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Sample records for repair protein xrcc1

  1. Purification of mammalian DNA repair protein XRCC1

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, I.

    1995-11-01

    Malfunctioning DNA repair systems lead to cancer mutations, and cell death. XRCC1 (X-ray Repair Cross Complementing) is a human DNA repair gene that has been found to fully correct the x-ray repair defect in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell mutant EM9. The corresponding protein (XRCC1) encoded by this gene has been linked to a DNA repair pathway known as base excision repair, and affects the activity of DNA ligase III. Previously, an XRCC1 cDNA minigene (consisting of the uninterrupted coding sequence for XRCC1 protein followed by a decahistidine tag) was constructed and cloned into vector pET-16b for the purpose of: (1) overproduction of XRCC1 in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells; and (2) to facilitate rapid purification of XRCC1 from these systems. A vector is basically a DNA carrier that allows recombinant protein to be cloned and overexpressed in host cells. In this study, XRCC1 protein was overexpressed in E. coli and purified by immobilized metal affinity chromatography. Currently, the XRCC1 minigene is being inserted into a new vector [pET-26b(+)] in hopes to increase overexpression and improve purification. Once purified XRCC1 can be crystallized for structural studies, or studied in vitro for its biological function.

  2. Partial loss of the DNA repair scaffolding protein, Xrcc1, results in increased brain damage and reduced recovery from ischemic stroke in mice.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Somnath; Canugovi, Chandrika; Yoon, Jeong Seon; Wilson, David M; Croteau, Deborah L; Mattson, Mark P; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2015-07-01

    Oxidative DNA damage is mainly repaired by base excision repair (BER). Previously, our laboratory showed that mice lacking the BER glycosylases 8-oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (Ogg1) or nei endonuclease VIII-like 1 (Neil1) recover more poorly from focal ischemic stroke than wild-type mice. Here, a mouse model was used to investigate whether loss of 1 of the 2 alleles of X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 1 (Xrcc1), which encodes a nonenzymatic scaffold protein required for BER, alters recovery from stroke. Ischemia and reperfusion caused higher brain damage and lower functional recovery in Xrcc1(+/-) mice than in wild-type mice. Additionally, a greater percentage of Xrcc1(+/-) mice died as a result of the stroke. Brain samples from human individuals who died of stroke and individuals who died of non-neurological causes were assayed for various steps of BER. Significant losses of thymine glycol incision, abasic endonuclease incision, and single nucleotide incorporation activities were identified, as well as lower expression of XRCC1 and NEIL1 proteins in stroke brains compared with controls. Together, these results suggest that impaired BER is a risk factor in ischemic brain injury and contributes to its recovery. PMID:25971543

  3. XRCC1 and Base Excision Repair Balance in Response to Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Mutamba, James T.; Svilar, David; Prasongtanakij, Somsak; Wang, Xiao-Hong; Lin, Ying-Chih; Dedon, Peter C.; Sobol, Robert W.; Engelward, Bevin P.

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation associated reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONs), including peroxynitrite (ONOO−) and nitric oxide (NO· ), create base lesions that potentially play a role in the toxicity and large-scale genomic rearrangements associated with many malignancies. Nevertheless, little is known about the functional role of base excision repair (BER) deficiencies following exposure to RONs. Here, we explore the role of XRCC1 in modulating the levels of RONs-induced genotoxicity. XRCC1 is a scaffold protein critical for BER for which polymorphisms modulate the risk of cancer. We exploited CHO and human glioblastoma cell lines engineered to carry varied levels of BER components to study XRCC1. Cytotoxicity and SSB-intermediate levels were evaluated following exposure to the ONOO− donor, SIN-1, and to gaseous NO·. XRCC1 null cells are slightly more sensitive to SIN-1 toxicity. To explore the potential importance of XRCC1 in response to NO· -induced lesions, we used small-scale bioreactors to expose cells to NO· and found that XRCC1 does not impact genotoxicity in CHO cells, suggesting a minimal role for XRCC1 in response to RONs. However, using a molecular beacon assay to measure AAG-mediated lesion removal in vitro, we found that XRCC1 facilitates AAG-initiated BER of two key NO· -induced lesions: 1,N6-ethenoadenine and hypoxanthine. Furthermore, overexpression of AAG rendered XRCC1 cells sensitive to NO· -induced DNA damage and toxicity. These results show that AAG is a key glycosylase in response to NO· exposure and that the cellular and functional impact of XRCC1 depends upon the level of AAG. These studies are some of the first to assess the functional role of XRCC1 in response to NO·, and demonstrate the importance of BER balance when considering the impact of XRCC1 polymorphisms in response to RONs. PMID:22041025

  4. Down-regulation of ERK1/2 and AKT-mediated X-ray repair cross-complement group 1 protein (XRCC1) expression by Hsp90 inhibition enhances the gefitinib-induced cytotoxicity in human lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tung, Chun-Liang; Jian, Yi-Jun; Syu, Jhan-Jhang; Wang, Tai-Jing; Chang, Po-Yuan; Chen, Chien-Yu; Jian, Yun-Ting; Lin, Yun-Wei

    2015-05-15

    Gefitinib (Iressa{sup R}, ZD1839) is a selective epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) that blocks growth factor-mediated cell proliferation and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) and AKT signaling activation. It has been shown that inhibition of Hsp90 function can enhance antitumor activity of EGFR-TKI. XRCC1 is an important scaffold protein in base excision repair, which could be regulated by ERK1/2 and AKT pathways. However, the role of ERK1/2 and AKT-mediated XRCC1 expression in gefitinib alone or combination with an Hsp90 inhibitor-induced cytotoxicity in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells has not been identified. In this study, gefitinib treatment decreased XRCC1 mRNA and protein expression through ERK1/2 and AKT inactivation in two NSCLC cells, A549 and H1975. Knocking down XRCC1 expression by transfection with small interfering RNA of XRCC1 enhanced the cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition of gefitinib. Combining treatment of gefitinib with an Hsp90 inhibitor resulted in enhancing the reduction of XRCC1 protein and mRNA levels in gefitinib-exposed A549 and H1975 cells. Compared to a single agent alone, gefitinib combined with an Hsp90 inhibitor resulted in cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition synergistically in NSCLC cells. Furthermore, transfection with constitutive active MKK1 or AKT vectors rescued the XRCC1 protein level as well as the cell survival suppressed by an Hsp90 inhibitor and gefitinib. These findings suggested that down-regulation of XRCC1 can enhance the sensitivity of gefitinib for NSCLC cells. - Highlights: • Gefitinib treatment decreased XRCC1 mRNA and protein expression in NSCLC cells. • Knocking down XRCC1 expression enhanced the cytotoxic effect of gefitinib. • Gefitinib combined with an Hsp90 inhibitor resulted in synergistically cytotoxicity.

  5. The cAMP signaling system inhibits the repair of {gamma}-ray-induced DNA damage by promoting Epac1-mediated proteasomal degradation of XRCC1 protein in human lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Eun-Ah; Juhnn, Yong-Sung

    2012-06-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP signaling system inhibits repair of {gamma}-ray-induced DNA damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP signaling system inhibits DNA damage repair by decreasing XRCC1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP signaling system decreases XRCC1 expression by promoting its proteasomal degradation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The promotion of XRCC1 degradation by cAMP signaling system is mediated by Epac1. -- Abstract: Cyclic AMP is involved in the regulation of metabolism, gene expression, cellular growth and proliferation. Recently, the cAMP signaling system was found to modulate DNA-damaging agent-induced apoptosis by regulating the expression of Bcl-2 family proteins and inhibitors of apoptosis. Thus, we hypothesized that the cAMP signaling may modulate DNA repair activity, and we investigated the effects of the cAMP signaling system on {gamma}-ray-induced DNA damage repair in lung cancer cells. Transient expression of a constitutively active mutant of stimulatory G protein (G{alpha}sQL) or treatment with forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase activator, augmented radiation-induced DNA damage and inhibited repair of the damage in H1299 lung cancer cells. Expression of G{alpha}sQL or treatment with forskolin or isoproterenol inhibited the radiation-induced expression of the XRCC1 protein, and exogenous expression of XRCC1 abolished the DNA repair-inhibiting effect of forskolin. Forskolin treatment promoted the ubiquitin and proteasome-dependent degradation of the XRCC1 protein, resulting in a significant decrease in the half-life of the protein after {gamma}-ray irradiation. The effect of forskolin on XRCC1 expression was not inhibited by PKA inhibitor, but 8-pCPT-2 Prime -O-Me-cAMP, an Epac-selective cAMP analog, increased ubiquitination of XRCC1 protein and decreased XRCC1 expression. Knockdown of Epac1 abolished the effect of 8-pCPT-2 Prime -O-Me-cAMP and restored XRCC1 protein level following {gamma}-ray irradiation. From

  6. HSP90 regulates DNA repair via the interaction between XRCC1 and DNA polymerase β

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Qingming; Inanc, Burcu; Schamus, Sandy; Wang, Xiao-hong; Wei, Leizhen; Brown, Ashley R.; Svilar, David; Sugrue, Kelsey F.; Goellner, Eva M.; Zeng, Xuemei; Yates, Nathan A.; Lan, Li; Vens, Conchita; Sobol, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Cellular DNA repair processes are crucial to maintain genome stability and integrity. In DNA base excision repair, a tight heterodimer complex formed by DNA polymerase β (Polβ) and XRCC1 is thought to facilitate repair by recruiting Polβ to DNA damage sites. Here we show that disruption of the complex does not impact DNA damage response or DNA repair. Instead, the heterodimer formation is required to prevent ubiquitylation and degradation of Polβ. In contrast, the stability of the XRCC1 monomer is protected from CHIP-mediated ubiquitylation by interaction with the binding partner HSP90. In response to cellular proliferation and DNA damage, proteasome and HSP90-mediated regulation of Polβ and XRCC1 alters the DNA repair complex architecture. We propose that protein stability, mediated by DNA repair protein complex formation, functions as a regulatory mechanism for DNA repair pathway choice in the context of cell cycle progression and genome surveillance. PMID:25423885

  7. XRCC1 and base excision repair balance in response to nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Mutamba, James T; Svilar, David; Prasongtanakij, Somsak; Wang, Xiao-Hong; Lin, Ying-Chih; Dedon, Peter C; Sobol, Robert W; Engelward, Bevin P

    2011-12-10

    Inflammation associated reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONs), including peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) and nitric oxide (NO), create base lesions that potentially play a role in the toxicity and large genomic rearrangements associated with many malignancies. Little is known about the role of base excision repair (BER) in removing these endogenous DNA lesions. Here, we explore the role of X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) in attenuating RONs-induced genotoxicity. XRCC1 is a scaffold protein critical for BER for which polymorphisms modulate the risk of cancer. We exploited CHO and human glioblastoma cell lines engineered to express varied levels of BER proteins to study XRCC1. Cytotoxicity and the levels of DNA repair intermediates (single-strand breaks; SSB) were evaluated following exposure of the cells to the ONOO(-) donor, SIN-1, and to gaseous NO. XRCC1 null cells were slightly more sensitive to SIN-1 than wild-type cells. We used small-scale bioreactors to expose cells to NO and found that XRCC1-deficient CHO cells were not sensitive. However, using a molecular beacon assay to test lesion removal in vitro, we found that XRCC1 facilitates AAG-initiated excision of two key NO-induced DNA lesions: 1,N(6)-ethenoadenine and hypoxanthine. Furthermore, overexpression of AAG rendered XRCC1-deficient cells sensitive to NO-induced DNA damage. These results show that AAG is a key glycosylase for BER of NO-induced DNA damage and that XRCC1's role in modulating sensitivity to RONs is dependent upon the cellular level of AAG. This demonstrates the importance of considering the expression of other components of the BER pathway when evaluating the impact of XRCC1 polymorphisms on cancer risk. PMID:22041025

  8. Down-regulation of ERK1/2 and AKT-mediated X-ray repair cross-complement group 1 protein (XRCC1) expression by Hsp90 inhibition enhances the gefitinib-induced cytotoxicity in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tung, Chun-Liang; Jian, Yi-Jun; Syu, Jhan-Jhang; Wang, Tai-Jing; Chang, Po-Yuan; Chen, Chien-Yu; Jian, Yun-Ting; Lin, Yun-Wei

    2015-05-15

    Gefitinib (Iressa(R), ZD1839) is a selective epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) that blocks growth factor-mediated cell proliferation and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) and AKT signaling activation. It has been shown that inhibition of Hsp90 function can enhance antitumor activity of EGFR-TKI. XRCC1 is an important scaffold protein in base excision repair, which could be regulated by ERK1/2 and AKT pathways. However, the role of ERK1/2 and AKT-mediated XRCC1 expression in gefitinib alone or combination with an Hsp90 inhibitor-induced cytotoxicity in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells has not been identified. In this study, gefitinib treatment decreased XRCC1 mRNA and protein expression through ERK1/2 and AKT inactivation in two NSCLC cells, A549 and H1975. Knocking down XRCC1 expression by transfection with small interfering RNA of XRCC1 enhanced the cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition of gefitinib. Combining treatment of gefitinib with an Hsp90 inhibitor resulted in enhancing the reduction of XRCC1 protein and mRNA levels in gefitinib-exposed A549 and H1975 cells. Compared to a single agent alone, gefitinib combined with an Hsp90 inhibitor resulted in cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition synergistically in NSCLC cells. Furthermore, transfection with constitutive active MKK1 or AKT vectors rescued the XRCC1 protein level as well as the cell survival suppressed by an Hsp90 inhibitor and gefitinib. These findings suggested that down-regulation of XRCC1 can enhance the sensitivity of gefitinib for NSCLC cells. PMID:25662161

  9. SNF2H interacts with XRCC1 and is involved in repair of H2O2-induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Yoshiko; Shimizu, Shinji; Yasuhira, Shinji; Horiuchi, Saburo

    2016-07-01

    The protein XRCC1 has no inherent enzymatic activity, and is believed to function in base excision repair as a dedicated scaffold component that coordinates other DNA repair factors. Repair foci clearly represent the recruitment and accumulation of DNA repair factors at sites of damage; however, uncertainties remain regarding their organization in the context of nuclear architecture and their biological significance. Here we identified the chromatin remodeling factor SNF2H/SMARCA5 as a novel binding partner of XRCC1, with their interaction dependent on the casein kinase 2-mediated constitutive phosphorylation of XRCC1. The proficiency of repairing H2O2-induced damage was strongly impaired by SNF2H knock-down, and similar impairment was observed with knock-down of both XRCC1 and SNF2H simultaneously, suggesting their role in a common repair pathway. Most SNF2H exists in the nuclear matrix fraction, forming salt extraction-resistant foci-like structures in unchallenged nuclei. Remarkably, damage-induced formation of both PAR and XRCC1 foci depended on SNF2H, and the PAR and XRCC1 foci co-localized with the SNF2H foci. We propose a model in which a base excision repair complex containing damaged chromatin is recruited to specific locations in the nuclear matrix for repair, with this recruitment mediated by XRCC1-SNF2H interaction. PMID:27268481

  10. Influence of XRCC1 Genetic Polymorphisms on Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Damage and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Sterpone, Silvia; Cozzi, Renata

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that ionizing radiation (IR) can damage DNA through a direct action, producing single- and double-strand breaks on DNA double helix, as well as an indirect effect by generating oxygen reactive species in the cells. Mammals have evolved several and distinct DNA repair pathways in order to maintain genomic stability and avoid tumour cell transformation. This review reports important data showing a huge interindividual variability on sensitivity to IR and in susceptibility to developing cancer; this variability is principally represented by genetic polymorphisms, that is, DNA repair gene polymorphisms. In particular we have focussed on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of XRCC1, a gene that encodes for a scaffold protein involved basically in Base Excision Repair (BER). In this paper we have reported and presented recent studies that show an influence of XRCC1 variants on DNA repair capacity and susceptibility to breast cancer. PMID:20798883

  11. Temporal activation of XRCC1-mediated DNA repair is essential for muscle differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Al-Khalaf, Mohammad H; Blake, Leanne E; Larsen, Brian D; Bell, Ryan A; Brunette, Steve; Parks, Robin J; Rudnicki, Michael A; McKinnon, Peter J; Jeffrey Dilworth, F; Megeney, Lynn A

    2016-01-01

    Transient DNA strand break formation has been identified as an effective means to enhance gene expression in living cells. In the muscle lineage, cell differentiation is contingent upon the induction of caspase-mediated DNA strand breaks, which act to establish the terminal gene expression program. This coordinated DNA nicking is rapidly resolved, suggesting that myoblasts may deploy DNA repair machinery to stabilize the genome and entrench the differentiated phenotype. Here, we identify the base excision repair pathway component XRCC1 as an indispensable mediator of muscle differentiation. Caspase-triggered XRCC1 repair foci form rapidly within differentiating myonuclei, and then dissipate as the maturation program proceeds. Skeletal myoblast deletion of Xrcc1 does not have an impact on cell growth, yet leads to perinatal lethality, with sustained DNA damage and impaired myofiber development. Together, these results demonstrate that XRCC1 manages a temporally responsive DNA repair process to advance the muscle differentiation program. PMID:27462438

  12. High XRCC1 Protein Expression Is Associated with Poorer Survival in Patients with Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Mei-Kim; Patel, Mihir R.; Yin, Xiao-Ying; Sundaram, Sneha; Fritchie, Karen; Zhao, Ni; Liu, Yufeng; Freemerman, Alex J.; Wilkerson, Matthew D.; Walter, Vonn; Weissler, Mark C.; Shockley, William W.; Couch, Marion E.; Zanation, Adam M.; Hackman, Trevor; Chera, Bhishamjit S.; Harris, Stephen L.; Miller, C. Ryan; Thorne, Leigh B.; Hayward, Michele C.; Funkhouser, William K.; Olshan, Andrew F.; Shores, Carol G.; Makowski, Liza; Hayes, D. Neil

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated X-ray repair complementing defective repair in Chinese hamster cells 1 (XRCC1) protein in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients in association with outcome. Experimental Design XRCC1 protein expression was assessed by immunohistochemical (IHC) staining of pretreatment tissue samples in 138 consecutive HNSCC patients treated with surgery (n = 31), radiation (15), surgery and radiation (23), surgery and adjuvant chemoradiation (17), primary chemoradiation (51), and palliative measures (1). Results Patients with high XRCC1 expression by IHC (n = 77) compared with patients with low XRCC1 expression (n = 60) had poorer median overall survival (OS; 41.0 months vs. OS not reached, P = 0.009) and poorer progression-free survival (28.0 months vs. 73.0 months, P = 0.031). This association was primarily due to patients who received chemoradiation (median OS of high- and low-XRCC1 expression patients, 35.5 months and not reached respectively, HR 3.48; 95% CI: 1.44–8.38; P = 0.006). In patients treated with nonchemoradiation modalities, there was no survival difference by XRCC1 expression. In multivariable analysis, high XRCC1 expression and p16INK4a-positive status were independently associated with survival in the overall study population (HR = 2.62; 95% CI: 1.52–4.52; P < 0.001 and HR = 0.21; 95% CI: 0.06–0.71; P = 0.012, respectively) and among chemoradiation patients (HR = 6.02; 95% CI: 2.36–15.37; P < 0.001 and HR = 0.26; 95% CI: 0.08–0.92, respectively; P = 0.037). Conclusions In HNSCC, high XRCC1 protein expression is associated with poorer survival, particularly in patients receiving chemoradiation. Future validation of these findings may enable identification of HNSCC expressing patients who benefit from chemoradiation treatment. PMID:21908577

  13. Decreased DNA repair gene XRCC1 expression is associated with radiotherapy-induced acute side effects in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Batar, Bahadir; Guven, Gulgun; Eroz, Seda; Bese, Nuran Senel; Guven, Mehmet

    2016-05-10

    DNA repair plays a critical role in response to ionizing radiation (IR) and developing of radiotherapy induced normal tissue reactions. In our study, we investigated the association of radiotherapy related acute side effects, with X-ray repair cross complementing group 1 (XRCC1) and Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) DNA repair gene expression levels, their changes in protein expression and DNA damage levels in breast cancer patients. The study included 40 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer; an experimental case group (n=20) with acute side effects and the control group (n=20) without side effects. For gene and protein expression analysis, lymphocytes were cultured for 72 h and followed by in vitro 2 Gray (Gy) gamma-irradiation. For detection of DNA damage levels, lymphocytes were irradiated with in vitro 2 Gy gamma-rays and followed by incubation for 72 h. XRCC1 mRNA and protein expression levels were significantly higher in controls than in experimental cases (P=0.020). In terms of DNA damage levels, an increased frequency of micronucleus (MN) was observed in experimental cases versus controls, but this association was not significant (P=0.206). We also observed a significant negative correlation between MN frequency and XRCC1 protein levels in experimental (r=-0.469, P=0.037) vs control (r=-0.734, P<0.001). Our results suggested that decreased XRCC1 expression levels might be associated with the increased risk of therapeutic IR-related acute side effects in patients with breast cancer. PMID:26826460

  14. Modulation of oxidative DNA damage by repair enzymes XRCC1 and hOGG1.

    PubMed

    Rihs, Hans-Peter; Marczynski, Boleslaw; Lotz, Anne; Raulf-Heimsoth, Monika; Brüning, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The influence of DNA repair gene polymorphisms (XRCC1: Arg194Trp, Arg280His, Arg399Gln; APE1: Asp148Glu; hOGG1: Ser326Cys) on oxidative DNA damage is controversial and was investigated in 214 German workers with occupational exposure to vapors and aerosols of bitumen,compared to 87 German construction workers without exposure, who were part of the Human Bitumen Study. Genotypes were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and actual smoking habits by a questionnaire and cotinine analysis. Oxidative DNA damage in white blood cells (WBC) collected pre- and postshift was measured as 8-oxodGuo adducts/10(6) dGuo by a hjigh-performance liquid chromatography electron capture detection (HPLC-ECD) method, followed by calculation of the difference between post- and preshift values (Δ8-oxodGuo/10(6) dGuo). The 214 bitumen exposed workers showed higher median Δ8-oxodGuo values than the 87 references. In the whole study group (n=301) there was a trend for increasing adduct values for XRCC1 Arg(GG)399Gln(AA) during a shift, especially in nonsmokers (n=108. Referents (n=87) displayed a similar trend for hOGG1 Ser(CC)326Cys(GG). In contrast, XRCC1 Arg(GG)280His(AA) showed a decrease of median Δ8-oxodGuo/10(6) dGuo values in workers with exposure to vapors and aerosols of bitumen (n=214), especially in smokers (n=145). XRCC1 Arg194Trp and APE1 Asp148Glu displayed no marked association with Δ8-oxodGuo levels. Data indicate that the combination of different variants in DNA damage repair enzymes may modulate the production of 8-oxoguanine adducts in WBC produced by xenobiotics during a shift. PMID:22686320

  15. Molecular cloning of the human XRCC1 gene, which corrects defective DNA strand break repair and sister chromatid exchange.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, L H; Brookman, K W; Jones, N J; Allen, S A; Carrano, A V

    1990-01-01

    We describe the cloning and function of the human XRCC1 gene, which is the first mammalian gene isolated that affects cellular sensitivity to ionizing radiation. The CHO mutant EM9 has 10-fold-higher sensitivity to ethyl methanesulfonate, 1.8-fold-higher sensitivity to ionizing radiation, a reduced capacity to rejoin single-strand DNA breaks, and a 10-fold-elevated level of sister chromatid exchange compared with the CHO parental cells. The complementing human gene was cloned from a cosmid library of a tertiary transformant. Two cosmid clones produced transformants that showed approximately 100% correction of the repair defect in EM9 cells, as determined by the kinetics of strand break repair, cell survival, and the level of sister chromatid exchange. A nearly full-length clone obtained from the pcD2 human cDNA expression library gave approximately 80% correction of EM9, as determined by the level of sister chromatid exchange. Based on an analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the cDNA insert compared with that of the 5' end of the gene from a cosmid clone, the cDNA clone appeared to be missing approximately 100 bp of transcribed sequence, including 26 nucleotides of coding sequence. The cDNA probe detected a single transcript of approximately 2.2 kb in HeLa polyadenylated RNA by Northern (RNA) blot hybridization. From the open reading frame and the positions of likely start sites for transcription and translation, the size of the putative XRCC1 protein is 633 amino acids (69.5 kDa). The size of the XRCC1 gene is 33 kb, as determined by localizing the endpoints on a restriction endonuclease site map of one cosmid clone. The deduced amino acid sequence did not show significant homology with any protein in the protein sequence data bases examined. Images PMID:2247054

  16. Curcumin downregulates p38 MAPK-dependent X-ray repair cross-complement group 1 (XRCC1) expression to enhance cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tung, Chun-Liang; Jian, Yi-Jun; Chen, Jyh-Cheng; Wang, Tai-Jing; Chen, Wen-Ching; Zheng, Hao-Yu; Chang, Po-Yuan; Liao, Kai-Sheng; Lin, Yun-Wei

    2016-06-01

    Cisplatin is a well-studied and widely used chemotherapeutic agent and is effective in the treatment of the advanced human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Curcumin is a yellow pigment derived from the rhizome of Curcuma longa and has been proved to have antioxidant and antitumor properties. XRCC1 is an important scaffold protein involved in base excision repair and plays an important role in the development of lung cancer. In this study, we characterize the role of curcumin in the cytotoxicity, p38 MAPK activation, and XRCC1 expression affected by cisplatin in NSCLC cells. We show that curcumin enhanced the cytotoxicity induced by cisplatin in two NSCLC cells, A549 and H1703. Treatment with cisplatin alone increased XRCC1 mRNA and protein expression through p38 MAPK activation. Moreover, SB2023580 (p38 inhibitor) decreased the XRCC1 mRNA and protein stability upon cisplatin treatment. Knockdown of XRCC1 in NSCLC cells by transfection of XRCC1 siRNA or inactivation of p38 MAPK resulted in enhancing the cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition induced by cisplatin. Curcumin inhibited the expression of XRCC1 in cisplatin-exposed NSCLC cells. Furthermore, transfection with constitutive active MKK6 or HA-p38 MAPK vectors rescued the XRCC1 protein level and also the cell survival suppressed by cisplatin and curcumin combination in A549 and H1703 cells. These findings suggested that the downregulation of XRCC1 expression by curcumin can enhance the chemosensitivity of cisplatin in NSCLC cells. PMID:27026405

  17. A computational approach to determine susceptibility to cancer by evaluating the deleterious effect of nsSNP in XRCC1 gene on binding interaction of XRCC1 protein with ligase III.

    PubMed

    Singh, Preety Kadian; Mistry, Kinnari N

    2016-01-15

    Several reports suggest that non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms affect the function of XRCC1 which impairs DNA repair capacity and thus increases risk to diseases like cancer. In our study, we predicted the most damaging nsSNPs using a computational approach and analysed its functional impact on the XRCC1 and LIG3 interaction. SNP rs2307166 was predicted to be deleterious using eight software programs: SIFT, PolyPhen, PANTHER, PhD-SNP, nsSNPAnalyzer, SNPS&GO, SNAP and I-Mutant. Protein structural analysis was performed using Swiss PDB viewer, and PyMOL. Xenoview was used for molecular dynamic simulation and energy minimisation. Finally, PatchDock and FireDock were used to analyse the interactions of XRCC1 and LIG3. By comparing the results we found that the mutant protein has less binding energy and the interacting amino acids than native protein. In silico analysis predicted rs2307166 to be more damaging than three other extensively studied SNPs. Identification of this SNP will help in determining the susceptibility of the individual to cancer, their prognosis and further treatment. PMID:26449312

  18. Decreased expression of DNA repair genes (XRCC1, ERCC1, ERCC2, and ERCC4) in squamous intraepithelial lesion and invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, Deepti; Banerjee, Ayan; Pathak, Sujata; Jain, Sunesh K; Singh, Neeta

    2013-05-01

    Reduced DNA repair might affect the risk of progression from infection with carcinogenic human papillomavirus (HPV), the etiologic agent for cervical cancer (CC), to persistent HPV infection, and hence to cervical pre-cancer and cancer. We assessed the variation in baseline expression of base excision repair gene XRCC1 and three nucleotide excision repair genes ERCC1, ERCC2, and ERCC4 and the risk of developing cervical cancer. A hospital-based case-control study was designed with 50 invasive cervical cancer patients, 40 squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) patients and 85 controls subjects. RT-qPCR and Western blotting was used to quantitate in vitro the mRNA and protein levels in fresh CC, SIL and normal cervix tissue. The levels of XRCC1, ERCC2, ERCC4, and ERCC1 transcripts and their respective proteins were lower in cervical cancer and SILs as compared to controls (p ≤ 0.001, 0.001, 0.001, and 0.025, respectively). In multivariate logistic regression analysis (adjusting for parity, age at first child birth, use of oral contraceptives, smoking status), low expression of XRCC1, ERCC2, ERCC4, and ERCC1 was associated with a significant increased risk for CC and SIL. Our results suggest that individuals whose expression of XRCC1, ERCC4, ERCC2, and ERCC1 are reduced may be at a higher risk of developing SIL which eventually leads to invasive cervical carcinoma. Moreover, independently also the reduced expression of these genes can directly lead to cervical cancer progression. PMID:23435956

  19. The XRCC1 phosphate-binding pocket binds poly (ADP-ribose) and is required for XRCC1 function

    PubMed Central

    Breslin, Claire; Hornyak, Peter; Ridley, Andrew; Rulten, Stuart L.; Hanzlikova, Hana; Oliver, Antony W.; Caldecott, Keith W.

    2015-01-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) is synthesized at DNA single-strand breaks and can promote the recruitment of the scaffold protein, XRCC1. However, the mechanism and importance of this process has been challenged. To address this issue, we have characterized the mechanism of poly (ADP-ribose) binding by XRCC1 and examined its importance for XRCC1 function. We show that the phosphate-binding pocket in the central BRCT1 domain of XRCC1 is required for selective binding to poly (ADP-ribose) at low levels of ADP-ribosylation, and promotes interaction with cellular PARP1. We also show that the phosphate-binding pocket is required for EGFP-XRCC1 accumulation at DNA damage induced by UVA laser, H2O2, and at sites of sub-nuclear PCNA foci, suggesting that poly (ADP-ribose) promotes XRCC1 recruitment both at single-strand breaks globally across the genome and at sites of DNA replication stress. Finally, we show that the phosphate-binding pocket is required following DNA damage for XRCC1-dependent acceleration of DNA single-strand break repair, DNA base excision repair, and cell survival. These data support the hypothesis that poly (ADP-ribose) synthesis promotes XRCC1 recruitment at DNA damage sites and is important for XRCC1 function. PMID:26130715

  20. The XRCC1 phosphate-binding pocket binds poly (ADP-ribose) and is required for XRCC1 function.

    PubMed

    Breslin, Claire; Hornyak, Peter; Ridley, Andrew; Rulten, Stuart L; Hanzlikova, Hana; Oliver, Antony W; Caldecott, Keith W

    2015-08-18

    Poly (ADP-ribose) is synthesized at DNA single-strand breaks and can promote the recruitment of the scaffold protein, XRCC1. However, the mechanism and importance of this process has been challenged. To address this issue, we have characterized the mechanism of poly (ADP-ribose) binding by XRCC1 and examined its importance for XRCC1 function. We show that the phosphate-binding pocket in the central BRCT1 domain of XRCC1 is required for selective binding to poly (ADP-ribose) at low levels of ADP-ribosylation, and promotes interaction with cellular PARP1. We also show that the phosphate-binding pocket is required for EGFP-XRCC1 accumulation at DNA damage induced by UVA laser, H2O2, and at sites of sub-nuclear PCNA foci, suggesting that poly (ADP-ribose) promotes XRCC1 recruitment both at single-strand breaks globally across the genome and at sites of DNA replication stress. Finally, we show that the phosphate-binding pocket is required following DNA damage for XRCC1-dependent acceleration of DNA single-strand break repair, DNA base excision repair, and cell survival. These data support the hypothesis that poly (ADP-ribose) synthesis promotes XRCC1 recruitment at DNA damage sites and is important for XRCC1 function. PMID:26130715

  1. XRCC1 Arg399Gln was associated with repair capacity for DNA damage induced by occupational chromium exposure

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Occupational chromium exposure may induce DNA damage and lead to lung cancer and other work-related diseases. DNA repair gene polymorphisms, which may alter the efficiency of DNA repair, thus may contribute to genetic susceptibility of DNA damage. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the genetic variations of 9 major DNA repair genes could modulate the hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI))-induced DNA damage. Findings The median (P25-P75) of Olive tail moment was 0.93 (0.58–1.79) for individuals carrying GG genotype of XRCC1 Arg399Gln (G/A), 0.73 (0.46–1.35) for GA heterozygote and 0.50 (0.43–0.93) for AA genotype. Significant difference was found among the subjects with three different genotypes (P = 0.048) after adjusting the confounding factors. The median of Olive tail moment of the subjects carrying A allele (the genotypes of AA and GA) was 0.66 (0.44–1.31), which was significantly lower than that of subjects with GG genotype (P = 0.043). The A allele conferred a significantly reduced risk of DNA damage with the OR of 0.39 (95% CI: 0.15–0.99, P = 0.048). No significant association was found between the XRCC1Arg194Trp, ERCC1 C8092A, ERCC5 His1104Asp, ERCC6 Gly399Asp, GSTP1 Ile105Val, OGG1 Ser326Cys, XPC Lys939Gln, XPD Lys751Gln and DNA damage. Conclusion The polymorphism of Arg399Gln in XRCC1 was associated with the Cr (VI)- induced DNA damage. XRCC1 Arg399Gln may serve as a genetic biomarker of susceptibility for Cr (VI)- induced DNA damage. PMID:22642904

  2. XRCC1 and XPD DNA repair gene polymorphisms: A potential risk factor for glaucoma in the Pakistani population

    PubMed Central

    Yousaf, Sajeela; Khan, Muhammad Imran; Micheal, Shazia; Akhtar, Farah; Ali, Syeda Hafiza Benish; Riaz, Moeen; Ali, Mahmood; Lall, Pramila; Waheed, Nadia Khalida; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Ahmed, Asifa

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The present study was designed to determine the association of polymorphisms of the DNA repair genes X-ray cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) (c.1316G>A [rs25487]) and xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group D (XPD) (c.2298A>C [rs13181]) with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and primary closed-angle glaucoma (PCAG). Methods In this prospective case-control study, polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was used to study the association of XRCC1 and XPD with 160 POAG patients, 163 PCAG patients, and 193 unaffected controls. Results XRCC1 rs25487 was found to be significantly associated specifically with male POAG patients (χ2=13.2 [p=0.001]), only for the dominant model (odds ratio [OR]=2.65 [95% confidence interval [CI]=1.44–4.85], p<0.005). In addition XPD rs13181 was also found to be associated with male POAG patients (χ2=12.1 [p<0.005]), for both dominant (OR=2.44 [95% CI=1.33–4.47], p<0.005) as well as recessive model (OR=3.62 [95% CI=1.45–9.01], p<0.01). Combined genotypes of both the genes revealed that the heterozygote AC/GA was significantly associated with the male POAG patients (z=3.00 [p<0.001]). The AA/GG genotype was present at a higher frequency in the male controls and the AA/GA in the female controls and could thus have a protective role in males and females, respectively. Conclusions We postulate that defects in the DNA repair genes XRCC1 and XPD may possibly be associated with the progression of POAG in male patients of Pakistani origin. PMID:21617750

  3. Sealing of chromosomal DNA nicks during nucleotide excision repair requires XRCC1 and DNA ligase III alpha in a cell-cycle-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Moser, Jill; Kool, Hanneke; Giakzidis, Ioannis; Caldecott, Keith; Mullenders, Leon H F; Fousteri, Maria I

    2007-07-20

    Impaired gap filling and sealing of chromosomal DNA in nucleotide excision repair (NER) leads to genome instability. XRCC1-DNA ligase IIIalpha (XRCC1-Lig3) plays a central role in the repair of DNA single-strand breaks but has never been implicated in NER. Here we show that XRCC1-Lig3 is indispensable for ligation of NER-induced breaks and repair of UV lesions in quiescent cells. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that two distinct complexes differentially carry out gap filling in NER. XRCC1-Lig3 and DNA polymerase delta colocalize and interact with NER components in a UV- and incision-dependent manner throughout the cell cycle. In contrast, DNA ligase I and DNA polymerase epsilon are recruited to UV-damage sites only in proliferating cells. This study reveals an unexpected and key role for XRCC1-Lig3 in maintenance of genomic integrity by NER in both dividing and nondividing cells and provides evidence for cell-cycle regulation of NER-mediated repair synthesis in vivo. PMID:17643379

  4. DNA Repair Gene (XRCC1) Polymorphism (Arg399Gln) Associated with Schizophrenia in South Indian Population: A Genotypic and Molecular Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Sujitha, S. P.; Kumar, D. Thirumal; Doss, C. George Priya; Aavula, K.; Ramesh, R.; Lakshmanan, S.; Gunasekaran, S.; Anilkumar, G.

    2016-01-01

    This paper depicts the first report from an Indian population on the association between the variant Arg399Gln of XRCC1 locus in the DNA repair system and schizophrenia, the debilitating disease that affects 1% of the world population. Genotypic analysis of a total of 523 subjects (260 patients and 263 controls) revealed an overwhelming presence of Gln399Gln in the case subjects against the controls (P < 0.0068), indicating significant level of association of this nsSNP with schizophrenia; the Gln399 allele frequency was also perceptibly more in cases than in controls (p < 0.003; OR = 1.448). The results of the genotypic studies were further validated using pathogenicity and stability prediction analysis employing computational tools [I-Mutant Suite, iStable, PolyPhen2, SNAP, and PROVEAN], with a view toassess the magnitude of deleteriousness of the mutation. The pathogenicity analysis reveals that the nsSNP could be deleterious inasmuch as it could affect the functionality of the gene, and interfere with protein function. Molecular dynamics simulation of 60ns was performed using GROMACS to analyse structural change due to a mutation (Arg399Gln) that was never examined before. RMSD, RMSF, hydrogen bonds, radius of gyration and SASA analysis showedthe existence of asignificant difference between the native and the mutant protein. The present study gives astrong indication that the XRCC1 locus deserves serious attention, as it could be a potential candidatecontributing to the etio-pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:26824244

  5. DNA-PKcs and PARP1 Bind to Unresected Stalled DNA Replication Forks Where They Recruit XRCC1 to Mediate Repair.

    PubMed

    Ying, Songmin; Chen, Zhihui; Medhurst, Annette L; Neal, Jessica A; Bao, Zhengqiang; Mortusewicz, Oliver; McGouran, Joanna; Song, Xinming; Shen, Huahao; Hamdy, Freddie C; Kessler, Benedikt M; Meek, Katheryn; Helleday, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    A series of critical pathways are responsible for the detection, signaling, and restart of replication forks that encounter blocks during S-phase progression. Small base lesions may obstruct replication fork progression and processing, but the link between repair of small lesions and replication forks is unclear. In this study, we investigated a hypothesized role for DNA-PK, an important enzyme in DNA repair, in cellular responses to DNA replication stress. The enzyme catalytic subunit DNA-PKcs was phosphorylated on S2056 at sites of stalled replication forks in response to short hydroxyurea treatment. Using DNA fiber experiments, we found that catalytically active DNA-PK was required for efficient replication restart of stalled forks. Furthermore, enzymatically active DNA-PK was also required for PARP-dependent recruitment of XRCC1 to stalled replication forks. This activity was enhanced by preventing Mre11-dependent DNA end resection, suggesting that XRCC1 must be recruited early to an unresected stalled fork. We also found that XRCC1 was required for effective restart of a subset of stalled replication forks. Overall, our work suggested that DNA-PK and PARP-dependent recruitment of XRCC1 is necessary to effectively protect, repair, and restart stalled replication forks, providing new insight into how genomic stability is preserved. Cancer Res; 76(5); 1078-88. ©2015 AACR. PMID:26603896

  6. Repair of radiation-induced heat-labile sites is independent of DNA-PKcs, XRCC1 or PARP

    SciTech Connect

    Stenerlöw, Bo; Karlsson, Karin H.; Radulescu, Irina; Rydberg, Bjorn; Stenerlow, Bo

    2008-04-29

    Ionizing radiation induces a variety of different DNA lesions: in addition to the most critical DNA damage, the DSB, numerous base alterations, SSBs and other modifications of the DNA double-helix are formed. When several non-DSB lesions are clustered within a short distance along DNA, or close to a DSB, they may interfere with the repair of DSBs and affect the measurement of DSB induction and repair. We have previously shown that a substantial fraction of DSBs measured by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) are in fact due to heat-labile sites (HLS) within clustered lesions, thus reflecting an artifact of preparation of genomic DNA at elevated temperature. To further characterize the influence of HLS on DSB induction and repair, four human cell lines (GM5758, GM7166, M059K, U-1810) with apparently normal DSB rejoining were tested for bi-phasic rejoining after gamma irradiation. When heat-released DSBs were excluded from the measurements the fraction of fast rejoining decreased to less than 50% of the total. However, neither the half-times of the fast (t{sub 1/2} = 7-8 min) or slow (t{sub 1/2} = 2.5 h) DSB rejoining were changed significantly. At t=0 the heat-released DSBs accounted for almost 40% of the DSBs, corresponding to 10 extra DSB/cell/Gy in the initial DSB yield. These heat-released DSBs were repaired within 60-90 min in all tested cells, including M059K cells treated with wortmannin or DNA-PKcs defect M059J cells. Furthermore, cells lacking XRCC1 or Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) rejoined both total DSBs and heat-released DSBs similar to normal cells. In summary, the presence of heat-labile sites have a substantial impact on DSB induction yields and DSB rejoining rates measured by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and HLS repair is independent of DNA-PKcs, XRCC1 and PARP.

  7. Oxidation State of the XRCC1 N-terminal Domain Regulates DNA Polymerase Beta Binding Affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Cuneo, M.; London, R

    2010-01-01

    Formation of a complex between the XRCC1 N-terminal domain (NTD) and DNA polymerase {beta} (Pol {beta}) is central to base excision repair of damaged DNA. Two crystal forms of XRCC1-NTD complexed with Pol {beta} have been solved, revealing that the XRCC1-NTD is able to adopt a redox-dependent alternate fold, characterized by a disulfide bond, and substantial variations of secondary structure, folding topology, and electrostatic surface. Although most of these structural changes occur distal to the interface, the oxidized XRCC1-NTD forms additional interactions with Pol {beta}, enhancing affinity by an order of magnitude. Transient disulfide bond formation is increasingly recognized as an important molecular regulatory mechanism. The results presented here suggest a paradigm in DNA repair in which the redox state of a scaffolding protein plays an active role in organizing the repair complex.

  8. Association study between XRCC1 gene polymorphisms and sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Coppedè, Fabio; Migheli, Francesca; Lo Gerfo, Annalisa; Fabbrizi, Maria Rita; Carlesi, Cecilia; Mancuso, Michelangelo; Corti, Stefania; Mezzina, Nicoletta; del Bo, Roberto; Comi, Giacomo P; Siciliano, Gabriele; Migliore, Lucia

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible contribution of three common functional polymorphisms in the DNA repair protein X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1), namely Arg194Trp (rs1799782), Arg280His (rs25489) and Arg399Gln (rs25487), to sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (SALS). We genotyped 206 Italian SALS patients and 203 matched controls for XRCC1 Arg194Trp, Arg280His and Arg399Gln polymorphisms by means of PCR/RFLP technique, searching for association between any of the studied polymorphisms and disease risk, age and site of onset. We observed a statistically significant difference in XRCC1 Gln399 allele frequencies between SALS cases and controls (0.39/0.28; p=0.001). The present study suggests that the XRCC1 Arg399Gln polymorphism might contribute to SALS risk. PMID:19707910

  9. Recent developments with the human repair genes ERCC2, ERCC4, and XRCC1

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Caldecott, K.W.; Brookman, K.W.; Weber, C.A.; Salazar, E.S.; Takayama, K.; Fornace, A.J.

    1992-11-06

    ERCC2 was first identified as a gene on human chromosome 19 that complemented the UV sensitivity of CHO UV5 cells in somatic cell hybrids. Subsequent studies localized ERCC2 to the same chromosomal region (19q13.2--13.3) as the ERCC1 gene and showed that the two genes were less than 250 kb apart. Cloning of ERCC2 was accomplished by transfection of genomic DNA into UV5 cells and rescue of the gene from a secondary transformant. Recovery of the gene was aided by the presence of repetitive sequences that were detected on Southern blots with a probe for Alu-family repeats. ERCC2, which is 19 kb in size, quantitatively corrected the UV sensitivity and incision defect in UV5 cells upon transfection. An ERCC2 CDNA clone was recovered from the pcD2 expression library. Although this clone was truncated at the 5 in. end, it conferred transient, but not stable, correction to UV5 cells upon transfection. Based on genomic sequence, this clone was extended by oligonucleotide addition to obtain minigene constructs in which the complete open reading frame (ORF) was present. Translation of the ERCC2 ORF gives an amino acid sequence that has 72% similarity with the S. cerevisiae RAD3 protein, which encodes a DNA helicase.

  10. XRCC1 suppresses somatic hypermutation and promotes alternative nonhomologous end joining in Igh genes

    PubMed Central

    Saribasak, Huseyin; Maul, Robert W.; Cao, Zheng; McClure, Rhonda L.; Yang, William; McNeill, Daniel R.; Wilson, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) deaminates cytosine to uracil in immunoglobulin genes. Uracils in DNA can be recognized by uracil DNA glycosylase and abasic endonuclease to produce single-strand breaks. The breaks are repaired either faithfully by DNA base excision repair (BER) or mutagenically to produce somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR). To unravel the interplay between repair and mutagenesis, we decreased the level of x-ray cross-complementing 1 (XRCC1), a scaffold protein involved in BER. Mice heterozygous for XRCC1 showed a significant increase in the frequencies of SHM in Igh variable regions in Peyer’s patch cells, and of double-strand breaks in the switch regions during CSR. Although the frequency of CSR was normal in Xrcc1+/− splenic B cells, the length of microhomology at the switch junctions decreased, suggesting that XRCC1 also participates in alternative nonhomologous end joining. Furthermore, Xrcc1+/− B cells had reduced Igh/c-myc translocations during CSR, supporting a role for XRCC1 in microhomology-mediated joining. Our results imply that AID-induced single-strand breaks in Igh variable and switch regions become substrates simultaneously for BER and mutagenesis pathways. PMID:21967769

  11. Polymorphisms of the DNA repair genes XRCC1, XRCC3, XPD, interaction with environmental exposures, and bladder cancer risk in a case-control study in northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Shen, Min; Hung, Rayjean J; Brennan, Paul; Malaveille, Christian; Donato, Francesco; Placidi, Donatella; Carta, Angela; Hautefeuille, Agnes; Boffetta, Paolo; Porru, Stefano

    2003-11-01

    Tobacco smoking and occupational exposures are the main known risk factors for bladder cancer, causing direct and indirect damage to DNA. Repair of DNA damage is under genetic control, and DNA repair genes may play a key role in maintaining genome integrity and preventing cancer development. Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes resulting in variation of DNA repair efficiency may therefore be associated with bladder cancer risk. A hospital-based case-control study was conducted in Brescia, Italy, to assess the relationship between polymorphisms in DNA repair genes XRCC1 (Arg(399)Gln), XRCC3 (Thr(241)Met), and XPD (Lys(751)Gln) and bladder cancer risk. A total of 201 male incident bladder cancer cases and 214 male controls with urological nonneoplastic diseases were recruited and frequency-matched on age, period, and hospital of recruitment. Detailed information was collected using a semistructured questionnaire on demographic, dietary, environmental, and occupational factors. Genotypes were determined by PCR-RFLP analysis. The XRCC3 codon 241 variant genotype exhibited a protective effect against bladder cancer [odds ratio (OR), 0.63; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.42-0.93], which was prominent among heavy smokers (OR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.28-0.88) but not among never and light smokers. No overall impact of the XRCC1 codon 399 polymorphism was found (OR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.59-1.28), but a protective influence of the homozygous variant was suggested among heavy smokers (OR, 0.38; 95% CI, 0.14-1.02). XPD polymorphisms did not show an association with bladder cancer (OR, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.62-1.37). There was no statistical evidence of an interaction between these three genetic polymorphisms and either tobacco smoking or occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and aromatic amines. The XRCC3 codon 241 polymorphism had an overall protective effect against bladder cancer that was most apparent among heavy smokers. Similarly, the XRCC1 codon 399 polymorphism also had

  12. Nuclear localization of the DNA repair scaffold XRCC1: Uncovering the functional role of a bipartite NLS

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kirby, Thomas W.; Gassman, Natalie R.; Smith, Cassandra E.; Pedersen, Lars C.; Gabel, Scott A.; Sobhany, Mack; Wilson, Samuel H.; London, Robert E.

    2015-08-25

    We have characterized the nuclear localization signal (NLS) of XRCC1 structurally using X-ray crystallography and functionally using fluorescence imaging. Crystallography and binding studies confirm the bipartite nature of the XRCC1 NLS interaction with Importin α (Impα) in which the major and minor binding motifs are separated by >20 residues, and resolve previous inconsistent determinations. Binding studies of peptides corresponding to the bipartite NLS, as well as its major and minor binding motifs, to both wild-type and mutated forms of Impα reveal pronounced cooperative binding behavior that is generated by the proximity effect of the tethered major and minor motifs ofmore » the NLS. The cooperativity stems from the increased local concentration of the second motif near its cognate binding site that is a consequence of the stepwise binding behavior of the bipartite NLS. We predict that the stepwise dissociation of the NLS from Impα facilitates unloading by providing a partially complexed intermediate that is available for competitive binding by Nup50 or the Importin β binding domain. This behavior gives a basis for meeting the intrinsically conflicting high affinity and high flux requirements of an efficient nuclear transport system.« less

  13. Nuclear localization of the DNA repair scaffold XRCC1: Uncovering the functional role of a bipartite NLS

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Thomas W.; Gassman, Natalie R.; Smith, Cassandra E.; Pedersen, Lars C.; Gabel, Scott A.; Sobhany, Mack; Wilson, Samuel H.; London, Robert E.

    2015-08-25

    We have characterized the nuclear localization signal (NLS) of XRCC1 structurally using X-ray crystallography and functionally using fluorescence imaging. Crystallography and binding studies confirm the bipartite nature of the XRCC1 NLS interaction with Importin α (Impα) in which the major and minor binding motifs are separated by >20 residues, and resolve previous inconsistent determinations. Binding studies of peptides corresponding to the bipartite NLS, as well as its major and minor binding motifs, to both wild-type and mutated forms of Impα reveal pronounced cooperative binding behavior that is generated by the proximity effect of the tethered major and minor motifs of the NLS. The cooperativity stems from the increased local concentration of the second motif near its cognate binding site that is a consequence of the stepwise binding behavior of the bipartite NLS. We predict that the stepwise dissociation of the NLS from Impα facilitates unloading by providing a partially complexed intermediate that is available for competitive binding by Nup50 or the Importin β binding domain. This behavior gives a basis for meeting the intrinsically conflicting high affinity and high flux requirements of an efficient nuclear transport system.

  14. Association of XRCC1 Trp194 allele with risk of breast cancer, and Ki67 protein status in breast tumor tissues

    PubMed Central

    Jalali, Chiya; Ghaderi, Bayazid; Amini, Sabrieh; Abdi, Mohammad; Roshani, Daem

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the role of this polymorphism as a risk factor for breast cancer in Kurdish patients and to investigate the possible association between Arg194Trp x-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) gene polymorphisms with clinical and histopathological outcomes of patients with breast cancer. Methods: A total of 100 breast cancer patients and 200 cancer-free controls in Kurdish population of Kurdistan state admitted to Tohid Hospital, Sanandaj, Kurdistan, Iran between January 2012 and May 2015 were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Tissue expression of estrogen receptor (ER), progesteron receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her2/neu), and Ki67 were evaluated by immunohistochemistry (IHC). The Arg194Trp genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction- restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Results: Our data showed that the risk for breast cancer increased significantly among the Trp variant of XRCC1. Statistically significant association was found between codon 194 polymorphisms and tissue expression of Ki67. Conclusion: The Trp allele of codon 194 XRCC1 is a potential risk factor for breast cancer in Kurdish ethnicity. Furthermore, effect of this polymorphism on clinical and histological features of breast cancer was significant. PMID:27279507

  15. JWA reverses cisplatin resistance via the CK2—XRCC1 pathway in human gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, W; Chen, Q; Wang, Q; Sun, Y; Wang, S; Li, A; Xu, S; Røe, O D; Wang, M; Zhang, R; Yang, L; Zhou, J

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the third most common malignancy in China, with a median 5-year survival of only 20%. Cisplatin has been used in first-line cancer treatment for several types of cancer including gastric cancer. However, patients are often primary resistant or develop acquired resistance resulting in relapse of the cancer and reduced survival. Recently, we demonstrated that the reduced expression of base excision repair protein XRCC1 and its upstream regulator JWA in gastric cancerous tissues correlated with a significant survival benefit of adjuvant first-line platinum-based chemotherapy as well as XRCC1 playing an important role in the DNA repair of cisplatin-resistant gastric cancer cells. In the present study, we demonstrated the role of JWA in cisplatin-induced DNA lesions and aquired cisplatin resistance in five cell-culture models: gastric epithelial cells GES-1, cisplatin-sensitive gastric cancer cell lines BGC823 and SGC7901, and the cisplatin-resistant gastric cancer cell lines BGC823/DDP and SGC7901/DDP. Our results indicated that JWA is required for DNA repair following cisplatin-induced double-strand breaks (DSBs) via XRCC1 in normal gastric epithelial cells. However, in gastric cancer cells, JWA enhanced cisplatin-induced cell death through regulation of DNA damage-induced apoptosis. The protein expression of JWA was significantly decreased in cisplatin-resistant cells and contributed to cisplatin resistance. Interestingly, as JWA upregulated XRCC1 expression in normal cells, JWA downregulated XRCC1 expression through promoting the degradation of XRCC1 in cisplatin-resistant gastric cancer cells. Furthermore, the negative regulation of JWA to XRCC1 was blocked due to the mutation of 518S/519T/523T residues of XRCC1, and indicating that the CK2 activated 518S/519T/523T phosphorylation is a key point in the regulation of JWA to XRCC1. In conclusion, we report for the first time that JWA regulated cisplatin-induced DNA damage and apoptosis through the

  16. Functional Polymorphisms of Base Excision Repair Genes XRCC1 and APEX1 Predict Risk of Radiation Pneumonitis in Patients With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Ming; Liao Zhongxing; Liu Zhensheng; Wang, Li-E; Gomez, Daniel; Komaki, Ritsuko; Wei Qingyi

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To explore whether functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of base-excision repair genes are predictors of radiation treatment-related pneumonitis (RP), we investigated associations between functional SNPs of ADPRT, APEX1, and XRCC1 and RP development. Methods and Materials: We genotyped SNPs of ADPRT (rs1136410 [V762A]), XRCC1 (rs1799782 [R194W], rs25489 [R280H], and rs25487 [Q399R]), and APEX1 (rs1130409 [D148E]) in 165 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who received definitive chemoradiation therapy. Results were assessed by both Logistic and Cox regression models for RP risk. Kaplan-Meier curves were generated for the cumulative RP probability by the genotypes. Results: We found that SNPs of XRCC1 Q399R and APEX1 D148E each had a significant effect on the development of Grade {>=}2 RP (XRCC1: AA vs. GG, adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 0.48, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.24-0.97; APEX1: GG vs. TT, adjusted HR = 3.61, 95% CI, 1.64-7.93) in an allele-dose response manner (Trend tests: p = 0.040 and 0.001, respectively). The number of the combined protective XRCC1 A and APEX1 T alleles (from 0 to 4) also showed a significant trend of predicting RP risk (p = 0.001). Conclusions: SNPs of the base-excision repair genes may be biomarkers for susceptibility to RP. Larger prospective studies are needed to validate our findings.

  17. Polymorphisms of XRCC1 and XRCC2 DNA Repair genes and Interaction with Environmental Factors Influence the Risk of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma in Northeast India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Seram Anil; Ghosh, Sankar Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Multiple genetic and environmental factors have been reported to play key role in the development of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Here, we investigated interactions of XRCC1 Arg399Gln and XRCC2 Arg188His polymorphisms and environmental factors in modulating susceptibility to NPC in Northeast India. One-hundred NPC patients, 90 first-degree relatives of patients and 120 controls were enrolled in the study. XRCC1 Arg399Gln and XRCC2 Arg188His polymorphisms were determined using PCR-RFLP, and the results were confirmed by DNA sequencing. Logistic regression (LR) and multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) approaches were applied for statistical analysis. The XRCC1 Gln/Gln genotype showed increased risk (OR=2.76; <0.024) of NPC. However, individuals with both XRCC1 and XRCC2 polymorphic variants had 3.2 fold elevated risk (<0.041). An enhanced risk of NPC was also observed in smoked meat (OR=4.07; P=0.004) and fermented fish consumers (OR=4.34, P=0.001), and tobacco-betel quid chewers (OR=7.00; P=0.0001) carrying XRCC1 polymorphic variants. However, smokers carrying defective XRCC1 gene showed the highest risk (OR = 7.47; <0.0001). On MDR analysis, the best model for NPC risk was the five-factor model combination of XRCC1 variant genotype, fermented fish, smoked meat, smoking and chewing (CVC=10/10; TBA=0.636; <0.0001); whereas in interaction entropy graphs, smoked meat and tobacco chewing showed synergistic interactions with XRCC1. These findings suggest that interaction of genetic and environmental factors might increase susceptibility to NPC in Northeast Indian populations. PMID:27356695

  18. Polymorphisms of ERCC1 and XRCC1 predict the overall survival of advanced gastric cancer patients receiving oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lijian; Yao, Ruyong; Fang, Shibao; Wang, Xiuwen; Li, Xin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of excision repair cross-complementing protein 1 (ERCC1) and X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 1 (XRCC1) gene polymorphisms in 89 patients receiving oxaliplatin/5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy as a first-line treatment regimen for advanced gastric cancer. ERCC1 codon 118C/T and XRCC1 codon 399A/G polymorphisms were identified using quantitative polymerase chain reactions, and the associations between disease control rate (DCR), median overall survival (mOS) and gene polymorphisms were analyzed. Following two cycles of chemotherapy, a complete response was observed in two patients, a partial response in 18 patients, stable disease in 38 patients and progressive disease in 31 patients. It was determined that ERCC1 and XRCC1 polymorphisms are not associated with DCR (P=0.662 and P=0.631, respectively). The mOS of patients exhibiting ERCC1 and XRCC1 polymorphisms was eight months, and although no significant association was identified between ERCC1 codon 118 genotypes and mOS (P>0.05), the combination of ERCC1 and XRCC1 polymorphisms, as well as the specific presence of the XRCC1 codon 399A/G polymorphism, was associated with mOS (P<0.05). Thus, the present study indicated that the XRCC1 polymorphism and the combination of XRCC1 and ERCC1 polymorphisms were independent predictors for mOS; however, the XRCC1 and ERCC1 genes were not able to predict the DCR. PMID:26770441

  19. SNPs of GSTM1, T1, P1, epoxide hydrolase and DNA repair enzyme XRCC1 and risk of urinary transitional cell carcinoma in southwestern Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, L.-I; Chiu, Allen W.; Huan, Steven K.; Chen, C.-L.; Wang, Y.-H.; Hsieh, F.-I; Chou, W.-L.; Wang, L.-H.; Chen, C.-J.

    2008-04-15

    A hospital-based case-control study was conducted near a former black-foot disease (BFD)-endemic area in southwestern Taiwan to examine the possible risk factors and genetic susceptibility for urinary transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). A total of 221 patients with pathologically confirmed TCC and 223 age-sex-matched control subjects from urology outpatient clinics were recruited between 1998 and 2002. The results showed that residency in the BFD area and consumption of well water for more than 10 years was a strong factor on urinary cancer risk (odds ratio [OR],8.16, 95% confidence interval [CI],3.34-19.90, p < 0.0001). Dose response relationship between average arsenic concentration in well water and TCC risk was also observed. Cigarette smoking played a relatively minor role in urinary carcinogenesis in this study. The GSTP1 Ile105Val A {yields} G polymorphism was significantly associated with cancer risk (A/G + G/G: OR = 0.60, 95%CI = 0.39-0.94, p = 0.02), and the effect of Val105 allele was largely confined to the subjects diagnosed earlier than 55 years old (A/G + G/G: OR,0.29; 95% CI, 0.09-0.87, p = 0.03). The results suggest that GSTP1 is a candidate for susceptibility locus and Ile105 allele may predispose individuals to early-onset urinary TCC. The GSTM1 null genotype was associated with tumors of high-invasiveness (OR,2.21; 95% CI, 1.34-4.73) as well as with early-onset TCC risk (OR,2.53; 95% CI, 0.97-6.59). Our preliminary results showed the XRCC1 Arg194Trp were associated with arsenic-related urinary TCC and the interaction between the genotype and the exposure was statistically significant. The modulating effect of the GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTP1 Ile105Val, EPHX Tyr113His and XRCC1 Arg280His on arsenic-related TCC risk was also suggestive. These observations implied that impaired metabolism of carcinogenic exposure as well as impaired DNA repair function play an important role in arsenic-related urinary transitional cell carcinogenesis.

  20. Microsatellite polymorphisms in DNA repair genes XRCC1, XRCC3 and XRCC5 in patients with gynecological tumors: association with late clinical radiosensitivity and cancer incidence.

    PubMed

    De Ruyck, K; Wilding, C S; Van Eijkeren, M; Morthier, R; Tawn, E J; Thierens, H

    2005-09-01

    This study investigates the association of microsatellite polymorphisms in XRCC1, XRCC3 and XRCC5 with the development of late radiation-induced radiotherapy reactions and examines the correlation between these microsatellites and cancer incidence. Sixty-two women with cervical or endometrial cancer treated with radiotherapy were included in the study. According to the CTCAEv3.0 scale, 22 patients showed late adverse radiotherapy reactions (grade 2 or more). PCR on lymphocyte DNA followed by automated fragment analysis was performed to examine the number of tandem repeat units at each locus. No significant association was found between the repeat length at any of the microsatellites in XRCC1, XRCC3 or XRCC5 and the incidence of late radiotherapy complications. Since higher odds ratios (ORs) were found for the rare XRCC1 [AC]11 and [AC]21 repeats (OR = 2.65, P = 0.325 and OR = 8.67, P = 0.093, respectively), the possible involvement of these small and large repeats in clinical radiosensitivity cannot be completely ruled out. When specific numbers of repeats were examined, no significant correlation was found between the microsatellite repeat length in XRCC1 and XRCC5 and cancer incidence. A weak correlation between XRCC3 [AC]16 homozygotes and cancer incidence was found (OR = 2.56, P = 0.055). A large-scale multicenter study of cancer patients with a high number of radiosensitive individuals is needed to clarify the value of rare polymorphic microsatellite repeats in XRCC1 and XRCC3 as a biomarker of clinical radiosensitivity or increased cancer risk. PMID:16137195

  1. A prospective study of XRCC1 haplotypes and their interaction with plasma carotenoids on breast cancer risk

    SciTech Connect

    Mohrenweiser, H W; Han, J; Hankinson, S E; De Vivo, I; Spiegelman, D; Tamimi, R M; Colditz, G A; Hunter, D J

    2004-01-15

    The XRCC1 protein is involved in the base excision repair pathway through interactions with other proteins. Polymorphisms in the XRCC1 gene may lead to variation in repair proficiency and confer inherited predisposition to cancer. We prospectively assessed the associations between polymorphisms and haplotypes in XRCC1 and breast cancer risk in a nested case-control study within the Nurses' Health Study (incident cases, n 1004; controls, n 1385). We further investigated gene-environment interactions between the XRCC1 variations and plasma carotenoids on breast cancer risk. We genotyped four haplotype-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms Arg {sup 194}Trp, C26602T, Arg{sup 399}Gln, and Gln{sup 632}Gln in the XRCC1 gene. Five common haplotypes accounted for 99% of the chromosomes in the present study population of mostly Caucasian women. We observed a marginally significant reduction in the risk of breast cancer among {sup 194}Trp carriers. As compared with no-carriers, women with at least one {sup 194}Trp allele had a multivariate odds ratio of 0.79 (95% of the confidence interval, 0.60 -1.04). The inferred haplotype harboring the {sup 194}Trp allele was more common in controls than in cases (6.6 versus 5.3%, P 0.07). We observed that the Arg {sup 194}Trp modified the inverse associations of plasma -carotene level (P, ordinal test for interaction 0.02) and plasma -carotene level (P, ordinal test for interaction 0.003) with breast cancer risk. No suggestion of an interaction was observed between the Arg {sup 194}Trp and cigarette smoking. Our results suggest an inverse association between XRCC1 {sup 194}Trp allele and breast cancer risk. The findings of the effect modification of the Arg {sup 194}Trp on the relations of plasma -and -carotene levels with breast cancer risk suggest a potential protective effect of carotenoids in breast carcinogenesis by preventing oxidative DNA damage.

  2. DNA polymerase β-dependent cell survival independent of XRCC1 expression.

    PubMed

    Horton, Julie K; Gassman, Natalie R; Dunigan, Brittany D; Stefanick, Donna F; Wilson, Samuel H

    2015-02-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is a primary mechanism for repair of base lesions in DNA such as those formed by exposure to the DNA methylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). Both DNA polymerase β (pol β)- and XRCC1-deficient mouse fibroblasts are hypersensitive to MMS. This is linked to a repair deficiency as measured by accumulation of strand breaks and poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR). The interaction between pol β and XRCC1 is important for recruitment of pol β to sites of DNA damage. Endogenous DNA damage can substitute for MMS-induced damage such that BER deficiency as a result of either pol β- or XRCC1-deletion is associated with sensitivity to PARP inhibitors. Pol β shRNA was used to knock down pol β in Xrcc1(+/+) and Xrcc1(-/-) mouse fibroblasts. We determined whether pol β-mediated cellular resistance to MMS and PARP inhibitors resulted entirely from coordination with XRCC1 within the same BER sub-pathway. We find evidence for pol β-dependent cell survival independent of XRCC1 expression for both types of agents. The results suggest a role for pol β-dependent, XRCC1-independent repair. PAR immunofluorescence data are consistent with the hypothesis of a decrease in repair in both pol β knock down cell variants. PMID:25541391

  3. DNA polymerase β-dependent cell survival independent of XRCC1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Julie K.; Gassman, Natalie R.; Dunigan, Brittany B.; Stefanick, Donna F.; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2014-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is a primary mechanism for repair of base lesions in DNA such as those formed by exposure to the DNA methylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). Both DNA polymerase β (pol β)- and XRCC1-deficient mouse fibroblasts are hypersensitive to MMS. This is linked to a repair deficiency as measured by accumulation of strand breaks and poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR). The interaction between pol β and XRCC1 is important for recruitment of pol β to sites of DNA damage. Endogenous DNA damage can substitute for MMS-induced damage such that BER deficiency as a result of either pol β- or XRCC1-deletion is associated with sensitivity to PARP inhibitors. Pol β shRNA was used to knock down pol β in Xrcc1+/+ and Xrcc1−/− mouse fibroblasts. We determined whether pol β-mediated cellular resistance to MMS and PARP inhibitors resulted entirely from coordination with XRCC1 within the same BER sub-pathway. We find evidence for pol β- dependent cell survival independent of XRCC1 expression for both types of agents. The results suggest a role for pol β-dependent, XRCC1-independent repair. PAR immunofluorescence data are consistent with the hypothesis of a decrease in repair in both pol β knock down cell variants. PMID:25541391

  4. XRCC1 haploinsufficiency in mice has little effect on aging, but adversely modifies exposure-dependent susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    McNeill, Daniel R.; Lin, Ping-Chang; Miller, Marshall G.; Pistell, Paul J.; de Souza-Pinto, Nadja C.; Fishbein, Kenneth W.; Spencer, Richard G.; Liu, Yie; Pettan-Brewer, Christina; Ladiges, Warren C.; Wilson, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative DNA damage plays a role in disease development and the aging process. A prominent participant in orchestrating the repair of oxidative DNA damage, particularly single-strand breaks, is the scaffold protein XRCC1. A series of chronological and biological aging parameters in XRCC1 heterozygous (HZ) mice were examined. HZ and wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 mice exhibit a similar median lifespan of ~26 months and a nearly identical maximal life expectancy of ~37 months. However, a number of HZ animals (7 of 92) showed a propensity for abdominal organ rupture, which may stem from developmental abnormalities given the prominent role of XRCC1 in endoderm and mesoderm formation. For other end-points evaluated—weight, fat composition, blood chemistries, condition of major organs, tissues and relevant cell types, behavior, brain volume and function, and chromosome and telomere integrity—HZ mice exhibited by-and-large a normal phenotype. Treatment of animals with the alkylating agent azoxymethane resulted in both liver toxicity and an increased incidence of precancerous lesions in the colon of HZ mice. Our study indicates that XRCC1 haploinsufficiency in mammals has little effect on chronological longevity and many key biological markers of aging in the absence of environmental challenges, but may adversely affect normal animal development or increase disease susceptibility to a relevant genotoxic exposure. PMID:21737425

  5. POLYMORPHISMS IN THE DNA BASE EXCISION REPAIR GENES APEX1 AND XRCC1 AND LUNG CANCER RISK IN XUAN WEI, CHINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The lung cancer mortality rate in Xuan Wei County is among the highest in China and has been attributed to exposure to indoor smoky coal emissions that contain very high levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Nucleotide excision repair (NER) plays a key role in revers...

  6. Association of -77T>C and Arg194trp polymorphisms of XRCC1 with risk of coronary artery diseases in Iranian population

    PubMed Central

    Pahlavanneshan, Saghar; Ahmadi, Amirhossein; Boroumand, Mohammadali; Sadeghian, Saeed; Behmanesh, Mehrdad

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death in both male and female worldwide. The main cause of CAD is the atherosclerosis of coronary arteries, which is, mostly caused by genetic alteration. 50% of such cases occur in mitotic cells where single-strand breaks occur spontaneously or due to ionizing radiation. X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 1 (XRCC1) as a key element, participate in the base excision repair (BER) and Single-strand Break Repair (SSBR) pathways. It has been suggested that XRCC1 functions as a scaffold protein able to coordinate and facilitate the various steps of DNA repair pathways. Two Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) (Arg194Trp and -77T>C) were reported to affect the function and expression of XRCC1, respectively. Materials and Methods: A case-control study was performed to investigate the relation between these polymorphisms and the CAD development. A population of 406 individuals was screened for SNPs by Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms (RFLP) method. Results: XRCC1 Arg194Trp polymorphism was associated with increased risk of CAD in examined population under a dominant model (Odds-ratio=2.604, P-value=0.001). Also the SNP of -77T>C revealed a protective role in the population under a dominant model (Odds-ratio=0.618, P-value=0.032). Conclusion: Our findings demonstrated a contributory role of these two SNPs in CAD. Furthermore, our results support the role of DNA damages and the malfunctions of DNA repair system in cardiovascular disease development in Iranian patients. PMID:27081465

  7. Association between Polymorphisms in XRCC1 Gene and Treatment Outcomes of Patients with Advanced Gastric Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhuo; Song, Jia; Wang, Jun; Guo, Xufeng; Yu, Shijie; Dong, Weiguo

    2014-01-01

    Background Many reports have shown inconsistent results on the relationship between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of X-ray repair cross complementing protein (XRCC1) gene and platinum-based chemotherapeutic efficacy. This meta-analysis aimed to summarize published data about the association between two SNPs of XRCC1 (Arg194Trp and Arg399Gln) and treatment outcomes of patients with advanced gastric cancer. Methodology/Principal Findings We retrieved the relevant articles from MEDLINE, Web of Knowledge, and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases. Studies were selected according to specific inclusion and exclusion criteria. Study quality was assessed according to the guidelines outlined by Hayden, et al. and PRISMA guidelines. We estimated the odds ratio (OR) for response rate versus no response after platinum-based chemotherapy. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were evaluated by pooled Cox proportional hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We found that none of the XRCC1 Arg194Trp and Arg399Gln polymorphisms was significantly associated with tumor response. Stratified analysis by ethnicity or sensitivity analysis also showed that XRCC1 SNPs were not related with chemotherapy response. Patients with minor variant A allele were likely to have poorer 2-year survival rate than those with G/G genotype. However, in the group of 5-year follow up, there was no significant association between the A allele and OS yet. Conclusions/Significance There is no evidence to support the use of XRCC1 Arg194Trp and Arg399Gln polymorphisms as prognostic predictors of TR and PFS in gastric patients treated with platinum-based chemotherapy. The relationship between minor variant A allele and OS requires further verification. PMID:24465544

  8. The Structural Basis for Partitioning of the XRCC1/DNA Ligase III-alpha BRCT-mediated Dimer Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    M Cuneo; S Gabel; J Krahn; M Ricker; R London

    2011-12-31

    The ultimate step common to almost all DNA repair pathways is the ligation of the nicked intermediate to form contiguous double-stranded DNA. In the mammalian nucleotide and base excision repair pathways, the ligation step is carried out by ligase III-{alpha}. For efficient ligation, ligase III-{alpha} is constitutively bound to the scaffolding protein XRCC1 through interactions between the C-terminal BRCT domains of each protein. Although structural data for the individual domains has been available, no structure of the complex has been determined and several alternative proposals for this interaction have been advanced. Interpretation of the models is complicated by the formation of homodimers that, depending on the model, may either contribute to, or compete with heterodimer formation. We report here the structures of both homodimer complexes as well as the heterodimer complex. Structural characterization of the heterodimer formed from a longer XRCC1 BRCT domain construct, including residues comprising the interdomain linker region, revealed an expanded heterodimer interface with the ligase III-{alpha} BRCT domain. This enhanced linker-mediated binding interface plays a significant role in the determination of heterodimer/homodimer selectivity. These data provide fundamental insights into the structural basis of BRCT-mediated dimerization, and resolve questions related to the organization of this important repair complex.

  9. The structural basis for partitioning of the XRCC1/DNA ligase III-[alpha] BRCT-mediated dimer complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Cuneo, Matthew J.; Gabel, Scott A.; Krahn, Joseph M.; Ricker, Melissa A.; London, Robert E.

    2011-11-17

    The ultimate step common to almost all DNA repair pathways is the ligation of the nicked intermediate to form contiguous double-stranded DNA. In the mammalian nucleotide and base excision repair pathways, the ligation step is carried out by ligase III-{alpha}. For efficient ligation, ligase III-{alpha} is constitutively bound to the scaffolding protein XRCC1 through interactions between the C-terminal BRCT domains of each protein. Although structural data for the individual domains has been available, no structure of the complex has been determined and several alternative proposals for this interaction have been advanced. Interpretation of the models is complicated by the formation of homodimers that, depending on the model, may either contribute to, or compete with heterodimer formation. We report here the structures of both homodimer complexes as well as the heterodimer complex. Structural characterization of the heterodimer formed from a longer XRCC1 BRCT domain construct, including residues comprising the interdomain linker region, revealed an expanded heterodimer interface with the ligase III-{alpha} BRCT domain. This enhanced linker-mediated binding interface plays a significant role in the determination of heterodimer/homodimer selectivity. These data provide fundamental insights into the structural basis of BRCT-mediated dimerization, and resolve questions related to the organization of this important repair complex.

  10. The PARP inhibitor Olaparib disrupts base excision repair of 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine lesions.

    PubMed

    Orta, Manuel Luis; Höglund, Andreas; Calderón-Montaño, José Manuel; Domínguez, Inmaculada; Burgos-Morón, Estefanía; Visnes, Torkild; Pastor, Nuria; Ström, Cecilia; López-lázaro, Miguel; Helleday, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Decitabine (5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, 5-azadC) is used in the treatment of Myelodysplatic syndrome (MDS) and Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML). Its mechanism of action is thought to involve reactivation of genes implicated in differentiation and transformation, as well as induction of DNA damage by trapping DNA methyltranferases (DNMT) to DNA. We demonstrate for the first time that base excision repair (BER) recognizes 5-azadC-induced lesions in DNA and mediates repair. We find that BER (XRCC1) deficient cells are sensitive to 5-azadC and display an increased amount of DNA single- and double-strand breaks. The XRCC1 protein co-localizes with DNMT1 foci after 5-azadC treatment, suggesting a novel and specific role of XRCC1 in the repair of trapped DNMT1. 5-azadC-induced DNMT foci persist in XRCC1 defective cells, demonstrating a role for XRCC1 in repair of 5-azadC-induced DNA lesions. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibition prevents XRCC1 relocation to DNA damage sites, disrupts XRCC1-DNMT1 co-localization and thereby efficient BER. In a panel of AML cell lines, combining 5-azadC and Olaparib cause synthetic lethality. These data suggest that PARP inhibitors can be used in combination with 5-azadC to improve treatment of MDS and AML. PMID:25074383

  11. XRCC1 Arg194Trp and Arg399Gln polymorphisms and arsenic methylation capacity are associated with urothelial carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, Chien-I; Huang, Ya-Li; Chen, Wei-Jen; Shiue, Horng-Sheng; Huang, Chao-Yuan; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Lin, Ying-Chin; Hsueh, Yu-Mei

    2014-09-15

    The association between DNA repair gene polymorphisms and bladder cancer has been widely studied. However, few studies have examined the correlation between urothelial carcinoma (UC) and arsenic or its metabolites. The aim of this study was to examine the association between polymorphisms of the DNA repair genes, XRCC1 Arg194Trp, XRCC1 Arg399Gln, XRCC3 Thr241Met, and XPD Lys751Gln, with urinary arsenic profiles and UC. To this end, we conducted a hospital-based case–control study with 324 UC patients and 647 age- and gender-matched non-cancer controls. Genomic DNA was used to examine the genotype of XRCC1 Arg194Trp, XRCC1 Arg399Gln, XRCC3 Thr241Met, and XPD Lys751Gln by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (PCR-RFLP). Urinary arsenic profiles were measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) linked with hydride generator and atomic absorption spectrometry. The XRCC1 399 Gln/Gln and 194 Arg/Trp and Trp/Trp genotypes were significantly related to UC, and the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95%CI) were 1.68 (1.03–2.75) and 0.66 (0.48–0.90), respectively. Participants with higher total urinary arsenic levels, a higher percentage of inorganic arsenic (InAs%) and a lower percentage of dimethylarsinic acid (DMA%) had a higher OR of UC. Participants carrying XRCC1 risk diplotypes G-C/G-C, A-C/A-C, and A-T/G-T, and who had higher total arsenic levels, higher InAs%, or lower DMA% compared to those with other XRCC1 diplotypes had a higher OR of UC. Our results suggest that the XRCC1 399 Gln/Gln and 194 Arg/Arg DNA repair genes play an important role in poor arsenic methylation capacity, thereby increasing the risk of UC in non-obvious arsenic exposure areas. - Highlights: • The XRCC1 399Gln/Gln genotype was significantly associated with increased OR of UC. • The XRCC1 194 Arg/Trp and Trp/Trp genotype had a significantly decreased OR of UC. • Combined effect of the XRCC1 genotypes and poor arsenic methylation capacity on

  12. XRCC1 and OGG1 Gene Polymorphisms and Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Sanjari Moghaddam, Ali; Nazarzadeh, Milad; Noroozi, Rezvan; Darvish, Hossein; Mosavi Jarrahi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Context: Known polymorphisms of DNA repair genes can be associated with the risk of many types of cancer. There is no consensus regarding association between XRCC1 and OGG1 with breast cancer (BC). Objectives: The aim of this study is to collect relevant published studies systematically. Data Sources: Sixty-two publications were identified through searching PubMed, PubMed Central, ISI web of knowledge, and reference list of related articles. Study Selection: We performed a systematic review according MOOSE guideline criteria. All longitudinal cohort and case-control studies investigating association of any type and grade of breast cancer with XRCC1 and OGG1 gene and their polymorphisms were eligible for initial inclusion. Data Extraction: Two authors screened titles and abstracts and extracted all needed information from eligible studies. Four research methodological components causing bias for the association between gene polymorphisms and breast cancer risk, including source of controls sampling, population ethnicity, sample size of studies and menopausal status of cases and controls was used for assessment of quality of studies Results: A total of 14,793 breast cancer cases and 15,409 controls were included in assessment of XRCC1 Arg194Trp. Four studies showed significant association and one study showed protective effect of XRCC1 Arg194Trp and BC. A total of 7,716 cases and 7,370 controls were included for XRCC1 Arg280His. Only one study showed significant association of XRCC1 Arg280His and breast cancer (OR = 1.82 (1.06 - 3.15). A total of 27,167 cases and 31,998 controls were included to estimate association between XRCC1 Arg399Gln polymorphism and breast cancer. Seven studies showed significant association and one showed protective effect of XRCC1 Arg399Gln and BC. A total of 9,417 cases and 11,087 controls were included for OGG1 Ser326Cys. Among studies focused on OGG1 Ser326Cys, none showed significant association with breast cancer. Conclusions

  13. Association of XPD (Lys751Gln) and XRCC1 (Arg280His) gene polymorphisms in myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Dolly; Korgaonkar, Seema; Shanmukhaiah, Chandrakala; Vundinti, Babu Rao

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) are heterogeneous hematopoietic disease characterized by ineffective haematopoiesis that frequently transforms into acute leukaemia. Alterations in many individual biologic pathways have been reported in MDS pathophysiology. Disease progression along the MDS, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) continuum is believed to be a consequence of stepwise accumulation of DNA mutations which infers a defect in DNA repair. The present study investigated the association between DNA repair genes (XRCC1, XRCC3, OGG1, XPD and RAD51) and the risk of developing MDS. The study was carried out in 92 primary MDS patients. The genotyping study was carried out by PCR-RFLP technique. We have studied seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of five DNA repair genes (XRCC1 (Arg194Trp, Arg280His, Arg399Gln), XRCC3, XPD, RAD51 and OGG1). Significantly, a high frequency of DNA repair gene XRCC1 (Arg280His) (p=0.05) and XPD (Lys751Gln) (p=0.01) polymorphism was observed in MDS patients compared to controls. The distribution of polymorphisms in MDS subgroups showed a significant association of XRCC1 with RAEB I compared to other subgroup. Though a high frequency of XRCC1 gene polymorphism was observed in farmers and tobacco chewers, it was not statistically significant. Our study suggests that XRCC1 (Arg280His) and XPD polymorphisms are associated with risk of MDS and XRCC1 polymorphism strongly associated with advanced MDS subgroup. Hence, these polymorphisms can be used as a prognostic marker in MDS. PMID:26482462

  14. Quantitative characterization of protein–protein complexes involved in base excision DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Moor, Nina A.; Vasil'eva, Inna A.; Anarbaev, Rashid O.; Antson, Alfred A.; Lavrik, Olga I.

    2015-01-01

    Base Excision Repair (BER) efficiently corrects the most common types of DNA damage in mammalian cells. Step-by-step coordination of BER is facilitated by multiple interactions between enzymes and accessory proteins involved. Here we characterize quantitatively a number of complexes formed by DNA polymerase β (Polβ), apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1), poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1), X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 1 (XRCC1) and tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (TDP1), using fluorescence- and light scattering-based techniques. Direct physical interactions between the APE1-Polβ, APE1-TDP1, APE1-PARP1 and Polβ-TDP1 pairs have been detected and characterized for the first time. The combined results provide strong evidence that the most stable complex is formed between XRCC1 and Polβ. Model DNA intermediates of BER are shown to induce significant rearrangement of the Polβ complexes with XRCC1 and PARP1, while having no detectable influence on the protein–protein binding affinities. The strength of APE1 interaction with Polβ, XRCC1 and PARP1 is revealed to be modulated by BER intermediates to different extents, depending on the type of DNA damage. The affinity of APE1 for Polβ is higher in the complex with abasic site-containing DNA than after the APE1-catalyzed incision. Our findings advance understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying coordination and regulation of the BER process. PMID:26013813

  15. Polymorphism of XRCC1, XRCC3, and XPD Genes and Risk of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bănescu, Claudia; Trifa, Adrian P.; Demian, Smaranda; Benedek Lazar, Erzsebeth; Dima, Delia; Duicu, Carmen; Dobreanu, Minodora

    2014-01-01

    The genetic polymorphisms of X-ray repair cross complementing group 1 (XRCC1), X-ray repair cross complementing group 3 (XRCC3), and xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group D (XPD) repair genes may lead to genetic instability and leukemogenesis. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the association between XRCC1 Arg399Gln, Arg280His and Arg194Trp, XRCC3 Thr241Met, and XPD Lys751Gln polymorphisms and the risk of developing CML in Romanian patients. A total of 156 patients diagnosed with CML and 180 healthy controls were included in this study. We found no association between CML and XRCC1 or XRCC3 variant genotypes in any of the investigated cases. A significant difference was observed in the variant genotype frequencies of the XPD Lys751Gln polymorphism between the patients with CML and control group (for variant homozygous genotypes, OR = 2.37; 95% CI = 1.20–4.67; P value = 0.016 and for combined heterozygous and variant homozygous genotypes, OR = 1.72; 95% CI = 1.10–2.69; P value = 0.019). This was also observed when analyzing the variant 751Gln allele (OR = 1.54; 95% CI = 1.13–2.11; P value = 0.008). Our results suggest that the XPD Lys751Gln variant genotype increases the risk of CML. PMID:24955348

  16. Polymorphism of XRCC1, XRCC3, and XPD genes and risk of chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bănescu, Claudia; Trifa, Adrian P; Demian, Smaranda; Benedek Lazar, Erzsebeth; Dima, Delia; Duicu, Carmen; Dobreanu, Minodora

    2014-01-01

    The genetic polymorphisms of X-ray repair cross complementing group 1 (XRCC1), X-ray repair cross complementing group 3 (XRCC3), and xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group D (XPD) repair genes may lead to genetic instability and leukemogenesis. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the association between XRCC1 Arg399Gln, Arg280His and Arg194Trp, XRCC3 Thr241Met, and XPD Lys751Gln polymorphisms and the risk of developing CML in Romanian patients. A total of 156 patients diagnosed with CML and 180 healthy controls were included in this study. We found no association between CML and XRCC1 or XRCC3 variant genotypes in any of the investigated cases. A significant difference was observed in the variant genotype frequencies of the XPD Lys751Gln polymorphism between the patients with CML and control group (for variant homozygous genotypes, OR = 2.37; 95% CI = 1.20-4.67; P value = 0.016 and for combined heterozygous and variant homozygous genotypes, OR = 1.72; 95% CI = 1.10-2.69; P value = 0.019). This was also observed when analyzing the variant 751Gln allele (OR = 1.54; 95% CI = 1.13-2.11; P value = 0.008). Our results suggest that the XPD Lys751Gln variant genotype increases the risk of CML. PMID:24955348

  17. Association studies of OGG1, XRCC1, XRCC2 and XRCC3 polymorphisms with differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    García-Quispes, Wilser-Andrés; Pérez-Machado, Giselle; Akdi, Abdelmounaim; Pastor, Susana; Galofré, Pere; Biarnés, Fina; Castell, Joan; Velázquez, Antonia; Marcos, Ricard

    2011-05-10

    The role of the DNA repair genes OGG1, XRCC1, XRCC2 and XRCC3 on differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) susceptibility was examined in 881 individuals (402 DTC and 479 controls). DNA repair genes were proposed as candidate genes, since the current data indicate that exposure to ionizing radiation is the only established factor in the development of thyroid cancer, especially when it occurs in early stages of life. We have genotyped DNA repair genes involved in base excision repair (BER) (OGG1, Ser326Cys; XRCC1, Arg280His and Arg399Gln), and homologous recombination repair (HRR) (XRCC2, Arg188His and XRCC3, ISV-14G). Genotyping was carried out using the iPLEX (Sequenom) technique. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed in a case-control study design. From all the studied polymorphism, only a positive association (OR=1.58, 95% CI 1.05-2.46, P=0.027) was obtained for XRCC1 (Arg280His). No associations were observed for the other polymorphisms. No effects of the histopathological type of tumor were found when the DTC patients were stratified according to the type of tumor. It must be emphasized that this study include the greater patients group, among the few studies carried out until now determining the role of DNA repair genes in thyroid cancer susceptibility. PMID:21414327

  18. The association between four SNPs of X-ray repair cross complementing protein 1 and the sensitivity to radiotherapy in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, YAOHONG; LUO, ZHAOYUN; YANG, LIYE; CHEN, SENMING; CHEN, CHUZHI; LIN, ZHIXIONG

    2016-01-01

    Early stage diagnosis and therapeutic outcomes of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma remain poor. In order to evaluate the association between 4 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of X-ray repair cross complementing protein 1 (XRCC1) and the sensitivity to radiotherapy in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), the present study identified 4 SNPs of XRCC1 and evaluated the distribution of these genotypes among patients with ESCC. Venous blood samples from 175 patients with ESCC were collected and DNA was extracted. The 4 SNPs of the XRCC1 gene fragment were amplified using three primer pairs, which were sequenced. The mismatches were analyzed and identified using Basic Local Alignment Search Tool software. The sensitivity to radiotherapy was graded as effective and non-effective, according to the treatment results of the patients. The present study successfully amplified and sequenced 4 SNPs of XRCC1 in 112 out of the 175 patients with ESCC. The effective response rate of radiotherapy was 84.8% among the 112 patients. The effective response rate of patients with no mutation in the SNPs was 74.3%, and the rate increased to 89.6% in patients that had ≥1 mutation out of the 4 SNPs (χ2=4.389; P=0.036). For G28152A and G28152A mutations the effective response rate of patients was 91.2% (χ2=4.014; P=0.045) and 91.5% (χ2=4.451; P=0.035), respectively, which was significantly different compared to patients with no mutation (P=0.045 and P=0.035, respectively). The present results suggest that the 4 SNPs of XRCC1 are associated with the effective response rate of radiotherapy in patients with ESCC. The mutation of SNP G28152A was particularly important and may be a potential genomic predictor for radiotherapy sensitivity in patients with ESCC. PMID:27123143

  19. Effect of APE1 T2197G (Asp148Glu) Polymorphism on APE1, XRCC1, PARP1 and OGG1 Expression in Patients with Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Juliana C.; Funck, Alexandre; Silva-Fernandes, Isabelle J. L.; Rabenhorst, Silvia H. B.; Martinez, Carlos A. R.; Ribeiro, Marcelo L.

    2014-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that genetic variation in base excision repair (BER) might modify colorectal adenoma risk. Thus, we evaluated the influence of APE1 T2197G (Asp148Glu) polymorphism on APE1, XRCC1, PARP1 and OGG1 expression in normal and tumor samples from patients with colorectal cancer. The results indicate a downregulation of OGG1 and an upregulation of XRCC1 expression in tumor tissue. Regarding the anatomical location of APE1, OGG1 and PARP-1, a decrease in gene expression was observed among patients with cancer in the rectum. In patients with or without some degree of tumor invasion, a significant downregulation in OGG1 was observed in tumor tissue. Interestingly, when taking into account the tumor stage, patients with more advanced grades (III and IV) showed a significant repression for APE1, OGG1 and PARP-1. XRCC1 expression levels were significantly enhanced in tumor samples and were correlated with all clinical and histopathological data. Concerning the polymorphism T2197G, GG genotype carriers exhibited a significantly reduced expression of genes of the BER repair system (APE1, XRCC1 and PARP1). In summary, our data show that patients with colorectal cancer present expression changes in several BER genes, suggesting a role for APE1, XRCC1, PARP1 and OGG1 and APE1 polymorphism in colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:25268610

  20. Effect of APE1 T2197G (Asp148Glu) polymorphism on APE1, XRCC1, PARP1 and OGG1 expression in patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Santos, Juliana C; Funck, Alexandre; Silva-Fernandes, Isabelle J L; Rabenhorst, Silvia H B; Martinez, Carlos A R; Ribeiro, Marcelo L

    2014-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that genetic variation in base excision repair (BER) might modify colorectal adenoma risk. Thus, we evaluated the influence of APE1 T2197G (Asp148Glu) polymorphism on APE1, XRCC1, PARP1 and OGG1 expression in normal and tumor samples from patients with colorectal cancer. The results indicate a downregulation of OGG1 and an upregulation of XRCC1 expression in tumor tissue. Regarding the anatomical location of APE1, OGG1 and PARP-1, a decrease in gene expression was observed among patients with cancer in the rectum. In patients with or without some degree of tumor invasion, a significant downregulation in OGG1 was observed in tumor tissue. Interestingly, when taking into account the tumor stage, patients with more advanced grades (III and IV) showed a significant repression for APE1, OGG1 and PARP-1. XRCC1 expression levels were significantly enhanced in tumor samples and were correlated with all clinical and histopathological data. Concerning the polymorphism T2197G, GG genotype carriers exhibited a significantly reduced expression of genes of the BER repair system (APE1, XRCC1 and PARP1). In summary, our data show that patients with colorectal cancer present expression changes in several BER genes, suggesting a role for APE1, XRCC1, PARP1 and OGG1 and APE1 polymorphism in colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:25268610

  1. Genetic Polymorphisms in XRCC1, CD3EAP, PPP1R13L, XPB, XPC, and XPF and the Risk of Chronic Benzene Poisoning in a Chinese Occupational Population

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Sha; Zhang, Guopei; Xiao, Mingyang; Zhang, Qianye; Zheng, Xiao; Cai, Yuan; Jin, Cuihong; Yang, Jinghua; Wu, Shengwen; Lu, Xiaobo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Individual variations in the capacity of DNA repair machinery to relieve benzene-induced DNA damage may be the key to developing chronic benzene poisoning (CBP), an increasingly prevalent occupational disease in China. ERCC1 (Excision repair cross complementation group 1) is located on chromosome 19q13.2–3 and participates in the crucial steps of Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER); moreover, we determined that one of its polymorphisms, ERCC1 rs11615, is a biomarker for CBP susceptibility in our previous report. Our aim is to further explore the deeper association between some genetic variations related to ERCC1 polymorphisms and CBP risk. Methods Nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of XRCC1 (X-ray repair cross-complementing 1), CD3EAP (CD3e molecule, epsilon associated protein), PPP1R13L (protein phosphatase 1, regulatory subunit 13 like), XPB (Xeroderma pigmentosum group B), XPC (Xeroderma pigmentosum group C) and XPF (Xeroderma pigmentosum group F) were genotyped by the Snapshot and TaqMan-MGB® probe techniques, in a study involving 102 CBP patients and 204 controls. The potential interactions between these SNPs and lifestyle factors, such as smoking and drinking, were assessed using a stratified analysis. Results An XRCC1 allele, rs25487, was related to a higher risk of CBP (P<0.001) even after stratifying for potential confounders. Carriers of the TT genotype of XRCC1 rs1799782 who were alcohol drinkers (OR = 8.000; 95% CI: 1.316–48.645; P = 0.022), male (OR = 9.333; 95% CI: 1.593–54.672; P = 0.019), and had an exposure of ≤12 years (OR = 2.612; 95% CI: 1.048–6.510; P = 0.035) had an increased risk of CBP. However, the T allele in PPP1R13L rs1005165 (P<0.05) and the GA allele in CD3EAP rs967591 (OR = 0.162; 95% CI: 0039~0.666; P = 0.037) decreased the risk of CBP in men. The haplotype analysis of XRCC1 indicated that XRCC1 rs25487A, rs25489G and rs1799782T (OR = 15.469; 95% CI: 5.536–43.225; P<0.001) were associated with a high

  2. Association between XRCC1 polymorphism 399 G->A and glioma among Caucasians: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The x-ray cross complementing group 1 gene (XRCC1) is crucial to proper repair of DNA damage such as single-strand DNA breaks. A non-synonymous polymorphism in XRCC1, 399 G → A, has been shown to reduce effectiveness of such DNA repair and has been associated with the risk of certain cancers. The known risk for glioma from high dose ionizing radiation makes associations between this polymorphism and glioma of particular interest. Methods A systematic literature review and meta-analysis was conducted to explore the association between XRCC1 399 G → A and glioma. Subgroup analyses by grade, gender, genotyping method, country in which study was conducted, and study size were conducted when data were available and validity of the results were assessed by influence analyses and exploration of potential publication bias. Results Six studies were eligible for meta-analysis including data on 2,362 Caucasian glioma cases and 3,085 Caucasian controls. Pooled analysis yielded a significant association between the variant of interest and risk of glioma (OR = 1.17, 95% CI: 1.05-1.30) which was found to be disproportionately driven by a single study. Exclusion of this study, in an influence analysis, produced no statistically significant evidence of association with glioma (OR = 1.10, 95% CI: 0.98-1.23), and no evidence of publication bias. Conclusions This meta-analysis does not suggest a major role of the XRCC1 399 G → A polymorphism in influencing risk of glioma among Caucasians. Future studies should report data separately for glioma subtypes to permit stratified analyses for Grade III and Grade IV glioma and examine other polymorphisms in this gene. PMID:23101479

  3. XRCC1 Polymorphism Associated With Late Toxicity After Radiation Therapy in Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Seibold, Petra; Behrens, Sabine; Schmezer, Peter; Helmbold, Irmgard; Barnett, Gillian; Coles, Charlotte; Yarnold, John; Talbot, Christopher J.; Imai, Takashi; Azria, David; Koch, C. Anne; Dunning, Alison M.; Burnet, Neil; Bliss, Judith M.; Symonds, R. Paul; Rattay, Tim; Suga, Tomo; Kerns, Sarah L.; and others

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in oxidative stress–related genes associated with risk of late toxicities in breast cancer patients receiving radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Using a 2-stage design, 305 SNPs in 59 candidate genes were investigated in the discovery phase in 753 breast cancer patients from 2 prospective cohorts from Germany. The 10 most promising SNPs in 4 genes were evaluated in the replication phase in up to 1883 breast cancer patients from 6 cohorts identified through the Radiogenomics Consortium. Outcomes of interest were late skin toxicity and fibrosis of the breast, as well as an overall toxicity score (Standardized Total Average Toxicity). Multivariable logistic and linear regression models were used to assess associations between SNPs and late toxicity. A meta-analysis approach was used to summarize evidence. Results: The association of a genetic variant in the base excision repair gene XRCC1, rs2682585, with normal tissue late radiation toxicity was replicated in all tested studies. In the combined analysis of discovery and replication cohorts, carrying the rare allele was associated with a significantly lower risk of skin toxicities (multivariate odds ratio 0.77, 95% confidence interval 0.61-0.96, P=.02) and a decrease in Standardized Total Average Toxicity scores (−0.08, 95% confidence interval −0.15 to −0.02, P=.016). Conclusions: Using a stage design with replication, we identified a variant allele in the base excision repair gene XRCC1 that could be used in combination with additional variants for developing a test to predict late toxicities after radiation therapy in breast cancer patients.

  4. A unified view of base excision repair: lesion-dependent protein complexes regulated by post-translational modification

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Karen H.; Sobol, Robert W.

    2007-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) proteins act upon a significantly broad spectrum of DNA lesions that result from endogenous and exogenous sources. Multiple sub-pathways of BER (short-path or long-patch) and newly designated DNA repair pathways (e.g., SSBR and NIR) that utilize BER proteins complicate any comprehensive understanding of BER and its role in genome maintenance, chemotherapeutic response, neurodegeneration, cancer or aging. Herein, we propose a unified model of BER, comprised of three functional processes: Lesion Recognition/Strand Scission, Gap Tailoring and DNA Synthesis/Ligation, each represented by one or more multiprotein complexes and coordinated via the XRCC1/DNA Ligase III and PARP1 scaffold proteins. BER therefore may be represented by a series of repair complexes that assemble at the site of the DNA lesion and mediates repair in a coordinated fashion involving protein-protein interactions that dictate subsequent steps or sub-pathway choice. Complex formation is influenced by post-translational protein modifications that arise from the cellular state or the DNA damage response, providing an increase in specificity and efficiency to the BER pathway. In this review, we have summarized the reported BER protein-protein interactions and protein post-translational modifications and discuss the impact on DNA repair capacity and complex formation. PMID:17337257

  5. The XRCC1 Arg194Trp polymorphism is significantly associated with lung adenocarcinoma: a case-control study in an Eastern European Caucasian group

    PubMed Central

    Cătană, Andreea; Pop, Monica; Hincu, Bianca Domokos; Pop, Ioan V; Petrişor, Felicia M; Porojan, Mihai D; Popp, Radu A

    2015-01-01

    DNA repair plays an important role in maintaining the integrity of the genome by repairing DNA damage induced by carcinogens. Certain genetic polymorphisms that occur in DNA-repair genes may affect the ability to repair DNA defects, and may represent a risk factor in carcinogenesis. The gene XRCC1 is involved in DNA repair. The purpose of our study was to investigate the association between XRCC1 Arg194Trp and Arg399Gln polymorphisms and the risk of lung cancer in a Romanian population. We recruited 222 healthy controls and 102 patients with lung cancer. Genotypes were determined by multiplex polymerase chain-reaction restriction fragment-length polymorphism. Statistical analysis (odds ratio, recessive model) revealed an increased risk for lung cancer for the homozygous 194Trp genotype (χ2=0.186, odds ratio 10.667, 95% confidence interval 1.309–86.933; P=0.007). Also, we found an association between the 194Trp allele and women with lung adenocarcinoma. In conclusion, the results of the study place the XRCC1 Arg194Trp polymorphism among independent risk factors for developing lung cancer. PMID:26664136

  6. XRCC1 Polymorphisms and Urinary 8-Hydroxydeoxyguanine Levels Are Associated with Urothelial Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Chien-I; Huang, Ya-Li; Huang, Chao-Yuan; Shiue, Horng-Sheng; Chen, Wei-Jen; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Lin, Ying-Chin; Hsueh, Yu-Mei

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the associations between the combined effects of urinary 8-Hydroxydeoxyguanine (8-OHdG) level and polymorphisms of XRCC1 Arg194Trp and XRCC1 Arg399Gln on the risk of urothelial carcinoma (UC). We conducted a hospital-based case-control study that included 168 cases of UC and 336 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. We used polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses to examine the genotypes of XRCC1 Arg194Trp and XRCC1 Arg399Gln. We used a competitive in vitro enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to determine urinary 8-OHdG levels. The XRCC1 399 Gln/Gln genotype and the XRCC1 194 Arg/Arg genotype were positively correlated to UC (OR [95%CI] = 2.27 [1.20–4.27] and 1.59 [1.06–2.36], respectively). Urinary 8-OHdG levels were associated with UC in a dose-dependent manner. Participants with the XRCC1 (Arg399Gln) Gln/Gln genotype or the G-C/A-C haplotype of XRCC1 and a high urinary 8-OHdG level had a significantly higher risk of UC than those with the Arg/Arg + Arg/Gln genotype or the G-T haplotype and a low urinary 8-OHdG level. This is the first study to investigate the combined effect of urinary 8-OHdG level and XRCC1 polymorphisms on UC risk. The findings are especially meaningful for participants with XRCC1 399Gln or XRCC1 Arg194 genotypes and a high urinary 8-OHdG level, since these variables are associated with an increased risk of UC. PMID:25938407

  7. GSTP1 Ile105Val and XRCC1 Arg399Gln gene polymorphisms contribute to the clinical outcome of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Bu, L; Zhang, L B; Mao, X; Wang, P

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1) and X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) genetic variations may in-fluence the efficacy of chemotherapy in various cancers. We investi-gated the possible roles of GSTP1 Ile105Val and XRCC1 Arg194Trp, and Arg399Gln gene polymorphisms in the prognosis of advanced non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) patients with cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Between January 2010 and December 2012, this study consecutively recruited 141 patients with advanced NSCLC from the First People's Hospital of Yunnan Province. Logistic regression analy-sis showed that individuals carrying the GG genotype were associated with a better response to chemotherapy than those with the wide-type genotype, with an adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval, CI) of 4.07 (1.06-25.06). Moreover, we observed that the AA genotype of XRCC1 Arg399Gln was correlated with a greater complete response + partial response to chemotherapy than that with the GG genotype (odds ratio = 2.71, 95%CI = 1.13-10.08). Based on the Cox hazard proportional model, the GG genotype of GSTP1 Ile105Val was found to be associated with a lower risk of death from all causes as compared to that with the AA genotype (hazard ratio = 0.07, 95%CI = 0.01-0.34). In summary, we suggest that GSTP1 Ile105Val and XRCC1 Arg399Gln polymorphisms could influence the response to chemotherapy and sur-vival of advanced NSCLC. PMID:27323109

  8. Expression profiles of DNA repair-related genes in rat target organs under subchronic cadmium exposure.

    PubMed

    Lei, Y X; Lu, Q; Shao, C; He, C C; Lei, Z N; Lian, Y Y

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the toxicity of long-term exposure to different cadmium (Cd) doses in rats and expression profiles of DNA repair-related genes. The model rats were exposed to different concentrations of CdCl2 for 3 months, and 5 DNA repair-related genes - hMSH2, MLH1, XRCC1, hOGG1, ERCC1 - were cloned in different tissues, including the liver, kidney, heart, and lung. Accumulated amounts of Cd were detected in the tissues. Gene and protein detections were conducted via fluorescence quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, respectively. Methylated sequences of the 5 DNA repair-related gene promoters were used to investigate whether the low expression levels of the genes were related to methylation of the promoter. In the Cd-exposed group, 3 DNA repair genes (i.e., XRCC1, hOGG1, and ERCC1) significantly decreased in the rat liver, kidney, heart, and lung according to the β-actin internal standard (P < 0.01). Western blotting indicated the same trend for the different tissues. Each of the DNA repair genes had special characteristics; for example, hOGG1 gene expression decreased by 75% in the kidney, and XRCC1 gene expression decreased by 5% in the liver and heart when compared to the control group (P < 0.01). A negative correlation between the DNA repair gene expression levels and the cumulative levels of Cd was also suggested by malignancy pathology. The expression levels of 3 DNA repair genes (i.e., ERCC1, XRCC1, and hOGG1) played an important role in the rat response to Cd exposure but not DNA methylated protection. PMID:25729986

  9. Biophysical modeling of mismatch repair proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salsbury, Freddie

    2009-03-01

    Mismatch repair proteins play a vital role in the bology of cancer due to their dual functions as repair proteins and as sensors of DNA damage. Computational modeling of mismatch repair proteins in conjunction with biological experimentation has demonstrated the role of long-range communication in the functions of these proteins. Furthermore, different conformations have been shown to be associated with different cellular functions, and these differences are being exploited in drug discovery. The latest results in this modeling will be presented.

  10. XRCC1 Arg399Gln Polymorphism Confers Risk of Breast Cancer in American Population: A Meta-Analysis of 10846 Cases and 11723 Controls

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yong; Zhao, Li; Peng, Yang; Zhou, Shudong; Li, Lixia; Chen, Sidong; Gao, Yanhui

    2014-01-01

    Background In the X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) gene, a polymorphism, Arg399Gln (rs25487), has been shown to change neoconservative amino acid and thus result in alternation of DNA repair capacity. Numerous studies have investigated the association between Arg399Gln and breast cancer risk in the American population, but yielding inconsistent results. This study aimed to clarify the role of this polymorphism in susceptibility to breast cancer. Methods Literatures were searched in multiple databases including PubMed, Springer Link, Ovid, EBSCO and ScienceDirect databases up to April 2013. A comprehensive meta-analysis was conducted to estimate the overall odds ratio (OR), by integrating data from 18 case control studies of 10846 cases and 11723 controls in the American population. Results Overall, significant association was observed between the Arg399Gln polymorphism and breast cancer risk under the random-effects model (OR for dominant model = 1.12, 95% CI: 1.02–1.24, Pheterogeneity = 0.003; OR for additive model = 1.07, 95% CI: 1.01–1.14, Pheterogeneity = 0.017). Further sensitivity analysis supported the robust stability of this current result by showing similar ORs before and after removal of a single study. Conclusions This meta-analysis suggests that the XRCC1 Arg399Gln polymorphism may significantly contribute to susceptibility of breast cancer in the American population. PMID:24489692

  11. Protein oxidation, UVA and human DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Karran, Peter; Brem, Reto

    2016-08-01

    Solar UVB is carcinogenic. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) counteracts the carcinogenicity of UVB by excising potentially mutagenic UVB-induced DNA lesions. Despite this capacity for DNA repair, non-melanoma skin cancers and apparently normal sun-exposed skin contain huge numbers of mutations that are mostly attributable to unrepaired UVB-induced DNA lesions. UVA is about 20-times more abundant than UVB in incident sunlight. It does cause some DNA damage but this does not fully account for its biological impact. The effects of solar UVA are mediated by its interactions with cellular photosensitizers that generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induce oxidative stress. The proteome is a significant target for damage by UVA-induced ROS. In cultured human cells, UVA-induced oxidation of DNA repair proteins inhibits DNA repair. This article addresses the possible role of oxidative stress and protein oxidation in determining DNA repair efficiency - with particular reference to NER and skin cancer risk. PMID:27324272

  12. Nucleotide excision repair proteins and interstrand crosslink repair

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    Although various schemes for interstrand crosslink (ICL) repair incorporate recombination, replication, and double-strand break intermediate steps, action of the NER system or some variation of it is a common feature of most models. In the bacterium Escherichia coli, the NER enzyme UvrABC can incise on either side of an ICL to unhook the crosslink, and repair can proceed via a subsequent recombination step. The relevance of NER to ICL repair in mammalian cells has been challenged. Of all NER mutants, it is clear that ERCC1 and XPF-defective cells show the most pronounced sensitivities to ICL-inducing agents, and defects in ICL repair. However, there is good evidence that cells defective in NER proteins including XPA and XPG are also more sensitive than normal to ICL-inducing agents. These results are summarized here, together with evidence for defective crosslink removal in NER-defective cells. Studies of incision at sites of ICL by cell extracts and purified proteins have been done, but these studies are not all consistent with one another and further research is required. PMID:20658645

  13. The Arg399Gln polymorphism in the XRCC1 gene is associated with increased risk of hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Du, Liang; Liu, Yuqi; Xue, Pei; Song, Chenxi; Shen, Jiani; He, Qing; Peng, Yuanling; Tong, Xiang; Tang, Lizhi; Zhang, Yonggang

    2015-06-01

    The associations between the Arg399Gln polymorphism in X-ray repair cross-complementing gene 1 (XRCC1) gene and the risk of hematological malignancies have been extensively investigated. However, the results were inconsistent. The objective of the current study is to investigate the association by meta-analysis. We searched PubMed database, Embase database, CNKI database, Wanfang database, and Weipu database, covering all studies until August 7, 2013. Statistical analysis was performed by using the Revman4.2 software and the Stata10.0 software. A total of 27 case-control studies concerning the Arg399Gln polymorphism were included from 26 articles. The results suggested that the Arg399Gln polymorphism was not associated with an increased/decreased risk of hematological malignancies in total analysis (OR = 1.15, 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 0.97-1.35, P = 0.10 for Arg/Gln + Gln/Gln vs. Arg/Arg). In the subgroup analysis by ethnicity and cancer types, significant association was found in Asians (OR = 1.35, 95 % CI = 1.04-1.75, P = 0.03) but not in Europeans (OR = 1.07, 95 % CI = 0.86-1.33, P = 0.56), and in leukemia (OR = 1.25, 95 % CI = 1.02-1.54, P = 0.03) but not in lymphoma (OR = 0.98, 95 % CI = 0.80-1.20, P = 0.84) or myeloma (OR = 1.13, 95 % CI = 0.23-5.69, P = 0.88). The current meta-analysis indicated that the Arg399Gln polymorphism in the XRCC1 gene might be a risk factor for hematological malignancies in Asians or for leukemia. In future, more large-scale case-control studies are needed to validate these results. PMID:25619474

  14. Antibody specific for a DNA repair protein

    DOEpatents

    Petrini, John H.; Morgan, William Francis; Maser, Richard Scott; Carney, James Patrick

    2006-07-11

    An isolated and purified DNA molecule encoding a DNA repair protein, p95, is provided, as is isolated and purified p95. Also provided are methods of detecting p95 and DNA encoding p95. The invention further provides p95 knock-out mice.

  15. DNA encoding a DNA repair protein

    DOEpatents

    Petrini, John H.; Morgan, William Francis; Maser, Richard Scott; Carney, James Patrick

    2006-08-15

    An isolated and purified DNA molecule encoding a DNA repair protein, p95, is provided, as is isolated and purified p95. Also provided are methods of detecting p95 and DNA encoding p95. The invention further provides p95 knock-out mice.

  16. Protein-protein interactions in DNA mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Friedhoff, Peter; Li, Pingping; Gotthardt, Julia

    2016-02-01

    The principal DNA mismatch repair proteins MutS and MutL are versatile enzymes that couple DNA mismatch or damage recognition to other cellular processes. Besides interaction with their DNA substrates this involves transient interactions with other proteins which is triggered by the DNA mismatch or damage and controlled by conformational changes. Both MutS and MutL proteins have ATPase activity, which adds another level to control their activity and interactions with DNA substrates and other proteins. Here we focus on the protein-protein interactions, protein interaction sites and the different levels of structural knowledge about the protein complexes formed with MutS and MutL during the mismatch repair reaction. PMID:26725162

  17. Association of Polymorphisms (rs 1799782, rs25489 and rs25487) in XRCC1 and (rs 13181) XPD genes with Acute Coronary Artery Syndrome in Subjects from Multan, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Hafsa; Faryal, Maemona; Aslam, Muhammad Assad; Akbar, Atif; Saad, Abu Bakar Ali; Pasha, Muhammad Burhan; Latif, Muhammad; Rehan Sadiq Shaikh, Rehan Rehan Sadiq Shaikh; Ali, Muhammad; Iqbal, Furhan

    2016-05-01

    Acute coronary artery syndrome (ACS) is the major cause of mortality in Pakistan with genetic and environmental influence on the incidence of the disease. This case-control study was designed to find out if a correlation is existing between ACS and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in DNA repair genes XPD [at codon 751, rs 13181 (Lys to Gln)] and XRCC1 [at codon 399, rs25487 (Arg to Gln); 280, rs25489 (Arg to His) and 194, rs 1799782 (Arg to Trp)] either individually or in various combination with each other (haplotype analysis). The objective of this study was to find out the association of various studied risk factors and serum lipid profile of the subjects with the disease, if any. PCR-RFLP method was used to determine genotype at specific codon in 221 subjects (115 ACS patients and 106 healthy controls) from Southern Punjab population. Genotypic and allelic frequency distribution among the cases and controls revealed that all the studied SNPs were not individually associated with the ACS. Haplotype analysis revealed that subjects having wild type combination of all three XRCC1 SNPs had greater susceptibility to ACS than any other studied genotypic combinations. Analysis of risk factors revealed that hypertension (P<0.001), age (P=0.05), education (P<0.001), gender (P<0.001), family history (P=0.005), smoking habit (P=0.002) and diabetes (P<0.001) were significantly associated with the incidence of ACS. Serum lipid profile analysis indicated that cholesterol level was significantly higher (P=0.048) in patients (161.5mg/dL) than controls (142.1mg/dL) while triglyceride remained unaffected (P=0.87) when compared between the two treatments. PMID:27166553

  18. ABCC5, ERCC2, XPA and XRCC1 transcript abundance levels correlate with cisplatin chemoresistance in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, David A; Crawford, Erin L; Warner, Kristy A; Elkhairi, Fadel; Khuder, Sadik A; Willey, James C

    2005-01-01

    Background Although 40–50% of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors respond to cisplatin chemotherapy, there currently is no way to prospectively identify potential responders. The purpose of this study was to determine whether transcript abundance (TA) levels of twelve selected DNA repair or multi-drug resistance genes (LIG1, ERCC2, ERCC3, DDIT3, ABCC1, ABCC4, ABCC5, ABCC10, GTF2H2, XPA, XPC and XRCC1) were associated with cisplatin chemoresistance and could therefore contribute to the development of a predictive marker. Standardized RT (StaRT)-PCR, was employed to assess these genes in a set of NSCLC cell lines with a previously published range of sensitivity to cisplatin. Data were obtained in the form of target gene molecules relative to 106 β-actin (ACTB) molecules. To cancel the effect of ACTB variation among the different cell lines individual gene expression values were incorporated into ratios of one gene to another. Each two-gene ratio was compared as a single variable to chemoresistance for each of eight NSCLC cell lines using multiple regression. In an effort to validate these results, six additional lines then were evaluated. Results Following validation, single variable models best correlated with chemoresistance (p < 0.001), were ERCC2/XPC, ABCC5/GTF2H2, ERCC2/GTF2H2, XPA/XPC and XRCC1/XPC. All single variable models were examined hierarchically to achieve two variable models. The two variable model with the highest correlation was (ABCC5/GTF2H2, ERCC2/GTF2H2) with an R2 value of 0.96 (p < 0.001). Conclusion These results provide markers suitable for assessment of small fine needle aspirate biopsies in an effort to prospectively identify cisplatin resistant tumors. PMID:15882455

  19. Heterochromatin formation via recruitment of DNA repair proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kirkland, Jacob G.; Peterson, Misty R.; Still, Christopher D.; Brueggeman, Leo; Dhillon, Namrita; Kamakaka, Rohinton T.

    2015-01-01

    Heterochromatin formation and nuclear organization are important in gene regulation and genome fidelity. Proteins involved in gene silencing localize to sites of damage and some DNA repair proteins localize to heterochromatin, but the biological importance of these correlations remains unclear. In this study, we examined the role of double-strand-break repair proteins in gene silencing and nuclear organization. We find that the ATM kinase Tel1 and the proteins Mre11 and Esc2 can silence a reporter gene dependent on the Sir, as well as on other repair proteins. Furthermore, these proteins aid in the localization of silenced domains to specific compartments in the nucleus. We identify two distinct mechanisms for repair protein–mediated silencing—via direct and indirect interactions with Sir proteins, as well as by tethering loci to the nuclear periphery. This study reveals previously unknown interactions between repair proteins and silencing proteins and suggests insights into the mechanism underlying genome integrity. PMID:25631822

  20. Inhibition of DNA damage repair by artificial activation of PARP with siDNA.

    PubMed

    Croset, Amelie; Cordelières, Fabrice P; Berthault, Nathalie; Buhler, Cyril; Sun, Jian-Sheng; Quanz, Maria; Dutreix, Marie

    2013-08-01

    One of the major early steps of repair is the recruitment of repair proteins at the damage site, and this is coordinated by a cascade of modifications controlled by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinases and/or poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). We used short interfering DNA molecules mimicking double-strand breaks (called Dbait) or single-strand breaks (called Pbait) to promote DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) and PARP activation. Dbait bound and induced both PARP and DNA-PK activities, whereas Pbait acts only on PARP. Therefore, comparative study of the two molecules allows analysis of the respective roles of the two signaling pathways: both recruit proteins involved in single-strand break repair (PARP, XRCC1 and PCNA) and prevent their recruitment at chromosomal damage. Dbait, but not Pbait, also inhibits recruitment of proteins involved in double-strand break repair (53BP1, NBS1, RAD51 and DNA-PK). By these ways, Pbait and Dbait disorganize DNA repair, thereby sensitizing cells to various treatments. Single-strand breaks repair inhibition depends on direct trapping of the main proteins on both molecules. Double-strand breaks repair inhibition may be indirect, resulting from the phosphorylation of double-strand breaks repair proteins and chromatin targets by activated DNA-PK. The DNA repair inhibition by both molecules is confirmed by their synthetic lethality with BRCA mutations. PMID:23761435

  1. Association between XRCC1 and XRCC3 Polymorphisms with Lung Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis from Case-Control Studies

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guohua; Zhang, Qing; Liu, Aihua

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have reported the association of X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) Arg399Gln, Arg194Trp, Arg280His, −77T>C, and X-ray repair cross-complementing group 3 (XRCC3) T241M polymorphisms with lung cancer risk, but the results remained controversial. Hence, we performed a meta-analysis to investigate the association between lung cancer risk and XRCC1 Arg399Gln (14,156 cases and 16,667 controls from 41 studies), Arg194Trp (7,426 cases and 9,603 controls from 23 studies), Arg280His (6,211 cases and 6,763 controls from 16 studies), −77T>C (2,487 cases and 2,576 controls from 5 studies), and XRCC3 T241M (8,560 cases and 11,557 controls from 19 studies) in different inheritance models. We found that −77T>C polymorphism was associated with increased lung cancer risk (dominant model: odds ration [OR] = 1.45, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.27–1.66, recessive model: OR = 1.73, 95% CI = 1.14–2.62, additive model: OR = 1.91, 95% CI = 1.24–1.94) when all the eligible studies were pooled into the meta-analysis. In the stratified and sensitive analyses, significantly decreased lung cancer risk was observed in overall analysis (dominant model: OR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.78–0.89; recessive model: OR = 0.90, 95% CI = 0.81–1.00; additive model: OR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.74–0.92), Caucasians (dominant model: OR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.76–0.87; recessive model: OR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.80–0.99; additive model: OR = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.73–0.91), and hospital-based controls (dominant model: OR = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.76–0.88; recessive model: OR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.79–1.00; additive model: OR = 0.80, 95% CI = 0.71–0.90) for XRCC3 T241M. In conclusion, this meta-analysis indicates that XRCC1 −77T>C shows an increased lung cancer risk and XRCC3 T241M polymorphism is associated with decreased lung cancer risk, especially in Caucasians. PMID:23990873

  2. Genetic Variability in DNA Repair Proteins in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Blasiak, Janusz; Synowiec, Ewelina; Salminen, Antero; Kaarniranta, Kai

    2012-01-01

    The pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is complex and involves interactions between environmental and genetic factors, with oxidative stress playing an important role inducing damage in biomolecules, including DNA. Therefore, genetic variability in the components of DNA repair systems may influence the ability of the cell to cope with oxidative stress and in this way contribute to the pathogenesis of AMD. However, few reports have been published on this subject so far. We demonstrated that the c.977C>G polymorphism (rs1052133) in the hOGG1 gene and the c.972G>C polymorphism (rs3219489) in the MUTYH gene, the products of which play important roles in the repair of oxidatively damaged DNA, might be associated with the risk of AMD. Oxidative stress may promote misincorporation of uracil into DNA, where it is targeted by several DNA glycosylases. We observed that the g.4235T>C (rs2337395) and c.–32A>G (rs3087404) polymorphisms in two genes encoding such glycosylases, UNG and SMUG1, respectively, could be associated with the occurrence of AMD. Polymorphisms in some other DNA repair genes, including XPD (ERCC2), XRCC1 and ERCC6 (CSB) have also been reported to be associated with AMD. These data confirm the importance of the cellular reaction to DNA damage, and this may be influenced by variability in DNA repair genes, in AMD pathogenesis. PMID:23202958

  3. Correlation between XRCC1 Arg399Gln genetic polymorphisms and susceptibility to bladder cancer: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nannan; Fei, Xiawei; Shen, Yi; Shi, Weifeng; Ma, Jinhong

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between XRCC1 polymorphisms and bladder cancer has been widely studied. Here, our meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the correlations between common genetic polymorphisms in XRCC1 and susceptibility to bladder cancer. In order to derive a more precise estimation of the association, 27 clinical case-control studies (which met all the inclusion criteria) were included in this meta-analysis. A total of 8,539 cancer cases and 10,750 controls were involved in this meta-analysis. Overall, no significant association was detected in allelic model (A allele vs T allele odds ratio [OR] =0.87, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.71–1.06), homozygote comparison (AA vs GG OR =1.12, 95% CI, 0.68–1.85), heterozygote comparison (AT vs TT OR =1.01, 95% CI, 0.81–1.26), dominant model (AA + AG vs GG OR =0.93, 95% CI, 0.85–1.02), and recessive model (AA vs AG + GG OR =1.01, 95% CI, 0.88–1.15), but a moderately significant association was found for AG vs GG (OR =0.241, 95% CI =0.17–0.35). Subgroup analysis based on ethnicity. Ethnicity analysis suggested that genetic polymorphisms in XRCC1 were not correlated with increased bladder cancer risk among Asians (all P>0.05). Therefore, we concluded that XRCC1 genetic polymorphism may not contribute to bladder cancer susceptibility in the present meta-analysis, and further well-designed studies with a large sample size are warranted to validate our conclusion. PMID:26869802

  4. Isolating human DNA repair genes using rodent-cell mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Weber, C.A.; Brookman, K.W.; Salazar, E.P.; Stewart, S.A.; Mitchell, D.L.

    1987-03-23

    The DNA repair systems of rodent and human cells appear to be at least as complex genetically as those in lower eukaryotes and bacteria. The use of mutant lines of rodent cells as a means of identifying human repair genes by functional complementation offers a new approach toward studying the role of repair in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. In each of six cases examined using hybrid cells, specific human chromosomes have been identified that correct CHO cell mutations affecting repair of damage from uv or ionizing radiations. This finding suggests that both the repair genes and proteins may be virtually interchangeable between rodent and human cells. Using cosmid vectors, human repair genes that map to chromosome 19 have cloned as functional sequences: ERCC2 and XRCC1. ERCC1 was found to have homology with the yeast excision repair gene RAD10. Transformants of repair-deficient cell lines carrying the corresponding human gene show efficient correction of repair capacity by all criteria examined. 39 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  5. Association between the XRCC1 Arg399Gln Polymorphism and Risk of Cancer: Evidence from 297 Case–Control Studies

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Liu; Xiao-feng, He; Yun-tao, Lu; Hao, Long; Ye, Song; Song-tao, Qi

    2013-01-01

    Background The Arg399Gln polymorphism in the X-ray cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) had been implicated in cancer susceptibility. The previous published data on the association between XRCC1 Arg399Gln polymorphism and cancer risk remained controversial. Methodology/Principal Findings To derive a more precise estimation of the association between the XRCC1 Arg399Gln polymorphism and overall cancer risk, we performed a meta-analysis of 297 case-control studies, in which a total of 93,941 cases and 121,480 controls were included. Overall, significantly increased cancer risk was observed in any genetic model (dominant model: odds ration [OR] = 1.04, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01–1.07; recessive model: OR = 1.08, 95% CI = 1.03–1.13; additive model: OR = 1.09, 95% CI = 1.04–1.14) when all eligible studies were pooled into the meta-analysis. In further stratified and sensitivity analyses, significantly elevated hepatocellular and breast cancers risk were observed in Asians (dominant model: OR = 1.39, 95% CI = 1.06–1.84) and in Indians (dominant model: OR = 1.64, 95% CI = 1.31–2.04; recessive model: OR = 1.94, 95% CI = 1.09–3.47; additive model: OR = 2.06, 95% CI = 1.50–2.84), respectively. Conclusions/Significance This meta-analysis suggests the participation of XRCC1 Arg399Gln is a genetic susceptibility for hepatocellular cancer in Asians and breast cancer in Indians. Moreover, our work also points out the importance of new studies for Arg399Gln association in some cancer types, such as glioma, gastric cancer, and oral cancer, where at least some of the covariates responsible for heterogeneity could be controlled, to obtain a more conclusive understanding about the function of the XRCC1 Arg399Gln polymorphism in cancer development. PMID:24205095

  6. Functional characterization of dna repair proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D M III

    2000-02-16

    Genetic material (DNA) is susceptible to spontaneous decomposition, to attack by reactive chemicals produced naturally in cells, and to assault by environmental and food mutagens. DNA modifications can lead to permanent genetic changes that promote human disease. To combat the deleterious effects of DNA damage, organisms are equipped with DNA repair systems. The focus of our investigations has been to elucidate the details of mammalian DNA repair. These studies have provided important insights into the relationship of DNA repair to human disease and the genetic factors that contribute to individual susceptibility to the harmful effects of environmental mutagens (e.g. ionizing radiation), and have established a framework for designing more effective anti-cancer treatment schemes. To investigate questions related to DNA repair, its mechanism(s) and linkage to disease development, the authors are employing an array of molecular, cellular, biochemical and structural approaches. These complementary experimental techniques have permitted a detailed analysis into various processes of human DNA repair.

  7. Association Between Genetic Polymorphisms in the XRCC1, XRCC3, XPD, GSTM1, GSTT1, MSH2, MLH1, MSH3, and MGMT Genes and Radiosensitivity in Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Mangoni, Monica; Bisanzi, Simonetta; Carozzi, Francesca; Sani, Cristina; Biti, Giampaolo; Livi, Lorenzo; Barletta, Emanuela; Costantini, Adele Seniori; Gorini, Giuseppe

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: Clinical radiosensitivity varies considerably among patients, and radiation-induced side effects developing in normal tissue can be therapy limiting. Some single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been shown to correlate with hypersensitivity to radiotherapy. We conducted a prospective study of 87 female patients with breast cancer who received radiotherapy after breast surgery. We evaluated the association between acute skin reaction following radiotherapy and 11 genetic polymorphisms in DNA repair genes: XRCC1 (Arg399Gln and Arg194Trp), XRCC3 (Thr241Met), XPD (Asp312Asn and Lys751Gln), MSH2 (gIVS12-6T>C), MLH1 (Ile219Val), MSH3 (Ala1045Thr), MGMT (Leu84Phe), and in damage-detoxification GSTM1 and GSTT1 genes (allele deletion). Methods and Materials: Individual genetic polymorphisms were determined by polymerase chain reaction and single nucleotide primer extension for single nucleotide polymorphisms or by a multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay for deletion polymorphisms. The development of severe acute skin reaction (moist desquamation or interruption of radiotherapy due to toxicity) associated with genetic polymorphisms was modeled using Cox proportional hazards, accounting for cumulative biologically effective radiation dose. Results: Radiosensitivity developed in eight patients and was increased in carriers of variants XRCC3-241Met allele (hazard ratio [HR] unquantifiably high), MSH2 gIVS12-6nt-C allele (HR = 53.36; 95% confidence intervals [95% CI], 3.56-798.98), and MSH3-1045Ala allele (HR unquantifiably high). Carriers of XRCC1-Arg194Trp variant allele in combination with XRCC1-Arg399Gln wild-type allele had a significant risk of radiosensitivity (HR = 38.26; 95% CI, 1.19-1232.52). Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first report to find an association between MSH2 and MSH3 genetic variants and the development of radiosensitivity in breast cancer patients. Our findings suggest the hypothesis that mismatch repair mechanisms may be

  8. The association of XRCC1 haplotypes and chromosomal damage levels in peripheral blood lymphocyte among coke-oven workers

    SciTech Connect

    Shuguang Leng; Juan Cheng; Linyuan Zhang; Yong Niu; Yufei Dai; Zufei Pan; Bin Li; Fengsheng He; Yuxin Zheng

    2005-05-15

    Theoretically, a haplotype has a higher level of heterozygosity than individual single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and the association study based on the haplotype may have an increased power for detecting disease associations compared with SNP-based analysis. In this study, we investigated the effects of four haplotype-tagging SNPs (htSNP) and the inferred haplotype pairs of the X-ray cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) gene on chromosome damage detected by the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay. The study included 141 coke-oven workers with exposure to a high level of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and 66 nonexposed controls. The frequencies of total MN and MNed cells were borderline associated with the Arg{sup 194}Trp polymorphism (P = 0.053 and P = 0.050, respectively) but not associated with the Arg{sup 280}His, Arg{sup 399}Gln and Gln{sup 632}Gln polymorphisms among coke-oven workers. Five haplotypes, including CGGG, TGGG, CAGG, CGAG, and CGGA, were inferred based on the four htSNPs of XRCC1 gene. The haplotype CGGG was associated with the decreased frequencies of total MN and MNed cells, and the haplotypes TGGG and CGAG were associated with the increased frequencies of total MN and MNed cells with adjustment for covariates among coke-oven workers. This study showed that the haplotypes derived from htSNPs in the XRCC1 gene were more likely than single SNPs to correlate with the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-induced chromosome damage among coke-oven workers.

  9. Mismatch repair and nucleotide excision repair proteins cooperate in the recognition of DNA interstrand crosslinks.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junhua; Jain, Aklank; Iyer, Ravi R; Modrich, Paul L; Vasquez, Karen M

    2009-07-01

    DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) are among the most cytotoxic types of DNA damage, thus ICL-inducing agents such as psoralen, are clinically useful chemotherapeutics. Psoralen-modified triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) have been used to target ICLs to specific genomic sites to increase the selectivity of these agents. However, how TFO-directed psoralen ICLs (Tdp-ICLs) are recognized and processed in human cells is unclear. Previously, we reported that two essential nucleotide excision repair (NER) protein complexes, XPA-RPA and XPC-RAD23B, recognized ICLs in vitro, and that cells deficient in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) complex MutSbeta were sensitive to psoralen ICLs. To further investigate the role of MutSbeta in ICL repair and the potential interaction between proteins from the MMR and NER pathways on these lesions, we performed electrophoretic mobility-shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis of MutSbeta and NER proteins with Tdp-ICLs. We found that MutSbeta bound to Tdp-ICLs with high affinity and specificity in vitro and in vivo, and that MutSbeta interacted with XPA-RPA or XPC-RAD23B in recognizing Tdp-ICLs. These data suggest that proteins from the MMR and NER pathways interact in the recognition of ICLs, and provide a mechanistic link by which proteins from multiple repair pathways contribute to ICL repair. PMID:19468048

  10. Radiation-induced damage to normal tissues after radiotherapy in patients treated for gynecologic tumors: Association with single nucleotide polymorphisms in XRCC1, XRCC3, and OGG1 genes and in vitro chromosomal radiosensitivity in lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Ruyck, Kim de . E-mail: kim.deruyck@UGent.be; Eijkeren, Marc van; Claes, Kathleen; Morthier, Rudy; Paepe, Anne de; Vral, Anne; Ridder, Leo de; Thierens, Hubert

    2005-07-15

    Purpose: To examine the association of polymorphisms in XRCC1 (194Arg/Trp, 280Arg/His, 399Arg/Gln, 632Gln/Gln), XRCC3 (5' UTR 4.541A>G, IVS5-14 17.893A>G, 241Thr/Met), and OGG1 (326Ser/Cys) with the development of late radiotherapy (RT) reactions and to assess the correlation between in vitro chromosomal radiosensitivity and clinical radiosensitivity. Methods and Materials: Sixty-two women with cervical or endometrial cancer treated with RT were included in the study. According to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, scale, 22 patients showed late adverse RT reactions. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assays were performed to examine polymorphic sites, the G2 assay was used to measure chromosomal radiosensitivity, and patient groups were compared using actuarial methods. Results: The XRCC3 IVS5-14 polymorphic allele was significantly associated with the risk of developing late RT reactions (odds ratio 3.98, p = 0.025), and the XRCC1 codon 194 variant showed a significant protective effect (p = 0.028). Patients with three or more risk alleles in XRCC1 and XRCC3 had a significantly increased risk of developing normal tissue reactions (odds ratio 10.10, p = 0.001). The mean number of chromatid breaks per cell was significantly greater in patients with normal tissue reactions than in patients with no reactions (1.16 and 1.34, respectively; p = 0.002). Patients with high chromosomal radiosensitivity showed a 9.2-fold greater annual risk of complications than patients with intermediate chromosomal radiosensitivity. Combining the G2 analysis with the risk allele model allowed us to identify 23% of the patients with late normal tissue reactions, without false-positive results. Conclusion: The results of the present study showed that clinical radiosensitivity is associated with an enhanced G2 chromosomal radiosensitivity and is significantly associated with a combination of different polymorphisms in

  11. Biological effects of novel “combi-targeting” molecule and its effect on DNA repair pathway in hormone-refractory prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Youqiang; Wu, Jieying; Li, Tengcheng; Luo, Yun; Qiu, Qiyu; Quan, Xinxin; Gao, Li; Liu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to investigate the biological effects of “combi-targeting” JDF12 and its effect on the DNA repair pathway in hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC). Methods: HRPC cell lines (PC3 cells and VCap cells) were treated with JDF12 at different concentrations, and SRB method was employed to detect the proliferation of HRPC cells; Annexin V-FITC kit was used to detect the apoptosis of PC3 cells; Alkaline comet assay was performed to detect DNA damage; Western blot assay was done to detect the expressions of autophosphorylated EGFR, XRCC1 and ERCC1 (later two are proteins in DNA repair pathway); the anti-tumor effect was evaluated in nude mice inoculated with PC3 cells. Results: JDF12 could inhibit the proliferation of PC3 cells and VCap cells in a concentration dependent manner (IC50: 14.04 ± 1.22 for PC3 and 15.57 ± 1.13 for VCap) and significantly increase the apoptotic cells as compared to those treated with mitozolomide or iressa alone. In PC3 cells, JDF12 induced DNA damage and also inhibited the expressions of phosphorylated EGFR, XRCC1 and ERCC1 in a concentration dependent manner. Moreover, JDF12 markedly inhibited tumor growth in nude mice. Conclusion: The novel “combi-targeting” JDF12 may exert more potent anti-proliferative effect as compared to mitozolomide or iressa alone, and the inhibitory effect on the EGFR signaling pathway and down-regulated XRCC1 and ERCC1 expressions may be ascribed to the JDF12 induced DNA damage. PMID:26396914

  12. HYDROGEL-BASED NANOCOMPOSITES OF THERAPEUTIC PROTEINS FOR TISSUE REPAIR

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Suwei; Segura, Tatiana

    2014-01-01

    The ability to design artificial extracellular matrices as cell instructive scaffolds has opened the door to technologies capable of studying cell fates in vitro and to guide tissue repair in vivo. One main component of the design of artificial extracellular matrices is the incorporation of protein-based biochemical cues to guide cell phenotypes and multicellular organizations. However, promoting the long-term bioactivity, controlling the bioavailability and understanding how the physical presentations of these proteins impacts cellular fates are among the challenges of the field. Nanotechnolgy has advanced to meet the challenges of protein therapeutics. For example, the approaches to incorporating proteins into tissue repairing scaffolds have ranged from bulk encapsulations to smart nanodepots that protect proteins from degradations and allow opportunities for controlled release. PMID:24778979

  13. Protein Engineering for Cardiovascular Therapeutics: Untapped Potential for Cardiac Repair

    PubMed Central

    Jay, Steven M.; Lee, Richard T.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous new and innovative approaches for repairing damaged myocardium are currently under investigation, with several encouraging results. In addition to the progression of stem cell-based approaches and gene therapy/silencing methods, evidence continues to emerge that protein therapeutics may be used to directly promote cardiac repair and even regeneration. However, proteins are often limited in their therapeutic potential by short local half-lives and insufficient bioavailability and/or bioactivity, and many academic laboratories studying cardiovascular diseases are more comfortable with molecular and cellular biology compared with protein biochemistry. Protein engineering has been employed broadly to overcome weaknesses traditionally associated with protein therapeutics and has the potential to specifically enhance the efficacy of molecules for cardiac repair. Yet protein engineering as a strategy has not yet been employed in the development of cardiovascular therapeutics to the degree that it has in other fields. In this review, we discuss the role of engineered proteins in cardiovascular therapies to date. Further, we address the promise of applying emerging protein engineering technologies to cardiovascular medicine and the barriers that must be overcome to enable the ultimate success of this approach. PMID:24030023

  14. Repair of hair bundles in sea anemones by secreted proteins.

    PubMed

    Watson, G M; Mire, P; Hudson, R R

    1998-01-01

    Sea anemones are sessile invertebrates that detect movements of prey using numerous hair bundles located on tentacles surrounding their mouth. Previously we found that hair bundles of anemones are structurally and functionally similar to those of vertebrates. After 10-15 min exposure to calcium depleted buffers, hair bundles in chickens suffer moderate damage from which they recover in 12 h without requiring new protein synthesis [Zhao, Yamoah and Gillespie, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 94 (1996) 15469-15474]. We find that after 1 h exposure to calcium free seawater, hair bundles of anemones suffer extensive damage from which they recover in 4 h, apparently because of newly synthesized, secretory proteins called 'repair proteins'. Recovery is delayed in a dose dependent fashion by cycloheximide. In the presence of exogenously added repair proteins, recovery occurs within 8 min and is cycloheximide insensitive. Recovery is ascertained by a bioassay performed on intact specimens, by electrophysiology, and by timelapse video microscopy. Fraction beta, a chromatographic fraction with bioactivity comparable to the complete mixture of repair proteins, consists of complexes having an estimated mass of 2000 kDa. Avidin based cytochemistry suggests that biotinylated fraction beta binds to damaged hair bundles. SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis demonstrates that fraction beta contains 8-10 polypeptides of 90 kDa or smaller. At least four of these polypeptides apparently are consumed during the repair process. Negatively stained samples of fraction beta are shown by transmission electron microscopy to include filamentous structures similar in length (150 nm) and width (6 nm) to linkages between stereocilia. The filamentous structures can be associated with globular structures (20 nm in diameter). A model is presented wherein repair proteins comprise replacement linkages and enzymes that attach linkages to appropriate membrane proteins. PMID:9472741

  15. In situ analysis of repair processes for oxidative DNA damage in mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Li; Nakajima, Satoshi; Oohata, Yoshitsugu; Takao, Masashi; Okano, Satoshi; Masutani, Mitsuko; Wilson, Samuel H.; Yasui, Akira

    2004-09-01

    Oxidative DNA damage causes blocks and errors in transcription and replication, leading to cell death and genomic instability. Although repair mechanisms of the damage have been extensively analyzed in vitro, the actual in vivo repair processes remain largely unknown. Here, by irradiation with an UVA laser through a microscope lens, we have conditionally produced single-strand breaks and oxidative base damage at restricted nuclear regions of mammalian cells. We showed, in real time after irradiation by using antibodies and GFP-tagged proteins, rapid and ordered DNA repair processes of oxidative DNA damage in human cells. Furthermore, we characterized repair pathways by using repair-defective mammalian cells and found that DNA polymerase accumulated at single-strand breaks and oxidative base damage by means of its 31- and 8-kDa domains, respectively, and that XRCC1 is essential for both polymerase -dependent and proliferating cell nuclear antigen-dependent repair pathways of single-strand breaks. Thus, the repair of oxidative DNA damage is based on temporal and functional interactions among various proteins operating at the site of DNA damage in living cells.

  16. Repair of traumatized mammalian hair cells via sea anemone repair proteins.

    PubMed

    Tang, Pei-Ciao; Smith, Karen Müller; Watson, Glen M

    2016-08-01

    Mammalian hair cells possess only a limited ability to repair damage after trauma. In contrast, sea anemones show a marked capability to repair damaged hair bundles by means of secreted repair proteins (RPs). Previously, it was found that recovery of traumatized hair cells in blind cavefish was enhanced by anemone-derived RPs; therefore, the ability of anemone RPs to assist recovery of damaged hair cells in mammals was tested here. After a 1 h incubation in RP-enriched culture media, uptake of FM1-43 by experimentally traumatized murine cochlear hair cells was restored to levels comparable to those exhibited by healthy controls. In addition, RP-treated explants had significantly more normally structured hair bundles than time-matched traumatized control explants. Collectively, these results indicate that anemone-derived RPs assist in restoring normal function and structure of experimentally traumatized hair cells of the mouse cochlea. PMID:27489215

  17. Variant Base Excision Repair Proteins: Contributors to Genomic Instability

    PubMed Central

    Nemec, Antonia A.; Wallace, Susan S.; Sweasy, Joann B.

    2012-01-01

    Cells sustain endogenous DNA damage at rates greater than 20,000 DNA lesions per cell per day. These damages occur largely as a result of the inherently unstable nature of DNA and the presence of reactive oxygen species within cells. The base excision repair system removes the majority of DNA lesions resulting from endogenous DNA damage. There are several enzymes that function during base excision repair. Importantly, there are over 100 germline single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes that function in base excision repair and that result in non-synonymous amino acid substitutions in the proteins they encode. Somatic variants of these enzymes are also found in human tumors. Variant repair enzymes catalyze aberrant base excision repair. Aberrant base excision repair combined with continuous endogenous DNA damage over time has the potential to lead to a mutator phenotype. Mutations that arise in key growth control genes, imbalances in chromosome number, chromosomal translocations, and loss of heterozygosity can result in the initiation of human cancer or its progression. PMID:20955798

  18. DNA Repair-Protein Relocalization After Heavy Ion Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metting, N. F.

    1999-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is good at making DNA double strand breaks, and high linear energy transfer (LET) radiations such as heavy ion particles are particularly efficient. For this reason, the proteins belonging to repair systems that deal with double strand breaks are of particular interest. One such protein is Ku, a component in the non-homologous recombination repair system. The Ku protein is an abundant, heterodimeric DNA end-binding complex, composed of one 70 and one 86 kDa subunit. Ku protein binds to DNA ends, nicks, gaps, and regions of transition between single and double-stranded structure. These binding properties suggest an important role in DNA repair. The Ku antigen is important in this study because it is present in relatively large copy numbers and it is part of a double-strand-break repair system. More importantly, we consistently measure an apparent upregulation in situ that is not verified by whole-cell-lysate immunoblot measurements. This apparent upregulation is triggered by very low doses of radiation, thus showing a potentially useful high sensitivity. However, elucidation of the mechanism underlying this phenomenon is still to be done.

  19. Methods to alter levels of a DNA repair protein

    DOEpatents

    Petrini, John H.; Morgan, William Francis; Maser, Richard Scott; Carney, James Patrick

    2006-10-17

    An isolated and purified DNA molecule encoding a DNA repair protein, p95, is provided, as is isolated and purified p95. Also provided are methods of detecting p95 and DNA encoding p95. The invention further provides p95 knock-out mice.

  20. Quantitative assessment of the association between XRCC1 Arg399Gln and Arg194Trp polymorphisms and risk of cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Huayong; Xu, Weidong; Zhang, Fuli; Wei, Li; Wang, Yajie; Wang, Yadi; Liu, Chuan

    2016-06-01

    Accumulating evidence has suggested that the XRCC1 Arg399Gln and Arg194Trp polymorphisms might be related to cutaneous melanoma susceptibility. However, epidemiologic findings have been inconsistent. We have assessed reported studies by meta-analysis to perform a more precise estimation of the association between the XRCC1 two polymorphisms (Arg399Gln, Arg194Trp) and risk of cutaneous melanoma. A total of seven eligible articles were selected for this meta-analysis, including 3454 cases and 3811 controls for the XRCC1 Arg399Gln polymorphism and 1256 cases and 1575 controls for the XRCC1 Arg194Trp polymorphism. Overall, no significant associations were found in all genetic models when the studies were pooled into the meta-analysis for the Arg399Gln and Arg194Trp polymorphisms. When stratified by source of control, significant associations were found for the Arg399Gln polymorphism in the population-based subgroup under AA versus GG [odds ratio (OR)=1.43, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.08-1.88]; the dominant model AA/GA versus GG (OR=1.25, 95% CI=1.04-1.51); and the recessive model AA versus GA/GG (OR=1.31, 95% CI=1.01-1.68). No significant associations were found for the Arg194Trp polymorphism in the subgroup analysis. This meta-analysis suggested that the XRCC1 Arg399Gln polymorphism was a risk factor for cutaneous melanoma in population-based subgroup. PMID:26967970

  1. Radiation induced base excision repair (BER): a mechanistic mathematical approach.

    PubMed

    Rahmanian, Shirin; Taleei, Reza; Nikjoo, Hooshang

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a mechanistic model of base excision repair (BER) pathway for the repair of single-stand breaks (SSBs) and oxidized base lesions produced by ionizing radiation (IR). The model is based on law of mass action kinetics to translate the biochemical processes involved, step-by-step, in the BER pathway to translate into mathematical equations. The BER is divided into two subpathways, short-patch repair (SPR) and long-patch repair (LPR). SPR involves in replacement of single nucleotide via Pol β and ligation of the ends via XRCC1 and Ligase III, while LPR involves in replacement of multiple nucleotides via PCNA, Pol δ/ɛ and FEN 1, and ligation via Ligase I. A hallmark of IR is the production of closely spaced lesions within a turn of DNA helix (named complex lesions), which have been attributed to a slower repair process. The model presented considers fast and slow component of BER kinetics by assigning SPR for simple lesions and LPR for complex lesions. In the absence of in vivo reaction rate constants for the BER proteins, we have deduced a set of rate constants based on different published experimental measurements including accumulation kinetics obtained from UVA irradiation, overall SSB repair kinetic experiments, and overall BER kinetics from live-cell imaging experiments. The model was further used to calculate the repair kinetics of complex base lesions via the LPR subpathway and compared to foci kinetic experiments for cells irradiated with γ rays, Si, and Fe ions. The model calculation show good agreement with experimental measurements for both overall repair and repair of complex lesions. Furthermore, using the model we explored different mechanisms responsible for inhibition of repair when higher LET and HZE particles are used and concluded that increasing the damage complexity can inhibit initiation of LPR after the AP site removal step in BER. PMID:25117268

  2. Biomolecular Simulation of Base Excision Repair and Protein Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Straatsma, TP; McCammon, J A; Miller, John H; Smith, Paul E; Vorpagel, Erich R; Wong, Chung F; Zacharias, Martin W

    2006-03-03

    The goal of the Biomolecular Simulation of Base Excision Repair and Protein Signaling project is to enhance our understanding of the mechanism of human polymerase-β, one of the key enzymes in base excision repair (BER) and the cell-signaling enzymes cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase. This work used molecular modeling and simulation studies to specifically focus on the • dynamics of DNA and damaged DNA • dynamics and energetics of base flipping in DNA • mechanism and fidelity of nucleotide insertion by BER enzyme human polymerase-β • mechanism and inhibitor design for cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase. Molecular dynamics simulations and electronic structure calculations have been performed using the computer resources at the Molecular Science Computing Facility at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory.

  3. CFTR protein repair therapy in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Quintana-Gallego, Esther; Delgado-Pecellín, Isabel; Calero Acuña, Carmen

    2014-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a single gene, autosomal recessive disorder, in which more than 1,900 mutations grouped into 6 classes have been described. It is an example a disease that could be well placed to benefit from personalised medicine. There are currently 2 very different approaches that aim to correct the basic defect: gene therapy, aimed at correcting the genetic alteration, and therapy aimed at correcting the defect in the CFTR protein. The latter is beginning to show promising results, with several molecules under development. Ataluren (PTC124) is a molecule designed to make the ribosomes become less sensitive to the premature stop codons responsible for class i mutations. Lumacaftor (VX-809) is a CFTR corrector directed at class ii mutations, among which Phe508del is the most frequent, with encouraging results. Ivacaftor (VX-770) is a potentiator, the only one marketed to date, which has shown good efficacy for the class iii mutation Gly551Asp in children over the age of 6 and adults. These drugs, or a combination of them, are currently undergoing various clinical trials for other less common genetic mutations. In the last 5 years, CFTR has been designated as a therapeutic target. Ivacaftor is the first drug to treat the basic defect in cystic fibrosis, but only provides a response in a small number of patients. New drugs capable of restoring the CFTR protein damaged by the most common mutations are required. PMID:24095197

  4. Studies of Bone Morphogenetic Protein based Surgical Repair

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Kevin W.-H.; Ulery, Bret D.; Ashe, Keshia M.; Laurencin, Cato T.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past several decades, recombinant human bone morphogenetic proteins (rhBMPs) have been the most extensively studied and widely used osteoinductive agents for clinical bone repair. Since rhBMP-2 and rhBMP-7 were approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for certain clinical uses, millions of patients worldwide have been treated with rhBMPs for various musculoskeletal disorders. Current clinical applications include treatment of long bone fracture non-unions, spinal surgeries, and oral maxillofacial surgeries. Considering the growing number of recent publications related to clincal research of rhBMPs, there exists enormous promise for these proteins to be used in bone regenerative medicine. The authors take this opportunity to review the rhBMP literature paying specific attention to the current applications of rhBMPs in bone repair and spine surgery. The prospective future of rhBMPs delivered in combination with tissue engineered scaffolds is also reviewed. PMID:22512928

  5. DNA repair prognostic index modelling reveals an essential role for base excision repair in influencing clinical outcomes in ER negative and triple negative breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Fatah, Tarek M A; Arora, Arvind; Moseley, Paul M; Perry, Christina; Rakha, Emad A; Green, Andrew R; Chan, Stephen Y T; Ellis, Ian O; Madhusudan, Srinivasan

    2015-09-01

    Stratification of oestrogen receptor (ER) negative and triple negative breast cancers (TNBCs) is urgently needed. In the current study, a cohort of 880 ER- (including 635 TNBCs) was immuno-profiled for a panel of DNA repair proteins including: Pol β, FEN1, APE1, XRCC1, SMUG1, PARP1, BRCA1, ATR, ATM, DNA-PKcs, Chk1, Chk2, p53, and TOPO2. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards models (with backward stepwise exclusion of these factors, using a criterion of p < 0.05 for retention of factors in the model) were used to identify factors that were independently associated with clinical outcomes. XRCC1 (p = 0.002), pol β (p = 0.032) FEN1 (p = 0.001) and BRCA1 (p = 0.040) levels were independently associated with poor BCSS. Subsequently, DNA repair index prognostic (DRPI) scores for breast cancer specific survival (BCSS) were calculated and two prognostic groups (DRPI-PGs) were identified. Patients in prognostic group 2 (DRPI-PG2) have higher risk of death (p < 0.001). Furthermore, in DRPI-PG2 patients, exposure to anthracycline reduced the risk of death [(HR (95% CI) = 0.79 (0.64-0.98), p = 0.032) by 21-26%. In addition, DRPI-PG2 patients have adverse clinicopathological features including higher grade, lympho-vascular invasion, Her-2 positive phenotype, compared to those in DRPI-PG1 (p < 0.01). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves indicated that the DRPI outperformed the currently used prognostic factors and adding DRPI to lymph node stage significantly improved their performance as a predictor for BCSS [p < 0.00001, area under curve (AUC) = 0.70]. BER strongly influences pathogenesis of ER- and TNBCs. The DRPI accurately predicts BCSS and can also serve as a valuable prognostic and predictive tool for TNBCs. PMID:26267318

  6. DNA Repair Gene Polymorphisms and Their Relation With DNA Damage, DNA Repair, and Total Antioxidant Capacity in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Survivors.

    PubMed

    Dincer, Yildiz; Yüksel, Selin; Batar, Bahadir; Güven, Mehmet; Onaran, Ilhan; Celkan, Tiraje

    2015-07-01

    Oxidative stress and defective DNA repair are major contributory factors in the initiation and progression of carcinogenesis. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy cause oxidative DNA damage, consume antioxidant capacity, and impair DNA repair activity. These effects of chemotherapy and radiotherapy may be contributory factors in the development of secondary malignancy in cancer survivors. Basal, H2O2-induced, and postrepair DNA damage; urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine level as a marker of oxidatively damaged DNA; and serum total antioxidant capacity were measured; XPD Lys751Gln, XRCC1 Arg399Gln, and XRCC1 Arg194Trp polymorphisms were analyzed in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) survivors. Basal and H2O2-induced DNA damage were found to be higher in the ALL survivor group versus the control group, however, there was no significant difference between the other parameters. No association was found between the examined parameters and polymorphisms of XPD 751 and XRCC1 399 and both the groups. XRCC1 194Trp allele was found to be associated with a low level of postrepair DNA damage in the ALL survivors. In conclusion, basal DNA damage and susceptibility to oxidation are high in childhood ALL survivors. This situation which may easily lead to occurrence of a secondary cancer does not seem to be a result of deficient DNA repair. PMID:24577548

  7. Association between codon 399 polymorphism in the X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 gene and risk of prostate cancer in Asians: A study of 4,479 cases and 4,281 controls

    PubMed Central

    Yuanyuan, Mi; Xiaoming, You; Lijie, Zhu; Ninghan, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The polymorphism in codon 399 of the X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) gene may subtly alter structure of DNA repair enzymes and modulate the repair capacity. Impaired DNA repair can lead to the development of cancers such as prostate cancer (PCA). Although the association between the XRCC1 codon 399 polymorphism and PCA risk has been extensively reported, the results have been ambiguous. Methods: We conducted an updated analysis of 18 case–control studies to determine the association between the XRCC1 codon 399 polymorphism and PCA risk. We performed a literature search of the PubMed database to identify all eligible articles that reported this association. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were evaluated to assess the association. Results: Significant associations between PCA risk and XRCC1 codon 399 polymorphism were found (such as A-allele vs. G-allele: OR = 1.11, 95% CI = 1.01–1.23). Moreover, subgroup analysis based on ethnicity revealed similar significant associations in Asians (such as AA vs. GG: OR = 1.53, 95% CI = 1.19–1.97). Egger’s test did not reveal the presence of a publication bias. Conclusions: Our updated analysis provides evidence for significant association between XRCC1 codon 399 polymorphism and PCA risk. Further carefully designed studies should be performed. PMID:26649000

  8. Laser-activated protein solder for peripheral nerve repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trickett, Rodney I.; Lauto, Antonio; Dawes, Judith M.; Owen, Earl R.

    1995-05-01

    A 100 micrometers core optical fiber-coupled 75 mW diode laser operating at a wavelength of 800 nm has been used in conjunction with a protein solder to stripe weld severed rat tibial nerves, reducing the long operating time required for microsurgical nerve repair. Welding is produced by selective laser denaturation of the albumin based solder which contains the dye indocyanine green. Operating time for laser soldering was 10 +/- 5 min. (n equals 20) compared to 23 +/- 9 min. (n equals 10) for microsuturing. The laser solder technique resulted in patent welds with a tensile strength of 15 +/- 5 g, while microsutured nerves had a tensile strength of 40 +/- 10 g. Histopathology of the laser soldered nerves, conducted immediately after surgery, displayed solder adhesion to the outer membrane with minimal damage to the inner axons of the nerves. An in vivo study is under way comparing laser solder repaired tibial nerves to conventional microsuture repair. At the time of submission 15 laser soldered nerves and 7 sutured nerves were characterized at 3 months and showed successful regeneration with compound muscle action potentials of 27 +/- 8 mV and 29 +/- 8 mW respectively. A faster, less damaging and long lasting laser based anastomotic technique is presented.

  9. Tumor-selective use of DNA base excision repair inhibition in pancreatic cancer using the NQO1 bioactivatable drug, β-lapachone

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Gaurab; Silvers, Molly A.; Ilcheva, Mariya; Liu, Yuliang; Moore, Zachary R.; Luo, Xiuquan; Gao, Jinming; Anderson, Glenda; Liu, Lili; Sarode, Venetia; Gerber, David E.; Burma, Sandeep; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Gerson, Stanton L.; Boothman, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is an essential pathway for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) survival. Attempts to target this repair pathway have failed due to lack of tumor-selectivity and very limited efficacy. The NAD(P)H:Quinone Oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) bioactivatable drug, ß-lapachone (ARQ761 in clinical form), can provide tumor-selective and enhanced synergy with BER inhibition. ß-Lapachone undergoes NQO1-dependent futile redox cycling, generating massive intracellular hydrogen peroxide levels and oxidative DNA lesions that stimulate poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) hyperactivation. Rapid NAD+/ATP depletion and programmed necrosis results. To identify BER modulators essential for repair of ß-lapachone-induced DNA base damage, a focused synthetic lethal RNAi screen demonstrated that silencing the BER scaffolding protein, XRCC1, sensitized PDA cells. In contrast, depleting OGG1 N-glycosylase spared cells from ß-lap-induced lethality and blunted PARP1 hyperactivation. Combining ß-lapachone with XRCC1 knockdown or methoxyamine (MeOX), an apyrimidinic/apurinic (AP)-modifying agent, led to NQO1-dependent synergistic killing in PDA, NSCLC, breast and head and neck cancers. OGG1 knockdown, dicoumarol-treatment or NQO1- cancer cells were spared. MeOX + ß-lapachone exposure resulted in elevated DNA double-strand breaks, PARP1 hyperactivation and TUNEL+ programmed necrosis. Combination treatment caused dramatic antitumor activity, enhanced PARP1-hyperactivation in tumor tissue, and improved survival of mice bearing MiaPaca2-derived xenografts, with 33% apparent cures. Significance: Targeting base excision repair (BER) alone has limited therapeutic potential for pancreatic or other cancers due to a general lack of tumor-selectivity. Here, we present a treatment strategy that makes BER inhibition tumor-selective and NQO1-dependent for therapy of most solid neoplasms, particularly for pancreatic cancer. PMID:26602448

  10. Laser-activated protein bands for peripheral nerve repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauto, Antonio; Trickett, Rodney I.; Malik, Richard; Dawes, Judith M.; Owen, Earl R.

    1996-01-01

    A 100 micrometer core optical fiber-coupled 75 mW diode laser operating at a wavelength of 800 nm has been used in conjunction with a protein solder to stripe weld severed rat tibial nerves, reducing the long operating time required for microsurgical nerve repair. Welding is produced by selective laser denaturation of the protein based solder which contains the dye indocyanine green. Operating time for laser soldering was 10 plus or minus 5 min. (n equals 24) compared to 23 plus or minus 9 min (n equals 13) for microsuturing. The laser solder technique resulted in patent welds with a tensile strength of 15 plus or minus 5 g, while microsutured nerves had a tensile strength of 40 plus or minus 10 g. Histopathology of the laser soldered nerves, conducted immediately after surgery, displayed solder adhesion to the outer membrane with minimal damage to the inner axons of the nerves. An in vivo study, with a total of fifty-seven adult male wistar rats, compared laser solder repaired tibial nerves to conventional microsuture repair. Twenty-four laser soldered nerves and thirteen sutured nerves were characterized at three months and showed successful regeneration with average compound muscle action potentials (CMAP) of 2.4 plus or minus 0.7 mV and 2.7 plus or minus 0.8 mV respectively. Histopathology of the in vivo study, confirmed the comparable regeneration of axons in laser and suture operated nerves. A faster, less damaging and long lasting laser based anastomotic technique is presented.

  11. Understanding the molecular mechanism of formaldehyde-induced DNA-protein crosslink repair

    EPA Science Inventory

    Formaldehyde induces DNA-protein crosslinks (DPCs) in several experimental in vitro and in vivo test systems, as well as in exposed human workers. DPCs are repaired by several DNA repair pathways in different species, but the molecular understanding of DPC repair in human tissues...

  12. Repair of uv damaged DNA: Genes and proteins of yeast and human

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, L.

    1992-04-01

    Our objectives are to determine the molecular mechanism of the incision step of excision repair of ultraviolet (UV) light damaged DNA in eukaryotic organisms, using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system, and to study the human homologs of yeast excision repair and postreplication repair proteins progress is described.

  13. S100B protein in tissue development, repair and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sorci, Guglielmo; Riuzzi, Francesca; Arcuri, Cataldo; Tubaro, Claudia; Bianchi, Roberta; Giambanco, Ileana; Donato, Rosario

    2013-01-01

    The Ca2+-binding protein of the EF-hand type, S100B, exerts both intracellular and extracellular regulatory activities. As an intracellular regulator, S100B is involved in the regulation of energy metabolism, transcription, protein phosphorylation, cell proliferation, survival, differentiation and motility, and Ca2+ homeostasis, by interacting with a wide array of proteins (i.e., enzymes, enzyme substrates, cytoskeletal subunits, scaffold/adaptor proteins, transcription factors, ubiquitin E3 ligases, ion channels) in a restricted number of cell types. As an extracellular signal, S100B engages the pattern recognition receptor, receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE), on immune cells as well as on neuronal, astrocytic and microglial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, skeletal myoblasts and cardiomyocytes. However, RAGE may not be the sole receptor activated by S100B, the protein being able to enhance bFGF-FGFR1 signaling by interacting with FGFR1-bound bFGF in particular cell types. Moreover, extracellular effects of S100B vary depending on its local concentration. Increasing evidence suggests that at the concentration found in extracellular fluids in normal physiological conditions and locally upon acute tissue injury, which is up to a few nM levels, S100B exerts trophic effects in the central and peripheral nervous system and in skeletal muscle tissue thus participating in tissue homeostasis. The present commentary summarizes results implicating intracellular and extracellular S100B in tissue development, repair and regeneration. PMID:23580916

  14. Evaluation of the XRCC1 gene as a phenotypic modifier in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. Results from the consortium of investigators of modifiers of BRCA1/BRCA2

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, A; Milne, R L; Alonso, R; Pita, G; Peterlongo, P; Teulé, A; Nathanson, K L; Domchek, S M; Rebbeck, T; Lasa, A; Konstantopoulou, I; Hogervorst, F B; Verhoef, S; van Dooren, M F; Jager, A; Ausems, M G E M; Aalfs, C M; van Asperen, C J; Vreeswijk, M; Waisfisz, Q; Van Roozendaal, C E; Ligtenberg, M J; Easton, D F; Peock, S; Cook, M; Oliver, C T; Frost, D; Curzon, B; Evans, D G; Lalloo, F; Eeles, R; Izatt, L; Davidson, R; Adlard, J; Eccles, D; Ong, K-r; Douglas, F; Downing, S; Brewer, C; Walker, L; Nevanlinna, H; Aittomäki, K; Couch, F J; Fredericksen, Z; Lindor, N M; Godwin, A; Isaacs, C; Caligo, M A; Loman, N; Jernström, H; Barbany-Bustinza, G; Liljegren, A; Ehrencrona, H; Stenmark-Askmalm, M; Feliubadaló, L; Manoukian, S; Peissel, B; Zaffaroni, D; Bonanni, B; Fortuzzi, S; Johannsson, O T; Chenevix-Trench, G; Chen, X-C; Beesley, J; Spurdle, A B; Sinilnikova, O M; Healey, S; McGuffog, L; Antoniou, A C; Brunet, J; Radice, P; Benítez, J

    2011-01-01

    Background: Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in DNA repair are good candidates to be tested as phenotypic modifiers for carriers of mutations in the high-risk susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2. The base excision repair (BER) pathway could be particularly interesting given the relation of synthetic lethality that exists between one of the components of the pathway, PARP1, and both BRCA1 and BRCA2. In this study, we have evaluated the XRCC1 gene that participates in the BER pathway, as phenotypic modifier of BRCA1 and BRCA2. Methods: Three common SNPs in the gene, c.-77C>T (rs3213245) p.Arg280His (rs25489) and p.Gln399Arg (rs25487) were analysed in a series of 701 BRCA1 and 576 BRCA2 mutation carriers. Results: An association was observed between p.Arg280His-rs25489 and breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers, with rare homozygotes at increased risk relative to common homozygotes (hazard ratio: 22.3, 95% confidence interval: 14.3–34, P<0.001). This association was further tested in a second series of 4480 BRCA1 and 3016 BRCA2 mutation carriers from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1 and BRCA2. Conclusions and inte No evidence of association was found when the larger series was analysed which lead us to conclude that none of the three SNPs are significant modifiers of breast cancer risk for mutation carriers. PMID:21427728

  15. Predictive assessment in pharmacogenetics of XRCC1 gene on clinical outcomes of advanced lung cancer patients treated with platinum-based chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhengrong; Li, Jiao; Hu, Ruiqi; Jiao, Yang; Han, Yingying; Weng, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Published data have shown inconsistent results about the pharmacogenetics of XRCC1 gene on clinical outcomes of advanced lung cancer patients treated with platinum-based chemotherapy. This meta-analysis aimed to summarize published findings and provide more reliable association. A total of 53 eligible studies including 7433 patients were included. Patients bearing the favorable TrpTrp and TrpArg genotypes of Arg194Trp were more likely to better response rates to platinum-based chemotherapy compared to those with the unfavorable ArgArg genotype (TrpTrp+TrpArg vs. ArgArg: odds ratio (OR) = 2.02, 95% CI, 1.66–2.45). The GlnGln and GlnArg genotypes of Arg399Gln were significantly associated with the poorer response rates compared to those with the ArgArg genotype (GlnGln +GlnArg vs. ArgArg: OR = 0.68, 95% CI, 0.54–0.86). The GlnGln genotype might be more closely associated with shorter survival time and higher risks of death for patients (GlnGln vs. ArgArg: hazard ratio (HR) = 1.14, 95% CI, 0.75–1.75). Our cumulative meta-analyses indicated a distinct apparent trend toward a better response rate for Arg194Trp, but a poorer response rate in Arg399Gln. These findings indicate a predictive role of XRCC1 polymorphisms in clinical outcomes. The use of XRCC1 polymorphisms as predictive factor of clinical outcomes in personalized chemotherapy treatment requires further verification from large well-designed pharmacogenetics studies. PMID:26585370

  16. Spatiotemporal analysis of DNA repair using charged particle radiation.

    PubMed

    Tobias, F; Durante, M; Taucher-Scholz, G; Jakob, B

    2010-01-01

    Approaches to visualise the dynamics of the DNA lesion processing substantially contributes to the understanding of the hierarchical organisation of the DNA damage response pathways. Charged particle irradiation has recently emerged as a tool to generate discrete sites of subnuclear damage by its means of extremely localised dose deposition at low energies, thus facilitating the spatiotemporal analysis of repair events. In addition, they are of high interest for risk estimations of human space exploration (e.g. mars mission) in the high energy regime (HZE). In this short review we will give examples for the application of charged particle irradiation to study spatiotemporal aspects of DNA damage recognition and repair in the context of recent achievements in this field. Beamline microscopy allows determining the exact kinetics of repair-related proteins after irradiation with different charged particles that induce different lesion densities. The classification into fast recruited proteins like DNA-PK or XRCC1 or slower recruited ones like 53BP1 or MDC1 helps to establish the hierarchical organisation of damage recognition and subsequent repair events. Additionally, motional analysis of DNA lesions induced by traversing particles proved information about the mobility of DSBs. Increased mobility or the absence of large scale motion has direct consequences on the formation of chromosomal translocations and, thus, on mechanisms of cancer formation. Charged particle microbeams offer the interesting perspective of precise nuclear or subnuclear targeting with a defined number of ions, avoiding the Poisson distribution of traversals inherent to broad beam experiments. With the help of the microbeam, geometrical patterns of traversing ions can be applied facilitating the analysis of spatial organisation of repair. PMID:19944777

  17. Fanconi Anemia Proteins, DNA Interstrand Crosslink Repair Pathways, and Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Andreassen, Paul R.; Ren, Keqin

    2016-01-01

    DNA interstrand crosslinkers, a chemically diverse group of compounds which also induce alkylation of bases and DNA intrastrand crosslinks, are extensively utilized for cancer therapy. Understanding the cellular response to DNA damage induced by these agents is critical for more effective utilization of these compounds and for the identification of novel therapeutic targets. Importantly, the repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) involves many distinct DNA repair pathways, including nucleotide excision repair, translesion synthesis (TLS), and homologous recombination (HR). Additionally, proteins implicated in the pathophysiology of the multigenic disease Fanconi anemia (FA) have a role in the repair of ICLs that is not well understood. Cells from FA patients are hypersensitive to agents that induce ICLs, therefore FA proteins are potentially novel therapeutic targets. Here we will review current research directed at identifying FA genes and understanding the function of FA proteins in DNA damage responses. We will also examine interactions of FA proteins with other repair proteins and pathways, including signaling networks, which are potentially involved in ICL repair. Potential approaches to the modulation of FA protein function to enhance therapeutic outcome will be discussed. Also, mutation of many genes that encode proteins involved in ICL repair, including FA genes, increases susceptibility to cancer. A better understanding of these pathways is therefore critical for the design of individualized therapies tailored to the genetic profile of a particular malignancy. For this purpose, we will also review evidence for the association of mutation of FA genes with cancer in non-FA patients. PMID:19200054

  18. The UvrD helicase and its modulation by the mismatch repair protein MutL.

    PubMed

    Matson, Steven W; Robertson, Adam B

    2006-01-01

    UvrD is a superfamily I DNA helicase with well documented roles in excision repair and methyl-directed mismatch repair (MMR) in addition to poorly understood roles in replication and recombination. The MutL protein is a homodimeric DNA-stimulated ATPase that plays a central role in MMR in Escherichia coli. This protein has been characterized as the master regulator of mismatch repair since it interacts with and modulates the activity of several other proteins involved in the mismatch repair pathway including MutS, MutH and UvrD. Here we present a brief summary of recent studies directed toward arriving at a better understanding of the interaction between MutL and UvrD, and the impact of this interaction on the activity of UvrD and its role in mismatch repair. PMID:16935885

  19. Host DNA repair proteins in response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in lung epitehlial cells and in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Host DNA damage and DNA repair response to bacterial infections and its significance are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that infection by Gram-negative bacterium P. aeruginosa significantly altered the expression and enzymatic activity of base excision DNA repair protein OGG1 in lung epi...

  20. A role for Saccharomyces cerevisiae Tpa1 protein in direct alkylation repair.

    PubMed

    Shivange, Gururaj; Kodipelli, Naveena; Monisha, Mohan; Anindya, Roy

    2014-12-26

    Alkylating agents induce cytotoxic DNA base adducts. In this work, we provide evidence to suggest, for the first time, that Saccharomyces cerevisiae Tpa1 protein is involved in DNA alkylation repair. Little is known about Tpa1 as a repair protein beyond the initial observation from a high-throughput analysis indicating that deletion of TPA1 causes methyl methane sulfonate sensitivity in S. cerevisiae. Using purified Tpa1, we demonstrate that Tpa1 repairs both single- and double-stranded methylated DNA. Tpa1 is a member of the Fe(II) and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase family, and we show that mutation of the amino acid residues involved in cofactor binding abolishes the Tpa1 DNA repair activity. Deletion of TPA1 along with the base excision repair pathway DNA glycosylase MAG1 renders the tpa1Δmag1Δ double mutant highly susceptible to methylation-induced toxicity. We further demonstrate that the trans-lesion synthesis DNA polymerase Polζ (REV3) plays a key role in tolerating DNA methyl-base lesions and that tpa1Δmag1revΔ3 triple mutant is extremely susceptible to methylation-induced toxicity. Our results indicate a synergism between the base excision repair pathway and direct alkylation repair by Tpa1 in S. cerevisiae. We conclude that Tpa1 is a hitherto unidentified DNA repair protein in yeast and that it plays a crucial role in reverting alkylated DNA base lesions and cytotoxicity. PMID:25381260

  1. A Role for Saccharomyces cerevisiae Tpa1 Protein in Direct Alkylation Repair*

    PubMed Central

    Shivange, Gururaj; Kodipelli, Naveena; Monisha, Mohan; Anindya, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Alkylating agents induce cytotoxic DNA base adducts. In this work, we provide evidence to suggest, for the first time, that Saccharomyces cerevisiae Tpa1 protein is involved in DNA alkylation repair. Little is known about Tpa1 as a repair protein beyond the initial observation from a high-throughput analysis indicating that deletion of TPA1 causes methyl methane sulfonate sensitivity in S. cerevisiae. Using purified Tpa1, we demonstrate that Tpa1 repairs both single- and double-stranded methylated DNA. Tpa1 is a member of the Fe(II) and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase family, and we show that mutation of the amino acid residues involved in cofactor binding abolishes the Tpa1 DNA repair activity. Deletion of TPA1 along with the base excision repair pathway DNA glycosylase MAG1 renders the tpa1Δmag1Δ double mutant highly susceptible to methylation-induced toxicity. We further demonstrate that the trans-lesion synthesis DNA polymerase Polζ (REV3) plays a key role in tolerating DNA methyl-base lesions and that tpa1Δmag1revΔ3 triple mutant is extremely susceptible to methylation-induced toxicity. Our results indicate a synergism between the base excision repair pathway and direct alkylation repair by Tpa1 in S. cerevisiae. We conclude that Tpa1 is a hitherto unidentified DNA repair protein in yeast and that it plays a crucial role in reverting alkylated DNA base lesions and cytotoxicity. PMID:25381260

  2. Proteomic identification of hair cell repair proteins in the model sea anemone Nematostella vectensis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Pei-Ciao; Watson, Glen M

    2015-09-01

    Sea anemones have an extraordinary capability to repair damaged hair bundles, even after severe trauma. A group of secreted proteins, named repair proteins (RPs), found in mucus covering sea anemones significantly assists the repair of damaged hair bundle mechanoreceptors both in the sea anemone Haliplanella luciae and the blind cavefish Astyanax hubbsi. The polypeptide constituents of RPs must be identified in order to gain insight into the molecular mechanisms by which repair of hair bundles is accomplished. In this study, several polypeptides of RPs were isolated from mucus using blue native PAGE and then sequenced using LC-MS/MS. Thirty-seven known polypeptides were identified, including Hsp70s, as well as many polypeptide subunits of the 20S proteasome. Other identified polypeptides included those involved in cellular stress responses, protein folding, and protein degradation. Specific inhibitors of Hsp70s and the 20S proteasome were employed in experiments to test their involvement in hair bundle repair. The results of those experiments suggested that repair requires biologically active Hsp70s and 20S proteasomes. A model is proposed that considers the function of extracellular Hsp70s and 20S proteasomes in the repair of damaged hair cells. PMID:26183436

  3. WHERE MULTIFUNCTIONAL DNA REPAIR PROTEINS MEET: MAPPING THE INTERACTION DOMAINS BETWEEN XPG AND WRN

    SciTech Connect

    Rangaraj, K.; Cooper, P.K.; Trego, K.S.

    2009-01-01

    The rapid recognition and repair of DNA damage is essential for the maintenance of genomic integrity and cellular survival. Multiple complex and interconnected DNA damage responses exist within cells to preserve the human genome, and these repair pathways are carried out by a specifi c interplay of protein-protein interactions. Thus a failure in the coordination of these processes, perhaps brought about by a breakdown in any one multifunctional repair protein, can lead to genomic instability, developmental and immunological abnormalities, cancer and premature aging. This study demonstrates a novel interaction between two such repair proteins, Xeroderma pigmentosum group G protein (XPG) and Werner syndrome helicase (WRN), that are both highly pleiotropic and associated with inherited genetic disorders when mutated. XPG is a structure-specifi c endonuclease required for the repair of UV-damaged DNA by nucleotide excision repair (NER), and mutations in XPG result in the diseases Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne syndrome (CS). A loss of XPG incision activity results in XP, whereas a loss of non-enzymatic function(s) of XPG causes CS. WRN is a multifunctional protein involved in double-strand break repair (DSBR), and consists of 3’–5’ DNA-dependent helicase, 3’–5’ exonuclease, and single-strand DNA annealing activities. Nonfunctional WRN protein leads to Werner syndrome, a premature aging disorder with increased cancer incidence. Far Western analysis was used to map the interacting domains between XPG and WRN by denaturing gel electrophoresis, which separated purifi ed full length and recombinant XPG and WRN deletion constructs, based primarily upon the length of each polypeptide. Specifi c interacting domains were visualized when probed with the secondary protein of interest which was then detected by traditional Western analysis using the antibody of the secondary protein. The interaction between XPG and WRN was mapped to the C-terminal region of

  4. Repair of UV damaged DNA, genes and proteins of yeast and human

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, L.

    1991-04-01

    Our objectives are to determine the molecular mechanism of the incision step of excision repair of ultraviolet (UV) light damaged DNA in eukaryotic organisms, using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system, as well as studying the human homologs of yeast excision repair and postreplication repair proteins. In addition to its single-stranded DNA-dependent A TPase and DNA helicase activities, we have found that RAD3 protein also possesses DNA-RNA helicase activity, and that like RAD3, the Schizosaccharomyces pombe RAD3 homolog, rhp3{sup +}, is an essential gene. We have overexpressed the human RAD3 homolog, ERCC2, in yeast to facilitate its purification. The RAD10 protein was purified to homogeneity and shown to bind DNA. ERCC3y, the yeast homolog of the human ERCC-3/XP-B gene, has been sequenced and shown to be essential for viability. The Drosophila and human homologs of RAD6, required for postreplication repair and UV induced mutagenesis, were shown to complement the rad6 {Delta} mutation of yeast. Since defective DNA repair and enhanced neoplasia characterize several human genetic diseases, and repair proteins are highly conserved between yeast and man, a thorough understanding of the molecular mechanisms of DNA repir in yeast should provide a better understanding of the causes of carcinogenesis.

  5. Production, Purification, and Characterization of 15N-Labeled DNA Repair Proteins as Internal Standards for Mass Spectrometric Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Jaruga, Pawel; Nelson, Bryant C.; Lowenthal, Mark S.; Jemth, Ann-Sofie; Loseva, Olga; Coskun, Erdem; Helleday, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Oxidatively induced DNA damage is caused in living organisms by a variety of damaging agents, resulting in the formation of a multiplicity of lesions, which are mutagenic and cytotoxic. Unless repaired by DNA repair mechanisms before DNA replication, DNA lesions can lead to genomic instability, which is one of the hallmarks of cancer. Oxidatively induced DNA damage is mainly repaired by base excision repair pathway with the involvement of a plethora of proteins. Cancer tissues develop greater DNA repair capacity than normal tissues by overexpressing DNA repair proteins. Increased DNA repair in tumors that removes DNA lesions generated by therapeutic agents before they became toxic is a major mechanism in the development of therapy resistance. Evidence suggests that DNA repair capacity may be a predictive biomarker of patient response. Thus, knowledge of DNA–protein expressions in disease-free and cancerous tissues may help predict and guide development of treatments and yield the best therapeutic response. Our laboratory has developed methodologies that use mass spectrometry with isotope dilution for the measurement of expression of DNA repair proteins in human tissues and cultured cells. For this purpose, full-length 15N-labeled analogs of a number of human DNA repair proteins have been produced and purified to be used as internal standards for positive identification and accurate quantification. This chapter describes in detail the protocols of this work. The use of 15N-labeled proteins as internal standards for the measurement of several DNA repair proteins in vivo is also presented. PMID:26791985

  6. Zinc Binding to MG53 Protein Facilitates Repair of Injury to Cell Membranes*

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Chuanxi; Lin, Peihui; Zhu, Hua; Ko, Jae-Kyun; Hwang, Moonsun; Tan, Tao; Pan, Zui; Korichneva, Irina; Ma, Jianjie

    2015-01-01

    Zinc is an essential trace element that participates in a wide range of biological functions, including wound healing. Although Zn2+ deficiency has been linked to compromised wound healing and tissue repair in human diseases, the molecular mechanisms underlying Zn2+-mediated tissue repair remain unknown. Our previous studies established that MG53, a TRIM (tripartite motif) family protein, is an essential component of the cell membrane repair machinery. Domain homology analysis revealed that MG53 contains two Zn2+-binding motifs. Here, we show that Zn2+ binding to MG53 is indispensable to assembly of the cell membrane repair machinery. Live cell imaging illustrated that Zn2+ entry from extracellular space is essential for translocation of MG53-containing vesicles to the acute membrane injury sites for formation of a repair patch. The effect of Zn2+ on membrane repair is abolished in mg53−/− muscle fibers, suggesting that MG53 functions as a potential target for Zn2+ during membrane repair. Mutagenesis studies suggested that both RING and B-box motifs of MG53 constitute Zn2+-binding domains that contribute to MG53-mediated membrane repair. Overall, this study establishes a base for Zn2+ interaction with MG53 in protection against injury to the cell membrane. PMID:25869134

  7. Zinc Binding to MG53 Protein Facilitates Repair of Injury to Cell Membranes.

    PubMed

    Cai, Chuanxi; Lin, Peihui; Zhu, Hua; Ko, Jae-Kyun; Hwang, Moonsun; Tan, Tao; Pan, Zui; Korichneva, Irina; Ma, Jianjie

    2015-05-29

    Zinc is an essential trace element that participates in a wide range of biological functions, including wound healing. Although Zn(2+) deficiency has been linked to compromised wound healing and tissue repair in human diseases, the molecular mechanisms underlying Zn(2+)-mediated tissue repair remain unknown. Our previous studies established that MG53, a TRIM (tripartite motif) family protein, is an essential component of the cell membrane repair machinery. Domain homology analysis revealed that MG53 contains two Zn(2+)-binding motifs. Here, we show that Zn(2+) binding to MG53 is indispensable to assembly of the cell membrane repair machinery. Live cell imaging illustrated that Zn(2+) entry from extracellular space is essential for translocation of MG53-containing vesicles to the acute membrane injury sites for formation of a repair patch. The effect of Zn(2+) on membrane repair is abolished in mg53(-/-) muscle fibers, suggesting that MG53 functions as a potential target for Zn(2+) during membrane repair. Mutagenesis studies suggested that both RING and B-box motifs of MG53 constitute Zn(2+)-binding domains that contribute to MG53-mediated membrane repair. Overall, this study establishes a base for Zn(2+) interaction with MG53 in protection against injury to the cell membrane. PMID:25869134

  8. Variation in DNA Base Excision Repair Genes in Fuchs Endothelial Corneal Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Wójcik, Katarzyna A.; Synowiec, Ewelina; Polakowski, Piotr; Błasiak, Janusz; Szaflik, Jerzy; Szaflik, Jacek P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD) is a corneal disease characterized by abnormalities in the Descemet membrane and the corneal endothelium. The etiology of this disease is poorly understood. An increased level of oxidative DNA damage reported in FECD corneas suggests a role of DNA base excision repair (BER) genes in its pathogenesis. In this work, we searched for the association between variation of the PARP-1, NEIL1, POLG, and XRCC1 genes and FECD occurrence. Material/Methods This study was conducted on 250 FECD patients and 353 controls using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism, high-resolution melting analysis, and the TaqMan® SNP Genotyping Assay. Results We observed that the A/A genotype and the A allele of the c.1196A>G polymorphism of the XRCC1 gene were positively correlated with an increased FECD occurrence, whereas the G allele had the opposite effect. A weak association between the C/G genotype of the g.46438521G>C polymorphism of the NEIL1 gene and an increased incidence of FECD was also detected. Haplotypes of both polymorphisms of the XRCC1 were associated with FECD occurrence. No association of the c.2285T>C, c.–1370T>A and c.580C>T polymorphisms of the PARP-1, POLG and XRCC1 genes, respectively, with FECD occurrence was observed. Conclusions Our results suggest that the c.1196A>G polymorphism in the XRCC1 gene may be an independent genetic risk factor for FECD. PMID:26388025

  9. Differential repair of etheno-DNA adducts by bacterial and human AlkB proteins.

    PubMed

    Zdżalik, Daria; Domańska, Anna; Prorok, Paulina; Kosicki, Konrad; van den Born, Erwin; Falnes, Pål Ø; Rizzo, Carmelo J; Guengerich, F Peter; Tudek, Barbara

    2015-06-01

    AlkB proteins are evolutionary conserved Fe(II)/2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases, which remove alkyl and highly promutagenic etheno(ɛ)-DNA adducts, but their substrate specificity has not been fully determined. We developed a novel assay for the repair of ɛ-adducts by AlkB enzymes using oligodeoxynucleotides with a single lesion and specific DNA glycosylases and AP-endonuclease for identification of the repair products. We compared the repair of three ɛ-adducts, 1,N(6)-ethenoadenine (ɛA), 3,N(4)-ethenocytosine (ɛC) and 1,N(2)-ethenoguanine (1,N(2)-ɛG) by nine bacterial and two human AlkBs, representing four different structural groups defined on the basis of conserved amino acids in the nucleotide recognition lid, engaged in the enzyme binding to the substrate. Two bacterial AlkB proteins, MT-2B (from Mycobacterium tuberculosis) and SC-2B (Streptomyces coelicolor) did not repair these lesions in either double-stranded (ds) or single-stranded (ss) DNA. Three proteins, RE-2A (Rhizobium etli), SA-2B (Streptomyces avermitilis), and XC-2B (Xanthomonas campestris) efficiently removed all three lesions from the DNA substrates. Interestingly, XC-2B and RE-2A are the first AlkB proteins shown to be specialized for ɛ-adducts, since they do not repair methylated bases. Three other proteins, EcAlkB (Escherichia coli), SA-1A, and XC-1B removed ɛA and ɛC from ds and ssDNA but were inactive toward 1,N(2)-ɛG. SC-1A repaired only ɛA with the preference for dsDNA. The human enzyme ALKBH2 repaired all three ɛ-adducts in dsDNA, while only ɛA and ɛC in ssDNA and repair was less efficient in ssDNA. ALKBH3 repaired only ɛC in ssDNA. Altogether, we have shown for the first time that some AlkB proteins, namely ALKBH2, RE-2A, SA-2B and XC-2B can repair 1,N(2)-ɛG and that ALKBH3 removes only ɛC from ssDNA. Our results also suggest that the nucleotide recognition lid is not the sole determinant of the substrate specificity of AlkB proteins. PMID:25797601

  10. Curcumin Triggers DNA Damage and Inhibits Expression of DNA Repair Proteins in Human Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ting, Chien-Yi; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Yu, Chien-Chih; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Liu, Yu-Chang; Chiang, I-Tsang

    2015-07-01

    The study goal was to evaluate the effects of curcumin on DNA damage and expression of DNA-repair proteins in human lung cancer. Thus, NCI-H460 cells were used to study the effects of curcumin on DNA damage and repair in vitro. We investigated curcumin induces DNA damage by comet the assay and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining. The DNA damage/repair-related protein levels were examined and monitored by western blotting and confocal microscopy. Curcumin significantly increased the length of comet tails and DNA condensation in NCI-H460 cells. Curcumin reduced expression of DNA-repair proteins such as 14-3-3 protein sigma (14-3-3σ), O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1), and mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (MDC1). Curcumin also increased phosphorylation of p53 and Histone H2A.X (S140) in the nuclei of NCI-H460 cells. Taken together, our findings indicated that curcumin triggered DNA damage and inhibited expression of DNA-repair-associated proteins in NCI-H460 cells. PMID:26124332

  11. Repair of uv damaged DNA: Genes and proteins of yeast and human. Progress report, November 1, 1991--April 15, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, L.

    1992-04-01

    Our objectives are to determine the molecular mechanism of the incision step of excision repair of ultraviolet (UV) light damaged DNA in eukaryotic organisms, using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system, and to study the human homologs of yeast excision repair and postreplication repair proteins progress is described.

  12. HIV-1 and HIV-2 exhibit divergent interactions with HLTF and UNG2 DNA repair proteins.

    PubMed

    Hrecka, Kasia; Hao, Caili; Shun, Ming-Chieh; Kaur, Sarabpreet; Swanson, Selene K; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P; Skowronski, Jacek

    2016-07-01

    HIV replication in nondividing host cells occurs in the presence of high concentrations of noncanonical dUTP, apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing, enzyme-catalytic, polypeptide-like 3 (APOBEC3) cytidine deaminases, and SAMHD1 (a cell cycle-regulated dNTP triphosphohydrolase) dNTPase, which maintains low concentrations of canonical dNTPs in these cells. These conditions favor the introduction of marks of DNA damage into viral cDNA, and thereby prime it for processing by DNA repair enzymes. Accessory protein Vpr, found in all primate lentiviruses, and its HIV-2/simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) SIVsm paralogue Vpx, hijack the CRL4(DCAF1) E3 ubiquitin ligase to alleviate some of these conditions, but the extent of their interactions with DNA repair proteins has not been thoroughly characterized. Here, we identify HLTF, a postreplication DNA repair helicase, as a common target of HIV-1/SIVcpz Vpr proteins. We show that HIV-1 Vpr reprograms CRL4(DCAF1) E3 to direct HLTF for proteasome-dependent degradation independent from previously reported Vpr interactions with base excision repair enzyme uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG2) and crossover junction endonuclease MUS81, which Vpr also directs for degradation via CRL4(DCAF1) E3. Thus, separate functions of HIV-1 Vpr usurp CRL4(DCAF1) E3 to remove key enzymes in three DNA repair pathways. In contrast, we find that HIV-2 Vpr is unable to efficiently program HLTF or UNG2 for degradation. Our findings reveal complex interactions between HIV-1 and the DNA repair machinery, suggesting that DNA repair plays important roles in the HIV-1 life cycle. The divergent interactions of HIV-1 and HIV-2 with DNA repair enzymes and SAMHD1 imply that these viruses use different strategies to guard their genomes and facilitate their replication in the host. PMID:27335459

  13. An interaction between the DNA repair factor XPA and replication protein A appears essential for nucleotide excision repair.

    PubMed Central

    Li, L; Lu, X; Peterson, C A; Legerski, R J

    1995-01-01

    Replication protein A (RPA) is required for simian virus 40-directed DNA replication in vitro and for nucleotide excision repair (NER). Here we report that RPA and the human repair protein XPA specifically interact both in vitro and in vivo. Mapping of the RPA-interactive domains in XPA revealed that both of the largest subunits of RPA, RPA-70 and RPA-34, interact with XPA at distinct sites. A domain involved in mediating the interaction with RPA-70 was located between XPA residues 153 and 176. Deletion of highly conserved motifs within this region identified two mutants that were deficient in binding RPA in vitro and highly defective in NER both in vitro and in vivo. A second domain mediating the interaction with RPA-34 was identified within the first 58 residues in XPA. Deletion of this region, however, only moderately affects the complementing activity of XPA in vivo. Finally, the XPA-RPA complex is shown to have a greater affinity for damaged DNA than XPA alone. Taken together, these results indicate that the interaction between XPA and RPA is required for NER but that only the interaction with RPA-70 is essential. PMID:7565690

  14. Specific association between the human DNA repair proteins XPA and ERCC1.

    PubMed Central

    Li, L; Elledge, S J; Peterson, C A; Bales, E S; Legerski, R J

    1994-01-01

    Processing of DNA damage by the nucleotide-excision repair pathway in eukaryotic cells is most likely accomplished by multiprotein complexes. However, the nature of these complexes and the details of the molecular interactions between DNA repair factors are for the most part unknown. Here, we demonstrate both in vivo, using the two-hybrid system, and in vitro, using recombinant proteins, that the human repair factors XPA and ERCC1 specifically interact. In addition, we report an initial determination of the domains in ERCC1 and XPA that mediate this interaction. These results suggest that XPA may play a role in the localization or loading of an incision complex, composed of ERCC1 and possibly other repair factors, onto a damaged site. Images PMID:8197174

  15. Functional interactions and signaling properties of mammalian DNA mismatch repair proteins.

    PubMed

    Bellacosa, A

    2001-11-01

    The mismatch repair (MMR) system promotes genomic fidelity by repairing base-base mismatches, insertion-deletion loops and heterologies generated during DNA replication and recombination. This function is critically dependent on the assembling of multimeric complexes involved in mismatch recognition and signal transduction to downstream repair events. In addition, MMR proteins coordinate a complex network of physical and functional interactions that mediate other DNA transactions, such as transcription-coupled repair, base excision repair and recombination. MMR proteins are also involved in activation of cell cycle checkpoint and induction of apoptosis when DNA damage overwhelms a critical threshold. For this reason, they play a role in cell death by alkylating agents and other chemotherapeutic drugs, including cisplatin. Inactivation of MMR genes in hereditary and sporadic cancer is associated with a mutator phenotype and inhibition of apoptosis. In the future, a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms and functional interactions of MMR proteins will lead to the development of more effective cancer prevention and treatment strategies. PMID:11687886

  16. The Rad9 protein enhances survival and promotes DNA repair following exposure to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Patrick D.; Helt, Christopher E.; Keng, Peter C.; Bambara, Robert A. . E-mail: robert_bambara@urmc.rochester.edu

    2006-08-18

    Following DNA damage cells initiate cell cycle checkpoints to allow time to repair sustained lesions. Rad9, Rad1, and Hus1 proteins form a toroidal complex, termed the 9-1-1 complex, that is involved in checkpoint signaling. 9-1-1 shares high structural similarity to the DNA replication protein proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and 9-1-1 has been shown in vitro to stimulate steps of the repair process known as long patch base excision repair. Using a system that allows conditional repression of the Rad9 protein in human cell culture, we show that Rad9, and by extension, the 9-1-1 complex, enhances cell survival, is required for efficient exit from G2-phase arrest, and stimulates the repair of damaged DNA following ionizing radiation. These data provide in vivo evidence that the human 9-1-1 complex participates in DNA repair in addition to its previously described role in DNA damage sensing.

  17. Protein phosphatase 5 is necessary for ATR-mediated DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Yoonsung; Cheong, Hyang-Min; Lee, Jung-Hee; Song, Peter I.; Lee, Kwang-Ho; Kim, Sang-Yong; Jun, Jae Yeoul; You, Ho Jin

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Serine/threonine protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) has been shown to participate in ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM)- and ATR (ATM- and Rad3-related)-mediated checkpoint pathways, which plays an important role in the DNA damage response and maintenance of genomic stability. {yields} However, it is not clear exactly how PP5 participates in this process. {yields} Our results indicate that PP5 is more closely related with ATR-mediated pathway than ATM-mediated pathway in DNA damage repair. -- Abstract: Several recent studies have shown that protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) participates in cell cycle arrest after DNA damage, but its roles in DNA repair have not yet been fully characterized. We investigated the roles of PP5 in the repair of ultraviolet (UV)- and neocarzinostatin (NCS)-induced DNA damage. The results of comet assays revealed different repair patterns in UV- and NCS-exposed U2OS-PS cells. PP5 is only essential for Rad3-related (ATR)-mediated DNA repair. Furthermore, the phosphorylation of 53BP1 and BRCA1, important mediators of DNA damage repair, and substrates of ATR and ATM decreased in U2OS-PS cells exposed to UV radiation. In contrast, the cell cycle arrest proteins p53, CHK1, and CHK2 were normally phosphorylated in U2OS and U2OS-PS cells exposed to UV radiation or treated with NCS. In view of these results, we suggest that PP5 plays a crucial role in ATR-mediated repair of UV-induced DNA damage.

  18. New Paradigms in the Repair of Oxidative Damage in Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Arijit; Yang, Chunying; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Mitra, Sankar; Hegde, Muralidhar L.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidized bases in the mammalian genome, which are invariably mutagenic due to their mis-pairing property, are continuously induced by endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS) and more abundantly after oxidative stress. Unlike bulky base adducts induced by UV and other environmental mutagens in the genome that block replicative DNA polymerases, oxidatively damaged bases such as 5-hydoxyuracil (5-OHU), produced by oxidative deamination of cytosine in the template strand, do not block replicative polymerases and thus need to be repaired prior to replication in order to prevent mutation. Following up our earlier studies, which showed that the Nei endonuclease VIII like 1 (NEIL1) DNA glycosylase, one of five base excision repair (BER)-initiating enzymes in mammalian cells, has enhanced expression during the S-phase and higher affinity for replication fork-mimicking single-stranded (ss) DNA substrates, we recently provided direct experimental evidence for NEIL1’s role in replicating template-strand repair. The key requirement for this event, which we named as the ‘cow-catcher’ mechanism of pre-replicative BER, is NEIL1’s non-productive binding (substrate binding without product formation) to the lesion base in ss DNA template to stall DNA synthesis, causing fork regression. Repair of the lesion in re-annealed duplex is then carried out by NEIL1 in association with the DNA replication proteins. NEIL1 (and other BER-initiating enzymes) also interact with several accessory and non-canonical proteins including the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U (hnRNP-U) and Y-box-binding protein 1 (YB-1) as well as high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), whose precise roles in BER are still obscure. In this review, we have discussed the recent advances in our understanding of oxidative genome damage repair pathways with particular focus on the pre-replicative template strand repair and the role of scaffold factors like X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 1 (XRCC1

  19. Proteasome inhibition rescues clinically significant unstable variants of the mismatch repair protein Msh2

    PubMed Central

    Arlow, Tim; Scott, Kristan; Wagenseller, Aubrey; Gammie, Alison

    2013-01-01

    MSH2 is required for DNA mismatch repair recognition in eukaryotes. Deleterious mutations in human MSH2 account for approximately half of the alleles associated with a common hereditary cancer syndrome. Previously, we characterized clinically identified MSH2 missense mutations, using yeast as a model system, and found that the most common cause of defective DNA mismatch repair was low levels of the variant Msh2 proteins. Here, we show that increased protein turnover is responsible for the reduced cellular levels. Increasing gene dosage of more than half of the missense alleles fully restored function. A titration experiment revealed that raising the expression level of one variant to less than wild-type levels restored mismatch repair, suggesting that overexpression is not always required to regain function. We found that the ubiquitin-mediated proteasome degradation pathway is the major mechanism for increased turnover of the Msh2 variants and identified the primary ubiquitin ligase as San1. Deletion of San1 restored protein levels for all but one variant, but did not elevate wild-type Msh2 levels. The unstable variants interacted with San1, whereas wild-type Msh2 did not. Additionally, san1Δ suppressed the mismatch repair defect of unstable variants. Of medical significance, the clinically approved drug Bortezomib partially restored protein levels and mismatch repair function for low-level variants and reversed the resistance to cisplatin, a common chemotherapeutic. Our results provide the foundation for an innovative therapeutic regime for certain mismatch-repair-defective cancers that are refractory to conventional chemotherapies. PMID:23248292

  20. Understanding the Molecular Mechanism(s) of Formaldehyde-induced DNA-protein Crosslink Repair

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although formaldehyde has been shown to induce many kinds of DNA damage both in in vitro and in vivo assay systems, initial DNA-protein crosslink (DPC) formation might play a major role in FA-induced mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. Several DNA repair pathways, such as base excisi...

  1. A novel method for monitoring functional lesion-specific recruitment of repair proteins in live cells

    PubMed Central

    Woodrick, Jordan; Gupta, Suhani; Khatkar, Pooja; Dave, Kalpana; Levashova, Darya; Choudhury, Sujata; Elias, Hadi; Saha, Tapas; Mueller, Susette; Roy, Rabindra

    2015-01-01

    DNA-protein relationships have been studied by numerous methods, but a particular gap in methodology lies in the study of DNA adduct-specific interactions with proteins in vivo, which particularly affects the field of DNA repair. Using the repair of a well-characterized and ubiquitous adduct, the abasic (AP) site, as a model, we have developed a comprehensive method of monitoring DNA lesion-specific recruitment of proteins in vivo over time. We utilized a surrogate system in which a Cy3-labeled plasmid containing a single AP-site was transfected into cells, and the interaction of the labeled DNA with BER enzymes, including APE1, Polβ, LIG1, and FEN1, was monitored by immunofluorescent staining of the enzymes by Alexafluor-488-conjugated secondary antibody. The recruitment of enzymes was characterized by quantification of Cy3-Alexafluor-488 co-localization. To validate the microscopy-based method, repair of the transfected AP-site DNA was also quantified at various time points post-transfection using a real time PCR-based method. Notably, the recruitment time kinetics for each enzyme were consistent with AP-site repair time kinetics. This microscopy-based methodology is reliable in detecting the recruitment of proteins to specific DNA substrates and can be extended to study other in vivo DNA-protein relationships in any DNA sequence and in the context of any DNA structure in transfectable proliferating or quiescent cells. The method may be applied to a variety of disciplines of nucleic acid transaction pathways, including repair, replication, transcription, and recombination. PMID:25879709

  2. A novel method for monitoring functional lesion-specific recruitment of repair proteins in live cells.

    PubMed

    Woodrick, Jordan; Gupta, Suhani; Khatkar, Pooja; Dave, Kalpana; Levashova, Darya; Choudhury, Sujata; Elias, Hadi; Saha, Tapas; Mueller, Susette; Roy, Rabindra

    2015-05-01

    DNA-protein relationships have been studied by numerous methods, but a particular gap in methodology lies in the study of DNA adduct-specific interactions with proteins in vivo, which particularly affects the field of DNA repair. Using the repair of a well-characterized and ubiquitous adduct, the abasic (AP) site, as a model, we have developed a comprehensive method of monitoring DNA lesion-specific recruitment of proteins in vivo over time. We utilized a surrogate system in which a Cy3-labeled plasmid containing a single AP-site was transfected into cells, and the interaction of the labeled DNA with BER enzymes, including APE1, Polβ, LIG1, and FEN1, was monitored by immunofluorescent staining of the enzymes by Alexafluor-488-conjugated secondary antibody. The recruitment of enzymes was characterized by quantification of Cy3-Alexafluor-488 co-localization. To validate the microscopy-based method, repair of the transfected AP-site DNA was also quantified at various time points post-transfection using a real time PCR-based method. Notably, the recruitment time kinetics for each enzyme were consistent with AP-site repair time kinetics. This microscopy-based methodology is reliable in detecting the recruitment of proteins to specific DNA substrates and can be extended to study other in vivo DNA-protein relationships in any DNA sequence and in the context of any DNA structure in transfectable proliferating or quiescent cells. The method may be applied to a variety of disciplines of nucleic acid transaction pathways, including repair, replication, transcription, and recombination. PMID:25879709

  3. Retinoblastoma family proteins: New players in DNA repair by non-homologous end-joining

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Paul H.; Cook, Rebecca; Zoumpoulidou, Georgia; Luczynski, Maciej T.; Mittnacht, Sibylle

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Loss of retinoblastoma protein (RB1) function is a major driver in cancer development. We have recently reported that, in addition to its well-documented functions in cell cycle and fate control, RB1 and its paralogs have a novel role in regulating DNA repair by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Here we summarize our findings and present mechanistic hypotheses on how RB1 may support the DNA repair process and the therapeutic implications for patients who harbor RB1-negative cancers. PMID:27308588

  4. Retinoblastoma family proteins: New players in DNA repair by non-homologous end-joining.

    PubMed

    Huang, Paul H; Cook, Rebecca; Zoumpoulidou, Georgia; Luczynski, Maciej T; Mittnacht, Sibylle

    2016-03-01

    Loss of retinoblastoma protein (RB1) function is a major driver in cancer development. We have recently reported that, in addition to its well-documented functions in cell cycle and fate control, RB1 and its paralogs have a novel role in regulating DNA repair by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Here we summarize our findings and present mechanistic hypotheses on how RB1 may support the DNA repair process and the therapeutic implications for patients who harbor RB1-negative cancers. PMID:27308588

  5. Complementation of DNA repair in xeroderma pigmentosum group A cell extracts by a protein with affinity for damaged DNA.

    PubMed

    Robins, P; Jones, C J; Biggerstaff, M; Lindahl, T; Wood, R D

    1991-12-01

    Complementation group A of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) represents one of the most prevalent and serious forms of this cancer-prone disorder. Because of a marked defect in DNA excision repair, cells from individuals with XP-A are hypersensitive to the toxic and mutagenic effects of ultraviolet light and many chemical agents. We report here the isolation of the XP-A DNA repair protein by complementation of cell extracts from a repair-defective human XP-A cell line. XP-A protein purified from calf thymus migrates on denaturing gel electrophoresis as a doublet of 40 and 42 kilodaltons. The XP-A protein binds preferentially to ultraviolet light-irradiated DNA, with a preference for damaged over nondamaged nucleotides of approximately 10(3). This strongly suggests that the XP-A protein plays a direct role in the recognition of and incision at lesions in DNA. We further show that this protein corresponds to the product encoded by a recently isolated gene that can restore excision repair to XP-A cells. Thus, excision repair of plasmid DNA by cell extracts sufficiently resembles genomic repair in cells to reveal accurately the repair defect in an inherited disease. The general approach described here can be extended to the identification and isolation of other human DNA repair proteins. PMID:1935910

  6. Complementation of DNA repair in xeroderma pigmentosum group A cell extracts by a protein with affinity for damaged DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Robins, P; Jones, C J; Biggerstaff, M; Lindahl, T; Wood, R D

    1991-01-01

    Complementation group A of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) represents one of the most prevalent and serious forms of this cancer-prone disorder. Because of a marked defect in DNA excision repair, cells from individuals with XP-A are hypersensitive to the toxic and mutagenic effects of ultraviolet light and many chemical agents. We report here the isolation of the XP-A DNA repair protein by complementation of cell extracts from a repair-defective human XP-A cell line. XP-A protein purified from calf thymus migrates on denaturing gel electrophoresis as a doublet of 40 and 42 kilodaltons. The XP-A protein binds preferentially to ultraviolet light-irradiated DNA, with a preference for damaged over nondamaged nucleotides of approximately 10(3). This strongly suggests that the XP-A protein plays a direct role in the recognition of and incision at lesions in DNA. We further show that this protein corresponds to the product encoded by a recently isolated gene that can restore excision repair to XP-A cells. Thus, excision repair of plasmid DNA by cell extracts sufficiently resembles genomic repair in cells to reveal accurately the repair defect in an inherited disease. The general approach described here can be extended to the identification and isolation of other human DNA repair proteins. Images PMID:1935910

  7. Role of mismatch repair proteins in the processing of cisplatin interstrand cross-links.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Akshada; Kothandapani, Anbarasi; Zhitkovich, Anatoly; Sobol, Robert W; Patrick, Steve M

    2015-11-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency gives rise to cisplatin resistance and can lead to poor prognosis in cancers. Various models have been proposed to explain this low level of resistance caused due to loss of MMR proteins. We have shown that MMR proteins are required to maintain cisplatin interstrand cross-links (ICLs) on the DNA leading to increased cellular sensitivity. In our previous studies, we have shown that BER processing of the cisplatin ICLs is mutagenic. Polymerase β (Polβ) can generate mismatches which leads to the activation and the recruitment of mismatch repair proteins. In this paper, we distinguished between the requirement of different downstream MMR proteins for maintaining cisplatin sensitivity. We show that the MutSα (MSH2-MSH6) heterocomplex is required to maintain cisplatin sensitivity, whereas the Mutsβ complex has no effect. These results can be correlated with the increased repair of cisplatin ICLs and ICL induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in the resistant cells. Moreover, we show that MLH1 proficient cells displayed a cisplatin sensitive phenotype when compared with the MLH1 deficient cells and the ATPase activity of MLH1 is essential to mediate this effect. Based on these results, we propose that MutSα as well as the downstream MMR pathway proteins are essential to maintain a cisplatin sensitive phenotype as a consequence of processing Polβ induced mismatches at sites flanking cisplatin ICLs. PMID:26519826

  8. Bone morphogenetic protein 2 stimulates endochondral ossification by regulating periosteal cell fate during bone repair

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yan Yiu; Lieu, Shirley; Lu, Chuanyong; Colnot, Céline

    2010-01-01

    Bone repair depends on the coordinated action of numerous growth factors and cytokines to stimulate new skeletal tissue formation. Among all the growth factors involved in bone repair, Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs) are the only molecules now used therapeutically to enhance healing. Although BMPs are known as strong bone inducers, their role in initiating skeletal repair is not entirely elucidated. The aim of this study was to define the role of BMP2 during the early stages of bone regeneration and more specifically in regulating the fate of skeletal progenitors. During healing of non-stabilized fractures via endochondral ossification, exogenous BMP2 increased the deposition and resorption of cartilage and bone, which was correlated with a stimulation of osteoclastogenesis but not angiogenesis in the early phase of repair. During healing of stabilized fractures, which normally occurs via intramembranous ossification, exogenous BMP2 induced cartilage formation suggesting a role in regulating cell fate decisions. Specifically, the periosteum was found to be a target of exogenous BMP2 as shown by activation of the BMP pathway in this tissue. Using cell lineage analyses, we further show that BMP2 can direct cell differentiation towards the chondrogenic lineage within the periosteum but not the endosteum, indicating that skeletal progenitors within periosteum and endosteum respond differently to BMP signals. In conclusion, BMP2 plays an important role in the early stages of repair by recruiting local sources of skeletal progenitors within periosteum and endosteum and by determining their differentiation towards the chondrogenic and osteogenic lineages. PMID:20348041

  9. Using the Bias from Flow to Elucidate Single DNA Repair Protein Sliding and Interactions with DNA

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yihan; Zhao, Tong; Jian, Xing; Farooqui, Zishaan; Qu, Xiaohui; He, Chuan; Dinner, Aaron R.; Scherer, Norbert F.

    2009-01-01

    We perform single-molecule spatial tracking measurements of a DNA repair protein, the C-terminal domain of Ada (C-Ada) from Escherichia coli, moving on DNA extended by flow. The trajectories of single proteins labeled with a fluorophore are constructed. We analyze single-protein dwell times on DNA for different flow rates and conclude that sliding (with essentially no hopping) is the mechanism of C-Ada motion along stretched DNA. We also analyze the trajectory results with a drift-diffusion Langevin equation approach to elucidate the influence of flow on the protein motion; systematic variation of the flow enables one to estimate the microscopic friction. We integrate the step-size probability distribution to obtain a version of the fluctuation theorem that articulates the relation between the entropy production and consumption under the adjustable drag (i.e., bias) from the flow. This expression allows validation of the Langevin equation description of the motion. Comparison of the rate of sliding with recent computer simulations of DNA repair suggests that C-Ada could conduct its repair function while moving at near the one-dimensional diffusion limit. PMID:19254550

  10. Hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein 2 promotes DNA repair by homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Baude, Annika; Aaes, Tania Løve; Zhai, Beibei; Al-Nakouzi, Nader; Oo, Htoo Zarni; Daugaard, Mads; Rohde, Mikkel; Jäättelä, Marja

    2016-03-18

    We have recently identified lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75, also known as PSIP1) as a component of the homologous recombination DNA repair machinery. Through its Pro-Trp-Trp-Pro (PWWP) domain, LEDGF/p75 binds to histone marks associated with active transcription and promotes DNA end resection by recruiting DNA endonuclease retinoblastoma-binding protein 8 (RBBP8/CtIP) to broken DNA ends. Here we show that the structurally related PWWP domain-containing protein, hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein 2 (HDGFRP2), serves a similar function in homologous recombination repair. Its depletion compromises the survival of human U2OS osteosarcoma and HeLa cervix carcinoma cells and impairs the DNA damage-induced phosphorylation of replication protein A2 (RPA2) and the recruitment of DNA endonuclease RBBP8/CtIP to DNA double strand breaks. In contrast to LEDGF/p75, HDGFRP2 binds preferentially to histone marks characteristic for transcriptionally silent chromatin. Accordingly, HDGFRP2 is found in complex with the heterochromatin-binding chromobox homologue 1 (CBX1) and Pogo transposable element with ZNF domain (POGZ). Supporting the functionality of this complex, POGZ-depleted cells show a similar defect in DNA damage-induced RPA2 phosphorylation as HDGFRP2-depleted cells. These data suggest that HDGFRP2, possibly in complex with POGZ, recruits homologous recombination repair machinery to damaged silent genes or to active genes silenced upon DNA damage. PMID:26721387

  11. Hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein 2 promotes DNA repair by homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Baude, Annika; Aaes, Tania Løve; Zhai, Beibei; Al-Nakouzi, Nader; Oo, Htoo Zarni; Daugaard, Mads; Rohde, Mikkel; Jäättelä, Marja

    2016-01-01

    We have recently identified lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75, also known as PSIP1) as a component of the homologous recombination DNA repair machinery. Through its Pro-Trp-Trp-Pro (PWWP) domain, LEDGF/p75 binds to histone marks associated with active transcription and promotes DNA end resection by recruiting DNA endonuclease retinoblastoma-binding protein 8 (RBBP8/CtIP) to broken DNA ends. Here we show that the structurally related PWWP domain-containing protein, hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein 2 (HDGFRP2), serves a similar function in homologous recombination repair. Its depletion compromises the survival of human U2OS osteosarcoma and HeLa cervix carcinoma cells and impairs the DNA damage-induced phosphorylation of replication protein A2 (RPA2) and the recruitment of DNA endonuclease RBBP8/CtIP to DNA double strand breaks. In contrast to LEDGF/p75, HDGFRP2 binds preferentially to histone marks characteristic for transcriptionally silent chromatin. Accordingly, HDGFRP2 is found in complex with the heterochromatin-binding chromobox homologue 1 (CBX1) and Pogo transposable element with ZNF domain (POGZ). Supporting the functionality of this complex, POGZ-depleted cells show a similar defect in DNA damage-induced RPA2 phosphorylation as HDGFRP2-depleted cells. These data suggest that HDGFRP2, possibly in complex with POGZ, recruits homologous recombination repair machinery to damaged silent genes or to active genes silenced upon DNA damage. PMID:26721387

  12. The DNA-dependent protein kinase: a multifunctional protein kinase with roles in DNA double strand break repair and mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Jette, Nicholas; Lees-Miller, Susan P.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase composed of a large catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and the Ku70/80 heterodimer. Over the past two decades, significant progress has been made in elucidating the role of DNA-PK in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), the major pathway for repair of ionizing radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in human cells and recently, additional roles for DNA-PK have been reported. In this review, we will describe the biochemistry, structure and function of DNA-PK, its roles in DNA double strand break repair and its newly described roles in mitosis and other cellular processes. PMID:25550082

  13. On the role of some ARGONAUTE proteins in meiosis and DNA repair in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Cecilia; Santos, Juan L.; Pradillo, Mónica

    2014-01-01

    In plants, small non-coding RNAs (≈20–30 nt) play a major role in a gene regulation mechanism that controls development, maintains heterochromatin and defends against viruses. However, their possible role in cell division (mitosis and meiosis) still remains to be ascertained. ARGONAUTE (AGO) proteins are key players in the different small RNA (sRNA) pathways. Arabidopsis contains 10 AGO proteins belonging to three distinct phylogenetic clades based on amino acid sequence, namely: AGO1/AGO5/AGO10, AGO2/AGO3/AGO7, and AGO4/AGO6/AGO8/AGO9. To gain new insights into the role of AGO proteins, we have focused our attention on AGO2, AGO5, and AGO9 by means of the analysis of plants carrying mutations in the corresponding genes. AGO2 plays a role in the natural cis-antisense (nat-siRNA) pathway and is required for an efficient DNA repair. On the other hand, AGO5, involved in miRNA (microRNA)-directed target cleavage, and AGO9, involved in RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM), are highly enriched in germline. On these grounds, we have analyzed the effects of these proteins on the meiotic process and also on DNA repair. It was confirmed that AGO2 is involved in DNA repair. In ago2-1 the mean cell chiasma frequency in pollen mother cells (PMCs) was increased relative to the wild-type (WT). ago5-4 showed a delay in germination time and a slight decrease in fertility, however the meiotic process and chiasma levels were normal. Meiosis in PMCs of ago9-1 was characterized by a high frequency of chromosome interlocks from pachytene to metaphase I, but chiasma frequency and fertility were normal. Genotoxicity assays have confirmed that AGO9 is also involved in somatic DNA repair. PMID:24904598

  14. Human DNA repair and recombination genes

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Weber, C.A.; Jones, N.J.

    1988-09-01

    Several genes involved in mammalian DNA repair pathways were identified by complementation analysis and chromosomal mapping based on hybrid cells. Eight complementation groups of rodent mutants defective in the repair of uv radiation damage are now identified. At least seven of these genes are probably essential for repair and at least six of them control the incision step. The many genes required for repair of DNA cross-linking damage show overlap with those involved in the repair of uv damage, but some of these genes appear to be unique for cross-link repair. Two genes residing on human chromosome 19 were cloned from genomic transformants using a cosmid vector, and near full-length cDNA clones of each gene were isolated and sequenced. Gene ERCC2 efficiently corrects the defect in CHO UV5, a nucleotide excision repair mutant. Gene XRCC1 normalizes repair of strand breaks and the excessive sister chromatid exchange in CHO mutant EM9. ERCC2 shows a remarkable /approximately/52% overall homology at both the amino acid and nucleotide levels with the yeast RAD3 gene. Evidence based on mutation induction frequencies suggests that ERCC2, like RAD3, might also be an essential gene for viability. 100 refs., 4 tabs.

  15. A moonlighting metabolic protein influences repair at DNA double-stranded breaks

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Machorro, Ana Lilia; Aris, John P.; Pillus, Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    Catalytically active proteins with divergent dual functions are often described as ‘moonlighting’. In this work we characterize a new, chromatin-based function of Lys20, a moonlighting protein that is well known for its role in metabolism. Lys20 was initially described as homocitrate synthase (HCS), the first enzyme in the lysine biosynthetic pathway in yeast. Its nuclear localization led to the discovery of a key role for Lys20 in DNA damage repair through its interaction with the MYST family histone acetyltransferase Esa1. Overexpression of Lys20 promotes suppression of DNA damage sensitivity of esa1 mutants. In this work, by taking advantage of LYS20 mutants that are active in repair but not in lysine biosynthesis, the mechanism of suppression of esa1 was characterized. First we analyzed the chromatin landscape of esa1 cells, finding impaired histone acetylation and eviction. Lys20 was recruited to sites of DNA damage, and its overexpression promoted enhanced recruitment of the INO80 remodeling complex to restore normal histone eviction at the damage sites. This study improves understanding of the evolutionary, structural and biological relevance of independent activities in a moonlighting protein and links metabolism to DNA damage repair. PMID:25628362

  16. Structure-function relationships governing activity and stability of a DNA alkylation damage repair thermostable protein.

    PubMed

    Perugino, Giuseppe; Miggiano, Riccardo; Serpe, Mario; Vettone, Antonella; Valenti, Anna; Lahiri, Samarpita; Rossi, Franca; Rossi, Mosè; Rizzi, Menico; Ciaramella, Maria

    2015-10-15

    Alkylated DNA-protein alkyltransferases repair alkylated DNA bases, which are among the most common DNA lesions, and are evolutionary conserved, from prokaryotes to higher eukaryotes. The human ortholog, hAGT, is involved in resistance to alkylating chemotherapy drugs. We report here on the alkylated DNA-protein alkyltransferase, SsOGT, from an archaeal species living at high temperature, a condition that enhances the harmful effect of DNA alkylation. The exceptionally high stability of SsOGT gave us the unique opportunity to perform structural and biochemical analysis of a protein of this class in its post-reaction form. This analysis, along with those performed on SsOGT in its ligand-free and DNA-bound forms, provides insights in the structure-function relationships of the protein before, during and after DNA repair, suggesting a molecular basis for DNA recognition, catalytic activity and protein post-reaction fate, and giving hints on the mechanism of alkylation-induced inactivation of this class of proteins. PMID:26227971

  17. Structure-function relationships governing activity and stability of a DNA alkylation damage repair thermostable protein

    PubMed Central

    Perugino, Giuseppe; Miggiano, Riccardo; Serpe, Mario; Vettone, Antonella; Valenti, Anna; Lahiri, Samarpita; Rossi, Franca; Rossi, Mosè; Rizzi, Menico; Ciaramella, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Alkylated DNA-protein alkyltransferases repair alkylated DNA bases, which are among the most common DNA lesions, and are evolutionary conserved, from prokaryotes to higher eukaryotes. The human ortholog, hAGT, is involved in resistance to alkylating chemotherapy drugs. We report here on the alkylated DNA-protein alkyltransferase, SsOGT, from an archaeal species living at high temperature, a condition that enhances the harmful effect of DNA alkylation. The exceptionally high stability of SsOGT gave us the unique opportunity to perform structural and biochemical analysis of a protein of this class in its post-reaction form. This analysis, along with those performed on SsOGT in its ligand-free and DNA-bound forms, provides insights in the structure-function relationships of the protein before, during and after DNA repair, suggesting a molecular basis for DNA recognition, catalytic activity and protein post-reaction fate, and giving hints on the mechanism of alkylation-induced inactivation of this class of proteins. PMID:26227971

  18. Hodgkin Lymphoma Risk: Role of Genetic Polymorphisms and Gene-Gene Interactions in DNA repair pathways

    PubMed Central

    Monroy, Claudia M.; Cortes, Andrea C.; Lopez, Mirtha; Rourke, Elizabeth; Etzel, Carol J.; Younes, Anas; Strom, Sara S.; El-Zein, Randa

    2011-01-01

    DNA repair variants may play a potentially important role in an individual’s susceptibility to developing cancer. Numerous studies have reported the association between genetic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in DNA repair genes and different types of hematologic cancers. However, to date, the effects of such SNPs on modulating Hodgkin Lymphoma (HL) risk have not yet been investigated. We hypothesized that gene-gene interaction between candidate genes in Direct Reversal, Nucleotide excision repair (NER), Base excision repair (BER) and Double strand break (DSB) pathways may contribute to susceptibility to HL. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a study on 200 HL cases and 220 controls to assess associations between HL risk and 21 functional SNPs in DNA repair genes. We evaluated potential gene-gene interactions and the association of multiple polymorphisms in a chromosome region using a multi-analytic strategy combining logistic regression, multi-factor dimensionality reduction and classification and regression tree approaches. We observed that, in combination, allelic variants in the XPC Ala499Val, NBN Glu185Gln, XRCC3 Thr241Me, XRCC1 Arg194Trp and XRCC1 399Gln polymorphisms modify the risk for developing HL. Moreover, the cumulative genetic risk score revealed a significant trend where the risk for developing HL increases as the number of adverse alleles in BER and DSB genes increase. These findings suggest that DNA repair variants in BER and DSB pathways may play an important role in the development of HL. PMID:21374732

  19. Sumoylation Influences DNA Break Repair Partly by Increasing the Solubility of a Conserved End Resection Protein

    PubMed Central

    Sarangi, Prabha; Steinacher, Roland; Altmannova, Veronika; Fu, Qiong; Paull, Tanya T.; Krejci, Lumir; Whitby, Matthew C.; Zhao, Xiaolan

    2015-01-01

    Protein modifications regulate both DNA repair levels and pathway choice. How each modification achieves regulatory effects and how different modifications collaborate with each other are important questions to be answered. Here, we show that sumoylation regulates double-strand break repair partly by modifying the end resection factor Sae2. This modification is conserved from yeast to humans, and is induced by DNA damage. We mapped the sumoylation site of Sae2 to a single lysine in its self-association domain. Abolishing Sae2 sumoylation by mutating this lysine to arginine impaired Sae2 function in the processing and repair of multiple types of DNA breaks. We found that Sae2 sumoylation occurs independently of its phosphorylation, and the two modifications act in synergy to increase soluble forms of Sae2. We also provide evidence that sumoylation of the Sae2-binding nuclease, the Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 complex, further increases end resection. These findings reveal a novel role for sumoylation in DNA repair by regulating the solubility of an end resection factor. They also show that collaboration between different modifications and among multiple substrates leads to a stronger biological effect. PMID:25569253

  20. UV sensitivity and impaired nucleotide excision repair in DNA-dependent protein kinase mutant cells.

    PubMed Central

    Muller, C; Calsou, P; Frit, P; Cayrol, C; Carter, T; Salles, B

    1998-01-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), a member of the phosphatidyl-inositol (PI)3-kinase family, is involved in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Its regulatory subunit, Ku, binds to DNA and recruits the kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). We show here a new role of DNA-PK in the modulation of the process of nucleotide excision repair (NER) in vivo since, as compared with their respective parental cell lines, DNA-PK mutants (scid , V-3 and xrs 6 cells) exhibit sensitivity to UV-C irradiation (2.0- to 2.5-fold) and cisplatin ( approximately 3- to 4-fold) associated with a decreased activity (40-55%) of unscheduled DNA synthesis after UV-C irradiation. Moreover, we observed that wortmannin sensitized parental cells in vivo when combined with either cisplatin or UV-C light, but had no effect on the DNA-PKcs deficient scid cells. Despite a lower repair synthesis activity (approximately 2-fold) measured in vitro with nuclear cell extracts from DNA-PK mutants, a direct involvement of DNA-PK in the NER reaction in vitro has not been observed. This study establishes a regulatory function of DNA-PK in the NER process in vivo but rules out a physical role of the complex in the repair machinery at the site of the DNA lesion. PMID:9490781

  1. Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes, traffic-related polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure and breast cancer incidence.

    PubMed

    Mordukhovich, Irina; Beyea, Jan; Herring, Amy H; Hatch, Maureen; Stellman, Steven D; Teitelbaum, Susan L; Richardson, David B; Millikan, Robert C; Engel, Lawrence S; Shantakumar, Sumitra; Steck, Susan E; Neugut, Alfred I; Rossner, Pavel; Santella, Regina M; Gammon, Marilie D

    2016-07-15

    Vehicular traffic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been associated with breast cancer incidence in epidemiologic studies, including our own. Because PAHs damage DNA by forming adducts and oxidative lesions, genetic polymorphisms that alter DNA repair capacity may modify associations between PAH-related exposures and breast cancer risk. Our goal was to examine the association between vehicular traffic exposure and breast cancer incidence within strata of a panel of nine biologically plausible nucleotide excision repair (NER) and base excision repair (BER) genotypes. Residential histories of 1,508 cases and 1,556 controls were assessed in the Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project between 1996 and 1997 and used to reconstruct residential traffic exposures to benzo[a]pyrene, as a proxy for traffic-related PAHs. Likelihood ratio tests from adjusted unconditional logistic regression models were used to assess multiplicative interactions. A gene-traffic interaction was evident (p = 0.04) for ERCC2 (Lys751); when comparing the upper and lower tertiles of 1995 traffic exposure estimates, the odds ratio (95% confidence interval) was 2.09 (1.13, 3.90) among women with homozygous variant alleles. Corresponding odds ratios for 1960-1990 traffic were also elevated nearly 2-3-fold for XRCC1(Arg194Trp), XRCC1(Arg399Gln) and OGG1(Ser326Cys), but formal multiplicative interaction was not evident. When DNA repair variants for ERCC2, XRCC1 and OGG1 were combined, among women with 4-6 variants, the odds ratios were 2.32 (1.22, 4.49) for 1995 traffic and 2.96 (1.06, 8.21) for 1960-1990 traffic. Our study is first to report positive associations between traffic-related PAH exposure and breast cancer incidence among women with select biologically plausible DNA repair genotypes. PMID:26946191

  2. Evaluation of DNA damage in COPD patients and its correlation with polymorphisms in repair genes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We investigated a potential link between genetic polymorphisms in genes XRCC1 (Arg399Gln), OGG1 (Ser326Cys), XRCC3 (Thr241Met), and XRCC4 (Ile401Thr) with the level of DNA damage and repair, accessed by comet and micronucleus test, in 51 COPD patients and 51 controls. Methods Peripheral blood was used to perform the alkaline and neutral comet assay; and genetic polymorphisms by PCR/RFLP. To assess the susceptibility to exogenous DNA damage, the cells were treated with methyl methanesulphonate for 1-h or 3-h. After 3-h treatment the % residual damage was calculated assuming the value of 1-h treatment as 100%. The cytogenetic damage was evaluated by buccal micronucleus cytome assay (BMCyt). Results COPD patients with the risk allele XRCC1 (Arg399Gln) and XRCC3 (Thr241Met) showed higher DNA damage by comet assay. The residual damage was higher for COPD with risk allele in the four genes. In COPD patients was showed negative correlation between BMCyt (binucleated, nuclear bud, condensed chromatin and karyorrhexic cells) with pulmonary function and some variant genotypes. Conclusion Our results suggest a possible association between variant genotypes in XRCC1 (Arg399Gln), OGG1 (Ser326Cys), XRCC3 (Thr241Met), and XRCC4 (Ile401Thr), DNA damage and progression of COPD. PMID:24053728

  3. Dynamic binding of replication protein a is required for DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ran; Subramanyam, Shyamal; Elcock, Adrian H.; Spies, Maria; Wold, Marc S.

    2016-01-01

    Replication protein A (RPA), the major eukaryotic single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein, is essential for replication, repair and recombination. High-affinity ssDNA-binding by RPA depends on two DNA binding domains in the large subunit of RPA. Mutation of the evolutionarily conserved aromatic residues in these two domains results in a separation-of-function phenotype: aromatic residue mutants support DNA replication but are defective in DNA repair. We used biochemical and single-molecule analyses, and Brownian Dynamics simulations to determine the molecular basis of this phenotype. Our studies demonstrated that RPA binds to ssDNA in at least two modes characterized by different dissociation kinetics. We also showed that the aromatic residues contribute to the formation of the longer-lived state, are required for stable binding to short ssDNA regions and are needed for RPA melting of partially duplex DNA structures. We conclude that stable binding and/or the melting of secondary DNA structures by RPA is required for DNA repair, including RAD51 mediated DNA strand exchange, but is dispensable for DNA replication. It is likely that the binding modes are in equilibrium and reflect dynamics in the RPA–DNA complex. This suggests that dynamic binding of RPA to DNA is necessary for different cellular functions. PMID:27131385

  4. Dynamic binding of replication protein a is required for DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ran; Subramanyam, Shyamal; Elcock, Adrian H; Spies, Maria; Wold, Marc S

    2016-07-01

    Replication protein A (RPA), the major eukaryotic single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein, is essential for replication, repair and recombination. High-affinity ssDNA-binding by RPA depends on two DNA binding domains in the large subunit of RPA. Mutation of the evolutionarily conserved aromatic residues in these two domains results in a separation-of-function phenotype: aromatic residue mutants support DNA replication but are defective in DNA repair. We used biochemical and single-molecule analyses, and Brownian Dynamics simulations to determine the molecular basis of this phenotype. Our studies demonstrated that RPA binds to ssDNA in at least two modes characterized by different dissociation kinetics. We also showed that the aromatic residues contribute to the formation of the longer-lived state, are required for stable binding to short ssDNA regions and are needed for RPA melting of partially duplex DNA structures. We conclude that stable binding and/or the melting of secondary DNA structures by RPA is required for DNA repair, including RAD51 mediated DNA strand exchange, but is dispensable for DNA replication. It is likely that the binding modes are in equilibrium and reflect dynamics in the RPA-DNA complex. This suggests that dynamic binding of RPA to DNA is necessary for different cellular functions. PMID:27131385

  5. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein B1 protein impairs DNA repair mediated through the inhibition of DNA-dependent protein kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Iwanaga, Kentaro; Sueoka, Naoko; Sato, Akemi; Hayashi, Shinichiro; Sueoka, Eisaburo . E-mail: sueokae@post.saga-med.ac.jp

    2005-08-05

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein B1, an RNA binding protein, is overexpressed from the early stage of lung cancers; it is evident even in bronchial dysplasia, a premalignant lesion. We evaluated the proteins bound with hnRNP B1 and found that hnRNP B1 interacted with DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) complex, and recombinant hnRNP B1 protein dose-dependently inhibited DNA-PK activity in vitro. To test the effect of hnRNP B1 on DNA repair, we performed comet assay after irradiation, using normal human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells treated with siRNA for hnRNP A2/B1: reduction of hnRNP B1 treated with siRNA for hnRNP A2/B1 induced faster DNA repair in normal HBE cells. Considering these results, we assume that overexpression of hnRNP B1 occurring in the early stage of carcinogenesis inhibits DNA-PK activity, resulting in subsequent accumulation of erroneous rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks, causing tumor progression.

  6. SUMOylation of xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein regulates DNA damage recognition during nucleotide excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Akita, Masaki; Tak, Yon-Soo; Shimura, Tsutomu; Matsumoto, Syota; Okuda-Shimizu, Yuki; Shimizu, Yuichiro; Nishi, Ryotaro; Saitoh, Hisato; Iwai, Shigenori; Mori, Toshio; Ikura, Tsuyoshi; Sakai, Wataru; Hanaoka, Fumio; Sugasawa, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    The xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC) protein complex is a key factor that detects DNA damage and initiates nucleotide excision repair (NER) in mammalian cells. Although biochemical and structural studies have elucidated the interaction of XPC with damaged DNA, the mechanism of its regulation in vivo remains to be understood in more details. Here, we show that the XPC protein undergoes modification by small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) proteins and the lack of this modification compromises the repair of UV-induced DNA photolesions. In the absence of SUMOylation, XPC is normally recruited to the sites with photolesions, but then immobilized profoundly by the UV-damaged DNA-binding protein (UV-DDB) complex. Since the absence of UV-DDB alleviates the NER defect caused by impaired SUMOylation of XPC, we propose that this modification is critical for functional interactions of XPC with UV-DDB, which facilitate the efficient damage handover between the two damage recognition factors and subsequent initiation of NER. PMID:26042670

  7. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein repair as a therapeutic strategy in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Sloane, Peter A.; Rowe, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Recent progress in understanding the production, processing, and function of the cystic fibrosis gene product, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), has revealed new therapeutic targets to repair the mutant protein. Classification of CFTR mutations and new treatment strategies to address each will be described here. Recent findings High-throughput screening and other drug discovery efforts have identified small molecules that restore activity to mutant CFTR. Compounds such as VX-770 that potentiate CFTR have demonstrated exciting results in recent clinical trials and demonstrate robust effects across several CFTR mutation classes in the laboratory. A number of novel F508del CFTR processing correctors restore protein to the cell surface and improve ion channel function in vitro and are augmented by coadministration of CFTR potentiators. Ongoing discovery efforts that target protein folding, CFTR trafficking, and cell stress have also indicated promising results. Aminoglycosides and the novel small molecule ataluren induce translational readthrough of nonsense mutations in CFTR and other genetic diseases in vitro and in vivo and have shown activity in proof of concept trials, and ataluren is now being studied in confirmatory trials. Summary An improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the basic genetic defect in cystic fibrosis have led to new treatment strategies to repair the mutant protein. PMID:20829696

  8. Trichomonas vaginalis Repair of Iron Centres Proteins: The Different Role of Two Paralogs.

    PubMed

    Nobre, Lígia S; Meloni, Dionigia; Teixeira, Miguel; Viscogliosi, Eric; Saraiva, Lígia M

    2016-06-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis, the causative parasite of one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted diseases is, so far, the only protozoan encoding two putative Repair of Iron Centres (RIC) proteins. Homologs of these proteins have been shown to protect bacteria from the chemical stress imposed by mammalian immunity. In this work, the biochemical and functional characterisation of the T. vaginalis RICs revealed that the two proteins have different properties. Expression of ric1 is induced by nitrosative stress but not by hydrogen peroxide, while ric2 transcription remained unaltered under similar conditions. T. vaginalis RIC1 contains a di-iron centre, but RIC2 apparently does not. Only RIC1 resembles bacterial RICs on spectroscopic profiling and repairing ability of oxidatively-damaged iron-sulfur clusters. Unexpectedly, RIC2 was found to bind DNA plasmid and T. vaginalis genomic DNA, a function proposed to be related with its leucine zipper domain. The two proteins also differ in their cellular localization: RIC1 is expressed in the cytoplasm only, and RIC2 occurs both in the nucleus and cytoplasm. Therefore, we concluded that the two RIC paralogs have different roles in T. vaginalis, with RIC2 showing an unprecedented DNA binding ability when compared with all other until now studied RICs. PMID:27124376

  9. Viral AlkB proteins repair RNA damage by oxidative demethylation

    PubMed Central

    van den Born, Erwin; Omelchenko, Marina V.; Bekkelund, Anders; Leihne, Vibeke; Koonin, Eugene V.; Dolja, Valerian V.; Falnes, Pål Ø.

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial and mammalian AlkB proteins are iron(II)- and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases that reverse methylation damage, such as 1-methyladenine and 3-methylcytosine, in RNA and DNA. An AlkB-domain is encoded by the genome of numerous single-stranded, plant-infecting RNA viruses, the majority of which belong to the Flexiviridae family. Our phylogenetic analysis of AlkB sequences suggests that a single plant virus might have acquired AlkB relatively recently, followed by horizontal dissemination among other viruses via recombination. Here, we describe the first functional characterization of AlkB proteins from three plant viruses. The viral AlkB proteins efficiently reactivated methylated bacteriophage genomes when expressed in Escherichia coli, and also displayed robust, iron(II)- and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent demethylase activity in vitro. Viral AlkB proteins preferred RNA over DNA substrates, and thus represent the first AlkBs with such substrate specificity. Our results suggest a role for viral AlkBs in maintaining the integrity of the viral RNA genome through repair of deleterious methylation damage, and support the notion that AlkB-mediated RNA repair is biologically relevant. PMID:18718927

  10. Prognostic significance of X-ray cross-complementing gene 1 expression in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Wang, Tongshan; Xu, Jun; Chen, WenJiao; Shi, Wei; Cheng, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study is to identify the prognostic significance of X-ray cross-complementing gene 1 (XRCC1) in patients with gastric cancer undergoing surgery and platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy. Methods Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to evaluate XRCC1 protein expression profiles on surgical specimens of 612 gastric cancer patients. The relationship between XRCC1 expression and existing prognostic factors, platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy, disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were analyzed. Results Among 612 patients staged Ⅱ/Ⅲ in our study, 182 (29.74%) were evaluated as XRCC1 IHC positive. XRCC1 expression was not significantly related to OS (P = 0.347) or DFS (P = 0.297). Compared with surgery only, platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy significantly improved the OS (P = 0.031). And the patients with negative XRCC1 expression benefited more from platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy (P = 0.049). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that tumor size, T category, N category, vascular or nerve invasion and platinum-based chemotherapy were good prognostic factors for OS (P < 0.05). Though XRCC1 plays an important role in DNA repair pathways, no significant relationship is found in XRCC1 expression and OS among gastric cancer in our study. Conclusions XRCC1 might be an alternative prognostic marker for the patients of gastric cancer after radical resection. The patients with negative XRCC1 expression can benefit more from platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy.

  11. Photosystem II repair in plant chloroplasts--Regulation, assisting proteins and shared components with photosystem II biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Järvi, Sari; Suorsa, Marjaana; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2015-09-01

    Photosystem (PS) II is a multisubunit thylakoid membrane pigment-protein complex responsible for light-driven oxidation of water and reduction of plastoquinone. Currently more than 40 proteins are known to associate with PSII, either stably or transiently. The inherent feature of the PSII complex is its vulnerability in light, with the damage mainly targeted to one of its core proteins, the D1 protein. The repair of the damaged D1 protein, i.e. the repair cycle of PSII, initiates in the grana stacks where the damage generally takes place, but subsequently continues in non-appressed thylakoid domains, where many steps are common for both the repair and de novo assembly of PSII. The sequence of the (re)assembly steps of genuine PSII subunits is relatively well-characterized in higher plants. A number of novel findings have shed light into the regulation mechanisms of lateral migration of PSII subcomplexes and the repair as well as the (re)assembly of the complex. Besides the utmost importance of the PSII repair cycle for the maintenance of PSII functionality, recent research has pointed out that the maintenance of PSI is closely dependent on regulation of the PSII repair cycle. This review focuses on the current knowledge of regulation of the repair cycle of PSII in higher plant chloroplasts. Particular emphasis is paid on sequential assembly steps of PSII and the function of the number of PSII auxiliary proteins involved both in the biogenesis and repair of PSII. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chloroplast Biogenesis. PMID:25615587

  12. Parkinsonism-associated protein DJ-1/Park7 is a major protein deglycase that repairs methylglyoxal- and glyoxal-glycated cysteine, arginine, and lysine residues.

    PubMed

    Richarme, Gilbert; Mihoub, Mouadh; Dairou, Julien; Bui, Linh Chi; Leger, Thibaut; Lamouri, Aazdine

    2015-01-16

    Glycation is an inevitable nonenzymatic covalent reaction between proteins and endogenous reducing sugars or dicarbonyls (methylglyoxal, glyoxal) that results in protein inactivation. DJ-1 was reported to be a multifunctional oxidative stress response protein with poorly defined function. Here, we show that human DJ-1 is a protein deglycase that repairs methylglyoxal- and glyoxal-glycated amino acids and proteins by acting on early glycation intermediates and releases repaired proteins and lactate or glycolate, respectively. DJ-1 deglycates cysteines, arginines, and lysines (the three major glycated amino acids) of serum albumin, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, aldolase, and aspartate aminotransferase and thus reactivates these proteins. DJ-1 prevented protein glycation in an Escherichia coli mutant deficient in the DJ-1 homolog YajL and restored cell viability in glucose-containing media. These results suggest that DJ-1-associated Parkinsonism results from excessive protein glycation and establishes DJ-1 as a major anti-glycation and anti-aging protein. PMID:25416785

  13. Parkinsonism-associated Protein DJ-1/Park7 Is a Major Protein Deglycase That Repairs Methylglyoxal- and Glyoxal-glycated Cysteine, Arginine, and Lysine Residues

    PubMed Central

    Richarme, Gilbert; Mihoub, Mouadh; Dairou, Julien; Bui, Linh Chi; Leger, Thibaut; Lamouri, Aazdine

    2015-01-01

    Glycation is an inevitable nonenzymatic covalent reaction between proteins and endogenous reducing sugars or dicarbonyls (methylglyoxal, glyoxal) that results in protein inactivation. DJ-1 was reported to be a multifunctional oxidative stress response protein with poorly defined function. Here, we show that human DJ-1 is a protein deglycase that repairs methylglyoxal- and glyoxal-glycated amino acids and proteins by acting on early glycation intermediates and releases repaired proteins and lactate or glycolate, respectively. DJ-1 deglycates cysteines, arginines, and lysines (the three major glycated amino acids) of serum albumin, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, aldolase, and aspartate aminotransferase and thus reactivates these proteins. DJ-1 prevented protein glycation in an Escherichia coli mutant deficient in the DJ-1 homolog YajL and restored cell viability in glucose-containing media. These results suggest that DJ-1-associated Parkinsonism results from excessive protein glycation and establishes DJ-1 as a major anti-glycation and anti-aging protein. PMID:25416785

  14. The redox/DNA repair protein, Ref-1, is essential for early embryonic development in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Xanthoudakis, S; Smeyne, R J; Wallace, J D; Curran, T

    1996-01-01

    The DNA-binding activity of AP-1 proteins is modulated, in vitro, by a posttranslational mechanism involving reduction oxidation. This mode of regulation has been proposed to control both the transcriptional activity and the oncogenic potential of Fos and Jun. Previous studies revealed that reduction of oxidized Fos and Jun by a cellular protein, Ref-1, stimulates sequence-specific AP-1 DNA-binding activity. Ref-1, a bifunctional protein, is also capable of initiating the repair of apurinic/apyrymidinic sites in damaged DNA. The relationship between the redox and DNA repair activities of Ref-1 is intriguing; both activities have been suggested to play an important role in the cellular response to oxidative stress. To investigate the physiological function of Ref-1, we used a gene targeting strategy to generate mice lacking a functional ref-1 gene. We report here that heterozygous mutant mice develop into adulthood without any apparent abnormalities. In contrast, homozygous mutant mice, lacking a functional ref-1 gene, die during embryonic development. Detailed analysis indicates that death occurs following blastocyst formation, shortly after the time of implantation. Degeneration of the mutant embryos is clearly evident at embryonic day 5.5. These findings demonstrate that Ref-1 is essential for early embryonic development. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8799128

  15. Elastin-like protein matrix reinforced with collagen microfibers for soft tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Caves, Jeffrey M; Cui, Wanxing; Wen, Jing; Kumar, Vivek A; Haller, Carolyn A; Chaikof, Elliot L

    2011-08-01

    Artificial composites designed to mimic the structure and properties of native extracellular matrix may lead to acellular materials for soft tissue repair and replacement, which display mechanical strength, stiffness, and resilience resembling native tissue. We describe the fabrication of thin lamellae consisting of continuous collagen microfiber embedded at controlled orientations and densities in a recombinant elastin-like protein polymer matrix. Multilamellar stacking affords flexible, protein-based composite sheets whose properties are dependent upon both the elastomeric matrix and collagen content and organization. Sheets are produced with properties that range over 13-fold in elongation to break (23-314%), six-fold in Young's modulus (5.3-33.1 MPa), and more than two-fold in tensile strength (1.85-4.08 MPa), exceeding that of a number of native human tissues, including urinary bladder, pulmonary artery, and aorta. A sheet approximating the mechanical response of human abdominal wall fascia is investigated as a fascial substitute for ventral hernia repair. Protein-based composite patches prevent hernia recurrence in Wistar rats over an 8-week period with new tissue formation and sustained structural integrity. PMID:21550111

  16. Elastin-like protein matrix reinforced with collagen microfibers for soft tissue repair

    PubMed Central

    Caves, Jeffrey M.; Cui, Wanxing; Wen, Jing; Kumar, Vivek A.; Haller, Carolyn A.; Chaikof, Elliot L.

    2011-01-01

    Artificial composites designed to mimic the structure and properties of native extracellular matrix may lead to acellular materials for soft tissue repair and replacement, which display mechanical strength, stiffness, and resilience resembling native tissue. We describe the fabrication of thin lamellae consisting of continuous collagen microfiber embedded at controlled orientations and densities in a recombinant elastin-like protein polymer matrix. Multilamellar stacking affords flexible, protein-based composite sheets whose properties are dependent upon both the elastomeric matrix and collagen content and organization. Sheets are produced with properties that range over 13-fold in elongation to break (23 – 314%), six-fold in Young’s modulus (5.3 to 33.1 MPa), and more than two-fold in tensile strength (1.85 to 4.08 MPa), exceeding that of a number of native human tissues, including urinary bladder, pulmonary artery, and aorta. A sheet approximating the mechanical response of human abdominal wall fascia is investigated as a fascial substitute for ventral hernia repair. Protein-based composite patches prevent hernia recurrence in Wistar rats over an 8-week period with new tissue formation and sustained structural integrity. PMID:21550111

  17. The Polycomb Group Protein EZH2 Impairs DNA Damage Repair Gene Expression in Human Uterine Fibroids.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiwei; Nair, Sangeeta; Laknaur, Archana; Ismail, Nahed; Diamond, Michael P; Al-Hendy, Ayman

    2016-03-01

    Uterine fibroids are benign, smooth muscle tumors that occur in approximately 70%-80% of women by age 50 yr. The cellular and molecular mechanism(s) by which uterine fibroids (UFs) develop are not fully understood. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that several genetic abnormalities, including deletions, rearrangements, translocations, as well as mutations, have been found in UFs. These genetic anomalies suggest that low DNA damage repair capacity may be involved in UF formation. The objective of this study was to determine whether expression levels of DNA damage repair-related genes were altered, and how they were regulated in the pathogenesis of UFs. Expression levels of DNA repair-related genes RAD51 and BRCA1 were deregulated in fibroid tissues as compared to adjacent myometrial tissues. Expression levels of chromatin protein enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) were higher in a subset of fibroids as compared to adjacent myometrial tissues by both immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. Treatment with an inhibitor of EZH2 markedly increased expression levels of RAD51 and BRCA1 in fibroid cells and inhibited cell proliferation paired with cell cycle arrest. Restoring the expression of RAD51 and BRCA1 by treatment with EZH2 inhibitor was dependent on reducing the enrichment of trimethylation of histone 3 lysine 27 epigenetic mark in their promoter regions. This study reveals the important role of EZH2-regulated DNA damage-repair genes via histone methylation in fibroid biology, and may provide novel therapeutic targets for the medical treatment of women with symptomatic UFs. PMID:26888970

  18. A novel small molecule inhibitor of the DNA repair protein Ku70/80.

    PubMed

    Weterings, Eric; Gallegos, Alfred C; Dominick, Lauren N; Cooke, Laurence S; Bartels, Trace N; Vagner, Josef; Matsunaga, Terry O; Mahadevan, Daruka

    2016-07-01

    Non-Homologous End-Joining (NHEJ) is the predominant pathway for the repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in human cells. The NHEJ pathway is frequently upregulated in several solid cancers as a compensatory mechanism for a separate DSB repair defect or for innate genomic instability, making this pathway a powerful target for synthetic lethality approaches. In addition, NHEJ reduces the efficacy of cancer treatment modalities which rely on the introduction of DSBs, like radiation therapy or genotoxic chemotherapy. Consequently, inhibition of the NHEJ pathway can modulate a radiation- or chemo-refractory disease presentation. The Ku70/80 heterodimer protein plays a pivotal role in the NHEJ process. It possesses a ring-shaped structure with high affinity for DSBs and serves as the first responder and central scaffold around which the rest of the repair complex is assembled. Because of this central position, the Ku70/80 dimer is a logical target for the disruption of the entire NHEJ pathway. Surprisingly, specific inhibitors of the Ku70/80 heterodimer are currently not available. We here describe an in silico, pocket-based drug discovery methodology utilizing the crystal structure of the Ku70/80 heterodimer. We identified a novel putative small molecule binding pocket and selected several potential inhibitors by computational screening. Subsequent biological screening resulted in the first identification of a compound with confirmed Ku-inhibitory activity in the low micro-molar range, capable of disrupting the binding of Ku70/80 to DNA substrates and impairing Ku-dependent activation of another NHEJ factor, the DNA-PKCS kinase. Importantly, this compound synergistically sensitized human cell lines to radiation treatment, indicating a clear potential to diminish DSB repair. The chemical scaffold we here describe can be utilized as a lead-generating platform for the design and development of a novel class of anti-cancer agents. PMID:27130816

  19. Versatile Recombinant SUMOylation System for the Production of SUMO-Modified Protein

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Alain R.; Schuermann, David; Schär, Primo

    2014-01-01

    Posttranslational modification by small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMO) is being associated with a growing number of regulatory functions in diverse cellular processes. The biochemical investigation into the underlying molecular mechanisms, however, has been lagging behind due to the difficulty to generate sufficient amounts of recombinant SUMOylated proteins. Here, we present two newly designed two-component vector systems for the expression and purification of SUMO-modified target proteins in Escherichia coli. One system consists of a vector for SUMO conjugation, expressing human SUMO-activating (SAE1/SAE2) and conjugating (Ubc9) enzymes together with His6-tagged SUMO1, 2 or 3, that can be combined with commonly used expression constructs for any gene of interest. To facilitate SUMOylation of targets normally requiring a SUMO-E3 ligase for efficient modification, a second system is designed to express the target protein as a fusion with the human SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9, thus compensating the absence of a potential SUMO ligase. We demonstrate the proficiency of these systems by SUMOylation of two DNA repair proteins, the thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) and XRCC1, and describe purification schemes for SUMOylated proteins in native and active form. This SUMO toolbox facilitates “in-cell” and “in-extract” production and purification of recombinant SUMO-modified target proteins for functional and structural analysis. PMID:25007328

  20. A physical interaction of UvrD with nucleotide excision repair protein UvrB.

    PubMed

    Ahn, B

    2000-10-31

    The dual-incision nature of the reaction of UV-irradiated DNA catalyzed by the UvrABC complex potentially leads to excision of a damaged fragment. However, neither fragment release under nondenaturing conditions nor the UvrBC proteins are turned over. The addition of the UvrD protein to the incised DNA-UvrBC complex results in excision of the incised damaged strand and in the turnover of the UvrC protein. In an effort to better understand the involvement of UvrD in the excision step, immunoprecipitation was used to detect interacting proteins with UvrD in the DNA repair. In this communication, it is shown that UvrA and UvrB are precipitated with UvrD in solution but the UvrAB complex is not. In the incision complex, UvrB could be precipitated and the preincubation of UvrD with UvrB revealed an inhibitory effect on the turnover of the incision complex. These data imply that UvrB in the incision complex seems to recruit UvrD to the 3' incised site of the incised strand by protein-protein interaction and to allow initiation of unwinding by UvrD from the resulting nick in a 3' to 5' direction. PMID:11101153

  1. Human HMGB1 directly facilitates interactions between nucleotide excision repair proteins on triplex-directed psoralen interstrand crosslinks

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Sabine S.; Reddy, Madhava C.; Vasquez, Karen M.

    2009-01-01

    Psoralen is a chemotherapeutic agent that acts by producing DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs), which are especially cytotoxic and mutagenic because their complex chemical nature makes them difficult to repair. Proteins from multiple repair pathways, including nucleotide excision repair (NER), are involved in their removal in mammalian cells, but the exact nature of their repair is poorly understood. We have shown previously that HMGB1, a protein involved in chromatin structure, transcriptional regulation, and inflammation, can bind cooperatively to triplex-directed psoralen ICLs with RPA, and that mammalian cells lacking HMGB1 are hyper-sensitive to psoralen ICLs. However, whether this effect is mediated by a role for HMGB1 in DNA damage recognition is still unknown. Given HMGB1’s ability to bind to damaged DNA and its interaction with the RPA protein, we hypothesized that HMGB1 works together with the NER damage recognition proteins to aid in the removal of ICLs. We show here that HMGB1 is capable of binding to triplex-directed psoralen ICLs with the dedicated NER damage recognition complex XPC-RAD23B, as well as RPA, and that they form a high molecular weight complex on these lesions. In addition, we demonstrate that HMGB1 interacts with XPC-RAD23B and XPA in the absence of DNA. These findings directly demonstrate interactions between HMGB1 and the NER damage recognition proteins, and suggest that HMGB1 may affect ICL repair by enhancing the interactions between NER damage recognition factors. PMID:19446504

  2. Identification of Plasmodium falciparum DNA Repair Protein Mre11 with an Evolutionarily Conserved Nuclease Function

    PubMed Central

    Badugu, Sugith Babu; Nabi, Shaik Abdul; Vaidyam, Pratap; Laskar, Shyamasree; Bhattacharyya, Sunanda; Bhattacharyya, Mrinal Kanti

    2015-01-01

    The eukaryotic Meiotic Recombination protein 11 (Mre11) plays pivotal roles in the DNA damage response (DDR). Specifically, Mre11 senses and signals DNA double strand breaks (DSB) and facilitates their repair through effector proteins belonging to either homologous recombination (HR) or non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair mechanisms. In the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, HR and alternative-NHEJ have been identified; however, little is known about the upstream factors involved in the DDR of this organism. In this report, we identify a putative ortholog of Mre11 in P. falciparum (PfalMre11) that shares 22% sequence similarity to human Mre11. Homology modeling reveals striking structural resemblance of the predicted PfalMre11 nuclease domain to the nuclease domain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mre11 (ScMre11). Complementation analyses reveal functional conservation of PfalMre11 nuclease activity as demonstrated by the ability of the PfalMre11 nuclease domain, in conjunction with the C-terminal domain of ScMre11, to functionally complement an mre11 deficient yeast strain. Functional complementation was virtually abrogated by an amino acid substitution in the PfalMre11 nuclease domain (D398N). PfalMre11 is abundant in the mitotically active trophozoite and schizont stages of P. falciparum and is up-regulated in response to DNA damage, suggesting a role in the DDR. PfalMre11 exhibits physical interaction with PfalRad50. In addition, yeast 2-hybrid studies show that PfalMre11 interacts with ScRad50 and ScXrs2, two important components of the well characterized Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 complex which is involved in DDR signaling and repair in S. cerevisiae, further supporting a role for PfalMre11 in the DDR. Taken together, these findings provide evidence that PfalMre11 is an evolutionarily conserved component of the DDR in Plasmodium. PMID:25938776

  3. Replication Protein A (RPA) deficiency activates the Fanconi anemia DNA repair pathway.

    PubMed

    Jang, Seok-Won; Jung, Jin Ki; Kim, Jung Min

    2016-09-01

    The Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway regulates DNA inter-strand crosslink (ICL) repair. Despite our greater understanding of the role of FA in ICL repair, its function in the preventing spontaneous genome instability is not well understood. Here, we show that depletion of replication protein A (RPA) activates the FA pathway. RPA1 deficiency increases chromatin recruitment of FA core complex, leading to FANCD2 monoubiquitination (FANCD2-Ub) and foci formation in the absence of DNA damaging agents. Importantly, ATR depletion, but not ATM, abolished RPA1 depletion-induced FANCD2-Ub, suggesting that ATR activation mediated FANCD2-Ub. Interestingly, we found that depletion of hSSB1/2-INTS3, a single-stranded DNA-binding protein complex, induces FANCD2-Ub, like RPA1 depletion. More interestingly, depletion of either RPA1 or INTS3 caused increased accumulation of DNA damage in FA pathway deficient cell lines. Taken together, these results indicate that RPA deficiency induces activation of the FA pathway in an ATR-dependent manner, which may play a role in the genome maintenance. PMID:27398742

  4. Yeast RAD14 and human xeroderma pigmentosum group A DNA-repair genes encode homologous proteins.

    PubMed

    Bankmann, M; Prakash, L; Prakash, S

    1992-02-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), a human autosomal recessive disorder, is characterized by extreme sensitivity to sunlight and high incidence of skin cancers. XP cells are defective in the incision step of excision repair of DNA damaged by ultraviolet light. Cell fusion studies have defined seven XP complementation groups, XP-A to XP-G. Similar genetic complexity of excision repair is observed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mutations in any one of five yeast genes, RAD1, RAD2, RAD3, RAD4, and RAD10, cause a total defect in incision and an extreme sensitivity to ultraviolet light. Here we report the characterization of the yeast RAD14 gene. The available rad14 point mutant is only moderately ultraviolet-sensitive, and it performs a substantial amount of incision of damaged DNA. Our studies with the rad14 deletion (delta) mutation indicate an absolute requirement of RAD14 in incision. RAD14 encodes a highly hydrophilic protein of 247 amino acids containing zinc-finger motifs, and it is similar to the protein encoded by the human XPAC gene that complements XP group A cell lines. PMID:1741034

  5. Structure of UvrA nucleotide excision repair protein in complex with modified DNA

    PubMed Central

    Jaciuk, Marcin; Nowak, Elżbieta; Skowronek, Krzysztof; Tańska, Anna; Nowotny, Marcin

    2012-01-01

    One of the primary pathways for removal of DNA damage is nucleotide excision repair (NER). In bacteria, the UvrA protein is the component of NER that locates the lesion. A notable feature of NER is its ability to act on many DNA modifications that vary in chemical structure. So far, the mechanism underlying this broad specificity has been unclear. Here, we report the first crystal structure of a UvrA protein in complex with a chemically modified oligonucleotide. The structure shows that the UvrA dimer does not contact the site of lesion directly, but rather binds the DNA regions on both sides of the modification. The DNA region harboring the modification is deformed, with the double helix bent and unwound. UvrA uses damage-induced deformations of the DNA and a less rigid structure of the modified double helix for indirect readout of the lesion. PMID:21240268

  6. Comparison of phosphorylation kinetics in DNA repair proteins after exposure to high and low LET radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okayasu, R.; Okabe, A.; Takakura, K.

    We irradiated plateau phase normal human fibroblasts with 2 Gy X-rays 70 keV um carbon 290MeV n and 200 keV um iron ions 500 MeV n and observed the kinetics of phosphorylation in various proteins associated with DNA double strand break DSB repair GammaH2AX foci a marker for DSBs were detected immediately after irradiation and the peak of phosphorylation was seen 30 to 60 min post-irradiation for three kinds of radiations Disappearance of gamma-H2AX foci was much faster for X-irradiated samples than that for heavy ion irradiated samples the phosphorylation kinetics for carbon and iron ions are similar for gamma-H2AX foci In contrast phosphorylation of an NHEJ protein DNA-PKcs threonine 2609 was significantly delayed in carbon and iron irradiated cells when compared to X-irradiated cells Disappearance of DNA-PKcs sites was much faster in X-irradiated samples than carbon and iron samples which showed a similar pattern as in the case of gamma-H2AX Furthermore in the case of ATM protein phosphorylation serine 1981 iron irradiation alone caused a significant initial delay but the kinetics of disappearance is similar for iron and carbon samples with much higher remaining number of foci in iron samples than those for X-rays and carbon ions These results suggest that 1 high LET irradiation induces complex and or severe DNA DSB damage which affects the function of DSB repair proteins 2 Both ATM and DNA-PKcs may recognize the complexity of DSBs but ATM may be more sensitive to detecting the complexity of DSB damage 3 gamma-H2AX may

  7. ERCC4 (XPF) encodes a human nucleotide excision repair protein with eukaryotic recombination homologs.

    PubMed

    Brookman, K W; Lamerdin, J E; Thelen, M P; Hwang, M; Reardon, J T; Sancar, A; Zhou, Z Q; Walter, C A; Parris, C N; Thompson, L H

    1996-11-01

    ERCC4 is an essential human gene in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway, which is responsible for removing UV-C photoproducts and bulky adducts from DNA. Among the NER genes, ERCC4 and ERCC1 are also uniquely involved in removing DNA interstrand cross-linking damage. The ERCC1-ERCC4 heterodimer, like the homologous Rad10-Rad1 complex, was recently found to possess an endonucleolytic activity that incises on the 5' side of damage. The ERCC4 gene, assigned to chromosome 16p13.1-p13.2, was previously isolated by using a chromosome 16 cosmid library. It corrects the defect in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mutants of NER complementation group 4 and is implicated in complementation group F of the human disorder xeroderma pigmentosum. We describe the ERCC4 gene structure and functional cDNA sequence encoding a 916-amino-acid protein (104 kDa), which has substantial homology with the eukaryotic DNA repair and recombination proteins MEI-9 (Drosophila melanogaster), Rad16 (Schizosaccharomyces pombe), and Rad1 (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). ERCC4 cDNA efficiently corrected mutants in rodent NER complementation groups 4 and 11, showing the equivalence of these groups, and ERCC4 protein levels were reduced in mutants of both groups. In cells of an XP-F patient, the ERCC4 protein level was reduced to less than 5%, consistent with XPF being the ERCC4 gene. The considerable identity (40%) between ERCC4 and MEI-9 suggests a possible involvement of ERCC4 in meiosis. In baboon tissues, ERCC4 was expressed weakly and was not significantly higher in testis than in nonmeiotic tissues. PMID:8887684

  8. The impact of detoxifying and repair gene polymorphisms on oxidative stress in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Orhan, Gürdal; Elkama, Aylin; Mungan, Semra Öztürk; Eruyar, Esra; Karahalil, Bensu

    2016-06-01

    Stroke is a multifactorial disease caused by the combination of certain risk factors and genetic factors. There are possible risk factors having important role in the pathogenesis of stroke. The most important environmental factors are cigarette smoking and oxidative stress which have different sources. GST (M1, T1, P1) have major roles in detoxification of the products of oxidative stress and they are polymorphic. DNA damages can also be repaired by repair enzymes such as OGG1 and XRCC1 which are highly polymorphic and have pivotal roles in repair systems. In the present study, we investigated that polymorphisms in genes involved in detoxification and DNA-repair pathways might modify the individual's risk for ischemic stroke. Furthermore, the products of oxidative stress and antioxidant capacity were measured and the impact of gene polymorphism on them was evaluated. Our data showed that OGG1 Ser326Cys and XRCC1 Arg399Gln gene polymorphisms had impacts on the development of stroke. PMID:26936466

  9. Protein repair L-isoaspartyl methyltransferase in plants. Phylogenetic distribution and the accumulation of substrate proteins in aged barley seeds.

    PubMed Central

    Mudgett, M B; Lowenson, J D; Clarke, S

    1997-01-01

    Protein L-isoaspartate (D-aspartate) O-methyltransferases (MTs; EC 2.1.1.77) can initiate the conversion of detrimental L-isoaspartyl residues in spontaneously damaged proteins to normal L-aspartyl residues. We detected this enzyme in 45 species from 23 families representing most of the divisions of the plant kingdom. MT activity is often localized in seeds, suggesting that it has a role in their maturation, quiescence, and germination. The relationship among MT activity, the accumulation of abnormal protein L-isoaspartyl residues, and seed viability was explored in barley (Hordeum vulgare cultivar Himalaya) seeds, which contain high levels of MT. Natural aging of barley seeds for 17 years resulted in a significant reduction in MT activity and in seed viability, coupled with increased levels of "unrepaired" L-isoaspartyl residues. In seeds heated to accelerate aging, we found no reduction of MT activity, but we did observe decreased seed viability and the accumulation of isoaspartyl residues. Among populations of accelerated aged seed, those possessing the highest levels of L-isoaspartyl-containing proteins had the lowest germination percentages. These results suggest that the MT present in seeds cannot efficiently repair all spontaneously damaged proteins containing altered aspartyl residues, and their accumulation during aging may contribute to the loss of seed viability. PMID:9414558

  10. Role of the translationally controlled tumor protein in DNA damage sensing and repair.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; de Toledo, Sonia M; Pandey, Badri N; Guo, Guozheng; Pain, Debkumar; Li, Hong; Azzam, Edouard I

    2012-04-17

    The translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) is essential for survival by mechanisms that as yet are incompletely defined. Here we describe an important role of TCTP in response to DNA damage. Upon exposure of normal human cells to low-dose γ rays, the TCTP protein level was greatly increased, with a significant enrichment in nuclei. TCTP up-regulation occurred in a manner dependent on ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase and the DNA-dependent protein kinase and was associated with protective effects against DNA damage. In chromatin of irradiated cells, coimmunoprecipitation experiments showed that TCTP forms a complex with ATM and γH2A.X, in agreement with its distinct localization with the foci of the DNA damage-marker proteins γH2A.X, 53BP1, and P-ATM. In cells lacking TCTP, repair of chromosomal damage induced by γ rays was compromised significantly. TCTP also was shown to interact with p53 and the DNA-binding subunits, Ku70 and Ku80, of DNA-dependent protein kinase. TCTP knockdown led to decreased levels of Ku70 and Ku80 in nuclei of irradiated cells and attenuated their DNA-binding activity. It also attenuated the radiation-induced G(1) delay but prolonged the G(2) delay. TCTP therefore may play a critical role in maintaining genomic integrity in response to DNA-damaging agents. PMID:22451927

  11. Towards comprehensive cardiac repair and regeneration after myocardial infarction: Aspects to consider and proteins to deliver.

    PubMed

    Awada, Hassan K; Hwang, Mintai P; Wang, Yadong

    2016-03-01

    Ischemic heart disease is a leading cause of death worldwide. After the onset of myocardial infarction, many pathological changes take place and progress the disease towards heart failure. Pathologies such as ischemia, inflammation, cardiomyocyte death, ventricular remodeling and dilation, and interstitial fibrosis, develop and involve the signaling of many proteins. Proteins can play important roles in limiting or countering pathological changes after infarction. However, they typically have short half-lives in vivo in their free form and can benefit from the advantages offered by controlled release systems to overcome their challenges. The controlled delivery of an optimal combination of proteins per their physiologic spatiotemporal cues to the infarcted myocardium holds great potential to repair and regenerate the heart. The effectiveness of therapeutic interventions depends on the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of the cargo proteins and the spatiotemporal control of their release. It is likely that multiple proteins will provide a more comprehensive and functional recovery of the heart in a controlled release strategy. PMID:26757257

  12. Expression of Mismatch Repair Proteins in Early and Advanced Gastric Cancer in Poland.

    PubMed

    Karpińska-Kaczmarczyk, Katarzyna; Lewandowska, Magdalena; Ławniczak, Małgorzata; Białek, Andrzej; Urasińska, Elżbieta

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Mutations in DNA of mismatch repair (MMR) genes result in failure to repair errors that occur during DNA replication in microsatellites, resulting in accumulation of frameshift mutations in these genes and leading to DNA mismatch replication errors and microsatellite instability. Gastric cancers (GCs) with high MSI (MSI-H) are a well-defined subset of carcinomas showing distinctive clinicopathological features. In this study we investigated the rate of MSI and the correlation between MSI status and clinicopathological features of GC. MATERIAL AND METHODS The study included 107 patients with GCs: 61 with advanced gastric cancers (AGC) and 46 with early gastric cancer (EGC). MSI deficiency in GCs was assessed by the immunohistochemical analysis of expression of MMR proteins - MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2 - using formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue. RESULTS A total of 6 (5.6%) MSI-H were observed. The loss of MMR proteins expression was associated with the intestinal type of GC in Lauren classification, and tubular and papillary architecture in WHO classification. There was no statistically significant association between negative MMR expression and other selected clinical parameters: age, sex, tumor location, depth of invasion (EGC and AGC), lymph nodes status, presence of the ulceration, and lymphocytic infiltrate. CONCLUSIONS In the present era of personalized medicine, the histological type of GC and MMR proteins status in cancer cells are very important for the proper surveillance of patients with familial GC and sporadic GCs, as well as for selecting the proper follow-up and treatment. Larger collaborative studies are needed to verify the features of MSI-H GCs in Poland. PMID:27527654

  13. Role of the Escherichia coli nucleotide excision repair proteins in DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Moolenaar, G F; Moorman, C; Goosen, N

    2000-10-01

    DNA polymerase I (PolI) functions both in nucleotide excision repair (NER) and in the processing of Okazaki fragments that are generated on the lagging strand during DNA replication. Escherichia coli cells completely lacking the PolI enzyme are viable as long as they are grown on minimal medium. Here we show that viability is fully dependent on the presence of functional UvrA, UvrB, and UvrD (helicase II) proteins but does not require UvrC. In contrast, delta polA cells grow even better when the uvrC gene has been deleted. Apparently UvrA, UvrB, and UvrD are needed in a replication backup system that replaces the PolI function, and UvrC interferes with this alternative replication pathway. With specific mutants of UvrC we could show that the inhibitory effect of this protein is related to its catalytic activity that on damaged DNA is responsible for the 3' incision reaction. Specific mutants of UvrA and UvrB were also studied for their capacity to support the PolI-independent replication. Deletion of the UvrC-binding domain of UvrB resulted in a phenotype similar to that caused by deletion of the uvrC gene, showing that the inhibitory incision activity of UvrC is mediated via binding to UvrB. A mutation in the N-terminal zinc finger domain of UvrA does not affect NER in vivo or in vitro. The same mutation, however, does give inviability in combination with the delta polA mutation. Apparently the N-terminal zinc-binding domain of UvrA has specifically evolved for a function outside DNA repair. A model for the function of the UvrA, UvrB, and UvrD proteins in the alternative replication pathway is discussed. PMID:11004168

  14. Expression of Mismatch Repair Proteins in Early and Advanced Gastric Cancer in Poland

    PubMed Central

    Karpińska-Kaczmarczyk, Katarzyna; Lewandowska, Magdalena; Ławniczak, Małgorzata; Białek, Andrzej; Urasińska, Elżbieta

    2016-01-01

    Background Mutations in DNA of mismatch repair (MMR) genes result in failure to repair errors that occur during DNA replication in microsatellites, resulting in accumulation of frameshift mutations in these genes and leading to DNA mismatch replication errors and microsatellite instability. Gastric cancers (GCs) with high MSI (MSI-H) are a well-defined subset of carcinomas showing distinctive clinicopathological features. In this study we investigated the rate of MSI and the correlation between MSI status and clinicopathological features of GC. Material/Methods The study included 107 patients with GCs: 61 with advanced gastric cancers (AGC) and 46 with early gastric cancer (EGC). MSI deficiency in GCs was assessed by the immunohistochemical analysis of expression of MMR proteins – MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2 – using formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue. Results A total of 6 (5.6%) MSI-H were observed. The loss of MMR proteins expression was associated with the intestinal type of GC in Lauren classification, and tubular and papillary architecture in WHO classification. There was no statistically significant association between negative MMR expression and other selected clinical parameters: age, sex, tumor location, depth of invasion (EGC and AGC), lymph nodes status, presence of the ulceration, and lymphocytic infiltrate. Conclusions In the present era of personalized medicine, the histological type of GC and MMR proteins status in cancer cells are very important for the proper surveillance of patients with familial GC and sporadic GCs, as well as for selecting the proper follow-up and treatment. Larger collaborative studies are needed to verify the features of MSI-H GCs in Poland. PMID:27527654

  15. Hydrogel Delivery of Mesenchymal Stem Cell–Expressing Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 Enhances Bone Defect Repair

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Hui-Yi; Yang, Shu-Rui; Brey, Eric M.; Chu, I-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background: The application of bone tissue engineering for repairing bone defects has gradually shown some satisfactory progress. One of the concerns raising scientific attention is the poor supply of growth factors. A number of growth factor delivery approaches have been developed for promoting bone formation. However, there is no systematic comparison of those approaches on efficiency of neobone formation. In this study, the approaches using periosteum, direct supply of growth factors, or gene transfection of growth factors were evaluated to determine the osteogenic capacity on the repair of bone defect. Methods: In total, 42 male 21-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 250 to 400 g were used as the bone defect model to evaluate the bone repair efficiency. Various tissue engineered constructs of poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(l-lactic acid) (PEG-PLLA) copolymer hydrogel with periosteum, with external supply of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2), or with BMP2-transfected bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) were filled in a 7-mm bone defect region. Animals were euthanized at 3 months, and the hydrogel constructs were harvested. The evaluation with histological staining and radiography analysis were performed for the volume of new bone formation. Results: The PEG-PLLA scaffold with BMMSCs promotes bone regeneration with the addition of periosteum. The group with BMP2-transfected BMMSCs demonstrated the largest volume of new bone among all the testing groups. Conclusions: Altogether, the results of this study provide the evidence that the combination of PEG-PLLA hydrogels with BMMSCs and sustained delivery of BMP2 resulted in the maximal bone regeneration. PMID:27622106

  16. RAD6 Promotes Homologous Recombination Repair by Activating the Autophagy-Mediated Degradation of Heterochromatin Protein HP1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Su; Wang, Chen; Sun, Luxi; Wang, Da-Liang; Chen, Lu; Huang, Zhuan; Yang, Qi; Gao, Jie; Yang, Xi-Bin; Chang, Jian-Feng; Chen, Ping; Lan, Li

    2014-01-01

    Efficient DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair is critical for the maintenance of genome stability. Unrepaired or misrepaired DSBs cause chromosomal rearrangements that can result in severe consequences, such as tumorigenesis. RAD6 is an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme that plays a pivotal role in repairing UV-induced DNA damage. Here, we present evidence that RAD6 is also required for DNA DSB repair via homologous recombination (HR) by specifically regulating the degradation of heterochromatin protein 1α (HP1α). Our study indicates that RAD6 physically interacts with HP1α and ubiquitinates HP1α at residue K154, thereby promoting HP1α degradation through the autophagy pathway and eventually leading to an open chromatin structure that facilitates efficient HR DSB repair. Furthermore, bioinformatics studies have indicated that the expression of RAD6 and HP1α exhibits an inverse relationship and correlates with the survival rate of patients. PMID:25384975

  17. Id Proteins Regulate Capillary Repair and Perivascular Cell Proliferation following Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, David; Shenoy, Shantheri; Nigatu, Yezina; Plotkin, Matt

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) results in microvascular damage that if not normally repaired, may lead to fibrosis. The Id1 and 3 proteins have a critical role in promoting angiogenesis during development, tumor growth and wound repair by functioning as dominant negative regulators of bHLH transcription factors. The goal of this study was to determine if Id proteins regulate microvascular repair and remodeling and if increased Id1 expression results in decreased capillary loss following AKI. The effect of changes in Id expression in vivo was examined using Id1−/−, Id3RFP/+ (Id1/Id3 KO) and Tek (Tie2)-rtTA, TRE-lacz/TRE Id1 (TRE Id1) mice with doxycycline inducible endothelial Id1 and β-galactosidase expression. Id1 and 3 were co-localized in endothelial cells in normal adult kidneys and protein levels were increased at day 3 following ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) and contralateral nephrectomy. Id1/Id3 KO mice had decreased baseline capillary density and pericyte coverage and increased tubular damage following IRI but decreased interstitial cell proliferation and fibrosis compared with WT littermates. No compensatory increase in kidney size occurred in KO mice resulting in increased creatinine compared with WT and TRE Id1 mice. TRE Id1 mice had no capillary rarefaction within 1 week following IRI in comparison with WT littermates. TRE Id1 mice had increased proliferation of PDGFRβ positive interstitial cells and medullary collagen deposition and developed capillary rarefaction and albuminuria at later time points. These differences were associated with increased Angiopoietin 1 (Ang1) and decreased Ang2 expression in TRE Id1 mice. Examination of gene expression in microvascular cells isolated from WT, Id1/Id3 KO and TRE Id1 mice showed increased Ang1 and αSMA in Id1 overexpressing cells and decreased pericyte markers in cells from KO mice. These results suggest that increased Id levels following AKI result in microvascular remodeling associated with increased

  18. The reaction of the dura to bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) in repair of skull defects.

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, K; Urist, M R

    1982-01-01

    Trephine defects in the adult rat skull 0.8 cm in diameter, which do not spontaneously heal, were filled with a bovine bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) fraction. The defects healed not only by bony ingrowth from the trephine rim, but also by proliferation of pervascular mesenchymal-type cells (pericytes) of the dura mater. Under the influence of BMP, dural pericytes differentiated into chondroid and woven bone. Between three and four weeks postimplantation, sinusoids formed and the woven bone remodelled into lamellar bone. Concurrently, blood-borne bone marrow cells colonized the bone deposits, and the diploe were restored. Demonstrating that it is soluble in interstitial fluid, and diffusible across a nucleopore membrane (which isolated the bony margins of the skull), BMP induced new bone formation in the underlying dura and complete repair of the defect. The response of the dura to the BMP fraction produced more new bone than the response to allogeneic bone matrix. The BMP-induced repair was dose dependent; the quantity of new bone was proportional to the dose of the implanted BMP. Images Fig. 1a. Fig. 1b. Fig. 1c. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. PMID:7092346

  19. Direct Involvement of Retinoblastoma Family Proteins in DNA Repair by Non-homologous End-Joining

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Rebecca; Zoumpoulidou, Georgia; Luczynski, Maciej T.; Rieger, Simone; Moquet, Jayne; Spanswick, Victoria J.; Hartley, John A.; Rothkamm, Kai; Huang, Paul H.; Mittnacht, Sibylle

    2015-01-01

    Summary Deficiencies in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair lead to genetic instability, a recognized cause of cancer initiation and evolution. We report that the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (RB1) is required for DNA DSB repair by canonical non-homologous end-joining (cNHEJ). Support of cNHEJ involves a mechanism independent of RB1’s cell-cycle function and depends on its amino terminal domain with which it binds to NHEJ components XRCC5 and XRCC6. Cells with engineered loss of RB family function as well as cancer-derived cells with mutational RB1 loss show substantially reduced levels of cNHEJ. RB1 variants disabled for the interaction with XRCC5 and XRCC6, including a cancer-associated variant, are unable to support cNHEJ despite being able to confer cell-cycle control. Our data identify RB1 loss as a candidate driver of structural genomic instability and a causative factor for cancer somatic heterogeneity and evolution. PMID:25818292

  20. Retinoblastoma Binding Protein 4 Modulates Temozolomide Sensitivity in Glioblastoma by Regulating DNA Repair Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kitange, Gaspar J.; Mladek, Ann C.; Schroeder, Mark A.; Pokorny, Jenny C.; Carlson, Brett L.; Zhang, Yuji; Nair, Asha A.; Lee, Jeong-Heon; Yan, Huihuang; Decker, Paul A.; Zhang, Zhiguo; Sarkaria, Jann N.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Here we provide evidence that RBBP4 modulates temozolomide (TMZ) sensitivity through coordinate regulation of 2 key DNA repair genes critical for recovery from TMZ-induced DNA damage: methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) and RAD51. Disruption of RBBP4 enhanced TMZ sensitivity, induced synthetic lethality to PARP inhibition and increased DNA damage signaling in response to TMZ. Moreover, RBBP4 silencing enhanced TMZ-induced H2AX phosphorylation and apoptosis in GBM cells. Intriguingly, RBBP4 knockdown suppressed the expression of MGMT, RAD51 and other genes in association with decreased promoter H3K9 acetylation (H3K9Ac) and increased H3K9 tri-methylation (H3K9me3). Consistent with these data, RBBP4 interacts with CBP/p300 to form a chromatin modifying complex that binds within the promoter of MGMT, RAD51 and perhaps other genes. Globally, RBBP4 positively and negatively regulates genes involved in critical cellular functions including tumorigenesis. RBBP4/CBP/p300 complex may provide an interesting target for developing therapy sensitizing strategies for GBM and other tumors. PMID:26972001

  1. Involvement of a periplasmic protein kinase in DNA strand break repair and homologous recombination in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Khairnar, Nivedita P; Kamble, Vidya A; Mangoli, Suhas H; Apte, Shree K; Misra, Hari S

    2007-07-01

    The involvement of signal transduction in the repair of radiation-induced damage to DNA has been known in eukaryotes but remains understudied in bacteria. This article for the first time demonstrates a role for the periplasmic lipoprotein (YfgL) with protein kinase activity transducing a signal for DNA strand break repair in Escherichia coli. Purified YfgL protein showed physical as well as functional interaction with pyrroloquinoline-quinone in solution and the protein kinase activity of YfgL was strongly stimulated in the presence of pyrroloquinoline-quinone. Transgenic E. coli cells producing Deinococcus radiodurans pyrroloquinoline-quinone synthase showed nearly four log cycle improvement in UVC dark survival and 10-fold increases in gamma radiation resistance as compared with untransformed cells. Pyrroloquinoline-quinone enhanced the UV resistance of E. coli through the YfgL protein and required the active recombination repair proteins. The yfgL mutant showed higher sensitivity to UVC, mitomycin C and gamma radiation as compared with wild-type cells and showed a strong impairment in homologous DNA recombination. The mutant expressing an active YfgL in trans recovered the lost phenotypes to nearly wild-type levels. The results strongly suggest that the periplasmic phosphoquinolipoprotein kinase YfgL plays an important role in radiation-induced DNA strand break repair and homologous recombination in E. coli. PMID:17630970

  2. WSTF does it all: a multifunctional protein in transcription, repair and replication

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Chris; Krebs, Jocelyn E.

    2011-01-01

    Williams Syndrome Transcription Factor (WSTF) has emerged as an incredibly versatile nuclear protein. WSTF and the ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes in which it exists, WINAC, WICH and B-WICH have been studied in a variety of organisms. This research has revealed roles for WSTF in a number of diverse molecular events. WSTF function includes chromatin assembly, Pol I and III gene regulation, vitamin D metabolism and DNA repair. In addition to functioning as a subunit of several ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes, WSTF binds specifically to acetylated histones and is itself a histone kinase, as well as a target of phosphorylation. This review will describe the three known WSTF-containing complexes and discuss their various roles as well as mechanisms of regulating WSTF activity. PMID:21326359

  3. Methods for quantitative evaluation of dynamics of repair proteins within irradiated cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hable, V.; Dollinger, G.; Greubel, C.; Hauptner, A.; Krücken, R.; Dietzel, S.; Cremer, T.; Drexler, G. A.; Friedl, A. A.; Löwe, R.

    2006-04-01

    Living HeLa cells are irradiated well directed with single 100 MeV oxygen ions by the superconducting ion microprobe SNAKE, the Superconducting Nanoscope for Applied Nuclear (=Kern-) Physics Experiments, at the Munich 14 MV tandem accelerator. Various proteins, which are involved directly or indirectly in repair processes, accumulate as clusters (so called foci) at DNA-double strand breaks (DSBs) induced by the ions. The spatiotemporal dynamics of these foci built by the phosphorylated histone γ-H2AX are studied. For this purpose cells are irradiated in line patterns. The γ-H2AX is made visible under the fluorescence microscope using immunofluorescence techniques. Quantitative analysis methods are developed to evaluate the data of the microscopic images in order to analyze movement of the foci and their changing size.

  4. Imaging of the DNA damage-induced dynamics of nuclear proteins via nonlinear photoperturbation.

    PubMed

    Tomas, Martin; Blumhardt, Philipp; Deutzmann, Anja; Schwarz, Tobias; Kromm, Dimitri; Leitenstorfer, Alfred; Ferrando-May, Elisa

    2013-08-01

    Understanding the cellular response to DNA strand breaks is crucial to decipher the mechanisms maintaining the integrity of our genome. We present a novel method to visualize how the mobility of nuclear proteins changes in response to localized DNA damage. DNA strand breaks are induced via nonlinear excitation with femtosecond laser pulses at λ = 1050 nm in a 3D-confined subnuclear volume. After a time delay of choice, protein mobility within this volume is analysed by two-photon photoactivation of PA-GFP fusion proteins at λ = 775 nm. By changing the position of the photoactivation spot with respect to the zone of lesion the influence of chromatin structure and of the distance from damage are investigated. As first applications we demonstrate a locally confined, time-dependent mobility increase of histone H1.2, and a progressive retardation of the DNA repair factor XRCC1 at damaged sites. This assay can be used to map the response of nuclear proteins to DNA damage in time and space. PMID:23420601

  5. Distinct kinetics of human DNA ligases I, IIIalpha, IIIbeta, and IV reveal direct DNA sensing ability and differential physiological functions in DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xi; Ballin, Jeff D.; Della-Maria, Julie; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; White, Elizabeth J.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Wilson, Gerald M.

    2009-05-11

    The three human LIG genes encode polypeptides that catalyze phosphodiester bond formation during DNA replication, recombination and repair. While numerous studies have identified protein partners of the human DNA ligases (hLigs), there has been little characterization of the catalytic properties of these enzymes. In this study, we developed and optimized a fluorescence-based DNA ligation assay to characterize the activities of purified hLigs. Although hLigI joins DNA nicks, it has no detectable activity on linear duplex DNA substrates with short, cohesive single-strand ends. By contrast, hLigIII{beta} and the hLigIII{alpha}/XRCC1 and hLigIV/XRCC4 complexes are active on both nicked and linear duplex DNA substrates. Surprisingly, hLigIV/XRCC4, which is a key component of the major non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway, is significantly less active than hLigIII on a linear duplex DNA substrate. Notably, hLigIV/XRCC4 molecules only catalyze a single ligation event in the absence or presence of ATP. The failure to catalyze subsequent ligation events reflects a defect in the enzyme-adenylation step of the next ligation reaction and suggests that, unless there is an in vivo mechanism to reactivate DNA ligase IV/XRCC4 following phosphodiester bond formation, the cellular NHEJ capacity will be determined by the number of adenylated DNA ligaseIV/XRCC4 molecules.

  6. Bone morphogenetic protein-2-encapsulated grafted-poly-lactic acid-polycaprolactone nanoparticles promote bone repair.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaojun; Yang, Jun; Ding, Lifeng; Li, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to test the efficacy of a novel tissue-engineered bone in repairing bone defects, using poly-lactic-acid-polycaprolactone (PLA-PCL) scaffolding seeded with PEG-bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2)-transfected rBMSCs (rabbit bone marrow stromal cells). The rBMSCs were transfected with PEG/BMP-2 or liposome/BMP-2, and then implanted into a PLA-PCL tissue-engineered bone. The protein level of BMP-2 was assessed by Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. ELISA was used to measure the amount of BMP-2 secreted in the culture media. The mRNA level of BMP-2 and osteocalcin was assayed quantitatively by real-time PCR. The middle portion of the bilateral radius in New Zealand rabbits was excised and implanted with tissue-engineered bone, and the modified areas were monitored by X-ray, hematoxylin-eosin staining, and immunohistochemistry staining of BMP-2. PEG-BMP-2 nanoparticles (NPs) and BMP-2-loaded PEG-PLA-PCL tissue-engineered bones were successfully constructed. The novel PEG-PLA-PCL NPs/DNA complex was a superior option for transfecting BMP-2 in rBMSCs compared to normal liposomes Moreover, the mRNA level of osteocalcin and alkaline phosphatase activity was also elevated upon transfection of BMP-2-encapsulated NPs. In vivo implants with BMP-2-carried tissue-engineered bone exhibited dramatic augmentation of BMP-2 and effective bone formation in the rabbit ectopic model. The PEG-PLA-PCL NPs/BMP-2 complex had an advantageous effect on bone repair, which provided an important theoretic basis for potential clinical treatments. PMID:25158862

  7. Role of Novel Dimeric Photosystem II (PSII)-Psb27 Protein Complex in PSII Repair*

    PubMed Central

    Grasse, Nicole; Mamedov, Fikret; Becker, Kristin; Styring, Stenbjörn; Rögner, Matthias; Nowaczyk, Marc M.

    2011-01-01

    The multisubunit membrane protein complex Photosystem II (PSII) catalyzes one of the key reactions in photosynthesis: the light-driven oxidation of water. Here, we focus on the role of the Psb27 assembly factor, which is involved in biogenesis and repair after light-induced damage of the complex. We show that Psb27 is essential for the survival of cyanobacterial cells grown under stress conditions. The combination of cold stress (30 °C) and high light stress (1000 μmol of photons × m−2 × s−1) led to complete inhibition of growth in a Δpsb27 mutant strain of the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus, whereas wild-type cells continued to grow. Moreover, Psb27-containing PSII complexes became the predominant PSII species in preparations from wild-type cells grown under cold stress. Two different PSII-Psb27 complexes were isolated and characterized in this study. The first complex represents the known monomeric PSII-Psb27 species, which is involved in the assembly of PSII. Additionally, a novel dimeric PSII-Psb27 complex could be allocated in the repair cycle, i.e. in processes after inactivation of PSII, by 15N pulse-label experiments followed by mass spectrometry analysis. Comparison with the corresponding PSII species from Δpsb27 mutant cells showed that Psb27 prevented the release of manganese from the previously inactivated complex. These results indicate a more complex role of the Psb27 protein within the life cycle of PSII, especially under stress conditions. PMID:21737447

  8. When DNA repair goes wrong: BER-generated DNA-protein crosslinks to oxidative lesions.

    PubMed

    Quiñones, Jason Luis; Demple, Bruce

    2016-08-01

    Free radicals generate an array of DNA lesions affecting all parts of the molecule. The damage to deoxyribose receives less attention than base damage, even though the former accounts for ∼20% of the total. Oxidative deoxyribose fragments (e.g., 3'-phosphoglycolate esters) are removed by the Ape1 AP endonuclease and other enzymes in mammalian cells to enable DNA repair synthesis. Oxidized abasic sites are initially incised by Ape1, thus recruiting these lesions into base excision repair (BER) pathways. Lesions such as 2-deoxypentos-4-ulose can be removed by conventional (single-nucleotide) BER, which proceeds through a covalent Schiff base intermediate with DNA polymerase β (Polβ) that is resolved by hydrolysis. In contrast, the lesion 2-deoxyribonolactone (dL) must be processed by multinucleotide ("long-patch") BER: attempted repair via the single-nucleotide pathway leads to a dead-end, covalent complex with Polβ cross- linked to the DNA by an amide bond. We recently detected these stable DNA-protein crosslinks (DPC) between Polβ and dL in intact cells. The features of the DPC formation in vivo are exactly in keeping with the mechanistic properties seen in vitro: Polβ-DPC are formed by oxidative agents in line with their ability to form the dL lesion; they are not formed by non-oxidative agents; DPC formation absolutely requires the active-site lysine-72 that attacks the 5'-deoxyribose; and DPC formation depends on Ape1 to incise the dL lesion first. The Polβ-DPC are rapidly processed in vivo, the signal disappearing with a half-life of 15-30min in both mouse and human cells. This removal is blocked by inhibiting the proteasome, which leads to the accumulation of ubiquitin associated with the Polβ-DPC. While other proteins (e.g., topoisomerases) also form DPC under these conditions, 60-70% of the trapped ubiquitin depends on Polβ. The mechanism of ubiquitin targeting to Polβ-DPC, the subsequent processing of the expected 5'-peptidyl-dL, and the

  9. 2-step purification of the Ku DNA repair protein expressed in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    The Ku protein is involved in DNA double-strand break repair by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), which is crucial to the maintenance of genomic integrity in mammals. To study the role of Ku in NHEJ we developed a bicistronic E. coli expression system for the Ku70 and Ku80 subunits. Association of the Ku70 and Ku80 subunits buries a substantial amount of surface area (~9000Å2 [1]), which suggests that herterodimerization may be important for protein stability. N-terminally his6-tagged Ku80 was soluble in the presence, but not in the absence, of bicistronically expressed untagged Ku70. In a 2-step purification, metal chelating affinity chromatography was followed by step-gradient elution from heparin-agarose. Co-purification of equimolar amounts of his6-tagged Ku80 and untagged Ku70 was observed, which indicated heterodimerization. Recombinant Ku bound dsDNA, activated the catalytic subunit of the DNA-dependent kinase (DNA-PKcs) and functioned in NHEJ reactions in vitro. Our results demonstrate that while the heterodimeric interface of Ku is extensive it is nonetheless possible to produce biologically active Ku protein in E. coli. PMID:17110127

  10. Structure of the human DNA-repair protein RAD52 containing surface mutations.

    PubMed

    Saotome, Mika; Saito, Kengo; Onodera, Keiichi; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Kagawa, Wataru

    2016-08-01

    The Rad52 protein is a eukaryotic single-strand DNA-annealing protein that is involved in the homologous recombinational repair of DNA double-strand breaks. The isolated N-terminal half of the human RAD52 protein (RAD52(1-212)) forms an undecameric ring structure with a surface that is mostly positively charged. In the present study, it was found that RAD52(1-212) containing alanine mutations of the charged surface residues (Lys102, Lys133 and Glu202) is highly amenable to crystallization. The structure of the mutant RAD52(1-212) was solved at 2.4 Å resolution. The structure revealed an association between the symmetry-related RAD52(1-212) rings, in which a partially unfolded, C-terminal region of RAD52 extended into the DNA-binding groove of the neighbouring ring in the crystal. The alanine mutations probably reduced the surface entropy of the RAD52(1-212) ring and stabilized the ring-ring association observed in the crystal. PMID:27487923

  11. Focal Contact and Hemidesmosomal Proteins in Keratinocyte Migration and Wound Repair

    PubMed Central

    Hopkinson, Susan B.; Hamill, Kevin J.; Wu, Yvonne; Eisenberg, Jessica L.; Hiroyasu, Sho; Jones, Jonathan C.R.

    2014-01-01

    Significance: During wound healing of the skin, keratinocytes should move over while still adhering to their underlying matrix. Thus, mechanistic insights into the wound-healing process require an understanding of the forms and functions of keratinocyte matrix adhesions, specifically focal contacts and hemidesmosomes, and their components. Recent Advances: Although the structure and composition of focal contacts and hemidesmosomes are relatively well defined, the functions of their components are only now being delineated using mouse genetic models and knockdown approaches in cell culture systems. Remarkably, both focal contact and hemidesmosomal proteins appear involved in determining the speed and directional migration of epidermal cells by modulating several signal transduction pathways. Critical Issues: Although many publications are centered on focal contacts, their existence in tissues such as the skin is controversial. Nonetheless, focal contact proteins are central to mechanisms that regulate skin cell motility. Conversely, hemidesmosomes have been identified in intact skin but whether hemidesmosomal components play a positive regulatory function in keratinocyte motility remains debated in the field. Future Directions: Defective wound healing is a developing problem in the aged, hospitalized and diabetic populations. Hence, deriving new insights into the molecular roles of matrix adhesion proteins in wound healing is a prerequisite to the development of novel therapeutics to enhance tissue repair and regeneration. PMID:24669360

  12. UV-sensitive syndrome protein UVSSA recruits USP7 to regulate transcription-coupled repair.

    PubMed

    Schwertman, Petra; Lagarou, Anna; Dekkers, Dick H W; Raams, Anja; van der Hoek, Adriana C; Laffeber, Charlie; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Demmers, Jeroen A A; Fousteri, Maria; Vermeulen, Wim; Marteijn, Jurgen A

    2012-05-01

    Transcription-coupled nucleotide-excision repair (TC-NER) is a subpathway of NER that efficiently removes the highly toxic RNA polymerase II blocking lesions in DNA. Defective TC-NER gives rise to the human disorders Cockayne syndrome and UV-sensitive syndrome (UV(S)S). NER initiating factors are known to be regulated by ubiquitination. Using a SILAC-based proteomic approach, we identified UVSSA (formerly known as KIAA1530) as part of a UV-induced ubiquitinated protein complex. Knockdown of UVSSA resulted in TC-NER deficiency. UVSSA was found to be the causative gene for UV(S)S, an unresolved NER deficiency disorder. The UVSSA protein interacts with elongating RNA polymerase II, localizes specifically to UV-induced lesions, resides in chromatin-associated TC-NER complexes and is implicated in stabilizing the TC-NER master organizing protein ERCC6 (also known as CSB) by delivering the deubiquitinating enzyme USP7 to TC-NER complexes. Together, these findings indicate that UVSSA-USP7–mediated stabilization of ERCC6 represents a critical regulatory mechanism of TC-NER in restoring gene expression. PMID:22466611

  13. Repairing oxidized proteins in the bacterial envelope using respiratory chain electrons.

    PubMed

    Gennaris, Alexandra; Ezraty, Benjamin; Henry, Camille; Agrebi, Rym; Vergnes, Alexandra; Oheix, Emmanuel; Bos, Julia; Leverrier, Pauline; Espinosa, Leon; Szewczyk, Joanna; Vertommen, Didier; Iranzo, Olga; Collet, Jean-François; Barras, Frédéric

    2015-12-17

    The reactive species of oxygen and chlorine damage cellular components, potentially leading to cell death. In proteins, the sulfur-containing amino acid methionine is converted to methionine sulfoxide, which can cause a loss of biological activity. To rescue proteins with methionine sulfoxide residues, living cells express methionine sulfoxide reductases (Msrs) in most subcellular compartments, including the cytosol, mitochondria and chloroplasts. Here we report the identification of an enzymatic system, MsrPQ, repairing proteins containing methionine sulfoxide in the bacterial cell envelope, a compartment particularly exposed to the reactive species of oxygen and chlorine generated by the host defence mechanisms. MsrP, a molybdo-enzyme, and MsrQ, a haem-binding membrane protein, are widely conserved throughout Gram-negative bacteria, including major human pathogens. MsrPQ synthesis is induced by hypochlorous acid, a powerful antimicrobial released by neutrophils. Consistently, MsrPQ is essential for the maintenance of envelope integrity under bleach stress, rescuing a wide series of structurally unrelated periplasmic proteins from methionine oxidation, including the primary periplasmic chaperone SurA. For this activity, MsrPQ uses electrons from the respiratory chain, which represents a novel mechanism to import reducing equivalents into the bacterial cell envelope. A remarkable feature of MsrPQ is its capacity to reduce both rectus (R-) and sinister (S-) diastereoisomers of methionine sulfoxide, making this oxidoreductase complex functionally different from previously identified Msrs. The discovery that a large class of bacteria contain a single, non-stereospecific enzymatic complex fully protecting methionine residues from oxidation should prompt a search for similar systems in eukaryotic subcellular oxidizing compartments, including the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:26641313

  14. Repairing oxidized proteins in the bacterial envelope using respiratory chain electrons

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Camille; Agrebi, Rym; Vergnes, Alexandra; Oheix, Emmanuel; Bos, Julia; Leverrier, Pauline; Espinosa, Leon; Szewczyk, Joanna; Vertommen, Didier; Iranzo, Olga; Collet, Jean-François; Barras, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    The reactive species of oxygen (ROS) and chlorine (RCS) damage cellular components, potentially leading to cell death. In proteins, the sulfur-containing amino acid methionine (Met) is converted to methionine sulfoxide (Met-O), which can cause a loss of biological activity. To rescue proteins with Met-O residues, living cells express methionine sulfoxide reductases (Msrs) in most subcellular compartments, including the cytosol, mitochondria and chloroplasts 1-3. Here, we report the identification of an enzymatic system, MsrPQ, repairing Met-O containing proteins in the bacterial cell envelope, a compartment particularly exposed to the ROS and RCS generated by the host defense mechanisms. MsrP, a molybdo-enzyme, and MsrQ, a heme-binding membrane protein, are widely conserved throughout Gram-negative bacteria, including major human pathogens. MsrPQ synthesis is induced by hypochlorous acid (HOCl), a powerful antimicrobial released by neutrophils. Consistently, MsrPQ is essential for the maintenance of envelope integrity under bleach stress, rescuing a wide series of structurally unrelated periplasmic proteins from Met oxidation, including the primary periplasmic chaperone SurA. For this activity, MsrPQ uses electrons from the respiratory chain, which represents a novel mechanism to import reducing equivalents into the bacterial cell envelope. A remarkable feature of MsrPQ is its capacity to reduce both R- and S- diastereoisomers of Met-O, making this oxidoreductase complex functionally different from previously identified Msrs. The discovery that a large class of bacteria contain a single, non-stereospecific enzymatic complex fully protecting Met residues from oxidation should prompt search for similar systems in eukaryotic subcellular oxidizing compartments, including the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). PMID:26641313

  15. Identification of Intrinsic Order and Disorder in the DNA Repair Protein XPA

    SciTech Connect

    Iakoucheva, Lilia M.; Kimzey, Amy L.; Masselon, Christophe D.; Bruce, James E.; Garner, Ethan C.; Brown, Celeste J.; Dunker, A. K.; Smith, Richard D.; Ackerman, Eric J.

    2001-03-01

    The damage recognition protein XPA is required to recognize a wide variety of bulky lesions during nucleotide excision repair (NER). Independent NMR solution structures of a human XPA protein (hXPA) fragment comprising approximately one-third of the full-length protein, the minimal DNA-binding domain (MBD), revealed that ~30% of the molecule was structurally disordered. To better characterize structural features of XPA, we performed time-resolved trypsin proteolysis on active, full-length recombinant Xenopus XPA protein (xXPA). The resulting proteolytic fragments were analyzed by electrospray ionization interface coupled to a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (ESI-FTICR) mass spectrometry, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), and selected N-terminal sequence determinations. The mass spectrum of the full-length xXPA was consistent with the predicted sequence, 30922.02 vs. 30922.45 Da; respectively. Moreover, the mass spectrometric data allowed the assignment of multiple xXPA fragments not resolvable by SDS PAGE. Full-length xXPA exhibited aberrant mobility on SDS-PAGE with an apparent MW of ~40 kDa. To test predictions that a Glu-rich region (E70-E76) or other local regions of high charge were responsible for this ~40% aberrant SDS-PAGE mobility, the MW's of partial proteolytic fragments from ~5 to 25 kDa precisely determined by ESI-FTICR MS were correlated with their gel positions. Surprisingly, all tested partial tryptic fragments within this size-range exhibited 10-42% divergence between calculated MW and that estimated by SDS-PAGE, thus indicating the origin of anomalous migration of XPA is not localized. The computer program Predictor of Natural Disordered Regions (PONDR) correctly identified several regions of xXPA either sensitive or resistant to partial proteolysis, thereby indicating that disorder in XPA shares sequence features with other well-characterized intrinsically unstructured proteins.

  16. Telomere proteins POT1, TRF1 and TRF2 augment long-patch base excision repair in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Adam S; Balakrishnan, Lata; Buncher, Noah A

    2012-01-01

    Human telomeres consist of multiple tandem hexameric repeats, each containing a guanine triplet. Guanosine-rich clusters are highly susceptible to oxidative base damage, necessitating base excision repair (BER). Previous demonstration of enhanced strand displacement synthesis by the BER component DNA polymerase β in the presence of telomere protein TRF2 suggests that telomeres employ long-patch (LP) BER. Earlier analyses in vitro showed that efficiency of BER reactions is reduced in the DNA-histone environment of chromatin. Evidence presented here indicates that BER is promoted at telomeres. We found that the three proteins that contact telomere DNA, POT1, TRF1 and TRF2, enhance the rate of individual steps of LP-BER and stimulate the complete reconstituted LP-BER pathway. Thought to protect telomere DNA from degradation, these proteins still apparently evolved to allow selective access of repair proteins. PMID:22336916

  17. Regulation of nucleotide excision repair activity by transcriptional and post-transcriptional control of the XPA protein.

    PubMed

    Kang, Tae-Hong; Reardon, Joyce T; Sancar, Aziz

    2011-04-01

    The XPA (Xeroderma pigmentosum A) protein is one of the six core factors of the human nucleotide excision repair system. In this study we show that XPA is a rate-limiting factor in all human cell lines tested, including a normal human fibroblast cell line. The level of XPA is controlled at the transcriptional level by the molecular circadian clock and at the post-translational level by a HECT domain family E3 ubiquitin ligase called HERC2. Stabilization of XPA by downregulation of HERC2 moderately enhances excision repair activity. Conversely, downregulation of XPA by siRNA reduces excision repair activity in proportion to the level of XPA. Ubiquitination and proteolysis of XPA are inhibited by DNA damage that promotes tight association of the protein with chromatin and its dissociation from the HERC2 E3 ligase. Finally, in agreement with a recent report, we find that XPA is post-translationally modified by acetylation. However, contrary to the previous claim, we find that in mouse liver only a small fraction of XPA is acetylated and that downregulation of SIRT1 deacetylase in two human cell lines does not affect the overall repair rate. Collectively, the data reveal that XPA is a limiting factor in excision repair and that its level is coordinately regulated by the circadian clock, the ubiquitin-proteasome system and DNA damage. PMID:21193487

  18. Schizosaccharomyces pombe rad32 protein: a phosphoprotein with an essential phosphoesterase motif required for repair of DNA double strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Wilson, S; Tavassoli, M; Watts, F Z

    1998-12-01

    The Schizosaccharomyces pombe Rad32 protein is required for repair of DNA double strand breaks, minichromosome stability and meiotic recombination. We show here that the Rad32 protein is phosphorylated in a cell cycle-dependent manner and during meiosis. The phosphorylation is not dependent on the checkpoint protein Rad3. Analysis of a partially purified protein preparation indicates that Rad32 is likely to act in a complex. Characterisation of the rad32-1 mutation and site-directed mutagenesis indicate that three aspartate residues in the conserved phosphoesterase motifs are important for both mitotic and meiotic functions, namely response to UV and ionising radiation and spore viability. PMID:9826747

  19. Yeast high mobility group protein HMO1 stabilizes chromatin and is evicted during repair of DNA double strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Panday, Arvind; Xiao, LiJuan; Grove, Anne

    2015-01-01

    DNA is packaged into condensed chromatin fibers by association with histones and architectural proteins such as high mobility group (HMGB) proteins. However, this DNA packaging reduces accessibility of enzymes that act on DNA, such as proteins that process DNA after double strand breaks (DSBs). Chromatin remodeling overcomes this barrier. We show here that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae HMGB protein HMO1 stabilizes chromatin as evidenced by faster chromatin remodeling in its absence. HMO1 was evicted along with core histones during repair of DSBs, and chromatin remodeling events such as histone H2A phosphorylation and H3 eviction were faster in absence of HMO1. The facilitated chromatin remodeling in turn correlated with more efficient DNA resection and recruitment of repair proteins; for example, inward translocation of the DNA-end-binding protein Ku was faster in absence of HMO1. This chromatin stabilization requires the lysine-rich C-terminal extension of HMO1 as truncation of the HMO1 C-terminal tail phenocopies hmo1 deletion. Since this is reminiscent of the need for the basic C-terminal domain of mammalian histone H1 in chromatin compaction, we speculate that HMO1 promotes chromatin stability by DNA bending and compaction imposed by its lysine-rich domain and that it must be evicted along with core histones for efficient DSB repair. PMID:25979266

  20. Arabidopsis Protein Repair L-Isoaspartyl Methyltransferases: Predominant Activities at Lethal Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Villa, Sarah T; Xu, Qilong; Downie, A Bruce; Clarke, Steven G

    2006-12-01

    Protein L-isoaspartyl (D-aspartyl) O-methyltransferases (EC 2.1.1.77; PIMT or PCMT) are enzymes that initiate the full or partial repair of damaged L-aspartyl and L-asparaginyl residues, respectively. These enzymes are found in most organisms and maintain a high degree of sequence conservation. Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis L. Heynh.) is unique among eukaryotes in that it contains two genes, rather than one, that encode PIMT isozymes. We describe a novel Arabidopsis PIMT isozyme, designated AtPIMT2αω, encoded by the PIMT2 gene (At5g50240). We characterized the enzymatic activity of the recombinant AtPIMT2αω in comparison to the other AtPIMT2 isozymes, AtPIMT1, and to the human PCMT ortholog, to better understand its role in Arabidopsis. All Arabidopsis PIMT isozymes are active over a relatively wide pH range. For AtPIMT2αω maximal activity is observed at 50 °C (a lethal temperature for Arabidopsis); this activity is almost ten times greater than the activity at the growth temperature of 25 °C. Interestingly, enzyme activity decreases after pre-incubation at temperatures above 30°C. A similar situation is found for the recombinant AtPIMT2ψ and the AtPIMT2ω isozymes, as well as for the AtPIMT1 and human PCMT1 enzymes. These results suggest that the short-term ability of these methyltransferases to initiate repair under extreme temperature conditions may be a common feature of both the plant and animal species. PMID:21076691

  1. Use of bone morphogenetic proteins in mesenchymal stem cell stimulation of cartilage and bone repair

    PubMed Central

    Scarfì, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix-associated bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) govern a plethora of biological processes. The BMPs are members of the transforming growth factor-β protein superfamily, and they actively participate to kidney development, digit and limb formation, angiogenesis, tissue fibrosis and tumor development. Since their discovery, they have attracted attention for their fascinating perspectives in the regenerative medicine and tissue engineering fields. BMPs have been employed in many preclinical and clinical studies exploring their chondrogenic or osteoinductive potential in several animal model defects and in human diseases. During years of research in particular two BMPs, BMP2 and BMP7 have gained the podium for their use in the treatment of various cartilage and bone defects. In particular they have been recently approved for employment in non-union fractures as adjunct therapies. On the other hand, thanks to their potentialities in biomedical applications, there is a growing interest in studying the biology of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC), the rules underneath their differentiation abilities, and to test their true abilities in tissue engineering. In fact, the specific differentiation of MSCs into targeted cell-type lineages for transplantation is a primary goal of the regenerative medicine. This review provides an overview on the current knowledge of BMP roles and signaling in MSC biology and differentiation capacities. In particular the article focuses on the potential clinical use of BMPs and MSCs concomitantly, in cartilage and bone tissue repair. PMID:26839636

  2. The Protein Oxidation Repair Enzyme Methionine Sulfoxide Reductase A Modulates Aβ Aggregation and Toxicity In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Minniti, Alicia N.; Arrazola, Macarena S.; Bravo-Zehnder, Marcela; Ramos, Francisca; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: To examine the role of the enzyme methionine sulfoxide reductase A-1 (MSRA-1) in amyloid-β peptide (Aβ)-peptide aggregation and toxicity in vivo, using a Caenorhabditis elegans model of the human amyloidogenic disease inclusion body myositis. Results: MSRA-1 specifically reduces oxidized methionines in proteins. Therefore, a deletion of the msra-1 gene was introduced into transgenic C. elegans worms that express the Aβ-peptide in muscle cells to prevent the reduction of oxidized methionines in proteins. In a constitutive transgenic Aβ strain that lacks MSRA-1, the number of amyloid aggregates decreases while the number of oligomeric Aβ species increases. These results correlate with enhanced synaptic dysfunction and mislocalization of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ACR-16 at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Innovation: This approach aims at modulating the oxidation of Aβ in vivo indirectly by dismantling the methionine sulfoxide repair system. The evidence presented here shows that the absence of MSRA-1 influences Aβ aggregation and aggravates locomotor behavior and NMJ dysfunction. The results suggest that therapies which boost the activity of the Msr system could have a beneficial effect in managing amyloidogenic pathologies. Conclusion: The absence of MSRA-1 modulates Aβ-peptide aggregation and increments its deleterious effects in vivo. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 48–62. PMID:24988428

  3. The Ku70 DNA-repair protein is involved in centromere function in a grasshopper species.

    PubMed

    Cabrero, Josefa; Bakkali, Mohammed; Navarro-Domínguez, Beatriz; Ruíz-Ruano, Francisco J; Martín-Blázquez, Rubén; López-León, María Dolores; Camacho, Juan Pedro M

    2013-06-25

    The Ku70 protein is involved in numerous cell functions, the nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) DNA repair pathway being the best known. Here, we report a novel function for this protein in the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans. We observed the presence of large Ku70 foci on the centromeres of meiotic and mitotic chromosomes during the cell cycle stages showing the highest centromeric activity (i.e., metaphase and anaphase). The fact that colchicine treatment prevented centromeric location of Ku70, suggests a microtubule-dependent centromeric function for Ku70. Likewise, the absence of Ku70 at metaphase-anaphase centromeres from three males whose Ku70 gene had been knocked down using interference RNA, and the dramatic increase in the frequency of polyploid spermatids observed in these males, suggest that the centromeric presence of Ku70 is required for normal cytokinesis in this species. The centromeric function of Ku70 was not observed in 14 other grasshopper and locust species, or in the mouse, thus suggesting that it is an autapomorphy in E. plorans. PMID:23797468

  4. Potential role of Escherichia coli DNA mismatch repair proteins in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shahanavaj

    2015-12-01

    The epithelium of gastrointestinal tract organizes many innate defense systems against microbial intruders such as integrity of epithelial, rapid eviction of infected cells, quick turnover of epithelial cell, intrinsic immune responses and autophagy. However, Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) are equipped with well developed infectious tricks that evade the host defense systems and utilize the gastrointestinal epithelium as a multiplicative foothold. During multiplication on and within the epithelium, EPEC secrete various toxins that can weaken, usurp, and use many host cellular systems. However, the possible mechanisms of pathogenesis are still poorly elusive. Recent study reveals the existence of EPEC in colorectal cancer patients and their potential role in depletion of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) proteins of host cell in colonic cell lines. The EPEC colonised intracellularly in colon mucosa of colorectal carcinoma whereas extracellular strain was detected in mucosa of normal colon cells. Interestingly, alteration in MutS, MutL complexes and MUTYH of mammalian cells may be involved in development of CRC. These data propose that MMR of E. coli may be potential therapeutic targets and early detection biomarkers for CRC. This article reviews the potential role of E. coli MutS, MutL and MutY protein in CRC aetiology. PMID:26014615

  5. The histone-like protein HU binds specifically to DNA recombination and repair intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Kamashev, D.; Rouviere-Yaniv, J.

    2000-01-01

    The heterodimeric HU protein associated with the Escherichia coli nucleoid shares some properties with histones and HMG proteins. HU binds DNA junctions and DNA containing a nick much more avidly than double-stranded (ds-) DNA. Cells lacking HU are extremely sensitive to γ irradiation and we wondered how HU could play a role in maintaining the integrity of the bacterial chromosome. We show that HU binds with high affinity to DNA repair and recombination intermediates, including DNA invasions, DNA overhangs and DNA forks. The DNA structural motif that HU specifically recognizes in all these structures consists of a ds-DNA module joined to a second module containing either ds- or single-stranded (ss-) DNA. The two modules rotate freely relative to one another. Binding specificity results from the simultaneous interaction of HU with these two modules: HU arms bind the ds-DNA module whereas the HU body contacts the ‘variable’ module containing either ds- or ss-DNA. Both structural motifs are recognized by HU at least 1000-fold more avidly than duplex DNA. PMID:11101525

  6. Identification of Pathways in Liver Repair Potentially Targeted by Secretory Proteins from Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Sandra; Hempel, Madlen; Brückner, Sandra; Tautenhahn, Hans-Michael; Kaufmann, Roland; Christ, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Background: The beneficial impact of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) on both acute and chronic liver diseases has been confirmed, although the molecular mechanisms behind it remain elusive. We aim to identify factors secreted by undifferentiated and hepatocytic differentiated MSC in vitro in order to delineate liver repair pathways potentially targeted by MSC. Methods: Secreted factors were determined by protein arrays and related pathways identified by biomathematical analyses. Results: MSC from adipose tissue and bone marrow expressed a similar pattern of surface markers. After hepatocytic differentiation, CD54 (intercellular adhesion molecule 1, ICAM-1) increased and CD166 (activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule, ALCAM) decreased. MSC secreted different factors before and after differentiation. These comprised cytokines involved in innate immunity and growth factors regulating liver regeneration. Pathway analysis revealed cytokine-cytokine receptor interactions, chemokine signalling pathways, the complement and coagulation cascades as well as the Januskinase-signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK-STAT) and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor (NOD-like receptor) signalling pathways as relevant networks. Relationships to transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α (HIF1-α) signalling seemed also relevant. Conclusion: MSC secreted proteins, which differed depending on cell source and degree of differentiation. The factors might address inflammatory and growth factor pathways as well as chemo-attraction and innate immunity. Since these are prone to dysregulation in most liver diseases, MSC release hepatotropic factors, potentially supporting liver regeneration. PMID:27409608

  7. DNA repair variants and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Grundy, Anne; Richardson, Harriet; Schuetz, Johanna M; Burstyn, Igor; Spinelli, John J; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Aronson, Kristan J

    2016-05-01

    A functional DNA repair system has been identified as important in the prevention of tumour development. Previous studies have hypothesized that common polymorphisms in DNA repair genes could play a role in breast cancer risk and also identified the potential for interactions between these polymorphisms and established breast cancer risk factors such as physical activity. Associations with breast cancer risk for 99 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from genes in ten DNA repair pathways were examined in a case-control study including both Europeans (644 cases, 809 controls) and East Asians (299 cases, 160 controls). Odds ratios in both additive and dominant genetic models were calculated separately for participants of European and East Asian ancestry using multivariate logistic regression. The impact of multiple comparisons was assessed by correcting for the false discovery rate within each DNA repair pathway. Interactions between several breast cancer risk factors and DNA repair SNPs were also evaluated. One SNP (rs3213282) in the gene XRCC1 was associated with an increased risk of breast cancer in the dominant model of inheritance following adjustment for the false discovery rate (P < 0.05), although no associations were observed for other DNA repair SNPs. Interactions of six SNPs in multiple DNA repair pathways with physical activity were evident prior to correction for FDR, following which there was support for only one of the interaction terms (P < 0.05). No consistent associations between variants in DNA repair genes and breast cancer risk or their modification by breast cancer risk factors were observed. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 57:269-281, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27060854

  8. Alpha-phellandrene-induced DNA damage and affect DNA repair protein expression in WEHI-3 murine leukemia cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jen-Jyh; Wu, Chih-Chung; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Weng, Shu-Wen; Ma, Yi-Shih; Huang, Yi-Ping; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-11-01

    Although there are few reports regarding α-phellandrene (α-PA), a natural compound from Schinus molle L. essential oil, there is no report to show that α-PA induced DNA damage and affected DNA repair associated protein expression. Herein, we investigated the effects of α-PA on DNA damage and repair associated protein expression in murine leukemia cells. Flow cytometric assay was used to measure the effects of α-PA on total cell viability and the results indicated that α-PA induced cell death. Comet assay and 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride staining were used for measuring DNA damage and condensation, respectively, and the results indicated that α-PA induced DNA damage and condensation in a concentration-dependent manner. DNA gel electrophoresis was used to examine the DNA damage and the results showed that α-PA induced DNA damage in WEHI-3 cells. Western blotting assay was used to measure the changes of DNA damage and repair associated protein expression and the results indicated that α-PA increased p-p53, p-H2A.X, 14-3-3-σ, and MDC1 protein expression but inhibited the protein of p53, MGMT, DNA-PK, and BRCA-1. PMID:24861204

  9. Interdependence of DNA mismatch repair proteins MLH1 and MSH2 in apoptosis in human colorectal carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hassen, Samar; Ali, Akhtar A; Kilaparty, Surya P; Al-Anbaky, Qudes A; Majeed, Waqar; Boman, Bruce M; Fields, Jeremy Z; Ali, Nawab

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system consists of a number of proteins that play important roles in repair of base pair mismatch mutations and in maintenance of genomic integrity. A defect in this system can cause genetic instability, which can lead to carcinogenesis. For instance, a germline mutation in one of the mismatch repair proteins, especially MLH1 or MSH2, is responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer. These MMR proteins also play an important role in the induction of apoptosis. Accordingly, altered expression of or a defect in MLH1 or MSH2 may confer resistance to anti-cancer drugs used in chemotherapy. We hypothesized that the ability of these two MMR proteins to regulate apoptosis are interdependent. Moreover, a defect in either one may confer resistance to chemotherapy by an inability to trigger apoptosis. To this end, we studied three cell lines-SW480, LoVo, and HTC116. These cell lines were selected based on their differential expression of MLH1 and MSH2 proteins. SW480 expresses both MLH1 and MSH2; LoVo expresses only MLH1 but not MSH2; HCT116 expresses only MSH2 but not MLH1 protein. MTT assays, a measure of cytotoxicity, showed that there were different cytotoxic effects of an anti-cancer drug, etoposide, on these cell lines, effects that were correlated with the MMR status of the cells. Cells that are deficient in MLH1 protein (HCT116 cells) were resistant to the drug. Cells that express both MLH1 and MSH2 proteins (SW480 cells) showed caspase-3 cleavage, an indicator of apoptosis. Cells that lack MLH1 (HCT116 cells) did not show any caspase-3 cleavage. Expression of full-length MLH1 protein was decreased in MMR proficient (SW480) cells during apoptosis; it remained unchanged in cells that lack MSH2 (LoVo cells). The expression of MSH2 protein remained unchanged during apoptosis both in MMR proficient (SW480) and deficient (HCT116) cells. Studies on translocation of MLH1 protein from nucleus to cytosolic fraction, an

  10. Involvement of the Artemis Protein in the Relative Biological Efficiency Observed With the 76-MeV Proton Beam Used at the Institut Curie Proton Therapy Center in Orsay

    SciTech Connect

    Calugaru, Valentin; Nauraye, Catherine; Cordelières, Fabrice P.; Biard, Denis; De Marzi, Ludovic; Hall, Janet; Favaudon, Vincent; Mégnin-Chanet, Frédérique

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Previously we showed that the relative biological efficiency for induced cell killing by the 76-MeV beam used at the Institut Curie Proton Therapy Center in Orsay increased with depth throughout the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP). To investigate the repair pathways underlying this increase, we used an isogenic human cell model in which individual DNA repair proteins have been depleted, and techniques dedicated to precise measurements of radiation-induced DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs) and double-strand breaks (DSBs). Methods and Materials: The 3-Gy surviving fractions of HeLa cells individually depleted of Ogg1, XRCC1, and PARP1 (the base excision repair/SSB repair pathway) or of ATM, DNA-PKcs, XRCC4, and Artemis (nonhomologous end-joining pathway) were determined at the 3 positions previously defined in the SOBP. Quantification of incident SSBs and DSBs by the alkaline elution technique and 3-dimensional (3D) immunofluorescence of γ-H2AX foci, respectively, was performed in SQ20 B cells. Results: We showed that the amount of SSBs and DSBs depends directly on the particle fluence and that the increase in relative biological efficiency observed in the distal part of the SOBP is due to a subset of lesions generated under these conditions, leading to cell death via a pathway in which the Artemis protein plays a central role. Conclusions: Because therapies like proton or carbon beams are now being used to treat cancer, it is even more important to dissect the mechanisms implicated in the repair of the lesions generated by these particles. Additionally, alteration of the expression or activity of the Artemis protein could be a novel therapeutic tool before high linear energy transfer irradiation treatment.

  11. Genetic variation in DNA-repair pathways and response to radiochemotherapy in esophageal adenocarcinoma: a retrospective cohort study of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Recent data in esophageal cancer suggests the variant allele of a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in XRCC1 may be associated with resistance to radiochemotherapy. However, this SNP has not been assessed in a histologically homogeneous clinical trial cohort that has been treated with a uniform approach. In addition, whether germline DNA may serve as a surrogate for tumor genotype at this locus is unknown in this disease. Our objective was to assess this SNP in relation to the pathologic complete response (pCR) rate in subjects with esophageal adenocarcinoma who received cisplatin-based preoperative radiochemotherapy in a multicenter clinical trial (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group 1201). As a secondary aim, we investigated the rate of allelic imbalance between germline and tumor DNA. Methods Eighty-one eligible treatment-naïve subjects with newly diagnosed resectable esophageal adenocarcinoma received radiotherapy (45 Gy) concurrent with cisplatin-based chemotherapy, with planned subsequent surgical resection. The primary endpoint was pCR, defined as complete absence of tumor in the surgical specimen after radiochemotherapy. Using germline DNA from 60 subjects, we examined the base-excision repair SNP, XRCC1 Arg399Gln, and 4 other SNPs in nucleotide excision (XPD Lys751Gln and Asp312Asn, ERCC1 3' flank) and double-stranded break (XRCC2 5' flank) repair pathways, and correlated genotype with pCR rate. Paired tumor tissue was used to estimate the frequency of allelic imbalance at the XRCC1 SNP. Results The variant allele of the XRCC1 SNP (399Gln) was detected in 52% of subjects. Only 6% of subjects with the variant allele experienced a pCR, compared to 28% of subjects without the variant allele (odds ratio 5.37 for failing to achieve pCR, p = 0.062). Allelic imbalance at this locus was found in only 10% of informative subjects, suggesting that germline genotype may reflect tumor genotype at this locus. No significant association with pCR was noted

  12. Translocator Protein 18kDA (TSPO): Molecular Sensor of Brain Injury & Repair

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ming-Kai; Guilarte, Tomás R.

    2008-01-01

    For over 15 years, the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR), recently named translocator protein 18kDa (TSPO) has been studied as a biomarker of reactive gliosis and inflammation associated with a variety of neuropathological conditions. Early studies documented that in the brain parenchyma, TSPO is exclusively localized in glial cells. Under normal physiological conditions, TSPO levels are low in the brain neuropil but they markedly increase at sites of brain injury and inflammation making it uniquely suited for assessing active gliosis. This research has generated significant efforts from multiple research groups throughout the world to apply TSPO as a marker of “active” brain pathology using in vivo imaging modalities such as Positron Emission Tomography (PET) in experimental animals and humans. Further, in the last few years, there has been an increased interest in understanding the molecular and cellular function(s) of TSPO in glial cells. The latest evidence suggests that TSPO may not only serve as a biomarker of active brain disease but also the use of TSPO-specific ligands may have therapeutic implications in brain injury and repair. This review presents an overview of the history and function of TSPO focusing on studies related to its use as a sensor of active brain disease in experimental animals and in human studies. PMID:18374421

  13. Intracellular Protein Shuttling: A Mechanism Relevant for Myelin Repair in Multiple Sclerosis?

    PubMed

    Göttle, Peter; Küry, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    A prominent feature of demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) is the degeneration and loss of previously established functional myelin sheaths, which results in impaired signal propagation and axonal damage. However, at least in early disease stages, partial replacement of lost oligodendrocytes and thus remyelination occur as a result of resident oligodendroglial precursor cell (OPC) activation. These cells represent a widespread cell population within the adult central nervous system (CNS) that can differentiate into functional myelinating glial cells to restore axonal functions. Nevertheless, the spontaneous remyelination capacity in the adult CNS is inefficient because OPCs often fail to generate new oligodendrocytes due to the lack of stimulatory cues and the presence of inhibitory factors. Recent studies have provided evidence that regulated intracellular protein shuttling is functionally involved in oligodendroglial differentiation and remyelination activities. In this review we shed light on the role of the subcellular localization of differentiation-associated factors within oligodendroglial cells and show that regulation of intracellular localization of regulatory factors represents a crucial process to modulate oligodendroglial maturation and myelin repair in the CNS. PMID:26151843

  14. Resveratrol improves bone repair by modulation of bone morphogenetic proteins and osteopontin gene expression in rats.

    PubMed

    Casarin, R C; Casati, M Z; Pimentel, S P; Cirano, F R; Algayer, M; Pires, P R; Ghiraldini, B; Duarte, P M; Ribeiro, F V

    2014-07-01

    This study investigated the effect of resveratrol on bone healing and its influence on the gene expression of osteogenic markers. Two calvarial defects were created and one screw-shaped titanium implant was inserted in the tibia of rats that were assigned to daily administration of placebo (control group, n=15) or 10mg/kg of resveratrol (RESV group, n=15) for 30 days. The animals were then sacrificed. One of the calvarial defects was processed for histomorphometric analysis and the tissue relative to the other was collected for mRNA quantification of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2, BMP-7, osteopontin (OPN), bone sialoprotein (BSP), osteoprotegrin (OPG), and receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL). Implants were removed by applying a counter-torque force. Histomorphometric analysis revealed higher remaining defect in the calvarial defects of the control group than the RESV group (P=0.026). Resveratrol increased the counter-torque values of implant removal when compared to control therapy (P=0.031). Gene expression analysis showed a higher expression of BMP-2 (P=0.011), BMP-7 (P=0.049), and OPN (P=0.002) genes in the RESV group than in the control group. In conclusion, resveratrol improved the repair of critical-sized bone defects and the biomechanical retention of implants. Indeed, this natural agent may up-regulate the gene expression of important osteogenic markers. PMID:24530035

  15. Bone morphogenetic protein signalling suppresses wound-induced skin repair by inhibiting keratinocyte proliferation and migration

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Christopher J.; Mardaryev, Andrei N.; Poterlowicz, Krzysztof; Sharova, Tatyana Y.; Aziz, Ahmar; Sharpe, David T.; Botchkareva, Natalia V.; Sharov, Andrey A.

    2013-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signalling plays a key role in the control of skin development and postnatal remodelling by regulating keratinocyte proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. To study the role of BMPs in wound-induced epidermal repair, we used transgenic mice overexpressing the BMP downstream component Smad1 under the control of a K14 promoter as an in vivo model, as well as ex vivo and in vitro assays. K14-caSmad1 mice exhibited retarded wound healing associated with significant inhibition of proliferation and increased apoptosis in healing wound epithelium. Furthermore, microarray and qRT-PCR analyses revealed decreased expression of a number of cytoskeletal/cell motility-associated genes including wound-associated keratins (Krt16, Krt17) and Myo5a, in the epidermis of K14-caSmad1 mice versus wild-type controls during wound healing. BMP treatment significantly inhibited keratinocyte migration ex vivo, and primary keratinocytes of K14-caSmad1 mice showed retarded migration compared to wild-type controls. Finally, siRNA-mediated silencing of Bmpr-1B in primary mouse keratinocytes accelerated cell migration and was associated with increased expression of Krt16, Krt17 and Myo5a compared to controls. Thus, this study demonstrates that BMPs inhibit keratinocyte proliferation, cytoskeletal organization and migration in regenerating skin epithelium during wound healing, and raises a possibility for using BMP antagonists for the management of chronic wounds. PMID:24126843

  16. The bacterial DNA repair protein Mfd confers resistance to the host nitrogen immune response.

    PubMed

    Guillemet, Elisabeth; Leréec, Alain; Tran, Seav-Ly; Royer, Corinne; Barbosa, Isabelle; Sansonetti, Philippe; Lereclus, Didier; Ramarao, Nalini

    2016-01-01

    Production of reactive nitrogen species (NO) is a key step in the immune response following infections. NO induces lesions to bacterial DNA, thus limiting bacterial growth within hosts. Using two pathogenic bacteria, Bacillus cereus and Shigella flexneri, we show that the DNA-repair protein Mfd (Mutation-Frequency-Decline) is required for bacterial resistance to the host-NO-response. In both species, a mutant deficient for mfd does not survive to NO, produced in vitro or by phagocytic cells. In vivo, the ∆mfd mutant is avirulent and unable to survive the NO-stress. Moreover, NO induces DNA-double-strand-breaks and point mutations in the Δmfd mutant. In overall, these observations demonstrate that NO damages bacterial DNA and that Mfd is required to maintain bacterial genomic integrity. This unexpected discovery reveals that Mfd, a typical housekeeping gene, turns out to be a true virulence factor allowing survival and growth of the pathogen in its host, due to its capacity to protect the bacterium against NO, a key molecule of the innate immune defense. As Mfd is widely conserved in the bacterial kingdom, these data highlight a mechanism that may be used by a large spectrum of bacteria to overcome the host immune response and especially the mutagenic properties of NO. PMID:27435260

  17. The bacterial DNA repair protein Mfd confers resistance to the host nitrogen immune response

    PubMed Central

    Guillemet, Elisabeth; Leréec, Alain; Tran, Seav-Ly; Royer, Corinne; Barbosa, Isabelle; Sansonetti, Philippe; Lereclus, Didier; Ramarao, Nalini

    2016-01-01

    Production of reactive nitrogen species (NO) is a key step in the immune response following infections. NO induces lesions to bacterial DNA, thus limiting bacterial growth within hosts. Using two pathogenic bacteria, Bacillus cereus and Shigella flexneri, we show that the DNA-repair protein Mfd (Mutation-Frequency-Decline) is required for bacterial resistance to the host-NO-response. In both species, a mutant deficient for mfd does not survive to NO, produced in vitro or by phagocytic cells. In vivo, the ∆mfd mutant is avirulent and unable to survive the NO-stress. Moreover, NO induces DNA-double-strand-breaks and point mutations in the Δmfd mutant. In overall, these observations demonstrate that NO damages bacterial DNA and that Mfd is required to maintain bacterial genomic integrity. This unexpected discovery reveals that Mfd, a typical housekeeping gene, turns out to be a true virulence factor allowing survival and growth of the pathogen in its host, due to its capacity to protect the bacterium against NO, a key molecule of the innate immune defense. As Mfd is widely conserved in the bacterial kingdom, these data highlight a mechanism that may be used by a large spectrum of bacteria to overcome the host immune response and especially the mutagenic properties of NO. PMID:27435260

  18. The proteomic investigation reveals interaction of mdig protein with the machinery of DNA double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Lu, Yongju; Stemmer, Paul M; Zhang, Xiangmin; Bi, Yongyi; Yi, Zhengping; Chen, Fei

    2015-09-29

    To investigate how mineral dust-induced gene (mdig, also named as mina53, MINA, or NO52) promotes carcinogenesis through inducing active chromatin, we performed proteomics analyses for the interacting proteins that were co-immunoprecipitated by anti-mdig antibody from either the lung cancer cell line A549 cells or the human bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS-2B cells. On SDS-PAGE gels, three to five unique protein bands were consistently observed in the complexes pulled-down by mdig antibody, but not the control IgG. In addition to the mdig protein, several DNA repair or chromatin binding proteins, including XRCC5, XRCC6, RBBP4, CBX8, PRMT5, and TDRD, were identified in the complexes by the proteomics analyses using both Orbitrap Fusion and Orbitrap XL nanoESI-MS/MS in four independent experiments. The interaction of mdig with some of these proteins was further validated by co-immunoprecipitation using antibodies against mdig and its partner proteins, respectively. These data, thus, provide evidence suggesting that mdig accomplishes its functions on chromatin, DNA repair and cell growth through interacting with the partner proteins. PMID:26293673

  19. Polymorphisms in DNA Repair Pathway Genes, Body Mass Index, and Risk of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yingtai; Zheng, Tongzhang; Lan, Qing; Kim, Christopher; Qin, Qin; Foss, Francine; Chen, Xuezhong; Holford, Theodore; Leaderer, Brian; Boyle, Peter; Wang, Chengfeng; Dai, Min; Liu, Zhenjiang; Ma, Shuangge; Chanock, Stephen J.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Zhang, Yawei

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a population-based case-control study in Connecticut women to test the hypothesis that genetic variations in DNA repair pathway genes may modify the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Compared to those with BMI < 25, women with BMI ≥ 25 had significantly increased risk of NHL among women who carried BRCA1 (rs799917) CT/TT, ERCC2 (rs13181) AA, XRCC1 (rs1799782) CC, and WRN (rs1801195) GG genotypes, but no increase in NHL risk among women who carried BRCA1 CC, ERCC2 AC/CC, XRCC1 CT/TT, and WRN GT/TT genotypes. A significant interaction with BMI was only observed for WRN (rs1801195, P=0.004) for T-cell lymphoma and ERCC2 (rs13181, P=0.002) for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The results suggest that common genetic variation in DNA repair pathway genes may modify the association between BMI and NHL risk. PMID:23619945

  20. Connecting Replication and Repair: YoaA, a Helicase-Related Protein, Promotes Azidothymidine Tolerance through Association with Chi, an Accessory Clamp Loader Protein

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Laura T.; Sutera, Vincent A.; Zhou, Shen; Weitzel, Christopher S.; Cheng, Yisha; Lovett, Susan T.

    2015-01-01

    Elongating DNA polymerases frequently encounter lesions or structures that impede progress and require repair before DNA replication can be completed. Therefore, directing repair factors to a blocked fork, without interfering with normal replication, is important for proper cell function, and it is a process that is not well understood. To study this process, we have employed the chain-terminating nucleoside analog, 3’ azidothymidine (AZT) and the E. coli genetic system, for which replication and repair factors have been well-defined. By using high-expression suppressor screens, we identified yoaA, encoding a putative helicase, and holC, encoding the Chi component of the replication clamp loader, as genes that promoted tolerance to AZT. YoaA is a putative Fe-S helicase in the XPD/RAD3 family for which orthologs can be found in most bacterial genomes; E. coli has a paralog to YoaA, DinG, which possesses 5’ to 3’ helicase activity and an Fe-S cluster essential to its activity. Mutants in yoaA are sensitive to AZT exposure; dinG mutations cause mild sensitivity to AZT and exacerbate the sensitivity of yoaA mutant strains. Suppression of AZT sensitivity by holC or yoaA was mutually codependent and we provide evidence here that YoaA and Chi physically interact. Interactions of Chi with single-strand DNA binding protein (SSB) and with Psi were required to aid AZT tolerance, as was the proofreading 3’ exonuclease, DnaQ. Our studies suggest that repair is coupled to blocked replication through these interactions. We hypothesize that SSB, through Chi, recruits the YoaA helicase to replication gaps and that unwinding of the nascent strand promotes repair and AZT excision. This recruitment prevents the toxicity of helicase activity and aids the handoff of repair with replication factors, ensuring timely repair and resumption of replication. PMID:26544712

  1. Effect of the space environment on the induction of DNA-repair related proteins and recovery from radiation damage.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Y; Watanabe, H; Kikuchi, M; Narumi, I

    2000-01-01

    Recovery of bacterial cells from radiation damage and the effects of microgravity were examined in an STS-79 Shuttle/Mir Mission-4 experiment using the extremely radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. The cells were irradiated with gamma rays before the space flight and incubated on board the Space-Shuttle. The survival of the wild type cells incubated in space increased compared with the ground controls, suggesting that the recovery of this bacterium from radiation damage was enhanced under microgravity. No difference was observed for the survival of radiosensitive mutant rec30 cells whether incubated in space or on the ground. The amount of DNA-repair related RecA protein induced under microgravity was similar to those of ground controls, however, induction of PprA protein, the product of a newly found gene related to the DNA repair mechanism of D. radiodurans, was enhanced under microgravity compared with ground controls. PMID:11542862

  2. Human XPA and RPA DNA repair proteins participate in specific recognition of triplex-induced helical distortions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasquez, Karen M.; Christensen, Jesper; Li, Lei; Finch, Rick A.; Glazer, Peter M.

    2002-04-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) plays a central role in maintaining genomic integrity by detecting and repairing a wide variety of DNA lesions. Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A protein (XPA) is an essential component of the repair machinery, and it is thought to be involved in the initial step as a DNA damage recognition and/or confirmation factor. Human replication protein A (RPA) and XPA have been reported to interact to form a DNA damage recognition complex with greater specificity for damaged DNA than XPA alone. The mechanism by which these two proteins recognize such a wide array of structures resulting from different types of DNA damage is not known. One possibility is that they recognize a common feature of the lesions, such as distortions of the helical backbone. We have tested this idea by determining whether human XPA and RPA proteins can recognize the helical distortions induced by a DNA triple helix, a noncanonical DNA structure that has been shown to induce DNA repair, mutagenesis, and recombination. We measured binding of XPA and RPA, together or separately, to substrates containing triplexes with three, two, or no strands covalently linked by psoralen conjugation and photoaddition. We found that RPA alone recognizes all covalent triplex structures, but also forms multivalent nonspecific DNA aggregates at higher concentrations. XPA by itself does not recognize the substrates, but it binds them in the presence of RPA. Addition of XPA decreases the nonspecific DNA aggregate formation. These results support the hypothesis that the NER machinery is targeted to helical distortions and demonstrate that RPA can recognize damaged DNA even without XPA.

  3. mTOR inhibition and levels of the DNA repair protein MGMT in T98G glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common and most aggressive type of primary adult brain tumour, responds poorly to conventional treatment. Temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy remains the most commonly used treatment, despite a large proportion of tumours displaying TMZ resistance. 60% of GBM tumours have unmethylated MGMT promoter regions, resulting in an overexpression of the DNA repair protein O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), which is responsible for tumour resistance to TMZ chemotherapy. Tumours also often exhibit hyperactive PI3-kinase/mTOR signalling, which enables them to resynthesise proteins quickly. Since MGMT is a suicide protein that is degraded upon binding to and repairing TMZ-induced O6-methylguanine adducts, it has been hypothesized that inhibition of translation via the mTOR signalling pathway could generate a tumour-specific reduction in MGMT protein and increase TMZ sensitivity. Methods MGMT was monitored at the post-transcriptional, translational and protein levels, to determine what effect mTOR inhibition was having on MGMT protein expression in vitro. Results We show that inhibiting mTOR signalling is indeed associated with acute inhibition of protein synthesis. Western blots show that despite this, relative to loading control proteins, steady state levels of MGMT protein increased and MGMT mRNA was retained in heavy polysomes. Whilst TMZ treatment resulted in maintained MGMT protein levels, concomitant treatment of T98G cells with TMZ and KU0063794 resulted in increased MGMT protein levels without changes in total mRNA levels. Conclusions These in vitro data suggest that, counterintuitively, mTOR inhibition may not be a useful adjunct to TMZ therapy and that more investigation is needed before applying mTOR inhibitors in a clinical setting. PMID:24909675

  4. The scaffold protein WRAP53β orchestrates the ubiquitin response critical for DNA double-strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    Henriksson, Sofia; Rassoolzadeh, Hanif; Hedström, Elisabeth; Coucoravas, Christos; Julner, Alexander; Goldstein, Michael; Imreh, Gabriela; Zhivotovsky, Boris; Kastan, Michael B.; Helleday, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The WD40 domain-containing protein WRAP53β (WD40 encoding RNA antisense to p53; also referred to as WDR79/TCAB1) controls trafficking of splicing factors and the telomerase enzyme to Cajal bodies, and its functional loss has been linked to carcinogenesis, premature aging, and neurodegeneration. Here, we identify WRAP53β as an essential regulator of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. WRAP53β rapidly localizes to DSBs in an ATM-, H2AX-, and MDC1-dependent manner. We show that WRAP53β targets the E3 ligase RNF8 to DNA lesions by facilitating the interaction between RNF8 and its upstream partner, MDC1, in response to DNA damage. Simultaneous binding of MDC1 and RNF8 to the highly conserved WD40 scaffold domain of WRAP53β facilitates their interaction and accumulation of RNF8 at DSBs. In this manner, WRAP53β controls proper ubiquitylation at DNA damage sites and the downstream assembly of 53BP1, BRCA1, and RAD51. Furthermore, we reveal that knockdown of WRAP53β impairs DSB repair by both homologous recombination (HR) and nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), causes accumulation of spontaneous DNA breaks, and delays recovery from radiation-induced cell cycle arrest. Our findings establish WRAP53β as a novel regulator of DSB repair by providing a scaffold for DNA repair factors. PMID:25512560

  5. DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit inhibitor reverses acquired radioresistance in lung adenocarcinoma by suppressing DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Li, Hang; Peng, Wen; He, Xin-Yun; Huang, Min; Qiu, Dong; Xue, Ying-Bo; Lu, Liang

    2015-07-01

    The mechanisms underlying lung cancer radioresistance remain to be fully elucidated. The DNA repair pathway is a predominant target of radiotherapy, which is considered to be involved in the acquired radioresistance of cancer cells. The present study aimed to establish a radioresistant cell model using the A549 human lung cancer cell line, and to further investigate the potential mechanisms underlying the radioresistance. The A549R radioresistant lung cancer cell variant was established by exposing the parental A549 cells to repeated γ-ray irradiation at a total dose of 60 Gy. Colony formation assays were then used to determine cell survival following γ-ray exposure. The established radioresistant cells were subsequently treated with or without the NU7026 DNA-PKcs inhibitor. The levels of DNA damage were determined by counting the number of fluorescent γ-H2AX foci in the cells. The cellular capacity for DNA repair was assessed using antibodies for the detection of various DNA repair pathway proteins. The radioresistant sub-clones exhibited significantly decreased survival following NU7026 treatment, compared with the parental cells, as determined by colony formation assays (P<0.05), and this finding was found to be dose-dependent. Treatment with the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) inhibitor significantly reduced γ-H2AX foci formation (P<0.05) following acute radiation exposure in the radioresistant sub-clones, compared with the parental control cells. The decreased levels of γ-H2AX were accompanied by an increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells in the radioresistant cell line following post-radiation treatment with the DNA-PKcs inhibitor. The expression levels of proteins associated with the DNA repair pathway were altered markedly in the cells treated with NU7026. The results of the present study suggested that radioresistance may be associated with enhanced DNA repair following exposure to radiation, resulting in reduced apoptosis. Therefore, the

  6. Protein repair L-isoaspartyl methyltransferase 1 (PIMT1) in rice improves seed longevity by preserving embryo vigor and viability.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yidong; Xu, Huibin; Diao, Lirong; Zhu, Yongsheng; Xie, Hongguang; Cai, Qiuhua; Wu, Fangxi; Wang, Zonghua; Zhang, Jianfu; Xie, Huaan

    2015-11-01

    Damaged proteins containing abnormal isoaspartyl (isoAsp) accumulate as seeds age and the abnormality is thought to undermine seed vigor. Protein-L-isoaspartyl methyltransferase (PIMT) is involved in isoAsp-containing protein repair. Two PIMT genes from rice (Oryza sativa L.), designated as OsPIMT1 and OsPIMT2, were isolated and investigated for their roles. The results indicated that OsPIMT2 was mainly present in green tissues, but OsPIMT1 largely accumulated in embryos. Confocal visualization of the transient expression of OsPIMTs showed that OsPIMT2 was localized in the chloroplast and nucleus, whereas OsPIMT1 was predominately found in the cytosol. Artificial aging results highlighted the sensitivity of the seeds of OsPIMT1 mutant line when subjected to accelerated aging. Overexpression of OsPIMT1 in transgenic seeds reduced the accumulation of isoAsp-containing protein in embryos, and increased embryo viability. The germination percentage of transgenic seeds overexpressing OsPIMT1 increased 9-15% compared to the WT seeds after 21-day of artificial aging, whereas seeds from the OsPIMT1 RNAi lines overaccumulated isoAsp in embryos and experienced rapid loss of seed germinability. Taken together, these data strongly indicated that OsPIMT1-related seed longevity improvement is probably due to the repair of detrimental isoAsp-containing proteins that over accumulate in embryos when subjected to accelerated aging. PMID:26438231

  7. Polymorphism of the DNA Base Excision Repair Genes in Keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Wojcik, Katarzyna A.; Synowiec, Ewelina; Sobierajczyk, Katarzyna; Izdebska, Justyna; Blasiak, Janusz; Szaflik, Jerzy; Szaflik, Jacek P.

    2014-01-01

    Keratoconus (KC) is a degenerative corneal disorder for which the exact pathogenesis is not yet known. Oxidative stress is reported to be associated with this disease. The stress may damage corneal biomolecules, including DNA, and such damage is primarily removed by base excision repair (BER). Variation in genes encoding BER components may influence the effectiveness of corneal cells to cope with oxidative stress. In the present work we genotyped 5 polymorphisms of 4 BER genes in 284 patients and 353 controls. The A/A genotype of the c.–1370T>A polymorphism of the DNA polymerase γ (POLG) gene was associated with increased occurrence of KC, while the A/T genotype was associated with decreased occurrence of KC. The A/G genotype and the A allele of the c.1196A>G polymorphism of the X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) were associated with increased, and the G/G genotype and the G allele, with decreased KC occurrence. Also, the C/T and T as well as C/C genotypes and alleles of the c.580C>T polymorphism of the same gene displayed relationship with KC occurrence. Neither the g.46438521G>C polymorphism of the Nei endonuclease VIII-like 1 (NEIL1) nor the c.2285T>C polymorphism of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) was associated with KC. In conclusion, the variability of the XRCC1 and POLG genes may play a role in KC pathogenesis and determine the risk of this disease. PMID:25356504

  8. Association between Genetic Polymorphisms of DNA Repair Genes and Chromosomal Damage for 1,3-Butadiene-Exposed Workers in a Matched Study in China

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Menglong; Sun, Lei; Dong, Xiaomei; Yang, Huan; Liu, Wen-bin; Zhou, Niya; Han, Xue; Zhou, Ziyuan; Cui, Zhihong; Liu, Jing-yi; Cao, Jia; Ao, Lin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the association between polymorphisms of DNA repair genes and chromosomal damage of 1,3-butadiene- (BD-) exposed workers. The study was conducted in 45 pairs of occupationally exposed workers in a BD product workshop and matched control workers in an administrative office and a circulatory water workshop in China. Newly developed biomarkers (micronuclei, MNi; nucleoplasmic bridges, NPBs; nuclear buds, NBUDs) in the cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus (CBMN) cytome assay were adopted to detect chromosomal damage. PCR and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) are adopted to analyze polymorphisms of DNA repair genes, such as X-ray repair cross-complementing Group 1 (XRCC1), O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerases (ADPRT), and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonucleases (APE1). The BD-exposed workers exhibited increased frequencies of MNi and NPBs when compared to subjects in the control group. The results also show that the BD-exposed workers carrying XRCC1 diplotypes TCGA-CCGG (4.25 ± 2.06‰) (FR = 2.10, 95% CI: 1.03–4.28) and TCGG-TCGA (5.80 ± 3.56‰) (FR = 2.75, 95% CI: 0.76–2.65) had statistically higher NBUD frequencies than those who carried diplotype TCGG-TCGG (1.89 ± 1.27‰). Our study suggests that polymorphisms of XRCC1 gene may influence chromosomal damage in BD-exposed workers. PMID:26339595

  9. Non-covalent interactions between ATP and RecA DNA-repairing proteins: DFT and semiempirical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Jorge

    2015-03-01

    The role of Bacterial RecA in the structural maintenance of genomes and the genetic information they carry has been established. In particular, the RecA DNA-repairing protein from D. Radiodurans, a radiation-resistant bacteria, is crucial for the repair of double strand breaks (DSBs). We have performed semi-empirical free-energy calculations and QM/MM calculations to study their non-covalent interactions with ATP and ADP. Such studies provide insight into the mechanisms of ATP/ADP --> RecA energy transfer and, therefore, about specific functional uses of incoming energy for DNA repairing mechanisms. We present a detailed analysis of the non-covalent interactions which minimize the interaction Gibbs free energies leading to the most stable non-covalent binding sites. Van der Waal, hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions has been quantified which provides a detailed insight into the mechanisms of ATP-RecA interaction. Further, possible chemical interactions and functional roles of RecA proteins are explored based on the previously mentioned studies. Acknowledgements: Funded, in part, by DTRA award 106339 (JHR). Dr. Mark C. Palenik and Mrs. Lora Beard are gratefully acknowledged Supported in part by DTRA Award 106339.

  10. ATM protein is indispensable to repair complex-type DNA double strand breaks induced by high LET heavy ion irradiation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Emiko; Yu, Dong; Fujimori, Akira; Anzai, Kazunori; Okayasu, Ryuichi

    ATM (ataxia telangiectasia-mutated) protein responsible for a rare genetic disease with hyperradiosensitivity, is the one of the earliest repair proteins sensing DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). ATM is known to phosphorylate DNA repair proteins such as MRN complex (Mre11, Rad50 and NBS1), 53BP1, Artemis, Brca1, gamma-H2AX, and MDC. We studied the interactions between ATM and DNA-PKcs, a crucial NHEJ repair protein, after cells exposure to high and low LET irradiation. Normal human (HFL III, MRC5VA) and AT homozygote (AT2KY, AT5BIVA, AT3BIVA) cells were irradiated with X-rays and high LET radiation (carbon ions: 290MeV/n initial energy at 70 keV/um, and iron ions: 500MeV/n initial energy at 200KeV/um), and several critical end points were examined. AT cells with high LET irradiation showed a significantly higher radiosensitivity when compared with normal cells. The behavior of DNA DSB repair was monitored by immuno-fluorescence techniques using DNA-PKcs (pThr2609, pSer2056) and ATM (pSer1981) antibodies. In normal cells, the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs was clearly detected after high LET irradiation, though the peak of phosphorylation was delayed when compared to X-irradiation. In contrast, almost no DNA-PKcs phosphorylation foci were detected in AT cells irradiated with high LET radiation. A similar result was also observed in normal cells treated with 10 uM ATM kinase specific inhibitor (KU55933) one hour before irradiation. These data suggest that the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs with low LET X-rays is mostly ATM-independent, and the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs with high LET radiation seems to require ATM probably due to its complex nature of DSB induced. Our study indicates that high LET heavy ion irradiation which we can observe in the space environment would provide a useful tool to study the fundamental mechanism associated with DNA DSB repair.

  11. Controlled degradation by ClpXP protease tunes the levels of the excision repair protein UvrA to the extent of DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Pruteanu, Mihaela; Baker, Tania A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary UV-irradiation damages DNA and activates expression of genes encoding proteins helpful for survival under DNA stress. These proteins are often deleterious in the absence of DNA damage. Here, we investigate mechanisms used to regulate the levels of DNA-repair proteins during recovery by studying control of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) protein UvrA. We show that UvrA is induced after UV-irradiation and reaches maximum levels between ~20 to 120 min post-UV. During post-UV recovery, UvrA levels decrease principally as a result of ClpXP-dependent protein degradation. The rate of UvrA degradation depends on the amount of unrepaired pyrimidine dimers present; this degradation rate is initially slow shortly after UV, but increases as damage is repaired. This increase in UvrA degradation as repair progresses is also influenced by protein-protein interactions. Genetic and in vitro experiments support the conclusion that UvrA-UvrB interactions antagonize degradation. In contrast, Mfd appears to act as an enhancer of UvrA turnover. Thus, our results reveal that a complex network of interactions contribute to tuning the level of UvrA in the cell in response to the extent of DNA damage and nicely mirror findings with excision repair proteins from eukaryotes, which are controlled by proteolysis in a similar manner. PMID:19183285

  12. Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes, smoking, and pancreatic adenocarcinoma risk.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, Robert R; Bamlet, William R; Cunningham, Julie M; Goode, Ellen L; de Andrade, Mariza; Boardman, Lisa A; Petersen, Gloria M

    2008-06-15

    Base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair are vital responses to multiple types of DNA damage, including damage from tobacco exposure. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in these pathways may affect DNA repair capacity and therefore influence risk for cancer development. We performed a clinic-based, case-control study comprising 481 consecutive patients with confirmed pancreatic adenocarcinoma and 625 healthy controls. Allele and genotype frequencies for 16 SNPs in DNA repair genes ERCC1, XPD/ERCC2, XPC, XPF/ERCC4, OGG1, and XRCC1 were compared after adjusting for age, sex, and smoking history. Subgroup analysis by sex and smoking history was performed. Carriers of one or two XPF/ERCC4 minor alleles at R415Q had decreased risk of pancreatic adenocarcinoma compared with those who had two major alleles [odds ratio (OR), 0.59; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.40-0.85]. Heavy smokers (>40 pack-years) had increased risk for cancer if they were carriers of at least one minor allele for XPD/ERCC2 at D312N (OR, 2.78; 95% CI, 1.28-6.04) or D711D (OR, 2.19; 95% CI, 1.01-4.73). No other significant differences in risk were identified. Minor alleles in DNA repair genes XPF/ERCC4 and XPD/ERCC2 were associated with altered risk for pancreatic cancer. PMID:18544627

  13. Histone chaperone activity of Fanconi anemia proteins, FANCD2 and FANCI, is required for DNA crosslink repair

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Koichi; Ishiai, Masamichi; Toda, Kazue; Furukoshi, Satoshi; Osakabe, Akihisa; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Takizawa, Yoshimasa; Kagawa, Wataru; Kitao, Hiroyuki; Dohmae, Naoshi; Obuse, Chikashi; Kimura, Hiroshi; Takata, Minoru; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2012-01-01

    Fanconi anaemia (FA) is a rare hereditary disorder characterized by genomic instability and cancer susceptibility. A key FA protein, FANCD2, is targeted to chromatin with its partner, FANCI, and plays a critical role in DNA crosslink repair. However, the molecular function of chromatin-bound FANCD2-FANCI is still poorly understood. In the present study, we found that FANCD2 possesses nucleosome-assembly activity in vitro. The mobility of histone H3 was reduced in FANCD2-knockdown cells following treatment with an interstrand DNA crosslinker, mitomycin C. Furthermore, cells harbouring FANCD2 mutations that were defective in nucleosome assembly displayed impaired survival upon cisplatin treatment. Although FANCI by itself lacked nucleosome-assembly activity, it significantly stimulated FANCD2-mediated nucleosome assembly. These observations suggest that FANCD2-FANCI may regulate chromatin dynamics during DNA repair. PMID:22828868

  14. The Role of Slr0151, a Tetratricopeptide Repeat Protein from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, during Photosystem II Assembly and Repair.

    PubMed

    Rast, Anna; Rengstl, Birgit; Heinz, Steffen; Klingl, Andreas; Nickelsen, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    The assembly and repair of photosystem II (PSII) is facilitated by a variety of assembly factors. Among those, the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) protein Slr0151 from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (hereafter Synechocystis) has previously been assigned a repair function under high light conditions (Yang et al., 2014). Here, we show that inactivation of slr0151 affects thylakoid membrane ultrastructure even under normal light conditions. Moreover, the level and localization of Slr0151 are affected in a variety of PSII-related mutants. In particular, the data suggest a close functional relationship between Slr0151 and Sll0933, which interacts with Ycf48 during PSII assembly and is homologous to PAM68 in Arabidopsis thaliana. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed a punctate distribution of Slr0151 within several different membrane types in Synechocystis cells. PMID:27200072

  15. The Role of Slr0151, a Tetratricopeptide Repeat Protein from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, during Photosystem II Assembly and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Rast, Anna; Rengstl, Birgit; Heinz, Steffen; Klingl, Andreas; Nickelsen, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    The assembly and repair of photosystem II (PSII) is facilitated by a variety of assembly factors. Among those, the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) protein Slr0151 from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (hereafter Synechocystis) has previously been assigned a repair function under high light conditions (Yang et al., 2014). Here, we show that inactivation of slr0151 affects thylakoid membrane ultrastructure even under normal light conditions. Moreover, the level and localization of Slr0151 are affected in a variety of PSII-related mutants. In particular, the data suggest a close functional relationship between Slr0151 and Sll0933, which interacts with Ycf48 during PSII assembly and is homologous to PAM68 in Arabidopsis thaliana. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed a punctate distribution of Slr0151 within several different membrane types in Synechocystis cells. PMID:27200072

  16. A Human Orthologue of Archaeal DNA Repair Protein Hef is Defective in Fanconi Anemia Complementation Group M

    PubMed Central

    Meetei, Amom Ruhikanta; Medhurst, Annette L.; Ling, Chen; Xue, Yutong; Singh, Thiyam Ramsing; Bier, Patrick; Steltenpool, Jurgen; Stone, Stacie; Dokal, Inderjeet; Mathew, Christopher G.; Hoatlin, Maureen; Joenje, Hans; de Winter, Johan P.; Wang, Weidong

    2005-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetic disease featuring genomic instability and cancer predisposition1. Nine FA genes have been identified, and their products participate in a DNA damage response network involving BRCA1 and BRCA22,3. We have previously purified a FA core complex containing the FANCL ubiquitin ligase and 6 other FA proteins4–6. Each protein in this complex is essential for monoubiquitination of FANCD2, a key reaction in the FA DNA damage response pathway2,7. Here we show that another component of this complex, FAAP250, is mutated in FA patients of a new complementation group (FA-M). FAAP250, renamed FANCM, has sequence similarity to known DNA repair proteins, including archaeal Hef, yeast Mph1 and human ERCC4/XPF. FANCM can dissociate DNA triplex, possibly due to its ability to translocate on duplex DNA. FANCM is essential for FANCD2 monoubiquitination and becomes hyperphosphorylated in response to DNA damage. Our data suggest an evolutionary link between FA proteins and DNA repair; FANCM may act as an engine that translocates the FA core complex along DNA. PMID:16116422

  17. Repair of chromosomal RAG-mediated DNA breaks by mutant RAG proteins lacking phosphatidylinositol 3-like kinase consensus phosphorylation sites.

    PubMed

    Gapud, Eric J; Lee, Baeck-Seung; Mahowald, Grace K; Bassing, Craig H; Sleckman, Barry P

    2011-08-15

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunits (DNA-PKcs) are members of the phosphatidylinositol 3-like family of serine/threonine kinases that phosphorylate serines or threonines when positioned adjacent to a glutamine residue (SQ/TQ). Both kinases are activated rapidly by DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and regulate the function of proteins involved in DNA damage responses. In developing lymphocytes, DSBs are generated during V(D)J recombination, which is required to assemble the second exon of all Ag receptor genes. This reaction is initiated through a DNA cleavage step by the RAG1 and RAG2 proteins, which together comprise an endonuclease that generates DSBs at the border of two recombining gene segments and their flanking recombination signals. This DNA cleavage step is followed by a joining step, during which pairs of DNA coding and signal ends are ligated to form a coding joint and a signal joint, respectively. ATM and DNA-PKcs are integrally involved in the repair of both signal and coding ends, but the targets of these kinases involved in the repair process have not been fully elucidated. In this regard, the RAG1 and RAG2 proteins, which each have several SQ/TQ motifs, have been implicated in the repair of RAG-mediated DSBs. In this study, we use a previously developed approach for studying chromosomal V(D)J recombination that has been modified to allow for the analysis of RAG1 and RAG2 function. We show that phosphorylation of RAG1 or RAG2 by ATM or DNA-PKcs at SQ/TQ consensus sites is dispensable for the joining step of V(D)J recombination. PMID:21742970

  18. Live cell imaging combined with high-energy single-ion microbeam.

    PubMed

    Guo, Na; Du, Guanghua; Liu, Wenjing; Guo, Jinlong; Wu, Ruqun; Chen, Hao; Wei, Junzhe

    2016-03-01

    DNA strand breaks can lead to cell carcinogenesis or cell death if not repaired rapidly and efficiently. An online live cell imaging system was established at the high energy microbeam facility at the Institute of Modern Physics to study early and fast cellular response to DNA damage after high linear energy transfer ion radiation. The HT1080 cells expressing XRCC1-RFP were irradiated with single high energy nickel ions, and time-lapse images of the irradiated cells were obtained online. The live cell imaging analysis shows that strand-break repair protein XRCC1 was recruited to the ion hit position within 20 s in the cells and formed bright foci in the cell nucleus. The fast recruitment of XRCC1 at the ion hits reached a maximum at about 200 s post-irradiation and then was followed by a slower release into the nucleoplasm. The measured dual-exponential kinetics of XRCC1 protein are consistent with the proposed consecutive reaction model, and the measurements obtained that the reaction rate constant of the XRCC1 recruitment to DNA strand break is 1.2 × 10(-3) s(-1) and the reaction rate constant of the XRCC1 release from the break-XRCC1 complex is 1.2 × 10(-2) s(-1). PMID:27036791

  19. Live cell imaging combined with high-energy single-ion microbeam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Na; Du, Guanghua; Liu, Wenjing; Guo, Jinlong; Wu, Ruqun; Chen, Hao; Wei, Junzhe

    2016-03-01

    DNA strand breaks can lead to cell carcinogenesis or cell death if not repaired rapidly and efficiently. An online live cell imaging system was established at the high energy microbeam facility at the Institute of Modern Physics to study early and fast cellular response to DNA damage after high linear energy transfer ion radiation. The HT1080 cells expressing XRCC1-RFP were irradiated with single high energy nickel ions, and time-lapse images of the irradiated cells were obtained online. The live cell imaging analysis shows that strand-break repair protein XRCC1 was recruited to the ion hit position within 20 s in the cells and formed bright foci in the cell nucleus. The fast recruitment of XRCC1 at the ion hits reached a maximum at about 200 s post-irradiation and then was followed by a slower release into the nucleoplasm. The measured dual-exponential kinetics of XRCC1 protein are consistent with the proposed consecutive reaction model, and the measurements obtained that the reaction rate constant of the XRCC1 recruitment to DNA strand break is 1.2 × 10-3 s-1 and the reaction rate constant of the XRCC1 release from the break-XRCC1 complex is 1.2 × 10-2 s-1.

  20. Complex formation by the human Rad51B and Rad51C DNA repair proteins and their activities in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lio, Yi-Ching; Mazin, Alexander V.; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.; Chen, David J.

    2003-01-01

    The human Rad51 protein is essential for DNA repair by homologous recombination. In addition to Rad51 protein, five paralogs have been identified: Rad51B/Rad51L1, Rad51C/Rad51L2, Rad51D/Rad51L3, XRCC2, and XRCC3. To further characterize a subset of these proteins, recombinant Rad51, Rad51B-(His)(6), and Rad51C proteins were individually expressed employing the baculovirus system, and each was purified from Sf9 insect cells. Evidence from nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid pull-down experiments demonstrates a highly stable Rad51B.Rad51C heterodimer, which interacts weakly with Rad51. Rad51B and Rad51C proteins were found to bind single- and double-stranded DNA and to preferentially bind 3'-end-tailed double-stranded DNA. The ability to bind DNA was elevated with mixed Rad51 and Rad51C, as well as with mixed Rad51B and Rad51C, compared with that of the individual protein. In addition, both Rad51B and Rad51C exhibit DNA-stimulated ATPase activity. Rad51C displays an ATP-independent apparent DNA strand exchange activity, whereas Rad51B shows no such activity; this apparent strand exchange ability results actually from a duplex DNA destabilization capability of Rad51C. By analogy to the yeast Rad55 and Rad57, our results suggest that Rad51B and Rad51C function through interactions with the human Rad51 recombinase and play a crucial role in the homologous recombinational repair pathway.

  1. MET1 Is a Thylakoid-Associated TPR Protein Involved in Photosystem II Supercomplex Formation and Repair in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Bhuiyan, Nazmul H.; Friso, Giulia; Poliakov, Anton; Ponnala, Lalit

    2015-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) requires constant disassembly and reassembly to accommodate replacement of the D1 protein. Here, we characterize Arabidopsis thaliana MET1, a PSII assembly factor with PDZ and TPR domains. The maize (Zea mays) MET1 homolog is enriched in mesophyll chloroplasts compared with bundle sheath chloroplasts, and MET1 mRNA and protein levels increase during leaf development concomitant with the thylakoid machinery. MET1 is conserved in C3 and C4 plants and green algae but is not found in prokaryotes. Arabidopsis MET1 is a peripheral thylakoid protein enriched in stroma lamellae and is also present in grana. Split-ubiquitin assays and coimmunoprecipitations showed interaction of MET1 with stromal loops of PSII core components CP43 and CP47. From native gels, we inferred that MET1 associates with PSII subcomplexes formed during the PSII repair cycle. When grown under fluctuating light intensities, the Arabidopsis MET1 null mutant (met1) showed conditional reduced growth, near complete blockage in PSII supercomplex formation, and concomitant increase of unassembled CP43. Growth of met1 in high light resulted in loss of PSII supercomplexes and accelerated D1 degradation. We propose that MET1 functions as a CP43/CP47 chaperone on the stromal side of the membrane during PSII assembly and repair. This function is consistent with the observed differential MET1 accumulation across dimorphic maize chloroplasts. PMID:25587003

  2. Genome-Wide Identification and 3D Modeling of Proteins involved in DNA Damage Recognition and Repair (Final Report)

    SciTech Connect

    Abagyan, Ruben; An, Jianghong

    2005-08-12

    DNA Damage Recognition and Repair (DDR&R) proteins play a critical role in cellular responses to low-dose radiation and are associated with cancer. We have performed a systematic, genome-wide computational analysis of genomic data for human genes involved in the DDR&R process. The significant achievements of this project include: 1) Construction of the computational pipeline for searching DDR&R genes, building and validation of 3D models of proteins involved in DDR&R; 2) Functional and structural annotation of the 3D models and generation of comprehensive lists of suggested knock-out mutations; and the development of a method to predict the effects of mutations. Large scale testing of technology to identify novel small binding pockets in protein structures leading to new DDRR inhibitor strategies 3) Improvements of macromolecular docking technology (see the CAPRI 1-3 and 4-5 results) 4) Development of a new algorithm for improved analysis of high-density oligonucleotide arrays for gene expression profiling; 5) Construction and maintenance of the DNA Damage Recognition and Repair Database; 6) Producing 15 research papers (12 published and 3 in preparation).

  3. Many amino acid substitution variants identified in DNA repair genes during human population screenings are predicted to impact protein function

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, T; Jones, I M; Mohrenweiser, H W

    2003-11-03

    Over 520 different amino acid substitution variants have been previously identified in the systematic screening of 91 human DNA repair genes for sequence variation. Two algorithms were employed to predict the impact of these amino acid substitutions on protein activity. Sorting Intolerant From Tolerant (SIFT) classified 226 of 508 variants (44%) as ''Intolerant''. Polymorphism Phenotyping (PolyPhen) classed 165 of 489 amino acid substitutions (34%) as ''Probably or Possibly Damaging''. Another 9-15% of the variants were classed as ''Potentially Intolerant or Damaging''. The results from the two algorithms are highly associated, with concordance in predicted impact observed for {approx}62% of the variants. Twenty one to thirty one percent of the variant proteins are predicted to exhibit reduced activity by both algorithms. These variants occur at slightly lower individual allele frequency than do the variants classified as ''Tolerant'' or ''Benign''. Both algorithms correctly predicted the impact of 26 functionally characterized amino acid substitutions in the APE1 protein on biochemical activity, with one exception. It is concluded that a substantial fraction of the missense variants observed in the general human population are functionally relevant. These variants are expected to be the molecular genetic and biochemical basis for the associations of reduced DNA repair capacity phenotypes with elevated cancer risk.

  4. Genome-Wide Identification and 3D Modeling of Proteins involved in DNA Damage Recognition and Repair (Final Report)

    SciTech Connect

    Ruben A. Abagyan, PhD

    2004-04-15

    OAK-B135 DNA Damage Recognition and Repair (DDR and R) proteins play a critical role in cellular responses to low-dose radiation and are associated with cancer. the authors have performed a systematic, genome-wide computational analysis of genomic data for human genes involved in the DDR and R process. The significant achievements of this project include: (1) Construction of the computational pipeline for searching DDR and R genes, building and validation of 3D models of proteins involved in DDR and R; (2) Functional and structural annotation of the 3D models and generation of comprehensive lists of suggested knock-out mutations; (3) Important improvement of macromolecular docking technology and its application to predict the DNA-Protein complex conformation; (4) Development of a new algorithm for improved analysis of high-density oligonucleotide arrays for gene expression profiling; (5) Construction and maintenance of the DNA Damage Recognition and Repair Database; and (6) Producing 14 research papers (10 published and 4 in preparation).

  5. [Comparison between gene therapy and gradual release carrier for bone morphogenetic protein-2 in repairing bone defects].

    PubMed

    Li, Jianjun; Bai, Lunhao; Cui, Shaoqian; Wang, Huan; Xu, Xinxiang

    2007-06-01

    To compare the effects between gene therapy and gradual release carrier for bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) in repairing bone defects, bone defects for 15 mm were created.on the bilateral radius in rabbits and treated with four kinds of implantations, ie, composite of transgeneic MSCs and PLA/PCL (Group A), composite of MSCs and gradual release carrier for BMP-2 (Group B), composite of MSCs and PLA/PCL (Group C), and PLA/PCL alone (Group D). After 4, 8, and 12 weeks of the operations, X-ray, histological examination, biomechanics analysis, and bone density measurement were conducted. Results showed that both osteoblasts and mesenchymal cells displayed strongly positive expression of BMP-2 in Group A after 4 weeks of the operation, the speed and quality of bone formation in Group A were much better than those in Group B. After 12 weeks of the operations, bone defects were completely repaired in Group A. BMP-2 gene therapy is really a good method to repair segmental bone defects. PMID:17713285

  6. KIAA1530 protein is recruited by Cockayne syndrome complementation group protein A (CSA) to participate in transcription-coupled repair (TCR).

    PubMed

    Fei, Jia; Chen, Junjie

    2012-10-12

    Transcription-coupled repair (TCR) is the major pathway involved in the removal of UV-induced photolesions from the transcribed strand of active genes. Two Cockayne syndrome (CS) complementation group proteins, CSA and CSB, are important for TCR repair. The molecular mechanisms by which CS proteins regulate TCR remain elusive. Here, we report the characterization of KIAA1530, an evolutionarily conserved protein that participates in this pathway through its interaction with CSA and the TFIIH complex. We found that UV irradiation led to the recruitment of KIAA1530 onto chromatin in a CSA-dependent manner. Cells lacking KIAA1530 were highly sensitive to UV irradiation and displayed deficiency in TCR. In addition, KIAA1530 depletion abrogated stability of the CSB protein following UV irradiation. More excitingly, we found that a unique CSA mutant (W361C), which was previously identified in a patient with UV(s)S syndrome, showed defective KIAA1530 binding and resulted in a failure of recruiting KIAA1530 and stabilizing CSB after UV treatment. Together, our data not only reveal that KIAA1530 is an important player in TCR but also lead to a better understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying UV(s)S syndrome. PMID:22902626

  7. KIAA1530 Protein Is Recruited by Cockayne Syndrome Complementation Group Protein A (CSA) to Participate in Transcription-coupled Repair (TCR)

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Jia; Chen, Junjie

    2012-01-01

    Transcription-coupled repair (TCR) is the major pathway involved in the removal of UV-induced photolesions from the transcribed strand of active genes. Two Cockayne syndrome (CS) complementation group proteins, CSA and CSB, are important for TCR repair. The molecular mechanisms by which CS proteins regulate TCR remain elusive. Here, we report the characterization of KIAA1530, an evolutionarily conserved protein that participates in this pathway through its interaction with CSA and the TFIIH complex. We found that UV irradiation led to the recruitment of KIAA1530 onto chromatin in a CSA-dependent manner. Cells lacking KIAA1530 were highly sensitive to UV irradiation and displayed deficiency in TCR. In addition, KIAA1530 depletion abrogated stability of the CSB protein following UV irradiation. More excitingly, we found that a unique CSA mutant (W361C), which was previously identified in a patient with UVsS syndrome, showed defective KIAA1530 binding and resulted in a failure of recruiting KIAA1530 and stabilizing CSB after UV treatment. Together, our data not only reveal that KIAA1530 is an important player in TCR but also lead to a better understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying UVsS syndrome. PMID:22902626

  8. Genetic analysis of repair and damage tolerance mechanisms for DNA-protein cross-links in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Salem, Amir M H; Nakano, Toshiaki; Takuwa, Minako; Matoba, Nagisa; Tsuboi, Tomohiro; Terato, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Yamada, Masami; Nohmi, Takehiko; Ide, Hiroshi

    2009-09-01

    DNA-protein cross-links (DPCs) are unique among DNA lesions in their unusually bulky nature. We have recently shown that nucleotide excision repair (NER) and RecBCD-dependent homologous recombination (HR) collaboratively alleviate the lethal effect of DPCs in Escherichia coli. In this study, to gain further insight into the damage-processing mechanism for DPCs, we assessed the sensitivities of a panel of repair-deficient E. coli mutants to DPC-inducing agents, including formaldehyde (FA) and 5-azacytidine (azaC). We show here that the damage tolerance mechanism involving HR and subsequent replication restart (RR) provides the most effective means of cell survival against DPCs. Translesion synthesis does not serve as an alternative damage tolerance mechanism for DPCs in cell survival. Elimination of DPCs from the genome relies primarily on NER, which provides a second and moderately effective means of cell survival against DPCs. Interestingly, Cho rather than UvrC seems to be an effective nuclease for the NER of DPCs. Together with the genes responsible for HR, RR, and NER, the mutation of genes involved in several aspects of DNA repair and transactions, such as recQ, xth nfo, dksA, and topA, rendered cells slightly but significantly sensitive to FA but not azaC, possibly reflecting the complexity of DPCs or cryptic lesions induced by FA. UvrD may have an additional role outside NER, since the uvrD mutation conferred a slight azaC sensitivity on cells. Finally, DNA glycosylases mitigate azaC toxicity, independently of the repair of DPCs, presumably by removing 5-azacytosine or its degradation product from the chromosome. PMID:19617358

  9. The role of AlkB protein in repair of 1,N⁶-ethenoadenine in Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Maciejewska, Agnieszka M; Sokołowska, Beata; Nowicki, Adam; Kuśmierek, Jarosław T

    2011-05-01

    Etheno (ε) DNA adducts, including 1,N(6)-ethenoadenine (εA), are formed by various bifunctional agents of exogenous and endogenous origin. The AT→TA transversion, the most frequent mutation provoked by the presence of εA in DNA, is very common in critical codons of the TP53 and RAS genes in tumours induced by exposure to carcinogenic vinyl compounds. Here, using a method that allows examination of the mutagenic potency of a metabolite of vinyl chloride, chloroacetaldehyde (CAA), but eliminates its cytotoxicity, we studied the participation of alkA, alkB and mug gene products in the repair of εA in Escherichia coli cells. The test system used comprised the pIF105 plasmid bearing the lactose operon of CC105 origin, which allowed monitoring of Lac(+) revertants that arose by AT→TA substitutions due to the modification of adenine by CAA. The plasmid was CAA-modified in vitro and replicated in E.coli of various genetic backgrounds (wt, alkA, alkB, mug, alkAalkB, alkAmug and alkBmug). To modify the levels of the AlkA and AlkB proteins, mutagenesis was studied in E.coli cells induced or not in adaptive response to alkylating agents. Considering the levels of CAA-induced Lac(+) revertants in strains harbouring the CAA-modified pIF105 plasmid and induced or not in adaptive response, we conclude that the AlkB dioxygenase plays a major role in decreasing the level of AT→TA mutations, thus in the repair of εA in E.coli cells. The observed differences of mutation frequencies in the various mutant strains assayed indicate that Mug glycosylase is also engaged in the repair of εA, whereas the role the AlkA glycosylase in this repair is negligible. PMID:21193516

  10. Pharmacogenetics of the DNA repair pathways in advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with platinum-based chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Ivana; Salazar, Juliana; Majem, Margarita; Pallarés, Cinta; Del Río, Elisabeth; Páez, David; Baiget, Montserrat; Barnadas, Agustí

    2014-10-28

    Genetic variants in DNA repair genes may play a role in the effectiveness of platinum-based chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We analyzed 17 SNPs in eight genes (ERCC1, ERCC2, ERCC3, ERCC4, ERCC5, XPA, XRCC1 and XRCC2) involved in DNA repair mechanisms and its association with outcome in NSCLC. This prospective study included patients with stages III and IV treated with platinum-based chemotherapy. All patients (n = 161) received cisplatin or carboplatin plus a third-generation drug. Additionally, stage IIIA and IIIB patients (n = 74) received concomitant or sequential radiotherapy. Germline polymorphisms were analyzed using the BioMark system in blood DNA samples. We found that in stage III patients, response was significantly associated with SNPs in ERCC1 and in ERCC3 genes, while radiotherapy-derived toxicity correlated with SNPs in the ERCC2 gene. In stage IV patients, response was associated with a genetic variant in the ERCC4 gene and survival with a SNP in the XRCC1 gene. The complexity of the DNA repair mechanisms along with the heterogeneity in the treatment of lung cancer could explain the role of multiple genes as putative biomarkers of patient outcome. PMID:25069034

  11. A Role for the Malignant Brain Tumour (MBT) Domain Protein LIN-61 in DNA Double-Strand Break Repair by Homologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Nicholas M.; Lemmens, Bennie B. L. G.; Tijsterman, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Malignant brain tumour (MBT) domain proteins are transcriptional repressors that function within Polycomb complexes. Some MBT genes are tumour suppressors, but how they prevent tumourigenesis is unknown. The Caenorhabditis elegans MBT protein LIN-61 is a member of the synMuvB chromatin-remodelling proteins that control vulval development. Here we report a new role for LIN-61: it protects the genome by promoting homologous recombination (HR) for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). lin-61 mutants manifest numerous problems associated with defective HR in germ and somatic cells but remain proficient in meiotic recombination. They are hypersensitive to ionizing radiation and interstrand crosslinks but not UV light. Using a novel reporter system that monitors repair of a defined DSB in C. elegans somatic cells, we show that LIN-61 contributes to HR. The involvement of this MBT protein in HR raises the possibility that MBT–deficient tumours may also have defective DSB repair. PMID:23505385

  12. Redox Control of the Human Iron-Sulfur Repair Protein MitoNEET Activity via Its Iron-Sulfur Cluster.

    PubMed

    Golinelli-Cohen, Marie-Pierre; Lescop, Ewen; Mons, Cécile; Gonçalves, Sergio; Clémancey, Martin; Santolini, Jérôme; Guittet, Eric; Blondin, Geneviève; Latour, Jean-Marc; Bouton, Cécile

    2016-04-01

    Human mitoNEET (mNT) is the first identified Fe-S protein of the mammalian outer mitochondrial membrane. Recently, mNT has been implicated in cytosolic Fe-S repair of a key regulator of cellular iron homeostasis. Here, we aimed to decipher the mechanism by which mNT triggers its Fe-S repair capacity. By using tightly controlled reactions combined with complementary spectroscopic approaches, we have determined the differential roles played by both the redox state of the mNT cluster and dioxygen in cluster transfer and protein stability. We unambiguously demonstrated that only the oxidized state of the mNT cluster triggers cluster transfer to a generic acceptor protein and that dioxygen is neither required for the cluster transfer reaction nor does it affect the transfer rate. In the absence of apo-acceptors, a large fraction of the oxidized holo-mNT form is converted back to reduced holo-mNT under low oxygen tension. Reduced holo-mNT, which holds a [2Fe-2S](+)with a global protein fold similar to that of the oxidized form is, by contrast, resistant in losing its cluster or in transferring it. Our findings thus demonstrate that mNT uses an iron-based redox switch mechanism to regulate the transfer of its cluster. The oxidized state is the "active state," which reacts promptly to initiate Fe-S transfer independently of dioxygen, whereas the reduced state is a "dormant form." Finally, we propose that the redox-sensing function of mNT is a key component of the cellular adaptive response to help stress-sensitive Fe-S proteins recover from oxidative injury. PMID:26887944

  13. Geometry of a complex formed by double strand break repair proteins at a single DNA end: recruitment of DNA-PKcs induces inward translocation of Ku protein.

    PubMed

    Yoo, S; Dynan, W S

    1999-12-15

    Ku protein and the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) are essential components of the double-strand break repair machinery in higher eukaryotic cells. Ku protein binds to broken DNA ends and recruits DNA-PKcs to form an enzymatically active complex. To characterize the arrangement of proteins in this complex, we developed a set of photocross-linking probes, each with a single free end. We have previously used this approach to characterize the contacts in an initial Ku-DNA complex, and we have now applied the same technology to define the events that occur when Ku recruits DNA-PKcs. The new probes allow the binding of one molecule of Ku protein and one molecule of DNA-PKcs in a defined position and orientation. Photocross-linking reveals that DNA-PKcs makes direct contact with the DNA termini, occupying an approximately 10 bp region proximal to the free end. Characterization of the Ku protein cross-linking pattern in the presence and absence of DNA-PKcs suggests that Ku binds to form an initial complex at the DNA ends, and that recruitment of DNA-PKcs induces an inward translocation of this Ku molecule by about one helical turn. The presence of ATP had no effect on protein-DNA contacts, suggesting that neither DNA-PK-mediated phosphorylation nor a putative Ku helicase activity plays a role in modulating protein conformation under the conditions tested. PMID:10572166

  14. Isolation and Characterization of Two Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Genes Encoding Homologs of the Bacterial Hexa and Muts Mismatch Repair Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Reenan, R. A.; Kolodner, R. D.

    1992-01-01

    Homologs of the Escherichia coli (mutL, S and uvrD) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (hexA, B) genes involved in mismatch repair are known in several distantly related organisms. Degenerate oligonucleotide primers based on conserved regions of E. coli MutS protein and its homologs from Salmonella typhimurium, S. pneumoniae and human were used in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify and clone mutS/hexA homologs from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Two DNA sequences were amplified whose deduced amino acid sequences both shared a high degree of homology with MutS. These sequences were then used to clone the full-length genes from a yeast genomic library. Sequence analysis of the two MSH genes (MSH = mutS homolog), MSH1 and MSH2, revealed open reading frames of 2877 bp and 2898 bp. The deduced amino acid sequences predict polypeptides of 109.3 kD and 109.1 kD, respectively. The overall amino acid sequence identity with the E. coli MutS protein is 28.6% for MSH1 and 25.2% for MSH2. Features previously found to be shared by MutS homologs, such as the nucleotide binding site and the helix-turn-helix DNA binding motif as well as other highly conserved regions whose function remain unknown, were also found in the two yeast homologs. Evidence presented in this and a companion study suggest that MSH1 is involved in repair of mitochondrial DNA and that MSH2 is involved in nuclear DNA repair. PMID:1459447

  15. Structural Basis for Bulky-Adduct DNA-Lesion Recognition by the Nucleotide Excision Repair Protein Rad14.

    PubMed

    Simon, Nina; Ebert, Charlotte; Schneider, Sabine

    2016-07-25

    Heterocyclic aromatic amines react with purine bases and result in bulky DNA adducts that cause mutations. Such structurally diverse lesions are substrates for the nucleotide excision repair (NER). It is thought that the NER machinery recognises and verifies distorted DNA conformations, also involving the xeroderma pigmentosum group A and C proteins (XPA, XPC) that act as a scaffold between the DNA substrate and several other NER proteins. Here we present the synthesis of DNA molecules containing the polycyclic, aromatic amine C8-guanine lesions acetylaminophenyl, acetylaminonaphthyl, acetylaminoanthryl, and acetylaminopyrenyl, as well as their crystal structures in complex with the yeast XPA homologue Rad14. This work further substantiates the indirect lesion-detection mechanism employed by the NER system that recognises destabilised and deformable DNA structures. PMID:27223336

  16. The effect of acute dose charge particle radiation on expression of DNA repair genes in mice.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Muhammad Akram; Soedipe, Ayodotun; Ramesh, Govindarajan; Wu, Honglu; Zhang, Ye; Shishodia, Shishir; Gridley, Daila S; Pourmand, Nader; Jejelowo, Olufisayo

    2011-03-01

    The space radiation environment consists of trapped particle radiation, solar particle radiation, and galactic cosmic radiation (GCR), in which protons are the most abundant particle type. During missions to the moon or to Mars, the constant exposure to GCR and occasional exposure to particles emitted from solar particle events (SPE) are major health concerns for astronauts. Therefore, in order to determine health risks during space missions, an understanding of cellular responses to proton exposure is of primary importance. The expression of DNA repair genes in response to ionizing radiation (X-rays and gamma rays) has been studied, but data on DNA repair in response to protons is lacking. Using qPCR analysis, we investigated changes in gene expression induced by positively charged particles (protons) in four categories (0, 0.1, 1.0, and 2.0 Gy) in nine different DNA repair genes isolated from the testes of irradiated mice. DNA repair genes were selected on the basis of their known functions. These genes include ERCC1 (5' incision subunit, DNA strand break repair), ERCC2/NER (opening DNA around the damage, Nucleotide Excision Repair), XRCC1 (5' incision subunit, DNA strand break repair), XRCC3 (DNA break and cross-link repair), XPA (binds damaged DNA in preincision complex), XPC (damage recognition), ATA or ATM (activates checkpoint signaling upon double strand breaks), MLH1 (post-replicative DNA mismatch repair), and PARP1 (base excision repair). Our results demonstrate that ERCC1, PARP1, and XPA genes showed no change at 0.1 Gy radiation, up-regulation at 1.0 Gy radiation (1.09 fold, 7.32 fold, 0.75 fold, respectively), and a remarkable increase in gene expression at 2.0 Gy radiation (4.83 fold, 57.58 fold and 87.58 fold, respectively). Expression of other genes, including ATM and XRCC3, was unchanged at 0.1 and 1.0 Gy radiation but showed up-regulation at 2.0 Gy radiation (2.64 fold and 2.86 fold, respectively). We were unable to detect gene expression for the

  17. EXPRESSION, PURIFICATION, AND SMALL ANGLE X-RAY SCATTERING OF DNA REPLICATION AND REPAIR PROTEINS FROM THE HYPERTHERMOPHILE SULFOLOBUS SOLFATARICUS

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, S.M.; Hatherill, J.R.; Hammel, M.; Hura, G.L.; Tainer, J.A.; Yannone, S.M.

    2008-01-01

    Vital molecular processes such as DNA replication, transcription, translation, and maintenance occur through transient protein interactions. Elucidating the mechanisms by which these protein complexes and interactions function could lead to treatments for diseases related to DNA damage and cell division control. In the recent decades since its introduction as a third domain, Archaea have shown to be simpler models for complicated eukaryotic processes such as DNA replication, repair, transcription, and translation. Sulfolobus solfataricus is one such model organism. A hyperthermophile with an optimal growth temperature of 80°C, Sulfolobus protein-protein complexes and transient protein interactions should be more stable at moderate temperatures, providing a means to isolate and study their structure and function. Here we provide the initial steps towards characterizing three DNA-related Sulfolobus proteins with small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS): Sso0257, a cell division control and origin recognition complex homolog, Sso0768, the small subunit of the replication factor C, and Sso3167, a Mut-T like protein. SAXS analysis was performed at multiple concentrations for both short and long exposure times. The Sso0257 sample was determined to be either a mixture of monomeric and dimeric states or a population of dynamic monomers in various conformational states in solution, consistent with a fl exible winged helix domain. Sso0768 was found to be a complex mixture of multimeric states in solution. Finally, molecular envelope reconstruction from SAXS data for Sso3167 revealed a novel structural component which may function as a disordered to ordered region in the presence of its substrates and/or protein partners.

  18. Meningocele repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... dysraphism repair; Meningomyelocele repair; Neural tube defect repair; Spina bifida repair ... a medical team with experience in children with spina bifida. Your baby will likely have an MRI (magnetic ...

  19. Role of protein synthesis in the repair of sublethal x-ray damage in a mutant Chinese hamster ovary cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Yezzi, M.J.

    1985-04-01

    A temperature-sensitive mutant for protein synthesis, CHO-TSH1, has been compared to the wild-type cell, CHO-sC1, in single- and split-radiation-dose schemes. When the exponentially growing TS mutant and the wild-type cells were treated at 40/sub 0/C for up to 2 hrs prior to graded doses of x rays, the survival curves were identical and were the same as those obtained without heat treatment. If the cultures were incubated at 40/sup 0/C for 2 hrs before a first dose and maintained at 40/sup 0/C during a 2 hr dose fractionation interval, repair of radiation damage was reduced in the mutant compared to the wild type. These observations implied that a pool of proteins was involved in the repair of sublethal x-ray damage. However, if repair was measured by the alkaline-unwinding technique under the same time and temperature schemes, no difference in the kientics of DNA strand rejoining was observed. Misrepair processes may permit restoration of DNA strand integrity but not allow functional repair. The effect of diminished repair under conditions of inhibition of protein synthesis was found to be cell-cycle dependent in survival studies with synchronized mutant cell populations. Repair was found to be almost completely eliminated if the temperature sequence described above was applied in the middle of the DNA synthetic phase. Treatment of cell populations in the middle of G/sub 1/-phase yielded repair inhibition comparable to that observed with the asynchronous cells. Splitdose experiments were done using pre-incubation with cycloheximide to chemically inhibit protein synthesis. WT cells and TS cells were treated with cycloheximide at 35/sup 0/C for 2 hrs before a first dose and during a 2 hr dose fractionation interval. 23 figs., 7 tabs.

  20. The l-Isoaspartyl Protein Repair Methyltransferase Enhances Survival of Aging Escherichia coli Subjected to Secondary Environmental Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Visick, Jonathan E.; Cai, Hui; Clarke, Steven

    1998-01-01

    Like its homologs throughout the biological world, the l-isoaspartyl protein repair methyltransferase of Escherichia coli, encoded by the pcm gene, can convert abnormal l-isoaspartyl residues in proteins (which form spontaneously from asparaginyl or aspartyl residues) to normal aspartyl residues. Mutations in pcm were reported to greatly reduce survival in stationary phase and when cells were subjected to heat or osmotic stresses (C. Li and S. Clarke, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 89:9885–9889, 1992). However, we subsequently demonstrated that those strains had a secondary mutation in rpoS, which encodes a stationary-phase-specific sigma factor (J. E. Visick and S. Clarke, J. Bacteriol. 179:4158–4163, 1997). We now show that the rpoS mutation, resulting in a 90% decrease in HPII catalase activity, can account for the previously observed phenotypes. We further demonstrate that a new pcm mutant lacks these phenotypes. Interestingly, the newly constructed pcm mutant, when maintained in stationary phase for extended periods, is susceptible to environmental stresses, including exposure to methanol, oxygen radical generation by paraquat, high salt concentrations, and repeated heating to 42°C. The pcm mutation also results in a competitive disadvantage in stationary-phase cells. All of these phenotypes can be complemented by a functional pcm gene integrated elsewhere in the chromosome. These data suggest that protein denaturation and isoaspartyl formation may act synergistically to the detriment of aging E. coli and that the repair methyltransferase can play a role in limiting the accumulation of the potentially disruptive isoaspartyl residues in vivo. PMID:9573145

  1. MutS and UvrD proteins stimulate exonuclease action: insights into exonuclease-mediated strand repair.

    PubMed

    Noothi, Sunil K; Minda, Renu; Rao, Basuthkar J

    2009-08-25

    MutS and UvrD proteins individually stimulate Escherichia coli exonuclease VII activity on blunt-ended short duplex DNA substrates. Stimulation by both proteins is ATP-dependent but not mismatch-specific and is not accompanied by apparent strand separation. Under similar conditions, MutS and UvrD proteins in fact confer resistance to exonuclease VII action on ssDNA targets, thereby implying that a novel state of a double-stranded DNA intermediate, which we term a "destabilized duplex", is involved in exonuclease-mediated strand degradation. We find that DNA strands in such a destabilized duplex can be displaced by the challenge of a molar excess of homologous single- and double-stranded DNA targets, in trans. Such an action of the UvrD protein is ATP-dependent. We discuss these results in relation to the (i) directional excision repair of E. coli MMR, (ii) downregulation of repeat deletions by exonucleases during replication slippage, and (iii) the fork reversal function of UvrD at stalled replication forks. PMID:19618961

  2. The PCNA-associated protein PARI negatively regulates homologous recombination via the inhibition of DNA repair synthesis.

    PubMed

    Burkovics, Peter; Dome, Lili; Juhasz, Szilvia; Altmannova, Veronika; Sebesta, Marek; Pacesa, Martin; Fugger, Kasper; Sorensen, Claus Storgaard; Lee, Marietta Y W T; Haracska, Lajos; Krejci, Lumir

    2016-04-20

    Successful and accurate completion of the replication of damage-containing DNA requires mainly recombination and RAD18-dependent DNA damage tolerance pathways. RAD18 governs at least two distinct mechanisms: translesion synthesis (TLS) and template switching (TS)-dependent pathways. Whereas TS is mainly error-free, TLS can work in an error-prone manner and, as such, the regulation of these pathways requires tight control to prevent DNA errors and potentially oncogenic transformation and tumorigenesis. In humans, the PCNA-associated recombination inhibitor (PARI) protein has recently been shown to inhibit homologous recombination (HR) events. Here, we describe a biochemical mechanism in which PARI functions as an HR regulator after replication fork stalling and during double-strand break repair. In our reconstituted biochemical system, we show that PARI inhibits DNA repair synthesis during recombination events in a PCNA interaction-dependent way but independently of its UvrD-like helicase domain. In accordance, we demonstrate that PARI inhibits HRin vivo, and its knockdown suppresses the UV sensitivity of RAD18-depleted cells. Our data reveal a novel human regulatory mechanism that limits the extent of HR and represents a new potential target for anticancer therapy. PMID:26792895

  3. The PCNA-associated protein PARI negatively regulates homologous recombination via the inhibition of DNA repair synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Burkovics, Peter; Dome, Lili; Juhasz, Szilvia; Altmannova, Veronika; Sebesta, Marek; Pacesa, Martin; Fugger, Kasper; Sorensen, Claus Storgaard; Lee, Marietta Y.W.T.; Haracska, Lajos; Krejci, Lumir

    2016-01-01

    Successful and accurate completion of the replication of damage-containing DNA requires mainly recombination and RAD18-dependent DNA damage tolerance pathways. RAD18 governs at least two distinct mechanisms: translesion synthesis (TLS) and template switching (TS)-dependent pathways. Whereas TS is mainly error-free, TLS can work in an error-prone manner and, as such, the regulation of these pathways requires tight control to prevent DNA errors and potentially oncogenic transformation and tumorigenesis. In humans, the PCNA-associated recombination inhibitor (PARI) protein has recently been shown to inhibit homologous recombination (HR) events. Here, we describe a biochemical mechanism in which PARI functions as an HR regulator after replication fork stalling and during double-strand break repair. In our reconstituted biochemical system, we show that PARI inhibits DNA repair synthesis during recombination events in a PCNA interaction-dependent way but independently of its UvrD-like helicase domain. In accordance, we demonstrate that PARI inhibits HR in vivo, and its knockdown suppresses the UV sensitivity of RAD18-depleted cells. Our data reveal a novel human regulatory mechanism that limits the extent of HR and represents a new potential target for anticancer therapy. PMID:26792895

  4. Crystal Structure Analysis of the Repair of Iron Centers Protein YtfE and Its Interaction with NO.

    PubMed

    Lo, Feng-Chun; Hsieh, Chang-Chih; Maestre-Reyna, Manuel; Chen, Chin-Yu; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Horng, Yih-Chern; Lai, Yei-Chen; Chiang, Yun-Wei; Chou, Chih-Mao; Chiang, Cheng-Hung; Huang, Wei-Ning; Lin, Yi-Hung; Bohle, D Scott; Liaw, Wen-Feng

    2016-07-01

    Molecular mechanisms underlying the repair of nitrosylated [Fe-S] clusters by the microbial protein YtfE remain poorly understood. The X-ray crystal structure of YtfE, in combination with EPR, magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), UV, and (17) O-labeling electron spin echo envelope modulation measurements, show that each iron of the oxo-bridged Fe(II) -Fe(III) diiron core is coordinatively unsaturated with each iron bound to two bridging carboxylates and two terminal histidines in addition to an oxo-bridge. Structural analysis reveals that there are two solvent-accessible tunnels, both of which converge to the diiron center and are critical for capturing substrates. The reactivity of the reduced-form Fe(II) -Fe(II) YtfE toward nitric oxide demonstrates that the prerequisite for N2 O production requires the two iron sites to be nitrosylated simultaneously. Specifically, the nitrosylation of the two iron sites prior to their reductive coupling to produce N2 O is cooperative. This result suggests that, in addition to any repair of iron centers (RIC) activity, YtfE acts as an NO-trapping scavenger to promote the NO to N2 O transformation under low NO flux, which precedes nitrosative stress. PMID:27246459

  5. Induction of resistance to alkylating agents in E. coli: the ada+ gene product serves both as a regulatory protein and as an enzyme for repair of mutagenic damage.

    PubMed Central

    Teo, I; Sedgwick, B; Demple, B; Li, B; Lindahl, T

    1984-01-01

    The expression of several inducible enzymes for repair of alkylated DNA in Escherichia coli is controlled by the ada+ gene. This regulatory gene has been cloned into a multicopy plasmid and shown to code for a 37-kd protein. Antibodies raised against homogeneous O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (the main repair activity for mutagenic damage in alkylated DNA) were found to cross-react with this 37-kd protein. Cell extracts from several independently derived ada mutants contain variable amounts of an altered 37-kd protein after an inducing alkylation treatment. In addition, an 18-kd protein identical with the previously isolated O6-methyl-guanine-DNA methyltransferase has been identified as a product of the ada+ gene. The smaller polypeptide is derived from the 37-kd protein by proteolytic processing. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:6092060

  6. Activation of the Canonical Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) Pathway during Lung Morphogenesis and Adult Lung Tissue Repair

    PubMed Central

    Sountoulidis, Alexandros; Stavropoulos, Athanasios; Giaglis, Stavros; Apostolou, Eirini; Monteiro, Rui; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana M.; Chen, Huaiyong; Stripp, Barry R.; Mummery, Christine; Andreakos, Evangelos; Sideras, Paschalis

    2012-01-01

    Signaling by Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMP) has been implicated in early lung development, adult lung homeostasis and tissue-injury repair. However, the precise mechanism of action and the spatio-temporal pattern of BMP-signaling during these processes remains inadequately described. To address this, we have utilized a transgenic line harboring a BMP-responsive eGFP-reporter allele (BRE-eGFP) to construct the first detailed spatiotemporal map of canonical BMP-pathway activation during lung development, homeostasis and adult-lung injury repair. We demonstrate that during the pseudoglandular stage, when branching morphogenesis progresses in the developing lung, canonical BMP-pathway is active mainly in the vascular network and the sub-epithelial smooth muscle layer of the proximal airways. Activation of the BMP-pathway becomes evident in epithelial compartments only after embryonic day (E) 14.5 primarily in cells negative for epithelial-lineage markers, located in the proximal portion of the airway-tree, clusters adjacent to neuro-epithelial-bodies (NEBs) and in a substantial portion of alveolar epithelial cells. The pathway becomes activated in isolated E12.5 mesenchyme-free distal epithelial buds cultured in Matrigel suggesting that absence of reporter activity in these regions stems from a dynamic cross-talk between endoderm and mesenchyme. Epithelial cells with activated BMP-pathway are enriched in progenitors capable of forming colonies in three-dimensional Matrigel cultures. As lung morphogenesis approaches completion, eGFP-expression declines and in adult lung its expression is barely detectable. However, upon tissue-injury, either with naphthalene or bleomycin, the canonical BMP-pathways is re-activated, in bronchial or alveolar epithelial cells respectively, in a manner reminiscent to early lung development and in tissue areas where reparatory progenitor cells reside. Our studies illustrate the dynamic activation of canonical BMP-pathway during lung

  7. Pivotal advances: high-mobility group box 1 protein--a cytokine with a role in cardiac repair.

    PubMed

    Germani, Antonia; Limana, Federica; Capogrossi, Maurizio C

    2007-01-01

    The nuclear protein high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) has been largely characterized for its role in inflammation. However, HMGB1 released by inflammatory cells, as well as by necrotic cells, may also act as a signal of tissue damage and participate in tissue repair by recruiting stem cells to the injury site. The emergence of this function has focused the interest on HMGB1 as a molecule with an active role in tissue regeneration. We recently demonstrated that HMGB1 administration in a mouse model of myocardial infarction activates cardiac stem cells and promotes their differentiation into cardiomyocytes. The regenerative effect results in the improvement of cardiac function. In this review, we highlight the beneficial role of HMGB1 and discuss growth factor-based therapeutic approaches for the treatment of myocardial infarction. PMID:16940333

  8. Secreted frizzled related protein 2 (Sfrp2) is the key Akt-mesenchymal stem cell-released paracrine factor mediating myocardial survival and repair

    PubMed Central

    Mirotsou, Maria; Zhang, Zhongyan; Deb, Arjun; Zhang, Lunan; Gnecchi, Massimiliano; Noiseux, Nicolas; Mu, Hui; Pachori, Alok; Dzau, Victor

    2007-01-01

    Stem cell therapy has emerged as a promising tool for the treatment of a variety of diseases. Previously, we have shown that Akt-modified mesenchymal stem cells mediate tissue repair through paracrine mechanisms. Using a comprehensive functional genomic strategy, we show that secreted frizzled related protein 2 (Sfrp2) is the key stem cell paracrine factor that mediates myocardial survival and repair after ischemic injury. Sfrp2 is known to modulate Wnt signaling, and we demonstrate that cardiomyocytes treated with secreted frizzled related protein increase cellular β-catenin and up-regulate expression of antiapoptotic genes. These findings reveal the key role played by Sfrp2 in mediating the paracrine effects of Akt-mesenchymal stem cells on tissue repair and identify modulation of Wnt signaling as a therapeutic target for heart disease. PMID:17251350

  9. Roles of Nucleoid-Associated Proteins in Stress-Induced Mutagenic Break Repair in Starving Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jessica M; Magnan, David; Mojica, Ana K; Núñez, María Angélica Bravo; Bates, David; Rosenberg, Susan M; Hastings, P J

    2015-12-01

    The mutagenicity of DNA double-strand break repair in Escherichia coli is controlled by DNA-damage (SOS) and general (RpoS) stress responses, which let error-prone DNA polymerases participate, potentially accelerating evolution during stress. Either base substitutions and indels or genome rearrangements result. Here we discovered that most small basic proteins that compact the genome, nucleoid-associated proteins (NAPs), promote or inhibit mutagenic break repair (MBR) via different routes. Of 15 NAPs, H-NS, Fis, CspE, and CbpA were required for MBR; Dps inhibited MBR; StpA and Hha did neither; and five others were characterized previously. Three essential genes were not tested. Using multiple tests, we found the following: First, Dps, which reduces reactive oxygen species (ROS), inhibited MBR, implicating ROS in MBR. Second, CbpA promoted F' plasmid maintenance, allowing MBR to be measured in an F'-based assay. Third, Fis was required for activation of the SOS DNA-damage response and could be substituted in MBR by SOS-induced levels of DinB error-prone DNA polymerase. Thus, Fis promoted MBR by allowing SOS activation. Fourth, H-NS represses ROS detoxifier sodB and was substituted in MBR by deletion of sodB, which was not otherwise mutagenic. We conclude that normal ROS levels promote MBR and that H-NS promotes MBR by maintaining ROS. CspE positively regulates RpoS, which is required for MBR. Four of five previously characterized NAPs promoted stress responses that enhance MBR. Hence, most NAPs affect MBR, the majority via regulatory functions. The data show that a total of six NAPs promote MBR by regulating stress responses, indicating the importance of nucleoid structure and function to the regulation of MBR and of coupling mutagenesis to stress, creating genetic diversity responsively. PMID:26500258

  10. Defective DNA single-strand break repair is responsible for senescence and neoplastic escape of epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nassour, Joe; Martien, Sébastien; Martin, Nathalie; Deruy, Emeric; Tomellini, Elisa; Malaquin, Nicolas; Bouali, Fatima; Sabatier, Laure; Wernert, Nicolas; Pinte, Sébastien; Gilson, Eric; Pourtier, Albin; Pluquet, Olivier; Abbadie, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    The main characteristic of senescence is its stability which relies on the persistence of DNA damage. We show that unlike fibroblasts, senescent epithelial cells do not activate an ATM-or ATR-dependent DNA damage response (DDR), but accumulate oxidative-stress-induced DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs). These breaks remain unrepaired because of a decrease in PARP1 expression and activity. This leads to the formation of abnormally large and persistent XRCC1 foci that engage a signalling cascade involving the p38MAPK and leading to p16 upregulation and cell cycle arrest. Importantly, the default in SSB repair also leads to the emergence of post-senescent transformed and mutated precancerous cells. In human-aged skin, XRCC1 foci accumulate in the epidermal cells in correlation with a decline of PARP1, whereas DDR foci accumulate mainly in dermal fibroblasts. These findings point SSBs as a DNA damage encountered by epithelial cells with aging which could fuel the very first steps of carcinogenesis. PMID:26822533

  11. Defective DNA single-strand break repair is responsible for senescence and neoplastic escape of epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Nassour, Joe; Martien, Sébastien; Martin, Nathalie; Deruy, Emeric; Tomellini, Elisa; Malaquin, Nicolas; Bouali, Fatima; Sabatier, Laure; Wernert, Nicolas; Pinte, Sébastien; Gilson, Eric; Pourtier, Albin; Pluquet, Olivier; Abbadie, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    The main characteristic of senescence is its stability which relies on the persistence of DNA damage. We show that unlike fibroblasts, senescent epithelial cells do not activate an ATM-or ATR-dependent DNA damage response (DDR), but accumulate oxidative-stress-induced DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs). These breaks remain unrepaired because of a decrease in PARP1 expression and activity. This leads to the formation of abnormally large and persistent XRCC1 foci that engage a signalling cascade involving the p38MAPK and leading to p16 upregulation and cell cycle arrest. Importantly, the default in SSB repair also leads to the emergence of post-senescent transformed and mutated precancerous cells. In human-aged skin, XRCC1 foci accumulate in the epidermal cells in correlation with a decline of PARP1, whereas DDR foci accumulate mainly in dermal fibroblasts. These findings point SSBs as a DNA damage encountered by epithelial cells with aging which could fuel the very first steps of carcinogenesis. PMID:26822533

  12. Structure-function analysis of the EF-hand protein centrin-2 for its intracellular localization and nucleotide excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Nishi, Ryotaro; Sakai, Wataru; Tone, Daisuke; Hanaoka, Fumio; Sugasawa, Kaoru

    2013-01-01

    Centrin-2 is an evolutionarily conserved, calmodulin-related protein, which is involved in multiple cellular functions including centrosome regulation and nucleotide excision repair (NER) of DNA. Particularly to exert the latter function, complex formation with the XPC protein, the pivotal NER damage recognition factor, is crucial. Here, we show that the C-terminal half of centrin-2, containing two calcium-binding EF-hand motifs, is necessary and sufficient for both its localization to the centrosome and interaction with XPC. In XPC-deficient cells, nuclear localization of overexpressed centrin-2 largely depends on co-overexpression of XPC, and mutational analyses of the C-terminal domain suggest that XPC and the major binding partner in the centrosome share a common binding surface on the centrin-2 molecule. On the other hand, the N-terminal domain of centrin-2 also contains two EF-hand motifs but shows only low-binding affinity for calcium ions. Although the N-terminal domain is dispensable for enhancement of the DNA damage recognition activity of XPC, it contributes to augmenting rather weak physical interaction between XPC and XPA, another key factor involved in NER. These results suggest that centrin-2 may have evolved to bridge two protein factors, one with high affinity and the other with low affinity, thereby allowing delicate regulation of various biological processes. PMID:23716636

  13. Overexpression of the scaffold WD40 protein WRAP53β enhances the repair of and cell survival from DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Rassoolzadeh, H; Böhm, S; Hedström, E; Gad, H; Helleday, T; Henriksson, S; Farnebo, M

    2016-01-01

    Altered expression of the multifunctional protein WRAP53β (WD40 encoding RNA Antisense to p53), which targets repair factors to DNA double-strand breaks and factors involved in telomere elongation to Cajal bodies, is linked to carcinogenesis. While loss of WRAP53β function has been shown to disrupt processes regulated by this protein, the consequences of its overexpression remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that overexpression of WRAP53β disrupts the formation of and impairs the localization of coilin to Cajal bodies. At the same time, the function of this protein in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks is enhanced. Following irradiation, cells overexpressing WRAP53β exhibit more rapid clearance of phospho-histone H2AX (γH2AX), and more efficient homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining, in association with fewer DNA breaks. Moreover, in these cells the ubiquitylation of damaged chromatin, which is known to facilitate the recruitment of repair factors and subsequent repair, is elevated. Knockdown of the ubiquitin ligase involved, ring-finger protein 8 (RNF8), which is recruited to DNA breaks by WRAP53β, attenuated this effect, suggesting that overexpression of WRAP53β leads to more rapid repair, as well as improved cell survival, by enhancing RNF8-mediated ubiquitylation at DNA breaks. Our present findings indicate that WRAP53β and RNF8 are rate-limiting factors in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks and raise the possibility that upregulation of WRAP53β may contribute to genomic stability in and survival of cancer cells. PMID:27310875

  14. Profiling DNA damage and repair capacity in sea urchin larvae and coelomocytes exposed to genotoxicants.

    PubMed

    Reinardy, Helena C; Bodnar, Andrea G

    2015-11-01

    The ability to protect the genome from harmful DNA damage is critical for maintaining genome stability and protecting against disease, including cancer. Many echinoderms, including sea urchins, are noted for the lack of neoplastic disease, but there are few studies investigating susceptibility to DNA damage and capacity for DNA repair in these animals. In this study, DNA damage was induced in adult sea urchin coelomocytes and larvae by exposure to a variety of genotoxicants [UV-C (0-3000 J/m(2)), hydrogen peroxide (0-10mM), bleomycin (0-300 µM) and methylmethanesulfonate (MMS, 0-30 mM)] and the capacity for repair was measured over a 24-h period of recovery. Larvae were more sensitive than coelomocytes, with higher levels of initial DNA damage (fast micromethod) for all genotoxicants except MMS and increased levels of mortality 24h following treatment for all genotoxicants. The larvae that survived were able to efficiently repair damage within 24-h recovery. The ability to repair DNA damage differed depending on treatments, but both larvae and coelomocytes were able to most efficiently repair H2O2-induced damage. Time profiles of expression of a panel of DNA repair genes (ddb1, ercc1, xpc, xrcc1, pcna, ogg1, parp1, parp2, ape, brca1, rad51, xrcc2, xrcc3, xrcc4, xrcc5, xrcc6 and gadd45), throughout the period of recovery, showed greater gene induction in coelomocytes compared with larvae, with particularly high expression of xrcc1, ercc1, parp2 and pcna. The heterogeneous response of larvae to DNA damage may reflect a strategy whereby a subset of the population is equipped to withstand acute genotoxic stress, while the ability of coelomocytes to resist and repair DNA damage confirm their significant role in protection against disease. Consideration of DNA repair capacity is critical for understanding effects of genotoxicants on organisms, in addition to shedding light on life strategies and disease susceptibility. PMID:26175033

  15. Metal binding mediated conformational change of XPA protein:a potential cytotoxic mechanism of nickel in the nucleotide excision repair.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianping; Hu, Ziheng; Zhang, Yan; Gou, Xiaojun; Mu, Ying; Wang, Lirong; Xie, Xiang-Qun

    2016-07-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a pivotal life process for repairing DNA nucleotide mismatch caused by chemicals, metal ions, radiation, and other factors. As the initiation step of NER, the xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A protein (XPA) recognizes damaged DNA molecules, and recruits the replication protein A (RPA), another important player in the NER process. The stability of the Zn(2+)-chelated Zn-finger domain of XPA center core portion (i.e., XPA98-210) is the foundation of its biological functionality, while the displacement of the Zn(2+) by toxic metal ions (such as Ni(2+), a known human carcinogen and allergen) may impair the effectiveness of NER and hence elevate the chance of carcinogenesis. In this study, we first calculated the force field parameters for the bonded model in the metal center of the XPA98-210 system, showing that the calculated results, including charges, bonds, angles etc., are congruent with previously reported results measured by spectrometry experiments and quantum chemistry computation. Then, comparative molecular dynamics simulations using these parameters revealed the changes in the conformation and motion mode of XPA98-210 Zn-finger after the substitution of Zn(2+) by Ni(2+). The results showed that Ni(2+) dramatically disrupted the relative positions of the four Cys residues in the Zn-finger structure, forcing them to collapse from a tetrahedron into an almost planar structure. Finally, we acquired the binding mode of XPA98-210 with its ligands RPA70N and DNA based on molecular docking and structural alignment. We found that XPA98-210's Zn-finger domain primarily binds to a V-shaped cleft in RPA70N, while the cationic band in its C-terminal subdomain participates in the recognition of damaged DNA. In addition, this article sheds light on the multi-component interaction pattern among XPA, DNA, and other NER-related proteins (i.e., RPA70N, RPA70A, RPA70B, RPA70C, RPA32, and RPA14) based on previously reported

  16. ATP-Dependent Chromatin Remodeling by Cockayne Syndrome Protein B and NAP1-Like Histone Chaperones Is Required for Efficient Transcription-Coupled DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Lake, Robert J.; Basheer, Asjad; Fan, Hua-Ying

    2013-01-01

    The Cockayne syndrome complementation group B (CSB) protein is essential for transcription-coupled DNA repair, and mutations in CSB are associated with Cockayne syndrome—a devastating disease with complex clinical features, including the appearance of premature aging, sun sensitivity, and numerous neurological and developmental defects. CSB belongs to the SWI2/SNF2 ATP–dependent chromatin remodeler family, but the extent to which CSB remodels chromatin and whether this activity is utilized in DNA repair is unknown. Here, we show that CSB repositions nucleosomes in an ATP–dependent manner in vitro and that this activity is greatly enhanced by the NAP1-like histone chaperones, which we identify as new CSB–binding partners. By mapping functional domains and analyzing CSB derivatives, we demonstrate that chromatin remodeling by the combined activities of CSB and the NAP1-like chaperones is required for efficient transcription-coupled DNA repair. Moreover, we show that chromatin remodeling and repair protein recruitment mediated by CSB are separable activities. The collaboration that we observed between CSB and the NAP1-like histone chaperones adds a new dimension to our understanding of the ways in which ATP–dependent chromatin remodelers and histone chaperones can regulate chromatin structure. Taken together, the results of this study offer new insights into the functions of chromatin remodeling by CSB in transcription-coupled DNA repair as well as the underlying mechanisms of Cockayne syndrome. PMID:23637612

  17. Non-histone protein HMGB1 inhibits the repair of damaged DNA by cisplatin in NIH-3T3 murine fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Yusein-Myashkova, Shazie; Ugrinova, Iva; Pasheva, Evdokia

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear non-histone protein high mobility group box (HMGB) 1 is known to having an inhibitory effect on the repair of DNA damaged by the antitumor drug cisplatin in vitro. To investigate the role of HMGB1 in living cells, we studied the DNA repair of cisplatin damages in mouse fibroblast cell line, NIH-3T3. We evaluated the effect of the post-synthetic acetylation and C-terminal domain of the protein by overexpression of the parental and mutant GFP fused forms of HMGB1. The results revealed that HMGB1 had also an inhibitory effect on the repair of cisplatin damaged DNA in vivo. The silencing of HMGB1 in NIH-3T3 cells increased the cellular DNA repair potential. The increased levels of repair synthesis could be “rescued” and returned to less than normal levels if the knockdown cells were transfected with plasmids encoding HMGB1 and HMGB1 K2A. In this case, the truncated form of HMGB1 also exhibited a slight inhibitory effect. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(2): 99-104] PMID:24325815

  18. Prevention and repair of protein damage by the Maillard reaction in vivo.

    PubMed

    Monnier, Vincent M; Sell, David R

    2006-01-01

    The aging human extracellular matrix (ECM) and tissues rich in long-lived proteins undergo extensive changes with age that include increased stiffening, loss of elasticity, insolubilization, and decreased proteolytic digestibility. Most if not all these changes can be duplicated by the Maillard reaction in vitro, that is, the incubation of the proteins with reducing sugars and oxoaldehydes. These carbonyls eventually form advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and crosslinks that impair proteolytic digestibility and alter protein conformation. To date, close to 20 AGEs have been found in the human skin, of which ornithine is the single major result of damage to arginine residues, and glucosepane the single major crosslink. Although redox active metals and oxoaldehydes appear to play an important role in protein damage in experimental diabetes, their role in diabetic humans is still poorly understood. Evidence for the existence of deglycating enzymes has been found in vertebrates, bacteria, and fungi. However, only the vertebrate enzymes can deglycate larger, intracellular proteins via an ATP-dependent mechanism. Protein engineering will thus be needed to adapt Amadoriase enzymes toward deglycation of ECM proteins for purpose of probing the role of advanced glycation in animal models of diabetes and age-related diseases. The blocking of the reactivity of the glucosepane precursor using potent nucleophiles may be useful in preventing age-related changes in ECM proteins. However, there currently is no evidence in support of the proposed ability of so-called "AGE breakers" to cleave existing crosslinks of the Maillard reaction in vivo, and other mechanisms of action should be sought for this class of compounds. PMID:16706654

  19. HRR25, a putative protein kinase from budding yeast: Association with repair of damaged DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Hoekstra, M.F.; Ou, A.C.; DeMaggio, A.J.; Burbee, D.G. ); Liskay, R.M. ); Heffron, F. )

    1991-08-30

    In simple eukaryotes, protein kinases regulate mitotic and meiotic cell cycles, the response to polypeptide pheromones, and the initiation of nuclear DNA synthesis. The protein HRR25 from the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was defined by the mutation hrr25-1. This mutation resulted in sensitivity to continuous expression of the HO double-strand endonuclease, to methyl methanesulfonate, and to x-irradiation. Homozygotes of hrr25-1 were unable to sporulate and disruption and deletion of HRR25 interfered with mitotic and meiotic cell division. Sequence analysis revealed two distinctive regions in the protein. The NH{sub 2}-terminus of HRR25 contains the hallmark features of protein kinases, whereas the COOH-terminus is rich in proline and glutamine. Mutations in HRR25 at conserved residues found in all protein kinases inactivated the gene, and these mutants exhibited the hrr25 null phenotypes. Taken together, the hrr25 mutant phenotypes and the features of the gene product indicate that HRR25 is a distinctive member of the protein kinase superfamily.

  20. Structural and Functional Interaction Between the Human DNA Repair Proteins DNA ligase IV and XRCC4

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, P.; Meesala, S; Dauvillier, S; Modesti, M; Andres, S; Huang, Y; Sekiguchi, J; Calsou, P; Salles, B; Junop, M

    2009-01-01

    Nonhomologous end-joining represents the major pathway used by human cells to repair DNA double-strand breaks. It relies on the XRCC4/DNA ligase IV complex to reseal DNA strands. Here we report the high-resolution crystal structure of human XRCC4 bound to the carboxy-terminal tandem BRCT repeat of DNA ligase IV. The structure differs from the homologous Saccharomyces cerevisiae complex and reveals an extensive DNA ligase IV binding interface formed by a helix-loop-helix structure within the inter-BRCT linker region, as well as significant interactions involving the second BRCT domain, which induces a kink in the tail region of XRCC4. We further demonstrate that interaction with the second BRCT domain of DNA ligase IV is necessary for stable binding to XRCC4 in cells, as well as to achieve efficient dominant-negative effects resulting in radiosensitization after ectopic overexpression of DNA ligase IV fragments in human fibroblasts. Together our findings provide unanticipated insight for understanding the physical and functional architecture of the nonhomologous end-joining ligation complex.

  1. Identification of the first small-molecule inhibitor of the REV7 DNA repair protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Actis, Marcelo L; Ambaye, Nigus D; Evison, Benjamin J; Shao, Youming; Vanarotti, Murugendra; Inoue, Akira; McDonald, Ezelle T; Kikuchi, Sotaro; Heath, Richard; Hara, Kodai; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Fujii, Naoaki

    2016-09-15

    DNA interstrand crosslink (ICL) repair (ICLR) has been implicated in the resistance of cancer cells to ICL-inducing chemotherapeutic agents. Despite the clinical significance of ICL-inducing chemotherapy, few studies have focused on developing small-molecule inhibitors for ICLR. The mammalian DNA polymerase ζ, which comprises the catalytic subunit REV3L and the non-catalytic subunit REV7, is essential for ICLR. To identify small-molecule compounds that are mechanistically capable of inhibiting ICLR by targeting REV7, high-throughput screening and structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis were performed. Compound 1 was identified as an inhibitor of the interaction of REV7 with the REV7-binding sequence of REV3L. Compound 7 (an optimized analog of compound 1) bound directly to REV7 in nuclear magnetic resonance analyses, and inhibited the reactivation of a reporter plasmid containing an ICL in between the promoter and reporter regions. The normalized clonogenic survival of HeLa cells treated with cisplatin and compound 7 was lower than that for cells treated with cisplatin only. These findings indicate that a small-molecule inhibitor of the REV7/REV3L interaction can chemosensitize cells by inhibiting ICLR. PMID:27448776

  2. Role of the DNA Base Excision Repair Protein, APE1 in Cisplatin, Oxaliplatin, or Carboplatin Induced Sensory Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Mark R.; Jiang, Yanlin; Guo, Chunlu; Reed, April; Meng, Hongdi; Vasko, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Although chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a dose-limiting side effect of platinum drugs, the mechanisms of this toxicity remain unknown. Previous work in our laboratory suggests that cisplatin-induced CIPN is secondary to DNA damage which is susceptible to base excision repair (BER). To further examine this hypothesis, we studied the effects of cisplatin, oxaliplatin, and carboplatin on cell survival, DNA damage, ROS production, and functional endpoints in rat sensory neurons in culture in the absence or presence of reduced expression of the BER protein AP endonuclease/redox factor-1 (APE1). Using an in situ model of peptidergic sensory neuron function, we examined the effects of the platinum drugs on hind limb capsaicin-evoked vasodilatation. Exposing sensory neurons in culture to the three platinum drugs caused a concentration-dependent increase in apoptosis and cell death, although the concentrations of carboplatin were 10 fold higher than cisplatin. As previously observed with cisplatin, oxaliplatin and carboplatin also increased DNA damage as indicated by an increase in phospho-H2AX and reduced the capsaicin-evoked release of CGRP from neuronal cultures. Both cisplatin and oxaliplatin increased the production of ROS as well as 8-oxoguanine DNA adduct levels, whereas carboplatin did not. Reducing levels of APE1 in neuronal cultures augmented the cisplatin and oxaliplatin induced toxicity, but did not alter the effects of carboplatin. Using an in vivo model, systemic injection of cisplatin (3 mg/kg), oxaliplatin (3 mg/kg), or carboplatin (30 mg/kg) once a week for three weeks caused a decrease in capsaicin-evoked vasodilatation, which was delayed in onset. The effects of cisplatin on capsaicin-evoked vasodilatation were attenuated by chronic administration of E3330, a redox inhibitor of APE1 that serendipitously enhances APE1 DNA repair activity in sensory neurons. These outcomes support the importance of the BER pathway, and particularly APE

  3. The yeast recombinational repair protein Rad59 interacts with Rad52 and stimulates single-strand annealing.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, A P; Symington, L S

    2001-01-01

    The yeast RAD52 gene is essential for homology-dependent repair of DNA double-strand breaks. In vitro, Rad52 binds to single- and double-stranded DNA and promotes annealing of complementary single-stranded DNA. Genetic studies indicate that the Rad52 and Rad59 proteins act in the same recombination pathway either as a complex or through overlapping functions. Here we demonstrate physical interaction between Rad52 and Rad59 using the yeast two-hybrid system and co-immunoprecipitation from yeast extracts. Purified Rad59 efficiently anneals complementary oligonucleotides and is able to overcome the inhibition to annealing imposed by replication protein A (RPA). Although Rad59 has strand-annealing activity by itself in vitro, this activity is insufficient to promote strand annealing in vivo in the absence of Rad52. The rfa1-D288Y allele partially suppresses the in vivo strand-annealing defect of rad52 mutants, but this is independent of RAD59. These results suggest that in vivo Rad59 is unable to compete with RPA for single-stranded DNA and therefore is unable to promote single-strand annealing. Instead, Rad59 appears to augment the activity of Rad52 in strand annealing. PMID:11606529

  4. Expression of human DNA mismatch-repair protein, hMSH2, in patients with oral lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao-Bo; Zhang, Ying-Huai; Chen, Hui-Zhen; Chen, Yong

    2015-01-01

    hMSH2 is one of the human DNA mismatch repair genes that plays an important role in reducing mutations and maintaining genomic stability. The aim of the present study was to detect the expression and significance of hMSH2 protein in patients with oral lichen planus (OLP). The expression levels of hMSH2 in the OLP group (n=51) and control group with normal oral mucosa (NM; n=40) were detected using an immunohistochemical method and subsequently assessed. The positive rate of hMSH2 expression in the OLP group was 52.94%, while the rate was 80% in the control group, exhibiting a statistically significant difference (χ(2)=7.1993; P<0.05). However, the expression of hMSH2 in the OLP tissues was not shown to significantly correlate with the patient gender, age and type of OLP (P>0.05). In conclusion, the protein expression levels of hMSH2 in the OLP tissues were significantly reduced as compared with that in the NM tissues, indicating that hMSH2 plays a role in the development of OLP. Therefore, hMSH2 may be used as a biomarker for evaluating the cancer risk of patients with OLP. PMID:25452803

  5. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the human mismatch repair protein MutS[beta

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, Quincy; Orans, Jillian; Hast, Michael A.; Iyer, Ravi R.; Changela, Anita; Modrich, Paul L.; Beese, Lorena S.

    2012-03-16

    MutS{beta} is a eukaryotic mismatch repair protein that preferentially targets extrahelical unpaired nucleotides and shares partial functional redundancy with MutS{alpha} (MSH2-MSH6). Although mismatch recognition by MutS{alpha} has been shown to involve a conserved Phe-X-Glu motif, little is known about the lesion-binding mechanism of MutS{beta}. Combined MSH3/MSH6 deficiency triggers a strong predisposition to cancer in mice and defects in msh2 and msh6 account for roughly half of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer mutations. These three MutS homologs are also believed to play a role in trinucleotide repeat instability, which is a hallmark of many neurodegenerative disorders. The baculovirus overexpression and purification of recombinant human MutS{beta} and three truncation mutants are presented here. Binding assays with heteroduplex DNA were carried out for biochemical characterization. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the protein bound to a heteroduplex DNA substrate are also reported.

  6. The human actin-related protein hArp5: Nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling and involvement in DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Kitayama, Kumiko; Kamo, Mariko; Oma, Yukako; Matsuda, Ryo; Uchida, Takafumi; Ikura, Tsuyoshi; Tashiro, Satoshi; Ohyama, Takashi; Winsor, Barbara; Harata, Masahiko

    2009-01-15

    Certain actin-related proteins (Arps) of budding yeast are localized in the nucleus, and have essential roles as stoichiometric components of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) and chromatin remodeling complexes. On the other hand, identification of vertebrate nuclear Arps and their functional analyses are just beginning. We show that human Arp5 (hArp5) proteins are localized in the nucleus, and that arp5{delta} yeast cells are partially complemented by hArp5. Thus, hArp5 is a novel member of the nuclear Arps of vertebrates, which possess evolutionarily conserved functions from yeast to humans. We show here that hArp5 shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Furthermore, after the induction of DNA double strand breaks (DSB), cell growth and the accumulation of phosphorylated histone H2AX ({gamma}-H2AX) are impaired by hArp5 depletion. Association of hArp5 with the hIno80 chromatin remodeling enzyme and decrease of chromatin-bound hIno80 by hArp5-depletion indicate that hArp5 may have a role in the recruitment of the hINO80 complex to chromatin. Overexpression of hArp5 and hIno80 enhanced {gamma}-H2AX accumulation. These observations suggest that hArp5 is involved in the process of DSB repair through the regulation of the chromatin remodelling machinery.

  7. Photosystem II recovery in the presence and absence of chloroplast protein repair in the symbionts of corals exposed to bleaching conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, R.; Takahashi, S.

    2014-12-01

    Increased seawater temperature causes photoinhibition due to accumulation of photodamaged photosystem II (PSII) in symbiotic algae (genus Symbiodinium) within corals, and it is assumed to be associated with coral bleaching. To avoid photoinhibition, photosynthetic organisms repair the photodamaged PSII through replacing the PSII proteins, primarily the D1 protein, with newly synthesised proteins. However, in experiments using cultured Symbiodinium strains, the PSII repair of Symbiodinium has been suggested not to be related to the synthesis of the D1 protein. In this study, we examined the relationship between the recovery of PSII photochemical efficiency ( F V/ F M) and the content of D1 protein after high-light and high-temperature treatments using the bleaching-sensitive coral species, Pocillopora damicornis and Acropora millepora, and the bleaching-tolerant coral species, Montipora digitata and Pavona decussata. When corals were exposed to strong light (600 µmol photons m-2 s-1) at elevated temperature (32 °C) for 8 h, significant bleaching occurred in bleaching-sensitive coral species although an almost similar extent of reduced PSII function was found across all coral species tested. During a subsequent 15-h recovery under low light (10 µmol photons m-2 s-1) at optimal temperature (22 °C), the reduced F V/ F M recovered close to initial levels in all coral species, but the reduced D1 content recovered only in one coral species ( Pavona decussata). D1 content was therefore not strongly linked to chloroplast protein synthesis-dependent PSII repair. These results demonstrate that the recovery of photodamaged PSII does not always correspond with the recovery of D1 protein content in Symbiodinium within corals, suggesting that photodamaged PSII can be repaired by a unique mechanism in Symbiodinium within corals.

  8. DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Friedberg, E.C.; Hanawalt, P.C. )

    1988-01-01

    Topics covered in this book included: Eukaryote model systems for DNA repair study; Sensitive detection of DNA lesions and their repair; and Defined DNA sequence probes for analysis of mutagenesis and repair.

  9. The activin binding proteins follistatin and follistatin-related protein are differentially regulated in vitro and during cutaneous wound repair.

    PubMed

    Wankell, M; Kaesler, S; Zhang, Y Q; Florence, C; Werner, S; Duan, R

    2001-12-01

    Follistatin is a secreted protein that binds activin in vitro and in vivo and thereby inhibits its biological functions. Recently, related human and murine genes, designated follistatin-related gene (FLRG), were identified, and their products were shown to bind activin with high affinity. In this study we further characterized the murine FLRG protein, and we analyzed its tissue-specific expression and regulation in comparison with those of follistatin. Transient expression of the mouse FLRG protein in COS-1 cells revealed that the FLRG cDNA encodes a secreted glycoprotein. FLRG mRNA was expressed at high levels in the lung, the testis, the uterus and, particularly, the skin. Immunohistochemistry revealed the presence of FLRG in the basement membrane between the dermis and the epidermis and around blood vessels. FLRG mRNA expression was induced in keratinocytes by keratinocyte growth factor, epidermal growth factor and transforming growth factor-beta 1, and in fibroblasts by platelet-derived growth factor and epidermal growth factor. The induction was more rapid, but weaker, than that of follistatin. Most interestingly, both follistatin and FLRG were expressed during the wound healing process, but their distribution within the wound was different. The different expression pattern of FLRG and follistatin and their differential regulation suggest different functions of these activin-binding proteins in vivo. PMID:11739004

  10. Reprint of "Oxidant and environmental toxicant-induced effects compromise DNA ligation during base excision DNA repair".

    PubMed

    Çağlayan, Melike; Wilson, Samuel H

    2015-12-01

    DNA lesions arise from many endogenous and environmental agents, and such lesions can promote deleterious events leading to genomic instability and cell death. Base excision repair (BER) is the main DNA repair pathway responsible for repairing single strand breaks, base lesions and abasic sites in mammalian cells. During BER, DNA substrates and repair intermediates are channeled from one step to the next in a sequential fashion so that release of toxic repair intermediates is minimized. This includes handoff of the product of gap-filling DNA synthesis to the DNA ligation step. The conformational differences in DNA polymerase β (pol β) associated with incorrect or oxidized nucleotide (8-oxodGMP) insertion could impact channeling of the repair intermediate to the final step of BER, i.e., DNA ligation by DNA ligase I or the DNA Ligase III/XRCC1 complex. Thus, modified DNA ligase substrates produced by faulty pol β gap-filling could impair coordination between pol β and DNA ligase. Ligation failure is associated with 5'-AMP addition to the repair intermediate and accumulation of strand breaks that could be more toxic than the initial DNA lesions. Here, we provide an overview of the consequences of ligation failure in the last step of BER. We also discuss DNA-end processing mechanisms that could play roles in reversal of impaired BER. PMID:26596511

  11. Fertilization stimulates 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine repair and antioxidant activity to prevent mutagenesis in the embryo.

    PubMed

    Lord, Tessa; Aitken, R John

    2015-10-01

    Oxidative DNA damage harbored by both spermatozoa and oocytes at the time of fertilization must be repaired prior to S-phase of the first mitotic division to reduce the risk of transversion mutations occurring in the zygote and subverting the normal patterns of cell differentiation and development. Of the characterised oxidative DNA lesions, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8OHdG) is particularly mutagenic. The current study reveals for the first time a marked acceleration of 8OHdG repair in the mouse oocyte/zygote by the base excision repair (BER) pathway following fertilization. Specifically, fertilization initiates post-translational modification to BER enzymes such as OGG1 and XRCC1, causing nuclear localisation and accelerated 8OHdG excision. Additionally, both the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes appear to benefit from increased protection against further 8OHdG formation by a fertilization-associated increase in glutathione peroxidase activity. The major limitation of the characterised 8OHdG repair system is the relatively low level of OGG1 expression in the oocyte, in contrast to the male germ line where it is the only constituent of the BER pathway. The male and female germ lines therefore collaborate in the repair of oxidative DNA damage, and oocytes are vulnerable to high levels of 8OHdG being carried into the zygote by the fertilizing spermatozoon. PMID:26234752

  12. The DJ-1 superfamily members YhbO and YajL from Escherichia coli repair proteins from glycation by methylglyoxal and glyoxal.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Jad; Mihoub, Mouadh; Gautier, Valérie; Richarme, Gilbert

    2016-02-01

    YhbO and YajL belong to the PfpI/Hsp31/DJ-1 superfamily. Both proteins are involved in protection against environmental stresses. Here, we show that, like DJ-1 and Hsp31, they repair glyoxal- and methylglyoxal-glycated proteins. YhbO and YajL repair glycated serum albumin, collagen, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and fructose biphosphate aldolase. Bacterial extracts from deglycase mutants display increased glycation levels, whereas deglycase overexpression decreases protein glycation. Moreover, yhbO and yajL mutants display decreased viability in methylglyoxal- or glucose-containing media. Finally, the apparent glyoxalase activities of YhbO and YajL reflect their deglycase activities. PMID:26774339

  13. Demethoxycurcumin-induced DNA Damage Decreases DNA Repair-associated Protein Expression Levels in NCI-H460 Human Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Yang-Ching; Lien, Jin-Cherng; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Lin, Hui-Yi; Chueh, Fu-Shin; Ji, Bin-Chuan; Yang, Mei-Due; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-05-01

    Demethoxycurcumin (DMC) is a key component of Chinese medicine (Turmeric) and has been proven effective in killing various cancer cells. Its role in inducing cytotoxic effects in many cancer cells has been reported, but its role regarding DNA damage on lung cancer cells has not been studied in detail. In the present study, we demonstrated DMC-induced DNA damage and condensation in NCI-H460 cells by using the Comet assay and DAPI staining examinations, respectively. Western blotting indicated that DMC suppressed the protein levels associated with DNA damage and repair, such as 14-3-3σ (an important checkpoint keeper of DNA damage response), DNA repair proteins breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1), O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (MDC1), and p53 (tumor suppressor protein). DMC activated phosphorylated p53 and p-H2A.X (phospho Ser140) in NCI-H460 cells. Furthermore, we used confocal laser systems microscopy to examine the protein translocation. The results showed that DMC promotes the translocation of p-p53 and p-H2A.X from the cytosol to the nuclei in NCI-H460 cells. Taken together, DMC induced DNA damage and affected DNA repair proteins in NCI-H460 cells in vitro. PMID:25964547

  14. Expression of hMSH2 protein of the human DNA mismatch repair system in oral lichen planus

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Lichen planus is a mucocutaneous disease of inflammatory nature and unknown etiology. It is characterized by a cell-mediated immunological response to induced antigenic change in skin and/or mucosa. The possible malignant transformation of lichen planus remains a subject of controversial discussions in the literature. hMSH2 is one of the human DNA mismatch repair (hMMR) genes and it plays an important role in reducing mutation and maintaining genomic stability. hMSH2 alterations have been reported in oral squamous cell carcinoma and there are evidences suggesting the association between oral lichen planus and squamous cell carcinoma. In this study, we aim to investigate the immunolocalization of hMSH2 protein in oral lichen planus compared to oral normal mucosa epithelium. We examined the expression of hMSH2 protein by immunohistochemistry in twenty-six cases of oral lichen planus. Clinically, 12 of them were categorized into reticular subtype and 14 were atrophic/erosive. Ten cases of normal mucosa were added to the control group. Results showed that the percentage of positive cells to hMSH2 was smaller in reticular (46.54%; p=0,006) and atrophic/erosive (48.79%; p=0,028) subtypes of oral lichen planus compared to normal mucosa (61.29%). The reduced expression of hMSH2 protein in oral lichen planus suggests that this lesion is more susceptible to mutation and therefore facilitate the development of oral squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:15912193

  15. Loss of Tau protein affects the structure, transcription and repair of neuronal pericentromeric heterochromatin

    PubMed Central

    Mansuroglu, Zeyni; Benhelli-Mokrani, Houda; Marcato, Vasco; Sultan, Audrey; Violet, Marie; Chauderlier, Alban; Delattre, Lucie; Loyens, Anne; Talahari, Smail; Bégard, Séverine; Nesslany, Fabrice; Colin, Morvane; Souès, Sylvie; Lefebvre, Bruno; Buée, Luc; Galas, Marie-Christine; Bonnefoy, Eliette

    2016-01-01

    Pericentromeric heterochromatin (PCH) gives rise to highly dense chromatin sub-structures rich in the epigenetic mark corresponding to the trimethylated form of lysine 9 of histone H3 (H3K9me3) and in heterochromatin protein 1α (HP1α), which regulate genome expression and stability. We demonstrate that Tau, a protein involved in a number of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease (AD), binds to and localizes within or next to neuronal PCH in primary neuronal cultures from wild-type mice. Concomitantly, we show that the clustered distribution of H3K9me3 and HP1α, two hallmarks of PCH, is disrupted in neurons from Tau-deficient mice (KOTau). Such altered distribution of H3K9me3 that could be rescued by overexpressing nuclear Tau protein was also observed in neurons from AD brains. Moreover, the expression of PCH non-coding RNAs, involved in PCH organization, was disrupted in KOTau neurons that displayed an abnormal accumulation of stress-induced PCH DNA breaks. Altogether, our results demonstrate a new physiological function of Tau in directly regulating neuronal PCH integrity that appears disrupted in AD neurons. PMID:27605042

  16. Loss of Tau protein affects the structure, transcription and repair of neuronal pericentromeric heterochromatin.

    PubMed

    Mansuroglu, Zeyni; Benhelli-Mokrani, Houda; Marcato, Vasco; Sultan, Audrey; Violet, Marie; Chauderlier, Alban; Delattre, Lucie; Loyens, Anne; Talahari, Smail; Bégard, Séverine; Nesslany, Fabrice; Colin, Morvane; Souès, Sylvie; Lefebvre, Bruno; Buée, Luc; Galas, Marie-Christine; Bonnefoy, Eliette

    2016-01-01

    Pericentromeric heterochromatin (PCH) gives rise to highly dense chromatin sub-structures rich in the epigenetic mark corresponding to the trimethylated form of lysine 9 of histone H3 (H3K9me3) and in heterochromatin protein 1α (HP1α), which regulate genome expression and stability. We demonstrate that Tau, a protein involved in a number of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD), binds to and localizes within or next to neuronal PCH in primary neuronal cultures from wild-type mice. Concomitantly, we show that the clustered distribution of H3K9me3 and HP1α, two hallmarks of PCH, is disrupted in neurons from Tau-deficient mice (KOTau). Such altered distribution of H3K9me3 that could be rescued by overexpressing nuclear Tau protein was also observed in neurons from AD brains. Moreover, the expression of PCH non-coding RNAs, involved in PCH organization, was disrupted in KOTau neurons that displayed an abnormal accumulation of stress-induced PCH DNA breaks. Altogether, our results demonstrate a new physiological function of Tau in directly regulating neuronal PCH integrity that appears disrupted in AD neurons. PMID:27605042

  17. Anhydrobiosis vs. aging: comparative genomics of protein repair L-isoaspartyl methyltransferases in the sleeping chironomid. .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, Oleg; Kikawada, Takahiro; Shagimardanova, Elena; Suetsugu, Yoshitaka; Ayupov, Rustam

    Origin of anhydrobiosis in the larvae of the sleeping chironomid Polypedilum vanderplanki represents unique example of set of evolutionary events in a single species, resulted in acquiring new ability allowing survival in extremely changeable environment. Complex comparative analysis of the genome of P. vanderplanki resulted in discovery of a set of features, including existence of the set of unique clusters of genes contributing in desiccation resistance. Surprisingly, in several cases, the genes mainly contributing to the formation of the molecular shield in the larvae are sleeping chironomid-specific and have no homology with genes from other insects, including P. nubifer - a chironomid from the same genus. Protein L-isoaspartyl methyltransferase (PIMT) acts on proteins that have been non-enzymatically damaged due to age, and partially restores aspartic residues, extending life of the polypeptides. PIMT a highly conserved enzyme present in nearly all eukaryotes, and microorganisms mostly in a single copy (or in a few isoforms in certain plants and some bacteria). While conducting a comparative analysis of the genomes of two chironomid midge species different in their ability to stand complete water loss, we have noticed that structure and number of PIMT-coding genes in the desiccation resistant (anhydrobiotic) midge (Polypedilum vanderplanki, Pv) is different from those of the common desiccation-sensitive midge (Polypedilum nubifer, Pn) and the rest of insects. Both species have a clear orthologous PIMT shared by all insects. At the same time, in contrast to Pn which has only one PIMT gene (PnPimt-1), the Pv genome contains 12 additional genes paralogous to Pimt1 (PvPimt-2-12) presumably coding functional PIMT proteins, which are arranged in a single cluster. Remarkably, PvPimt-1 location in the Pv is different from the rest of Pimt-like genes. PvPimt-1 gene is ubiquitously expressed during the life cycle, but expression of the PvPimt2-12 is limited to the eggs

  18. Dynamics and Cell-Type Specificity of the DNA Double-Strand Break Repair Protein RecN in the Developmental Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Sheng; Wang, Jinglan; Wang, Li; Zhang, Cheng-Cai; Chen, Wen-Li

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication and repair are two fundamental processes required in life proliferation and cellular defense and some common proteins are involved in both processes. The filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is capable of forming heterocysts for N2 fixation in the absence of a combined-nitrogen source. This developmental process is intimately linked to cell cycle control. In this study, we investigated the localization of the DNA double-strand break repair protein RecN during key cellular events, such as chromosome damaging, cell division, and heterocyst differentiation. Treatment by a drug causing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced reorganization of the RecN focus preferentially towards the mid-cell position. RecN-GFP was absent in most mature heterocysts. Furthermore, our results showed that HetR, a central player in heterocyst development, was involved in the proper positioning and distribution of RecN-GFP. These results showed the dynamics of RecN in DSB repair and suggested a differential regulation of DNA DSB repair in vegetative cell and heterocysts. The absence of RecN in mature heterocysts is compatible with the terminal nature of these cells. PMID:26431054

  19. A High-Throughput Screening Strategy to Identify Protein-Protein Interaction Inhibitors That Block the Fanconi Anemia DNA Repair Pathway.

    PubMed

    Voter, Andrew F; Manthei, Kelly A; Keck, James L

    2016-07-01

    Induction of the Fanconi anemia (FA) DNA repair pathway is a common mechanism by which tumors evolve resistance to DNA crosslinking chemotherapies. Proper execution of the FA pathway requires interaction between the FA complementation group M protein (FANCM) and the RecQ-mediated genome instability protein (RMI) complex, and mutations that disrupt FANCM/RMI interactions sensitize cells to DNA crosslinking agents. Inhibitors that block FANCM/RMI complex formation could be useful therapeutics for resensitizing tumors that have acquired chemotherapeutic resistance. To identify such inhibitors, we have developed and validated high-throughput fluorescence polarization and proximity assays that are sensitive to inhibitors that disrupt interactions between the RMI complex and its binding site on FANCM (a peptide referred to as MM2). A pilot screen of 74,807 small molecules was performed using the fluorescence polarization assay. Hits from the primary screen were further tested using the proximity assay, and an orthogonal proximity assay was used to assess inhibitor selectivity. Direct physical interaction between the RMI complex and the most selective inhibitor identified through the screening process was measured by surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration calorimetry. Observation of direct binding by this small molecule validates the screening protocol. PMID:26962873

  20. Minor Changes in Expression of the Mismatch Repair Protein MSH2 Exert a Major Impact on Glioblastoma Response to Temozolomide.

    PubMed

    McFaline-Figueroa, José L; Braun, Christian J; Stanciu, Monica; Nagel, Zachary D; Mazzucato, Patrizia; Sangaraju, Dewakar; Cerniauskas, Edvinas; Barford, Kelly; Vargas, Amanda; Chen, Yimin; Tretyakova, Natalia; Lees, Jacqueline A; Hemann, Michael T; White, Forest M; Samson, Leona D

    2015-08-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is often treated with the cytotoxic drug temozolomide, but the disease inevitably recurs in a drug-resistant form after initial treatment. Here, we report that in GBM cells, even a modest decrease in the mismatch repair (MMR) components MSH2 and MSH6 have profound effects on temozolomide sensitivity. RNAi-mediated attenuation of MSH2 and MSH6 showed that such modest decreases provided an unexpectedly strong mechanism of temozolomide resistance. In a mouse xenograft model of human GBM, small changes in MSH2 were sufficient to suppress temozolomide-induced tumor regression. Using The Cancer Genome Atlas to analyze mRNA expression patterns in tumors from temozolomide-treated GBM patients, we found that MSH2 transcripts in primary GBM could predict patient responses to initial temozolomide therapy. In recurrent disease, the absence of microsatellite instability (the standard marker for MMR deficiency) suggests a lack of involvement of MMR in the resistant phenotype of recurrent disease. However, more recent studies reveal that decreased MMR protein levels occur often in recurrent GBM. In accordance with our findings, these reported decreases may constitute a mechanism by which GBM evades temozolomide sensitivity while maintaining microsatellite stability. Overall, our results highlight the powerful effects of MSH2 attenuation as a potent mediator of temozolomide resistance and argue that MMR activity offers a predictive marker for initial therapeutic response to temozolomide treatment. PMID:26025730

  1. The role of bone marrow-derived cells in bone fracture repair in a green fluorescent protein chimeric mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, Kazuhiro . E-mail: s3061@nms.ac.jp; Ogawa, Rei; Migita, Makoto; Hanawa, Hideki; Ito, Hiromoto; Orimo, Hideo

    2005-05-27

    We investigated the role of bone marrow cells in bone fracture repair using green fluorescent protein (GFP) chimeric model mice. First, the chimeric model mice were created: bone marrow cells from GFP-transgenic C57BL/6 mice were injected into the tail veins of recipient wild-type C57BL/6 mice that had been irradiated with a lethal dose of 10 Gy from a cesium source. Next, bone fracture models were created from these mice: closed transverse fractures of the left femur were produced using a specially designed device. One, three, and five weeks later, fracture lesions were extirpated for histological and immunohistochemical analyses. In the specimens collected 3 and 5 weeks after operation, we confirmed calluses showing intramembranous ossification peripheral to the fracture site. The calluses consisted of GFP- and osteocalcin-positive cells at the same site, although the femur consisted of only osteocalcin-positive cells. We suggest that bone marrow cells migrated outside of the bone marrow and differentiated into osteoblasts to make up the calluses.

  2. Bone Marrow Cells Expressing Clara Cell Secretory Protein Increase Epithelial Repair After Ablation of Pulmonary Clara Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bustos, Martha L; Mura, Marco; Marcus, Paula; Hwang, David; Ludkovski, Olga; Wong, Amy P; Waddell, Thomas K

    2013-01-01

    We have previously reported a subpopulation of bone marrow cells (BMC) that express Clara cell secretory protein (CCSP), generally felt to be specific to lung Clara cells. Ablation of lung Clara cells has been reported using a transgenic mouse that expresses thymidine kinase under control of the CCSP promoter. Treatment with ganciclovir results in permanent elimination of CCSP+ cells, failure of airway regeneration, and death. To determine if transtracheal delivery of wild-type bone marrow CCSP+ cells is beneficial after ablation of lung CCSP+ cells, transgenic mice were treated with ganciclovir followed by transtracheal administration of CCSP+ or CCSP− BMC. Compared with mice administered CCSP− cells, mice treated with CCSP+ cells had more donor cells lining the airway epithelium, where they expressed epithelial markers including CCSP. Although donor CCSP+ cells did not substantially repopulate the airway, their administration resulted in increased host ciliated cells, better preservation of airway epithelium, reduction of inflammatory cells, and an increase in animal survival time. Administration of CCSP+ BMC is beneficial after permanent ablation of lung Clara cells by increasing bronchial epithelial repair. Therefore, CCSP+ BMC could be important for treatment of lung diseases where airways re-epithelialization is compromised. PMID:23609017

  3. Metformin-mediated downregulation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent excision repair cross-complementing 1 decreases DNA repair capacity and sensitizes human lung cancer cells to paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Sheng-Chieh; Huang, Yu-Ching; Chen, Huang-Jen; Chiu, Hsien-Chun; Huang, Yi-Jhen; Wo, Ting-Yu; Weng, Shao-Hsing; Lin, Yun-Wei

    2013-02-15

    Metformin, an extensively used and well-tolerated drug for treating individuals with type 2 diabetes, has recently gained significant attention as an anticancer drug. On the other hand, paclitaxel (Taxol) is a new antineoplastic drug that has shown promise in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). High expression levels of excision repair cross-complementary 1 (ERCC1) in cancers have been positively associated with the DNA repair capacity and a poor prognosis in NSCLC patients treated with platinum-containing chemotherapy. In this current study, paclitaxel was found to increase phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase 3/6 (MKK3/6)-p38 MAPK as well as protein and mRNA levels of ERCC1 in H1650 and H1703 cells. Moreover, paclitaxel-induced ERCC1 protein and mRNA levels significantly decreased via the downregulation of p38 activity by either a p38 MAPK inhibitor SB202190 or p38 knockdown with specific small interfering RNA (siRNA). Specific inhibition of ERCC1 with siRNA was found to enhance the paclitaxel-induced cytotoxic effect and growth inhibition. Furthermore, metformin was able to not only decrease the paclitaxel-induced p38 MAPK-mediated ERCC1 expression, but also augment the cytotoxic effect induced by paclitaxel. Finally, expression of constitutive activate MKK6 or HA-p38 MAPK vectors in lung cancer cells was able to abrogate ERCC1 downregulation by metformin and paclitaxel as well as cell viability and DNA repair capacity. Overall, our results suggest that inhibition of the p38 MAPK signaling by metformin coupled with paclitaxel therapy in human NSCLC cells may be a clinically useful combination, which however will require further validation. PMID:23228696

  4. Chemoproteomics-Enabled Discovery of a Potent and Selective Inhibitor of the DNA Repair Protein MGMT.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Abegg, Daniel; Hoch, Dominic G; Adibekian, Alexander

    2016-02-18

    We present a novel chemical scaffold for cysteine-reactive covalent inhibitors. Chloromethyl triazoles (CMTs) are readily accessed in only two chemical steps, thus enabling the rapid optimization of the pharmacological properties of these inhibitors. We demonstrate the tunability of the CMTs towards a specific biological target by synthesizing AA-CW236 as the first potent non-pseudosubstrate inhibitor of the O(6) -alkylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), a protein of major clinical significance for the treatment of several severe cancer forms. Using quantitative proteomics profiling techniques, we show that AA-CW236 exhibits a high degree of selectivity towards MGMT. Finally, we validate the effectiveness of our MGMT inhibitor in combination with the DNA alkylating drug temozolomide in breast and colon cancer cells by fluorescence imaging and a cell-viability assay. Our results may open a new avenue towards the development of a clinically approved MGMT inhibitor. PMID:26798972

  5. Post-transcriptional Repair of a Split Heat Shock Protein 90 Gene by mRNA trans-Splicing*♦

    PubMed Central

    Nageshan, Rishi Kumar; Roy, Nainita; Hehl, Adrian B.; Tatu, Utpal

    2011-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 participates in diverse biological processes ranging from protein folding, cell cycle, signal transduction and development to evolution in all eukaryotes. It is also critically involved in regulating growth of protozoa such as Dictyostelium discoideum, Leishmania donovani, Plasmodium falciparum, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Trypanosoma evansi. Selective inhibition of Hsp90 has also been explored as an intervention strategy against important human diseases such as cancer, malaria, or trypanosomiasis. Giardia lamblia, a simple protozoan parasite of humans and animals, is an important cause of diarrheal disease with significant morbidity and some mortality in tropical countries. Here we show that the G. lamblia cytosolic hsp90 (glhsp90) is split in two similar sized fragments located 777 kb apart on the same scaffold. Intrigued by this unique arrangement, which appears to be specific for the Giardiinae, we have investigated the biosynthesis of GlHsp90. We used genome sequencing to confirm the split nature of the giardial hsp90. However, a specific antibody raised against the peptide detected a product with a mass of about 80 kDa, suggesting a post-transcriptional rescue of the genomic defect. We show evidence for the joining of the two independent Hsp90 transcripts in-trans to one long mature mRNA presumably by RNA splicing. The splicing junction carries hallmarks of classical cis-spliced introns, suggesting that the regular cis-splicing machinery may be sufficient for repair of the open reading frame. A complementary 26-nt sequence in the “intron” regions adjacent to the splice sites may assist in positioning the two pre-mRNAs for processing. This is the first example of post-transcriptional rescue of a split gene by trans-splicing. PMID:21209094

  6. Post-transcriptional repair of a split heat shock protein 90 gene by mRNA trans-splicing.

    PubMed

    Nageshan, Rishi Kumar; Roy, Nainita; Hehl, Adrian B; Tatu, Utpal

    2011-03-01

    Heat shock protein 90 participates in diverse biological processes ranging from protein folding, cell cycle, signal transduction and development to evolution in all eukaryotes. It is also critically involved in regulating growth of protozoa such as Dictyostelium discoideum, Leishmania donovani, Plasmodium falciparum, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Trypanosoma evansi. Selective inhibition of Hsp90 has also been explored as an intervention strategy against important human diseases such as cancer, malaria, or trypanosomiasis. Giardia lamblia, a simple protozoan parasite of humans and animals, is an important cause of diarrheal disease with significant morbidity and some mortality in tropical countries. Here we show that the G. lamblia cytosolic hsp90 (glhsp90) is split in two similar sized fragments located 777 kb apart on the same scaffold. Intrigued by this unique arrangement, which appears to be specific for the Giardiinae, we have investigated the biosynthesis of GlHsp90. We used genome sequencing to confirm the split nature of the giardial hsp90. However, a specific antibody raised against the peptide detected a product with a mass of about 80 kDa, suggesting a post-transcriptional rescue of the genomic defect. We show evidence for the joining of the two independent Hsp90 transcripts in-trans to one long mature mRNA presumably by RNA splicing. The splicing junction carries hallmarks of classical cis-spliced introns, suggesting that the regular cis-splicing machinery may be sufficient for repair of the open reading frame. A complementary 26-nt sequence in the "intron" regions adjacent to the splice sites may assist in positioning the two pre-mRNAs for processing. This is the first example of post-transcriptional rescue of a split gene by trans-splicing. PMID:21209094

  7. Loss of DNA-protein crosslinks from formaldehyde-exposed cells occurs through spontaneous hydrolysis and an active repair process linked to proteosome function.

    PubMed

    Quievryn, G; Zhitkovich, A

    2000-08-01

    DNA-protein crosslinks (DPC) involving all major histones are the dominant form of DNA damage in formaldehyde-exposed cells. In order to understand the repair mechanisms for these lesions we conducted detailed analysis of the stability of formaldehyde-induced DPC in vitro and in human cells. DNA-histone linkages were found to be hydrolytically unstable, with t(1/2) = 18.3 h at 37 degrees C. When histones were allowed to remain bound to DNA after crosslink breakage, the half-life of DPC increased to 26.3 h. This suggests that approximately 30% of spontaneously broken DPC could be re-established under physiological conditions. The half-lives of DPC in three human cell lines (HF/SV fibroblasts, kidney Ad293 and lung A549 cells) were similar and averaged 12.5 h (range 11.6-13.0 h). After adjustment for spontaneous loss, an active repair process was calculated to eliminate DPC from these cells with an average t(1/2) = 23.3 h. Removal of DPC from peripheral human lymphocytes was slower (t(1/2) = 18.1 h), due to inefficient active repair (t(1/2) = 66.6 h). This indicates that the major portion of DPC is lost from lymphocytes through spontaneous hydrolysis rather than being actively repaired. Depletion of intracellular glutathione from A549 cells had no significant effect on the initial levels of DPC, the rate of their repair or cell survival. Nucleotide excision repair does not appear to be involved in the removal of DPC, since the kinetics of DPC elimination in XP-A and XP-F fibroblasts were very similar to normal cells. Incubation of normal or XP-A cells with lactacystin, a specific inhibitor of proteosomes, caused inhibition of DPC repair, suggesting that the active removal of DPC in cells may involve proteolytic degradation of crosslinked proteins. XP-F cells showed somewhat higher sensitivity to formaldehyde, possibly signaling participation of XPF protein in the removal of residual peptide-DNA adducts. PMID:10910961

  8. A novel cytoprotective function for the DNA repair protein Ku in regulating p53 mRNA translation and function.

    PubMed

    Lamaa, Assala; Le Bras, Morgane; Skuli, Nicolas; Britton, Sébastien; Frit, Philippe; Calsou, Patrick; Prats, Hervé; Cammas, Anne; Millevoi, Stefania

    2016-04-01

    Ku heterodimer is a DNA binding protein with a prominent role in DNA repair. Here, we investigate whether and how Ku impacts the DNA damage response by acting as a post-transcriptional regulator of gene expression. We show that Ku represses p53 protein synthesis and p53-mediated apoptosis by binding to a bulged stem-loop structure within the p53 5' UTR However, Ku-mediated translational repression of the p53 mRNA is relieved after genotoxic stress. The underlying mechanism involves Ku acetylation which disrupts Ku-p53 mRNA interactions. These results suggest that Ku-mediated repression of p53 mRNA translation constitutes a novel mechanism linking DNA repair and mRNA translation. PMID:26964895

  9. Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase-1 and DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase Have Equivalent Roles in Double Strand Break Repair Following Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Jody; Smith, Graeme; Curtin, Nicola J.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are predominantly repaired by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), involving DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), well characterized for its role in single strand break repair, may also facilitate DSB repair. We investigated the activation of these enzymes by differing DNA ends and their interaction in the cellular response to ionizing radiation (IR). Methods and Materials: The effect of PARP and DNA-PK inhibitors (KU-0058684 and NU7441) on repair of IR-induced DSBs was investigated in DNA-PK and PARP-1 proficient and deficient cells by measuring gammaH2AX foci and neutral comets. Complementary in vitro enzyme kinetics assays demonstrated the affinities of DNA-PK and PARP-1 for DSBs with varying DNA termini. Results: DNA-PK and PARP-1 both promoted the fast phase of resolution of IR-induced DSBs in cells. Inactivation of both enzymes was not additive, suggesting that PARP-1 and DNA-PK cooperate within the same pathway to promote DSB repair. The affinities of the two enzymes for oligonucleotides with blunt, 3' GGG or 5' GGG overhanging termini were similar and overlapping (K{sub dapp} = 2.6-6.4nM for DNA-PK; 1.7-4.5nM for PARP-1). DNA-PK showed a slightly greater affinity for overhanging DNA and was significantly more efficient when activated by a 5' GGG overhang. PARP-1 had a preference for blunt-ended DNA and required a separate factor for efficient stimulation by a 5' GGG overhang. Conclusion: DNA-PK and PARP-1 are both required in a pathway facilitating the fast phase of DNA DSB repair.

  10. DNA-mediated supercharged fluorescent protein/graphene oxide interaction for label-free fluorescence assay of base excision repair enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Li, Yong; Li, Lijun; Li, Daiqi; Huang, Yan; Nie, Zhou; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2015-09-01

    The interaction between supercharged green fluorescent protein (ScGFP) and graphene oxide (GO) as well as the resulting quenching effect of GO on ScGFP were investigated. Based on this unique quenching effect and the DNA-mediated ScGFP/GO interaction, a label-free fluorescence method has been established for homogeneously assaying the activity and inhibition of base excision repair enzyme. PMID:26208330

  11. Loss-of-function of OsSTN8 suppresses the photosystem II core protein phosphorylation and interferes with the photosystem II repair mechanism in rice (Oryza sativa).

    PubMed

    Nath, Krishna; Poudyal, Roshan Sharma; Eom, Joon-Seob; Park, Yu Shin; Zulfugarov, Ismayil S; Mishra, Sujata R; Tovuu, Altanzaya; Ryoo, Nayeoon; Yoon, Ho-Sung; Nam, Hong Gil; An, Gynheung; Jeon, Jong-Seong; Lee, Choon-Hwan

    2013-11-01

    STN8 kinase is involved in photosystem II (PSII) core protein phosphorylation (PCPP). To examine the role of PCPP in PSII repair during high light (HL) illumination, we characterized a T-DNA insertional knockout mutant of the rice (Oryza sativa) STN8 gene. In this osstn8 mutant, PCPP was significantly suppressed, and the grana were thin and elongated. Upon HL illumination, PSII was strongly inactivated in the mutants, but the D1 protein was degraded more slowly than in wild-type, and mobilization of the PSII supercomplexes from the grana to the stromal lamellae for repair was also suppressed. In addition, higher accumulation of reactive oxygen species and preferential oxidation of PSII reaction center core proteins in thylakoid membranes were observed in the mutants during HL illumination. Taken together, our current data show that the absence of STN8 is sufficient to abolish PCPP in osstn8 mutants and to produce all of the phenotypes observed in the double mutant of Arabidopsis, indicating the essential role of STN8-mediated PCPP in PSII repair. PMID:24103067

  12. XRCC4 and XLF form long helical protein filaments suitable for DNA end protection and alignment to facilitate DNA double strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Mahaney, Brandi L; Hammel, Michal; Meek, Katheryn; Tainer, John A; Lees-Miller, Susan P

    2013-02-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), induced by ionizing radiation (IR) and endogenous stress including replication failure, are the most cytotoxic form of DNA damage. In human cells, most IR-induced DSBs are repaired by the nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway. One of the most critical steps in NHEJ is ligation of DNA ends by DNA ligase IV (LIG4), which interacts with, and is stabilized by, the scaffolding protein X-ray cross-complementing gene 4 (XRCC4). XRCC4 also interacts with XRCC4-like factor (XLF, also called Cernunnos); yet, XLF has been one of the least mechanistically understood proteins and precisely how XLF functions in NHEJ has been enigmatic. Here, we examine current combined structural and mutational findings that uncover integrated functions of XRCC4 and XLF and reveal their interactions to form long, helical protein filaments suitable to protect and align DSB ends. XLF-XRCC4 provides a global structural scaffold for ligating DSBs without requiring long DNA ends, thus ensuring accurate and efficient ligation and repair. The assembly of these XRCC4-XLF filaments, providing both DNA end protection and alignment, may commit cells to NHEJ with general biological implications for NHEJ and DSB repair processes and their links to cancer predispositions and interventions. PMID:23442139

  13. XRCC4 and XLF form long helical protein filaments suitable for DNA end protection and alignment to facilitate DNA double strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    Mahaney, Brandi L.; Hammel, Michal; Meek, Katheryn; Tainer, John A.; Lees-Miller, Susan P.

    2013-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), induced by ionizing radiation (IR) and endogenous stress including replication failure, are the most cytotoxic form of DNA damage. In human cells, most IR-induced DSBs are repaired by the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway. One of the most critical steps in NHEJ is ligation of DNA ends by DNA ligase IV (LIG4), which interacts with, and is stabilized by, the scaffolding protein X-ray cross-complementing gene 4 (XRCC4). XRCC4 also interacts with XRCC4-like factor (XLF, also called Cernunnos); yet, XLF has been one of the least mechanistically understood proteins and precisely how XLF functions in NHEJ has been enigmatic. Here, we examine current combined structural and mutational findings that uncover integrated functions of XRCC4 and XLF and reveal their interactions to form long, helical protein filaments suitable to protect and align DSB ends. XLF-XRCC4 provides a global structural scaffold for ligating DSBs without requiring long complementary DNA ends, thus ensuring accurate and efficient ligation and repair. The assembly of these XRCC4-XLF filaments, providing both DNA end protection and alignment, may commit cells to NHEJ with general biological implications for NHEJ and DSB repair processes and their links to cancer predispositions and interventions. PMID:23442139

  14. Mitochondrial uncoupler carbonyl cyanide M-chlorophenylhydrazone induces the multimer assembly and activity of repair enzyme protein L-isoaspartyl methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Fanélus, Irvens; Desrosiers, Richard R

    2013-07-01

    The protein L-isoaspartyl methyltransferase (PIMT) repairs damaged aspartyl residues in proteins. It is commonly described as a cytosolic protein highly expressed in brain tissues. Here, we report that PIMT is an active monomeric as well as a multimeric protein in mitochondria isolated from neuroblastoma cells. Upon treatments with mitochondrial uncoupler carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), PIMT monomers level decreased by half while that of PIMT multimers was higher. Gel electrophoresis under reducing conditions of CCCP-induced PIMT multimers led to PIMT monomers accumulation, indicating that multimers resulted from disulfide-linked PIMT monomers. The antioxidant ascorbic acid significantly lowered CCCP-induced formation of PIMT multimers, suggesting that reactive oxygen species contributed to PIMT multimerization. In addition, the elevation of PIMT multimers catalytic activity upon treatments with CCCP was severely inhibited by the reducing agent dithiothreitol. This indicated that PIMT monomers have lower enzymatic activity following CCCP treatments and that activation of PIMT multimers is essentially dependent on the formation of disulfide-linked monomers of PIMT. Furthermore, the perturbation of mitochondrial function by CCCP promoted the accumulation of damaged aspartyl residues in proteins with high molecular weights. Thus, this study demonstrates the formation of active PIMT multimers associated with mitochondria that could play a key role in repairing damaged proteins accumulating during mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:23319267

  15. DNA repair gene variants associated with benign breast disease in high cancer risk women.

    PubMed

    Jorgensen, Timothy J; Helzlsouer, Kathy J; Clipp, Sandra C; Bolton, Judy Hoffman; Crum, Rosa M; Visvanathan, Kala

    2009-01-01

    Benign breast disease (BBD) is a risk factor for breast cancer and may have a heritable component. Deficient DNA repair has been implicated in breast cancer etiology and may exert its effect before BBD, a known precursor. The association between allelic variants in DNA repair genes and BBD was examined in a cohort of women in Washington County, Maryland. BBD was defined by two criteria: (a) a physician diagnosis of BBD or fibrocystic disease and/or (b) a benign breast biopsy. 3,212 women without BBD at baseline were genotyped for 12 candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms in seven DNA repair genes. Of these women, 482 subsequently reported a diagnosis of BBD. The Cox model was used to calculate hazard ratios (HR). Variant alleles of XRCC1 Arg(194)Trp (rs1799782) and ERCC4 Arg(415)Gln (rs1800067) were significantly associated with BBD [HR, 1.36; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.06-1.74 and HR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.09-1.76, respectively]. Similar estimates were also observed for each of the BBD criterion used. The BBD association for ERCC4 was even stronger among women with a family history of breast cancer (HR, 2.68; 95% CI, 1.52-4.66; P(interaction) = 0.02). This study suggests that variant alleles in DNA repair genes may modify BBD risk, a potential intermediate marker of breast cancer risk, particularly among high-risk subgroups. PMID:19124519

  16. Replication Protein A: Single-stranded DNA's first responder : Dynamic DNA-interactions allow Replication Protein A to direct single-strand DNA intermediates into different pathways for synthesis or repair

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ran; Wold, Marc S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Replication Protein A (RPA), the major single-stranded DNA-binding protein in eukaryotic cells, is required for processing of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) intermediates found in replication, repair and recombination. Recent studies have shown that RPA binding to ssDNA is highly dynamic and that more than high-affinity binding is needed for function. Analysis of DNA binding mutants identified forms of RPA with reduced affinity for ssDNA that are fully active, and other mutants with higher affinity that are inactive. Single molecule studies showed that while RPA binds ssDNA with high affinity, the RPA complex can rapidly diffuse along ssDNA and be displaced by other proteins that act on ssDNA. Finally, dynamic DNA binding allows RPA to prevent error-prone repair of double-stranded breaks and promote error-free repair. Together, these findings suggest a new paradigm where RPA acts as a first responder at sites with ssDNA, thereby actively coordinating DNA repair and DNA synthesis. PMID:25171654

  17. The ATM substrate KAP1 controls DNA repair in heterochromatin: Regulation by HP1 proteins and Serine 473/824 phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    White, D. E.; Rafalska-Metcalf, I. U.; Ivanov, A. V.; Corsinotti, A.; Peng, H.; Lee, S. C.; Trono, D.; Janicki, S. M.; Rauscher, F. J.

    2016-01-01

    The repair of DNA damage in highly compact, transcriptionally silent heterochromatin requires that repair and chromatin packaging machineries be tightly coupled and regulated. KAP1 is a heterochromatin protein and co-repressor which binds to HP1 during gene silencing, but is also robustly phosphorylated by ATM at serine 824 in response to DNA damage. The interplay between HP1-KAP1 binding/ATM phosphorylation during DNA repair is not known. We show that HP1α and unmodified KAP1 are enriched in endogenous heterochromatic loci and at a silent transgene prior to damage. Following damage, γH2AX and pKAP1-s824 rapidly increase and persist at these loci. Cells which lack HP1 fail to form discreet pKAP1-s824 foci after damage but levels are higher and more persistent. KAP1 is phosphorylated at Serine 473 in response to DNA damage and its levels are also modulated by HP1. Unlike pKAP1-s824, pKAP1-s473 does not accumulate at damage foci but is diffusely localized in the nucleus. While HP1 association tempers KAP1 phosphorylation, this interaction also slows the resolution of γH2AX foci. Thus, HP1-dependent regulation of KAP1 influences DNA repair in heterochromatin. PMID:22205726

  18. Fibrinogen-Related Proteins in Tissue Repair: How a Unique Domain with a Common Structure Controls Diverse Aspects of Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Zuliani-Alvarez, Lorena; Midwood, Kim S.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Fibrinogen-related proteins (FRePs) comprise an intriguing collection of extracellular molecules, each containing a conserved fibrinogen-like globe (FBG). This group includes the eponymous fibrinogen as well as the tenascin, angiopoietin, and ficolin families. Many of these proteins are upregulated during tissue repair and exhibit diverse roles during wound healing. Recent Advances: An increasing body of evidence highlights the specific expression of a number of FRePs following tissue injury and infection. Upon induction, each FReP uses its FBG domain to mediate quite distinct effects that contribute to different stages of tissue repair, such as driving coagulation, pathogen detection, inflammation, angiogenesis, and tissue remodeling. Critical Issues: Despite a high degree of homology among FRePs, each contains unique sequences that enable their diversification of function. Comparative analysis of the structure and function of FRePs and precise mapping of regions that interact with a variety of ligands has started to reveal the underlying molecular mechanisms by which these proteins play very different roles using their common domain. Future Directions: Fibrinogen has long been used in the clinic as a synthetic matrix serving as a scaffold or a delivery system to aid tissue repair. Novel therapeutic strategies are now emerging that harness the use of other FRePs to improve wound healing outcomes. As we learn more about the underlying mechanisms by which each FReP contributes to the repair response, specific blockade, or indeed potentiation, of their function offers real potential to enable regulation of distinct processes during pathological wound healing. PMID:26005593

  19. Chloroacetaldehyde-induced mutagenesis in Escherichia coli: the role of AlkB protein in repair of 3,N(4)-ethenocytosine and 3,N(4)-alpha-hydroxyethanocytosine.

    PubMed

    Maciejewska, Agnieszka M; Ruszel, Karol P; Nieminuszczy, Jadwiga; Lewicka, Joanna; Sokołowska, Beata; Grzesiuk, Elzbieta; Kuśmierek, Jarosław T

    2010-02-01

    Etheno (epsilon) adducts are formed in reaction of DNA bases with various environmental carcinogens and endogenously created products of lipid peroxidation. Chloroacetaldehyde (CAA), a metabolite of carcinogen vinyl chloride, is routinely used to generate epsilon-adducts. We studied the role of AlkB, along with AlkA and Mug proteins, all engaged in repair of epsilon-adducts, in CAA-induced mutagenesis. The test system used involved pIF102 and pIF104 plasmids bearing the lactose operon of CC102 or CC104 origin (Cupples and Miller (1989) [17]) which allowed to monitor Lac(+) revertants, the latter arose by GC-->AT or GC-->TA substitutions, respectively, as a result of modification of guanine and cytosine. The plasmids were CAA-damaged in vitro and replicated in Escherichia coli of various genetic backgrounds. To modify the levels of AlkA and AlkB proteins, mutagenesis was studied in E. coli cells induced or not in adaptive response. Formation of varepsilonC proceeds via a relatively stable intermediate, 3,N(4)-alpha-hydroxyethanocytosine (HEC), which allowed to compare repair of both adducts. The results indicate that all three genes, alkA, alkB and microg, are engaged in alleviation of CAA-induced mutagenesis. The frequency of mutation was higher in AlkA-, AlkB- and Mug-deficient strains in comparison to alkA(+), alkB(+), and microg(+) controls. Considering the levels of CAA-induced Lac(+) revertants in strains harboring the pIF plasmids and induced or not in adaptive response, we conclude that AlkB protein is engaged in the repair of epsilonC and HEC in vivo. Using the modified TTCTT 5-mers as substrates, we confirmed in vitro that AlkB protein repairs epsilonC and HEC although far less efficiently than the reference adduct 3-methylcytosine. The pH optimum for repair of HEC and epsilonC is significantly different from that for 3-methylcytosine. We propose that the protonated form of adduct interact in active site of AlkB protein. PMID:19941873

  20. Reduction of DNA mismatch repair protein expression in airway epithelial cells of premenopausal women chronically exposed to biomass smoke.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Bidisha; Dutta, Anindita; Chowdhury, Saswati; Roychoudhury, Sanghita; Ray, Manas Ranjan

    2014-02-01

    Biomass burning is a major source of indoor air pollution in rural India. This study examined whether chronic inhalation of biomass smoke causes change in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) pathway in the airway cells. For this, airway cells exfoliated in sputum were collected from 72 premenopausal nonsmoking rural women (median age 34 years) who cooked with biomass (wood, dung, crop residues) and 68 control women who cooked with cleaner fuel liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) for the past 5 years or more. The levels of particulate matters with diameters less than 10 and 2.5 μm (PM10 and PM2.5) in indoor air were measured by real-time aerosol monitor. Benzene exposure was monitored by measuring trans,trans-muconic acid (t,t-MA) in urine by high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detector. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and level of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in airway cells were measured by flow cytometry and spectrophotometry, respectively. Immunocytochemical assay revealed lower percentage of airway epithelial cells expressing MMR proteins mutL homolog 1 (MLH1) and mutS homolog 2 (MSH2) in biomass-using women compared to LPG-using controls. Women who cooked with biomass had 6.7 times higher level of urinary t,t-MA, twofold increase in ROS generation, and 31 % depletion of SOD. Indoor air of biomass-using households had three times more particulate matters than that of controls. ROS, urinary t,t-MA, and particulate pollution in biomass-using kitchen had negative correlation, while SOD showed positive correlation with MSH2 and MLH1 expression. It appears that chronic exposure to biomass smoke reduces MMR response in airway epithelial cells, and oxidative stress plays an important role in the process. PMID:24146321

  1. Overlapping functions between XLF repair protein and 53BP1 DNA damage response factor in end joining and lymphocyte development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiangyu; Jiang, Wenxia; Dubois, Richard L; Yamamoto, Kenta; Wolner, Zachary; Zha, Shan

    2012-03-01

    Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), a major pathway of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair, is required during lymphocyte development to resolve the programmed DSBs generated during Variable, Diverse, and Joining [V(D)J] recombination. XRCC4-like factor (XLF) (also called Cernunnos or NHEJ1) is a unique component of the NHEJ pathway. Although germ-line mutations of other NHEJ factors abrogate lymphocyte development and lead to severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), XLF mutations cause a progressive lymphocytopenia that is generally less severe than SCID. Accordingly, XLF-deficient murine lymphocytes show no measurable defects in V(D)J recombination. We reported earlier that ATM kinase and its substrate histone H2AX are both essential for V(D)J recombination in XLF-deficient lymphocytes, despite moderate role in V(D)J recombination in WT cells. p53-binding protein 1 (53BP1) is another substrate of ATM. 53BP1 deficiency led to small reduction of peripheral lymphocyte number by compromising both synapse and end-joining at modest level during V(D)J recombination. Here, we report that 53BP1/XLF double deficiency blocks lymphocyte development at early progenitor stages, owing to severe defects in end joining during chromosomal V(D)J recombination. The unrepaired DNA ends are rapidly degraded in 53BP1(-/-)XLF(-/-) cells, as reported for H2AX(-/-)XLF(-/-) cells, revealing an end protection role for 53BP1 reminiscent of H2AX. In contrast to the early embryonic lethality of H2AX(-/-)XLF(-/-) mice, 53BP1(-/-)XLF(-/-) mice are born alive and develop thymic lymphomas with translocations involving the T-cell receptor loci. Together, our findings identify a unique function for 53BP1 in end-joining and tumor suppression. PMID:22355127

  2. Photosystem II Repair and Plant Immunity: Lessons Learned from Arabidopsis Mutant Lacking the THYLAKOID LUMEN PROTEIN 18.3

    PubMed Central

    Järvi, Sari; Isojärvi, Janne; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa; Salojärvi, Jarkko; Mamedov, Fikret; Suorsa, Marjaana; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplasts play an important role in the cellular sensing of abiotic and biotic stress. Signals originating from photosynthetic light reactions, in the form of redox and pH changes, accumulation of reactive oxygen and electrophile species or stromal metabolites are of key importance in chloroplast retrograde signaling. These signals initiate plant acclimation responses to both abiotic and biotic stresses. To reveal the molecular responses activated by rapid fluctuations in growth light intensity, gene expression analysis was performed with Arabidopsis thaliana wild type and the tlp18.3 mutant plants, the latter showing a stunted growth phenotype under fluctuating light conditions (Biochem. J, 406, 415–425). Expression pattern of genes encoding components of the photosynthetic electron transfer chain did not differ between fluctuating and constant light conditions, neither in wild type nor in tlp18.3 plants, and the composition of the thylakoid membrane protein complexes likewise remained unchanged. Nevertheless, the fluctuating light conditions repressed in wild-type plants a broad spectrum of genes involved in immune responses, which likely resulted from shade-avoidance responses and their intermixing with hormonal signaling. On the contrary, in the tlp18.3 mutant plants there was an imperfect repression of defense-related transcripts upon growth under fluctuating light, possibly by signals originating from minor malfunction of the photosystem II (PSII) repair cycle, which directly or indirectly modulated the transcript abundances of genes related to light perception via phytochromes. Consequently, a strong allocation of resources to defense reactions in the tlp18.3 mutant plants presumably results in the stunted growth phenotype under fluctuating light. PMID:27064270

  3. 3K3A-activated protein C stimulates postischemic neuronal repair by human neural stem cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaoming; Zhao, Zhen; Rege, Sanket V; Wang, Min; Si, Gabriel; Zhou, Yi; Wang, Su; Griffin, John H; Goldman, Steven A; Zlokovic, Berislav V

    2016-09-01

    Activated protein C (APC) is a blood protease with anticoagulant activity and cell-signaling activities mediated by the activation of protease-activated receptor 1 (F2R, also known as PAR1) and F2RL1 (also known as PAR3) via noncanonical cleavage. Recombinant variants of APC, such as the 3K3A-APC (Lys191-193Ala) mutant in which three Lys residues (KKK191-193) were replaced with alanine, and/or its other mutants with reduced (>90%) anticoagulant activity, engineered to reduce APC-associated bleeding risk while retaining normal cell-signaling activity, have shown benefits in preclinical models of ischemic stroke, brain trauma, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, sepsis, ischemic and reperfusion injury of heart, kidney and liver, pulmonary, kidney and gastrointestinal inflammation, diabetes and lethal body radiation. On the basis of proof-of-concept studies and an excellent safety profile in humans, 3K3A-APC has advanced to clinical trials as a neuroprotectant in ischemic stroke. Recently, 3K3A-APC has been shown to stimulate neuronal production by human neural stem and progenitor cells (NSCs) in vitro via a PAR1-PAR3-sphingosine-1-phosphate-receptor 1-Akt pathway, which suggests the potential for APC-based treatment as a strategy for structural repair in the human central nervous (CNS) system. Here we report that late postischemic treatment of mice with 3K3A-APC stimulates neuronal production by transplanted human NSCs, promotes circuit restoration and improves functional recovery. Thus, 3K3A-APC-potentiated neuronal recruitment from engrafted NSCs might offer a new approach to the treatment of stroke and related neurological disorders. PMID:27548576

  4. Photosystem II Repair and Plant Immunity: Lessons Learned from Arabidopsis Mutant Lacking the THYLAKOID LUMEN PROTEIN 18.3.

    PubMed

    Järvi, Sari; Isojärvi, Janne; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa; Salojärvi, Jarkko; Mamedov, Fikret; Suorsa, Marjaana; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplasts play an important role in the cellular sensing of abiotic and biotic stress. Signals originating from photosynthetic light reactions, in the form of redox and pH changes, accumulation of reactive oxygen and electrophile species or stromal metabolites are of key importance in chloroplast retrograde signaling. These signals initiate plant acclimation responses to both abiotic and biotic stresses. To reveal the molecular responses activated by rapid fluctuations in growth light intensity, gene expression analysis was performed with Arabidopsis thaliana wild type and the tlp18.3 mutant plants, the latter showing a stunted growth phenotype under fluctuating light conditions (Biochem. J, 406, 415-425). Expression pattern of genes encoding components of the photosynthetic electron transfer chain did not differ between fluctuating and constant light conditions, neither in wild type nor in tlp18.3 plants, and the composition of the thylakoid membrane protein complexes likewise remained unchanged. Nevertheless, the fluctuating light conditions repressed in wild-type plants a broad spectrum of genes involved in immune responses, which likely resulted from shade-avoidance responses and their intermixing with hormonal signaling. On the contrary, in the tlp18.3 mutant plants there was an imperfect repression of defense-related transcripts upon growth under fluctuating light, possibly by signals originating from minor malfunction of the photosystem II (PSII) repair cycle, which directly or indirectly modulated the transcript abundances of genes related to light perception via phytochromes. Consequently, a strong allocation of resources to defense reactions in the tlp18.3 mutant plants presumably results in the stunted growth phenotype under fluctuating light. PMID:27064270

  5. Role of Cell Cycle Regulation and MLH1, A Key DNA Mismatch Repair Protein, In Adaptive Survival Responses. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Boothman

    1999-08-11

    Due to several interesting findings on both adaptive survival responses (ASRs) and DNA mismatch repair (MMR), this grant was separated into two discrete Specific Aim sets (each with their own discrete hypotheses). The described experiments were simultaneously performed.

  6. Human MMH (OGG1) type 1a protein is a major enzyme for repair of 8-hydroxyguanine lesions in human cells.

    PubMed

    Monden, Y; Arai, T; Asano, M; Ohtsuka, E; Aburatani, H; Nishimura, S

    1999-05-19

    8-Hydroxyguanine (8-OH-G) is the site of a frequent mutagenic lesion of DNA, produced by oxidative damage. MutM of E. coli and OGG1 of Saccharomyces cervisiae are known to possess 8-OH-G glycosylase activity and apurinic (AP) site lyase activity to repair 8-OH-G lesions. Recently, cDNA clones of human OGG1 homologues (hMMH) of four isoforms (type 1a, type 1b, type 1c, and type 2) were isolated. However, it is unknown whether expression of endogenous hMMH proteins actually occurs in mammalian cells. Here using hMMH type 1a-specific antibody and cells overexpressing tag-fused hMMH type 1a, we show the expression of hMMH type 1a protein in many types of human cells and show that endogenous hMMH type 1a protein has 8-OH-G glycosylase/AP lyase activity. Furthermore, we show that upon depletion of hMMH type 1a protein in a whole cell extract by its antibody, most of the AP lyase activity is lost, indicating that hMMH type 1a protein is a major enzyme for repair of 8-OH-G lesions in human cells. PMID:10329432

  7. Ubiquitin-specific Protease 7 Regulates Nucleotide Excision Repair through Deubiquitinating XPC Protein and Preventing XPC Protein from Undergoing Ultraviolet Light-induced and VCP/p97 Protein-regulated Proteolysis*

    PubMed Central

    He, Jinshan; Zhu, Qianzheng; Wani, Gulzar; Sharma, Nidhi; Han, Chunhua; Qian, Jiang; Pentz, Kyle; Wang, Qi-en; Wani, Altaf A.

    2014-01-01

    Ubiquitin specific protease 7 (USP7) is a known deubiquitinating enzyme for tumor suppressor p53 and its downstream regulator, E3 ubiquitin ligase Mdm2. Here we report that USP7 regulates nucleotide excision repair (NER) via deubiquitinating xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XPC) protein, a critical damage recognition factor that binds to helix-distorting DNA lesions and initiates NER. XPC is ubiquitinated during the early stage of NER of UV light-induced DNA lesions. We demonstrate that transiently compromising cellular USP7 by siRNA and chemical inhibition leads to accumulation of ubiquitinated forms of XPC, whereas complete USP7 deficiency leads to rapid ubiquitin-mediated XPC degradation upon UV irradiation. We show that USP7 physically interacts with XPC in vitro and in vivo. Overexpression of wild-type USP7, but not its catalytically inactive or interaction-defective mutants, reduces the ubiquitinated forms of XPC. Importantly, USP7 efficiently deubiquitinates XPC-ubiquitin conjugates in deubiquitination assays in vitro. We further show that valosin-containing protein (VCP)/p97 is involved in UV light-induced XPC degradation in USP7-deficient cells. VCP/p97 is readily recruited to DNA damage sites and colocalizes with XPC. Chemical inhibition of the activity of VCP/p97 ATPase causes an increase in ubiquitinated XPC on DNA-damaged chromatin. Moreover, USP7 deficiency severely impairs the repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and, to a lesser extent, affects the repair of 6-4 photoproducts. Taken together, our findings uncovered an important role of USP7 in regulating NER via deubiquitinating XPC and by preventing its VCP/p97-regulated proteolysis. PMID:25118285

  8. UV-induced histone H2AX phosphorylation and DNA damage related proteins accumulate and persist in nucleotide excision repair-deficient XP-B cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Kyu-Seon; Bustin, Michael; Mazur, Sharlyn J; Appella, Ettore; Kraemer, Kenneth H

    2011-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSB) may be caused by ionizing radiation. In contrast, UV exposure forms dipyrimidine photoproducts and is not considered an inducer of DSB. We found that uniform or localized UV treatment induced phosphorylation of the DNA damage related (DDR) proteins H2AX, ATM and NBS1 and co-localization of γ-H2AX with the DDR proteins p-ATM, p-NBS1, Rad51 and FANCD2 that persisted for about 6h in normal human fibroblasts. This post-UV phosphorylation was observed in the absence of nucleotide excision repair (NER), since NER deficient XP-B cells (lacking functional XPB DNA repair helicase) and global genome repair-deficient rodent cells also showed phosphorylation and localization of these DDR proteins. Resolution of the DDR proteins was dependent on NER, since they persisted for 24h in the XP-B cells. In the normal and XP-B cells p53 and p21 was detected at 6h and 24h but Mdm2 was not induced in the XP-B cells. Post-UV induction of Wip1 phosphatase was detected in the normal cells but not in the XP-B cells. DNA DSB were detected with a neutral comet assay at 6h and 24h post-UV in the normal and XP-B cells. These results indicate that UV damage can activate the DDR pathway in the absence of NER. However, a later step in DNA damage processing involving induction of Wip1 and resolution of DDR proteins was not observed in the absence of NER. PMID:20947453

  9. The set1Delta mutation unveils a novel signaling pathway relayed by the Rad53-dependent hyperphosphorylation of replication protein A that leads to transcriptional activation of repair genes.

    PubMed

    Schramke, V; Neecke, H; Brevet, V; Corda, Y; Lucchini, G; Longhese, M P; Gilson, E; Géli, V

    2001-07-15

    SET domain proteins are present in chromosomal proteins involved in epigenetic control of transcription. The yeast SET domain protein Set1p regulates chromatin structure, DNA repair, and telomeric functions. We investigated the mechanism by which the absence of Set1p increases DNA repair capacities of checkpoint mutants. We show that deletion of SET1 induces a response relayed by the signaling kinase Rad53p that leads to the MEC1/TEL1-independent hyperphosphorylation of replication protein A middle subunit (Rfa2p). Consequently, the binding of Rfa2p to upstream repressing sequences (URS) of repair genes is decreased, thereby leading to their derepression. Our results correlate the set1Delta-dependent phosphorylation of Rfa2p with the transcriptional induction of repair genes. Moreover, we show that the deletion of the amino-terminal region of Rfa2p suppresses the sensitivity to ultraviolet radiation of a mec3Delta checkpoint mutant, abolishes the URS-mediated repression, and increases the expression of repair genes. This work provides an additional link for the role of Rfa2p in the regulation of the repair capacity of the cell and reveals a role for the phosphorylation of Rfa2p and unveils unsuspected connections between chromatin, signaling pathways, telomeres, and DNA repair. PMID:11459833

  10. Clubfoot repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... release; Talipes equinovarus - repair; Tibialis anterior tendon transfer Images Clubfoot repair - series References Kelly DM. Congenital Anomalies ... provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of ...

  11. Genetic polymorphisms of multiple DNA repair pathways impact age at diagnosis and TP53 mutations in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tasha R; Liu-Mares, Wen; Van Emburgh, Beth O; Levine, Edward A; Allen, Glenn O; Hill, Jeff W; Reis, Isildinha M; Kresty, Laura A; Pegram, Mark D; Miller, Mark S; Hu, Jennifer J

    2011-09-01

    Defective DNA repair may contribute to early age and late stage at time of diagnosis and mutations in critical tumor suppressor genes, such as TP53 in breast cancer. Using DNA samples from 436 breast cancer cases (374 Caucasians and 62 African-Americans), we tested these associations with 18 non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) in four DNA repair pathways: (i) base excision repair: ADPRT V762A, APE1 D148E, XRCC1 R194W/R280H/R399Q and POLD1 R119H; (ii) double-strand break repair: NBS1 E185Q and XRCC3 T241M; (iii) mismatch repair: MLH1 I219V, MSH3 R940Q/T1036A and MSH6 G39E and (iv) nucleotide excision repair: ERCC2 D312N/K751Q, ERCC4 R415Q, ERCC5 D1104H and XPC A499V/K939Q. Younger age at diagnosis (<50) was associated with ERCC2 312 DN/NN genotypes [odds ratio (OR) = 1.76; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.10, 2.81] and NBS1 185 QQ genotype (OR = 3.09; 95% CI = 1.47, 6.49). The XPC 939 QQ genotype was associated with TP53 mutations (OR = 5.80; 95% CI = 2.23, 15.09). There was a significant trend associating younger age at diagnosis (<50) with increasing numbers of risk genotypes for ERCC2 312 DN/NN, MSH6 39 EE and NBS1 185 QQ (P(trend) < 0.001). A similar significant trend was also observed associating TP53 mutations with increasing numbers of risk genotypes for XRCC1 399 QQ, XPC 939 QQ, ERCC4 415 QQ and XPC 499 AA (P(trend) < 0.001). Our pilot data suggest that nsSNPs of multiple DNA repair pathways are associated with younger age at diagnosis and TP53 mutations in breast cancer and larger studies are warranted to further evaluate these associations. PMID:21700777

  12. Downregulation of the cancer susceptibility protein WRAP53β in epithelial ovarian cancer leads to defective DNA repair and poor clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Hedström, E; Pederiva, C; Farnebo, J; Nodin, B; Jirström, K; Brennan, D J; Farnebo, M

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in the scaffold protein WRAP53β have previously been linked to carcinogenesis and, in particular, associated with an increased risk for epithelial ovarian cancer. Here, we investigated the pathogenic impact and prognostic significance of WRAP53β in connection with epithelial ovarian cancer and examined the underlying mechanisms. We find that reduced expression of WRAP53β in ovarian tumors correlated with attenuated DNA damage response and poor patient survival. Furthermore, in ovarian cancer cell lines, WRAP53β was rapidly recruited to DNA double-strand breaks, where it orchestrated the recruitment of repair factors involved in homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining, including RNF168, 53BP1, BRCA1 and RAD51. Mechanistically, WRAP53β accomplishes this by facilitating the necessary ubiquitinylation at DNA breaks. Finally, we demonstrate that loss of WRAP53β significantly impairs the repair of DNA double-strand breaks, resulting in their accumulation. Our findings establish WRAP53β as a regulator of homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining repair in ovarian cancer cells, suggesting that loss of this protein contributes to the development and/or progression of ovarian tumors. Moreover, our current observations identify the nuclear levels of WRAP53β as a promising biomarker for the survival of patients with ovarian cancer. PMID:26426684

  13. Pharmacogenetic Study in Rectal Cancer Patients Treated With Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy: Polymorphisms in Thymidylate Synthase, Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor, GSTP1, and DNA Repair Genes

    SciTech Connect

    Paez, David; Salazar, Juliana; Pare, Laia; Pertriz, Lourdes; Targarona, Eduardo; Rio, Elisabeth del; Barnadas, Agusti; Marcuello, Eugenio; Baiget, Montserrat

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Several studies have been performed to evaluate the usefulness of neoadjuvant treatment using oxaliplatin and fluoropyrimidines for locally advanced rectal cancer. However, preoperative biomarkers of outcome are lacking. We studied the polymorphisms in thymidylate synthase, epidermal growth factor receptor, glutathione S-transferase pi 1 (GSTP1), and several DNA repair genes to evaluate their usefulness as pharmacogenetic markers in a cohort of 128 rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Blood samples were obtained from 128 patients with Stage II-III rectal cancer. DNA was extracted from the peripheral blood nucleated cells, and the genotypes were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction amplification and automated sequencing techniques or using a 48.48 dynamic array on the BioMark system. The germline polymorphisms studied were thymidylate synthase, (VNTR/5 Prime UTR, 2R G>C single nucleotide polymorphism [SNP], 3R G>C SNP), epidermal growth factor receptor (Arg497Lys), GSTP1 (Ile105val), excision repair cross-complementing 1 (Asn118Asn, 8092C>A, 19716G>C), X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) (Arg194Trp, Arg280His, Arg399Gln), and xeroderma pigmentosum group D (Lys751Gln). The pathologic response, pathologic regression, progression-free survival, and overall survival were evaluated according to each genotype. Results: The Asterisk-Operator 3/ Asterisk-Operator 3 thymidylate synthase genotype was associated with a greater response rate (pathologic complete remission and microfoci residual tumor, 59% in Asterisk-Operator 3/ Asterisk-Operator 3 vs. 35% in Asterisk-Operator 2/ Asterisk-Operator 2 and Asterisk-Operator 2/ Asterisk-Operator 3; p = .013). For the thymidylate synthase genotype, the median progression-free survival was 103 months for the Asterisk-Operator 3/ Asterisk-Operator 3 patients and 84 months for the Asterisk-Operator 2/ Asterisk-Operator 2 and Asterisk-Operator 2/ Asterisk

  14. The catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase is required for cellular resistance to oxidative stress independent of DNA double strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mengxia; Lin, Yu-Fen; Palchik, Guillermo; Matsunaga, Shinji; Wang, Dong; Chen, Benjamin P.C.

    2014-01-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) are the two major kinases involved in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair, and are required for cellular resistance to ionizing radiation. While ATM is the key upstream kinase for DSB signaling, DNA-PKcs is primarily involved in DSB repair through the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) mechanism. In addition to DSB repair, ATM has been shown to be involved in oxidative stress response and could be activated directly in vitro upon hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatment. However, the role of DNA-PKcs in cellular response to oxidative stress is not clear. We hypothesize that DNA-PKcs may participate in the regulation of ATM activation in response to oxidative stress, and that this regulatory role is independent of its role in DNA double strand break repair. Our findings reveal that H2O2 induces hyperactivation of ATM signaling in DNA-PKcs deficient, but not Ligase 4 deficient cells, suggesting an NHEJ-independent role for DNA-PKcs. Furthermore, DNA-PKcs deficiency leads to the elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and to a decrease in cellular survival against H2O2. For the first time, our results reveal that DNA-PKcs plays a non-canonical role in the cellular response to oxidative stress, which is independent from its role in NHEJ. In addition, DNA-PKcs is a critical regulator of the oxidative stress response and contributes to the maintenance of redox homeostasis. Our findings reveal that DNA-PKcs is required for cellular resistance to oxidative stress and suppression of ROS build-up independently to its function in DSB repair. PMID:25224041

  15. The promotion of osteochondral repair by combined intra-articular injection of parathyroid hormone-related protein and implantation of a bi-layer collagen-silk scaffold.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Chen, Jialin; Tao, Jiadong; Hu, Changchang; Chen, Longkun; Zhao, Hongshi; Xu, Guowei; Heng, Boon C; Ouyang, Hong Wei

    2013-08-01

    The repair of osteochondral defects can be enhanced with scaffolds but is often accompanied with undesirable terminal differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) has been shown to inhibit aberrant differentiation, but administration at inappropriate time points would have adverse effects on chondrogenesis. This study aims to develop an effective tissue engineering strategy by combining PTHrP and collagen-silk scaffold for osteochondral defect repair. The underlying mechanisms of the synergistic effect of combining PTHrP administration with collagen-silk scaffold implantation for rabbit knee joint osteochondral defect repair were investigated. In vitro studies showed that PTHrP treatment significantly reduced Alizarin Red staining and expression of terminal differentiation-related markers. This is achieved in part through blocking activation of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. For the in vivo repair study, intra-articular injection of PTHrP was carried out at three different time windows (4-6, 7-9 and 10-12 weeks) together with implantation of a bi-layer collagen-silk scaffold. Defects treated with PTHrP at the 4-6 weeks time window exhibited better regeneration (reconstitution of cartilage and subchondral bone) with minimal terminal differentiation (hypertrophy, ossification and matrix degradation), as well as enhanced chondrogenesis (cell shape, Col2 and GAG accumulation) compared with treatment at other time windows. Furthermore, the timing of PTHrP administration also influenced PTHrP receptor expression, thus affecting the treatment outcome. Our results demonstrated that intra-articular injection of PTHrP at 4-6 weeks post-injury together with collagen-silk scaffold implantation is an effective strategy for inhibiting terminal differentiation and enhancing chondrogenesis, thus improving cartilage repair and regeneration in a rabbit model. PMID:23702148

  16. Cartilage Repair in a Rat Model of Osteoarthritis Through Intraarticular Transplantation of Muscle-Derived Stem Cells Expressing Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4 and Soluble Flt-1

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Cooper, Gregory M.; Gharaibeh, Burhan; Meszaros, Laura B.; Li, Guangheng; Usas, Arvydas; Fu, Freddie H.; Huard, Johnny

    2016-01-01

    Objective The control of angiogenesis during chondrogenic differentiation is an important issue affecting the use of stem cells in cartilage repair, especially with regard to the persistence of regenerated cartilage. This study was undertaken to investigate the effect of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) stimulation and the blocking of VEGF with its antagonist, soluble Flt-1 (sFlt-1), on the chondrogenesis of skeletal muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs) in a rat model of osteoarthritis (OA). Methods We investigated the effect of VEGF on cartilage repair in an immunodeficiency rat model of OA after intraarticular injection of murine MDSCs expressing bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP-4) in combination with MDSCs expressing VEGF or sFlt-1. Results In vivo, a combination of sFlt-1– and BMP-4–transduced MDSCs demonstrated better repair without osteophyte formation macroscopically and histologically following OA induction, when compared with the other groups. Higher differentiation/proliferation and lower levels of chondrocyte apoptosis were also observed in sFlt-1– and BMP-4–transduced MDSCs compared with a combination of VEGF- and BMP-4– transduced MDSCs or with BMP-4–transduced MDSCs alone. In vitro experiments with mixed pellet co-culture of MDSCs and OA chondrocytes revealed that BMP-4– transduced MDSCs produced the largest pellets, which had the highest gene expression of not only type II collagen and SOX9 but also type X collagen, suggesting formation of hypertrophic chondrocytes. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that MDSC-based therapy involving sFlt-1 and BMP-4 repairs articular cartilage in OA mainly by having a beneficial effect on chondrogenesis by the donor and host cells as well as by preventing angiogenesis, which eventually prevents cartilage resorption, resulting in persistent cartilage regeneration and repair. PMID:19404941

  17. Repair of rat cranial bone defect by using bone morphogenetic protein-2-related peptide combined with microspheres composed of polylactic acid/polyglycolic acid copolymer and chitosan.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingfeng; Jin, Lin; Wang, Mingbo; Zhu, Shaobo; Xu, Shuyun

    2015-08-01

    The effects of the transplanted bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) -related peptide P24 and rhBMP2 combined with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)/chitosan (CS) microspheres were investigated in promoting the repair of rat cranial bone defect. Forty white rats were selected and equally divided into four groups (group A: 1 μg of rhBMP2/PLGA/CS composite; group B: 3 mg of P24/PLGA/CS composite; group C: 0.5 μg of rhBMP2 + 1.5 mg of P24/PLGA/CS composite; group D: blank PLGA/CS material), and rat cranial bone defect models with a diameter of 5 mm were established. The materials were transplanted to the cranial bone defects. The animals were sacrificed on weeks 6 and 12 post-operation. Radiographic examinations (x-ray imaging and 3D CT scanning) and histological evaluations were performed. The repaired areas of cranial bone defects were measured, and the osteogenetic abilities of various materials were compared. Cranial histology, imaging, and repaired area measurements showed that the osteogenetic effects at two time points (weeks 6 and 12) in group C were better than those in groups A and B. The effects in groups A and B were similar. Group D achieved the worst repair effect of cranial bone defects, where a large number of fibrous connective tissues were observed. The PLGA/CS composite microspheres loaded with rhBMP2 and P24 had optimal concrescence and could mutually increase their osteogenesis capability. rhBMP2 + P24/PLGA/CS composite is a novel material for bone defect repair with stable activity to induce bone formation. PMID:26154695

  18. Cantharidin induces DNA damage and inhibits DNA repair-associated protein levels in NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hsia, Te-Chun; Lin, Ju-Hwa; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Tang, Nou-Ying; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Wu, Shin-Hwar; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-09-01

    Cantharidin is one of the major compounds from mylabris and it has cytotoxic effects in many different types of human cancer cells. Previously, we found that cantharidin induced cell death through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction in human lung cancer NCI-H460 cells. However, cantharidin-affected DNA damage, repair, and associated protein levels in NCI-H460 cells have not been examined. In this study, we determined whether cantharidin induced DNA damage and condensation and altered levels of proteins in NCI-H460 cells in vitro. Incubation of NCI-H460 cells with 0, 2.5, 5, 10, and 15 μM of cantharidin caused a longer DNA migration smear (comet tail). Cantharidin also increased DNA condensation. These effects were dose-dependent. Cantharidin (5, 10, and 15 μM) treatment of NCI-H460 cells reduced protein levels of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA-1), 14-3-3 proteins sigma (14-3-3σ), DNA-dependent serine/threonine protein kinase (DNA-PK), O(6) -methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), and mediator of DNA damage checkpoint protein 1 (MDC1). Protein translocation of p-p53, p-H2A.X (S140), and MDC1 from cytoplasm to nucleus was induced by cantharidin in NCI-H460 cells. Taken together, this study showed that cantharidin caused DNA damage and inhibited levels of DNA repair-associated proteins. These effects may contribute to cantharidin-induced cell death in vitro. PMID:24639390

  19. Downregulation of SWI5 and CTC1 genes: hepatitis B virus DNA polymerase transactivated protein 1-mediated inhibition of DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Yao, X-K; Pan, Z-P; Li, Y; Lun, Y-Z; Chi, Q; Jiang, S-J; Wang, F; Sui, W

    2016-06-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA polymerase transactivated protein 1 (HBVDNAPTP1) is a novel protein upregulated by HBV DNA polymerase, which has been screened by suppression subtractive hybridization technique (SSH) (GenBank Acc. No. AY450389). A vector pcDNA3.1 (-)/myc-His A-HBVDNAPTP1 was constructed and used to transfect acute monocytic leukemia cell line THP-1. HBVDNAPTP1 expression was detected by Western blot analysis in the cells. A cDNA library of genes downregulated by HBVDNAPTP1 in THP-1 cells was made in pGEM-T Easy using SSH. The cDNAs were sequenced and analyzed with BLAST search against the sequences in GenBank. Some sequences, such as DNA repair protein SWI5 homolog (SWI5) and CTS telomere maintenance complex component 1 (CTC1), might be involved in DNA repair. Protein expression of SWI5 and CTC1 was identified by Western blot in THP-1 cells. HBVDNAPTP1 could downregulate the expression of SWI5 and CTC1 at translation level. PMID:27265469

  20. Zinc finger transcription factor CASZ1 interacts with histones, DNA repair proteins and recruits NuRD complex to regulate gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhihui; Lam, Norris; Thiele, Carol J

    2015-09-29

    The zinc finger transcription factor CASZ1 has been found to control neural fate-determination in flies, regulate murine and frog cardiac development, control murine retinal cell progenitor expansion and function as a tumor suppressor gene in humans. However, the molecular mechanism by which CASZ1 regulates gene transcription to exert these diverse biological functions has not been described. Here we identify co-factors that are recruited by CASZ1b to regulate gene transcription using co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) and mass spectrometry assays. We find that CASZ1b binds to the nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase (NuRD) complex, histones and DNA repair proteins. Mutagenesis of the CASZ1b protein assay demonstrates that the N-terminus of CASZ1b is required for NuRD binding, and a poly(ADP-ribose) binding motif in the CASZ1b protein is required for histone H3 and DNA repair proteins binding. The N-terminus of CASZ1b fused to an artificial DNA-binding domain (GAL4DBD) causes a significant repression of transcription (5xUAS-luciferase assay), which could be blocked by treatment with an HDAC inhibitor. Realtime PCR results show that the transcriptional activity of CASZ1b mutants that abrogate NuRD or histone H3/DNA binding is significantly decreased. This indicates a model in which CASZ1b binds to chromatin and recruits NuRD complexes to orchestrate epigenetic-mediated transcriptional programs. PMID:26296975

  1. Biologically engineered protein-graft-poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels: A cell-adhesive and plasmin-degradable biosynthetic material for tissue repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halstenberg, Sven

    2002-01-01

    The goal of the research presented in this dissertation was to create a biomimetic artificial material that exhibits functions of extracellular matrix relevant for improved nerve regeneration. Neural adhesion peptides were photoimmobilized on highly crosslinked poly(ethylene glycol)-based substrates that were otherwise non-adhesive. Neurons adhered in two-dimensional patterns for eleven hours, but no neurites extended. To enable neurite extension and nerve regeneration in three dimensions, and to address the need for specifically cell adhesive and cell degradable materials for clinical applications in tissue repair in general, an artificial protein was recombinantly expressed and purified that consisted of a repeating amino acid sequence based on fibrinogen and anti-thrombin III. The recombinant protein contained integrin-binding RGD sites, plasmin degradation sites, heparin binding sites, and six thiol-containing cysteine residues as grafting sites for poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate via Michael-type conjugate addition. The resulting protein-graft-poly(ethylene glycol)acrylates were crosslinked by photopolymerization to form hydrogels. Although three-dimensional, RGD mediated and serine protease-dependent ingrowth of human fibroblasts into protein-graft-poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels occurred, only surface neurite outgrowth was observed from chick dorsal root ganglia. Axonal outgrowth depended on the concentration of matrix-bound heparin, suggesting that improved mechanical strength of the hydrogels and possible immobilization of neuroactive factors due to the presence of heparin promoted neurite outgrowth. Together, the above results show that specific biological functions can be harnessed by protein-graft-poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels to serve as matrices for tissue repair and regeneration. In particular, the two design objectives, specific cell adhesion and degradability by cell-associated proteases, were fulfilled by the material. In the future, this and

  2. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the DNA repair genes in HPV-positive cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, Deepti; Banerjee, Ayan; Pathak, Sujata; Thakur, Bhaskar; Jain, Sunesh K; Singh, Neeta

    2016-05-01

    Genetic variation in DNA repair genes can modulate DNA repair capacity and may be related to the risk of cancer. The human papillomavirus is considered to be a necessary but not sufficient cause for cervical cancer and, therefore, other factors contribute to the carcinogenesis. A hereditary component for this neoplasia has been reported. Evaluation of the association of six polymorphisms was carried out in the following DNA repair genes: XRCC1 (Arg194Trp, Arg280His, and Arg399Gln), ERCC1 (Asp118Asp), ERCC2 (Lys751Gln), and ERCC4 (Arg415Gln). The cases (n=110) included 65 squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) and 45 squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL). Controls (n=68) were recruited from among women without cervical abnormalities. Genotypes were determined by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism and DNA sequencing. A positive association was observed between the polymorphisms of XRCC1 genes, that is, in codons 194 [P=0.001, odds ratio (OR)=20.1, 95% confidence interval (CI)=5.9-68.8], 280 (P=0.001, OR=5.4, 95% CI=2.3-12.6), and 399 (P=0.008, OR=4.2, 95% CI=1.5-12.1) and cervical cancer. SIL patients also showed a significant association with codon 194 (P=0.012, OR=3.8, 95% CI=1.3-10.6), but not with 280 (P=0.35) and 399 (P=0.81). A positive correlation was also found in ERCC4 Gln415Gln in both SCCs and SILs (P=0.001, OR=21.3, 95% CI=7.1-64.0 and P=0.001, OR=7.8, 95% CI=2.9-20.9, respectively). For ERCC2 Gln751Gln, the association was significant for both SCCs (P=0.001, OR=10.1, 95% CI=2.6-37.9) and SILs (P=0.001, OR=8.9, 95% CI=2.8-28.3). However, the risk of SCC did not appear to differ significantly among individuals with the ERCC1 Asp118Asp genotype (P=0.404). For SILs, it appeared to be a protective genotype (95% CI=0.1-0.7). This study indicates that variant types of DNA repair genes play an important role in modifying individual susceptibility to SCC. PMID:25812040

  3. Vascular endothelial growth factor/bone morphogenetic protein-2 bone marrow combined modification of the mesenchymal stem cells to repair the avascular necrosis of the femoral head

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiao-Wei; Cui, Da-Ping; Zhao, De-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) combined with bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) was used to repair avascular necrosis of the femoral head, which can maintain the osteogenic phenotype of seed cells, and effectively secrete VEGF and BMP-2, and effectively promote blood vessel regeneration and contribute to formation and revascularization of tissue engineered bone tissues. To observe the therapeutic effect on the treatment of avascular necrosis of the femoral head by using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) modified by VEGF-165 and BMP-2 in vitro. The models were avascular necrosis of femoral head of rabbits on right leg. There groups were single core decompression group, core decompression + BMSCs group, core decompression + VEGF-165/BMP-2 transfect BMSCs group. Necrotic bone was cleared out under arthroscope. Arthroscopic observation demonstrated that necrotic bone was cleared out in each group, and fresh blood flowed out. Histomorphology determination showed that blood vessel number and new bone area in the repair region were significantly greater at various time points following transplantation in the core decompression + VEGF-165/BMP-2 transfect BMSCs group compared with single core decompression group and core decompression + BMSCs group (P < 0.05). These suggested that VEGF-165/BMP-2 gene transfection strengthened osteogenic effects of BMSCs, elevated number and quality of new bones and accelerated the repair of osteonecrosis of the femoral head. PMID:26629044

  4. In vivo effects of UV radiation on multiple endpoints and expression profiles of DNA repair and heat shock protein (Hsp) genes in the cycloid copepod Paracyclopina nana.

    PubMed

    Won, Eun-Ji; Han, Jeonghoon; Lee, Yeonjung; Kumar, K Suresh; Shin, Kyung-Hoon; Lee, Su-Jae; Park, Heum Gi; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the effects of ultraviolet (UV) radiation on energy acquisition and consumption, the copepod Paracyclopina nana was irradiated with several doses (0-3kJ/m(2)) of UV. After UV radiation, we measured the re-brooding success, growth pattern of newly hatched nauplii, ingestion rate, and assimilation of diet. In addition, we checked the modulated patterns of DNA repair and heat shock protein (hsp) chaperoning genes of P. nana. UV-B radiation induced a significant reduction (7-87%) of the re-brooding rate of ovigerous females, indicating that UV-induced egg sac damage is closely correlated with a reduction in the hatching rate of UV-irradiated ovigerous female offspring. Using chlorophyll a and stable carbon isotope incubation experiments, we found a dose-dependent decrease (P<0.05) in food ingestion and the rate of assimilation to the body in response to UV radiation, implying that P. nana has an underlying ability to shift its balanced-energy status from growth and reproduction to DNA repair and adaptation. Also, expression of P. nana base excision repair (BER)-associated genes and hsp chaperoning genes was significantly increased in response to UV radiation in P. nana. These findings indicate that even 1kJ/m(2) of UV radiation induces a reduction in reproduction and growth patterns, alters the physiological balance and inhibits the ability to cope with UV-induced damage in P. nana. PMID:26001085

  5. Testicular Nuclear Receptor 4 (TR4) Regulates UV Light-induced Responses via Cockayne Syndrome B Protein-mediated Transcription-coupled DNA Repair*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Su; Yan, Shian-Jang; Lee, Yi-Fen; Liu, Ning-Chun; Ting, Huei-Ju; Li, Gonghui; Wu, Qiao; Chen, Lu-Min; Chang, Chawnshang

    2011-01-01

    UV irradiation is one of the major external insults to cells and can cause skin aging and cancer. In response to UV light-induced DNA damage, the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathways are activated to remove DNA lesions. We report here that testicular nuclear receptor 4 (TR4), a member of the nuclear receptor family, modulates DNA repair specifically through the transcription-coupled (TC) NER pathway but not the global genomic NER pathway. The level of Cockayne syndrome B protein (CSB), a member of the TC-NER pathway, is 10-fold reduced in TR4-deficient mouse tissues, and TR4 directly regulates CSB at the transcriptional level. Moreover, restored CSB expression rescues UV hypersensitivity of TR4-deficient cells. Together, these results indicate that TR4 modulates UV sensitivity by promoting the TC-NER DNA repair pathway through transcriptional regulation of CSB. These results may lead to the development of new treatments for UV light-sensitive syndromes, skin cancer, and aging. PMID:21918225

  6. Distinct roles of Ape1 protein, an enzyme involved in DNA repair, in high or low linear energy transfer ionizing radiation-induced cell killing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongyan; Wang, Xiang; Chen, Guangnan; Zhang, Xiangming; Tang, Xiaobing; Park, Dongkyoo; Cucinotta, Francis A; Yu, David S; Deng, Xingming; Dynan, William S; Doetsch, Paul W; Wang, Ya

    2014-10-31

    High linear energy transfer (LET) radiation from space heavy charged particles or a heavier ion radiotherapy machine kills more cells than low LET radiation, mainly because high LET radiation-induced DNA damage is more difficult to repair. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is the ratio of the effects generated by high LET radiation to low LET radiation. Previously, our group and others demonstrated that the cell-killing RBE is involved in the interference of high LET radiation with non-homologous end joining but not homologous recombination repair. This effect is attributable, in part, to the small DNA fragments (≤40 bp) directly produced by high LET radiation, the size of which prevents Ku protein from efficiently binding to the two ends of one fragment at the same time, thereby reducing non-homologous end joining efficiency. Here we demonstrate that Ape1, an enzyme required for processing apurinic/apyrimidinic (known as abasic) sites, is also involved in the generation of small DNA fragments during the repair of high LET radiation-induced base damage, which contributes to the higher RBE of high LET radiation-induced cell killing. This discovery opens a new direction to develop approaches for either protecting astronauts from exposure to space radiation or benefiting cancer patients by sensitizing tumor cells to high LET radiotherapy. PMID:25210033

  7. Radio-adaptive response of base excision repair genes and proteins in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Toprani, Sneh M; Das, Birajalaxmi

    2015-09-01

    Radio-adaptive response is a mechanism whereby a low-dose exposure (priming dose) induces resistance to a higher dose (challenging dose) thus significantly reducing its detrimental effects. Radiation-induced DNA damage gets repaired through various DNA repair pathways in human cells depending upon the type of lesion. The base excision repair (BER) pathway repairs radiation-induced base damage, abasic sites and single-strand breaks in cellular DNA. In the present study, an attempt has been made to investigate the involvement of BER genes and proteins in the radio-adaptive response in human resting peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Venous blood samples were collected from 20 randomly selected healthy male individuals with written informed consent. PBMC were isolated and irradiated at a priming dose of 0.1 Gy followed 4h later with a challenging dose of 2.0 Gy (primed cells). Quantitation of DNA damage was done using the alkaline comet assay immediately and expression profile of BER genes and proteins were studied 30 min after the challenging dose using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot, respectively. The overall result showed significant (P ≤ 0.05) reduction of DNA damage in terms of percentage of DNA in tail (%T) with a priming dose of 0.1 Gy followed by a challenging dose of 2.0 Gy after 4 h. Twelve individuals showed significant (P ≤ 0.05) reduction in %T whereas eight individuals showed marginal reduction in DNA damage that was not statistically significant. However, at the transcriptional level, BER genes such as APE1, FEN1 and LIGASE1 showed significant (P ≤ 0.05) up-regulation in both groups. Significant (P ≤ 0.05) up-regulation was also observed at the protein level for OGG1, APE1, MBD4, FEN1 and LIGASE1 in primed cells. Up-regulation of some BER genes and proteins such as APE1, FEN1 and LIGASE1 in primed cells of resting PBMC is suggestive of active involvement of the BER pathway in radio-adaptive response

  8. Mouse HORMAD1 is a meiosis i checkpoint protein that modulates DNA double- strand break repair during female meiosis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yong-Hyun; McGuire, Megan M; Rajkovic, Aleksandar

    2013-08-01

    Oocytes in embryonic ovaries enter meiosis I and arrest in the diplonema stage. Perturbations in meiosis I, such as abnormal double-strand break (DSB) formation and repair, adversely affect oocyte survival. We previously discovered that HORMAD1 is a critical component of the synaptonemal complex but not essential for oocyte survival. No significant differences were observed in the number of primordial, primary, secondary, and developing follicles between wild-type and Hormad1(−/−)newborn, 8-day, and 80-day ovaries. Meiosis I progression in Hormad1(−/−) embryonic ovaries was normal through the zygotene stage and in oocytes arrested in diplonema; however, we did not visualize oocytes with completely synapsed chromosomes. We investigated effects of HORMAD1 deficiency on the kinetics of DNA DSB formation and repair in the mouse ovary. We irradiated Embryonic Day 16.5 wild-type and Hormad1(−/−) ovaries and monitored DSB repair using gammaH2AX, RAD51, and DMC1 immunofluorescence. Our results showed a significant drop in unrepaired DSBs in the irradiated Hormad1(−/−) zygotene oocytes as compared to the wild-type oocytes. Moreover, Hormad1 deficiency rescued Dmc1(−/−) oocytes. These results indicate that Hormad1 deficiency promotes DMC1-independent DSB repairs, which in turn helps asynaptic Hormad1(−/−) oocytes resist perinatal loss. PMID:23759310

  9. Human DNA repair genes.

    PubMed

    Wood, R D; Mitchell, M; Sgouros, J; Lindahl, T

    2001-02-16

    Cellular DNA is subjected to continual attack, both by reactive species inside cells and by environmental agents. Toxic and mutagenic consequences are minimized by distinct pathways of repair, and 130 known human DNA repair genes are described here. Notable features presently include four enzymes that can remove uracil from DNA, seven recombination genes related to RAD51, and many recently discovered DNA polymerases that bypass damage, but only one system to remove the main DNA lesions induced by ultraviolet light. More human DNA repair genes will be found by comparison with model organisms and as common folds in three-dimensional protein structures are determined. Modulation of DNA repair should lead to clinical applications including improvement of radiotherapy and treatment with anticancer drugs and an advanced understanding of the cellular aging process. PMID:11181991

  10. Heat shock protein 70 enhanced deoxyribonucleic acid base excision repair in human leukemic cells after ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Bases, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) of DNA damage in irradiated THP1 human leukemic cells was stimulated by pretreating the cells with exogenous recombinant Hsp70. The treatment of THP1 cells with recombinant Hsp70 in cell culture promoted repair by reducing the frequency of apurinic, apyrimidinic (AP) sites in DNA before and after 1.3 Gy of radiation. However, by 30 minutes after 2.6 Gy, accelerated repair of abasic sites supervened, which may contribute to the loss of the very-low-dose cell hypersensitivity seen in clonogenic studies of other laboratories. After irradiation with 2.6 Gy, the crucial initial glycosylase step was markedly incomplete when cells had been transfected 24 hours before with a small interfering RNA (siRNA) designed to inhibit synthesis of Hsp70. In confirmation, lysates from irradiated siRNA-treated cells after 2.6 Gy were deficient in uracil glycosylase activity (UDG). Transfection with a scrambled RNA of the same size did not interfere with the glycosylase step, ie, the prompt conversion of damaged pyrimidine sites to abasic sites as well as the subsequent repair of those sites. BER measured by reduction of DNA AP sites before and after low-dose radiation was also deficient in THP1 cells that had been transfected with the siRNA designed to inhibit synthesis of Hsp70. These results implicate BER and the participation of Hsp70 in the repair of DNA in human leukemic cells with the doses of ionizing radiation used in clinical regimens. PMID:17009597

  11. A Synthetic Lethal Screen Identifies DNA Repair Pathways that Sensitize Cancer Cells to Combined ATR Inhibition and Cisplatin Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Mohni, Kareem N.; Thompson, Petria S.; Luzwick, Jessica W.; Glick, Gloria G.; Pendleton, Christopher S.; Lehmann, Brian D.; Pietenpol, Jennifer A.; Cortez, David

    2015-01-01

    The DNA damage response kinase ATR may be a useful cancer therapeutic target. ATR inhibition synergizes with loss of ERCC1, ATM, XRCC1 and DNA damaging chemotherapy agents. Clinical trials have begun using ATR inhibitors in combination with cisplatin. Here we report the first synthetic lethality screen with a combination treatment of an ATR inhibitor (ATRi) and cisplatin. Combination treatment with ATRi/cisplatin is synthetically lethal with loss of the TLS polymerase ζ and 53BP1. Other DNA repair pathways including homologous recombination and mismatch repair do not exhibit synthetic lethal interactions with ATRi/cisplatin, even though loss of some of these repair pathways sensitizes cells to cisplatin as a single-agent. We also report that ATRi strongly synergizes with PARP inhibition, even in homologous recombination-proficient backgrounds. Lastly, ATR inhibitors were able to resensitize cisplatin-resistant cell lines to cisplatin. These data provide a comprehensive analysis of DNA repair pathways that exhibit synthetic lethality with ATR inhibitors when combined with cisplatin chemotherapy, and will help guide patient selection strategies as ATR inhibitors progress into the cancer clinic. PMID:25965342

  12. Production of VEGF receptor 1 and 2 mRNA and protein during endochondral bone repair is differential and healing phase specific

    PubMed Central

    Reumann, Marie K.; Nair, Turya; Strachna, Olga; Boskey, Adele L.

    2010-01-01

    Physiological disturbances, including temporary hypoxia, are expected to drive angiogenesis during bone repair. Evidence suggests that the angiogenic ligand vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A plays an important role in this process. We characterized the expression of two receptors that are essential for mediating VEGF signaling, VEGFR1/Flt-1 and VEGFR2/Flk-1/KDR, in a mouse rib fracture model. Their mRNA and protein levels were assessed in four healing phases, which were characterized histologically as hemorrhage formation on postfracture day (PFD) 1, inflammatory response on PFD 3, initiation of callus development on PFD 7, and the presence of a mature callus on PFD 14. Transcript was detected for VEGFR1 and VEGFR2, as well as VEGF. While mRNA expression of VEGFR1 was monophasic throughout all healing phases, VEGFR2 showed a biphasic profile with significantly increased mRNA expression during callus formation and maturation. Expression of VEGF mRNA was characterized by a more gradual increase during callus formation. The protein level for VEGFR1 was below detection sensitivity during the initial healing phase. It was then restored to a stable level, detectable through the subsequent healing phases. Hence, the VEGFR1 protein levels partially mirrored the transcript expression profile. In comparison, the protein level of VEGFR2 increased gradually during the healing phases and peaked at callus maturation. This correlated well with the transcriptional expression of VEGFR2. Intact bone from age-matched male mice had considerable protein levels of VEGFR1 and VEGF, but no detectable VEGFR2. Together, these findings uncovered expression signatures of the VEGF-VEGFR axis in endochondral bone repair. PMID:20947709

  13. An Intrinsically Disordered Region of the DNA Repair Protein Nbs1 Is a Species-Specific Barrier to Herpes Simplex Virus 1 in Primates.

    PubMed

    Lou, Dianne I; Kim, Eui Tae; Meyerson, Nicholas R; Pancholi, Neha J; Mohni, Kareem N; Enard, David; Petrov, Dmitri A; Weller, Sandra K; Weitzman, Matthew D; Sawyer, Sara L

    2016-08-10

    Humans occasionally transmit herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) to captive primates, who reciprocally harbor alphaherpesviruses poised for zoonotic transmission to humans. To understand the basis for the species-specific restriction of HSV-1 in primates, we simulated what might happen during the cross-species transmission of HSV-1 and found that the DNA repair protein Nbs1 from only some primate species is able to promote HSV-1 infection. The Nbs1 homologs that promote HSV-1 infection also interact with the HSV-1 ICP0 protein. ICP0 interaction mapped to a region of structural disorder in the Nbs1 protein. Chimeras reversing patterns of disorder in Nbs1 reversed titers of HSV-1 produced in the cell. By extending this analysis to 1,237 virus-interacting mammalian proteins, we show that proteins that interact with viruses are highly enriched in disorder, suggesting that viruses commonly interact with host proteins through intrinsically disordered domains. PMID:27512903

  14. Stabilization of Ultraviolet (UV)-stimulated Scaffold Protein A by Interaction with Ubiquitin-specific Peptidase 7 Is Essential for Transcription-coupled Nucleotide Excision Repair.

    PubMed

    Higa, Mitsuru; Zhang, Xue; Tanaka, Kiyoji; Saijo, Masafumi

    2016-06-24

    UV-sensitive syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hypersensitivity to UV light and deficiency in transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER), a subpathway of nucleotide excision repair that rapidly removes transcription-blocking DNA damage. UV-sensitive syndrome consists of three genetic complementation groups caused by mutations in the CSA, CSB, and UVSSA genes. UV-stimulated scaffold protein A (UVSSA), the product of UVSSA, which is required for stabilization of Cockayne syndrome group B (CSB) protein and reappearance of the hypophosphorylated form of RNA polymerase II after UV irradiation, forms a complex with ubiquitin-specific peptidase 7 (USP7). In this study, we demonstrated that the deubiquitination activity of USP7 is suppressed by its interaction with UVSSA. The interaction required the tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor domain of USP7 and the central region of UVSSA and was disrupted by an amino acid substitution in the tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor-binding motif of UVSSA. Cells expressing mutant UVSSA were highly sensitive to UV irradiation and defective in recovery of RNA synthesis after UV irradiation. These results indicate that the interaction between UVSSA and USP7 is important for TC-NER. Furthermore, the mutant UVSSA was rapidly degraded by the proteasome, and CSB was also degraded after UV irradiation as observed in UVSSA-deficient cells. Thus, stabilization of UVSSA by interaction with USP7 is essential for TC-NER. PMID:27129218

  15. Quantitative genomic analysis of RecA protein binding during DNA double-strand break repair reveals RecBCD action in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cockram, Charlotte A.; Filatenkova, Milana; Danos, Vincent; El Karoui, Meriem; Leach, David R. F.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding molecular mechanisms in the context of living cells requires the development of new methods of in vivo biochemical analysis to complement established in vitro biochemistry. A critically important molecular mechanism is genetic recombination, required for the beneficial reassortment of genetic information and for DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR). Central to recombination is the RecA (Rad51) protein that assembles into a spiral filament on DNA and mediates genetic exchange. Here we have developed a method that combines chromatin immunoprecipitation with next-generation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) and mathematical modeling to quantify RecA protein binding during the active repair of a single DSB in the chromosome of Escherichia coli. We have used quantitative genomic analysis to infer the key in vivo molecular parameters governing RecA loading by the helicase/nuclease RecBCD at recombination hot-spots, known as Chi. Our genomic analysis has also revealed that DSBR at the lacZ locus causes a second RecBCD-mediated DSBR event to occur in the terminus region of the chromosome, over 1 Mb away. PMID:26261330

  16. Quantitative genomic analysis of RecA protein binding during DNA double-strand break repair reveals RecBCD action in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cockram, Charlotte A; Filatenkova, Milana; Danos, Vincent; El Karoui, Meriem; Leach, David R F

    2015-08-25

    Understanding molecular mechanisms in the context of living cells requires the development of new methods of in vivo biochemical analysis to complement established in vitro biochemistry. A critically important molecular mechanism is genetic recombination, required for the beneficial reassortment of genetic information and for DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR). Central to recombination is the RecA (Rad51) protein that assembles into a spiral filament on DNA and mediates genetic exchange. Here we have developed a method that combines chromatin immunoprecipitation with next-generation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) and mathematical modeling to quantify RecA protein binding during the active repair of a single DSB in the chromosome of Escherichia coli. We have used quantitative genomic analysis to infer the key in vivo molecular parameters governing RecA loading by the helicase/nuclease RecBCD at recombination hot-spots, known as Chi. Our genomic analysis has also revealed that DSBR at the lacZ locus causes a second RecBCD-mediated DSBR event to occur in the terminus region of the chromosome, over 1 Mb away. PMID:26261330

  17. Construction of nerve guide conduits from cellulose/soy protein composite membranes combined with Schwann cells and pyrroloquinoline quinone for the repair of peripheral nerve defect

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Lihua; Gan, Li; Liu, Yongming; Tian, Weiqun; Tong, Zan; Wang, Xiong; Huselstein, Celine; Chen, Yun

    2015-02-20

    conduits in the field of nerve tissue engineering. - Highlights: • A novel nerve conduit was constructed and applied to repair nerve defect in rats. • Transparent hollow cellulose/soy protein isolate tube was used as conduit matrix. • Pyrroloquinoline quinine was adsorbed into the hollow tube as nerve growth factor. • Schwann cells were cultured into the hollow tube as seed cells. • The new nerve conduit could repair and reconstruct the peripheral nerve defects.

  18. The role of secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) in cardiac repair and fibrosis: Does expression of SPARC by macrophages influence outcomes?

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Amy D

    2016-04-01

    Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) is a matricellular, collagen-binding protein. Matricellular proteins are described as extracellular matrix-associated proteins that do not serve classical structural roles in the matrix such as those ascribed to laminins and collagens. The family of matricellular proteins modulates cell:extracellular matrix interactions and is actively expressed during tissue remodeling. Functional activities attributed to SPARC in cultured cells include regulation of cell adhesion, cytoskeletal rearrangement, proliferation, and matrix assembly. The primary phenotype characteristic of SPARC-null mice is a deficit in amounts of fibrillar collagen and fibril morphology. Strikingly, SPARC-null mice demonstrate a blunted fibrotic response in a number of different tissue settings. The role of monocyte/macrophages as an important component of tissue fibrosis is becoming increasingly appreciated. Expression of SPARC by bone marrow derived inflammatory cells raises the interesting proposition that SPARC produced by infiltrating leukocytes might contribute to the course of inflammation and tissue fibrosis in the heart. This review will summarize results from studies defining the function of SPARC in myocardial repair and fibrosis and results from other non-cardiac tissues that shed light onto possible consequences of SPARC expression by monocyte/macrophages in the setting of heart disease. PMID:26582465

  19. Proteoglycans and brain repair.

    PubMed

    Properzi, Francesca; Fawcett, James W

    2004-02-01

    Proteoglycans are complex molecules composed of long, unbranched sugar chains attached to a protein core. In the mammalian central nervous system, they are a major component of the extracellular matrix and of the cellular surface. After a central nervous system injury, their expression in the lesion area changes strongly and contributes to the inhibition of axon regrowth and brain repair. PMID:14739401

  20. Targeting BRCA1-BER deficient breast cancer by ATM or DNA-PKcs blockade either alone or in combination with cisplatin for personalized therapy.

    PubMed

    Albarakati, Nada; Abdel-Fatah, Tarek M A; Doherty, Rachel; Russell, Roslin; Agarwal, Devika; Moseley, Paul; Perry, Christina; Arora, Arvind; Alsubhi, Nouf; Seedhouse, Claire; Rakha, Emad A; Green, Andrew; Ball, Graham; Chan, Stephen; Caldas, Carlos; Ellis, Ian O; Madhusudan, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    BRCA1, a key factor in homologous recombination (HR) repair may also regulate base excision repair (BER). Targeting BRCA1-BER deficient cells by blockade of ATM and DNA-PKcs could be a promising strategy in breast cancer. We investigated BRCA1, XRCC1 and pol β protein expression in two cohorts (n = 1602 sporadic and n = 50 germ-line BRCA1 mutated) and mRNA expression in two cohorts (n = 1952 and n = 249). Artificial neural network analysis for BRCA1-DNA repair interacting genes was conducted in 249 tumours. Pre-clinically, BRCA1 proficient and deficient cells were DNA repair expression profiled and evaluated for synthetic lethality using ATM and DNA-PKcs inhibitors either alone or in combination with cisplatin. In human tumours, BRCA1 negativity was strongly associated with low XRCC1, and low pol β at mRNA and protein levels (p < 0.0001). In patients with BRCA1 negative tumours, low XRCC1 or low pol β expression was significantly associated with poor survival in univariate and multivariate analysis compared to high XRCC1 or high pol β expressing BRCA1 negative tumours (ps < 0.05). Pre-clinically, BRCA1 negative cancer cells exhibit low mRNA and low protein expression of XRCC1 and pol β. BRCA1-BER deficient cells were sensitive to ATM and DNA-PKcs inhibitor treatment either alone or in combination with cisplatin and synthetic lethality was evidenced by DNA double strand breaks accumulation, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. We conclude that XRCC1 and pol β expression status in BRCA1 negative tumours may have prognostic significance. BRCA1-BER deficient cells could be targeted by ATM or DNA-PKcs inhibitors for personalized therapy. PMID:25205036

  1. Distinct Roles of the Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium CyaY and YggX Proteins in the Biosynthesis and Repair of Iron-Sulfur Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Velayudhan, Jyoti; Karlinsey, Joyce E.; Frawley, Elaine R.; Becker, Lynne A.; Nartea, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Labile [4Fe-4S]2+ clusters found at the active sites of many dehydratases are susceptible to damage by univalent oxidants that convert the clusters to an inactive [3Fe-4S]1+ form. Bacteria repair damaged clusters in a process that does not require de novo protein synthesis or the Isc and Suf cluster assembly pathways. The current study investigates the participation of the bacterial frataxin ortholog CyaY and the YggX protein, which are proposed to play roles in iron trafficking and iron-sulfur cluster repair. Previous reports found that individual mutations in cyaY or yggX were not associated with phenotypic changes in Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, suggesting that CyaY and YggX might have functionally redundant roles. However, we have found that individual mutations in cyaY or yggX confer enhanced susceptibility to hydrogen peroxide in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. In addition, inactivation of the stm3944 open reading frame, which is located immediately upstream of cyaY and which encodes a putative inner membrane protein, dramatically enhances the hydrogen peroxide sensitivity of a cyaY mutant. Overexpression of STM3944 reduces the elevated intracellular free iron levels observed in an S. Typhimurium fur mutant and also reduces the total cellular iron content under conditions of iron overload, suggesting that the stm3944-encoded protein may mediate iron efflux. Mutations in cyaY and yggX have different effects on the activities of the iron-sulfur cluster-containing aconitase, serine deaminase, and NADH dehydrogenase I enzymes of S. Typhimurium under basal conditions or following recovery from oxidative stress. In addition, cyaY and yggX mutations have additive effects on 6-phosphogluconate dehydratase-dependent growth during nitrosative stress, and a cyaY mutation reduces Salmonella virulence in mice. Collectively, these results indicate that CyaY and YggX play distinct supporting roles in iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis

  2. Recruitment of DNA damage recognition and repair pathway proteins following near-IR femtosecond laser irradiation of cells.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Godinez, Veronica; Wakida, Nicole M; Dvornikov, Alexander S; Yokomori, Kyoko; Berns, Michael W

    2007-01-01

    An 800-nm 200-fs laser is used to produce DNA damage in rat kangaroo (PtK1) and human cystic fibrosis pancreatic adenoma carcinoma (CFPAC-1) cells. Immunofluorescence staining for DNA repair factors in irradiated cells displays localization of gammaH2AX, Nbs1, and Rad50 to the site of irradiation 3 to 30 min following laser exposure. It is concluded that the 200-fs near-infrared laser is an excellent source for the production and study of spatially defined regions of DNA damage. PMID:17477704

  3. Human ERCC5 cDNA-cosmid complementation for excision repair and bipartite amino acid domains conserved with RAD proteins of saccharomyces cerevisiae and schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    MacInnes, M.A.; Dickson, J.A.; Hernandez, R.R.; Lin, G.Y.; Park, M.S.; Schauer, S.; Reynolds, R.J.; Strniste, G.F. ); Learmonth, D. ); Mudgett, J.S. ); Yu, J.Y. )

    1993-10-01

    Several human genes related to DNA excision repair (ER) have been isolated via ER cross-species complementation (ERCC) of UV-sensitive CHO cells. The authors have now isolated and characterized cDNAs for the human ERCC5 gene that complement CHO UV135 cells. The ERCC5 mRNA size is about 4.6 kb. Their available cDNA clones are partial length, and no single clone was active for UV135 complementation. When cDNAs were mixed pairwise with a cosmid clone containing an overlapping 5[prime]-end segment of the ERCC5 gene, DNA transfer produced UV-resistant colonies with 60 to 95% correction of UV resistance relative to either a genomic ERCC5 DNA transformant or the CHO AA8 progenitor cells. cDNA-cosmid transformants regained intermediate levels (20 to 45%) of ER-dependent reactivation of a UV-damaged pSVCATgpt reporter plasmid. Their evidence strongly implicates an in situ recombination mechanism in cDNA-cosmid complementation for ER. The complete deduced amino acid sequence of ERCC5 was reconstructed for several cDNA clones encoding a predicted protein of 1,186 amino acids. The ERCC5 protein has extensive sequence similarities, in bipartite domains A and B, to products of RAD repair genes of two yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD2 and Schizosaccharomyces pombe rad13. Sequence, structural, and functional data taken together indicate that ERCC5 and its relatives are probable functional homologs. A second locus represented by S. cerevisiae YKL510 and S. pombe rad2 genes is structurally distinct from the ERCC5 locus but retains vestigial A and B domain similarities. Their analyses suggest that ERCC5 is a nuclear-localized protein with one or more highly conserved helix-loop-helix segments within domains A and B. 69 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  4. The immunohistochemical detection of mismatch repair gene proteins (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2): practical aspects in antigen retrieval and biotin blocking protocols.

    PubMed

    Manavis, Jim; Gilham, Peter; Davies, Ruth; Ruszkiewicz, Andrew

    2003-03-01

    The immunohistochemical detection of the mismatch repair (MMR) proteins is used as a screening test with microsatellite instability for the detection of hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer (HNPCC). The authors describe a simple and cost-effective method using a pressure cooker and microwave oven for antigen retrieval and a modified method for applying a commercial biotin blocking kit. Colorectal tumors of 20 patients of the HNPCC spectrum were included in this study. Eighty paraffin sections were cut and submitted for immunohistochemical analysis using a routine protocol and a pressure cooker protocol. Parallel sections for biotin blocking were also run, including the modified biotin block for each protocol. The sections were incubated with the following antibodies: MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2. All cases examined exhibited a normal expression of the MMR proteins in the nucleus and adjacent nonneoplastic tissue elements and consequently defined as having a normal expression of these proteins. Cases with tumor that exhibited a loss of the nuclear staining with the MMR proteins with a concurrent staining of the adjacent nonneoplastic cells were classified as abnormal MMR expression. The series of 20 cases using pressure cooker antigen retrieval produced superior results to the routine immunohistochemical protocol used previously in our laboratory. The modified biotin block also gave consistent results. The reproducibility and consistency of this procedure has resulted it in being used routinely for suspected HNPCC cases, both current and archival. PMID:12610360

  5. Locally accelerated growth is part of the innate immune response and repair mechanisms in reef-building corals as detected by green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like pigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, C.; Smith, E. G.; Oswald, F.; Burt, J.; Tchernov, D.; Wiedenmann, J.

    2012-12-01

    Homologs of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) are a prevalent group of host pigments responsible for the green, red and purple-blue colours of many reef-building corals. They have been suggested to contribute to the striking coloration changes of different corals species in response to wounding and infestation with epibionts/parasites. In order to elucidate the physiological processes underlying the potentially disease-related colour changes, we have analysed spatial and temporal expression patterns of GFP-like proteins and other biomarkers in corals from the Red Sea, the Arabian/Persian Gulf and Fiji both in their natural habitat and under specific laboratory conditions. The expression of distinct GFP-like proteins and the growth marker proliferating cell nuclear antigen was upregulated in growing branch tips and margins of healthy coral colonies as well as in disturbed colony parts. Furthermore, phenoloxidase activity increased in these proliferating tissues. It is thus demonstrated that locally accelerated growth is part of the innate immune response and repair mechanisms in reef-building corals and, moreover, these processes can be detected utilizing the excellent biomarker properties of GFP-like proteins. Finally, the results of this work suggest an additional vulnerability of corals in predicted future scenarios of increased ocean acidification, warming and eutrophication that are anticipated to reduce coral growth capacity.

  6. Gastroschisis repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... and surgery in general are: Allergic reactions to medicines Breathing problems Bleeding Infection Risks for gastroschisis repair are: Breathing problems if the baby's belly area (abdominal space) is smaller than normal. The baby may need ...

  7. Hydrocele repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... is excellent. However, another hydrocele may form over time, or if there was also a hernia present. Alternative Names Hydrocelectomy Images Hydrocele repair - series References Aiken JJ, Oldham KT. Inguinal hernias. In: ...

  8. Combination of Aβ Secretion and Oxidative Stress in an Alzheimer-Like Cell Line Leads to the Over-Expression of the Nucleotide Excision Repair Proteins DDB2 and XPC.

    PubMed

    Forestier, Anne; Douki, Thierry; De Rosa, Viviana; Béal, David; Rachidi, Walid

    2015-01-01

    Repair of oxidative DNA damage, particularly Base Excision Repair (BER), impairment is often associated with Alzheimer's disease pathology. Here, we aimed at investigating the complete Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER), a DNA repair pathway involved in the removal of bulky DNA adducts, status in an Alzheimer-like cell line. The level of DNA damage was quantified using mass spectrometry, NER gene expression was assessed by qPCR, and the NER protein activity was analysed through a modified version of the COMET assay. Interestingly, we found that in the presence of the Amyloid β peptide (Aβ), NER factors were upregulated at the mRNA level and that NER capacities were also specifically increased following oxidative stress. Surprisingly, NER capacities were not differentially improved following a typical NER-triggering of ultraviolet C (UVC) stress. Oxidative stress generates a differential and specific DNA damage response in the presence of Aβ. We hypothesized that the release of NER components such as DNA damage binding protein 2 (DDB2) and Xeroderma Pigmentosum complementation group C protein (XPC) following oxidative stress might putatively involve their apoptotic role rather than DNA repair function. PMID:26263968

  9. Combination of Aβ Secretion and Oxidative Stress in an Alzheimer-Like Cell Line Leads to the Over-Expression of the Nucleotide Excision Repair Proteins DDB2 and XPC

    PubMed Central

    Forestier, Anne; Douki, Thierry; De Rosa, Viviana; Béal, David; Rachidi, Walid

    2015-01-01

    Repair of oxidative DNA damage, particularly Base Excision Repair (BER), impairment is often associated with Alzheimer’s disease pathology. Here, we aimed at investigating the complete Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER), a DNA repair pathway involved in the removal of bulky DNA adducts, status in an Alzheimer-like cell line. The level of DNA damage was quantified using mass spectrometry, NER gene expression was assessed by qPCR, and the NER protein activity was analysed through a modified version of the COMET assay. Interestingly, we found that in the presence of the Amyloid β peptide (Aβ), NER factors were upregulated at the mRNA level and that NER capacities were also specifically increased following oxidative stress. Surprisingly, NER capacities were not differentially improved following a typical NER-triggering of ultraviolet C (UVC) stress. Oxidative stress generates a differential and specific DNA damage response in the presence of Aβ. We hypothesized that the release of NER components such as DNA damage binding protein 2 (DDB2) and Xeroderma Pigmentosum complementation group C protein (XPC) following oxidative stress might putatively involve their apoptotic role rather than DNA repair function. PMID:26263968

  10. Long non-coding RNAs as novel expression signatures modulate DNA damage and repair in cadmium toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhiheng; Liu, Haibai; Wang, Caixia; Lu, Qian; Huang, Qinhai; Zheng, Chanjiao; Lei, Yixiong

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are involved in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological processes. Our study was to investigate whether lncRNAs as novel expression signatures are able to modulate DNA damage and repair in cadmium(Cd) toxicity. There were aberrant expression profiles of lncRNAs in 35th Cd-induced cells as compared to untreated 16HBE cells. siRNA-mediated knockdown of ENST00000414355 inhibited the growth of DNA-damaged cells and decreased the expressions of DNA-damage related genes (ATM, ATR and ATRIP), while increased the expressions of DNA-repair related genes (DDB1, DDB2, OGG1, ERCC1, MSH2, RAD50, XRCC1 and BARD1). Cadmium increased ENST00000414355 expression in the lung of Cd-exposed rats in a dose-dependent manner. A significant positive correlation was observed between blood ENST00000414355 expression and urinary/blood Cd concentrations, and there were significant correlations of lncRNA-ENST00000414355 expression with the expressions of target genes in the lung of Cd-exposed rats and the blood of Cd exposed workers. These results indicate that some lncRNAs are aberrantly expressed in Cd-treated 16HBE cells. lncRNA-ENST00000414355 may serve as a signature for DNA damage and repair related to the epigenetic mechanisms underlying the cadmium toxicity and become a novel biomarker of cadmium toxicity. PMID:26472689

  11. Long non-coding RNAs as novel expression signatures modulate DNA damage and repair in cadmium toxicology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhiheng; Liu, Haibai; Wang, Caixia; Lu, Qian; Huang, Qinhai; Zheng, Chanjiao; Lei, Yixiong

    2015-10-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are involved in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological processes. Our study was to investigate whether lncRNAs as novel expression signatures are able to modulate DNA damage and repair in cadmium(Cd) toxicity. There were aberrant expression profiles of lncRNAs in 35th Cd-induced cells as compared to untreated 16HBE cells. siRNA-mediated knockdown of ENST00000414355 inhibited the growth of DNA-damaged cells and decreased the expressions of DNA-damage related genes (ATM, ATR and ATRIP), while increased the expressions of DNA-repair related genes (DDB1, DDB2, OGG1, ERCC1, MSH2, RAD50, XRCC1 and BARD1). Cadmium increased ENST00000414355 expression in the lung of Cd-exposed rats in a dose-dependent manner. A significant positive correlation was observed between blood ENST00000414355 expression and urinary/blood Cd concentrations, and there were significant correlations of lncRNA-ENST00000414355 expression with the expressions of target genes in the lung of Cd-exposed rats and the blood of Cd exposed workers. These results indicate that some lncRNAs are aberrantly expressed in Cd-treated 16HBE cells. lncRNA-ENST00000414355 may serve as a signature for DNA damage and repair related to the epigenetic mechanisms underlying the cadmium toxicity and become a novel biomarker of cadmium toxicity.

  12. Demineralized Bone Matrix Combined Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 and Transforming Growth Factor-β3 Gene Promoted Pig Cartilage Defect Repair

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Li, Yanlin; Han, Rui; He, Chuan; Wang, Guoliang; Wang, Jianwei; Zheng, Jiali; Pei, Mei; Wei, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate whether a combination of demineralized bone matrix (DBM) and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) infected with adenovirus-mediated- bone morphogenetic protein (Ad-BMP-2) and transforming growth factor-β3 (Ad-TGF-β3) promotes the repair of the full-thickness cartilage lesions in pig model. Methods BMSCs isolated from pig were cultured and infected with Ad-BMP-2(B group), Ad-TGF-β3 (T group), Ad-BMP-2 + Ad-TGF-β3(BT group), cells infected with empty Ad served as a negative group(N group), the expression of the BMP-2 and TGF-β3 were confirmed by immunofluorescence, PCR, and ELISA, the expression of SOX-9, type II collagen(COL-2A), aggrecan (ACAN) in each group were evaluated by real-time PCR at 1w, 2w, 3w, respectively. The chondrogenic differentiation of BMSCs was evaluated by type II collagen at 21d with immunohistochemical staining. The third-passage BMSCs infected with Ad-BMP-2 and Ad-TGF-β3 were suspended and cultured with DBM for 6 days to construct a new type of tissue engineering scaffold to repair full-thickness cartilage lesions in the femur condyles of pig knee, the regenerated tissue was evaluated at 1,2 and 3 months after surgery by gross appearance, H&E, safranin O staining and O'driscoll score. Results Ad-BMP-2 and Ad-TGF-β3 (BT group) infected cells acquired strong type II collagen staining compared with Ad-BMP-2 (B group) and Ad-TGF-β3 (T group) along. The Ad-BMP-2 and Ad-TGF-β3 infected BMSCs adhered and propagated well in DBM and the new type of tissue engineering scaffold produced hyaline cartilage morphology containing a stronger type II collagen and safranin O staining, the O'driscoll score was higher than other groups. Conclusions The DBM compound with Ad-BMP-2 and Ad-TGF-β3 infected BMSCs scaffold has a good biocompatibility and could well induce cartilage regeneration to repair the defects of joint cartilage. This technology may be efficiently employed for cartilage lesions repair in vivo. PMID

  13. Activation of the PI3K/Akt signal transduction pathway and increased levels of insulin receptor in protein repair-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Farrar, Christine; Houser, Carolyn R; Clarke, Steven

    2005-02-01

    Protein L-isoaspartate (D-aspartate) O-methyltransferase is an enzyme that catalyses the repair of isoaspartyl damage in proteins. Mice lacking this enzyme (Pcmt1-/- mice) have a progressive increase in brain size compared with wild-type mice (Pcmt1+/+ mice), a phenotype that can be associated with alterations in the PI3K/Akt signal transduction pathway. Here we show that components of this pathway, including Akt, GSK3beta and PDK-1, are more highly phosphorylated in the brains of Pcmt1-/- mice, particularly in cells of the hippocampus, in comparison with Pcmt1+/+ mice. Examination of upstream elements of this pathway in the hippocampus revealed that Pcmt1-/- mice have increased activation of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) receptor and/or insulin receptor. Western blot analysis revealed an approximate 200% increase in insulin receptor protein levels and an approximate 50% increase in IGF-I receptor protein levels in the hippocampus of Pcmt1-/- mice. Higher levels of the insulin receptor protein were also found in other regions of the adult brain and in whole tissue extracts of brain, liver, heart and testes of both juvenile and adult Pcmt1-/- mice. There were no significant differences in plasma insulin levels for adult Pcmt1-/- mice during glucose tolerance tests. However, they did show higher peak levels of blood glucose, suggesting a mild impairment in glucose tolerance. We propose that Pcmt1-/- mice have altered regulation of the insulin pathway, possibly as a compensatory response to altered glucose uptake or metabolism or as an adaptive response to a general accumulation of isoaspartyl protein damage in the brain and other tissues. PMID:15659208

  14. The C-terminal Region and SUMOylation of Cockayne Syndrome Group B Protein Play Critical Roles in Transcription-coupled Nucleotide Excision Repair.

    PubMed

    Sin, Yooksil; Tanaka, Kiyoji; Saijo, Masafumi

    2016-01-15

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a recessive disorder that results in deficiencies in transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER), a subpathway of nucleotide excision repair, and cells from CS patients exhibit hypersensitivity to UV light. CS group B protein (CSB), which is the gene product of one of the genes responsible for CS, belongs to the SWI2/SNF2 DNA-dependent ATPase family and has an ATPase domain and an ubiquitin-binding domain (UBD) in the central region and the C-terminal region, respectively. The C-terminal region containing the UBD is essential for the functions of CSB. In this study, we generated several CSB deletion mutants and analyzed the functions of the C-terminal region of CSB in TC-NER. Not only the UBD but also the C-terminal 30-amino acid residues were required for UV light resistance and TC-NER. This region was needed for the interaction of CSB with RNA polymerase II, the translocation of CS group A protein to the nuclear matrix, and the association of CSB with chromatin after UV irradiation. CSB was modified by small ubiquitin-like modifier 2/3 in a UV light-dependent manner. This modification was abolished in a CSB mutant lacking the C-terminal 30 amino acid residues. However, the substitution of lysine residues in this region with arginine did not affect SUMOylation or TC-NER. By contrast, substitution of a lysine residue in the N-terminal region with arginine decreased SUMOylation and resulted in cells with defects in TC-NER. These results indicate that both the most C-terminal region and SUMOylation are important for the functions of CSB in TC-NER. PMID:26620705

  15. Protein Dynamics Control the Progression and Efficiency of the Catalytic Reaction Cycle of the Escherichia coli DNA-Repair Enzyme AlkB*

    PubMed Central

    Ergel, Burçe; Gill, Michelle L.; Brown, Lewis; Yu, Bomina; Palmer, Arthur G.; Hunt, John F.

    2014-01-01

    A central goal of enzymology is to understand the physicochemical mechanisms that enable proteins to catalyze complex chemical reactions with high efficiency. Recent methodological advances enable the contribution of protein dynamics to enzyme efficiency to be explored more deeply. Here, we utilize enzymological and biophysical studies, including NMR measurements of conformational dynamics, to develop a quantitative mechanistic scheme for the DNA repair enzyme AlkB. Like other iron/2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases, AlkB employs a two-step mechanism in which oxidation of 2-oxoglutarate generates a highly reactive enzyme-bound oxyferryl intermediate that, in the case of AlkB, slowly hydroxylates an alkylated nucleobase. Our results demonstrate that a microsecond-to-millisecond time scale conformational transition facilitates the proper sequential order of substrate binding to AlkB. Mutations altering the dynamics of this transition allow generation of the oxyferryl intermediate but promote its premature quenching by solvent, which uncouples 2-oxoglutarate turnover from nucleobase oxidation. Therefore, efficient catalysis by AlkB depends upon the dynamics of a specific conformational transition, establishing another paradigm for the control of enzyme function by protein dynamics. PMID:25043760

  16. Role of Saccharomyces Single-Stranded DNA-Binding Protein RPA in the Strand Invasion Step of Double-Strand Break Repair

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding protein replication protein A (RPA) is essential for both DNA replication and recombination. Chromatin immunoprecipitation techniques were used to visualize the kinetics and extent of RPA binding following induction of a double-strand break (DSB) and during its repair by homologous recombination in yeast. RPA assembles at the HO endonuclease-cut MAT locus simultaneously with the appearance of the DSB, and binding spreads away from the DSB as 5′ to 3′ exonuclease activity creates more ssDNA. RPA binding precedes binding of the Rad51 recombination protein. The extent of RPA binding is greater when Rad51 is absent, supporting the idea that Rad51 displaces RPA from ssDNA. RPA plays an important role during RAD51-mediated strand invasion of the MAT ssDNA into the donor sequence HML. The replication-proficient but recombination-defective rfa1-t11 (K45E) mutation in the large subunit of RPA is normal in facilitating Rad51 filament formation on ssDNA, but is unable to achieve synapsis between MAT and HML. Thus, RPA appears to play a role in strand invasion as well as in facilitating Rad51 binding to ssDNA, possibly by stabilizing the displaced ssDNA. PMID:14737196

  17. Isolation and structural characterization of a cDNA clone encoding the human DNA repair protein for O sup 6 -alkylguanine

    SciTech Connect

    Tano, K.; Shiota, S.; Collier, J.; Foote, R.S.; Mitra, S. )

    1990-01-01

    O{sup 6}-Methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase a unique DNA repair protein present in most organisms, removes the carcinogenic and mutagenic adduct O{sup 6}-alkylguanine from DNA by stoichiometrically accepting the alkyl group on a cysteine residue in a suicide reaction. The mammalian protein is highly regulated in both somatic and germ-like cells. In addition, the toxicity of certain alkylating drugs in tumor and normal cells is inversely related to the levels of this protein. The cDNA of the human gene, henceforth named MGMT, has been cloned in an expression vector on the basis of its rescue of a methyltransferase-deficient (ada{sup {minus}}) Escherichia coli host. A 22-kDa active methyltransferase encoded entirely by the cDNA contains an amino acid sequence of 61 residues that bears 60-65% similarity with segments of E. coli methyltransferase which encompass the alkyl-acceptor residues. The human cDNA has no sequence similarity with the ada and ogt genes, due in part to differences in codon usage, and shows no detectable homology with E. coli genomic DNA. However, it hybridizes with distinct restriction fragments of human, mouse, and rat DNAs. The lack of methyltransferase observed in many human cell lines is due to the absence of the MGNT gene or to lack of synthesis and/or stability of its 0.95-kilobase poly(A){sup +} RNA transcript.

  18. Role of intercalation and redox potential in DNA photosensitization by ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes: assessment using DNA repair protein tests.

    PubMed

    Gicquel, Etienne; Souchard, Jean-Pierre; Magnusson, Fay; Chemaly, Jad; Calsou, Patrick; Vicendo, Patricia

    2013-08-01

    Here we report that the photoreactivity of ruthenium(II) complexes with nucleobases may not only be modulated by their photoredox properties but also by their DNA binding mode. The damage resulting from photolysis of synthetic oligonucleotides and plasmid DNA by [Ru(bpz)3](2+), [Ru(bipy)3](2+) and the two DNA intercalating agents [Ru(bpz)2dppz](2+) and [Ru(bipy)2dppz](2+) has been monitored by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and by tests using proteins involved in DNA repair processes (DNA-PKCs, Ku80, Ku70, and PARP-1). The data show that intercalation controls the nature of the DNA damage photo-induced by ruthenium(II) complexes reacting with DNA via an electron transfer process. The intercalating agent [Ru(bpz)2dppz](2+) is a powerful DNA breaker inducing the formation of both single and double (DSBs) strand breaks which are recognized by the PARP-1 and DNA-PKCs proteins respectively. [Ru(bpz)2dppz](2+) is the first ruthenium(II) complex described in the literature that is able to induce DSBs by an electron transfer process. In contrast, its non-intercalating parent compound, [Ru(bpz)3](2+), is mostly an efficient DNA alkylating agent. Photoadducts are recognized by the proteins Ku70 and Ku80 as with cisplatin adducts. This result suggests that photoaddition of [Ru(bpz)2dppz](2+) is strongly affected by its DNA intercalation whereas its photonuclease activity is exalted. The data clearly show that DNA intercalation decreases drastically the photonuclease activity of ruthenium(II) complexes oxidizing guanine via the production of singlet oxygen. Interestingly, the DNA sequencing data revealed that the ligand dipyridophenazine exhibits on single-stranded oligonucleotides a preference for the 5'-TGCGT-3' sequence. Moreover the use of proteins involved in DNA repair processes to detect DNA damage was a powerful tool to examine the photoreactivity of ruthenium(II) complexes with nucleic acids. PMID:23835850

  19. DNA repair gene polymorphisms and risk of adult meningioma, glioma, and acoustic neuroma.

    PubMed

    Rajaraman, Preetha; Hutchinson, Amy; Wichner, Sara; Black, Peter M; Fine, Howard A; Loeffler, Jay S; Selker, Robert G; Shapiro, William R; Rothman, Nathaniel; Linet, Martha S; Inskip, Peter D

    2010-01-01

    Although the etiology of primary brain tumors is largely unknown, prior studies suggest that DNA repair polymorphisms may influence risk of glioma. Altered DNA repair is also likely to affect the risk of meningioma and acoustic neuroma, but these tumors have not been well studied. We estimated the risk of glioma (n = 362), meningioma (n = 134), and acoustic neuroma (n = 69) in non-Hispanic whites with respect to 36 single nucleotide polymorphisms from 26 genes involved in DNA repair in a hospital-based, case-control study conducted by the National Cancer Institute. We observed significantly increased risk of meningioma with the T variant of GLTSCR1 rs1035938 (OR(CT/TT) = 3.5; 95% confidence interval: 1.8-6.9; P(trend) .0006), which persisted after controlling for multiple comparisons (P = .019). Significantly increased meningioma risk was also observed for the minor allele variants of ERCC4 rs1800067 (P(trend) .01); MUTYH rs3219466 (P(trend) .02), and PCNA rs25406 (P(trend) .03). The NBN rs1805794 minor allele variant was associated with decreased meningioma risk (P(trend) .006). Risk of acoustic neuroma was increased for the ERCC2 rs1799793 (P(trend) .03) and ERCC5 rs17655 (P(trend) .05) variants and decreased for the PARP1 rs1136410 (P(trend) .03). Decreased glioma risk was observed with the XRCC1 rs1799782 variant (P(trend) .04). Our results suggest that common DNA repair variants may affect the risk of adult brain tumors, especially meningioma. PMID:20150366

  20. Expression of DNA repair and metabolic genes in response to a flavonoid-rich diet.

    PubMed

    Guarrera, Simonetta; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Fiorini, Laura; Marsala, Rosa; Polidoro, Silvia; Gamberini, Sara; Saletta, Federica; Malaveille, Christian; Talaska, Glenn; Vineis, Paolo; Matullo, Giuseppe

    2007-09-01

    A diet rich in fruit and vegetables can be effective in the reduction of oxidative stress, through the antioxidant effects of phytochemicals and other mechanisms. Protection against the carcinogenic effects of chemicals may also be exerted by an enhancement of detoxification and DNA damage repair mechanisms. To investigate a putative effect of flavonoids, a class of polyphenols, on the regulation of the gene expression of DNA repair and metabolic genes, a 1-month flavonoid-rich diet was administered to thirty healthy male smokers, nine of whom underwent gene expression analysis. We postulated that tobacco smoke is a powerful source of reactive oxygen species. The expression level of twelve genes (APEX, ERCC1, ERCC2, ERCC4, MGMT, OGG1, XPA, XPC, XRCC1, XRCC3, AHR, CYP1A1) was investigated. We found a significant increase (P < 0.001) in flavonoid intake. Urinary phenolic content and anti-mutagenicity did not significantly change after diet, nor was a correlation found between flavonoid intake and urinary phenolic levels or anti-mutagenicity. Phenolic levels showed a significant positive correlation with urinary anti-mutagenicity. AHR levels were significantly reduced after the diet (P = 0.038), whereas the other genes showed a generalized up regulation, significant for XRCC3 gene (P = 0.038). Also in the context of a generalized up regulation of DNA repair genes, we found a non-significant negative correlation between flavonoid intake and the expression of all the DNA repair genes. Larger studies are needed to clarify the possible effects of flavonoids in vivo; our preliminary results could help to better plan new studies on gene expression and diet. PMID:17445347

  1. Tissue repair

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    As living beings that encounter every kind of traumatic event from paper cut to myocardial infarction, we must possess ways to heal damaged tissues. While some animals are able to regrow complete body parts following injury (such as the earthworm who grows a new head following bisection), humans are sadly incapable of such feats. Our means of recovery following tissue damage consists largely of repair rather than pure regeneration. Thousands of times in our lives, a meticulously scripted but unseen wound healing drama plays, with cells serving as actors, extracellular matrix as the setting and growth factors as the means of communication. This article briefly reviews the cells involved in tissue repair, their signaling and proliferation mechanisms and the function of the extracellular matrix, then presents the actors and script for the three acts of the tissue repair drama. PMID:21220961

  2. Methylation-induced G2/M arrest requires a full complement of the mismatch repair protein hMLH1

    PubMed Central

    Cejka, Petr; Stojic, Lovorka; Mojas, Nina; Russell, Anna Marie; Heinimann, Karl; Cannavó, Elda; di Pietro, Massimiliano; Marra, Giancarlo; Jiricny, Josef

    2003-01-01

    The mismatch repair (MMR) gene hMLH1 is mutated in ∼50% of hereditary non-polyposis colon cancers and transcriptionally silenced in ∼25% of sporadic tumours of the right colon. Cells lacking hMLH1 display microsatellite instability and resistance to killing by methylating agents. In an attempt to study the phenotypic effects of hMLH1 downregulation in greater detail, we designed an isogenic system, in which hMLH1 expression is regulated by doxycycline. We now report that human embryonic kidney 293T cells expressing high amounts of hMLH1 were MMR-proficient and arrested at the G2/M cell cycle checkpoint following treatment with the DNA methylating agent N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), while cells not expressing hMLH1 displayed a MMR defect and failed to arrest upon MNNG treatment. Interestingly, MMR proficiency was restored even at low hMLH1 concentrations, while checkpoint activation required a full complement of hMLH1. In the MMR-proficient cells, activation of the MNNG-induced G2/M checkpoint was accompanied by phosphorylation of p53, but the cell death pathway was p53 independent, as the latter polypeptide is functionally inactivated in these cells by SV40 large T antigen. PMID:12727890

  3. Polygenic model of DNA repair genetic polymorphisms in human breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tasha R; Levine, Edward A; Freimanis, Rita I; Akman, Steven A; Allen, Glenn O; Hoang, Kimberly N; Liu-Mares, Wen; Hu, Jennifer J

    2008-11-01

    Genetic variations in DNA repair may impact repair functions, DNA damage and breast cancer risk. Using data/samples collected from the first 752 Caucasians and 141 African-Americans in an ongoing case-control study, we examined the association between breast cancer risk and 18 non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) in four DNA repair pathways-(i) base excision repair: ADPRT V762A, APE1 D148E, XRCC1 R194W/R280H/R399Q and POLD1 R119H; (ii) nucleotide excision repair: ERCC2 D312N/K751Q, ERCC4 R415Q, ERCC5 D1104H and XPC A499V/K939Q; (iii) mismatch repair: MLH1 I219V, MSH3 R940Q/T1036A and MSH6 G39E and (iv) double-strand break repair: NBS1 E185Q and XRCC3 T241M. In Caucasians, breast cancer risk was significantly associated with ADPRT 762VV [odds ratio (OR) = 1.45; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.03, 2.03], APE1 148DD (OR = 1.44; 95% CI = 1.03, 2.00), MLH1 219II/IV (OR = 1.87; 95% CI = 1.11, 3.16) and ERCC4 415QQ (OR = 8.64; 95% CI = 1.04, 72.02) genotypes. With a limited sample size, we did not observe any significant association in African-Americans. However, there were significant trends in breast cancer risk with increasing numbers of risk genotypes for ADPRT 762VV, APE1 148DD, ERCC4 415RQ/QQ and MLH1 219II/IV (P(trend) < 0.001) in Caucasians and ADPRT 762VA, ERCC2 751KQ/QQ and NBS1 185EQ/QQ in African-Americans (P(trend) = 0.006), respectively. Our results suggest that combined nsSNPs in multiple DNA repair pathways may contribute to breast cancer risk and larger studies are warranted to further evaluate polygenic models of DNA repair in breast cancer risk. PMID:18701435

  4. Conjugational hyperrecombination achieved by derepressing the LexA regulon, altering the properties of RecA protein and inactivating mismatch repair in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Lanzov, Vladislav A; Bakhlanova, Irina V; Clark, Alvin J

    2003-01-01

    The frequency of recombinational exchanges (FRE) that disrupt co-inheritance of transferred donor markers in Escherichia coli Hfr by F(-) crosses differs by up to a factor of two depending on physiological factors and culture conditions. Under standard conditions we found FRE to be 5.01 +/- 0.43 exchanges per 100-min units of DNA length for wild-type strains of the AB1157 line. Using these conditions we showed a cumulative effect of various mutations on FRE. Constitutive SOS expression by lexA gene inactivation (lexA71::Tn5) and recA gene mutation (recA730) showed, respectively, approximately 4- and 7-fold increases of FRE. The double lexA71 recA730 combination gave an approximately 17-fold increase in FRE. Addition of mutS215::Tn10, inactivating the mismatch repair system, to the double lexA recA mutant increased FRE to approximately 26-fold above wild-type FRE. Finally, we showed that another recA mutation produced as much SOS expression as recA730 but increased FRE only 3-fold. We conclude that three factors contribute to normally low FRE under standard conditions: repression of the LexA regulon, the properties of wild-type RecA protein, and a functioning MutSHL mismatch repair system. We discuss mechanisms by which the lexA, recA, and mutS mutations may elevate FRE cumulatively to obtain hyperrecombination. PMID:12702672

  5. Hepatitis C virus NS3/4A protein interacts with ATM, impairs DNA repair and enhances sensitivity to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Chao-Kuen; Jeng, King-Song; Machida, Keigo; Cheng, Yi-Sheng; Lai, Michael M.C.

    2008-01-20

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is frequently associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinomas and non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphomas. Nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) of HCV possesses serine protease, nucleoside triphosphatase, and helicase activities, while NS4A functions as a cofactor for the NS3 serine protease. Here, we show that HCV NS3/4A interacts with the ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated), a cellular protein essential for cellular response to irradiation. The expression of NS3/4A caused cytoplasmic translocation of either endogenous or exogenous ATM and delayed dephosphorylation of the phosphorylated ATM and {gamma}-H2AX following ionizing irradiation. As a result, the irradiation-induced {gamma}-H2AX foci persisted longer in the NS3/4A-expressing cells. Furthermore, these cells showed increased comet tail moment in single-cell electrophoresis assay, indicating increased double-strand DNA breaks. The cells harboring an HCV replicon also exhibited cytoplasmic localization of ATM and increased sensitivity to irradiation. These results demonstrate that NS3/4A impairs the efficiency of DNA repair by interacting with ATM and renders the cells more sensitive to DNA damage. This effect may contribute to HCV oncogenesis.

  6. The Q motif of Fanconi anemia group J protein (FANCJ) DNA helicase regulates its dimerization, DNA binding, and DNA repair function.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuliang; Sommers, Joshua A; Loiland, Jason A; Kitao, Hiroyuki; Kuper, Jochen; Kisker, Caroline; Brosh, Robert M

    2012-06-22

    The Q motif, conserved in a number of RNA and DNA helicases, is proposed to be important for ATP binding based on structural data, but its precise biochemical functions are less certain. FANCJ encodes a Q motif DEAH box DNA helicase implicated in Fanconi anemia and breast cancer. A Q25A mutation of the invariant glutamine in the Q motif abolished its ability to complement cisplatin or telomestatin sensitivity of a fancj null cell line and exerted a dominant negative effect. Biochemical characterization of the purified recombinant FANCJ-Q25A protein showed that the mutation disabled FANCJ helicase activity and the ability to disrupt protein-DNA interactions. FANCJ-Q25A showed impaired DNA binding and ATPase activity but displayed ATP binding and temperature-induced unfolding transition similar to FANCJ-WT. Size exclusion chromatography and sedimentation velocity analyses revealed that FANCJ-WT existed as molecular weight species corresponding to a monomer and a dimer, and the dimeric form displayed a higher specific activity for ATPase and helicase, as well as greater DNA binding. In contrast, FANCJ-Q25A existed only as a monomer, devoid of helicase activity. Thus, the Q motif is essential for FANCJ enzymatic activity in vitro and DNA repair function in vivo. PMID:22582397

  7. The distribution of C-Fos protein immunolabeled cells in the spinal cord of the rat after electrical and noxious thermal stimulation following sciatic nerve crush, or transection and repair.

    PubMed

    Hongpaisan, J; Molander, C

    1993-01-01

    The distribution of stimulus evoked Fos protein-like immunoreactivity in spinal cord neurons was studied in adult rats at different survival times after sciatic nerve crush or transection and epineural repair. Fos protein-like immunoreactivity was induced either by electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve central to the injury, at C-fiber strength, at 21, 39, and 92 days post-lesion, or by noxious heat applied to the skin of the hind paw 92 days post-lesion. The contralateral uninjured side served as control. The results with electrical stimulation showed, with some exceptions, that the distribution of c-fos expressing cells in the spinal cord on the normal and on the previously injured side were similar after both crush and transection with repair. The main finding was an up-regulation of the number of Fos protein immunoreactive neurons in the inner portion of Rexed's lamina II. The results following heat stimulation 92 days post-lesion showed a decrease in the number of labeled neurons in most laminae after both types of injury. This was more pronounced in cases with sciatic nerve transection with repair compared to cases with crush. The results indicate time-dependent alterations in the distribution of stimulus evoked c-fos expression in spinal cord neurons during regeneration after nerve injury. Furthermore, the results from heat stimulation may indicate a slower and perhaps more incomplete restoration process after transection with repair than after crush. PMID:21551711

  8. Outboard Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardway, Jack

    This consortium-developed instructor's manual for small engine repair (with focus on outboard motors) consists of the following nine instructional units: electrical remote control assembly, mechanical remote control assembly, tilt assemblies, exhaust housing, propeller and trim tabs, cooling system, mechanical gearcase, electrical gearcase, and…

  9. Snowmobile Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helbling, Wayne

    This guide is designed to provide and/or improve instruction for occupational training in the area of snowmobile repair, and includes eight areas. Each area consists of one or more units of instruction, with each instructional unit including some or all of the following basic components: Performance objectives, suggested activities for teacher and…

  10. Motorcycle Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hein, Jim; Bundy, Mike

    This motorcycle repair curriculum guide contains the following ten areas of study: brake systems, clutches, constant mesh transmissions, final drives, suspension, mechanical starting mechanisms, electrical systems, fuel systems, lubrication systems, and overhead camshafts. Each area consists of one or more units of instruction. Each instructional…

  11. Hydrocele repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... small surgical cut in the fold of the groin, and then drains the fluid. The sac (hydrocele) holding the fluid may be removed. The surgeon strengthens the muscle wall with stitches. This is called a hernia repair. Sometimes the surgeon uses a laparoscope to do ...

  12. Bladder exstrophy repair

    MedlinePlus

    Bladder birth defect repair; Everted bladder repair; Exposed bladder repair; Repair of bladder exstrophy ... in boys and is often linked to other birth defects. Surgery is necessary to: Allow the child to ...

  13. Turbine repair process, repaired coating, and repaired turbine component

    DOEpatents

    Das, Rupak; Delvaux, John McConnell; Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2015-11-03

    A turbine repair process, a repaired coating, and a repaired turbine component are disclosed. The turbine repair process includes providing a turbine component having a higher-pressure region and a lower-pressure region, introducing particles into the higher-pressure region, and at least partially repairing an opening between the higher-pressure region and the lower-pressure region with at least one of the particles to form a repaired turbine component. The repaired coating includes a silicon material, a ceramic matrix composite material, and a repaired region having the silicon material deposited on and surrounded by the ceramic matrix composite material. The repaired turbine component a ceramic matrix composite layer and a repaired region having silicon material deposited on and surrounded by the ceramic matrix composite material.

  14. Complexities of the DNA Base Excision Repair Pathway for Repair of Oxidative DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Sankar; Boldogh, Istvan; Izumi, Tadahide; Hazra, Tapas K.

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative damage represents the most significant insult to organisms because of continuous production of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) in vivo. Oxidative damage in DNA, a critical target of ROS, is repaired primarily via the base excision repair (BER) pathway which appears to be the simplest among the three excision repair pathways. However, it is now evident that although BER can be carried with four or five enzymes in vitro, a large number of proteins, including some required for nucleotide excision repair (NER), are needed for in vivo repair of oxidative damage. Furthermore, BER in transcribed vs. nontranscribed DNA regions requires distinct sets of proteins, as in the case of NER. We propose an additional complexity in repair of replicating vs. nonreplicating DNA. Unlike DNA bulky adducts, the oxidized base lesions could be incorporated in the nascent DNA strand, repair of which may share components of the mismatch repair process. Distinct enzyme specificities are thus warranted for repair of lesions in the parental vs. nascent DNA strand. Repair synthesis may be carried out by DNA polymerase β or replicative polymerases δ and ε. Thus, multiple subpathways are needed for repairing oxidative DNA damage, and the pathway decision may require coordination of the successive steps in repair. Such coordination includes transfer of the product of a DNA glycosylase to AP-endonuclease, the next enzyme in the pathway. Interactions among proteins in the pathway may also reflect such coordination, characterization of which should help elucidate these subpathways and their in vivo regulation. PMID:11746753

  15. The role of non-protein sulphydryls in determining the chemical repair rates of free radical precursors of DNA damage and cell killing in Chinese hamster V79 cells.

    PubMed

    Prise, K M; Davies, S; Stratford, M R; Michael, B D

    1992-09-01

    Chinese hamster V79 fibroblasts were irradiated in the gas explosion apparatus and the chemical repair rates of the oxygen-dependent free radical precursors of DNA double-strand breaks (dsb) and lethal lesions measured using filter elution (pH 9.6) and a clonogenic assay. Depletion of cellular GSH levels, from 4.16 fmol/cell to 0.05 fmol/cell, by treatment with buthionine sulphoximine (50 mumol dm-3; 18 h), led to sensitization as regards DNA dsb induction and cell killing. This was evident at all time settings but was particularly pronounced when the oxygen shot was given 1 ms after the irradiation pulse. A detailed analysis of the chemical repair kinetics showed that depletion of GSH led to a reduction in the first-order rate constant for dsb precursors from 385 s-1 to 144 s-1, and for lethal lesion precursors from 533 s-1 to 165 s-1. This is generally consistent with the role of GSH in the repair-fixation model of radiation damage at the critical DNA lesions. However, the reduction in chemical repair rate was not proportional to the severe thiol depletion (down to approximately 1% for GSH) and a residual repair capacity remained (approximately 30%). This was found not to be due to compartmentalization of residual GSH in the nucleus, as the repair rate for dsb precursors in isolated nuclei, washed virtually free of GSH, was identical to that found in GSH-depleted cells (144 s-1), also the OER remained substantially above unity. This suggests that other reducing agents may have a role to play in the chemical repair of oxygen-dependent damage. One possible candidate is the significant level of protein sulphydryls present in isolated nuclei. PMID:1356131

  16. Lipoic acid inhibits the DNA repair protein O 6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) and triggers its depletion in colorectal cancer cells with concomitant autophagy induction.

    PubMed

    Göder, Anja; Nagel, Georg; Kraus, Alexander; Dörsam, Bastian; Seiwert, Nina; Kaina, Bernd; Fahrer, Jörg

    2015-08-01

    Alkylating agents are present in food and tobacco smoke, but are also used in cancer chemotherapy, inducing the DNA lesion O (6)-methylguanine. This critical adduct is repaired by O (6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), resulting in MGMT inactivation and degradation. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of the natural disulfide compound lipoic acid (LA) on MGMT in vitro and in colorectal cancer cells. We show that LA, but not its reduced form dihydrolipoic acid, potently inhibits the activity of recombinant MGMT by interfering with its catalytic Cys-145 residue, which was partially reversible by N-acetyl cysteine. Incubation of HCT116 colorectal cancer cells with LA altered their glutathione pool and caused a decline in MGMT activity. This was mirrored by LA-induced depletion of MGMT protein, which was not attributable to changes in MGMT messenger RNA levels. Loss of MGMT protein coincided with LA-induced autophagy, a process resulting in lysosomal degradation of proteins, including presumably MGMT. LA-stimulated autophagy in a p53-independent manner as revealed by the response of isogenic HCT116 cell lines. Knockdown of the crucial autophagy component beclin-1 and chemical inhibitors blocked LA-induced autophagy, but did not abrogate LA-triggered MGMT degradation. Concomitant with MGMT depletion, LA pretreatment resulted in enhanced O (6)-methylguanine levels in DNA. It also increased the cytotoxicity of the alkylating anticancer drug temozolomide in temozolomide-resistant colorectal cancer cells. Taken together, our study showed that the natural compound LA inhibits MGMT and induces autophagy. Furthermore, LA enhanced the cytotoxic effects of temozolomide, which makes it a candidate for a supplement in cancer therapy. PMID:25998848

  17. Molecular Pathways: Emergence of Protein Kinase CK2 (CSNK2) as a Potential Target to Inhibit Survival and DNA Damage Response and Repair Pathways in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Rabalski, Adam J; Gyenis, Laszlo; Litchfield, David W

    2016-06-15

    Protein kinase CK2 (designated CSNK2) is a constitutively active protein kinase with a vast repertoire of putative substrates that has been implicated in several human cancers, including cancer of the breast, lung, colon, and prostate, as well as hematologic malignancies. On the basis of these observations, CSNK2 has emerged as a candidate for targeted therapy, with two CSNK2 inhibitors in ongoing clinical trials. CX-4945 is a bioavailable small-molecule ATP-competitive inhibitor targeting its active site, and CIGB-300 is a cell-permeable cyclic peptide that prevents phosphorylation of the E7 protein of HPV16 by CSNK2. In preclinical models, either of these inhibitors exhibit antitumor efficacy. Furthermore, in combinations with chemotherapeutics such as cisplatin or gemcitabine, either CX-4945 or CIGB-300 promote synergistic induction of apoptosis. While CSNK2 is a regulatory participant in many processes related to cancer, its potential to modulate caspase action may be particularly pertinent to its emergence as a therapeutic target. Because the substrate recognition motifs for CSNK2 and caspases are remarkably similar, CSNK2 can block the cleavage of many caspase substrates through the phosphorylation of sites adjacent to cleavage sites. Phosphoproteomic strategies have also revealed previously underappreciated roles for CSNK2 in the phosphorylation of several key constituents of DNA damage and DNA repair pathways. Going forward, applications of proteomic strategies to interrogate responses to CSNK2 inhibitors are expected to reveal signatures for CSNK2 inhibition and molecular insights to guide new strategies to interfere with its potential to inhibit caspase action or enhance the susceptibility of cancer cells to DNA damage. Clin Cancer Res; 22(12); 2840-7. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27306791

  18. Serum proteins reflecting inflammation, injury and repair as biomarkers of disease activity in ANCA-associated vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Monach, Paul A; Warner, Roscoe L; Tomasson, Gunnar; Specks, Ulrich; Stone, John H; Ding, Linna; Fervenza, Fernando C; Fessler, Barri J; Hoffman, Gary S; Iklé, David; Kallenberg, Cees GM; Krischer, Jeffrey; Langford, Carol A; Mueller, Mark; Seo, Philip; St. Clair, E William; Spiera, Robert; Tchao, Nadia; Ytterberg, Steven R; Johnson, Kent J; Merkel, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify circulating proteins that distinguish between active anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) and remission in a manner complementary to markers of systemic inflammation. Methods Twenty-eight serum proteins representing diverse aspects of the biology of AAV were measured before and 6 months after treatment in a large clinical trial of AAV. Subjects (n=186) enrolled in the Rituximab in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis (RAVE) trial were studied. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were available for comparison. The primary outcome was the ability of markers to distinguish severe AAV (Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score for Wegener’s granulomatosis (BVAS/WG)≥3 at screening) from remission (BVAS/WG=0 at month 6), using areas under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC). Results All subjects had severe active vasculitis (median BVAS/WG=8) at screening. In the 137 subjects in remission at month 6, 24 of the 28 markers showed significant declines. ROC analysis indicated that levels of CXCL13 (BCA-1), matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) best discriminated active AAV from remission (AUC>0.8) and from healthy controls (AUC>0.9). Correlations among these markers and with ESR or CRP were low. Conclusions Many markers are elevated in severe active AAV and decline with treatment, but CXCL13, MMP-3 and TIMP-1 distinguish active AAV from remission better than the other markers studied, including ESR and CRP. These proteins are particularly promising candidates for future studies to address unmet needs in the assessment of patients with AAV. PMID:22975753

  19. SNPs in DNA repair or oxidative stress genes and late subcutaneous fibrosis in patients following single shot partial breast irradiation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential association between single nucleotide polymorphisms related response to radiotherapy injury, such as genes related to DNA repair or enzymes involved in anti-oxidative activities. The paper aims to identify marker genes able to predict an increased risk of late toxicity studying our group of patients who underwent a Single Shot 3D-CRT PBI (SSPBI) after BCS (breast conserving surgery). Methods A total of 57 breast cancer patients who underwent SSPBI were genotyped for SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) in XRCC1, XRCC3, GST and RAD51 by Pyrosequencing technology. Univariate analysis (ORs and 95% CI) was performed to correlate SNPs with the risk of developing ≥ G2 fibrosis or fat necrosis. Results A higher significant risk of developing ≥ G2 fibrosis or fat necrosis in patients with: polymorphic variant GSTP1 (Ile105Val) (OR = 2.9; 95%CI, 0.88-10.14, p = 0.047). Conclusions The presence of some SNPs involved in DNA repair or response to oxidative stress seem to be able to predict late toxicity. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01316328 PMID:22272830

  20. [Experimental study on application recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2(rhBMP-2)/poly-lactide-co-glycolic acid (PLGA)/fibrin sealant(FS) on repair of rabbit radial bone defect].

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhongkai; Cao, Yang; Zhang, Zhe; Zhang, Mingchao; Lu, Wei; Tang, Lei; Yao, Qi; Lu, Gang

    2012-10-01

    This paper is aimed to investigate the repair of rabbit radial bone defect by the recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2/poly-lactideco-glycolic acid microsphere with fibrin sealant (rhBMP-2/PLGA/FS). The radial bone defect models were prepared using New Zealand white rabbits, which were randomly divided into 3 groups, experiment group which were injected with eMP-2/PLGA/FS at bone defect location, control group which were injected with FS at bone defect location, and blank control group without treatment. The ability of repairing bone defect was evaluated with X-ray radiograph. Bone mineral density in the defect regions was analysed using the level of ossification. The osteogenetic ability of repairing bone defect, the degradation of the material, the morphologic change and the bone formation were assessed by HE staining and Masson staining. The result showed that rhBMP-2/PLGA/FS had overwhelming superiority in the osteogenetic ability and quality of bone defect over the control group, and it could promote the repair of bone defect and could especially repair the radial bone defect of rabbit well. It may be a promising and efficient synthetic bone graft. PMID:23198432

  1. DNA repair in Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background DNA repair is essential for the maintenance of genome stability in all living beings. Genome size as well as the repertoire and abundance of DNA repair components may vary among prokaryotic species. The bacteria of the Mollicutes class feature a small genome size, absence of a cell wall, and a parasitic lifestyle. A small number of genes make Mollicutes a good model for a “minimal cell” concept. Results In this work we studied the DNA repair system of Mycoplasma gallisepticum on genomic, transcriptional, and proteomic levels. We detected 18 out of 22 members of the DNA repair system on a protein level. We found that abundance of the respective mRNAs is less than one per cell. We studied transcriptional response of DNA repair genes of M. gallisepticum at stress conditions including heat, osmotic, peroxide stresses, tetracycline and ciprofloxacin treatment, stationary phase and heat stress in stationary phase. Conclusions Based on comparative genomic study, we determined that the DNA repair system M. gallisepticum includes a sufficient set of proteins to provide a cell with functional nucleotide and base excision repair and mismatch repair. We identified SOS-response in M. gallisepticum on ciprofloxacin, which is a known SOS-inducer, tetracycline and heat stress in the absence of established regulators. Heat stress was found to be the strongest SOS-inducer. We found that upon transition to stationary phase of culture growth transcription of DNA repair genes decreases dramatically. Heat stress does not induce SOS-response in a stationary phase. PMID:24148612

  2. Meniscal Repair

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Kyoung Ho

    2014-01-01

    The meniscus has several important roles, such as transmission of the load, absorption of the shock in the knee joint, acting as a secondary anteroposterior stabilizer of the knee joint, and contributing to proprioception of the knee joint. Degenerative changes of the knee joint develop in the long-term follow-up even after partial meniscectomy. Thus, there has been growing interest in meniscal repair. In addition, with increased understanding of the important roles of the meniscal root and advancement of diagnostic methods, efforts have been made to ensure preservation of the meniscal roots. In this review article, we will discuss operative techniques and clinical outcomes of arthroscopic repair of the meniscus and the meniscal root and postoperative rehabilitation and complications as well. PMID:24944971

  3. Energy and Technology Review: Unlocking the mysteries of DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Quirk, W.A.

    1993-04-01

    DNA, the genetic blueprint, has the remarkable property of encoding its own repair following diverse types of structural damage induced by external agents or normal metabolism. We are studying the interplay of DNA damaging agents, repair genes, and their protein products to decipher the complex biochemical pathways that mediate such repair. Our research focuses on repair processes that correct DNA damage produced by chemical mutagens and radiation, both ionizing and ultraviolet. The most important type of DNA repair in human cells is called excision repair. This multistep process removes damaged or inappropriate pieces of DNA -- often as a string of 29 nucleotides containing the damage -- and replaces them with intact ones. We have isolated, cloned, and mapped several human repair genes associated with the nucleotide excision repair pathway and involved in the repair of DNA damage after exposure to ultraviolet light or mutagens in cooked food. We have shown that a defect in one of these repair genes, ERCC2, is responsible for the repair deficiency in one of the groups of patients with the recessive genetic disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP group D). We are exploring ways to purify sufficient quantities (milligrams) of the protein products of these and other repair genes so that we can understand their functions. Our long-term goals are to link defective repair proteins to human DNA repair disorders that predispose to cancer, and to produce DNA-repair-deficient mice that can serve as models for the human disorders.

  4. Nucleotide Excision Repair Gene ERCC2 and ERCC5 Variants Increase Risk of Uterine Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Jungnam; Yoon, Kyong-Ah; Hayashi, Tomonori; Kong, Sun-Young; Shin, Hye-Jin; Park, Boram; Kim, Young Min; Hwang, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Jeongseon; Shin, Aesun; Kim, Joo-Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Defects in the DNA damage repair process can cause genomic instability and play an important role in cervical carcinogenesis. The purpose of this study was to analyze the association of 29 candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes in the DNA repair pathway, TP53, and TP53BP1 with the risk of cervical cancer. Materials and Methods Twenty-nine SNPs in four genes in the DNA repair pathway (ERCC2, ERCC5, NBS1, and XRCC1), TP53, and TP53BP1 were genotyped for 478 cervical cancer patients and 922 healthy control subjects, and their effects on cervical carcinogenesis were analyzed. Results The most significant association was found for rs17655 in ERCC5, with an age-adjusted p-value < 0.0001, for which a strong additive effect of the risk allele C was observed (odds ratio, 2.01 for CC to GG). On the other hand, another significant polymorphism rs454421 in ERCC2 showed a dominant effect (odds ratio, 1.68 for GA+AA to GG) with an age-adjusted p-value of 0.0009. The association of these polymorphisms remained significant regardless of the age of onset. The significant result for rs17655 was also consistent for subgroups of patients defined by histology and human papillomavirus (HPV) types. However, for rs454421, the association was observed only in patients with squamous cell carcinoma and non-HPV 18 type. Conclusion The results of this study show a novel association of cervical cancer and the genes involved in the nucleotide excision pathway in the Korean population. PMID:26130668

  5. Association and Interactions between DNA Repair Gene Polymorphisms and Adult Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanhong; Scheurer, Michael E.; El-Zein, Randa; Cao, Yumei; Do, Kim-Anh; Gilbert, Mark; Aldape, Kenneth D.; Wei, Qingyi; Etzel, Carol; Bondy, Melissa L.

    2010-01-01

    It is generally accepted that glioma develops through accumulation of genetic alterations. We hypothesized that polymorphisms of candidate genes involved in the DNA repair pathways may contribute to susceptibility to glioma. To address this possibility, we conducted a study of 373 Caucasian glioma cases and 365 cancer-free Caucasian controls to assess associations between glioma risk and 18 functional SNPs in DNA repair genes. We evaluated potential gene-gene and gene-environment interactions using a multi-analytic strategy combining logistic regression, multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR), and classification and regression tree (CART) approaches. In the single-locus analysis, six SNPs (ERCC1 3’ UTR, XRCC1 R399Q, APEX1 E148D, PARP1 A762V, MGMT F84L, and LIG1 5’UTR) showed a significant association with glioma risk. In the analysis of cumulative genetic risk of multiple SNPs, a significant gene-dosage effect was found for increased glioma risk with increasing numbers of adverse genotypes involving the above-mentioned six SNPs (P trend = 0.0004). Further, both the MDR and CART analyses identified MGMT F84L as the predominant risk factor for glioma, and revealed strong interactions among ionizing radiation (IR) exposure, PARP1 A762V, MGMT F84L and APEX1 E148D. Interestingly, the risk for glioma was dramatically increased in IR exposure individuals who had the wild-type genotypes of both MGMT F84L and PARP1 A762V [adjusted odds ratios (OR), 5.95; 95% confidence intervals (CI), 2.21–16.65]. Taken together, these results suggest that polymorphisms in DNA repair genes may act individually or together to contribute to glioma risk. PMID:19124499

  6. Antibody to a human DNA repair protein allows for cloning of a Drosophila cDNA that encodes an apurinic endonuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, M.R. ); Venugopal, S.; Harless, J.; Deutsch, W.A. . Dept. of Biochemistry)

    1989-03-01

    The cDNA of a Drosophila DNA repair gene, AP3, was cloned by screening an embryonic lambda gt11 expression library with an antibody that was originally prepared against a purified human apurinicapyrimidine (AP) endonuclease. The 1.2-kilobase (kb) AP3 cDNA mapped to a region on the third chromosome where a number of mutagen-sensitive alleles were located. The cDNA clone yielded an in vitro translation product of 35,000 daltons, in agreement with the predicted size of the translation product of the only open reading frame of AP3, and identical to the molecular size of an AP endonuclease activity recovered following sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrymalide gel electrophoresis of Drosophilia extracts. The C-terminal portion of the predicted protein contained regions of presumptive DNA-binding domains, while the DNA sequence at the amino end of AP3 showed similarity to the Escherichia coli recA gene. AP3 is expressed as an abundant 1.3-kb mRNA that is detected throughout the life cycle of Drosophila melanogaster. Another 3.5-klb mRNA also hybridized to the AP3 cDNA, but species was restricted to the early stages of development.

  7. Mismatch repair mRNA and protein expression in intestinal adenocarcinoma in sika deer (Cervus nippon) resembling heritable non-polyposis colorectal cancer in man.

    PubMed

    Jahns, H; Browne, J A

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal adenocarcinomas seen in an inbred herd of farmed sika deer (Cervus nippon) morphologically resembled human hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Features common to both included multiple de novo sites of tumourigenesis in the proximal colon, sessile and non-polyposis mucosal changes, the frequent finding of mucinous type adenocarcinoma, lymphocyte infiltration into the neoplastic tubules and Crohn's-like lymphoid follicles at the deep margin of the tumour. HNPCC is defined by a germline mutation of mismatch repair (MMR) genes resulting in their inactivation and loss of expression. To test the hypothesis that similar MMR gene inactivation occurs in the deer tumours, the expression of the four most important MMR genes, MSH2, MLH1, MSH6 and PMS2, was examined at the mRNA level by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (n = 12) and at the protein level by immunohistochemistry (n = 40) in tumour and control tissues. All four genes were expressed equally in normal and neoplastic tissues, so MMR gene inactivation could not be implicated in the carcinogenesis of this tumour in sika deer. PMID:25678423

  8. Screening for Lynch syndrome and referral to clinical genetics by selective mismatch repair protein immunohistochemistry testing: an audit and cost analysis.

    PubMed

    Colling, Richard; Church, David N; Carmichael, Juliet; Murphy, Lucinda; East, James; Risby, Peter; Kerr, Rachel; Chetty, Runjan; Wang, Lai Mun

    2015-12-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) accounts for around 3% of colorectal cancers (CRCs) and is caused by germline mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes. Recently, screening strategies to identify patients with LS have become popular. We audited CRCs screened with MMR immunohistochemistry (IHC) in 2013. 209 tumours had MMR IHC performed at a cost of £12 540. 47/209 (21%) cases showed IHC loss of expression in at least one MMR protein. 28/44 cases with loss of MLH1 had additional BRAF V600E testing, at a cost of £5040. MMR IHC reduced the number of potential clinical genetics referrals from 209 to 47. BRAF mutation testing, performed in a subset of cases with MLH1 loss, further reduced this to 21. At a cost of £1340 per referral, this model of LS screening for clinical genetics referral had significant potential savings (£234 340) and can be easily implemented in parallel with MMR IHC done for prognostication in CRCs. PMID:26201544

  9. Rational design of cancer-targeted BSA protein nanoparticles as radiosensitizer to overcome cancer radioresistance.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanyu; Luo, Yi; Zheng, Wenjie; Chen, Tianfeng

    2014-01-01

    Radiotherapy displays curative potential for cervical cancer management, but radioresistance occurs during long-term therapy. To overcome this limitation, tumor-targeted nanotechnology has been proposed to enhance the radiosensitivity of solid tumors. Herein, we used biocompatible bovine serum albumin nanoparticles (BSANPs) as carriers of organic selenocompound (PSeD) with folate (FA) as the targeting ligand to fabricate a cancer-targeted nanosystem. The combination of PSeD and BSANPs endowed the nanosystem with higher light absorption and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation owing to their properties of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect, heavy metal effect, high refractive index and nanoparticulate interfacial effect. The combined treatment drastically increased the ROS overproduction, VEGF/VEGFR2 inactivation and inhibition of XRCC-1-mediated repair of DNA damage, thus triggering G2/M phase arrest and apoptosis. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the utility of FA-BSANPs as a promising radiosensitizer to improve cancer radiotherapy. PMID:25314331

  10. Prokaryotic nucleotide excision repair.

    PubMed

    Kisker, Caroline; Kuper, Jochen; Van Houten, Bennett

    2013-03-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) has allowed bacteria to flourish in many different niches around the globe that inflict harsh environmental damage to their genetic material. NER is remarkable because of its diverse substrate repertoire, which differs greatly in chemical composition and structure. Recent advances in structural biology and single-molecule studies have given great insight into the structure and function of NER components. This ensemble of proteins orchestrates faithful removal of toxic DNA lesions through a multistep process. The damaged nucleotide is recognized by dynamic probing of the DNA structure that is then verified and marked for dual incisions followed by excision of the damage and surrounding nucleotides. The opposite DNA strand serves as a template for repair, which is completed after resynthesis and ligation. PMID:23457260

  11. Roles of the Major, Small, Acid-Soluble Spore Proteins and Spore-Specific and Universal DNA Repair Mechanisms in Resistance of Bacillus subtilis Spores to Ionizing Radiation from X Rays and High-Energy Charged-Particle Bombardment▿

    PubMed Central

    Moeller, Ralf; Setlow, Peter; Horneck, Gerda; Berger, Thomas; Reitz, Günther; Rettberg, Petra; Doherty, Aidan J.; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Nicholson, Wayne L.

    2008-01-01

    The role of DNA repair by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), homologous recombination, spore photoproduct lyase, and DNA polymerase I and genome protection via α/β-type small, acid-soluble spore proteins (SASP) in Bacillus subtilis spore resistance to accelerated heavy ions (high-energy charged [HZE] particles) and X rays has been studied. Spores deficient in NHEJ and α/β-type SASP were significantly more sensitive to HZE particle bombardment and X-ray irradiation than were the recA, polA, and splB mutant and wild-type spores, indicating that NHEJ provides an efficient DNA double-strand break repair pathway during spore germination and that the loss of the α/β-type SASP leads to a significant radiosensitivity to ionizing radiation, suggesting the essential function of these spore proteins as protectants of spore DNA against ionizing radiation. PMID:18055591

  12. XPD DNA nucleotide excision repair gene polymorphisms associated with DNA repair deficiency predict better treatment outcomes in secondary acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kuptsova-Clarkson, Nataliya; Ambrosone, Christine B; Weiss, Joli; Baer, Maria R; Sucheston, Lara E; Zirpoli, Gary; Kopecky, Kenneth J; Ford, Laurie; Blanco, Javier; Wetzler, Meir; Moysich, Kirsten B

    2010-01-01

    Pharmacogenetic studies in DNA repair pathway have consistently demonstrated correlations between the XRCC1 Arg399Gln, XPD Lys751Gln and XPD Asp312Gln genotypes, previously associated with suboptimal DNA repair, and differential cancer treatment outcomes. We evaluated these polymorphisms and XPD haplotypes in adult de novo (n=214) and secondary (n=79) acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients treated with cytarabine and anthracycline chemotherapy. Genotyping was performed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Logistic and proportional hazards regression models were used to evaluate relationships. Differential responses were observed in secondary, but not de novo, AML. Among secondary AML patients, the odds of achieving complete remission (CR) were higher for the XPD 312Asn/Asn (OR= 11.23; 95% CI, 2.23-56.63) and XPD 751Gln/Gln (OR= 7.07; 95% CI, 1.42-35.18) genotypes. The XPD diplotypes were coded as the combination of two of the following haplotypes: haplotype A=(Lys)751A/(Asp) 312G; B=(Gln)751C/(Asn)312A; C=(Lys)751A/(Asn)312A; and D=(Gln)751C/(Asp)312G. The BB diplotype was associated with CR attainment [OR=18.31; 95% CI: 2.08-283.57] and longer survival [HR=0.31; 95% CI: 0.14-0.73] compared to the referent AA diplotype. The XPD 751 CC, 312GA, 312AA genotypes and the XPD DC diplotype were also associated with longer overall survival (OS).Thus, XPD codon 312 and 751 variant genotypes and haplotypes containing at least one variant allele may predict better treatment responses. If validated, these findings could support stratification of chemotherapy in secondary AML. PMID:21394217

  13. Ovarian endometrioid adenocarcinoma: incidence and clinical significance of the morphologic and immunohistochemical markers of mismatch repair protein defects and tumor microsatellite instability.

    PubMed

    Aysal, Anil; Karnezis, Anthony; Medhi, Irum; Grenert, James P; Zaloudek, Charles J; Rabban, Joseph T

    2012-02-01

    A subset of women with uterine cancer exhibiting defective mismatch repair (MMR) proteins and microsatellite instability (MSI) may have Lynch syndrome, which also confers a risk for colorectal cancer and other cancers in the patient and in her family. Screening algorithms based on clinical and pathologic criteria are effective in determining which patients with uterine cancer are most likely to benefit from definitive genetic testing for Lynch syndrome. Ovarian cancer, particularly endometrioid adenocarcinoma, is also associated with Lynch syndrome, although the risk is much smaller than for uterine cancer. This study evaluated whether the morphologic criteria [tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs), peritumoral lymphocytes (PTLs), dedifferentiated morphology)] currently used to screen uterine cancer for further Lynch syndrome testing can be applied to ovarian cancer. Among 71 patients with pure ovarian endometrioid adenocarcinoma treated at a single institution, 13% had a tumor with TILs, 3% had PTLs, and none had dedifferentiated morphology. Overall, 10% of tumors had abnormal MMR protein status, defined as complete immunohistochemical loss of expression of MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and/or PMS2. Each of these tumors with abnormal MMR status demonstrated MSI using a polymerase chain reaction-based assay evaluating 5 mononucleotide repeat markers. No relationship was found between patient age, TILs, PTLs, or a spectrum of other morphologic variables and MMR protein status/MSI. Only 1/7 tumors with abnormal MMR/MSI had TILs/PTLs. Among 14 patients who died, 12 (86%) had normal MMR status. Among 7 patients with tumors with abnormal MMR/MSI, 5 (71%) were alive without disease. Concurrent uterine tumor was present in 5/7 patients whose ovarian tumor had abnormal MMR/MSI. This study suggests that the morphologic criteria used to screen patients with uterine cancer for further Lynch syndrome testing are not applicable in patients with ovarian cancer. Although abnormal MMR/MSI did

  14. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in DNA repair genes and association with breast cancer risk in the web study.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Michelle R; Shields, Peter G; Ambrosone, Christine B; Nie, Jing; Marian, Catalin; Krishnan, Shiva S; Goerlitz, David S; Modali, Ramakrishna; Seddon, Michael; Lehman, Teresa; Amend, Kandace L; Trevisan, Maurizio; Edge, Stephen B; Freudenheim, Jo L

    2011-08-01

    Base excision repair (BER) and nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathways repair damaged DNA, and polymorphisms in these genes might affect breast cancer susceptibility. We evaluated associations between seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms in four DNA repair genes (ERCC4 rs1799801, XPC rs2227998, rs2228001, rs2228000, OGG1 rs1052133 and XRCC1 rs25487 and rs25486) and breast cancer risk, examining modification by smoking and alcohol consumption, using data from the Western New York Exposures and Breast Cancer Study. Women aged 35-79 years with incident breast cancer (n = 1170) and age- and race-matched controls (n = 2115) were enrolled. Genotyping was performed using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). No significant associations were observed in premenopausal women. Among postmenopausal women, rs25487 and rs25486 (OR = 1.24; 95% CI 1.01-1.51 and OR = 1.23; 95% CI 1.01-1.49, respectively, for combined heterozygous and homozygous variant compared with reference) were associated with increased risk of breast cancer. Postmenopausal women carrying the variant allele of the synonymous XPC polymorphism (rs2227998) were also at borderline significantly increased risk (OR = 1.24; 95% CI 1.01-1.52, heterozygous variant compared with reference; OR = 1.22; 95% CI 1.01-1.48, for combined heterozygous and homozygous variant compared with reference). There was no evidence of genotype-smoking and genotype-alcohol consumption interactions for pre- and postmenopausal women. These results indicate that some of the variants in BER and NER genes may influence risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. PMID:21622940

  15. Importance of universal mismatch repair protein immunohistochemistry in patients with sebaceous neoplasia as an initial screening tool for Muir-Torre syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jessup, Chad J; Redston, Mark; Tilton, Erin; Reimann, Julie D R

    2016-03-01

    Muir-Torre syndrome, a Lynch syndrome variant, is characterized by sebaceous neoplasia plus one or more malignancies, typically colon cancer. The significance of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency detection by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in colorectal carcinomas is well established and is recommended as a screening tool for Lynch syndrome in newly diagnosed colorectal carcinomas. In comparison, literature on IHC application to detect MMR proteins (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2) in sebaceous neoplasia has been less studied and has been derived almost exclusively from tertiary care centers. Herein we describe the largest series to date characterizing MMR deficiency in sebaceous neoplasms, as well as the relative frequencies of each deficiency. Two hundred sixteen consecutive sebaceous neoplasms (216 patients) were analyzed from a community practice setting (133 sebaceous adenomas, 68 sebaceomas, 15 sebaceous carcinomas). One hundred forty-three were MMR deficient (66%), of which 90 were MSH2/MSH6 deficient (63%), 27 MLH1/PMS2 deficient (19%), 22 MSH6 deficient (15%), and 4 PMS2 deficient (3%). MMR deficiency was significantly associated with site, with tumors off of the head and neck more likely to be MMR deficient (specificity 96%). In contrast to prior reports, no significant trend in MMR-deficient versus -nondeficient tumors was seen in age at presentation (median age, 68 versus 66), tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, or tumor type. Given the low sensitivity of age < 60 years (30%), location off of the head and neck (41%), or presence of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (29%) in MMR deficiency detection, IHC screening programs should test all sebaceous neoplasms for MMR deficiency, regardless of their clinicopathological features. PMID:26826402

  16. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular

    MedlinePlus

    ... Endovascular aneurysm repair - aorta; AAA repair - endovascular; Repair - aortic aneurysm - endovascular ... leaking or bleeding. You may have an abdominal aortic aneurysm that is not causing any symptoms or problems. ...

  17. Eye muscle repair - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lazy eye repair - discharge; Strabismus repair - discharge; Extraocular muscle surgery - discharge ... You or your child had eye muscle repair surgery to correct eye muscle ... term for crossed eyes is strabismus. Children most often ...

  18. Brain aneurysm repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... aneurysm repair; Dissecting aneurysm repair; Endovascular aneurysm repair - brain; Subarachnoid hemorrhage - aneurysm ... Your scalp, skull, and the coverings of the brain are opened. A metal clip is placed at ...

  19. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular

    MedlinePlus

    EVAR; Endovascular aneurysm repair - aorta; AAA repair - endovascular; Repair - aortic aneurysm - endovascular ... leaking or bleeding. You may have an abdominal aortic aneurysm that is not causing any symptoms or problems. ...

  20. INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES

    SciTech Connect

    Robin Gordon; Bill Bruce; Nancy Porter; Mike Sullivan; Chris Neary

    2003-05-01

    The two broad categories of deposited weld metal repair and fiber-reinforced composite repair technologies were reviewed for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Preliminary test programs were developed for both deposited weld metal repairs and for fiber-reinforced composite repair. To date, all of the experimental work pertaining to the evaluation of potential repair methods has focused on fiber-reinforced composite repairs. Hydrostatic testing was also conducted on four pipeline sections with simulated corrosion damage: two with composite liners and two without.

  1. Loss of expression of the double strand break repair protein ATM is associated with worse prognosis in colorectal cancer and loss of Ku70 expression is associated with CIN

    PubMed Central

    Beggs, Andrew D; Domingo, Enric; McGregor, Megan; Presz, Mikael; Johnstone, Elaine; Midgley, Rachel; Kerr, David; Oukrif, Dahmane; Novelli, Marco; Abulafi, Muti; Hodgson, Shirley V; Fadhil, Wakkas; Ilyas, Mohammad; Tomlinson, Ian PM

    2012-01-01

    Repair of double strand DNA breaks (DSBs) is pivotal in maintaining normal cell division and disruption of this system has been shown to be a key factor in carcinogenesis. Loss of expression of the DSB repair proteins have previously been shown to be associated with poorer survival in colorectal cancer. We wished to ascertain the relationship of altered expression of the DSB repair proteins γ-H2AX (gamma-H2AX), ATM and Ku70 with biological and clinico-pathological features of colorectal cancer. 908 tumours from the VICTOR clinical trial of stage II/III colorectal cancer were analysed for expression of γ-H2AX, ATM and Ku70 using immunohistochemistry. Expression levels were correlated with CIN and with disease-free survival, correcting for microsatellite instability, BRAF/KRAS mutation status, Dukes stage, chemo/radiotherapy, age, gender and tumour location. Down-regulated Ku70 expression was associated with chromosomal instability (p=0.029) in colorectal cancer. Reduced ATM expression was an independent marker of poor disease-free survival (HR=1.67, 95% CI 1.11-2.50, p=0.015). For Ku70, further studies are required to investigate the potential relationship of non-homologous end joining with chromosomal instability. Loss of ATM expression might serve as a biomarker of poor prognosis in colorectal cancer. PMID:23154512

  2. Progranulin promotes Temozolomide resistance of glioblastoma by orchestrating DNA repair and tumor stemness.

    PubMed

    Bandey, I; Chiou, S-H; Huang, A-P; Tsai, J-C; Tu, P-h

    2015-04-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common malignant brain tumor in adults with a dismal prognosis. Current therapy of surgical removal combined with Temozolomide (TMZ) and radiation therapy only slightly prolongs the survival of GBM patients. Thus, it is essential to elucidate mechanism underlying its highly malignant properties in order to develop efficacious therapeutic regimens. In this study, we showed that progranulin (PGRN) was overexpressed in most GBM cell lines and the majority of human tumor samples. PGRN overexpression conferred GBM cells with tumorigenic properties and TMZ resistance by upregulating DNA repair (PARP, ATM, BRCA1, Rad51, XRCC1 and so on) and cancer stemness (CD133, CD44, ABCG2) genes, in part via an AP-1 transcription factor, specifically cFos/JunB. Curcumin, an AP-1 inhibitor, was also found to regulate PGRN promoter activity and expression including its downstream effectors aforementioned. These data suggested a feedforward loop between PGRN signaling and AP-1. PGRN depletion significantly decreased unlimited self-renewal and multilineage differentiation and the malignant properties of GBMs cells S1R1, and enhanced their vulnerability to TMZ. In addition, S1R1 depleted of PGRN also lost the ability to form tumor in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model. In conclusion, PGRN had a critical role in the pathogenesis and chemoresistance of GBM and functioned at the top of the hierarchy of cellular machinery that modulates both DNA repair pathways and cancer stemness. Our data suggest that a new strategy combining current regimens with compounds targeting PGRN/AP-1 loop like curcumin may significantly improve the therapeutic outcome of GBM. PMID:24793792

  3. DNA Repair Pathways in Trypanosomatids: from DNA Repair to Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Genois, Marie-Michelle; Paquet, Eric R.; Laffitte, Marie-Claude N.; Maity, Ranjan; Rodrigue, Amélie

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY All living organisms are continuously faced with endogenous or exogenous stress conditions affecting genome stability. DNA repair pathways act as a defense mechanism, which is essential to maintain DNA integrity. There is much to learn about the regulation and functions of these mechanisms, not only in human cells but also equally in divergent organisms. In trypanosomatids, DNA repair pathways protect the genome against mutations but also act as an adaptive mechanism to promote drug resistance. In this review, we scrutinize the molecular mechanisms and DNA repair pathways which are conserved in trypanosomatids. The recent advances made by the genome consortiums reveal the complete genomic sequences of several pathogens. Therefore, using bioinformatics and genomic sequences, we analyze the conservation of DNA repair proteins and their key protein motifs in trypanosomatids. We thus present a comprehensive view of DNA repair processes in trypanosomatids at the crossroads of DNA repair and drug resistance. PMID:24600040

  4. Activated RecA protein may induce expression of a gene that is not controlled by the LexA repressor and whose function is required for mutagenesis and repair of UV-irradiated bacteriophage lambda

    SciTech Connect

    Calsou, P.; Villaverde, A.; Defais, M.

    1987-10-01

    The activated form of the RecA protein (RecA) is known to be involved in the reactivation and mutagenesis of UV-irradiated bacteriophage lambda and in the expression of the SOS response in Escherichia coli K-12. The expression of the SOS response requires cleavage of the LexA repressor by RecA and the subsequent expression of LexA-controlled genes. The evidence presented here suggests that RecA induces the expression of a gene(s) that is not under LexA control and that is also necessary for maximal repair and mutagenesis of damaged phage. This conclusion is based on the chloramphenicol sensitivity of RecA -dependent repair and mutagenesis of damaged bacteriophage lambda in lexA(Def) hosts.

  5. Book Repair Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milevski, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    This book repair manual developed for the Illinois Cooperative Conservation Program includes book structure and book problems, book repair procedures for 4 specific problems, a description of adhesive bindings, a glossary, an annotated list of 11 additional readings, book repair supplies and suppliers, and specifications for book repair kits. (LRW)

  6. Human mismatch-repair protein MutL homologue 1 (MLH1) interacts with Escherichia coli MutL and MutS in vivo and in vitro: a simple genetic system to assay MLH1 function.

    PubMed Central

    Quaresima, Barbara; Alifano, Pietro; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Avvedimento, Enrico V; Costanzo, Francesco S; Venuta, Salvatore

    2003-01-01

    A simple genetic system has been developed to test the effect of over-expression of wild-type or mutated human MutL homologue 1 (hMLH1) proteins on methyl-directed mismatch repair (MMR) in Escherichia coli. The system relies on detection of Lac(+) revertants using MMR-proficient or MMR-deficient E. coli strains carrying a lac +1 frameshift mutation expressing hMLH1 proteins. We report that expression of wild-type hMLH1 protein causes an approx. 19-fold increase in mutation rates. The mutator phenotype was due to the ability of hMLH1 protein to interact with bacterial MutL and MutS proteins, thereby interfering with the formation of complexes between MMR proteins and mismatched DNA. Conversely, expression of proteins encoded by alleles deriving from hereditary-non-polyposis-colon-cancer (HNPCC) families decreases mutation rates, depending on the specific amino acid substitutions. These effects parallel the MutL-and MutS-binding and ATP-binding/hydrolysis activities of the mutated proteins. PMID:12513688

  7. Inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A radiosensitizes pancreatic cancers by modulating CDC25C/CDK1 and homologous recombination repair

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Dongping; Parsels, Leslie A.; Karnak, David; Davis, Mary A.; Parsels, Joshua D.; Zhao, Lili; Maybaum, Jonathan; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Sun, Yi; Morgan, Meredith A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To identify targets whose inhibition may enhance the efficacy of chemoradiation in pancreatic cancer and thus improve survival, we performed an siRNA library screen in pancreatic cancer cells. We investigated PPP2R1A, a scaffolding subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) as a lead radiosensitizing target. Experimental Design We determined the effect of PP2A inhibition by genetic (PPP2R1A siRNA) and pharmacological (LB100, a small molecule entering Phase I clinical trials) approaches on radiosensitization of Panc-1 and MiaPaCa-2 pancreatic cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. Results PPP2R1A depletion by siRNA radiosensitized Panc-1 and MiaPaCa-2 cells, with radiation enhancement ratios of 1.4 (P<0.05). Likewise, LB100 produced similar radiosensitization in pancreatic cancer cells, but minimal radiosensitization in normal small intestinal cells. Mechanistically, PPP2R1A siRNA or LB100 caused aberrant CDK1 activation, likely resulting from accumulation of the active forms of PLK1 (pPLK1 T210) and CDC25C (pCDC25C T130). Furthermore, LB100 inhibited radiation-induced Rad51 focus formation and homologous recombination repair (HRR), ultimately leading to persistent radiation-induced DNA damage, as reflected by γH2AX expression. Finally, we identified CDC25C as a key PP2A substrate involved in LB100-mediated radiosensitization as depletion of CDC25C partially reversed LB100-mediated radiosensitization. In a mouse xenograft model of human pancreatic cancer, LB100 produced significant radiosensitization with minimal weight loss. Conclusions Collectively, our data demonstrate that PP2A inhibition radiosensitizes pancreatic cancer both in vitro and in vivo via activation of CDC25C/CDK1 and inhibition of HRR, and provide proof-of-concept evidence that PP2A is a promising target for the improvement of local therapy in pancreatic cancer. PMID:23780887

  8. Pattern of antioxidant and DNA repair gene expression in normal airway epithelium associated with lung cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Blomquist, Thomas; Crawford, Erin L; Mullins, D'Anna; Yoon, Youngsook; Hernandez, Dawn-Alita; Khuder, Sadik; Ruppel, Patricia L; Peters, Elizabeth; Oldfield, David J; Austermiller, Brad; Anders, John C; Willey, James C

    2009-11-15

    In previous studies, we reported that key antioxidant and DNA repair genes are regulated differently in normal bronchial epithelial cells of lung cancer cases compared with non-lung cancer controls. In an effort to develop a biomarker for lung cancer risk, we evaluated the transcript expressions of 14 antioxidant, DNA repair, and transcription factor genes in normal bronchial epithelial cells (HUGO names CAT, CEBPG, E2F1, ERCC4, ERCC5, GPX1, GPX3, GSTM3, GSTP1, GSTT1, GSTZ1, MGST1, SOD1, and XRCC1). A test comprising these 14 genes accurately identified the lung cancer cases in two case-control studies. The receiver operating characteristic-area under the curve was 0.82 (95% confidence intervals, 0.68-0.91) for the first case-control set (25 lung cancer cases and 24 controls), and 0.87 (95% confidence intervals, 0.73-0.96) for the second set (18 cases and 22 controls). For each gene included in the test, the key difference between cases and controls was altered distribution of transcript expression among cancer cases compared with controls, with more lung cancer cases expressing at both extremes among all genes (Kolmorogov-Smirnov test, D = 0.0795; P = 0.041). A novel statistical approach was used to identify the lower and upper boundaries of transcript expression that optimally classifies cases and controls for each gene. Based on the data presented here, there is an increased prevalence of lung cancer diagnosis among individuals that express a threshold number of key antioxidant, DNA repair, and transcription factor genes at either very high or very low levels in the normal airway epithelium. PMID:19887610

  9. DNA repair in mammalian embryos.

    PubMed

    Jaroudi, Souraya; SenGupta, Sioban

    2007-01-01

    Mammalian cells have developed complex mechanisms to identify DNA damage and activate the required response to maintain genome integrity. Those mechanisms include DNA damage detection, DNA repair, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis which operate together to protect the conceptus from DNA damage originating either in parental gametes or in the embryo's somatic cells. DNA repair in the newly fertilized preimplantation embryo is believed to rely entirely on the oocyte's machinery (mRNAs and proteins deposited and stored prior to ovulation). DNA repair genes have been shown to be expressed in the early stages of mammalian development. The survival of the embryo necessitates that the oocyte be sufficiently equipped with maternal stored products and that embryonic gene expression commences at the correct time. A Medline based literature search was performed using the keywords 'DNA repair' and 'embryo development' or 'gametogenesis' (publication dates between 1995 and 2006). Mammalian studies which investigated gene expression were selected. Further articles were acquired from the citations in the articles obtained from the preliminary Medline search. This paper reviews mammalian DNA repair from gametogenesis to preimplantation embryos to late gestational stages. PMID:17141556

  10. Selenium compounds activate ATM-dependent DNA damage responses via the mismatch repair protein hMLH1 in colorectal cancer cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Epidemiological and animal studies indicate that selenium supplementation suppresses risk of colorectal and other cancers. The majority of colorectal cancers are characterized by a defective DNA mismatch repair (MMR) process. Here, we have employed the MMR-deficient HCT 116 colorectal cancer cells ...

  11. A new heterologous fibrin sealant as scaffold to recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) and natural latex proteins for the repair of tibial bone defects.

    PubMed

    Machado, Eduardo Gomes; Issa, João Paulo Mardegan; Figueiredo, Fellipe Augusto Tocchini de; Santos, Geovane Ribeiro Dos; Galdeano, Ewerton Alexandre; Alves, Mariana Carla; Chacon, Erivelto Luis; Ferreira Junior, Rui Seabra; Barraviera, Benedito; Cunha, Marcelo Rodrigues da

    2015-04-01

    Tissue engineering has special interest in bone tissue aiming at future medical applications Studies have focused on recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) and natural latex proteins due to the osteogenic properties of rhBMP-2 and the angiogenic characteristic of fraction 1 protein (P-1) extracted from the rubber tree Hevea brasiliensis. Furthermore, heterologous fibrin sealant (FS) has been shown as a promising alternative in regenerative therapies. The aim of this study was to evaluate these substances for the repair of bone defects in rats. A bone defect measuring 3mm in diameter was created in the proximal metaphysis of the left tibia of 60 rats and was implanted with rhBMP-2 or P-1 in combination with a new heterologous FS derived from snake venom. The animals were divided into six groups: control (unfilled bone defect), rhBMP-2 (defect filled with 5μg rhBMP-2), P-1 (defect filled with 5μg P-1), FS (defect filled with 8μg FS), FS/rhBMP-2 (defect filled with 8μg FS and 5μg rhBMP-2), FS/P-1 (defect filled with 8μg FS and 5μg P-1). The animals were sacrificed 2 and 6 weeks after surgery. The newly formed bone projected from the margins of the original bone and exhibited trabecular morphology and a disorganized arrangement of osteocyte lacunae. Immunohistochemical analysis showed intense expression of osteocalcin in all groups. Histometric analysis revealed a significant difference in all groups after 2 weeks (p<0.05), except for the rhBMP-2 and FS/rhBMP-2 groups (p>0.05). A statistically significant difference (p<0.05) was observed in all groups after 6 weeks in relation to the volume of newly formed bone in the surgical area. In conclusion, the new heterologous fibrin sealant was found to be biocompatible and the combination with rhBMP-2 showed the highest osteogenic and osteoconductive capacity for bone healing. These findings suggest a promising application of this combination in the regeneration surgery. PMID:25825118

  12. Rapid road repair vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Mara, Leo M.

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed is a rapid road repair vehicle capable of moving over a surface to be repaired at near normal posted traffic speeds to scan for and find an the high rate of speed, imperfections in the pavement surface, prepare the surface imperfection for repair by air pressure and vacuum cleaning, applying a correct amount of the correct patching material to effect the repair, smooth the resulting repaired surface, and catalog the location and quality of the repairs for maintenance records of the road surface. The rapid road repair vehicle can repair surface imperfections at lower cost, improved quality, at a higher rate of speed than was was heretofor possible, with significantly reduced exposure to safety and health hazards associated with this kind of road repair activities in the past.

  13. Rapid road repair vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Mara, L.M.

    1998-05-05

    Disclosed is a rapid road repair vehicle capable of moving over a surface to be repaired at near normal posted traffic speeds to scan for and find at the high rate of speed, imperfections in the pavement surface, prepare the surface imperfection for repair by air pressure and vacuum cleaning, applying a correct amount of the correct patching material to effect the repair, smooth the resulting repaired surface, and catalog the location and quality of the repairs for maintenance records of the road surface. The rapid road repair vehicle can repair surface imperfections at lower cost, improved quality, at a higher rate of speed than was not heretofor possible, with significantly reduced exposure to safety and health hazards associated with this kind of road repair activities in the past. 2 figs.

  14. Microarray-based expression of DNA repair genes does not correlate with growth inhibition of cancer cells by natural products derived from traditional Chinese medicine.

    PubMed

    Konkimalla, V S Badireenath; Wang, Gan; Kaina, Bernd; Efferth, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Drug resistance represents a major obstacle in cancer chemotherapy. As chemically characterized compounds derived from plants used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) may have molecular targets different from those of standard antitumor drugs, they might be attractive candidates for novel therapeutics with improved pharmacological features. DNA repair is frequently involved in the development of resistance to established anticancer drugs, e.g. alkylating agents. Using a database of 531 chemically characterized TCM compounds from medicinal plants recently established by us, the IC50 values of 60 N.C.I. tumor cell lines for these 531 natural products were tested for correlation with the microarray-based mRNA expression of six genes involved in nucleotide excision repair (ERCC1, XPA, XPC, DDB2, ERCC4, ERCC5). No compound correlated with the expression of these genes, indicating that mRNA expression of these genes is not associated with resistance of the cell lines to these TCM compounds. The same is true for another six genes of the base excision repair pathway (MPG, APEX1, OGG1, XRCC1, LIG3, POLB). Microarray-based COMPARE analyses were performed to identify other candidate genes that are able to predict responsiveness of tumor cells to TCM-derived natural products. As an example, diallyl disulfide from garlic (Allium sativum L., Chinese name: dashuan) was chosen. Eighteen genes were identified whose mRNA expression predicted sensitivity or resistance to diallyl disulfide in hierarchical cluster analyses. Apart from some genes with still unknown function, genes were identified from different functional groups, e.g. signal transducers, regulators of GTPase activity, those associated with cytoskeleton formation and regulation, constituents of the ribosome. Remarkably, none of these genes have been described to be involved in DNA repair. In conclusion, our data indicate that TCM-derived natural products are worth being further investigated as novel compounds to

  15. Role of isolated and clustered DNA damage and the post-irradiating repair process in the effects of heavy ion beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Tokuyama, Yuka; Furus