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Sample records for repair cross-complementation group

  1. Expression of Excision Repair Cross-Complementation Group 1 as Predictive Marker for Nasopharyngeal Cancer Treated With Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jong-Mu; Ahn, Myung-Ju; Park, Min Jae; Lee, Hui-Young; Ahn, Jin Seok; Lee, Seungkoo; Kang, Gu; Han, Joungho; Son, Young-Ik; Baek, Chung-Hwan; Ahn, Yong Chan; Park, Keunchil

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: Cisplatin-based concurrent chemoradiotherapy is the standard treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer. The expression of excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1) has been reported to be associated with resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy. We evaluated whether ERCC1 expression could predict the treatment response and survival outcome of patients with locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer who were treated with cisplatin-based concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Immunohistochemistry was used to examine the expression of ERCC1 in nasopharyngeal tumor tissue. Patients were categorized into either a resistant or sensitive group depending on their treatment response outcome. A total of 77 patients were assessed in the present study. Results: The resistant and sensitive groups included 25 and 52 patients, respectively. ERCC1 expression was positive in the tumor tissue for 39 of the 77 patients (51%). Significantly more ERCC1-negative tumors were in the sensitive group than in the resistant group (p = .035). In terms of survival outcome, univariate analysis determined that patients with ERCC1-negative tumors had longer disease-free survival (p = .076) and overall survival (p = .013) than patients with ERCC1-positive tumors. Multivariate analysis determined that negative ERCC expression in tumors was an independent predictor for prolonged overall survival (hazard ratio, 0.14; 95% confidence interval, 0.03-0.71). Conclusion: These results suggest that ERCC1 expression might be a useful predictive marker in patients with locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer who are under consideration for cisplatin-based concurrent chemoradiotherapy.

  2. Heterogeneity of excision repair cross-complementation group 1 gene expression in non-small-cell lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    SMIRNOV, SERHEY; PASHKEVICH, ANASTASIYA; LIUNDYSHEVA, VALERIYA; BABENKO, ANDREY; SMOLYAKOVA, RAISA

    2015-01-01

    Excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1) gene expression analysis is currently used widely in the molecular diagnosis of cancer. According to numerous studies, ERCC1 gene expression correlates with overall survival and effectiveness of chemotherapy with platinum agents. However, the degree of this correlation differs among various studies, with certain authors reporting a complete lack of such a correlation. These contradictions may be attributed to a number of factors, including the heterogeneity of the tumor tissue. In this study, we attempted to assess the degree of genetic heterogeneity exhibited by tissue samples obtained from non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) through the expression of the ERCC1 gene. This study included 25 samples of tumor tissue from patients with a morphologically confirmed NSCLC diagnosis. A total of three randomized sections of each specimen were used. The ERCC1 gene expression was assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in the TaqMan format. When planning the experiment and analysis of qPCR data, the MIQE guidelines were taken into consideration. We established that the coefficient of variation of the relative level of ERCC1 gene expression in the majority of the samples exceeded 33% (P<0.05), indicating the significant heterogeneity of the sample. We also demonstrated that the degree of heterogeneity of the tumor tissue is largely dependent on disease stage. PMID:25469300

  3. Excision Repair Cross-complementation Group 1 is a Prognostic Biomarker in Patients with Colorectal Cancer Receiving Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mu-Xing; Bi, Xin-Yu; Zhao, Hong; Huang, Zhen; Han, Yue; Zhao, Dong-Bin; Zhao, Jian-Jun; Cai, Jian-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Conflicting results about the association between expression level of excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1) and clinical outcome in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) receiving chemotherapy have been reported. Thus, we searched the available articles and performed the meta-analysis to elucidate the prognostic role of ERCC1 expression in patients with CRC. Methods: A thorough literature search using PubMed (Medline), Embase, Cochrane Library, Web of Science databases, and Chinese Science Citation Database was conducted to obtain the relevant studies. Pooled hazard ratios (HRs) or odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to estimate the results. Results: A total of 11 studies were finally enrolled in this meta-analysis. Compared with patients with lower ERCC1 expression, patients with higher ERCC1 expression tended to have unfavorable overall survival (OS) (HR = 2.325, 95% CI: 1.720–3.143, P < 0.001), progression-free survival (PFS) (HR = 1.917, 95% CI: 1.366–2.691, P < 0.001) and poor response to chemotherapy (OR = 0.491, 95% CI: 0.243–0.990, P = 0.047). Subgroup analyses by treatment setting, ethnicity, HR extraction, detection methods, survival analysis, and study design demonstrated that our results were robust. Conclusions: ERCC1 expression may be taken as an effective prognostic factor predicting the response to chemotherapy, OS, and PFS. Further studies with better study design and longer follow-up are warranted in order to gain a deeper understanding of ERCC1's prognostic value. PMID:26904994

  4. Association between x-ray repair cross-complementing group 3 (XRCC3) genetic polymorphisms and papillary thyroid cancer susceptibility in a Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Kai; Huo, Meiling; Sun, Yong; Wu, Hongyan; Chen, Hongqiang; Wang, Yulong; Fu, Rongzhan

    2016-01-01

    Papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) is a predominant type of thyroid cancer. Ionizing radiation is the only well-established risk factor and may result in double-strand breaks. The x-ray repair cross-complementing group 3 (XRCC3) gene plays a vital role in DNA repair through homologous recombination. We aimed at investigating the association between XRCC3 genetic polymorphisms and PTC susceptibility. Eighty-three PTC patients and 367 controls in a Chinese population were enrolled in the study. Tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified by HaploView 4.2 software. Genomic DNAs were isolated from peripheral blood samples by using TaqMan Blood DNA kits. The genotyping of XRCC3 SNPs was performed by TaqMan SNPs genotyping assay. Odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to evaluate the association between XRCC3 SNPs and PTC susceptibility. The statistical analyses were conducted by using SPSS 13.0 software. Four tag-SNPs were initially identified by HaploView 4.2 software. Only one SNP (rs861539) was shown to be significantly associated with increased risk of PTC. There was a significant difference in smoking and drinking status between PTC cases and controls. And the stratified analysis suggested that the polymorphisms of rs861539 in XRCC3 were correlated with PTC risk in the four subgroups of smokers (ex-smokers included), non-smokers, drinkers (ex-drinkers included), and non-drinkers. The meta-analysis showed that only two studies reported a significant association between XRCC3 polymorphisms and PTC risk. In this study, we find a significant association between rs861539 polymorphisms and PTC susceptibility. However, there were inconsistent results in previous published studies. Therefore, further studies in a large population are required to gain insights into the PTC risk conferred by XRCC3 SNPs. PMID:26264616

  5. Genetic Polymorphisms of X-ray Repair Cross-Complementing Group 1 and Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonuclease-1 in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Bardia, Avinash; Vishwakarma, Sandeep Kumar; Reddy, Chandrakala Lakki; Raju, N; Iqbal, Shaik; Sravani, Gallapalli; Lavanya, Narneni; Begum, Nazima; Usma, Naziya; Nallari, Pratibha; Baderuzzaman; Ahmed, Syed Mehmood; Hasan, Asfaq; Khan, Aleem A

    2016-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a heterogeneous collection of conditions characterized by irreversible expiratory airflow limitation. The disease is interspersed with exacerbations; periods of acute symptomatic, physiological, and functional deterioration. The present study was designed to investigate the role of X-ray cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) polymorphisms and the risk of COPD. Blood samples from 354 unrelated subject (age range 18-60 years; 156 with COPD, 198 healthy controls) were collected. Genomic DNA was isolated and genotyped for XRCC1 Arg399Gln and APE1 Asp148Glu using a confronting two pair primers polymerase chain reaction. GA genotype of XRCC1 gene was found to be predominant in the COPD group compared to controls with 1.86-fold increased risk for COPD (OR 1.86, 95 % CI 1.20-2.88, p = 0.0013). TG genotype of APE1 was found to be predominant in COPD group compared to controls with the difference being statistically significant (OR 1.68, 95 % CI 1.08-2.61, p = 0.0043). The GA haplotype was found to be predominant in COPD than controls with a 2.19-fold significant increase (OR 2.19, 95 % CI 1.46-3.28, p = 0.003). Polymorphism in XRCC1 and APE1 gene is associated with an increased risk of COPD. PMID:27107596

  6. Excision repair cross complementation group 1 is a chemotherapy-tolerating gene in cisplatin-based treatment for non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shoufeng; Pan, Hong; Liu, Desen; Mao, Naiquan; Zuo, Chuantian; Li, Li; Xie, Tong; Huang, Dingming; Huang, Yaoyuan; Pan, Qi; Yang, Li; Wu, Junwei

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the biological functions of excision repair cross complementation goup 1 (ERCC1) in cell proliferation, cell cycle, invasion and cisplatin response of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Firstly, ERCC1 gene was successfully transfected into H1299 cells by gene cloning and transfection techniques. Then, cell proliferation was determined with the cell growth curve and colony-forming assays. Flow cytometry (FCM) was employed to investigate the cell cycle distribution. The ability of cell invasion was estimated by means of Matrigel invasion assays. Response of NSCLC cells to cisplatin was detected utilizing MTT assays, and the intracellular drug concentrations were determined by the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. Expression of the two cell membrane proteins, P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP), was also evaluated utilizing FCM technique. By contrast, ERCC1 expression in the NSCLC A549 cells was silenced by small interfering RNA (siRNA) through RNAi technique. In addition, the cytotoxic effect of cisplatin on A549 cells was detected by MTT assays. In the present study, the results demonstrated that ERCC1 had no effect on cell proliferation, cell cycle and the ability of invasion, but showed significant impact on cisplatin response of the NSCLC H1299 cells. Furthermore, siRNA-induced suppression of ERCC1 evidently enhanced sensitivity to cisplatin of NSCLC A549 cells. Therefore, it is confirmed that ERCC1 is a chemotherapy-tolerating gene and a promising predictor in tailoring chemotherapy of NSCLC. PMID:25434755

  7. Association between codon 399 polymorphism in the X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 gene and risk of prostate cancer in Asians: A study of 4,479 cases and 4,281 controls

    PubMed Central

    Yuanyuan, Mi; Xiaoming, You; Lijie, Zhu; Ninghan, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The polymorphism in codon 399 of the X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) gene may subtly alter structure of DNA repair enzymes and modulate the repair capacity. Impaired DNA repair can lead to the development of cancers such as prostate cancer (PCA). Although the association between the XRCC1 codon 399 polymorphism and PCA risk has been extensively reported, the results have been ambiguous. Methods: We conducted an updated analysis of 18 case–control studies to determine the association between the XRCC1 codon 399 polymorphism and PCA risk. We performed a literature search of the PubMed database to identify all eligible articles that reported this association. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were evaluated to assess the association. Results: Significant associations between PCA risk and XRCC1 codon 399 polymorphism were found (such as A-allele vs. G-allele: OR = 1.11, 95% CI = 1.01–1.23). Moreover, subgroup analysis based on ethnicity revealed similar significant associations in Asians (such as AA vs. GG: OR = 1.53, 95% CI = 1.19–1.97). Egger’s test did not reveal the presence of a publication bias. Conclusions: Our updated analysis provides evidence for significant association between XRCC1 codon 399 polymorphism and PCA risk. Further carefully designed studies should be performed. PMID:26649000

  8. Polymorphisms in excision repair cross-complementing group 4 (ERCC4) and susceptibility to primary lung cancer in a Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Shao, Minhua; Ma, Hongxia; Wang, Ying; Xu, Liang; Yuan, Jing; Wang, Yi; Hu, Zhibin; Yang, Lin; Wang, Feng; Liu, Hongliang; Qian, Ji; Xun, Pengcheng; Chen, Weihong; Yuan, Wentao; Jing, Guangfu; Chen, Feng; Jin, Li; Wei, Qingyi; Wu, Tangchun; Shen, Hongbing; Huang, Wei; Lu, Daru

    2008-06-01

    ERCC4/XPF protein plays an important role in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway, and deficiencies in the gene encoding it can lead to a repair-deficiency syndrome, xeroderma pigmentosum group F (XP-F). Common variants on this gene are assumed to be foreboding markers for lung cancer, and 4 selected SNPs in the ERCC4 gene were genotyped in a multi-center case-control study involving 1010 lung cancer patients and 1011 cancer-free controls in a Chinese Han population to test the hypothesis. A significant association to decreased risk of lung cancer was observed in major allele C of rs3136038 carriers (adjusted OR=0.57, 95% CI=0.39-0.84 for CT; adjusted OR=0.75, 95% CI=0.52-1.10 for CC; adjusted OR=0.68, 95% CI=0.46-0.99 for CT+CC, compared with genotype TT), and additionally, referenced with homozygote TT, the heterozygous genotype CT showed a distinct protective effect in younger subjects (adjusted OR=0.47, 95% CI=0.26-0.86), in males (adjusted OR=0.59, 95% CI=0.37-0.93), in non-smokers (adjusted OR=0.38, 95% CI=0.20-0.72), in subjects without family history of cancer (adjusted OR=0.52, 95% CI=0.34-0.80) and in adenocarcinomas patients (adjusted OR=0.51, 95% CI=0.31-0.84). Our finding indicated, for the first time, the polymorphism rs3136038 on the promotor region of ERCC4 may contribute to the etiology of lung cancer. Further functional studies on this locus and/or other genetic variants in highly linkage disequilibrium with it are warranted to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of the association. PMID:18068852

  9. The prognostic and predictive value of excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1) protein in 1288 patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma treated with platinum-based therapy: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Bišof, Vesna; Zajc Petranović, Matea; Rakušić, Zoran; Samardžić, Kristina Ruža; Juretić, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    Excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1) protein has been extensively investigated as a prognostic and predictive factor for platinum-based treatment in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) but with inconsistent results. We performed the present meta-analysis to better elucidate this issue in advanced HNSCC. A literature search was conducted using the PubMed and Web of Science databases. The inclusion criteria were head and neck cancer patients with platinum-based treatment and evaluation of the correlation between ERCC1 expression and clinical outcomes [objective response rate (ORR), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS), both unadjusted and adjusted estimates]. In high vs. low pooled analyses, high ERCC1 expression was associated with unfavorable OS [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.95, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.18-3.21, p = 0.009], PFS (HR = 2.39, 95 % CI 1.74-3.28, p = 0.000) and ORR (odds ratio = 0.48, 95 % CI 0.23-0.98, p = 0.044). In the subgroup analysis of adjusted OS estimates, ERCC1 was a predictor of shorter survival in Asians (HR = 3.13, 95 % CI 2.09-4.70, p = 0.000) and Caucasians (HR = 2.02, 95 % CI 1.32-3.07, p = 0.001) but of longer survival in South Americans (HR = 0.17, 95 % CI 0.07-0.40, p = 0.000). Immunohistochemistry proved to be of predictive value irrespective of used antibody (p = 0.009). In the stratified analysis according to the tumor site, ERCC1 expression was associated with OS in nasopharyngeal cancer (HR = 2.72, 95 % CI 1.79-4.13, p = 0.000). ERCC1 has a potential to become predictive and prognostic factor enabling treatment tailoring in HNSCC patients. PMID:26179868

  10. Curcumin downregulates p38 MAPK-dependent X-ray repair cross-complement group 1 (XRCC1) expression to enhance cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tung, Chun-Liang; Jian, Yi-Jun; Chen, Jyh-Cheng; Wang, Tai-Jing; Chen, Wen-Ching; Zheng, Hao-Yu; Chang, Po-Yuan; Liao, Kai-Sheng; Lin, Yun-Wei

    2016-06-01

    Cisplatin is a well-studied and widely used chemotherapeutic agent and is effective in the treatment of the advanced human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Curcumin is a yellow pigment derived from the rhizome of Curcuma longa and has been proved to have antioxidant and antitumor properties. XRCC1 is an important scaffold protein involved in base excision repair and plays an important role in the development of lung cancer. In this study, we characterize the role of curcumin in the cytotoxicity, p38 MAPK activation, and XRCC1 expression affected by cisplatin in NSCLC cells. We show that curcumin enhanced the cytotoxicity induced by cisplatin in two NSCLC cells, A549 and H1703. Treatment with cisplatin alone increased XRCC1 mRNA and protein expression through p38 MAPK activation. Moreover, SB2023580 (p38 inhibitor) decreased the XRCC1 mRNA and protein stability upon cisplatin treatment. Knockdown of XRCC1 in NSCLC cells by transfection of XRCC1 siRNA or inactivation of p38 MAPK resulted in enhancing the cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition induced by cisplatin. Curcumin inhibited the expression of XRCC1 in cisplatin-exposed NSCLC cells. Furthermore, transfection with constitutive active MKK6 or HA-p38 MAPK vectors rescued the XRCC1 protein level and also the cell survival suppressed by cisplatin and curcumin combination in A549 and H1703 cells. These findings suggested that the downregulation of XRCC1 expression by curcumin can enhance the chemosensitivity of cisplatin in NSCLC cells. PMID:27026405

  11. Down-regulation of ERK1/2 and AKT-mediated X-ray repair cross-complement group 1 protein (XRCC1) expression by Hsp90 inhibition enhances the gefitinib-induced cytotoxicity in human lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tung, Chun-Liang; Jian, Yi-Jun; Syu, Jhan-Jhang; Wang, Tai-Jing; Chang, Po-Yuan; Chen, Chien-Yu; Jian, Yun-Ting; Lin, Yun-Wei

    2015-05-15

    Gefitinib (Iressa{sup R}, ZD1839) is a selective epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) that blocks growth factor-mediated cell proliferation and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) and AKT signaling activation. It has been shown that inhibition of Hsp90 function can enhance antitumor activity of EGFR-TKI. XRCC1 is an important scaffold protein in base excision repair, which could be regulated by ERK1/2 and AKT pathways. However, the role of ERK1/2 and AKT-mediated XRCC1 expression in gefitinib alone or combination with an Hsp90 inhibitor-induced cytotoxicity in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells has not been identified. In this study, gefitinib treatment decreased XRCC1 mRNA and protein expression through ERK1/2 and AKT inactivation in two NSCLC cells, A549 and H1975. Knocking down XRCC1 expression by transfection with small interfering RNA of XRCC1 enhanced the cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition of gefitinib. Combining treatment of gefitinib with an Hsp90 inhibitor resulted in enhancing the reduction of XRCC1 protein and mRNA levels in gefitinib-exposed A549 and H1975 cells. Compared to a single agent alone, gefitinib combined with an Hsp90 inhibitor resulted in cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition synergistically in NSCLC cells. Furthermore, transfection with constitutive active MKK1 or AKT vectors rescued the XRCC1 protein level as well as the cell survival suppressed by an Hsp90 inhibitor and gefitinib. These findings suggested that down-regulation of XRCC1 can enhance the sensitivity of gefitinib for NSCLC cells. - Highlights: • Gefitinib treatment decreased XRCC1 mRNA and protein expression in NSCLC cells. • Knocking down XRCC1 expression enhanced the cytotoxic effect of gefitinib. • Gefitinib combined with an Hsp90 inhibitor resulted in synergistically cytotoxicity.

  12. Down-regulation of ERK1/2 and AKT-mediated X-ray repair cross-complement group 1 protein (XRCC1) expression by Hsp90 inhibition enhances the gefitinib-induced cytotoxicity in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tung, Chun-Liang; Jian, Yi-Jun; Syu, Jhan-Jhang; Wang, Tai-Jing; Chang, Po-Yuan; Chen, Chien-Yu; Jian, Yun-Ting; Lin, Yun-Wei

    2015-05-15

    Gefitinib (Iressa(R), ZD1839) is a selective epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) that blocks growth factor-mediated cell proliferation and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) and AKT signaling activation. It has been shown that inhibition of Hsp90 function can enhance antitumor activity of EGFR-TKI. XRCC1 is an important scaffold protein in base excision repair, which could be regulated by ERK1/2 and AKT pathways. However, the role of ERK1/2 and AKT-mediated XRCC1 expression in gefitinib alone or combination with an Hsp90 inhibitor-induced cytotoxicity in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells has not been identified. In this study, gefitinib treatment decreased XRCC1 mRNA and protein expression through ERK1/2 and AKT inactivation in two NSCLC cells, A549 and H1975. Knocking down XRCC1 expression by transfection with small interfering RNA of XRCC1 enhanced the cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition of gefitinib. Combining treatment of gefitinib with an Hsp90 inhibitor resulted in enhancing the reduction of XRCC1 protein and mRNA levels in gefitinib-exposed A549 and H1975 cells. Compared to a single agent alone, gefitinib combined with an Hsp90 inhibitor resulted in cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition synergistically in NSCLC cells. Furthermore, transfection with constitutive active MKK1 or AKT vectors rescued the XRCC1 protein level as well as the cell survival suppressed by an Hsp90 inhibitor and gefitinib. These findings suggested that down-regulation of XRCC1 can enhance the sensitivity of gefitinib for NSCLC cells. PMID:25662161

  13. AB153. Down-regulated expression of excision of repair cross-complementing gene 1 reduces resistance to hydroxycamptothecine in bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yili

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of the study was to explore the potential mechanisms that interference of excision of repair cross-complementing gene 1 (ERCC1) mediated by lentiviral vector in bladder cancer T24 Cells. Methods the expression of ERCC1 was observed by immunohistochemical method in 25 cases of primary bladder cancer and recurrent bladder cancer tissues respectively from 25 patients. T24 cells were silenced targeting ERCC1 by lentiviruses .The transfection efficiency for ERCC1 was observed by fluorescence microscope and the interference efficiency was detected by real-time polymerase clain reaction and western blot assay. CCK-8 assay was used to assess the cell proliferation. Effects of cell apoptosis were detected by flow cytometry. Finally, the pathway of apoptosis was studied by using western blot method. Results As a result, we discovered that the expression level of ERCC1 in recurrent bladder cancer tissues (52%) was significantly higher than that in primary bladder cancer tissues (20%) (P<0.05). Compared with the T24 cells that did not silence the ERCC1 gene (control group) at different time periods (29.45%, 36.48%, 38.45%, 40.35%), the proliferation of T24 cells that silenced ERCC1 gene (experimental group) (27.25%, 37.45%, 32.5%, 42.05%) was not significantly changed (P>0.05). Hydroxycamptothecine (HCPT) inhibited the proliferation of T24 cells in dosage and time dependent manner. The inhibitory effect of HCPT on the experimental group was significantly higher than that of the control group (P<0.05).With the HCPT concentration increased, the apoptosis rate of the experimental group was significantly higher than that of the control group (P<0.05). After silencing of ERCC1, the sensitivity of T24 cells was increased to HCPT which could inhibit cell proliferation and induce cell apoptosis. Conclusions Therefore, ERCC1 may be a potential target protein used to guide the postoperative chemotherapy of bladder cancer.

  14. The association between four SNPs of X-ray repair cross complementing protein 1 and the sensitivity to radiotherapy in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, YAOHONG; LUO, ZHAOYUN; YANG, LIYE; CHEN, SENMING; CHEN, CHUZHI; LIN, ZHIXIONG

    2016-01-01

    Early stage diagnosis and therapeutic outcomes of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma remain poor. In order to evaluate the association between 4 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of X-ray repair cross complementing protein 1 (XRCC1) and the sensitivity to radiotherapy in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), the present study identified 4 SNPs of XRCC1 and evaluated the distribution of these genotypes among patients with ESCC. Venous blood samples from 175 patients with ESCC were collected and DNA was extracted. The 4 SNPs of the XRCC1 gene fragment were amplified using three primer pairs, which were sequenced. The mismatches were analyzed and identified using Basic Local Alignment Search Tool software. The sensitivity to radiotherapy was graded as effective and non-effective, according to the treatment results of the patients. The present study successfully amplified and sequenced 4 SNPs of XRCC1 in 112 out of the 175 patients with ESCC. The effective response rate of radiotherapy was 84.8% among the 112 patients. The effective response rate of patients with no mutation in the SNPs was 74.3%, and the rate increased to 89.6% in patients that had ≥1 mutation out of the 4 SNPs (χ2=4.389; P=0.036). For G28152A and G28152A mutations the effective response rate of patients was 91.2% (χ2=4.014; P=0.045) and 91.5% (χ2=4.451; P=0.035), respectively, which was significantly different compared to patients with no mutation (P=0.045 and P=0.035, respectively). The present results suggest that the 4 SNPs of XRCC1 are associated with the effective response rate of radiotherapy in patients with ESCC. The mutation of SNP G28152A was particularly important and may be a potential genomic predictor for radiotherapy sensitivity in patients with ESCC. PMID:27123143

  15. Evaluation of effects of thymidylate synthase and excision repair cross-complementing 1 polymorphisms on chemotherapy outcome in patients with gastrointestinal tumors using peripheral venous blood

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, KAIDA; SHEN, YAN; ZHANG, FENGQI; WANG, SHANSHAN; WEI, XIAO

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of thymidylate synthase (TYMS) and excision repair cross-complementing 1 (ERCC1) polymorphisms on chemotherapeutic efficacy in patients with gastrointestinal tumors using peripheral venous blood. Preoperative peripheral venous blood and tumor tissue samples of 43 patients with gastric cancer and the peripheral venous blood samples of 76 patients with cancer who underwent chemotherapy were studied. The 3R/3R and 2R/2R or 2R/3R genotypes of TYMS were identified in 72.09 and 27.91%, respectively (P<0.01), of untreated patients, and the C/C and T/T or C/T genotypes of ERCC1 were present in 81.39 and 18.61%, respectively (P<0.01), of patients. The 3R/3R and 2R/2R or 2R/3R genotypes of TYMS were identified in 65.79 and 34.21%, respectively, of chemotherapy-treated patients. The overall response rates (ORRs) for the two aforementioned genotypes were 18.00 and 57.69%, respectively (P<0.01), and those for the C/C and T/T or C/T genotypes of ERCC1 were 63.16 and 36.84%, respectively. The ORRs were 47.91 and 3.57%, respectively (P<0.01). In conclusion, peripheral blood samples may be used to replace tumor tissue for detecting TYMS and ERCC1 polymorphisms, and may be used to evaluate the efficacy of 5-fluorouracil and platinum drugs. PMID:27123139

  16. X-Ray Cross-Complementing Group 1 and Thymidylate Synthase Polymorphisms Might Predict Response to Chemoradiotherapy in Rectal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Lamas, Maria J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: 5-Fluorouracil-based chemoradiotherapy before total mesorectal excision is currently the standard treatment of Stage II and III rectal cancer patients. We used known predictive pharmacogenetic biomarkers to identify the responders to preoperative chemoradiotherapy in our series. Methods and Materials: A total of 93 Stage II-III rectal cancer patients were genotyped using peripheral blood samples. The genes analyzed were X-ray cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1), ERCC1, MTHFR, EGFR, DPYD, and TYMS. The patients were treated with 225 mg/m{sup 2}/d continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil concomitantly with radiotherapy (50.4 Gy) followed by total mesorectal excision. The outcomes were measured by tumor regression grade (TRG) as a major response (TRG 1 and TRG 2) or as a poor response (TRG3, TRG4, and TRG5). Results: The major histopathologic response rate was 47.3%. XRCC1 G/G carriers had a greater probability of response than G/A carriers (odds ratio, 4.18; 95% confidence interval, 1.62-10.74, p = .003) Patients with polymorphisms associated with high expression of thymidylate synthase (2R/3G, 3C/3G, and 3G/3G) showed a greater pathologic response rate compared with carriers of low expression (odds ratio, 2.65; 95% confidence interval, 1.10-6.39, p = .02) No significant differences were seen in the response according to EGFR, ERCC1, MTHFR{sub C}677 and MTHFR{sub A}1298 expression. Conclusions: XRCC1 G/G and thymidylate synthase (2R/3G, 3C/3G, and 3G/3G) are independent factors of a major response. Germline thymidylate synthase and XRCC1 polymorphisms might be useful as predictive markers of rectal tumor response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy with 5-fluorouracil.

  17. Metformin-mediated downregulation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent excision repair cross-complementing 1 decreases DNA repair capacity and sensitizes human lung cancer cells to paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Sheng-Chieh; Huang, Yu-Ching; Chen, Huang-Jen; Chiu, Hsien-Chun; Huang, Yi-Jhen; Wo, Ting-Yu; Weng, Shao-Hsing; Lin, Yun-Wei

    2013-02-15

    Metformin, an extensively used and well-tolerated drug for treating individuals with type 2 diabetes, has recently gained significant attention as an anticancer drug. On the other hand, paclitaxel (Taxol) is a new antineoplastic drug that has shown promise in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). High expression levels of excision repair cross-complementary 1 (ERCC1) in cancers have been positively associated with the DNA repair capacity and a poor prognosis in NSCLC patients treated with platinum-containing chemotherapy. In this current study, paclitaxel was found to increase phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase 3/6 (MKK3/6)-p38 MAPK as well as protein and mRNA levels of ERCC1 in H1650 and H1703 cells. Moreover, paclitaxel-induced ERCC1 protein and mRNA levels significantly decreased via the downregulation of p38 activity by either a p38 MAPK inhibitor SB202190 or p38 knockdown with specific small interfering RNA (siRNA). Specific inhibition of ERCC1 with siRNA was found to enhance the paclitaxel-induced cytotoxic effect and growth inhibition. Furthermore, metformin was able to not only decrease the paclitaxel-induced p38 MAPK-mediated ERCC1 expression, but also augment the cytotoxic effect induced by paclitaxel. Finally, expression of constitutive activate MKK6 or HA-p38 MAPK vectors in lung cancer cells was able to abrogate ERCC1 downregulation by metformin and paclitaxel as well as cell viability and DNA repair capacity. Overall, our results suggest that inhibition of the p38 MAPK signaling by metformin coupled with paclitaxel therapy in human NSCLC cells may be a clinically useful combination, which however will require further validation. PMID:23228696

  18. Prognostic significance of X-ray cross-complementing gene 1 expression in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Wang, Tongshan; Xu, Jun; Chen, WenJiao; Shi, Wei; Cheng, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study is to identify the prognostic significance of X-ray cross-complementing gene 1 (XRCC1) in patients with gastric cancer undergoing surgery and platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy. Methods Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to evaluate XRCC1 protein expression profiles on surgical specimens of 612 gastric cancer patients. The relationship between XRCC1 expression and existing prognostic factors, platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy, disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were analyzed. Results Among 612 patients staged Ⅱ/Ⅲ in our study, 182 (29.74%) were evaluated as XRCC1 IHC positive. XRCC1 expression was not significantly related to OS (P = 0.347) or DFS (P = 0.297). Compared with surgery only, platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy significantly improved the OS (P = 0.031). And the patients with negative XRCC1 expression benefited more from platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy (P = 0.049). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that tumor size, T category, N category, vascular or nerve invasion and platinum-based chemotherapy were good prognostic factors for OS (P < 0.05). Though XRCC1 plays an important role in DNA repair pathways, no significant relationship is found in XRCC1 expression and OS among gastric cancer in our study. Conclusions XRCC1 might be an alternative prognostic marker for the patients of gastric cancer after radical resection. The patients with negative XRCC1 expression can benefit more from platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy.

  19. Group Task Force on Satellite Rescue and Repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Group Task Force was chartered by the Administrator of NASA to recommend 'a policy outlining the criteria, the design standards, and the pricing model to guide NASA in assessing the responsibilities for government and nongovernment Satellite Rescue and Repair Missions.' Criteria for accepting such missions, risks, and benefits to all sectors of our economy involved in satellite services, adequacy of planning and training, and the impact on NASA's primary mission were reviewed. The Group began by asking a more fundamental question; is satellite rescue and repair a logical element of NASA's mission? Factors considered were: (1) the probability of rescue or repair opportunities arising; (2) the economic justification for such attempts; (3) the benefits to NASA, both from such ad hoc learning experiences in space operations and the impact on the public perception of NASA; (4) the effect of such unanticipated missions on NASA's scheduled activities; (5) any potential effect on NASA's technical capability to work in space; and (6) any potential effect on U.S. economic competitiveness.

  20. Valve repair in rheumatic heart disease in pediatric age group.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Pramod K; Dharmapuram, Anil K; Swain, Sunil K; Ramdoss, Nagarajan; Raghavan, Sreekanth S; Murthy, Kona S

    2008-04-01

    Valve repair in children is technically demanding but more desirable than valve replacement. From April 2004 to September 2005, 1 boy and 8 girls with rheumatic heart disease, aged 2-13 years (median, 9 years), underwent valve repair for isolated mitral regurgitation in 5, combined mitral and aortic regurgitation in 2, mitral stenosis in 1, and mitral regurgitation associated with atrial septal defect in 1. Chordal shortening in 7, annular plication in 6, commissurotomy in 1, reconstruction of commissural leaflets in 7 were performed for mitral valve disease. Plication and reattachment of the aortic cusps was carried out in 2 patients. Annuloplasty rings were not used. All patients survived the operation, 8 had trivial or mild residual mitral regurgitation, and 1 had trivial aortic regurgitation. Mean left atrial pressure decreased from 14 to 7 mm Hg postoperatively. During follow-up of 3-18 months, all children were asymptomatic and enjoyed normal activity. None required reoperation. In addition to chordal shortening and annular plication, reconstruction of the commissural leaflets is considered the most important aspect of valve repair. It can be achieved without annuloplasty rings, giving good early and midterm results. PMID:18381871

  1. Role of RAD52 Epistasis Group Genes in Homologous Recombination and Double-Strand Break Repair

    PubMed Central

    Symington, Lorraine S.

    2002-01-01

    The process of homologous recombination is a major DNA repair pathway that operates on DNA double-strand breaks, and possibly other kinds of DNA lesions, to promote error-free repair. Central to the process of homologous recombination are the RAD52 group genes (RAD50, RAD51, RAD52, RAD54, RDH54/TID1, RAD55, RAD57, RAD59, MRE11, and XRS2), most of which were identified by their requirement for the repair of ionizing-radiation-induced DNA damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The Rad52 group proteins are highly conserved among eukaryotes, and Rad51, Mre11, and Rad50 are also conserved in prokaryotes and archaea. Recent studies showing defects in homologous recombination and double-strand break repair in several human cancer-prone syndromes have emphasized the importance of this repair pathway in maintaining genome integrity. Although sensitivity to ionizing radiation is a universal feature of rad52 group mutants, the mutants show considerable heterogeneity in different assays for recombinational repair of double-strand breaks and spontaneous mitotic recombination. Herein, I provide an overview of recent biochemical and structural analyses of the Rad52 group proteins and discuss how this information can be incorporated into genetic studies of recombination. PMID:12456786

  2. Cost-effectiveness of extraperitoneal laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair: a randomized comparison with conventional herniorrhaphy. Coala trial group.

    PubMed Central

    Liem, M S; Halsema, J A; van der Graaf, Y; Schrijvers, A J; van Vroonhoven, T J

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the cost-effectiveness of laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair seems superior to open techniques with respect to short-term results. An issue yet to be studied in depth remains the cost-effectiveness of the procedure. As part of a multicenter randomized study in which >1000 patients were included, a cost-effectiveness analysis from a societal point of view was performed. METHODS: After informed consent, all resource costs, both in and outside the hospital, for patients between August 1994 and July 1995 were recorded prospectively. Actual costs were calculated in a standardized fashion according to international guidelines. The main measures used for the evaluation of inguinal hernia repair were the number of averted recurrences and quality of life measured with the Short Form 36 questionnaire. RESULTS: Resource costs were recorded for 273 patients, 139 in the open and 134 in the laparoscopic group. Both groups were comparable at baseline. Average total hospital costs were Dfl 1384.91 (standard deviation: Dfl 440.15) for the open repair group and Dfl 2417.24 (standard deviation: Dfl 577.10) for laparoscopic repair, including a disposable kit of Dfl 676. Societal costs, including costs for days of sick leave, were lower for the laparoscopic repair and offset the hospital costs by Dfl 780.83 (75.6%), leaving the laparoscopic repair Dfl 251.50 more expensive (Dfl 4665 versus Dfl 4916.50). At present, the recurrence rate is 2.6% lower after laparoscopic repair. Thus, 38 laparoscopic repairs, costing an additional Dfl 9,557, prevent the occurrence of one recurrent hernia. Quality of life was better after laparoscopic repair. CONCLUSION: A better quality of life in the recovery period and the possibility of replacing parts of the disposable kit with reusable instruments may result in the laparoscopic repair becoming dominantly better--that is, less expensive and more effective from a

  3. Complementation of DNA repair in xeroderma pigmentosum group A cell extracts by a protein with affinity for damaged DNA.

    PubMed

    Robins, P; Jones, C J; Biggerstaff, M; Lindahl, T; Wood, R D

    1991-12-01

    Complementation group A of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) represents one of the most prevalent and serious forms of this cancer-prone disorder. Because of a marked defect in DNA excision repair, cells from individuals with XP-A are hypersensitive to the toxic and mutagenic effects of ultraviolet light and many chemical agents. We report here the isolation of the XP-A DNA repair protein by complementation of cell extracts from a repair-defective human XP-A cell line. XP-A protein purified from calf thymus migrates on denaturing gel electrophoresis as a doublet of 40 and 42 kilodaltons. The XP-A protein binds preferentially to ultraviolet light-irradiated DNA, with a preference for damaged over nondamaged nucleotides of approximately 10(3). This strongly suggests that the XP-A protein plays a direct role in the recognition of and incision at lesions in DNA. We further show that this protein corresponds to the product encoded by a recently isolated gene that can restore excision repair to XP-A cells. Thus, excision repair of plasmid DNA by cell extracts sufficiently resembles genomic repair in cells to reveal accurately the repair defect in an inherited disease. The general approach described here can be extended to the identification and isolation of other human DNA repair proteins. PMID:1935910

  4. Complementation of DNA repair in xeroderma pigmentosum group A cell extracts by a protein with affinity for damaged DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Robins, P; Jones, C J; Biggerstaff, M; Lindahl, T; Wood, R D

    1991-01-01

    Complementation group A of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) represents one of the most prevalent and serious forms of this cancer-prone disorder. Because of a marked defect in DNA excision repair, cells from individuals with XP-A are hypersensitive to the toxic and mutagenic effects of ultraviolet light and many chemical agents. We report here the isolation of the XP-A DNA repair protein by complementation of cell extracts from a repair-defective human XP-A cell line. XP-A protein purified from calf thymus migrates on denaturing gel electrophoresis as a doublet of 40 and 42 kilodaltons. The XP-A protein binds preferentially to ultraviolet light-irradiated DNA, with a preference for damaged over nondamaged nucleotides of approximately 10(3). This strongly suggests that the XP-A protein plays a direct role in the recognition of and incision at lesions in DNA. We further show that this protein corresponds to the product encoded by a recently isolated gene that can restore excision repair to XP-A cells. Thus, excision repair of plasmid DNA by cell extracts sufficiently resembles genomic repair in cells to reveal accurately the repair defect in an inherited disease. The general approach described here can be extended to the identification and isolation of other human DNA repair proteins. Images PMID:1935910

  5. Yeast RAD14 and human xeroderma pigmentosum group A DNA-repair genes encode homologous proteins.

    PubMed

    Bankmann, M; Prakash, L; Prakash, S

    1992-02-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), a human autosomal recessive disorder, is characterized by extreme sensitivity to sunlight and high incidence of skin cancers. XP cells are defective in the incision step of excision repair of DNA damaged by ultraviolet light. Cell fusion studies have defined seven XP complementation groups, XP-A to XP-G. Similar genetic complexity of excision repair is observed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mutations in any one of five yeast genes, RAD1, RAD2, RAD3, RAD4, and RAD10, cause a total defect in incision and an extreme sensitivity to ultraviolet light. Here we report the characterization of the yeast RAD14 gene. The available rad14 point mutant is only moderately ultraviolet-sensitive, and it performs a substantial amount of incision of damaged DNA. Our studies with the rad14 deletion (delta) mutation indicate an absolute requirement of RAD14 in incision. RAD14 encodes a highly hydrophilic protein of 247 amino acids containing zinc-finger motifs, and it is similar to the protein encoded by the human XPAC gene that complements XP group A cell lines. PMID:1741034

  6. SUMOylation of xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein regulates DNA damage recognition during nucleotide excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Akita, Masaki; Tak, Yon-Soo; Shimura, Tsutomu; Matsumoto, Syota; Okuda-Shimizu, Yuki; Shimizu, Yuichiro; Nishi, Ryotaro; Saitoh, Hisato; Iwai, Shigenori; Mori, Toshio; Ikura, Tsuyoshi; Sakai, Wataru; Hanaoka, Fumio; Sugasawa, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    The xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC) protein complex is a key factor that detects DNA damage and initiates nucleotide excision repair (NER) in mammalian cells. Although biochemical and structural studies have elucidated the interaction of XPC with damaged DNA, the mechanism of its regulation in vivo remains to be understood in more details. Here, we show that the XPC protein undergoes modification by small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) proteins and the lack of this modification compromises the repair of UV-induced DNA photolesions. In the absence of SUMOylation, XPC is normally recruited to the sites with photolesions, but then immobilized profoundly by the UV-damaged DNA-binding protein (UV-DDB) complex. Since the absence of UV-DDB alleviates the NER defect caused by impaired SUMOylation of XPC, we propose that this modification is critical for functional interactions of XPC with UV-DDB, which facilitate the efficient damage handover between the two damage recognition factors and subsequent initiation of NER. PMID:26042670

  7. Thoracoscopic Esophageal Atresia with Tracheoesophageal Fistula Repair: The First Iranian Group Report, Passing the Learning Curve

    PubMed Central

    Hiradfar, Mehran; Gharavifard, Mohammad; Shojaeian, Reza; Joodi, Marjan; Nazarzadeh, Reza; Sabzevari, Alireza; Yal, Nazila; Eslami, Reza; Mohammadipour, Ahmad; Azadmand, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Thoracoscopic treatment of esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula (EA+TEF) is accepted as a superior technique at least in cosmetic point of view but it is considered as an advance endoscopic procedure that needs a learning curve to be performed perfectly. This is the first report of Iranian group pediatric surgeons in thoracoscopic approach to EA. Methods and Materials: Since 2010, twenty four cases with EA+TEF underwent thoracoscopic approach in Sarvar Children Hospital (Mashhad -Iran). During the first 6 months, thoracoscopic approach to 6 cases of EA+TEF was converted to open procedure because of technical and instrumental problems. The first case of successful thoracoscopic EA repair was accomplished in 2010 and since then, 10 cases of EA+ TEF among 18 patients were treated successfully with thoracoscopic approach Results: Overall conversion rate was 58.3% but conversion rate after the primary learning curve period, was 35.7%. The main conversion causes include difficulties in esophageal anastomosis, limited exposure and deteriorating the patient's condition. Anastomotic leak and stenosis were observed in 20% and 40% respectively. Overall mortality rate was 4.2%. Conclusion: Thoracoscopic repair of esophageal atresia seems feasible and safe with considerable superiorities to the conventional method although acceptable results needs a prolonged learning curve and advanced endoscopic surgical skill. Clear judgment about the best surgical intervention for EA according to all cosmetic and functional outcomes needs further studies. PMID:27471677

  8. Conservation of the Nucleotide Excision Repair Pathway: Characterization of Hydra Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group F Homolog

    PubMed Central

    Barve, Apurva; Ghaskadbi, Saroj; Ghaskadbi, Surendra

    2013-01-01

    Hydra, one of the earliest metazoans with tissue grade organization and nervous system, is an animal with a remarkable regeneration capacity and shows no signs of organismal aging. We have for the first time identified genes of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway from hydra. Here we report cloning and characterization of hydra homolog of xeroderma pigmentosum group F (XPF) gene that encodes a structure-specific 5′ endonuclease which is a crucial component of NER. In silico analysis shows that hydra XPF amino acid sequence is very similar to its counterparts from other animals, especially vertebrates, and shows all features essential for its function. By in situ hybridization, we show that hydra XPF is expressed prominently in the multipotent stem cell niche in the central region of the body column. Ectoderm of the diploblastic hydra was shown to express higher levels of XPF as compared to the endoderm by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis also demonstrated that interstitial cells, a multipotent and rapidly cycling stem cell lineage of hydra, express higher levels of XPF mRNA than other cell types. Our data show that XPF and by extension, the NER pathway is highly conserved during evolution. The prominent expression of an NER gene in interstitial cells may have implications for the lack of senescence in hydra. PMID:23577191

  9. Studying nucleotide excision repair of mammalian DNA in a cell-free system

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, R.D.

    1994-12-31

    During nucleotide excision repair, a multiprotein system locates a lesion in DNA and catalyzes enzymatic cleavage of the altered strand. The damaged oligonucleotide and the incision proteins are then displaced, DNA synthesis proceeds to form a short patch using the nonmodified strand as a template, and repair is completed by a DNA ligase. Many gene products participate in these reactions, the best known of which correspond to the seven genetic complementation groups XP-A to XP-G of the disease xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). Cells representing any of these XP groups appear to exhibit, to varying degrees, defects in the first steps of nucleotide excision repair. Individuals affected with XP are hypersensitive to sunlight; most have a predisposition to skin cancer, and some patients show severe neurological abnormalities. In addition to XP, other UV-sensitive mutants of mammalian cells are providing insight into nucleotide excision repair. Of particular interest are mutants isolated from the rodent cells, which have been assigned to 11 different complementation groups. Human genes that can correct the repair defects of rodent mutants in these complementation groups are denoted. ERCC (excision repair cross-complementing) genes are are referred to by number, ERCC1 to ERCC11. Some of these genes are proving to be equivalent to particular XP-complementing genes, while others are distinct. The process of nucleotide excision repair is evolutionarily conserved in eukaryotes, and functional homologues of many of the ERCC and XP genes have been identified in other organisms; studies in yeast are proving to be particularly informative.

  10. The Polycomb Group Protein EZH2 Impairs DNA Damage Repair Gene Expression in Human Uterine Fibroids.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiwei; Nair, Sangeeta; Laknaur, Archana; Ismail, Nahed; Diamond, Michael P; Al-Hendy, Ayman

    2016-03-01

    Uterine fibroids are benign, smooth muscle tumors that occur in approximately 70%-80% of women by age 50 yr. The cellular and molecular mechanism(s) by which uterine fibroids (UFs) develop are not fully understood. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that several genetic abnormalities, including deletions, rearrangements, translocations, as well as mutations, have been found in UFs. These genetic anomalies suggest that low DNA damage repair capacity may be involved in UF formation. The objective of this study was to determine whether expression levels of DNA damage repair-related genes were altered, and how they were regulated in the pathogenesis of UFs. Expression levels of DNA repair-related genes RAD51 and BRCA1 were deregulated in fibroid tissues as compared to adjacent myometrial tissues. Expression levels of chromatin protein enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) were higher in a subset of fibroids as compared to adjacent myometrial tissues by both immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. Treatment with an inhibitor of EZH2 markedly increased expression levels of RAD51 and BRCA1 in fibroid cells and inhibited cell proliferation paired with cell cycle arrest. Restoring the expression of RAD51 and BRCA1 by treatment with EZH2 inhibitor was dependent on reducing the enrichment of trimethylation of histone 3 lysine 27 epigenetic mark in their promoter regions. This study reveals the important role of EZH2-regulated DNA damage-repair genes via histone methylation in fibroid biology, and may provide novel therapeutic targets for the medical treatment of women with symptomatic UFs. PMID:26888970

  11. Different patterns of evolution for duplicated DNA repair genes in bacteria of the Xanthomonadales group

    PubMed Central

    Martins-Pinheiro, Marinalva; Galhardo, Rodrigo S; Lage, Claudia; Lima-Bessa, Keronninn M; Aires, Karina A; Menck, Carlos FM

    2004-01-01

    Background DNA repair genes encode proteins that protect organisms against genetic damage generated by environmental agents and by-products of cell metabolism. The importance of these genes in life maintenance is supported by their high conservation, and the presence of duplications of such genes may be easily traced, especially in prokaryotic genomes. Results The genome sequences of two Xanthomonas species were used as the basis for phylogenetic analyses of genes related to DNA repair that were found duplicated. Although 16S rRNA phylogenetic analyses confirm their classification at the basis of the gamma proteobacteria subdivision, differences were found in the origin of the various genes investigated. Except for lexA, detected as a recent duplication, most of the genes in more than one copy are represented by two highly divergent orthologs. Basically, one of such duplications is frequently positioned close to other gamma proteobacteria, but the second is often positioned close to unrelated bacteria. These orthologs may have occurred from old duplication events, followed by extensive gene loss, or were originated from lateral gene transfer (LGT), as is the case of the uvrD homolog. Conclusions Duplications of DNA repair related genes may result in redundancy and also improve the organisms' responses to environmental challenges. Most of such duplications, in Xanthomonas, seem to have arisen from old events and possibly enlarge both functional and evolutionary genome potentiality. PMID:15333143

  12. Yeast high mobility group protein HMO1 stabilizes chromatin and is evicted during repair of DNA double strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Panday, Arvind; Xiao, LiJuan; Grove, Anne

    2015-01-01

    DNA is packaged into condensed chromatin fibers by association with histones and architectural proteins such as high mobility group (HMGB) proteins. However, this DNA packaging reduces accessibility of enzymes that act on DNA, such as proteins that process DNA after double strand breaks (DSBs). Chromatin remodeling overcomes this barrier. We show here that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae HMGB protein HMO1 stabilizes chromatin as evidenced by faster chromatin remodeling in its absence. HMO1 was evicted along with core histones during repair of DSBs, and chromatin remodeling events such as histone H2A phosphorylation and H3 eviction were faster in absence of HMO1. The facilitated chromatin remodeling in turn correlated with more efficient DNA resection and recruitment of repair proteins; for example, inward translocation of the DNA-end-binding protein Ku was faster in absence of HMO1. This chromatin stabilization requires the lysine-rich C-terminal extension of HMO1 as truncation of the HMO1 C-terminal tail phenocopies hmo1 deletion. Since this is reminiscent of the need for the basic C-terminal domain of mammalian histone H1 in chromatin compaction, we speculate that HMO1 promotes chromatin stability by DNA bending and compaction imposed by its lysine-rich domain and that it must be evicted along with core histones for efficient DSB repair. PMID:25979266

  13. High-mobility group box 1 promotes extracellular matrix synthesis and wound repair in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ojo, Oluwaseun O; Ryu, Min Hyung; Jha, Aruni; Unruh, Helmut; Halayko, Andrew J

    2015-12-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) protein that binds Toll-like receptors (e.g., TLR4) and the receptor for advanced glycated end products (RAGE). The direct effects of HMGB1 on airway structural cells are not fully known. As epithelial cell responses are fundamental drivers of asthma, including abnormal repair-restitution linked to changes in extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis, we tested the hypothesis that HMGB1 promotes bronchial epithelial cell wound repair via TLR4 and/or RAGE signaling that regulates ECM (fibronectin and the γ2-chain of laminin-5) and integrin protein abundance. To assess impact of HMGB1 we used molecular and pharmacological inhibitors of RAGE or TLR4 signaling in scratch wound, immunofluorescence, and immunoblotting assays to assess wound repair, ECM synthesis, and phosphorylation of intracellular signaling. HMGB1 increased wound closure, and this effect was attenuated by blocking RAGE and TLR4 signaling. HMGB1-induced fibronectin and laminin-5 (γ2 chain) was diminished by blocking RAGE and/or blunting TLR4 signaling. Similarly, induction of α3-integrin receptor for fibronectin and laminin-5 was also diminished by blocking TLR4 signaling and RAGE. Lastly, rapid and/or sustained phosphorylation of SMAD2, ERK1/2, and JNK signaling modulated HMGB1-induced wound closure. Our findings suggest a role for HMGB1 in human airway epithelial cell repair and restitution via multiple pathways mediated by TLR4 and RAGE that underpin increased ECM synthesis and modulation of cell-matrix adhesion. PMID:26432865

  14. Molecular cloning of a mouse DNA repair gene that complements the defect of group-A xeroderma pigmentosum.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, K; Satokata, I; Ogita, Z; Uchida, T; Okada, Y

    1989-01-01

    For isolation of the gene responsible for xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation group A, plasmid pSV2gpt and genomic DNA from a mouse embryo were cotransfected into XP2OSSV cells, a group-A XP cell line. Two primary UV-resistant XP transfectants were isolated from about 1.6 X 10(5) pSV2gpt-transformed XP colonies. pSV2gpt and genomic DNA from the primary transfectants were again cotransfected into XP2OSSV cells and a secondary UV-resistant XP transfectant was obtained by screening about 4.8 X 10(5) pSV2gpt-transformed XP colonies. The secondary transfectant retained fewer mouse repetitive sequences. A mouse gene that complements the defect of XP2OSSV cells was cloned into an EMBL3 vector from the genome of a secondary transfectant. Transfections of the cloned DNA also conferred UV resistance on another group-A XP cell line but not on XP cell lines of group C, D, F, or G. Northern blot analysis of poly(A)+ RNA with a subfragment of cloned mouse DNA repair gene as the probe revealed that an approximately 1.0 kilobase mRNA was transcribed in the donor mouse embryo and secondary transfectant, and approximately 1.0- and approximately 1.3-kilobase mRNAs were transcribed in normal human cells, but none of these mRNAs was detected in three strains of group-A XP cells. These results suggest that the cloned DNA repair gene is specific for group-A XP and may be the mouse homologue of the group-A XP human gene. Images PMID:2748601

  15. Molecular cloning of a mouse DNA repair gene that complements the defect of group-A xeroderma pigmentosum

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, K.; Satokata, I.; Ogita, Z.; Uchida, T.; Okada, Y.

    1989-07-01

    For isolation of the gene responsible for xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation group A, plasmid pSV2gpt and genomic DNA from a mouse embryo were cotransfected into XP2OSSV cells, a group-A XP cell line. Two primary UV-resistant XP transfectants were isolated from about 1.6 X 10(5) pSV2gpt-transformed XP colonies. pSV2gpt and genomic DNA from the primary transfectants were again cotransfected into XP2OSSV cells and a secondary UV-resistant XP transfectant was obtained by screening about 4.8 X 10(5) pSV2gpt-transformed XP colonies. The secondary transfectant retained fewer mouse repetitive sequences. A mouse gene that complements the defect of XP2OSSV cells was cloned into an EMBL3 vector from the genome of a secondary transfectant. Transfections of the cloned DNA also conferred UV resistance on another group-A XP cell line but not on XP cell lines of group C, D, F, or G. Northern blot analysis of poly(A)+ RNA with a subfragment of cloned mouse DNA repair gene as the probe revealed that an approximately 1.0 kilobase mRNA was transcribed in the donor mouse embryo and secondary transfectant, and approximately 1.0- and approximately 1.3-kilobase mRNAs were transcribed in normal human cells, but none of these mRNAs was detected in three strains of group-A XP cells. These results suggest that the cloned DNA repair gene is specific for group-A XP and may be the mouse homologue of the group-A XP human gene.

  16. Low-level laser irradiation alters mRNA expression from genes involved in DNA repair and genomic stabilization in myoblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trajano, L. A. S. N.; Sergio, L. P. S.; Silva, C. L.; Carvalho, L.; Mencalha, A. L.; Stumbo, A. C.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2016-07-01

    Low-level lasers are used for the treatment of diseases in soft and bone tissues, but few data are available regarding their effects on genomic stability. In this study, we investigated mRNA expression from genes involved in DNA repair and genomic stabilization in myoblasts exposed to low-level infrared laser. C2C12 myoblast cultures in different fetal bovine serum concentrations were exposed to low-level infrared laser (10, 35 and 70 J cm‑2), and collected for the evaluation of DNA repair gene expression. Laser exposure increased gene expression related to base excision repair (8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1), nucleotide excision repair (excision repair cross-complementation group 1 and xeroderma pigmentosum C protein) and genomic stabilization (ATM serine/threonine kinase and tumor protein p53) in normal and low fetal bovine serum concentrations. Results suggest that genomic stability could be part of a biostimulation effect of low-level laser therapy in injured muscles.

  17. Low-intensity red and infrared lasers affect mRNA expression of DNA nucleotide excision repair in skin and muscle tissue.

    PubMed

    Sergio, Luiz Philippe S; Campos, Vera Maria A; Vicentini, Solange C; Mencalha, Andre Luiz; de Paoli, Flavia; Fonseca, Adenilson S

    2016-04-01

    Lasers emit light beams with specific characteristics, in which wavelength, frequency, power, fluence, and emission mode properties determine the photophysical, photochemical, and photobiological responses. Low-intensity lasers could induce free radical generation in biological tissues and cause alterations in macromolecules, such as DNA. Thus, the aim of this work was to evaluate excision repair cross-complementing group 1 (ERCC1) and excision repair cross-complementing group 2 (ERCC2) messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in biological tissues exposed to low-intensity lasers. Wistar rat (n = 28, 4 for each group) skin and muscle were exposed to low-intensity red (660 nm) and near-infrared (880 nm) lasers at different fluences (25, 50, and 100 J/cm(2)), and samples of these tissues were withdrawn for RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, and gene expression evaluation by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Laser exposure was in continuous wave and power of 100 mW. Data show that ERCC1 and ERCC2 mRNA expressions decrease in skin (p < 0.001) exposed to near-infrared laser, but increase in muscle tissue (p < 0.001). ERCC1 mRNA expression does not alter (p > 0.05), but ERCC2 mRNA expression decreases in skin (p < 0.001) and increases in muscle tissue (p < 0.001) exposed to red laser. Our results show that ERCC1 and ERCC2 mRNA expression is differently altered in skin and muscle tissue exposed to low-intensity lasers depending on wavelengths and fluences used in therapeutic protocols. PMID:26796702

  18. New design of nucleotide excision repair (NER) inhibitors for combination cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Francesco; Tuszynski, Jack A; Barakat, Khaled H

    2016-04-01

    Many cancer chemotherapy agents act by targeting the DNA of cancer cells, causing substantial damage within their genome and causing them to undergo apoptosis. An effective DNA repair pathway in cancer cells can act in a reverse way by removing these drug-induced DNA lesions, allowing cancer cells to survive, grow and proliferate. In this context, DNA repair inhibitors opened a new avenue in cancer treatment, by blocking the DNA repair mechanisms from removing the chemotherapy-mediated DNA damage. In particular, the nucleotide excision repair (NER) involves more than thirty protein-protein interactions and removes DNA adducts caused by platinum-based chemotherapy. The excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1)-xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group A (XPA) protein (XPA-ERCC1) complex seems to be one of the most promising targets in this pathway. ERCC1 is over expressed in cancer cells and the only known cellular function so far for XPA is to recruit ERCC1 to the damaged point. Here, we build upon our recent advances in identifying inhibitors for this interaction and continue our efforts to rationally design more effective and potent regulators for the NER pathway. We employed in silico drug design techniques to: (1) identify compounds similar to the recently discovered inhibitors, but more effective at inhibiting the XPA-ERCC1 interactions, and (2) identify different scaffolds to develop novel lead compounds. Two known inhibitor structures have been used as starting points for two ligand/structure-hybrid virtual screening approaches. The findings described here form a milestone in discovering novel inhibitors for the NER pathway aiming at improving the efficacy of current platinum-based therapy, by modulating the XPA-ERCC1 interaction. PMID:26939044

  19. Epidermal Notch1 recruits RORγ+ group 3 innate lymphoid cells to orchestrate normal skin repair

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi; Hodgkinson, Tom; Gothard, Elizabeth J.; Boroumand, Soulmaz; Lamb, Rebecca; Cummins, Ian; Narang, Priyanka; Sawtell, Amy; Coles, Jenny; Leonov, German; Reboldi, Andrea; Buckley, Christopher D.; Cupedo, Tom; Siebel, Christian; Bayat, Ardeshir; Coles, Mark C.; Ambler, Carrie A.

    2016-01-01

    Notch has a well-defined role in controlling cell fate decisions in the embryo and the adult epidermis and immune systems, yet emerging evidence suggests Notch also directs non-cell-autonomous signalling in adult tissues. Here, we show that Notch1 works as a damage response signal. Epidermal Notch induces recruitment of immune cell subsets including RORγ+ ILC3s into wounded dermis; RORγ+ ILC3s are potent sources of IL17F in wounds and control immunological and epidermal cell responses. Mice deficient for RORγ+ ILC3s heal wounds poorly resulting from delayed epidermal proliferation and macrophage recruitment in a CCL3-dependent process. Notch1 upregulates TNFα and the ILC3 recruitment chemokines CCL20 and CXCL13. TNFα, as a Notch1 effector, directs ILC3 localization and rates of wound healing. Altogether these findings suggest that Notch is a key stress/injury signal in skin epithelium driving innate immune cell recruitment and normal skin tissue repair. PMID:27099134

  20. Epidermal Notch1 recruits RORγ(+) group 3 innate lymphoid cells to orchestrate normal skin repair.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Hodgkinson, Tom; Gothard, Elizabeth J; Boroumand, Soulmaz; Lamb, Rebecca; Cummins, Ian; Narang, Priyanka; Sawtell, Amy; Coles, Jenny; Leonov, German; Reboldi, Andrea; Buckley, Christopher D; Cupedo, Tom; Siebel, Christian; Bayat, Ardeshir; Coles, Mark C; Ambler, Carrie A

    2016-01-01

    Notch has a well-defined role in controlling cell fate decisions in the embryo and the adult epidermis and immune systems, yet emerging evidence suggests Notch also directs non-cell-autonomous signalling in adult tissues. Here, we show that Notch1 works as a damage response signal. Epidermal Notch induces recruitment of immune cell subsets including RORγ(+) ILC3s into wounded dermis; RORγ(+) ILC3s are potent sources of IL17F in wounds and control immunological and epidermal cell responses. Mice deficient for RORγ(+) ILC3s heal wounds poorly resulting from delayed epidermal proliferation and macrophage recruitment in a CCL3-dependent process. Notch1 upregulates TNFα and the ILC3 recruitment chemokines CCL20 and CXCL13. TNFα, as a Notch1 effector, directs ILC3 localization and rates of wound healing. Altogether these findings suggest that Notch is a key stress/injury signal in skin epithelium driving innate immune cell recruitment and normal skin tissue repair. PMID:27099134

  1. Difficulties and Problematic Steps in Teaching the Onstep Technique for Inguinal Hernia Repair, Results from a Focus Group Interview

    PubMed Central

    Andresen, Kristoffer; Laursen, Jannie

    2016-01-01

    Background. When a new surgical technique is brought into a department, it is often experienced surgeons that learn it first and then pass it on to younger surgeons in training. This study seeks to clarify the problems and positive experiences when teaching and training surgeons in the Onstep technique for inguinal hernia repair, seen from the instructor's point of view. Methods. We designed a qualitative study using a focus group to allow participants to elaborate freely and facilitate a discussion. Participants were surgeons with extensive experience in performing the Onstep technique from Germany, UK, France, Belgium, Italy, Greece, and Sweden. Results. Four main themes were found, with one theme covering three subthemes: instruction of others (experience, patient selection, and tailored teaching), comfort, concerns/fear, and anatomy. Conclusion. Surgeons receiving a one-day training course should preferably have experience with other types of hernia repairs. If trainees are inexperienced, the training setup should be a traditional step-by-step programme. A training setup should consist of an explanation of the technique with emphasis on anatomy and difficult parts of the procedure and then a training day should follow. Surgeons teaching surgery can use these findings to improve their everyday practice. PMID:27144225

  2. A Human Orthologue of Archaeal DNA Repair Protein Hef is Defective in Fanconi Anemia Complementation Group M

    PubMed Central

    Meetei, Amom Ruhikanta; Medhurst, Annette L.; Ling, Chen; Xue, Yutong; Singh, Thiyam Ramsing; Bier, Patrick; Steltenpool, Jurgen; Stone, Stacie; Dokal, Inderjeet; Mathew, Christopher G.; Hoatlin, Maureen; Joenje, Hans; de Winter, Johan P.; Wang, Weidong

    2005-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetic disease featuring genomic instability and cancer predisposition1. Nine FA genes have been identified, and their products participate in a DNA damage response network involving BRCA1 and BRCA22,3. We have previously purified a FA core complex containing the FANCL ubiquitin ligase and 6 other FA proteins4–6. Each protein in this complex is essential for monoubiquitination of FANCD2, a key reaction in the FA DNA damage response pathway2,7. Here we show that another component of this complex, FAAP250, is mutated in FA patients of a new complementation group (FA-M). FAAP250, renamed FANCM, has sequence similarity to known DNA repair proteins, including archaeal Hef, yeast Mph1 and human ERCC4/XPF. FANCM can dissociate DNA triplex, possibly due to its ability to translocate on duplex DNA. FANCM is essential for FANCD2 monoubiquitination and becomes hyperphosphorylated in response to DNA damage. Our data suggest an evolutionary link between FA proteins and DNA repair; FANCM may act as an engine that translocates the FA core complex along DNA. PMID:16116422

  3. Pivotal advances: high-mobility group box 1 protein--a cytokine with a role in cardiac repair.

    PubMed

    Germani, Antonia; Limana, Federica; Capogrossi, Maurizio C

    2007-01-01

    The nuclear protein high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) has been largely characterized for its role in inflammation. However, HMGB1 released by inflammatory cells, as well as by necrotic cells, may also act as a signal of tissue damage and participate in tissue repair by recruiting stem cells to the injury site. The emergence of this function has focused the interest on HMGB1 as a molecule with an active role in tissue regeneration. We recently demonstrated that HMGB1 administration in a mouse model of myocardial infarction activates cardiac stem cells and promotes their differentiation into cardiomyocytes. The regenerative effect results in the improvement of cardiac function. In this review, we highlight the beneficial role of HMGB1 and discuss growth factor-based therapeutic approaches for the treatment of myocardial infarction. PMID:16940333

  4. Polymorphism of the DNA Base Excision Repair Genes in Keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Wojcik, Katarzyna A.; Synowiec, Ewelina; Sobierajczyk, Katarzyna; Izdebska, Justyna; Blasiak, Janusz; Szaflik, Jerzy; Szaflik, Jacek P.

    2014-01-01

    Keratoconus (KC) is a degenerative corneal disorder for which the exact pathogenesis is not yet known. Oxidative stress is reported to be associated with this disease. The stress may damage corneal biomolecules, including DNA, and such damage is primarily removed by base excision repair (BER). Variation in genes encoding BER components may influence the effectiveness of corneal cells to cope with oxidative stress. In the present work we genotyped 5 polymorphisms of 4 BER genes in 284 patients and 353 controls. The A/A genotype of the c.–1370T>A polymorphism of the DNA polymerase γ (POLG) gene was associated with increased occurrence of KC, while the A/T genotype was associated with decreased occurrence of KC. The A/G genotype and the A allele of the c.1196A>G polymorphism of the X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) were associated with increased, and the G/G genotype and the G allele, with decreased KC occurrence. Also, the C/T and T as well as C/C genotypes and alleles of the c.580C>T polymorphism of the same gene displayed relationship with KC occurrence. Neither the g.46438521G>C polymorphism of the Nei endonuclease VIII-like 1 (NEIL1) nor the c.2285T>C polymorphism of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) was associated with KC. In conclusion, the variability of the XRCC1 and POLG genes may play a role in KC pathogenesis and determine the risk of this disease. PMID:25356504

  5. Protective Effect of Diphlorethohydroxycarmalol against Ultraviolet B Radiation-Induced DNA Damage by Inducing the Nucleotide Excision Repair System in HaCaT Human Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Piao, Mei Jing; Madduma Hewage, Susara Ruwan Kumara; Han, Xia; Kang, Kyoung Ah; Kang, Hee Kyoung; Lee, Nam Ho; Hyun, Jin Won

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the protective properties of diphlorethohydroxycarmalol (DPHC), a phlorotannin, against ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) in HaCaT human keratinocytes. The nucleotide excision repair (NER) system is the pathway by which cells identify and repair bulky, helix-distorting DNA lesions such as ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced CPDs and 6-4 photoproducts. CPDs levels were elevated in UVB-exposed cells; however, this increase was reduced by DPHC. Expression levels of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XPC) and excision repair cross-complementing 1 (ERCC1), which are essential components of the NER pathway, were induced in DPHC-treated cells. Expression of XPC and ERCC1 were reduced following UVB exposure, whereas DPHC treatment partially restored the levels of both proteins. DPHC also increased expression of transcription factor specificity protein 1 (SP1) and sirtuin 1, an up-regulator of XPC, in UVB-exposed cells. DPHC restored binding of the SP1 to the XPC promoter, which is reduced in UVB-exposed cells. These results indicate that DPHC can protect cells against UVB-induced DNA damage by inducing the NER system. PMID:26404324

  6. Meningocele repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... dysraphism repair; Meningomyelocele repair; Neural tube defect repair; Spina bifida repair ... a medical team with experience in children with spina bifida. Your baby will likely have an MRI (magnetic ...

  7. Analysis of a human DNA excision repair gene involved in group A xeroderma pigmentosum and containing a zinc-finger domain.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, K; Miura, N; Satokata, I; Miyamoto, I; Yoshida, M C; Satoh, Y; Kondo, S; Yasui, A; Okayama, H; Okada, Y

    1990-11-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is an autosomal recessive disease, characterized by a high incidence of sunlight-induced skin cancer. Cells from people with this condition are hypersensitive to ultraviolet because of a defect in DNA repair. There are nine genetic complementation groups of XP, groups A-H and a variant. We have cloned the mouse DNA repair gene that complements the defect of group A, the XPAC gene. Here we report molecular cloning of human and mouse XPAC complementary DNAs. Expression of XPAC cDNA confers ultraviolet-resistance on several group A cell lines, but not on lines of other XP groups. Almost all group A lines tested showed abnormality or absence of XPAC messenger RNAs. These results indicate that a defective XPAC gene causes group A XP. The human and mouse XPAC genes are located on chromosome 9q34.1 and chromosome 4C2, respectively. Human XPAC cDNA encodes a protein of 273 amino acids with a zinc-finger motif. PMID:2234061

  8. New Paradigms in the Repair of Oxidative Damage in Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Arijit; Yang, Chunying; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Mitra, Sankar; Hegde, Muralidhar L.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidized bases in the mammalian genome, which are invariably mutagenic due to their mis-pairing property, are continuously induced by endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS) and more abundantly after oxidative stress. Unlike bulky base adducts induced by UV and other environmental mutagens in the genome that block replicative DNA polymerases, oxidatively damaged bases such as 5-hydoxyuracil (5-OHU), produced by oxidative deamination of cytosine in the template strand, do not block replicative polymerases and thus need to be repaired prior to replication in order to prevent mutation. Following up our earlier studies, which showed that the Nei endonuclease VIII like 1 (NEIL1) DNA glycosylase, one of five base excision repair (BER)-initiating enzymes in mammalian cells, has enhanced expression during the S-phase and higher affinity for replication fork-mimicking single-stranded (ss) DNA substrates, we recently provided direct experimental evidence for NEIL1’s role in replicating template-strand repair. The key requirement for this event, which we named as the ‘cow-catcher’ mechanism of pre-replicative BER, is NEIL1’s non-productive binding (substrate binding without product formation) to the lesion base in ss DNA template to stall DNA synthesis, causing fork regression. Repair of the lesion in re-annealed duplex is then carried out by NEIL1 in association with the DNA replication proteins. NEIL1 (and other BER-initiating enzymes) also interact with several accessory and non-canonical proteins including the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U (hnRNP-U) and Y-box-binding protein 1 (YB-1) as well as high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), whose precise roles in BER are still obscure. In this review, we have discussed the recent advances in our understanding of oxidative genome damage repair pathways with particular focus on the pre-replicative template strand repair and the role of scaffold factors like X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 1 (XRCC1

  9. XRCC1 and base excision repair balance in response to nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Mutamba, James T; Svilar, David; Prasongtanakij, Somsak; Wang, Xiao-Hong; Lin, Ying-Chih; Dedon, Peter C; Sobol, Robert W; Engelward, Bevin P

    2011-12-10

    Inflammation associated reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONs), including peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) and nitric oxide (NO), create base lesions that potentially play a role in the toxicity and large genomic rearrangements associated with many malignancies. Little is known about the role of base excision repair (BER) in removing these endogenous DNA lesions. Here, we explore the role of X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) in attenuating RONs-induced genotoxicity. XRCC1 is a scaffold protein critical for BER for which polymorphisms modulate the risk of cancer. We exploited CHO and human glioblastoma cell lines engineered to express varied levels of BER proteins to study XRCC1. Cytotoxicity and the levels of DNA repair intermediates (single-strand breaks; SSB) were evaluated following exposure of the cells to the ONOO(-) donor, SIN-1, and to gaseous NO. XRCC1 null cells were slightly more sensitive to SIN-1 than wild-type cells. We used small-scale bioreactors to expose cells to NO and found that XRCC1-deficient CHO cells were not sensitive. However, using a molecular beacon assay to test lesion removal in vitro, we found that XRCC1 facilitates AAG-initiated excision of two key NO-induced DNA lesions: 1,N(6)-ethenoadenine and hypoxanthine. Furthermore, overexpression of AAG rendered XRCC1-deficient cells sensitive to NO-induced DNA damage. These results show that AAG is a key glycosylase for BER of NO-induced DNA damage and that XRCC1's role in modulating sensitivity to RONs is dependent upon the cellular level of AAG. This demonstrates the importance of considering the expression of other components of the BER pathway when evaluating the impact of XRCC1 polymorphisms on cancer risk. PMID:22041025

  10. The Cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal Syndrome Point Mutation F231L in the ERCC1 DNA Repair Protein Causes Dissociation of the ERCC1-XPF Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Faridounnia, Maryam; Wienk, Hans; Kovačič, Lidija; Folkers, Gert E.; Jaspers, Nicolaas G. J.; Kaptein, Robert; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; Boelens, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    The ERCC1-XPF heterodimer, a structure-specific DNA endonuclease, is best known for its function in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. The ERCC1 point mutation F231L, located at the hydrophobic interaction interface of ERCC1 (excision repair cross-complementation group 1) and XPF (xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group F), leads to severe NER pathway deficiencies. Here, we analyze biophysical properties and report the NMR structure of the complex of the C-terminal tandem helix-hairpin-helix domains of ERCC1-XPF that contains this mutation. The structures of wild type and the F231L mutant are very similar. The F231L mutation results in only a small disturbance of the ERCC1-XPF interface, where, in contrast to Phe231, Leu231 lacks interactions stabilizing the ERCC1-XPF complex. One of the two anchor points is severely distorted, and this results in a more dynamic complex, causing reduced stability and an increased dissociation rate of the mutant complex as compared with wild type. These data provide a biophysical explanation for the severe NER deficiencies caused by this mutation. PMID:26085086

  11. Decreased DNA repair gene XRCC1 expression is associated with radiotherapy-induced acute side effects in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Batar, Bahadir; Guven, Gulgun; Eroz, Seda; Bese, Nuran Senel; Guven, Mehmet

    2016-05-10

    DNA repair plays a critical role in response to ionizing radiation (IR) and developing of radiotherapy induced normal tissue reactions. In our study, we investigated the association of radiotherapy related acute side effects, with X-ray repair cross complementing group 1 (XRCC1) and Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) DNA repair gene expression levels, their changes in protein expression and DNA damage levels in breast cancer patients. The study included 40 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer; an experimental case group (n=20) with acute side effects and the control group (n=20) without side effects. For gene and protein expression analysis, lymphocytes were cultured for 72 h and followed by in vitro 2 Gray (Gy) gamma-irradiation. For detection of DNA damage levels, lymphocytes were irradiated with in vitro 2 Gy gamma-rays and followed by incubation for 72 h. XRCC1 mRNA and protein expression levels were significantly higher in controls than in experimental cases (P=0.020). In terms of DNA damage levels, an increased frequency of micronucleus (MN) was observed in experimental cases versus controls, but this association was not significant (P=0.206). We also observed a significant negative correlation between MN frequency and XRCC1 protein levels in experimental (r=-0.469, P=0.037) vs control (r=-0.734, P<0.001). Our results suggested that decreased XRCC1 expression levels might be associated with the increased risk of therapeutic IR-related acute side effects in patients with breast cancer. PMID:26826460

  12. Repair of UV photolesions in xeroderma pigmentosum group C cells induced by translational readthrough of premature termination codons

    PubMed Central

    Kuschal, Christiane; DiGiovanna, John. J.; Khan, Sikandar G.; Gatti, Richard A.; Kraemer, Kenneth H.

    2013-01-01

    About 12% of human genetic disorders involve premature termination codons (PTCs). Aminoglycoside antibiotics have been proposed for restoring full-length proteins by readthrough of PTC. To assess the efficiency of readthrough, we selected homozygous and compound heterozygous skin fibroblasts from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients with different PTCs in the XPC DNA repair gene. XP patients have a nucleotide excision repair defect and a 10,000-fold increased risk of UV-induced skin cancer. In six of eight PTC-containing XP-C cells, treatment with Geneticin and gentamicin resulted in (i) stabilized XPC–mRNA, which would have been degraded by nonsense-mediated decay; (ii) increased expression of XPC protein that localized to UV-damaged sites; (iii) recruitment of XPB and XPD proteins to UV DNA damage sites; and (iv) increased repair of 6–4 photoproducts and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. Expression of PTC in a transfected vector revealed that readthrough depends on the PTC sequence and its location within the gene. This sensitive DNA repair assay system demonstrates the complexity of response to PTC readthrough inducers. The efficiency of aminoglycoside-mediated readthrough depends on the type and copy number of PTC, the downstream 4+ nucleotide, and the location within the exon. Treatment with small-molecule nonaminoglycoside compounds (PTC124, BZ16, or RTC14) resulted in similarly increased XPC mRNA expression and photoproduct removal with less toxicity than with the aminoglycosides. Characterizing PTC structure and parameters governing effective PTC readthrough may provide a unique prophylactic therapy for skin cancer prevention in XP-C patients. PMID:24218596

  13. Repair of UV photolesions in xeroderma pigmentosum group C cells induced by translational readthrough of premature termination codons.

    PubMed

    Kuschal, Christiane; DiGiovanna, John J; Khan, Sikandar G; Gatti, Richard A; Kraemer, Kenneth H

    2013-11-26

    About 12% of human genetic disorders involve premature termination codons (PTCs). Aminoglycoside antibiotics have been proposed for restoring full-length proteins by readthrough of PTC. To assess the efficiency of readthrough, we selected homozygous and compound heterozygous skin fibroblasts from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients with different PTCs in the XPC DNA repair gene. XP patients have a nucleotide excision repair defect and a 10,000-fold increased risk of UV-induced skin cancer. In six of eight PTC-containing XP-C cells, treatment with Geneticin and gentamicin resulted in (i) stabilized XPC-mRNA, which would have been degraded by nonsense-mediated decay; (ii) increased expression of XPC protein that localized to UV-damaged sites; (iii) recruitment of XPB and XPD proteins to UV DNA damage sites; and (iv) increased repair of 6-4 photoproducts and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. Expression of PTC in a transfected vector revealed that readthrough depends on the PTC sequence and its location within the gene. This sensitive DNA repair assay system demonstrates the complexity of response to PTC readthrough inducers. The efficiency of aminoglycoside-mediated readthrough depends on the type and copy number of PTC, the downstream 4+ nucleotide, and the location within the exon. Treatment with small-molecule nonaminoglycoside compounds (PTC124, BZ16, or RTC14) resulted in similarly increased XPC mRNA expression and photoproduct removal with less toxicity than with the aminoglycosides. Characterizing PTC structure and parameters governing effective PTC readthrough may provide a unique prophylactic therapy for skin cancer prevention in XP-C patients. PMID:24218596

  14. Pharmacogenetic Study in Rectal Cancer Patients Treated With Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy: Polymorphisms in Thymidylate Synthase, Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor, GSTP1, and DNA Repair Genes

    SciTech Connect

    Paez, David; Salazar, Juliana; Pare, Laia; Pertriz, Lourdes; Targarona, Eduardo; Rio, Elisabeth del; Barnadas, Agusti; Marcuello, Eugenio; Baiget, Montserrat

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Several studies have been performed to evaluate the usefulness of neoadjuvant treatment using oxaliplatin and fluoropyrimidines for locally advanced rectal cancer. However, preoperative biomarkers of outcome are lacking. We studied the polymorphisms in thymidylate synthase, epidermal growth factor receptor, glutathione S-transferase pi 1 (GSTP1), and several DNA repair genes to evaluate their usefulness as pharmacogenetic markers in a cohort of 128 rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Blood samples were obtained from 128 patients with Stage II-III rectal cancer. DNA was extracted from the peripheral blood nucleated cells, and the genotypes were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction amplification and automated sequencing techniques or using a 48.48 dynamic array on the BioMark system. The germline polymorphisms studied were thymidylate synthase, (VNTR/5 Prime UTR, 2R G>C single nucleotide polymorphism [SNP], 3R G>C SNP), epidermal growth factor receptor (Arg497Lys), GSTP1 (Ile105val), excision repair cross-complementing 1 (Asn118Asn, 8092C>A, 19716G>C), X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) (Arg194Trp, Arg280His, Arg399Gln), and xeroderma pigmentosum group D (Lys751Gln). The pathologic response, pathologic regression, progression-free survival, and overall survival were evaluated according to each genotype. Results: The Asterisk-Operator 3/ Asterisk-Operator 3 thymidylate synthase genotype was associated with a greater response rate (pathologic complete remission and microfoci residual tumor, 59% in Asterisk-Operator 3/ Asterisk-Operator 3 vs. 35% in Asterisk-Operator 2/ Asterisk-Operator 2 and Asterisk-Operator 2/ Asterisk-Operator 3; p = .013). For the thymidylate synthase genotype, the median progression-free survival was 103 months for the Asterisk-Operator 3/ Asterisk-Operator 3 patients and 84 months for the Asterisk-Operator 2/ Asterisk-Operator 2 and Asterisk-Operator 2/ Asterisk

  15. DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Friedberg, E.C.; Hanawalt, P.C. )

    1988-01-01

    Topics covered in this book included: Eukaryote model systems for DNA repair study; Sensitive detection of DNA lesions and their repair; and Defined DNA sequence probes for analysis of mutagenesis and repair.

  16. DNA repair gene ERCC1 polymorphisms may contribute to the risk of glioma.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Guanqian; Gao, Dandan; Ding, Shaofeng; Tan, Jun

    2014-05-01

    Polymorphisms in excision repair cross-complementing rodent repair deficiency complementation group 1 (ERCC1) gene have been shown to affect individual susceptibility to glioma, though studies have yielded conflicting results. This meta-analysis aims to derive a more precise estimation of the association between ERCC1 C8092A and C118T polymorphisms and glioma risk. A literature search of PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and CBM databases was conducted to identify all eligible studies published before August 5, 2013. Crude odds ratios (ORs) with their corresponding confidence intervals (95% CIs) were used to assess the strength of this association. A meta-analysis was performed by reviewing seven studies on the C8092A polymorphism (2,978 cases and 4,051 controls) and four studies on the C118T polymorphism (1,390 Asian cases and 1,546 Asian controls). Pooled analysis yielded a significant association between the C8092A variant genotype and increased risk of glioma. As for ethnicity, the A allele was associated with increased risk of glioma in Asians, while no similar finding was observed in Caucasians. Stratified analyses by histological subtype indicated that the C8092A polymorphism showed a significant association with the risk of non-glioblastoma multiforme. For the C118T polymorphism, increased glioma susceptibility was also observed among Asians. Taken together, results from our meta-analysis support the view that common variants in ERCC1 may contribute to susceptibility to glioma, especially in Asians. However, further studies investigating the significance of these two polymorphisms as markers of susceptibility to and disease progression of glioma are still needed. PMID:24453030

  17. KIAA1530 protein is recruited by Cockayne syndrome complementation group protein A (CSA) to participate in transcription-coupled repair (TCR).

    PubMed

    Fei, Jia; Chen, Junjie

    2012-10-12

    Transcription-coupled repair (TCR) is the major pathway involved in the removal of UV-induced photolesions from the transcribed strand of active genes. Two Cockayne syndrome (CS) complementation group proteins, CSA and CSB, are important for TCR repair. The molecular mechanisms by which CS proteins regulate TCR remain elusive. Here, we report the characterization of KIAA1530, an evolutionarily conserved protein that participates in this pathway through its interaction with CSA and the TFIIH complex. We found that UV irradiation led to the recruitment of KIAA1530 onto chromatin in a CSA-dependent manner. Cells lacking KIAA1530 were highly sensitive to UV irradiation and displayed deficiency in TCR. In addition, KIAA1530 depletion abrogated stability of the CSB protein following UV irradiation. More excitingly, we found that a unique CSA mutant (W361C), which was previously identified in a patient with UV(s)S syndrome, showed defective KIAA1530 binding and resulted in a failure of recruiting KIAA1530 and stabilizing CSB after UV treatment. Together, our data not only reveal that KIAA1530 is an important player in TCR but also lead to a better understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying UV(s)S syndrome. PMID:22902626

  18. KIAA1530 Protein Is Recruited by Cockayne Syndrome Complementation Group Protein A (CSA) to Participate in Transcription-coupled Repair (TCR)

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Jia; Chen, Junjie

    2012-01-01

    Transcription-coupled repair (TCR) is the major pathway involved in the removal of UV-induced photolesions from the transcribed strand of active genes. Two Cockayne syndrome (CS) complementation group proteins, CSA and CSB, are important for TCR repair. The molecular mechanisms by which CS proteins regulate TCR remain elusive. Here, we report the characterization of KIAA1530, an evolutionarily conserved protein that participates in this pathway through its interaction with CSA and the TFIIH complex. We found that UV irradiation led to the recruitment of KIAA1530 onto chromatin in a CSA-dependent manner. Cells lacking KIAA1530 were highly sensitive to UV irradiation and displayed deficiency in TCR. In addition, KIAA1530 depletion abrogated stability of the CSB protein following UV irradiation. More excitingly, we found that a unique CSA mutant (W361C), which was previously identified in a patient with UVsS syndrome, showed defective KIAA1530 binding and resulted in a failure of recruiting KIAA1530 and stabilizing CSB after UV treatment. Together, our data not only reveal that KIAA1530 is an important player in TCR but also lead to a better understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying UVsS syndrome. PMID:22902626

  19. Arsenic-induced promoter hypomethylation and over-expression of ERCC2 reduces DNA repair capacity in humans by non-disjunction of the ERCC2-Cdk7 complex.

    PubMed

    Paul, Somnath; Banerjee, Nilanjana; Chatterjee, Aditi; Sau, Tanmoy J; Das, Jayanta K; Mishra, Prafulla K; Chakrabarti, Partha; Bandyopadhyay, Arun; Giri, Ashok K

    2014-04-01

    Arsenic in drinking water is of critical concern in West Bengal, India, as it results in several physiological symptoms including dermatological lesions and cancers. Impairment of the DNA repair mechanism has been associated with arsenic-induced genetic damage as well as with several cancers. ERCC2 (Excision Repair Cross-Complementing rodent repair, complementation group 2), mediates DNA-repair by interacting with Cdk-activating kinase (CAK) complex, which helps in DNA proof-reading during transcription. Arsenic metabolism alters epigenetic regulation; we tried to elucidate the regulation of ERCC2 in arsenic-exposed humans. Water, urine, nails, hair and blood samples from one hundred and fifty seven exposed and eighty eight unexposed individuals were collected. Dose dependent validation was done in vitro using HepG2 and HEK-293. Arsenic content in the biological samples was higher in the exposed individuals compared with the content in unexposed individuals (p < 0.001). Bisulfite-modified methylation specific PCR showed a significant (p < 0.0001) hypomethylation of the ERCC2 promoter in the arsenic-exposed individuals. Densitometric analysis of immunoblots showed a nearly two-fold increase in expression of ERCC2 in exposed individuals, but there was an enhanced genotoxic insult as measured by micronuclei frequency. Immuno-precipitation and western blotting revealed an increased (p < 0.001) association of Cdk7 with ERCC2 in highly arsenic exposed individuals. The decrease in CAK activity was determined by observing the intensity of Ser(392) phosphorylation in p53, in vitro, which decreased with an increase in arsenic dose. Thus we infer that arsenic biotransformation leads to promoter hypomethylation of ERCC2, which in turn inhibits the normal functioning of the CAK-complex, thus affecting DNA-repair; this effect was highest among the arsenic exposed individuals with dermatological lesions. PMID:24473091

  20. Purification of mammalian DNA repair protein XRCC1

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, I.

    1995-11-01

    Malfunctioning DNA repair systems lead to cancer mutations, and cell death. XRCC1 (X-ray Repair Cross Complementing) is a human DNA repair gene that has been found to fully correct the x-ray repair defect in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell mutant EM9. The corresponding protein (XRCC1) encoded by this gene has been linked to a DNA repair pathway known as base excision repair, and affects the activity of DNA ligase III. Previously, an XRCC1 cDNA minigene (consisting of the uninterrupted coding sequence for XRCC1 protein followed by a decahistidine tag) was constructed and cloned into vector pET-16b for the purpose of: (1) overproduction of XRCC1 in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells; and (2) to facilitate rapid purification of XRCC1 from these systems. A vector is basically a DNA carrier that allows recombinant protein to be cloned and overexpressed in host cells. In this study, XRCC1 protein was overexpressed in E. coli and purified by immobilized metal affinity chromatography. Currently, the XRCC1 minigene is being inserted into a new vector [pET-26b(+)] in hopes to increase overexpression and improve purification. Once purified XRCC1 can be crystallized for structural studies, or studied in vitro for its biological function.

  1. The C-terminal Region and SUMOylation of Cockayne Syndrome Group B Protein Play Critical Roles in Transcription-coupled Nucleotide Excision Repair.

    PubMed

    Sin, Yooksil; Tanaka, Kiyoji; Saijo, Masafumi

    2016-01-15

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a recessive disorder that results in deficiencies in transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER), a subpathway of nucleotide excision repair, and cells from CS patients exhibit hypersensitivity to UV light. CS group B protein (CSB), which is the gene product of one of the genes responsible for CS, belongs to the SWI2/SNF2 DNA-dependent ATPase family and has an ATPase domain and an ubiquitin-binding domain (UBD) in the central region and the C-terminal region, respectively. The C-terminal region containing the UBD is essential for the functions of CSB. In this study, we generated several CSB deletion mutants and analyzed the functions of the C-terminal region of CSB in TC-NER. Not only the UBD but also the C-terminal 30-amino acid residues were required for UV light resistance and TC-NER. This region was needed for the interaction of CSB with RNA polymerase II, the translocation of CS group A protein to the nuclear matrix, and the association of CSB with chromatin after UV irradiation. CSB was modified by small ubiquitin-like modifier 2/3 in a UV light-dependent manner. This modification was abolished in a CSB mutant lacking the C-terminal 30 amino acid residues. However, the substitution of lysine residues in this region with arginine did not affect SUMOylation or TC-NER. By contrast, substitution of a lysine residue in the N-terminal region with arginine decreased SUMOylation and resulted in cells with defects in TC-NER. These results indicate that both the most C-terminal region and SUMOylation are important for the functions of CSB in TC-NER. PMID:26620705

  2. Clubfoot repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... release; Talipes equinovarus - repair; Tibialis anterior tendon transfer Images Clubfoot repair - series References Kelly DM. Congenital Anomalies ... provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of ...

  3. Association between Genetic Polymorphisms of DNA Repair Genes and Chromosomal Damage for 1,3-Butadiene-Exposed Workers in a Matched Study in China

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Menglong; Sun, Lei; Dong, Xiaomei; Yang, Huan; Liu, Wen-bin; Zhou, Niya; Han, Xue; Zhou, Ziyuan; Cui, Zhihong; Liu, Jing-yi; Cao, Jia; Ao, Lin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the association between polymorphisms of DNA repair genes and chromosomal damage of 1,3-butadiene- (BD-) exposed workers. The study was conducted in 45 pairs of occupationally exposed workers in a BD product workshop and matched control workers in an administrative office and a circulatory water workshop in China. Newly developed biomarkers (micronuclei, MNi; nucleoplasmic bridges, NPBs; nuclear buds, NBUDs) in the cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus (CBMN) cytome assay were adopted to detect chromosomal damage. PCR and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) are adopted to analyze polymorphisms of DNA repair genes, such as X-ray repair cross-complementing Group 1 (XRCC1), O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerases (ADPRT), and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonucleases (APE1). The BD-exposed workers exhibited increased frequencies of MNi and NPBs when compared to subjects in the control group. The results also show that the BD-exposed workers carrying XRCC1 diplotypes TCGA-CCGG (4.25 ± 2.06‰) (FR = 2.10, 95% CI: 1.03–4.28) and TCGG-TCGA (5.80 ± 3.56‰) (FR = 2.75, 95% CI: 0.76–2.65) had statistically higher NBUD frequencies than those who carried diplotype TCGG-TCGG (1.89 ± 1.27‰). Our study suggests that polymorphisms of XRCC1 gene may influence chromosomal damage in BD-exposed workers. PMID:26339595

  4. XRCC1 and XPD DNA repair gene polymorphisms: A potential risk factor for glaucoma in the Pakistani population

    PubMed Central

    Yousaf, Sajeela; Khan, Muhammad Imran; Micheal, Shazia; Akhtar, Farah; Ali, Syeda Hafiza Benish; Riaz, Moeen; Ali, Mahmood; Lall, Pramila; Waheed, Nadia Khalida; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Ahmed, Asifa

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The present study was designed to determine the association of polymorphisms of the DNA repair genes X-ray cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) (c.1316G>A [rs25487]) and xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group D (XPD) (c.2298A>C [rs13181]) with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and primary closed-angle glaucoma (PCAG). Methods In this prospective case-control study, polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was used to study the association of XRCC1 and XPD with 160 POAG patients, 163 PCAG patients, and 193 unaffected controls. Results XRCC1 rs25487 was found to be significantly associated specifically with male POAG patients (χ2=13.2 [p=0.001]), only for the dominant model (odds ratio [OR]=2.65 [95% confidence interval [CI]=1.44–4.85], p<0.005). In addition XPD rs13181 was also found to be associated with male POAG patients (χ2=12.1 [p<0.005]), for both dominant (OR=2.44 [95% CI=1.33–4.47], p<0.005) as well as recessive model (OR=3.62 [95% CI=1.45–9.01], p<0.01). Combined genotypes of both the genes revealed that the heterozygote AC/GA was significantly associated with the male POAG patients (z=3.00 [p<0.001]). The AA/GG genotype was present at a higher frequency in the male controls and the AA/GA in the female controls and could thus have a protective role in males and females, respectively. Conclusions We postulate that defects in the DNA repair genes XRCC1 and XPD may possibly be associated with the progression of POAG in male patients of Pakistani origin. PMID:21617750

  5. INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES

    SciTech Connect

    Bill Bruce; Nancy Porter; George Ritter; Matt Boring; Mark Lozev; Ian Harris; Bill Mohr; Dennis Harwig; Robin Gordon; Chris Neary; Mike Sullivan

    2005-07-20

    The two broad categories of fiber-reinforced composite liner repair and deposited weld metal repair technologies were reviewed and evaluated for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Principal conclusions from a survey of natural gas transmission industry pipeline operators can be summarized in terms of the following performance requirements for internal repair: (1) Use of internal repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water, in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway crossings. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling when a new bore must be created to solve a leak or other problem. (3) Typical travel distances can be divided into three distinct groups: up to 305 m (1,000 ft.); between 305 m and 610 m (1,000 ft. and 2,000 ft.); and beyond 914 m (3,000 ft.). All three groups require pig-based systems. A despooled umbilical system would suffice for the first two groups which represents 81% of survey respondents. The third group would require an onboard self-contained power unit for propulsion and welding/liner repair energy needs. (4) The most common size range for 80% to 90% of operators surveyed is 508 mm (20 in.) to 762 mm (30 in.), with 95% using 558.8 mm (22 in.) pipe. Evaluation trials were conducted on pipe sections with simulated corrosion damage repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liners, carbon fiber-reinforced composite liners, and weld deposition. Additional un-repaired pipe sections were evaluated in the virgin condition and with simulated damage. Hydrostatic failure pressures for pipe sections repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liner were only marginally greater than that of pipe sections without

  6. INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES

    SciTech Connect

    Robin Gordon; Bill Bruce; Ian Harris; Dennis Harwig; George Ritter; Bill Mohr; Matt Boring; Nancy Porter; Mike Sullivan; Chris Neary

    2004-12-31

    The two broad categories of fiber-reinforced composite liner repair and deposited weld metal repair technologies were reviewed and evaluated for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Principal conclusions from a survey of natural gas transmission industry pipeline operators can be summarized in terms of the following performance requirements for internal repair: (1) Use of internal repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water, in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway crossings. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling when a new bore must be created to solve a leak or other problem. (3) Typical travel distances can be divided into three distinct groups: up to 305 m (1,000 ft.); between 305 m and 610 m (1,000 ft. and 2,000 ft.); and beyond 914 m (3,000 ft.). All three groups require pig-based systems. A despooled umbilical system would suffice for the first two groups which represents 81% of survey respondents. The third group would require an onboard self-contained power unit for propulsion and welding/liner repair energy needs. (4) The most common size range for 80% to 90% of operators surveyed is 508 mm (20 in.) to 762 mm (30 in.), with 95% using 558.8 mm (22 in.) pipe. Evaluation trials were conducted on pipe sections with simulated corrosion damage repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liners, carbon fiber-reinforced composite liners, and weld deposition. Additional un-repaired pipe sections were evaluated in the virgin condition and with simulated damage. Hydrostatic failure pressures for pipe sections repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liner were only marginally greater than that of pipe sections without

  7. INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES

    SciTech Connect

    Robin Gordon; Bill Bruce; Ian Harris; Dennis Harwig; George Ritter; Bill Mohr; Matt Boring; Nancy Porter; Mike Sullivan; Chris Neary

    2004-08-17

    The two broad categories of fiber-reinforced composite liner repair and deposited weld metal repair technologies were reviewed and evaluated for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Principal conclusions from a survey of natural gas transmission industry pipeline operators can be summarized in terms of the following performance requirements for internal repair: (1) Use of internal repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water, in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling when a new bore must be created to solve a leak or other problem. (3) Typical travel distances can be divided into three distinct groups: up to 305 m (1,000 ft.); between 305 m and 610 m (1,000 ft. and 2,000 ft.); and beyond 914 m (3,000 ft.). All three groups require pig-based systems. A despooled umbilical system would suffice for the first two groups which represents 81% of survey respondents. The third group would require an onboard self-contained power unit for propulsion and welding/liner repair energy needs. (4) The most common size range for 80% to 90% of operators surveyed is 508 mm (20 in.) to 762 mm (30 in.), with 95% using 558.8 mm (22 in.) pipe. Evaluation trials were conducted on pipe sections with simulated corrosion damage repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liners, carbon fiber-reinforced composite liners, and weld deposition. Additional un-repaired pipe sections were evaluated in the virgin condition and with simulated damage. Hydrostatic failure pressures for pipe sections repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liner were only marginally greater than that of pipe sections without liners

  8. Polymorphisms in the DNA Repair Gene ERCC2/XPD and Breast Cancer Risk: A HapMap-Based Case–Control Study Among Han Women in a Chinese Less-Developed Area

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Haitao; Guo, Hongyun; Yang, Suisheng; Zhu, Gongjian; Guo, Huan; Wang, Lan; Li, Yonghui; Yang, Kai; Li, Haining; Min, Jianping; Li, Xueping; Hu, Qingrong; Wang, Yumei; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Binming; Chen, Xuezhong

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Genetic variations in DNA repair genes may impact repair functions, DNA damage, and breast cancer risk. This study is aimed to assess the associations of genetic polymorphisms in excision repair cross-complementing group 2 (ERCC2) with the risk of developing breast cancer. Materials and Methods: In total, 101 histopathologically confirmed breast cancer cases and 101 age/region-matched healthy controls were genotyped for rs3916840, rs1799793, and rs238416 in ERCC2 by polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism. Results: The rs238416 heterozygous GA genotype combined with the rs238416 genotypes (GA+AA) showed a significant association with breast cancer susceptibility (corrected p<0.01, odds ratio [OR]=0.29, 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.15–0.54; corrected p<0.01, OR=0.31, 95% CI=0.17–0.56, respectively). The rs238416 GA genotype carriers had a decreased risk of breast cancer. However, we observed no significant association between the rs3916840 and rs1799793 polymorphisms in ERCC2 and breast cancer risk. Moreover, haplotype analysis showed that the ACG haplotype was associated with a significantly decreased risk of breast cancer, whereas the GCG haplotype was associated with a significantly increased risk of breast cancer (corrected p=0.004 and p=0.002, respectively). Multifactor dimensionality reduction analysis demonstrated that the interactions between rs3916840 and rs238416 were significantly synergistic. Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate that the rs238416 heterozygous genotype likely has a higher DNA repair capacity and, thus, can be protective against breast cancer in Chinese Han women. PMID:25117088

  9. Genetic variation in DNA-repair pathways and response to radiochemotherapy in esophageal adenocarcinoma: a retrospective cohort study of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Recent data in esophageal cancer suggests the variant allele of a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in XRCC1 may be associated with resistance to radiochemotherapy. However, this SNP has not been assessed in a histologically homogeneous clinical trial cohort that has been treated with a uniform approach. In addition, whether germline DNA may serve as a surrogate for tumor genotype at this locus is unknown in this disease. Our objective was to assess this SNP in relation to the pathologic complete response (pCR) rate in subjects with esophageal adenocarcinoma who received cisplatin-based preoperative radiochemotherapy in a multicenter clinical trial (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group 1201). As a secondary aim, we investigated the rate of allelic imbalance between germline and tumor DNA. Methods Eighty-one eligible treatment-naïve subjects with newly diagnosed resectable esophageal adenocarcinoma received radiotherapy (45 Gy) concurrent with cisplatin-based chemotherapy, with planned subsequent surgical resection. The primary endpoint was pCR, defined as complete absence of tumor in the surgical specimen after radiochemotherapy. Using germline DNA from 60 subjects, we examined the base-excision repair SNP, XRCC1 Arg399Gln, and 4 other SNPs in nucleotide excision (XPD Lys751Gln and Asp312Asn, ERCC1 3' flank) and double-stranded break (XRCC2 5' flank) repair pathways, and correlated genotype with pCR rate. Paired tumor tissue was used to estimate the frequency of allelic imbalance at the XRCC1 SNP. Results The variant allele of the XRCC1 SNP (399Gln) was detected in 52% of subjects. Only 6% of subjects with the variant allele experienced a pCR, compared to 28% of subjects without the variant allele (odds ratio 5.37 for failing to achieve pCR, p = 0.062). Allelic imbalance at this locus was found in only 10% of informative subjects, suggesting that germline genotype may reflect tumor genotype at this locus. No significant association with pCR was noted

  10. INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES

    SciTech Connect

    Robin Gordon; Bill Bruce; Ian Harris; Dennis Harwig; Nancy Porter; Mike Sullivan; Chris Neary

    2004-04-12

    solve a leak or other problem. (3) Typical travel distances can be divided into three distinct groups: up to 305 m (1,000 ft.); between 305 m and 610 m (1,000 ft. and 2,000 ft.); and beyond 914 m (3,000 ft.). All three groups require pig-based systems. A despooled umbilical system would suffice for the first two groups which represents 81% of survey respondents. The third group would require an onboard self-contained power unit for propulsion and welding/liner repair energy needs. (4) Pipe diameter sizes range from 50.8 mm (2 in.) through 1,219.2 mm (48 in.). The most common size range for 80% to 90% of operators surveyed is 508 mm to 762 mm (20 in. to 30 in.), with 95% using 558.8 mm (22 in.) pipe. An evaluation of potential repair methods clearly indicates that the project should continue to focus on the development of a repair process involving the use of GMAW welding and on the development of a repair process involving the use of fiber-reinforced composite liners.

  11. DNA repair gene ERCC1 polymorphisms and glioma susceptibility among Chinese population: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chunming; Shen, Fang; Du, Jianmin; Wang, Xiaohua; Su, Jin; Liu, Zhanli; Huang, Xianmei

    2015-01-01

    Background: Excision repair cross complementation group 1 (ERCC1) has been shown to be involved in the progression of glioma susceptibility. However, the results remain conflict. The aim of this study was to systematically review and evaluate the role of ERCC1 C118T and C8092A polymorphisms in glioma risk among Chinese population. Methods: Related case-control studies were searched in online electronic databases. Odds ratio (OR) with its 95% confidence interval (CI) were employed to calculate the extracted data. Results: Total seven articles were retrieved, including 4426 subjects (1926 were glioma patients and 2500 were matched controls). No significant heterogeneity was found between studies (I2=0%, P>0.01). Our results demonstrated that A allele and AA genotype of ERCC1 C8092A polymorphism have a positive association with increasing the risk of glioma in the fixed-effect model (A vs. C: OR=1.13, 95% CI=1.02-1.25, P=0.02; AA vs. CC: OR=1.29, 95% CI=1.04-1.61, P=0.02; AA vs. CA+CC: OR=1.25, 95% CI=1.01-1.55, P=0.04). However, no significant relationship was found between C118T variant and glioma susceptibility. Conclusions: Our results indicated that ERCC1 C8092A, not C118T polymorphism might be a biomarker for patients with glioma among Chinese population. Future studies with more ethnicities are needed to explore the precise association. PMID:26379816

  12. Gastroschisis repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... and surgery in general are: Allergic reactions to medicines Breathing problems Bleeding Infection Risks for gastroschisis repair are: Breathing problems if the baby's belly area (abdominal space) is smaller than normal. The baby may need ...

  13. Hydrocele repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... is excellent. However, another hydrocele may form over time, or if there was also a hernia present. Alternative Names Hydrocelectomy Images Hydrocele repair - series References Aiken JJ, Oldham KT. Inguinal hernias. In: ...

  14. Chemopreventive effects of diverse dietary phytochemicals against DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch carcinogenesis via the induction of Nrf2-mediated cytoprotective antioxidant, detoxification, and DNA repair enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, K; Thiyagarajan, P; Rathna Nandhini, J; Mishra, Rajakishore; Nagini, S

    2013-08-01

    Identifying agents that activate nuclear factor erythroid-2 related factor-2 (Nrf2), a key regulator of various cytoprotective antioxidant, and detoxifying enzymes has evolved as a promising strategy for cancer chemoprevention. In the present study, we investigated the effect of dietary supplementation of structurally diverse phytochemicals- astaxanthin, blueberry, chlorophyllin, ellagic acid, and theaphenon-E on Nrf2 signaling, and xenobiotic-metabolizing and antioxidant enzymes in the 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis model. We observed that these phytochemicals induce nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 while downregulating its negative regulator, Keap-1. This was associated with reduced expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1, the cytochrome P450 isoforms involved in the activation of DMBA, and the oxidative stress marker 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine coupled with upregulation of the phase II detoxification enzymes glutathione S-transferases and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 and the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase. In addition, these dietary phytochemicals also enhanced the DNA repair enzymes 8-oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (OGG1), xeroderma pigmentosum D (XPD), xeroderma pigmentosum G (XPG), and x-ray repair cross complementing group 1 (XRCC1). Our data provide substantial evidence that the dietary phytochemicals inhibit the development of HBP carcinomas through the activation of Nrf2/Keap-1 signaling and by upregulating cytoprotective enzymes. The extent of the chemopreventive effects of the phytochemicals was in the order: chlorophyllin > blueberry > ellagic acid > astaxanthin > theaphenon-E. Thus these dietary phytochemicals that function as potent activators of Nrf2 and its orchestrated response are novel candidates for cancer chemoprevention. PMID:23707664

  15. Bond strength of repaired amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Rey, Rosalia; Mondragon, Eduardo; Shen, Chiayi

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study investigated the interfacial flexural strength (FS) of amalgam repairs and the optimal combination of repair materials and mechanical retention required for a consistent and durable repair bond. Amalgam bricks were created, each with 1 end roughened to expose a fresh surface before repair. Four groups followed separate repair protocols: group 1, bonding agent with amalgam; group 2, bonding agent with composite resin; group 3, mechanical retention (slot) with amalgam; and group 4, slot with bonding agent and amalgam. Repaired specimens were stored in artificial saliva for 1, 10, 30, 120, or 360 days before being loaded to failure in a 3-point bending test. Statistical analysis showed significant changes in median FS over time in groups 2 and 4. The effect of the repair method on the FS values after each storage period was significant for most groups except the 30-day storage groups. Amalgam-amalgam repair with adequate condensation yielded the most consistent and durable bond. An amalgam bonding agent could be beneficial when firm condensation on the repair surface cannot be achieved or when tooth structure is involved. Composite resin can be a viable option for amalgam repair in an esthetically demanding region, but proper mechanical modification of the amalgam surface and selection of the proper bonding system are essential. PMID:26325656

  16. Tissue repair

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    As living beings that encounter every kind of traumatic event from paper cut to myocardial infarction, we must possess ways to heal damaged tissues. While some animals are able to regrow complete body parts following injury (such as the earthworm who grows a new head following bisection), humans are sadly incapable of such feats. Our means of recovery following tissue damage consists largely of repair rather than pure regeneration. Thousands of times in our lives, a meticulously scripted but unseen wound healing drama plays, with cells serving as actors, extracellular matrix as the setting and growth factors as the means of communication. This article briefly reviews the cells involved in tissue repair, their signaling and proliferation mechanisms and the function of the extracellular matrix, then presents the actors and script for the three acts of the tissue repair drama. PMID:21220961

  17. Position Paper of the European Society of Cardiology Working Group Cellular Biology of the Heart: cell-based therapies for myocardial repair and regeneration in ischemic heart disease and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Madonna, Rosalinda; Van Laake, Linda W; Davidson, Sean M; Engel, Felix B; Hausenloy, Derek J; Lecour, Sandrine; Leor, Jonathan; Perrino, Cinzia; Schulz, Rainer; Ytrehus, Kirsti; Landmesser, Ulf; Mummery, Christine L; Janssens, Stefan; Willerson, James; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Ferdinandy, Péter; Sluijter, Joost P G

    2016-06-14

    Despite improvements in modern cardiovascular therapy, the morbidity and mortality of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and heart failure (HF) remain significant in Europe and worldwide. Patients with IHD may benefit from therapies that would accelerate natural processes of postnatal collateral vessel formation and/or muscle regeneration. Here, we discuss the use of cells in the context of heart repair, and the most relevant results and current limitations from clinical trials using cell-based therapies to treat IHD and HF. We identify and discuss promising potential new therapeutic strategies that include ex vivo cell-mediated gene therapy, the use of biomaterials and cell-free therapies aimed at increasing the success rates of therapy for IHD and HF. The overall aim of this Position Paper of the ESC Working Group Cellular Biology of the Heart is to provide recommendations on how to improve the therapeutic application of cell-based therapies for cardiac regeneration and repair. PMID:27055812

  18. Outboard Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardway, Jack

    This consortium-developed instructor's manual for small engine repair (with focus on outboard motors) consists of the following nine instructional units: electrical remote control assembly, mechanical remote control assembly, tilt assemblies, exhaust housing, propeller and trim tabs, cooling system, mechanical gearcase, electrical gearcase, and…

  19. Snowmobile Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helbling, Wayne

    This guide is designed to provide and/or improve instruction for occupational training in the area of snowmobile repair, and includes eight areas. Each area consists of one or more units of instruction, with each instructional unit including some or all of the following basic components: Performance objectives, suggested activities for teacher and…

  20. Motorcycle Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hein, Jim; Bundy, Mike

    This motorcycle repair curriculum guide contains the following ten areas of study: brake systems, clutches, constant mesh transmissions, final drives, suspension, mechanical starting mechanisms, electrical systems, fuel systems, lubrication systems, and overhead camshafts. Each area consists of one or more units of instruction. Each instructional…

  1. Hydrocele repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... small surgical cut in the fold of the groin, and then drains the fluid. The sac (hydrocele) holding the fluid may be removed. The surgeon strengthens the muscle wall with stitches. This is called a hernia repair. Sometimes the surgeon uses a laparoscope to do ...

  2. Bladder exstrophy repair

    MedlinePlus

    Bladder birth defect repair; Everted bladder repair; Exposed bladder repair; Repair of bladder exstrophy ... in boys and is often linked to other birth defects. Surgery is necessary to: Allow the child to ...

  3. Turbine repair process, repaired coating, and repaired turbine component

    DOEpatents

    Das, Rupak; Delvaux, John McConnell; Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2015-11-03

    A turbine repair process, a repaired coating, and a repaired turbine component are disclosed. The turbine repair process includes providing a turbine component having a higher-pressure region and a lower-pressure region, introducing particles into the higher-pressure region, and at least partially repairing an opening between the higher-pressure region and the lower-pressure region with at least one of the particles to form a repaired turbine component. The repaired coating includes a silicon material, a ceramic matrix composite material, and a repaired region having the silicon material deposited on and surrounded by the ceramic matrix composite material. The repaired turbine component a ceramic matrix composite layer and a repaired region having silicon material deposited on and surrounded by the ceramic matrix composite material.

  4. Meniscal Repair

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Kyoung Ho

    2014-01-01

    The meniscus has several important roles, such as transmission of the load, absorption of the shock in the knee joint, acting as a secondary anteroposterior stabilizer of the knee joint, and contributing to proprioception of the knee joint. Degenerative changes of the knee joint develop in the long-term follow-up even after partial meniscectomy. Thus, there has been growing interest in meniscal repair. In addition, with increased understanding of the important roles of the meniscal root and advancement of diagnostic methods, efforts have been made to ensure preservation of the meniscal roots. In this review article, we will discuss operative techniques and clinical outcomes of arthroscopic repair of the meniscus and the meniscal root and postoperative rehabilitation and complications as well. PMID:24944971

  5. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular

    MedlinePlus

    ... Endovascular aneurysm repair - aorta; AAA repair - endovascular; Repair - aortic aneurysm - endovascular ... leaking or bleeding. You may have an abdominal aortic aneurysm that is not causing any symptoms or problems. ...

  6. Eye muscle repair - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lazy eye repair - discharge; Strabismus repair - discharge; Extraocular muscle surgery - discharge ... You or your child had eye muscle repair surgery to correct eye muscle ... term for crossed eyes is strabismus. Children most often ...

  7. Brain aneurysm repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... aneurysm repair; Dissecting aneurysm repair; Endovascular aneurysm repair - brain; Subarachnoid hemorrhage - aneurysm ... Your scalp, skull, and the coverings of the brain are opened. A metal clip is placed at ...

  8. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular

    MedlinePlus

    EVAR; Endovascular aneurysm repair - aorta; AAA repair - endovascular; Repair - aortic aneurysm - endovascular ... leaking or bleeding. You may have an abdominal aortic aneurysm that is not causing any symptoms or problems. ...

  9. The Q motif of Fanconi anemia group J protein (FANCJ) DNA helicase regulates its dimerization, DNA binding, and DNA repair function.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuliang; Sommers, Joshua A; Loiland, Jason A; Kitao, Hiroyuki; Kuper, Jochen; Kisker, Caroline; Brosh, Robert M

    2012-06-22

    The Q motif, conserved in a number of RNA and DNA helicases, is proposed to be important for ATP binding based on structural data, but its precise biochemical functions are less certain. FANCJ encodes a Q motif DEAH box DNA helicase implicated in Fanconi anemia and breast cancer. A Q25A mutation of the invariant glutamine in the Q motif abolished its ability to complement cisplatin or telomestatin sensitivity of a fancj null cell line and exerted a dominant negative effect. Biochemical characterization of the purified recombinant FANCJ-Q25A protein showed that the mutation disabled FANCJ helicase activity and the ability to disrupt protein-DNA interactions. FANCJ-Q25A showed impaired DNA binding and ATPase activity but displayed ATP binding and temperature-induced unfolding transition similar to FANCJ-WT. Size exclusion chromatography and sedimentation velocity analyses revealed that FANCJ-WT existed as molecular weight species corresponding to a monomer and a dimer, and the dimeric form displayed a higher specific activity for ATPase and helicase, as well as greater DNA binding. In contrast, FANCJ-Q25A existed only as a monomer, devoid of helicase activity. Thus, the Q motif is essential for FANCJ enzymatic activity in vitro and DNA repair function in vivo. PMID:22582397

  10. INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES

    SciTech Connect

    Robin Gordon; Bill Bruce; Nancy Porter; Mike Sullivan; Chris Neary

    2003-05-01

    The two broad categories of deposited weld metal repair and fiber-reinforced composite repair technologies were reviewed for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Preliminary test programs were developed for both deposited weld metal repairs and for fiber-reinforced composite repair. To date, all of the experimental work pertaining to the evaluation of potential repair methods has focused on fiber-reinforced composite repairs. Hydrostatic testing was also conducted on four pipeline sections with simulated corrosion damage: two with composite liners and two without.

  11. Repair Integrity and Clinical Outcomes Following Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Ariel A.; Mark, P.; DiVenere, Jessica Megan; Klinge, Stephen Austin; Arciero, Robert A.; Mazzocca, Augustus D.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To prospectively evaluate the effect of early versus delayed motion on repair integrity on 6-month postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans following rotator cuff repair, and to correlate repair integrity with clinical and functional outcomes. We hypothesized that repair integrity would differ between the early and delayed groups and that patients with repair failures would have worse clinical and functional outcomes. Methods: This was a prospective, randomized, single blinded clinical trial comparing an early motion (post-op day 2-3) to a delayed motion (post-op day 28) rehabilitation protocol following arthroscopic repair of isolated supraspinatus tears. All patients underwent MRI at 6 months post-operatively as part of the study protocol. A blinded board-certified and fellowship-trained orthopaedic surgeon (not part of the surgical team) reviewed operative photos and video to confirm the presence of a full thickness supraspinatus tear and to ensure an adequate and consistent repair. The same surgeon along with a blinded sports medicine fellowship-trained musculoskeletal radiologist independently reviewed all MRIs to determine whether the repair was intact at 6 months. Outcome measures were collected by independent evaluators who were also blinded to group assignment. These included the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff (WORC) index, Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE) ratings, pain scores, sling use, and physical exam data. Enrolled patients were followed at 6 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year. Results: From October 2008 to April 2012, 73 patients met all inclusion criteria and were willing to participate. 36 patients were randomized to delayed motion and 37 were randomized to early motion. The final study group at 6 months consisted of 58 study participants. Postoperative MRIs were obtained on all of these patients at 6 months regardless of whether or not they were progressing as expected. These MRIs demonstrated an overall failure rate of

  12. Energy and Technology Review: Unlocking the mysteries of DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Quirk, W.A.

    1993-04-01

    DNA, the genetic blueprint, has the remarkable property of encoding its own repair following diverse types of structural damage induced by external agents or normal metabolism. We are studying the interplay of DNA damaging agents, repair genes, and their protein products to decipher the complex biochemical pathways that mediate such repair. Our research focuses on repair processes that correct DNA damage produced by chemical mutagens and radiation, both ionizing and ultraviolet. The most important type of DNA repair in human cells is called excision repair. This multistep process removes damaged or inappropriate pieces of DNA -- often as a string of 29 nucleotides containing the damage -- and replaces them with intact ones. We have isolated, cloned, and mapped several human repair genes associated with the nucleotide excision repair pathway and involved in the repair of DNA damage after exposure to ultraviolet light or mutagens in cooked food. We have shown that a defect in one of these repair genes, ERCC2, is responsible for the repair deficiency in one of the groups of patients with the recessive genetic disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP group D). We are exploring ways to purify sufficient quantities (milligrams) of the protein products of these and other repair genes so that we can understand their functions. Our long-term goals are to link defective repair proteins to human DNA repair disorders that predispose to cancer, and to produce DNA-repair-deficient mice that can serve as models for the human disorders.

  13. Book Repair Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milevski, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    This book repair manual developed for the Illinois Cooperative Conservation Program includes book structure and book problems, book repair procedures for 4 specific problems, a description of adhesive bindings, a glossary, an annotated list of 11 additional readings, book repair supplies and suppliers, and specifications for book repair kits. (LRW)

  14. Arsenic Exposure Is Associated with Decreased DNA Repair in Vitro and in Individuals Exposed to Drinking Water Arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, Angeline S.; Burgess, Jefferey L.; Meza, Maria M.; Demidenko, Eugene; Waugh, Mary G.; Hamilton, Joshua W.; Karagas, Margaret R.

    2006-01-01

    The mechanism(s) by which arsenic exposure contributes to human cancer risk is unknown; however, several indirect cocarcinogenesis mechanisms have been proposed. Many studies support the role of As in altering one or more DNA repair processes. In the present study we used individual-level exposure data and biologic samples to investigate the effects of As exposure on nucleotide excision repair in two study populations, focusing on the excision repair cross-complement 1 (ERCC1) component. We measured drinking water, urinary, or toenail As levels and obtained cryopreserved lymphocytes of a subset of individuals enrolled in epidemiologic studies in New Hampshire (USA) and Sonora (Mexico). Additionally, in corroborative laboratory studies, we examined the effects of As on DNA repair in a cultured human cell model. Arsenic exposure was associated with decreased expression of ERCC1 in isolated lymphocytes at the mRNA and protein levels. In addition, lymphocytes from As-exposed individuals showed higher levels of DNA damage, as measured by a comet assay, both at baseline and after a 2-acetoxyacetylaminofluorene (2-AAAF) challenge. In support of the in vivo data, As exposure decreased ERCC1 mRNA expression and enhanced levels of DNA damage after a 2-AAAF challenge in cell culture. These data provide further evidence to support the ability of As to inhibit the DNA repair machinery, which is likely to enhance the genotoxicity and mutagenicity of other directly genotoxic compounds, as part of a cocarcinogenic mechanism of action. PMID:16882524

  15. Laparoscopic Versus Open Umbilical Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Mason, Edward; Duncan, Titus; Wilson, Russell

    2003-01-01

    Background: The use of prosthetic material for open umbilical hernia repair has been reported to reduce recurrence rates. The aim of this study was to compare outcomes after laparoscopic versus open umbilical hernia repair. Methods: We reviewed all umbilical hernia repairs performed from November 1995 to October 2000. Demographic data, hernia characteristics, and outcomes were compared. Results: Of the 76 patients identified, 32 underwent laparoscopic repair (LR), 24 primary suture repairs (PSR), and 20 open repairs with mesh (ORWM). Preoperative characteristics were similar between groups. Hernia size was similar between LR and ORWM groups, and both were larger than that in the PSR group. ORWM compared with the other techniques resulted in longer operating time, more frequent use of drains, higher complication rates, and prolonged return to normal activities (RTNA). The length of stay (LOS) was longer in the ORWM than in the PSR group. When compared with ORWM, LR resulted in lower recurrence rates. LR resulted in fewer recurrences in patients with previous repairs and hernias larger than 3 cm than in both open techniques. Conclusions: LR results in faster RTNA, and lower complication and recurrence rates compared with those in ORWM. Patients with larger hernias and previous repairs benefit from LR. PMID:14626398

  16. A prospective study of bilateral inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed Central

    Serpell, J. W.; Johnson, C. D.; Jarrett, P. E.

    1990-01-01

    A prospective study of outcome after inguinal hernia repair in patients undergoing simultaneous repair of bilateral hernias (n = 31), sequential repair of bilateral hernias (n = 5), and unilateral hernia repair (n = 75) is reported. There were no differences in wound complications, post-operative respiratory complications, or other adverse effects in the three groups. Operating time was similar in the unilateral and bilateral simultaneous repairs (median 55 min), but was longer (100 min) for the combination of two sequential repairs. Hospital stay was shortest for patients undergoing unilateral repair (2 days) but was less with bilateral simultaneous repair (4 days) than after two sequential repairs (total of 6 days). There were 12 (11%) wound complications of which five (5%) were infections. There was no difference in complication rate between unilateral and bilateral hernia repair. Postoperative recovery was assessed prospectively and was recorded at 1 month. There was no difference between unilateral and bilateral simultaneous repairs in the number of days before the patient was able to climb stairs easily, drive a car or return to work. The duration of the requirement for analgesia was similar in each group. We conclude that bilateral simultaneous hernia repair can be carried out with no greater morbidity than a unilateral repair, and the return to normal activity is as rapid. Bilateral hernias should be repaired simultaneously rather than sequentially. PMID:2221764

  17. Rapid road repair vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Mara, Leo M.

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed is a rapid road repair vehicle capable of moving over a surface to be repaired at near normal posted traffic speeds to scan for and find an the high rate of speed, imperfections in the pavement surface, prepare the surface imperfection for repair by air pressure and vacuum cleaning, applying a correct amount of the correct patching material to effect the repair, smooth the resulting repaired surface, and catalog the location and quality of the repairs for maintenance records of the road surface. The rapid road repair vehicle can repair surface imperfections at lower cost, improved quality, at a higher rate of speed than was was heretofor possible, with significantly reduced exposure to safety and health hazards associated with this kind of road repair activities in the past.

  18. Rapid road repair vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Mara, L.M.

    1998-05-05

    Disclosed is a rapid road repair vehicle capable of moving over a surface to be repaired at near normal posted traffic speeds to scan for and find at the high rate of speed, imperfections in the pavement surface, prepare the surface imperfection for repair by air pressure and vacuum cleaning, applying a correct amount of the correct patching material to effect the repair, smooth the resulting repaired surface, and catalog the location and quality of the repairs for maintenance records of the road surface. The rapid road repair vehicle can repair surface imperfections at lower cost, improved quality, at a higher rate of speed than was not heretofor possible, with significantly reduced exposure to safety and health hazards associated with this kind of road repair activities in the past. 2 figs.

  19. Bio-enhanced repair of the anterior cruciate ligament

    PubMed Central

    Proffen, Benedikt L.; Sieker, Jakob T.; Murray, Martha

    2015-01-01

    Suture repair of the ACL has been widely abandoned in favor of ACL reconstruction, largely due to the high rates of failure and unreliability of the outcomes following suture repair. However, there have been recent basic science studies which suggest that combining a suture repair with a biologic adjunct may improve the results of suture repair of the ACL, with several studies in large animal models showing equivalent strength of an ACL treated with bio-enhanced repaired with that of an ACL graft at 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery. In addition, the groups treated with bio-enhanced repair had significantly less osteoarthritis when compared with the animals undergoing ACL reconstruction. These findings have led to a renewed interest in bio-enhanced primary repair as a way to make repair of the ACL a viable option for a select group of patients in the future. PMID:25595694

  20. Pol β associated complex and base excision repair factors in mouse fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Rajendra; Williams, Jason G; Hou, Esther W; Wilson, Samuel H

    2012-12-01

    During mammalian base excision repair (BER) of lesion-containing DNA, it is proposed that toxic strand-break intermediates generated throughout the pathway are sequestered and passed from one step to the next until repair is complete. This stepwise process is termed substrate channeling. A working model evaluated here is that a complex of BER factors may facilitate the BER process. FLAG-tagged DNA polymerase (pol) β was expressed in mouse fibroblasts carrying a deletion in the endogenous pol β gene, and the cell extract was subjected to an 'affinity-capture' procedure using anti-FLAG antibody. The pol β affinity-capture fraction (ACF) was found to contain several BER factors including polymerase-1, X-ray cross-complementing factor1-DNA ligase III and enzymes involved in processing 3'-blocked ends of BER intermediates, e.g. polynucleotide kinase and tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1. In contrast, DNA glycosylases, apurinic/aprymidinic endonuclease 1 and flap endonuclease 1 and several other factors involved in BER were not present. Some of the BER factors in the pol β ACF were in a multi-protein complex as observed by sucrose gradient centrifugation. The pol β ACF was capable of substrate channeling for steps in vitro BER and was proficient in in vitro repair of substrates mimicking a 3'-blocked topoisomerase I covalent intermediate or an oxidative stress-induced 3'-blocked intermediate. PMID:23042675

  1. DNA Mismatch Repair

    PubMed Central

    MARINUS, M. G.

    2014-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair functions to correct replication errors in newly synthesized DNA and to prevent recombination between related, but not identical (homeologous), DNA sequences. The mechanism of mismatch repair is best understood in Escherichia coli and is the main focus of this review. The early genetic studies of mismatch repair are described as a basis for the subsequent biochemical characterization of the system. The effects of mismatch repair on homologous and homeologous recombination are described. The relationship of mismatch repair to cell toxicity induced by various drugs is included. The VSP (Very Short Patch) repair system is described in detail. PMID:26442827

  2. Eye muscle repair - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000111.htm Eye muscle repair - discharge To use the sharing features on ... enable JavaScript. You or your child had eye muscle repair surgery to correct eye muscle problems that ...

  3. Umbilical hernia repair

    MedlinePlus

    Umbilical hernia repair is surgery to repair an umbilical hernia . An umbilical hernia is a sac (pouch) formed from the ... the hole or weak spot caused by the umbilical hernia. Your surgeon may also lay a piece ...

  4. Femoral hernia repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... pushed back in. The weakened area is sewn closed or strengthened. This repair can be done with ... end of the repair, the cuts are stitched closed. In laparascopic surgery: The surgeon makes three to ...

  5. Laparoscopic Inguinal Hernia Repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... Some hernia repairs are performed using a small telescope known as a laparoscope. If your surgeon has ... in the abdominal wall (muscle) using small incisions, telescopes and a patch (mesh). Laparoscopic repair offers a ...

  6. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular- discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000236.htm Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular - discharge To use the sharing features ... enable JavaScript. AAA repair - endovascular - discharge; Repair - aortic aneurysm - endovascular - discharge; EVAR - discharge; Endovascular aneurysm repair - discharge ...

  7. Surgical repair of myelomeningocele.

    PubMed

    Lanigan, M W

    1993-12-01

    The birth of an infant with myelomeningocele provides a devastating experience for parents, a management dilemma for medical personnel, and an economic liability of immense proportions associated with the multiple disciplinary management program throughout the patient's life. Although undue delay in the onset of therapy is to be avoided, time can be taken for through assessment and appropriate discussion with the family without compromising the outcome. Once decisions are made to proceed with repair, early cover of the myelomeningocele defect is necessary to prevent progressive loss of neural tissue through exposure, desiccation, and sepsis. Many techniques of repair have been advocated. In principle, the ideal should be applicable to all sizes of defect, should be able to be executed in the neonatal age group with minimal morbidity, and should provide long-term, stable soft tissue cover without significant secondary scarring. A technique adhering to these principles is described and supported by results in a personal series of 84 patients during a 12-year period. PMID:8297082

  8. Tensile bond strength of repaired amalgam.

    PubMed

    Hadavi, F; Hey, J H; Czech, D; Ambrose, E R

    1992-03-01

    This study evaluated the tensile strength of repaired high-copper amalgams and analyzed the different treatments of the amalgam interface prior to repair. One hundred specimens were divided into 10 groups: group 1 was left intact and was considered as the control group. In groups 2 through 8, the specimens were sectioned into halves after 10 days and were reconstructed with new amalgam. Groups 9 and 10 were condensed with time intervals of 15 minutes and all specimens were subjected to tensile loads in a Universal Testing Machine. The tensile strengths at the junction between old and new amalgam ranged between 50% to 79% of those of the control group and verified that the same type of amalgam and uncontaminated interfaces had higher strengths. The results also suggested that if an amalgam repair is anticipated, additional retention is critical to the longevity of the restoration. PMID:1507091

  9. Human DNA repair and recombination genes

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Weber, C.A.; Jones, N.J.

    1988-09-01

    Several genes involved in mammalian DNA repair pathways were identified by complementation analysis and chromosomal mapping based on hybrid cells. Eight complementation groups of rodent mutants defective in the repair of uv radiation damage are now identified. At least seven of these genes are probably essential for repair and at least six of them control the incision step. The many genes required for repair of DNA cross-linking damage show overlap with those involved in the repair of uv damage, but some of these genes appear to be unique for cross-link repair. Two genes residing on human chromosome 19 were cloned from genomic transformants using a cosmid vector, and near full-length cDNA clones of each gene were isolated and sequenced. Gene ERCC2 efficiently corrects the defect in CHO UV5, a nucleotide excision repair mutant. Gene XRCC1 normalizes repair of strand breaks and the excessive sister chromatid exchange in CHO mutant EM9. ERCC2 shows a remarkable /approximately/52% overall homology at both the amino acid and nucleotide levels with the yeast RAD3 gene. Evidence based on mutation induction frequencies suggests that ERCC2, like RAD3, might also be an essential gene for viability. 100 refs., 4 tabs.

  10. Extracranial repair of cerebrospinal fluid otorhinorrhea

    SciTech Connect

    Persky, M.S.; Rothstein, S.G.; Breda, S.D.; Cohen, N.L.; Cooper, P.; Ransohoff, J. )

    1991-02-01

    Forty-eight patients with cerebrospinal fluid leaks comprise this retrospective study. There were 39 traumatic and 9 spontaneous leaks. Nine patients were initially managed with bed rest and spinal drainage, but 3 patients in this group ultimately required surgical intervention for repair of their persistent leaks. Thirty-nine patients had surgery as initial therapy, with 33 extracranial repairs, 2 intracranial repairs, and 4 combined approaches. The extracranial approach was used in 36 of 42 patients, with an initial success rate of 86%.

  11. Shear Bond Strength of Repaired Composites Using Surface Treatments and Repair Materials: An In vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Hemadri, M; Saritha, G; Rajasekhar, V; Pachlag, K Amit; Purushotham, R; Reddy, Veera Kishore Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Enhancement of bond strength between new and old composite usually requires increased surface roughness of old composite to promote mechanical interlocking and subsequent coating with bonding agents to improve surface wetting and chemical bonding. So this study was carried out to evaluate and compare the effects of different surface treatments and repair materials on the shear bond strength (SBS) of composite repairs The mode of failure of repaired composites whether cohesive or adhesive was also evaluated. Materials and Methods: The substrates for 60 composite specimens were fabricated and aged with water treatment and subjected to various surface treatments. The surface treatment regimens used in the study were: No surface treatment, abraded with diamond bur, air abraded (sandblasted) with 50 µ aluminum oxide particles. Specimens were then repaired with fresh composite using either Clearfil™ repair or all-bond two adhesive systems. Specimens were water stored, thermocycled and tested for SBS using universal testing machine. Fractured specimens were then examined under stereomicroscope to determine the mode of failure. Results: It was clearly showed that surface roughening of the aged composite substrate with air abrasion, followed by the application of Clearfil™ repair adhesive system (Group IIIa) yielded the highest repair bond strength (32.3 ± 2.2 MPa). Conclusion: Surface treatment with air abrasion followed by bonding with Clearfil™ repair adhesive system can be attempted clinically for the repair of composite restorations. PMID:25628478

  12. Systems Maintenance Automated Repair Tasks (SMART)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuh, Joseph; Mitchell, Brent; Locklear, Louis; Belson, Martin A.; Al-Shihabi, Mary Jo Y.; King, Nadean; Norena, Elkin; Hardin, Derek

    2010-01-01

    SMART is a uniform automated discrepancy analysis and repair-authoring platform that improves technical accuracy and timely delivery of repair procedures for a given discrepancy (see figure a). SMART will minimize data errors, create uniform repair processes, and enhance the existing knowledge base of engineering repair processes. This innovation is the first tool developed that links the hardware specification requirements with the actual repair methods, sequences, and required equipment. SMART is flexibly designed to be useable by multiple engineering groups requiring decision analysis, and by any work authorization and disposition platform (see figure b). The organizational logic creates the link between specification requirements of the hardware, and specific procedures required to repair discrepancies. The first segment in the SMART process uses a decision analysis tree to define all the permutations between component/ subcomponent/discrepancy/repair on the hardware. The second segment uses a repair matrix to define what the steps and sequences are for any repair defined in the decision tree. This segment also allows for the selection of specific steps from multivariable steps. SMART will also be able to interface with outside databases and to store information from them to be inserted into the repair-procedure document. Some of the steps will be identified as optional, and would only be used based on the location and the current configuration of the hardware. The output from this analysis would be sent to a work authoring system in the form of a predefined sequence of steps containing required actions, tools, parts, materials, certifications, and specific requirements controlling quality, functional requirements, and limitations.

  13. Endovascular Repair versus Open Repair for Isolated Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyung Chae; Joo, Hyun-Chel; Lee, Seung Hyun; Lee, Sak; Chang, Byung-Chul; Yoo, Kyung-Jong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare the outcomes of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) with those of open repair for descending thoracic aortic aneurysms (DTAA). Materials and Methods We compared the outcomes of 114 patients with DTAA and proximal landing zones 3 or 4 after TEVAR to those of 53 patients after conventional open repairs. Thirty-day and late mortality were the primary endpoints, and early morbidities, aneurysm-related death, and re-intervention were the secondary endpoints. Results The TEVAR group was older and had more incidences of dissecting aneurysm. The mean follow-up was 36±26 months (follow-up rate, 97.8%). The 30-day mortality in the TEVAR and open repair groups were 3.5% and 9.4% (p=0.11). Perioperative stroke and paraplegia incidences were similar between the groups [5.3% vs. 7.5% (p=0.56) and 7.5% vs. 3.5% (p=0.26), respectively]. Respiratory failure occurred more in the open repair group (1.8% vs. 26.4%, p<0.01). The incidence of acute kidney injury requiring dialysis was higher in the open repair group (1.8% vs. 9.4%, p<0.01). The cumulative survival rate was higher in the TEVAR group at 2 to 5 years (79.6% vs. 58.3%, p=0.03). The free from re-intervention was lower in the TEVAR group (65.3% vs. 100%, p=0.02), and the free from aneurysm-related death in the TEVAR and open repair groups were 88.5% and 86.1% (p=0.45). Conclusion TEVAR is safe and effective for treating DTAAs with improved perioperative and long-term outcomes compared with open repair. PMID:26069110

  14. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, Stephen S; Lo, Ian K Y

    2006-06-01

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is being performed by an increasing number of orthopaedic surgeons. The principles, techniques, and instrumentation have evolved to the extent that all patterns and sizes of rotator cuff tear, including massive tears, can now be repaired arthroscopically. Achieving a biomechanically stable construct is critical to biologic healing. The ideal repair construct must optimize suture-to-bone fixation, suture-to-tendon fixation, abrasion resistance of suture, suture strength, knot security, loop security, and restoration of the anatomic rotator cuff footprint (the surface area of bone to which the cuff tendons attach). By achieving optimized repair constructs, experienced arthroscopic surgeons are reporting results equal to those of open rotator cuff repair. As surgeons' arthroscopic skill levels increase through attendance at surgical skills courses and greater experience gained in the operating room, there will be an increasing trend toward arthroscopic repair of most rotator cuff pathology. PMID:16757673

  15. Prosthetic Mesh Repair for Incarcerated Inguinal Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Tatar, Cihad; Tüzün, İshak Sefa; Karşıdağ, Tamer; Kızılkaya, Mehmet Celal; Yılmaz, Erdem

    2016-01-01

    Background: Incarcerated inguinal hernia is a commonly encountered urgent surgical condition, and tension-free repair is a well-established method for the treatment of non-complicated cases. However, due to the risk of prosthetic material-related infections, the use of mesh in the repair of strangulated or incarcerated hernia has often been subject to debate. Recent studies have demonstrated that biomaterials represent suitable materials for performing urgent hernia repair. Certain studies recommend mesh repair only for cases where no bowel resection is required; other studies, however, recommend mesh repair for patients requiring bowel resection as well. Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of different surgical techniques performed for strangulated hernia, and to evaluate the effect of mesh use on postoperative complications. Study Design: Retrospective cross-sectional study. Methods: This retrospective study was performed with 151 patients who had been admitted to our hospital’s emergency department to undergo surgery for a diagnosis of incarcerated inguinal hernia. The patients were divided into two groups based on the applied surgical technique. Group 1 consisted of 112 patients treated with mesh-based repair techniques, while Group 2 consisted of 39 patients treated with tissue repair techniques. Patients in Group 1 were further divided into two sub-groups: one consisting of patients undergoing bowel resection (Group 3), and the other consisting of patients not undergoing bowel resection (Group 4). Results: In Group 1, it was observed that eight (7.14%) of the patients had wound infections, while two (1.78%) had hematomas, four (3.57%) had seromas, and one (0.89%) had relapse. In Group 2, one (2.56%) of the patients had a wound infection, while three (7.69%) had hematomas, one (2.56%) had seroma, and none had relapses. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups with respect to wound infection, seroma

  16. Velopharyngeal Insufficiency Rates After Delayed Cleft Palate Repair: Lessons Learned From Internationally Adopted Patients.

    PubMed

    Follmar, Keith E; Yuan, Nance; Pendleton, Courtney S; Dorafshar, Amir H; Kolk, Craig Vander; Redett, Richard J

    2015-09-01

    Most surgeons recommend cleft palate repair between 6 and 12 months of age. Internationally adopted patients often undergo delayed repair due to social circumstances. There are few outcomes studies on this population. We conducted a 13-year retrospective review of all patients undergoing primary cleft palate repair at a single tertiary-care academic medical center between 1993 and 2006. The primary outcome was velopharyngeal insufficiency, defined as the recommendation for corrective surgery after multiple formal speech assessments. Two hundred one patients (102 males and 99 females) were identified. One hundred eighty-three repairs were performed before 18 months of age (standard repair group). Eighteen repairs were performed after 18 months of age (delayed repair group), with international adoption being a circumstance in 16 cases. The delayed and standard repair groups were similar with regard to sex, presence of craniofacial syndrome, Veau class, cleft size and laterality, type of repair, and operating surgeon. Mean follow-up was 9.3 years, with minimum follow-up of 5.0 years. Six (33%) of 18 patients in the delayed repair group developed velopharyngeal insufficiency compared to 23 (13%) of 183 in the standard repair group (P = 0.03 by Fisher exact test). These data demonstrate that internationally adopted patients undergoing delayed palate repair suffer especially poor speech outcomes. Physiologic differences in patients undergoing late repair, as well as social factors including adaptation to a new language and culture, may be factors. Early repair should be performed when possible. PMID:25046662

  17. Repairs of composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roh, Hee Seok

    Repair on damaged composite panels was conducted. To better understand adhesively bonded repair, the study investigates the effect of design parameters on the joint strength. The design parameters include bondline length, thickness of adherend and type of adhesive. Adhesives considered in this study were tested to measure their tensile material properties. Three types of adhesively bonded joints, single strap, double strap, and single lap joint were considered under changing bondline lengths, thickness of adherend and type of adhesive. Based on lessons learned from bonded joints, a one-sided patch repair method for composite structures was conducted. The composite patch was bonded to the damaged panel by either film adhesive FM-73M or paste adhesive EA-9394 and the residual strengths of the repaired specimens were compared under varying patch sizes. A new repair method using attachments has been suggested to enhance the residual strength. Results obtained through experiments were analyzed using finite element analysis to provide a better repair design and explain the experimental results. It was observed that the residual strength of the repaired specimen was affected by patch length. Method for rapid repairs of damaged composite structures was investigated. The damage was represented by a circular hole in a composite laminated plate. Pre-cured composite patches were bonded with a quick-curing commercial adhesive near (rather than over) the hole. Tensile tests were conducted on specimens repaired with various patch geometries. The test results showed that, among the methods investigated, the best repair method restored over 90% of the original strength of an undamaged panel. The interfacial stresses in the adhesive zone for different patches were calculated in order to understand the efficiencies of the designs of these patch repairs. It was found that the composite patch that yielded the best strength had the lowest interfacial peel stress between the patch and

  18. Arthroscopic Repair of Posterior Meniscal Root Tears

    PubMed Central

    Matheny, Lauren; Moulton, Samuel G.; Dean, Chase S.; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare subjective clinical outcomes in patients requiring arthroscopic transtibial pullout repair for posterior meniscus root tears of the medial and lateral menisci. We hypothesized that improvement in function and activity level would be similar among patients undergoing lateral and medial meniscal root repairs. Methods: This study was IRB approved. All patients who underwent posterior meniscal root repair by a single orthopaedic surgeon were included in this study. Detailed operative data were documented at surgery. Patients completed a subjective questionnaire, including Lysholm score, Tegner activity scale, WOMAC, SF-12 and patient satisfaction with outcome, which were collected preoperatively and at a minimum of two years postoperatively. Failure was defined as any patient who underwent revision meniscal root repair or partial meniscectomy following the index surgery. Results: There were 50 patients (16 females, 34 males) with a mean age of 37.8 years (range, 16.6-65.7) and a mean BMI of 27.3 (range, 20.5-49.2) included in this study. Fifteen patients underwent lateral meniscus root repair and 35 patients underwent medial meniscus root repair. Three patients who underwent lateral meniscus root repair required revision meniscus root repair surgery, while no patients who underwent medial meniscus root repair required revision surgery (p=0.26). There was a significant difference in preoperative and postoperative Lysholm score (53 vs. 78) (p<0.001), Tegner activity scale (2.0 vs. 4.0) (p=0.03), SF-12 physical component subscale (38 vs. 50) (p=0.001) and WOMAC (36 vs. 8) (p<0.001) for the total population. Median patient satisfaction with outcome was 9 (range, 1-10). There was no significant difference in mean age between lateral and medial root repair groups (32 vs. 40) (p=0.12) or gender (p=0.19). There was no significant difference in gender between lateral and medial root repair groups (p=0.95). There was a

  19. Repair bond strength of resin composite to a novel CAD/CAM hybrid ceramic using different repair systems.

    PubMed

    Elsaka, Shaymaa E

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the repair bond strength of a nanohybrid resin composite to a novel CAD/CAM hybrid ceramic based on four intraoral ceramic repair systems. Vita Enamic (VE) CAD/CAM hybrid ceramic was used in this study. Specimens were divided into five test groups according to the repair method performed on the ceramic surface: Gr C (No treatment; control); Gr CZ (Cimara Zircon); Gr PR (Porcelain Repair); Gr CR (Clearfil Repair); and Gr CS (CoJet system). Nanohybrid resin composite (GrandioSO) was packed onto treated ceramic surfaces for adhesion testing using microtensile bond strength test. Debonded specimens were examined with a stereomicroscope and SEM to determine the fracture mode. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test. PR and CZ repair systems significantly enhanced the bond strength of nanohybrid resin composite to VE CAD/CAM hybrid ceramic when compared with the other tested repair systems. PMID:25736259

  20. Methods of repairing a substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedell, James A. (Inventor); Easler, Timothy E. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A precursor of a ceramic adhesive suitable for use in a vacuum, thermal, and microgravity environment. The precursor of the ceramic adhesive includes a silicon-based, preceramic polymer and at least one ceramic powder selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide, aluminum nitride, boron carbide, boron oxide, boron nitride, hafnium boride, hafnium carbide, hafnium oxide, lithium aluminate, molybdenum silicide, niobium carbide, niobium nitride, silicon boride, silicon carbide, silicon oxide, silicon nitride, tin oxide, tantalum boride, tantalum carbide, tantalum oxide, tantalum nitride, titanium boride, titanium carbide, titanium oxide, titanium nitride, yttrium oxide, zirconium boride, zirconium carbide, zirconium oxide, and zirconium silicate. Methods of forming the ceramic adhesive and of repairing a substrate in a vacuum and microgravity environment are also disclosed, as is a substrate repaired with the ceramic adhesive.

  1. Snowmobile Repair. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennessy, Stephen S.; Conrad, Rex

    This teacher's guide contains 14 units on snowmobile repair: (1) introduction to snowmobile repair; (2) skis, front suspension, and steering; (3) drive clutch; (4) drive belts; (5) driven clutch; (6) chain drives; (7) jackshafts and axles; (8) rear suspension; (9) tracks; (10) shock absorbers; (11) brakes; (12) engines; (13) ignition and…

  2. EUVL Mask Blank Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, A; Mirkarimi, P; Stearns, D G; Sweeney, D; Chapman, H N; Clift, M; Hector, S; Yi, M

    2002-05-22

    EUV mask blanks are fabricated by depositing a reflective Mo/Si multilayer film onto super-polished substrates. Small defects in this thin film coating can significantly alter the reflected field and introduce defects in the printed image. Ideally one would want to produce defect-free mask blanks; however, this may be very difficult to achieve in practice. One practical way to increase the yield of mask blanks is to effectively repair multilayer defects, and to this effect they present two complementary defect repair strategies for use on multilayer-coated EUVL mask blanks. A defect is any area on the mask which causes unwanted variations in EUV dose in the aerial image obtained in a printing tool, and defect repair is correspondingly defined as any strategy that renders a defect unprintable during exposure. The term defect mitigation can be adopted to describe any strategy which renders a critical defect non-critical when printed, and in this regard a non-critical defect is one that does not adversely affect device function. Defects in the patterned absorber layer consist of regions where metal, typically chrome, is unintentionally added or removed from the pattern leading to errors in the reflected field. There currently exists a mature technology based on ion beam milling and ion beam assisted deposition for repairing defects in the absorber layer of transmission lithography masks, and it is reasonable to expect that this technology will be extended to the repair of absorber defects in EUVL masks. However, techniques designed for the repair of absorber layers can not be directly applied to the repair of defects in the mask blank, and in particular the multilayer film. In this paper they present for the first time a new technique for the repair of amplitude defects as well as recent results on the repair of phase defects.

  3. Rapid road repair vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Mara, Leo M.

    1999-01-01

    Disclosed are improvments to a rapid road repair vehicle comprising an improved cleaning device arrangement, two dispensing arrays for filling defects more rapidly and efficiently, an array of pre-heaters to heat the road way surface in order to help the repair material better bond to the repaired surface, a means for detecting, measuring, and computing the number, location and volume of each of the detected surface imperfection, and a computer means schema for controlling the operation of the plurality of vehicle subsystems. The improved vehicle is, therefore, better able to perform its intended function of filling surface imperfections while moving over those surfaces at near normal traffic speeds.

  4. Regulatory Challenges for Cartilage Repair Technologies.

    PubMed

    McGowan, Kevin B; Stiegman, Glenn

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, few Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved options exist for the treatment of focal cartilage and osteochondral lesions. Developers of products for cartilage repair face many challenges to obtain marketing approval from the FDA. The objective of this review is to discuss the necessary steps for FDA application and approval for a new cartilage repair product. FDA Guidance Documents, FDA Panel Meetings, scientific organization recommendations, and clinicaltrials.gov were reviewed to demonstrate the current thinking of FDA and the scientific community on the regulatory process for cartilage repair therapies. Cartilage repair therapies can receive market approval from FDA as medical devices, drugs, or biologics, and the specific classification of product can affect the nonclinical, clinical, and regulatory strategy to bring the product to market. Recent FDA guidance gives an outline of the required elements to bring a cartilage repair product to market, although these standards are often very general. As a result, companies have to carefully craft their study patient population, comparator group, and clinical endpoint to best showcase their product's attributes. In addition, regulatory strategy and manufacturing process validation need to be considered early in the clinical study process to allow for timely product approval following the completion of clinical study. Although the path to regulatory approval for a cartilage repair therapy is challenging and time-consuming, proper clinical trial planning and attention to the details can eventually save companies time and money by bringing a product to the market in the most expeditious process possible. PMID:26069647

  5. Human DNA repair genes.

    PubMed

    Wood, R D; Mitchell, M; Sgouros, J; Lindahl, T

    2001-02-16

    Cellular DNA is subjected to continual attack, both by reactive species inside cells and by environmental agents. Toxic and mutagenic consequences are minimized by distinct pathways of repair, and 130 known human DNA repair genes are described here. Notable features presently include four enzymes that can remove uracil from DNA, seven recombination genes related to RAD51, and many recently discovered DNA polymerases that bypass damage, but only one system to remove the main DNA lesions induced by ultraviolet light. More human DNA repair genes will be found by comparison with model organisms and as common folds in three-dimensional protein structures are determined. Modulation of DNA repair should lead to clinical applications including improvement of radiotherapy and treatment with anticancer drugs and an advanced understanding of the cellular aging process. PMID:11181991

  6. Planning Maintenance and Repairs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzemeyer, Ted

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the use of school facility design as an aid to efficiently repairing and maintaining facility systems. Also presents details on facility design's influence in properly maintaining mechanical and electrical systems. (GR)

  7. Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... the likelihood of a hernia including persistent coughing, difficulty with bowel movements or urination, or frequent need for straining. What are the Advantages of Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair? Keep reading... Page 1 of 2 1 2 » Brought to ...

  8. Easily repairable networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    We introduce a simple class of distribution networks which withstand damage by being repairable instead of redundant. Instead of asking how hard it is to disconnect nodes through damage, we ask how easy it is to reconnect nodes after damage. We prove that optimal networks on regular lattices have an expected cost of reconnection proportional to the lattice length, and that such networks have exactly three levels of structural hierarchy. We extend our results to networks subject to repeated attacks, in which the repairs themselves must be repairable. We find that, in exchange for a modest increase in repair cost, such networks are able to withstand any number of attacks. We acknowledge support from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, BCG and EU FP7 (Growthcom).

  9. Eye muscle repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100062.htm Eye muscle repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... the eyeball to the eye socket. The external muscles of the eye are found behind the conjunctiva. ...

  10. Tracheoesophageal fistula repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100103.htm Tracheoesophageal fistula repair - series To use the sharing features on ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Esophagus Disorders Fistulas Tracheal Disorders A.D.A.M., Inc. is ...

  11. Bone fracture repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100077.htm Bone fracture repair - series To use the sharing features on ... to slide 4 out of 4 Indications Overview Fractures of the bones are classified in a number ...

  12. Pectus excavatum repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgery to repair this condition -- open surgery and closed (minimally invasive) surgery. Either surgery is done while ... At the end of surgery, the incision is closed. The metal struts are removed in 6 to ...

  13. Anterior vaginal wall repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cystocele Anterior vaginal wall repair (surgical treatment of urinary incontinence) - series References Lentz GM. Anatomic defects of the ... 72. Read More Anterior Inflatable artificial sphincter Stress urinary incontinence Urinary catheters Urinary incontinence - injectable implant Urinary incontinence - ...

  14. Imperforate anus repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... presentations/100030.htm Imperforate anus repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... of 4 Overview In individuals with a normal anatomy, the large intestine (colon) empties into a pouch- ...

  15. Meningocele repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/presentations/100128.htm Meningocele repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles and Department of Anatomy, University of California, San Francisco, CA. Review provided ...

  16. Endograft collapse following endovascular repair of traumatic aortic injury.

    PubMed

    Annamalai, Ganesan; Cook, Richard; Martin, Michael

    2011-03-01

    The advent of endovascular treatment of traumatic thoracic aortic injuries offers a valuable, minimally invasive alternative to open surgical repair. However, there are limitations of the current endovascular stent graft technology for this group of patients. After endovascular repair meticulous follow-up is required with a high index of suspicion for potential complications including the lethal complication of endograft collapse. PMID:19784919

  17. Robotic inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Escobar Dominguez, Jose E; Gonzalez, Anthony; Donkor, Charan

    2015-09-01

    Inguinal hernias have been described throughout the history of medicine with many efforts to achieve the cure. Currently, with the advantages of minimally invasive surgery, new questions arise: what is going to be the best approach for inguinal hernia repair? Is there a real benefit with the robotic approach? Should minimally invasive hernia surgery be the standard of care? In this report we address these questions by describing our experience with robotic inguinal hernia repair. PMID:26153353

  18. Repairing Foam Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corbin, J.; Buras, D.

    1986-01-01

    Large holes in polyurethane foam insulation repaired reliably by simple method. Little skill needed to apply method, used for overhead repairs as well as for those in other orientations. Plug positioned in hole to be filled and held in place with mounting fixture. Fresh liquid foam injected through plug to bond it in place. As foam cures and expands, it displaces plug outward. Protrusion later removed.

  19. Explorative study to identify novel candidate genes related to oxaliplatin efficacy and toxicity using a DNA repair array

    PubMed Central

    Kweekel, D M; Antonini, N F; Nortier, J W R; Punt, C J A; Gelderblom, H; Guchelaar, H-J

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To identify new polymorphisms (single nucleotide polymorphisms, SNPs) in DNA repair pathways that are associated with efficacy and toxicity in patients receiving oxaliplatin and capecitabine for advanced colorectal cancer (ACC). Methods: We studied progression-free survival (PFS) in 91 ACC patients, of whom germ-line DNA was isolated and genotyped using an Asper Biotech array. Overall survival (OS) and toxicity were studied as secondary end points. A step-wise selection of SNPs was performed, involving univariate and multivariate log-rank tests and Cox regression analysis, with age and performance status as covariates. Results: A total of 81 SNPs in 46 genes on the array were selected for further analysis, based on genotyping success rates and minor allele frequencies. After step-wise selection, we found that homozygosity for the ataxia telangiectasia mutated gene (ATM) rs1801516 or excision repair cross-complementing gene (ERCC5) rs1047768 SNPs was associated with shorter PFS; however there were no significant associations (P>0.01) with OS or toxicity. Discussion: This is the first study describing the pathway gene approach for the selection of new candidate genes involved in oxaliplatin efficacy and toxicity. The results suggest that the ATM and ERCC5 genes may be associated with oxaliplatin efficacy in ACC. PMID:19536092

  20. Lightweight Material Patches Allow for Quick Repairs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Cornerstone Research Group Inc., of Dayton, Ohio, has been the recipient of 16 Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts with NASA with a variety of different focuses, including projects like creating inflatable structures for radio frequency antennas and, most recently, healable polymer matrix composites for future space vehicles. One of its earlier SBIR contracts, with Kennedy Space Center, led to the development of a new type of structural patch for a variety of consumer uses: Rubbn Repair, for automotive uses; and Rec Repair for the outdoors and adventure market. Both are flexible, heat-activated structural patches.

  1. XRCC4 and XLF form long helical protein filaments suitable for DNA end protection and alignment to facilitate DNA double strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Mahaney, Brandi L; Hammel, Michal; Meek, Katheryn; Tainer, John A; Lees-Miller, Susan P

    2013-02-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), induced by ionizing radiation (IR) and endogenous stress including replication failure, are the most cytotoxic form of DNA damage. In human cells, most IR-induced DSBs are repaired by the nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway. One of the most critical steps in NHEJ is ligation of DNA ends by DNA ligase IV (LIG4), which interacts with, and is stabilized by, the scaffolding protein X-ray cross-complementing gene 4 (XRCC4). XRCC4 also interacts with XRCC4-like factor (XLF, also called Cernunnos); yet, XLF has been one of the least mechanistically understood proteins and precisely how XLF functions in NHEJ has been enigmatic. Here, we examine current combined structural and mutational findings that uncover integrated functions of XRCC4 and XLF and reveal their interactions to form long, helical protein filaments suitable to protect and align DSB ends. XLF-XRCC4 provides a global structural scaffold for ligating DSBs without requiring long DNA ends, thus ensuring accurate and efficient ligation and repair. The assembly of these XRCC4-XLF filaments, providing both DNA end protection and alignment, may commit cells to NHEJ with general biological implications for NHEJ and DSB repair processes and their links to cancer predispositions and interventions. PMID:23442139

  2. XRCC4 and XLF form long helical protein filaments suitable for DNA end protection and alignment to facilitate DNA double strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    Mahaney, Brandi L.; Hammel, Michal; Meek, Katheryn; Tainer, John A.; Lees-Miller, Susan P.

    2013-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), induced by ionizing radiation (IR) and endogenous stress including replication failure, are the most cytotoxic form of DNA damage. In human cells, most IR-induced DSBs are repaired by the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway. One of the most critical steps in NHEJ is ligation of DNA ends by DNA ligase IV (LIG4), which interacts with, and is stabilized by, the scaffolding protein X-ray cross-complementing gene 4 (XRCC4). XRCC4 also interacts with XRCC4-like factor (XLF, also called Cernunnos); yet, XLF has been one of the least mechanistically understood proteins and precisely how XLF functions in NHEJ has been enigmatic. Here, we examine current combined structural and mutational findings that uncover integrated functions of XRCC4 and XLF and reveal their interactions to form long, helical protein filaments suitable to protect and align DSB ends. XLF-XRCC4 provides a global structural scaffold for ligating DSBs without requiring long complementary DNA ends, thus ensuring accurate and efficient ligation and repair. The assembly of these XRCC4-XLF filaments, providing both DNA end protection and alignment, may commit cells to NHEJ with general biological implications for NHEJ and DSB repair processes and their links to cancer predispositions and interventions. PMID:23442139

  3. Partial loss of the DNA repair scaffolding protein, Xrcc1, results in increased brain damage and reduced recovery from ischemic stroke in mice.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Somnath; Canugovi, Chandrika; Yoon, Jeong Seon; Wilson, David M; Croteau, Deborah L; Mattson, Mark P; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2015-07-01

    Oxidative DNA damage is mainly repaired by base excision repair (BER). Previously, our laboratory showed that mice lacking the BER glycosylases 8-oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (Ogg1) or nei endonuclease VIII-like 1 (Neil1) recover more poorly from focal ischemic stroke than wild-type mice. Here, a mouse model was used to investigate whether loss of 1 of the 2 alleles of X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 1 (Xrcc1), which encodes a nonenzymatic scaffold protein required for BER, alters recovery from stroke. Ischemia and reperfusion caused higher brain damage and lower functional recovery in Xrcc1(+/-) mice than in wild-type mice. Additionally, a greater percentage of Xrcc1(+/-) mice died as a result of the stroke. Brain samples from human individuals who died of stroke and individuals who died of non-neurological causes were assayed for various steps of BER. Significant losses of thymine glycol incision, abasic endonuclease incision, and single nucleotide incorporation activities were identified, as well as lower expression of XRCC1 and NEIL1 proteins in stroke brains compared with controls. Together, these results suggest that impaired BER is a risk factor in ischemic brain injury and contributes to its recovery. PMID:25971543

  4. Inguinal hernia repair: toward Asian guidelines.

    PubMed

    Lomanto, Davide; Cheah, Wei-Keat; Faylona, Jose Macario; Huang, Ching Shui; Lohsiriwat, Darin; Maleachi, Andy; Yang, George Pei Cheung; Li, Michael Ka-Wai; Tumtavitikul, Sathien; Sharma, Anil; Hartung, Rolf Ulrich; Choi, Young Bai; Sutedja, Barlian

    2015-02-01

    Groin hernias are very common, and surgical treatment is usually recommended. In fact, hernia repair is the most common surgical procedure performed worldwide. In countries such as the USA, China, and India, there may easily be over 1 million repairs every year. The need for this surgery has become an important socioeconomic problem and may affect health-care providers, especially in aging societies. Surgical repair using mesh is recommended and widely employed in Western countries, but in many developing countries, tissue-to-tissue repair is still the preferred surgical procedure due to economic constraints. For these reason, the development and implementation of guidelines, consensus, or recommendations may aim to clarify issues related to best practices in inguinal hernia repair in Asia. A group of Asian experts in hernia repair gathered together to debate inguinal hernia treatments in Asia in an attempt to reach some consensus or develop recommendations on best practices in the region. The need for recommendations or guidelines was unanimously confirmed to help overcome the discrepancy in clinical practice between countries; the experts decided to focus mainly on the technical aspects of open repair, which is the most common surgery for hernia in our region. After the identification of 12 main topics for discussion (indication, age, and sex; symptomatic and asymptomatic hernia: type of hernia; type of treatment; hospital admission; preoperative care; anesthesia; surgical technique; perioperative care; postoperative care; early complications; and long-term complications), a search of the literature was carried out according to the five levels of the Oxford Classification of Evidence and the four grades of recommendation. PMID:25598054

  5. SLAP Repairs With Combined Procedures Have Lower Failure Rate Than Isolated Repairs in a Military Population

    PubMed Central

    Waterman, Brian R.; Arroyo, William; Heida, Kenneth; Burks, Robert; Pallis, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Background: Injuries to the superior glenoid labrum represent a significant cause of shoulder pain among active patients. The physical requirements of military service may contribute to an increased risk of injury. Limited data are available regarding the success of superior labral anterior posterior (SLAP) repairs in an active military population. Purpose: To quantify the rate of clinical failure and surgical revision after isolated and combined SLAP repair. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: All consecutive active-duty servicemembers undergoing arthroscopic repair of type II SLAP lesions at a single institution between 2006 and 2012 were identified. Patients with less than 2-year clinical follow-up and nonmilitary status were excluded. Demographic variables, surgical variables, and occupational outcomes were extracted from electronic medical records and confirmed with the US Army Physical Disability Agency database. Failure was defined as subsequent revision surgery or medical discharge with persistent shoulder complaints. Results: A total of 192 patients with SLAP repair were identified with a mean follow-up of 50.0 months (SD, 17.0 months). Isolated SLAP repair occurred in 31.3% (n = 60) versus 68.8% (n = 132) with concomitant procedures. At final follow-up, 37.0% (n = 71) of patients reported some subjective activity-related shoulder pain. Postoperative return to duty occurred in 79.6% (n = 153), and only 20.3% (n = 39) were discharged with continuing shoulder disability. The combined rotator cuff repair (96%; P = .023) and anteroinferior labral repair group (88%; P = .056) had a higher rate of functional return than isolated SLAP repair (70%). Thirty-one (16.1%) patients were classified as surgical failure and required revision. Of these, the majority of patients undergoing biceps tenodesis (76%) returned to active duty, as compared with revision SLAP repair (17%). Lower demand occupation and the presence of combined shoulder injuries

  6. Arthroscopic hip labral repair.

    PubMed

    Philippon, Marc J; Faucet, Scott C; Briggs, Karen K

    2013-05-01

    Labral tears in the hip may cause painful clicking or locking of the hip, reduced range of motion, and disruption to sports and daily activities. The acetabular labrum aids stabilization of the hip joint, particularly during hip motion. The fibrocartilaginous structure extends the acetabular rim and provides a suction seal around the femoroacetabular interface. Treatment options for labral tears include debridement, repair, and reconstruction. Repair of the labrum has been shown to have better results than debridement. Labral refixation is achieved with sutures anchored into the acetabular rim. The acetabular rim is trimmed either to correct pincer impingement or to provide a bleeding bed to improve healing. Labral repair has shown excellent short-term to midterm outcomes and allows patients to return to activities and sports. Arthroscopic rim trimming and labral refixation comprise an effective treatment for labral tears with an underlying diagnosis of femoroacetabular impingement and are supported by the peer-reviewed literature. PMID:23875153

  7. Successful repair of a 6 meter battery

    SciTech Connect

    Nay, K.; Gratson, M.; Wash, S.; Sundholm, J.L.; Hippe, W.; Ramani, R.V.

    1996-12-31

    Following a two-year construction period, LTV Steel Company commissioned a new six-meter coke oven battery and ancillary facilities in December 1981 at the S. Chicago Works. The battery is a 60-oven Didier grouped flue underjet design capable of firing coke oven gas and blast furnace gas. In late 1990, coke side refractory damage in the form of severe spalls and holes in the walls were observed. Numerous repair techniques--welding, guniting, panel patching, end flue repairs using zero expansion brick--were employed as interim measures until a comprehensive repair plan could be implemented. A repair plan (primarily for coke side flues) was developed which envisioned end flue repairs on six walls per year beginning in late 1991, early 1992 depending on refractory delivery. However, in late 1992 it became apparent that the coke side deterioration was occurring faster than expected and that extensive pusher side deterioration was also occurring. Because of these developments, another battery inspection was performed. On the basis of this inspection, it was determined that a major rehabilitation would be required to assure long-term, environmentally acceptable operation of the battery.

  8. Telocytes in cardiac regeneration and repair.

    PubMed

    Bei, Yihua; Zhou, Qiulian; Sun, Qi; Xiao, Junjie

    2016-07-01

    Telocytes (TCs) are a novel type of stromal cells reported by Popescu's group in 2010. The unique feature that distinguishes TCs from other "classical" stromal cells is their extremely long and thin telopodes (Tps). As evidenced by electron microscopy, TCs are widely distributed in almost all tissues and organs. TCs contribute to form a three-dimensional interstitial network and play as active regulators in intercellular communication via homocellular/heterocellular junctions or shed vesicles. Interestingly, increasing evidence suggests the potential role of TCs in regenerative medicine. Although the heart retains some limited endogenous regenerative capacity, cardiac regenerative and repair response is however insufficient to make up the loss of cardiomyocytes upon injury. Developing novel strategies to increase cardiomyocyte renewal and repair is of great importance for the treatment of cardiac diseases. In this review, we focus on the role of TCs in cardiac regeneration and repair. We particularly describe the intercellular communication between TCs and cardiomyocytes, stem/progenitor cells, endothelial cells, and fibroblasts. Also, we discuss the current knowledge about TCs in cardiac repair after myocardial injury, as well as their potential roles in cardiac development and aging. TC-based therapy or TC-derived exosome delivery might be used as novel therapeutic strategies to promote cardiac regeneration and repair. PMID:26826525

  9. Rescheduling with iterative repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweben, Monte; Davis, Eugene; Daun, Brian; Deale, Michael

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach to rescheduling called constraint-based iterative repair. This approach gives our system the ability to satisfy domain constraints, address optimization concerns, minimize perturbation to the original schedule, produce modified schedules, quickly, and exhibits 'anytime' behavior. The system begins with an initial, flawed schedule and then iteratively repairs constraint violations until a conflict-free schedule is produced. In an empirical demonstration, we vary the importance of minimizing perturbation and report how fast the system is able to resolve conflicts in a given time bound. We also show the anytime characteristics of the system. These experiments were performed within the domain of Space Shuttle ground processing.

  10. Rescheduling with iterative repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweben, Monte; Davis, Eugene; Daun, Brian; Deale, Michael

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach to rescheduling called constraint-based iterative repair. This approach gives our system the ability to satisfy domain constraints, address optimization concerns, minimize perturbation to the original schedule, and produce modified schedules quickly. The system begins with an initial, flawed schedule and then iteratively repairs constraint violations until a conflict-free schedule is produced. In an empirical demonstration, we vary the importance of minimizing perturbation and report how fast the system is able to resolve conflicts in a given time bound. These experiments were performed within the domain of Space Shuttle ground processing.

  11. Assays for DNA double-strand break repair by microhomology-based end-joining repair mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Kostyrko, Kaja; Mermod, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    DNA double stranded breaks (DSBs) are one of the most deleterious types of DNA lesions. The main pathways responsible for repairing these breaks in eukaryotic cells are homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). However, a third group of still poorly characterized DSB repair pathways, collectively termed microhomology-mediated end-joining (MMEJ), relies on short homologies for the end-joining process. Here, we constructed GFP reporter assays to characterize and distinguish MMEJ variant pathways, namely the simple MMEJ and the DNA synthesis-dependent (SD)-MMEJ mechanisms. Transfection of these assay vectors in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and characterization of the repaired DNA sequences indicated that while simple MMEJ is able to mediate relatively efficient DSB repair if longer microhomologies are present, the majority of DSBs were repaired using the highly error-prone SD-MMEJ pathway. To validate the involvement of DNA synthesis in the repair process, siRNA knock-down of different genes proposed to play a role in MMEJ were performed, revealing that the knock-down of DNA polymerase θ inhibited DNA end resection and repair through simple MMEJ, thus favoring the other repair pathway. Overall, we conclude that this approach provides a convenient assay to study MMEJ-related DNA repair pathways. PMID:26657630

  12. A modified host-cell reactivation assay to quantify DNA repair capacity in cryopreserved peripheral lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Pedro; Taron, Miquel; Moran, Teresa; Fernandez, Marco A; Requena, Gerard; Rosell, Rafael

    2011-06-10

    The host-cell reactivation assay (HCRA) is a functional assay that allows the identification of the genes responsible for DNA repair-deficient syndromes, such as Xeroderma pigmentosum, by cross-complementation experiments. It has also been used in molecular epidemiology studies to correlate the low nucleotide excision repair pathway function in peripheral blood lymphocytes with an increased risk of bladder, head and neck, skin and lung cancers. Herein, we present the technical validation of a newly modified HCRA, where nucleofection is used for the transfection of the pmaxGFP plasmid into cryopreserved peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) or lymphoblastoid cell lines. In each sample, 20-24h after transfection, the relative DNA repair capacity (DRC) was quantified by flow cytometry, comparing the transfection efficiency of nucleoporated cells with undamaged plasmid to those transfected with UV-light damaged plasmid in the seven cell lines that were characterized by different DNA repair phenotypes. Dead cells were excluded from the analysis. We observed a high reproducibility of the relative DRC, transfection efficiency and cell viability. The inter-experimental normalization of the flow cytometry resulted in an increased data accuracy and reproducibility. The amount of cells required for each transfection reaction was reduced fourfold, without affecting the final relative DRC. Furthermore, our HCRA demonstrated strong discrimination power in the UV-light dose-response, both in lymphoblastoid cell lines and cryopreserved PBLs. We also observed a strong correlation of the relative DRC data, when samples were measured against two independent batches of both damaged and undamaged plasmid DNA. The relative DRC variable shows a normal distribution when analyzed in the cryopreserved PBLs from a cohort of 35 lung cancer patients and a 5.59-fold variation in the relative DRC is identified among our patients. The mitotic dynamic was discarded as a confounding factor for the

  13. Bone fracture repair - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... main treatment options for bone fractures are: Casting Open reduction, and internal fixation- this involves a surgery to repair the fracture-frequently, metal rods, screws or plates are used to repair the bone, and remain ...

  14. Electric motor model repair specifications

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    These model repair specifications list the minimum requirements for repair and overhaul of polyphase AC squireel cage induction motors. All power ranges, voltages, and speeds of squirrel cage motors are covered.

  15. Getting Ready To Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stryker, Rick

    2002-01-01

    Successful camp repairs require careful planning. Prioritize projects by program needs first, then by cost. Determine the cause of deterioration and address it. Build goodwill with suppliers by knowing what you want and giving them ample time to prepare estimates. Include labor costs, even for staff labor. A cost-estimate table for a sample…

  16. Comprehensive Small Engine Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hires, Bill; And Others

    This curriculum guide contains the basic information needed to repair all two- and four-stroke cycle engines. The curriculum covers four areas, each consisting of one or more units of instruction that include performance objectives, suggested activities for teacher and students, information sheets, assignment sheets, job sheets, visual aids,…

  17. Repairing cracked glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helman, D. D.; Holt, J. W.; Smiser, L. V.

    1979-01-01

    Filing procedure consisting of machined lightweight fused-silica tiles coated with thin-layer of borosilicate glass produces homogeneous seal in thin glass. Procedure is useful in repairing glass envelopes, X-ray tub windows, Dewar flasks, and similar thin glass objects.

  18. Automotive Body Repair Competencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Armond, Jack; And Others

    Designed to provide a model curriculum and guidelines, this manual presents tasks that were identified by employers, employees, and teachers as important in a postsecondary auto body repair curriculum. The tasks are divided into ten major component areas of instruction: metalworking and fiberglass, painting, frame and suspension, glass and trim,…

  19. Patent urachus repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools About MedlinePlus Show Search Search MedlinePlus GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Patent urachus repair URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ ...

  20. Patent urachus repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools About MedlinePlus Show Search Search MedlinePlus GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Patent urachus repair - series—Normal anatomy URL of this ...

  1. Repairing damaged platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, R.E.; Kwok, P.H.; Wang, S.S.

    1995-10-01

    This paper introduces a unique method for strengthening of platforms and replacing damaged members. Extending the life of existing infrastructure is approved means of decreasing cash expenditures for new platforms and facilities. Platforms can be affected by corrosion, overloading and fatigue. The renovation and repair of existing offshore installations is an important part of offshore engineering. The basis behind this paper is an April, 1993 incident in the Arabian Gulf. A vessel broke loose from its moorings in a severe storm and collided with a wellhead platform. The collision severely damaged the platform buckling seven major support members and cracking joints throughout the structure. In view of the significant damage, there was an urgent need to repair the structure to avoid any further damage from potentially sever winter storm conditions. Various means of repair and their associated costs were evaluated: traditional dry hyperbaric welding, adjacent platforms, grouted clamped connections, and mechanical pipe connectors. The repair was completed using an innovative combination of clamps and wet welding to attach external braces to the structure.

  2. Proteoglycans and brain repair.

    PubMed

    Properzi, Francesca; Fawcett, James W

    2004-02-01

    Proteoglycans are complex molecules composed of long, unbranched sugar chains attached to a protein core. In the mammalian central nervous system, they are a major component of the extracellular matrix and of the cellular surface. After a central nervous system injury, their expression in the lesion area changes strongly and contributes to the inhibition of axon regrowth and brain repair. PMID:14739401

  3. Targeting Nuclear Envelope Repair.

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    Migrating cancer cells undergo repeated rupture of the protective nuclear envelope as they squeeze through small spaces in the surrounding tissue, compromising genomic integrity. Inhibiting both general DNA repair and the mechanism that seals these tears may enhance cell death and curb metastasis. PMID:27130435

  4. Auto Repair Gets Technical.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steiger, Jim; Shoemaker, Byrl

    1989-01-01

    Rapid advances in automotive technology and the growth of the automotive service industry have created opportunities in car repair, parts supply, and body work. Certification is the best way for vocational educators to ensure that their programs prepare students for work in the automotive industry. (JOW)

  5. Aircraft Propeller Hub Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Muth, Thomas R.; Peter, William H.

    2015-02-13

    The team performed a literature review, conducted residual stress measurements, performed failure analysis, and demonstrated a solid state additive manufacturing repair technique on samples removed from a scrapped propeller hub. The team evaluated multiple options for hub repair that included existing metal buildup technologies that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has already embraced, such as cold spray, high velocity oxy-fuel deposition (HVOF), and plasma spray. In addition the team helped Piedmont Propulsion Systems, LLC (PPS) evaluate three potential solutions that could be deployed at different stages in the life cycle of aluminum alloy hubs, in addition to the conventional spray coating method for repair. For new hubs, a machining practice to prevent fretting with the steel drive shaft was recommended. For hubs that were refurbished with some material remaining above the minimal material condition (MMC), a silver interface applied by an electromagnetic pulse additive manufacturing method was recommended. For hubs that were at or below the MMC, a solid state additive manufacturing technique using ultrasonic welding (UW) of thin layers of 7075 aluminum to the hub interface was recommended. A cladding demonstration using the UW technique achieved mechanical bonding of the layers showing promise as a viable repair method.

  6. Achilles tendon repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/article/007643.htm Achilles tendon repair To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Your Achilles tendon joins your calf muscle to your heel. You can tear your Achilles tendon if you land hard on your heel during sports, from a ...

  7. Basic Book Repair Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schechter, Abraham A.

    This book addresses some common preservation techniques that invariably become necessary in library and archival collections of any size. The procedures are described in chronological sequence, and photographs show the techniques from the viewpoint of the person actually doing the work. The recommended repair methods can be accomplished using…

  8. Femoral hernia repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... bulges out of a weak spot in the groin. Usually this tissue is part of the intestine. ... Your surgeon makes a cut (incision) in your groin area. The hernia is ... wall. This repairs the weakness in the wall. At the end ...

  9. Single cell wound repair

    PubMed Central

    Abreu-Blanco, Maria Teresa; Verboon, Jeffrey M

    2011-01-01

    Cell wounding is a common event in the life of many cell types, and the capacity of the cell to repair day-to-day wear-and-tear injuries, as well as traumatic ones, is fundamental for maintaining tissue integrity. Cell wounding is most frequent in tissues exposed to high levels of stress. Survival of such plasma membrane disruptions requires rapid resealing to prevent the loss of cytosolic components, to block Ca2+ influx and to avoid cell death. In addition to patching the torn membrane, plasma membrane and cortical cytoskeleton remodeling are required to restore cell function. Although a general understanding of the cell wound repair process is in place, the underlying mechanisms of each step of this response are not yet known. We have developed a model to study single cell wound repair using the early Drosophila embryo. Our system combines genetics and live imaging tools, allowing us to dissect in vivo the dynamics of the single cell wound response. We have shown that cell wound repair in Drosophila requires the coordinated activities of plasma membrane and cytoskeleton components. Furthermore, we identified an unexpected role for E-cadherin as a link between the contractile actomyosin ring and the newly formed plasma membrane plug. PMID:21922041

  10. Quantitative characterization of protein–protein complexes involved in base excision DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Moor, Nina A.; Vasil'eva, Inna A.; Anarbaev, Rashid O.; Antson, Alfred A.; Lavrik, Olga I.

    2015-01-01

    Base Excision Repair (BER) efficiently corrects the most common types of DNA damage in mammalian cells. Step-by-step coordination of BER is facilitated by multiple interactions between enzymes and accessory proteins involved. Here we characterize quantitatively a number of complexes formed by DNA polymerase β (Polβ), apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1), poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1), X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 1 (XRCC1) and tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (TDP1), using fluorescence- and light scattering-based techniques. Direct physical interactions between the APE1-Polβ, APE1-TDP1, APE1-PARP1 and Polβ-TDP1 pairs have been detected and characterized for the first time. The combined results provide strong evidence that the most stable complex is formed between XRCC1 and Polβ. Model DNA intermediates of BER are shown to induce significant rearrangement of the Polβ complexes with XRCC1 and PARP1, while having no detectable influence on the protein–protein binding affinities. The strength of APE1 interaction with Polβ, XRCC1 and PARP1 is revealed to be modulated by BER intermediates to different extents, depending on the type of DNA damage. The affinity of APE1 for Polβ is higher in the complex with abasic site-containing DNA than after the APE1-catalyzed incision. Our findings advance understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying coordination and regulation of the BER process. PMID:26013813

  11. Lawn and Garden Equipment Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardway, Jack; And Others

    This publication is designed to supplement the Comprehensive Small Engine Rapair guide by covering in detail all aspects of lawn and garden equipment repair not included in general engine repair or the repair of other small engines. It consists of instructional materials for both teachers and students, written in terms of student performance using…

  12. Cleft lip repair - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the middle of the upper lip. A cleft palate is an opening in the roof of the ... Cleft lip repair and cleft palate repair are indicated for: Repair of physical deformity Nursing, feeding, or speech problems resulting from cleft lip or palate

  13. Automotive Engine Maintenance and Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    This correspondence course, originally developed for the Marine Corps, is designed to provide students with an understanding of automotive engine maintenance and repair. The course contains six study units covering automotive engine maintenance and repair; design classification; engine malfunction, diagnosis, and repair; engine disassembly; engine…

  14. Porcelain repair - Influence of different systems and surface treatments on resin bond strength

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Ji-Young; Yoon, Hyung-In; Park, Ji-Man

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of composite resin on the fracture surface of metal-ceramic depending on the repair systems and surface roughening methods. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 30 disk specimens were fabricated, 15 of each were made from feldspathic porcelain and nickel-chromium base metal alloy. Each substrate was divided into three groups according to the repair method: a) application of repair system I (Intraoral Repair Kit) with diamond bur roughening (Group DP and DM), b) application of repair system I with airborne-particle abrasion (Group SP and SM), and c) application of repair system II (CoJet Intraoral Repair System, Group CP and CM). All specimens were thermocycled, and the shear bond strength was measured. The data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis analysis and the Mann-Whitney test with a significance level of 0.05. RESULTS For the porcelain specimens, group SP showed the highest shear bond strength (25.85 ± 3.51 MPa) and group DP and CP were not significantly different. In metal specimens, group CM showed superior values of bond strength (13.81 ± 3.45 MPa) compared to groups DM or SM. CONCLUSION Airborne-particle abrasion and application of repair system I can be recommended in the case of a fracture localized to the porcelain. If the fracture extends to metal surface, the repair system II is worthy of consideration. PMID:26576249

  15. Base Excision Repair and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Susan S.; Murphy, Drew L.; Sweasy, Joann B.

    2012-01-01

    Base excision repair is the system used from bacteria to man to remove the tens of thousands of endogenous DNA damages produced daily in each human cell. Base excision repair is required for normal mammalian development and defects have been associated with neurological disorders and cancer. In this paper we provide an overview of short patch base excision repair in humans and summarize current knowledge of defects in base excision repair in mouse models and functional studies on short patch base excision repair germ line polymorphisms and their relationship to cancer. The biallelic germ line mutations that result in MUTYH-associated colon cancer are also discussed. PMID:22252118

  16. Minimally Invasive Spigelian Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Baucom, Catherine; Nguyen, Quan D.; Hidalgo, Marco

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Spigelian hernia is an uncommon ventral hernia characterized by a defect in the linea semilunaris. Repair of spigelian hernia has traditionally been accomplished via an open transverse incision and primary repair. The purpose of this article is to present 2 case reports of incarcerated spigelian hernia that were successfully repaired laparoscopically using Gortex mesh and to present a review of the literature regarding laparoscopic repair of spigelian hernias. Methods: Retrospective chart review and Medline literature search. Results: Two patients underwent laparoscopic mesh repair of incarcerated spigelian hernias. Both were started on a regular diet on postoperative day 1 and discharged on postoperative days 2 and 3. One patient developed a seroma that resolved without intervention. There was complete resolution of preoperative symptoms at the 12-month follow-up. Conclusion: Minimally invasive repair of spigelian hernias is an alternative to the traditional open surgical technique. Further studies are needed to directly compare the open and the laparoscopic repair. PMID:19660230

  17. Gene Therapy for Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Madry, Henning; Orth, Patrick; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2011-01-01

    The concept of using gene transfer strategies for cartilage repair originates from the idea of transferring genes encoding therapeutic factors into the repair tissue, resulting in a temporarily and spatially defined delivery of therapeutic molecules to sites of cartilage damage. This review focuses on the potential benefits of using gene therapy approaches for the repair of articular cartilage and meniscal fibrocartilage, including articular cartilage defects resulting from acute trauma, osteochondritis dissecans, osteonecrosis, and osteoarthritis. Possible applications for meniscal repair comprise meniscal lesions, meniscal sutures, and meniscal transplantation. Recent studies in both small and large animal models have demonstrated the applicability of gene-based approaches for cartilage repair. Chondrogenic pathways were stimulated in the repair tissue and in osteoarthritic cartilage using genes for polypeptide growth factors and transcription factors. Although encouraging data have been generated, a successful translation of gene therapy for cartilage repair will require an ongoing combined effort of orthopedic surgeons and of basic scientists. PMID:26069580

  18. Prokaryotic nucleotide excision repair.

    PubMed

    Kisker, Caroline; Kuper, Jochen; Van Houten, Bennett

    2013-03-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) has allowed bacteria to flourish in many different niches around the globe that inflict harsh environmental damage to their genetic material. NER is remarkable because of its diverse substrate repertoire, which differs greatly in chemical composition and structure. Recent advances in structural biology and single-molecule studies have given great insight into the structure and function of NER components. This ensemble of proteins orchestrates faithful removal of toxic DNA lesions through a multistep process. The damaged nucleotide is recognized by dynamic probing of the DNA structure that is then verified and marked for dual incisions followed by excision of the damage and surrounding nucleotides. The opposite DNA strand serves as a template for repair, which is completed after resynthesis and ligation. PMID:23457260

  19. The Reinforcement Effect of Nano-Zirconia on the Transverse Strength of Repaired Acrylic Denture Base

    PubMed Central

    ArRejaie, Aws S.; Abdel-Halim, Mohamed Saber; Rahoma, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of incorporation of glass fiber, zirconia, and nano-zirconia on the transverse strength of repaired denture base. Materials and Methods. Eighty specimens of heat polymerized acrylic resin were prepared and randomly divided into eight groups (n = 10): one intact group (control) and seven repaired groups. One group was repaired with autopolymerized resin while the other six groups were repaired using autopolymerized resin reinforced with 2 wt% or 5 wt% glass fiber, zirconia, or nano-zirconia particles. A three-point bending test was used to measure the transverse strength. The results were analyzed using SPSS and repeated measure ANOVA and post hoc least significance (LSD) test (P ≤ 0.05). Results. Among repaired groups it was found that autopolymerized resin reinforced with 2 or 5 wt% nano-zirconia showed the highest transverse strength (P ≤ 0.05). Repairs with autopolymerized acrylic resin reinforced with 5 wt% zirconia showed the lowest transverse strength value. There was no significant difference between the groups repaired with repair resin without reinforcement, 2 wt% zirconia, and glass fiber reinforced resin. Conclusion. Reinforcing of repair material with nano-zirconia may significantly improve the transverse strength of some fractured denture base polymers. PMID:27366150

  20. The Reinforcement Effect of Nano-Zirconia on the Transverse Strength of Repaired Acrylic Denture Base.

    PubMed

    Gad, Mohammed; ArRejaie, Aws S; Abdel-Halim, Mohamed Saber; Rahoma, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of incorporation of glass fiber, zirconia, and nano-zirconia on the transverse strength of repaired denture base. Materials and Methods. Eighty specimens of heat polymerized acrylic resin were prepared and randomly divided into eight groups (n = 10): one intact group (control) and seven repaired groups. One group was repaired with autopolymerized resin while the other six groups were repaired using autopolymerized resin reinforced with 2 wt% or 5 wt% glass fiber, zirconia, or nano-zirconia particles. A three-point bending test was used to measure the transverse strength. The results were analyzed using SPSS and repeated measure ANOVA and post hoc least significance (LSD) test (P ≤ 0.05). Results. Among repaired groups it was found that autopolymerized resin reinforced with 2 or 5 wt% nano-zirconia showed the highest transverse strength (P ≤ 0.05). Repairs with autopolymerized acrylic resin reinforced with 5 wt% zirconia showed the lowest transverse strength value. There was no significant difference between the groups repaired with repair resin without reinforcement, 2 wt% zirconia, and glass fiber reinforced resin. Conclusion. Reinforcing of repair material with nano-zirconia may significantly improve the transverse strength of some fractured denture base polymers. PMID:27366150

  1. Proteoglycans and cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Ouzzine, Mohamed; Venkatesan, Narayanan; Fournel-Gigleux, Sylvie

    2012-01-01

    Repair of damaged articular cartilage in osteoarthritis (OA) is a clinical challenge. Because cartilage is an avascular and aneural tissue, normal mechanisms of tissue repair through recruitment of cells to the site of tissue destruction are not feasible. Proteoglycan (PG) depletion induced by the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β, a principal mediator in OA, is a major factor in the onset and progression of joint destruction. Current symptomatic treatments of OA by anti-inflammatory drugs do not alter the progression of the disease. Various therapeutic strategies have been developed to antagonize the effect of proinflammatory cytokines. However, relatively few studies were conducted to stimulate anabolic activity, in an attempt to enhance cartilage repair. To this aim, a nonviral gene transfer strategy of glycosyltransferases responsible for PG synthesis has been developed and tested for its capacity to promote cartilage PG synthesis and deposition. Transfection of chondrocytes or cartilage explants by the expression vector for the glycosyltransferase β-1,3-glucuronosyltransferase-I (GlcAT-I) enhanced PG synthesis and deposition in the ECM by promoting the synthesis of chondroitin sulfate GAG chains of the cartilage matrix. This indicates that therapy mediated through GT gene delivery may constitute a new strategy for the treatment of OA. PMID:22252645

  2. Binding of HIV-1 Vpr Protein to the Human Homolog of the Yeast DNA Repair Protein RAD23 (hHR23A) Requires Its Xeroderma Pigmentosum Complementation Group C Binding (XPCB) Domain as Well as the Ubiquitin-associated 2 (UBA2) Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jinwon; Byeon, In-Ja L.; DeLucia, Maria; Koharudin, Leonardus M. I.; Ahn, Jinwoo; Gronenborn, Angela M.

    2014-01-01

    The human homolog of the yeast DNA repair protein RAD23, hHR23A, has been found previously to interact with the human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 accessory protein Vpr. hHR23A is a modular protein containing an N-terminal ubiquitin-like (UBL) domain and two ubiquitin-associated domains (UBA1 and UBA2) separated by a xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C binding (XPCB) domain. All domains are connected by flexible linkers. hHR23A binds ubiquitinated proteins and acts as a shuttling factor to the proteasome. Here, we show that hHR23A utilizes both the UBA2 and XPCB domains to form a stable complex with Vpr, linking Vpr directly to cellular DNA repair pathways and their probable exploitation by the virus. Detailed structural mapping of the Vpr contacts on hHR23A, by NMR, revealed substantial contact surfaces on the UBA2 and XPCB domains. In addition, Vpr binding disrupts an intramolecular UBL-UBA2 interaction. We also show that Lys-48-linked di-ubiquitin, when binding to UBA1, does not release the bound Vpr from the hHR23A-Vpr complex. Instead, a ternary hHR23A·Vpr·di-UbK48 complex is formed, indicating that Vpr does not necessarily abolish hHR23A-mediated shuttling to the proteasome. PMID:24318982

  3. In vivo cartilage repair using adipose-derived stem cell-loaded decellularized cartilage ECM scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hongjun; Peng, Jiang; Lu, Shibi; Liu, Shuyun; Zhang, Li; Huang, Jingxiang; Sui, Xiang; Zhao, Bin; Wang, Aiyuan; Xu, Wenjing; Luo, Zhijie; Guo, Quanyi

    2014-06-01

    We have previously reported a natural, human cartilage ECM (extracellular matrix)-derived three-dimensional (3D) porous acellular scaffold for in vivo cartilage tissue engineering in nude mice. However, the in vivo repair effects of this scaffold are still unknown. The aim of this study was to further explore the feasibility of application of cell-loaded scaffolds, using autologous adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs), for cartilage defect repair in rabbits. A defect 4 mm in diameter was created on the patellar groove of the femur in both knees, and was repaired with the chondrogenically induced ADSC-scaffold constructs (group A) or the scaffold alone (group B); defects without treatment were used as controls (group C). The results showed that in group A all defects were fully filled with repair tissue and at 6 months post-surgery most of the repair site was filled with hyaline cartilage. In contrast, in group B all defects were partially filled with repair tissue, but only half of the repair tissue was hyaline cartilage. Defects were only filled with fibrotic tissue in group C. Indeed, histological grading score analysis revealed that an average score in group A was higher than in groups B and C. GAG and type II collagen content and biomechanical property detection showed that the group A levels approached those of normal cartilage. In conclusion, ADSC-loaded cartilage ECM scaffolds induced cartilage repair tissue comparable to native cartilage in terms of mechanical properties and biochemical components. PMID:22674864

  4. Outcomes after Arthroscopic Bankart Repair

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Tyler James; Vega, Jose F.; Siqueira, Marcelo BP; Gelber, Jonathan David; Cagle, Robert; Saluan, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The shoulder is the most common joint dislocation effecting roughly 2% of the general population. Males are effected to a higher degree that females at a ratio of 3:1.1-2 The young, athletic population make up the largest portion of shoulder instability, and treated nonoperatively have a recurrent dislocation rate approaching 50%.3-5 Owens et. al recently published a cohort looking at 45 college athletes with an in season shoulder instability event. 73% of athletes returned to play in season. Only 36% of athletes completed the season without re-injury and 64% of athletes had a recurrent instability event.6 It is unknown how the outcomes of those who go on to have a recurrent dislocation in season are effected versus those who have a stabilization procedure after a first time dislocation. The objective of the current study is to report the postoperative outcomes of first time dislocators versus patients with recurrent dislocations prior to surgery. Methods: CPT codes were used to identify patients who had arthroscopic Bankart repair between 2003-2013. 439 patients aged 16-30 years were identified across 8 fellowship trained surgical practices. The first phase of the study was a retrospective chart review to obtain patient demographics, number of reported preoperative dislocations, review imaging, and number of anchors placed. Patients were identified as first time dislocators or as recurrent dislocators when they had more than one dislocation prior to surgical intervention. The second phase consisted of a survey to obtain a simple shoulder test score, whether they returned to sport, postoperative instability events and further surgery on the shoulder. Postoperative instability was defined as a subluxation or dislocation reported by the patient survey in the postoperative period. Of the 439 patients identified, 296 were excluded for revision surgery, open repair, posterior instability, multidirectional instability, HAGL lesion, labral tears involving the

  5. Measurement of DNA repair deficiency in workers exposed to benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Hallberg, L.M.; Au, W.W.; El Zein, R.; Grossman, L.

    1996-05-01

    We hypothesize that chronic exposure to environmental toxicants can induce genetic damage causing DNA repair deficiencies and leading to the postulated mutator phenotype of carcinogenesis. To test our hypothesis, a host cell reactivation (HCR) assay was used in which pCMVcat plasmids were damaged with UV light (175, 350 J/m{sup 2} UV light), inactivating the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene, and then transfected into lymphocytes. Transfected lymphocytes were therefore challenged to repair the damaged plasmids, reactivating the reporter gene. Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Gaucher cell lines were used as positive and negative controls for the HCR assay. The Gaucher cell line repaired normally but XP cell lines demonstrated lower repair activity. Additionally, the repair activity of the XP heterozygous cell line showed intermediate repair compared to the homozygous XP and Gaucher cells. We used HCR to measure the effects of benzene exposure on 12 exposed and 8 nonexposed workers from a local benzene plant. Plasmids 175 J/m{sup 2} and 350 J/m{sup 2} were repaired with a mean frequency of 66% and 58%, respectively, in control workers compared to 71% and 62% in exposed workers. Conversely, more of the exposed workers were grouped into the reduced repair category than controls. These differences in repair capacity between exposed and control workers were, however, not statistically significant. The lack of significant differences between the exposed and control groups may be due to extremely low exposure to benzene (<0.3 ppm), small population size, or a lack of benzene genotoxicity at these concentrations. These results are consistent with a parallel hprt gene mutation assay. 26 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Measurement of DNA repair deficiency in workers exposed to benzene.

    PubMed Central

    Hallberg, L M; el Zein, R; Grossman, L; Au, W W

    1996-01-01

    We hypothesize that chronic exposure to environmental toxicants can induce genetic damage causing DNA repair deficiencies and leading to the postulated mutator phenotype of carcinogenesis. To test our hypothesis, a host cell reactivation (HCR) assay was used in which pCMVcat plasmids were damaged with UV light (175, 350 J/m2 UV light), inactivating the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene, and then transfected into lymphocytes. Transfected lymphocytes were therefore challenged to repair the damaged plasmids, reactivating the reporter gene. Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Gaucher cell lines were used as positive and negative controls for the HCR assay. The Gaucher cell line repaired normally but XP cell lines demonstrated lower repair activity. Additionally, the repair activity of the XP heterozygous cell line showed intermediate repair compared to the homozygous XP and Gaucher cells. We used HCR to measure the effects of benzene exposure on 12 exposed and 8 nonexposed workers from a local benzene plant. Plasmids 175 J/m2 and 350 J/m2 were repaired with a mean frequency of 66% and 58%, respectively, in control workers compared to 71% and 62% in exposed workers. Conversely, more of the exposed workers were grouped into the reduced repair category than controls. These differences in repair capacity between exposed and control workers were, however, not statistically significant. The lack of significant differences between the exposed and control groups may be due to extremely low exposure to benzene (< 0.3 ppm), small population size, or a lack of benzene genotoxicity at these concentrations. These results are consistent with a parallel hprt gene mutation assay. PMID:8781377

  7. STEAM GENERATOR GROUP PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R. A.; Lewis, M

    1985-09-01

    This report is a summary of progress in the Surry Steam Generator Group Project for 1984. Information is presented on the analysis of two baseline eddy current inspections of the generator. Round robin series of tests using standard in-service inspection techniques are described along with some preliminary results. Observations are reported of degradation found on tubing specimens removed from the generator, and on support plates characterized in-situ. Residual stresses measured on a tubing specimen are reported. Two steam generator repair demonstrations are described; one for antivibration bar replacement, and one on tube repair methods. Chemical analyses are shown for sludge samples removed from above the tube sheet.

  8. Intraoral repair of cosmetic restorations.

    PubMed

    Denehy, G; Bouschlicher, M; Vargas, M

    1998-10-01

    The longevity of porcelain and composite resin restorations can often be prolonged by using sound principles, up-to-date materials, and judicious attention to repair when fracture problems arise. Careful case selection and correct usage of surface treatment agents, followed by the use of a quality bonding system and restorative materials, can result in a repair that exhibits excellent retention and natural color blending. This article outlines procedures and materials to repair both resin composite and porcelain intraorally. PMID:9891653

  9. Stimulating endogenous cardiac repair

    PubMed Central

    Finan, Amanda; Richard, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    The healthy adult heart has a low turnover of cardiac myocytes. The renewal capacity, however, is augmented after cardiac injury. Participants in cardiac regeneration include cardiac myocytes themselves, cardiac progenitor cells, and peripheral stem cells, particularly from the bone marrow compartment. Cardiac progenitor cells and bone marrow stem cells are augmented after cardiac injury, migrate to the myocardium, and support regeneration. Depletion studies of these populations have demonstrated their necessary role in cardiac repair. However, the potential of these cells to completely regenerate the heart is limited. Efforts are now being focused on ways to augment these natural pathways to improve cardiac healing, primarily after ischemic injury but in other cardiac pathologies as well. Cell and gene therapy or pharmacological interventions are proposed mechanisms. Cell therapy has demonstrated modest results and has passed into clinical trials. However, the beneficial effects of cell therapy have primarily been their ability to produce paracrine effects on the cardiac tissue and recruit endogenous stem cell populations as opposed to direct cardiac regeneration. Gene therapy efforts have focused on prolonging or reactivating natural signaling pathways. Positive results have been demonstrated to activate the endogenous stem cell populations and are currently being tested in clinical trials. A potential new avenue may be to refine pharmacological treatments that are currently in place in the clinic. Evidence is mounting that drugs such as statins or beta blockers may alter endogenous stem cell activity. Understanding the effects of these drugs on stem cell repair while keeping in mind their primary function may strike a balance in myocardial healing. To maximize endogenous cardiac regeneration, a combination of these approaches could ameliorate the overall repair process to incorporate the participation of multiple cellular players. PMID:26484341

  10. Color stability of repaired composite submitted to accelerated artificial aging.

    PubMed

    Souza, Ana Beatriz Silva; Silame, Francisca Daniele Jardilino; Alandia-Roman, Carla Cecilia; Cruvinel, Diogo Rodrigues; Garcia, Lucas da Fonseca Roberti; Pires-de-Souza, Fernanda de Carvalho Panzeri

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the color stability (ΔE) of nanoparticulate composite, with consideration for the type of surface treatment performed before repair. A Teflon matrix was used to fabricate 50 test specimens from composite. After initial color readout, the specimens were submitted to 100 hours of accelerated artificial aging (AAA). The samples were divided into five groups (n = 10), according to the surface treatment performed: sandblasting with aluminum oxide powder, phosphoric acid, and an adhesive system (Group 1); sandblasting with aluminum oxide powder, phosphoric acid, and a flowable composite (Group 2); abrasion with a diamond bur, phosphoric acid, and an adhesive system (Group 3); abrasion with a diamond bur, phosphoric acid, and a nanoparticulate composite (Group 4); and a control group (Group 5). After repair, a new color readout was taken, the test specimens were submitted to a new AAA cycle (300 hours), and the final color readout was taken. Comparison of the ΔE means (one-way ANOVA and Tukey tests, p < 0.05) demonstrated no statistically significant differences among the groups (p > 0.05) after 100 hours of AAA. After repair, Group 1 (4.61 ± 2.03) presented the highest color alteration with a statistically significant difference compared with the other groups (p < 0.05). After 300 hours, Group 4 specimens (13.84 ± 0.71) presented the lowest color alteration in comparison with the other groups, with a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05). It was concluded that the repair performed in Group 4 provided greater esthetic recovery, made possible by the regression in the ΔE values of the restorations after repair, and less color alteration of the restorations over the course of time. PMID:23032241

  11. DNA repair in cultured keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.C.; Parsons, S.; Hanawalt, P.C.

    1983-07-01

    Most of our understanding of DNA repair mechanisms in human cells has come from the study of these processes in cultured fibroblasts. The unique properties of keratinocytes and their pattern of terminal differentiation led us to a comparative examination of their DNA repair properties. The relative repair capabilities of the basal cells and the differentiated epidermal keratinocytes as well as possible correlations of DNA repair capacity with respect to age of the donor have been examined. In addition, since portions of human skin are chronically exposed to sunlight, the repair response to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation (254 nm) when the cells are conditioned by chronic low-level UV irradiation has been assessed. The comparative studies of DNA repair in keratinocytes from infant and aged donors have revealed no significant age-related differences for repair of UV-induced damage to DNA. Sublethal UV conditioning of cells from infant skin had no appreciable effect on either the repair or normal replication response to higher, challenge doses of UVL. However, such conditioning resulted in attenuated repair in keratinocytes from adult skin after UV doses above 25 J/m2. In addition, a surprising enhancement in replication was seen in conditioned cells from adult following challenge UV doses.

  12. Heterogenous mismatch-repair status in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Immunohistochemical staining for mismatch repair proteins is efficient and widely used to identify mismatch repair defective tumors. The tumors typically show uniform and widespread loss of MMR protein staining. We identified and characterized colorectal cancers with alternative, heterogenous mismatch repair protein staining in order to delineate expression patterns and underlying mechanisms. Methods Heterogenous staining patterns that affected at least one of the mismatch repair proteins MLH1, PMS2, MSH2 and MSH6 were identified in 14 colorectal cancers. Based on alternative expression patterns macro-dissected and micro-dissected tumor areas were separately analyzed for microsatellite instability and MLH1 promoter methylation. Results Heterogenous retained/lost mismatch repair protein expression could be classified as intraglandular (within or in-between glandular formations), clonal (in whole glands or groups of glands) and compartmental (in larger tumor areas/compartments or in between different tumor blocks). These patterns coexisted in 9/14 tumors and in the majority of the tumors correlated with differences in microsatellite instability/MLH1 methylation status. Conclusions Heterogenous mismatch repair status can be demonstrated in colorectal cancer. Though rare, attention to this phenomenon is recommended since it corresponds to differences in mismatch repair status that are relevant for correct classification. Virtual Slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1771940323126788 PMID:24968821

  13. Role of percutaneous mitral valve repair in the contemporary management of mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Rana, Bushra S; Calvert, Patrick A; Punjabi, Prakash P; Hildick-Smith, David

    2015-10-01

    Percutaneous mitral valve (MV) repair has been performed in over 20,000 patients worldwide. As clinical experience in this technique grows indications for its use are being defined. Mitral regurgitation (MR) encompasses a complex heterogeneous group and its treatment is governed by determining a clear understanding of the underlying aetiology. Surgical MV repair remains the gold standard therapy for severe MR. However in select groups of high-risk surgical patients, a percutaneous approach to MV repair is establishing its role. This review gives an overview of the published data in percutaneous MV repair and its impact on the contemporary management of MR. PMID:26101091

  14. Pectoralis Major Tendon Repair

    PubMed Central

    Cordasco, Frank A.; Degen, Ryan; Mahony, Gregory Thomas; Tsouris, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Systematic reviews of the literature have identified 365 reported cases of Pectoralis Major Tendon (PMT) injuries. While surgical treatment has demonstrated improved outcomes compared to non-operative treatment, there is still relatively limited data on the functional outcome, return to sport and need for 2nd surgery in athletes following PMT repair. This study comprises the largest series of athletes following PMT repair reported to date. The Objective is to report on the functional outcomes, return to sport and need for 2nd surgery in a consecutive series of PMT tears. Methods: From 2009, 81 patients with PMT tears were enrolled in this prospective series. Baseline evaluation included patient demographics, mechanism of injury, physical examination and PMT specific MRI for confirmation of the diagnosis and analysis of the extent of injury. Each patient underwent surgical repair by the senior author utilizing a previously published surgical technique. Patients were then followed at 2 weeks, 6 weeks, 3 months and 6 months and further follow-up was conducted annually thereafter with functional outcome scores and adduction strength testing. The return to sport and incidence of 2nd surgery data were recorded. This study includes the first 40 athletes to reach the 2-year post-operative period. Results: All athletes were male, with an average age of 34.4 years (range 23-59). The patient cohort consisted of 4 professional NFL players and 36 recreational athletes. Average follow-up duration was 2.5 years (range 2 - 6.0 years). The most common mechanisms of injury occurred during the bench press (n=26) and contact sport participation (n=14). Sixteen injuries were complete avulsions involving both the clavicular and sternocostal heads, while 24 were isolated sternocostal head avulsions. Average pre-injury bench press of 396 lbs (range 170-500 lbs) was restored to 241 lbs post-operatively (range 140-550 lbs). Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE) scores

  15. New Materials for the Repair of Polyimide Electrical Wire Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Two viable polyimide backbone materials have been identified that will allow the repair of polyimide electrical wire insulation found on the Space Shuttle and other aging aircraft. This identification is the outcome of ongoing efforts to assess the viability of using such polyimides and polyimide precursors (polyamic acids [PAAs]) as repair materials for aging polyimide electrical wire insulation. These repair materials were selected because they match the chemical makeup of the underlying wire insulation as closely as possible. This similarity allows for maximum compatibility, coupled with the outstanding physical properties of polyimides. The two polyimide backbone materials allow the polymer to be extremely flexible and to melt at low temperatures. A polymer chain end capping group that allows the polymer to crosslink into a nonflowable repair upon curing at around 200 C was also identified.

  16. Industrial motor repair in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Schueler, V.; Leistner, P.; Douglass, J.

    1994-09-01

    This report characterizes the motor repair industry in the United States; summarizes current motor repair and testing practice; and identifies barriers to energy motor repair practice and recommends strategies for overcoming those barriers.

  17. Laparoscopic paracolostomy hernia mesh repair.

    PubMed

    Virzí, Giuseppe; Giuseppe, Virzí; Scaravilli, Francesco; Francesco, Scaravilli; Ragazzi, Salvatore; Salvatore, Ragazzi; Piazza, Diego; Diego, Piazza

    2007-12-01

    Paracolostomy hernia is a common occurrence, representing a late complication of stoma surgery. Different surgical techniques have been proposed to repair the wall defect, but the lowest recurrence rates are associated with the use of mesh. We present the case report of a patient in which laparoscopic paracolostomy hernia mesh repair has been successfully performed. PMID:18097321

  18. Instructional Guide for Autobody Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg. Dept. of Education.

    The curriculum guide was developed to serve as a statewide model for Virginia auto body repair programs. The guide is designed to 1,080 hours of instruction in eleven blocks: orientation, introduction, welding and cutting, techniques of shaping metal, body filler and fiberglass repairs, body and frame, removing and replacing damaged parts, basic…

  19. Cobbler's Technique for Iridodialysis Repair

    PubMed Central

    Pandav, Surinder Singh; Gupta, Parul Chawla; Singh, Rishi Raj; Das, Kalpita; Kaushik, Sushmita; Raj, Srishti; Ram, Jagat

    2016-01-01

    We describe a novel “Cobbler's technique” for iridodialysis repair in the right eye of a patient aged 18 years, with a traumatic iridodialysis secondary to open globe injury with an iron rod. Our technique is simple with easy surgical maneuvers, that is, effective for repairing iridodialysis. The “Cobbler's technique” allows a maximally functional and cosmetic result for iridodialysis. PMID:26957855

  20. Pipe inspection and repair system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schempf, Hagen (Inventor); Mutschler, Edward (Inventor); Chemel, Brian (Inventor); Boehmke, Scott (Inventor); Crowley, William (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A multi-module pipe inspection and repair device. The device includes a base module, a camera module, a sensor module, an MFL module, a brush module, a patch set/test module, and a marker module. Each of the modules may be interconnected to construct one of an inspection device, a preparation device, a marking device, and a repair device.

  1. Major Appliance Repair. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smreker, Eugene; Calvert, King

    This module is a comprehensive text on basic appliance repair, designed to prepare students for entry-level jobs in this growing field. Ensuring a firm grounding in electrical knowledge, the module contains 13 instructional units that cover the following topics: (1) major appliance repair orientation; (2) safety and first aid; (3) fundamentals of…

  2. Membrane Repair: Mechanisms and Pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Sandra T; McNeil, Paul L

    2015-10-01

    Eukaryotic cells have been confronted throughout their evolution with potentially lethal plasma membrane injuries, including those caused by osmotic stress, by infection from bacterial toxins and parasites, and by mechanical and ischemic stress. The wounded cell can survive if a rapid repair response is mounted that restores boundary integrity. Calcium has been identified as the key trigger to activate an effective membrane repair response that utilizes exocytosis and endocytosis to repair a membrane tear, or remove a membrane pore. We here review what is known about the cellular and molecular mechanisms of membrane repair, with particular emphasis on the relevance of repair as it relates to disease pathologies. Collective evidence reveals membrane repair employs primitive yet robust molecular machinery, such as vesicle fusion and contractile rings, processes evolutionarily honed for simplicity and success. Yet to be fully understood is whether core membrane repair machinery exists in all cells, or whether evolutionary adaptation has resulted in multiple compensatory repair pathways that specialize in different tissues and cells within our body. PMID:26336031

  3. Comparison of shear bond strength of two porcelain repair systems after different surface treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Ashish; Mohan, Murali S.; Gowda, E. Mahesh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Intraoral chair side porcelain repair system is a quick, painless and highly patient acceptable procedure, without removal of restoration or fabrication of new restoration. There are very limited studies conducted to evaluate the shear bond strength of repair systems after different surface treatment. Objectives of Research: The objective of research was to evaluate the shear bond strength of two intraoral porcelain repair systems Clearfil repair system (Kuraray) and Ceramic repair system (Ivoclar) to repair metal-ceramic restoration after three different surface treatment. Materials and Methods: Totally, 120 discs of base metal alloy were fabricated. The opaque, dentine and enamel of ceramic were applied to achieve the uniform thickness. Defect was created, and repair was done using two repair systems after different surface treatment. Shear bond strength was measured. Results: Analysis of variance was utilized. Ceramic repair system after 40% phosphoric acid surface treatment showed the highest mean value and Clearfil repair system after surface treatment with 37% phosphoric acid showed the lowest. The statistical difference was found to be significant between the groups. Conclusion: The shear bond strength of Ceramic repair system with 40% phosphoric acid etching showed highest shear bond strength as compared to other system and surface treatment used in the study. PMID:26097354

  4. Rethinking transcription coupled DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Kamarthapu, Venu; Nudler, Evgeny

    2015-04-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is an evolutionarily conserved, multistep process that can detect a wide variety of DNA lesions. Transcription coupled repair (TCR) is a subpathway of NER that repairs the transcribed DNA strand faster than the rest of the genome. RNA polymerase (RNAP) stalled at DNA lesions mediates the recruitment of NER enzymes to the damage site. In this review we focus on a newly identified bacterial TCR pathway in which the NER enzyme UvrD, in conjunction with NusA, plays a major role in initiating the repair process. We discuss the tradeoff between the new and conventional models of TCR, how and when each pathway operates to repair DNA damage, and the necessity of pervasive transcription in maintaining genome integrity. PMID:25596348

  5. Engineering skeletal muscle repair.

    PubMed

    Juhas, Mark; Bursac, Nenad

    2013-10-01

    Healthy skeletal muscle has a remarkable capacity for regeneration. Even at a mature age, muscle tissue can undergo a robust rebuilding process that involves the formation of new muscle cells and extracellular matrix and the re-establishment of vascular and neural networks. Understanding and reverse-engineering components of this process is essential for our ability to restore loss of muscle mass and function in cases where the natural ability of muscle for self-repair is exhausted or impaired. In this article, we will describe current approaches to restore the function of diseased or injured muscle through combined use of myogenic stem cells, biomaterials, and functional tissue-engineered muscle. Furthermore, we will discuss possibilities for expanding the future use of human cell sources toward the development of cell-based clinical therapies and in vitro models of human muscle disease. PMID:23711735

  6. TPS Inspection and Repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parazynski, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Scott Parazynski provided a retrospective on the EVA tools and procedures efforts NASA went through in the aftermath of Columbia for the Shuttle Thermal Protection System (TPS) inspection and repair. He describes his role as the lead astronaut on this effort, and covered all of the Neutral Buoyancy Lab (NBL), KC 135 (reduced gravity aircraft), Precision Air Bearing Floor (PABF), vacuum chamber and 1 G testing that was done in order to develop the tools and techniques that were flown. Parazynski also discusses how the EVA community worked together to resolve a huge safety issue, and how his work in the spacesuit was critical to overcoming a design limitation of the Space Shuttle.

  7. Wound repair in Pocillopora.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Villalobos, Jenny Carolina; Work, Thierry Martin; Calderon-Aguilera, Luis Eduardo

    2016-09-01

    Corals routinely lose tissue due to causes ranging from predation to disease. Tissue healing and regeneration are fundamental to the normal functioning of corals, yet we know little about this process. We described the microscopic morphology of wound repair in Pocillopora damicornis. Tissue was removed by airbrushing fragments from three healthy colonies, and these were monitored daily at the gross and microscopic level for 40days. Grossly, corals healed by Day 30, but repigmentation was not evident at the end of the study (40d). On histology, from Day 8 onwards, tissues at the lesion site were microscopically indistinguishable from adjacent normal tissues with evidence of zooxanthellae in gastrodermis. Inflammation was not evident. P. damicornis manifested a unique mode of regeneration involving projections of cell-covered mesoglea from the surface body wall that anastomosed to form gastrovascular canals. PMID:27397755

  8. Wound repair in Pocillopora

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodríguez-Villalobos, Jenny Carolina; Work, Thierry M.; Calderon-Aguileraa, Luis Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Corals routinely lose tissue due to causes ranging from predation to disease. Tissue healing and regeneration are fundamental to the normal functioning of corals, yet we know little about this process. We described the microscopic morphology of wound repair in Pocillopora damicornis. Tissue was removed by airbrushing fragments from three healthy colonies, and these were monitored daily at the gross and microscopic level for 40 days. Grossly, corals healed by Day 30, but repigmentation was not evident at the end of the study (40 d). On histology, from Day 8 onwards, tissues at the lesion site were microscopically indistinguishable from adjacent normal tissues with evidence of zooxanthellae in gastrodermis. Inflammation was not evident. P. damicornis manifested a unique mode of regeneration involving projections of cell-covered mesoglea from the surface body wall that anastomosed to form gastrovascular canals.

  9. Defect repair performance using the nanomachining repair technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morikawa, Yasutaka; Kokubo, Haruo; Nishiguchi, Masaharu; Hayashi, Naoya; White, Roy; Bozak, Ron; Terrill, Lee

    2003-08-01

    Nanomachining is a new technique for repairing photomask defects. The advantages of this technique are no substrate damage, precise edge placement position and Z height accuracy when compared with current Laser zapper or FIB GAE repair techniques. This technique can be applied to any type of opaque defects at any type of film materials and quartz bump defects on Alternating Aperture Phase Sifting Masks (AAPSM). Furthermore, these characteristics enable complex pattern repairs of most advanced photomasks for 193nm lithography and enables iterative repair to achieve improved printing performance when analyzed with an AIMS 193nm tool. Dai Nippon Printing Co., Ltd. (DNP) has been producing AAPSMs in mass production for quite some time. The standard type of AAPSMs manufactured has been etched quartz, single trench with an undercut structure. On this structure, there is a potential for quartz defects underneath the chrome overhang based on the combination of dry and wet etching to create the undercut. For this study, we fabricated this kind of designed quartz defects and repaired them using the nanomachining system. These types of defects are particularly difficult to repair perfectly because they exist underneath the chrome overhang. We will show some options to achieve better printing results through the repair of these kinds of defects. In this report, we confirmed basic performance of this technique such as edge placement accuracy, Z height accuracy and AIMS printability. Additionally, we also tried to repair some complex defects such as quartz defects of AAPSM, quartz defects of CPL mask and oversized Serifs for application options. We will show these nanomachining repairs with evaluation results of printing performance simulated by the AIMS 193nm tool.

  10. 46 CFR Sec. 18 - Group classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Group classification. Sec. 18 Section 18 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY PROCEDURE FOR ACCOMPLISHMENT OF VESSEL REPAIRS UNDER NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR...

  11. 46 CFR Sec. 18 - Group classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Group classification. Sec. 18 Section 18 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY PROCEDURE FOR ACCOMPLISHMENT OF VESSEL REPAIRS UNDER NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR...

  12. 46 CFR Sec. 18 - Group classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Group classification. Sec. 18 Section 18 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY PROCEDURE FOR ACCOMPLISHMENT OF VESSEL REPAIRS UNDER NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR...

  13. 46 CFR Sec. 18 - Group classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Group classification. Sec. 18 Section 18 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY PROCEDURE FOR ACCOMPLISHMENT OF VESSEL REPAIRS UNDER NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR...

  14. Biomaterials for orbital fractures repair

    PubMed Central

    Totir, M; Ciuluvica, R; Dinu, I; Careba, I; Gradinaru, S

    2014-01-01

    The unique and complex anatomy of the orbit requires significant contouring of the implants to restore the proper anatomy. Fractures of the orbital region have an incidence of 10-25% from total facial fractures and the most common age group was the third decade of life. The majority of cases require reconstruction of the orbital floor to support the globe position and restore the shape of the orbit. The reason for this is that the bony walls are comminuted and/or bone fragments are missing. Therefore, the reconstruction of missing bone is important rather than reducing bone fragments. This can be accomplished using various materials. There is hardly any anatomic region in the human body that is so controversial in terms of appropriate material used for fracture repair: nonresorbable versus resorbable, autogenous/allogenous/xenogenous versus alloplastic material, non-prebent versus preformed (anatomical) plates, standard versus custom-made plates, nonporous versus porous material, non-coated versus coated plates. Thus, the importance of material used for reconstruction becomes more challenging for the ophthalmologist and the oral and maxillofacial surgeon. PMID:27057250

  15. Biomaterials for orbital fractures repair

    PubMed Central

    Totir, M; Ciuluvica, R; Dinu, I; Careba, I; Gradinaru, S

    2015-01-01

    The unique and complex anatomy of the orbit requires significant contouring of the implants to restore the proper anatomy. Fractures of the orbital region have an incidence of 10-25% from the total facial fractures and the most common age group was the third decade of life. The majority of cases required reconstruction of the orbital floor to support the globe position and restore the shape of the orbit. The reason for this was that the bony walls were comminuted and/ or bone fragments were missing. Therefore, the reconstruction of the missing bone was important rather than reducing the bone fragments. This could be accomplished by using various materials. There is hardly any anatomic region in the human body that is so controversial in terms of appropriate material used for fracture repair: non resorbable versus resorbable, autogenous/ allogeneic/ xenogenous versus alloplastic material, non-prebent versus preformed (anatomical) plates, standard versus custom-made plates, nonporous versus porous material, non-coated versus coated plates. Thus, the importance of the material used for reconstruction becomes more challenging for the ophthalmologist and the oral and maxillofacial surgeon. PMID:25914737

  16. How to repair an episiotomy.

    PubMed

    Steen, Mary; Cummins, Bernie

    2016-02-17

    Rationale and key points Skilful repair of an episiotomy is an important aspect of maternal health care. It is essential that midwives and doctors have the knowledge and skills to undertake this procedure in a safe and effective manner. ▶ An episiotomy should be repaired promptly to reduce blood loss and prevent infection. ▶ Repair of an episiotomy is undertaken in three stages: repair of the vaginal mucosa, repair of the muscle layer and repair of the skin layer. ▶ Adequate pain relief should be provided before suturing. Reflective activity Clinical skills articles can help update your practice and ensure it remains evidence based. Apply this article to your practice. Reflect on and write a short account of: 1. Why a rectal examination is recommended before and following repair of an episiotomy. 2. What you would do to improve your suturing skills. 3. The factors that may prevent or delay an episiotomy from healing. Subscribers can upload their reflective accounts at rcni.com/portfolio . PMID:26884039

  17. Endovascular aortic repair: first twenty years.

    PubMed

    Koncar, Igor; Tolić, Momcilo; Ilić, Nikola; Cvetković, Slobodan; Dragas, Marko; Cinara, Ilijas; Kostić, Dusan; Davidović, Lazar

    2012-01-01

    Endovascular aortic/aneurysm repair (EVAR) was introduced into clinical practice at the beginning of the nineties. Its fast development had a great influence on clinicians, vascular surgeons and interventional radiologists, educational curriculums, patients, industry and medical insurance. The aim of this paper is to present the contribution of clinicians and industry to the development and advancement of endovascular aortic repair over the last 20 years. This review article presents the development of EVAR by focusing on the contribution of physicians, surgeons and interventional radiologists in the creation of the new field of vascular surgery termed hybrid vascular surgery, and also the contribution of technological advancement by a significant help of industrial representatives--engineers and their counselors. This article also analyzes studies conducted in order to compare the successfulness of EVAR with up-to-now applied open surgical repair of aortic aneurysms, and some treatment techniques of other aortic diseases. During the first two decades of its development the EVAR method was rapidly progressing and was adopted concurrently with the expansion of technology. Owing to large randomized studies, early and long-term results indicate specific complications of this method, thus influencing further technological improvement and defining risk patients groups in whom the use of the technique should be avoided. Good results are insured only in centers, specialized in vascular surgery, which have on their disposal adequate conditions for solving all complications associated with this method. PMID:23350259

  18. DNA repair in Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background DNA repair is essential for the maintenance of genome stability in all living beings. Genome size as well as the repertoire and abundance of DNA repair components may vary among prokaryotic species. The bacteria of the Mollicutes class feature a small genome size, absence of a cell wall, and a parasitic lifestyle. A small number of genes make Mollicutes a good model for a “minimal cell” concept. Results In this work we studied the DNA repair system of Mycoplasma gallisepticum on genomic, transcriptional, and proteomic levels. We detected 18 out of 22 members of the DNA repair system on a protein level. We found that abundance of the respective mRNAs is less than one per cell. We studied transcriptional response of DNA repair genes of M. gallisepticum at stress conditions including heat, osmotic, peroxide stresses, tetracycline and ciprofloxacin treatment, stationary phase and heat stress in stationary phase. Conclusions Based on comparative genomic study, we determined that the DNA repair system M. gallisepticum includes a sufficient set of proteins to provide a cell with functional nucleotide and base excision repair and mismatch repair. We identified SOS-response in M. gallisepticum on ciprofloxacin, which is a known SOS-inducer, tetracycline and heat stress in the absence of established regulators. Heat stress was found to be the strongest SOS-inducer. We found that upon transition to stationary phase of culture growth transcription of DNA repair genes decreases dramatically. Heat stress does not induce SOS-response in a stationary phase. PMID:24148612

  19. Scalp repair using tissue expanders.

    PubMed

    Mangubat, E Antonio

    2013-08-01

    Repair of scalp defects is often challenging, because without careful planning, excision of the defect may leave unsatisfactory cosmesis. Contemporary techniques in hair restoration surgery allow creation of natural and undetectable results, but these techniques are often unsuitable for repairing large scarred areas of hair loss. However, by using older techniques of scalp reduction and tissue expansion, excision of many large scarring defects can be accomplished. Combining older methods with modern hair restoration surgery permits the satisfactory treatment of many previously untreatable conditions. This article focuses on tissue expansion as an adjunct to repairing large scalp defects. PMID:24017990

  20. Lichtenstein Mesh Repair (LMR) v/s Modified Bassini’s Repair (MBR) + Lichtenstein Mesh Repair of Direct Inguinal Hernias in Rural Population – A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Santosh M; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Kuthadi Sravan; Mithun, Gorre

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Lichtenstein’s tension free mesh hernioplasty is the commonly done open technique for inguinal hernias. As our hospital is in rural area, majority of patients are labourers, open hernias are commonly done. The present study was done by comparing Lichtenstein Mesh Repair (LMR) v/s Modified Bassini’s repair (MBR) + Lichtenstein mesh repair (LMR) of direct Inguinal Hernias to compare the technique of both surgeries and its outcome like postoperative complications and recurrence rate. Materials and Methods A comparative randomized study was conducted on patients reporting to MNR hospital, sangareddy with direct inguinal hernias. A total of fifty consecutive patients were included in this study of which, 25 patients were operated by LMR and 25 patients were operated by MBR+LMR and followed up for a period of two years. The outcomes of the both techniques were compared. Results Study involved 25 each of Lichtenstein’s mesh repair (LMR) and modified bassini’s repair (MBR) + LMR, over a period of 2 years. The duration of surgery for lichtenstein mesh repair is around 34.56 min compared to LMR+MBR, which is 47.56 min which was statistically significant (p-value is <0.0001). In this study the most common complication for both the groups was seroma. The pain was relatively higher in LMR+MBR group in POD 1, but not statistically significant (p-value is 0.0949) and from POD 7 the pain was almost similar in both groups. The recurrence rate is 2% for LMR and 0% for MBR+LMR. Conclusion LMR+MBR was comparatively better than only LMR in all direct inguinal hernias because of low recurrence rate (0%) and low postoperative complications, which showed in our present study. PMID:27042517

  1. Comparison of CO2 laser welding with suture technique for repair of tendons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovic, Neven A.; Johnstone, Frederic L.; Kilkelly, Francis X.; McKinney, LuAnn; Van De Merwe, Willem P.; Smith, Allan C.

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy, histology, and strength of laser welding in repair of sharply transected rat Achilles tendons. In 26 adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats, the severed tendons were repaired with a 7-0 nylon, modified Kessler core suture followed by either a running 9-0 nylon epitendinous suture or a circumferential CO2 laser epidendinous weld using 25% human albumin as a solder. All repairs were timed and post- operative tensile strength was analyzed with material testing equipment. In addition, histologic testing was performed on both types of repairs. The mean time to complete the epitendinous repair in the laser group was 3.5 minutes and in the suture group, 8 minutes. The mean ultimate tensile strength in 6 normal tendons was 40.9 Newtons (N) with group standard deviation of 5.2 N. When compared with normal controls, post-operatively both types of tendon repairs resulted in tensile failure at lower forces. The ultimate tensile strength for the epitendinous suture repair and the laser welds were 13% and 6% of normal controls, respectively. Twenty tendons with epidendinous suture repair had mean ultimate tensile strength of 5.4 (+/- 1.2) N, while the 17 tendons with laser wends failed at 2.6 (+/- 0.9) N. Histologic evaluation of tendons repaired with CO2 laser revealed areas of coagulation and edema on the surface of tendon edges. Post-operatively, greater tissue changes were noted in laser treated tendons than those repaired with sutures. Laser welding of epitenon is possible and can be completed faster than the suture repair. The repaired tendon surface appears smoother and less bulky after laser treatment. However, significantly decreased immediate post-operative strength was demonstrated by the use of Kruskal-Wallis one way analysis of variance and Turkey's pairwise comparison.

  2. Looped Versus Single-Stranded Flexor Tendon Repairs: A Cadaveric Mechanical Study

    PubMed Central

    Calfee, Ryan P.; Boone, Sean; Stepan, Jeffrey G.; Osei, Daniel A.; Thomopoulos, Stavros; Boyer, Martin I.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare the tensile properties of 4-strand modified Kessler flexor tendon repairs using a looped or single-stranded suture. Methods We evaluated the mechanical properties of 4-strand Kessler zone II core suture repairs using either looped or single-stranded suture in human flexor digitorum profundus and flexor pollicis longus tendons. Forty repairs were performed on tendons from bilateral cadaveric hands: 20 matched tendons were divided into equal groups of 3-0 looped and 3-0 single-strand repairs and 20 additional matched tendons were divided into equal groups of 4-0 looped and 4-0 single-strand repairs. Repaired tendons were tested in uniaxial tension to failure to determine mechanical properties and failure modes. Data were analyzed to determine the effect of repair type (ie, looped vs single-stranded) for each suture caliber (ie, 3-0 and 4-0). Results Single-strand repairs with 3-0 suture demonstrated a significantly greater maximum load to failure and a significantly higher force at 2-mm gap compared with repairs with looped 3-0 suture. All 8 looped repairs with 3-0 suture failed by suture pullout whereas 7 of 8 repairs with 3-0 single-stranded suture failed by suture breakage. The mechanical properties of looped versus single-stranded repairs with 4-0 caliber suture were not statistically different. Repairs with 4-0 caliber suture failed by suture breakage in 8 of 10 single-strand repairs and failed by suture pullout in 6 of 10 repairs with looped suture. Conclusions In a time-0 ex vivo human cadaveric core suture model, the mechanical properties of a 4-strand repair using 3-0 single-stranded suture were significantly better than the same 4-strand repair performed with looped suture. Clinical relevance Four-strand flexor tendon repairs with 3-0 suture are mechanically superior when performed with single-strand suture versus looped suture. PMID:25801581

  3. Should we think about wrist extensor after flexor tendon repair?

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Aline M; Tanaka, Denise M; Barbosa, Rafael I; Marcolino, Alexandre M; Elui, Valeria MC; Mazzer, Nilton

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the activity of wrist extensor muscle, correlating with wrist motion during gripping after flexor tendon repair. Design: Cross-sectional clinical measurement study. Setting: Laboratory for biomechanics and rehabilitation. Subjects: A total of 11 patients submitted to rehabilitation by early passive motion of the fingers with wrist flexion position were evaluated after 8 weeks of fingers flexor tendon repair and 11 healthy volunteers, all ranging from 20 to 37 years of age. Intervention: Volunteers performed an isometric standardized gripping task. Main measures: We used electrogoniometry to analyze wrist range of motion and surface electromyography, considering 100% maximum voluntary contraction to represent the amplitude of electromyographic activity of the extensor carpi radialis and flexor digitorum superficialis. Results: Patients with flexor tendon repair showed co-activation deficit between wrist extensor (extensor carpi radialis) and flexor finger muscles (flexor digitorum superficialis) during gripping in the intermediate phase of rehabilitation, despite some recovering mobility for wrist extension (p ≤ 0.05). A moderate correlation between range of motion and extensor carpi radialis was present only for injured group (r = 0.32). Total active motion score, which represents finger active excursion, was regular or poor in 65% of cases, all with nerve repair associated. Conclusion: Wrist extensors have an important synergist role at handgrip, although some imbalance can be present after flexor tendon repair. These preliminary findings suggest that emphasis could be directed to add synergistic wrist motion in rehabilitation protocols after flexor tendon repair. Future studies with early active rehabilitation are necessary. PMID:26770674

  4. Repair of spinal dural defects. An experimental study.

    PubMed

    Keller, J T; Ongkiko, C M; Saunders, M C; Mayfield, F H; Dunsker, S B

    1984-05-01

    The search for an ideal substance for duraplasty has stimulated clinical and experimental investigations. To date a large number of materials have been employed for dural repair, although there is as yet no unanimity regarding the ideal material. Most of these studies have been concerned with cranial dura, and spinal duraplasty has received less attention. This study was designed to examine the repair of spinal dural defects in the dog. The materials chosen for this experiment were autologous fat, a polyester fiber mesh (Mersilene) and silicone-coated Dacron (Dura Film). Nineteen dogs were used in this study. Following lumbar laminectomy and the excision of elliptical pieces of dura (1.0 X 0.5 cm) at three noncontiguous levels, each of the defects was repaired using one of the three materials. Groups of animals were sacrificed at each of 3, 6, 12, and 24 weeks after dural repair. The lumbar region was removed en bloc and prepared for histological examination. Repair of the dural opening was achieved in all cases. The polyester fiber mesh was quite effective for dural repair, serving as a scaffold through which a neomembrane grew and united the dural edges. The results with autologous fat were similarly favorable. On the other hand, results with silicone-coated Dacron showed encapsulation by connective tissue, with the ventral aspect of the graft frequently compressing the underlying cord. PMID:6232352

  5. A Comparative Study between Modified Bassini’s Repair and Lichtenstein Mesh Repair (LMR) of Inguinal Hernias in Rural Population

    PubMed Central

    N., Naveen; R., Srinath

    2014-01-01

    Background: Bassini’s repair and the Lichtenstein’s tension free mesh hernioplasty are commonly used hernia repair techniques and yet there is no unison as to which is the best technique. Our hospital being in a rural setup and catering to majority of poor patients who are daily wagers, open hernia repairs are commonly done. This study was undertaken to compare the technique and post-operative course so as to determine the best suitable of the two procedures for them. Materials and Methods: A comparative randomized study was conducted on a total of 70 patients with inguinal hernia and were operated upon by either of technique and followed up. Outcome of both the techniques were analyzed and compared with other similar studies. Results: Study involved 35 each of Modified Bassini’s Repair (MBR) and Lichtenstein’s Mesh Repair (LMR), over a period of 18 months. MBR took more operating time than LMR. Commonest complication in both the groups was seroma formation. There were two recurrences in the MBR group and none in LMR group. Conclusion: LMR was comparatively better than MBR due to its simplicity, less dissection and early ambulation in the post-operative period and with no recurrence, in our study. PMID:24701491

  6. The influence of an adhesive system on shear bond strength of repaired high-copper amalgams.

    PubMed

    Hadavi, F; Hey, J H; Ambrose, E R; elBadrawy, H E

    1991-01-01

    The shear bond strengths of intact high-copper spherical and admixed amalgams were compared with repaired high-copper spherical and admixed amalgam specimens with and without the use of an adhesive system (Amalgambond). In the spherical group the shear bond strength of the repaired specimens was found to be 55 and 53.2% of the intact specimens without and with the use of the adhesive system. After thermocycling those percentages were 48.5 and 43. In the admixed groups those percentages were 39, 36.5, 34.5, and 35.2 respectively. It was found that the application of Amalgambond did not significantly increase the strength of the repaired amalgam. Thermocycling only had a significantly adverse effect on the repair strength in the admixed group repaired without an adhesive system. PMID:1813872

  7. Repair of webbed fingers - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/presentations/100096.htm Repair of webbed fingers - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features ... Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Finger Injuries and Disorders A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  8. Cleft lip and palate repair

    MedlinePlus

    Orofacial cleft; Craniofacial birth defect repair; Cheiloplasty; Cleft rhinoplasty; Palatoplasty; Tip rhinoplasty ... A cleft lip is a birth defect: A cleft lip may be just a small notch in the lip. It may also be a complete split in the ...

  9. Rotator cuff repair - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... shoulder and arm bones. The tendons can be torn from overuse or injury. ... Surgery to repair a torn rotator cuff is usually very successful at relieving pain in the shoulder. The procedure is less predictable at returning strength ...

  10. Nucleotide excision repair in humans.

    PubMed

    Spivak, Graciela

    2015-12-01

    The demonstration of DNA damage excision and repair replication by Setlow, Howard-Flanders, Hanawalt and their colleagues in the early 1960s, constituted the discovery of the ubiquitous pathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER). The serial steps in NER are similar in organisms from unicellular bacteria to complex mammals and plants, and involve recognition of lesions, adducts or structures that disrupt the DNA double helix, removal of a short oligonucleotide containing the offending lesion, synthesis of a repair patch copying the opposite undamaged strand, and ligation, to restore the DNA to its original form. The transcription-coupled repair (TCR) subpathway of NER, discovered nearly two decades later, is dedicated to the removal of lesions from the template DNA strands of actively transcribed genes. In this review I will outline the essential factors and complexes involved in NER in humans, and will comment on additional factors and metabolic processes that affect the efficiency of this important process. PMID:26388429

  11. Precision Instrument and Equipment Repairers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyatt, Ian

    2001-01-01

    Explains the job of precision instrument and equipment repairers, who work on cameras, medical equipment, musical instruments, watches and clocks, and industrial measuring devices. Discusses duties, working conditions, employment and earnings, job outlook, and skills and training. (JOW)

  12. Anterior Repair with Processed Dermis

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Anterior Repair with Axis® Tutoplast® Processed Dermis and Digitex® - Performed by Dr. Manish Patel Click Here to view the BroadcastMed, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2016 BroadcastMed, Inc. ...

  13. Mammalian DNA Repair. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    2003-01-24

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Mammalian DNA Repair was held at Harbortown Resort, Ventura Beach, CA. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  14. 46 CFR Sec. 19 - Ship Repair Summaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ship Repair Summaries. Sec. 19 Section 19 Shipping... Sec. 19 Ship Repair Summaries. (a) Ship Repair Summaries shall be prepared on Form MA-159 by the... jurisdiction and submitted to the District Ship Repair and Maintenance office involved. The summaries must...

  15. 46 CFR Sec. 19 - Ship Repair Summaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ship Repair Summaries. Sec. 19 Section 19 Shipping... Sec. 19 Ship Repair Summaries. (a) Ship Repair Summaries shall be prepared on Form MA-159 by the... jurisdiction and submitted to the District Ship Repair and Maintenance office involved. The summaries must...

  16. 46 CFR Sec. 19 - Ship Repair Summaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ship Repair Summaries. Sec. 19 Section 19 Shipping... Sec. 19 Ship Repair Summaries. (a) Ship Repair Summaries shall be prepared on Form MA-159 by the... jurisdiction and submitted to the District Ship Repair and Maintenance office involved. The summaries must...

  17. 46 CFR Sec. 19 - Ship Repair Summaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ship Repair Summaries. Sec. 19 Section 19 Shipping... Sec. 19 Ship Repair Summaries. (a) Ship Repair Summaries shall be prepared on Form MA-159 by the... jurisdiction and submitted to the District Ship Repair and Maintenance office involved. The summaries must...

  18. 46 CFR Sec. 19 - Ship Repair Summaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ship Repair Summaries. Sec. 19 Section 19 Shipping... Sec. 19 Ship Repair Summaries. (a) Ship Repair Summaries shall be prepared on Form MA-159 by the... jurisdiction and submitted to the District Ship Repair and Maintenance office involved. The summaries must...

  19. Mitral valve repair versus replacement

    PubMed Central

    Keshavamurthy, Suresh; Gillinov, A. Marc

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative, ischemic, rheumatic and infectious (endocarditis) processes are responsible for mitral valve disease in adults. Mitral valve repair has been widely regarded as the optimal surgical procedure to treat mitral valve dysfunction of all etiologies. The supporting evidence for repair over replacement is strongest in degenerative mitral regurgitation. The aim of the present review is to summarize the data in each category of mitral insufficiency and to provide recommendations based upon this data. PMID:26309824

  20. Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair Using the Undersurface Technique

    PubMed Central

    Rubenis, Imants; Lam, Patrick H.; Murrell, George A.C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair has traditionally been performed in the subacromial space from the bursal side of the tendon. The undersurface rotator cuff repair technique involves the arthroscope remaining in the glenohumeral joint, thus viewing the tendon from its undersurface during repair without a bursectomy or acromioplasty. Purpose: To compare the clinical and structural outcomes of undersurface rotator cuff repair with bursal-side repair. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data was conducted on 2 cohorts of patients who had undergone arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with knotless suture anchors configured in a single-row formation using inverted mattress–style sutures from either the bursal side (n = 100) or undersurface (n = 165) of the supraspinatus tendon. Data were collected preoperatively, intraoperatively, and at 1 week, 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 2 years postoperatively. At each time point, patients completed a modified L’Insalata questionnaire to assess patient-ranked pain scores and were clinically examined using standardized tests. Ultrasound examination was performed at 6 months and 2 years to assess the integrity of the repair. Results: At 2 years postoperatively, patients in both cohorts had significantly less pain and less difficulty with overhead activities compared with preoperative levels (P < .001). The type of repair performed (bursal or undersurface) did not affect the ability to perform overhead activities at 2 years. At 2 years, both groups also had similar retear rates (21% for bursal side, 23% for undersurface). The mean operative time for the arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was 32 minutes when performed from the bursal side and 20 minutes when performed from the undersurface (P < .001). Conclusion: Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, whether performed from the subacromial space or glenohumeral joint, resulted in decreased levels of

  1. Large steam turbine repair: A survey

    SciTech Connect

    Findlan, S.J.; Lube, B. )

    1991-07-01

    This report covers a survey taken to document the current state-of-the-art in repairs to large steam turbines. One objective was to provide information to assist utilities in making repair or replacement decisions. The survey revealed that a large number of repairs have been successfully repaired involving both mechanical and welding repair techniques. Repair techniques have been improving in recent years and are being used more frequently. No guidelines or codes exist for the repair of steam turbine components so each repair is primarily controlled by agreement between the utility, contractor and insurer. Types of repairs are reviewed in this report and in addition, the capabilities of various contractors who are currently active in providing repair service. 40 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. 49 CFR 1242.42 - Administration, repair and maintenance, machinery repair, equipment damaged, dismantling retired...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Administration, repair and maintenance, machinery repair, equipment damaged, dismantling retired property, fringe benefits, other casualties and insurance... maintenance, machinery repair, equipment damaged, dismantling retired property, fringe benefits,...

  3. Muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration after an acute rotator cuff repair in a sheep model

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Tammy; Liu, Xuhui; Easley, Jeremiah T.; Ravishankar, Bharat; Puttlitz, Christian; Feeley, Brian T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Introduction rotator cuff tears (RCTs) are the most common tendon injury seen in orthopedic patients. Muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration of the muscle are crucial factors that dictate the outcome following rotator cuff surgery. Though less studied in humans, rotator cuff muscle fibrosis has been seen in animal models as well and may influence outcomes as well. The purpose of this study was to determine if the rotator cuff would develop muscle changes even in the setting of an acute repair in a sheep model. We hypothesized that fatty infiltration and fibrosis would be present even after an acute repair six months after initial surgery. Methods twelve female adult sheep underwent an acute rotator cuff tear and immediate repair on the right shoulder. The left shoulder served as a control and did not undergo a tear or a repair. Six months following acute rotator cuff repairs, sheep muscles were harvested to study atrophy, fatty infiltration, and fibrosis by histological analysis, western blotting, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results the repair group demonstrated an increase expression of muscle atrophy, fatty infiltration, and fibrosis related genes. Significantly increased adipocytes, muscle fatty infiltration, and collagen deposition was observed in rotator cuff muscles in the tendon repair group compared to the control group. Conclusions rotator cuff muscle undergoes degradation changes including fatty infiltration and fibrosis even after the tendons are repair immediately after rupture. Level of Evidence Basic Science Study. PMID:26261789

  4. Arthroscopic biceps tenodesis compared with repair of isolated type II SLAP lesions in patients older than 35 years.

    PubMed

    Denard, Patrick J; Lädermann, Alexandre; Parsley, B K; Burkhart, Stephen S

    2014-03-01

    This study compared arthroscopic biceps tenodesis with biceps repair for isolated type II superior labrum anterior and posterior (SLAP) lesions in patients older than 35 years. The authors identified isolated type II SLAP lesions that were surgically managed over a 5-year period. Minimum 2-year follow-up data were available for 22 patients who underwent biceps repair (repair group) and for 15 patients who underwent a primary biceps tenodesis (tenodesis group). Mean age at surgery was 45.2±5.5 years in the repair group and 52.0±8.0 years in the tenodesis group. In the repair group, functional outcome improved from baseline to final follow-up using the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) (47.5 to 87.4, respectively; P<.0001) and University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) scores (18.5 to 31.2, respectively; P<.0001). In the tenodesis group, similar findings were observed for the ASES (43.4 to 89.9, respectively; P<.0001) and UCLA scores (19.0 to 32.7, respectively; P<.0001). No difference was found in functional outcome between the groups. Full range of motion recovery was delayed by approximately 3 months in the repair group compared with the tenodesis group (P=.0631). Two patients in the repair group required a secondary capsular release. Seventy-seven percent of patients in the repair group and 100% of patients in the tenodesis group were satisfied and returned to normal activity (P=.0673). In the current study, individuals older than 35 years with an isolated type II SLAP lesion had a shorter postoperative recovery, a more predictable functional outcome, and a higher rate of satisfaction and return to activity with a biceps tenodesis compared with a biceps repair. Based on these observations, biceps tenodesis is preferable to biceps repair for isolated type II SLAP lesions in nonoverhead athletes older than 35 years. PMID:24762158

  5. Self-repairable polymeric networks: Synthesis and network design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Biswajit

    This dissertation describes the design, synthesis and development of a new class of polymeric networks that exhibit self-repairing properties under UV exposure. It consists of two parts: (a) modification and synthesis of oxetane (OXE), and oxolane (OXO) substituted chitosan (CHI) macromonomer, and (b) design, and synthesis of self-repairing polyurethane (PUR) networks consisting of modified chitosan. Unmodified CHI consisting of acetamide (-NHCOCH3), primary hydroxyl (-OH), and amine (-NH2) functional groups were reacted with OXE or OXO compounds under basic conditions in order to substitute the 1° --OH groups, and at the same time, convert -NHCOCH 3 functionalities into -NH2 groups, while maintaining their un-reacted form to generate OXE/OXO-substituted CHI macromonomer. These substituted CHI macromonomers were incorporated within the PUR backbone by reacting with trifunctional isocyanate in the presence of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and dibutyl tin dilaurate catalyst (DBTDL). Utilizing spectroscopic analysis combined with optical microscopy, these studies showed that the kinetics of self-repair depends on the stoichiometry of the individual entities as well as the time required for self-repairing to occur decrease with increasing OXE quantity within the network. Internal reflection infrared imaging (IRIRI) of OXE/OXO-CHI-PUR networks as well as Raman and Fourier transform IR (FT-IR) studies of OXE/OXO-CHI macromonomers revealed that cationic OXE/OXO ring opening, free radical polyurea (PUA)-to-PUR conversion, along with chair-to-boat conformational changes of CHI backbone are responsible for repairing the damaged network. The network remodeling process, investigated by utilizing micro-thermal analyzer (muTA), revealed that mechanical damage generates small fragments or oligomers within the scratch, therefore glass transition temperature (Tg) decreases, and under UV exposure cross-linking reactions propagate from the bottom of the scratch to the top resulting in

  6. A Canine Non-Weight-Bearing Model with Radial Neurectomy for Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xiaoxi; Bao, Nirong; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.; Steinmann, Scott P.; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2015-01-01

    Background The major concern of using a large animal model to study rotator cuff repair is the high rate of repair retears. The purpose of this study was to test a non-weight-bearing (NWB) canine model for rotator cuff repair research. Methods First, in the in vitro study, 18 shoulders were randomized to 3 groups. 1) Full-width transections repaired with modified Mason-Allen sutures using 3-0 polyglactin suture, 2) Group 1 repaired using number 2 (#2) polyester braid and long-chain polyethylene suture, and 3) Partial-width transections leaving the superior 2 mm infraspinatus tendon intact without repair. In the in vivo study of 6 dogs, the infraspinatus tendon was partially transected as the same as the in vitro group 3. A radial neurectomy was performed to prevent weight bearing. The operated limb was slung in a custom-made jacket for 6 weeks. Results In the in vitro study, mean ultimate tensile load and stiffness in Group 2 were significantly higher than Group 1 and 3 (p<0.05). In the in vivo study, gross inspection and histology showed that the preserved superior 2-mm portion of the infraspinatus tendon remained intact with normal structure. Conclusions Based on the biomechanical and histological findings, this canine NWB model may be an appropriate and useful model for studies of rotator cuff repair. PMID:26107616

  7. Repair of peripheral nerve with vein wrapping*

    PubMed Central

    LEUZZI, S.; ARMENIO, A.; LEONE, L.; DE SANTIS, V.; DI TURI, A.; ANNOSCIA, P.; BUFANO, L.; PASCONE, M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The post–traumatic neuro-anastomosis must be protected from the surrounding environment. This barrier must be biologically inert, biodegradable, not compressing but protecting the nerve. Formation of painful neuroma is one of the major issues with neuro-anastomosis; currently there is no consensus on post-repair neuroma prevention. Aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of neuroanastomosis performed with venous sheath to reduce painful neuromas formation, improve the electrical conductivity of the repaired nerve, and reduce the discrepancies of the sectioned nerve stumps. Patients and methods From a trauma population of 320 patients treated in a single centre between January 2008 and December 2011, twenty-six patients were identified as having an injury to at least one of the peripheral nerves of the arm and enrolled in the study. Patients were divided into two groups. In the group A (16 patients) the end-to-end nerve suture was wrapped in a vein sheath and compared with the group B (10 patients) in which a simple end-to-end neurorrhaphy was performed. The venous segment used to cover the nerve micro-suture was harvested from the superficial veins of the forearm. The parameters analyzed were: functional recovery of motor nerves, sensitivity and pain. Results Average follow-up was 14 months (range: 12–24 months). The group A showed a more rapid motor and sensory recovery and a reduction of the painful symptoms compared to the control group (B). Conclusions The Authors demonstrated that, in their experience, the venous sheath provides a valid solution to avoid the dispersion of the nerve fibres, to prevent adherent scars and painful neuromas formation. Moreover it can compensate the different size of two nerve stumps, allowing, thereby, a more rapid functional and sensitive recovery without expensive devices. PMID:24841688

  8. Articular capsule repair in initial artificial hip replacement via anterolateral approach to the hip joint.

    PubMed

    Zhang, B L; Wang, F; Tian, M B; Yin, W L; You, X Y; Li, D; Ma, L G; Xing, L Q

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to explore articular capsule repair in first artificial hip replacement (AHR) via anterolateral approach and its influence on postoperative dislocation. A total of 292 patients who received AHR via anterolateral approach and had the articular capsule repaired in People’s Hospital of Zhengzhou (Henan, China) from February 2008 to February 2014 were selected and divided into total hip replacement (THR) group (group A1) and artificial femoral head replacement (AFHR) group (group A2). Five hundred and five cases in the control group treated using the same approach but receiving no articular capsule repair were divided into THR group (group B1) and AFHR group (group B2). Condition of postoperative dislocation was compared between the two groups. All cases were followed up for 6 months to 5 years (average: 3.75 years); it was noted that the difference in average age, gender, disease constitution and follow-up time in the two groups was not significant (P>0.05). Moreover, groups A1 and B1 were found with 1 case of early hip joint dislocation (0.73%) and 13 cases of hip joint dislocation (5.24%) respectively post-operatively, and the comparison between the two groups was statistically significant (P less than 0.05). One case of hip joint dislocation (0.65%) was found in group A2 and 5 cases (1.95%) in group B2 in early post operation and the difference between two groups had no statistical significance (P>0.05). Neither the repair group nor the control group developed late-onset dislocation after the operation. Thus, we can state that articular capsule repair is feasible during the first AHR via anterolateral approach, which decreases the occurrence of early hip joint dislocation after operation and proves that repairing articular capsule during AFHR via anterolateral approach is unnecessary. PMID:27358130

  9. Repair of the Ankle Syndesmosis

    PubMed Central

    Backus, Jonathan D.; Clanton, Thomas O.; Whitlow, Scott R.; Williams, Brady T.; Liechti, Daniel; Dornan, Grant J.; Saroki, Adriana; Turnbull, Travis Lee; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Significant debate exists regarding the optimal repair techniques for unstable syndesmosis injuries. Techniques range from one to multiple screw fixation, suture-button fixation devices, or a combination of the two. The purpose of the current investigation was to biomechanically compare three common syndesmotic repair techniques using a simulated weight-bearing protocol with internal and external rotation of the foot. Methods: Twenty-four, lower leg specimens with mean age 54.25 years (range, 38 to 68 years) were utilized for testing. Following the creation of a complete syndesmotic injury (AITFL, ITFL, PITFL, interosseous membrane) specimens were repaired using one of three randomly assigned repair techniques: (1) one 3.5 mm syndesmotic screw, (2) one suture-button construct, and (3) two divergent suture-button constructs. For testing, specimens were oriented in neutral plantar/dorsiflexion and neutral internal/external rotation with the respect to the vertical tibia. Repairs were then cycled for 500 cycles between 7.5 Nm of internal/external rotation torque under a constant 750 N axial compressive load. At 0, 10, 100, and 500 cycles, torsional cyclic loading was interrupted to assess torsional stiffness and resistance to rotation within a physiologic range of motion. While axially loaded to 750 N, the foot was externally rotated to 15° and then rotated to 10° of internal rotation. Torsional cyclic loading was then resumed. Torque (Nm) and rotational position (degrees) were recorded continuously throughout testing. Three-dimensional data was also collected throughout testing to characterize the relative spatial relationships of the tibiofibular articulation. Results: Biomechanically, there were no significant differences between techniques when repairs were compared to the intact syndesmosis. Three-dimensional analysis revealed significant differences between all repair techniques for sagittal fibular translation with external rotation of the foot

  10. Essentials of skin laceration repair.

    PubMed

    Forsch, Randall T

    2008-10-15

    Skin laceration repair is an important skill in family medicine. Sutures, tissue adhesives, staples, and skin-closure tapes are options in the outpatient setting. Physicians should be familiar with various suturing techniques, including simple, running, and half-buried mattress (corner) sutures. Although suturing is the preferred method for laceration repair, tissue adhesives are similar in patient satisfaction, infection rates, and scarring risk in low skin-tension areas and may be more cost-effective. The tissue adhesive hair apposition technique also is effective in repairing scalp lacerations. The sting of local anesthesia injections can be lessened by using smaller gauge needles, administering the injection slowly, and warming or buffering the solution. Studies have shown that tap water is safe to use for irrigation, that white petrolatum ointment is as effective as antibiotic ointment in postprocedure care, and that wetting the wound as early as 12 hours after repair does not increase the risk of infection. Patient education and appropriate procedural coding are important after the repair. PMID:18953970

  11. DNA repair in mammalian embryos.

    PubMed

    Jaroudi, Souraya; SenGupta, Sioban

    2007-01-01

    Mammalian cells have developed complex mechanisms to identify DNA damage and activate the required response to maintain genome integrity. Those mechanisms include DNA damage detection, DNA repair, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis which operate together to protect the conceptus from DNA damage originating either in parental gametes or in the embryo's somatic cells. DNA repair in the newly fertilized preimplantation embryo is believed to rely entirely on the oocyte's machinery (mRNAs and proteins deposited and stored prior to ovulation). DNA repair genes have been shown to be expressed in the early stages of mammalian development. The survival of the embryo necessitates that the oocyte be sufficiently equipped with maternal stored products and that embryonic gene expression commences at the correct time. A Medline based literature search was performed using the keywords 'DNA repair' and 'embryo development' or 'gametogenesis' (publication dates between 1995 and 2006). Mammalian studies which investigated gene expression were selected. Further articles were acquired from the citations in the articles obtained from the preliminary Medline search. This paper reviews mammalian DNA repair from gametogenesis to preimplantation embryos to late gestational stages. PMID:17141556

  12. Imaging of cartilage repair procedures

    PubMed Central

    Sanghvi, Darshana; Munshi, Mihir; Pardiwala, Dinshaw

    2014-01-01

    The rationale for cartilage repair is to prevent precocious osteoarthritis in untreated focal cartilage injuries in the young and middle-aged population. The gamut of surgical techniques, normal postoperative radiological appearances, and possible complications have been described. An objective method of recording the quality of repair tissue is with the magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) score. This scoring system evaluates nine parameters that include the extent of defect filling, border zone integration, signal intensity, quality of structure and surface, subchondral bone, subchondral lamina, and records presence or absence of synovitis and adhesions. The five common techniques of cartilage repair currently offered include bone marrow stimulation (microfracture or drilling), mosaicplasty, synthetic resorbable scaffold grafts, osteochondral allograft transplants, and autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). Complications of cartilage repair procedures that may be demonstrated on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) include plug loosening, graft protuberance, graft depression, and collapse in mosaicplasty, graft hypertrophy in ACI, and immune response leading to graft rejection, which is more common with synthetic grafts and cadaveric allografts. PMID:25114387

  13. Repairing Solar Max: The Solar Maximum Repair Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmahan, T.; Neal, V.

    1984-01-01

    Technology and procedures designed for replacing a faulty attitude control module and scientific instruments on the only orbiting solar observatory are described. The rationale for the repair mission is given and the operations of the flight support system within the cargo bay of the space shuttle are discussed. The use of the manned maneuvering unit in capturing the satellite and of the remote manipulator arm in berthing it are discussed, as well as the space tools to be used for repair operations. The space crew and their responsibilities are identified.

  14. Recommendations for Enabling Manual Component Level Electronic Repair for Future Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struk, Peter M.; Easton, John W.; Funk, Gregory P.; Latta, Gary S.; Ganster, Andrew W.; Estes, Brett E.

    2011-01-01

    Long duration missions to the Moon and Mars pose a number of challenges to mission designers, controllers, and the crews. Among these challenges are planning for corrective maintenance actions which often require a repair. Current repair strategies on the International Space Station (ISS) rely primarily on the use of Orbital Replacement Units (ORUs), where a faulty unit is replaced with a spare, and the faulty unit typically returns to Earth for analysis and possible repair. The strategy of replace to repair has posed challenges even for the ISS program. Repairing faulty hardware at lower levels such as the component level can help maintain system availability in situations where no spares exist and potentially reduce logistic resupply mass.This report provides recommendations to help enable manual replacement of electronics at the component-level for future manned space missions. The recommendations include hardware, tools, containment options, and crew training. The recommendations are based on the work of the Component Level Electronics Assembly Repair (CLEAR) task of the Exploration Technology Development Program from 2006 to 2009. The recommendations are derived based on the experience of two experiments conducted by the CLEAR team aboard the International Space Station as well as a group of experienced Miniature/Microminiature (2M) electronics repair technicians and instructors from the U.S. Navy 2M Project Office. The emphasis of the recommendations is the physical repair. Fault diagnostics and post-repair functional test are discussed in other CLEAR reports.

  15. Comparing Gray and White Mineral Trioxide Aggregate as a Repair Material for Furcation Perforation: An in Vitro Dye Extraction Study

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kiran; Baba, Suheel Manzoor; Jaiswal, Shikha; Venkataraghavan, Karthik; Jani, Mehul

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Furcation perforation can have a negative impact on the prognosis of the affected tooth by compromising the attached apparatus. Hence these perforations require immediate repair. A variety of materials have been suggested for repair, of that MTA is the most promising material. The purpose of this study was to compare the ability of Gray and White MTA to seal furcation perforations using a dye extraction method under spectrophotometer. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 permanent mandibular molars were randomly divided into four experimental groups of 15 samples each as follows: Group A: Perforation repaired with White MTA. Group B: Perforation repaired with Gray MTA. Group C: Perforation left unsealed (positive). Group D: without perforation (negative). Dye extraction was performed using full concentration nitric acid. Dye absorbance was measured at 550 nm using spectrophotometer. The data analyzed using one-way-Anova Ratio and Unpaired t-test showing statistically significance difference among the groups. Result: It was seen that Group D samples without perforation showed least absorbance followed by Group A (perforation repaired with White MTA) and Group B (perforation repaired with Gray MTA). Group C (perforation left unsealed) showed highest absorbance. Conclusion: The White and Gray Mineral Trioxide Aggregate performed similarly as a furcation perforation repair material. There was no significant difference between the Gray MTA and White MTA. PMID:25478452

  16. Does the light source affect the repairability of composite resins?

    PubMed

    Karaman, Emel; Gönülol, Nihan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of the light source on the microshear bond strength of different composite resins repaired with the same substrate. Thirty cylindrical specimens of each composite resin--Filtek Silorane, Filtek Z550 (3M ESPE), Gradia Direct Anterior (GC), and Aelite Posterior (BISCO)--were prepared and light-cured with a QTH light curing unit (LCU). The specimens were aged by thermal cycling and divided into three subgroups according to the light source used--QTH, LED, or PAC (n = 10). They were repaired with the same substrate and a Clearfil Repair Kit (Kuraray). The specimens were light-cured and aged for 1 week in distilled water at 37 °C. The microshear bond strength and failure modes were assessed. There was no significant difference in the microshear bond strength values among the composite resins, except for the Filtek Silorane group that showed significantly lower bond strength values when polymerized with the PAC unit compared to the QTH or LED unit. In conclusion, previously placed dimethacrylate-based composites can be repaired with different light sources; however, if the composite to be repaired is silorane-based, then using a QTH or LED device may be the best option. PMID:25098825

  17. Sciatic nerve repair using adhesive bonding and a modified conduit

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiangdang; Cai, Hongfei; Hao, Yongyu; Sun, Geng; Song, Yaoyao; Chen, Wen

    2014-01-01

    When repairing nerves with adhesives, most researchers place glue directly on the nerve stumps, but this method does not fix the nerve ends well and allows glue to easily invade the nerve ends. In this study, we established a rat model of completely transected sciatic nerve injury and repaired it using a modified 1 cm-length conduit with inner diameter of 1.5 mm. Each end of the cylindrical conduit contains a short linear channel, while the enclosed central tube protects the nerve ends well. Nerves were repaired with 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate and suture, which complement the function of the modified conduit. The results demonstrated that for the same conduit, the average operation time using the adhesive method was much shorter than with the suture method. No significant differences were found between the two groups in sciatic function index, motor evoked potential latency, motor evoked potential amplitude, muscular recovery rate, number of medullated nerve fibers, axon diameter, or medullary sheath thickness. Thus, the adhesive method for repairing nerves using a modified conduit is feasible and effective, and reduces the operation time while providing an equivalent repair effect. PMID:25206861

  18. Quality of life in patients undergoing inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, K.; McWhinnie, D.; Jenkinson, C.; Coulter, A.

    1997-01-01

    Inguinal hernia repair is one of the most common surgical procedures undertaken in the NHS. Despite this, no previous work has examined quality of life in this patient group. This study examines quality of life preoperatively and at 3 and 6 months postoperatively in 140 patients undergoing inguinal hernia repair in the context of a randomised controlled trial of laparoscopic versus open hernia repair. Surgery was undertaken on a day case basis, and quality of life was assessed using the Short Form 36 (SF36). In the initial phase of the study, 57% of those screened for suitability met the study inclusion criteria and were randomised. No significant differences were found between laparoscopic and open hernia repair in terms of quality of life at 3 and 6 months postoperatively. No difference was found between 3 and 6 month scores, suggesting that patients had already made a good recovery by 3 months. A significant improvement was found between preoperative and postoperative scores, with the greatest change arising on dimensions assessing pain, physical function, and role limitation owing to physical restriction. After standardising for age, sex, and social class, a comparison of the hernia patients to population norms for the SF36 was consistent with improvement from preoperative to postoperative assessment. This study has demonstrated the improvement in quality of life in patients undergoing elective inguinal hernia repair by experienced surgeons on a day case basis. It has also demonstrated the feasibility of assessing quality of life using generic measures in this patient group. Further work in this area is required. Ultimately, the priority given to elective inguinal hernia repair will depend on how the demonstrated benefits compare with those derived from other elective surgical procedures. PMID:9038494

  19. Nucleotide excision repair proteins and interstrand crosslink repair

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    Although various schemes for interstrand crosslink (ICL) repair incorporate recombination, replication, and double-strand break intermediate steps, action of the NER system or some variation of it is a common feature of most models. In the bacterium Escherichia coli, the NER enzyme UvrABC can incise on either side of an ICL to unhook the crosslink, and repair can proceed via a subsequent recombination step. The relevance of NER to ICL repair in mammalian cells has been challenged. Of all NER mutants, it is clear that ERCC1 and XPF-defective cells show the most pronounced sensitivities to ICL-inducing agents, and defects in ICL repair. However, there is good evidence that cells defective in NER proteins including XPA and XPG are also more sensitive than normal to ICL-inducing agents. These results are summarized here, together with evidence for defective crosslink removal in NER-defective cells. Studies of incision at sites of ICL by cell extracts and purified proteins have been done, but these studies are not all consistent with one another and further research is required. PMID:20658645

  20. Mountain Plains Learning Experience Guide: Automotive Repair. Course: Engine Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schramm, C.; Osland, Walt

    One of twelve individualized courses included in an automotive repair curriculum, this course covers theory and construction, inspection diagnoses, and service and overhaul of automotive engines. The course is comprised of five units: (1) Fundamentals of Four-Cycle Engines, (2) Engine Construction, (3) Valve Train, (4) Lubricating Systems, and (5)…

  1. Enhanced Zone II Flexor Tendon Repair through a New Half Hitch Loop Suture Configuration

    PubMed Central

    Thomopoulos, Stavros; Gelberman, Richard H.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the impact of a new half hitch loop suture configuration on flexor tendon repair mechanics. Cadaver canine flexor digitorum profundus tendons were repaired with 4- or 8-strands, 4–0 or 3–0 suture, with and without half hitch loops. An additional group underwent repair with half hitch loops but without the terminal knot. Half hitch loops improved the strength of 8-strand repairs by 21% when 4–0, and 33% when 3–0 suture was used, and caused a shift in failure mode from suture pullout to suture breakage. 8-strand repairs with half hitch loops but without a terminal knot produced equivalent mechanical properties to those without half hitch loops but with a terminal knot. 4-strand repairs were limited by the strength of the suture in all groups and, as a result, the presence of half hitch loops did not alter the mechanical properties. Overall, half hitch loops improved repair mechanics, allowing failure strength to reach the full capability of suture strength. Improving the mechanical properties of flexor tendon repair with half hitch loops has the potential to reduce the postoperative risk of gap formation and catastrophic rupture in the early postoperative period. PMID:27101409

  2. The temporal outcomes of open versus arthroscopic knotted and knotless rotator cuff repair over 5 years

    PubMed Central

    Lucena, Thomas R; Lam, Patrick H; Millar, Neal L

    2015-01-01

    Background The present study aimed to determine how repair technique influenced structural and clinical outcomes at 5 years post-surgery. Methods Three cohorts of patients had repair of a symptomatic rotator cuff tear using (i) an open double-row mattress repair technique (n = 25); (ii) arthroscopic single-row simple suture knotted technique (n = 25); or (iii) arthroscopic single-row inverted mattress knotless technique (n = 36) by one surgeon. Standardized patient- and examiner-determined outcomes were obtained pre-operatively and postoperatively with a validated protocol, ultrasound were also performed at the same time. Results Retear occurred more often after open repair (48%) at 5 years than after arthroscopic knotted (33%) and arthroscopic knotless (26%) repair. Retear was associated with increasing age, pre-operative tear size and weaker pre-operative and 5 years postoperative cuff strength. Between 2 years and 5 years, the open repair group experienced an increase in the frequency of pain during activity, as well as in the difficulty experienced and the severity of pain during overhead activities (p < 0.05) and, at 5 years, also experienced more difficulty with overhead activities, compared to the arthroscopic knotless repair group. Conclusions At 5-year follow-up, arthroscopic rotator cuff repair techniques resulted in fewer retears and better outcomes compared to an open double-row technique.

  3. Effect of an Extra Hydrophobic Resin Layer on Repair Shear Bond Strength of a Silorane-Based Composite Resin

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Narmin; Bahari, Mahmoud; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Rahbani Nobar, Behnam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Composite repair is a minimally invasive and conservative approach. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of an additional hydrophobic resin layer on the repair shear bond strength of a silorane-based composite repaired with silorane or methacrylate-based composite. Materials and Methods: Sixty bar-shaped composite blocks were fabricated and stored in saline for 72 hours. The surface of the samples were roughened by diamond burs and etched with phosphoric acid; then, they were randomly divided into three groups according to the repairing process: Group 1: Silorane composite-silorane bonding agent-silorane composite; group 2: Silorane composite-silorane bonding agent-hydrophobic resin-silorane composite, and group 3: Silorane composite-silorane bonding agent-hydrophobic resin methacrylate-based composite. Repairing composite blocks measured 2.5×2.5×5mm. After repairing, the samples were stored in saline for 24 hours and thermocycled for 1500 cycles. The repair bond strength was measured at a strain rate of 1mm/min. Twenty additional cylindrical composite blocks (diameter: 2.5mm, height: 6mm) were also fabricated for measuring the cohesive strength of silorane-based composite. The data were analyzed using One-way ANOVA and the post hoc Tukey’s test (α=0.05). Results: Cohesive bond strength of silorane composite was significantly higher than the repair bond strengths in other groups (P<0.001). The repair bond strength of group 3 was significantly higher than that of group 1 (P=0.001). Conclusion: Application of an additional hydrophobic resin layer for repair of silorane-based composite with a methacrylate-based composite enhanced the repair shear bond strength. PMID:27559348

  4. A Randomized Trial of Prenatal versus Postnatal Repair of Myelomeningocele

    PubMed Central

    Adzick, N. Scott; Thom, Elizabeth A.; Spong, Catherine Y.; Brock, John W.; Burrows, Pamela K.; Johnson, Mark P.; Howell, Lori J.; Farrell, Jody A.; Dabrowiak, Mary E.; Sutton, Leslie N.; Gupta, Nalin; Tulipan, Noel B.; D'Alton, Mary E.; Farmer, Diana L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Prenatal repair of myelomeningocele, the most common form of spina bifida, may result in better neurologic function than repair deferred until after delivery. We compared outcomes of in utero repair with standard postnatal repair. Methods We randomly assigned eligible women to undergo either prenatal surgery before 26 weeks of gestation or standard postnatal repair. One primary outcome was a composite of fetal or neonatal death or the need for placement of a cerebrospinal fluid shunt by the age of 12 months. Another primary outcome at 30 months was a composite of mental development and motor function. Results The trial was stopped for efficacy of prenatal surgery after the recruitment of 183 of a planned 200 patients. This report is based on results in 158 patients whose children were evaluated at 12 months. The first primary outcome occurred in 68% of the infants in the prenatal-surgery group and in 98% of those in the postnatal-surgery group (relative risk, 0.70; 97.7% confidence interval [CI], 0.58 to 0.84; P<0.001). Actual rates of shunt placement were 40% in the prenatal-surgery group and 82% in the postnatal-surgery group (relative risk, 0.48; 97.7% CI, 0.36 to 0.64; P<0.001). Prenatal surgery also resulted in improvement in the composite score for mental development and motor function at 30 months (P = 0.007) and in improvement in several secondary outcomes, including hindbrain herniation by 12 months and ambulation by 30 months. However, prenatal surgery was associated with an increased risk of preterm delivery and uterine dehiscence at delivery. Conclusions Prenatal surgery for myelomeningocele reduced the need for shunting and improved motor outcomes at 30 months but was associated with maternal and fetal risks. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00060606.) PMID:21306277

  5. Repair potential of a laboratory-processed nano-hybrid resin composite.

    PubMed

    Dall'oca, Susanna; Papacchini, Federica; Radovic, Ivana; Polimeni, Antonella; Ferrari, Marco

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the 24-h composite-to-composite microtensile bond strength of Gradia Forte (GF) repaired with the same or a different material after different surface treatments. Different groups were set up, in which composite blocks of GF were subjected to the following treatments: Group 1, sandblasting with 50-microm aluminum oxide and 37% phosphoric acid etching (PA); Group 2, bur roughening and etching with 37% PA; Group 3, etching with 37% PA only. In all groups, a bonding resin was used as an intermediate agent prior to layering of the repair material (Gradia Direct (GD), Gradia (G), or GF). Bond strengths were then determined and analysed statistically. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) evaluation of substrates and bonded interfaces was also performed. Surface treatment (P < 0.001) and repair materials (P < 0.001) were factors that significantly affected repair strength, whereas their interaction (P = 0.31) had no significant effect. Group 3 showed significantly superior repair strength to Groups 1 and 2, whereas Group 2 showed significantly weaker repair strength to Groups 1 and 3. Irrespective of surface treatment, GD and G gave similar results, which were better than those obtained using GF. The lowest probability of failure was found for GD and G in Group 3, whereas the highest was found for GF in Groups 1 and 2. Premature failures occurred mainly with G and GF. No pre-testing failures were found in the sandblasting/GD subgroup. Surface-treated composites showed different textures under SEM, whereas composite-repair bonds showed comparable interfacial features. PMID:19106467

  6. Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair - open - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    AAA - open - discharge; Repair - aortic aneurysm - open - discharge ... You had open aortic aneurysm surgery to repair an aneurysm (a widened part) in your aorta, the large artery that carries blood to your ...

  7. Final report [DNA Repair and Mutagenesis - 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Graham C.

    2001-05-30

    The meeting, titled ''DNA Repair and Mutagenesis: Mechanism, Control, and Biological Consequences'', was designed to bring together the various sub-disciplines that collectively comprise the field of DNA Repair and Mutagenesis. The keynote address was titled ''Mutability Doth Play Her Cruel Sports to Many Men's Decay: Variations on the Theme of Translesion Synthesis.'' Sessions were held on the following themes: Excision repair of DNA damage; Transcription and DNA excision repair; UmuC/DinB/Rev1/Rad30 superfamily of DNA polymerases; Cellular responses to DNA damage, checkpoints, and damage tolerance; Repair of mismatched bases, mutation; Genome-instability, and hypermutation; Repair of strand breaks; Replicational fidelity, and Late-breaking developments; Repair and mutation in challenging environments; and Defects in DNA repair: consequences for human disease and aging.

  8. Repair to the Huygens probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) workers examine the Huygens probe after removal from the Cassini spacecraft in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility (PHSF) at KSC. The spacecraft was returned to the PHSF after damage to the thermal insulation was discovered inside Huygens from an abnormally high flow of conditioned air. The damage required technicians to inspect the inside of the probe, repair the insulation, and clean the instruments. After returning from the PHSF to Launch Pad 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Station, Cassini/Huygens launched successfully in October 1997, and reached Saturn in July of 2004. Scientific instruments carried aboard the Cassini orbiter will study Saturn's atmosphere, magnetic field, rings, and several moons, while the Huygens probe will separate and land on the surface of Titan, Saturn's largest moon. The Cassini-Huygens mission owes its name to the Dutch astronomer Christiaan Huygens and Italian astronomer Giovanni Domenico Cassini. Both had spectacular careers as observers of the heavens, which included important discoveries about Saturn and its satellites. Huygens (1629-1695) discovered Saturn's largest moon, Titan, in 1655 and in 1656 described the shape and phase changes of Saturn's rings. Cassini (1625-1712) was the first to observe four of Saturn's moons, Iapetus, Rhea, Tethys, and Dione, in the 1670s and 1680s. He also, in 1675, discovered the gap in Saturn's rings, now called the Cassini Division, and proposed that the rings were formed from many tiny particles. Cassini-Huygens is a joint mission of NASA, the European Space Agency (ESA), and the Italian Space Agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI). JPL is managing the Cassini project for NASA. The mission was proposed in November 1982 by a group of European and American scientists from the European Science Foundation and the National Academy of Sciences. The Solar System Exploration Committee of the NASA Advisory Council endorsed the idea in April 1983, and NASA and ESA began a

  9. Small Engine Repair Course Outline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeClouet, Fred

    Small engines as referred to here are engines used on lawn mowers, chain saws, power plants, outboards, and cycles. It does not include engines used on automobiles. The course outlined is intended to show how small two-cycle and four-cycle gas engines are constructed, how they operate, what goes wrong, and how to service and repair them. It is…

  10. URIC ACID AND TISSUE REPAIR

    PubMed Central

    NERY, Rodrigo Araldi; KAHLOW, Barbara Stadler; SKARE, Thelma L; TABUSHI, Fernando Issamu; CASTRO, Adham do Amaral e

    2015-01-01

    Uric acid, a metabolic product of purines, may exert a role in tissue healing. In this review we will explore its role as an alarm initiating the inflammatory process that is necessary for tissue repair, as a scavenger of oxygen free radicals, as a mobilizer of progenitor endothelial cells and as supporter of adaptive immune system. PMID:26734804

  11. Computer Equipment Repair Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reneau, Fred; And Others

    This guide is intended for use in a course to train students to repair computer equipment and perform related administrative and customer service tasks. Addressed in the individual units are the following topics (with selected subtopics in brackets): performing administrative functions (preparing service bills, maintaining accounts and labor…

  12. Anodization As A Repair Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groff, Roy E.; Maloney, Robert D.; Reeser, Robert W.

    1988-01-01

    Thin, hard oxide layer added to aluminum part. Surfaces on aluminum part worn out of tolerance by no more than 0.004 in. often repaired by anodizing to build up aluminum oxide layers. Oxide layers very hard and grounded to desired final dimensions.

  13. Laparoscopic repair of paraesophageal hernia.

    PubMed Central

    Willekes, C L; Edoga, J K; Frezza, E E

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this report is to describe the authors' technique for the laparoscopic repair of paraesophageal hernias and the outcome in their series of patients. METHODS: Thirty patients underwent elective laparoscopic repair of paraesophageal hernias. All were pure type II paraesophageal hernias as defined by upper gastrointestinal contrast studies. All operations were performed by a single surgeon (JKE) assisted by five different chief surgical residents. The authors have used various prototypes of a laparoscopic utility belt to reduce the physician requirement to the surgeon and a first assistant. The operative setup and specific techniques of the repair are described and illustrated. A concomitant anti-reflux procedure was performed in the last 23 patients. RESULTS: Satisfactory repair using video-laparoscopic techniques was achieved in all cases. There were no deaths. Complications occurred in 8 of 30 patients. Postoperative gastroesophageal reflux developed in three of the first seven patients in whom fundoplication was not performed. Three consecutive patients had left lower lobe atelectasis believed to be related to endotracheal tube displacement during the passage of the bougie. One patient had postoperative dysphagia. There was one case of major deep venous thrombosis with pulmonary embolism. Twenty-eight of 30 patients were discharged home by postoperative day 3. Twenty-four of 30 patients had returned to normal activity by the time of their first postoperative office visit 1 week after surgery. Images Figure 9. Figure 10. PMID:8998118

  14. How the Brain Repairs Stuttering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kell, Christian A.; Neumann, Katrin; von Kriegstein, Katharina; Posenenske, Claudia; von Gudenberg, Alexander W.; Euler, Harald; Giraud, Anne-Lise

    2009-01-01

    Stuttering is a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with left inferior frontal structural anomalies. While children often recover, stuttering may also spontaneously disappear much later after years of dysfluency. These rare cases of unassisted recovery in adulthood provide a model of optimal brain repair outside the classical windows of…

  15. Microwave Oven Repair. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smreker, Eugene

    This competency-based curriculum guide for teachers addresses the skills a technician will need to service microwave ovens and to provide customer relations to help retain the customer's confidence in the product and trust in the service company that performs the repair. The guide begins with a task analysis, listing 20 cognitive tasks and 5…

  16. [A Nobel Prize for DNA repair].

    PubMed

    Jordan, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    This year's Nobel Prize for chemistry recognizes the seminal contributions of three researchers who discovered the existence and the basic mechanisms of DNA repair: base excision repair, mismatch repair, and nucleotide excision repair. They have since been joined by many scientists elucidating diverse aspects of these complex mechanisms that now constitute a thriving research field with many applications, notably for understanding oncogenesis and devising more effective therapies. PMID:26850617

  17. The usefulness of laparoscopic hernia repair in the management of incisional hernia following liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hegab, Bassem; Abdelfattah, Mohamed Rabei; Azzam, Ayman; Al Sebayel, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The reported incidence of incisional hernia following orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) varies from 4% to 23%. Postoperative wound complications are less frequent after laparoscopic repair while maintaining low recurrence rates. We present our experience in managing this complication. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Retrospectively, collected data of all patients who underwent liver transplant and developed incisional hernias were analyzed. Patients’ demographic data, anthropometric data, transplantation-related data, and repair-related operative and postoperative data were collected. Risk factors for post-transplant incisional hernia were appraised in our patients. Patients were divided into two groups: Group A included patients who had their incisional hernia repaired through the laparoscopic approach, and Group B included patients who had their incisional hernia repaired through open conventional approach. RESULTS: A total of 488 liver transplantations were performed at our institution between May 2001 and end of December 2012. Thirty-three patients developed incisional hernias after primary direct closure of the abdominal wall with an overall incidence of 6.9%. Hernia repair was done in 25 patients. Follow-up ranged from 6.4 to 106.1 months with a mean of 48.3 ± 28.3 months. All patients were living at the end of the follow up except four patients (16%). Group A included 13 patients, and Group B included 12 patients. The size of defects and operative time did not differ significantly between both the groups. On the other hand, hospital stay was significantly shorter in laparoscopic group. Complication rate following laparoscopic repair was insignificantly different for open repair. CONCLUSION: In experienced hands, laparoscopic incisional hernia repair in post-liver transplant setting proved to be a safe and feasible alternative to open approach and showed superior outcome expressed in shorter hospital stay, with low recurrence and complication

  18. Fix-It Careers: Jobs in Repair

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torpey, Elka Maria

    2010-01-01

    From auto mechanic to HVAC technicians, many occupations require repair skills. For jobseekers with the right skills, there are many advantages to a repair career. Repair work provides millions of jobs throughout the United States. Wages are often higher than average. And in many occupations, the employment outlook is bright. Plus, most repair…

  19. 40 CFR 63.1024 - Leak repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... reading measured by Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A at the time the leak is successfully repaired...) Repair requires replacing the existing seal design with a new system that the owner or operator has... repaired within 15 calendar days after discovery of the leak as specified in paragraphs (f)(4)(i) and...

  20. 33 CFR 115.40 - Bridge repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bridge repairs. 115.40 Section 115.40 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LOCATIONS AND CLEARANCES; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES § 115.40 Bridge repairs. Repairs to a bridge which...

  1. 33 CFR 115.40 - Bridge repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bridge repairs. 115.40 Section 115.40 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LOCATIONS AND CLEARANCES; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES § 115.40 Bridge repairs. Repairs to a bridge which...

  2. 33 CFR 115.40 - Bridge repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bridge repairs. 115.40 Section 115.40 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LOCATIONS AND CLEARANCES; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES § 115.40 Bridge repairs. Repairs to a bridge which...

  3. 33 CFR 115.40 - Bridge repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bridge repairs. 115.40 Section 115.40 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LOCATIONS AND CLEARANCES; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES § 115.40 Bridge repairs. Repairs to a bridge which...

  4. 33 CFR 115.40 - Bridge repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bridge repairs. 115.40 Section 115.40 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LOCATIONS AND CLEARANCES; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES § 115.40 Bridge repairs. Repairs to a bridge which...

  5. Bringing mask repair to the next level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edinger, K.; Wolff, K.; Steigerwald, H.; Auth, N.; Spies, P.; Oster, J.; Schneider, H.; Budach, M.; Hofmann, T.; Waiblinger, M.

    2014-10-01

    Mask repair is an essential step in the mask manufacturing process as the extension of 193nm technology and the insertion of EUV are drivers for mask complexity and cost. The ability to repair all types of defects on all mask blank materials is crucial for the economic success of a mask shop operation. In the future mask repair is facing several challenges. The mask minimum features sizes are shrinking and require a higher resolution repair tool. At the same time mask blanks with different new mask materials are introduced to optimize optical performance and long term durability. For EUV masks new classes of defects like multilayer and phase defects are entering the stage. In order to achieve a high yield, mask repair has to cover etch and deposition capabilities and must not damage the mask. These challenges require sophisticated technologies to bring mask repair to the next level. For high end masks ion-beam based and e-based repair technologies are the obvious choice when it comes to the repair of small features. Both technologies have their pro and cons. The scope of this paper is to review and compare the performance of ion-beam based mask repair to e-beam based mask repair. We will analyze the limits of both technologies theoretically and experimentally and show mask repair related performance data. Based on this data, we will give an outlook to future mask repair tools.

  6. Welding/brazing for Space Station repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, David W.; Babel, H. W.; Conaway, H. R.; Hooper, W. H.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on welding/brazing for space station repair are presented. Topics covered include: fabrication and repair candidates; debris penetration of module panel; welded repair patch; mechanical assembly of utility fluid line; space station utility systems; Soviet aerospace fabrication - an overview; and processes under consideration.

  7. Standardized Curriculum for Small Engine Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi State Dept. of Education, Jackson. Office of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education.

    This curriculum guide for small engine repair was developed by the state of Mississippi to standardize vocational education course titles and core contents. The objectives contained in this document are common to all small engine repair programs in the state. The guide contains objectives for small engine repair I and II courses. Units in course I…

  8. Standardized Curriculum for Shoe and Boot Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi State Dept. of Education, Jackson. Office of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education.

    This curriculum guide for shoe and boot repair was developed by the state of Mississippi to standardize vocational education course titles and core contents. The objectives contained in this document are common to all shoe and boot repair programs in the state. The guide contains objectives for shoe and boot repair I and II courses. Units in…

  9. Cartilage repair: 2013 Asian update.

    PubMed

    Hui, James H P; Goyal, Deepak; Nakamura, Norimasa; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2013-12-01

    Despite financial and regulatory hurdles, Asian scientists and clinicians have made important contributions in the area of cartilage repair. Because it is impossible to include observations on all the published articles in one review, our attempt is to highlight Asian progress in this area during recent years (2005 to the present), reviewing research development and clinical studies. In the former, our discussion of in vitro studies focuses on (1) potential sources of stem cells--such as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from marrow, cord blood, synovium, and mobilized peripheral blood--which are capable of enhancing cartilage repair and (2) the use of growth factors and scaffolds with and without cells. Our discussion of animal studies attempts to summarize activities in evaluating surgical procedures and determining the route of cell administration, as well as studies on matrices and scaffolds. It ranges from the use of small animals such as rats and rabbits to larger animals like pigs and dogs. The local adherent technique, enhancement of microfracture with poly(l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) scaffold, adenovirus-mediated bone morphogenic protein (BMP) genes, and MSCs--whether they are magnetically labeled, suspended in hyaluronic acid, or immobilized with transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)--have all been able to engineer a repair of the osteochondral defect. Although published Asian reports of clinical studies on cartilage repair are few, the findings of relevant trials are summarized in our discussion of these investigations. There has been a long history of use of laboratory-derived MSCs for cartilage repair. Recent progress has suggested the potential utility of cord blood and mobilized peripheral blood in this area, as well as more injectable bone marrow (BM)-derived stem cells. Finally, we make a few suggestions on the direction of research and development activities and the need for collaborative approaches by regulatory agencies. PMID:24286798

  10. Laparoscopic Repair of Ventral Hernias

    PubMed Central

    Heniford, B Todd; Park, Adrian; Ramshaw, Bruce J.; Voeller, Guy

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of laparoscopic repair of ventral hernias. Summary Background Data: The recurrence rate after standard repair of ventral hernias may be as high as 12-52%, and the wide surgical dissection required often results in wound complications. Use of a laparoscopic approach may decrease rates of complications and recurrence after ventral hernia repair. Methods: Data on all patients who underwent laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR) performed by 4 surgeons using a standardized procedure between November 1993 and October 2002 were collected prospectively (85% of patients) or retrospectively. Results: LVHR was completed in 819 of the 850 patients (422 men; 428 women) in whom it was attempted. Thirty-four percent of completed LVHRs were for recurrent hernias. The patient mean body mass index was 32; the mean defect size was 118 cm2. Mesh, averaging 344 cm2, was used in all cases. Mean operating time was 120 min, mean estimated blood loss was 49 mL, and hospital stay averaged 2.3 days. There were 128 complications in 112 patients (13.2%). One patient died of a myocardial infarction. The most common complications were ileus (3%) and prolonged seroma (2.6%). During a mean follow-up time of 20.2 months (range, 1-94 months), the hernia recurrence rate was 4.7%. Recurrence was associated with large defects, obesity, previous open repairs, and perioperative complications. Conclusion: In this large series, LVHR had a low rate of conversion to open surgery, a short hospital stay, a moderate complication rate, and a low risk of recurrence. PMID:14501505

  11. Flexural strength of acrylic resin repairs processed by different methods: water bath, microwave energy and chemical polymerization

    PubMed Central

    ARIOLI FILHO, João Neudenir; BUTIGNON, Luís Eduardo; PEREIRA, Rodrigo de Paula; LUCAS, Matheus Guilherme; MOLLO JUNIOR, Francisco de Assis

    2011-01-01

    Denture fractures are common in daily practice, causing inconvenience to the patient and to the dentists. Denture repairs should have adequate strength, dimensional stability and color match, and should be easily and quickly performed as well as relatively inexpensive. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the flexural strength of acrylic resin repairs processed by different methods: warm water-bath, microwave energy, and chemical polymerization. Material and methods Sixty rectangular specimens (31x10x2.5 mm) were made with warm water-bath acrylic resin (Lucitone 550) and grouped (15 specimens per group) according to the resin type used to make repair procedure: 1) specimens of warm water-bath resin (Lucitone 550) without repair (control group); 2) specimens of warm water-bath resin repaired with warm water-bath; 3) specimens of warm water-bath resin repaired with microwave resin (Acron MC); 4) specimens of warm water-bath resin repaired with autopolymerized acrylic resin (Simplex). Flexural strength was measured with the three-point bending in a universal testing machine (MTS 810 Material Test System) with load cell of 100 kgf under constant speed of 5 mm/min. Data were analyzed statistically by Kruskal-Wallis test (p<0.05). Results The control group showed the best result (156.04±1.82 MPa). Significant differences were found among repaired specimens and the results were decreasing as follows: group 3 (43.02±2.25 MPa), group 2 (36.21±1.20 MPa) and group 4 (6.74±0.85 MPa). Conclusion All repaired specimens demonstrated lower flexural strength than the control group. Repairs with autopolymerized acrylic resin showed the lowest flexural strength. PMID:21625742

  12. Repair of gamma-ray-induced DNA base damage in xeroderma pigmentosum cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fornace, A.J. Jr.; Dobson, P.P.; Kinsella, T.J.

    1986-04-01

    The repair of DNA damage produced by /sup 137/Cs gamma irradiation was measured with a preparation from Micrococcus luteus containing DNA damage-specific endonucleases in combination with alkaline elution. The frequency of these endonuclease sensitive sites (ESS) was determined after 54 or 110 Gy of oxic irradiation in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) fibroblasts from complementation groups A, C, D, and G. Repair was rapid in all cell strains with greater than 50% repair after 1.5 h of repair incubation. At later repair times, 12-17 h, more ESS remained in XP than in normal cells. The frequency of excess ESS in XP cells was approximately 0.04 per 10(9) Da of DNA per Gy which was equivalent to 10% of the initial ESS produced. The removal of ESS was comparable in XP cells with normal radiosensitivity and XP3BR cells which have been reported to be moderately radiosensitive.

  13. Effects of aging on repair bond strengths of a polyacid-modified composite resin.

    PubMed

    Yap, A U; Sau, C W; Lye, K W

    1999-01-01

    The effect of age of a poly-acid-modified composite resin on repair bond strength after different methods of surface conditioning was studied. Surface conditioning methods included the following: maleic acid with resin application; polyacrylic acid with resin application; sand-blasting with resin application. Shear bond testing between the aged and new material was carried out with an Instron Universal Testing Machine. Although repair bonds strengths after all surface conditioning methods were significantly higher than the control group at 1 week, no statistically significant differences in bond strengths were noted after aging the material for 6 months. After all aging periods, surface conditioning with sand-blasting and resin application resulted in the highest repair bond for poly-acid-modified composite resins. Specimens with cohesive failure in the material gave significantly higher repair bond strengths than specimens with adhesive failure at the repaired interface. PMID:10823087

  14. The effect of recent chemotherapy in aorto-iliac aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Tsilimparis, Nikolaos; Ricotta, Joseph J; Dayama, Anand; Reeves, James G; Perez, Sebastian; Sweeney, John F

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of recent chemotherapy (Chx) on outcome of aorto-iliac aneurysm (AAA) repair. The 2005-2010 American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database was queried to identify vascular patients undergoing AAA repair within 30 days after Chx. Seventy-one patients underwent AAA repair within 30 days of receiving Chx, group A (71 ± 8.4 years, 77.5% males) and 20,024 patients underwent AAA repair without prior Chx, group B (73 ± 9 years, 79.2% males). The two groups did not significantly differ with respect to open or endovascular repair (open repair A: 32%, B: 35%, P = 0.66). However, patients in group A presented more often as emergent cases (A: 27%, B: 12%, P = 0.001). Multivariable regression analysis for emergent cases after adjustment for relevant confounders also demonstrated that patients with recent Chx present more often as emergency (P = 0.001, odds ratio [OR]: 2.4). Thirty-day non-surgical complications were more common in group A (A: 25%, B: 16.5%, P = 0.046) while surgical complications were equivalent (A: 15.5%, B: 12.3%, P = 0.414). Risk of death was significantly higher in group A in univariate analysis (A: 13%, B: 5%, P = 0.005, OR: 2.6). Patients who receive Chx within 30 days prior to AAA repair present more frequently as emergencies leading to higher mortality. The reason for this cannot be sufficiently explained by the current database but patient selection for elective repair or the effect of Chx on the natural course of AAA may play a role. PMID:23512896

  15. Augmentation of Rotator Cuff Repair With Soft Tissue Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Thangarajah, Tanujan; Pendegrass, Catherine J.; Shahbazi, Shirin; Lambert, Simon; Alexander, Susan; Blunn, Gordon W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Tears of the rotator cuff are one of the most common tendon disorders. Treatment often includes surgical repair, but the rate of failure to gain or maintain healing has been reported to be as high as 94%. This has been substantially attributed to the inadequate capacity of tendon to heal once damaged, particularly to bone at the enthesis. A number of strategies have been developed to improve tendon-bone healing, tendon-tendon healing, and tendon regeneration. Scaffolds have received considerable attention for replacement, reconstruction, or reinforcement of tendon defects but may not possess situation-specific or durable mechanical and biological characteristics. Purpose To provide an overview of the biology of tendon-bone healing and the current scaffolds used to augment rotator cuff repairs. Study Design Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods A preliminary literature search of MEDLINE and Embase databases was performed using the terms rotator cuff scaffolds, rotator cuff augmentation, allografts for rotator cuff repair, xenografts for rotator cuff repair, and synthetic grafts for rotator cuff repair. Results The search identified 438 unique articles. Of these, 214 articles were irrelevant to the topic and were therefore excluded. This left a total of 224 studies that were suitable for analysis. Conclusion A number of novel biomaterials have been developed into biologically and mechanically favorable scaffolds. Few clinical trials have examined their effect on tendon-bone healing in well-designed, long-term follow-up studies with appropriate control groups. While there is still considerable work to be done before scaffolds are introduced into routine clinical practice, there does appear to be a clear indication for their use as an interpositional graft for large and massive retracted rotator cuff tears and when repairing a poor-quality degenerative tendon. PMID:26665095

  16. Systemic EP4 Inhibition Increases Adhesion Formation in a Murine Model of Flexor Tendon Repair

    PubMed Central

    Geary, Michael B.; Orner, Caitlin A.; Bawany, Fatima; Awad, Hani A.; Hammert, Warren C.; O’Keefe, Regis J.; Loiselle, Alayna E.

    2015-01-01

    Flexor tendon injuries are a common clinical problem, and repairs are frequently complicated by post-operative adhesions forming between the tendon and surrounding soft tissue. Prostaglandin E2 and the EP4 receptor have been implicated in this process following tendon injury; thus, we hypothesized that inhibiting EP4 after tendon injury would attenuate adhesion formation. A model of flexor tendon laceration and repair was utilized in C57BL/6J female mice to evaluate the effects of EP4 inhibition on adhesion formation and matrix deposition during flexor tendon repair. Systemic EP4 antagonist or vehicle control was given by intraperitoneal injection during the late proliferative phase of healing, and outcomes were analyzed for range of motion, biomechanics, histology, and genetic changes. Repairs treated with an EP4 antagonist demonstrated significant decreases in range of motion with increased resistance to gliding within the first three weeks after injury, suggesting greater adhesion formation. Histologic analysis of the repair site revealed a more robust granulation zone in the EP4 antagonist treated repairs, with early polarization for type III collagen by picrosirius red staining, findings consistent with functional outcomes. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated accelerated peaks in F4/80 and type III collagen (Col3a1) expression in the antagonist group, along with decreases in type I collagen (Col1a1). Mmp9 expression was significantly increased after discontinuing the antagonist, consistent with its role in mediating adhesion formation. Mmp2, which contributes to repair site remodeling, increases steadily between 10 and 28 days post-repair in the EP4 antagonist group, consistent with the increased matrix and granulation zones requiring remodeling in these repairs. These findings suggest that systemic EP4 antagonism leads to increased adhesion formation and matrix deposition during flexor tendon healing. Counter to our hypothesis that EP4 antagonism would improve the

  17. Systemic EP4 Inhibition Increases Adhesion Formation in a Murine Model of Flexor Tendon Repair.

    PubMed

    Geary, Michael B; Orner, Caitlin A; Bawany, Fatima; Awad, Hani A; Hammert, Warren C; O'Keefe, Regis J; Loiselle, Alayna E

    2015-01-01

    Flexor tendon injuries are a common clinical problem, and repairs are frequently complicated by post-operative adhesions forming between the tendon and surrounding soft tissue. Prostaglandin E2 and the EP4 receptor have been implicated in this process following tendon injury; thus, we hypothesized that inhibiting EP4 after tendon injury would attenuate adhesion formation. A model of flexor tendon laceration and repair was utilized in C57BL/6J female mice to evaluate the effects of EP4 inhibition on adhesion formation and matrix deposition during flexor tendon repair. Systemic EP4 antagonist or vehicle control was given by intraperitoneal injection during the late proliferative phase of healing, and outcomes were analyzed for range of motion, biomechanics, histology, and genetic changes. Repairs treated with an EP4 antagonist demonstrated significant decreases in range of motion with increased resistance to gliding within the first three weeks after injury, suggesting greater adhesion formation. Histologic analysis of the repair site revealed a more robust granulation zone in the EP4 antagonist treated repairs, with early polarization for type III collagen by picrosirius red staining, findings consistent with functional outcomes. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated accelerated peaks in F4/80 and type III collagen (Col3a1) expression in the antagonist group, along with decreases in type I collagen (Col1a1). Mmp9 expression was significantly increased after discontinuing the antagonist, consistent with its role in mediating adhesion formation. Mmp2, which contributes to repair site remodeling, increases steadily between 10 and 28 days post-repair in the EP4 antagonist group, consistent with the increased matrix and granulation zones requiring remodeling in these repairs. These findings suggest that systemic EP4 antagonism leads to increased adhesion formation and matrix deposition during flexor tendon healing. Counter to our hypothesis that EP4 antagonism would improve the

  18. Effect of Delayed Peripheral Nerve Repair on Nerve Regeneration, Schwann Cell Function and Target Muscle Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Jonsson, Samuel; Wiberg, Rebecca; McGrath, Aleksandra M.; Novikov, Lev N.; Wiberg, Mikael; Novikova, Liudmila N.; Kingham, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite advances in surgical techniques for peripheral nerve repair, functional restitution remains incomplete. The timing of surgery is one factor influencing the extent of recovery but it is not yet clearly defined how long a delay may be tolerated before repair becomes futile. In this study, rats underwent sciatic nerve transection before immediate (0) or 1, 3, or 6 months delayed repair with a nerve graft. Regeneration of spinal motoneurons, 13 weeks after nerve repair, was assessed using retrograde labeling. Nerve tissue was also collected from the proximal and distal stumps and from the nerve graft, together with the medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscles. A dramatic decline in the number of regenerating motoneurons and myelinated axons in the distal nerve stump was observed in the 3- and 6-months delayed groups. After 3 months delay, the axonal number in the proximal stump increased 2–3 folds, accompanied by a smaller axonal area. RT-PCR of distal nerve segments revealed a decline in Schwann cells (SC) markers, most notably in the 3 and 6 month delayed repair samples. There was also a progressive increase in fibrosis and proteoglycan scar markers in the distal nerve with increased delayed repair time. The yield of SC isolated from the distal nerve segments progressively fell with increased delay in repair time but cultured SC from all groups proliferated at similar rates. MG muscle at 3- and 6-months delay repair showed a significant decline in weight (61% and 27% compared with contra-lateral side). Muscle fiber atrophy and changes to neuromuscular junctions were observed with increased delayed repair time suggestive of progressively impaired reinnervation. This study demonstrates that one of the main limiting factors for nerve regeneration after delayed repair is the distal stump. The critical time point after which the outcome of regeneration becomes too poor appears to be 3-months. PMID:23409189

  19. Endovascular Repair of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Findeiss, Laura K.; Cody, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    Degenerative aneurysms of the thoracic aorta are increasing in prevalence; open repair of descending thoracic aortic aneurysms is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Repair of isolated descending thoracic aortic aneurysms using stent grafts was introduced in 1995, and in an anatomically suitable subgroup of patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm, repair with endovascular stent graft provides favorable outcomes, with decreased perioperative morbidity and mortality relative to open repair. The cornerstones of successful thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair are appropriate patient selection, thorough preprocedural planning, and cautious procedural execution, the elements of which are discussed here. PMID:22379281

  20. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information should be... repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: âBacterial DNA damage or repair tests.â 798.5500 Section... inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests.”...

  1. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information should be... repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: âBacterial DNA damage or repair tests.â 798.5500 Section... inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests.”...

  2. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information should be... repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: âBacterial DNA damage or repair tests.â 798.5500 Section... inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests.”...

  3. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information should be... repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: âBacterial DNA damage or repair tests.â 798.5500 Section... inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests.”...

  4. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information should be... repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: âBacterial DNA damage or repair tests.â 798.5500 Section... inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests.”...

  5. How to Relate Complex DNA Repair Genotypes to Pathway Function and, Ultimately, Health Risk

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, IM

    2002-01-09

    Exposure to ionizing radiation increases the incidence of cancer. However, predicting which individuals are at most risk from radiation exposure is a distant goal. Predictive ability is needed to guide policies that regulate radiation exposure and ensure that medical treatments have maximum benefit and minimum risk. Differences between people in susceptibility to radiation are largely based on their genotype, the genes inherited from their parents. Among the important genes are those that produce proteins that repair DNA damaged by radiation. Base Excision Repair (BER) proteins repair single strand breaks and oxidized bases in DNA. Double Strand Break Repair proteins repair broken chromosomes. Using technologies and information from the Human Genome Project, we have previously determined that the DNA sequence of DNA repair genes varies within the human population. An average of 3-4 different variants were found that affect the protein for each of 37 genes studied. The average frequency of these variants is 5%. Given the many genes in each DNA repair pathway and their many variants, technical ability to determine an individual's repair genotype greatly exceeds ability to interpret the information. A long-term goal is to relate DNA repair genotypes to health risk from radiation. This study focused on the BER pathway. The BER genes are known, variants of the genes have been identified at LLNL, and LLNL had recently developed an assay for BER function using white blood cells. The goal of this initial effort was to begin developing data that could be used to test the hypothesis that many different genotypes have similar DNA repair capacity phenotypes (function). Relationships between genotype and phenotype could then be used to group genotypes with similar function and ultimately test the association of groups of genotypes with health risk from radiation. Genotypes with reduced repair function are expected to increase risk of radiation-induced health effects. The goal

  6. Current Biomechanical Concepts for Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    For the past few decades, the repair of rotator cuff tears has evolved significantly with advances in arthroscopy techniques, suture anchors and instrumentation. From the biomechanical perspective, the focus in arthroscopic repair has been on increasing fixation strength and restoration of the footprint contact characteristics to provide early rehabilitation and improve healing. To accomplish these objectives, various repair strategies and construct configurations have been developed for rotator cuff repair with the understanding that many factors contribute to the structural integrity of the repaired construct. These include repaired rotator cuff tendon-footprint motion, increased tendon-footprint contact area and pressure, and tissue quality of tendon and bone. In addition, the healing response may be compromised by intrinsic factors such as decreased vascularity, hypoxia, and fibrocartilaginous changes or aforementioned extrinsic compression factors. Furthermore, it is well documented that torn rotator cuff muscles have a tendency to atrophy and become subject to fatty infiltration which may affect the longevity of the repair. Despite all the aforementioned factors, initial fixation strength is an essential consideration in optimizing rotator cuff repair. Therefore, numerous biomechanical studies have focused on elucidating the strongest devices, knots, and repair configurations to improve contact characteristics for rotator cuff repair. In this review, the biomechanical concepts behind current rotator cuff repair techniques will be reviewed and discussed. PMID:23730471

  7. Ultrasound determination of rotator cuff tear repairability

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Andrew K; Lam, Patrick H; Walton, Judie R; Hackett, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Background Rotator cuff repair aims to reattach the torn tendon to the greater tuberosity footprint with suture anchors. The present study aimed to assess the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound in predicting rotator cuff tear repairability and to assess which sonographic and pre-operative features are strongest in predicting repairability. Methods The study was a retrospective analysis of measurements made prospectively in a cohort of 373 patients who had ultrasounds of their shoulder and underwent rotator cuff repair. Measurements of rotator cuff tear size and muscle atrophy were made pre-operatively by ultrasound to enable prediction of rotator cuff repairability. Tears were classified following ultrasound as repairable or irreparable, and were correlated with intra-operative repairability. Results Ultrasound assessment of rotator cuff tear repairability has a sensitivity of 86% (p < 0.0001) and a specificity of 67% (p < 0.0001). The strongest predictors of rotator cuff repairability were tear size (p < 0.001) and age (p = 0.004). Sonographic assessments of tear size ≥4 cm2 or anteroposterior tear length ≥25 mm indicated an irreparable rotator cuff tear. Conclusions Ultrasound assessment is accurate in predicting rotator cuff tear repairability. Tear size or anteroposterior tear length and age were the best predictors of repairability. PMID:27582996

  8. Shuttle orbiter TPS flight repair kit development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The design and application of a TPS repair kit is presented. The repair kit is designed for on orbit use by a crew member working in the manned maneuvering unit (MMU). The kit includes the necessary equipment and materials to accomplish the repair tasks which include the following: HRSI emittance coating repair, damaged tile repair, missing tile repair, and multiple tile repair. Two types of repair materials required to do the small area repair and the large area repair are described. The materials area cure in place, silicone base ablator for small damaged areas and precured ablator tile for repair of larger damaged areas is examined. The cure in place ablator is also used as an adhesive to bond the precured tiles in place. An applicator for the cure in place ablator, designed to contain a two-part silicon compound, mix the two components at correct ratio, and dispense the materials at rates compatible with mission timelines established for the EVA is described.

  9. Minimally disruptive schedule repair for MCM missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molineaux, Matthew; Auslander, Bryan; Moore, Philip G.; Gupta, Kalyan M.

    2015-05-01

    Mine countermeasures (MCM) missions entail planning and operations in very dynamic and uncertain operating environments, which pose considerable risk to personnel and equipment. Frequent schedule repairs are needed that consider the latest operating conditions to keep mission on target. Presently no decision support tools are available for the challenging task of MCM mission rescheduling. To address this capability gap, we have developed the CARPE system to assist operation planners. CARPE constantly monitors the operational environment for changes and recommends alternative repaired schedules in response. It includes a novel schedule repair algorithm called Case-Based Local Schedule Repair (CLOSR) that automatically repairs broken schedules while satisfying the requirement of minimal operational disruption. It uses a case-based approach to represent repair strategies and apply them to new situations. Evaluation of CLOSR on simulated MCM operations demonstrates the effectiveness of case-based strategy. Schedule repairs are generated rapidly, ensure the elimination of all mines, and achieve required levels of clearance.

  10. Is bone transplantation the gold standard for repair of alveolar bone defects?

    PubMed

    Raposo-Amaral, Cassio Eduardo; Bueno, Daniela Franco; Almeida, Ana Beatriz; Jorgetti, Vanda; Costa, Cristiane Cabral; Gouveia, Cecília Helena; Vulcano, Luiz Carlos; Fanganiello, Roberto D; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita; Alonso, Nivaldo

    2014-01-01

    New strategies to fulfill craniofacial bone defects have gained attention in recent years due to the morbidity of autologous bone graft harvesting. We aimed to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of bone tissue engineering strategy using mesenchymal stem cells associated with two matrices (bovine bone mineral and α-tricalcium phosphate), compared to an autologous bone transfer. A total of 28 adult, male, non-immunosuppressed Wistar rats underwent a critical-sized osseous defect of 5 mm diameter in the alveolar region. Animals were divided into five groups. Group 1 (n = 7) defects were repaired with autogenous bone grafts; Group 2 (n = 5) defects were repaired with bovine bone mineral free of cells; Group 3 (n = 5) defects were repaired with bovine bone mineral loaded with mesenchymal stem cells; Group 4 (n = 5) defects were repaired with α-tricalcium phosphate free of cells; and Group 5 (n = 6) defects were repaired with α-tricalcium phosphate loaded with mesenchymal stem cells. Groups 2-5 were compared to Group 1, the reference group. Healing response was evaluated by histomorphometry and computerized tomography. Histomorphometrically, Group 1 showed 60.27% ± 16.13% of bone in the defect. Groups 2 and 3 showed 23.02% ± 8.6% (p = 0.01) and 38.35% ± 19.59% (p = 0.06) of bone in the defect, respectively. Groups 4 and 5 showed 51.48% ± 11.7% (p = 0.30) and 61.80% ± 2.14% (p = 0.88) of bone in the defect, respectively. Animals whose bone defects were repaired with α-tricalcium phosphate and mesenchymal stem cells presented the highest bone volume filling the defects; both were not statistically different from autogenous bone. PMID:24551445

  11. Is bone transplantation the gold standard for repair of alveolar bone defects?

    PubMed Central

    Raposo-Amaral, Cassio Eduardo; Bueno, Daniela Franco; Almeida, Ana Beatriz; Jorgetti, Vanda; Costa, Cristiane Cabral; Gouveia, Cecília Helena; Vulcano, Luiz Carlos; Fanganiello, Roberto D; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2014-01-01

    New strategies to fulfill craniofacial bone defects have gained attention in recent years due to the morbidity of autologous bone graft harvesting. We aimed to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of bone tissue engineering strategy using mesenchymal stem cells associated with two matrices (bovine bone mineral and α-tricalcium phosphate), compared to an autologous bone transfer. A total of 28 adult, male, non-immunosuppressed Wistar rats underwent a critical-sized osseous defect of 5 mm diameter in the alveolar region. Animals were divided into five groups. Group 1 (n = 7) defects were repaired with autogenous bone grafts; Group 2 (n = 5) defects were repaired with bovine bone mineral free of cells; Group 3 (n = 5) defects were repaired with bovine bone mineral loaded with mesenchymal stem cells; Group 4 (n = 5) defects were repaired with α-tricalcium phosphate free of cells; and Group 5 (n = 6) defects were repaired with α-tricalcium phosphate loaded with mesenchymal stem cells. Groups 2–5 were compared to Group 1, the reference group. Healing response was evaluated by histomorphometry and computerized tomography. Histomorphometrically, Group 1 showed 60.27% ± 16.13% of bone in the defect. Groups 2 and 3 showed 23.02% ± 8.6% (p = 0.01) and 38.35% ± 19.59% (p = 0.06) of bone in the defect, respectively. Groups 4 and 5 showed 51.48% ± 11.7% (p = 0.30) and 61.80% ± 2.14% (p = 0.88) of bone in the defect, respectively. Animals whose bone defects were repaired with α-tricalcium phosphate and mesenchymal stem cells presented the highest bone volume filling the defects; both were not statistically different from autogenous bone. PMID:24551445

  12. Repairable, nanostructured biomimetic hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firestone, M.; Brombosz, S.; Grubjesic, S.

    2013-03-01

    Proteins facilitate many key cellular processes, including signal recognition and energy transduction. The ability to harness this evolutionarily-optimized functionality could lead to the development of protein-based systems useful for advancing alternative energy storage and conversion. The future of protein-based, however, requires the development of materials that will stabilize, order and control the activity of the proteins. Recently we have developed a synthetic approach for the preparation of a durable biomimetic chemical hydrogel that can be reversibly swollen in water. The matrix has proven ideal for the stable encapsulation of both water- and membrane-soluble proteins. The material is composed of an aqueous dispersion of a diacrylate end-derivatized PEO-PPO-PEO macromer, a saturated phospholipid and a zwitterionic co-surfactant that self-assembles into a nanostructured physical gel at room temperature as determined by X-ray scattering. The addition of a water soluble PEGDA co-monomer and photoinitator does not alter the self-assembled structure and UV irradiation serves to crosslink the acrylate end groups on the macromer with the PEGDA forming a network within the aqueous domains as determined by FT-IR. More recently we have begun to incorporate reversible crosslinks employing Diels-Alder chemistry, allowing for the extraction and replacement of inactive proteins. The ability to replenish the materials with active, non-denatured forms of protein is an important step in advancing these materials for use in nanostructured devices This work was supported by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences, USDoE under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  13. Endovascular vs. Open Repair for Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Patelis, Nikolaos; Moris, Demetrios; Karaolanis, Georgios; Georgopoulos, Sotiris

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients presenting with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms are most often treated with open repair despite the fact that endovascular aneurysm repair is a less invasive and widely accepted method with clear benefits for elective aortic aneurysm patients. A debate exists regarding the definitive benefit in endovascular repair for patients with a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. The aim of this literature review was to determine if any trends exist in favor of either open or endovascular repair. Material/Methods A literature search was performed using PUBMED, OVID, and Google Scholar databases. The search yielded 64 publications. Results Out of 64 publications, 25 were retrospective studies, 12 were population-based, 21 were prospective, 5 were the results of RCTs, and 1 was a case-series. Sixty-one studies reported on early mortality and provided data comparing endovascular repair (rEVAR) and open repair (rOR) for ruptured abdominal aneurysm groups. Twenty-nine of these studies reported that rEVAR has a lower early mortality rate. Late mortality after rEVAR compared to that of rOR was reported in 21 studies for a period of 3 to 60 months. Results of 61.9% of the studies found no difference in late mortality rates between these 2 groups. Thirty-nine publications reported on the incidence of complications. Approximately half of these publications support that the rEVAR group has a lower complication rate and the other half found no difference between the groups. Length of hospital stay has been reported to be shorter for rEVAR in most studies. Blood loss and need for transfusion of either red cells or fresh frozen plasma was consistently lower in the rEVAR group. Conclusions Differences between the included publications affect the outcomes. Randomized control trials have not been able to provide clear conclusions. rEVAR can now be considered a safe method of treating rAAA, and is at least equal to the well-established rOR method. PMID:27090791

  14. Developing an in silico model of the modulation of base excision repair using methoxyamine for more targeted cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Gurkan-Cavusoglu, Evren; Avadhani, Sriya; Liu, Lili; Kinsella, Timothy J; Loparo, Kenneth A

    2013-04-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is a major DNA repair pathway involved in the processing of exogenous non-bulky base damages from certain classes of cancer chemotherapy drugs as well as ionising radiation (IR). Methoxyamine (MX) is a small molecule chemical inhibitor of BER that is shown to enhance chemotherapy and/or IR cytotoxicity in human cancers. In this study, the authors have analysed the inhibitory effect of MX on the BER pathway kinetics using a computational model of the repair pathway. The inhibitory effect of MX depends on the BER efficiency. The authors have generated variable efficiency groups using different sets of protein concentrations generated by Latin hypercube sampling, and they have clustered simulation results into high, medium and low efficiency repair groups. From analysis of the inhibitory effect of MX on each of the three groups, it is found that the inhibition is most effective for high efficiency BER, and least effective for low efficiency repair. PMID:23847811

  15. Laparoscopic Repair of Paraesophageal Hernias

    PubMed Central

    Borao, Frank; Squillaro, Anthony; Mansson, Jonas; Barker, William; Baker, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Laparoscopy has quickly become the standard surgical approach to repair paraesophageal hernias. Although many centers routinely perform this procedure, relatively high recurrence rates have led many surgeons to question this approach. We sought to evaluate outcomes in our cohort of patients with an emphasis on recurrence rates and symptom improvement and their correlation with true radiologic recurrence seen on contrast imaging. Methods: We retrospectively identified 126 consecutive patients who underwent laparoscopic repair of a large paraesophageal hernia between 2000 and 2010. Clinical outcomes were reviewed, and data were collected regarding operative details, perioperative and postoperative complications, symptoms, and follow-up imaging. Radiologic evidence of any size hiatal hernia was considered to indicate a recurrence. Results: There were 95 female and 31 male patients with a mean age (± standard deviation) of 71 ± 14 years. Laparoscopic repair was completed successfully in 120 of 126 patients, with 6 operations converted to open procedures. Crural reinforcement with mesh was performed in 79% of patients, and 11% underwent a Collis gastroplasty. Fundoplications were performed in 90% of patients: Nissen (112), Dor (1), and Toupet (1). Radiographic surveillance, obtained at a mean time interval of 23 months postoperatively, was available in 89 of 126 patients (71%). Radiographic evidence of a recurrence was present in 19 patients (21%). Reoperation was necessary in 6 patients (5%): 5 for symptomatic recurrence (4%) and 1 for dysphagia (1%). The median length of stay was 4 days. Conclusion: Laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia repair results in an excellent outcome with a short length of stay when performed at an experienced center. Radiologic recurrence is observed relatively frequently with routine surveillance; however, many of these recurrences are small, and few patients require correction of the recurrence. Furthermore, these

  16. A Case of Microangiopathic Hemolytic Anemia after Myxoma Excision and Mitral Valve Repair Presenting as Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young Joo; Kim, Sang Pil; Shin, Ho-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Microangiopathic hemolytic anemia occurs in a diverse group of disorders, including thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, hemolytic uremic syndrome, and prosthetic cardiac valves. Hemolytic anemia also occurs as a rare complication after mitral valve repair. In this report, we describe a case of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia following myxoma excision and mitral valve repair, which was presented as hemolytic uremic syndrome. PMID:27081450

  17. A Case of Microangiopathic Hemolytic Anemia after Myxoma Excision and Mitral Valve Repair Presenting as Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Park, Young Joo; Kim, Sang Pil; Shin, Ho-Jin; Choi, Jung Hyun

    2016-03-01

    Microangiopathic hemolytic anemia occurs in a diverse group of disorders, including thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, hemolytic uremic syndrome, and prosthetic cardiac valves. Hemolytic anemia also occurs as a rare complication after mitral valve repair. In this report, we describe a case of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia following myxoma excision and mitral valve repair, which was presented as hemolytic uremic syndrome. PMID:27081450

  18. Animal models of cartilage repair

    PubMed Central

    Cook, J. L.; Hung, C. T.; Kuroki, K.; Stoker, A. M.; Cook, C. R.; Pfeiffer, F. M.; Sherman, S. L.; Stannard, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage repair in terms of replacement, or regeneration of damaged or diseased articular cartilage with functional tissue, is the ‘holy grail’ of joint surgery. A wide spectrum of strategies for cartilage repair currently exists and several of these techniques have been reported to be associated with successful clinical outcomes for appropriately selected indications. However, based on respective advantages, disadvantages, and limitations, no single strategy, or even combination of strategies, provides surgeons with viable options for attaining successful long-term outcomes in the majority of patients. As such, development of novel techniques and optimisation of current techniques need to be, and are, the focus of a great deal of research from the basic science level to clinical trials. Translational research that bridges scientific discoveries to clinical application involves the use of animal models in order to assess safety and efficacy for regulatory approval for human use. This review article provides an overview of animal models for cartilage repair. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;4:89–94. PMID:24695750

  19. Tissue Engineering for Rotator Cuff Repair: An Evidence-Based Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Maffulli, Nicola; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Loppini, Mattia; Berton, Alessandra; Spiezia, Filippo; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to address the treatment of rotator cuff tears by applying tissue engineering approaches to improve tendon healing, specifically platelet rich plasma (PRP) augmentation, stem cells, and scaffolds. Our systematic search was performed using the combination of the following terms: “rotator cuff”, “shoulder”, “PRP”, “platelet rich plasma”, “stemcells”, “scaffold”, “growth factors”, and “tissue engineering”. No level I or II studies were found on the use of scaffolds and stem cells for rotator cuff repair. Three studies compared rotator cuff repair with or without PRP augmentation. All authors performed arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with different techniques of suture anchor fixation and different PRP augmentation. The three studies found no difference in clinical rating scales and functional outcomes between PRP and control groups. Only one study showed clinical statistically significant difference between the two groups at the 3-month follow up. Any statistically significant difference in the rates of tendon rerupture between the control group and the PRP group was found using the magnetic resonance imaging. The current literature on tissue engineering application for rotator cuff repair is scanty. Comparative studies included in this review suggest that PRP augmented repair of a rotator cuff does not yield improved functional and clinical outcome compared with non-augmented repair at a medium and long-term followup. PMID:25098365

  20. DNA repair and mutagen sensitivity of epithelial cells and lymphocytes in oropharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    REITER, MAXIMILIAN; BAUMEISTER, PHILIPP; JAISER, SONJA; REISS, ANDREAS; SCHWENK-ZIEGER, SABINA; KLEINSASSER, NORBERT; HARRÉUS, ULRICH

    2012-01-01

    Tobacco-associated nitrosamines are known carcinogens causing DNA damage in epithelial cells of the head and neck. A matched case-control study was performed to evaluate the sensitivity of patients with squamous cell cancer (SCC) of the oropharynx, and controls to tobacco-associated nitrosamines. Quantitative DNA repair was evaluated following a period of 15 and 30 min. Fresh biopsies from 100 male donors of macroscopically healthy oropharyngeal cells and lymphocytes (50 SCC patients and 50 controls) were incubated with N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA), 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) or N-nitrosonornicotine (NNN). DNA damage in epithelial cells and lymphocytes was assessed using the comet assay. Following incubation with NDEA, cells underwent a period of DNA repair. All of the nitrosamines caused equivalent genotoxic damage in mucosal cells and lymphocytes of the two groups. Lymphocyte DNA repair capacity in the control group (26.8 and 37.1% after 15 and 30 min) was comparable to the tumor group (23.6 and 40.6%). However, epithelial cell DNA repair capacity of carcinoma patients was significantly reduced to 17.1% (15 min) and 23% (30 min) compared to the DNA repair of the control group (36.2%, 15 min and 46.0%, 30 min). Mutagen sensitivity was comparable in patients and controls. Thus, reduced epithelial cell DNA repair capacity of tumor patients is a possible endogenous risk factor for the development of head and neck squamous cell cancer. PMID:22740863

  1. Impairment of erectile function after elective repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Majd, P; Ahmad, W; Luebke, Th; Gawenda, M; Brunkwall, J

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the functional change of erectile dysfunction after endovascular repair (EVAR) and open repair (OR) of abdominal aortic aneurysm.Between April 2009 and December 2011, male patients admitted for elective treatment of an asymptomatic infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm were included. The erectile function was evaluated by using a validated KEED questionnaire. All patients filled out the questionnaire preoperatively and postoperatively after one year.The number of patients with an increase of erectile dysfunction was 8 (26.6%) to 16 (53.3%) in open repair group vs. 30 (42.6%) to 40 (58.8%) in endovascular aneurysm repair. There was no statistically significant difference between open repair and endovascular aneurysm repair groups in order of new incidence of erectile dysfunction (p = 0.412). The study showed an increase in the mean value of Erectile Dysfunction -Score postoperatively in both the groups as well.The present study showed an increase of erectile dysfunction postoperatively, but the difference between the two groups was not statistically significant. PMID:25761855

  2. Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell and Vein Conduit on Sciatic Nerve Repair in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Seyed Foroutan, Kamal; Khodarahmi, Ali; Alavi, Hootan; Pedram, Sepehr; Baghaban Eslaminejad, Mohamad Reza; Bordbar, Sima

    2015-01-01

    Background: Peripheral nerve repair with sufficient functional recovery is an important issue in reconstructive surgery. Stem cells have attracted extensive research interest in recent years. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the vein conduit technique, with and without the addition of mesenchymal stem cells in gap-less nerve injury repair in rats. Materials and Methods: In this study, 36 Wistar rats were randomly allocated to three groups: In the first group, nerve repair was performed with simple neurorrhaphy (control group), in the second group, nerve repair was done with vein conduit over site (vein conduit group) and in the third group, bone marrow stem cells were instilled into the vein conduit (stem cell group) after nerve repair with vein conduit over site. Six weeks after the intervention, the sciatic function index, electrophysiological study and histological examination were performed. Results: All animals tolerated the surgical procedures and survived well. The sciatic function index and latency were significantly improved in the vein conduit (P = 0.04 and 0.03, respectively) and stem cell group (P = 0.02 and 0.03, respectively) compared with the control group. No significant difference was observed in sciatic function and latency between the vein conduit and stem-cell groups. Moreover, histological analysis showed no significant difference in regenerative density between these two groups. Conclusions: The results of this study showed that the meticulous microsurgical nerve repair, which was performed using the vein tubulization induced significantly better sciatic nerve regeneration. However, the addition of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell to vein conduit failed to promote any significant changes in regeneration outcome. PMID:25825699

  3. Silibinin enhances the repair of ultraviolet B-induced DNA damage by activating p53-dependent nucleotide excision repair mechanism in human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Guillermo-Lagae, Ruth; Deep, Gagan; Ting, Harold; Agarwal, Chapla; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2015-11-24

    Ultraviolet radiation B (UVB) is the main cause of DNA damage in epidermal cells; and if not repaired, this DNA damage leads to skin cancer. In earlier studies, we have reported that natural flavonolignan silibinin exerts strong chemopreventive efficacy against UVB-induced skin damage and carcinogenesis; however mechanistic studies are still being actively pursued. Here, we investigated the role of nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway in silibinin's efficacy to repair UVB-induced DNA damage. Normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs) were exposed to UVB (1 mJ/cm2) with pre- or post- silibinin (100 μM) treatment, and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) formation/repair was measured. Results showed that post-UVB silibinin treatment accelerates DNA repair via activating the NER pathway including the expression of XPA (xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A), XPB, XPC, and XPG. In UVB exposed fibroblasts, silibinin treatment also increased p53 and GADD45α expression; the key regulators of the NER pathway and DNA repair. Consistently, post-UVB silibinin treatment increased the mRNA transcripts of XPA and GADD45α. Importantly, silibinin showed no effect on UVB-induced DNA damage repair in XPA- and XPB-deficient human dermal fibroblasts suggesting their key role in silibinin-mediated DNA damage repair. Moreover, in the presence of pifithrin-α, an inhibitor of p53, the DNA repair efficacy of silibinin was compromised associated with a reduction in XPA and GADD45α transcripts. Together, these findings suggest that silibinin's efficacy against UVB-induced photodamage is primarily by inhibiting NER and p53; and these findings further support silibinin's usage as a potential inexpensive, effective, and non-toxic agent for skin cancer chemoprevention. PMID:26447614

  4. Effect of various surface treatments on the bond strength of porcelain repair.

    PubMed

    Saraç, Duygu; Saraç, Yakup Sinasi; Külünk, Safak; Erkoçak, Ayca

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of surface treatments on the repair strength of composite resin on a feldspathic ceramic. Ninety ceramic specimens were divided into six groups. In the experimental groups, 4% hydrofluoric acid etching, Er:YAG laser irradiation, CO2 laser irradiation, airborne-particle abrasion, and silica coating were used as surface treatments. After the application of a porcelain repair kit, composite resin was placed on the treated surfaces. After a shear bond strength test, data were statistically analyzed (α = .05). Surface treatments increased the repair bond strength values (P < .05). Airborne particle abrasion and silica coating were found to be the most effective. CO2 laser showed higher repair strength values than Er:YAG laser. PMID:23820715

  5. Repair Mechanism of Osteochondral Defect Promoted by Bioengineered Chondrocyte Sheet

    PubMed Central

    Kamei, Naosuke; Adachi, Nobuo; Hamanishi, Michio; Kamei, Goki; Mahmoud, Elhussein Elbadry; Nakano, Tomohiro; Iwata, Takanori; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2015-01-01

    Cell sheet engineering has developed as a remarkable method for cell transplantation. In the field of cartilage regeneration, several studies previously reported that cartilage defects could be regenerated by transplantation of a chondrocyte sheet using cell sheet engineering. However, it remains unclear how such a thin cell sheet could repair a deep cartilage defect. We, therefore, focused on the mechanism of cartilage repair using cell sheet engineering in this study. Chondrocyte sheets and synovial cell sheets were fabricated using cell sheet engineering, and these allogenic cell sheets were transplanted to cover an osteochondral defect in a rat model. Macroscopic and histological evaluation was performed at 4 and 12 weeks after transplantation. Analysis of the gene expression of each cell sheet and of the regenerated tissue at 1 week after transplantation was performed. In addition, green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic rats were used as donors (transplanted chondrocyte sheets) or recipients (osteochondral defect models) to identify the cell origin of regenerated cartilage. Cartilage repair was significantly better in the group implanted with a chondrocyte sheet than in that with a synovial cell sheet. The results of gene expression analysis suggest that the possible factor contributing to cartilage repair might be TGFβ1. Cell tracking experiments using GFP transgenic rats showed that the regenerated cartilage was largely composed of cells derived from the transplanted chondrocyte sheets. PMID:25396711

  6. Assembling an orchestra: Fanconi anemia pathway of DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Fenghua; Song, Limin; Qian, Liangyue; Hu, Jennifer J; Zhang, Yanbin

    2010-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a recessive genetic disorder characterized by developmental defects, bone marrow failure, and cancer susceptibility. The complete set of FA genes has only been identified recently and seems to be uniquely conserved among vertebrates. Fanconi anemia proteins have been implicated in the repair of interstrand DNA crosslinks that block DNA replication and transcription. Although all thirteen FA complementation groups show similar clinical and cellular phenotypes, approximately 85% of patients presented defective FANCA, FANCC, or FANCG. The established DNA interacting components (FANCM, FANCI, FANCD2, and FANCJ) account only for approximately 5% of all FA patients, an observation that raises doubt concerning the roles of FA proteins in DNA repair. In recent years, rapid progress in the area of FA research has provided great insights into the critical roles of FA proteins in DNA repair. However, many FA proteins do not have identifiable domains to indicate how they contribute to biological processes, particularly DNA repair. Therefore, future biochemical studies are warranted to understand the biological functions of FA proteins and their implications in human diseases. PMID:20515746

  7. Tibiofemoral contact biomechanics following meniscocapsular separation and repair.

    PubMed

    Dugas, J R; Barrett, A M; Beason, D P; Plymale, M F; Fleisig, G S

    2015-06-01

    Meniscocapsular separations are often seen in knees with other intra-articular pathology. The consequences of these tears with regard to knee contact mechanics are currently unknown, and the biomechanical advantages of repair have not been measured. We hypothesize that tears to the meniscocapsular junction will cause an increase in tibiofemoral contact pressure and a decrease in contact area, with a return to more normal conditions after repair. 10 fresh-frozen cadaver knees each underwent 10 cycles of axial compressive loading in full extension under three different testing conditions: intact, meniscocapsular separation, and repair. A pressure sensor matrix was inserted into the medial joint space and used to measure magnitude and location of contact pressure and area. Mean contact pressure increased from 0.80±0.17 MPa in the intact knee to 0.88±0.19 MPa with separation, with a decrease to 0.78±0.14 MPa following repair. Peak pressures followed a similar trend with 2.59±0.41, 3.03±0.48, and 2.84±0.40 MPa for the same three groups, respectively. While none of the changes seen was statistically significant, even these small changes would potentially create degenerative changes at the articular surface over prolonged (i. e., months or years) standing, walking, and activity in the unrepaired state. PMID:25734910

  8. Does Strand Configuration and Number of Purchase Points Affect the Biomechanical Behavior of a Tendon Repair? A Biomechanical Evaluation Using Different Kessler Methods of Flexor Tendon Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kalaci, Aydiner; Sevinç, Teoman Toni; Esen, Erdinc; Komurcu, Mahmut; Yanat, Ahmet Nedim

    2008-01-01

    This study compares the mechanical properties of modified Kessler and double-modified Kessler flexor tendon repair techniques and evaluates simple modifications on both methods. Forty fresh sheep flexor tendons were divided equally into four groups. A transverse sharp cut was done in the middle of each tendon and then repaired with modified Kessler technique, modified Kessler with additional purchase point in the midpoint of each longitudinal strand, double-modified Kessler technique, or a combination of outer Kessler and inner cruciate configuration based on double-modified Kessler technique. The tendons were tested in a tensile testing machine to assess the mechanical performance of the repairs. Outcome measures included gap formation and ultimate forces. The gap strengths of the double-modified Kessler technique (30.85 N, SD 1.90) and double-modified Kessler technique with inner cruciate configuration (33.60 N, SD 4.64) were statistically significantly greater than that of the two-strand modified Kessler (22.56 N, SD 3.44) and modified Kessler with additional purchase configuration (21.75 N, SD 4.03; Tukey honestly significant difference test, P < 0.000). There were statistically significant differences in failure strengths of the all groups (analysis of variance, P < 0.000). With an identical number of strands, the gap formation and ultimate forces of the repairs were not changed by additional locking purchase point in modified Kessler repair or changing the inner strand configuration in double-modified Kessler repair. The results of this study show that the number of strands across the repair site together with the number of locking loops clearly affects the strength of the repair; meanwhile, the longitudinal strand orientation and number of purchase points in a single loop did not affect its strength. PMID:18780108

  9. Fate of venous repair after shock and trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Barkun, J.S.; Terazza, O.; Daignault, P.; Chiu, R.C.; Mulder, D.S.

    1988-09-01

    To assess the role of shock and trauma in the subsequent thrombosis of a venous repair, the following experiments were performed. Two groups of unsplenectomized dogs were studied: control dogs (Gr.C) underwent replacement of a segment of superficial femoral vein by an autogenous vein graft. Trauma group (Gr.T) dogs were subjected to hypovolemic shock using a modified Wiggers' technique and received standardized hindleg trauma. After resuscitation, venous repairs identical to Gr.C dogs were performed. Gr.T dogs exhibited a 78% thrombosis rate as opposed to 12% in Gr.C animals. To elucidate possible mechanisms, platelets were drawn from another ten animals, divided into similar groups, and labelled with Indium-111-oxine. In Gr.T animals, graft activity increased over time and platelet distribution along the graft was homogeneous. These results contrasted markedly with those of Gr.C animals. We conclude that shock and trauma predispose venous repairs to failure and that altered platelet-endothelium interactions may be implicated.

  10. Circadian Modulation of 8-Oxoguanine DNA Damage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Manzella, Nicola; Bracci, Massimo; Strafella, Elisabetta; Staffolani, Sara; Ciarapica, Veronica; Copertaro, Alfredo; Rapisarda, Venerando; Ledda, Caterina; Amati, Monica; Valentino, Matteo; Tomasetti, Marco; Stevens, Richard G.; Santarelli, Lory

    2015-01-01

    The DNA base excision repair pathway is the main system involved in the removal of oxidative damage to DNA such as 8-Oxoguanine (8-oxoG) primarily via the 8-Oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1). Our goal was to investigate whether the repair of 8-oxoG DNA damage follow a circadian rhythm. In a group of 15 healthy volunteers, we found a daily variation of Ogg1 expression and activity with higher levels in the morning compared to the evening hours. Consistent with this, we also found lower levels of 8-oxoG in morning hours compared to those in the evening hours. Lymphocytes exposed to oxidative damage to DNA at 8:00 AM display lower accumulation of 8-oxoG than lymphocytes exposed at 8:00 PM. Furthermore, altered levels of Ogg1 expression were also observed in a group of shift workers experiencing a deregulation of circadian clock genes compared to a control group. Moreover, BMAL1 knockdown fibroblasts with a deregulated molecular clock showed an abolishment of circadian variation of Ogg1 expression and an increase of OGG1 activity. Our results suggest that the circadian modulation of 8-oxoG DNA damage repair, according to a variation of Ogg1 expression, could render humans less susceptible to accumulate 8-oxoG DNA damage in the morning hours. PMID:26337123

  11. Circadian Modulation of 8-Oxoguanine DNA Damage Repair.

    PubMed

    Manzella, Nicola; Bracci, Massimo; Strafella, Elisabetta; Staffolani, Sara; Ciarapica, Veronica; Copertaro, Alfredo; Rapisarda, Venerando; Ledda, Caterina; Amati, Monica; Valentino, Matteo; Tomasetti, Marco; Stevens, Richard G; Santarelli, Lory

    2015-01-01

    The DNA base excision repair pathway is the main system involved in the removal of oxidative damage to DNA such as 8-Oxoguanine (8-oxoG) primarily via the 8-Oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1). Our goal was to investigate whether the repair of 8-oxoG DNA damage follow a circadian rhythm. In a group of 15 healthy volunteers, we found a daily variation of Ogg1 expression and activity with higher levels in the morning compared to the evening hours. Consistent with this, we also found lower levels of 8-oxoG in morning hours compared to those in the evening hours. Lymphocytes exposed to oxidative damage to DNA at 8:00 AM display lower accumulation of 8-oxoG than lymphocytes exposed at 8:00 PM. Furthermore, altered levels of Ogg1 expression were also observed in a group of shift workers experiencing a deregulation of circadian clock genes compared to a control group. Moreover, BMAL1 knockdown fibroblasts with a deregulated molecular clock showed an abolishment of circadian variation of Ogg1 expression and an increase of OGG1 activity. Our results suggest that the circadian modulation of 8-oxoG DNA damage repair, according to a variation of Ogg1 expression, could render humans less susceptible to accumulate 8-oxoG DNA damage in the morning hours. PMID:26337123

  12. Effect of Scapular Dyskinesis on Supraspinatus Repair Healing in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Reuther, Katherine E.; Tucker, Jennica J.; Thomas, Stephen J.; Vafa, Rameen P.; Liu, Stephen S.; Gordon, Joshua A.; Caro, Adam C.; Yannascoli, Sarah M.; Kuntz, Andrew F.; Soslowsky, Louis J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Rotator cuff tears are common conditions that often require surgical repair to improve function and relieve pain. Unfortunately, repair failure remains a common problem following rotator cuff repair surgery. Several factors may contribute to repair failure including age, tear size, and time from injury. However, the mechanical mechanisms resulting in repair failure are not well understood making clinical management difficult. Specifically, altered scapular motion (termed scapular dyskinesis) may be one important and modifiable factor contributing to the risk of repair failure. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the effect of scapular dyskinesis on supraspinatus tendon healing following repair. Methods A rat model of scapular dyskinesis was used. 70 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (400-450 grams) were randomized into two groups: nerve transection of the accessory and long-thoracic nerves (SD) or sham nerve transection (Sham Control). Following this procedure, all rats underwent unilateral detachment and repair of the supraspinatus tendon. All rats were sacrificed at 2, 4, and 8 weeks after surgery. Shoulder function, passive joint mechanics, and tendon properties (mechanical, histological, organizational, and compositional) were evaluated. Results Scapular dyskinesis alters joint function and may lead to compromised supraspinatus tendon properties. Specifically, diminished mechanical properties, altered histology, and decreased tendon organization was observed for some parameters. Conclusion This study identifies scapular dyskinesis as one underlying mechanism leading to compromise of supraspinatus healing following repair. Identifying modifiable factors that lead to compromised tendon healing will help improve clinical outcomes following repair. Level of evidence Basic Science, in-vivo Animal Study. PMID:25745826

  13. Myocardial histopathology in late-repaired and unrepaired adults with tetralogy of Fallot.

    PubMed

    Pradegan, Nicola; Vida, Vladimiro L; Geva, Tal; Stellin, Giovanni; White, Matthew T; Sanders, Stephen P; Padera, Robert F

    2016-01-01

    Survival of patients after repair of tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) is worse than for the general population. We aimed to assess the time-related effects of surgical repair on right (RV) and left ventricle (LV) myocardium by quantifying hypertrophy and fibrosis. Cardiomyocyte transverse diameter and percent of fibrosis were measured in 8 adult heart specimens with late-repaired TOF, 6 with unrepaired TOF, and 11 normal hearts (controls). The RV and LV mean and median cardiomyocyte diameter and percent of fibrosis were significantly greater than controls in both repaired and unrepaired hearts. The mean RV inferior wall myocyte diameter in unrepaired hearts was significantly greater at average age at death than in repaired hearts (24.9±2.5 vs. 16.4±1.3μm, P=.015), but not the mean RV anterior wall myocyte diameter (21.5±2.2 vs. 17±1.2μm, P=.09) or the mean LV myocyte diameter (19.7±1.5 vs. 16.7±0.8μm, P=.10). Of the RV myocyte diameter measurements, only the RV anterior wall myocyte diameter for repaired hearts correlated with age at death, while LV myocyte diameter for both repaired and unrepaired hearts correlated with age at death. None of the measures of myocyte diameter correlated with age at repair. The mean RV anterior wall, inferior wall, and LV percent fibrosis were all significantly greater in unrepaired hearts at average age at death compared with repaired hearts (16.3±1.3 vs. 13.0±0.7%, P=.04; 18.1±1.9 vs. 12.7±1.0%, P=.03; 15.7±0.8 vs. 11.6±0.4%, P=.004, respectively). There was a significant correlation between RV percent fibrosis (both locations) and age at death for repaired hearts but not for unrepaired hearts, while LV wall percent fibrosis correlated significantly with age at death for both groups. RV percent fibrosis was not significantly correlated with age at repair, while LV percent fibrosis was negatively correlated with age at repair. Hypertrophy and fibrosis in RV and LV of late-repaired TOF hearts progress during follow-up despite

  14. Use of nerve elongator to repair short-distance peripheral nerve defects: a prospective randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Lu; Wang, Tian-bing; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Wei-wen; Xu, Ji-hai; Cai, Xiao-ming; Zhou, Dan-ya; Cai, Li-bing; Pan, Jia-dong; Tian, Min-tao; Chen, Hong; Zhang, Dian-ying; Fu, Zhong-guo; Zhang, Pei-xun; Jiang, Bao-guo

    2015-01-01

    Repair techniques for short-distance peripheral nerve defects, including adjacent joint flexion to reduce the distance between the nerve stump defects, “nerve splint” suturing, and nerve sleeve connection, have some disadvantages. Therefore, we designed a repair technique involving intraoperative tension-free application of a nerve elongator and obtained good outcomes in the repair of short-distance peripheral nerve defects in a previous animal study. The present study compared the clinical outcomes between the use of this nerve elongator and performance of the conventional method in the repair of short-distance transection injuries in human elbows. The 3-, 6-, and 12-month postoperative follow-up results demonstrated that early neurological function recovery was better in the nerve elongation group than in the conventional group, but no significant difference in long-term neurological function recovery was detected between the two groups. In the nerve elongation group, the nerves were sutured without tension, and the duration of postoperative immobilization of the elbow was decreased. Elbow function rehabilitation was significantly better in the nerve elongation group than in the control group. Moreover, there were no security risks. The results of this study confirm that the use of this nerve elongator for repair of short-distance peripheral nerve defects is safe and effective. PMID:25788924

  15. Outcome of pediatric hypospadias repair in adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Chertin, Boris; Prat, Dan; Shenfeld, Ofer Z

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To review the evolution of the technique of hypospadias repair. Methods A search of Pubmed, Medline and the Journal of Pediatric Urology was performed, and papers dealing with surgical techniques for hypospadias repair were critally reviewed. Special emphasis was given to papers on the effects in the long term of hypospadias repair on voiding and sexual dysfunction. Results The techniques for hypospadias repair have evolved over the years. The most popular technique now is tubularized incised plate urethroplasty. Long-term results with the use of the new techniques of the hypospadias repair in terms of voiding and sexual problems should be addressed. Conclusion There is a need for valid studies on the outcomes of hypospadias repair in adults that were performed in childhood in terms of cosmetic appearance, voiding and sexual performance. PMID:24198614

  16. Efficacy of Different Rotator Cuff Repair Techniques.

    PubMed

    Gurnani, Navin; van Deurzen, Derek Friedrich Petrus; Flipsen, Mark; Raven, Eric Ernest Joseph; van den Bekerom, Michel Pieter Jozef

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this review article is to describe the currently used techniques for rotator cuff repair and after treatment. The literature was searched for the different surgical techniques and additional treatment including: [1] full arthroscopic and arthroscopic assisted rotator cuff repair, [2] acromioplasty as an additional treatment to rotator cuff repair, [3] the use of plasma rich platelets (PRP) after rotator cuff repair, [4] the single and double row fixation techniques, [5] long head of the biceps brachii tenotomy or tenodesis with rotator cuff repair, [6] scaffolds in rotator cuff surgery, and [7] early motion or immobilization after rotator cuff repair. The rationale, the results, and the scientific evidence were reported for the eligible procedures. PMID:26055023

  17. The effect of joint surface contours and glass fiber reinforcement on the transverse strength of repaired acrylic resin: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Anasane, Nayana; Ahirrao, Yogesh; Chitnis, Deepa; Meshram, Suresh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Denture fracture is an unresolved problem in complete denture prosthodontics. However, the repaired denture often experiences a refracture at the repaired site due to poor transverse strength. Hence, this study was conducted to evaluate the effect of joint surface contours and glass fiber reinforcement on the transverse strength of repaired acrylic resins. Materials and Methods: A total of 135 specimens of heat polymerized polymethyl methacrylate resin of dimensions 64 × 10 × 2.5 mm were fabricated. Fifteen intact specimens served as the control and 120 test specimens were divided into four groups (30 specimens each), depending upon the joint surface contour (butt, bevel, rabbet and round), with two subgroups based on type of the repair. Half of the specimens were repaired with plain repair resin and the other half with glass fibers reinforced repair resin. Transverse strength of the specimens was determined using three-point bending test. The results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc test (α= 0.05). Results: Transverse strength values for all repaired groups were significantly lower than those for the control group (P < 0.001) (88.77 MPa), with exception of round surface design repaired with glass fiber reinforced repair resin (89.92 MPa) which was significantly superior to the other joint surface contours (P < 0.001). Glass fiber reinforced resin significantly improved the repaired denture base resins as compared to the plain repair resin (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Specimens repaired with glass fiber reinforced resin and round surface design exhibited highest transverse strength; hence, it can be advocated for repair of denture base resins. PMID:23946739

  18. Hiatal hernia repair with biologic mesh reinforcement reduces recurrence rate in small hiatal hernias.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, E; Shaligram, A; Reynoso, J F; Kothari, V; Oleynikov, D

    2014-01-01

    The utility of mesh reinforcement for small hiatal hernia found especially during antireflux surgery is unknown. Initial reports for the use of biological mesh for crural reinforcement during repair for defects greater than 5 cm have been shown to decrease recurrence rates. This study compares patients with small hiatal hernias who underwent onlay biologic mesh buttress repair versus those with suture cruroplasty alone. This is a single-institution retrospective review of all patients undergoing repair of hiatal hernia measuring 1-5 cm between 2002 and 2009. The patients were evaluated based on surgical repair: one group undergoing crural reinforcement with onlay biologic mesh and other group with suture cruroplasty only. Seventy patients with hiatal hernia measuring 1-5 cm were identified. Thirty-eight patients had hernia repair with biologic mesh, and 32 patients had repair with suture cruroplasty only. Recurrence rate at 1 year was 16% (5/32) in patients who had suture cruroplasty only and 0% (0/38) in the group with crural reinforcement with absorbable mesh (statistically significant, P = 0.017). Suture cruroplasty alone appears to be inadequate for hiatal hernias measuring 1-5 cm with significant recurrence rate and failure of antireflux surgery. Crural reinforcement with absorbable mesh may reduce hiatal hernia recurrence rate in small hiatal hernias. PMID:23441634

  19. Laparoscopic repair for vesicouterine fistulae

    PubMed Central

    Maioli, Rafael A.; Macedo, André R. S.; Garcia, André R. L.; de Almeida, Silvio H. M.; Rodrigues, Marco Aurélio Freitas

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The purpose of this video is to present the laparoscopic repair of a VUF in a 42-year-old woman, with gross hematuria, in the immediate postoperative phase following a cesarean delivery. The obstetric team implemented conservative management, including Foley catheter insertion, for 2 weeks. She subsequently developed intermittent hematuria and cystitis. The urology team was consulted 15 days after cesarean delivery. Cystoscopy indicated an ulcerated lesion in the bladder dome of approximately 1.0cm in size. Hysterosalpingography and a pelvic computed tomography scan indicated a fistula. Materials and Methods: Laparoscopic repair was performed 30 days after the cesarean delivery. The patient was placed in the lithotomy position while also in an extreme Trendelenburg position. Pneumoperitoneum was established using a Veress needle in the midline infra-umbilical region, and a primary 11-mm port was inserted. Another 11-mm port was inserted exactly between the left superior iliac spine and the umbilicus. Two other 5-mm ports were established under laparoscopic guidance in the iliac fossa on both sides. The omental adhesions in the pelvis were carefully released and the peritoneum between the bladder and uterus was incised via cautery. Limited cystotomy was performed, and the specific sites of the fistula and the ureteral meatus were identified; thereafter, the posterior bladder wall was adequately mobilized away from the uterus. The uterine rent was then closed using single 3/0Vicryl sutures and two-layer watertight closure of the urinary bladder was achieved by using 3/0Vicryl sutures. An omental flap was mobilized and inserted between the uterus and the urinary bladder, and was fixed using two 3/0Vicryl sutures, followed by tube drain insertion. Results: The operative time was 140 min, whereas the blood loss was 100ml. The patient was discharged 3 days after surgery, and the catheter was removed 12 days after surgery. Discussion: Laparoscopy has

  20. Thermal protection system repair kit program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility and conceptual design aspects of repair materials and procedures for in orbit repair of the space shuttle orbiter TPS tiles are investigated. Material studies to investigate cure in place materials are described including catalyst and cure studies, ablation tests and evaluations, and support mixing and applicator design. The feasibility of the repair procedures, the storage of the TPS, dispensing, and cure problems are addressed.

  1. Cellular repair/misrepair track model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    1991-01-01

    A repair/misrepair cell kinetics model is superimposed onto the track structure model of Katz to provide for a repair mechanism. The model is tested on the repair-dependent data of Yang et al. and provides an adequate description of that data. The misrepair rate determines the maximum relative biological effectiveness (RBE), but similar results could arise from indirect X-ray lethality not include in the present model.

  2. Biophysical modeling of mismatch repair proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salsbury, Freddie

    2009-03-01

    Mismatch repair proteins play a vital role in the bology of cancer due to their dual functions as repair proteins and as sensors of DNA damage. Computational modeling of mismatch repair proteins in conjunction with biological experimentation has demonstrated the role of long-range communication in the functions of these proteins. Furthermore, different conformations have been shown to be associated with different cellular functions, and these differences are being exploited in drug discovery. The latest results in this modeling will be presented.

  3. Is Early Nasal Shaping With a Limited Alar Base Incision Possible in the Repair of Cleft Lips?

    PubMed

    Kapi, Emin; Bozkurt, Mehmet; Ozer, Torun; Celik, Mehmet Yusuf

    2016-05-01

    The repair of cleft lips has an important place in plastic and reconstructive surgery. In the treatment of these deformities, the aim was to restore the normal lip morphology in the cleft area as well as repairing any coexisting nasal deformities. Various methods are in use for this purpose. One of the most commonly employed surgical methods is Millard repair. However, this method may lead to additional scarring in the alar base on the cleft side subsequent to the incision. In this study, the results obtained from a group who have been applied alar base incisions during the modified Millard repair are compared to a group who have undergone intranasal wide dissections.The patients enrolled in the study were randomized into 2 groups. The first group were applied the modified Millard repair. In the second group, the rotation, advancement, and C-flaps were prepared according to Millard surgical repair technique; however, instead of an alar base and nasofacial groove incision on the cleft side, a nasal and maxillary supraperiosteal wide dissection was made through the incision in the mucosa of the nostril.The intranasal dissection performed during the study was observed to provide the targeted outcome and a more satisfactory cosmetic result through the modified Millard repair. In conclusion, the authors are of the opinion that the limited alar base incision and the wide supraperiosteal dissection performed in patients with cleft lips is an alternative method that can be employed in a wide range of patients. PMID:27092908

  4. Mutagenic DNA repair in enterobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Sedgwick, S.G. ); Chao Ho; Woodgate, R. )

    1991-09-01

    Sixteen species of enterobacteria have been screened for mutagenic DNA repair activity. In Escherichia coli, mutagenic DNA repair is encoded by the umuDC operon. Synthesis of UmuD and UmuC proteins is induced as part of the SOS response to DNA damage, and after induction, the UmuD protein undergoes an autocatalytic cleavage to produce the carboxy-terminal UmuD{prime} fragment needed for induced mutagenesis. The presence of a similar system in other species was examined by using a combined approach of inducible-mutagenesis assays, cross-reactivity to E. coli UmuD and UmuD{prime} antibodies to test for induction and cleavage of UmuD-like proteins, and hybridization with E. coli and Salmonella typhimurium u mu DNA probes to map umu-like genes. The results indicate a more widespread distribution of mutagenic DNA repair in other species than was previously thought. They also show that umu loci can be more complex in other species than in E. coli. Differences in UV-induced mutability of more than 200-fold were seen between different species of enteric bacteria and even between multiple natural isolates of E. coli, and yet some of the species which display a poorly mutable phenotype still have umu-like genes and proteins. It is suggested that umuDC genes can be curtailed in their mutagenic activities but that they may still participate in some other, unknown process which provides the continued stimulus for their retention.

  5. Transcriptomic Approaches to Neural Repair

    PubMed Central

    Antunes-Martins, Ana; Chandran, Vijayendran; Costigan, Michael; Lerch, Jessica K.; Willis, Dianna E.; Tuszynski, Mark H.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding why adult CNS neurons fail to regenerate their axons following injury remains a central challenge of neuroscience research. A more complete appreciation of the biological mechanisms shaping the injured nervous system is a crucial prerequisite for the development of robust therapies to promote neural repair. Historically, the identification of regeneration associated signaling pathways has been impeded by the limitations of available genetic and molecular tools. As we progress into an era in which the high-throughput interrogation of gene expression is commonplace and our knowledge base of interactome data is rapidly expanding, we can now begin to assemble a more comprehensive view of the complex biology governing axon regeneration. Here, we highlight current and ongoing work featuring transcriptomic approaches toward the discovery of novel molecular mechanisms that can be manipulated to promote neural repair. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Transcriptional profiling is a powerful technique with broad applications in the field of neuroscience. Recent advances such as single-cell transcriptomics, CNS cell type-specific and developmental stage-specific expression libraries are rapidly enhancing the power of transcriptomics for neuroscience applications. However, extracting biologically meaningful information from large transcriptomic datasets remains a formidable challenge. This mini-symposium will highlight current work using transcriptomic approaches to identify regulatory networks in the injured nervous system. We will discuss analytical strategies for transcriptomics data, the significance of noncoding RNA networks, and the utility of multiomic data integration. Though the studies featured here specifically focus on neural repair, the approaches highlighted in this mini-symposium will be of broad interest and utility to neuroscientists working in diverse areas of the field. PMID:26468186

  6. Differences in Cartilage Repair between Loading and Unloading Environments in the Rat Knee

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Taro; Yoshida, Shinya; Kitade, Ippei; Hoso, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the histopathological and immunohistochemical effects of loading on cartilage repair in rat full-thickness articular cartilage defects. A total of 40 male 9-week-old Wistar rats were studied. Full-thickness articular cartilage defects were created over the capsule at the loading portion in the medial condyle of the femur. Twenty rats were randomly allocated into each of the 2 groups: a loading group and a unloading group. Twenty rats from these 2 groups were later randomly allocated to each of the 2 groups for evaluation at 1 and 2 weeks after surgery. At the end of each period, knee joints were examined histopathologically and immunohistochemically. In both groups at 1 and 2 weeks, the defects were filled with a mixture of granulation tissue and some remnants of hyaline cartilage. The repair tissue was not stained with toluidine blue in both groups. Strong staining of type I collagen was observed in the repair tissue of both groups. The area stained with type I collagen was smaller in the unloading group than in the loading groups, and the stained area was smaller at 2 weeks than at 1 week. In the staining for type II collagen, apparent staining of type II collagen was observed in the repair tissue of both groups at 1 week. At 2 weeks, there was a tendency toward a higher degree of apparent staining in the loading group than in the unloading group. Accordingly, these results indicated that loading and unloading in the early phase of cartilage repair have both merits and demerits. PMID:25792905

  7. Surgical Site Occurrences of Simultaneous Panniculectomy and Incisional Hernia Repair.

    PubMed

    Warren, Jeremy A; Epps, Matthew; Debrux, Cart; Fowler, James L; Ewing, Joseph A; Cobb, William S; Carbonell, Alfredo M

    2015-08-01

    Horizontal panniculectomy (PAN) offers the advantage of wide exposure for hernia repair with elimination of excess skin and adiposity, at the expense of massive subcutaneous flap creation and its attendant risks. We report our experience with ventral hernia repair (VHR) with PAN compared with patients with hernia repair alone. A prospective database was reviewed retrospectively for all patients undergoing open VHR + PAN. A matched cohort of patients without PAN was used for comparison, resulting in 43 study and 43 control patients. Incidence of surgical site occurrences (SSO), surgical site infection (SSI), and recurrence were analyzed. A total of 43 patients underwent PAN + VHR with mesh. Mean body mass index was 34.3 kg/m(2), with 35 per cent having undergone prior bariatric surgery. Repair techniques included retromuscular (74.4%), preperitoneal (11.6%), intraperitoneal (6.9%), onlay (4.6%), and suture (2.3%). Mesh used was polypropylene (76.7%), polyester (18.6%), bioabsorbable (2.3%), and polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) (2.3%). Component separation was performed in 44.2 per cent of patients. There was a significant difference in total SSO between PAN + VHR and VHR alone (46.5% vs 27.9%; P < 0.001), though the difference for individual SSOs was not significant. There was no difference in SSI between groups (16.3% vs 20.9%; P = 0.776). Mean follow-up was 11.4 months, with recurrence rate of 11.6 per cent in the PAN group and 9.3 per cent in the control group (P = 0.725). Panniculectomy at the time of VHR does not increase the incidence of SSI, though higher rates of skin necrosis and cellulitis were seen. There is no difference in recurrence. This approach is a valid option for patients with excessive abdominal panniculus requiring VHR. PMID:26215237

  8. Integrated Electrical Wire Insulation Repair System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha; Jolley, Scott; Gibson, Tracy; Parks, Steven

    2013-01-01

    An integrated system tool will allow a technician to easily and quickly repair damaged high-performance electrical wire insulation in the field. Low-melt polyimides have been developed that can be processed into thin films that work well in the repair of damaged polyimide or fluoropolymer insulated electrical wiring. Such thin films can be used in wire insulation repairs by affixing a film of this low-melt polyimide to the damaged wire, and heating the film to effect melting, flow, and cure of the film. The resulting repair is robust, lightweight, and small in volume. The heating of this repair film is accomplished with the use of a common electrical soldering tool that has been modified with a special head or tip that can accommodate the size of wire being repaired. This repair method can furthermore be simplified for the repair technician by providing replaceable or disposable soldering tool heads that have repair film already "loaded" and ready for use. The soldering tool heating device can also be equipped with a battery power supply that will allow its use in areas where plug-in current is not available

  9. The design of bonded structure repairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, K. B.

    1983-01-01

    This paper illustrates the problems of the repair engineer in the field when no stress analysis or structural repair manual is available. In this extreme situation he can only seek to restore the original strength of the damaged part whether or not all of that strength is actually required. Two major design factors are considered, i.e. overlap shear joints and core to skin bond strength. Back-up by rivets or bolts is discussed and also sealing the repair with a fabric overlay to prevent or minimize water ingress. The paper concludes with a practical example of a repair using the data provided.

  10. Scheduling and rescheduling with iterative repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweben, Monte; Davis, Eugene; Daun, Brian; Deale, Michael

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the GERRY scheduling and rescheduling system being applied to coordinate Space Shuttle Ground Processing. The system uses constraint-based iterative repair, a technique that starts with a complete but possibly flawed schedule and iteratively improves it by using constraint knowledge within repair heuristics. In this paper we explore the tradeoff between the informedness and the computational cost of several repair heuristics. We show empirically that some knowledge can greatly improve the convergence speed of a repair-based system, but that too much knowledge, such as the knowledge embodied within the MIN-CONFLICTS lookahead heuristic, can overwhelm a system and result in degraded performance.

  11. Preferential DNA repair in expressed genes.

    PubMed Central

    Hanawalt, P C

    1987-01-01

    Potentially deleterious alterations to DNA occur nonrandomly within the mammalian genome. These alterations include the adducts produced by many chemical carcinogens, but not the UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer, which may be an exception. Recent studies in our laboratory have shown that the excision repair of pyrimidine dimers and certain other lesions is nonrandom in the mammalian genome, exhibiting a distinct preference for actively transcribed DNA sequences. An important consequence of this fact is that mutagenesis and carcinogenesis may be determined in part by the activities of the relevant genes. Repair may also be processive, and a model is proposed in which excision repair is coupled to transcription at the nuclear matrix. Similar but freely diffusing repair complexes may account for the lower overall repair efficiencies in the silent domains of the genome. Risk assessment in relation to chemical carcinogenesis requires assays that determine effective levels of DNA damage for producing malignancy. The existence of nonrandom repair in the genome casts into doubt the reliability of overall indicators of DNA binding and lesion repair for such determinations. Furthermore, some apparent differences between the intragenomic repair heterogeneity in rodent cells and that in human cells mandate a reevaluation of rodent test systems for human risk assessment. Tissue-specific and cell-specific differences in the coordinate regulation of gene expression and DNA repair may account for corresponding differences in the carcinogenic response. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 1. PMID:3447906

  12. Current Trends in Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Patapis, Paul; Zavras, Nick; Tzanetis, Panagiotis; Machairas, Anastasios

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The purpose of this study was to analyze the surgical technique, postoperative complications, and possible recurrence after laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR) in comparison with open ventral hernia repair (OVHR), based on the international literature. Database: A Medline search of the current English literature was performed using the terms laparoscopic ventral hernia repair and incisional hernia repair. Conclusions: LVHR is a safe alternative to the open method, with the main advantages being minimal postoperative pain, shorter recovery, and decreased wound and mesh infections. Incidental enterotomy can be avoided by using a meticulous technique and sharp dissection to avoid thermal injury. PMID:26273186

  13. 33 CFR 127.405 - Repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS GAS Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Natural Gas Maintenance § 127.405 Repairs. The operator shall ensure that—...

  14. 33 CFR 127.1405 - Repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS GAS Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Hazardous Gas Maintenance § 127.1405 Repairs. Each operator of...

  15. Photomask repair using low-energetic electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edinger, K.; Wolff, K.; Spies, P.; Luchs, T.; Schneider, H.; Auth, N.; Hermanns, Ch. F.; Waiblinger, M.

    2015-10-01

    Mask repair is an essential step in the mask manufacturing process as the extension of 193nm technology and the insertion of EUV are drivers for mask complexity and cost. The ability to repair all types of defects on all mask blank materials is crucial for the economic success of a mask shop operation. In the future mask repair is facing several challenges. The mask minimum features sizes are shrinking and require a higher resolution repair tool. At the same time mask blanks with different new mask materials are introduced to optimize optical performance and long term durability. For EUV masks new classes of defects like multilayer and phase defects are entering the stage. In order to achieve a high yield, mask repair has to cover etch and deposition capabilities and must not damage the mask. We will demonstrate in this paper that low energetic electron-beam (e-beam)-based mask repair is a commercially viable solution. Therefore we developed a new repair platform called MeRiT® neXT to address the technical challenges of this new technology. We will analyze the limits of the existing as well as lower energetic electron induced repair technologies theoretically and experimentally and show performance data on photomask reticles. Based on this data, we will give an outlook to future mask repair technology.

  16. Bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells are involved in aneurysm repair in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xinggen; Zhao, Rui; Wang, Kuizhong; Li, Zifu; Yang, Penfei; Huang, Qinghai; Xu, Yi; Hong, Bo; Liu, Jianmin

    2012-09-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) are believed to be involved in aneurysmal repair and remodeling. The aim of this study was to test this hypothesis and, if true, explore how EPC contribute to aneurysm repair in a rabbit model of elastase-induced carotid aneurysm. Rabbits were divided randomly into an in situ carotid EPC transfusion group (ISCT group, n=5), and an intravenous EPC transfusion group (IVT group, n=5). Autologous EPC were double-labeled with Hoechst 33342 and 5,6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester before injection into the animals in either the carotid artery (ISCT group) or marginal ear veins (IVT group). Three weeks later, labeled cells in the aneurysms were observed with respect to location, adhesion, and growth to detect signs of aneurysm repair. Labeled EPC were detected within the neointima in all five aneurysms in the ISCT group and in three of the five aneurysms in the IVT group, but there was no endothelial growth in the aneurysmal neointima in either group. These results show that bone marrow-derived EPC are involved in the process of aneurysm repair in this rabbit model. PMID:22789632

  17. National results after ventral hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Helgstrand, Frederik

    2016-07-01

    Ventral hernia repairs are among the most frequently performed surgical procedures. The variations of repair techniques are multiple and outcome has been unacceptable. Despite the high volume, it has been difficult to obtain sufficient data to provide evidence for best practice. In order to monitor national surgical quality and provide the warranted high volume data, the first national ventral hernia register (The Danish Ventral Hernia Database) was established in 2007 in Denmark. The present study series show that data from a well-established database supported by clinical examinations, patient files, questionnaires, and administrative data makes it possible to obtain nationwide high volume data and to achieve evidence for better outcome in a complex surgical condition as ventral hernia. Due to the high volume and included variables on surgical technique, it is now possible to make analyses adjusting for a variety of surgical techniques and different hernia specifications. We documented high 30-day complications and recurrence rates for both primary and secondary ventral hernias in a nationwide cohort. Furthermore, recurrence found by clinical examination was shown to exceed the number of patients undergoing reoperation for recurrence by a factor 4-5. The nationwide adjusted analyses proved that open mesh and laparoscopic repair for umbilical and epigastric hernias does not differ in 30-day outcome or in risk of recurrence. There is a minor risk reduction in early complications after open sutured repairs. However, the risk for a later recurrence repair is significantly higher after sutured repairs compared with mesh repairs. The study series showed that large hernia defects and open re-pairs were independent predictors for 30-day complications after an incisional hernia repair. Open procedures and large hernia defects were independent risk factors for a later recurrence re-pair. However, patients with large defects (> 15 cm) seemed to benefit from an open mesh

  18. 24 CFR 206.47 - Property standards; repair work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Property standards; repair work... Property standards; repair work. (a) Need for repairs. Properties must meet the applicable property... insured mortgage. (b) Assurance that repairs are made. The mortgage may be closed before the repair...

  19. 24 CFR 206.47 - Property standards; repair work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Property standards; repair work... Property standards; repair work. (a) Need for repairs. Properties must meet the applicable property... insured mortgage. (b) Assurance that repairs are made. The mortgage may be closed before the repair...

  20. 24 CFR 206.47 - Property standards; repair work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Property standards; repair work... Property standards; repair work. (a) Need for repairs. Properties must meet the applicable property... insured mortgage. (b) Assurance that repairs are made. The mortgage may be closed before the repair...

  1. 14 CFR 145.107 - Satellite repair stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Satellite repair stations. 145.107 Section... Data § 145.107 Satellite repair stations. (a) A certificated repair station under the managerial control of another certificated repair station may operate as a satellite repair station with its...

  2. 14 CFR 145.107 - Satellite repair stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Satellite repair stations. 145.107 Section... Data § 145.107 Satellite repair stations. (a) A certificated repair station under the managerial control of another certificated repair station may operate as a satellite repair station with its...

  3. 14 CFR 145.107 - Satellite repair stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Satellite repair stations. 145.107 Section... Data § 145.107 Satellite repair stations. (a) A certificated repair station under the managerial control of another certificated repair station may operate as a satellite repair station with its...

  4. 14 CFR 145.107 - Satellite repair stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Satellite repair stations. 145.107 Section... Data § 145.107 Satellite repair stations. (a) A certificated repair station under the managerial control of another certificated repair station may operate as a satellite repair station with its...

  5. 14 CFR 145.107 - Satellite repair stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Satellite repair stations. 145.107 Section... Data § 145.107 Satellite repair stations. (a) A certificated repair station under the managerial control of another certificated repair station may operate as a satellite repair station with its...

  6. 14 CFR 145.207 - Repair station manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Repair station manual. 145.207 Section 145...) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES REPAIR STATIONS Operating Rules § 145.207 Repair station manual. (a) A certificated repair station must prepare and follow a repair station manual acceptable to...

  7. Combined Orbital Fractures: Surgical Strategy of Sequential Repair

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Su Won; Kim, Sung Eun; Chung, Kyu Jin; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Tae Gon

    2015-01-01

    Background Reconstruction of combined orbital floor and medial wall fractures with a comminuted inferomedial strut (IMS) is challenging and requires careful practice. We present our surgical strategy and postoperative outcomes. Methods We divided 74 patients who underwent the reconstruction of the orbital floor and medial wall concomitantly into a comminuted IMS group (41 patients) and non-comminuted IMS group (33 patients). In the comminuted IMS group, we first reconstructed the floor stably and then the medial wall by using separate implant pieces. In the non-comminuted IMS group, we reconstructed the floor and the medial wall with a single large implant. Results In the follow-up of 6 to 65 months, most patients with diplopia improved in the first-week except one, who eventually improved at 1 year. All patients with an EOM limitation improved during the first month of follow-up. Enophthalmos (displacement, 2 mm) was observed in two patients. The orbit volume measured on the CT scans was statistically significantly restored in both groups. No complications related to the surgery were observed. Conclusions We recommend the reconstruction of orbit walls in the comminuted IMS group by using the following surgical strategy: usage of multiple pieces of rigid implants instead of one large implant, sequential repair first of the floor and then of the medial wall, and a focus on the reconstruction of key areas. Our strategy of step-by-step reconstruction has the benefits of easy repair, less surgical trauma, and minimal stress to the surgeon. PMID:26217562

  8. Agents that reverse UV-induced immune suppression and photocarcinogenesis affect DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Sreevidya, Coimbatore S.; Fukunaga, Atsushi; Khaskhely, Noor M.; Masaki, Taro; Ono, Ryusuke; Nishigori, Chikako; Ullrich, Stephen E.

    2010-01-01

    UV exposure induces skin cancer, in part by inducing immune suppression. Repairing DNA damage, neutralizing the activity of cis-urocanic acid (cis-UCA), and reversing oxidative stress abrogates UV-induced immune suppression and skin cancer induction, suggesting the DNA, UCA and lipid photo-oxidation serves as UV photoreceptors. What is not clear is whether signaling through each of these different photoreceptors activates independent pathways to induce biological effects or whether there is a common checkpoint where these pathways converge. Here we show that agents known to reverse photocarcinogenesis and photoimmune suppression, such as platelet activating factor (PAF) and serotonin (5-HT) receptor antagonists regulate DNA repair. Pyrimidine dimer repair was accelerated in UV-irradiated mice injected with PAF and 5-HT receptor antagonists. Nucleotide excision repair, as measured by unscheduled DNA synthesis, was accelerated by PAF and 5-HT receptor antagonists. Injecting PAF and 5-HT receptor antagonists into UV-irradiated Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A (XPA) deficient mice, which lack the enzymes responsible for nucleotide excision repair, did not accelerate photoproduct repair. Similarly, UV-induced formation of 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) was reduced by PAF and 5-HT receptor antagonists. We conclude that PAF and 5-HT receptor antagonists accelerate DNA repair caused by UV radiation, which prevents immune suppression and interferes with photocarcinogenesis. PMID:19829299

  9. Electronic structure of (6-4) DNA photoproduct repair involving a non-oxetane pathway.

    PubMed

    Domratcheva, Tatiana; Schlichting, Ilme

    2009-12-16

    Mutagenic pyrimidine-pyrimidone (6-4) photoproducts are one of the main DNA lesions induced by solar UV radiation. These lesions can be photoreversed by (6-4) photolyases. The originally published repair mechanism involves rearrangement of the lesion into an oxetane intermediate upon binding to the (6-4) photolyase, followed by light-induced electron transfer from the reduced flavin cofactor. In a recent crystallographic study on a (6-4) photoproduct complexed with (6-4) photolyase from Drosophila melanogaster no oxetane was observed, raising the possibility of a non-oxetane repair mechanism. Using quantum-chemical calculations we find that in addition to repair via an oxetane, a direct transfer of the hydroxyl group results in reversal of the radical anion (6-4) photoproduct. In both mechanisms, the transition states have high energies and correspond to avoided crossings of the ground and excited electronic states. To study whether the repair can proceed via these state crossings, the excited-state potential energy curves were computed. The radical excitation energies and accessibility of the nonadiabatic repair path were found to depend on hydrogen bonds and the protonation state of the lesion. On the basis of the energy calculations, a nonadiabatic repair of the excited (6-4) lesion radical anion via hydroxyl transfer is probable. This repair mechanism is in line with the recent structural data on the (6-4) photolyase from D. melanogaster . PMID:19921821

  10. Capsule repair may reduce dislocation following hip hemiarthroplasty through a direct lateral approach: a cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Hughes, A W; Clark, D; Carlino, W; Gosling, O; Spencer, R F

    2015-01-01

    Reported rates of dislocation in hip hemiarthroplasty (HA) for the treatment of intra-capsular fractures of the hip, range between 1% and 10%. HA is frequently performed through a direct lateral surgical approach. The aim of this study is to determine the contribution of the anterior capsule to the stability of a cemented HA through a direct lateral approach. A total of five whole-body cadavers were thawed at room temperature, providing ten hip joints for investigation. A Thompson HA was cemented in place via a direct lateral approach. The cadavers were then positioned supine, both knee joints were disarticulated and a digital torque wrench was attached to the femur using a circular frame with three half pins. The wrench applied an external rotation force with the hip in extension to allow the hip to dislocate anteriorly. Each hip was dislocated twice; once with a capsular repair and once without repairing the capsule. Stratified sampling ensured the order in which this was performed was alternated for the paired hips on each cadaver. Comparing peak torque force in hips with the capsule repaired and peak torque force in hips without repair of the capsule, revealed a significant difference between the 'capsule repaired' (mean 22.96 Nm, standard deviation (sd) 4.61) and the 'capsule not repaired' group (mean 5.6 Nm, sd 2.81) (p < 0.001). Capsular repair may help reduce the risk of hip dislocation following HA. PMID:25568428

  11. Inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 and DNA repair by uranium.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Karen L; Dashner, Erica J; Tsosie, Ranalda; Cho, Young Mi; Lewis, Johnnye; Hudson, Laurie G

    2016-01-15

    Uranium has radiological and non-radiological effects within biological systems and there is increasing evidence for genotoxic and carcinogenic properties attributable to uranium through its heavy metal properties. In this study, we report that low concentrations of uranium (as uranyl acetate; <10 μM) is not cytotoxic to human embryonic kidney cells or normal human keratinocytes; however, uranium exacerbates DNA damage and cytotoxicity induced by hydrogen peroxide, suggesting that uranium may inhibit DNA repair processes. Concentrations of uranyl acetate in the low micromolar range inhibited the zinc finger DNA repair protein poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 and caused zinc loss from PARP-1 protein. Uranyl acetate exposure also led to zinc loss from the zinc finger DNA repair proteins Xeroderma Pigmentosum, Complementation Group A (XPA) and aprataxin (APTX). In keeping with the observed inhibition of zinc finger function of DNA repair proteins, exposure to uranyl acetate enhanced retention of induced DNA damage. Co-incubation of uranyl acetate with zinc largely overcame the impact of uranium on PARP-1 activity and DNA damage. These findings present evidence that low concentrations of uranium can inhibit DNA repair through disruption of zinc finger domains of specific target DNA repair proteins. This may provide a mechanistic basis to account for the published observations that uranium exposure is associated with DNA repair deficiency in exposed human populations. PMID:26627003

  12. Proteomic identification of hair cell repair proteins in the model sea anemone Nematostella vectensis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Pei-Ciao; Watson, Glen M

    2015-09-01

    Sea anemones have an extraordinary capability to repair damaged hair bundles, even after severe trauma. A group of secreted proteins, named repair proteins (RPs), found in mucus covering sea anemones significantly assists the repair of damaged hair bundle mechanoreceptors both in the sea anemone Haliplanella luciae and the blind cavefish Astyanax hubbsi. The polypeptide constituents of RPs must be identified in order to gain insight into the molecular mechanisms by which repair of hair bundles is accomplished. In this study, several polypeptides of RPs were isolated from mucus using blue native PAGE and then sequenced using LC-MS/MS. Thirty-seven known polypeptides were identified, including Hsp70s, as well as many polypeptide subunits of the 20S proteasome. Other identified polypeptides included those involved in cellular stress responses, protein folding, and protein degradation. Specific inhibitors of Hsp70s and the 20S proteasome were employed in experiments to test their involvement in hair bundle repair. The results of those experiments suggested that repair requires biologically active Hsp70s and 20S proteasomes. A model is proposed that considers the function of extracellular Hsp70s and 20S proteasomes in the repair of damaged hair cells. PMID:26183436

  13. Fanconi Anemia Proteins, DNA Interstrand Crosslink Repair Pathways, and Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Andreassen, Paul R.; Ren, Keqin

    2016-01-01

    DNA interstrand crosslinkers, a chemically diverse group of compounds which also induce alkylation of bases and DNA intrastrand crosslinks, are extensively utilized for cancer therapy. Understanding the cellular response to DNA damage induced by these agents is critical for more effective utilization of these compounds and for the identification of novel therapeutic targets. Importantly, the repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) involves many distinct DNA repair pathways, including nucleotide excision repair, translesion synthesis (TLS), and homologous recombination (HR). Additionally, proteins implicated in the pathophysiology of the multigenic disease Fanconi anemia (FA) have a role in the repair of ICLs that is not well understood. Cells from FA patients are hypersensitive to agents that induce ICLs, therefore FA proteins are potentially novel therapeutic targets. Here we will review current research directed at identifying FA genes and understanding the function of FA proteins in DNA damage responses. We will also examine interactions of FA proteins with other repair proteins and pathways, including signaling networks, which are potentially involved in ICL repair. Potential approaches to the modulation of FA protein function to enhance therapeutic outcome will be discussed. Also, mutation of many genes that encode proteins involved in ICL repair, including FA genes, increases susceptibility to cancer. A better understanding of these pathways is therefore critical for the design of individualized therapies tailored to the genetic profile of a particular malignancy. For this purpose, we will also review evidence for the association of mutation of FA genes with cancer in non-FA patients. PMID:19200054

  14. Hyperglycemia Interacts with Ischemia in a Synergistic Way on Wound Repair and Myofibroblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Lévigne, Dominik; Modarressi, Ali; Atashi, Fatemeh; Villard, Frederic; Hinz, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hyperglycemia is known to adversely affect the outcome of ischemic insults, but its interaction with ischemia has not been investigated in wound repair yet. In this study, we develop a new animal model allowing to investigate the interaction between hyperglycemia and ischemia during the wound repair process. We focus on myofibroblast differentiation, a key element of wound repair. Methods: Ischemia was inflicted in Wistar rats by resection of the femoral to popliteal arteries on the left side, whereas arteries were dissected without resection on the right side. Full-thickness skin wounds (1 cm2) were created on both feet. Hyperglycemia was induced by injection of streptozotocin. Normoglycemic animals served as control (n = 23/group). Blood flow, wound closure, and myofibroblast expression were measured. Results: Wound closure was significantly delayed in ischemic compared with nonischemic wounds in all rats. This delay was almost 5-fold exacerbated in hyperglycemic rats compared with normoglycemic rats, while hyperglycemia alone showed only a slight effect on wound repair. Delayed wound repair was associated with impaired wound contraction and myofibroblast differentiation. Conclusions: Our model allows to specifically quantify the effect of hyperglycemia and ischemia alone or in combination on wound repair. We show that hyperglycemia amplifies the inhibitory effect of ischemia on wound repair and myofibroblast expression. Our data reveal for the first time the synergic aspect of this interaction and therefore stress the importance of a strict glycemic control in the management of ischemic wounds. PMID:26301160

  15. Laser-activated solder weld repair of the inferior alveolar nerve in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Nigel J.; Lauto, Antonio; Trickett, Rodney I.; Owen, Earl R.; Walker, D. M.

    1997-05-01

    A new laser activated solder weld technique is described for the microsurgical repair of the inferior alveolar nerve in rats. The laser weld technique used an albumin based solder, containing indocyanine cardiogreen, plus an infrared diode laser. Seven animals had inferior alveolar nerve repairs performed using the laser weld technique and these were compared against corresponding unoperated controls plus three cases of nerve section without repair. Histochemical analysis was performed utilizing neuron counts and horseradish peroxidase tracer (HRP) uptake in the trigeminal ganglion following sacrifice and staining of frozen sections with cresyl violet and diaminobenzidene. The results of this analysis showed comparable mean neuron counts and mean HRP uptake by neurons for the unoperated control and laser weld groups with considerable reduction of mean values in cases of nerve section with no repair. Sections of the repaired inferior alveolar nerves, stained with Masson's trichrome, showed no adverse reactions by axons or epineurium to the coagulative repair with the solder and demonstrated regeneration of myelinated axons at the time of sacrifice. In summary a new technique of laser weld repair of the inferior alveolar nerve is described which, on initial analysis, appears to be a reliable alternative to traditional techniques.

  16. Complexities of the DNA Base Excision Repair Pathway for Repair of Oxidative DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Sankar; Boldogh, Istvan; Izumi, Tadahide; Hazra, Tapas K.

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative damage represents the most significant insult to organisms because of continuous production of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) in vivo. Oxidative damage in DNA, a critical target of ROS, is repaired primarily via the base excision repair (BER) pathway which appears to be the simplest among the three excision repair pathways. However, it is now evident that although BER can be carried with four or five enzymes in vitro, a large number of proteins, including some required for nucleotide excision repair (NER), are needed for in vivo repair of oxidative damage. Furthermore, BER in transcribed vs. nontranscribed DNA regions requires distinct sets of proteins, as in the case of NER. We propose an additional complexity in repair of replicating vs. nonreplicating DNA. Unlike DNA bulky adducts, the oxidized base lesions could be incorporated in the nascent DNA strand, repair of which may share components of the mismatch repair process. Distinct enzyme specificities are thus warranted for repair of lesions in the parental vs. nascent DNA strand. Repair synthesis may be carried out by DNA polymerase β or replicative polymerases δ and ε. Thus, multiple subpathways are needed for repairing oxidative DNA damage, and the pathway decision may require coordination of the successive steps in repair. Such coordination includes transfer of the product of a DNA glycosylase to AP-endonuclease, the next enzyme in the pathway. Interactions among proteins in the pathway may also reflect such coordination, characterization of which should help elucidate these subpathways and their in vivo regulation. PMID:11746753

  17. Starting System 2. Repair the Starter Rewind Spring. Student Manual. Small Engine Repair Series. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Pamela

    This student manual on repairing the starter rewind spring on a small gas engine is the third of three in an instructional package on the starting system in the Small Engine Repair Series for handicapped students. The stated purpose for the booklet is to help students learn what tools and equipment to use in repairing the starter rewind spring and…

  18. The Covert Repair Hypothesis: Prearticulatory Repair Processes in Normal and Stuttered Disfluencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Postma, Albert; Kolk, Herman

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the speech monitoring process that underlies overt self-repairing of speech errors; the covert repair hypothesis, dealing particularly with explaining the variety of disfluency types from a restricted set of repair principles; quantitative and qualitative characteristics of disfluency in people who stutter; and the covert…

  19. Biomechanical evaluation of a novel suturing scheme for grafting load-bearing collagen scaffolds for rotator cuff repair

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Anowarul; Bohl, Michael S.; Tsai, Andrew G; Younesi, Mousa; Gillespie, Robert; Akkus, Ozan

    2015-01-01

    Background Currently, there are no well-established suture protocols to attach fully load-bearing scaffolds which span tendon defects between bone and muscle for repair of critical sized tendon tears. Methods to attach load-bearing tissue repair scaffolds could enable functional repair of tendon injuries. Methods Sixteen rabbit shoulders were dissected (New Zealand white rabbits, 1 yr. old, female) to isolate the humeral-infraspinatus muscle complex. A unique suture technique was developed to allow for a 5 mm segmental defect in infraspinatus tendon to be replaced with a mechanically strong bioscaffold woven from pure collagen threads. The suturing pattern resulted in a fully load-bearing scaffold. The tensile stiffness and strength of scaffold repair was compared with intact infraspinatus and regular direct repair. Findings The failure load and displacement at failure of the scaffold repair group were 59.9 N (Standard Deviation, SD = 10.7) and 10.3 mm (SD = 2.9), respectively and matched those obtained by direct repair group which were 57.5 N (SD = 15.3) and 8.6 mm (SD = 1.5), (p > 0.05). Failure load, displacement at failure and stiffness of both of the repair groups were half of the intact infraspinatus shoulder group. Interpretation With the developed suture technique, scaffolds repair showed similar failure load, displacement at failure and stiffness to the direct repair. This novel suturing pattern and the mechanical robustness of the scaffold at time zero indicates that the proposed model is mechanically viable for future in vivo studies which has a higher potential to translate into clinical uses. PMID:26009492

  20. International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) Recommended Guidelines for Histological Endpoints for Cartilage Repair Studies in Animal Models and Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Hoemann, Caroline; Kandel, Rita; Roberts, Sally; Saris, Daniel B.F.; Creemers, Laura; Mainil-Varlet, Pierre; Méthot, Stephane; Hollander, Anthony P.; Buschmann, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Cartilage repair strategies aim to resurface a lesion with osteochondral tissue resembling native cartilage, but a variety of repair tissues are usually observed. Histology is an important structural outcome that could serve as an interim measure of efficacy in randomized controlled clinical studies. The purpose of this article is to propose guidelines for standardized histoprocessing and unbiased evaluation of animal tissues and human biopsies. Methods were compiled from a literature review, and illustrative data were added. In animal models, treatments are usually administered to acute defects created in healthy tissues, and the entire joint can be analyzed at multiple postoperative time points. In human clinical therapy, treatments are applied to developed lesions, and biopsies are obtained, usually from a subset of patients, at a specific time point. In striving to standardize evaluation of structural endpoints in cartilage repair studies, 5 variables should be controlled: 1) location of biopsy/sample section, 2) timing of biopsy/sample recovery, 3) histoprocessing, 4) staining, and 5) blinded evaluation with a proper control group. Histological scores, quantitative histomorphometry of repair tissue thickness, percentage of tissue staining for collagens and glycosaminoglycan, polarized light microscopy for collagen fibril organization, and subchondral bone integration/structure are all relevant outcome measures that can be collected and used to assess the efficacy of novel therapeutics. Standardized histology methods could improve statistical analyses, help interpret and validate noninvasive imaging outcomes, and permit cross-comparison between studies. Currently, there are no suitable substitutes for histology in evaluating repair tissue quality and cartilaginous character. PMID:26069577

  1. “Evaluation of sealing ability of MM-MTA, Endosequence, and biodentine as furcation repair materials: UV spectrophotometric analysis”

    PubMed Central

    Jeevani, Eppala; Jayaprakash, Thumu; Bolla, Nagesh; Vemuri, Sayesh; Sunil, Chukka Ram; Kalluru, Rama S

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the sealing ability of MICRO-MEGA Mineral Trioxide Aggregate, Endosequence, Biodentine as furcation repair materials using a dye extraction leakage method. Materials and Methods: Forty mandibular molars were randomly divided according to the material used for perforation repair. Group I- (left unsealed) control, Group II-MICRO-MEGA Mineral Trioxide Aggregate, Group III - Endosequence, Group IV - Biodentine. All samples were subjected to orthograde and retrograde methylene blue dye challenge followed by dye extraction with 65% nitric acid. Samples were then analyzed using Ultra violet (UV) Visible Spectrophotometer. Results: Biodentine showed highest dye absorbance, whereas Endosequence showed lowest dye absorbance when compared with other repair materials. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, it was observed that Endosequence showed better sealing ability when compared with other root repair materials. PMID:25125846

  2. Fibrin glue repair leads to enhanced axonal elongation during early peripheral nerve regeneration in an in vivo mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Koulaxouzidis, Georgios; Reim, Gernot; Witzel, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Microsurgical suturing is the gold standard of nerve coaptation. Although literature on the usefulness of fibrin glue as an alternative is becoming increasingly available, it remains contradictory. Furthermore, no data exist on how both repair methods might influence the morphological aspects (arborization; branching) of early peripheral nerve regeneration. We used the sciatic nerve transplantation model in thy-1 yellow fluorescent protein mice (YFP; n = 10). Pieces of nerve (1cm) were grafted from YFP-negative mice (n = 10) into those expressing YFP. We performed microsuture coaptations on one side and used fibrin glue for repair on the contralateral side. Seven days after grafting, the regeneration distance, the percentage of regenerating and arborizing axons, the number of branches per axon, the coaptation failure rate, the gap size at the repair site and the time needed for surgical repair were all investigated. Fibrin glue repair resulted in regenerating axons travelling further into the distal nerve. It also increased the percentage of arborizing axons. No coaptation failure was detected. Gap sizes were comparable in both groups. Fibrin glue significantly reduced surgical repair time. The increase in regeneration distance, even after the short period of time, is in line with the results of others that showed faster axonal regeneration after fibrin glue repair. The increase in arborizing axons could be another explanation for better functional and electrophysiological results after fibrin glue repair. Fibrin glue nerve coaptation seems to be a promising alternative to microsuture repair. PMID:26330844

  3. UNCOMPLICATED MIDVAGINAL VESICO-VAGINAL FISTULA REPAIR IN IBADAN: A COMPARISON OF THE ABDOMINAL AND VAGINAL ROUTES

    PubMed Central

    Morhason-Bello, I. O.; Ojengbede, O. A.; Adedokun, B. O.; Okunlola, M. A; Oladokun, A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Obstetric fistula is a resultant effect of prolonged obstructed labour. The best surgical management of simple uncomplicated fistula determines the outcome of care. Objective: To compare outcome of uncomplicated mid-vaginal fistula between vaginal and abdominal route of repair. Materials and Method: This was a hospital based retrospective study conducted at the University College Hospital, Ibadan from January, 2000 till December, 2006. Result: Of the 71 midvaginal fistulae managed, 40.8% had abdominal repair while the remainder were through vaginal approach. The overall repair success rate was 79.2% with comparable outcome in both groups-78.3% for the abdominal and 80% for the vaginal group (p=0.999). The duration of hospital stay did not differ significantly between the groups (p=0.972). Post operative complications were found in 41.4% of the abdominal group compared to none in the vaginal group (p<0.001). The complications were failed repair (20.7%) and urinary tract infection (20.7%). The mean estimated blood loss was 465.5ml in the abdominal group compared to 332.9ml for the vaginal group (p=0.303). Conclusion: Despite the comparable surgical repair outcome of the two methods, the vaginal approach is associated with lesser blood loss and lower risk of post-operative complications. It is recommended that the vaginal route should be employed in the repair of uncomplicated midvaginal fistula unless there are other compelling reasons to the contrary. PMID:25161453

  4. Popliteal Artery Aneurysm Repair in the Endovascular Era

    PubMed Central

    Ronchey, Sonia; Pecoraro, Felice; Alberti, Vittorio; Serrao, Eugenia; Orrico, Matteo; Lachat, Mario; Mangialardi, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To compare outcomes of popliteal artery aneurysm (PAA) repair by endovascular treatment, great saphenous vein (GSV) bypass, and prosthetic bypass. Single center retrospective analysis of patients presenting PAA from 2000 to 2013. Patients were divided into endovascular treatment (group A); GSV bypass (group B); and prosthetic graft bypass (group C). Outcomes were technical success, perioperative mortality, and morbidity. Survival, primary and secondary patency, and freedom from reintervention rate were estimated. Differences in ankle-brachial index (ABI), in-hospital length of stay (InH-Los), red blood cell (RBC) transfusion, and limb loss were reported. Mean follow-up was 49 (median: 35; 1–145; SD 42) months. Sixty-seven patients were included; 25 in group A, 28 in group B, and 14 in group C. PAA was symptomatic in 23 (34%) cases. Technical success was 100%. No perioperative death occurred. Three (4.5%) perioperative complications were reported with no significant difference between groups (P = 0.866). Five-years estimated survival was 78%. Estimated 5-years primary patency for groups A, B, and C was 71%, 81%, and 69%, respectively (P = 0.19). Estimated 5-years secondary patency for groups A, B, and C was 88%, 85%, and 84% (P = 0.85). Estimated 5-years freedom from reintervention for groups A, B, and C was 62%, 84%, and 70%, respectively (P = 0.16). A significant difference between preoperative ABI versus postoperative ABI was observed (P = 0.001). InH-LoS was significantly shorter in group A (P < 0.001). RBC transfusions were required significantly less in group A when compared to group C (P = 0.045). Overall limb salvage was achieved in all but 1 patient. PAA repair has good early and long-term outcomes with different treatment options. Endovascular treatment was not inferior to surgical repair with a reduced InH-LoS and RBC transfusion. It can be successfully employed even in nonelective setting. A randomized controlled

  5. Group Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahler, Clarence A.

    1971-01-01

    This article reviews the major concerns of group counseling and differentiates among group guidance, group counseling, and group therapy. It also evaluates the research status of group counseling and presents implications for the future of this approach. Comment by Carl E. Thoresen follows. (Author)

  6. An Exploration of Technical Troubleshooting Expertise in Design, Manufacturing, and Repair Contexts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flesher, Jeffrey W.

    1993-01-01

    Engineers and technicians completed a knowledge inventory and performed an electronics troubleshooting activity in three context groups (repair, design, production). Results showed general lack of troubleshooting preparation in all groups; common troubleshooting processes among experts; and deemphasis of theoretical knowledge among production and…

  7. DNA excision repair in cell extracts from human cell lines exhibiting hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hansson, J.; Keyse, S.M.; Lindahl, T.; Wood, R.D. )

    1991-07-01

    Whole cell extracts from human lymphoid cell lines can perform in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids damaged by agents including UV or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cis-DDP). Extracts from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells are defective in repair synthesis. We have now studied in vitro DNA repair synthesis using extracts from lymphoblastoid cell lines representing four human hereditary syndromes with increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. Extracts of cell lines from individuals with the sunlight-sensitive disorders dysplastic nevus syndrome or Cockayne's syndrome (complementation groups A and B) showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids with UV photoproducts. This is consistent with in vivo measurements of the overall DNA repair capacity in such cell lines. A number of extracts were prepared from two cell lines representing the variant form of XP (XP-V). Half of the extracts prepared showed normal levels of in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing UV lesions, but the remainder of the extracts from the same cell lines showed deficient repair synthesis, suggesting the possibility of an unusually labile excision repair protein in XP-V. Fanconi's anemia (FA) cells show cellular hypersensitivity to cross-linking agents including cis-DDP. Extracts from cell lines belonging to two different complementation groups of FA showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing cis-DDP or UV adducts. Thus, there does not appear to be an overall excision repair defect in FA, but the data do not exclude a defect in the repair of interstrand DNA cross-links.

  8. Verapamil inhibits scar formation after peripheral nerve repair in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Han, A-chao; Deng, Jing-xiu; Huang, Qi-shun; Zheng, Huai-yuan; Zhou, Pan; Liu, Zhi-wei; Chen, Zhen-bing

    2016-01-01

    The calcium channel blocker, verapamil, has been shown to reduce scar formation by inhibiting fibroblast adhesion and proliferation in vitro. It was not clear whether topical application of verapamil after surgical repair of the nerve in vivo could inhibit the formation of excessive scar tissue. In this study, the right sciatic nerve of adult Sprague-Dawley rats was transected and sutured with No. 10-0 suture. The stoma was wrapped with gelfoam soaked with verapamil solution for 4 weeks. Compared with the control group (stoma wrapped with gelfoam soaked with physiological saline), the verapamil application inhibited the secretion of extracellular matrix from fibroblasts in vivo, suppressed type I and III collagen secretion and increased the total number of axons and the number of myelinated axons. These findings suggest that verapamil could reduce the formation of scar tissue and promote axon growth after peripheral nerve repair. PMID:27127494

  9. Image-Guided Techniques Improve the Short-Term Outcome of Autologous Osteochondral Cartilage Repair Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Devlin, Steven M.; Hurtig, Mark B.; Waldman, Stephen D.; Rudan, John F.; Bardana, Davide D.; Stewart, A. James

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Autologous osteochondral cartilage repair is a valuable reconstruction option for cartilage defects, but the accuracy to harvest and deliver osteochondral grafts remains problematic. We investigated whether image-guided methods (optically guided and template guided) can improve the outcome of these procedures. Design: Fifteen sheep were operated to create traumatic chondral injuries in each knee. After 4 months, the chondral defect in one knee was repaired using (a) conventional approach, (b) optically guided method, or (c) template-guided method. For both image-guided groups, harvest and delivery sites were preoperatively planned using custom-made software. During optically guided surgery, instrument position and orientation were tracked and superimposed onto the surgical plan. For the template-guided group, plastic templates were manufactured to allow an exact fit between template and the joint anatomy. Cylindrical holes within the template guided surgical tools according to the plan. Three months postsurgery, both knees were harvested and computed tomography scans were used to compare the reconstructed versus the native pre-injury joint surfaces. For each repaired defect, macroscopic (International Cartilage Repair Society [ICRS]) and histological repair (ICRS II) scores were assessed. Results: Three months after repair surgery, both image-guided surgical approaches resulted in significantly better histology scores compared with the conventional approach (improvement by 55%, P < 0.02). Interestingly, there were no significant differences found in cartilage surface reconstruction and macroscopic scores between the image-guided and the conventional surgeries. PMID:26069658

  10. The role of n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate in the repair of traumatic diaphragmatic injuries

    PubMed Central

    Bas, Gurhan; Ozkan, Orhan Veli; Alimoglu, Orhan; Eryilmaz, Ramazan; Sahin, Mustafa; Okan, Ismail; Cevikbas, Ugur

    2015-01-01

    Diaphragmatic injuries either by blunt or penetrating trauma require prompt surgical intervention and are often exigent to repair. N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (n-butyl-2-CA) is a tissue adhesive which has gained wide application in many areas of surgery including emergency. To repair the extensive injuries of the diaphragm it may be necessary the use of synthetic mesh by fixing it with sutures or staples. The use of tissue adhesives may circumvent the potential problems associated with mesh fixation. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of tissue adhesives usage for mesh fixation in diaphragmatic injury repair. Twenty-four rats were divided into 3 groups each of them containing 8 rats. A 1- cm diaphragmatic defect was created in all rats. The defect was repaired by polypropylene suture in Group I, by mesh fixed with sutures in group II and by mesh fixed with n-butyl-2-CA in group III. The rats were sacrificed after 1 month. The episode of hernia and the adhesions were assessed by adhesion density score. Also, the abscess and inflammation in the repaired tissue were evaluated microscopically. The Kruskal-Wallis test was performed for the histopathological analysis. No diaphragmatic hernia was detected in any group. While Group III had higher adhesion density scores than group I (P: 0.027), there were no differences between group III and II (P: 0.317) and group II and I (P = 0.095) regarding adhesion density scores. The inflammation grade was higher in group III than group I and II (P < 0.001) and was higher in group II than group I (P < 0.05). There was no differences between each groups, concerning microabcsess formation (P > 0.05). Repair of traumatic diaphragmatic injury in penetrating wound, with polypropylene mesh fixed by n-butyl-2-CA in rats appears to be as efficacious and safe as conventional methods in early period. However, further experimental and clinical study are needed to compare the long-term results of adhesive mesh repair with those of

  11. Guidelines for the Design and Conduct of Clinical Studies in Knee Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Mithoefer, Kai; Saris, Daniel B.F.; Farr, Jack; Kon, Elizaveta; Zaslav, Kenneth; Cole, Brian J.; Ranstam, Jonas; Yao, Jian; Shive, Matthew; Levine, David; Dalemans, Wilfried; Brittberg, Mats

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To summarize current clinical research practice and develop methodological standards for objective scientific evaluation of knee cartilage repair procedures and products. Design: A comprehensive literature review was performed of high-level original studies providing information relevant for the design of clinical studies on articular cartilage repair in the knee. Analysis of cartilage repair publications and synopses of ongoing trials were used to identify important criteria for the design, reporting, and interpretation of studies in this field. Results: Current literature reflects the methodological limitations of the scientific evidence available for articular cartilage repair. However, clinical trial databases of ongoing trials document a trend suggesting improved study designs and clinical evaluation methodology. Based on the current scientific information and standards of clinical care, detailed methodological recommendations were developed for the statistical study design, patient recruitment, control group considerations, study endpoint definition, documentation of results, use of validated patient-reported outcome instruments, and inclusion and exclusion criteria for the design and conduct of scientifically sound cartilage repair study protocols. A consensus statement among the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) and contributing authors experienced in clinical trial design and implementation was achieved. Conclusions: High-quality clinical research methodology is critical for the optimal evaluation of current and new cartilage repair technologies. In addition to generally applicable principles for orthopedic study design, specific criteria and considerations apply to cartilage repair studies. Systematic application of these criteria and considerations can facilitate study designs that are scientifically rigorous, ethical, practical, and appropriate for the question(s) being addressed in any given cartilage repair research project

  12. Erosion of repaired exstrophy bladder by a large vesical calculus

    PubMed Central

    Hai, Abdul; Sinha, Arvind; Bisht, Mayank; Gola, Neelkamal

    2011-01-01

    Formation of stones in repaired exstrophy bladder is common; however, erosion of stone through the repaired bladder and anterior abdominal wall has never been reported. We report one such case of erosion after three years of repair. PMID:21897570

  13. 40 CFR 61.242-10 - Standards: Delay of repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... repair for valves will be allowed if: (1) The owner or operator demonstrates that emissions of purged... delay of repair, and (2) When repair procedures are effected, the purged material is collected...

  14. 40 CFR 60.482-9 - Standards: Delay of repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... purged material resulting from immediate repair are greater than the fugitive emissions likely to result from delay of repair, and (2) When repair procedures are effected, the purged material is collected...

  15. International congress on DNA damage and repair: Book of abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This document contains the abstracts of 105 papers presented at the Congress. Topics covered include the Escherichia coli nucleotide excision repair system, DNA repair in malignant transformations, defective DNA repair, and gene regulation. (TEM)

  16. AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP, DETAIL OF FABRICATING PRESS IN EAST END ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP, DETAIL OF FABRICATING PRESS IN EAST END OF MAIN WING, WITH SCALE. - Cedar City Automotive Repair Shop, Automotive Repair Shop, 820 North Main Street, Cedar City, Iron County, UT

  17. AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP, DETAIL OF MILLS COAL BOILER WITH SCREWFEED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP, DETAIL OF MILLS COAL BOILER WITH SCREW-FEED COAL HOPPER ON RIGHT SIDE. - Cedar City Automotive Repair Shop, Automotive Repair Shop, 820 North Main Street, Cedar City, Iron County, UT

  18. AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP, INTERIOR VIEW TO SOUTHEAST, DOORWAYS TO SHOP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP, INTERIOR VIEW TO SOUTHEAST, DOORWAYS TO SHOP OFFICE AND SOUTH WING. - Cedar City Automotive Repair Shop, Automotive Repair Shop, 820 North Main Street, Cedar City, Iron County, UT

  19. AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP, INTERIOR VIEW TO SOUTHEAST, DOORWAYS TO SHOP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP, INTERIOR VIEW TO SOUTHEAST, DOORWAYS TO SHOP OFFICE AND SOUTH WING, WITH SCALE. - Cedar City Automotive Repair Shop, Automotive Repair Shop, 820 North Main Street, Cedar City, Iron County, UT

  20. AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP, SLIDING DOOR LEADING TO BOILER ROOM ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP, SLIDING DOOR LEADING TO BOILER ROOM ON SOUTH SIDE OF SOUTH WING, WITH SCALE. - Cedar City Automotive Repair Shop, Automotive Repair Shop, 820 North Main Street, Cedar City, Iron County, UT

  1. AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP, DETAIL OF BUILDING CORNER (MAIN WING) SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP, DETAIL OF BUILDING CORNER (MAIN WING) SHOWING WOOD EAVE AND STUCCO RAKEBOARD ON GABLE END. - Cedar City Automotive Repair Shop, Automotive Repair Shop, 820 North Main Street, Cedar City, Iron County, UT

  2. AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP, DETAIL OF MILLS COAL BOILER WITH SCREWFEED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP, DETAIL OF MILLS COAL BOILER WITH SCREW-FEED COAL HOPPER ON RIGHT SIDE, WITH SCALE. - Cedar City Automotive Repair Shop, Automotive Repair Shop, 820 North Main Street, Cedar City, Iron County, UT

  3. Lube rack of Automotive and Tractor Repair Shops with Warehousefield ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Lube rack of Automotive and Tractor Repair Shops with Warehouse-field Equipment Repair Shop Building's wall to the right, looking from the south - Kekaha Sugar Company, Automotive and Tractor Repair Shops, 8315 Kekaha Road, Kekaha, Kauai County, HI

  4. AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP, DETAIL OF BUILDING CORNER (MAIN WING) SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP, DETAIL OF BUILDING CORNER (MAIN WING) SHOWING WOOD EAVE AND STUCCO RAKEBOARD ON GABLE END, WITH SCALE. - Cedar City Automotive Repair Shop, Automotive Repair Shop, 820 North Main Street, Cedar City, Iron County, UT

  5. AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP, SLIDING DOOR LEADING TO BOILER ROOM ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP, SLIDING DOOR LEADING TO BOILER ROOM ON SOUTH SIDE OF SOUTH WING. - Cedar City Automotive Repair Shop, Automotive Repair Shop, 820 North Main Street, Cedar City, Iron County, UT

  6. 40 CFR 63.1005 - Leak repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... successful repair of the leak. (3) Maximum instrument reading measured by Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60... replacing the existing seal design with a new system that the owner or operator has determined will provide... delayed” and the reason for the delay if a leak is not repaired within 15 calendar days after discovery...

  7. Robot Service and Repair. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittsburg State Univ., KS. Kansas Vocational Curriculum Dissemination Center.

    This document is a teacher's guide for teaching a course on robot service and repair. The guide is organized in four units covering the following topics: introduction to robots, power supply, robot control systems, and service and repair. Each unit contains several lesson plans on the unit topic. Lesson plans consist of objectives, tools and…

  8. Robot Service and Repair. Student Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittsburg State Univ., KS. Kansas Vocational Curriculum Dissemination Center.

    This document is a student guide for a course on robot service and repair. It is organized in four units covering the following topics: introduction to robots, power supply, robot control systems, and service and repair. Each unit contains several lesson plans on the unit topic. Lesson plans consist of lesson objectives, lists of teaching aids and…

  9. Thermal protection system flight repair kit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A thermal protection system (TPS) flight repair kit required for use on a flight of the Space Transportation System is defined. A means of making TPS repairs in orbit by the crew via extravehicular activity is discussed. A cure in place ablator, a precured ablator (large area application), and packaging design (containers for mixing and dispensing) for the TPS are investigated.

  10. Repairing high-temperature glazed tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ecord, G. M.; Schomburg, C.

    1981-01-01

    Tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) mixture fills chips and cracks in glazed tile surface. Filler is made by mixing hydrolyzed TEOS, silicon tetraboride powder, and pulverized tile material. Repaired tiles survived testing by intense acoustic emissions, arc jets, and intense heat radiation. Repair is reliable and rapid, performed in 1-1 1/2 hours with tile in any or orientation.

  11. 40 CFR 63.1024 - Leak repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... reading measured by Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A at the time the leak is successfully repaired... detected. First attempt at repair for pumps includes, but is not limited to, tightening the packing gland... the bonnet bolts, and/or tightening the packing gland nuts, and/or injecting lubricant into...

  12. 40 CFR 63.1024 - Leak repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... reading measured by Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A at the time the leak is successfully repaired... detected. First attempt at repair for pumps includes, but is not limited to, tightening the packing gland... the bonnet bolts, and/or tightening the packing gland nuts, and/or injecting lubricant into...

  13. 40 CFR 63.1024 - Leak repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... reading measured by Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A at the time the leak is successfully repaired... detected. First attempt at repair for pumps includes, but is not limited to, tightening the packing gland... the bonnet bolts, and/or tightening the packing gland nuts, and/or injecting lubricant into...

  14. Self repairing composites for drone air vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dry, Carolyn

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this effort was to demonstrate the feasibility of impact-initiated delivery of repair chemicals through hollow fiber architectures embedded within graphite fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites, representative of advanced drone aircraft component material systems. Self-repairing structures through coupon and elements were demonstrated, and evaluated.

  15. 30 CFR 56.6801 - Vehicle repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vehicle repair. 56.6801 Section 56.6801 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Vehicle repair. Vehicles containing explosive material and oxidizers shall not be taken into a...

  16. 30 CFR 57.6801 - Vehicle repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Vehicle repair. 57.6801 Section 57.6801 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... and Underground § 57.6801 Vehicle repair. Vehicles containing explosive material and oxidizers...

  17. 30 CFR 57.6801 - Vehicle repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vehicle repair. 57.6801 Section 57.6801 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... and Underground § 57.6801 Vehicle repair. Vehicles containing explosive material and oxidizers...

  18. 30 CFR 56.6801 - Vehicle repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Vehicle repair. 56.6801 Section 56.6801 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Vehicle repair. Vehicles containing explosive material and oxidizers shall not be taken into a...

  19. 30 CFR 57.6801 - Vehicle repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Vehicle repair. 57.6801 Section 57.6801 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... and Underground § 57.6801 Vehicle repair. Vehicles containing explosive material and oxidizers...

  20. 30 CFR 56.6801 - Vehicle repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Vehicle repair. 56.6801 Section 56.6801 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Vehicle repair. Vehicles containing explosive material and oxidizers shall not be taken into a...

  1. Self-repairing composites for airplane components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dry, Carolyn

    2008-03-01

    Durability and damage tolerance criteria drives the design of most composite structures. Those criteria could be altered by developing structure that repairs itself from impact damage. This is a technology for increasing damage tolerance for impact damage. Repaired damage would enable continued function and prevent further degradation to catastrophic failure in the case of an aircraft application. Further, repaired damage would enable applications to be utilized without reduction in performance due to impacts. Self repairing structures are designed to incorporate hollow fibers, which will release a repairing agent when the structure is impacted, so that the repairing agent will fill delaminations, voids and cracks in les than one minute, thus healing matrix voids. The intent is to modify the durability and damage tolerance criteria by incorporation of self-healing technologies to reduce overall weight: The structure will actually remain lighter than current conventional design procedures allow. Research objective(s) were: Prove that damage can be repaired to within 80-90% of original flexural strength in less than one minute, in laminates that are processed at 300-350F typical for aircraft composites. These were successfully met. The main focus was on testing of elements in compression after impact and a larger component in shear at Natural Process Design, Inc. Based on these results the advantages purposes are assessed. The results show potential; with self repairing composites, compressive strength is maintained sufficiently so that less material can be used as per durability and damage tolerance, yielding a lighter structure.

  2. 40 CFR 63.1024 - Leak repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... reading measured by Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A at the time the leak is successfully repaired... at repair for valves includes, but is not limited to, tightening the bonnet bolts, and/or replacing the bonnet bolts, and/or tightening the packing gland nuts, and/or injecting lubricant into...

  3. 40 CFR 63.1005 - Leak repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... successful repair of the leak. (3) Maximum instrument reading measured by Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60... temperature. First attempt at repair for valves includes, but is not limited to, tightening the bonnet bolts, and/or replacing the bonnet bolts, and/or tightening the packing gland nuts, and/or...

  4. Railroad track repairs are complete at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Railroad track repairs have been completed at Kennedy Space Center. This section of track is located on KSC property, just north of the NASA Causeway in the KSC Industrial Area. The repairs were required following the minor derailment of two solid rocket booster segment cars on July 18.

  5. Experiment K-7-29: Connective Tissue Studies. Part 3; Rodent Tissue Repair: Skeletal Muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauber, W.; Fritz, V. K.; Burkovskaya, T. E.; Ilyina-Kakueva, E. I.

    1994-01-01

    Myofiber injury-repair was studied in the rat gastrocnemius following a crush injury to the lower leg prior to flight in order to understand if the regenerative responses of muscles are altered by the lack of gravitational forces during Cosmos 2044 flight. After 14 days of flight, the gastrocnemius muscle was removed from the 5 injured flight rodents and various Earth-based treatment groups for comparison. The Earth-based animals consisted of three groups of five rats with injured muscles from a simulated, tail-suspended, and vivarium as well as an uninjured basal group. The gastrocnemius muscle from each was evaluated by histochemical and immunohistochemical techniques to document myofiber, vascular, and connective tissue alterations following injury. In general the repair process was somewhat similar in all injured muscle samples with regard to extracellular matrix organization and myofiber regeneration. Small and large myofibers were present with a newly organized extracellular matrix indicative of myogenesis and muscle regeneration. In the tail-suspended animals, a more complete repair was observed with no enlarged area of non-muscle cells or matrix material visible. In contrast, the muscle samples from the flight animals were less well differentiated with more macrophages and blood vessels in the repair region but small myofibers and proteoglycans, nevertheless, were in their usual configuration. Thus, myofiber repair did vary in muscles from the different groups, but for the most part, resulted in functional muscle tissue.

  6. DNA Triplet Repeat Expansion and Mismatch Repair

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Ravi R.; Pluciennik, Anna; Napierala, Marek; Wells, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair is a conserved antimutagenic pathway that maintains genomic stability through rectification of DNA replication errors and attenuation of chromosomal rearrangements. Paradoxically, mutagenic action of mismatch repair has been implicated as a cause of triplet repeat expansions that cause neurological diseases such as Huntington disease and myotonic dystrophy. This mutagenic process requires the mismatch recognition factor MutSβ and the MutLα (and/or possibly MutLγ) endonuclease, and is thought to be triggered by the transient formation of unusual DNA structures within the expanded triplet repeat element. This review summarizes the current knowledge of DNA mismatch repair involvement in triplet repeat expansion, which encompasses in vitro biochemical findings, cellular studies, and various in vivo transgenic animal model experiments. We present current mechanistic hypotheses regarding mismatch repair protein function in mediating triplet repeat expansions and discuss potential therapeutic approaches targeting the mismatch repair pathway. PMID:25580529

  7. Protein oxidation, UVA and human DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Karran, Peter; Brem, Reto

    2016-08-01

    Solar UVB is carcinogenic. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) counteracts the carcinogenicity of UVB by excising potentially mutagenic UVB-induced DNA lesions. Despite this capacity for DNA repair, non-melanoma skin cancers and apparently normal sun-exposed skin contain huge numbers of mutations that are mostly attributable to unrepaired UVB-induced DNA lesions. UVA is about 20-times more abundant than UVB in incident sunlight. It does cause some DNA damage but this does not fully account for its biological impact. The effects of solar UVA are mediated by its interactions with cellular photosensitizers that generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induce oxidative stress. The proteome is a significant target for damage by UVA-induced ROS. In cultured human cells, UVA-induced oxidation of DNA repair proteins inhibits DNA repair. This article addresses the possible role of oxidative stress and protein oxidation in determining DNA repair efficiency - with particular reference to NER and skin cancer risk. PMID:27324272

  8. Repair Development for a Composite Cryotank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Sarah B.; Danley, Susan E.; Caraccio, Anne J.; Cheshire, Brian C.; Sampson, Jeffrey W.; Taylor, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    The Composite Cryotank Technologies and Demonstration Project is working to advance the technologies for composite cryogenic propellant tanks at diameters suitable for future heavy lift vehicles and other in-space applications. The main goals of the project are to reduce weight and cost. One aspect of this project has focused on damage evaluation and repair development. Test panels have been impacted, repaired, and tested. Several repair methods were used to compare their effectiveness at restoring the integrity of the composite. Panels were evaluated by nondestructive evaluations at several points during the process to assess the damage and repair. The testing performed and the results and conclusions from the nondestructive evaluations and the destructive testing will be discussed. These results will lead to further development of inspection techniques and repair methods.

  9. Anti-Inflammatory Strategies in Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Pizzute, Tyler

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage defects are normally concomitant with posttraumatic inflammation and pose a major challenge in cartilage repair. Due to the avascular nature of cartilage and its inability to surmount an inflammatory response, the cartilage is easily attacked by proinflammatory factors and oxidative stress; if left untreated, osteoarthritis may develop. Suppression of inflammation has always been a crux for cartilage repair. Pharmacological drugs have been successfully applied in cartilage repair; however, they cannot optimally work alone. This review article will summarize current pharmacological drugs and their application in cartilage repair. The development of extracellular matrix-based scaffolds and preconditioned tissue-specific stem cells will be emphasized because both of these tissue engineering components could contribute to an enhanced ability not only for cartilage regeneration but also for anti-inflammation. These strategies could be combined to boost cartilage repair under inflammatory conditions. PMID:24846478

  10. Functional characterization of dna repair proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D M III

    2000-02-16

    Genetic material (DNA) is susceptible to spontaneous decomposition, to attack by reactive chemicals produced naturally in cells, and to assault by environmental and food mutagens. DNA modifications can lead to permanent genetic changes that promote human disease. To combat the deleterious effects of DNA damage, organisms are equipped with DNA repair systems. The focus of our investigations has been to elucidate the details of mammalian DNA repair. These studies have provided important insights into the relationship of DNA repair to human disease and the genetic factors that contribute to individual susceptibility to the harmful effects of environmental mutagens (e.g. ionizing radiation), and have established a framework for designing more effective anti-cancer treatment schemes. To investigate questions related to DNA repair, its mechanism(s) and linkage to disease development, the authors are employing an array of molecular, cellular, biochemical and structural approaches. These complementary experimental techniques have permitted a detailed analysis into various processes of human DNA repair.

  11. A mutation in the XPB/ERCC3 DNA repair transcription gene, associated with trichothiodystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Weeda, G.; Donker, I.; Vermeulen, W.

    1997-02-01

    Trichothiodystrophy (TTD) is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by sulfur-deficient brittle hair and nails, mental retardation, impaired sexual development, and ichthyosis. Photosensitivity has been reported in {approximately}50% of the cases, but no skin cancer is associated with TTD. Virtually all photosensitive TTD patients have a deficiency in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) of UV-induced DNA damage that is indistinguishable from that of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation group D (XP-D) patients. DNA repair defects in XP-D are associated with two additional, quite different diseases; XP, a sun-sensitive and cancer-prone repair disorder, and Cockayne syndrome (CS), a photosensitive condition characterized by physical and mental retardation and wizened facial appearance. One photosensitive TTD case constitutes a new repair-deficient complementation group, TTD-A. Remarkably, both TTD-A and XP-D defects are associated with subunits of TFIIH, a basal transcription factor with a second function in DNA repair. Thus, mutations in TFIIH components may, on top of a repair defect, also cause transcriptional insufficiency, which may explain part of the non-XP clinical features of TTD. To date, three patients with the remarkable conjunction of XP and CS but not TM have been assigned to XP complementation group B (XP-B). Here we present the characterization of the NER defect in two mild TTD patients (TTD6VI and TTD4VI) and confirm the assignment to X-PB. The causative mutation was found to be a single base substitution resulting in a missense mutation (T119P) in a region of the XPB protein. These findings define a third TTD complementation group, extend the clinical heterogeneity associated with XP-B, stress the exclusive relationship between TTD and mutations in subunits of repair/transcription factor TFIIH, and strongly support the concept of {open_quotes}transcription syndromes.{close_quotes} 46 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Repairing Posteromedial Meniscocapsular Separation: A Technique Using Inside-Out Meniscal Repair Needles

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Anant; Usman, Sajeer; Sabnis, Bhushan; Kini, Abhishek

    2016-01-01

    Posteromedial meniscocapsular separation of the knee has received renewed interest, with many articles describing a high incidence in association with anterior cruciate ligament injury. Various techniques have been described to address these lesions using all-inside meniscal repair sutures or using rotator cuff repair instruments through the posteromedial portal. Most orthopaedic surgeons are accustomed to using the “inside-out” meniscal repair technique with a double-armed suture. This technique is cost-effective and, in our opinion, more efficient in repairing such tears. We present our technique of repairing peripheral meniscocapsular lesions using an inside-out meniscal repair system. We believe that this technique is easily reproducible, is less time-consuming, and ensures a good “bite” of the capsular tissue, producing a robust repair. PMID:27073773

  13. Open Repair Versus Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair in Multiple-Injured Patients: Observations From a Level-1 Trauma Center

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Stephan; Breitenbach, Ingo; Bolzen, Philipp; Petri, Maximilian; Krettek, Christian; Teebken, Omke

    2015-01-01

    Background: Blunt trauma of the thoracic aorta is a rare but potentially life-threatening entity. Intimal tears are a domain of non-operative management, whereas all other types of lesions should be repaired urgently. There is now a clear trend favoring minimally invasive stent grafting over open surgical repair. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to retrospectively evaluate the mortality and morbidity with either treatment option. Therefore, a retrospective observational study was performed to compare two different treatment methods at two different time periods at one trauma center. Patients and Methods: Between 1977 and 2012, all severely injured patients referred to our level 1 trauma center were screened for blunt aortic injuries. We compared baseline characteristics, 30-day and overall mortality, morbidity, duration of intensive care treatment, procedure time, and transfusion of packed red blood between patients who underwent open surgical or stent repair. Results: During the observation period, 45 blunt aortic injuries were recorded. The average Injury Severity Score (ISS) was 41.8 (range 29 - 68). Twenty-five patients underwent Open Repair (OR), and another 20 patients were scheduled to emergency stent grafting. The 30-day mortality in the surgical and stent groups were 5/25 (20%) and 2/20 (10%), respectively. The average time for open surgery was 151 minutes; the mean time for stent grafting was 67 minutes (P = 0.001). Postoperative stay on the intensive care unit was between one and 59 days (median 10) in group one and between four and 50 days in group two (median 26)(P = 0.03). Patients undergoing OR required transfusion of 6.0 units of packed red cells in median; patients undergoing stent grafting required a median of 2.0 units of packed red cells (P < 0.001). In the stent grafting group, 30-day mortality was 10% (2/20). Conclusions: Due to more sophisticated diagnostic tools and surgical approaches, mortality and morbidity of blunt aortic

  14. INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES REVIEW & EVALUATION OF INTERNAL PIPELINE REPAIR TRIALS REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Robin Gordon; Bill Bruce; Ian Harris; Dennis Harwig; George Ritter; Bill Mohr; Matt Boring; Nancy Porter; Mike Sullivan; Chris Neary

    2004-09-01

    The two broad categories of fiber-reinforced composite liner repair and deposited weld metal repair technologies were reviewed and evaluated for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Evaluation trials were conducted on pipe sections with simulated corrosion damage repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liners, carbon fiber-reinforced composite liners, and weld deposition. Additional un-repaired pipe sections were evaluated in the virgin condition and with simulated damage. Hydrostatic failure pressures for pipe sections repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liner were only marginally greater than that of pipe sections without liners, indicating that this type of liner is generally ineffective at restoring the pressure containing capabilities of pipelines. Failure pressure for pipe repaired with carbon fiber-reinforced composite liner was greater than that of the un-repaired pipe section with damage, indicating that this type of liner is effective at restoring the pressure containing capability of pipe. Pipe repaired with weld deposition failed at pressures lower than that of un-repaired pipe in both the virgin and damaged conditions, indicating that this repair technology is less effective at restoring the pressure containing capability of pipe than a carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair. Physical testing indicates that carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair is the most promising technology evaluated to-date. Development of a comprehensive test plan for this process is recommended for use in the next phase of this project.

  15. Postreplication repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Resnick, M.A.; Boyce, J.; Cox, B.

    1981-04-01

    Postreplication events in logarithmically growing excision-defective mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were examined after low doses of ultraviolet light. Pulse-labeled deoxyribonucleic acid had interruptions, and when the cells were chased, the interruptions were no longer detected. Since the loss of interruptions was not associated with an exchange of pyrimidine dimers at a detection level of 10 to 20% of the induced dimers, it was concluded that postreplication repair in excision-defective mutants does not involve molecular recombination. Pyrimidine dimers were assayed by utilizing the ultraviolet-endonuclease activity in extracts of Micrococcus luteus and newly developed alkaline sucrose gradient techniques, which yielded chromosomal-size deoxyribonucleic acid after treatment of irradiated cells.

  16. Signaling Pathways in Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Mariani, Erminia; Pulsatelli, Lia; Facchini, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    In adult healthy cartilage, chondrocytes are in a quiescent phase characterized by a fine balance between anabolic and catabolic activities. In ageing, degenerative joint diseases and traumatic injuries of cartilage, a loss of homeostatic conditions and an up-regulation of catabolic pathways occur. Since cartilage differentiation and maintenance of homeostasis are finely tuned by a complex network of signaling molecules and biophysical factors, shedding light on these mechanisms appears to be extremely relevant for both the identification of pathogenic key factors, as specific therapeutic targets, and the development of biological approaches for cartilage regeneration. This review will focus on the main signaling pathways that can activate cellular and molecular processes, regulating the functional behavior of cartilage in both physiological and pathological conditions. These networks may be relevant in the crosstalk among joint compartments and increased knowledge in this field may lead to the development of more effective strategies for inducing cartilage repair. PMID:24837833

  17. Cardiac regeneration: epicardial mediated repair

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The hearts of lower vertebrates such as fish and salamanders display scarless regeneration following injury, although this feature is lost in adult mammals. The remarkable capacity of the neonatal mammalian heart to regenerate suggests that the underlying machinery required for the regenerative process is evolutionarily retained. Recent studies highlight the epicardial covering of the heart as an important source of the signalling factors required for the repair process. The developing epicardium is also a major source of cardiac fibroblasts, smooth muscle, endothelial cells and stem cells. Here, we examine animal models that are capable of scarless regeneration, the role of the epicardium as a source of cells, signalling mechanisms implicated in the regenerative process and how these mechanisms influence cardiomyocyte proliferation. We also discuss recent advances in cardiac stem cell research and potential therapeutic targets arising from these studies. PMID:26702046

  18. INTERNAL REPAIR OF GAS PIPLINES SURVEY OF OPERATOR EXPERIENCE AND INDUSTRY NEEDS REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Ian D. Harris

    2003-09-01

    A repair method that can be applied from the inside of a gas transmission pipeline (i.e., a trenchless repair) is an attractive alternative to conventional repair methods since the need to excavate the pipeline is precluded. This is particularly true for pipelines in environmentally sensitive and highly populated areas. The objectives of the project are to evaluate, develop, demonstrate, and validate internal repair methods for pipelines; develop a functional specification for an internal pipeline repair system; and prepare a recommended practice for internal repair of pipelines. The purpose of this survey is to better understand the needs and performance requirements of the natural gas transmission industry regarding internal repair. A total of fifty-six surveys were sent to pipeline operators. A total of twenty completed surveys were returned, representing a 36% response rate, which is considered very good given the fact that tailored surveys are known in the marketing industry to seldom attract more than a 10% response rate. The twenty survey responses produced the following principal conclusions: (1) Use of internal weld repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water (e.g., lakes and swamps) in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway crossings. All these areas tend to be very difficult and very costly if, and where, conventional excavated repairs may be currently used. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling (HDD) when a new bore must be created to solve a leak or other problem in a water/river crossing. (3) The typical travel distances required can be divided into three distinct groups: up to 305 m (1,000 ft.); between 305 m and 610 m (1,000 ft. and 2,000 ft.); and beyond 914 m (3,000 ft.). In concept, these groups require pig-based systems; despooled umbilical systems could be considered for the first two groups

  19. Articular cartilage repair with recombinant human type II collagen/polylactide scaffold in a preliminary porcine study.

    PubMed

    Muhonen, Virpi; Salonius, Eve; Haaparanta, Anne-Marie; Järvinen, Elina; Paatela, Teemu; Meller, Anna; Hannula, Markus; Björkman, Mimmi; Pyhältö, Tuomo; Ellä, Ville; Vasara, Anna; Töyräs, Juha; Kellomäki, Minna; Kiviranta, Ilkka

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of a novel recombinant human type II collagen/polylactide scaffold (rhCo-PLA) in the repair of full-thickness cartilage lesions with autologous chondrocyte implantation technique (ACI). The forming repair tissue was compared to spontaneous healing (spontaneous) and repair with a commercial porcine type I/III collagen membrane (pCo). Domestic pigs (4-month-old, n = 20) were randomized into three study groups and a circular full-thickness chondral lesion with a diameter of 8 mm was created in the right medial femoral condyle. After 3 weeks, the chondral lesions were repaired with either rhCo-PLA or pCo together with autologous chondrocytes, or the lesion was only debrided and left untreated for spontaneous repair. The repair tissue was evaluated 4 months after the second operation. Hyaline cartilage formed most frequently in the rhCo-PLA treatment group. Biomechanically, there was a trend that both treatment groups resulted in better repair tissue than spontaneous healing. Adverse subchondral bone reactions developed less frequently in the spontaneous group (40%) and the rhCo-PLA treated group (50%) than in the pCo control group (100%). However, no statistically significant differences were found between the groups. The novel rhCo-PLA biomaterial showed promising results in this proof-of-concept study, but further studies will be needed in order to determine its effectiveness in articular cartilage repair. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:745-753, 2016. PMID:26573959

  20. Comparison of robotic versus laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Waite, Kimberly E; Herman, Mark A; Doyle, Patrick J

    2016-09-01

    Despite growing popularity and potential advantages of robotics in general surgery, there is very little published data regarding robotic inguinal hernia repair. This study examines a single surgeon's early experience with robotic TAPP inguinal hernia repair compared with laparoscopic TAPP repair in terms of feasibility and cost. We performed a retrospective review of 63 consecutive patients (24 laparoscopic and 39 robotic) who underwent inguinal hernia repair between December 2012-December 2014 at a single institution by a single surgeon. Data examined included gender, age, BMI, operative times, recovery room times, pain scale ratings, and cost. Patient groups were the same in terms of age and BMI. The mean operative time (77.5 vs 60.7 min, p = 0.001) and room time (109.3 vs 93.0 min, p = 0.001) were significantly longer for the robotic vs the laparoscopic patients. Recovery room time (109.1 vs 133.5 min, p = 0.026) and average pain scores in recovery (2.5 vs 3.8, p = 0.02) were significantly less for the robotic group. The average direct cost of the laparoscopic group was $3216 compared with $3479 for the robotic group. The average contribution margin for the laparoscopic group was $2396 compared with $2489 for the robotic group. Robotic TAPP inguinal hernia repair had longer operative times, but patients spent less time in recovery and noted less pain than patients who underwent laparoscopic TAPP inguinal hernia repair. The direct cost and contribution margin are nearly equivalent. These results should allow the continued investigation of this technique without concern over excess cost. PMID:27112781

  1. Shuttle Repair Tools Automate Vehicle Maintenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    Successfully building, flying, and maintaining the space shuttles was an immensely complex job that required a high level of detailed, precise engineering. After each shuttle landed, it entered a maintenance, repair, and overhaul (MRO) phase. Each system was thoroughly checked and tested, and worn or damaged parts replaced, before the shuttle was rolled out for its next mission. During the MRO period, workers needed to record exactly what needed replacing and why, as well as follow precise guidelines and procedures in making their repairs. That meant traceability, and with it lots of paperwork. In 2007, the number of reports generated during electrical system repairs was getting out of hand-placing among the top three systems in terms of paperwork volume. Repair specialists at Kennedy Space Center were unhappy spending so much time at a desk and so little time actually working on the shuttle. "Engineers weren't spending their time doing technical work," says Joseph Schuh, an electrical engineer at Kennedy. "Instead, they were busy with repetitive, time-consuming processes that, while important in their own right, provided a low return on time invested." The strain of such inefficiency was bad enough that slow electrical repairs jeopardized rollout on several occasions. Knowing there had to be a way to streamline operations, Kennedy asked Martin Belson, a project manager with 30 years experience as an aerospace contractor, to co-lead a team in developing software that would reduce the effort required to document shuttle repairs. The result was System Maintenance Automated Repair Tasks (SMART) software. SMART is a tool for aggregating and applying information on every aspect of repairs, from procedures and instructions to a vehicle s troubleshooting history. Drawing on that data, SMART largely automates the processes of generating repair instructions and post-repair paperwork. In the case of the space shuttle, this meant that SMART had 30 years worth of operations

  2. [Results of ventral hernia repair: comparison of suture repair with mesh implantation (onlay vs sublay) using open and laparoscopic approach--prospective, randomized, multicenter study].

    PubMed

    Wéber, György; Horváth, Ors Péter

    2002-10-01

    Incisional hernias is a frequent complication following abdominal surgery, it develops in 11-20% of patients who had laparotomies. Different operative techniques are used for repair but results are often poor. In the absence of valid scientific data, there is no general agreement on the best surgical treatment. To provide evidence based surgery a nation-wide multi-center, prospective, randomized study is set up. The present study compares suture and mesh repairs in different positions, using open and laparoscopic approach to define standard indication for the treatment of incisional hernias. The study was started in March, 2002, with 23 surgical departments participating. Each report about 100 patients with incisional hernia repair. The 2300 consecutive patients (who are 18 to 70 years old) with primary incisional hernia or first recurrent umbilical hernia are randomized. Patients are divided in two groups. If the hernia is between 5-25 cm2 (Group I) they are selected at random either for prosthetic (sublay) or suture repair. In patients with a hernia larger than 25 cm2 (Group II) mesh is implanted at random as either sublay or onlay position using a computer randomization program. After a short learning period, in Group II the laparoscopic approach will also be randomized. Postoperative outcome, complications and recurrence are recorded. The study will run for five years. All collected data are sent to the coordinating center via internet to be entered into database. PMID:12474512

  3. Main factors providing specificity of repair enzymes.

    PubMed

    Nevinsky, G A

    2011-01-01

    Specific and nonspecific DNA complex formation with human uracil-DNA glycosylase, 8-oxoguanine-DNA glycosylase, and apurine/apyrimidine endonuclease, as well as with E. coli 8-oxoguanine-DNA glycosylase and RecA protein was analyzed using the method of stepwise increase in DNA-ligand complexity. It is shown that high affinity of these enzymes to any DNA (10(-4)-10(-8) M) is provided by a large number of weak additive contacts mainly with DNA internucleoside phosphate groups and in a less degree with bases of nucleotide links "covered" by protein globules. Enzyme interactions with specific DNA links are comparable in efficiency with weak unspecific contacts and provide only for one-two orders of affinity (10(-1)-10(-2) M), but these contacts are extremely important at stages of DNA and enzyme structural adaptation and catalysis proper. Only in the case of specific DNA individual for each enzyme alterations in DNA structure provide for efficient adjustment of reacting enzyme atoms and DNA orbitals with accuracy up to 10-15° and, as a result, for high reaction rate. Upon transition from nonspecific to specific DNA, reaction rate (k(cat)) increases by 4-8 orders of magnitude. Thus, stages of DNA and enzyme structural adaptation as well as catalysis proper are the basis of specificity of repair enzymes. PMID:21568843

  4. Group X

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, Susannah

    2007-08-16

    This project is currently under contract for research through the Department of Homeland Security until 2011. The group I was responsible for studying has to remain confidential so as not to affect the current project. All dates, reference links and authors, and other distinguishing characteristics of the original group have been removed from this report. All references to the name of this group or the individual splinter groups has been changed to 'Group X'. I have been collecting texts from a variety of sources intended for the use of recruiting and radicalizing members for Group X splinter groups for the purpose of researching the motivation and intent of leaders of those groups and their influence over the likelihood of group radicalization. This work included visiting many Group X websites to find information on splinter group leaders and finding their statements to new and old members. This proved difficult because the splinter groups of Group X are united in beliefs, but differ in public opinion. They are eager to tear each other down, prove their superiority, and yet remain anonymous. After a few weeks of intense searching, a list of eight recruiting texts and eight radicalizing texts from a variety of Group X leaders were compiled.

  5. Repair material properties for effective structural application

    SciTech Connect

    Mangat, P.S.; Limbachiya, M.C.

    1997-04-01

    Strength and engineering properties of three generic repair materials which are likely to influence long-term performance of repaired concrete structures were studied. Measured properties include strength, stiffness, shrinkage and creep deformations, together with the complete compressive stress-strain characteristics including post-cracking behavior. The repair materials considered in this investigation are commercially available and widely used. These included a high performance non-shrinkable concrete, a mineral based cementitious material with no additives or coarse aggregate size particles, and a cementitious mortar containing styrene acrylic copolymer with fiber additives. Performance comparisons are also made between these materials and plain concrete mixes of similar strength and stiffness, suitable for repair applications. The results show that shrinkage of the repair materials was significantly greater than the shrinkage of normal concrete. Moreover, the shrinkage of those modified with a polymer admixture was found to be very sensitive to the relative humidity of the exposure compared to normal concrete. The post-peak strain capacity of the material modified with a polymer admixture was markedly improved leading to a more pronounced falling branch of stress-strain curve. The ultimate stress level (at a maximum load) of specially formulated repair materials varies significantly, the lowest ultimate stress being recorded for the porous mineral-based material. The inclusion of aggregates improves the mechanical properties and dimensional stability of repair materials.

  6. Failure of distal biceps repair by gapping

    PubMed Central

    Copas, David; Watts, Adam C

    2016-01-01

    Background We describe the clinical, radiological and surgical findings of failed distal biceps repair by gapping and report the functional outcomes following revision repair. Methods A retrospective review of five consecutive patients was conducted. Patients presented with radial-sided forearm pain after their distal biceps fixation. All patients had less than 5 cm of retraction of the biceps muscle belly, a palpable tendon although the manoeuvre was painful with weakness on resisted supination. Flexed abducted supinated magnetic resonance imaging (FABS MRI) showed a gap between the distal end of the tendon and the footprint on the radial tuberosity. Results Mean FEA score at presentation was 44/100 (35 to 49). Mean time to re-operation was 18 months (range 4 months to 36 months). At revision, the distal end of the tendon was retracted and not making contact with the bone. All cases were revised to an in-bone endobutton repair. Mean postoperative Functional Elbow Assessment (FEA) scores undertaken at a mean of 14 months (range 5 months to 22 months) after revision improved to 95/100 (90 to 100). Conclusions Patients presenting with persistent radial sided forearm pain and weakness on provocative testing after distal biceps repair with a seemingly intact repair should be investigated with FABS MRI to look for evidence of failure of repair by gapping. Revision repair with an anatomic in-bone technique can lead to good results. PMID:27583018

  7. Laparoscopic repair of an incarcerated femoral hernia

    PubMed Central

    Pillay, Yagan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A femoral hernia is a rare, acquired condition, which has been reported in less than 5% of all abdominal wall hernias, with a female to male ratio of 4:1. Presentation of case We report a case in a female patient who had a previous open inguinal herniorrhaphy three years previously. She presented with right sided groin pain of one month duration. Ultrasound gave a differential diagnosis of a recurrent inguinal hernia or a femoral hernia. A transabdominal preperitoneal repair was performed and the patient made an uneventful recovery. Discussion Laparoscopic repair of a femoral hernia is still in its infancy and even though the outcomes are superior to an open repair, open surgery remains the standard of care. The decision to perform a laparoscopic trans abdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) repair was facilitated by the patient having previous open hernia surgery. The learning curve for laparoscopic femoral hernia repair is steep and requires great commitment from the surgeon. Once the learning curve has been breached this is a feasible method of surgical repair. This is demonstrated by the fact that this case report is from a rural hospital in Canada. Conclusion Laparoscopic femoral hernia repair involves more time and specialized laparoscopic skills. The advantages are a lower recurrence rate and lower incidence of inguinodynia. PMID:26581083

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Trattnig, Siegfried; Winalski, Carl S.; Marlovits, Stephan; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Welsch, Goetz H.; Potter, Hollis G.

    2011-01-01

    Articular cartilage lesions are a common pathology of the knee joint, and many patients may benefit from cartilage repair surgeries that offer the chance to avoid the development of osteoarthritis or delay its progression. Cartilage repair surgery, no matter the technique, requires a noninvasive, standardized, and high-quality longitudinal method to assess the structure of the repair tissue. This goal is best fulfilled by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The present article provides an overview of the current state of the art of MRI of cartilage repair. In the first 2 sections, preclinical and clinical MRI of cartilage repair tissue are described with a focus on morphological depiction of cartilage and the use of functional (biochemical) MR methodologies for the visualization of the ultrastructure of cartilage repair. In the third section, a short overview is provided on the regulatory issues of the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) regarding MR follow-up studies of patients after cartilage repair surgeries. PMID:26069565

  9. Comparison of the Effects of Lidocaine Prilocaine Cream (EMLA) and Lidocaine Injection on Reduction of Perineal Pain During Perineum Repair in Normal Vaginal Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kargar, Roxana; Aghazadeh-Nainie, Afsaneh; Khoddami-Vishteh, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy of EMLA cream and lidocaine injection to reduce pain during episiotomy repair. Materials and methods: A total of 46 primiparous women with normal pregnancy who referred for normal vaginal delivery and needed episiotomy repair were selected and randomly divided into two groups. For EMLA group, one hour before the estimated time of delivery, 5g of EMLA cream was applied to perinealmediolateral incision, and after the delivery of the fetus and placenta, again 5g of EMLA cream was applied to healthy skin around the episiotomy for repair. In the other group, lidocaine 2% was used before episiotomy and for its repair, too. Results: Only 8 people (19%) were in need of further analgesia. The mean ± SD of pain during repair of episiotomy on the VAS scale in all cases was 4.2 ± 2.3 cm. Most people (97%) were satisfied with their episiotomy repair. Comparing the two groups of EMLA and lidocaine, there was no difference between the two groups in terms of the duration of episiotomy repair, need for further analgesia, pain on the VAS scale, and satisfaction with the repair method. Conclusion: The findings of this study showed that the use of EMLA cream in the site of episiotomy incision in primiparous women can induce a level of analgesia equal to that of lidocaine, and cause a similar level of satisfaction. PMID:27385970

  10. Dynamics of orthodontic root resorption and repair in human premolars: a light microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Winter, Björn U; Stenvik, Arild; Vandevska-Radunovic, Vaska

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the relationship between root resorption and repair in human premolars that had been orthodontically intruded. The objective was to examine these processes related to time and root development. Seventy-six premolars were divided into subgroups: 33 teeth were intruded and then extracted (G1); 25 teeth were intruded and then left in situ for varying periods before extraction (G2); 18 teeth served as the controls (G3). All teeth were examined by light microscopy. Using non-parametric statistical analysis, differences between the groups were examined with the Pearson chi-square test. Teeth in G1 and G2 had significantly more resorptive lesions, 55 and 64 per cent, respectively, than the controls of 11 per cent. Resorption was observed over the whole root surface and increased with time. The occurrence increased to 100 per cent in both experimental groups after 36 days of intrusion. The appearance of lesions in relation to root development showed no differences between G1 and G2. In the apical part of the root, total resorption of the dentine was sometimes observed, but no resorptions extended into the predentine. Resorptive lesions undergoing repair were seen in both groups, with significantly more repair in G2 (58 per cent) than in G1 (32 per cent). Active resorption and repair were sometimes seen at the same resorption site. Deposition of cellular and acellular cementum was found to the same extent over the whole root when repair took place. With time, resorption appeared over the whole root surface. In some teeth, resorptive activity continued up to 10 days after removal of forces but on the other hand, repair of the resorbed area sometimes started during active movement. The individual variation in repair was much wider compared with resorption. The predentine layer in the apical area appeared not to be affected by the resorptive process. PMID:19465737

  11. Group Flow and Group Genius

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Keith Sawyer views the spontaneous collaboration of group creativity and improvisation actions as "group flow," which organizations can use to function at optimum levels. Sawyer establishes ideal conditions for group flow: group goals, close listening, complete concentration, being in control, blending egos, equal participation, knowing…

  12. Chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor promotes sciatic nerve repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanru; Zhang, Hui; Katiella, Kaka; Huang, Wenhua

    2014-01-01

    A chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft can reduce postoperative immune rejection, similar to an autologous nerve graft, and can guide neural regeneration. However, it remains poorly understood whether a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with neurotrophic factors provides a good local environment for neural regeneration. This study investigated the repair of injured rat sciatic nerve using a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor. An autologous nerve anastomosis group and a chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group were prepared as controls. At 8 weeks after repair, sciatic functional index, evoked potential amplitude of the soleus muscle, triceps wet weight recovery rate, total number of myelinated nerve fibers and myelin sheath thickness were measured. For these indices, values in the three groups showed the autologous nerve anastomosis group > chemically extracted acellular nerve graft + ciliary neurotrophic factor group > chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group. These results suggest that chemically extracted acellular nerve grafts combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor can repair sciatic nerve defects, and that this repair is inferior to autologous nerve anastomosis, but superior to chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve bridging alone. PMID:25221592

  13. Chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor promotes sciatic nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanru; Zhang, Hui; Katiella, Kaka; Huang, Wenhua

    2014-07-15

    A chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft can reduce postoperative immune rejection, similar to an autologous nerve graft, and can guide neural regeneration. However, it remains poorly understood whether a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with neurotrophic factors provides a good local environment for neural regeneration. This study investigated the repair of injured rat sciatic nerve using a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor. An autologous nerve anastomosis group and a chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group were prepared as controls. At 8 weeks after repair, sciatic functional index, evoked potential amplitude of the soleus muscle, triceps wet weight recovery rate, total number of myelinated nerve fibers and myelin sheath thickness were measured. For these indices, values in the three groups showed the autologous nerve anastomosis group > chemically extracted acellular nerve graft + ciliary neurotrophic factor group > chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group. These results suggest that chemically extracted acellular nerve grafts combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor can repair sciatic nerve defects, and that this repair is inferior to autologous nerve anastomosis, but superior to chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve bridging alone. PMID:25221592

  14. Aortic cusp extension valvuloplasty: repair with an extracellular patch

    PubMed Central

    Pawlak, Szymon; Śliwka, Joanna; Urlik, Maciej; Maruszewski, Marcin; Kukulski, Tomasz; Nożyński, Jerzy; Zembala, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The proportion of valve repair procedures is increasing in experienced centers. The aim of the study was to assess the clinical and echocardiographic outcomes after aortic valve reconstruction with a novel surgical technique. Material and methods The study group consisted of 30 patients (23 male and 7 female) at a mean age of 35 ± 14 years. In patients with aortic root aneurysm the reimplantation or Florida sleeve technique was used. A sub-commissural annuloplasty, plication of the free edge of the cusp, shaving, and commissurotomy were performed. At this stage of surgery aortic repair was then attempted by cusp extension. Since 2013 the strips have been tailored from extracellular matrix. Results The mean aortic cross-clamp time was 90 ± 32 min. The mean cardiopulmonary bypass time was 126 ± 38 min. There was no in-hospital death. Re-exploration for bleeding was required in 1 patient. During follow-up, 1 patient needed reoperation at 1 year due to endocarditis. All patients remained alive in New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class I. The echocardiographic findings remained unchanged in all cases during follow-up. Conclusions Our modification of aortic valve repair results in a good outcome. PMID:26855646

  15. Oxidative DNA Damage and Nucleotide Excision Repair

    PubMed Central

    Melis, Joost P.M.; Luijten, Mirjam

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Oxidative DNA damage is repaired by multiple, overlapping DNA repair pathways. Accumulating evidence supports the hypothesis that nucleotide excision repair (NER), besides base excision repair (BER), is also involved in neutralizing oxidative DNA damage. Recent Advances: NER includes two distinct sub-pathways: transcription-coupled NER (TC-NER) and global genome repair (GG-NER). The CSA and CSB proteins initiate the onset of TC-NER. Recent findings show that not only CSB, but also CSA is involved in the repair of oxidative DNA lesions, in the nucleus as well as in mitochondria. The XPG protein is also of importance for the removal of oxidative DNA lesions, as it may enhance the initial step of BER. Substantial evidence exists that support a role for XPC in NER and BER. XPC deficiency not only results in decreased repair of oxidative lesions, but has also been linked to disturbed redox homeostasis. Critical Issues: The role of NER proteins in the regulation of the cellular response to oxidative (mitochondrial and nuclear) DNA damage may be the underlying mechanism of the pathology of accelerated aging in Cockayne syndrome patients, a driving force for internal cancer development in XP-A and XP-C patients, and a contributor to the mixed exhibited phenotypes of XP-G patients. Future Directions: Accumulating evidence indicates that DNA repair factors can be involved in multiple DNA repair pathways. However, the distinct detailed mechanism and consequences of these additional functions remain to be elucidated and can possibly shine a light on clinically related issues. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 2409–2419. PMID:23216312

  16. A comparison of post operative pain and hospital stay between Lichtenstein’s repair and Laparoscopic Transabdominal Preperitoneal (TAPP) repair of inguinal hernia: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Salma, Umme; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Ishtiaq, Sundas

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the open Lichtenstein repair and laparoscopic mesh repair for direct inguinal hernias in terms of immediate post operative pain and length of hospital stay. Methods: This randomized control trial was conducted at Benazir Bhutto Hospital Rawalpindi from January 2009 to June 2010. All patients presenting in the surgical OPD with direct inguinal hernia, ASA I/II, were randomly divided in two equal groups. Group-I, patients underwent Lichtenstein’s repair and Group-II had hernioplasty by laparoscopic method (TAPP). Post operative pain intensity assessed by VAS and hospital stay measured in hours. Results: A total 60 patients of direct inguinal hernia were studied. The mean age was 61.48±7. The range of postoperative pain experienced was 5.55 as per VAS among all patients. In group-I (open hernioplasty) majority of patients (53.33%, n=16) experience severe type of pain where as in group-II, moderate severity of pain was reported by large number of patients (63.34%, n=19). The mean post operative pain intensity as per VAS was 6.23 in group-I and 4.43 in group-II patients. The mean length of hospital stay was slightly less (35.10 hrs) in group-I as compared to group-II (38.70 hrs). Conclusion: There is definitely less post operative pain after laparoscopic repair but hospital stay is same in both the procedures but laparoscopic procedure does increase the cost. PMID:26648987

  17. Weld Repair of Thin Aluminum Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuyukian, C. S.; Mitchell, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    Weld repairing of thin aluminum sheets now possible, using niobium shield and copper heat sinks. Refractory niobium shield protects aluminum adjacent to hole, while copper heat sinks help conduct heat away from repair site. Technique limits tungsten/inert-gas (TIG) welding bombardment zone to melt area, leaving surrounding areas around weld unaffected. Used successfully to repair aluminum cold plates on Space Shuttle, Commercial applications, especially in sealing fractures, dents, and holes in thin aluminum face sheets or clad brazing sheet in cold plates, heat exchangers, coolers, and Solar panels. While particularly suited to thin aluminum sheet, this process also used in thicker aluminum material to prevent surface damage near weld area.

  18. Hybrid Approaches for Complex Parastomal Hernia Repair.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Heng; Xie, Jia-Ming; Miao, Jian-Qing; Wu, Hao-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Parastomal hernia is one of the major complications of colostomy with high occurrence. From October 2011 to November 2014, a retrospective study was conducted by analyzing and following up data of 16 patients suffering from parastomal hernia who underwent a hybrid technique repair. The safety and efficacy of the hybrid technique for parastomal hernia repair was investigated in terms of complications. All cases were operated successfully and had no major immediate postoperative complications other than mild abdominal pain in 5 cases. No long-term postoperative complications were reported in the follow-up. The authors found hybrid technique to be safe and effective for parastomal hernia repair with fewer complications. PMID:26787038

  19. Repair of Electronics for Long Duration Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettegrew, Richard D.; Easton, John; Struk, Peter

    2007-01-01

    To reduce mission risk, long duration spaceflight and exploration activities will require greater degrees of self-sufficiency with regards to repair capability than have ever been employed before in space exploration. The current repair paradigm of replacing Orbital Replacement Units (ORUs) of malfunctioning avionics and electronic hardware will be impractical, since carrying all of the spares that could possibly be needed for a long duration mission would require upmass and volume at unprecedented and unacceptable levels. A strategy of component-level repair for electronics, however, could significantly reduce the mass and volume necessary for spares and enhance mission safety via a generic contingency capability. This approach is already used to varying degrees by the U.S. Navy, where vessels at sea experience some similar constraints such as the need for self sufficiency for moderately long time periods, and restrictions on volume of repair spares and infrastructure. The concept of conducting component-level repairs of electronics in spacecraft requires the development of design guidelines for future avionics (to enable repair), development of diagnostic techniques to allow an astronaut to pinpoint the faulty component aboard a vastly complex vehicle, and development of tools and methodologies for dealing with the physical processes of replacing the component. This physical process includes tasks such as conformal coating removal and replacement, component removal, replacement, and alignment--all in the difficulty of a reduced gravity environment. Further, the gravitational effects on the soldering process must be characterized and accounted for to ensure reliability of the newly repaired components. The Component-Level Electronics-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) project under the NASA Supportability program was established to develop and demonstrate the practicality of this repair approach. CLEAR involves collaborative efforts between NASA s Glenn Research Center

  20. Navigating the Nucleotide Excision Repair Threshold

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liren; Lee, Jennifer; Zhou, Pengbo

    2010-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is the primary DNA repair pathway that removes helix-distorting DNA strand damage induced by ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation or chemical carcinogens to ensure genome integrity. While the core NER proteins that carry out damage recognition, excision and repair reactions have been identified and extensively characterized, and the NER pathway has been reconstituted in vitro, the regulatory pathways that govern the threshold levels of NER have not been fully elucidated. This mini-review focuses on recently discovered transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms that specify the capacity of NER, and suggests the potential implications of modulating NER activity in cancer prevention and therapeutic intervention. PMID:20458729

  1. Method of repairing discontinuity in fiberglass structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelb, L. L.; Helbert, W. B., Jr.; Enie, R. B.; Mulliken, R. F. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Damaged fiberglass structures are repaired by substantially filling the irregular surfaced damaged area with a liquid, self-curing resin, preferably an epoxy resin mixed with chopped fiberglass, and then applying to the resin surface the first of several woven fiberglass swatches which has stitching in a zig-zag pattern parallel to each of its edges and a fringe of warp and fill glass fibers about the edges outward of the stitching. The method is especially applicable to repair of fiberglass rocket engine casings and is particularly advantageous since it restores the repaired fiberglass structure to substantially its original strength without any significant changes in the geometry or mass of the structure.

  2. Laparoscopic total extraperitoneal repair of lumbar hernia

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Man Sup; Lee, Hae Wan; Yu, Chang Hee

    2011-01-01

    Lumbar hernia is a rare surgical entity without a standard method of repair. With advancements in laparoscopic techniques, successful lumbar herniorrhaphy can be achieved by the creation of a completely extraperitoneal working space and secure fixation of a wide posterior mesh. We present a total extraperitoneal laparoendoscopic repair of lumbar hernia, which allowed for minimal invasiveness while providing excellent anatomical identification, easy mobilization of contents and wide secure mesh fixation. A total extraperitoneal method of lumbar hernia repair by laparoscopic approach is feasible and may be an ideal option. PMID:22111086

  3. Mesenchymal stem cells and cardiac repair

    PubMed Central

    Nesselmann, Catharina; Ma, Nan; Bieback, Karen; Wagner, Wolfgang; Ho, Anthony; Konttinen, Yrjö T; Zhang, Hao; Hinescu, Mihail E; Steinhoff, Gustav

    2008-01-01

    Accumulating clinical and experimental evidence indicates that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are promising cell types in the treatment of cardiac dysfunction. They may trigger production of reparative growth factors, replace damaged cells and create an environment that favours endogenous cardiac repair. However, identifying mechanisms which regulate the role of MSCs in cardiac repair is still at work. To achieve the maximal clinical benefits, ex vivo manipulation can further enhance MSC therapeutic potential. This review focuses on the mechanism of MSCs in cardiac repair, with emphasis on ex vivo manipulation. PMID:18684237

  4. Laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia repair: current controversies.

    PubMed

    Soper, Nathaniel J; Teitelbaum, Ezra N

    2013-10-01

    The advent of laparoscopy has significantly improved postoperative outcomes in patients undergoing surgical repair of a paraesophageal hernia. Although this minimally invasive approach considerably reduces postoperative pain and recovery times, and may improve physiologic outcomes, laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia repair remains a complex operation requiring advanced laparoscopic skills and experience with the anatomy of the gastroesophageal junction and diaphragmatic hiatus. In this article, we describe our approach to patient selection, preoperative evaluation, operative technique, and postoperative management. Specific attention is paid to performing an adequate hiatal dissection and esophageal mobilization, the decision of whether to use a mesh to reinforce the crural repair, and construction of an adequate antireflux barrier (ie, fundoplication). PMID:24105282

  5. Imaging of postoperative tetralogy of Fallot repair.

    PubMed

    Vaujois, L; Gorincour, G; Alison, M; Déry, J; Poirier, N; Lapierre, C

    2016-05-01

    Over the last years, the surgical techniques used to repair Tetralogy of Fallot as well as the cross-sectional cardiac imaging techniques have substantially improved. Now, the survival rate after surgical repair is more than 90% at 40 years old. A follow-up is needed and the imaging evaluation should be guided by the surgical techniques used. This article reviews the most common surgical procedures for a complete repair, the associated anatomic and hemodynamic complications and the role of cardiac imaging, mainly magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:26993966

  6. Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm and Dissection Repair (EVAR) in Iran: Descriptive Midterm Follow-up Results

    PubMed Central

    Haji Zeinali, Ali Mohammad; Marzban, Mehrab; Zafarghandi, Mohammadreza; Shirzad, Mahmood; Shirani, Shapour; Mahmoodian, Roshanak; Sheikhvatan, Mehrdad; Lotfi-Tokaldany, Masoumeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Endovascular repair of aorta in comparison to open surgery has a low early operative mortality rate, but its long-term results are uncertain. Objectives: The current study describes for the first time our initial four-year experience of elective endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) at Tehran heart center, the first and a major referral heart center in Iran, as a pioneer of EVAR in Iran. Patients and Methods: A total of 51 patients (46 men) who had the diagnosis of either an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) (n = 36), thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) (n = 7), or thoracic aortic dissection (TAD) (n = 8) who had undergone EVAR by Medtronic stent grafts by our team between December 2006 and June 2009 were reviewed. Results: The rate of in-hospital aneurysm-related deaths in the group with AAA stood at 2.8% (one case), while there was no in-hospital mortality in the other groups. All patients were followed up for 13-18 months. The cumulative death rate in follow-up was nine cases from the total 51 cases (18%), out of which six cases were in the AAA group (four patients due to non-cardiac causes and two patients due to aneurysm-related causes), one case in the TAA group (following a severe hemoptysis), and two cases in the TAD group (following an expansion of dissection from re-entrance). The major event-free survival rate was 80.7% for endovascular repair of AAA, 85.7% for endovascular repair of TAA, and 65.6% for endovascular repair of TAD. Conclusion: The endovascular stent-graft repair of the abdominal and thoracic aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection had high technical success rates in tandem with low-rate early mortality and morbidity, short hospital stay, and acceptable mid-term free symptom survival among Iranian patients. PMID:27110330

  7. Effect of Intermediate Agents and Preheated Composites on Repair Bond Strength of Silorane-Based Composites

    PubMed Central

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Daryadar, Marzieh

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Repairing composite restorations is a challenging procedure especially when two different types of composites are used. This study aimed to compare the repair strength of silorane-based composite (SC) (Filtek P90) with that of preheated SC, methacrylate composite (MC)(Z250), flowable MC (Filtek Supreme Plus) and different adhesive/composite combinations. Materials and Methods: Eighty-four SC specimens were fabricated and randomly divided into seven groups (G). In the control group (G7), SC was bonded immediately to SC. The other specimens were water-aged for two months and were then roughened, etched and repaired with the following materials: G1) Silorane Adhesive Bond (SAB)/SC; G2) Preheated SC; G3) SAB/MC; G4) Adper Single Bond (SB)/MC; G5) Flowable MC/MC; G6) Preheated MC. After water storage and thermocycling, the repaired specimens were subjected to shear bond strength testing. The data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey’s test. Results: Preheated SC and MC, flowable MC and SAB/SC resulted in bond strength comparable to that of the control group. Preheated SC showed significantly higher bond strength when compared to SAB/MC (P=0.04) and SB/MC (P<0.001). Bond strength of SB/MC was significantly lower than that of the other groups (P<0.05), except for SAB/SC and SAB/MC. Conclusion: All repairing materials except for SB/MC resulted in bond strength values comparable to that of the control group. Repair with preheated SC yielded the highest bond strength. PMID:27148378

  8. Evaluation of Internet Information About Rotator Cuff Repair.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Kevin A; Codella, Stephen; Ciccotti, Michael G; Kane, Patrick W; Duncan, Ian C; Cohen, Steven B

    2016-01-01

    The content and quality of Internet websites are not governed or regulated. Therefore, patients who consult the Internet may receive outdated or incorrect medical information. Researchers have analyzed the quality of web information about various orthopedic surgeries, but no such analysis has been performed on websites covering rotator cuff repair. We conducted a study to evaluate and analyze rotator cuff repair information available to the general public through the Internet; to assess changes in the quality of information over time; to determine if sites sponsored by academic institutions offered higher-quality information; and to assess whether the readability of the material varied according to DISCERN scores. Two Internet searches were conducted, in 2011 and 2014. The 3 most commonly used search engines were used to search for rotator cuff repair. The first 50 websites from each search engine were evaluated for authorship and content. The DISCERN instrument was used to analyze the quality of each website's health information. The 2011 search revealed 21% of websites were associated with an academic institution, 38% were authored by a hospital or physician group, and 11.5% were industry-sponsored. The 2014 search revealed a similar distribution of contributors. The highest DISCERN scores were given to academic institution websites (51.6) and public education websites (49). There was no correlation between readability and DISCERN scores. Websites associated with academic institutions produced the highest-quality medical information. Over the past few years, authorship and content have changed little with respect to Internet information about rotator cuff repair. PMID:26991581

  9. Endovascular vs open repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Nedeau, April E.; Pomposelli, Frank B.; Hamdan, Allen D.; Wyers, Mark C.; Hsu, Richard; Sachs, Teviah; Siracuse, Jeffrey J.; Schermerhorn, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Endovascular repair (EVAR) of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) has become first-line therapy at our institution and is performed under a standardized protocol. We compare perioperative mortality, midterm survival, and morbidity after EVAR and open surgical repair (OSR). Methods Records were retrospectively reviewed from May 2000 to September 2010 for repair of infrarenal rAAAs. Primary end points included perioperative mortality and midterm survival. Secondary end points included acute limb ischemia, length of stay, ventilator-dependent respiratory failure, myocardial infarction, renal failure, abdominal compartment syndrome, and secondary intervention. Statistical analysis was performed using the t-test,X2 test, the Fisher exact test, and logistic regression calculations. Midterm survival was assessed with Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazard models. Results Seventy-four infrarenal rAAAs were repaired, 19 by EVAR and 55 by OSR. Despite increased age and comorbidity in the EVAR patients, perioperative mortality was 15.7% for EVAR, which was significantly lower than the 49% for OSR (odds ratio, 0.19; 95% CI, 0.05-0.74; P = .008). Midterm survival also favored EVAR (hazard ratio, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.21-0.77; P = .028, adjusted for age and sex). Mean follow-up was 20 months, and 1-year survival was 60% for EVAR vs 45% for OSR. Mean length of stay for patients surviving >1 day was 10 days for EVAR and 21 days for OSR (P = .004). Ventilator-dependent respiratory failure was 5% in the EVAR group vs 42% for OSR (odds ratio, 0.08; 95% CI, 0.01-0.62; P = .001). Conclusions EVAR of rAAA has a superior perioperative survival advantage and decreased morbidity vs OSR. Although not statistically significant, overall survival favors EVAR. We recommend that EVAR be considered as the first-line treatment of rAAAs and practiced as the standard of care. PMID:22626871

  10. A Comparison of Rehabilitation Methods After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Anthony; Villacis, Diego; Yalamanchili, Raj; Hatch, George F. Rick

    2015-01-01

    Context: Despite the significant attention directed toward optimizing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, there has been less focus on rehabilitation after rotator cuff repair surgery. Objective: To determine the effect of different rehabilitation protocols on clinical outcomes by comparing early versus late mobilization approaches and continuous passive mobilization (CPM) versus manual therapy after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Data Sources: PubMed was searched for relevant articles using the keywords rotator cuff, rotator, cuff, tears, lacerations, and rehabilitation to identify articles published from January 1980 to March 2014. Study Selection: Inclusion criteria consisted of articles of level 1 or 2 evidence, written in the English language, and with reported outcomes for early versus late mobilization or rehabilitation with CPM versus manual therapy after primary arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Exclusion criteria consisted of articles of level 3, 4, or 5 evidence, non-English language, and those with significantly different demographic variables between study groups. Included studies were evaluated with the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials criteria. Study Design: Systematic review. Level of Evidence: Level 2. Data Extraction: Level of evidence, study type, number of patients enrolled, number of patients at final follow-up, length of follow-up, age, sex, rotator cuff tear size, surgical technique, and concomitant operative procedures were extracted from included articles. Postoperative data included clinical outcome scores, visual analog score for pain, shoulder range of motion, strength, and rotator cuff retear rates. Results: A total of 7 studies met all criteria and were included in the final analysis. Five studies compared early and late mobilization. Two studies compared CPM and manual therapy. Conclusion: In general, current data do not definitively demonstrate a significant difference between postoperative rotator cuff rehabilitation

  11. Isopermutation group

    SciTech Connect

    Muktibodh, A. S.

    2015-03-10

    The concept of ‘Isotopy’ as formulated by Ruggero Maria Santilli [1, 2, 3] plays a vital role in the development of Iso mathematics. Santilli defined iso-fields of characteristic zero. In this paper we extend this definition to define Iso-Galois fields [4] which are essentially of non-zero characteristic. Isotopically isomorphic realizations of a group define isopermutation group which gives a clear cut distinction between automorphic groups and isotopic groups.

  12. Influence of surface preparation on fracture load of resin composite-based repairs

    PubMed Central

    Mateos-Palacios, Rocío; Román-Rodríguez, Juan-Luis; Solá-Ruíz, María-Fernanda; Fons-Font, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the fracture load of composite-based repairs to fractured zirconium oxide (Z) crowns and to ceramic-fused-to-metal (CM) crowns, comparing different mechanical surface preparation methods. A total of 75 crowns were repaired; samples then underwent dynamic loading and thermocycling. Final fracture load values for failure of the repaired crowns were measured and the type of fracture registered. Group I: CM: Surface preparation with a diamond bur + 9.5% Hydrofluoric Acid (HF) etching; Group II): CM: air-particle (Al2O3) + 9.5% HF; Group III: CM: Silica coating (SiO2); Group IV): Z: air-particle (Al2O3) + HF 9.5%; Group V) Z: Silica coating (SiO2). Of the three CM groups, Group I (CM-diamond bur) showed the highest mean failure value, with significant difference in comparison with Group III (CM-silica coating). For the zirconia groups, the highest value was obtained by Group V (silica coating). Key words:Crown, ceramic-fused-to-metal, zirconia, resin-composite, ceramic covering. PMID:25810848

  13. The role of aging and DNA repair in chronic disease. Final progress report, December 1, 1985--September 29, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, L.

    1993-11-01

    We carried out a molecular epidemiological study of the DNA repair of photochemical damage as a risk factor in basal cell carcinoma (BCC). In that clinic-based control study of 88 cases and 135 cancer-free control it was found that DNA repair in the controls declined linearly at a rate of 0.61% per year over a 30-60 year age group. However, repair in younger BCC cases, significantly less than their age-matched controls, did not decline at the same rate so that the repair differences between the cases and the controls disappeared as the cases grew older. Besides this age effect, the odds are high (5:1) that an individual with low repair overexposed to sunlight will have basal cell carcinoma. That these odds increase to 10:1 for females compared to male subjects led to the observation that repair may be sensitive to hormonal control. Because of the ease of BCC diagnosis it is possible to demonstrate significantly that the level of DNA repair directly influences the multiplicity of tumors. Further, both those cases and controls with a family history of BCC invariably have reduced levels of DNA repair (p<0-05).

  14. Effect of hyperbaric oxygen profiles on the bond strength of repaired composite resin

    PubMed Central

    Mossa, Hossam; ElKhatat, Essam; Hassan, Ahmed M.; Baroudi, Kusai; Beshr, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study was performed to evaluate the bond strength of repaired three types of composite resins under various hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) profiles with various session numbers. Materials and Methods: Sixty specimens of three types of composite resin (nanofilled composite, nanohybrid composite and microfilled composite) each type of composite was divided into four group according to various profiles of HBO treatment (control, 2bar, 3 bar and 5 bar). Then, the specimens were repaired; thermocycled, the tensile bond strength were measured. Then the data were analyzed by One-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post hoc test (α = 0.05). Results: The highest bond strength was obtained for the repaired nanofilled composite resin specimens while; the lowest bond strength was obtained for the repaired microfilled composite resin specimens. The highest tensile bond strength was recorded for the specimens who treated with the highest pressure of HBO. Conclusion: The bond strength of repaired nanofilled composite resins is better than the other types of composite resin. The highest pressure of HBO, the highest bond strength of repaired composite resins. PMID:27195232

  15. FEN1 participates in repair of the 5'-phosphotyrosyl terminus of DNA single-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Kametani, Yukiko; Takahata, Chiaki; Narita, Takashi; Tanaka, Kiyoji; Iwai, Shigenori; Kuraoka, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Etoposide is a widely used anticancer drug and a DNA topoisomerase II (Top2) inhibitor. Etoposide produces Top2-attached single-strand breaks (Top2-SSB complex) and double-strand breaks (Top2-DSB complex) that are thought to induce cell death in tumor cells. The Top2-SSB complex is more abundant than the Top2-DSB complex. Human tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (TDP2) is required for efficient repair of Top2-DSB complexes. However, the identities of the proteins involved in the repair of Top2-SSB complexes are unknown, although yeast genetic data indicate that 5' to 3' structure-specific DNA endonuclease activity is required for alternative repair of Top2 DNA damage. In this study, we purified a flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) and xeroderma pigmentosum group G protein (XPG) in the 5' to 3' structure-specific DNA endonuclease family and synthesized single-strand break DNA substrates containing a 5'-phoshotyrosyl bond, mimicking the Top2-SSB complex. We found that FEN1 and XPG did not remove the 5'-phoshotyrosyl bond-containing DSB substrates but removed the 5'-phoshotyrosyl bond-containing SSB substrates. Under DNA repair conditions, FEN1 efficiently repaired the 5'-phoshotyrosyl bond-containing SSB substrates in the presence of DNA ligase and DNA polymerase. Therefore, FEN1 may play an important role in the repair of Top2-SSB complexes in etoposide-treated cells. PMID:26581212

  16. Separation Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Addington, Jean

    1992-01-01

    Describes eight-week short-term group designed to help separated or divorced men and women move through related adjustment phase in focused group setting. Discusses constructs that form the foundations of this short-term psychoeducational and support group and presents brief overview of psychological difficulties that occur as result of marital…

  17. Biomechanical properties of the sciatic nerve following repair: effects of topical application of hyaluronic acid or tacrolimus

    PubMed Central

    Mekaj, Agon Y; Morina, Arsim A; Lajqi, Shpetim; Manxhuka-Kerliu, Suzana; Kelmendi, Fatos M; Duci, Shkelzen B

    2015-01-01

    Recovery following nerve repair can be evaluated based on electrophysiological and morphological assessments of biomechanical properties. This study compared the effects of topical hyaluronic acid (HA), tacrolimus (FK-506) or saline administration on the biomechanical properties of the sciatic nerve at 12 weeks after nerve repair. Materials and Methods: Eighteen male European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) (weight from 2.5 to 3 kg) were randomly assigned to one of the following experimental groups (six animals per group): Saline, HA, or FK-506. The non-transected left leg was used as a control group (eighteen sciatic nerves). Biomechanical assays were performed and statistically analyzed. Results: The average maximal load, elastic limit load, maximal stress, and elastic limit strain of the control group were significantly different (P<0.001) from those of all three experimental groups. Moreover, the other examined parameters (i.e., maximal displacement, elastic limit stress, and maximal strain) were significantly different between the control group and all three experimental groups (P<0.0001). However, no significant differences in any of the biomechanical parameters were observed between the experimental groups (P>0.05). At 12 weeks after nerve repair, Saline, HA, and FK-506 groups displayed average maximal stress values that were 72.6%, 77.38%, and 73.8% of those in the control group (100%), respectively. Conclusion: The biomechanical properties of the HA and FK-506 groups were similar to those of the saline group at 12 weeks after nerve repair. PMID:26884934

  18. Impact of changing trends in technique and learning curve on outcome of hypospadias repair: An experience from tertiary care center

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, M. S.; Agarwal, Shikhar; Sureka, Sanjoy Kumar; Mandhani, Anil; Kapoor, Rakesh; Srivastava, Aneesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Apart from numerous clinical factors, surgical experience and technique are important determinants of hypospadias repair outcome. This study was aimed to evaluate the learning curve of hypospadias repair and the impact of changing trends in surgical techniques on the success of primary hypospadias repair. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed of data of 324 patients who underwent primary repair of hypospadias between January 1997 and December 2013 at our center. During the initial 8 years, repairs were performed by multiple 5 different urologists. From 2005 onwards, all procedures were performed by a single urologist. The study cohorts was categorized into three groups; Group I, surgeries performed between 1997–2004 by multiple surgeons, Group II, between 2005–2006 during the initial learning curve of a single surgeon, and Group III, from 2007 onwards after completion of the learning curve of the single surgeon. The groups were compared in respect to surgical techniques, overall success and complications. Results: Overall 296 patients fulfilled the inclusion criterion, 93 (31.4%), 50 (16.9%), and 153 (51.7%) in Group I, II, and III, respectively. Overall success was achieved in 60 (64.5%), 32 (64%), and 128 (83.7%) patients among the three groups respectively (P < 0.01). Nineteen (20.4%), 20 (40%), and 96 (62.7%) patients underwent tubularized incised plate repair in Group I, II, and III, with successful outcome in 12 (63.2%), 15 (75%), and 91 (94.8%) patients, respectively (P < 0.01). The most common complication among all groups was urethrocutaneous fistula, 20 (21.5%) in Group I, 11 (22%) in Group II, and 17 (11.1%) in Group III. Conclusion: There is a learning curve for attaining surgical skills in hypospadias surgery. Surgeons dedicated for this surgery provide better results. Tubularized incised plate urethroplasty appear promising in both distal and proximal type hypospadias. PMID:27555680

  19. DNA Repair Pathways in Trypanosomatids: from DNA Repair to Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Genois, Marie-Michelle; Paquet, Eric R.; Laffitte, Marie-Claude N.; Maity, Ranjan; Rodrigue, Amélie

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY All living organisms are continuously faced with endogenous or exogenous stress conditions affecting genome stability. DNA repair pathways act as a defense mechanism, which is essential to maintain DNA integrity. There is much to learn about the regulation and functions of these mechanisms, not only in human cells but also equally in divergent organisms. In trypanosomatids, DNA repair pathways protect the genome against mutations but also act as an adaptive mechanism to promote drug resistance. In this review, we scrutinize the molecular mechanisms and DNA repair pathways which are conserved in trypanosomatids. The recent advances made by the genome consortiums reveal the complete genomic sequences of several pathogens. Therefore, using bioinformatics and genomic sequences, we analyze the conservation of DNA repair proteins and their key protein motifs in trypanosomatids. We thus present a comprehensive view of DNA repair processes in trypanosomatids at the crossroads of DNA repair and drug resistance. PMID:24600040

  20. Loss of transcription factor early growth response gene 1 results in impaired endochondral bone repair

    PubMed Central

    Reumann, Marie K.; Strachna, Olga; Yagerman, Sarah; Torrecilla, Daniel; Kim, Jihye; Doty, Steven B.; Lukashova, Lyudmila; Boskey, Adele L.; Mayer-Kuckuk, Philipp

    2011-01-01

    Transcription factors that play a role in ossification during development are expected to participate in postnatal fracture repair since the endochondral bone formation that occurs in embryos is recapitulated during fracture repair. However, inherent differences exist between bone development and fracture repair, including a sudden disruption of tissue integrity followed by an inflammatory response. This raises the possibility that repair-specific transcription factors participate in bone healing. Here, we assessed the consequence of loss of early growth response gene 1 (EGR-1) on endochondral bone healing because this transcription factor has been shown to modulate repair in vascularized tissues. Model fractures were created in ribs of wild type (wt) and EGR-1−/− mice. Differences in tissue morphology and composition between these two animal groups were followed over 28 post fracture days (PFDs). In wt mice, bone healing occurred in healing phases characteristic of endochondral bone repair. A similar healing sequence was observed in EGR-1−/− mice but was impaired by alterations. A persistent accumulation of fibrin between the disconnected bones was observed on PFD7 and remained pronounced in the callus on PFD14. Additionally, the PFD14 callus was abnormally enlarged and showed increased deposition of mineralized tissue. Cartilage ossification in the callus was associated with hyper-vascularity and -proliferation. Moreover, cell deposits located in proximity to the callus within skeletal muscle were detected on PFD14. Despite these impairments, repair in EGR-1−/− callus advanced on PFD28, suggesting EGR-1 is not essential for healing. Together, this study provides genetic evidence that EGR-1 is a pleiotropic regulator of endochondral fracture repair. PMID:21726677

  1. Folate depletion impairs DNA excision repair in the colon of the rat

    PubMed Central

    Choi, S; Kim, Y; Weitzel, J; Mason, J

    1998-01-01

    Background/Aims—Diminished folate status appears to promote colonic carcinogenesis by, as of yet, undefined mechanisms. Impaired DNA repair plays a significant role in the evolution of many colon cancers. Since folate is essential for the de novo synthesis of nucleotides and since folate depletion has previously been associated with excessive DNA strand breaks, it was hypothesised that folate depletion may impair DNA repair. Studies were therefore performed to examine whether folate depletion affects the two major categories of DNA repair. 
Methods—Study 1: eight weanling male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed on diets containing either 0 or 8 mg folate/kg diet with 1% succinylsulphathiazole for four weeks. After viable colonocytes had been harvested, DNA excision repair was evaluated by a single cell gel electrophoresis assay. Study 2: eighteen animals were fed on similar diets for five weeks. Also in study 2, 18 additional rats were fed on the same defined diet without succinylsulphathiazole for 15 weeks. Weekly injections with the procarcinogen, 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (20 mg base/kg), were administered to the latter group of animals. Five microsatellite loci from different chromosomes were investigated for instability in hepatic and colonic DNA. 
Results—In study 1, a significantly retarded rate of DNA excision repair was observed in the folate deficient colonocytes compared with controls (p<0.05). In study 2, there was no evidence of instability at the five microsatellite loci associated with either short or long term folate depletion. 
Conclusions—Folate deficiency impairs DNA excision repair in rat colonic mucosa; a similar degree of deficiency, even when administered in conjunction with a colonic carcinogen, did not produce evidence of a widespread defect in mismatch repair. 

 Keywords: folate; colon cancer; DNA repair; single cell gel electrophoresis; microsatellite instability; rat PMID:9771411

  2. Surgical Repair of Retrograde Type A Aortic Dissection after Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Young; Kim, Yeon Soo; Ryoo, Ji Yoon

    2014-01-01

    It is expected that the stent graft will become an alternative method for treating aortic diseases or reducing the extent of surgery; therefore, thoracic endovascular aortic repair has widened its indications. However, it can have rare but serious complications such as paraplegia and retrograde type A aortic dissection. Here, we report a surgical repair of retrograde type A aortic dissection that was performed after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. PMID:24570865

  3. A history of the DNA repair and mutagenesis field: The discovery of base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, Errol C

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the early history of the discovery of an DNA repair pathway designated as base excision repair (BER), since in contrast to the enzyme-catalyzed removal of damaged bases from DNA as nucleotides [called nucleotide excision repair (NER)], BER involves the removal of damaged or inappropriate bases, such as the presence of uracil instead of thymine, from DNA as free bases. PMID:26861186

  4. Galaxy groups

    SciTech Connect

    Brent Tully, R.

    2015-02-01

    Galaxy groups can be characterized by the radius of decoupling from cosmic expansion, the radius of the caustic of second turnaround, and the velocity dispersion of galaxies within this latter radius. These parameters can be a challenge to measure, especially for small groups with few members. In this study, results are gathered pertaining to particularly well-studied groups over four decades in group mass. Scaling relations anticipated from theory are demonstrated and coefficients of the relationships are specified. There is an update of the relationship between light and mass for groups, confirming that groups with mass of a few times 10{sup 12}M{sub ⊙} are the most lit up while groups with more and less mass are darker. It is demonstrated that there is an interesting one-to-one correlation between the number of dwarf satellites in a group and the group mass. There is the suggestion that small variations in the slope of the luminosity function in groups are caused by the degree of depletion of intermediate luminosity systems rather than variations in the number per unit mass of dwarfs. Finally, returning to the characteristic radii of groups, the ratio of first to second turnaround depends on the dark matter and dark energy content of the universe and a crude estimate can be made from the current observations of Ω{sub matter}∼0.15 in a flat topology, with a 68% probability of being less than 0.44.

  5. Galaxy Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tully, R. Brent

    2015-02-01

    Galaxy groups can be characterized by the radius of decoupling from cosmic expansion, the radius of the caustic of second turnaround, and the velocity dispersion of galaxies within this latter radius. These parameters can be a challenge to measure, especially for small groups with few members. In this study, results are gathered pertaining to particularly well-studied groups over four decades in group mass. Scaling relations anticipated from theory are demonstrated and coefficients of the relationships are specified. There is an update of the relationship between light and mass for groups, confirming that groups with mass of a few times {{10}12}{{M}⊙ } are the most lit up while groups with more and less mass are darker. It is demonstrated that there is an interesting one-to-one correlation between the number of dwarf satellites in a group and the group mass. There is the suggestion that small variations in the slope of the luminosity function in groups are caused by the degree of depletion of intermediate luminosity systems rather than variations in the number per unit mass of dwarfs. Finally, returning to the characteristic radii of groups, the ratio of first to second turnaround depends on the dark matter and dark energy content of the universe and a crude estimate can be made from the current observations of {{Ω}matter}˜ 0.15 in a flat topology, with a 68% probability of being less than 0.44.

  6. Pipeline repair technique cuts downtime

    SciTech Connect

    Bellamy, G.; Jouanneau, J.F.; Quin, R.; Wiet, P.

    1985-02-11

    This article deals with a project that explored the cold-tapping technique for repairing or modifying sea gas lines. The technique allows work to be carried out on a section of pipeline without the need, as before, for the flooding of the line, and subsequent dewatering and drying of the line. Lost production time is greatly reduced. Cold-tapping is performed on a pipe depressurized at the same level as the sea-bed hydrostatic pressure. The system is designed to withstand an accidental depressurization of the pipe to the atmosphere pressure with a safety factor of one third. The technique is simple, allows for accurate positioning of the plugs, and offers a maximum reliability due to an efficient monitoring and a wide range of backup procedures. Keeping the line entirely free of extra pieces of equipment after the operation is also a major advantage. The entire operation described took 34 hours during which all the required tasks were performed flawlessly. Analysis of the data collected during the test program showed that cold-tapping required a maximum of four extra barge days. It was demonstrated that the method can save up to eight weeks of gas-pipeline shutdown time.

  7. Glaucoma and optic nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Diekmann, Heike; Fischer, Dietmar

    2013-08-01

    Glaucoma is a leading cause of irreversible blindness worldwide and causes progressive visual impairment attributable to the dysfunction and death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Progression of visual field damage is slow and typically painless. Thus, glaucoma is often diagnosed after a substantial percentage of RGCs has been damaged. To date, clinical interventions are mainly restricted to the reduction of intraocular pressure (IOP), one of the major risk factors for this disease. However, the lowering of IOP is often insufficient to halt or reverse the progress of visual loss, underlining the need for the development of alternative treatment strategies. Several lines of evidence suggest that axonal damage of RGCs occurs primary at the optic nerve head, where axons appear to be most vulnerable. Axonal injury leads to the functional loss of RGCs and subsequently induces the death of the neurons. However, the detailed molecular mechanism(s) underlying IOP-induced optic nerve injury remain poorly understood. Moreover, whether glaucoma pathophysiology is primarily axonal, glial, or vascular remains unclear. Therefore, protective strategies to prevent further axonal and subsequent soma degeneration are of great importance to limit the progression of sight loss. In addition, strategies that stimulate injured RGCs to regenerate and reconnect axons with their central targets are necessary for functional restoration. The present review provides an overview of the context of glaucoma pathogenesis and surveys recent findings regarding potential strategies for axonal regeneration of RGCs and optic nerve repair, focusing on the role of cytokines and their downstream signaling pathways. PMID:23512141

  8. Skeletal myoblasts for cardiac repair

    PubMed Central

    Durrani, Shazia; Konoplyannikov, Mikhail; Ashraf, Muhammad; Haider, Khawaja Husnain

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells provide an alternative curative intervention for the infarcted heart by compensating for the cardiomyocyte loss subsequent to myocardial injury. The presence of resident stem and progenitor cell populations in the heart, and nuclear reprogramming of somatic cells with genetic induction of pluripotency markers are the emerging new developments in stem cell-based regenerative medicine. However, until safety and feasibility of these cells are established by extensive experimentation in in vitro and in vivo experimental models, skeletal muscle-derived myoblasts, and bone marrow cells remain the most well-studied donor cell types for myocardial regeneration and repair. This article provides a critical review of skeletal myoblasts as donor cells for transplantation in the light of published experimental and clinical data, and indepth discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of skeletal myoblast-based therapeutic intervention for augmentation of myocardial function in the infarcted heart. Furthermore, strategies to overcome the problems of arrhythmogenicity and failure of the transplanted skeletal myoblasts to integrate with the host cardiomyocytes are discussed. PMID:21082891

  9. Conceptual Approaches to Lung Injury and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Henson, Peter M.; Henson, Jan E.; Janssen, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Lung injury and repair is a broad topic that includes many cell types and is relevant to the pathogenesis of most lung diseases. Here, we focus on injury and repair of the alveolus, the principal function of which is to achieve gas exchange. The many cell types and structures present in the alveolus are discussed, with emphasis on their interactions in both health and disease. We define injury as damage resulting in impaired gas exchange; physiologic repair, then, requires restoration of normal alveolar architecture and function. The role of inflammation in both injury and repair of structural alveolar cells, particularly epithelial cells, as well as mechanisms of resolution of inflammation will be addressed. Finally, emphasis is placed on the importance of addressing quantitatively the dynamic and complex multidirectional interactions between the many alveolar cell types and structures in three dimensions over time and in relating such mechanistic studies to physiologic outcomes and human disease. PMID:25830855

  10. 26 CFR 1.162-4 - Repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... incidental repairs which neither materially add to the value of the property nor appreciably prolong its life... nature of replacements, to the extent that they arrest deterioration and appreciably prolong the life...

  11. 26 CFR 1.162-4 - Repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... incidental repairs which neither materially add to the value of the property nor appreciably prolong its life... nature of replacements, to the extent that they arrest deterioration and appreciably prolong the life...

  12. Integrated tools for teleoperated satellite repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, H.; Fiorini, P.

    1993-01-01

    Tools and tool handling techniques designed for demonstrating the use of the Advanced Teleoperation System at JPL in satellite repair operations are described in this paper. Our model for the repair demonstration is the Main Electronics Box (MEB) replacement on the Solar Maximum Satellite Repair (SMSR) procedure developed by NASA and successfully performed by the crew of Space Shuttle STS-13 in 1984. A summary of the repair procedure consists of uncovering thermal protection blankets on the satellite, removing screws from the MEB panel, opening the panel and clamping it in place, then removing electrical connectors from their sockets, cutting cords that hold electrical cables to the MEB panel, replacing the panel, and finally reversing the previous procedures. Methods for handling tools used in our SMSR procedure, along with details of the tool designs are discussed in this paper.

  13. 33 CFR 127.1405 - Repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS GAS Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Hazardous Gas Maintenance § 127.1405 Repairs. Each operator of a...) Welding and cutting meet NFPA 51B....

  14. 33 CFR 127.1405 - Repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS GAS Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Hazardous Gas Maintenance § 127.1405 Repairs. Each operator of a...) Welding and cutting meet NFPA 51B....

  15. 33 CFR 127.1405 - Repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS GAS Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Hazardous Gas Maintenance § 127.1405 Repairs. Each operator of a...) Welding and cutting meet NFPA 51B....

  16. 33 CFR 127.1405 - Repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS GAS Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Hazardous Gas Maintenance § 127.1405 Repairs. Each operator of a...) Welding and cutting meet NFPA 51B....

  17. Conceptual approaches to lung injury and repair.

    PubMed

    Zemans, Rachel L; Henson, Peter M; Henson, Jan E; Janssen, William J

    2015-03-01

    Lung injury and repair is a broad topic that includes many cell types and is relevant to the pathogenesis of most lung diseases. Here, we focus on injury and repair of the alveolus, the principal function of which is to achieve gas exchange. The many cell types and structures present in the alveolus are discussed, with emphasis on their interactions in both health and disease. We define injury as damage resulting in impaired gas exchange; physiologic repair, then, requires restoration of normal alveolar architecture and function. The role of inflammation in both injury and repair of structural alveolar cells, particularly epithelial cells, as well as mechanisms of resolution of inflammation will be addressed. Finally, emphasis is placed on the importance of addressing quantitatively the dynamic and complex multidirectional interactions between the many alveolar cell types and structures in three dimensions over time and in relating such mechanistic studies to physiologic outcomes and human disease. PMID:25830855

  18. Systems Maintenance Automated Repair Tasks (SMART)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    SMART is an interactive decision analysis and refinement software system that uses evaluation criteria for discrepant conditions to automatically provide and populate a document/procedure with predefined steps necessary to repair a discrepancy safely, effectively, and efficiently. SMART can store the tacit (corporate) knowledge merging the hardware specification requirements with the actual "how to" repair methods, sequences, and required equipment, all within a user-friendly interface. Besides helping organizations retain repair knowledge in streamlined procedures and sequences, SMART can also help them in saving processing time and expense, increasing productivity, improving quality, and adhering more closely to safety and other guidelines. Though SMART was developed for Space Shuttle applications, its interface is easily adaptable to any hardware that can be broken down by component, subcomponent, discrepancy, and repair.

  19. Light-Curing Adhesive Repair Tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allred, Ronald; Haight, Andrea Hoyt

    2009-01-01

    Adhesive tapes, the adhesive resins of which can be cured (and thereby rigidized) by exposure to ultraviolet and/or visible light, are being developed as repair patch materials. The tapes, including their resin components, consist entirely of solid, low-outgassing, nonhazardous or minimally hazardous materials. They can be used in air or in vacuum and can be cured rapidly, even at temperatures as low as -20 C. Although these tapes were originally intended for use in repairing structures in outer space, they can also be used on Earth for quickly repairing a wide variety of structures. They can be expected to be especially useful in situations in which it is necessary to rigidize tapes after wrapping them around or pressing them onto the parts to be repaired.

  20. Highway Repair: A New Silicosis Threat

    PubMed Central

    Valiante, David J.; Schill, Donald P.; Rosenman, Kenneth D.; Socie, Edward

    2004-01-01

    Objectives. We describe an emerging public health concern regarding silicosis in the fast-growing highway repair industry. Methods. We examined highway construction trends, silicosis surveillance case data, and environmental exposure data to evaluate the risk of silicosis among highway repair workers. We reviewed silicosis case data from the construction industry in 3 states that have silicosis registries, and we conducted environmental monitoring for silica at highway repair work sites. Results. Our findings indicate that a large population of highway workers is at risk of developing silicosis from exposure to crystalline silica. Conclusions. Exposure control methods, medical screenings, protective health standards, and safety-related contract language are necessary for preventing future occupational disease problems among highway repair workers. PMID:15117715