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Sample records for repeat pass deformation

  1. An L-band SAR for repeat pass deformation measurements on a UAV platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hensley, Scott; Lou, Yunling; Rosen, Paul; Wheeler, Kevin; Zebker, Howard; Madsen, Soren; Miller, Tim; Hoffman, Jim; Farra, Don

    2003-01-01

    We are proposing to develop a miniaturized polarimetric L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) for repeat-pass differential interferometric measurements of deformation for rapidly deforming surfaces of geophysical interest such as volcanoes or earthquakes that is to be flown on a unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) or minimally piloted vehicle (MPV). Upon surveying the capabilities and availabilities of such aircraft, the Proteus aircraft and the ALTAIR UAV appear to meet our criteria in terms of payload capabilities, flying altitude, and endurance. To support the repeat pass deformation capability it is necessary to control flight track capability of the aircraft to be within a specified 10 m tube with a goal of 1 m. This requires real-time GPS control of the autopilot to achieve these objectives that has not been demonstrated on these aircraft. Based on the Proteus and ALTAIR's altitude of 13.7 km (45,000 ft), we are designing a fully polarimetric L-band radar with 80 MHz bandwidth and a 16 km range swath. The radar will have an active electronic beam steering antenna to achieve a Doppler centroid stability that is necessary for repeat-pass interferometry. This paper presents some of the trade studies for the platform, instrument and the expected science.

  2. Status of a UAV SAR Designed for Repeat Pass Interferometry for Deformation Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hensley, Scott; Wheeler, Kevin; Hoffman, Jim; Miller, Tim; Lou, Yunling; Muellerschoen, Ron; Zebker, Howard; Madsen, Soren; Rosen, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Under the NASA ESTO sponsored Instrument Incubator Program we have designed a lightweight, reconfigurable polarimetric L-band SAR designed for repeat pass deformation measurements of rapidly deforming surfaces of geophysical interest such as volcanoes or earthquakes. This radar will be installed on an unmanned airborne vehicle (UAV) or a lightweight, high-altitude, and long endurance platform such as the Proteus. After a study of suitable available platforms we selected the Proteus for initial development and testing of the system. We want to control the repeat track capability of the aircraft to be within a 10 m tube to support the repeat deformation capability. We conducted tests with the Proteus using real-time GPS with sub-meter accuracy to see if pilots could fly the aircraft within the desired tube. Our results show that pilots are unable to fly the aircraft with the desired accuracy and therefore an augmented autopilot will be required to meet these objectives. Based on the Proteus flying altitude of 13.7 km (45,000 ft), we are designing a fully polarimetric L-band radar with 80 MHz bandwidth and 16 km range swath. This radar will have an active electronic beam steering antenna to achieve Doppler centroid stability that is necessary for repeat-pass interferometry (RPI). This paper will present are design criteria, current design and expected science applications.

  3. Status of a UAVSAR designed for repeat pass interferometry for deformation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hensley, Scott; Wheeler, Kevin; Sadowy, Greg; Miller, Tim; Shaffer, Scott; Muellerschoen, Ron; Jones, Cathleen; Zebker, Howard; Madsen, Soren; Paul, Rose

    2005-01-01

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory is currently implementing a reconfigurable polarimetric L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR), specifically designed to acquire airborne repeat track interferometric (RTI) SAR data, also known as differential interferometric measurements. Differential interferometry can provide key deformation measurements, important for the scientific studies of Earthquakes and volcanoes. Using precision real-time GPS and a sensor controlled flight management system, the system will be able to fly predefined paths with great precision. The expected performance of the flight control system will constrain the flight path to be within a 10 m diameter tube about the desired flight track. The radar wilI be designed to operate on a UAV (Unpiloted Aria1 Vehicle) but will initially be demonstrated on a minimally piloted vehicle (MPV), such as the Proteus buitt by Scaled Composites or on a NASA Gulfstream III. The radar design is a fully polarimetric with an 80 MHz bandwidth (2 m range resolution) and 16 km range swath. The antenna is an electronically steered along track to assure that the actual antenna pointing can be controlled independent of the wind direction and speed. Other features supported by the antenna include an elevation monopulse option and a pulse-to-pulse resteering capability that will enable some novel modes of operation. The system will nominally operate at 45,000 ft (13800 m). The program began out as an Instrument Incubator Project (IIP) funded by NASA Earth Science and Technology Office (ESTO).

  4. An L-band SAR for repeat pass deformation measurements on a UAV platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Kevin; Hensley, Scott; Lou, Yunling

    2004-01-01

    We are proposing to develop a miniaturized polarimetric L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) for repeatpass differential interferometric measurements of deformation for rapidly deforming surfaces of geophysical interest such as volcanoes or earthquakes that is to be flown on a unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV or minimally piloted vehicle (MPV).

  5. Airborne Radar Interferometric Repeat-Pass Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hensley, Scott; Michel, Thierry R.; Jones, Cathleen E.; Muellerschoen, Ronald J.; Chapman, Bruce D.; Fore, Alexander; Simard, Marc; Zebker, Howard A.

    2011-01-01

    Earth science research often requires crustal deformation measurements at a variety of time scales, from seconds to decades. Although satellites have been used for repeat-track interferometric (RTI) synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) mapping for close to 20 years, RTI is much more difficult to implement from an airborne platform owing to the irregular trajectory of the aircraft compared with microwave imaging radar wavelengths. Two basic requirements for robust airborne repeat-pass radar interferometry include the ability to fly the platform to a desired trajectory within a narrow tube and the ability to have the radar beam pointed in a desired direction to a fraction of a beam width. Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) is equipped with a precision auto pilot developed by NASA Dryden that allows the platform, a Gulfstream III, to nominally fly within a 5 m diameter tube and with an electronically scanned antenna to position the radar beam to a fraction of a beam width based on INU (inertial navigation unit) attitude angle measurements.

  6. UAVSAR: Airborne L-band Radar for Repeat Pass Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moes, Timothy R.

    2009-01-01

    The primary objectives of the UAVSAR Project were to: a) develop a miniaturized polarimetric L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) for use on an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) or piloted vehicle. b) develop the associated processing algorithms for repeat-pass differential interferometric measurements using a single antenna. c) conduct measurements of geophysical interest, particularly changes of rapidly deforming surfaces such as volcanoes or earthquakes. Two complete systems were developed. Operational Science Missions began on February 18, 2009 ... concurrent development and testing of the radar system continues.

  7. Temporal decorrelation in repeat pass-radar interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villasenor, John; Zebker, Howard

    1992-01-01

    Correlation in pass-to-pass, interferometric radar can be degraded by thermal noise, lack of parallelism between the radar flight tracks, spatial baseline noise, and surficial change. The effects of decorrelation due to thermal noise can be easily evaluated and removed, while those due slight angular changes between flight tracks are negligible for data acquired using near-repeat orbits. Empirical results obtained using images of Death Valley confirm that as the baseline increases, the overall correlation decreases due to spatial baseline noise. It is shown that areas of Cottonball Basin in Death Valley remained unchanged over the three-week period for which data was obtained, while a heavily forested area in Oregon exhibited significant temporal decorrelation. Lava in central Oregon also appeared to decorrelate. The results demonstrate that generation of height maps of heavily vegetated areas using pass-to-pass interferometry is practical, provided that the time between passes is at most several weeks.

  8. Results of 1993 Repeat-Pass SAR Interferometry Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, J. D.; Hensley, S.; Madsen, S. N.; Webb, F. H.

    1994-01-01

    In this talk we present results of a repeat-pass SAR interferometry experiment performed in June 1993 near Portage, Maine. Differential GPS data accurate to +/-10cm were acquired to aid in motion compensation and geolocation of targets in the imagery. The experiment and data analysis will be discussed, and results will be shown during the presentation.

  9. Demonstration of Repeat-Pass POLINSAR Using UAVSAR: The RMOG Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavalle, Marco; Hensley, Scott

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we show our first POLINSAR results using the Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). UAVSAR is a L-band repeat-pass polarimetric and interferometric system designed for measuring vegetation structure and monitoring crustal deformations. In order to extract canopy height from POLINSAR data and account for temporal decorrelation, we formulate a physical model of the temporal-volumetric coherence, random motion over ground (RMOG) model. Canopy height extracted from single-baseline UAVSAR data using the RMOG model is shown to be in agreement with canopy height measured by the Land, Vegetation, and Ice Sensor (LVIS) lidar.

  10. A new method to extract forest height from repeat-pass polarimetric and interferometric radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavalle, M.; Hensley, S.; Dubayah, R.

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a new remote sensing method and a new physical model that will potentially enable estimating forest height and vegetation 3D structure using radar technology. The method is based on repeat-pass polarimetric-interferometric radar technique; the model is termed random-motion-over-ground (RMoG) model [1, 2]. We will describe a step-by-step procedure that will help the ecosystem community to monitor ecosystems at regional and global scale using radar data available from the forthcoming radar missions. We will show first results of forest height estimated from UAVSAR data and compared against LVIS data. We will quantify the error associated to our method. We will also discuss the improvements that we plan on including in future works. Our ultimate goal is to measure low and large biomass stocks using the large amount of radar data that will be available in the near future. The Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) is a fully polarimetric L-band airborne radar developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). UAVSAR acquires repeat-pass interferometric data for measuring vegetation structure and monitoring crustal deformations. The UAVSAR team at JPL has acquired and processed several polarimetric-interferometric (Pol-InSAR) datasets over the Harvard Forest in Massachusetts (United States) that allows testing repeat-pass Pol-InSAR technique. Pol-InSAR technique was proposed 15 years ago to estimate vegetation biomass and overcome the inherent saturation of radar backscatter versus biomass [3]. The advantage of Pol-InSAR is the ability to estimate the 3D structure of vegetation using a small number of interferometric acquisitions. In order to extract vegetation properties from Pol-InSAR UAVSAR data, we use a model of temporal-volumetric coherence, the RMoG model, suitable for repeat-pass interferometry. In the RMoG model the vegetation is idealized as a two-layer scattering scenario constituted by a

  11. UAVSAR - A New Airborne L-Band Radar for Repeat Pass Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mace, Thomas H.; Lou, Yunling

    2009-01-01

    NASA/JPL has developed a new airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) which has become available for use by the scientific community in January, 2009. Pod mounted, the UAVSAR was designed to be portable among a variety of aircraft, including unmanned aerial systems (UAS). The instrument operates in the L-Band, has a resolution under 2m from a GPS altitude of 12Km and a swath width of approximately 20Km. UAVSAR currently flies on a modified Gulfstream-III aircraft, operated by NASA s Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards, California. The G-III platform enables repeat-pass interferometric measurements, by using a modified autopilot and precise kinematic differential GPS to repeatedly fly the aircraft within a specified 10m tube. The antenna is electronically steered along track to assure that the antenna beam can be directed independently, regardless of speed and wind direction. The instrument can be controlled remotely, AS AN OPTION, using the Research Environment for Vehicle Embedded Analysis on Linux (REVEAL). This allows simulation of the telepresence environment necessary for flight on UAS. Potential earth science research and applications include surface deformation, volcano studies, ice sheet dynamics, and vegetation structure.

  12. Mapping Slumgullion Landslide in Colorado, USA Using Airborne Repeat-Pass InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H.; Shrestha, R. L.; Carter, W. E.; Glennie, C. L.; Wang, G.; Lu, Z.; Fernandez-Diaz, J. C.; Cao, N.; Zaugg, E.

    2015-12-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) uses two or more SAR images over the same area to determine landscape topography or ground deformation. An interferogram, generated by the phase components of two coherent SAR images, depicts range changes between the radar and the ground resolution elements, and can be used to derive both landscape topography and subtle changes in surface elevation. However, spaceborne repeat-pass interferometry has two main drawbacks: effects due to differences in atmospheric temperature, pressure, and water vapour at two observation times, and loss of coherence due to long spatial and temporal baselines between observations. Airborne repeat-pass interferometry does not suffer from these drawbacks. The atmospheric effect in case of airborne DInSAR becomes negligible due to smaller swath coverage, and the coherence can be maintained by using smaller spatial and temporal baselines. However, the main technical limitation concerning airborne DInSAR is the need of precise motion compensation with an accurate navigation system to correct for the significant phase errors due to typical flight instability from air turbulence. Here, we present results from a pilot study conducted on July 2015 using both X-band and L-band SlimSAR airborne system over the Slumgullion landslide in Colorado in order to (1) acquire the differential interferograms from the airborne platform, (2) understand their source of errors, and (3) pave a way to improve the precision of the derived surface deformation. The landslide movement estimated from airborne DInSAR is also compared with coincident GPS, terrestrial laser scanning (TLS), airborne LiDAR, and spaceborne DInSAR measurements using COSMO-SkyMed images. The airborne DInSAR system has a potential to provide time-transient variability in land surface topography with high-precision and high-resolution, and provide researchers with greater flexibility in selecting the temporal and spatial baselines of the data

  13. The flight test of Pi-SAR(L) for the repeat-pass interferometric SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nohmi, Hitoshi; Shimada, Masanobu; Miyawaki, Masanori

    2006-09-01

    This paper describes the experiment of the repeat pass interferometric SAR using Pi-SAR(L). The air-borne repeat-pass interferometric SAR is expected as an effective method to detect landslide or predict a volcano eruption. To obtain a high-quality interferometric image, it is necessary to make two flights on the same flight pass. In addition, since the antenna of the Pi-SAR(L) is secured to the aircraft, it is necessary to fly at the same drift angle to keep the observation direction same. We built a flight control system using an auto pilot which has been installed in the airplane. This navigation system measures position and altitude precisely with using a differential GPS, and the PC Navigator outputs a difference from the desired course to the auto pilot. Since the air density is thinner and the speed is higher than the landing situation, the gain of the control system is required to be adjusted during the repeat pass flight. The observation direction could be controlled to some extent by adjusting a drift angle with using a flight speed control. The repeat-pass flight was conducted in Japan for three days in late November. The flight was stable and the deviation was within a few meters for both horizontal and vertical direction even in the gusty condition. The SAR data were processed in time domain based on range Doppler algorism to make the complete motion compensation. Thus, the interferometric image processed after precise phase compensation is shown.

  14. Forest canopy height estimation using double-frequency repeat pass interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamvasis, Kleanthis; Karathanassi, Vassilia

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, many efforts have been made in order to assess forest stand parameters from remote sensing data, as a mean to estimate the above-ground carbon stock of forests in the context of the Kyoto protocol. Synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR) techniques have gained traction in last decade as a viable technology for vegetation parameter estimation. Many works have shown that forest canopy height, which is a critical parameter for quantifying the terrestrial carbon cycle, can be estimated with InSAR. However, research is still needed to understand further the interaction of SAR signals with forest canopy and to develop an operational method for forestry applications. This work discusses the use of repeat pass interferometry with ALOS PALSAR (L band) HH polarized and COSMO Skymed (X band) HH polarized acquisitions over the Taxiarchis forest (Chalkidiki, Greece), in order to produce accurate digital elevation models (DEMs) and estimate canopy height with interferometric processing. The effect of wavelength-dependent penetration depth into the canopy is known to be strong, and could potentially lead to forest canopy height mapping using dual-wavelength SAR interferometry at X- and L-band. The method is based on scattering phase center separation at different wavelengths. It involves the generation of a terrain elevation model underneath the forest canopy from repeat-pass L-band InSAR data as well as the generation of a canopy surface elevation model from repeat pass X-band InSAR data. The terrain model is then used to remove the terrain component from the repeat pass interferometric X-band elevation model, so as to enable the forest canopy height estimation. The canopy height results were compared to a field survey with 6.9 m root mean square error (RMSE). The effects of vegetation characteristics, SAR incidence angle and view geometry, and terrain slope on the accuracy of the results have also been studied in this work.

  15. Repeat Pass Aircraft Interferometry Results at Portage Lake, Maine and Innisfail, Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hensley, Scott; Klein, Jeff; Rosen, Paul; Chapin, Elaine; Madsen, Soren; Webb, Frank

    1996-01-01

    The NASA/JPL AIRSAR/TOPSAR instruments have the capability of collecting fully polarimetric radar data at three wavelengths (C, L and P-Bands) and dual antenna interferometry at C-Band, and more recently L-Band. In order to understand frequency and baseline dependent scattering effects in vegetated regions repeat pass interferometry data was collected for two vegetated regions in 1993. Portage Lake, Maine is a primarily coniferous forested region with some clear cutting from logging activities in the region. The second site at Innisfail, Australia borders a tropical rain forest and is situated adjacent to some major clear cut regions and banana plantations. Preliminary analysis of repeat pass data collected in these areas shows that the smaller the wavelength the greater the temporal decorrelation between passes, the longer the wavelength the greater the penetration depth for some types of vegetation canopy, yet for some vegetation canopy types, in particular for a banana plantation there appears to be no frequency dependent penetration into the canopy.

  16. Repeat Pass Aircraft Interferometry Results at Portage Lake, Maine and Innisfail, Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hensley, Scott; Klein, Jeff; Rosen, Paul; Chapin, Elaine; Madsen, Soren; Webb, Frank

    1996-01-01

    The NASA/JPL AIRSAR/TOPSAR instruments have the capability of collecting fully polarimetric radar data at three wavelengths (C, L, and P-bands) and dual antenna interferometry at C-band, and more recently, L-band. In order to understand frequency and baseline dependent scattering effects in vegetated regions, repeat pass interferometry data was collected for two vegetated regions in 1993. Portage Lake, Maine is a primarily coniferous forested region with some clear cutting from logging activities in the region. The second site at Innisfail, Australia borders a tropical rain forest and is situated adjacent to some major clear cut regions and banana plantations. Preliminary analysis of repeat pass data collected in these areas shows that the smaller the wavelength the greater the temporal decorrelation between passes, the longer the wavelength the greater the penetration depth for some types of vegetation canopy, yet for some vegetation canopy types, in particular for a banana plantation, there appears to be no frequency dependent penetration into the canopy.

  17. Creep Deformation and Rupture Behavior of Single- and Dual-Pass 316LN Stainless-Steel-Activated TIG Weld Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayanand, V. D.; Vasudevan, M.; Ganesan, V.; Parameswaran, P.; Laha, K.; Bhaduri, A. K.

    2016-03-01

    Creep deformation and rupture behavior of single-pass and dual-pass 316LN stainless steel (SS) weld joints fabricated by an autogenous activated tungsten inert gas welding process have been assessed by performing metallography, hardness, and conventional and impression creep tests. The fusion zone of the single-pass joint consisted of columnar zones adjacent to base metals with a central equiaxed zone, which have been modified extensively by the thermal cycle of the second pass in the dual-pass joint. The equiaxed zone in the single-pass joint, as well as in the second pass of the dual-pass joint, displayed the lowest hardness in the joints. In the dual-pass joint, the equiaxed zone of the first pass had hardness comparable to the columnar zone. The hardness variations in the joints influenced the creep deformation. The equiaxed and columnar zone in the first pass of the dual-pass joint was more creep resistant than that of the second pass. Both joints possessed lower creep rupture life than the base metal. However, the creep rupture life of the dual-pass joint was about twofolds more than that of the single-pass joint. Creep failure in the single-pass joint occurred in the central equiaxed fusion zone, whereas creep cavitation that originated in the second pass was blocked at the weld pass interface. The additional interface and strength variation between two passes in the dual-pass joint provides more restraint to creep deformation and crack propagation in the fusion zone, resulting in an increase in the creep rupture life of the dual-pass joint over the single-pass joint. Furthermore, the differences in content, morphology, and distribution of delta ferrite in the fusion zone of the joints favors more creep cavitation resistance in the dual-pass joint over the single-pass joint with the enhancement of creep rupture life.

  18. Creep Deformation and Rupture Behavior of Single- and Dual-Pass 316LN Stainless-Steel-Activated TIG Weld Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayanand, V. D.; Vasudevan, M.; Ganesan, V.; Parameswaran, P.; Laha, K.; Bhaduri, A. K.

    2016-06-01

    Creep deformation and rupture behavior of single-pass and dual-pass 316LN stainless steel (SS) weld joints fabricated by an autogenous activated tungsten inert gas welding process have been assessed by performing metallography, hardness, and conventional and impression creep tests. The fusion zone of the single-pass joint consisted of columnar zones adjacent to base metals with a central equiaxed zone, which have been modified extensively by the thermal cycle of the second pass in the dual-pass joint. The equiaxed zone in the single-pass joint, as well as in the second pass of the dual-pass joint, displayed the lowest hardness in the joints. In the dual-pass joint, the equiaxed zone of the first pass had hardness comparable to the columnar zone. The hardness variations in the joints influenced the creep deformation. The equiaxed and columnar zone in the first pass of the dual-pass joint was more creep resistant than that of the second pass. Both joints possessed lower creep rupture life than the base metal. However, the creep rupture life of the dual-pass joint was about twofolds more than that of the single-pass joint. Creep failure in the single-pass joint occurred in the central equiaxed fusion zone, whereas creep cavitation that originated in the second pass was blocked at the weld pass interface. The additional interface and strength variation between two passes in the dual-pass joint provides more restraint to creep deformation and crack propagation in the fusion zone, resulting in an increase in the creep rupture life of the dual-pass joint over the single-pass joint. Furthermore, the differences in content, morphology, and distribution of delta ferrite in the fusion zone of the joints favors more creep cavitation resistance in the dual-pass joint over the single-pass joint with the enhancement of creep rupture life.

  19. Repeat-pass InSAR processing for Vegetation Height Calculation: Theory and a validated example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siqueira, P.; Lei, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Knowledge of the vegetation height for a forested region is often used as a proxy for stem volume, biomass, and for characterizing habitats of a variety of plant and animal species. For this reason, remote sensing measures available from stereography, lidar, and InSAR have been important tools for airborne and spaceborne platforms. Among these and other candidates for measuring vegetation heights, InSAR has the advantage of achieving wide coverage areas (on the order of 100 km in cross-track swath) over short time periods, thus making it practical for large-scale assessments of the global environment. The determination of forest stand height (FSH), which is an assessment made on the order of one to ten hectares of resolution, InSAR can provide measures that are proportional to FSH. These are: 1.) interferometric phase compared to a known DEM, preferably of the bald earth, 2.) interferometric correlation (polarimetric or otherwise), which is related to the volume scattering nature of the target, and 3.) interferometric correlation which is related to the temporal decorrelation of the target. Of these, while the volumetric aspect of interferometric correlation is of keen interest, because of the dominant error source of temporal decorrelation, it comes at the cost of the need to perform single-pass interferometry. While such satellite systems do exist (notably the TanDEM-X mission), for vegetation applications, lower frequency systems such as ALOS-1 and -2, and the future NASA radar mission at L-band, provides better signal returns from throughout the vegetation canopy. Hence, rather than relying on volumetric correlation to provide the desired FSH signature, repeat-pass observations of temporal decorrelation are coupled with a vegetation model for this decorrelation to determine the vegetation height. In order to demonstrate this technique, the University of Massachusetts has used 46-day repeat-pass ALOS data to estimate FSH over the US State of Maine, nearly a 10

  20. Fabric strain sensor integrated with CNPECs for repeated large deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Weijing

    Flexible and soft strain sensors that can be used in smart textiles for wearable applications are much desired. They should meet the requirements of low modulus, large working range and good fatigue resistance as well as good sensing performances. However, there were no commercial products available and the objective of the thesis is to investigate fabric strain sensors based on carbon nanoparticle (CNP) filled elastomer composites (CNPECs) for potential wearing applications. Conductive CNPECs were fabricated and investigated. The introduction of silicone oil (SO) significantly decreased modulus of the composites to less than 1 MPa without affecting their deformability and they showed good stability after heat treatment. With increase of CNP concentration, a percolation appeared in electrical resistivity and the composites can be divided into three ranges. I-V curves and impedance spectra together with electro-mechanical studies demonstrated a balance between sensitivity and working range for the composites with CNP concentrations in post percolation range, and were preferred for sensing applications only if the fatigue life was improved. Due to the good elasticity and failure resist property of knitted fabric under repeated extension, it was adopted as substrate to increase the fatigue life of the conductive composites. After optimization of processing parameters, the conductive fabric with CNP concentration of 9.0CNP showed linear I-V curves when voltage is in the range of -1 V/mm and 1 V/mm and negligible capacitive behavior when frequency below 103 Hz even with strain of 60%. It showed higher sensitivity due to the combination of nonlinear resistance-strain behavior of the CNPECs and non-even strain distribution of knitted fabric under extension. The fatigue life of the conductive fabric was greatly improved. Extended on the studies of CNPECs and the coated conductive fabrics, a fabric strain sensor was designed, fabricated and packaged. The Young's modulus of

  1. Repeatability and Reproducibility of a Double-Pass Optical Quality Analysis Device

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chen-Chen; Xue, Ting; Wang, Qin-Mei; Zhou, Yi-Ni; Huang, Jin-Hai; Yu, A-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the repeatability and reproducibility of a double-pass instrument (OQASII, Visiomereics SL, Spain), which objectively measures overall optical quality of the human eyes. Methods The right eye of 119 healthy subjects with best corrected visual acuity of 20/25 or better was included in this prospective, comparative, observational study. Two separate tests with OQASII were conducted sequentially on the same day by two different examiners. A week later, the first examiner conducted the third measurement. All subjects underwent three consecutive tests during each session. The repeatability and reproducibility of the modulation transfer function cut off frequency (MTF cutoff), the Strehl ratio, the OQAS values (OVs) at contrasts of 100%, 20% and 9%, and the objective scatter index (OSI) were analyzed. Results For MTF cutoff, Strehl ratio, OV100%, OV20%, OV9%, and OSI, the mean values were 39.32±9.75cpd, 0.22±0.06, 1.31±0.33, 1.33±0.39, 1.33±0.41, 0.60±0.42, respectively. Repeatability and reproducibility were good with a very low coefficient of variation and high interclass correlation coefficients (>0.88) for all parameters. Bland-Altman plots showed good correlation with 95% limits of agreement ranged from -6.04 to 6.78cpd, -0.05 to 0.05, -0.20 to 0.23, -0.29 to 0.32, -0.40 to 0.42, -0.23 to 0.21 in inter-observer, and -6.56 to 7.42cpd, -0.06 to 0.06, -0.22 to 0.24, -0.30 to 0.32, -0.35 to 0.34, -0.24 to 0.23 in inter-visit, respectively. Conclusion The OQASII system yields excellent repeatability and good reproducibility for objective measurements of overall optical quality in clinic. PMID:25646846

  2. Extracting Tree Height from Repeat-Pass PolInSAR Data : Experiments with JPL and ESA Airborne Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavalle, Marco; Ahmed, Razi; Neumann, Maxim; Hensley, Scott

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present our latest developments and experiments with the random-motion-over-ground (RMoG) model used to extract canopy height and other important forest parameters from repeat-pass polarimetricinterferometric SAR (Pol-InSAR) data. More specifically, we summarize the key features of the RMoG model in contrast with the random-volume-over-ground (RVoG) model, describe in detail a possible inversion scheme for the RMoG model and illustrate the results of the RMoG inversion using airborne data collected by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the European Space Agency (ESA).

  3. Rapid, Repeat-sample Monitoring of Crustal Deformations and Environmental Phenomena with the Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Robert C.

    2006-01-01

    The Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) is a precision repeat-pass Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) mission being developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the Dryden Flight Research Center in support of NASA s Science Mission Directorate. UAVSAR's unique ability to fly a repeatable flight path, along with an electronically steerable array, allows interferometric data to be obtained with accuracies measured in millimeters. Deploying the radar on an airborne platform will also allow for radar images to be collected and compared with images from the same area taken hours or even years later - providing for long-term trending and near real-time notification of changes and deformations. UAVSAR s data processing algorithms will provide for near-real time data reduction providing disaster planning and response teams with highly accurate data to aid in the prediction of, and response to, natural phenomena. UAVSAR data can be applied to increasing our understanding of the processes behind solid earth, cryosphere, carbon cycle and other areas of interest in earth science. Technologies developed for UAVSAR may also be applicable to a future earth-orbiting InSAR mission and possibly for missions to the Moon or Mars. The UAVSAR is expected to fly on a Gulfstream III aircraft this winter, followed by a flight test program lasting until the second half of 2007. Following radar calibration and data reduction activities, the platform will be ready for science users in the summer of 2008.

  4. Crustal deformation in the Kumano Basin along the Nankai Trough inferred from repeated seafloor geodetic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, T.; Tadokoro, K.; Sugimoto, S.; Okuda, T.; Muto, D.; Kimoto, A.; Miyata, K.; Kuno, M.

    2008-12-01

    At the Nankai Trough (NT), the Philippine Sea plate (PH) subducts beneath the southwest Japan at a rate of about 4-6 cm/yr, where great interplate earthquakes have repeatedly occurred every 100-200 years. A number of researchers have investigated crustal deformation caused by subduction of the PH based on geodetic measurements as represented by GPS observation. However it is difficult to infer the plate coupling strength in offshore areas, due to the poverty of offshore geodetic data. From a viewpoint of disaster mitigation, it is important to know the updip and downdip limit of the plate locking depth. For this issue, we have conducted observations of the seafloor crustal deformations around the NT using a GPS/Acoustic technique since 2004. In this system, we estimate the position of a surveying vessel by Kinematic GPS analysis and measure the distance between the vessel and the benchmark on the sea floor by Acoustic measurements. Next we determine the location of the benchmark. For the repeatability of observation, the location of benchmark is determined within a precision of 2-3 cm at horizontal components (Tadokoro et al., 2006). In the Kumano Basin, we have two seafloor benchmarks, which are located about 60 and 80 km away from the deformation front of the NT. The observations from 2005 to 2008 have illustrated that these benchmarks are moving at rates of about 5-6 cm/yr with velocity uncertainties of 1-3 cm/yr relative to the Amurian plate. In this study, in order to estimate interplate coupling at the NT, we calculated surface deformations accompanied with plate subduction in an elastic half-space and compared them with on- and offshore GPS velocities. Then, we investigated the effect of observation for the seafloor crustal deformations on slip resolution on the plate interface. We conclude that offshore crustal deformation data provide good constraints for the estimation of fault slips at the shallower part of the plate interface, especially at the depths

  5. Repeatability of a 3D multi-segment foot model protocol in presence of foot deformities.

    PubMed

    Deschamps, Kevin; Staes, Filip; Bruyninckx, Herman; Busschots, Ellen; Matricali, Giovanni A; Spaepen, Pieter; Meyer, Christophe; Desloovere, Kaat

    2012-07-01

    Repeatability studies on 3D multi-segment foot models (3DMFMs) have mainly considered healthy participants which contrasts with the widespread application of these models to evaluate foot pathologies. The current study aimed at establishing the repeatability of the 3DMFM described by Leardini et al. in presence of foot deformities. Foot kinematics of eight adult participants were analyzed using a repeated-measures design including two therapists with different levels of experience. The inter-trial variability was higher compared to the kinematics of healthy subjects. Consideration of relative angles resulted in the lowest inter-session variability. The absolute 3D rotations between the Sha-Cal and Cal-Met seem to have the lowest variability in both therapists. A general trend towards higher σ(sess)/σ(trial) ratios was observed when the midfoot was involved. The current study indicates that not only relative 3D rotations and planar angles can be measured consistently in patients, also a number of absolute parameters can be consistently measured serving as basis for the decision making process. PMID:22591792

  6. Wetland Hydraulics along the middle reach of the Congo River revealed by repeat-pass multi-temporal interferometric SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, T.; Lee, H.; Jung, H. C.

    2014-12-01

    The Congo River originates from Southeastern part of Democratic Republic of Congo following a 4,375km semi-circular path to Atlantic, with average annual discharge of 40,200 m3/s. It is expected that the wetland hydraulics vary along the middle reach of the Congo River, including the floodplains with distinct boundary from the Kisangani to the intersection between the mainstem and the Lulonga River, and the vast wetlands in the Cuvette Centrale. In this study, we will use repeat-pass multi-temporal interferometric SAR measurement from ALOS PALSAR data to investigate spatial and temporal variations of dh/dt and examine how the dh/dt patterns are related to topographic relief from SRTM DEM. Early results over the wetlands in the Cuvette Centrale show that two distinct dh/dt patterns exist: rapid changes of dh/dt perpendicular to a narrow band of floodplains along the mainstem, and slow and diffuse dh/dt changes over the interfluvial wetlands. It indicates that the hydrodynamics of the interfluvial wetlands cannot be governed by the fluvial process of river-floodplain exchange. Comparison of dh/dt patterns over the Cuvette Centrale and the upper middle reach of the Congo River will enable us to understand how their wetlands and floodplains are filled and drained during high-water and low-water seasons.

  7. Error analysis in the digital elevation model of Kuwait desert derived from repeat pass synthetic aperture radar interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Kota S.; Al Jassar, Hala K.

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze the errors in the Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) derived through repeat pass SAR interferometry (InSAR). Out of 29 ASAR images available to us, 8 are selected for this study which has unique data set forming 7 InSAR pairs with single master image. The perpendicular component of baseline (B highmod) varies between 200 to 400 m to generate good quality DEMs. The Temporal baseline (T) varies from 35 days to 525 days to see the effect of temporal decorrelation. It is expected that all the DEMs be similar to each other spatially with in the noise limits. However, they differ very much with one another. The 7 DEMs are compared with the DEM of SRTM for the estimation of errors. The spatial and temporal distribution of errors in the DEM is analyzed by considering several case studies. Spatial and temporal variability of precipitable water vapour is analysed. Precipitable water vapour (PWV) corrections to the DEMs are implemented and found to have no significant effect. The reasons are explained. Temporal decorrelation of phases and soil moisture variations seem to have influence on the accuracy of the derived DEM. It is suggested that installing a number of corner reflectors (CRs) and the use of Permanent Scatter approach may improve the accuracy of the results in desert test sites.

  8. A novel method for surface exploration: Super-resolution restoration of Mars repeat-pass orbital imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Y.; Muller, J.-P.

    2016-02-01

    Higher resolution imaging data of planetary surfaces is considered desirable by the international community of planetary scientists interested in improving understanding of surface formation processes. However, given various physical constraints from the imaging instruments through to limited bandwidth of transmission one needs to trade-off spatial resolution against bandwidth. Even given optical communications, future imaging systems are unlikely to be able to resolve features smaller than 25 cm on most planetary bodies, such as Mars. In this paper, we propose a novel super-resolution restoration technique, called Gotcha-PDE-TV (GPT), taking advantage of the non-redundant sub-pixel information contained in multiple raw orbital images in order to restore higher resolution imagery. We demonstrate optimality of this technique in planetary image super-resolution restoration with example processing of 8 repeat-pass 25 cm HiRISE images covering the MER-A Spirit rover traverse in Gusev crater to resolve a 5 cm resolution of the area. We assess the "true" resolution of the 5 cm super-resolution restored images using contemporaneous rover Navcam imagery on the surface and an inter-comparison of landmarks in the two sets of imagery.

  9. UAVSAR: An Airborne Window on Earth Surface Deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hensley, Scott

    2011-01-01

    This study demonstrates that UAVSAR's precision autopilot and electronic steering have allowed for the reliable collection of airborne repeat pass radar interferometric data for deformation mapping. Deformation maps from temporal scales ranging from hours to months over a variety of signals of geophysical interest illustrate the utility of UAVSAR airborne repeat pass interferometry to these studies.

  10. Deformation Band Shear Zones Formed in Unconsolidated Sediment From Repeated Late Holocene Coseismic Deformation Along the 1906 Rupture Trace of the San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, J. N.; Cashman, S. M.; Crawford, R.; Deis, A.; Cashman, K. V.

    2005-12-01

    several m. from the fault, but both display preferred orientation of elongate grains parallel or subparallel to the fault zone. This study demonstrates that deformation bands can form in near-surface unconsolidated late Holocene sediments from repeated coseismic displacement along discrete shear planes. These structures record significant porosity reduction, grain rotation, and grain fracturing as a product of surface-fault rupture on the SAF. We speculate that these microstructural characteristics of fault zones in well-sorted unconsolidated granular deposits may be diagnostic of coseismic rupture. Further study of microstructures and the deformation mechanisms that operate during their formation may provide insight into loading conditions associated with earthquake propagation in unconsolidated surface deposits.

  11. Geodetic Deformation in the Central-Southern Apennines (Italy) From Repeated GPS Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anzidei, M.; Serpelloni, E.; Baldi, P.; Shen, Z.; Casula, G.; Galvani, A.; Pesci, A.; Riguzzi, F.

    2001-12-01

    We analyzed the horizontal strain rate field of a sector of the Central-Southern Apennines. This area was a site of large earthquakes in the past, and its present low seismicity could suggest a high seismic hazard. The number of permanent GPS stations is still too limited to provide a satisfactory description of the highly heterogeneous strain field which seems to affect this zone; thus, the use of non continuous but denser GPS networks is still a fundamental tool. We used GPS data collected during yearly repeated campaigns performed from 1994 to 2001 on the GEOMODAP network. Site velocities were obtained starting from the daily coordinates and covariance solutions, using a Kalman filter approach. We used the ITRF2000 solution for European IGS stations to compute an Euler pole and to determine a stable Europe reference frame. The residual velocity field obtained shows two different prevalent motion trends, NNE-ward for the eastern sector of the network and NW-ward for most of the sites of the western side. The mean strain rate tensor obtained from a least square inversion method, over a sub-network oriented approximately SW-NE, shows a significant extensional deformation (1.5x10-8 strain/yr) about normal to the Apennine chain, in agreement with seismological and neotectonic data. On the basis of a network dimension of about 250 Km, this value gives a well constrained estimate of the extensional velocity of about 4.0 mm/yr, normal to the chain axis, that can be considered an upper bound of the active extensio of this area. In order to detect changes in the spatial pattern of the strain rate field within this sub-network we used a least square inversion method that interpolates the velocity solution and solves for the velocity gradient tensor over a regular grid. This analysis shows a more complex picture, with a transition of the strain rate field from about N-S compression in the Tyrrhenian side to about NE-SW extension toward the Adriatic.

  12. CovAmCoh-analysis: a method to improve the interpretation of high resolution repeat pass SAR images of urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Karsten; Boldt, Markus; Thiele, Antje

    2009-09-01

    The main advantages of SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) are the availability of data under nearly all weather conditions and its independence from natural illumination. Data can be gathered on demand and exploited to extract the needed information. However, due to the side looking imaging geometry, SAR images are difficult to interpret and there is a need for support of human interpreters by image analysis algorithms. In this paper a method is described to improve and to simplify the interpretation of high resolution repeat pass SAR images. Modern spaceborne SAR sensors provide imagery with high spatial resolution and the same imaging geometry in an equidistant time interval. These repeat pass orbits are e. g. used for interferometric evaluation. The information contained in a repeat pass image pair is visualized by the introduced method so that some basic features can be directly extracted from a color representation of three deduced features. The CoV (Coefficient of Variation), the amplitude and the coherence are calculated and jointly evaluated. The combined evaluation of these features can be used to identify regions dominated by volume scatterers (e. g. leafed vegetation), rough surfaces (e. g. grass, gravel) and smooth surfaces (e. g. streets, parking lots). Additionally the coherence between the two images includes information about changes between the acquisitions. The potential of the CovAmCoh- Analysis is demonstrated and discussed by the evaluation of a TerraSAR-X image pair of the Frankfurt airport. The method shows a simple way to improve the intuitive interpretation by the human interpreter and it is used to improve the classification of some basic urban features.

  13. A serial micropipette microfluidic device with applications to cancer cell repeated deformation studies†

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Cells are complex viscoelastic materials that are frequently in deformed morphological states, particularly during the cancer invasion process. The ability to study cell mechanical deformability in an accessible way can be enabling in many areas of research where biomechanics is important, from cancer metastasis to immune response to stem cell differentiation. Furthermore, phenomena in biology are frequently exhibited in high multiplicity. For instance, during metastasis, cells undergoing non-proteolytic invasion squeeze through a multitude of physiological barriers, including many small pores in the dense extracellular matrix (ECM) of the tumor stroma. Therefore, it is important to perform multiple measurements of the same property even for the same cell in order to fully appreciate its dynamics and variability, especially in the high recurrence regime. We have created a simple and minimalistic micropipette system with automated operational procedures that can sample the deformation and relaxation dynamics of single-cells serially and in a parallel manner. We demonstrated its ability to elucidate the impact of an initial cell deformation event on subsequent deformations for untreated and paclitaxel treated MDA-MB-231 metastatic breast cancer cells, and we examined contributions from the cell nucleus during whole-cell micropipette experiments. Finally we developed an empirical model that characterizes the serial factor, which describes the reduction in cost for cell deformations across sequential constrictions. We performed experiments using spatial, temporal, and force scales that match physiological and biomechanical processes, thus potentially enabling a qualitatively more pertinent representation of the functional attributes of cell deformability. PMID:24056324

  14. Observations of Convective Development from Repeat Pass Radiometry during CalWaters 2015: Outlook for the TEMPEST Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S. T.

    2015-12-01

    The Temporal Experiment for Storms and Tropical Systems (TEMPEST), which was recently selected as a NASA Earth Ventures technology demonstration mission, uses a constellation of five CubeSats flying in formation to provide observations of developing precipitation with a temporal resolution of 5 minutes. The observations are made using small mm-wave radiometers with frequencies ranging from 90 to 183 GHz which are sensitive to the integrated ice water path above the precipitation layer in the storm. This paper describes TEMPEST like observations that were made with the High Altitude MMIC Sounding Radiometer (HAMSR) on the ER-2 during CalWaters 2015. HAMSR is a mm-wave airborne radiometer with 25 channels in three bands; 50, 118 and 183 GHz. During the campaign, a small isolated area of convection was identified by the ER-2 pilot and 5 overpasses of the area were made with about 5 minutes between each pass. The HAMSR data reveal two convective cells, one which was diminishing and one which was developing. The mm-wave channels near the 183 GHz water vapor line clearly show the change in the vertical extent of the storm with time, a proxy for vertical velocity. These data demonstrate the potential for TEMPEST like observations from an orbital vantage point. This paper will provide an overview of the measurements, an analysis of the observations and offer perspectives for the TEMPEST mission.

  15. Present-day crustal deformation along the Magallanes-Fagnano Fault System in Tierra del Fuego from repeated GPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, L.; Perdomo, R.; Hormaechea, J. L.; Del Cogliano, D.; Fritsche, M.; Richter, A.; Dietrich, R.

    2011-03-01

    The present-day deformation of the earth crust in the Argentine part of Tierra del Fuego main island (southernmost South America) is here investigated based on repeated geodetic GPS observations. The island is traversed by the active transform boundary between the South American and Scotia tectonic plates, represented by the Magallanes-Fagnano fault system. Since 1993 a regional network comprising to date 29 GPS sites has been observed almost every year. The complete set of accumulated observations was processed using the Bernese GPS software and state-of-the-art processing strategies and models. The utilization of homogeneous GPS products resulting from a reprocessing of the global IGS network warrants a stable realization of a global reference frame. For each GPS site 3-D positions and linear velocities with error estimates were obtained. A strain analysis of the horizontal velocity components revealed the zones of major deformation activity. A 30-km-wide deformation belt centred on the main trace of the fault system was identified. This belt is bordered to the north (South America) and south (Scotia) by geodynamically stable zones, which move horizontally with a relative average velocity of 4.4 ± 0.6 (east) and -0.3 ± 0.4 (north) mm a-1. Within the deformation belt a maximum strain rate in the order of 0.25 μstrain per year has been detected. A pronounced change in the deformation style from transtension (east) to transpression (west) is observed. The area of predominating shortening of the crust coincides with a local rotation minimum and relative uplift. Throughout the period covered by the GPS observations the displacements and deformations occurred to be linear with time.

  16. A viscoelastic coupling model for the cyclic deformation due to periodically repeated Earthquakes at subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thatcher, Wayne; Rundle, John B.

    1984-09-01

    Vertical displacements due to periodic reverse faulting events in an elastic plate overlying a viscoelastic (Maxwell) half space are obtained and compared with the observed deformation cycle (coseismic strain release, postseismic transients, interseismic strain accumulation) from Japan. The viscoelastic effects, including the influence of buoyant restoring forces, are obtained using the method developed by Rundle, and plate convergence and strain accumulation are incorporated following the procedure suggested by Savage. The resulting deformation cycle is compared with that of an analogous elastic half-space dislocation model in which postearthquake effects are due to transient aseismic slip below the coseismic fault. Cyclic deformation is similar but not identical for the two models, and observations from southwest Japan suggest the superiority of the viscoelastic coupling model. In particular, inclusion of the effects of steady state flow in the asthenosphere overcomes a defect of the elastic half-space model and results in agreement with the observed interseismic movement pattern. Several aspects of the postseismic deformation, its landward migration, and its transition to the interseismic phase of the cycle are explained as well, but the short duration of near-trench transients relative to those observed farther inland is not matched. The success of a buried slip model in explaining early postseismic near-trench movements and asthenospheric flow in accounting for cumulative postearthquake transient motions suggests the existence of a transition zone between lithosphere and asthenosphere whose behavior is brittle/elastic in the short term and ductile for longer-term deformation, and such a modification may reconcile remaining discordant observations. However, reasonable variations in coupling model parameters cannot account for observed differences in the deformation cycle in other parts of Japan, and these regional differences remain unexplained.

  17. Evaluation of repeated single-point diamond turning on the deformation behavior of monocrystalline silicon via molecular dynamic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lin; Zhao, Hongwei; Yang, Yihan; Huang, Hu; Ma, Zhichao; Shao, Mingkun

    2014-07-01

    A three-dimensional molecular dynamics simulation study is conducted to investigate repeated single-point turnings of a monocrystalline silicon specimen with diamond tools at nanometric scale. Morse potential energy function and Tersoff potential energy function are applied to model the silicon/diamond and silicon/silicon interactions, respectively. As repeated nano-cutting process on surfaces often involve the interactions between the consequent machining processes, repeated single-point diamond turnings are employed to investigate the phase transformation in the successive nano-cutting processes. The simulation results show that a layer of the damaged residual amorphous silicon remained beneath the surface after the first-time nano-cutting process. The amorphous phase silicon deforms and removes differently in the second nano-cutting process. By considering the coordination number (CN) of silicon atoms in the specimen, it is observed that there is an increase of atoms with six nearest neighbors during the second nano-cutting process. It suggests that the recovery of the crystalline phase from the amorphous phase occurred. Moreover, the instantaneous temperature distributions in the specimen are analyzed. Although the tangential force ( F X ) and the thrust force ( F Y ) become much smaller in the second cutting process, the material resistance rate is larger than the first cutting process. The larger resistance also induces the increase of local temperature between the cutting tool and the amorphous layer in the second cutting process.

  18. Performance Evaluation of Automatic Anatomy Segmentation Algorithm on Repeat or Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography Images Using Deformable Image Registration Method

    SciTech Connect

    Wang He; Garden, Adam S.; Zhang Lifei; Wei Xiong; Ahamad, Anesa; Kuban, Deborah A.; Komaki, Ritsuko; O'Daniel, Jennifer; Zhang Yongbin; Mohan, Radhe; Dong Lei

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: Auto-propagation of anatomic regions of interest from the planning computed tomography (CT) scan to the daily CT is an essential step in image-guided adaptive radiotherapy. The goal of this study was to quantitatively evaluate the performance of the algorithm in typical clinical applications. Methods and Materials: We had previously adopted an image intensity-based deformable registration algorithm to find the correspondence between two images. In the present study, the regions of interest delineated on the planning CT image were mapped onto daily CT or four-dimensional CT images using the same transformation. Postprocessing methods, such as boundary smoothing and modification, were used to enhance the robustness of the algorithm. Auto-propagated contours for 8 head-and-neck cancer patients with a total of 100 repeat CT scans, 1 prostate patient with 24 repeat CT scans, and 9 lung cancer patients with a total of 90 four-dimensional CT images were evaluated against physician-drawn contours and physician-modified deformed contours using the volume overlap index and mean absolute surface-to-surface distance. Results: The deformed contours were reasonably well matched with the daily anatomy on the repeat CT images. The volume overlap index and mean absolute surface-to-surface distance was 83% and 1.3 mm, respectively, compared with the independently drawn contours. Better agreement (>97% and <0.4 mm) was achieved if the physician was only asked to correct the deformed contours. The algorithm was also robust in the presence of random noise in the image. Conclusion: The deformable algorithm might be an effective method to propagate the planning regions of interest to subsequent CT images of changed anatomy, although a final review by physicians is highly recommended.

  19. Low-pass shotgun sequencing of the barley genome facilitates rapid identification of genes, conserved non-coding sequences and novel repeats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Barley has one of the largest and most complex genomes of all economically important food crops. The rise of new short read sequencing technologies such as Illumina/Solexa permits such large genomes to be effectively sampled at relatively low costs. An MDR (Mathematically Defined Repeat)...

  20. Incremental subglacial meltwater sediment deposition and deformation associated with repeated ice-bed decoupling: a case study from the Island of Funen, Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesemann, Jerome-Etienne; Alsop, G. Ian; Piotrowski, Jan A.

    2010-11-01

    On the Island of Funen, Denmark, sediments that are 4-7 m below the land surface consist of a 2-4 m thick sequence of stacked and folded glaciofluvial sediments overlain by a 2-3 m thick basal till. The glaciofluvial sediments consist of tabular beds of planar-stratified, massive and cross-stratified sand and gravel with localized channel fills of open-framework gravel. Sand and gravel beds exhibit curvilinear sheath folding often leading to eye folds. This folding is attributed to repeated glacier-bed decoupling and recoupling, with subglacial deposition of sand and gravel by meltwater occurring during the decoupling phase and deformation occurring during recoupling. Sand and gravel beds are typically separated by silty clay beds and laminations recording slackwater deposition within subglacial cavities. Folds frequently display attenuated upper limbs reflecting shearing associated with overlying ice movement. On lower fold limbs, only localized thrusting is observed, suggesting water saturation of sands and gravels during deformation, and relatively low strain rates. Folds are frequently truncated by overlying sand and gravel beds. No evidence of shearing is found along these contacts which are interpreted as erosional surfaces. Thus, we propose that the glaciofluvial sediment sequence records incremental, step-wise subglacial deposition and deformation rather than wholesale deformation following emplacement of the entire glaciofluvial sequence. Specifically, we envisage that individual beds were deposited and folded subglacially, with ice-bed decoupling occurring during sediment deposition followed by recoupling and shearing of the upper bed surface by the ice base to produce folds with attenuated upper limbs. Incremental deformation and folding were facilitated by elevated porewater pressure within the sediments. Silty clay beds helped to maintain elevated porewater pressure by acting as local aquitards. A general absence of till from the glaciofluvial sequence

  1. 15 years slow deformation in and around Lake Vänern (SW Sweden) deduced from repeated GPS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilfouroushan, Faramarz; Hodacs, Peter; Talbot, Christopher; Koyi, Hemin; Sjöberg, Lars

    2013-04-01

    In this contribution, we present the new geodetic velocity and strain rate fields obtained from GPS surveys around Lake Vänern in southwestern Sweden during the period 1997-2012. The lake Vänern is a graben bounded to the east and west by main N-S striking faults, whereas ENE-WSW striking faults define its northern and southern boundaries. The Värmland GPS network, was setup to monitor the ongoing slow deformation in and around this lake due to tectonic and Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) processes in Fennoscandia. This network straddles the Protogine and the Mylonite zones and covers one of the most active seismic zones of Sweden. We use GAMIT-GLOBK software to process the past GPS data, collected in October 1997, and the new GPS data, collected in October 2010, 2011 and 2012. We also integrate our local network with the SWEPOS (Swedish Permanent GPS network) and IGS (International GNSS Service) stations to better constrain the velocity fields in ITRF2008 and Eurasia-fixed reference frames. The preliminary results obtained from campaign-mode measurements between 1997 and 2011 shows that the eastern part of the network, located on the eastern side of the NS trending Mylonite zone, is deforming relatively faster than the western part. In the eastern part, the overall extensional components trending NW-SE with local variations are observed. To constrain better these preliminary results, we will add the new campaign data collected in October 2012 to the 1997-2011 solutions and present new deformation maps. The 15 years long observation period (1997-2012) can better constrain sub-mm/yr horizontal crustal shortening or extension rates in Sweden, more specifically around Lake Vänern.

  2. Effect of multiple extrusion passes on zein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zein was repeatedly processed up to seven times using a single screw extruder at a temperature of 145 °C and at approximately 15 grams per minute to determine the extent of degradation that occurs with multiple extrusion passes. SDS-PAGE shows that with the second pass, and each additional pass, the...

  3. Passing excellence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoupikova, Daria

    2007-02-01

    This paper describes the research and development of a virtual reality visualization project "Passing excellence" about the world famous architectural ensemble "Kizhi". The Kizhi Pogost is located on an island in Lake Onega in northern Karelia in Russia. It is an authentic museum of an ancient wood building tradition which presents a unique artistic achievement. This ensemble preserves a concentration of masterpieces of the Russian heritage and is included in the List of Most Endangered Sites of the World Monuments Watch protected by World Heritage List of UNESCO. The project strives to create a unique virtual observation of the dynamics of the architectural changes of the museum area beginning from the 15th Century up to the 21st Century. The visualization is being created to restore the original architecture of Kizhi island based on the detailed photographs, architectural and geometric measurements, textural data, video surveys and resources from the Kizhi State Open-Air Museum archives. The project is being developed using Electro, an application development environment for the tiled display high-resolution graphics visualization system and can be shown on the virtual reality systems such as the GeoWall TM and the C-Wall.

  4. Recent crustal deformation of İzmir, Western Anatolia and surrounding regions as deduced from repeated GPS measurements and strain field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aktuğ, Bahadır; Kılıçoğlu, Ali

    2006-07-01

    To investigate contemporary neotectonic deformation in İzmir, Western Anatolia and in its neighborhood, a relatively dense Global Positioning System (GPS) monitoring network was established in 2001. Combination of three spatially dense GPS campaigns in 2001, 2003 and 2004 with temporally dense campaigns between 1992 and 2004 resulted in a combined velocity field representing active deformation rate in the region. We computed horizontal and vertical velocity fields with respect to Earth-centered, Earth-fixed ITRF2000, to Eurasia and to Anatolia as well. The rates of principal and shear strains along with rigid-body rotation rates were derived from velocity field. Results show east-west shortening between Karaburun Peninsula and northern part of İzmir Bay together with the extension of İzmir Bay in accordance with general extension regime of Western Anatolia and Eastern Agea. East-west shortening and north-south extension of Karaburun Peninsula are closely related to right-lateral faulting and a clockwise rotation. There exists a block in the middle of the peninsula with a differential motion at a rate of 3-5 ± 1 mm/year and 5-6 ± 1 mm/year to the east and south, respectively. As is in Western Anatolia, north-south extension is dominant in almost all parts of the region despite the fact that they exhibit significantly higher rates in the middle of the peninsula. Extensional rates along Tuzla Fault lying nearly perpendicular to İzmir Bay and in its west are maximum in the region with an extension rate of 300-500 ± 80-100 nanostrain/year and confirm its active state. Extensional rates in other parts of the region are at level of 50-150 nanostrain/year as expected in the other parts of Western Anatolia.

  5. The Potato Nucleotide-binding Leucine-rich Repeat (NLR) Immune Receptor Rx1 Is a Pathogen-dependent DNA-deforming Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Fenyk, Stepan; Townsend, Philip D.; Dixon, Christopher H.; Spies, Gerhard B.; de San Eustaquio Campillo, Alba; Slootweg, Erik J.; Westerhof, Lotte B.; Gawehns, Fleur K. K.; Knight, Marc R.; Sharples, Gary J.; Goverse, Aska; Pålsson, Lars-Olof; Takken, Frank L. W.; Cann, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins enable cells to respond to pathogen attack. Several NLRs act in the nucleus; however, conserved nuclear targets that support their role in immunity are unknown. Previously, we noted a structural homology between the nucleotide-binding domain of NLRs and DNA replication origin-binding Cdc6/Orc1 proteins. Here we show that the NB-ARC (nucleotide-binding, Apaf-1, R-proteins, and CED-4) domain of the Rx1 NLR of potato binds nucleic acids. Rx1 induces ATP-dependent bending and melting of DNA in vitro, dependent upon a functional P-loop. In situ full-length Rx1 binds nuclear DNA following activation by its cognate pathogen-derived effector protein, the coat protein of potato virus X. In line with its obligatory nucleocytoplasmic distribution, DNA binding was only observed when Rx1 was allowed to freely translocate between both compartments and was activated in the cytoplasm. Immune activation induced by an unrelated NLR-effector pair did not trigger an Rx1-DNA interaction. DNA binding is therefore not merely a consequence of immune activation. These data establish a role for DNA distortion in Rx1 immune signaling and define DNA as a molecular target of an activated NLR. PMID:26306038

  6. Microstructural evolution in ultra-fine grained copper processed by severe plastic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Anuj

    Equal Channel Angular Pressing (ECAP) is a severe plastic deformation technique that was used to produce ultra-fine grained copper. The microstructure was optimized using different deformation sequences. A steady state grain size of 200--500 nm was routinely obtained after eight passes (with an effective strain of ˜1 per pass). This resulted in a random texture evidenced by EBSD results. The mechanical response was obtained under quasi-static and dynamic conditions. The evolution of microstructure upon repeated ECAP passes was characterized by TEM and EBSD techniques. The features of grain refinement process were captured using analytical models. The minimum grain size obtained, 200--500 nm, was quantitatively explained by means of grain boundary rotation and grain boundary mobility calculations at the temperature reached in deformation process (˜360 K). The ultra-fine grained structure produced in Cu by ECAP was found to be thermally unstable. The microstructure recrystallized upon being dynamically deformed due to the adiabatic temperature rise imparted by plastic deformation. This was observed in three modes of high-strain rate plastic deformation experiments: cylindrical and hat-shaped specimens in Hopkinson bar experiments and cylindrical specimens in reverse Taylor impact experiments.

  7. Passing and Catching in Rugby.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Namudu, Mike M.

    This booklet contains the fundamentals for rugby at the primary school level. It deals primarily with passing and catching the ball. It contains instructions on (1) holding the ball for passing, (2) passing the ball to the left--standing, (3) passing the ball to the left--running, (4) making a switch pass, (5) the scrum half's normal pass, (6) the…

  8. UAVSAR: Airborne L-Band Radar for Repeat Pass Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moes, Tim

    2011-01-01

    The Costa Rican National Center for Advanced Technology (CeNAT) is sponsoring NASA's G-III(C-20) UAVSAR science deployment to San Jose, Costa Rica April 25-28, 2011. NASA is very thankful for their support and has offered to provide a Top-Level presentation on the G-III UAVSAR program with specific emphasis on the science conducted in Costa Rica. The presentation will overview the G-III capabilities and the various science applications of UAVSAR. Only technical and scientific data that is already in the open literature will be presented.

  9. Repeated passing principle for propagation in optical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keča, Tatjana P.; Headley, William R.; Mashanovich, Goran Z.; Matavulj, Petar S.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we make comparison between a well-known theoretical model of light propagation through racetrack resonator and experimentally obtained results. Observed differences are studied and some original modifications are made in the existing model so as to achieve better alignment with experiment. The influence of several geometric parameters on racetrack's response is used for further adjustments to be performed. This procedure opens up the possibility to estimate the free spectral range and resonant wavelength for different geometric parameters and consequently to predict resonator functionality and working conditions, as well as functionality of complex photonic devices based on resonant structures.

  10. Fluctuations as stochastic deformation.

    PubMed

    Kazinski, P O

    2008-04-01

    A notion of stochastic deformation is introduced and the corresponding algebraic deformation procedure is developed. This procedure is analogous to the deformation of an algebra of observables like deformation quantization, but for an imaginary deformation parameter (the Planck constant). This method is demonstrated on diverse relativistic and nonrelativistic models with finite and infinite degrees of freedom. It is shown that under stochastic deformation the model of a nonrelativistic particle interacting with the electromagnetic field on a curved background passes into the stochastic model described by the Fokker-Planck equation with the diffusion tensor being the inverse metric tensor. The first stochastic correction to the Newton equations for this system is found. The Klein-Kramers equation is also derived as the stochastic deformation of a certain classical model. Relativistic generalizations of the Fokker-Planck and Klein-Kramers equations are obtained by applying the procedure of stochastic deformation to appropriate relativistic classical models. The analog of the Fokker-Planck equation associated with the stochastic Lorentz-Dirac equation is derived too. The stochastic deformation of the models of a free scalar field and an electromagnetic field is investigated. It turns out that in the latter case the obtained stochastic model describes a fluctuating electromagnetic field in a transparent medium. PMID:18517590

  11. Fluctuations as stochastic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazinski, P. O.

    2008-04-01

    A notion of stochastic deformation is introduced and the corresponding algebraic deformation procedure is developed. This procedure is analogous to the deformation of an algebra of observables like deformation quantization, but for an imaginary deformation parameter (the Planck constant). This method is demonstrated on diverse relativistic and nonrelativistic models with finite and infinite degrees of freedom. It is shown that under stochastic deformation the model of a nonrelativistic particle interacting with the electromagnetic field on a curved background passes into the stochastic model described by the Fokker-Planck equation with the diffusion tensor being the inverse metric tensor. The first stochastic correction to the Newton equations for this system is found. The Klein-Kramers equation is also derived as the stochastic deformation of a certain classical model. Relativistic generalizations of the Fokker-Planck and Klein-Kramers equations are obtained by applying the procedure of stochastic deformation to appropriate relativistic classical models. The analog of the Fokker-Planck equation associated with the stochastic Lorentz-Dirac equation is derived too. The stochastic deformation of the models of a free scalar field and an electromagnetic field is investigated. It turns out that in the latter case the obtained stochastic model describes a fluctuating electromagnetic field in a transparent medium.

  12. Repeating thermocouple

    SciTech Connect

    Falk, R. A.

    1985-06-04

    Disclosed herein is a repeating use thermocouple assembly and method of making the same in which a cavity adjacent the tip of the thermocouple is filled with a thermosetting foundry sand and baked in place to provide support for the thermocouple tube without causing stresses during use which could cause breakage of the thermocouple tube.

  13. The Effects of Repeaters on Test Equating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrulis, Richard S.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The effects of repeaters (testees included in both administrations of two forms of a test) on the test equating process are examined. It is shown that repeaters do effect test equating and tend to lower the cutoff point for passing the test. (JKS)

  14. No Pass, No Drive?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses basis for Kentucky appellate court decision that state's no-pass, no-drive statute did not violate due-process and equal-protection clauses of the Kentucky and federal constitutions, but did violate the federal Family Education Rights and Privacy Act, but nevertheless did not invalidate the statute. Explains why the decision is…

  15. PASS and Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, John R.

    Two studies examined the effectiveness of the PASS (Planning, Attention, Simultaneous, and Successive cognitive processes) theory of intelligence in predicting reading achievement scores of normally achieving children and distinguishing children with reading disabilities from normally achieving children. The first study dealt with predicting…

  16. Surface deformation and coherence measurements of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, from SIR C radar interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, P. A.; Hensley, S.; Zebker, H. A.; Webb, F. H.; Fielding, E. J.

    1996-10-01

    The shuttle imaging radar C/X synthetic aperture radar (SIR C/X SAR) radar on board the space shuttle Endeavor imaged Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, in April and October 1994 for the purpose of measuring active surface deformation by the methods of repeat-pass differential radar interferometry. Observations at 24 cm (L band) and 5.6 cm (C band) wavelengths were reduced to interferograms showing apparent surface deformation over the 6-month interval and over a succession of 1-day intervals in October. A statistically significant local phase signature in the 6-month interferogram is coincident with the Pu'u O'o lava vent. Interpreted as deformation, the signal implies centimeter-scale deflation in an area several kilometers wide surrounding the vent. Peak deflation is roughly 14 cm if the deformation is purely vertical, centered southward of the Pu'u O'o caldera. Delays in the radar signal phase induced by atmospheric refractivity anomalies introduce spurious apparent deformation signatures, at the level of 12 cm peak-to-peak in the radar line-of-sight direction. Though the phase observations are suggestive of the wide-area deformation measured by Global Positioning System (GPS) methods, the atmospheric effects are large enough to limit the interpretation of the result. It is difficult to characterize centimeter-scale deformations spatially distributed over tens of kilometers using differential interferometry without supporting simultaneous, spatially distributed measurements of refractivity along the radar line of sight. Studies of the interferometric correlation of images acquired at different times show that L band is far superior to C band in the vegetated areas, even when the observations are separated by only 1 day. These results imply longer wavelength instruments are more appropriate for studying surfaces by repeat-pass observations.

  17. Message passing in PUMA

    SciTech Connect

    Maccabe, A.B. |; Wheat, S.R.

    1993-05-01

    This paper provides an overview of the message passing primitives provided by PUMA (Performance-oriented, User-managed Messaging Architecture). Message passing in PUMA is based on the concept of a portal--an opening in the address space of an application process. Once an application process has established a portal, other processes can write values into the memory associated with the portal using a simple send operation. Because messages are written directly into the address space of the receiving process, there is not need to buffer messages in the PUMA kernel. This simplifies the design of the kernel, increasing its reliability and portability. Moreover, because messages are mapped directly into the address space of the application process, the application can manage the messages that it receives without needing direct support from the kernel.

  18. SuperSAR: A Mission to Detect Earth Surface Deformation in Three Dimensions from a Single Satellite Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Andrew

    2010-05-01

    Earth surface deformation occurs in three dimensions. The technique of repeat-pass interferometric synthetic aperture radar InSAR is a powerful tool for monitoring the deformation that arises through a broad spectrum of natural hazards and commercial processes. Applications of InSAR include studies of co-seismic, inter-seismic, and post-seismic deformation, tectonic rifting, volcanic uplift, land subsidence, landslides, glacier motion, the extent of grounded ice sheets, atmospheric water vapour, wetland flooding, canopy biomass, and signals associated with the commercial extraction and injection of gases, fluids, and solids. The major limitation of the current generation of InSAR sensors remains their ability to detect only a single component of the Earth surface deformation vector, in a direction perpendicular to the instrument flight path. SuperSAR is a novel, multi-azimuth SAR that is capable of detecting Earth surface deformation in three dimensions. The instrument will sample deformation perpendicular and parallel to the satellite ground track, simultaneously, using the established techniques of repeat pass, conventional InSAR and multiple aperture InSAR, respectively. The third component of the deformation vector is resolved through a combination of observations recorded in ascending and descending satellite orbits. The key design feature of SuperSAR is the addition of multiple beams in the azimuth direction that are generated using simultaneous or sequential excitation of the same antenna. The multi-azimuth concept means that SuperSAR is uniquely able to resolve the full three-dimensional deformation vector using only a single satellite platform, providing a fundamental advance in the capacity of the present and planned generations of InSAR sensors.

  19. Congress passes space year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The year 1992 will mark the 500th anniversary of Christopher Columbus' arrival in America and the 35th anniversary of both the International Geophysical Year and the launch of Sputnik. The U.S. Senate passed a joint resolution (S.J.Res. 177) on November 21 recommending that the President endorse an International Space Year (ISY) in 1992. A similar resolution introduced in the House of Representatives was incorporated into the conference report (House Report 99-379) accompanying the authorization bill for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and approved by both houses, also on November 21. As Eos went to press, the NASA authorization bill (H.R. 1714) awaited President Ronald Reagan's signature.

  20. Education Bill passes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    On March 2 the U.S. House of Representatives passed a bill authorizing $425 million for science and mathematics education in fiscal 1984; the authorization is $350 million more than President Ronald Reagan requested in his budget proposal (Eos, February 15, 1983, p. 65).H.R. 1310 allocates $295 million to the Department of Education not only to improve precollege instruction in science and math, but to beef up foreign language training to aid in improving international communication among scientists. The bill also allots $130 million to the National Science Foundation for a variety of programs, the lion's share of which aims to upgrade research equipment at colleges and universities. It is hoped that industry will match the $100 million targeted for this program.

  1. Haglund's Deformity

    MedlinePlus

    ... Is Haglund’s Deformity? Haglund’s deformity is a bony enlargement on the back of the heel. The soft ... the Achilles tendon becomes irritated when the bony enlargement rubs against shoes. This often leads to painful ...

  2. Madelung Deformity.

    PubMed

    Kozin, Scott H; Zlotolow, Dan A

    2015-10-01

    Madelung deformity of the wrist is more common in females and is often associated with Leri Weill dyschondrosteosis, a mesomelic form of dwarfism. Patients with Madelung deformity often report wrist deformity resulting from the prominence of the relatively long ulna. The typical Madelung deformity is associated with a Vickers ligament that creates a tether across the volar-ulnar radial physis that restricts growth across this segment. The distal radius deforms in the coronal (increasing radial inclination) and the sagittal (increasing volar tilt) planes. There is lunate subsidence and the proximal carpal row adapts to the deformity by forming an upside-down pyramid shape or triangle. Treatment depends on the age at presentation, degree of deformity, and magnitude of symptoms. Mild asymptomatic deformity warrants a period of nonsurgical management with serial x-ray examinations because the natural history is unpredictable. Many patients never require surgical intervention. Progressive deformity in the young child with considerable growth potential remaining requires release of Vickers ligament and radial physiolysis to prevent ongoing deterioration Concomitant ulnar epiphysiodesis may be necessary. Advanced asymptomatic deformity in older children with an unacceptable-appearing wrist or symptomatic deformity are indications for surgery. A dome osteotomy of the radius allows 3-dimensional correction of the deformity. Positive radiographic and clinical results after dome osteotomy have been reported. PMID:26341718

  3. Stress Engineering of Multi-pass Welds of Structural Steel to Enhance Structural Integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Supriyo; Sule, Jibrin; Yakubu, Mustapha Y.

    2016-05-01

    In multi-pass welding, the weld metal and the associated heat-affected zone are subjected to repeated thermal cycling from successive deposition of filler metals. The thermal straining results into multi-mode deformation of the weld metal which causes a variably distributed residual stress field through the thickness and across the weld of a multi-pass weldment. In addition to this, the as-welded fusion zone microstructure shows dendritic formation of grains and segregation of alloying element. This may result in formation of micro-corrosion cells and the problem would aggravate in case of highly alloyed materials. Local mechanical tensioning is an effective way of elimination of the weld tensile residual stress. It has been shown that application of cold rolling is capable not only of removing the residual stress, but depending on its magnitude it may also form beneficial compressive stress state. Multi-pass structural steel welds used as structural alloy in general engineering and structural applications. Such alloys are subjected to severe in-service degradation mechanisms e.g., corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. Welds and the locked-in residual stress in the welded area often initiate the defect which finally results in failure. In the present study, a multi-pass structural steel weld metal was first subjected to post-weld cold rolling which was followed by controlled heating by a fiber laser. Cold straining resulted in redistribution of the internal stress through the thickness and controlled laser processing helps in reforming of the grain structure. However, even with controlled laser, processing the residual stress is reinstated. Therefore, a strategy has been adopted to roll the metal post-laser processing so as to obtain a complete stress-free and recrystallized microstructure.

  4. Space-based monitoring of ground deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobakht Ersi, Fereydoun; Safari, Abdolreza; Gamse, Sonja

    2016-07-01

    Ground deformation monitoring is valuable to understanding of the behaviour of natural phenomena. Space-Based measurement systems such as Global Positioning System are useful tools for continuous monitoring of ground deformation. Ground deformation analysis based on space geodetic techniques have provided a new, more accurate, and reliable source of information for geodetic positioning which is used to detect deformations of the Ground surface. This type of studies using displacement fields derived from repeated measurments of space-based geodetic networks indicates how crucial role the space geodetic methods play in geodynamics. The main scope of this contribution is to monitor of ground deformation by obtained measurements from GPS sites. We present ground deformation analysis in three steps: a global congruency test on daily coordinates of permanent GPS stations to specify in which epochs deformations occur, the localization of the deformed GPS sites and the determination of deformations.

  5. The ACL Message Passing Library

    SciTech Connect

    Painter, J.; McCormick, P.; Krogh, M.; Hansen, C.; Colin de Verdiere, G.

    1995-09-01

    This paper presents the ACL (Advanced Computing Lab) Message Passing Library. It is a high throughput, low latency communications library, based on Thinking Machines Corp.`s CMMD, upon which message passing applications can be built. The library has been implemented on the Cray T3D, Thinking Machines CM-5, SGI workstations, and on top of PVM.

  6. Multiple pass laser amplifier system

    DOEpatents

    Brueckner, Keith A.; Jorna, Siebe; Moncur, N. Kent

    1977-01-01

    A laser amplification method for increasing the energy extraction efficiency from laser amplifiers while reducing the energy flux that passes through a flux limited system which includes apparatus for decomposing a linearly polarized light beam into multiple components, passing the components through an amplifier in delayed time sequence and recombining the amplified components into an in phase linearly polarized beam.

  7. Inflated Soft Actuators with Reversible Stable Deformations.

    PubMed

    Hines, Lindsey; Petersen, Kirstin; Sitti, Metin

    2016-05-01

    Most soft robotic systems are currently dependent on bulky compressors or pumps. A soft actuation method is presented combining hyperelastic membranes and dielectric elastomer actuators to switch between stable deformations of sealed chambers. This method is capable of large repeatable deformations, and has a number of stable states proportional to the number of actuatable membranes in the chamber. PMID:27008455

  8. Spinal deformity.

    PubMed

    Bunnell, W P

    1986-12-01

    Spinal deformity is a relatively common disorder, particularly in teenage girls. Early detection is possible by a simple, quick visual inspection that should be a standard part of the routine examination of all preteen and teenage patients. Follow-up observation will reveal those curvatures that are progressive and permit orthotic treatment to prevent further increase in the deformity. Spinal fusion offers correction and stabilization of more severe degrees of scoliosis. PMID:3786010

  9. Opioids and rat erythrocyte deformability.

    PubMed

    Rhoads, D L; Wei, L X; Lin, E T; Rezvani, A; Way, E L

    1986-01-01

    In previous studies from this laboratory, it was noted that opioids in vitro reduced human red blood cell deformability. The effect was found to be dose-dependent, naloxone reversible and preferentially selective kappa ligands exhibited the highest potency. To extend these findings studies were carried out using rat erythrocytes. The time required for erythrocytes to pass through a 5.0 um pore membrane was determined and used as an index of deformability. Opioids added in vitro produced inhibition of deformability in a dose-dependent, naloxone reversible manner. Injecting naive animals with morphine or nalbuphine also produced dose related reductions in red cell deformability. The degree of inhibition produced by nalbuphine correlated well with its plasma concentrations as measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Chronic morphine treatment by pellet implantation resulted in the development of tolerance as evidenced by a loss in the ability of morphine in vitro to inhibit red cell deformability. Addition of naloxone resulted in a decrease in filtration time. Thus, the data confirm and extend previous findings on human red blood cells. In as much as previous data from this laboratory demonstrated that opioids inhibit calcium flux from erythrocytes by inhibiting calcium-ATPase and calcium efflux is necessary for normal deformability, it is concluded that opioids act to reduce red cell deformability by inhibition of the calcium pump. PMID:3123933

  10. Formal Analysis of Message Passing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, Stephen F.; Gopalakrishnan, Ganesh

    The message passing paradigm underlies many important families of programs - for instance programs in the area of high performance computing that support science and engineering research. Unfortunately, very few formal methods researchers are involved in developing formal analysis tools and techniques for message passing programs. This paper summarizes research being done in our groups in support of this area, specifically with respect to the Message Passing Interface. We emphasize the need for specialized varieties of many familiar notions such as deadlock detection, race analysis, symmetry analysis, partial order reduction, static analysis and symbolic reasoning support. Since these issues are harbingers of those being faced in multicore programming, the time is ripe to build a critical mass of researchers working in this area.

  11. Quaternary deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.D. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Displaced or deformed rock units and landforms record the past 2 m.y. of faulting, folding, uplift, and subsidence in California. Properly interpreted, such evidence provides a quantitative basis for predicting future earthquake activity and for relating many diverse structures and landforms to the 5 cm/yr of horizontal motion at the boundary between the North American and Pacific plates. Modern techniques of geologic dating and expanded research on earthquake hazards have greatly improved our knowledge of the San Andreas fault system. Much of this new knowledge has been gained since 1965, and that part which concerns crustal deformation during the past 2 m.y. is briefly summarized here.

  12. Accuracy of velocities from repeated GPS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akarsu, V.; Sanli, D. U.; Arslan, E.

    2015-04-01

    Today repeated GPS measurements are still in use, because we cannot always employ GPS permanent stations due to a variety of limitations. One area of study that uses velocities/deformation rates from repeated GPS measurements is the monitoring of crustal motion. This paper discusses the quality of the velocities derived using repeated GPS measurements for the aim of monitoring crustal motion. From a global network of International GNSS Service (IGS) stations, we processed GPS measurements repeated monthly and annually spanning nearly 15 years and estimated GPS velocities for GPS baseline components latitude, longitude and ellipsoidal height. We used web-based GIPSY for the processing. Assuming true deformation rates can only be determined from the solutions of 24 h observation sessions, we evaluated the accuracy of the deformation rates from 8 and 12 h sessions. We used statistical hypothesis testing to assess the velocities derived from short observation sessions. In addition, as an alternative control method we checked the accuracy of GPS solutions from short observation sessions against those of 24 h sessions referring to statistical criteria that measure the accuracy of regression models. Results indicate that the velocities of the vertical component are completely affected when repeated GPS measurements are used. The results also reveal that only about 30% of the 8 h solutions and about 40% of 12 h solutions for the horizontal coordinates are acceptable for velocity estimation. The situation is much worse for the vertical component in which none of the solutions from campaign measurements are acceptable for obtaining reliable deformation rates.

  13. Repeated Course Enrollments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Windham, Patricia

    This report resents tables of repeated course enrollment data in Florida community colleges for the fall 1993 cohort. Overall, the percent of repeats in college preparatory courses was greater than that of college credit courses. Within ICS codes, the highest percentage of credit repeat enrollments was in mathematics; the second highest was in…

  14. Numerical simulation of the pairwise interaction of deformable cells during migration in a microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Hongzhi; Khismatullin, Damir B.

    2014-07-01

    Leukocytes and other circulating cells deform and move relatively to the channel flow in the lateral and translational directions. Their migratory property is important in immune response, hemostasis, cancer progression, delivery of nutrients, and microfluidic technologies such as cell separation and enrichment, and flow cytometry. Using our three-dimensional computational algorithm for multiphase viscoelastic flow, we have investigated the effect of pairwise interaction on the lateral and translational migration of circulating cells in a microchannel. The numerical simulation data show that when two cells with the same size and small separation distance interact, repulsive interaction take place until they reach the same lateral equilibrium position. During this process, they undergo swapping or passing, depending on the initial separation distance between each other. The threshold value of this distance increases with cell deformation, indicating that the cells experiencing larger deformation are more likely to swap. When a series of closely spaced cells with the same size are considered, they generally undergo damped oscillation in both lateral and translational directions until they reach equilibrium positions where they become evenly distributed in the flow direction (self-assembly phenomenon). A series of cells with a large lateral separation distance could collide repeatedly with each other, eventually crossing the centerline and entering the other side of the channel. For a series of cells with different deformability, more deformable cells, upon impact with less deformable cells, move to an equilibrium position closer to the centerline. The results of our study show that the bulk deformation of circulating cells plays a key role in their migration in a microchannel.

  15. Madelung deformity.

    PubMed

    Ghatan, Andrew C; Hanel, Douglas P

    2013-06-01

    Madelung deformity is a rare congenital anomaly of the wrist caused by asymmetric growth at the distal radial physis secondary to a partial ulnar-sided arrest. The deformity is characterized by ulnar and palmar curvature of the distal radius, positive ulnar variance, and proximal subsidence of the lunate. It more commonly occurs in females than males and typically affects both wrists. The deformity can occur in isolation or as part of a genetic syndrome. The pattern of inheritance varies, with some cases following a pseudoautosomal pattern and many others lacking a clear family history. Nonsurgical management is typically advocated in asymptomatic patients. Few studies exist on the natural history of the condition; however, extensor tendon ruptures have been reported in severe and chronic cases. Stiffness, pain, and patient concerns regarding wrist cosmesis have been cited as indications for surgery. Various techniques for surgical management of Madelung deformity have been described, but clear evidence to support the use of any single approach is lacking. PMID:23728962

  16. Multi-pass light amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaessmann, Henry (Inventor); Grossman, William M. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A multiple-pass laser amplifier that uses optical focusing between subsequent passes through a single gain medium so that a reproducibly stable beam size is achieved within the gain region. A confocal resonator or White Cell resonator is provided, including two or three curvilinearly shaped mirrors facing each other along a resonator axis and an optical gain medium positioned on the resonator axis between the mirrors (confocal resonator) or adjacent to one of the mirrors (White Cell). In a first embodiment, two mirrors, which may include adjacent lenses, are configured so that a light beam passing through the gain medium and incident on the first mirror is reflected by that mirror toward the second mirror in a direction approximately parallel to the resonator axis. A light beam translator, such as an optical flat of transparent material, is positioned to translate this light beam by a controllable amount toward or away from the resonator axis for each pass of the light beam through the translator. The optical gain medium may be solid-state, liquid or gaseous medium and may be pumped longitudinally or transversely. In a second embodiment, first and second mirrors face a third mirror in a White Cell configuration, and the optical gain medium is positioned at or adjacent to one of the mirrors. Defocusing means and optical gain medium cooling means are optionally provided with either embodiment, to controllably defocus the light beam, to cool the optical gain medium and to suppress thermal lensing in the gain medium.

  17. Multiscale InSAR Time Series (MInTS) analysis of surface deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetland, E. A.; Musé, P.; Simons, M.; Lin, Y. N.; Agram, P. S.; Dicaprio, C. J.

    2012-02-01

    We present a new approach to extracting spatially and temporally continuous ground deformation fields from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data. We focus on unwrapped interferograms from a single viewing geometry, estimating ground deformation along the line-of-sight. Our approach is based on a wavelet decomposition in space and a general parametrization in time. We refer to this approach as MInTS (Multiscale InSAR Time Series). The wavelet decomposition efficiently deals with commonly seen spatial covariances in repeat-pass InSAR measurements, since the coefficients of the wavelets are essentially spatially uncorrelated. Our time-dependent parametrization is capable of capturing both recognized and unrecognized processes, and is not arbitrarily tied to the times of the SAR acquisitions. We estimate deformation in the wavelet-domain, using a cross-validated, regularized least squares inversion. We include a model-resolution-based regularization, in order to more heavily damp the model during periods of sparse SAR acquisitions, compared to during times of dense acquisitions. To illustrate the application of MInTS, we consider a catalog of 92 ERS and Envisat interferograms, spanning 16 years, in the Long Valley caldera, CA, region. MInTS analysis captures the ground deformation with high spatial density over the Long Valley region.

  18. Multiscale InSAR Time Series (MInTS) analysis of surface deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetland, E. A.; Muse, P.; Simons, M.; Lin, Y. N.; Agram, P. S.; DiCaprio, C. J.

    2011-12-01

    We present a new approach to extracting spatially and temporally continuous ground deformation fields from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data. We focus on unwrapped interferograms from a single viewing geometry, estimating ground deformation along the line-of-sight. Our approach is based on a wavelet decomposition in space and a general parametrization in time. We refer to this approach as MInTS (Multiscale InSAR Time Series). The wavelet decomposition efficiently deals with commonly seen spatial covariances in repeat-pass InSAR measurements, such that coefficients of the wavelets are essentially spatially uncorrelated. Our time-dependent parametrization is capable of capturing both recognized and unrecognized processes, and is not arbitrarily tied to the times of the SAR acquisitions. We estimate deformation in the wavelet-domain, using a cross-validated, regularized least-squares inversion. We include a model-resolution-based regularization, in order to more heavily damp the model during periods of sparse SAR acquisitions, compared to during times of dense acquisitions. To illustrate the application of MInTS, we consider a catalog of 92 ERS and Envisat interferograms, spanning 16 years, in the Long Valley caldera, CA, region. MInTS analysis captures the ground deformation with high spatial density over the Long Valley region.

  19. People's Republic of China passes "eugenics" law.

    PubMed

    1994-12-01

    On October 27, 1994, China passed the "Maternal and Infant Health Care Law." This law regulates support for maternal and child health and also requires physicians to recommend a postponement of marriage if either member of a couple has an infectious, contagious disease or an active mental disorder. If one member of a couple has a serious hereditary disease, the couple may only marry if they agree to use longterm contraception or to undergo sterilization. If prenatal tests reveal that a fetus has a serious hereditary disease or serious deformity, the physician must advise the pregnant woman to have an abortion, and the law states that the pregnant woman "should" follow this recommendation. This statute also bans determining the sex of a fetus through the use of technology unless such tests are medically necessary. This ban is the reaction to the combination of China's one-child policy and the technological ability to predict the sex of a fetus which has led to a change in China's sex ratio from 103.8 boys/100 girls in 1953 to 118 boys/100 girls in 1992. PMID:12288092

  20. Dense pattern multiple pass cells

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, Joel A.; Bomse, David S.

    2010-09-21

    An optical cell and a method of operating an optical cell comprising employing a first mirror comprising a first hole therein at approximately a center of the first mirror and through which laser light enters the cell, employing a second mirror comprising a second hole therein at approximately a center of the second mirror and through which laser light exits the cell, and forming a Lissajous pattern of spots on the mirrors by repeated reflection of laser light entering the cell.

  1. A time series deformation estimation in the NW Himalayas using SBAS InSAR technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, V.; Venkataraman, G.

    2012-12-01

    A time series land deformation studies in north western Himalayan region has been presented in this study. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry (InSAR) is an important tool for measuring the land displacement caused by different geological processes [1]. Frequent spatial and temporal decorrelation in the Himalayan region is a strong impediment in precise deformation estimation using conventional interferometric SAR approach. In such cases, advanced DInSAR approaches PSInSAR as well as Small base line subset (SBAS) can be used to estimate earth surface deformation. The SBAS technique [2] is a DInSAR approach which uses a twelve or more number of repeat SAR acquisitions in different combinations of a properly chosen data (subsets) for generation of DInSAR interferograms using two pass interferometric approach. Finally it leads to the generation of mean deformation velocity maps and displacement time series. Herein, SBAS algorithm has been used for time series deformation estimation in the NW Himalayan region. ENVISAT ASAR IS2 swath data from 2003 to 2008 have been used for quantifying slow deformation. Himalayan region is a very active tectonic belt and active orogeny play a significant role in land deformation process [3]. Geomorphology in the region is unique and reacts to the climate change adversely bringing with land slides and subsidence. Settlements on the hill slopes are prone to land slides, landslips, rockslides and soil creep. These hazardous features have hampered the over all progress of the region as they obstruct the roads and flow of traffic, break communication, block flowing water in stream and create temporary reservoirs and also bring down lot of soil cover and thus add enormous silt and gravel to the streams. It has been observed that average deformation varies from -30.0 mm/year to 10 mm/year in the NW Himalayan region . References [1] Massonnet, D., Feigl, K.L.,Rossi, M. and Adragna, F. (1994) Radar interferometry mapping of

  2. Static thermo-optic instability in double-pass fiber amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Lægsgaard, Jesper

    2016-06-13

    A coupled-mode formalism, earlier used to describe transverse mode instabilities in single-pass optical fiber amplifiers is extended to the case of double-pass amplifiers. Contrary to the single-pass case, it is shown that the thermo-optic nonlinearity can couple light at the same frequency between the LP01 and LP11 modes, leading to a static deformation of the output beam profile. This novel phenomenon is caused by the interaction of light propagating in either direction with thermo-optic index perturbations caused by light propagating in the opposite direction. The threshold power for the static deformation is found to be several times lower than what is typically found for the dynamic modal instabilities observed in single-pass amplifiers. PMID:27410360

  3. Aseismic fracturing and cataclasis involving reaction softening within core material from the Cajon Pass drill hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blenkinsop, Tom G.; Sibson, Richard H.

    1992-04-01

    Core material from the Cajon Pass drill hole in southern California was examined for brittle structures and microstructures to address the questions of whether the observed structures and microstructures are related to the current phase of the San Andreas strike-slip activity and, if so, whether the deformation features bear any relation to the cyclic accumulation and release of shear stress accompanying major earthquakes on the San Andreas fault. Textures of extension fracture fillings, synchroneity of alteration and deformation, and particle size distributions in areas of distributed dilatancy, extension, and shear fractures all suggest that the deformation was slow. This agrees with the inference that most of the deformation features formed in an area of distributed crustal deformation, rather than within a major fault zone. The effective least principle stress was close to zero after initial fracture, and pore fluid pressures did not change abruptly. Temperatures of deformation are estimated to be in the range 90-250 C.

  4. Multi-pass light amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaessmann, Henry (Inventor); Grossman, William M. (Inventor); Olson, Todd E. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A multiple-pass laser amplifier that uses optical focusing between subsequent passes through a single gain medium so that a reproducibly stable beam size is achieved within the gain region. A resonator or a White Cell cavity is provided, including two or more mirrors (planar or curvilinearly shaped) facing each other along a resonator axis and an optical gain medium positioned on a resonator axis between the mirrors or adjacent to one of the mirrors. In a first embodiment, two curvilinear mirrors, which may include adjacent lenses, are configured so that a light beam passing through the gain medium and incident on the first mirror is reflected by that mirror toward the second mirror in a direction approximately parallel to the resonator axis. A light beam translator, such as an optical flat of transparent material, is positioned to translate this light beam by a controllable amount toward or away from the resonator axis for each pass of the light beam through the translator. A second embodiment uses two curvilinear mirrors and one planar mirror, with a gain medium positioned in the optical path between each curvilinear mirror and the planar mirror. A third embodiment uses two curvilinear mirrors and two planar mirrors, with a gain medium positioned adjacent to a planar mirror. A fourth embodiment uses a curvilinear mirror and three planar mirrors, with a gain medium positioned adjacent to a planar mirror. A fourth embodiment uses four planar mirrors and a focusing lens system, with a gain medium positioned between the four mirrors. A fifth embodiment uses first and second planar mirrors, a focusing lens system and a third mirror that may be planar or curvilinear, with a gain medium positioned adjacent to the third mirror. A sixth embodiment uses two planar mirrors and a curvilinear mirror and a fourth mirror that may be planar or curvilinear, with a gain medium positioned adjacent to the fourth mirror. In a seventh embodiment, first and second mirrors face a third

  5. Anon-Pass: Practical Anonymous Subscriptions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Michael Z.; Dunn, Alan M.; Katz, Jonathan; Waters, Brent; Witchel, Emmett

    2014-01-01

    We present the design, security proof, and implementation of an anonymous subscription service. Users register for the service by providing some form of identity, which might or might not be linked to a real-world identity such as a credit card, a web login, or a public key. A user logs on to the system by presenting a credential derived from information received at registration. Each credential allows only a single login in any authentication window, or epoch. Logins are anonymous in the sense that the service cannot distinguish which user is logging in any better than random guessing. This implies unlinkability of a user across different logins. We find that a central tension in an anonymous subscription service is the service provider’s desire for a long epoch (to reduce server-side computation) versus users’ desire for a short epoch (so they can repeatedly “re-anonymize” their sessions). We balance this tension by having short epochs, but adding an efficient operation for clients who do not need unlinkability to cheaply re-authenticate themselves for the next time period. We measure performance of a research prototype of our protocol that allows an independent service to offer anonymous access to existing services. We implement a music service, an Android-based subway-pass application, and a web proxy, and show that adding anonymity adds minimal client latency and only requires 33 KB of server memory per active user. PMID:24504081

  6. Anon-Pass: Practical Anonymous Subscriptions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael Z; Dunn, Alan M; Katz, Jonathan; Waters, Brent; Witchel, Emmett

    2013-12-31

    We present the design, security proof, and implementation of an anonymous subscription service. Users register for the service by providing some form of identity, which might or might not be linked to a real-world identity such as a credit card, a web login, or a public key. A user logs on to the system by presenting a credential derived from information received at registration. Each credential allows only a single login in any authentication window, or epoch. Logins are anonymous in the sense that the service cannot distinguish which user is logging in any better than random guessing. This implies unlinkability of a user across different logins. We find that a central tension in an anonymous subscription service is the service provider's desire for a long epoch (to reduce server-side computation) versus users' desire for a short epoch (so they can repeatedly "re-anonymize" their sessions). We balance this tension by having short epochs, but adding an efficient operation for clients who do not need unlinkability to cheaply re-authenticate themselves for the next time period. We measure performance of a research prototype of our protocol that allows an independent service to offer anonymous access to existing services. We implement a music service, an Android-based subway-pass application, and a web proxy, and show that adding anonymity adds minimal client latency and only requires 33 KB of server memory per active user. PMID:24504081

  7. Repeat radiosurgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Awad, Ahmed J; Walcott, Brian P; Stapleton, Christopher J; Ding, Dale; Lee, Cheng-Chia; Loeffler, Jay S

    2015-06-01

    We perform a systematic review of repeat radiosurgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVM) with an emphasis on lesion obliteration rates and complications. Radiosurgery is an accepted treatment modality for AVM located in eloquent cortex or deep brain structures. For residual or persistent lesions, repeat radiosurgery can be considered if sufficient time has passed to allow for a full appreciation of treatment effects, usually at least 3years. A systematic review was performed in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. References for this review were identified by searches of MEDLINE, Web of Science and Google Scholar databases. A total of 14 studies comprising 733 patients met the review criteria and were included. For series that reported target dose at both first and repeat treatments, the weighted means were 19.42Gy and 19.06Gy, respectively. The mean and median obliteration rate for the repeat radiosurgery treatments were 61% (95% confidence interval 51.9-71.7%) and 61.5%, respectively. The median follow up following radiosurgery ranged from 19.5 to 80months. Time to complete obliteration after the repeat treatment ranged from 21 to 40.8months. The most common complications of repeat radiosurgery for AVM included hemorrhage (7.6%) and radiation-induced changes (7.4%). Repeat radiosurgery can be used to treat incompletely obliterated AVM with an obliteration rate of 61%. Complications are related to treatment effect latency (hemorrhage risk) as well as radiation-induced changes. Repeat radiosurgery can be performed at 3 years following the initial treatment, allowing for full realization of effects from the initial treatment prior to commencing therapy. PMID:25913746

  8. Reconfigurable multiport EPON repeater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oishi, Masayuki; Inohara, Ryo; Agata, Akira; Horiuchi, Yukio

    2009-11-01

    An extended reach EPON repeater is one of the solutions to effectively expand FTTH service areas. In this paper, we propose a reconfigurable multi-port EPON repeater for effective accommodation of multiple ODNs with a single OLT line card. The proposed repeater, which has multi-ports in both OLT and ODN sides, consists of TRs, BTRs with the CDR function and a reconfigurable electrical matrix switch, can accommodate multiple ODNs to a single OLT line card by controlling the connection of the matrix switch. Although conventional EPON repeaters require full OLT line cards to accommodate subscribers from the initial installation stage, the proposed repeater can dramatically reduce the number of required line cards especially when the number of subscribers is less than a half of the maximum registerable users per OLT. Numerical calculation results show that the extended reach EPON system with the proposed EPON repeater can save 17.5% of the initial installation cost compared with a conventional repeater, and can be less expensive than conventional systems up to the maximum subscribers especially when the percentage of ODNs in lightly-populated areas is higher.

  9. Revisiting the TALE repeat.

    PubMed

    Deng, Dong; Yan, Chuangye; Wu, Jianping; Pan, Xiaojing; Yan, Nieng

    2014-04-01

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors specifically bind to double stranded (ds) DNA through a central domain of tandem repeats. Each TAL effector (TALE) repeat comprises 33-35 amino acids and recognizes one specific DNA base through a highly variable residue at a fixed position in the repeat. Structural studies have revealed the molecular basis of DNA recognition by TALE repeats. Examination of the overall structure reveals that the basic building block of TALE protein, namely a helical hairpin, is one-helix shifted from the previously defined TALE motif. Here we wish to suggest a structure-based re-demarcation of the TALE repeat which starts with the residues that bind to the DNA backbone phosphate and concludes with the base-recognition hyper-variable residue. This new numbering system is consistent with the α-solenoid superfamily to which TALE belongs, and reflects the structural integrity of TAL effectors. In addition, it confers integral number of TALE repeats that matches the number of bound DNA bases. We then present fifteen crystal structures of engineered dHax3 variants in complex with target DNA molecules, which elucidate the structural basis for the recognition of bases adenine (A) and guanine (G) by reported or uncharacterized TALE codes. Finally, we analyzed the sequence-structure correlation of the amino acid residues within a TALE repeat. The structural analyses reported here may advance the mechanistic understanding of TALE proteins and facilitate the design of TALEN with improved affinity and specificity. PMID:24622844

  10. A single pass electron accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuetz, Marlin N.; Vroom, David A.

    1995-02-01

    Higher volumes, increasing competition and the need to improve quality have led us to re-examine the process for irradiation of tubing and wire. Traditionallyin Raychem, product irradiation has involved the use of large multi-purpose facilities that were designed to handle relatively small volumes of a large variety of products as a separate process. Today, with larger volumes of certain products, there is an interest in combining processes to improve quality and reduce cost. We have recently designed and constructed a small, low voltage accelerator system that can be placed in-line with another manufacturing process and can uniformly irradiate a tube or wire product in a single pass. The system is comprised of two conventional accelerator systems having elongated filaments and placed on opposite sides of a linear product path. The ribbon shaped electron beams from these two accelerators are scanned, after acceleration toward the product path, in a conventional manner and 180 degrees out of phase from each other. The two accelerated electron beams then enter a third magnetic field that is synchronous with the scanning magnets and whose oscillating polarity is such that the ribbon beams are converged onto a tubular shaped window close to and around a segment of the product path. Trials with a prototype system have produced tubing having a dose concentricity of better than ± 10 percent on a single pass through the system.

  11. Quantum repeated games revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frąckiewicz, Piotr

    2012-03-01

    We present a scheme for playing quantum repeated 2 × 2 games based on Marinatto and Weber’s approach to quantum games. As a potential application, we study the twice repeated Prisoner’s Dilemma game. We show that results not available in the classical game can be obtained when the game is played in the quantum way. Before we present our idea, we comment on the previous scheme of playing quantum repeated games proposed by Iqbal and Toor. We point out the drawbacks that make their results unacceptable.

  12. Senate passes clean air bill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    In an 89 to 11 vote the Senate passed a clean air bill aimed at reducing pollution by the turn of the century by imposing tougher controls on American industry. The bill is the first revision of the Clean Air Act of 1970 in 13 years and calls for new limits on auto pollution to clean up smog in most U.S. cities, decreasing by half emissions by power plants that cause acid rain to protect the ecology, and increasing technological controls on factories to protect against cancer-causing and toxic substances. The bill will add about $20 billion per year to the estimated $33 billion cost of complying with current pollution laws.

  13. DEM generation and tidal deformation detection for sulzberger ice shelf, West Antarctica using SAR interferometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baek, S.; Kwoun, Oh-Ig; Bassler, M.; Lu, Zhiming; Shum, C.K.; Dietrich, R.

    2004-01-01

    In this study we generated a relative Digital Elevation Model (DEM) over the Sulzberger Ice Shelf, West Antarctica using ERS1/2 synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry data. Four repeat pass differential interferograms are used to find the grounding zone and to classify the study area. An interferometrically derived DEM is compared with laser altimetry profile from ICESat. Standard deviation of the relative height difference is 5.12 m and 1.34 m in total length of the profile and at the center of the profile respectively. The magnitude and the direction of tidal changes estimated from interferogram are compared with those predicted tidal differences from four ocean tide models. Tidal deformation measured in InSAR is -16.7 cm and it agrees well within 3 cm with predicted ones from tide models.

  14. The Pentapeptide Repeat Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Vetting,M.; Hegde, S.; Fajardo, J.; Fiser, A.; Roderick, S.; Takiff, H.; Blanchard, J.

    2006-01-01

    The Pentapeptide Repeat Protein (PRP) family has over 500 members in the prokaryotic and eukaryotic kingdoms. These proteins are composed of, or contain domains composed of, tandemly repeated amino acid sequences with a consensus sequence of [S, T,A, V][D, N][L, F]-[S, T,R][G]. The biochemical function of the vast majority of PRP family members is unknown. The three-dimensional structure of the first member of the PRP family was determined for the fluoroquinolone resistance protein (MfpA) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The structure revealed that the pentapeptide repeats encode the folding of a novel right-handed quadrilateral {beta}-helix. MfpA binds to DNA gyrase and inhibits its activity. The rod-shaped, dimeric protein exhibits remarkable size, shape and electrostatic similarity to DNA.

  15. Mars orbits with daily repeating ground traces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noreen, Gary K.; Kerridge, Stuart; Diehl, Roger; neelon, Joseph; Ely, Todd; Turner, Andrew

    2003-01-01

    This paper derives orbits at Mars with ground traces that repeat at the same times every solar day (sol). A relay orbiter in such an orbit would pass over insitu probes at the same times every sol, ensuring consistent coverage and simplifying mission design and operations. 42 orbits in five classes are characteried: 14 cicular equatorial prograde orbits; 14 circular equatorial retrograde orbits; 11 circular sun synchrounous orbits; 2 eccentroc equatorial orbits; 1 eccentric critcally inclined orbit. the paper reports on the performance of a relay orbiter in some of the orbits.

  16. Honesty through repeated interactions.

    PubMed

    Rich, Patricia; Zollman, Kevin J S

    2016-04-21

    In the study of signaling, it is well known that the cost of deception is an essential element for stable honest signaling in nature. In this paper, we show how costs for deception can arise endogenously from repeated interactions between individuals. Utilizing the Sir Philip Sidney game as an illustrative case, we show that repeated interactions can sustain honesty with no observable signal costs, even when deception cannot be directly observed. We provide a number of potential experimental tests for this theory which distinguish it from the available alternatives. PMID:26869213

  17. Bidirectional Manchester repeater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, J.

    1980-01-01

    Bidirectional Manchester repeater is inserted at periodic intervals along single bidirectional twisted pair transmission line to detect, amplify, and transmit bidirectional Manchester 11 code signals. Requiring only 18 TTL 7400 series IC's, some line receivers and drivers, and handful of passive components, circuit is simple and relatively inexpensive to build.

  18. Triggering of repeated earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, G. A.; Zakrzhevskaya, N. A.; Sobolev, D. G.

    2016-03-01

    Based on the analysis of the world's earthquakes with magnitudes M ≥ 6.5 for 1960-2013, it is shown that they cause global-scale coherent seismic oscillations which most distinctly manifest themselves in the period interval of 4-6 min during 1-3 days after the event. After these earthquakes, a repeated shock has an increased probability to occur in different seismically active regions located as far away as a few thousand km from the previous event, i.e., a remote interaction of seismic events takes place. The number of the repeated shocks N( t) decreases with time, which characterizes the memory of the lithosphere about the impact that has occurred. The time decay N( t) can be approximated by the linear, exponential, and powerlaw dependences. No distinct correlation between the spatial locations of the initial and repeated earthquakes is revealed. The probable triggering mechanisms of the remote interaction between the earthquakes are discussed. Surface seismic waves traveling several times around the Earth's, coherent oscillations, and global source are the most preferable candidates. This may lead to the accumulation and coalescence of ruptures in the highly stressed or weakened domains of a seismically active region, which increases the probability of a repeated earthquake.

  19. Repeated Causal Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagmayer, York; Meder, Bjorn

    2013-01-01

    Many of our decisions refer to actions that have a causal impact on the external environment. Such actions may not only allow for the mere learning of expected values or utilities but also for acquiring knowledge about the causal structure of our world. We used a repeated decision-making paradigm to examine what kind of knowledge people acquire in…

  20. Pass-transistor very large scale integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maki, Gary K. (Inventor); Bhatia, Prakash R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Logic elements are provided that permit reductions in layout size and avoidance of hazards. Such logic elements may be included in libraries of logic cells. A logical function to be implemented by the logic element is decomposed about logical variables to identify factors corresponding to combinations of the logical variables and their complements. A pass transistor network is provided for implementing the pass network function in accordance with this decomposition. The pass transistor network includes ordered arrangements of pass transistors that correspond to the combinations of variables and complements resulting from the logical decomposition. The logic elements may act as selection circuits and be integrated with memory and buffer elements.

  1. Photoacoustic Soot Spectrometer (PASS) Instrument Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Dubey, M; Springston, S; Koontz, A; Aiken, A

    2013-01-17

    The photoacoustic soot spectrometer (PASS) measures light absorption by aerosol particles. As the particles pass through a laser beam, the absorbed energy heats the particles and in turn the surrounding air, which sets off a pressure wave that can be detected by a microphone. The PASS instruments deployed by ARM can also simultaneously measure the scattered laser light at three wavelengths and therefore provide a direct measure of the single-scattering albedo. The Operator Manual for the PASS-3100 is included here with the permission of Droplet Measurement Technologies, the instrument’s manufacturer.

  2. Standwise Change Detection for Growing STOCK Using Repeat-Pass Alos Palsar / PALSAR-2 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, M.-G.; Kim, C.

    2016-06-01

    This study demonstrates the possibility of detecting the changes of growing stocks in mountainous forest stands derived from ALOS PALSAR and PALSAR-2 images. The ALOS PALSAR were obtained over the Kwangneung Experiment Forest (KEF, Korea) during the period of nineteen and a half months from the April 26, 2009 to December 12, 2010, whereas the PALSAR-2 data were acquired on the April 7, 2015. The KEF test site comprises 58 stands, which cover approximately 1,000ha and have steep slope topography. Owing to topographic effects of SAR data in mountainous areas, the DEM-assisted topographic normalized backscattering coefficient γ0 was applied to the evaluation of the relationships between the ALOS PALSAR / PALSAR-2 HV backscatter and the field inventory-based stand stock volume. The results indicate that: 1) the γ0 values for the volume obtained from ALOS PALSAR data on December 12, 2010 show a gradual increase higher than those computed from the data on April 26, 2009, here the γ0 value increases in accordance with an increase in the volume: 2) the γ0 values determined from the PALSAR-2 data increase with the same inventory-based volume, when compared with those computed from both ALOS PALSAR data. They also increase substantially as the values of the volume rise, with the exception of the volume interval from 130 m3 ha-1 to 160 m3 ha-1. This is understandable because the volume of the aforementioned interval has been reduced through clearing. Consequently, the γ0-based relationship between PALSAR-2 HV backscatter and growing stock can lead to detecting the stand growth changes in the KEF of Korea.

  3. Comparison between the Morse eigenfunctions and deformed oscillator wavefunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Recamier, J.; Mochan, W. L.; Gorayeb, M.; Paz, J. L.

    2008-04-15

    In this work we introduce deformed creation and annihilation operators which differ from the usual harmonic oscillator operators a, a{sup {dagger}} by a number operator function A circumflex = a circumflex f(n circumflex ), A circumflex {sup {dagger}} = f(n circumflex )a circumflex {sup {dagger}}. We construct the deformed coordinate and momentum in terms of the deformed operators and maintain only up to first order terms in the deformed operators. By application of the deformed annihilation operator upon the vacuum state we get the ground state wavefunction in the configuration space and the wavefunctions for excited states are obtained by repeated application of the deformed creation operator. Finally, we compare the wavefunctions obtained with the deformed operators with the corresponding Morse eigenfunctions.

  4. Accumulate repeat accumulate codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative channel coding scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate codes' (ARA). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, thus belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA codes on a graph. The structure of encoder for this class can be viewed as precoded Repeat Accumulate (RA) code or as precoded Irregular Repeat Accumulate (IRA) code, where simply an accumulator is chosen as a precoder. Thus ARA codes have simple, and very fast encoder structure when they representing LDPC codes. Based on density evolution for LDPC codes through some examples for ARA codes, we show that for maximum variable node degree 5 a minimum bit SNR as low as 0.08 dB from channel capacity for rate 1/2 can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Thus based on fixed low maximum variable node degree, its threshold outperforms not only the RA and IRA codes but also the best known LDPC codes with the dame maximum node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators any desired high rate codes close to code rate 1 can be obtained with thresholds that stay close to the channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results are provided. The ARA codes also have projected graph or protograph representation that allows for high speed decoder implementation.

  5. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

    2014-01-01

    Duct leakage often needs to be measured to demonstrate compliance with requirements or to determine energy or Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) impacts. Testing is often done using standards such as ASTM E1554 (ASTM 2013) or California Title 24 (California Energy Commission 2013 & 2013b), but there are several choices of methods available within the accepted standards. Determining which method to use or not use requires an evaluation of those methods in the context of the particular needs. Three factors that are important considerations are the cost of the measurement, the accuracy of the measurement and the repeatability of the measurement. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards.

  6. PASS--Placement/Advisement for Student Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shreve, Chuck; Wildie, Avace

    In 1985-86, Northern Michigan College (NMC) used funds received from the United States Department of Education to develop a system of assessment, advisement, and placement--Placement/Advisement for Student Success (PASS), an integrated system designed to improve student retention. PASS currently consists of three components: summer orientation,…

  7. Low-Noise Band-Pass Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, L.

    1982-01-01

    Circuit uses standard components to overcome common limitation of JFET amplifiers. Low-noise band-pass amplifier employs JFET and operational amplifier. High gain and band-pass characteristics are achieved with suitable choice of resistances and capacitances. Circuit should find use as low-noise amplifier, for example as first stage instrumentation systems.

  8. Pass transistor implementations of multivalued logic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maki, G.; Whitaker, S.

    1990-01-01

    A simple straight-forward Karnaugh map logic design procedure for realization of multiple-valued logic circuits is presented in this paper. Pass transistor logic gates are used to realize multiple-valued networks. This work is an extension of pass transistor implementations for binary-valued logic.

  9. Multifrequency, single pass free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Szoke, Abraham; Prosnitz, Donald

    1985-01-01

    A method for simultaneous amplification of laser beams with a sequence of frequencies in a single pass, using a relativistic beam of electrons grouped in a sequence of energies corresponding to the sequence of laser beam frequencies. The method allows electrons to pass from one potential well or "bucket" to another adjacent bucket, thus increasing efficiency of trapping and energy conversion.

  10. Software available for analyzing GPS deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespi, Mattia; Riguzzi, Federica

    1998-06-01

    A FORTRAN 77 software package that analyzes Global Positioning System (GPS) deformation control networks is available free of charge. This package is able to simulate and adjust GPS networks. It can also perform onedimensional, two dimensional, and three-dimensional statistical analysis to study the significance of coordinate differences coming from two repeated surveys of the same network. In addition, the package computes displacement vectors with error and reliability ellipsoids, and it is suited for both engineering and geophysical applications. It has been used successfully in Italy to analyze small and large networks established for high precision engineering surveys and geodynamic deformation control [Acker et al., 1998; Anzidei et al., 1996].

  11. Optimum periodicity of repeated contractile actions applied in mass transport

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sungsook; Lee, Sang Joon

    2015-01-01

    Dynamically repeated periodic patterns are abundant in natural and artificial systems, such as tides, heart beats, stock prices, and the like. The characteristic repeatability and periodicity are expected to be optimized in effective system-specific functions. In this study, such optimum periodicity is experimentally evaluated in terms of effective mass transport using one-valve and multi-valve systems working in contractile fluid flows. A set of nanoscale gating functions is utilized, operating in nanocomposite networks through which permeates selectively pass under characteristic contractile actions. Optimized contractile periodicity exists for effective energy impartment to flow in a one-valve system. In the sequential contractile actions for a multi-valve system, synchronization with the fluid flow is critical for effective mass transport. This study provides fundamental understanding on the various repeated periodic patterns and dynamic repeatability occurring in nature and mechanical systems, which are useful for broad applications. PMID:25622949

  12. Optimum periodicity of repeated contractile actions applied in mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sungsook; Lee, Sang Joon

    2015-01-01

    Dynamically repeated periodic patterns are abundant in natural and artificial systems, such as tides, heart beats, stock prices, and the like. The characteristic repeatability and periodicity are expected to be optimized in effective system-specific functions. In this study, such optimum periodicity is experimentally evaluated in terms of effective mass transport using one-valve and multi-valve systems working in contractile fluid flows. A set of nanoscale gating functions is utilized, operating in nanocomposite networks through which permeates selectively pass under characteristic contractile actions. Optimized contractile periodicity exists for effective energy impartment to flow in a one-valve system. In the sequential contractile actions for a multi-valve system, synchronization with the fluid flow is critical for effective mass transport. This study provides fundamental understanding on the various repeated periodic patterns and dynamic repeatability occurring in nature and mechanical systems, which are useful for broad applications.

  13. Microstructural modeling during multi-pass rolling of a nickel-base superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Kannan

    2009-08-01

    Microstructure present at the end of rolling and cooling operations controls the product properties. Therefore, control of grain size is an important characteristic in any hot-working. The narrow temperature range for hot working of Alloy 718 makes the grain size control more difficult. In the current work, a systematic numerical approach to predict the microstructure of Alloy 718 during multi-pass rolling is developed. This approach takes into account the severe deformation that takes place during each pass and also the possible reheating between passes. In order to predict the grain size at the end of rolling process, microstructural processes such as dynamic recrystallization (DRX), metadynamic recrystallization (MDRX), and static grain growth need to be captured at every deformation step for superalloys. Empirical relationships between the average grain size from various microstructural processes and the macroscopic variables such as temperature (T), effective strain 3¯ and strain rate 3¯˙ form the basis for the current work. The empirical relationships considered in this work are based on Avrami equations and utilize data taken from various forging analyses. The macroscopic variables are calculated using the Finite Element Method (FEM) by modeling the rolling process as a creeping flow problem. FEM incorporates a mesh re-zoning algorithm that enables the analysis to continue for several passes. A two-dimensional transient thermal analysis is carried out between passes that can capture the MDRX and/or static grain growth during the microstructural evolution. The microstructure prediction algorithm continuously updates two families of grains, namely, the recrystallized family and strained family at the start of deformation in any given pass. In addition, the algorithm calculates various subgroups within these two families at every deformation step within a pass. As the material undergoes deformation between the rolls, recrystallization equations are invoked

  14. Hamiltonian deformations of Gabor frames: First steps

    PubMed Central

    de Gosson, Maurice A.

    2015-01-01

    Gabor frames can advantageously be redefined using the Heisenberg–Weyl operators familiar from harmonic analysis and quantum mechanics. Not only does this redefinition allow us to recover in a very simple way known results of symplectic covariance, but it immediately leads to the consideration of a general deformation scheme by Hamiltonian isotopies (i.e. arbitrary paths of non-linear symplectic mappings passing through the identity). We will study in some detail an associated weak notion of Hamiltonian deformation of Gabor frames, using ideas from semiclassical physics involving coherent states and Gaussian approximations. We will thereafter discuss possible applications and extensions of our method, which can be viewed – as the title suggests – as the very first steps towards a general deformation theory for Gabor frames. PMID:25892903

  15. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques for duct leakage using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards. The three duct leak measurement methods assessed in this report are the two duct pressurization methods that are commonly used by many practitioners and the DeltaQ technique. These are methods B, C and A, respectively of the ASTM E1554 standard. Although it would be useful to evaluate other duct leak test methods, this study focused on those test methods that are commonly used and are required in various test standards, such as BPI (2010), RESNET (2014), ASHRAE 62.2 (2013), California Title 24 (CEC 2012), DOE Weatherization and many other energy efficiency programs.

  16. Repeated measures with zeros.

    PubMed

    Berk, K N; Lachenbruch, P A

    2002-08-01

    Consider repeated measures data with many zeros. For the case with one grouping factor and one repeated measure, we examine several models, assuming that the nonzero data are roughly lognormal. One of the simplest approaches is to model the zeros as left-censored observations from the lognormal distribution. A random effect is assumed for subjects. The censored model makes a strong assumption about the relationship between the zeros and the nonzero values. To check on this, you can instead assume that some of the zeros are 'true' zeros and model them as Bernoulli. Then the other values are modeled with a censored lognormal. A logistic model is used for the Bernoulli p, the probability of a true nonzero. The fit of the pure left-censored lognormal can be assessed by testing the hypothesis that p is 1, as described by Moulton and Halsey. The model can also be simplified by omitting the censoring, leaving a logistic model for the zeros and a lognormal model for the nonzero values. This is approximately equivalent to modeling the zero and nonzero values separately, a two-part model. In contrast to the censored model, this model assumes only a slight relationship (a covariance component) between the occurrence of zeros and the size of the nonzero values. The models are compared in terms of an example with data from children's private speech. PMID:12197298

  17. Repeat Customer Success in Extension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bess, Melissa M.; Traub, Sarah M.

    2013-01-01

    Four multi-session research-based programs were offered by two Extension specialist in one rural Missouri county. Eleven participants who came to multiple Extension programs could be called "repeat customers." Based on the total number of participants for all four programs, 25% could be deemed as repeat customers. Repeat customers had…

  18. Validation of a deformable image registration technique for cone beam CT-based dose verification

    SciTech Connect

    Moteabbed, M. Sharp, G. C.; Wang, Y.; Trofimov, A.; Efstathiou, J. A.; Lu, H.-M.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: As radiation therapy evolves toward more adaptive techniques, image guidance plays an increasingly important role, not only in patient setup but also in monitoring the delivered dose and adapting the treatment to patient changes. This study aimed to validate a method for evaluation of delivered intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) dose based on multimodal deformable image registration (DIR) for prostate treatments. Methods: A pelvic phantom was scanned with CT and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Both images were digitally deformed using two realistic patient-based deformation fields. The original CT was then registered to the deformed CBCT resulting in a secondary deformed CT. The registration quality was assessed as the ability of the DIR method to recover the artificially induced deformations. The primary and secondary deformed CT images as well as vector fields were compared to evaluate the efficacy of the registration method and it’s suitability to be used for dose calculation. PLASTIMATCH, a free and open source software was used for deformable image registration. A B-spline algorithm with optimized parameters was used to achieve the best registration quality. Geometric image evaluation was performed through voxel-based Hounsfield unit (HU) and vector field comparison. For dosimetric evaluation, IMRT treatment plans were created and optimized on the original CT image and recomputed on the two warped images to be compared. The dose volume histograms were compared for the warped structures that were identical in both warped images. This procedure was repeated for the phantom with full, half full, and empty bladder. Results: The results indicated mean HU differences of up to 120 between registered and ground-truth deformed CT images. However, when the CBCT intensities were calibrated using a region of interest (ROI)-based calibration curve, these differences were reduced by up to 60%. Similarly, the mean differences in average vector field

  19. Structural and strain analysis of the metasediments in Pacheco Pass, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saja, David Bryan

    Structural mapping at 1:200 is applied to 8 kilometers of near continuous but isolated outcrop in Pacheco Pass, California, to understand outcrop-scale structures created during subduction. Pacheco Pass, ˜177 km SSE of San Francisco, is part of the deeply subducted Eastern belt of the Franciscan accretionary-complex. Here, road and reservoir-shoreline outcrops provide exceptional exposures of distal turbidites, which are well known for their mid-Cretaceous blueschist-facies minerals. Using geometric and domainal analyses, I determined four progressively overprinted phases of deformation recorded in interbedded Franciscan metagraywackes and argillites at Pacheco Pass. The structures of deformation D1 consist of pre-cleavage veins, close to isoclinal interstratal F1 folds, and a regionally dominant, weak axial-planar S1 slaty cleavage. The structures of deformation D2, which deform D1 structures, are pinch-and-swell structures, tight to isoclinal F2 folds, and S2 discrete-crenulation cleavage, which is locally developed in clay-rich hinge zones. These structures are overprinted by D3 structures that consist of open to tight F3 folds, and S3 zonal-crenulation cleavage. Finally, the structures of D4 consist of F4 kink bands and late high-angle normal faults. The consistency in orientations and discrete phases of deformation demonstrates a coherent and systematic deformation of the rock within these deeply-subducted terranes. I interpret these deformations as the result of initial subduction (D1), accretion (D2, D3?), and late strike-slip faulting (D4). Further, I describe the taphonomy of Equisetum-like stems in siltstone layers at Pacheco Pass. These long, slender, and straight stem segments look like flattened hollow tubes. Textures and overprinting relationships indicate they settled out onto the sea floor between turbidity flows, were shallowly buried, collapsed from decay, and then silicified. I also measured 40% extensional strain recorded by three sets of

  20. Deformations in VLBI antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, T. A.; Thomsen, P.

    1988-01-01

    A study is presented of deformations in antennas with the emphasis on their influence on VLBI measurements. The GIFTS structural analysis program has been used to model the VLBI antenna in Fairbanks (Alaska). The report identifies key deformations and studies the effect of gravity, wind, and temperature. Estimates of expected deformations are given.

  1. Hurricane Sandy -- Pass 1, Oct. 29, 2012

    NASA Video Gallery

    Hurricane Sandy was viewed Monday morning from the International Space Station as it orbited 260 miles above the Atlantic Ocean. Sandy had sustained winds of 90 miles an hour as the station passed ...

  2. Automated Procedure for Roll Pass Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambiase, F.; Langella, A.

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this work has been to develop an automatic roll pass design method, capable of minimizing the number of roll passes. The adoption of artificial intelligence technologies, particularly expert systems, and a hybrid model for the surface profile evaluation of rolled bars, has allowed us to model the search for the minimal sequence with a tree path search. This approach permitted a geometrical optimization of roll passes while allowing automation of the roll pass design process. Moreover, the heuristic nature of the inferential engine contributes a great deal toward reducing search time, thus allowing such a system to be employed for industrial purposes. Finally, this new approach was compared with other recently developed automatic systems to validate and measure possible improvements among them.

  3. Message Passing Framework for Globally Interconnected Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafeez, M.; Asghar, S.; Malik, U. A.; Rehman, A.; Riaz, N.

    2011-12-01

    In prevailing technology trends it is apparent that the network requirements and technologies will advance in future. Therefore the need of High Performance Computing (HPC) based implementation for interconnecting clusters is comprehensible for scalability of clusters. Grid computing provides global infrastructure of interconnecting clusters consisting of dispersed computing resources over Internet. On the other hand the leading model for HPC programming is Message Passing Interface (MPI). As compared to Grid computing, MPI is better suited for solving most of the complex computational problems. MPI itself is restricted to a single cluster. It does not support message passing over the internet to use the computing resources of different clusters in an optimal way. We propose a model that provides message passing capabilities between parallel applications over the internet. The proposed model is based on Architecture for Java Universal Message Passing (A-JUMP) framework and Enterprise Service Bus (ESB) named as High Performance Computing Bus. The HPC Bus is built using ActiveMQ. HPC Bus is responsible for communication and message passing in an asynchronous manner. Asynchronous mode of communication offers an assurance for message delivery as well as a fault tolerance mechanism for message passing. The idea presented in this paper effectively utilizes wide-area intercluster networks. It also provides scheduling, dynamic resource discovery and allocation, and sub-clustering of resources for different jobs. Performance analysis and comparison study of the proposed framework with P2P-MPI are also presented in this paper.

  4. RepeatsDB: a database of tandem repeat protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Di Domenico, Tomás; Potenza, Emilio; Walsh, Ian; Gonzalo Parra, R.; Giollo, Manuel; Minervini, Giovanni; Piovesan, Damiano; Ihsan, Awais; Ferrari, Carlo; Kajava, Andrey V.; Tosatto, Silvio C.E.

    2014-01-01

    RepeatsDB (http://repeatsdb.bio.unipd.it/) is a database of annotated tandem repeat protein structures. Tandem repeats pose a difficult problem for the analysis of protein structures, as the underlying sequence can be highly degenerate. Several repeat types haven been studied over the years, but their annotation was done in a case-by-case basis, thus making large-scale analysis difficult. We developed RepeatsDB to fill this gap. Using state-of-the-art repeat detection methods and manual curation, we systematically annotated the Protein Data Bank, predicting 10 745 repeat structures. In all, 2797 structures were classified according to a recently proposed classification schema, which was expanded to accommodate new findings. In addition, detailed annotations were performed in a subset of 321 proteins. These annotations feature information on start and end positions for the repeat regions and units. RepeatsDB is an ongoing effort to systematically classify and annotate structural protein repeats in a consistent way. It provides users with the possibility to access and download high-quality datasets either interactively or programmatically through web services. PMID:24311564

  5. Deformable Nanolaminate Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S S; Papavasiliou, A P; Barbee, T W; Miles, R R; Walton, C C; Cohn, M B; Chang, K

    2006-05-12

    We are developing a new class of deformable optic based on electrostatic actuation of nanolaminate foils. These foils are engineered at the atomic level to provide optimal opto-mechanical properties, including surface quality, strength and stiffness, for a wide range of deformable optics. We are combining these foils, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), with commercial metal processing techniques to produce prototype deformable optics with aperture sizes up to 10 cm and actuator spacing from 1 mm to 1 cm and with a range of surface deformation designed to be as much as 10 microns. The existing capability for producing nanolaminate foils at LLNL, coupled with the commercial metal processing techniques being used, enable the potential production of these deformable optics with aperture sizes of over 1 m, and much larger deformable optics could potentially be produced by tiling multiple deformable segments. In addition, based on the fabrication processes being used, deformable nanolaminate optics could potentially be produced with areal densities of less than 1 kg per square m for applications in which lightweight deformable optics are desirable, and deformable nanolaminate optics could potentially be fabricated with intrinsically curved surfaces, including aspheric shapes. We will describe the basic principles of these devices, and we will present details of the design, fabrication and characterization of the prototype deformable nanolaminate optics that have been developed to date. We will also discuss the possibilities for future work on scaling these devices to larger sizes and developing both devices with lower areal densities and devices with curved surfaces.

  6. Symmetrical band-pass loudspeaker systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matusiak, Grzegorz Piotr

    2001-12-01

    Loudspeaker systems are analyzed in a doctoral dissertation. The dissertation concerns loudspeaker systems, which are known as subwoofers or band-pass loudspeaker systems. Their advantages include: high- quality sound reproduction in the low-frequency range, small dimensions, small nonlinear distortions and the fact that they can be placed anywhere in a room or car. Band-pass loudspeaker systems are used widely in the so- called Home Theatre as well as to provide sound in cinema, theatre, concert, discotheque, opera, operetta, philharmonic and amphitheater halls, at open-air concerts, and so on. Various designs are mass-produced by a large number of manufacturers. The study covers an analysis of band-pass loudspeaker systems to which the frequency transformation, i.e. the reactance transformation, has been applied. Since this is a symmetrical transformation, amplitude frequency responses of the studied band-pass systems are also symmetrical (logarithmic scale of a frequency). As a result, the high-pass loudspeaker system design method, known as the Thiele-Small, Benson analysis, can be employed. The investigations include the formulation of band-pass system equations (fourth, sixth and eighth-order polynomials) and the subsequent derivation of relations for the calculation of system parameters. The obtained results enable the calculation of optimum designs for prescribed alignments, e.g. (Chebyshev) equal-ripple, (Butterworth) maximally flat, or quasi-maximally flat (QB). The analysis covers fourth, sixth and eighth-order symmetrical systems. Eighth-order systems have been divided into three kinds according to three ways of physical realization. The doctoral dissertation includes band-pass loudspeaker systems, which can be designed with active or passive filters or without the filter. Designed systems consist of a loudspeaker whose front of a diaphragm is loaded with a Helmholtz resonator, i.e. an enclosure with a vent, which radiates sound outwards. The back is

  7. Deformability of Tumor Cells versus Blood Cells.

    PubMed

    Shaw Bagnall, Josephine; Byun, Sangwon; Begum, Shahinoor; Miyamoto, David T; Hecht, Vivian C; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Stott, Shannon L; Toner, Mehmet; Hynes, Richard O; Manalis, Scott R

    2015-01-01

    The potential for circulating tumor cells (CTCs) to elucidate the process of cancer metastasis and inform clinical decision-making has made their isolation of great importance. However, CTCs are rare in the blood, and universal properties with which to identify them remain elusive. As technological advancements have made single-cell deformability measurements increasingly routine, the assessment of physical distinctions between tumor cells and blood cells may provide insight into the feasibility of deformability-based methods for identifying CTCs in patient blood. To this end, we present an initial study assessing deformability differences between tumor cells and blood cells, indicated by the length of time required for them to pass through a microfluidic constriction. Here, we demonstrate that deformability changes in tumor cells that have undergone phenotypic shifts are small compared to differences between tumor cell lines and blood cells. Additionally, in a syngeneic mouse tumor model, cells that are able to exit a tumor and enter circulation are not required to be more deformable than the cells that were first injected into the mouse. However, a limited study of metastatic prostate cancer patients provides evidence that some CTCs may be more mechanically similar to blood cells than to typical tumor cell lines. PMID:26679988

  8. Deformability of Tumor Cells versus Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shaw Bagnall, Josephine; Byun, Sangwon; Begum, Shahinoor; Miyamoto, David T.; Hecht, Vivian C.; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Stott, Shannon L.; Toner, Mehmet; Hynes, Richard O.; Manalis, Scott R.

    2015-01-01

    The potential for circulating tumor cells (CTCs) to elucidate the process of cancer metastasis and inform clinical decision-making has made their isolation of great importance. However, CTCs are rare in the blood, and universal properties with which to identify them remain elusive. As technological advancements have made single-cell deformability measurements increasingly routine, the assessment of physical distinctions between tumor cells and blood cells may provide insight into the feasibility of deformability-based methods for identifying CTCs in patient blood. To this end, we present an initial study assessing deformability differences between tumor cells and blood cells, indicated by the length of time required for them to pass through a microfluidic constriction. Here, we demonstrate that deformability changes in tumor cells that have undergone phenotypic shifts are small compared to differences between tumor cell lines and blood cells. Additionally, in a syngeneic mouse tumor model, cells that are able to exit a tumor and enter circulation are not required to be more deformable than the cells that were first injected into the mouse. However, a limited study of metastatic prostate cancer patients provides evidence that some CTCs may be more mechanically similar to blood cells than to typical tumor cell lines. PMID:26679988

  9. Improved multiple-pass Raman spectrometer.

    PubMed

    KC, Utsav; Silver, Joel A; Hovde, David C; Varghese, Philip L

    2011-08-20

    An improved Raman gain spectrometer for flame measurements of gas temperature and species concentrations is described. This instrument uses a multiple-pass optical cell to enhance the incident light intensity in the measurement volume. The Raman signal is 83 times larger than from a single pass, and the Raman signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in room-temperature air of 153 is an improvement over that from a single-pass cell by a factor of 9.3 when the cell is operated with 100 passes and the signal is integrated over 20 laser shots. The SNR improvement with the multipass cell is even higher for flame measurements at atmospheric pressure, because detector readout noise is more significant for single-pass measurements when the gas density is lower. Raman scattering is collected and dispersed in a spectrograph with a transmission grating and recorded with a fast gated CCD array detector to help eliminate flame interferences. The instrument is used to record spontaneous Raman spectra from N(2), CO(2), O(2), and CO in a methane-air flame. Curve fits of the recorded Raman spectra to detailed simulations of nitrogen spectra are used to determine the flame temperature from the shapes of the spectral signatures and from the ratio of the total intensities of the Stokes and anti-Stokes signals. The temperatures measured are in good agreement with radiation-corrected thermocouple measurements for a range of equivalence ratios. PMID:21857704

  10. Residual stresses and plastic deformation in GTA-welded steel

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, P.C. ); Keijser, T.H. de; Ouden, G. den )

    1993-03-01

    Residual stresses and plastic deformation in single pass GTA welded low-carbon steel were studied by means of x-ray diffraction in combination with optical microscopy and hardness measurements. The residual stresses and the amount of plastic deformation (microstrain) were obtained from x-ray diffraction line positions and line broading. Since the plates were polished before welding, it was possible to observe in the optical microscope two types of Lueders bands. During heating curved Lueders bands and during cooling straight Lueders bands perpendicular to the weld are formed. The curved Lueders bands extend over a larger distance from the weld than the straight Lueders bands. The amount of plastic deformation as obtained from the x-ray diffraction analysis is in agreement with these observations. An explanation is offered for the stresses measured in combination with plastic deformations observed. It is concluded that in the present experiments plastic deformation is the main cause of the residual stresses.

  11. Novel optical fiber sensor for deformation measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, Haiting; Sun, Suping; Yu, Jianqiang; Liu, Renqiang

    2010-10-01

    A light intensity modulation optical fiber sensor, which can measure deformation directly, has been developed. A light leakage zone is introduced on one side of fiber to increase the sensitivity of fiber under deformation. The machining process of sensor is considered. Hand carving, milling and embossing methods are introduced to produce the light leakage zone respectively, and the comparison between these methods is carried out. To obtain the static curve of sensor, cantilevered beam, simple support beam and cylinders are used respectively to measure little and large deformation. The static characters of sensor, such as sensitivity and measurement range, are analyzed from the static curve. The experimental results show that the sensor can distinguish the direction of deformation (positive bending and negative bending). Positive bending increases the throughput of light, and is distinguishable from negative bending, which decreases the throughput. The output of sensor is linear with curvature when the curvature radius is larger than 60mm. The response of sensor is a cosine function with the direction of deformation and there is a maximum sensitivity direction (perpendicular to the light leakage zone plane and passing through the axis of the fiber) and a minimum sensitivity direction (parallel to light leakage zone plane and pass through the axis of the fiber). The dynamic responds of attenuation vibration and sawtooth input signal are studied. Comparison between the optical fiber sensor, untreated fiber and strain gauge shows that the sensor is 400 times of untreated fiber in sensitivity and is more advantageous in measurement of thin structures. The sensor is easily made by multi-mode plastic optical fiber and the detection equipments are very simple, therefore it is small in size, simple in structure and low in cost, which make the sensor can be widely used in various fields.

  12. Over-under double-pass interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schindler, R. A. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An over-under double pass interferometer in which the beamsplitter area and thickness can be reduced to conform only with optical flatness considerations was achieved by offsetting the optical center line of one cat's-eye retroreflector relative to the optical center line of the other in order that one split beam be folded into a plane distinct from the other folded split beam. The beamsplitter is made transparent in one area for a first folded beam to be passed to a mirror for doubling back and is made totally reflective in another area for the second folded beam to be reflected to a mirror for doubling back. The two beams thus doubled back are combined in the central, beamsplitting area of the beamsplitting and passed to a detector. This makes the beamsplitter insensitive to minimum thickness requirements and selection of material.

  13. 78 FR 62344 - Sabine Pass Liquefaction Expansion, LLC, Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC, and Sabine Pass LNG, L.P...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-18

    ... Sabine Pass LNG, L.P., Cheniere Creole Trail Pipeline, L.P.; Notice of Application Take notice that on... Commission an application under section 3(a) of the Natural Gas Act (NGA) for authorization to site...) filed, in the same application, a request under section 7(c) of the NGA, for authorization to...

  14. Saturation of repeated quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haapasalo, Erkka; Heinosaari, Teiko; Kuramochi, Yui

    2016-08-01

    We study sequential measurement scenarios where the system is repeatedly subjected to the same measurement process. We first provide examples of such repeated measurements where further repetitions of the measurement do not increase our knowledge on the system after some finite number of measurement steps. We also prove, however, that repeating the Lüders measurement of an unsharp two-outcome observable never saturates in this sense, and we characterize the observable measured in the limit of infinitely many repetitions. Our result implies that a repeated measurement can be used to correct the inherent noise of an unsharp observable.

  15. Deformable bearing seat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreman, O. S., III (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A deformable bearing seat is described for seating a bearing assembly in a housing. The seat includes a seating surface in the housing having a first predetermined spheroidal contour when the housing is in an undeformed mode. The seating surface is deformable to a second predetermined spherically contoured surface when the housing is in a deformed mode. The seat is particularly adaptable for application to a rotating blade and mounting ring assembly in a gas turbine engine.

  16. 77 FR 65546 - Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC; Sabine Pass LNG, L.P.; Notice of Petition To Amend Authorizations...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-29

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC; Sabine Pass LNG, L.P.; Notice of Petition To... Pass Liquefaction, LLC and Sabine Pass LNG, L.P. (collectively, Sabine Pass), 700 Milam Street, Suite... authorizations granted on April 16, 2012 in Docket No. CP11-72-000 (Liquefaction Project) in order to...

  17. 78 FR 66909 - Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC; Sabine Pass LNG, L.P.; Notice of Application to Amend...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC; Sabine Pass LNG, L.P.; Notice of Application... Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC and Sabine Pass LNG, L.P. (collectively, Sabine Pass), 700 Milam Street... authorizations granted on April 16, 2012 in Docket No. CP11-72-000 (Liquefaction Project), as amended in...

  18. Deformed discrete symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzano, Michele; Kowalski-Glikman, Jerzy

    2016-09-01

    We construct discrete symmetry transformations for deformed relativistic kinematics based on group valued momenta. We focus on the specific example of κ-deformations of the Poincaré algebra with associated momenta living on (a sub-manifold of) de Sitter space. Our approach relies on the description of quantum states constructed from deformed kinematics and the observable charges associated with them. The results we present provide the first step towards the analysis of experimental bounds on the deformation parameter κ to be derived via precision measurements of discrete symmetries and CPT.

  19. Does deformation saturate seismic anisotropy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatham, D. J.; Lloyd, G. E.; Butler, R. W.; Casey, M.

    2006-12-01

    The progressive simple shear deformation that characterizes ductile fault zones in the crust involves both rotation and intensification of the strain ellipsoid. These mathematic predictions have been confirmed repeatedly by finite strain determinations in outcrop studies of natural shear zones and used to test geodynamic models of mountain belts. Seismic anisotropy (SA) methods offer the opportunity to pursue these approaches in situ. First however, we must calibrate the magnitude and orientation of the SA ellipsoid against naturally deformed tectonites of known strain state and microstructure. Here we present data from a field analogue of mafic ductile crust in an amphibolite-facies shear zone developed in a deformed mafic dyke embedded within the Lewisian Gneiss (Badcall, NW Scotland). Deflection of pre-existing linear and planar elements and attenuation of the dyke into the shear zone are used to determine the strain gradient. Specimens collected along this gradient were used to establish the geometric fabric intensity defined by different minerals (hornblende grain alignment and ellipticity of plagioclase clots). Finally, petrophysical properties were calculated for the specimens using the SEM-EBSD measured populations of lattice preferred orientations (LPO) for all mineral phases. It is the hornblende-plagioclase LPO, combined in their modal proportions and modulated by the individual mineral single crystal elastic properties, which define the SA profile across the shear zone. Hornblende develops a strong preferred dimensional orientation and hence LPO at shear strains of about 2, whereas the plagioclase LPO remains close to random regardless of bulk strain. The modelled SA of the samples is dominated therefore by the amphibole LPO. Although the values of bulk shear strain vary across the shear zone (0 at the margins to greater than 12 in the centre), the calculated intensity of SA saturates at a shear strain of about 2. These results, if typical of large

  20. Message passing with parallel queue traversal

    DOEpatents

    Underwood, Keith D.; Brightwell, Ronald B.; Hemmert, K. Scott

    2012-05-01

    In message passing implementations, associative matching structures are used to permit list entries to be searched in parallel fashion, thereby avoiding the delay of linear list traversal. List management capabilities are provided to support list entry turnover semantics and priority ordering semantics.

  1. Message-passing performance of various computers

    SciTech Connect

    Dongarra, J.J.; Dunigan, T.H.

    1996-02-01

    This report compares the performance of different computer systems message passing. Latency and bandwidth are measured on Convex, Cray, IBM, Intel, KSR, Meiko, nCUBE, NEC, SGI, and TMC multiprocessors. Communication performance is contrasted with the computational power of each system. The comparison includes both shared a memory computers as well as networked workstation cluster.

  2. Passing the Bond Issue (with Related Video)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Paul W.

    2011-01-01

    When a bond referendum comes around for a school district, it often is the culmination of years of planning, strategizing and communicating to the public. Especially in these economic times, passing a building referendum is challenging. Complete transparency among the superintendent, school board and community is essential to communicate the…

  3. PASS: Promoting Academic Student Success. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Kenneth; Sonner, Bruce

    Active between 1993 and 1996, the Promoting Academic Student Success (PASS) Program was aimed at reducing the high percentage of failure experienced by academic probation students at Corning Community College (New York). These students typically came from non supportive environments, possessed academic deficiencies, and suffered from feelings of…

  4. Generalizing Galileo's Passe-Dix Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hombas, Vassilios

    2012-01-01

    This article shows a generalization of Galileo's "passe-dix" game. The game was born following one of Galileo's [G. Galileo, "Sopra le Scoperte dei Dadi" (Galileo, Opere, Firenze, Barbera, Vol. 8). Translated by E.H. Thorne, 1898, pp. 591-594] explanations on a paradox that occurred in the experiment of tossing three fair "six-sided" dice.…

  5. PASS: Creating Physically Active School Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciotto, Carol M.; Fede, Marybeth H.

    2014-01-01

    PASS, a Physically Active School System, is a program by which school districts and schools utilize opportunities for school-based physical activity that enhance overall fitness and cognition, which can be broken down into four integral parts consisting of connecting, communicating, collaborating, and cooperating. There needs to be an…

  6. Program for Access to Science Study (PASS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Millicent; Weiner, Michael

    The Program for Access to Science Study (PASS) consists of a preparatory science course which is taught in tandem with a special counseling seminar. Problem solving is taught using content in chemistry and physics. The curriculum is divided into cycles, each built around a single topic. A problem set related to the topic and an illustrative lab…

  7. 34 CFR 668.147 - Passing scores.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... be representative of the population of high school graduates in the United States. (Authority: 20 U.S... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Passing scores. 668.147 Section 668.147 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY...

  8. 34 CFR 668.147 - Passing scores.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... be representative of the population of high school graduates in the United States. (Authority: 20 U.S... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Passing scores. 668.147 Section 668.147 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY...

  9. 34 CFR 668.147 - Passing scores.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... be representative of the population of high school graduates in the United States. (Authority: 20 U.S... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Passing scores. 668.147 Section 668.147 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY...

  10. 34 CFR 668.147 - Passing scores.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... be representative of the population of high school graduates in the United States. (Authority: 20 U.S... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Passing scores. 668.147 Section 668.147 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY...

  11. 34 CFR 668.147 - Passing scores.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... standard deviation below the mean for students with high school diplomas who have taken the test within... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Passing scores. 668.147 Section 668.147 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY...

  12. The Physics of "String Passing through Ice"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohazzabi, Pirooz

    2011-01-01

    One of the oldest yet interesting experiments related to heat and thermodynamics is placing a string on a block of ice and hanging two masses from the ends of the string. Sometime later, it is discovered that the string has passed through the ice without cutting it in half. A simple explanation of this effect is that the pressure caused by the…

  13. All-photonic quantum repeaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-04-01

    Quantum communication holds promise for unconditionally secure transmission of secret messages and faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photons appear to be the medium of choice for quantum communication. Owing to photon losses, robust quantum communication over long lossy channels requires quantum repeaters. It is widely believed that a necessary and highly demanding requirement for quantum repeaters is the existence of matter quantum memories. Here we show that such a requirement is, in fact, unnecessary by introducing the concept of all-photonic quantum repeaters based on flying qubits. In particular, we present a protocol based on photonic cluster-state machine guns and a loss-tolerant measurement equipped with local high-speed active feedforwards. We show that, with such all-photonic quantum repeaters, the communication efficiency scales polynomially with the channel distance. Our result paves a new route towards quantum repeaters with efficient single-photon sources rather than matter quantum memories.

  14. All-photonic quantum repeaters.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-01-01

    Quantum communication holds promise for unconditionally secure transmission of secret messages and faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photons appear to be the medium of choice for quantum communication. Owing to photon losses, robust quantum communication over long lossy channels requires quantum repeaters. It is widely believed that a necessary and highly demanding requirement for quantum repeaters is the existence of matter quantum memories. Here we show that such a requirement is, in fact, unnecessary by introducing the concept of all-photonic quantum repeaters based on flying qubits. In particular, we present a protocol based on photonic cluster-state machine guns and a loss-tolerant measurement equipped with local high-speed active feedforwards. We show that, with such all-photonic quantum repeaters, the communication efficiency scales polynomially with the channel distance. Our result paves a new route towards quantum repeaters with efficient single-photon sources rather than matter quantum memories. PMID:25873153

  15. All-photonic quantum repeaters

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-01-01

    Quantum communication holds promise for unconditionally secure transmission of secret messages and faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photons appear to be the medium of choice for quantum communication. Owing to photon losses, robust quantum communication over long lossy channels requires quantum repeaters. It is widely believed that a necessary and highly demanding requirement for quantum repeaters is the existence of matter quantum memories. Here we show that such a requirement is, in fact, unnecessary by introducing the concept of all-photonic quantum repeaters based on flying qubits. In particular, we present a protocol based on photonic cluster-state machine guns and a loss-tolerant measurement equipped with local high-speed active feedforwards. We show that, with such all-photonic quantum repeaters, the communication efficiency scales polynomially with the channel distance. Our result paves a new route towards quantum repeaters with efficient single-photon sources rather than matter quantum memories. PMID:25873153

  16. Sequence repeats and protein structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Trinh X.; Trovato, Antonio; Seno, Flavio; Banavar, Jayanth R.; Maritan, Amos

    2012-11-01

    Repeats are frequently found in known protein sequences. The level of sequence conservation in tandem repeats correlates with their propensities to be intrinsically disordered. We employ a coarse-grained model of a protein with a two-letter amino acid alphabet, hydrophobic (H) and polar (P), to examine the sequence-structure relationship in the realm of repeated sequences. A fraction of repeated sequences comprises a distinct class of bad folders, whose folding temperatures are much lower than those of random sequences. Imperfection in sequence repetition improves the folding properties of the bad folders while deteriorating those of the good folders. Our results may explain why nature has utilized repeated sequences for their versatility and especially to design functional proteins that are intrinsically unstructured at physiological temperatures.

  17. Estimating repeatability of egg size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flint, P.L.; Rockwell, R.F.; Sedinger, J.S.

    2001-01-01

    Measures of repeatability have long been used to assess patterns of variation in egg size within and among females. We compared different analytical approaches for estimating repeatability of egg size of Black Brant. Separate estimates of repeatability for eggs of each clutch size and laying sequence number varied from 0.49 to 0.64. We suggest that using the averaging egg size within clutches results in underestimation of variation within females and thereby overestimates repeatability. We recommend a nested design that partitions egg-size variation within clutches, among clutches within females, and among females. We demonstrate little variation in estimates of repeatability resulting from a nested model controlling for egg laying sequence and a nested model in which we assumed laying sequence was unknown.

  18. Assessing ScanSAR Interferometry for Deformation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, S. M.; Gudipati, K.

    2007-12-01

    There is a trend in civil satellite SAR mission design to implement an imaging strategy that incorporates both stripmap mode and ScanSAR imaging. This represents a compromise between high resolution data collection and a desire for greater spatial coverage and more frequent revisit times. However, mixed mode imaging can greatly reduce the number of stripmap images available for measuring subtle ground deformation. Although ScanSAR-ScanSAR and ScanSAR-stripmap repeat-pass interferometry have been demonstrated, these approaches are infrequently used for single interferogram formation and nonexistent for InSAR time series analysis. For future mission design, e.g., a dedicated US InSAR mission, the effect of various ScanSAR system parameter choices on InSAR time series analysis also remains unexplored. Our objective is to determine the utility of ScanSAR differential interferometry. We will demonstrate the use of ScanSAR interferograms for several previous deformation studies: localized and broad-scale urban land subsidence, tunneling, volcanic surface movements and several examples associated with the seismic cycle. We also investigate the effect of various ScanSAR burst synchronization levels on our ability to detect and make quality measurements of deformation. To avoid the issues associated with Envisat ScanSAR burst alignment and to exploit a decade of InSAR measurements, we simulate ScanSAR data by bursting (throwing away range lines of) ERS-1/2 data. All the burst mode datasets are processed using a Modified SPECAN algorithm. To investigate the effects of burst misalignment, a number of cases with varying degrees of burst overlap are considered. In particular, we look at phase decorrelation as a function of percentage of burst overlap. Coherence clearly reduces as the percentage of overlap decreases and we find a useful threshold of 40-70% burst overlap depending on the study site. In order to get a more generalized understanding for different surface conditions

  19. Comparison of deformation at ends of the results obtained by some commonly used filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Dechun; Liao, Xinhao

    By using some commonly used filters, such as MULTI-STAGE, ELLIPSE, CHEBYSHEV, and BUTTERWORTH, seasonal, interannual, and decadal components are separated from a synthetic LOD series which was composed of 11 periodic terms extracted from a real LOD series during 1962 - 1998. And then comparisons of the filtered results with the original components have been made to investigate the deformations induced by the different filters at the two ends of the data series. Some results are shown. It is clear by the comparison that the MULTI-STAGE filter has least deformation rate at the two ends of series either it is used for high or low pass filtering, the BUTTERWORTH (for high pass filtering) and CHEBYSHEV (for low pass filtering) have less deformation among the others. For the band pass filtering, however, the CHEBYSHEV filter has least deformation. After adding some extended data obtained by fitting the original data series as a linear statistical model, comparison of the filtered results show that the BUTTERWORTH and ELLIPSE filters have least deformations for band pass filtering. The ends deformation induced by filtering will be smaller for any filters after adding of some statistically extended data to the original series.

  20. Resurgent deformation quantisation

    SciTech Connect

    Garay, Mauricio; Goursac, Axel de; Straten, Duco van

    2014-03-15

    We construct a version of the complex Heisenberg algebra based on the idea of endless analytic continuation. The algebra would be large enough to capture quantum effects that escape ordinary formal deformation quantisation. -- Highlights: •We construct resurgent deformation quantisation. •We give integral formulæ. •We compute examples which show that hypergeometric functions appear naturally in quantum computations.

  1. Deformation mechanisms in experimentally deformed Boom Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desbois, Guillaume; Schuck, Bernhard; Urai, Janos

    2016-04-01

    Bulk mechanical and transport properties of reference claystones for deep disposal of radioactive waste have been investigated since many years but little is known about microscale deformation mechanisms because accessing the relevant microstructure in these soft, very fine-grained, low permeable and low porous materials remains difficult. Recent development of ion beam polishing methods to prepare high quality damage free surfaces for scanning electron microscope (SEM) is opening new fields of microstructural investigation in claystones towards a better understanding of the deformation behavior transitional between rocks and soils. We present results of Boom Clay deformed in a triaxial cell in a consolidated - undrained test at a confining pressure of 0.375 MPa (i.e. close to natural value), with σ1 perpendicular to the bedding. Experiments stopped at 20 % strain. As a first approximation, the plasticity of the sample can be described by a Mohr-Coulomb type failure envelope with a coefficient of cohesion C = 0.117 MPa and an internal friction angle ϕ = 18.7°. After deformation test, the bulk sample shows a shear zone at an angle of about 35° from the vertical with an offset of about 5 mm. We used the "Lamipeel" method that allows producing a permanent absolutely plane and large size etched micro relief-replica in order to localize and to document the shear zone at the scale of the deformed core. High-resolution imaging of microstructures was mostly done by using the BIB-SEM method on key-regions identified after the "Lamipeel" method. Detailed BIB-SEM investigations of shear zones show the following: the boundaries between the shear zone and the host rock are sharp, clay aggregates and clastic grains are strongly reoriented parallel to the shear direction, and the porosity is significantly reduced in the shear zone and the grain size is smaller in the shear zone than in the host rock but there is no evidence for broken grains. Comparison of microstructures

  2. Development of Crystallographic Texture and Grain Refinement in the Aluminum Layer of CU-AL-CU Tri-Layer Composite Deformed by Equal Channel Angular Extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolaminejad, B.; Taheri, A. Karimi; Shahmiri, M.; Arabi, H.

    The present research is concerned with the aluminum layer of a loosely packed tri-layer copper-aluminum-copper composite deformed by ECAE process. Electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD), transmission electron microscope, and X-ray technique were employed to investigate the detailed changes occurring in the microtexture, microstructure (cell size and misorientation), and dislocation density evolution during consecutive passes of ECAE process performed on the composite based on route Bc. According to tensile test results, the yield stress of the aluminum layer was increased significantly after application of ECAE throughout the four repeated passes and then slightly decreased. An ultrafine grain size within the range of 500-600 nm was obtained in the Al layer by increasing the thickness of copper layers. It was observed that the reduction of grain size in the aluminum layer is nearly 57% more than that of an ECAE-ed single layer aluminum billet. Also, the grain refinement of the aluminum layer is accelerated throughout 8 passes. This observation was attributed to the higher rate of dislocation interaction, cell formation and texture development during the ECAE of the composite compared to those of the single billet.

  3. AC electric field induced droplet deformation in a microfluidic T-junction.

    PubMed

    Xi, Heng-Dong; Guo, Wei; Leniart, Michael; Chong, Zhuang Zhi; Tan, Say Hwa

    2016-08-01

    We present for the first time an experimental study on the droplet deformation induced by an AC electric field in droplet-based microfluidics. It is found that the deformation of the droplets becomes stronger with increasing electric field intensity and frequency. The measured electric field intensity dependence of the droplet deformation is consistent with an early theoretical prediction for stationary droplets. We also proposed a simple equivalent circuit model to account for the frequency dependence of the droplet deformation. The model well explains our experimental observations. In addition, we found that the droplets can be deformed repeatedly by applying an amplitude modulation (AM) signal. PMID:27173587

  4. Plastic deformation at surface during unlubricated sliding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    The plastic deformation and wear of 304 stainless-steel surface slid against an aluminum oxide rider were observed by using a scanning electron microscope and an optical microscope. Experiments were conducted in a vacuum of 0.000001 Pa and in an environment of 0.0005 Pa chlorine gas at 25 C. The load was 500 grams and the sliding velocity was 0.5 centimeter per second. The deformed surface layer which accumulates and develops successively is left behind the rider, and step-shaped protuberances are developed even after single pass sliding under both environmental conditions. A fully developed surface layer is gradually torn off leaving a characteristic pattern. These observations result from both adhesion and an adhesive wear mechanism.

  5. InSAR and GPS time series analysis: Crustal deformation in the Yucca Mountain, Nevada region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Hammond, W. C.; Blewitt, G.; Kreemer, C. W.; Plag, H.

    2010-12-01

    Several previous studies have successfully demonstrated that long time series (e.g. >5 years) of GPS measurements can be employed to detect tectonic signals with a vertical rate greater than 0.3 mm/yr (e.g. Hill and Blewitt, 2006; Bennett et al. 2009). However, GPS stations are often sparse, with spacing from a few kilometres to a few hundred kilometres. Interferometric SAR (InSAR) can complement GPS by providing high horizontal spatial resolution (e.g. meters to tens-of metres) over large regions (e.g. 100 km × 100 km). A major source of error for repeat-pass InSAR is the phase delay in radio signal propagation through the atmosphere. The portion of this attributable to tropospheric water vapour causes errors as large as 10-20 cm in deformation retrievals. InSAR Time Series analysis with Atmospheric Estimation Models (InSAR TS + AEM), developed at the University of Glasgow, is a robust time series analysis approach, which mainly uses interferograms with small geometric baselines to minimise the effects of decorrelation and inaccuracies in topographic data. In addition, InSAR TS + AEM can be used to separate deformation signals from atmospheric water vapour effects in order to map surface deformation as it evolves in time. The principal purposes of this study are to assess: (1) how consistent InSAR-derived deformation time series are with GPS; and (2) how precise InSAR-derived atmospheric path delays can be. The Yucca Mountain, Nevada region is chosen as the study site because of its excellent GPS network and extensive radar archives (>10 years of dense and high-quality GPS stations, and >17 years of ERS and ENVISAT radar acquisitions), and because of its arid environment. The latter results in coherence that is generally high, even for long periods that span the existing C-band radar archives of ERS and ENVISAT. Preliminary results show that our InSAR LOS deformation map agrees with GPS measurements to within 0.35 mm/yr RMS misfit at the stations which is the

  6. Pass-Fail: How Is It Working?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Clinton I.; And Others

    This study investigates the pass/fail (P/F) grading system. A sample of 154 Indiana University students was interviewed. Half of the group, 77 students, had not taken any P/F courses. Of the remaining 77 students, 42% had taken only one P/F course and most of the rest from two to five courses. Results of the student interview questionnaire…

  7. Battery Cell By-Pass Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mumaw, Susan J. (Inventor); Evers, Jeffrey (Inventor); Craig, Calvin L., Jr. (Inventor); Walker, Stuart D. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The invention is a circuit and method of limiting the charging current voltage from a power supply net work applied to an individual cell of a plurality of cells making up a battery being charged in series. It is particularly designed for use with batteries that can be damaged by overcharging, such as Lithium-ion type batteries. In detail. the method includes the following steps: 1) sensing the actual voltage level of the individual cell; 2) comparing the actual voltage level of the individual cell with a reference value and providing an error signal representative thereof; and 3) by-passing the charging current around individual cell necessary to keep the individual cell voltage level generally equal a specific voltage level while continuing to charge the remaining cells. Preferably this is accomplished by by-passing the charging current around the individual cell if said actual voltage level is above the specific voltage level and allowing the charging current to the individual cell if the actual voltage level is equal or less than the specific voltage level. In the step of bypassing the charging current, the by-passed current is transferred at a proper voltage level to the power supply. The by-pass circuit a voltage comparison circuit is used to compare the actual voltage level of the individual cell with a reference value and to provide an error signal representative thereof. A third circuit, designed to be responsive to the error signal, is provided for maintaining the individual cell voltage level generally equal to the specific voltage level. Circuitry is provided in the third circuit for bypassing charging current around the individual cell if the actual voltage level is above the specific voltage level and transfers the excess charging current to the power supply net work. The circuitry also allows charging of the individual cell if the actual voltage level is equal or less than the specific voltage level.

  8. TE and TM pass integrated optic polarizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madaan, Divya; Kaur, Davinder; Sharma, V. K.; Kapoor, A.

    2016-05-01

    A four layer integrated optical waveguide is studied, in which a high index buffer is used along with the metal cladding. The structure can act both as TE and TM pass polarizer. We have designed it for λ=1.55 µm which corresponds to telecommunication wavelength. TiO2 is used as a buffer layer with Au as metal cladding. When metal clad optical waveguides with a high index buffer layer are used there is periodic coupling between lossless modes of waveguide and the lossy modes supported by high index buffer layer with metal clad. We present theoretical results of the effect of buffer thickness on the mode index and the losses. The TM Pass polarizer with TE and TM losses, 1029.19dB/cm and 59.67dB/cm respectively are obtained. Also, TE Pass polarizer with TM and TE losses 1444.74dB/cm and 238.51dB/cm respectively are obtained.

  9. 7 CFR 29.97 - Who shall pass upon appeals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Who shall pass upon appeals. 29.97 Section 29.97... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Regulations Appeal § 29.97 Who shall pass upon appeals. Appeals shall be passed... shall pass upon an appeal involving the correctness of a certificate issued or sample prepared by him....

  10. The level of detail required in a deformable phantom to accurately perform quality assurance of deformable image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saenz, Daniel L.; Kim, Hojin; Chen, Josephine; Stathakis, Sotirios; Kirby, Neil

    2016-09-01

    The primary purpose of the study was to determine how detailed deformable image registration (DIR) phantoms need to adequately simulate human anatomy and accurately assess the quality of DIR algorithms. In particular, how many distinct tissues are required in a phantom to simulate complex human anatomy? Pelvis and head-and-neck patient CT images were used for this study as virtual phantoms. Two data sets from each site were analyzed. The virtual phantoms were warped to create two pairs consisting of undeformed and deformed images. Otsu’s method was employed to create additional segmented image pairs of n distinct soft tissue CT number ranges (fat, muscle, etc). A realistic noise image was added to each image. Deformations were applied in MIM Software (MIM) and Velocity deformable multi-pass (DMP) and compared with the known warping. Images with more simulated tissue levels exhibit more contrast, enabling more accurate results. Deformation error (magnitude of the vector difference between known and predicted deformation) was used as a metric to evaluate how many CT number gray levels are needed for a phantom to serve as a realistic patient proxy. Stabilization of the mean deformation error was reached by three soft tissue levels for Velocity DMP and MIM, though MIM exhibited a persisting difference in accuracy between the discrete images and the unprocessed image pair. A minimum detail of three levels allows a realistic patient proxy for use with Velocity and MIM deformation algorithms.

  11. The level of detail required in a deformable phantom to accurately perform quality assurance of deformable image registration.

    PubMed

    Saenz, Daniel L; Kim, Hojin; Chen, Josephine; Stathakis, Sotirios; Kirby, Neil

    2016-09-01

    The primary purpose of the study was to determine how detailed deformable image registration (DIR) phantoms need to adequately simulate human anatomy and accurately assess the quality of DIR algorithms. In particular, how many distinct tissues are required in a phantom to simulate complex human anatomy? Pelvis and head-and-neck patient CT images were used for this study as virtual phantoms. Two data sets from each site were analyzed. The virtual phantoms were warped to create two pairs consisting of undeformed and deformed images. Otsu's method was employed to create additional segmented image pairs of n distinct soft tissue CT number ranges (fat, muscle, etc). A realistic noise image was added to each image. Deformations were applied in MIM Software (MIM) and Velocity deformable multi-pass (DMP) and compared with the known warping. Images with more simulated tissue levels exhibit more contrast, enabling more accurate results. Deformation error (magnitude of the vector difference between known and predicted deformation) was used as a metric to evaluate how many CT number gray levels are needed for a phantom to serve as a realistic patient proxy. Stabilization of the mean deformation error was reached by three soft tissue levels for Velocity DMP and MIM, though MIM exhibited a persisting difference in accuracy between the discrete images and the unprocessed image pair. A minimum detail of three levels allows a realistic patient proxy for use with Velocity and MIM deformation algorithms. PMID:27494827

  12. Protein Repeats from First Principles.

    PubMed

    Turjanski, Pablo; Parra, R Gonzalo; Espada, Rocío; Becher, Verónica; Ferreiro, Diego U

    2016-01-01

    Some natural proteins display recurrent structural patterns. Despite being highly similar at the tertiary structure level, repeating patterns within a single repeat protein can be extremely variable at the sequence level. We use a mathematical definition of a repetition and investigate the occurrences of these in sequences of different protein families. We found that long stretches of perfect repetitions are infrequent in individual natural proteins, even for those which are known to fold into structures of recurrent structural motifs. We found that natural repeat proteins are indeed repetitive in their families, exhibiting abundant stretches of 6 amino acids or longer that are perfect repetitions in the reference family. We provide a systematic quantification for this repetitiveness. We show that this form of repetitiveness is not exclusive of repeat proteins, but also occurs in globular domains. A by-product of this work is a fast quantification of the likelihood of a protein to belong to a family. PMID:27044676

  13. Protein Repeats from First Principles

    PubMed Central

    Turjanski, Pablo; Parra, R. Gonzalo; Espada, Rocío; Becher, Verónica; Ferreiro, Diego U.

    2016-01-01

    Some natural proteins display recurrent structural patterns. Despite being highly similar at the tertiary structure level, repeating patterns within a single repeat protein can be extremely variable at the sequence level. We use a mathematical definition of a repetition and investigate the occurrences of these in sequences of different protein families. We found that long stretches of perfect repetitions are infrequent in individual natural proteins, even for those which are known to fold into structures of recurrent structural motifs. We found that natural repeat proteins are indeed repetitive in their families, exhibiting abundant stretches of 6 amino acids or longer that are perfect repetitions in the reference family. We provide a systematic quantification for this repetitiveness. We show that this form of repetitiveness is not exclusive of repeat proteins, but also occurs in globular domains. A by-product of this work is a fast quantification of the likelihood of a protein to belong to a family. PMID:27044676

  14. Protein Repeats from First Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turjanski, Pablo; Parra, R. Gonzalo; Espada, Rocío; Becher, Verónica; Ferreiro, Diego U.

    2016-04-01

    Some natural proteins display recurrent structural patterns. Despite being highly similar at the tertiary structure level, repeating patterns within a single repeat protein can be extremely variable at the sequence level. We use a mathematical definition of a repetition and investigate the occurrences of these in sequences of different protein families. We found that long stretches of perfect repetitions are infrequent in individual natural proteins, even for those which are known to fold into structures of recurrent structural motifs. We found that natural repeat proteins are indeed repetitive in their families, exhibiting abundant stretches of 6 amino acids or longer that are perfect repetitions in the reference family. We provide a systematic quantification for this repetitiveness. We show that this form of repetitiveness is not exclusive of repeat proteins, but also occurs in globular domains. A by-product of this work is a fast quantification of the likelihood of a protein to belong to a family.

  15. The effect of skin passing on the material behavior of metal strip in pure bending and tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Matthias; Ryan, Will; Rolfe, Bernard; Yang, Chunhui

    2010-06-01

    The metal strip used in roll forming has often been preprocessed by (tension or roller) leveling or by skin-pass rolling, and as a consequence, may contain residual stresses. These stresses are not well observed by the tensile test, but could have a significant effect on the bending and springback behavior. With the advent of improved process design techniques for roll forming, including advanced finite element techniques, the need for precise material property data has become important. The major deformation mode of roll forming is that of bending combined with unloading and reverse bending, and hence property data derived from bend tests could be more relevant than that from tensile testing. This work presents a numerical study on the effect of skin passing on the material behavior of stainless steel strip in pure bending and tension. A two dimensional (2-D) numerical model was developed using Abaqus Explicit to analyze the affect of skin passing on the residual stress profile across a section for various working conditions. The deformed meshes and their final stress fields were then imported as pre-defined fields into Abaqus Standard, and the post-skin passing material behavior in pure bending was determined. The results show that a residual stress profile is introduced into the steel strip during skin passing, and that its shape and stress level depend on the overall thickness reduction as well as the number of rolling passes used in the skin passing process. The material behavior in bending and the amount of springback changed significantly depending on the skin pass condition.

  16. 78 FR 25432 - Sabine Pass LNG, L.P., Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC; Notice of Availability of the Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-01

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Sabine Pass LNG, L.P., Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC; Notice of Availability of the Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Sabine Pass Liquefaction Project Modification The... assessment (EA) for the Sabine Pass Liquefaction Project Modification (Modification Project), proposed...

  17. 76 FR 9573 - Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC and Sabine Pass LNG, L.P.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-18

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC and Sabine Pass LNG, L.P.; Notice of Application Take notice that on January 31, 2011, Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC and Sabine Pass LNG, L.P... the Commission's Regulations, to site, construct, and operate liquefaction and export...

  18. Effect of Ball Mass on Dribble, Pass, and Pass Reception in 9-11-Year-Old Boys' Basketball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arias, Jose L.; Argudo, Francisco M.; Alonso, Jose I.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study was to analyze the effect of ball mass on dribble, pass, and pass reception in real game situations in 9-11-year-old boys' basketball. Participants were 54 boys identified from six federated teams. The independent variable was ball mass, and dependent variables were number of dribbles, passes, and pass receptions. Three…

  19. MEMS deformable mirrors for astronomical adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelissen, S. A.; Hartzell, A. L.; Stewart, J. B.; Bifano, T. G.; Bierden, P. A.

    2010-07-01

    We report on the development of high actuator count, micro-electromechanical (MEMS) deformable mirrors designed for high order wavefront correction in ground and space-based astronomical adaptive optics instruments. The design of these polysilicon, surface-micromachined MEMS deformable mirrors builds on technology that has been used extensively to correct for ocular aberrations in retinal imaging systems and for compensation of atmospheric turbulence in free-space laser communication. These light-weight, low power deformable mirrors have an active aperture of up to 25.2mm consisting of a thin silicon membrane mirror supported by an array of 140 to 4092 electrostatic actuators which exhibit no hysteresis and have sub-nanometer repeatability making them well suited for open-loop control applications such as Multi-Object Adaptive Optics (MOAO). The continuous membrane deformable mirrors, coated with a highly reflective metal film, are capable of up to 6μm of stroke, have a surface finish of <10nm RMS with a fill factor of 99.8%. Presented in this paper are device characteristics and performance test results, as well as reliability test data and device lifetime predictions that show that trillions of actuator cycles can be achieved without failures.

  20. Three-dimensional deformation of orthodontic brackets

    PubMed Central

    Melenka, Garrett W; Nobes, David S; Major, Paul W

    2013-01-01

    Braces are used by orthodontists to correct the misalignment of teeth in the mouth. Archwire rotation is a particular procedure used to correct tooth inclination. Wire rotation can result in deformation to the orthodontic brackets, and an orthodontic torque simulator has been designed to examine this wire–bracket interaction. An optical technique has been employed to measure the deformation due to size and geometric constraints of the orthodontic brackets. Images of orthodontic brackets are collected using a stereo microscope and two charge-coupled device cameras, and deformation of orthodontic brackets is measured using a three-dimensional digital image correlation technique. The three-dimensional deformation of orthodontic brackets will be evaluated. The repeatability of the three-dimensional digital image correlation measurement method was evaluated by performing 30 archwire rotation tests using the same bracket and archwire. Finally, five Damon 3MX and five In-Ovation R self-ligating brackets will be compared using this technique to demonstrate the effect of archwire rotation on bracket design. PMID:23762201

  1. Crustal deformation in Great California Earthquake cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Victor C.; Rice, James R.

    1987-01-01

    A model in which coupling is described approximately through a generalized Elsasser model is proposed for computation of the periodic crustal deformation associated with repeated strike-slip earthquakes. The model is found to provide a more realistic physical description of tectonic loading than do simpler kinematic models. Parameters are chosen to model the 1857 and 1906 San Andreas ruptures, and predictions are found to be consistent with data on variations of contemporary surface strain and displacement rates as a function of distance from the 1857 and 1906 rupture traces. Results indicate that the asthenosphere appropriate to describe crustal deformation on the earthquake cycle time scale lies in the lower crust and perhaps the crust-mantle transition zone.

  2. Deformations of 3-algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Figueroa-O'Farrill, Jose Miguel

    2009-11-15

    We phrase deformations of n-Leibniz algebras in terms of the cohomology theory of the associated Leibniz algebra. We do the same for n-Lie algebras and for the metric versions of n-Leibniz and n-Lie algebras. We place particular emphasis on the case of n=3 and explore the deformations of 3-algebras of relevance to three-dimensional superconformal Chern-Simons theories with matter.

  3. Principles of rock deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolas, A.

    1987-01-01

    This text focuses on the recent achievements in the analysis of rock deformation. It gives an analytical presentation of the essential structures in terms of kinetic and dynamic interpretation. The physical properties underlying the interpretation of rock structures are exposed in simple terms. Emphasized in the book are: the role of fluids in rock fracturing; the kinematic analysis of magnetic flow structures; the application of crystalline plasticity to the kinematic and dynamic analysis of the large deformation imprinted in many metamorphic rocks.

  4. Mechanical Behavior of Magnesium Experienced Severe Plastic Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Xing

    This thesis reviewed the development of processing technologies, including forging, rolling, extrusion and equal channel angular pressing (ECAP). Among these technologies, ECAP technology to process pure magnesium was studied. This thesis describes what ECAP technology is and reviews the current research status of ECAP processed pure magnesium. This thesis studied the effects of temperature, passes and post-heat treatment on microstructures and sample hardness. Across each sample, the microstructure was observed. Experiments were conducted at 350°C, 250°C and 200°C to study the microstructure change as a function of temperature. It was found that as the temperature was decreased, the average grain size also decreased. We fixed the temperature at 200°C and used 1 pass, 2 passes, 4 passes and 8 passes to see the microstructure change right after pressing. The microstructure was altered significantly after post heat treatment. The more suitable post heat treatment for samples pressed at 200°C with 8 passes, is 300°C for 40 min with water cooling, by which we can get the smallest average grain size of 11.2 μm. The hardness was higher with more severe deformation, more passes, and lower pressing temperature, which has been increased more than 20% from 7.5HV right after pressing.

  5. Polygonal deformation bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonellini, Marco; Mollema, Pauline Nella

    2015-12-01

    We report for the first time the occurrence of polygonal faults in sandstone, which is compelling given that layer-bound polygonal fault systems have been observed so far only in fine-grained sediments such as clay and chalk. The polygonal faults are shear deformation bands that developed under shallow burial conditions via strain hardening in dm-wide zones. The edges of the polygons are 1-5 m long. The shear deformation bands are organized as conjugate faults along each edge of the polygon and form characteristic horst-like structures. The individual deformation bands have slip magnitudes ranging from a few mm to 1.5 cm; the cumulative average slip magnitude in a zone is up to 10 cm. The deformation bands heaves, in aggregate form, accommodate a small isotropic horizontal extension (strain <0.005). The individual shear deformation bands show abutting T-junctions, veering, curving, and merging where they mechanically interact. Crosscutting relationships are rare. The interactions of the deformation bands are similar to those of mode I opening fractures. The documented fault networks have important implications for evaluating the geometry of km-scale polygonal fault systems in the subsurface, top seal integrity, as well as constraining paleo-tectonic stress regimes.

  6. Statistical variability and confidence intervals for planar dose QA pass rates

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Daniel W.; Nelms, Benjamin E.; Attwood, Kristopher; Kumaraswamy, Lalith; Podgorsak, Matthew B.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The most common metric for comparing measured to calculated dose, such as for pretreatment quality assurance of intensity-modulated photon fields, is a pass rate (%) generated using percent difference (%Diff), distance-to-agreement (DTA), or some combination of the two (e.g., gamma evaluation). For many dosimeters, the grid of analyzed points corresponds to an array with a low areal density of point detectors. In these cases, the pass rates for any given comparison criteria are not absolute but exhibit statistical variability that is a function, in part, on the detector sampling geometry. In this work, the authors analyze the statistics of various methods commonly used to calculate pass rates and propose methods for establishing confidence intervals for pass rates obtained with low-density arrays. Methods: Dose planes were acquired for 25 prostate and 79 head and neck intensity-modulated fields via diode array and electronic portal imaging device (EPID), and matching calculated dose planes were created via a commercial treatment planning system. Pass rates for each dose plane pair (both centered to the beam central axis) were calculated with several common comparison methods: %Diff/DTA composite analysis and gamma evaluation, using absolute dose comparison with both local and global normalization. Specialized software was designed to selectively sample the measured EPID response (very high data density) down to discrete points to simulate low-density measurements. The software was used to realign the simulated detector grid at many simulated positions with respect to the beam central axis, thereby altering the low-density sampled grid. Simulations were repeated with 100 positional iterations using a 1 detector/cm{sup 2} uniform grid, a 2 detector/cm{sup 2} uniform grid, and similar random detector grids. For each simulation, %/DTA composite pass rates were calculated with various %Diff/DTA criteria and for both local and global %Diff normalization

  7. Pass-transistor asynchronous sequential circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, Sterling R.; Maki, Gary K.

    1989-02-01

    Design methods for asynchronous sequential pass-transistor circuits, which result in circuits that are hazard- and critical-race-free and which have added degrees of freedom for the input signals, are discussed. The design procedures are straightforward and easy to implement. Two single-transition-time state assignment methods are presented, and hardware bounds for each are established. A surprising result is that the hardware realizations for each next state variable and output variable is identical for a given flow table. Thus, a state machine with N states and M outputs can be constructed using a single layout replicated N + M times.

  8. Quantum three-pass cryptography protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li; Wu, Ling-An; Liu, Songhao

    2002-09-01

    We present a new kind of quantum cryptography protocol based on Shamir's three-pass protocol of classical cryptography, which allows the transmission of qubits directly and secretly via the aid of an unjammable classical channel. In this protocol we implement the encryption and decryption transformations via rotations on the Poincare sphere of the photons polarization parameters. The key technique is that Bob's encryption rotation must be commutative with Alice s decryption rotation; this means that the axes of these two rotations must be parallel. We also present a security analysis of the protocol under a man-in-the-middle attack.

  9. msg: A Message-Passing Library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roll, J. B.; Mandel, J.

    As the foundation for the SAO MMT Instrument control software, we have developed an ASCII protocol for passing messages between client and server applications. Server interfaces are described as registered commands and published values. Clients may execute these commands and subscribe to published values. The mechanics of exchanging data between the client and server over a TCP/IP socket are handled by the library. The protocol and its implementing libraries have been designed with simplicity in mind. The simplest server can be written in three lines of code. However, we also have used the msg library to build complex systems with dozens of registered commands and hundreds of published values.

  10. Multichannel, Active Low-Pass Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lev, James J.

    1989-01-01

    Multichannel integrated circuits cascaded to obtain matched characteristics. Gain and phase characteristics of channels of multichannel, multistage, active, low-pass filter matched by making filter of cascaded multichannel integrated-circuit operational amplifiers. Concept takes advantage of inherent equality of electrical characteristics of nominally-identical circuit elements made on same integrated-circuit chip. Characteristics of channels vary identically with changes in temperature. If additional matched channels needed, chips containing more than two operational amplifiers apiece (e.g., commercial quad operational amplifliers) used. Concept applicable to variety of equipment requiring matched gain and phase in multiple channels - radar, test instruments, communication circuits, and equipment for electronic countermeasures.

  11. Gene-network inference by message passing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braunstein, A.; Pagnani, A.; Weigt, M.; Zecchina, R.

    2008-01-01

    The inference of gene-regulatory processes from gene-expression data belongs to the major challenges of computational systems biology. Here we address the problem from a statistical-physics perspective and develop a message-passing algorithm which is able to infer sparse, directed and combinatorial regulatory mechanisms. Using the replica technique, the algorithmic performance can be characterized analytically for artificially generated data. The algorithm is applied to genome-wide expression data of baker's yeast under various environmental conditions. We find clear cases of combinatorial control, and enrichment in common functional annotations of regulated genes and their regulators.

  12. Binary classification of items of interest in a repeatable process

    DOEpatents

    Abell, Jeffrey A; Spicer, John Patrick; Wincek, Michael Anthony; Wang, Hui; Chakraborty, Debejyo

    2015-01-06

    A system includes host and learning machines. Each machine has a processor in electrical communication with at least one sensor. Instructions for predicting a binary quality status of an item of interest during a repeatable process are recorded in memory. The binary quality status includes passing and failing binary classes. The learning machine receives signals from the at least one sensor and identifies candidate features. Features are extracted from the candidate features, each more predictive of the binary quality status. The extracted features are mapped to a dimensional space having a number of dimensions proportional to the number of extracted features. The dimensional space includes most of the passing class and excludes at least 90 percent of the failing class. Received signals are compared to the boundaries of the recorded dimensional space to predict, in real time, the binary quality status of a subsequent item of interest.

  13. Fabrication of seamless calandria tubes by cold pilgering route using 3-pass and 2-pass schedules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saibaba, N.

    2008-12-01

    Calandria tube is a large diameter, extremely thin walled zirconium alloy tube which has diameter to wall thickness ratio as high as 90-95. Such tubes are conventionally produced by the 'welded route', which involves extrusion of slabs followed by a series of hot and cold rolling passes, intermediate anneals, press forming of sheets into circular shape and closing the gap by TIG welding. Though pilgering is a well established process for the fabrication of seamless tubes, production of extremely thin walled tubes offers several challenges during pilgering. Nuclear fuel complex (NFC), Hyderabad, has successfully developed a process for the production of Zircaloy-4 calandria tubes by adopting the 'seamless route' which involves hot extrusion of mother blanks followed by three-pass pilgering or two-pass pilgering schedules. This paper deals with standardization of the seamless route processes for fabrication of calandria tubes, comparison between the tubes produced by 2-pass and 3-pass pilgering schedules, role of ultrasonic test charts for control of process parameters, development of new testing methods for burst testing and other properties.

  14. SU-E-J-105: Trusting Dose Deformation and Accumulation for GYN Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Poplawski, L; Li, T; Chino, J; Craciunescu, O

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In brachytherapy, structures surrounding the target have the potential to move between treatments and receive unknown dose. Deformable image registration could overcome challenges through dose accumulation. This study uses two possible deformable dose summation techniques and compares the results to point dose summation currently performed in clinic. Methods: Data for ten patients treated with a Syed template was imported into the MIM software (Cleveland, OH). The deformable registration was applied to structures by masking other image data to a single intensity. The registration flow consisted of the following steps: 1) mask CTs so that each of the structures-of-interest had one unique intensity; 2) perform applicator — based rigid registration; 3) Perform deformable registration; 4) Refine registration by changing local alignments manually; 5) Repeat steps 1 to 3 until desired structure adequately deformed; 5) Transfer each deformed contours to the first CT. The deformed structure accuracy was determined by a dice similarity coefficient (DSC) comparison with the first fraction. Two dose summation techniques were investigated: a deformation and recalculation on the structure; and a dose deformation and accumulation method. Point doses were used as a comparison value. Results: The Syed deformations have DSC ranging from 0.53 to 0.97 and 0.75 and 0.95 for the bladder and rectum, respectively. For the bladder, contour deformation addition ranged from −34.8% to 0.98% and dose deformation accumulation ranged from −35% to 29.3% difference from clinical calculations. For the rectum, contour deformation addition ranged from −5.2% to 16.9% and the dose deformation accumulation ranged from −29.1% to 15.3% change. Conclusion: Deforming dose for summation leads to different volumetric doses than when dose is recalculated on deformed structures, raising concerns about the accuracy of the deformed dose. DSC alone cannot be used to establish the accuracy of a

  15. Resistive Pulse Analysis of Microgel Deformation During Nanopore Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Deric A.; Hendrickson, Grant; Lyon, L. Andrew; White, Henry S.

    2012-01-01

    Deformation of 570-nm radius poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) microgels passing through individual 375- to 915-nm radius nanopores in glass has been investigated by the resistive-pulse method. Particle translocation through nanopores of dimensions smaller than the microgel yields electrical signatures reflecting the dynamics of microgel deformation. Translocation rates, and event duration and peak shape, are functions of the conductivities of microgel and electrolyte. Our results demonstrate that nanopore resistive-pulse methods provide new fundamental insights into microgel permeation through porous membranes.

  16. ABM Drag_Pass Report Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Forest; Gladden, Roy; Khanampornpan, Teerapat

    2008-01-01

    dragREPORT software was developed in parallel with abmREPORT, which is described in the preceding article. Both programs were built on the capabilities created during that process. This tool generates a drag_pass report that summarizes vital information from the MRO aerobreaking drag_pass build process to facilitate both sequence reviews and provide a high-level summarization of the sequence for mission management. The script extracts information from the ENV, SSF, FRF, SCMFmax, and OPTG files, presenting them in a single, easy-to-check report providing the majority of parameters needed for cross check and verification as part of the sequence review process. Prior to dragReport, all the needed information was spread across a number of different files, each in a different format. This software is a Perl script that extracts vital summarization information and build-process details from a number of source files into a single, concise report format used to aid the MPST sequence review process and to provide a high-level summarization of the sequence for mission management reference. This software could be adapted for future aerobraking missions to provide similar reports, review and summarization information.

  17. Experimental Deformation of Magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Till, J. L.; Rybacki, E.; Morales, L. F. G.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetite is an important iron ore mineral and the most prominent Fe-oxide phase in the Earth's crust. The systematic occurrence of magnetite in zones of intense deformation in oceanic core complexes suggests that it may play a role in strain localization in some silicate rocks. We performed a series of high-temperature deformation experiments on synthetic magnetite aggregates and natural single crystals to characterize the rheological behavior of magnetite. As starting material, we used fine-grained magnetite powder that was hot isostatically pressed at 1100°C for several hours, resulting in polycrystalline material with a mean grain size of around 40 μm and containing 3-5% porosity. Samples were deformed to 15-20% axial strain under constant load (approximating constant stress) conditions in a Paterson-type gas apparatus for triaxial deformation at temperatures between 900 and 1100°C and 300 MPa confining pressure. The aggregates exhibit typical power-law creep behavior. At high stresses, samples deformed by dislocation creep exhibit stress exponents close to 3, revealing a transition to near-Newtonian creep with stress exponents around 1.3 at lower stresses. Natural magnetite single crystals deformed at 1 atm pressure and temperatures between 950°C and 1150 °C also exhibit stress exponents close to 3, but with lower flow stresses and a lower apparent activation energy than the aggregates. Such behavior may result from the different oxygen fugacity buffers used. Crystallographic-preferred orientations in all polycrystalline samples are very weak and corroborate numerical models of CPO development, suggesting that texture development in magnetite may be inherently slow compared with lower symmetry phases. Comparison of our results with experimental deformation data for various silicate minerals suggests that magnetite should be weaker than most silicates during ductile creep in dry igneous rocks.

  18. Limitations on quantum key repeaters.

    PubMed

    Bäuml, Stefan; Christandl, Matthias; Horodecki, Karol; Winter, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    A major application of quantum communication is the distribution of entangled particles for use in quantum key distribution. Owing to noise in the communication line, quantum key distribution is, in practice, limited to a distance of a few hundred kilometres, and can only be extended to longer distances by use of a quantum repeater, a device that performs entanglement distillation and quantum teleportation. The existence of noisy entangled states that are undistillable but nevertheless useful for quantum key distribution raises the question of the feasibility of a quantum key repeater, which would work beyond the limits of entanglement distillation, hence possibly tolerating higher noise levels than existing protocols. Here we exhibit fundamental limits on such a device in the form of bounds on the rate at which it may extract secure key. As a consequence, we give examples of states suitable for quantum key distribution but unsuitable for the most general quantum key repeater protocol. PMID:25903096

  19. Hysteresis of magnetostructural transitions: Repeatable and non-repeatable processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provenzano, Virgil; Della Torre, Edward; Bennett, Lawrence H.; ElBidweihy, Hatem

    2014-02-01

    The Gd5Ge2Si2 alloy and the off-stoichiometric Ni50Mn35In15 Heusler alloy belong to a special class of metallic materials that exhibit first-order magnetostructural transitions near room temperature. The magnetic properties of this class of materials have been extensively studied due to their interesting magnetic behavior and their potential for a number of technological applications such as refrigerants for near-room-temperature magnetic refrigeration. The thermally driven first-order transitions in these materials can be field-induced in the reverse order by applying a strong enough field. The field-induced transitions are typically accompanied by the presence of large magnetic hysteresis, the characteristics of which are a complicated function of temperature, field, and magneto-thermal history. In this study we show that the virgin curve, the major loop, and sequentially measured MH loops are the results of both repeatable and non-repeatable processes, in which the starting magnetostructural state, prior to the cycling of field, plays a major role. Using the Gd5Ge2Si2 and Ni50Mn35In15 alloys, as model materials, we show that a starting single phase state results in fully repeatable processes and large magnetic hysteresis, whereas a mixed phase starting state results in non-repeatable processes and smaller hysteresis.

  20. Feasibility study of multi-pass respiratory-gated helical tomotherapy of a moving target via binary MLC closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bryan; Chen, Jeff; Kron, Tomas; Battista, Jerry

    2010-11-01

    Gated radiotherapy of lung lesions is particularly complex for helical tomotherapy, due to the simultaneous motions of its three subsystems (gantry, couch and collimator). We propose a new way to implement gating for helical tomotherapy, namely multi-pass respiratory gating. In this method, gating is achieved by delivering only the beam projections that occur within a respiratory gating window, while blocking the rest of the beam projections by fully closing all collimator leaves. Due to the continuous couch motion, the planned beam projections must be delivered over multiple passes of radiation deliveries. After each pass, the patient couch is reset to its starting position, and the treatment recommences at a different phase of tumour motion to 'fill in' the previously blocked beam projections. The gating process may be repeated until the plan dose is delivered (full gating), or halted after a certain number of passes, with the entire remaining dose delivered in a final pass without gating (partial gating). The feasibility of the full gating approach was first tested for sinusoidal target motion, through experimental measurements with film and computer simulation. The optimal gating parameters for full and partial gating methods were then determined for various fractionation schemes through computer simulation, using a patient respiratory waveform. For sinusoidal motion, the PTV dose deviations of -29 to 5% observed without gating were reduced to range from -1 to 3% for a single fraction, with a 4 pass full gating. For a patient waveform, partial gating required fewer passes than full gating for all fractionation schemes. For a single fraction, the maximum allowed residual motion was only 4 mm, requiring large numbers of passes for both full (12) and partial (7 + 1) gating methods. The number of required passes decreased significantly for 3 and 30 fractions, allowing residual motion up to 7 mm. Overall, the multi-pass gating technique was shown to be a promising

  1. Feasibility study of multi-pass respiratory-gated helical tomotherapy of a moving target via binary MLC closure.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bryan; Chen, Jeff; Kron, Tomas; Battista, Jerry

    2010-11-21

    Gated radiotherapy of lung lesions is particularly complex for helical tomotherapy, due to the simultaneous motions of its three subsystems (gantry, couch and collimator). We propose a new way to implement gating for helical tomotherapy, namely multi-pass respiratory gating. In this method, gating is achieved by delivering only the beam projections that occur within a respiratory gating window, while blocking the rest of the beam projections by fully closing all collimator leaves. Due to the continuous couch motion, the planned beam projections must be delivered over multiple passes of radiation deliveries. After each pass, the patient couch is reset to its starting position, and the treatment recommences at a different phase of tumour motion to 'fill in' the previously blocked beam projections. The gating process may be repeated until the plan dose is delivered (full gating), or halted after a certain number of passes, with the entire remaining dose delivered in a final pass without gating (partial gating). The feasibility of the full gating approach was first tested for sinusoidal target motion, through experimental measurements with film and computer simulation. The optimal gating parameters for full and partial gating methods were then determined for various fractionation schemes through computer simulation, using a patient respiratory waveform. For sinusoidal motion, the PTV dose deviations of -29 to 5% observed without gating were reduced to range from -1 to 3% for a single fraction, with a 4 pass full gating. For a patient waveform, partial gating required fewer passes than full gating for all fractionation schemes. For a single fraction, the maximum allowed residual motion was only 4 mm, requiring large numbers of passes for both full (12) and partial (7 + 1) gating methods. The number of required passes decreased significantly for 3 and 30 fractions, allowing residual motion up to 7 mm. Overall, the multi-pass gating technique was shown to be a promising

  2. Repeating seismic events in China.

    PubMed

    Schaff, David P; Richards, Paul G

    2004-02-20

    About 10% of seismic events in and near China from 1985 to 2000 were repeating events not more than about 1 kilometer from each other. We cross-correlated seismograms from approximately 14,000 earthquakes and explosions and measured relative arrival times to approximately 0.01 second, enabling lateral location precision of about 100 to 300 meters. Such precision is important for seismic hazard studies, earthquake physics, and nuclear test ban verification. Recognition and measurement of repeating signals in archived data and the resulting improvement in location specificity quantifies the inaccuracy of current procedures for picking onset times and locating events. PMID:14976310

  3. Band-pass design optimization of piezoelectric cantilever bimorph energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Long; Williams, Keith A.

    2011-03-01

    Piezoelectric energy harvesting has become a feasible method for powering micro portable electronics and wireless sensor networks by converting ambient vibration energy into electrical energy. As a thumb of rule, it is critical to tune the resonant frequency of the generator to the frequency of the environmental vibrations in order to induce the maximum structural deformation and then the maximum converted electrical energy through piezoelectric effect. However, it is well-known that the ambient vibrations are not usually fixed in only one single frequency and could span over a limited frequency band. In this paper, a band-pass design optimization of piezoelectric cantilever bimorph (PCB) energy harvester is presented based on the system transfer function of the PCB generator presented in a previous literature. For such an energy harvester, a group of PCB with dimensions appropriately selected can be integrated into a band-pass energy harvester working over a limited frequency band if the dimensions of piezoelectric bimorphs and proof masses are appropriately chosen. Further, the finite element analysis (FEA) of such a band-pass energy harvester is performed in ANSYS to validate the theoretical proposal. The result shows that the band-pass design optimization leads to a piezoelectric generator working over a certain frequency band while keeping outputting the relatively stable open-circuit voltage.

  4. Pure laparoscopic hepatectomy as repeat surgery and repeat hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Isetani, Masashi; Morise, Zenichi; Kawabe, Norihiko; Tomishige, Hirokazu; Nagata, Hidetoshi; Kawase, Jin; Arakawa, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess clinical outcomes of laparoscopic hepatectomy (LH) in patients with a history of upper abdominal surgery and repeat hepatectomy. METHODS: This study compared the perioperative courses of patients receiving LH at our institution that had or had not previously undergone upper abdominal surgery. Of the 80 patients who underwent LH, 22 had prior abdominal surgeries, including hepatectomy (n = 12), pancreatectomy (n = 3), cholecystectomy and common bile duct excision (n = 1), splenectomy (n = 1), total gastrectomy (n = 1), colectomy with the involvement of transverse colon (n = 3), and extended hysterectomy with extensive lymph-node dissection up to the upper abdomen (n = 1). Clinical indicators including operating time, blood loss, hospital stay, and morbidity were compared among the groups. RESULTS: Eighteen of the 22 patients who had undergone previous surgery had severe adhesions in the area around the liver. However, there were no conversions to laparotomy in this group. In the 58 patients without a history of upper abdominal surgery, the median operative time was 301 min and blood loss was 150 mL. In patients with upper abdominal surgical history or repeat hepatectomy, the operative times were 351 and 301 min, and blood loss was 100 and 50 mL, respectively. The median postoperative stay was 17, 13 and 12 d for patients with no history of upper abdominal surgery, patients with a history, and patients with repeat hepatectomy, respectively. There were five cases with complications in the group with no surgical history, compared to only one case in the group with a prior history. There were no statistically significant differences in the perioperative results between the groups with and without upper abdominal surgical history, or with repeat hepatectomy. CONCLUSION: LH is feasible and safe in patients with a history of upper abdominal surgery or repeat hepatectomy. PMID:25624731

  5. Bathymetric survey of the nearshore from Belle Pass to Caminada Pass, Louisiana: methods and data report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeWitt, Nancy T.; Flocks, James G.; Hansen, Mark; Kulp, Mark; Reynolds, B.J.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the University of New Orleans (UNO) and the Louisiana Department of Natural Resources (LDNR), conducted a high-resolution, single-beam bathymetric survey along the Louisiana southern coastal zone from Belle Pass to Caminada Pass. The survey consisted of 483 line kilometers of data acquired in July and August of 2005. This report outlines the methodology and provides the data from the survey. Analysis of the data and comparison to a similar bathymetric survey completed in 1989 show significant loss of seafloor and shoreline retreat, which is consistent with previously published estimates of shoreline change in the study area.

  6. Microstructural Evolution During Multi-Pass Friction Stir Processing of a Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, A.; Tewari, A.; Kanjarla, A. K.; Srinivasan, N.; Reddy, G. M.; Zhu, S. M.; Nie, J. F.; Doherty, R. D.; Samajdar, I.

    2016-05-01

    A commercial magnesium alloy was processed through multi-pass and multi-directional (unidirectional, reverse, and transverse tool movements) friction stir processing (FSP). Based on the FSP location, the dominant prior-deformation basal texture was shifted along the arc of a hypothetical ellipse. The patterns of deformation texture developments were captured by viscoplastic self-consistent modeling with appropriate velocity gradients. The simulated textures, however, had two clear deficiencies. The simulations involved shear strains of 0.8 to 1.0, significantly lower than those expected in the FSP. Even at such low shear, the simulated textures were significantly stronger. Microstructural observations also revealed the presence of ultra-fine grains with relatively weak crystallographic texture. Combinations of ultra-fine grain superplasticity followed by grain coarsening were proposed as the possible mechanism for the microstructural evolution during FSP.

  7. Shock wave absorber having a deformable liner

    DOEpatents

    Youngdahl, C.K.; Wiedermann, A.H.; Shin, Y.W.; Kot, C.A.; Ockert, C.E.

    1983-08-26

    This invention discloses a shock wave absorber for a piping system carrying liquid. The absorber has a plastically deformable liner defining the normal flow boundary for an axial segment of the piping system, and a nondeformable housing is spaced outwardly from the liner so as to define a gas-tight space therebetween. The flow capacity of the liner generally corresponds to the flow capacity of the piping system line, but the liner has a noncircular cross section and extends axially of the piping system line a distance between one and twenty times the diameter thereof. Gas pressurizes the gas-tight space equal to the normal liquid pressure in the piping system. The liner has sufficient structural capacity to withstand between one and one-half and two times this normal liquid pressures; but at greater pressures it begins to plastically deform initially with respect to shape to a more circular cross section, and then with respect to material extension by circumferentially stretching the wall of the liner. A high energy shock wave passing through the liner thus plastically deforms the liner radially into the gas space and progressively also as needed in the axial direction of the shock wave to minimize transmission of the shock wave beyond the absorber.

  8. Vaporization of Deforming Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanxing; Chen, Xiaodong; Ma, Dongjun; Yang, Vigor

    2012-11-01

    Droplet deformation is one of the most important factors influencing the evaporation rate. In the present study, high-fidelity numerical simulations of single evaporating droplets with deformation are carried out over a wide range of the Reynolds and Weber numbers. The formulation is based on a complete set of conservation equations for both the liquid and surrounding gas phases. A modified volume-of-fluid (VOF) technique that takes into account heat and mass transfer is used to track the behavior of the liquid/gas interface. Special attention is given to the property conservation, which can be realized by using an iterative algorithm that enforces a divergence constraint in cells containing the interface. The effect of the ambient flow on droplet dynamics and evaporation are investigated systematically. Various underlying mechanisms dictating the droplet characteristics in different deformation regimes are identified. Correlations for the droplet evaporation rate are established in terms of the Reynolds and Weber numbers.

  9. Interfacial Bubble Deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour, Brian; Shabane, Parvis; Cypull, Olivia; Cheng, Shengfeng; Feitosa, Klebert

    Soap bubbles floating at an air-water experience deformations as a result of surface tension and hydrostatic forces. In this experiment, we investigate the nature of such deformations by taking cross-sectional images of bubbles of different volumes. The results show that as their volume increases, bubbles transition from spherical to hemispherical shape. The deformation of the interface also changes with bubble volume with the capillary rise converging to the capillary length as volume increases. The profile of the top and bottom of the bubble and the capillary rise are completely determined by the volume and pressure differences. James Madison University Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4VA Consortium, Research Corporation for Advancement of Science.

  10. Crustal deformation and earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    The manner in which the Earth's surface deforms during the cycle of stress accumulation and release along major faults is investigated. In an investigation of the crustal deformation associated with a thin channel asthenosphere displacements are reduced from those computed for a half space asthenosphere. A previous finding by other workers that displacements are enhanced when flow is confined to a thin channel is based on several invalid approximations. The major predictions of the finite element model are that the near field postseismic displacements and strain rates are less than those for a half space asthenosphere and that the postseismic strain rates at intermediate distances are greater (in magnitude). The finite width of the asthenosphere ceases to have a significant impact on the crustal deformation pattern when its magnitude exceeds about three lithosphere thicknesses.

  11. Three-dimensional surface deformation derived from airborne interferometric UAVSAR: Application to the Slumgullion Landslide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delbridge, Brent G.; Bürgmann, Roland; Fielding, Eric; Hensley, Scott; Schulz, William H.

    2016-05-01

    In order to provide surface geodetic measurements with "landslide-wide" spatial coverage, we develop and validate a method for the characterization of 3-D surface deformation using the unique capabilities of the Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) airborne repeat-pass radar interferometry system. We apply our method at the well-studied Slumgullion Landslide, which is 3.9 km long and moves persistently at rates up to ˜2 cm/day. A comparison with concurrent GPS measurements validates this method and shows that it provides reliable and accurate 3-D surface deformation measurements. The UAVSAR-derived vector velocity field measurements accurately capture the sharp boundaries defining previously identified kinematic units and geomorphic domains within the landslide. We acquired data across the landslide during spring and summer and identify that the landslide moves more slowly during summer except at its head, presumably in response to spatiotemporal variations in snowmelt infiltration. In order to constrain the mechanics controlling landslide motion from surface velocity measurements, we present an inversion framework for the extraction of slide thickness and basal geometry from dense 3-D surface velocity fields. We find that the average depth of the Slumgullion Landslide is 7.5 m, several meters less than previous depth estimates. We show that by considering a viscoplastic rheology, we can derive tighter theoretical bounds on the rheological parameter relating mean horizontal flow rate to surface velocity. Using inclinometer data for slow-moving, clay-rich landslides across the globe, we find a consistent value for the rheological parameter of 0.85 ± 0.08.

  12. Do Twelfths Terminate or Repeat?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambrose, Rebecca; Burnison, Erica

    2015-01-01

    When finding the decimal equivalent of a fraction with 12 in the denominator, will it terminate or repeat? This question came from a seventh grader in author Erica Burnison's class as the student was pondering a poster generated by one of her classmates. Not only was the question intriguing, but it also affirmed the belief in the power of…

  13. CT reconstruction via denoising approximate message passing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perelli, Alessandro; Lexa, Michael A.; Can, Ali; Davies, Mike E.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we adapt and apply a compressed sensing based reconstruction algorithm to the problem of computed tomography reconstruction for luggage inspection. Specifically, we propose a variant of the denoising generalized approximate message passing (D-GAMP) algorithm and compare its performance to the performance of traditional filtered back projection and to a penalized weighted least squares (PWLS) based reconstruction method. D-GAMP is an iterative algorithm that at each iteration estimates the conditional probability of the image given the measurements and employs a non-linear "denoising" function which implicitly imposes an image prior. Results on real baggage show that D-GAMP is well-suited to limited-view acquisitions.

  14. Single-pass ion cyclotron resonance absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Breizman, Boris N.; Arefiev, Alexey V.

    2001-03-01

    The ion response to the rf-field during single-pass ion-cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) can be essentially nonlinear. This paper presents a self-consistent theory of the rf-wave propagation and ion motion through the resonance. An important ingredient of the problem is the ion flow along the magnetic field. The flow velocity limits the time the ions spend at the resonance, which in turn limits the ion energy gain. A feature that makes the problem nonlinear is that the flow accelerates under the effect of the {nabla}B force and rf-pressure. This acceleration can produce a steep decrease in the plasma density at the resonance, resulting in partial reflection of the incident wave.

  15. Down syndrome passed from mother to child.

    PubMed

    Pachajoa, Harry; Riascos, Antonio José; Castro, Diego; Isaza, Carolina; Quintero, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Down syndrome is the leading cause of inherited intellectual disability; it is characterized by mental retardation associated to physical growth delay and certain physical traits or features. It is caused by the presence of a third copy of chromosome 21, being this trisomy the most common chromosomal aneuploidy. Women with Down syndrome are less fertile, and pregnancy in these women is rare, although the information on exact statistics of reproduction in these patients is very limited, and they often have difficulties with miscarriage, premature birth, and difficult labor. We report the case of a preterm newborn with Down syndrome passed from her mother; this pregnancy was a result of sexual assault, which is an event that can and should be prevented in this population. PMID:25504119

  16. 20 CFR 631.18 - Federal by-pass authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Secretary's intent to exercise by-pass authority and an opportunity to request and to receive a hearing.... (c) The Secretary will exercise by-pass authority only until such time as the affected State has...

  17. Two antenna, two pass interferometric synthetic aperture radar

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Ana; Doerry, Armin W.; Bickel, Douglas L.

    2005-06-28

    A multi-antenna, multi-pass IFSAR mode utilizing data driven alignment of multiple independent passes can combine the scaling accuracy of a two-antenna, one-pass IFSAR mode with the height-noise performance of a one-antenna, two-pass IFSAR mode. A two-antenna, two-pass IFSAR mode can accurately estimate the larger antenna baseline from the data itself and reduce height-noise, allowing for more accurate information about target ground position locations and heights. The two-antenna, two-pass IFSAR mode can use coarser IFSAR data to estimate the larger antenna baseline. Multi-pass IFSAR can be extended to more than two (2) passes, thereby allowing true three-dimensional radar imaging from stand-off aircraft and satellite platforms.

  18. Plate motion and deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Minster, B.; Prescott, W.; Royden, L.

    1991-02-01

    Our goal is to understand the motions of the plates, the deformation along their boundaries and within their interiors, and the processes that control these tectonic phenomena. In the broadest terms, we must strive to understand the relationships of regional and local deformation to flow in the upper mantle and the rheological, thermal and density structure of the lithosphere. The essential data sets which we require to reach our goal consist of maps of current strain rates at the earth's surface and the distribution of integrated deformation through time as recorded in the geologic record. Our success will depend on the effective synthesis of crustal kinematics with a variety of other geological and geophysical data, within a quantitative theoretical framework describing processes in the earth's interior. Only in this way can we relate the snapshot of current motions and earth structure provided by geodetic and geophysical data with long-term processes operating on the time scales relevant to most geological processes. The wide-spread use of space-based techniques, coupled with traditional geological and geophysical data, promises a revolution in our understanding of the kinematics and dynamics of plate motions over a broad range of spatial and temporal scales and in a variety of geologic settings. The space-based techniques that best address problems in plate motion and deformation are precise space-geodetic positioning -- on land and on the seafloor -- and satellite acquisition of detailed altimetric and remote sensing data in oceanic and continental areas. The overall science objectives for the NASA Solid Earth Science plan for the 1990's, are to Understand the motion and deformation of the lithosphere within and across plate boundaries'', and to understand the dynamics of the mantle, the structure and evolution of the lithosphere, and the landforms that result from local and regional deformation. 57 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Pentapeptide Repeat Proteins and Cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.

    2009-10-16

    Cyanobacteria are unique in many ways and one unusual feature is the presence of a suite of proteins that contain at least one domain with a minimum of eight tandem repeated five-residues (Rfr) of the general consensus sequence A[N/D]LXX. The function of such pentapeptide repeat proteins (PRPs) are still unknown, however, their prevalence in cyanobacteria suggests that they may play some role in the unique biological activities of cyanobacteria. As part of an inter-disciplinary Membrane Biology Grand Challenge at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) and Washington University in St. Louis, the genome of Cyanothece 51142 was sequenced and its molecular biology studied with relation to circadian rhythms. The genome of Cyanothece encodes for 35 proteins that contain at least one PRP domain. These proteins range in size from 105 (Cce_3102) to 930 (Cce_2929) kDa with the PRP domains ranging in predicted size from 12 (Cce_1545) to 62 (cce_3979) tandem pentapeptide repeats. Transcriptomic studies with 29 out of the 35 genes showed that at least three of the PRPs in Cyanothece 51142 (cce_0029, cce_3083, and cce_3272) oscillated with repeated periods of light and dark, further supporting a biological function for PRPs. Using X-ray diffraction crystallography, the structure for two pentapeptide repeat proteins from Cyanothece 51142 were determined, cce_1272 (aka Rfr32) and cce_4529 (aka Rfr23). Analysis of their molecular structures suggests that all PRP may share the same structural motif, a novel type of right-handed quadrilateral β-helix, or Rfr-fold, reminiscent of a square tower with four distinct faces. Each pentapeptide repeat occupies one face of the Rfr-fold with four consecutive pentapeptide repeats completing a coil that, in turn, stack upon each other to form “protein skyscrapers”. Details of the structural features of the Rfr-fold are reviewed here together with a discussion for the possible role of end

  20. Lobster claw deformity.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Ashish; Agrawal, Rahul; Singh, Rajat; Agrawal, Romi; Agrawal, Seema

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous erythroid colony (EEC) syndrome comprise of three cardinal features, i.e. ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia and cleft lip. EEC itself has three different forms. Ectrodactyly (absence of one or more digits) can be present with clefting in the proximal portion of hand or foot known as split hand foot malformation (SHFM) or lobster claw deformity. SHFM can be of four types depending upon the different responsible chromosomal loci. SHFM-4 can be present as pure limb malformation (non-syndromic form). In this article, describes a rare case report of lobster claw deformity patient. PMID:24992861

  1. Nail Deformities and Injuries.

    PubMed

    Tucker, James Rory J

    2015-12-01

    A variety of nail deformities commonly presents in the primary care office. An understanding of nail anatomy coupled with inspection of the nails at routine office visits can reveal undetected disorders. Some problems are benign, and treatment should be attempted by the primary care provider, such as onychomycosis, paronychia, or ingrown toenails. For conditions such as benign melanonychia, longitudinal ridges, isolated Beau lines, and onycholysis, clinicians may offer reassurance to patients who are concerned about the change in their nails. For deformities such as early pterygium or clubbing, a thorough evaluation and referral to an appropriate specialist may be warranted. PMID:26612379

  2. Nanolaminate deformable mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Papavasiliou, Alexandros P.; Olivier, Scot S.

    2009-04-14

    A deformable mirror formed out of two layers of a nanolaminate foil attached to a stiff substrate is introduced. Deformation is provided by an electrostatic force between two of the layers. The internal stiffness of the structure allows for high-spatial-frequency shapes. The nanolaminate foil of the present invention allows for a high-quality mirror surface. The device achieves high precision in the vertical direction by using foils with accurately controlled thicknesses, but does not require high precision in the lateral dimensions, allowing such mirrors to be fabricated using crude lithography techniques. Such techniques allow structures up to about the meter scale to be fabricated.

  3. Nanolaminate deformable mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Papavasiliou, Alexandros P.; Olivier, Scot S.

    2010-04-06

    A deformable mirror formed out of two layers of a nanolaminate foil attached to a stiff substrate is introduced. Deformation is provided by an electrostatic force between two of the layers. The internal stiffness of the structure allows for high-spatial-frequency shapes. The nanolaminate foil of the present invention allows for a high-quality mirror surface. The device achieves high precision in the vertical direction by using foils with accurately controlled thicknesses, but does not require high precision in the lateral dimensions, allowing such mirrors to be fabricated using crude lithography techniques. Such techniques allow structures up to about the meter scale to be fabricated.

  4. Effects of high-pass and low-pass spatial filtering on face identification.

    PubMed

    Costen, N P; Parker, D M; Craw, I

    1996-05-01

    If face images are degraded by block averaging, there is a nonlinear decline in recognition accuracy as block size increases, suggesting that identification requires a critical minimum range of object spatial frequencies. The identification of faces was measured with equivalent Fourier low-pass filtering and block averaging preserving the same information and with high-pass transformations. In Experiment 1, accuracy declined and response time increased in a significant nonlinear manner in all cases as the spatial-frequency range was reduced. However, it did so at a faster rate for the quantized and high-passed images. A second experiment controlled for the differences in the contrast of the high-pass faces and found a reduced but significant and nonlinear decline in performance as the spatial-frequency range was reduced. These data suggest that face identification is preferentially supported by a band of spatial frequencies of approximately 8-16 cycles per face; contrast or line-based explanations were found to be inadequate. The data are discussed in terms of current models of face identification. PMID:8934690

  5. 75 FR 62690 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Grants Pass, Oregon

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-13

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Grants Pass, Oregon AGENCY: Federal Communications..., allots FM Channel 257A at Grants Pass, Oregon, as the community's second commercial FM transmission service. Channel 257A can be allotted at Grants Pass, consistent with the minimum distance...

  6. 36 CFR 72.37 - Pass-through funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pass-through funding. 72.37... and Innovation § 72.37 Pass-through funding. Section 1006(a)(1) of the Act states that at the... funding assistance on a pass-through basis must work with an applicant jurisdiction in the preparation...

  7. 36 CFR 72.37 - Pass-through funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pass-through funding. 72.37... and Innovation § 72.37 Pass-through funding. Section 1006(a)(1) of the Act states that at the... funding assistance on a pass-through basis must work with an applicant jurisdiction in the preparation...

  8. 36 CFR 72.37 - Pass-through funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pass-through funding. 72.37... and Innovation § 72.37 Pass-through funding. Section 1006(a)(1) of the Act states that at the... funding assistance on a pass-through basis must work with an applicant jurisdiction in the preparation...

  9. 33 CFR 401.42 - Passing hand lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Passing hand lines. 401.42... OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Seaway Navigation § 401.42 Passing hand lines. (a) At locks, hand lines shall be secured to the mooring lines and passed as follows: (1)...

  10. 33 CFR 401.42 - Passing hand lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Passing hand lines. 401.42... OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Seaway Navigation § 401.42 Passing hand lines. (a) At locks, hand lines shall be secured to the mooring lines and passed as follows: (1)...

  11. 33 CFR 401.42 - Passing hand lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Passing hand lines. 401.42... OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Seaway Navigation § 401.42 Passing hand lines. (a) At locks, hand lines shall be secured to the mooring lines and passed as follows: (1)...

  12. 33 CFR 401.42 - Passing hand lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Passing hand lines. 401.42... OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Seaway Navigation § 401.42 Passing hand lines. (a) At locks, hand lines shall be secured to the mooring lines and passed as follows: (1)...

  13. Transfer involving deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, J.O.; Guidry, M.W.; Canto, L.F.

    1985-03-01

    Results are reviewed of 1- and 2-neutron transfer reactions at near-barrier energies for deformed nuclei. Rotational angular momentum and excitation patterns are examined. A strong tendency to populating high spin states within a few MeV of the yrast line is noted, and it is interpreted as preferential transfer to rotation-aligned states. 16 refs., 12 figs.

  14. Deformation twins in Hornblende

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rooney, T.P.; Riecker, R.E.; Ross, M.

    1970-01-01

    Hornblende deformation twins with twin planes parallel to (101) are produced experimentally in single crystals by compression parallel to the c axis. Twinning occurs at confining pressures from 5 to 15 kilobars and temperatures from 400?? to 600??C (strain rate, 10-5 per second).

  15. Degenerative Spinal Deformity.

    PubMed

    Ailon, Tamir; Smith, Justin S; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Lenke, Lawrence G; Brodke, Darrel; Harrop, James S; Fehlings, Michael; Ames, Christopher P

    2015-10-01

    Degenerative spinal deformity afflicts a significant portion of the elderly and is increasing in prevalence. Recent evidence has revealed sagittal plane malalignment to be a key driver of pain and disability in this population and has led to a significant shift toward a more evidence-based management paradigm. In this narrative review, we review the recent literature on the epidemiology, evaluation, management, and outcomes of degenerative adult spinal deformity (ASD). ASD is increasing in prevalence in North America due to an aging population and demographic shifts. It results from cumulative degenerative changes focused in the intervertebral discs and facet joints that occur asymmetrically to produce deformity. Deformity correction focuses on restoration of global alignment, especially in the sagittal plane, and decompression of the neural elements. General realignment goals have been established, including sagittal vertical axis <50 mm, pelvic tilt <22°, and lumbopelvic mismatch <±9°; however, these should be tailored to the patient. Operative management, in carefully selected patients, yields satisfactory outcomes that appear to be superior to nonoperative strategies. ASD is characterized by malalignment in the sagittal and/or coronal plane and, in adults, presents with pain and disability. Nonoperative management is recommended for patients with mild, nonprogressive symptoms; however, evidence of its efficacy is limited. Surgery aims to restore global spinal alignment, decompress neural elements, and achieve fusion with minimal complications. The surgical approach should balance the desired correction with the increased risk of more aggressive maneuvers. In well-selected patients, surgery yields excellent outcomes. PMID:26378361

  16. MEMS Actuated Deformable Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Papavasiliou, A; Olivier, S; Barbee, T; Walton, C; Cohn, M

    2005-11-10

    This ongoing work concerns the creation of a deformable mirror by the integration of MEMS actuators with Nanolaminate foils through metal compression boning. These mirrors will use the advantages of these disparate technologies to achieve dense actuation of a high-quality, continuous mirror surface. They will enable advanced adaptive optics systems in large terrestrial telescopes. While MEMS actuators provide very dense actuation with high precision they can not provide large forces typically necessary to deform conventional mirror surfaces. Nanolaminate foils can be fabricated with very high surface quality while their extraordinary mechanical properties enable very thin, flexible foils to survive the rigors of fabrication. Precise metal compression bonding allows the attachment of the fragile MEMS actuators to the thin nanolaminate foils without creating distortions at the bond sites. This paper will describe work in four major areas: (1) modeling and design, (2) bonding development, (3) nanolaminate foil development, (4) producing a prototype. A first-principles analytical model was created and used to determine the design parameters. A method of bonding was determined that is both strong, and minimizes the localized deformation or print through. Work has also been done to produce nanolaminate foils that are sufficiently thin, flexible and flat to be deformed by the MEMS actuators. Finally a prototype was produced by bonding thin, flexible nanolaminate foils to commercially available MEMS actuators.

  17. Design of the polarization multi-pass Thomson scattering system

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuhara, R.; Yamada, I.; Kawahata, K.; Funaba, H.; Yoshikawa, M.; Morimoto, M.; Shima, Y.; Kohagura, J.; Sakamoto, M.; Nakashima, Y.; Imai, T.; Minami, T.

    2012-10-15

    A novel configuration of the multi-pass Thomson scattering (TS) system is proposed to improve the time resolution and accuracy of electron temperature measurements by use of a polarization control technique. This configuration can realize a perfect coaxial multi-passing at each pass, and the number of round trips is not limited by the optical configuration. To confirm the feasibility of the new method, we installed this system in the GAMMA 10 plasma system. As a result, the integrated scattering signal of the double-pass configuration is about two times larger than that of the single-pass configuration. These results are in good agreement with the design.

  18. Astor Pass Seismic Surveys Preliminary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Louie, John; Pullammanappallil, Satish; Faulds, James; Eisses, Amy; Kell, Annie; Frary, Roxanna; Kent, Graham

    2011-08-05

    In collaboration with the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe (PLPT), the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) and Optim re-processed, or collected and processed, over 24 miles of 2d seismic-reflection data near the northwest corner of Pyramid Lake, Nevada. The network of 2d land surveys achieved a near-3d density at the Astor Pass geothermal prospect that the PLPT drilled during Nov. 2010 to Feb. 2011. The Bureau of Indian Affairs funded additional seismic work around the Lake, and an extensive, detailed single-channel marine survey producing more than 300 miles of section, imaging more than 120 ft below the Lake bottom. Optim’s land data collection utilized multiple heavy vibrators and recorded over 200 channels live, providing a state-of-the-art reflection-refraction data set. After advanced seismic analysis including first-arrival velocity optimization and prestack depth migration, the 2d sections show clear fault-plane reflections, in some areas as deep as 4000 ft, tying to distinct terminations of the mostly volcanic stratigraphy. Some lines achieved velocity control to 3000 ft depth; all lines show reflections and terminations to 5000 ft depth. Three separate sets of normal faults appear in an initial interpretation of fault reflections and stratigraphic terminations, after loading the data into the OpendTect 3d seismic visualization system. Each preliminary fault set includes a continuous trace more than 3000 ft long, and a swarm of short fault strands. The three preliminary normal-fault sets strike northerly with westward dip, northwesterly with northeast dip, and easterly with north dip. An intersection of all three fault systems documented in the seismic sections at the end of Phase I helped to locate the APS-2 and APS-3 slimholes. The seismic sections do not show the faults connected to the Astor Pass tufa spire, suggesting that we have imaged mostly Tertiary-aged faults. We hypothesize that the Recent, active faults that produced the tufa through hotspring

  19. Multi-Pass Quadrupole Mass Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of the composition of planetary atmospheres is one of the most important and fundamental measurements in planetary robotic exploration. Quadrupole mass analyzers (QMAs) are the primary tool used to execute these investigations, but reductions in size of these instruments has sacrificed mass resolving power so that the best present-day QMA devices are still large, expensive, and do not deliver performance of laboratory instruments. An ultra-high-resolution QMA was developed to resolve N2 +/CO+ by trapping ions in a linear trap quadrupole filter. Because N2 and CO are resolved, gas chromatography columns used to separate species before analysis are eliminated, greatly simplifying gas analysis instrumentation. For highest performance, the ion trap mode is used. High-resolution (or narrow-band) mass selection is carried out in the central region, but near the DC electrodes at each end, RF/DC field settings are adjusted to allow broadband ion passage. This is to prevent ion loss during ion reflection at each end. Ions are created inside the trap so that low-energy particles are selected by low-voltage settings on the end electrodes. This is beneficial to good mass resolution since low-energy particles traverse many cycles of the RF filtering fields. Through Monte Carlo simulations, it is shown that ions are reflected at each end many tens of times, each time being sent back through the central section of the quadrupole where ultrahigh mass filtering is carried out. An analyzer was produced with electrical length orders of magnitude longer than its physical length. Since the selector fields are sized as in conventional devices, the loss of sensitivity inherent in miniaturizing quadrupole instruments is avoided. The no-loss, multi-pass QMA architecture will improve mass resolution of planetary QMA instruments while reducing demands on the RF electronics for high-voltage/high-frequency production since ion transit time is no longer limited to a single pass. The

  20. 77 FR 277 - Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC and Sabine Pass LNG, L.P; Notice of Availability of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC and Sabine Pass LNG, L.P; Notice of Availability of the Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Sabine Pass Liquefaction Project The staff of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission...

  1. Observations of Soft Gamma Repeaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2004-01-01

    Magnetars (Soft Gamma Repeaters and Anomalous X-ray Pulsars) are a subclass of neutron stars characterized by their recurrent X-ray bursts. While in an active (bursting) state (lasting anywhere between days and years), they are emit&ng hundreds of predominantly soft (kT=30 kev), short (0.1-100 ms long) events. Their quiescent source x-ray light ewes exhibit puhlions rotational period rate changes (spin-down) indicate that their magnetic fields are extremely high, of the order of 10^14- 10^l5 G. Such high B-field objects, dubbed "magnetars", had been predicted to exist in 1992, but the first concrete observational evidence were obtained in 1998 for two of these sources. I will discuss here the history of Soft Gamma Repeaters, and their spectral, timing and flux characteristics both in the persistent and their burst emission.

  2. Repeated mobility testing for later artificial visual function evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velikay-Parel, M.; Ivastinovic, D.; Koch, M.; Hornig, R.; Dagnelie, G.; Richard, G.; Langmann, A.

    2007-03-01

    The study investigates the utility of a newly designed mobility test for repeated testing of visual function in patients with severe visual impairment and future application in evaluating functional progress in patients with artificial vision. Ten subjects divided into three groups based on visual acuity (VA) ranging from light perception to 20/200 and reduced visual field (VF) were included in the study. The mobility test consisted of using a set of four different but structurally similar and relatively short mazes having a constant number of obstacles of various sizes. The subjects, divided into three groups by acuity, passed through each course several times. In general, the patients with better VA had a larger extent of VF. Average speed and number of contacts were recorded as measures of performance. The average passing times of the groups through the courses were significantly different (p = 0.03), which was influenced by VA and VF. There was no significant difference in average number of contacts between the groups (p = 0.15). The mobility test proved to be appropriate for gaining statistically relevant results in repeated individual testing of patients with severe vision impairment. Results show promise for use this mobility test as a tool for assessing visual function of patients undergoing implantation of a visual prosthesis for artificial vision.

  3. A repeating fast radio burst.

    PubMed

    Spitler, L G; Scholz, P; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-03-10

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star. PMID:26934226

  4. A repeating fast radio burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitler, L. G.; Scholz, P.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J.; Ferdman, R. D.; Freire, P. C. C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Lazarus, P.; Lynch, R.; Madsen, E. C.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Patel, C.; Ransom, S. M.; Seymour, A.; Stairs, I. H.; Stappers, B. W.; van Leeuwen, J.; Zhu, W. W.

    2016-03-01

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star.

  5. Deformation of human erythrocytes in a centrifugal field.

    PubMed Central

    Corry, W D; Meiselman, H J

    1978-01-01

    A new method for altering red cell morphology by high-speed centrifugation of cells through a physiological medium is described. Cell shape is preserved for microscopic analysis by allowing the sedimenting cells to pass from the physiological medium into a glutaraldehyde fixative solution. Examination of the deformed, fixed cells indicates that the vast majority resemble spheres with a flat, triangular tail. Measurements of the overall length of deformed cells show a nearly linear relationship between cell length and centrifugal force; average cell length increased from 8 to 11 micrometer as the centrifugal field was increased from 2,000 to 15,000 g. These data suggest that this centrifugal technique may be useful for evaluating cellular deformability and, potentially, the material properties of red cells. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 PMID:413592

  6. How My Program Passed the Turing Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphrys, Mark

    In 1989, the author put an ELIZA-like chatbot on the Internet. The conversations this program had can be seen - depending on how one defines the rules (and how seriously one takes the idea of the test itself) - as a passing of the Turing Test. This is the first time this event has been properly written. This chatbot succeeded due to profanity, relentless aggression, prurient queries about the user, and implying that they were a liar when they responded. The element of surprise was also crucial. Most chatbots exist in an environment where people expectto find some bots among the humans. Not this one. What was also novel was the onlineelement. This was certainly one of the first AI programs online. It seems to have been the first (a) AI real-time chat program, which (b) had the element of surprise, and (c) was on the Internet. We conclude with some speculation that the future of all of AI is on the Internet, and a description of the "World- Wide-Mind" project that aims to bring this about.

  7. Iterative pass optimization of sequence data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Ward C.

    2003-01-01

    The problem of determining the minimum-cost hypothetical ancestral sequences for a given cladogram is known to be NP-complete. This "tree alignment" problem has motivated the considerable effort placed in multiple sequence alignment procedures. Wheeler in 1996 proposed a heuristic method, direct optimization, to calculate cladogram costs without the intervention of multiple sequence alignment. This method, though more efficient in time and more effective in cladogram length than many alignment-based procedures, greedily optimizes nodes based on descendent information only. In their proposal of an exact multiple alignment solution, Sankoff et al. in 1976 described a heuristic procedure--the iterative improvement method--to create alignments at internal nodes by solving a series of median problems. The combination of a three-sequence direct optimization with iterative improvement and a branch-length-based cladogram cost procedure, provides an algorithm that frequently results in superior (i.e., lower) cladogram costs. This iterative pass optimization is both computation and memory intensive, but economies can be made to reduce this burden. An example in arthropod systematics is discussed. c2003 The Willi Hennig Society. Published by Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  8. Iterative pass optimization of sequence data.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Ward C

    2003-06-01

    The problem of determining the minimum-cost hypothetical ancestral sequences for a given cladogram is known to be NP-complete. This "tree alignment" problem has motivated the considerable effort placed in multiple sequence alignment procedures. Wheeler in 1996 proposed a heuristic method, direct optimization, to calculate cladogram costs without the intervention of multiple sequence alignment. This method, though more efficient in time and more effective in cladogram length than many alignment-based procedures, greedily optimizes nodes based on descendent information only. In their proposal of an exact multiple alignment solution, Sankoff et al. in 1976 described a heuristic procedure--the iterative improvement method--to create alignments at internal nodes by solving a series of median problems. The combination of a three-sequence direct optimization with iterative improvement and a branch-length-based cladogram cost procedure, provides an algorithm that frequently results in superior (i.e., lower) cladogram costs. This iterative pass optimization is both computation and memory intensive, but economies can be made to reduce this burden. An example in arthropod systematics is discussed. PMID:12901382

  9. Tracking particles by passing messages between images

    SciTech Connect

    Chertkov, Michael; Kroc, Lukas; Zdeborova, Lenka; Krakala, Florent; Vergassola, M

    2009-01-01

    Methods to extract information from the tracking of mobile objects/particles have broad interest in biological and physical sciences. Techniques based on the simple criterion of proximity in time-consecutive snapshots are useful to identify the trajectories of the particles. However, they become problematic as the motility and/or the density of the particles increases because of the uncertainties on the trajectories that particles have followed during the acquisition time of the images. Here, we report efficient methods for learning parameters of the dynamics of the particles from their positions in time-consecutive images. Our algorithm belongs to the class of message-passing algorithms, also known in computer science, information theory and statistical physics under the name of Belief Propagation (BP). The algorithm is distributed, thus allowing parallel implementation suitable for computations on multiple machines without significant inter-machine overhead. We test our method on the model example of particle tracking in turbulent flows, which is particularly challenging due to the strong transport that those flows produce. Our numerical experiments show that the BP algorithm compares in quality with exact Markov Chain Monte-Carlo algorithms, yet BP is far superior in speed. We also suggest and analyze a random-distance model that provides theoretical justification for BP accuracy. Methods developed here systematically formulate the problem of particle tracking and provide fast and reliable tools for its extensive range of applications.

  10. Operator pencil passing through a given operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggs, A.; Khudaverdian, H. M.

    2013-12-01

    Let Δ be a linear differential operator acting on the space of densities of a given weight λ0 on a manifold M. One can consider a pencil of operators {widehat{Pi }}(Δ )=lbrace Δ _{λ }rbrace passing through the operator Δ such that any Δλ is a linear differential operator acting on densities of weight λ. This pencil can be identified with a linear differential operator widehat{Δ } acting on the algebra of densities of all weights. The existence of an invariant scalar product in the algebra of densities implies a natural decomposition of operators, i.e., pencils of self-adjoint and anti-self-adjoint operators. We study lifting maps that are on one hand equivariant with respect to divergenceless vector fields, and, on the other hand, with values in self-adjoint or anti-self-adjoint operators. In particular, we analyze the relation between these two concepts, and apply it to the study of diff (M)-equivariant liftings. Finally, we briefly consider the case of liftings equivariant with respect to the algebra of projective transformations and describe all regular self-adjoint and anti-self-adjoint liftings. Our constructions can be considered as a generalisation of equivariant quantisation.