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Sample records for renal protein synthesis

  1. Renal protein synthesis in diabetes mellitus: effects of insulin and insulin-like growth factor I

    SciTech Connect

    Barac-Nieto, M.; Lui, S.M.; Spitzer, A. )

    1991-06-01

    Is increased synthesis of proteins responsible for the hypertrophy of kidney cells in diabetes mellitus Does the lack of insulin, and/or the effect of insulin-like growth factor I (IGFI) on renal tubule protein synthesis play a role in diabetic renal hypertrophy To answer these questions, we determined the rates of 3H-valine incorporation into tubule proteins and the valine-tRNA specific activity, in the presence or absence of insulin and/or IGFI, in proximal tubule suspension isolated from kidneys of streptozotocin diabetic and control rats. The rate of protein synthesis increased, while the stimulatory effects of insulin and IGFI on tubule protein synthesis were reduced, early (96 hours) after induction of experimental diabetes. Thus, hypertrophy of the kidneys in experimental diabetes mellitus is associated with increases in protein synthesis, rather than with decreases in protein degradation. Factor(s) other than the lack of insulin, or the effects of IGFI, must be responsible for the high rate of protein synthesis present in the hypertrophying tubules of diabetic rats.

  2. Insulin-stimulated Na/sup +/ transport in a model renal epithelium: protein synthesis dependence and receptor interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Blazer-Yost, B.L.; Cox, M.

    1987-05-01

    The urinary bladder of the toad, Bufo marinus, is a well characterized model of the mammalian distal nephron. Porcine insulin (approx. 0.5-5.0 ..mu..M) stimulates net mucosal to serosal Na/sup +/ flux within 10 minutes of hormone addition. The response is maintained for at least 5 hr and is completely abolished by low doses (10..mu..M) of the epithelial Na/sup +/ channel blocker amiloride. Insulin-stimulated Na/sup +/ transport does not require new protein synthesis since it is actinomycin-D (10..mu..g/ml) insensitive. Also in 3 separate experiments in which epithelial cell proteins were examined by /sup 35/S-methionine labeling, 2-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis/autoradiography, no insulin induced proteins were observed. Equimolar concentrations of purified porcine proinsulin and insulin (0.64..mu..M) stimulate Na/sup +/ transport to the same extent. Thus, the putative toad insulin receptor may have different affinity characteristics than those demonstrated for insulin and proinsulin in mammalian tissues. Alternatively, the natriferic action of insulin in toad urinary bladders may be mediated by occupancy of another receptor. Preliminary experiments indicating that nanomolar concentrations of IGF/sub 1/ stimulate Na/sup +/ transport in this tissue support the latter contention.

  3. The Effect of Acetyl Salicylic Acid Induced Nitric Oxide Synthesis in the Normalization of Hypertension through the Stimulation of Renal Cortexin Synthesis and by the Inhibition of Dermcidin Isoform 2, A Hypertensive Protein Production.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Rajeshwary; Bank, Sarbashri; Maji, Uttam K; Bhattacharya, Rabindra; Guha, Santanu; Khan, Nighat N; Sinha, A Kumar

    2014-09-01

    Currently, there is no specific medication for essential hypertension (EH), a major form of the condition, in man. As acetyl salicylic acid (aspirin) is reported to stimulate the synthesis of renal (r)-cortexin, an anti-essential hypertensive protein, and, as aspirin is reported to inhibit dermcidin isoform 2 (dermcidin), a causative protein for EH, the role of aspirin in the control of EH in man was studied. Oral administration of 150 mg aspirin/70 kg body weight in subjects with EH was found to reduce both the elevated systolic and diastolic blood pressures to normal levels within 3 h due to the normalization of dermcidin level in these subjects. The plasma cortexin level at day 0, 1, 30 and 90 were 0.5 pmol/ml, 155.5 pmol/ml, 160.2 pmol/ml, 190.5 pmol/ml respectively with increased NO synthesis (r=+0.994). In vitro studies demonstrated that the incubation of the goat kidney cortex cells with aspirin stimulated (r)-cortexin synthesis due to NO synthesis. It could be suggested that the use of aspirin might control EH in man. PMID:25324696

  4. The Effect of Acetyl Salicylic Acid Induced Nitric Oxide Synthesis in the Normalization of Hypertension through the Stimulation of Renal Cortexin Synthesis and by the Inhibition of Dermcidin Isoform 2, A Hypertensive Protein Production

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Rajeshwary; Bank, Sarbashri; Maji, Uttam K.; Bhattacharya, Rabindra; Guha, Santanu; Khan, Nighat N.; Sinha, A. Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there is no specific medication for essential hypertension (EH), a major form of the condition, in man. As acetyl salicylic acid (aspirin) is reported to stimulate the synthesis of renal (r)-cortexin, an anti-essential hypertensive protein, and, as aspirin is reported to inhibit dermcidin isoform 2 (dermcidin), a causative protein for EH, the role of aspirin in the control of EH in man was studied. Oral administration of 150 mg aspirin/70 kg body weight in subjects with EH was found to reduce both the elevated systolic and diastolic blood pressures to normal levels within 3 h due to the normalization of dermcidin level in these subjects. The plasma cortexin level at day 0, 1, 30 and 90 were 0.5 pmol/ml, 155.5 pmol/ml, 160.2 pmol/ml, 190.5 pmol/ml respectively with increased NO synthesis (r=+0.994). In vitro studies demonstrated that the incubation of the goat kidney cortex cells with aspirin stimulated (r)-cortexin synthesis due to NO synthesis. It could be suggested that the use of aspirin might control EH in man. PMID:25324696

  5. Differential effects of leucine on translation initiation factor activation and protein synthesis in skeletal muscle, renal and adipose tissues of neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In adult rats, protein synthesis in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue increases in response to pharmacological doses of leucine (Leu) administered orally. In neonatal pigs, a physiological increase in plasma leucine stimulates protein synthesis in skeletal muscle without increasing hepatic protein...

  6. Synthesis of Lipidated Proteins.

    PubMed

    Mejuch, Tom; Waldmann, Herbert

    2016-08-17

    Protein lipidation is one of the major post-translational modifications (PTM) of proteins. The attachment of the lipid moiety frequently determines the localization and the function of the lipoproteins. Lipidated proteins participate in many essential biological processes in eukaryotic cells, including vesicular trafficking, signal transduction, and regulation of the immune response. Malfunction of these cellular processes usually leads to various diseases such as cancer. Understanding the mechanism of cellular signaling and identifying the protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions in which the lipoproteins are involved is a crucial task. To achieve these goals, fully functional lipidated proteins are required. However, access to lipoproteins by means of standard expression is often rather limited. Therefore, semisynthetic methods, involving the synthesis of lipidated peptides and their subsequent chemoselective ligation to yield full-length lipoproteins, were developed. In this Review we summarize the commonly used methods for lipoprotein synthesis and the development of the corresponding chemoselective ligation techniques. Several key studies involving full-length semisynthetic lipidated Ras, Rheb, and LC3 proteins are presented. PMID:27444727

  7. Prednisolone protein binding in renal transplant patients.

    PubMed Central

    Reece, P A; Disney, A P; Stafford, I; Shastry, J C

    1985-01-01

    Prednisolone pharmacokinetics and protein binding characteristics were studied in 10 renal transplant patients with various degrees of renal function (serum creatinine: 80-380 mumol/l) who received their usual oral maintenance dose of prednisolone (0.18 +/- 0.04 mg/kg). Plasma was assayed for prednisolone and hydrocortisone by h.p.l.c. and free prednisolone concentrations were determined in each sample by a rapid ultrafiltration technique. Free prednisolone area under curve (AUCu) ranged from 101 to 436 ng ml-1 h and was 6.3 to 15.0% of total prednisolone AUC. The fraction AUCu/AUC was closely related to serum albumin and creatinine concentrations determined at the time of study (multilinear regression correlation coefficient r2 = 0.830, P less than 0.0001); elevated serum creatinine and low albumin concentrations were associated with a higher % free. These results suggest that much of the variability in prednisolone protein binding could be attributed to inter-patient variability in serum albumin and creatinine concentrations. Total prednisolone concentrations would be potentially misleading in any comparisons made between patient groups with different renal function. PMID:3899153

  8. Effect of increased protein intake on renal acid load and renal hemodynamic responses.

    PubMed

    Teunissen-Beekman, Karianna F M; Dopheide, Janneke; Geleijnse, Johanna M; Bakker, Stephan J L; Brink, Elizabeth J; de Leeuw, Peter W; van Baak, Marleen A

    2016-03-01

    Increased protein intake versus maltodextrin intake for 4 weeks lowers blood pressure. Concerns exist that high-protein diets reduce renal function. Effects of acute and 4-week protein intake versus maltodextrin intake on renal acid load, glomerular filtration rate and related parameters were compared in this study. Seventy-nine overweight individuals with untreated elevated blood pressure and normal kidney function were randomized to consume a mix of protein isolates (60 g/day) or maltodextrin (60 g/day) for 4 weeks in energy balance. Twenty-four-hour urinary potential renal acid load (uPRAL) was compared between groups. A subgroup (maltodextrin N = 27, protein mix N = 25) participated in extra test days investigating fasting levels and postprandial effects of meals supplemented with a moderate protein- or maltodextrin-load on glomerular filtration rate, effective renal plasma flow, plasma renin, aldosterone, pH, and bicarbonate. uPRAL was significantly higher in the protein group after 4 weeks (P ≤ 0.001). Postprandial filtration fraction decreased further after the protein-supplemented breakfast than after the maltodextrin-supplemented breakfast after 4 weeks of supplementation (P ≤ 0.001). Fasting and postprandial levels of glomerular filtration rate, effective renal plasma flow, renin, aldosterone, angiotensin-converting enzyme, pH and bicarbonate did not differ between groups. In conclusion, 4 weeks on an increased protein diet (25% of energy intake) increased renal acid load, but did not affect renal function. Postprandial changes, except for filtration fraction, also did not differ between groups. These data suggest that a moderate increase in protein intake by consumption of a protein mix for 4 weeks causes no (undesirable) effects on kidney function in overweight and obese individuals with normal kidney function. PMID:26997623

  9. Water Stress and Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Dhindsa, R. S.; Cleland, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    Water stress causes a reduction in hydrostatic pressure and can cause an increase in abscisic acid in plant tissues. To assess the possible role of abscisic acid and hydrostatic pressure in water stress effects, we have compared the effects of water stress, abscisic acid, and an imposed hydrostatic pressure on the rate and pattern of protein synthesis in Avena coleoptiles. Water stress reduces the rate and changes the pattern of protein synthesis as judged by a double labeling ratio technique, Abscisic acid reduces the rate but does not alter the pattern of protein synthesis. Gibberellic acid reverses the abscisic acid-induced but not the stress-induced inhibition of protein synthesis. The effect of hydrostatic pressure depends on the gas used. With a 19: 1 N2-air mixture, the rate of protein synthesis is increased in stressed but not in turgid tissues. An imposed hydrostatic pressure alters the pattern of synthesis in stressed tissues, but does not restore the pattern to that found in turgid tissues. Because of the differences in response, we conclude that water stress does not affect protein synthesis via abscisic acid or reduced hydrostatic pressure. PMID:16659167

  10. Insulin is protein-anabolic in chronic renal failure patients.

    PubMed

    Lim, Victoria S; Yarasheski, Kevin E; Crowley, Jan R; Fangman, Jerry; Flanigan, Michael

    2003-09-01

    To examine the protein anabolic actions of insulin in chronic renal failure, the authors measured four sets of whole body leucine fluxes during insulin alone and insulin with amino acid infusion in nine uremic patients before hemodialysis (B-HD). Seven were restudied 8 wk after initiation of maintenance hemodialysis (HD). Six normal subjects served as control (N). All values ( micro mol/kg/h, mean +/- SEM) are presented in the sequence of B-HD, HD, and N, and only P < 0.05 are listed. During Flux 1 (baseline), D (leucine release from body protein degradation) were 114 +/- 7, 126 +/- 4, and 116 +/- 6, respectively. C (leucine oxidation rates) were 18 +/- 2, 17 +/- 2, and 21 +/- 3, respectively. S (leucine disappearance into body protein [index of protein synthesis]) were 96 +/- 6, 107 +/- 4, and 94 +/- 4, respectively, and balances (net leucine flux into protein [values were negative during fasting]) were -18 +/- 2, -17 +/- 2, and -21 +/- 3, respectively. During Flux 2 (low-dose insulin infusion), D were 89 +/- 3, 98 +/- 6, and 94 +/- 5, respectively; C were 12 +/- 1, 11 +/- 2, and 18 +/- 1, respectively (P = 0.02); S were 77 +/- 4, 87 +/- 5, and 76 +/- 5, respectively, and balances were -12 +/- 1, -11 +/- 2, and -18 +/- 1, respectively (P = 0.02). During Flux 3 (high-dose insulin infusion): D were 77 +/- 3, 82 +/- 7, and 84 +/- 5, respectively; C were 9 +/- 1, 8 +/- 1, and 14 +/- 1, respectively (P = 0.005); S were 68 +/- 4, 74 +/- 6, and 70 +/- 5, respectively, and balances were -9 +/- 1, -8 +/- 1, and -14 +/- 1, respectively (P = 0.005). In Flux 4 (insulin infused with amino acids): D were 73 +/- 3, 107 +/- 18, and 85 +/- 7, respectively; C were 35 +/- 4, 29 +/- 5, and 39 +/- 3, respectively; S were 105 +/- 5, 145 +/- 15, and 113 +/- 6, respectively (P = 0.02), and balances were 32 +/- 4, 38 +/- 5, and 27 +/- 3, respectively. These data show that B-HD and HD patients were as sensitive as normal subjects to the protein anabolic actions of insulin. Insulin alone

  11. Renal function, protein binding and pharmacological response to diazoxide.

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, R M; Breckenridge, A M

    1976-01-01

    1 The effect of rapid (10s) injections of diazoxide was studied in ten hypertensive patients with varying degrees of impairment of renal function. 2 There was a significant correlation between the patient's plasma urea concentration and reduction in mean arterial blood pressure. Diazoxide was also shown to be less highly protein bound in patients with renal failure. 3 It is suggested that the explanation for the increased hypotensive effect of diazoxide observed in patients with reduced renal function is related to higher unbound drug concentrations. PMID:973937

  12. Whey versus soy protein diets and renal status in rats.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Virginia A; Nebot, Elena; Tassi, Mohamed; Camiletti-Moirón, Daniel; Sanchez-Gonzalez, Cristina; Porres, Jesús M; Aranda, Pilar

    2014-09-01

    Different dietary protein sources can promote different renal statuses. We examined the effects of whey protein (WP) and soy protein (SP) intake on plasma, urinary, and morphological renal parameters in rats. One hundred and twenty Wistar rats were randomly distributed into 2 experimental groups fed with either WP or SP diets over 12 weeks. These diets were based on commercial WP or SP isolates. The urinary calcium content was higher in the WP diet compared to the SP diet group (P<.001) whereas the urinary citrate level was lower (P<.001). The urinary pH was more acidic in the WP diet group compared to the SP diet group (P<.001); however, no differences were observed between the groups for any of the renal morphological parameters analyzed (all, P>.05) or other plasma renal markers such as albumin or urea concentrations. The increase of acid and urinary calcium and the lower urinary citrate level observed in the WP diet group could increase the incidence of nephrolithiasis compared to the SP diet group. Despite the WP showed poorer acid-base profile, no significant morphological renal changes were observed. These results suggest that the use of SP instead of WP appears to promote a more alkaline plasma and urinary profile, with their consequent renal advantages. PMID:25055031

  13. Chloroplast ribosomes and protein synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, E H; Boynton, J E; Gillham, N W

    1994-01-01

    Consistent with their postulated origin from endosymbiotic cyanobacteria, chloroplasts of plants and algae have ribosomes whose component RNAs and proteins are strikingly similar to those of eubacteria. Comparison of the secondary structures of 16S rRNAs of chloroplasts and bacteria has been particularly useful in identifying highly conserved regions likely to have essential functions. Comparative analysis of ribosomal protein sequences may likewise prove valuable in determining their roles in protein synthesis. This review is concerned primarily with the RNAs and proteins that constitute the chloroplast ribosome, the genes that encode these components, and their expression. It begins with an overview of chloroplast genome structure in land plants and algae and then presents a brief comparison of chloroplast and prokaryotic protein-synthesizing systems and a more detailed analysis of chloroplast rRNAs and ribosomal proteins. A description of the synthesis and assembly of chloroplast ribosomes follows. The review concludes with discussion of whether chloroplast protein synthesis is essential for cell survival. PMID:7854253

  14. [Carbonyl stress and oxidatively modified proteins in chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Bargnoux, A-S; Morena, M; Badiou, S; Dupuy, A-M; Canaud, B; Cristol, J-P

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress is commonly observed in chronic renal failure patients resulting from an unbalance between overproduction of reactive oxygen species and impairement of defense mechanisms. Proteins appear as potential targets of uremia-induced oxidative stress and may undergo qualitative modifications. Proteins could be directly modified by reactive oxygen species which leads to amino acid oxydation and cross-linking. Proteins could be indirectly modified by reactive carbonyl compounds produced by glycoxidation and lipo-peroxidation. The resulting post-traductional modifications are known as carbonyl stress. In addition, thiols could be oxidized or could react with homocystein leading to homocysteinylation. Finally, tyrosin could be oxidized by myeloperoxidase leading to advanced oxidative protein products (AOPP). Oxidatively modified proteins are increased in chronic renal failure patients and may contribute to exacerbate the oxidative stress/inflammation syndrome. They have been involved in long term complications of uremia such as amyloidosis and accelerated atherosclerosis. PMID:19297289

  15. Enhancement of RNA Synthesis, Protein Synthesis, and Abscission by Ethylene

    PubMed Central

    Abeles, F. B.; Holm, R. E.

    1966-01-01

    Ethylene stimulated RNA and protein synthesis in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. Red Kidney) abscission zone explants prior to abscission. The effect of ethylene on RNA synthesis and abscission was blocked by actinomycin D. Carbon dioxide, which inhibits the effect of ethylene on abscission, also inhibited the influence of ethylene on protein synthesis. An aging period appears to be essential before bean explants respond to ethylene. Stimulation of protein synthesis by ethylene occurred only in receptive or senescent explants. Treatment of juvenile explants with ethylene, which has no effect on abscission also has no effect on protein synthesis. Evidence in favor of a hormonal role for ethylene during abscission is discussed. PMID:16656405

  16. Erythropoietin Synthesis in Renal Myofibroblasts Is Restored by Activation of Hypoxia Signaling.

    PubMed

    Souma, Tomokazu; Nezu, Masahiro; Nakano, Daisuke; Yamazaki, Shun; Hirano, Ikuo; Sekine, Hiroki; Dan, Takashi; Takeda, Kotaro; Fong, Guo-Hua; Nishiyama, Akira; Ito, Sadayoshi; Miyata, Toshio; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Suzuki, Norio

    2016-02-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo) is produced by renal Epo-producing cells (REPs) in a hypoxia-inducible manner. The conversion of REPs into myofibroblasts and coincident loss of Epo-producing ability are the major cause of renal fibrosis and anemia. However, the hypoxic response of these transformed myofibroblasts remains unclear. Here, we used complementary in vivo transgenic and live imaging approaches to better understand the importance of hypoxia signaling in Epo production. Live imaging of REPs in transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent protein from a modified Epo-gene locus revealed that healthy REPs tightly associated with endothelium by wrapping processes around capillaries. However, this association was hampered in states of renal injury-induced inflammation previously shown to correlate with the transition to myofibroblast-transformed renal Epo-producing cells (MF-REPs). Furthermore, activation of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) by genetic inactivation of HIF-prolyl hydroxylases (PHD1, PHD2, and PHD3) selectively in Epo-producing cells reactivated Epo production in MF-REPs. Loss of PHD2 in REPs restored Epo-gene expression in injured kidneys but caused polycythemia. Notably, combined deletions of PHD1 and PHD3 prevented loss of Epo expression without provoking polycythemia. Mice with PHD-deficient REPs also showed resistance to LPS-induced Epo repression in kidneys, suggesting that augmented HIF signaling counterbalances inflammatory stimuli in regulation of Epo production. Thus, augmentation of HIF signaling may be an attractive therapeutic strategy for treating renal anemia by reactivating Epo synthesis in MF-REPs. PMID:26054543

  17. Shotgun Proteomics Identifies Proteins Specific for Acute Renal Transplant Rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Sigdel, Tara K.; Kaushal, Amit; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Qian, Weijun; Xiao, Wenzhong; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Sarwal, Minnie M.

    2010-01-04

    Acute rejection (AR) remains the primary risk factor for renal transplant outcome; development of non-invasive diagnostic biomarkers for AR is an unmet need. We used shotgun proteomics using LC-MS/MS and ELISA to analyze a set of 92 urine samples, from patients with AR, stable grafts (STA), proteinuria (NS), and healthy controls (HC). A total of 1446 urinary proteins were identified along with a number of NS specific, renal transplantation specific and AR specific proteins. Relative abundance of identified urinary proteins was measured by protein-level spectral counts adopting a weighted fold-change statistic, assigning increased weight for more frequently observed proteins. We have identified alterations in a number of specific urinary proteins in AR, primarily relating to MHC antigens, the complement cascade and extra-cellular matrix proteins. A subset of proteins (UMOD, SERPINF1 and CD44), have been further cross-validated by ELISA in an independent set of urine samples, for significant differences in the abundance of these urinary proteins in AR. This label-free, semi-quantitative approach for sampling the urinary proteome in normal and disease states provides a robust and sensitive method for detection of urinary proteins for serial, non-invasive clinical monitoring for graft rejection after

  18. AA protein-related renal amyloidosis in drug addicts.

    PubMed Central

    Menchel, S.; Cohen, D.; Gross, E.; Frangione, B.; Gallo, G.

    1983-01-01

    Reports of renal amyloidosis occurring among narcotic addicts have been limited, for the most part, to case reports. In a prospective survey of 150 addicts examined at autopsy in the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner of the City of New York, 7 cases of renal amyloidosis were found. Immunohistologic examination demonstrated that in all of the 7 cases, the amyloid was AA protein-related. The amyloid extracted from the kidneys of two addicts and analyzed biochemically did not differ from the AA amyloid secondary to chronic infectious and inflammatory diseases. The combined data of previous reports and the present survey demonstrate that addicts who are subcutaneous users with skin infections most frequently develop amyloidosis. Our data demonstrating renal amyloidosis in 26% of addicts with chronic suppurative skin infections suggest that such addicts are at high risk for the development of amyloidosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:6881286

  19. Renal

    MedlinePlus

    ... term "renal" refers to the kidney. For example, renal failure means kidney failure. Related topics: Kidney disease Kidney disease - diet Kidney failure Kidney function tests Renal scan Kidney transplant

  20. Heat Shock Protein 72 Antagonizes STAT3 Signaling to Inhibit Fibroblast Accumulation in Renal Fibrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yi; Cao, Shirong; Li, Huiyan; Peng, Xuan; Wang, Yating; Fan, Jinjin; Wang, Yihan; Zhuang, Shougang; Yu, Xueqing; Mao, Haiping

    2016-04-01

    Heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) has been shown to attenuate unilateral ureteral obstruction-induced kidney fibrosis. It remains unknown whether HSP72 has direct effects on fibroblast proliferation in the renal fibrotic evolution. Herein, we first confirmed that increased HSP72 expression occurred in fibrotic human kidneys. Using three different animal models of kidney fibrosis, pharmacological down-regulation or genetic deletion of endogenous HSP72 expression exacerbated STAT3 phosphorylation, fibroblast proliferation, and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. In contrast, treatment with geranylgeranyl acetone, a specific inducer of HSP72, reduced phosphorylated STAT3 and protected animals from kidney fibrosis. In cultured renal interstitial fibroblasts, overexpression of HSP72 blocked transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-induced cell activation and proliferation, as evidenced by inhibiting expression of α-smooth muscle actin, fibronectin, and collagen I/III, as well as by reducing cell numbers and DNA synthesis. Mechanical studies showed that overexpressed HSP72 attenuated TGF-β-induced phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of STAT3 and its downstream protein expression. However, siRNA knockdown of HSP72 increased TGF-β-induced STAT3 activity and fibroblast proliferation. Ectopic expression of a constitutively active STAT3 conferred resistance to HSP72 inhibition of fibroblast proliferation. Thus, HSP72 blocks fibroblast activation and proliferation in renal fibrosis via targeting the STAT3 pathway and may serve as a novel therapeutic agent for chronic kidney disease regardless of the etiology. PMID:26851345

  1. Protein Synthesis--An Interactive Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clements, Lee Ann J.; Jackson, Karen E.

    1998-01-01

    Describes an interactive game designed to help students see and understand the dynamic relationship between DNA, RNA, and proteins. Appropriate for either a class or laboratory setting, following a lecture session about protein synthesis. (DDR)

  2. Role of bone morphogenetic protein-7 in renal fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rui Xi; Yiu, Wai Han; Tang, Sydney C. W.

    2015-01-01

    Renal fibrosis is final common pathway of end stage renal disease. Irrespective of the primary cause, renal fibrogenesis is a dynamic process which involves a large network of cellular and molecular interaction, including pro-inflammatory cell infiltration and activation, matrix-producing cell accumulation and activation, and secretion of profibrogenic factors that modulate extracellular matrix (ECM) formation and cell-cell interaction. Bone morphogenetic protein-7 is a protein of the TGF-β super family and increasingly regarded as a counteracting molecule against TGF-β. A large variety of evidence shows an anti-fibrotic role of BMP-7 in chronic kidney disease, and this effect is largely mediated via counterbalancing the profibrotic effect of TGF-β. Besides, BMP-7 reduced ECM formation by inactivating matrix-producing cells and promoting mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET). BMP-7 also increased ECM degradation. Despite these observations, the anti-fibrotic effect of BMP-7 is still controversial such that fine regulation of BMP-7 expression in vivo might be a great challenge for its ultimate clinical application. PMID:25954203

  3. Quest for the chemical synthesis of proteins.

    PubMed

    Engelhard, Martin

    2016-05-01

    The chemical synthesis of proteins has been the wish of chemists since the early 19th century. There were decisive methodological steps necessary to accomplish this aim. Cornerstones were the introduction of the Z-protecting group of Bergmann and Zervas, the development of Solid-phase Peptide Synthesis of Merrifield, and the establishment of Native Chemical Ligation by Kent. Chemical synthesis of proteins has now become generally applicable technique for the synthesis of proteins with tailor made properties which can be applied not only in vitro but also in vivo .Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27114253

  4. Microsomal protein synthesis inhibition: an early manifestation of gentamicin nephrotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, W.M.; Mela-Riker, L.M.; Houghton, D.C.; Gilbert, D.N.; Buss, W.C.

    1988-08-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics achieve bacterial killing by binding to bacterial ribosomes and inhibiting protein synthesis. To examine whether similar mechanisms could be present in renal tubular cells prior to the onset of overt proximal tubular necrosis due to these drugs, we isolated microsomes from Fischer rats given 20 mg/kg gentamicin every 12 h subcutaneously for 2 days and from vehicle-injected controls. Concomitant studies of renal structure, function, and mitochondrial respiration were carried out. (3H)leucine incorporation into renal microsomes of treated animals was reduced by 21.9% (P less than 0.01), whereas brain and liver microsomes from the same animals were unaffected. Gentamicin concentration in the renal microsomal preparation was 56 micrograms/ml, a value 7- to 10-fold above concentrations necessary to inhibit bacterial growth. Conventional renal function studies were normal (blood urea, serum creatinine, creatinine clearance). Treated animals showed only a mild reduction of inulin clearance, 0.71 compared with 0.93 ml.min-1.100 g-1 in controls (P less than 0.05), and an increase in urinary excretion of N-acetylglucosaminidase of 20 compared with 14.8 units/l (P less than 0.05). Renal slice transport of p-aminohippuric acid, tetraethylammonium, and the fractional excretion of sodium were well preserved. There was no evidence, as seen by light microscopy, of proximal tubular necrosis. Mitochondrial cytochrome concentrations were normal and respiratory activities only slightly reduced. Processes similar to those responsible for bacterial killing could be involved in experimental gentamicin nephrotoxicity before overt cellular necrosis.

  5. Storage Protein Synthesis in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Larkins, Brian A.; Bracker, Charles E.; Tsai, C. Y.

    1976-01-01

    Undegraded free and membrane-bound polysomes were isolated from developing kernels of Zea mays L. frozen in liquid nitrogen. Freezing in liquid nitrogen was a prerequisite for preserving polysome structure in stored kernels. Membrane-bound polysomes from 22-day post-pollination kernels ground in high pH buffers containing 50 mm Mg2+ contained unique classes of large polysomes. These large polysomes were sensitive to ribonuclease, and electron micrographs verified that they were not formed by aggregation. The membrane-bound polysomes were the principal site of zein synthesis, since the major protein synthesized in vitro was similar to purified zein in its ethanol solubility and mobility on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels. Images PMID:16659563

  6. T-2 mycotoxin inhibits mitochondrial protein synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, J.G.; Watts, M.R.; Canterbury, W.J.

    1988-01-01

    The authors investigated the effect of T-2 toxin on rat liver mitochondrial protein synthesis. Isolated rat liver mitochondria were supplemented with an S-100 supernatant from rat liver and an external ATP-generating system. An in-vitro assay employing cycloheximide, and inhibitor of cytoplasmic protein synthesis, and chloramphenicol, and inhibitor of mitochondrial protein synthesis, to distinguish mitochondrial protein synthesis from the cytoplasmic process. Amino acid incorporation into mitochondria was dependent on the concentration of mitochondria and was inhibited by chloramphenicol. The rate of uptake of tritium leucine into mitochondrial protein was unaffected by the addition of T-2 toxin and was not a rate-limiting step in incorporation. However, 0.02 micrograms/ml of T-2 toxin decreased the rate of protein synthesis inhibition correlated with the amount of T-2 toxin taken up by the mitochondria. While T-2 toxin is known to inhibit eukaryotic protein synthesis, this is the first time T-2 was shown to inhibit mitochondrial protein synthesis.

  7. Activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) slows renal cystogenesis.

    PubMed

    Takiar, Vinita; Nishio, Saori; Seo-Mayer, Patricia; King, J Darwin; Li, Hui; Zhang, Li; Karihaloo, Anil; Hallows, Kenneth R; Somlo, Stefan; Caplan, Michael J

    2011-02-01

    Renal cyst development and expansion in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) involves both fluid secretion and abnormal proliferation of cyst-lining epithelial cells. The chloride channel of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) participates in secretion of cyst fluid, and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway may drive proliferation of cyst epithelial cells. CFTR and mTOR are both negatively regulated by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Metformin, a drug in wide clinical use, is a pharmacological activator of AMPK. We find that metformin stimulates AMPK, resulting in inhibition of both CFTR and the mTOR pathways. Metformin induces significant arrest of cystic growth in both in vitro and ex vivo models of renal cystogenesis. In addition, metformin administration produces a significant decrease in the cystic index in two mouse models of ADPKD. Our results suggest a possible role for AMPK activation in slowing renal cystogenesis as well as the potential for therapeutic application of metformin in the context of ADPKD. PMID:21262823

  8. [Current conservative treatment of renal colic: value of prostaglandin synthesis inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Zwergel, U; Felgner, J; Rombach, H; Zwergel, T

    1998-04-20

    Prostaglandin synthesis inhibitors and parasympatholytic drugs are often used as analgetics in the case of renal colic. This paper analyzes how and whether these drug effects are important for the analgetic therapy. In an animal and in a human model with acutely obstructed kidneys we found that intravenous application of Indometacine and dipyrone significantly reduces renal pelvic pressure. The parasympatholytic drug hyoscine butylbromide did not produce any change of upper urinary tract dynamics. Inhibitors of prostaglandin synthesis thus effect pressure reduction in the renal pelvis, which is necessary for analgetic therapy. In contrast, hyoscine butylbromide does not have any influence on the acute upper urinary tract obstruction; consequently its usefulness in the treatment of renal colic is rather doubtful. PMID:12799978

  9. Cyclooxygenase-2-dependent phosphorylation of the pro-apoptotic protein Bad inhibits tonicity-induced apoptosis in renal medullary cells.

    PubMed

    Küper, Christoph; Bartels, Helmut; Beck, Franz-X; Neuhofer, Wolfgang

    2011-11-01

    During antidiuresis, cell survival in the renal medulla requires cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) activity. We have recently found that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) promotes cell survival by phosphorylation and, hence, inactivation of the pro-apoptotic protein Bad during hypertonic stress in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells in vitro. Here we determine the role of COX-2-derived PGE(2) on phosphorylation of Bad and medullary apoptosis in vivo using COX-2-deficient mice. Both wild-type and COX-2-knockout mice constitutively expressed Bad in tubular epithelial cells of the renal medulla. Dehydration caused a robust increase in papillary COX-2 expression, PGE2 excretion, and Bad phosphorylation in wild-type, but not in the knockout mice. The abundance of cleaved caspase-3, a marker of apoptosis, was significantly higher in papillary homogenates, especially in tubular epithelial cells of the knockout mice. Knockdown of Bad in MDCK cells decreased tonicity-induced caspase-3 activation. Furthermore, the addition of PGE2 to cells with knockdown of Bad had no effect on caspase-3 activation; however, PGE2 caused phosphorylation of Bad and substantially improved cell survival in mock-transfected cells. Thus, tonicity-induced COX-2 expression and PGE2 synthesis in the renal medulla entails phosphorylation and inactivation of the pro-apoptotic protein Bad, thereby counteracting apoptosis in renal medullary epithelial cells. PMID:21716255

  10. Protein synthesis in geostimulated root caps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, L. J.

    1982-01-01

    A study is presented of the processes occurring in the root cap of corn which are requisite for the formation of root cap inhibitor and which can be triggered or modulated by both light and gravity. The results of this study indicate the importance of protein synthesis for light-induced gravitropic bending in roots. Root caps in which protein synthesis is prevented are unable to induce downward bending. This suggests that light acts by stimulating proteins which are necessary for the translation of the gravitropic stimulus into a growth response (downward bending). The turnover of protein with time was also examined in order to determine whether light acts by stimulating the synthesis of unique proteins required for downward growth. It is found that auxin in combination with light allows for the translation of the gravitropic stimulus into a growth response at least in part through the modification of protein synthesis. It is concluded that unique proteins are stimulated by light and are involved in promoting the downward growth in roots which are responding to gravity.

  11. Mitochondrial nucleoid interacting proteins support mitochondrial protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    He, J.; Cooper, H. M.; Reyes, A.; Di Re, M.; Sembongi, H.; Litwin, T. R.; Gao, J.; Neuman, K. C.; Fearnley, I. M.; Spinazzola, A.; Walker, J. E.; Holt, I. J.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial ribosomes and translation factors co-purify with mitochondrial nucleoids of human cells, based on affinity protein purification of tagged mitochondrial DNA binding proteins. Among the most frequently identified proteins were ATAD3 and prohibitin, which have been identified previously as nucleoid components, using a variety of methods. Both proteins are demonstrated to be required for mitochondrial protein synthesis in human cultured cells, and the major binding partner of ATAD3 is the mitochondrial ribosome. Altered ATAD3 expression also perturbs mtDNA maintenance and replication. These findings suggest an intimate association between nucleoids and the machinery of protein synthesis in mitochondria. ATAD3 and prohibitin are tightly associated with the mitochondrial membranes and so we propose that they support nucleic acid complexes at the inner membrane of the mitochondrion. PMID:22453275

  12. Protein Synthesis Initiation Factors: Phosphorylation and Regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Karen S. Browning

    2009-06-15

    The initiation of the synthesis of proteins is a fundamental process shared by all living organisms. Each organism has both shared and unique mechanisms for regulation of this vital process. Higher plants provide for a major amount of fixation of carbon from the environment and turn this carbon into food and fuel sources for our use. However, we have very little understanding of how plants regulate the synthesis of the proteins necessary for these metabolic processes. The research carried out during the grant period sought to address some of these unknowns in the regulation of protein synthesis initiation. Our first goal was to determine if phosphorylation plays a significant role in plant initiation of protein synthesis. The role of phosphorylation, although well documented in mammalian protein synthesis regulation, is not well studied in plants. We showed that several of the factors necessary for the initiation of protein synthesis were targets of plant casein kinase and showed differential phosphorylation by the plant specific isoforms of this kinase. In addition, we identified and confirmed the phosphorylation sites in five of the plant initiation factors. Further, we showed that phosphorylation of one of these factors, eIF5, affected the ability of the factor to participate in the initiation process. Our second goal was to develop a method to make initiation factor 3 (eIF3) using recombinant methods. To date, we successfully cloned and expressed 13/13 subunits of wheat eIF3 in E. coli using de novo gene construction methods. The final step in this process is to place the subunits into three different plasmid operons for co-expression. Successful completion of expression of eIF3 will be an invaluable tool to the plant translation community.

  13. Co-oxidation of 2-bromohydroquinone by renal prostaglandin synthase. Modulation of prostaglandin synthesis by 2-bromohydroquinone and glutathione.

    PubMed

    Lau, S S; Monks, T J

    1987-01-01

    Homogenates from rat renal papillae, a rich source of the prostaglandin (PG) H synthase system (PHS), metabolized [14C]2-bromohydroquinone, in the presence of arachidonic acid, to products which are covalently bound to protein. The co-oxidation of 2-bromohydroquinone caused a concentration-dependent stimulation in 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, thromboxane B2, PGF2 alpha, PGE2, and PGD2 formation. Glutathione (1 mM) caused a decrease in prostaglandin formation and inhibited the arachidonic acid-supported covalent binding of [14C]2-bromohydroquinone with the concomitant formation of [14C]2-bromohydroquinone-glutathione conjugates, oxidized glutathione, and an increase in the recovery of [14C]2-bromohydroquinone. NADPH also inhibited [14C]2-bromohydroquinone covalent binding, probably by reduction of the semiquinone radical back to the hydroquinone. Indomethacin and aspirin, inhibitors of the cyclooxygenase component of PHS, and propylthiouracil and methimazole, inhibitors of the hydroperoxidase component of PHS, inhibited the arachidonic acid-supported covalent binding of [14C]2-bromohydroquinone by 94%, 52%, 78%, and 79% respectively. These data suggest that 1) renal PHS may play a role in activating the nephrotoxin, 2-bromohydroquinone, and that 2) xenobiotic metabolism and its subsequent effects on glutathione levels can modulate renal prostaglandin synthesis. PMID:2893705

  14. Chlorolissoclimides: New inhibitors of eukaryotic protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Francis; Gao, Hong Qing; Donia, Marwa; Merrick, William C.; Hamann, Mark T.; Pelletier, Jerry

    2006-01-01

    Lissoclimides are cytotoxic compounds produced by shell-less molluscs through chemical secretions to deter predators. Chlorinated lissoclimides were identified as the active component of a marine extract from Pleurobranchus forskalii found during a high-throughput screening campaign to characterize new protein synthesis inhibitors. It was demonstrated that these compounds inhibit protein synthesis in vitro, in extracts prepared from mammalian and plant cells, as well as in vivo against mammalian cells. Our results suggest that they block translation elongation by inhibiting translocation, leading to an accumulation of ribosomes on mRNA. These data provide a rationale for the cytotoxic nature of this class of small molecule natural products. PMID:16540697

  15. EFFECT OF ANTIBIOTICS AND INHIBITORS ON M PROTEIN SYNTHESIS

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Thomas D.

    1963-01-01

    Brock, Thomas D. (Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio). Effect of antibiotics and inhibitors on M protein synthesis. J. Bacteriol. 85:527–531. 1963.—This work extends the observations of Fox and Krampitz on M protein synthesis in nongrowing cells of streptococci. A survey of a large number of antibiotics and other potential inhibitors was made. Some substances bring about inhibition of fermentation and inhibit M protein synthesis because they deprive the cell of the energy needed for this process. A second group of substances inhibit growth at concentrations tenfold or more lower than they inhibit M protein synthesis. These are the antibiotics which inhibit synthesis of cell wall or other structures in growing cells, but do not affect protein synthesis. A third group of substances inhibit growth and M protein synthesis at the same concentration. These substances probably inhibit growth because they inhibit general protein synthesis, and are therefore specific inhibitors of protein synthesis. In this class are chloramphenicol, erythromycin, and the tetracyclines. Several other antibiotics of previously unknown mode of action are in this class. A fourth group of substances had no effect on M protein synthesis. No substances were found which inhibited M protein synthesis at a lower concentration than that which inhibited growth. M protein synthesis in nongrowing cells may be a useful model system for obtaining a detailed understanding of protein synthesis. PMID:14042928

  16. Origins of the protein synthesis cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.

    1981-01-01

    Largely derived from experiments in molecular evolution, a theory of protein synthesis cycles has been constructed. The sequence begins with ordered thermal proteins resulting from the self-sequencing of mixed amino acids. Ordered thermal proteins then aggregate to cell-like structures. When they contained proteinoids sufficiently rich in lysine, the structures were able to synthesize offspring peptides. Since lysine-rich proteinoid (LRP) also catalyzes the polymerization of nucleoside triphosphate to polynucleotides, the same microspheres containing LRP could have synthesized both original cellular proteins and cellular nucleic acids. The LRP within protocells would have provided proximity advantageous for the origin and evolution of the genetic code.

  17. Postnatal ontogeny of skeletal muscle protein synthesis in pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The neonatal period is characterized by rapid growth and elevated rates of synthesis and accretion of skeletal muscle proteins. The fractional rate of muscle protein synthesis is very high at birth and declines rapidly with age. The elevated capacity for muscle protein synthesis in the neonatal pig ...

  18. Postnatal ontogeny of skeletal muscle protein synthesis in pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The neonatal period is characterized by rapid growth and elevated rates of synthesis and accretion of skeletal muscle proteins. The fractional rate of muscle protein synthesis is very high at birth and declines rapidly with development. The elevated capacity for muscle protein synthesis in the neo...

  19. Activated protein C protects against renal ischaemia/reperfusion injury, independent of its anticoagulant properties.

    PubMed

    Lattenist, Lionel; Jansen, Marcel P B; Teske, Gwendoline; Claessen, Nike; Meijers, Joost C M; Rezaie, Alireza R; Esmon, Charles T; Florquin, Sandrine; Roelofs, Joris J T H

    2016-07-01

    Acute renal failure, a serious condition characterised by a drastic decline in renal function, often follows ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) episodes. I/R is characterised by necrosis, inflammation and activation of coagulation, in concert causing renal tissue damage. In this context, activated protein C (APC) might be of importance in the pathogenesis of renal I/R. APC is a serine protease which has anticoagulant but also several anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective effects such as protection of endothelial barrier function. It was our objective to study the role of cytoprotective and anticoagulant functions of APC during renal I/R. C57BL/6j mice subjected to renal I/R were treated with intraperitoneally injected exogenous human APC, or two mutant forms of APC (200 µg/kg) which specifically lack anticoagulant or signalling properties. In a different experiment mice received specific monoclonal antibodies (20 mg/kg) that block the cytoprotective and/or anticoagulant properties of endogenous APC. Treatment with APC reduced tubular injury and enhanced renal function without altering the inflammatory response and did reduce renal fibrin deposition. Administration of APC mutant lacking anticoagulant properties reduced renal damage and enhanced renal function. Blocking the anticoagulant and cytoprotective functions of endogenous APC resulted in elevated tubular damage and reduced tubular cell proliferation, however, without influencing renal function or the inflammatory response. Furthermore, blocking both the anticoagulant and cytoprotective effects of APC resulted in dramatic renal interstitial haemorrhage, indicative of impaired vascular integrity. Blocking only the anticoagulant function of APC did not result in interstitial bleeding. In conclusion, the renoprotective effect of APC during I/R is independent of its anticoagulant properties. PMID:27052416

  20. Cumulative Muscle Protein Synthesis and Protein Intake Requirements.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Erin; Fluckey, James D; Riechman, Steven E

    2016-07-17

    Muscle protein synthesis (MPS) fluctuates widely over the course of a day and is influenced by many factors. The time course of MPS responses to exercise and the influence of training and nutrition can only be pieced together from several different investigations and methods, many of which create unnatural experimental conditions. Measurements of cumulative MPS, the sum synthesis over an extended period, using deuterium oxide have been shown to accurately reflect muscle responses and may allow investigations of the response to exercise, total protein intake requirements, and interaction with protein timing in free-living experimental conditions; these factors have yet to be carefully integrated. Such studies could include clinical and athletic populations to integrate nutritional and exercise recommendations and help guide their revisions to optimize the skeletal muscle function that is so important to overall health. PMID:27215586

  1. Expression of Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein in Human Kidney and in Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ambrosio, Maria R; Rocca, Bruno J; Barone, Aurora; Onorati, Monica; Mundo, Lucia; Crivelli, Filippo; Di Nuovo, Franca; De Falco, Giulia; del Vecchio, Maria T; Tripodi, Sergio A; Tosi, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Translationally controlled tumor protein is a multifaceted protein involved in several physiological and biological functions. Its expression in normal kidney and in renal carcinomas, once corroborated by functional data, may add elements to elucidate renal physiology and carcinogenesis. In this study, translationally controlled tumor protein expression was evaluated by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting, and its localization was examined by immunohistochemistry on 84 nephrectomies for cancer. In normal kidney protein expression was found in the cytoplasm of proximal and distal tubular cells, in cells of the thick segment of the loop of Henle, and in urothelial cells of the pelvis. It was also detectable in cells of renal carcinoma with different pattern of localization (membranous and cytoplasmic) depending on tumor histotype. Our data may suggest an involvement of translationally controlled tumor protein in normal physiology and carcinogenesis. However, functional in vitro and in vivo studies are needed to verify this hypothesis. PMID:26425551

  2. Expression of Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein in Human Kidney and in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosio, Maria R.; Rocca, Bruno J.; Barone, Aurora; Onorati, Monica; Mundo, Lucia; Crivelli, Filippo; Di Nuovo, Franca; De Falco, Giulia; del Vecchio, Maria T.; Tripodi, Sergio A.; Tosi, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Translationally controlled tumor protein is a multifaceted protein involved in several physiological and biological functions. Its expression in normal kidney and in renal carcinomas, once corroborated by functional data, may add elements to elucidate renal physiology and carcinogenesis. In this study, translationally controlled tumor protein expression was evaluated by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting, and its localization was examined by immunohistochemistry on 84 nephrectomies for cancer. In normal kidney protein expression was found in the cytoplasm of proximal and distal tubular cells, in cells of the thick segment of the loop of Henle, and in urothelial cells of the pelvis. It was also detectable in cells of renal carcinoma with different pattern of localization (membranous and cytoplasmic) depending on tumor histotype. Our data may suggest an involvement of translationally controlled tumor protein in normal physiology and carcinogenesis. However, functional in vitro and in vivo studies are needed to verify this hypothesis. PMID:26425551

  3. Aldosterone and angiotensin II induce protein aggregation in renal proximal tubules

    PubMed Central

    Cheema, Muhammad U; Poulsen, Ebbe T; Enghild, Jan J; Hoorn, Ewout; Fenton, Robert A; Praetorius, Jeppe

    2013-01-01

    Renal tubules are highly active transporting epithelia and are at risk of protein aggregation due to high protein turnover and/or oxidative stress. We hypothesized that the risk of aggregation was increased upon hormone stimulation and assessed the state of the intracellular protein degradation systems in the kidney from control rats and rats receiving aldosterone or angiotensin II treatment for 7 days. Control rats formed both aggresomes and autophagosomes specifically in the proximal tubules, indicating a need for these structures even under baseline conditions. Fluorescence sorted aggresomes contained various rat keratins known to be expressed in renal tubules as assessed by protein mass spectrometry. Aldosterone administration increased the abundance of the proximal tubular aggresomal protein keratin 5, the ribosomal protein RPL27, ataxin-3, and the chaperone heat shock protein 70-4 with no apparent change in the aggresome–autophagosome markers. Angiotensin II induced aggregation of RPL27 specifically in proximal tubules, again without apparent change in antiaggregating proteins or the aggresome–autophagosome markers. Albumin endocytosis was unaffected by the hormone administration. Taken together, we find that the renal proximal tubules display aggresome formation and autophagy. Despite an increase in aggregation-prone protein load in these tubules during hormone treatment, renal proximal tubules seem to have sufficient capacity for removing protein aggregates from the cells. PMID:24303148

  4. Fibroblast activation protein predicts prognosis in clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    López, José I; Errarte, Peio; Erramuzpe, Asier; Guarch, Rosa; Cortés, Jesús M; Angulo, Javier C; Pulido, Rafael; Irazusta, Jon; Llarena, Roberto; Larrinaga, Gorka

    2016-08-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma is a complex disease with only partial response to therapy and scarce reliable clinical parameters indicative of progression and survival. Fibroblast activation protein expression has been correlated with prognosis in several malignancies but never in renal cancer. We aim to analyze the immunohistochemical expression of fibroblast activation protein in 208 clear cell renal cell carcinomas and to evaluate its impact on the prognosis and survival. A positive cytoplasmic immunostaining of this protein in the stromal fibroblasts associated to cancer cells is associated with large tumor diameter (≥4cm), high-grade (G3/4) tumors, and high-stage (≥pT3) tumors. Fibroblast activation protein-positive cases had significantly shorter survivals after 5 (P=.00015), 10 (P=.0000042), and 15 (P=.000043) years of follow-up, with a hazard ratio of 0.31. Multivariate analysis showed that fibroblast activation protein (P=.00117) was stronger than grade and stage in predicting clinical aggressiveness in clear cell renal cell carcinoma. This study confirms the usefulness of fibroblast activation protein detection in the stromal fibroblast associated to cancer in clear cell renal cell carcinoma and adds a new immunohistochemical marker to predict clinical behavior in these patients. PMID:27063470

  5. Study of childhood renal tumours using a monoclonal antibody to Tamm-Horsfall protein.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, S; Marsden, H B; Jasani, B; Kumar, P

    1987-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody to Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein was used for the immuno-localization of Tamm-Horsfall protein in formalin fixed, paraffin embedded tissue sections of childhood renal tumours, normal children's kidneys, and human fetal kidneys. The procedure was a dinitrophenyl hapten sandwich staining method. The antibody, diluted 1/100,000, gave a very strong and specific staining of the loop of Henle and distal tubules of normal and fetal kidneys. No staining was seen in Wilms' tumour, mesoblastic nephroma, and bone metastasizing renal tumour of childhood. In contrast, two of seven renal carcinomas and three of four rhabdoid renal tumours were positive for Tamm-Horsfall protein. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 Fig 4 Fig 5 Fig 6 Fig 7 Fig 8 PMID:3429675

  6. Ribonucleic acid synthesis in the renal cortex at the initiation of compensatory growth.

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, P; Levin, N W; Martin, P R

    1976-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for the increase in RNA per cell during the first 48h of renal compensatory growth were studied in the renal cortex. Unilaterally nephrectomized, sham-operated or non-operated rats were used. Incorporation into RNA of labelled precursors was studied in vivo and in vitro. Sham-operation produced significant changes in precursor incorporation, absolute amounts of UTP and RNA, and the rate of RNA synthesis. At 6h after surgery, the amount of RNA decreased in sham-operated controls, whereas that in growing cortex remained unchanged. Incorporation into RNA in vivo was greater in the growing cortex, although the rate of RNA synthesis was not increased. At 24h, precursor incorporation into RNA and UTP and RNA synthesis were all increased in the growing cortex. In contrast with results obtained in vivo, slices of growing cortex incorporated less labelled precursor into RNA than did cortex slices from sham-operated controls, from 3 to 48h. Maximal differences were found from 6 to 24h. An attempt was made to equalize endogenous precursor pool sizes by increasing the concentration of unlabelled uridine in the media; incorporation differences were narrowed significantly. Serum from nephrectomized animals did not increase precursor incorporation into RNA in vitro. An increase in RNA synthesis is an important factor in RNA accretion in the renal cortex beyond 12h of compensatory growth. This is accompanied by increased UTP content and preceded by expansion of other pools. The amount of labelled precursor incorporated into RNA is greatly influenced by its delivery rate to the growing kidney in vivo and by intracellular dilution of expanded precursor pools in vitro. PMID:985437

  7. Protein Synthesis in Relation to Ripening of Pome Fruits 1

    PubMed Central

    Frenkel, Chaim; Klein, Isaac; Dilley, D. R.

    1968-01-01

    Protein synthesis by intact Bartlett pear fruits was studied with ripening as measured by flesh softening, chlorophyll degradation, respiration, ethylene synthesis, and malic enzyme activity. Protein synthesis is required for normal ripening, and the proteins synthesized early in the ripening process are, in fact, enzymes required for ripening. 14C-Phenylalanine is differentially incorporated into fruit proteins separated by acrylamide gel electrophoresis of pome fruits taken at successive ripening stages. Capacity for malic enzyme synthesis increases during the early stage of ripening. Fruit ripening and ethylene synthesis are inhibited when protein synthesis is blocked by treatment with cycloheximide at the early-climacteric stage. Cycloheximide became less effective as the climacteric developed. Ethylene did not overcome inhibition of ripening by cycloheximide. The respiratory climacteric is not inhibited by cycloheximide. It is concluded that normal ripening of pome fruits is a highly coordinated process of biochemical differentiation involving directed protein synthesis. PMID:16656897

  8. Erythropoietin Does Not Enhance Skeletal Muscle Protein Synthesis Following Exercise in Young and Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lamon, Séverine; Zacharewicz, Evelyn; Arentson-Lantz, Emily; Gatta, Paul A. Della; Ghobrial, Lobna; Gerlinger-Romero, Frederico; Garnham, Andrew; Paddon-Jones, Douglas; Russell, Aaron P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Erythropoietin (EPO) is a renal cytokine that is primarily involved in hematopoiesis while also playing a role in non-hematopoietic tissues expressing the EPO-receptor (EPOR). The EPOR is present in human skeletal muscle. In mouse skeletal muscle, EPO stimulation can activate the AKT serine/threonine kinase 1 (AKT) signaling pathway, the main positive regulator of muscle protein synthesis. We hypothesized that a single intravenous EPO injection combined with acute resistance exercise would have a synergistic effect on skeletal muscle protein synthesis via activation of the AKT pathway. Methods: Ten young (24.2 ± 0.9 years) and 10 older (66.6 ± 1.1 years) healthy subjects received a primed, constant infusion of [ring-13C6] L-phenylalanine and a single injection of 10,000 IU epoetin-beta or placebo in a double-blind randomized, cross-over design. 2 h after the injection, the subjects completed an acute bout of leg extension resistance exercise to stimulate skeletal muscle protein synthesis. Results: Significant interaction effects in the phosphorylation levels of the members of the AKT signaling pathway indicated a differential activation of protein synthesis signaling in older subjects when compared to young subjects. However, EPO offered no synergistic effect on vastus lateralis mixed muscle protein synthesis rate in young or older subjects. Conclusions: Despite its ability to activate the AKT pathway in skeletal muscle, an acute EPO injection had no additive or synergistic effect on the exercise-induced activation of muscle protein synthesis or muscle protein synthesis signaling pathways. PMID:27458387

  9. Protein synthesis inhibitor from potato tuber

    SciTech Connect

    Romaen, R. )

    1989-04-01

    A protein fraction capable of inhibit in vitro protein synthesis was found in potato tubers in fresh and wounded tissue. Inhibitor activity from fresh tissue decays with wounding. Inhibition activity was detected absorbed to ribsomal fraction and cytosol of potato tuber tissue by a partially reconstituted in vitro system from potato tuber and wheat germ. Adsorbed ribosomal fraction was more suitable of purification. This fraction was washed from ribosomes with 0.3M KCl, concentrated with ammonium sulfate precipitation and purified through sephadex G100 and sephadex G-75 columns chromatography. After 61 fold purification adsorbed protein fraction can inhibit germination of maize, wheat and sesame seeds, as well as {sup 3}H-leucine incorporation into protein by imbibed maize embryos. Inhibition activity was lost by temperature, alkali and protease-K hydrolysis. Preliminar analysis could not show presence of reductor sugars. Physiological role of this inhibitor in relation to rest and active tissue remains to be studied.

  10. Renal angiotensin-converting enzyme localization in diabetic rats and the effect of low protein diet.

    PubMed

    Mizuiri, S; Kobayashi, M; Nakanishi, T; Yoshikawa, H; Miyagi, M; Tanegashima, M; Sakai, K; Hayashi, I; Fushimi, T; Hasegawa, A

    1997-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests a role of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) in diabetic nephropathy. The effect of diabetes and low protein diet on renal immunohistochemical ACE localization was studied in streptozotocin-induced DM rats. Immunohistochemical ACE localization was reduced in DM rats, and a low protein diet partially resolved this abnormality while inhibiting the progression of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:9200410

  11. Kielin/Chordin-Like Protein Attenuates both Acute and Chronic Renal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Soofi, Abdul; Zhang, Peng

    2013-01-01

    The secreted kielin/chordin-like (KCP) protein, one of a family of cysteine-rich proteins, suppresses TGF-β signaling by sequestering the ligand from its receptor, but it enhances bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling by promoting ligand-receptor interactions. Given the critical roles for TGF-β and BMP proteins in enhancing or suppressing renal interstitial fibrosis, respectively, we examined whether secreted KCP could attenuate renal fibrosis in mouse models of chronic and acute disease. Transgenic mice that express KCP in adult kidneys showed significantly less expression of collagen IV, α-smooth muscle actin, and other markers of disease progression in the unilateral ureteral obstruction model of renal interstitial fibrosis. In the folic acid nephrotoxicity model of acute tubular necrosis, mice expressing KCP survived high doses of folic acid that were lethal for wild-type mice. With a lower dose of folic acid, mice expressing KCP exhibited improved renal recovery compared with wild-type mice. Thus, these data suggest that extracellular regulation of the TGF-β/BMP signaling axis by KCP, and by extension possibly other cysteine-rich domain proteins, can attenuate both acute and chronic renal injury. PMID:23539757

  12. Human serum albumin homeostasis: a new look at the roles of synthesis, catabolism, renal and gastrointestinal excretion, and the clinical value of serum albumin measurements.

    PubMed

    Levitt, David G; Levitt, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Serum albumin concentration (CP) is a remarkably strong prognostic indicator of morbidity and mortality in both sick and seemingly healthy subjects. Surprisingly, the specifics of the pathophysiology underlying the relationship between CP and ill-health are poorly understood. This review provides a summary that is not previously available in the literature, concerning how synthesis, catabolism, and renal and gastrointestinal clearance of albumin interact to bring about albumin homeostasis, with a focus on the clinical factors that influence this homeostasis. In normal humans, the albumin turnover time of about 25 days reflects a liver albumin synthesis rate of about 10.5 g/day balanced by renal (≈6%), gastrointestinal (≈10%), and catabolic (≈84%) clearances. The acute development of hypoalbuminemia with sepsis or trauma results from increased albumin capillary permeability leading to redistribution of albumin from the vascular to interstitial space. The best understood mechanism of chronic hypoalbuminemia is the decreased albumin synthesis observed in liver disease. Decreased albumin production also accounts for hypoalbuminemia observed with a low-protein and normal caloric diet. However, a calorie- and protein-deficient diet does not reduce albumin synthesis and is not associated with hypoalbuminemia, and CP is not a useful marker of malnutrition. In most disease states other than liver disease, albumin synthesis is normal or increased, and hypoalbuminemia reflects an enhanced rate of albumin turnover resulting either from an increased rate of catabolism (a poorly understood phenomenon) or enhanced loss of albumin into the urine (nephrosis) or intestine (protein-losing enteropathy). The latter may occur with subtle intestinal pathology and hence may be more prevalent than commonly appreciated. Clinically, reduced CP appears to be a result rather than a cause of ill-health, and therapy designed to increase CP has limited benefit. The ubiquitous occurrence of

  13. Human serum albumin homeostasis: a new look at the roles of synthesis, catabolism, renal and gastrointestinal excretion, and the clinical value of serum albumin measurements

    PubMed Central

    Levitt, David G; Levitt, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Serum albumin concentration (CP) is a remarkably strong prognostic indicator of morbidity and mortality in both sick and seemingly healthy subjects. Surprisingly, the specifics of the pathophysiology underlying the relationship between CP and ill-health are poorly understood. This review provides a summary that is not previously available in the literature, concerning how synthesis, catabolism, and renal and gastrointestinal clearance of albumin interact to bring about albumin homeostasis, with a focus on the clinical factors that influence this homeostasis. In normal humans, the albumin turnover time of about 25 days reflects a liver albumin synthesis rate of about 10.5 g/day balanced by renal (≈6%), gastrointestinal (≈10%), and catabolic (≈84%) clearances. The acute development of hypoalbuminemia with sepsis or trauma results from increased albumin capillary permeability leading to redistribution of albumin from the vascular to interstitial space. The best understood mechanism of chronic hypoalbuminemia is the decreased albumin synthesis observed in liver disease. Decreased albumin production also accounts for hypoalbuminemia observed with a low-protein and normal caloric diet. However, a calorie- and protein-deficient diet does not reduce albumin synthesis and is not associated with hypoalbuminemia, and CP is not a useful marker of malnutrition. In most disease states other than liver disease, albumin synthesis is normal or increased, and hypoalbuminemia reflects an enhanced rate of albumin turnover resulting either from an increased rate of catabolism (a poorly understood phenomenon) or enhanced loss of albumin into the urine (nephrosis) or intestine (protein-losing enteropathy). The latter may occur with subtle intestinal pathology and hence may be more prevalent than commonly appreciated. Clinically, reduced CP appears to be a result rather than a cause of ill-health, and therapy designed to increase CP has limited benefit. The ubiquitous occurrence of

  14. The evolution of the protein synthesis system. I - A model of a primitive protein synthesis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizutani, H.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1977-01-01

    A model is developed to describe the evolution of the protein synthesis system. The model is comprised of two independent autocatalytic systems, one including one gene (A-gene) and two activated amino acid polymerases (O and A-polymerases), and the other including the addition of another gene (N-gene) and a nucleotide polymerase. Simulation results have suggested that even a small enzymic activity and polymerase specificity could lead the system to the most accurate protein synthesis, as far as permitted by transitions to systems with higher accuracy.

  15. C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) deficiency ameliorates renal fibrosis in unilateral ureteral obstructive kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ching-Chia; Guan, Siao-Syun; Chen, Li-Ping; Chiang, Chih-Kang

    2016-01-01

    Renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis is an important pathogenic feature in chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease, regardless of the initiating insults. A recent study has shown that CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) homologous protein (CHOP) is involved in acute ischemia/reperfusion-related acute kidney injury through oxidative stress induction. However, the influence of CHOP on chronic kidney disease-correlated renal fibrosis remains unclear. Here, we investigated the role of CHOP in unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO)-induced experimental chronic tubulointerstital fibrosis. The CHOP knockout and wild type mice with or without UUO were used. The results showed that the increased expressions of renal fibrosis markers collagen I, fibronectin, α-smooth muscle actin, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in the kidneys of UUO-treated wild type mice were dramatically attenuated in the kidneys of UUO-treated CHOP knockout mice. CHOP deficiency could also ameliorate lipid peroxidation and endogenous antioxidant enzymes depletion, tubular apoptosis, and inflammatory cells infiltration in the UUO kidneys. These results suggest that CHOP deficiency not only attenuates apoptotic death and oxidative stress in experimental renal fibrosis, but also reduces local inflammation, leading to diminish UUO-induced renal fibrosis. Our findings support that CHOP may be an important signaling molecule in the progression of chronic kidney disease. PMID:26942460

  16. C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) deficiency ameliorates renal fibrosis in unilateral ureteral obstructive kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shing-Hwa; Wu, Cheng-Tien; Huang, Kuo-How; Wang, Ching-Chia; Guan, Siao-Syun; Chen, Li-Ping; Chiang, Chih-Kang

    2016-04-19

    Renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis is an important pathogenic feature in chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease, regardless of the initiating insults. A recent study has shown that CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) homologous protein (CHOP) is involved in acute ischemia/reperfusion-related acute kidney injury through oxidative stress induction. However, the influence of CHOP on chronic kidney disease-correlated renal fibrosis remains unclear. Here, we investigated the role of CHOP in unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO)-induced experimental chronic tubulointerstital fibrosis. The CHOP knockout and wild type mice with or without UUO were used. The results showed that the increased expressions of renal fibrosis markers collagen I, fibronectin, α-smooth muscle actin, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in the kidneys of UUO-treated wild type mice were dramatically attenuated in the kidneys of UUO-treated CHOP knockout mice. CHOP deficiency could also ameliorate lipid peroxidation and endogenous antioxidant enzymes depletion, tubular apoptosis, and inflammatory cells infiltration in the UUO kidneys. These results suggest that CHOP deficiency not only attenuates apoptotic death and oxidative stress in experimental renal fibrosis, but also reduces local inflammation, leading to diminish UUO-induced renal fibrosis. Our findings support that CHOP may be an important signaling molecule in the progression of chronic kidney disease. PMID:26942460

  17. Mitochondrial Protein Synthesis, Import, and Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Thomas D.

    2012-01-01

    The mitochondrion is arguably the most complex organelle in the budding yeast cell cytoplasm. It is essential for viability as well as respiratory growth. Its innermost aqueous compartment, the matrix, is bounded by the highly structured inner membrane, which in turn is bounded by the intermembrane space and the outer membrane. Approximately 1000 proteins are present in these organelles, of which eight major constituents are coded and synthesized in the matrix. The import of mitochondrial proteins synthesized in the cytoplasm, and their direction to the correct soluble compartments, correct membranes, and correct membrane surfaces/topologies, involves multiple pathways and macromolecular machines. The targeting of some, but not all, cytoplasmically synthesized mitochondrial proteins begins with translation of messenger RNAs localized to the organelle. Most proteins then pass through the translocase of the outer membrane to the intermembrane space, where divergent pathways sort them to the outer membrane, inner membrane, and matrix or trap them in the intermembrane space. Roughly 25% of mitochondrial proteins participate in maintenance or expression of the organellar genome at the inner surface of the inner membrane, providing 7 membrane proteins whose synthesis nucleates the assembly of three respiratory complexes. PMID:23212899

  18. Tools for Characterizing Bacterial Protein Synthesis Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Orelle, Cédric; Carlson, Skylar; Kaushal, Bindiya; Almutairi, Mashal M.; Liu, Haipeng; Ochabowicz, Anna; Quan, Selwyn; Pham, Van Cuong; Squires, Catherine L.; Murphy, Brian T.

    2013-01-01

    Many antibiotics inhibit the growth of sensitive bacteria by interfering with ribosome function. However, discovery of new protein synthesis inhibitors is curbed by the lack of facile techniques capable of readily identifying antibiotic target sites and modes of action. Furthermore, the frequent rediscovery of known antibiotic scaffolds, especially in natural product extracts, is time-consuming and expensive and diverts resources that could be used toward the isolation of novel lead molecules. In order to avoid these pitfalls and improve the process of dereplication of chemically complex extracts, we designed a two-pronged approach for the characterization of inhibitors of protein synthesis (ChIPS) that is suitable for the rapid identification of the site and mode of action on the bacterial ribosome. First, we engineered antibiotic-hypersensitive Escherichia coli strains that contain only one rRNA operon. These strains are used for the rapid isolation of resistance mutants in which rRNA mutations identify the site of the antibiotic action. Second, we show that patterns of drug-induced ribosome stalling on mRNA, monitored by primer extension, can be used to elucidate the mode of antibiotic action. These analyses can be performed within a few days and provide a rapid and efficient approach for identifying the site and mode of action of translation inhibitors targeting the bacterial ribosome. Both techniques were validated using a bacterial strain whose culture extract, composed of unknown metabolites, exhibited protein synthesis inhibitory activity; we were able to rapidly detect the presence of the antibiotic chloramphenicol. PMID:24041905

  19. S100 protein expression distinguishes metanephric adenomas from other renal neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Azabdaftari, Gissou; Alroy, Joseph; Banner, Barbara F; Ucci, Angelo; Bhan, Ina; Cheville, John C

    2008-01-01

    Metanephric adenoma is a benign renal neoplasm with morphologic features similar to those of malignant renal neoplasms, such as papillary renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and Wilms' tumor. Different methods have been used to distinguish between metanephric adenoma and papillary RCC and Wilms' tumor. However, some techniques are not always available, such as certain immunohistochemical stains, cytogenetics, molecular genetics, and electron microscopy. In the current study, we compared the expression of S100 protein in 15 cases of metanephric adenoma, 10 cases of Wilms' tumor, and 13 cases of papillary RCC. Our results revealed strong expression of S100 proteins in all cases of metanephric adenoma, weak expression in two cases of Wilms' tumor, and no expression in any of the cases of papillary RCC. These findings indicate that S100 could be a useful and accessible tool for the diagnosis of metanephric adenoma. PMID:18621486

  20. Regulation of sphingolipid synthesis in renal cells from normal subjects and familial hypercholesterolemic subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, S.; Clarke, K.S.; Kwiterovich, P.O. Jr.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have investigated the effects of lipoproteins on sphingolipid metabolism in proximal renal tubular cells from normal subjects and low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-negative homozygous familial hypercholesterolemic (FH) subjects (TB,BA,DD,VH) employing (/sup 3/H)serine and (/sup 3/H)glucose. The results were: normal cells - 1) LDL (25 ..mu..g/ml) decreased the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)glucose and (/sup 3/H)serine into ceramide and LacCer about 2-3 fold; 2) the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)serine into sphingomyelin was also reduced 2 fold by LDL; 3) LDL modified by reductive methylation of lysine residues (which is not recognized by the LDL receptor) did not decrease the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)glucose and (/sup 3/H)serine into sphingolipids; FH cells - In contrast to normal cells, LDL (100 ..mu..g/ml) stimulated both the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)glucose into LacCer and of (/sup 3/H)serine into ceramide, LacCer and sphingomyelin 2-3 fold in cells lacking LDL receptors. The authors conclude that the endogenous synthesis of sphingolipids in normal renal cells may be regulated by the LDL receptor. Lack of LDL receptor, as in FH cells, results in increased sphingolipid synthesis and storage of LacCer.

  1. Organization and Regulation of Mitochondrial Protein Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Ott, Martin; Amunts, Alexey; Brown, Alan

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondria are essential organelles of endosymbiotic origin that are responsible for oxidative phosphorylation within eukaryotic cells. Independent evolution between species has generated mitochondrial genomes that are extremely diverse, with the composition of the vestigial genome determining their translational requirements. Typically, translation within mitochondria is restricted to a few key subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation complexes that are synthesized by dedicated ribosomes (mitoribosomes). The dramatically rearranged mitochondrial genomes, the limited set of transcripts, and the need for the synthesized proteins to coassemble with nuclear-encoded subunits have had substantial consequences for the translation machinery. Recent high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy has revealed the effect of coevolution on the mitoribosome with the mitochondrial genome. In this review, we place the new structural information in the context of the molecular mechanisms of mitochondrial translation and focus on the novel ways protein synthesis is organized and regulated in mitochondria. PMID:26789594

  2. Cell-free protein synthesis: applications come of age.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Erik D; Gan, Rui; Hodgman, C Eric; Jewett, Michael C

    2012-01-01

    Cell-free protein synthesis has emerged as a powerful technology platform to help satisfy the growing demand for simple and efficient protein production. While used for decades as a foundational research tool for understanding transcription and translation, recent advances have made possible cost-effective microscale to manufacturing scale synthesis of complex proteins. Protein yields exceed grams protein produced per liter reaction volume, batch reactions last for multiple hours, costs have been reduced orders of magnitude, and reaction scale has reached the 100-liter milestone. These advances have inspired new applications in the synthesis of protein libraries for functional genomics and structural biology, the production of personalized medicines, and the expression of virus-like particles, among others. In the coming years, cell-free protein synthesis promises new industrial processes where short protein production timelines are crucial as well as innovative approaches to a wide range of applications. PMID:22008973

  3. Understanding Protein Synthesis: An Interactive Card Game Discussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Alison; Peat, Mary; Franklin, Sue

    2005-01-01

    Protein synthesis is a complex process and students find it difficult to understand. This article describes an interactive discussion "game" used by first year biology students at the University of Sydney. The students, in small groups, use the game in which the processes of protein synthesis are actioned by the students during a practical…

  4. SHORT-TERM MEMORY IS INDEPENDENT OF BRAIN PROTEIN SYNTHESIS

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Hasker P.; Rosenzweig, Mark R.; Jones, Oliver W.

    1980-09-01

    Male Swiss albino CD-1 mice given a single injection of a cerebral protein synthesis inhibitor, anisomycin (ANI) (1 mg/animal), 20 min prior to single trial passive avoidance training demonstrated impaired retention at tests given 3 hr, 6 hr, 1 day, and 7 days after training. Retention was not significantly different from saline controls when tests were given 0.5 or 1.5 hr after training. Prolonging inhibition of brain protein synthesis by giving either 1 or 2 additional injections of ANI 2 or 2 and 4 hr after training did not prolong short-term retention performance. The temporal development of impaired retention in ANI treated mice could not be accounted for by drug dosage, duration of protein synthesis inhibition, or nonspecific sickness at test. In contrast to the suggestion that protein synthesis inhibition prolongs short-term memory (Quinton, 1978), the results of this experiment indicate that short-term memory is not prolonged by antibiotic drugs that inhibit cerebral protein synthesis. All evidence seems consistent with the hypothesis that short-term memory is protein synthesis independent and that the establishment of long-term memory depends upon protein synthesis during or shortly after training. Evidence for a role of protein synthesis in memory maintenance is discussed.

  5. Renal Papillary Necrosis Caused by Protein C Deficiency Leading to Recurrent Hydronephrosis

    PubMed Central

    Olorunnisomo, Vincent; Fowle, Evan James; Modica, Ippolito; Meisels, Ira; Gupta, Mantu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A patient with history of a solitary functioning kidney and protein C deficiency (PCD) presented with recurrent severe hydronephrosis causing acute kidney injury upon chronic kidney disease. Work-up with endoscopic evaluation revealed renal papillary necrosis (RPN) and sloughed renal papillae to be the true cause of the recurrent obstruction. Pathologic evaluation of the sloughed tissue confirmed the diagnosis of RPN. This is the first case reported in the literature illustrating the unique presentation of RPN in the setting of PCD. PMID:27579411

  6. Renal Papillary Necrosis Caused by Protein C Deficiency Leading to Recurrent Hydronephrosis.

    PubMed

    Chugh, Rohit Kumar; Olorunnisomo, Vincent; Fowle, Evan James; Modica, Ippolito; Meisels, Ira; Gupta, Mantu

    2016-01-01

    A patient with history of a solitary functioning kidney and protein C deficiency (PCD) presented with recurrent severe hydronephrosis causing acute kidney injury upon chronic kidney disease. Work-up with endoscopic evaluation revealed renal papillary necrosis (RPN) and sloughed renal papillae to be the true cause of the recurrent obstruction. Pathologic evaluation of the sloughed tissue confirmed the diagnosis of RPN. This is the first case reported in the literature illustrating the unique presentation of RPN in the setting of PCD. PMID:27579411

  7. Inhibition of mammalian mitochondrial protein synthesis by oxazolidinones.

    PubMed

    McKee, E E; Ferguson, M; Bentley, A T; Marks, T A

    2006-06-01

    The effects of a variety of oxazolidinones, with different antibacterial potencies, including linezolid, on mitochondrial protein synthesis were determined in intact mitochondria isolated from rat heart and liver and rabbit heart and bone marrow. The results demonstrate that a general feature of the oxazolidinone class of antibiotics is the inhibition of mammalian mitochondrial protein synthesis. Inhibition was similar in mitochondria from all tissues studied. Further, oxazolidinones that were very potent as antibiotics were uniformly potent in inhibiting mitochondrial protein synthesis. These results were compared to the inhibitory profiles of other antibiotics that function by inhibiting bacterial protein synthesis. Of these, chloramphenicol and tetracycline were significant inhibitors of mammalian mitochondrial protein synthesis while the macrolides, lincosamides, and aminoglycosides were not. Development of future antibiotics from the oxazolidinone class will have to evaluate potential mitochondrial toxicity. PMID:16723564

  8. Pranlukast inhibits renal epithelial cyst progression via activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Pathomthongtaweechai, Nutthapoom; Soodvilai, Sunhapas; Chatsudthipong, Varanuj; Muanprasat, Chatchai

    2014-02-01

    Cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 1 (CysLT1 receptor) antagonists were found to inhibit chloride secretion in human airway epithelial cells. Since chloride secretion in renal epithelial cells, which shares common mechanisms with airway epithelial cells, plays important roles in renal cyst progression in polycystic kidney disease (PKD), this study was aimed to investigate effects of drugs acting as CysLT1 receptor antagonists on renal cyst progression and its underlying mechanisms. Effects of CysLT1 receptor antagonists on renal cyst growth and formation were determined using Madine Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cyst models. Mechanisms of actions of CysLT1 receptor antagonists were determined using short-circuit current measurement, assays of cell viability and cell proliferation, and immunoblot analysis of signaling proteins. Of the three drugs acting as CysLT1 receptor antagonists (montelukast, pranlukast and zafirlukast) tested, pranlukast was the most promising drug that inhibited MDCK cyst growth and formation without affecting cell viability. Its effect was independent of the inhibition of CysLT1 receptors. Instead, it reduced cAMP-activated chloride secretion and proliferation of MDCK cells in an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent manner and had no effect on CFTR protein expression. Interestingly, pranlukast enhanced AMPK activation via calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase beta (CaMKKβ) with consequent activation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and suppression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. These results indicate that pranlukast retards renal epithelial cyst progression by inhibiting cAMP-activated chloride secretion and cell proliferation via CaMKKβ-AMPK-mTOR pathway. Therefore, pranlukast represents a class of known drugs that may have potential utility in PKD treatment. PMID:24360935

  9. Dietary protein and fiber in end stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Sirich, Tammy L

    2015-01-01

    Prior to the availability of hemodialysis, dietary protein restriction played a large part in the treatment of uremia. This therapy was based on observations that uremic symptoms increased with high protein intake. Early investigators thus presumed that "uremic toxins" were derived from the breakdown of dietary protein; its restriction improved uremic symptoms but caused malnutrition. After the availability of hemodialysis, protein restriction was no longer recommended. Studies in healthy subjects have shown that an intake of 0.6-0.8 g/kg/day is adequate to prevent protein malnutrition. Guidelines for hemodialysis patients, however, currently recommend higher protein intakes of 1.2 g/kg/day. A downside to higher intake may be increased production of protein-derived uremic solutes that caused the symptoms observed by early investigators. Some of these solutes are produced by colon microbes acting on protein which escapes digestion in the small intestine. Increasing dietary fiber may reduce the production of colon-derived solutes in hemodialysis patients without adverse effects of protein restriction. Fiber comprises carbohydrates and related substances that are resistant to digestion in the small intestine. Upon delivery to the colon, fiber is broken down to short chain fatty acids, providing energy to both the microbes and the host. With an increased energy supply, the microbes can incorporate dietary protein for growth rather than breaking them down to uremic solutes. Increasing fiber intake in hemodialysis patients has been shown to reduce the plasma levels of selected colon-derived solutes. Further studies are needed to test whether this provides clinical benefit. PMID:25319504

  10. DIETARY PROTEIN AND LACTOSE INCREASE TRANSLATION INITIATION FACTOR ACTIVATION AND TISSUE PROTEIN SYNTHESIS IN NEONATAL PIGS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein synthesis and eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) activation are increased in muscle and liver of pigs parenterally infused with amino acids and insulin. To examine the effects of enteral protein and carbohydrate on protein synthesis, pigs (n = 42, 1.7 kg body wt) were fed isocaloric milk die...

  11. Modeling protein synthesis from a physicist's perspective: A toy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Aakash; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2007-10-01

    Proteins are polymers of amino acids. These macromolecules are synthesized by intracellular machines called ribosomes. Although the experimental investigation of protein synthesis has been a traditional area of research in molecular cell biology, important quantitative models of protein synthesis have been reported in research journals devoted to statistical physics and related interdisciplinary topics. From the perspective of a physicist, protein synthesis is the classical transport of interacting ribosomes on a messenger RNA (mRNA) template that dictates the sequence of the amino acids on the protein. We discuss appropriate simplification of the models and methods. In particular, we develop and analyze a simple toy model using some elementary techniques of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics and predict the average rate of protein synthesis and the spatial organization of the ribosomes in the steady state.

  12. New perspectives on the renal slit diaphragm protein podocin

    PubMed Central

    Relle, Manfred; Cash, Hannes; Brochhausen, Christoph; Strand, Dennis; Menke, Julia; Galle, Peter R; Schwarting, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Podocin is a critical component of the glomerular filtration barrier, its mutations causing recessive steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome. A GenBank analysis of the human podocin (NPHS2) gene resulted in the possible existence of a new splice variant of podocin in the kidney, missing the in-frame of exon 5, encoding the prohibitin homology domain. Using RT–polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting followed by sequence analysis, we are for the first time able to prove the expression of a novel podocin isoform (isoform 2), exclusively and constitutively expressed in human podocytes. Furthermore, we reveal singular extrarenal podocin expression in human and murine testis. Our data show the Sertoli cells of the seminiferous tubules to be the origin of testicular podocin. Confocal laser microscopy illustrates the co-localization of podocin with filamentous actin within Sertoli cells, suggesting a role of podocin in the blood/testis barrier. These results led to the rationale to examine podocin expression in testes of men with Sertoli cell-only syndrome, a disorder characterized by azoospermia. Interestingly, we observed a complete down-regulation of podocin mRNA in Sertoli cell-only syndrome, indicating a possible role of podocin in the pathogenesis of this germinal aplasia. Men with Sertoli cell-only syndrome show normal renal podocin expression, suggesting an alternate regulation of the testicular promoter. Our findings may change the perception of podocin and give new insights into the ultrastructure of glomerular slit diaphragm and the blood/testis barrier. PMID:21499232

  13. Role of RNA and Protein Synthesis in Abscission

    PubMed Central

    Abeles, F. B.

    1968-01-01

    The cell separation aspect of abscission is thought to involve the action of specific cell wall degrading enzymes. Enzymes represent synthesis which in turn is preceded by the synthesis of specific RNA molecules, and it follows that inhibition of either of these processes would also block abscission. Since abscission is a localized phenomenon usually involving 2 or 3 cell layers, RNA and protein synthesis should also be localized. Manipulations of plant material which either accelerate or retard abscission may be due to the regulation of RNA and protein synthesis. This paper is a review of literature concerned with these and related questions. Images PMID:16657020

  14. Loss of activator of G-protein signaling 3 impairs renal tubular regeneration following acute kidney injury in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Regner, Kevin R.; Nozu, Kandai; Lanier, Stephen M.; Blumer, Joe B.; Avner, Ellis D.; Sweeney, William E.; Park, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The intracellular mechanisms underlying renal tubular epithelial cell proliferation and tubular repair following ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) remain poorly understood. In this report, we demonstrate that activator of G-protein signaling 3 (AGS3), an unconventional receptor-independent regulator of heterotrimeric G-protein function, influences renal tubular regeneration following IRI. In rat kidneys exposed to IRI, there was a temporal induction in renal AGS3 protein expression that peaked 72 h after reperfusion and corresponded to the repair and recovery phase following ischemic injury. Renal AGS3 expression was localized predominantly to the recovering outer medullary proximal tubular cells and was highly coexpressed with Ki-67, a marker of cell proliferation. Kidneys from mice deficient in the expression of AGS3 exhibited impaired renal tubular recovery 7 d following IRI compared to wild-type AGS3-expressing mice. Mechanistically, genetic knockdown of endogenous AGS3 mRNA and protein in renal tubular epithelial cells reduced cell proliferation in vitro. Similar reductions in renal tubular epithelial cell proliferation were observed following incubation with gallein, a selective inhibitor of Gβγ subunit activity, and lentiviral overexpression of the carboxyl-terminus of G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2ct), a scavenger of Gβγ subunits. In summary, these data suggest that AGS3 acts through a novel receptor-independent mechanism to facilitate renal tubular epithelial cell proliferation and renal tubular regeneration.—Regner, K. R., Nozu, K., Lanier, S. M., Blumer, J. B., Avner, E. D., Sweeney, Jr., W. E., Park, F. Loss of activator of G-protein signaling 3 impairs renal tubular regeneration following acute kidney injury in rodents. PMID:21343176

  15. The protein kinase 2 inhibitor tetrabromobenzotriazole protects against renal ischemia reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Ka, Sun-O; Hwang, Hong Pil; Jang, Jong-Hwa; Hyuk Bang, In; Bae, Ui-Jin; Yu, Hee Chul; Cho, Baik Hwan; Park, Byung-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinase 2 (CK2) activation was reported to enhance reactive oxygen species production and activate the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) pathway. Because oxidative stress and inflammation are critical events for tissue destruction during ischemia reperfusion (I/R), we sought to determine whether CK2 was important in the renal response to I/R. Mice underwent 25 min of renal ischemia and were then reperfused. We confirmed an increased expression of CK2α during the reperfusion period, while expression of CK2β remained consistent. We administered tetrabromobenzotriazole (TBBt), a selective CK2α inhibitor before inducing I/R injury. Mice subjected to I/R injury showed typical patterns of acute kidney injury; blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine levels, tubular necrosis and apoptosis, inflammatory cell infiltration and proinflammatory cytokine production, and oxidative stress were markedly increased when compared to sham mice. However, pretreatment with TBBt abolished these changes and improved renal function and architecture. Similar renoprotective effects of CK2α inhibition were observed for emodin. Renoprotective effects of CK2α inhibition were associated with suppression of NF-κB and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. Taken together, these results suggest that CK2α mediates proapoptotic and proinflammatory signaling, thus the CK2α inhibitor may be used to prevent renal I/R injuries observed in clinical settings. PMID:26423352

  16. Interrelation between protein synthesis, proteostasis and life span.

    PubMed

    Arnsburg, Kristin; Kirstein-Miles, Janine

    2014-02-01

    The production of newly synthesized proteins is a key process of protein homeostasis that initiates the biosynthetic flux of proteins and thereby determines the composition, stability and functionality of the proteome. Protein synthesis is highly regulated on multiple levels to adapt the proteome to environmental and physiological challenges such as aging and proteotoxic conditions. Imbalances of protein folding conditions are sensed by the cell that then trigger a cascade of signaling pathways aiming to restore the protein folding equilibrium. One regulatory node to rebalance proteostasis upon stress is the control of protein synthesis itself. Translation is reduced as an immediate response to perturbations of the protein folding equilibrium that can be observed in the cytosol as well as in the organelles such as the endoplasmatic reticulum and mitochondria. As reduction of protein synthesis is linked to life span increase, the signaling pathways regu-lating protein synthesis might be putative targets for treatments of age-related diseases. Eukaryotic cells have evolved a complex system for protein synthesis regulation and this review will summarize cellular strategies to regulate mRNA translation upon stress and its impact on longevity. PMID:24653664

  17. Mutation in mitochondrial ribosomal protein S7 (MRPS7) causes congenital sensorineural deafness, progressive hepatic and renal failure and lactic acidemia.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Minal J; Guo, Yiran; Zhang, Jianguo; Riley, Lisa G; Cooper, Sandra T; Thorburn, David R; Li, Jiankang; Dong, Daoyuan; Li, Zhijun; Glessner, Joseph; Davis, Ryan L; Sue, Carolyn M; Alexander, Stephen I; Arbuckle, Susan; Kirwan, Paul; Keating, Brendan J; Xu, Xun; Hakonarson, Hakon; Christodoulou, John

    2015-04-15

    Functional defects of the mitochondrial translation machinery, as a result of mutations in nuclear-encoded genes, have been associated with combined oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) deficiencies. We report siblings with congenital sensorineural deafness and lactic acidemia in association with combined respiratory chain (RC) deficiencies of complexes I, III and IV observed in fibroblasts and liver. One of the siblings had a more severe phenotype showing progressive hepatic and renal failure. Whole-exome sequencing revealed a homozygous mutation in the gene encoding mitochondrial ribosomal protein S7 (MRPS7), a c.550A>G transition that encodes a substitution of valine for a highly conserved methionine (p.Met184Val) in both affected siblings. MRPS7 is a 12S ribosomal RNA-binding subunit of the small mitochondrial ribosomal subunit, and is required for the assembly of the small ribosomal subunit. Pulse labeling of mitochondrial protein synthesis products revealed impaired mitochondrial protein synthesis in patient fibroblasts. Exogenous expression of wild-type MRPS7 in patient fibroblasts rescued complexes I and IV activities, demonstrating the deleterious effect of the mutation on RC function. Moreover, reduced 12S rRNA transcript levels observed in the patient's fibroblasts were also restored to normal levels by exogenous expression of wild-type MRPS7. Our data demonstrate the pathogenicity of the identified MRPS7 mutation as a novel cause of mitochondrial RC dysfunction, congenital sensorineural deafness and progressive hepatic and renal failure. PMID:25556185

  18. Diverse Renal Phenotypes Observed in a Single Family with a Genetic Mutation in Paired Box Protein 2

    PubMed Central

    Iwafuchi, Yoichi; Morioka, Tetsuo; Morita, Takashi; Yanagihara, Toshio; Oyama, Yuko; Morisada, Naoya; Iijima, Kazumoto; Narita, Ichiei

    2016-01-01

    A common renal phenotype of paired box protein 2 (PAX2) mutations is renal coloboma syndrome. We report a single family with diverse renal phenotypes associated with PAX2 mutation. The proband presented steroid-resistant focal segmental glomerulosclerosis with optic coloboma, whereas his two sons showed severe renal hypoplasia with end-stage renal disease, with or without optic coloboma. In all three cases, a heterozygous PAX2 genetic mutation was identified (exon 2; NM_003987.3:c.76dupG, p.Val26Glyfs*28). Based on histopathological findings of the proband, we hypothesized that autophagic dysfunction was associated with the pathophysiology of the focal segmental glomerulosclerosis with PAX2 mutation. Detailed funduscopic examination – including the optic disc – might be useful for the diagnosis of renal anomalies associated with PAX2 mutation. PMID:27226968

  19. Diverse Renal Phenotypes Observed in a Single Family with a Genetic Mutation in Paired Box Protein 2.

    PubMed

    Iwafuchi, Yoichi; Morioka, Tetsuo; Morita, Takashi; Yanagihara, Toshio; Oyama, Yuko; Morisada, Naoya; Iijima, Kazumoto; Narita, Ichiei

    2016-01-01

    A common renal phenotype of paired box protein 2 (PAX2) mutations is renal coloboma syndrome. We report a single family with diverse renal phenotypes associated with PAX2 mutation. The proband presented steroid-resistant focal segmental glomerulosclerosis with optic coloboma, whereas his two sons showed severe renal hypoplasia with end-stage renal disease, with or without optic coloboma. In all three cases, a heterozygous PAX2 genetic mutation was identified (exon 2; NM_003987.3:c.76dupG, p.Val26Glyfs*28). Based on histopathological findings of the proband, we hypothesized that autophagic dysfunction was associated with the pathophysiology of the focal segmental glomerulosclerosis with PAX2 mutation. Detailed funduscopic examination - including the optic disc - might be useful for the diagnosis of renal anomalies associated with PAX2 mutation. PMID:27226968

  20. Decreased expression of receptor tyrosine kinase of EphB1 protein in renal cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shuigen; Wang, Longxin; Li, Guimei; Zhang, Zhengyu; Wang, Jiandong

    2014-01-01

    Receptors tyrosine kinase of Eph superfamily plays an important role in human cancers. We previously found that EphB1 subtype is down-regulated in gastric cancer, colorectal cancer and ovary serous carcinoma. Fore the more, the decreased expression of EphB1 is related to invasion and metastasis in cancers. Although EphB1 has been revealed as an important receptor in cancers, our understanding of its roles in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is limited. In the present study, using specific anit-EphB1 polyclonal antibody and immunohistochemistry, we evaluated EphB1 protein expression levels in RCC specimens surgically resected from 82 patients (including 62 conventional clear-cell RCC, 10 papillary, and 10 chromophobic RCC cases). We found EphB1 protein is positively expressed in the epithelium of renal tubules. Decreased expression of EphB1 was found in all RCC carcinomas compared with expression in the normal epithelium of renal tubules. EphB1 protein moderately expressed in chromophobic RCC, weakly expressed in clear-cell RCC and negatively expressed in papillary RCC. Our results indicate that EphB1 may be involved in carcinogenesis of RCC, the molecular mechanisms of down-regulation of EphB1 including genetic and epigenetic alterations and the dedicated roles of EphB1 in occurrence and progress of RCC need to be explicated in next step. PMID:25120806

  1. MATERNAL PROTEIN HOMEOSTASIS AND MILK PROTEIN SYNTHESIS DURING FEEDING AND FASTING IN HUMANS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about amino acid (aa) and protein metabolism in lactating women. We hypothesized: 1) aa sources other than the plasma acid pool provide substrate for milk protein synthesis in humans; and 2) if albumin was one such source, then albumin fractional synthesis rate (FSR) is higher in th...

  2. Predictors of Muscle Protein Synthesis after Severe Pediatric Burns

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Eva C.; Herndon, David N.; Lee, Jinhyung; Porter, Craig; Cotter, Matthew; Suman, Oscar E.; Sidossis, Labros S.; Børsheim, Elisabet

    2015-01-01

    Background Following a major burn, skeletal muscle protein synthesis rate increases, but is often insufficient to compensate for massively elevated muscle protein breakdown rates. Given the long-term nature of the pathophysiologic response to burn injury, we hypothesized that muscle protein synthesis rate would be chronically elevated in severely burned children. The objectives of this study were to characterize muscle protein synthesis rate of burned children over a period of 24 months post-injury, and identify predictors that influence this response. Study design 87 children with ≥40% total body surface area (TBSA) burn were included. Patients participated in stable isotope infusion studies at 1, 2 and ~ 4 weeks post-burn, and at 6, 12 and 24 months post-injury to determine skeletal muscle fractional synthesis rate. Generalized estimating equations with log link normal distribution were applied to account for clustering of patients and control for patient characteristics. Results Patients (8±6 years) had large (62, 51–72% TBSA) and deep (47±21% TBSA third degree) burns. Muscle fractional synthesis rate was elevated throughout the first 12 months post-burn compared to established values from healthy young adults. Muscle fractional synthesis rate was lower in boys, children >3 years old, and when burns were >80% TBSA. Conclusions Muscle protein synthesis is elevated for at least one year after injury, suggesting that greater muscle protein turnover is a component of the long-term pathophysiological response to burn trauma. Muscle protein synthesis is highly affected by gender, age and burn size in severely burned children. These findings may explain the divergence in net protein balance and lean body mass in different populations of burn victims. PMID:25807408

  3. Protein chemical synthesis by α-ketoacid-hydroxylamine ligation.

    PubMed

    Harmand, Thibault J; Murar, Claudia E; Bode, Jeffrey W

    2016-06-01

    Total chemical synthesis of proteins allows researchers to custom design proteins without the complex molecular biology that is required to insert non-natural amino acids or the biocontamination that arises from methods relying on overexpression in cells. We describe a detailed procedure for the chemical synthesis of proteins with the α-ketoacid-hydroxylamine (KAHA ligation), using (S)-5-oxaproline (Opr) as a key building block. This protocol comprises two main parts: (i) the synthesis of peptide fragments by standard fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl (Fmoc) chemistry and (ii) the KAHA ligation between fragments containing Opr and a C-terminal peptide α-ketoacid. This procedure provides an alternative to native chemical ligation (NCL) that could be valuable for the synthesis of proteins, particularly targets that do not contain cysteine residues. The ligation conditions-acidic DMSO/H2O or N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP)/H2O-are ideally suited for solubilizing peptide segments, including many hydrophobic examples. The utility and efficiency of the protocol is demonstrated by the total chemical synthesis of the mature betatrophin (also called ANGPTL8), a 177-residue protein that contains no cysteine residues. With this protocol, the total synthesis of the betatrophin protein has been achieved in around 35 working days on a multimilligram scale. PMID:27227514

  4. Circulating protein synthesis rates reveal skeletal muscle proteome dynamics.

    PubMed

    Shankaran, Mahalakshmi; King, Chelsea L; Angel, Thomas E; Holmes, William E; Li, Kelvin W; Colangelo, Marc; Price, John C; Turner, Scott M; Bell, Christopher; Hamilton, Karyn L; Miller, Benjamin F; Hellerstein, Marc K

    2016-01-01

    Here, we have described and validated a strategy for monitoring skeletal muscle protein synthesis rates in rodents and humans over days or weeks from blood samples. We based this approach on label incorporation into proteins that are synthesized specifically in skeletal muscle and escape into the circulation. Heavy water labeling combined with sensitive tandem mass spectrometric analysis allowed integrated synthesis rates of proteins in muscle tissue across the proteome to be measured over several weeks. Fractional synthesis rate (FSR) of plasma creatine kinase M-type (CK-M) and carbonic anhydrase 3 (CA-3) in the blood, more than 90% of which is derived from skeletal muscle, correlated closely with FSR of CK-M, CA-3, and other proteins of various ontologies in skeletal muscle tissue in both rodents and humans. Protein synthesis rates across the muscle proteome generally changed in a coordinate manner in response to a sprint interval exercise training regimen in humans and to denervation or clenbuterol treatment in rodents. FSR of plasma CK-M and CA-3 revealed changes and interindividual differences in muscle tissue proteome dynamics. In human subjects, sprint interval training primarily stimulated synthesis of structural and glycolytic proteins. Together, our results indicate that this approach provides a virtual biopsy, sensitively revealing individualized changes in proteome-wide synthesis rates in skeletal muscle without a muscle biopsy. Accordingly, this approach has potential applications for the diagnosis, management, and treatment of muscle disorders. PMID:26657858

  5. Circulating protein synthesis rates reveal skeletal muscle proteome dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Shankaran, Mahalakshmi; King, Chelsea L.; Angel, Thomas E.; Holmes, William E.; Li, Kelvin W.; Colangelo, Marc; Price, John C.; Turner, Scott M.; Bell, Christopher; Hamilton, Karyn L.; Miller, Benjamin F.; Hellerstein, Marc K.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we have described and validated a strategy for monitoring skeletal muscle protein synthesis rates in rodents and humans over days or weeks from blood samples. We based this approach on label incorporation into proteins that are synthesized specifically in skeletal muscle and escape into the circulation. Heavy water labeling combined with sensitive tandem mass spectrometric analysis allowed integrated synthesis rates of proteins in muscle tissue across the proteome to be measured over several weeks. Fractional synthesis rate (FSR) of plasma creatine kinase M-type (CK-M) and carbonic anhydrase 3 (CA-3) in the blood, more than 90% of which is derived from skeletal muscle, correlated closely with FSR of CK-M, CA-3, and other proteins of various ontologies in skeletal muscle tissue in both rodents and humans. Protein synthesis rates across the muscle proteome generally changed in a coordinate manner in response to a sprint interval exercise training regimen in humans and to denervation or clenbuterol treatment in rodents. FSR of plasma CK-M and CA-3 revealed changes and interindividual differences in muscle tissue proteome dynamics. In human subjects, sprint interval training primarily stimulated synthesis of structural and glycolytic proteins. Together, our results indicate that this approach provides a virtual biopsy, sensitively revealing individualized changes in proteome-wide synthesis rates in skeletal muscle without a muscle biopsy. Accordingly, this approach has potential applications for the diagnosis, management, and treatment of muscle disorders. PMID:26657858

  6. Temperature-Regulated Protein Synthesis by Leptospira interrogans

    PubMed Central

    Nally, Jarlath E.; Timoney, John F.; Stevenson, Brian

    2001-01-01

    Leptospira interrogans is an important mammalian pathogen. Transmission from an environmental source requires adaptations to a range of new environmental conditions in the organs and tissues of the infected host. Since many pathogenic bacteria utilize temperature to discern their environment and regulate the synthesis of appropriate proteins, we investigated the effects of temperature on protein synthesis in L. interrogans. Bacteria were grown for several days after culture temperatures were shifted from 30 to 37°C. Triton X-114 cellular fractionation identified several proteins of the cytoplasm, periplasm, and outer membrane for which synthesis was dependent on the culture temperature. Synthesis of a cytoplasmic protein of 20 kDa was switched off at 37°C, whereas synthesis of a 66-kDa periplasmic protein was increased at the higher temperature. Increased synthesis of a 25-kDa outer membrane protein was observed when the organisms were shifted from 30 to 37°C. A 36-kDa protein synthesized at 30 but not at 37°C was identified as LipL36, an outer membrane lipoprotein. In contrast, expression of another lipoprotein, LipL41, was the same at either temperature. Immunoblotting with convalescent equine sera revealed that some proteins exhibiting thermoregulation of synthesis elicited antibody responses during infection. Our results show that sera from horses which aborted as a result of naturally acquired infection with L. interrogans serovar pomona type kennewicki recognize periplasmic and outer membrane proteins which are differentially synthesized in response to temperature and which therefore may be important in the host-pathogen interaction during infection. PMID:11119530

  7. Protein biomarkers associated with acute renal failure and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Perco, P; Pleban, C; Kainz, A; Lukas, A; Mayer, G; Mayer, B; Oberbauer, R

    2006-11-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) as well as chronic kidney disease (CKD) are currently categorized according to serum creatinine concentrations. Serum creatinine, however, has shortcomings because of its low predictive values. The need for novel markers for the early diagnosis and prognosis of renal diseases is imminent, particularly for markers reflecting intrinsic organ injury in stages when glomerular filtration is not impaired. This review summarizes protein markers discussed in the context of ARF as well as CKD, and provides an overview on currently available discovery results following 'omics' techniques. The identified set of candidate marker proteins is discussed in their cellular and functional context. The systematic review of proteomics and genomics studies revealed 56 genes to be associated with acute or chronic kidney disease. Context analysis, i.e. correlation of biological processes and molecular functions of reported kidney markers, revealed that 15 genes on the candidate list were assigned to the most significant ontology groups: immunity and defence. Other significantly enriched groups were cell communication (14 genes), signal transduction (22 genes) and apoptosis (seven genes). Among 24 candidate protein markers, nine proteins were also identified by gene expression studies. Next generation candidate marker proteins with improved diagnostic and prognostic values for kidney diseases will be derived from whole genome scans and protemics approaches. Prospective validation still remains elusive for all proposed candidates. PMID:17032342

  8. The origin of polynucleotide-directed protein synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orgel, Leslie E.

    1989-01-01

    If protein synthesis evolved in an RNA world it was probably preceded by simpler processes by means of which interaction with amino acids conferred selective advantage on replicating RNA molecules. It is suggested that at first the simple attachment of amino acids to the 2'(3') termini of RNA templates favored initiation of replication at the end of the template rather than at internal positions. The second stage in the evolution of protein synthesis would probably have been the association of pairs of charged RNA adaptors in such a way as to favor noncoded formation of peptides. Only after this process had become efficient could coded synthesis have begun.

  9. Adeno-associated virus rep protein synthesis during productive infection

    SciTech Connect

    Redemann, B.E.; Mendelson, E.; Carter, B.J.

    1989-02-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) Rep proteins mediate viral DNA replication and can regulate expression from AAV genes. The authors studied the kinetics of synthesis of the four Rep proteins, Rep78, Rep68, Rep52, and Rep40, during infection of human 293 or KB cells with AAV and helper adenovirus by in vivo labeling with (/sup 35/S)methionine, immunoprecipitation, and immunoblotting analyses. Rep78 and Rep52 were readily detected concomitantly with detection of viral monomer duplex DNA replicating about 10 to 12 h after infection, and Rep68 and Rep40 were detected 2 h later. Rep78 and Rep52 were more abundant than Rep68 and Rep40 owing to a higher synthesis rate throughout the infectious cycle. In some experiments, very low levels of Rep78 could be detected as early as 4 h after infection. The synthesis rates of Rep proteins were maximal between 14 and 24 h and then decreased later after infection. Isotopic pulse-chase experiments showed that each of the Rep proteins was synthesized independently and was stable for at least 15 h. A slower-migrating, modified form of Rep78 was identified late after infection. AAV capsid protein synthesis was detected at 10 to 12 h after infection and also exhibited synthesis kinetics similar to those of the Rep proteins. AAV DNA replication showed at least two clearly defined stages. Bulk duplex replicating DNA accumulation began around 10 to 12 h and reached a maximum level at about 20 h when Rep and capsid protein synthesis was maximal. Progeny single-stranded DNA accumulation began about 12 to 13 h, but most of this DNA accumulated after 24 h when Rep and capsid protein synthesis had decreased.

  10. Cell-free protein synthesis in microfluidic array devices.

    PubMed

    Mei, Qian; Fredrickson, Carl K; Simon, Andrew; Khnouf, Ruba; Fan, Z Hugh

    2007-01-01

    We report the development of a microfluidic array device for continuous-exchange, cell-free protein synthesis. The advantages of protein expression in the microfluidic array include (1) the potential to achieve high-throughput protein expression, matching the throughput of gene discovery; (2) more than 2 orders of magnitude reduction in reagent consumption, decreasing the cost of protein synthesis; and (3) the possibility to integrate with detection for rapid protein analysis, eliminating the need to harvest proteins. The device consists of an array of units, and each unit can be used for production of an individual protein. The unit comprises a tray chamber for in vitro protein expression and a well chamber as a nutrient reservoir. The tray is nested in the well, and they are separated by a dialysis membrane and connected through a microfluidic connection that provides a means to supply nutrients and remove the reaction byproducts. The device is demonstrated by synthesis of green fluorescent protein, chloramphenicol acetyl-transferase, and luciferase. Protein expression in the device lasts 5-10 times longer and the production yield is 13-22 times higher than in a microcentrifuge tube. In addition, we studied the effects of the operation temperature and hydrostatic flow on the protein production yield. PMID:17924644

  11. Multiple Post-translational Modifications Affect Heterologous Protein Synthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Tokmakov, Alexander A.; Kurotani, Atsushi; Takagi, Tetsuo; Toyama, Mitsutoshi; Shirouzu, Mikako; Fukami, Yasuo; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2012-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) are required for proper folding of many proteins. The low capacity for PTMs hinders the production of heterologous proteins in the widely used prokaryotic systems of protein synthesis. Until now, a systematic and comprehensive study concerning the specific effects of individual PTMs on heterologous protein synthesis has not been presented. To address this issue, we expressed 1488 human proteins and their domains in a bacterial cell-free system, and we examined the correlation of the expression yields with the presence of multiple PTM sites bioinformatically predicted in these proteins. This approach revealed a number of previously unknown statistically significant correlations. Prediction of some PTMs, such as myristoylation, glycosylation, palmitoylation, and disulfide bond formation, was found to significantly worsen protein amenability to soluble expression. The presence of other PTMs, such as aspartyl hydroxylation, C-terminal amidation, and Tyr sulfation, did not correlate with the yield of heterologous protein expression. Surprisingly, the predicted presence of several PTMs, such as phosphorylation, ubiquitination, SUMOylation, and prenylation, was associated with the increased production of properly folded soluble proteins. The plausible rationales for the existence of the observed correlations are presented. Our findings suggest that identification of potential PTMs in polypeptide sequences can be of practical use for predicting expression success and optimizing heterologous protein synthesis. In sum, this study provides the most compelling evidence so far for the role of multiple PTMs in the stability and solubility of heterologously expressed recombinant proteins. PMID:22674579

  12. Monitoring protein synthesis in single live cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tu, Chengyi; Santo, Loredana; Mishima, Yuko; Raje, Noopur; Smilansky, Zeev; Zoldan, Janet

    2016-05-16

    Protein synthesis is generally under sophisticated and dynamic regulation to meet the ever-changing demands of a cell. Global up or down-regulation of protein synthesis and the shift of protein synthesis location (as shown, for example, during cellular stress or viral infection) are recognized as cellular responses to environmental changes such as nutrient/oxygen deprivation or to alterations such as pathological mutations in cancer cells. Monitoring protein synthesis in single live cells can be a powerful tool for cancer research. Here we employed a microfluidic platform to perform high throughput delivery of fluorescent labeled tRNAs into multiple myeloma cells with high transfection efficiency (∼45%) and high viability (>80%). We show that the delivered tRNAs were actively recruited to the ER for protein synthesis and that treatment with puromycin effectively disrupted this process. Interestingly, we observed the scattered distribution of tRNAs in cells undergoing mitosis, which has not been previously reported. Fluorescence lifetime analysis detected extensive FRET signals generated from tRNAs labeled as FRET pairs, further confirming that the delivered tRNAs were used by active ribosomes for protein translation. Our work demonstrates that the microfluidic delivery of FRET labeled tRNAs into living cancer cells can provide new insights into basic cancer metabolism and has the potential to serve as a platform for drug screening, diagnostics, or personalized medication. PMID:26956582

  13. Regulation of protein synthesis during early limitation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Swedes, J S; Dial, M E; McLaughlin, C S

    1979-01-01

    Arsenate, a competitive inhibitor with phosphate in phosphorylation reactions, has been used to lower adenine and guanine nucleotide levels in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to study nucleotide effects on protein synthesis. By measuring polysome levels, we have shown that initiation of protein synthesis is much more sensitive than elongation or termination to inhibition when the ATP/ADP, GTP/GDP ratios are low. When the arsenate-phosphate molar ratio was 0.27, protein synthesis was inhibited by about 85% and the kinetics of polysome decay was similar to that observed with the initiation inhibitor, verrucarin-76, or with the protein synthesis initiation mutant, ts187, at the restrictive temperature. With this level of arsenate, the adenylate energy charge dropped from 0.9 to 0.7 and the ATP/ADP and GTP/GDP ratios dropped from 6 to 2. The observed correlations between nucleotide ratio changes and inhibition of protein synthesis suggest that the former may be a control signal for the latter. The significance of these in vivo correlations will have to be tested with an in vitro protein synthesizing system. Higher arsenate levels resulted in even lower ATP/ADP, GTP/GDP ratios and in a slower decay of polysomes, implying that, eventually, elongation (in addition to initiation) was being inhibited. PMID:374362

  14. Energizing eukaryotic cell-free protein synthesis with glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Mark J; Stark, Jessica C; Hodgman, C Eric; Jewett, Michael C

    2015-07-01

    Eukaryotic cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) is limited by the dependence on costly high-energy phosphate compounds and exogenous enzymes to power protein synthesis (e.g., creatine phosphate and creatine kinase, CrP/CrK). Here, we report the ability to use glucose as a secondary energy substrate to regenerate ATP in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae crude extract CFPS platform. We observed synthesis of 3.64±0.35 μg mL(-1) active luciferase in batch reactions with 16 mM glucose and 25 mM phosphate, resulting in a 16% increase in relative protein yield (μg protein/$ reagents) compared to the CrP/CrK system. Our demonstration provides the foundation for development of cost-effective eukaryotic CFPS platforms. PMID:26054976

  15. Leucine-Enriched Essential Amino Acids Augment Mixed Protein Synthesis, But Not Collagen Protein Synthesis, in Rat Skeletal Muscle after Downhill Running.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Hiromi; Inoue, Yoshiko; Suzuki, Katsuya; Kobayashi, Hisamine

    2016-01-01

    Mixed and collagen protein synthesis is elevated for as many as 3 days following exercise. Immediately after exercise, enhanced amino acid availability increases synthesis of mixed muscle protein, but not muscle collagen protein. However, the potential for synergic effects of amino acid ingestion with exercise on both mixed and collagen protein synthesis remains unclear. We investigated muscle collagen protein synthesis in rats following post-exercise ingestion of leucine-enriched essential amino acids. We determined fractional protein synthesis rates (FSR) at different time points following exercise. Mixed protein and collagen protein FSRs in skeletal muscle were determined by measuring protein-bound enrichments of hydroxyproline and proline, and by measuring the intracellular enrichment of proline, using injections of flooding d₃-proline doses. A leucine-enriched mixture of essential amino acids (or distilled water as a control) was administrated 30 min or 1 day post-exercise. The collagen protein synthesis in the vastus lateralis was elevated for 2 days after exercise. Although amino acid administration did not increase muscle collagen protein synthesis, it did lead to augmented mixed muscle protein synthesis 1 day following exercise. Thus, contrary to the regulation of mixed muscle protein synthesis, muscle collagen protein synthesis is not affected by amino acid availability after damage-inducing exercise. PMID:27367725

  16. Leucine-Enriched Essential Amino Acids Augment Mixed Protein Synthesis, But Not Collagen Protein Synthesis, in Rat Skeletal Muscle after Downhill Running

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Hiromi; Inoue, Yoshiko; Suzuki, Katsuya; Kobayashi, Hisamine

    2016-01-01

    Mixed and collagen protein synthesis is elevated for as many as 3 days following exercise. Immediately after exercise, enhanced amino acid availability increases synthesis of mixed muscle protein, but not muscle collagen protein. However, the potential for synergic effects of amino acid ingestion with exercise on both mixed and collagen protein synthesis remains unclear. We investigated muscle collagen protein synthesis in rats following post-exercise ingestion of leucine-enriched essential amino acids. We determined fractional protein synthesis rates (FSR) at different time points following exercise. Mixed protein and collagen protein FSRs in skeletal muscle were determined by measuring protein-bound enrichments of hydroxyproline and proline, and by measuring the intracellular enrichment of proline, using injections of flooding d3-proline doses. A leucine-enriched mixture of essential amino acids (or distilled water as a control) was administrated 30 min or 1 day post-exercise. The collagen protein synthesis in the vastus lateralis was elevated for 2 days after exercise. Although amino acid administration did not increase muscle collagen protein synthesis, it did lead to augmented mixed muscle protein synthesis 1 day following exercise. Thus, contrary to the regulation of mixed muscle protein synthesis, muscle collagen protein synthesis is not affected by amino acid availability after damage-inducing exercise. PMID:27367725

  17. Renal Deletion of 12 kDa FK506-Binding Protein Attenuates Tacrolimus-Induced Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lazelle, Rebecca A; McCully, Belinda H; Terker, Andrew S; Himmerkus, Nina; Blankenstein, Katharina I; Mutig, Kerim; Bleich, Markus; Bachmann, Sebastian; Yang, Chao-Ling; Ellison, David H

    2016-05-01

    Tacrolimus is a widely used immunosuppressive drug that inhibits the phosphatase calcineurin when bound to the 12 kDa FK506-binding protein (FKBP12). When this binding occurs in T cells, it leads to immunosuppression. Tacrolimus also causes side effects, however, such as hypertension and hyperkalemia. Previously, we reported that tacrolimus stimulates the renal thiazide-sensitive sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC), which is necessary for the development of hypertension. However, it was unclear if tacrolimus-induced hypertension resulted from tacrolimus effects in renal epithelial cells directly or in extrarenal tissues, and whether inhibition of calcineurin was required. To address these questions, we developed a mouse model in which FKBP12 could be deleted along the nephron. FKBP12 disruption alone did not cause phenotypic effects. When treated with tacrolimus, however, BP and the renal abundance of phosphorylated NCC were lower in mice lacking FKBP12 along the nephron than in control mice. Mice lacking FKBP12 along the nephron also maintained a normal relationship between plasma potassium levels and the abundance of phosphorylated NCC with tacrolimus treatment. In cultured cells, tacrolimus inhibited dephosphorylation of NCC. Together, these results suggest that tacrolimus causes hypertension predominantly by inhibiting calcineurin directly in cells expressing NCC, indicating thiazide diuretics may be particularly effective for lowering BP in tacrolimus-treated patients with hypertension. PMID:26432904

  18. Glucose Synthesis in a Protein-Based Artificial Photosynthesis System.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hao; Yuan, Wenqiao; Zhou, Jack; Chong, Parkson Lee-Gau

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to understand glucose synthesis of a protein-based artificial photosynthesis system affected by operating conditions, including the concentrations of reactants, reaction temperature, and illumination. Results from non-vesicle-based glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (GAP) and glucose synthesis showed that the initial concentrations of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), lighting source, and temperature significantly affected glucose synthesis. Higher initial concentrations of RuBP and ATP significantly enhanced GAP synthesis, which was linearly correlated to glucose synthesis, confirming the proper functions of all catalyzing enzymes in the system. White fluorescent light inhibited artificial photosynthesis and reduced glucose synthesis by 79.2 % compared to in the dark. The reaction temperature of 40 °C was optimum, whereas lower or higher temperature reduced glucose synthesis. Glucose synthesis in the vesicle-based artificial photosynthesis system reconstituted with bacteriorhodopsin, F 0 F 1 ATP synthase, and polydimethylsiloxane-methyloxazoline-polydimethylsiloxane triblock copolymer was successfully demonstrated. This system efficiently utilized light-induced ATP to drive glucose synthesis, and 5.2 μg ml(-1) glucose was synthesized in 0.78-ml reaction buffer in 7 h. Light-dependent reactions were found to be the bottleneck of the studied artificial photosynthesis system. PMID:26170084

  19. Acetaldehyde inhibition of protein synthesis in isolated rat pancreatic acini

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, A.P.; Haiman, M.J.; Zylbert, B.A.; Billy, H.T.; Vesenka, G.D.; Geokas, M.C.

    1986-03-30

    Exposure of isolated dispersed pancreatic acini to increasing concentrations of ethanol (5 to 500 mM) or acetaldehyde (0.5 to 100 mM) produced a progressive inhibition of (3H)leucine incorporation into both cellular (those remaining in the cell) and secretory (those released into the medium) proteins. Whereas 500 mM ethanol caused 90-95% inhibition in the synthesis of cellular and secretory proteins, the concentration of acetaldehyde needed to produce a similar inhibition was found to be 50 mM. All subsequent experiments were performed with 12.5 mM acetaldehyde, a concentration that consistently inhibited acinar protein synthesis by about 50%. The acetaldehyde-mediated inhibition of acinar protein synthesis was partially normalized when this metabolite was removed after 30 min during a 90-min incubation period. In the presence of acetaldehyde, the secretion of 3H-pulse-labeled proteins, but not amylase, trypsinogen, or chymotrypsinogen, was greatly depressed. Acetaldehyde also caused a marked reduction in (3H)uridine incorporation into acinar RNA. The entry of (3H)uridine, (3H)leucine, and (3H)aminoisobutyric acid into isolated acini was found to be slightly (15-25%) decreased by acetaldehyde. It is concluded that acetaldehyde exerts a direct toxic effect on isolated dispersed pancreatic acini as evidenced by diminution of both protein and RNA synthesis and decreased secretion of the newly synthesized proteins. This inhibitory effect of acetaldehyde could be partially reversed.

  20. His6 tag-assisted chemical protein synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, Duhee; Kent, Stephen B. H.

    2005-04-01

    To make more practical the total chemical synthesis of proteins by the ligation of unprotected peptide building blocks, we have developed a method to facilitate the isolation and handling of intermediate products. The synthetic technique makes use of a His6 tag at the C terminus of the target polypeptide chain, introduced during the synthesis of the C-terminal peptide segment building block. The presence of a His6 tag enables the isolation of peptide or protein products directly from ligation reaction mixtures by Ni-NTA affinity column purification. This simple approach enables facile buffer exchange to alternate reaction conditions and is compatible with direct analytical control by protein MS of the multiple ligation steps involved in protein synthesis. We used syntheses of crambin and a modular tetratricopeptide repeat protein of 17 kDa as models to examine the utility of this affinity purification approach. The results show that His6 tag-assisted chemical protein synthesis is a useful method that substantially reduces handling losses and provides for rapid chemical protein syntheses. affinity purification | native chemical ligation

  1. Protein synthesis rates in atrophied gastrocnemius muscles after limb immobilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, K. R.; Seider, M. J.; Booth, F. W.

    1981-01-01

    Noting that protein synthesis declines in the gastrocnemius 6 hr after immobilization, the study sought to detect an increase of protein synthesis when the limb was freed, and to examine the effects of exercise on the rate of increase. Rats were used as subjects, with their hind legs in plaster of Paris in plantar flexion to eliminate strain on the gastrocnemius. Periods of immobilization were varied and samples of blood from the muscle were taken to track protein synthesis rates for different groups in immobilization and exercise regimens (running and weightlifting). Synthesis rates declined 3.6% during time in the cast, then increased 6.3%/day after the casts were removed. Both running and weightlifting were found to increase the fractional rate of protein formation in the gastrocnemius muscle when compared with contralateral muscles that were not exercised and were used as controls, suggesting that the mechanism controlling protein synthesis in skeletal muscles is rapidly responsive to changes in muscular contractile activity.

  2. Regulation of protein synthesis during sea urchin early development

    SciTech Connect

    Kelso, L.C.

    1989-01-01

    Fertilization of the sea urchin egg results in a 20-40 fold increase in the rate of protein synthesis. The masked message hypothesis proposes that mRNAs are masked or unavailable for translation in the egg. We devised an in vivo assay to test this hypothesis. Our results show that masked mRNAs limit protein synthesis in the unfertilized egg. In addition, we show that protein synthesis is also regulated at the level of translational machinery. Following fertilization is a period of rapid cell divisions. This period, known as the rapid cleavage stage, is characterized by the transient synthesis of a novel set of proteins. The synthesis of these proteins is programmed by maternal mRNAs stored in the unfertilized egg. To study the behavior of these mRNAs, we prepared a cDNA library from polysomal poly (A+) RNA from 2-hour embryos. ({sup 32}P) labeled probes, prepared from the cDNA library, were used to monitor the levels of individual mRNAs in polysomes at fertilization and during early development.

  3. Protective Immunity and Reduced Renal Colonization Induced by Vaccines Containing Recombinant Leptospira interrogans Outer Membrane Proteins and Flagellin Adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Monaris, D; Sbrogio-Almeida, M E; Dib, C C; Canhamero, T A; Souza, G O; Vasconcellos, S A; Ferreira, L C S; Abreu, P A E

    2015-08-01

    Leptospirosis is a global zoonotic disease caused by different Leptospira species, such as Leptospira interrogans, that colonize the renal tubules of wild and domestic animals. Thus far, attempts to develop effective leptospirosis vaccines, both for humans and animals, have failed to induce immune responses capable of conferring protection and simultaneously preventing renal colonization. In this study, we evaluated the protective immunity induced by subunit vaccines containing seven different recombinant Leptospira interrogans outer membrane proteins, including the carboxy-terminal portion of the immunoglobulinlike protein A (LigA(C)) and six novel antigens, combined with aluminum hydroxide (alum) or Salmonella flagellin (FliC) as adjuvants. Hamsters vaccinated with the different formulations elicited high antigen-specific antibody titers. Immunization with LigA(C), either with alum or flagellin, conferred protective immunity but did not prevent renal colonization. Similarly, animals immunized with LigA(C) or LigA(C) coadministered with six leptospiral proteins with alum adjuvant conferred protection but did not reduce renal colonization. In contrast, immunizing animals with the pool of seven antigens in combination with flagellin conferred protection and significantly reduced renal colonization by the pathogen. The present study emphasizes the relevance of antigen composition and added adjuvant in the efficacy of antileptospirosis subunit vaccines and shows the complex relationship between immune responses and renal colonization by the pathogen. PMID:26108285

  4. Protective Immunity and Reduced Renal Colonization Induced by Vaccines Containing Recombinant Leptospira interrogans Outer Membrane Proteins and Flagellin Adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Monaris, D.; Sbrogio-Almeida, M. E.; Dib, C. C.; Canhamero, T. A.; Souza, G. O.; Vasconcellos, S. A.; Ferreira, L. C. S.

    2015-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a global zoonotic disease caused by different Leptospira species, such as Leptospira interrogans, that colonize the renal tubules of wild and domestic animals. Thus far, attempts to develop effective leptospirosis vaccines, both for humans and animals, have failed to induce immune responses capable of conferring protection and simultaneously preventing renal colonization. In this study, we evaluated the protective immunity induced by subunit vaccines containing seven different recombinant Leptospira interrogans outer membrane proteins, including the carboxy-terminal portion of the immunoglobulinlike protein A (LigAC) and six novel antigens, combined with aluminum hydroxide (alum) or Salmonella flagellin (FliC) as adjuvants. Hamsters vaccinated with the different formulations elicited high antigen-specific antibody titers. Immunization with LigAC, either with alum or flagellin, conferred protective immunity but did not prevent renal colonization. Similarly, animals immunized with LigAC or LigAC coadministered with six leptospiral proteins with alum adjuvant conferred protection but did not reduce renal colonization. In contrast, immunizing animals with the pool of seven antigens in combination with flagellin conferred protection and significantly reduced renal colonization by the pathogen. The present study emphasizes the relevance of antigen composition and added adjuvant in the efficacy of antileptospirosis subunit vaccines and shows the complex relationship between immune responses and renal colonization by the pathogen. PMID:26108285

  5. Identification of Protein Markers Specific for Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma Using Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Na, Chan Hyun; Hong, Ji Hye; Kim, Wan Sup; Shanta, Selina Rahman; Bang, Joo Yong; Park, Dongmin; Kim, Hark Kyun; Kim, Kwang Pyo

    2015-01-01

    Since the emergence of proteomics methods, many proteins specific for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) have been identified. Despite their usefulness for the specific diagnosis of RCC, such proteins do not provide spatial information on the diseased tissue. Therefore, the identification of cancer-specific proteins that include information on their specific location is needed. Recently, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) based imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) has emerged as a new tool for the analysis of spatial distribution as well as identification of either proteins or small molecules in tissues. In this report, surgical tissue sections of papillary RCC were analyzed using MALDI-IMS. Statistical analysis revealed several discriminative cancer-specific m/z-species between normal and diseased tissues. Among these m/z-species, two particular proteins, S100A11 and ferritin light chain, which are specific for papillary RCC cancer regions, were successfully identified using LC-MS/MS following protein extraction from independent RCC samples. The expressions of S100A11 and ferritin light chain were further validated by immunohistochemistry of human tissues and tissue microarrays (TMAs) of RCC. In conclusion, MALDI-IMS followed by LC-MS/MS analysis in human tissue identified that S100A11 and ferritin light chain are differentially expressed proteins in papillary RCC cancer regions. PMID:26062552

  6. The Role of Protein Synthesis in the Senescence of Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Colin; Thimann, Kenneth V.

    1972-01-01

    The senescence of oat leaves has been studied by following the loss of chlorophyll and protein and the increase of α-amino nitrogen, after detachment and darkening. Protein synthesis and the amounts of proteolytic enzymes in the leaves have been determined directly. The process of senescence is shown to be a sequential one in which protein synthesis,most probably the formation of a proteolytic enzyme with l-serine in its active center, is of prime importance. The evidence is as follows. Firstly, l-serine specifically enhances senescence, especially in presence of kinetin. Secondly, cycloheximide, which inhibits protein synthesis in other systems, delays senescence and prevents the serine enhancement. Although requiring higher concentrations, cycloheximide can be as effective as kinetin in inhibiting senescence. It is shown directly that cycloheximide prevents protein synthesis in oat leaves under the same conditions as when it prevents senescence. Thirdly, leaves have been shown to contain two proteinases, with pH optima at 3 and 7.5, whose activity increases during senescence, even though the total leaf protein is decreasing. The amounts of both these enzymes present after 3 days are clearly increased by serine, and are greatly decreased by cycloheximide or by kinetin. The role of kinetin in delaying senescence thus may rest on its ability to suppress protease formation. PMID:16657898

  7. DNA Nanoparticles for Improved Protein Synthesis In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Galinis, Robertas; Stonyte, Greta; Kiseliovas, Vaidotas; Zilionis, Rapolas; Studer, Sabine; Hilvert, Donald; Janulaitis, Arvydas

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The amplification and digital quantification of single DNA molecules are important in biomedicine and diagnostics. Beyond quantifying DNA molecules in a sample, the ability to express proteins from the amplified DNA would open even broader applications in synthetic biology, directed evolution, and proteomics. Herein, a microfluidic approach is reported for the production of condensed DNA nanoparticles that can serve as efficient templates for in vitro protein synthesis. Using phi29 DNA polymerase and a multiple displacement amplification reaction, single DNA molecules were converted into DNA nanoparticles containing up to about 104 clonal gene copies of the starting template. DNA nanoparticle formation was triggered by accumulation of inorganic pyrophosphate (produced during DNA synthesis) and magnesium ions from the buffer. Transcription–translation reactions performed in vitro showed that individual DNA nanoparticles can serve as efficient templates for protein synthesis in vitro. PMID:26821778

  8. Prolonged inhibition of bacterial protein synthesis abolishes Salmonella invasion.

    PubMed Central

    MacBeth, K J; Lee, C A

    1993-01-01

    We have found that prolonged inhibition of bacterial protein synthesis abolishes the ability of Salmonella typhimurium to enter HEp-2 cells. Our results suggest that an essential invasion factor has a functional half-life that is seen as a gradual loss of invasiveness in the absence of protein synthesis. Therefore, Salmonella invasiveness appears to be a transient phenotype that is lost unless protein synthesis is maintained. This finding may explain why salmonellae grown to stationary phase lose their ability to enter cultured cells. In addition, a short-lived capacity to enter cells may be important during infection so that bacterial invasiveness is limited to certain times and host sites during pathogenesis. PMID:8454361

  9. Bacterial Protein Synthesis as a Target for Antibiotic Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Arenz, Stefan; Wilson, Daniel N

    2016-01-01

    Protein synthesis occurs on macromolecular machines, called ribosomes. Bacterial ribosomes and the translational machinery represent one of the major targets for antibiotics in the cell. Therefore, structural and biochemical investigations into ribosome-targeting antibiotics provide not only insight into the mechanism of action and resistance of antibiotics, but also insight into the fundamental process of protein synthesis. This review summarizes the recent advances in our understanding of protein synthesis, particularly with respect to X-ray and cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM) structures of ribosome complexes, and highlights the different steps of translation that are targeted by the diverse array of known antibiotics. Such findings will be important for the ongoing development of novel and improved antimicrobial agents to combat the rapid emergence of multidrug resistant pathogenic bacteria. PMID:27481773

  10. Quantifying elongation rhythm during full-length protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Rosenblum, Gabriel; Chen, Chunlai; Kaur, Jaskiran; Cui, Xiaonan; Zhang, Haibo; Asahara, Haruichi; Chong, Shaorong; Smilansky, Zeev; Goldman, Yale E; Cooperman, Barry S

    2013-07-31

    Pauses regulate the rhythm of ribosomal protein synthesis. Mutations disrupting even minor pauses can give rise to improperly formed proteins and human disease. Such minor pauses are difficult to characterize by ensemble methods, but can be readily examined by single-molecule (sm) approaches. Here we use smFRET to carry out real-time monitoring of the expression of a full-length protein, the green fluorescent protein variant Emerald GFP. We demonstrate significant correlations between measured elongation rates and codon and isoacceptor tRNA usage, and provide a quantitative estimate of the effect on elongation rate of replacing a codon recognizing an abundant tRNA with a synonymous codon cognate to a rarer tRNA. Our results suggest that tRNA selection plays an important general role in modulating the rates and rhythms of protein synthesis, potentially influencing simultaneous co-translational processes such as folding and chemical modification. PMID:23822614

  11. Selective memory generalization by spatial patterning of protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, Cian; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Protein synthesis is crucial for both persistent synaptic plasticity and long-term memory. De novo protein expression can be restricted to specific neurons within a population, and to specific dendrites within a single neuron. Despite its ubiquity, the functional benefits of spatial protein regulation for learning are unknown. We used computational modeling to study this problem. We found that spatially patterned protein synthesis can enable selective consolidation of some memories but forgetting of others, even for simultaneous events that are represented by the same neural population. Key factors regulating selectivity include the functional clustering of synapses on dendrites, and the sparsity and overlap of neural activity patterns at the circuit level. Based on these findings we proposed a novel two-step model for selective memory generalization during REM and slow-wave sleep. The pattern-matching framework we propose may be broadly applicable to spatial protein signaling throughout cortex and hippocampus. PMID:24742462

  12. Cyclin B synthesis and rapamycin-sensitive regulation of protein synthesis during starfish oocyte meiotic divisions.

    PubMed

    Lapasset, Laure; Pradet-Balade, Bérengère; Vergé, Valérie; Lozano, Jean-Claude; Oulhen, Nathalie; Cormier, Patrick; Peaucellier, Gérard

    2008-11-01

    Translation of cyclin mRNAs represents an important event for proper meiotic maturation and post-fertilization mitoses in many species. Translational control of cyclin B mRNA has been described to be achieved through two separate but related mechanisms: translational repression and polyadenylation. In this paper, we evaluated the contribution of global translational regulation by the cap-dependent translation repressor 4E-BP (eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein) on the cyclin B protein synthesis during meiotic maturation of the starfish oocytes. We used the immunosupressant drug rapamycin, a strong inhibitor of cap-dependent translation, to check for the involvement of this protein synthesis during this physiological process. Rapamycin was found to prevent dissociation of 4E-BP from the initiation factor eIF4E and to suppress correlatively a burst of global protein synthesis occurring at the G2/M transition. The drug had no effect on first meiotic division but defects in meiotic spindle formation prevented second polar body emission, demonstrating that a rapamycin-sensitive pathway is involved in this mechanism. While rapamycin affected the global protein synthesis, the drug altered neither the specific translation of cyclin B mRNA nor the expression of the Mos protein. The expression of these two proteins was correlated with the phosphorylation and the dissociation of the cytoplasmic polyadenylation element-binding protein from eIF4E. PMID:18361417

  13. Necrotizing Enterocolitis in a mouse model leads to widespread renal inflammation, acute kidney injury and disruption of renal tight junction proteins

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Parvesh M; Tatum, Rodney; Ravisankar, Srikanth; Shekhawat, Prem S; Chen, Yan-Hua

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a devastating condition affecting premature infants and leads to high mortality and chronic morbidity. Severe form of NEC is associated with acute renal failure, fluid imbalance, hyponatremia and acidosis. We investigated the effect of NEC on tight junction (TJ) proteins in kidneys using a NEC mouse model to investigate the basis for the observed renal dysfunction. METHODS NEC was induced in C57BL/6 mice by formula feeding and subjecting them to periods of hypoxia and cold stress. NEC was confirmed by gross and histological examination. We studied various markers of inflammation in kidneys and investigated changes in expression of several TJ proteins and AQP2 using immunofluorecent staining and Western blotting. RESULTS We found markedly increased expression of NFκB, TGFβ and ERK1/2 along with claudin-1, -2, -3, -4, -8 and AQP-2 in NEC kidneys. The membrane localization of claudin-2 was altered in the NEC kidneys and its immunostaining signal at TJ was disrupted. CONCLUSION NEC led to a severe inflammatory response not only in the gut but also the kidneys. NEC increased expression of several TJ proteins and caused disruption of claudin-2 in renal tubules. These observed changes can help explain some of the clinical findings observed in NEC. PMID:26270572

  14. Effects of Whey, Caseinate, or Milk Protein Ingestion on Muscle Protein Synthesis after Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Kanda, Atsushi; Nakayama, Kyosuke; Sanbongi, Chiaki; Nagata, Masashi; Ikegami, Shuji; Itoh, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Whey protein (WP) is characterized as a “fast” protein and caseinate (CA) as a “slow” protein according to their digestion and absorption rates. We hypothesized that co-ingestion of milk proteins (WP and CA) may be effective for prolonging the muscle protein synthesis response compared to either protein alone. We therefore compared the effect of ingesting milk protein (MP) to either WP or CA alone on muscle protein synthesis after exercise in rats. We also compared the effects of these milk-derived proteins to a control, soy protein (SP). Male Sprague-Dawley rats swam for two hours. Immediately after exercise, one of the following four solutions was administered: WP, CA, MP, or SP. Individual rats were euthanized at designated postprandial time points and triceps muscle samples collected for measurement of the protein fractional synthesis rate (FSR). FSR tended to increase in all groups post-ingestion, although the initial peaks of FSR occurred at different times (WP, peak time = 60 min, FSR = 7.76%/day; MP, peak time = 90 min, FSR = 8.34%/day; CA, peak time = 120 min, FSR = 7.85%/day). Milk-derived proteins caused significantly greater increases (p < 0.05) in FSR compared with SP at different times (WP, 60 min; MP, 90 and 120 min; CA, 120 min). Although statistical analysis could not be performed, the calculated the area under the curve (AUC) values for FSR following this trend were: MP, 534.61; CA, 498.22; WP, 473.46; and SP, 406.18. We conclude that ingestion of MP, CA or WP causes the initial peak time in muscle protein synthesis to occur at different times (WP, fast; MP, intermediate; CA, slow) and the dairy proteins have a superior effect on muscle protein synthesis after exercise compared with SP. PMID:27271661

  15. Effects of Whey, Caseinate, or Milk Protein Ingestion on Muscle Protein Synthesis after Exercise.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Atsushi; Nakayama, Kyosuke; Sanbongi, Chiaki; Nagata, Masashi; Ikegami, Shuji; Itoh, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Whey protein (WP) is characterized as a "fast" protein and caseinate (CA) as a "slow" protein according to their digestion and absorption rates. We hypothesized that co-ingestion of milk proteins (WP and CA) may be effective for prolonging the muscle protein synthesis response compared to either protein alone. We therefore compared the effect of ingesting milk protein (MP) to either WP or CA alone on muscle protein synthesis after exercise in rats. We also compared the effects of these milk-derived proteins to a control, soy protein (SP). Male Sprague-Dawley rats swam for two hours. Immediately after exercise, one of the following four solutions was administered: WP, CA, MP, or SP. Individual rats were euthanized at designated postprandial time points and triceps muscle samples collected for measurement of the protein fractional synthesis rate (FSR). FSR tended to increase in all groups post-ingestion, although the initial peaks of FSR occurred at different times (WP, peak time = 60 min, FSR = 7.76%/day; MP, peak time = 90 min, FSR = 8.34%/day; CA, peak time = 120 min, FSR = 7.85%/day). Milk-derived proteins caused significantly greater increases (p < 0.05) in FSR compared with SP at different times (WP, 60 min; MP, 90 and 120 min; CA, 120 min). Although statistical analysis could not be performed, the calculated the area under the curve (AUC) values for FSR following this trend were: MP, 534.61; CA, 498.22; WP, 473.46; and SP, 406.18. We conclude that ingestion of MP, CA or WP causes the initial peak time in muscle protein synthesis to occur at different times (WP, fast; MP, intermediate; CA, slow) and the dairy proteins have a superior effect on muscle protein synthesis after exercise compared with SP. PMID:27271661

  16. Cell-free protein synthesis and assembly on a biochip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyman, Yael; Buxboim, Amnon; Wolf, Sharon G.; Daube, Shirley S.; Bar-Ziv, Roy H.

    2012-06-01

    Biologically active complexes such as ribosomes and bacteriophages are formed through the self-assembly of proteins and nucleic acids. Recapitulating these biological self-assembly processes in a cell-free environment offers a way to develop synthetic biodevices. To visualize and understand the assembly process, a platform is required that enables simultaneous synthesis, assembly and imaging at the nanoscale. Here, we show that a silicon dioxide grid, used to support samples in transmission electron microscopy, can be modified into a biochip to combine in situ protein synthesis, assembly and imaging. Light is used to pattern the biochip surface with genes that encode specific proteins, and antibody traps that bind and assemble the nascent proteins. Using transmission electron microscopy imaging we show that protein nanotubes synthesized on the biochip surface in the presence of antibody traps efficiently assembled on these traps, but pre-assembled nanotubes were not effectively captured. Moreover, synthesis of green fluorescent protein from its immobilized gene generated a gradient of captured proteins decreasing in concentration away from the gene source. This biochip could be used to create spatial patterns of proteins assembled on surfaces.

  17. Protein profiling of microdomains purified from renal cell carcinoma and normal kidney tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Raimondo, F; Morosi, L; Chinello, C; Perego, R; Bianchi, C; Albo, G; Ferrero, S; Rocco, F; Magni, F; Pitto, M

    2012-04-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is representing about 3% of all adult cancers. A promising strategy for cancer biomarker discovery is subcellular comparative proteomics, allowing enriching specific cell compartments and assessing differences in protein expression patterns. We investigated the proteomic profile of a peculiar RCC subcellular compartment, plasma membrane microdomains (MD), involved in cell signalling, transport, proliferation and in many human diseases, such as cancer. Subcellular fractions were prepared by differential centrifugation from surgical samples of RCC and adjacent normal kidney (ANK). MD were isolated from plasma-membrane-enriched fractions after Triton X-100 treatment and sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation. MD derived from RCC and ANK tissues were analyzed after SDS-PAGE separation by LC-ESI-MS/MS. We identified 93 proteins from MD isolated from RCC tissue, and 98 proteins from ANK MD. About 70% of the identified proteins are membrane-associated and about half of these are known as microdomain-associated. GRAVY scores assignment shows that most identified proteins (about 70%) are in the hydrophobic range. We chose a panel of proteins to validate their differential expression by WB. In conclusion, our work shows that RCC microdomain proteome is reproducibly different from ANK, and suggests that mining into such differences may support new biomarker discovery. PMID:22159573

  18. Breviscapine prevents downregulation of renal water and sodium transport proteins in response to unilateral ureteral obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Yang; Yangyang, Zhuang; Shuai, Luo; Hao, Jin; Yirong, Yang; Yong, Cai; Peng, Xia; Bicheng, Chen; Yan, Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Our recent report indicates that breviscapine play a protective role of the kidney by down-regulating transforming growth factor-β1(TGF-β1), α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and alleviating interstitial fibrosis following unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO). In this study, we investigate the effect of breviscapine on changes of renal water and sodium transport proteins in response to UUO. Materials and Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 3 groups, sham group, UUO group and UUO treat with breviscapine. After 4, 7 and 14 days, histologic changes and interstitial collagen were determined microscopically following hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and Masson’s trichrome staining. The expression of Aquaporins (AQP-2) and γ-epithelial sodium channel (γ-ENaC) were investigated using immunohistochemistry and Western blot in each group. Results: Breviscapine treatment decrease the tubular injury index and the degree of interstitial collagen deposition significantly compared with the UUO group (P<0.05). Breviscapine treatment also significantly reduced downregulation of AQP2 and γ-ENaC compared to those subjected to the same time course of obstruction in UUO group (P<0.05). Conclusion: These results demonstrate that breviscapine could prevent downregulation of renal water and sodium transport proteins in response to UUO so as to protect obstructed kidney. PMID:27403265

  19. Overexpression of Csk-binding protein contributes to renal cell carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Feng, X; Lu, X; Man, X; Zhou, W; Jiang, L Q; Knyazev, P; Lei, L; Huang, Q; Ullrich, A; Zhang, Z; Chen, Z

    2009-09-17

    C-terminal Src kinase (Csk)-binding protein (Cbp) is a transmembrane adaptor protein that localizes exclusively in lipid rafts, where it regulates Src family kinase (SFK) activities through recruitment of Csk. Although SFKs are well known for their involvement in cancer, the function of Cbp in carcinogenesis remains largely unknown. In this study, we reported overexpression of Cbp in more than 70% of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) specimens and in the majority of tested RCC cell lines. Depletion of Cbp in RCC cells by RNA interference led to remarkable inhibition of cell proliferation, migration, anchorage-independent growth as well as tumorigenicity in nude mice. Strikingly, silencing of Cbp negatively affected the sustaining of Erk1/2 activation but not c-Src activation induced by serum. Besides, the RhoA activity in RCC cells was remarkably impaired when Cbp was knocked down. Overexpression of wild-type Cbp, but not its mutant Cbp/DeltaCP lacking C-terminal PDZ-binding motif, significantly enhanced RhoA activation and cell migration of RCC cells. These results provided new insights into the function of Cbp in modulating RhoA activation, by which Cbp might contribute to renal cell carcinogenesis. PMID:19581936

  20. Effect of Ramipril on Urinary Protein Excretion in Maintenance Renal Transplant Patients Converted to Sirolimus.

    PubMed

    Mandelbrot, D A; Alberú, J; Barama, A; Marder, B A; Silva, H T; Flechner, S M; Flynn, A; Healy, C; Li, H; Tortorici, M A; Schulman, S L

    2015-12-01

    This prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study evaluated the effects of ramipril on urinary protein excretion in renal transplant patients treated with sirolimus following conversion from a calcineurin inhibitor. Patients received ramipril or placebo for up to 6 weeks before conversion and 52 weeks thereafter. Doses were increased if patients developed proteinuria (urinary protein/creatinine ratio ≥0.5); losartan was given as rescue therapy for persistent proteinuria. The primary end point was time to losartan initiation. Of 295 patients randomized, 264 met the criteria for sirolimus conversion (ramipril, 138; placebo, 126). At 52 weeks, the cumulative rate of losartan initiation was significantly lower with ramipril (6.2%) versus placebo (23.2%) (p < 0.001). No significant differences were observed between ramipril and placebo for change in glomerular filtration rate from baseline (p = 0.148) or in the number of patients with biopsy-confirmed acute rejection (13 vs. 5, respectively; p = 0.073). One patient in the placebo group died due to cerebrovascular accident. Treatment-emergent adverse events were consistent with the known safety profile of sirolimus and were not potentiated by ramipril co-administration. Ramipril was effective in reducing the incidence of proteinuria for up to 1 year following conversion to sirolimus in maintenance renal transplant patients. PMID:26176342

  1. Semi-synthesis of labeled proteins for spectroscopic applications.

    PubMed

    De Rosa, Lucia; Russomanno, Anna; Romanelli, Alessandra; D'Andrea, Luca Domenico

    2013-01-01

    Since the introduction of SPPS by Merrifield in the 60s, peptide chemists have considered the possibility of preparing large proteins. The introduction of native chemical ligation in the 90s and then of expressed protein ligation have opened the way to the preparation of synthetic proteins without size limitations. This review focuses on semi-synthetic strategies useful to prepare proteins decorated with spectroscopic probes, like fluorescent labels and stable isotopes, and their biophysical applications. We show that expressed protein ligation, combining the advantages of organic chemistry with the easy and size limitless recombinant protein expression, is an excellent strategy for the chemical synthesis of labeled proteins, enabling a single protein to be functionalized at one or even more distinct positions with different probes. PMID:23282535

  2. FGF23 inhibits extra-renal synthesis of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D in human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bacchetta, Justine; Sea, Jessica L; Chun, Rene F; Lisse, Thomas S; Wesseling-Perry, Katherine; Gales, Barbara; Adams, John S.; Salusky, Isidro B; Hewison, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin D is a potent stimulator of monocyte innate immunity, with this effect being mediated via intracrine conversion of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D). In the kidney synthesis of 1,25(OH)2D is suppressed by fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), via transcriptional suppression of the vitamin D-activating enzyme 1α-hydroxylase (CYP27B1). We hypothesized that FGF23 also suppresses CYP27B1 in monocytes, with concomitant effects on intracrine responses to 1,25(OH)2D. Monocytes from healthy donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCm) and from peritoneal dialysate effluent from kidney disease patients (PDm) were assessed at baseline to confirm the presence of mRNA for FGF23 receptors (FGFRs), with Klotho and FGFR1 being more strongly expressed than FGFR2/3/4 in both cell types. Immunohistochemistry showed co-expression of Klotho and FGFR1 in PBMCm and PDm, with this effect being enhanced following treatment with FGF23 in PBMCm but not PDm. Treatment with FGF23 activated MAP kinase (MAPK) and Akt pathways in PBMCm, demonstrating functional FGFR signaling in these cells. FGF23 treatment of PBMCm and PDm decreased expression of mRNA for CYP27B1. In PBMCm this was associated with downregulation of 25OHD to 1,25(OH)2D metabolism, and concomitant suppression of intracrine induced 24-hydroxylase (CYP24A1) and antibacterial cathelicidin (LL37). FGF23 suppression of CYP27B1 was particularly pronounced in PBMCm treated with interleukin-15 to stimulate synthesis of 1,25(OH)2D. These data indicate that FGF23 can inhibit extra-renal expression of CYP27B1 and subsequent intracrine responses to 1,25(OH)2D in two different human monocyte models. Elevated expression of FGF23 may therefore play a crucial role in defining immune responses to vitamin D and this, in turn, may be a key determinant of infection in patients with CKD. PMID:22886720

  3. Thyroid hormone stimulation of plasma protein synthesis in cultured hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Hertzberg, K M; Pindyck, J; Mosesson, M W; Grieninger, G

    1981-01-25

    The direct effect of thyroid hormones on hepatocellular plasma protein synthesis has been studied in primary monolayer cultures derived from chick embryo liver. The chemically defined medium used for plating and maintaining the cultures contained no other hormones, protein, or serum supplement. Addition of physiological concentrations (10 nM) of triiodothyronine or thyroxine produced 3-fold or greater increases in the rates of synthesis of fibrinogen and three other major secreted proteins. By comparison albumin, transferrin, and total protein synthesis were not substantially increased. The enhanced synthesis of selected plasma proteins could be detected 6 h after initial addition of triiodothyronine. Exposure of the cells to the hormone for only 30 min was nearly as effective as continuous exposure in eliciting the ultimate response. Triiodothyronine exerted its half-maximal effect at a concentration of 1 nM. Diminished potency was associated with less iodination of the hormone; a marked reduction was noted with di-iodinated thyronine and no stimulatory activity at all with either mono- or non-iodinated thyronine. PMID:7451459

  4. Insulin accelerates global and mitochondrial protein synthesis rates in neonatal muscle during sepsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In neonatal pigs, sepsis decreases protein synthesis in skeletal muscle by decreasing translation initiation. However, insulin stimulates muscle protein synthesis despite persistent repression of translation initiation signaling. To determine whether the insulin-induced increase in global rates of m...

  5. A Working Model of Protein Synthesis Using Lego(TM) Building Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Templin, Mark A.; Fetters, Marcia K.

    2002-01-01

    Uses Lego building blocks to improve the effectiveness of teaching about protein synthesis. Provides diagrams and pictures for a 2-3 day student activity. Discusses mRNA, transfer RNA, and a protein synthesis model. (MVL)

  6. Dibromosulphophthalein: its pharmacokinetics and binding to hepatic cytosol proteins in rats with acute renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Silberstein, D. J.; Bowmer, C. J.; Yates, M. S.

    1988-01-01

    1. The pharmacokinetics, biliary excretion and binding of dibromosulphophthalein (DBSP) to plasma proteins and hepatic cytosol proteins have been studied in male rats with glycerol-induced acute renal failure (ARF). 2. The rate constants for hepatic uptake, efflux from liver to plasma and excretion into bile were all significantly decreased in rats with ARF. Furthermore, the plasma clearance of DBSP was also reduced. 3. The initial (0-10 min) and maximum biliary excretion rates of DBSP were both diminished in animals with ARF. The maximum excretion rate occurred between 5-10 min in control rats and 10-15 min in rats with ARF. However, there was no statistically significant change in the percentage dose recovered from bile after 30 min. 4. The plasma-protein binding of DBSP was decreased in rats with ARF and this change was due to a significant reduction in the association constant for the primary binding sites. 5. The binding of DBSP to ligandin (Y protein) was reduced by about 38% in rats with ARF but no change was noted in binding to Z protein. Reduced binding to ligandin was accompanied by decreased total liver glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity and a 36% reduction in the GST activity of ligandin. 6. The results support the contention that altered hepatic handling of cholephilic dyes in rats with ARF may be due to reduced binding to ligandin. PMID:3228667

  7. Tinkering with Translation: Protein Synthesis in Virus-Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Derek; Mathews, Michael B.; Mohr, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Viruses are obligate intracellular parasites, and their replication requires host cell functions. Although the size, composition, complexity, and functions encoded by their genomes are remarkably diverse, all viruses rely absolutely on the protein synthesis machinery of their host cells. Lacking their own translational apparatus, they must recruit cellular ribosomes in order to translate viral mRNAs and produce the protein products required for their replication. In addition, there are other constraints on viral protein production. Crucially, host innate defenses and stress responses capable of inactivating the translation machinery must be effectively neutralized. Furthermore, the limited coding capacity of the viral genome needs to be used optimally. These demands have resulted in complex interactions between virus and host that exploit ostensibly virus-specific mechanisms and, at the same time, illuminate the functioning of the cellular protein synthesis apparatus. PMID:23209131

  8. Steroid-induced protein synthesis in giant-toad (Bufo marinus) urinary bladders. Correlation with natriferic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Geheb, M; Alvis, R; Owen, A; Hercker, E; Cox, M

    1984-01-01

    We have identified a group of proteins (Mr approximately 70 000-80 000; pI approximately 5.5-6.0) in giant-toad (Bufo marinus) urinary bladders whose synthesis appears to be related to aldosterone-stimulated Na+ transport. Spironolactone, a specific mineralocorticoid antagonist in renal epithelia, inhibits the synthesis of these proteins as well as the natriferic effect of the hormone. Since a variety of other steroids (some of which are traditionally considered to be glucocorticoids) also stimulate Na+ transport in toad urinary bladders, we examined whether their natriferic activity was expressed in a fashion similar to that of aldosterone. Short-circuit current was used to measure Na+ transport, and epithelial-cell protein synthesis was detected with high-resolution two-dimensional polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. At a concentration of approximately 100 nM, dexamethasone, corticosterone and aldosterone were equinatriferic. Dexamethasone and aldosterone had identical dose-response curves, maximal and half-maximal activity being evident at concentrations of approximately 100 nM and 10 nM respectively. In contrast, at a concentration of approximately 10 nM, corticosterone had no effect on Na+ transport. The natriferic activities of these three steroids correlate with their known affinities for the putative mineralocorticoid receptor in toad urinary bladders. Natriferic concentrations of dexamethasone and corticosterone (140 nM) induced the synthesis of proteins with characteristics identical with those induced by aldosterone. Spironolactone, at an antagonist/agonist ratio of 2000:1, inhibited steroid-induced Na+ transport and the synthesis of these proteins. Thus it appears that all natriferic steroids share a common mechanism of action in toad urinary bladders. Natriferic activity can be correlated not only with relative steroid-receptor affinity but also with the induction of a specific group of epithelial-cell proteins. Images Fig. 1. Fig

  9. Monomeric C-reactive protein inhibits renal cell-directed complement activation mediated by properdin.

    PubMed

    O'Flynn, Joseph; van der Pol, Pieter; Dixon, Karen O; Prohászka, Zoltán; Daha, Mohamed R; van Kooten, Cees

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that complement activation on renal tubular cells is involved in the induction of interstitial fibrosis and cellular injury. Evidence suggests that the tubular cell damage is initiated by the alternative pathway (AP) of complement with properdin having an instrumental role. Properdin is a positive regulator of the AP, which can bind necrotic cells as well as viable proximal tubular epithelial cells (PTECs), inducing complement activation. Various studies have indicated that in the circulation there is an unidentified inhibitor of properdin. We investigated the ability of C-reactive protein (CRP), both in its monomeric (mCRP) and pentameric (pCRP) form, to inhibit AP activation and injury in vitro on renal tubular cells by fluorescent microscopy, ELISA, and flow cytometry. We demonstrated that preincubation of properdin with normal human serum inhibits properdin binding to viable PTECs. We identified mCRP as a factor able to bind to properdin in solution, thereby inhibiting its binding to PTECs. In contrast, pCRP exhibited no such binding and inhibitory effect. Furthermore, mCRP was able to inhibit properdin-directed C3 and C5b-9 deposition on viable PTECs. The inhibitory ability of mCRP was not unique for viable cells but also demonstrated for binding to necrotic Jurkat cells, a target for properdin binding and complement activation. In summary, mCRP is an inhibitor of properdin in both binding to necrotic cells and viable renal cells, regulating complement activation on the cell surface. We propose that mCRP limits amplification of tissue injury by controlling properdin-directed complement activation by damaged tissue and cells. PMID:26984957

  10. Involvement of Cyclic Guanosine Monophosphate-Dependent Protein Kinase I in Renal Antifibrotic Effects of Serelaxin

    PubMed Central

    Wetzl, Veronika; Schinner, Elisabeth; Kees, Frieder; Hofmann, Franz; Faerber, Lothar; Schlossmann, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Kidney fibrosis has shown to be ameliorated through the involvement of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and its dependent protein kinase I (cGKI). Serelaxin, the recombinant form of human relaxin-II, increases cGMP levels and has shown beneficial effects on kidney function in acute heart failure patients. Antifibrotic properties of serelaxin are supposed to be mediated via relaxin family peptide receptor 1 and subsequently enhanced nitric oxide/cGMP to inhibit transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling. This study examines the involvement of cGKI in the antifibrotic signaling of serelaxin. Methods and Results: Kidney fibrosis was induced by unilateral ureteral obstruction in wildtype (WT) and cGKI knock-out (KO) mice. After 7 days, renal antifibrotic effects of serelaxin were assessed. Serelaxin treatment for 7 days significantly increased cGMP in the kidney of WT and cGKI-KO. In WT, renal fibrosis was reduced through decreased accumulation of collagen1A1, total collagen, and fibronectin. The profibrotic connective tissue growth factor as well as myofibroblast differentiation were reduced and matrix metalloproteinases-2 and -9 were positively modulated after treatment. Moreover, Smad2 as well as extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (ERK1) phosphorylation were decreased, whereas phosphodiesterase (PDE) 5a phosphorylation was increased. However, these effects were not observed in cGKI-KO. Conclusion: Antifibrotic renal effects of serelaxin are mediated via cGMP/cGKI to inhibit Smad2- and ERK1-dependent TGF-β signaling and increased PDE5a phosphorylation. PMID:27462268

  11. The Development of an Interactive Videodisc Program on Protein Synthesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazan, Charlene Corey

    An interactive videodisk (IVD) program was developed to reinforce learning of the biological concept of protein synthesis for high school students. The laser videodisc "The Living Textbook Life Science" was the source of frames, and the authoring system of G. Smith was used to create the disc. The interactive program was designed to make the…

  12. Protein Synthesis Inhibition Blocks Consolidation of an Acrobatic Motor Skill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaelin-Lang, Alain; Dichgans, Johannes; Schulz, Jorg B.; Luft, Andreas R.; Buitrago, Manuel M.

    2004-01-01

    To investigate whether motor skill learning depends on de novo protein synthesis, adult rats were trained in an acrobatic locomotor task (accelerating rotarod) for 7 d. Animals were systemically injected with cycloheximide (CHX, 0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) 1 h before sessions 1 and 2 or sessions 2 and 3. Control rats received vehicle injections before…

  13. Leucine acts as a nutrient signal to stimulate protein synthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The postprandial rise in amino acids and insulin independently stimulates protein synthesis in skeletal muscle of piglets. Leucine is an important mediator of the response to amino acids. We have shown that the postprandial rise in leucine, but not isoleucine or valine, acutely stimulates muscle pro...

  14. The Teaching of Protein Synthesis--A Microcomputer Based Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodridge, Frank

    1983-01-01

    Describes two computer programs (BASIC for 32K Commodore PET) for teaching protein synthesis. The first is an interactive test of base-pairing knowledge, and the second generates random DNA nucleotide sequences, with instructions for substitution, insertion, and deletion printed out for each student. (JN)

  15. Problem-Solving Test: The Mechanism of Protein Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2009-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: protein synthesis, ribosomes, amino acids, peptides, peptide bond, polypeptide chain, N- and C-terminus, hemoglobin, [alpha]- and [beta]-globin chains, radioactive labeling, [[to the third power]H] and [[to the fourteenth power]C]leucine, cytosol, differential centrifugation, density…

  16. PBRM1 (BAF180) protein is functionally regulated by p53-induced protein degradation in renal cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Macher-Goeppinger, Stephan; Keith, Martina; Tagscherer, Katrin E; Singer, Stephan; Winkler, Juliane; Hofmann, Thomas G; Pahernik, Sascha; Duensing, Stefan; Hohenfellner, Markus; Kopitz, Juergen; Schirmacher, Peter; Roth, Wilfried

    2015-12-01

    About 40% of clear-cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCC) harbour mutations in Polybromo-1 (PBRM1), encoding the BAF180 subunit of a SWI/SNF chromatin remodelling complex. This qualifies PBRM1 as a major cancer gene in ccRCC. The PBRM1 protein alters chromatin structure and its known functions include transcriptional regulation by controlling the accessibility of DNA and influencing p53 transcriptional activity. Since little is known about the regulation of PBRM1, we studied possible mechanisms and interaction partners involved in the regulation of PBRM1 expression. Activation of p53 in RCC cells resulted in a marked decrease of PBRM1 protein levels. This effect was abolished by siRNA-mediated down-regulation of p53, and transcriptional activity was not crucial for p53-dependent PBRM1 regulation. Pulse-chase experiments determined post-translational protein degradation to be the underlying mechanism for p53-dependent PBRM1 regulation, which was accordingly inhibited by proteasome inhibitors. The effects of p53 activation on PBRM1 expression were confirmed in RCC tissue ex vivo. Our results demonstrate that PBRM1 is a target of p53-induced proteasomal protein degradation and provide further evidence for the influence of PBRM1 on p53 function in RCC tumour cells. Considering the paramount role of p53 in carcinogenesis and the presumptive impact of PBRM1 in RCC development, this novel regulation mechanism might be therapeutically exploited in the future. PMID:26178300

  17. AMINO ACIDS AUGMENT MUSCLE PROTEIN SYNTHESIS IN NEONATAL PIGS DURING ENDOTOXEMIA BY MODULATING TRANSLATION INITIATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In adults, sepsis reduces protein synthesis in skeletal muscle by restraining translation. The effect of sepsis on amino acid-stimulated muscle protein synthesis has not been determined in neonates, a population who is highly anabolic and whose muscle protein synthesis rates are uniquely sensitive ...

  18. Enhanced skeletal muscle protein synthesis rates in pigs treated with somatotropin requires fed amino acids levels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic somatotropin (pST) treatment in pigs increases skeletal muscle protein synthesis and circulating insulin, a known promoter of protein synthesis. Previously, we showed that the pST-mediated rise in insulin alone could not account for the pST-induced increase in protein synthesis. This study...

  19. Dietary protein distribution positively influences 24-h muscle protein synthesis in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Mamerow, Madonna M; Mettler, Joni A; English, Kirk L; Casperson, Shanon L; Arentson-Lantz, Emily; Sheffield-Moore, Melinda; Layman, Donald K; Paddon-Jones, Douglas

    2014-06-01

    The RDA for protein describes the quantity that should be consumed daily to meet population needs and to prevent deficiency. Protein consumption in many countries exceeds the RDA; however, intake is often skewed toward the evening meal, whereas breakfast is typically carbohydrate rich and low in protein. We examined the effects of protein distribution on 24-h skeletal muscle protein synthesis in healthy adult men and women (n = 8; age: 36.9 ± 3.1 y; BMI: 25.7 ± 0.8 kg/m2). By using a 7-d crossover feeding design with a 30-d washout period, we measured changes in muscle protein synthesis in response to isoenergetic and isonitrogenous diets with protein at breakfast, lunch, and dinner distributed evenly (EVEN; 31.5 ± 1.3, 29.9 ± 1.6, and 32.7 ± 1.6 g protein, respectively) or skewed (SKEW; 10.7 ± 0.8, 16.0 ± 0.5, and 63.4 ± 3.7 g protein, respectively). Over 24-h periods on days 1 and 7, venous blood samples and vastus lateralis muscle biopsy samples were obtained during primed (2.0 μmol/kg) constant infusion [0.06 μmol/(kg⋅min)] of l-[ring-(13)C6]phenylalanine. The 24-h mixed muscle protein fractional synthesis rate was 25% higher in the EVEN (0.075 ± 0.006%/h) vs. the SKEW (0.056 ± 0.006%/h) protein distribution groups (P = 0.003). This pattern was maintained after 7 d of habituation to each diet (EVEN vs. SKEW: 0.077 ± 0.006 vs. 0.056 ± 0.006%/h; P = 0.001). The consumption of a moderate amount of protein at each meal stimulated 24-h muscle protein synthesis more effectively than skewing protein intake toward the evening meal. PMID:24477298

  20. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) and IGF binding protein gene expression in multicystic renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Matsell, D G; Bennett, T; Armstrong, R A; Goodyer, P; Goodyer, C; Han, V K

    1997-01-01

    Multicystic dysplastic kidney disease is the most common form of renal dysplasia that leads to ESRD in children. This study describes the histopathological changes of multicystic dysplasia that occur from early fetal life to the postnatal period. At 14 wk gestation, early cystic enlargement of various segments of the nephron have been identified, in addition to a displaced metanephric blastema adjacent to zones of normal nephrogenesis. At later stages, the predominant features include cyst enlargement with marked fibromuscular collars, architectural disorganization, and replacement of the interstitium with a disarray of mesenchymal tissue. This study investigated the expression of the mRNA encoding the insulin-like growth factors (IGF) and IGF binding proteins (IGFBP) and have demonstrated IGF-II, IGFBP-2, and IGFBP-3 to be altered. Apart from their expression in the displaced metanephric blastema, both IGF-II and IGFBP-2 were overexpressed in abnormal tissue elements in all kidneys from fetal to postnatal life. IGF-II gene expression was localized to mesenchymal tissue, specifically in the periductal fibromuscular collars. IGFBP-2 mRNA was found to be expressed exclusively in the cyst epithelia of all cysts at all ages studied, whereas IGFBP-3 mRNA was absent from these epithelia. This study details the failure of normal IGF expression in the development of multicystic renal dysplasia and suggests a role for the IGF system in the progressive histopathological changes of this disorder. PMID:9013452

  1. An oxygen-regulated switch in the protein synthesis machinery

    PubMed Central

    Uniacke, James; Holterman, Chet E.; Lachance, Gabriel; Franovic, Aleksandra; Jacob, Mathieu D.; Fabian, Marc R.; Payette, Josianne; Holcik, Martin; Pause, Arnim; Lee, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Protein synthesis involves the translation of ribonucleic acid information into proteins, the building blocks of life. The initial step of protein synthesis consists of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) binding to the 7-methylguanosine (m7-GpppG) 5′cap of mRNAs1,2. Low oxygen tension (hypoxia) represses cap-mediated translation by sequestering eIF4E through mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-dependent mechanisms3–6. While the internal ribosome entry site is an alternative translation initiation mechanism, this pathway alone cannot account for the translational capacity of hypoxic cells7,8. This raises a fundamental question in biology as to how proteins are synthesized in periods of oxygen scarcity and eIF4E inhibition9. Here, we uncover an oxygen-regulated translation initiation complex that mediates selective cap-dependent protein synthesis. Hypoxia stimulates the formation of a complex that includes the oxygen-regulated hypoxia-inducible factor 2α (HIF-2α), the RNA binding protein RBM4 and the cap-binding eIF4E2, an eIF4E homologue. PAR-CLIP10 analysis identified an RNA hypoxia response element (rHRE) that recruits this complex to a wide array mRNAs, including the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Once assembled at the rHRE, HIF-2α/RBM4/eIF4E2 captures the 5′cap and targets mRNAs to polysomes for active translation thereby evading hypoxia-induced repression of protein synthesis. These findings demonstrate that cells have evolved a program whereby oxygen tension switches the basic translation initiation machinery. PMID:22678294

  2. Deficiency for the Chemokine Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 Aggravates Tubular Damage after Renal Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Stroo, Ingrid; Claessen, Nike; Teske, Gwendoline J. D.; Butter, Loes M.; Florquin, Sandrine; Leemans, Jaklien C.

    2015-01-01

    Temporal expression of chemokines is a crucial factor in the regulation of renal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury and repair. Beside their role in the migration and activation of inflammatory cells to sites of injury, chemokines are also involved in other processes such as angiogenesis, development and migration of stem cells. In the present study we investigated the role of the chemokine MCP-1 (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 or CCL2), the main chemoattractant for monocytes, during renal I/R injury. MCP-1 expression peaks several days after inducing renal I/R injury coinciding with macrophage accumulation. However, MCP-1 deficient mice had a significant decreased survival and increased renal damage within the first two days, i.e. the acute inflammatory response, after renal I/R injury with no evidence of altered macrophage accumulation. Kidneys and primary tubular epithelial cells from MCP-1 deficient mice showed increased apoptosis after ischemia. Taken together, MCP-1 protects the kidney during the acute inflammatory response following renal I/R injury. PMID:25875776

  3. Immunoassay of urinary retinol binding protein as a putative renal marker in cats.

    PubMed

    van Hoek, Ingrid; Daminet, Sylvie; Notebaert, Sofie; Janssens, Isabel; Meyer, Evelyne

    2008-01-01

    The presence of low molecular weight retinol binding protein (RBP) in urine reflects tubular damage. Therefore, RBP has been used as a renal marker in humans and dogs. Using an anti-human RBP antibody (Ab), this study first demonstrates feline urinary RBP by Western blot analysis and then evaluates its potential as a renal marker in cats by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Urine was taken by cystocentesis, centrifuged and stored at -80 degrees C until analysis. Urinary RBP levels were compared in clinically healthy cats (H), chronic renal failure patients (CRF) and cats with hyperthyroidism (HT). The detection of a band at the same position as the human RBP standard with Western blot analysis, indicated that RBP was present in the urine of CRF and HT patients but minimally present in H cats. The data obtained with ELISA were in accordance with these observations. RBP levels were expressed as RBP:creatinine (RBP:c) ratios following normalisation with urinary creatinine. The functional assay sensitivity was 1.37 microg/l RBP. Parallelism between the trend lines of the human RBP standard curve and the curves obtained from sequentially diluted urine samples indicated that feline RBP was recovered. The mean intra-assay coefficient of variance was 7% and the standardised agreement index revealed satisfactory day-to-day repeatability. The RBP:c ratio in all H cats (n=10) was below the assay sensitivity. The groups of CRF and HT patients had increased mean RBP:c ratios of 1.6+/-0.5x10(-2) microg/mg (mean+/-SEM, n=10) and 1.4+/-0.4x10(-2) microg/mg (n=13), respectively. Both groups showed a large variation in the relative RBP concentrations of individual cats. In conclusion, RBP is demonstrated for the first time in urine from most CRF and HT patients and the validated ELISA allows its evaluation as a putative renal marker in cats. PMID:17996888

  4. C-reactive protein exacerbates renal ischemia-reperfusion injury: are myeloid-derived suppressor cells to blame?

    PubMed

    Pegues, Melissa A; McWilliams, Ian L; Szalai, Alexander J

    2016-07-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a CD11b(+)Gr1(+) population in mice that can be separated into granulocytic (g-MDSC) and monocytic (m-MDSC) subtypes based on their expression of Ly6G and Ly6C. Both MDSC subtypes are potent suppressors of T cell immunity, and their contribution has been investigated in a plethora of diseases including renal cancer, renal transplant, and chronic kidney disease. Whether MDSCs contribute to the pathogenesis of acute kidney injury (AKI) remains unknown. Herein, using human C-reactive protein (CRP) transgenic (CRPtg) and CRP-deficient mice (CRP(-/-)) subjected to bilateral renal ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI), we confirm our earlier finding that CRP exacerbates renal IRI and show for the first time that this effect is accompanied in CRPtg mice by a shift in the balance of kidney-infiltrating MDSCs toward a suppressive Ly6G(+)Ly6C(low) g-MDSC subtype. In CRPtg mice, direct depletion of g-MDSCs (using an anti-Gr1 monoclonal antibody) reduced the albuminuria caused by renal IRI, confirming they play a deleterious role. Remarkably, treatment of CRPtg mice with an antisense oligonucleotide that specifically blocks the human CRP acute-phase response also led to a reduction in renal g-MDSC numbers and improved albuminuria after renal IRI. Our study in CRPtg mice provides new evidence that MDSCs participate in the pathogenesis of renal IRI and shows that their pharmacological depletion is beneficial. If ongoing investigations confirm that CRP is an endogenous regulator of MDSCs in CRPtg mice, and if this action is recapitulated in humans, then targeting CRP or/and MDSCs might offer a new approach for the treatment of AKI. PMID:27053688

  5. Transcriptional regulation of decreased protein synthesis during skeletal muscle unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, G.; Steffen, J. M.; Geoghegan, T. E.

    1989-01-01

    The regulatory role of transcriptional alterations in unloaded skeletal muscles was investigated by determining levels of total muscle RNA and mRNA fractions in soleus, gastrocnemius, and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) of rats subjected to whole-body suspension for up to 7 days. After 7 days, total RNA and mRNA contents were lower in soleus and gastrocnemius, compared with controls, but the concentrations of both RNAs per g muscle were unaltered. Alpha-actin mRNA (assessed by dot hybridization) was significantly reduced in soleus after 1, 3, and 7 days of suspension and in gastrocnemius after 3 and 7 days, but was unchanged in EDL. Protein synthesis directed by RNA extracted from soleus and EDL indicated marked alteration in mRNAs coding for several small proteins. Results suggest that altered transcription and availability of specific mRNAs contribute significantly to the regulation of protein synthesis during skeletal muscle unloading.

  6. The Role of the Renal Ammonia Transporter Rhcg in Metabolic Responses to Dietary Protein

    PubMed Central

    Bounoure, Lisa; Ruffoni, Davide; Müller, Ralph; Kuhn, Gisela Anna; Devuyst, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    High dietary protein imposes a metabolic acid load requiring excretion and buffering by the kidney. Impaired acid excretion in CKD, with potential metabolic acidosis, may contribute to the progression of CKD. Here, we investigated the renal adaptive response of acid excretory pathways in mice to high-protein diets containing normal or low amounts of acid-producing sulfur amino acids (SAA) and examined how this adaption requires the RhCG ammonia transporter. Diets rich in SAA stimulated expression of enzymes and transporters involved in mediating NH4+ reabsorption in the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle. The SAA-rich diet increased diuresis paralleled by downregulation of aquaporin-2 (AQP2) water channels. The absence of Rhcg transiently reduced NH4+ excretion, stimulated the ammoniagenic pathway more strongly, and further enhanced diuresis by exacerbating the downregulation of the Na+/K+/2Cl− cotransporter (NKCC2) and AQP2, with less phosphorylation of AQP2 at serine 256. The high protein acid load affected bone turnover, as indicated by higher Ca2+ and deoxypyridinoline excretion, phenomena exaggerated in the absence of Rhcg. In animals receiving a high-protein diet with low SAA content, the kidney excreted alkaline urine, with low levels of NH4+ and no change in bone metabolism. Thus, the acid load associated with high-protein diets causes a concerted response of various nephron segments to excrete acid, mostly in the form of NH4+, that requires Rhcg. Furthermore, bone metabolism is altered by a high-protein acidogenic diet, presumably to buffer the acid load. PMID:24652796

  7. Ribosomal History Reveals Origins of Modern Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Harish, Ajith; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    The origin and evolution of the ribosome is central to our understanding of the cellular world. Most hypotheses posit that the ribosome originated in the peptidyl transferase center of the large ribosomal subunit. However, these proposals do not link protein synthesis to RNA recognition and do not use a phylogenetic comparative framework to study ribosomal evolution. Here we infer evolution of the structural components of the ribosome. Phylogenetic methods widely used in morphometrics are applied directly to RNA structures of thousands of molecules and to a census of protein structures in hundreds of genomes. We find that components of the small subunit involved in ribosomal processivity evolved earlier than the catalytic peptidyl transferase center responsible for protein synthesis. Remarkably, subunit RNA and proteins coevolved, starting with interactions between the oldest proteins (S12 and S17) and the oldest substructure (the ribosomal ratchet) in the small subunit and ending with the rise of a modern multi-subunit ribosome. Ancestral ribonucleoprotein components show similarities to in vitro evolved RNA replicase ribozymes and protein structures in extant replication machinery. Our study therefore provides important clues about the chicken-or-egg dilemma associated with the central dogma of molecular biology by showing that ribosomal history is driven by the gradual structural accretion of protein and RNA structures. Most importantly, results suggest that functionally important and conserved regions of the ribosome were recruited and could be relics of an ancient ribonucleoprotein world. PMID:22427882

  8. Accelerated chemical synthesis of peptides and small proteins

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Les P.; Alewood, Paul F.

    1999-01-01

    The chemical synthesis of peptides and small proteins is a powerful complementary strategy to recombinant protein overexpression and is widely used in structural biology, immunology, protein engineering, and biomedical research. Despite considerable improvements in the fidelity of peptide chain assembly, side-chain protection, and postsynthesis analysis, a limiting factor in accessing polypeptides containing greater than 50 residues remains the time taken for chain assembly. The ultimate goal of this work is to establish highly efficient chemical procedures that achieve chain-assembly rates of approximately 10–15 residues per hour, thus underpinning the rapid chemical synthesis of long polypeptides and proteins, including cytokines, growth factors, protein domains, and small enzymes. Here we report Boc chemistry that employs O-(7-azabenzotriazol-1-yl)-N,N,N′,N′-tetramethyluronium hexafluorophosphate (HATU)/dimethyl sulfoxide in situ neutralization as the coupling agent and incorporates a protected amino acid residue every 5 min to produce peptides of good quality. This rapid coupling chemistry was successfully demonstrated by synthesizing several small to medium peptides, including the “difficult” C-terminal sequence of HIV-1 proteinase (residues 81–99); fragment 65–74 of the acyl carrier protein; conotoxin PnIA(A10L), a potent neuronal nicotinic receptor antagonist; and the pro-inflammatory chemotactic protein CP10, an 88-residue protein, by means of native chemical ligation. The benefits of this approach include enhanced ability to identify and characterize “difficult couplings,” rapid access to peptides for biological and structure–activity studies, and accelerated synthesis of tailored large peptide segments (<50 residues) for use in chemoselective ligation methods. PMID:9989998

  9. Novel Urinary Protein Biomarkers Predicting the Development of Microalbuminuria and Renal Function Decline in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Schlatzer, Daniela; Maahs, David M.; Chance, Mark R.; Dazard, Jean-Eudes; Li, Xiaolin; Hazlett, Fred; Rewers, Marian; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To define a panel of novel protein biomarkers of renal disease. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Adults with type 1 diabetes in the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes study who were initially free of renal complications (n = 465) were followed for development of micro- or macroalbuminuria (MA) and early renal function decline (ERFD, annual decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate of ≥3.3%). The label-free proteomic discovery phase was conducted in 13 patients who progressed to MA by the 6-year visit and 11 control subjects, and four proteins (Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein, α-1 acid glycoprotein, clusterin, and progranulin) identified in the discovery phase were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 74 subjects: group A, normal renal function (n = 35); group B, ERFD without MA (n = 15); group C, MA without ERFD (n = 16); and group D, both ERFD and MA (n = 8). RESULTS In the label-free analysis, a model of progression to MA was built using 252 peptides, yielding an area under the curve (AUC) of 84.7 ± 5.3%. In the validation study, ordinal logistic regression was used to predict development of ERFD, MA, or both. A panel including Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein (odds ratio 2.9, 95% CI 1.3–6.2, P = 0.008), progranulin (1.9, 0.8–4.5, P = 0.16), clusterin (0.6, 0.3–1.1, P = 0.09), and α-1 acid glycoprotein (1.6, 0.7–3.7, P = 0.27) improved the AUC from 0.841 to 0.889. CONCLUSIONS A panel of four novel protein biomarkers predicted early renal damage in type 1 diabetes. These findings require further validation in other populations for prediction of renal complications and treatment monitoring. PMID:22238279

  10. Directed Evolution of Proteins through In Vitro Protein Synthesis in Liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, Takehiro; Sunami, Takeshi; Matsuura, Tomoaki; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2012-01-01

    Directed evolution of proteins is a technique used to modify protein functions through “Darwinian selection.” In vitro compartmentalization (IVC) is an in vitro gene screening system for directed evolution of proteins. IVC establishes the link between genetic information (genotype) and the protein translated from the information (phenotype), which is essential for all directed evolution methods, by encapsulating both in a nonliving microcompartment. Herein, we introduce a new liposome-based IVC system consisting of a liposome, the protein synthesis using recombinant elements (PURE) system and a fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) used as a microcompartment, in vitro protein synthesis system, and high-throughput screen, respectively. Liposome-based IVC is characterized by in vitro protein synthesis from a single copy of a gene in a cell-sized unilamellar liposome and quantitative functional evaluation of the synthesized proteins. Examples of liposome-based IVC for screening proteins such as GFP and β-glucuronidase are described. We discuss the future directions for this method and its applications. PMID:22957209

  11. Downregulation of the renal outer medullary K(+) channel ROMK by the AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Siraskar, Balasaheb; Huang, Dan Yang; Pakladok, Tatsiana; Siraskar, Gulab; Sopjani, Mentor; Alesutan, Ioana; Kucherenko, Yulia; Almilaji, Ahmad; Devanathan, Vasudharani; Shumilina, Ekaterina; Föller, Michael; Munoz, Carlos; Lang, Florian

    2013-02-01

    The 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated serine/threonine protein kinase (AMPK) is stimulated by energy depletion, increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) activity, oxidative stress, and nitric oxide. AMPK participates in the regulation of the epithelial Na(+) channel ENaC and the voltage-gated K(+) channel KCNE1/KCNQ1. It is partially effective by decreasing PIP(2) formation through the PI3K pathway. The present study explored whether AMPK regulates the renal outer medullary K(+) channel ROMK. To this end, cRNA encoding ROMK was injected into Xenopus oocytes with and without additional injection of constitutively active AMPK(γR70Q) (AMPK(α1)-HA+AMPK(β1)-Flag+AMPKγ1(R70Q)), or of inactive AMPK(αK45R) (AMPK(α1K45R)+AMPK(β1)-Flag+AMPK(γ1)-HA), and the current determined utilizing two-electrode voltage-clamp and single channel patch clamp. ROMK protein abundance was measured utilizing chemiluminescence in Xenopus oocytes and western blot in whole kidney tissue. Moreover, renal Na(+) and K(+) excretion were determined in AMPK(α1)-deficient mice (ampk ( -/- )) and wild-type mice (ampk ( +/+ )) prior to and following an acute K(+) load (111 mM KCl, 30 mM NaHCO(3), 4.7 mM NaCl, and 2.25 g/dl BSA) at a rate of 500 μl/h. As a result, coexpression of AMPK(γR70Q) but not of AMPK(αK45R) significantly decreased the current in ROMK1-expressing Xenopus oocytes. Injection of phosphatidylinositol PI((4,5))P(2) significantly increased the current in ROMK1-expressing Xenopus oocytes, an effect reversed in the presence of AMPK(γR70Q). Under control conditions, no significant differences between ampk ( -/- ) and ampk ( +/+ ) mice were observed in glomerular filtration rate (GFR), urinary flow rate, serum aldosterone, plasma Na(+), and K(+) concentrations as well as absolute and fractional Na(+) and K(+) excretion. Following an acute K(+) load, GFR, urinary flow rate, serum aldosterone, plasma Na(+), and K(+) concentration were again similar in both genotypes, but renal absolute

  12. Selective inhibition of thromboxane synthesis partially protected while inhibition of angiotensin II formation did not protect rats against acute renal failure induced with glycerol.

    PubMed

    Papanicolaou, N; Hatziantoniou, C; Bariety, J

    1986-01-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) was induced in 35 week-old conscious female Wistar rats, by intramuscular (IM) injection of glycerol. Intraperitoneal (IP) injection of imidazole, an inhibitor of thromboxane (TXA2) synthesis, partially protected the animals against ARF. This protection was accompanied by a significant decrease in renal TXB2 (the stable chemical metabolite of TXA2) and a significant increase in renal 6-keto-PGF1 alpha (the stable chemical metabolite of PGI2) synthesis. Intraperitoneal injection of captopril (SQ 14225) an angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor, did not protect the animals against ARF. This lack of protection was accompanied by a significant increase in renal TXB2 and a significant decrease in renal 6-keto-PGF1 alpha synthesis. The results suggest that: (a) the renin-angiotensin (R-A) system does not play a role, or has only a secondary one in the development of ARF; (b) thromboxane A2 (the most potent vasoconstrictor and platelet aggregator agent known) is the preponderant agent responsible for the development of this pathological syndrome. PMID:3513208

  13. Conditional Knockout of Src Homology 2 Domain-containing Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase-2 in Myeloid Cells Attenuates Renal Fibrosis after Unilateral Ureter Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Jing-Fei; Wang, Kai; Li, Yao; Qu, Fa-Jun; Yuan, Qing; Cui, Xin-Gang; Wang, Quan-Xing; Xu, Dan-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Background: Src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP-2) is a kind of intracellular protein tyrosine phosphatase. Studies have revealed its roles in various disease, however, whether SHP-2 involves in renal fibrosis remains unclear. The aim of this study was to explore the roles of myeloid cells SHP-2 in renal interstitial fibrosis. Methods: Myeloid cells SHP-2 gene was conditionally knocked-out (CKO) in mice using loxP-Cre system, and renal interstitial fibrosis was induced by unilateral ureter obstruction (UUO). The total collagen deposition in the renal interstitium was assessed using picrosirius red stain. F4/80 immunostaing was used to evaluate macrophage infiltration in renal tubular interstitium. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay were used to analyze the production of cytokines in the kidney. Transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling stain was used to assess the apoptotic renal tubular epithelial cells. Results: Src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 gene CKO in myeloid cells significantly reduced collagen deposition in the renal interstitium after UUO. Macrophage infiltration was evidently decreased in renal tubular interstitium of SHP-2 CKO mice. Meanwhile, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines was significantly suppressed in SHP-2 CKO mice. However, no significant difference was observed in the number of apoptotic renal tubular epithelial cells between wild-type and SHP-2 CKO mice. Conclusions: Our observations suggested that SHP-2 in myeloid cells plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of renal fibrosis, and that silencing of SHP-2 gene in myeloid cells may protect renal from inflammatory damage and prevent renal fibrosis after renal injury. PMID:25947403

  14. Reduced protein synthesis in schizophrenia patient-derived olfactory cells

    PubMed Central

    English, J A; Fan, Y; Föcking, M; Lopez, L M; Hryniewiecka, M; Wynne, K; Dicker, P; Matigian, N; Cagney, G; Mackay-Sim, A; Cotter, D R

    2015-01-01

    Human olfactory neurosphere-derived (ONS) cells have the potential to provide novel insights into the cellular pathology of schizophrenia. We used discovery-based proteomics and targeted functional analyses to reveal reductions in 17 ribosomal proteins, with an 18% decrease in the total ribosomal signal intensity in schizophrenia-patient-derived ONS cells. We quantified the rates of global protein synthesis in vitro and found a significant reduction in the rate of protein synthesis in schizophrenia patient-derived ONS cells compared with control-derived cells. Protein synthesis rates in fibroblast cell lines from the same patients did not differ, suggesting cell type-specific effects. Pathway analysis of dysregulated proteomic and transcriptomic data sets from these ONS cells converged to highlight perturbation of the eIF2α, eIF4 and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) translational control pathways, and these pathways were also implicated in an independent induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem model, and cohort, of schizophrenia patients. Analysis in schizophrenia genome-wide association data from the Psychiatric Genetics Consortium specifically implicated eIF2α regulatory kinase EIF2AK2, and confirmed the importance of the eIF2α, eIF4 and mTOR translational control pathways at the level of the genome. Thus, we integrated data from proteomic, transcriptomic, and functional assays from schizophrenia patient-derived ONS cells with genomics data to implicate dysregulated protein synthesis for the first time in schizophrenia. PMID:26485547

  15. Synthesis of Hydrogen-Bond Surrogate α-helices as Inhibitors of Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Stephen E.; Thomson, Paul F.; Arora, Paramjit S.

    2014-01-01

    The α-helix is a prevalent secondary structure in proteins and critical in mediating protein-protein interactions (PPIs). Peptide mimetics that adopt stable helices have become powerful tools for the modulation of PPIs in vitro and in vivo. Hydrogen-bond surrogate (HBS) α-helices utilize a covalent bond in place of an N-terminal i to i+4 hydrogen bond and have been used to target and disrupt PPIs that become dysregulated in disease states. These compounds have improved conformational stability and cellular uptake as compared to their linear peptide counterparts. The protocol presented here describes current methodology for the synthesis of HBS α-helical mimetics. The solid phase synthesis of HBS helices involves solid phase peptide synthesis with three key steps involving incorporation of N-allyl functionality within the backbone of the peptide, coupling of a secondary amine, and a ring-closing metathesis step. PMID:24903885

  16. Modulation by estrogen of synthesis of specific uterine proteins.

    PubMed

    Skipper, J K; Eakle, S D; Hamilton, T H

    1980-11-01

    The contemporary procedure for high resolution two dimensional gel electrophoresis was extended to include an initial nondenaturing dimension of electrophoresis. Use of the resulting three dimensional procedure revealed that the previously described single peak of estrogen-induced protein in the uterus of the rat contains at least three distinct proteins whose rates of synthesis are regulated by estrogen. These proteins were localized within partial protein maps, thereby providing definitive operational definitions for the detection and identification of each. It was unambiguously demonstrated that each of the three proteins is continuously synthesized in control uteri. These findings cast doubt on the simplistic hypothesis that estrogen induces a single key protein that triggers a "cascade" of sequential transcriptional events in the uterus. Our finding that the major uterine protein induced by estrogen is also synthesized in liver and muscle cells is significant in that it points to a more general cellular function for the protein, rather than a unique role within uterine cells. Finally, our procedure for three dimensional gel electrophoresis opens new avenues for the detection of minor proteins in heterogeneous protein mixtures, such as those from the tissues of higher animals. PMID:7428041

  17. Antibiotics in development targeting protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Sutcliffe, Joyce A

    2011-12-01

    The resolution of antibiotic-ribosomal subunit complexes and antibacterial-protein complexes at the atomic level has provided new insights into modifications of clinically relevant antimicrobials and provided new classes that target the protein cellular apparatus. New chemistry platforms that use fragment-based drug design or allow novel modifications in known structural classes are being used to design new antibiotics that overcome known resistance mechanisms and extend spectrum and potency by circumventing ubiquitous efflux pumps. This review provides details on seven antibiotics in development for treatment of moderate-to-severe community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and/or acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections: solithromycin, cethromycin, omadacycline, CEM-102, GSK1322322, radezolid, and tedizolid. Two antibiotics of the oxazolidinone class, PF-02341272 and AZD5847, are being developed as antituberculosis agents. Only three antibiotics that target the protein cellular machinery, TP-434, GSK2251052, and plazomicin, have a spectrum that encompasses multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens. These compounds provide hope for treating key pathogens that cause serious disease in both the community and the hospital. PMID:22191530

  18. Polyaromatic compounds alter placental protein synthesis in pregnant rats

    SciTech Connect

    Shiverick, K.T.; Ogilvie, S.; Medrano, T. )

    1991-03-15

    The administration of the polyaromatic compounds {beta}-naphthoflavone ({beta}NF) and 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC) to pregnant rats during mid-gestation has been shown to produce marked feto-placental growth retardation. This study examined secretory protein synthesis in placental tissue from rats following administration of {beta}NF on gestation days (gd) 11-14 or 3MC on gd 12-14. Explants of placental basal zone tissue were cultured for 24 hours in serum-free medium in the presence of ({sup 3}H)leucine. Secreted proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by either fluorography or immunostaining. Total incorporation of ({sup 3}H)leucine into secreted proteins was not altered in BZ explants from {beta}NF or 3MC-treated animals. However a selective decrease was observed in ({sup 3}H)leucine incorporation into a major complex of proteins with apparent molecular weight of 25-30,000 and isoelectric point between 5.3 to 5.7. This group of proteins has been further identified as being related to rat pituitary growth hormone (GH) using N-terminal amino acid microsequencing of individual spots from 2-D SDS-PA gels. This is the first report that synthesis of GH-related proteins by rat placenta is decreased following {beta}NF and 3MC administration, a change which may underlie the feto-placental growth retardation associated with these polyaromatic compounds.

  19. Ablation of the Stimulatory G Protein α-Subunit in Renal Proximal Tubules Leads to Parathyroid Hormone-Resistance With Increased Renal Cyp24a1 mRNA Abundance and Reduced Serum 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yan; He, Qing; Aydin, Cumhur; Rubera, Isabelle; Tauc, Michel; Chen, Min; Weinstein, Lee S; Marshansky, Vladimir; Jüppner, Harald; Bastepe, Murat

    2016-02-01

    PTH regulates serum calcium, phosphate, and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D) levels by acting on bone and kidney. In renal proximal tubules (PTs), PTH inhibits reabsorption of phosphate and stimulates the synthesis of 1,25(OH)2D. The PTH receptor couples to multiple G proteins. We here ablated the α-subunit of the stimulatory G protein (Gsα) in mouse PTs by using Cre recombinase driven by the promoter of type-2 sodium-glucose cotransporter (Gsα(Sglt2KO) mice). Gsα(Sglt2KO) mice were normophosphatemic but displayed, relative to controls, hypocalcemia (1.19 ±0.01 vs 1.23 ±0.01 mmol/L; P < .05), reduced serum 1,25(OH)2D (59.3 ±7.0 vs 102.5 ±12.2 pmol/L; P < .05), and elevated serum PTH (834 ±133 vs 438 ±59 pg/mL; P < .05). PTH-induced elevation in urinary cAMP excretion was blunted in Gsα(Sglt2KO) mice (2- vs 4-fold over baseline in controls; P < .05). Relative to baseline in controls, PTH-induced reduction in serum phosphate tended to be blunted in Gsα(Sglt2KO) mice (-0.39 ±0.33 vs -1.34 ±0.36 mg/dL; P = .07). Gsα(Sglt2KO) mice showed elevated renal vitamin D 24-hydroxylase and bone fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23) mRNA abundance (∼3.4- and ∼11-fold over controls, respectively; P < .05) and tended to have elevated serum FGF23 (829 ±76 vs 632 ±60 pg/mL in controls; P = .07). Heterozygous mice having constitutive ablation of the maternal Gsα allele (E1(m-/+)) (model of pseudohypoparathyroidism type-Ia), in which Gsα levels in PT are reduced, also exhibited elevated serum FGF23 (474 ±20 vs 374 ±27 pg/mL in controls; P < .05). Our findings indicate that Gsα is required in PTs for suppressing renal vitamin D 24-hydroxylase mRNA levels and for maintaining normal serum 1,25(OH)2D. PMID:26671181

  20. Question 7: Optimized Energy Consumption for Protein Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szaflarski, Witold; Nierhaus, Knud H.

    2007-10-01

    In our previous contribution (Nierhaus, Orig Life Evol Biosph, this volume, 2007) we mentioned that life had solved the problem of energy supply in three major steps, and that these steps also mark major stages during the development of life. We further outlined a possible scenario concerning a minimal translational apparatus focusing on the essential components necessary for protein synthesis. Here we continue that consideration by addressing on one of the main problems of early life, namely avoiding wasteful energy loss. With regard to the limiting energy supply of early living systems, i.e. those of say more than 3,000 Ma, a carefully controlled and product oriented energy consumption was in demand. In recent years we learned how a bacterial cell avoids energy drain, thus being able to pump most of the energy into protein synthesis. These lessons must be followed by the design of a minimal living system, which is surveyed in this short article.

  1. Global protein synthesis in human trophoblast is resistant to inhibition by hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Williams, S.F.; Fik, E.; Zamudio, S.; Illsley, N.P.

    2012-01-01

    Placental growth and function depend on syncytial cell processes which require the continuing synthesis of cellular proteins. The substantial energy demands of protein synthesis are met primarily from oxidative metabolism. Although the responses of individual proteins produced by the syncytiotrophoblast to oxygen deprivation have been investigated previously, there is no information available on global protein synthesis in syncytiotrophoblast under conditions of hypoxia. These studies were designed to test the hypothesis that syncytial protein synthesis is decreased in a dose-dependent manner by hypoxia. Experiments were performed to measure amino acid incorporation into proteins in primary syncytiotrophoblast cells exposed to oxygen concentrations ranging from 0 to 10%. Compared to cells exposed to normoxia (10% O2), no changes were observed following exposure to 5% or 3% O2, but after exposure to 1% O2, protein synthesis after 24 and 48 h decreased by 24% and 23% and with exposure to 0% O2, by 65% and 50%. As a consequence of these results, we hypothesized that global protein synthesis in conditions of severe hypoxia was being supported by glucose metabolism. Additional experiments were performed therefore to examine the role of glucose in supporting protein synthesis. These demonstrated that at each oxygen concentration there was a significant, decreasing linear trend in protein synthesis as glucose concentration was reduced. Under conditions of near-anoxia and in the absence of glucose, protein synthesis was reduced by >85%. Even under normoxic conditions (defined as 10% O2) and in the presence of oxidative substrates, reductions in glucose were accompanied by decreases in protein synthesis. These experiments demonstrate that syncytiotrophoblast cells are resistant to reductions in protein synthesis at O2 concentrations greater than 1%. This could be explained by our finding that a significant fraction of protein synthesis in the syncytiotrophoblast is

  2. Role of AMP-activated protein kinase α1 in angiotensin-II-induced renal Tgfß-activated kinase 1 activation.

    PubMed

    Mia, Sobuj; Castor, Tatsiana; Musculus, Katharina; Voelkl, Jakob; Alesutan, Ioana; Lang, Florian

    2016-08-01

    Angiotensin-II is a key factor in renal fibrosis. Obstructive nephropathy induces an isoform shift from catalytic Ampkα2 towards Ampkα1 which contributes to signaling involved in renal tissue injury. The present study explored whether the Ampkα1 isoform contributes to the renal effects of angiotensin-II. To this end, angiotensin-II was infused by subcutaneous implantation of osmotic minipumps in gene-targeted mice lacking functional Ampkα1 (Ampkα1(-/-)) and corresponding wild-type mice (Ampkα1(+/+)). Western blotting and qRT-PCR were employed to determine protein abundance and mRNA levels, respectively, in renal tissue. In Ampkα1(+/+) mice, angiotensin-II increased renal Ampkα1 protein expression without significantly modifying renal Ampkα2 protein expression. The renal phosphorylated Ampkα (Thr(172)) protein abundance was not affected by angiotensin-II in neither genotypes, but was significantly lower in Ampkα1(-/-) mice than Ampkα1(+/+) mice. Angiotensin-II increased the phosphorylation of Tak1 (Ser(412)) in renal tissue of Ampkα1(+/+) mice, an effect virtually absent in the Ampkα1(-/-) mice. Furthermore, angiotensin-II treatment significantly increased renal protein and mRNA expression of α-smooth muscle actin (αSma) as well as Tak1-target gene expression: Cox2, Il6 and Pai1 in Ampkα1(+/+) mice, all effects significantly less pronounced in Ampkα1(-/-) mice. In conclusion, angiotensin-II up-regulates the Ampkα1 isoform in renal tissue. Ampkα1 participates in renal Tak1 activation and Tak1-dependent signaling induced by angiotensin-II. PMID:27230958

  3. Concurrent protein synthesis is required for in vivo chitin synthesis in postmolt blue crabs

    SciTech Connect

    Horst, M.N. )

    1990-12-01

    Chitin synthesis in crustaceans involves the deposition of a protein-polysaccharide complex at the apical surface of epithelial cells which secrete the cuticle or exoskeleton. The present study involves an examination of in vivo incorporation of radiolabeled amino acids and amino sugars into the cuticle of postmolt blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus. Rates of incorporation of both 3H leucine and 3H threonine were linear with respect to time of incubation. Incorporation of 3H threonine into the endocuticle was inhibited greater than 90% in the presence of the protein synthesis inhibitor, puromycin. Linear incorporation of 14C glucosamine into the cuticle was also demonstrated; a significant improvement of radiolabeling was achieved by using 14C-N-acetylglucosamine as the labeled precursor. Incorporation of 3H-N-acetylglucosamine into the cuticle of postmolt blue crabs was inhibited 89% by puromycin, indicating that concurrent protein synthesis is required for the deposition of chitin in the blue crab. Autoradiographic analysis of control vs. puromycin-treated crabs indicates that puromycin totally blocks labeling of the new endocuticle with 3H glucosamine. These results are consistent with the notion that crustacean chitin is synthesized as a protein-polysaccharide complex. Analysis of the postmolt and intermolt blue crab cuticle indicates that the exoskeleton contains about 60% protein and 40% chitin. The predominant amino acids are arginine, glutamic acid, alanine, aspartic acid, and threonine.

  4. An evaluation of the antioxidant protein α1-microglobulin as a renal tubular cytoprotectant.

    PubMed

    Zager, Richard A; Johnson, Ali C M; Frostad, Kirsten

    2016-09-01

    α1-Microglobulin (A1M) is a low-molecular-weight heme-binding antioxidant protein that is readily filtered by the glomerulus and reabsorbed by proximal tubules. Given these properties, recombinant A1M (rA1M) has been proposed as a renal antioxidant and therapeutic agent. However, little direct evidence to support this hypothesis exists. Hence, we have sought "proof of concept" in this regard. Cultured proximal tubule (HK-2) cells or isolated mouse proximal tubule segments were challenged with a variety of prooxidant insults: 1) hemin, 2) myoglobin; 3) "catalytic" iron, 4) H2O2/Fenton reagents, 5) a Ca(2+) ionophore, 6) antimycin A, or 7) hypoxia (with or without rA1M treatment). HK-2 injury was gauged by the percent lactate dehydrogenase release and 4,5-(dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide uptake. In vivo protection was sought in rA1M-treated mice subjected to 1) graded myohemoglobinura (2, 4, 8, or 9 ml/kg glycerol injection), 2) purified myoglobinemia/uria, or 3) endotoxemia. In vivo injury was assessed by blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, and the expression of redox-sensitive genes (heme oxygenase-1, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 mRNAs). Although rA1M totally blocked in vitro hemin toxicity, equimolar albumin (another heme binder) or 10% serum induced equal protection. rA1M failed to mitigate any nonhemin forms of either in vitro or in vivo injury. A1M appeared to be rapidly degraded within proximal tubules (by Western blot analysis). Surprisingly, rA1M exerted select injury-promoting effects (increased in vitro catalytic iron/antimycin toxicities and increased in vivo monocyte chemoattractant protein-1/neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin mRNA expression after glycerol or endotoxin injection). We conclude that rA1M has questionable utility as a renal antioxidant/cytoprotective agent, particularly in the presence of larger amounts of competitive free heme (e.g., albumin) binders. PMID

  5. Impact of protein coingestion on muscle protein synthesis during continuous endurance type exercise.

    PubMed

    Beelen, Milou; Zorenc, Antoine; Pennings, Bart; Senden, Joan M; Kuipers, Harm; van Loon, Luc J C

    2011-06-01

    This study investigates the impact of protein coingestion with carbohydrate on muscle protein synthesis during endurance type exercise. Twelve healthy male cyclists were studied during 2 h of fasted rest followed by 2 h of continuous cycling at 55% W(max). During exercise, subjects received either 1.0 g·kg(-1)·h(-1) carbohydrate (CHO) or 0.8 g·kg(-1)·h(-1) carbohydrate with 0.2 g·kg(-1)·h(-1) protein hydrolysate (CHO+PRO). Continuous intravenous infusions with l-[ring-(13)C(6)]phenylalanine and l-[ring-(2)H(2)]tyrosine were applied, and blood and muscle biopsies were collected to assess whole body protein turnover and muscle protein synthesis rates at rest and during exercise conditions. Protein coingestion stimulated whole body protein synthesis and oxidation rates during exercise by 22 ± 3 and 70 ± 17%, respectively (P < 0.01). Whole body protein breakdown rates did not differ between experiments. As a consequence, whole body net protein balance was slightly negative in CHO and positive in the CHO+PRO treatment (-4.9 ± 0.3 vs. 8.0 ± 0.3 μmol Phe·kg(-1)·h(-1), respectively, P < 0.01). Mixed muscle protein fractional synthetic rates (FSR) were higher during exercise compared with resting conditions (0.058 ± 0.006 vs. 0.035 ± 0.006%/h in CHO and 0.070 ± 0.011 vs. 0.038 ± 0.005%/h in the CHO+PRO treatment, respectively, P < 0.05). FSR during exercise did not differ between experiments (P = 0.46). We conclude that muscle protein synthesis is stimulated during continuous endurance type exercise activities when carbohydrate with or without protein is ingested. Protein coingestion does not further increase muscle protein synthesis rates during continuous endurance type exercise. PMID:21364122

  6. Synthesis of Nanogel-Protein Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Chacko, Reuben T.; Maynard, Heather D.; Thayumanavan, S.

    2014-01-01

    The covalent conjugation of bovine serum albumin (BSA) to disulfide cross-linked polymeric nanogels is reported. Polymeric nanogel precursors were synthesized via a reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) random copolymerization of poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA) and pyridyl disulfide methacrylate (PDSMA). Reaction of the p(PEGMA-co-PDSMA) with dithiothreitol resulted in the formation of nanogels. PDSMA serves as both a crosslinking agent and a reactive handle for the surface modification of the nanogels. Lipophilic dye, DiI, was sequestered within the nanogels by performing the crosslinking reaction in the presence of the hydrophobic molecule. Thiol-enriched BSA was conjugated to nanogels loaded with DiI via a disulfide reaction between the BSA and the surface exposed nanogel pyridyl disulfides. Conjugation was confirmed by fast protein liquid chromatography, dynamic light scattering, and agarose and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. We expect that this methodology is generally applicable to the preparation of nanogel-protein therapeutics. PMID:24761162

  7. Synthesis of Nanogel-Protein Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Nicholas M; González-Toro, Daniella C; Chacko, Reuben T; Maynard, Heather D; Thayumanavan, S

    2013-04-21

    The covalent conjugation of bovine serum albumin (BSA) to disulfide cross-linked polymeric nanogels is reported. Polymeric nanogel precursors were synthesized via a reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) random copolymerization of poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA) and pyridyl disulfide methacrylate (PDSMA). Reaction of the p(PEGMA-co-PDSMA) with dithiothreitol resulted in the formation of nanogels. PDSMA serves as both a crosslinking agent and a reactive handle for the surface modification of the nanogels. Lipophilic dye, DiI, was sequestered within the nanogels by performing the crosslinking reaction in the presence of the hydrophobic molecule. Thiol-enriched BSA was conjugated to nanogels loaded with DiI via a disulfide reaction between the BSA and the surface exposed nanogel pyridyl disulfides. Conjugation was confirmed by fast protein liquid chromatography, dynamic light scattering, and agarose and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. We expect that this methodology is generally applicable to the preparation of nanogel-protein therapeutics. PMID:24761162

  8. Protein synthesis in liposomes with a minimal set of enzymes.

    PubMed

    Murtas, Giovanni; Kuruma, Yutetsu; Bianchini, Paolo; Diaspro, Alberto; Luisi, Pier Luigi

    2007-11-01

    In a significant step towards the construction of the semi-synthetic minimal cell, a protein expression system with a minimal set of pure and specific enzymes is required. A novel cell-free transcription and translation system named PURESYSTEM (PS), consisting of a specified set of 36 enzymes and ribosomes, has been entrapped in POPC liposomes for protein synthesis. The PS has been used to transcribe and translate an Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (EGFP) gene from plasmid DNA. The synthesis is confirmed by the EGFP fluorescence emitting liposomes on fluorometric analysis and on confocal microscopy analysis. Furthermore the PS encapsulated into POPC liposomes can drive the expression of the plsB and plsC genes encoding for the sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT) and 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (LPAAT) involved in the first step of the "salvage pathway" for synthesis of POPC. The expression of GPAT and LPAAT in liposomes would in principle allow the production of the cell boundary from within. PMID:17850764

  9. Voluntary Exercise Regionally Augments Rates of Cerebral Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Nadel, Jeffrey; Huang, Tianjian; Xia, Zengyan; Burlin, Thomas; Zametkin, Alan; Smith, Carolyn Beebe

    2016-01-01

    Exercise is a natural form of neurophysiologic stimulation that has known benefits for mental health, maintenance of cerebral function, and stress reduction. Exercise is known to induce an upregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and this is thought to be involved in associated increases in neural plasticity. Protein synthesis is also an essential component of adaptive plasticity. We hypothesized that exercise may stimulate changes in brain protein synthesis as part of its effects on plasticity. Here, we applied the quantitative autoradiographic L-[1-14C] leucine method to the in vivo determination of regional rates of cerebral protein synthesis (rCPS) in adult rats following a seven day period of voluntary wheel-running and their sedentary counterparts. In four of 21 brain regions examined, the mean values of rCPS in the exercised rats were statistically significantly higher than in sedentary controls; regions affected were paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus, ventral hippocampus as a whole, CA1 pyramidal cell layer in ventral hippocampus, and frontal cortex. Increases in rCPS approached statistical significance in dentate gyrus of the ventral hippocampus. Our results affirm the value of exercise in encouraging hippocampal and possibly cortical neuroplasticity, and also suggest that exercise may modulate stimulation of stress-response pathways. Ultimately, our study indicates that measurement of rCPS with PET might be used as a marker of brain response to exercise in human subjects. PMID:24016692

  10. Eukaryotic protein synthesis inhibitors identified by comparison of cytotoxicity profiles

    PubMed Central

    CHAN, JENNY; KHAN, SHAKILA N.; HARVEY, ISABELLE; MERRICK, WILLIAM; PELLETIER, JERRY

    2004-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Human Tumor Cell Line Anti-Cancer Drug Screen has evaluated the cytotoxicity profiles of a large number of synthetic compounds, natural products, and plant extracts on 60 different cell lines. The data for each compound/extract can be assessed for similarity of cytotoxicity pattern, relative to a given test compound, using an algorithm called COMPARE. In applying a chemical biology approach to better understand the mechanism of eukaryotic protein synthesis, we used these resources to search for novel inhibitors of translation. The cytotoxicity profiles of 31 known protein synthesis inhibitors were used to identify compounds from the NCI database with similar activity profiles. Using this approach, two natural products, phyllanthoside and nagilactone C, were identified and characterized as novel protein synthesis inhibitors. Both compounds are specific for the eukaryotic translation apparatus, function in vivo and in vitro, and interfere with translation elongation. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing cytotoxicity profiles to identify new inhibitors of translation. PMID:14970397

  11. Ultrafast sonochemical synthesis of protein-inorganic nanoflowers

    PubMed Central

    Batule, Bhagwan S; Park, Ki Soo; Kim, Moon Il; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2015-01-01

    We developed a simple but efficient method to synthesize protein-inorganic hybrid nanostructures with a flower-like shape (nanoflowers), which relies on sonication to facilitate the synthesis of the nanoflowers. With this technique, we synthesized nanoflowers containing laccase as a model protein and copper phosphate within 5 minutes at room temperature. The resulting laccase nanoflowers yielded greatly enhanced activity, stability, and reusability, and their usefulness was successfully demonstrated by applying them in the colorimetric detection of epinephrine. The strategy developed could be used to rapidly synthesize nanoflowers for various applications in biosensor and enzyme catalysis and would expand the utilization of nanoflowers in diverse fields of biotechnology. PMID:26346235

  12. Quantitating protein synthesis, degradation, and endogenous antigen processing.

    PubMed

    Princiotta, Michael F; Finzi, Diana; Qian, Shu-Bing; Gibbs, James; Schuchmann, Sebastian; Buttgereit, Frank; Bennink, Jack R; Yewdell, Jonathan W

    2003-03-01

    Using L929 cells, we quantitated the macroeconomics of protein synthesis and degradation and the microeconomics of producing MHC class I associated peptides from viral translation products. To maintain a content of 2.6 x 10(9) proteins, each cell's 6 x 10(6) ribosomes produce 4 x 10(6) proteins min(-1). Each of the cell's 8 x 10(5) proteasomes degrades 2.5 substrates min(-1), creating one MHC class I-peptide complex for each 500-3000 viral translation products degraded. The efficiency of complex formation is similar in dendritic cells and macrophages, which play a critical role in activating T cells in vivo. Proteasomes create antigenic peptides at different efficiencies from two distinct substrate pools: rapidly degraded newly synthesized proteins that clearly represent defective ribosomal products (DRiPs) and a less rapidly degraded pool in which DRiPs may also predominate. PMID:12648452

  13. Fluorinated proteins: from design and synthesis to structure and stability.

    PubMed

    Marsh, E Neil G

    2014-10-21

    Fluorine is all but absent from biology; however, it has proved to be a remarkably useful element with which to modulate the activity of biological molecules and to study their mechanism of action. Our laboratory's interest in incorporating fluorine into proteins was stimulated by the unusual physicochemical properties exhibited by perfluorinated small molecules. These include extreme chemical inertness and thermal stability, properties that have made them valuable as nonstick coatings and fire retardants. Fluorocarbons also exhibit an unusual propensity to phase segregation. This phenomenon, which has been termed the "fluorous effect", has been effectively exploited in organic synthesis to purify compounds from reaction mixtures by extracting fluorocarbon-tagged molecules into fluorocarbon solvents. As biochemists, we were curious to explore whether the unusual physicochemical properties of perfluorocarbons could be engineered into proteins. To do this, we developed a synthesis of a highly fluorinated amino acid, hexafluoroleucine, and designed a model 4-helix bundle protein, α4H, in which the hydrophobic core was packed exclusively with leucine. We then investigated the effects of repacking the hydrophobic core of α4H with various combinations of leucine and hexafluoroleucine. These initial studies demonstrated that fluorination is a general and effective strategy for enhancing the stability of proteins against chemical and thermal denaturation and proteolytic degradation. We had originally envisaged that the "fluorous interactions", postulated from the self-segregating properties of fluorous solvents, might be used to mediate specific protein-protein interactions orthogonal to those of natural proteins. However, various lines of evidence indicate that no special, favorable fluorine-fluorine interactions occur in the core of the fluorinated α4 protein. This makes it unlikely that fluorinated amino acids can be used to direct protein-protein interactions. More

  14. Protein synthesis in chloroplasts. Characteristics and products of protein synthesis in vitro in etioplasts and developing chloroplasts from pea leaves.

    PubMed Central

    Siddell, S G; Ellis, R J

    1975-01-01

    The function of plastid ribosomes in pea (Pisum sativum L.) was investigated by characterizing the products of protein synthesis in vitro in plastids isolated at different stages during the transition from etioplast to chloroplast. Etioplasts and plastids isolated after 24, 48 and 96h of greening in continuous white light, use added ATP to incorporate labelled amino acids into protein. Plastids isolated from greening leaves can also use light as the source of energy for protein synthesis. The labelled polypeptides synthesized in isolated plastids were analysed by electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulphate-ureapolyacrylamide gels. Six polypeptides are synthesized in etioplasts with ATP as energy source. Only one of these polypeptides is present in a 150 000g supernatant fraction. This polypeptide has been identified as the large subunit of Fraction I protein (3-phospho-D-glycerate carboxylyase EC 4.1.1.39) by comparing the tryptic 'map' of its L-(35S)methionine-labelled peptides with the tryptic 'map' of large subunit peptides from Fraction I labelled with L-(35S)methionine in vivo. The same gel pattern of six polypeptides is seen when plastids isolated from greening leaves are incubated with either added ATP or light as the energy source. However, the rates of synthesis of particular polypeptides are different in plastids isolated at different stages of the etioplast to chloroplast transition. The results support the idea that plastid ribosomes synthesize only a small number of proteins, and that the number and molecular weight of these proteins does not alter during the formation of chloroplasts from etioplasts. Images PLATE 1 PMID:1147911

  15. VCP and ATL1 regulate endoplasmic reticulum and protein synthesis for dendritic spine formation

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Yu-Tzu; Hsueh, Yi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Imbalanced protein homeostasis, such as excessive protein synthesis and protein aggregation, is a pathogenic hallmark of a range of neurological disorders. Here, using expression of mutant proteins, a knockdown approach and disease mutation knockin mice, we show that VCP (valosin-containing protein), together with its cofactor P47 and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) morphology regulator ATL1 (Atlastin-1), regulates tubular ER formation and influences the efficiency of protein synthesis to control dendritic spine formation in neurons. Strengthening the significance of protein synthesis in dendritic spinogenesis, the translation blocker cyclohexamide and the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin reduce dendritic spine density, while a leucine supplement that increases protein synthesis ameliorates the dendritic spine defects caused by Vcp and Atl1 deficiencies. Because VCP and ATL1 are the causative genes of several neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental disorders, we suggest that impaired ER formation and inefficient protein synthesis are significant in the pathogenesis of multiple neurological disorders. PMID:26984393

  16. Renal protein reactivity and stability of antibiotic amphenicols: structure and affinity.

    PubMed

    Ding, Fei; Peng, Wei; Peng, Yu-Kui; Jiang, Yu-Ting

    2014-10-01

    In the present work, the molecular recognition of the oldest active amphenicols by the most popular renal carrier, lysozyme, was deciphered by using fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) and molecular modeling at the molecular scale. Steady state fluorescence data showed that the recognition of amphenicol by lysozyme yields a static type of fluorescence quenching. This corroborates time-resolved fluorescence results that lysozyme-amphenicol adduct formation has a moderate affinity of 10(4) M(-1), and the driving forces were found to be chiefly hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic interactions and π stacking. Far-UV CD spectra confirmed that the spatial structure of lysozyme was slightly changed with a distinct reduction of α-helices in the presence of amphenicol, suggesting partial destabilization of the protein. Furthermore, via the extrinsic 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid fluorescence spectral properties and molecular modeling, one could see that the amphenicol binding site was situated at the deep crevice on the protein surface, and the ligand was also near to several crucial amino acid residues, such as Trp-62, Trp-63 and Arg-73. Simultaneously, contrastive studies of protein-amphenicols revealed clearly that some substituting groups, e.g. nitryl in the molecular structure of ligands, may be vitally important for the recognition activity of amphenicols with lysozyme. Due to the connection of amphenicols with fatal detrimental effects and because lysozyme has been applied as a drug carrier for proximal tubular targeting, the discussion herein is necessary for rational antibiotic use, development of safe antibiotics and particularly a better appraisal of the risks associated with human exposure to toxic agrochemicals. PMID:25016933

  17. The chemokine (C-C motif) ligand protein synthesis inhibitor bindarit prevents cytoskeletal rearrangement and contraction of human mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Paccosi, Sara; Giachi, Matelda; Di Gennaro, Paola; Guglielmotti, Angelo; Parenti, Astrid

    2016-09-01

    Intraglomerular mesangial cells (MCs) maintain structural and functional integrity of renal glomerular microcirculation and homeostasis of mesangial matrix. Following different types of injury, MCs change their phenotype upregulating the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), changing contractile abilities and increasing the production of matrix proteins, chemokines and cytokines. CCL2 is a chemokine known to be involved in the pathogenesis of renal diseases. Its glomerular upregulation correlates with the extent of renal damage. Bindarit is an indazolic derivative endowed with anti-inflammatory activity when tested in experimental diseases. It selectively inhibits the synthesis of inflammatory C-C chemokines including CCL2, CCL7 and CCL8. This work aims to analyse bindarit effects on ET1-, AngII- and TGFβ-induced mesangial cell dysfunction. Bindarit significantly reduced AngII-, ET1- and TGFβ-induced α-SMA upregulation. In a collagen contraction assay, bindarit reduced AngII-, ET1- and TGFβ-induced HRMC contraction. Within 3-6h stimulation, vinculin organization and phosphorylation was significantly impaired by bindarit in AngII-, ET1- and TGFβ-stimulated cells without any effect on F-actin distribution. Conversely, p38 phosphorylation was not significantly inhibited by bindarit. Our data strengthen the importance of CCL2 on ET-1, AngII- and TGFβ-induced mesangial cell dysfunction, adding new insights into the cellular mechanisms responsible of bindarit protective effects in human MC dysfunction. PMID:27309675

  18. Lipid-mediated Protein-protein Interactions Modulate Respiration-driven ATP Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Tobias; Lundin, Camilla Rydström; Nordlund, Gustav; Ädelroth, Pia; von Ballmoos, Christoph; Brzezinski, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Energy conversion in biological systems is underpinned by membrane-bound proton transporters that generate and maintain a proton electrochemical gradient across the membrane which used, e.g. for generation of ATP by the ATP synthase. Here, we have co-reconstituted the proton pump cytochrome bo3 (ubiquinol oxidase) together with ATP synthase in liposomes and studied the effect of changing the lipid composition on the ATP synthesis activity driven by proton pumping. We found that for 100 nm liposomes, containing 5 of each proteins, the ATP synthesis rates decreased significantly with increasing fractions of DOPA, DOPE, DOPG or cardiolipin added to liposomes made of DOPC; with e.g. 5% DOPG, we observed an almost 50% decrease in the ATP synthesis rate. However, upon increasing the average distance between the proton pumps and ATP synthases, the ATP synthesis rate dropped and the lipid dependence of this activity vanished. The data indicate that protons are transferred along the membrane, between cytochrome bo3 and the ATP synthase, but only at sufficiently high protein densities. We also argue that the local protein density may be modulated by lipid-dependent changes in interactions between the two proteins complexes, which points to a mechanism by which the cell may regulate the overall activity of the respiratory chain. PMID:27063297

  19. Effect of dexmedetomidine on rats with renal ischemia-reperfusion injury and the expression of tight junction protein in kidney.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun-En; Tong, Chang-Ci; Zhang, Yu-Biao; Jin, Hong-Xu; Gao, Yan; Hou, Ming-Xiao

    2015-01-01

    To explore the protective effect of dexmedetomidine (Dex) on rats with renal ischemia-reperfusion injury and the influence of Dex on the expression of tight junction protein in kidney. Grouped 40 SPF male rats into 4 groups, sham operation group (group S), ischemia-reperfusion group (group I/R), pretreatment with Dex group (group Pre/Dex), post-treatment with Dex group (group Post/Dex), randomly, 10 rats each group. Rats in group S were anaesthetized and set up with removal of right kidney; rats in group I/R were set up with removal of right kidney and left renal artery clamping for 45 min followed by 60 min reperfusion; rats in group Pre/Dex were intravenous injected with Dex (1 μg/kg) for 30 min after indwelling catheter via femoral vein puncture; rats in group Post/Dex were intravenous injected with Dex (1 μg/kg) for 30 min after left renal reperfusion. The kidneys in each group were made out pathologic slices after 6 h I/R, stained with HE; blood samples were taken with separation plasma, creatinine (Scr) and urea nitrogen (BUN) were detected by automatic biochemical analyzer; IL-1β and TNF-α were detected by Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA); the expression level of tight junction protein ZO-1 and protein occludin in kidney were detected by Western-blot. The results of HE staining showed that, comparing to group S, the tissue of kidney in group I/R were damaged heavily with tubules dilatation and inflammation obviously, while lightened in group Pre/Dex and group Post/Dex. The results of detection of renal function and inflammatory factors showed that, comparing to group S, Scr, BUN, IL-1β and TNF-α were all enhanced in group I/R, group Pre/Dex and group Post/Dex, significantly (P < 0.05), while the inflammatory factors in group Pre/Dex and group Post/Dex were lower than in group I/R, significantly (P < 0.05). The results of Western-blot showed that the expression of protein ZO-1 and occludin in group Pre/Dex and group Post/Dex were higher than in

  20. Protein synthesis directly from PCR: progress and applications of cell-free protein synthesis with linear DNA.

    PubMed

    Schinn, Song-Min; Broadbent, Andrew; Bradley, William T; Bundy, Bradley C

    2016-06-25

    A rapid, versatile method of protein expression and screening can greatly facilitate the future development of therapeutic biologics, proteomic drug targets and biocatalysts. An attractive candidate is cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS), a cell-lysate-based in vitro expression system, which can utilize linear DNA as expression templates, bypassing time-consuming cloning steps of plasmid-based methods. Traditionally, such linear DNA expression templates (LET) have been vulnerable to degradation by nucleases present in the cell lysate, leading to lower yields. This challenge has been significantly addressed in the recent past, propelling LET-based CFPS as a useful tool for studying, screening and engineering proteins in a high-throughput manner. Currently, LET-based CFPS has promise in fields such as functional proteomics, protein microarrays, and the optimization of complex biological systems. PMID:27085957

  1. Concomitant Impact of High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein and Renal Dysfunction in Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yong Un; Kim, Min Jee; Choi, Joon Seok; Kim, Chang Seong; Bae, Eun Hui; Ma, Seong Kwon; Ahn, Young-Keun; Jeong, Myung Ho; Kim, Young Jo; Cho, Myeong Chan; Kim, Chong Jin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The present study aimed to investigate the impact of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and renal dysfunction on clinical outcomes in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients. Materials and Methods The study involved a retrospective cohort of 8332 patients admitted with AMI. The participants were divided into 4 groups according to the levels of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and hs-CRP: group I, no renal dysfunction (eGFR ≥60 mL·min-1·1.73 m-2) with low hs-CRP (≤2.0 mg/dL); group II, no renal dysfunction with high hs-CRP; group III, renal dysfunction with low hs-CRP; and group IV, renal dysfunction with high hs-CRP. We compared major adverse cardiac events (MACE) over a 1-year follow-up period. Results The 4 groups demonstrated a graded association with increased MACE rates (group I, 8.8%; group II, 13.8%; group III, 18.6%; group IV, 30.1%; p<0.001). In a Cox proportional hazards model, mortality at 12 months increased in groups II, III, and IV compared with group I [hazard ratio (HR) 2.038, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.450-2.863, p<0.001; HR 3.003, 95% CI 2.269-3.974, p<0.001; HR 5.087, 95% CI 3.755-6.891, p<0.001]. Conclusion High hs-CRP, especially in association with renal dysfunction, is related to the occurrence of composite MACE, and indicates poor prognosis in AMI patients. PMID:24339298

  2. Respective influences of age and weaning on skeletal and visceral muscle protein synthesis in the lamb.

    PubMed Central

    Attaix, D; Aurousseau, E; Bayle, G; Rosolowska-Huszcz, D; Arnal, M

    1988-01-01

    1. The influences of age and weaning on muscle protein synthesis were studied in vivo, by injecting a large dose of [3H]valine into 1-, 5- and 8-week-old suckling or 8-week-old weaned lambs. 2. The fractional rates of protein synthesis, in red- and white-fibre-type skeletal muscles or striated and smooth visceral muscles, were in 8-week-old suckling animals 24-37% of their values at 1 week of age. This developmental decline was related to decreased capacities for protein synthesis, i.e. RNA/protein ratios. 3. At 8 weeks of age, suckling and weaned lambs had similar fractional synthesis rates, capacities for protein synthesis and efficiencies of protein synthesis (i.e. rates of protein synthesis relative to RNA) in skeletal muscles. 4. In contrast, visceral-muscle fractional synthesis rates were lower in 8-week-old suckling lambs than in weaned animals, owing to decreased efficiencies of protein synthesis. It was concluded that developmental factors and the change to a solid diet, or weaning in itself, or both, affect differently skeletal and visceral muscle protein synthesis in the immature lamb. PMID:3223952

  3. Acceptability of selected low-protein products for use in a potential diet therapy for chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Van Duyn, M A

    1987-07-01

    A very-low-protein, low-phosphorus diet, supplemented with either amino acids or ketoacids, is being studied as a potential therapy for chronic renal failure. Because of the severity of the protein restriction in this dietary approach, maintenance of adequate caloric intake is a concern. Acceptability of 27 low-protein products for potential use as sources of calories in the diet was evaluated. Twenty-three dietitians judged the products on the bases of appearance, taste, texture, and overall acceptability, using a scale of 1 (unacceptable) to 5 (highly acceptable). Sixty-seven percent of the products tested received scores of more than 2.5 in all categories. Products receiving the highest scores were vanilla cream wafers (4.0), low-protein gelatin (3.97), and chocolate chip cookies (3.78). Differences in calories and protein between brands of similar products are minimal; unfortunately, phosphorus and calcium data are lacking for many products. Cost in cents per calorie is 2 to 10 times greater than in conventional foods of the same type. The results show that there are a number of acceptable low-protein products that can be used to help ensure adequate energy intakes without sacrificing protein restriction in this dietary approach for chronic renal failure. PMID:3598040

  4. Lil3 Assembles with Proteins Regulating Chlorophyll Synthesis in Barley

    PubMed Central

    Gargano, Daniela; Furnes, Clemens; Reisinger, Veronika; Arnold, Janine; Kmiec, Karol; Eichacker, Lutz Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The light-harvesting-like (LIL) proteins are a family of membrane proteins that share a chlorophyll a/b-binding motif with the major light-harvesting antenna proteins of oxygenic photoautotrophs. LIL proteins have been associated with the regulation of tetrapyrrol biosynthesis, and plant responses to light-stress. Here, it was found in a native PAGE approach that chlorophyllide, and chlorophyllide plus geranylgeraniolpyrophosphate trigger assembly of Lil3 in three chlorine binding fluorescent protein bands, termed F1, F2, and F3. It is shown that light and chlorophyllide trigger accumulation of protochlorophyllide-oxidoreductase, and chlorophyll synthase in band F3. Chlorophyllide and chlorophyll esterified to geranylgeraniol were identified as basis of fluorescence recorded from band F3. A direct interaction between Lil3, CHS and POR was confirmed in a split ubiquitin assay. In the presence of light or chlorophyllide, geranylgeraniolpyrophosphate was shown to trigger a loss of the F3 band and accumulation of Lil3 and geranylgeranyl reductase in F1 and F2. No direct interaction between Lil3 and geranylgeraniolreductase was identified in a split ubiquitin assay; however, accumulation of chlorophyll esterified to phytol in F1 and F2 corroborated the enzymes assembly. Chlorophyll esterified to phytol and the reaction center protein psbD of photosystem II were identified to accumulate together with psb29, and APX in the fluorescent band F2. Data show that Lil3 assembles with proteins regulating chlorophyll synthesis in etioplasts from barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). PMID:26172838

  5. Marginal B-6 intake affects protein synthesis in rat tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Sampson, D.A.; Kretsch, M.J.; Young, L.A.; Jansen, G.R.

    1986-03-05

    The role of vitamin B-6 in amino acid metabolism suggests that inadequate B-6 intake may impair protein synthesis. To test this hypothesis, 30 male rats (initially 227 g) were fed AIN76A diets that contained control, marginal or devoid levels of B-6 (5.8, 1.2 or 0.1 mg B-6/kg diet, by analysis) ad libitum for 9 weeks. Protein synthesis rates (PSRs) were measured in liver, kidney and calf muscle using a flooding dose of /sup 3/H-phenylalanine. Marginal and control groups ate and gained weight at similar rates. The marginal diet did not elevate xanthurenic acid (XA) excretion following a tryptophan load. However, marginal B-6 intake did depress liver PSR by 29% (2182 vs 1549 mg/day, P<.05), liver wet weight by 15% (19.0 vs 16.1 g, P<.05) and muscle PSR by 23% (3.0 vs 2.3%/day, P<.10). Unexpectedly, marginal B-6 intake increased PSR in kidney 47% (90 vs 132 mg/day, P<.05). The devoid diet, which increased XA excretion following a tryptophan load by more than 3-fold, depressed PSRs 56% in liver and 31% in muscle. However, the devoid diet decreased food intake by 40% (25.0 vs 15.0 g/day); therefore effects of devoid B-6 intake on PSRs may have been confounded by deficits in protein-energy intake in devoid vs control groups. These data demonstrate that marginal B-6 intake alters protein synthesis in tissues of the rat.

  6. Chloroplast protein synthesis: thylakoid bound polysomes synthesize thylakoid proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Hurewitz, J.; Jagendorf, A.T.

    1986-04-01

    Previous work indicated more polysomes bound to pea thylakoids in light than in the dark, in vivo. With isolated intact chloroplasts incubated in darkness, 24 to 74% more RNA was thylakoid-bound at pH 8.3 than at pH 7. Thus the major effect of light in vivo may be due to higher stroma pH. In isolated pea chloroplasts, initiation inhibitors (pactamycin and kanamycin) decreased the extent of RNA binding, and elongation inhibitors (lincomycin and streptomycin) increased it. Thus translation initiation and termination probably control the cycling of bound ribosomes. While only 3 to 6% of total RNA is in bound polysomes the incorporation of /sup 3/H-Leu into thylakoids was proportional to the amount of this bound RNA. When Micrococcal nuclease-treated thylakoids were added to labeled runoff translation products of stroma ribosomes, less than 1% of the label adhered to the added membranes; but 37% of the labeled products made by thylakoid polysomes were bound. These data support the concept that stroma ribosomes are recruited into thylakoid proteins.

  7. Common reduction of the Raf kinase inhibitory protein in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Brianne; Melo, Jason De; Yan, Judy; Kapoor, Anil; He, Lizhi; Cutz, Jean-Claude; Feng, Xingchang; Bakhtyar, Nazihah; Tang, Damu

    2014-01-01

    Despite the recent progress in our understanding of clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs), the etiology of ccRCC remains unclear. We reported here a prevailing reduction of the raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP) in ccRCC. In our examination of more than 600 ccRCC patients by western blot and immunohistochemistry, RKIP was significantly reduced in 80% of tumors. Inhibition of RKIP transcription in ccRCC occurs to greater levels than VHL transcription based on the quantification analysis of their transcripts in six large datasets of DNA microarray available in Oncomine™ with the median rank of suppression being 582 and 2343 for RKIP and VHL, respectively. Collectively, the magnitude of RKIP reduction and the levels of its downregulation match those of VHL. Furthermore, RKIP displays tumor suppressing activity in ccRCC. While modulation of RKIP expression did not affect the proliferation of A498 and 786-0 ccRCC cells and neither their ability to form xenograft tumors in NOD/SCID mice, ectopic expression or knockdown of RKIP inhibited or enhanced A498 and 786-0 ccRCC cell invasion, respectively. This was associated with robust changes in vimentin expression, a marker of EMT. Taken together, we demonstrate here that downregulation of RKIP occurs frequently at a rate that reaches that of VHL, suggesting RKIP being a critical tumor suppressor for ccRCC. This is consistent with RKIP being a tumor suppressor for other cancers. PMID:25277181

  8. Human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) in laboratory medicine and an algorithm in renal disorders.

    PubMed

    Kappelmayer, János; Antal-Szalmás, Péter; Nagy, Béla

    2015-01-01

    Over the past three decades, cancer antigen (CA) 125 has been utilized for monitoring women who were treated for ovarian cancer. However, this tumor marker showed several limitations such as false elevation in benign pelvic diseases and, in turn, no alterations in ovarian tumors at early stages with a relatively high ratio. For more than ten years, the human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) has become available for the routine laboratory repertoire, showing a higher sensitivity and specificity compared to that of CA125 in ovarian malignancies, but also in other types of tumors based on recently accumulated clinical data. Despite its remarkable diagnostic characteristics, in certain cases, the evaluation of HE4 results may be problematic when patients suffer from additional conditions that may alter HE4 level. Besides the direct effects of age and smoking, menopause status and decreased renal function also show a substantial impact on HE4 values, which should be considered in each patient. For this purpose, we attempted to create a new formula and an algorithm that may be helpful to predict the probability of the presence of ovarian tumor by using the concentrations of HE4 and CA125. PMID:25127713

  9. Inflammation and hypoxia linked to renal injury by CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein δ.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Junna; Tanaka, Tetsuhiro; Eto, Nobuaki; Nangaku, Masaomi

    2015-08-01

    Tubulointerstitial hypoxia plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of kidney injury, and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1 is a master regulator of cellular adaptation to hypoxia. Aside from oxygen molecules, factors that modify HIF-1 expression and functional operation remain obscure. Therefore, we sought to identify novel HIF-1-regulating genes in kidney. A short-hairpin RNA library consisting of 150 hypoxia-inducible genes was derived from a microarray analysis of the rat renal artery stenosis model screened for the effect on HIF-1 response. We report that CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein δ (CEBPD), a transcription factor and inflammatory response gene, is a novel HIF-1 regulator in kidney. CEBPD was induced in the nuclei of tubular epithelial cells in both acute and chronic hypoxic kidneys. In turn, CEBPD induction augmented HIF-1α expression and its transcriptional activity. Mechanistically, CEBPD directly bound to the HIF-1α promoter and enhanced its transcription. Notably, CEBPD was rapidly induced by inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1β in a nuclear factor-κB-dependent manner, which not only increased HIF-1α expression during hypoxia, but was also indispensable for the non-hypoxic induction of HIF-1α. Thus our study provides novel insight into HIF-1 regulation in tubular epithelial cells and offers a potential hypoxia and inflammation link relevant in both acute and chronic kidney diseases. PMID:25692954

  10. Amino acid metabolism and protein synthesis in malarial parasites*

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, I. W.

    1977-01-01

    Malaria-infected red cells and free parasites have limited capabilities for the biosynthesis of amino acids. Therefore, the principal amino acid sources for parasite protein synthesis are the plasma free amino acids and host cell haemoglobin. Infected cells and plasmodia incorporate exogenously supplied amino acids into protein. However, the hypothesis that amino acid utilization (from an external source) is related to availability of that amino acid in haemoglobin is without universal support: it is true for isoleucine and for Plasmodium knowlesi and P. falciparum, but not for methionine, cysteine, and other amino acids, and it does not apply to P. lophurae. More by default than by direct evidence, haemoglobin is believed to be the main amino acid reservoir available to the intraerythrocytic plasmodium. Haemoglobin, ingested via the cytostome, is held in food vacuoles where auto-oxidation takes place. As a consequence, haem is released and accumulates in the vacuole as particulate haemozoin (= malaria pigment). Current evidence favours the view that haemozoin is mainly haematin. Acid and alkaline proteases (identified in crude extracts from mammalian and avian malarias) are presumably secreted directly into the food vacuole. They then digest the denatured globin and the resulting amino acids are incorporated into parasite protein. Cell-free protein synthesizing systems have been developed using P. knowlesi and P. lophurae ribosomes. In the main these systems are typically eukaryotic. Studies of amino acid metabolism are exceedingly limited. Arginine, lysine, methionine, and proline are incorporated into protein, whereas glutamic acid is metabolized via an NADP-specific glutamic dehydrogenase. Glutamate oxidation generates NADPH and auxiliary energy (in the form of α-ketoglutarate). The role of red cell glutathione in the economy of the parasite remains obscure. Important goals for future research should be: quantitative assessment of the relative importance of

  11. Synthesis and trafficking of prion proteins in cultured cells.

    PubMed Central

    Taraboulos, A; Raeber, A J; Borchelt, D R; Serban, D; Prusiner, S B

    1992-01-01

    Scrapie prions are composed largely, if not entirely, of the scrapie prion protein (PrPSc) that is encoded by a chromosomal gene. Scrapie-infected mouse neuroblastoma (ScN2a) and hamster brain (ScHaB) cells synthesize PrPSc from the normal PrP isoform (PrPC) or a precursor through a posttranslational process. In pulse-chase radiolabeling experiments, we found that presence of brefeldin A (BFA) during both the pulse and the chase periods prevented the synthesis of PrPSc. Removal of BFA after the chase permitted synthesis of PrPSc to resume. BFA also blocked the export of nascent PrPC to the cell surface but did not alter the distribution of intracellular deposits of PrPSc. Under the same conditions, BFA caused the redistribution of the Golgi marker MG160 into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Using monensin as an inhibitor of mid-Golgi glycosylation, we determined that PrP traverses the mid-Golgi stack before acquiring protease resistance. About 1 h after the formation of PrPSc, its N-terminus was removed by a proteolytic process that was inhibited by ammonium chloride, chloroquine, and monensin, arguing that this is a lysosomal event. These results suggest that the ER is not competent for the synthesis of PrPSc and that the synthesis of PrPSc occurs during the transit of PrP between the mid-Golgi stack and lysosomes. Presumably, the endocytic pathway features in the synthesis of PrPSc. Images PMID:1356522

  12. Gram-scale synthesis of coordination polymer nanodots with renal clearance properties for cancer theranostic applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fuyao; He, Xiuxia; Chen, Hongda; Zhang, Junping; Zhang, Huimao; Wang, Zhenxin

    2015-01-01

    An ultrasmall hydrodynamic diameter is a critical factor for the renal clearance of nanoparticles from the body within a reasonable timescale. However, the integration of diagnostic and therapeutic components into a single ultrasmall nanoparticle remains challenging. In this study, pH-activated nanodots (termed Fe-CPNDs) composed of coordination polymers were synthesized via a simple and scalable method based on coordination reactions among Fe(3+), gallic acid and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) at ambient conditions. The Fe-CPNDs exhibited ultrasmall (5.3 nm) hydrodynamic diameters and electrically neutral surfaces. The Fe-CPNDs also exhibited pH-activatable magnetic resonance imaging contrast and outstanding photothermal performance. The features of Fe-CPNDs greatly increased the tumour-imaging sensitivity and facilitated renal clearance after injection in animal models in vivo. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided photothermal therapy using Fe-CPNDs completely suppressed tumour growth. These findings demonstrate that Fe-CPNDs constitute a new class of renal clearable nanomedicine for photothermal therapy and molecular imaging. PMID:26245151

  13. Gram-scale synthesis of coordination polymer nanodots with renal clearance properties for cancer theranostic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fuyao; He, Xiuxia; Chen, Hongda; Zhang, Junping; Zhang, Huimao; Wang, Zhenxin

    2015-08-01

    An ultrasmall hydrodynamic diameter is a critical factor for the renal clearance of nanoparticles from the body within a reasonable timescale. However, the integration of diagnostic and therapeutic components into a single ultrasmall nanoparticle remains challenging. In this study, pH-activated nanodots (termed Fe-CPNDs) composed of coordination polymers were synthesized via a simple and scalable method based on coordination reactions among Fe3+, gallic acid and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) at ambient conditions. The Fe-CPNDs exhibited ultrasmall (5.3 nm) hydrodynamic diameters and electrically neutral surfaces. The Fe-CPNDs also exhibited pH-activatable magnetic resonance imaging contrast and outstanding photothermal performance. The features of Fe-CPNDs greatly increased the tumour-imaging sensitivity and facilitated renal clearance after injection in animal models in vivo. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided photothermal therapy using Fe-CPNDs completely suppressed tumour growth. These findings demonstrate that Fe-CPNDs constitute a new class of renal clearable nanomedicine for photothermal therapy and molecular imaging.

  14. Gram-scale synthesis of coordination polymer nanodots with renal clearance properties for cancer theranostic applications

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fuyao; He, Xiuxia; Chen, Hongda; Zhang, Junping; Zhang, Huimao; Wang, Zhenxin

    2015-01-01

    An ultrasmall hydrodynamic diameter is a critical factor for the renal clearance of nanoparticles from the body within a reasonable timescale. However, the integration of diagnostic and therapeutic components into a single ultrasmall nanoparticle remains challenging. In this study, pH-activated nanodots (termed Fe-CPNDs) composed of coordination polymers were synthesized via a simple and scalable method based on coordination reactions among Fe3+, gallic acid and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) at ambient conditions. The Fe-CPNDs exhibited ultrasmall (5.3 nm) hydrodynamic diameters and electrically neutral surfaces. The Fe-CPNDs also exhibited pH-activatable magnetic resonance imaging contrast and outstanding photothermal performance. The features of Fe-CPNDs greatly increased the tumour-imaging sensitivity and facilitated renal clearance after injection in animal models in vivo. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided photothermal therapy using Fe-CPNDs completely suppressed tumour growth. These findings demonstrate that Fe-CPNDs constitute a new class of renal clearable nanomedicine for photothermal therapy and molecular imaging. PMID:26245151

  15. Interferon Production and Protein Synthesis in Chick Cells

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Robert M.

    1966-01-01

    Friedman, Robert M. (National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Md.). Interferon production and protein synthesis in chick cells. J. Bacteriol. 91:1224–1229. 1966.—Overnight incubation of chick embryo fibroblasts (CEF) at 4 C before infection with live Semliki Forest virus (SFV) increased virus yields but decreased interferon production. The same findings were noted when CEF were incubated for 4 hr with p-fluorophenylalanine (FPA) before infection with live SFV or inactivated Chikungunya virus. In both systems incorporation of C14-leucine into protein appeared to be increased after pretreatment at 4 C or with FPA. Protein synthesis could be raised in CEF incubated in 0.5% serum after trypsinization by increasing the concentration of serum. CEF in 10% serum had higher rates of C14-leucine incorporation than did cells in 1.5% serum, but again the cells with the apparently high rate of incorporation produced less interferon. These findings may be related to the mechanism of cellular control over interferon production. PMID:5929753

  16. Acute in vivo elevation of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) binding protein-1 decreases plasma free IGF-I and muscle protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Lang, Charles H; Vary, Thomas C; Frost, Robert A

    2003-09-01

    This study examined whether the acute elevation of IGF-binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) decreases the plasma free IGF-I concentration and alters in vivo rates of muscle protein synthesis and glucose uptake. The plasma concentration of human IGFBP-1 was increased to approximately 95 ng/ml in conscious catheterized rats infused iv with human IGFBP-1 for 4 h. Infusion of IGFBP-1 also increased the concentration of endogenous (e.g. rat) IGFBP-1 in the blood, and this response was associated with a 2- to 3-fold elevation of IGFBP-1 mRNA in liver and kidney. IGFBP-1 did not significantly alter the plasma concentration of total IGF-I, but decreased circulating free IGF-I levels by about 50%. IGFBP-1 decreased protein synthesis in the predominantly fast-twitch gastrocnemius muscle (20%), and this change resulted from a decreased translational efficiency that was associated with a decreased phosphorylation of S6K1, but not 4E-BP1. Complementary studies demonstrated that IGFBP-1 also decreased the rates of protein synthesis under basal conditions and in response to stimulation by IGF-I when added in vitro to the fast-twitch epitrochlearis muscle. In contrast, IGFBP-1 did not alter in vivo-determined rates of protein synthesis in the slow-twitch soleus muscle, heart, liver, or kidney. The infusion of IGFBP-1 did not significantly alter the plasma glucose or lactate concentration or the whole body rate of glucose production or disposal. The above-mentioned changes were not mediated indirectly by changes in the plasma insulin or corticosterone concentrations, decreased high energy phosphate content in muscle, or hepatoxicity produced by the infused IGFBP-1. These results demonstrate that acute in vivo elevation in IGFBP-1, of the magnitude observed in various catabolic conditions, is capable of selectively decreasing protein synthesis in fast-twitch skeletal muscle and up-regulating the hepatic and renal syntheses of IGFBP-1 per se. Hence, elevations in circulating and tissue levels

  17. Lewis lung carcinoma regulation of mechanical stretch-induced protein synthesis in cultured myotubes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; Carson, James A

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical stretch can activate muscle and myotube protein synthesis through mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling. While it has been established that tumor-derived cachectic factors can induce myotube wasting, the effect of this catabolic environment on myotube mechanical signaling has not been determined. We investigated whether media containing cachectic factors derived from Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) can regulate the stretch induction of myotube protein synthesis. C2C12 myotubes preincubated in control or LLC-derived media were chronically stretched. Protein synthesis regulation by anabolic and catabolic signaling was then examined. In the control condition, stretch increased mTORC1 activity and protein synthesis. The LLC treatment decreased basal mTORC1 activity and protein synthesis and attenuated the stretch induction of protein synthesis. LLC media increased STAT3 and AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation in myotubes, independent of stretch. Both stretch and LLC independently increased ERK1/2, p38, and NF-κB phosphorylation. In LLC-treated myotubes, the inhibition of ERK1/2 and p38 rescued the stretch induction of protein synthesis. Interestingly, either leukemia inhibitory factor or glycoprotein 130 antibody administration caused further inhibition of mTORC1 signaling and protein synthesis in stretched myotubes. AMP-activated protein kinase inhibition increased basal mTORC1 signaling activity and protein synthesis in LLC-treated myotubes, but did not restore the stretch induction of protein synthesis. These results demonstrate that LLC-derived cachectic factors can dissociate stretch-induced signaling from protein synthesis through ERK1/2 and p38 signaling, and that glycoprotein 130 signaling is associated with the basal stretch response in myotubes. PMID:26491045

  18. Combining in Vitro Folding with Cell Free Protein Synthesis for Membrane Protein Expression.

    PubMed

    Focke, Paul J; Hein, Christopher; Hoffmann, Beate; Matulef, Kimberly; Bernhard, Frank; Dötsch, Volker; Valiyaveetil, Francis I

    2016-08-01

    Cell free protein synthesis (CFPS) has emerged as a promising methodology for protein expression. While polypeptide production is very reliable and efficient using CFPS, the correct cotranslational folding of membrane proteins during CFPS is still a challenge. In this contribution, we describe a two-step protocol in which the integral membrane protein is initially expressed by CFPS as a precipitate followed by an in vitro folding procedure using lipid vesicles for converting the protein precipitate to the correctly folded protein. We demonstrate the feasibility of using this approach for the K(+) channels KcsA and MVP and the amino acid transporter LeuT. We determine the crystal structure of the KcsA channel obtained by CFPS and in vitro folding to show the structural similarity to the cellular expressed KcsA channel and to establish the feasibility of using this two-step approach for membrane protein production for structural studies. Our studies show that the correct folding of these membrane proteins with complex topologies can take place in vitro without the involvement of the cellular machinery for membrane protein biogenesis. This indicates that the folding instructions for these complex membrane proteins are contained entirely within the protein sequence. PMID:27384110

  19. Kluyveromyces marxianus as a host for heterologous protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Gombert, Andreas K; Madeira, José Valdo; Cerdán, María-Esperanza; González-Siso, María-Isabel

    2016-07-01

    The preferentially respiring and thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus is an emerging host for heterologous protein synthesis, surpassing the traditional preferentially fermenting yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in some important aspects: K . marxianus can grow at temperatures 10 °C higher than S. cerevisiae, which may result in decreased costs for cooling bioreactors and reduced contamination risk; has ability to metabolize a wider variety of sugars, such as lactose and xylose; is the fastest growing eukaryote described so far; and does not require special cultivation techniques (such as fed-batch) to avoid fermentative metabolism. All these advantages exist together with a high secretory capacity, performance of eukaryotic post-translational modifications, and with a generally regarded as safe (GRAS) status. In the last years, replication origins from several Kluyveromyces spp. have been used for the construction of episomal vectors, and also integrative strategies have been developed based on the tendency for non-homologous recombination displayed by K. marxianus. The recessive URA3 auxotrophic marker and the dominant Kan(R) are mostly used for selection of transformed cells, but other markers have been made available. Homologous and heterologous promoters and secretion signals have been characterized, with the K. marxianus INU1 expression and secretion system being of remarkable functionality. The efficient synthesis of roughly 50 heterologous proteins has been demonstrated, including one thermophilic enzyme. In this mini-review, we summarize the physiological characteristics of K. marxianus relevant for its use in the efficient synthesis of heterologous proteins, the efforts performed hitherto in the development of a molecular toolbox for this purpose, and some successful examples. PMID:27260286

  20. Responses of insect cells to baculovirus infection: protein synthesis shutdown and apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Du, X; Thiem, S M

    1997-01-01

    Protein synthesis is globally shut down at late times postinfection in the baculovirus Autographa californica M nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV)-infected gypsy moth cell line Ld652Y. A single gene, hrf-1, from another baculovirus, Lymantria dispar M nucleopolyhedrovirus, is able to preclude protein synthesis shutdown and ensure production of AcMNPV progeny in Ld652Y cells (S. M. Thiem, X. Du, M. E. Quentin, and M. M. Berner, J. Virol. 70:2221-2229, 1996; X. Du and S. M. Thiem, Virology 227:420-430, 1997). AcMNPV contains a potent antiapoptotic gene, p35, and protein synthesis arrest was reported in apoptotic insect cells induced by infection with AcMNPV lacking p35. In exploring the function of host range factor 1 (HRF-1) and the possible connection between protein synthesis shutdown and apoptosis, a series of recombinant AcMNPVs with different complements of p35 and hrf-1 were employed in apoptosis and protein synthesis assays. We found that the apoptotic suppressor AcMNPV P35 was translated prior to protein synthesis shutdown and functioned to prevent apoptosis. HRF-1 prevented protein synthesis shutdown even when the cells were undergoing apoptosis, but HRF-1 could not functionally substitute for P35. The DNA synthesis inhibitor aphidicolin could block both apoptosis and protein synthesis shutdown in Ld652Y cells infected with p35 mutant AcMNPVs but not the protein synthesis shutdown in wild-type AcMNPV-infected Ld652Y cells. These data suggest that protein synthesis shutdown and apoptosis are separate responses of Ld652Y cells to AcMNPV infection and that P35 is involved in inducing a protein synthesis shutdown response in the absence of late viral gene expression in Ld652Y cells. A model was developed for these responses of Ld652Y cells to AcMNPV infection. PMID:9311875

  1. Electrochemical template synthesis of multisegment nanowires: fabrication and protein functionalization.

    PubMed

    Wildt, Bridget; Mali, Prashant; Searson, Peter C

    2006-12-01

    Multisegment nanowires represent a unique platform for engineering multifunctional nanoparticles for a wide range of applications. For example, the optical and magnetic properties of nanowires can be tailored by modifying the size, shape, and composition of each segment. Similarly, surface modification can be used to tailor chemical and biological properties. In this article, we report on recent work on electrochemical template synthesis of nanogap electrodes, the fabrication of multisegment nanowires with embedded catalysts, and the selective functionalization of multisegment nanowires with proteins. PMID:17129026

  2. Truly Absorbed Microbial Protein Synthesis, Rumen Bypass Protein, Endogenous Protein, and Total Metabolizable Protein from Starchy and Protein-Rich Raw Materials: Model Comparison and Predictions.

    PubMed

    Parand, Ehsan; Vakili, Alireza; Mesgaran, Mohsen Danesh; van Duinkerken, Gert; Yu, Peiqiang

    2015-07-29

    This study was carried out to measure truly absorbed microbial protein synthesis, rumen bypass protein, and endogenous protein loss, as well as total metabolizable protein, from starchy and protein-rich raw feed materials with model comparisons. Predictions by the DVE2010 system as a more mechanistic model were compared with those of two other models, DVE1994 and NRC-2001, that are frequently used in common international feeding practice. DVE1994 predictions for intestinally digestible rumen undegradable protein (ARUP) for starchy concentrates were higher (27 vs 18 g/kg DM, p < 0.05, SEM = 1.2) than predictions by the NRC-2001, whereas there was no difference in predictions for ARUP from protein concentrates among the three models. DVE2010 and NRC-2001 had highest estimations of intestinally digestible microbial protein for starchy (92 g/kg DM in DVE2010 vs 46 g/kg DM in NRC-2001 and 67 g/kg DM in DVE1994, p < 0.05 SEM = 4) and protein concentrates (69 g/kg DM in NRC-2001 vs 31 g/kg DM in DVE1994 and 49 g/kg DM in DVE2010, p < 0.05 SEM = 4), respectively. Potential protein supplies predicted by tested models from starchy and protein concentrates are widely different, and comparable direct measurements are needed to evaluate the actual ability of different models to predict the potential protein supply to dairy cows from different feedstuffs. PMID:26118653

  3. Involvement of protein kinase C activation in L-leucine-induced stimulation of protein synthesis in l6 myotubes.

    PubMed

    Yagasaki, Kazumi; Morisaki, Naoko; Kitahara, Yoshiro; Miura, Atsuhito; Funabiki, Ryuhei

    2003-11-01

    Effects of leucine and related compounds on protein synthesis were studied in L6 myotubes. The incorporation of [(3)H]tyrosine into cellular protein was measured as an index of protein synthesis. In leucine-depleted L6 myotubes, leucine and its keto acid, alpha-ketoisocaproic acid (KIC), stimulated protein synthesis, while D-leucine did not. Mepacrine, an inhibitor of both phospholipases A(2) and C, canceled stimulatory actions of L-leucine and KIC on protein synthesis. Neither indomethacin, an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase, nor caffeic acid, an inhibitor of lipoxygenase, diminished their stimulatory actions, suggesting no involvement of arachidonic acid metabolism. Conversely, 1-O-hexadecyl-2-O-methylglycerol, an inhibitor of proteinkinase C, significantly canceled the stimulatory actions of L-leucine and KIC on protein synthesis, suggesting an involvement of phosphatidylinositol degradation and activation of protein kinase C. L-Leucine caused a rapid activation of protein kinase C in both cytosol and membrane fractions of the cells. These results strongly suggest that both L-leucine and KIC stimulate protein synthesis in L6 myotubes through activation of phospholipase C and protein kinase C. PMID:19003213

  4. Expanding the chemical toolbox for the synthesis of large and uniquely modified proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondalapati, Somasekhar; Jbara, Muhammad; Brik, Ashraf

    2016-05-01

    Methods to prepare proteins that include a specific modification at a desired position are essential for understanding their cellular functions and physical properties in living systems. Chemical protein synthesis, which relies on the chemoselective ligation of unprotected peptides, enables the preparation of modified proteins that are not easily fabricated by other methods. In contrast to recombinant approaches, chemical synthesis can be used to prepare protein analogues such as D-proteins, which are useful in protein structure determination and the discovery of novel therapeutics. Post-translationally modifying proteins is another example where chemical protein synthesis proved itself as a powerful approach for preparing samples with high homogeneity and in workable quantities. In this Review, we discuss the basic principles of the field, focusing on novel chemoselective peptide ligation approaches such as native chemical ligation and the recent advances based on this method with a proven record of success in the synthesis of highly important protein targets.

  5. Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) Affects Global Protein Synthesis in Dividing Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Shuang; Rambo, Brittany; Skucha, Sylvia; Weber, Megan J.; Alani, Sara; Bocchetta, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is dependent on Notch-1 signaling for survival. Targeting Notch-1 by means of γ-secretase inhibitors (GSI) proved effective in killing hypoxic NSCLC. Post-mortem analysis of GSI-treated, NSCLC-burdened mice suggested enhanced phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 at threonines 37/46 in hypoxic tumor tissues. In vitro dissection of this phenomenon revealed that Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) inhibition was responsible for a non-canonical 4E-BP1 phosphorylation pattern rearrangement—a process, in part, mediated by APP regulation of the pseudophosphatase Styx. Upon APP depletion we observed modifications of eIF-4F composition indicating increased recruitment of eIF-4A to the mRNA cap. This phenomenon was supported by the observation that cells with depleted APP were partially resistant to silvestrol, an antibiotic that interferes with eIF-4A assembly into eIF-4F complexes. APP downregulation in dividing human cells increased the rate of global protein synthesis, both cap- and IRES-dependent. Such an increase seemed independent of mTOR inhibition. After administration of Torin-1, APP downregulation and Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC-1) inhibition affected 4E-BP1 phosphorylation and global protein synthesis in opposite fashions. Additional investigations indicated that APP operates independently of mTORC-1. Key phenomena described in this study were reversed by overexpression of the APP C-terminal domain. The presented data suggest that APP may be a novel regulator of protein synthesis in dividing human cells, both cancerous and primary. Furthermore, APP appears to affect translation initiation using mechanisms seemingly dissimilar to mTORC-1 regulation of cap-dependent protein synthesis. PMID:25283437

  6. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) affects global protein synthesis in dividing human cells.

    PubMed

    Sobol, Anna; Galluzzo, Paola; Liang, Shuang; Rambo, Brittany; Skucha, Sylvia; Weber, Megan J; Alani, Sara; Bocchetta, Maurizio

    2015-05-01

    Hypoxic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is dependent on Notch-1 signaling for survival. Targeting Notch-1 by means of γ-secretase inhibitors (GSI) proved effective in killing hypoxic NSCLC. Post-mortem analysis of GSI-treated, NSCLC-burdened mice suggested enhanced phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 at threonines 37/46 in hypoxic tumor tissues. In vitro dissection of this phenomenon revealed that Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) inhibition was responsible for a non-canonical 4E-BP1 phosphorylation pattern rearrangement-a process, in part, mediated by APP regulation of the pseudophosphatase Styx. Upon APP depletion we observed modifications of eIF-4F composition indicating increased recruitment of eIF-4A to the mRNA cap. This phenomenon was supported by the observation that cells with depleted APP were partially resistant to silvestrol, an antibiotic that interferes with eIF-4A assembly into eIF-4F complexes. APP downregulation in dividing human cells increased the rate of global protein synthesis, both cap- and IRES-dependent. Such an increase seemed independent of mTOR inhibition. After administration of Torin-1, APP downregulation and Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC-1) inhibition affected 4E-BP1 phosphorylation and global protein synthesis in opposite fashions. Additional investigations indicated that APP operates independently of mTORC-1. Key phenomena described in this study were reversed by overexpression of the APP C-terminal domain. The presented data suggest that APP may be a novel regulator of protein synthesis in dividing human cells, both cancerous and primary. Furthermore, APP appears to affect translation initiation using mechanisms seemingly dissimilar to mTORC-1 regulation of cap-dependent protein synthesis. PMID:25283437

  7. Development of injury in a rat model of chronic renal allograft rejection: effect of dietary protein restriction.

    PubMed

    Bombas, A; Stein-Oakley, A N; Baxter, K; Thomson, N M; Jablonski, P

    1999-01-01

    Non-allogeneic factors such as increased nephron "workload" may contribute to chronic renal allograft rejection. Reducing dietary protein from 20% to 8% was tested in a model of chronic rejection: Dark Agouti kidney to Albino Surgery recipient, "tolerised" by previous donor blood transfusions. Survival, weight gain, serum creatinine concentration and creatinine clearance were similar for both groups at all times. Urinary protein was significantly (P < 0.05) lower in the low-protein (LP) group 1 month after transplantation. After 3 and 6 months, both groups demonstrated mild chronic rejection. After 6 months, tubular atrophy was significantly (P < 0.05) less in the LP group and interstitial fibrosis was marginally reduced. Glomerular hypertrophy, glomerular sclerosis, tubular dilatation, leucocyte infiltration, adhesion molecule expression and TGF-beta1 mRNA expression were similarly increased in both groups. Thus, reducing dietary protein to 8% lowered urinary protein, but did not significantly affect the development of chronic rejection in renal allografts beyond affording a degree of protection from tubulointerstitial damage. PMID:10080402

  8. Evolution, structure, and synthesis of vertebrate egg-coat proteins

    PubMed Central

    Litscher, Eveline S.; Wassarman, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    All vertebrate eggs are surrounded by an extracellular coat that supports growth of oocytes, protects oocytes, eggs, and early embryos, and participates in the process of fertilization. In mammals (platypus to human beings) the coat is called a zona pellucida (ZP) and in non-mammals (molluscs to birds), a vitelline envelope (VE). The ZP and VE are composed of just a few proteins that are related to one another and possess a common motif, called the zona pellucida domain (ZPD). The ZPD arose more than ~600 million years ago, consists of ~260 amino acids, and has 8 conserved Cys residues that participate in 4 intramolecular disulfides. It is likely that egg-coat proteins are derived from a common ancestral gene. This gene duplicated several times during evolution and gave rise to 3–4 genes in fish, 5 genes in amphibians, 6 genes in birds, and 3–4 genes in mammals. Some highly divergent sequences, N- and C-terminal to the ZPD, have been identified in egg-coat proteins and some of these sequences may be under positive Darwinian selection that drives evolution of the proteins. These and other aspects of egg-coat proteins, including their structure and synthesis, are addressed in this review. PMID:26504367

  9. A Network Synthesis Model for Generating Protein Interaction Network Families

    PubMed Central

    Sahraeian, Sayed Mohammad Ebrahim; Yoon, Byung-Jun

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we introduce a novel network synthesis model that can generate families of evolutionarily related synthetic protein–protein interaction (PPI) networks. Given an ancestral network, the proposed model generates the network family according to a hypothetical phylogenetic tree, where the descendant networks are obtained through duplication and divergence of their ancestors, followed by network growth using network evolution models. We demonstrate that this network synthesis model can effectively create synthetic networks whose internal and cross-network properties closely resemble those of real PPI networks. The proposed model can serve as an effective framework for generating comprehensive benchmark datasets that can be used for reliable performance assessment of comparative network analysis algorithms. Using this model, we constructed a large-scale network alignment benchmark, called NAPAbench, and evaluated the performance of several representative network alignment algorithms. Our analysis clearly shows the relative performance of the leading network algorithms, with their respective advantages and disadvantages. The algorithm and source code of the network synthesis model and the network alignment benchmark NAPAbench are publicly available at http://www.ece.tamu.edu/bjyoon/NAPAbench/. PMID:22912671

  10. Prion protein interaction with stress-inducible protein 1 enhances neuronal protein synthesis via mTOR

    PubMed Central

    Roffé, Martín; Beraldo, Flávio Henrique; Bester, Romina; Nunziante, Max; Bach, Christian; Mancini, Gabriel; Gilch, Sabine; Vorberg, Ina; Castilho, Beatriz A.; Martins, Vilma Regina; Hajj, Glaucia Noeli Maroso

    2010-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are fatal neurodegenerative diseases caused by the conversion of prion protein (PrPC) into an infectious isoform (PrPSc). How this event leads to pathology is not fully understood. Here we demonstrate that protein synthesis in neurons is enhanced via PrPC interaction with stress-inducible protein 1 (STI1). We also show that neuroprotection and neuritogenesis mediated by PrPC–STI1 engagement are dependent upon the increased protein synthesis mediated by PI3K-mTOR signaling. Strikingly, the translational stimulation mediated by PrPC–STI1 binding is corrupted in neuronal cell lines persistently infected with PrPSc, as well as in primary cultured hippocampal neurons acutely exposed to PrPSc. Consistent with this, high levels of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) phosphorylation were found in PrPSc-infected cells and in neurons acutely exposed to PrPSc. These data indicate that modulation of protein synthesis is critical for PrPC–STI1 neurotrophic functions, and point to the impairment of this process during PrPSc infection as a possible contributor to neurodegeneration. PMID:20615969

  11. Consumption of Milk Protein or Whey Protein Results in a Similar Increase in Muscle Protein Synthesis in Middle Aged Men

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Cameron J.; McGregor, Robin A.; D’Souza, Randall F.; Thorstensen, Eric B.; Markworth, James F.; Fanning, Aaron C.; Poppitt, Sally D.; Cameron-Smith, David

    2015-01-01

    The differential ability of various milk protein fractions to stimulate muscle protein synthesis (MPS) has been previously described, with whey protein generally considered to be superior to other fractions. However, the relative ability of a whole milk protein to stimulate MPS has not been compared to whey. Sixteen healthy middle-aged males ingested either 20 g of milk protein (n = 8) or whey protein (n = 8) while undergoing a primed constant infusion of ring 13C6 phenylalanine. Muscle biopsies were obtained 120 min prior to consumption of the protein and 90 and 210 min afterwards. Resting myofibrillar fractional synthetic rates (FSR) were 0.019% ± 0.009% and 0.021% ± 0.018% h−1 in the milk and whey groups respectively. For the first 90 min after protein ingestion the FSR increased (p < 0.001) to 0.057% ± 0.018% and 0.052% ± 0.024% h−1 in the milk and whey groups respectively with no difference between groups (p = 0.810). FSR returned to baseline in both groups between 90 and 210 min after protein ingestion. Despite evidence of increased rate of digestion and leucine availability following the ingestion of whey protein, there was similar activation of MPS in middle-aged men with either 20 g of milk protein or whey protein. PMID:26506377

  12. Human liver-type fatty acid-binding protein protects against tubulointerstitial injury in aldosterone-induced renal injury.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Daisuke; Kamijo-Ikemori, Atsuko; Sugaya, Takeshi; Shibagaki, Yugo; Yasuda, Takashi; Hoshino, Seiko; Katayama, Kimie; Igarashi-Migitaka, Junko; Hirata, Kazuaki; Kimura, Kenjiro

    2015-01-15

    To demonstrate the renoprotective function of human liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (hL-FABP) expressed in proximal tubules in aldosterone (Aldo)-induced renal injury, hL-FABP chromosomal transgenic (Tg) and wild-type (WT) mice received systemic Aldo infusions (Tg-Aldo and WT-Aldo, respectively) were given 1% NaCl water for 28 days. In this model, elevation of systolic blood pressure, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 expression, macrophage infiltration in the interstitium, tubulointerstitial damage, and depositions of type I and III collagens were observed. Elevation of systolic blood pressure did not differ in WT-Aldo vs. Tg-Aldo animals, however, renal injury was suppressed in Tg-Aldo compared with WT-Aldo mice. Dihydroethidium fluorescence was used to evaluate reactive oxidative stress, which was suppressed in Tg-Aldo compared with WT-Aldo mice. Gene expression of angiotensinogen in the kidney was upregulated, and excretion of urinary angiotensinogen was increased in WT-Aldo mice. This exacerbation was suppressed in Tg-Aldo mice. Expression of hL-FABP was upregulated in proximal tubules of Tg-Aldo mice. Urinary excretion of hL-FABP was significantly greater in Tg-Aldo than in Tg-control mice. In conclusion, hL-FABP ameliorated the tubulointerstitial damage in Aldo-induced renal injury via reducing oxidative stress and suppressing activation of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system. PMID:25339700

  13. Growth pattern switch of renal cells and expression of cell cycle related proteins at the early stage of diabetic nephropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yanling; Shi Yonghong; Liu Yaling; Dong Hui; Liu, Maodong; Li Ying; Duan Huijun

    2007-11-09

    Renal hypertrophy, partly due to cell proliferation and hypertrophy, has been found correlated to renal function deterioration in diabetes mellitus. We screened the up-regulated cell cycle related genes to investigate cell growth and the expression of cell cycle regulating proteins at the early stage of diabetic nephropathy using STZ-induced diabetic rats. Cyclin E, CDK{sub 2} and P{sup 27} were found significantly up-regulated in diabetic kidney. Increased cell proliferation in the kidney was seen at day 3, peaked at day 5, and returned to normal level at day 30. Cyclin E and CDK{sub 2} expression also peeked at day 5 and P{sup 27} activity peaked at day 14. These findings indicate that a hyperplastic growth period of renal cells is followed by a hypertrophic growth period at the early stage of diabetes. The growth pattern switch may be regulated by cell cycle regulating proteins, Cyclin E, CDK{sub 2}, and P{sup 27}.

  14. Krüppel-Like Zinc Finger Protein Glis2 Is Essential for the Maintenance of Normal Renal Functions▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong-Sik; Kang, Hong Soon; Herbert, Ronald; Beak, Ju Youn; Collins, Jennifer B.; Grissom, Sherry F.; Jetten, Anton M.

    2008-01-01

    To obtain insight into the physiological functions of the Krüppel-like zinc finger protein Gli-similar 2 (Glis2), mice deficient in Glis2 expression were generated. Glis2 mutant (Glis2mut) mice exhibit significantly shorter life spans than do littermate wild-type (WT) mice due to the development of progressive chronic kidney disease with features resembling nephronophthisis. Glis2mut mice develop severe renal atrophy involving increased cell death and basement membrane thickening in the proximal convoluted tubules. This development is accompanied by infiltration of lymphocytic inflammatory cells and interstitial/glomerular fibrosis. The severity of the fibrosis, inflammatory infiltrates, and glomerular and tubular changes progresses with age. Blood urea nitrogen and creatinine increase, and Glis2mut mice develop proteinuria and ultimately die prematurely of renal failure. A comparison of the gene expression profiles of kidneys from 25-day-old/60-day-old WT and Glis2mut mice by microarray analysis showed increased expressions of many genes involved in immune responses/inflammation and fibrosis/tissue remodeling in kidneys of Glis2mut mice, including several cytokines and adhesion and extracellular matrix proteins. Our data demonstrate that a deficiency in Glis2 expression leads to tubular atrophy and progressive fibrosis, similar to nephronophthisis, that ultimately results in renal failure. Our study indicates that Glis2 plays a critical role in the maintenance of normal kidney architecture and functions. PMID:18227149

  15. Evolution of Protein Synthesis from an RNA World

    PubMed Central

    Noller, Harry F.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Because of the molecular complexity of the ribosome and protein synthesis, it is a challenge to imagine how translation could have evolved from a primitive RNA World. Two specific suggestions are made here to help to address this, involving separate evolution of the peptidyl transferase and decoding functions. First, it is proposed that translation originally arose not to synthesize functional proteins, but to provide simple (perhaps random) peptides that bound to RNA, increasing its available structure space, and therefore its functional capabilities. Second, it is proposed that the decoding site of the ribosome evolved from a mechanism for duplication of RNA. This process involved homodimeric “duplicator RNAs,” resembling the anticodon arms of tRNAs, which directed ligation of trinucleotides in response to an RNA template. PMID:20610545

  16. Characterization of a protein cofactor that mediates protein kinase A regulation of the renal brush border membrane Na(+)-H+ exchanger.

    PubMed Central

    Weinman, E J; Steplock, D; Wang, Y; Shenolikar, S

    1995-01-01

    Activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A inhibits the renal proximal tubule brush border membrane Na(+)-H+ exchanger by a process involving participation of a regulatory cofactor (NHE-RF) that is distinct from the transporter itself. Recent studies from this laboratory reported a partial amino acid sequence of this putative cofactor (Weinman, E. J., D. H. Steplock, and S. Shenolikar. 1993. J. Clin. Invest. 92:1781-1786). The present experiments detail the structure of the NHE-RF protein as determined from molecular cloning studies. A codon-biased oligonucleotide probe to a portion of the amino acid sequence of the putative cofactor was used to isolate a 1.9-kb cDNA from a rabbit renal library. The encoded protein is 358 amino acids in length and is rich in proline residues. Search of existing data bases indicates that NHE-RF is a unique protein. Using a reticulocyte lysate, the cDNA translated a product of approximately 44 kD, which was recognized by an affinity-purified polyclonal antibody to NHE-RF. Potential phosphorylation sites for protein kinase A are present. The mRNA for the protein is expressed in kidney, proximal small intestine, and liver. Reverse transcription/PCR studies in the kidney indicate the presence of mRNA for NHE-RF in several distinct nephron segments including the proximal tubule. Images PMID:7738182

  17. Synthesis of several membrane proteins during developmental aggregation in Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed

    Orndorff, P E; Dworkin, M

    1982-01-01

    We have examined the pattern of synthesis of several membrane proteins during the aggregation phase of development in Myxococcus xanthus. Development was initiated by plating vegetative cells on polycarbonate filters placed on top of an agar medium that supported fruiting body formation. At various times during aggregation a filter was removed, the cells were pulse-labeled with [35S]methionine, and the membrane proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The rate of synthesis of numerous individual proteins changed during aggregation; we concentrated on six whose pattern of synthesis was greatly altered during aggregation. The rate of synthesis of five of the six proteins increased considerably during aggregation; that of the remaining protein was curtailed and appeared to be regulated by nutrient conditions. Three of the five major membrane proteins that increased during aggregation had a unique pattern of synthesis that was displayed only under conditions that are are required for development - high cell density, nutrient depletion, and a solid (agar) surface. The remaining two proteins were not unique to development; the appearance of one protein could be induced under conditions of high cell density, whereas the other could be induced by placing the cells on a solid agar surface. All of the five major proteins that appeared during development did so during the preaggregation stage, and the synthesis of four of the five proteins appeared to be curtailed late in aggregation. The synthesis of the remaining protein continued throughout aggregation. PMID:6798022

  18. Impaired renal secretion of substrates for the multidrug resistance protein 2 in mutant transport-deficient (TR-) rats.

    PubMed

    Masereeuw, Rosalinde; Notenboom, Sylvia; Smeets, Pascal H E; Wouterse, Alfons C; Russel, Frans G M

    2003-11-01

    Previous studies with mutant transport-deficient rats (TR(-)), in which the multidrug resistance protein 2 (Mrp2) is lacking, have emphasized the importance of this transport protein in the biliary excretion of a wide variety of glutathione conjugates, glucuronides, and other organic anions. Mrp2 is also present in the luminal membrane of proximal tubule cells of the kidney, but little information is available on its role in the renal excretion of xenobiotics. The authors compared renal transport of the fluorescent Mrp2 substrates calcein, fluo-3, and lucifer yellow (LY) between perfused kidneys isolated from Wistar Hannover (WH) and TR(-) rats. Isolated rat kidneys were perfused with 100 nM of the nonfluorescent calcein-AM or 500 nM fluo3-AM, which enter the tubular cells by diffusion and are hydrolyzed intracellularly into the fluorescent anion. The urinary excretion rates of calcein and fluo-3 were 3 to 4 times lower in perfused kidneys from TR(-) rats compared with WH rats. In contrast, the renal excretion of LY (10 micro M, free anion) was somewhat delayed but appeared unimpaired in TR(-) rats. Membrane vesicles from Sf9 cells expressing human MRP2 or human MRP4 indicated that MRP2 exhibits a preferential affinity for calcein and fluo-3, whereas LY is a better substrate for MRP4. We conclude that the renal clearance of the Mrp2 substrates calcein and fluo-3 is significantly reduced in TR(-) rat; for LY, the absence of the transporter may be compensated for by (an)other organic anion transporter(s). PMID:14569083

  19. Application of electroimmunoassay to the study of plasma protein synthesis in cultured hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Grieninger, G; Pindyck, J; Hertzberg, K M; Mosesson, M W

    1979-01-01

    Electroimmunoassay has been applied to the study of plasma protein synthesis and secretion in liver cell cultures. The assay is performed on unconcentrated samples of culture medium containing the secreted plasma proteins and yields results within 2 hours. The characteristics of plasma protein production by the cultured hepatocytes coupled with the sensitivity of this assay permit the study of plasma protein in synthesis and its regulation by hormones and other agents without the routine use of radioisotopes. PMID:518014

  20. In female rats, ethylene glycol treatment elevates protein expression of hepatic and renal oxalate transporter sat-1 (Slc26a1) without inducing hyperoxaluria

    PubMed Central

    Breljak, Davorka; Brzica, Hrvoje; Vrhovac, Ivana; Micek, Vedran; Karaica, Dean; Ljubojević, Marija; Sekovanić, Ankica; Jurasović, Jasna; Rašić, Dubravka; Peraica, Maja; Lovrić, Mila; Schnedler, Nina; Henjakovic, Maja; Wegner, Waja; Burckhardt, Gerhard; Burckhardt, Birgitta C.; Sabolić, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Aim To investigate whether the sex-dependent expression of hepatic and renal oxalate transporter sat-1 (Slc26a1) changes in a rat model of ethylene glycol (EG)-induced hyperoxaluria. Methods Rats were given tap water (12 males and 12 females; controls) or EG (12 males and 12 females; 0.75% v/v in tap water) for one month. Oxaluric state was confirmed by biochemical parameters in blood plasma, urine, and tissues. Expression of sat-1 and rate-limiting enzymes of oxalate synthesis, alcohol dehydrogenase 1 (Adh1) and hydroxy-acid oxidase 1 (Hao1), was determined by immunocytochemistry (protein) and/or real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (mRNA). Results EG-treated males had significantly higher (in μmol/L; mean ± standard deviation) plasma (59.7 ± 27.2 vs 12.9 ± 4.1, P < 0.001) and urine (3716 ± 1726 vs 241 ± 204, P < 0.001) oxalate levels, and more abundant oxalate crystaluria than controls, while the liver and kidney sat-1 protein and mRNA expression did not differ significantly between these groups. EG-treated females, in comparison with controls had significantly higher (in μmol/L) serum oxalate levels (18.8 ± 2.9 vs 11.6 ± 4.9, P < 0.001), unchanged urine oxalate levels, low oxalate crystaluria, and significantly higher expression (in relative fluorescence units) of the liver (1.59 ± 0.61 vs 0.56 ± 0.39, P = 0.006) and kidney (1.77 ± 0.42 vs 0.69 ± 0.27, P < 0.001) sat-1 protein, but not mRNA. The mRNA expression of Adh1 was female-dominant and that of Hao1 male-dominant, but both were unaffected by EG treatment. Conclusions An increased expression of hepatic and renal oxalate transporting protein sat-1 in EG-treated female rats could protect from hyperoxaluria and oxalate urolithiasis. PMID:26526882

  1. The renal and hepatic distribution of Bence Jones proteins depends on glycosylation: a scintigraphic study in rats.

    PubMed

    Prado, M J; Nicastri, A L; Costa, P L; Rockman, T; Tersariol, I L; Nader, H B; Barros, R T; Prado, E B

    1997-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate renal and liver distribution of two monoclonal immunoglobulin light chains. The chains were purified individually from the urine of patients with multiple myeloma and characterized as lambda light chains with a molecular mass of 28 kDa. They were named BJg (high amount of galactose residues exposed) and BJs (sialic acid residues exposed) on the basis of carbohydrate content. A scintigraphic study was performed on male Wistar rats weighing 250 g for 60 min after i.v. administration of 1 mg of each protein (7.4 MBq), as the intact proteins and also after carbohydrate oxidation. Images were obtained with a Siemens gamma camera with a high-resolution collimator and processed with a MicroDelta system. Hepatic and renal distribution were established and are reported as percent of injected dose. Liver uptake of BJg was significantly higher than liver uptake of BJs (94.3 vs 81.4%) (P < 0.05). This contributed to its greater removal from the intravascular compartment, and consequently lower kidney accumulation of BJg in comparison to BJs (5.7 vs 18.6%) (P < 0.05). After carbohydrate oxidation, there was a decrease in hepatic accumulation of both proteins and consequently a higher renal overload. The tissue distribution of periodate-treated BJg was similar to that of native BJs: 82.7 vs 81.4% in the liver and 17.3 vs 18.6% in the kidneys. These observations indicate the important role of sugar residues of Bence Jones proteins for their recognition by specific membrane receptors, which leads to differential tissue accumulation and possible toxicity. PMID:9361711

  2. The mitochondrial outer membrane protein MDI promotes local protein synthesis and mtDNA replication.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Chen, Yong; Gucek, Marjan; Xu, Hong

    2016-05-17

    Early embryonic development features rapid nuclear DNA replication cycles, but lacks mtDNA replication. To meet the high-energy demands of embryogenesis, mature oocytes are furnished with vast amounts of mitochondria and mtDNA However, the cellular machinery driving massive mtDNA replication in ovaries remains unknown. Here, we describe a Drosophila AKAP protein, MDI that recruits a translation stimulator, La-related protein (Larp), to the mitochondrial outer membrane in ovaries. The MDI-Larp complex promotes the synthesis of a subset of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins by cytosolic ribosomes on the mitochondrial surface. MDI-Larp's targets include mtDNA replication factors, mitochondrial ribosomal proteins, and electron-transport chain subunits. Lack of MDI abolishes mtDNA replication in ovaries, which leads to mtDNA deficiency in mature eggs. Targeting Larp to the mitochondrial outer membrane independently of MDI restores local protein synthesis and rescues the phenotypes of mdi mutant flies. Our work suggests that a selective translational boost by the MDI-Larp complex on the outer mitochondrial membrane might be essential for mtDNA replication and mitochondrial biogenesis during oogenesis. PMID:27053724

  3. Integrating gene synthesis and microfluidic protein analysis for rapid protein engineering

    PubMed Central

    Blackburn, Matthew C.; Petrova, Ekaterina; Correia, Bruno E.; Maerkl, Sebastian J.

    2016-01-01

    The capability to rapidly design proteins with novel functions will have a significant impact on medicine, biotechnology and synthetic biology. Synthetic genes are becoming a commodity, but integrated approaches have yet to be developed that take full advantage of gene synthesis. We developed a solid-phase gene synthesis method based on asymmetric primer extension (APE) and coupled this process directly to high-throughput, on-chip protein expression, purification and characterization (via mechanically induced trapping of molecular interactions, MITOMI). By completely circumventing molecular cloning and cell-based steps, APE-MITOMI reduces the time between protein design and quantitative characterization to 3–4 days. With APE-MITOMI we synthesized and characterized over 400 zinc-finger (ZF) transcription factors (TF), showing that although ZF TFs can be readily engineered to recognize a particular DNA sequence, engineering the precise binding energy landscape remains challenging. We also found that it is possible to engineer ZF–DNA affinity precisely and independently of sequence specificity and that in silico modeling can explain some of the observed affinity differences. APE-MITOMI is a generic approach that should facilitate fundamental studies in protein biophysics, and protein design/engineering. PMID:26704969

  4. Non-standard amino acid incorporation into proteins using Escherichia coli cell-free protein synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seok Hoon; Kwon, Yong-Chan; Jewett, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Incorporating non-standard amino acids (NSAAs) into proteins enables new chemical properties, new structures, and new functions. In recent years, improvements in cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) systems have opened the way to accurate and efficient incorporation of NSAAs into proteins. The driving force behind this development has been three-fold. First, a technical renaissance has enabled high-yielding (>1 g/L) and long-lasting (>10 h in batch operation) CFPS in systems derived from Escherichia coli. Second, the efficiency of orthogonal translation systems has improved. Third, the open nature of the CFPS platform has brought about an unprecedented level of control and freedom of design. Here, we review recent developments in CFPS platforms designed to precisely incorporate NSAAs. In the coming years, we anticipate that CFPS systems will impact efforts to elucidate structure/function relationships of proteins and to make biomaterials and sequence-defined biopolymers for medical and industrial applications.

  5. Perioperative glutamine supplementation restores disturbed renal arginine synthesis after open aortic surgery: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, Saskia J H; Buijs, Nikki; Vermeulen, Mechteld A R; Oosterink, Efraim; Schierbeek, Henk; Beishuizen, Albertus; de Vries, Jean-Paul P M; Wisselink, Willem; van Leeuwen, Paul A M

    2016-09-01

    Postoperative renal failure is a common complication after open repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. The amino acid arginine is formed in the kidneys from its precursor citrulline, and citrulline is formed from glutamine in the intestines. Arginine enhances the function of the immune and cardiovascular systems, which is important for recovery after surgery. We hypothesized that renal arginine production is diminished after ischemia-reperfusion injury caused by clamping of the aorta during open abdominal aortic surgery and that parenteral glutamine supplementation might compensate for this impaired arginine synthesis. This open-label clinical trial randomized patients who underwent clamping of the aorta during open abdominal aortic surgery to receive a perioperative supplement of intravenous alanyl-glutamine (0.5 g·kg(-1)·day(-1); group A, n = 5) or no supplement (group B, n = 5). One day after surgery, stable isotopes and tracer methods were used to analyze the metabolism and conversion of glutamine, citrulline, and arginine. Whole body plasma flux of glutamine, citrulline, and arginine was significantly higher in group A than in group B (glutamine: 391 ± 34 vs. 258 ± 19 μmol·kg(-1)·h(-1), citrulline: 5.7 ± 0.4 vs. 2.8 ± 0.4 μmol·kg(-1)·h(-1), and arginine: 50 ± 4 vs. 26 ± 2 μmol·kg(-1)·h(-1), P < 0.01), as was the synthesis of citrulline from glutamine (4.8 ± 0.7 vs. 1.6 ± 0.3 μmol·kg(-1)·h(-1)), citrulline from arginine (2.3 ± 0.3 vs. 0.96 ± 0.1 μmol·kg(-1)·h(-1)), and arginine from glutamine (7.7 ± 0.4 vs. 2.8 ± 0.2 μmol·kg(-1)·h(-1)), respectively (P < 0.001 for all). In conclusion, the production of citrulline and arginine is severely reduced after clamping during aortic surgery. This study shows that an intravenous supplement of glutamine increases the production of citrulline and arginine and compensates for the inhibitory effect of ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:27194717

  6. AB248. Expression of EphA2 protein is positively associated with age, tumor size and Fuhrman nuclear grade in clear cell renal cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Longxin; Zhou, Wenquan

    2016-01-01

    Background The receptor tyrosine kinase of EphA2 has been shown frequently overexpressed in various types of human carcinomas, but the relationship between the expression of EphA2 protein in clear cell renal cell carcinoma was not well documented. Methods In the present study, using specific anit-EphA2 polyclonal antibody and immunohistochemistry, we evaluated EphA2 protein expression levels in clear cell RCC specimens surgically resected from 90 patients. Results Our results shows that EphA2 protein was positively expressed in all normal renal tubes of 90 samples (100%, 3+), which was expressed at low levels in renal cortex but high levels in the collecting ducts of the renal medulla and papilla. EphA2 was negatively or weakly expressed in 30 out of 90 samples (33.3%, 0/1+), moderately expressed in 24 samples (26.7%, 2+) and strongly expressed in 36 samples (40%, 3+). Expression of EphA2 was positively associated with age (P=0.029), tumor diameters (P<0.001) and Fuhrman nuclear grade (P<0.001). Conclusions Our results indicate that EphA2 variably expressed in clear cell renal cell carci-nomas. High expression of EphA2 was more often found in big size and high nuclear grade tumors, which indicated EphA2 protein may be used as a new marker for the prognosis of clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

  7. Effect of dietary protein quality and feeding level on milk secretion and mammary protein synthesis in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Sampson, D.A.; Jansen, G.R.

    1985-04-01

    Protein synthesis was studied in mammary tissue of rats fed diets deficient in protein quality and/or restricted in food intake throughout gestation and lactation. Diets containing 25% wheat gluten (WG), wheat gluten plus lysine and threonine (WGLT), or casein (C) were pair-fed from conception until day 15 of lactation at 100% or 85% of WG ad libitum consumption (PF100 and PF85, respectively). A seventh group was fed C ad libitum. Rates of protein synthesis were measured in vivo at day 15 of lactation from incorporation of (3-/sup 3/H)phenylalanine. At both PF100 and PF85, fractional and absolute rates of mammary gland protein synthesis were two- to three-fold higher in rats fed C than in those fed WG. Pup weights showed similar treatment effects. Both mammary protein synthesis rates and pup weights were significantly higher in rats fed C at PF85 than rats fed WG ad libitum. Food restriction from PF100 to PF85 depressed pup weights and mammary protein synthesis rates in rats fed WGLT, but had no effect in rats fed WG. These results demonstrate that when food intake is restricted, improvement of protein quality of the maternal diet increases milk output in the rat in association with increased rates of mammary protein synthesis.

  8. Feeding rapidly stimulates protein synthesis in skeletal muscle of neonatal pigs by enhancing translation initiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Food consumption increases protein synthesis in most tissues by promoting translation initiation, and in the neonate, this increase is greatest in skeletal muscle. In this study, we aimed to identify the currently unknown time course of changes in the rate of protein synthesis and the activation of ...

  9. Long-term leucine induced stimulation of muscle protein synthesis is amino acid dependent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infusing leucine for 1 h increases skeletal muscle protein synthesis in the neonate, but this is not sustained for 2 h unless the corresponding fall in amino acids is prevented. This study aimed to determine whether a continuous leucine infusion can stimulate protein synthesis for a prolonged period...

  10. On the Role of Hippocampal Protein Synthesis in the Consolidation and Reconsolidation of Object Recognition Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossato, Janine I.; Bevilaqua, Lia R. M.; Myskiw, Jociane C.; Medina, Jorge H.; Izquierdo, Ivan; Cammarota, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Upon retrieval, consolidated memories are again rendered vulnerable to the action of metabolic blockers, notably protein synthesis inhibitors. This has led to the hypothesis that memories are reconsolidated at the time of retrieval, and that this depends on protein synthesis. Ample evidence indicates that the hippocampus plays a key role both in…

  11. Differential effects of long-term leucine infusion on tissue protein synthesis in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leucine is unique among the amino acids in its ability to promote protein synthesis by activating translation initiation via the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Previously, we showed that leucine infusion acutely stimulates protein synthesis in fast-twitch glycolytic muscle of neonatal...

  12. Recalling an Aversive Experience by Day-Old Chicks Is Not Dependent on Somatic Protein Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mileusnic, Radmila; Lancashire, Christine L.; Rose, Steven P. R.

    2005-01-01

    Long-term memory is dependent on protein synthesis and inhibiting such synthesis following training results in amnesia for the task. Proteins synthesized during training must be transported to the synapse and disrupting microtubules with Colchicines, and hence, blocking transport, results in transient amnesia. Reactivating memory for a previously…

  13. Social Recognition Memory Requires Two Stages of Protein Synthesis in Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Gerald; Engelmann, Mario; Richter, Karin

    2005-01-01

    Olfactory recognition memory was tested in adult male mice using a social discrimination task. The testing was conducted to begin to characterize the role of protein synthesis and the specific brain regions associated with activity in this task. Long-term olfactory recognition memory was blocked when the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin was…

  14. LOCAL IGF-I ENHANCES THE SENSITIVITY OF MUSCLE PROTEIN SYNTHESIS TO INSULIN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Skeletal muscle protein synthesis in the immature muscle is highly sensitive to insulin and nutrients. We hypothesized that this sensitivity of protein synthesis to insulin is attributable to local IGFs that are expressed at a significant level by immature skeletal muscle. To test the hypothesis, t...

  15. STIMULATION OF MUSCLE PROTEIN SYNTHESIS BY GLUCOSE IN NEONATES IS AMP KINASE INDEPENDENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Muscle protein synthesis is elevated in the neonate, in part due to an elevated response to the rise in amino acids and insulin after a meal. Recent evidence suggests that glucose may also play a role in the regulation of protein synthesis. AMP kinase has been recognized as an energy sensor and a ...

  16. Feeding-induced time course of changes in protein synthesis in neonatal pig skeletal muscle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Feeding increases protein synthesis by promoting translation initiation, and in the neonate, this increase is greatest in skeletal muscle. This study aimed to identify the feeding-induced time course of the changes in protein synthesis and translation factor activation in muscle. Piglets (n=36; 5-7 ...

  17. Prolonged leucine infusion differentially affects tissue protein synthesis in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leucine (Leu) acutely stimulates protein synthesis by activating the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway. To determine whether Leu can stimulate protein synthesis in muscles of different fiber types and visceral tissues of the neonate for a prolonged period and to determine the ...

  18. MODULATION OF MUSCLE PROTEIN SYNTHESIS BY INSULIN IS MAINTAINED DURING NEONATAL ENDOTOXEMIA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sepsis promotes insulin resistance and reduces protein synthesis in skeletal muscle of adults. The effect of sepsis on insulin-stimulated muscle protein synthesis has not been determined in neonates, a highly anabolic population that is uniquely sensitive to insulin. Overnight fasted neonatal pigs w...

  19. Somatotropin enhanced muscle protein synthesis in growing pigs is not modulated by insulin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic, 7-day treatment of growing pigs with porcine somatotropin (ST) promotes protein synthesis and doubles postprandial levels of insulin, a hormone that enhances translation initiation. This study aimed to determine whether the ST-induced increase in skeletal muscle protein synthesis was media...

  20. Post-prandial changes in protein synthesis in red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) larvae.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Ian D; Fuiman, Lee A

    2011-06-01

    Protein synthesis is one of the major energy-consuming processes in all living organisms. Post-prandial changes in protein synthesis have been studied in a range of animal taxa but have been little studied in fish larvae. Using the flooding-dose method, we measured post-prandial changes in whole-body rates of protein synthesis in regularly fed red drum Sciaenops ocellatus (Linnaeus) larvae for 24-28 h following their daily meal. Fractional rates of protein synthesis increased from a baseline (pre-feeding) rate of 16% day(-1) to a post-prandial peak of 48% day(-1) ca. 8 h after feeding before declining to 12% day(-1) after 24-28 h. The overall mean daily rate of protein synthesis was calculated as 27% day(-1). Although suggested as energetically impossible in larval poikilotherms, our results show that rates in excess of 30% day(-1) can be attained by larval fishes for a few hours but are not sustained. The average daily energetic cost of protein synthesis was estimated as 34% of daily total oxygen consumption, ranging from 19% immediately before feeding to 61% during the post-prandial peak in protein synthesis. This suggests that during the post-prandial peak, protein synthesis will require a large proportion of the hourly energy production, which, given the limited metabolic scope in fish larvae, may limit the energy that could otherwise be allocated to other energy-costly functions, such as foraging and escape responses. PMID:21562168

  1. Robust Chemical Synthesis of Membrane Proteins through a General Method of Removable Backbone Modification.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ji-Shen; He, Yao; Zuo, Chao; Cai, Xiao-Ying; Tang, Shan; Wang, Zhipeng A; Zhang, Long-Hua; Tian, Chang-Lin; Liu, Lei

    2016-03-16

    Chemical protein synthesis can provide access to proteins with post-translational modifications or site-specific labelings. Although this technology is finding increasing applications in the studies of water-soluble globular proteins, chemical synthesis of membrane proteins remains elusive. In this report, a general and robust removable backbone modification (RBM) method is developed for the chemical synthesis of membrane proteins. This method uses an activated O-to-N acyl transfer auxiliary to install in the Fmoc solid-phase peptide synthesis process a RBM group with switchable reactivity toward trifluoroacetic acid. The method can be applied to versatile membrane proteins because the RBM group can be placed at any primary amino acid. With RBM, the membrane proteins and their segments behave almost as if they were water-soluble peptides and can be easily handled in the process of ligation, purification, and mass characterizations. After the full-length protein is assembled, the RBM group can be readily removed by trifluoroacetic acid. The efficiency and usefulness of the new method has been demonstrated by the successful synthesis of a two-transmembrane-domain protein (HCV p7 ion channel) with site-specific isotopic labeling and a four-transmembrane-domain protein (multidrug resistance transporter EmrE). This method enables practical synthesis of small- to medium-sized membrane proteins or membrane protein domains for biochemical and biophysical studies. PMID:26943264

  2. Defects in MAP1S-mediated autophagy turnover of fibronectin cause renal fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    He, Yongzhong; Li, Xun; Zhao, Haibo; Su, Zhengming; Jiang, Xianhan; Li, Wenjiao; Zou, Jing; Chen, Qi; Liu, Leyuan

    2016-01-01

    Excessive deposition of extracellular matrix proteins in renal tissues causes renal fibrosis and renal function failure. Mammalian cells primarily use the autophagy-lysosome system to degrade misfolded/aggregated proteins and dysfunctional organelles. MAP1S is an autophagy activator and promotes the biogenesis and degradation of autophagosomes. Previously, we reported that MAP1S suppresses hepatocellular carcinogenesis in a mouse model and predicts a better prognosis in patients suffering from clear cell renal cell carcinomas. Furthermore, we have characterized that MAP1S enhances the turnover of fibronectin, and mice overexpressing LC3 but with MAP1S deleted accumulate fibronectin and develop liver fibrosis because of the synergistic impact of LC3-induced over-synthesis of fibronectin and MAP1S depletion-caused impairment of fibronectin degradation. Here we show that a suppression of MAP1S in renal cells caused an impairment of autophagy clearance of fibronectin and an activation of pyroptosis. Depletion of MAP1S in mice leads to an accumulation of fibrosis-related proteins and the development of renal fibrosis in aged mice. The levels of MAP1S were dramatically reduced and levels of fibronectin were greatly elevated in renal fibrotic tissues from patients diagnosed as renal atrophy and renal failure. Therefore, MAP1S deficiency may cause the accumulation of fibronectin and the development of renal fibrosis. PMID:27236336

  3. Assessment of protein synthesis in highly aerobic canine species at the onset and during exercise training

    PubMed Central

    Ehrlicher, Sarah E.; Drake, Joshua C.; Peelor, Frederick F.; Biela, Laurie M.; Pratt-Phillips, Shannon; Davis, Michael; Hamilton, Karyn L.

    2015-01-01

    Canis lupus familiaris, the domesticated dog, is capable of extreme endurance performance. The ability to perform sustained aerobic exercise is dependent on a well-developed mitochondrial reticulum. In this study we examined the cumulative muscle protein and DNA synthesis in groups of athletic dogs at the onset of an exercise training program and following a strenuous exercise training program. We hypothesized that both at the onset and during an exercise training program there would be greater mitochondrial protein synthesis rates compared with sedentary control with no difference in mixed or cytoplasmic protein synthesis rates. Protein synthetic rates of three protein fractions and DNA synthesis were determined over 1 wk using 2H2O in competitive Alaskan Huskies and Labrador Retrievers trained for explosive device detection. Both groups of dogs had very high rates of skeletal muscle protein synthesis in the sedentary state [Alaskan Huskies: Mixed = 2.28 ± 0.12, cytoplasmic (Cyto) = 2.91 ± 0.10, and mitochondrial (Mito) = 2.62 ± 0.07; Labrador Retrievers: Mixed = 3.88 ± 0.37, Cyto = 3.85 ± 0.06, and Mito = 2.92 ± 0.20%/day]. Mitochondrial (Mito) protein synthesis rates did not increase at the onset of an exercise training program. Exercise-trained dogs maintained Mito protein synthesis during exercise training when mixed (Mixed) and cytosolic (Cyto) fractions decreased, and this coincided with a decrease in p-RpS6 but also a decrease in p-ACC signaling. Contrary to our hypothesis, canines did not have large increases in mitochondrial protein synthesis at the onset or during an exercise training program. However, dogs have a high rate of protein synthesis compared with humans that perhaps does not necessitate an extra increase in protein synthesis at the onset of aerobic exercise training. PMID:25614602

  4. Involvement of spliced X-box binding protein 1 in renal fibrosis induced by unilateral ureteral obstruction in mice.

    PubMed

    Shao, D-C; Miao, Nai-Jun; Li, Jia-Jia

    2016-04-25

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is involved in the process of kidney fibrosis. Spliced X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1S) is the key mediator of ER stress while its role in fibrosis is still poorly understood. This study was aimed to investigate the role of XBP1S in renal fibrosis and evaluate whether valsartan could alleviate fibrosis through XBP1S. Renal interstitial fibrosis was induced by unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) in C57BL/6 mice, and UUO mice were daily administered with valsartan (20 mg/kg) through oral gavage. After 7 days of UUO, at euthanasia, left kidney was collected to examine the histological alteration by using haematoxylin-eosin staining, Masson's trichrome staining, Sirius red staining and immunohistochemistry. Western blot was used to assess XBP1S, targets of XBP1S, fibronectin, α-SMA, BAX and BCL2 protein levels. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed to assess NADPH oxidase subunits p47-phox and p67-phox mRNA levels. The results showed that XBP1S expression was decreased by about 70% in the UUO mice compared with that in sham mice (P < 0.01), which was reversed by valsartan administration (P < 0.05). Meanwhile, UUO-induced renal interstitial fibrosis was attenuated by valsartan treatment. In addition, the protein levels of fibronectin and α-SMA were upregulated by UUO induction (P < 0.01), and valsartan administration inhibited the protein levels of fibronectin and α-SMA in UUO mice (P < 0.05). Western blot analysis showed that the ratio of BAX to BCL2 protein level was increased in UUO model compared with that in sham mice, and the increment also was diminished by valsartan treatment (P < 0.05). Finally, UUO-induced mRNA levels of p47-phox and p67-phox were significantly attenuated by valsartan administration (P < 0.05). These results showed that valsartan at least partly restores renal interstitial fibrosis by enhancing XBP1S activation through inhibiting oxidative stress and apoptosis in the UUO mice. These results

  5. Estrogen receptor α inhibitor activates the unfolded protein response, blocks protein synthesis, and induces tumor regression.

    PubMed

    Andruska, Neal D; Zheng, Xiaobin; Yang, Xujuan; Mao, Chengjian; Cherian, Mathew M; Mahapatra, Lily; Helferich, William G; Shapiro, David J

    2015-04-14

    Recurrent estrogen receptor α (ERα)-positive breast and ovarian cancers are often therapy resistant. Using screening and functional validation, we identified BHPI, a potent noncompetitive small molecule ERα biomodulator that selectively blocks proliferation of drug-resistant ERα-positive breast and ovarian cancer cells. In a mouse xenograft model of breast cancer, BHPI induced rapid and substantial tumor regression. Whereas BHPI potently inhibits nuclear estrogen-ERα-regulated gene expression, BHPI is effective because it elicits sustained ERα-dependent activation of the endoplasmic reticulum (EnR) stress sensor, the unfolded protein response (UPR), and persistent inhibition of protein synthesis. BHPI distorts a newly described action of estrogen-ERα: mild and transient UPR activation. In contrast, BHPI elicits massive and sustained UPR activation, converting the UPR from protective to toxic. In ERα(+) cancer cells, BHPI rapidly hyperactivates plasma membrane PLCγ, generating inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3), which opens EnR IP3R calcium channels, rapidly depleting EnR Ca(2+) stores. This leads to activation of all three arms of the UPR. Activation of the PERK arm stimulates phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α), resulting in rapid inhibition of protein synthesis. The cell attempts to restore EnR Ca(2+) levels, but the open EnR IP3R calcium channel leads to an ATP-depleting futile cycle, resulting in activation of the energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase and phosphorylation of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2). eEF2 phosphorylation inhibits protein synthesis at a second site. BHPI's novel mode of action, high potency, and effectiveness in therapy-resistant tumor cells make it an exceptional candidate for further mechanistic and therapeutic exploration. PMID:25825714

  6. [Renal disease].

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Cuevas, María de Los Ángeles

    2016-09-01

    Chronic renal failure in its various stages, requires certain nutritional restrictions associated with the accumulation of minerals and waste products that cannot be easily eliminated by the kidneys. Some of these restrictions modify the intake of proteins, sodium, and phosphorus. Milk and dairy products are sources of these nutrients. This article aims to inform the reader about the benefits including milk and dairy products relying on a scientific and critical view according to the clinical conditions and the stage of renal disease in which the patient is. PMID:27603894

  7. Arginine Depletion by Arginine Deiminase Does Not Affect Whole Protein Metabolism or Muscle Fractional Protein Synthesis Rate in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Marini, Juan C.; Didelija, Inka Cajo

    2015-01-01

    Due to the absolute need for arginine that certain cancer cells have, arginine depletion is a therapy in clinical trials to treat several types of cancers. Arginine is an amino acids utilized not only as a precursor for other important molecules, but also for protein synthesis. Because arginine depletion can potentially exacerbate the progressive loss of body weight, and especially lean body mass, in cancer patients we determined the effect of arginine depletion by pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG 20) on whole body protein synthesis and fractional protein synthesis rate in multiple tissues of mice. ADI-PEG 20 successfully depleted circulating arginine (<1 μmol/L), and increased citrulline concentration more than tenfold. Body weight and body composition, however, were not affected by ADI-PEG 20. Despite the depletion of arginine, whole body protein synthesis and breakdown were maintained in the ADI-PEG 20 treated mice. The fractional protein synthesis rate of muscle was also not affected by arginine depletion. Most tissues (liver, kidney, spleen, heart, lungs, stomach, small and large intestine, pancreas) were able to maintain their fractional protein synthesis rate; however, the fractional protein synthesis rate of brain, thymus and testicles was reduced due to the ADI-PEG 20 treatment. Furthermore, these results were confirmed by the incorporation of ureido [14C]citrulline, which indicate the local conversion into arginine, into protein. In conclusion, the intracellular recycling pathway of citrulline is able to provide enough arginine to maintain protein synthesis rate and prevent the loss of lean body mass and body weight. PMID:25775142

  8. Cell-free protein synthesis enables high yielding synthesis of an active multicopper oxidase.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Lawton, Thomas J; Kostecki, Jan S; Nisthal, Alex; Fang, Jia; Mayo, Stephen L; Rosenzweig, Amy C; Jewett, Michael C

    2016-02-01

    Multicopper oxidases (MCOs) are broadly distributed in all kingdoms of life and perform a variety of important oxidative reactions. These enzymes have potential biotechnological applications; however, the applications are impeded by low expression yields in traditional recombinant hosts, solubility issues, and poor copper cofactor assembly. As an alternative to traditional recombinant protein expression, we show the ability to use cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) to produce complex MCO proteins with high soluble titers. Specifically, we report the production of MCOs in an Escherichia coli-based cell-free transcription-translation system. Total yields as high as 1.2 mg mL(-1) were observed after a 20-h batch reaction. More than 95% of the protein was soluble and activity was obtained by simple post-CFPS addition of copper ions in the form of CuSO4 . Scale-up reactions were achieved from 15 to 100 µL without a decrease in productivity and solubility. CFPS titers were higher than in vivo expression titers and more soluble, avoiding the formation of inclusion bodies. Our work extends the utility of the cell-free platform to the production of active proteins containing copper cofactors and demonstrates a simple method for producing MCOs. PMID:26356243

  9. Avian renal proximal tubule urate secretion is inhibited by cellular stress-induced AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Bataille, Amy M; Maffeo, Carla L; Renfro, J Larry

    2011-06-01

    Urate is a potent antioxidant at high concentrations but it has also been associated with a wide variety of health risks. Plasma urate concentration is determined by ingestion, production, and urinary excretion; however, factors that regulate urate excretion remain uncertain. The objective of this study was to determine whether cellular stress, which has been shown to affect other renal transport properties, modulates urate secretion in the avian renal proximal tubule. Chick kidney proximal tubule epithelial cell primary culture monolayers were used to study the transepithelial transport of radiolabeled urate. This model allowed examination of the processes, such as multidrug resistance protein 4 (Mrp4, Abcc4), which subserve urate secretion in a functional, intact, homologous system. Our results show that the recently implicated urate efflux transporter, breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2), does not significantly contribute to urate secretion in this system. Exposure to a high concentration of zinc for 6 h induced a cellular stress response and a striking decrease in transepithelial urate secretion. Acute exposure to zinc had no effect on transepithelial urate secretion or isolated membrane vesicle urate transport, suggesting involvement of a cellular stress adaptation. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a candidate modulator of ATP-dependent urate efflux, by 5'-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide 1-β-d-ribo-furanoside caused a decrease in urate secretion similar to that seen with zinc-induced cellular stress. This effect was prevented with the AMPK inhibitor compound C. Notably, the decrease in urate secretion seen with zinc-induced cellular stress was also prevented by compound C, implicating AMPK in regulation of renal uric acid excretion. PMID:21429974

  10. Stabilization of tubulin mRNA by inhibition of protein synthesis in sea urchin embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Z Y; Brandhorst, B P

    1988-01-01

    An increased level of unpolymerized tubulin caused by depolymerization of microtubules in sea urchin larvae resulted in a rapid loss of tubulin mRNA, which was prevented by nearly complete inhibition of protein synthesis. Results of an RNA run-on assay indicated that inhibition of protein synthesis does not alter tubulin gene transcription. Analysis of the decay of tubulin mRNA in embryos in which RNA synthesis was inhibited by actinomycin D indicated that inhibition of protein synthesis prevents the destabilization of tubulin mRNA. The effect was similar whether mRNA was maintained on polysomes in the presence of emetine or anisomycin or displaced from the polysomes in the presence of puromycin or pactamycin; thus, the stabilization of tubulin mRNA is not dependent on the state of the polysomes after inhibition of protein synthesis. Even after tubulin mRNA declined to a low level after depolymerization of microtubules, it could be rescued by treatment of embryos with inhibitors of protein synthesis. Tubulin mRNA could be induced to accumulate prematurely in gastrulae but not in plutei if protein synthesis was inhibited, an observation that is indicative of the importance of the autogenous regulation of tubulin mRNA stability during embryogenesis. Possible explanations for the role of protein synthesis in the control of mRNA stability are discussed. Images PMID:3211150