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Sample records for renibacterium salmoninarum extracellular

  1. Further characterization of Renibacterium salmoninarum extracellular products.

    PubMed

    Barton, T A; Bannister, L A; Griffiths, S G; Lynch, W H

    1997-10-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum, the agent of bacterial kidney disease in salmonids, releases high concentrations of extracellular protein in tissues of infected fish. The extracellular protein consists almost entirely of a 57-kDa protein and derivatives of degradation and aggregation of the same molecule. The 57-kDa protein and its derivatives were fractionated into defined ranges of molecular mass. Separated fractions continued to produce degradation and aggregation products. One-dimensional electrophoretic separation of extracellular protein revealed a number of proteolytically active bands from > 100 to approximately 18 kDa associated with various 57-kDa protein derivatives in the different molecular mass fractions. Two-dimensional separation of extracellular protein showed that continued degradation and aggregation, similar both in location and behavior to some of the 57-kDa protein derivatives, was also displayed by the proteolytically active bands after their separation. Effects of reducing agents and sulfhydryl group proteinase inhibitors indicated a common mechanism for the proteolytically active polypeptides characteristic of a thiol proteinase. The results suggested that the 57-kDa protein and some of its derivatives undergo autolytic cleavage, releasing a proteolytically active polypeptide(s) of at least 18 kDa. Soluble polysaccharide-like material also was detected in extracellular products and tissue from infected fish. Antiserum to the polysaccharide-like material cross-reacted with O-polysaccharide of the fish pathogen Aeromonas salmonicida, suggesting some structural similarity between these polysaccharides. The polysaccharide and the proteolytic activity associated with the 57-kDa protein derivatives should be investigated with respect to the pathogenesis of R. salmoninarum infections. PMID:9480644

  2. Further characterization of Renibacterium salmoninarum extracellular products.

    PubMed Central

    Barton, T A; Bannister, L A; Griffiths, S G; Lynch, W H

    1997-01-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum, the agent of bacterial kidney disease in salmonids, releases high concentrations of extracellular protein in tissues of infected fish. The extracellular protein consists almost entirely of a 57-kDa protein and derivatives of degradation and aggregation of the same molecule. The 57-kDa protein and its derivatives were fractionated into defined ranges of molecular mass. Separated fractions continued to produce degradation and aggregation products. One-dimensional electrophoretic separation of extracellular protein revealed a number of proteolytically active bands from > 100 to approximately 18 kDa associated with various 57-kDa protein derivatives in the different molecular mass fractions. Two-dimensional separation of extracellular protein showed that continued degradation and aggregation, similar both in location and behavior to some of the 57-kDa protein derivatives, was also displayed by the proteolytically active bands after their separation. Effects of reducing agents and sulfhydryl group proteinase inhibitors indicated a common mechanism for the proteolytically active polypeptides characteristic of a thiol proteinase. The results suggested that the 57-kDa protein and some of its derivatives undergo autolytic cleavage, releasing a proteolytically active polypeptide(s) of at least 18 kDa. Soluble polysaccharide-like material also was detected in extracellular products and tissue from infected fish. Antiserum to the polysaccharide-like material cross-reacted with O-polysaccharide of the fish pathogen Aeromonas salmonicida, suggesting some structural similarity between these polysaccharides. The polysaccharide and the proteolytic activity associated with the 57-kDa protein derivatives should be investigated with respect to the pathogenesis of R. salmoninarum infections. PMID:9480644

  3. Detection of a vascular permeability factor in the extracellular products of Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed

    Bandín, I; Santos, Y; Toranzo, A E; Barja, J L

    1992-09-01

    The presence of vascular permeability factors in the extracellular products (ECP) of 10 strains of Renibacterium salmoninarum with different geographical origin and serological characteristics are reported. All the ECP produced haemorrhagic and/or oedematous zones at the injection site with a diameter ranging from 10-30 mm. However, the ECP samples did not display toxic effect in fish at the same dose as inoculated in rabbit (180-400 micrograms protein/0.1 ml). No differences were observed in the production of this dermatotoxic factor between the two antigenic groups found in this microorganism. Whereas heating (80 and 100 degrees C/15 min) the ECP samples resulted in a complete loss of their proteolytic activity, only a decrease (but not total inactivation) of the dermatotoxic effects was detected. Therefore, although proteases could be implicated in the permeability factor, they are not totally responsible for this activity. PMID:1291845

  4. In vitro effects of the extracellular protein of Renibacterium salmoninarum on phagocyte function in brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis).

    PubMed

    Densmore, C L; Smith, S A; Holladay, S D

    1998-04-30

    Renibacterium salmoninarum is a facultative intracellular pathogen often found in host phagocytes where it appears to successfully avoid the host fish's immunological defenses. The objective of this investigation was to determine if soluble extracellular protein (ECP) produced by R. salmoninarum may contribute to the immunomodulation in bacterial kidney disease (BKD) via inhibition of phagocyte respiratory burst and/or phagocytosis mechanisms. Splenic cells from adult brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) were incubated with two different concentrations of ECP (0.1 mg/ml and 1.0 mg/ml) and viable R. salmoninarum. Splenic cell cultures were evaluated for respiratory burst activity via flow cytometry with the dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCF-DA) assay and for phagocytosis via light microscopic assessment of microsphere engulfment. Respiratory burst activity was significantly inhibited in all treatment groups as compared to untreated fish, while no differences were noted in phagocytic activity. PMID:9646439

  5. Serine proteinase of Renibacterium salmoninarum digests a major autologous extracellular and cell-surface protein.

    PubMed

    Rockey, D D; Turaga, P S; Wiens, G D; Cook, B A; Kaattari, S L

    1991-10-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum is a pathogen of salmonid fish that produces large amounts of extracellular protein (ECP) during growth. A proteolytic activity present in ECP at elevated temperatures digested the majority of the proteins in ECP. This digestion was also associated with the loss of ECP immunosuppressive function. In vitro activity of the proteinase in ECP was temperature dependent: it was not detected in an 18-h digest at 4 and 17 degrees C but became readily apparent at 37 degrees C. Proteinase activity was detected at bacterial physiological temperatures (17 degrees C) in reactions incubated for several days. Under these conditions, digestion of partially purified p57, a major constituent of ECP and a major cell-surface protein, yielded a spectrum of breakdown products similar in molecular weight and antigenicity to those in ECP. This pattern of digestion suggests that most of the immunologically related constituents of ECP are p57 and its breakdown products. The proteolytic activity was sensitive to phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, methanol, and ethanol and to 10-min incubation at temperatures above 65 degrees C. Electrophoretic analysis of the proteinase on polyacrylamide gels containing proteinase substrates indicated the native form to be 100 kDa or greater. The enzyme was active against selected unrelated substrates only when coincubated with a denaturant (0.1% lauryl sulfate) and (or) a reducing agent (20 mM dithiothreitol). PMID:1777853

  6. Bacterial kidney disease (Renibacterium salmoninarum)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial kidney disease (BKD), caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum, is a prevalent disease of salmonid fish that impacts sustainable production for consumption and species conservation efforts. The disease is chronic in nature and mortality most often occurs in juvenile salmonids and prespawning a...

  7. Molecular cloning of Renibacterium salmoninarum DNA fragments.

    PubMed

    Etchegaray, J P; Martínez, M A; Krauskopf, M; León, G

    1991-03-15

    A Renibacterium salmoninarum enriched recombinant DNA library was constructed to isolate DNA fragments which could be used as probes to detect gene sequences specific for the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease in salmonid fish. One fragment of 149 base pairs was isolated and its specificity and sequence determined. This probe may prove useful in the design of diagnostic tests for the disease in asymptomatic fish and ova. PMID:2044941

  8. The fish pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum: growth in a microaerophilic atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Hirvelä-Koski, Varpu

    2008-02-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum is the etiologic agent of bacterial kidney disease (BKD) occurring worldwide in salmonid fish. This bacterium has previously been regarded as a strict aerobic species. However, in this study it is shown that R. salmoninarum grows well in microaerophilic atmosphere, the colony size being larger and the colonies being more mucoid than in aerobic conditions. Microaerophilic cultivation might be one possibility to increase the sensitivity of the cultivation method for the detection of this slowly growing pathogen. PMID:17884309

  9. Virulence of Renibacterium salmoninarum to salmonids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Starliper, C.E.; Smith, D.R.; Shatzer, T.

    1997-01-01

    Virulence of Renibacterium salmoninarum isolates representing five origins was evaluated in eight salmonid hosts; four origins were of Lake Michigan and the fifth was of the Pacific Northwest. The species type strain, ATCC (American Type Culture Collection) 33209, was also included. Each isolate was grown in a kidney disease medium (KDM2) supplemented with 1 % ATCC 33209 culture metabolite; serial 10-fold dilutions were prepared, and groups of fish were challenged by intraperitoneal injection with 0.1 mL of each dilution. A 70-d observation period followed, and bacterial kidney disease (BKD) was diagnosed by the fluorescent antibody technique. Virulence of isolates was quantified as a dose lethal to 50% of fish (LD50) for each host–isolate challenge. In the first set of experiments, 23 isolates were used to challenge groups of brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis. The mean LD50 was 1.087 x 106 colony-forming units per milliliter (cfu/mL; SD = 2.022 x 106), and the LD50 values ranged from 8.457 x 106 to 2.227 x 104 cfu/mL. Analysis of variance to evaluate the effect of isolate origin on virulence in brook trout revealed no significant difference (F = 1.502; P = 0.243). Susceptibilities of the other salmonid hosts were evaluated by challenge with six isolates of R. salmoninarum representing each origin and the species type strain. For many of the host–isolate challenge combinations, time to death was highly dependent on the dilution (number of bacteria) injected. In general, the isolates MCO4M, B26, and A34 (all of Lake Michigan origin) tended to be more virulent. Also, LD50 values were dispersed throughout a wider range among the more susceptible hosts. Lake trout Salvelinus namaycush, rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, and brook trout were relatively resistant to challenge with the strains, whereas coho salmon O. kisutch, domestic Atlantic salmon Saltno salar, and chinook salmon O. tshawytscha were relatively susceptible. Another challenge evaluated the effect of

  10. Expression of duplicate msa genes in the salmonid pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Linda D; Coady, Alison M; Strom, Mark S

    2002-11-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum is a gram-positive bacterium responsible for bacterial kidney disease of salmon and trout. R. salmoninarum has two identical copies of the gene encoding major soluble antigen (MSA), an immunodominant, extracellular protein. To determine whether one or both copies of msa are expressed, reporter plasmids encoding a fusion of MSA and green fluorescent protein controlled by 0.6 kb of promoter region from msa1 or msa2 were constructed and introduced into R. salmoninarum. Single copies of the reporter plasmids integrated into the chromosome by homologous recombination. Expression of mRNA and protein from the integrated plasmids was detected, and transformed cells were fluorescent, demonstrating that both msa1 and msa2 are expressed under in vitro conditions. This is the first report of successful transformation and homologous recombination in R. salmoninarum. PMID:12406741

  11. Expression of Duplicate msa Genes in the Salmonid Pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Linda D.; Coady, Alison M.; Strom, Mark S.

    2002-01-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum is a gram-positive bacterium responsible for bacterial kidney disease of salmon and trout. R. salmoninarum has two identical copies of the gene encoding major soluble antigen (MSA), an immunodominant, extracellular protein. To determine whether one or both copies of msa are expressed, reporter plasmids encoding a fusion of MSA and green fluorescent protein controlled by 0.6 kb of promoter region from msa1 or msa2 were constructed and introduced into R. salmoninarum. Single copies of the reporter plasmids integrated into the chromosome by homologous recombination. Expression of mRNA and protein from the integrated plasmids was detected, and transformed cells were fluorescent, demonstrating that both msa1 and msa2 are expressed under in vitro conditions. This is the first report of successful transformation and homologous recombination in R. salmoninarum. PMID:12406741

  12. Monoclonal antibody characterization of a leukoagglutinin produced by Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed

    Wiens, G D; Kaattari, S L

    1991-02-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum causes a chronic disease of salmonid fish known as bacterial kidney disease. High concentrations of bacterially produced extracellular protein (ECP) are present in plasma, kidney, and spleen tissue of naturally and experimentally infected fish. ECP agglutinated salmonid leukocytes in vitro at concentrations which correspond to levels found in highly infected fish. Association of biological activity with the structure of the major protein constituent of ECP, p57, was accomplished by monoclonal antibody (MAb) analysis. Location of the antigenic binding sites recognized by the MAbs was determined by two-dimensional electrophoresis and Western immunoblotting of the proteolytic breakdown fragments of p57. Eight MAbs have been classified into three groups on the basis of their differential recognition of these proteolytic breakdown products. Group I MAbs bound a region proximal to the amino terminus of the protein. Two of these MAbs were also able to block leukoagglutinating activity. Group III MAbs bound to a region associated with the bacterial cell surface, while group II MAbs bound a region between group I and group III. These analyses have allowed the identification of potential structural and functional regions of p57. PMID:1987079

  13. Monoclonal antibody characterization of a leukoagglutinin produced by Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed Central

    Wiens, G D; Kaattari, S L

    1991-01-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum causes a chronic disease of salmonid fish known as bacterial kidney disease. High concentrations of bacterially produced extracellular protein (ECP) are present in plasma, kidney, and spleen tissue of naturally and experimentally infected fish. ECP agglutinated salmonid leukocytes in vitro at concentrations which correspond to levels found in highly infected fish. Association of biological activity with the structure of the major protein constituent of ECP, p57, was accomplished by monoclonal antibody (MAb) analysis. Location of the antigenic binding sites recognized by the MAbs was determined by two-dimensional electrophoresis and Western immunoblotting of the proteolytic breakdown fragments of p57. Eight MAbs have been classified into three groups on the basis of their differential recognition of these proteolytic breakdown products. Group I MAbs bound a region proximal to the amino terminus of the protein. Two of these MAbs were also able to block leukoagglutinating activity. Group III MAbs bound to a region associated with the bacterial cell surface, while group II MAbs bound a region between group I and group III. These analyses have allowed the identification of potential structural and functional regions of p57. Images PMID:1987079

  14. Renibacterium salmoninarum: effect of hypochlorite treatment, and survival in water.

    PubMed

    Hirvelä-Koski, Varpu

    2004-04-21

    The effect of different concentrations of sodium hypochlorite on Renibacterium salmoninarum and the survival of the bacterium in autoclaved river water and groundwater were examined. The disinfection trial was performed using R. salmoninarum ATCC 33209. The concentrations of free chlorine were 10, 50, 100 and 200 mg 1(-1), the contact times were 5, 15, and 30 min and 24 h, and the test suspensions were subcultured both on Kidney disease medium (KDM2) agar and in 3 parallel KDM2 broths, which were then subcultured on KDM2 and selective KDM (SKDM) agar. The survival of the bacterium in river water and groundwater was studied using 4 isolates of R. salmoninarum including ATCC 33209. Treatment with sodium hypochlorite effectively reduced the number of culturable cells of R. salmoninarum, but use of the recovery broth showed that small numbers of cells remained viable at all concentrations of free chlorine. The numbers of R. salmoninarum decreased to an undetectable level after 4 wk incubation in the survival trials, but low numbers of colonies were again found in the subculture after 5 wk incubation. Viable cells of R. salmoninarum were still detected in subcultures of all strains after 20 wk of incubation in river water. PMID:15212289

  15. Shedding of Renibacterium salmoninarum by infected chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tschawytscha

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKibben, C.L.; Pascho, R.J.

    1999-01-01

    Laboratory studies of the transmission and pathogenesis of Renibacterium salmoninarum may describe more accurately what is occurring in the natural environment if test fish are infected by waterborne R. salmoninarum shed from infected fish. To quantify bacterial shedding by chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tschawytscha at 13??C in freshwater, groups of fish were injected intraperitoneally with R. salmoninarum at either 1.3 x 106 colony forming units (CFU) fish-1 (high-dose injection group) or 1.5 x 103 CFU fish-1 (low-dose injection group). R. salmoninarum infection levels were measured in the exposed fish by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (BKD-ELISA). At regular intervals for 30 d, the numbers of R. salmoninarum shed by the injected fish were calculated on the basis of testing water samples by the membrane filtration-fluorescent antibody test (MF-FAT) and bacteriological culture. Mean BKD-ELISA optical densities (ODs) for fish in the low-dose injection group were not different from those of control fish [p > 0.05), and no R. salmoninarum were detected in water samples taken up to 30 d after injection of fish in the low-dose group. By 12 d after injection a proportion of the fish from the high-dose infection group had high (BKD-ELISA OD ??? 1.000) to severe (BKD-ELISA OD ??? 2.000) R. salmoninarum infection levels, and bacteria were detected in the water by both tests. However, measurable levels of R. salmoninarum were not consistently detected in the water until a proportion of the fish maintained high to severe infection levels for an additional 8 d. The concentrations of R salmoninarum in the water samples ranged from undetectable up to 994 cells ml-1 on the basis of the MF-FAT, and up to 1850 CFU ml-1 on the basis of bacteriological culture. The results suggest that chinook salmon infected with R. salmoninarum by injection of approximately 1 x 106 CFU fish-1 can be used as the source of infection in cohabitation challenges beginning 20 darter injection.

  16. Shedding of Renibacterium salmoninarum by infected chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tschawytscha.

    PubMed

    McKibben, C L; Pascho, R J

    1999-10-11

    Laboratory studies of the transmission and pathogenesis of Renibacterium salmoninarum may describe more accurately what is occurring in the natural environment if test fish are infected by waterborne R. salmoninarum shed from infected fish. To quantify bacterial shedding by chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tschawytscha at 13 degrees C in freshwater, groups of fish were injected intraperitoneally with R. salmoninarum at either 1.3 x 10(6) colony forming units (CFU) fish (-1) (high-dose injection group) or 1.5 x 10(3) CFU fish (-1) (low-dose injection group). R. salmoninarum infection levels were measured in the exposed fish by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (BKD-ELISA). At regular intervals for 30 d, the numbers of R. salmoninarum shed by the injected fish were calculated on the basis of testing water samples by the membrane filtration-fluorescent antibody test (MF-FAT) and bacteriological culture. Mean BKD-ELISA optical densities (ODs) for fish in the low-dose injection group were not different from those control fish (p > 0.05), and no R. salmoninarum were detected in water samples taken up to 30 d after injection of fish in the low-dose group. By 12 d after injection a proportion of the fish from the high-dose infection group had high (BKD-ELISA OD > or = 1.000) to severe (BKD-ELISA OD > or = 2.000) R. salmoninarum infection levels, and bacteria were detected in the water by both tests. However, measurable levels of R. salmoninarum were not consistently detected in the water until a proportion of the fish maintained high to severe infection levels for an additional 8 d. The concentrations of R. salmoninarum in the water samples ranged from undetectable up to 994 cells ml(-1) on the basis of the MF-FAT, and up to 1850 CFU ml(-1) on the basis of bacteriological culture. The results suggest that chinook salmon infected with R. salmoninarum by injection of approximately 1 x 10(6) CFU fish (-1) can be used as the source of infection in cohabitation challenges

  17. Rhamnolipid biosurfactants produced by Renibacterium salmoninarum 27BN during growth on n-hexadecane.

    PubMed

    Christova, Nelly; Tuleva, Borjana; Lalchev, Zdravko; Jordanova, Albena; Jordanov, Bojidar

    2004-01-01

    A new strain Renibacterium salmoninarum 27BN was isolated for its capacity to utilize n-hexadecane as sole substrate. Growth on n-hexadecane was accompanied with the production of glycolipid surface active substances detected by surface pressure lowering and emulsifying activity. Glycolipid detection by thin layer chromatography and infrared spectra analyses showed for the first time that Renibacterium salmoninarum 27BN secretes the two rhamnolipids RLL and RRLL typical for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Growth of Renibacterium salmoninarum 27BN on n-hexadecane depended on the bioavailability of the substrate and the secreted rhamnolipids appeared to be efficient in increasing hexadecane availability for the cells. PMID:15018056

  18. MICs and MBCs of chemotherapeutic agents against Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed Central

    Bandín, I; Santos, Y; Toranzo, A E; Barja, J L

    1991-01-01

    The efficacies of 21 chemotherapeutic agents for controlling bacterial kidney disease were evaluated. The bactericidal and/or bacteriostatic effects of these drugs were tested against 11 Renibacterium salmoninarum strains with different origins. The most effective compounds displaying both bacteriostatic and bactericidal activity for all the isolates were tetracycline and erythromycin, with MICs ranging from less than 0.62 to 10.95 micrograms/ml for tetracycline and from less than 0.62 to 5.47 micrograms/ml for erythromycin. Whereas tetracycline showed identical MICs and MBCs, erythromycin showed bactericidal effects at concentrations of 5.47 to 21.87 micrograms/ml. Similarly, cefazolin and tiamulin proved to be very effective bactericidal compounds against the majority of R. salmoninarum isolates, with MBCs for 90% of the strains tested of 21.87 and 10.95 micrograms/ml, respectively. Neither nitrofuranes, quinolones, nor sulfonamides showed inhibitory effects on the growth of the strains. PMID:1854157

  19. MICs and MBCs of chemotherapeutic agents against Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed

    Bandín, I; Santos, Y; Toranzo, A E; Barja, J L

    1991-05-01

    The efficacies of 21 chemotherapeutic agents for controlling bacterial kidney disease were evaluated. The bactericidal and/or bacteriostatic effects of these drugs were tested against 11 Renibacterium salmoninarum strains with different origins. The most effective compounds displaying both bacteriostatic and bactericidal activity for all the isolates were tetracycline and erythromycin, with MICs ranging from less than 0.62 to 10.95 micrograms/ml for tetracycline and from less than 0.62 to 5.47 micrograms/ml for erythromycin. Whereas tetracycline showed identical MICs and MBCs, erythromycin showed bactericidal effects at concentrations of 5.47 to 21.87 micrograms/ml. Similarly, cefazolin and tiamulin proved to be very effective bactericidal compounds against the majority of R. salmoninarum isolates, with MBCs for 90% of the strains tested of 21.87 and 10.95 micrograms/ml, respectively. Neither nitrofuranes, quinolones, nor sulfonamides showed inhibitory effects on the growth of the strains. PMID:1854157

  20. The detection of two antigenic groups among Renibacterium salmoninarum isolates.

    PubMed

    Bandín, I; Santos, Y; Magariños, B; Barja, J L; Toranzo, A E

    1992-07-01

    The analysis of the membrane proteins and their antigenic properties in a group of 14 geographically diverse strains of Renibacterium salmoninarum revealed the existence of antigenic diversity within this species. Eleven isolates, including the type strain ATCC 33209, shared a similar protein profile with a major component of 57 kDa whereas three strains showed a common pattern with a major protein of 30 kDa. The quantitative agglutination tests and Western blotting assays seem to indicate the existence of serological heterogeneity, with two distinct groups being detected. PMID:1521757

  1. Identification of Renibacterium salmoninarum surface proteins by radioiodination.

    PubMed

    Fredriksen, A; Bakken, V

    1994-09-01

    Surface exposed proteins of Renibacterium salmoninarum were identified by radiolabelling whole bacterial cells with 125I, followed by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography. The most prominent bands had molecular masses of approximately 57 kDa and 22 kDa; in addition, some less intensively labelled bands were detected. Polyclonal sera raised against the 22 kDa protein did not react with the 57 kDa protein. N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis of the purified 22 kDa protein showed no similarity with the sequence of the 57 kDa protein. PMID:7926685

  2. Growth of the fish pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum on different media.

    PubMed

    Bandín, I; Santos, Y; Barja, J I; Toranzo, A E

    1996-09-01

    In the present study, the ability of a group of Renibacterium salmoninarum strains to grow in the presence or absence of the amino acid cysteine and other mineral and organic sources of sulfur and nitrogen has been evaluated. Most of the isolates tested were able to grow on a mineral media supplemented with L-cysteine-HCl or other organic compounds, such as the vitamin thiamine and a casein hydrolysate (Bacto Casamino Acids, Difco). Bacterial growth was also recorded on commercial and specific media not supplemented with L-cysteine-HCl, or in which this amino acid was replaced by the compounds cited above. PMID:8897425

  3. Molecular differentiation of Renibacterium salmoninarum isolates from worldwide locations.

    PubMed

    Grayson, T H; Cooper, L F; Atienzar, F A; Knowles, M R; Gilpin, M L

    1999-03-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum is a genospecies that is an obligate pathogen of salmonid fish and is capable of intracellular survival. Conventional typing systems have failed to differentiate isolates of R. salmoninarum. We used two methods to assess the extent of molecular variation which was present in isolates from different geographic locations. In one analysis we investigated possible polymorphisms in a specific region of the genome, the intergenic spacer (ITS) region between the 16S and 23S rRNA genes. In the other analysis we analyzed differences throughout the genome by using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). We amplified the spacer region of 74 isolates by using PCR and performed a DNA sequence analysis with 14 geographically distinct samples. The results showed that the 16S-23S ribosomal DNA spacer region of R. salmoninarum is highly conserved and suggested that only a single copy of the rRNA operon is present in this slowly growing pathogen. DNA sequencing of the spacer region showed that it was the same length in all 14 isolates examined, and the same nucleotide sequence, sequevar 1, was obtained for 11 of these isolates. Two other sequevars were found. No tRNA genes were found. We found that RAPD analysis allows reproducible differentiation between isolates of R. salmoninarum obtained from different hosts and different geographic regions. By using RAPD analysis it was possible to differentiate between isolates with identical ITS sequences. PMID:10049848

  4. Atypical growth of Renibacterium salmoninarum in subclinical infections.

    PubMed

    Hirvelä-Koski, V; Pohjanvirta, T; Koski, P; Sukura, A

    2006-01-01

    Two growth types of Renibacterium salmoninarum were isolated from subclinically infected rainbow trout, one producing the smooth colonies typical of R. salmoninarum and the other forming a thin film on the surface of the agar with no separate colonies. The atypical growth was present on kidney disease medium agar in primary cultures of the kidney but not on selective kidney disease medium (SKDM). Fluorescent antibody staining of the fresh isolate and polymerase chain reaction amplification were the most reliable techniques to identify the atypical growth of R. salmoninarum. The condition was reversible, with growth reverting from atypical to the smooth colony form in experimentally infected rainbow trout and under laboratory conditions. There was no mortality, or any clinical signs of bacterial kidney disease (BKD) in the fish challenged with the atypical growth, although small numbers of smooth colonies of R. salmoninarum were isolated from 8% of these fish. The atypical growth reported here may explain some of the failures of culture, when SKDM agar alone is used for the detection of BKD in subclinically infected fish. PMID:16351695

  5. Molecular Differentiation of Renibacterium salmoninarum Isolates from Worldwide Locations

    PubMed Central

    Grayson, Thomas H.; Cooper, Lynne F.; Atienzar, Franck A.; Knowles, Mark R.; Gilpin, Martyn L.

    1999-01-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum is a genospecies that is an obligate pathogen of salmonid fish and is capable of intracellular survival. Conventional typing systems have failed to differentiate isolates of R. salmoninarum. We used two methods to assess the extent of molecular variation which was present in isolates from different geographic locations. In one analysis we investigated possible polymorphisms in a specific region of the genome, the intergenic spacer (ITS) region between the 16S and 23S rRNA genes. In the other analysis we analyzed differences throughout the genome by using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). We amplified the spacer region of 74 isolates by using PCR and performed a DNA sequence analysis with 14 geographically distinct samples. The results showed that the 16S-23S ribosomal DNA spacer region of R. salmoninarum is highly conserved and suggested that only a single copy of the rRNA operon is present in this slowly growing pathogen. DNA sequencing of the spacer region showed that it was the same length in all 14 isolates examined, and the same nucleotide sequence, sequevar 1, was obtained for 11 of these isolates. Two other sequevars were found. No tRNA genes were found. We found that RAPD analysis allows reproducible differentiation between isolates of R. salmoninarum obtained from different hosts and different geographic regions. By using RAPD analysis it was possible to differentiate between isolates with identical ITS sequences. PMID:10049848

  6. Method for flow cytometric monitoring of Renibacterium salmoninarum inactivation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pascho, R.J.; Ongerth, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    The slow growth of Renibacterium salmoninarum limits the usefulness of culture as a research tool. Development of a 2-color flow cytometric assay to quantify the proportions of live and dead R. salmoninarum in a test population is described. Bacteria were simultaneously stained with fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated immunoglobulin and exposed to the exclusion dye propidium iodide. Propidium iodide red fluorescence profiles of control groups of untreated and killed R. salmoninarum were compared with those for bacteria exposed to chlorine. Bacterial inactivation was based on mean red fluorescence intensity, and analyzed by high-red fluorescence intensity (HRFI) and curve subtraction (CS) analyses. When the concentration of R. salmoninarum was 8.65 x 106 bacteria ml-1 and the bacteria exposed to chlorine at 1 mg l-1 for periods from 1 to 20 min (high-Rs assessment), the mean red fluorescence intensity of the profile for each chlorine-exposure group was higher than that for the untreated control (p < 0.0001). When the concentration of R. salmoninarum was reduced to 1.76 x 106 bacteria ml-1 and exposed to 0.8 mg l-1 free chlorine level for periods from 20 s to 5 min (reduced-Rs assessment), the mean red fluorescence intensities of the exposure groups were higher than that for the untreated control only when the R. salmoninarum was exposed to chlorine for at least 1 min (p ??? 0.01). On the basis of red fluorescence intensity, the proportion of dead cells generally increased with the duration of chlorine exposure. Whereas the rates of inactivation derived from the HRFI and CS analyses did not correlate with the duration of exposure in the high-Rs assessment (r2 ??? 0.27), there was a correlation between these estimates and the duration of exposure in the reduced-Rs assessment (r2 ??? 0.92). Because of the rapid loss of culturable R. salmoninarum in both assessments following chlorine exposure, neither the duration of exposure nor the inactivation estimates correlated

  7. Method for flow cytometric monitoring of Renibacterium salmoninarum inactivation.

    PubMed

    Pascho, R J; Ongerth, J E

    2000-07-14

    The slow growth of Renibacterium salmoninarum limits the usefulness of culture as a research tool. Development of a 2-color flow cytometric assay to quantify the proportions of live and dead R. salmoninarum in a test population is described. Bacteria were simultaneously stained with fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated immunoglobulin and exposed to the exclusion dye propidium iodide. Propidium iodide red fluorescence profiles of control groups of untreated and killed R. salmoninarum were compared with those for bacteria exposed to chlorine. Bacterial inactivation was based on mean red fluorescence intensity, and analyzed by high-red fluorescence intensity (HRFI) and curve subtraction (CS) analyses. When the concentration of R. salmoninarum was 8.65 x 10(6) bacteria ml(-1) and the bacteria exposed to chlorine at 1 mg l(-1) for periods from 1 to 20 min (high-Rs assessment), the mean red fluorescence intensity of the profile for each chlorine-exposure group was higher than that for the untreated control (p < 0.0001). When the concentration of R. salmoninarum was reduced to 1.76 x 10(6) bacteria ml(-1) and exposed to 0.8 mg l(-1) free chlorine level for periods from 20 s to 5 min (reduced-Rs assessment), the mean red fluorescence intensities of the exposure groups were higher than that for the untreated control only when the R. salmoninarum was exposed to chlorine for at least 1 min (p < or = 0.01). On the basis of red fluorescence intensity, the proportion of dead cells generally increased with the duration of chlorine exposure. Whereas the rates of inactivation derived from the HRFI and CS analyses did not correlate with the duration of exposure in the high-Rs assessment (r2 < or = 0.27), there was a correlation between these estimates and the duration of exposure in the reduced-Rs assessment (r2 > or = 0.92). Because of the rapid loss of culturable R. salmoninarum in both assessments following chlorine exposure, neither the duration of exposure nor the inactivation

  8. The cloning and expression of a gene encoding haemolytic activity from the fish pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed

    Evenden, A J; Gilpin, M L; Munn, C B

    1990-09-01

    A gene encoding haemolytic activity from Renibacterium salmoninarum (strain PPD) was cloned into Escherichia coli using the cosmid vector pHC79, and subsequently subcloned on a 1.6 kbp SAlI fragment into pBR328. Southern blot hybridisation revealed that a homologous sequence is found in other strains of R. salmoninarum. PMID:2276613

  9. Identification of a third msa gene in Renibacterium salmoninarum and the associated virulence phenotype.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Linda D; Coady, Alison M; Deinhard, Rebecca K

    2004-11-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum, a gram-positive diplococcobacillus, causes bacterial kidney disease, a condition that can result in extensive morbidity and mortality among stocks of fish. An immunodominant extracellular protein, called major soluble antigen (MSA), is encoded by two identical genes, msa1 and msa2. We found evidence for a third msa gene, msa3, which appears to be a duplication of msa1. Unlike msa1 and msa2, msa3 is not present in all isolates of R. salmoninarum. The presence of the msa3 locus does not affect total MSA production in culture conditions. In a challenge study, isolates possessing the msa3 locus reduced median survival in juvenile chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) by an average of 34% at doses of < or =10(5) cells per fish compared to isolates lacking the msa3 locus. In contrast, no difference in survival was observed at the highest dose, 10(6) cells per fish. The phenotype associated with the msa3 locus and its nonuniform distribution may contribute to observed differences in virulence among R. salmoninarum isolates. PMID:15528510

  10. Identification of a Third msa Gene in Renibacterium salmoninarum and the Associated Virulence Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Linda D.; Coady, Alison M.; Deinhard, Rebecca K.

    2004-01-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum, a gram-positive diplococcobacillus, causes bacterial kidney disease, a condition that can result in extensive morbidity and mortality among stocks of fish. An immunodominant extracellular protein, called major soluble antigen (MSA), is encoded by two identical genes, msa1 and msa2. We found evidence for a third msa gene, msa3, which appears to be a duplication of msa1. Unlike msa1 and msa2, msa3 is not present in all isolates of R. salmoninarum. The presence of the msa3 locus does not affect total MSA production in culture conditions. In a challenge study, isolates possessing the msa3 locus reduced median survival in juvenile chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) by an average of 34% at doses of ≤105 cells per fish compared to isolates lacking the msa3 locus. In contrast, no difference in survival was observed at the highest dose, 106 cells per fish. The phenotype associated with the msa3 locus and its nonuniform distribution may contribute to observed differences in virulence among R. salmoninarum isolates. PMID:15528510

  11. Evaluation of a whole cell, p57- vaccine against Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed

    Piganelli, J D; Wiens, G D; Zhang, J A; Christensen, J M; Kaattari, S L

    1999-04-15

    A whole cell Renibacterium salmoninarum vaccine was developed using 37 degrees C heat treated cells that were subsequently formalin fixed; this treatment reduced bacterial hydrophobicity and cell associated p57. Coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch were immunized with the p57- vaccine by either a combination of intraperitoneal (i.p.) and intramuscular (i.m.) injections or per os. In the first experiment, i.p./i.m. vaccination of coho salmon with p57- cells in Freund's Incomplete Adjuvant (FIA) conferred a statistically significant increase in mean time to death after the salmon were i.p. challenged with 4.1 x 10(6) colony forming units (cfu) of R. salmoninarum. There was no significant difference in response between fish immunized with R. salmoninarum cell surface extract in FIA and those immunized with extracellular protein (ECP) concentrated from culture supernatant in FIA. The i.p. challenge dose resulted in complete mortality of all fish by Day 43. In a second experiment, fish were orally vaccinated with p57- R. salmoninarum cells encased in a pH protected, enteric-coated antigen microsphere (ECAM). Fish were bath challenged with 4.2 x 10(6) cfu ml-1 on Day 0 and sampled at time points of 0 (pre-challenge), 50, 90, or 150 d immersion challenge. Vaccine efficacy was determined by monitoring the elaboration of p57 in the kidneys of vaccinated and control fish. Fish vaccinated orally demonstrated a significantly lower concentration of p57 (p < 0.01) at Day 150 post challenge compared to fish receiving ECAMs alone. Fish receiving p57 cells without ECAM coating also showed a significantly lower p57 level (p < 0.03) versus control. In contrast, fish injected intraperitoneally with the p57- cells or fish fed p57+ R. salmoninarum cells in ECAMs demonstrated no significant difference (p > 0.05) versus controls. In summary, these studies suggest the preliminary efficacy of 37 degrees C treatment of R. salmoninarum cells as an oral bacterial kidney disease vaccine. PMID

  12. A gene from Renibacterium salmoninarum encoding a product which shows homology to bacterial zinc-metalloproteases.

    PubMed

    Grayson, T H; Evenden, A J; Gilpin, M L; Martin, K L; Munn, C B

    1995-06-01

    A genomic library constructed from Renibacterium salmoninarum isolate MT444 DNA in the plasmid vector pBR328 was screened using Escherichia coli host strain DH1 for the expression of genes encoding putative virulence factors. A single haemolytic clone was isolated at 22 degrees C and found to contain a 3.1 kb HindIII fragment of inserted DNA. This fragment was present in seven isolates of R. salmoninarum which were examined. Western blots of extracts from clones exhibiting haemolytic activity were performed with antisera raised against either cellular or extracellular components of R. salmoninarum and failed to identify any additional proteins compared to control E. coli containing pBR328. However, minicell analysis revealed that a polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass of 65 kDa was associated with a haemolytic activity distinct from that previously described for R. salmoninarum. The nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding this product was determined and the amino acid sequence deduced. The product was 548 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 66757 Da and a pl of 5.57. The deduced amino acid sequence of the gene possessed strong similarities to those of a range of secreted bacterial zinc-metalloproteases and was tentatively designed hly. Neither protease nor lecithinase activities were detectable in E. coli recombinants expressing gene hly. Haemolytic activity was observed from 6 degrees C to 37 degrees C for erythrocytes from a number of mammalian species and also from fish. Gene hly was expressed in E. coli as a fusion protein consisting of maltose-binding protein at the N-terminus linked to all but the first 24 amino acids, largely constituting the putative signal peptide, of the N-terminus of Hly. The soluble fusion protein was produced and purified by affinity chromatography. Antiserum raised against the purified fusion protein was used to probe Western blots of cell lysates and extracellular products from seven isolates of R. salmoninarum

  13. Detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum antigen in migrating adult chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sakai, M; Atsuta, S; Kobayashi, M

    1992-01-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum antigen was detected in the kidney of migrating chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) using the indirect dot blot assay and indirect fluorescent antibody test. The adult chum salmon had migrated into a bay in which cultured coho salmon infected with R. salmoninarum were present. Antigen was detected in 5% of the chum salmon although they did not have clinical signs of bacterial kidney disease (BKD). This report describes the first case of R. salmoninarum antigen detection among wild chum salmon populations in eastern Asia. PMID:1548789

  14. A PCR-based assay for the identification of the fish pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed

    León, G; Maulén, N; Figueroa, J; Villanueva, J; Rodríguez, C; Vera, M I; Krauskopf, M

    1994-01-15

    By means of a one-step one-tube extraction from less than 1 mg of tissue it is possible to identify, via the polymerase chain reaction, Renibacterium salmoninarum in salmon with bacterial kidney disease. A 149-bp DNA sequence unique to R. salmoninarum was specifically amplified and its nature confirmed by Southern hybridization using a non-isotopically labelled probe. The sensitivity of the approach allowed the detection of 22 R. salmoninarum cells. The procedure was successfully applied in the identification of the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease in kidney tissue from infected fishes. PMID:8138127

  15. Rapid identification of Renibacterium salmoninarum using an oligonucleotide probe complementary to 16S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, J G; Gersdorf, H; Jansson, E; Hongslo, T; Göbel, U B; Johansson, K E

    1993-02-01

    Bacterial kidney disease in salmonid fish is caused by the slow-growing Gram-positive rod, Renibacterium salmoninarum. The partial sequence of 16S rRNA from R. salmoninarum was determined and compared with published bacterial 16S rRNA sequences. From this sequence information, a 30-bases-long oligonucleotide was designed and used as a specific probe for identification of R. salmoninarum in filter hybridization experiments. Strong specific hybridization signals were observed for all strains of R. salmoninarum tested. Furthermore, no cross-hybridization could be seen against 22 other bacterial species, among them other salmonid fish pathogens. The detection limit for the probe in direct filter hybridization by the dot-blot technique was 2.5 x 10(4) bacteria. It was also possible to detect R. salmoninarum in clinical samples by direct filter hybridization. PMID:8455640

  16. DETECTION OF RENIBACTERIUM SALMONINARUM IN CHINOOK SALMON ONCORHYNCHUS TSHAWYTSCHA USING QUANTITATIVE PCR.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have developed a quantitative PCR assay to detect varying levels of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease (BKD). This assay allows for the direct enumeration of bacterial DNA or RNA copy number within tissues and body fluids. The assay can be applied nonletha...

  17. Renibacterium salmoninarum p57 antigenic variation is restricted in geographic distribution and correlated with genomic markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 57 kDa protein (p57) is an important diagnostic antigen that is implicated in the pathogenesis of salmonid bacterial kidney disease. Little is known about the nature and extent of antigenic variation in p57. Previously, we reported that p57 produced by Renibacterium salmoninarum Strain 684 conta...

  18. Microevolution of Renibacterium salmoninarum: evidence for intercontinental dissemination associated with fish movements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Renibacterium salmoninarum is the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease, a major pathogen of salmonid fish species worldwide. Very low levels of intra-species genetic diversity have hampered efforts to understand the transmission dynamics and recent evolutionary history of this Gram-positive b...

  19. Elevated temperature treatment as a novel method for decreasing p57 on the cell surface of Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed

    Piganelli, J D; Wiens, G D; Kaattari, S L

    1999-04-15

    Renibacterium salmoninarum is a Gram-positive diplo-bacillus and the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease, a prevalent disease of salmonid fish. Virulent isolates of R. salmoninarum have a hydrophobic cell surface and express the 57-58 kDa protein (p57). Here we have investigated parameters which effect cell hydrophobicity and p57 degradation. Incubation of R. salmoninarum cells at 37 degrees C for > 4 h decreased cell surface hydrophobicity as measured by the salt aggregation assay, and decreased the amount of cell associated p57. Incubation of cells at lower temperatures (22, 17, 4 or -20 degrees C) for up to 16 h did not reduce hydrophobicity or the amount of cell associated p57. Both the loss of cell surface hydrophobicity and the degradation of p57 were inhibited by pre-incubation with the serine protease inhibitor phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF). Cell surface hydrophobicity was specifically reconstituted by incubation with extracellular protein (ECP) concentrated from culture supernatant and was correlated with the reassociation of p57 onto the bacterial cell surface as determined by western blot and total protein stain analyses. The ability of p57 to reassociate suggests that the bacterial cell surface is not irreversibly modified by the 37 degrees C treatment and that p57 contributes to the hydrophobic nature of R. salmoninarum. In summary, we describe parameters effecting the removal of the p57 virulence factor and suggest the utility of this modification for generating a whole cell vaccine against bacterial kidney disease. PMID:10349550

  20. Recovery of Renibacterium salmoninarum from naturally infected salmonine stocks in Michigan using a modified culture protocol

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Faisal, M.; Eissa, A.E.; Starliper, C.E.

    2010-01-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease (BKD), is a fastidious and slow-growing bacterium that is extremely difficult to grow in vitro. Herein, we describe a modified primary culture protocol that encompasses a modified bacteriological culture medium and a tissue processing procedure. In order to facilitate the release of R. salmoninarum from granulomatous tissues, kidneys of infected fish were homogenized in a high speed stomacher. The kidney disease medium (KDM2), routinely used for primary culture of R. salmoninarum was modified by the addition of antibiotics and metabolites. When a relatively large inoculum of diluted kidney homogenate was streak-plate inoculated onto the modified KDM2, colonial growth of R. salmoninarum was achieved within 5-7. days, compared to the standard of two weeks or more. The modified procedure was then used to determine the prevalence of R. salmoninarum among representative captive and feral salmonid stocks in Michigan. Prevalence and clinical manifestations varied among species, strains of fish, and locations; however, R. salmoninarum isolates were biochemically homogenous. The improved primary culture procedure described in this study enabled selective and quick isolation of R. salmoninarum. Also, the isolates retrieved in this study constitute a unique biological resource for future studies of R. salmoninarum in the Laurentian Great Lakes. ?? 2009 University of Cairo.

  1. Identification of a Renibacterium salmoninarum DNA fragment associated with bacterial internalization into CHSE-cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Maulén, N P; Morales, P J; Aruti, D; Figueroa, J E; Concha, M I; Krauskopf, M; León, G

    1996-01-01

    We report here the isolation of a Renibacterium salmoninarum DNA sequence capable of transforming a non-invasive Escherichia coli strain into a microorganism able to enter the fish cell line, CHSE-214. Immunofluorescence and electron microscopy techniques were used to assess the acquired invasive phenotype by HB101 E. coli cells, upon transformation with pPMV-189. This plasmid carries a 2282-bp R. salmoninarum DNA segment. The invasive phenotype is conserved upon deletion of approximately 1000 bp at the 3' end of the insert. The remaining segment contains an ORF region encoding a putative protein of about 30 kDa. PMID:8598275

  2. Effects of temperature on Renibacterium salmoninarum infection and transmission potential in Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum).

    PubMed

    Purcell, M K; McKibben, C L; Pearman-Gillman, S; Elliott, D G; Winton, J R

    2016-07-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum is a significant pathogen of salmonids and the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease (BKD). Water temperature affects the replication rate of pathogens and the function of the fish immune system to influence the progression of disease. In addition, rapid shifts in temperature may serve as stressors that reduce host resistance. This study evaluated the effect of shifts in water temperature on established R. salmoninarum infections. We challenged Chinook salmon with R. salmoninarum at 12 °C for 2 weeks and then divided the fish into three temperature groups (8, 12 and 15 °C). Fish in the 8 °C group had significantly higher R. salmoninarum-specific mortality, kidney R. salmoninarum loads and bacterial shedding rates relative to the fish held at 12 or 15 °C. There was a trend towards suppressed bacterial load and shedding in the 15 °C group, but the results were not significant. Bacterial load was a significant predictor of shedding for the 8 and 12 °C groups but not for the 15 °C group. Overall, our results showed little effect of temperature stress on the progress of infection, but do support the conclusion that cooler water temperatures contribute to infection progression and increased transmission potential in Chinook salmon infected with R. salmoninarum. PMID:26449619

  3. Effects of temperature on Renibacterium salmoninarum infection and transmission potential in Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, Maureen K.; McKibben, Constance L.; Pearman-Gillman, Schuyler; Elliott, Diane G.; Winton, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum is a significant pathogen of salmonids and the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease (BKD). Water temperature affects the replication rate of pathogens and the function of the fish immune system to influence the progression of disease. In addition, rapid shifts in temperature may serve as stressors that reduce host resistance. This study evaluated the effect of shifts in water temperature on established R. salmoninarum infections. We challenged Chinook salmon with R. salmoninarum at 12°C for 2 weeks and then divided the fish into three temperature groups (8, 12 and 15°C). Fish in the 8°C group had significantly higher R. salmoninarum-specific mortality, kidney R. salmoninarum loads and bacterial shedding rates relative to the fish held at 12 or 15°C. There was a trend towards suppressed bacterial load and shedding in the 15°C group, but the results were not significant. Bacterial load was a significant predictor of shedding for the 8 and 12°C groups but not for the 15°C group. Overall, our results showed little effect of temperature stress on the progress of infection, but do support the conclusion that cooler water temperatures contribute to infection progression and increased transmission potential in Chinook salmon infected with R. salmoninarum.

  4. First record of Renibacterium salmoninarum in the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus).

    PubMed

    Eissa, A E; Elsayed, E E; McDonald, R; Faisal, M

    2006-07-01

    Bacterial kidney disease (BKD), caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum, is a widespread problem with major implications for salmonid fish species. The mechanisms by which the bacterium has reached high levels of infection previously unrecorded in the Laurentian Great Lakes are presently unknown. Research involving reservoirs and mechanisms of R. salmoninarum transmission in fish is lacking because of the ecologic complexity of heterogeneous habitats and the lack of adequate funding. Herein, we report on the isolation of R. salmoninarum from the kidneys of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus). The bacterium was cultured from kidneys of 16% and 4% of lampreys collected from two locations within the Lake Ontario watershed in 2003 and 2004, respectively. The identity of bacterial colonies was verified with the nested polymerase chain reaction and quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. PMID:17092886

  5. Production of putative virulence factors by Renibacterium salmoninarum grown in cell culture.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, D; Flaño, E; Grayson, T H; Gilpin, M L; Austin, B; Villena, A J

    1997-10-01

    A cell culture system, employing the fish cell line Epithelioma papillosum cyprini (EPC), was developed to study the synthesis of intracellular antigen and the expression of putative virulence factors by Renibacterium salmoninarum. EPC cultures infected with R. salmoninarum could be maintained for 7 weeks, during which the pathogen multiplied intracellularly. Immunohistochemical examination of infected cultures revealed the production of the p57 antigen, haemolysin and cytolysin. The intracellular nature of the infection was confirmed by transmission electron microscopic examination of EPC monolayers. A comparison of the relative virulence of bacterial cells cultured in EPC cells and on agar plates revealed that the former were markedly more virulent in challenge experiments with juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum). The EPC cell culture model provided a system for the study of R. salmoninarum under more natural conditions than those achieved with plate culture techniques. PMID:9353936

  6. Sortase inhibitor phenyl vinyl sulfone inhibits Renibacterium salmoninarum adherence and invasion of host cells.

    PubMed

    Sudheesh, Ponnerassery S; Crane, Samuel; Cain, Kenneth D; Strom, Mark S

    2007-12-13

    Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease in salmonid fishes, is a Gram-positive diplococcobacillus belonging to the family Micrococcaceae. Analysis of the genome sequence of the bacterium demonstrated the presence of a sortase homolog (srtD), a gene specifying an enzyme found in Gram-positive bacteria and required for covalent anchoring of cell surface proteins. Interference of sortase activity is being examined as a target for therapeutic prevention of infection by several pathogenic Gram-positive bacterial species. In silico analysis identified 8 open reading frames containing sortase recognition motifs, suggesting these proteins are translocated to the bacterial cell wall. The sortase and potential sortase substrate genes are transcribed in R. salmoninarum, suggesting they encode functional proteins. Treatment of R. salmoninarum with phenyl vinyl sulfone (PVS) significantly reduced bacterial adherence to Chinook salmon fibronectin. In addition, the ability of the PVS-treated bacteria to adhere to Chinook salmon embryo cells (CHSE-214) in vitro was dramatically reduced compared to that of untreated bacteria. More importantly, PVS-treated bacteria were unable to invade and replicate within CHSE-214 cells (demonstrated by an intracellular growth assay and by light microscopy). When treated with PVS, R. salmoninarum was not cytopathic to CHSE-214 cells, whereas untreated bacteria produced cytopathology within a few days. These findings clearly show that PVS, a small molecule drug and a known sortase inhibitor, can interfere with the ability of R. salmoninarum to adhere and colonize fish cells, with a corresponding decrease in virulence. PMID:18286808

  7. Zygosity at the major histocompatibility class IIB locus predicts susceptibility to Renibacterium salmoninarum in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.).

    PubMed

    Turner, S M; Faisal, M; DeWoody, J A

    2007-10-01

    Major histocompatibility (MH) class II genes play an important role in the vertebrate immune response. Here, we investigate the relationship between Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) MH class IIB zygosity and susceptibility to Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causal agent of bacterial kidney disease. By combining DNA sequences from the salmon MH class IIB gene with quantitative ELISA data on R. salmoninarum antigen levels, we found that MH class IIB homozygotes were significantly more susceptible to R. salmoninarum than heterozygotes. These findings are discussed in the context of current evolutionary theory. PMID:17627802

  8. Comparison of five techniques for the detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum in adult coho salmon.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pascho, R.J.; Elliott, D.G.; Mallett, R.W.; Mulcahy, D.

    1987-01-01

    Samples of kidney, spleen, coelomic fluid, and blood from 56 sexually mature coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch were examined for infection by Renibacterium salmoninarum by five methods. The overall prevalence (all sample types combined) of R. salmoninarum in the fish was 100% by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, 86% by the combined results of the direct fluorescent antibody and the direct filtration-fluorescent antibody techniques, 39% by culture, 11% by counterimmunoelectrophoresis, and 5% by agarose gel immunodiffusion. There was a significant positive correlation (P < 0.001) between the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay absorbance levels and the counts by fluorescent antibody techniques for kidney, spleen, and coelomic fluid, and significant positive correlations (P < 0.001) in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay absorbance levels for all four of the sample types.

  9. Specific DNA probes for the identification of the fish pathogen, Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed

    León, G; Martinez, M A; Etchegaray, J P; Vera, M I; Figueroa, J; Krauskopf, M

    1994-03-01

    To obtain specific DNA probes for the identification of the fish pathogen, Renibacterium salmoninarum, a discriminatory recombinant DNA library was constructed using selective fragments of the bacterial genome. Three renibacterial clones, pMAM29, pMAM46 and pMAM77, containing 149, 73, and 154 bp respectively, were isolated and characterized. The specificity of the probes was confirmed by dot-blot and Southern hybridization analyses. Bacterial hybridization experiments revealed that pMAM29 discriminates the R. salmoninarum genome from that of other fish pathogens such as Aeromonas salmonicida, Yersinia ruckeri, Flexibacter columnaris, Lactobacillus piscicola, Vibrio ordalii, Vibrio anguillarum and Aeromonas hydrophila. Thus, this probe may provide a new means to diagnose bacterial kidney disease in asymptomatic fish and ova. PMID:24420936

  10. Nutrient Requirements of Renibacterium salmoninarum on Agar and in Broth Media.

    PubMed

    Daly, J G; Stevenson, R M

    1993-07-01

    In well-aerated broth cultures, good growth of Renibacterium salmoninarum was obtained in a serum-free medium consisting of 1% peptone, 1% yeast extract, and 0.1% l-cysteine (PYC broth). In contrast, serum or charcoal is required for growth on agar medium. Charcoal treatment of broth media, either before bacterial inoculation or during growth, increased the growth of R. salmoninarum, whereas the surfactants Tween 20 and Tween 80 inhibited growth. l-Cysteine was essential for optimal growth. Other organic sulfur compounds, such as d-cysteine, l-methionine, homocysteine, homocysteine thiolactone, and reduced glutathione, supported only lower levels of growth, while cystine and dithiothreitol did not allow growth. PMID:16348993

  11. Nutrient Requirements of Renibacterium salmoninarum on Agar and in Broth Media

    PubMed Central

    Daly, J. G.; Stevenson, R. M. W.

    1993-01-01

    In well-aerated broth cultures, good growth of Renibacterium salmoninarum was obtained in a serum-free medium consisting of 1% peptone, 1% yeast extract, and 0.1% l-cysteine (PYC broth). In contrast, serum or charcoal is required for growth on agar medium. Charcoal treatment of broth media, either before bacterial inoculation or during growth, increased the growth of R. salmoninarum, whereas the surfactants Tween 20 and Tween 80 inhibited growth. l-Cysteine was essential for optimal growth. Other organic sulfur compounds, such as d-cysteine, l-methionine, homocysteine, homocysteine thiolactone, and reduced glutathione, supported only lower levels of growth, while cystine and dithiothreitol did not allow growth. PMID:16348993

  12. Charcoal agar, a new growth medium for the fish disease bacterium Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed Central

    Daly, J G; Stevenson, R M

    1985-01-01

    Charcoal is an effective replacement for serum in media for the isolation and culture of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease in salmonid fish. The medium, KDM-C, contains 10 g of peptone, 0.5 g of yeast extract, 1 g of L-cysteine hydrochloride, 1 g of activated charcoal, and 15 g of agar per liter and is adjusted to pH 6.8 with NaOH before autoclaving. Eight strains of R. salmoninarum grew from dilute inocula as well on KDM-C as on a standard serum-containing medium (KDM-2). The medium was effective for both primary isolations from fish and repeated transfers and has potential value for antigen preparation and physiological studies. Images PMID:4083882

  13. Evidence that coded-wire-tagging procedures can enhance transmission of Renibacterium salmoninarum in chinook salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, D.G.; Pascho, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    Binary coded wire tags (CWTs) are used extensively for identification and management of anadromous salmonid populations. A study of bacterial kidney disease (BKD) in two brood year groups of hatchery-reared spring chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha provided strong evidence that horizontal transmission of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of BKD, might be enhanced by CWT-marking procedures. About 4 months after CWTs were implanted in the snouts of juvenile fish, 14-16 different tissues were sampled from each of 60 fish per brood year group for histological analysis. Of the fish that were positive for R. salmoninarum by histological examination, 41% (7 of 17) of the 1988 brood year fish and 24% (10 of 42) of the 1989 brood year fish had BKD lesions confined to the head near the site of tag implantation. These lesions often resulted in the destruction of tissues of one or both olfactory organs. No focal snout infections were observed in fish that had not been marked with CWTs. Further data obtained from tissue analyses by use of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a fluorescent antibody test for detection of R. salmoninarum supported the hypothesis that infections of R. salmoninarum can be initiated in the snout tissues of CWT-marked fish and then spread to other organs. The tagging procedures might promote transmission of the pathogen among fish via contaminated tagging needles, by facilitating the entry of pathogens through the injection wound, or both. Limited evidence from this study suggested that implantation of passive integrated transponder tags in the peritoneal cavities of fish might also promote the transmission of R. salmoninarum or exacerbate existing infections. The results indicated a need for strict sanitary procedures during the tagging of fish in populations positive for R. salmoninarum to reduce the probability of enhanced horizontal transmission of the pathogen.

  14. Bactericidal activity of juvenile chinook salmon macrophages against Aeromonas salmonicida after exposure to live or heat-killed Renibacterium salmoninarum or to soluble proteins produced by R. salmoninarum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Siegel, D.C.; Congleton, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    Macrophages isolated from the anterior kidney of juvenile chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in 96-well microtiter plates were exposed for 72 h to 0, 105, or 106 live or heat-killed Renibacterium salmoninarum cells per well or to 0, 0.1, 1.0, or 10 ??g/mL of R. salmoninarum soluble proteins. After treatment, the bactericidal activity of the macrophages against Aerornonas salmonicida was determined by a colorimetric assay based on the reduction of the tetrazolium dye MTT to formazan by viable bacteria. The MTT assay was modified to allow estimation of the percentage of bacteria killed by reference to a standard curve relating the number of bacteria added to microtiter wells to absorbance by formazan at 600 nm. The live and heat-killed R. salmoninarum treatments significantly (P < 0.001) increased killing of A. salmonicida by chinook salmon macrophages. In each of the five trials, significantly (P < 0.05) greater increases in killing occurred after exposure to 105 R. salmoninarum cells than to 106 R. salmoninarum cells per well. In contrast, treatment of macrophages with 10 ??g/mL R. salmoninarum soluble proteins significantly (P < 0.001) decreased killing of A. salmonicida, but treatment with lower doses did not. These results show that the bactericidal activity of chinook salmon macrophages is stimulated by exposure to R. salmoninarum cells at lower dose levels but inhibited by exposure to R. salmoninarum cells or soluble proteins at higher dose levels.

  15. Both msa genes in Renibacterium salmoninarum are needed for full virulence in bacterial kidney disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coady, A.M.; Murray, A.L.; Elliott, D.G.; Rhodes, L.D.

    2006-01-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum, a gram-positive diplococcobacillus that causes bacterial kidney disease among salmon and trout, has two chromosomal loci encoding the major soluble antigen (msa) gene. Because the MSA protein is widely suspected to be an important virulence factor, we used insertion-duplication mutagenesis to generate disruptions of either the msa1 or msa2 gene. Surprisingly, expression of MSA protein in broth cultures appeared unaffected. However, the virulence of either mutant in juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) by intraperitoneal challenge was severely attenuated, suggesting that disruption of the msa1 or msa2 gene affected in vivo expression. Copyright ?? 2006, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Both msa genes in Renibacterium salmoninarum are needed for full virulence in bacterial kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Coady, Alison M; Murray, Anthony L; Elliott, Diane G; Rhodes, Linda D

    2006-04-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum, a gram-positive diplococcobacillus that causes bacterial kidney disease among salmon and trout, has two chromosomal loci encoding the major soluble antigen (msa) gene. Because the MSA protein is widely suspected to be an important virulence factor, we used insertion-duplication mutagenesis to generate disruptions of either the msa1 or msa2 gene. Surprisingly, expression of MSA protein in broth cultures appeared unaffected. However, the virulence of either mutant in juvenile chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) by intraperitoneal challenge was severely attenuated, suggesting that disruption of the msa1 or msa2 gene affected in vivo expression. PMID:16597972

  17. Both msa Genes in Renibacterium salmoninarum Are Needed for Full Virulence in Bacterial Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Coady, Alison M.; Murray, Anthony L.; Elliott, Diane G.; Rhodes, Linda D.

    2006-01-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum, a gram-positive diplococcobacillus that causes bacterial kidney disease among salmon and trout, has two chromosomal loci encoding the major soluble antigen (msa) gene. Because the MSA protein is widely suspected to be an important virulence factor, we used insertion-duplication mutagenesis to generate disruptions of either the msa1 or msa2 gene. Surprisingly, expression of MSA protein in broth cultures appeared unaffected. However, the virulence of either mutant in juvenile chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) by intraperitoneal challenge was severely attenuated, suggesting that disruption of the msa1 or msa2 gene affected in vivo expression. PMID:16597972

  18. Characterization of attenuated Renibacterium salmoninarum strains and their use as live vaccines.

    PubMed

    Daly, J G; Griffiths, S G; Kew, A K; Moore, A R; Olivier, G

    2001-03-01

    Two nutritionally mutant strains of Renibacterium salmoninarum (Rs) were isolated that grew on tryticase soy agar (Rs TSA1) or brain heart infusion agar (Rs BHI1). These 2 strains could be continuously cultured on these media, whereas typical R. salmoninarum would only grow on KDM-2 agar. We determined no other phenotypic difference that could be used to distinguish them from wild-type R. salmoninarum. Both strains were found to be avirulent when 5 x 10(6) bacteria were intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected into Atlantic salmon. Rs TSA1, Rs BHI1, and Rs MT-239 (a R. salmoninarum strain previously shown to be attenuated) were tested as live vaccines in 2 separate trials. The best protection was seen with Rs TSA1. Vaccinated Atlantic salmon had relative percent survival (RPS) of 50 at 74 d post-challenge in Trial 1 and 76 at 60 d post-challenge in Trial 2. In both trials, 100% of the control salmon died from bacterial kidney disease (BKD) (within 40 d for Trial 1 and 50 d for Trial 2) after i.p. challenge with 5 x 10(6) live cells of the virulent isolate Rs Margaree. PMID:11324812

  19. Biochemical and immunochemical properties of the cell surface of Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed Central

    Fiedler, F; Draxl, R

    1986-01-01

    The biochemical composition of the cell envelope of Renibacterium salmoninarum was investigated in a total of 13 strains isolated from different salmonid fish species at various geographical locations of the United States, Canada, and Europe. A marked similarity with the type strain R. salmoninarum ATCC 33209 was found both in the peptidoglycan and the cell wall polysaccharide. The primary structure of the peptidoglycan was found to be consistent with lysine in the third position of the peptide subunit, a glycyl-alanine interpeptide bridge between lysine and D-alanine of adjacent peptide subunits, and a D-alanine amide substituent at the alpha-carboxyl group of D-glutamic acid in position 2 of the peptide subunit. The cell wall polysaccharide contained galactose as the major sugar component which was accompanied by rhamnose, N-acetylglucosamine, and N-acetylfucosamine. The polysaccharide amounted to more than 60% of the dry weight of the cell walls. It was found to be covalently linked to the peptidoglycan and was released by hot formamide treatment. On gel filtration chromatography the extracted polysaccharide behaved like a homogeneous polymeric compound. The purified cell wall polysaccharide showed antigenic activity with antiserum obtained by immunization of rabbits with heat-inactivated trypsinized cells of R. salmoninarum. Immunoblotting experiments with nontrypsinized cell walls and antisera raised against R. salmoninarum cells revealed that antigenic proteins were attached to the cell walls. Images PMID:3782026

  20. Development of a specific biotinylated DNA probe for the detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed

    Hariharan, H; Qian, B; Despres, B; Kibenge, F S; Heaney, S B; Rainnie, D J

    1995-10-01

    A specific DNA probe for the identification of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease (BKD), was developed from one of 3 clones pRS47, pRS49, and pRS26 of 5.1 kb, 5.3 kb, and 11.3 kb, respectively. The biotinylated pRS47/BamHI insert probe was tested on 3 dilutions of DNA extracted from 3 strains of R. salmoninarum and from 1 strain each of Arthrobacter protophormiae, Aeromonas salmonicida, Corynebacterium aquaticum, Carnobacterium piscicola, Listonella anguillarum, Micrococcus luteus, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Vibrio ordalii, and Yersinia ruckeri. In a dot blot assay, this probe hybridized only with the DNA from the R. salmoninarum strains. When used on kidney samples from fish challenged with R. salmoninarum, the dot blot hybridization assay with the probe was found to be as sensitive as culture. In a fluorescent antibody test, samples that were negative in culture and dot blot hybridization showed no more than one fluorescing cell in 50 microscopic fields examined. This DNA probe, therefore, has the potential for use in the diagnosis of BKD of fish. PMID:8548693

  1. Development of a specific biotinylated DNA probe for the detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed Central

    Hariharan, H; Qian, B; Despres, B; Kibenge, F S; Heaney, S B; Rainnie, D J

    1995-01-01

    A specific DNA probe for the identification of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease (BKD), was developed from one of 3 clones pRS47, pRS49, and pRS26 of 5.1 kb, 5.3 kb, and 11.3 kb, respectively. The biotinylated pRS47/BamHI insert probe was tested on 3 dilutions of DNA extracted from 3 strains of R. salmoninarum and from 1 strain each of Arthrobacter protophormiae, Aeromonas salmonicida, Corynebacterium aquaticum, Carnobacterium piscicola, Listonella anguillarum, Micrococcus luteus, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Vibrio ordalii, and Yersinia ruckeri. In a dot blot assay, this probe hybridized only with the DNA from the R. salmoninarum strains. When used on kidney samples from fish challenged with R. salmoninarum, the dot blot hybridization assay with the probe was found to be as sensitive as culture. In a fluorescent antibody test, samples that were negative in culture and dot blot hybridization showed no more than one fluorescing cell in 50 microscopic fields examined. This DNA probe, therefore, has the potential for use in the diagnosis of BKD of fish. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:8548693

  2. Diagnostic testing patterns of Renibacterium salmoninarum in spawning salmonid stocks in Michigan.

    PubMed

    Faisal, M; Eissa, A E

    2009-04-01

    Bacterial kidney disease (BKD), caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum, is a slowly progressing disease that threatens salmon conservation and restoration programs in North America. The purpose of this study was to track naturally occurring R. salmoninarum infection in representative, Michigan, USA, salmonid stocks using nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR), quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Q-ELISA), and culture. The Q-ELISA test detected 67.6% infection prevalence, which is lower than culture (77.2%) or nPCR (94.2%), yet it provided semiquantitative data on infection intensity. The disagreement in results among the three assays may reflect the different phases of R. salmoninarum infection at the time of sampling. The testing results demonstrated the presence of six patterns, with each of the patterns representing a probable stage along the course of natural R. salmoninarum infection. Findings also suggest that fish stocks tested in this study were not uniform in the distribution of the diagnostic patterns and that, from studying such patterns, one can determine the course of BKD infection in a particular population. PMID:19395754

  3. Genome sequence of the fish pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum suggests reductive evolution away from an environmental Arthrobacter ancestor.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Renibacterium salmoninarum (Rs) is the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease and a significant threat to the healthy and sustainable production of salmonid fish worldwide. The pathogen is difficult to culture in vitro, genetic manipulation is challenging, and current therapies and preventative...

  4. A new value for mol percent guanine + cytosine of DNA for the salmonid fish pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed

    Banner, C R; Rohovec, J S; Fryer, J L

    1991-03-15

    The mol% G + C of DNA extracted from seven different isolates of Renibacterium salmoninarum was determined. Organisms studied were from selected geographical areas (U.S.A., Canada, England and France) and were isolated from five different species of salmonid fish. The mol% G + C was determined to be 55.5, higher than the currently reported value of 53. PMID:2044940

  5. Genes associated with an effective host response by Chinook salmon to Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Linda D; Wallis, Steviebrooke; Demlow, S Ellen

    2009-02-01

    An effective host response to Renibacterium salmoninarum, the etiologic agent of bacterial kidney disease, is poorly characterized. Using suppression subtractive hybridization, we exploited the difference in early host response in the pronephros of fish challenged by an attenuated strain (MT239) or a virulent strain (ATCC 33209) of R. salmoninarum. Among the 132 expressed sequence tag (EST) clones that were sequenced, 20 were selected for expression analysis at 24 and 72h after challenge. ESTs matching two interferon inducible genes (IFN-inducible GBP and VLIG1), the ligand GAS6, and the kinase VRK2 were upregulated in fish exposed to MT239, but downregulated or unchanged in fish exposed to 33209. A second group of ESTs matching genes involved in apoptosis (caspase 8) and immune function (IkappaBalpha, p47(phoX), EMR/CD97) were more slowly upregulated in fish exposed to 33209 compared to fish exposed to MT239. The ESTs displaying elevated expression in MT239-exposed fish may represent important cellular processes to bacterial challenge, and may be useful indicators of an effective host response to R. salmoninarum infection. PMID:18793667

  6. Pathological and immunological responses associated with differential survival of Chinook salmon following Renibacterium salmoninarum challenge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Elliott, Diane G.; Metzger, C. David; Wargo, Andrew; Park, K. Linda

    2010-01-01

    Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha are highly susceptible to Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease (BKD). Previously we demonstrated that introduced Chinook salmon from Lake Michigan, Wisconsin (WI), USA, have higher survival following R. salmoninarum challenge relative to the progenitor stock from Green River, Washington, USA. In the present study, we investigated the pathological and immunological responses that are associated with differential survival in the 2 Chinook salmon stocks following intra-peritoneal R. salmoninarum challenge of 2 different cohort years (2003 and 2005). Histological evaluation revealed delayed appearance of severe granulomatous lesions in the kidney and lower overall prevalence of membranous glomerulopathy in the higher surviving WI stock. The higher survival WI stock had a lower bacterial load at 28 d post-infection, as measured by reverse-transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). However, at all other time points, bacterial load levels were similar despite higher mortality in the more susceptible Green River stock, suggesting the possibility that the stocks may differ in their tolerance to infection by the bacterium. Interferon-y, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), Mx-1, and transferrin gene expression were up-regulated in both stocks following challenge. A trend of higher iNOS gene expression at later time points (≥28 d post-infection) was observed in the lower surviving Green River stock, suggesting the possibility that higher iNOS expression may contribute to greater pathology in that stock.

  7. Pathological and immunological responses associated with differential survival of Chinook salmon following Renibacterium salmoninarum challenge.

    PubMed

    Metzger, David C; Elliott, Diane G; Wargo, Andrew; Park, Linda K; Purcell, Maureen K

    2010-05-18

    Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha are highly susceptible to Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease (BKD). Previously we demonstrated that introduced Chinook salmon from Lake Michigan, Wisconsin (WI), USA, have higher survival following R. salmoninarum challenge relative to the progenitor stock from Green River, Washington, USA. In the present study, we investigated the pathological and immunological responses that are associated with differential survival in the 2 Chinook salmon stocks following intra-peritoneal R. salmoninarum challenge of 2 different cohort years (2003 and 2005). Histological evaluation revealed delayed appearance of severe granulomatous lesions in the kidney and lower overall prevalence of membranous glomerulopathy in the higher surviving WI stock. The higher survival WI stock had a lower bacterial load at 28 d post-infection, as measured by reverse-transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). However, at all other time points, bacterial load levels were similar despite higher mortality in the more susceptible Green River stock, suggesting the possibility that the stocks may differ in their tolerance to infection by the bacterium. Interferon-gamma, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), Mx-1, and transferrin gene expression were up-regulated in both stocks following challenge. A trend of higher iNOS gene expression at later time points (> or = 28 d post-infection) was observed in the lower surviving Green River stock, suggesting the possibility that higher iNOS expression may contribute to greater pathology in that stock. PMID:20597428

  8. Detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum in chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum), using quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Powell, M; Overturf, K; Hogge, C; Johnson, K

    2005-10-01

    A quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) assay has been developed to detect varying levels of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease. This assay allows for the direct enumeration of bacterial DNA or RNA copy number within tissues and body fluids. The assay can be applied non-lethally and can be used to determine whether R. salmoninarum is transcriptionally active. The presence of R. salmoninarum in kidney tissues from 430 chinook salmon collected from five Idaho Fish and Game operated hatcheries was initially evaluated using the widely employed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with two sets of Kirkegaard and Perry Laboratories polyclonal antibodies, 'mother batches' 1 and 2. The same tissue samples were then analysed using the novel QPCR assay and the results compared. At moderate to high levels of infection [optical density (OD > 0.5)], ELISA values and estimated DNA copy number were highly correlated (r(2) > 0.80), although correlation to specific antibody batches varied. However, lower ELISA values (OD < 0.5) observed with either antibody batch did not correlate well with the QPCR assay (R(2)

  9. Detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the Causative Agent of Bacterial Kidney Disease in Salmonid Fish, from Pen-Cultured Coho Salmon.

    PubMed

    Sakai, M; Kobayashi, M

    1992-03-01

    The detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum antigen from pen-cultured coho salmon was attempted. Flounder (Limanda herzensteini) (n = 24), greenling (Hexagrammos otakii) (n = 5), Japanese sculpin (Cottus japonicus) (n = 1), and flathead (Platycephalus indicus) (n = 22) captured by fishing around coho salmon net pens were examined for the presence of R. salmoninarum antigen by an indirect dot blot assay and by an indirect fluorescent-antibody technique using polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies. R. salmoninarum antigen was detected from kidney samples of one greenling and six flathead. Moreover, 86 scallops (Patinopecten yessoensis) were hung from the edge of the net pen for 50 days, and R. salmoninarum antigen was demonstrated in 31 samples by the indirect dot blot assay and the indirect fluorescent-antibody technique. PMID:16348666

  10. Detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the Causative Agent of Bacterial Kidney Disease in Salmonid Fish, from Pen-Cultured Coho Salmon

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Masanori

    1992-01-01

    The detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum antigen from pen-cultured coho salmon was attempted. Flounder (Limanda herzensteini) (n = 24), greenling (Hexagrammos otakii) (n = 5), Japanese sculpin (Cottus japonicus) (n = 1), and flathead (Platycephalus indicus) (n = 22) captured by fishing around coho salmon net pens were examined for the presence of R. salmoninarum antigen by an indirect dot blot assay and by an indirect fluorescent-antibody technique using polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies. R. salmoninarum antigen was detected from kidney samples of one greenling and six flathead. Moreover, 86 scallops (Patinopecten yessoensis) were hung from the edge of the net pen for 50 days, and R. salmoninarum antigen was demonstrated in 31 samples by the indirect dot blot assay and the indirect fluorescent-antibody technique. PMID:16348666

  11. Impact of stressors on transmission potential of Renibacterium salmoninarum in Chinook salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Winton, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum is the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease (BKD) affecting several species of Pacific salmon.  The severity of BKD can range from a chronic infection to overt disease with high mortality as in the case of large losses of adult Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Great Lakes during late 1980s. The goal of this study was to empirically evaluate how environmental stressors relevant to the Great Lakes impact R. salmoninarum disease progression and bacterial shedding, the latter parameter being a proxy of horizontal transmission. In the first study (Aim 1), we focused on how endogenous host thiamine levels and dietary fatty acids impacted resistance of Chinook salmon to R. salmoninarum. Juvenile fish were fed one of four experimental diets, including a (1) thiamine replete diet formulated with fish oil, (2) thiamine deplete diet formulated with fish oil, (3) thiamine replete diet formulated with soybean oil, and (4) thiamine deplete diet formulated with soybean oil, before being challenged with buffer or R. salmoninarum. We observed significantly higher mortality in the R. salmoninarum infected groups relative to the corresponding mock controls in only the thiamine replete diet groups. We also observed a significant effect of time and diet on kidney bacterial load and bacterial shedding, with a significant trend towards higher shedding and bacterial load in the fish oil – thiamine replete diet group. However, during the course of the study, unexpected mortality occurred in all groups attributed to the myxozoan parasite Ceratomyxa shasta. Since the fish were dually-infected with C. shasta, we evaluated parasite DNA levels (parasitic load) in the kidney of sampled fish. We found that parasite load varied across time points but there was no significant effect of diet. However, parasite load did differ significantly between the mock and R. salmoninarum challenge groups with a trend towards longer persistence of C. shasta

  12. Molecular diversity of Renibacterium salmoninarum isolates determined by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Grayson, T H; Atienzar, F A; Alexander, S M; Cooper, L F; Gilpin, M L

    2000-01-01

    The molecular diversity among 60 isolates of Renibacterium salmoninarum which differ in place and date of isolation was investigated by using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. Isolates were grouped into 21 banding patterns which did not reflect the biological source. Four 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer (ITS1) sequence variations and two alleles of an exact tandem repeat locus, ETR-A, were the bases for formation of distinct groups within the RAPD clusters. This study provides evidence that the most common ITS1 sequence variant, SV1, possesses two copies of a 51-bp repeat unit at ETR-A and has been widely dispersed among countries which are associated with mainstream intensive salmonid culture. PMID:10618262

  13. Cloning, functional expression and partial characterization of the glucose kinase from Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed

    Concha, M I; León, G

    2000-05-01

    The complete glcK gene from the fish pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum, encoding a glucose kinase, was analyzed and expressed. The partial characterization of the recombinant enzyme confirmed that it belongs to a group of glucose kinases involved in carbon catabolite repression. Multiple sequence alignments were used to deduce a new consensus sequence for this family of bacterial proteins, characterized by several conserved Cys residues. This sequence was more specific and allowed the detection of the first eukaryotic protein of this family. The recombinant enzyme was inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide and the substrates protected the enzyme from this inhibition, suggesting the presence of Cys residues in or close to the active site. PMID:10779719

  14. Structural studies of the major polysaccharide in the cell wall of Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed

    Sørum, U; Robertsen, B; Kenne, L

    1998-01-01

    The galactose-rich polysaccharide (GPS) in the cell wall of the Gram-positive bacterium Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent in of bacterial kidney disease (BKD) of salmonids, has been studied by sugar and methylation analysis, partial acid hydrolysis, Smith degradation, FABMS, and 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. The data show that the GPS has a heptasaccharide repeating unit with the following structure: alpha-D-Rhap-(1-->3)-alpha-L-FucpNAc-(1-->)-beta-D-GlcpNAc 1 decreases 2 -->3)-beta-D-Galf-(1-->6)-beta-D-Galf-(1-->3)-beta-D-Galf -(1-->6) -beta-D-Galf-(1-->. PMID:9691455

  15. Molecular Diversity of Renibacterium salmoninarum Isolates Determined by Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Grayson, T. Hilton; Atienzar, Franck A.; Alexander, Sarah M.; Cooper, Lynne F.; Gilpin, Martyn L.

    2000-01-01

    The molecular diversity among 60 isolates of Renibacterium salmoninarum which differ in place and date of isolation was investigated by using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. Isolates were grouped into 21 banding patterns which did not reflect the biological source. Four 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer (ITS1) sequence variations and two alleles of an exact tandem repeat locus, ETR-A, were the bases for formation of distinct groups within the RAPD clusters. This study provides evidence that the most common ITS1 sequence variant, SV1, possesses two copies of a 51-bp repeat unit at ETR-A and has been widely dispersed among countries which are associated with mainstream intensive salmonid culture. PMID:10618262

  16. Renibacterium salmoninarum bar forms: characterization, occurrence, and evidence of a host response to a R. salmoninarum infection.

    PubMed

    Cvitanich, J D

    2004-04-01

    Unique-staining Renibacterium salmoninarum (Rs) cells, termed bar forms, first observed in a coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch (Walbaum), in 1983, could not be cultured, making their characterization difficult and significance obscure. They can be detected only by the fluorescent-antibody technique (FAT) and their numbers estimated only by a quantitative FAT (QFAT). Data collected over a 10-year period showed that bar forms were observed only in vivo and appeared associated with a host response. Bar forms were observed in 10 salmonid species from five countries and in fish from < 1 g to spawning adults. They were observed in 50.1% of kidney smears prepared from 10,061 Rs positive chinook, O. tshawytscha (Walbaum), coho, and Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L. Bar forms were shown to be Rs cells based on absorption studies, their reaction with an Rs-specific FAT and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and a transition from 'typical' Rs cells to bar forms in naturally and experimentally infected fish. Bar forms were determined to be non-virulent, damaged or dead Rs cells, based on fluorescence and electron microscopy observations, the inability to culture them, and mortality data. Bar forms appeared to represent visual markers of recovery from an Rs infection. PMID:15049888

  17. Performance of serum-free broth media for growth of Renibacterium salmoninarum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Starliper, C.E.; Schill, W.B.; Mathias, J.

    1998-01-01

    Growth of Renibacterium salmoninarum was compared in 14 different broth media; 13 serum-free, and 1 that contained newborn calf serum, KDM2+M. Supplementation with 1% v/v R. salmoninarum MCO4M metabolite was evaluated for 6 of the media that do not utilize it as part of their ingredients. Viable cells were enumerated on Days 10, 20, and 30 post inoculation to evaluate performance. The experiment was repeated 3 times using high, low, and medium (trials 1 to 3, respectively) cell concentrations as inoculum. In general there was no optimal medium and all performed well. The choice of which to employ depends on the ease of preparation and presence of certain ingredients that might affect subsequent assays. In trials 2 and 3, the pH was estimated using test papers at the same time as cells were counted. Maximum pH increase occurred with KDM2+M and those media containing charcoal. For most media, a simple pH determination could be used as a means to check that growth has occurred in a culture, particularly if charcoal was added directly to the media and a visual inspection could not be made to detect growth.

  18. Performance of serum-free broth media for growth of Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed

    Starliper, C E; Schill, W B; Mathias, J

    1998-09-11

    Growth of Renibacterium salmoninarum was compared in 14 different broth media; 13 serum-free, and 1 that contained newborn calf serum, KDM2+M. Supplementation with 1% v/v R. salmoninarum MCO4M metabolite was evaluated for 6 of the media that do not utilize it as part of their ingredients. Viable cells were enumerated on Days 10, 20, and 30 post inoculation to evaluate performance. The experiment was repeated 3 times using high, low, and medium (trials 1 to 3, respectively) cell concentrations as inoculum. In general there was no optimal medium and all performed well. The choice of which to employ depends on the ease of preparation and presence of certain ingredients that might affect subsequent assays. In trials 2 and 3, the pH was estimated using test papers at the same time as cells were counted. Maximum pH increase occurred with KDM2+M and those media containing charcoal. For most media, a simple pH determination could be used as a means to check that growth has occurred in a culture, particularly if charcoal was added directly to the media and a visual inspection could not be made to detect growth. PMID:9789976

  19. Use of Arthrobacter davidanieli as a live vaccine against Renibacterium salmoninarum and Piscirickettsia salmonis in salmonids.

    PubMed

    Salonius, K; Siderakis, C; MacKinnon, A M; Griffiths, S G

    2005-01-01

    Arthrobacter davidanieli (proposed species nomenclature) is a non-pathogenic Gram-variable bacterium related to, but taxonomically distinct from, Renibacterium salmoninarum, the aetiological agent of bacterial kidney disease (BKD). We have demonstrated that vaccination with live A. davidanieli is effective against BKD in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) showing above 80 relative percent survival in experimental challenge trials. Good protection was also demonstrated in long-term field trials where Atlantic salmon were naturally exposed to R. salmoninarum challenge until 23 months after vaccination. The same vaccine, which is licensed in Canada against BKD has also proved effective in reducing mortality from experimental challenge of coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) with Piscirickettsia salmonis, the causative agent of piscirickettsiosis. Under field conditions in Chile, use of the vaccine led to a significant reduction in piscirickettsiosis mortality in coho salmon over 10 months following sea transfer. The vaccine strain is unique in that it is the first live organism to be licensed as a vaccine for use in aquaculture. Potential mechanisms of protection against the two taxonomically disparate pathogens are discussed. PMID:15962482

  20. Characterization of Renibacterium salmoninarum with reduced susceptibility to macrolide antibiotics by a standardized antibiotic susceptibility test.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Linda D; Nguyen, Oanh T; Deinhard, Rebecca K; White, Teresa M; Harrell, Lee W; Roberts, Marilyn C

    2008-08-01

    Three cohorts of juvenile and subadult Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha received multiple treatments with macrolide antibiotics for bacterial kidney disease (BKD) during rearing in a captive broodstock program. A total of 77 mortalities among the cohorts were screened for Renibacterium salmoninarum, the etiologic agent of BKD, by agar culture from kidney, and isolates from 7 fish were suitable for growth testing in the presence of macrolide antibiotics. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of erythromycin and azithromycin was determined by a modification of the standardized broth assay using defined medium. The American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) type strain 33209 exhibited a MIC of 0.008 microg m(-1) to either erythromycin or azithromycin. Isolates from 3 fish displayed MICs identical to the MICs for the ATCC type strain 33209. In contrast, isolates from 4 fish exhibited higher MICs, ranging between 0.125 and 0.250 microg ml(-1) for erythromycin and between 0.016 and 0.031 microg ml(-1) for azithromycin. Sequence analysis of the mutational hotspots for macrolide resistance in the 23S rDNA gene and the open reading frames of ribosomal proteins L4 and L22 found identical sequences among all isolates, indicating that the phenotype was not due to mutations associated with the drug-binding site of 23S rRNA. These results are the first report of R. salmoninarum with reduced susceptibility to macrolide antibiotics isolated from fish receiving multiple antibiotic treatments. PMID:18814542

  1. Purification, and biochemical and structural characterization of a fimbrial haemagglutinin of Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed

    Dubreuil, J D; Jacques, M; Graham, L; Lallier, R

    1990-12-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum was shown to possess peritrichous fimbriae. Electron microscopy of strains FMV 84-01 and ATCC 33209T revealed short, flexible fimbriae less than 2 nm in diameter. These surface appendages were isolated from the bacteria by a procedure involving water extraction and urea solubilization. The fimbrin was purified to homogeneity by Fast Pressure Liquid Chromatography, and shown by SDS-PAGE to be a protein of 57 kDa. Isoelectric focusing under non-denaturing conditions indicated a pI of 4.8. The protein had an amino acid composition rich in glycine, Asx (aspartic acid and asparagine), valine and alanine; methionine was absent. Approximately 33% of the amino acid residues were hydrophobic. Immunoblotting using a polyclonal antiserum raised against whole cells showed that the 57 kDa protein was the immunodominant antigen on the cell surface. Immunogold labelling using polyclonal antibodies raised against the fimbrin revealed an alignment of gold particles along the fimbriae. Purified fimbriae caused agglutination of rabbit erythrocytes and antifimbrial serum inhibited this haemagglutination. Altogether the results indicate that the fimbriae on the surface of R. salmoninarum are responsible for the haemagglutinating activity. PMID:1981894

  2. Microevolution of Renibacterium salmoninarum: evidence for intercontinental dissemination associated with fish movements

    PubMed Central

    Brynildsrud, Ola; Feil, Edward J; Bohlin, Jon; Castillo-Ramirez, Santiago; Colquhoun, Duncan; McCarthy, Una; Matejusova, Iveta M; Rhodes, Linda D; Wiens, Gregory D; Verner-Jeffreys, David W

    2014-01-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum is the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease, a major pathogen of salmonid fish species worldwide. Very low levels of intra-species genetic diversity have hampered efforts to understand the transmission dynamics and recent evolutionary history of this Gram-positive bacterium. We exploited recent advances in the next-generation sequencing technology to generate genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data from 68 diverse R. salmoninarum isolates representing broad geographical and temporal ranges and different host species. Phylogenetic analysis robustly delineated two lineages (lineage 1 and lineage 2); futhermore, dating analysis estimated that the time to the most recent ancestor of all the isolates is 1239 years ago (95% credible interval (CI) 444–2720 years ago). Our data reveal the intercontinental spread of lineage 1 over the last century, concurrent with anthropogenic movement of live fish, feed and ova for aquaculture purposes and stocking of recreational fisheries, whilst lineage 2 appears to have been endemic in wild Eastern Atlantic salmonid stocks before commercial activity. The high resolution of the SNP-based analyses allowed us to separate closely related isolates linked to neighboring fish farms, indicating that they formed part of single outbreaks. We were able to demonstrate that the main lineage 1 subgroup of R. salmoninarum isolated from Norway and the UK likely represent an introduction to these areas ∼40 years ago. This study demonstrates the promise of this technology for analysis of micro and medium scale evolutionary relationships in veterinary and environmental microorganisms, as well as human pathogens. PMID:24173459

  3. Microevolution of Renibacterium salmoninarum: evidence for intercontinental dissemination associated with fish movements.

    PubMed

    Brynildsrud, Ola; Feil, Edward J; Bohlin, Jon; Castillo-Ramirez, Santiago; Colquhoun, Duncan; McCarthy, Una; Matejusova, Iveta M; Rhodes, Linda D; Wiens, Gregory D; Verner-Jeffreys, David W

    2014-04-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum is the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease, a major pathogen of salmonid fish species worldwide. Very low levels of intra-species genetic diversity have hampered efforts to understand the transmission dynamics and recent evolutionary history of this Gram-positive bacterium. We exploited recent advances in the next-generation sequencing technology to generate genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data from 68 diverse R. salmoninarum isolates representing broad geographical and temporal ranges and different host species. Phylogenetic analysis robustly delineated two lineages (lineage 1 and lineage 2); futhermore, dating analysis estimated that the time to the most recent ancestor of all the isolates is 1239 years ago (95% credible interval (CI) 444-2720 years ago). Our data reveal the intercontinental spread of lineage 1 over the last century, concurrent with anthropogenic movement of live fish, feed and ova for aquaculture purposes and stocking of recreational fisheries, whilst lineage 2 appears to have been endemic in wild Eastern Atlantic salmonid stocks before commercial activity. The high resolution of the SNP-based analyses allowed us to separate closely related isolates linked to neighboring fish farms, indicating that they formed part of single outbreaks. We were able to demonstrate that the main lineage 1 subgroup of R. salmoninarum isolated from Norway and the UK likely represent an introduction to these areas ~40 years ago. This study demonstrates the promise of this technology for analysis of micro and medium scale evolutionary relationships in veterinary and environmental microorganisms, as well as human pathogens. PMID:24173459

  4. Detection and quantification of Renibacterium salmoninarum DNA in salmonid tissues by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chase, D.M.; Elliott, D.G.; Pascho, R.J.

    2006-01-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum is an important salmonid pathogen that is difficult to culture. We developed and assessed a real-time, quantitative, polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay for the detection and enumeration of R. salmoninarum. The qPCR is based on TaqMan technology and amplifies a 69-base pair (bp) region of the gene encoding the major soluble antigen (MSA) of R. salmoninarum. The qPCR assay consistently detected as few as 5 R. salmoninarum cells per reaction in kidney tissue. The specificity of the qPCR was confirmed by testing the DNA extracts from a panel of microorganisms that were either common fish pathogens or reported to cause false-positive reactions in the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Kidney samples from 38 juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in a naturally infected population were examined by real-time qPCR, a nested PCR, and ELISA, and prevalences of R. salmoninarum detected were 71, 66, and 71%, respectively. The qPCR should be a valuable tool for evaluating the R. salmoninarum infection status of salmonids.

  5. Detection and quantification of Renibacterium salmoninarum DNA in salmonid tissues by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis.

    PubMed

    Chase, Dorothy M; Elliott, Diane G; Pascho, Ronald J

    2006-07-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum is an important salmonid pathogen that is difficult to culture. We developed and assessed a real-time, quantitative, polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay for the detection and enumeration of R. salmoninarum. The qPCR is based on TaqMan technology and amplifies a 69-base pair (bp) region of the gene encoding the major soluble antigen (MSA) of R. salmoninarum. The qPCR assay consistently detected as few as 5 R. salmoninarum cells per reaction in kidney tissue. The specificity of the qPCR was confirmed by testing the DNA extracts from a panel of microorganisms that were either common fish pathogens or reported to cause false-positive reactions in the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Kidney samples from 38 juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in a naturally infected population were examined by real-time qPCR, a nested PCR, and ELISA, and prevalences of R. salmoninarum detected were 71, 66, and 71%, respectively. The qPCR should be a valuable tool for evaluating the R. salmoninarum infection status of salmonids. PMID:16921877

  6. Epidemiological investigation of Renibacterium salmoninarum in three Oncorhynchus spp. in Michigan from 2001 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Faisal, Mohamed; Schulz, Carolyn; Eissa, Alaa; Brenden, Travis; Winters, Andrew; Whelan, Gary; Wolgamood, Martha; Eisch, Edward; VanAmberg, Jan

    2012-12-01

    Bacterial kidney disease (BKD) has caused mortalities and chronic infections in wild and farm-raised salmonids throughout the world. In the Laurentian Great Lakes of North America, BKD was associated with several large-scale mortality events of Oncorhynchus spp. throughout the 1980s and 1990s. In response to these mortality events, the state of Michigan implemented several enhanced biosecurity measures to limit the occurrence of BKD in state-operated hatcheries and gamete-collection weirs. The objectives of this study were to assess if infection levels (prevalence and intensity) of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of BKD, have changed in broodstock and pre-stocking fingerlings of three feral Oncorhynchus spp. (Chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha), coho salmon (O. kisutch), and steelhead (O. mykiss)) over a decade, following the implementation of the enhanced biosecurity measures. Between 2001 and 2010, a total of 3,530 broodstock salmonids collected from lakes Huron and Michigan tributaries during spawning runs and 4,294 propagated pre-stocking salmonid fingerlings collected from three state of Michigan fish hatcheries were tested for the presence of R. salmoninarum antigens using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Substantial declines in the overall prevalence of the bacterium were detected in each of the examined broodstocks. Most propagated pre-stocking fingerlings also exhibited substantial declines in R. salmoninarum prevalence. Prevalence was typically higher in Chinook salmon from Lake Michigan than from Lake Huron; prevalence was also generally higher in the Hinchenbrooke strain of coho salmon than in the Michigan-adapted strain. For most strains and stocks examined, intensity of R. salmoninarum infection was found to have declined. Although there were declines in the potential for shedding the bacteria for both male and female Chinook and coho salmon, overall shedding rates were generally low (<15%) except for Hinchenbrooke coho salmon strain

  7. Real-time PCR for quantification of viable Renibacterium salmoninarum in chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kunio; Sakai, D K

    2007-03-13

    Quantification of msa gene mRNA of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease (BKD), was investigated using reverse transcription followed by real-time PCR assay on R. salmoninarum in culture, and in experimentally challenged chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta fry kidney tissues (total of 70 samples) after intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection and bath infection. Correlations of msa gene mRNA concentrations with culturable cell concentrations (as colony forming units [CFU]), determined by drop-plate culture method on selective kidney disease medium (SKDM) agar through a 12 wk incubation time, and msa gene DNA concentrations by real-time PCR assay were examined. Furthermore, ovarian fluid samples from wild chum salmon adults with no clinical signs of disease were collected from 8 rivers and from clinically infected kokanee 0. nerka and masu salmon O. masou that were reared in 1 and 2 hatcheries, respectively (total of 414 samples). All samples were examined by nested PCR assay. Then, positive samples were examined by real-time PCR assays for mRNA and DNA; mRNA was detectable at 8 log units (5.0 x 101 to 5.0 x 10(9) copies p11(-1)) with high correlation (R2 = 0.999). The mRNA concentration correlated with CFU in kidney tissue from fish infected by i.p. injection (R2 = 0.924), by bath infection (R2 = 0.502) and in culture (R2 = 0.888). R. salmoninarum was detected and quantified by real-time PCR assay for mRNA in ovarian fluid samples in both subclinically infected chum salmon adults and clinically infected kokanee and masu salmon adults; detection rates ranged from 0 to 44.4% and concentrations ranged from 9.7 x 10(2) to 5.6 x 10(5) copies pl(-1). These results indicate that real-time PCR assay for the mRNA is a rapid, sensitive and reliable method to detect and quantify the viability of R. salmoninarum in kidney and ovarian fluid samples of salmonid fishes with both clinical and subclinical infection of the pathogen. PMID:17465306

  8. Evaluation by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of Renibacterium salmoninarum bacterins affected by persistence of bacterial antigens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pascho, R.J.; Goodrich, T.D.; McKibben, C.L.

    1997-01-01

    Rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss were injected intraperitoneally with a bacterin containing killed Renibacterium salmoninarum cells delivered alone or in an oil-based adjuvant. We evaluated the relative abilities of the batterins to prevent the initiation or progression of infection in fish challenged by waterborne exposure to R. salmoninarum. Sixty-one days after vaccination, fish were held for 24 h in water containing either no bacteria or approximately 1.7 x 103, 1.7 x 105, or 5.3 x 106 live R. salmoninarum cells/mL. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to monitor changes in the levels of R. salmoninarum antigen in live fish before and after the immersion challenges. High levels of R. salmoninarum antigens were detected by ELISA in kidney-spleen tissue homogenates from vaccinated fish immediately before the challenges. Levels of those antigens remained high in the tissues of unchallenged fish throughout the study. We found that the ELISA used in this study may be unsuitable for evaluating the efficacy of batterins because it did not distinguish antigens produced by the challenge bacteria during an infection from those of the bacterins. Groups of control and vaccinated fish also were injected with either 1.7 x 104 or 1.7 x 106 R. salmoninarum cells and served as R. salmoninarum virulence controls. Relative survival among the various subgroups in the injection challenge suggests that adverse effects might have been associated with the adjuvant used in this study. The lowest survival at both injection challenge levels was among fish vaccinated with bacteria in adjuvant.

  9. Testing of candidate non-lethal sampling methods for detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum in juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Diane G; McKibben, Constance L; Conway, Carla M; Purcell, Maureen K; Chase, Dorothy M; Applegate, LynnMarie J

    2015-05-11

    Non-lethal pathogen testing can be a useful tool for fish disease research and management. Our research objectives were to determine if (1) fin clips, gill snips, surface mucus scrapings, blood draws, or kidney biopsies could be obtained non-lethally from 3 to 15 g Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, (2) non-lethal samples could accurately discriminate between fish exposed to the bacterial kidney disease agent Renibacterium salmoninarum and non-exposed fish, and (3) non-lethal samples could serve as proxies for lethal kidney samples to assess infection intensity. Blood draws and kidney biopsies caused ≥5% post-sampling mortality (Objective 1) and may be appropriate only for larger fish, but the other sample types were non-lethal. Sampling was performed over 21 wk following R. salmoninarum immersion challenge of fish from 2 stocks (Objectives 2 and 3), and nested PCR (nPCR) and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) results from candidate non-lethal samples were compared with kidney tissue analysis by nPCR, qPCR, bacteriological culture, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), fluorescent antibody test (FAT) and histopathology/immunohistochemistry. R. salmoninarum was detected by PCR in >50% of fin, gill, and mucus samples from challenged fish. Mucus qPCR was the only non-lethal assay exhibiting both diagnostic sensitivity and specificity estimates>90% for distinguishing between R. salmoninarum-exposed and non-exposed fish and was the best candidate for use as an alternative to lethal kidney sample testing. Mucus qPCR R. salmoninarum quantity estimates reflected changes in kidney bacterial load estimates, as evidenced by significant positive correlations with kidney R. salmoninarum infection intensity scores at all sample times and in both fish stocks, and were not significantly impacted by environmental R. salmoninarum concentrations. PMID:25958804

  10. Antigenic and functional characterization of p57 produced by Renibacterium salmoninarum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weins, G.; Chien, M.S.; Winton, J.R.; Kaatari, S.L.

    1999-01-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease, produces large quantities of a 57-58 kDa protein (p57) during growth in broth culture and during infection of salmonid fish. Biological activities of secreted p57 include agglutination of salrnonid leucocytes and rabbit erythrocytes. We define the location of epitopes on p57 recognized by agglutination-blocking monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) 4Cl1, 4H8 and 4D3, and demonstrate that the majority of secreted p57 is a nlonomer that retains salrnonid leucocyte agglutinat~ng activity. The 3 MAbs bound a recombinant, amino-terminal fragment of p57 (211 aa) but not a carboxy-terminal fragment (315 aa) demonstrating that the neutralizing epitopes are located within the amino-terminal portion of p57. When combinations of the MAbs were used in an antigen capture ELISA. the epitopes recognized by the 3 MAbs were shown to be sterically separate. However, when the same MAb was used as both the coating and detection MAb, binding of the biotinylated detection MAb was not observed. These data indicate that the epitopes recognized by the 3 agglutination-blocking antibodies are functionally available only once per molecule and that native p57 exists as a monomer Similar ELISA results were obtained when kidney tissues from 3 naturally infected chinook salmon were assayed. Finally, a p57 monomer was purified using anion exchange and size exclusion chromatography that retained in vitro agglutinating activity. A model in which p57 is released from R. salmoninarum as a biologically active monomer during infection of salmonid fish is proposed.

  11. Renibacterium salmoninarum p57 antigenic variation is restricted in geographic distribution and correlated with genomic markers.

    PubMed

    Wiens, Gregory D; Dale, Ole Bendik

    2009-02-12

    The 57 kDa protein (p57) is an important diagnostic antigen that is implicated in the pathogenesis of salmonid bacterial kidney disease. Little is known about the nature and extent of antigenic variation in p57. Previously, we reported that p57 produced by Renibacterium salmoninarum Strain 684 contains a mutation that disrupts monoclonal antibody (MAb) 4C11 binding. In the present study, we examined MAb binding to a panel of 23 additional R. salmoninarum isolates obtained from diverse geographic locations to examine the prevalence of this variant and whether additional variability exists within other p57 epitopes. Six p57-specific MAbs (4C11, 4D3, 3H1, 4H8, 4D10 and 1A1) were used to probe dot and western blots to determine the relative expression, size and cellular association of p57. Full-length p57 was produced by all isolates, and for each isolate, the protein was associated with the bacterial cell surface. The epitopes recognized by 4 MAbs, 4D3, 4H8, 3H1 and 1A1, were conserved among all strains tested. The 4C11 epitope was absent in 5 of 8 strains originating from Norway, while the 4D10 epitope was partially disrupted in one isolate from British Columbia, Canada. The 5 Norwegian antigenic-variant strains appeared to be clonally related as they shared the following characteristics: one tandem repeat in the ETRA locus, a Sequovar-4 16-23S rRNA intervening DNA sequence, a larger XhoI fragment in the msa1 5' region, and absent msa3 gene. These results indicate that limited antigenic and genomic variation exists between strains and this variation appears geographically restricted in distribution. PMID:19326793

  12. Antigenic and functional characterization of p57 produced by Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed

    Wiens, G D; Chien, M S; Winton, J R; Kaattari, S L

    1999-06-23

    Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease, produces large quantities of a 57-58 kDa protein (p57) during growth in broth culture and during infection of salmonid fish. Biological activities of secreted p57 include agglutination of salmonid leucocytes and rabbit erythrocytes. We define the location of epitopes on p57 recognized by agglutination-blocking monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) 4C11, 4H8 and 4D3, and demonstrate that the majority of secreted p57 is a monomer that retains salmonid leucocyte agglutinating activity. The 3 MAbs bound a recombinant, amino-terminal fragment of p57 (211 aa) but not a carboxy-terminal fragment (315 aa) demonstrating that the neutralizing epitopes are located within the amino-terminal portion of p57. When combinations of the MAbs were used in an antigen capture ELISA, the epitopes recognized by the 3 MAbs were shown to be sterically separate. However, when the same MAb was used as both the coating and detection MAb, binding of the biotinylated detection MAb was not observed. These data indicate that the epitopes recognized by the 3 agglutination-blocking antibodies are functionally available only once per molecule and that native p57 exists as a monomer. Similar ELISA results were obtained when kidney tissues from 3 naturally infected chinook salmon were assayed. Finally, a p57 monomer was purified using anion exchange and size exclusion chromatography that retained in vitro agglutinating activity. A model in which p57 is released from R. salmoninarum as a biologically active monomer during infection of salmonid fish is proposed. PMID:10439902

  13. Multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat genotyping of Renibacterium salmoninarum, a bacterium causing bacterial kidney disease in salmonid fish

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bacterial kidney disease (BKD), caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum, is a bacterial disease of fish, which is both geographically widespread and difficult to control. Previously, application of various molecular typing methods has failed to reliably discriminate between R. salmoninarum isolates originating from different host species and geographic areas. The current study aimed to utilize multilocus variable number tandem repeats (VNTR) to investigate inter-strain variation of R. salmoninarum to establish whether host-specific populations exist in Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout respectively. Such information would be valuable in risk assessment of transmission of R. salmoninarum in a multispecies aquaculture environment. Results The present analysis utilizing sixteen VNTRs distinguished 17 different haplotypes amongst 41 R. salmoninarum isolates originating from Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout in Scotland, Norway and the US. The VNTR typing system revealed two well supported groups of R. salmoninarum haplotypes. The first group included R. salmoninarum isolates originating from both Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout circulating in Scottish and Norwegian aquaculture, in addition to the type strain ATCC33209T originating from Chinook salmon in North America. The second group comprised isolates found exclusively in Atlantic salmon, of mainly wild origin, including isolates NCIB1114 and NCIB1116 associated with the original Dee disease in Scotland. Conclusions The present study confirmed that VNTR analysis can be successfully applied to discriminate R. salmoninarum strains. There was no clear distinction between isolates originating from Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout as several haplotypes in group 1 clustered together R. salmoninarum isolates from both species. These findings indicate a potential exchange of pathogens between Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout in Scottish and Norwegian aquaculture during the last 20 years. In a scenario of

  14. Modeling fish health to inform research and management: Renibacterium salmoninarum dynamics in Lake Michigan.

    PubMed

    Fenichel, Eli P; Tsao, Jean I; Jones, Michael L

    2009-04-01

    Little is known about the interaction between fish pathogens and managed freshwater fish populations. We develop a model of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tschawytscha)-Renibacterium salmoninarum (Rs) dynamics based on free-swimming Lake Michigan fish by synthesizing population and epidemiological theory. Using the model, we expose critical uncertainties about the system, identify opportunities for efficient and insightful data collection, and pose testable hypotheses. Our simulation results suggest that hatcheries potentially play an important role in Lake Michigan Rs dynamics, and understanding vertical transmission will be critical for quantifying this role. Our results also show that disease-mediated responses to chinook salmon density need to be considered when evaluating management actions. Related to this, a better understanding of the stock-recruitment relationship and natural mortality rates for wild-spawned fish and the impact of hatchery stocking on recruitment is required. Finally, to further develop models capable of assisting fishery management, fish health surveys ought to be integrated with stock assessment. This is the first time a host-pathogen modeling framework has been applied to managed, freshwater ecosystems, and we suggest that such an approach should be used more frequently to inform other emerging and chronic fish health issues. PMID:19425436

  15. Diagnosis of bacterial kidney disease by detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Jansson, E; Lindberg, L; Säker, E; Aspán, A

    2008-10-01

    Bacterial kidney disease (BKD), caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum (Rs), is a serious threat to salmon in aquaculture as well as to wild populations. We have developed a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for detection of Rs in kidney samples. The PCR is based on detection of unique parts of the 16S rRNA gene of Rs and DNA equivalent to 1-10 Rs genomes was detected per reaction. No cross-reactivity with other fish pathogenic or related bacteria could be demonstrated. Analysis of individual kidney samples collected from BKD classified populations identified 39.9% of the fish as positive by real-time PCR compared with 28.0% by polyclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The real-time PCR assay was found to be well suited for complementary use with ELISA for diagnosis of BKD, with the ability to detect clinical as well as covert Rs infections. The infection level determined by the polyclonal ELISA and by real-time PCR was significantly correlated. PMID:18681904

  16. A phylogenetic comparison of the 16S rRNA sequence of the fish pathogen, Renibacterium salmoninarum, to gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Gutenberger, S K; Giovannoni, S J; Field, K G; Fryer, J L; Rohovec, J S

    1991-01-15

    The 16S rRNA of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease in salmonids, was sequenced by reverse transcriptase to produce a nearly complete sequence (97%) of 1475 nucleotides. Phylogenetic comparisons to seventeen genera and signature sequence analysis indicated that R. salmoninarum was a member of the high G + C Gram-positive eubacterial subdivision although the reported G + C value is only 53%. A phylogenetic tree details the relationship of R. salmoninarum to ten actinomycetes from diverse environments. PMID:1709893

  17. A simplified PCR-based method for the detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum utilizing preparations of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Walbaum) lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, D; Meaden, P G; Austin, B

    1996-11-01

    A method for the detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum by PCR is described. A rapid, reliable procedure was developed for the extraction of DNA, which could be applied to infected kidney homogenates and head kidney lymphocyte preparations. The target for DNA amplification was a 376-bp region of the gene encoding the 57-kDa major surface antigen (MSA). The PCR was specific for R. salmoninarum and allowed the detection of 10 to 100 cells of the pathogen. Use of the PCR for the examination of experimentally infected rainbow trout showed it to be as reliable as plate culture methods for the detection of R. salmoninarum in infected kidneys. PMID:8899978

  18. A simplified PCR-based method for the detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum utilizing preparations of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Walbaum) lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, D; Meaden, P G; Austin, B

    1996-01-01

    A method for the detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum by PCR is described. A rapid, reliable procedure was developed for the extraction of DNA, which could be applied to infected kidney homogenates and head kidney lymphocyte preparations. The target for DNA amplification was a 376-bp region of the gene encoding the 57-kDa major surface antigen (MSA). The PCR was specific for R. salmoninarum and allowed the detection of 10 to 100 cells of the pathogen. Use of the PCR for the examination of experimentally infected rainbow trout showed it to be as reliable as plate culture methods for the detection of R. salmoninarum in infected kidneys. PMID:8899978

  19. Testing of candidate non-lethal sampling methods for detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum in juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, Diane G.; McKibben, Constance L.; Conway, Carla M.; Purcell, Maureen K.; Chase, Dorothy M.; Applegate, Lynn M.

    2015-01-01

    Non-lethal pathogen testing can be a useful tool for fish disease research and management. Our research objectives were to determine if (1) fin clips, gill snips, surface mucus scrapings, blood draws, or kidney biopsies could be obtained non-lethally from 3 to 15 g Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, (2) non-lethal samples could accurately discriminate between fish exposed to the bacterial kidney disease agent Renibacterium salmoninarum and non-exposed fish, and (3) non-lethal samples could serve as proxies for lethal kidney samples to assess infection intensity. Blood draws and kidney biopsies caused ≥5% post-sampling mortality (Objective 1) and may be appropriate only for larger fish, but the other sample types were non-lethal. Sampling was performed over 21 wk following R. salmoninarum immersion challenge of fish from 2 stocks (Objectives 2 and 3), and nested PCR (nPCR) and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) results from candidate non-lethal samples were compared with kidney tissue analysis by nPCR, qPCR, bacteriological culture, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), fluorescent antibody test (FAT) and histopathology/immunohistochemistry. R. salmoninarum was detected by PCR in >50% of fin, gill, and mucus samples from challenged fish. Mucus qPCR was the only non-lethal assay exhibiting both diagnostic sensitivity and specificity estimates >90% for distinguishing between R. salmoninarum-exposed and non-exposed fish and was the best candidate for use as an alternative to lethal kidney sample testing. Mucus qPCR R. salmoninarum quantity estimates reflected changes in kidney bacterial load estimates, as evidenced by significant positive correlations with kidney R. salmoninaruminfection intensity scores at all sample times and in both fish stocks, and were not significantly impacted by environmentalR. salmoninarum concentrations.

  20. Different prevalences of Renibacterium salmoninarum detected by ELISA in Alaskan chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha spawned from freshwater and seawater.

    PubMed

    Meyers, T R; Thrower, F; Short, S; Lipson, K; Joyce, J; Farrington, C; Doherty, S

    1999-01-29

    Soluble antigen of Renibacterium salmoninarum (Rs) was detected by a polyclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) at significantly higher prevalences in adult chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that matured in freshwater than in the same cohort of fish spawned after maturation in seawater. The cumulative results were consistent during 4 yr of comparison at the Little Port Walter Hatchery on Baranof Island, Alaska, USA. Possible causes for this difference are discussed. Maturation of chinook salmon broodstock in seawater has become a practical strategy at this hatchery to reduce the prevalence of Rs-positive parent fish and the numbers of culled eggs. PMID:10092972

  1. Renibacterium salmoninarum in spring-summer chinook salmon smolts at dams on the Columbia and Snake Rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, D.G.; Pascho, R.J.; Jackson, L.M.; Matthews, G.M.; Harmon, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    We evaluated Renibacterium salmoninarum infection in smolts of hatchery and wild spring-summer chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha sampled during most of the out-migration at Little Goose (1988) and Lower Granite dams (1988-1991) on the Snake River and at Priest Rapids and McNary dams on the Columbia River (1988-1990). We sampled 860-2,178 fish per dam each year. Homogenates of kidney-spleen tissue from all fish were tested for the presence of R. salmoninarum antigens by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and homogenates from 10% of the fish were examined by the fluorescent antibody technique (FAT). Although only 1-11% of fish sampled at a given dam during any 1 year exhibited lesions characteristic of bacterial kidney disease, 86-100% of the fish tested positive for R. salmoninarum antigen by ELISA, whereas 4-17% of the fish tested positive by the FAT. During most years, a majority (68-87%) of fish testing positive by the ELISA had low R. salmoninarum antigen levels, but in 1989, 53% of positive fish from Lower Granite Dam and 52% from McNary Dam showed medium-to-high antigen levels. For most years, the highest mean antigen levels were measured in fish sampled after 75% of the total out-migrants had passed a given dam. When the largest numbers of fish were being collected for bypass or downriver transportation, mean antigen levels were relatively low.

  2. Bench-top validation testing of selected immunological and molecular Renibacterium salmoninarum diagnostic assays by comparison with quantitative bacteriological culture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, D.G.; Applegate, L.J.; Murray, A.L.; Purcell, M.K.; McKibben, C.L.

    2013-01-01

    No gold standard assay exhibiting error-free classification of results has been identified for detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of salmonid bacterial kidney disease. Validation of diagnostic assays for R. salmoninarum has been hindered by its unique characteristics and biology, and difficulties in locating suitable populations of reference test animals. Infection status of fish in test populations is often unknown, and it is commonly assumed that the assay yielding the most positive results has the highest diagnostic accuracy, without consideration of misclassification of results. In this research, quantification of R. salmoninarum in samples by bacteriological culture provided a standardized measure of viable bacteria to evaluate analytical performance characteristics (sensitivity, specificity and repeatability) of non-culture assays in three matrices (phosphate-buffered saline, ovarian fluid and kidney tissue). Non-culture assays included polyclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), direct smear fluorescent antibody technique (FAT), membrane-filtration FAT, nested polymerase chain reaction (nested PCR) and three real-time quantitative PCR assays. Injection challenge of specific pathogen-free Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum), with R. salmoninarum was used to estimate diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. Results did not identify a single assay demonstrating the highest analytical and diagnostic performance characteristics, but revealed strengths and weaknesses of each test.

  3. Bench-top validation testing of selected immunological and molecular Renibacterium salmoninarum diagnostic assays by comparison with quantitative bacteriological culture.

    PubMed

    Elliott, D G; Applegate, L J; Murray, A L; Purcell, M K; McKibben, C L

    2013-09-01

    No gold standard assay exhibiting error-free classification of results has been identified for detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of salmonid bacterial kidney disease. Validation of diagnostic assays for R. salmoninarum has been hindered by its unique characteristics and biology, and difficulties in locating suitable populations of reference test animals. Infection status of fish in test populations is often unknown, and it is commonly assumed that the assay yielding the most positive results has the highest diagnostic accuracy, without consideration of misclassification of results. In this research, quantification of R. salmoninarum in samples by bacteriological culture provided a standardized measure of viable bacteria to evaluate analytical performance characteristics (sensitivity, specificity and repeatability) of non-culture assays in three matrices (phosphate-buffered saline, ovarian fluid and kidney tissue). Non-culture assays included polyclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), direct smear fluorescent antibody technique (FAT), membrane-filtration FAT, nested polymerase chain reaction (nested PCR) and three real-time quantitative PCR assays. Injection challenge of specific pathogen-free Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum), with R. salmoninarum was used to estimate diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. Results did not identify a single assay demonstrating the highest analytical and diagnostic performance characteristics, but revealed strengths and weaknesses of each test. PMID:23346868

  4. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) for rapid detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Mona; Soliman, Hatem; El-Matbouli, Mansour

    2008-08-27

    A loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay was developed for rapid, specific and sensitive detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum in 1 h without thermal cycling. A fragment of R. salmoninarum p57 gene was amplified at 63 degrees C in the presence of Bst polymerase and a specially designed primer mixture. The specificity of the BKD-LAMP assay was demonstrated by the absence of any cross reaction with other bacterial strains, followed by restriction digestion of the amplified products. Detections of BKD-LAMP amplicons by visual inspection, agrose gel electrophoresis, and real-time monitoring using a turbidimeter were equivalently sensitive. The BKD-LAMP assay has the sensitivity of the nested PCR method, and 10 times the sensitivity of one-round PCR assay. The lower detection limit of BKD-LAMP and nested PCR is 1 pg genomic R. salmoninarum DNA, compared to 10 pg genomic R. salmoninarum DNA for one-round PCR assay. In comparison to other available diagnostic methods, the BKD-LAMP assay is rapid, simple, sensitive, specific, and cost effective with a high potential for field application. PMID:18924379

  5. A single Ala139-to-Glu substitution in the Renibacterium salmoninarum virulence-associated protein p57 results in antigenic variation and is associated with enhanced p57 binding to chinook salmon leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Wiens, Gregory D; Pascho, Ron; Winton, James R

    2002-08-01

    The gram-positive bacterium Renibacterium salmoninarum produces relatively large amounts of a 57-kDa protein (p57) implicated in the pathogenesis of salmonid bacterial kidney disease. Antigenic variation in p57 was identified by using monoclonal antibody 4C11, which exhibited severely decreased binding to R. salmoninarum strain 684 p57 and bound robustly to the p57 proteins of seven other R. salmoninarum strains. This difference in binding was not due to alterations in p57 synthesis, secretion, or bacterial cell association. The molecular basis of the 4C11 epitope loss was determined by amplifying and sequencing the two identical genes encoding p57, msa1 and msa2. The 5' and coding sequences of the 684 msa1 and msa2 genes were identical to those of the ATCC 33209 msa1 and msa2 genes except for a single C-to-A nucleotide mutation. This mutation was identified in both the msa1 and msa2 genes of strain 684 and resulted in an Ala(139)-to-Glu substitution in the amino-terminal region of p57. We examined whether this mutation in p57 altered salmonid leukocyte and rabbit erythrocyte binding activities. R. salmoninarum strain 684 extracellular protein exhibited a twofold increase in agglutinating activity for chinook salmon leukocytes and rabbit erythrocytes compared to the activity of the ATCC 33209 extracellular protein. A specific and quantitative p57 binding assay confirmed the increased binding activity of 684 p57. Monoclonal antibody 4C11 blocked the agglutinating activity of the ATCC 33209 extracellular protein but not the agglutinating activity of the 684 extracellular protein. These results indicate that the Ala139-to-Glu substitution altered immune recognition and was associated with enhanced biological activity of R. salmoninarum 684 p57. PMID:12147498

  6. A Single Ala139-to-Glu Substitution in the Renibacterium salmoninarum Virulence-Associated Protein p57 Results in Antigenic Variation and Is Associated with Enhanced p57 Binding to Chinook Salmon Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wiens, Gregory D.; Pascho, Ron; Winton, James R.

    2002-01-01

    The gram-positive bacterium Renibacterium salmoninarum produces relatively large amounts of a 57-kDa protein (p57) implicated in the pathogenesis of salmonid bacterial kidney disease. Antigenic variation in p57 was identified by using monoclonal antibody 4C11, which exhibited severely decreased binding to R. salmoninarum strain 684 p57 and bound robustly to the p57 proteins of seven other R. salmoninarum strains. This difference in binding was not due to alterations in p57 synthesis, secretion, or bacterial cell association. The molecular basis of the 4C11 epitope loss was determined by amplifying and sequencing the two identical genes encoding p57, msa1 and msa2. The 5′ and coding sequences of the 684 msa1 and msa2 genes were identical to those of the ATCC 33209 msa1 and msa2 genes except for a single C-to-A nucleotide mutation. This mutation was identified in both the msa1 and msa2 genes of strain 684 and resulted in an Ala139-to-Glu substitution in the amino-terminal region of p57. We examined whether this mutation in p57 altered salmonid leukocyte and rabbit erythrocyte binding activities. R. salmoninarum strain 684 extracellular protein exhibited a twofold increase in agglutinating activity for chinook salmon leukocytes and rabbit erythrocytes compared to the activity of the ATCC 33209 extracellular protein. A specific and quantitative p57 binding assay confirmed the increased binding activity of 684 p57. Monoclonal antibody 4C11 blocked the agglutinating activity of the ATCC 33209 extracellular protein but not the agglutinating activity of the 684 extracellular protein. These results indicate that the Ala139-to-Glu substitution altered immune recognition and was associated with enhanced biological activity of R. salmoninarum 684 p57. PMID:12147498

  7. Differential expression of the virulence-associated protein p57 and characterization of its duplicated gene rosa in virulent and attenuated strains of Renibacterium salmoninarum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Farrell, C. L.; Strom, M.S.

    1999-01-01

    Virulence mechanisms utilized by the salmonid fish pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum are poorly understood. One potential virulence factor is p57 (also designated MSA for major soluble antigen), an abundant 57 kDa soluble protein that is predominately localized on the bacterial cell surface with significant levels released into the extracellular milieu. Previous studies of an attenuated strain, MT 239, indicated that it differs from virulent strains in the amount of surface-associated p57. In this report, we show overall expression of p57 in R. salmoninarum MT 239 is considerably reduced as compared to a virulent strain, ATCC 33209. The amount of cell-associated p57 is decreased while the level of p57 in the culture supernatant is nearly equivalent between the strains. To determine if lowered amount of cell-associated p57 was due to a sequence defect in p57, a genetic comparison was performed. Two copies of the gene encoding p57 (msa1 and msa2) were found in 33209 and MT 239, as well as in several other virulent isolates. Both copies from 33209 and MT 239 were cloned and sequenced and found to be identical to each other, and identical between the 2 strains. A comparison of msa1 and msa2 within each strain showed that their sequences diverge 40 base pairs 5, to the open reading frame, while sequences 3' to the open reading frame are essentially identical for at least 225 base pairs. Northern blot analysis showed no difference in steady state levels of rosa mRNA between the 2 strains. These data suggest that while cell-surface localization of p57 may be important for R. salmoninarum virulence, the differences in localization, and total p57 expression between 33209 anti MT 239 are not due to differences in rosa sequence or differences in steady state transcript levels.

  8. Differential expression of the virulence-associated protein p57 and characterization of its duplicated gene msa in virulent and attenuated strains of Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed

    O'Farrell, C L; Strom, M S

    1999-11-01

    Virulence mechanisms utilized by the salmonid fish pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum are poorly understood. One potential virulence factor is p57 (also designated MSA for major soluble antigen), an abundant 57 kDa soluble protein that is predominately localized on the bacterial cell surface with significant levels released into the extracellular milieu. Previous studies of an attenuated strain, MT 239, indicated that it differs from virulent strains in the amount of surface-associated p57. In this report, we show overall expression of p57 in R. salmoninarum MT 239 is considerably reduced as compared to a virulent strain, ATCC 33209. The amount of cell-associated p57 is decreased while the level of p57 in the culture supernatant is nearly equivalent between the strains. To determine if the lowered amount of cell-associated p57 was due to a sequence defect in p57, a genetic comparison was performed. Two copies of the gene encoding p57 (msa1 and msa2) were found in 33209 and MT 239, as well as in several other virulent isolates. Both copies from 33209 and MT 239 were cloned and sequenced and found to be identical to each other, and identical between the 2 strains. A comparison of msa1 and msa2 within each strain showed that their sequences diverge 40 base pairs 5' to the open reading frame, while sequences 3' to the open reading frame are essentially identical for at least 225 base pairs. Northern blot analysis showed no difference in steady state levels of msa mRNA between the 2 strains. These data suggest that while cell-surface localization of p57 may be important for R. salmoninarum virulence, the differences in localization and total p57 expression between 33209 and MT 239 are not due to differences in msa sequence or differences in steady state transcript levels. PMID:10598282

  9. Comparison and evaluation of Renibacterium salmoninarum quantitative PCR diagnostic assays using field samples of Chinook and coho salmon.

    PubMed

    Sandell, Todd A; Jacobson, Kym C

    2011-01-21

    Renibacterium salmoninarum is a Gram-positive bacterium causing bacterial kidney disease (BKD) in susceptible salmonid fishes. Several quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays to measure R. salmoninarum infection intensity have been reported, but comparison and evaluation of these assays has been limited. Here, we compared 3 qPCR primer/probe sets for detection of R. salmoninarum in field samples of naturally exposed Chinook and coho salmon first identified as positive by nested PCR (nPCR). Additional samples from a hatchery population of Chinook salmon with BKD were included to serve as strong positive controls. The 3 qPCR assays targeted either the multiple copy major soluble antigen (msa) genes or the single copy abc gene. The msa/non-fluorescent quencher (NFQ) assay amplified R. salmoninarum DNA in 53.2% of the nPCR positive samples, whereas the abc/NFQ assay amplified 21.8% of the samples and the abc/TAMRA assay 18.2%. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) successfully quantified only 16.4% of the nPCR positive samples. Although the msa/NFQ assay amplified a greater proportion of nPCR positive samples, the abc/NFQ assay better amplified those samples with medium and high ELISA values. A comparison of the geometric mean quantity ratios highlighted limitations of the assays, and the abc/NFQ assay strongly amplified some samples that were negative in other tests, in contrast to its performance among the sample group as a whole. These data demonstrate that both the msa/NFQ and abc/NFQ qPCR assays are specific and effective at higher infection levels and outperform the ELISA. However, most pathogen studies will continue to require multiple assays to both detect and quantify R. salmoninarum infection. PMID:21381519

  10. Host responses to Renibacterium salmoninarum and specific components of the pathogen reveal the mechanisms of immune suppression and activation.

    PubMed

    Grayson, T Hilton; Cooper, Lynne F; Wrathmell, Annette B; Roper, Janet; Evenden, Andrew J; Gilpin, Martyn L

    2002-06-01

    During infection, Renibacterium salmoninarum survives within the pronephric macrophages of salmonid fish. Therefore, to study the initial phases of the interaction we infected macrophages with live bacteria and analysed the responses of host and pathogen. It was found that the expression of msa encoding the p57 antigen of R. salmoninarum, was constitutive, while the expression of hly and rsh, encoding haemolysins, and lysB and grp was reduced after infection. Macrophages showed a rapid inflammatory response in which the expression of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II), inducible cyclo-oxygenase (Cox-2), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was enhanced, but tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) expression was greatly reduced initially and then increased. After 5 days, except for TNF-alpha and MHC II, expression returned to levels approaching those of uninfected macrophages. We propose that R. salmoninarum survives initial contact with macrophages by avoiding and/or interfering with TNF-alpha-dependent killing pathways. The effects of specific R. salmoninarum components were studied in vivo by injecting fish with DNA vaccine constructs expressing msa, hly, rsh, lysB, or grp. We found that msa reduced the expression of IL-1beta, Cox-2, and MHC II but stimulated TNF-alpha while hly, rsh and grp stimulated MHC II but down-regulated TNF-alpha. Constructs expressing hly or lysB stimulated iNOS expression and additionally, lysB stimulated TNF-alpha. The results show how p57 suppresses the host immune system and suggest that the immune mechanisms for the containment of R. salmoninarum infections rely on MHC II- and TNF-alpha-dependent pathways. Moreover, prolonged stimulation of TNF-alpha may contribute to the chronic inflammatory pathology of bacterial kidney disease. PMID:12047757

  11. Host responses to Renibacterium salmoninarum and specific components of the pathogen reveal the mechanisms of immune suppression and activation

    PubMed Central

    Grayson, T Hilton; Cooper, Lynne F; Wrathmell, Annette B; Roper, Janet; Evenden, Andrew J; Gilpin, Martyn L

    2002-01-01

    During infection, Renibacterium salmoninarum survives within the pronephric macrophages of salmonid fish. Therefore, to study the initial phases of the interaction we infected macrophages with live bacteria and analysed the responses of host and pathogen. It was found that the expression of msa encoding the p57 antigen of R. salmoninarum, was constitutive, while the expression of hly and rsh, encoding haemolysins, and lysB and grp was reduced after infection. Macrophages showed a rapid inflammatory response in which the expression of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II), inducible cyclo-oxygenase (Cox-2), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was enhanced, but tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) expression was greatly reduced initially and then increased. After 5 days, except for TNF-α and MHC II, expression returned to levels approaching those of uninfected macrophages. We propose that R. salmoninarum survives initial contact with macrophages by avoiding and/or interfering with TNF-α-dependent killing pathways. The effects of specific R. salmoninarum components were studied in vivo by injecting fish with DNA vaccine constructs expressing msa, hly, rsh, lysB, or grp. We found that msa reduced the expression of IL-1β, Cox-2, and MHC II but stimulated TNF-α while hly, rsh and grp stimulated MHC II but down-regulated TNF-α. Constructs expressing hly or lysB stimulated iNOS expression and additionally, lysB stimulated TNF-α. The results show how p57 suppresses the host immune system and suggest that the immune mechanisms for the containment of R. salmoninarum infections rely on MHC II- and TNF-α-dependent pathways. Moreover, prolonged stimulation of TNF-α may contribute to the chronic inflammatory pathology of bacterial kidney disease. PMID:12047757

  12. Immunosuppression in progeny of chinook salmon infected with Renibacterium salmoninarum: re-analysis of a brood stock segregation experiment.

    PubMed

    Hamel, Owen S

    2005-06-14

    Female spawner infection level and temperature variation through rearing are sufficient to explain in-hatchery mortality rates and infection levels and smolt to adult return ratios (SARs) of progeny of Renibacterium salmoninarum infected spring chinook salmon. Data from published reports and manuscripts regarding a 1988 brood stock segregation experiment that held progeny of highly infected female spring chinook salmon spawners separate from progeny of other spawners during 16 mo of hatchery rearing are analyzed to test the hypothesis that immunosuppression could account for differences in survival and infection levels between the 2 segregates. Immunosuppression, caused by the presence of the p57 antigen of R. salmoninarum in sufficient concentration within the salmon egg before spawning, can account for differences in infection levels, mortality rates, and SARs for each hatchery raceway in that study. This immunosuppression may be characterized by immunotolerance, or might only affect cell mediated immunity, which appears the most effective defense mechanism against R. salmoninarum infection, as antibody production can result in tissue damaging antibody-antigen complexes. Low-temperature mediated immunosuppression can account for the nearly identical trajectories of infection and mortality between the 2 segregates during the first 8 mo of hatchery rearing. There is no evidence of widespread vertical infection from spawner to progeny, nor is there evidence that brood stock segregation reduces overall mortality. Rather, the suppression of cell-mediated immune mechanisms may condemn progeny of highly infected female spawners to an almost certain eventual premature demise. PMID:16042041

  13. Effects of Renibacterium salmoninarum on olfactory organs of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) marked with coded wire tags

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, Diane G.; Conway, Carla M.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial kidney disease (BKD) caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum can cause significant morbidity and mortality in Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), particularly in Chinook salmon of the stream (spring) life history type, which migrate to sea as yearlings rather than subyearlings. R. salmoninarum can be transmitted vertically from the female parent to the progeny in association with the egg, as well as horizontally from fish to fish. This study was conducted as part of a research project to investigate whether the prevalence and intensity of R. salmoninarum infections in adult spring Chinook salmon could affect the survival and pathogen prevalence and intensity in their progeny (Pascho et al., 1991, 1993; Elliott et al., 1995). Fish from two brood years (1988 and 1989) were reared at Dworshak National Fish Hatchery (Idaho, USA) for about 1-1/2 years, released as yearling smolts, and allowed to migrate to the Pacific Ocean for maturation. The majority of progeny fish were marked with coded wire tags (CWTs) about 4 months before they were released from the hatchery so that adult returns could be monitored. The CWTs were implanted in the snouts of the fish by an experienced team of fish markers using automated wire-tagging machines. The intended placement site was the cartilage, skeletal muscle or loose connective tissue of the snout.

  14. Mapping of neutralizing epitopes on Renibacterium salmoninarum p57 by use of transposon mutagenesis and synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Wiens, Gregory D; Owen, Jennifer

    2005-06-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum is a gram-positive bacterium that causes bacterial kidney disease in salmonid fish. The virulence mechanisms of R. salmoninarum are not well understood. Production of a 57-kDa protein (p57) has been associated with isolate virulence and is a diagnostic marker for R. salmoninarum infection. Biological activities of p57 include binding to eukaryotic cells and immunosuppression. We previously isolated three monoclonal antibodies (4D3, 4C11, and 4H8) that neutralize p57 activity. These monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) bind to the amino-terminal region of p57 between amino acids 32 though 243; however, the precise locations of the neutralizing epitopes were not determined. Here, we use transposon mutagenesis to map the 4D3, 4C11, and 4H8 epitopes. Forty-five transposon mutants were generated and overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The ability of MAbs 4D3, 4H8, and 4C11 to bind each mutant protein was assessed by immunoblotting. Transposons inserting between amino acids 51 and 112 disrupted the 4H8 epitope. Insertions between residues 78 and 210 disrupted the 4C11 epitope, while insertions between amino acids 158 and 234 disrupted the 4D3 epitope. The three MAbs failed to bind overlapping, 15-mer peptides spanning these regions, suggesting that the epitopes are discontinuous in conformation. We conclude that recognition of secondary structure on the amino terminus of p57 is important for neutralization. The epitope mapping studies suggest directions for improvement of MAb-based immunoassays for detection of R. salmoninarum-infected fish. PMID:15932983

  15. Genome sequence of the fish pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum suggests reductive evolution away from an environmental Arthrobacter ancestor.

    PubMed

    Wiens, Gregory D; Rockey, Daniel D; Wu, Zaining; Chang, Jean; Levy, Ruth; Crane, Samuel; Chen, Donald S; Capri, Gina R; Burnett, Jeffrey R; Sudheesh, Ponnerassery S; Schipma, Matthew J; Burd, Henry; Bhattacharyya, Anamitra; Rhodes, Linda D; Kaul, Rajinder; Strom, Mark S

    2008-11-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum is the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease and a significant threat to healthy and sustainable production of salmonid fish worldwide. This pathogen is difficult to culture in vitro, genetic manipulation is challenging, and current therapies and preventative strategies are only marginally effective in preventing disease. The complete genome of R. salmoninarum ATCC 33209 was sequenced and shown to be a 3,155,250-bp circular chromosome that is predicted to contain 3,507 open-reading frames (ORFs). A total of 80 copies of three different insertion sequence elements are interspersed throughout the genome. Approximately 21% of the predicted ORFs have been inactivated via frameshifts, point mutations, insertion sequences, and putative deletions. The R. salmoninarum genome has extended regions of synteny to the Arthrobacter sp. strain FB24 and Arthrobacter aurescens TC1 genomes, but it is approximately 1.9 Mb smaller than both Arthrobacter genomes and has a lower G+C content, suggesting that significant genome reduction has occurred since divergence from the last common ancestor. A limited set of putative virulence factors appear to have been acquired via horizontal transmission after divergence of the species; these factors include capsular polysaccharides, heme sequestration molecules, and the major secreted cell surface antigen p57 (also known as major soluble antigen). Examination of the genome revealed a number of ORFs homologous to antibiotic resistance genes, including genes encoding beta-lactamases, efflux proteins, macrolide glycosyltransferases, and rRNA methyltransferases. The genome sequence provides new insights into R. salmoninarum evolution and may facilitate identification of chemotherapeutic targets and vaccine candidates that can be used for prevention and treatment of infections in cultured salmonids. PMID:18723615

  16. Genome Sequence of the Fish Pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum Suggests Reductive Evolution away from an Environmental Arthrobacter Ancestor▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Wiens, Gregory D.; Rockey, Daniel D.; Wu, Zaining; Chang, Jean; Levy, Ruth; Crane, Samuel; Chen, Donald S.; Capri, Gina R.; Burnett, Jeffrey R.; Sudheesh, Ponnerassery S.; Schipma, Matthew J.; Burd, Henry; Bhattacharyya, Anamitra; Rhodes, Linda D.; Kaul, Rajinder; Strom, Mark S.

    2008-01-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum is the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease and a significant threat to healthy and sustainable production of salmonid fish worldwide. This pathogen is difficult to culture in vitro, genetic manipulation is challenging, and current therapies and preventative strategies are only marginally effective in preventing disease. The complete genome of R. salmoninarum ATCC 33209 was sequenced and shown to be a 3,155,250-bp circular chromosome that is predicted to contain 3,507 open-reading frames (ORFs). A total of 80 copies of three different insertion sequence elements are interspersed throughout the genome. Approximately 21% of the predicted ORFs have been inactivated via frameshifts, point mutations, insertion sequences, and putative deletions. The R. salmoninarum genome has extended regions of synteny to the Arthrobacter sp. strain FB24 and Arthrobacter aurescens TC1 genomes, but it is approximately 1.9 Mb smaller than both Arthrobacter genomes and has a lower G+C content, suggesting that significant genome reduction has occurred since divergence from the last common ancestor. A limited set of putative virulence factors appear to have been acquired via horizontal transmission after divergence of the species; these factors include capsular polysaccharides, heme sequestration molecules, and the major secreted cell surface antigen p57 (also known as major soluble antigen). Examination of the genome revealed a number of ORFs homologous to antibiotic resistance genes, including genes encoding β-lactamases, efflux proteins, macrolide glycosyltransferases, and rRNA methyltransferases. The genome sequence provides new insights into R. salmoninarum evolution and may facilitate identification of chemotherapeutic targets and vaccine candidates that can be used for prevention and treatment of infections in cultured salmonids. PMID:18723615

  17. Mapping of Neutralizing Epitopes on Renibacterium salmoninarum p57 by Use of Transposon Mutagenesis and Synthetic Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Wiens, Gregory D.; Owen, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum is a gram-positive bacterium that causes bacterial kidney disease in salmonid fish. The virulence mechanisms of R. salmoninarum are not well understood. Production of a 57-kDa protein (p57) has been associated with isolate virulence and is a diagnostic marker for R. salmoninarum infection. Biological activities of p57 include binding to eukaryotic cells and immunosuppression. We previously isolated three monoclonal antibodies (4D3, 4C11, and 4H8) that neutralize p57 activity. These monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) bind to the amino-terminal region of p57 between amino acids 32 though 243; however, the precise locations of the neutralizing epitopes were not determined. Here, we use transposon mutagenesis to map the 4D3, 4C11, and 4H8 epitopes. Forty-five transposon mutants were generated and overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The ability of MAbs 4D3, 4H8, and 4C11 to bind each mutant protein was assessed by immunoblotting. Transposons inserting between amino acids 51 and 112 disrupted the 4H8 epitope. Insertions between residues 78 and 210 disrupted the 4C11 epitope, while insertions between amino acids 158 and 234 disrupted the 4D3 epitope. The three MAbs failed to bind overlapping, 15-mer peptides spanning these regions, suggesting that the epitopes are discontinuous in conformation. We conclude that recognition of secondary structure on the amino terminus of p57 is important for neutralization. The epitope mapping studies suggest directions for improvement of MAb-based immunoassays for detection of R. salmoninarum-infected fish. PMID:15932983

  18. Comparison of the membrane-filtration fluorescent antibody test, the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the polymerase chain reaction to detect Renibacterium salmoninarum in salmon ovarian fluid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pascho, R.J.; Chase, D.; McKibben, C.L.

    1998-01-01

    Ovarian fluid samples from naturally infected chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) were examined for the presence of Renibacterium salmoninarum by the membrane-filtration fluorescent antibody test (MF-FAT), an antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and a nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). On the basis of the MF-FAT, 64% (66/103) samples contained detectable levels of R. salmoninarum cells. Among the positive fish, the R. salmoninarum concentrations ranged from 25 cells/ml to 4.3 3 109 cells/ml. A soluble antigenic fraction of R. salmoninarum was detected in 39% of the fish (40/103) by the ELISA. The ELISA is considered one of the most sensitive detection methods for bacterial kidney disease in tissues, yet it did not detect R. salmoninarum antigen consistently at bacterial cell concentrations below about 1.3 3 104 cells/ml according to the MF-FAT counts. When total DNA was extracted and tested in a nested PCR designed to amplify a 320-base-pair region of the gene encoding a soluble 57-kD protein of R. salmoninarum, 100% of the 100 samples tested were positive. The results provided strong evidence that R. salmoninarum may be present in ovarian fluids thought to be free of the bacterium on the basis of standard diagnostic methods.

  19. Comparison of the membrane-filtration fluorescent antibody test, the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the polymerase chain reaction to detect Renibacterium salmoninarum in salmonid ovarian fluid.

    PubMed

    Pascho, R J; Chase, D; McKibben, C L

    1998-01-01

    Ovarian fluid samples from naturally infected chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) were examined for the presence of Renibacterium salmoninarum by the membrane-filtration fluorescent antibody test (MF-FAT), an antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and a nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). On the basis of the MF-FAT, 64% (66/103) samples contained detectable levels of R. salmoninarum cells. Among the positive fish, the R. salmoninarum concentrations ranged from 25 cells/ml to 4.3 x 10(9) cells/ml. A soluble antigenic fraction of R. salmoninarum was detected in 39% of the fish (40/103) by the ELISA. The ELISA is considered one of the most sensitive detection methods for bacterial kidney disease in tissues, yet it did not detect R. salmoninarum antigen consistently at bacterial cell concentrations below about 1.3 x 10(4) cells/ml according to the MF-FAT counts. When total DNA was extracted and tested in a nested PCR designed to amplify a 320-base-pair region of the gene encoding a soluble 57-kD protein of R. salmoninarum, 100% of the 100 samples tested were positive. The results provided strong evidence that R. salmoninarum may be present in ovarian fluids thought to be free of the bacterium on the basis of standard diagnostic methods. PMID:9526862

  20. Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease in salmonid fish, detected by nested reverse transcription-PCR of 16S rRNA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Magnússon, H B; Fridjónsson, O H; Andrésson, O S; Benediktsdóttir, E; Gudmundsdóttir, S; Andrésdóttir, V

    1994-01-01

    An assay based on reverse transcription and nested PCR amplification of hypervariable regions within the 16S rRNA sequence was used to specifically detect Renibacterium salmoninarum, the slowly growing causative agent of bacterial kidney disease in salmonid fish. This assay detected 1 to 10 bacteria per sample and took 1 to 2 days to perform. The assay was used to detect R. salmoninarum in ovarian fluid obtained from naturally infected fish. The assay was unreliable when it was used to examine kidney tissue. Images PMID:7529017

  1. Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease in salmonid fish, detected by nested reverse transcription-PCR of 16S rRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Magnússon, H B; Fridjónsson, O H; Andrésson, O S; Benediktsdóttir, E; Gudmundsdóttir, S; Andrésdóttir, V

    1994-12-01

    An assay based on reverse transcription and nested PCR amplification of hypervariable regions within the 16S rRNA sequence was used to specifically detect Renibacterium salmoninarum, the slowly growing causative agent of bacterial kidney disease in salmonid fish. This assay detected 1 to 10 bacteria per sample and took 1 to 2 days to perform. The assay was used to detect R. salmoninarum in ovarian fluid obtained from naturally infected fish. The assay was unreliable when it was used to examine kidney tissue. PMID:7529017

  2. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for a soluble antigen of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent for salmonid bacterial kidney disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pascho, R.J.; Mulcahy, D.

    1987-01-01

    A double-antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detection of a soluble fraction of Renibacterium salmoninarum was developed from components extracted from the supernatant of an R. salmoninarum broth culture. The Costar® Serocluster™ EIA microplate gave the highest absorbance and signal-to-noise ratios among seven types tested. Including Tween 80 in the wash buffer resulted in higher absorbances than Tween 20 when antigen was present. Background absorbance did not increase when Tween 80 was added to the wash buffer, but did when Tween 80 replaced Tween 20 in antigen and conjugate diluents. Adsorption of coating antibody peaked within 4 h at 37 °C and 16 h at 4 °C. Antigen attachment to antibody-coated microplate wells depended more on incubation temperature than duration; we adopted a 3-h incubation at 25 °C. Conjugate incubation for longer than 1 h at 37 °C or 3 h at 25 °C resulted in unacceptable background levels. No cross-reactions resulted from heat-extracted antigens of 10 other species of bacteria. The optimized ELISA is a 6-h test that enables detection of levels of soluble antigen as low as 2–20 ng.

  3. Description and characterization of IS994, a putative IS3 family insertion sequence from the salmon pathogen, Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, L D; Grayson, T H; Alexander, S M; Strom, M S

    2000-02-22

    Renibacterium salmoninarum, a slowly growing, Gram-positive bacterium, is responsible for bacterial kidney disease in salmonid fishes world-wide. To date, no mobile genetic elements have been reported for this pathogen. Here, we describe the first insertion sequence (IS) identified from R. salmoninarum. This element, IS994, has a significant predicted amino acid sequence homology (64.8 and 71.9%) to the two open reading frames encoding the transposase of IS6110 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Protein parsimony and protein distance matrix analyses show that IS994 is a member of group IS51 of the IS3 family. From a conservative estimate, there are at least 17 chromosomal insertions of IS994 or closely related elements. Sequence analysis of seven of these loci reveals single nucleotide polymorphisms throughout the element (including the terminal inverted repeats), a 15bp insertion in three of the seven loci, and an absence of flanking direct repeats or conserved insertion site. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of XbaI-digested chromosomal DNA shows variations among European and North American isolates, indicating that IS994 may be a useful molecular marker for epizootiological studies. PMID:10689192

  4. Swimming endurance of bull trout, lake trout, arctic char, and rainbow trout following challenge with Renibacterium salmoninarum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, D.T.; Moffitt, C.M.

    2004-01-01

    We tested the swimming endurance of juvenile bull trout Salvelinus confluentus, lake trout S. namaycush, Arctic char S. alpinus, and rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss at 9??C and 15??C to determine whether sublethal infection from a moderate challenge of Renibacterium salmoninarum administered months before testing affected the length of time fish could maintain a swimming speed of 5-6 body lengths per second in an experimental flume. Rainbow trout and Arctic char swam longer in trials than did bull trout or lake trout, regardless of challenge treatment. When we tested fish 14-23 weeks postchallenge, we found no measurable effect of R. salmoninarum on the swimming endurance of the study species except for bull trout, which showed a mixed response. We conducted additional trials with bull trout 5-8 weeks postchallenge to determine whether increasing the challenge dose would affect swimming endurance and hematocrit. In those tests, bull trout with clinical signs of disease and those exposed to the highest challenge doses had significantly reduced swimming endurance compared with unchallenged control fish. Fish hematocrit levels measured at the end of all swimming endurance tests varied among species and between test temperatures, and patterns were not always consistent between challenged and control fish.

  5. Membrane filtration-fluorescent antibody staining procedure for detecting and quantifying Renibacterium salmoninarum in coelomic fluid of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, D.G.; Barila, T.Y.

    1988-01-01

    e developed a rapid method for detecting and quantifying the pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum in coelomic fluid of spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) by concentrating the bacteria on 0.2-μm polycarbonate filters and staining them with specific fluorescein-labeled antibody. Centrifugation of samples and resuspension of the sedimented material in phosphate-buffered saline containing Triton X-100 increased the ease of filtration. Background fluorescence was reduced by counterstaining filters with Eriochrome black T. Postfiltration staining, rinsing, and counterstaining were done in the syringe-mounted filter holders, reducing handling of the filters and possible loss of bacteria. The number of bacteria detected by the filtration – fluorescent antibody technique in a broth culture of R. salmoninarum ranged from 6.7 × 107to7.6 × 107/mL and was slightly higher than that determined by plate count (9.6 × 106/mL). Increasing the sample dilution or decreasing the number of microscope fields examined generally increased the variability of filter counts of R. salmoninarum. Using the filtration – fluorescent antibody technique, we detected the bacterium in the coelomic fluid of 85% of spawning female spring chinook salmon sampled from a hatchery population. Membrane Filtration – Fluorescent Antibody Staining Procedure for Detecting and Quantifying Renibacterium salmoninarum in Coelomic Fluid of Chinook Salmon (oncorhynchus tshawytscha) (PDF Download Available). 

  6. A single Alal 39-to-Glu substitution in the Renibacterium salmoninarum virulence-associated protein p57 results in antigenic variation and is associated with enhanced p57 binding to Chinook salmon leukocytes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiens, Gregory D.; Pascho, Ron; Winton, James R.

    2002-01-01

    The gram-positive bacterium Renibacterium salmoninarum produces relatively large amounts of a 57-kDa protein (p57) implicated in the pathogenesis of salmonid bacterial kidney disease. Antigenic variation in p57 was identified by using monoclonal antibody 4C11, which exhibited severely decreased binding to R. salmoninarum strain 684 p57 and bound robustly to the p57 proteins of seven other R. salmoninarum strains. This difference in binding was not due to alterations in p57 synthesis, secretion, or bacterial cell association. The molecular basis of the 4C11 epitope loss was determined by amplifying and sequencing the two identical genes encoding p57, msa1 and msa2. The 5′ and coding sequences of the 684 msa1 and msa2 genes were identical to those of the ATCC 33209 msa1and msa2 genes except for a single C-to-A nucleotide mutation. This mutation was identified in both the msa1 and msa2 genes of strain 684 and resulted in an Ala139-to-Glu substitution in the amino-terminal region of p57. We examined whether this mutation in p57 altered salmonid leukocyte and rabbit erythrocyte binding activities. R. salmoninarum strain 684 extracellular protein exhibited a twofold increase in agglutinating activity for chinook salmon leukocytes and rabbit erythrocytes compared to the activity of the ATCC 33209 extracellular protein. A specific and quantitative p57 binding assay confirmed the increased binding activity of 684 p57. Monoclonal antibody 4C11 blocked the agglutinating activity of the ATCC 33209 extracellular protein but not the agglutinating activity of the 684 extracellular protein. These results indicate that the Ala139-to-Glu substitution altered immune recognition and was associated with enhanced biological activity of R. salmoninarum 684 p57.

  7. An investigation into the prevalence of Renibacterium salmoninarum in farmed rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum), and wild fish populations in selected river catchments in England and Wales between 1998 and 2000.

    PubMed

    Chambers, E; Gardiner, R; Peeler, E J

    2008-02-01

    A cross-sectional survey of Renibacterium salmoninarum infection in farmed rainbow trout (RBT) and wild fish populations was carried out in 10 farms and six river catchments, respectively, in England and Wales. The majority of the wild fish were sampled in 1998 and the farmed fish in 2000. Grayling, Thymallus thymallus, and brown trout, Salmo trutta, were the main wild species sampled. Two fish, one grayling and one salmon, Salmo salar, were R. salmoninarum culture-positive, compared with 40 confirmed polymerase chain reaction-positive wild fish. The highest prevalence of R. salmoninarum infection was found in grayling in rivers with RBT farms with a history of R. salmoninarum infection. One hundred and fifty fish were sampled from each RBT farm, but none of the fish was found to be R. salmoninarum-positive. Evidence was found, for the first time, for the presence of R. salmoninarum in an eel, Anguilla anguilla. PMID:18234016

  8. A sensitive loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method for detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum, causative agent of bacterial kidney disease in salmonids.

    PubMed

    Gahlawat, S K; Ellis, A E; Collet, B

    2009-06-01

    Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is a novel technique for nucleic acid amplification with high specificity, sensitivity and rapidity and does not require expensive equipment or reagents. In the present study, we developed and evaluated a LAMP method for the rapid detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum causing the bacterial kidney disease in salmonids. This method was more sensitive than quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Using DNA template extracted from cultured R. salmoninarum, the LAMP method gave an amplification signal from template diluted to 10(-8) while the limit of detection of qPCR was10(-7). The LAMP method was also highly specific and did not amplify DNA purified from five other Gram-positive and -negative bacterial fish pathogens. The method also worked well using extracts of macrophages infected with R. salmoninarum and kidney material from rainbow trout, which were positive for R. salmoninarum by qPCR and crude R. salmoninarum culture. There was some evidence for inhibitors of the LAMP reaction in the kidney samples, which was overcome by diluting the sample. PMID:19538642

  9. Mortality and kidney histopathology of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha exposed to virulent and attenuated Renibacterium salmoninarum strains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Farrell, Caroline L.; Elliott, Diane G.; Landolt, Marsha L.

    2001-01-01

    An isolate of Renibacterium salmoninarum (strain MT 239) exhibiting reduced virulence in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss was tested for its ability to cause bacterial kidney disease (BKD) in chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, a salmonid species more susceptible to BKD. Juvenile chinook salmon were exposed to either 33209, the American Type Culture Collection type strain of R. salmoninarum, or to MT 239, by an intraperitoneal injection of 1 x 10(3) or 1 x 10(6) bacteria fish(-1), or by a 24 h immersion in 1 x 10(5) or 1 x 10(7) bacteria ml(-1). For 22 wk fish were held in 12 degrees C water and monitored for mortality. Fish were sampled periodically for histological examination of kidney tissues. In contrast to fish exposed to the high dose of strain 33209 by either injection or immersion, none of the fish exposed to strain MT 239 by either route exhibited gross clinical signs or histopathological changes indicative of BKD. However, the MT 239 strain was detected by the direct fluorescent antibody technique in 4 fish that died up to 11 wk after the injection challenge and in 5 fish that died up to 20 wk after the immersion challenge. Viable MT 239 was isolated in culture from 3 fish that died up to 13 wk after the immersion challenge. Total mortality in groups injected with the high dose of strain MT 239 (12%) was also significantly lower (p < 0.05) than mortality in groups injected with strain 33209 (73 %). These data indicate that the attenuated virulence observed with MT 239 in rainbow trout also occurs in a salmonid species highly susceptible to BKD. The reasons for the attenuated virulence of MT 239 were not determined but may be related to the reduced levels of the putative virulence protein p57 associated with this strain.

  10. Mortality and kidney histopathology of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha exposed to virulent and attenuated Renibacterium salmoninarum strains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Farrell, C. L.; Elliott, D.G.; Landolt, M.L.

    2000-01-01

    An isolate of Renibacterium salmoninarum (strain MT 239) exhibiting reduced virulence in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss was tested for its ability to cause bacterial kidney disease (BKD) in chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, a salmonid species more susceptible to BKD. Juvenile chinook salmon were exposed to either 33209, the American Type Culture Collection type strain of R. salmoninarum, or to MT 239, by an intraperitoneal injection of 1 ?? 103 or 1 ?? 106 bacteria fish-1, or by a 24 h immersion in 1 ?? 105 or 1 ?? 107 bacteria ml-1. For 22 wk fish were held in 12??C water and monitored for mortality. Fish were sampled periodically for histological examination of kidney tissues. In contrast to fish exposed to the high dose of strain 33209 by either injection or immersion, none of the fish exposed to strain MT 239 by either route exhibited gross clinical signs or histopathological changes indicative of BKD. However, the MT 239 strain was detected by the direct fluorescent antibody technique in 4 fish that died up to 11 wk after the injection challenge and in 5 fish that died up to 20 wk after the immersion challenge. Viable MT 239 was isolated in culture from 3 fish that died up to 13 wk after the immersion challenge. Total mortality in groups injected with the high dose of strain MT 239 (12%) was also significantly lower (p < 0.05) than mortality in groups injected with strain 33209 (73%). These data indicate that the attenuated virulence observed with MT 239 in rainbow trout also occurs in a salmonid species highly susceptible to BKD. The reasons for the attenuated virulence of MT 239 were not determined but may be related to the reduced levels of the putative virulence protein p57 associated with this strain.

  11. Prevalence and analysis of Renibacterium salmoninarum infection among juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in North Puget Sound.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Linda D; Durkin, Colleen; Nance, Shelly L; Rice, Casimir A

    2006-08-30

    Renibacterium salmoninarum causes bacterial kidney disease (BKD), a chronic and sometimes fatal disease of salmon and trout that could lower fitness in populations with high prevalences of infection. Prevalence of R. salmoninarum infection among juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha inhabiting neritic marine habitats in North Puget Sound, Washington, USA, was assessed in 2002 and 2003. Fish were collected by monthly surface trawl at 32 sites within 4 bays, and kidney infections were detected by a quantitative fluorescent antibody technique (qFAT). The sensitivity of the qFAT was within an order of magnitude of the quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) sensitivity. Prevalence of infection was classified by fish origin (marked/hatchery vs. unmarked/likely natural spawn), month of capture, capture location and stock origin. The highest percentages of infected fish (63.5 to 63.8%) and the greatest infection severity were observed for fish collected in Bellingham Bay. The lowest percentages were found in Skagit Bay (11.4 to 13.5%); however, there was no difference in prevalence between marked and unmarked fish among the capture locations. The optimal logistic regression model of infection probabilities identified the capture location of Bellingham Bay as the strongest effect, and analysis of coded wire tagged (CWT) fish revealed that prevalence of infection was associated with the capture location and not with the originating stock. These results suggest that infections can occur during the early marine life stages of Chinook salmon that may be due to common reservoirs of infection or horizontal transmission among fish stocks. PMID:17058599

  12. Mortality and kidney histopathology of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha exposed to virulent and attenuated Renibacterium salmoninarum strains.

    PubMed

    O'Farrell, C L; Elliott, D G; Landolt, M L

    2000-12-21

    An isolate of Renibacterium salmoninarum (strain MT 239) exhibiting reduced virulence in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss was tested for its ability to cause bacterial kidney disease (BKD) in chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, a salmonid species more susceptible to BKD. Juvenile chinook salmon were exposed to either 33209, the American Type Culture Collection type strain of R. salmoninarum, or to MT 239, by an intraperitoneal injection of 1 x 10(3) or 1 x 10(6) bacteria fish(-1), or by a 24 h immersion in 1 x 10(5) or 1 x 10(7) bacteria ml(-1). For 22 wk fish were held in 12 degrees C water and monitored for mortality. Fish were sampled periodically for histological examination of kidney tissues. In contrast to fish exposed to the high dose of strain 33209 by either injection or immersion, none of the fish exposed to strain MT 239 by either route exhibited gross clinical signs or histopathological changes indicative of BKD. However, the MT 239 strain was detected by the direct fluorescent antibody technique in 4 fish that died up to 11 wk after the injection challenge and in 5 fish that died up to 20 wk after the immersion challenge. Viable MT 239 was isolated in culture from 3 fish that died up to 13 wk after the immersion challenge. Total mortality in groups injected with the high dose of strain MT 239 (12%) was also significantly lower (p < 0.05) than mortality in groups injected with strain 33209 (73 %). These data indicate that the attenuated virulence observed with MT 239 in rainbow trout also occurs in a salmonid species highly susceptible to BKD. The reasons for the attenuated virulence of MT 239 were not determined but may be related to the reduced levels of the putative virulence protein p57 associated with this strain. PMID:11206735

  13. Levels of Renibacterium salmoninarum antigens in resident and anadromous salmonids in the River Ellidaár system in Iceland.

    PubMed

    Kristmundsson, Á; Árnason, F; Gudmundsdóttir, S; Antonsson, T

    2016-06-01

    In relation to stock enhancement programmes, wild salmon broodfish have been routinely screened for the presence of Renibacterium salmoninarum antigens (Rs-Ag) for decades. A sudden increase in the prevalence of Rs-Ag experienced caused extensive problems to this industry as eggs from positive fish are discarded. The prevalence and level of Rs-Ag were examined in resident and anadromous salmonids in the River Ellidaár system and the progress of Rs-Ag in a cohort of salmon followed. Both prevalence and Rs-Ag levels were high in resident salmonids and emigrating salmon smolts in the river system. When the smolts re-entered their home river as adults the following summer, they were almost free of Rs-Ag, but the longer they stayed in the river, the more Rs-Ag they acquired; the majority being positive at spawning. This study demonstrates a high level of Rs-Ag in salmonids in the River Ellidaár system which significantly reduces in the salmon during its seawater phase. Accordingly, it seems ideal to sample salmon broodfish as soon as possible after ascending the river and subsequently transfer to Rs-free environment for storage until stripping, which could result in lower Rs-prevalence and minimize the problems that stock enhancement programmes have faced due to Rs-positive wild broodfish. PMID:26275672

  14. Vulnerability to predation and physiological stress responses in juvenile chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) experimentally infected with Renibacterium salmoninarum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mesa, M.G.; Poe, T.P.; Maule, A.G.; Schreck, C.B.

    1998-01-01

    We experimentally infected juvenile chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) with Renibacterium salmoninarum (Rs), the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease (BKD), to examine the vulnerability to predation of fish with differing levels of Rs infection and assess physiological change during progression of the disease. Immersion challenges conducted during 1992 and 1994 produced fish with either a low to moderate (1992) or high (1994) infection level of Rs during the 14-week postchallenge rearing period. When equal numbers of treatment and unchallenged control fish were subjected to predation by either northern squaw fish (Ptychocheilus oregonensis) or smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieui), Rs-challenged fish were eaten in significantly greater numbers than controls by nearly two to one. In 1994, we also sampled fish every 2 weeks after the challenge to determine some stressful effects of Rs infection. During disease progression in fish, plasma cortisol and lactate increased significantly whereas glucose decreased significantly. Our results indicate the role that BKD may play in predator-prey interactions, thus ascribing some ecological significance to this disease beyond that of direct pathogen-related mortality. In addition, the physiological changes observed in our fish during the chronic progression of BKD indicate that this disease is stressful, particularly during the later stages.

  15. Incidence of Renibacterium salmoninarum infections in juvenile hatchery spring chinook salmon in the Columbia and Snake Rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maule, A.G.; Rondorf, D.W.; Beeman, J.W.; Haner, P.V.

    1996-01-01

    From 1988 through 1992, we assessed the prevalence (frequency of occurrence) and severity (degree of infection) of Renibacterium salmoninarum (RS) among fish in marked groups of Columbia River basin and Snake River basin hatchery spring chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha before release and during their seaward migration. During the study, prevalence of RS infection decreased (from >90% to <65%) in six of the eight hatchery groups. We attributed this decrease to changes in hatchery practices that reduced vertical and horizontal transmission. Fish from Snake River hatcheries had a higher prevalence of infection when sampled at dams (mean >90%) than in the hatchery (mean <70%), but there were no differences in similar comparisons of Columbia River fish. Although prevalence and severity of RS infection were not correlated in the groups studied, it appears that fish from the Snake River were more severely infected than those from the Columbia River. Some groups of Snake River fish had higher severity of infection at dams than in the hatchery, but infection in fish from Columbia River hatcheries did not change. These differences between Snake River and Columbia River fish might have resulted from differences in river conditions and the distances from hatcheries to dams.

  16. A new real time PCR-based assay for diagnosing Renibacterium salmoninarum in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and comparison with other techniques.

    PubMed

    Halaihel, Nabil; Vendrell, Daniel; Ruiz-Zarzuela, Imanol; de Blas, Ignacio; Alonso, José Luis; Gironés, Olivia; Pérez, Tania; Muzquiz, José Luis

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial Kidney Disease of salmonid is caused by a slow-growing gram-positive bacterium, Renibacterium salmoninarum. This bacterium lives both extra-cellular and intra-cellular in the host. Serological and molecular diagnostic methods to detect the bacterium major surface protein antigen p57 have been developed. In the present work, a newly developed quantitative Reverse Transcriptase-PCR (RT-QPCR), using self-quenched fluorescent primer (Lux), a nested PCR (NPCR), a commercial ELISA and recently commercially available Immune-chromatographic strip test(IC-Strip) were compared for their ability to detect BKD in kidney tissue samples obtained from experimentally infected fish. ELISA test resulted to be rapid, simple and indicative for the bacterial load. The IC-Strip test had similar characteristics for bacterial detection. Both tests are a good option for rapid and relatively inexpensive screening studies, despite the one and two log decrease in bacterial detection limits compared to NPCR and RT-QPCR, respectively. The use of Lux primers in the newly developed RT-QPCR revealed to be a cost-effective alternative to other fluorescence-based PCR techniques. The option of generating a melting temperature curve with the real time PCR instrument confirmed the specificity of the PCR product. The RT-QPCR technique had the advantage of detecting low numbers of viable bacterial mRNA which implied a higher capacity of detecting chronically infected animals. For instance, some fish in the group infected by cohabitation had very low bacterial load and were only detected by this technique. PMID:18938198

  17. The gills are an important site of iNOS expression in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss after challenge with the gram-positive pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed

    Campos-Perez, J J; Ward, M; Grabowski, P S; Ellis, A E; Secombes, C J

    2000-01-01

    Following injection challenge of rainbow trout with the Gram-positive pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum, serum nitrate levels increased indicative of NO production. The timing and amount of nitrate produced varied with the virulence of the bacterial strain used, with the highest levels seen in fish challenged with the most virulent (autoaggregating) strain. Immunization with a killed R. salmoninarum preparation in Freund's incomplete adjuvant significantly increased nitrate levels after challenge. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) transcript expression was detectable in rainbow trout tissues after injection challenge with R. salmoninarum, and its induction in the gills was both quick (between 3 and 6 hr) and relatively prolonged (lasting several days). iNOS expression in the kidney was also seen at a later stage (24 hr) but appeared to switch off relatively rapidly. Bath challenge with R. salmoninarum also induced iNOS expression in gill, and a variable expression in the gut and kidney also occurred. These results highlight the importance of the gills, not only as a point of entry of pathogens but also as a tissue capable of mounting an immune response. PMID:10651954

  18. The gills are an important site of iNOS expression in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss after challenge with the Gram‐positive pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum

    PubMed Central

    Campos‐perez, J J; Ward, M; Grabowski, P S; Ellis, A E; Secombes, C J

    2000-01-01

    Following injection challenge of rainbow trout with the Gram‐positive pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum, serum nitrate levels increased indicative of NO production. The timing and amount of nitrate produced varied with the virulence of the bacterial strain used, with the highest levels seen in fish challenged with the most virulent (autoaggregating) strain. Immunization with a killed R. salmoninarum preparation in Freund’s incomplete adjuvant significantly increased nitrate levels after challenge. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) transcript expression was detectable in rainbow trout tissues after injection challenge with R. salmoninarum, and its induction in the gills was both quick (between 3 and 6 hr) and relatively prolonged (lasting several days). iNOS expression in the kidney was also seen at a later stage (24 hr) but appeared to switch off relatively rapidly. Bath challenge with R. salmoninarum also induced iNOS expression in gill, and a variable expression in the gut and kidney also occurred. These results highlight the importance of the gills, not only as a point of entry of pathogens but also as a tissue capable of mounting an immune response. PMID:10651954

  19. Comparison of two fluorescent antibody techniques (FATS) for detection and quantification of Renibacterium salmoninarum in coelomic fluid of spawning chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, D.G.; McKibben, C.L.

    1997-01-01

    Two versions of the fluorescent antibody technique (FAT) were compared for detection and quantification of Renibacterium salmoninarum in coelomic fluid samples from naturally infected spawning chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha. For the membrane filtration-FAT (MF-FAT), trypsin-treated samples were passed through 0.2 ??m polycarbonate filters to concentrate bacteria for direct enumeration by immunofluorescence microscopy. For the smear-FAT (S-FAT), samples were centrifuged at 8800 x g for 10 min and the pelleted material was smeared on slides for immunofluorescence staining Detected prevalences of Renibacterium salmoninarum were 1.8 to 3.4 times higher by the MF-FAT than by the S-FAT: differences were significant at p ??? 0.0002. The S-FAT consistently detected R. salmoninarum only in samples with calculated bacterial concentrations ??? 2.4 x 103 cells ml-1 by MF-FAT testing. Increasing the area examined on a filter or slide from 50 to 100 microscope fields at 1000x magnification resulted in the detection of a maximum of 4% additional positive samples by the MF-FAT and 7% additional positive samples by the S-FAT. In individual samples for which bacterial counts were obtained by both the MF-FAT and the S-FAT, the counts averaged from 47 times (??30 SD) to 175 times (??165 SD) higher by the MF-FAT. Centrifugation of samples at 10000 x g for 10 min resulted in a 4-fold increase in mean bacterial counts by the S-FAT compared with a 10-min centrifugation at 2000 x g, but the highest calculated bacterial concentration obtained by S-FAT testing was more than 6-fold lower than that obtained for the same sample by MF-FAT testing. Because of its greater sensitivity, the MF-FAT is preferable to the S-FAT for use in critical situations requiring the detection of low numbers of R. salmoninarum.

  20. Influence of infection with Renibacterium salmoninarum on susceptibility of juvenile spring chinook salmon to gas bubble trauma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weiland, L.K.; Mesa, M.G.; Maule, A.G.

    1999-01-01

    During experiments in our laboratory to assess the progression and severity of gas bubble trauma (GBT) in juvenile spring chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, we had the opportunity to assess the influence of Renibacterium salmoninarum (Rs), the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease, on the susceptibility of salmon to GBT. We exposed fish with an established infection of Rs to 120% total dissolved gas (TDG) for 96 h and monitored severity of GBT signs in the fins and gills, Rs infection level in kidneys by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and mortality. Mortality occurred rapidly after exposure to 120% TDG, with a LT20 (time necessary to kill 20% of the population) of about 37 h, which is at a minimum about 16% earlier than other bioassays we have conducted using fish that had no apparent signs of disease. Fish that died early (from 31 to 36 h and from 49 to 52 h) had significantly higher infection levels (mean ?? SE ELISA absorbance = 1.532 ?? 0.108) than fish that survived for 96h (mean ?? SE ELISA absorbance = 0.828 ?? 0.137). Fish that died early also had a significantly greater number of gill filaments occluded with bubbles than those that survived 96 h. Conversely, fish that survived for 96 h had a significantly higher median fin severity ranking than those that died early. Our results indicate that fish with moderate to high levels of Rs infection are more vulnerable to the effects of dissolved gas supersaturation (DGS) and die sooner than fish with lower levels of Rs infection. However, there is a substantial amount of individual variation in susceptibility to the apparent cumulative effects of DGS and Rs infection. Collectively, our findings have important implications to programs designed to monitor the prevalence and severity of GBT in juvenile salmonids in areas like the Columbia River basin and perhaps elsewhere.

  1. Interaction of infection with Renibacterium salmoninarum and physical stress in juvenile chinook salmon: Physiological responses, disease progression, and mortality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mesa, M.G.; Maule, A.G.; Schreck, C.B.

    2000-01-01

    We experimentally infected juvenile spring chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha with Renibacterium salmoninarum (Rs), the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease (BKD), in order to compare the physiological responses of Rs-infected and Rs-noninfected fish to a series of multiple, acute stressors and to determine whether exposure to these stressors worsens the infection and leads to increased mortality. After subjecting groups of fish to a waterborne challenge of Rs, we sampled them biweekly to monitor infection levels, mortality, and some stress-related physiological changes. As infections worsened, fish developed decreased hematocrits and blood glucose levels and increased levels of cortisol and lactate, indicating that BKD is stressful, particularly during the later stages. Eight weeks after the challenge, when fish had moderate to high infection levels, we subjected them, along with unchallenged control fish, to three 60-s bouts of hypoxia, struggling, and mild agitation that were separated by 48-72 h. Our results indicate that the imposition of these stressors on Rs-infected fish did not lead to higher infection levels or increased mortality when compared with diseased fish that did not receive the stressors. Furthermore, the kinetics of plasma cortisol, glucose, and lactate over a 24-h period following each application of the stressor were similar between fish with moderate to high Rs infections and those that had low or no detectable infection. Some differences in the stress responses of these two groups did exist, however. Most notably, fish with moderate to high Rs infections had higher titers of cortisol and lactate prior to each application of the stressor and also were unable to consistently elicit a significant hyperglycemia in response to the stressors. Collectively, our results should be important in understanding the impact that BKD has on the survival of juvenile salmonids, but we caution that our results represent the combined effects of one

  2. A sensitive nested reverse transcriptase PCR assay to detect viable cells of the fish pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.).

    PubMed

    Cook, M; Lynch, W H

    1999-07-01

    A nested reverse transcriptase (RT) PCR assay detected mRNA of the salmonid pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum in samples of RNA extracts of between 1 and 10 cells. Total RNA was extracted from cultured bacteria, Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) kidney tissue and ovarian fluid seeded with the pathogen, and kidney tissue from both experimentally challenged and commercially raised fish. Following DNase treatment, extracted RNA was amplified by both RT PCR and PCR by using primers specific for the gene encoding the major protein antigen of R. salmoninarum. A 349-bp amplicon was detected by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver stain. Inactivation of cultured bacteria by rifampin or erythromycin produced a loss of nested RT PCR mRNA detection corresponding to a loss of bacterial cell viability determined from plate counts but no loss of DNA detection by PCR. In subclinically diseased fish, nested RT PCR identified similar levels of infected fish as determined by viable pathogen culture. Higher percentages of fish testing positive were generated by PCR, particularly in samples from fish previously subjected to antibiotic chemotherapy where 93% were PCR positive, but only 7% were nested RT PCR and culture positive. PCR can generate false-positive data from amplification of target DNA from nonviable pathogen cells. Therefore, nested RT PCR may prove useful for monitoring cultured Atlantic salmon for the presence of viable R. salmoninarum within a useful time frame, particularly samples from broodstock where antibiotic chemotherapy is used prior to spawning to reduce vertical pathogen transmission. PMID:10388701

  3. In vitro growth of the bacterial kidney disease organism Renibacterium salmoninarum on a nonserum, noncharcoal-based "homospecies-metabolite" medium.

    PubMed

    Teska, J D

    1994-07-01

    Laboratory and field trials were conducted to evaluate in vitro growth of Renibacterium salmoninarum in media without serum or charcoal. Growth of this bacterium, the cause of bacterial kidney disease (BKD) in salmonids, is accelerated by addition of a growth enhancing "metabolite" of unknown composition to KDM2 medium, the medium commonly used for isolation of R. salmoninarum. KDM2 medium supplemented with greater than 1% (v/v) metabolite enhanced growth even without addition of either serum or charcoal. Medium containing 5% metabolite (denoted Five-M) allowed optimal growth in laboratory studies and was further evaluated as a primary plating medium for recovery of the bacterium isolated from chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) exhibiting clinical BKD. Recovery rates of R. salmoninarum using Five-M medium were 4% and 36% higher, respectively, than comparable rates using a serum-based medium for the two salmon populations evaluated. Five-M medium is an effective, inexpensive alternative to serum-based or charcoal-based media. PMID:7933282

  4. A Sensitive Nested Reverse Transcriptase PCR Assay To Detect Viable Cells of the Fish Pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum in Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar L.)

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Marcia; Lynch, William H.

    1999-01-01

    A nested reverse transcriptase (RT) PCR assay detected mRNA of the salmonid pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum in samples of RNA extracts of between 1 and 10 cells. Total RNA was extracted from cultured bacteria, Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) kidney tissue and ovarian fluid seeded with the pathogen, and kidney tissue from both experimentally challenged and commercially raised fish. Following DNase treatment, extracted RNA was amplified by both RT PCR and PCR by using primers specific for the gene encoding the major protein antigen of R. salmoninarum. A 349-bp amplicon was detected by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver stain. Inactivation of cultured bacteria by rifampin or erythromycin produced a loss of nested RT PCR mRNA detection corresponding to a loss of bacterial cell viability determined from plate counts but no loss of DNA detection by PCR. In subclinically diseased fish, nested RT PCR identified similar levels of infected fish as determined by viable pathogen culture. Higher percentages of fish testing positive were generated by PCR, particularly in samples from fish previously subjected to antibiotic chemotherapy where 93% were PCR positive, but only 7% were nested RT PCR and culture positive. PCR can generate false-positive data from amplification of target DNA from nonviable pathogen cells. Therefore, nested RT PCR may prove useful for monitoring cultured Atlantic salmon for the presence of viable R. salmoninarum within a useful time frame, particularly samples from broodstock where antibiotic chemotherapy is used prior to spawning to reduce vertical pathogen transmission. PMID:10388701

  5. Variation in the Spacer Regions Separating tRNA Genes in Renibacterium salmoninarum Distinguishes Recent Clinical Isolates from the Same Location

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Sarah M.; Grayson, T. Hilton; Chambers, Edel M.; Cooper, Lynne F.; Barker, Gavin A.; Gilpin, Martyn L.

    2001-01-01

    A means for distinguishing between clinical isolates of Renibacterium salmoninarum that is based on the PCR amplification of length polymorphisms in the tRNA intergenic spacer regions (tDNA-ILPs) was investigated. The method used primers specific to nucleotide sequences of R. salmoninarum tRNA genes and tRNA intergenic spacer regions that had been generated by using consensus tRNA gene primers. Twenty-one PCR products were sequenced from five isolates of R. salmoninarum from the United States, England, and Scotland, and four complete tRNA genes and spacer regions were identified. Sixteen specific PCR primers were designed and tested singly and in all possible pairwise combinations for their potential to discriminate between isolates from recent clinical outbreaks of bacterial kidney disease (BKD) in the United Kingdom. Fourteen of the isolates were cultured from kidney samples taken from fish displaying clinical signs of BKD on five farms, and some of the isolates came from the same farm and at the same time. The tDNA-ILP profiles separated 22 clinical isolates into nine groups and highlighted that some farms may have had more than one source of infection. The grouping of isolates improved on the discriminatory power of previously reported typing methods based on randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis and restriction fragment length profiles developed using insertion sequence IS994. Our method enabled us to make divisions between closely related clinical isolates of R. salmoninarum that have identical exact tandem repeat (ETR-A) loci, rRNA intergenic spacer sequences, and IS994 profiles. PMID:11136759

  6. Variation in the spacer regions separating tRNA genes in Renibacterium salmoninarum distinguishes recent clinical isolates from the same location.

    PubMed

    Alexander, S M; Grayson, T H; Chambers, E M; Cooper, L F; Barker, G A; Gilpin, M L

    2001-01-01

    A means for distinguishing between clinical isolates of Renibacterium salmoninarum that is based on the PCR amplification of length polymorphisms in the tRNA intergenic spacer regions (tDNA-ILPs) was investigated. The method used primers specific to nucleotide sequences of R. salmoninarum tRNA genes and tRNA intergenic spacer regions that had been generated by using consensus tRNA gene primers. Twenty-one PCR products were sequenced from five isolates of R. salmoninarum from the United States, England, and Scotland, and four complete tRNA genes and spacer regions were identified. Sixteen specific PCR primers were designed and tested singly and in all possible pairwise combinations for their potential to discriminate between isolates from recent clinical outbreaks of bacterial kidney disease (BKD) in the United Kingdom. Fourteen of the isolates were cultured from kidney samples taken from fish displaying clinical signs of BKD on five farms, and some of the isolates came from the same farm and at the same time. The tDNA-ILP profiles separated 22 clinical isolates into nine groups and highlighted that some farms may have had more than one source of infection. The grouping of isolates improved on the discriminatory power of previously reported typing methods based on randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis and restriction fragment length profiles developed using insertion sequence IS994. Our method enabled us to make divisions between closely related clinical isolates of R. salmoninarum that have identical exact tandem repeat (ETR-A) loci, rRNA intergenic spacer sequences, and IS994 profiles. PMID:11136759

  7. Sensitive detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum in whole fry, blood, and other tissues of pacific salmon by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, L D; Nilsson, W B; Strom, M S

    1998-12-01

    A sensitive, reproducible assay for detecting Renibacterium salmoninarum in a variety of tissues, including blood, has been developed. This assay, based on reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of 16S ribosomal RNA, exhibited sensitivity to

  8. Temperature-mediated differences in bacterial kidney disease expression and survival in Renibacterium salmoninarum-challenged bull trout and other salmonids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, D.T.; Moffitt, C.M.; Peters, K.K.

    2007-01-01

    Resource managers considering restoration and reconnection of watersheds to protect and enhance threatened populations of bull trout Salvelinus confluentus have little information about the consequences of bacterial kidney disease (BKD) caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum. To better understand the response of bull trout to R. salmoninarum challenge, we conducted several laboratory experiments at two water temperatures. The extent, severity, and lethality of BKD in bull trout were compared with those of similarly challenged lake trout S. namaycush, Arctic char S. alpinus, Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, and rainbow trout O. mykiss. The lethal dose of bacterial cells necessary to induce 50% mortality (LD50) was 10-fold lower at the 15??C challenge than at the 9??C challenge. Of the species tested, bull trout were relatively resistant to BKD, Arctic char were the most susceptible among Salvelinus species, and Chinook salmon were the most susceptible among Oncorhynchus species tested. Mean time to death was more rapid for all fish tested at 15??C than for fish challenged at 9??C. These results suggest that infection of bull trout with BKD likely poses a low risk to successful restoration of threatened populations. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2007.

  9. Detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum in tissue samples by sequence capture and fluorescent PCR based on the 16S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Königsson, Malin Heldtander; Ballagi, Andras; Jansson, Eva; Johansson, Karl-Erik

    2005-02-25

    The 16S rRNA genes from eight isolates of Renibacterium salmoninarum with different origins and dates of isolation were sequenced to evaluate the possibility to construct a diagnostic PCR system with target sites within this gene. The sequences were found to be identical but for one single position in one of the isolates, and two regions with an adequate number of nucleotide differences as compared to closely related species were identified. Species-specific fluorescent PCR primers complementary to these regions were constructed as well as oligonucleotides for DNA preparation by sequence capture. A mimic molecule was constructed to be used as an internal control. The PCR was specific and allowed the detection of DNA equivalent to 1-10 R. salmoninarum genomes per reaction. The DNA preparation with sequence capture and analysis by PCR with a mimic was found to be a reliable method for analysis of kidneys from fish with BKD. The amount of PCR inhibiting substances present in the tissue was reduced, and the relevant DNA was concentrated in the capture step. Furthermore, the use of the mimic molecule in the system assured that false negative results could be identified. PMID:15708821

  10. Infections by Renibacterium salmoninarum and Nanophyetus salmincola Chapin are associated with reduced growth of juvenile Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum), in the Northeast Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Sandell, T A; Teel, D J; Fisher, J; Beckman, B; Jacobson, K C

    2015-04-01

    We examined 1454 juvenile Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum), captured in nearshore waters off the coasts of Washington and Oregon (USA) from 1999 to 2004 for infection by Renibacterium salmoninarum, Nanophyetus salmincola Chapin and skin metacercariae. The prevalence and intensities for each of these infections were established for both yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon. Two metrics of salmon growth, weight residuals and plasma levels of insulin-like growth factor-1, were determined for salmon infected with these pathogens/parasites, both individually and in combination, with uninfected fish used for comparison. Yearling Chinook salmon infected with R. salmoninarum had significantly reduced weight residuals. Chinook salmon infected with skin metacercariae alone did not have significantly reduced growth metrics. Dual infections were not associated with significantly more severe effects on the growth metrics than single infections; the number of triple infections was very low and precluded statistical comparison. Overall, these data suggest that infections by these organisms can be associated with reduced juvenile Chinook salmon growth. Because growth in the first year at sea has been linked to survival for some stocks of Chinook salmon, the infections may therefore play a role in regulating these populations in the Northeast Pacific Ocean. PMID:24720546

  11. Development of a nested polymerase chain reaction for amplification of a sequence of the p57 gene of Renibacterium salmoninarum that provides a highly sensitive method for detection of the bacterium in salmonid kidney

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chase, D.M.; Pascho, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    Nucleic acid-based assays have shown promise for diagnosing Renibacterium salmoninarum in tissues and body fluids of salmonids. DeVelopment of a nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method to detect a 320 bp DNA segment of the gene encoding the p57 protein of R. salmoninarum is described. Whereas a conventional PCR for a 383 bp segment of the p57 gene reliably detected 1000 R. salmoninarum cells per reaction in kidney tissue, the nested PCR detected as few as 10 R. salmoninarum per reaction in kidney tissue. Two DNA extraction methods for the nested PCR were compared and the correlation between replicate samples was generally higher in samples extracted by the QIAamp system compared with those extracted by the phenol/chloroform method. The specificity of the nested PCR was confirmed by testing DNA extracts of common bacterial fish pathogens and a panel of bacterial species reported to cause false-positive reactions in the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the fluorescent antibody test (FAT) for R. salmoninarum. Kidney samples from 74 naturally infected chinook Salmon were examined by the nested PCR, the ELISA, and the FAT, and the detected prevalences of R. salmoninarum were 61, 47, and 43%, respectively.

  12. Development of a nested polymerase chain reaction for amplification of a sequence of the p57 gene of Renibacterium salmoninarum that provides a highly sensitive method for detection of the bacterium in salmonid kidney.

    PubMed

    Chase, D M; Pascho, R J

    1998-11-30

    Nucleic acid-based assays have shown promise for diagnosing Renibacterium salmoninarum in tissues and body fluids of salmonids. Development of a nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method to detect a 320 bp DNA segment of the gene encoding the p57 protein of R. salmoninarum is described. Whereas a conventional PCR for a 383 bp segment of the p57 gene reliably detected 1000 R. salmoninarum cells per reaction in kidney tissue, the nested PCR detected as few as 10 R. salmoninarum per reaction in kidney tissue. Two DNA extraction methods for the nested PCR were compared and the correlation between replicate samples was generally higher in samples extracted by the QIAamp system compared with those extracted by the phenol/chloroform method. The specificity of the nested PCR was confirmed by testing DNA extracts of common bacterial fish pathogens and a panel of bacterial species reported to cause false-positive reactions in the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the fluorescent antibody test (FAT) for R. salmoninarum. Kidney samples from 74 naturally infected chinook salmon were examined by the nested PCR, the ELISA, and the FAT, and the detected prevalences of R. salmoninarum were 61, 47, and 43%, respectively. PMID:9925428

  13. PCR and probe-PCR assays to monitor broodstock Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) ovarian fluid and kidney tissue for presence of DNA of the fish pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed Central

    Miriam, A; Griffiths, S G; Lovely, J E; Lynch, W H

    1997-01-01

    A simple, rapid PCR assay for the identification of Renibacterium salmoninarum in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) tissues detected DNA extracted from between 4 and 40 bacterial cells. PCR was at least as sensitive as culture when it was used to identify subclinically infected fish experimentally challenged with R. salmoninarum. However, PCR identified much higher numbers of kidney tissue and ovarian fluid samples from commercially reared broodstock fish to be positive for R. salmoninarum than did culture. This difference may be due to the antibiotic chemotherapy of broodstock fish used by the industry in 1994 to control the vertical transmission of R. salmoninarum. A much closer relationship between PCR and culture results was observed for ovarian fluid samples collected from broodstock fish in 1993. Also, PCR scored a much higher percentage of kidney tissue samples than ovarian fluid samples from 1994 broodstock fish positive for R. salmoninarum, which may reflect the uneven distribution of the pathogen in different fish tissues. Inclusion of a nested probe to identify the PCR-positive 1994 ovarian fluid samples increased the sensitivity of detection to between one and four cells and the number of samples that scored positive by almost threefold. These data indicate that many infected ovarian fluid samples contained very low numbers of R. salmoninarum cells and, because almost all these samples were culture negative, that PCR may have detected dead or otherwise unculturable bacterial cells. PMID:9163437

  14. PCR and probe-PCR assays to monitor broodstock Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) ovarian fluid and kidney tissue for presence of DNA of the fish pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed

    Miriam, A; Griffiths, S G; Lovely, J E; Lynch, W H

    1997-06-01

    A simple, rapid PCR assay for the identification of Renibacterium salmoninarum in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) tissues detected DNA extracted from between 4 and 40 bacterial cells. PCR was at least as sensitive as culture when it was used to identify subclinically infected fish experimentally challenged with R. salmoninarum. However, PCR identified much higher numbers of kidney tissue and ovarian fluid samples from commercially reared broodstock fish to be positive for R. salmoninarum than did culture. This difference may be due to the antibiotic chemotherapy of broodstock fish used by the industry in 1994 to control the vertical transmission of R. salmoninarum. A much closer relationship between PCR and culture results was observed for ovarian fluid samples collected from broodstock fish in 1993. Also, PCR scored a much higher percentage of kidney tissue samples than ovarian fluid samples from 1994 broodstock fish positive for R. salmoninarum, which may reflect the uneven distribution of the pathogen in different fish tissues. Inclusion of a nested probe to identify the PCR-positive 1994 ovarian fluid samples increased the sensitivity of detection to between one and four cells and the number of samples that scored positive by almost threefold. These data indicate that many infected ovarian fluid samples contained very low numbers of R. salmoninarum cells and, because almost all these samples were culture negative, that PCR may have detected dead or otherwise unculturable bacterial cells. PMID:9163437

  15. Production of the 57 kDa major surface antigen by a non-agglutinating strain of the fish pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed

    Senson, P R; Stevenson, R M

    1999-10-11

    The major surface antigen of Renibacterium salmoninarum, p57, is associated with cell autoagglutination and implicated as a virulence factor in fish infections. An autoagglutinating strain, JD24, caused 92% mortality when 2 x 10(7) cells were injected intraperitoneally into rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, while a non-agglutinating strain, MT 239, produced only 7% mortality after 100 d. The p57 antigen was present in the supernates of broth cultures of both strains when examined by western immunoblotting, and the gene for p57 was detected in both strains by PCR. Electron microscopy of cryopreserved thin sections showed an amorphous layer associated with the cell surface of JD24 which was not seen with MT 239. While p57 from JD24 could reassociate with cells of both strains, p57 from MT 239 failed to restore haemagglutination activity to either strain. Biotinylation of bacterial surfaces demonstrated the presence of a carbohydrate component of p57 from JD24 which was absent from the p57 produced by MT 239. The higher virulence of JD24 may depend not only on the production of p57, but also its direct association with the bacterial cell surface. PMID:10590925

  16. Characterization of susceptibility and carrier status of burbot, Lota lota (L.), to IHNV, IPNV, Flavobacterium psychrophilum, Aeromonas salmonicida and Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed

    Polinski, M P; Fehringer, T R; Johnson, K A; Snekvik, K R; Lapatra, S E; Lafrentz, B R; Ireland, S C; Cain, K D

    2010-07-01

    In this study, susceptibility and potential carrier status of burbot, Lota lota, were assessed for five important fish pathogens. Burbot demonstrated susceptibility and elevated mortality following challenge with infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) by immersion and to Aeromonas salmonicida by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection. IHNV persisted in fish for at least 28 days, whereas A. salmonicida was not re-isolated beyond 17 days post-challenge. In contrast, burbot appeared refractory to Flavobacterium psychrophilum following intramuscular (i.m.) injection and to infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) by immersion. However, i.p injection of IPNV resulted in re-isolation of virus from fish for the duration of the 28 day challenge. Renibacterium salmoninarum appeared to induce an asymptomatic carrier state in burbot following i.p. injection, but overt manifestation of disease was not apparent. Viable bacteria persisted in fish for at least 41 days, and bacterial DNA isolated by diagnostic polymerase chain reaction was detected from burbot kidney tissue 90 days after initial exposure. This study is the first to investigate susceptibility of burbot to selected fish pathogens, and this information will aid in efforts to culture and manage this species. PMID:20367740

  17. Detection of humoral antibodies to Renibacterium salmoninarum in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and Atlantic salmon Salmo salar challenged by immersion and in naturally infected populations.

    PubMed

    Jansson, E; Ljungberg, O

    1998-06-19

    Humoral antibodies to heat-stable antigens of Renibacterium salmoninarum (Rs) were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and in Atlantic salmon Salmo salar challenged by immersion. A slow antibody response was found: 3% (1/30) was positive 4 wk after immersion and 72% (26/36) was positive after 8 wk. All 30 fish sampled after 4 wk were found to be infected, as determined by bacterial culture and/or the presence of soluble antigens in the kidney. At 6, 8 and 12 wk after immersion the proportion of positives indicated by ELISA was 58%. The Rs infection was detected by cultivation in 36% of sampled fish collected on the same occasion. Elevated antibody titres to Rs were detected in samples from both Atlantic salmon (59% in 1 farm) and from rainbow trout (20% in 1 of 5 sampled farms) in naturally exposed populations all of which classified positive for bacterial kidney disease (BKD). Elevated antibody titres were detected among sampled fish from populations of rainbow trout and salmon with clinical BKD. Samples collected from farm populations of rainbow trout, salmon and brown trout Salmo trutta, exposed to Rs but without clinical BKD, were negative in the ELISA, although Rs bacteria or soluble antigens were detected at the same sampling. The antibody ELISA method cannot be recommended for general fish health monitoring purposes, but may be a valuable tool for monitoring the disease progression during controlled experiments. PMID:9684315

  18. Immunohistochemical identification of Renibacterium salmoninarum by monoclonal antibodies in paraffin-embedded tissues of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.), using paired immunoenzyme and paired immunofluorescence techniques.

    PubMed

    Evensen, O; Dale, O B; Nilsen, A

    1994-01-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum was identified in situ by immunoenzymatic and immunofluorescence techniques in paraffin-embedded tissue specimens collected during a natural outbreak of bacterial kidney disease (BKD) and from an experimental infection in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.). Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) 4D3 and 2G5 were used in this study, both specific for the 57-58-kD outer membrane protein (p57) of the bacterium. Both MAbs revealed positive staining in ethanol-fixed tissue specimens, but only the epitope identified by MAb 4D3 was formalin resistant. Pretreatment with trypsin did not reestablish the antigenicity for the epitope identified by Mab 2G5. Paired immunoenzymatic staining for identification of the bacterium in sequential incubation steps on ethanol-fixed tissue specimens using an avidin-biotin-peroxidase system was obtained after serial dilution of the Mab (2G5) or the chromagen, amino ethyl carbazole, in the first sequence. Paired immunofluorescence staining with well-balanced color mixing was easily obtained on ethanol-fixed tissue specimens using sequential incubations. Single exposures gave blue (aminomethyl coumarin acetic acid) and green (fluorescein isothiocyanate) fluorescence for MAbs 2G5 and biotinylated 4D3, respectively. Color mixing was revealed as a turquoise staining. Studies on method sensitivity was performed by incorporating a known amount of a protein preparation of p57 into an inert matrix, creating an artificial test substrate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8011782

  19. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of the gene coding for the 57-kDa major soluble antigen of the salmonid fish pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed

    Chien, M S; Gilbert, T L; Huang, C; Landolt, M L; O'Hara, P J; Winton, J R

    1992-09-15

    The complete sequence coding for the 57-kDa major soluble antigen of the salmonid fish pathogen, Renibacterium salmoninarum, was determined. The gene contained an opening reading frame of 1671 nucleotides coding for a protein of 557 amino acids with a calculated M(r) value of 57,190. The first 26 amino acids constituted a signal peptide. The deduced sequence for amino acid residues 27-61 was in agreement with the 35 N-terminal amino acid residues determined by microsequencing, suggesting the protein is synthesized as a 557-amino acid precursor and processed to produce a mature protein of M(r) 54,505. Two regions of the protein contained imperfect direct repeats. The first region contained two copies of an 81-residue repeat, the second contained five copies of an unrelated 25-residue repeat. Also, a perfect inverted repeat (including three in-frame UAA stop codons) was observed at the carboxyl-terminus of the gene. PMID:1383085

  20. Renibacterium salmoninarum isolates from different sources possess two highly conserved copies of the rRNA operon .

    PubMed

    Grayson, T H; Alexander, S M; Cooper, L F; Gilpin, M L

    2000-07-01

    The nucleotide sequences of the rRNA genes and the 5' flanking region were determined for R. salmoninarum ATCC 33209T from overlapping products generated by PCR amplification from the genomic DNA. Comparison of the sequences with rRNA genes from a variety of bacteria demonstrated the close relatedness between R. salmoninarum and the high G+C group of the actinobacteria, in particular, Arthrobacter species. A regulatory element within the 5' leader of the rRNA operon was identical to an element, CL2, described for mycobacteria. PCR, DNA sequence analysis, and DNA hybridisation were performed to examine variation between isolates from diverse sources which represented the four 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer sequevars previously described for R. salmoninarum. Two 23S-5S rRNA intergenic spacer sequevars of identical length were found. DNA hybridisation using probes complementary to 23S rDNA and 16S rDNA identified two rRNA operons which were identical or nearly identical amongst 40 isolates sourced from a variety of countries. PMID:11016696

  1. Prevalence and levels of Renibacterium salmoninarum in spring-summer Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) smolts at dams on the Columbia and Snake Rivers.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, D.G.; Pascho, R.J.; Jackson, L.M.; Mathews, G.M.; Harmon, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    We evaluated Renibaeterium salmoninarum infection in smolts of hatchery and wild spring-summer Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha sampled during most of the outmigration at Little Goose (1988) and Lower Granite dams (1988–1991) on the Snake River and at Priest Rapids and McNary dams on the Columbia River (1988–1990). We sampled 860–2,178 fish per dam each year. Homogenates of kidney–spleen tissue from all fish were tested for the presence of R. salmoninarum antigens by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and homogenates from 10% of the fish were examined by the fluorescent antibody technique (FAT). Although only 1–11% of fish sampled at a given dam during any l year exhibited lesions characteristic of bacterial kidney disease, 86–100% of the fish tested positive for R. salmoninarum antigen by ELISA, whereas 4–17% of the fish tested positive by the FAT. During most years, a majority (68–87%) of fish testing positive by the ELISA had low R. salmoninarum antigen levels, but in 1989, 53% of positive fish from Lower Granite Dam and 52% from McNary Dam showed medium-to-high antigen levels. For most years, the highest mean antigen levels were measured in fish sampled after 75% of the total out-migrants had passed a given dam. When the largest numbers of fish were being collected for bypass or downriver transportation, mean antigen levels were relatively low.

  2. A field evaluation of an indirect fluorescent antibody-based broodstock screening test used to control the vertical transmission of Renibacterium salmoninarium in Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha).

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, R D; Martin, S W; Evelyn, T P; Hicks, B; Dorward, W J; Ferguson, H W

    1989-01-01

    Ovarian fluid samples from erythromycin treated and untreated spawning three year old Chinook salmon were screened independently by two laboratories for the presence of Renibacterium salmoninarum using the indirect fluorescent antibody technique (IFAT). Agreement between the results of the two laboratories could be explained by chance when R. salmoninarum cell numbers as low as one per sample were considered sufficient to represent a positive result. If a positive result was considered to be the detection of larger numbers of R. salmoninarum cells (greater than 51 cells per sample), agreement increased and there was a statistically significant association between the results of the two laboratories. However, the level of agreement did not reach satisfactory levels for a population screening test. Furthermore, approximately 60% of the samples yielded false negative results when IFAT results were compared with positive culture results. These results led to the conclusion that the IFAT screening procedure, as carried out, was unsuitable for the purposes intended. Erythromycin injection of the spawning fish had no statistically significant effect on the results of the IFAT screening test. PMID:2686828

  3. Characterization of susceptibility and carrier status of burbot, Lota lota (L.), to IHNV, IPNV, Flavobacterium psychrophilum, Aeromonas salmonicida, and Renibacterium salmoninarum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, susceptibility and potential carrier status of burbot, Lota lota, were assessed for five important fish pathogens. Burbot demonstrated susceptibility and elevated mortality following challenge with infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) by immersion and to Aeromonas salmonici...

  4. Extracellular respiration

    PubMed Central

    Gralnick, Jeffrey A.; Newman, Dianne K.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Although it has long been known that microbes can generate energy using diverse strategies, only recently has it become clear that a growing number involve electron transfer to or from extracellular substrates. The best-known example of what we will term ‘extracellular respiration’ is electron transfer between microbes and minerals, such as iron and manganese (hydr)oxides. This makes sense, given that these minerals are sparingly soluble. What is perhaps surprising, however, is that a number of substrates that might typically be classified as ‘soluble’ are also respired at the cell surface. There are several reasons why this might be the case: the substrate, in its ecological context, might be associated with a solid surface and thus effectively insoluble; the substrate, while soluble, might simply be too large to transport inside the cell; or the substrate, while benign in one redox state, might become toxic after it is metabolized. In this review, we discuss various examples of extracellular respiration, paying particular attention to what is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes. As will become clear, much remains to be learned about the biochemistry, cell biology and regulation of extracellular respiration, making it a rich field of study for molecular microbiologists. PMID:17581115

  5. Extracellular guanosine regulates extracellular adenosine levels

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Dongmei; Jackson, Travis C.; Verrier, Jonathan D.; Gillespie, Delbert G.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to test the hypothesis that extracellular guanosine regulates extracellular adenosine levels. Rat preglomerular vascular smooth muscle cells were incubated with adenosine, guanosine, or both. Guanosine (30 μmol/l) per se had little effect on extracellular adenosine levels. Extracellular adenosine levels 1 h after addition of adenosine (3 μmol/l) were 0.125 ± 0.020 μmol/l, indicating rapid disposition of extracellular adenosine. Extracellular adenosine levels 1 h after addition of adenosine (3 μmol/l) plus guanosine (30 μmol/l) were 1.173 ± 0.061 μmol/l, indicating slow disposition of extracellular adenosine. Cell injury increased extracellular levels of endogenous adenosine and guanosine, and the effects of cell injury on endogenous extracellular adenosine were modulated by altering the levels of endogenous extracellular guanosine with exogenous purine nucleoside phosphorylase (converts guanosine to guanine) or 8-aminoguanosine (inhibits purine nucleoside phosphorylase). Extracellular guanosine also slowed the disposition of extracellular adenosine in rat preglomerular vascular endothelial cells, mesangial cells, cardiac fibroblasts, and kidney epithelial cells and in human aortic and coronary artery vascular smooth muscle cells and coronary artery endothelial cells. The effects of guanosine on adenosine levels were not mimicked or attenuated by 5-iodotubericidin (adenosine kinase inhibitor), erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)-adenine (adenosine deaminase inhibitor), 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide (guanine deaminase inhibitor), aristeromycin (S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase inhibitor), low sodium (inhibits concentrative nucleoside transporters), S-(4-nitrobenzyl)−6-thioinosine [inhibits equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT) type 1], zidovudine (inhibits ENT type 2), or acadesine (known modulator of adenosine levels). Guanosine also increases extracellular inosine, uridine, thymidine, and cytidine, yet decreases

  6. Application of isotope coded affinity tag (ICAT) analysis for the identification of differentially expressed proteins following infection of atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) with infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) or Renibacterium salmoninarum (BKD).

    PubMed

    Booy, A T; Haddow, J D; Ohlund, L B; Hardie, D B; Olafson, R W

    2005-01-01

    Aquaculture and commercial fisheries worldwide suffer from significant economic loss due to diseases of net-pen reared fish. In British Columbia, infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) and bacterial kidney disease (BKD) epidemics occur because there are currently no commercially available drugs or fully licensed vaccines to treat these diseases. With a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying these diseases, this circumstance might be significantly improved. In the present study, we have used a proteomics approach in an effort to identify and quantitate differentially expressed proteins in the liver and kidneys of diseased and healthy Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). Isotope coded affinity tagging (ICAT), 2D gel electrophoresis, and multidimensional liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (2D-LC MS/MS) were used to identify hundreds of differentially expressed proteins. While the direct significance of changes in expression levels of many proteins remains to be elucidated, others appear to be more clearly related to the infectious process. Examples of the latter are discussed here and include, a natural killer cell enhancement factor (NKEF), procathepsin L, superoxide-producing NADPH oxidase and interferon-induced viral resistance protein Mx (IFI-Mx). PMID:15822907

  7. Extracellular calcium sensing and extracellular calcium signaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, E. M.; MacLeod, R. J.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    The cloning of a G protein-coupled extracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(o)(2+))-sensing receptor (CaR) has elucidated the molecular basis for many of the previously recognized effects of Ca(o)(2+) on tissues that maintain systemic Ca(o)(2+) homeostasis, especially parathyroid chief cells and several cells in the kidney. The availability of the cloned CaR enabled the development of DNA and antibody probes for identifying the CaR's mRNA and protein, respectively, within these and other tissues. It also permitted the identification of human diseases resulting from inactivating or activating mutations of the CaR gene and the subsequent generation of mice with targeted disruption of the CaR gene. The characteristic alterations in parathyroid and renal function in these patients and in the mice with "knockout" of the CaR gene have provided valuable information on the CaR's physiological roles in these tissues participating in mineral ion homeostasis. Nevertheless, relatively little is known about how the CaR regulates other tissues involved in systemic Ca(o)(2+) homeostasis, particularly bone and intestine. Moreover, there is evidence that additional Ca(o)(2+) sensors may exist in bone cells that mediate some or even all of the known effects of Ca(o)(2+) on these cells. Even more remains to be learned about the CaR's function in the rapidly growing list of cells that express it but are uninvolved in systemic Ca(o)(2+) metabolism. Available data suggest that the receptor serves numerous roles outside of systemic mineral ion homeostasis, ranging from the regulation of hormonal secretion and the activities of various ion channels to the longer term control of gene expression, programmed cell death (apoptosis), and cellular proliferation. In some cases, the CaR on these "nonhomeostatic" cells responds to local changes in Ca(o)(2+) taking place within compartments of the extracellular fluid (ECF) that communicate with the outside environment (e.g., the gastrointestinal tract). In others

  8. Bacterial extracellular lignin peroxidase

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, Donald L.; Ramachandra, Muralidhara

    1993-01-01

    A newly discovered lignin peroxidase enzyme is provided. The enzyme is obtained from a bacterial source and is capable of degrading the lignin portion of lignocellulose in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The enzyme is extracellular, oxidative, inducible by lignin, larch wood xylan, or related substrates and capable of attacking certain lignin substructure chemical bonds that are not degradable by fungal lignin peroxidases.

  9. Vaccination against salmonid bacterial kidney disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial kidney disease (BKD) of salmonid fishes, caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum, has presented challenges for development of effective vaccines, despite several decades of research. The only vaccine against BKD that is commercially licensed is an injectable preparation containing live cells ...

  10. Tendon Functional Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Screen, H.R.C.; Birk, D.E.; Kadler, K.E.; Ramirez, F; Young, M.F.

    2015-01-01

    This article is one of a series, summarising views expressed at the Orthopaedic Research Society New Frontiers in Tendon Research Conference. This particular article reviews the three workshops held under the “Functional Extracellular Matrix” stream. The workshops focused on the roles of the tendon extracellular matrix, such as performing the mechanical functions of tendon, creating the local cell environment and providing cellular cues. Tendon is a complex network of matrix and cells, and its biological functions are influenced by widely-varying extrinsic and intrinsic factors such as age, nutrition, exercise levels and biomechanics. Consequently, tendon adapts dynamically during development, ageing and injury. The workshop discussions identified research directions associated with understanding cell-matrix interactions to be of prime importance for developing novel strategies to target tendon healing or repair. PMID:25640030

  11. Preeclampsia and Extracellular Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Gilani, Sarwat I; Weissgerber, Tracey L; Garovic, Vesna D; Jayachandran, Muthuvel

    2016-09-01

    Preeclampsia is a hypertensive pregnancy disorder characterized by development of hypertension and proteinuria after 20 weeks of gestation that remains a leading cause of maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. While preeclampsia is believed to result from complex interactions between maternal and placental factors, the proximate pathophysiology of this syndrome remains elusive. Cell-to-cell communication is a critical signaling mechanism for feto-placental development in normal pregnancies. One mechanism of cellular communication relates to activated cell-derived sealed membrane vesicles called extracellular vesicles (EVs). The concentrations and contents of EVs in biological fluids depend upon their cells of origin and the stimuli which trigger their production. Research on EVs in preeclampsia has focused on EVs derived from the maternal vasculature (endothelium, vascular smooth muscle) and blood (erythrocytes, leukocytes, and platelets), as well as placental syncytiotrophoblasts. Changes in the concentrations and contents of these EVs may contribute to the pathophysiology of preeclampsia by accentuating the pro-inflammatory and pro-coagulatory states of pregnancy. This review focuses on possible interactions among placental- and maternal-derived EVs and their contents in the initiation and progression of the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. Understanding the contributions of EVs in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia may facilitate their use as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. PMID:27590522

  12. Extracellular matrix and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Maquart, F X; Monboisse, J C

    2014-04-01

    Extracellular matrix has been known for a long time as an architectural support for the tissues. Many recent data, however, have shown that extracellular matrix macromolecules (collagens, elastin, glycosaminoglycans, proteoglycans and connective tissue glycoproteins) are able to regulate many important cell functions, such as proliferation, migration, protein synthesis or degradation, apoptosis, etc., making them able to play an important role in the wound repair process. Not only the intact macromolecules but some of their specific domains, that we called "Matrikines", are also able to regulate many cell activities. In this article, we will summarize main findings showing the effects of extracellular matrix macromolecules and matrikines on connective tissue and epithelial cells, particularly in skin, and their potential implication in the wound healing process. These examples show that extracellular matrix macromolecules or some of their specific domains may play a major role in wound healing. Better knowledge of these interactions may suggest new therapeutic targets in wound healing defects. PMID:24650524

  13. Acidic extracellular microenvironment and cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Acidic extracellular pH is a major feature of tumor tissue, extracellular acidification being primarily considered to be due to lactate secretion from anaerobic glycolysis. Clinicopathological evidence shows that transporters and pumps contribute to H+ secretion, such as the Na+/H+ exchanger, the H+-lactate co-transporter, monocarboxylate transporters, and the proton pump (H+-ATPase); these may also be associated with tumor metastasis. An acidic extracellular pH not only activates secreted lysosomal enzymes that have an optimal pH in the acidic range, but induces the expression of certain genes of pro-metastatic factors through an intracellular signaling cascade that is different from hypoxia. In addition to lactate, CO2 from the pentose phosphate pathway is an alternative source of acidity, showing that hypoxia and extracellular acidity are, while being independent from each other, deeply associated with the cellular microenvironment. In this article, the importance of an acidic extracellular pH as a microenvironmental factor participating in tumor progression is reviewed. PMID:24004445

  14. Extracellular enzyme kinetics scale with resource availability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbial community metabolism relies on external digestion, mediated by extracellular enzymes that break down complex organic matter into molecules small enough for cells to assimilate. We analyzed the kinetics of 40 extracellular enzymes that mediate the degradation and assimi...

  15. Extracellular metalloproteinases in Phytomonas serpens.

    PubMed

    Vermelho, Alane B; Almeida, Flávia V S; Bronzato, Leandro S; Branquinha, Marta H

    2003-03-01

    The detection of extracellular proteinases in Phytomonas serpens, a trypanosomatid isolated from tomato fruits, is demonstrated in this paper. Maximal production occurred at the end of the logarithmic phase of growth. These enzymes exhibited selective substrate utilization in SDS-PAGE, being more active with gelatin; hemoglobin and bovine serum albumin were not degraded. Three proteinases were detected in SDS-PAGE-gelatin, with apparent molecular masses between 94 and 70 kDa. The proteolytic activity was completely blocked by 1,10-phenanthroline and strongly inhibited by EDTA, whereas a partial inhibition was observed with trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido-(4-guanidino) butane (E-64) and soybean trypsin inhibitor; phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride weakly inhibited the enzymes. This inhibition profile indicated that these extracellular proteinases belong to the metalloproteinase class. PMID:12795409

  16. Extracellular matrix in ovarian follicles.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, R J; Irving-Rodgers, H F; van Wezel, I L

    2000-05-25

    A lot is known about the control of the development of ovarian follicles by growth factors and hormones, but less is known about the roles of extracellular matrix in the control of follicular growth and development. In this review we focus on the specialized extracellular matrix of the basal laminas that are present in ovarian follicles. These include the follicular basal lamina itself, the Call-Exner bodies of the membrana granulosa, the subendothelial and arteriole smooth muscle basal laminas in the theca, and the basal lamina-like material of the thecal matrix. We discuss the evidence that during follicle development the follicular basal lamina changes in composition, that many of its components are produced by the granulosa cells, and that the follicular basal laminas of different follicles have different ultrastructural appearances, linked to the shape of the aligning granulosa cells. All these studies suggest that the follicular basal lamina is extremely dynamic during follicular development. PMID:10963877

  17. Diffusion in Brain Extracellular Space

    PubMed Central

    Syková, Eva; Nicholson, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Diffusion in the extracellular space (ECS) of the brain is constrained by the volume fraction and the tortuosity and a modified diffusion equation represents the transport behavior of many molecules in the brain. Deviations from the equation reveal loss of molecules across the blood-brain barrier, through cellular uptake, binding or other mechanisms. Early diffusion measurements used radiolabeled sucrose and other tracers. Presently, the real-time iontophoresis (RTI) method is employed for small ions and the integrative optical imaging (IOI) method for fluorescent macromolecules, including dextrans or proteins. Theoretical models and simulations of the ECS have explored the influence of ECS geometry, effects of dead-space microdomains, extracellular matrix and interaction of macromolecules with ECS channels. Extensive experimental studies with the RTI method employing the cation tetramethylammonium (TMA) in normal brain tissue show that the volume fraction of the ECS typically is about 20% and the tortuosity about 1.6 (i.e. free diffusion coefficient of TMA is reduced by 2.6), although there are regional variations. These parameters change during development and aging. Diffusion properties have been characterized in several interventions, including brain stimulation, osmotic challenge and knockout of extracellular matrix components. Measurements have also been made during ischemia, in models of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases and in human gliomas. Overall, these studies improve our conception of ECS structure and the roles of glia and extracellular matrix in modulating the ECS microenvironment. Knowledge of ECS diffusion properties are valuable in contexts ranging from understanding extrasynaptic volume transmission to the development of paradigms for drug delivery to the brain. PMID:18923183

  18. Extracellular secretion of recombinant proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Linger, Jeffrey G.; Darzins, Aldis

    2014-07-22

    Nucleic acids encoding secretion signals, expression vectors containing the nucleic acids, and host cells containing the expression vectors are disclosed. Also disclosed are polypeptides that contain the secretion signals and methods of producing polypeptides, including methods of directing the extracellular secretion of the polypeptides. Exemplary embodiments include cellulase proteins fused to secretion signals, methods to produce and isolate these polypeptides, and methods to degrade lignocellulosic biomass.

  19. Brain Extracellular Matrix in Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bonneh-Barkay, Dafna; Wiley, Clayton A.

    2009-01-01

    The role of extracellular matrix (ECM) in neurological development, function and degeneration has evolved from a simplistic physical adhesion to a system of intricate cellular signaling. While most cells require ECM adhesion to survive, it is now clear that differentiated function is intimately dependent upon cellular interaction with the ECM. Therefore, it is not surprising that the ECM is increasingly found to be involved in the enigmatic process of neurodegeneration. Descriptive studies of human neurodegenerative disorders and experimental studies of animal models of neurodegeneration have begun to define potential mechanisms of ECM disruption that can lead to synaptic and neuronal loss. PMID:18662234

  20. Mechanotransduction and extracellular matrix homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, Jay D.; Dufresne, Eric R.; Schwartz, Martin A.

    2015-01-01

    Preface Soft connective tissues at steady state are yet dynamic; resident cells continually read environmental cues and respond to promote homeostasis, including maintenance of the mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix that are fundamental to cellular and tissue health. The mechanosensing process involves assessment of the mechanics of the matrix by the cells through integrins and the actomyosin cytoskeleton, and is followed by a mechano-regulation process that includes the deposition, rearrangement, or removal of matrix to maintain overall form and function. Progress toward understanding the molecular, cellular, and tissue scale effects that promote mechanical homeostasis has helped identify key questions for future research. PMID:25355505

  1. The Evolution of Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Özbek, Suat; Balasubramanian, Prakash G.; Chiquet-Ehrismann, Ruth; Tucker, Richard P.

    2010-01-01

    We present a perspective on the molecular evolution of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in metazoa that draws on research publications and data from sequenced genomes and expressed sequence tag libraries. ECM components do not function in isolation, and the biological ECM system or “adhesome” also depends on posttranslational processing enzymes, cell surface receptors, and extracellular proteases. We focus principally on the adhesome of internal tissues and discuss its origins at the dawn of the metazoa and the expansion of complexity that occurred in the chordate lineage. The analyses demonstrate very high conservation of a core adhesome that apparently evolved in a major wave of innovation in conjunction with the origin of metazoa. Integrin, CD36, and certain domains predate the metazoa, and some ECM-related proteins are identified in choanoflagellates as predicted sequences. Modern deuterostomes and vertebrates have many novelties and elaborations of ECM as a result of domain shuffling, domain innovations and gene family expansions. Knowledge of the evolution of metazoan ECM is important for understanding how it is built as a system, its roles in normal tissues and disease processes, and has relevance for tissue engineering, the development of artificial organs, and the goals of synthetic biology. PMID:21160071

  2. Extracellular enzymes produced by marine eukaryotes, thraustochytrids.

    PubMed

    Taoka, Yousuke; Nagano, Naoki; Okita, Yuji; Izumida, Hitoshi; Sugimoto, Shinichi; Hayashi, Masahiro

    2009-01-01

    Extracellular enzymes produced by six strains of thraustochytrids, Thraustochytrium, Schizochytrium, and Aurantiochytrium, were investigated. These strains produced 5 to 8 kinds of the extracellular enzymes, depending on the species. Only the genus Thraustochytrium produced amylase. When insoluble cellulose was used as substrate, cellulase was not detected in the six strains of thraustochytrids. This study indicates that marine eukaryotes, thraustochytrids, produced a wide variety of extracellular enzymes. PMID:19129663

  3. Extracellular modulators of Wnt signalling.

    PubMed

    Malinauskas, Tomas; Jones, E Yvonne

    2014-12-01

    Wnt morphogens are secreted signalling proteins that play leading roles in embryogenesis and tissue homeostasis throughout life. Wnt signalling is controlled by multiple mechanisms, including posttranslational modification of Wnts, antagonist binding (to Wnts or their receptors), and regulation of the availability of Wnt receptors. Recent crystallographic, structure-guided biophysical and cell-based studies have advanced our understanding of how Wnt signalling is regulated at the cell surface. Structures include Wnt in complex with the cysteine-rich domain (CRD) of Frizzled, extracellular fragments of Wnt co-receptor LRP6, LRP6-binding antagonists Dickkopf and Sclerostin, antagonists 5T4/WAIF1 and Wnt inhibitory factor 1 (WIF-1), as well as Frizzled-ubiquitin ligases ZNRF3/RNF43 (in isolation and in complexes with Wnt signalling promoters R-spondins and LGR5). We review recent discoveries and remaining questions. PMID:25460271

  4. Extracellular HSPs: The Complicated Roles of Extracellular HSPs in Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Calderwood, Stuart K.; Gong, Jianlin; Murshid, Ayesha

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular heat-shock proteins (HSPs) interact with the immune system in a very complex manner. Many such HSPs exert powerful effects on the immune response, playing both stimulatory and regulatory roles. However, the influence of the HSPs on immunity appears to be positive or negative in nature – rarely neutral. Thus, the HSPs can act as dominant antigens and can comprise key components of antitumor vaccines. They can also function as powerful immunoregulatory agents and, as such, are employed to treat inflammatory diseases or to extend the lifespan of tissue transplants. Small modifications in the cellular milieu have been shown to flip the allegiances of HSPs from immunoregulatory agents toward a potent inflammatory alignment. These mutable properties of HSPs may be related to the ability of these proteins to interact with multiple receptors often with mutually confounding properties in immune cells. Therefore, understanding the complex immune properties of HSPs may help us to harness their potential in treatment of a range of conditions. PMID:27199984

  5. Extracellular Matrix Abnormalities in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Berretta, Sabina

    2011-01-01

    Emerging evidence points to the involvement of the brain extracellular matrix (ECM) in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia (SZ). Abnormalities affecting several ECM components, including Reelin and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs), have been described in subjects with this disease. Solid evidence supports the involvement of Reelin, an ECM glycoprotein involved in corticogenesis, synaptic functions and glutamate NMDA receptor regulation, expressed prevalently in distinct populations of GABAergic neurons, which secrete it into the ECM. Marked changes of Reelin expression in SZ have typically been reported in association with GABA-related abnormalities in subjects with SZ and bipolar disorder. Recent findings from our group point to substantial abnormalities affecting CSPGs, a main ECM component, in the amygdala and entorhinal cortex of subjects with schizophrenia, but not bipolar disorder. Striking increases of glial cells expressing CSPGs were accompanied by reductions of perineuronal nets, CSPG- and Reelin-enriched ECM aggregates enveloping distinct neuronal populations. CSPGs developmental and adult functions, including neuronal migration, axon guidance, synaptic and neurotransmission regulation are highly relevant to the pathophysiology of SZ. Together with reports of anomalies affecting several other ECM components, these findings point to the ECM as a key component of the pathology of SZ. We propose that ECM abnormalities may contribute to several aspects of the pathophysiology of this disease, including disrupted connectivity and neuronal migration, synaptic anomalies and altered GABAergic, glutamatergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission. PMID:21856318

  6. Extracellular vesicles in parasitic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Marcilla, Antonio; Martin-Jaular, Lorena; Trelis, Maria; de Menezes-Neto, Armando; Osuna, Antonio; Bernal, Dolores; Fernandez-Becerra, Carmen; Almeida, Igor C.; del Portillo, Hernando A.

    2014-01-01

    Parasitic diseases affect billions of people and are considered a major public health issue. Close to 400 species are estimated to parasitize humans, of which around 90 are responsible for great clinical burden and mortality rates. Unfortunately, they are largely neglected as they are mainly endemic to poor regions. Of relevance to this review, there is accumulating evidence of the release of extracellular vesicles (EVs) in parasitic diseases, acting both in parasite–parasite inter-communication as well as in parasite–host interactions. EVs participate in the dissemination of the pathogen and play a role in the regulation of the host immune systems. Production of EVs from parasites or parasitized cells has been described for a number of parasitic infections. In this review, we provide the most relevant findings of the involvement of EVs in intercellular communication, modulation of immune responses, involvement in pathology, and their potential as new diagnostic tools and therapeutic agents in some of the major human parasitic pathogens. PMID:25536932

  7. Extracellular Control of Limb Regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calve, S.; Simon, H.-G.

    Adult newts possess the ability to completely regenerate organs and appendages. Immediately after limb loss, the extracellular matrix (ECM) undergoes dramatic changes that may provide mechanical and biochemical cues to guide the formation of the blastema, which is comprised of uncommitted stem-like cells that proliferate to replace the lost structure. Skeletal muscle is a known reservoir for blastema cells but the mechanism by which it contributes progenitor cells is still unclear. To create physiologically relevant culture conditions for the testing of primary newt muscle cells in vitro, the spatio-temporal distribution of ECM components and the mechanical properties of newt muscle were analyzed. Tenascin-C and hyaluronic acid (HA) were found to be dramatically upregulated in the amputated limb and were co-expressed around regenerating skeletal muscle. The transverse stiffness of muscle measured in situ was used as a guide to generate silicone-based substrates of physiological stiffness. Culturing newt muscle cells under different conditions revealed that the cells are sensitive to both matrix coating and substrate stiffness: Myoblasts on HA-coated soft substrates display a rounded morphology and become more elongated as the stiffness of the substrate increases. Coating of soft substrates with matrigel or fibronectin enhanced cell spreading and eventual cell fusion.

  8. Extracellular vesicles as emerging intercellular communicasomes

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Yae Jin; Kim, Oh Youn; Gho, Yong Song

    2014-01-01

    All living cells release extracellular vesicles having pleiotropic functions in intercellular communication. Mammalian extracellular vesicles, also known as exosomes and microvesicles, are spherical bilayered proteolipids composed of various bioactive molecules, including RNAs, DNAs, proteins, and lipids. Extracellular vesicles directly and indirectly control a diverse range of biological processes by transferring membrane proteins, signaling molecules, mRNAs, and miRNAs, and activating receptors of recipient cells. The active interaction of extracellular vesicles with other cells regulates various physiological and pathological conditions, including cancer, infectious diseases, and neurodegenerative disorders. Recent developments in high-throughput proteomics, transcriptomics, and lipidomics tools have provided ample data on the common and specific components of various types of extracellular vesicles. These studies may contribute to the understanding of the molecular mechanism involved in vesicular cargo sorting and the biogenesis of extracellular vesicles, and, further, to the identification of disease-specific biomarkers. This review focuses on the components, functions, and therapeutic and diagnostic potential of extracellular vesicles under various pathophysiological conditions. [BMB Reports 2014; 47(10): 531-539] PMID:25104400

  9. Proteomics of extracellular vesicles: Exosomes and ectosomes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dong-Sic; Kim, Dae-Kyum; Kim, Yoon-Keun; Gho, Yong Song

    2015-01-01

    Almost all bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotic cells shed extracellular vesicles either constitutively or in a regulated manner. These nanosized membrane vesicles are spherical, bilayered proteolipids that harbor specific subsets of proteins, DNAs, RNAs, and lipids. Recent research has facilitated conceptual advancements in this emerging field that indicate that extracellular vesicles act as intercellular communicasomes by transferring signals to their target cell via surface ligands and delivering receptors and functional molecules. Recent progress in mass spectrometry-based proteomic analyses of mammalian extracellular vesicles derived from diverse cell types and body fluids has resulted in the identification of several thousand vesicular proteins that provide us with essential clues to the molecular mechanisms involved in vesicle cargo sorting and biogenesis. Furthermore, cell-type- or disease-specific vesicular proteins help us to understand the pathophysiological functions of extracellular vesicles and contribute to the discovery of diagnostic and therapeutic target proteins. This review focuses on the high-throughput mass spectrometry-based proteomic analyses of mammalian extracellular vesicles (i.e., exosomes and ectosomes), EVpedia (a free web-based integrated database of high-throughput data for systematic analyses of extracellular vesicles; http://evpedia.info), and the intravesicular protein-protein interaction network analyses of mammalian extracellular vesicles. The goal of this article is to encourage further studies to construct a comprehensive proteome database for extracellular vesicles that will help us to not only decode the biogenesis and cargo-sorting mechanisms during vesicle formation but also elucidate the pathophysiological roles of these complex extracellular organelles. PMID:24421117

  10. Illuminating the physiology of extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hongyoon; Lee, Dong Soo

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles play a crucial role in intercellular communication by transmitting biological materials from donor cells to recipient cells. They have pathophysiologic roles in cancer metastasis, neurodegenerative diseases, and inflammation. Extracellular vesicles also show promise as emerging therapeutics, with understanding of their physiology including targeting, distribution, and clearance therefore becoming an important issue. Here, we review recent advances in methods for tracking and imaging extracellular vesicles in vivo and critically discuss their systemic distribution, targeting, and kinetics based on up-to-date evidence in the literature. PMID:27084088

  11. Characterization of Extracellular Chitinolytic Activity in Biofilms

    SciTech Connect

    Baty, Ace M.; Diwu, Zhenjun; Dunham, Glen C.; Eastburn, Callie; Geesey, Gill G.; Goodman, Amanda; Suci, Peter; Techkarnjanaruk, Somkiet

    2001-05-01

    It is common for bacteria to produce extracellular enzymes having some form of degradative activity. In some cases these enzymes serve to protect cells from antagonistic substances, or to convert a large and/or insoluble biopolymer to an assimilable nutrient source. In some cases the physiological benefit to the bacterium is not entirely evident. Extracellular enzymes may be membrane bound, but in many cases they are released into the surrounding medium. It has been shown that these relatively large molecules become immobilized in the extracellular polymeric matrix in which cells in flocs and biofilms are embedded. Most proteins adsorb irreversibly to substrata having a variety of surface chemistries, and transport by convection is reduced near any solid surface, regardless of the flow regimen in the bulk liquid. Thus, extracellular enzymes have a tendency to become an integral and significant component of the biofilm/substratum microenvironment, influencing cell physiology and biofilm ecology.

  12. The extracellular RNA complement of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Ghosal, Anubrata; Upadhyaya, Bimal Babu; Fritz, Joëlle V; Heintz-Buschart, Anna; Desai, Mahesh S; Yusuf, Dilmurat; Huang, David; Baumuratov, Aidos; Wang, Kai; Galas, David; Wilmes, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The secretion of biomolecules into the extracellular milieu is a common and well-conserved phenomenon in biology. In bacteria, secreted biomolecules are not only involved in intra-species communication but they also play roles in inter-kingdom exchanges and pathogenicity. To date, released products, such as small molecules, DNA, peptides, and proteins, have been well studied in bacteria. However, the bacterial extracellular RNA complement has so far not been comprehensively characterized. Here, we have analyzed, using a combination of physical characterization and high-throughput sequencing, the extracellular RNA complement of both outer membrane vesicle (OMV)-associated and OMV-free RNA of the enteric Gram-negative model bacterium Escherichia coli K-12 substrain MG1655 and have compared it to its intracellular RNA complement. Our results demonstrate that a large part of the extracellular RNA complement is in the size range between 15 and 40 nucleotides and is derived from specific intracellular RNAs. Furthermore, RNA is associated with OMVs and the relative abundances of RNA biotypes in the intracellular, OMV and OMV-free fractions are distinct. Apart from rRNA fragments, a significant portion of the extracellular RNA complement is composed of specific cleavage products of functionally important structural noncoding RNAs, including tRNAs, 4.5S RNA, 6S RNA, and tmRNA. In addition, the extracellular RNA pool includes RNA biotypes from cryptic prophages, intergenic, and coding regions, of which some are so far uncharacterised, for example, transcripts mapping to the fimA-fimL and ves-spy intergenic regions. Our study provides the first detailed characterization of the extracellular RNA complement of the enteric model bacterium E. coli. Analogous to findings in eukaryotes, our results suggest the selective export of specific RNA biotypes by E. coli, which in turn indicates a potential role for extracellular bacterial RNAs in intercellular communication. PMID:25611733

  13. Modeling Extracellular Field Potentials and the Frequency-Filtering Properties of Extracellular Space

    PubMed Central

    Bédard, Claude; Kröger, Helmut; Destexhe, Alain

    2004-01-01

    Extracellular local field potentials are usually modeled as arising from a set of current sources embedded in a homogeneous extracellular medium. Although this formalism can successfully model several properties of extracellular local field potentials, it does not account for their frequency-dependent attenuation with distance, a property essential to correctly model extracellular spikes. Here we derive expressions for the extracellular potential that include this frequency-dependent attenuation. We first show that, if the extracellular conductivity is nonhomogeneous, there is induction of nonhomogeneous charge densities that may result in a low-pass filter. We next derive a simplified model consisting of a punctual (or spherical) current source with spherically symmetric conductivity/permittivity gradients around the source. We analyze the effect of different radial profiles of conductivity and permittivity on the frequency-filtering behavior of this model. We show that this simple model generally displays low-pass filtering behavior, in which fast electrical events (such as Na+-mediated action potentials) attenuate very steeply with distance, whereas slower (K+-mediated) events propagate over larger distances in extracellular space, in qualitative agreement with experimental observations. This simple model can be used to obtain frequency-dependent extracellular field potentials without taking into account explicitly the complex folding of extracellular space. PMID:14990509

  14. Proteases decode the extracellular matrix cryptome.

    PubMed

    Ricard-Blum, Sylvie; Vallet, Sylvain D

    2016-03-01

    The extracellular matrix is comprised of 1100 core-matrisome and matrisome-associated proteins and of glycosaminoglycans. This structural scaffold contributes to the organization and mechanical properties of tissues and modulates cell behavior. The extracellular matrix is dynamic and undergoes constant remodeling, which leads to diseases if uncontrolled. Bioactive fragments, called matricryptins, are released from the extracellular proteins by limited proteolysis and have biological activities on their own. They regulate numerous physiological and pathological processes such as angiogenesis, cancer, diabetes, wound healing, fibrosis and infectious diseases and either improve or worsen the course of diseases depending on the matricryptins and on the molecular and biological contexts. Several protease families release matricryptins from core-matrisome and matrisome-associated proteins both in vitro and in vivo. The major proteases, which decrypt the extracellular matrix, are zinc metalloproteinases of the metzincin superfamily (matrixins, adamalysins and astacins), cysteine proteinases and serine proteases. Some matricryptins act as enzyme inhibitors, further connecting protease and matricryptin fates and providing intricate regulation of major physiopathological processes such as angiogenesis and tumorigenesis. They strengthen the role of the extracellular matrix as a key player in tissue failure and core-matrisome and matrisome-associated proteins as important therapeutic targets. PMID:26382969

  15. Direct fluorescent antibody technique for the detection of bacterial kidney disease in paraffin-embedded tissues

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ochiai, T.; Yasutake, W.T.; Gould, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    The direct fluorescent antibody technique (FAT) was successfully used to detect the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease (BKD), Renibacterium salmoninarum, in Bouin's solution flexed and paraffinembedded egg and tissue sections. This method is superior to gram stain and may be particularly useful in detecting the BKD organism in fish with low-grade infection.

  16. Extracellular enzyme kinetics scale with resource availability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sinsabaugh, Robert L.; Belnap, Jayne; Findlay, Stuart G.; Follstad Shah, Jennifer J.; Hill, Brian H.; Kuehn, Kevin A.; Kuske, Cheryl; Litvak, Marcy E.; Martinez, Noelle G.; Moorhead, Daryl L.; Warnock, Daniel D.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial community metabolism relies on external digestion, mediated by extracellular enzymes that break down complex organic matter into molecules small enough for cells to assimilate. We analyzed the kinetics of 40 extracellular enzymes that mediate the degradation and assimilation of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus by diverse aquatic and terrestrial microbial communities (1160 cases). Regression analyses were conducted by habitat (aquatic and terrestrial), enzyme class (hydrolases and oxidoreductases) and assay methodology (low affinity and high affinity substrates) to relate potential reaction rates to substrate availability. Across enzyme classes and habitats, the scaling relationships between apparent Vmax and apparent Km followed similar power laws with exponents of 0.44 to 0.67. These exponents, called elasticities, were not statistically distinct from a central value of 0.50, which occurs when the Km of an enzyme equals substrate concentration, a condition optimal for maintenance of steady state. We also conducted an ecosystem scale analysis of ten extracellular hydrolase activities in relation to soil and sediment organic carbon (2,000–5,000 cases/enzyme) that yielded elasticities near 1.0 (0.9 ± 0.2, n = 36). At the metabolomic scale, the elasticity of extracellular enzymatic reactions is the proportionality constant that connects the C:N:P stoichiometries of organic matter and ecoenzymatic activities. At the ecosystem scale, the elasticity of extracellular enzymatic reactions shows that organic matter ultimately limits effective enzyme binding sites. Our findings suggest that one mechanism by which microbial communities maintain homeostasis is regulating extracellular enzyme expression to optimize the short-term responsiveness of substrate acquisition. The analyses also show that, like elemental stoichiometry, the fundamental attributes of enzymatic reactions can be extrapolated from biochemical to community and ecosystem scales.

  17. Screening Actinomycetes for Extracellular Peroxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, D. K.; Iqbal, M.; Miller, P.; McCarthy, A. J.

    1996-01-01

    A diverse collection of actinomycete strains were screened for production of extracellular peroxidase activity by adapting a chemiluminescence analysis system developed for horseradish peroxidase-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Extracellular peroxidase activity was found to be common but quantitatively variable, and this rapid and sensitive screening system permitted identification of a small group of high-producing strains. A range of spectrophotometric assays were compared for the measurement of peroxidase activity in concentrated culture supernatants of two selected thermophilic streptomycetes. Of these, the peroxide-dependent oxidation of 2,4-dichlorophenol was identified as the most robust and reproducible assay for quantitative studies. PMID:16535344

  18. Contact guidance induced organization of extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Manwaring, Michael E; Walsh, Jennifer F; Tresco, Patrick A

    2004-08-01

    The scarring response following injury to the central nervous system disrupts the anatomical organization of nervous tissue posing a barrier to the regeneration of axons. In the present study, using materials with nanometer level surface features we examined whether matrix organization could be controlled by engineering meningeal cell asymmetry. Following 5 days in culture, the organization of meningeal cells along with their cytoskeletal elements and extracellular matrix proteins was evaluated. Meningeal cell morphology was markedly affected by nanometer level substrate topography. Cell alignment increased with increasing surface roughness. In addition, linear arrays of extracellular matrix were expressed that appeared related to cellular orientation. When cultured on substrates with topographical features of less than 10 nm neither cells nor their extracellular matrix showed organizational asymmetry. However, as oriented surface roughness increased, cellular and matrix asymmetrical organization became more pronounced reaching a threshold at 345 nm. These results suggest that biomaterial surface topography or other methods of altering the orientation of cells may be used to engineer orientation into the secreted extracellular matrix and as such may be a potential strategy for developing organized cell-derived matrix as a bridging material for nerve repair or other regenerative applications. PMID:15020137

  19. Involvement of extracellular matrix constituents in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lochter, Andre; Bissell, Mina J

    1995-06-01

    It has recently been established that the extracellular matrix is required for normal functional differentiation of mammary epithelia not only in culture, but also in vivo. The mechanisms by which extracellular matrix affects differentiation, as well as the nature of extracellular matrix constituents which have major impacts on mammary gland function, have only now begun to be dissected. The intricate variety of extracellular matrix-mediated events and the remarkable degree of plasticity of extracellular matrix structure and composition at virtually all times during ontogeny, make such studies difficult. Similarly, during carcinogenesis, the extracellular matrix undergoes gross alterations, the consequences of which are not yet precisely understood. Nevertheless, an increasing amount of data suggests that the extracellular matrix and extracellular matrix-receptors might participate in the control of most, if not all, of the successive stages of breast tumors, from appearance to progression and metastasis.

  20. Extracellular signaling and multicellularity in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Shank, Elizabeth Anne; Kolter, Roberto

    2011-12-01

    Bacillus subtilis regulates its ability to differentiate into distinct, co-existing cell types in response to extracellular signaling molecules produced either by itself, or present in its environment. The production of molecules by B. subtilis cells, as well as their response to these signals, is not uniform across the population. There is specificity and heterogeneity both within genetically identical populations as well as at the strain-level and species-level. This review will discuss how extracellular signaling compounds influence B. subtilis multicellularity with regard to matrix-producing cannibal differentiation, germination, and swarming behavior, as well as the specificity of the quorum-sensing peptides ComX and CSF. It will also highlight how imaging mass spectrometry can aid in identifying signaling compounds and contribute to our understanding of the functional relationship between such compounds and multicellular behavior. PMID:22024380

  1. Extracellular signaling and multicellularity in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Anne Shank, Elizabeth; Kolter, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Summary Bacillus subtilis regulates its ability to differentiate into distinct, co-existing cell types in response to extracellular signaling molecules produced either by itself, or present in its environment. The production of molecules by B. subtilis cells, as well as their response to these signals, is not uniform across the population. There is specificity and heterogeneity both within genetically identical populations as well as at the strain- and species-levels. This review will discuss how extracellular signaling compounds influence B. subtilis multicellularity with regard to matrix-producing cannibal differentiation, germination, and swarming behavior, as well as the specificity of the quorum-sensing peptides ComX and CSF. It will also highlight how imaging mass spectrometry can aid in identifying signaling compounds and contribute to our understanding of the functional relationship between such compounds and multicellular behavior. PMID:22024380

  2. Micromanaging of tumor metastasis by extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Naoomi; Katsuda, Takeshi; Ochiya, Takahiro

    2015-04-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are nanometer-sized membranous vesicles that are released by a variety of cell types into the extracellular space. In the past two decades, EVs have emerged as novel mediators of cancer biology. Many reports have demonstrated the contribution of EVs to cancer metastasis. Metastasis is a multistep process that is responsible for the majority of deaths in cancer patients. This process includes proliferation, angiogenesis, immune modulation, extravasation, intravasation, and colonization. EVs from cancer cells impact these steps through modulation of the host immune system, angiogenesis, and pre-/pro-metastatic niche formation. In this review, we summarize the function of EVs in cancer metastasis. In addition, we also discuss the hurdles to be overcome for further developing this research field. PMID:25746922

  3. Nanomechanics of the Cartilage Extracellular Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Lin; Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Ortiz, Christine

    2011-08-01

    Cartilage is a hydrated biomacromolecular fiber composite located at the ends of long bones that enables proper joint lubrication, articulation, loading, and energy dissipation. Degradation of extracellular matrix molecular components and changes in their nanoscale structure greatly influence the macroscale behavior of the tissue and result in dysfunction with age, injury, and diseases such as osteoarthritis. Here, the application of the field of nanomechanics to cartilage is reviewed. Nanomechanics involves the measurement and prediction of nanoscale forces and displacements, intra- and intermolecular interactions, spatially varying mechanical properties, and other mechanical phenomena existing at small length scales. Experimental nanomechanics and theoretical nanomechanics have been applied to cartilage at varying levels of material complexity, e.g., nanoscale properties of intact tissue, the matrix associated with single cells, biomimetic molecular assemblies, and individual extracellular matrix biomolecules (such as aggrecan, collagen, and hyaluronan). These studies have contributed to establishing a fundamental mechanism-based understanding of native and engineered cartilage tissue function, quality, and pathology.

  4. Biotechnological Aspects of Microbial Extracellular Electron Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Souichiro

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular electron transfer (EET) is a type of microbial respiration that enables electron transfer between microbial cells and extracellular solid materials, including naturally-occurring metal compounds and artificial electrodes. Microorganisms harboring EET abilities have received considerable attention for their various biotechnological applications, in addition to their contribution to global energy and material cycles. In this review, current knowledge on microbial EET and its application to diverse biotechnologies, including the bioremediation of toxic metals, recovery of useful metals, biocorrosion, and microbial electrochemical systems (microbial fuel cells and microbial electrosynthesis), were introduced. Two potential biotechnologies based on microbial EET, namely the electrochemical control of microbial metabolism and electrochemical stimulation of microbial symbiotic reactions (electric syntrophy), were also discussed. PMID:26004795

  5. Circulating Extracellular RNA Markers of Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Irene K.; Wang, Xue; Asmann, Yan W.; Haga, Hiroaki; Patel, Tushar

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Although a key determinant of hepatic recovery after injury is active liver regeneration, the ability to detect ongoing regeneration is lacking. The restoration of liver mass after hepatectomy involves systemic changes with coordinated changes in gene expression guiding regenerative responses, activation of progenitor cells, and proliferation of quiescent hepatocytes. We postulated that these responses involve intercellular communication involving extracellular RNA and that these could represent biomarkers of active regenerative responses. Methods RNA sequencing was performed to identify temporal changes in serum extracellular non-coding RNA after partial hepatectomy in C57BL/6 male mice. Tissue expression of selected RNA was performed by microarray analysis and validated using qRT-PCR. Digital PCR was used to detect and quantify serum expression of selected RNA. Results A peak increase in extracellular RNA content occurred six hours after hepatectomy. RNA sequencing identified alterations in several small non-coding RNA including known and novel microRNAs, snoRNAs, tRNA, antisense and repeat elements after partial hepatectomy. Combinatorial effects and network analyses identified signal regulation, protein complex assembly, and signal transduction as the most common biological processes targeted by miRNA that altered. miR-1A and miR-181 were most significantly altered microRNA in both serum and in hepatic tissues, and their presence in serum was quantitated using digital PCR. Conclusions Extracellular RNA selectively enriched during acute regeneration can be detected within serum and represent biomarkers of ongoing liver regeneration in mice. The ability to detect ongoing active regeneration would improve the assessment of hepatic recovery from liver injury. PMID:27415797

  6. Extracellular glycation crosslinks: prospects for removal.

    PubMed

    Furber, John D

    2006-01-01

    Extracellular aging--accumulating molecular damage by glycation, oxidation, and crosslinking of long-lived extracellular proteins, mainly collagen and elastin--is a major cause of several important human aging pathologies. Crosslinking increases mechanical stiffness of blood vessels and urinary bladder. Crosslinking impairs the functioning of the kidney, heart, retina, and other tissues and organs. Glycation adducts trigger inflammatory signaling, provoking tissue damage and cancers. Crosslinking tightens up the extracellular matrix (ECM), hardening it against natural turnover processes. Known crosslink breakers (e.g., alagebrium, of the thiazolium halide family) are only partly effective because they break only a subset of AGE crosslink structures (sugar-derived alpha-diketone bridges). So far, no agent has been found that breaks the prevalent glucosepane and K2P crosslink structures. Enzymes that would be able to recognize and disassemble glycation products may be too big to migrate into the ECM and repair collagen or elastin in vivo. Two approaches to therapy development are presented here. ECM turnover enhancement would enhance natural processes to digest old ECM and replace it with new. It will be important to tune the collagen degradation to a rate slow enough to prevent dire side-effects, such as hemorrhage from leaky blood vessels as collagen molecules are removed and replaced. Glycation breaker discovery would use high-throughput screening and rational drug design to find molecules that are able to break glucosepane crosslinks and K2P crosslinks of extracellular proteins. Candidates would be further screened for selectivity and toxicity in order to avoid damage to other molecules. PMID:16706655

  7. Extracellular proteases of Trichoderma species. A review.

    PubMed

    Kredics, L; Antal, Zsuzsanna; Szekeres, A; Hatvani, L; Manczinger, L; Vágvölgyi, Cs; Nagy, Erzsébet

    2005-01-01

    Cellulolytic, xylanolytic, chitinolytic and beta-1,3-glucanolytic enzyme systems of species belonging to the filamentous fungal genus Trichoderma have been investigated in details and are well characterised. The ability of Trichoderma strains to produce extracellular proteases has also been known for a long time, however, the proteolytic enzyme system is relatively unknown in this genus. Fortunately, in the recent years more and more attention is focused on the research in this field. The role of Trichoderma proteases in the biological control of plant pathogenic fungi and nematodes has been demonstrated, and it is also suspected that they may be important for the competitive saprophytic ability of green mould isolates and may represent potential virulence factors of Trichoderma strains as emerging fungal pathogens of clinical importance. The aim of this review is to summarize the information available about the extracellular proteases of Trichoderma. Numerous studies are available about the extracellular proteolytic enzyme profiles of Trichoderma strains and about the effect of abiotic environmental factors on protease activities. A number of protease enzymes have been purified to homogeneity and some protease encoding genes have been cloned and characterized. These results will be reviewed and the role of Trichoderma proteases in biological control as well as their advantages and disadvantages in biotechnology will be discussed. PMID:16003937

  8. Extracellular Metabolic Energetics Can Promote Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Loo, Jia Min; Scherl, Alexis; Nguyen, Alexander; Man, Fung Ying; Weinberg, Ethan; Zeng, Zhaoshi; Saltz, Leonard; Paty, Philip B.; Tavazoie, Sohail F.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Colorectal cancer primarily metastasizes to the liver and kills over 600,000 people annually. By functionally screening 661 miRNAs in parallel during liver colonization, we have identified miR-551a and miR-483 as robust endogenous suppressors of liver colonization and metastasis. These miRNAs convergently target creatine kinase, brain-type (CKB), which phosphorylates the metabolite creatine, to generate phosphocreatine. CKB is released into the extracellular space by metastatic cells encountering hepatic hypoxia and catalyzes production of extracellular phosphocreatine, which is imported through the SLC6A8 transporter and used to generate ATP—fueling metastatic survival. Combinatorial therapeutic viral delivery of miR-551a and miR-483-5p through single-dose adeno-associated viral (AAV) delivery significantly suppressed colon cancer metastatic colonization, as did CKB inhibition with a small-molecule inhibitor. Importantly, human liver metastases express higher CKB and SLC6A8 levels and reduced miR-551a/miR-483 levels relative to primary tumors. We identify the extracellular space as an important compartment for malignant energetic catalysis and therapeutic targeting. PMID:25601461

  9. Extracellular signaling cues for nuclear actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Plessner, Matthias; Grosse, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Contrary to cytoplasmic actin structures, the biological functions of nuclear actin filaments remain largely enigmatic. Recent progress in the field, however, has determined nuclear actin structures in somatic cells either under steady state conditions or in response to extracellular signaling cues. These actin structures differ in size and shape as well as in their temporal appearance and dynamics. Thus, a picture emerges that suggests that mammalian cells may have different pathways and mechanisms to assemble nuclear actin filaments. Apart from serum- or LPA-triggered nuclear actin polymerization, integrin activation by extracellular matrix interaction was recently implicated in nuclear actin polymerization through the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex. Some of these extracellular cues known so far appear to converge at the level of nuclear formin activity and subsequent regulation of myocardin-related transcription factors. Nevertheless, as the precise signaling events are as yet unknown, the regulation of nuclear actin polymerization may be of significant importance for different cellular functions as well as disease conditions caused by altered nuclear dynamics and architecture. PMID:26059398

  10. Identification of extracellularly phosphorylated membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Burghoff, Sandra; Willberg, Wibke; Schrader, Jürgen

    2015-10-01

    Ecto-protein kinases phosphorylate extracellular membrane proteins and exhibit similarities to casein kinases and protein kinases A and C. However, the identification of their protein substrates still remains a challenge because a clear separation from intracellular phosphoproteins is difficult. Here, we describe a straightforward method for the identification of extracellularly phosphorylated membrane proteins in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and K562 cells which used the protease bromelain to selectively remove ectoproteins from intact cells and combined this with the subsequent analysis using IMAC and LC-MS/MS. A "false-positive" strategy in which cells without protease treatment served as controls was applied. Using this approach we identified novel phosphorylation sites on five ectophosphoproteins (NOTCH1, otopetrin 1, regulator of G-protein signalling 13 (RGS13), protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type D isoform 3 (PTPRD), usherin isoform B (USH2A)). Use of bromelain appears to be a reliable technique for the further identification of phosphorylated surface-exposed peptides when extracellular adenosine-5'-triphosphate is elevated during purinergic signalling. PMID:26152529

  11. Airway and Extracellular Matrix Mechanics in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Bidan, Cécile M.; Veldsink, Annemiek C.; Meurs, Herman; Gosens, Reinoud

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common lung diseases worldwide, and is characterized by airflow obstruction that is not fully reversible with treatment. Even though airflow obstruction is caused by airway smooth muscle contraction, the extent of airway narrowing depends on a range of other structural and functional determinants that impact on active and passive tissue mechanics. Cells and extracellular matrix in the airway and parenchymal compartments respond both passively and actively to the mechanical stimulation induced by smooth muscle contraction. In this review, we summarize the factors that regulate airway narrowing and provide insight into the relative contributions of different constituents of the extracellular matrix and their biomechanical impact on airway obstruction. We then review the changes in extracellular matrix composition in the airway and parenchymal compartments at different stages of COPD, and finally discuss how these changes impact airway narrowing and the development of airway hyperresponsiveness. Finally, we position these data in the context of therapeutic research focused on defective tissue repair. As a conclusion, we propose that future works should primarily target mild or early COPD, prior to the widespread structural changes in the alveolar compartment that are more characteristic of severe COPD. PMID:26696894

  12. Autocrine signal transmission with extracellular ligand degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muratov, C B; Posta, F; Shvartsman, S Y

    2009-03-01

    Traveling waves of cell signaling in epithelial layers orchestrate a number of important processes in developing and adult tissues. These waves can be mediated by positive feedback autocrine loops, a mode of cell signaling where binding of a diffusible extracellular ligand to a cell surface receptor can lead to further ligand release. We formulate and analyze a biophysical model that accounts for ligand-induced ligand release, extracellular ligand diffusion and ligand-receptor interaction. We focus on the case when the main mode for ligand degradation is extracellular and analyze the problem with the sharp threshold positive feedback nonlinearity. We derive expressions that link the speed of propagation and other characteristics of traveling waves to the parameters of the biophysical processes, such as diffusion rates, receptor expression level, etc. Analyzing the derived expressions we found that traveling waves in such systems can exhibit a number of unusual properties, e.g. non-monotonic dependence of the speed of propagation on ligand diffusivity. Our results for the fully developed traveling fronts can be used to analyze wave initiation from localized perturbations, a scenario that frequently arises in the in vitro models of epithelial wound healing, and guide future modeling studies of cell communication in epithelial layers.

  13. A constant current source for extracellular microiontophoresis.

    PubMed

    Walker, T; Dillman, N; Weiss, M L

    1995-12-01

    A sophisticated constant-current source suitable for extracellular microiontophoresis of tract-tracing substances, such as Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin, Biocytin or Fluoro-Gold, is described. This design uses a flyback switched-mode power supply to generate controllable high-voltage and operational amplifier circuitry to regulate current and provide instrumentation. Design features include a fast rise time, +/- 2000 V supply (stable output in < 250 ms), simultaneous load current and voltage monitoring, and separate pumping and holding current settings. Three features of this constant-current source make it especially useful for extracellular microiontophoresis. First, the output voltage monitor permits one to follow changes in the microelectrode resistance during current injection. Second, the voltage-limit (or out-of-compliance) indicator circuitry will sound an alarm when the iontophoretic pump is unable to generate the desired current, such as when the micropipette is blocked. Third, the high-compliance voltage power supply insures up to +/- 20 microA of current through 100 M omega resistance. This device has proven itself to be a reliable constant-current source for extracellular microiontophoresis in the laboratory. PMID:8788057

  14. Extracellular nucleases and extracellular DNA play important roles in Vibrio cholerae biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Seper, Andrea; Fengler, Vera H I; Roier, Sandro; Wolinski, Heimo; Kohlwein, Sepp D; Bishop, Anne L; Camilli, Andrew; Reidl, Joachim; Schild, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Biofilms are a preferred mode of survival for many microorganisms including Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the severe secretory diarrhoeal disease cholera. The ability of the facultative human pathogen V. cholerae to form biofilms is a key factor for persistence in aquatic ecosystems and biofilms act as a source for new outbreaks. Thus, a better understanding of biofilm formation and transmission of V. cholerae is an important target to control the disease. So far the Vibrio exopolysaccharide was the only known constituent of the biofilm matrix. In this study we identify and characterize extracellular DNA as a component of the Vibrio biofilm matrix. Furthermore, we show that extracellular DNA is modulated and controlled by the two extracellular nucleases Dns and Xds. Our results indicate that extracellular DNA and the extracellular nucleases are involved in diverse processes including the development of a typical biofilm architecture, nutrient acquisition, detachment from biofilms and the colonization fitness of biofilm clumps after ingestion by the host. This study provides new insights into biofilm development and transmission of biofilm-derived V. cholerae. PMID:22032623

  15. Anomalous extracellular diffusion in rat cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fanrong; Hrabe, Jan; Hrabetova, Sabina

    2015-05-01

    Extracellular space (ECS) is a major channel transporting biologically active molecules and drugs in the brain. Diffusion-mediated transport of these substances is hindered by the ECS structure but the microscopic basis of this hindrance is not fully understood. One hypothesis proposes that the hindrance originates in large part from the presence of dead-space (DS) microdomains that can transiently retain diffusing molecules. Because previous theoretical and modeling work reported an initial period of anomalous diffusion in similar environments, we expected that brain regions densely populated by DS microdomains would exhibit anomalous extracellular diffusion. Specifically, we targeted granular layers (GL) of rat and turtle cerebella that are populated with large and geometrically complex glomeruli. The integrative optical imaging (IOI) method was employed to evaluate diffusion of fluorophore-labeled dextran (MW 3000) in GL, and the IOI data analysis was adapted to quantify the anomalous diffusion exponent dw from the IOI records. Diffusion was significantly anomalous in rat GL, where dw reached 4.8. In the geometrically simpler turtle GL, dw was elevated but not robustly anomalous (dw = 2.6). The experimental work was complemented by numerical Monte Carlo simulations of anomalous ECS diffusion in several three-dimensional tissue models containing glomeruli-like structures. It demonstrated that both the duration of transiently anomalous diffusion and the anomalous exponent depend on the size of model glomeruli and the degree of their wrapping. In conclusion, we have found anomalous extracellular diffusion in the GL of rat cerebellum. This finding lends support to the DS microdomain hypothesis. Transiently anomalous diffusion also has a profound effect on the spatiotemporal distribution of molecules released into the ECS, especially at diffusion distances on the order of a few cell diameters, speeding up short-range diffusion-mediated signals in less permeable

  16. Extracellular Signatures as Indicators of Processing Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, Karen L.

    2012-01-09

    As described in other chapters within this volume, many aspects of microbial cells vary with culture conditions and therefore can potentially be analyzed as forensic signatures of growth conditions. In addition to changes or variations in components of the microbes themselves, extracellular materials indicative of production processes may remain associated with the final bacterial product. It is well recognized that even with considerable effort to make pure products such as fine chemicals or pharmaceuticals, trace impurities from components or synthesis steps associated with production processes can be detected in the final product. These impurities can be used as indicators of production source or methods, such as to help connect drugs of abuse to supply chains. Extracellular residue associated with microbial cells could similarly help to characterize production processes. For successful growth of microorganisms on culture media there must be an available source of carbon, nitrogen, inorganic phosphate and sulfur, trace metals, water and vitamins. The pH, temperature, and a supply of oxygen or other gases must also be appropriate for a given organism for successful culture. The sources of these components and the range in temperature, pH and other variables has adapted over the years with currently a wide range of possible combinations of media components, recipes and parameters to choose from for a given organism. Because of this wide variability in components, mixtures of components, and other parameters, there is the potential for differentiation of cultured organisms based on changes in culture conditions. The challenge remains how to narrow the field of potential combinations and be able to attribute variations in the final bacterial product and extracellular signatures associated with the final product to information about the culture conditions or recipe used in the production of that product.

  17. Extracellular killing of inhaled pneumococci in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Coonrod, J.D.; Marple, S.; Holmes, G.P.; Rehm, S.R.

    1987-12-01

    Early clearance of inhaled Staphylococcus aureus is believed to be caused by phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages. In murine models inhaled pneumococci are cleared even more rapidly than S. aureus. Conventional opsonins appear to play no role in this clearance, and recently it has been shown that murine alveolar lining material contains free fatty acids and other soluble factors that are directly bactericidal for pneumococci. To determine whether non-phagocytic factors are involved in pneumococcal clearance, we compared the site of killing of inhaled pneumococci and S. aureus in rats using histologic methods and bronchoalveolar lavage. Spontaneous lysis of pneumococci was prevented by use of autolysin-defective pneumococci or by substitution of ethanolamine for choline in the cell wall. Histologic studies showed that the percent of inhaled staphylococci associated with alveolar macrophages always exceeded the percent of staphylococci cleared, whereas there was little association of pneumococci with macrophages during clearance. Analysis of the intracellular or extracellular location of iron 59 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of rats that had inhaled aerosols of /sup 59/Fe-labeled bacteria suggested that staphylococci were killed predominantly in macrophages and pneumococci in the extracellular space. When /sup 59/Fe-labeled pneumococci or staphylococci were ingested and killed by macrophages in vitro, the /sup 59/Fe remained with the macrophages, suggesting that the extracellular location of /sup 59/Fe during pneumococcal killing in vivo was not caused by rapid turnover of /sup 59/Fe in macrophages. Studies of the site of killing of inhaled type 25 pneumococci labeled exclusively in the cell wall with carbon 14-ethanolamine confirmed the results obtained with /sup 59/Fe-labeled pneumococci. Thus, early killing of inhaled pneumococci, unlike staphylococci, appears to take place outside of macrophages.

  18. Neutrophil extracellular traps in sheep mastitis.

    PubMed

    Pisanu, Salvatore; Cubeddu, Tiziana; Pagnozzi, Daniela; Rocca, Stefano; Cacciotto, Carla; Alberti, Alberto; Marogna, Gavino; Uzzau, Sergio; Addis, Maria Filippa

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are structures composed of DNA, histones, and antimicrobial proteins that are released extracellularly by neutrophils and other immune cells as a means for trapping and killing invading pathogens. Here, we describe NET formation in milk and in mammary alveoli of mastitic sheep, and provide a dataset of proteins found in association to these structures. Nucleic acid staining, immunomicroscopy and fluorescent in-situ hybridization of mastitic mammary tissue from sheep infected with Streptococcus uberis demonstrated the presence of extranuclear DNA colocalizing with antimicrobial proteins, histones, and bacteria. Then, proteomic analysis by LTQ-Orbitrap Velos mass spectrometry provided detailed information on protein abundance changes occurring in milk upon infection. As a result, 1095 unique proteins were identified, of which 287 being significantly more abundant in mastitic milk. Upon protein ontology classification, the most represented localization classes for upregulated proteins were the cytoplasmic granule, the nucleus, and the mitochondrion, while function classes were mostly related to immune defence and inflammation pathways. All known NET markers were massively increased, including histones, granule proteases, and antimicrobial proteins. Of note was the detection of protein arginine deiminases (PAD3 and PAD4). These enzymes are responsible for citrullination, the post-translational modification that is known to trigger NET formation by inducing chromatin decondensation and extracellular release of NETs. As a further observation, citrullinated residues were detected by tandem mass spectrometry in histones of samples from mastitic animals. In conclusion, this work provides novel microscopic and proteomic information on NETs formed in vivo in the mammary gland, and reports the most complete database of proteins increased in milk upon bacterial mastitis. PMID:26088507

  19. Microbial extracellular polysaccharides and plagioclase dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, S.A.; Barker, W.W.; Banfield, J.F.

    1999-05-01

    Bytownite feldspar was dissolved in batch reactors in solutions of starch (glucose polymer), gum xanthan (glucose, mannose, glucuronic acid), pectin (poly-galacturonic acid), and four alginates (mannuronic and guluronic acid) with a range of molecular weights (low, medium, high and uncharacterized) to evaluate the effect of extracellular microbial polymers on mineral dissolution rates. Solutions were analyzed for dissolved Si and Al as an indicator of feldspar dissolution. At neutral pH, feldspar dissolution was inhibited by five of the acid polysaccharides, gum xanthan, pectin, alginate low, alginate medium, alginate high, compared to an organic-free control. An uncharacterized alginate substantially enhanced both Si and Al release from the feldspar. Starch, a neutral polysaccharide, had no apparent effect. Under mildly acidic conditions, initial pH {approx} 4, all of the polymers enhanced feldspar dissolution compared to the inorganic controls. Si release from feldspar in starch solution exceeded the control by a factor of three. Pectin and gum xanthan increased feldspar dissolution by a factor of 10, and the alginates enhanced feldspar dissolution by a factor of 50 to 100. Si and Al concentrations increased with time, even though solutions were supersaturated with respect to several possible secondary phases. Under acidic conditions, initial pH {approx} 3, below the pK{sub a} of the carboxylic acid groups, dissolution rates increased, but the relative increase due to the polysaccharides is lower, approximately a factor of two to ten. Microbial extracellular polymers play a complex role in mineral weathering. Polymers appear to inhibit dissolution under some conditions, possibly by irreversibly binding to the mineral surfaces. The extracellular polysaccharides can also enhance dissolution by providing protons and complexing with ions in solution.

  20. Regulation of Corneal Stroma Extracellular Matrix Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shoujun; Mienaltowski, Michael J.; Birk, David E.

    2014-01-01

    The transparent cornea is the major refractive element of the eye. A finely controlled assembly of the stromal extracellular matrix is critical to corneal function, as well as in establishing the appropriate mechanical stability required to maintain corneal shape and curvature. In the stroma, homogeneous, small diameter collagen fibrils, regularly packed with a highly ordered hierarchical organization, are essential for function. This review focuses on corneal stroma assembly and the regulation of collagen fibrillogenesis. Corneal collagen fibrillogenesis involves multiple molecules interacting in sequential steps, as well as interactions between keratocytes and stroma matrix components. The stroma has the highest collagen V:I ratio in the body. Collagen V regulates the nucleation of protofibril assembly, thus controlling the number of fibrils and assembly of smaller diameter fibrils in the stroma. The corneal stroma is also enriched in small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs) that cooperate in a temporal and spatial manner to regulate linear and lateral collagen fibril growth. In addition, the fibril-associated collagens (FACITs) such as collagen XII and collagen XIV have roles in the regulation of fibril packing and inter-lamellar interactions. A communicating keratocyte network contributes to the overall and long-range regulation of stromal extracellular matrix assembly, by creating micro-domains where the sequential steps in stromal matrix assembly are controlled. Keratocytes control the synthesis of extracellular matrix components, which interact with the keratocytes dynamically to coordinate the regulatory steps into a cohesive process. Mutations or deficiencies in stromal regulatory molecules result in altered interactions and deficiencies in both transparency and refraction, leading to corneal stroma pathobiology such as stromal dystrophies, cornea plana and keratoconus. PMID:25819456

  1. Role of extracellular vesicles in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Turpin, Delphine; Truchetet, Marie-Elise; Faustin, Benjamin; Augusto, Jean-François; Contin-Bordes, Cécile; Brisson, Alain; Blanco, Patrick; Duffau, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) consist of exosomes released upon fusion of multivesicular bodies with the cell plasma membrane and microparticles shed directly from the cell membrane of many cell types. EVs can mediate cell-cell communication and are involved in many processes including inflammation, immune signaling, angiogenesis, stress response, senescence, proliferation, and cell differentiation. Accumulating evidence reveals that EVs act in the establishment, maintenance and modulation of autoimmune processes among several others involved in cancer and cardiovascular complications. EVs could also present biomedical applications, as disease biomarkers and therapeutic targets or agents for drug delivery. PMID:26554931

  2. Extracellular vesicles: Emerging targets for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Vader, Pieter; Breakefield, Xandra O.; Wood, Matthew J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs), including exosomes, microvesicles and apoptotic bodies, are released by almost all cell types, including tumour cells. Through transfer of their molecular contents, EVs are capable of altering the function of recipient cells. Increasing evidence suggests a key role for EV-mediated intercellular communication in a variety of cellular processes involved in tumour development and progression, including immune suppression, angiogenesis and metastasis. Aspects of EV biogenesis or function are therefore increasingly being considered as targets for anti-cancer therapy. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on the contributions of EVs to cancer pathogenesis and discuss novel therapeutic strategies to target EVs to prevent tumour growth and spread. PMID:24703619

  3. Bidirectional extracellular matrix signaling during tissue morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gjorevski, Nikolce; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2009-01-01

    Normal tissue development and function are regulated by the interplay between cells and their surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM). The ECM provides biochemical and mechanical contextual information that is conveyed from the cell membrane through the cytoskeleton to the nucleus to direct cell phenotype. Cells, in turn, remodel the ECM and thereby sculpt their local microenvironment. Here we review the mechanisms by which cells interact with, respond to, and influence the ECM, with particular emphasis placed on the role of this bidirectional communication during tissue morphogenesis. We also discuss the implications for successful engineering of functional tissues ex vivo. PMID:19896886

  4. Aquaporins in Urinary Extracellular Vesicles (Exosomes).

    PubMed

    Oshikawa, Sayaka; Sonoda, Hiroko; Ikeda, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Since the successful characterization of urinary extracellular vesicles (uEVs) by Knepper's group in 2004, these vesicles have been a focus of intense basic and translational research worldwide, with the aim of developing novel biomarkers and therapeutics for renal disease. Along with these studies, there is growing evidence that aquaporins (AQPs), water channel proteins, in uEVs have the potential to be diagnostically useful. In this review, we highlight current knowledge of AQPs in uEVs from their discovery to clinical application. PMID:27322253

  5. Aquaporins in Urinary Extracellular Vesicles (Exosomes)

    PubMed Central

    Oshikawa, Sayaka; Sonoda, Hiroko; Ikeda, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Since the successful characterization of urinary extracellular vesicles (uEVs) by Knepper’s group in 2004, these vesicles have been a focus of intense basic and translational research worldwide, with the aim of developing novel biomarkers and therapeutics for renal disease. Along with these studies, there is growing evidence that aquaporins (AQPs), water channel proteins, in uEVs have the potential to be diagnostically useful. In this review, we highlight current knowledge of AQPs in uEVs from their discovery to clinical application. PMID:27322253

  6. Biogenesis, delivery, and function of extracellular RNA.

    PubMed

    Patton, James G; Franklin, Jeffrey L; Weaver, Alissa M; Vickers, Kasey; Zhang, Bing; Coffey, Robert J; Ansel, K Mark; Blelloch, Robert; Goga, Andrei; Huang, Bo; L'Etoille, Noelle; Raffai, Robert L; Lai, Charles P; Krichevsky, Anna M; Mateescu, Bogdan; Greiner, Vanille J; Hunter, Craig; Voinnet, Olivier; McManus, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    The Extracellular RNA (exRNA) Communication Consortium was launched by the National Institutes of Health to focus on the extent to which RNA might function in a non-cell-autonomous manner. With the availability of increasingly sensitive tools, small amounts of RNA can be detected in serum, plasma, and other bodily fluids. The exact mechanism(s) by which RNA can be secreted from cells and the mechanisms for the delivery and uptake by recipient cells remain to be determined. This review will summarize current knowledge about the biogenesis and delivery of exRNA and outline projects seeking to understand the functional impact of exRNA. PMID:26320939

  7. Extracellular matrix of the developing ovarian follicle.

    PubMed

    Irving-Rodgers, Helen F; Rodgers, Raymond J

    2006-09-01

    There are many different types of extracellular matrices in the different follicle compartments. These have different roles in follicle development and atresia, and they change in composition during these processes. This review focuses on basal lamina matrix in particular, and considers follicular fluid, the newly identified focimatrix, and thecal matrices. When follicles commence growing, the follicular basal lamina changes in its composition from containing all six alpha chains of type IV collagen to only alpha1 and alpha2. Perlecan and nidogen-1 and -2 subsequently become components of the follicular basal lamina, and there is an increase in the amount of laminin chains alpha1, beta2, and gamma1, in the bovine at least. Late in follicular development and on atresia some follicles contain laminin alpha2. On atresia the follicular basal lamina is not degraded, as occurs in ovulation, but can be breached by cells from the thecal layer when it is not aligned by granulosa cells. A novel type of basal lamina-like matrix, called focimatrix (abbreviated from focal intraepithelial matrix), develops between the cells of the membrana granulosa as aggregates of basal lamina material. It does not envelop cells and so cannot perform functions of basal lamina as currently understood. It is hypothesized that focimatrix assists or initiates depolarization of the membrana granulosa necessary for the transformation into luteal cells. The largest osmotically active molecules in follicular fluid are hyaluronan and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, including versican and inter-alpha trypsin inhibitor. It has been suggested that these might be responsible for the formation of follicular fluid by creating an osmotic gradient across the follicular wall. The formation, development, and then either ovulation or regression of follicles requires considerable tissue remodeling, cellular replication, and specialization. The expectation of researchers is that extracellular matrix will be

  8. Efficacy of cellular vaccines and genetic adjuvants against bacterial kidney disease in chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha).

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Linda D; Rathbone, Cindra K; Corbett, Stephen C; Harrell, Lee W; Strom, Mark S

    2004-04-01

    DNA adjuvants and whole bacterial cell vaccines against bacterial kidney disease (BKD) were tested in juvenile chinook salmon. Whole cell vaccines of either a nonpathogenic Arthrobacter spp. or an attenuated Renibacterium salmoninarum strain provided limited prophylactic protection against acute intraperitoneal challenge with virulent R. salmoninarum, and the addition of either synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides or purified R. salmoninarum genomic DNA as adjuvants did not increase protection. However, a combination of both whole cell vaccines significantly increased survival among fish naturally infected with R. salmoninarum, and the surviving fish treated with the combination vaccine exhibited reduced levels of bacterial antigens in the kidney. This is the first demonstration of a potential therapeutic effect of a whole cell vaccine against BKD. PMID:15123289

  9. How Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Become Visible

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have been identified as a fundamental innate immune defense mechanism against different pathogens. NETs are characterized as released nuclear DNA associated with histones and granule proteins, which form an extracellular web-like structure that is able to entrap and occasionally kill certain microbes. Furthermore, NETs have been shown to contribute to several noninfectious disease conditions when released by activated neutrophils during inflammation. The identification of NETs has mainly been succeeded by various microscopy techniques, for example, immunofluorescence microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Since the last years the development and improvement of new immunofluorescence-based techniques enabled optimized visualization and quantification of NETs. On the one hand in vitro live-cell imaging led to profound new ideas about the mechanisms involved in the formation and functionality of NETs. On the other hand different intravital, in vivo, and in situ microscopy techniques led to deeper insights into the role of NET formation during health and disease. This paper presents an overview of the main used microscopy techniques to visualize NETs and describes their advantages as well as disadvantages. PMID:27294157

  10. Brain Extracellular Space as a Diffusion Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Charles; Kamali-Zare, Padideh; Tao, Lian

    2012-01-01

    The extracellular space (ECS) consists of the narrow channels between brain cells together with their geometrical configuration and contents. Despite being only 20–60 nm in width, the ECS typically occupies 20% of the brain volume. Numerous experiments over the last 50 years have established that molecules moving through the ECS obey the laws of diffusion but with an effective diffusion coefficient reduced by a factor of about 2.6 compared to free diffusion. This review considers the origins of the diffusion barrier arising from the ECS and its properties. The paper presents a brief overview of software for implementing two point-source paradigms for measurements of localized diffusion properties: the real-time iontophoresis or pressure method for small ions and the integrative optical imaging method for macromolecules. Selected results are presented. This is followed by a discussion of the application of the MCell Monte Carlo simulation program to determining the importance of geometrical constraints, especially dead-space microdomains, and the possible role of interaction with the extracellular matrix. It is concluded that we can predict the impediment to diffusion of many molecules of practical importance and also use studies of the diffusion of selected molecular probes to reveal the barrier properties of the ECS. PMID:23172993

  11. Instructive Roles of Extracellular Matrix on Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Neill, Thomas; Schaefer, Liliana; Iozzo, Renato V.

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy plays an essential role in maintaining an intricate balance between nutrient demands and energetic requirements during normal homeostasis. Autophagy recycles metabolic substrates from nonspecific bulk degradation of proteins and excess or damaged organelles. Recent work posits an active and dynamic signaling role for extracellular matrix-evoked autophagic regulation, that is, allosteric and independent of prevailing nutrient conditions. Several candidates, representing a diverse repertoire of matrix constituents (decorin, collagen VI, laminin α2, endostatin, endorepellin, and kringle V), can modulate autophagic signaling pathways. Importantly, a novel principle indicates that matrix constituents can differentially modulate autophagic induction and repression via interaction with specific receptors. Most of the matrix-derived factors described here appear to control autophagy in a canonical manner but independent of nutrient deprivation. Because the molecular composition and structure of the extracellular matrix are dynamically remodeled during various physiological and pathological conditions, we propose that matrix-regulated autophagy is key for maintaining proper tissue homeostasis and disease prevention, such as cancer progression and muscular dystrophies. PMID:24976620

  12. Quantification of extracellular UDP-galactose

    PubMed Central

    Lazarowski, Eduardo R.

    2009-01-01

    The human P2Y14 receptor is potently activated by UDP-glucose (UDP-Glc), UDP-galactose (UDP-Gal), UDP-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc), and UDP-glucuronic acid. Recently, cellular release of UDP-Glc and UDP-GlcNAc has been reported, but whether additional UDP-sugars are endogenous agonists for the P2Y14 receptor remains poorly defined. In the present study, we describe an assay for the quantification of UDP-Gal with sub-nanomolar sensitivity. This assay is based on the enzymatic conversion of UDP-Gal to UDP, using 1–4-β-galactosyltransferase. UDP is subsequently phosphorylated by nucleoside diphosphokinase in the presence of [γ32P]ATP and the formation of [γ32P]UTP is monitored by high performance liquid chromatography. The overall conversion of UDP-Gal to [γ32P]UTP was linear between 0.5 and 30 nM UDP-Gal. Extracellular UDP-Gal was detected on resting cultures of various cell types, and increased release of UDP-Gal was observed in 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells stimulated with the protease-activated receptor agonist thrombin. Occurrence of regulated release of UDP-Gal suggests that, in addition to its role in glycosylation reactions, UDP-Gal is an important extracellular signaling molecule. PMID:19699703

  13. Probing extracellular Sonic hedgehog in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Eitan, Erez; Petralia, Ronald S.; Wang, Ya-Xian; Indig, Fred E.; Mattson, Mark P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The bioactivity of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) depends on specific lipid modifications; a palmitate at its N-terminus and a cholesterol at its C-terminus. This dual-lipid modification makes Shh molecules lipophilic, which prevents them from diffusing freely in extracellular space. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that Shh proteins are carried by various forms of extracellular vesicles (EVs). It also has been shown, for instance, that in some tissues Shh proteins are transported to neighboring cells directly via filopodia. We have previously reported that Shh proteins are expressed in hippocampal neurons. In this study we show that, in the hippocampus and cerebellum of postnatal day (P)2 rats, Shh is mostly found near or on the membrane surface of small neurites or filopodia. We also examined cultured hippocampal neurons where we observed noticeable and widespread Shh-immunolabeled vesicles located outside neurons. Through immunoelectron microscopy and biochemical analysis, we find Shh-containing EVs with a wide range of sizes. Unlike robust Shh activity in EVs isolated from cells overexpressing an N-terminal Shh fragment construct, we did not detect measurable Shh activity in EVs purified from the medium of cultured hippocampal neurons. These results suggest the complexity of the transcellular Shh signaling mechanisms in neurons. PMID:27387534

  14. Extracellular metabolic energetics can promote cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Loo, Jia Min; Scherl, Alexis; Nguyen, Alexander; Man, Fung Ying; Weinberg, Ethan; Zeng, Zhaoshi; Saltz, Leonard; Paty, Philip B; Tavazoie, Sohail F

    2015-01-29

    Colorectal cancer primarily metastasizes to the liver and globally kills over 600,000 people annually. By functionally screening 661 microRNAs (miRNAs) in parallel during liver colonization, we have identified miR-551a and miR-483 as robust endogenous suppressors of liver colonization and metastasis. These miRNAs convergently target creatine kinase, brain-type (CKB), which phosphorylates the metabolite creatine, to generate phosphocreatine. CKB is released into the extracellular space by metastatic cells encountering hepatic hypoxia and catalyzes production of phosphocreatine, which is imported through the SLC6A8 transporter and used to generate ATP—fueling metastatic survival. Combinatorial therapeutic viral delivery of miR-551a and miR-483-5p through single-dose adeno-associated viral (AAV) delivery significantly suppressed colon cancer metastasis, as did CKB inhibition with a small-molecule inhibitor. Importantly, human liver metastases express higher CKB and SLC6A8 levels and reduced miR-551a/miR-483 levels relative to primary tumors. We identify the extracellular space as an important compartment for malignant energetic catalysis and therapeutic targeting. PMID:25601461

  15. Defining the extracellular matrix using proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Byron, Adam; Humphries, Jonathan D; Humphries, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    The cell microenvironment has a profound influence on the behaviour, growth and survival of cells. The extracellular matrix (ECM) provides not only mechanical and structural support to cells and tissues but also binds soluble ligands and transmembrane receptors to provide spatial coordination of signalling processes. The ability of cells to sense the chemical, mechanical and topographical features of the ECM enables them to integrate complex, multiparametric information into a coherent response to the surrounding microenvironment. Consequently, dysregulation or mutation of ECM components results in a broad range of pathological conditions. Characterization of the composition of ECM derived from various cells has begun to reveal insights into ECM structure and function, and mechanisms of disease. Proteomic methodologies permit the global analysis of subcellular systems, but extracellular and transmembrane proteins present analytical difficulties to proteomic strategies owing to the particular biochemical properties of these molecules. Here, we review advances in proteomic approaches that have been applied to furthering our understanding of the ECM microenvironment. We survey recent studies that have addressed challenges in the analysis of ECM and discuss major outcomes in the context of health and disease. In addition, we summarize efforts to progress towards a systems-level understanding of ECM biology. PMID:23419153

  16. Cardiac Physiology of Aging: Extracellular Considerations.

    PubMed

    Horn, Margaux A

    2015-07-01

    Aging is a major risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease, with the majority of affected patients being elderly. Progressive changes to myocardial structure and function occur with aging, often in concert with underlying pathologies. However, whether chronological aging results in a remodeled "aged substrate" has yet to be established. In addition to myocyte contractility, myocardial performance relies heavily on the cardiac extracellular matrix (ECM), the roles of which are as dynamic as they are significant; including providing structural integrity, assisting in force transmission throughout the cardiac cycle and acting as a signaling medium for communication between cells and the extracellular environment. In the healthy heart, ECM homeostasis must be maintained, and matrix deposition is in balance with degradation. Consequently, alterations to, or misregulation of the cardiac ECM has been shown to occur in both aging and in pathological remodeling with disease. Mounting evidence suggests that age-induced matrix remodeling may occur at the level of ECM control; including collagen synthesis, deposition, maturation, and degradation. Furthermore, experimental studies using aged animal models not only suggest that the aged heart may respond differently to insult than the young, but the identification of key players specific to remodeling with age may hold future therapeutic potential for the treatment of cardiac dysfunction in the elderly. This review will focus on the role of the cardiac interstitium in the physiology of the aging myocardium, with particular emphasis on the implications to age-related remodeling in disease. PMID:26140710

  17. Nanomechanics of the Cartilage Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Han, Lin; Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Ortiz, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Cartilage is a hydrated biomacromolecular fiber composite located at the ends of long bones that enables proper joint lubrication, articulation, loading, and energy dissipation. Degradation of extracellular matrix molecular components and changes in their nanoscale structure greatly influence the macroscale behavior of the tissue and result in dysfunction with age, injury, and diseases such as osteoarthritis. Here, the application of the field of nanomechanics to cartilage is reviewed. Nanomechanics involves the measurement and prediction of nanoscale forces and displacements, intra- and intermolecular interactions, spatially varying mechanical properties, and other mechanical phenomena existing at small length scales. Experimental nanomechanics and theoretical nanomechanics have been applied to cartilage at varying levels of material complexity, e.g., nanoscale properties of intact tissue, the matrix associated with single cells, biomimetic molecular assemblies, and individual extracellular matrix biomolecules (such as aggrecan, collagen, and hyaluronan). These studies have contributed to establishing a fundamental mechanism-based understanding of native and engineered cartilage tissue function, quality, and pathology. PMID:22792042

  18. Probing extracellular Sonic hedgehog in neurons.

    PubMed

    Eitan, Erez; Petralia, Ronald S; Wang, Ya-Xian; Indig, Fred E; Mattson, Mark P; Yao, Pamela J

    2016-01-01

    The bioactivity of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) depends on specific lipid modifications; a palmitate at its N-terminus and a cholesterol at its C-terminus. This dual-lipid modification makes Shh molecules lipophilic, which prevents them from diffusing freely in extracellular space. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that Shh proteins are carried by various forms of extracellular vesicles (EVs). It also has been shown, for instance, that in some tissues Shh proteins are transported to neighboring cells directly via filopodia. We have previously reported that Shh proteins are expressed in hippocampal neurons. In this study we show that, in the hippocampus and cerebellum of postnatal day (P)2 rats, Shh is mostly found near or on the membrane surface of small neurites or filopodia. We also examined cultured hippocampal neurons where we observed noticeable and widespread Shh-immunolabeled vesicles located outside neurons. Through immunoelectron microscopy and biochemical analysis, we find Shh-containing EVs with a wide range of sizes. Unlike robust Shh activity in EVs isolated from cells overexpressing an N-terminal Shh fragment construct, we did not detect measurable Shh activity in EVs purified from the medium of cultured hippocampal neurons. These results suggest the complexity of the transcellular Shh signaling mechanisms in neurons. PMID:27387534

  19. Extracellular domain dependence of PTPα transforming activity

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xinmin; Holsinger, Leslie J.; Shalloway, David

    2016-01-01

    Two isoforms of the transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPα, which differ by nine amino acids in their extracellular regions, are expressed in a tissue-specific manner. Over-expression of the shorter isoform transforms rodent cells, and it has previously been reasonable to assume that this was a direct consequence of its dephosphorylation and activation of Src. Transformation by the longer wild-type isoform has not previously been studied. We tested the activities of both isoforms in NIH3T3 cells and found that, while both dephosphorylated and activated Src similarly, only the shorter isoform induced focus formation or anchorage-independent growth. Differences in phosphorylation of PTPα at its known regulatory sites, Grb2 binding to PTPα, phosphorylation level of focal adhesion kinase by PTPα, or overall localization were excluded as possible explanations for the differences in transforming activities. The results suggest that transformation by PTPα involves at least one function other than, or in addition to, its activation of Src and that this depends on PTPα’s extracellular domain. Previous studies have suggested that PTPα might be a useful target in breast and colon cancer therapy, and the results presented here suggest that it may be advantageous to develop isoform-specific therapeutic reagents. PMID:20545765

  20. The Extracellular Matrix of Candida albicans Biofilms Impairs Formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Chad J; Cabezas-Olcoz, Jonathan; Kernien, John F; Wang, Steven X; Beebe, David J; Huttenlocher, Anna; Ansari, Hamayail; Nett, Jeniel E

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophils release extracellular traps (NETs) in response to planktonic C. albicans. These complexes composed of DNA, histones, and proteins inhibit Candida growth and dissemination. Considering the resilience of Candida biofilms to host defenses, we examined the neutrophil response to C. albicans during biofilm growth. In contrast to planktonic C. albicans, biofilms triggered negligible release of NETs. Time lapse imaging confirmed the impairment in NET release and revealed neutrophils adhering to hyphae and migrating on the biofilm. NET inhibition depended on an intact extracellular biofilm matrix as physical or genetic disruption of this component resulted in NET release. Biofilm inhibition of NETosis could not be overcome by protein kinase C activation via phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and was associated with suppression of neutrophil reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. The degree of impaired NET release correlated with resistance to neutrophil attack. The clinical relevance of the role for extracellular matrix in diminishing NET production was corroborated in vivo using a rat catheter model. The C. albicans pmr1Δ/Δ, defective in production of matrix mannan, appeared to elicit a greater abundance of NETs by scanning electron microscopy imaging, which correlated with a decreased fungal burden. Together, these findings show that C. albicans biofilms impair neutrophil response through an inhibitory pathway induced by the extracellular matrix. PMID:27622514

  1. Extracellular Spermine Exacerbates Ischemic Neuronal Injury through Sensitization of ASIC1a Channels to Extracellular Acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Bo; Wang, Yi-Zhi; Yang, Tao; Chu, Xiang-Ping; Yu, Ye; Huang, Yu; Cao, Hui; Hansen, Jillian; Simon, Roger P.; Zhu, Michael X.; Xiong, Zhi-Gang; Xu, Tian-Le

    2011-01-01

    Ischemic brain injury is a major problem associated with stroke. It has been increasingly recognized that acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) contribute significantly to ischemic neuronal damage, but the underlying mechanism has remained elusive. Here, we show that extracellular spermine, one of the endogenous polyamines, exacerbates ischemic neuronal injury through sensitization of ASIC1a channels to extracellular acidosis. Pharmacological blockade of ASIC1a or deletion of the ASIC1 gene greatly reduces the enhancing effect of spermine in ischemic neuronal damage both in cultures of dissociated neurons and in a mouse model of focal ischemia. Mechanistically, spermine profoundly reduces desensitization of ASIC1a by slowing down desensitization in the open state, shifting steady-state desensitization to more acidic pH, and accelerating recovery between repeated periods of acid stimulation. Spermine-mediated potentiation of ASIC1a activity is occluded by PcTX1 (psalmotoxin 1), a specific ASIC1a inhibitor binding to its extracellular domain. Functionally, the enhanced channel activity is accompanied by increased acid-induced neuronal membrane depolarization and cytoplasmic Ca2+ overload, which may partially explain the exacerbated neuronal damage caused by spermine. More importantly, blocking endogenous spermine synthesis significantly attenuates ischemic brain injury mediated by ASIC1a but not that by NMDA receptors. Thus, extracellular spermine contributes significantly to ischemic neuronal injury through enhancing ASIC1a activity. Our data suggest new neuroprotective strategies for stroke patients via inhibition of polyamine synthesis and subsequent spermine–ASIC interaction. PMID:21307247

  2. The extracellular compartments of frog skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Neville, M C; Mathias, R T

    1979-01-01

    1. Detailed studies of solute efflux from frog sartorius muscle and single muscle fibres were carried out in order to characterize a 'special region' (Harris, 1963) in the extracellular space of muscle and determine whether this 'special region' is the sarcoplasmic reticulum. 2. The efflux of radioactive Na, Cl, glusose, 3-O-methylglucose, xylose, glycine, leucine, cycloleucine, Rb, K, inulin (mol. wt. 5000) and dextran (mol. wt. 17,000) from previously loaded muscles was studied. In all cases except dextran the curve had three components, a rapid (A) component which could be equated with efflux from the extracellular space proper, a slow (C) component representing cellular solute and an intermediate (B) component. The distribution space for the B component was 8% of muscle volume in summer frogs and 12% in winter frogs and appeared to be equal for all compounds studied. We tested the hypothesis that the B component originated from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. 3. The C component was missing from the dextran curves. Both dextran and inulin entered the compartment of origin of the B component (compartment B) to the same extent as small molecules. 4. For all compounds studies, the efflux rate constant for the A component could be predicted from the diffusion coefficient. For the B component the efflux rate constant was 6--10 times slower than that for the A component but was still proportional to the diffusion coefficient for the solute in question. 5. When Na and sucrose efflux from single fibres was followed, a B component was usually observed. The average distribution space for this component was small, averaging 1.5% of fibre volume. There was no difference between the average efflux rate constants for Na and sucrose. 6. In an appendix, the constraints placed on the properties of a hypothetical channel between the sarcoplasmic reticulum and the T-system by the linear electrical parameters of frog skeletal muscle are derived. It is shown that the conductance of such

  3. Extracellular RNAs: development as biomarkers of human disease.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Joseph F; Patel, Tushar; Wong, David; Das, Saumya; Freedman, Jane E; Laurent, Louise C; Carter, Bob S; Hochberg, Fred; Van Keuren-Jensen, Kendall; Huentelman, Matt; Spetzler, Robert; Kalani, M Yashar S; Arango, Jorge; Adelson, P David; Weiner, Howard L; Gandhi, Roopali; Goilav, Beatrice; Putterman, Chaim; Saugstad, Julie A

    2015-01-01

    Ten ongoing studies designed to test the possibility that extracellular RNAs may serve as biomarkers in human disease are described. These studies, funded by the NIH Common Fund Extracellular RNA Communication Program, examine diverse extracellular body fluids, including plasma, serum, urine and cerebrospinal fluid. The disorders studied include hepatic and gastric cancer, cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, neurodegenerative disease, brain tumours, intracranial haemorrhage, multiple sclerosis and placental disorders. Progress to date and the plans for future studies are outlined. PMID:26320940

  4. Extracellular RNAs: development as biomarkers of human disease

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Joseph F.; Patel, Tushar; Wong, David; Das, Saumya; Freedman, Jane E.; Laurent, Louise C.; Carter, Bob S.; Hochberg, Fred; Keuren-Jensen, Kendall Van; Huentelman, Matt; Spetzler, Robert; Kalani, M. Yashar S.; Arango, Jorge; Adelson, P. David; Weiner, Howard L.; Gandhi, Roopali; Goilav, Beatrice; Putterman, Chaim; Saugstad, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Ten ongoing studies designed to test the possibility that extracellular RNAs may serve as biomarkers in human disease are described. These studies, funded by the NIH Common Fund Extracellular RNA Communication Program, examine diverse extracellular body fluids, including plasma, serum, urine and cerebrospinal fluid. The disorders studied include hepatic and gastric cancer, cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, neurodegenerative disease, brain tumours, intracranial haemorrhage, multiple sclerosis and placental disorders. Progress to date and the plans for future studies are outlined. PMID:26320940

  5. Active endocannabinoids are secreted on extracellular membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Gabrielli, Martina; Battista, Natalia; Riganti, Loredana; Prada, Ilaria; Antonucci, Flavia; Cantone, Laura; Matteoli, Michela; Maccarrone, Mauro; Verderio, Claudia

    2015-02-01

    Endocannabinoids primarily influence neuronal synaptic communication within the nervous system. To exert their function, endocannabinoids need to travel across the intercellular space. However, how hydrophobic endocannabinoids cross cell membranes and move extracellularly remains an unresolved problem. Here, we show that endocannabinoids are secreted through extracellular membrane vesicles produced by microglial cells. We demonstrate that microglial extracellular vesicles carry on their surface N-arachidonoylethanolamine (AEA), which is able to stimulate type-1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1), and inhibit presynaptic transmission, in target GABAergic neurons. This is the first demonstration of a functional role of extracellular vesicular transport of endocannabinoids. PMID:25568329

  6. Extracellular matrix and pathogenic mechanisms in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Hardingham, Tim

    2008-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a heterogeneous condition of joint degeneration characterized by structural changes in extracellular matrices such as subchondral bone and cartilage. Research has identified many diverse ways of initiating OA, varying from mechanical disruption to gene mutations in structural proteins. A frequent end point is cartilage loss, which can occur irrespective of the initiating mechanism. Of the mechanisms responsible for cartilage matrix damage, a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS)-5 was identified as of key importance in knockout mice, but work with human cartilage has suggested that ADAMTS-4 was also involved. A transgenic mouse expressing aggrecan lacking a key aggrecanase site clearly showed that loss of aggrecan from cartilage was an important step in both inflammatory and trauma-induced joint degeneration. In OA, cartilage chondrocytes show changes in gene expression, and it remains to be resolved if this reflects adaptive responses to changes in biological, physical, and mechanical signaling rather than any form of differentiation. PMID:18457609

  7. Extracellular vesicles in lung microenvironment and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yu; Kosaka, Nobuyoshi; Araya, Jun; Kuwano, Kazuyoshi; Ochiya, Takahiro

    2015-09-01

    Increasing attention is being paid to the role of extracellular vesicles (EVs) in various lung diseases. EVs are released by a variety of cells, including respiratory cells and immune cells, and they encapsulate various molecules, such as proteins and microRNAs, as modulators of intercellular communication. Cancer cell-derived EVs play crucial roles in promoting tumor progression and modifying their microenvironment. By contrast, noncancerous cell-derived EVs demonstrate protective functions against injury, such as tissue recovery and repair, to maintain physiological homeostasis. Airway cells in contact with harmful substances may alter their EV composition and modify the balanced reciprocal interactions with surrounding mesenchymal cells. We summarize the novel findings of EV function in various lung diseases, primarily chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer. PMID:26231094

  8. The (dys)functional extracellular matrix☆

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Benjamin R.; Bade, Nathan D.; Riggin, Corinne N.; Zhang, Sijia; Haines, Philip G.; Ong, Katy L.; Janmey, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a major component of the biomechanical environment with which cells interact, and it plays important roles in both normal development and disease progression. Mechanical and biochemical factors alter the biomechanical properties of tissues by driving cellular remodeling of the ECM. This review provides an overview of the structural, compositional, and mechanical properties of the ECM that instruct cell behaviors. Case studies are reviewed that highlight mechanotransduction in the context of two distinct tissues: tendons and the heart. Although these two tissues demonstrate differences in relative cell–ECM composition and mechanical environment, they share similar mechanisms underlying ECM dysfunction and cell mechanotransduction. Together, these topics provide a framework for a fundamental understanding of the ECM and how it may vary across normal and diseased tissues in response to mechanical and biochemical cues. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mechanobiology. PMID:25930943

  9. Extracellular Matrix Roles During Cardiac Repair

    PubMed Central

    Jourdan-LeSaux, Claude; Zhang, Jianhua; Lindsey, Merry L.

    2010-01-01

    The cardiac extracellular matrix (ECM) provides a platform for cells to maintain structure and function, which in turn maintains tissue function. In response to injury, the ECM undergoes remodeling that involves synthesis, incorporation, and degradation of matrix proteins, with the net outcome determined by the balance of these processes. The major goals of this review are a) to serve as an initial resource for students and investigators new to the cardiac ECM remodeling field, and b) to highlight a few of the key exciting avenues and methodologies that have recently been explored. While we focus on cardiac injury and responses of the left ventricle (LV), the mechanisms reviewed here have pathways in common with other wound healing models. PMID:20670633

  10. Extracellular matrix motion and early morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, Rajprasad; Rongish, Brenda J; Smith, Christopher M; Filla, Michael B; Czirok, Andras; Bénazéraf, Bertrand; Little, Charles D

    2016-06-15

    For over a century, embryologists who studied cellular motion in early amniotes generally assumed that morphogenetic movement reflected migration relative to a static extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffold. However, as we discuss in this Review, recent investigations reveal that the ECM is also moving during morphogenesis. Time-lapse studies show how convective tissue displacement patterns, as visualized by ECM markers, contribute to morphogenesis and organogenesis. Computational image analysis distinguishes between cell-autonomous (active) displacements and convection caused by large-scale (composite) tissue movements. Modern quantification of large-scale 'total' cellular motion and the accompanying ECM motion in the embryo demonstrates that a dynamic ECM is required for generation of the emergent motion patterns that drive amniote morphogenesis. PMID:27302396