidou, M; Siaka, E

    2012-01-01

    A Pseudomonas oryzihabitans clinical isolate was recovered from a blood sample. The patient, a 14-year-old-adolescent underwent parathyroidectomy due to secondary hyperparathyroidism. The patient had been going peritoneal dialysis because of chronic renal failure. According to the susceptibility testing conducted with phenotypic methods the microorganism was sensitive to the vast majority of the antibiotics. The isolation of this rare species of Pseudomonas combined with the patient's medical history stimulated as to focus on the causes of the bacteremia, which was non catheter-related. PMID:23930068

  16. Focus on renal congestion in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Afsar, Baris; Ortiz, Alberto; Covic, Adrian; Solak, Yalcin; Goldsmith, David; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Hospitalizations due to heart failure are increasing steadily despite advances in medicine. Patients hospitalized for worsening heart failure have high mortality in hospital and within the months following discharge. Kidney dysfunction is associated with adverse outcomes in heart failure patients. Recent evidence suggests that both deterioration in kidney function and renal congestion are important prognostic factors in heart failure. Kidney congestion in heart failure results from low cardiac output (forward failure), tubuloglomerular feedback, increased intra-abdominal pressure or increased venous pressure. Regardless of the cause, renal congestion is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in heart failure. The impact on outcomes of renal decongestion strategies that do not compromise renal function should be explored in heart failure. These studies require novel diagnostic markers that identify early renal damage and renal congestion and allow monitoring of treatment responses in order to avoid severe worsening of renal function. In addition, there is an unmet need regarding evidence-based therapeutic management of renal congestion and worsening renal function. In the present review, we summarize the mechanisms, diagnosis, outcomes, prognostic markers and treatment options of renal congestion in heart failure. PMID:26798459

  17. A Rare Case of Fatal Endocarditis and Sepsis Caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a Patient with Chronic Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Vijan, Vikrant; Vupputuri, Anjith; Nandakumar, Sandya; Mathew, Navin

    2016-01-01

    Nosocomial catheter-related and Arteriovenous fistula (AV)-related infections are significant concern in patients undergoing haemodialysis. These infections are associated with multiple complications as well as mortality and demands immediate and appropriate management. While coagulase-negative staphylococci, S.aureus, and Escherichia coli are the most common causes of catheter-related infections in haemodialysis patients, such infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa are relatively rare. Here, we present an unusual case of 36-year-old male patient with chronic renal failure, who developed endocarditis and sepsis from Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection of the left hand arteriovenous fistula. The bacteraemia in the present case caused multiple complications including dry gangrene of bilateral lower limbs, stroke, endophthalmitis, left brachial artery thrombosis and vegetations on the interventricular septum and aortic wall. Despite antibiotic treatment, the patient suffered a cardiac arrest and could not be revived.

  18. Radiocontrast-induced renal failure

    SciTech Connect

    Misson, R.T.; Cutler, R.E.

    1985-05-01

    Review of the literature concerning contrast-induced renal dysfunction shows that the currently used agents are remarkably safe with careful patient selection. Clinically apparent kidney failure after their use is essentially nonexistent in those without preexistent renal insufficiency. The incidence rises rapidly in those with azotemia from any cause, however, and diabetic persons with nephropathy are perhaps at special risk. Vigorous volume expansion is possibly effective as a preventive measure and may attenuate adverse effects in those in whom postcontrast dysfunction occurs. New agents are becoming available. It is not yet known if these will prove safer or cost-effective. They have some experimentally demonstrated and theoretical advantages over the presently used agents. 58 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  19. Renal failure after ruptured aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Abbott, W M; Abel, R M; Beck, C H; Fischer, J E

    1975-09-01

    The effectiveness of an intravenous nutritional program plus aggressive dialysis was studied in 32 patients with renal failure following ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. Each patient was managed postoperatively with a renal failure fluid regimen, consisting of the eight essential amino acids plus dextrose in conjunction with peritoneal dialysis and hemodialysis. This regimen induced salutary metabolic effects temporarily improving the patient's condition in most instances. No technical or septic complications associated with the intravenous dietary therapy occurred. However, the incidence of recovery of renal function was low, and the overall patient survival was only 12.5%. The experience indicates that although this program has been shown to be efficacious in some patients with acute renal failure, it seems of little benefit in those whose renal failure follows ruptured aortic aneurysm. PMID:808197

  20. Renal disease and chronic renal failure in dental practice.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, J J; Wilson, M H; McArdle, N S; Stassen, L F A

    2008-01-01

    Patients with renal diseases are increasingly common in dental practice. This is due to advances in medicine, and the increasing life expectancy of western populations. Chronic renal failure is a serious condition that general dental practitioners may see in their practice. This article discusses the functions of the kidney, and the causes and medical management of chronic renal failure, as well as considerations in the dental management of these patients. Common complications such as infection and bleeding are discussed. General recommendations are made, based on current evidence with respect to prescribing of medications. PMID:18986093

  1. Common Cause Failure Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hark, Frank; Britton, Paul; Ring, Robert; Novack, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Space Launch System (SLS) Agenda: Objective; Key Definitions; Calculating Common Cause; Examples; Defense against Common Cause; Impact of varied Common Cause Failure (CCF) and abortability; Response Surface for various CCF Beta; Takeaways.

  2. Management of acute renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Fry, A C; Farrington, K

    2006-01-01

    Acute renal failure is a common condition, frequently encountered in both community practice and hospital inpatients. While it remains a heterologous condition, following basic principles makes investigation straightforward, and initial management follows a standard pathway in most patients. This article shows this, advises on therapeutic strategies, including those in special situations, and should help the clinician in deciding when to refer to a nephrologist, and when to consider renal replacement therapy. PMID:16461473

  3. Renal Dysfunction in Acute Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seong Woo

    2011-01-01

    During treatment of acute heart failure (AHF), worsening renal function is often complicated and results in a complex clinical course. Furthermore, renal dysfunction is a strong independent predictor of long-term adverse outcomes in patients with AHF. Traditionally, the predominant cause of renal dysfunction has been attributed to impairment of cardiac output and relative underfilling of arterial perfusion. Recently, emerging data have led to the importance of venous congestion and elevated intra-abdominal pressure rather than confining it to impaired forward cardiac output as the primary driver of renal impairment. Relief of congestion is a major objective of AHF treatment but therapy is still based on the administration of loop diuretics. The results of the recently performed controlled studies for the assessment of new treatments to overcome resistance to diuretic treatment to protect kidneys from untoward effects have been mostly neutral. Better treatment of congestion in heart failure remains a major problem. PMID:22125554

  4. Genetics Home Reference: action myoclonus-renal failure syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Action Myoclonus - Renal Failure Syndrome Genetic Testing Registry: Epilepsy, progressive myoclonic 4, with or without renal failure ... failure syndrome action myoclonus–renal failure syndrome AMRF epilepsy, progressive myoclonic 4, with or without renal failure ...

  5. Prevention of renal failure: the Malaysian experience.

    PubMed

    Hooi, Lai Seong; Wong, Hin Seng; Morad, Zaki

    2005-04-01

    Renal replacement therapy in Malaysia has shown exponential growth since 1990. The dialysis acceptance rate for 2003 was 80 per million population, prevalence 391 per million population. There are now more than 10,000 patients on dialysis. This growth is proportional to the growth in gross domestic product (GDP). Improvement in nephrology and urology services with widespread availability of ultrasonography and renal pathology has improved care of renal patients. Proper management of renal stone disease, lupus nephritis, and acute renal failure has decreased these as causes of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in younger age groups. Older patients are being accepted for dialysis, and 51% of new patients on dialysis were diabetic in 2003. The prevalence of diabetes is rising in the country (presently 7%); glycemic control of such patients is suboptimal. Thirty-three percent of adult Malaysians are hypertensive and blood pressure control is poor (6%). There is a national coordinating committee to oversee the control of diabetes and hypertension in the country. Primary care clinics have been provided with kits to detect microalbuminuria, and ACE inhibitors for the treatment of hypertension and diabetic nephropathy. Prevention of renal failure workshops targeted at primary care doctors have been launched, opportunistic screening at health clinics is being carried out, and public education targeting high-risk groups is ongoing. The challenge in Malaysia is to stem the rising tide of diabetic ESRD. PMID:15752245

  6. Nuclear medicine in acute and chronic renal failure

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, R.A.; Byun, K.J.

    1982-07-01

    The diagnostic value of renal scintiscans in patients with acute or chronic renal failure has not been emphasized other than for the estimation of renal size. /sup 131/I OIH, /sup 67/gallium, /sup 99m/TcDTPA, glucoheptonate and DMSA all may be valuable in a variety of specific settings. Acute renal failure due to acute tubular necrosis, hepatorenal syndrome, acute interstitial nephritis, cortical necrosis, renal artery embolism, or acute pyelonephritis may be recognized. Data useful in the diagnosis and management of the patient with obstructive or reflux nephropathy may be obtained. Radionuclide studies in patients with chronic renal failure may help make apparent such causes as renal artery stenosis, chronic pyelonephritis or lymphomatous kidney infiltration. Future correlation of scanning results with renal pathology promises to further expand nuclear medicine's utility in the noninvasive diagnosis of renal disease.

  7. Depletion of Phagocytic Cells during Nonlethal Plasmodium yoelii Infection Causes Severe Malaria Characterized by Acute Renal Failure in Mice.

    PubMed

    Terkawi, Mohamad Alaa; Nishimura, Maki; Furuoka, Hidefumi; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi

    2016-03-01

    In the current study, we examined the effects of depletion of phagocytes on the progression of Plasmodium yoelii 17XNL infection in mice. Strikingly, the depletion of phagocytic cells, including macrophages, with clodronate in the acute phase of infection significantly reduced peripheral parasitemia but increased mortality. Moribund mice displayed severe pathological damage, including coagulative necrosis in liver and thrombi in the glomeruli, fibrin deposition, and tubular necrosis in kidney. The severity of infection was coincident with the increased sequestration of parasitized erythrocytes, the systematic upregulation of inflammation and coagulation, and the disruption of endothelial integrity in the liver and kidney. Aspirin was administered to the mice to minimize the risk of excessive activation of the coagulation response and fibrin deposition in the renal tissue. Interestingly, treatment with aspirin reduced the parasite burden and pathological lesions in the renal tissue and improved survival of phagocyte-depleted mice. Our data imply that the depletion of phagocytic cells, including macrophages, in the acute phase of infection increases the severity of malarial infection, typified by multiorgan failure and high mortality. PMID:26755155

  8. [Spinal lipoma with a dural closure defect as a cause of neurogenic bladder and chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Eichler, I; Ungersböck, K; Waldhauser, F; Balzar, E; Nürnberger, N; Pflüger, H; Frisch, H

    1986-04-01

    It is reported on a 6-year-old boy, in whom 3 years after the appearance of a neurogenic disturbance of the urinary bladder a lipoma in the spinal canal of the inferior thoracic region was diagnosed myelographically. The operative removal of the growing and displacing fatty tissue which by a (congenital?) dural gap continued in epidural direction indeed resulted in a far-reaching regression of the paresis of the lower extremities, not, however, in an improvement of the urological picture of the disease. The renal insufficiency caused by the hydronephrosis was no more reversible, which emphasizes the importance of the early diagnosis of this relatively infrequent malformation. PMID:3727820

  9. Propranolol disposition in renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, A J; Vestal, R E; Spannuth, C L; Stone, W J; Wilkinson, G R; Shand, D G

    1980-01-01

    1 Previous studies of propranolol disposition in renal failure have been conflicting. 2 Using simultaneous administration of [3H]-propranolol intravenously and unlabelled propranolol orally the principal determinants of drug distribution were calculated in normals, patients with severe renal impairment (creatinine clearance 14.5 +/- 2.8 ml/min) but not on haemodialysis and patients on haemodialysis (creatinine clearance less than 5 ml/min). 3 The effect of haemodialysis on propranolol binding and free fraction was also examined. The percentage of propranolol unbound rose from 7.1% to 9.9%. (P less than 0.001) 20 min following heparinization and beginning haemodialysis. This was accompanied by a large rise in free fatty acids from 0.567 +/- 0.059 to 3.326 +/- 0.691 mumol/ml (P less than 0.005). 4 The blood to plasma concentration ratios of propranolol were significantly higher in patients with renal failure (P less than 0.02) and on haemodialysis (P less than 0.001) and were significantly negatively correlated (P less than 0.001) with the haematocrit. 5 Although the half-life propranolol was significantly shortened in the patients with renal failure (P less than 0.02), there was no change in the apparent liver blood flow, extraction ratio or the principal determinants of steady-state drug concentrations in blood namely oral and intravenous clearance from blood. 6 There is, therefore, no pharmacokinetic basis to adjust the dosage of propranolol in patients with renal failure. PMID:7470370

  10. Chronic renal failure in Sri Lanka caused by elevated dietary cadmium: Trojan horse of the green revolution.

    PubMed

    Bandara, J M R S; Wijewardena, H V P; Liyanege, J; Upul, M A; Bandara, J M U A

    2010-09-15

    The endemic of chronic renal failure (CRF) emerged in 2002 in the farming provinces of Sri Lanka. An estimate of dietary cadmium intake was between 15 and 28 microg/kg body weight per week. The mean urinary cadmium in patients diagnosed with stage 5 kidney failure was 7.6 microg/g creatinine and 11.6 microg/g for asymptomatic persons. The agrochemical triple superphosphate (TSP) fertilizer containing 23.5-71.7 mg Cd/kg was the source of cadmium added to soils. Mean Cd content in cultivated vs. uncultivated soils in Anuradhapura district was 0.02 +/- 0.01 vs. 0.11 +/- 0.19 mg/kg while in Polonnaruwa district, it was 0.005 +/- 0.004 vs. 0.016 +/- 0.005 mg/kg. Prior to the Green Revolution, the amount of fertilizer used in rice cultivation in 1970 was 32,000 metric tons (Mts) rising to 74,000 Mts in 1975. Up to 68.9 Mts of Cd could have entered into the rice-cascade reservoir environment from TSP use since 1973. Diversion of the Mahaweli River in 1970-1980 further increased cadmium input. Cadmium transfer from Upper Mahaweli water to Polgolla was 72.13 kg/day. Cadmium content of the sediments from reservoirs collecting cadmium from irrigated TSP fertilized crop fields (rice and vegetables) was 1.8-2.4 mg/kg. PMID:20430069

  11. What Causes Respiratory Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... easily move oxygen into your blood and remove carbon dioxide from your blood (gas exchange). This can cause a low oxygen level or high carbon dioxide level, or both, in your blood. Respiratory failure ...

  12. High urinary homoarginine excretion is associated with low rates of all-cause mortality and graft failure in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Frenay, Anne-Roos S; Kayacelebi, Arslan Arinc; Beckmann, Bibiana; Soedamah-Muhtu, Sabita S; de Borst, Martin H; van den Berg, Else; van Goor, Harry; Bakker, Stephan J L; Tsikas, Dimitrios

    2015-09-01

    Renal transplant recipients (RTR) have an increased cardiovascular risk profile. Low levels of circulating homoarginine (hArg) are a novel risk factor for mortality and the progression of atherosclerosis. The kidney is known as a major source of hArg, suggesting that urinary excretion of hArg (UhArg) might be associated with mortality and graft failure in RTR. hArg was quantified by mass spectrometry in 24-h urine samples of 704 RTR (functioning graft ≥1 year) and 103 healthy subjects. UhArg determinants were identified with multivariable linear regression models. Associations of UhArg with all-cause mortality and graft failure were assessed using multivariable Cox regression analyses. UhArg excretion was significantly lower in RTR compared to healthy controls [1.62 (1.09-2.61) vs. 2.46 (1.65-4.06) µmol/24 h, P < 0.001]. In multivariable linear regression models, body surface area, diastolic blood pressure, eGFR, pre-emptive transplantation, serum albumin, albuminuria, urinary excretion of urea and uric acid and use of sirolimus were positively associated with UhArg, while donor age and serum phosphate were inversely associated (model R (2) = 0.43). During follow-up for 3.1 (2.7-3.9) years, 83 (12 %) patients died and 45 (7 %) developed graft failure. UhArg was inversely associated with all-cause mortality [hazard risk (HR) 0.52 (95 % CI 0.40-0.66), P < 0.001] and graft failure [HR 0.58 (0.42-0.81), P = 0.001]. These associations remained independent of potential confounders. High UhArg levels are associated with reduced all-cause mortality and graft failure in RTR. Kidney-derived hArg is likely to be of particular importance for proper maintenance of cardiovascular and renal systems. PMID:26142633

  13. Common Cause Failure Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hark, Frank; Britton, Paul; Ring, Rob; Novack, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    Common Cause Failures (CCFs) are a known and documented phenomenon that defeats system redundancy. CCFS are a set of dependent type of failures that can be caused by: system environments; manufacturing; transportation; storage; maintenance; and assembly, as examples. Since there are many factors that contribute to CCFs, the effects can be reduced, but they are difficult to eliminate entirely. Furthermore, failure databases sometimes fail to differentiate between independent and CCF (dependent) failure and data is limited, especially for launch vehicles. The Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of NASA's Safety and Mission Assurance Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC) is using generic data from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's database of common cause failures at nuclear power plants to estimate CCF due to the lack of a more appropriate data source. There remains uncertainty in the actual magnitude of the common cause risk estimates for different systems at this stage of the design. Given the limited data about launch vehicle CCF and that launch vehicles are a highly redundant system by design, it is important to make design decisions to account for a range of values for independent and CCFs. When investigating the design of the one-out-of-two component redundant system for launch vehicles, a response surface was constructed to represent the impact of the independent failure rate versus a common cause beta factor effect on a system's failure probability. This presentation will define a CCF and review estimation calculations. It gives a summary of reduction methodologies and a review of examples of historical CCFs. Finally, it presents the response surface and discusses the results of the different CCFs on the reliability of a one-out-of-two system.

  14. Common Cause Failure Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hark, Frank; Britton, Paul; Ring, Rob; Novack, Steven D.

    2016-01-01

    Common Cause Failures (CCFs) are a known and documented phenomenon that defeats system redundancy. CCFS are a set of dependent type of failures that can be caused by: system environments; manufacturing; transportation; storage; maintenance; and assembly, as examples. Since there are many factors that contribute to CCFs, the effects can be reduced, but they are difficult to eliminate entirely. Furthermore, failure databases sometimes fail to differentiate between independent and CCF (dependent) failure and data is limited, especially for launch vehicles. The Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of NASA's Safety and Mission Assurance Directorate at Marshal Space Flight Center (MFSC) is using generic data from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's database of common cause failures at nuclear power plants to estimate CCF due to the lack of a more appropriate data source. There remains uncertainty in the actual magnitude of the common cause risk estimates for different systems at this stage of the design. Given the limited data about launch vehicle CCF and that launch vehicles are a highly redundant system by design, it is important to make design decisions to account for a range of values for independent and CCFs. When investigating the design of the one-out-of-two component redundant system for launch vehicles, a response surface was constructed to represent the impact of the independent failure rate versus a common cause beta factor effect on a system's failure probability. This presentation will define a CCF and review estimation calculations. It gives a summary of reduction methodologies and a review of examples of historical CCFs. Finally, it presents the response surface and discusses the results of the different CCFs on the reliability of a one-out-of-two system.

  15. Common Cause Failure Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherholt, Jon; Heimann, Timothy J.; Anderson, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    High technology industries with high failure costs commonly use redundancy as a means to reduce risk. Redundant systems, whether similar or dissimilar, are susceptible to Common Cause Failures (CCF). CCF is not always considered in the design effort and, therefore, can be a major threat to success. There are several aspects to CCF which must be understood to perform an analysis which will find hidden issues that may negate redundancy. This paper will provide definition, types, a list of possible causes and some examples of CCF. Requirements and designs from NASA projects will be used in the paper as examples.

  16. Parasites and chronic renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi Manesh, Reza; Hosseini Safa, Ahmad; Sharafi, Seyedeh Maryam; Jafari, Rasool; Bahadoran, Mehran; Yousefi, Morteza; Nasri, Hamid; Yousofi Darani, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Suppression of the human immune system results in an increase in susceptibility to infection by various infectious agents. Conditions such as AIDS, organ transplantation and chronic renal insufficiency (CRI) are the most important cause of insufficient immune response against infections. Long term renal disorders result in uremia, which can suppress human immune system. Parasitic infections are one of the most important factors indicating the public health problems of the societies. These infections can be more hostile and life threatening in susceptible individuals than in the normal people. In these patients some parasitic infections such as blastocystiosis, cryptosporidiosis and toxoplasmosis have been reported to be more prevalent. This review aimed to give an overview about parasitic infections in patients with renal disorders. PMID:25610885

  17. Acute renal failure due to falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Habte, B

    1990-01-01

    Seventy-two patients with severe falciparum malaria are described. Twenty-four (33.3%) were complicated by acute renal failure. Comparing patients with renal failure and those without, statistically significant differences occurred regarding presence of cerebral malaria (83% vs 46%), jaundice (92% vs 33%), and death (54% vs 17%). A significantly higher number of patients with renal failure were nonimmune visitors to malaria endemic regions. Renal failure was oliguric in 45% of cases. Dialysis was indicated in 38%, 29% died in early renal failure, and 33% recovered spontaneously. It is concluded that falciparum malaria is frequently complicated by cerebral malaria and renal failure. As nonimmune individuals are prone to develop serious complications, malaria prophylaxis and vigorous treatment of cases is mandatory. PMID:2236718

  18. Mutation in mitochondrial ribosomal protein S7 (MRPS7) causes congenital sensorineural deafness, progressive hepatic and renal failure and lactic acidemia.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Minal J; Guo, Yiran; Zhang, Jianguo; Riley, Lisa G; Cooper, Sandra T; Thorburn, David R; Li, Jiankang; Dong, Daoyuan; Li, Zhijun; Glessner, Joseph; Davis, Ryan L; Sue, Carolyn M; Alexander, Stephen I; Arbuckle, Susan; Kirwan, Paul; Keating, Brendan J; Xu, Xun; Hakonarson, Hakon; Christodoulou, John

    2015-04-15

    Functional defects of the mitochondrial translation machinery, as a result of mutations in nuclear-encoded genes, have been associated with combined oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) deficiencies. We report siblings with congenital sensorineural deafness and lactic acidemia in association with combined respiratory chain (RC) deficiencies of complexes I, III and IV observed in fibroblasts and liver. One of the siblings had a more severe phenotype showing progressive hepatic and renal failure. Whole-exome sequencing revealed a homozygous mutation in the gene encoding mitochondrial ribosomal protein S7 (MRPS7), a c.550A>G transition that encodes a substitution of valine for a highly conserved methionine (p.Met184Val) in both affected siblings. MRPS7 is a 12S ribosomal RNA-binding subunit of the small mitochondrial ribosomal subunit, and is required for the assembly of the small ribosomal subunit. Pulse labeling of mitochondrial protein synthesis products revealed impaired mitochondrial protein synthesis in patient fibroblasts. Exogenous expression of wild-type MRPS7 in patient fibroblasts rescued complexes I and IV activities, demonstrating the deleterious effect of the mutation on RC function. Moreover, reduced 12S rRNA transcript levels observed in the patient's fibroblasts were also restored to normal levels by exogenous expression of wild-type MRPS7. Our data demonstrate the pathogenicity of the identified MRPS7 mutation as a novel cause of mitochondrial RC dysfunction, congenital sensorineural deafness and progressive hepatic and renal failure. PMID:25556185

  19. Survival from acute renal failure after severe burns.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Y; Momma, S; Takamizawa, A; Nishida, S

    1984-12-01

    We describe a patient with 50 per cent, third degree flame burns who had a history of paint thinner inhalation for over 10 years. Moreover, chlorpromazine had been administered for the treatment of insomnia caused by chronic thinner intoxication. He developed oliguric acute renal failure soon after the burn injury, although adequate resuscitation therapy was given, and survived following frequent haemodialysis. Although survival from acute renal failure after severe burns is rare, once the diagnosis of acute renal failure has been made, haemodialysis should be instituted as early as possible. Furthermore, in a severely burnt patient with episodes of chronic and acute intoxication from organic chemicals or drugs which may have caused renal damage, acute renal failure may occur, so that careful observation is advised. PMID:6525538

  20. [Acute renal failure after participation in high endurance sport].

    PubMed

    Lange, Marie Liva Kjærgaard; Skansing, Terese Bräuner

    2016-01-18

    In two case report Danish men, who were experienced amateur athletes, suffered from severe reversible acute renal failure after participation in a trail run and a long-distance bike race. For both men the treatment was dialysis, diuretics and fluid therapy. The cause of renal failure was never fully clarified. Both men consumed non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs during the race, had high levels of creatinine kinase and were dehydrated. Possibly, these factors together resulted in "the perfect storm" and caused acute reversible renal failure. PMID:26815586

  1. Renal failure in cirrhosis: Emerging concepts

    PubMed Central

    Bittencourt, Paulo Lisboa; Farias, Alberto Queiroz; Terra, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Acute renal failure, now termed acute kidney injury (AKI), is frequently found in patients with cirrhosis. The occurrence of AKI, irrespective of the underlying cause, is associated with reduced in-hospital, 3-mo and 1-year survival. Hepatorenal syndrome is associated with the worst outcome among AKI patients with cirrhosis. Several definitions for AKI that have been proposed are outlined and evaluated in this paper. Among these, the International Club for Ascites-AKI criteria substantially strengthen the quality of early diagnosis and intervention according to underlying cause of AKI. PMID:26413223

  2. [Renal failure and cystic kidney diseases].

    PubMed

    Correas, J-M; Joly, D; Chauveau, D; Richard, S; Hélénon, O

    2011-04-01

    Cystic kidney diseases often are discovered at the time of initial work-up of renal failure through ultrasound or family history, or incidentally at the time of an imaging test. Hereditary diseases include autosomal dominant or recessive polycystic kidney disease (PKD), tuberous sclerosis (TS) and medullary cystic kidney disease (MCKD). Autosomal dominant PKD is characterized by large renal cysts developing in young adults. Renal failure is progressive and becomes severe around 50-60 years of age. Atypical cysts (hemorrhagic or hyperdense) are frequent on CT and MRI examinations. Imaging plays a valuable role in the management of acute complications such as cyst hemorrhage or infection. Autosomal recessive PKD is often detected in neonates, infants or young adults. It is characterized by renal enlargement due to the presence of small cysts and liver disease (fibrosis and biliary ductal dilatation). Late manifestation or slow progression of autosomal recessive PKD may be more difficult to distinguish from autosomal dominant PKD. These cystic kidney diseases should not be confused with non-hereditary incidental multiple renal cysts. In tuberous sclerosis, renal cysts are associated with angiomyolipomas and sometimes pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis. Renal failure is inconstant. Other hereditary cystic kidney diseases, including MCKD and nephronophtisis, are usually associated with renal failure. Non-hereditary cystic kidney diseases include multicystic renal dysplasia (due to complete pelvi-ureteric atresia or hydronephrosis), acquired multicystic kidney disease (chronic renal failure, chronic hemodialysis) and varied cystic kidney diseases (multicystic renal disease, glomerulocystic kidney disease, microcystic kidney disease). PMID:21549887

  3. Comorbid Heart Failure and Renal Impairment: Epidemiology and Management

    PubMed Central

    Iyngkaran, Pupalan; Thomas, Merlin; Majoni, William; Anavekar, Nagesh S.; Ronco, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Heart failure mortality is significantly increased in patients with baseline renal impairment and those with underlying heart failure who subsequently develop renal dysfunction. This accelerated progression occurs independent of the cause or grade of renal dysfunction and baseline risk factors. Recent large prospective databases have highlighted the depth of the current problem, while longitudinal population studies support an increasing disease burden. We have extensively reviewed the epidemiological and therapeutic data among these patients. The evidence points to a progression of heart failure early in renal impairment, even in the albuminuric stage. The data also support poor prescription of prognostic therapies. As renal function is the most important prognostic factor in heart failure, it is important to establish the current understanding of the disease burden and the therapeutic implications. PMID:23381594

  4. Dyschromatosis Universalis Hereditaria with Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Rojhirunsakool, Salinee; Vachiramon, Vasanop

    2015-01-01

    Dyschromatosis universalis hereditaria (DUH) is a rare autosomal dominant inherited dermatosis which usually appears during childhood and is characterized by dyspigmentation, with both hypopigmented and hyperpigmented macules. We report a case of DUH with unexplained childhood-onset renal failure. The association between DUH and renal failure is yet to be proven by further studies. PMID:25969678

  5. Acute renal failure in general surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Slapak, M

    1996-01-01

    The high mortality and morbidity can be significantly reduced by three cardinal steps: 1. Early diagnosis of intrinsic renal failure 2. Early institution of fluid restriction and dialysis 3. The identification of patients who are likely to be at high risk from acute renal failure, and the careful planning and institution of available therapeutic measures to prevent it. PMID:9155748

  6. Inconsequence of membrane choice in acute renal failure?

    PubMed

    Mujais, S K; Ivanavich, P

    1996-05-01

    The choice of hemodialysis membrane in acute renal failure has caused a heated debate, principally because of the dogmatism with which the results of preliminary clinical studies have been translated into prescription dictum. The issue, however, is not merely the limitations of these two studies, but rather the shift in emphasis they may have engendered in the approach to dialytic therapy in acute renal failure. Dogmatism based on limited or flawed data does not serve the interests of our patients, and the issue of hemodialysis in acute renal failure is far more complex than the exaggerated importance of membrane choice. PMID:8725627

  7. Computed radionuclide urogram for assessing acute renal failure

    SciTech Connect

    Schlegel, J.U.; Lang, E.K.

    1980-05-01

    The computed radionuclide urogram is advocated as a noninvasive diagnostic method for differentiation of the most common prerenal, renal, and postrenal causes of acute renal failure. On the basis of characteristic changes in the effective renal plasma flow rate, the calculated filtration fraction, and the calculated glomerular filtration rate, prerenal conditions such as renal artery stenosis or thrombosis, renal conditions such as acute rejection or acute tubular necrosis, and postrenal conditions such as obstruction or leakage, which are the most common causes of acute renal failure, can be differentiated. In conjunction with morphologic criteria derived from sonograms, a diagnosis with acceptable confidence can be rendered in most instances. Both the computed radionuclide urogram and sonogram are noninvasive and can be used without adverse effects in the presence of azotemia and even anuria. This also makes feasible reexamination at intervals to assess effect of therapy and offer prognostic information.

  8. Synthetic cannabinoid hyperemesis resulting in rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Argamany, Jacqueline R; Reveles, Kelly R; Duhon, Bryson

    2016-04-01

    Synthetic cannabinoid usage has increased in the past decade. Concurrently, emergency management of associated adverse effects due to synthetic cannabinoid usage has also risen. Reported toxicities include psychosis, seizures, cardiotoxicity, acute kidney injury, and death. While cannabis was first described as a cause of acute hyperemesis in 2004, a more recent case series also describes the association between cannabinoid hyperemesis and risk of acute renal failure. Synthetic cannabinoids have also been reported to cause acute hyperemesis and acute renal failure; however, the risk of rhabdomyolysis-induced renal failure has yet to be elucidated. In this article, we report the first known case of synthetic cannabinoid hyperemesis leading to rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure. PMID:26422191

  9. Abnormalities of endothelial function in patients with predialysis renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Thambyrajah, J; Landray, M; McGlynn, F; Jones, H; Wheeler, D; Townend, J

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Endothelial dysfunction plays an important role in the development of atherosclerotic vascular disease, which is the leading cause of mortality in patients with chronic renal failure.
OBJECTIVE—To examine the relation between predialysis renal failure and endothelial function.
DESIGN—Two groups were studied: 80 patients with non-diabetic chronic renal failure and 26 healthy controls, with similar age and sex distributions. Two indices of endothelial function were assessed: high resolution ultrasonography to measure flow mediated endothelium dependent dilatation of the brachial artery following reactive hyperaemia, and plasma concentration of von Willebrand factor. Endothelium independent dilatation was also assessed following sublingual glyceryl trinitrate. The patients were divided into those with and without overt atherosclerotic vascular disease.
RESULTS—Although patients with chronic renal failure had significantly impaired endothelium dependent dilatation compared with controls (median (interquartile range), 2.6% (0.7% to 4.8%) v 6.5% (4.8% to 8.3%); p < 0.001) and increased von Willebrand factor (254 (207 to 294) v 106 (87 to 138) iu/dl; p < 0.001), there was no difference between renal failure patients with and without atherosclerotic vascular disease. Within the chronic renal failure group, endothelium dependent dilatation and von Willebrand factor were similar in patients in the upper and lower quartiles of glomerular filtration rate (2.7% (0.7% to 6.7%) v 2.8% (1.1% to 5.0%); and 255 (205 to 291) v 254 (209 to 292) iu/dl, respectively). Endothelium independent dilatation did not differ between the renal failure or control groups and was also similar in patients with renal failure irrespective of the degree of renal failure or the presence of atherosclerotic vascular disease.
CONCLUSIONS—Endothelial function is abnormal in chronic renal failure, even in patients with mild renal insufficiency and those without

  10. Pharmacokinetics of brotizolam in renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Evers, J.; Renner, E.; Bechtel, W. D.

    1983-01-01

    1 Kinetics of brotizolam (0.25 mg) were studied in patients with different degrees of renal failure after single and repeated oral ingestion. Serum levels were analysed by radio-immunoassay. 2 Patients were divided into three groups according to their renal function, i.e. creatinine clearance values of 45-80, 15-45, or less than 15 ml/min. 3 The mean elimination half-life was 6.9-8.15 h, with a considerable variation of the peak concentration and elimination half-life in slight to moderate renal failure. There was no delay in elimination in severe renal failure and there was no drug accumulation. 4 No dose adjustment is necessary for brotizolam in renal failure. PMID:6661376

  11. Defective cellular immunity in renal failure: depression of reactivity of lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin by renal failure serum

    PubMed Central

    Newberry, W. Marcus; Sanford, Jay P.

    1971-01-01

    In defining host resistance factors in uremia, experiments were designed to assess the effect of renal failure serum upon the reactivity of normal human lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin in vitro. Normal buffy coat cells were resuspended in sera obtained from normal subjects and from 14 patients with renal failure, then stimulated with phytohemagglutinin M and the cellular response measured by the increase in thymidine or uridine uptake. The mean thymidine uptake by stimulated cells in normal sera was 14,389 ±1695 (SEM) cpm per 2 × 106 lymphocytes. Uridine uptake under the same conditions was 12,540 ±1887 cpm. Compared to these are a mean thymidine uptake of 2740 ±457 cpm and uridine uptake of 3928 ±667 cpm in renal failure sera. Both differences are significant at P<0.01 level. For controls representing “chronic illnesses,” sera from patients with pneumococcal meningitis, cirrhosis of the liver without jaundice, rheumatoid arthritis, and paraplegia with urinary tract infection did not cause suppression. No single drug had been taken by all the renal failure patients; three patients were taking no drugs. The serum from one patient with acute renal failure suppressed thymidine uptake while her serum obtained after recovery from her illness supported a normal lymphocyte response. Improvement of lymphocyte response was also noted in 9 of 10 sera obtained from patients immediately after hemodialysis. These observations plus the inhibition of stimulated cells by normal serum mixed with renal failure serum indicate the presence of a dialyzable inhibitory factor rather than the absence of a supporting factor in the renal failure sera. Lymphocytes preincubated for 24 hr in renal failure serum responded normally when transferred to normal serum and stimulated. Cells stimulated in normal serum and transferred to renal failure serum within the initial 24 hr of incubation demonstrated depressed thymidine uptake. Also, cell survival for 72 hr incubation as judged by

  12. Race and mortality after acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Waikar, Sushrut S; Curhan, Gary C; Ayanian, John Z; Chertow, Glenn M

    2007-10-01

    Black patients receiving dialysis for end-stage renal disease in the United States have lower mortality rates than white patients. Whether racial differences exist in mortality after acute renal failure is not known. We studied acute renal failure in patients hospitalized between 2000 and 2003 using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample and found that black patients had an 18% (95% confidence interval [CI] 16 to 21%) lower odds of death than white patients after adjusting for age, sex, comorbidity, and the need for mechanical ventilation. Similarly, among those with acute renal failure requiring dialysis, black patients had a 16% (95% CI 10 to 22%) lower odds of death than white patients. In stratified analyses of patients with acute renal failure, black patients had significantly lower adjusted odds of death than white patients in settings of coronary artery bypass grafting, cardiac catheterization, acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, pneumonia, sepsis, and gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Black patients were more likely than white patients to be treated in hospitals that care for a larger number of patients with acute renal failure, and black patients had lower in-hospital mortality than white patients in all four quartiles of hospital volume. In conclusion, in-hospital mortality is lower for black patients with acute renal failure than white patients. Future studies should assess the reasons for this difference. PMID:17855647

  13. Renal failure in burn patients: a review

    PubMed Central

    Emara, S.S.; Alzaylai, A.A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Burn care providers are usually challenged by multiple complications during the management of acute burns. One of the most common complications worldwide is renal failure. This article reviews the various aspects of renal failure management in burn patients. Two different types of renal failures develop in these patients. The different aetiological factors, incidence, suspected prognosis, ways of diagnosing, as well as prevention methods, and the most accepted treatment modalities are all discussed. A good understanding and an effective assessment of the problem help to reduce both morbidity and mortality in burn management. PMID:23966893

  14. Prognostic factors in neonatal acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, R L; Campbell, F; Brenbridge, A N

    1984-08-01

    Sixteen infants, 2 to 35 days of age, had acute renal failure, a diagnosis based on serum creatinine concentrations greater than 1.5 mg/dL for at least 24 hours. Eight infants were oliguric (urine flow less than 1.0 mL/kg/h) whereas the remainder were nonoliguric. To determine clinical parameters useful in prognosis, urine flow rate, duration of anuria, peak serum creatinine, urea (BUN) concentration, and nuclide uptake by scintigraphy were correlated with recovery. Nine infants had acute renal failure secondary to perinatal asphyxia, three had acute renal failure as a result of congenital cardiovascular disease, and four had major renal anomalies. Four oliguric patients died: three of renal failure and one of heart failure. All nonoliguric infants survived with mean follow-up serum creatinine concentration of 0.8 +/- 0.5 (SD) mg/dL whereas that of oliguric survivors was 0.6 +/- 0.3 mg/dL. Peak serum creatinine concentration did not differ between those patients who were dying and those recovering. All infants who were dying remained anuric at least four days and revealed no renal uptake of nuclide. Eleven survivors were anuric three days or less, and renal perfusion was detectable by scintigraphy in each case. However, the remaining survivor (with bilateral renal vein thrombosis) recovered after 15 days of anuria despite nonvisualization of kidneys by scintigraphy. In neonates with ischemic acute renal failure, lack of oliguria and the presence of identifiable renal uptake of nuclide suggest a favorable prognosis. PMID:6462825

  15. Prognostic factors in neonatal acute renal failure

    SciTech Connect

    Chevalier, R.L.; Campbell, F.; Brenbridge, A.N.

    1984-08-01

    Sixteen infants, 2 to 35 days of age, had acute renal failure, a diagnosis based on serum creatinine concentrations greater than 1.5 mg/dL for at least 24 hours. Eight infants were oliguric (urine flow less than 1.0 mL/kg/h) whereas the remainder were nonoliguric. To determine clinical parameters useful in prognosis, urine flow rate, duration of anuria, peak serum creatinine, urea (BUN) concentration, and nuclide uptake by scintigraphy were correlated with recovery. Nine infants had acute renal failure secondary to perinatal asphyxia, three had acute renal failure as a result of congenital cardiovascular disease, and four had major renal anomalies. Four oliguric patients died: three of renal failure and one of heart failure. All nonoliguric infants survived with mean follow-up serum creatinine concentration of 0.8 +/- 0.5 (SD) mg/dL whereas that of oliguric survivors was 0.6 +/- 0.3 mg/dL. Peak serum creatinine concentration did not differ between those patients who were dying and those recovering. All infants who were dying remained anuric at least four days and revealed no renal uptake of nuclide. Eleven survivors were anuric three days or less, and renal perfusion was detectable by scintigraphy in each case. However, the remaining survivor (with bilateral renal vein thrombosis) recovered after 15 days of anuria despite nonvisualization of kidneys by scintigraphy. In neonates with ischemic acute renal failure, lack of oliguria and the presence of identifiable renal uptake of nuclide suggest a favorable prognosis.

  16. Reversible renal failure after treatment with omeprazole.

    PubMed

    Post, A T; Voorhorst, G; Zanen, A L

    2000-08-01

    Omeprazole is a proton pump inhibitor widely used in the treatment of gastro-esophageal reflux disease and peptic ulcer disease. In a 73-year-old man we describe renal failure due to acute interstitial nephritis after use of omeprazol during 4 months. Unexpected renal failure without signs of hydronephrosis should always provoke awareness of drug reaction, omeprazole being one of the possible drugs. PMID:10924942

  17. Immunization in children with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Laube, Guido F; Berger, Christoph; Goetschel, Philippe; Leumann, Ernst; Neuhaus, Thomas J

    2002-08-01

    Infections jeopardize children on immunosuppression after organ transplantation. Immunization is protective in healthy children. The aims of this study were to analyze the rate and efficacy of immunization in 62 children undergoing dialysis and renal transplantation (RTPL) between 1987 and 2000. The analysis was based on clinical findings, vaccination certificates, and measurement of specific serum antibodies. A member of the renal unit administered vaccinations. All 62 patients were immunized against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, poliomyelitis, measles, mumps, rubella, and hepatitis B. Since introduction in 1991 and 1995, 44 and 42 children were also vaccinated against influenza and Hemophilus influenzae type b, respectively. Of 16 patients with a negative history, 14 were given varicella vaccine; 16 children on peritoneal dialysis (PD) or with nephrotic syndrome were immunized against Streptococcus pneumoniae. All vaccinated patients had detectable serum antibodies against measles, mumps, rubella, varicella, hepatitis B, H. influenzae, and S. pneumoniae. There were 3 infections despite vaccination; 1 patient developed varicella after RTPL and 1 patient on PD had 2 episodes of peritonitis caused by H. influenzae and S. pneumoniae. In conclusion, monitoring and administration of the vaccines by the renal team enabled a high immunization rate. Whether vaccines, as documented by antibody titers, or by the low prevalence in the general population promoted the low prevalence of infections remains open, as there were at least a few vaccination failures. PMID:12185473

  18. Hepatocyte Growth Factor Prevents Acute Renal Failure of Accelerates Renal Regeneration in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaida, Kouichi; Matsumoto, Kunio; Shimazu, Hisaaki; Nakamura, Toshikazu

    1994-05-01

    Although acute renal failure is encountered with administration of nephrotoxic drugs, ischemia, or unilateral nephrectomy, there has been no effective drug which can be used in case of acute renal failure. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a potent hepatotropic factor for liver regeneration and is known to have mitogenic, motogenic, and morphogenic activities for various epithelial cells, including renal tubular cells. Intravenous injection of recombinant human HGF into mice remarkably suppressed increases in blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine caused by administration of cisplatin, a widely used antitumor drug, or HgCl_2, thereby indicating that HGF strongly prevented the onset of acute renal dysfunction. Moreover, exogenous HGF stimulated DNA synthesis of renal tubular cells after renal injuries caused by HgCl_2 administration and unilateral nephrectomy and induced reconstruction of the normal renal tissue structure in vivo. Taken together with our previous finding that expression of HGF was rapidly induced after renal injuries, these results allow us to conclude that HGF may be the long-sought renotropic factor for renal regeneration and may prove to be effective treatment for patients with renal dysfunction, especially that caused by cisplatin.

  19. Acute anuric renal failure following jering bean ingestion.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jin Shyan; Ong, Teng-Aik; Chua, Hock-Hin; Tan, Clare

    2007-01-01

    Djenkol beans or jering (Pithecellobium jeringa) is a traditional delicacy consumed by the local population in Malaysia. Jering poisoning or djenkolism is characterized by spasmodic pain, urinary obstruction and acute renal failure. The underlying pathology is an obstructive nephropathy, which is usually responsive to aggressive hydration and diuretic therapy. We present a case of djenkolism following ingestion of jering. The patient required urgent bilateral ureteric stenting following the failure of conservative therapy. Healthcare providers need to recognize djenkolism as a cause of acute renal failure and the public educated on this potential health hazard. PMID:17337378

  20. Renal Failure Prevalence in Poisoned Patients

    PubMed Central

    Arefi, Mohammad; Taghaddosinejad, Fakhroddin; Salamaty, Peyman; Soroosh, Davood; Ashraf, Hami; Ebrahimi, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    Background: Renal failure is an important adverse effect of drug poisoning. Determining the prevalence and etiology of this serious side effect could help us find appropriate strategies for the prevention of renal failure in most affected patients. Objectives: The present study is aimed to identify drugs that induce renal failure and also to find the prevalence of renal failure in patients referred to emergency departments with the chief complaint of drug poisoning, in order to plan better therapeutic strategies to minimize the mortality associated with drug poisoning induced renal failure. Patients and Methods: This cross-sectional study surveyed 1500 poisoned patients referred to the Emergency Department of Baharloo Hospital in Tehran during 2010. Demographic data including age and gender as well as clinical data including type of medication, duration of hospital stay, and presence of renal failure were recorded. Mann-Whitney U test and chi-squared statistics were used to analyze the results. Results: A total number of 435 patients were poisoned with several drugs, 118 patients were intoxicated with sedative-hypnotic drugs, 279 patients were exposed to opium, and 478 patients were administered to other drugs. The method of intoxication included oral 84.3%, injective 9%, inhalation 4.3% and finally a combination of methods 2.3%. Laboratory results revealed that 134 cases had renal failure and 242 had rhabdomyolysis. The incidence of rhabdomyolysis and renal failure increased significantly with age, and also with time of admission to the hospital. Renal failure was reported in 25.1% of patients exposed to opium, vs. 18.2% of patients poisoned with aluminum phosphide, 16.7% of those with organophosphate, 8% with multiple drugs, 6.7% with alcohol, heavy metals and acids, and 1.7% with sedative hypnotics. Conclusions: Based on the findings of this study, there is a high probability of renal failure for patients poisoned with drugs such as opium, aluminum phosphide

  1. What Causes Heart Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the heart, leading to heart failure. High Blood Pressure Blood pressure is the force of blood pushing against the ... weaken your heart and lead to plaque buildup. Blood pressure is considered high if it stays at or ...

  2. Renal failure in obstructive jaundice—pathogenic factors

    PubMed Central

    Wardle, E. N.

    1975-01-01

    In the patient with obstructive jaundice, preliminary dehydration, combined with the toxic effects of free bilirubin and serum bile acids, together with factors which cause inhibition of fibrinolysis, determine a high degree of renal susceptibility to ischaemia. Evidence from animals and man suggests that intravascular coagulation determined by endotoxaemia from the obstructed biliary system occurs at the onset of acute renal failure. Endotoxin is unique in being able to produce all those factors which separately cause a primary increase of renal arteriolar constriction. PMID:1234333

  3. Sustained Oxidative Stress Causes Late Acute Renal Failure via Duplex Regulation on p38 MAPK and Akt Phosphorylation in Severely Burned Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xiaoqing; Wang, Dexin; Wu, Kaimin; Chen, Hongli; Li, Jia; Lei, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical evidence indicates that late acute renal failure (ARF) predicts high mortality in severely burned patients but the pathophysiology of late ARF remains undefined. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that sustained reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced late ARF in a severely burned rat model and to investigate the signaling mechanisms involved. Materials and Methods Rats were exposed to 100°C bath for 15 s to induce severe burn injury (40% of total body surface area). Renal function, ROS generation, tubular necrosis and apoptosis, and phosphorylation of MAPK and Akt were measured during 72 hours after burn. Results Renal function as assessed by serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen deteriorated significantly at 3 h after burn, alleviated at 6 h but worsened at 48 h and 72 h, indicating a late ARF was induced. Apoptotic cells and cleavage caspase-3 in the kidney went up slowly and turned into significant at 48 h and 72 h. Tubular cell ROS production shot up at 6 h and continuously rose during the 72-h experiment. Scavenging ROS with tempol markedly attenuated tubular apoptosis and renal dysfunction at 72 h after burn. Interestingly, renal p38 MAPK phosphorylation elevated in a time dependent manner whereas Akt phosphorylation increased during the first 24 h but decreased at 48 h after burn. The p38 MAPK specific inhibitor SB203580 alleviated whereas Akt inhibitor exacerbated burn-induced tubular apoptosis and renal dysfunction. Furthermore, tempol treatment exerted a duplex regulation through inhibiting p38 MAPK phosphorylation but further increasing Akt phosphorylation at 72 h postburn. Conclusions These results demonstrate that sustained renal ROS overproduction induces continuous tubular cell apoptosis and thus a late ARF at 72 h after burn in severely burned rats, which may result from ROS-mediated activation of p38 MAPK but a late inhibition of Akt phosphorylation. PMID:23349934

  4. Pseudomelanosis duodeni associated with chronic renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Marcia Henriques de Magalhães; Pegado, Maria da Gloria Fernandes; Vargas, Cleber; Castro, Maria Elizabeth C; Madi, Kalil; Nunes, Tiago; Zaltman, Cyrla

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomelanosis duodeni (PD) is a rare dark speckled appearance of the duodenum associated with gastrointestinal bleeding, hypertension, chronic heart failure, chronic renal failure and consumption of different drugs. We report four cases of PD associated with chronic renal failure admitted to the gastroenterology outpatient unit due to epigastric pain, nausea, melena and progressive reduction of hemoglobin index. Gastroduodenal endoscopy revealed erosions in the esophagus and stomach, with no active bleeding at the moment. In addition, the duodenal mucosa presented marked signs of melanosis; later confirmed by histopathological study. Even though PD is usually regarded as a benign condition, its pathogenesis and clinical significance is yet to be defined. PMID:22493558

  5. Early diagnosis of renal disease and renal failure.

    PubMed

    Lees, George E

    2004-07-01

    The main goal of early diagnosis of renal disease and renal failure in dogs and cats is to enable timely application of therapeutic interventions that may slow or halt disease progression. Strategies for early diagnosis of renal disease use urine tests that detect proteinuria that is a manifestation of altered glomerular permselectivity or impaired urine-concentrating ability as well blood tests to evaluate plasma creatinine concentration. Animals with progressive renal disease should be carefully investigated and treated appropriately. Animals with mild, possibly nonprogressive, renal disease should be monitored adequately to detect any worsening trends,which should lead to further investigation and treatment even if the increments of change are small. PMID:15223206

  6. Acute renal failure and severe thrombocytopenia associated with metamizole.

    PubMed

    Redondo-Pachon, Maria Dolores; Enriquez, Ricardo; Sirvent, Ana Esther; Millan, Isabel; Romero, Alberto; Amorós, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Metamizole or dipyrone is a pyrazolone derivative that belongs to the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Its main side-effect is hematological toxicity. Thrombocytopenia due to metamizole is rare and is usually associated with the involvement of the two other blood series. Drug-induced thrombocytopenia is more frequently related to immune mechanisms, and the diagnosis is still largely made by exclusion of other causes and by correlation of timing of thrombocytopenia with the administration of drug. Metamizole may cause acute renal failure due to hemodynamic renal failure/acute tubular necrosis and/or acute tubulointerstitial nephritis. We report a case of acute renal failure and severe thrombocytopenia after metamizole. As far as we know, this combination of adverse effects from this drug has not been reported previously. PMID:24434395

  7. Dental management of patients with renal failure.

    PubMed

    Gudapati, Anil; Ahmed, Parveen; Rada, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Renal disease has become increasingly more prevalent in our society. There are many more people undergoing dialysis treatment and kidney transplants than there were only a decade ago. The dental care of these patients can be complex, given the medications associated with the disease and the medical conditions that result from inadequately functioning kidneys. This article reviews the literature regarding the dental management of patients with acute and chronic renal failure. PMID:12572182

  8. Myocardial Calcinosis in Chronic Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kempf, Ashley E.; Momeni, Maryam Golshan; Saremi, Farhood

    2009-01-01

    The authors are presenting an 18 year old male with history of end stage renal disease and rejected renal transplant. In his workup echocardiogram and non contract CT of chest revealed diffuse endocardial and myocardial calcifications. Extensive cardiac calcification is a rare but important entity in relation to end stage renal disease as it may cause complications such as valvular dysfunction and fatal arrhythmia. PMID:22470643

  9. Acute renal failure due to ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Allon, M; Lopez, E J; Min, K W

    1990-10-01

    Acute renal failure developed in three patients within a few days of starting ciprofloxacin hydrochloride therapy. An allergic interstitial nephritis was suggested by fever and eosinophiluria in one patient and by erythema multiforme in another. A kidney biopsy specimen confirmed this diagnosis in one patient. Renal function improved shortly after withdrawal of the drug in all three patients. Literature survey revealed an additional three patients with a similar complication. Allergic manifestations, such as fever or rash, were a feature in most reported cases. In view of this potential complication, renal function should be closely monitored in patients receiving ciprofloxacin therapy, especially if other potentially nephrotoxic drugs are prescribed concomitantly. PMID:2222106

  10. Anemia of renal failure. Use of erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Humphries, J E

    1992-05-01

    Chronic renal failure is almost invariably accompanied by symptomatic anemia. It has been demonstrated that the primary cause of this anemia is inadequate production of erythropoietin by the diseased kidneys. The isolation of erythropoietin, followed by the cloning and expression of the human erythropoietin gene, made possible clinical trials of rHuEPO in uremic patients. rHuEPO produced dramatic increases in the hematocrit in almost all patients treated and also ameliorated many symptoms, such as lethargy, dizziness, and poor appetite, that had long been attributed to the effect of uremic toxins. Adverse effects of treatment with rHuEPO noted in the early clinical trials included hypertension, seizures, arteriovenous fistula or shunt thrombosis, and hyperkalemia. Further study of rHuEPO has shown that many of these side effects may be no more frequent in patients receiving rHuEPO than in other uremic patients not receiving rHuEPO. Reduction of the rHuEPO dosage and subcutaneous administration produce less rapid increases in the hematocrit and may lessen the incidence and severity of these side effects. rHuEPO therapy places great demands on both the body's iron stores and the capacity to rapidly transfer iron from storage sites to the erythroid progenitor cells. Thus, almost all patients treated with rHuEPO become iron deficient and require oral or parenteral iron replacement. Response to rHuEPO in uremic patients is diminished if the anemia is complicated by iron deficiency, inflammatory disorders, aluminum overload, or deficiency of folate or vitamin B12. rHuEPO therapy is safe and effective in the treatment of the anemia of chronic renal failure. The use of rHuEPO leads to enhanced quality of life and eliminates the need for red cell transfusions. In addition to hemodialysis patients, predialysis patients and those on CAPD benefit from and are candidates for rHuEPO therapy. PMID:1578966

  11. Laboratory Markers of Ventricular Arrhythmia Risk in Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death continues to be a major public health problem. Ventricular arrhythmia is a main cause of sudden cardiac death. The present review addresses the links between renal function tests, several laboratory markers, and ventricular arrhythmia risk in patients with renal disease, undergoing or not hemodialysis or renal transplant, focusing on recent clinical studies. Therapy of hypokalemia, hypocalcemia, and hypomagnesemia should be an emergency and performed simultaneously under electrocardiographic monitoring in patients with renal failure. Serum phosphates and iron, PTH level, renal function, hemoglobin and hematocrit, pH, inflammatory markers, proteinuria and microalbuminuria, and osmolarity should be monitored, besides standard 12-lead ECG, in order to prevent ventricular arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death. PMID:24982887

  12. Delayed diagnosis of Townes-Brocks syndrome with multicystic kidneys and renal failure caused by a novel SALL1 nonsense mutation: A case report

    PubMed Central

    LIN, FU-JUN; LU, WEI; GALE, DANIEL; YAO, YAO; ZOU, REN; BIAN, FAN; JIANG, GENG-RU

    2016-01-01

    Townes-Brocks syndrome (TBS) is a rare autosomal dominant congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by the triad of anorectal, hand and external ear malformations. Kidney involvement is less common and may progress to end-stage renal failure (ESRF) early in life. The present study reports the case of a male patient presenting with multiple bilateral cortical kidney cysts at the age of 4 years, at which time the kidneys were of normal size and function. A clinical diagnosis of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease was made initially as the patient's parents are clinically healthy. However, the consideration of extra-renal involvements (imperforate anus at birth, preaxial polydactyly and dysplastic right ear) following the progression of the patient to ESRF at the age of 16 years, led to the diagnosis of TBS. This prompted sequencing of the SALL1 gene, which identified a novel heterozygous nonsense mutation in the mutational ‘hotspot’ of exon 2 (c.874C>T, p.Q292X), and this mutation was not detected in healthy controls. The current case highlights that TBS may present with normal sized, cystic kidneys in childhood, while recognition of extra-renal features of cystic kidney diseases, such as TBS, and genetic testing may facilitate the correct diagnosis and transmission mode. Reaching a correct diagnosis of as TBS is important since this condition has a 50% rate of transmission to offspring and can progress to ESRF early in life. PMID:27073431

  13. Intermittent Hemodialysis in Terminal Chronic Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, L. E.; Mandin, H.; Davidman, M.; Ulan, R.; Lakey, W. H.

    1966-01-01

    Seven patients with chronic renal failure underwent intermittent hemodialysis for five to 37 months (111 patient-months on a twice-weekly basis) employing arteriovenous Teflon-Silastic cannulas and the modified two-layer Kiil hemodialyzer. A single-pass 37° C. dialysate system has been used. One patient died of an indirectly related cause. All other patients have been successfully rehabilitated and now carry on normal activity of moderate sedentary type. Complications included recurring infection and clotting of arteriovenous cannulas. Hypertension and anemia were common complications requiring careful control. Peripheral neuropathy was noted in five of the seven patients but was of clinical significance in only one patient. Metastatic calcification, osteoporosis and urolithiasis also occurred in this patient. Peptic ulcers with hemorrhage developed in two patients. The degree of rehabilitation and psychological adjustment achieved by this group of patients strongly indicates the need for expansion of dialysis facilities and further research into the medical and economic aspects of dialysis. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:5903169

  14. Acute renal failure in patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Cohen, D J; Sherman, W H; Osserman, E F; Appel, G B

    1984-02-01

    In the past, patients with multiple myeloma and acute renal failure have had a poor prognosis. Few patients recovered renal function and fewer still survived for prolonged time periods. This report describes the course of 10 patients with multiple myeloma and true acute renal failure treated during the decade 1970 to 1980, and reviews recent reports concerning this association. The use of radiographic contrast agents is no longer the primary predisposing factor to acute renal failure in the myeloma population. Rather, infection, hypercalcemia, and dehydration in the presence of light chain excretion are the major conditions precipitating the renal failure. Despite severe renal failure requiring dialysis, many patients may regain good renal function. Factors associated with a good or poor prognosis in this population are reviewed. The prognosis in patients with myeloma and acute renal failure has greatly improved in recent years, and prolonged survival may occur. PMID:6695948

  15. Renal Infarction Caused by Isolated Spontaneous Renal Artery Intramural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sihyung; Lee, Ga Hee; Jin, Kyubok; Park, Kang Min; Kim, Yang Wook; Park, Bong Soo

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 46 Final Diagnosis: Renal infarction Symptoms: Flank pain Medication: — Clinical Procedure: CT Specialty: Nephrology Objective: Rare disease Background: Acute renal infarction is an uncommon condition resulting from an obstruction or a decrease in renal arterial blood flow. Isolated spontaneous renal artery intramural hematoma is a rare cause of renal infarction. Case Report: A 46-year-old healthy man presented to our emergency room because of sudden onset of severe right flank pain. An enhanced abdominal computed tomography scan showed a low-attenuated lesion in the lateral portion of the right kidney but no visible thromboembolisms in the main vessels. Computed tomography angiography revealed acute infarction resulting from intramural hematoma of the anterior segmental artery of the right kidney, with distal occlusion. Conclusions: The rarity and non-specific clinical presentation of renal infarction often lead to a delayed diagnosis that may result in impaired renal function. Clinical suspicion is important in the early diagnosis, and intramural hematoma of the renal artery should be considered the cause of renal infarction even in healthy patients without pre-disposing factors. PMID:26596500

  16. A case of cardiopulmonary arrest caused by laxatives-induced hypermagnesemia in a patient with anorexia nervosa and chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Tatsumi, Hiroomi; Masuda, Yoshiki; Imaizumi, Hitoshi; Kuroda, Hiromitsu; Yoshida, Shin-ichiro; Kyan, Ryoko; Goto, Kyoko; Asai, Yasufumi

    2011-12-01

    We report a case of laxatives induced severe hypermagnesemia complicated with cardiopulmonary arrest. A 55-year-old woman, with nephritic syndrome and anorexia nervosa, was later transported to our emergency room (ER) because of oliguria and consciousness disturbance. During transfer to the intensive care unit from the ER, cardiopulmonary arrest suddenly occurred. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was immediately performed, and spontaneous circulation was restored after 3 min. Thereafter, administration of dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine was required to maintain systolic blood pressure at 80 mmHg. Arterial blood gas analysis showed severe metabolic alkalosis, and blood biochemical tests revealed hypermagnesemia (serum magnesium concentration, 18.5 mg/dl) and renal dysfunction. Continuous infusion of diuretics followed by massive hydration and continuous hemodiafiltration (CHDF) was started. Five days after starting CHDF, magnesium concentration was almost normalized and administration of catecholamine was stopped. It was thought that progression of renal dysfunction that occurred in the patient taking a magnesium product for chronic constipation caused reduction in magnesium excretion ability, resulting in hypermagnesemia-induced cardiopulmonary arrest. To avoid a rebound phenomenon following magnesium flux from cells, continuous blood purification seems to be an effective treatment for symptomatic hypermagnesemia. PMID:21904782

  17. Renal failure in a calf secondary to chronic enteritis.

    PubMed

    Mechor, G D; Cebra, C; Blue, J

    1993-10-01

    This clinical report describes a case of renal failure in a Holstein calf. It is suggested that the renal failure was hemodynamically-mediated. The combination of a chronic enteritis and failure to ingest adequate fluids produced the hyponatremia, hypochloremia, and metabolic acidosis. The elevated BUN, creatinine, FENa, and isosthenuria confirmed the diagnosis of renal failure. Continued testing of the heifer demonstrated persistence of the renal failure even though the heifer appeared normal on clinical examination. Monitoring the growth rate of the heifer calf demonstrated a severe reduction when compared to age-matched herdmates. PMID:8306655

  18. Left ventricular function in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, B S; Milne, F J; Goldberg, B

    1976-01-01

    Left ventricular function was studied in 14 patients with end-stage chronic renal failure using non-invasive methods (echocardiography and systolic time intervals). Patients were divided into 3 groups. Group 1 consisted of 5 patients who were normotensive at the time of study and group 2 of 7 patients who were hypertensive when studied. Group 3 consisted of 2 patients: one was receiving propranolol and the other, studied 302 days after renal transplantation, was receiving digitalis for recurrent episodes of cardiac failure. All except the patient receiving propranolol had normal left ventricular function in systole with normal measurements of fractional fibre shortening (% delta S, EF) and normal measurements relating to the velocity of ventricular contraction (mean Vcf, mean velocity of posterior wall motion). Stroke volume and cardiac output were normal in some patients but were increased in patients with fluid overload. Early diastolic compliance of the left ventricle seemed to be normal except in the patient with recurrent cardiac failure. The study provided no evidence for the existence of a specific uraemic cardiomyopathy. PMID:1008967

  19. Renal failure due to granulomatous interstitial nephritis in native and allograft renal biopsies: experience from a tertiary care hospital.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pallav; Rana, D S; Bhalla, A K; Gupta, Ashwini; Malik, Manish; Gupta, Anurag; Bhargava, Vinant

    2014-10-01

    Granulomatous interstitial nephritis is a rare cause of renal failure in both native and allograft renal biopsies. Drugs and sarcoidosis are the commonest causes of granulomatous interstitial nephritis as reported in Western countries. Unlike the west, tuberculosis is the commonest cause of granulomatous interstitial nephritis in Indian subcontinent. The etiological factors, clinical course, glomerular and tubulointerstitial changes associated with granulomatous interstitial nephritis have been analyzed in the present study along with the outcome in patients with granulomatous interstitial nephritis. PMID:25155448

  20. Carbon monoxide poisoning and nonoliguric acute renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Bessoudo, R.; Gray, J.

    1978-01-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning in a 37-year-old man was complicated by neurologic damage, skin changes, muscle necrosis and nonoliguric renal failure. The relation between nontraumatic rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure in carbon monoxide poisoning is reviewed. Recognition of the acute renal failure in such cases is important, for this complication can be fatal; the prognosis is excellent, however, if proper medical management is provided. PMID:679099

  1. Renal

    MedlinePlus

    ... term "renal" refers to the kidney. For example, renal failure means kidney failure. Related topics: Kidney disease Kidney disease - diet Kidney failure Kidney function tests Renal scan Kidney transplant

  2. Urinary Tuberculosis with Renal Failure: Challenges in Management

    PubMed Central

    Chirmade, Rahul Arun; Baheti, Vidyasagar Hansraj; Tanwar, Harshawardhan Vedpalsingh; Patwardhan, Sujata Kiran; Gopalakrishnan, Ganesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction India is the country with the highest burden of TB, an estimated incidence figure of 2.1 million cases of TB for India out of a global incidence of 9 million according to World Health Organization (WHO) statistics for 2013. Renal impairment in these patients is slow and due to continuous infection causing destruction of renal mass. Reconstruction of urinary tract which is frequently required for patients with Urinary TB poses significant challenges. This paper analyses these challenges. Aim To analyse challenges in reconstruction of urinary tract in patients with urinary tuberculosis and renal failure. Materials and Methods Thirty-one patients with renal tuber-culosis were seen from August 2011 to August 2013. We faced major problem in outcomes of surgery in patients with multifocal disease. Results Out of 31 patients 18 patients were males and 13 were females. Total 11 patients had serum creatinine more than 2mg/dl (1.5 mg/dl being upper normal range of our laboratory) at the time of presentation. These patients had simultaneous kidney, ureter and bladder involvement or with bilateral disease. Four of these patients underwent uretero-calicostomy, five patients underwent augmentation cystoplasty with bilateral ureteric reimplantation and two patients underwent ileal conduit as they were having serum creatinine of more than 2.5 mg/dl. All patients who underwent ureterocalicostomy had re stricture and failure of surgery and augmentation cystoplasty had raised creatinine requiring second procedure in the form of percutaneous nephrostomy. Patients with ileal conduit remained stable with overnight bladder drainage at bed time. Conclusion Though renal failure is not considered contrain-dication for augmentation cystoplasty, reconstruction using large segment of bowel predisposes them to metabolic complications and sepsis. Use of short segment of ileal conduit with continued drainage at night in creatinine above 2.5 mg% is reasonable option for augmentation

  3. Parenteral nutrition in patients with renal failure – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 17

    PubMed Central

    Druml, W.; Kierdorf, H. P.

    2009-01-01

    Partial EN (enteral nutrition) should always be aimed for in patients with renal failure that require nutritional support. Nevertheless PN (parenteral nutrition) may be necessary in renal failure in patient groups with acute or chronic renal failure (ARF or CRF) and additional acute diseases but without extracorporeal renal replacement therapy, or in patients with ARF or CRF with additional acute diseases on extracorporeal renal replacement therapy, haemodialysis therapy (HD), peritoneal dialysis (PD) or continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT), or in patients on HD therapy with intradialytic PN. Patients with renal failure who show marked metabolic derangements and changes in nutritional requirements require the use of specifically adapted nutrient solutions. The substrate requirements of acutely ill, non-hypercatabolic patients with CRF correspond to those of patients with ARF who are not receiving any renal replacement patients therapy (utilisation of the administered nutrients has to be monitored carefully). In ARF patients and acutely ill CRF patients on renal replacement therapy, substrate requirements depend on disease severity, type and extent/frequency of extracorporeal renal replacement therapy, nutritional status, underlying disease and complications occurring during the course of the disease. Patients under HD have a higher risk of developing malnutrition. Intradialytic PN (IDPN) should be used if causes of malnutrition cannot be eliminated and other interventions fail. IDPN should only be carried out when modifiable causes of malnutrition are excluded and enhanced oral (like i.e. additional energy drinks) or enteral supply is unsuccessful or cannot be carried out. PMID:20049069

  4. Hypercalcemia and renal failure in the course of sarcoidosis--case report.

    PubMed

    Kempisty, Anna; Kuś, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Disturbances of calcium metabolism such as hypercalcemia or/and hypercalciuria in the course of sarcoidosis can be a cause of renal failure in some patients. Life threatening hypercalcemia in sarcoidosis patients is not very frequent. Severe hypercalcemia leading to renal insufficiency is a very rare condition. We present a case of 53-year old man who was admitted to Department of Lung Diseases because of hypercalcemic syndrome and renal failure, and in whom diagnosis of sarcoidosis was made. He was successfully treated with systemic corticosteroids. In this article we present physiological mechanism of hypercalcemia in sarcoidosis patients, mechanism of renal damage and management of these difficult problems. PMID:23109211

  5. Common Cause Failures and Ultra Reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry W.

    2012-01-01

    A common cause failure occurs when several failures have the same origin. Common cause failures are either common event failures, where the cause is a single external event, or common mode failures, where two systems fail in the same way for the same reason. Common mode failures can occur at different times because of a design defect or a repeated external event. Common event failures reduce the reliability of on-line redundant systems but not of systems using off-line spare parts. Common mode failures reduce the dependability of systems using off-line spare parts and on-line redundancy.

  6. Acute renal failure in pregnancy: our experience.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Rohina S; Mishra, Vineet V; Jasani, Anil F; Gumber, Manoj

    2014-03-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is a serious medical complication during pregnancy, and, in the post-partum period, is associated with significant maternal morbidity and mortality as well as fetal loss. The objective of our study is to find the etiology and maternal outcome of ARF during pregnancy. The study was conducted at the Obstetrics and Gynecology Department of the Institute of Kidney Disease and Research Center, Ahmedabad, India from January 2009 to January 2011. Fifty previously healthy patients who developed ARF, diagnosed on oliguria and serum creatinine >2 mg%, were included in the study. Patients with a known history of renal disease, diabetes and hypertension were excluded from the study. All patients were followed-up for a period of six months. Patient re-cords, demographic data, urine output on admission and preceding history of antepartum hemorrhage (APH), post-partum hemorrhage (PPH), septicemia, operative interventions and retained product of conception were noted and need for dialysis was considered. Patients were thoroughly examined and baseline biochemical investigations and renal and obstetrical ultrasound were performed on each patient and bacterial culture sensitivity on blood, urine or vaginal swabs were performed in selected patients. The age range was 19-38 years (mean 26 ± 3.8). The first trimester, second trimester and puerperal groups comprised of four (8%), 25 (50%) and 21 patients (42%), respectively. Hemorrhage was the etiology for ARF in 15 (30%), APH in ten (20%) and PPH in five (10%) patients. Eleven (22%) patients had lower segment cesarian section (LSCS) while 36 (78%) patients had normal vaginal delivery. In 20 (40%) patients, puerperal sepsis was the etiological factor, while pre-eclampsia, eclampsia and HELLP syndrome accounted for 18 (36%) patients. Two (4%) patients had disseminated intravascular coagulation on presentation while one (2%) patient was diagnosed with hemolytic uremic syndrome. Maternal mortality was 12% (n = 6

  7. Acute renal failure in the "Comrades Marathon" runners.

    PubMed

    Seedat, Y K; Aboo, N; Naicker, S; Parsoo, I

    This study investigated the clinical and biochemical features of acute renal failure in marathon runners. Over a period of 18 years (1969-1986), 19 patients were admitted to the renal unit. The histories and biochemical data of 4 patients seen in 1986 are described. The pathophysiology of acute renal failure is multifactorial and is the combined effect of rhabdomyolysis, dehydration, hypotension, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and hyperuricaemia. Efforts to correct dehydration have resulted in a decrease in the incidence of acute renal failure. The use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is to be deprecated and efforts should be made to publicize this harmful effect. PMID:2485484

  8. Fish gall bladder consumption presenting as acute renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, A; Karnik, ND; Gupta, VA; Hase, NK

    2015-01-01

    A forty two year old male was admitted with history of anuria and breathlessness following consumption of raw rohu fish gall bladder. He had azotemia and required hemodialysis. His renal failure improved over a period of about four weeks. Incidences have been reported from South East Asian countries associating consumption of raw rohu fish gall bladder with acute renal failure. PMID:26440398

  9. Dental considerations for the patient receiving dialysis for renal failure.

    PubMed

    Levy, H M

    1988-01-01

    A review of the literature describing the dental management of patients receiving hemodialysis because of renal failure is presented. A description of the renal failure process is given. Pretreatment and day of treatment precautions are considered. A pertinent dental case report of a dialysis patient is also presented. PMID:2978765

  10. Acute renal failure in the Armenian earthquake.

    PubMed

    Eknoyan, G

    1992-01-01

    A destructive earthquake devastated northwestern Armenia on December 7, 1988. The size of the affected area (radius of 50 miles), the time of the day when it occurred (11:41 a.m.), deficiencies in the design and construction of buildings, and inadequate initial rescue and relief capabilities resulted in one of the most lethal and traumatic natural disasters of the century. A large but unknown number (estimated at 225 to 385) of the extricated victims who had sustained crush injury developed myoglobinuric acute renal failure requiring dialytic support. The limited number (8-10 dialysis machines) of antiquated dialysis facilities available locally were overwhelmed. International dialysis relief efforts resulted in meeting the immediate acute needs and provided the motivation and elements of the more efficient system for the future delivery of maintenance dialysis. PMID:1509155

  11. Automatic calculation for the renal failure diet.

    PubMed

    Dubin, S; Jackson, A

    1984-05-01

    A logical scheme for algorithm for computation of the renal failure diet is presented along with its application to a programmable calculator. The program is user-interractive; the user may add or delete foods without re-entering previous data. Program outputs include water, protein, calories, carbohydrate, sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphorus, and the essential amino acids (EAA) in absolute and percentage terms. As an index of relative protein quality, the chemical score is computed on a meal-by-meal basis. Individual EAA scores are available to permit designation of the limiting EAA of a meal. A major benefit of the program is the ability to explore and document rapidly a wide variety of meal plans. Improvements in "user-friendliness" will facilitate application with patients. PMID:6715755

  12. Rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure after gardening.

    PubMed

    Vucicevic, Zeljko

    2015-01-01

    Acute nontraumatic exertional rhabdomyolysis may arise when the energy supply to muscle is insufficient to meet demands, particularly in physically untrained individuals. We report on a psychiatric patient who developed large bruises and hemorrhagic blisters on both hands and arms, rhabdomyolysis of both forearm muscles with a moderate compartment syndrome, and consecutive acute renal failure following excessive work in the garden. Although specifically asked, the patient denied any hard physical work or gardening, and heteroanamnestic data were not available. The diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis was easy to establish, but until reliable anamnestic data were obtained, the etiology remained uncertain. Four days after arrival, the patient recalled working hard in the garden. The etiology of rhabdomyolysis was finally reached, and the importance of anamnestic data was once more confirmed. PMID:25954536

  13. Rhabdomyolysis and Acute Renal Failure after Gardening

    PubMed Central

    Vucicevic, Zeljko

    2015-01-01

    Acute nontraumatic exertional rhabdomyolysis may arise when the energy supply to muscle is insufficient to meet demands, particularly in physically untrained individuals. We report on a psychiatric patient who developed large bruises and hemorrhagic blisters on both hands and arms, rhabdomyolysis of both forearm muscles with a moderate compartment syndrome, and consecutive acute renal failure following excessive work in the garden. Although specifically asked, the patient denied any hard physical work or gardening, and heteroanamnestic data were not available. The diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis was easy to establish, but until reliable anamnestic data were obtained, the etiology remained uncertain. Four days after arrival, the patient recalled working hard in the garden. The etiology of rhabdomyolysis was finally reached, and the importance of anamnestic data was once more confirmed. PMID:25954536

  14. Hypermagnesemia and progression of renal failure associated with renacidin therapy.

    PubMed

    Wilson, C; Azmy, A F; Beattie, T J; Murphy, A V

    1986-05-01

    Renacidin is a urinary stone dissolving agent composed primarily of gluconic and citric acids and their magnesium salts, buffered to a pH of 4. We describe its use in a child with oxalosis, disabling renal colic and deteriorating renal function in whom its use was associated with hypermagnesemia and rapid progression of the renal failure. Possible mechanisms for the deterioration in renal function are discussed. PMID:3720036

  15. Hemodialysis: an appropriate therapy in myeloma-induced renal failure.

    PubMed

    Sharland, A; Snowdon, L; Joshua, D E; Gibson, J; Tiller, D J

    1997-12-01

    To determine whether vigorous treatment with dialysis is of benefit to patients with myeloma-induced renal failure at presentation, we retrospectively reviewed outcomes in a group of patients diagnosed with multiple myeloma between January 1986 and September 1993. Increased age (P = 0.003), presence of renal impairment (P = 0.006), and failure to enter plateau phase (P < 0.001) were independently associated with shortened survival. However, there was no difference in outcome between patients with severe renal failure, those treated with dialysis, and those with milder renal impairment (median survival, 22 months in both groups), nor was reversibility of renal failure associated with any survival advantage. The lack of correlation between severity or reversibility of the renal failure and survival suggests that there may be characteristics of some patients or their underlying myeloma that are responsible both for renal impairment and for adverse prognosis. In this study, neither age, clinical stage, labeling index, nor response to treatment was able to account for the difference in outcome between patients with and without renal failure. The prolongation of life achieved in the dialysis patients such that their median survival was identical with that of the group with milder renal impairment was considered to represent a significant benefit to these patients and to justify the offer of dialysis to all patients requiring it. PMID:9398122

  16. Renal Abscess Caused by Salmonella Typhi

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Amarjeet; Sarma, Smita; Kumar, Navin; Sengupta, Sharmila

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella typhi is a true pathogen, which is capable of causing both intestinal and extraintestinal infections. Unusual presentations of Salmonella should always be kept in mind as this organism can cause disease in almost any organ of the body. S. typhi has been reported to cause the life-threatening infections such as meningitis, endocarditis, myocarditis, empyema, and hepatic abscess. Renal involvement by S. typhi is a relatively rare presentation. We report a case of renal abscess caused by S. typhi in an afebrile, 10-year-old child who did not have any clinical history of enteric fever. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of isolation of S. typhi from the renal abscess, and interestingly this isolate was found to be resistant to quinolones. PMID:26417164

  17. Acute renal failure by ingestion of Euphorbia paralias.

    PubMed

    Boubaker, Karima; Ounissi, Mondher; Brahmi, Nozha; Goucha, Rym; Hedri, Hafedh; Abdellah, Taieb Ben; El Younsi, Fethi; Maiz, Hedi Ben; Kheder, Adel

    2013-05-01

    intoxication, serum creatinine of the patient was 240 μmol/L. In cases of unexplained ARF, a toxic mechanism should always be considered and acute renal failure caused by Euphorbia paralias should be included as a cause if renal toxicity is suspected in those places where it is being used as a native medicine. PMID:23640634

  18. [Pathomechanism of hyperlipoproteinemia in chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, Bolesław; Łososowska, Renata; Król, Ewa; Kisielnicka, Ewa; Zdrojewski, Zbigniew; Szołkiewicz, Marek; Niewegłowski, Tomasz; Chmielewski, Michał; Sucajtys, Elzbieta; Swierczyński, Julian; Korczyńska, Justyna; Stelmańska, Ewa; Goyke, Elzbieta; Bogusławski, Wojciech

    2003-10-01

    Lipid disorders are one of the known metabolic changes associated with chronic renal failure (CRF) [1, 2]. They are present as: hypertriglyceridemia--existed in 60% of CRF patients and hypercholesterolemia observed in 20-30% of people with this syndrome. These disorders, what was shown also in our own studies, are existing in different intensity in patients treated with maintenance haemodialysis [3], peritoneal dialysis [4] and after renal transplantation as well [5]. Mechanism of hypertriglyceridemia, despite over thirty years of studies, is still not finally elucidated. The opinion that it is a result of impaired triglyceride removal (due to decreased activities of both lipoprotein and hepatic lipases) is well documented, however the role of lipogenesis in its development is obscure [6, 7]. The reports concerning this problem contain contradictory data. In our studies performed several years ago we have shown that lipogenesis rate in white adipose tissue of uremic rats is significantly augmented [8, 9, 10] due to activation of free fatty acid synthase. Therefore, recently we paid once again our attention on the activity of this lipogenesis rate limiting enzyme responsible for the long term regulation. We measured its activity, protein abundance and mRNA level in liver and epididymal white adipose tissue of rats with surgically induced renal failure (two-stage subtotal nephrectomy). The results support the thesis that lipogenesis takes a part in a hypertriglyceridemia found in renal failure. There have been observed a significant increase in plasma triglyceride and VLDL concentrations in uremic animals and it was associated with the increase of FAS activity, FAS protein abundance and FAS mRNA. The results were similar in both studied tissues. Moreover, there have been also observed the increased activities of malic enzyme, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase. All these enzymes participate in NADPH production, which is a necessary

  19. Chronic renal failure in a patient with bilateral ureterocele

    PubMed Central

    Dada, Samuel A.; Rafiu, Mojeed O.; Olanrewaju, Timothy O.

    2015-01-01

    Ureterocele is a congenital anomaly, in which there is mal-development of the caudal segments of the ureter. There is a female preponderance with most cases seen in Caucasians. Among the reported complications of this condition, chronic renal failure occurring in the setting of ureterocele has not been well documented. We report a case of a young girl with bilateral ureterocele presenting with chronic renal failure, whose management presented a diagnostic failure and inadequate treatment. PMID:26108593

  20. A case of anorexia nervosa with acute renal failure induced by rhabdomyolysis; possible involvement of hypophosphatemia or phosphate depletion.

    PubMed

    Wada, S; Nagase, T; Koike, Y; Kugai, N; Nagata, N

    1992-04-01

    A 16-year-old girl with anorexia nervosa first presented with malnutrition, liver dysfunction, and rhabdomyolysis. Administration of fluid and nutrition saved her from the initial critical state, but acute renal failure followed. Laboratory examination revealed intrinsic renal failure induced by rhabdomyolysis. Latent phosphate depletion and refeeding-induced hypophosphatemia was implicated as the cause of rhabdomyolysis; however coexisting hypotension, dehydration, and liver dysfunction may have contributed to the renal failure. The patient recovered from azotemia by hemodialysis. This is the first reported case of anorexia nervosa with acute renal failure resulting from rhabdomyolysis induced by hypophosphatemia or phosphate depletion. PMID:1633352

  1. Atrial natriuretic factor in oliguric acute renal failure. Anaritide Acute Renal Failure Study Group.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J; Salem, M M; Chertow, G M; Weisberg, L S; McGrew, F; Marbury, T C; Allgren, R L

    2000-10-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), an endogenous hormone synthesized by the cardiac atria, has been shown to improve renal function in multiple animal models of acute renal failure. In a recent multicenter clinical trial of 504 patients with acute tubular necrosis (oliguric and nonoliguric), ANP decreased the need for dialysis only in the oliguric patients. In the present study, 222 patients with oliguric acute renal failure were enrolled into a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial designed to assess prospectively the safety and efficacy of ANP compared with placebo. Subjects were randomized to treatment with a 24-hour infusion of ANP (anaritide, 0.2 microgram/kg/min; synthetic form of human ANP) or placebo. Dialysis and mortality status were followed up for 60 days. The primary efficacy end point was dialysis-free survival through day 21. Dialysis-free survival rates were 21% in the ANP group and 15% in the placebo group (P = 0.22). By day 14 of the study, 64% and 77% of the ANP and placebo groups had undergone dialysis, respectively (P = 0.054), and 9 additional patients (7 patients, ANP group; 2 patients, placebo group) needed dialysis but did not receive it. Although a trend was present, there was no statistically significant beneficial effect of ANP in dialysis-free survival or reduction in dialysis in these subjects with oliguric acute renal failure. Mortality rates through day 60 were 60% versus 56% in the ANP and placebo groups, respectively (P = 0.541). One hundred two of 108 (95%) versus 63 of 114 (55%) patients in the ANP and placebo groups had systolic blood pressures less than 90 mm Hg during the study-drug infusion (P < 0.001). The maximal absolute decrease in systolic blood pressure was significantly greater in the anaritide group than placebo group (33.6 versus 23.9 mm Hg; P < 0.001). This well-characterized population with oliguric acute renal failure had an overall high morbidity and mortality. PMID:11007679

  2. Acetylcholinesterase activity in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Prall, Y G; Gambhir, K K; Cruz, I A; Blassingale, J; Ampy, F R

    2000-01-21

    Twenty healthy subjects and 39 Chronic Renal Failure patients (CRF-patients) maintained on chronic hemodialysis were used in this investigation to study the changes in acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity of red blood cells (RBCs). The CRF-patients were all undergoing hemodialysis treatment. AChE activity from the CRF-patients was determined before and after dialysis. An additional objective was to study the effect of chronic renal failure on human red blood cell aging. Blood samples were drawn from controls and CRF-patients in tubes containing EDTA or sodium heparin as an anticoagulant. Red blood cells were purified to avoid interference with monocytes, reticulocytes and leukocytes. The purified RBCs were subfractionated into young (y) (1.08-1.09), mid (m) (1.09-1.11) and old (o) (1.11-1.12) percoll density (g/mL) fractions using a discontinous percoll gradient. The mean +/- SD AChE per gram hemoglobin (U/g Hgb) activities in whole blood (WB), purified human red blood cells (PRBCs), young human red blood cells (y-RBCs), mid age human red blood cells (m-RBCs) and old human red blood cells (o-RBCs) in CRF-patients were 31.2+/-3.43, 29.3+/-3.26, 30.4+/-3.91, 25.1+/-5.25, 17.1+/-6.02 in females and 29.8+/-5.39, 28.8+/-5.29, 28.7+/-5.29, 23.7+/-5.39 and 16.0+/-5.60 in males. AChE activity from CRF-patients were higher than that found in the control subjects. The aging of human RBCs in both the controls and CRF-patients showed a progressive reduction in AChE activity. AChE activity of RBCs from female CRF-patients were significantly higher (p < 0.05) than that of the female control subjects. The RBCs isolated from male CRF-patients showed a higher AChE activity than control males, but a significant difference was only observed with the mid-age-cells. These studies further indicate that AChE activity remained insignificantly different in the various density based age subfractions of RBCs of both CRF-patients and controls. PMID:10698358

  3. Long term outcome of treatment of end stage renal failure.

    PubMed

    Henning, P; Tomlinson, L; Rigden, S P; Haycock, G B; Chantler, C

    1988-01-01

    The most common causes of end stage renal failure in 46 children (mean age 11 years, range 4-14) treated between January 1972 and June 1977 were: reflux nephropathy (n = 12), cystinosis (n = 7), focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (n = 6), and Schönlein-Henoch disease (n = 5). The quality of life, degree of renal function, and height attainment of the 31 survivors were assessed in June 1985, when their mean age was 22 years (range 14-27), using hospital records and a questionnaire designed to highlight social and psychological problems. Twenty six patients had a functioning transplanted kidney. Average growth during treatment for all survivors was normal, but most were disappointed with their 'final height'. Though five patients had some form of disabling bone disease, all 31 could walk and 27 could run. Sixteen (67%) were in full or part time employment and nine were living independently. A group of 32 patients with juvenile onset diabetes treated at this hospital for at least five years were also asked to complete the questionnaire and of these, 17 responded. On average, their data could usefully be compared with those of cases of end stage renal failure. More of the diabetics had jobs, but most sexually mature patients with renal disease were concerned about their physical appearance and had not achieved any stable long term sexual relationships. We suggest that a poor body image resulting in low self esteem may be responsible for the deficiency and believe that further study in this group is warranted. PMID:3126713

  4. Chronic renal failure and periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Kitsou, V K; Konstantinidis, A; Siamopoulos, K C

    2000-05-01

    In order to define the effects of chronic renal failure (CRF) in the progress of gingival inflammation, we studied 6 patients (4 male, 2 female) with CRF who were on chronic hemodialysis for 4.25 (range 1-15) years. Six healthy individuals, age and sex matched were used as controls. The protocol which we used comprised of two periods (a) a 40-day duration period of preparation and (b) a 28-day duration experimental period. During the (a) period, all subjects went through: (1) therapy of the chronic gingivitis and (2) complete control of dental plaque by oral hygiene. During the experimental period, all subjects were advised to avoid, for at least 21 days, any mechanical or chemical media of oral hygiene and went through photographing, recording of gingival index (GI), recording of plaque index (PII), and the collection and quantification of gingival crevicular fluid (GCF). On the 21st day, root planning and polishing were performed and subjects were advised to carry out oral hygiene. On the 28th day, all previous examinations (GI, PII, GCF) were repeated. In both patients and controls, GI, PII and GCF were increased on 7th, 14th and 21st day, without significant differences between the groups and returned to normal (close to zero point) on the 28th day. There are no significant differences between patients with CRF and normal controls in the evolution of experimental gingivitis. Therefore, chronic uremia has no effect on the defense of periodontal tissue against microbial plaque. PMID:10843241

  5. Delayed onset renal failure in a patient on tenofovir based antiretroviral regimen.

    PubMed

    Krishna, M Murali; Subbalaxmi, M V S; Uppin, Megha; Radhika, S

    2014-01-01

    Tenofovir is recommended as one of the first line agents in combination with other antiretroviral drugs for management of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). It is known to cause renal failure after exposure for a median duration of 5 months. We report tenofovir induced adverse drug reaction in a 56-year-old female patient who was diagnosed to have HIV 1 infection since 10 years. The combination antiretroviral treatment included tenofovir, emtricitabine and ritonavir/lopinavir regimen since the last 6 years. She presented with recent onset renal failure and renal biopsy showed interstitial nephritis which could probably attributable to tenofovir. PMID:24741201

  6. The role of renal denervation in the treatment of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Sobotka, Paul A; Krum, Henry; Böhm, Michael; Francis, Darrel P; Schlaich, Markus P

    2012-06-01

    The heart and kidney interact in terms of hemodynamics and neurohumoral regulatory mechanisms, and this helps to maintain circulatory homeostasis under normal conditions. However, the normal regulatory mechanisms become inappropriate in the setting of congestive heart failure (CHF), and significant renal dysfunction often develops in CHF patients. Activation of renal sympathetic efferent nerves causes renin release, sodium and water retention, and reduced renal blood flow, all hallmarks of the renal manifestations of CHF. An increase in plasma levels of angiotensin II that is mediated in part by renal sympathetic activation has an effect on the central nervous system to further increase global sympathetic tone. Renal sympathetic activity can be assessed clinically by renal norepinephrine spillover, and an increase in renal norepinephrine spillover in CHF predicts reduced survival. In addition to efferent sympathetic activation, activation of renal sensory nerves in CHF may cause a reflex increase in sympathetic tone that contributes to elevated peripheral vascular resistance and vascular remodeling as well as left ventricular remodeling and dysfunction. In animal models of heart failure, surgical renal denervation has been shown to improve both renal and ventricular function. Although surgical renal denervation has long been known to lower blood pressure and improve survival in patients with hypertension, the invasive nature of this approach and its associated complications has limited its appeal. However, a novel catheter-based device has recently been introduced that specifically interrupts both efferent and afferent renal nerves, and there is significant interest in the use of this device to treat both hypertension and CHF. Several ongoing clinical trials are investigating the safety and efficacy of renal denervation in patients with CHF. PMID:22392370

  7. Reversible renal impairment caused by thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Chakera, Aron; Paul, Hans-Joerg; O'Callaghan, Chris A

    2010-04-01

    Renal impairment is a common finding in clinical practice and is increasingly recognized with the routine reporting of estimated glomerular filtration rates. Clinical assessment is essential to determine which of the many possible investigations are appropriate. Thyroid hormones regulate many cellular functions, and abnormalities of the active thyroid hormones, thyroxine (T(4)) and tri-iodothyronine (T(3)), can influence serum creatinine levels. Evaluation of thyroid function is easily overlooked, but important in this context, as hypothyroidism is common and can cause renal impairment, which is typically reversible. Renal dysfunction may also be more frequent in hyperthyroidism than is recognized. This report describe how a dramatic elevation in serum creatinine paralleled the development of hyperthyroidism, with a return of the creatinine to normal following treatment of the hyperthyroid state. PMID:20199343

  8. Heart failure as the first manifestation of renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chee Meng; Kurugulasigamoney, Gunasegaran; Ng, Lay Guat

    2015-01-01

    We report the rare case of a patient with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) who initially presented to the hospital with symptoms of cardiac failure. Preoperative cardiac studies did not reveal any underlying ischemia. After resection of a large 14-cm left renal tumor, cardiac function was noted to improve dramatically. We discuss this case of concomitant RCC and nonischemic cardiomyopathy. PMID:25598941

  9. Multimodality Renal Failure in a Patient with OEIS Complex

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Jonathan D.; Chao, Stephanie; Hsieh, Michael H.; Lee, Henry C.

    2015-01-01

    Omphalocele-exstrophy of the bladder-imperforate anus-spinal defect (OEIS) complex is a rare constellation of clinical abnormalities with wide phenotypic presentation. We describe a case of a preterm neonate with OEIS complex with acute renal failure, and the challenges in diagnosis and management of this patient as renal failure can be a multifactorial process when encountered with this rare complex. PMID:26495176

  10. Acute renal failure in children. An ultrasonographic-clinical study.

    PubMed

    Vergesslich, K A; Sommer, G; Wittich, G R; Balzar, E; Weninger, M; Ponhold, W

    1987-11-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) may be due to obstructive uropathy or renal parenchymal disease. Twenty-five children with acute renal failure secondary to renal parenchymal disease underwent ultrasonographic examination of the kidneys. Changes of renal size and cortical echogenicity were correlated with renal function. All patients presented with bilaterally enlarged kidneys with the exception of those in the neonatal age group (12%). Improvement in renal function resulted in normalization of renal size. With regard to cortical echogenicity two groups were formed. Group A comprised 11 patients whose kidneys had the same echogenicity as the liver, while in group B the kidneys were more echogenic (14 patients). Cortical echogenicity was always increased. Determination of creatinine levels showed a statistically significant difference between group A (3.32 mg% +/- 1.40 S.D.) and group B (5.95 mg% +/- 1.96 S.D.), p less than 0.001. Changes in renal function were paralleled by rapid changes in renal size and cortical echogenicity. PMID:3319623

  11. Hypercalcemia as a Cause of Kidney Failure: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Stojceva-Taneva, Olivera; Taneva, Borjanka; Selim, Gjulsen

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypercalcemia is a common manifestation in clinical practice and occurs as a result of primary hyperparathyroidism, malignancy, milk-alkali syndrome, hyper or hypothyroidism, sarcoidosis and other known and unknown causes. Patients with milk-alkali syndrome typically are presented with renal failure, hypercalcemia, and metabolic alkalosis caused by the ingestion of calcium and absorbable alkali. This syndrome is caused by high intake of milk and sodium bicarbonate. CASE PRESENTATION: We present a 28-year old male admitted to hospital with a one-month history of nausea, vomiting, epigastric pain, increased blood pressure and worsening of renal function with hypercalcemia. His serum PTH level was almost undetectable; he had mild alkalosis, renal failure with eGFR of 42 ml/min, anemia, hypertension and abnormal ECG with shortened QT interval and ST elevation in V1-V4. He had a positive medical history for calcium-containing antacids intake and after ruling out primary hyperparathyroidism, malignancy, multiple myelomas, sarcoidosis, and thyroid dysfunction, it seemed plausible to diagnose him as having the milk-alkali syndrome. CONCLUSION: Although milk-alkali syndrome currently may be more probably a result of calcium and vitamin D intake in postmenopausal women, or in elderly men with reduced kidney function taking calcium-containing medications, one should not exclude the possibility of its appearance in younger patients taking calcium-containing medications and consider it a serious condition taking into account its possibility of inducing renal insufficiency. PMID:27335601

  12. Acute pancreatitis and acute renal failure complicating doxylamine succinate intoxication.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yang Deok; Lee, Soo Teik

    2002-06-01

    Doxylamine succinate is an antihistaminic drugwith additional hypnotic, anticholinergic and local anesthetic effects first described in 1948. In Korea and many other countries, it is a common-over-the counter medication frequently involved in overdoses. Clinical symtomatology of doxylamine succinate overdose includes somnolence, coma, seizures, mydriasis, tachycardia, psychosis, and rhabdomyolysis. A serious complication may be rhabdomyolysis with subsequent impairment of renal function and acute renal failure. We report a case of acute renal failure and acute pancreatitis complicating a doxylamine succinate intoxication. PMID:12046971

  13. [Oral cavity pathology by renal failure].

    PubMed

    Maĭborodin, I V; Minikeev, I M; Kim, S A; Ragimova, T M

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of the scientific literature devoted to organ and tissue changes of oral cavity at the chronic renal insufficiency (CRI)is made. The number of patients in an end-stage of CRI constantly increases and patients receiving renal replacement therapy including hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis or renal transplantation will comprise an enlarging segment of the dental patient population. Owing to CRI and its treatment there is a set of changes of teeth and oral cavity fabrics which remain even in a end-stage. Renal replacement therapy can affect periodontal tissues including gingival hyperplasia in immune suppressed renal transplantation patients and increased levels of bacterial contamination, gingival inflammation, formation of calculus, and possible increased prevalence and severity of destructive periodontal diseases. Besides, the presence of undiagnosed periodontitis may have significant effects on the medical management of the patients in end-stage of CRI. PMID:24719973

  14. Defects in MAP1S-mediated autophagy turnover of fibronectin cause renal fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    He, Yongzhong; Li, Xun; Zhao, Haibo; Su, Zhengming; Jiang, Xianhan; Li, Wenjiao; Zou, Jing; Chen, Qi; Liu, Leyuan

    2016-01-01

    Excessive deposition of extracellular matrix proteins in renal tissues causes renal fibrosis and renal function failure. Mammalian cells primarily use the autophagy-lysosome system to degrade misfolded/aggregated proteins and dysfunctional organelles. MAP1S is an autophagy activator and promotes the biogenesis and degradation of autophagosomes. Previously, we reported that MAP1S suppresses hepatocellular carcinogenesis in a mouse model and predicts a better prognosis in patients suffering from clear cell renal cell carcinomas. Furthermore, we have characterized that MAP1S enhances the turnover of fibronectin, and mice overexpressing LC3 but with MAP1S deleted accumulate fibronectin and develop liver fibrosis because of the synergistic impact of LC3-induced over-synthesis of fibronectin and MAP1S depletion-caused impairment of fibronectin degradation. Here we show that a suppression of MAP1S in renal cells caused an impairment of autophagy clearance of fibronectin and an activation of pyroptosis. Depletion of MAP1S in mice leads to an accumulation of fibrosis-related proteins and the development of renal fibrosis in aged mice. The levels of MAP1S were dramatically reduced and levels of fibronectin were greatly elevated in renal fibrotic tissues from patients diagnosed as renal atrophy and renal failure. Therefore, MAP1S deficiency may cause the accumulation of fibronectin and the development of renal fibrosis. PMID:27236336

  15. Neurodiagnostic Abnormalities in Patients with Acute Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Jerry D.; Lazarowitz, Virginia C.; Arieff, Allen I.

    1978-01-01

    Neurological abnormalities are a major cause of morbidity in patients with renal failure. The pathophysiology of these neurological changes is unclear, and the effects on them of dialysis and return of renal function have not been well studied. Studies were done in 31 patients who had acute renal failure (ARF), all of whom were either treated with dialysis within 5 days or did not survive. Studies on these patients included the electroencephalogram (EEG), motor nerve conduction velocity, and plasma Ca++ and parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels. Studies were done at the time ARF was diagnosed, after stabilization on dialysis, during the diuretic phase of ARF, and 3 mo after recovery from ARF. In 16 patients with acute or chronic renal failure who did not survive and in nine patients without renal disease who died, measurements were made in brain of content of Na+, K+, Cl−, Ca++, Mg++, and water. In patients with ARF for less than 48 h, despite the fact that there were only modest increases in plasma urea and creatinine, there were striking abnormalities in the EEG. The percent EEG power < 5 Hz±SE was 41±8% (normal = 2±1%), whereas the percent of frequencies > 9 Hz was only 22±6% (normal = 62±3%). These changes were unaffected by dialysis, but became normal with return of renal function and remained normal at 3 mo follow-up. The motor nerve conduction velocity was unaffected by either ARF or dialysis. In patients with ARF, the brain Ca++ was 46.5±3.2 meq/kg dry wt, almost twice the normal value of 26.9±1.0 meq/kg dry wt (P < 0.001). The plasma PTH level was 3.2±0.6 ng/ml (normal < 1.5 ng/ml, P < 0.01). The increased brain Ca++ was not related to an increased plasma (Ca++) (PO4−−−) product (r2 = 0.14, P > 0.05). There was a small but significant decrement in brain Na+ (P < 0.05), but brain water, K+, and Mg++ were unaffected by ARF. Thus, in patients with ARF for less than 48 h, the EEG is grossly abnormal and there are elevated levels of PTH in plasma

  16. Potentials and limitations of microorganisms as renal failure biotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Poonam; Shah, Sapna; Coussa, Razek; Prakash, Satya

    2009-01-01

    Renal insufficiency leads to uremia, a complicated syndrome. It thus becomes vital to reduce waste metabolites and regulate water and electrolytes in kidney failure. The most common treatment of this disease is either dialysis or transplantation. Although these treatments are very effective, they are extremely costly. Recently artificial cells, microencapsulated live bacterial cells, and other cells have been studied to manage renal failure metabolic wastes. The procedure for microencapsulation of biologically active material is well documented and offers many biomedical applications. Microencapsulated bacteria have been documented to efficiently remove urea and several uremic markers such as ammonia, creatinine, uric acid, phosphate, potassium, magnesium, sodium, and chloride. These bacteria also have further potential as biotherapeutic agents because they can be engineered to remove selected unwanted waste. This application has enormous potential for removal of waste metabolites and electrolytes in renal failure as well as other diseases such as liver failure, phenylketonuria, and Crohn’s disease, to name a few. This paper discusses the various options available to date to manage renal failure metabolites and focuses on the potential of using encapsulated live cells as biotherapeutic agents to control renal failure waste metabolites and electrolytes. PMID:19707412

  17. Renal failure in Hay-Wells syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Dhanya; Sugathan, Dileep K; Railey, Mohammed; Alrukhaimi, Mona

    2013-11-01

    Ectodermal dysplasia (ED) is a group of disorders involving developmental defects of the ectodermal structures, with abnormalities in the skin, hair, nails and sweat glands. Ankyloblepharon - ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate (AEC) syndrome, also known as Hay-Wells syndrome, is characterized by eyelid fusion, ED and cleft lip/palate. We report a 15-year-old Omani boy with AEC syndrome who presented with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) requiring renal replacement therapy. Genitourinary anomalies including hypospadiasis, posterior urethral stricture and bilateral vesicoureteric reflux were noted. These led to secondary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and ESRD. Screening for genitourinary anomalies and renal function tests must be performed in all patients with ED to facilitate early detection of renal disease and appropriate management. PMID:24231488

  18. Neural regulation of the kidney function in rats with cisplatin induced renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Goulding, Niamh E.; Johns, Edward J.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is often associated with a disturbed cardiovascular homeostasis. This investigation explored the role of the renal innervation in mediating deranged baroreflex control of renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and renal excretory function in cisplatin-induced renal failure. Methods: Rats were either intact or bilaterally renally denervated 4 days prior to receiving cisplatin (5 mg/kg i.p.) and entered a chronic metabolic study for 8 days. At day 8, other groups of rats were prepared for acute measurement of RSNA or renal function with either intact or denervated kidneys. Results: Following the cisplatin challenge, creatinine clearance was 50% lower while fractional sodium excretion and renal cortical and medullary TGF-β1 concentrations were 3–4 fold higher in both intact and renally denervated rats compared to control rats. In cisplatin-treated rats, the maximal gain of the high-pressure baroreflex curve was only 20% that of control rats, but following renal denervation not different from that of renally denervated control rats. Volume expansion reduced RSNA by 50% in control and in cisplatin-treated rats but only following bilateral renal denervation. The volume expansion mediated natriuresis/diuresis was absent in the cisplatin-treated rats but was normalized following renal denervation. Conclusions: Cisplatin-induced renal injury impaired renal function and caused a sympatho-excitation with blunting of high and low pressure baroreflex regulation of RSNA, which was dependent on the renal innervation. It is suggested that in man with CKD there is a dysregulation of the neural control of the kidney mediated by its sensory innervation. PMID:26175693

  19. Common Cause Failure Modeling: Aerospace Versus Nuclear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stott, James E.; Britton, Paul; Ring, Robert W.; Hark, Frank; Hatfield, G. Spencer

    2010-01-01

    Aggregate nuclear plant failure data is used to produce generic common-cause factors that are specifically for use in the common-cause failure models of NUREG/CR-5485. Furthermore, the models presented in NUREG/CR-5485 are specifically designed to incorporate two significantly distinct assumptions about the methods of surveillance testing from whence this aggregate failure data came. What are the implications of using these NUREG generic factors to model the common-cause failures of aerospace systems? Herein, the implications of using the NUREG generic factors in the modeling of aerospace systems are investigated in detail and strong recommendations for modeling the common-cause failures of aerospace systems are given.

  20. Renal handling of drugs in renal failure. I: Differential effects of uranyl nitrate- and glycerol-induced acute renal failure on renal excretion of TEAB and PAH in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, J.H.; Lin, T.H.

    1988-09-01

    Two etiologically different models of experimental acute renal failure were induced in rats by administration of either glycerol or uranyl nitrate. Both compounds caused a substantial decrease in the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and the net tubular secretion of tetraethylammonium bromide (TEAB) and para-aminohippuric acid (PAH). The degree of renal impairment induced by uranyl nitrate and glycerol appeared to be dose related. Deprivation of drinking water 24 hr before the administration of glycerol potentiated the renal damage. In uranyl nitrate-induced renal failure, the decline of the net tubular secretion for TEAB and PAH was not proportional to the decrease in GFR; the secretion process deteriorated faster than the GFR. For example, when 0.5 mg/kg uranyl nitrate was administered, GFR fell to approximately 65% of normal, whereas the net tubular secretion was decreased to 30% of normal. These results suggest that the tubular transport was preferentially affected by uranyl nitrate. In contrast, in glycerol-induced renal failure, the decline of TEAB secretion fell in a parallel fashion with the GFR, suggesting that the glomeruli and the proximal tubules were equally damaged by glycerol. However, in this latter model, the decline of PAH secretion did not parallel the decrease in GFR, contradicting the proposal that glycerol affects equally the glomeruli and the proximal tubules. This discrepancy may be due to the selective competitive inhibition of PAH secretion by the accumulation of naturally occurring organic acids.

  1. Effects of renal failure on drug transport and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hong; Frassetto, Lynda; Benet, Leslie Z

    2006-01-01

    Renal failure not only alters the renal elimination, but also the non-renal disposition of drugs that are extensively metabolized by the liver. Although reduced metabolic enzyme activity in some cases can be responsible for the reduced drug clearance, alterations in the transporter systems may also be involved in the process. With the development of renal failure, the renal secretion of organic ions mediated by organic anion transporters (OATs) and organic cation transporters (OCTs) is decreased. 3-Carboxy-4-methyl-5-propyl-2-furanpropanoic acid (CMPF) and other organic anionic uremic toxins may directly inhibit the renal excretion of various drugs and endogenous organic acids by competitively inhibiting OATs. In addition, the expression of OAT1 and OCT2 was reduced in chronic renal failure (CRF) rats. Renal failure also impairs the liver uptake of drugs and organic anions, such as bromosulphophthalein (BSP), indocyanine green (ICG), and thyroxine, where organic anion transport polypeptides (OATPs) are the major transporters. Most previous studies have been done in animals or cell culture, very often in rat models, but these are presumed to reflect the presentation of advanced renal disease in humans as well. Recent studies demonstrate that the uremic toxins CMPF and indoxyl sulfate (IS) can directly inhibit rOatp2 and hOATP-C in hepatocytes. The protein content of the liver uptake transporters Oatp1, 2, and 4 were significantly decreased in CRF rats. Decreased activity of the intestinal efflux transporter, P-glycoprotein (P-gp), was also observed in CRF rats, with no significant change of protein content, suggesting that uremic toxins may suppress P-gp function. However, increased protein levels of multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) 2 in the kidney and MRP3 in the liver were found in CRF rats, suggesting an adaptive response that may serve as a protective mechanism. Increases in drug areas under the curve (AUCs) in subjects with advanced renal disease

  2. Diabetes mellitus and renal failure: Prevention and management

    PubMed Central

    Nasri, Hamid; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypertension are considered as the most common causes of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). In this paper, other than presenting the role of DM in ESRD, glucose metabolism and the management of hyperglycemia in these patients are reviewed. Although in several large studies there was no significant relationship found between tight glycemic control and the survival of ESRD patients, it is recommended that glycemic control be considered as the main therapeutic goal in the treatment of these patients to prevent damage to other organs. Glycemic control is perfect when fasting blood sugar is less than 140 mg/dL, 1-h postprandial blood glucose is less than 200 mg/dL, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is 6-7 in patients with type 1 diabetes and 7-8 in patients with type 2 diabetes. Administration of metformin should be avoided in chronic renal failure (CRF) because of lactic acidosis, the potentially fatal complication of metformin, but glipizide and repaglinide seem to be good choices. PMID:26941817

  3. Diabetes mellitus and renal failure: Prevention and management.

    PubMed

    Nasri, Hamid; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud

    2015-11-01

    Nowadays, diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypertension are considered as the most common causes of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). In this paper, other than presenting the role of DM in ESRD, glucose metabolism and the management of hyperglycemia in these patients are reviewed. Although in several large studies there was no significant relationship found between tight glycemic control and the survival of ESRD patients, it is recommended that glycemic control be considered as the main therapeutic goal in the treatment of these patients to prevent damage to other organs. Glycemic control is perfect when fasting blood sugar is less than 140 mg/dL, 1-h postprandial blood glucose is less than 200 mg/dL, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is 6-7 in patients with type 1 diabetes and 7-8 in patients with type 2 diabetes. Administration of metformin should be avoided in chronic renal failure (CRF) because of lactic acidosis, the potentially fatal complication of metformin, but glipizide and repaglinide seem to be good choices. PMID:26941817

  4. [Diagnosis and management of chronic renal failure in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Segalen, Isabelle; Le Meur, Yannick

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of chronic renal failure in the elderly is rising due to the ageing of the general population. Its management, and notably nephroprotective therapies, must be adapted to the elderly person who is often frail and with multiple pathologies. The decision to start extra-renal purification does not depend on the patient's chronological age but on their physiological age and requires dialogue between the patient and their family, the geriatrician and the nephrologist. PMID:26805640

  5. Acute renal failure in four cats treated with paromomycin.

    PubMed

    Gookin, J L; Riviere, J E; Gilger, B C; Papich, M G

    1999-12-15

    Acute renal failure was diagnosed in 4 cats receiving paromomycin orally for treatment of infectious enteritis. All 4 cats responded to fluid therapy and recovered normal or near-normal renal function; however, 3 of the cats subsequently became deaf and developed cataracts. Toxicoses were attributed to a combination of an excessive dosage of paromomycin and absorption of the drug across injured intestinal mucosal epithelium. Pharmacokinetic studies are needed to further define the disposition of paromomycin after oral administration to cats. PMID:10613215

  6. Cholangitis with acute renal failure: priorities in therapeutics.

    PubMed Central

    Bismuth, H; Kuntziger, H; Corlette, M B

    1975-01-01

    Obstructive cholangitis with acute renal failure is a dramatic syndrome which merits individual definition. Twenty-one patients with acute suppurative cholangitis complicated by rapidly developing renal insufficiency were studied, and the severity of the renal failure, an acute interstitial tubulopathy, bore no significant relationship to the serum bilirubin level. The mechanism of renal damage was clearly related to episodes of septicemia. Increasing experience has modified the approach to treatment. The dominant septic problem can often be controlled by vigorous antibiotic and fluid therapy, allowing time for spontaneous improvements in renal function. All patients thus operated at a distance from the septic episode survived. If emergency operation is required because of persistent or recrudescnet sepsis, the necessity for dialysis should be considered first; the circumstances demanding dialysis are defined. The priorities in therapy are then: 1) treatment of the infection, 2) treatment of the renal failure, and finally 3) operation. The amount of the operation depends on the evolution of the sepsis, but should be preceded by dialysis when required. PMID:1138640

  7. Ceftriaxone-related hemolysis and acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Demirkaya, Erkan; Atay, Abdullah Avni; Musabak, Ugur; Sengul, Ali; Gok, Faysal

    2006-05-01

    A 5-year-old girl with no underlying immune deficiency or hematologic disease was treated with a combination of ceftriaxone and ampicilline-sulbactam for pneumonia. On the ninth day of the therapy, she developed oliguria, paleness, malaise, immune hemolytic anemia (IHA) and acute renal failure (ARF). Laboratory studies showed the presence of antibodies against ceftriaxone. Acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) was diagnosed by renal biopsy. The patient's renal insufficiency was successfully treated with peritoneal dialysis without any complications. The patient recovered without any treatment using steroids or other immunosuppressive agents. PMID:16491410

  8. Acute renal failure following oxalic acid poisoning: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Oxalic acid poisoning is being recognized as an emerging epidemic in the rural communities of Sri Lanka as it is a component of locally produced household laundry detergents. Herein we describe a case of a 32 year old female, presenting after direct ingestion of oxalic acid. She then went on to develop significant metabolic acidosis and acute renal failure, requiring dialysis. Renal biopsy revealed acute tubulointerstitial nephritis associated with diffuse moderate acute tubular damage with refractile crystals in some of the tubules. The patient symptomatically improved with haemodialysis and renal functions subsequently returned to normal. PMID:22978510

  9. Piridoxilate-induced oxalate nephropathy can lead to end-stage renal failure.

    PubMed

    Mousson, C; Justrabo, E; Rifle, G; Sgro, C; Chalopin, J M; Gérard, C

    1993-01-01

    A 71-year-old woman was admitted with end-stage renal failure and histological evidence of oxalosis. This case of diffuse renal tubular crystal calcium oxalate deposits seems to be induced by long-term piridoxilate therapy (10 years) or simultaneous intake of both piridoxilate and vitamin C (500 mg/day for 6 months), since no other cause of secondary oxalosis could be found. So, it seems necessary to monitor the serum creatinine level, especially in the elderly, during piridoxilate therapy and to avoid high vitamin C intakes in patients under such treatment to prevent development of renal insufficiency. PMID:8446234

  10. Two Brothers with Bardet-Biedl Syndrome Presenting with Chronic Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Cem; Huddam, Bulent; Akbaba, Gulhan; Tunca, Hasan; Koca, Emine; Levent, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Bardet-Biedl Syndrome (BBS) is a rarely seen autosomal recessive transfer disease characterised by retinal dystrophy, obesity, extremity deformities, mental retardation, and renal and genital system anomalies. BBS shows heterogenic transfer. To date, 18 genes (BBS1–18) and 7 BBS proteins have been defined as related to BBS. All of the defined BBS genes have been shown to be related to the biogenesis or function of cilia. Renal failure accompanying the syndrome, especially in the advanced stages, is the most common cause of mortality. Therefore, as one of the major diagnostic criteria, renal damage is of great importance in early diagnosis. This paper presents the cases of two brothers with BBS who presented with chronic renal failure. PMID:25960897

  11. Renal Denervation in Heart Failure: A New Therapeutic Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Dhakal, Pramesh; Liu, Kan; Kozman, Hani; Carhart, Robert L; Villarreal, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure constitutes a significant source of morbidity and mortality in the United States, and its incidence and prevalence continue to grow, increasing its burden on the health care system. Renal dysfunction in patients with heart failure is common and has been associated with adverse clinical outcomes. This complex interaction is characterized by a pathophysiological disequilibrium between the heart and the kidney, in which cardiac malfunction promotes renal impairment, which in turn feeds back, resulting in further deterioration of cardiovascular function. Multiple neurohumoral and hemodynamic mechanisms are involved in this cardiorenal dyshomeostasis, including resistance to compensatory cardiac natriuretic peptides, leading to sodium retention, volume overload, and organ remodeling. Previous studies in animal models of heart failure have demonstrated that renal denervation promotes a robust natriuresis and diuresis as well as increased response of endogenous and exogenous natriuretic agents. With the recent development of minimally invasive renal denervation in humans, it is possible to suggest that this technique may become effective and important in the management of renal sodium and water metabolism in heart failure. PMID:26157338

  12. Nonobstructive Acute Renal Failure with a Large Solitary Fibroid

    PubMed Central

    Bakker, Blakele; Yilmaz, Ali; DePasquale, Stephen; Boren, Todd

    2016-01-01

    A 38-year-old African American woman presenting with acute abdominal pain and nonobstructive renal failure was found to have an enlarged fibroid uterus. A differential for sepsis was considered. Lab evaluation revealed an elevated creatinine and myoglobin level at 3.9 mg/dL and 2140 ng/mL, respectively. Ongoing hemodynamic instability mandated surgery for acute abdomen. A 25 cm fibroid uterus was extirpated through a total abdominal hysterectomy. Immediate improvement of acute nephropathy mirrored the postoperative decline in serum myoglobin levels. Myoglobinemia from a massive degenerating fibroid is associated with nonobstructive acute renal failure. PMID:27375910

  13. Renin and Acute Renal Failure: Studies in Man

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J. J.; Gleadle, R. I.; Lawson, D. H.; Lever, A. F.; Linton, A. L.; Macadam, R. F.; Prentice, E.; Robertson, J. I. S.; Tree, M.

    1970-01-01

    Plasma renin concentration was increased, usually appreciably, in 22 out of 25 patients with acute renal failure, the average value being 226 units/litre (mean for normal subjects 8·2 units/1.). The highest renin values were found in the first 10 days of the disease; lower and sometimes normal values were found subsequently. Unequivocal acute tubular necrosis was present in only two of the eight cases examined post mortem. These findings are compatible with Goormaghtigh's proposal that an excess of renin and angiotensin may act within the kidney to produce acute renal failure. PMID:4313590

  14. Surgical management of patients receiving haemodialysis for chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Yassin, S; Ezz, M

    1995-10-01

    This study was carried out on 22 patients seeking dental extractions of one molar tooth. The first group consisted of 12 patients suffering from chronic renal failure undergoing haemodialysis, while the other group consisted of 10 apparently healthy dental patients acting as a control group. The scope of this work is based on the proper handling and management of chronic renal failure patients receiving haemodialysis and undergoing an oral surgical procedure. Complete blood picture, screening of bleeding and coagulation and postextraction complications were monitored for the two groups. PMID:9497692

  15. Technetium-99m pyrophosphate imaging in acute renal failure associated with nontraumatic rhabdomyolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, R.; Mishkin, F.S.

    1986-10-01

    Technetium-99m pyrophosphate (Tc-PYP) imaging was performed in five patients with acute renal failure associated with nontraumatic rhabdomyolysis. Four patients had phencyclidine intoxication and one had viral pneumonia. During the acute phase, marked uptake of pyrophosphate was seen in all patients in several muscle groups, but always in the thigh adductors. The results show that phencyclidine intoxication can result in diffuse muscle uptake of Tc-PYP without overt evidence of muscle injury. Tc-PYP imaging may provide a clue to the cause of acute renal failure in patients with suspected rhabdomyolysis in whom elevations of serum creatine phosphokinase concentrations are equivocal.

  16. Statin-induced rhabdomyolysis in patient with renal failure and underlying undiagnosed hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Ambapkar, Sachinkumar N; Shetty, Naresh; Dwivedy, Arpita; Malve, Harshad Onkarrao

    2016-05-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a syndrome characterized by muscle necrosis which causes the release of myoglobin into the bloodstream. The manifestations of this syndrome range from asymptomatic elevation of serum muscle enzymes to life-threatening cases associated with extremely high enzyme levels, electrolyte imbalance, and acute renal failure. Symptoms of rhabdomyolysis include dark urine, muscle weakness, and fatigue. Statins are commonly used drugs for the prevention and management of dyslipidemia. We present an interesting and critical case on statin-induced rhabdomyolysis with renal failure and previously undiagnosed idiopathic hypothyroidism. PMID:27275082

  17. Statin-induced rhabdomyolysis in patient with renal failure and underlying undiagnosed hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Ambapkar, Sachinkumar N.; Shetty, Naresh; Dwivedy, Arpita; Malve, Harshad Onkarrao

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a syndrome characterized by muscle necrosis which causes the release of myoglobin into the bloodstream. The manifestations of this syndrome range from asymptomatic elevation of serum muscle enzymes to life-threatening cases associated with extremely high enzyme levels, electrolyte imbalance, and acute renal failure. Symptoms of rhabdomyolysis include dark urine, muscle weakness, and fatigue. Statins are commonly used drugs for the prevention and management of dyslipidemia. We present an interesting and critical case on statin-induced rhabdomyolysis with renal failure and previously undiagnosed idiopathic hypothyroidism. PMID:27275082

  18. The endocrinology and pathophysiology of alcoholic cirrhosis and functional renal failure--a review.

    PubMed Central

    Domurat, E. S.; Elias, A. N.

    1992-01-01

    The pathophysiology and characteristics of decompensated alcoholic cirrhosis and functional renal failure are reviewed. The review will be restricted to alcoholic cirrhosis, because most cases of functional renal failure in the United States occur in the setting of alcoholic cirrhosis, which is also the most common cause of ascites in North America and Europe. Moreover, hepatorenal syndrome may complicate other forms of liver disease besides alcoholic cirrhosis, but the pathogenesis in such circumstances may not be the same as in the cirrhotic state. PMID:1602514

  19. [Metastatic prostate cancer complicated with chronic disseminated intravascular coagulopathy causing acute renal failure, mimicking thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and hemolytic uremic syndrome: pathomechanism, differential diagnosis and therapy related to a case].

    PubMed

    Deme, Dániel; Ragán, Márton; Kalmár, Katalin; Kovács, Lajos; Varga, Erzsébet; Varga, Tünde; Rakonczai, Ervin

    2010-12-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC) is characterized as activation of the clotting system resulting in fibrin thrombi, gradually diminishing levels of clotting factors with increased risk of bleeding. Basically two types of DIC are distinguished: (1) chronic (compensated) - with alteration of laboratory values and (2) acute (non-compensated) - with severe clinical manifestations: bleeding, shock, acute renal failure (ARF), transient focal neurologic deficit, delirium or coma. Chronic DIC related to metastatic neoplasia is caused by pancreatic, gastric or prostatic carcinoma in most of the cases. Incidence rate of DIC is 13-30% in prostate cancer, among those only 0.4-1.65% of patients had clinical signs and symptoms of DIC. In other words, chronic DIC is developed in one of eight patients with prostate cancer. DIC is considered as a poor prognostic factor in prostatic carcinoma. The similar clinical and laboratory findings of TTP-HUS (thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura - hemolytic uremic syndrome) and DIC makes it difficult to differentiate between them. A 71 years old male patient with known chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, benign prostatic hyperplasia, significant carotid artery stenosis, gastric ulcer and alcoholic liver disease was admitted to another hospital with melena. Gastroscopy revealed intact gastric mucosa and actually non-bleeding duodenal ulcer covered by clots. Laboratory results showed hyperkalemia, elevated kidney function tests, indirect hyperbilirubinemia, increased liver function tests, leukocytosis, anemia, thrombocytopenia and elevated international normalized ratio (INR). He was treated with saline infusions, four units of red blood cells and one unit of fresh frozen plasma transfusions. Four days later he was transported to our Institution with ARF. Physical examination revealed dyspnoe, petechiae, hemoptoe, oliguria, chest-wall pain and aggressive behavior. Thrombocytopenia, signs of MAHA (fragmentocytes and helmet cells

  20. Current strategies for preventing renal dysfunction in patients with heart failure: a heart failure stage approach

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Victor Sarli; Andrade, Lúcia; Bocchi, Edimar Alcides

    2013-01-01

    Renal dysfunction is common during episodes of acute decompensated heart failure, and historical data indicate that the mean creatinine level at admission has risen in recent decades. Different mechanisms underlying this change over time have been proposed, such as demographic changes, hemodynamic and neurohumoral derangements and medical interventions. In this setting, various strategies have been proposed for the prevention of renal dysfunction with heterogeneous results. In the present article, we review and discuss the main aspects of renal dysfunction prevention according to the different stages of heart failure. PMID:23644863

  1. Structures for common-cause failure analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Vaurio, J.K.

    1981-01-01

    Common-cause failure methodology and terminology have been reviewed and structured to provide a systematical basis for addressing and developing models and methods for quantification. The structure is based on (1) a specific set of definitions, (2) categories based on the way faults are attributable to a common cause, and (3) classes based on the time of entry and the time of elimination of the faults. The failure events are then characterized by their likelihood or frequency and the average residence time. The structure provides a basis for selecting computational models, collecting and evaluating data and assessing the importance of various failure types, and for developing effective defences against common-cause failure. The relationships of this and several other structures are described.

  2. Deregulated Renal Calcium and Phosphate Transport during Experimental Kidney Failure

    PubMed Central

    van Loon, Ellen P.; van de Sluis, Bart; Vervloet, Mark G.; Hoenderop, Joost G.; Bindels, René J.

    2015-01-01

    Impaired mineral homeostasis and inflammation are hallmarks of chronic kidney disease (CKD), yet the underlying mechanisms of electrolyte regulation during CKD are still unclear. Here, we applied two different murine models, partial nephrectomy and adenine-enriched dietary intervention, to induce kidney failure and to investigate the subsequent impact on systemic and local renal factors involved in Ca2+ and Pi regulation. Our results demonstrated that both experimental models induce features of CKD, as reflected by uremia, and elevated renal neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) expression. In our model kidney failure was associated with polyuria, hypercalcemia and elevated urinary Ca2+ excretion. In accordance, CKD augmented systemic PTH and affected the FGF23-αklotho-vitamin-D axis by elevating circulatory FGF23 levels and reducing renal αklotho expression. Interestingly, renal FGF23 expression was also induced by inflammatory stimuli directly. Renal expression of Cyp27b1, but not Cyp24a1, and blood levels of 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3 were significantly elevated in both models. Furthermore, kidney failure was characterized by enhanced renal expression of the transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 5 (TRPV5), calbindin-D28k, and sodium-dependent Pi transporter type 2b (NaPi2b), whereas the renal expression of sodium-dependent Pi transporter type 2a (NaPi2a) and type 3 (PIT2) were reduced. Together, our data indicates two different models of experimental kidney failure comparably associate with disturbed FGF23-αklotho-vitamin-D signalling and a deregulated electrolyte homeostasis. Moreover, this study identifies local tubular, possibly inflammation- or PTH- and/or FGF23-associated, adaptive mechanisms, impacting on Ca2+/Pi homeostasis, hence enabling new opportunities to target electrolyte disturbances that emerge as a consequence of CKD development. PMID:26566277

  3. The Prognostic Importance of Changes in Renal Function during Treatment for Acute Heart Failure Depends on Admission Renal Function

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Ryan; Ezekowitz, Justin A.; Brown, Paul M.; McAlister, Finlay A.; Rowe, Brian H.; Braam, Branko

    2015-01-01

    Background Worsening and improving renal function during acute heart failure have been associated with adverse outcomes but few studies have considered the admission level of renal function upon which these changes are superimposed. Objectives The objective of this study was to evaluate definitions that incorporate both admission renal function and change in renal function. Methods 696 patients with acute heart failure with calculable eGFR were classified by admission renal function (Reduced [R, eGFR<45 ml/min] or Preserved [P, eGFR≥45 ml/min]) and change over hospital admission (worsening [WRF]: eGFR ≥20% decline; stable [SRF]; and improving [IRF]: eGFR ≥20% increase). The primary outcome was all-cause mortality. The prevalence of Pres and Red renal function was 47.8% and 52.2%. The frequency of R-WRF, R-SRF, and R-IRF was 11.4%, 28.7%, and 12.1%, respectively; the incidence of P-WRF, P-SRF, and P-IRF was 5.7%, 35.3%, and 6.8%, respectively. Survival was shorter for patients with R-WRF compared to R-IRF (median survival times 13.9 months (95%CI 7.7–24.9) and 32.5 months (95%CI 18.8–56.1), respectively), resulting in an acceleration factor of 2.3 (p = 0.016). Thus, an increase compared with a decrease in renal function was associated with greater than two times longer survival among patients with Reduced renal function. PMID:26380982

  4. Bone scintigraphy in acute renal failure with severe loin pain and patchy renal vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Han, J S; Kim, Y G; Kim, S; Lee, M C; Lee, J S; Kim, S H

    1991-01-01

    To evaluate the patterns of renal images and the diagnostic value as a screening test of the whole-body bone and renal scintigraphy with technetium-99m-methylene diphosphonate (99mTc-MDP) or -pyrophosphate (99mTc-PYP), we performed bone scintigraphy in 6 patients with acute renal failure (ARF) with severe loin pain and patchy renal vasoconstriction on postcontrast renal computed tomography (CT). All 6 patients were young and previously healthy but experienced severe loin pain after track events. Five took analgesics. Postcontrast renal CT showed patchy low-density areas or diffuse enhancement immediately after radiocontrast injection and then patchy wedge-shaped enhancement 24 or 48 h later, which subsequently disappeared 72 h later. On the whole-body bone scintigrams with 99mTc-MDP or 99mTc-PYP before obtaining renal CT, there was no increased uptake of isotope in the soft tissue, and multiple patchy increased accumulations of the isotope in the kidney were observed in 5 patients. In 2 patients, renal scintigraphies with technetium-99m-dimercaptosuccinate showed photon-deficient areas in the same areas of patchy isotope accumulation in the whole-body bone scintigraphies. Whole-body image and renal scintigraphy with bone-seeking agents may be useful as a screening test and in the search for the theoretical evidence of ARF with severe loin pain and patchy renal vasoconstriction. PMID:1835520

  5. [Strategies of age-adapted pharmacotherapy in renal failure].

    PubMed

    Lenssen, R; Liekweg, A

    2016-08-01

    Many geriatric patients with multimorbidities have an increased risk for impaired renal function due to age and often the presence of comorbidities, such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension and heart failure. This impairment in kidney function in turn necessitates adjustments in drug therapy. A successful strategy for treating these patients includes treatment of the underlying diseases, a comprehensive review of the indications, selection of appropriate pharmacotherapeutic alternatives and for some drugs dose adjustment to the renal function. To achieve therapeutic success many patient individual factors, such as potentially complex medication regimens, polypharmacy, cognitive function and functional disabilities need to be considered when prescribing medications. This article describes the problems associated with drug therapy that is not adjusted to renal function and provides guidelines for assessment of the benefits and risks in patients with kidney failure. The characteristic features of geriatric patients in particular are considered and discussed. PMID:27447457

  6. Oral and dental aspects of chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Proctor, R; Kumar, N; Stein, A; Moles, D; Porter, S

    2005-03-01

    The present article reviews, in detail, the current knowledge of the oral and dental aspects of chronic renal failure (CRF). Worldwide, increasing numbers of persons have CRF; thus, oral health care staffs are increasingly likely to provide care for patients with such disease. Chronic renal failure can give rise to a wide spectrum of oral manifestations, affecting the hard or soft tissues of the mouth. The majority of affected individuals have disease that does not complicate oral health care; nevertheless, the dental management of such individuals does require that the clinician understand the multiple systems that can be affected. The clinician should also consider the adverse side-effects of drug therapy and appropriate prescribing, in view of compromised renal clearance. PMID:15723858

  7. Regulation of renal sympathetic neurotransmission by renal α2A-adrenoceptors is impaired in chronic renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Hoch, Henning; Stegbauer, Johannes; Potthoff, Sebastian A; Hein, Lutz; Quack, Ivo; Rump, Lars Christian; Vonend, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The mechanisms underlying increased renal noradrenaline in renal failure are still unclear. In this study, the role of α2A-adrenoceptors in controlling sympathetic neurotransmission in chronic renal failure was evaluated in a subtotal nephrectomy model. Also, the influence of this receptor subtype on angiotensin II (Ang II)-mediated noradrenaline release was evaluated. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH α2A-Adrenoceptor-knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice underwent subtotal (5/6) nephrectomy (SNx) or SHAM-operation (SHAM). Kidneys of WT and KO mice were isolated and perfused. Renal nerves were stimulated with platinum electrodes and noradrenaline release was measured by HPLC. KEY RESULTS Noradrenaline release induced by renal nerve stimulation (RNS) was significantly increased in WT mice after SNx. RNS-induced noradrenaline release was significantly higher in SHAM-KO compared with SHAM-WT, but no further increase in noradrenaline release could be observed in SNx-KO. α-Adrenoceptor antagonists increased RNS-induced noradrenaline release in SHAM-WT but not in SHAM-KO. After SNx, the effect of α2-adrenoceptor blockade on renal noradrenaline release was attenuated in WT mice. The mRNA expression of α2A-adrenoceptors was not altered, but the inhibitory effect of α2-adrenoceptor agonists on cAMP formation was abolished after SNx. Ang II facilitated RNS-induced noradrenaline release in SHAM-WT but not in SHAM-KO and SNx-WT. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS In our model of renal failure autoregulation of renal sympathetic neurotransmission was impaired. Presynaptic inhibition of noradrenaline release was diminished and the facilitatory effect of presynaptic angiotensin AT1 receptors on noradrenaline release was markedly decreased in renal failure and depended on functioning α2A-adrenoceptors. PMID:21244368

  8. Acute Renal Failure Induced by Chinese Herbal Medication in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Akpan, Effiong Ekong; Ekrikpo, Udeme E

    2015-01-01

    Traditional herbal medicine is a global phenomenon especially in the resource poor economy where only the very rich can access orthodox care. These herbal products are associated with complications such as acute renal failure and liver damage with a high incidence of mortalities and morbidities. Acute renal failure from the use of herbal remedies is said to account for about 30-35% of all cases of acute renal failure in Africa. Most of the herbal medications are not usually identified, but some common preparation often used in Nigeria includes "holy water" green water leaves, bark of Mangifera indica (mango), shoot of Anacardium occidentale (cashew), Carica papaya (paw-paw) leaves, lime water, Solanum erianthum (Potato tree), and Azadirachta indica (Neem) trees. We report a rare case of a young man who developed acute renal failure two days after ingestion of Chinese herb for "body cleansing" and general wellbeing. He had 4 sessions of haemodialysis and recovered kidney function fully after 18 days of admission. PMID:26199625

  9. Oral piretanide in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, I S; Beattie, T J; Kennedy, A C; Dombey, S L

    1982-01-01

    1 The effects of high doses of piretanide, a new diuretic agent chemically related to frusemide and bumetanide were evaluated in twelve patients with severe chronic renal insufficiency (creatinine clearance below 25 ml/min). 2 Patients received either 30 mg or 60 mg piretanide orally after a water load of 11. Urine volume and the excretion of electrolytes, creatinine, urea and uric acid were measured over the subsequent 24 h. 3 Piretanide produced an effective diuresis and natriuresis in these patients, its action being broadly similar to those of bumetanide and frusemide observed in previous studies. PMID:7150461

  10. Dental management for children with chronic renal failure undergoing hemodialysis therapy.

    PubMed

    Chow, M H; Peterson, D S

    1979-07-01

    Patients with chronic renal failure who are undergoing hemodialysis therapy demonstrate problems of significant importance for dental treatment. A case is presented in which secondard hyperparathyroidism, resulting from renal failure and hemodialysis, was noted in a child. Other relationships between renal failure, hemodialysis, and dental care were also presented. PMID:287985

  11. Chronic sublethal stress causes bee colony failure

    PubMed Central

    Bryden, John; Gill, Richard J; Mitton, Robert A A; Raine, Nigel E; Jansen, Vincent A A; Hodgson, David

    2013-01-01

    Current bee population declines and colony failures are well documented yet poorly understood and no single factor has been identified as a leading cause. The evidence is equivocal and puzzling: for instance, many pathogens and parasites can be found in both failing and surviving colonies and field pesticide exposure is typically sublethal. Here, we investigate how these results can be due to sublethal stress impairing colony function. We mathematically modelled stress on individual bees which impairs colony function and found how positive density dependence can cause multiple dynamic outcomes: some colonies fail while others thrive. We then exposed bumblebee colonies to sublethal levels of a neonicotinoid pesticide. The dynamics of colony failure, which we observed, were most accurately described by our model. We argue that our model can explain the enigmatic aspects of bee colony failures, highlighting an important role for sublethal stress in colony declines. PMID:24112478

  12. Mechanisms of renal hyporesponsiveness to BNP in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Egom, Emmanuel E; Feridooni, Tiam; Hotchkiss, Adam; Kruzliak, Peter; Pasumarthi, Kishore B S

    2015-06-01

    The B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), a member of the family of vasoactive peptides, is a potent natriuretic, diuretic, and vasodilatory peptide that contributes to blood pressure and volume homeostasis. These attributes make BNP an ideal drug that could aid in diuresing a fluid-overloaded patient who had poor or worsening renal function. Despite the potential benefits of BNP, accumulating evidence suggests that simply increasing the amount of circulating BNP does not necessarily increase natriuresis in patients with heart failure (HF). Moreover, despite high BNP levels, natriuresis falls when HF progresses from a compensated to a decompensated state, suggesting the emergence of renal resistance to BNP. Although likely multifactorial, several mechanisms have been proposed to explain renal hyporesponsiveness in HF, including, but not limited to, decreased renal BNP availability, down-regulation of natriuretic peptide receptors, and altered BNP intracellular signal transduction pathways. Thus, a better understanding of renal hyporesponsiveness in HF is required to devise strategies to develop novel agents and technologies that directly restore renal BNP efficiency. It is hoped that development of these new therapeutic approaches will serve to limit sodium retention in patients with HF, which may ultimately delay the progression to overt HF. PMID:25881664

  13. Failure Caused by Breaching in Subaqueous Sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Y.; Flemings, P. B.; Mohrig, D. C.

    2009-12-01

    Breaching can generate sustained turbidity flows in submarine canyon heads or delta mouths; it is caused by shear dilation. We conduct flume experiments and analyze pore pressure changes due to shear dilation during breaching. We deposit and consolidate fine-grained sand 9cm deep and 6cm long at one end of a 29cm long water-filled tank placed on flat surface. Breaching is initiated by removal of an artificial support that retains the sand; creating an initial vertical failure surface. Pore pressure near the bottom of the initial surface reduces by 850Pa; we estimate 600Pa is caused by dilation. Pore pressure reduction farther from the initial surface is less. The pore pressure decrease stabilizes the sand. However, the underpressure will try to recover and destabilize the sand. Destabilization occurs first at the failure surface causing sand to fail, which causes pore pressure reduction in the rest of the deposit. The failure surface steps back in this way at ~0.3 cm/s. Sustained turbidity flow forms from the failed material. Part of the flow deposits in front of the failure surface, causing the surface height to decrease from 9cm to 3.5cm. The drop in pore pressure caused by dilation is approximately 20% more mid-way in the sand than near the bottom of the sand. This suggests breaching may not happen in deep water levels or thick deposits, where the confining stress is too large for dilation to occur. When the water tank is placed at an angle of 23o the failed material is able to evacuate to the downstream end, resulting in a steady failure surface height. This study allows slope stability predictions and provides a process-based way to determine sediment supply for associated turbidity currents and sediment transport models.

  14. Renal failure: unusual clinical presentation of an isolated intrarenal hydatid cyst.

    PubMed

    Nadeem, Mehwash; Biyabani, Syed Raziuddin; Pervez, Shahid

    2013-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis or hydatid disease is a zoonotic parasitic infection caused by larval stage of cestode Echinococcus spp. Humans are an accidental intermediate host and present with the involvement of different organs, the liver being the most common while kidney is the rarest site. Here, authors are reporting a case of a 55-year-old woman who presented with renal failure and was found to have a right-sided intrarenal hydatid cyst, diagnosed and treated with nephroscopy without sacrificing the kidney. She had an uneventful postoperative course and her renal function improved dramatically. She is now on oral albendazole therapy and doing well on follow-up. To the best of our knowledge, renal failure has never been reported in the literature as clinical manifestation of intrarenal hydatid cyst in adult population. PMID:24243503

  15. Current Concepts on Diabetic Nephropathy and 2014 Data on Diabetic Renal Failure in Texas.

    PubMed

    Pazmino, Patricio A

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the United States and other developed countries. In 1982, diabetes accounted for 27% of patients with ESRD in the United States and rose to 36% by 1992 and to 47% in 2012. Currently, the number of prevalent cases of ESRD in the country (dialysis and transplant) exceeds more than 636,900. Primary care practitioners (PCP) provide more than 90% of the diabetic care and are well-positioned to identify, prevent, and treat initially DN. PCPs should identify DN with a urine microalbumin test, obtain a serum creatinine and glomerular filtration rate, monitor hemoglobin A1c, and treat hypertension and dyslipidemia according to current guidelines. This article reviews basic concepts and goals for DN as well as the 2014 data for diabetic renal failure in the most populous counties in Texas. The Texas counties bordering Mexico show an excessive prevalence of diabetic renal failure. PMID:27441426

  16. Acute renal failure and bilateral kidney infiltration as the first presentation of non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Monfared, Ali; Orangpoor, Reza Orangpoor; Fakheri, Tabassom Fakheri; Falahatkar, Siavash

    2009-01-01

    Diffuse bilateral infiltration of the kidneys by lymphoma is probably the rarest cause of renal insufficiency. Moreover, acute renal failure as the initial manifestation of the lymphoma is reported only in a few cases. A 44-year-old man complaining of bilateral flank pain and weakness for 2 months was admitted with acute renal failure. Ultraonography revealed hyperechoic bilaterally enlarged kidneys and an enlarged spleen. Fat pad aspiration was negative for amyloidosis and serum protein electrophoresis was normal. Needle biopsy of the kidney and pathologic examination showed diffuse infiltration of the interstitium with lymphocytes and atypical cells. Bone marrow aspiration and biopsy were negative for malignant cells. Open kidney biopsy was performed and infiltrated cells positive for CD20 and negative for CD3 markers were observed based upon which diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell type non-Hodgkin lymphoma was made. PMID:19377260

  17. Thyroid Dysfunction in Chronic Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Victoria Sy; Fang, Victor S.; Katz, Adrian I.; Refetoff, Samuel

    1977-01-01

    Thyroid function was evaluated in 46 patients with end-stage kidney disease and 42 normal subjects. Patients were studied before and after the institution of maintenance hemodialysis (HD) and after renal transplantation (RT). Serum total triiodothyronine concentrations (TT3, ng/100 ml, mean±SD) were 63±17 and 83±22 in the non-HD and HD groups, respectively. Values from normal subjects were 128±25 and from RT patients 134±20. The TT3 was in the hypothyroid range (<78 ng/100 ml; 2 SD below normal mean) in 80% of non-HD and 43% of HD patients. Mean serum total thyroxine concentration (TT4), although within the normal range, was lower than the control value. T4-binding globulin capacity was also slightly lower but the difference was not statistically significant. Among patients whose TT4 was 1 SD below the normal mean, the free T4 index was equally depressed, suggesting that factors other than decreased binding capacity might be responsible for the low TT4. In addition, there was a 37% incidence of goiter. Mean serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) was not elevated and the TSH response to thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) was distinctly blunted, suggesting the possibility of pituitary dysfunction as well. In vivo 125I-l-T4 and 131I-l-T3 kinetics during 0.2 mg/day of l-T4 replacement showed marked reduction in T3 turnover rate in the uremic patients, both before and during HD; the values (μg T3/day, mean±SD) for the different groups were as follows: normal, 33.8±6.1; non-HD, 13.5±2.6; HD, 12.9±3.1; and RT, 30.3±7.1. The low T3 turnover rate was due to impaired extrathyroidal conversion of T4 to T3. The mean percent±SD of metabolized T4 converted to T3 was 37.2±5.8 in normal subjects, 15.7±3.1 in non-HD, 12.8±1.7 in HD, and 34.0±14.7 in RT patients. In contrast, thyroidal T3 secretion rate was not different between the control and the three patient groups. Thus, it appears that uremia affects thyroid function at several levels: (a) subnormal pituitary

  18. Late renal failure due to prostatic outflow obstruction: a preventable disease.

    PubMed

    Sacks, S H; Aparicio, S A; Bevan, A; Oliver, D O; Will, E J; Davison, A M

    1989-01-21

    Nineteen patients presenting with late renal failure due to prostatic outflow obstruction (mean age 68.7 years; mean serum creatinine concentration 1158 mumol/l) were identified from the admission records of two renal units. As late renal failure secondary to prostatic enlargement is preventable case records were analysed retrospectively in an attempt to identify aspects of management in which preventive efforts might be of value. Delays in referral were common, with a mean of 2.8 years between the onset of prostatic symptoms and time of referral, six patients being referred who had had symptoms for more than three years. Four of five patients who had had a prostatectomy were known to be in renal failure at the time of operation but were not referred until 2-13 years later, when prostatic symptoms had recurred and there was evidence of progressive nephropathy with dilatation of the upper urinary tract. Two patients died on admission and eight (47% of survivors) required long term dialysis, most patients (80%) requiring some dialysis support during the initial period. These findings suggest that progressive nephropathy caused by prostatic outflow obstruction might, in part, be averted by more adequate screening of renal function in men with untreated prostatism and closer follow up of patients with uraemia at the time of prostatectomy. PMID:2466506

  19. Acute kidney failure

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure; Renal failure; Renal failure - acute; ARF; Kidney injury - acute ... There are many possible causes of kidney damage. They include: ... cholesterol (cholesterol emboli) Decreased blood flow due to very ...

  20. Causes of catastrophic failure in complex systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, David A.

    2010-08-01

    Root causes of mission critical failures and major cost and schedule overruns in complex systems and programs are studied through the post-mortem analyses compiled for several examples, including the Hubble Space Telescope, the Challenger and Columbia Shuttle accidents, and the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant accident. The roles of organizational complexity, cognitive biases in decision making, the display of quantitative data, and cost and schedule pressure are all considered. Recommendations for mitigating the risk of similar failures in future programs are also provided.

  1. [Carbonyl stress and oxidatively modified proteins in chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Bargnoux, A-S; Morena, M; Badiou, S; Dupuy, A-M; Canaud, B; Cristol, J-P

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress is commonly observed in chronic renal failure patients resulting from an unbalance between overproduction of reactive oxygen species and impairement of defense mechanisms. Proteins appear as potential targets of uremia-induced oxidative stress and may undergo qualitative modifications. Proteins could be directly modified by reactive oxygen species which leads to amino acid oxydation and cross-linking. Proteins could be indirectly modified by reactive carbonyl compounds produced by glycoxidation and lipo-peroxidation. The resulting post-traductional modifications are known as carbonyl stress. In addition, thiols could be oxidized or could react with homocystein leading to homocysteinylation. Finally, tyrosin could be oxidized by myeloperoxidase leading to advanced oxidative protein products (AOPP). Oxidatively modified proteins are increased in chronic renal failure patients and may contribute to exacerbate the oxidative stress/inflammation syndrome. They have been involved in long term complications of uremia such as amyloidosis and accelerated atherosclerosis. PMID:19297289

  2. Image diagnosis of parathyroid glands in chronic renal failure

    SciTech Connect

    Takagi, H.; Tominaga, Y.; Uchida, K.; Yamada, N.; Morimoto, T.; Yasue, M.

    1983-07-01

    Twenty-two out of 31 patients with chronic renal failure and secondary hyperparathyroidism who underwent parathyroidectomy before operation underwent non-invasive image diagnosis of parathyroid glands by computed tomography (CT), scintigraphy with /sup 201/TlCl and /sup 99m/TcO/sup 4 +/, and/or ultrasonography. CT visualized 39 of 45 parathyroid glands (86.7%), weighing more than 500 mg. Scintigraphy with a subtraction method using a computer performed the diagnosis in 19 of 27 glands (70.4%). Ultrasonography detected 21 of 27 glands (77.8%). Image diagnosis was also useful in the postoperative follow-up study. The non-invasive image diagnosis of parathyroid glands in patients with chronic renal failure is thus valuable for 1) definite diagnosis of secondary hyperparathyroidism, 2) localization, and 3) diagnosis for effectiveness of conservative treatment.

  3. Tsutsugamushi infection-associated acute rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Young, Park Chi; Hae, Chung Choon; Lee, Kim Hyun; Hoon, Chung Jong

    2003-12-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a rare complication that emerges in a variety of infectious diseases, such as tsutsugamushi infection. In this study, we report a 71-year-old female patient with tsutsugamushi infection who exhibiting rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure. On admission, an eschar, which is characteristic of tsutsugamushi infection, was found on her right flank area. Moreover, her tsutsugamushi antibody titer was 1:40960. The elevated values of serum creatinine phosphokinase (CPK), aldolase, creatinine and dark brown urine secondary to myoglobinuria are consistent with indications of rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure due to tsutsugamushi infection. Her health improved without any residual effects after treatment with doxycyclin and hydration with normal saline. PMID:14717236

  4. Elimination kinetics of labetalol in severe renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Wood, A. J.; Ferry, D. G.; Bailey, R. R.

    1982-01-01

    1 The pharmacokinetics of intravenously administered labetalol were studied in four patients with severe renal failure and in three normal subjects. 2 A new and sensitive method for the assay of plasma labetalol concentrations using high performance liquid chromatography is described. 3 Labetalol has a relatively large apparent volume of distribution (3.3-7.9 l/kg, two-compartment open model) and a relatively high plasma clearance (0.3-1.6 1 h-1 kg-1). 4 There were no significant differences between the patients with severe renal failure and the controls for any of the pharmacokinetic parameters measured. 5 In the presence of renal functional impairment, no modification of labetalol dosage is required. 6 In another study of 31 patients, glomerular filtration rate was measured at 3-month intervals for 3-18 months. In ten patients there was no change, in ten there was an improvement and in 11 there was deterioration, but in only three was this attributable to treatment. 7 In our experience with over 300 patients, we conclude that labetalol plus diuretic treatment is efficacious and safe in all grades of hypertension including those with all degrees of renal insufficiency. PMID:7093103

  5. Is chronic renal failure a risk factor for the development of erosive osteoarthritis?

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, I J; Hurst, N P; Disney, A; Sebben, R; Milazzo, S C

    1989-01-01

    Erosive osteoarthritis of the hands of unusually early onset and severity was seen in two patients treated for chronic renal failure by long term haemodialysis and renal homograft respectively. The significance of this observation is discussed in the light of previous studies of erosive arthropathy in patients with chronic renal failure. Factors associated with chronic renal failure may predispose to the development of erosive osteoarthritis. Images PMID:2649026

  6. [Acute oliguric renal failure and haemolytic anaemia following infectious mononucleosis].

    PubMed

    Brkovic, Natasa; Jørgensen, Kit Riegels; Rosenbæk, Jeppe Bakkestrøm; Pedersen, Erling Bjerregaard

    2015-11-01

    A 19-year-old man was admitted to hospital due to fatigue, nausea, abdominal pain and faint. He was pale and icteric, awake with sufficient respiration and circulation. He had infectious mononucleosis complicated with acute oliguric renal failure and severe haemolytic anaemia with a positive Coombs test. He had a cold agglutinin syndrome. The treatment comprised intermittent haemodialysis, plasmapheresis and heating. He recovered completely after two months. PMID:26573947

  7. Effect of Renal Function on Prognosis in Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Löffler, Adrián I.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Fang, James; Hetzel, Scott J.; Kadlec, Andrew; Astor, Brad; Sweitzer, Nancy K.

    2014-01-01

    Renal dysfunction (RD) is associated with increased mortality in heart failure (HF). The aim of this study was to identify whether worsened or improved renal function during mid-term follow-up is associated with worsened outcomes in chronic HF patients. 892 participants from a multicenter cohort study of chronic HF were followed over 3.1±1.9 years of enrollment. Worsened and improved renal function were tested with multivariable models as independent predictors of HF hospitalization and mortality. While 12% of subjects experienced a ≥25% decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), 17% experienced a ≥25% increase in eGFR, and there was stability of kidney function observed in the cohort as a whole. The quartile with the worst RD at any point in time had increased risk of HF hospitalization and mortality. Worsened eGFR was associated with HF outcomes in the unadjusted (HR=1.71 (95%CI 1.04-2.81), p=0.035), but not the adjusted analysis. Improvement in eGFR was not associated with outcome (p=0.453). In chronic HF, the severity of RD predicts risk of poor outcome better than changes in renal function during mid-term follow-up. This suggests that in patients with appropriately treated chronic HF, worsening renal function in itself does not yield useful prognostic information and may not reflect poor outcome. PMID:25465925

  8. Pyrotechnic system failures: Causes and prevention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J.

    1988-01-01

    Although pyrotechnics have successfully accomplished many critical mechanical spacecraft functions, such as ignition, severance, jettisoning and valving (excluding propulsion), failures continue to occur. Provided is a listing of 84 failures of pyrotechnic hardware with completed design over a 23-year period, compiled informally by experts from every NASA Center, as well as the Air Force Space Division and the Naval Surface Warfare Center. Analyses are presented as to when and where these failures occurred, their technical source or cause, followed by the reasons why and how these kinds of failures persist. The major contributor is a fundamental lack of understanding of the functional mechanisms of pyrotechnic devices and systems, followed by not recognizing pyrotechnics as an engineering technology, insufficient manpower with hands-on experience, too few test facilities, and inadequate guidelines and specifications for design, development, qualification and acceptance. Recommendations are made on both a managerial and technical basis to prevent failures, increase reliability, improve existing and future designs, and develop the technology to meet future requirements.

  9. The pharmacokinetics of nortriptyline in patients with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Dawlilng, S; Lynn, K; Rosser, R; Braithwaite, R

    1981-01-01

    1 The pharmacokinetics of single oral doses of nortriptyline were studied in twenty patients with chronic renal failure, eight of whom were receiving treatment with haemodialysis. 2 The median nortriptyline half-life was 25.2 h (range 14.5-140.0 h) and the median nortriptyline clearance was 32.3 l/h (range 8.1-122.0 l/h). 3 No differences were observed between the dialysed and non-dialysed groups. 4 Comparisons of nortriptyline half-life and clearance between the patients and groups of physically healthy subjects revealed no significant differences. 5 There was no significant linear correlation between age and either of these measurements. In the twelve patients not receiving haemodialysis there was no correlation between nortriptyline clearance and glomerular filtration rate. 6 Chronic renal failure is not associated with a significant alteration in nortriptyline metabolism as measured by its half-life or clearance, but the drug should nonetheless be used with caution, and monitored whenever possible. However, the marked inter-individual differences observed in nortriptyline half-life and clearance in patients with chronic renal failure may not be solely responsible for their unpredictable response to tricyclic antidepressant therapy, and other possible contributory factors are discussed. PMID:7248140

  10. McKittrick-Wheelock syndrome: a rare case report of acute renal failure

    PubMed Central

    MOIS, EMIL IOAN; GRAUR, FLORIN; SECHEL, ROXANA; AL-HAJJAR, NADIM

    2016-01-01

    Giant tubular-villous adenoma of the rectum can determine secretory diarrhea, associated with a depleting syndrome of prerenal acute renal failure, hyponatremia, hypokalemia and hypoproteinemia. These symptoms are known as the McKittrick-Wheelock syndrome, and there are about 50 cases reported in literature. We present the case of a 59-year-old woman presented to our emergency department with abdominal pain, prerenal azotemia, and electrolyte disturbances with a background of chronic diarrhea, caused by a giant rectal tumor. Conservative therapy initially improved and normalized renal function, and made surgical resection of the tumor possible. PMID:27152085

  11. African American female with renal failure presenting with skin lesions: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Israel, Nejla; Markova, Tsveti

    2009-01-01

    Calciphylaxis is a lethal disorder seen in patients with end-stage renal disease and is characterized by painful necrotic skin lesions. The pathophysiology is still unknown. Elevated calcium, phosphorous and parathormone appear to play a role in causing small and medium sized vasculopathy. Diagnosis is delayed, prognosis is poor and mortality remains high. In this article we describe the case of calciphylaxis in a patient with chronic renal failure and multiple medical comorbidities, and discuss diagnostic management, prognosis and treatment options. PMID:19830094

  12. [Treatment of acute renal failure--concepts and controversies. 2. Extracorporeal renal replacement and peritoneal dialysis].

    PubMed

    Gabriel, A; Müller, E; Tarnow, J

    2001-04-01

    Therapy of prolonged acute renal failure regularly requires a renal replacement therapy. This can be achieved by different extracorporal renal replacement therapies (ERRT) or by peritoneal dialysis. ERRT are classified according to the physical principle underlying toxin elimination as hemodialysis (diffusion) and hemofiltration (convection). Another classification refers to intermittent or continuous application modes. Biocompatibility of membranes is judged according to their activation of the complement system. Prospective randomized studies did not consolidate the assumptions about the benefit of particular modalities proposed on theoretical foundations. Mortality, duration and complication rates of acute renal failure are not significantly decreased by use of biocompatible membranes. Continuous modalities are not generally preferable but optimize treatment in hemodynamically unstable patients, in whom they endorse fluid balancing and maintenance of sufficient arterial blood pressure. The use of demanding hemofiltration techniques for cytokine removal should be limited to clinical studies. The effects of ERRT-"intensity" and the best timing for initiation of ERRT have not been evaluated sufficiently. The choice of the ERRT modality is subject to clinical judgement (criterion: hemodynamic situation), practical aspects (criteria: availability of equipment and handling experience), and costs. Prior to their general use new and expensive technical modalities and membrane types should be thoroughly evaluated in studies with regard to outcome-related aspects such as patient survival and preservation of renal function. PMID:11386089

  13. Angiotensin and thromboxane in the enhanced renal adrenergic nerve sensitivity of acute renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Robinette, J B; Conger, J D

    1990-01-01

    The roles of intrarenal angiotensin (A) and thromboxane (TX) in the vascular hypersensitivity to renal nerve stimulation (RNS) and paradoxical vasoconstriction to renal perfusion pressure (RPP) reduction in the autoregulatory range in 1 wk norepinephrine (NE)-induced acute renal failure (ARF) in rats were investigated. Renal blood flow (RBF) responses were determined before and during intrarenal infusion of an AII and TXA2 antagonist. Saralasin or SQ29548 alone partially corrected the slopes of RBF to RNS and RPP reduction in NE-ARF rats (P less than 0.02). Saralasin + SQ29548 normalized the RBF response to RNS. While combined saralasin + SQ29548 eliminated the vasoconstriction to RPP reduction, similar to the effect of renal denervation, appropriate vasodilatation was not restored. Renal vein norepinephrine efflux during RNS was disproportionately increased in NE-ARF (P less than 0.001) and was suppressed by saralasin + SQ29548 infusion (P less than 0.005). It is concluded that the enhanced sensitivity to RNS and paradoxical vasoconstriction to RPP reduction in 1 wk NE-ARF kidneys are the result of intrarenal TX and AII acceleration of neurotransmitter release to adrenergic nerve activity. PMID:2243129

  14. Influence of acute renal failure on the mononuclear phagocytic system.

    PubMed

    Sousa, V R; Sousa, A A; Petroianu, A; Simal, C J; Barbosa, A J

    2001-09-01

    Several studies show the ability of macrophages to remove particles injected into the bloodstream. This function seems to be increased in the presence of acute renal failure. The objective of the present study was to assess the phagocytic function of the main organs (spleen, liver and lung) of the mononuclear phagocytic system in renal and postrenal failures. Fifteen rats (250-350 g) were divided into three groups (N = 5): group I - control; group II - ligature of both ureters, and group III - bilateral nephrectomy. On the third postoperative day, all animals received an iv injection of 1 ml/kg 99mTc sulfur colloid. Blood samples were collected for the assessment of plasma urea, creatinine, sodium, and potassium concentrations and arterial gasometry. Samples of liver, spleen, lung and blood clots were obtained and radioactivity was measured. Samples of liver, spleen, lung and kidney were prepared for routine histopathological analysis. Plasma urea, creatinine and potassium concentrations in groups II and III were higher than in group I (P<0.05). Plasma sodium concentrations in groups II and III were lower than in group I (P<0.05). Compensated metabolic acidosis was observed in the presence of postrenal failure. Group II animals showed a lower level of radioactivity in the spleen (0.98) and lung (2.63), and a higher level in the liver (105.51) than control. Group III animals showed a lower level of radioactivity in the spleen (11.94) and a higher level in the liver (61.80), lung (11.30) and blood clot (5.13) than control. In groups II and III liver steatosis and bronchopneumonia were observed. Renal and postrenal failures seem to interfere with blood clearance by the mononuclear phagocytic system. PMID:11514841

  15. Anuric renal failure associated with zinc toxicosis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Volmer, Petra A; Roberts, Jennifer; Meerdink, Gavin L

    2004-10-01

    The development of anuric renal failure associated with zinc intoxication was detected in a dog following ingestion of an ornamental brass knob from a toilet paper holder. The 3-y-old, male neutered, 15.4 kg Welsh Corgi presented to a local veterinary clinic with a 2-w history of intermittent vomiting, inappetance and lethargy. The dog was transferred to a veterinary teaching hospital where surgery was performed to remove the foreign body. The dogwas euthanized 24 h post-surgery due to the development of anuric renal failure. Whole blood drawn at the time of surgery had a serum zinc concentration of 89.8 ppm (normal 0.7-2.0 ppm). The serum zinc concentration in this dog is the highest reported concentration in the literature. Ingestion of any zinc-containing metal object can potentially result in a severe intravascular hemolysis with subsequent renal impairment. Zinc intoxication should be suspected when hemolysis is accompanied by the finding of a metallic object in the gut. PMID:15487654

  16. Dental management in renal failure: patients on dialysis.

    PubMed

    Jover Cerveró, Alba; Bagán, José V; Jiménez Soriano, Yolanda; Poveda Roda, Rafael

    2008-07-01

    Chronic renal failure is an important health care problem throughout the world, with an incidence of 337, 90, 107 and 95 new cases per million inhabitants/year in the United States, Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom, respectively. These figures moreover invariably tend to increase. During the progression of renal damage, clinical manifestations are noted in practically all body organs and systems, and 90% of all affected patients experience oral symptoms. The existing management options range from simple measures based on changes in diet and life style, to different forms of dialysis (hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis), and also kidney transplantation. Given the multiple oral manifestations of chronic renal failure, and the different repercussions of its treatment upon the oral cavity, these patients require special considerations and precautions in the face of dental treatment. Consultation with the nephrologist is essential before any dental treatment is carried out, in order to determine the condition of the patient, define the best moment for dental treatment, introduce the necessary pharmacological adjustments, or to establish other important aspects for preventing complications in the dental clinic. The present study reviews the characteristics of the disease, the existing therapeutic options, and the considerations of relevance for the dental professional. PMID:18587305

  17. The significance of fibrinogen derivatives in plasma in human renal failure.

    PubMed

    Lane, D A; Ireland, H; Knight, I; Wolff, S; Kyle, P; Curtis, J R

    1984-02-01

    The concentrations in plasma of fibrinogen derivatives fibrinopeptide A (FPA), beta 15-42 antigen and fragment E (FgE) antigen have been determined in patients with renal failure and compared to the concentrations of the platelet release products, beta-thromboglobulin (beta TG) and platelet factor 4 (PF4). In 'partial renal failure' (51Cr-EDTA clearance rate 4-60 ml/min) FPA, beta 15-42 antigen, FgE antigen and beta TG levels were significantly raised above a normal laboratory control group. These levels were further raised in a group of patients whose disease required regular maintenance haemodialysis (51Cr-EDTA clearance rate less than 4 ml/min). PF4 levels were not significantly raised in either group. A statistical analysis of all patient results revealed that FPA, beta 15-42 antigen and FgE antigen levels all correlated with beta TG levels but not with PF4 levels. It is known that beta TG is catabolized by the kidney but PF4 is not and that elevated beta TG levels in renal failure are caused by impaired elimination rather than increased production. These results suggest that the plasma levels of these three fibrinogen derivatives are elevated in renal disease at least in part by decreased elimination rather than by increased thrombin and plasmin activities alone. PMID:6229269

  18. Causes of hatching failure in endangered birds

    PubMed Central

    Hemmings, N.; West, M.; Birkhead, T. R.

    2012-01-01

    About 10 per cent of birds' eggs fail to hatch, but the incidence of failure can be much higher in endangered species. Most studies fail to distinguish between infertility (due to a lack of sperm) and embryo mortality as the cause of hatching failure, yet doing so is crucial in order to understand the underlying problem. Using newly validated techniques to visualize sperm and embryonic tissue, we assessed the fertility status of unhatched eggs of five endangered species, including both wild and captive birds. All eggs were classified as ‘infertile’ when collected, but most were actually fertile with numerous sperm on the ovum. Eggs of captive birds had fewer sperm and were more likely to be infertile than those of wild birds. Our findings raise important questions regarding the management of captive breeding programmes. PMID:22977070

  19. Diffuse elevated MIBG activity in the renal parenchyma caused by compromised renal blood flow.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Codreanu, Ion; Yang, Jigang; Servaes, Sabah; Zhuang, Hongming

    2014-11-01

    Increased metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) activity in the kidneys is usually focal and commonly attributed to radioactive urine accumulation in the renal pelvis. Hereby, we present 2 cases of abnormal diffuse MIBG activity in the kidneys caused by compromised renal blood flow. The patterns should be differentiated from physiologic renal MIBG activity, especially when the uptake is relatively symmetric as well as from regional MIBG-avid disease. PMID:24999702

  20. Unilateral renal agenesis and other causes of the solitary photopenic renal fossa

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, W.H.; Bunker, S.R.; Karl, R.D. Jr.; Ralston, T.; Hartshorne, M.F.; Cawthon, M.A.; Bauman, J.M.

    1985-04-01

    The differential diagnosis of a solitary photopenic defect in the renal fossa observed at renal scintigraphy is extensive. A case of one of the most unusual causes for this finding, renal agenesis, is presented. Additional cases that illustrate the similarity in the radionuclide appearance of other pathologic entities are also presented. Correlation with clinical findings and other imaging modalities is required to accurately distinguish these conditions.

  1. Pharmacokinetics of Cefamandole in Patients with Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, Burt R.; Hirschman, Shalom Z.

    1977-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of cefamandole were studied in four patients with stable renal failure, two patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis, and four patients undergoing hemodialysis. Peak concentrations of cefamandole in serum were achieved 1 to 2 h after intramuscular injection in the patients with stable renal impairment, and the concentrations declined slowly, with half-life values of 12.3 to 18 h. Cefamandole was removed only very slowly by peritoneal dialysis. Hemodialysis was more efficient in removing cefamandole, with serum half-life values ranging from 3.8 to 7.9 h. The mean apparent volume of distribution of cefamandole in these 10 patients was 21.92 liters, or 31% of the body weight. PMID:848929

  2. Plasma amino and keto acids in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Langer, K; Fröhling, P T; Diederich, J; Brandl, M; Lindenau, K; Fekl, W

    1988-01-01

    During both early and late stages of chronic renal insufficiency the response of BCKA to the disease state, as indicated by plasma levels, differs from that of BCAA. Val is the only BCAA whose concentration changes under the conditions of our study, and this only during the more advanced stages of disease. In contrast, all three BCKA declined, KIVA and KICA even in mild renal failure, showing that already during the early stages of the disease these BCKA levels are decreased. BCKA are more sensitive parameters than the corresponding amino acids with regard to the metabolic dysfunctions characteristic of this disease. Modern analytical methods allow more exact and reliable knowledge of these indicators and thus a better understanding of biochemical mechanisms, possibly resulting in better therapy. PMID:3168462

  3. Acute renal failure: outcomes and risk of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Block, C A; Schoolwerth, A C

    2007-09-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is a common condition, especially among the critically ill, and confers a high mortality. The incidence of ARF is increasing. Efforts such as the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI) are being undertaken to establish a consensus definition of ARF, and to distinguish between varying degrees of acute kidney injury that might confer a different prognosis. Data are emerging to allow comparison of the epidemiology of ARF across institutions internationally. There is ongoing recognition of the important interaction between ARF and chronic kidney disease and more information regarding recovery from ARF is available. Controversy exists regarding the optimal management of ARF. Recent publications emphasize the importance of timing and dose of renal replacement therapy rather than the modality of treatment (intermittent hemodialysis vs continuous therapies). These issues are explored in this review. PMID:17912228

  4. Pulmonary function in chronic renal failure: effects of dialysis and transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Bush, A; Gabriel, R

    1991-01-01

    Many possible pulmonary complications of renal disease have been described, but little is known of their physiological importance or the effects on them of different forms of renal replacement therapy. Four groups were recruited, each containing 20 patients. The groups consisted of patients with chronic renal failure before dialysis (group 1); patients receiving continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis, never having received a transplant (group 2); patients receiving haemodialysis, never having received a transplant (group 3); and patients after their first successful cadaveric renal transplant (group 4). All were attending the same regional dialysis and transplant unit. None was known to have clinically important lung or chest wall disease. Flow-volume loops were recorded before and after 400 micrograms of salbutamol, and plethysmographic lung volumes and airway conductance and single breath carbon monoxide transfer factor were measured. Only nine of 80 patients had normal lung function. The reductions in spirometric values were minor. Whole lung carbon monoxide transfer factor was reduced in all groups (mean % predicted with 95% confidence intervals: group 1 81.7% (74-89%); group 2 69.7% (62-77%); group 3 87.5% (80-96%); group 4 82.5% (78-87%]. The values were significantly lower in those having continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (group 2). Residual volume was reduced significantly in the group who had undergone renal transplantation (85.7%, 77-94%). There was no correlation between these changes and smoking habit, age, duration or severity of renal failure, duration of treatment, or biochemical derangement. It is concluded that abnormal lung function is common in renal disease. The main change is a reduction in carbon monoxide transfer that persists after transplantation. The likeliest explanation is that subclinical pulmonary oedema progresses to fibrosis before transplantation. The fibrosis may worsen further to cause the reduced residual volume in the

  5. Differentiation of acute renal failure and chronic renal failure by 2-dimensional analysis of urinary dipeptidase versus serum creatinine.

    PubMed

    Lee, S H; Kang, B Y; We, J S; Park, S K; Park, H S

    1999-03-01

    The differential diagnosis of acute renal failure (ARF) and chronic renal failure (CRF) may be possible by measuring urinary dipeptidase (Udpase) activity and serum creatinine (Scr) concentration. When the mass test of 246 individuals was examined on a 2-dimensional plot of Udpase (y-axis) versus Scr (x-axis) with the data obtained from healthy volunteers (n = 189), ARF (n = 19) and CRF (n = 38) patients, the characteristic distribution of each group was obvious. It is summarized by the mean values of healthy volunteers (1.44 +/- 0.39 mg/dL, 1.19 (0.59 mU/mL), ARF (6.04 +/- 5.04 mg/dL, 0.12 +/- 0.08 mU/mL), and CRF patients (8.72 +/- 2.93 mg/dL, 0.81 +/- 0.44 mU/mL). The healthy volunteers are distributed along the y-axis and the ARF patients the x-axis, thus separating the two groups 90 degrees apart. The CRF patients are scattered away from both x-, and y-axis. This 2-dimensional approach is thought to be very useful for the differential diagnosis of ARF suggesting Udpase as a new member of the marker enzymes of renal disease. PMID:10088177

  6. Preemptive Renal Transplantation-The Best Treatment Option for Terminal Chronic Renal Failure.

    PubMed

    Arze Aimaretti, L; Arze, S

    2016-03-01

    Renal transplantation is the best therapeutic option for end-stage chronic renal disease. Assuming that it is more advisable if performed early, we aimed to show the clinical, social, and economic advantages in 70% of our patients who were dialyzed only for a short period. For this purpose, we retrospectively collected data over 28 years in 142 kidney transplants performed in patients with <6 weeks on dialysis. 66% of our patients were 30-60 years old; 98% of the patients had living donors. At transplantation, 64% of our patients had no public support; however, 64% of them returned to work and got health insurance 2 months later. Full rehabilitation was achieved in all cases, including integration to the family, return to full-time work, school and university, sports, and reproduction. Immunosuppression consisted of 3 drugs, including steroids, cyclosporine, and azathioprine or mycophenolate. The cost in the 1st year, including patient and donor evaluation, surgery, immunosuppression, and follow-up, was $13,300 USD versus $22,320 for hemodialysis. We conclude that preemptive renal transplantation with <6 weeks on dialysis is the best therapeutic option for end-stage renal failure, especially in developing countries such as Bolivia, where until last year, full public support for renal replacement therapy was unavailable. PMID:27110013

  7. Chronic renal failure and macrogenitalia associated with genitourinary neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Dündar, Bumin Nuri; Oktem, Faruk; Armağan, Abdullah; Dündar, Nihal Olgaç; Bircan, Sema; Yesildag, Ahmet

    2010-02-01

    Neurofibromatosis (NF) is a genetic disorder of the nervous system that primarily affects the development and growth of neural cell tissues. This disorder is characterized by the development of various tumors, including neurofibromas, neuroniomas, malignant and benign peripheral nerve sheath tumors, and meningiomas. Accompanying skin changes and bone deformities are also common in NF. However, genitourinary involvement in NF is a rare condition, and penile enlargement has been reported only in a few males with plexiform NF. We report a 6-year-old boy with chronic renal failure associated with plexiform neurofibromas of the bladder and prostatic urethra which led to urinary obstruction and macrogenitalia due to genitourinary NF. PMID:19826840

  8. Hyperaluminemia associated with liver transplantation and acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Erasmus, R T; Kusnir, J; Stevenson, W C; Lobo, P; Herman, M M; Wills, M R; Savory, J

    1995-08-01

    Iatrogenic aluminium toxicity is reported in a patient who underwent an orthotopic liver transplant and who had concomitant renal failure requiring hemodialysis. Following transplantation the patient developed a metabolic encephalopathy with only mildly elevated blood ammonia concentrations. During the period following transplantation the patient received massive infusions of albumin and was on oral feeding (vivonexten), both of which contained aluminium, as did the dialysis fluid. Hyperaluminemia and profoundly elevated liver tissue aluminium concentrations were observed. Treatment with desferrioxamine, a trivalent ion chelator, decreased the plasma aluminium concentrations with an improvement in the patient's mental status. PMID:7579738

  9. Leptospirosis Presenting with Rapidly Progressing Acute Renal Failure and Conjugated Hyperbilirubinemia: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Pothuri, Pallavi; Ahuja, Keerat; Kumar, Viki; Lal, Sham; Tumarinson, Taisiya; Mahmood, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Unexplained renal insufficiency combined with hepatic failure is a common problem encountered by clinicians. As with many disease processes involving multi-organ systems, reversible causes are usually not readily identifiable, and for many patients their health deteriorates rapidly. We present a rare cause of acute renal failure and hyperbilirubinemia occurring simultaneously, with leptospirosis presenting as Weil's disease. CASE REPORT A 53-year-old male presented to our clinic with complaints of anuria over the past two days. His symptoms started with dark urine, severe cramps in the thighs, and chills. The patient was a visitor to the United States from Guyana. Positive physical examination findings included mild tachycardia and hypotension, scleral icterus, and tenderness over abdomen, costovertebral angles, and thighs. The patient had a high white blood cell count, thrombocytopenia, renal/hepatic insufficiency, and an urinary tract infection (UTI). The patient was initially treated under the suspicion of acute kidney injury secondary to rhabdomyolysis and pyelonephritis. The patient continued to deteriorate with decreasing platelet counts, worsening renal function, hyperbilirubinemia, and respiratory distress, with no improvement with hemodialysis. Broad-spectrum antibiotics were administered, including doxycycline, due to a high suspicion of leptospirosis. The patient's condition drastically improved after initiation of doxycycline. On subsequent days, the patient's Leptospira antibody results were available, showing titers of more than 1:3200. Hemodialysis was discontinued as the patient started producing urine with improved kidney function. CONCLUSIONS As world travel becomes more economically feasible, we will continue to encounter foreign endemic diseases. Leptospirosis presenting as Weil's disease is a common cause of renal and hyperbilirubinemia in endemic areas. Often, as was the case for our patient where the time from presentation to acute

  10. Mechanisms of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids to improve cardiac remodeling in chronic renal failure disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Wang, Ju; Zhang, Huanji; Chen, Jie; Zuo, Zhiyi; Wang, Jingfeng; Huang, Hui

    2013-02-15

    Both clinical and basic science studies have demonstrated that cardiac remodeling in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) is very common. It is a key feature during the course of heart failure and an important risk factor for subsequent cardiac mortality. Traditional drugs or therapies rarely have effects on cardiac regression of CRF and cardiovascular events are still the first cause of death. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are the products of arachidonic acids metabolized by cytochrome P450 epoxygenases. It has been found that EETs have important biological effects including anti-hypertension and anti-inflammation. Recent data suggest that EETs are involved in regulating cardiomyocyte injury, renal dysfunction, chronic kidney disease (CKD)-related risk factors and signaling pathways, all of which play key roles in cardiac remodeling induced by CRF. This review analyzes the literature to identify the possible mechanisms for EETs to improve cardiac remodeling induced by CRF and indicates the therapeutic potential of EETs in it. PMID:23313758

  11. Forty years abuse of baking soda, rhabdomyolysis, glomerulonephritis, hypertension leading to renal failure: a case report.

    PubMed

    Forslund, Terje; Koistinen, Arvo; Anttinen, Jorma; Wagner, Bodo; Miettinen, Marja

    2008-01-01

    We present a patient who had ingested sodium bicarbonate for treatment of alcoholic dyspepsia during forty years at increasing doses. During the last year he had used more than 50 grams daily. He presented with metabolic alkalosis, epileptic convulsions, subdural hematoma, hypertension and rhabdomyolysis with end stage renal failure, for which he had to be given regular intermittent hemodialysis treatment. Untreated hypertension and glomerulonephritis was probably present prior to all these acute incidents. Examination of the kidney biopsy revealed mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis and arterial wall thickening causing nephrosclerosis together with interstitial calcinosis. The combination of all these pathologic changes might be responsible for the development of progressive chronic renal failure ending up with the need for continuous intermittent hemodialysis treatment. PMID:24179353

  12. A case of anorexia nervosa with acute renal failure resulting from rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Abe, K; Mezaki, T; Hirono, N; Udaka, F; Kameyama, M

    1990-01-01

    Symptoms of acute renal failure were observed in an anorexia patient who had a history of frequent vomiting. The acute renal failure might have resulted from rhabdomyolysis subsequent to a disturbance of electrolyte balance. This acute renal failure might have resulted in death if not treated. We postulate that even a mild case of anorexia nervosa should be carefully observed to prevent such possible tragedy. PMID:2330820

  13. Multi-factor analysis of failure of renal replacement therapy in acute renal failure developed after cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Szwedo, Ireneusz; Tyc, Joanna; Hawrysz, Anna; Janiak, Kamila; Cichoń, Romuald

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Acute renal failure (ARF) is a rare (2-15%), but severe complication of cardiac surgery with overall mortality reaching 40-80%. In order to save patients’ lives they are treated with renal replacement therapy (RRT). The aim of our study was to assess the impact of different perioperative factors on mortality among patients treated with RRT because of acute renal failure, which occurred as a complication of a heart surgery. Material and methods Retrospective analysis included 45 patients, operated in the years 2009-2013, who underwent renal replacement therapy in order to treat postoperative ARF. The perioperative factors were analysed in two groups: group 1 – patients who died before discharge; and group 2 – those who survived until hospital discharge. Results Forty-five of 3509 cardiac surgical patients (1.25%) required RRT after the surgery. A total of 23 (51.11%) died before discharge (group 1). Patients in group 1 were characterised by older age (70.21 vs. 67 years), higher mean EuroSCORE value (9.28 vs. 7.15) (p < 0.05), higher percentage of concomitant surgery (63.63% vs. 28.57%) (p < 0.05) and of admission of catecholamines in the postoperative period (100% vs. 68.42%) (p < 0.005), and higher mean urea blood level prior to RRT initiation (156.65 vs. 102.54 mg/dl) (p < 0.05). Conclusions The statistically relevant death predictors proved to be: high EuroSCORE, concomitant surgery, and high urea level at RRT initiation and admission of catecholamines in the postoperative period. After conformation in further studies, those factors may prove useful in stratification of death risk among surgical patients requiring RRT. PMID:26702273

  14. Metronidazole pharmacokinetics in patients with acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Somogyi, A A; Kong, C B; Gurr, F W; Sabto, J; Spicer, W J; McLean, A J

    1984-02-01

    The pharmacokinetics and metabolism of intravenous metronidazole were studied in six patients with acute renal failure. In two of the patients a single dose (500 mg) of metronidazole was administered, whereas in four patients the steady-state pharmacokinetics were studied after four days therapy of 500 mg twice daily. Plasma concentrations of metronidazole and its hydroxy and acetic acid metabolites were measured by a specific and sensitive HPLC method. The volume of distribution was 0.65 +/- 0.13 l/kg (mean +/- S.D.), elimination half-life was 9.9 +/- 2.5 h and total plasma clearance was 55.5 +/- 17.7 ml/min. Renal clearance was almost non-existent (1.4 +/- 1.4 ml/min), whereas non-renal clearance was 54.0 +/- 18.2 ml/min. Steady-state plasma concentrations of metronidazole were 15.3 +/- 3.8 mg/l, the hydroxy metabolite were 17.4 +/- 2.0 mg/l and the acetic acid metabolite were 1.2 +/- 0.8 mg/l. In the patients studied, a dosing regimen of 500 mg twice daily resulted in therapeutically adequate blood levels of metronidazole. PMID:6706889

  15. [Clinical study on niaodujing in treating chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Wang, Y J; Xu, L; Cheng, X X

    1996-11-01

    One hundred and five chronic renal failure patients were divided randomly into two groups, 75 cases of Niaodujing (NDJ) treatment group and 30 cases of control group treated with aldehyde coated oxystarch. The effects were compared between two groups and within the same group before and after the entry. Results indicated that the total effective rate and markely effecive rate of NDJ group (74.1% and 44.0%) were better than those of the control group (56.6% and 23.3%) respectively (P < 0.05). The serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen and middle molecular substance were decreased and creatinine clearance rate was increased significantly after NDJ treatment as compared with before treatment (P < 0.05-0.01). In comparison of two groups, the decrement of creatinine clearance rate and middle molecular substance and the increment of creatinine in NDJ group were higher than that in control group (P < 0.05-0.01). NDJ was especially effective in patients with azotemia or early renal failure. PMID:9772612

  16. Cardiac abnormalities in end stage renal failure and anaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Morris, K P; Skinner, J R; Wren, C; Hunter, S; Coulthard, M G

    1993-01-01

    Thirteen anaemic children on dialysis were assessed to determine the incidence of cardiac changes in end stage renal failure. Nine children had an increased cardiothoracic ratio on radiography. The electrocardiogram was abnormal in every case but no child had left ventricular hypertrophy as assessed by voltage criteria. However, left ventricular hypertrophy, often gross, was found on echocardiography in 12 children and affected the interventricular septum disproportionately. Cardiac index was increased in 10 patients as a result of an increased left ventricular stroke volume rather than heart rate. Left ventricular hypertrophy was significantly greater in those on treatment for hypertension and in those with the highest cardiac index. Abnormal diastolic ventricular function was found in 6/11 children. Children with end stage renal failure have significant cardiac abnormalities that are likely to contribute to the high cardiovascular mortality in this group. Anaemia and hypertension, or its treatment, probably contribute to these changes. Voltage criteria on electrocardiogram are of no value in detecting left ventricular hypertrophy. Echocardiography must be performed, with the results corrected for age and surface area, in order to detect and follow these abnormalities. Images PMID:8323332

  17. Acute renal failure after a holiday in the tropics.

    PubMed

    Guron, G; Holmdahl, J; Dotevall, L

    2006-12-01

    A 20-year-old, previously healthy woman, presented with high fever, headache and myalgia 3 days after her return from a holiday in Southeast Asia. Laboratory data on admission demonstrated a pronounced increase in plasma creatinine, marked thrombocytopenia and moderately elevated liver aminotransferases. After having ruled out malaria, dengue fever was primarily suspected and supportive intravenous fluid therapy was initiated. Still, 1 day after admission, platelet counts dropped even further and she became anuric although she did not appear hypovolemic. On day 2 after admission, urine production commenced spontaneously and the patient slowly recovered. All laboratory test results had returned to normal approximately 2 months later. Serological analysis for dengue fever was negative. It turned out that the patient had been trekking in the jungle while in Thailand and we, therefore, analyzed serology for Leptospira spirochetes which was clearly positive. The patient was diagnosed with leptospirosis which is a serious condition associated with a high mortality when complicated by acute renal failure. Differential diagnoses in patients with acute renal failure and tropical infections are reviewed. The importance of early recognition of leptospirosis, and prompt treatment with antibiotics in suspected cases, is emphasized. PMID:17176921

  18. Arterial wall properties in patients with renal failure.

    PubMed

    Konings, Constantijn J A M; Dammers, Ruben; Rensma, Pieter L; Kooman, Jeroen P; Hoeks, Arnold P G; Kornet, Lilian; Gladziwa, Ulrich; van der Sande, Frank M; Leunissen, Karel M L

    2002-06-01

    Hemodialysis (HD) patients commonly show abnormalities of the arterial system. Only a few studies have focused on arterial wall properties in patients with early stages of renal insufficiency and patients on peritoneal dialysis (PD) therapy. In this study, the distensibility coefficient (DC), a marker of arterial stiffening and intima media thickness (IMT) of the common carotid artery (CCA) and a surrogate marker of atherosclerosis, was assessed in four age-matched groups of patients: 18 HD patients, 36 PD patients, 30 patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) not yet on dialysis therapy with a creatinine clearance (CCl) between 10 and 70 mL/min, and 25 normotensive controls with normal renal function. Arterial wall properties were assessed by an automated vessel wall detection system. In patients with CRF and HD patients, but not PD patients, the DC of the CCA was significantly reduced (P < 0.05) compared with controls (CRF, 12.6 +/- 7.5 10(-3)/kPa; HD, 11.6 +/- 7.6 10(-3)/kPa; and PD, 14.7 +/- 6.2 10(-3)/kPa compared with controls, 16.7 +/- 4.6 10(-3)/kPa). In patients with CRF, a significant relationship was found between CCl and the DC (r = 0.41; P = 0.02). IMT was not different among patients with CRF (589 +/- 115 microm), HD (622 +/- 115 microm) and PD patients (585 +/- 121 microm), and controls (668 +/- 150 microm). In conclusion, compared with controls, the DC of the CCA was significantly reduced in HD patients and those with CRF, but not PD patients. In patients with CRF, the DC correlated significantly with CCl. IMT did not differ between groups of renal patients and controls. PMID:12046032

  19. Autoantibodies against oxidized LDL in chronic renal failure: role of renal function, diet, and lipids.

    PubMed

    Bergesio, F; Monzani, G; Ciuti, R; Cirami, C; Martinelli, F; Salvadori, M; Tosi, P L

    2001-02-01

    Lipid peroxidation (LP) has recently been suggested to trigger the atherosclerotic process as well as to worsen the progression of renal disease. Autoantibodies against oxidized low-density lipoproteins (Ox-LDLAb) were considered to provide a sensitive marker to detect LDL oxidation in vivo. To date few studies have been reported on Ox-LDLAb levels in patients with different degrees of renal failure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influences of renal function, dietary manipulation, and lipids on Ox-LDLAb concentrations in uremic patients either on conservative or replacement therapy. Seventy-one patients (42 males, 29 females) aged 60 +/- 19 years with chronic renal failure (CRF) of different etiology and degree were divided into four groups according to serum creatinine levels [sCr(mg/dl)] and diet: CRF I > or = 1.5-3.0, CRF II > 3.0-5.5, and CRF III > 5.5 were all patients on a conventional low-protein diet, while a fourth group included patients on a vegetarian diet supplemented with keto analogues and amino acids (CRF SD >3.0). A further group was represented by patients on dialysis therapy. All patients were examined for Ox-LDLAb, triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol, HDL and LDL cholesterol, and apolipoproteins Apo A1, Apo B, and Lp(a). The results were compared with those of 20 controls (9 males and 11 females) aged 52 +/- 11 years with sCr <1.5 mg/dl. Ox-LDLAb increased, although not significantly, with TG and Lp(a) from the early stages of CRF along with the deterioration of renal function. However, TG and Lp(a) levels were significantly higher in all groups of patients except those on vegetarian diet (CRF SD). This group also showed the lowest Ox-LDLAb levels. No relationship was observed between lipids or apolipoproteins and Ox-LDLAb. Hyperlipidemic patients did not show higher Ox-LDLAb levels than normolipidemics. Our results show a progressive increase of LP as the renal function declines, which may account for the increased risk of

  20. Systemic lupus erythematosus with distal renal tubular acidosis presenting as hypokalemic paralysis with respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Koul, Parvaiz Ahmad; Wahid, Abdul; Shah, Bashir Ahmad

    2003-01-01

    An eighteen-year-old woman presented with hypokalemic respiratory failure. She was found to have distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA) as the underlying cause for hypokalemia. This was treated successfully, and no apparent etiology for the dRTA was discovered. Three years later she presented with full-blown picture of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) together with features of persistent dRTA complicated, this time, with bilateral renal calculi and nephrocalcinosis. It is very likely that the dRTA was an early feature that preceded the other markers of SLE. The moral of this case is that patients with dRTA should be followed-up carefully as a primary cause for the dRTA may show up in-due-course and to monitor the treatment so as to prevent long-term complications of the RTA. PMID:18209445

  1. How to interpret cardiac biomarkers in renal failure and elderly?

    PubMed

    Bargnoux, Anne-Sophie; Kuster, Nils; Moréna, Marion; Baptista, Gregory; Chenine, Leila; Badiou, Stéphanie; Leray, Hélène; Dupuy, Anne-Marie; Cristol, Jean-Paul

    2016-08-01

    New highly sensitive (hs) assays have challenged the interpretation of cardiac troponins (cTn) as markers of injury while natriuretic peptides remain the markers of choice for myocardial dysfunction. However, variability extracardiac factors such as age, gender and renal function may alter circulating levels. In chronic kidney disease (CKD), the increase in circulating levels of these biomarkers in the absence of cardiac disease underlines the problem of discriminative value for diagnosis as well as the need to redefine the thresholds. In addition, these biomarkers are of potential interest to stratify cardiovascular risk, the leading cause of death in CKD. The aim of this work is to clarify the effect of age and renal function on circulating levels of high-sensitivity troponins and natriuretic peptides. PMID:27492694

  2. Renal Distribution Volumes of Indocyanine Green, [51Cr]EDTA, and 24Na in Man during Acute Renal Failure after Shock. IMPLICATIONS FOR THE PATHOGENESIS OF ANURIA

    PubMed Central

    Reubi, F. C.; Vorburger, C.; Tuckman, J.

    1973-01-01

    The mechanism responsible for the anuria in acute renal failure after shock is still controversial. Suppressed glomerular filtration and/or tubular back-diffusion of the filtrate are major possible causes. In the present investigation, seven patients with acute anuria, three of these seven again in the polyuric phase, six patients with moderate renal impairment, four patients with chronic renal failure, and eight subjects with normal renal function were studied by a multiple indicator-dilution method in which the total renal blood flow and renal distribution volumes of indocyanine green, [51Cr]EDTA, and 24Na were determined. In normal subjects the average values for one kidney were 582 ml/min, 42 ml, 92 ml, and 139 ml, respectively. The measurements in the patients with moderate renal impairment were similar to those in the normal subjects, but were decreased in chronic renal failure. In acute anuria, the average values were 269 ml/min, 40 ml, 101 ml, and 114 ml and the kidney volume, estimated radiographically, was increased by 40%. When expressed as milliliters per milliliters kidney, the average distribution volume of 24Na was decreased from 0.64 to 0.38. This decrease is consistent with the hypothesis that suppressed filtration is largely responsible for the anuria and that back-diffusion is, at most, a contributory factor. The apparent contradiction between the relatively well-preserved total blood flow and the suppressed filtration may be due to a combination of afferent vasoconstriction and efferent vasodilatation. This view is supported by the observation that low filtration fractions were found in clearance measurements performed during the polyuric phase. PMID:4630601

  3. [Renal risks of dietary complements: a forgotten cause].

    PubMed

    Dori, Olympia; Humbert, Antoine; Burnier, Michel; Teta, Daniel

    2014-02-26

    The use of dietary complements like vitamins, minerals, trace elements, proteins, aminoacids and plant-derived agents is prevalent in the general population, in order to promote health and treat diseases. Dietary complements are considered as safe natural products and are easily available without prescription. However, these can lead to severe renal toxicity, especially in cases of unknown pre-existing chronic kidney disease (CKD). In particular, Chinese herbs including aristolochic acid, high doses of vitamine C, creatine and protein complements may lead to acute and chronic renal failure, sometimes irreversible. Dietary complement toxicity should be suspected in any case of unexplained renal impairement. In the case of pre-existing CKD, the use of potentially nephrotoxic dietary complements should be screened for. PMID:24665660

  4. Statistical Study of Risk Factors of End Stage Renal Failure in Peshawar, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Salahuddin; Hussain, Tariq; Azam, Hashimuddin; Salahuddin, Najma

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: End Stage Renal Failure (ESRD) is the last stage of the chronic renal failure in which kidneys become completely fail to function. AIM: The basic aim of this study was to discover the important risk factors of ESRD and to construct a model for prediction of the ESRD patients in various hospitals of Peshawar, Pakistan. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The data were collected from the patients of renal diseases from three major hospitals of Peshawar. Brown method was used to obtain initial model, then backward elimination logistic regression analysis was performed to find the significant variables (risk factors). The response variable (ESRD) in this study is binary; therefore, logistic regression analysis is used to identify the significant variables. A Statistical Package GLIM and SPSS were used for fitting the model and for finding the significant variables. RESULTS: The backward elimination procedure selects predictor variables diabetic, hypertension, glomerulonephritis and heredity, for males. Thus, these variables are the main causes of ESRD. For females, the predictor variables selected are hypertension & (Diabetic*Hypertension), which means that hypertension and hypertensive diabetic are significant causes of ESRD. CONCLUSION: Our main conclusion from this analysis is that diabetic, hypertension and glomerulonephritis are the significant risk factors of ESRD. PMID:27275220

  5. Prediction of acute renal failure following soft-tissue injury using the venous bicarbonate concentration.

    PubMed

    Muckart, D J; Moodley, M; Naidu, A G; Reddy, A D; Meineke, K R

    1992-12-01

    Sixty-four patients with soft-tissue injuries were studied prospectively to determine whether an initial venous bicarbonate concentration (VBC) of less than 17 mmol/L would predict the development of myoglobin-induced acute renal failure. The VBC was > 17 mmol/L in 59 patients, seven of whom had myoglobinuria. All recovered without renal complications. The remaining five patients all had VBC < 17 mmol/L and four had myoglobinuria. Acute renal failure developed in four patients (p < 0.001). The VBC on hospital arrival was the most accurate predictor of these patients' risk for the development of acute renal failure following soft-tissue injury. PMID:1474620

  6. [Case of renal subcapsular hematoma caused by flexible transurethral lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Ryuta; Inada, Kouji; Azuma, Kouji; Yamashita, Yokihiko; Oka, Akihiro

    2013-09-01

    A 39-year-old man with macroscopic hematuria was admitted to our hospital. A stone, 5 mm in diameter was detected in the right ureteropelvic junction after abdominal computed tomography and plain abdominal radiography. We performed flexible transurethral lithotripsy (f-TUL) and crushed the stone and extracted almost all stone fragments without any complications. However, almost immediately after the operation, the patient began to complain about pain in the right back. In the results of abdominal plain computed tomography right renal subcapsular hematoma was detected. Because active bleeding was not observed in the results of enhanced computed tomography, only conservative treatment was performed. The patient was discharged from the hospital on day 11 of hospitalization. One month after the operation, plain computed tomography was performed and diminished subcapsular hematoma was detected. Renal subcapsular hematoma is assumed to be a unique complication of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. This is the first report of a case of renal subcapsular hematoma caused by f-TUL. The onset of renal subcapsular hematoma following f-TUL could have been caused either because the laser fiber thrust into the renal lithiasis unintentionally or because the internal pressure of the renal pelvis increased substantially during the operation. PMID:24113753

  7. Acute renal failure and intravascular hemolysis following henna ingestion.

    PubMed

    Qurashi, Hala E A; Qumqumji, Abbas A A; Zacharia, Yasir

    2013-05-01

    The powder of henna plant (Lawsonia inermis Linn.) is extensively used as a decorative skin paint for nail coloring and as a hair dye. Most reports of henna toxicity have been attributed to adding a synthetic dye para-phenylenediamine (PPD). PPD is marketed as black henna added to natural henna to accentuate the dark color and shorten the application time. PPD toxicity is well known and extensively reported in medical literature. We report a case of a young Saudi male who presented with characteristic features of acute renal failure and intravascular hemolysis following ingestion of henna mixture. Management of PPD poisoning is only supportive and helpful only if instituted early. Diagnosis requires a high degree of clinical suspicion, as the clinical features are quite distinctive. PMID:23640630

  8. Antioxidant Effect of Erythropoietin during Experimental Chronic Renal Failure.

    PubMed

    Osikov, M V; Telesheva, L F; Ageev, Yu I

    2015-12-01

    The effects of erythropoietin (Epokrin, 900 U/kg) on the parameters of free radical oxidation in the plasma and lymphocytes of peripheral blood were studied in rats with chronic renal failure. We observed accumulation of primary (diene conjugates) and secondary (ketodienes, and conjugated trienes) LPO products in the heptane and isopropanol fractions of blood plasma and a decrease in superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in blood plasma. In lymphocytes, the concentration of primary, secondary and end-products (Schiff bases) of LPO increased in the isopropanol fraction of lipid extract. Treatment with erythropoietin was followed by a decrease in the level of primary and end-products of LPO in the isopropanol fraction of lipid extract of the plasma and lymphocytes and an increase in of superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in the plasma. The content of primary LPO products in the isopropanol fraction of the plasma progressively decreased with increasing superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in the plasma. PMID:26639466

  9. Congestive heart failure and converting enzyme inhibition: failure of current prognostic criteria for predicting subsequent renal insufficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Odum, J.; Carson, P.; Russell, G.

    1991-01-01

    Angiotensin-1-converting enzyme inhibitors have an effective and established role in the treatment of patients with congestive heart failure. However, a small number of such patients will subsequently develop renal insufficiency. These patients may be identified prior to, or shortly after, commencement of therapy by recognized criteria. This report describes 4 patients with congestive heart failure who developed severe renal insufficiency secondary to either enalapril or captopril therapy in the absence of any currently recognized predisposing factors. One patient died. PMID:2068028

  10. An association between antibodies specific for endothelial cells and renal transplant failure.

    PubMed

    Perrey, C; Brenchley, P E; Johnson, R W; Martin, S

    1998-06-01

    Human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-specific antibodies, present at the time of transplant, cause renal transplant rejection but cases of rejection of HLA-identical renal transplants indicate that antibodies to non-HLA antigens may also be detrimental. There is increasing evidence that antibodies to antigens present on endothelial cells and monocytes, and on endothelial cells alone, are associated with transplant rejection. We investigated 105 patients with failed renal transplants for the presence of endothelial cell reactive antibodies and compared them with 94 successful transplant patients to determine the role of non-HLA antibodies in transplant failure. Patient sera were tested by enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA) using as a target fixed cells either from the endothelial/epithelial cell line EAHy.926 or primary cultures of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Antibody binding was detected using an alkaline phosphatase-conjugated anti-human immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody. Fourteen of the 105 failed transplant patients had endothelial cell-reactive antibodies as compared with only three of the 94 patients with successful transplants (Fisher's exact test, p = 0.02). Antibody-positive sera were absorbed with the epithelial cell line A549 to remove antibodies directed against the epithelial component of EAHy.926 and with a pool of lymphoblastoid cell line cells to remove HLA-specific antibodies. Absorption did not reduce antibody activity showing the antibodies to be directed against endothelial cell determinants. Antibody-positive sera were also tested by flow cytometry against the monocyte cell line THP-1 and 13 of the 14 patients were negative. In conclusion, we have demonstrated the presence of IgG antibodies directed against endothelial cell determinants in renal transplant recipients in association with renal transplant failure. PMID:9777698

  11. Restoration of renal function by a novel prostaglandin EP4 receptor-derived peptide in models of acute renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Leduc, Martin; Hou, Xin; Hamel, David; Sanchez, Melanie; Quiniou, Christiane; Honoré, Jean-Claude; Roy, Olivier; Madaan, Ankush; Lubell, William; Varma, Daya R.; Mancini, Joseph; Duhamel, François; Peri, Krishna G.; Pichette, Vincent; Heveker, Nikolaus

    2013-01-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is a serious medical complication characterized by an abrupt and sustained decline in renal function. Despite significant advances in supportive care, there is currently no effective treatment to restore renal function. PGE2 is a lipid hormone mediator abundantly produced in the kidney, where it acts locally to regulate renal function; several studies suggest that modulating EP4 receptor activity could improve renal function following kidney injury. An optimized peptidomimetic ligand of EP4 receptor, THG213.29, was tested for its efficacy to improve renal function (glomerular filtration rate, renal plasma flow, and urine output) and histological changes in a model of ARF induced by either cisplatin or renal artery occlusion in Sprague-Dawley rats. THG213.29 modulated PGE2-binding dissociation kinetics, indicative of an allosteric binding mode. Consistently, THG213.29 antagonized EP4-mediated relaxation of piglet saphenous vein rings, partially inhibited EP4-mediated cAMP production, but did not affect Gαi activation or β-arrestin recruitment. In vivo, THG213.29 significantly improved renal function and histological changes in cisplatin- and renal artery occlusion-induced ARF models. THG213.29 increased mRNA expression of heme-oxygenase 1, Bcl2, and FGF-2 in renal cortex; correspondingly, in EP4-transfected HEK293 cells, THG213.29 augmented FGF-2 and abrogated EP4-dependent overexpression of inflammatory IL-6 and of apoptotic death domain-associated protein and BCL2-associated agonist of cell death. Our results demonstrate that THG213.29 represents a novel class of diuretic agent with noncompetitive allosteric modulator effects on EP4 receptor, resulting in improved renal function and integrity following acute renal failure. PMID:23152113

  12. Na/sup +/-K/sup +/ pump in chronic renal failure

    SciTech Connect

    Deepak, K.; Kahn, T.

    1987-05-01

    This review summarizes the evidence for the defect in Na/sup +/-K/sup +/ pump in chronic renal failure, considers the role of various factors in causing this defect, and discusses the clinical implications thereof. Intracellular Na is elevated in erythrocytes, leukocytes, and muscle cells from some patients with chronic renal failure (CRF). Recent evidence suggest that this elevation of cell Na may be, in large part, a consequence of decreased number of Na/sup +/-K/sup +/ pump units per cell. Maintenance dialysis over a period of weeks ameliorates the defect in intracellular Na/sup +/, and this improvement is contemporaneous with an increase in the number of Na/sup +/-K/sup +/ pump sites per cell. In erythrocytes with normal cell Na/sup +/, acute hemodialysis increases the rate of /sup 22/Na/sup +/ and /sup 42/K/sup +/ transport. Many factors such as the presence of retained toxic metabolite or circulating inhibitor in the uremic plasma, or biochemical changes produced by acute hemodialysis, may explain this finding. In cells with high cell Na/sup +/, the pump-mediated /sup 42/K/sup +/ transport is normalized at the expense of a raised cell Na/sup +/. The decreased muscle membrane potential in uremic subjects has been attributed to a decreased activity of Na/sup +/-K/sup +/ pump. The authors discuss the role of hormonal abnormalities and circulating inhibitors, which may cause an acute inhibition of the pump and of other factors such as K/sup +/ depletion, which may cause more chronic alterations. The implications of alteration of Na/sup +/ and K/sup +/ pump transport and raised cell Na/sup +/ on other non-pump-mediated transport pathways are discussed. Raised cell Na/sup +/ may be a marker for the adequacy of maintenance dialysis in patients with end-stage renal failure.

  13. Sub-nephrotoxic cisplatin sensitizes rats to acute renal failure and increases urinary excretion of fumarylacetoacetase.

    PubMed

    Vicente-Vicente, Laura; Sánchez-Juanes, Fernando; García-Sánchez, Omar; Blanco-Gozalo, Víctor; Pescador, Moisés; Sevilla, María A; González-Buitrago, José Manuel; López-Hernández, Francisco J; López-Novoa, José Miguel; Morales, Ana Isabel

    2015-04-16

    Nephrotoxicity limits the therapeutic efficacy of the antineoplastic drug cisplatin. Due to dosage adjustment and appropriate monitoring, most therapeutic courses with cisplatin produce no or minimal kidney damage. However, we studied whether even sub-nephrotoxic dosage of cisplatin poses a potential risk for the kidneys by predisposing to acute kidney injury (AKI), specifically by lowering the toxicity threshold for a second nephrotoxin. With this purpose rats were treated with a single sub-nephrotoxic dosage of cisplatin (3mg/kg, i.p.) and after two days, with a sub-nephrotoxic regime of gentamicin (50mg/kg/day, during 6 days, i.p.). Control groups received only one of the drugs or the vehicle. Renal function and renal histology were monitored throughout the experiment. Cisplatin treatment did not cause any relevant functional or histological alterations in the kidneys. Rats treated with cisplatin and gentamicin, but not those under single treatments, developed an overt renal failure characterized by both renal dysfunction and massive tubular necrosis. In addition, the urinary excretion of fumarylacetoacetase was increased in cisplatin-treated animals at subtoxic doses, which might be exploited as a cisplatin-induced predisposition marker. In fact, the urinary level of fumarylacetoacetase prior to the second nephrotoxin correlated with the level of AKI triggered by gentamicin in predisposed animals. PMID:25677510

  14. Pathogenic GLUT9 mutations causing renal hypouricemia type 2 (RHUC2).

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Y; Matsuo, H; Chiba, T; Nagamori, S; Nakayama, A; Inoue, H; Utsumi, Y; Oda, T; Nishiyama, J; Kanai, Y; Shinomiya, N

    2011-12-01

    Renal hypouricemia (MIM 220150) is an inherited disorder characterized by low serum uric acid levels and has severe complications such as exercise-induced acute renal failure and urolithiasis. We have previously reported that URAT1/SLC22A12 encodes a renal urate-anion exchanger and that its mutations cause renal hypouricemia type 1 (RHUC1). With the large health-examination database of the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force, we found two missense mutations (R198C and R380W) of GLUT9/SLC2A9 in hypouricemia patients. R198C and R380W occur in highly conserved amino acid motifs in the "sugar transport proteins signatures" that are observed in GLUT family transporters. The corresponding mutations in GLUT1 (R153C and R333W) are known to cause GLUT1 deficiency syndrome because arginine residues in this motif are reportedly important as the determinants of the membrane topology of human GLUT1. Therefore, on the basis of membrane topology, the same may be true of GLUT9. GLUT9 mutants showed markedly reduced urate transport in oocyte expression studies, which would be the result of the loss of positive charges in those conserved amino acid motifs. Together with previous reports on GLUT9 localization, our findings suggest that these GLUT9 mutations cause renal hypouricemia type 2 (RHUC2) by their decreased urate reabsorption on both sides of the renal proximal tubule cells. However, a previously reported GLUT9 mutation, P412R, was unlikely to be pathogenic. These findings also enable us to propose a physiological model of the renal urate reabsorption via GLUT9 and URAT1 and can lead to a promising therapeutic target for gout and related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:22132964

  15. Palliative care for patients with end-stage renal failure: reflections from Central Australia.

    PubMed

    Fried, Ofra

    2003-09-01

    This paper explores palliative care issues for Australian Aboriginal patients with end-stage renal failure. Renal disease is epidemic amongst Aboriginal Australians. The Central Australian Palliative Care Service, based in the remote town of Alice Springs, sees a high proportion of renal patients, with different demographic characteristics to those seen in urban palliative care services. A case history illustrates distinctive concerns for local service provision, including communication issues, cultural requirements for maximizing quality of life, and the need to provide care in remote locations. Palliation for end-stage renal failure (ESRF) patients should be based on standard principles, but modified in accordance with local practical requirements and community needs. PMID:14526885

  16. Functional renal failure (FRF) in cirrhosis of the liver and liver carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Vesin, P.; Traverso, H.

    1975-01-01

    The term ‘functional renal failure’ has been used to describe the renal failure developing in advanced cirrhosis in which tubular function and structure remain intact. It may develop spontaneously, in which case prognosis is poor, but may be secondary to gastro-intestinal haemorrhage or excessive use of diuretics, in which case correction of the precipitating factor leads to improvement in renal function. It is suggested that the renal failure is due to a reduction in effective circulating plasma volume. PMID:1234327

  17. Renal Lymphangiectasia: A Curious Cause of Pleural Effusion.

    PubMed

    Nassiri, Amir Ahmad; Lotfollahi, Legha; Bakhshayeshkaram, Mehrdad; Kiani, Arda; Haghighi, Shirin; Alavi Darazam, Ilad; Rashidfarokhi, Farin

    2015-01-01

    Renal lymphangiectasia is a disorder of the lymphatic system of the kidneys, which can be congenital or acquired. Although the exact etiology remains unknown, an obstructive process resulting from several causes, including infection, inflammation or malignant infiltration, has been suggested to be responsible for the acquired form. This disorder may be associated with several pathologies. We report a case of a 24-year-old man with renal lymphangiectasia presenting with polycythemia, ascites and pleural effusion associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in an intravenous (IV) drug user. Our case is the first in the literature that shows an association between HCV infection and IV drug use. PMID:26858768

  18. Glomerular hemodynamics in established glycerol-induced acute renal failure in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Wolfert, A I; Oken, D E

    1989-01-01

    The glomerular dynamic correlates of failed filtration were studied in volume replete rats with established glycerol-induced acute renal failure (ARF). Over one-half of all nephrons formed virtually no filtrate, while the single nephron glomerular filtration rate (SNGFR) of fluid-filled nephrons, measured at the glomerulotubular junction to preclude the possibility of covert tubular leakage, averaged one-sixth of control (P less than 0.001). Even that low mean value was elevated by a few nephrons with a near normal SNGFR. Renal failure thus reflected both total filtration failure in the majority of nephrons and massively reduced filtration in most of the remainder. Glomerular capillary pressure (Pg) averaged some 14 mmHg below control (P less than 0.001), whereas the arterial colloid osmotic and Bowman's space pressures were not significantly altered. Renocortical and whole kidney blood flow were also unchanged. Marked internephron functional heterogeneity precluded estimates of the ultrafiltration coefficient. However, the fall in SNGFR correlated well with the markedly depressed Pg and afferent net filtration pressure (delta PnetA, P less than 0.001), which in turn were caused by increased preglomerular resistance and a reciprocal fall in efferent arteriolar resistance. This complex change in intrarenal resistances was largely, if not entirely, responsible for failed filtration in this ARF model. PMID:2592568

  19. Plasma homocysteine concentration in children with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Merouani, A; Lambert, M; Delvin, E E; Genest, J; Robitaille, P; Rozen, R

    2001-10-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia, a risk factor for vascular disease, is commonly found in adult patients with end-stage renal disease. Major determinants of elevated plasma homocysteine levels in these patients include deficiencies in folate and vitamin B12, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) genotype and renal function. Little information is available for children with chronic renal failure (CRF). The prevalence and the factors that affect plasma homocysteine concentration were determined in children. Twenty-nine children with various degrees of CRF (15 were dialyzed, 14 were not dialyzed) were compared with 57 age- and sex-matched healthy children. Homocysteine concentrations were higher in patients than controls (17.3 micromol/l vs 6.8 micromol/l, P<0.0001) and hyperhomocysteinemia (>95th percentile for controls: 14.0 micromol/l) was seen in 62.0% of patients and 5.2% of controls. Folate concentrations were lower in patients (9.9 nmol/l) than controls (13.5 nmol/l), P<0.01. Vitamin B12 was similar in patients (322 pmol/l) and controls (284 pmol/l). Dialyzed patients have a higher prevalence of hyperhomocysteinemia than nondialyzed patients (87% vs 35%). Dialyzed patients with MTHFR mutation have higher plasma homocysteine (28.5 micromol/l) than nondialyzed patients with the mutation (10.7 micromol/l), P<0.002. In our study, differences between controls and patients in plasma homocysteine concentrations are observed when age is greater then 92 months, folate less than 21.6 nmol/l and vitamin B12 less than 522 pmol/l. Our study shows that hyperhomocysteinemia is common in children with CRF and is associated with low folate and normal vitamin B12 status, compared to normal children. Among the patients, the dialyzed patients with the MTHFR mutation are particularly at risk for hyperhomocysteinemia. Further studies are needed to investigate therapeutic interventions and the potential link with vascular complications in these patients. PMID:11605787

  20. Leptospirosis Presenting with Rapidly Progressing Acute Renal Failure and Conjugated Hyperbilirubinemia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Pothuri, Pallavi; Ahuja, Keerat; Kumar, Viki; Lal, Sham; Tumarinson, Taisiya; Mahmood, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 53 Final Diagnosis: Leptospirosis Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: None Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Rare disease Background: Unexplained renal insufficiency combined with hepatic failure is a common problem encountered by clinicians. As with many disease processes involving multi-organ systems, reversible causes are usually not readily identifiable, and for many patients their health deteriorates rapidly. We present a rare cause of acute renal failure and hyperbilirubinemia occurring simultaneously, with leptospirosis presenting as Weil’s disease. Case Report: A 53-year-old male presented to our clinic with complaints of anuria over the past two days. His symptoms started with dark urine, severe cramps in the thighs, and chills. The patient was a visitor to the United States from Guyana. Positive physical examination findings included mild tachycardia and hypotension, scleral icterus, and tenderness over abdomen, costovertebral angles, and thighs. The patient had a high white blood cell count, thrombocytopenia, renal/hepatic insufficiency, and an urinary tract infection (UTI). The patient was initially treated under the suspicion of acute kidney injury secondary to rhabdomyolysis and pyelonephritis. The patient continued to deteriorate with decreasing platelet counts, worsening renal function, hyperbilirubinemia, and respiratory distress, with no improvement with hemodialysis. Broad-spectrum antibiotics were administered, including doxycycline, due to a high suspicion of leptospirosis. The patient’s condition drastically improved after initiation of doxycycline. On subsequent days, the patient’s Leptospira antibody results were available, showing titers of more than 1:3200. Hemodialysis was discontinued as the patient started producing urine with improved kidney function. Conclusions: As world travel becomes more economically feasible, we will continue to encounter foreign endemic diseases. Leptospirosis

  1. Analysis of Phase 3 telavancin nosocomial pneumonia data excluding patients with severe renal impairment and acute renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Torres, A.; Rubinstein, E.; Corey, G. R.; Stryjewski, M. E.; Barriere, S. L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Telavancin is approved in Europe for the treatment of nosocomial pneumonia caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus when other alternatives are not suitable. The approved European prescribing information contraindicates the use of telavancin in patients with severe renal impairment (creatinine clearance <30 mL/min, including patients on haemodialysis) and pre-existing acute renal failure owing to the higher observed mortality in these patients. Data from the ATTAIN studies were reanalysed, excluding patients with these contraindicating conditions at baseline. (At the time of submission of this article, the European marketing authorization of telavancin for the treatment of nosocomial pneumonia was suspended pending evidence of a new European Medicines Agency-approved supplier. Clinigen Healthcare Ltd, Theravance's commercialization partner for telavancin in Europe, is in the process of seeking approval of a new manufacturing source.) Methods A post hoc analysis of data from two Phase 3 ATTAIN trials of telavancin for the treatment of Gram-positive nosocomial pneumonia assessing clinical outcomes and safety. Results The all-treated population for this analysis represented 84.2% (1266/1503) of the ATTAIN all-treated population. The cure rates in the clinically evaluable population were similar in the telavancin (82.5%, 231/280) and vancomycin (81.3%, 243/299) groups [treatment difference (95% CI): 1.3% (−5.0% to 7.6%)], and were consistent with the overall ATTAIN study results. The cure rate was higher in the telavancin than the vancomycin treatment group in microbiologically evaluable patients with only Gram-positive pathogens isolated at baseline [85.0% (130/153) versus 75.2% (109/145), respectively; treatment difference (95% CI): 9.7% (0.6%–18.8%)]. The incidences of adverse events were similar between treatment groups and consistent with the overall findings of the ATTAIN study. Conclusions This analysis demonstrated that in the subset

  2. Health status, renal function, and quality of life after multiorgan failure and acute kidney injury requiring renal replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Faulhaber-Walter, Robert; Scholz, Sebastian; Haller, Herrmann; Kielstein, Jan T; Hafer, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Background Critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) in need of renal replacement therapy (RRT) may have a protracted and often incomplete rehabilitation. Their long-term outcome has rarely been investigated. Study design Survivors of the HANnover Dialysis OUTcome (HANDOUT) study were evaluated after 5 years for survival, health status, renal function, and quality of life (QoL). The HANDOUT study had examinded mortality and renal recovery of patients with AKI receiving either standard extendend or intensified dialysis after multi organ failure. Results One hundred fifty-six former HANDOUT participants were analyzed. In-hospital mortality was 56.4%. Five-year survival after AKI/RRT was 40.1% (86.5% if discharged from hospital). Main causes of death were cardiovascular complications and sepsis. A total of 19 survivors presented to the outpatient department of our clinic and had good renal recovery (mean estimated glomerular filtration rate 72.5±30 mL/min/1.73 m2; mean proteinuria 89±84 mg/d). One person required maintenance dialysis. Seventy-nine percent of the patients had a pathological kidney sonomorphology. The Charlson comorbidity score was 2.2±1.4 and adjusted for age 3.3±2.1 years. Numbers of comorbid conditions averaged 2.38±1.72 per patient (heart failure [52%] > chronic kidney disease/myocardial infarction [each 29%]). Median 36-item short form health survey (SF-36™) index was 0.657 (0.69 physical health/0.66 mental health). Quality-adjusted life-years after 5 years were 3.365. Conclusion Mortality after severe AKI is higher than short-term prospective studies show, and morbidity is significant. Kidney recovery as well as general health remains incomplete. Reduction of QoL is minor, and social rehabilitation is very good. Affectivity is heterogeneous, but most patients experience emotional well-being. In summary, AKI in critically ill patients leads to incomplete rehabilitation but acceptable QoL after 5 years. PMID:27284261

  3. Protective effect of crocetin on hemorrhagic shock-induced acute renal failure in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunbo; Yan, Junling; Xi, Liang; Qian, Zhiyu; Wang, Zhenghong; Yang, Lina

    2012-07-01

    Multiple organ failure is a common outcome of hemorrhagic shock followed by resuscitation, and the kidney is one of the prime target organs involved. The main objective of the study was to evaluate whether crocetin, a natural product from Gardenia jasminoides Ellis, has beneficial effects on renal dysfunction caused by hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation in rats. Anesthetized rats were bled to reduce mean arterial blood pressure to 35 (SD, 5) mmHg for 60 min and then were resuscitated with their withdrawn shed blood and normal saline. Crocetin was administered via the duodenum at a dose of 50 mg/kg 40 min after hemorrhage. The increase in creatinine and blood urea nitrogen was significantly reduced at 2 h after hemorrhage and resuscitation in crocetin-treated rats. The increases in renal nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor α, and interleukin 6 were also attenuated by crocetin. Hemorrhagic shock resulted in a significant elevation in malondialdehyde production and was accompanied by a reduction in total superoxide dismutase activity, activation of nuclear factor κB, and overexpression of inducible nitric oxide synthase. These changes were significantly attenuated by crocetin at 2 h after resuscitation. These results suggested that crocetin blocks inflammatory cascades by inhibiting production of reactive oxygen species and restoring superoxide dismutase activity to ameliorate renal dysfunction caused by hemorrhage shock and resuscitation. PMID:22576007

  4. Acute pancreatitis, ascites, and acute renal failure in Plasmodium vivax malaria infection, a rare complication.

    PubMed

    Lakhotia, Manoj; Pahadiya, Hans Raj; Kumar, Harish; Singh, Jagdish; Sangappa, Jainapur Ravi; Choudhary, Prakash Kumar

    2015-01-01

    A 22-year-old male presented with 6 days history of intermittent fever with chills, 2 days history of upper abdomen pain, distension of abdomen, and decreased urine output. He was diagnosed to have Plasmodium vivax malaria, acute pancreatitis, ascites, and acute renal failure. These constellations of complications in P. vivax infection have never been reported in the past. The patient responded to intravenous chloroquine and supportive treatment. For renal failure, he required hemodialysis. Acute pancreatitis, ascites, and acute renal failure form an unusual combination in P. vivax infection. PMID:26629455

  5. Advanced Renal Failure in Patients with Sickle Cell Anemia: Clinical Course and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Iluminado A.; Hosten, Adrian O.; Dillard, Martin G.; Castro, Oswaldo L.

    1982-01-01

    Advanced renal failure occurred in nine adult sickle cell disease patients. There were six men and three women with a mean age of 38.6 years. Eight patients had homozygous SS disease, one had sickle cell thalassemia. Three patients had acute renal failure from which they partially recovered. Six developed endstage kidney disease requiring dialysis. Two of these received a kidney transplant, and there was one death in the immediate postoperative period. Angina pectoris, hyperkalemia, and severe anemia complicated chronic dialysis, suggesting that early transplantation should be considered for sickle cell anemia patients with renal failure. PMID:6757451

  6. A child presenting with acute renal failure secondary to a high dose of indomethacin: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Acute renal failure caused by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs administered at therapeutic doses is generally mild, non-anuric and transitory. There are no publications on indomethacin toxicity secondary to high doses in children. The aim of this article is to describe acute renal failure secondary to a high dose of indomethacin in a child and to review an error in a supervised drug prescription and administration system. Case presentation Due to a medication error, a 20-day-old infant in the postoperative period of surgery for Fallot's tetralogy received a dose of 10 mg/kg of indomethacin, 50 to 100 times higher than the therapeutic dose. The child presented with acute, oligo-anuric renal failure requiring treatment with continuous venovenous renal replacement therapy, achieving complete recovery of renal function with no sequelae. Conclusion In order to reduce medication errors in critically ill children, it is necessary to develop a supervised drug prescription and administration system, with controls at various levels. PMID:19192282

  7. Pathophysiology of protracted acute renal failure in man

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, S.M.; Myers, B.D.

    1985-10-01

    Postischemic acute renal failure (ARF) induced by cardiac surgery is commonly prolonged and may be irreversible. To examine whether persistence of postischemic, tubular cell injury accounts for delayed recovery from ARF, we studied 10 patients developing protracted (36 +/- 4 d) ARF after cardiac surgery. The differential clearance and excretion dynamics of probe solutes of graded size were determined. Inulin clearance was depressed (5.0 +/- 1.7 ml/min), while the fractional urinary clearance of dextrans (radii 17-30 A) were elevated above unity. Employing a model of conservation of mass, we calculated that 44% of filtered inulin was lost via transtubular backleak. The clearance and fractional backleak of technetium-labeled DTPA ((/sup 99m/Tc)DTPA, radius = 4 A) were identical to those of inulin (radius 15 A). The time at which inulin or DTPA excretion reached a maximum after an intravenous bolus injection was markedly delayed when compared with control subjects with ARF of brief duration, 102 vs. 11 min. Applying a three-compartment model of inulin/DTPA kinetics (which takes backleak into account) revealed the residence time of intravenously administered inulin/DTPA in the compartment occupied by tubular fluid and urine to be markedly prolonged, 20 vs. 6 min in controls, suggesting reduced velocity of tubular fluid flow.

  8. Aluminium intoxication in undialysed adults with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Russo, L S; Beale, G; Sandroni, S; Ballinger, W E

    1992-01-01

    The dialysis encephalopathy syndrome (DES) consists of altered mental status, communication difficulty, seizures and myoclonus. It has been attributed to elevated serum aluminium (A1) levels. Two undialysed patients with chronic renal failure who presented with the characteristic syndrome are reported. The first, a 48 year old female, had used A1 containing phosphate binders for two years. Her serum A1 level was 25.34 mumol/L. Despite treatment with desferoximine and dialysis, she died. Necropsy revealed elevated A1 levels in the cerebral cortex (19 mcg/gm) and spongioform change in the outer three cortical layers. The second patient, a 46 year old woman, had a serum A1 of 8.70 mumol/L. She had never taken A1 containing phosphate binders but had taken several grams/day of citrate for at least six months. Treatment with haemodialysis and discontinuation of the citrate produced a resolution of symptoms and return of the A1 level to normal. During two years of haemodialysis there has been no recurrence. Images PMID:1527541

  9. Effect of experimentally induced hepatic and renal failure on the pharmacokinetics of topiramate in rats.

    PubMed

    Matar, Kamal M; Tayem, Yasin I

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the effect of induced hepatic and renal failure on the pharmacokinetics of topiramate (TPM) in rats. Twenty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this study. Renal or hepatic failure was induced by a single i.p. dose of 7.5 mg/kg cisplatin (n = 8) or 0.5 mL/kg carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) (n = 8), respectively. Three days after cisplatin dose or 24 h after CCl4 dose, the rats were administered a single oral dose of 20 mg/kg TPM. The plasma samples were quantified by LC-MS/MS method. Compared to control, plasma concentration-time profile in CCl4-treated and, to a lesser extent, in cisplatin-treated rats decreased more slowly particularly in the elimination phase. TPM oral clearance (CL/F) in CCl4-treated group was significantly lower than that in control (P < 0.001), whereas AUC0-∞, T1/2, and Vd/F were significantly higher in CCl4-treated rats compared to the control (P < 0.01). The CL/F was not significantly different between cisplatin-treated rats and control (P > 0.05). However, in cisplatin-treated rats, the T1/2 and Vd/F were significantly higher than that in the control group (P < 0.01). Both conditions failed to cause a significant effect on Cmax or Tmax. The present findings suggest that induced hepatic or renal failure could modify the pharmacokinetic profile of TPM in the rat. PMID:25009818

  10. Effect of Experimentally Induced Hepatic and Renal Failure on the Pharmacokinetics of Topiramate in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Matar, Kamal M.; Tayem, Yasin I.

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the effect of induced hepatic and renal failure on the pharmacokinetics of topiramate (TPM) in rats. Twenty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this study. Renal or hepatic failure was induced by a single i.p. dose of 7.5 mg/kg cisplatin (n = 8) or 0.5 mL/kg carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) (n = 8), respectively. Three days after cisplatin dose or 24 h after CCl4 dose, the rats were administered a single oral dose of 20 mg/kg TPM. The plasma samples were quantified by LC-MS/MS method. Compared to control, plasma concentration-time profile in CCl4-treated and, to a lesser extent, in cisplatin-treated rats decreased more slowly particularly in the elimination phase. TPM oral clearance (CL/F) in CCl4-treated group was significantly lower than that in control (P < 0.001), whereas AUC0−∞, T1/2, and Vd/F were significantly higher in CCl4-treated rats compared to the control (P < 0.01). The CL/F was not significantly different between cisplatin-treated rats and control (P > 0.05). However, in cisplatin-treated rats, the T1/2 and Vd/F were significantly higher than that in the control group (P < 0.01). Both conditions failed to cause a significant effect on Cmax or Tmax. The present findings suggest that induced hepatic or renal failure could modify the pharmacokinetic profile of TPM in the rat. PMID:25009818

  11. Acute renal failure potentiates methylmalonate-induced oxidative stress in brain and kidney of rats.

    PubMed

    Schuck, P F; Alves, L; Pettenuzzo, L F; Felisberto, F; Rodrigues, L B; Freitas, B W; Petronilho, F; Dal-Pizzol, F; Streck, E L; Ferreira, G C

    2013-03-01

    Tissue methylmalonic acid (MMA) accumulation is the biochemical hallmark of methylmalonic acidemia. The disease is clinically characterized by progressive neurological deterioration and kidney failure, whose pathophysiology is still unclear. In the present work we investigated the effects of acute MMA administration on various parameters of oxidative stress in cerebral cortex and kidney of young rats, as well as the influence of acute renal failure on MMA-elicited effects on these parameters. Acute renal failure was induced by gentamicin, an aminoglycoside antibiotic whose utilization over prolonged periods causes nephrotoxicity. The administration of gentamicin alone increased carbonyl content and inhibited superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in cerebral cortex, as well as increased thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBA-RS) and sulfhydryl levels and diminished glutathione peroxidase activity in kidney. On the other hand, MMA administration increased TBA-RS levels in cerebral cortex and decreased SOD activity in kidney. Furthermore, the simultaneous administration of MMA and gentamicin to the rats provoked an augment in TBA-RS levels and superoxide generation in cerebral cortex and in TBA-RS, carbonyl and sulfhydryl levels in kidney, while diminished SOD activity in both studied tissues. Finally, nitrate/nitrite content, reduced glutathione levels, 2',7'-dihydrodichlorofluorescein oxidation and catalase activity were not affected by this animal treatment in either tissue. In conclusion, our present data are in line with the hypothesis that MMA acts as a toxin in brain and kidney of rats and suggest that renal injury potentiates the toxicity of MMA on oxidative stress parameters in brain and peripheral tissues. PMID:23297832

  12. The role of the renal afferent and efferent nerve fibers in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Lindsea C.; May, Clive N.; Yao, Song T.

    2015-01-01

    Renal nerves contain afferent, sensory and efferent, sympathetic nerve fibers. In heart failure (HF) there is an increase in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), which can lead to renal vasoconstriction, increased renin release and sodium retention. These changes are thought to contribute to renal dysfunction, which is predictive of poor outcome in patients with HF. In contrast, the role of the renal afferent nerves remains largely unexplored in HF. This is somewhat surprising as there are multiple triggers in HF that have the potential to increase afferent nerve activity, including increased venous pressure and reduced kidney perfusion. Some of the few studies investigating renal afferents in HF have suggested that at least the sympatho-inhibitory reno-renal reflex is blunted. In experimentally induced HF, renal denervation, both surgical and catheter-based, has been associated with some improvements in renal and cardiac function. It remains unknown whether the effects are due to removal of the efferent renal nerve fibers or afferent renal nerve fibers, or a combination of both. Here, we review the effects of HF on renal efferent and afferent nerve function and critically assess the latest evidence supporting renal denervation as a potential treatment in HF. PMID:26483699

  13. Intravascular foscarnet crystal precipitation causing multiorgan failure.

    PubMed

    Philipponnet, Carole; Michel, Pierre-Antoine; Daudon, Michel; Brocheriou, Isabelle; Boffa, Jean-Jacques

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of multiorgan failure resulting from treatment with the antiviral foscarnet in a kidney transplant recipient. Precipitation of foscarnet crystals was confirmed histologically from a biopsy of the transplant using optical and infrared microscopy. In addition to kidney damage resulting from foscarnet crystal precipitation in the tubular lumen and glomerular capillaries, the patient presented with pancreatitis, pancolitis, and myocarditis with shock. Interruption of the treatment led to rapid improvement in her general condition, but did not prevent permanent loss of the kidney transplant. When faced with unexplained multiorgan failure in a patient treated with foscarnet, one should assume this substance to be toxic. A kidney biopsy can confirm this diagnosis. PMID:25301103

  14. Fulminant course of unilateral emphysematous pyelonephritis revealing a renal actinomycosis caused by Actinomyces meyeri, an unknown cause of septic shock.

    PubMed

    Herbland, Alexandre; Leloup, Maxime; Levrat, Quentin; Guillaume, Frédéric; Verrier, Virginie; Bouillard, Philippe; Landois, Thierry; Ouaki, Charlie Frédéric; Lesieur, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this case report is to describe the first case of renal actinomycosis caused by Actinomyces meyeri presenting as severe emphysematous pyelonephritis and complicated by septic shock and multi-organ failure. Emphysematous pyelonephritis is a potentially life-threatening infection mostly described in diabetic patients and predominantly caused by uropathogenic bacteria. Actinomycosis is an uncommon chronic infection due to anaerobic gram-positive bacteria that unusually involves the urinary tract. We report the first case of emphysematous pyelonephritis caused by A. meyeri in a 75-year-old non-diabetic woman. The patient presented with an altered status, fever, nausea, and vomiting lasting for 2 days. A computed tomography scan revealed unilateral emphysematous pyelonephritis. She was rapidly admitted to intensive care unit for a septic shock with multiple organ dysfunctions. A conservative management consisting in renal percutaneous drainage, supportive measures, and prolonged adapted antibiotic therapy resulted in complete recovery. This case report illustrates that renal actinomycosis should be considered in case of emphysematous pyelonephritis given the good prognosis of this infection with conservative medical treatment. PMID:25878793

  15. Recurrent exercise-induced acute renal failure in a young Pakistani man with severe renal hypouricemia and SLC2A9 compound heterozygosity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Familial renal hypouricemia (RHUC) is a hereditary disease characterized by hypouricemia, high renal fractional excretion of uric acid (FE-UA) and can be complicated by acute kidney failure and nephrolithiasis. Loss-of-function mutations in the SLC22A12 gene cause renal hypouricemia type 1 (RHUC1), whereas renal hypouricemia type 2 (RHUC2) is caused by mutations in the SLC2A9 gene. Case presentation We describe a 24-year-old Pakistani man who was admitted twice to our hospital for severe exercise-induced acute renal failure (EIARF), abdominal pain and fever; he had very low serum UA levels (0.2 mg/dl the first time and 0.09 mg/dl the second time) and high FE-UA (200% and 732% respectively), suggestive of RHUC. Mutational analyses of both urate transporters revealed a new compound heterozygosity for two distinct missense mutations in the SLC2A9 gene: p.Arg380Trp, already identified in heterozygosity, and p.Gly216Arg, previously found in homozygosity or compound heterozygosity in some RHUC2 patients. Compared with previously reported patients harbouring these mutations, our proband showed the highest FE-UA levels, suggesting that the combination of p.Arg380Trp and p.Gly216Arg mutations most severely affects the renal handling of UA. Conclusions The clinical and molecular findings from this patient and a review of the literature provide new insights into the genotype-phenotype correlation of this disorder, supporting the evidence of an autosomal recessive inheritance pattern for RHUC2. Further investigations into the functional properties of GLUT9, URAT1 and other urate transporters are required to assess their potential research and clinical implications. PMID:24397858

  16. Chronic renal failure in a patient with Sotos syndrome due to autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Cefle, K; Yildiz, A; Palanduz, S; Ozturk, S; Ozbey, N; Kylyçaslan, I; Colakoglu, S; Balci, C

    2002-05-01

    Sotos syndrome is characterised by accelerated growth, acromegalic appearance, mental retardation and social maladjustment. Most cases are sporadic, but familial cases have also been reported. We report a case of Sotos syndrome presenting with chronic renal failure due to autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Ultrasonographic examination of the patient, his father and other family members revealed polycystic kidneys. Renal failure was present only in the Sotos case, who also had considerably larger cysts than other family members. We suggest that the underlying mechanism responsible from the somatic overgrowth in Sotos syndrome may also be linked with the development of larger cysts and earlier onset of renal failure in ADPKD. Although Sotos syndrome has been associated with urological abnormalities, chronic renal failure is very rare. To our knowledge, Sotos syndrome associated with ADPKD has not been reported before. PMID:12074220

  17. Acute renal failure due to phenazopyridine (Pyridium) overdose: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Onder, Ali Mirza; Espinoza, Veronica; Berho, Mariana E; Chandar, Jayanthi; Zilleruelo, Gaston; Abitbol, Carolyn

    2006-11-01

    Phenazopyridine (Pyridium) is a commonly used urinary tract analgesic. It has been associated with yellow skin discoloration, hemolytic anemia, methemoglobinemia, and acute renal failure, especially in patients with preexisting kidney disease. We report a 17-year-old female with vertically transmitted human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, presenting with acute renal failure and methemoglobinemia following a suicidal attempt with a single 1,200 mg ingestion of Pyridium. She had no prior evidence of HIV nephropathy. The patient had a progressive nonoliguric renal failure on the 3rd day following the ingestion. She was treated with N-acetylcysteine, intravenous carnitine, and alkalinization of the urine. Her kidney biopsy revealed acute tubular necrosis with no glomerular changes. After 7 days of conservative management, she was discharged home with normal kidney function. To our knowledge, this is the second smallest amount of Pyridium overdose resulting in acute renal failure with no previous history of kidney disease. PMID:16897003

  18. Treatment of compartment syndrome of the thigh associated with acute renal failure after the Wenchuan earthquake.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xin; Zhang, Kaiwei; Zhong, Gang; Cen, Shiqiang; Huang, Fuguo; Lv, Jingtong; Xiang, Zhou

    2012-04-01

    Compartment syndrome of the thigh is a rare emergency often treated operatively. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of nonoperative treatment for compartment syndrome of the thigh associated with acute renal failure after the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake. Nonoperative treatment, which primarily involves continuous renal replacement therapy, was performed in 6 patients (3 men and 3 women) who presented with compartment syndrome of the thigh associated with acute renal failure. The mean mangled extremity severity score (MESS) and laboratory data regarding renal function were analyzed before and after treatment, and the clinical outcome was evaluated at 17-month follow-up. Laboratory data regarding renal function showed improvements. All 6 patients survived with the affected lower limbs intact after nonoperative treatment. Follow-up revealed active knee range of motion and increased muscle strength, as well as a recovery of sensation. A positive linear correlation was found between MESS and the time required to achieve a reduction in swelling, as well as the time required for the recovery of sensation and knee range of motion (r>0.8; P<.05). Satisfactory clinical outcomes were obtained in patients with compartment syndrome of the thigh associated with acute renal failure.Urine alkalization, electrolyte and water balance, and continuous renal replacement therapy have played an important role in saving lives and extremities. Nonoperative treatment should be considered in the treatment of compartment syndrome of the thigh associated with acute renal failure. PMID:22495847

  19. Palliative Care for a Mentally Incompetent End Stage Renal Failure Patient: Why Is It Important?

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kwok-Ying; Yip, Terence; Sham, Mau-Kwong; Cheng, Benjamin Hon-Wai; Li, Cho-Wing; Wong, Yim-Chi; Lau, Vikki Wai-Kee

    2015-01-01

    People with intellectual disabilities are among the most disadvantaged groups in society. Here we report a mentally incompetent end stage renal failure (ESRF) patient with frequent emergency visits who made a significant improvement in symptoms control and reduction in casualty visits after introduction of renal palliative care service. Multidisciplinary approach would be useful in this case. PMID:25838954

  20. Acute Renal Failure Associated with Lenalidomide Treatment in Multiple Myeloma: A Rare Occurrence?

    PubMed

    Kreiniz, Natalia; Khateeb, Ali; Gino-Moor, Sharon; Polliack, Aaron; Tadmor, Tamar

    2016-06-01

    Renal failure is a frequent complication of multiple myeloma (MM). Recently, the combination of lenalidomide-dexamethasone has become one of the cornerstone regimens for the treatment of MM. Impairment of renal function exacerbation is a rare, but potential, complication of lenalidomide therapy in plasma cell dyscrasias. We present two patients who developed exacerbation of renal function during their first cycle of therapy with lenalidomide. In the first case, we present a 76-year-old-male with MM and impaired renal function, who declined two weeks after initiation of second-line therapy with lenalidomide. His renal functions improved after discontinuation of lenalidomide and with supportive care. In the second case, we describe a 61-year-old woman who was started on lenalidomide for relapsed MM and admitted to intensive care unit three weeks later due to severe renal failure. Despite intensive supportive care, her renal function deteriorated even more and she died. We conclude that renal failure is an uncommon, but serious, potential complication of lenalidomide therapy in plasma cell dyscrasias, particularly MM. Close monitoring of renal function is clearly recommended during this treatment. PMID:27272801

  1. Common-Cause Failure Analysis in Event Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Dana L. Kelly; Dale M. Rasmuson

    2008-09-01

    This paper describes the approach taken by the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to the treatment of common-cause failure in probabilistic risk assessment of operational events. The approach is based upon the Basic Parameter Model for common-cause failure, and examples are illustrated using the alpha-factor parameterization, the approach adopted by the NRC in their Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) models. The cases of a failed component (with and without shared common-cause failure potential) and a component being unavailable due to preventive maintenance or testing are addressed. The treatment of two related failure modes (e.g., failure to start and failure to run) is a new feature of this paper. These methods are being applied by the NRC in assessing the risk significance of operational events for the Significance Determination Process (SDP) and the Accident Sequence Precursor (ASP) program.

  2. Homocystein as a Risk Factor for Developing Complications in Chronic Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Jakovljevic, Biljana; Gasic, Branislav; Kovacevic, Pedja; Rajkovaca, Zvezdana; Kovacevic, Tijana

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Cardiovascular diseases are leading cause of death in patients with chronic renal failure. The aim of our study was to establish connection between levels of homocysteine and traditional and nontraditional risk factors for developing cardiovascular diseases in dialysis and pre dialysis patients. Methods: We included 33 pre dialysis (23 in stage three and 10 in stage four of chronic kidney disease) and 43 patients receiving hemodialysis longer than six months. Besides standard laboratory parameters, levels of homocysteine and blood pressure were measured in all patients. Glomerular filtration rate was measured in pre dialysis patients and dialysis quality parameters in dialysis patients. Results: Homocysteine levels were elevated in all patients (19±5.42mmol/l). The connection between homocysteine levels and other cardiovascular diseases risk factors was not established in pre dialysis patients. In patients treated with hemodialysis we found negative correlation between homocysteine levels and patients’ age (p<0.05) and positive correlation between homocysteine levels and length of dialysis (p<0.01) as well as between homocysteine and anemia parameters (erythrocytes, hemoglobin), (p<0.01). Homocysteine and LDL (and total cholesterol) were in negative correlation (p<0.01). Conclusion: Homocysteine, as one of nontraditional cardiovascular diseases risk factors, is elevated in all patients with chronic renal failure and it’s positive correlation with some other risk factors was found. PMID:26005384

  3. Bardet-Biedl syndrome with vulva carcinoma presented with acute renal failure: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Sari, F; Sarikaya, A M; Suren, D; Eren, M; Yilmaz, B

    2015-01-01

    Background Bardet-Biedl syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by retinal dystrophy, obesity, kidney dysfunction, polydactyly, hypogonadism and cognitive impairment. It can be accompanied by systemic findings such as malignancy, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, constitutional and functional disorders of urogenital system and liver fibrosis. Case report A 35-year-old woman with Bardet-Biedl syndrome was referred to our outpatient nephrology clinic with dysuria, acute renal failure, and urinary tract infection. A sized 2 x 1 cm mass between labia major and minor was noted, while CT scan showed a lesion that encompassed uterus and extended to the posterior side of the bladder in the left adnexal region and a 3 cm lesion in the liver. Excisional biopsy of the mass revealed a well-differentiated, squamous cell carcinoma. Dysuria resolved with insertion of urinary catheter after bougie dilatation and the patient was referred for radiotherapy. Conclusion It should be kept in the mind that renal failure may develop due to constitutional urogenital anomalies such as vulva carcinoma. This can be an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with Bardet-Biedl syndrome.Hippokratia 2015; 19 (2):176-178.

  4. Immunoglobulin D Multiple Myeloma With Rapidly Progressing Renal Failure.

    PubMed

    Modi, Jwalant; Kamal, Jeanne; Eter, Ahmad; El-Sayegh, Suzanne; El-Charabaty, Elie

    2015-08-01

    Immunoglobulin D (IgD) multiple myeloma (MM) is a very rare form of myeloma affecting less than 2% of all myeloma patients. It has a multiorgan involvement with renal failure being the key feature. We present here a case of IgD MM in a 62-year-old white male, smoker with past medical history of hypertension, who presented to emergency department with complaints of lower abdominal pain, constipation and decreased urination. Physical exam was unremarkable. Laboratory investigation showed S.Cr 5.99 mg/dL, hemoglobin 8.7 g/dL and corrected S.Ca 10.6 mg/dL. Urine dipstick showed 100 protein and TP/Cr ratio was 23. Serology was positive for serum free lambda chain level of 8,947.6 mg/L as well with free κ/λ ratio < 0.01. The results of serum and urine electrophoresis and immunofixation were also supportive of diagnosis of IgD MM. IgD level was remarkably elevated (27,300 mg/L) too. CT scan of abdomen/pelvis was negative for obstructive uropathy. Skeletal survey showed a solitary lytic lesion in the iliac crest. His kidney function deteriorated next day requiring hemodialysis. The bone marrow biopsy was positive for plasma cell hypercellularity (70-80%) and flow cytometry showed 8% monoclonal IgD lambda plasma cells. The patient was started on bortezomib and dexamethasone and he underwent bone marrow transplant 6 months later. He is doing well hematologically now but he remains dialysis-dependent. IgD MM is a very rare disease affecting younger population with poor prognosis; patients often end up on hemodialysis despite better control of the hematological component. PMID:26124916

  5. Cardiac remodeling in rats with renal failure shows interventricular differences.

    PubMed

    Svíglerová, Jitka; Kuncová, Jitka; Nalos, Lukás; Holas, Jaromír; Tonar, Zbynek; Rajdl, Daniel; Stengl, Milan

    2012-09-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) is associated with an increased incidence of cardiovascular diseases. Intensive research revealed a number of alterations in the heart during CRF; however, possible interventricular differences in CRF-induced cardiac remodeling have so far not been addressed. CRF was induced by two-stage surgical 5/6 nephrectomy (NX) in male Wistar rats. Cellular hypertrophy was quantified using immunohistological morphometric analysis. Contraction force and membrane potential were recorded in left and right ventricle papillary muscles with an isometric force transducer and high-resistance glass microelectrodes. Hypertrophy was present in the left ventricle (LV) of NX animals, but not in the right ventricle (RV) of NX animals, as documented by both ventricle/body weight ratios and cellular morphometric analysis of the cross-sectional area of myocytes. The contraction force was reduced in the LV of NX animals but increased in the RV of NX animals compared with sham-operated rats. Rest potentiation of contraction force was relatively more pronounced in the LV of NX rats. Fifty percent substitution of extracellular sodium with lithium significantly increased the contraction force only in the LV of NX animals. Action potential durations were shortened in both ventricles of CRF animals. Cardiac structural and contractile remodeling in CRF shows significant interventricular differences. CRF induces hypertrophy of the LV but not of the RV. LV hypertrophy was associated with a reduction of contraction force, whereas in the RV, the contraction force was enhanced. Partial recovery of contractile function of the LV by rest potentiation or lithium substitution indicates a role of the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger in this phenomenon. PMID:22929800

  6. Pharmacologically active drug metabolites: therapeutic and toxic activities, plasma and urine data in man, accumulation in renal failure.

    PubMed

    Drayer, D E

    1976-01-01

    acetylated sulphonamides in patients with renal failure is associated with an increase in toxic side-effects (severe nausea and vomiting, evanescent macular rash). (f) Peripheral neuritis seen after nitrofurantoin therapy in patients with impaired renal function is thought to be due to accumulation of a toxic metabolite. The high incidence of adverse drug reactions seen in patients with renal failure may for some drugs be explained in part, as the above examples illustrate, by the accumulation of active drug metabolites. Monitoring plasma levels of drugs can be an important guide to therapy. However, if a drug has an active metabolite, determination of parent drug alone may cause misleading interpretations of blood level measurements. The plasma level of the active metabolite should also be determined and its time-action characteristics taken into account in any clinical decisions based on drug level monitoring. PMID:799549

  7. Infection related renal impairment: a major cause of acute allograft dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Nampoory, Mangalathillam R N; Johny, Kaivilayil V; Costandy, Jamal N; Nair, Madhavan P; Said, Tarek; Homoud, Hani; Al-Muzairai, Ibrahim; Samhan, Mohmoud; Al-Moussawi, Mustafa

    2003-06-01

    We prospectively analyzed the impact of post-transplant infections on the renal function in 532 stable renal transplant recipients (M=340; F=192) over a period of 5 years. Their age ranged from 3-75 years (40+14 years). During the follow-up period, 52 patients expired and 64 lost on followup. We defined renal impairment (RI) as a persistent rise in serum creatinine above 20% from baseline value. 495 episodes of RI occurred in 269 recipients. This included 180-36% episodes of acute rejection, 53-10.7% Cyclosporine toxicity, 236-47.7% infection related renal impairment [IRRI] and 26-5.3% others. The severity of renal failure is less in IRRI (100+90.2) than that of acute rejection (166+127.1), but was more than that in cyclosporine toxicity (50+42.2). Sites of infection in IRRI were urinary (33%), respiratory (26.3%), septicemia (15.7%) and others (25.4%). Episode of IRRI occurred more frequently in LURD (159-67.4%) compared to LRD-RTR (50-21.2%). Occurrence of IRRI is more significantly higher in patients on triple drug immunosuppression (IS) (34.3%) than those on two drug IS (13.2%) (P=or<0.01). Ecoli (23.1%), Pseudomonas (11.1%), Salmonella (8.8%), Klebsiella (8.8%) and Staphylococai (8.3%) were the major organisms producing IRRI. IRRI is frequent (27.8%) during the first six months. Present study denotes that IRRI is a major cause of acute failure in RTR. PMID:15859909

  8. Telomere dysfunction causes alveolar stem cell failure.

    PubMed

    Alder, Jonathan K; Barkauskas, Christina E; Limjunyawong, Nathachit; Stanley, Susan E; Kembou, Frant; Tuder, Rubin M; Hogan, Brigid L M; Mitzner, Wayne; Armanios, Mary

    2015-04-21

    Telomere syndromes have their most common manifestation in lung disease that is recognized as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema. In both conditions, there is loss of alveolar integrity, but the underlying mechanisms are not known. We tested the capacity of alveolar epithelial and stromal cells from mice with short telomeres to support alveolar organoid colony formation and found that type 2 alveolar epithelial cells (AEC2s), the stem cell-containing population, were limiting. When telomere dysfunction was induced in adult AEC2s by conditional deletion of the shelterin component telomeric repeat-binding factor 2, cells survived but remained dormant and showed all the hallmarks of cellular senescence. Telomere dysfunction in AEC2s triggered an immune response, and this was associated with AEC2-derived up-regulation of cytokine signaling pathways that are known to provoke inflammation in the lung. Mice uniformly died after challenge with bleomycin, underscoring an essential role for telomere function in AEC2s for alveolar repair. Our data show that alveoloar progenitor senescence is sufficient to recapitulate the regenerative defects, inflammatory responses, and susceptibility to injury that are characteristic of telomere-mediated lung disease. They suggest alveolar stem cell failure is a driver of telomere-mediated lung disease and that efforts to reverse it may be clinically beneficial. PMID:25840590

  9. Renal impairment and worsening of renal function in acute heart failure: can new therapies help? The potential role of serelaxin.

    PubMed

    Schmieder, Roland E; Mitrovic, Veselin; Hengstenberg, Christian

    2015-08-01

    Renal dysfunction is a frequent finding in patients with acute heart failure (AHF) and an important prognostic factor for adverse outcomes. Worsening of renal function occurs in 30-50% of patients hospitalised for AHF, and is associated with increased mortality, prolonged hospital stay and increased risk of readmission. Likely mechanisms involved in the decrease in renal function include impaired haemodynamics and activation of neurohormonal factors, such as the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, the sympathetic nervous system and the arginine-vasopressin system. Additionally, many drugs currently used to treat AHF have a detrimental effect on renal function. Therefore, pharmacotherapy for AHF should carefully take into account any potential complications related to renal function. Serelaxin, currently in clinical development for the treatment of AHF is a recombinant form of human relaxin-2, identical in structure to the naturally occurring human relaxin-2 peptide hormone that mediates cardiac and renal adaptations during pregnancy. Data from both pre-clinical and clinical studies indicate a potentially beneficial effect of serelaxin on kidney function. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms and impact of impairment of renal function in AHF, and the potential benefits of new therapies, such as serelaxin, in this context. PMID:25787721

  10. Predictive factors for renal failure and a control and treatment algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Cerqueira, Denise de Paula; Tavares, José Roberto; Machado, Regimar Carla

    2014-01-01

    Objectives to evaluate the renal function of patients in an intensive care unit, to identify the predisposing factors for the development of renal failure, and to develop an algorithm to help in the control of the disease. Method exploratory, descriptive, prospective study with a quantitative approach. Results a total of 30 patients (75.0%) were diagnosed with kidney failure and the main factors associated with this disease were: advanced age, systemic arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus, lung diseases, and antibiotic use. Of these, 23 patients (76.6%) showed a reduction in creatinine clearance in the first 24 hours of hospitalization. Conclusion a decline in renal function was observed in a significant number of subjects, therefore, an algorithm was developed with the aim of helping in the control of renal failure in a practical and functional way. PMID:26107827