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Sample records for repeated opioid administration

  1. Population Pharmacokinetic Modeling After Repeated Administrations of RBP-6000, a New, Subcutaneously Injectable, Long-Acting, Sustained-Release Formulation of Buprenorphine, for the Treatment of Opioid Use Disorder.

    PubMed

    Laffont, Celine M; Gomeni, Roberto; Heidbreder, Christian; Jones, J P; Nasser, Azmi F

    2016-07-01

    RBP-6000 is a novel sustained-release formulation of buprenorphine for the treatment of opioid use disorder, which has been designed for once-monthly (28 days) subcutaneous (SC) injections. A population pharmacokinetic (PK) model was developed to describe the time course of buprenorphine plasma concentrations after repeated SC injections of RBP-6000 at 50 mg, 100 mg, 200 mg, or 300 mg in treatment-seeking opioid-dependent subjects previously on sublingual buprenorphine (Subutex(®) ) treatment. The μ-opioid receptor occupancy was predicted using a previously developed PK/PD Emax model. The results of the population PK analysis jointly with the predicted level of μ-opioid receptor occupancy provided quantitative criteria for clinical dose selection for RBP-6000: the dose of 300 mg every 28 days seems appropriate for immediately achieving an effective exposure after the first SC injection and to maintain effective levels of exposure during chronic treatment. Furthermore, simulations conducted to evaluate the potential impact of a holiday in drug intake indicated that in the unexpected event of a 2-week holiday, levels of μ-opioid receptor occupancy remained consistently above 70% with no significant loss of drug efficacy. This analysis indicated that RBP-6000 has the potential for becoming an effective treatment for opioid-dependent subjects by addressing compliance issues associated with the current once-a-day treatments. PMID:26479717

  2. A history of neuraxial administration of local analgesics and opioids.

    PubMed

    Brill, S; Gurman, G M; Fisher, A

    2003-09-01

    The history of intrathecal and epidural anaesthesia is in parallel with the development of general anaesthesia. As ether anaesthesia (1846) is considered the first modern anaesthetic since its use by Morton 157 yr ago, so Bier made history by using cocaine for intrathecal anaesthesia in 1898. The first published report on opioids for intrathecal anaesthesia belongs to a Romanian surgeon, Racoviceanu-Pitesti, who presented his experience at Paris in 1901. It was almost a century before the opioids were used for epidural analgesia. Behar and his colleagues published the first report on the epidural use of morphine for the treatment of pain in The Lancet in 1979. Epidural and intrathecal opioids are today part of a routine regimen for intra- and postoperative analgesia. Over the last 30 yr, the use of epidural opioids has became a standard for analgesia in labour and delivery, and for the management of chronic pain. Finally, epidural opioids have been shown to have a pre-emptive effect, when used before major surgery. We present the evolution of neuraxial anaesthesia and the history of intrathecal and epidural administration of opioids. PMID:12974588

  3. Prolonged central mu-opioid receptor occupancy after single and repeated nalmefene dosing.

    PubMed

    Ingman, Kimmo; Hagelberg, Nora; Aalto, Sargo; Någren, Kjell; Juhakoski, Auni; Karhuvaara, Sakari; Kallio, Antero; Oikonen, Vesa; Hietala, Jarmo; Scheinin, Harry

    2005-12-01

    The opioid antagonist nalmefene offers an alternative to traditional pharmacological treatments for alcoholism. The present study was designed to investigate the relationship between nalmefene plasma concentration and central mu-opioid receptor occupancy after a clinically effective dose (20 mg, orally). Pharmacokinetics and mu-opioid receptor occupancy of nalmefene after single and repeated dosing over 7 days was studied in 12 healthy subjects. Serial blood samples were obtained after both dosings, and pharmacokinetic parameters for nalmefene and main metabolites were determined. Central mu-opioid receptor occupancy of nalmefene was measured with positron emission tomography (PET) and [(11)C]carfentanil at four time points (3, 26, 50, 74 h) after both dosings. Nalmefene was rapidly absorbed in all subjects. The mean t(1/2) of nalmefene was 13.4 h after single and repeated dosing. The accumulation of nalmefene and its main metabolites in plasma during the repeated dosing period was as expected for a drug with linear pharmacokinetics, and steady-state was reached for all analytes. Both nalmefene dosings resulted in a very high occupancy at mu-opioid receptors (87-100%), and the decline in the occupancy was similar after both dosings but clearly slower than the decline in the plasma concentration of nalmefene or metabolites. High nalmefene occupancy (83-100%) persisted at 26 h after the dosings. The prolonged mu-opioid receptor occupancy by nalmefene indicates slow dissociation of the drug from mu-opioid receptors. These results support the rational of administering nalmefene when needed before alcohol drinking, and they additionally suggest that a high mu-opioid receptor occupancy can be maintained when nalmefene is taken once daily. PMID:15956985

  4. Inflammatory Pain Promotes Increased Opioid Self-Administration: Role of Dysregulated Ventral Tegmental Area μ Opioid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Hipólito, Lucia; Wilson-Poe, Adrianne; Campos-Jurado, Yolanda; Zhong, Elaine; Gonzalez-Romero, Jose; Virag, Laszlo; Whittington, Robert; Comer, Sandra D.; Carlton, Susan M.; Walker, Brendan M.; Bruchas, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Pain management in opioid abusers engenders ethical and practical difficulties for clinicians, often resulting in pain mismanagement. Although chronic opioid administration may alter pain states, the presence of pain itself may alter the propensity to self-administer opioids, and previous history of drug abuse comorbid with chronic pain promotes higher rates of opioid misuse. Here, we tested the hypothesis that inflammatory pain leads to increased heroin self-administration resulting from altered mu opioid receptor (MOR) regulation of mesolimbic dopamine (DA) transmission. To this end, the complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) model of inflammation was used to assess the neurochemical and functional changes induced by inflammatory pain on MOR-mediated mesolimbic DA transmission and on rat intravenous heroin self-administration under fixed ratio (FR) and progressive ratio (PR) schedules of reinforcement. In the presence of inflammatory pain, heroin intake under an FR schedule was increased for high, but attenuated for low, heroin doses with concomitant alterations in mesolimbic MOR function suggested by DA microdialysis. Consistent with the reduction in low dose FR heroin self-administration, inflammatory pain reduced motivation for a low dose of heroin, as measured by responding under a PR schedule of reinforcement, an effect dissociable from high heroin dose PR responding. Together, these results identify a connection between inflammatory pain and loss of MOR function in the mesolimbic dopaminergic pathway that increases intake of high doses of heroin. These findings suggest that pain-induced loss of MOR function in the mesolimbic pathway may promote opioid dose escalation and contribute to opioid abuse-associated phenotypes. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This study provides critical new insights that show that inflammatory pain alters heroin intake through a desensitization of MORs located within the VTA. These findings expand our knowledge of the interactions between

  5. Alternate Routes of Administration among Prescription Opioid Misusers and Associations with Sexual HIV Transmission Risk Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Buttram, Mance E; Kurtz, Steven P

    2016-01-01

    Literature suggests that young adult prescription opioid misusers who are using alternate routes of administration (e.g., snorting, injecting) may be engaging in sexual and non-sexual HIV risk behaviors. This study examines demographics, substance use, sexual risk behavior, and health and social problems associated with alternate routes of administration of prescription opioids among a sample of young adult prescription opioid misusers. Data are drawn from baseline assessments from a behavioral intervention trial. Eligible participants were ages 18-39, and reported recent (past 90 days) heterosexual sex, and recent and regular substance use and attendance at large, recognized local nightclubs. The analyses include 446 racially/ethnically diverse participants. In bivariate regression models, compared to those who did not, participants reporting alternate routes of administration (n = 209) were more likely to be White (p < 0.025) and report group sex participation history (p = 0.002), sex with an injection drug user (p = 0.003), sexual victimization history (p = 0.003), and severe mental distress (p < 0.000). White race, group sex participation history, and severe mental distress remained significant in the multivariate model. Alternate routes of administration of prescription opioids are associated with sexual HIV transmission risk behaviors. Early prevention and intervention efforts that address sexual and non-sexual HIV risk behaviors are warranted. PMID:27224253

  6. Opioid and adjuvant analgesics: compared and contrasted.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammed Ilyas Ahmed; Walsh, Declan; Brito-Dellan, Norman

    2011-08-01

    AAs (1-2 days). Rotation among opioids is a useful therapeutic strategy to improve analgesic response or minimize toxicity. Most AAs are unsuitable for rescue dosing because of their pharmacological characteristics. The mu agonist side effect profile is similar among the different opioid agents, regardless of the route of administration. The appropriate use of AAs will reduce opioid-related side effects. No apparent tolerance to analgesia develops with AAs. Abrupt discontinuation of an opioid after chronic repeated use for more than a few days will cause a withdrawal syndrome of variable severity. Adjuvant analgesics are an essential tool in cancer pain. PMID:21622486

  7. Preprodynorphin mediates locomotion and D2 dopamine and mu-opioid receptor changes induced by chronic 'binge' cocaine administration.

    PubMed

    Bailey, A; Yoo, J H; Racz, I; Zimmer, A; Kitchen, I

    2007-09-01

    Evidence suggests that the kappa-opioid receptor (KOP-r) system plays an important role in cocaine addiction. Indeed, cocaine induces endogenous KOP activity, which is a mechanism that opposes alterations in behaviour and brain function resulting from repeated cocaine use. In this study, we have examined the influence of deletion of preprodynorphin (ppDYN) on cocaine-induced behavioural effects and on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity. Furthermore, we have measured mu-opioid receptor (MOP-r) agonist-stimulated [(35)S]GTPgammaS, dopamine D(1), D(2) receptor and dopamine transporter (DAT) binding. Male wild-type (WT) and ppDYN knockout (KO) mice were injected with saline or cocaine (45 mg/kg/day) in a 'binge' administration paradigm for 14 days. Chronic cocaine produced an enhancement of locomotor sensitisation in KO. No genotype effect was found on stereotypy behaviour. Cocaine-enhanced MOP-r activation in WT but not in KO. There was an overall decrease in D(2) receptor binding in cocaine-treated KO but not in WT mice. No changes were observed in D(1) and DAT binding. Cocaine increased plasma corticosterone levels in WT but not in KO. The data confirms that the endogenous KOP system inhibits dopamine neurotransmission and that ppDYN may mediate the enhancement of MOP-r activity and the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis after chronic cocaine treatment. PMID:17532787

  8. Perspectives on opioid tolerance from basic research: behavioural studies after spinal administration in rodents.

    PubMed

    Stevens, C W

    1994-01-01

    For tolerance development studies, computer modelling and statistical tests suggested that the equation which best described the decrement of analgesic effect was best served by an exponential decay function. Further analysis of the time course data led to the tentative conclusion that all groups of animals became tolerant at the same rate, regardless of drug or dose. A literature search revealed then, as it does now, that although there are many statements regarding the rate of opioid tolerance, there has been little systematic investigation of this. The Holy Grail of obtaining the rates of tolerance for a number of opioid agents in a systematic study is well within grasp. This information will be needed in clinical practice for the rational choice of opioid with regard to rate of the development of tolerance. The working hypothesis that emerges for the magnitude of opioid tolerance is that more potent agonists produce less tolerance. Further confirmation of this hypothesis has been forthcoming. This suggests that clinical use of more potent opioids, such as fentanyl, should be considered as a substitute for morphine in long term treatment regimens. The working hypothesis for cross-tolerance is that agents acting on the same receptors will show cross-tolerance. Cross-tolerance will also be observed among agents acting on different receptors, but only those that exhibit pharmacological synergy after short term administration. Asymmetry of cross-tolerance can occur, as the magnitude of this cross-tolerance is determined by the relative potency of the toleragen with regard to that of the probe agent. Given the additional factor of receptor selectivity with agents of different receptor classes, types and subtypes, new studies need to be designed combining the toleragen with a selective antagonist to determine the precise receptor mediation of the magnitude of tolerance, and thus cross-tolerance. For example, the delta opioid DADLE infused with a mu selective opioid

  9. Effects of fentanyl administration on locomotor response in horses with the G57C μ-opioid receptor polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Wetmore, Lois A; Pascoe, Peter J; Shilo-Benjamini, Yael; Lindsey, Jane C

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the locomotor response to the administration of fentanyl in horses with and without the G57C polymorphism of the μ-opioid receptor. ANIMALS 20 horses of various breeds and ages (10 horses heterozygous for the G57C polymorphism and 10 age-, breed-, and sex-matched horses that did not have the G57C polymorphism). PROCEDURES The number of steps each horse took was counted over consecutive 2-minute periods for 20 minutes to determine a baseline value. The horse then received a bolus of fentanyl (20 μg/kg, IV), and the number of steps was again counted during consecutive 2-minute periods for 60 minutes. The mean baseline value was subtracted from each 2-minute period after fentanyl administration; step counts with negative values were assigned a value of 0. Data were analyzed by use of a repeated-measures ANOVA. RESULTS Data for 19 of 20 horses (10 horses with the G57C polymorphism and 9 control horses without the G57C polymorphism) were included in the analysis. Horses with the G57C polymorphism had a significant increase in locomotor activity, compared with results for horses without the polymorphism. There was a significant group-by-time interaction. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Horses heterozygous for the G57C polymorphism of the μ-opioid receptor had an increased locomotor response to fentanyl administration, compared with the response for horses without this polymorphism. The clinical impact of this finding should be investigated. PMID:27463545

  10. Abuse risks and routes of administration of different prescription opioid compounds and formulations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Evaluation of tamper resistant formulations (TRFs) and classwide Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies (REMS) for prescription opioid analgesics will require baseline descriptions of abuse patterns of existing opioid analgesics, including the relative risk of abuse of existing prescription opioids and characteristic patterns of abuse by alternate routes of administration (ROAs). This article presents, for one population at high risk for abuse of prescription opioids, the unadjusted relative risk of abuse of hydrocodone, immediate release (IR) and extended release (ER) oxycodone, methadone, IR and ER morphine, hydromorphone, IR and ER fentanyl, IR and ER oxymorphone. How relative risks change when adjusted for prescription volume of the products was examined along with patterns of abuse via ROAs for the products. Methods Using data on prescription opioid abuse and ROAs used from 2009 Addiction Severity Index-Multimedia Version (ASI-MV®) Connect assessments of 59,792 patients entering treatment for substance use disorders at 464 treatment facilities in 34 states and prescription volume data from SDI Health LLC, unadjusted and adjusted risk for abuse were estimated using log-binomial regression models. A random effects binary logistic regression model estimated the predicted probabilities of abusing a product by one of five ROAs, intended ROA (i.e., swallowing whole), snorting, injection, chewing, and other. Results Unadjusted relative risk of abuse for the 11 compound/formulations determined hydrocodone and IR oxycodone to be most highly abused while IR oxymorphone and IR fentanyl were least often abused. Adjusting for prescription volume suggested hydrocodone and IR oxycodone were least often abused on a prescription-by-prescription basis. Methadone and morphine, especially IR morphine, showed increases in relative risk of abuse. Examination of the data without methadone revealed ER oxycodone as the drug with greatest risk after adjusting for

  11. Neonatal Administration of Thimerosal Causes Persistent Changes in Mu Opioid Receptors in the Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Olczak, Mieszko; Duszczyk, Michalina; Mierzejewski, Pawel; Bobrowicz, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    Thimerosal added to some pediatric vaccines is suspected in pathogenesis of several neurodevelopmental disorders. Our previous study showed that thimerosal administered to suckling rats causes persistent, endogenous opioid-mediated hypoalgesia. Here we examined, using immunohistochemical staining technique, the density of μ-opioid receptors (MORs) in the brains of rats, which in the second postnatal week received four i.m. injections of thimerosal at doses 12, 240, 1,440 or 3,000 μg Hg/kg. The periaqueductal gray, caudate putamen and hippocampus were examined. Thimerosal administration caused dose-dependent statistically significant increase in MOR densities in the periaqueductal gray and caudate putamen, but decrease in the dentate gyrus, where it was accompanied by the presence of degenerating neurons and loss of synaptic vesicle marker (synaptophysin). These data document that exposure to thimerosal during early postnatal life produces lasting alterations in the densities of brain opioid receptors along with other neuropathological changes, which may disturb brain development. PMID:20803069

  12. Route of administration for illicit prescription opioids: a comparison of rural and urban drug users

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Nonmedical prescription opioid use has emerged as a major public health concern in recent years, particularly in rural Appalachia. Little is known about the routes of administration (ROA) involved in nonmedical prescription opioid use among rural and urban drug users. The purpose of this study was to describe rural-urban differences in ROA for nonmedical prescription opioid use. Methods A purposive sample of 212 prescription drug users was recruited from a rural Appalachian county (n = 101) and a major metropolitan area (n = 111) in Kentucky. Consenting participants were given an interviewer-administered questionnaire examining sociodemographics, psychiatric disorders, and self-reported nonmedical use and ROA (swallowing, snorting, injecting) for the following prescription drugs: buprenorphine, fentanyl, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, methadone, morphine, OxyContin® and other oxycodone. Results Among urban participants, swallowing was the most common ROA, contrasting sharply with substance-specific variation in ROA among rural participants. Among rural participants, snorting was the most frequent ROA for hydrocodone, methadone, OxyContin®, and oxycodone, while injection was most common for hydromorphone and morphine. In age-, gender-, and race-adjusted analyses, rural participants had significantly higher odds of snorting hydrocodone, OxyContin®, and oxycodone than urban participants. Urban participants had significantly higher odds of swallowing hydrocodone and oxycodone than did rural participants. Notably, among rural participants, 67% of hydromorphone users and 63% of morphine users had injected the drugs. Conclusions Alternative ROA are common among rural drug users. This finding has implications for rural substance abuse treatment and harm reduction, in which interventions should incorporate methods to prevent and reduce route-specific health complications of drug use. PMID:20950455

  13. Acute and chronic fentanyl administration causes hyperalgesia independently of opioid receptor activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Waxman, Amanda R; Arout, Caroline; Caldwell, Megan; Dahan, Albert; Kest, Benjamin

    2009-10-01

    Although mu-receptor opioids are clinically important analgesics, they can also paradoxically cause hyperalgesia independently of opioid receptor activity, presumably via the action of neuroexcitatory glucoronide metabolites. However, it is unknown whether the commonly used mu-receptor opioid analgesic fentanyl, which is not subject to glucuronidation, can also induce hyperalgesia independently of opioid receptor activity. Thus, here we examined whether fentanyl increases nociception on the tail-withdrawal test in CD-1 mice concurrently treated with the opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone or in opioid receptor triple knock-out mice lacking mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors. For both groups, an acute fentanyl bolus dose (0.25mg/kg, s.c.) and continuous fentanyl infusion (cumulative daily dose: 10mg/kg) did not cause analgesia at any time. Instead, fentanyl significantly decreased withdrawal latencies relative to pre-drug values for the next 15-60 min and for six days, respectively. MK-801 blocked and reversed hyperalgesia caused by the acute injection and continuous infusion of fentanyl, respectively, in naltrexone-treated CD-1 mice, indicating the contribution of NMDA receptors to fentanyl hyperalgesia. These data show that the synthetic opioid fentanyl causes hyperalgesia independently of prior or concurrent opioid receptor activity or analgesia. Since the biotransformation of fentanyl does not yield any known pronociceptive metabolites, these data challenge assumptions regarding the role of neuroexcitatory metabolites in opioid-induced hyperalgesia. PMID:19559072

  14. μ Opioid Receptor Expression after Morphine Administration Is Regulated by miR-212/132 Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Concejo, Adrian; Jimenez-Gonzalez, Ada; Rodríguez, Raquel E.

    2016-01-01

    Since their discovery, miRNAs have emerged as a promising therapeutical approach in the treatment of several diseases, as demonstrated by miR-212 and its relation to addiction. Here we prove that the miR-212/132 cluster can be regulated by morphine, through the activation of mu opioid receptor (Oprm1). The molecular pathways triggered after morphine administration also induce changes in the levels of expression of oprm1. In addition, miR-212/132 cluster is actively repressing the expression of mu opioid receptor by targeting a sequence in the 3’ UTR of its mRNA. These findings suggest that this cluster is closely related to opioid signaling, and function as a post-transcriptional regulator, modulating morphine response in a dose dependent manner. The regulation of miR-212/132 cluster expression is mediated by MAP kinase pathway, CaMKII-CaMKIV and PKA, through the phosphorylation of CREB. Moreover, the regulation of both oprm1 and of the cluster promoter is mediated by MeCP2, acting as a transcriptional repressor on methylated DNA after prolonged morphine administration. This mechanism explains the molecular signaling triggered by morphine as well as the regulation of the expression of the mu opioid receptor mediated by morphine and the implication of miR-212/132 in these processes. PMID:27380026

  15. Peripheral administration of a μ-opioid receptor agonist DAMGO suppresses the anxiolytic and stimulatory effects of caffeine.

    PubMed

    Sudakov, S K; Nazarova, G A; Alekseeva, E V; Kolpakov, A A

    2015-01-01

    We studied the possibility of modulation of the stimulatory and anxiolytic effects of caffeine by activation of μ-opioid receptors in the gastrointestinal tract. Caffeine in a dose of 10 mg/kg (but not in a dose of 100 mg/kg) had a strong anxiolytic and psychostimulant effect. This effect was manifested in a significant increase in the time spent in the open arms of the elevated plus-maze, elevation of locomotor activity, and stimulation of metabolism. Administration of DAMGO to animals receiving caffeine in a dose of 10 mg/kg abolished the anxiolytic and psychostimulant effects of caffeine. By contrast, administration of DAMGO to rats receiving caffeine in a dose of 100 mg/kg had the anxiolytic effect. Activation of peripheral μ-opioid receptors is followed by the inhibition of the central μ-opioid system. We observed a decrease in the number of μ-opioid receptors in the midbrain and cerebral cortex and inhibition of β-endorphin release from nerve ending of the cingulate cortex in rats. These changes are probably followed by activation of the adenosine system in the brain. Caffeine dose should be increased to achieve the effect. Therefore, the anxiolytic and stimulatory effects of caffeine in a dose of 10 mg/kg are abolished under these conditions. By contrast, the anxiolytic effect of caffeine in a dose of 100 mg/kg (not observed under normal conditions) develops after this treatment. PMID:25573353

  16. Use of infusion devices for epidural or intrathecal administration of spinal opioids.

    PubMed

    Kwan, J W

    1990-08-01

    The use of infusion devices for epidural or intrathecal administration of spinal opioids is described. The risks of infection and mechanical catheter complications, the need for escalating doses, reservoir volume, drug stability, and cost are practical considerations associated with use of both external and internal infusion systems. Use of patient criteria to identify suitable candidates for intraspinal administration of pain medication helps ensure successful management. The criteria for intraspinal delivery pumps are safety, accuracy, reliability, ease of management by the patient and the health-care professional, and compatibility of the drug with the pump components. The primary factors to consider when comparing pumps to be used for intraspinal delivery of pain medication are the volume and flow rate requirements of the devices. External portable infusion devices are classified according to the mechanism of operation into three primary groups: syringe pumps, peristaltic mechanisms, and elastomeric reservoir pumps. Portable patient-controlled analgesia pumps that have syringes, flexible reservoir bags, and elastomeric reservoirs have been developed. Implanted systems with flow rates that are preset at the factory make pain management more difficult when the patient requires changes or escalations in doses over time. A programmable implanted pump is available. Two advantages of continuous epidural or intrathecal infusion are (1) the peaks and valleys of pain relief with bolus injections are eliminated and (2) the need for multiple injections is reduced. Patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) pumps enhance the efficacy of continuous infusions by allowing the patient to administer bolus doses to control acute pain. PMID:2202209

  17. Effectiveness of topical administration of opioids in palliative care: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    LeBon, Beata; Zeppetella, Giovambattista; Higginson, Irene J

    2009-05-01

    The discovery of peripheral opioid receptors has become the scientific basis for topical use of opioids in malignant and nonmalignant ulcers and oropharyngeal mucositis. This systematic review aimed to assess the quality of published literature and to examine whether topical opioids are effective in controlling pain in palliative care settings. After a systematic literature review, 19 studies (six randomized controlled trials [RCTs] and 13 case reports) met the inclusion criteria for the review. Eighteen studies favored topical opioids in pain relief, as evidenced by reductions in post-treatment pain scores, but time to onset and duration of analgesia varied widely. Because of the heterogeneity of the studies, meta-analysis was not possible. Despite clear clinical benefits described in small RCTs, there is a deficiency of higher-quality evidence on the role of topical opioids, and more robust primary studies are required to inform practice recommendations. N-of-1 trials should be encouraged for specific clinical circumstances. PMID:19321297

  18. Impact of Intraoperative Acetaminophen Administration on Postoperative Opioid Consumption in Patients Undergoing Hip or Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Cathy; McGee, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Opioid utilization for acute pain has been associated with numerous adverse events, potentially resulting in longer inpatient stays and increased costs. Objective: To examine the effect of intravenous (IV) acetaminophen administered intraoperatively on postoperative opioid consumption in adult subjects who underwent hip or knee replacement. Methods: This retrospective cohort study evaluated postoperative opioid consumption in 176 randomly selected adult subjects who underwent hip or knee replacement at Duke University Hospital (DUH). Eighty-eight subjects received a single, intraoperative, 1 g dose of IV acetaminophen. The other subjects did not receive any IV acetaminophen. This study evaluated mean opioid consumption (in oral morphine equivalents) during the 24-hour postoperative period in the 2 groups. Other endpoints included length of stay in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU), incidence of oversedation, need for acute opioid reversal, and adjunctive analgesic utilization. Results: Subjects who were given a single dose of intraoperative acetaminophen received an average of 149.3 mg of oral morphine equivalents during the 24 hours following surgery compared to 147.2 mg in participants who were not exposed to IV acetaminophen (P = .904). The difference in average length of PACU stay between the IV acetaminophen group (163 minutes) and those subjects not exposed to IV acetaminophen (169 minutes) was not statistically significant (P = .588). No subjects in the study experienced oversedation or required acute opioid reversal. Conclusion: There was not a statistically significant difference in postoperative opioid consumption between patients receiving and not receiving IV acetaminophen intraoperatively. PMID:25673891

  19. Nalfurafine hydrochloride, a selective κ opioid receptor agonist, has no reinforcing effect on intravenous self-administration in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Kaoru; Hirakata, Mikito; Miyamoto, Yohei; Kainoh, Mie; Wakasa, Yoshio; Yanagita, Tomoji

    2016-01-01

    Nalfurafine hydrochloride [(E)-N-[17-(cyclopropylmethyl)-4,5α-epoxy-3,14-dihydroxymorphinan-6β-yl]-3-(furan-3-yl)-N-methylprop-2-enamide monohydrochloride; nalfurafine] is used in Japan as an antipruritic for the treatment of intractable pruritus in patients undergoing hemodialysis or with chronic liver disease. It is a potent and selective agonist at the κ opioid receptor, but also has weak and partial agonist activity at μ opioid receptors. Opioids, especially those acting at μ receptors, carry a risk of abuse. This is an important factor in the consideration of therapeutic risk vs. benefit in clinical use and the potential for misuse as a public health problem. It is therefore necessary to carefully evaluate the reinforcing effects of nalfurafine. To this end, we investigated intravenous self-administration of nalfurafine in rhesus monkeys. The number of self-administration of nalfurafine at doses of 0.0625, 0.125 and 0.25 μg/kg/infusion was not higher than that of saline in rhesus monkeys that frequently self-administered pentazocine (0.25 mg/kg/infusion). These results indicate that nalfurafine has no reinforcing effect in rhesus monkeys in the intravenous self-administration paradigm. PMID:26786553

  20. Striatal patch compartment lesions reduce stereotypy following repeated cocaine administration.

    PubMed

    Murray, Ryan C; Logan, Mary C; Horner, Kristen A

    2015-08-27

    Stereotypy can be characterized as inflexible, repetitive behaviors that occur following repeated exposure to psychostimulants, such as cocaine (COC). Stereotypy may be related to preferential activation of the patch (striosome) compartment of striatum, as enhanced relative activation of the patch compartment has been shown to positively correlate with the emergence of stereotypy following repeated psychostimulant treatment. However, the specific contribution of the patch compartment to COC-induced stereotypy following repeated exposure is unknown. To elucidate the involvement of the patch compartment to the development of stereotypy following repeated COC exposure, we determined if destruction of this sub-region altered COC-induced behaviors. The neurons of the patch compartment were ablated by bilateral infusion of the neurotoxin dermorphin-saporin (DERM-SAP; 17 ng/μl) into the striatum. Animals were allowed to recover for eight days following the infusion, and then were given daily injections of COC (25mg/kg) or saline for one week, followed by a weeklong drug-free period. Animals were then given a challenge dose of saline or COC, observed for 2h in activity chambers and sacrificed. The number of mu-labeled patches in the striatum were reduced by DERM-SAP pretreatment. In COC-treated animals DERM-SAP pretreatment significantly reduced the immobilization and intensity of stereotypy but increased locomotor activity. DERM-SAP pretreatment attenuated COC-induced c-Fos expression in the patch compartment, while enhancing COC-induced c-Fos expression in the matrix compartment. These data indicate that the patch compartment contributes to repetitive behavior and suggests that alterations in activity in the patch vs matrix compartments may underlie to this phenomenon. PMID:26100338

  1. Acute opioid administration induces hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activation and is mediated by genetic variation in interleukin (Il)1B.

    PubMed

    Kershaw, Stephanie G; Della Vedova, Chris B; Majumder, Irina; Ward, Michael B; Farquharson, Aaron L; Williamson, Paul A; White, Jason M

    2015-11-01

    There is a complex relationship between drug dependence and stress, with alcohol and other drugs of abuse both relieving stress and potentially inducing physiological stress responses in the user. Opioid drugs have been shown to modulate hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) activity in animal models and individual response to this modulation may play a role in continuation of drug use. Healthy young Caucasian adults were administered a single dose of immediate release oxycodone (20mg, n=30) or assigned to a control group (n=19) that was not administered the drug. At 0, 1, 2, 4 and 6h post-administration, blood and saliva samples were collected along with assessment of pupil diameter. The HPA response was determined by measurement of salivary cortisol through a commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results were compared to genotype at the -511 and -31 positions in the interleukin1B (IL1B) gene. No difference in cortisol production was initially observed between the two groups, however, when participants were separated based on their genotype for two single nucleotide polymorphisms in the promoter of the IL1B gene, which have been shown to occur at a higher frequency in opioid-dependent populations, individuals carrying the -511T and -31 C alleles (-511 C/T, -31 C/T or -511 T/T, -31 C/C) had a significantly (p<0.05) higher cortisol levels compared to individuals homozygous for the -511 C and -31T alleles. These results suggest that individuals carrying the -511T and -31 C alleles experience HPA activation in response to opioid administration and therefore may be less likely to undertake subsequent self-administration. PMID:26363312

  2. US Food and Drug Administration's Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy for extended-release and long-acting opioids: pros and cons, and a European perspective.

    PubMed

    Mercadante, Sebastiano; Craig, David; Giarratano, Antonello

    2012-12-24

    Prescriptions for opioid analgesics to manage moderate-to-severe chronic non-cancer pain have increased markedly over the last decade. An unintentional consequence of greater prescription opioid utilization has been the parallel increase in misuse, abuse and overdose, which are serious risks associated with all opioid analgesics. In response to disturbing rises in prescription opioid abuse, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has proposed the implementation of aggressive Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies (REMS). While REMS could dramatically change the development, release, marketing and prescription of extended-release opioids, questions remain on how these programmes may influence prescribing practices, patient safety and ultimately patient access to these agents. The extent of the availability and misuse of prescription opioids in Europe is difficult to assess from the data currently available, due in large part to the considerable differences in prescribing patterns and regulations between countries. Balancing the availability of prescription opioids for those patients who have pain, while discouraging illicit use, is a complex challenge and requires effective efforts on many levels, particularly in Europe where policies are quite different between countries. PMID:23116252

  3. Effects of Acute and Repeated Administration of Oxycodone and Naloxone-Precipitated Withdrawal on Intracranial Self-Stimulation in Rats.

    PubMed

    Wiebelhaus, Jason M; Walentiny, D Matthew; Beardsley, Patrick M

    2016-01-01

    Incidence of prescription opioid abuse and overdose, often led by oxycodone, continues to increase, producing twice as many overdose deaths as heroin. Surprisingly, preclinical reports relevant to oxycodone's abuse-related effects are relatively sparse considering its history and patient usage. The goal of this study was to characterize dose- and time-dependent effects of acute and repeated oxycodone administration in a frequency-rate intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) procedure, an assay often predictive of drug-related reinforcing effects, in male Sprague-Dawley rats. We hypothesized that oxycodone would produce a biphasic profile of rate-increasing and rate-decreasing effects maintained by ICSS similar to μ-opioid receptor agonists. Oxycodone (0.03, 0.3, 1, and 3 mg/kg, s.c.) produced dose- and time-dependent alterations on ICSS, with the predicted biphasic profile of rate-increasing effects at lower stimulation frequencies followed by rate-decreasing effects at higher frequencies. Peak effects were observed between 30 and 60 minutes, which were reversed by naloxone pretreatment (30 minutes). Tolerance to rate-decreasing effects was observed over a 5-day period when rats were treated with 1 mg/kg oxycodone twice a day. Subsequently, the dosing regimen was increased to 3 mg/kg twice a day over 10 days, although further marked tolerance did not develop. When then challenged with 10 mg/kg naloxone, a significant suppression below baseline levels of ICSS-maintained responding occurred indicative of dependence that recovered to baseline within 5 hours. The results of this study provide the first report of acute and chronic effects of oxycodone on responding maintained by ICSS presentation and the use of ICSS-maintained responding to characterize its tolerance and dependence effects. PMID:26491062

  4. Impact of age, sex and route of administration on adverse events after opioid treatment in the emergency department: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Daoust, Raoul; Paquet, Jean; Lavigne, Gilles; Piette, Éric; Chauny, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The efficacy of opioids for acute pain relief in the emergency department (ED) is well recognized, but treatment with opioids is associated with adverse events ranging from minor discomforts to life-threatening events. OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of age, sex and route of administration on the incidence of adverse events due to opioid administration in the ED. METHODS: Real-time archived data were analyzed retrospectively in a tertiary care urban hospital. All consecutive patients (≥16 years of age) who were assigned to an ED bed and received an opioid between March 2008 and December 2012 were included. Adverse events were defined as: nausea/vomiting (minor); systolic blood pressure (SBP) <90 mmHg, oxygen saturation (Sat) <92% and respiration rate <10 breaths/min (major) within 2 h of the first opioid doses. RESULTS: In the study period, 31,742 patients were treated with opioids. The mean (± SD) age was 55.8±20.5 years, and 53% were female. The overall incidence of adverse events was 12.0% (95% CI 11.6% to 12.4%): 5.9% (95% CI 5.6% to 6.2%) experienced nausea/vomiting, 2.4% (95% CI 2.2% to 2.6%) SBP <90 mmHg, 4.7% (95% CI 4.5% to 4.9%) Sat that dropped to <92% and 0.09% respiration rate <10 breaths/min. After controlling for confounding factors, these adverse events were associated with: female sex (more nausea/vomiting, more SBP <90 mmHg, less Sat <92%); age ≥65 years (less nausea/vomiting, more SBP <90 mmHg, more Sat <92%); and route of administration (intravenous > subcutaneous > oral). CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of adverse events associated with opioid administration in the ED is generally low and is associated with age, sex and route of administration. PMID:25664538

  5. Mu-opioid receptor activation in the medial shell of nucleus accumbens promotes alcohol consumption, self-administration and cue-induced reinstatement.

    PubMed

    Richard, Jocelyn M; Fields, Howard L

    2016-09-01

    Endogenous opioid signaling in ventral cortico-striatal-pallidal circuitry is implicated in elevated alcohol consumption and relapse to alcohol seeking. Mu-opioid receptor activation in the medial shell of the nucleus accumbens (NAc), a region implicated in multiple aspects of reward processing, elevates alcohol consumption while NAc opioid antagonists reduce it. However, the precise nature of the increases in alcohol consumption, and the effects of mu-opioid agonists on alcohol seeking and relapse are not clear. Here, we tested the effects of the mu-opioid agonist [D-Ala(2), N-MePhe(4), Gly-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO) in rat NAc shell on lick microstructure in a free-drinking test, alcohol seeking during operant self-administration, extinction learning and expression, and cue-reinforced reinstatement of alcohol seeking. DAMGO enhanced the number, but not the size of drinking bouts. DAMGO also enhanced operant alcohol self-administration and cue-induced reinstatement, but did not affect extinction learning or elicit reinstatement in the absence of cues. Our results suggest that mu-opioid agonism in NAc shell elevates alcohol consumption, seeking and conditioned reinforcement primarily by enhancing the incentive motivational properties of alcohol and alcohol-paired cues, rather than by modulating palatability, satiety, or reinforcement. PMID:27089981

  6. Effect of the kappa-opioid receptor agonist, U69593, on reinstatement of extinguished amphetamine self-administration behavior.

    PubMed

    Schenk, S; Partridge, B

    2001-04-01

    Previous research has indicated that pretreatment with the kappa-opioid receptor agonist, U69593, decreased the ability of experimenter-administered cocaine to reinstate extinguished cocaine self-administration behavior. This effect was specific to cocaine-produced drug seeking since U69593 failed to attenuate the ability of experimenter-administered amphetamine to reinstate extinguished cocaine self-administration behavior. One possibility is that U69593 selectively attenuates the behavioral effects of the drug that was originally self-administered. In order to test this hypothesis, the present study examined the effect of U69593 (0.0 or 0.32 mg/kg) on the reinstatement of extinguished amphetamine self-administration behavior produced by experimenter-administered injections of cocaine and amphetamine. Following extinction of amphetamine self-administration (0.04 mg/kg/infusion) the ability of cocaine (0.0, 5.0, 10.0 or 20.0 mg/kg) or amphetamine (0.0, 0.3, 1.0 or 3.0 mg/kg) to reinstate extinguished self-administration behavior was measured. Both drugs reinstated extinguished responding and the reinstatement was attenuated by pretreatment with U69593. The data indicate that the ability of U69593 to decrease drug seeking is not restricted to subjects experienced with cocaine self-administration. Self-administration history does, however, determine the effect of U69593 on amphetamine-produced drug seeking. PMID:11526958

  7. Potent Inhibition of Alcohol Self-Administration in Alcohol-Preferring Rats by a κ-Opioid Receptor Antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Azar, Marc R.

    2014-01-01

    A substituted aryl amide derivative of 6-naltrexamine—17-cyclopropylmethyl-3,14β-dihydroxy-4,5α-epoxy-6β-[(4′-trimethylfluoro)benzamido]morphinan-hydrochloride—(compound 5), previously shown to be a potent κ-opioid receptor antagonist, was used to characterize the physicochemical properties and efficacy to decrease alcohol self-administration in alcohol-preferring rats (P-rats) and binge-like P-rats. Previous studies showed that compounds closely related to compound 5 possessed favorable properties regarding penetration of the blood-brain barrier. Pharmacokinetic studies showed that compound 5 had acceptable bioavailability. In contrast to other κ-receptor antagonists, in particular norbinaltorphimine, compound 5 showed favorable drug-like properties. Based on these findings, further studies were done. Safety studies showed that compound 5 was not hepatotoxic at doses 200-fold greater than an efficacious dose. The effects of compound 5 or naltrexone on the hepatotoxicity of thiobenzamide were investigated. In contrast to naltrexone, which exacerbated thiobenzamide-mediated hepatotoxicity, compound 5 was observed to be hepatoprotective. Based on the physicochemical properties of compound 5, the compound was examined in rat animal models of alcohol self-administration. The inhibition of ethanol self-administration by compound 5 in alcohol-dependent and alcohol-nondependent P-rats trained to self-administer a 10% (w/v) ethanol solution, using operant techniques, showed very potent efficacy (i.e., estimated ED50 values of 4–5 μg/kg). In a binge-like P-rat animal model, inhibition of alcohol self-administration by compound 5 had an estimated ED50 value of 8 μg/kg. The results suggest that compound 5 is a potent drug-like κ-opioid receptor antagonist of utility in alcohol cessation medications development. PMID:24817033

  8. Synthesis of mixed MOR/KOR efficacy cyclic opioid peptide analogs with antinociceptive activity after systemic administration.

    PubMed

    Perlikowska, Renata; Piekielna, Justyna; Gentilucci, Luca; De Marco, Rossella; Cerlesi, Maria Camilla; Calo, Girolamo; Artali, Roberto; Tömböly, Csaba; Kluczyk, Alicja; Janecka, Anna

    2016-02-15

    Cyclic pentapeptide Tyr-c[D-Lys-Phe-Phe-Asp]NH2, based on the structure of endomorphin-2 (EM-2), which shows high affinity to the μ-opioid receptor (MOR) and a very strong antinociceptive activity in mice was used as a parent compound for the structure-activity relationship studies. In this report we synthesized analogs of a general sequence Dmt-c[D-Lys-Xaa-Yaa-Asp]NH2, with D-1- or D-2-naphthyl-3-alanine (D-1-Nal or D-2-Nal) in positions 3 or 4. In our earlier papers we have indicated that replacing a phenylalanine residue by the more extended aromatic system of naphthylalanines may result in increased bioactivities of linear analogs. The data obtained here showed that only cyclopeptides modified in position 4 retained the sub-nanomolar MOR and nanomolar κ-opioid receptor (KOR) affinity, similar but not better than that of a parent cyclopeptide. In the in vivo mouse hot-plate test, the most potent analog, Dmt-c[D-Lys-Phe-D-1-Nal-Asp]NH2, exhibited higher than EM-2 but slightly lower than the cyclic parent peptide antinociceptive activity after peripheral (ip) and also central administration (icv). Conformational analyses in a biomimetic environment and molecular docking studies disclosed the structural determinants responsible for the different pharmacological profiles of position 3- versus position 4-modified analogs. PMID:26785295

  9. Association of Opioids and Sedatives with Increased Risk of In-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Arrest from an Administrative Database

    PubMed Central

    Overdyk, Frank J.; Dowling, Oonagh; Marino, Joseph; Qiu, Jiejing; Chien, Hung-Lun; Erslon, Mary; Morrison, Neil; Harrison, Brooke; Dahan, Albert; Gan, Tong J.

    2016-01-01

    Background While opioid use confers a known risk for respiratory depression, the incremental risk of in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest, respiratory arrest, or cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPRA) has not been studied. Our aim was to investigate the prevalence, outcomes, and risk profile of in-hospital CPRA for patients receiving opioids and medications with central nervous system sedating side effects (sedatives). Methods A retrospective analysis of adult inpatient discharges from 2008–2012 reported in the Premier Database. Patients were grouped into four mutually exclusive categories: (1) opioids and sedatives, (2) opioids only, (3) sedatives only, and (4) neither opioids nor sedatives. Results Among 21,276,691 inpatient discharges, 53% received opioids with or without sedatives. A total of 96,554 patients suffered CPRA (0.92 per 1000 hospital bed-days). Patients who received opioids and sedatives had an adjusted odds ratio for CPRA of 3.47 (95% CI: 3.40–3.54; p<0.0001) compared with patients not receiving opioids or sedatives. Opioids alone and sedatives alone were associated with a 1.81-fold and a 1.82-fold (p<0.0001 for both) increase in the odds of CPRA, respectively. In opioid patients, locations of CPRA were intensive care (54%), general care floor (25%), and stepdown units (15%). Only 42% of patients survived CPRA and only 22% were discharged home. Opioid patients with CPRA had mean increased hospital lengths of stay of 7.57 days and mean increased total hospital costs of $27,569. Conclusions Opioids and sedatives are independent and additive risk factors for in-hospital CPRA. The impact of opioid sparing analgesia, reduced sedative use, and better monitoring on CPRA incidence deserves further study. PMID:26913753

  10. Opioid intoxication

    MedlinePlus

    Intoxication - opioids ... In the United States, the most commonly abused opioids are heroin and methadone. People who become addicted ... of these drugs. Also, the use of prescription opioids for nonmedical reasons is an extensive and growing ...

  11. Opioid intoxication

    MedlinePlus

    ... use of opioid-based drugs. These include morphine, heroin, oxycodone, and synthetic (man-made) opioid narcotics. Prescription ... United States, the most commonly abused opioids are heroin and methadone. People who become addicted to these ...

  12. Effects of the kappa-opioid receptor agonist, U69593, on the development of sensitization and on the maintenance of cocaine self-administration.

    PubMed

    Schenk, S; Partridge, B; Shippenberg, T S

    2001-04-01

    Previous studies showed that prior administration of kappa-opioid agonists decreased the development of sensitization to some of the behavioral effects of cocaine. The present study sought to determine whether the development of sensitization to cocaine's reinforcing effects was also sensitive to antagonism by kappa-opioid agonists. During a pretreatment phase, the kappa-opioid agonist, U69593 (0.0 or 0.32 mg/kg) was administered prior to (1) 2 daily injections of cocaine (0.0 or 20.0 mg/kg), or (2) cocaine or saline administered via a yoking procedure. Cocaine pretreatment decreased the latency to acquisition of cocaine self-administration. However, prior administration of U69593 during the pretreatment phase failed to attenuate the development of this sensitized response to cocaine's reinforcing effect. In other groups, the effect of acute U69593 pretreatment on the maintenance of cocaine self-administration was examined during a 10 hr session. During training and testing, a stimulus was associated with each self-administered cocaine infusion for one group whereas responding of another group was reinforced by a cocaine infusion alone. On the test day, pretreatment with U69593 (0.32 mg/kg) decreased responding during each hour of the 10 hr session for the group that was reinforced with cocaine plus the cocaine-associated stimulus. U69593 failed to produce a long-lasting disruption of cocaine self-administration for rats that were trained and tested without the cocaine-associated stimulus. These data suggest that the acquisition and maintenance of cocaine self-administration are differentially sensitive to manipulations of kappa-opioid systems. Further, the disruption of cocaine self-administration by U69593 may be due to interactions with mechanisms that underlie facilitative effects of stimuli that have been associated with self-administered cocaine infusions. PMID:11182539

  13. COMPARATIVE METABOLISM OF ARSENIC IN MICE AFTER A SINGLE OR REPEATED ORAL ADMINISTRATION OF ARSENATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    COMPARATIVE METABOLISM OF ARSENIC IN MICE AFTER A SINGLE OR REPEATED ORAL ADMINISTRATION OF ARSENATE
    Michael F. Hughes*1, Elaina M. Kenyon1, Brenda C. Edwards1, Carol T. Mitchell1, Luz Maria Del Razo2 and David J. Thomas1
    1US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, ETD, PKB, Research Triangle Pa...

  14. ACCUMULATION AND METABOLISM OF ARSENIC IN MICE AFTER REPEATED ADMINISTRATION OF ARSENATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accumulation and metabolism of arsenic in mice after repeated oral administration of arsenate, Hughes, M. F., Kenyon, E. M., Edwards, B. C., Mitchell, C. T., Del Razo, L. M., and Thomas,
    D. J.

    The human carcinogen inorganic arsenic (iAs) is a pervasive environmental ...

  15. Repeated Post- or Presession Cocaine Administration: Roles of Dose and Fixed-Ratio Schedule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinkston, Jonathan W.; Branch, Marc N.

    2004-01-01

    Effects of repeated administration of cocaine to animals behaving under operant contingencies have depended on when the drug is given. Moderate doses given presession have generally led to a decrease in the drug's effect, an outcome usually referred to as tolerance. When these same doses have been given after sessions, the usual result has been no…

  16. Developing Items to Measure Theory of Planned Behavior Constructs for Opioid Administration for Children: Pilot Testing.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Catherine; Riley, Barth B; Wilkie, Diana J

    2015-12-01

    The Theory of Planned Behavior (TpB) is useful to direct nursing research aimed at behavior change. As proposed in the TpB, individuals' attitudes, perceived norms, and perceived behavior control predict their intentions to perform a behavior and subsequently predict their actual performance of the behavior. Our purpose was to apply Fishbein and Ajzen's guidelines to begin development of a valid and reliable instrument for pediatric nurses' attitudes, perceived norms, perceived behavior control, and intentions to administer PRN opioid analgesics when hospitalized children self-report moderate to severe pain. Following Fishbein and Ajzen's directions, we were able to define the behavior of interest and specify the research population, formulate items for direct measures, elicit salient beliefs shared by our target population and formulate items for indirect measures, and prepare and test our questionnaire. For the pilot testing of internal consistency of measurement items, Cronbach alphas were between 0.60 and 0.90 for all constructs. Test-retest reliability correlations ranged from 0.63 to 0.90. Following Fishbein and Ajzen's guidelines was a feasible and organized approach for instrument development. In these early stages, we demonstrated good reliability for most subscales, showing promise for the instrument and its use in pain management research. Better understanding of the TpB constructs will facilitate the development of interventions targeted toward nurses' attitudes, perceived norms, and/or perceived behavior control to ultimately improve their pain behaviors toward reducing pain for vulnerable children. PMID:26527107

  17. The macrocyclic tetrapeptide [D-Trp]CJ-15,208 produces short-acting κ opioid receptor antagonism in the CNS after oral administration

    PubMed Central

    Eans, Shainnel O; Ganno, Michelle L; Reilley, Kate J; Patkar, Kshitij A; Senadheera, Sanjeewa N; Aldrich, Jane V; McLaughlin, Jay P

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Cyclic peptides are resistant to proteolytic cleavage, therefore potentially exhibiting activity after systemic administration. We hypothesized that the macrocyclic κ opioid receptor (KOR)-selective antagonist [D-Trp]CJ-15,208 would demonstrate antagonist activity after systemic, that is, s.c. and oral (per os, p. o.), administration. Experimental Approach C57BL/6J mice were pretreated with [D-Trp]CJ-15,208 s.c. or p.o. before administration of the KOR-selective agonist U50,488 and the determination of antinociception in the warm-water tail-withdrawal assay. The locomotor activity of mice treated with [D-Trp]CJ-15,208 was determined by rotorod testing. Additional mice demonstrating cocaine conditioned place preference and subsequent extinction were pretreated daily with vehicle or [D-Trp]CJ-15,208 and then exposed to repeated forced swim stress or a single additional session of cocaine place conditioning before redetermining place preference. Key Results Pretreatment with [D-Trp]CJ-15,208 administered s.c. or p.o. dose-dependently antagonized the antinociception induced by i.p. administration of U50,488 in mice tested in the warm-water tail-withdrawal assay for less than 12 and 6 h respectively. [D-Trp]CJ-15,208 also produced limited (<25%), short-duration antinociception mediated through KOR agonism. Orally administered [D-Trp]CJ-15,208 dose-dependently antagonized centrally administered U50,488-induced antinociception, and prevented stress-, but not cocaine-induced, reinstatement of extinguished cocaine-seeking behaviour, consistent with its KOR antagonist activity, without affecting locomotor activity. Conclusions and Implications The macrocyclic tetrapeptide [D-Trp]CJ-15,208 is a short-duration KOR antagonist with weak KOR agonist activity that is active after oral administration and demonstrates blood–brain barrier permeability. These data validate the use of systemically active peptides such as [D-Trp]CJ-15,208 as potentially useful

  18. The effects of repeated parenteral administration of chelating agents on the distribution and excretion of uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Domingo, J.L.; Ortega, A.; Llobet, J.M.; Paternain, J.L.; Corbella, J.

    1989-04-01

    The effects of repeated ip administration of gallic acid, 4,5-dihydroxy-1,3-benzenedisulfonic acid (Tiron), diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), and 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-AS) on the distribution and excretion of uranium were assessed in male Swiss mice. Only Tiron significantly increased the amount of uranium excreted into urine and feces. A significant decrease in the concentration of uranium in liver, spleen and bone was observed after administration of Tiron, whereas injection of gallic acid or DTPA resulted in a significant decrease in the concentration of the metal in the liver. The results show that Tiron was consistently the most effective chelator of those tested in the treatment of uranium poisoning after repeated daily administration of the metal.

  19. Pharmacological characterization of repeated administration of the first generation abused synthetic cannabinoid CP47,497.

    PubMed

    Grim, Travis W; Samano, Kimberly L; Ignatowska-Jankowska, Bogna; Tao, Qing; Sim-Selly, Laura J; Selley, Dana E; Wise, Laura E; Poklis, Alphonse; Lichtman, Aron H

    2016-05-01

    A series of in vivo and in vitro assays were conducted to characterize the pharmacological effects of the first generation abused synthetic cannabinoid CP47,497, a racemic bicyclic cannabinoid that is similar in structure to the potent, high-efficacy synthetic cannabinoid CP55,940. CP47,497 was less efficacious than CP55,940 in activating G-proteins and dose-dependently produced common CB1 receptor-dependent pharmacological effects (i.e. catalepsy, hypothermia, antinociception, and hypolocomotion). CP47,497 also substituted for Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in the mouse drug discrimination, indicating that both drugs elicited a similar interceptive stimulus. The pharmacological effects of CP47,497 underwent tolerance following repeated administration and showed cross-tolerance following repeated THC administration, further suggesting a common cannabimimetic mechanism of action. Finally, the CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant precipitated similar magnitudes of somatic withdrawal responses in mice treated repeatedly with THC or CP47,497. Taken together, these data verify the acute cannabimimetic effects of CP47,497, and indicate tolerance and dependence following repeated administration. The assays used here provide a straightforward approach to characterize the emerging next generation of abused synthetic cannabinoids. PMID:27149200

  20. Preweaning cocaine exposure alters brain glucose metabolic rates following repeated amphetamine administration in the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Melnick, Susan M; Torres-Reveron, Annelyn; Dow-Edwards, Diana L

    2004-10-15

    Developmental cocaine exposure produces long-term alterations in function of many neuronal circuits. This study examined glucose metabolic rates following repeated amphetamine administration in adult male and female rats pretreated with cocaine during postnatal days (PND) 11-20. PND11-20 cocaine increased the response to amphetamine in many components of the motor system and the dorsal caudate-putamen, in particular, and decreased the metabolic response in the hypothalamus. While amphetamine alone produced widespread increases in metabolism, there were no cocaine-related effects in the mesolimbic, limbic or sensory structures. These data suggest that a brief cocaine exposure during development can alter ontogeny and result in abnormal neuronal responses to repeated psychostimulant administration in adulthood. PMID:15464226

  1. The pharmacological basis of opioids

    PubMed Central

    Ghelardini, Carla; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Bianchi, Enrica

    2015-01-01

    Summary An opioid is a chemical that binds to opioid receptors, which are widely distributed in the central and peripheral nervous system and gastrointestinal tract. The different effects elicited by activation of these receptors are due to their specific neuronal and extraneuronal distribution. The painkiller effect of opioids is induced by the synergy of the two events, namely reduction of pain threshold and emotional detachment from pain. The opioid effects transcending analgesia include sedation, respiratory depression, constipation and a strong sense of euphoria. There are opioid-like substances endogenously produced by the body. Naturally occurring peptides, called enkephalins, have opioid-like activities but are not derived from opium and exert opioid-like effects by interacting with opioid receptors on cell membranes. Yet, animals do contain the same morphine precursors and metabolites as opium poppy and are able to synthesize endogenous morphine alkaloid. Experimental and clinical studies show that opioids, at doses comparable to those of endogenous opioids, can activate pronociceptive systems, leading to pain hypersensitivity and short-term tolerance, a phenomenon encountered in postoperative pain management by acute opioid administration. Whether endogenous opioids play a role in the acute pain necessary to the survival of the individual, remains an open question. PMID:26811699

  2. The pharmacological basis of opioids.

    PubMed

    Ghelardini, Carla; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Bianchi, Enrica

    2015-01-01

    An opioid is a chemical that binds to opioid receptors, which are widely distributed in the central and peripheral nervous system and gastrointestinal tract. The different effects elicited by activation of these receptors are due to their specific neuronal and extraneuronal distribution. The painkiller effect of opioids is induced by the synergy of the two events, namely reduction of pain threshold and emotional detachment from pain. The opioid effects transcending analgesia include sedation, respiratory depression, constipation and a strong sense of euphoria. There are opioid-like substances endogenously produced by the body. Naturally occurring peptides, called enkephalins, have opioid-like activities but are not derived from opium and exert opioid-like effects by interacting with opioid receptors on cell membranes. Yet, animals do contain the same morphine precursors and metabolites as opium poppy and are able to synthesize endogenous morphine alkaloid. Experimental and clinical studies show that opioids, at doses comparable to those of endogenous opioids, can activate pronociceptive systems, leading to pain hypersensitivity and short-term tolerance, a phenomenon encountered in postoperative pain management by acute opioid administration. Whether endogenous opioids play a role in the acute pain necessary to the survival of the individual, remains an open question. PMID:26811699

  3. Pharmacogenomic considerations in opioid analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Vuilleumier, Pascal H; Stamer, Ulrike M; Landau, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Translating pharmacogenetics to clinical practice has been particularly challenging in the context of pain, due to the complexity of this multifaceted phenotype and the overall subjective nature of pain perception and response to analgesia. Overall, numerous genes involved with the pharmacokinetics and dynamics of opioids response are candidate genes in the context of opioid analgesia. The clinical relevance of CYP2D6 genotyping to predict analgesic outcomes is still relatively unknown; the two extremes in CYP2D6 genotype (ultrarapid and poor metabolism) seem to predict pain response and/or adverse effects. Overall, the level of evidence linking genetic variability (CYP2D6 and CYP3A4) to oxycodone response and phenotype (altered biotransformation of oxycodone into oxymorphone and overall clearance of oxycodone and oxymorphone) is strong; however, there has been no randomized clinical trial on the benefits of genetic testing prior to oxycodone therapy. On the other hand, predicting the analgesic response to morphine based on pharmacogenetic testing is more complex; though there was hope that simple genetic testing would allow tailoring morphine doses to provide optimal analgesia, this is unlikely to occur. A variety of polymorphisms clearly influence pain perception and behavior in response to pain. However, the response to analgesics also differs depending on the pain modality and the potential for repeated noxious stimuli, the opioid prescribed, and even its route of administration. PMID:23226064

  4. Attentional Bias For Prescription Opioid Cues Among Opioid Dependent Chronic Pain Patients

    PubMed Central

    Garland, Eric L.; Froeliger, Brett; Passik, Steven D.; Howard, Matthew O.

    2012-01-01

    Recurrent use of prescription opioid analgesics by chronic pain patients may result in opioid dependence, which involves implicit neurocognitive operations that organize and impel craving states and compulsive drug taking behavior. Prior studies have identified an attentional bias (AB) towards heroin among heroin dependent individuals. The aim of this study was to determine whether opioid-dependent chronic pain patients exhibit an AB towards prescription opioidrelated cues. Opioid-dependent chronic pain patients (n = 32) and a comparison group of non-dependent opioid users with chronic pain (n = 33) completed a dot probe task designed to measure opioid AB. Participants also rated their opioid craving and self-reported arousal associated with opioid-related and neutral images, pain severity, and relief from pain treatments. Repeated-measures ANOVA revealed a significant group (opioid-dependent vs. non-dependent opioid user) × presentation duration (200 ms. vs. 2000 ms.) interaction, such that opioid-dependent individuals evidenced a significant AB towards opioid cues presented for 200 ms but not for cues presented for 2000 ms, whereas non-dependent opioid users did not exhibit a significant mean AB at either stimulus duration. Among opioid-dependent individuals, 200 ms opioid AB was significantly associated with opioid craving, while among non-dependent opioid users, 200 ms opioid AB was significantly associated with relief from pain treatments. Furthermore, dependent and non-dependent opioid users experienced opioid cues as significantly more arousing than neutral cues. Opioid dependence among chronic pain patients appears to involve an automatic AB towards opioid-related cues. When coupled with chronic pain, attentional fixation on opioid cues may promote compulsive drug use and addictive behavior. PMID:22968666

  5. FDA Approves Implant to Battle Opioid Addiction

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159050.html FDA Approves Implant to Battle Opioid Addiction Experts say steady dosing eliminates need to take ... U.S. Food and Drug Administration. "Opioid abuse and addiction have taken a devastating toll on American families. ...

  6. Varenicline impairs extinction and enhances reinstatement across repeated cycles of nicotine self-administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Macnamara, Claire L; Holmes, Nathan M; Westbrook, R Fred; Clemens, Kelly J

    2016-06-01

    Varenicline is a partial nicotine receptor agonist widely prescribed as a smoking cessation medication. Repeated (or long-term) use of varenicline has been proposed as a treatment option for tobacco addiction. However the effect of repeated varenicline use on motivation for nicotine is unknown. Here the intravenous nicotine self-administration paradigm in rats was used to model the consequences of varenicline treatment across repeated cycles of administration, extinction and reinstatement. Rats acquired nicotine self-administration across 20 days before undergoing 6 days of extinction, where each extinction session was preceded by a single injection of varenicline or saline. This was followed by a single varenicline-free nicotine-primed reinstatement test. All rats then reacquired nicotine self-administration for 10 days followed by a second cycle of extinction. Across this period, rats either received a second cycle of varenicline (VAR-VAR) or saline (SAL-SAL), or the alternative treatment (SAL-VAR, VAR-SAL), followed by a final reinstatement test. Treatment with varenicline increased responding across the first cycle of extinction, but did not affect responding in the reinstatement test. Across the second cycle, varenicline again increased responding across extinction, and critically, rats treated with varenicline across cycle 1 and saline across cycle 2 (Group VAR-SAL) exhibited more reinstatement than rats in any other group. The effect of VAR on nicotine seeking was not due to its effects on locomotor activity. Instead, the results suggest that a history of VAR can increase vulnerability to reinstatement/relapse when its treatment is discontinued. The possible mechanisms of this increased vulnerability are discussed. PMID:26907808

  7. Repeated cocaine administration promotes long-term potentiation induction in rat medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chiung-Chun; Lin, Hsiao-Ju; Hsu, Kuei-Sen

    2007-08-01

    Although drug-induced adaptations in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) may contribute to several core aspects of addictive behaviors, it is not clear yet whether drugs of abuse elicit changes in synaptic plasticity at the PFC excitatory synapses. Here we report that, following repeated cocaine administration (15 mg/kg/day intraperitoneal injection for 5 consecutive days) with a 3-day withdrawal, excitatory synapses to layer V pyramidal neurons in rat medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) become highly sensitive to the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) by repeated correlated presynaptic and postsynaptic activity. This promoted LTP induction is caused by cocaine-induced reduction of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)(A) receptor-mediated inhibition of mPFC pyramidal neurons. In contrast, in slices from rats treated with saline or a single dose of cocaine, the same LTP induction protocol did not induce significant LTP unless the blockade of GABA(A) receptors. Blockade of the D1-like receptors specifically prevented the cocaine-induced enhancement of LTP. Repeated cocaine exposure reduced the GABA(A) receptor-mediated synaptic currents in mPFC pyramidal neurons. Biotinylation experiments revealed a significant reduction of surface GABA(A) receptor alpha1 subunit expression in mPFC slices from repeated cocaine-treated rats. These findings support an important role for cocaine-induced enhancement of synaptic plasticity in the PFC in the development of drug-associated behavioral plasticity. PMID:17050645

  8. Different dosing regimens of repeated ketamine administration have opposite effects on novelty processing in rats.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Anett; Sivanandan, Brindan; Tolledo, Edgor Cole; Woldegabriel, Jacob; Ito, Rutsuko

    2016-08-01

    Repeated exposure to sub-anesthetic doses of ketamine in rats has been shown to induce cognitive deficits, as well as behavioral changes akin to the negative symptoms of schizophrenia, giving much face validity to the use of ketamine administration as a pharmacological model of schizophrenia. This study sought to further characterize the behavioral effects of two different ketamine pre-treatment regimens, focusing primarily on the effects of repeated ketamine administration on novelty processing, a capacity that is disrupted in schizophrenia. Rats received 5 or 14 intra-peritoneal injections of 30mg/kg ketamine or saline across 5 or 7days, respectively. They were then tested in an associative mismatch detection task to examine their ability to detect novel configurations of familiar audio-visual sequences. Furthermore, rats underwent a sequential novel object and novel object location exploration task. Subsequently, rats were also tested on the delayed matching to place T-maze task, sucrose preference task and locomotor tests involving administering a challenge dose of amphetamine (AMPH). The high-dose ketamine pre-treatment regimen elicited impairments in mismatch detection and working memory. In contrast, the low-dose ketamine pre-treatment regimen improved performance of novelty detection. In addition, low-dose ketamine pre-treated rats showed locomotor sensitization following an AMPH challenge, while the high-dose ketamine pre-treated rats showed an attenuated locomotor response to AMPH, compared to control rats. These findings demonstrate that different regimens of repeated ketamine administration induce alterations in novelty processing in opposite directions, and that differential neural adaptations occurring in the mesolimbic dopamine system may underlie these effects. PMID:27064663

  9. Sex differences in behavioral and PKA cascade responses to repeated cocaine administration.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Luyi; Sun, Wei-Lun; Weierstall, Karen; Minerly, Ana Christina; Weiner, Jan; Jenab, Shirzad; Quinones-Jenab, Vanya

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies have shown sex different patterns in behavioral responses to cocaine. Here, we used between-subject experiment design to study whether sex differences exist in the development of behavioral sensitization and tolerance to repeated cocaine, as well as the role of protein kinase A (PKA) signaling cascade in this process. Ambulatory and rearing responses were recorded in male and female rats after 1 to 14 days of administration of saline or cocaine (15 mg/kg; ip). Correspondent PKA-associated signaling in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and caudate-putamen (CPu) was measured at each time point. Our results showed that females exhibited higher cocaine-induced behavioral responses and developed behavioral sensitization and tolerance faster than males. Whereas females developed behavioral sensitization to cocaine after 2 days and tolerance after 14 days, male rats developed sensitization after 5 days. In addition, cocaine induced a sexual dimorphic pattern in the progression of neuronal adaptations on the PKA cascade signaling in region (NAc vs. CPu) and time (days of cocaine administration)-dependent manners. In general, more PKA signaling cascade changes were found in the NAc of males on day 5 and in the CPu of females with repeated cocaine injection. In addition, in females, behavioral activities positively correlated with FosB levels in the NAc and CPu and negatively correlated with Cdk5 and p35 in the CPu, while no correlation was observed in males. Our studies suggest that repeated cocaine administration induced different patterns of behavioral and molecular responses in the PKA cascade in male and female rats. PMID:27553823

  10. Resistance of the hamster to amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity following repeated intraperitoneal administration.

    PubMed

    Leeder, R G; Evans, C D; Brien, J F; Massey, T E

    1994-10-01

    Amiodarone is an effective antidysrhythmic agent, restricted in use by the development of pulmonary toxicity. Several in vivo animal models have been used to study amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity. Intratracheal administration of amiodarone to the hamster has been used as a model for the critical amiodarone-induced pulmonary fibrosis (AIPF). In order to investigate the cellular mechanism of human AIPF, which occurs following oral or intravenous administration, an animal model of AIPF resulting from systemic administration of the drug would appear to be preferable. We have evaluated pulmonary toxicity following repeated intraperitoneal amiodarone administration to the hamster. Intraperitoneal treatment of hamsters for 1, 4, or 7 weeks with amiodarone (100 mg/kg/day) did not lead to pulmonary toxicity based on wet lung weight, hydroxyproline content, or histological examination. Furthermore, when comparing 1- and 7-week treatment groups, there was no pulmonary accumulation of either amiodarone or desethylamiodarone beyond levels found at 1 week. Therefore, failure to develop pulmonary toxicity may be due to an inability to accumulate sufficient amiodarone and/or desethylamiodarone. Intratracheal administration of amiodarone to rodents remains the only in vivo animal model for studying the mechanism(s) of AIPF. PMID:8085270

  11. Brexpiprazole Alters Monoaminergic Systems following Repeated Administration: an in Vivo Electrophysiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Mansari, Mostafa El; Bundgaard, Christoffer; Blier, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Background: Brexpiprazole was recently approved as adjunctive therapy for depression and treatment of schizophrenia in adults. To complement results from a previous study in which its acute effects were characterized, the present study assessed the effect of repeated brexpiprazole administration on monoaminergic systems. Methods: Brexpiprazole (1mg/kg, subcutaneous) or vehicle was administered once daily for 2 and 14 days. Single-unit electrophysiological recordings from noradrenaline neurons in the locus coeruleus, serotonin neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus, dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area, and pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus CA3 region were obtained in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats under chloral hydrate anesthesia within 4 hours after final dosing. Results: Brexpiprazole blunted D2 autoreceptor responsiveness, while firing activity of ventral tegmental area dopaminergic neurons remained unaltered. Brexpiprazole increased the firing rate of locus coeruleus noradrenaline neurons and increased noradrenaline tone on α2-adrenergic receptors in the hippocampus. Administration of brexpiprazole for 2 but not 14 days increased the firing rate of serotonin neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus. In the hippocampus, serotonin1A receptor blockade significantly disinhibited pyramidal neurons after 2- and 14-day brexpiprazole administration. In contrast, no significant disinhibition occurred after 24-hour washout or acute brexpiprazole. Conclusions: Repeated brexpiprazole administration resulted in a marked occupancy of D2 autoreceptors, while discharge activity of ventral tegmental area dopaminergic neurons remained unaltered. Brexpiprazole enhanced serotonergic and noradrenergic tone in the hippocampus, effects common to antidepressant agents. Together, these results provide further insight in the neural mechanisms by which brexpiprazole exerts antidepressant and antipsychotic effects. PMID:26428352

  12. Opioid Analgesics.

    PubMed

    Jamison, Robert N; Mao, Jianren

    2015-07-01

    Chronic pain is an international health issue of immense importance that is influenced by both physical and psychological factors. Opioids are useful in treating chronic pain but have accompanying complications. It is important for clinicians to understand the basics of opioid pharmacology, the benefits and adverse effects of opioids, and related problematic issues of tolerance, dependence, and opioid-induced hyperalgesia. In this article, the role of psychiatric comorbidity and the use of validated assessment tools to identify individuals who are at the greatest risk for opioid misuse are discussed. Additionally, interventional treatment strategies for patients with chronic pain who are at risk for opioid misuse are presented. Specific behavioral interventions designed to improve adherence with prescription opioids among persons treated for chronic pain, such as frequent monitoring, periodic urine screens, opioid therapy agreements, opioid checklists, and motivational counseling, are also reviewed. Use of state-sponsored prescription drug monitoring programs is also encouraged. Areas requiring additional investigation are identified, and the future role of abuse-deterrent opioids and innovative technology in addressing issues of opioid therapy and pain are presented. PMID:26141334

  13. Lack of behavioral sensitization to repeated cocaine administration from postnatal days 1 to 10.

    PubMed

    Meyer, J S; Yacht, A C

    1993-09-01

    This research determined whether sensitization (or tolerance) to the behavioral effects of cocaine in rat pups would occur following repeated cocaine administration. Rats were injected daily with 20 mg/kg of cocaine HCl s.c. from postnatal day 1 to day 10, injected with saline vehicle only, or left untreated during this period. On day 11, animals from each group were challenged with either 0, .625, 1.25, or 2.50 mg/kg of cocaine and their behavioral responses were recorded. Prior cocaine treatment did not influence the acute effects of cocaine on ultrasonic vocalizations or on any observed motor responses. In contrast, the cocaine- and saline-treated pups differed in a similar manner from the untreated control group on several behavioral measures. These results indicate that the sensitizing effects of repeated cocaine administration are not manifested during the neonatal period. However, the stimulation (stress) of handling and injection may alter the subsequent responsivity of infant rats to a cocaine challenge. PMID:8225794

  14. Repeated ketamine administration redeems the time lag for citalopram's antidepressant-like effects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, G-F; Liu, W-X; Qiu, L-L; Guo, J; Wang, X-M; Sun, H-L; Yang, J-J; Zhou, Z-Q

    2015-06-01

    Current available antidepressants exhibit low remission rate with a long response lag time. Growing evidence has demonstrated acute sub-anesthetic dose of ketamine exerts rapid, robust, and lasting antidepressant effects. However, a long term use of ketamine tends to elicit its adverse reactions. The present study aimed to investigate the antidepressant-like effects of intermittent and consecutive administrations of ketamine on chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) rats, and to determine whether ketamine can redeem the time lag for treatment response of classic antidepressants. The behavioral responses were assessed by the sucrose preference test, forced swimming test, and open field test. In the first stage of experiments, all the four treatment regimens of ketamine (10mg/kg ip, once daily for 3 or 7 consecutive days, or once every 7 or 3 days, in a total 21 days) showed robust antidepressant-like effects, with no significant influence on locomotor activity and stereotype behavior in the CUMS rats. The intermittent administration regimens produced longer antidepressant-like effects than the consecutive administration regimens and the administration every 7 days presented similar antidepressant-like effects with less administration times compared with the administration every 3 days. In the second stage of experiments, the combination of ketamine (10 mg/kg ip, once every 7 days) and citalopram (20 mg/kg po, once daily) for 21 days caused more rapid and sustained antidepressant-like effects than citalopram administered alone. In summary, repeated sub-anesthestic doses of ketamine can redeem the time lag for the antidepressant-like effects of citalopram, suggesting the combination of ketamine and classic antidepressants is a promising regimen for depression with quick onset time and stable and lasting effects. PMID:25795441

  15. Strain and cocaine-induced differential opioid gene expression may predispose Lewis but not Fischer rats to escalate cocaine self-administration.

    PubMed

    Valenza, Marta; Picetti, Roberto; Yuferov, Vadim; Butelman, Eduardo R; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate alterations in gene expression of opioid system components induced by extended access (18 h) cocaine self-administration and to determine the impact of genetic background in the vulnerability to escalate cocaine intake. Comparing two inbred rat strains, we previously reported that Lewis rats progressively escalated cocaine consumption compared to Fischer rats, in a new translational model of intravenous cocaine self-administration, which included 14 sessions of 18-h operant sessions in which rats were allowed to select the cocaine unit dose to self-administer. We compare here Fischer and Lewis rats in the gene expression of endogenous opioid peptides (Pomc, Penk, Pdyn) and cognate receptors (Oprm, Oprk and Oprd) in reward-related brain regions, after exposure to either cocaine self-administration or yoked-saline, in the aforementioned translational paradigm. We performed a correlation analysis between the mRNA level, found in the Dorsal Striatum (DS), Nucleus accumbens (NAcc) shell and core respectively, and individual cocaine intake. Our findings show that the gene expression of all the aforementioned opioid genes exhibit strain-dependent differences in the DS, in absence of cocaine exposure. Also, different strain-specific cocaine-induced mRNA expression of Oprm and Oprk was found in DS. Only few differences were found in the ventral parts of the striatum. Moreover, gene expression level of Pdyn, Penk, Oprk, and Oprm in the DS was significantly correlated with cocaine intake only in Fischer rats. Overall, these data shed light on potential genetic differences which may predispose of subjects to initiate and escalate cocaine consumption. PMID:26777278

  16. Pharmacokinetics and tissue disposition of meloxicam in beef calves after repeated oral administration.

    PubMed

    Coetzee, J F; Mosher, R A; Griffith, G R; Gehring, R; Anderson, D E; KuKanich, B; Miesner, M

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics and tissue disposition of meloxicam after repeated oral administration in calves. Thirteen male British × Continental beef calves aged 4 to 6 months and weighing 297-392 kg received 0.5 mg/kg meloxicam per os once daily for 4 days. Plasma meloxicam concentrations were determined in 8 calves over 6 days after first treatment. Calves were randomly assigned to be euthanized at 5, 10, 15 (n = 3/timepoint), and 19 days (n = 4) after final administration. Meloxicam concentrations were determined in plasma (LOQ= 0.025 μg/mL) and muscle, liver, kidney, and fat samples (LOQ = 2 ng/g) after extraction using validated LC-MS-MS methods. The mean (± SD) Cmax , Cmin , and Caverage plasma meloxicam concentrations were 4.52 ± 0.87 μg/mL, 2.95 ± 0.77 μg/mL, and 3.84 ± 0.81 μg/mL, respectively. Mean (± SD) tissue meloxicam concentrations were highest in liver (226.67 ± 118.16 ng/g) and kidney samples (52.73 ± 39.01 ng/g) at 5 days after final treatment. Meloxicam concentrations were below the LOQ in all tissues at 15 days after treatment. These findings suggest that tissue from meloxicam-treated calves will have low residue concentrations by 21 days after repeated oral administration. PMID:25708937

  17. Regulation of Gene Expression in Brain Tissues of Rats Repeatedly Treated by the Highly Abused Opioid Agonist, Oxycodone: Microarray Profiling and Gene Mapping Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Hazem E.; Myers, Alan L.; Lee, Insong J.; Chen, Hegang; Coop, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Although oxycodone is the most often used opioid agonist, it remains one of the most understudied drugs. We used microarray analysis to better understand the global changes in gene expression in brain tissues of rats repeatedly treated with oxycodone. Many genes were significantly regulated by oxycodone (e.g., Fkbp5, Per2, Rt1.Dα, Slc16a1, and Abcg2). Validation of the microarray data by quantitative real-time-polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) indicated that there was a strong significant correlation (r = 0.979, p < 0.0000001) between the Q-PCR and the microarray data. Using MetaCore (a computational platform), many biological processes were identified [e.g., organic anion transport (p = 7.251 × 10−4) and regulation of immune response (p = 5.090 × 10−4)]. Among the regulated genes, Abcg2 mRNA was up-regulated by 2.1-fold, which was further confirmed by immunoblotting (1.8-fold up-regulation). Testing the Abcg2 affinity status of oxycodone using an Abcg2 ATPase assay suggests that oxycodone behaves as an Abcg2 substrate only at higher concentrations (≥500 μM). Furthermore, brain uptake studies demonstrated that oxycodone-induced Abcg2 up-regulation resulted in a significant (p < 0.05) decrease (∼2-fold) in brain/plasma ratios of mitoxantrone. These results highlight markers/mediators of neuronal responses and identify regulatory pathways involved in the pharmacological action of oxycodone. These results also identify genes that potentially modulate tolerance, dependence, immune response, and drug-drug interactions. Finally, our findings suggest that oxycodone-induced up-regulation of Abcg2 enhanced the efflux of the Abcg2 substrate, mitoxantrone, limiting its brain accumulation and resulting in an undesirable drug-drug interaction. Extrapolating these results to other Abcg2 substrates (e.g., daunorubicin and doxorubicin) indicates that the brain uptake of these agents may be affected if they are administered concomitantly with oxycodone. PMID:19786507

  18. Effects of repeated administration of methylphenidate on reproductive parameters in male rats.

    PubMed

    Montagnini, Bruno Garcia; Silva, Luiza Sienna; dos Santos, Alice Hartmann; Anselmo-Franci, Janete Aparecida; Fernandes, Glaura Scantamburlo Alves; Mesquita, Suzana de Fátima Paccola; Gerardin, Daniela Cristina Ceccatto

    2014-06-22

    Methylphenidate (MPH) is a psychostimulant drug which acts by blocking the dopamine and norepinephrine transporters and is the main drug used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children and adolescents. During puberty, changes in neurotransmitter systems (including dopaminergic system) are engaged on the release of gonadal hormones and the development of cephalic structures responsible for reproductive function. This study investigated the effects of repeated treatment with methylphenidate during development on reproductive parameters of adult male rats. Wistar rats received MPH 2.5 mg/kg, MPH 5.0 mg/kg, or distilled water (gavage) from postnatal day (PND) 21 to PND 60. At PND 100, an increase in percentage of abnormal tail morphology sperm in MPH 2.5 and increase in testicular interstitial tissue volume in MPH groups as well as in the number of type A spermatogonia in MPH 5.0 group were observed. This study demonstrated that repeated administration of methylphenidate during periods corresponding childhood to early adulthood interfered on testicular function in rats at adult life. PMID:24866909

  19. Effects of exercise conditioning on thermoregulatory responses to repeated administration of chlorpyrifos.

    PubMed

    Rowsey, Pamela Johnson; Metzger, Bonnie L; Carlson, John; Gordon, Christopher J

    2003-05-01

    Little is known about the effects of physical activity (i.e., exercise training) on susceptibility to environmental toxicants. Chlorpyrifos (CHP), an organophosphate (OP) insecticide, affects thermoregulation, causing an acute period of hypothermia followed by a delayed fever. Since exercise conditioning alters the thermoregulatory responses of rodents, this study examined whether exercise training would alter the thermoregulatory response to repeated CHP administration in the female Sprague-Dawley rat. Core temperature (T(c)) and motor activity (MA) were monitored by radiotelemetry in rats housed at an ambient temperature (T(a)) of 22 degrees C. The rats either were provided with continuous access to running wheels (exercise group) or were housed in standard cages without wheels (sedentary group). The exercise group rats ran predominantly at night with an average of 7.6 km/24h. After 8 weeks the rats in both groups were gavaged daily with corn oil or 10mg/kg CHP (dissolved in corn oil) for 4 days. CHP induced an immediate hypothermic response followed by a delayed fever throughout the next day in the sedentary group rats after the first three doses of CHP. The exercise group rats showed no hypothermia after the first dose of CHP. However, they became hypothermic after the second and third doses of CHP. The exercise group rats developed a smaller daytime fever after each dose of CHP compared to the sedentary group rats. Overall, exercise training attenuated the hypothermic and febrile effects of repeated CHP. Thus, the data suggest that a sedentary lifestyle may increase the sensitivity to OP insecticides. Exercise training was also associated with a more rapid recovery of plasma cholinesterase activity. PMID:12706752

  20. Circadian Phase-Shifting Effects of Repeated Ramelteon Administration in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Gary S.; Zee, Phyllis C.; Wang-Weigand, Sherry; Rodriguez, Laura; Peng, Xuejun

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives: To assess the ability of repeated daily oral ramelteon to facilitate re-entrainment of human circadian rhythms after an imposed phase advance of the sleep-wake cycle. Methods: A total of 75 healthy adult volunteers aged 18–45 years remained in a sleep laboratory for 6 days and 5 nights; a 5-h phase advance in their sleep-wake cycle was imposed under dim-light conditions. Oral ramelteon (1, 2, 4, or 8 mg once daily for 4 days) or placebo was administered 30 min before bedtime. The primary endpoint was the phase of the circadian rhythm as assessed by the time at which salivary melatonin concentrations declined below 3 pg/mL after morning awakening (dim-light melatonin offset [DLMoff]). Results: After 4 days of once-daily treatment, participants receiving 1, 2, or 4 mg ramelteon exhibited statistically significant phase shifts in DLMoff of −88.0 (16.6), −80.5 (14.8), and −90.5 (15.2) minutes respectively, versus −7.1 (18.6) minutes for placebo (least-squares mean(SEM), p = 0.002, p = 0.003, p = 0.001, respectively). Change in DLMoff for the 8 mg dose of ramelteon, −27.9 (16.4) minutes, was not significantly different than that for placebo (p = 0.392). Conclusions: Ramelteon (1, 2, or 4 mg per day) administered before bedtime significantly advanced the phase of the circadian rhythm after a 5-h phase advance in the sleep-wake cycle. These findings suggest that ramelteon has potential as a specific therapy for circadian rhythm sleep disorders. Citation: Richardson GS; Zee PC; Wang-Weigand S; Rodriguez L; Peng X. Circadian phase-shifting effects of repeated ramelteon administration in healthy adults. J Clin Sleep Med 2008;4(5):456–461. PMID:18853704

  1. Repeated administration of an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor attenuates nicotine taking in rats and smoking behavior in human smokers.

    PubMed

    Ashare, R L; Kimmey, B A; Rupprecht, L E; Bowers, M E; Hayes, M R; Schmidt, H D

    2016-01-01

    Tobacco smoking remains the leading cause of preventable death worldwide and current smoking cessation medications have limited efficacy. Thus, there is a clear need for translational research focused on identifying novel pharmacotherapies for nicotine addiction. Our previous studies demonstrated that acute administration of an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (AChEI) attenuates nicotine taking and seeking in rats and suggest that AChEIs could be repurposed for smoking cessation. Here, we expand upon these findings with experiments designed to determine the effects of repeated AChEI administration on voluntary nicotine taking in rats as well as smoking behavior in human smokers. Rats were trained to self-administer intravenous infusions of nicotine (0.03 mg kg(-1) per 0.59 ml) on a fixed-ratio-5 schedule of reinforcement. Once rats maintained stable nicotine taking, galantamine or donepezil was administered before 10 consecutive daily nicotine self-administration sessions. Repeated administration of 5.0 mg kg(-1) galantamine and 3.0 mg kg(-1) donepezil attenuated nicotine self-administration in rats. These effects were reinforcer-specific and not due to adverse malaise-like effects of drug treatment as repeated galantamine and donepezil administration had no effects on sucrose self-administration, ad libitum food intake and pica. The effects of repeated galantamine (versus placebo) on cigarette smoking were also tested in human treatment-seeking smokers. Two weeks of daily galantamine treatment (8.0 mg (week 1) and 16.0 mg (week 2)) significantly reduced smoking rate as well as smoking satisfaction and reward compared with placebo. This translational study indicates that repeated AChEI administration reduces nicotine reinforcement in rats and smoking behavior in humans at doses not associated with tolerance and/or adverse effects. PMID:26784967

  2. Hyperintense Dentate Nuclei on T1-Weighted MRI: Relation to Repeat Gadolinium Administration

    PubMed Central

    Adin, M.E.; Kleinberg, L.; Vaidya, D.; Zan, E.; Mirbagheri, S.; Yousem, D.M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE A hyperintense appearance of the dentate nucleus on T1-weighted MR images has been related to various clinical conditions, but the etiology remains indeterminate. We aimed to investigate the possible associations between a hyperintense appearance of the dentate nucleus on T1-weighted MR images in patients exposed to radiation and factors including, but not limited to, the cumulative number of contrast-enhanced MR images, amount of gadolinium administration, dosage of ionizing radiation, and patient demographics. MATERIALS AND METHODS The medical records of 706 consecutive patients who were treated with brain irradiation at The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions between 1995 and 2010 were blindly reviewed by 2 readers. RESULTS One hundred eighty-four subjects were included for dentate nuclei analysis. Among the 184 subjects who cumulatively underwent 2677 MR imaging studies following intravenous gadolinium administration, 103 patients had hyperintense dentate nuclei on precontrast T1-weighted MR images. The average number of gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging studies performed in the group with normal dentate nuclei was significantly lower than that of the group with hyperintense dentate nuclei. The average follow-up time was 62.5 months. No significant difference was observed between hyperintense and normal dentate nuclei groups in terms of exposed radiation dose, serum creatinine and calcium/phosphate levels, patient demographics, history of chemotherapy, and strength of the scanner. No dentate nuclei abnormalities were found on the corresponding CT scans of patients with hyperintense dentate nuclei (n = 44). No dentate nuclei abnormalities were found in 53 healthy volunteers. CONCLUSIONS Repeat performance of gadolinium-enhanced studies likely contributes to a long-standing hyperintense appearance of dentate nuclei on precontrast T1-weighted-MR images. PMID:26294649

  3. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics following single and repeated nightly administrations of loprazolam, a new benzodiazepine hypnotic.

    PubMed Central

    McInnes, G T; Bunting, E A; Ings, R M; Robinson, J; Ankier, S I

    1985-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of oral loprazolam and pharmacodynamic responses on the morning following nightly drug administration were examined after single and after seven consecutive 1 mg doses in six non-fasting healthy subjects. The serum concentration-time profiles for unchanged loprazolam measured by a specific high pressure liquid chromatography/gas chromatography (h.p.l.c./g.c.) method and for benzodiazepine material measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA) were qualitatively similar although RIA levels were consistently higher. Approximate elimination half-life of unchanged loprazolam after single doses was 8.0 h. For RIA measured material, approximate half-life was 11.7 h following acute administration and 12.8 h after seven consecutive doses. Compared to results after single doses, maximum serum concentration and AUC were greater following 1 week's treatment. Using RIA results, the increases were 27.2% (95% CL 6.9 to 47.4%) and 35.1% (95% CL 15.8 to 54.3%) respectively and using h.p.l.c./g.c. data, 11% (95% CL - 22.6% to 44.5%) and 41% (95% CL - 50.9 to 133.0%). After repeated doses of loprazolam, there were no significant changes with respect to results after single doses in psychomotor function assessed objectively by critical flicker fusion threshold or choice reaction time, or in sleep quality or behaviour on awakening assessed subjectively by 10 cm analogue scales. Mean time to maximum serum concentration was 4.95 h with considerable inter-individual variability (range 1-12 h) and there was a lag time of 1-1.5 h before drug was detectable in blood.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2860916

  4. Determination of co-administrated opioids and benzodiazepines in urine using column-switching solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Lingjuan; Wang, Rong; Liang, Chen; Teng, Xiaomei; Jiang, Fengli; Zeng, Libo; Ye, Haiying; Ni, Chunfang; Yuan, Xiaoliang; Rao, Yulan; Zhang, Yurong

    2015-05-22

    Co-administration of opioids with benzodiazepines is very common around the world. A semi-automated method was developed for the determination of four opioids and two benzodiazepines as well as their metabolites (including glucuronide metabolites) in human urine, based on on-line column-switching-solid-phase extraction (CS-SPE) and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The CS-SPE was performed by loading 200μL of urine sample to an Oasis HLB cartridge. Detection was achieved using a LC-MS/MS system equipped with an electrospray ionization source (ESI). For unequivocal identification and confirmation, two selected reaction monitoring transitions were registered for each compound, and no co-elution of interferences was observed at the expected retention time. Significant ion suppressions were observed for most analytes during chromatographic runs, but isotope-labeled internal standards (ISs) were used and found to be useful to compensate for the determination error caused by the matrix effect. The assay's linearity ranged from 1-20ng/mL to 800-1000ng/mL for 23 compounds, except for lorazepam (LOR), whose linearity was in the range of 1-100ng/mL. This method showed to be precise and accurate. The relative standard deviation (RSD) % values of within-run precision, between-run precision and total precision were not greater than 10.4% (n=3), 12.9% (n=5) and 15.1% (n=15), respectively. Accuracy values were in the range of 87.5-110%. Limits of detection (LODs) ranged from 0.2ng/mL to 5ng/mL, and limits of quantification (LOQs) ranged from 1ng/mL to 20ng/mL. The method was applied to the assay of 12 samples from forensic cases, which exemplified the co-administration of benzodiazepines (BZDs) by some heroin abusers. This method was of high sensitivity, selectivity and reliability, minimum sample manipulation, semi-automation, and fairly high throughput (analysis time per sample was 20min). The method developed will be useful for the detection of co-administrated

  5. In vitro interactions with repeated grapefruit juice administration--to peel or not to peel?

    PubMed

    Brill, Shlomo; Zimmermann, Christian; Berger, Karin; Drewe, Juergen; Gutmann, Heike

    2009-03-01

    Interactions of acutely administered grapefruit juice (GFJ) with cytochrome P450 isoform 3A4 (CYP3A4) and P-glycoprotein (Pgp) function are well established. In this study, we investigated in vitro the effect of repeated administration of GFJ and its major constituents (the flavonoid naringin, its aglycone naringenin and the furanocoumarin bergamottin) on mRNA expression of MDR1 and CYP3A4 in LS180 cells. Since the bergamottin content is higher in the peel than in the fruit, we compared GFJ containing peel (GFJP+) with juice without any peel extract (GFJP-). GFJP- (1%) showed no significant effect on MDR1 and CYP3A4 mRNA expression, whereas 1% GFJP+ increased expression of MDR1 3.7-fold (P<0.01) and CYP3A4 2.3-fold (P<0.05). Of the tested constituents, only 10 microM bergamottin and 200 microM naringenin induced MDR1 mRNA levels 2.9- and 4.0-fold, respectively (P<0.01 for both), and CYP3A4 mRNA levels 3.2- and 15.6-fold (P<0.01 for both), respectively. Western blot analysis and rhodamine 123 uptake experiments partly confirmed these findings on the protein and the functional level. In summary, GFJ containing no peel extract may have a lower potential for interactions with CYP3A4 or P-glycoprotein. PMID:19148864

  6. Repeated Administration of Hyaluronic Acid Coated Liposomes with Improved Pharmacokinetics and Reduced Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quan; Deng, Caifeng; Fu, Yao; Sun, Xun; Gong, Tao; Zhang, Zhirong

    2016-06-01

    PEGylated liposomes (PEG-Lip) have been widely used as a drug carrier for their good stealth property in blood circulation. However, the second injection of PEG-Lip was reported to result in the accelerated blood clearance (ABC) phenomenon and trigger hypersensitivity reactions in sensitive individuals for its complement activation effect. To avoid adverse immune responses, HA was selected to modify liposomes to afford HA modified liposomes (HA-Lip). Repeated administrations of PEG-Lip and HA-Lip were performed in rats. Our results showed that PEG-Lip induced the ABC phenomenon accompanied by a greatly increased accumulation of PEG-Lip in the liver. In contrast, HA-Lip showed good stealth property without inducing either the ABC phenomenon or an increase in liver uptake. Moreover, HA-Lip did not trigger complement activation in human serum in vitro and in rat blood in vivo. Consequently, HA modification represents a viable strategy to prolong the blood circulation time of liposomes without inducing the ABC phenomenon and adverse immune responses. PMID:27112287

  7. Lymphoid follicle destruction and immunosuppression after repeated CpG oligodeoxynucleotide administration.

    PubMed

    Heikenwalder, Mathias; Polymenidou, Magdalini; Junt, Tobias; Sigurdson, Christina; Wagner, Hermann; Akira, Shizuo; Zinkernagel, Rolf; Aguzzi, Adriano

    2004-02-01

    DNA containing unmethylated cytidyl guanosyl (CpG) sequences, which are underrepresented in mammalian genomes but prevalent in prokaryotes, is endocytosed by cells of the innate immune system, including macrophages, monocytes and dendritic cells, and activates a pathway involving Toll-like receptor-9 (TLR9). CpG-containing oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG-ODN) are potent stimulators of innate immunity, and are currently being tested as adjuvants of antimicrobial, antiallergic, anticancer and antiprion immunotherapy. Little is known, however, about the consequences of repeated CpG-ODN administration, which is advocated for some of these applications. Here we report that daily injection of 60 microg CpG-ODN dramatically alters the morphology and functionality of mouse lymphoid organs. By day 7, lymphoid follicles were poorly defined; follicular dendritic cells (FDC) and germinal center B lymphocytes were suppressed. Accordingly, CpG-ODN treatment for > or =7 d strongly reduced primary humoral immune responses and immunoglobulin class switching. By day 20, mice developed multifocal liver necrosis and hemorrhagic ascites. All untoward effects were strictly dependent on CpG and TLR9, as neither the CpG-ODN treatment of Tlr9(-/-) mice nor the repetitive challenge of wild-type mice with nonstimulatory ODN (AT-ODN) or with the TLR3 agonist polyinosinic:cytidylic acid (polyI:C) were immunotoxic or hepatotoxic. PMID:14745443

  8. Endogenous opioids and reward.

    PubMed

    Van Ree, J M; Niesink, R J; Van Wolfswinkel, L; Ramsey, N F; Kornet, M M; Van Furth, W R; Vanderschuren, L J; Gerrits, M A; Van den Berg, C L

    2000-09-29

    The discovery of endogenous opioids has markedly influenced the research on the biology of addiction and reward brain processes. Evidence has been presented that these brain substances modulate brain stimulation reward, self-administration of different drugs of abuse, sexual behaviour and social behaviour. There appears to be two different domains in which endogenous opioids, present in separate and distinct brain regions, are involved. One is related to the modulation of incentive motivational processes and the other to the performance of certain behaviours. It is concluded that endogenous opioids may play a role in the vulnerability to certain diseases, such as addiction and autism, but also when the disease is present, such as alcoholism. PMID:11033317

  9. Opioid Use in Fibromyalgia: A Cautionary Tale.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, Don L; Clauw, Daniel J; Palmer, Roy E; Clair, Andrew G

    2016-05-01

    Multiple pharmacotherapies are available for the treatment of fibromyalgia (FM), including opioid analgesics. We postulate that the mechanism of action of traditional opioids predicts their lack of efficacy in FM. Literature searches of the MEDLINE and Cochrane Library databases were conducted using the search term opioid AND fibromyalgia to identify relevant articles, with no date limitations set. Citation lists in returned articles and personal archives of references were also examined for additional relevant items, and articles were selected based on the expert opinions of the authors. We found no evidence from clinical trials that opioids are effective for the treatment of FM. Observational studies have found that patients with FM receiving opioids have poorer outcomes than patients receiving nonopioids, and FM guidelines recommend against the use of opioid analgesics. Despite this, and despite the availability of alternative Food and Drug Administration-approved pharmacotherapies and the efficacy of nonpharmacologic therapies, opioids are commonly used in the treatment of FM. Factors associated with opioid use include female sex; geographic variation; psychological factors; a history of opioid use, misuse, or abuse; and patient or physician preference. The long-term use of opioid analgesics is of particular concern in the United States given the ongoing public health emergency relating to excess prescription opioid consumption. The continued use of opioids to treat FM despite a proven lack of efficacy, lack of support from treatment guidelines, and the availability of approved pharmacotherapy options provides a cautionary tale for their use in other chronic pain conditions. PMID:26975749

  10. Use of Remifentanil in a Novel Clinical Paradigm to Characterize Onset and Duration of Opioid Blockade by Samidorphan, a Potent μ-Receptor Antagonist.

    PubMed

    Shram, Megan J; Silverman, Bernard; Ehrich, Elliot; Sellers, Edward M; Turncliff, Ryan

    2015-06-01

    A novel clinical study design was used to evaluate the blockade of a selective short-acting μ-opioid agonist (remifentanil) in 24 opioid-experienced subjects. Samidorphan (3-carboxamido-4-hydroxynaltrexone) is a novel opioid modulator with μ-antagonist properties. Objective (pupil diameter) and subjective (visual analog scale) responses to repeated remifentanil and saline infusion challenges were assessed after single oral administration of placebo (day 1) and samidorphan (day 2). Complete blockade persisted with samidorphan for 24 hours for pupil miosis and 48 hours for the drug liking visual analog scale. Samidorphan effects persisted beyond measurable samidorphan exposure (t½ = 7 hours). Samidorphan was associated with complete blockade of remifentanil, and the duration supports daily administration. This study used a novel approach with multiple administrations of remifentanil to successfully demonstrate a durable effect with samidorphan and a rapid and potent blockade of physiological and subjective μ-opioid effects. PMID:25928699

  11. Use of Remifentanil in a Novel Clinical Paradigm to Characterize Onset and Duration of Opioid Blockade by Samidorphan, a Potent μ-Receptor Antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Shram, Megan J.; Silverman, Bernard; Ehrich, Elliot; Sellers, Edward M.; Turncliff, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A novel clinical study design was used to evaluate the blockade of a selective short-acting μ-opioid agonist (remifentanil) in 24 opioid-experienced subjects. Samidorphan (3-carboxamido-4-hydroxynaltrexone) is a novel opioid modulator with μ-antagonist properties. Objective (pupil diameter) and subjective (visual analog scale) responses to repeated remifentanil and saline infusion challenges were assessed after single oral administration of placebo (day 1) and samidorphan (day 2). Complete blockade persisted with samidorphan for 24 hours for pupil miosis and 48 hours for the drug liking visual analog scale. Samidorphan effects persisted beyond measurable samidorphan exposure (t½ = 7 hours). Samidorphan was associated with complete blockade of remifentanil, and the duration supports daily administration. This study used a novel approach with multiple administrations of remifentanil to successfully demonstrate a durable effect with samidorphan and a rapid and potent blockade of physiological and subjective μ-opioid effects. PMID:25928699

  12. Opioid use and dropout in patients receiving oral naltrexone with or without single administration of injection naltrexone

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Maria A.; Bisaga, Adam; Glass, Andrew; Mishlen, Kaitlyn; Pavlicova, Martina; Carpenter, Kenneth M.; Mariani, John J; Levin, Frances R.; Nunes, Edward V.

    2015-01-01

    Background Adherence to oral naltrexone has been poor and can be improved somewhat with behavioral therapy. We compared Behavioral Naltrexone Therapy (BNT) to Compliance Enhancement (CE) and tested efficacy of single-dose injection naltrexone (XR-NTX; 384 mg) with behavioral therapies at further improving aherence to oral naltrexone. Methods A 24-week, randomized, placebo-controlled trial (N=125) compared four treatment conditions following inpatient detoxification and oral naltrexone induction: (1) BNT+XR-NTX; (2) BNT+ placebo injection; (3) CE+ XR-NTX; and (4) CE+placebo injection. All participants were maintained on oral naltrexone throughout the trial. Primary outcome was retention in treatment. Results Of 89 randomized participants, 78.7% (70/89) completed 4 weeks, 58.2% (54/89) completed 8 weeks, 47.2% (42/89) completed 12 weeks, and 25.8% (23/89) completed 24 weeks. A Cox proportional hazards regression modeled time to dropout as a function of treatment condition, baseline opioid dependence severity (bags per day of heroin use), and their interaction. Interaction of conditions by baseline severity was significant (X23 = 9.19, p = .027). For low-severity patients (<6 bags/day), retention was highest in the BNT-XRNTX group (60% at 6 months), as hypothesized. For high-severity (> 6 bags/day) patients, BNT-XR-NTX did not perform as well, due to high early attrition. Conclusion For low-severity heroin users, single-dose XR-NTX improved long-term treatment retention when combined with behavioral therapy. In higher-severity opioid-dependent patients, XR-NTX was less helpful, perhaps because, combined with oral naltrexone, it produced higher blood levels and more withdrawal discomfort. When cost considerations recommend oral naltrexone following XR-NTX, the latter should be phased in slowly. PMID:25555621

  13. Adjuncts to opioid therapy.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Frederick J

    2002-09-01

    Administration of opioids to alleviate moderate to severe acute pain and chronic cancer pain is an established management process. However, advancements in clinical pharmacologic research have shown that opioids are also effective in chronic noncancerous pain. Many patients properly treated for prolonged periods with opioids develop tolerance and subsequently, physical dependence. This process is not necessarily harmful to the patient and will not cause the patient to develop an addiction (properly defined as psychologic dependence). For many patients who have been on opioid therapy for months or years, analgesic effectiveness tragically becomes less. In addition, opioid-induced constipation can be severe and cause pain; patients do not develop tolerance to this adverse reaction. Therefore, such issues become a management problem and require additional intervention. Currently, many different classes of drugs can serve as effective adjuncts to opioids for treatment of pain. Adding adjunctive medication to opioid therapy improves pain management primarily by nonopioid mechanisms of action. Clinical outcomes of such combinations include greater analgesia and attenuation of opioid-induced adverse reactions such as nausea and vomiting, constipation, sedation, and respiratory depression. Adjuncts include acetaminophen, antiarrhythmics, anticonvulsants, antidepressants, antipsychotics, baclofen, benzodiazepines, capsaicin, calcium channel blockers, clonidine hydrochloride, central nervous system stimulants, corticosteroids, local anesthetics, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, pentoxifylline, and scopolamine. Some adjuncts (eg, acetaminophen) are routinely used today, whereas others (eg, nifedipine [calcium channel blocker]) are used on a limited basis but have great potential for more widespread application. All professionals (eg, nurses, pharmacists, physicians, physicians' assistants, social workers, members of the clergy

  14. Loss of parvalbumin-immunoreactivity in mouse brain regions after repeated intermittent administration of esketamine, but not R-ketamine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun; Han, Mei; Zhang, Ji-Chun; Ren, Qian; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2016-05-30

    Clinical use of the rapid antidepressant drug ketamine is limited, due to psychotomimetic side effects. R-ketamine appears to be a potent, long-lasting and safer antidepressant, relative to S-ketamine (esketamine), since it is free of psychotomimetic side effects. Repeated, intermittent administration of esketamine (10mg/kg, once per week for 8-weeks), but not R-ketamine, caused loss of parvalbumin (PV)-immunoreactivity in the medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of mouse brains, regions associated with psychosis. This study suggests that repeated intermittent use of R-ketamine is safer than esketamine in the treatment of depression. PMID:27043274

  15. [Pharmacotherapy of cancer pain : 2. Use of opioids.].

    PubMed

    Cherny, N I; Portenoy, R K; Raber, M; Zenz, M

    1995-01-01

    The adequate use of opioids in the treatment of chronic cancer pain requires sound knowledge of selection criteria for the various opioids, the routes of administration, dosages, dosing schemes and possible side effects. Drug selection depends on the intensity of pain rather than on the specific pathophysiology. Mild to moderate pain can often be treated effectively by so-called "weak" opioids. These include codeine, dihydrocodeine and dextropropoxyphene. Non-opioid analgesics, like acetylsalicylic acid or paracetamol can be added according to the "analgesic ladder" proposed by the World Health Organization (WHO). If adequate pain relief is not achieved "strong" opioids are required. The route of administration that is the safest and the least invasive for the patient should be chosen. Non-invasive (oral, rectal, sublingual, transdermal and intranasal) and invasive routes (intravenous, subcutaneous, spinal and epidural) are available (Table 8). Noninvasive routes are preferred, and most patients can be maintained on oral opioids. Alternatively, in some patients pain can be managed by the sublingual (buprenorphine) route. A transdermal preparation exists for fentanyl, but has not yet been approved for the German market. If the oral route cannot be used or if large doses are required, it will be necessary to change to an invasive route. Intravenous bolus injections provide the fastest onset of analgesic action. They are mostly used in very severe pain. Repeated injections can be avoided by using intravenous or subcutaneous infusions. Various types of pumps delivering analgesics at constant basal infusion rates with the option of rescue doses in case of breakthrough pain are available (patient-controlled analgesia=PCA). Opioids frequently used for s. c. infusion are morphine and hydromorphone. Adjuvant drugs (antiemetics, anxiolytics) can be added. Epidural or intrathecal administration of opioids should only be used in intractable pain or if severe side effects, such

  16. The evolution of vertebrate opioid receptors

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Craig W.

    2011-01-01

    The proteins that mediate the analgesic and other effects of opioid drugs and endogenous opioid peptides are known as opioid receptors. Opioid receptors consist of a family of four closely-related proteins belonging to the large superfamily of G-protein coupled receptors. The three types of opioid receptors shown unequivocally to mediate analgesia in animal models are the mu (MOR), delta (DOR), and kappa (KOR) opioid receptor proteins. The role of the fourth member of the opioid receptor family, the nociceptin or orphanin FQ receptor (ORL), is not as clear as hyperalgesia, analgesia, and no effect was reported after administration of ORL agonists. There are now cDNA sequences for all four types of opioid receptors that are expressed in the brain of six species from three different classes of vertebrates. This review presents a comparative analysis of vertebrate opioid receptors using bioinformatics and data from recent human genome studies. Results indicate that opioid receptors arose by gene duplication, that there is a vector of opioid receptor divergence, and that MOR shows evidence of rapid evolution. PMID:19273128

  17. Modulation of pre- and postsynaptic dopamine D2 receptor function by the selective kappa-opioid receptor agonist U69593.

    PubMed

    Acri, J B; Thompson, A C; Shippenberg, T

    2001-03-15

    The repeated administration of selective kappa-opioid receptor agonists prevents the locomotor activation produced by acute cocaine administration and the development of cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization. Previous studies have shown that dopamine (DA) D2 autoreceptors modulate the synthesis and release of DA in the striatum. Evidence that kappa agonist treatment downregulates DA D2 receptors in this same brain region has recently been obtained. Accordingly, the present studies were undertaken to examine the influence of repeated kappa-opioid receptor agonist administration on pre- and postsynaptic DA D2 receptor function in the dorsal striatum using pre- and postsynaptic receptor-selective doses of quinpirole. Rats were injected once daily with the selective kappa-opioid receptor agonist U69593 (0.16-0.32 mg/kg s.c.) or vehicle for 3 days. Microdialysis studies assessing basal and quinpirole-evoked (0.05 mg/kg s.c.) DA levels were conducted 2 days later. Basal and quinpirole-stimulated locomotor activity were assessed in a parallel group of animals. The no-net flux method of quantitative microdialysis revealed no effect of U69593 on basal DA dynamics, in that extracellular DA concentration and extraction fraction did not differ in control and U69593-treated animals. Acute administration of quinpirole significantly decreased striatal DA levels in control animals, but in animals treated with U69593, the inhibitory effects of quinpirole were significantly reduced. Quinpirole produced a dose-related increase in locomotor activity in control animals, and this effect was significantly attenuated in U69593-treated animals. These data reveal that prior repeated administration of a selective kappa-opioid receptor agonist attenuates quinpirole-induced alterations in DA neurotransmission and locomotor activity. These results suggest that both pre- and postsynaptic striatal DA D2 receptors may be downregulated following repeated kappa-opioid receptor agonist

  18. Comparison of a drug versus money and drug versus drug self-administration choice procedure with oxycodone and morphine in opioid addicts

    PubMed Central

    Comer, Sandra D; Metz, Verena E; Cooper, Ziva D; Kowalczyk, William J; Jones, Jermaine D; Sullivan, Maria A; Manubay, Jeanne M; Vosburg, Suzanne K; Smith, Mary E; Peyser, Deena; Saccone, Phillip A

    2014-01-01

    This double-blind, placebo-controlled study investigated effects of oral morphine (0, 45, 135 mg/70kg) and oral oxycodone (0, 15, 45 mg/70kg) in buprenorphine-maintained opioid addicts. Since a 3:1 morphine:oxycodone dose ratio had yielded equivalent subjective and physiological effects in non-dependent individuals, this ratio was used in the present study. Two self-administration laboratory procedures, i.e. a drug vs. money and a drug vs. drug procedure, were assessed. Study participants (N=12) lived in the hospital and were maintained on 4 mg/day sublingual buprenorphine. When participants chose between drug and money, money was preferred over all drug doses; only high-dose oxycodone was self-administered more than placebo. When participants chose between drug and drug, both drugs were chosen more than placebo, high doses of each drug were chosen over low doses, and high-dose oxycodone was preferred over high-dose morphine. The subjective, performance-impairing, and miotic effects of high-dose oxycodone were generally greater compared to high-dose morphine. The study demonstrated that a 3:1 dose ratio of morphine:oxycodone was not equipotent in buprenorphine-dependent subjects. Both self-administration procedures were effective for assessing the relative reinforcing effects of drugs; preference for one procedure should be driven by the specific research question of interest. PMID:23839029

  19. Comparison of a drug versus money and drug versus drug self-administration choice procedure with oxycodone and morphine in opioid addicts.

    PubMed

    Comer, Sandra D; Metz, Verena E; Cooper, Ziva D; Kowalczyk, William J; Jones, Jermaine D; Sullivan, Maria A; Manubay, Jeanne M; Vosburg, Suzanne K; Smith, Mary E; Peyser, Deena; Saccone, Phillip A

    2013-09-01

    This double-blind, placebo-controlled study investigated the effects of oral morphine (0, 45, 135 mg/70 kg) and oral oxycodone (0, 15, 45 mg/70 kg) on buprenorphine-maintained opioid addicts. As a 3: 1 morphine : oxycodone oral dose ratio yielded equivalent subjective and physiological effects in nondependent individuals, this ratio was used in the present study. Two self-administration laboratory procedures - that is, a drug versus money and a drug versus drug procedure - were assessed. Study participants (N=12) lived in the hospital and were maintained on 4 mg/day sublingual buprenorphine. When participants chose between drug and money, money was preferred over all drug doses; only high-dose oxycodone was self-administered more than placebo. When participants chose between drug and drug, both drugs were chosen more than placebo, high doses of each drug were chosen over low doses, and high-dose oxycodone was preferred over high-dose morphine. The subjective, performance-impairing, and miotic effects of high-dose oxycodone were generally greater than those of high-dose morphine. The study demonstrated that a 3: 1 oral dose ratio of morphine : oxycodone was not equipotent in buprenorphine-dependent individuals. Both self-administration procedures were effective for assessing the relative reinforcing effects of drugs; preference for one procedure should be driven by the specific research question of interest. PMID:23839029

  20. Dopamine and serotonin imbalances in the left anterior cingulate and pyriform cortices following the repeated intermittent administration of cocaine.

    PubMed

    Heidbreder, C A; Oertle, T; Feldon, J

    1999-03-01

    Studies on the neurobiology of cocaine abuse suggest that cocaine directly modifies the activity of dopamine neurons projecting from the dopamine-synthesizing cells of the ventral tegmental area to the nucleus accumbens. The repeated use of cocaine produces persistent adaptations within the mesocorticolimbic system and the resulting changes in monoamine neurotransmission may lead to behavioral sensitization. The present series of experiments sought to determine the effects of the repeated, intermittent challenge that took place two days after discontinuation of the pretreatment regimen; (ii) the ex vivo levels of biogenic monoamines, choline and acetylcholine in the nucleus accumbens, the dorsolateral caudate nucleus, as well as the anterior cingulate, frontal motor, frontal somatosensory and pyriform cortices; and (iii) the degree of neurochemical relationship between the left and right hemispheres. The repeated administration of cocaine produced sensitized behavioral responses to a subsequent challenge. Neurochemical correlates of repeated cocaine administration were observed at the cortical level and included a significant decrease in serotonin levels in the left anterior cingulate and pyriform cortices and an increase in dopamine metabolism in the left pyriform cortex. Furthermore, a shift in the interhemispheric coupling coefficient matrix for dopamine neurotransmission was observed in both the pyriform cortex and nucleus accumbens of cocaine-sensitized animals suggesting that, in these structures, the two hemispheres are operating independently. These results demonstrate that cocaine produces alterations in specific dopaminergic and serotonergic pathways that arise from the mesencephalon and project towards both the anterior cingulate and pyriform cortices. PMID:10199606

  1. Repeated cocaine administration increases B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2 phosphorylation in the rat dorsal striatum.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sung Min; Jang, Dong Hye; Choe, Eun Sang

    2010-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation caused by drug administration is a critical step in the regulation of behavioral alterations. This study was conducted to determine how repeated exposure to cocaine phosphorylates B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2 (Bcl2), which may be responsible for the regulation of behavioral alterations in the rat dorsal striatum. The results revealed that repeated systemic injections of cocaine (20 mg/kg) once a day for 7 consecutive days increased the phosphorylation of Bcl2 at serine 70 (Bcl2-S70). However, this increase was reduced by the blockade of dopamine D1 receptors, group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. In addition, elevation of behavioral locomotor activity after repeated exposure to cocaine was partially reduced by the inhibition of Bcl2. These data suggest that stimulation of dopamine D1 receptors, group I mGluRs, and NMDA receptors following repeated cocaine administration is necessary for the induction of Bcl2-S70 phosphorylation, which contributes to the expression of behavioral sensitization. PMID:19879923

  2. Short-term repeated corticosterone administration enhances glutamatergic but not GABAergic transmission in the rat motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Kula, Joanna; Blasiak, Anna; Czerw, Anna; Tylko, Grzegorz; Sowa, Joanna; Hess, Grzegorz

    2016-04-01

    It has been demonstrated that stress impairs performance of skilled reaching and walking tasks in rats due to the action of glucocorticoids involved in the stress response. Skilled reaching and walking are controlled by the primary motor cortex (M1); however, it is not known whether stress-related impairments in skilled motor tasks are related to functional and/or structural alterations within the M1. We studied the effects of single and repeated injections of corticosterone (twice daily for 7 days) on spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs and sIPSCs) recorded from layer II/III pyramidal neurons in ex vivo slices of the M1, prepared 2 days after the last administration of the hormone. We also measured the density of dendritic spines on pyramidal cells and the protein levels of selected subunits of AMPA, NMDA, and GABAA receptors after repeated corticosterone administration. Repeatedly administered corticosterone induced an increase in the frequency but not in the amplitude of sEPSCs, while a single administration had no effect on the recorded excitatory currents. The frequency and amplitude of sIPSCs as well as the excitability of pyramidal cells were changed neither after single nor after repeated corticosterone administration. Treatment with corticosterone for 7 days did not modify the density of dendritic spines on pyramidal neurons. Corticosterone influenced neither the protein levels of GluA1, GluA2, GluN1, GluN2A, and GluN2B subunits of glutamate receptors nor those of α1, β2, and γ2 subunits of the GABAA receptor. The increase in sEPSCs frequency induced by repeated corticosterone administration faded out within 7 days. These data indicate that prolonged administration of exogenous corticosterone selectively and reversibly enhances glutamatergic, but not GABAergic transmission in the rat motor cortex. Our results suggest that corticosterone treatment results in an enhancement of spontaneous glutamate release from

  3. Repeated administration of low-dose cisplatin in mice induces fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Cierra N; Doll, Mark A; Dupre, Tess V; Shah, Parag P; Subathra, Marimuthu; Siow, Deanna; Arteel, Gavin E; Megyesi, Judit; Beverly, Levi J; Siskind, Leah J

    2016-03-15

    Cisplatin, a chemotherapeutic used for the treatment of solid cancers, has nephrotoxic side effects leading to acute kidney injury (AKI). Cisplatin cannot be given to patients that have comorbidities that predispose them to an increased risk for AKI. Even without these comorbidities, 30% of patients administered cisplatin will develop kidney injury, requiring the oncologist to withhold or reduce the next dose, leading to a less effective therapeutic regimen. Although recovery can occur after one episode of cisplatin-induced AKI, longitudinal studies have indicated that multiple episodes of AKI lead to the development of chronic kidney disease, an irreversible disease with no current treatment. The standard mouse model of cisplatin-induced AKI consists of one high dose of cisplatin (>20 mg/kg) that is lethal to the animal 3 days later. This model does not accurately reflect the dosing regimen patients receive nor does it allow for the long-term study of kidney function and biology. We have developed a repeated dosing model whereby cisplatin is given once a week for 4 wk. Comparison of the repeated dosing model with the standard dosing model demonstrated that inflammatory cytokines and chemokines were induced in the repeated dosing model, but levels of cell death were lower in the repeated dosing model. The repeated dosing model had increased levels of fibrotic markers (fibronectin, transforming growth factor-β, and α-smooth muscle actin) and interstitial fibrosis. These data indicate that the repeated dosing model can be used to study the AKI to chronic kidney disease progression as well as the mechanisms of this progression. PMID:26739893

  4. Augmented behavioral response and enhanced synaptosomal calcium transport induced by repeated cocaine administration are decreased by calcium channel blockers

    PubMed Central

    Mills, K.; Ansah, T.A.; Ali, S.F.; Mukherjee, S.; Shockley, D.C.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that calcium influx via L-type calcium channels is necessary for psychostimulant-induced behavioral sensitization. In addition, chronic amphetamine upregulates subtype Cav1.2-containing L-type calcium channels. In the present studies, we assessed the effect of calcium channel blockers (CCBs) on cocaine-induced behavioral sentitization and determined whether the functional activity of L-type calcium channels is altered after repeated cocaine administration. Rats were administered daily intraperitoneal injections of either flunarizine (40 mg/kg), diltiazem (40 mg/kg) or cocaine (20 mg/kg) and the combination of the CCB’s and cocaine for 30 days. Motor activities were monitored on Day 1, and every 6th day during the 30-day treatment period. Daily cocaine administration produced increased locomotor activity. Maximal augmentation of behavioral response to repeated cocaine administration was observed on Day 18. Flunarizine pretreatment abolished the augmented behavioral response to repeated cocaine administration while diltiazem was less effective. Measurement of tissue monoamine levels on Day 18 revealed cocaine-induced increases in DA and 5-HT in the nucleus accumbens. By contrast to behavioral response, diltiazem was more effective in attenuating increases in monoamine levels than flunarizine. Cocaine administration for 18 days produced increases in calcium-uptake in synaptosomes prepared from the nucleus accumbens and frontal cortex. Increases in calcium-uptake were abolished by flunarizine- and diltiazem-pretreatment. Taken together, the augmented cocaine-induced behavioral response on Day 18 may be due to increased calcium uptake in the nucleus accumbens leading to increased dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) release. Flunarizine and diltiazem attenuated the behavioral response by decreasing calcium uptake and decreasing neurochemical release. PMID:17689567

  5. EFFECT OF REPEATED ORGANOPHOSPHATE ADMINISTRATION ON CARBACHOL-STIMULATED PHOSPHOINSITIDE HYDROLYSIS IN RAT BRAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of repeated exposure to two organophosphates on the turnover of phosphoinositides, the second messenger system coupled to the M1 and M3 subtypes of muscarinic receptors, were examined in rat hippocampus. epeated diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) exposure (0.2-0.8 mg/kg...

  6. Effects of repeated oral corticosterone administration on performance and stress parameters of laying hens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of repeated stress during rearing on performance and physiology of laying hens was studied using a corticosterone (Cort) model. 240 Hisex laying hens were reared in environmentally controlled battery cages. At 7, 11, and 15 wk of age they were exposed for 1 wk to the following treatments...

  7. EFFECT OF EPISODIC WEEKLY NICOTINE ADMINISTRATION ON REPEATED ACQUISITION IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our prior research showed both tolerance and sensitization to nicotine?s effects on motor activity with weekly dosing. This experiment determined the generality of this finding to conditioned behavior. After extended training on a repeated acquisition/performance schedule all ra...

  8. Neuraxial opioid-induced itch and its pharmacological antagonism.

    PubMed

    Ko, Mei-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Given its profound analgesic nature, neuraxial opioids are frequently used for pain management. Unfortunately, the high incident rate of itch/pruritus after spinal administration of opioid analgesics reported in postoperative and obstetric patients greatly diminishes patient satisfaction and thus the value of the analgesics. Many endeavors to solve the mystery behind neuraxial opioid-induced itch had not been successful, as the pharmacological antagonism other than the blockade of mu opioid receptors remains elusive. Nevertheless, as the characteristics of all opioid receptor subtypes have become more understood, more studies have shed light on the potential effective treatments. This review discusses the mechanisms underlying neuraxial opioid-induced itch and compares pharmacological evidence in nonhuman primates with clinical findings across diverse drugs. Both nonhuman primate and human studies corroborate that mixed mu/kappa opioid partial agonists seem to be the most effective drugs in ameliorating neuraxial opioid-induced itch while retaining neuraxial opioid-induced analgesia. PMID:25861787

  9. Neuraxial Opioid-Induced Itch and Its Pharmacological Antagonism

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Given its profound analgesic nature, neuraxial opioids are frequently used for pain management. Unfortunately, the high incident rate of itch/pruritus after spinal administration of opioid analgesics reported in postoperative and obstetric patients greatly diminishes patient satisfaction and thus the value of the analgesics. Many endeavors to solve the mystery behind neuraxial opioid-induced itch had not been successful, as the pharmacological antagonism other than the blockade of mu opioid receptors remains elusive. Nevertheless, as the characteristics of all opioid receptor subtypes have become more understood, more studies have shed light on the potential effective treatments. This review discusses the mechanisms underlying neuraxial opioid-induced itch and compares pharmacological evidence in nonhuman primates with clinical findings across diverse drugs. Both nonhuman primate and human studies corroborate that mixed mu/kappa opioid partial agonists seem to be the most effective drugs in ameliorating neuraxial opioid-induced itch while retaining neuraxial opioid-induced analgesia. PMID:25861787

  10. Modulation of the behavioral and neurochemical effects of psychostimulants by kappa-opioid receptor systems.

    PubMed

    Shippenberg, T S; Chefer, V I; Zapata, A; Heidbreder, C A

    2001-06-01

    The repeated, intermittent use of cocaine and other drugs of abuse produces profound and often long-lasting alterations in behavior and brain chemistry. It has been suggested that these consequences of drug use play a critical role in drug craving and relapse to addiction. This article reviews the effects of psychostimulant administration on dopaminergic and excitatory amino acid neurotransmission in brain regions comprising the brain's motive circuit and provides evidence that the activation of endogenous kappa-opioid receptor systems in these regions opposes the behavioral and neurochemical consequences of repeated drug use. The role of this opioid system in mediating alterations in mood and affect that occur during abstinence from repeated psychostimulant use are also discussed. PMID:11458540

  11. Clinical pharmacology of non opioid analgesics in neonates.

    PubMed

    Allegaert, K; de Hoon, J; Van Overmeire, B; Devlieger, H

    2005-01-01

    An integrated approach of neonatal analgesia starts with the systematic evaluation of pain and should be followed by effective interventions, mainly based on the appropriate (i.e. safe and effective) administration of analgesics. In contrast to the more potent opioids, data on the pharmacokinetics and -dynamics of non-opioid analgesics in this specific population are still rare or even lacking. We therefore evaluated various aspects of developmental pharmacology of non-opioid analgesics (paracetamol, ibuprofen, acetylsalicyl acid) in neonates. We first performed a single dose propacetamol study in preterm and term neonates. Based on these preliminary findings, a repeated dose administration scheme was developed and tested and maturational aspects from preterm till teenage were documented. Although non-selective COX-inhibitors might be effective in the treatment of postoperative or inflammatory pain syndromes in neonates, potential efficacy should be balanced against the drugs' safety profile. Neonatal renal clearance strongly depends on glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and GFR itself strongly depends on the vaso-dilatative of prostaglandins on the afferent arterioli. We therefore evaluated the impact of the administration of ibuprofen or acetylsalicylic acid on renal clearance in preterm infants and hereby used amikacin clearance as a surrogate marker. We hereby documented the negative effect of ibuprofen on glomerular filtration rate in preterm infants up to 34 weeks and we were able to show that ibuprofen and acetylsalicylic acid had an equal impact on the glomerular filtration rate. PMID:16408826

  12. FDA Boxed Warning for Immediate-Release Opioids.

    PubMed

    Food And Drug Administration Public Health Service U S Department Of Health And Human Services

    2016-06-01

    On March 22, 2016, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced enhanced warnings for immediate-release opioid pain medications related to risks of misuse, abuse, addiction, overdose, and death. The new safety warnings also added to all prescription opioid medications to inform prescribers and patients of additional risks related to opioid use. PMID:27301692

  13. Toxicology study assessing efficacy and safety of repeated administration of lipid/DNA complexes to mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Alton, E W F W; Boyd, A C; Cheng, S H; Davies, J C; Davies, L A; Dayan, A; Gill, D R; Griesenbach, U; Higgins, T; Hyde, S C; Innes, J A; McLachlan, G; Porteous, D; Pringle, I; Scheule, R K; Sumner-Jones, S

    2014-01-01

    For gene therapy to improve lung function in cystic fibrosis (CF) subjects, repeated administration of the gene transfer agent over the lifetime of patients is likely to be necessary. This requirement limits the utility of adenoviral and adeno-associated viral vectors (both previously evaluated in CF gene therapy trials) because of induced adaptive immune responses that render repeated dosing ineffective. For CF gene therapy trials, non-viral vectors are currently the only viable option. We previously showed that the cationic lipid formulation GL67A is the most efficient of several non-viral vectors analysed for airway gene transfer. Here, we assessed the efficacy and safety of administering 12 inhaled doses of GL67A complexed with pGM169, a CpG-free plasmid encoding human CFTR complementary DNA, into mice. We show that repeated administration of pGM169/GL67A to murine lungs is feasible, safe and achieves reproducible, dose-related and persistent gene expression (>140 days after each dose) using an aerosol generated by a clinically relevant nebuliser. This study supports progression into the first non-viral multidose lung trial in CF patients. PMID:24196086

  14. Upregulation of the opioid receptor complex by the chronic administration of morphine: a biochemical marker related to the development of tolerance and dependence.

    PubMed

    Rothman, R B; Long, J B; Bykov, V; Xu, H; Jacobson, A E; Rice, K C; Holaday, J W

    1991-01-01

    Studies conducted after the development of the rapid filtration assay for opiate receptors, and before the recognition of multiple opioid receptors, failed to detect changes in opioid receptors induced by chronic morphine. Recent experiments conducted in our laboratories were designed to examine the hypothesis that only one of several opioid receptor types might be altered by chronic morphine. Using binding surface analysis and irreversible ligands to increase the "resolving power" of the ligand binding assay, the results indicated that chronic morphine increased both the Bmax and Kd of the opioid receptor complex, labeled with either [3H][D-Ala2,D-Leu5]enkephalin, [3H][D-Ala2-MePhe4,Gly-ol5]enkephalin or [3H]6-desoxy-6 beta-fluoronaltreone. In the present study rats were pretreated with drugs known to attenuate the development of tolerance and dependence [the irreversible mu-receptor antagonist, beta-funaltrexamine (beta-FNA), and the inhibitor of tryptophan hydroxylase, para-chlorophenylalanine], prior to subcutaneous implantation of morphine pellets. The results demonstrated that 1) unlike chronic naltrexone, beta-FNA failed to upregulate opioid receptors and 2) both beta-funaltrexamine and PCPA pretreatment attenuated the chronic morphine-induced increase in the Bmax, but not the Kd, of the opioid receptor complex. These results provide evidence that naltrex-one-induced upregulation of the opioid receptor complex might occur indirectly as a consequence of interactions at beta-funaltrexamine-insensitive opioid receptors and that morphine-induced upregulation (increased Bmax) of the opioid receptor complex is a relevant in vitro marker related to the development of tolerance and dependence. These data collectively support the hypothesis that endogenous antiopiate peptides play an important role in the development of tolerance and dependence to morphine. PMID:1646998

  15. Treatment response after repeated administration of C1 esterase inhibitor for successive acute hereditary angioedema attacks.

    PubMed

    Craig, Timothy J; Bewtra, Againdra K; Hurewitz, David; Levy, Robyn; Janss, Gerti; Jacobson, Kraig W; Packer, Flint; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Rojavin, Mikhail A; Machnig, Thomas; Keinecke, Heinz-Otto; Wasserman, Richard L

    2012-01-01

    Placebo-controlled studies established the efficacy of replacement therapy with C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) concentrate for treating single acute hereditary angioedema (HAE) attacks, but only limited data from prospective studies are available on repeated treatment of successive HAE attacks. This study evaluates the association between repeated treatments with 20 U/kg of C1-INH concentrate (Berinert; CSL Behring, Marburg, Germany) for HAE attacks at any body location and treatment response. In a post hoc analysis of an open-label extension study (International Multicenter Prospective Angioedema C1-INH Trial [I.M.P.A.C.T.2]), the association between repeated treatment with C1-INH and times to onset of symptom relief and complete resolution of HAE symptoms was assessed in patients who were treated for at least 15 attacks by linear regression on the ordinal attack number. Eighteen patients received C1-INH concentrate for at least 15 HAE attacks over a mean duration of 34 months. Demographic and baseline characteristics of these patients were similar to those of all patients in the study. The distribution of body locations and the intensity of HAE attacks were similar for each of the first 15 attacks and subsequent attacks. The extent of previous use of C1-INH concentrate had no effect on the time to onset of symptom relief, the time to complete resolution of HAE symptoms, or the time between attacks treated with C1-INH concentrate; the median of individual linear regression coefficients was not statistically significantly different from 0. Treatment with 20 U/kg of C1-INH concentrate provided consistent treatment response in patients treated for multiple successive HAE attacks at any body location. (Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00292981). PMID:22856636

  16. Sputum Tobramycin Concentrations in Cystic Fibrosis Patients with Repeated Administration of Inhaled Tobramycin

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, Julia; Moss, Richard; Genatossio, Alan; McNamara, Sharon; Burns, Jane L.; Anderson, Gail; Rosenfeld, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Dosing of tobramycin solution for inhalation (TSI) in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients was based on single-dose pharmacokinetic studies. This investigation was prompted by evidence of possible antibiotic accumulation in respiratory secretions with repeated dosing. The objectives were to evaluate whether tobramycin accumulates in respiratory secretions with repeated inhalation, compare total and biologically active tobramycin concentrations in CF sputum, and evaluate sputum induction for obtaining secretions for drug concentration assay. Methods : Individuals with CF ≥10 years of age were enrolled at the beginning of a course of TSI, 300 mg twice daily for 28 days. Two study visits were conducted, 1–2 days and 24–28 days after initiation of TSI treatment. Induced sputum and expectorated sputum samples were collected for measurement of trough and peak tobramycin concentrations at each visit. Total tobramycin concentrations were measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography and bioactive concentrations by bioassay. Results Twenty participants completed the study. Trough concentrations were similar at visits 1 and 2, as were peak concentrations. Trough bioactive and total tobramycin concentrations were similar (mean ratio 1.2, 95% CI 0.56, 1.87), but peak bioactive concentrations were significantly lower than peak total concentrations (mean ratio 0.33, 95% CI 0.23, 0.44). Sputum induction was well tolerated. Conclusions : No evidence of significant drug accumulation in respiratory secretions with repeat dosing of TSI was seen. Peak bioactive concentrations, although lower than peak total concentrations, were still generally well within the bactericidal range. Sputum induction as a method for determining airway drug concentrations appears safe and feasible. PMID:22620494

  17. Constipation in people prescribed opioids

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Constipation is reported in 52% of people with advanced malignancy. This figure rises to 87% in people who are terminally ill and taking opioids. Constipation may be the most common adverse effect of opioids. There is no reason to believe that people with chronic non-malignant disease who take opioids will be any less troubled by this adverse effect. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of: oral laxatives, rectally applied medications, and opioid antagonists for constipation in people prescribed opioids? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to August 2009 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 23 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: arachis oil enemas, bisacodyl, co-danthrusate/co-danthramer, docusate, glycerol suppositories, ispaghula husk, lactulose, liquid paraffin, macrogols plus electrolyte solutions, magnesium salts, methylcellulose, opioid antagonists, phosphate enemas, senna, sodium citrate micro-enema, and sodium picosulfate. PMID:21718572

  18. Opioid and non-opioid mechanisms of footshock-induced analgesia: role of the spinal dorsolateral funiculus.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J W; Terman, G W; Watkins, L R; Mayer, D J; Liebeskind, J C

    1983-05-01

    Exposure to inescapable footshock causes either an opioid or non-opioid mediated analgesia in the rat depending on the temporal parameters of its administration. Lesions of the spinal dorsolateral funiculus significantly reduce both the opioid and non-opioid forms of this footshock-induced analgesia. Thus, these two neurochemically discrete pain-inhibitory systems appear to depend on the integrity of the same descending path, one known to be activated by morphine and by analgesic brain stimulation. PMID:6860939

  19. Repeated cocaine administration results in supersensitivity of striatal D-2 dopamine autoreceptors to pergolide

    SciTech Connect

    Dwoskin, L.P.; Peris, J.; Yasuda, R.P.; Philpott, K.; Zahniser, N.R.

    1988-01-01

    Groups of rats administered cocaine-HCl (10 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline either acutely or once daily for 8 or 14 days were killed 24 hrs after the last dose. In striatal slices prelabelled with (/sup 3/H)DA, modulation of (/sup 3/H)-overflow by pergolide was used to measure D-2 autoreceptor activity. Compared to the contemporaneous control group pergolide produced a greater inhibition only in striatal slices from rats treated repeatedly with cocaine. In radioligand binding studies using striatal membranes from control rats, pergolide had a 500-fold greater affinity for the D-2, as opposed to the D-1, dopamine (DA) receptor subtype. These results indicate that repeated treatment with cocaine produces supersensitive striatal D-2 release-modulating autoreceptors consistent with a compensatory change to diminish the effect of elevated synaptic concentrations of DA produced by cocaine. In contrast, supersensitivity of D-2 receptors was not detected in (/sup 3/H)spiperone binding assays. 31 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  20. Repeated administrations of carbon nanotubes in male mice cause reversible testis damage without affecting fertility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yuhong; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Jingping; Mu, Qingxin; Zhang, Weidong; Butch, Elizabeth R.; Snyder, Scott E.; Yan, Bing

    2010-09-01

    Soluble carbon nanotubes show promise as materials for in vivo delivery and imaging applications. Several reports have described the in vivo toxicity of carbon nanotubes, but their effects on male reproduction have not been examined. Here, we show that repeated intravenous injections of water-soluble multiwalled carbon nanotubes into male mice can cause reversible testis damage without affecting fertility. Nanotubes accumulated in the testes, generated oxidative stress and decreased the thickness of the seminiferous epithelium in the testis at day 15, but the damage was repaired at 60 and 90 days. The quantity, quality and integrity of the sperm and the levels of three major sex hormones were not significantly affected throughout the 90-day period. The fertility of treated male mice was unaffected; the pregnancy rate and delivery success of female mice that mated with the treated male mice did not differ from those that mated with untreated male mice.

  1. Cholinesterase inhibition and alterations of hepatic metabolism by oral acute and repeated chlorpyrifos administration to mice.

    PubMed

    Cometa, Maria Francesca; Buratti, Franca Maria; Fortuna, Stefano; Lorenzini, Paola; Volpe, Maria Teresa; Parisi, Laura; Testai, Emanuela; Meneguz, Annarita

    2007-05-01

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is a broad spectrum organophosphorus insecticide bioactivated in vivo to chlorpyrifos-oxon (CPFO), a very potent anticholinesterase. A great majority of available animal studies on CPF and CPFO toxicity are performed in rats. The use of mice in developmental neurobehavioural studies and the availability of transgenic mice warrant a better characterization of CPF-induced toxicity in this species. CD1 mice were exposed to a broad range of acute (12.5-100.0mg/kg) and subacute (1.56-25mg/kg/day from 5 to 30 days) CPF oral doses. Functional and biochemical parameters such as brain and serum cholinesterase (ChE) and liver xenobiotic metabolizing system, including the biotransformation of CPF itself, have been studied and the no observed effect levels (NOELs) identified. Mice seem to be more susceptible than rats at least to acute CPF treatment (oral LD(50) 4.5-fold lower). The species-related differences were not so evident after repeated exposures. In mice a good correlation was observed between brain ChE inhibition and classical cholinergic signs of toxicity. After CPF-repeated treatment, mice seemed to develop some tolerance to CPF-induced effects, which could not be attributed to an alteration of P450-mediated CPF hepatic metabolism. CPF-induced effects on hepatic microsomal carboxylesterase (CE) activity and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels observed at an early stage of treatment and then recovered after 30 days, suggest that the detoxifying mechanisms are actively involved in the protection of CPF-induced effects and possibly in the induction of tolerance in long term exposure. The mouse could be considered a suitable experimental model for future studies on the toxic action of organophosphorus pesticides focused on mechanisms, long term and age-related effects. PMID:17382447

  2. Effects of Repeated Oral Administration of Pazufloxacin Mesylate and Meloxicam on the Antioxidant Status in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Adil Mehraj; Rampal, Satyavan

    2014-01-01

    Prolonged antibiotic and antiinflammatory therapy for complicated infections exposes the body to xenobiotics that can produce several adverse effects for which oxidative damage is the proposed underlying mechanism. In this context, we evaluated the effect of pazufloxacin, a fluoroquinolone antimicrobial, and meloxicam, a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug, on antioxidant parameters and lipid peroxidation in rabbits after oral administration for 21 d. Reduced glutathione levels were significantly decreased in rabbits (n = 4 per group) given pazufloxacin, meloxicam, or their combination. In addition, glutathione peroxidase activity was induced in the rabbits treated with pazufloxacin only. Administration of pazufloxacin and meloxicam, as single agents as well as in combination, produced significant lipid peroxidation compared with levels in untreated controls. In conclusion, both pazufloxacin and meloxicam potentially can induce oxidative damage in rabbits. PMID:25199097

  3. Repeated oral administration of capsaicin increases anxiety-like behaviours with prolonged stress-response in rats.

    PubMed

    Choi, Y-J; Kim, J Y; Yoo, S B; Lee, J-H; Jahng, J W

    2013-09-01

    This study was conducted to examine the psycho-emotional effects of repeated oral exposure to capsaicin, the principal active component of chili peppers. Each rat received 1 mL of 0.02 percent capsaicin into its oral cavity daily, and was subjected to behavioural tests following 10 daily administrations of capsaicin. Stereotypy counts and rostral grooming were significantly increased, and caudal grooming decreased, in capsaicin-treated rats during the ambulatory activity test. In elevated plus maze test, not only the time spent in open arms but also the percent arm entry into open arms was reduced in capsaicin-treated rats compared with control rats. In forced swim test, although swimming duration was decreased, struggling increased in the capsaicin group, immobility duration did not differ between the groups. Repeated oral capsaicin did not affect the basal levels of plasma corticosterone; however, the stress-induced elevation of plasma corticosterone was prolonged in capsaicin treated rats. Oral capsaicin exposure significantly increased c-Fos expression not only in the nucleus tractus of solitarius but also in the paraventricular nucleus. Results suggest that repeated oral exposure to capsaicin increases anxiety-like behaviours in rats, and dysfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis may play a role in its pathophysiology. PMID:23938388

  4. Attenuation of cocaine self-administration in squirrel monkeys following repeated administration of the MGluR5 antagonist MPEP: Comparison with dizocilpine

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Donna M.; Rowlett, James K.; Spealman, Roger D.

    2008-01-01

    Rationale The mGluR5 antagonist MPEP has effects that suggest potential as a pharmacotherapy for cocaine addiction. MPEP can attenuate self-administration of cocaine in animals; however, studies usually involved only acute treatment with MPEP and a single dose of self-administered cocaine. Cocaine addicts use varied amounts of cocaine over long periods of time, and an effective pharmacotherapy would almost certainly require more chronic treatment. Objectives The present study: 1) compared the effects of repeated treatment with MPEP or the NMDA receptor antagonist dizocilpine on the reinforcing effects of a range of doses of cocaine and 2) determined the pharmacological specificity of the effects of the drugs in attenuating cocaine self-administration compared to food-reinforced behavior. An effective pharmacotherapy should selectively reduce cocaine self-administration. Methods Groups of monkeys responded under a fixed-ratio schedule of i.v. cocaine self-administration or food-pellet delivery. The effects of daily treatment with MPEP and dizocilpine were determined under both the schedule of i.v. cocaine injection and food delivery. Results Treatment with MPEP and dizocilpine significantly reduced cocaine self-administration, producing rightward and downward shifts in the ascending limb of the cocaine dose-response function. MPEP and dizocilpine selectively and significantly attenuated self-administration of a low reinforcing dose of cocaine compared to food without evidence of tolerance. Conclusions Both MPEP and dizocilpine functioned as partially surmountable antagonists of the reinforcing effects of cocaine. The similar effects of the two drugs raises the possibility that MPEP attenuated the reinforcing effects of cocaine, at least in part, via mGluR5-mediated inhibition of NMDA receptor activity. PMID:18509621

  5. Intracerebroventricular opioids for intractable pain

    PubMed Central

    Raffa, Robert B; Pergolizzi, Joseph V

    2012-01-01

    When pain is refractory to systemic opioid and non-opioid analgesic therapy and palliative chemoradiation or ablative or stimulant neurosurgical procedures are not possible, palliative treatment becomes limited, particularly if the patient wishes to be at home at the end of life. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion of morphine in the home setting might be presented as an option. The present article reviews the basic and clinical evidence of the efficacy and safety of ICV administration of opioids. Information was gathered from various bibliographic sources, including PubMed and others, and summarized and evaluated to assess the efficacy and safety of ICV opioids for pain relief. Results from ICV infusion of morphine into terminally ill patients refractory to other pain treatments have been reported since the early 1980s. Good efficacy has been achieved for the vast majority of patients, without serious development of analgesic tolerance. There have also been a low incidence of adverse effects, such as constipation and respiratory depression, and a significant retention of alertness associated with this route of administration. Intracerebroventricular infusion of opioid analgesics thus appears to be a safe and effective therapy for the palliative treatment of refractory pain. PMID:22295988

  6. Repeated neonatal propofol administration induces sex-dependent long-term impairments on spatial and recognition memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Edson Luck T; Yang, Sung Min; Choi, Chang Soon; Mabunga, Darine Froy N; Kim, Hee Jin; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Ryu, Jong Hoon; Koo, Bon-Nyeo; Shin, Chan Young

    2015-05-01

    Propofol is an anesthetic agent that gained wide use because of its fast induction of anesthesia and rapid recovery post-anesthesia. However, previous studies have reported immediate neurodegeneration and long-term impairment in spatial learning and memory from repeated neonatal propofol administration in animals. Yet, none of those studies has explored the sex-specific long-term physical changes and behavioral alterations such as social (sociability and social preference), emotional (anxiety), and other cognitive functions (spatial working, recognition, and avoidance memory) after neonatal propofol treatment. Seven-day-old Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats underwent repeated daily intraperitoneal injections of propofol or normal saline for 7 days. Starting fourth week of age and onwards, rats were subjected to behavior tests including open-field, elevated-plus-maze, Y-maze, 3-chamber social interaction, novel-object-recognition, passive-avoidance, and rotarod. Rats were sacrificed at 9 weeks and hippocampal protein expressions were analyzed by Western blot. Results revealed long-term body weight gain alterations in the growing rats and sex-specific impairments in spatial (female) and recognition (male) learning and memory paradigms. A markedly decreased expression of hippocampal NMDA receptor GluN1 subunit in female- and increased expression of AMPA GluR1 subunit protein expression in male rats were also found. Other aspects of behaviors such as locomotor activity and coordination, anxiety, sociability, social preference and avoidance learning and memory were not generally affected. These results suggest that neonatal repeated propofol administration disrupts normal growth and some aspects of neurodevelopment in rats in a sex-specific manner. PMID:25995824

  7. Repeated Neonatal Propofol Administration Induces Sex-Dependent Long-Term Impairments on Spatial and Recognition Memory in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Edson Luck T.; Yang, Sung Min; Choi, Chang Soon; Mabunga, Darine Froy N.; Kim, Hee Jin; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Ryu, Jong Hoon; Koo, Bon-Nyeo; Shin, Chan Young

    2015-01-01

    Propofol is an anesthetic agent that gained wide use because of its fast induction of anesthesia and rapid recovery post-anesthesia. However, previous studies have reported immediate neurodegeneration and long-term impairment in spatial learning and memory from repeated neonatal propofol administration in animals. Yet, none of those studies has explored the sex-specific long-term physical changes and behavioral alterations such as social (sociability and social preference), emotional (anxiety), and other cognitive functions (spatial working, recognition, and avoidance memory) after neonatal propofol treatment. Seven-day-old Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats underwent repeated daily intraperitoneal injections of propofol or normal saline for 7 days. Starting fourth week of age and onwards, rats were subjected to behavior tests including open-field, elevated-plus-maze, Y-maze, 3-chamber social interaction, novel-object-recognition, passive-avoidance, and rotarod. Rats were sacrificed at 9 weeks and hippocampal protein expressions were analyzed by Western blot. Results revealed long-term body weight gain alterations in the growing rats and sex-specific impairments in spatial (female) and recognition (male) learning and memory paradigms. A markedly decreased expression of hippocampal NMDA receptor GluN1 subunit in female- and increased expression of AMPA GluR1 subunit protein expression in male rats were also found. Other aspects of behaviors such as locomotor activity and coordination, anxiety, sociability, social preference and avoidance learning and memory were not generally affected. These results suggest that neonatal repeated propofol administration disrupts normal growth and some aspects of neurodevelopment in rats in a sex-specific manner. PMID:25995824

  8. Opioid System Modulates the Immune Function: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xuan; Liu, Renyu; Chen, Chunhua; Ji, Fang; Li, Tianzuo

    2016-01-01

    Opioid receptors and their ligands produce powerful analgesia that is effective in perioperative period and chronic pain managements accompanied with various side effects including respiratory depression, constipation and addiction etc. Opioids can also interfere with the immune system, not only participating in the function of the immune cells, but also modulating innate and acquired immune responses. The traditional notion of opioids is immunosuppressive. Recent studies indicate that the role of opioid receptors on immune function is complicated, working through various different mechanisms. Different opioids or opioids administrations show various effects on the immune system: immunosuppressive, immunostimulatory, or dual effect. It is important to elucidate the relationship between opioids and immune function, since immune system plays critical role in various physiological and pathophysiological processes, including the inflammation, tumor growth and metastasis, drug abuse, and so on. This review article tends to have an overview of the recent work and perspectives on opioids and the immune function. PMID:26985446

  9. Prescription opioids. III. Disposition of oxycodone in oral fluid and blood following controlled single-dose administration.

    PubMed

    Cone, Edward J; DePriest, Anne Z; Heltsley, Rebecca; Black, David L; Mitchell, John M; LoDico, Charles; Flegel, Ron

    2015-04-01

    Oxycodone (OC) is recommended to be included as an analyte tested in the proposed Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA's) Mandatory Guidelines for Federal Workplace Drug Testing Programs using Oral Fluid (OF) Specimens. This study demonstrates the time course of OC and metabolites, noroxycodone (NOC), oxymorphone (OM) and noroxymorphone (NOM), in near-simultaneous paired OF and whole blood (BL) specimens by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) (limit of detection = 1 ng/mL OF, 5 ng/mL BL). A single dose of OC 20 mg controlled-release was administered to 12 healthy subjects followed by specimen collections for 52 h. Analyte prevalence was as follows: OF, OC > NOC > OM; and BL, OC > NOC > NOM. OC and NOC were frequently detected within 15-30 min in OF and 30 min to 2 h in BL. NOM and OM appeared between 1.5-5 h post-dose. The mean OF-to-BL (OF:BL) ratios and correlations were 5.4 for OC (r = 0.719) and 1.0 for NOC (r = 0.651). The period of detection for OF exceeded BL by ∼2-fold at similar cutoff concentrations. At a 1 ng/mL cutoff for OF, the mean detection time was 34 h for OC and NOC. These data provide new information that should facilitate interpretation of OC test results. PMID:25589778

  10. Hepatotoxicity assessment of Mn-doped ZnS quantum dots after repeated administration in mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanjie; Lv, Shuang-Yu; Yu, Bianfei; Xu, Shuang; Shen, Jianmin; Zhao, Tong; Zhang, Haixia

    2015-01-01

    Doped ZnS quantum dots (QDs) have a longer dopant emission lifetime and potentially lower cytotoxicity compared to other doped QDs. The liver is the key organ for clearance and detoxification of xenobiotics by phagocytosis and metabolism. The present study was designed to synthesize and evaluate the hepatotoxicity of Mn-doped ZnS QDs and their polyethylene glycol-coated counterparts (1 mg/kg and 5 mg/kg) in mice. The results demonstrated that daily injection of Mn-doped ZnS QDs and polyethylene glycol-coated QDs via tail vein for 7 days did not influence body weight, relative liver weight, serum aminotransferases (alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase), the levels of antioxidant enzymes (catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase), or malondialdehyde in the liver. Analysis of hepatocyte ultrastructure showed that Mn-doped ZnS QDs and polyethylene glycol-coated QDs mainly accumulated in mitochondria at 24 hours after repeated intravenous injection. No damage to cell nuclei or mitochondria was observed with either of the QDs. Our results indicate that Mn-doped ZnS QDs did not cause obvious damage to the liver. This study will assist in the development of Mn-doped ZnS QDs-based bioimaging and biomedical applications in the future. PMID:26396512

  11. Hepatotoxicity assessment of Mn-doped ZnS quantum dots after repeated administration in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yanjie; Lv, Shuang-Yu; Yu, Bianfei; Xu, Shuang; Shen, Jianmin; Zhao, Tong; Zhang, Haixia

    2015-01-01

    Doped ZnS quantum dots (QDs) have a longer dopant emission lifetime and potentially lower cytotoxicity compared to other doped QDs. The liver is the key organ for clearance and detoxification of xenobiotics by phagocytosis and metabolism. The present study was designed to synthesize and evaluate the hepatotoxicity of Mn-doped ZnS QDs and their polyethylene glycol-coated counterparts (1 mg/kg and 5 mg/kg) in mice. The results demonstrated that daily injection of Mn-doped ZnS QDs and polyethylene glycol-coated QDs via tail vein for 7 days did not influence body weight, relative liver weight, serum aminotransferases (alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase), the levels of antioxidant enzymes (catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase), or malondialdehyde in the liver. Analysis of hepatocyte ultrastructure showed that Mn-doped ZnS QDs and polyethylene glycol-coated QDs mainly accumulated in mitochondria at 24 hours after repeated intravenous injection. No damage to cell nuclei or mitochondria was observed with either of the QDs. Our results indicate that Mn-doped ZnS QDs did not cause obvious damage to the liver. This study will assist in the development of Mn-doped ZnS QDs-based bioimaging and biomedical applications in the future. PMID:26396512

  12. The hydrosoluble fiber Plantago ovata husk improves levodopa (with carbidopa) bioavailability after repeated administration.

    PubMed

    Diez, M Jose; Garcia, Juan J; Prieto, Carlos; Fernandez, Nelida; Sahagun, Ana; Sierra, Matilde

    2008-08-15

    The influence of treatment duration (7 or 14 days) with Plantago ovata husk/levodopa/carbidopa in the bioavailability and other pharmacokinetic parameters of levodopa were evaluated in rabbits. Fiber was administered at two different doses, 100 and 400 mg/kg, and the dosage of levodopa/carbidopa was 20:5 mg/kg. These doses were administered once a day. When 100 mg/kg of fiber was administered, the mean AUC value obtained for levodopa increased 20.2% from day 1 to day 7, and 27.2% from day 1 to day 14; C(max) was 8.6% higher on day 7 and 11.7% higher on day 14. When administering 400 mg/kg of fiber, the increase in AUC values was 17.6% on day 7 and 24.9% on day 14, and that of C(max) 11.1% on day 7 and 11.3% on day 14. The concentration determined immediately before drug administration (C(min)) increased progressively with the duration of treatment, and the highest increase (53.2%) was observed on day 14 with 100 mg/kg of fiber. There was also a delay in levodopa elimination (higher MRT and lower Cl) in a fiber-dose dependent manner. In summary, we found that there was an improvement in the extent of levodopa absorbed with higher final concentrations and that levodopa elimination was slower with the administration of P. ovata husk. PMID:18474374

  13. Prescription Opioids during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... brand names ConZip®, Ryzolt®, Ultram®) The street drug heroin also is an opioid. What problems can opioids ... to buy them illegally. People often start using heroin after becoming addicted to prescription opioids. Sometimes opioids ...

  14. Urinary excretion of enzymes following repeated parenteral administration of cadmium to rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bonner, F.W.; King, L.J.; Parke, D.V.

    1980-06-01

    The effect of daily parenteral administration of cadmium (0.75, 1.5, and 3.0 mg/kg) on the urinary excretion of enzymes has been studied in the young male rat. Aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, ..gamma..-glutamyl transpeptidase, and leucine aminopeptidase all showed an initial significant increase around the second day of dosage, the intensity of which was dose related. A second phase of enzymuria occurred later, the onset of which was dose related. High-dose-group animals (3.0 mg/kg) exhibited this increase around Day 15, while the median (1.5 mg/kg) and low- (0.75 mg/kg)dose-group animals developed enzymuria around Days 21 and 38, respectively. This second phase of elevated enzyme levels in the urine was persistent, and is believed to represent the development of renal damage.

  15. The Changing Use of Intravenous Opioids in an Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Sutter, Mark E.; Wintemute, Garen J.; Clarke, Samuel O.; Roche, Bailey M.; Chenoweth, James A.; Gutierrez, Rory; Albertson, Timothy E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Government agencies are increasingly emphasizing opioid safety in hospitals. In 2012, the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) started a sentinel event program, the “Safe Use of Opioids in Hospitals.” We sought to determine if opioid use patterns in our emergency department (ED) changed from 2011, before the program began, to 2013, after start of the program. Methods This was a retrospective study of all adult ED patients who received an intravenous opioid and had a serum creatinine measured. We recorded opioids used, dose prescribed, and serum creatinine. As an index of the safety of opioids, uses of naloxone after administration of an opioid was recorded. Results Morphine is still the most commonly used opioid by doses given, but its percentage of opioids used decreased from 68.9% in 2011 to 52.8% in 2013. During the same period, use of hydromorphone increased from 27.5% to 42.9%, while the use of fentanyl changed little (3.6% to 4.3%). Naloxone administration was rare after an opioid had been given. Opioids were not dosed in an equipotent manner. Conclusion The use of hydromorphone in our ED increased by 56% (absolute increase of 15.4%), while the use of morphine decreased by 30.5% (absolute decrease 16.1%) of total opioid use from 2011 to 2013. The JCAHO program likely was at least indirectly responsible for this change in relative dosing of the opioids. Based on frequency of naloxone administered after administration of an opioid, the use of opioids was safe. PMID:26759658

  16. Development of peripheral opioid antagonists' new insights into opioid effects.

    PubMed

    Moss, Jonathan; Rosow, Carl E

    2008-10-01

    The recent approval by the US Food and Drug Administration of 2 medications--methylnaltrexone and alvimopan--introduces a new class of therapeutic entities to clinicians. These peripherally acting mu-opioid receptor antagonists selectively reverse opioid actions mediated by receptors outside the central nervous system, while preserving centrally mediated analgesia. Methylnaltrexone, administered subcutaneously, has been approved in the United States, Europe, and Canada. In the United States, it is indicated for the treatment of opioid-induced constipation in patients with advanced illness (eg, cancer, AIDS) who are receiving palliative care, when response to laxative therapy has not been sufficient. Alvimopan, an orally administered medication, has been approved in the United States to facilitate recovery of gastrointestinal function after bowel resection and primary anastomosis. Clinical and laboratory studies performed during the development of these drugs have indicated that peripheral receptors mediate other opioid effects, including decreased gastric emptying, nausea and vomiting, pruritus, and urinary retention. Laboratory investigations with these compounds suggest that opioids affect fundamental cellular processes through mechanisms that were previously unknown. These mechanisms include modifications of human immunodeficiency virus penetration, tumor angiogenesis, vascular permeability, and bacterial virulence. PMID:18828971

  17. Correlates of prescription opioid initiation and long-term opioid use in veterans with persistent pain

    PubMed Central

    Dobscha, Steven K.; Morasco, Benjamin J.; Duckart, Jonathan P.; Macey, Tara; Deyo, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Little is known about how opioid prescriptions for chronic pain are initiated. We sought to describe patterns of prescription opioid initiation, identify correlates of opioid initiation, and examine correlates of receipt of chronic opioid therapy (COT) among veterans with persistent non-cancer pain. Methods Using Veterans Affairs (VA) administrative data, we identified 5,961 veterans from the Pacific Northwest with persistent elevated pain intensity scores who had not been prescribed opioids in the prior 12 months. We compared veterans not prescribed opioids over the subsequent 12 months to those prescribed any opioid and to those prescribed COT (≥90 consecutive days). Results During the study year, 34% of the sample received an opioid prescription, and 5% received COT. Most first opioid prescriptions were written by primary care clinicians. Veterans prescribed COT were younger, had greater pain intensity, and high rates of psychiatric and substance use disorders (SUDs) compared to veterans in the other two groups. Among patients receiving COT, 29% were prescribed long-acting opioids, 37% received one or more urine drug screens, and 24% were prescribed benzodiazepines. Adjusting for age, sex, and baseline pain intensity, major depression (OR 1.24 [1.10–1.39]; 1.48 [1.14–1.93]) and nicotine dependence (1.34 [1.17–1.53]; 2.02 [1.53–2.67]) were associated with receiving any opioid prescription and with COT, respectively. Discussion Opioid initiations are common among veterans with persistent pain, but most veterans are not prescribed opioids long-term. Psychiatric disorders and SUDs are associated with receiving COT. Many Veterans receiving COT are concurrently prescribed benzodiazepines and many do not receive urine drug screening; additional study regarding practices that optimize safety of COT in this population is indicated. PMID:23269280

  18. Mu Opioid Splice Variant MOR-1K Contributes to the Development of Opioid-Induced Hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Oladosu, Folabomi A.; Conrad, Matthew S.; O’Buckley, Sandra C.; Rashid, Naim U.; Slade, Gary D.; Nackley, Andrea G.

    2015-01-01

    Background A subset of the population receiving opioids for the treatment of acute and chronic clinical pain develops a paradoxical increase in pain sensitivity known as opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Given that opioid analgesics are one of few treatments available against clinical pain, it is critical to determine the key molecular mechanisms that drive opioid-induced hyperalgesia in order to reduce its prevalence. Recent evidence implicates a splice variant of the mu opioid receptor known as MOR-1K in the emergence of opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Results from human genetic association and cell signaling studies demonstrate that MOR-1K contributes to decreased opioid analgesic responses and produces increased cellular activity via Gs signaling. Here, we conducted the first study to directly test the role of MOR-1K in opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Methods and Results In order to examine the role of MOR-1K in opioid-induced hyperalgesia, we first assessed pain responses to mechanical and thermal stimuli prior to, during, and following chronic morphine administration. Results show that genetically diverse mouse strains (C57BL/6J, 129S6, and CXB7/ByJ) exhibited different morphine response profiles with corresponding changes in MOR-1K gene expression patterns. The 129S6 mice exhibited an analgesic response correlating to a measured decrease in MOR-1K gene expression levels, while CXB7/ByJ mice exhibited a hyperalgesic response correlating to a measured increase in MOR-1K gene expression levels. Furthermore, knockdown of MOR-1K in CXB7/ByJ mice via chronic intrathecal siRNA administration not only prevented the development of opioid-induced hyperalgesia, but also unmasked morphine analgesia. Conclusions These findings suggest that MOR-1K is likely a necessary contributor to the development of opioid-induced hyperalgesia. With further research, MOR-1K could be exploited as a target for antagonists that reduce or prevent opioid-induced hyperalgesia. PMID:26270813

  19. 13-week repeated dose toxicity study of l-tyrosine in rats by daily oral administration.

    PubMed

    Shibui, Yusuke; Manabe, Yasuhiro; Kodama, Terutaka; Gonsho, Akinori

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the potential toxicity of l-tyrosine, 4 groups of Crl:CD(SD) rats of both sexes were administered l-tyrosine in water suspension by gavage once daily for 13 weeks at doses of 0 (vehicle), 200, 600 or 2000 mg/kg bw/day. Findings related to l-tyrosine administration were as follows. Edema of the cornified layer at the limiting ridge or forestomach was seen in 600 mg/kg bw/day female group and in both sexes of 2000 mg/kg bw/day group. In the liver, increased weight and hypertrophy of centrilobular hepatocytes were seen in both sexes at 2000 mg/kg bw/day, associated with slight increases in ALT and AST. Regarding the kidney morphology and function, increased hyaline droplets in the proximal tubules and increased urinary protein were seen in the 2000 mg/kg bw/day male group. In addition, increased kidney weight was also observed in both sexes of the 2000 mg/kg bw/day group, although the histological changes attributable to the weight increase remained unclear. As for blood chemistry, increases in triglycerides, total cholesterol, phospholipids, potassium ion, calcium, total protein, and α1 globulin were also seen in both sexes at 2000 mg/kg bw/day. Thus, in this study the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of l-tyrosine was considered to be 600 mg/kg bw/day for males and 200 mg/kg bw/day for females. PMID:26646752

  20. Absorption and dosage of theophylline in the horse after single and repeated administration of a microencapsulated preparation.

    PubMed

    Roncada, P; Tomasi, L; Montesissa, C; Grossi, G; Stracciari, G L; Anfossi, P

    1995-01-01

    The kinetics of 2 formulations of theophylline were studied in horses. In an initial cross-over study (Phase I) serum concentration-time curves were determined for granulated and microencapsulated theophylline after a single oral administration (5 mg/kg bwt). In Phase II microencapsulated theophylline was administered at 5 mg/kg bwt/12 h for 10 days at feeding time, as in normal clinical practice. Although no significant differences between the 2 preparations were found with respect to the main kinetic parameters, the microencapsulated form was more evenly and completely absorbed from the digestive tract; furthermore, after the repeated treatment, its trough-peak serum concentrations were always within the therapeutic window and no toxic effects were observed in treated animals. PMID:7774541

  1. Upregulation of metabotropic glutamate receptor 8 mRNA expression in the rat forebrain after repeated amphetamine administration

    PubMed Central

    Parelkar, Nikhil K; Wang, John Q.

    2008-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are G-protein-coupled receptors and are densely expressed in the forebrain of adult rats. Accumulative evidence suggests a critical role of mGluRs in the regulation of normal physiological activity of neurons and pathogenesis of mental illnesses such as schizophrenia, depression, and substance addiction. In this study, we investigated alterations in mGluR8 subtype mRNA expression in the rat forebrain in response to repeated intraperitoneal administration of amphetamine (twice daily for 12 days, 5 mg/kg per injection) using quantitative in situ hybridization. We found that mGluR8 mRNA levels were profoundly increased in the dorsal (caudate putamen) and ventral (nucleus accumbens) striatum 1 day after the discontinuation of amphetamine treatments. Such increases were sustained up to 21 days of withdrawal. Increases in mGluR8 mRNAs were also found in the cerebral cortex, including the cingulate and sensory cortex but not the piriform cortex, at 1 and 21 days. These data demonstrate a positive response of mGluR8 in mRNA abundance in most forebrain regions to repeated stimulant exposure. PMID:18255232

  2. Prescription Opioid Epidemic and Infant Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, Judith; Martin, Peter R.; Harrell, Frank E.; Warren, Michael D.; Hartmann, Katherine E.; Ely, E. Wesley; Grijalva, Carlos G.; Cooper, William O.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Although opioid pain relievers are commonly prescribed in pregnancy, their association with neonatal outcomes is poorly described. Our objectives were to identify neonatal complications associated with antenatal opioid pain reliever exposure and to establish predictors of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). METHODS: We used prescription and administrative data linked to vital statistics for mothers and infants enrolled in the Tennessee Medicaid program between 2009 and 2011. A random sample of NAS cases was validated by medical record review. The association of antenatal exposures with NAS was evaluated by using multivariable logistic regression, controlling for maternal and infant characteristics. RESULTS: Of 112 029 pregnant women, 31 354 (28%) filled ≥1 opioid prescription. Women prescribed opioid pain relievers were more likely than those not prescribed opioids (P < .001) to have depression (5.3% vs 2.7%), anxiety disorder (4.3% vs 1.6%) and to smoke tobacco (41.8% vs 25.8%). Infants with NAS and opioid-exposed infants were more likely than unexposed infants to be born at a low birth weight (21.2% vs 11.8% vs 9.9%; P < .001). In a multivariable model, higher cumulative opioid exposure for short-acting preparations (P < .001), opioid type (P < .001), number of daily cigarettes smoked (P < .001), and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor use (odds ratio: 2.08 [95% confidence interval: 1.67–2.60]) were associated with greater risk of developing NAS. CONCLUSIONS: Prescription opioid use in pregnancy is common and strongly associated with neonatal complications. Antenatal cumulative prescription opioid exposure, opioid type, tobacco use, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor use increase the risk of NAS. PMID:25869370

  3. Repeated Administration of Inhibitors for Ion Pumps Reduce Markedly Tumor Growth in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hrgovic, Igor; Glavic, Zeljko; Kovacic, Zeljko; Mulic, Smaila; Zunic, Lejla; Hrgovic, Zlatko

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Measurements of extracellular pH show that the micro environment of malignant tumors is more acidic than that of normal cells, whereas pH does not differ appreciable in normal and malignant cells. The acid micro environment of tumors is created by the secretion of tumor factors and ATP hydrolysis in hypoxic tumor tissue. In order to survive in a low pH-environment tumor cells develop regulatory mechanisms which keep their intracellular pH stable. Two of the most important systems are the Na+/H+ ion pump and the Na-dependent HCO3-/Cl- pump of stilbenian derivatives. Material and methods: Experiments were carried out on DBA mice of both sexes at the age of 4 month. Laboratory animals were grown in our institute and supplied with food and aqua ad libitum. Results: After termination of the experiments the mean tumor diameter in the control group was 12.4±0.8mm, in group A it was 6.9±0.6mm, and in group B we measured 6.6±3.1mm. At the final day the tumor size in treated animals was twice as small as in the control group. In addition we observed the rate of survival. In the control group only 18% of the animals were still alive at day 18. Considering the rate of survival a statistically significant difference between treated and untreated animals was observed. The survival of tumor cells is dependent on the function of these ion pumps which keep their intracellular pH values constant in the setting of an acid extracellular environment. Conclusion: The activity of the ion pump is especially important at the beginning of cell division and in cell proliferation. Our in vivo experiments demonstrate that prolonged administration of intratumoral ion pump inhibitors suppresses tumor growth as well as enhances survival of tumor-bearing animals. Research of inhibitors of ion pumps and their action in tumor growth opens new perspectives into pathophysiology of malignant tumors and may create new therapeutic options. PMID:24937925

  4. Effects of methiothepin on changes in brain serotonin release induced by repeated administration of high doses of anorectic serotoninergic drugs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardier, A. M.; Kaakkola, S.; Erfurth, A.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    We previously observed, using in vivo microdialysis, that the potassium-evoked release of frontocortical serotonin (5-HT) is suppressed after rats receive high doses (30 mg/kg, i.p., daily for 3 days) of fluoxetine, a selective blocker of 5-HT reuptake. We now describe similar impairments in 5-HT release after repeated administration of two other 5-HT uptake blockers, zimelidine and sertraline (both at 20 mg/kg, i.p. for 3 days) as well as after dexfenfluramine (7.5 mg/kg, i.p. daily for 3 days), a drug which both releases 5-HT and blocks its reuptake. Doses of these indirect serotonin agonists were about 4-6 times the drug's ED50 in producing anorexia, a serotonin-related behavior. In addition, methiothepin (20 microM), a non-selective receptor antagonist, locally perfused through the dialysis probe 24 h after the last drug injection, enhanced K(+)-evoked release of 5-HT at serotoninergic nerve terminals markedly in control rats and slightly in rats treated with high doses of dexfenfluramine or fluoxetine. On the other hand, pretreatment with methiothepin (10 mg/kg, i.p.) one hour before each of the daily doses of fluoxetine or dexfenfluramine given for 3 days, totally prevented the decrease in basal and K(+)-evoked release of 5-HT. Finally, when methiothepin was injected systemically the day before the first of 3 daily injections of dexfenfluramine, it partially attenuated the long-term depletion of brain 5-HT and 5-HIAA levels induced by repeated administration of high doses of dexfenfluramine. These data suggest that drugs which bring about the prolonged blockade of 5-HT reuptake - such as dexfenfluramine and fluoxetine - can, by causing prolonged increases in intrasynaptic 5-HT levels as measured by in vivo microdialysis, produce receptor-mediated long-term changes in the processes controlling serotonin levels and dynamics.

  5. Mediation of opioid analgesia by a truncated 6-transmembrane GPCR

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhigang; Xu, Jin; Rossi, Grace C.; Majumdar, Susruta; Pasternak, Gavril W.; Pan, Ying-Xian

    2015-01-01

    The generation of potent opioid analgesics that lack the side effects of traditional opioids may be possible by targeting truncated splice variants of the μ-opioid receptor. μ-Opioids act through GPCRs that are generated from the Oprm1 gene, which undergoes extensive alternative splicing. The most abundant set of Oprm1 variants encode classical full-length 7 transmembrane domain (7TM) μ-opioid receptors that mediate the actions of the traditional μ-opioid drugs morphine and methadone. In contrast, 3-iodobenzoyl-6β-naltrexamide (IBNtxA) is a potent analgesic against thermal, inflammatory, and neuropathic pain that acts independently of 7TM μ-opioid receptors but has no activity in mice lacking a set of 6TM truncated μ-opioid receptor splice variants. Unlike traditional opioids, IBNtxA does not depress respiration or result in physical dependence or reward behavior, suggesting it acts through an alternative μ-opioid receptor target. Here we demonstrated that a truncated 6TM splice variant, mMOR-1G, can rescue IBNtxA analgesia in a μ-opioid receptor–deficient mouse that lacks all Oprm1 splice variants, ablating μ-opioid activity in these animals. Intrathecal administration of lentivirus containing the 6TM variant mMOR-1G restored IBNtxA, but not morphine, analgesia in Oprm1-deficient animals. Together, these results confirm that a truncated 6TM GPCR is both necessary and sufficient for IBNtxA analgesia. PMID:26011641

  6. Opioid Analgesics and Nicotine: More Than Blowing Smoke.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jin H; Lane, Scott D; Weaver, Michael F

    2015-09-01

    Practitioners are highly likely to encounter patients with concurrent use of nicotine products and opioid analgesics. Smokers present with more severe and extended chronic pain outcomes and have a higher frequency of prescription opioid use. Current tobacco smoking is a strong predictor of risk for nonmedical use of prescription opioids. Opioid and nicotinic-cholinergic neurotransmitter systems interact in important ways to modulate opioid and nicotine effects: dopamine release induced by nicotine is dependent on facilitation by the opioid system, and the nicotinic-acetylcholine system modulates self-administration of several classes of abused drugs-including opioids. Nicotine can serve as a prime for the use of other drugs, which in the case of the opioid system may be bidirectional. Opioids and compounds in tobacco, including nicotine, are metabolized by the cytochrome P450 enzyme system, but the metabolism of opioids and tobacco products can be complicated. Accordingly, drug interactions are possible but not always clear. Because of these issues, asking about nicotine use in patients taking opioids for pain is recommended. When assessing patient tobacco use, practitioners should also obtain information on products other than cigarettes, such as cigars, pipes, smokeless tobacco, and electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS, or e-cigarettes). There are multiple forms of behavioral therapy and pharmacotherapy available to assist patients with smoking cessation, and opioid agonist maintenance and pain clinics represent underutilized opportunities for nicotine intervention programs. PMID:26375198

  7. Prevalence and correlates of co-prescribing psychotropic medications with long-term opioid use nationally in the Veterans Health Administration.

    PubMed

    Barry, Declan T; Sofuoglu, Mehmet; Kerns, Robert D; Wiechers, Ilse R; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2015-06-30

    We used national data for fiscal year 2012 to examine demographic, psychiatric and medical diagnoses, indications for psychotropics, and service use correlates of psychotropic medication fills in Veterans with at least 10 opioid prescriptions during the year (the highest 29% of opioid users); and whether the Veteran was treated in a specialty mental health clinic. Of the 328,398 Veterans who filled at least 10 opioid prescriptions, 77% also received psychotropics, of whom: 74% received antidepressants, 55% anxiolytics/sedatives/hypnotics, and 26% three or more classes of psychotropic medications. Altogether, 87% had a psychiatric or medical indication; and 54% received mental health treatment. Veterans treated in a mental health clinic were prescribed more psychotropics and were more likely to have a documented psychiatric or medical indication than those treated solely in other settings. Indicated psychiatric diagnoses were the strongest predictors of specific class of psychotropics prescribed; anxiety disorder and insomnia were most strongly associated with anxioloytics/sedatives/hypnotics receipt. Since psychotropics and opioids can produce harmful side effects, especially when combined, and since they are likely prescribed by separate providers in different settings, coordinated consideration of the risks and benefits of co-prescribing these medications may be needed, along with further study of related adverse events. PMID:25863822

  8. Hippocampal Aβ expression, but not phosphorylated tau, predicts cognitive deficits following repeated peripheral poly I:C administration.

    PubMed

    White, J D; Eimerbrink, M J; Hayes, H B; Hardy, A; Van Enkevort, E A; Peterman, J L; Chumley, M J; Boehm, G W

    2016-10-15

    Alzheimer's disease is marked by the accumulation of the amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide, and increases in phosphorylation of the microtubule associated protein, tau. Changes in these proteins are considered responsible, in part, for the progressive neuronal degeneration and cognitive deficits seen in AD. We examined the effect of repeated consecutive peripheral poly I:C injections on cognitive deficits, central Aβ, and phosphorylated tau accumulation, following three treatment durations: 7, 14, and 21 days. Forty-eight hours after the final injection, animals were trained in a contextual fear-conditioning paradigm, and tested 24h later. Immediately after testing, the hippocampus was collected to quantify Aβ and phosphorylated tau accumulation. Results showed that, although poly I:C-induced Aβ was significantly elevated at all time points examined, poly I:C only disrupted cognition after 14 and 21 days of administration. Moreover, elevations in phosphorylated tau were not seen until the 14-day time point. Interestingly, phosphorylated tau expression then declined at the 21-day time point. Finally, we demonstrated that Aβ levels are a stronger predictor of cognitive dysfunction, explaining 37% of the variance, whereas phosphorylated tau levels only accounted for 0.2%. Taken together, these results support the hypothesis that inflammation-induced elevation in Aβ disrupts cognition, independently of phosphorylated tau, and suggest that long-term administration of poly I:C may provide a model to investigate the contribution of long-term inflammation toward the development of Alzheimer's-like pathology. PMID:27449203

  9. Clenbuterol Distribution and Residues in Goat Tissues After the Repeated Administration of a Growth-Promoting Dose.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhen; Yao, Ting; Qin, Yuchang; Yang, Xiaowei; Li, Jun; Li, Junguo; Gu, Xu

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the deposition and depletion process of clenbuterol (CL) in goat tissues, plasma and urine after the repeated administration of a growth-promoting dose. The experiment was conducted in 24 goats (21 treated and 3 controls). Treated animals were administered orally in a dose of 16 µg/kg body mass once daily for 21 consecutive days and randomly sacrificed on days 0.25, 1, 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 of the withdrawal period. CL in goat tissues was extracted with organic solvents and determined using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. The depletion rates of tissue differed significantly. The highest concentrations of CL in all tissues are detected on day 0.25 of treatment discontinuation. After administration had been discontinued for 28 days, CL still residues in all tissues, especially, in whole eye, where the concentrations reach 363.29 ± 31.60 μg/kg. These findings confirmed that the whole eye, which are rich in pigment, showed a much higher concentration than any other studied tissue during the withdrawal period. PMID:25910488

  10. What are the risks and knowledge deficits for prescribing and administering opioids in the ward environment? A quality project on assessing and improving knowledge.

    PubMed

    Markocic, S; Humphries, M; Tarne, K; Watts, M; Collins, L

    2016-03-01

    Investigations into Medical Emergency Team (MET) calls and related clinical incident reviews at a large district teaching hospital provided evidence that over sedation can be a significant issue post opioid administration and that safe and effective pain management requires accurate opioid knowledge and patient assessment skills. The aim of the study was to develop education that was directed at identified knowledge deficits, and to evaluate the impact of this tailored education program on knowledge of safe prescribing and administration of opioids. Knowledge levels were explored using a structured questionnaire in a pre and post-test design. A convenience sample of 34 nurses and 5 junior medical officers across three surgical wards in a tertiary referral hospital had their knowledge assessed. Results showed significant improvement when repeat questionnaires were given two weeks post-delivery of education. Mean scores were 68% at baseline and 89% two weeks post completion of the education program. The greatest improvement in scores was recorded for drug knowledge including dose, half-life and administration. The findings from this study suggest that the opioid education program is effective in improving the knowledge of safe prescribing and administration of opioids, however further studies are required. PMID:26589096

  11. Influence of single and repeated cannabidiol administration on emotional behavior and markers of cell proliferation and neurogenesis in non-stressed mice.

    PubMed

    Schiavon, Angélica Pupin; Bonato, Jéssica Mendes; Milani, Humberto; Guimarães, Francisco Silveira; Weffort de Oliveira, Rúbia Maria

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic effects of antidepressants and atypical antipsychotics may arise partially from their ability to stimulate neurogenesis. Cannabidiol (CBD), a phytocannabinoid present in Cannabis sativa, presents anxiolytic- and antipsychotic-like effects in preclinical and clinical settings. Anxiolytic-like effects of repeated CBD were shown in chronically stressed animals and these effects were parallel with increased hippocampal neurogenesis. However, antidepressant-like effects of repeated CBD administration in non-stressed animals have been scarcely reported. Here we investigated the behavioral consequences of single or repeated CBD administration in non-stressed animals. We also determined the effects of CBD on cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG) and subventricular zone (SVZ). Single CBD 3mg/kg administration resulted in anxiolytic-like effect in mice submitted to the elevated plus maze (EPM). In the tail suspension test (TST), single or repeated CBD administration reduced immobility time, an effect that was comparable to those of imipramine (20 mg/kg). Moreover, repeated CBD administration at a lower dose (3 mg/kg) increased cell proliferation and neurogenesis, as seen by an increased number of Ki-67-, BrdU- and doublecortin (DCX)-positive cells in both in DG and SVZ. Despite its antidepressant-like effects in the TST, repeated CBD administration at a higher dose (30 mg/kg) decreased cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the hippocampal DG and SVZ. Our findings show a dissociation between behavioral and proliferative effects of repeated CBD and suggest that the antidepressant-like effects of CBD may occur independently of adult neurogenesis in non-stressed Swiss mice. PMID:26187374

  12. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia and burn pain.

    PubMed

    Holtman, Joseph R; Jellish, W Scott

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of pain produced during the management of burn injury has been an ongoing problem for physicians caring for these patients. The main therapeutic option for analgesia has been the repeated and prolonged use of opioids. The adverse effects of opioids are well known but the long term use of opioids which produces tolerance with accompanying dose escalation and dependence is most problematic. Another potentially important consequence of opioid exposure that sometimes masks as tolerance is that of opioid induced hyperalgesia. This syndrome is manifest as enhanced pain, sensitivity and loss of analgesic efficacy in patients treated with opioids who actually become sensitized to painful stimuli. This article focuses on the treatment of burn pain and how current analgesic therapies with opioids may cause hyperalgesia and affect the adequacy of treatment for burn pain. This article also provides possible modalities to help therapeutically manage these patients and considers future analgesic strategies which may help to improve pain management in this complicated patient population. PMID:23143613

  13. [Misuse of opioid analgesics. An internet analysis].

    PubMed

    Krüger, R; Meißner, W; Zimmer, A

    2014-10-01

    Apart from the prescribed administration and indications for pain relief, opioids are also used for unintended purposes. Information for misuse is circulated on the internet. In order to analyze the abuse of opioids and opiates,which are only available by prescription, defined search keywords were entered into the search engine of a German language internet forum on drugs in 2010 and 2013 and the results were evaluated. Items to be assessed and analyzed were the frequency of naming various substances and (in the first analysis only) aspects of their incorporation as well as user reports on various aspects of use (e.g. drug procurement, administration, effects and side effects). Tramadol was the most frequently quoted opioid followed by codeine, tilidine, morphine and oxycodone. Other opioids were named in only 10 % of the entries. Oral intake was the most frequently mentioned mode of administration followed by parenteral and nasal routes. These findings can support caregivers to identify unintended use of opioids and to increase awareness of the most frequently used opioids and modes of administration. PMID:25106826

  14. Effects of chronic and repeated repeated coritcosterone administration in rearing chickens on physiology, the onset of lay and egg production in hens.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A corticosterone (CORT) model was used to study the effects of repeated stress during rearing phase on physiology and performance of hens’ in subsequent laying period. Two hundred and seventy Hy-line laying birds were reared in environmentally controlled battery cages. At 7, 11, and 15 wk of age bir...

  15. Dopamine D4 receptors linked to protein kinase G are required for changes in dopamine release followed by locomotor activity after repeated cocaine administration.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jeong Hwan; Lee, Dong Kun; Shim, Yoon-Bo; Ryu, In Soo; Seo, Su Yeon; Kim, Jieun; Yang, Ju Hwan; Cho, Hyun-Wook; Choe, Eun Sang

    2015-05-01

    We previously found that the dopamine D2-type receptors (D2 and D3 receptors), coupled to protein kinase G (PKG), upregulate locomotor activity after repeated cocaine administration. In this study, D4 receptors, another type of D2 receptor also coupled to PKG, were examined to determine their requirement in the regulation of locomotor activity after repeated cocaine administration. The results demonstrated that repeated injections of cocaine (20 mg/kg), given once a day for seven consecutive days, significantly increased extracellular dopamine concentrations. Intra-caudate infusion of the D4 receptor agonist, PD168077 (10 nmol), and the PKG inhibitor, KT5823 (2 nmol), significantly decreased the repeated cocaine-induced increase in dopamine levels and locomotor activity. However, intra-caudate infusion of KT5823, but not PD168077, decreased ∆FosB immunoreactivity elevated by repeated cocaine administration. These findings suggest that D4 receptors linked to PKG could be a key modulator for dopamine release required for changes in locomotor activity caused by repeated cocaine exposure. PMID:25702161

  16. Neuroprotection and functional recovery conferred by administration of kappa- and delta 1-opioid agonists in a rat model of global ischemia.

    PubMed

    Charron, Charlaine; Messier, Claude; Plamondon, Hélène

    2008-02-27

    Studies that have evaluated the beneficial effect of pre-ischemic treatment of kappa-opioid receptor agonists have used short-term reperfusion intervals. We examined the long-term impact of the pre-ischemic peripheral injection of U50,488H (trans-3,4-dichloro-N-methyl-N-[2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)cyclohexyl]-benzeneacetamide), a selective kappa-opioid receptor agonist, on neuronal damage and behavioral deficits following global ischemia in rats. Four groups of ischemic rats were pretreated with various doses of U50,488H (i.p. 0, 5, 15, 30 mg/kg) 15 min prior to vessel occlusion. Two groups of sham-operated animals that received either saline or U50,488H (30 mg/kg) acted as controls. The injection of 30 mg/kg U50,488H led to a 65% increase in CA1 neuron survival 35 days post-ischemia. CA1 neuronal protection translated into significant improvement of ischemia-induced spatial memory deficits assessed in the 8-arm radial maze. However, there was no difference in activity in the open field. We also found that the pre-ischemic intracerebroventricular injection of 5 mug of the delta1-opioid receptor agonist DPDPE ([d-Pen(2,5)]-enkephalin) produced a 59% increase in CA1 neuron survival 7 days post-ischemia. Similar to U50,488H, DPDPE had no significant impact on locomotor activity. These findings support a role for kappa- and delta-opioid receptors in attenuation of ischemia-induced hippocampal damage and cognitive impairments. PMID:18031772

  17. A comparative pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic study of FSK0808 versus reference filgrastim after repeated subcutaneous administration in healthy Japanese men.

    PubMed

    Matsuguma, Kyoko; Matsuki, Shunji; Sakamoto, Kei; Shiramoto, Masanari; Nakagawa, Misato; Kimura, Miyuki; Irie, Shin; Kaneko, Daiki; Ohnishi, Akihiro

    2015-03-01

    FSK0808, a biosimilar of filgrastim, is a recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor developed by Fuji Pharmaceuticals and Mochida Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd. We conducted a double-blind, randomized, crossover study in healthy Japanese men, comparing the number of CD34-positive cells (CD34(+) cells) after repeated subcutaneous administration of either FSK0808 or the reference filgrastim (Gran(®) ). As primary endpoints, we compared the maximum number of CD34(+) cells (CD34(+)  Cmax ) and the time to reach CD34(+) Cmax (CD34(+) tmax ). As secondary endpoints, we compared the area under the curve for the number of CD34(+) cells over time at the 410 hours time point (CD34(+) AUC0-410 ), the parameters used to calculate the pharmacodynamic index of the absolute neutrophil count, and the pharmacokinetic parameters. Regarding the CD34(+) Cmax and the CD34(+) AUC0-410 values, the 95% confidence interval (CI) of the differences between the mean values for each drug was within the range of log(0.8)-log(1.25). With respect to the differences in the median values between drugs, the ratio against the reference filgrastim median value in the 95% CI was within the range of ± 0.2 for the CD34(+) tmax value. From these results, we considered that these drugs display equivalent pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties. PMID:27128214

  18. Corticotropin releasing factor-1 receptor antagonism alters the biochemical, but not behavioral effects of repeated interleukin-1β administration

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, Clare J.; Murphy-Crews, Aaron; Menasco, Daniel J.; Huckans, Marilyn S.; Loftis, Jennifer M.

    2011-01-01

    Activation of the immune system via administration of cytokines is used for the treatment of chronic viral infections such as hepatitis C and for cancers resistant to radiotherapy. Cytokine-based treatments induce a range of “sickness” behaviors (e.g. depression, anxiety, pain, anorexia, and fatigue). Activation of the hypothalamic pituitary-adrenal axis via the induction of corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) may underlie these unwanted side effects. This study used repeated systemic injections of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β) to model the sickness behaviors and biochemical effects of immune system activation. We assessed the ability of CRF type I receptor (CRF1) antagonism to reduce biochemical and behavioral signs of sickness induced by IL-1β treatment. Forty Wistar rats were assigned to one of four groups: 1) saline + vehicle; 2) saline + DMP904 (CRF1 antagonist); 3) IL-1β + vehicle; 4) IL-1β + DMP904. Rats received intraperitoneal injections of either DMP904 or vehicle and of IL-1β or saline for six days. Sickness behavior was evaluated using body weight assessments and forced swim testing (FST). Blood and brain samples were collected to measure cytokine, p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK), and phospho-p38 MAPK levels using multiplex techniques. There were significant reductions in body weights and FST immobility times associated with IL-1β administration. Rats administered IL-1β had significantly higher serum levels of IL-10, but not interferon-γ. Within the hippocampus, IL-1β reduced levels of p38 MAPK, but had no impact on levels of phospho-p38 MAPK except in the presence of DMP904. When administered alone, DMP904 had no significant effect on p38 MAPK or phospho-p38 MAPK in the hippocampus, but when given with IL-1β led to increased phosphorylation of p38 MAPK. IL-1β and DMP904 reduced levels of p38 MAPK within the hypothalamus, while co-administration of IL-1β and DMP904 abolished the effects of either drug

  19. Corticotropin releasing factor-1 receptor antagonism alters the biochemical, but not behavioral effects of repeated interleukin-1β administration.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Clare J; Murphy-Crews, Aaron; Menasco, Daniel J; Huckans, Marilyn S; Loftis, Jennifer M

    2012-01-01

    Activation of the immune system via administration of cytokines is used for the treatment of chronic viral infections such as hepatitis C and for cancers resistant to radiotherapy. Cytokine-based treatments induce a range of "sickness" behaviors (e.g. depression, anxiety, pain, anorexia, and fatigue). Activation of the hypothalamic pituitary-adrenal axis via the induction of corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) may underlie these unwanted side effects. This study used repeated systemic injections of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β) to model the sickness behaviors and biochemical effects of immune system activation. We assessed the ability of CRF type I receptor (CRF(1)) antagonism to reduce biochemical and behavioral signs of sickness induced by IL-1β treatment. Forty Wistar rats were assigned to one of four groups: 1) saline+vehicle; 2) saline+DMP904 (CRF(1) antagonist); 3) IL-1β+vehicle; 4) IL-1β+DMP904. Rats received intraperitoneal injections of either DMP904 or vehicle and of IL-1β or saline for six days. Sickness behavior was evaluated using body weight assessments and forced swim testing (FST). Blood and brain samples were collected to measure cytokine, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and phospho-p38 MAPK levels using multiplex techniques. There were significant reductions in body weights and FST immobility times associated with IL-1β administration. Rats administered IL-1β had significantly higher serum levels of IL-10, but not interferon-γ. Within the hippocampus, IL-1β reduced levels of p38 MAPK, but had no impact on levels of phospho-p38 MAPK except in the presence of DMP904. When administered alone, DMP904 had no significant effect on p38 MAPK or phospho-p38 MAPK in the hippocampus, but when given with IL-1β led to increased phosphorylation of p38 MAPK. IL-1β and DMP904 reduced levels of p38 MAPK within the hypothalamus, while co-administration of IL-1β and DMP904 abolished the effects of either drug alone

  20. Effects of acute and repeated administration of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) into the ventral tegmental area: locomotor activating effects of NMDA and cocaine.

    PubMed

    Schenk, S; Partridge, B

    1997-09-26

    Repeated, intermittent administration of psychostimulants produces an enhancement of the subsequent behavioral effects of these drugs. This behavioral sensitization has been implicated in maintenance of and relapse to drug-taking. As a result, there has been great interest in elucidating the mechanisms underlying both the development and expression of sensitization. An accumulation of data from studies of stimulant-induced locomotor activity has implicated excitatory amino acids in the development of behavioral sensitization. In the present study, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) (0.6, 1.25 or 2.5 microg) infused bilaterally into the ventral tegmental area (VTA) produced dose-dependent locomotor activation. The locomotor activating effect of NMDA was increased following repeated NMDA administration (two exposures to intra-VTA NMDA), suggesting sensitization. However, repeated intra-VTA NMDA failed to sensitize rats to the locomotor activating effects of systemically administered cocaine (5.0, 10.0 or 20.0 mg/kg). These findings are consistent with the notion that repeated activation of NMDA receptors is sufficient for the development of behavioral sensitization to NMDA. Other neuroadaptations produced by repeated psychostimulant administration are required in order for the development of sensitization to the behavioral effects of those drugs. PMID:9374190

  1. Intranasal administration of crushed ALO-02 (extended-release oxycodone with sequestered naltrexone): A randomized, controlled abuse-potential study in nondependent recreational opioid users.

    PubMed

    Setnik, Beatrice; Bramson, Candace; Bass, Almasa; Levy-Cooperman, Naama; Malhotra, Bimal; Matschke, Kyle; Sommerville, Kenneth W; Wolfram, Gernot; Geoffroy, Pierre

    2015-12-01

    ALO-02 is an abuse-deterrent formulation consisting of capsules filled with pellets of extended-release oxycodone surrounding sequestered naltrexone. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-/active-controlled, 4-way crossover study examined the abuse potential of crushed ALO-02 administered intranasally to healthy, nondependent, recreational opioid users. Following drug discrimination and naloxone challenge, eligible participants (n = 32) entered a 4-way crossover treatment phase: crushed single dose of 1 of 2 placebos, ALO-02 30 mg/3.6 mg (oxycodone/naltrexone) or oxycodone immediate-release (IR) 30 mg. Primary end points were Drug Liking and High, measured on visual analog scales (VAS) summarized as maximum effect (Emax ) and effect occurring over 2 hours postdose (AUE0-2  h ). Crushed ALO-02 resulted in significantly lower scores versus oxycodone IR on Drug Liking (Emax , 60.5 vs 92.8; AUE0-2  h , 105.4 vs 160.0, respectively) and High (Emax , 25.2 vs 86.9; AUE0-2  h , 27.1 vs 136.4, respectively; n = 28; P < .0001). Adverse events occurred most frequently with oxycodone IR, followed by ALO-02, then placebo, and were considered mild and consistent with opioid therapy. Crushed ALO-02 administered intranasally to nondependent recreational opioid users resulted in significantly lower scores on Drug Liking/High VAS and other positive subjective measures versus crushed oxycodone IR, suggesting less abuse potential. Demonstration of actual abuse deterrence in the real world requires further research. PMID:26011742

  2. Regulation of opioid receptors by cocaine.

    PubMed

    Unterwald, E M

    2001-06-01

    Cocaine is a widely abused psychostimulant. Its direct actions include inhibition of dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine reuptake into presynaptic nerve terminals, thereby potentiating the actions of these transmitters in the synapse. A variety of studies have demonstrated that cocaine can also have profound effects on the endogenous opioid system. Compelling evidence points to the importance of mu opioid receptors in human cocaine addiction and craving. Animal studies support these findings and demonstrate that chronic cocaine administration can result in alterations in opioid receptor expression and function as measured by changes in critical signal transduction pathways. This chapter reviews studies on the regulation of opioid receptors as the result of exposure to cocaine. PMID:11458541

  3. Desensitization of ovalbumin-sensitized mice by repeated co-administrations of di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate and ovalbumin

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Søren T; Nielsen, Gunnar D

    2009-01-01

    Background The plasticizer di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) has been shown to stimulate a non-allergy related immune response with increased levels of IgG1 and IgG2a, but not IgE, after co-administration with the model allergen ovalbumin (OVA) in mice. In mice, decreased IgG1 and increased IgG2a have been associated with the development of mucosal tolerance towards inhaled allergens. As DEHP selectively promote formations of IgG1 and IgG2a without stimulating the IgE response, it was hypothesized that DEHP may suppress an established IgE mediated allergic response. Mice pre-sensitised to OVA were repeatedly co-exposed to DEHP and OVA and the effects were evaluated on the levels of OVA-specific antibodies, ex vivo cytokine levels and the degree of lung inflammation after challenge with an OVA aerosol. Findings Compared to the OVA-sensitised control mice, multiple co-exposures to DEHP+OVA reduced the IgG1 level and reduced the IgE/IgG2a ratio. This suggests that DEHP may attenuate allergic sensitisation, as the IgE/IgG2a ratio has been shown to correlate with the degree of anaphylaxis. Nevertheless, no effect of DEHP exposures was seen on inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and on cytokine levels in spleen cell culture. Conclusion Data from humane and murine studies suggest that DEHP may attenuate the allergic response. More studies are necessary in order to assess the size of this effect and to rule out the underlying mechanism. PMID:19900263

  4. Repeated systemic administrations of both aminobisphosphonates and human Vγ9Vδ2 T cells efficiently control tumor development in vivo.

    PubMed

    Santolaria, Thibault; Robard, Myriam; Léger, Alexandra; Catros, Véronique; Bonneville, Marc; Scotet, Emmanuel

    2013-08-15

    Peripheral Vγ9Vδ2 T lymphocytes compose a major γδ T cell subset in primates with broad reactivity against tumor cells. Vγ9Vδ2 T cells are specifically activated by phosphorylated isoprenoid pathway metabolites called "phosphoagonists." Accordingly, pharmacologic inhibitors of the mevalonate pathway, such as aminobisphosphonates (NBP) that upregulate the intracellular production of phosphoagonists, increase antitumor Vγ9Vδ2 T cell responses. Immunotherapeutic protocols exploiting GMP-grade agonist molecules targeting human Vγ9Vδ2 T lymphocytes have yielded promising, yet limited, signs of antitumor efficacy and therefore need to be improved for next-generation immunotherapies. In this study, we used a model of s.c. human tumor xenografts in severely immunodeficient mice to assess the antitumor efficacy of systemic NBP treatments when combined with the adoptive transfer of human Vγ9Vδ2 T cells. We show that infusion of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells, 24 h after systemic NBP treatment, efficiently delays tumor growth in mice. Importantly, our results indicate efficient but transient in vivo NBP-induced sensitization of tumor cells to human Vγ9Vδ2-T cell recognition. Accordingly, repeated and combined administrations of both NBP and γδ T cells yielded improved antitumor responses in vivo. Because Vγ9Vδ2 T cells show similar responsiveness toward both autologous and allogeneic tumors and are devoid of alloreactivity, these results provide preclinical proof of concept for optimized antitumor immunotherapies combining NBP treatment and adoptive transfer of allogeneic human γδ T cells. PMID:23836057

  5. Treating Opioid-Induced Constipation in Older Adults: New Options.

    PubMed

    Sani, Halima; Mahan, Rebecca J

    2015-10-01

    Numerous factors, such as changes in gastrointestinal physiology, reduced mobility, decreased liquid and nutritional intake, and certain comorbidities, predispose older adults to constipation. Use of opioid medications further compounds this problem. Unlike other side effects associated with opioid use, patients do not develop tolerance to constipation and other opioid-induced bowel dysfunctions. Although opioid-induced constipation has a prevalence rate of 80% in this population, it remains highly undertreated. Despite this problem, there have been limited therapeutic options available for older adults suffering from opioid-induced constipation. On September 16, 2014, a new oral agent, naloxegol, a peripherally acting muopioid receptor antagonist (PAMORA), approved by the Food and Drug Administration, provides new hope for patients. This paper explores clinical complications associated with opioid-induced constipation in older adults, analyzes the efficacy and safety of laxatives and PAMORAs, and defines the future role of naloxegol in this vulnerable population. PMID:26450143

  6. Central antinociception induced by ketamine is mediated by endogenous opioids and μ- and δ-opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Daniela da Fonseca; Romero, Thiago Roberto Lima; Duarte, Igor Dimitri Gama

    2014-05-01

    It is generally believed that NMDA receptor antagonism accounts for most of the anesthetic and analgesic effects of ketamine, however, it interacts at multiple sites in the central nervous system, including NMDA and non-NMDA glutamate receptors, nicotinic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors, and adrenergic and opioid receptors. Interestingly, it was shown that at supraspinal sites, ketamine interacts with the μ-opioid system and causes supraspinal antinociception. In this study, we investigated the involvement of endogenous opioids in ketamine-induced central antinociception. The nociceptive threshold for thermal stimulation was measured in Swiss mice using the tail-flick test. The drugs were administered via the intracerebroventricular route. Our results demonstrated that the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone, the μ-opioid receptor antagonist clocinnamox and the δ-opioid receptor antagonist naltrindole, but not the κ-opioid receptor antagonist nor-binaltorphimine, antagonized ketamine-induced central antinociception in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, the administration of the aminopeptidase inhibitor bestatin significantly enhanced low-dose ketamine-induced central antinociception. These data provide evidence for the involvement of endogenous opioids and μ- and δ-opioid receptors in ketamine-induced central antinociception. In contrast, κ-opioid receptors not appear to be involved in this effect. PMID:24675031

  7. Medication-Assisted Treatment For Opioid Addiction in Opioid Treatment Programs. Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series 43

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tinkler, Emily; Vallejos Bartlett, Catalina; Brooks, Margaret; Gilbert, Johnatnan Max; Henderson, Randi; Shuman, Deborah, J.

    2005-01-01

    TIP 43 provides best-practice guidelines for medication-assisted treatment of opioid addiction in opioid treatment programs (OTPs). The primary intended audience for this volume is substance abuse treatment providers and administrators who work in OTPs. Recommendations in the TIP are based on both an analysis of current research and determinations…

  8. Repeated intravenous administrations of teneurin-C terminal associated peptide (TCAP)-1 attenuates reinstatement of cocaine seeking by corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in rats.

    PubMed

    Erb, Suzanne; McPhee, Matthew; Brown, Zenya J; Kupferschmidt, David A; Song, Lifang; Lovejoy, David A

    2014-08-01

    The teneurin c-terminal associated peptides (TCAP) have been implicated in the regulation of the stress response, possibly via a corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-related mechanism. We have previously shown that repeated intracerebroventricular (ICV) injections of TCAP-1 attenuate the reinstatement of cocaine seeking by CRF in rats. Here, we determined whether intravenous (IV) administrations of TCAP-1 would likewise attenuate CRF-induced reinstatement, and whether this effect would vary depending on the rat's history of cocaine self administration. Rats were trained to self-administer cocaine for 10 days, during once daily sessions that were either 3h ("short access"; ShA) or 6h ("long access"; LgA). Rats were then given five daily injections of TCAP-1 (0, 300, or 3,000 pmol, IV) in their home cage. Subsequently, they were returned to the self-administration chambers where extinction of cocaine seeking and testing for CRF-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking was carried out. Repeated IV administrations of TCAP-1 were efficacious in attenuating CRF-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking, but at different doses in ShA and LgA rats. Taken together, the findings extend previous work showing a consistent effect of repeated ICV TCAP-1 on CRF-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking, and point to a potential therapeutic benefit of TCAP-1 in attenuating cocaine seeking behaviors. PMID:24768621

  9. Buprenorphine for opioid dependence.

    PubMed

    Ling, Walter

    2009-05-01

    As a treatment agent for opioid dependence, buprenorphine is a nearly ideal medication at our current stage of medication development. Unlike methadone, buprenorphine dosage can be rapidly adjusted with minimal potential for inducing severe consequences. In addition to its intrinsic safety, buprenorphine's relatively low abuse liability in the combination product (i.e., with naloxone as Suboxone) makes it even more acceptable in regulatory quarters as well as to prescribing physicians. The approval of buprenorphine as a pharmacotherapy for opioid dependence returns to physicians the ability to treat their opioid-dependent patients with an effective opioid-based treatment for the first time in nearly 100 years. Buprenorphine is an opioid, however, and potential for misuse remains, even in combination with naloxone. Whether buprenorphine will be increasingly accepted as a treatment for opioid-dependent patients depends on clinicians recognizing the advantages of its uniquely useful properties while still heeding the need to manage their patients' therapy with reasonable vigilance. PMID:19402772

  10. Opioids and endocrine dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Hester, Joan

    2012-01-01

    The endocrine effects of opioids used for the management of persistent pain are poorly understood by clinicians and patients, and hormone levels are rarely measured. It is recognized that opioids exert this effect via the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Additional effects on adrenal hormones, weight, blood pressure and bone density may also occur. Symptoms and signs of sex hormone deficiency occur in both men and women but are under-reported and are often clinically unrecognized. The potential effects of long term opioid therapy on the endocrine system should be explained to patients before opioid therapy is commenced. Monitoring of sex hormones is recommended; if there are deficiencies opioids should be tapered and withdrawn, if this is clinically acceptable. If opioid therapy has to continue, hormone replacement therapy should be initiated and monitored by an endocrinologist. PMID:26516462

  11. The socially evaluated cold-pressor test (SECPT) for groups: effects of repeated administration of a combined physiological and psychological stressor.

    PubMed

    Minkley, Nina; Schröder, Thomas P; Wolf, Oliver T; Kirchner, Wolfgang H

    2014-07-01

    The combined administration of physiological (cold pressor) and psychological (social-evaluative threat) stressors, as in the socially evaluated cold pressor test (SECPT; Schwabe et al., 2008) activates the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Thus far, the SECPT has been administered exclusively to individual participants, which requires substantial personal effort and time. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate whether and to what extent cardiovascular parameters (SNS) and salivary cortisol concentrations (HPA axis) are affected over the course of repeated SECPT administration in a group design. The SECPT was conducted in groups of seven or more persons and repeated twice with a 24-h interval between each administration. During the stress test, the participants (n=61) were videotaped and observed continuously while they immersed their hands into ice-cold (1 °C, experimental group) or room-temperature (20 °C, control group) water. Blood pressure, heart rate, salivary cortisol concentration, and subjective stress perception were measured. All of these parameters increased significantly during each of the three stress exposures; in contrast, they remained constant in the control group. Moreover, the heart rate response towards the stressor decreased significantly over the course of the repeated stress exposures and salivary cortisol concentration of the experimental group was elevated before the third SECPT administration. Our results indicate that the group SECPT activates the SNS and the HPA, leading to increased blood pressure, heart rate, and cortisol concentration. Moreover, the repeated administration leads to habituation exclusively of heart rate. PMID:24845183

  12. The effects of acute and repeated administration of ketamine on attentional performance in the five-choice serial reaction time task in rats.

    PubMed

    Nikiforuk, Agnieszka; Popik, Piotr

    2014-08-01

    Ketamine, the non-competitive antagonist of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors, is used in clinical and preclinical studies to produce schizophrenia-like cognitive impairments. However, the impact of ketamine on attentional functions remains poorly characterised. In the present study, we further examine the effects of ketamine on attentional processes assessed in the five-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT) in rats. The applied schedules of ketamine administration have been previously demonstrated to evoke frontal-dependent set-shifting impairments. Rats were trained to reach a stable baseline performance. Afterwards, animals received a single injection of ketamine (0, 3 and 10 mg/kg, IP) 45 min before the 5-CSRTT session (experiment 1). In experiment 2, ketamine (0 and 30 mg/kg, IP) was administered after the daily test session for 10 consecutive days. The rats' performance was assessed at 22 h following ketamine administration and for 4 days after the last dose. Acute and repeated administration of ketamine disrupted rats performance on the 5-CSRTT. Reduced speed of responding and an increased number of omissions were noted in the absence of reduced food motivation. The within-session pattern of responding differed between rats treated acutely and repeatedly with ketamine. Specifically, repeated drug administration evoked an increase in omissions toward the end of the session, and this effect was not secondary to the reduced motivation. Ketamine affected performance during the withdrawal period only when testing with variable inter-trial intervals. The repeated administration of ketamine can impair rats' ability to sustain attention over the course of session, suggesting some utility for modelling attentional disturbances. PMID:24846536

  13. Using buprenorphine for outpatient opioid detoxification.

    PubMed

    Manlandro, James J

    2007-09-01

    The Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000 (DATA 2000) was established to create a new paradigm for medication-assisted treatment of persons with opiate addiction in the United States. Before enactment of DATA 2000, the use of opioid medications to treat patients with opioid addiction was permissible only in federally approved treatment programs, ie, "methadone clinics." The only medications permitted were Schedule II drugs (eg, methadone hydrochloride and l-alpha-acetylmethadol [LAAM]), which could only be dispensed, not prescribed. Under provisions of DATA 2000, qualified physicians in a medical office and other appropriate settings outside the opioid treatment program system may prescribe and/or dispense Schedule III, IV, and V opioid medications for treating persons with opioid addiction if such medications have been specifically approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for that indication. Opioid addiction treatment programs were commonly known as methadone clinics. Such programs now may also dispense buprenorphine hydrochloride and the buprenorphine hydrochloride-naloxone combination. PMID:17908825

  14. [Breakthrough pain and short-acting opioids].

    PubMed

    Beutlhauser, T; Oeltjenbruns, J; Schäfer, M

    2013-06-01

    Conventional opioid therapy consists of the regular administration of extended-release opioids following fixed time intervals and, as needed, the supplemental use of an immediate-release formulation. For the patient needs of such rescue medication, recent studies distinguished different scenarios, such as an inadequate daily opioid dose or time interval (end-of-dose failure) from so-called breakthrough pain where the attacks can suddenly occur either spontaneously (idiopathic pain) or due to certain provocations (incident pain) despite optimal dose adjustment. In line with this time course, a fast and short-lasting elevation of the opioid plasma concentration seems to be reasonable. Although in a recent European survey breakthrough pain attacks in the majority of cancer pain patients were sufficiently treated with immediate-release opioids, currently running clinical trials examine whether the application of transmucosal or intranasal fentanyl with their known reduced time to maximum plasma concentrations show a possible advantage in comparison to immediate-release opioids. In these clinical trials the pain intensity and number of pain episodes were significantly reduced following transmucosal or intranasal fentanyl; however, the magnitude of these effects does not convincingly appear to be clinically relevant. Among other reasons this may be related to the fact that those patients who would perhaps benefit from such treatment have not yet been identified. PMID:23754483

  15. [Pain and opioids].

    PubMed

    Murányi, Marianna; Radák, Zsolt

    2008-12-14

    Noxious stimuli cause pain to protect the body from harmful situations and attract attention to pathophysiologic changes of the body. Specific receptors of pain (nociceptors) can be found all over our body. Pain initiates protecting mechanisms such as vegetative and motor reflexes, and emotional, behavioral changes. However, chronic pain is practically useless and leads to psychopathological changes. There are several ways to relieve pain including non-steroid anti-inflammatory agents, opioids, neurosurgical and non-invasive methods. Central and peripheral effects of opioids can be realized through opioid receptors of the central and the enteric nervous system. In the central nervous system, they can inhibit the perception of pain or change the emotional reactions. Opioids are indicated in postoperative pain, neuropathic pain and cancer. However, the use of opioids has severe side-effects such as breathing depression and the development of tolerance and dependence which do not make opioids optimal painkillers. There are several laboratories in Hungary and abroad working on the design of optimal pain relievers. Furthermore, the euphoric effects of opioids lead to abuse which makes the research important on the mechanisms of opioid addiction. Taken together, opioid research, the design of new compounds and the exploration of the mechanisms of opiate addiction are very important. PMID:19073443

  16. Repeated methylphenidate administration during lactation reduces maternal behavior, induces maternal tolerance, and increases anxiety-like behavior in pups in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Ponchio, R A; Teodorov, E; Kirsten, T B; Coelho, C P; Oshiro, A; Florio, J C; Bernardi, M M

    2015-01-01

    Methylphenidate (MPD) is a dopamine uptake inhibitor and the most commonly prescribed drug for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in children. Several studies have shown that such stimulants as cocaine and amphetamine that are administered during gestation and lactation may disrupt maternal behavior. Also, MPD is used in lactation. Repeated MPD administration can induce either sensitization or tolerance. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether repeated MPD administration alters maternal behavior and promotes tolerance or sensitization in these females. The effects in adult offspring were also examined in models of anxiety. Methylphenidate (5mg/kg) was administered from lactation day 2 to 4, and maternal pup retrieval behavior was assessed. This treatment was continued until lactation day 7. At weaning, the dams received a challenge dose of MPD, and general activity was evaluated in the open field. Striatal monoamine and metabolite levels were also measured to determine whether this treatment promotes behavioral or biochemical plasticity. The long-term behavioral effects of MPD exposure were evaluated in pups in adulthood. The results showed an increase in the latency to retrieve the first, second, and third pups and a decrease in the number of dams that retrieved all pups. After a challenge dose of MPD, the dams exhibited a decrease in locomotion frequency, an increase in immobility duration in the open field, and a decrease in striatal serotonin levels. In pups, anxiety-like behavior increased in the light/dark box test. These results indicate that repeated MPD administration during early lactation impairs maternal behavior, likely by decreasing maternal motivation. Repeated MPD administration induced maternal tolerance at weaning after a challenge dose of MPD, suggesting the development of central nervous system plasticity. In pups, maternal exposure to MPD during early lactation induced long-term effects and increased

  17. Parenteral opioids for maternal pain management in labour

    PubMed Central

    Ullman, Roz; Smith, Lesley A; Burns, Ethel; Mori, Rintaro; Dowswell, Therese

    2014-01-01

    Background Parenteral opioids are used for pain relief in labour in many countries throughout the world. Objectives To assess the acceptability, effectiveness and safety of different types, doses and modes of administration of parenteral opioids given to women in labour. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (30 April 2011) and reference lists of retrieved studies. Selection criteria We included randomised controlled trials examining the use of intramuscular or intravenous opioids (including patient controlled analgesia) for women in labour. We looked at studies comparing an opioid with another opioid, placebo, other non-pharmacological interventions (TENS) or inhaled analgesia. Data collection and analysis At least two review authors independently assessed study eligibility, collected data and assessed risk of bias. Main results We included 57 studies involving more than 7000 women that compared an opioid with placebo, another opioid administered intramuscularly or intravenously or compared with TENS to the back. The 57 studies reported on 29 different comparisons, and for many outcomes only one study contributed data. Overall, the evidence was of poor quality regarding the analgesic effect of opioids, satisfaction with analgesia, adverse effects and harm to women and babies. There were few statistically significant results. Many of the studies had small sample sizes, and low statistical power. Overall findings indicated that parenteral opioids provided some pain relief and moderate satisfaction with analgesia in labour, although up to two-thirds of women who received opioids reported moderate or severe pain and/or poor or moderate pain relief one or two hours after administration. Opioid drugs were associated with maternal nausea, vomiting and drowsiness, although different opioid drugs were associated with different adverse effects. There was no clear evidence of adverse effects of opioids on the newborn. We

  18. [Forced opioid detoxification under general anesthesia--a new challenge for anesthetists and intensive care physicians].

    PubMed

    Hensel, M; Volk, T; Kox, W J

    1999-05-01

    Treatment of opioid addicts by means of competitive opioid receptor antagonists was developed at the University of Vienna in 1987 by Loimer and co-workers. They compared two withdrawal regimens: The short Opiate withdrawal using a staggered naloxone regimen and the rapid opiate detoxification during general anesthesia by means of high doses of naloxone. Based on the latter concept, various modifications have been developed world-wide using either naloxone or as an alternative, naltrexone, an antagonist available for oral administration only. However, there are considerable objections to opioid detoxification during general anasthesia. The main criticism is based an the supposedly unacceptable high risk:benefit-ratio, the higher costs, the lack of psycho-social support, and the lack of prospective studies. However, first results suggest that rapid detoxification procedures are more successful in decreasing relapse than methods which are based on psychiatric treatment alone. As sympathetic hyperfunction is common in rapid detoxification procedures using high doses of opioid receptor antagonists, it is essential to avoid severe autonomic imbalance with possible subsequent impairment of organ functions. To prevent those disturbances, general anesthesia plays an important role. So far, there is almost no information about such methods in the anesthesiological literature. In this article the clinical relevance of such methods is discussed summarizing both the available literature and our own experience and we conclude that rapid opioid detoxification under general anesthesia is a safe and efficient method to suppress withdrawal symptoms. This treatment may be of benefit in patients who particularly suffer from severe withdrawal symptoms and who have failed repeatedly to complete conventional withdrawal. PMID:10372215

  19. Opioid Peptidomimetics: Leads for the Design of Bioavailable Mixed Efficacy Mu Opioid Receptor (MOR) Agonist/Delta Opioid Receptor (DOR) Antagonist Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Mosberg, Henry I.; Yeomans, Larisa; Harland, Aubrie A.; Bender, Aaron M.; Sobczyk-Kojiro, Katarzyna; Anand, Jessica P.; Clark, Mary J.; Jutkiewicz, Emily M.; Traynor, John R.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously described opioid peptidomimetic, 1, employing a tetrahydroquinoline scaffold and modeled on a series of cyclic tetrapeptide opioid agonists. We have recently described modifications to these peptides that confer a mu opioid receptor (MOR) agonist, delta opioid receptor (DOR) antagonist profile, which has been shown to reduce the development of tolerance to the analgesic actions of MOR agonists. Several such bifunctional ligands have been reported, but none has been demonstrated to cross the blood brain barrier. Here we describe the transfer of structural features that evoked MOR agonist/DOR antagonist behavior in the cyclic peptides to the tetrahydroquinoline scaffold and show that the resulting peptidomimetics maintain the desired pharmacological profile. Further, the 4R diastereomer of 1 was fully efficacious and approximately equipotent to morphine in the mouse warm water tail withdrawal assay following intraperitoneal administration and thus a promising lead for the development of opioid analgesics with reduced tolerance. PMID:23419026

  20. Ligand-biased activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 leads to differences in opioid induced antinociception and tolerance.

    PubMed

    Bobeck, Erin N; Ingram, Susan L; Hermes, Sam M; Aicher, Sue A; Morgan, Michael M

    2016-02-01

    Opioids produce antinociception by activation of G protein signaling linked to the mu-opioid receptor (MOPr). However, opioid binding to the MOPr also activates β-arrestin signaling. Opioids such as DAMGO and fentanyl differ in their relative efficacy for activation of these signaling cascades, but the behavioral consequences of this differential signaling are not known. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the behavioral significance of G protein and internalization dependent signaling within ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG). Antinociception induced by microinjecting DAMGO into the vlPAG was attenuated by blocking Gαi/o protein signaling with administration of pertussis toxin (PTX), preventing internalization with administration of dynamin dominant-negative inhibitory peptide (dyn-DN) or direct inhibition of ERK1/2 with administration of the MEK inhibitor, U0126. In contrast, the antinociceptive effect of microinjecting fentanyl into the vlPAG was not altered by administration of PTX or U0126, and was enhanced by administration of dyn-DN. Microinjection of DAMGO, but not fentanyl, into the vlPAG induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, which was blocked by inhibiting receptor internalization with administration of dyn-DN, but not by inhibition of Gαi/o proteins. ERK1/2 inhibition also prevented the development and expression of tolerance to repeated DAMGO microinjections, but had no effect on fentanyl tolerance. These data reveal that ERK1/2 activation following MOPr internalization contributes to the antinociceptive effect of some (e.g., DAMGO), but not all opioids (e.g., fentanyl) despite the known similarities for these agonists to induce β-arrestin recruitment and internalization. PMID:26497105

  1. A review of opioid prescription in a teaching hospital in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Moyano, Jairo; Figueras, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Review of opioid prescriptions in a hospital provides valuable information to health care professionals which may contribute to proper pain management; opioid utilization studies may help uncover factors that can be improved for better prescribing. To evaluate the use of opioid analgesics in a university hospital, a review of opioids prescribed in hospitalized patients was developed. Methods: Information was obtained from the pharmacy database and medical records. The study period was 1 month. Results: Medical records of 1156 patients admitted in July 2009 were analyzed. The most widely prescribed opioid was tramadol; the preferred administration route was intravenous; the main indication was severe pain; and major prescribers were from surgical departments. Discussion: Underutilization of potent opioids for acute and chronic pain seems to occur. Conclusion: Most prescribers prefer weak opioids, given intravenously to treat acute and chronic pain, while some patients may benefit from the prescription of more potent opioids. PMID:23049273

  2. ACCUMULATION AND TISSUE DISPOSITION OF PARTICLE ASSOCIATED ELEMENTS IN THE RAT AFTER REPEATED INTRATRACHAEL ADMINISTRATION OF SOURCE PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this study was to determine the fate of source particle tracer elements following repeated intratracheal instillation (IT) to rats. PM samples comprised Mt. St. Helens ash (MSH) with no water-soluble metals, and oil flyash emission PM (EPM) with water-leachable solubl...

  3. Endogenous opioids and feeding behavior: A decade of further progress (2004-2014). A Festschrift to Dr. Abba Kastin.

    PubMed

    Bodnar, Richard J

    2015-10-01

    Functional elucidation of the endogenous opioid system temporally paralleled the creation and growth of the journal, Peptides, under the leadership of its founding editor, Dr. Abba Kastin. He was prescient in publishing annual and uninterrupted reviews on Endogenous Opiates and Behavior that served as a microcosm for the journal under his stewardship. This author published a 2004 review, "Endogenous opioids and feeding behavior: a thirty-year historical perspective", summarizing research in this field between 1974 and 2003. The present review "closes the circle" by reviewing the last 10 years (2004-2014) of research examining the role of endogenous opioids and feeding behavior. The review summarizes effects upon ingestive behavior following administration of opioid receptor agonists, in opioid receptor knockout animals, following administration of general opioid receptor antagonists, following administration of selective mu, delta, kappa and ORL-1 receptor antagonists, and evaluating opioid peptide and opioid receptor changes in different food intake models. PMID:25843025

  4. Pharmacokinetics of Repeated Sodium Salicylate Administration to Laying Hens: Evidence for Time Dependent Increase in Drug Elimination from Plasma and Eggs

    PubMed Central

    Poźniak, Błażej; Grabowski, Tomasz; Motykiewicz-Pers, Karolina; Bobrek, Kamila; Rak, Lech; Bobusia, Katarzyna; Gaweł, Andrzej; Świtała, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    Salicylates were the first non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to be used in any species and are still widely used in humans and livestock. However, the data on their pharmacokinetics in animals is limited, especially after repeated administration. Evidence exist that in chickens (Gallus gallus) salicylate (SA) may induce its own elimination. The aim of this study was to investigate salicylate pharmacokinetics and egg residues during repeated administration of sodium salicylate (SS) to laying hens. Pharmacokinetics of SA was assessed during 14 d oral administration of SS at daily doses of 50 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg body weight to laying hens. On the 1st, 7th and 14th d a 24 h-long pharmacokinetic study was carried out, whereas eggs were collected daily. Salicylate concentrations in plasma and eggs were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection and pharmacokinetic variables were calculated using a non-compartmental model. Mean residence time (MRT), minimal plasma concentration (Cmin, C16h) and elimination half-life (T1/2el) of SA showed gradual decrease in layers administered with a lower dose. Total body clearance (ClB) increased. Layers administered with the higher dose showed a decrease only in the T1/2el. In the low dose group, SA was found only in the egg white and was low throughout the experiment. Egg whites from the higher dose group showed initially high SA levels which significantly decreased during the experiment. Yolk SA levels were lower and showed longer periods of accumulation and elimination. Repeated administration of SS induces SA elimination, although this effect may differ depending on the dose and production type of a chicken. Decreased plasma drug concentration may have clinical implications during prolonged SS treatment. PMID:25893240

  5. Pharmacokinetics of repeated sodium salicylate administration to laying hens: evidence for time dependent increase in drug elimination from plasma and eggs.

    PubMed

    Poźniak, Błażej; Grabowski, Tomasz; Motykiewicz-Pers, Karolina; Bobrek, Kamila; Rak, Lech; Bobusia, Katarzyna; Gaweł, Andrzej; Świtała, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    Salicylates were the first non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to be used in any species and are still widely used in humans and livestock. However, the data on their pharmacokinetics in animals is limited, especially after repeated administration. Evidence exist that in chickens (Gallus gallus) salicylate (SA) may induce its own elimination. The aim of this study was to investigate salicylate pharmacokinetics and egg residues during repeated administration of sodium salicylate (SS) to laying hens. Pharmacokinetics of SA was assessed during 14 d oral administration of SS at daily doses of 50 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg body weight to laying hens. On the 1st, 7th and 14th d a 24 h-long pharmacokinetic study was carried out, whereas eggs were collected daily. Salicylate concentrations in plasma and eggs were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection and pharmacokinetic variables were calculated using a non-compartmental model. Mean residence time (MRT), minimal plasma concentration (Cmin, C16h) and elimination half-life (T1/2el) of SA showed gradual decrease in layers administered with a lower dose. Total body clearance (ClB) increased. Layers administered with the higher dose showed a decrease only in the T1/2el. In the low dose group, SA was found only in the egg white and was low throughout the experiment. Egg whites from the higher dose group showed initially high SA levels which significantly decreased during the experiment. Yolk SA levels were lower and showed longer periods of accumulation and elimination. Repeated administration of SS induces SA elimination, although this effect may differ depending on the dose and production type of a chicken. Decreased plasma drug concentration may have clinical implications during prolonged SS treatment. PMID:25893240

  6. Combined administration of gonadotropin-releasing hormone, progesterone, and meloxicam is an effective treatment for the repeat-breeder cow.

    PubMed

    Amiridis, G S; Tsiligianni, Th; Dovolou, E; Rekkas, C; Vouzaras, D; Menegatos, I

    2009-09-01

    In practice, the etiologic treatment of the repeat-breeder cow is nearly infeasible. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that a combined treatment would benefit the conception rate of repeat-breeder cows. The components of this regimen target ovulation defects, late progesterone (P4) rise, and premature luteolysis. In a 5-year period, 402 repeat-breeder cows were divided in five groups, and treatment regimens consisted of the following: gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH; Group 1, n=115, 0.012mg buserelin im 4 to 6h before artificial insemination); P4 (Group 2, n=51, 100mg P4 intravaginally, on Days 5 to 7); meloxicam (Group 3, n=31, 0.5mgkg(-1), 24h(-1) melomicronxicam sc, on Days 16 to 18); GnRH+P4+meloxicam (Group 4, n=98); and no treatment (Group 5, control, n=107). Artificial insemination was conducted only after overt estrus; thereafter, the duration of the estrous cycle was assessed in all cows that were detected to return to heat. The conception and pregnancy rate was compared among groups. The proportion of cows that returned to estrus after artificial insemination did not differ among groups; the duration of estrous cycle was the shortest in Group 1 and the longest in Group 4. In Group 4, pregnancy rate was higher (P<0.05) than that of Groups 1 and 5 (35.71% vs. 20.00% and 17.76% for Groups 4, 1, and 5, respectively), but though numerically higher, it did not differ statistically from that of Groups 2 (27.45%) and 3 (22.58%). Our results imply that a multifaceted protocol has to be applied for the successful treatment of the repeat-breeder cow. PMID:19501897

  7. Neuroprotective actions of GR89696, a highly potent and selective kappa-opioid receptor agonist.

    PubMed Central

    Birch, P. J.; Rogers, H.; Hayes, A. G.; Hayward, N. J.; Tyers, M. B.; Scopes, D. I.; Naylor, A.; Judd, D. B.

    1991-01-01

    1. The effect of a novel, highly potent and selective kappa-opioid receptor agonist, GR89696, has been evaluated in two animal models of cerebral ischaemia: transient bilateral carotid artery occlusion in the Mongolian gerbil and permanent, unilateral middle cerebral artery occlusion in the mouse. 2. In the Mongolian gerbil model, administration of GR89696 (3 to 30 micrograms kg-1, s.c.), immediately before and at 4 h after insult, produced a dose-dependent reduction in the hippocampal CA1 neuronal cell loss resulting from a 7-min bilateral carotid occlusion. Similar effects were obtained with two other kappa-agonists, GR86014 (1 mgkg-1, s.c.) and GR91272 (1 mgkg-1, s.c.). The neuroprotective effect of GR89696 was completely blocked by prior administration of the opioid receptor antagonist, naltrexone, at 10 mgkg-1, s.c. Repeated post-treatment with GR89696 (100 micrograms kg-1, s.c.) or GR44821 (10 mgkg-1, s.c.) was also effective in protecting completely the hippocampal CA1 neurones from ischaemia-induced neurodegeneration. 3. In the permanent, unilateral middle cerebral artery occlusion model in the mouse, repeated administration of GR89696 at 300 micrograms kg-1, s.c. produced a 50% reduction in cerebrocortical infarct volume. In these experiments GR89696 was dosed 5 min, 4, 8, 12, 16, 20 and 24 h after occlusion on the first day and then three times daily for the next three days. GR89696 (300 micrograms kg-1) also produced a significant 35% reduction in infarct volume in this model when the initiation of dosing was delayed for 6 h after the insult. 4. The results indicate that the potent kappa-opioid receptor agonist, GR89696, is neuroprotective in both global and focal cerebral ischaemia models and suggest that, with this class of compound, there may be a considerable time window for pharmacological intervention. PMID:1657267

  8. Buprenorphine for opioid addiction

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Walter; Mooney, Larissa; Torrington, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Buprenorphine is a partial opioid agonist of the µ-receptor, and is used as a daily dose sublingual tablet or filmstrip for managing opioid addiction. In the USA, the Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000 made buprenorphine the only opioid medication for opioid addiction that can be prescribed in an office-based setting. Owing to its high affinity for the µ-receptor, buprenorphine inhibits the reinforcing effect of exogenous opioids. The ceiling effect of buprenorphine's µ-agonist activity reduces the potential for drug overdose and confers low toxicity even at high doses. Buprenorphine pharmacotherapy has proven to be a treatment approach that supports recovery from addiction while reducing or curtailing the use of opioids. This article examines buprenorphine pharmacotherapy for opioid addiction, focusing on the situation in the USA, and is based on a review of pertinent literature, and the authors’ research and clinical experience. The references in this paper were chosen according to the authors’ judgment of quality and relevance, and with respect to their familiarity and involvement in related research. PMID:24654720

  9. The epidemic of prescription opioid abuse, the subsequent rising prevalence of heroin use, and the federal response.

    PubMed

    Kanouse, Andrew B; Compton, Peggy

    2015-06-01

    Opioids are a mainstay in the treatment of pain both chronically and acutely. In the past 20 years, the prescribing of opioids has increased exponentially. As the population for whom opioids are indicated has grown, with the number of opioid prescriptions written increased, so have indicators of opioid misuse, abuse, morbidity, and mortality. The purpose of this article is to review and explore the combination of factors of events that led to the current "epidemic" of prescription opioid abuse and overdose deaths, as well as the subsequent resurgence of heroin use among opioid addicts. Federal initiatives to mount war on prescription opioid abuse are reviewed, including responses from the White House, Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA), Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and interagency initiatives. Many initiatives are currently in place to combat the rising rates of morbidity and mortality associated with opioids, and those involved are hopeful in their efforts to curb the epidemic of this deadly phenomenon. PMID:26095479

  10. Opioid control of gonadotrophin secretion in humans.

    PubMed

    Genazzani, A R; Genazzani, A D; Volpogni, C; Pianazzi, F; Li, G A; Surico, N; Petraglia, F

    1993-11-01

    Hypothalamus-pituitary-axis (HPA) is constantly under the modulatory effect of many substances, such as neurotransmitters, neuromodulators and steroid hormones. Recently, the involvement of endogenous opioid peptides (EOP) in the control of the neuroendocrine mechanism modulating gonadotrophin secretion has been supported by several authors. It has been demonstrated that acute morphine administration decreases luteinizing hormone (LH) plasma levels and this is due to an inhibitory modulation on gonadotrophin releasing hormone discharge from the hypothalamic neurons. EOP are usually increased by stressful situations. In stress-induced amenorrhoea, the presence of low LH plasma levels and an abnormal LH pulsatile secretion has been related to an increased opioid activity, thus supporting the integrative role of opioids between hormonal and neuronal afferences of brain. PMID:8276950

  11. Kinetics of selected di-n-butyl phthalate metabolites and fetal testosterone following repeated and single administration in pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Clewell, Rebecca A; Kremer, John J; Williams, Carla C; Campbell, Jerry L; Sochaski, Mark A; Andersen, Melvin E; Borghoff, Susan J

    2009-01-01

    Human exposure to phthalic acid diesters occurs through a variety of pathways as a result of their widespread use in consumer products and plastics. Repeated doses of di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) from gestation day (GD) 12 to 19 disrupt testosterone synthesis and male sexual development in the fetal rat. Currently little is known about the disposition of DBP metabolites, such as monobutyl phthalate (MBP) and its glucuronide conjugate (MBP-G), during gestation after repeated exposure to DBP. In order to gain a better understanding of the effect of repeated dosing on maternal and fetal metabolism and distribution, pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were given a single dose of 500 mg/kg DBP on GD 19 or daily doses of 50, 100, and 500 mg/(kg day) from GD 12 to 19 via corn oil gavage. Dose-response evaluation revealed a non-linear increase in maternal and fetal plasma concentrations of MBP. Maternal and fetal MBP levels were slightly lower in animals after 8 days of dosing at 500 mg/(kg day). Fetal plasma MBP levels closely followed maternal plasma, while the appearance and elimination of MBP-G in fetal plasma were significantly delayed. MBP-G accumulated over time in the amniotic fluid. Inhibition of testosterone was rapid in fetal testes when exposed to DBP (500 mg/(kg day)) on GD 19. Within 24h, the level of inhibition in the fetus was similar between animals exposed to a single or multiple daily doses of 500 mg/(kg day). Examination of testosterone time-course data indicates a rapid recovery to normal levels within 24h post-dosing at DBP doses of 50 and 100 mg/(kg day), with a rebound to higher than normal concentrations at later time-points. MBP kinetics in fetal testes allows direct comparison of active metabolite concentrations and testosterone response in the fetal testes. PMID:19010379

  12. Effect of repeated administration of antidepressant drugs on the serum and brain concentration of testosterone and its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Przegaliński, E; Warchoł-Kania, A; Budziszewska, B; Jaworska, L

    1987-01-01

    A repeated oral treatment (twice daily, for 21 consecutive days) with 10 mg/kg of antidepressants imipramine, amitriptyline, citalopram, mianserin affects the level of testosterone and its metabolites (5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone and estradiol-17 beta) in the serum and brain structures (cerebral cortex, hypothalamus). Citalopram and mianserin increased significantly the serum testosterone concentration, while imipramine and amitriptyline reduced the concentration of 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone. In the cerebral cortex a reduction in 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone after imipramine, and in the hypothalamus a decrease in testosterone level after amitriptyline were observed. None of the investigated drugs influenced estradiol-17 beta concentration in the serum or in the brain. PMID:3503989

  13. Deficits in neuronal cytochrome P450 activity attenuate opioid analgesia but not opioid side effects.

    PubMed

    Hough, Lindsay B; Nalwalk, Julia W; Cleary, Rachel A; Phillips, James G; Fang, Cheng; Yang, Weizhu; Ding, Xinxin

    2014-10-01

    Morphine-like analgesics act on µ opioid receptors in the CNS to produce highly effective pain relief, but the same class of receptors also mediates non-therapeutic side effects. The analgesic properties of morphine were recently shown to require the activity of a brain neuronal cytochrome P450 epoxygenase, but the significance of this pathway for opioid side effects is unknown. Here we show that brain P450 activity is not required for three of morphine׳s major side effects (respiratory depression, constipation, and locomotor stimulation). Following systemic or intracerebroventricular administration of morphine, transgenic mice with brain neuron - specific reductions in P450 activity showed highly attenuated analgesic responses as compared with wild-type (control) mice. However, brain P450-deficient mice showed normal morphine-induced side effects (respiratory depression, locomotor stimulation, and inhibition of intestinal motility). Pretreatment of control mice with the P450 inhibitor CC12 similarly reduced the analgesia, but not these side effects of morphine. Because activation of brain µ opioid receptors produces both opioid analgesia and opioid side effects, dissociation of the mechanisms for the therapeutic and therapy-limiting effects of opioids has important consequences for the development of analgesics with reduced side effects and/or limited addiction liability. PMID:25062792

  14. New opioid prescribing guidelines favor non-opioid alternatives.

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    Determined to make a dent in the growing problem of opioid addiction, the CDC has unveiled new guidelines for opioid prescribing for chronic pain. The recommendations urge providers to be more judicious in their prescribing, opting for opioids only after carefully weighing substantial risks and benefits. Public health authorities note the rampant use and misuse of opioids have "blurred the lines" between prescription opioids and illicit opioids. The new guidelines are designed to help frontline providers balance the need to manage their patients' chronic pain with the duty to curb dangerous prescribing practices. The recommendations are built around three principles: favor non-opioid alternatives for most cases of chronic pain, use the lowest effective dose when prescribing opioids, and exercise caution/monitor patients who are treated with opioids. PMID:27266000

  15. Repeated Administrations of Human Umbilical Cord Blood Cells Improve Disease Outcomes in a Mouse Model of Sanfilippo Syndrome Type III B.

    PubMed

    Willing, Alison E; Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana N; Zayko, Olga; Derasari, Hiranya M; Rawls, Ashley E; James, Chris R; Mervis, Ron F; Sanberg, Cyndy D; Kuzmin-Nichols, Nicole; Sanberg, Paul R

    2013-12-30

    Sanfilippo syndrome type III B (MPS III B) is an inherited disorder characterized by a deficiency of ?-N-acetylglucosaminidase (Naglu) enzyme leading to accumulation of heparan sulfate in lysosomes and severe neurological deficits. We have previously shown that a single administration of human umbilical cord mononuclear cells (hUCB MNC) into Nagluknockout mice decreased behavioral abnormalities and tissue pathology. In this study, we tested whether repeated doses of hUCB MNCs would be more beneficial than a single dose of cells. Naglumice at 3 months of age were randomly assigned to either a Media only group, or one of three hUCB MNC treatment groups - single low dose (3x10(6) cells), single high dose (1.8x10(7) cells) or multiple doses (3x10(6) cells monthly for 6 months) delivered intravenously (i.v.); cyclosporine was injected i.p. to immune suppress the mice for the duration of the study. An additional control group of wild type mice was also used. We measured anxiety in an open field test and cognition inactive avoidance test prior to treatment and then at monthly intervals for 6 months. hUCB MNCs restored normal anxiety-like behavior in these mice (p < 0.001). The repeated cell administrations also restored hippocampal cytoarchitecture, protected the dendritic tree, decreased GM3 ganglioside accumulation and decreased microglial activation, particularly in hippocampus and cortex. These data suggest that the neuroprotective effect of hUCB MNCs can be enhanced by repeated cell administrations. PMID:24380668

  16. Repeated administrations of human umbilical cord blood cells improve disease outcomes in a mouse model of Sanfilippo syndrome type III B.

    PubMed

    Willing, Alison E; Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana N; Zayko, Olga; Derasari, Hiranya M; Rawls, Ashley E; James, Chris R; Mervis, Ron F; Sanberg, Cyndy D; Kuzmin-Nichols, Nicole; Sanberg, Paul R

    2014-01-01

    Sanfilippo syndrome type III B (MPS III B) is an inherited disorder characterized by a deficiency of α-N-acetylglucosaminidase (Naglu) enzyme leading to accumulation of heparan sulfate in lysosomes and severe neurological deficits. We have previously shown that a single administration of human umbilical cord mononuclear cells (hUCB MNCs) into Naglu knockout mice decreased behavioral abnormalities and tissue pathology. In this study, we tested whether repeated doses of hUCB MNCs would be more beneficial than a single dose of cells. Naglu mice at 3 months of age were randomly assigned to either a Media-only group or one of three hUCB MNC treatment groups--single low dose (3 × 10(6) cells), single high dose (1.8 × 10(7) cells), or multiple doses (3 × 10(6) cells monthly for 6 months) delivered intravenously; cyclosporine was injected intraperitoneally to immune suppress the mice for the duration of the study. An additional control group of wild-type mice was also used. We measured anxiety in an open field test and cognition in an active avoidance test prior to treatment and then at monthly intervals for 6 months. hUCB MNCs restored normal anxiety-like behavior in these mice (p < 0.001). The repeated cell administrations also restored hippocampal cytoarchitecture, protected the dendritic tree, decreased GM3 ganglioside accumulation, and decreased microglial activation, particularly in the hippocampus and cortex. These data suggest that the neuroprotective effect of hUCB MNCs can be enhanced by repeated cell administrations. PMID:25565636

  17. Involvement of peripheral mu opioid receptors in scratching behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Atsuki; Sugimoto, Yukio

    2010-12-15

    Pruritus is a common adverse effect of opioid treatment. However, the mechanism by which pruritus is induced by opioid administration is unclear. In this study, we examined the effects of the intradermal injection of loperamide, a peripherally restricted opioid receptor agonist, on the itch sensation. When injected intradermally into the rostral part of the back in mice, loperamide elicited scratching behavior. We also examined the effects of the selective mu opioid receptor agonist [d-Ala², N-Me-Phe⁴, Gly⁵-ol]-enkephalin acetate (DAMGO), the selective delta opioid receptor agonist [d-Pen(2,5)]-enkephalin (DPDPE), and the selective kappa opioid receptor agonist U-50488H on scratching behavior in mice in order to determine which subtype is involved in opioid-induced pruritus. Following intradermal injection into the rostral part of the back in mice, DAMGO elicited scratching behavior, while DPDPE and U-50488H did not. This suggests that peripheral mu opioid activation elicits the itch sensation. Next, we focused on the treatment of opioid-induced itch sensation without central adverse effects. Naloxone methiodide is a peripherally restricted opioid receptor antagonist. In the present study, naloxone methiodide significantly suppressed scratching behavior induced by loperamide and DAMGO. These findings suggest that mu opioid receptors play a primary role in peripheral pruritus and that naloxone methiodide may represent a possible remedy for opioid-induced itching. PMID:20863827

  18. The critical role of spinal 5-HT7 receptors in opioid and non-opioid type stress-induced analgesia.

    PubMed

    Yesilyurt, Ozgur; Seyrek, Melik; Tasdemir, Serdar; Kahraman, Serdar; Deveci, Mehmet Salih; Karakus, Emre; Halici, Zekai; Dogrul, Ahmet

    2015-09-01

    The opioid and non-opioid types of stress-induced analgesia have been well defined. One of the non-opioid type involve the endocannabinoid system. We previously reported that the spinal serotonin 7 receptor (5-HT7) blockers inhibit both morphine and cannabinoid-induced analgesia, thus we hypothesized that descending serotonergic pathways-spinal 5-HT7 receptor loop might contribute to stress-induced analgesia. Stress-induced analgesia was induced with warm (32°C) or cold (20°C) water swim stress in male Balb-C mice. The effects of intrathecal injection of a selective 5-HT7 receptor antagonist, SB 269970, of the denervation of serotonergic neurons by intrathecal administration of 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) and of lesions of the dorsolateral funiculus on opioid and non-opioid type stress-induced analgesia were evaluated with the tail-flick and hot plate tests. The expression of 5-HT7 receptors mRNA in the dorsal lumbar region of spinal cord were analyzed by RT-PCR following spinal serotonin depletion or dorsolateral funiculus lesion. The effects of the selective 5-HT7 receptor agonists LP 44 and AS 19 were tested on nociception. Intrathecal SB 269970 blocked both opioid and non-opioid type stress-induced analgesia. Dorsolateral funiculus lesion or denervation of the spinal serotonergic neurons resulted in a marked decrease in 5-HT7 receptor expression in the dorsal lumbar spinal cord, accompanied by inhibition of opioid and non-opioid type stress-induced analgesia. However, the systemic or intrathecal LP 44 and AS 19 alone did not produce analgesia in unstressed mice. These results indicate that descending serotonergic pathways and the spinal 5-HT7 receptor loop play a crucial role in mediating both opioid and non-opioid type stress-induced analgesia. PMID:25917322

  19. Women Who Abuse Prescription Opioids: Findings from the Addiction Severity Index-Multimedia Version® Connect Prescription Opioid Database

    PubMed Central

    Green, Traci C.; Grimes Serrano, Jill M.; Licari, Andrea; Budman, Simon H.; Butler, Stephen F.

    2009-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests gender differences in abuse of prescription opioids. This study aimed to describe characteristics of women who abuse prescription opioids in a treatment-seeking sample and to contrast gender differences among prescription opioid abusers. Methods Data collected November 2005 to April 2008 derived from the Addiction Severity Index Multimedia Version Connect (ASI-MV® Connect) database. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression examined correlates of prescription opioid abuse stratified by gender. Results 29,906 assessments from 220 treatment centers were included, of which 12.8% (N=3,821) reported past month prescription opioid abuse. Women were more likely than men to report use of any prescription opioid (29.8% females vs. 21.1% males, p< 0.001) and abuse of any prescription opioid (15.4% females vs. 11.1% males, p < 0.001) in the past month. Route of administration and source of prescription opioids displayed gender-specific tendencies. Women-specific correlates of recent prescription opioid abuse were problem drinking, age <54, inhalant use, residence outside of West US Census region, and history of drug overdose. Men-specific correlates were age <34, currently living with their children, residence in the South and Midwest, hallucinogen use, and recent depression. Women prescription opioid abusers were less likely to report a pain problem although they were more likely to report medical problems than women who abused other drugs. Conclusions Gender-specific factors should be taken into account in efforts to screen and identify those at highest risk of prescription opioid abuse. Prevention and intervention efforts with a gender-specific approach are warranted. PMID:19409735

  20. Outpatient provider contact prior to unintentional opioid overdose

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lewei (Allison); Bohnert, Amy; Ilgen, Mark; Pfeiffer, Paul Nelson; Ganoczy, Dara; Blow, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Prescribed opioid medications are the most commonly implicated substances in unintentional overdoses. Outpatient health care encounters represent a potential opportunity to intervene to reduce opioid overdose risk. This study assessed the timing and type of outpatient provider contacts prior to overdose. Methods This study examined all adult patients nationally in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) who died from unintentional prescription opioid overdose in fiscal years 2004–2007 and used VHA services anytime within two years of their deaths (n=1,813). For those whose last treatment contact was in an outpatient setting (n=1,457), demographic, clinical and treatment characteristics were compared among patients categorized by the location of their last contact. Results 33% (N=479) of those last seen in outpatient settings were seen within one week and 62% (N=910) within one month of their overdose. A substantial proportion of patients were last seen within one month of death in mental health or substance disorder outpatient settings (30% N=438). The majority of patients did not fill an opioid prescription on their last outpatient visit prior to unintentional opioid overdose. Conclusions The majority of patients who died by unintentional overdose on prescription opioids were seen within a month of their overdose in outpatient settings. These settings may provide an opportunity to prevent patients from dying from prescription opioid overdoses, and interventions to reduce risk should not be limited to visits that resulted in an opioid prescription. PMID:26129993

  1. The Useage of Opioids and their Adverse Effects in Gastrointestinal Practice: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Khansari, MahmoudReza; Sohrabi, MasourReza; Zamani, Farhad

    2013-01-01

    Opium is one of the oldest herbal medicines currently used as an analgesic, sedative and antidiarrheal treatment. The effects of opium are principally mediated by the μ-, κ- and δ-opioid receptors. Opioid substances consist of all natural and synthetic alkaloids that are derived from opium. Most of their effects on gastrointestinal motility and secretion result from suppression of neural activity. Inhibition of gastric emptying, increase in sphincter tone, changes in motor patterns, and blockage of peristalsis result from opioid use. Common adverse effects of opioid administration include sedation, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, constipation, dependency and tolerance, and respiratory depression. The most common adverse effect of opioid use is constipation. Although stool softeners are frequently used to decrease opioid-induced bowel dysfunction, however they are not efficacious. Possibly, the use of specific opioid receptor antagonists is a more suitable approach. Opioid antagonists, both central and peripheral, could affect gastrointestinal function and visceromotor sensitivity, which suggests an important role for endogenous opioid peptides in the control of gastrointestinal physiology. Underlying diseases or medications known to influence the central nervous system (CNS) often accelerate the opioid’s adverse effects. However, changing the opioid and/or route of administration could also decrease their adverse effects. Appropriate patient selection, patient education and discussion regarding potential adverse effects may assist physicians in maximizing the effectiveness of opioids, while reducing the number and severity of adverse effects. PMID:24829664

  2. Brain regional acetylcholinesterase activity and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in rats after repeated administration of cholinesterase inhibitors and its withdrawal

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Haruo . E-mail: hk1664@iwate-u.ac.jp; Suzuki, Tadahiko; Sakamoto, Maki; Hashimoto, Wataru; Kashiwada, Keiko; Sato, Itaru; Akahori, Fumiaki; Satoh, Tetsuo

    2007-03-15

    Activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and specific binding of [{sup 3}H]quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB), [{sup 3}H]pirenzepine (PZP) and [{sup 3}H]AF-DX 384 to muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) preparations in the striatum, hippocampus and cortex of rats were determined 1, 6 and 11 days after the last treatment with an organophosphate DDVP, a carbamate propoxur or a muscarinic agonist oxotremorine as a reference for 7 and 14 days. AChE activity was markedly decreased in the three regions 1 day after the treatment with DDVP for 7 and 14 days with a gradual recovery 6 to 11 days, and much less decreased 1, 6 and 11 days after the treatment with propoxur for 7 days but not for 14 days in the hippocampus and cortex. The binding of [{sup 3}H]-QNB, PZP and AF-DX 384 in the three regions was generally decreased by the treatment with DDVP for 7 and 14 days. Such down-regulations were generally restored 6 or 11 days after the treatment for 7 but not for 14 days. The down-regulation or up-regulation as measured by [{sup 3}H]-QNB, PZP and AF-DX 384 was observed 1, 6 or 11 days after treatment with propoxur for 7 days and/or 14 days. Repeated treatment with oxotremorine produced similar effects except AChE activity to DDVP. These results suggest that repeated inhibition of AChE activity may usually cause down-regulation of mAChRs with some exception in the hippocampus when a reversible antiChE propoxur is injected.

  3. Buprenorphine for opioid dependence

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Walter

    2014-01-01

    As a treatment agent for opioid dependence, buprenorphine is a nearly ideal medication at our current stage of medication development. Unlike methadone, buprenorphine dosage can be rapidly adjusted with minimal potential for inducing severe consequences. In addition to its intrinsic safety, buprenorphine's relatively low abuse liability in the combination product (i.e., with naloxone as Suboxone®) makes it even more acceptable in regulatory quarters as well as to prescribing physicians. The approval of buprenorphine as a pharmacotherapy for opioid dependence returns to physicians the ability to treat their opioid-dependent patients with an effective opioid-based treatment for the first time in nearly 100 years. Buprenorphine is an opioid, however, and potential for misuse remains, even in combination with naloxone. Whether buprenorphine will be increasingly accepted as a treatment for opioid-dependent patients depends on clinicians recognizing the advantages of its uniquely useful properties while still heeding the need to manage their patients' therapy with reasonable vigilance. PMID:19402772

  4. Opioids and sexual reward.

    PubMed

    Paredes, R G

    2014-06-01

    Various lines of research indicate that sexual reward is mediated by opioids in both males and females. In the first part I review basic ideas about sexual reward in humans followed by a description of what is known in rodents, where most of the studies have been done. Although a direct method to measure opioid release during mating is not yet available, there is a substantial amount of indirect evidence in humans and animals indicating that opioids are released during the execution of sexual behavior. Studies using the conditioned place preference (CPP) method where the effects of opioids upon sex induced reward have been evaluated will also be described. Evidence will also be presented indicating that the medial preoptic area (MPOA) plays a crucial role in the expression of opioid mediated sex-reward in males and females. This area is also important in other naturally occurring reward related behaviors such as singing. Opioids might be part of a system that mediates the rewarding properties of natural behaviors that are intrinsically rewarding. PMID:24239788

  5. Endogenous and xenobiotic metabolite profiling of liver extracts from SCID and chimeric humanized mice following repeated oral administration of troglitazone.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Alan J; Baker, David R; Hobby, Kirsten; Ashton, Simon; Michopoulos, Filippos; Spagou, Konstantina; Loftus, Neil J; Wilson, Ian D

    2014-01-01

    1. Metabonomic analysis, via a combination of untargeted and targeted liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and untargeted (1)H NMR spectroscopy-based metabolite profiling, was performed on aqueous (AQ) and organic liver extracts from control (SCID) and chimeric humanized (PXB) mice dosed with troglitazone at 0, 300 and 600 mg/kg/day for seven days. 2. LC-MS analysis of AQ liver extracts showed a more "human-like" profile for troglitazone metabolites for PXB, compared with SCID, mice. 3. LC-MS detected differences in endogenous metabolites, particularly lipid species in dosed mice, including elevated triacylglycerols and 1-alkyl,2-acylglycerophosphates as well as lowered diacylglycerophosphocholines and 1-alkyl,2-acylglycerophosphocholines for PXB compared with SCID mouse liver extracts. Following drug administration changes in the relative proportions of the ions for various unsaturated fatty acids were observed for both types of mouse, some of which were specific to PXB or SCID mice. 4.  (1)H NMR spectroscopy revealed that AQ PXB mouse liver extracts had elevated amounts of inosine, fumarate, creatine, aspartate, trimethylamine N-oxide, glycerophosphocholine, phosphocholine, choline, glutamine, glutamate, acetate, alanine and lactate relative to SCID mice and decreased histidine, glycogen, α- and β-glucose, taurine, and glutathione. Increased uracil and tyrosine concentrations were detected for PXB mice on troglitazone administration. 5. Metabonomic profiling thus showed clear differences between humanized and SCID mice, including after administration of troglitazone. PMID:24350779

  6. Repeated low-dose kainate administration in C57BL/6J mice produces temporal lobe epilepsy pathology but infrequent spontaneous seizures.

    PubMed

    Umpierre, Anthony D; Bennett, Isaiah V; Nebeker, Lismore D; Newell, Thomas G; Tian, Bruce B; Thomson, Kyle E; White, H Steve; White, John A; Wilcox, Karen S

    2016-05-01

    More efficient or translationally relevant approaches are needed to model acquired temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) in genetically tractable mice. The high costs associated with breeding and maintaining transgenic, knock-in, or knock-out lines place a high value on the efficiency of induction and animal survivability. Herein, we describe our approaches to model acquired epilepsy in C57BL/6J mice using repeated, low-dose kainate (KA) administration paradigms. Four paradigms (i.p.) were tested for their ability to induce status epilepticus (SE), temporal lobe pathology, and the development of epilepsy. All four paradigms reliably induce behavioral and/or electrographic SE without mortality over a 7d period. Two of the four paradigms investigated produce features indicative of TLE pathology, including hippocampal cell death, widespread astrogliosis, and astrocyte expression of mGluR5, a feature commonly reported in TLE models. Three of the investigated paradigms were able to produce aberrant electrographic features, such as interictal spiking in cortex. However, only one paradigm, previously published by others, produces spontaneous recurrent seizures over an eight week period. Presentation of spontaneous seizures is rare (N=2/14), with epilepsy preferentially developing in animals having a high number of seizures during SE. Overall, repeated, low-dose KA administration improves the efficiency and pathological relevance of a systemic KA insult, but does not produce a robust epilepsy phenotype under the experimental paradigms described herein. PMID:26896834

  7. The effects of repeated administration of camphor-crataegus berry extract combination on blood pressure and on attentional performance - a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Erfurt, L; Schandry, R; Rubenbauer, S; Braun, U

    2014-09-25

    The present study investigated the effects of repeated administration of Korodin(®), a combination of camphor and crataegus berry extract, on blood pressure and attentional functioning. This study was conducted based on a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind design. 54 persons participated (33 female, 21 male) with a mean age of 24.3 years. Blood pressure and body mass index were in the normal range. Participants received 20 drops of either Korodin(®) or a placebo for four times with interjacent time intervals of about 10 min. Blood pressure was measured sphygmomanometrically before and after each administration. Attentional performance was quantified by using two paper-and-pencil tests, the d2 Test of Attention and Digit Symbol Test. Greater increases in blood pressure occurred after the four Korodin(®) administrations in comparison to the four placebo administrations. The performance in two parameters of d2 Test of Attention was consistently superior after the intake of Korodin(®). The excellent tolerability and safety of Korodin(®), even after a total consumption of 80 drops, was confirmed. PMID:25172798

  8. Effect of repeated oral administration of Bifidobacterium longum BB536 on apomorphine-induced rearing behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Orikasa, Shuzo; Nabeshima, Kazumi; Iwabuchi, Noriyuki; Xiao, Jin-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a chronic psychiatric illness. Disruption of the dopaminergic system has been suggested to be the pathogenic cause of this disease. The effect of Bifidobacterium longum BB536 (BB536) on schizophrenic behavior was investigated in an animal model. Daily administration of BB536 (10(9) CFU/mouse, p.o. for 2 weeks) was found to reduce rearing behavior augmented by the dopamine receptor agonist apomorphine and to decrease the resting level of plasma corticosterone and the ratio of kynurenine to tryptophan. These results suggest the potential of BB536 for supplemental treatment of the symptoms of schizophrenia. PMID:27508116

  9. Ovarian response to repeated administration of alternating exogenous gonadotropin regimens in the ocelot (Leopardus pardalis) and tigrinus (Leopardus tigrinus).

    PubMed

    da Paz, Regina Celia Rodrigues; Dias, Eduardo Antunes; Adania, Cristina Harumi; Barnabe, Valquíria Hippólito; Barnabe, Renato Campanarut

    2006-10-01

    Exogenous gonadotropins are used to stimulate ovarian follicular growth and ovulation in mammalian species, including wild cats. However, successes in application of assisted reproduction techniques in nondomestic felids have been sparse. Our objectives were to assess the effectiveness of alternating gonadotropin regimens on ovarian responses. Five adult female ocelots and four adult female tigrinus were treated four to six times, using alternating eCG/hCG and pFSH/pLH at 4-month intervals. Laparoscopies were done to assess follicular development and to collect oocytes from matures follicles. The average number of follicles and corpus luteum (CL) per stimulation was higher in ocelots (7.0 +/- 0.8; mean +/- S.E.M.) than in tigrinus (2.5 +/- 0.4; P < 0.05), but the percentage of mature oocytes did not differ between the two species (mean range, 54-55%). Within species, both gonadotropin regimens were equally effective in inducing follicular growth and oocyte maturation. The total number of ovarian structures and oocyte maturation percentages did not decrease in either species with sequential stimulations. In summary, female ocelots and tigrinus continued to respond to repeated alternating ovarian stimulation protocols. In conclusion, the use of alternating gonadotropin regimens may permit more intensive reproductive management in these endangered cats. PMID:16472853

  10. Opioid analgesics: does potency matter?

    PubMed

    Passik, Steven D; Webster, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Prescription opioid analgesics with a wide range of potencies are currently used for the treatment of chronic pain. Yet understanding the clinical relevance and therapeutic consequences of opioid potency remains ill defined. Both patients and clinicians alike have misperceptions about opioid potency, expecting that less-potent opioids will be less effective or fearing that more-potent opioids are more dangerous or more likely to be abused. In this review, common myths about the potency of opioid analgesics will be discussed. Clinicians should understand that pharmacologic potency per se does not necessarily imply more effective analgesia or higher abuse liability. Published dose conversion tables may not accurately calculate the dose for effective and safe rotation from one opioid to another in patients receiving long-term opioid therapy because they are based on limited data that may not apply to chronic pain. Differences in pharmacologic potency are largely accounted for by the actual doses prescribed, according to individualized patient need. Factors for achieving effective analgesia and reducing the risks involved with opioid use include careful medication selection based on patient characteristics, appropriate dosing titration and opioid rotation practices, knowledge of product formulation characteristics (eg, extended release, immediate release, and tamper-resistant features), and an awareness of differences in opioid pharmacokinetics and metabolism. Clinicians should remain vigilant in monitoring patients on any opioid medication, regardless of classification along the opioid potency continuum. PMID:25162606

  11. Gene profiling the response to repeated cocaine self-administration in dorsal striatum: a focus on circadian genes.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Wendy J; Girgenti, Matthew J; Breslin, Florence J; Newton, Samuel S; Taylor, Jane R

    2008-06-01

    Alterations in gene expression in the dorsal striatum caused by chronic cocaine exposure have been implicated in the long-term behavioral changes associated with cocaine addiction. To gain further insight into the molecular alterations that occur as a result of cocaine self-administration, we conducted a microarray analysis of gene expression followed by bioinformatic gene network analysis that allowed us to identify adaptations at the level of gene expression as well as into interconnected networks. Changes in gene expression were examined in the dorsal striatum of rats 1 day after they had self-administered cocaine for 7 days under a 24-h access, discrete trial paradigm (averaging 98 mg/kg/day). Here we report the regulation of the circadian genes Clock, Bmal1, Cryptochrome1, Period2, as well as several genes that are regulated by/associated with the circadian system (i.e., early growth response 1, dynorphin). We also observed regulation of other relevant genes (i.e., Nur77, beta catenin). These changes were then linked to curated pathways and formulated networks which identified circadian rhythm processes as affected by cocaine self-administration. These data strongly suggest involvement of circadian-associated genes in the brain's response to cocaine and may contribute to an understanding of addictive behavior including disruptions in sleep and circadian rhythmicity. PMID:18452895

  12. Local tolerance and systemic toxicity of single and repeated intramuscular administrations of two different formulations of the RTS,S malaria candidate vaccine in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Segal, Lawrence; Morelle, Danielle; Blee, Mark; Moore, Emma; Damsten, Micaela; Liu, Kai Chiu; Destexhe, Eric; Garçon, Nathalie

    2015-03-01

    RTS,S malaria antigen is weakly immunogenic as such and needs to be formulated with an adjuvant to improve the magnitude and duration of the immune responses to RTS,S. Two Adjuvant Systems, AS01 and AS02 were evaluated during the development of the RTS,S vaccine. The evaluation included non-clinical studies in rabbits to evaluate the local intramuscular tolerance following administration on a single occasion, and the local and systemic effects following repeated administrations of RTS,S/AS01 or RTS,S/AS02 formulations. In the first study, rabbits were injected on one occasion with RTS,S/AS01, RTS,S/AS02 or controls, and the local intramuscular tolerance was evaluated up to 3 days after injection. In the second study, the different formulations were injected on Days 0, 14, 28 and 42. General health status, haematology and blood chemistry parameters were monitored on a regular basis. Macroscopic and microscopic evaluations were made after termination of the study. No sign of toxicity was detected following single or repeated administrations of the adjuvanted RTS,S formulations. Changes in haematology or clinical chemistry parameters were indicative of a developing immune response in the groups receiving either RTS,S formulation. All examined parameters returned to normal within 28 days after the last injection. The absence of toxicological effects following the injection of RTS,S/AS01 or RTS,S/AS02 in rabbits was supportive of further clinical evaluation of these two formulations. PMID:25545314

  13. Reduction of Aggressive Episodes After Repeated Transdermal Nicotine Administration in a Hospitalized Adolescent with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Alan S.; Qayyum, Zheala; Koslosky, Kourtney; Picciotto, Marina R.; Volkmar, Fred R.

    2016-01-01

    Aggression remains a major cause of morbidity in patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Current pharmacotherapy for aggression is not always effective and is often associated with morbidity. Nicotinic acetylcholinergic neurotransmission may play a prominent role in ASD pathophysiology based on human and animal studies, and preclinical studies show nicotine administration can reduce aggression-related behaviors. Transdermal nicotine has been used to treat agitation in neuropsychiatric conditions with cholinergic dysfunction. Here we report the use of transdermal nicotine as an adjunctive medication to treat aggression in a hospitalized adolescent with ASD. Nicotine patch was recurrently well tolerated, and reduced the need for emergency medication and restraint. These findings suggest further study of transdermal nicotine for aggression comorbid with ASD is warranted. PMID:25982311

  14. Baseline reward circuitry activity and trait reward responsiveness predict expression of opioid analgesia in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Wanigasekera, Vishvarani; Lee, Michael C.; Rogers, Richard; Kong, Yazhuo; Leknes, Siri; Andersson, Jesper; Tracey, Irene

    2012-01-01

    Variability in opioid analgesia has been attributed to many factors. For example, genetic variability of the μ-opioid receptor (MOR)-encoding gene introduces variability in MOR function and endogenous opioid neurotransmission. Emerging evidence suggests that personality trait related to the experience of reward is linked to endogenous opioid neurotransmission. We hypothesized that opioid-induced behavioral analgesia would be predicted by the trait reward responsiveness (RWR) and the response of the brain reward circuitry to noxious stimuli at baseline before opioid administration. In healthy volunteers using functional magnetic resonance imaging and the μ-opioid agonist remifentanil, we found that the magnitude of behavioral opioid analgesia is positively correlated with the trait RWR and predicted by the neuronal response to painful noxious stimuli before infusion in key structures of the reward circuitry, such as the orbitofrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, and the ventral tegmental area. These findings highlight the role of the brain reward circuitry in the expression of behavioral opioid analgesia. We also show a positive correlation between behavioral opioid analgesia and opioid-induced suppression of neuronal responses to noxious stimuli in key structures of the descending pain modulatory system (amygdala, periaqueductal gray, and rostral–ventromedial medulla), as well as the hippocampus. Further, these activity changes were predicted by the preinfusion period neuronal response to noxious stimuli within the ventral tegmentum. These results support the notion of future imaging-based subject-stratification paradigms that can guide therapeutic decisions. PMID:23045652

  15. Correlates and Consequences of Opioid Misuse among High-Risk Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Schrager, Sheree M.; Silva, Karol; Jackson Bloom, Jennifer; Iverson, Ellen; Lankenau, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Prescription opioids are the most frequently misused class of prescription drug among young adults aged 18–25, yet trajectories of opioid misuse and escalation are understudied. We sought to model opioid misuse patterns and relationships between opioid misuse, sociodemographic factors, and other substance uses. Methods. Participants were 575 young adults age 16–25 who had misused opioids in the last 90 days. Latent class analysis was performed with models based on years of misuse, recency of misuse, and alternate modes of administration within the past 12 months, 3 months, and 30 days. Results. Four latent classes emerged that were differentially associated with heroin, cocaine, and methamphetamine use, tranquilizer misuse, daily opioid misuse, and opioid withdrawal. Alternate modes of administering opioids were associated with increased risk for these outcomes. Sociodemographic factors, homelessness, prescription history, and history of parental drug use were significantly associated with riskier opioid misuse trajectories. Conclusion. Young adults who reported more debilitating experiences as children and adolescents misused opioids longer and engaged in higher risk alternate modes of administering opioids. Data on decisions both to use and to alter a drug's form can be combined to describe patterns of misuse over time and predict important risk behaviors. PMID:25506462

  16. The effect of a novel pentadecapeptide BPC 157 on development of tolerance and physical dependence following repeated administration of diazepam.

    PubMed

    Jelovac, N; Sikiric, P; Rucman, R; Petek, M; Perovic, D; Marovic, A; Anic, T; Seiwerth, S; Mise, S; Pigac, B; Duplancie, B; Turkovic, B; Dodig, G; Prkacin, I; Stancic-Rokotov, D; Zoricic, I; Aralica, G; Sebecic, B; Ziger, T; Slobodnjak, Z

    1999-09-30

    A novel gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 with different beneficial activities and anticonvulsant effect interacting with GABAergic system could improve diazepam efficacy coadministered (10 microg/kg, 10 ng/kg i.p.) with diazepam (5.0 mg/kg i.p.) twice daily for 10 days, since diazepam chronic medication would otherwise predispose for diazepam- tolerance/withdrawal development (shorter latency to convulsion after convulsant). In diazepam chronically treated mice, it attenuated diazepam tolerance (provoked by later acute administration of diazepam together with convulsant) and postponed physical dependence/withdrawal effects (provoked by later administration of isoniazid). In tolerance assay, at 42 h after the end of conditioning regimen, shorter preconvulsive latencies than in healthy (non-diazepam conditioned) mice following isoniazid (800 mg/kg i.p.) (as hallmark of tolerance) were observed if diazepam (5.0 mg/kg i.p.) was again given acutely to mice previously conditioned with diazepam alone (use of picrotoxin 3.0 mg/kg i.p., as convulsant, with acute application of diazepam in previously diazepam conditioned mice did not lead to tolerance hallmark). This was completely avoided in diazepam+BPC 157 10 microg or diazepam+BPC 157 10 ng chronically treated animals. In physical dependence assay (isoniazid challenge assessed at 6, 14, 42 and 72 h after conditioning medication), when compared to diazepam non-conditioned healthy mice, in diazepam conditioned mice residual anticonvulsive activity was not present already at the earliest post-conditioning interval (i.e., not different latency to isoniazid-convulsions), whereas shorter preconvulsive latencies (as physical dependence/withdrawal hallmark) were noted in diazepam conditioned mice following isoniazid challenge at 42 h and at 72 h after end of conditioning treatment. In diazepam+BPC 157 10 microg- conditioned mice, a residual anticonvulsive activity (i.e., longer latency to isoniazid convulsion) was noted at 6 h

  17. Muscarinic receptor plasticity in the brain of senescent rats: down-regulation after repeated administration of diisopropyl fluorophosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Pintor, A.; Fortuna, S.; Volpe, M.T.; Michalek, H.

    1988-01-01

    Potential age-related differences in the response of Fischer 344 rats to subchronic treatment with diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) were evaluated in terms of brain cholinesterase (ChE) inhibition and muscarinic receptor sites. Male 3- and 24-month old rats were sc injected with sublethal doses of DFP for 2 weeks and killed 48 hrs after the last treatment. In the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and striatum of control rats a significant age-related reduction of ChE and of maximum number of /sup 3/H-QNB binding sites (Bmax) was observed. The administration of DFP to senescent rats resulted in more pronounced and longer lasting syndrome of cholinergic stimulation, with marked body weight loss and 60% mortality. The percentage inhibition of brain ChE induced by DFP did not differ between young and senescent rats. As expected, in young rats DFP caused a significant decrease of Bmax, which in the cerebral cortex reached about 40%. In the surviving senescent rats, the percentage decrease of Bmax due to DFP with respect to age-matched controls was very similar to that of young animals, especially in the cerebral cortex. Thus there is great variability in the response of aged rats to DFP treatment, from total failure of adaptive mechanisms resulting in death to considerable muscarinic receptor plasticity.

  18. Effect of repeated gaboxadol administration on night sleep and next-day performance in healthy elderly subjects.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Stefan; Zihl, Josef; Steiger, Axel; Lancel, Marike

    2005-04-01

    Aging is associated with dramatic reductions in sleep continuity and sleep intensity. Since gaboxadol, a selective GABA(A) receptor agonist, has been demonstrated to improve sleep consolidation and promote deep sleep, it may be an effective hypnotic, particularly for elderly patients with insomnia. In the present study, we investigated the effects of subchronic gaboxadol administration on nocturnal sleep and its residual effects during the next days in elderly subjects. This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, balanced crossover study in 10 healthy elderly subjects without sleep complaints. The subjects were administered either placebo or 15 mg gaboxadol hydrochloride at bedtime on three consecutive nights. Sleep was recorded during each night from 2300 to 0700 h and tests assessing attention (target detection, stroop test) and memory function (visual form recognition, immediate word recall, digit span) were applied at 0900, 1400, and 1700 h during the following days. Compared with placebo, gaboxadol significantly shortened subjective sleep onset latency and increased self-rated sleep intensity and quality. Polysomnographic recordings showed that it significantly decreased the number of awakenings, the amount of intermittent wakefulness, and stage 1, and increased slow wave sleep and stage 2. These effects were stable over the three nights. None of the subjects reported side effects. Next-day cognitive performance was not affected by gaboxadol. Gaboxadol persistently improved subjective and objective sleep quality and was devoid of residual effects. Thus, at the employed dose, it seems an effective hypnotic in elderly subjects. PMID:15602499

  19. Validation of a Brief Measure of Opioid Dependence: The Rapid Opioid Dependence Screen (RODS)

    PubMed Central

    Wickersham, Jeffrey A.; Azar, Marwan M.; Cannon, Christopher M.; Altice, Frederick L.; Springer, Sandra A.

    2015-01-01

    The Rapid Opioid Dependence Screen (RODS) is an 8-item measure of opioid dependence designed for quick, targeted screening in clinical and research settings. Based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth edition, criteria, the RODS has an average administration of less than 2 minutes and can easily be administered as a stand-alone instrument or as part of a comprehensive interview. This study reports on the initial validation of the RODS among a sample of 97 newly incarcerated, HIV-positive individuals. Using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview as the primary measure of opioid dependence, the RODS showed good-to-strong sensitivity (.97), specificity (.76), positive predictive value (.69), and negative predictive value (.98), while concordance analysis revealed moderate diagnostic agreement (κ = .67). Psychometric properties revealed strong internal consistency (α = .92) and inter-item correlations (.66 to .87). PMID:25559628

  20. Pharmacokinetics of difloxacin and its concentration in body fluids and endometrial tissues of mares after repeated intragastric administration.

    PubMed

    Adams, Aric R; Haines, Gregory R; Brown, Murray P; Gronwall, Ronald; Merritt, Kelly

    2005-07-01

    Pharmacokinetics of difloxacin and its distribution within the body fluids and endometrium of 6 mares were studied after intragastric (IG) administration of 5 individual doses. Difloxacin concentrations were serially measured in serum, urine, peritoneal fluid, synovial fluid, cerebrospinal fluid, and endometrium over 120 h. Bacterial susceptibility to difloxacin was determined for 174 equine pathogens over a 7-month period. Maximum serum concentration (Cmax) was 2.25 +/- 0.70 microg/mL at 3.12 +/- 2.63 h and Cmax after the 5th dose was 2.41 +/- 0.86 microg/mL at 97.86 +/- 1.45 h. The mean elimination half-life (t(1/2)) was 8.75 +/- 2.77 h and area under the serum concentration versus time curve (AUC) was 25.13 +/- 8.79 microg h/mL. Highest mean synovial fluid concentration was 1.26 +/- 0.49 microg/mL at 100 h. Highest mean peritoneal fluid concentration was 1.50 +/- 0.56 microg/mL at 98 h. Highest mean endometrial concentration was 0.78 +/- 0.48 microg/g at 97.5 h. Mean cerebrospinal fluid concentration was 0.87 +/- 0.52 microg/mL at 99 h. Highest mean urine concentration was 92.05 +/- 30.35 microg/mL at 104 h. All isolates of Salmonella spp. and Pasteurella spp. were susceptible. In general, gram-negative organisms were more susceptible than gram-positives. Difloxacin appears to be safe, adequately absorbed, and well distributed to body fluids and endometrial tissues of mares and may be useful in the treatment of susceptible bacterial infections in adult horses. PMID:16187554

  1. Pharmacokinetics of difloxacin and its concentration in body fluids and endometrial tissues of mares after repeated intragastric administration

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Pharmacokinetics of difloxacin and its distribution within the body fluids and endometrium of 6 mares were studied after intragastric (IG) administration of 5 individual doses. Difloxacin concentrations were serially measured in serum, urine, peritoneal fluid, synovial fluid, cerebrospinal fluid, and endometrium over 120 h. Bacterial susceptibility to difloxacin was determined for 174 equine pathogens over a 7-month period. Maximum serum concentration (Cmax) was 2.25 ± 0.70 μg/mL at 3.12 ± 2.63 h and Cmax after the 5th dose was 2.41 ± 0.86 μg/mL at 97.86 ± 1.45 h. The mean elimination half-life (t1/2) was 8.75 ± 2.77 h and area under the serum concentration versus time curve (AUC) was 25.13 ± 8.79 μg h/mL. Highest mean synovial fluid concentration was 1.26 ± 0.49 μg/mL at 100 h. Highest mean peritoneal fluid concentration was 1.50 ± 0.56 μg/mL at 98 h. Highest mean endometrial concentration was 0.78 ± 0.48 μg/g at 97.5 h. Mean cerebrospinal fluid concentration was 0.87 ± 0.52 μg/mL at 99 h. Highest mean urine concentration was 92.05 ± 30.35 μg/mL at 104 h. All isolates of Salmonella spp. and Pasteurella spp. were susceptible. In general, gram-negative organisms were more susceptible than gram-positives. Difloxacin appears to be safe, adequately absorbed, and well distributed to body fluids and endometrial tissues of mares and may be useful in the treatment of susceptible bacterial infections in adult horses. PMID:16187554

  2. Cellular mechanisms underlying the interaction between cannabinoid and opioid system.

    PubMed

    Parolaro, D; Rubino, T; Viganò, D; Massi, P; Guidali, C; Realini, N

    2010-04-01

    Recently, the presence of functional interaction between the opioid and cannabinoid system has been shown in various pharmacological responses. Although there is an increasing interest for the feasible therapeutic application of a co-administration of cannabinoids and opioids in some disorders (i.e. to manage pain, to modulate immune system and emotions) and the combined use of the two drugs by drug abusers is becoming largely diffuse, only few papers focused on cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this interaction. This review updates the biochemical and molecular underpinnings of opioid and cannabinoid interaction, both within the central nervous system and periphery. The most convincing theory for the explanation of this reciprocal interaction involves (i) the release of opioid peptides by cannabinoids or endocannabinoids by opioids, (ii) the existence of a direct receptor-receptor interaction when the receptors are co-expressed in the same cells, and (iii) the interaction of their intracellular pathways. Finally, the cannabinoid/opioid interaction might be different in the brain rewarding networks and in those accounting for other pharmacological effects (antinociception, modulation of emotionality and cognitive behavior), as well as between the central nervous system and periphery. Further insights about the cannabinoid/opioid interaction could pave the way for new and promising therapeutic approaches. PMID:20017730

  3. Cellular Composition of the Spleen and Changes in Splenic Lysosomes in the Dynamics of Dyslipidemia in Mice Caused by Repeated Administration of Poloxamer 407.

    PubMed

    Goncharova, N V; Shurlygina, A V; Mel'nikova, E V; Karmatskikh, O L; Avrorov, P A; Loktev, K V; Korolenko, T A

    2015-11-01

    We studied the effect of dyslipidemia induced by poloxamer 407 (300 mg/kg twice a week for 30 days) on cellular composition of the spleen and splenocyte lysosomes in mice. Changes in blood lipid profile included elevated concentrations of total cholesterol, aterogenic LDL, and triglycerides most pronounced in 24 h after the last poloxamer 407 injection; gradual normalization of lipid profile was observed in 4 days (except triglycerides) and 10 days. The most pronounced changes in the spleen (increase in organ weight and number of cells, inhibition in apoptosis, and reduced accumulation of vital dye acridine orange in lysosomes) were detected on day 4; on day 10, the indices returned to normal. Cathepsin D activity in the spleen also increased at these terms. The relationship between changes in the cellular composition of the spleen and dynamics of serum lipid profile in mice in dyslipidemia caused by repeated administrations of relatively low doses of poloxamer 407 is discussed. PMID:26608379

  4. Repeated dose (28-day) administration of silver nanoparticles of varied size and coating does not significantly alter the indigenous murine gut microbiome.

    PubMed

    Wilding, Laura A; Bassis, Christine M; Walacavage, Kim; Hashway, Sara; Leroueil, Pascale R; Morishita, Masako; Maynard, Andrew D; Philbert, Martin A; Bergin, Ingrid L

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been used as antimicrobials in a number of applications, including topical wound dressings and coatings for consumer products and biomedical devices. Ingestion is a relevant route of exposure for AgNPs, whether occurring unintentionally via Ag dissolution from consumer products, or intentionally from dietary supplements. AgNP have also been proposed as substitutes for antibiotics in animal feeds. While oral antibiotics are known to have significant effects on gut bacteria, the antimicrobial effects of ingested AgNPs on the indigenous microbiome or on gut pathogens are unknown. In addition, AgNP size and coating have been postulated as significantly influential towards their biochemical properties and the influence of these properties on antimicrobial efficacy is unknown. We evaluated murine gut microbial communities using culture-independent sequencing of 16S rRNA gene fragments following 28 days of repeated oral dosing of well-characterized AgNPs of two different sizes (20 and 110 nm) and coatings (PVP and Citrate). Irrespective of size or coating, oral administration of AgNPs at 10 mg/kg body weight/day did not alter the membership, structure or diversity of the murine gut microbiome. Thus, in contrast to effects of broad-spectrum antibiotics, repeat dosing of AgNP, at doses equivalent to 2000 times the oral reference dose and 100-400 times the effective in vitro anti-microbial concentration, does not affect the indigenous murine gut microbiome. PMID:26525505

  5. Opioid Use Disorders.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bikash; Bruner, Ann; Barnett, Gabrielle; Fishman, Marc

    2016-07-01

    Opioid use and addiction in adolescents and young adults is a health problem of epidemic proportions, with devastating consequences for youth and their families. Opioid overdose is a life-threatening emergency that should be treated with naloxone, and respiratory support if necessary. Overdose should always be an opportunity to initiate addiction treatment. Detoxification is often a necessary, but never sufficient, component of treatment for OUDs. Treatment for OUDs is effective but treatment capacity is alarmingly limited and under-developed. Emerging consensus supports the incorporation of relapse prevention medications such as buprenorphine and extended release naltrexone into comprehensive psychosocial treatment including counseling and family involvement. PMID:27338968

  6. Comparative toxicokinetic/toxicodynamic study of rubber antioxidants, 2-mercaptobenzimidazole and its methyl substituted derivatives, by repeated oral administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Sakemi, Kazue; Ito, Rieno; Umemura, Takashi; Ohno, Yasuo; Tsuda, Mitsuhiro

    2002-12-01

    2-Mercaptobenzimidazole (MBI), a rubber antioxidant, is known to exhibit potent thyroid toxicity in rats, whereas its methylated derivatives are much less toxic. To characterize this methyl-substituent effect on the thyroid toxicity of MBI, comparative toxicokinetic analyses have been conducted in the present study. MBI and the MMBIs [4-methylated MBI (4-MMBI) and 5-methylated MBI (5-MMBI), and a 1:1 mixture of these 4- and 5-methylated isomers (MMBI mix)] suspended in corn oil were repeatedly administered (at 0.3-0.6 mmol/kg) to male Wistar rats by gavage once daily for 2 weeks. After the first and last administrations, blood and urine samples were collected, and the levels of unchanged compounds and their desulfurated metabolites were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. After repeated oral administration (roa), the C(max) and area under concentration-time curve (AUC) of MBI were markedly increased, while the MMBIs essentially were cleared from the blood within 10 h. After roa, the C(max) and AUC of 4-MMBI decreased markedly, suggesting metabolic enzyme induction. However, the toxicokinetic parameters of 5-MMBI were not markedly altered by roa. The inhibitory potencies (IC(50)) against lactoperoxidase of MBI, 4-MMBI, and 5-MMBI were 20.6 micro M, 45.6 micro M and 31.6 micro M, respectively. Thus, we suggest that the marked decrease of thyroid toxicity by methyl substitution of MBI is caused mainly by a decrease in systemic exposure to the compounds and partly by a decrease in inhibition of thyroid hormone synthesis. PMID:12451444

  7. Endogenous opioids and excessive alcohol consumption.

    PubMed Central

    Gianoulakis, C

    1993-01-01

    Alcohol is one of the most popular drugs of abuse in our society, and alcoholism is an important cause of absenteeism at work and a major health and social problem. Ethanol induces a number of effects, such as disinhibition, a feeling of general well-being, tolerance and physical dependence. Since there are no specific receptors with which ethanol interacts, it has been proposed that ethanol exerts its effects by altering the activity of a number of neuronal and neuroendocrine systems. Studies have indicated that alcohol influences the activity of the dopaminergic, serotonergic and opioidergic systems. The implication of the endogenous opioid system in mediating some of the effects of ethanol is indicated by the observations that some of the behavioral and pharmacological effects of ethanol are similar to those of the opiates. Indeed, injections of small amounts of morphine increased ethanol consumption, while the administration of naltrexone decreased ethanol consumption among rats and other experimental animals, in a number of experimental paradigms, suggesting that endogenous opioids may play an important role in controlling voluntary ethanol consumption. This paper reviews studies of the effects of ethanol on the activity of the endogenous opioid system and on the importance of endogenous opioids in controlling alcohol consumption. PMID:7690585

  8. Effect of Intra CA1 and Intraperitoneal Administration of Opioid Receptor Modulating Agents on The Anxiolytic Properties of Nano and Conventional ZnO in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Torabi, Mozhgan; Kesmati, Mahnaz; Eshagh Harooni, Hooman; Varzi, Hosein Najafzadeh

    2014-01-01

    Objective Nano components are today’s new wonder material. However, the safety or toxicity of these components in humans is not yet clear. In a previous study we indicated that nano ZnO (nZnO) has a stronger anxiolytic effect compared to the conventional ZnO (cZnO). The present study was designed to evaluate the intraperitoneal administration of an opioidergic receptor agonist and antagonist of as well as the intra CA1 administration of an opioidergic receptor antagonist on the anxiolytic properties of nano and conventional ZnO in adult male Wistar rats. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, rats received drugs via two modes of injection; intraperitoneal (IP.) and intra CA1 (intra hippocampus, CA1 area). Firstly, nZnO (5, 10, 20 mg/kg), cZnO (5, 10, 20 mg/kg), morphine 6 mg/kg, and naloxone 1 mg/kg were injected IP and naloxone 1µg/rat was injected intra CA1. Subsequently, morphine and na- loxone (IP and intra CA1) were co-injected with the effective dose of nZnO and cZnO. An elevated plus maze was used to evaluate anxiety related behavior and anxiety parameters 30 minutes after the second injection. Results The results indicated that the anxiolytic effects of nZnO 5 mg/kg and cZnO 10 mg/kg were equal. When injected intraperitoneally, naloxone increased anxiety but did not inhibit the anxiolytic effect of nZnO and cZnO. The anxiolytic effects of morphine potentiated the anxio- lytic effects of ZnO, particularly nZno. When introduced via intra CA1 injection naloxone alone had no effect on anxiety behaviors and did not inhibit the anxiolytic effect of nZnO. Conclusion It seems that the opioidergic system activity involved in the anxiolytic effect of nano and conventional ZnO may operate through shared and unshared pathways. PMID:24567946

  9. Repeated administration of a mutant cocaine esterase: effects on plasma cocaine levels, cocaine-induced cardiovascular activity, and immune responses in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Collins, Gregory T; Brim, Remy L; Noon, Kathleen R; Narasimhan, Diwahar; Lukacs, Nicholas W; Sunahara, Roger K; Woods, James H; Ko, Mei-Chuan

    2012-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the capacity of a long-acting mutant form of a naturally occurring bacterial double mutant cocaine esterase (DM CocE) to antagonize the reinforcing, discriminative, convulsant, and lethal effects of cocaine in rodents and reverse the increases in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) produced by cocaine in rhesus monkeys. This study was aimed at characterizing the immunologic responses to repeated dosing with DM CocE and determining whether the development of anti-CocE antibodies altered the capacity of DM CocE to reduce plasma cocaine levels and ameliorate the cardiovascular effects of cocaine in rhesus monkeys. Under control conditions, intravenous administration of cocaine (3 mg/kg) resulted in a rapid increase in the plasma concentration of cocaine (n = 2) and long-lasting increases in MAP and HR (n = 3). Administration of DM CocE (0.32 mg/kg i.v.) 10 min after cocaine resulted in a rapid hydrolysis of cocaine with plasma levels below detection limits within 5 to 8 min. Elevations in MAP and HR were significantly reduced within 25 and 50 min of DM CocE administration, respectively. Although slight (10-fold) increases in anti-CocE antibodies were observed after the fourth administration of DM CocE, these antibodies did not alter the capacity of DM CocE to reduce plasma cocaine levels or ameliorate cocaine's cardiovascular effects. Anti-CocE titers were transient and generally dissipated within 8 weeks. Together, these results suggest that highly efficient cocaine esterases, such as DM CocE, may provide a novel and effective therapeutic for the treatment of acute cocaine intoxication in humans. PMID:22518021

  10. Repeated cocaine administration decreases calcineurin (PP2B) but enhances DARPP-32 modulation of sodium currents in rat nucleus accumbens neurons.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiu-Ti; Ford, Kerstin; White, Francis J

    2005-05-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that repeated cocaine (COC) administration reduces voltage-sensitive sodium and calcium currents (I(Na) or VSSCs and I(Ca) or VSCCs, respectively) in medium spiny nucleus accumbens (NAc) neurons of rats. The present findings further indicate that chronic COC-induced I(Na) reduction in NAc neurons is regulated by decreased dephosphorylation and enhanced phosphorylation of Na(+) channels. Whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings revealed that dephosphorylation of Na(+) channels by calcineurin (CaN) enhanced I(Na), while inhibition of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) by phosphorylated dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein (M(r)=32 kDa) (DARPP-32) at the site of threonine 34 (p-Thr.34-DARPP-32) suppressed I(Na), in freshly dissociated NAc neurons of saline-pretreated rats. However, the effects of CaN on enhancing I(Na) were significantly attenuated, and the action of p-Thr.34-DARPP-32 to decrease I(Na) was mimicked, although not potentiated, by repeated COC pretreatment. Dephosphorylation of Na(+) channels by PP1 also enhanced I(Na), but this effect of PP1 on I(Na) was not apparently affected by repeated COC administration. Western blot analysis indicates that the protein levels of CaN and DARPP-32 were significantly decreased and increased, respectively, while the PP1 levels were unchanged, in the COC-withdrawn NAc as compared to saline-pretreated controls. Combined with previous findings, our results indicate that both CaN and PP1 modulate the increase in I(Na) via enhancing dephosphorylation, while p-Thr.34-DARPP-32 reduces I(Na) by inhibiting PP1-induced dephosphorylation, thereby stabilizing the phosphorylation state, of Na(+) channels in NAc neurons. They also suggest that chronic COC-induced I(Na) reduction may be attributed to a reduction in Ca(2+) signaling, which disrupts the physiological balance of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of Na(+) channels. PMID:15726118

  11. Dynorphin A (1-13) Neurotoxicity In Vitro: Opioid and Non-Opioid Mechanisms in Mouse Spinal Cord Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Kurt F.; Foldes, Jane K.; Turbek, Carol S.

    2016-01-01

    Dynorphin A is an endogenous opioid peptide that preferentially activates κ opioid receptors and is antinociceptive at physiological concentrations. Levels of dynorphin A and a major metabolite, dynorphin A (1-13), increase significantly following spinal cord trauma and reportedly contribute to neurodegeneration associated with secondary injury. Interestingly, both κ opioid and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists can modulate dynorphin toxicity, suggesting that dynorphin is acting (directly or indirectly) through κ opioid and/or NMDA receptor (NMDAR) types. Despite these findings, few studies have systematically explored dynorphin toxicity at the cellular level in defined populations of neurons co-expressing κ opioid and NMDA receptors. To address this question, we isolated populations of neurons enriched in both κ opioid and NMDA receptors from embryonic mouse spinal cord and examined the effects of dynorphin A (1-13) on intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) and neuronal survival in vitro. Time-lapse photography was used to repeatedly follow the same neurons before and during experimental treatments. At micromolar concentrations, dynorphin A (1-13) elevated [Ca2+]i and caused a significant loss of neurons. The excitotoxic effects were prevented by MK-801 (Dizocilpine) (10 μM), 2-amino-5-phosphopentanoic acid (AP-5) (100 μM), or 7-chlorokynurenic acid (100 μM)— suggesting that dynorphin A (1-13) was acting (directly or indirectly) through NMDA receptors. In contrast, co-treatment with (−)-naloxone (3 μM), or the more selective κ opioid receptor antagonist nor-binaltorphimine (3 μM), exacerbated dynorphin A (1-13)-induced neuronal loss; however, cell losses were not enhanced by the inactive stereoisomer (+)-naloxone (3 μM). Neuronal losses were not seen with exposure to the opioid antagonists alone (10 μM). Thus, opioid receptor blockade significantly increased toxicity, but only in the presence of excitotoxic levels of

  12. Opioid Drugs in Patients With Liver Disease: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Soleimanpour, Hassan; Safari, Saeid; Shahsavari Nia, Kavous; Sanaie, Sarvin; Alavian, Seyed Moayed

    2016-01-01

    Context The liver, one of the most important organs of the body, is known to be responsible for several functions. The functional contribution of the liver to the metabolism of carbohydrates, protein, drugs and toxins, fats and cholesterol and many other biological processes are still unknown. Liver disorders are classified into two types: acute and chronic. Different drugs are used in liver diseases to treat and control pain. Most pain relief medications such as opioids are metabolized via the liver; therefore, the adverse reactions of drugs are probably higher for patients with liver disease. The current study aimed to evaluate the effects of opioid drugs on patients with liver disease; therefore, it is necessary to select suitable opioids for such patients. Evidence Acquisition This review was written by referring to research literature including 70 articles and four textbooks published from 1958 to 2015 on various reputable sites. Searches were carried out on the key phrases of narcotic pain relievers (opioids), acute and chronic hepatic failure, opioid adverse drug reactions, drug-induced liver injury (DILI) and other similar keywords. References included a variety of research papers (descriptive and analytical), intervention and review articles. Results In patients with liver disease, administration of opioid analgesics should be observed, accurately. As a general rule, lower doses of drugs should be administered at regular intervals based on the signs of drug accumulation. Secondly, the interactions of opioid drugs with different levels of substrates of the P450 cytochrome enzyme should be considered. Conclusions Pain management in patients with liver dysfunction is always challenging to physicians because of the adverse reactions of drugs, especially opioids. Opioids should be used cautiously since they can cause sedation, constipation and sudden encephalopathy effects. Since the clearance of these drugs in patients with hepatic insufficiency is decreased

  13. Pleasure-related analgesia activates opioid-insensitive circuits.

    PubMed

    Kut, Elvan; Candia, Victor; von Overbeck, Jan; Pok, Judit; Fink, Daniel; Folkers, Gerd

    2011-03-16

    Recent findings suggest that pain and pleasure share common neurochemical circuits, and studies in animals and humans show that opioid-mediated descending pathways can inhibit or facilitate pain. We explored the role of endogenous opioid neurotransmission in pleasure-related analgesia. μ-Opioidergic activity was blocked with 0.2 mg/kg naloxone to assess its effects on hedonic responses to pleasant emotional pictures (International Affective Picture System) and its modulating effects on heat pain tolerance. Naloxone did not alter subjective and autonomous reactions to pleasure induction or overall mood of participants. In addition, pleasure-related increases in pain tolerance persisted after reversal of endogenous μ-opioidergic neurotransmission. Subjective pain intensity and unpleasantness ratings increased after naloxone administration. These findings suggest that, in addition to opioid-sensitive circuits, mainly opioid-insensitive pain-modulating circuits are activated during pleasure-related analgesia. PMID:21411655

  14. Repeated ketamine administration alters N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor subunit gene expression: Implication of genetic vulnerability for ketamine abuse and ketamine psychosis in humans

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ke; Lipsky, Robert H

    2015-01-01

    For more than 40 years following its approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as an anesthetic, ketamine, a non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist, has been used as a tool of psychiatric research. As a psychedelic drug, ketamine induces psychotic symptoms, cognitive impairment, and mood elevation, which resemble some symptoms of schizophrenia. Recreational use of ketamine has been increasing in recent years. However, little is known of the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for ketamine-associated psychosis. Recent animal studies have shown that repeated ketamine administration significantly increases NMDA receptor subunit gene expression, in particular subunit 1 (NR1 or GluN1) levels. This results in neurodegeneration, supporting a potential mechanism where up-regulation of NMDA receptors could produce cognitive deficits in chronic ketamine abuse patients. In other studies, NMDA receptor gene variants are associated with addictive behavior. Here, we focus on the roles of NMDA receptor gene subunits in ketamine abuse and ketamine psychosis and propose that full sequencing of NMDA receptor genes may help explain individual vulnerability to ketamine abuse and ketamine-associated psychosis. PMID:25245072

  15. Repeated administration of propofol upregulated the expression of c-Fos and cleaved-caspase-3 proteins in the developing mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yin; Ling-Shan, Gou; Yi, Liu; Xing-Qi, Wang; Xue-Mei, Zhuang; Xiao-Xing, Yin

    2011-01-01

    Objectives and Aim: This study was designed to analyze the relationship between the expression of c-Fos protein and apoptosis in the hippocampus following propofol administration in infant mice. There are reports that certain drugs, including the general anesthetics applied in pediatrics and obstetrics, could block N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptors and activate γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors. Furthermore, some anesthetics could trigger neuroapoptosis and the expression of c-Fos in the developing rodent brain. Propofol is a general anesthetic increasingly used in pediatrics and obstetrics, and is reported to be able to interact with both γ-aminobutyric acid type A and N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptors. No adequate evaluations have been available as to whether the dosage of propofol to maintain anaesthesia could trigger the expression of c-Fos and apoptosis. Materials and Methods: Intraperitoneal injections of propofol (50, 100 and 150 mg/kg) or vehicle were administered every 90 minutes (4 times) in infant mice (5–7 days old). 30 minutes after the final administration, the protein expressions of c-Fos and cleaved-caspase-3 in the hippocampus were determined by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. Results: It was demonstrated that the expressions of cleaved-caspase-3 and c-Fos were upregulated in the hippocampal CA3 region in this study. Conclusions: The upregulated c-Fos expression induced by repeated injections of propofol might evoke neuroapoptosis. PMID:22144767

  16. Opioid-induced constipation.

    PubMed

    Gyawali, Bishal; Hayashi, Naomi; Tsukuura, Hiroaki; Honda, Kazunori; Shimokata, Tomoya; Ando, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Opioid-induced constipation (OIC) is a very troublesome, difficult to manage and a nearly universal complication of chronic opioid use to control pain associated with advanced illness. Some studies have reported that OIC is so intolerable in some patients that they skip their opioid medications and bear pain instead of OIC. Laxatives have commonly been used as a prophylaxis and treatment of OIC but they are frequently ineffective because the commonly available laxatives do not target the underlying mechanism of OIC, which is the blockade of peripheral mu-receptors. Recently, there have been a number of advances in the treatment of OIC, which any physician involved with opioid-prescribing discipline should be aware of. This review will update the new options and strategies available for treating OIC along with the relevant clinical trials. Finally, this review also provides a recommendation on the preferred way to approach a patient with OIC in the modern era as well as highlight on the importance of doctor-patient communication in this setting. PMID:26061717

  17. Treating Pain with Opioids

    MedlinePlus

    ... it costs. Ask if they have a drug discount program that can help you pay less for your medicine. Buy your medicine from the pharmacy that gives you the cheapest price.  Sign up for patient assistance programs: Most companies that make medicines have programs that Opioids: Howhaerleptpheeoypulesetdh? ...

  18. Opioid Antagonist Impedes Exposure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merluzzi, Thomas V.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Thirty spider-phobic adults underwent exposure to 17 phobic-related, graded performance tests. Fifteen subjects were assigned to naltrexone, an opioid antagonist, and 15 were assigned to placebo. Naltrexone had a significant effect on exposure, with naltrexone subjects taking significantly longer to complete first 10 steps of exposure and with…

  19. Neurobiology of opioid dependence in creating addiction vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Evans, Christopher J; Cahill, Catherine M

    2016-01-01

    Opioid drugs are potent modulators of many physiological and psychological processes. When given acutely, they can elicit the signature responses of euphoria and analgesia that societies have coveted for centuries. Repeated, or chronic, use of opioids induces adaptive or allostatic changes that modify neuronal circuitry and create an altered normality - the "drug-dependent" state. This state, at least that exhibited by those maintained continuously on long-acting opioid drugs such as methadone or buprenorphine, is generally indistinguishable from the drug-naïve state for most overt behaviors. The consequences of the allostatic changes (cellular, circuit, and system adaptations) that accompany the drug-dependent state are revealed during drug withdrawal. Drug cessation triggers a temporally orchestrated allostatic re-establishment of neuronal systems, which is manifested as opposing physiological and psychological effects to those exhibited by acute drug intoxication. Some withdrawal symptoms, such as physical symptoms (sweating, shaking, and diarrhea) resolve within days, whilst others, such as dysphoria, insomnia, and anxiety, can linger for months, and some adaptations, such as learned associations, may be established for life. We will briefly discuss the cellular mechanisms and neural circuitry that contribute to the opioid drug-dependent state, inferring an emerging role for neuroinflammation. We will argue that opioid addictive behaviors result from a learned relationship between opioids and relief from an existing or withdrawal-induced anxiogenic and/or dysphoric state. Furthermore, a future stressful life event can recall the memory that opioid drugs alleviate negative affect (despair, sadness, and anxiety) and thereby precipitate craving, resulting in relapse. A learned association of relief of aversive states would fuel drug craving in vulnerable people living in an increasingly stressful society. We suggest that this route to addiction is contributive to

  20. Neurobiology of opioid dependence in creating addiction vulnerability

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Christopher J.; Cahill, Catherine M.

    2016-01-01

    Opioid drugs are potent modulators of many physiological and psychological processes. When given acutely, they can elicit the signature responses of euphoria and analgesia that societies have coveted for centuries. Repeated, or chronic, use of opioids induces adaptive or allostatic changes that modify neuronal circuitry and create an altered normality — the “drug-dependent” state. This state, at least that exhibited by those maintained continuously on long-acting opioid drugs such as methadone or buprenorphine, is generally indistinguishable from the drug-naïve state for most overt behaviors. The consequences of the allostatic changes (cellular, circuit, and system adaptations) that accompany the drug-dependent state are revealed during drug withdrawal. Drug cessation triggers a temporally orchestrated allostatic re-establishment of neuronal systems, which is manifested as opposing physiological and psychological effects to those exhibited by acute drug intoxication. Some withdrawal symptoms, such as physical symptoms (sweating, shaking, and diarrhea) resolve within days, whilst others, such as dysphoria, insomnia, and anxiety, can linger for months, and some adaptations, such as learned associations, may be established for life. We will briefly discuss the cellular mechanisms and neural circuitry that contribute to the opioid drug-dependent state, inferring an emerging role for neuroinflammation. We will argue that opioid addictive behaviors result from a learned relationship between opioids and relief from an existing or withdrawal-induced anxiogenic and/or dysphoric state. Furthermore, a future stressful life event can recall the memory that opioid drugs alleviate negative affect (despair, sadness, and anxiety) and thereby precipitate craving, resulting in relapse. A learned association of relief of aversive states would fuel drug craving in vulnerable people living in an increasingly stressful society. We suggest that this route to addiction is

  1. Oral Administration of Recombinant Lactococcus lactis Expressing HSP65 and Tandemly Repeated P277 Reduces the Incidence of Type I Diabetes in Non-Obese Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yanjun; Liu, Jingjing; Hou, Jing; Dong, Yuankai; Lu, Yong; Jin, Liang; Cao, Rongyue; Li, Taiming; Wu, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus type 1 (DM1) is an autoimmune disease that gradually destroys insulin-producing beta-cells. We have previously reported that mucosal administration of fusion protein of HSP65 with tandem repeats of P277 (HSP65-6P277) can reduce the onset of DM1 in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. To deliver large amounts of the fusion protein and to enhance long-term immune tolerance effects, in the present study, we investigated the efficacy of using orally administrated L. lactis expressing HSP65-6P277 to reduce the incidence of DM1 in NOD mice. L. lactis strain NZ9000 was engineered to express HSP65-6P277 either constitutively or by nisin induction. After immunization via gavage with the recombinant L. lactis strains to groups of 4-week old female NOD mice for 36 weeks, we observed that oral administration of recombinant L. Lactis resulted in the prevention of hyperglycemia, improved glucose tolerance and reduced insulitis. Immunologic analysis showed that treatment with recombinant L. lactis induced HSP65- and P277- specific T cell immuno-tolerance, as well as antigen-specific proliferation of splenocytes. The results revealed that the DM1-preventing function was in part caused by a reduction in the pro-inflammatory cytokine IFN-γ and an increase in the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Orally administered recombinant L. lactis delivering HSP65-6P277 may be an effective therapeutic approach in preventing DM1. PMID:25157497

  2. The Economic Impact of Opioid Use in the Management of Chronic Nonmalignant Pain.

    PubMed

    Lipman, Arthur; Webster, Lynn

    2015-10-01

    Chronic nonmalignant pain (CNMP), defined as persistent pain that is not attributable to a potentially life-limiting condition and has a duration of at least 3 months, is widespread in the United States. Moderate-to-severe CNMP often is treated with opioid analgesics, and there is ongoing debate regarding appropriate allocation of opioids to treat CNMP because long-term treatment can result in problematic side effects, drug misuse, or abuse leading to detrimental medical, social, and economic consequences. Furthermore, therapeutic strategies arising from concerns about the misuse of opioids may impede the treatment of patients who require strong analgesics for adequate pain relief. While current CNMP management includes nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic approaches, including acetaminophen, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and opioids, there is debate regarding the risk-benefit profile of opioids for chronic pain treatment. Mitigation of opioid misuse and abuse and proper administration of opioid analgesics must be balanced against providing appropriate analgesia. To accomplish this, managed care policies could implement guidelines that focus on evaluating risk characteristics for opioid misuse and abuse, use opioid dose-sparing strategies, and encourage the use of alternative analgesics or nonpharmacologic therapy when appropriate. The purpose of this review is to examine challenges and costs associated with CNMP management using opioids and to summarize alternative therapeutic approaches. PMID:26402389

  3. Neurobiological mechanisms involved in nicotine dependence and reward: participation of the endogenous opioid system

    PubMed Central

    Berrendero, Fernando; Robledo, Patricia; Trigo, José Manuel; Martín-García, Elena; Maldonado, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    Nicotine is the primary component of tobacco that maintains the smoking habit and develops addiction. The adaptive changes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors produced by repeated exposure to nicotine play a crucial role in the establishment of dependence. However, other neurochemical systems also participate in the addictive effects of nicotine including glutamate, cannabinoids, GABA and opioids. This review will cover the involvement of these neurotransmitters in nicotine addictive properties, with a special emphasis on the endogenous opioid system. Thus, endogenous enkephalins and beta-endorphins acting on mu-opioid receptors are involved in nicotine rewarding effects, whereas opioid peptides derived from prodynorphin participate in nicotine aversive responses. An upregulation of mu-opioid receptors has been reported after chronic nicotine treatment that could counteract the development of nicotine tolerance, whereas the downregulation induced on kappa-opioid receptors seems to facilitate nicotine tolerance. Endogenous enkephalins acting on mu-opioid receptors also play a role in the development of physical dependence to nicotine. In agreement with these actions of the endogenous opioid system, the opioid antagonist naltrexone has shown to be effective for smoking cessation in certain subpopulations of smokers. PMID:20170672

  4. Opioid-induced preconditioning: recent advances and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Peart, Jason N; Gross, Eric R; Gross, Garrett J

    2005-01-01

    Opioids, named by Acheson for compounds with morphine-like actions despite chemically distinct structures, have received much research interest, particularly for their central nervous system (CNS) actions involved in pain management, resulting in thousands of scientific papers focusing on their effects on the CNS and other organ systems. A more recent area which may have great clinical importance concerns the role of opioids, either endogenous or exogenous compounds, in limiting the pathogenesis of ischemia-reperfusion injury in heart and brain. The role of endogenous opioids in hibernation provides tantalizing evidence for the protective potential of opioids against ischemia or hypoxia. Mammalian hibernation, a distinct energy-conserving state, is associated with depletion of energy stores, intracellular acidosis and hypoxia, similar to those which occur during ischemia. However, despite the potentially detrimental cellular state induced with hibernation, the myocardium remains resilient for many months. What accounts for the hypoxia-tolerant state is of great interest. During hibernation, circulating levels of opioid peptides are increased dramatically, and indeed, are considered a "trigger" of hibernation. Furthermore, administration of opioid antagonists can effectively reverse hibernation in mammals. Therefore, it is not surprising that activation of opioid receptors has been demonstrated to preserve cellular status following a hypoxic insult, such as ischemia-reperfusion in many model systems including the intestine [Zhang, Y., Wu, Y.X., Hao, Y.B., Dun, Y. Yang, S.P., 2001. Role of endogenous opioid peptides in protection of ischemic preconditioning in rat small intestine. Life Sci. 68, 1013-1019], skeletal muscle [Addison, P.D., Neligan, P.C., Ashrafpour, H., Khan, A., Zhong, A., Moses, M., Forrest, C.R., Pang, C.Y., 2003. Noninvasive remote ischemic preconditioning for global protection of skeletal muscle against infarction. Am. J. Physiol. Heart Circ

  5. The acceptability of repeat Internet-based hybrid diet assessment of previous 24-h dietary intake: administration of the Oxford WebQ in UK Biobank.

    PubMed

    Galante, Julieta; Adamska, Ligia; Young, Alan; Young, Heather; Littlejohns, Thomas J; Gallacher, John; Allen, Naomi

    2016-02-28

    Although dietary intake over a single 24-h period may be atypical of an individual's habitual pattern, multiple 24-h dietary assessments can be representative of habitual intake and help in assessing seasonal variation. Web-based questionnaires are convenient for the participant and result in automatic data capture for study investigators. This study reports on the acceptability of repeated web-based administration of the Oxford WebQ--a 24-h recall of frequency from a set food list suitable for self-completion from which energy and nutrient values can be automatically generated. As part of the UK Biobank study, four invitations to complete the Oxford WebQ were sent by email over a 16-month period. Overall, 176 012 (53% of those invited) participants completed the online version of the Oxford WebQ at least once and 66% completed it more than once, although only 16% completed it on all four occasions. The response rate for any one round of invitations varied between 34 and 26%. On most occasions, the Oxford WebQ was completed on the same day that they received the invitation, although this was less likely if sent on a weekend. Participants who completed the Oxford WebQ tended to be white, female, slightly older, less deprived and more educated, which is typical of health-conscious volunteer-based studies. These findings provide preliminary evidence to suggest that repeated 24-h dietary assessment via the Internet is acceptable to the public and a feasible strategy for large population-based studies. PMID:26652593

  6. Short-Term Effects of Repeated Olfactory Administration of Homeopathic Sulphur or Pulsatilla on Electroencephalographic Alpha Power in Healthy Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Iris R.; Brooks, Audrey J.; Howerter, Amy; Jackson, Nicholas; Schwartz, Gary E.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Homeopathic pathogenetic trials usually rely on symptom self report measures. Adding objective biomarkers could enhance detection of subtle initial remedy effects. The present feasibility study examined electroencephalographic (EEG) effects of repeated olfactory administration of two polycrest remedies. Methods College student volunteers (ages 18–30, both sexes) from an introductory psychology course were screened for good health and relatively elevated Sulphur OR Pulsatilla symptom scores on the Homeopathic Constitutional Type Questionnaire. Subjects underwent a series of 3 once-weekly double-blind sessions during which they repeatedly sniffed the remedy matched to their CTQ type and solvent controls. Each remedy was given in a 6c, 12c, and 30c potency, one potency per week, in randomly assigned order. Solvent controls included both plain distilled water and a water-ethanol (95%) solution. All sniff test solutions were further diluted just prior to laboratory sessions (0.5 ml test solution in 150 ml distilled water). Within a session, remedies and control solvents were administered via 2-second sniffs (8 sniffs of each of 4 different succussion levels for the potency in randomized order). Primary outcome variable was relative EEG power (alpha 1 8–10 hertz; alpha 2 10–12 hertz) averaged over 19 electrode sites, including all succussions for a given potency. Results Mixed-effect models revealed significant main effects for remedy type (Sulphur>Pulsatilla) in both alpha bands, controlling for gender, baseline resting EEG alpha, and solvent control responses. Additional analyses showed significant non-linear interactions between dilution and time (weekly session) in alpha 2 for both remedies and alpha 1 for Sulphur. Conclusion EEG alpha offers an objective biomarker of remedy effects for future studies and potential method for distinguishing time-dependent effects of specific remedies and remedy potencies from one another. PMID:21962194

  7. Impaired recovery of brain muscarinic receptor sites following an adaptive down-regulation induced by repeated administration of diisopropyl fluorophosphate in aged rats

    SciTech Connect

    Pintor, A.; Fortuna, S.; De Angelis, S.; Michalek, H. )

    1990-01-01

    Potential age-related differences in the recovery rate of brain cholinesterase activity (ChE) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor binding sites (mAChRs) following reduction induced by repeated treatment with diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) were evaluated in Sprague-Dawley rats. Male 3- and 24-month old rats were s.c. injected with DFP on alternate days for 2 weeks and killed 48 hr and 7, 14, 21, 28 and 35 days after the last treatment. In the hippocampus and striatum, but not in the cerebral cortex, of control rats there as a significant age-related decline of ChE activity and maximal density of 3H-QNB binding sites (Bmax). The repeated administration of DFP during the first week caused a syndrome of cholinergic stimulation both in aged and young rats. The syndrome was more pronounced, in terms of intensity and duration in aged than in young animals resulting in 40 and 12% mortality, respectively; during the second week the syndrome attenuated in the two age-groups. The percentage inhibition of brain ChE at the end of DFP treatment did not differ between young and surviving aged rats. The down-regulation of mACRs was present in the three brain regions of both young and age rats (from 20 to 40%). Factorial analysis of variance showed significant differences for age, recovery rate, and significant interaction between age and recovery rate, both for ChE and mAChRs in young rats the three brain areas.

  8. The relationship between the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of spinal opioids. Minireview based on a doctoral thesis.

    PubMed

    Sjöström, S

    1988-01-01

    Spinal opioids have been used clinically since the late seventies to treat acute, traumatic, obstetric and chronic pain. In this article the influence of the pharmacokinetics on the dynamics of intrathecal and epidural opioid administration are discussed with reference to current knowledge. PMID:2905092

  9. Emerging therapies for patients with symptoms of opioid-induced bowel dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Leppert, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Opioid-induced bowel dysfunction (OIBD) comprises gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms, including dry mouth, nausea, vomiting, gastric stasis, bloating, abdominal pain, and opioid-induced constipation, which significantly impair patients’ quality of life and may lead to undertreatment of pain. Traditional laxatives are often prescribed for OIBD symptoms, although they display limited efficacy and exert adverse effects. Other strategies include prokinetics and change of opioids or their administration route. However, these approaches do not address underlying causes of OIBD associated with opioid effects on mostly peripheral opioid receptors located in the GI tract. Targeted management of OIBD comprises purely peripherally acting opioid receptor antagonists and a combination of opioid receptor agonist and antagonist. Methylnaltrexone induces laxation in 50%–60% of patients with advanced diseases and OIBD who do not respond to traditional oral laxatives without inducing opioid withdrawal symptoms with similar response (45%–50%) after an oral administration of naloxegol. A combination of prolonged-release oxycodone with prolonged-release naloxone (OXN) in one tablet (a ratio of 2:1) provides analgesia with limited negative effect on the bowel function, as oxycodone displays high oral bioavailability and naloxone demonstrates local antagonist effect on opioid receptors in the GI tract and is totally inactivated in the liver. OXN in daily doses of up to 80 mg/40 mg provides equally effective analgesia with improved bowel function compared to oxycodone administered alone in patients with chronic non-malignant and cancer-related pain. OIBD is a common complication of long-term opioid therapy and may lead to quality of life deterioration and undertreatment of pain. Thus, a complex assessment and management that addresses underlying causes and patomechanisms of OIBD is recommended. Newer strategies comprise methylnaltrexone or OXN administration in the management of OIBD

  10. Responsible opioid use.

    PubMed

    Compton, Peggy; Weaver, Michael F

    2015-06-01

    Editor's Note The journal is delighted to introduce a new feature in this issue that focuses on the complex and multifaceted issue of managing pain and related symptoms while responsibly attending to minimizing substance abuse. How should the seemingly disparate disciplines of drug abuse and symptom control interact? Should these be two separate fields or should practitioners/investigators in one also be qualified in the other? Is that even feasible? We are honored to have two leading, academically based clinician scientists coordinating this new feature. Peggy Compton is Professor and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs at the School of Nursing & Health Studies, Georgetown University in Washington, DC. Many readers know of Peggy's work from her years on the faculty of the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA). Peggy brings both clinical and scientific addictionology expertise as well as the invaluable perspective of nursing to this arena. Her collaborator is Michael F. Weaver. Mike is Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, and Medical Director of the Center for Neurobehavioral Research on Addictions, at the University of Texas Health Sciences Center at Houston. Prior to moving to Texas, Dr. Weaver became internationally known for his work in addiction medicine at the Medical College of Virginia. We look forward to detailed explorations of many interacting issues in symptom control and substance abuse in the articles featured in this new journal feature in coming issues. The commentary below, the article by Kanouse and Compton, the Issue Brief issued by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and my editorial, all of which appear in this journal issue, introduce the new feature, which I am confident will make valuable contributions to the pain management and substance abuse literature. Arthur G. Lipman, Editor ABSTRACT Abusers of prescription opioids represent two distinct populations: those who develop addiction via opioids prescribed

  11. Opioids: The Prescription Drug & Heroin Overdose Epidemic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Law Enforcement Resources Opioids: The Prescription Drug & Heroin Overdose Epidemic Opioids are natural or synthetic chemicals ... in your brain or body. Common opioids include heroin and prescription drugs such as oxycodone, hydrocodone, and ...

  12. Treating Chronic Pain with Opioids: Comparing Effectiveness and Cost

    MedlinePlus

    Treating Chronic Pain with Opioids: Comparing Effectiveness and Cost What are opioids? Opioids are very strong prescription ... using opioids. We compared the effectiveness, safety, and cost of different opioids. We chose these as Consumer ...

  13. 78 FR 2676 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Abuse-Deterrent Opioids-Evaluation and Labeling; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Abuse-Deterrent Opioids... Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a draft guidance for industry... availability of a draft guidance for industry entitled ``Abuse-Deterrent Opioids--Evaluation and...

  14. Combating an Epidemic of Prescription Opioid Abuse.

    PubMed

    Pon, Doreen; Awuah, Kwaku; Curi, Danielle; Okyere, Ernest; Stern, Craig S

    2015-11-01

    The past decade has witnessed an alarming increase in the number of deaths due to prescription opioids that has paralleled the rise in the number of opioid prescriptions dispensed. Prescription drug monitoring programs, abuse-deterrent formulations and proper disposal of opioids have been promoted to help combat the opioid epidemic. We discuss changes that dentists, the third most frequent prescribers of opioids, can implement to help reduce the risk of prescription opioid abuse in their communities. PMID:26798885

  15. Repeated alcohol administration during adolescence causes changes in the mesolimbic dopaminergic and glutamatergic systems and promotes alcohol intake in the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Maria; Boix, Jordi; Felipo, Vicente; Guerri, Consuelo

    2009-02-01

    Adolescence is a developmental period which the risk of drug and alcohol abuse increases. Since mesolimbic dopaminergic system undergoes developmental changes during adolescence, and this system is involved in rewarding effects of drugs of abuse, we addressed the hypothesis that ethanol exposure during juvenile/adolescent period over-activates mesolimbic dopaminergic system inducing adaptations which can trigger long-term enduring behavioural effects of alcohol abuse. We treated juvenile/adolescent or adult rats with ethanol (3 g/kg) for two-consecutive days at 48-h intervals over 14-day period. Here we show that intermittent ethanol treatment during the juvenile/adolescence period alters subsequent ethanol intake. In vivo microdialysis demonstrates that ethanol elicits a similar prolonged dopamine response in the nucleus accumbens of both adolescent and adult animals pre-treated with multiple doses of ethanol, although the basal dopamine levels were higher in ethanol-treated adolescents than in adult-treated animals. Repeated ethanol administration also down-regulates the expression of DRD2 and NMDAR2B phosphorylation in prefrontal cortex of adolescent animals, but not of adult rats. Finally, ethanol treatment during adolescence changes the acetylation of histones H3 and H4 in frontal cortex, nucleus accumbens and striatum, suggesting chromatin remodelling changes. In summary, our findings demonstrate the sensitivity of adolescent brain to ethanol effects on dopaminergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission, and suggest that abnormal plasticity in reward-related processes and epigenetic mechanisms could contribute to the vulnerability of adolescents to alcohol addiction. PMID:19077056

  16. Acute, but not repeated, administration of the neurotensin NTS1 receptor agonist PD149163 decreases conditioned footshock-induced ultrasonic vocalizations in rats

    PubMed Central

    Prus, Adam J.; Hillhouse, Todd M.; LaCrosse, Amber L.

    2014-01-01

    Neurotensin is an endogenous neuropeptide that has significant interactions with monoamine neurotransmitter systems. To date, neurotensin NTS1 receptor agonists, such as PD149163, have been primarily evaluated for the treatment for schizophrenia, drug addiction, and pain. Recently, PD149163 was found to attenuate fear-potentiated startle in rats, an experimental procedure used for screening anxiolytic drugs. The present study sought to extend these findings through testing PD149163 in a conditioned footshock-induced ultrasonic vocalization (USV) model. Conditioning was conducted in Male Wistar rats using chambers equipped with shock grid floors and an ultrasonic vocalization detector. PD149163 and the 5-HT1A receptor partial agonist buspirone produced a statistically significant reduction of 22 kHz USV counts. The typical antipsychotic haloperidol also reduced 22 kHz USV counts, but did so at cataleptic doses. Ten days of repeated administration of PD149163 abolished the inhibitory effects of PD149163 on 22 kHz USVs. These findings further support an anxiolytic profile for PD149163. However, tolerance to these effects may limit the utility of these drugs for the treatment of anxiety. PMID:24275076

  17. The safety profile of a cationic lipid-mediated cystic fibrosis gene transfer agent following repeated monthly aerosol administration to sheep.

    PubMed

    Alton, Eric W F W; Baker, Alison; Baker, Eilidh; Boyd, A Christopher; Cheng, Seng H; Coles, Rebecca L; Collie, D David S; Davidson, Heather; Davies, Jane C; Gill, Deborah R; Gordon, Catherine; Griesenbach, Uta; Higgins, Tracy; Hyde, Stephen C; Innes, J Alastair; McCormick, Dominique; McGovern, Michael; McLachlan, Gerry; Porteous, David J; Pringle, Ian; Scheule, Ronald K; Shaw, Darren J; Smith, Sionagh; Sumner-Jones, Stephanie G; Tennant, Peter; Vrettou, Christina

    2013-12-01

    Clinically effective gene therapy for Cystic Fibrosis has been a goal for over 20 years. A plasmid vector (pGM169) that generates persistent expression and reduced host inflammatory responses in mice has raised prospects for translation to the clinic. The UK CF Gene Therapy Consortium is currently evaluating long-term repeated delivery of pGM169 complexed with the cationic lipid GL67A in a large Multidose Trial. This regulatory-compliant evaluation of aerosol administration of nine doses of pGM169/GL67A at monthly intervals, to the sheep lung, was performed in preparation for the Multidose Trial. All sheep tolerated treatment well with no adverse effects on haematology, serum chemistry, lung function or histopathology. Acute responses were observed in relation to bronchoalveolar cellularity comprising increased neutrophils and macrophage numbers 1 day post-delivery but these increases were transient and returned to baseline. Importantly there was no cumulative inflammatory effect or lung remodelling with successive doses. Molecular analysis confirmed delivery of pGM169 DNA to the airways and pGM169-specific mRNA was detected in bronchial brushing samples at day 1 following doses 1, 5 and 9. In conclusion, nine doses of pGM169/GL67A were well tolerated with no significant evidence of toxicity that would preclude adoption of a similar strategy in CF patients. PMID:24090839

  18. Two opioid forms of stress analgesia: studies of tolerance and cross-tolerance.

    PubMed

    Terman, G W; Lewis, J W; Liebeskind, J C

    1986-03-12

    We have previously reported that stress analgesia sensitive to and insensitive to opiate antagonists can be differentially produced in rats by varying the severity or temporal pattern of inescapable footshock. In these studies, we give further evidence for the opioid and non-opioid bases of these paradigms of stress analgesia. We find that naloxone-sensitive analgesia demonstrates tolerance with repeated stress and cross-tolerance with morphine, whereas naloxone-insensitive analgesia demonstrates neither of these characteristics. Moreover, different forms of opioid, but not non-opioid, stress analgesia manifest cross-tolerance with each other. These data are discussed in terms of the similarities and differences between two forms of opioid stress analgesia. PMID:3955348

  19. Structural and functional interactions between six-transmembrane μ-opioid receptors and β2-adrenoreceptors modulate opioid signaling

    PubMed Central

    Samoshkin, Alexander; Convertino, Marino; Viet, Chi T.; Wieskopf, Jeffrey S.; Kambur, Oleg; Marcovitz, Jaclyn; Patel, Pinkal; Stone, Laura S.; Kalso, Eija; Mogil, Jeffrey S.; Schmidt, Brian L.; Maixner, William; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.; Diatchenko, Luda

    2015-01-01

    The primary molecular target for clinically used opioids is the μ-opioid receptor (MOR). Besides the major seven-transmembrane (7TM) receptors, the MOR gene codes for alternatively spliced six-transmembrane (6TM) isoforms, the biological and clinical significance of which remains unclear. Here, we show that the otherwise exclusively intracellular localized 6TM-MOR translocates to the plasma membrane upon coexpression with β2-adrenergic receptors (β2-ARs) through an interaction with the fifth and sixth helices of β2-AR. Coexpression of the two receptors in BE(2)-C neuroblastoma cells potentiates calcium responses to a 6TM-MOR ligand, and this calcium response is completely blocked by a selective β2-antagonist in BE(2)-C cells, and in trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia. Co-administration of 6TM-MOR and β2-AR ligands leads to substantial analgesic synergy and completely reverses opioid-induced hyperalgesia in rodent behavioral models. Together, our results provide evidence that the heterodimerization of 6TM-MOR with β2-AR underlies a molecular mechanism for 6TM cellular signaling, presenting a unique functional responses to opioids. This signaling pathway may contribute to the hyperalgesic effects of opioids that can be efficiently blocked by β2-AR antagonists, providing a new avenue for opioid therapy. PMID:26657998

  20. Targeting the opioid growth factor: opioid growth factor receptor axis for treatment of human ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Zagon, Ian S; Donahue, Renee; McLaughlin, Patricia J

    2013-05-01

    The opioid growth factor (OGF) - opioid growth factor receptor (OGFr) axis is a biological pathway that is present in human ovarian cancer cells and tissues. OGF, chemically termed [Met(5)]-enkephalin, is an endogenous opioid peptide that interfaces with OGFr to delay cells moving through the cell cycle by upregulation of cyclin-dependent inhibitory kinase pathways. OGF inhibitory activity is dose dependent, receptor mediated, reversible, protein and RNA dependent, but not related to apoptosis or necrosis. The OGF-OGFr axis can be targeted for treatment of human ovarian cancer by (i) administration of exogenous OGF, (ii) genetic manipulation to over-express OGFr and (iii) use of low dosages of naltrexone, an opioid antagonist, which stimulates production of OGF and OGFr for subsequent interaction following blockade of the receptor. The OGF-OGFr axis may be a feasible target for treatment of cancer of the ovary (i) in a prophylactic fashion, (ii) following cytoreduction or (iii) in conjunction with standard chemotherapy for additive effectiveness. In summary, preclinical data support the transition of these novel therapies for treatment of human ovarian cancer from the bench to bedside to provide additional targets for treatment of this devastating disease. PMID:23856908

  1. The opioid system majorly contributes to preference for fat emulsions but not sucrose solutions in mice.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kazuhiro; Okahashi, Tatsuya; Matsumura, Shigenobu; Okafuji, Yoko; Adachi, Shin-ichi; Tsuzuki, Satoshi; Inoue, Kazuo; Fushiki, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Rodents show a stronger preference for fat than sucrose, even if their diet is isocaloric. This implies that the preference mechanisms for fat and sucrose differ. To compare the contribution of the opioid system to the preference of fat and sucrose, we examined the effects of mu-, delta-, kappa-, and non-selective opioid receptor antagonists on the preference of sucrose and fat, assessed by a two-bottle choice test and a licking test, in mice naïve to sucrose and fat ingestion. Administration of non-selective and mu-selective opioid receptor antagonists more strongly inhibited the preference of fat than sucrose. While the preference of fat was reduced to the same level as water by the antagonist administration that of sucrose was still greater than water. Our results suggest that the preference of fat relies strongly on the opioid system, while that of sucrose is regulated by other mechanisms in addition to the opioid system. PMID:25516200

  2. Long-Acting Injectable Naltrexone for the Management of Patients with Opioid Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Kjome, Kimberly L.; Moeller, F. Gerard

    2011-01-01

    Opioid dependence is a condition with serious clinical ramifications. Treatment has focused on detoxification, agonist therapy with methadone or buprenorphine, or remission maintenance with the opioid antagonist, naltrexone. Treatment with oral naltrexone has been limited by poor treatment adherence and relapse. Studies with long-acting formulations have shown increased treatment adherence. Extended-release injectable naltrexone has been used for the treatment of alcohol dependence, and has recently received an indication for treatment of opioid dependence from the US Food and Drug Administration. Dosing occurs once monthly and existing data with long-acting naltrexone supports efficacy of treatment for opioid dependence; however published data is sparse. Treatment with long-acting naltrexone should be monitored for hepatotoxicity, and patients should be made aware of increased risk of overdose with administration of opioids during and immediately after discontinuation of long-acting naltrexone. PMID:22879745

  3. Patterns and Correlates of Prescription Opioid Use in OEF/OIF Veterans with Chronic Non-Cancer Pain

    PubMed Central

    Macey, Tara A.; Morasco, Benjamin J.; Duckart, Jonathan P.; Dobscha, Steven K.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Little is known about the treatment Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) veterans receive for chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP). We sought to describe the prevalence of prescription opioid use, types and doses of opioids received, and identify correlates of receiving prescription opioids for CNCP among OEF/OIF veterans. Design Retrospective review of VA administrative data. Setting Ambulatory clinics within a VA regional healthcare network. Patients OEF/OIF veterans who had at least 3 elevated pain screening scores within a 12-month period in 2008. Within this group, those prescribed opioids (n=485) over the next 12 months were compared to those not prescribed opioids (n=277). In addition, patients receiving opioids short term (<90 days, n=284) were compared to patients receiving them long-term (≥90 consecutive days, n=201). Results Of 762 OEF/OIF veterans with CNCP, 64% were prescribed at least one opioid medication over the 12 months following their index dates. Of those prescribed an opioid, 59% were prescribed opioids short-term and 41% were prescribed opioids long-term. The average morphine-equivalent opioid dose for short-term users was 23.7 mg (SD=20.5) compared with 40.8 mg (SD=36.1) for long-term users (p<0.001). Fifty-one percent of long-term opioid users were prescribed short-acting opioids only and one-third were also prescribed sedative-hypnotics. In adjusted analyses, diagnoses of low back pain, migraine headache, post-traumatic stress disorder, and nicotine use disorder were associated with an increased likelihood of receiving an opioid prescription. Conclusion Prescription opioid use is common among OEF/OIF veterans with CNCP and is associated with several pain diagnoses and medical conditions. PMID:21899715

  4. Opioids for low back pain.

    PubMed

    Deyo, Richard A; Von Korff, Michael; Duhrkoop, David

    2015-01-01

    Back pain affects most adults, causes disability for some, and is a common reason for seeking healthcare. In the United States, opioid prescription for low back pain has increased, and opioids are now the most commonly prescribed drug class. More than half of regular opioid users report back pain. Rates of opioid prescribing in the US and Canada are two to three times higher than in most European countries. The analgesic efficacy of opioids for acute back pain is inferred from evidence in other acute pain conditions. Opioids do not seem to expedite return to work in injured workers or improve functional outcomes of acute back pain in primary care. For chronic back pain, systematic reviews find scant evidence of efficacy. Randomized controlled trials have high dropout rates, brief duration (four months or less), and highly selected patients. Opioids seem to have short term analgesic efficacy for chronic back pain, but benefits for function are less clear. The magnitude of pain relief across chronic non-cancer pain conditions is about 30%. Given the brevity of randomized controlled trials, the long term effectiveness and safety of opioids are unknown. Loss of long term efficacy could result from drug tolerance and emergence of hyperalgesia. Complications of opioid use include addiction and overdose related mortality, which have risen in parallel with prescription rates. Common short term side effects are constipation, nausea, sedation, and increased risk of falls and fractures. Longer term side effects may include depression and sexual dysfunction. Screening for high risk patients, treatment agreements, and urine testing have not reduced overall rates of opioid prescribing, misuse, or overdose. Newer strategies for reducing risks include more selective prescription of opioids and lower doses; use of prescription monitoring programs; avoidance of co-prescription with sedative hypnotics; and reformulations that make drugs more difficult to snort, smoke, or inject. PMID

  5. The Selective Monoacylglycerol Lipase Inhibitor MJN110 Produces Opioid-Sparing Effects in a Mouse Neuropathic Pain Model.

    PubMed

    Wilkerson, Jenny L; Niphakis, Micah J; Grim, Travis W; Mustafa, Mohammed A; Abdullah, Rehab A; Poklis, Justin L; Dewey, William L; Akbarali, Hamid; Banks, Matthew L; Wise, Laura E; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Lichtman, Aron H

    2016-04-01

    Serious clinical liabilities associated with the prescription of opiates for pain control include constipation, respiratory depression, pruritus, tolerance, abuse, and addiction. A recognized strategy to circumvent these side effects is to combine opioids with other antinociceptive agents. The combination of opiates with the primary active constituent of cannabis (Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol) produces enhanced antinociceptive actions, suggesting that cannabinoid receptor agonists can be opioid sparing. Here, we tested whether elevating the endogenous cannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol through the inhibition of its primary hydrolytic enzyme monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), will produce opioid-sparing effects in the mouse chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve model of neuropathic pain. The dose-response relationships of i.p. administration of morphine and the selective MAGL inhibitor 2,5-dioxopyrrolidin-1-yl 4-(bis(4-chlorophenyl)methyl)piperazine-1-carboxylate (MJN110) were tested alone and in combination at equieffective doses for reversal of CCI-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. The respective ED50 doses (95% confidence interval) of morphine and MJN110 were 2.4 (1.9-3.0) mg/kg and 0.43 (0.23-0.79) mg/kg. Isobolographic analysis of these drugs in combination revealed synergistic antiallodynic effects. Acute antinociceptive effects of the combination of morphine and MJN110 required μ-opioid, CB1, and CB2 receptors. This combination did not reduce gastric motility or produce subjective cannabimimetic effects in the drug discrimination assay. Importantly, combinations of MJN110 and morphine given repeatedly (i.e., twice a day for 6 days) continued to produce antiallodynic effects with no evidence of tolerance. Taken together, these findings suggest that MAGL inhibition produces opiate-sparing events with diminished tolerance, constipation, and cannabimimetic side effects. PMID:26791602

  6. Current Evidence for Spinal Opioid Selection in Postoperative Pain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Spinal opioid administration is an excellent option to separate the desirable analgesic effects of opioids from their expected dose-limiting side effects to improve postoperative analgesia. Therefore, physicians must better identify either specific opioids or adequate doses and routes of administration that result in a mainly spinal site of action rather than a cerebral analgesic one. Methods The purpose of this topical review is to describe current available clinical evidence to determine what opioids reach high enough concentrations to produce spinally selective analgesia when given by epidural or intrathecal routes and also to make recommendations regarding their rational and safety use for the best management of postoperative pain. To this end, a search of Medline/Embase was conducted to identify all articles published up to December 2013 on this topic. Results Recent advances in spinal opioid bioavailability, based on both animals and humans trials support the theory that spinal opioid bioavailability is inversely proportional to the drug lipid solubility, which is higher in hydrophilic opioids like morphine, diamorphine and hydromorphone than lipophilic ones like alfentanil, fentanyl and sufentanil. Conclusions Results obtained from meta-analyses of RTCs is considered to be the 'highest' level and support their use. However, it's a fact that meta-analyses based on studies about treatment of postoperative pain should explore clinical surgery heterogeneity to improve patient's outcome. This observation forces physicians to use of a specific procedure surgical-based practical guideline. A vigilance protocol is also needed to achieve a good postoperative analgesia in terms of efficacy and security. PMID:25031805

  7. Differential effects of LY235959, a competitive antagonist of the NMDA receptor on kappa-opioid receptor agonist induced responses in mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, H N; Thorat, S N

    1997-02-01

    The effects of the competitive antagonist of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, LY235959, were determined on the analgesic and hypothermic effects as well as on the development of tolerance to these effects of U-50,488H, a kappa-opioid receptor agonist in mice and rats. In the mouse, a single injection of LY235959 given 10 min prior to U-50,488H did not modify the analgesic action of the latter. Similarly, chronic administration of LY235959 twice a day for 4 days did not modify U-50,488H-induced analgesia in mice. Repeated pretreatment of mice with LY235959 dose-dependently attenuated the development of tolerance to the analgesic actions of U-50,488H. In the rat, LY235959 by itself produced a significant analgesia and prior treatment of rats with LY235959 enhanced the analgesic action of U-50,488H. Similar effects were seen with the hypothermic action. Pretreatment of rats with LY235959 attenuated the development of tolerance to the analgesic but not to the hypothermic action of U-50,488H. These results provide evidence that LY235959 produces differential actions on nociception and thermic responses by itself and when given acutely with U-50,488H in mice and rats. However, when the animals are pretreated with LY235959, similar inhibitory effects are observed on the development of tolerance to the analgesic action of U-50,488H in both the species. These studies demonstrate an involvement of the NMDA receptor in the development of kappa-opioid tolerance and suggest that the biochemical consequences of an opioid's interaction with the opioid receptor are not the only factors that contribute to the acute and chronic actions of opioid analgesic drugs. PMID:9045999

  8. Opioid neurotransmission in the post-ictal analgesia: involvement of mu(1)-opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Coimbra, N C; Freitas, R L; Savoldi, M; Castro-Souza, C; Segato, E N; Kishi, R; Weltson, A; Resende, G C

    2001-06-01

    Pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), a non-competitive antagonist that blocks GABA-mediated Cl(-) flux, was used in the present work to induce seizures in animals. The aim of this work is to study the neurochemical basis of the antinociception induced by convulsions elicited by peripheral administration of PTZ (64 mg/kg). The analgesia was measured by the tail-flick test, in eight rats per group. Convulsions were followed by significative increase in the tail-flick latencies (TFL), for at least 120 min of the post-ictal period. Peripheral administration of naltrexone (5 mg/kg, 10 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg) caused a significant decrease in the TFL in seizing animals, as compared to controls. These data were corroborated with peripheral administration of naloxonazine (10 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg), a mu(1)-opioid blocker, in the same doses used for non-specific antagonist. These results indicate that endogenous opioids may be involved in the post-ictal analgesia. The involvement of mu(1)-opioid receptor was also considered. PMID:11382405

  9. The effect of repeated intramuscular alfentanil injections on experimental pain and abuse liability indices in healthy males

    PubMed Central

    Tompkins, D. Andrew; Smith, Michael T.; Bigelow, George E.; Moaddel, Ruin; Venkata, S.L. Vatem; Strain, Eric C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH), increased sensitivity to noxious stimuli following repeated opioid exposures, has been demonstrated in pre-clinical studies. However, there is no accepted, prospective model of OIH following repeated opioid exposures currently available in humans. This study assessed a potential prospective OIH model. Methods Double-blind intramuscular (IM) injections of a short-acting opioid, (alfentanil 15 mcg/kg; N=8) were compared to active placebo (diphenhydramine 25 mg; N=3) on cold and pressure pain testing and standard abuse liability measures in eight 10-hour sessions (1 injection/session) over 4–5 weeks in healthy pain-free males. Decreases from session baseline pain threshold (PThr) and tolerance (PTol) were calculated to represent hyperalgesia, and were assessed both within and across sessions. Results Mean decreases in cold PTol were seen in the alfentanil group at 180 minutes (−3.8 seconds, +/−26.5) and 480 minutes (−1.63 seconds, +/−31.5) after drug administration. There was a trend for differences between conditions on cold PThr hyperalgesia but not for pressure PThr. Alfentanil participants had greater mean ratings on LIKING and HIGH visual analog scales at peak effects (30 minutes), but these scores did not change across sessions. Discussion Repeated alfentanil exposures over 4–5 weeks resulted in within session decreases in cold pain tolerance from baseline but these differences were not substantially different from diphenhydramine controls. The results did not support the phenomenon of OIH in this model, although definitive conclusions regarding the existence of OIH in humans likely requires a larger sample size or an alternative model. PMID:23446076

  10. State Legal Restrictions and Prescription-Opioid Use among Disabled Adults.

    PubMed

    Meara, Ellen; Horwitz, Jill R; Powell, Wilson; McClelland, Lynn; Zhou, Weiping; O'Malley, A James; Morden, Nancy E

    2016-07-01

    Background In response to rising rates of opioid abuse and overdose, U.S. states enacted laws to restrict the prescribing and dispensing of controlled substances. The effect of these laws on opioid use is unclear. Methods We tested associations between prescription-opioid receipt and state controlled-substances laws. Using Medicare administrative data for fee-for-service disabled beneficiaries 21 to 64 years of age who were alive throughout the calendar year (8.7 million person-years from 2006 through 2012) and an original data set of laws (e.g., prescription-drug monitoring programs), we examined the annual prevalence of beneficiaries with four or more opioid prescribers, prescriptions yielding a daily morphine-equivalent dose (MED) of more than 120 mg, and treatment for nonfatal prescription-opioid overdose. We estimated how opioid outcomes varied according to eight types of laws. Results From 2006 through 2012, states added 81 controlled-substance laws. Opioid receipt and potentially hazardous prescription patterns were common. In 2012 alone, 47% of beneficiaries filled opioid prescriptions (25% in one to three calendar quarters and 22% in every calendar quarter); 8% had four or more opioid prescribers; 5% had prescriptions yielding a daily MED of more than 120 mg in any calendar quarter; and 0.3% were treated for a nonfatal prescription-opioid overdose. We observed no significant associations between opioid outcomes and specific types of laws or the number of types enacted. For example, the percentage of beneficiaries with a prescription yielding a daily MED of more than 120 mg did not decline after adoption of a prescription-drug monitoring program (0.27 percentage points; 95% confidence interval, -0.05 to 0.59). Conclusions Adoption of controlled-substance laws was not associated with reductions in potentially hazardous use of opioids or overdose among disabled Medicare beneficiaries, a population particularly at risk. (Funded by the National Institute on

  11. Regulation of μ and δ opioid receptor functions: involvement of cyclin-dependent kinase 5

    PubMed Central

    Beaudry, H; Mercier-Blais, A-A; Delaygue, C; Lavoie, C; Parent, J-L; Neugebauer, W; Gendron, L

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Phosphorylation of δ opioid receptors (DOP receptors) by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) was shown to regulate the trafficking of this receptor. Therefore, we aimed to determine the role of CDK5 in regulating DOP receptors in rats treated with morphine or with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). As μ (MOP) and DOP receptors are known to be co-regulated, we also sought to determine if CDK5-mediated regulation of DOP receptors also affects MOP receptor functions. Experimental Approach The role of CDK5 in regulating opioid receptors in CFA- and morphine-treated rats was studied using roscovitine as a CDK inhibitor and a cell-penetrant peptide mimicking the second intracellular loop of DOP receptors (C11-DOPri2). Opioid receptor functions were assessed in vivo in a series of behavioural experiments and correlated by measuring ERK1/2 activity in dorsal root ganglia homogenates. Key Results Chronic roscovitine treatment reduced the antinociceptive and antihyperalgesic effects of deltorphin II (Dlt II) in morphine- and CFA-treated rats respectively. Repeated administrations of C11-DOPri2 also robustly decreased Dlt II-induced analgesia. Interestingly, DAMGO-induced analgesia was significantly increased by roscovitine and C11-DOPri2. Concomitantly, in roscovitine-treated rats the Dlt II-induced ERK1/2 activation was decreased, whereas the DAMGO-induced ERK1/2 activation was increased. An acute roscovitine treatment had no effect on Dlt II- or DAMGO-induced analgesia. Conclusions and Implications Together, our results demonstrate that CDK5 is a key player in the regulation of DOP receptors in morphine- and CFA-treated rats and that the regulation of DOP receptors by CDK5 is sufficient to modulate MOP receptor functions through an indirect process. PMID:25598508

  12. Detection of diazepam in urine, hair and preserved oral fluid samples with LC-MS-MS after single and repeated administration of Myolastan and Valium.

    PubMed

    Laloup, Marleen; Fernandez, Maria Del Mar Ramirez; Wood, Michelle; Maes, Viviane; De Boeck, Gert; Vanbeckevoort, Yvan; Samyn, Nele

    2007-08-01

    Sedative agents are used to facilitate sexual assault due to their ability to render the victim passive, submissive and unable to resist. The primary pharmacological effect of the benzodiazepine tetrazepam is muscle relaxation, whereas the benzodiazepine diazepam acts on the central nervous system (CNS) exerting mainly sedation effects. Therefore, contrary to tetrazepam, diazepam is an often-abused drug, which can potentially be used as a date-rape drug. In this study, we describe the detection of low amounts of diazepam in Myolastan (Sanofi-Synthelabo S.A., Brussels, Belgium) and Epsipam (Will-Pharma, Wavre, Belgium) 50 mg tablet preparations by LC-MS-MS, GC-FID and HPLC-DAD. Considering the important forensic implication of this finding, a study was conducted with volunteers receiving a single or repeated dosage of Myolastan. Urine, hair and preserved oral fluid samples were analysed using a previously described sensitive and specific LC-MS-MS detection method allowing for the simultaneous quantification of tetrazepam, diazepam, nordiazepam, oxazepam and temazepam. This study demonstrates that diazepam can be observed in urine samples even after a single dose of Myolastan. In addition, maintaining therapy for 1 week results in the detection of both diazepam and nordiazepam in urine samples and of diazepam in the first hair segment. Importantly, comparing urine and hair samples after a single intake of diazepam versus the single and 1 week administration of Myolastan shows that the possible metabolic conversion of tetrazepam to diazepam is a more plausible explanation for the detection of diazepam in biological samples after the intake of Myolastan. As such, these results reveal that the presence of diazepam and/or nordiazepam in biological samples from alleged drug-facilitated assault cases should be interpreted with care. PMID:17468852

  13. Gabapentinoid Insensitivity after Repeated Administration is Associated with Down-Regulation of the α(2)δ-1 Subunit in Rats with Central Post-Stroke Pain Hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Yang, Fei; Yang, Fan; Li, Chun-Li; Wang, Yan; Li, Zhen; Lu, Yun-Fei; Yu, Yao-Qing; Fu, Han; He, Ting; Sun, Wei; Wang, Rui-Rui; Chen, Jun

    2016-02-01

    The α2δ-1 subunit of the voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel (VGCC) is a molecular target of gabapentin (GBP), which has been used as a first-line drug for the relief of neuropathic pain. GBP exerts its anti-nociceptive effects by disrupting trafficking of the α2δ-1 subunit to the presynaptic membrane, resulting in decreased neurotransmitter release. We previously showed that GBP has an anti-allodynic effect in the first two weeks; but this is followed by insensitivity in the later stage after repeated administration in a rat model of central post-stroke pain (CPSP) hypersensitivity induced by intra-thalamic hemorrhage. To explore the mechanisms underlying GBP insensitivity, the cellular localization and time-course of expression of the α2δ-1 subunit in both the thalamus and spinal dorsal horn were studied in the same model. We found that the α2δ-1 subunit was mostly localized in neurons, but not astrocytes and microglia. The level of α2δ-1 protein increased in the first two weeks after injury but then decreased in the third week, when GBP insensitivity occurred. Furthermore, the α2δ-1 down-regulation was likely caused by later neuronal loss in the injured thalamus through a mechanism other than apoptosis. In summary, the present results suggest that the GBP receptor α2δ-1 is mainly expressed in thalamic neurons in which it is up-regulated in the early stage of CPSP but this is followed by dramatic down-regulation, which is likely associated with GBP insensitivity after long-term use. PMID:26781878

  14. Role of renal nerves in excretory responses to administration of kappa agonists in conscious spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Kapusta, D R; Jones, S Y; DiBona, G F

    1989-10-01

    The present study examined whether the renal sympathetic nerves contribute to the renal excretory responses produced by kappa opioid receptor agonist administration in conscious spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Intravenous infusion of the kappa opioid receptor agonists, ketocyclazocine (KC) and U-50488H, produced increases in urine flow rate. KC and U-50488H infusion also resulted in a marked and sustained antinatriuresis which was promptly reversed by low-dose naloxone (50 micrograms/kg i.v.), thus suggesting an opioid receptor-mediated action of both agonists. Although these kappa agonists did not produce changes in glomerular filtration rate or renal plasma flow, efferent renal sympathetic nerve activity increased with the same time course as the antinatriuretic response. To investigate whether the decrease in urinary sodium excretion was mediated via the increase in efferent renal sympathetic nerve activity, experiments were repeated in SHR with prior bilateral renal denervation. These studies demonstrated that similar renal excretory responses (diuresis and a naloxone reversible antiinatriuresis occurred during infusion of KC and U-50488H in renal denervated as were seen in intact SHR. These studies indicate that the renal excretory responses to the kappa opioid agonists KC and U-50488H are not mediated through changes in renal hemodynamics or via a pathway requiring intact renal innervation. Because an antinatriuretic response was observed in renal denervated SHR, this suggests that kappa opioid receptor agonists may influence the renal tubular reabsorption of sodium by additional naloxone-sensitive mechanisms independent of intact renal innervation. PMID:2552076

  15. Comparative effects of cyclo-oxygenase and nitric oxide synthase inhibition on the development and reversal of spinal opioid tolerance.

    PubMed

    Powell, K J; Hosokawa, A; Bell, A; Sutak, M; Milne, B; Quirion, R; Jhamandas, K

    1999-06-01

    1. This study examined the effects of the COX inhibitors, ketorolac and ibuprofen, and the NOS inhibitor L-NAME for their potential to both inhibit the development and reverse tolerance to the antinociceptive action of morphine. 2. Repeated administration of intrathecal morphine (15 micrograms), once daily, resulted in a progressive decline of antinociceptive effect and an increase in the ED50 value in the tailflick and paw pressure tests. Co-administration of ketorolac (30 and 45 micrograms) or S(+) ibuprofen (10 micrograms) with morphine (15 micrograms) prevented the decline of antinociceptive effect and increase in ED50 value. Similar treatment with L-NAME (100 micrograms) exerted weaker effects. Administration of S(+) but not R(-) ibuprofen (10 mg kg-1) had similar effects on systemic administration of morphine (15 mg kg-1). 3. Intrathecal or systemic administration of the COX or NOS inhibitors did not alter the baseline responses in either tests. Acute keterolac or S(+) ibuprofen also did not potentiate the acute actions of spinal or systemic morphine, but chronic intrathecal administration of these agents increased the potency of acute morphine. 4. In animals already tolerant to intrathecal morphine, subsequent administration of ketorolac (30 micrograms) with morphine (15 micrograms) partially restored the antinociceptive effect and ED50 value of acute morphine, reflecting the reversal of tolerance. Intrathecal L-NAME (100 micrograms) exerted a weaker effect. 5. These data suggest that spinal COX activity, and to a lesser extent NOS activity, contributes to the development and expression of opioid tolerance. Inhibition of COX may represent a useful approach for the prevention as well as reversal of opioid tolerance. PMID:10401553

  16. Medication-assisted therapy for opioid addiction.

    PubMed

    Tai, Betty; Saxon, Andrew J; Ling, Walter

    2013-12-01

    The "Medication-Assisted Therapy for Opioid Addiction" session was chaired by Dr. Betty Tai and had three presenters. The presenters (and their topics) were: Dr. Andrew J. Saxon (Methadone and Buprenorphine for Treatment of Opioid Addiction and HIV Risk Reduction), Dr. Walter Ling (Opioid Antagonist Treatment for Opioid Addiction), and Dr. Betty Tai (Chronic Care Model for Substance Use Disorder). PMID:25264415

  17. Demethylation regulation of BDNF gene expression in dorsal root ganglion neurons is implicated in opioid-induced pain hypersensitivity in rats.

    PubMed

    Chao, Yu-Chieh; Xie, Fang; Li, Xueyang; Guo, Ruijuan; Yang, Ning; Zhang, Chen; Shi, Rong; Guan, Yun; Yue, Yun; Wang, Yun

    2016-07-01

    Repeated administration of morphine may result in opioid-induced hypersensitivity (OIH), which involves altered expression of numerous genes, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Yet, it remains unclear how BDNF expression is increased in DRG neurons after repeated morphine treatment. DNA methylation is an important mechanism of epigenetic control of gene expression. In the current study, we hypothesized that the demethylation regulation of certain BDNF gene promoters in DRG neurons may contribute to the development of OIH. Real-time RT-PCR was used to assess changes in the mRNA transcription levels of major BDNF exons including exon I, II, IV, VI, as well as total BDNF mRNA in DRGs from rats after repeated morphine administration. The levels of exon IV and total BDNF mRNA were significantly upregulated by repeated morphine administration, as compared to that in saline control group. Further, ELISA array and immunocytochemistry study revealed a robust upregulation of BDNF protein expression in DRG neurons after repeated morphine exposure. Correspondingly, the methylation levels of BDNF exon IV promoter showed a significant downregulation by morphine treatment. Importantly, intrathecal administration of a BDNF antibody, but not control IgG, significantly inhibited mechanical hypersensitivity that developed in rats after repeated morphine treatment. Conversely, intrathecal administration of an inhibitor of DNA methylation, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) markedly upregulated the BDNF protein expression in DRG neurons and enhanced the mechanical allodynia after repeated morphine exposure. Together, our findings suggest that demethylation regulation of BDNF gene promoter may be implicated in the development of OIH through epigenetic control of BDNF expression in DRG neurons. PMID:26970395

  18. Pharmacokinetics of daclizumab high-yield process with repeated administration of the clinical subcutaneous regimen in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Jonathan Q; Othman, Ahmed A; Mikulskis, Alvydas; Wolstencroft, Paul; Elkins, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Background Daclizumab high-yield process (DAC HYP), a humanized immunoglobulin G1 monoclonal antibody specific for the α subunit (CD25) of the high-affinity interleukin-2 receptor, has demonstrated efficacy for treatment of relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis in Phase II and III clinical trials. Objective To characterize the pharmacokinetics (PK) of DAC HYP following repeated administration of the 150 mg subcutaneous (SC) dose every 4 weeks (q4wk), the proposed clinical regimen in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Methods Twenty-six patients with RRMS received DAC HYP 150 mg SC q4wk for a total of six doses. Serial PK blood samples were collected over the first and last dosing intervals and trough PK samples were collected between these doses. Blood samples for immunogenicity assessment were collected throughout the study. Serum DAC HYP levels and anti-DAC HYP antibodies were characterized using validated immunoassays. PK parameters were estimated using noncompartmental analysis. Results DAC HYP showed slow SC absorption with a median time to reach maximum observed concentration (Cmax) value of ~1 week. Steady state was reached by the fourth injection. At steady state, DAC HYP mean serum Cmax, minimum observed concentration (Cmin), and area under the concentration–time curve within a dosing interval (AUCtau) values were 29.1 µg/mL, 14.9 µg/mL, and 638 µg · day/mL, respectively, with intersubject variability of 35%–40%. The AUC accumulation ratio was ~2.5 at steady state. DAC HYP had a long elimination half-life of ~22 days and low apparent clearance (0.274 L/day). Nine patients tested positive for anti-DAC HYP antibodies, with no impact on DAC HYP clearance in this limited data set. Conclusion The PK of DAC HYP in patients with RRMS are consistent with those previously reported in healthy volunteers. The half-life of ~3 weeks and the low fluctuations in peak and trough concentrations of serum DAC HYP support the once-monthly SC

  19. Opioid-Induced Androgen Deficiency (OPIAD): Diagnosis, Management, and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, Timothy K; Wosnitzer, Matthew S

    2016-10-01

    Opioid-induced androgen deficiency (OPIAD) was initially recognized as a possible consequence of opioid use roughly four decades ago. Long-acting opioid use carries risks of addiction, tolerance, and systemic side effects including hypogonadotropic hypogonadism with consequent testosterone depletion leading to multiple central and peripheral effects. Hypogonadism is induced through direct inhibitory action of opioids on receptors within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axes as well as testosterone production within the testes. Few studies have systematically investigated hormonal changes induced by long-term opioid administration or the effects of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) in patients with OPIAD. Clomiphene citrate, a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), is a testosterone enhancement treatment which upregulates endogenous hypothalamic function. This review will focus on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of OPIAD, including summary of literature evaluating OPIAD treatment with TRT, and areas of future investigation. PMID:27586511

  20. Prospects for Creation of Cardioprotective and Antiarrhythmic Drugs Based on Opioid Receptor Agonists.

    PubMed

    Maslov, Leonid N; Khaliulin, Igor; Oeltgen, Peter R; Naryzhnaya, Natalia V; Pei, Jian-Ming; Brown, Stephen A; Lishmanov, Yury B; Downey, James M

    2016-09-01

    It has now been demonstrated that the μ, δ1 , δ2 , and κ1 opioid receptor (OR) agonists represent the most promising group of opioids for the creation of drugs enhancing cardiac tolerance to the detrimental effects of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Opioids are able to prevent necrosis and apoptosis of cardiomyocytes during I/R and improve cardiac contractility in the reperfusion period. The OR agonists exert an infarct-reducing effect with prophylactic administration and prevent reperfusion-induced cardiomyocyte death when ischemic injury of heart has already occurred; that is, opioids can mimic preconditioning and postconditioning phenomena. Furthermore, opioids are also effective in preventing ischemia-induced arrhythmias. PMID:27197922

  1. Chronic opioid use in fibromyalgia syndrome: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Painter, Jacob T; Crofford, Leslie J

    2013-03-01

    Chronic opioid therapy in the treatment of chronic nonmalignant pain has increased drastically over the past decade. This is a worrisome trend in general, but specifically, given pathophysiologic characteristics seen in fibromyalgia (FM) syndrome patients, the use of this class of medication deserves special scrutiny. We first describe the current understanding of the etiology and pathophysiology of FM, including the role of genetic and environmental factors in the development of this syndrome. We then discuss the biologic effects of opioid use. Next, we review the pharmaceutical treatment options for FM, including 3 Food and Drug Administration-approved medications, and the evolution of treatment guidelines since 2004. We then highlight the various consequences associated with the mechanism of action of opioids and the specific concerns for FM patients.Finally, summarizing the existing literature, we make the case that chronic opioid use is inappropriate in the treatment of FM because of the interaction of unique pathophysiologic characteristics of the patients and effects associated with chronic opioid use. PMID:23364665

  2. Review of naloxone safety for opioid overdose: practical considerations for new technology and expanded public access

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Opioid overdose and mortality have increased at an alarming rate prompting new public health initiatives to reduce drug poisoning. One initiative is to expand access to the opioid antidote naloxone. Naloxone has a long history of safe and effective use by organized healthcare systems and providers in the treatment of opioid overdose by paramedics/emergency medicine technicians, emergency medicine physicians and anesthesiologists. The safety of naloxone in a prehospital setting administered by nonhealthcare professionals has not been formally established but will likely parallel medically supervised experiences. Naloxone dose and route of administration can produce variable intensity of potential adverse reactions and opioid withdrawal symptoms: intravenous administration and higher doses produce more adverse events and more severe withdrawal symptoms in those individuals who are opioid dependent. More serious adverse reactions after naloxone administration occur rarely and may be confounded by the effects of other co-intoxicants and the effects of prolonged hypoxia. One component of the new opioid harm reduction initiative is to expand naloxone access to high-risk individuals (addicts, abusers, or patients taking high-dose or extended-release opioids for pain) and their close family or household contacts. Patients or their close contacts receive a naloxone prescription to have the medication on their person or in the home for use during an emergency. Contacts are trained on overdose recognition, rescue breathing and administration of naloxone by intramuscular injection or nasal spraying of the injection prior to the arrival of emergency medical personnel. The safety profile of naloxone in traditional medical use must be considered in this new context of outpatient prescribing, dispensing and treatment of overdose prior to paramedic arrival. New naloxone delivery products are being developed for this prehospital application of naloxone in treatment of opioid

  3. Review of naloxone safety for opioid overdose: practical considerations for new technology and expanded public access.

    PubMed

    Wermeling, Daniel P

    2015-02-01

    Opioid overdose and mortality have increased at an alarming rate prompting new public health initiatives to reduce drug poisoning. One initiative is to expand access to the opioid antidote naloxone. Naloxone has a long history of safe and effective use by organized healthcare systems and providers in the treatment of opioid overdose by paramedics/emergency medicine technicians, emergency medicine physicians and anesthesiologists. The safety of naloxone in a prehospital setting administered by nonhealthcare professionals has not been formally established but will likely parallel medically supervised experiences. Naloxone dose and route of administration can produce variable intensity of potential adverse reactions and opioid withdrawal symptoms: intravenous administration and higher doses produce more adverse events and more severe withdrawal symptoms in those individuals who are opioid dependent. More serious adverse reactions after naloxone administration occur rarely and may be confounded by the effects of other co-intoxicants and the effects of prolonged hypoxia. One component of the new opioid harm reduction initiative is to expand naloxone access to high-risk individuals (addicts, abusers, or patients taking high-dose or extended-release opioids for pain) and their close family or household contacts. Patients or their close contacts receive a naloxone prescription to have the medication on their person or in the home for use during an emergency. Contacts are trained on overdose recognition, rescue breathing and administration of naloxone by intramuscular injection or nasal spraying of the injection prior to the arrival of emergency medical personnel. The safety profile of naloxone in traditional medical use must be considered in this new context of outpatient prescribing, dispensing and treatment of overdose prior to paramedic arrival. New naloxone delivery products are being developed for this prehospital application of naloxone in treatment of opioid

  4. Novel Oral Therapies for Opioid-induced Bowel Dysfunction in Patients with Chronic Noncancer Pain.

    PubMed

    Holder, Renee M; Rhee, Diane

    2016-03-01

    Opioid analgesics are frequently prescribed and play an important role in chronic pain management. Opioid-induced bowel dysfunction, which includes constipation, hardened stool, incomplete evacuation, gas, and nausea and vomiting, is the most common adverse event associated with opioid use. Mu-opioid receptors are specifically responsible for opioid-induced bowel dysfunction, resulting in reduced peristaltic and secretory actions. Agents that reverse these actions in the bowel without reversing pain control in the central nervous system may be preferred over traditional laxatives. The efficacy and safety of these agents in chronic noncancer pain were assessed from publications identified through Ovid and PubMed database searches. Trials that evaluated the safety and efficacy of oral agents for opioid-induced constipation or opioid-induced bowel dysfunction, excluding laxatives, were reviewed. Lubiprostone and naloxegol are approved in the United States by the Food and Drug Administration for use in opioid-induced constipation. Axelopran (TD-1211) and sustained-release naloxone have undergone phase 2 and phase 1 studies, respectively, for the same indication. Naloxegol and axelopran are peripherally acting μ-opioid receptor antagonists. Naloxone essentially functions as a peripherally acting μ-opioid receptor antagonist when administered orally in a sustained-release formulation. Lubiprostone is a locally acting chloride channel (CIC-2) activator that increases secretions and peristalsis. All agents increase spontaneous bowel movements and reduce other bowel symptoms compared with placebo in patients with noncancer pain who are chronic opioid users. The most common adverse events were gastrointestinal in nature, and none of the drugs were associated with severe adverse or cardiovascular events. Investigations comparing these agents to regimens using standard laxative and combination therapy and trials in special populations and patients with active cancer are

  5. Oxycodone/Naloxone: role in chronic pain management, opioid-induced constipation, and abuse deterrence.

    PubMed

    DePriest, Anne Z; Miller, Katie

    2014-06-01

    The use of opioids in the treatment of chronic pain is widespread; the prevalence of specific opioids varies from country to country and depends on product availability, national formulary systems, and provider preferences. Patients often receive opioids for legitimate treatment of pain conditions, but on the opposite side of the spectrum, nonmedical use of opioids is a significant public health concern. Opioids are associated with several side effects, and constipation is the most commonly reported and persistent symptom. Unlike some adverse effects associated with opioid use, tolerance does not develop to constipation. Opioid-induced constipation (OIC) is the most prevalent patient complaint associated with opioid use and has been associated with declines in various quality of life measures. OIC can be extremely difficult for patients to tolerate and may prompt patients to decrease or discontinue opioid treatment. Current management strategies for OIC are often insufficient. A prolonged-release formulation of oxycodone/naloxone (OXN) has been investigated for the treatment of nonmalignant and cancer pain and mitigation of OIC, and evidence is largely favorable. Studies have demonstrated the capability of OXN to alleviate OIC while maintaining pain control comparable to oxycodone-only regimens. There is insufficient evidence for OXN efficacy for patients with mild OIC or patients maintained on high doses of opioids, and use in these populations is controversial. The reduction of costs associated with OIC may provide overall cost effectiveness with OXN. Additionally, the presence of naloxone may deter abuse/misuse by those seeking to misuse the formulation by modes of administration other than oral ingestion. Most studies to date have occurred in European countries, and phase 3 trials continue in the United States. This review will include current therapeutic options for pain and constipation, unique characteristics of OXN, evidence related to use of OXN and its

  6. Effects of repeated morphine on intracranial self-stimulation in male rats in the absence or presence of a noxious pain stimulus.

    PubMed

    Miller, Laurence L; Altarifi, Ahmad A; Negus, S Stevens

    2015-10-01

    Research on opioid analgesics such as morphine suggests that expression of abuse-related effects increases with repeated exposure. Repeated exposure to opioids often occurs clinically in the context of pain management, and a major concern for clinicians is the risk of iatrogenic addiction and dependence in patients receiving opioids for treatment of pain. This study compared abuse-related morphine effects in male rats in an intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) procedure after repeated treatment either with morphine alone or with morphine in combination with a repeated noxious stimulus (intraperitoneal administration of dilute acid). The study also permitted comparison of morphine potency and effectiveness to block acid-induced depression of ICSS (antinociception) and to produce enhanced facilitation of ICSS (abuse-related effect). There were 3 main findings. First, initial morphine exposure to drug naïve rats did not produce abuse-related ICSS facilitation. Second, repeated daily treatment with 3.2 mg/kg/day morphine for 6 days increased expression of ICSS facilitation. This occurred whether morphine was administered in the absence or presence of the noxious stimulus. Finally, a lower dose of 1.0 mg/kg/day morphine was sufficient to produce antinociception during repeated acid treatment, but this lower dose did not reliably increase abuse-related morphine effects. Taken together, these results suggest that prior morphine exposure can increase abuse liability of subsequent morphine treatments even when that morphine exposure occurs in the context of a pain state. However, it may be possible to relieve pain with relatively low morphine doses that do not produce increases in abuse-related morphine effects. PMID:26375515

  7. Naltrexone extended-release injection: an option for the management of opioid abuse

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Robert; Raffa, Robert B; Pergolizzi, Joseph V

    2011-01-01

    The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved naltrexone, a synthetic competitive antagonist at opioid receptors, in oral form in 1984 for use in the management of opioid abuse and addiction. Because naltrexone and its major metabolite, 6-β-naltrexone, are both competitive antagonists at opioid receptors – and thereby inhibit opioid agonist-induced effects including those desired by abusers – it was hypothesized that once maintained on naltrex-one, opioid-induced desirable effects would be diminished to the point that relapse to illicit use would decline because it was no longer rewarding. However, good medication compliance is a requisite for such a strategy to be effective and a systematic review of oral naltrexone concluded that this method of treatment was not superior for any outcomes measured (ie, retention, abstinence, or side effects) to placebo, psychotherapy, benzodiazepines, or buprenorphine treatment. In addition, the retention rate on oral naltrexone was very low (less than 30%). Recently, the FDA approved an extended-release formulation (intramuscular depot injection) of naltrexone for prevention of relapse to opioid dependence following opioid detoxification and to be used along with counseling and social support. Since it needs to be administered only monthly, as opposed to the daily administration required for the oral formulation, naltrexone injection has the potential for increasing adherence and retention rates. Concerns include liver damage at high doses (oral formulation) and possible opioid overdose if an attempt is made to surmount receptor antagonism by taking higher doses of an opioid agonist or if opioid receptors become “sensitized” under long-term antagonism. The focus of the present review is the current information regarding the safety and efficacy of naltrexone extended-release therapy. PMID:24474859

  8. Argon blocks the expression of locomotor sensitization to amphetamine through antagonism at the vesicular monoamine transporter-2 and mu-opioid receptor in the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    David, H N; Dhilly, M; Degoulet, M; Poisnel, G; Meckler, C; Vallée, N; Blatteau, J-É; Risso, J-J; Lemaire, M; Debruyne, D; Abraini, J H

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of the noble gas argon on the expression of locomotor sensitization to amphetamine and amphetamine-induced changes in dopamine release and mu-opioid neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens. We found (1) argon blocked the increase in carrier-mediated dopamine release induced by amphetamine in brain slices, but, in contrast, potentiated the decrease in KCl-evoked dopamine release induced by amphetamine, thereby suggesting that argon inhibited the vesicular monoamine transporter-2; (2) argon blocked the expression of locomotor and mu-opioid neurotransmission sensitization induced by repeated amphetamine administration in a short-term model of sensitization in rats; (3) argon decreased the maximal number of binding sites and increased the dissociation constant of mu-receptors in membrane preparations, thereby indicating that argon is a mu-receptor antagonist; (4) argon blocked the expression of locomotor sensitization and context-dependent locomotor activity induced by repeated administration of amphetamine in a long-term model of sensitization. Taken together, these data indicate that argon could be of potential interest for treating drug addiction and dependence. PMID:26151922

  9. Combined Effect of Opioids and Corticosteroids for Alleviating Dyspnea in Terminal Cancer Patients: A Retrospective Review.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Tsuyoshi; Hayakawa, Toru

    2016-06-01

    Dyspnea is a prognostic factor that affects the quality of life of terminal cancer patients, and many reports have described opioid treatment for dyspnea alleviation. Here, we retrospectively evaluated differences in the effects of various opioids administered concomitantly with corticosteroids on dyspnea in 20 terminal-stage cancer patients (13 men, 7 women; mean age [range]: 71 [49-94] years) who received opioids concomitantly with corticosteroids. Effectiveness was assessed throughout administration using the Support Team Assessment Schedule, Japanese version (STAS-J), particularly the subscale indicating how strongly a patient is affected by symptoms. The effectiveness of combined opioid and corticosteroid therapy against dyspnea and the opioid dose comprised the primary and secondary foci, respectively. Among concomitantly treated patients, STAS-J scores at initiation (mean ± SD: 3.1 ± 0.24) and lowest recorded STAS-J scores (1.4 ± 0.22) differed significantly (P = .0034) among those receiving morphine, but not among those receiving oxycodone (P = .068) or fentanyl (P = .18). Concomitant opioid and corticosteroid treatment was associated with a ≥2-point STAS-J score improvement in 14/20 patients (effectiveness: 70%). The opioid dose did not significantly affect dyspnea alleviation. We conclude that concomitant opioid and corticosteroid treatment can effectively alleviate dyspnea in terminal cancer patients. PMID:27093633

  10. Nurses' Role in Preventing Prescription Opioid Diversion.

    PubMed

    Manworren, Renee C B; Gilson, Aaron M

    2015-08-01

    Prescription opioid abuse is at epidemic levels. Opioids diverted from friends and family members who have legitimate prescriptions are a major source of abused prescription opioids. Nurses are vital to any effort to combat this public health crisis because they have the opportunity to provide essential anticipatory guidance every time a patient receives prescription medication. The purpose of this article is to inform nurses of the magnitude of opioid diversion, the nonmedical use of opioids, and opioids' inappropriate disposal. The authors propose three potential interventions in which nurses can play a critical role: teaching patients about the risks of opioid diversion, providing patients with information on the safekeeping and proper disposal of opioids, and tracking patients' analgesic use to improve our knowledge of prescription analgesic requirements for pain management. Nurses are in an ideal position to help reverse the occurrence and potentially fatal consequences of prescription opioid diversion. PMID:26186473

  11. Nucleus accumbens μ-opioid receptors mediate social reward.

    PubMed

    Trezza, Viviana; Damsteegt, Ruth; Achterberg, E J Marijke; Vanderschuren, Louk J M J

    2011-04-27

    Positive social interactions are essential for emotional well-being and proper behavioral development of young individuals. Here, we studied the neural underpinnings of social reward by investigating the involvement of opioid neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in social play behavior, a highly rewarding social interaction in adolescent rats. Intra-NAc infusion of morphine (0.05-0.1 μg) increased pinning and pouncing, characteristic elements of social play behavior in rats, and blockade of NAc opioid receptors with naloxone (0.5 μg) prevented the play-enhancing effects of systemic morphine (1 mg/kg, s.c.) administration. Thus, stimulation of opioid receptors in the NAc was necessary and sufficient for morphine to increase social play. Intra-NAc treatment with the selective μ-opioid receptor agonist [D-Ala(2),N-MePhe(4),Gly(5)-ol]enkephalin (DAMGO) (0.1-10 ng) and the μ-opioid receptor antagonist Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Arg-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH(2) (CTAP) (0.3-3 μg) increased and decreased social play, respectively. The δ-opioid receptor agonist DPDPE ([D-Pen(2),D-Pen(5)]-enkephalin) (0.3-3 μg) had no effects, whereas the κ-opioid receptor agonist U69593 (N-methyl-2-phenyl-N-[(5R,7S,8S)-7-(pyrrolidin-1-yl)-1-oxaspiro[4.5]dec-8-yl]acetamide) (0.01-1 μg) decreased social play. Intra-NAc treatment with β-endorphin (0.01-1 μg) increased social play, but met-enkephalin (0.1-5 μg) and the enkephalinase inhibitor thiorphan (0.1-1 μg) were ineffective. DAMGO (0.1-10 ng) increased social play after infusion into both the shell and core subregions of the NAc. Last, intra-NAc infusion of CTAP (3 μg) prevented the development of social play-induced conditioned place preference. These findings identify NAc μ-opioid receptor stimulation as an important neural mechanism for the attribution of positive value to social interactions in adolescent rats. Altered NAc μ-opioid receptor function may underlie social impairments in psychiatric disorders such as autism

  12. Prescription opioid use and misuse

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Anita; Kahan, Meldon; Jiwa, Ashifa

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of a multifaceted educational intervention to improve the opioid prescribing practices of rural family physicians in a remote First Nations community. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Sioux Lookout, Ont. Participants Family physicians. Interventions Eighteen family physicians participated in a 1-year study of a series of educational interventions on safe opioid prescribing. Interventions included a main workshop with a lecture and interactive case discussions, an online chat room, video case conferencing, and consultant support. Main outcome measures Responses to questionnaires at baseline and after 1 year on knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to opioid prescribing. Results The main workshop was feasible and was well received by primary care physicians in remote communities. At 1 year, physicians were less concerned about getting patients addicted to opioids and more comfortable with opioid dosing. Conclusion Multifaceted education and consultant support might play an important role in improving family physician comfort with opioid prescribing, and could improve the treatment of chronic pain while minimizing the risk of addiction. PMID:22611608

  13. The K+ channel GIRK2 is both necessary and sufficient for peripheral opioid-mediated analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Nockemann, Dinah; Rouault, Morgane; Labuz, Dominika; Hublitz, Philip; McKnelly, Kate; Reis, Fernanda C; Stein, Christoph; Heppenstall, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    The use of opioid agonists acting outside the central nervous system (CNS) is a promising therapeutic strategy for pain control that avoids deleterious central side effects such as apnea and addiction. In human clinical trials and rat models of inflammatory pain, peripherally restricted opioids have repeatedly shown powerful analgesic effects; in some mouse models however, their actions remain unclear. Here, we investigated opioid receptor coupling to K+ channels as a mechanism to explain such discrepancies. We found that GIRK channels, major effectors for opioid signalling in the CNS, are absent from mouse peripheral sensory neurons but present in human and rat. In vivo transgenic expression of GIRK channels in mouse nociceptors established peripheral opioid signalling and local analgesia. We further identified a regulatory element in the rat GIRK2 gene that accounts for differential expression in rodents. Thus, GIRK channels are indispensable for peripheral opioid analgesia, and their absence in mice has profound consequences for GPCR signalling in peripheral sensory neurons. GIRK channels are indispensable for peripheral opioid analgesia. The absence of GIRK channels from mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons questions the predictive validity of mice as a model organism for investigating peripheral GPCRmediated analgesia. PMID:23818182

  14. Validation of a Brief Opioid Compliance Checklist for Patients with Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Jamison, Robert N.; Martel, Marc O.; Edwards, Robert R.; Qian, Jing; Sheehan, Kerry Anne; Ross, Edgar L.

    2014-01-01

    There has been a need for a brief assessment tool to determine compliance with use of prescribed opioids for pain. The purpose of this study was to develop and begin the validation of a brief and simple compliance checklist (Opioid Compliance Checklist; OCC) for chronic pain patients prescribed long-term opioid therapy. A review of the literature of opioid therapy agreements led to a 12-item OCC that was repeatedly administered to 157 patients who were taking opioids for chronic pain and followed for six months. Validation of the OCC was conducted by identifying those patients exhibiting aberrant drug-related behavior as determined by any of the following: positive urine toxicology screen, a positive score on the Prescription Drug Use Questionnaire (PDUQ) interview or Current Opioid Misuse Measure (COMM), and/or ratings by staff on the Addiction Behavior Checklist (ABC). Of the original 12 items, 5 OCC items appeared to best predict subsequent aberrant behaviors based on multivariate logistic regression analyses (cross-validated AUC=.67). Although further testing is needed, these results suggest that the OCC is an easy-to-use, promising measure in monitoring opioid adherence among persons with chronic pain. PMID:25092233

  15. Respiratory depression in the intoxicated trauma patient: are opioids to blame?

    PubMed

    Shenk, Eleni; Barton, Cassie A; Mah, Nathan D; Ran, Ran; Hendrickson, Robert G; Watters, Jennifer

    2016-02-01

    Providing effective pain management to acutely intoxicated trauma patients represents a challenge of balancing appropriate pain management with the risk of potential respiratory depression from opioid administration. The objective of this study was to quantify the incidence of respiratory depression in trauma patients acutely intoxicated with ethanol who received opioids as compared with those who did not and identify potential risk factors for respiratory depression in this population. Retrospective medical record review was conducted for subjects identified via the trauma registry who were admitted as a trauma activation and had a detectable serum ethanol level upon admission. Risk factors and characteristics compared included demographics, Injury Severity Score, Glasgow Coma Score, serum ethanol level upon arrival, urine drug screen results, incidence of respiratory depression, and opioid and other sedative medication use. A total of 233 patients were included (78.5% male). Patients who received opioids were more likely to have a higher Injury Severity Score and initial pain score on admission as compared with those who did not receive opioids. Blood ethanol content was higher in patients who did not receive opioids (0.205 vs 0.237 mg/dL, P = .015). Patients who did not receive opioids were more likely to be intubated within 4 hours of admission (1.7% vs 12.1%, P = .02). Opioid administration was not associated with increased risk of respiratory depression (19.7% vs 22.4%, P = .606). Increased cumulative fentanyl dose was associated with increased risk of respiratory depression. Increased cumulative fentanyl dose, but not opioid administration alone, was found to be a risk factor for respiratory depression. PMID:26614581

  16. Compulsive-Like Responding for Opioid Analgesics in Rats with Extended Access

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Carrie L; Vendruscolo, Leandro F; Schlosburg, Joel E; Hernandez, Daniel O; Koob, George F

    2015-01-01

    The abuse of prescription opioids that are used for the treatment of chronic pain is a major public health concern, costing ∼$53.4 billion annually in lost wages, health-care costs, and criminal costs. Although opioids remain a first-line therapy for the treatment of severe chronic pain, practitioners remain cautious because of the potential for abuse and addiction. Opioids such as heroin are considered very rewarding and reinforcing, but direct and systematic comparisons of compulsive intake between commonly prescribed opioids and heroin in animal models have not yet been performed. In the present study, we evaluated the potential for compulsive-like drug seeking and taking, using intravenous self-administration of oxycodone, fentanyl, and buprenorphine in rats allowed long access sessions (12 h). We measured compulsive-like intake using an established escalation model and responding on a progressive ratio schedule of reinforcement. We compared the potential for compulsive-like self-administration of these prescription opioids and heroin, which has been previously established to induce increasing intake that models the transition to addiction in humans. We found that animals that self-administered oxycodone, fentanyl, or heroin, but not buprenorphine had similar profiles of escalation and increases in breakpoints. The use of extended access models of prescription opioid intake will help better understand the biological factors that underlie opioid dependence. PMID:25060491

  17. Repeated Superovulation via PMSG/hCG Administration Induces 2-Cys Peroxiredoxins Expression and Overoxidation in the Reproductive Tracts of Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sun-Ji; Kim, Tae-Shin; Kim, Jin-Man; Chang, Kyu-Tae; Lee, Hyun-Shik; Lee, Dong-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Superovulation induced by exogenous gonadotropin treatment (PMSG/hCG) increases the number of available oocytes in humans and animals. However, Superovulatory PMSG/hCG treatment is known to affect maternal environment, and these effects may result from PMSG/hCG treatment-induced oxidative stress. 2-Cys peroxiredoxins (2-Cys Prxs) act as antioxidant enzymes that protect cells from oxidative stress induced by various exogenous stimuli. Therefore, the objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that repeated PMSG/hCG treatment induces 2-Cys Prx expression and overoxidation in the reproductive tracts of female mice. Immunohistochemistry and western blotting analyses further demonstrated that, after PMSG/hCG treatment, the protein expression levels of 2-Cys Prxs increased most significantly in the ovaries, while that of Prx1 was most affected by PMSG/hCG stimulation in all tissues of the female reproductive tract. Repeated PMSG/hCG treatment eventually leads to 2-Cys Prxs overoxidation in all reproductive organs of female mice, and the abundance of the 2-Cys Prxs-SO2/3 proteins reported here supports the hypothesis that repeated superovulation induces strong oxidative stress and damage to the female reproductive tract. Our data suggest that excessive oxidative stress caused by repeated PMSG/hCG stimulation increases 2-Cys Prxs expression and overoxidation in the female reproductive organs. Intracellular 2-Cys Prx therefore plays an important role in maintaining the reproductive organ environment of female mice upon exogenous gonadotropin treatment. PMID:26486164

  18. Effects of daily delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol treatment on heroin self-administration in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Maguire, David R; France, Charles P

    2016-04-01

    Opioid abuse remains a significant public health problem; together with the greater availability of marijuana in some regions there is an increasing likelihood that opioids and marijuana will be used together. Polydrug abuse is associated with increased toxicity and poorer treatment outcome; thus, a better understanding of the consequences of repeated coadministration of these drugs will facilitate the development of better prevention and treatment strategies. This study examined the effects of daily treatment with the cannabinoid receptor agonist delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ-THC) and its discontinuation on self-administration of heroin in rhesus monkeys (n=4) lever-pressing under a fixed-ratio 30 schedule. Heroin self-administration (0.32-32 μg/kg/infusion, intravenously) generated an inverted U-shaped dose-effect curve. Administered acutely, Δ-THC (0.01-0.32 mg/kg, subcutaneously) dose dependently decreased responding for heroin and flattened the self-administration dose-effect curve. Daily treatment with Δ-THC (0.01-0.1 mg/kg/12 h, subcutaneously) either had no effect on or decreased responding for heroin. In addition, daily treatment did not significantly impact extinction of heroin self-administration or resumption of responding for heroin after extinction. Discontinuation of daily Δ-THC treatment did not systematically impact rates of heroin self-administration. These data suggest that repeated administration of a cannabinoid receptor agonist likely does not increase, and possibly decreases, the positive reinforcing effects of a mu opioid receptor agonist. PMID:26397756

  19. Epigenetic regulation of spinal cord gene expression contributes to enhanced postoperative pain and analgesic tolerance subsequent to continuous opioid exposure

    PubMed Central

    Liang, De-Yong; Shi, Xiao-You; Sun, Yuan; Clark, J David

    2016-01-01

    Background Opioids have become the mainstay for treatment of moderate to severe pain and are commonly used to treat surgical pain. While opioid administration has been shown to cause opioid-induced hyperalgesia and tolerance, interactions between opioid administration and surgery with respect to these problematic adaptations have scarcely been addressed. Accumulating evidence suggests opioids and nociceptive signaling may converge on epigenetic mechanisms in spinal cord to enhance or prolong neuroplastic changes. Epigenetic regulation of Bdnf (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) and Pdyn (prodynorphin) genes may be involved. Results Four days of ascending doses of morphine treatment caused opioid-induced hyperalgesia and reduced opioid analgesic efficacy in mice. Both opioid-induced hyperalgesia and the reduced opioid analgesic efficacy were enhanced in mice that received hindpaw incisions. The expression of Bdnf and Pdyn (qPCR) was increased after morphine treatment and incision. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that the Pdyn and Bdnf promoters were more strongly associated with acetylated H3K9 after morphine plus incision than in the morphine or incision alone groups. Selective tropomyosin-related kinase B (ANA-12) and κ-opioid receptor (nor-binaltorphimine) antagonists were administered intrathecally, both reduced hyperalgesia one or three days after surgery. Administration of ANA-12 or nor-binaltorphimine attenuated the decreased morphine analgesic efficacy on day 1, but only nor-binaltorphimine was effective on day 3 after incision in opioid-exposed group. Coadministration of histone acetyltransferase inhibitor anacardic acid daily with morphine blocked the development of opioid-induced hyperalgesia and attenuated incision-enhanced hyperalgesia in morphine-treated mice. Anacardic acid had similar effects on analgesic tolerance, showing the involvement of histone acetylation in the interactions detected. Conclusions Spinal epigenetic changes

  20. Peptide and non-peptide opioid-induced hyperthermia in rabbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandasamy, S. B.; Williams, B. A.

    1983-01-01

    The intracerebroventricular administration of prototype nonpeptide opioid receptor (mu, kappa, and sigma) agonists, morphine, ketocyclazocine, and N-allyl-normetazocine was found to induce hyperthermia in rabbits. The similar administration of peptide opioids like beta-endorphin (BE), methionine-enkephalin (ME), and its synthetic analogue D-ala2-methionine-enkephalinamide (DAME) was also found to cause hyperthermia. Results indicate that only the liver-like transport system is important to the ventricular inactivation of BE and DAME. Prostaglandins and norepinephrine were determined not to be involved in peptide and nonpeptide opioid-induced hyperthermia. In addition, cAMP was not required since a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, theophylline, did not accentuate the hyperthermia due to peptide and nonpeptide opioids. Naloxone-sensitive receptors were found to be involved in the induction of hyperthermia by morphine, BE, ME, and DAME since naloxone attenuated them. However, the hyperthermic response to ketocyclazocine and N-allyl-normetazocine was not antagonized by naloxone.

  1. Dual Alleviation of Acute and Neuropathic Pain by Fused Opioid Agonist-Neurokinin 1 Antagonist Peptidomimetics.

    PubMed

    Betti, Cecilia; Starnowska, Joanna; Mika, Joanna; Dyniewicz, Jolanta; Frankiewicz, Lukasz; Novoa, Alexandre; Bochynska, Marta; Keresztes, Attila; Kosson, Piotr; Makuch, Wioletta; Van Duppen, Joost; Chung, Nga N; Vanden Broeck, Jozef; Lipkowski, Andrzej W; Schiller, Peter W; Janssens, Frans; Ceusters, Marc; Sommen, François; Meert, Theo; Przewlocka, Barbara; Tourwé, Dirk; Ballet, Steven

    2015-12-10

    Herein, the synthesis and biological evaluation of dual opioid agonists-neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) antagonists is described. In these multitarget ligands, the two pharmacophores do not overlap, and this allowed maintaining high NK1R affinity and antagonist potency in compounds 12 and 13. Although the fusion of the two ligands resulted in slightly diminished opioid agonism at the μ- and δ-opioid receptors (MOR and DOR, respectively), as compared to the opioid parent peptide, balanced MOR/DOR activities were obtained. Compared to morphine, compounds 12 and 13 produced more potent antinociceptive effects in both acute (tail-flick) and neuropathic pain models (von Frey and cold plate). Similarly to morphine, analgesic tolerance developed after repetitive administration of these compounds. To our delight, compound 12 did not produce cross-tolerance with morphine and high antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effects could be reinstated after chronic administration of each of the two compounds. PMID:26713106

  2. EMS runs for suspected opioid overdose: Implications for surveillance and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Knowlton, Amy; Weir, Brian; Hazzard, Frank; Olsen, Yngvild; McWilliams, Junette; Fields, Julie; Gaasch, Wade

    2013-01-01

    Objective Opioid (including prescription opiate) abuse and overdose rates in the US have surged in the past decade. The dearth and limitations of opioid abuse and overdose surveillance systems impede the development of interventions to address this epidemic. We explored evidence to support the validity of emergency medical services (EMS) data on naloxone administration as a possible proxy for estimating incidence of opioid overdose. Methods We reviewed data from Baltimore City Fire Department EMS patient records matched with dispatch records over a thirteen month time period (2008-2009), and census 2008 data. We calculated incidence rates and patient demographic and temporal patterns of naloxone administration, and examined patient evaluation data associated with naloxone administration. Results were compared to the demographic distributions of the EMS patient and city population and to prior study findings. Results Of 116,910 EMS incidents during the study period for patients 15 years and older, EMS providers administered naloxone 1,297 times (1.1% of incidents), an average of 100 administrations per month. Overall incidence was 1.87 administrations per 1,000 population per year. Findings indicated naloxone administration peaked in summer months (31% of administrations), weekends (32%), and late afternoon (4-5:00pm [8%]); and there was a trend toward peaking in the first week of the month. The incidence of suspected opioid overdose was highest among males, whites, and those in the 45-54 year age group. Findings on temporal patterns were comparable to findings from prior studies. Demographic patterns of suspected opioid overdose were similar to medical examiner reports of demographic patterns of fatal drug or alcohol related overdoses in Baltimore in 2008-9 (88% of which involved opioids). The findings on patient evaluation data suggest some inconsistencies with previously recommended clinical indications of opioid overdose. Conclusions While our findings suggest

  3. Opioid-sparing effects of perioperative paracetamol and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in children

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ivan; St John-Green, Celia; Walker, Suellen M

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives Perioperative pain in children can be effectively managed with systemic opioids, but addition of paracetamol or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce opioid requirements and potentially improve analgesia and/or reduce adverse effects. Methods A systematic literature search was conducted to identify trials evaluating postoperative opioid requirements in children and comparing NSAID and/or paracetamol with placebo. Studies were stratified according to design: continuous availability of intravenous opioid (PCA/NCA) vs intermittent ‘as needed’ bolus; and single vs multiple dose paracetamol/NSAIDs. Primary outcome data were extracted, and the percentage decrease in mean opioid consumption was calculated for statistically significant reductions compared with placebo. Secondary outcomes included differences in pain intensity, adverse effects (sedation, respiratory depression, postoperative nausea and vomiting, pruritus, urinary retention, bleeding), and patient/parent satisfaction. Results Thirty-one randomized controlled studies, with 48 active treatment arms compared with placebo, were included. Significant opioid sparing was reported in 38 of 48 active treatment arms, across 21 of the 31 studies. Benefit was most consistently reported when multiple doses of study drug were administered, and 24 h PCA or NCA opioid requirements were assessed. The proportion of positive studies was less with paracetamol, but was influenced by dose and route of administration. Despite availability of opioid for titration, a reduction in pain intensity by NSAIDs and/or paracetamol was reported in 16 of 29 studies. Evidence for clinically significant reductions in opioid-related adverse effects was less robust. Conclusion This systematic review supports addition of NSAIDs and/or paracetamol to systemic opioid for perioperative pain management in children. PMID:23570544

  4. Withdrawal from repeated administration of a low dose of reserpine induced opposing adaptive changes in the noradrenaline and serotonin system function: a behavioral and neurochemical ex vivo and in vivo studies in the rat.

    PubMed

    Antkiewicz-Michaluk, Lucyna; Wąsik, Agnieszka; Możdżeń, Edyta; Romańska, Irena; Michaluk, Jerzy

    2015-03-01

    Reserpine is an inhibitor of the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) and monoamine releaser, so it can be used as a pharmacological model of depression. In the present paper, we investigated the behavioral and neurochemical effects of withdrawal from acute and repeated administration of a low dose of reserpine (0.2 mg/kg) in Wistar Han rats. We demonstrated the behavioral and receptor oversensitivity (postsynaptic dopamine D1) during withdrawal from chronic reserpine. It was accompanied by a significant increase in motility in the locomotor activity test and climbing behavior in the forced swim test (FST). Neurochemical studies revealed that repeated but not acute administration the a low dose of reserpine triggered opposing adaptive changes in the noradrenergic and serotonin system function analyzed during reserpine withdrawal, i.e. 48 h after the last injection. The tissue concentration of noradrenaline was significantly decreased in the hypothalamus and nucleus accumbens only after repeated drug administration (by about 20% and 35% vs. control; p<0.05, respectively). On the other hand, the concentration of its extraneuronal metabolite, normetanephrine (NM) increased significantly in the VTA during withdrawal both from acute and chronic reserpine. The serotonin concentration was significantly reduced in the VTA after chronic reserpine (by about 40% vs. the control group, p<0.05) as well as its main metabolite, 5-HIAA (by about 30% vs. control; p<0.05) in the VTA and hypothalamus. Dopamine and its metabolites were not changed after acute or chronic reserpine administration. In vivo microdialysis studies clearly evidenced the lack of the effect of a single dose of reserpine, and its distinct effects after chronic treatment on the release of noradrenaline and serotonin in the rat striatum. In fact, the withdrawal from repeated administration of reserpine significantly increased an extraneuronal concentration of noradrenaline in the rat striatum but at the same

  5. Trends in use of opioids for chronic non-cancer pain among individuals with mental health and substance use disorders: the TROUP study

    PubMed Central

    Edlund, Mark J.; Martin, Bradley C.; Devries, Andrea; Fan, Ming-Yu; Braden, Jennifer Brennan; Sullivan, Mark D.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Use of prescription opioids for chronic pain is increasing, as is abuse of these medications, though the nature of the link between these trends is unclear. These increases may be most marked in patients with mental health (MH) and substance use disorders (SUDs). We analyzed trends between 2000 and 2005 in opioid prescribing among individuals with non-cancer pain conditions (NCPC), with and without MH and SUDs. Methods Secondary data analysis of longitudinal administrative data from two dissimilar populations: a national, commercially-insured population, and Arkansas Medicaid enrollees. We examined these opioid outcomes: (1) Rates of any prescription opioid use in the past year, (2) rates of chronic use of prescription opioids (greater than 90 days in the past year), (3) mean days supply of opioids, (4) mean daily opioid dose in morphine equivalents, and (5) percentage of total opioid dose that was Schedule II opioids. Results In 2000, among individuals with NCPC, chronic opioid use was more common among those with a MH or SUD than those without in commercially insured (8% versus 3%, p<0.001) and Arkansas Medicaid (20% versus 13%, p<0.001). Between 2000 and 2005, in commercially insured, rates of chronic opioid use increased by 34.9% among individuals with an MH or SUD, and 27.8% among individuals without these disorders. In Arkansas Medicaid chronic opioid use increased 55.4% among individuals with an MH or SUD, and 39.8% among those without. Discussion Chronic use of prescription opioids for NCPC is much higher and growing faster in patients with MH and SUDs than those without these diagnoses. Clinicians should monitor use of prescription opioids in these vulnerable groups to determine whether opioids are substituting for or interfering with appropriate mental health and substance abuse treatment. PMID:20026946

  6. Prescribed opioids in primary care: cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses of influence of patient and practice characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Foy, Robbie; Leaman, Ben; McCrorie, Carolyn; Petty, Duncan; House, Allan; Bennett, Michael; Carder, Paul; Faulkner, Simon; Glidewell, Liz; West, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine trends in opioid prescribing in primary care, identify patient and general practice characteristics associated with long-term and stronger opioid prescribing, and identify associations with changes in opioid prescribing. Design Trend, cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses of routinely recorded patient data. Setting 111 primary care practices in Leeds and Bradford, UK. Participants We observed 471 828 patient-years in which all patients represented had at least 1 opioid prescription between April 2005 and March 2012. A cross-sectional analysis included 99 847 patients prescribed opioids between April 2011 and March 2012. A longitudinal analysis included 49 065 patient-years between April 2008 and March 2012. We excluded patients with cancer or treated for substance misuse. Main outcome measures Long-term opioid prescribing (4 or more prescriptions within 12 months), stronger opioid prescribing and stepping up to or down from stronger opioids. Results Opioid prescribing in the adult population almost doubled for weaker opioids over 2005–2012 and rose over sixfold for stronger opioids. There was marked variation among general practices in the odds of patients stepping up to stronger opioids compared with those not stepping up (range 0.31–3.36), unexplained by practice-level variables. Stepping up to stronger opioids was most strongly associated with being underweight (adjusted OR 3.26, 1.49 to 7.17), increasing polypharmacy (4.15, 3.26 to 5.29 for 10 or more repeat prescriptions), increasing numbers of primary care appointments (3.04, 2.48 to 3.73 for over 12 appointments in the year) and referrals to specialist pain services (5.17, 4.37 to 6.12). Compared with women under 50 years, men under 50 were less likely to step down once prescribed stronger opioids (0.53, 0.37 to 0.75). Conclusions While clinicians should be alert to patients at risk of escalated opioid prescribing, much prescribing variation may be attributable to

  7. Pain Raises Risk of Opioid Addiction

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_160033.html Pain Raises Risk of Opioid Addiction Men and younger people had higher odds of ... had a 41 percent higher risk of opioid addiction than those with no pain. That increased risk ...

  8. Common Surgeries Raise Risk for Opioid Dependence

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159815.html Common Surgeries Raise Risk for Opioid Dependence: Study Doctors should explore alternatives for pain ... have an elevated risk of growing dependent on opioid painkillers, a new study finds. These prescription painkillers ...

  9. Parenthood and opioid dependence

    PubMed Central

    Pihkala, Heljä; Sandlund, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Many patients in maintenance treatment programs for opioid dependence are parents to underage children. Objective The aim of this study was to explore how parents who are regular patients in maintenance treatment perceive their parenthood. Methods The study used a qualitative approach. The informants were recruited by staff at a substance abuse clinic in Sweden. Criteria for inclusion were participation in the local maintenance treatment program, having a child or children younger than 18 years, and being in contact with the child or children. Data were collected in 2012–2013 by in-depth interviews of seven fathers and five mothers and analyzed using concepts and procedures of qualitative content analysis. Results The central findings of the study were: 1) the parents’ concerns about possible future discrimination against their children, ie, stigma by association; and 2) the patients’ own parents’ role as the most important support in parenthood. Conclusion The issue of anticipated discrimination against the children of parents undergoing maintenance treatment might be an aspect to consider in the development of interventions and support. Considering the role of the patients’ own parents also seems important. PMID:25709518

  10. The effects of ibudilast, a glial activation inhibitor, on opioid withdrawal symptoms in opioid-dependent volunteers.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Ziva D; Johnson, Kirk W; Pavlicova, Martina; Glass, Andrew; Vosburg, Suzanne K; Sullivan, Maria A; Manubay, Jeanne M; Martinez, Diana M; Jones, Jermaine D; Saccone, Phillip A; Comer, Sandra D

    2016-07-01

    Glial activation is hypothesized to contribute directly to opioid withdrawal. This study investigated the dose-dependent effects of a glial cell modulator, ibudilast, on withdrawal symptoms in opioid-dependent volunteers after abrupt discontinuation of morphine administration. Non-treatment-seeking heroin-dependent volunteers (n = 31) completed the in-patient, double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subject and between-group study. Volunteers were maintained on morphine (30 mg, QID) for 14 days and placebo (0 mg, QID) for the last 7 days of the 3-week study. Volunteers also received placebo (0 mg, PO, BID) capsules on days 1-7. On days 8-21, volunteers were randomized to receive ibudilast (20 or 40 mg, PO, BID) or placebo capsules. Subjective and clinical ratings of withdrawal symptoms were completed daily using daily using the Subjective Opioid Withdrawal Scale (SOWS) and Clinical Opioid Withdrawal Scale (COWS). Medication side effects were also monitored. Relative to the first 2 weeks, all groups exhibited withdrawal during the third week as assessed by the SOWS and COWS (P ≤ 0.0001). Although overall SOWS scores did not differ between groups, exploratory analyses pooling the two ibudilast groups demonstrated that they had lower ratings of withdrawal symptoms on SOWS items ('anxious,' 'perspiring,' 'restless,' 'stomach cramps') during detoxification relative to the placebo group. Ibudilast was well tolerated; no serious adverse events occurred during the study. Pharmacological modulation of glial activity with ibudilast decreased some subjective ratings of opioid withdrawal symptoms. These exploratory findings are the first to demonstrate the potential clinical utility of glial modulators for treating opioid withdrawal in humans. PMID:25975386

  11. Official position of the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology on serial neuropsychological assessments: the utility and challenges of repeat test administrations in clinical and forensic contexts.

    PubMed

    Heilbronner, Robert L; Sweet, Jerry J; Attix, Deborah K; Krull, Kevin R; Henry, George K; Hart, Robert P

    2010-11-01

    Serial assessments are now common in neuropsychological practice, and have a recognized value in numerous clinical and forensic settings. These assessments can aid in differential diagnosis, tracking neuropsychological strengths and weaknesses over time, and managing various neurologic and psychiatric conditions. This document provides a discussion of the benefits and challenges of serial neuropsychological testing in the context of clinical and forensic assessments. Recommendations regarding the use of repeated testing in neuropsychological practice are provided. PMID:21108148

  12. Non-clinical safety evaluation of single and repeated intramuscular administrations of MAGE-A3 Cancer Immunotherapeutic in rabbits and cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Destexhe, Eric; Grosdidier, Emilie; Baudson, Nathalie; Forster, Roy; Gerard, Catherine; Garçon, Nathalie; Segal, Lawrence

    2015-07-01

    The MAGE-A3 recombinant protein combined with AS15 immunostimulant (MAGE-A3 Cancer Immunotherapeutic) is under development by GlaxoSmithKline for the treatment of lung cancer and melanoma. We performed non-clinical safety studies evaluating potential local and systemic toxic effects induced by MAGE-A3 Cancer Immunotherapeutic in rabbits (study 1) and cynomolgus monkeys (study 2). Animals were allocated to two groups to receive a single (rabbits) or 25 repeated (every 2 weeks) injections (monkeys) of MAGE-A3 Cancer Immunotherapeutic (treatment groups) or saline (control groups). All rabbits were sacrificed 3 days post-injection and monkeys 3 days following last injection (3/5 per gender per group) or after a 3-month treatment-free period (2/5 per gender per group). Local and systemic reactions and MAGE-A3-specific immune responses (monkeys) were assessed. Macroscopic and microscopic (for rabbits, injection site only) post-mortem examinations were performed on all animals. No systemic toxicity or unscheduled mortalities were recorded. Single (rabbits) and repeated (monkeys; up to four times at the same site) injections were well tolerated. Following five to seven repeated injections, limb circumferences increased up to 26% (5 h post-injection), but returned to normal after 1-8 days. Three days after the last injection, enlargements of iliac, popliteal, axillary and inguinal lymph nodes, and increased incidence or severity of mononuclear inflammatory cell infiltrates was observed in injected muscles of treated monkeys. No treatment-related macroscopic findings were recorded after the treatment-free period. MAGE-A3-specific antibody and T-cell responses were raised in all treated monkeys, confirming test item exposure. Single or repeated intramuscular injections of MAGE-A3 Cancer Immunotherapeutic were well tolerated in rabbits and monkeys. PMID:25219328

  13. Enhanced central serotonin release from slices of rat hypothalamus following repeated nialamide administration: evidence supporting the overactive serotonin receptor theory of depression

    SciTech Connect

    Offord, S.J.

    1986-01-01

    Researchers are suggesting unipolar affective disorders may be related to an abnormality in biogenic amine receptor-sensitivity. This abnormality may be a result of a dysfunction in central serotonin (5-HT) release mechanisms. 5-HT neurotransmission is modulated by presynaptic autoreceptors, which are members of the 5-HT/sub 1/ receptor subtype. The autoreceptor is thought to play an important role in the homeostasis of the central 5-HT synapse and could be a site at which some antidepressants mediate their therapeutic effect. The number of 5-HT/sub 1/ type receptor binding sites are reduced and behavior mediated by this receptor is abolished following repeated injections of monoamine oxidase inhibitor type antidepressants. These changes did not occur following a single injection. It was hypothesized that repeated treatment with a monoamine oxidase inhibitor would reduce the sensitivity of 5-HT autoreceptors and enhance 5-HT release. Rats were pretreated with single or repeated (twice daily for 7 days) intraperitoneal injections of nialamide (40 mg/kg) or chlorimipramine (10 mg/kg) and the ability of the autoreceptor agonist to inhibit potassium-induced /sup 3/H-5-HT release was evaluated using an in vitro superfusion system. These changes in 5-HT autoreceptor activity are consistent with other reports evaluating monoamine oxidase inhibitors on 5-HT/sub 1/ type receptors. It is hypothesized that the changes in 5-HT neurotransmission are related to the antidepressant mechanism of monoamine oxidase inhibitors.

  14. Naloxone Administration in US Emergency Departments, 2000-2011.

    PubMed

    Frank, Joseph W; Levy, Cari; Calcaterra, Susan L; Hoppe, Jason A; Binswanger, Ingrid A

    2016-06-01

    Rates of opioid overdose and opioid-related emergency department (ED) visits have increased dramatically. Naloxone is an effective antidote to potentially fatal opioid overdose, but little is known about naloxone administration in ED settings. We examined trends and correlates of naloxone administration in ED visits nationally from 2000 to 2011. Using data from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, we examined ED visits involving (1) the administration of naloxone or (2) a diagnosis of opioid overdose, abuse, or dependence. We assessed patient characteristics in these visits, including concomitant administration of prescription opioid medications. We used logistic regression to identify correlates of naloxone administration. From 2000 to 2011, naloxone was administered in an estimated 1.7 million adult ED visits nationally; 19 % of these visits recorded a diagnosis of opioid overdose, abuse, or dependence. An estimated 2.9 million adult ED visits were related to opioid overdose, abuse, or dependence; 11 % of these visits involved naloxone administration. In multivariable logistic regression models, patient age, race, and insurance and non-rural facility location were independently associated with naloxone administration. An opioid medication was provided in 14 % of visits involving naloxone administration. Naloxone was administered in a minority of ED visits related to opioid overdose, abuse, or dependence. Among all ED visits involving naloxone administration, prescription opioids were also provided in one in seven visits. Further work should explore the provider decision-making in the management of opioid overdose in ED settings and examine patient outcomes following these visits. PMID:26621354

  15. Opioid-induced central immune signaling: implications for opioid analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Peter M.; Maier, Steven F.; Watkins, Linda R.

    2015-01-01

    Despite being the mainstay of pain management, opioids are limited in their clinical utility by adverse effects, such as tolerance and paradoxical hyperalgesia. Research of the past 15 years has extended beyond neurons, to implicate central nervous system immune signaling in these adverse effects. This article will provide an overview of these central immune mechanisms in opioid tolerance and paradoxical hyperalgesia, including those mediated by toll like receptor 4, purinergic, ceramide and chemokine signaling. Challenges for the future, as well as new lines of investigation will be highlighted. PMID:25833219

  16. Opioids in Preclinical and Clinical Trials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagase, Hiroshi; Fujii, Hideaki

    Since 1952, when Gates determined the stereo structure of morphine, numerous groups have focused on discovering a nonnarcotic opioid drug [1]. Although several natural, semisynthetic, and synthetic opioid ligands (alkaloids and peptides) have been developed in clinical studies, very few were nonnarcotic opioid drugs [2]. One of the most important studies in the opioid field appeared in 1976, when Martin and colleagues [3] established types of opioid receptors (these are now classified into μ, δ, and κ types). Later, Portoghese discovered a highly selective μ type opioid receptor antagonist, β-funaltrexamine [4]. This led to the finding that the μ type opioid receptor was correlated to drug dependence [5]. Consequently, δ, and particularly κ, opioid agonists were expected to lead to ideal opioid drugs. Moreover, opioid antagonists were evaluated for the treatment of symptoms related to undesirable opioid system activation. In this chapter, we provide a short survey of opioid ligands in development and describe the discovery of the two most promising drugs, TRK-851 [6] and TRK-820 (nalfurafine hydrochloride) [7].

  17. Effects of genetic deletion of endogenous opioid system components on the reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Cuesta, Javier; Burokas, Aurelijus; Mancino, Samantha; Kummer, Sami; Martín-García, Elena; Maldonado, Rafael

    2014-12-01

    The repeated cycles of cessation of consumption and relapse remain the major clinical concern in treating drug addiction. The endogenous opioid system is a crucial component of the reward circuit that participates in the adaptive changes leading to relapse in the addictive processes. We have used genetically modified mice to evaluate the involvement of μ-opioid receptor (MOR) and δ-opioid receptor (DOR) and their main endogenous ligands, the enkephalins derived from proenkephalin (PENK) and prodynorphin (PDYN), in the reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior. Constitutive knockout mice of MOR, DOR, PENK, and PDYN, and their wild-type littermates were trained to self-administer cocaine or to seek for palatable food, followed by a period of extinction and finally tested on a cue-induced reinstatement of seeking behavior. The four lines of knockout mice acquired operant cocaine self-administration behavior, although DOR and PENK knockout mice showed less motivation for cocaine than wild-type littermates. Moreover, cue-induced relapse was significantly decreased in MOR and DOR knockout mice. In contrast, PDYN knockout mice showed a slower extinction and increased relapse than wild-type littermates. C-Fos expression analysis revealed differential activation in brain areas related with memory and reward in these knockout mice. No differences were found in any of the four genotypes in operant responding to obtain palatable food, indicating that the changes revealed in knockout mice were not due to unspecific deficit in operant performance. Our results indicate that MOR, DOR, and PDYN have a differential role in cue-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior. PMID:24943644

  18. Evidence for altered opioid activity in patients with cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Lissoni, P.; Barni, S.; Paolorossi, F.; Crispino, S.; Rovelli, F.; Ferri, L.; Delitala, G.; Tancini, G.

    1987-01-01

    Endogenous opioid peptides have been shown to be involved in the regulation of tumour growth. At present, however, no data are available about the secretion of opioid peptides in cancer patients. To draw some preliminary conclusions on opioid brain function in human neoplasms, we evaluated hypophyseal hormone responses to the administration of a met-enkephalin analogue, FK 33-824. The study included 14 patients affected by early or advanced neoplastic disease, 12 healthy subjects and 7 patients with a chronic medical illness other than cancer. FK 33-824 was given intravenously at a dose of 0.3 mg. Venous blood samples were collected at zero time, and 30, 60 and 120 min after drug administration. In each sample, PRL, GH, LH, cortisol and beta-endorphin levels were measured by RIA. In all normal subjects and in patients with non-neoplastic chronic illness, FK 33-824 induced a rise in PRL and GH levels, and a decrease in LH, cortisol and beta-endorphin. A normal endocrine response to FK 33-824 was seen in our cancer patient only, while in the other cases with tumour no hormonal changes or a paradoxical response were seen after FK 33-824. Based on the fact that an abnormal endocrine response to FK 33-824 has been described in hypothalamic-pituitary disorders, in which anomalous brain opioid activity has been demonstrated, these results suggest the existence of an altered function of the opioid system in cancer patients, the clinical importance of which remains to be determined. PMID:2963662

  19. The endogenous opioid system in cocaine addiction: what lessons have opioid peptide and receptor knockout mice taught us?

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Ji Hoon; Kitchen, Ian; Bailey, Alexis

    2012-01-01

    Cocaine addiction has become a major concern in the UK as Britain tops the European ‘league table’ for cocaine abuse. Despite its devastating health and socio-economic consequences, no effective pharmacotherapy for treating cocaine addiction is available. Identifying neurochemical changes induced by repeated drug exposure is critical not only for understanding the transition from recreational drug use towards compulsive drug abuse but also for the development of novel targets for the treatment of the disease and especially for relapse prevention. This article focuses on the effects of chronic cocaine exposure and withdrawal on each of the endogenous opioid peptides and receptors in rodent models. In addition, we review the studies that utilized opioid peptide or receptor knockout mice in order to identify and/or clarify the role of different components of the opioid system in cocaine-addictive behaviours and in cocaine-induced alterations of brain neurochemistry. The review of these studies indicates a region-specific activation of the µ-opioid receptor system following chronic cocaine exposure, which may contribute towards the rewarding effect of the drug and possibly towards cocaine craving during withdrawal followed by relapse. Cocaine also causes a region-specific activation of the κ-opioid receptor/dynorphin system, which may antagonize the rewarding effect of the drug, and at the same time, contribute to the stress-inducing properties of the drug and the triggering of relapse. These conclusions have important implications for the development of effective pharmacotherapy for the treatment of cocaine addiction and the prevention of relapse. PMID:22428846

  20. Molecular characterization of opioid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, A.D.

    1986-01-01

    The aim of this research was to purify and characterize active opioid receptors and elucidate molecular aspects of opioid receptor heterogeneity. Purification to apparent homogeneity of an opioid binding protein from bovine caudate was achieved by solubilization in the non-ionic detergent, digitonin, followed by sequential chromatography on the opiate affinity matrix, ..beta..-naltrexylethylenediamine-CH-Sepharose 4B, and on the lectine affinity matrix, wheat germ agglutinin-agarose. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS-PAGE) followed by autoradiography revealed that radioiodinated purified receptor gave a single band. Purified receptor preparations showed a specific activity of 12,000-15,000 fmol of opiate bound per mg of protein. Radioiodinated human beta-endorphin (/sup 125/I-beta-end/sub H/) was used as a probe to investigate the ligand binding subunits of mu and delta opioid receptors. /sup 125/I-beta-end/sub H/ was shown to bind to a variety of opioid receptor-containing tissues with high affinity and specificity with preference for mu and delta sites, and with little, if any, binding to kappa sites. Affinity crosslinking techniques were employed to covalently link /sup 125/I-beta-end/sub H/ to opioid receptors, utilizing derivatives of bis-succinimidyl esters that are bifunctional crosslinkers with specificities for amino and sulfhydryl groups. This, and competition experiments with high type-selective ligands, permitted the assignment of two labeled peptides to their receptor types, namely a peptide of M/sub r/ = 65,000 for mu receptors and one of M/sub r/ = 53,000 for delta receptors.

  1. Adaptations in the mesoaccumbens dopamine system resulting from repeated administration of dopamine D1 and D2 receptor-selective agonists: relevance to cocaine sensitization.

    PubMed

    Henry, D J; Hu, X T; White, F J

    1998-11-01

    The mesoaccumbens dopamine (DA) system is intricately involved in sensitization to the locomotor stimulant effects of cocaine. Among the adaptations implicated in cocaine sensitization are transient subsensitivity of impulse-regulating DA D2 autoreceptors on ventral tegmental area (VTA) DA neurons leading to hyperactivity of the mesoaccumbens DA pathway, and persistently enhanced DA D1 receptor responses of nucleus accumbens (NAc) neurons. We have tested the hypothesis that both of these adaptations are necessary to produce cocaine sensitization. We injected rats twice daily for 2 weeks with the selective DA D1 class receptor agonist SKF 38393, the DA D2 class receptor agonist quinpirole, or both. We then used single-cell recording procedures to determine possible alterations in VTA DA autoreceptor sensitivity and NAc D1 receptor sensitivity at three withdrawal times: 1 day, 1 week and 1 month. We also tested whether these treatments produced cross-sensitization to cocaine at each withdrawal time. Repeated quinpirole treatment produced a reduction in VTA autoreceptor sensitivity and cross-sensitization to cocaine, but these effects lasted for less than 1 week. Repeated SKF 38393 treatment produced enhanced NAc D1 responses which lasted for 1 week and cross-sensitization to cocaine which was only evident after 1 week of withdrawal. Repeated treatment with the combination of the two agonists transiently down-regulated autoreceptor sensitivity, enhanced and prolonged D1 receptor supersensitivity (lasting 1 month), and produced enduring cross-sensitization to cocaine. These results suggest that neuroadaptations within both the VTA and NAc may be necessary for the induction of enduring cocaine sensitization. PMID:9860115

  2. Synthetic opioids and arrhythmia risk: a new paradigm?

    PubMed

    Schuller, Joseph L; Krantz, Mori J

    2012-09-01

    The most commonly prescribed class of medications in the United States for chronic severe pain is opioid analgesics. Due to their low cost and widespread availability, the synthetic opioids are popular choices among clinicians and patients. However, there is an increasingly recognized risk of QT prolongation with several drugs in this class, and recently propoxyphene (Darvon) was withdrawn from the market by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) due to, in part, the risk of QT prolongation and ventricular arrhythmias Updated Epidemiological Review of Propoxyphene Safety. [FDA Alert]. Rockville, MD: U.S. Food and Drug Administration; 2010. Available from: http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/DrugSafety/PostmarketDrugSafetyInformationforPatientsandProviders/UCM234383.pdf on 5 May 2012 . PMID:22770657

  3. Selective review and commentary on emerging pharmacotherapies for opioid addiction.

    PubMed

    Ling, Walter; Mooney, Larissa; Zhao, Min; Nielsen, Suzanne; Torrington, Matthew; Miotto, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Pharmacotherapies for opioid addiction under active development in the US include lofexidine (primarily for managing withdrawal symptoms) and Probuphine®, a distinctive mode of delivering buprenorphine for six months, thus relieving patients, clinicians, and regulatory personnel from most concerns about diversion, misuse, and unintended exposure in children. In addition, two recently approved formulations of previously proven medications are in early phases of implementation. The sublingual film form of buprenorphine + naloxone (Suboxone®) provides a less divertible, more quickly administered, more child-proof version than the buprenorphine + naloxone sublingual tablet. The injectable depot form of naltrexone (Vivitrol®) ensures consistent opioid receptor blockade for one month between administrations, removing concerns about medication compliance. The clinical implications of these developments have attracted increasing attention from clinicians and policymakers in the US and around the world, especially given that human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and other infectious diseases are recognized as companions to opioid addiction, commanding more efforts to reduce opioid addiction. While research and practice improvement efforts continue, reluctance to adopt new medications and procedures can be expected, especially considerations in the regulatory process and in the course of implementation. Best practices and improved outcomes will ultimately emerge from continued development efforts that reflect input from many quarters. PMID:24474855

  4. Regulation of plasma motilin by opioids in the dog.

    PubMed

    Poitras, P; Boivin, M; Lahaie, R G; Trudel, L

    1989-07-01

    In the first part of this study, we compared the effects of morphine and trimebutine, two opioid receptor agonists, on small intestinal motility and plasma motilin in dogs. Morphine (100 micrograms/kg iv for 10 min) induced first a typical vomiting myoelectric profile followed subsequently by a migrating electrical activity mimicking phase III of the migrating myoelectric complex; trimebutine (5 mg/kg iv for 10 min) initiated only a migrating phase III-like activity. Despite their different initial contractile effects, both agents induced a significant and similar rise in plasma motilin that preceded the beginning of the premature phase III. In the second portion of the study, naloxone, an opioid receptor antagonist, was infused to verify the influence of endogenous opiates on plasma motilin and on the migrating motor complex. Naloxone (2 mg/kg, then 0.5 mg.kg-1.h-1 iv) delayed significantly the cyclic recurrence of plasma motilin peak increases and of the phase IIIs. In some animals, where naloxone abolished the phase IIIs, the amplitude of the motilin peak increases was significantly diminished. These results suggest 1) that opioid administration increases plasma levels of motilin by a mechanism that is independent of the intestinal contractile activity, and 2) that endogenous opioids could be physiological inducers of plasma motilin increases in the conscious dog. PMID:2546442

  5. Repeated administration of phytocannabinoid Δ(9)-THC or synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073 induces tolerance to hypothermia but not locomotor suppression in mice, and reduces CB1 receptor expression and function in a brain region-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Tai, S; Hyatt, W S; Gu, C; Franks, L N; Vasiljevik, T; Brents, L K; Prather, P L; Fantegrossi, W E

    2015-12-01

    These studies probed the relationship between intrinsic efficacy and tolerance/cross-tolerance between ∆(9)-THC and synthetic cannabinoid drugs of abuse (SCBs) by examining in vivo effects and cellular changes concomitant with their repeated administration in mice. Dose-effect relationships for hypothermic effects were determined in order to confirm that SCBs JWH-018 and JWH-073 are higher efficacy agonists than ∆(9)-THC in mice. Separate groups of mice were treated with saline, sub-maximal hypothermic doses of JWH-018 or JWH-073 (3.0mg/kg or 10.0mg/kg, respectively) or a maximally hypothermic dose of 30.0mg/kg ∆(9)-THC once per day for 5 consecutive days while core temperature and locomotor activity were monitored via biotelemetry. Repeated administration of all drugs resulted in tolerance to hypothermic effects, but not locomotor effects, and this tolerance was still evident 14 days after the last drug administration. Further studies treated mice with 30.0mg/kg ∆(9)-THC once per day for 4 days, then tested with SCBs on day 5. Mice with a ∆(9)-THC history were cross-tolerant to both SCBs, and this cross-tolerance also persisted 14 days after testing. Select brain regions from chronically treated mice were examined for changes in CB1 receptor expression and function. Expression and function of hypothalamic CB1Rs were reduced in mice receiving chronic drugs, but cortical CB1R expression and function were not altered. Collectively, these data demonstrate that repeated ∆(9)-THC, JWH-018 and JWH-073 can induce long-lasting tolerance to some in vivo effects, which is likely mediated by region-specific downregulation and desensitization of CB1Rs. PMID:26361728

  6. Sensitization to the behavioural effects of cocaine: alterations in tyrosine hydroxylase or endogenous opioid mRNAs are not necessarily involved.

    PubMed

    Alvarez Fischer, D; Schäfer, M K; Ferger, B; Gross, S; Westermann, R; Weihe, E; Kuschinsky, K

    2001-03-01

    After repeated administration of cocaine at intervals, sensitization phenomena can be observed, so that its behavioural effects are enhanced. Since this phenomenon is long-lasting, it was of interest to study which persistent alterations in the activity of dopaminergic neurones or of endogenous opioid systems downstream of dopaminergic synapses in the basal ganglia are involved in the sensitization. Cocaine (10 mg/kg i.p.) was administered to rats on days 1, 3, 5 and 7 and saline on days 2, 4 and 6 ("repeated cocaine"), or saline was injected on days 1-6 and cocaine on day 7 ("acute cocaine"), or saline was injected on days 1-7 ("saline group"). The "repeated cocaine" schedule led to a significant sensitization to the locomotor activation produced by cocaine on day 7 or on day 17, 10 days after the end of sensitization protocol. Microdialysis in the nucleus accumbens which was performed after administration of cocaine (10 mg/kg i.p.) on day 7, or after an administration of the same dose 10 days after the last administration of cocaine, respectively, revealed significant acute increases of extracellular dopamine to about 200% of basal values. These increases were similar in "acute cocaine" and in "repeated cocaine" animals both after 7 days and after 17 days. For in situ hybridization studies, rats were sacrificed on day 7, 4.5 h after the last cocaine or saline administration. The mRNA for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in substantia nigra + ventral tegmental area was significantly elevated to about 140% of saline controls both in the "repeated cocaine" and the "acute cocaine" group as compared with the "saline group". In contrast, there were no differences between the three groups in the mRNAs of preprodynorphin or preproenkephalin levels measured in the nucleus accumbens (core and shell). These results suggest that sensitization phenomena to cocaine are not necessarily connected with alterations in the dopaminergic activity in the mesolimbic system or in the

  7. Toward a systematic approach to opioid rotation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Howard S; Peppin, John F

    2014-01-01

    Patients requiring chronic opioid therapy may not respond to or tolerate the first opioid prescribed to them, necessitating rotation to another opioid. They may also require dose increases for a number of reasons, including worsening disease and increased pain. Dose escalation to restore analgesia using the primary opioid may lead to increased adverse events. In these patients, rotation to a different opioid at a lower-than-equivalent dose may be sufficient to maintain adequate tolerability and analgesia. In published trials and case series, opioid rotation is performed either using a predetermined substitute opioid with fixed conversion methods, or in a manner that appears to be no more systematic than trial and error. In clinical practice, opioid rotation must be performed with consideration of individual patient characteristics, comorbidities (eg, concurrent psychiatric, pulmonary, renal, or hepatic illness), and concurrent medications, using flexible dosing protocols that take into account incomplete opioid cross-tolerance. References cited in this review were identified via a search of PubMed covering all English language publications up to May 21, 2013 pertaining to opioid rotation, excluding narrative reviews, letters, and expert opinion. The search yielded a total of 129 articles, 92 of which were judged to provide relevant information and subsequently included in this review. Through a review of this literature and from the authors’ empiric experience, this review provides practical information on performing opioid rotation in clinical practice. PMID:25378948

  8. An exploration of opioid medication management for non-malignant pain in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Foell, Jens

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to explore how prescription of opioid medication for chronic non-malignant pain (CNMP) is managed in primary care. We used audit as a research tool, and one general practitioner (GP) practice in West London acted as an exemplar. Of the practice population with CNMP, 1% had repeat prescription of at least 12 months duration for opioid analgesics at the time of data collection. These 1% are on highly controlled opioids. Our study showed the following: (1) long-term opioid prescription appears to follow a fluctuating course as opposed to staying the same; (2) we found that medication reviews were done in most cases (85.7%), but the quality of the process is difficult to assess and ascertain; and (3) we identified two incidences where opioid contract was implemented. In both cases, contracts were used as a last chance warning for patients who were already problematic, suggesting that opioid contracts served as a disciplinary tool rather than a preventative measure. Our findings highlight a need for a more structured and specific review of analgesic medication, and a need for a simple and effective way to identify patients at high risk of developing problematic use, to ensure better monitoring and early presentations. PMID:26516575

  9. Repeating thermocouple

    SciTech Connect

    Falk, R. A.

    1985-06-04

    Disclosed herein is a repeating use thermocouple assembly and method of making the same in which a cavity adjacent the tip of the thermocouple is filled with a thermosetting foundry sand and baked in place to provide support for the thermocouple tube without causing stresses during use which could cause breakage of the thermocouple tube.

  10. Role of the mu opioid receptor in opioid modulation of immune function

    PubMed Central

    Ninković, Jana; Roy, Sabita

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Endogenous opioids are synthesized in vivo in order to modulate pain mechanisms and inflammatory pathways. Endogenous and exogenous opioids mediate analgesia in response to painful stimuli by binding to opioid receptors on neuronal cells. However, wide distribution of opioid receptors on tissues and organ systems outside the CNS, such as the cells of the immune system, indicate that opioids are capable of exerting additional effects in the periphery, such as immunomodulation. The increased prevalence of infections in opioid abusers based epidemiological studies further highlights the immunosuppressive effects of opioids. In spite of their many debilitating side effects, prescription opioids remain a gold standard for treatment of chronic pain. Therefore, given the prevalence of opioid use and abuse, opioid mediated immune suppression presents a serious concern in our society today. It is imperative to understand the mechanisms by which exogenous opioids modulate immune processes. In this review we will discuss the role of opioid receptors and their ligands in mediating immune suppressive functions. We will summarize recent studies on direct and indirect opioid modulation of the cells of the immune system as well as the role of opioids in exacerbation of certain disease states. PMID:22170499

  11. Using behavioral economics to predict opioid use during prescription opioid dependence treatment

    PubMed Central

    Worley, Matthew J.; Shoptaw, Steven J.; Bickel, Warren K.; Ling, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Background Research grounded in behavioral economics has previously linked addictive behavior to disrupted decision-making and reward-processing, but these principles have not been examined in prescription opioid addiction, which is currently a major public health problem. This study examined whether pre-treatment drug reinforcement value predicted opioid use during outpatient treatment of prescription opioid addiction. Methods Secondary analyses examined participants with prescription opioid dependence who received 12 weeks of buprenorphine-naloxone and counseling in a multi-site clinical trial (N = 353). Baseline measures assessed opioid source and indices of drug reinforcement value, including the total amount and proportion of income spent on drugs. Weekly urine drug screens measured opioid use. Results Obtaining opioids from doctors was associated with lower pre-treatment drug spending, while obtaining opioids from dealers/patients was associated with greater spending. Controlling for demographics, opioid use history, and opioid source frequency, patients who spent a greater total amount (OR = 1.30, p < .001) and a greater proportion of their income on drugs (OR = 1.31, p < .001) were more likely to use opioids during treatment. Conclusions Individual differences in drug reinforcement value, as indicated by pre-treatment allocation of economic resources to drugs, reflects propensity for continued opioid use during treatment among individuals with prescription opioid addiction. Future studies should examine disrupted decision-making and reward-processing in prescription opioid users more directly and test whether reinforcer pathology can be remediated in this population. PMID:25622776

  12. Management of opioid-induced constipation.

    PubMed

    Prichard, David; Norton, Christine; Bharucha, Adil E

    Up to 40% of patients taking opioids develop constipation. Opioid-induced constipation (OIC) may limit the adequate dosing of opioids for pain relief and reduce quality of life. Health professionals must therefore inquire about bowel function in patients receiving opioids. The management of OIC includes carefully re-evaluating the necessity, type and dose of opioids at each visit. Lifestyle modification and alteration of aggravating factors, the use of simple laxatives and, when essential, the addition of newer laxatives or opioid antagonists (naloxone, naloxegol or methylnaltrexone) can be used to treat OIC. This review discusses the recent literature regarding the management of OIC and provides a rational approach to assessing and managing constipation in individuals receiving opioids. PMID:27231750

  13. Current State of Opioid Therapy and Abuse.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Kaye, Adam M; Kaye, Alan D

    2016-05-01

    Currently, there is growing tension between the twin challenges of opioid therapy for chronic pain and adverse consequences of abuse, leading to multiple complications including respiratory failure and death. The recent data from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have shown continued escalation of prescription opioid use with opioid overdose deaths topping all previous estimations. Numerous policy initiatives, advisories, and guidelines have been advanced through the years to control the opioid epidemic. The strategies to prevent opioid abuse and to maintain opioid therapy when medically necessary fall into primary and secondary prevention categories. The primary prevention category is extremely crucial, since it involves education of primary care providers and patients at the starting point of opioid therapy. The education of surgeons and other prescribers is as crucial as the education of primary care physicians. PMID:27048483

  14. Prescription opioid abuse: Problems and responses.

    PubMed

    Compton, Wilson M; Boyle, Maureen; Wargo, Eric

    2015-11-01

    Prescription opioid abuse and addiction, along with consequences such as overdose death and increasing transition to heroin use, constitute a devastating public health problem in the United States. Increasingly it is clear that overprescription of these medications over the past two decades has been a major upstream driver of the opioid abuse epidemic. This commentary considers the factors that have led to overprescription of opioids by clinicians, discusses recent evidence casting doubt on the efficacy of opioids for treating chronic pain, and describes the ongoing efforts by federal and community stakeholders to address this epidemic-for example, supporting prescription drug monitoring programs and improved clinician training in pain management to help reduce the supply of opioids, increasing dissemination of evidence-based primary prevention programs to reduce demand for opioids, and expanding access to effective opioid agonist therapies and antagonist medications for both treatment and overdose prevention. PMID:25871819

  15. Medication-assisted treatment for opioid addiction: methadone and buprenorphine.

    PubMed

    Saxon, Andrew J; Hser, Yih-Ing; Woody, George; Ling, Walter

    2013-12-01

    Among agents for treatment of opioid addiction, methadone is a full mu-opioid receptor agonist, whereas buprenorphine is a partial agonist. Both are long-acting. Buprenorphine has a superior safety profile. Methadone is formulated for oral administration and buprenorphine for sublingual administration. A subdermal buprenorphine implant with a 6-month duration of action is being considered for approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Both medications reduce mortality rates and improve other outcomes. Data from a recent randomized controlled comparison of both medications (N = 1269) show better treatment retention with methadone but reduced illicit opioid use early in treatment with buprenorphine. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk behaviors were measured using the Risk Behavior Survey at baseline, 12 weeks, and 24 weeks for study completers. In the 30 days prior to treatment entry, 14.4% of the completers randomized to treatment with buprenorphine (n = 340) and 14.1% of the completers randomized to methadone treatment (n = 391) shared needles. The percent sharing needles decreased to 2.4% for buprenorphine and 4.8 for methadone in the 30 days prior to Week 24 (p < 0.0001). In the 30 days prior to treatment entry, 6.8% of the completers randomized to buprenorphine and 8.2% of the completers randomized to methadone had multiple sexual partners, with only 5.2% and 5.1%, respectively, reporting multiple partners at Week 24 (p < 0.04). PMID:24436573

  16. Co-occurring prescription opioid use problems and posttraumatic stress disorder symptom severity

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Andrea; Lambert-Harris, Chantal; McGovern, Mark P.; Xie, Haiyi; An, Melissa; McLeman, Bethany

    2016-01-01

    Background Prescription opioids are the most rapidly growing category of abused substances, and result in significant morbidity, mortality and healthcare costs. Co-occurring with psychiatric disorders, persons with prescription opioid problems have negative treatment outcomes. Data are needed on the prevalence of co-occurring prescription opioid abuse and specific disorders, such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), to better inform clinical practice. Objective: To determine prevalence rates of current co-occurring prescription opioid use problems and PTSD symptom severity among patients in community addiction treatment settings. Methods We abstracted administrative and chart information on 573 new admissions to three addictive treatment agencies during 2011. Systematic data were collected on PTSD symptoms, substance use, and patient demographics. Results Prescription opioid use was significantly associated with co-occurring PTSD symptom severity (OR: 1.42, p < 0.05). Use of prescription opioids in combination with sedatives (OR: 3.81, p < 0.01) or cocaine (OR: 2.24, p < 0.001) also were associated with PTSD severity. The odds of having co-occurring PTSD symptoms and prescription opioid use problem were nearly three times greater among females versus males (OR: 2.63, p < 0.001). Younger patients (18–34 years old) also were at higher risk (OR: 1.86, p < 0.01). Conclusions Prescription opioid use problems are a risk factor for co-occurring PTSD symptom severity. Being female or younger increase the likelihood of this co-morbidity. Further research is needed to confirm these finding, particularly using more rigorous diagnostic procedures. These data suggest that patients with prescription opioid use problems should be carefully evaluated for PTSD symptoms. PMID:24809229

  17. The role of naloxegol in the management of opioid-induced bowel dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Leppert, Wojciech; Woron, Jaroslaw

    2016-09-01

    Opioid-induced constipation (OIC) and other gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms of opioid-induced bowel dysfunction (OIBD) significantly deteriorate patients' quality of life and may lead to noncompliance with opioid schedule and undertreatment of pain. Although traditional oral laxatives are the first-line treatment of OIC, they do not address OIBD pathophysiology, and display numerous adverse effects. OIC treatment includes prokinetics (lubiprostone), opioid switch, and changing route of opioid administration. Targeted management of OIBD comprises the use of purely peripherally acting μ-opioid receptor antagonists (PAMORA): naloxegol and methylnaltrexone. Naloxegol (NKTR-118) is a polymer conjugate of the opioid antagonist naloxone. The polyethylene glycol limits naloxegol capacity to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Naloxegol is substrate for the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) transporter. The central nervous system penetration of naloxegol is negligible due to reduced permeability and its increased efflux across the BBB, related to P-gp transporter. Naloxegol antagonizes μ- and κ-opioid receptors and displays low affinity to δ-opioid receptors in the GI tract, thereby decreasing OIBD symptoms without reversing central analgesic effects. Naloxegol is metabolised through CYP3A4 to six metabolites, with the majority of the dose (68%) excreted with faeces and less (16%) with urine. The dose of naloxegol equals 25 mg administered orally once daily on a fasting condition. Mild or moderate hepatic impairment has no impact on naloxegol dosing; naloxegol was not studied and is not recommended in patients with hepatic failure. Dose reduction (12.5 mg once daily) and caution is recommended in patients with moderate-to-severe renal impairment. Efficacy (bowel movement in 42-49% of patients not responsive to laxatives) and safety of naloxegol were confirmed in studies conducted in patients with OIC and nonmalignant pain. Naloxegol may be useful for cancer patients with OIC

  18. Clinical care for opioid-using pregnant and postpartum women: the role of obstetric providers.

    PubMed

    Jones, Hendrée E; Deppen, Krisanna; Hudak, Mark L; Leffert, Lisa; McClelland, Carol; Sahin, Leyla; Starer, Jacquelyn; Terplan, Mishka; Thorp, John M; Walsh, James; Creanga, Andreea A

    2014-04-01

    We review clinical care issues that are related to illicit and therapeutic opioid use among pregnant women and women in the postpartum period and outline the major responsibilities of obstetrics providers who care for these patients during the antepartum, intrapartum, and postpartum periods. Selected patient treatment issues are highlighted, and case examples are provided. Securing a strong rapport and trust with these patients is crucial for success in delivering high-quality obstetric care and in coordinating services with other specialists as needed. Obstetrics providers have an ethical obligation to screen, assess, and provide brief interventions and referral to specialized treatment for patients with drug use disorders. Opioid-dependent pregnant women often can be treated effectively with methadone or buprenorphine. These medications are classified as pregnancy category C medications by the Food and Drug Administration, and their use in the treatment of opioid-dependent pregnant patients should not be considered "off-label." Except in rare special circumstances, medication-assisted withdrawal during pregnancy should be discouraged because of a high relapse rate. Acute pain management in this population deserves special consideration because patients who use opioids can be hypersensitive to pain and because the use of mixed opioid-agonist/antagonists can precipitate opioid withdrawal. In the absence of other indications, pregnant women who use opioids do not require more intense medical care than other pregnant patients to ensure adequate treatment and the best possible outcomes. Together with specialists in pain and addiction medicine, obstetricians can coordinate comprehensive care for pregnant women who use opioids and women who use opioids in the postpartum period. PMID:24120973

  19. SCOPE of Pain: An Evaluation of an Opioid Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy Continuing Education Program

    PubMed Central

    Zisblatt, Lara; Ng, Pamela; Hayes, Sean M.; Peloquin, Sophie; Hardesty, Ilana; White, Julie L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Due to the high prevalence of prescription opioid misuse, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) mandated a Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) requiring manufacturers of extended-release/long-acting (ER/LA) opioid analgesics to fund continuing education based on a FDA Blueprint. This article describes the Safe and Competent Opioid Prescribing Education (SCOPE of Pain) program, an ER/LA opioid analgesic REMS program, and its impact on clinician knowledge, confidence, attitudes, and self-reported clinical practice. Method. Participants of the 3-h SCOPE of Pain training completed pre-, immediate post- and 2-month post-assessments. Subjects. The primary target group (n = 2,850), and a subset (n = 476) who completed a 2-month post-assessment, consisted of clinicians licensed to prescribe ER/LA opioid analgesics, who care for patients with chronic pain and who completed the 3-h training between February 28, 2013 and June 13, 2014. Results. Immediately post-program, there was a significant increase in correct responses to knowledge questions (60% to 84%, P ≤ 0.02) and 87% of participants planned to make practice changes. At 2-months post-program, there continued to be a significant increase in correct responses to knowledge questions (60% to 69%, P ≤ 0.03) and 67% reported increased confidence in applying safe opioid prescribing care and 86% reported implementing practice changes. There was also an improvement in alignment of desired attitudes toward safe opioid prescribing. Conclusions. The SCOPE of Pain program improved knowledge, attitudes, confidence, and self-reported clinical practice in safe opioid prescribing. This national REMS program holds potential to improve the safe use of opioids for the treatment of chronic pain. PMID:26304703

  20. Opioid receptors mediate direct predictive fear learning: Evidence from one-trial blocking

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Sindy; McNally, Gavan P.

    2007-01-01

    Pavlovian fear learning depends on predictive error, so that fear learning occurs when the actual outcome of a conditioning trial exceeds the expected outcome. Previous research has shown that opioid receptors, including μ-opioid receptors in the ventrolateral quadrant of the midbrain periaqueductal gray (vlPAG), mediate such predictive fear learning. Four experiments reported here used a within-subject one-trial blocking design to study whether opioid receptors mediate a direct or indirect action of predictive error on Pavlovian association formation. In Stage I, rats were trained to fear conditioned stimulus (CS) A by pairing it with shock. In Stage II, CSA and CSB were co-presented once and co-terminated with shock. Two novel stimuli, CSC and CSD, were also co-presented once and co-terminated with shock in Stage II. The results showed one-trial blocking of fear learning (Experiment 1) as well as one-trial unblocking of fear learning when Stage II training employed a higher intensity footshock than was used in Stage I (Experiment 2). Systemic administrations of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (Experiment 3) or intra-vlPAG administrations of the selective μ-opioid receptor antagonist CTAP (Experiment 4) prior to Stage II training prevented one-trial blocking. These results show that opioid receptors mediate the direct actions of predictive error on Pavlovian association formation. PMID:17404385

  1. Growth In Buprenorphine Waivers For Physicians Increased Potential Access To Opioid Agonist Treatment, 2002-11.

    PubMed

    Dick, Andrew W; Pacula, Rosalie L; Gordon, Adam J; Sorbero, Mark; Burns, Rachel M; Leslie, Douglas; Stein, Bradley D

    2015-06-01

    Opioid use disorders are a significant public health problem, affecting two million people in the United States. Treatment with buprenorphine, methadone, or both is predominantly offered in methadone clinics, yet many people do not receive the treatment they need. In 2002 the Food and Drug Administration approved buprenorphine for prescription by physicians who completed a course and received a waiver from the Drug Enforcement Administration, exempting them from requirements in the Controlled Substances Act. To determine the waiver program's impact on the availability of opioid agonist treatment, we analyzed data for the period 2002-11 to identify counties with opioid treatment shortages. We found that the percentage of counties with a shortage of waivered physicians fell sharply, from 98.9 percent in 2002 to 46.8 percent in 2011. As a result, the percentage of the US population residing in what we classified as opioid treatment shortage counties declined from 48.6 percent in 2002 to 10.4 percent in 2011. These findings suggest that the increase in waivered physicians has dramatically increased potential access to opioid agonist treatment. Policy makers should focus their efforts on further increasing the number and geographical distribution of physicians, particularly in more rural counties, where prescription opioid misuse is rapidly growing. PMID:26056209

  2. DEVELOPMENT AND IN VITRO CHARACTERIZATION OF A NOVEL BIFUNCTIONAL MU-AGONIST/DELTA-ANTAGONIST OPIOID TETRAPEPTIDE

    PubMed Central

    Purington, Lauren C.; Sobczyk-Kojiro, Katarzyna; Pogozheva, Irina D.; Traynor, John R.; Mosberg, Henry I.

    2011-01-01

    The development of tolerance to and dependence on opioid analgesics greatly reduces their long-term usefulness. Previous studies have demonstrated that co-administration of a mu opioid receptor (MOR) agonist and delta opioid receptor (DOR) antagonist can decrease MOR agonist induced tolerance and dependence development after chronic exposure. Clinically, a single ligand displaying multiple efficacies (e.g. MOR agonism concurrently with DOR antagonism) would be of increased value over two drugs administered simultaneously. Guided by modeling of receptor-ligand complexes we have developed a series of potent non-selective opioid tetrapeptides that have differing efficacy at MOR and DOR. In particular, our lead peptide (KSK-103) binds with equal affinity to MOR and DOR but acts as a MOR agonist with similar efficacy but greater potency than morphine and a DOR antagonist in cellular assays measuring both G protein stimulation and adenylyl cyclase inhibition. PMID:21958158

  3. Opioids and rat erythrocyte deformability.

    PubMed

    Rhoads, D L; Wei, L X; Lin, E T; Rezvani, A; Way, E L

    1986-01-01

    In previous studies from this laboratory, it was noted that opioids in vitro reduced human red blood cell deformability. The effect was found to be dose-dependent, naloxone reversible and preferentially selective kappa ligands exhibited the highest potency. To extend these findings studies were carried out using rat erythrocytes. The time required for erythrocytes to pass through a 5.0 um pore membrane was determined and used as an index of deformability. Opioids added in vitro produced inhibition of deformability in a dose-dependent, naloxone reversible manner. Injecting naive animals with morphine or nalbuphine also produced dose related reductions in red cell deformability. The degree of inhibition produced by nalbuphine correlated well with its plasma concentrations as measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Chronic morphine treatment by pellet implantation resulted in the development of tolerance as evidenced by a loss in the ability of morphine in vitro to inhibit red cell deformability. Addition of naloxone resulted in a decrease in filtration time. Thus, the data confirm and extend previous findings on human red blood cells. In as much as previous data from this laboratory demonstrated that opioids inhibit calcium flux from erythrocytes by inhibiting calcium-ATPase and calcium efflux is necessary for normal deformability, it is concluded that opioids act to reduce red cell deformability by inhibition of the calcium pump. PMID:3123933

  4. Reduced striatal dopamine transporter density associated with working memory deficits in opioid-dependent male subjects: a SPECT study.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chih-Sung; Ho, Pei-Shen; Yen, Che-Hung; Yeh, Yi-Wei; Kuo, Shin-Chang; Huang, Chang-Chih; Chen, Chun-Yen; Shih, Mei-Chen; Ma, Kuo-Hsing; Huang, San-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Research on the effects of repeated opioid use on striatal dopamine transporters has yielded inconsistent results, possibly confounded by a history of methamphetamine or methadone exposure in opioid-dependent individuals. Previous studies have shown that striatal dopamine transporter density is positively correlated with the cognitive performance of healthy volunteers. This study aimed to investigate changes in striatal dopamine transporter density and their functional significance in opioid-dependent individuals. Single-photon emission computed tomography with [(99m) Tc]TRODAT-1 as a ligand was used to measure striatal dopamine transporter levels in 20 opioid-dependent individuals and 20 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Opioid-dependent individuals had no history of methamphetamine or methadone use. The Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) was performed to assess neurocognitive function. We found that compared with healthy controls, opioid-dependent individuals showed a significant reduction in striatal dopamine transporter density. They also showed poorer performance on the WCST in terms of the trials administered, total errors, perseverative responses, perseverative errors, and non-perseverative errors. Striatal dopamine transporter levels negatively correlated with non-perseverative errors not only in opioid-dependent individuals but also in healthy controls. These findings suggest that in human, repeated opioid exposure reduces striatal dopamine transporter density, which can be associated with non-perseverative errors. Non-perseverative errors may be one of the more sensitive parameters in WCST to identify working memory deficits associated with striatal dopamine transporter reduction. Moreover, we suggest that whether opioid-associated neurotoxicity is reversible depends on the brain region. PMID:25439653

  5. Oral administration of Lactococcus lactis-expressing heat shock protein 65 and tandemly repeated IA2P2 prevents type 1 diabetes in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kun-Feng; Liu, Xiao-Rui; Li, Guo-Liang; Lu, Shi-Ping; Jin, Liang; Wu, Jie

    2016-06-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by the destruction of insulin-secreting β cells upon autoreactive T cell attack. Oral administration of autoantigens is an attractive approach to treating T1DM, but an effective carrier should be used in order to protect antigens. Lactococcus lactis, a safe engineering strain, was used for this task in the present study. Two recombinant L. lactis expressing protein HSP65-6IA2P2 were used and be investigated the effects and mechanisms against T1DM in NOD mice. Our findings demonstrate that recombinant L. lactis strains can successfully both deliver antigens to intestinal mucosa and maintain the epitopes for a long time in NOD mice. Oral administration of recombinant L. lactis could prevent hyperglycemia, improve glucose tolerance, and reduce insulitis by inhibiting antigen-specific proliferation of T cells, augmenting regulatory immune reactions, and balancing ratios of Th17/Tregs and Th1/Th2. These results prove that orally administrated L. lactis expressing HSP65-6IA2P2 is an effective approach for the prevention of T1DM in NOD mice. PMID:27085380

  6. Equianalgesic dose ratios for opioids. a critical review and proposals for long-term dosing.

    PubMed

    Pereira, J; Lawlor, P; Vigano, A; Dorgan, M; Bruera, E

    2001-08-01

    Clinicians involved in the opioid pharmacotherapy of cancer-related pain should be acquainted with a variety of opioids and be skilled in the selection of doses when the type of opioid or route of administration needs changing. The optimal dose should avoid under-dosing or overdosing, both associated with negative outcomes for the patient. Although equianalgesic dose tables are generally used to determine the new doses in these circumstances, the evidence to support the ratios indicated in these tables largely refers to the context of single dose administration. The applicability of these ratios to the setting of chronic opioid administration has been questioned. A systematic search of published literature from 1966 to September 1999 was conducted to critically appraise the emerging evidence on equianalgesic dose ratios derived from studies of chronic opioid administration. There were six major findings: 1) there exists a general paucity of data related to long-term dosing and studies are heterogeneous in nature; 2) the ratios exhibit extremely wide ranges; 3) methadone is more potent than previously appreciated; 4) the ratios related to methadone are highly correlated with the dose of the previous opioid; 5) the ratio may change according to the direction the opioid switch; and 6) discrepancies exist with respect to both oxycodone and fentanyl. Overall, these findings have important clinical implications for clinicians and warrant consideration in the potential revision of current tables. The complexity of the clinical context in which many switches occur must be recognized and also appreciated in the design of future studies. PMID:11495714

  7. Opioid receptors in the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Holzer, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Opium is arguably one of the oldest herbal medicines, being used as analgesic, sedative and antidiarrheal drug for thousands of years. These effects mirror the actions of the endogenous opioid system and are mediated by the principal μ-, κ- and δ-opioid receptors. In the gut, met-enkephalin, leu-enkephalin, β-endorphin and dynorphin occur in both neurons and endocrine cells. When released, opioid peptides activate opioid receptors on the enteric circuitry controlling motility and secretion. As a result, inhibition of gastric emptying, increase in sphincter tone, induction of stationary motor patterns and blockade of peristalsis ensue. Together with inhibition of ion and fluid secretion, these effects cause constipation, one of the most frequent and troublesome adverse reactions of opioid analgesic therapy. Although laxatives are most frequently used to ameliorate opioid-induced bowel dysfunction, their efficacy is unsatisfactory. Specific antagonism of peripheral opioid receptors is a more rational approach. This goal is addressed by the use of opioid receptor antagonists with limited absorption such as oral prolonged-release naloxone and opioid receptor antagonists that do not penetrate the blood-brain barrier such as methylnaltrexone and alvimopan. Preliminary evidence indicates that peripherally restricted opioid receptor antagonists may act as prokinetic drugs in their own right. PMID:19345246

  8. Peripartum pain management in opioid dependent women

    PubMed Central

    Höflich, Anna S.; Langer, Martin; Jagsch, Reinhold; Bäwert, Andjela; Winklbaur, Bernadette; Fischer, Gabriele; Unger, Annemarie

    2011-01-01

    Increased pain sensitivity and the development of opioid tolerance complicate the treatment of pain experienced by opioid maintained pregnant women during delivery and the perinatal period. The aim of the present study was to investigate differences in pain management of opioid maintained compared to non-dependent pregnant women during delivery and the postpartum period. 40 deliveries of 37 opioid dependent women enrolled in a double-blind, double-dummy randomized controlled trial (RCT) examining the safety and efficacy of methadone (mean dose at the time of delivery = 63.89 mg) and buprenorphine (mean dose at the time of delivery = 14.05 mg) during pregnancy were analyzed and participants were matched to a non-dependent comparison group of 80 pregnant women. Differences in pain management (opioid and non-opioid analgesic medication) during delivery and perinatal period were analyzed. Following cesarean delivery opioid maintained women received significantly less opioid analgesics (day of delivery p = 0.038; day 1: p = 0.02), NSAIDs were administered more frequently to opioid dependent patients than to the comparison group during cesarean section and on the third day postpartum. Significantly higher nicotine consumption in the group of opioid dependent women had a strong influence on the retrieved results, and might be considered as an independent factor of altered pain experience. Differences in pain treatment became evident when comparing opioid maintained women to healthy controls. These differences might be based on psychosocial consequences of opioid addiction along with the lack of an interdisciplinary consensus on pain treatment protocols for opioid dependent patients. PMID:22396085

  9. Will abuse-deterrent formulations of opioid analgesics be successful in achieving their purpose?

    PubMed

    Bannwarth, Bernard

    2012-09-10

    During the last 2 decades, there has been a dramatic increase in the use of strong opioids for chronic non-cancer pain. This increase has been accompanied by a steep increase in abuse, misuse, and both fatal and non-fatal overdoses involving prescription opioids. The situation is already alarming in the US. Prescription opioid-related harm is a complex, multifactorial issue that requires a multifaceted solution. In this respect, formulations of opioid analgesics designed to resist or deter abuse may be a useful component of a comprehensive opioid risk minimization programme. Such formulations have or are being developed. Abuse-resistant opioids include those that use some kind of physical barrier to prevent tampering with the formulation. Abuse-deterrent opioids are not necessarily resistant to tampering, but contain substances that are designed to make the formulation less attractive to abusers. This article focuses on two products intended to deter abuse that were reviewed by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The first (Embeda®) consists of extended-release morphine with sequestered naltrexone, an opioid antagonist that is released if the tablet is compromised by chewing or crushing. Although Embeda® exhibited abuse-deterrent features, its label warns that it can be abused in a manner similar to other opioid agonists. Furthermore, tampering with Embeda® will result in the release of naltrexone, which may precipitate withdrawal in opioid-tolerant individuals. In March 2011, all dosage forms of Embeda® were recalled because the product failed to meet routine stability standards, and its return date to the market is currently unknown. The second product (Acurox®) was intended to be both tamper resistant and abuse deterrent. It consisted of an immediate-release oxycodone tablet with subtherapeutic niacin as an aversive agent and used a gel-forming ingredient designed to inhibit inhalation and prevent extraction of the drug for injection. The new drug

  10. "Weak" opioid analgesics. Codeine, dihydrocodeine and tramadol: no less risky than morphine.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    So-called weak opioid analgesics are often used to treat severe pain, or when paracetamol or a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) proves inadequate. But are weak opioids any more effective than paracetamol or NSAIDs on nociceptive pain, and are they better tolerated than morphine? To answer these questions, we conducted a review of literature using the standard Prescrire methodology. The potency of codeine and tramadol is strongly influenced by the cytochrome P450 isoenzyme CYP2D6 genotype, which varies widely from one person to another. This explains reports of overdosing or underdosing after administration of standard doses of the two drugs. The potency of morphine and that of buprenorphine, an opioid receptor agonist-antagonist, appears to be independent of CYP2D6 activity. All "weak" opioids can have the same dose-dependent adverse effects as morphine. There is no evidence that, at equivalent analgesic efficacy, weak opioids carry a lower risk of addiction than low-dose morphine. Respiratory depression can occur in ultrarapid metabolisers after brief exposure to standard doses of codeine or tramadol. Similar cases have been reported with dihydrocodeine in patients with renal failure. In addition, tramadol can cause a serotonin syndrome, hypoglycaemia, hyponatraemia and seizures. Several trials have compared different weak opioids in patients with post-operative pain. A single dose of a weak opioid, possibly combined with paracetamol, has greater analgesic efficacy than paracetamol alone but is not more effective than an NSAID alone. There is a dearth of evidence on weak opioids in patients with chronic pain. Available trials fail to show that a weak opioid has markedly superior analgesic efficacy to paracetamol or an NSAID. Sublingual buprenorphine at analgesic doses appears less likely to cause respiratory depression, but it seems to have weak analgesic efficacy. In practice, when opioid therapy is needed, there is no evidence that codeine

  11. Population pharmacokinetics of teduglutide following repeated subcutaneous administrations in healthy participants and in patients with short bowel syndrome and Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Marier, Jean-Francois; Mouksassi, Mohamad-Samer; Gosselin, Nathalie H; Beliveau, Martin; Cyran, Jane; Wallens, John

    2010-01-01

    Teduglutide is a GLP-2 analog currently evaluated for the treatment of short bowel syndrome, Crohn's disease, and other gastrointestinal disorders. The population pharmacokinetics (PK) of teduglutide were assessed following daily subcutaneous (SC) administrations of 2.5 to 80 mg doses in a total of 256 patients. A 1-compartment model with a site-specific rate constant of absorption in the abdomen, arm, and thigh was used to assess the PK of teduglutide. Apparent clearance (CL/F) of teduglutide in male participants was approximately 18% higher than that observed in female participants (12.4 vs 10.5 L/h, respectively). Body weight was detected as a significant covariate explaining the volume of distribution of teduglutide. The elimination half-life (t((1/2))) of teduglutide was also influenced by the body weight of participants. For a male patient weighing 50 and 90 kg, t((1/2)) of teduglutide was 0.897 and 2.99 hours, respectively. Renal and hepatic function of patients did not affect the PK of teduglutide. As a result, no dose adjustment was deemed necessary in patients with altered renal or liver function. The population PK model will help to support adequate drug labeling following SC administrations in patients and determine whether an individualized dosage is required. PMID:19773525

  12. Repeated administration of almonds increases brain acetylcholine levels and enhances memory function in healthy rats while attenuates memory deficits in animal model of amnesia.

    PubMed

    Batool, Zehra; Sadir, Sadia; Liaquat, Laraib; Tabassum, Saiqa; Madiha, Syeda; Rafiq, Sahar; Tariq, Sumayya; Batool, Tuba Sharf; Saleem, Sadia; Naqvi, Fizza; Perveen, Tahira; Haider, Saida

    2016-01-01

    Dietary nutrients may play a vital role in protecting the brain from age-related memory dysfunction and neurodegenerative diseases. Tree nuts including almonds have shown potential to combat age-associated brain dysfunction. These nuts are an important source of essential nutrients, such as tocopherol, folate, mono- and poly-unsaturated fatty acids, and polyphenols. These components have shown promise as possible dietary supplements to prevent or delay the onset of age-associated cognitive dysfunction. This study investigated possible protective potential of almond against scopolamine induced amnesia in rats. The present study also investigated a role of acetylcholine in almond induced memory enhancement. Rats in test group were orally administrated with almond suspension (400 mg/kg/day) for four weeks. Both control and almond-treated rats were then divided into saline and scopolamine injected groups. Rats in the scopolamine group were injected with scopolamine (0.5 mg/kg) five minutes before the start of each memory test. Memory was assessed by elevated plus maze (EPM), Morris water maze (MWM) and novel object recognition (NOR) task. Cholinergic function was determined in terms of hippocampal and frontal cortical acetylcholine content and acetylcholinesterase activity. Results of the present study suggest that almond administration for 28 days significantly improved memory retention. This memory enhancing effect of almond was also observed in scopolamine induced amnesia model. Present study also suggests a role of acetylcholine in the attenuation of scopolamine induced amnesia by almond. PMID:26548495

  13. Effects of mu- and kappa-2 opioid receptor agonists on pain and rearing behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Neubert, John K; Rossi, Heather L; Pogar, Jonathan; Jenkins, Alan C; Caudle, Robert M

    2007-01-01

    Background Management of pain involves a balance between inhibition of pain and minimization of side effects; therefore, in developing new analgesic compounds, one must consider the effects of treatment on both pain processing and behavior. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of the mu and kappa-2 opioid receptor agonists on general and pain behavioral outcomes. Methods As a general behavioral assessment, we modified the cylinder rearing assay and recorded the number and duration of rearing events. Thermal sensitivity was evaluated using either a reflexive measure of hindpaw withdrawal latency to a radiant heat source or using an orofacial operant thermal assay. Acetic acid-induced visceral pain and capsaicin-induced neurogenic inflammatory pain were used as painful stimuli. The mu-opioid receptor agonist, morphine or the kappa-2 receptor agonist GR89696 was administered 30 min prior to testing. A general linear model repeated measures analysis was completed for baseline session comparisons and an analysis of variance was used to evaluate the effects of treatment on each outcome measure (SPSS Inc). When significant differences were found, post-hoc comparisons were made using the Tukey honestly significant difference test. *P < 0.05 was considered significant in all instances. Results We found that morphine and GR89,696 dose-dependently decreased the number of reaching events and rearing duration. Rearing behavior was not affected at 0.5 mg/kg for morphine, 1.25 × 10-4 mg/kg for GR89,696. Hindpaw thermal sensitivity was significantly increased only at the highest doses for each drug. At the highest dose that did not significantly influence rearing behavior, we found that visceral and neurogenic inflammatory pain was not affected following GR89,696 administration and morphine was only partially effective for blocking visceral pain. Conclusion This study demonstrated that high levels of the opioids produced significant untoward effects and made

  14. Strategies to Reduce the Tampering and Subsequent Abuse of Long-acting Opioids: Potential Risks and Benefits of Formulations With Physical or Pharmacologic Deterrents to Tampering

    PubMed Central

    Stanos, Steven P.; Bruckenthal, Patricia; Barkin, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Increased prescribing of opioid analgesics for chronic noncancer pain may reflect acceptance that opioid benefits outweigh risks of adverse events for a broadening array of indications and patient populations; however, a parallel increase in the abuse, misuse, and diversion of prescription opioids has resulted. There is an urgent need to reduce opioid tampering and subsequent abuse without creating barriers to safe, effective analgesia. Similar to the “magic bullet” concept of antibiotic development (kill the bacteria without harming the patient), the idea behind reformulating opioid analgesics is to make them more difficult to tamper with and abuse by drug abusers but innocuous to the compliant patient. As antibiotics exploit differences in bacterial and human physiology, tamper-resistant formulations depend on differences in the way drug abusers and compliant patients consume opioids. Most opioid abusers tamper with tablets to facilitate oral, intranasal, or intravenous administration, whereas compliant patients usually take intact tablets. Pharmaceutical strategies to deter opioid abuse predominantly focus on tablet tampering, incorporating physical barriers (eg, crush resistance) or embedded chemicals that render tampered tablets inert, unusable, or noxious. Deterring tampering and abuse of intact tablets is more challenging. At present, only a few formulations with characteristics designed to oppose tampering for abuse have received approval by the US Food and Drug Administration, and none has been permitted to include claims of abuse deterrence or tamper resistance in their labeling. This review discusses the potential benefits, risks, and limitations associated with available tamper-resistant opioids and those in development. PMID:22766088

  15. Strategies to reduce the tampering and subsequent abuse of long-acting opioids: potential risks and benefits of formulations with physical or pharmacologic deterrents to tampering.

    PubMed

    Stanos, Steven P; Bruckenthal, Patricia; Barkin, Robert L

    2012-07-01

    Increased prescribing of opioid analgesics for chronic noncancer pain may reflect acceptance that opioid benefits outweigh risks of adverse events for a broadening array of indications and patient populations; however, a parallel increase in the abuse, misuse, and diversion of prescription opioids has resulted. There is an urgent need to reduce opioid tampering and subsequent abuse without creating barriers to safe, effective analgesia. Similar to the "magic bullet" concept of antibiotic development (kill the bacteria without harming the patient), the idea behind reformulating opioid analgesics is to make them more difficult to tamper with and abuse by drug abusers but innocuous to the compliant patient. As antibiotics exploit differences in bacterial and human physiology, tamper-resistant formulations depend on differences in the way drug abusers and compliant patients consume opioids. Most opioid abusers tamper with tablets to facilitate oral, intranasal, or intravenous administration, whereas compliant patients usually take intact tablets. Pharmaceutical strategies to deter opioid abuse predominantly focus on tablet tampering, incorporating physical barriers (eg, crush resistance) or embedded chemicals that render tampered tablets inert, unusable, or noxious. Deterring tampering and abuse of intact tablets is more challenging. At present, only a few formulations with characteristics designed to oppose tampering for abuse have received approval by the US Food and Drug Administration, and none has been permitted to include claims of abuse deterrence or tamper resistance in their labeling. This review discusses the potential benefits, risks, and limitations associated with available tamper-resistant opioids and those in development. PMID:22766088

  16. Repeated stress exposure causes strain-dependent shifts in the behavioral economics of cocaine in rats.

    PubMed

    Groblewski, Peter A; Zietz, Chad; Willuhn, Ingo; Phillips, Paul E M; Chavkin, Charles

    2015-03-01

    Cocaine-experienced Wistar and Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats received four daily repeated forced swim stress sessions (R-FSS), each of which preceded 4-hour cocaine self-administration sessions. Twenty-four hours after the last swim stress, cocaine valuation was assessed during a single-session threshold procedure. Prior exposure to R-FSS significantly altered cocaine responding in Wistar, but not WKY, rats. Behavioral economic analysis of responding revealed that the Wistar rats that had received R-FSS exhibited an increase in the maximum price that they were willing to pay for cocaine (Pmax ). Pre-treatment with the long-lasting kappa opioid receptor (KOR) antagonist norbinaltorphimine prevented the stress-induced increase in Pmax . Thus, R-FSS exposure had strain-dependent effects on cocaine responding during the threshold procedure, and the stress effects on cocaine valuation exhibited by Wistar, but not WKY, required intact KOR signaling. PMID:24919534

  17. Repeated stress exposure causes strain-dependent shifts in the behavioral economics of cocaine in rats

    PubMed Central

    Groblewski, Peter A.; Zietz, Chad; Willuhn, Ingo; Phillips, Paul E. M.; Chavkin, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine-experienced Wistar and Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats received four daily repeated forced swim stress sessions (R-FSS), each of which preceded 4-hour cocaine self-administration sessions. Twenty-four hours after the last swim stress, cocaine valuation was assessed during a single-session threshold procedure. Prior exposure to R-FSS significantly altered cocaine responding in Wistar, but not WKY, rats. Behavioral economic analysis of responding revealed that the Wistar rats that had received R-FSS exhibited an increase in the maximum price that they were willing to pay for cocaine (Pmax). Pre-treatment with the long-lasting kappa opioid receptor (KOR) antagonist norbinaltorphimine prevented the stress-induced increase in Pmax. Thus, R-FSS exposure had strain-dependent effects on cocaine responding during the threshold procedure, and the stress effects on cocaine valuation exhibited by Wistar, but not WKY, required intact KOR signaling. PMID:24919534

  18. 42 CFR 8.34 - Court review of final administrative action; exhaustion of administrative remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CERTIFICATION OF OPIOID TREATMENT PROGRAMS Procedures for... Withdrawal of Approval of an Accreditation Body § 8.34 Court review of final administrative...

  19. 42 CFR 8.34 - Court review of final administrative action; exhaustion of administrative remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CERTIFICATION OF OPIOID TREATMENT PROGRAMS Procedures for... Withdrawal of Approval of an Accreditation Body § 8.34 Court review of final administrative...

  20. Use of Naloxone by Emergency Medical Services during Opioid Drug Overdose Resuscitation Efforts.

    PubMed

    Sumner, Steven Allan; Mercado-Crespo, Melissa C; Spelke, M Bridget; Paulozzi, Leonard; Sugerman, David E; Hillis, Susan D; Stanley, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Naloxone administration is an important component of resuscitation attempts by emergency medical services (EMS) for opioid drug overdoses. However, EMS providers must first recognize the possibility of opioid overdose in clinical encounters. As part of a public health response to an outbreak of opioid overdoses in Rhode Island, we examined missed opportunities for naloxone administration and factors potentially influencing EMS providers' decision to administer naloxone. We reviewed medical examiner files on all individuals who died of an opioid-related drug overdose in Rhode Island from January 1, 2012 through March 31, 2014, underwent attempted resuscitation by EMS providers, and had records available to assess for naloxone administration. We evaluated whether these individuals received naloxone as part of their resuscitation efforts and compared patient and scene characteristics of those who received naloxone to those who did not receive naloxone via chi-square, t-test, and logistic regression analyses. One hundred and twenty-four individuals who underwent attempted EMS resuscitation died due to opioid overdose. Naloxone was administered during EMS resuscitation attempts in 82 (66.1%) of cases. Females were nearly three-fold as likely not to receive naloxone as males (OR 2.9; 95% CI 1.2-7.0; p-value 0.02). Additionally, patients without signs of potential drug abuse also had a greater than three-fold odds of not receiving naloxone (OR 3.3; 95% CI 1.2-9.2; p-value 0.02). Older individuals, particularly those over age 50, were more likely not to receive naloxone than victims younger than age 30 (OR 4.8; 95% CI 1.3-17.4; p-value 0.02). Women, older individuals, and those patients without clear signs of illicit drug abuse, were less likely to receive naloxone in EMS resuscitation attempts. Heightened clinical suspicion for opioid overdose is important given the recent increase in overdoses among patients due to prescription opioids. PMID:26383533

  1. Clinical and forensic signs related to opioids abuse.

    PubMed

    Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo Jorge; Carvalho, Felix; Moreira, Roxana; Duarte, Jose Alberto; Proenca, Jorge Brandao; Santos, Agostinho; Magalhaes, Teresa

    2012-12-01

    For a good performance in Clinical and Forensic Toxicology it is important to be aware of the biological and non-biological signs and symptoms related to xenobiotic exposure. This manuscript highlights and analyzes clinical and forensic imaging related to opioids abuse critically. Particularly, respiratory depression, track marks and hemorrhages, skin "popping", practices of phlebotomy, tissue necrosis and ulceration, dermatitis, tongue hyperpigmentation, "coma blisters", intra-arterial administration, candidiasis, wounds associated with anthrax or clostridium contaminated heroin, desomorphine related lesions and characteristic non-biological evidences are some commonly reported findings in opioids abuse, which will be discussed. For this purpose, clinical and forensic cases from our database (National Institute of Legal Medicine and Forensic Sciences, North Branch, Portugal), in addition to literature data, are reviewed. PMID:23170787

  2. Role of the informed consent, from mesotherapy to opioid therapy.

    PubMed

    Mammucari, M; Lazzari, M; Maggiori, E; Gafforio, P; Tufaro, G; Baffini, S; Maggiori, S; Palombo, E; de Meo, B; Sabato, A F

    2014-01-01

    Informed consent is part of a process of communication useful to obtain an agreement (conscious, voluntary and free) between doctors and patients. Mesotherapy is based on the introduction of drugs by intradermal route in order to obtain a dose-sparing effect with respect to deeper administration. Opioids are the most appropriate therapy for patients who do not respond to other therapies. Proper communication between doctor and patient, including an explanation of the potential benefits, limitations and risks (even mild), is recommended both in clinical practice and research. Active participation of the patient has the advantage of better control of adverse events, both of mesotherapy and opioid-based therapy. This information-education process returns to the fundamental concept of "first do no harm" and set a "therapeutic partnership" with patients. PMID:24615182

  3. Oxycodone with an opioid receptor antagonist: A review.

    PubMed

    Davis, Mellar P; Goforth, Harold W

    2016-01-01

    The rationale for putting opioid antagonists with an agonist is to improve pain control, to reduce side effects, and/or to reduce abuse. The combination of prolonged release (PR) oxycodone and naloxone reduces constipation as demonstrated in multiple studies and has been designated a tamper-resistant opioid by the Food and Drug Administration. Bioequivalence of the combination product compared with PR oxycodone has not been established. Several of the pivotal studies provided suboptimal laxative support in the control arm of the randomized trials. Two noninferiority trials have demonstrated equivalent analgesia between PR oxycodone and the combination product at doses of less than 120 mg of oxycodone per day. There appears to be an analgesic ceiling above 80-120 mg of oxycodone per day. Safety monitoring during randomized trials was not been well described in published manuscripts. Benefits appear to be better for those with chronic noncancer pain compared with individuals with cancer when constipation was the primary outcome. PMID:26908305

  4. Fewer Injured Workers Getting Opioid Prescriptions in Some States

    MedlinePlus

    ... opioids in the 25 states in the study. Simultaneous use of opioids and sedating medications called benzodiazepines ... 1 percent to 9 percent of injured workers. Simultaneous use of opioids and muscle relaxants occurred among ...

  5. [Opioid receptors and their selective ligands].

    PubMed

    Piestrzeniewicz, Mariola Katarzyna; Fichna, Jakub; Michna, Jakub; Janecka, Anna

    2006-01-01

    Opioid receptors (micro, delta, and kappa) belong to a large family of G protein-coupled receptors and play an important physiological role. Stimulation of these receptors triggers analgesic effects and affects the function of gastrointestinal tract. The discovery of opioid peptides, which are endogenous ligands of opioid receptors, including delta-selective enkephalins, kappa-selective dynorphins, and micro-selective endomorphins, initiated their structure-activity relationship studies. For the last 30 years, hundreds of analogs of opioid peptides have been synthesized in an effort to obtain the compounds more active, selective, and resistant to biodegradation than the endogenous ligands. Different unnatural amino acids, as well as cyclisation procedures, leading to conformationaly restricted analogs, were employed. All these modifications resulted in obtaining very selective agonists and antagonists with high affinity at micro-, dlta-, and kappa-opioid receptors, which are extremely useful tools in further studies on the pharmacology of opioid receptors in a mammalian organism. PMID:17201067

  6. Renal mu opioid receptor mechanisms in regulation of renal function in rats.

    PubMed

    Kapusta, D R; Jones, S Y; DiBona, G F

    1991-07-01

    Studies were performed in pentobarbital anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats to determine whether mu opioid receptor agonists produce changes in renal function via intrarenal mechanisms. Left renal artery infusion of isotonic saline vehicle or the selective mu opioid receptor agonist, dermorphin (0.5 nmol/kg/min), did not alter mean arterial pressure or heart rate. In contrast, left renal artery dermorphin administration produced a significant decrease in left kidney urinary flow rate and sodium excretion without altering glomerular filtration rate or effective renal plasma flow; function of the right kidney was unaffected. Pretreatment of the left kidney with the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone, 50 micrograms/kg into left renal artery, prevented changes in urinary flow rate and sodium excretion induced by subsequent left renal artery dermorphin administration. Prior bilateral renal denervation abolished the antidiuretic and antinatriuretic responses to left renal artery dermorphin administration. These results suggest that mu opioid receptor agonists participate in the process of renal tubular sodium and water reabsorption via an intrarenal action that is dependent on an interaction with renal sympathetic nerves. This may occur via an action of mu opioid receptor agonists to facilitate the nerve terminal release and/or the direct tubular action of norepinephrine to affect renal tubular sodium and water reabsorption. PMID:1677034

  7. Mobile opioid agonist treatment and public funding expands treatment for disenfranchised opioid-dependent individuals.

    PubMed

    Hall, Gerod; Neighbors, Charles J; Iheoma, Jude; Dauber, Sarah; Adams, Merribeth; Culleton, Robert; Muench, Fred; Borys, Suzanne; McDonald, Rebecca; Morgenstern, Jon

    2014-04-01

    The New Jersey Medication Assisted Treatment Initiative (NJ-MATI) sought to reduce barriers to treatment by providing free, opioid agonist treatment (OAT, methadone or buprenorphine) via mobile medication units (MMUs). To evaluate barriers to OAT, logistic regression was used to compare opioid dependent patients enrolled in NJ-MATI to those entering treatment at fixed-site methadone clinics or non-medication assisted treatment (non-MAT). Client demographic and clinical data were taken from an administrative database for licensed treatment providers. The MMUs enrolled a greater proportion of African-American, homeless, and uninsured individuals than the fixed-site methadone clinics. Compared to non-MAT and traditional methadone clients, NJ-MATI patients were more likely to be injection drug users and daily users but less likely to have a recent history of treatment. These observations suggest that the patient-centered policies associated with NJ-MATI increased treatment participation by high severity, socially disenfranchised patients who were not likely to receive OAT. PMID:24468235

  8. Tetrahydroquinoline derivatives as opioid receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cunyu; Westaway, Susan M; Speake, Jason D; Bishop, Michael J; Goetz, Aaron S; Carballo, Luz Helena; Hu, Mike; Epperly, Andrea H

    2011-01-15

    Opioid receptors play an important role in both behavioral and homeostatic functions. We herein report tetrahydroquinoline derivatives as opioid receptor antagonists. SAR studies led to the identification of the potent antagonist 2v, endowed with 1.58nM (K(i)) functional activity against the μ opioid receptor. DMPK data suggest that novel tetrahydroquinoline analogs may be advantageous in peripheral applications. PMID:21193310

  9. scAAVIL-1ra dosing trial in a large animal model and validation of long-term expression with repeat administration for osteoarthritis therapy.

    PubMed

    Goodrich, L R; Grieger, J C; Phillips, J N; Khan, N; Gray, S J; McIlwraith, C W; Samulski, R J

    2015-07-01

    A gene therapeutic approach to treat osteoarthritis (OA) appears to be on the horizon for millions of people who suffer from this disease. Previously we described optimization of a scAAVIL-1ra gene therapeutic vector and initially tested this in an equine model verifying long-term intrasynovial IL-1ra protein at therapeutic levels. Using this vector, we carried out a dosing trial in six horses to verify protein levels and establish a dose that would express relevant levels of therapeutic protein for extended periods of time (8 months). A novel arthroscopic procedure used to detect green fluorescence protein (GFP) fluorescence intrasynovially confirmed successful transduction of the scAAVGFP vector in both the synovial and cartilage tissues. No evidence of intra-articular toxicity was detected. Immune responses to vector revealed development of neutralizing antibodies (Nabs) within 2 weeks of administration, which persisted for the duration of the study but did not lower protein expression intra-articularly. Re-dosing with a different serotype to attain therapeutic levels of protein confirmed establishment of successful transduction. This is the first study in an equine model to establish a dosing/redosing protocol, as well as examine the Nab response to capsid and supports further clinical investigation to determine the clinical efficacy of scAAVIL-1ra to treat OA. PMID:25902762

  10. Repeated systemic administration of the nutraceutical alpha-linolenic acid exerts neuroprotective efficacy, an antidepressant effect and improves cognitive performance when given after soman exposure.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hongna; Piermartiri, Tetsade C B; Chen, Jun; McDonough, John; Oppel, Craig; Driwech, Wafae; Winter, Kristin; McFarland, Emylee; Black, Katelyn; Figueiredo, Taiza; Grunberg, Neil; Marini, Ann M

    2015-12-01

    Exposure to nerve agents results in severe seizures or status epilepticus caused by the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase, a critical enzyme that breaks down acetylcholine to terminate neurotransmission. Prolonged seizures cause brain damage and can lead to long-term consequences. Current countermeasures are only modestly effective against the brain damage supporting interest in the evaluation of new and efficacious therapies. The nutraceutical alpha-linolenic acid (LIN) is an essential omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid that has a wide safety margin. Previous work showed that a single intravenous injection of alpha-linolenic acid (500 nmol/kg) administered before or after soman significantly protected against soman-induced brain damage when analyzed 24h after exposure. Here, we show that administration of three intravenous injections of alpha-linolenic acid over a 7 day period after soman significantly improved motor performance on the rotarod, enhanced memory retention, exerted an anti-depressant-like activity and increased animal survival. This dosing schedule significantly reduced soman-induced neuronal degeneration in four major vulnerable brain regions up to 21 days. Taken together, alpha-linolenic acid reduces the profound behavioral deficits induced by soman possibly by decreasing neuronal cell death, and increases animal survival. PMID:26386148

  11. Thienorphine is a potent long-acting partial opioid agonist: a comparative study with buprenorphine.

    PubMed

    Yu, Gang; Yue, Yong-Juan; Cui, Meng-Xun; Gong, Ze-Hui

    2006-07-01

    A strategy in the development of new treatment for opioid addiction is to find partial opioid agonists with properties of long duration of action and high oral bioavailability. In a search for such compounds, thienorphine, a novel analog of buprenorphine, was synthesized. Here, we reported that, like buprenorphine, thienorphine bound potently and nonselectively to mu-, delta-, and kappa-opioid receptors stably expressed in CHO (Chinese hamster ovary) cells and behaved as a partial agonist at mu-opioid receptor. However, some differences were observed between the pharmacological profiles of thienorphine and buprenorphine. In vitro, thienorphine was more potent than buprenorphine in inhibiting [3H]diprenorphine and stimulating guanosine 5'-O-(3-[35S]thio)triphosphate binding to rat mu-opioid receptor stably expressed in CHO cells. In vivo, thienorphine exhibited a less potent but more efficacious antinociceptive effect with an ED50 value of 0.25 mg/kg s.c. and more potent antimorphine effect with an ED50 value of 0.64 mg/kg intragastric, compared with buprenorphine. Additionally, the bioavailability of thienorphine was greatly higher than that of buprenorphine after oral administration. Moreover, compared with buprenorphine, thienorphine showed a similar long-lasting antinociceptive effect but a much longer antagonism of morphine-induced lethality (more than 15 days). These results indicate that thienorphine is a potent, long-acting partial opioid agonist with high oral bioavailability and may have possible application in treating addiction. PMID:16569757

  12. Improving the recognition and diagnosis of opioid-induced constipation in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Anita

    2015-10-01

    Opioid-induced constipation is a common side effect of opioid therapy that has been under-recognized and undertreated. With the continued increase in opioid use in the United States, along with the growth of the elderly population, more patients will develop OIC, and family physicians will encounter more patients with OIC. OIC negatively affects patient QOL, daily activity, work productivity, and psychological well-being. If not treated effectively, OIC may result in patients attempting to balance their pain relief against their constipation, by self-adjusting their opioid dose. OIC results from opioid actions at enteric opioid receptors. Although commonly prescribed for OIC, laxatives do not target the pathophysiologic mechanism of OIC and have limited efficacy. Specific, effective treatments for OIC, consisting of a subcutaneously administered PAMORA, an oral PAMORA, and an oral chloride channel activator, have been developed and have received US Food and Drug Administration approval. After recognizing the signs and symptoms of OIC to facilitate diagnosis, family physicians can initiate effective treatments in appropriate patients. PMID:26561554

  13. Autoradiographic localization of mu and delta opioid receptors in the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system

    SciTech Connect

    Dilts, R.P. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    In vitro autoradiographic techniques were coupled with selective chemical lesions of the A10 dopamine cells and intrinsic perikarya of the region to delineate the anatomical localization of mu and delta opioid receptors, as well as, neurotensin receptors. Mu opioid receptors were labeled with {sup 125}I-DAGO. Delta receptors were labeled with {sup 125}I-DPDPE. Neurotensin receptors were labeled with {sup 125}I-NT3. Unilateral lesions of the dopamine perikarya were produced by injections of 6-OHDA administered in the ventral mesencephalon. Unilateral lesions of intrinsic perikarya were induced by injections of quinolinic acid in to the A10 dopamine cell region. Unilateral lesions produced with 6-OHDA resulted in the loss of neurotensin receptors in the A10 region and within the terminal fields. Mu opioid receptors were unaffected by this treatment, but delta opioid receptors increased in the contralateral striatum and nucleus accumbens following 6-OHDA administration. Quinolinic acid produced a reduction of mu opioid receptors within the A10 region with a concomitant reduction in neurotensin receptors in both the cell body region and terminal fields. These results are consistent with a variety of biochemical and behavioral data which suggest the indirect modulation of dopamine transmission by the opioids. In contrast these results strongly indicate a direct modulation of the mesolimbic dopamine system by neurotensin.

  14. Opioid prescribing pitfalls: medicolegal and regulatory issues

    PubMed Central

    Jammal, Walid; Gown, Grace

    2015-01-01

    Summary Inappropriate opioid prescribing can lead to patient harm as well as a medicolegal risk to prescribers. Prescribers need to be familiar with the indications, contraindications and harms associated with opioids. When prescribing opioids, doctors must be aware of their clinical, ethical and legal responsibilities, particularly the legislative requirements in their state. Failure to comply with these can result in disciplinary action. To avoid potential conflict with differing state regulations on opioid prescribing, doctors should advise patients to get their prescription dispensed in the same state in which it was written. PMID:26843712

  15. Opioid receptor trafficking and interaction in nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, X; Bao, L; Li, S

    2015-01-01

    Opiate analgesics such as morphine are often used for pain therapy. However, antinociceptive tolerance and dependence may develop with long-term use of these drugs. It was found that μ-opioid receptors can interact with δ-opioid receptors, and morphine antinociceptive tolerance can be reduced by blocking δ-opioid receptors. Recent studies have shown that μ- and δ-opioid receptors are co-expressed in a considerable number of small neurons in the dorsal root ganglion. The interaction of μ-opioid receptors with δ-opioid receptors in the nociceptive afferents is facilitated by the stimulus-induced cell-surface expression of δ-opioid receptors, and contributes to morphine tolerance. Further analysis of the molecular, cellular and neural circuit mechanisms that regulate the trafficking and interaction of opioid receptors and related signalling molecules in the pain pathway would help to elucidate the mechanism of opiate analgesia and improve pain therapy. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24611685

  16. Chronic Pain and the Opioid Conundrum.

    PubMed

    Webster, Lynn R

    2016-06-01

    Opioids prescribed for chronic cancer and noncancer pain have been embroiled in public policy debates as to effectiveness and potential for contributing to society's problem with misuse, addiction, and overdose mortality. The conundrum of opioid prescribing is to determine who will most likely benefit from opioids and how medical practitioners may safely provide chronic opioid therapy, while also identifying patients who are unlikely to benefit or could divert illicit pharmaceuticals into society. Risk assessment and monitoring are essential to meet the standard of care, as is compliance with federal controlled substances law as well as state regulations. PMID:27208714

  17. Molecular Physiology of Enteric Opioid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Galligan, James J.; Akbarali, Hamid I.

    2015-01-01

    Opioid drugs have powerful antidiarrheal effects and many patients taking these drugs for chronic pain relief experience chronic constipation that can progress to opioid-induced bowel dysfunction. Three classes of opioid receptors are expressed by enteric neurons: μ-, δ-, and κ-opioid receptors (MOR, DOR, and KOR). MOR and DOR couple to inhibition of adenylate cylase and nerve terminal Ca2+ channels and activation of K+ channels. These effects reduce neuronal activity and neurotransmitter release. KOR couples to inhibition of Ca2+ channels and inhibition of neurotransmitter release. In the human gastrointestinal tract, MOR, DOR, and KOR link to inhibition of acetylcholine release from enteric interneurons and purine/nitric oxide release from inhibitory motorneurons. These actions inhibit propulsive motility. MOR and DOR also link to inhibition of submucosal secretomotor neurons, reducing active Cl− secretion and passive water movement into the colonic lumen. These effects account for the constipation caused by opioid receptor agonists. Tolerance develops to the analgesic effects of opioid receptor agonists but not to the constipating actions. This may be due to differential β-arrestin-2-dependent opioid receptor desensitization and internalization in enteric nerves in the colon compared with the small intestine and in neuronal pain pathways. Further studies of differential opioid receptor desensitization and tolerance in subsets of enteric neurons may identify new drugs or other treatment strategies of opioid-induced bowel dysfunction. PMID:25207608

  18. Molecular physiology of enteric opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Galligan, James J; Akbarali, Hamid I

    2014-09-10

    Opioid drugs have powerful antidiarrheal effects and many patients taking these drugs for chronic pain relief experience chronic constipation that can progress to opioid-induced bowel dysfunction. Three classes of opioid receptors are expressed by enteric neurons: μ-, δ-, and κ-opioid receptors (MOR, DOR, and KOR). MOR and DOR couple to inhibition of adenylate cylase and nerve terminal Ca(2+) channels and activation of K(+) channels. These effects reduce neuronal activity and neurotransmitter release. KOR couples to inhibition of Ca(2+) channels and inhibition of neurotransmitter release. In the human gastrointestinal tract, MOR, DOR, and KOR link to inhibition of acetylcholine release from enteric interneurons and purine/nitric oxide release from inhibitory motorneurons. These actions inhibit propulsive motility. MOR and DOR also link to inhibition of submucosal secretomotor neurons, reducing active Cl(-) secretion and passive water movement into the colonic lumen. These effects account for the constipation caused by opioid receptor agonists. Tolerance develops to the analgesic effects of opioid receptor agonists but not to the constipating actions. This may be due to differential β-arrestin-2-dependent opioid receptor desensitization and internalization in enteric nerves in the colon compared with the small intestine and in neuronal pain pathways. Further studies of differential opioid receptor desensitization and tolerance in subsets of enteric neurons may identify new drugs or other treatment strategies of opioid-induced bowel dysfunction. PMID:25207608

  19. Hepatic effects of repeated oral administration of diclofenac to hepatic cytochrome P450 reductase null (HRN™) and wild-type mice.

    PubMed

    Akingbasote, James A; Foster, Alison J; Wilson, Ian; Sarda, Sunil; Jones, Huw B; Kenna, J Gerry

    2016-04-01

    Hepatic NADPH-cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase null (HRN™) mice exhibit normal hepatic and extrahepatic biotransformation enzyme activities when compared to wild-type (WT) mice, but express no functional hepatic cytochrome P450 activities. When incubated in vitro with [(14)C]-diclofenac, liver microsomes from WT mice exhibited extensive biotransformation to oxidative and glucuronide metabolites and covalent binding to proteins was also observed. In contrast, whereas glucuronide conjugates and a quinone-imine metabolite were formed when [(14)C]-diclofenac was incubated with HRN™ mouse liver, only small quantities of P450-derived oxidative metabolites were produced in these samples and covalent binding to proteins was not observed. Livers from vehicle-treated HRN™ mice exhibited enhanced lipid accumulation, bile duct proliferation, hepatocellular degeneration and necrosis and inflammatory cell infiltration, which were not present in livers from WT mice. Elevated liver-derived alanine aminotransferase, glutamate dehydrogenase and alkaline phosphatase activities were also observed in plasma from HRN™ mice. When treated orally with diclofenac for 7 days, at 30 mg/kg/day, the severities of the abnormal liver histopathology and plasma liver enzyme findings in HRN™ mice were reduced markedly. Oral diclofenac administration did not alter the liver histopathology or elevate plasma enzyme activities of WT mice. These findings indicate that HRN™ mice are valuable for exploration of the role played by hepatic P450s in drug biotransformation, but poorly suited to investigations of drug-induced liver toxicity. Nevertheless, studies in HRN™ mice could provide novel insights into the role played by inflammation in liver injury and may aid the evaluation of new strategies for its treatment. PMID:25820915

  20. The toxicity and distribution of iron oxide-zinc oxide core-shell nanoparticles in C57BL/6 mice after repeated subcutaneous administration.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jun-Won; Yoon, Jung-Hee; Kang, Byeong-Cheol; Cho, Nam-Hyuk; Seok, Seung Hyeok; Min, Seung-Kee; Min, Ji Hyun; Che, Jeong-Hwan; Kim, Young Keun

    2015-06-01

    Therapeutic cancer vaccines promote immune responses by delivering tumour-specific antigens. Recently, we developed iron oxide (Fe3 O4 )-zinc oxide (ZnO) core-shell nanoparticles (CSNPs) as carriers for antigen delivery into dendritic cells (DCs), and the CSNPs were injected subcutaneously into C57BL/6 mice to examine the systemic toxicity, tissue distribution and excretion of the CSNPs. The doses injected were 0, 4, 20 and 200 mg kg(-1) weekly for 4 weeks. No significant changes were observed after the CSNPs administration with respect to mortality, clinical observations, body weight, food intake, water consumption, urinalysis, haematology, serum biochemistry,and organ weights. A dose-dependent increase in granulomatous inflammation was observed at the injection site of the CSNP-treated animals, but no other histopathological lesions in other organs could be attributed to the CSNPs. The Zn concentration, which is an indicator for CSNPs, was not significantly higher in the sampled tissues, urine, or faeces after the CSNP injection. In contrast, the Zn concentration at the subcutaneous skin of the site injected with the CSNPs increased in a dose-dependent manner, along with a macroscopic deposition of the CSNPs. The CSNP residue at the injection site resulted in a foreign body response with the appearance of macrophage infiltration, but otherwise did not show any systemic distribution or toxicity at up to 200 mg kg(-1) during this study. In conclusion, CSNPs could be used as good antigen carriers for DC-based immunotherapy, although further study is needed to completely clear the residue of the CSNPs at the injection site. PMID:25572658

  1. Overexpression of BDNF in the ventral tegmental area enhances binge cocaine self-administration in rats exposed to repeated social defeat.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junshi; Bastle, Ryan M; Bass, Caroline E; Hammer, Ronald P; Neisewander, Janet L; Nikulina, Ella M

    2016-10-01

    Stress is a major risk factor for substance abuse. Intermittent social defeat stress increases drug self-administration (SA) and elevates brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) in rats. Intra-VTA BDNF overexpression enhances social defeat stress-induced cross-sensitization to psychostimulants and induces nucleus accumbens (NAc) ΔFosB expression. Therefore, increased VTA BDNF may mimic or augment the development of drug abuse-related behavior following social stress. To test this hypothesis, adeno-associated virus (AAV) was infused into the VTA to overexpress either GFP alone (control) or GFP + BDNF. Rats were then either handled or exposed to intermittent social defeat stress before beginning cocaine SA training. The SA acquisition and maintenance phases were followed by testing on a progressive ratio (PR) schedule of cocaine reinforcement, and then during a 12-h access "binge" cocaine SA session. BDNF and ΔFosB were quantified postmortem in regions of the mesocorticolimbic circuitry using immunohistochemistry. Social defeat stress increased cocaine intake on a PR schedule, regardless of virus treatment. While stress alone increased intake during the 12-h binge session, socially-defeated rats that received VTA BDNF overexpression exhibited even greater cocaine intake compared to the GFP-stressed group. However, VTA BDNF overexpression alone did not alter binge intake. BDNF expression in the VTA was also positively correlated with total cocaine intake during binge session. VTA BDNF overexpression increased ΔFosB expression in the NAc, but not in the dorsal striatum. Here we demonstrate that VTA BDNF overexpression increases long-access cocaine intake, but only under stressful conditions. Therefore, enhanced VTA-BDNF expression may be a facilitator for stress-induced increases in drug abuse-related behavior specifically under conditions that capture compulsive-like drug intake. PMID:27154426

  2. Gene expression changes induced by ochratoxin A in renal and hepatic tissues of male F344 rat after oral repeated administration

    SciTech Connect

    Arbillaga, Leire; Vettorazzi, Ariane; Gil, Ana G; Garcia-Jalon, Jose Antonio

    2008-07-15

    Ochratoxin A (OTA), a naturally occurring mycotoxin, is nephrotoxic in all animal species tested and is considered a potent renal carcinogen, particularly in male rats. Its mechanism of toxicity is still unknown, although oxidative stress appears to be a plausible mechanism. Therefore, the objective of this study was to identify the biological pathways that are modulated in vivo by OTA in male F344 rats in order to gain further insight into its mechanism of renal toxicity. Rats were gavaged daily with OTA (500 {mu}g/kg bw) and gene expression profiles in target and non-target organs were analyzed after 7 and 21 days administration. As was expected, a time-dependent increase of OTA concentrations was found in plasma, kidney and liver, with the concentrations found in both tissues being quite similar. However, histopathological examinations only revealed changes in kidney; signs of nephrotoxicity involving single cell necrosis and karyomegalic nuclei were observed in the treated rats. The number of differentially expressed genes in kidney was much higher than in liver (541 versus 11 at both time points). Several similarities were observed with other in vivo gene expression data. However, great differences were found with previous in vitro gene expression data, with the exception of DNA damage response which was not observed at mRNA level in any of our study conditions. Down-regulation was the predominant effect. Oxidative stress response pathway and genes involved in metabolism and transport were inhibited at both time points. RGN (regucalcin) - a gene implicated in calcium homeostasis - was strongly inhibited at both time points and genes implicated in cell survival and proliferation were up-regulated at day 21. Moreover, translation factors and annexin genes were up-regulated at both time points. Apart from oxidative stress, alterations of the calcium homeostasis and cytoskeleton structure may be present at the first events of OTA toxicity.

  3. Regulation and Functional Implications of Opioid Receptor Splicing in Opioid Pharmacology and HIV Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Regan, Patrick M; Langford, Dianne; Khalili, Kamel

    2016-05-01

    Despite the identification and characterization of four opioid receptor subtypes and the genes from which they are encoded, pharmacological data does not conform to the predications of a four opioid receptor model. Instead, current studies of opioid pharmacology suggest the existence of additional receptor subtypes; however, no additional opioid receptor subtype has been identified to date. It is now understood that this discrepancy is due to the generation of multiple isoforms of opioid receptor subtypes. While several mechanisms are utilized to generate these isoforms, the primary mechanism involves alternative splicing of the pre-mRNA transcript. Extensive alternative splicing patterns for opioid receptors have since been identified and discrepancies in opioid pharmacology are now partially attributed to variable expression of these isoforms. Recent studies have been successful in characterizing the localization of these isoforms as well as their specificity in ligand binding; however, the regulation of opioid receptor splicing specificity is poorly characterized. Furthermore, the functional significance of individual receptor isoforms and the extent to which opioid- and/or HIV-mediated changes in the opioid receptor isoform profile contributes to altered opioid pharmacology or the well-known physiological role of opioids in the exacerbation of HIV neurocognitive dysfunction is unknown. As such, the current review details constitutive splicing mechanisms as well as the specific architecture of opioid receptor genes, transcripts, and receptors in order to highlight the current understanding of opioid receptor isoforms, potential mechanisms of their regulation and signaling, and their functional significance in both opioid pharmacology and HIV-associated neuropathology. PMID:26529364

  4. The influence of divalent cations on the analgesic effect of opioid and non-opioid drugs.

    PubMed

    Assi, A A

    2001-06-01

    It is generally accepted that divalent cations are involved in the nociceptive pathway. The effect of systemic co-administration of magnesium sulfate and calcium channel blockers (nifedipine, verapamil) on the analgesic effect of opioid (mixed mu/kappa: butorphanol) and non-opioid drugs (paracetamol) was investigated. Albino mice and rats were used as experimental animals. Magnesium sulfate and calcium channel blockers were given i.p., 30 min before the administration of butorphanol tartrate and paracetamol. Analgesia was measured using "hot-plate" ( 52.5( composite function)C), "tail-flick" (radiant heat source), "writhing" (acetic acid, 1%, i.p.) and "tail-clip" tests. The pain threshold was evaluated before and after the administration (i.p.) of the different agents. The effect of the combined administration of different agents on behavior, blood pressure and heart rate, was also determined. Nifedipine (5 mg kg(-1), i.p.) and verapamil (10 mg kg(-1), i.p.) potentiated the analgesic effect of butorphanol tartrate (0.25-2 mg kg(-1), i.p.) in all tests (synergism) and enhanced analgesic effect of paracetamol (50-125 mg kg(-1), i.p.), only in acetic acid writhing and tail-clip tests. Magensium sulfate (2.5 mg kg(-1), i.p.) potentiated the analgesic effect of butorphanol, but not that of paracetamol. Co-administration of nifedipine and verapamil with either of butorphanol (0.25-2 mg kg(-1)) or paracetamol (50-125 mg kg(-1), i.p.) produced no significant effects on motor coordination, motor performance, locomotor activity, long-term memory or on the blood pressure and heart rate of experimental animals. Co-administration of magnesium sulfate, however, significantly induced sedation, inhibition of locomotor activity, motor performance and coordination, as well as impairing of long-term memory, as compared with butorphanol and paracetamol, administered alone. We conclude that the systemic co-administration of calcium channel blockers potentiated the analgesic effect of

  5. Endogenous opioids: opposing stress with a cost

    PubMed Central

    Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    The stress response is characterized by the coordinated engagement of central and peripheral neural systems in response to life-threatening challenges. It has been conserved through evolution and is essential for survival. However, the frequent or continual elicitation of the stress response by repeated or chronic stress, respectively, results in the dysfunction of stress response circuits, ultimately leading to stress-related pathology. In an effort to best respond to stressors, yet at the same time maintain homeostasis and avoid dysfunction, stress response systems are finely balanced and co-regulated by neuromodulators that exert opposing effects. These opposing systems serve to restrain certain stress response systems and promote recovery. However, the engagement of opposing systems comes with the cost of alternate dysfunctions. This review describes, as an example of this dynamic, how endogenous opioids function to oppose the effects of the major stress neuromediator, corticotropin-releasing hormone, and promote recovery from a stress response and how these actions can both protect and be hazardous to health. PMID:26097731

  6. The role of opioid antagonist efficacy and constitutive opioid receptor activity in the opioid withdrawal syndrome in mice.

    PubMed

    Navani, Dipesh M; Sirohi, Sunil; Madia, Priyanka A; Yoburn, Byron C

    2011-10-01

    On the basis of efficacy, opioid antagonists are classified as inverse opioid agonists (e.g. naltrexone) or neutral opioid antagonists (e.g. 6β-naltrexol). This study examined the interaction between naltrexone and 6β-naltrexol in the precipitated opioid withdrawal syndrome in morphine dependent mice. Furthermore, the possible contribution of constitutive opioid receptor activity to precipitated withdrawal was evaluated using increasing levels of morphine dependence. In the first experiment, low doses of 6β-naltrexol antagonized naltrexone precipitated withdrawal while high doses acted additively. All doses of naltrexone increased 6β-naltrexol's potency to precipitate withdrawal. The next experiment examined changes in antagonist potency to precipitate withdrawal with increasing morphine dependence. Mice were exposed to morphine for 1-6 days and then withdrawal was precipitated. Naltrexone was more potent than 6β-naltrexol at all the time points. The ED(50) of both drugs decreased at the same rate suggesting that increased dependence produced no change in constitutive opioid receptor activity. Taken together these results indicate that the functional efficacy of 6β-naltrexol is dose-dependent and that constitutive opioid receptor activity did not change as opioid dependence increased from 1 to 6 days. PMID:21736895

  7. Role of renal nerves in excretory responses to exogenous and endogenous opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Kapusta, D R; Jones, S Y; Kopp, U C; Dibona, G F

    1989-03-01

    The present study was designed to investigate opioid peptide-mediated changes in renal function in conscious Sprague-Dawley rats after administration of the native opioid agonist methionine enkephalin (ME), its synthetic analog D-Ala2-methionine enkephalinamide (DALA) and the opioid antagonist naloxone. Intravenous infusion of DALA (25 micrograms/kg/min) and ME (75 micrograms/kg/min) produced no changes in mean arterial pressure, heart rate, glomerular filtration rate or effective renal plasma flow in rats with intact or bilaterally denervated kidneys. In contrast, i.v. infusion of these opioid agonists produced differing effects on the renal excretion of water and sodium; DALA produced an increase in urinary flow rate and sodium excretion and ME produced a decrease in these parameters. Changes in renal sympathetic nerve activity were not involved in producing these effects as supported by measurements of renal sympathetic nerve activity and the finding that prior bilateral renal denervation did not alter the renal responses to either agonist. The renal excretory responses to both DALA and ME infusion were prevented by pretreatment with the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone, thus suggesting an opioid receptor-mediated effect of both agonists. Intravenous bolus injections of naloxone alone produced a dose-dependent diuresis and natriuresis without producing changes in systemic or renal hemodynamics or renal sympathetic nerve activity. These studies, therefore, provide evidence that the administration of opioid receptor agonists and antagonists produce changes in the renal excretion of water and sodium via an action on renal tubular reabsorptive mechanisms which are independent of changes in systemic or renal hemodynamics or renal sympathetic nerve activity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2703962

  8. Synergism between dexketoprofen and meloxicam in an orofacial formalin test was not modified by opioid antagonists.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Claudia; Zegpi, Carlos; Noriega, Viviana; Prieto, Juan C; Miranda, Hugo F

    2011-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are among the most widely used drugs for the management of acute and chronic pain. The role of the opioid system in the synergism between NSAIDs is not well characterized. Mice were injected with a 5% formalin solution (20 μl) into the upper right lip to perform an orofacial formalin test. The isobolographic method was used to determine the interaction between dexketoprofen, which is the (S)-(+) enantiomer of ketoprofen, and meloxicam co-administration. Additionally, the non-selective, opioid antagonist naltrexone, the selective δ opioid receptor (DOP) antagonist naltrindole and the selective κ opioid receptor (KOP) antagonist norbinaltorphimine were used to assess the opioid effects on this interaction. Intraperitoneal administration of dexketoprofen or meloxicam induced dose-dependent antinociception with different phase I and phase II potencies in the orofacial formalin test. Meloxicam displayed similar potencies (ED(50)) in phase I (7.20 mg/kg) and phase II (8.60 mg/kg). Dexketoprofen was more potent in phase I (19.96 mg/kg) than in phase II (50.90 mg/kg). The interactions between dexketoprofen and meloxicam were synergistic in both phases. This was determined based on the fixed ratios (1:1) of their ED(50) values, which were determined by isobolographic analysis. Furthermore, this antinociceptive activity does not seem to be modulated by opioid receptor blockers because they did not induce changes in the nature of this interaction. This finding may be relevant with regards to NSAID multi-modal analgesia where an opioid antagonist must be used. PMID:21602598

  9. Buprenorphine for office-based treatment of patients with opioid addiction.

    PubMed

    Manlandro, James J

    2005-06-01

    The Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000 (DATA 2000) was established to create a new paradigm for medication-assisted treatment of opiate addiction in the United States. Before enactment of DATA 2000, the use of opioid medications to treat opioid addiction was permissible only in federally approved treatment programs, ie, methadone clinics. The only medications permitted were Schedule II drugs (eg, methadone and l-a-acetylmethadol [LAAM]), which could only be dispensed, not prescribed. Under provisions of DATA 2000, qualified physicians in a medical office and other appropriate settings outside the opioid treatment program system may prescribe or dispense (or both), Schedule III, IV, and V opioid medications for treatment of opioid addiction if such medications have been specifically approved by the the US Food and Drug Administration for that indication. Opioid addiction treatment programs were commonly known as methadone clinics. They now may also dispense buprenorphine hydrochloride and the buprenorphine hydrochloride-naloxone combination. The information in this article is extracted (with revision) from: Center for Substance Abuse Treatment. Clinical Guidelines for the Use of Buprenorphine in the Treatment of Opioid Addiction. Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series 40. DHS Publication No. (SMA) 04-3939. Rockville, Md: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration; 2004. The Clinical Guidelines document is in the public domain except for material indicated as reprinted from a copyrighted source. The author served on both the Expert Panel and the Consensus Panel that produced the guidelines, available in portable document format at http://buprenorphine.samhsa.gov/Bup%20Guidelines.pdf. PMID:16118361

  10. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reversed Morphine Tolerance and Opioid-induced Hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Hua, Zhen; Liu, LiPing; Shen, Jun; Cheng, Katherine; Liu, Aijun; Yang, Jing; Wang, Lina; Qu, Tingyu; Yang, HongNa; Li, Yan; Wu, Haiyan; Narouze, John; Yin, Yan; Cheng, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    More than 240 million opioid prescriptions are dispensed annually to treat pain in the US. The use of opioids is commonly associated with opioid tolerance (OT) and opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH), which limit efficacy and compromise safety. The dearth of effective way to prevent or treat OT and OIH is a major medical challenge. We hypothesized that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) attenuate OT and OIH in rats and mice based on the understanding that MSCs possess remarkable anti-inflammatory properties and that both OT and chronic pain are associated with neuroinflammation in the spinal cord. We found that the development of OT and OIH was effectively prevented by either intravenous or intrathecal MSC transplantation (MSC-TP), which was performed before morphine treatment. Remarkably, established OT and OIH were significantly reversed by either intravenous or intrathecal MSCs when cells were transplanted after repeated morphine injections. The animals did not show any abnormality in vital organs or functions. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the treatments significantly reduced activation level of microglia and astrocytes in the spinal cord. We have thus demonstrated that MSC-TP promises to be a potentially safe and effective way to prevent and reverse two of the major problems of opioid therapy. PMID:27554341

  11. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reversed Morphine Tolerance and Opioid-induced Hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Zhen; Liu, LiPing; Shen, Jun; Cheng, Katherine; Liu, Aijun; Yang, Jing; Wang, Lina; Qu, Tingyu; Yang, HongNa; Li, Yan; Wu, Haiyan; Narouze, John; Yin, Yan; Cheng, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    More than 240 million opioid prescriptions are dispensed annually to treat pain in the US. The use of opioids is commonly associated with opioid tolerance (OT) and opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH), which limit efficacy and compromise safety. The dearth of effective way to prevent or treat OT and OIH is a major medical challenge. We hypothesized that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) attenuate OT and OIH in rats and mice based on the understanding that MSCs possess remarkable anti-inflammatory properties and that both OT and chronic pain are associated with neuroinflammation in the spinal cord. We found that the development of OT and OIH was effectively prevented by either intravenous or intrathecal MSC transplantation (MSC-TP), which was performed before morphine treatment. Remarkably, established OT and OIH were significantly reversed by either intravenous or intrathecal MSCs when cells were transplanted after repeated morphine injections. The animals did not show any abnormality in vital organs or functions. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the treatments significantly reduced activation level of microglia and astrocytes in the spinal cord. We have thus demonstrated that MSC-TP promises to be a potentially safe and effective way to prevent and reverse two of the major problems of opioid therapy. PMID:27554341

  12. Only modest long-term opioid dose escalation occurs over time in chronic nonmalignant pain management.

    PubMed

    Chapman, C Richard; Bradshaw, David H

    2013-12-01

    Clinical experience and the literature increasingly support differentiating chronic pain associated with malignant disease from chronic pain associated with nonmalignant conditions when defining optimal pharmacotherapy. The use of opioids for chronic nonmalignant pain has grown steadily despite the lack of a strong evidence base that can guide practice. A fundamental question is whether patients develop tolerance and need repeated dose escalations to sustain pain control. We examined opioid prescribing data from United Kingdom Clinical Practice Research Datalink longitudinal database of general practice records and tracked dose changes but not pain reports in a sample of 4035 patients who received oral or transdermal-extended release opioids for chronic nonmalignant pain. The median number of days on opioid pharmacotherapy for all patients was 311. Thirty percent of patients never changed doses during the course of treatment. In patients who never changed medications, the mean morphine equivalent 24-hour dose increased from beginning to end of opioid pharmacotherapy only by 1.4 fold, t = 25.73, Cohen's d = .427 and was independent of both age and gender. Comparison across extended release morphine, oxycodone, and fentanyl revealed that it was significantly greatest for patients using fentanyl and least for those using morphine. PMID:24143927

  13. Sex differences in opioid analgesia and addiction: interactions among opioid receptors and estrogen receptors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Opioids are widely used as the pain reliever and also notorious for being addictive drugs. Sex differences in the opioid analgesia and addiction have been reported and investigated in human subjects and animal models. Yet, the molecular mechanism underlying the differences between males and females is still unclear. Here, we reviewed the literature describing the sex differences in analgesic responses and addiction liabilities to clinically relevant opioids. The reported interactions among opioids, estrogens, opioid receptors, and estrogen receptors are also evaluated. We postulate that the sex differences partly originated from the crosstalk among the estrogen and opioid receptors when stimulated by the exogenous opioids, possibly through common secondary messengers and the downstream gene transcriptional regulators. PMID:24010861

  14. Pyrrolo- and Pyridomorphinans: Non-selective opioid antagonists and delta opioid agonists/mu opioid partial agonists

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, V.; Clark, M.J.; Traynor, J.R.; Lewis, J.W.; Husbands, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    Opioid ligands have found use in a number of therapeutic areas, including for the treatment of pain and opiate addiction (using agonists) and alcohol addiction (using antagonists such as naltrexone and nalmefene). The reaction of imines, derived from the opioid ligands oxymorphone and naltrexone, with Michael acceptors leads to pyridomorphinans with structures similar to known pyrrolo- and indolomorphinans. One of the synthesized compounds, 5e, derived from oxymorphone had substantial agonist activity at delta opioid receptors but not at mu and/or kappa opioid receptors and in that sense profiled as a selective delta opioid receptor agonist. The pyridomorphinans derived from naltrexone and naloxone were all found to be non-selective potent antagonists and as such could have utility as treatments for alcohol abuse. PMID:24973818

  15. Pyrrolo- and pyridomorphinans: non-selective opioid antagonists and delta opioid agonists/mu opioid partial agonists.

    PubMed

    Kumar, V; Clark, M J; Traynor, J R; Lewis, J W; Husbands, S M

    2014-08-01

    Opioid ligands have found use in a number of therapeutic areas, including for the treatment of pain and opiate addiction (using agonists) and alcohol addiction (using antagonists such as naltrexone and nalmefene). The reaction of imines, derived from the opioid ligands oxymorphone and naltrexone, with Michael acceptors leads to pyridomorphinans with structures similar to known pyrrolo- and indolomorphinans. One of the synthesized compounds, 5e, derived from oxymorphone had substantial agonist activity at delta opioid receptors but not at mu and/or kappa opioid receptors and in that sense profiled as a selective delta opioid receptor agonist. The pyridomorphinans derived from naltrexone and naloxone were all found to be non-selective potent antagonists and as such could have utility as treatments for alcohol abuse. PMID:24973818

  16. Selectively Promiscuous Opioid Ligands: Discovery of High Affinity/Low Efficacy Opioid Ligands with Substantial Nociceptin Opioid Peptide Receptor Affinity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Emerging clinical and preclinical evidence suggests that a compound displaying high affinity for μ, κ, and δ opioid (MOP, KOP, and DOP) receptors and antagonist activity at each, coupled with moderate affinity and efficacy at nociceptin opioid peptide (NOP) receptors will have utility as a relapse prevention agent for multiple types of drug abuse. Members of the orvinol family of opioid ligands have the desired affinity profile but have typically displayed substantial efficacy at MOP and or KOP receptors. In this study it is shown that a phenyl ring analogue (1d) of buprenorphine displays the desired profile in vitro with high, nonselective affinity for the MOP, KOP, and DOP receptors coupled with moderate affinity for NOP receptors. In vivo, 1d lacked any opioid agonist activity and was an antagonist of both the MOP receptor agonist morphine and the KOP receptor agonist ethylketocyclazocine, confirming the desired opioid receptor profile in vivo. PMID:24761755

  17. Opioid treatment of experimental pain activates nuclear factor-κB

    PubMed Central

    Compton, Peggy; Griffis, Charles; Breen, Elizabeth Crabb; Torrington, Matthew; Sadakane, Ryan; Tefera, Eshetu; Irwin, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the independent and combined effects of pain and opioids on the activation of an early marker of inflammation, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). Design NF-κB activation was compared within-subjects following four randomly ordered experimental sessions of opioid-only (intravenous fentanyl 1 μg/kg), pain-only (cold-pressor), opioid + pain, and a resting condition. Setting University General Clinical Research Center. Participants Twenty-one (11 female) healthy controls. Interventions Following exposure to treatment (fentanyl administration and/or cold-pressor pain), blood samples for NF-kB analysis were obtained. Main outcome measures Intracellular levels of activated NF-κB, in unstimulated and stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells at 15 and 30 minutes. Results Neither pain nor opioid administration alone effected NF-κB levels in cell populations; however, the combination of treatments induced significant increases of NF-κB in stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cell, lymphocytes, and monocytes. Conclusions The combination of acute pain with opioids, as occurs in clinical situations, activates a key transcription factor involved in proinflammatory responses. PMID:25901477

  18. [Nociceptin and the ORL1 receptor: pharmacology of a new opioid receptor].

    PubMed

    Grond, S; Meuser, T; Pietruck, C; Sablotzki, A

    2002-12-01

    Molecular biological investigations led to the discovery of the ORL1 receptor ( opioid receptor like-1 receptor) and its endogenous ligand nociceptin. Although its sequence and structure are closely related to traditional opioid receptors, the ORL1 receptor shows low binding affinities for selective opioid agonists and antagonists. On the other hand, the ORL1 ligand nociceptin does not bind to the three traditional opioid receptors. The activation of the G protein-coupled ORL1 receptor inhibits adenlylate cyclase activity, reduces the intracellular concentration of the second messenger cAMP and regulates ion channels. The supraspinal administration of nociceptin produces hyperalgesia. unlike opioids. Spinal intrathecal and peripheral administration of nociceptin causes hyperalgesia in low doses and analgesia in high doses. The physiological role and detailed mechanisms of these dose-dependent nociceptin effects in opposite directions are not yet known. In addition, nociceptin modulates other biological phenomena such as feeding, locomotion, gastrointestinal function,memory, cardiovascular function,immunity, renal function, anxiety,dependence and tolerance.Future research on the physiological and pathophysiological importance of the nociceptin/ORL1 receptor systems may provide a target for novel therapeutics. PMID:12486589

  19. Modulation of MDMA-induced behavioral and transcriptional effects by the delta opioid antagonist naltrindole in mice

    PubMed Central

    Belkaï, Emilie; Scherrmann, Jean-Michel; Noble, Florence; Marie-Claire, Cynthia

    2009-01-01

    The delta opioid system is involved in the behavioral effects of various drugs of abuse. However, only few studies have focused on the possible interactions between the opioid system and the effects of MDMA. In order to examine the possible role of the delta opioid system in MDMA-induced behaviors in mice, locomotor activity and conditioned place preference were investigated in the presence of naltrindole, a selective delta opioid antagonist. Moreover, the consequences of acute and chronic MDMA administration on Penk (pro-enkephalin) and Pomc (pro-opioimelanocortin) gene expression were assessed by quantitative real-time PCR. The results showed that, after acute MDMA administration (9mg/kg; i.p.), naltrindole (5mg/kg, s.c.) was able to totally block MDMA-induced hyperlocomotion. Penk expression gene was not modulated by acute MDMA but a decrease of Pomc gene expression was observed that was not antagonized by naltrindole. Administration of the antagonist prevented the acquisition of MDMA-induced conditioned place preference, suggesting an implication of the delta opioid receptors in this behavior. Following chronic MDMA treatment only the level of Pomc was modulated. The observed increase was totally blocked by naltrindole pretreatment. All these results confirm the interactions between the delta opioid system (receptors and peptides) and the effects of MDMA. PMID:19523041

  20. Modulation of MDMA-induced behavioral and transcriptional effects by the delta opioid antagonist naltrindole in mice.

    PubMed

    Belkaï, Emilie; Scherrmann, Jean-Michel; Noble, Florence; Marie-Claire, Cynthia

    2009-07-01

    The delta opioid system is involved in the behavioral effects of various drugs of abuse. However, only a few studies have focused on the possible interactions between the opioid system and the effects of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). In order to examine the possible role of the delta opioid system in MDMA-induced behaviors in mice, locomotor activity and conditioned place preference (CPP) were investigated in the presence of naltrindole (NTI), a selective delta opioid antagonist. Moreover, the consequences of acute and chronic MDMA administration on pro-enkephalin (Penk) and pro-opiomelanocortin (Pomc) gene expression were assessed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR). The results showed that, after acute MDMA administration (9 mg/kg; i.p.), NTI (5 mg/kg, s.c.) was able to totally block MDMA-induced hyperlocomotion. Penk gene expression was not modulated by acute MDMA, but a decrease of Pomc gene expression was observed, which was not antagonized by NTI. Administration of the antagonist prevented the acquisition of MDMA-induced CPP, suggesting an implication of the delta opioid receptors in this behavior. Following chronic MDMA treatment, only the level of Pomc was modulated. The observed increase was totally blocked by NTI pre-treatment. All these results confirm the interactions between the delta opioid system (receptors and peptides) and the effects of MDMA. PMID:19523041

  1. Does the kappa opioid receptor system contribute to pain aversion?

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, Catherine M.; Taylor, Anna M. W.; Cook, Christopher; Ong, Edmund; Morón, Jose A.; Evans, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    The kappa opioid receptor (KOR) and the endogenous peptide-ligand dynorphin have received significant attention due the involvement in mediating a variety of behavioral and neurophysiological responses, including opposing the rewarding properties of drugs of abuse including opioids. Accumulating evidence indicates this system is involved in regulating states of motivation and emotion. Acute activation of the KOR produces an increase in motivational behavior to escape a threat, however, KOR activation associated with chronic stress leads to the expression of symptoms indicative of mood disorders. It is well accepted that KOR can produce analgesia and is engaged in chronic pain states including neuropathic pain. Spinal studies have revealed KOR-induced analgesia in reversing pain hypersensitivities associated with peripheral nerve injury. While systemic administration of KOR agonists attenuates nociceptive sensory transmission, this effect appears to be a stress-induced effect as anxiolytic agents, including delta opioid receptor agonists, mitigate KOR agonist-induced analgesia. Additionally, while the role of KOR and dynorphin in driving the dysphoric and aversive components of stress and drug withdrawal has been well characterized, how this system mediates the negative emotional states associated with chronic pain is relatively unexplored. This review provides evidence that dynorphin and the KOR system contribute to the negative affective component of pain and that this receptor system likely contributes to the high comorbidity of mood disorders associated with chronic neuropathic pain. PMID:25452729

  2. Distinct roles of exogenous opioid agonists and endogenous opioid peptides in the peripheral control of neuropathy-triggered heat pain

    PubMed Central

    Labuz, Dominika; Celik, Melih Ö.; Zimmer, Andreas; Machelska, Halina

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain often results from peripheral nerve damage, which can involve immune response. Local leukocyte-derived opioid peptides or exogenous opioid agonists inhibit neuropathy-induced mechanical hypersensitivity in animal models. Since neuropathic pain can also be augmented by heat, in this study we investigated the role of opioids in the modulation of neuropathy-evoked heat hypersensitivity. We used a chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve in wild-type and opioid peptide-knockout mice, and tested opioid effects in heat and mechanical hypersensitivity using Hargreaves and von Frey tests, respectively. We found that although perineural exogenous opioid agonists, including peptidergic ligands, were effective, the endogenous opioid peptides β-endorphin, Met-enkephalin and dynorphin A did not alleviate heat hypersensitivity. Specifically, corticotropin-releasing factor, an agent triggering opioid peptide secretion from leukocytes, applied perineurally did not attenuate heat hypersensitivity in wild-type mice. Exogenous opioids, also shown to release opioid peptides via activation of leukocyte opioid receptors, were equally analgesic in wild-type and opioid peptide-knockout mice, indicating that endogenous opioids do not contribute to exogenous opioid analgesia in heat hypersensitivity. Furthermore, exogenously applied opioid peptides were ineffective as well. Conversely, opioid peptides relieved mechanical hypersensitivity. Thus, both opioid type and sensory modality may determine the outcome of neuropathic pain treatment. PMID:27605249

  3. Distinct roles of exogenous opioid agonists and endogenous opioid peptides in the peripheral control of neuropathy-triggered heat pain.

    PubMed

    Labuz, Dominika; Celik, Melih Ö; Zimmer, Andreas; Machelska, Halina

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain often results from peripheral nerve damage, which can involve immune response. Local leukocyte-derived opioid peptides or exogenous opioid agonists inhibit neuropathy-induced mechanical hypersensitivity in animal models. Since neuropathic pain can also be augmented by heat, in this study we investigated the role of opioids in the modulation of neuropathy-evoked heat hypersensitivity. We used a chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve in wild-type and opioid peptide-knockout mice, and tested opioid effects in heat and mechanical hypersensitivity using Hargreaves and von Frey tests, respectively. We found that although perineural exogenous opioid agonists, including peptidergic ligands, were effective, the endogenous opioid peptides β-endorphin, Met-enkephalin and dynorphin A did not alleviate heat hypersensitivity. Specifically, corticotropin-releasing factor, an agent triggering opioid peptide secretion from leukocytes, applied perineurally did not attenuate heat hypersensitivity in wild-type mice. Exogenous opioids, also shown to release opioid peptides via activation of leukocyte opioid receptors, were equally analgesic in wild-type and opioid peptide-knockout mice, indicating that endogenous opioids do not contribute to exogenous opioid analgesia in heat hypersensitivity. Furthermore, exogenously applied opioid peptides were ineffective as well. Conversely, opioid peptides relieved mechanical hypersensitivity. Thus, both opioid type and sensory modality may determine the outcome of neuropathic pain treatment. PMID:27605249

  4. Receptor reserve reflects differential intrinsic efficacy associated with opioid diastereomers.

    PubMed

    Carliss, Richard D S; Keefer, James F; Perschke, Scott; Welch, Sandra; Rich, Thomas C; Weissman, Arthur D

    2009-05-01

    Structure-activity relationships built around receptor binding or cell-based assays are designed to reveal physiochemical differences between ligands. We hypothesized that agonist receptor reserve may provide a unique approach to distinguish structurally-related agonists exhibiting similar functional characteristics. An intracellular calcium activation assay in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells expressing cloned human mu-opioid receptors was developed. We examined two isomers exhibiting indistinguishable receptor binding and in vitro potency profiles. Oxymorphone, a clinically-available congener of codeine has at least two active diastereomeric metabolites (6alpha- and 6beta-oxymorphols) found to be similar for mu-opioid receptor binding affinity (K(d) = 15 versus 14 nM) and calcium activation (EC(50) = 22 versus 14 nM). Calcium activation was then inhibited in CHO cells in a concentration-dependent manner using the irreversible mu-opioid receptor antagonist, beta-funaltrexamine (beta-FNA). Under these conditions, approximately 10-fold greater receptor reserve was found for 6alpha-oxymorphol compared to 6beta-oxymorphol. This difference between the oxymorphols corresponded to a rank order of intrinsic efficacy (Emax): DAMGO > oxymorphone = 6alpha-oxymorphol = oxycodone > 6beta-oxymorphol. In addition, 6alpha-oxymorphol exhibited greater relative potency than the 6beta-oxymorphol in mouse tail-flick, hot-plate and phenylquinone writhing antinociceptive assays, regardless of route of administration. Thus the beta-FNA/calcium model provides a novel, cell-based approach to distinguish structurally related mu-opioid agonists, and in the specific case of the oxymorphols, receptor reserve differences provided a means to bridge functional in vitro and in vivo models. PMID:19463265

  5. Kappa-opioid receptor signaling and brain reward function

    PubMed Central

    Bruijnzeel, Adrie W.

    2009-01-01

    The dynorphin-like peptides have profound effects on the state of the brain reward system and human and animal behavior. The dynorphin-like peptides affect locomotor activity, food intake, sexual behavior, anxiety-like behavior, and drug intake. Stimulation of kappa-opioid receptors, the endogenous receptor for the dynorphin-like peptides, inhibits dopamine release in the striatum (nucleus accumbens and caudate putamen) and induces a negative mood state in humans and animals. The administration of drugs of abuse increases the release of dopamine in the striatum and mediates the concomitant release of dynorphin-like peptides in this brain region. The reviewed studies suggest that chronic drug intake leads to an upregulation of the brain dynorphin system in the striatum and in particular in the dorsal part of the striatum/caudate putamen. This might inhibit drug-induced dopamine release and provide protection against the neurotoxic effects of high dopamine levels. After the discontinuation of chronic drug intake these neuroadaptations remain unopposed which has been suggested to contribute to the negative emotional state associated with drug withdrawal and increased drug intake. Kappa-opioid receptor agonists have also been shown to inhibit calcium channels. Calcium channel inhibitors have antidepressant-like effects and inhibit the release of norepinephrine. This might explain that in some studies kappa-opioid receptor agonists attenuate nicotine and opioid withdrawal symptomatology. A better understanding of the role of dynorphins in the regulation of brain reward function might contribute to the development of novel treatments for mood disorders and other disorders that stem from a dysregulation of the brain reward system. PMID:19804796

  6. microRNAs in opioid pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Cheol Kyu; Wagley, Yadav; Law, Ping-Yee; Wei, Li-Na; Loh, Horace H.

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA), a class of ~22-nucleotide RNA molecules, are important gene regulators that bind to the target sites of mRNAs to inhibit the gene expressions either through translational inhibition or mRNA destabilization. There are growing evidences that miRNAs have played several regulatory roles in opioid pharmacology. Like other research fields such as cancer biology, the area where numerous miRNAs are found to be involved in gene regulation, we assume that in opioid studies including research fields of drug additions and opioid receptor regulation, there may be more miRNAs waiting to be discovered. This review will summarize our current knowledge of miRNA functions on opioids biology and briefly describe future research directions of miRNAs related to opioids. PMID:22068836

  7. Cytochrome P450 epoxygenase dependence of opioid analgesia: fluconazole does not interfere with remifentanil-mediated analgesia in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Oertel, B G; Vermehren, J; Huynh, T T; Doehring, A; Ferreiros, N; Zimmermann, M; Geisslinger, G; Lötsch, J

    2014-12-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) inhibitors may reduce opioid analgesia by inhibiting CYP activity-dependent post-opioid receptor signaling pathways in the brain. This suggestion was predicated on observations of highly attenuated morphine antinociception in rodents after intracerebroventricular injection of fluconazole or carrying a neuron-specific deletion of the cytochrome P450 reductase. However, based on assessments of thermal and electrical pain tolerance, respiratory function, and side effects in 21 healthy volunteers, before and during steady-state concentrations of 1.5 and 3.0 ng/ml of remifentanil at the effect site (viz., the central nervous system), administration of 400 mg/day fluconazole for 8 days in a double-blind, placebo-controlled manner failed to attenuate opioid effects. Although CYP inhibitors such as fluconazole are unlikely to attenuate remifentanil analgesia in humans, extrapolation of the findings to other opioids is premature because differences among opioid effects, such as ligand-selective biased signaling at opioid receptors, leave the possibility that CYP-dependent opioid signaling in the brain might be limited to morphine and may not extend to remifentanil. PMID:25148377

  8. A Review of Opioid Overdose Prevention and Naloxone Prescribing: Implications for Translating Community Programming into Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Shane R.; Walley, Alexander Y.; Calcaterra, Susan L.; Glanz, Jason M.; Binswanger, Ingrid A.

    2015-01-01

    Background As physicians have increased opioid prescribing, overdose deaths from pharmaceutical opioids have substantially increased in the United States. Naloxone hydrochloride (naloxone), an opioid antagonist, is the standard of care for treatment of opioid induced respiratory depression. Since 1996, community-based programs have offered overdose prevention education and distributed naloxone for bystander administration to people who use opioids, particularly heroin. There is growing interest in translating overdose education and naloxone distribution (OEND) into conventional medical settings for patients who are prescribed pharmaceutical opioids. For this review, we summarized and classified existing publications on overdose education and naloxone distribution to identify evidence of effectiveness and opportunities for translation into conventional medical settings. Methods For this review, we searched English language PubMed for articles on naloxone based on primary data collection from humans, including feasibility studies, program evaluations, surveys, qualitative studies and studies comparing the effectiveness of different routes of naloxone administration. We also included cost-effectiveness studies. Results We identified 41 articles that represented 5 categories: evaluations of OEND programs, effects of OEND programs on experiences and attitudes of participants, willingness of medical providers to prescribe naloxone, comparisons of different routes of naloxone administration, and the cost-effectiveness of naloxone. Conclusions Existing research suggests that people who are at risk for overdose and other bystanders are willing and able to be trained to prevent overdoses and administer naloxone. Counseling patients about the risks of opioid overdose and prescribing naloxone is an emerging clinical practice which may reduce fatalities from overdose while enhancing the safe prescribing of opioids. PMID:25774771

  9. Pain pharmacology: focus on opioids

    PubMed Central

    Fornasari, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Summary The incidence of chronic pain is estimated to be 20–25% worldwide. Although major improvements in pain control have been obtained, more than 50% of the patients reports inadequate relief. It is accepted that chronic pain, if not adequately and rapidly treated, can become a disease in itself, often intractable and maybe irreversible. This is mainly due to neuroplasticity of pain pathways. In the present review I will discuss about pain depicting the rational for the principal pharmacological interventions and finally focusing on opioids, that represent a primary class of drug to treat pain. PMID:25568646

  10. Effect of daily morphine administration and its discontinuation on delay discounting of food in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Maguire, David R; Gerak, Lisa R; France, Charles P

    2016-04-01

    Opioid abusers discount delayed reinforcers more rapidly than nonusers; however, it is unclear whether chronic drug administration or its discontinuation impacts discounting. This study examined the impact of daily morphine administration and its discontinuation on delay discounting of food in rhesus monkeys. Responding on one lever delivered one food pellet immediately; responding on another lever delivered two food pellets either immediately or after a delay (30-120 s) that increased within the session. Monkeys (n=3) responded for the large reinforcer when both reinforcers were delivered immediately and more for the smaller, immediately available reinforcer as the delay to delivery of the large reinforcer increased. When administered acutely, morphine (0.032-5.6 mg/kg) increased trial omissions and had variable effects on choice, with small doses decreasing and large doses increasing choice of the large delayed reinforcer. Chronic morphine administration (0.1 mg/kg/day to 3.2 mg/kg twice daily) reduced choice of the large delayed reinforcer in two monkeys, while increasing choice in a third monkey. Despite the development of tolerance to some effects (i.e. rightward shifts in dose-effect curves for the number of trials omitted) and evidence of mild opioid dependence (e.g. decrease in the number of trials completed, as well as body weight), discontinuation of treatment did not appear to systematically impact discounting. Overall, these results suggest that repeated opioid administration causes persistent effects on choice under a delay discounting procedure; however, differences in the direction of effect among individuals suggest that factors other than, or in addition to, changes in discounting might play a role. PMID:26397762

  11. Increased Burden of Healthcare Utilization and Cost Associated with Opioid-Related Constipation Among Patients with Noncancer Pain

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Ancilla W.; Kern, David M.; Datto, Catherine; Chen, Yen-Wen; McLeskey, Charles; Tunceli, Ozgur

    2016-01-01

    Background Opioids are widely accepted as treatment for moderate to severe pain, and opioid-induced constipation is one of the most common side effects of opioids. This side effect negatively affects pain management and patients’ quality of life, which could result in increased healthcare utilization and costs. Objective To assess healthcare utilization and costs (all-cause, constipation-related, and pain-related) for individuals with and without opioid-induced constipation during the 12 months after initiation of opioid therapy for noncancer pain. Methods This retrospective cohort study was conducted using administrative claims data from HealthCore Integrated Research Environment between January 1, 2006, and June 30, 2014. The analysis was limited to patients aged ≥18 years who filled a prescription for continuous opioid treatment (≥28 days) for noncancer pain. Propensity scores were used to match opioid users with constipation (cohort 1) and opioid users without constipation (cohort 2), using a 1:1 ratio. Generalized linear models were used to estimate all-cause, constipation-related, and pain-related healthcare utilization and costs during the 12 months after the initiation of opioid therapy. Results After matching and balancing for all prespecified variables, 17,384 patients were retained in each cohort (mean age, 56 years; 63% female). Opioid users with constipation were twice as likely as those without constipation to have ≥1 inpatient hospitalizations (odds ratio, 2.28; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.17–2.39) during the 12 months. The total mean adjusted overall costs per patient during the study period were $12,413 higher for patients with constipation versus those without it (95% CI, $11,726–$13,116). The total mean adjusted overall pain-related costs per patient were $6778 (95% CI, $6293–$7279) higher for the patients with constipation than those without. Among patients using opioids for noncancer pain, the annual mean constipation

  12. Denial of urinalysis-confirmed opioid use in prescription opioid dependence

    PubMed Central

    Hilario, E. Yvette; Griffin, Margaret L.; McHugh, R. Kathryn; McDermott, Katherine A.; Connery, Hilary S.; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M.; Weiss, Roger D.

    2014-01-01

    Although research has generally supported the validity of substance use self-reports, some patients deny urine-verified substance use. We examined the prevalence and patterns of denying urinalysis-confirmed opioid use in a sample of prescription opioid dependent patients. We also identified characteristics associated with denial in this population of increasing public health concern. Opioid use self-reports were compared with weekly urinalysis results in a 12-week multi-site treatment study for prescription opioid dependence. Among those who used opioids during the trial (n=246/360), 44.3% (n=109) denied urinalysis-confirmed opioid use, although usually only once (78%). Overall, 22.9% of opioid-positive urine tests (149/650) were denied on self-report. Multivariable analysis found that initially using opioids to relieve pain was associated with denying opioid use. These findings support the use of both self-reports and urine testing in treating prescription opioid dependence. PMID:25115135

  13. Determination of substance overdose in two Iranian centers: comparison between opioids and non-opioids.

    PubMed

    Taghaddosinejad, Fakhreddin; Arefi, Mohammad; Fayaz, Amir Farshid; Tanhaeivash, Roozbeh

    2013-04-01

    Recently, new trend toward non-opioid substances is observed in Iran. This is, therefore, to compare overdose of opioids and non-opioids origin. We performed this investigation to provide more detailed information so that preventive actions are taken in future. Over 18 month, 1876 individuals with opioid (opium, heroin, compact-heroin, buprenorphine and opiates) or non-opioid (MDMA (ecstasy), LSD, hashish and cocaine) overdose were selected. They have been compared regarding sex, age, reason of overdose, method of substance use, occupation, marital status, history of addiction in parents/siblings, duration of hospital admission and educational level. There were 1782 and 94 persons with opioid and non-opioid, respectively. Inhalation was the method of choice and women were found to have more tendencies to hallucinogens rather opioids. Moreover, use of non-opioids was observed more in individuals with university education and moreover in whom none of whose parents/siblings was addict. Policies should be planned by the governments to prevent further addictions especially to non-opioids. PMID:23472794

  14. Denial of urinalysis-confirmed opioid use in prescription opioid dependence.

    PubMed

    Hilario, E Yvette; Griffin, Margaret L; McHugh, R Kathryn; McDermott, Katherine A; Connery, Hilary S; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M; Weiss, Roger D

    2015-01-01

    Although research has generally supported the validity of substance use self-reports, some patients deny urine-verified substance use. We examined the prevalence and patterns of denying urinalysis-confirmed opioid use in a sample of prescription opioid dependent patients. We also identified characteristics associated with denial in this population of increasing public health concern. Opioid use self-reports were compared with weekly urinalysis results in a 12-week multi-site treatment study for prescription opioid dependence. Among those who used opioids during the trial (n=246/360), 44.3% (n=109) denied urinalysis-confirmed opioid use, although usually only once (78%). Overall, 22.9% of opioid-positive urine tests (149/650) were denied on self-report. Multivariable analysis found that initially using opioids to relieve pain was associated with denying opioid use. These findings support the use of both self-reports and urine testing in treating prescription opioid dependence. PMID:25115135

  15. Involvement of multiple µ-opioid receptor subtypes on the presynaptic or postsynaptic inhibition of spinal pain transmission.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, Hirokazu; Takagi, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Chizuko; Yonezawa, Akihiko; Sato, Takumi; Sakurada, Tsukasa; Sakurada, Shinobu

    2014-01-01

    The involvement of the μ-opioid receptor subtypes on the presynaptic or postsynaptic inhibition of spinal pain transmission was characterized in ddY mice using endomorphins. Intrathecal treatment with capsaicin, N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) or substance P elicited characteristic nociceptive behaviors that consisted primarily of vigorous biting and/or licking with some scratching. Intrathecal co-administration of endogenous μ-opioid peptide endomorphin-1 or endomorphin-2 resulted in a potent antinociceptive effect against the nociceptive behaviors induced by capsaicin, NMDA or substance P, which was eliminated by i.t. co-administration of the μ-opioid receptor antagonist D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 (CTOP). The antinociceptive effect of endomorphin-1 was significantly suppressed by i.t.-co-administration of the μ2-opioid receptor antagonist Tyr-D-Pro-Trp-Phe-NH2 (D-Pro2-endomorphin-1) but not the μ1-opioid receptor antagonist Tyr-D-Pro-Phe-Phe-NH2 (D-Pro2-endomorphin-2) on capsaicin- or NMDA-elicited nociceptive behaviors. In contrast, the antinociceptive effect of endomorphin-2 was significantly suppressed by i.t.-co-administration of D-Pro2-endomorphin-2 but not D-Pro2-endomorphin-1 on capsaicin-, NMDA- or substance P-elicited nociceptive behaviors. Interestingly, regarding substance P-elicited nociceptive behaviors, the antinociceptive effect of endomorphin-1 was significantly suppressed by i.t.-co-administration of another μ2-opioid receptor antagonist, Tyr-D-Pro-Trp-Gly-NH2 (D-Pro2-Tyr-W-MIF-1), but not D-Pro2-endomorphin-1 or D-Pro2-endomorphin-2. The present results suggest that the multiple μ-opioid receptor subtypes are involved in the presynaptic or postsynaptic inhibition of spinal pain transmission. PMID:24512946

  16. Pharmacological Profiles of Oligomerized μ-Opioid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cynthia Wei-Sheng; Ho, Ing-Kang

    2013-01-01

    Opioids are widely prescribed pain relievers with multiple side effects and potential complications. They produce analgesia via G-protein-protein coupled receptors: μ-, δ-, κ-opioid and opioid receptor-like 1 receptors. Bivalent ligands targeted to the oligomerized opioid receptors might be the key to developing analgesics without undesired side effects and obtaining effective treatment for opioid addicts. In this review we will update the biological effects of μ-opioids on homo- or hetero-oligomerized μ-opioid receptor and discuss potential mechanisms through which bivalent ligands exert beneficial effects, including adenylate cyclase regulation and receptor-mediated signaling pathways. PMID:24709876

  17. Impact of a Standardized Treatment Guideline for Pediatric Iatrogenic Opioid Dependence: A Quality Improvement Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Reyburn-Orne, Teri; Youssef, Tarek H.; Haddad, Imad Y.; Gerkin, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine whether utilization of a hospital-based clinical practice guideline for the care of pediatric iatrogenic opioid dependence (IOD) would promote a decrease in opioid exposure and improve management of opioid abstinence syndrome (AS). METHODS: This study is a retrospective chart review of critically ill patients from a tertiary care children's hospital. Inclusion criteria included mechanically ventilated patients up to 18 years of age who received continuous opioid infusions for at least 7 days and any length of methadone administration. Data on IOD patients from January 2005 to June 2010 was divided into 3 periods: baseline, phase 1, and phase 2. Primary outcome was decrease in opioid exposure, measured by methadone duration of use and any additional opioid bolus doses used in AS management. Documentation of additional opioid bolus doses was regarded as a surrogate measure of AS. Secondary outcomes included total cumulative fentanyl dose, continuous fentanyl infusion duration of use, and hospital and pediatric intensive care unit length of stay. RESULTS: There was a significant decrease in methadone duration of use in IOD patients from 15.3 ± 8.7 days at baseline to 9.5 ± 3.7 days during phase 1 (p = 0.002), to 8.1 ± 3.7 days on phase 2 (reduction not significant, p = 0.106) of this evaluation. Additional opioid bolus doses were significantly lower from baseline to phase 1 (5.5 ± 5.1 vs. 1.8 ± 2.3, p = 0.001) and from phase 1 to phase 2 (1.8 ± 2.3 vs. 0.2 ± 1.5, p = 0.003). For the remaining outcomes, differences were not observed among the evaluation periods, except for the total cumulative fentanyl dose, which was reduced from 2.8 ± 3.7 mg/kg at baseline to 1 ± 1 mg/kg only during phase 1 (p = 0.017). CONCLUSIONS: Introduction of a standardized, hospital-based clinical practice guideline for children with IOD reduced the length of exposure to opioids and improved opioid AS management. PMID:26997929

  18. Practice guidelines for transdermal opioids in malignant pain.

    PubMed

    Skaer, Tracy L

    2004-01-01

    Patients with moderate-to-severe malignancy-related pain require opioid pharmacotherapy. Many cancer patients continue to be prescribed subtherapeutic doses of pain medications resulting in undue suffering and diminished quality of life. Pain associated with malignancy and its treatment may exacerbate other symptoms associated with cancer, including nausea, fatigue, weakness, dyspnoea, constipation and impaired cognition. The choice of analgesic pharmacotherapy should be individualised and based on the intensity of pain reported by the patient, rather than its specific aetiology. When selecting pain management pharmacotherapy, the healthcare provider should consider the patient's pain level, activity level and any comorbid illness. Intolerable adverse effects, ineffective pain relief or a change in the patient's clinical status can dictate the need for a new pain management regimen. Healthcare providers must be able to readily quantify the relative analgesic potency when converting from one opioid to another or from one route of administration to another. Transdermal formulations of fentanyl and buprenorphine are effective pharmacotherapy that can be safely used for cancer patients with pain. However, clinicians need to be cognisant that the US/UK manufacturer's recommendations for equianalgesic dose administration of transdermal fentanyl may result in initial doses that produce subtherapeutic concentrations and unrelieved pain in some patients. A less conservative dose administration algorithm for transdermal fentanyl using a 2:1 (mg/day of oral morphine : microg/h of transdermal fentanyl) conversion ratio that considers both a review of the literature and clinical experience should help clinicians individualise cancer pain pharmacotherapy. PMID:15537367

  19. Predator-scent stress, ethanol consumption and the opioid system in an animal model of PTSD.

    PubMed

    Manjoch, Hadar; Vainer, Ella; Matar, Michael; Ifergane, Gal; Zohar, Joseph; Kaplan, Zeev; Cohen, Hagit

    2016-06-01

    Emerging literature points to stress exposure as a potential contributor to the development of alcohol abuse, but animal models have yielded inconsistent results. Converging experimental data indicate that the endogenous opioid system modulates alcohol consumption and stress regulation. The aim of the present study is to examine the interplay between stress exposure, behavioral stress responses, ethanol (EtOH) consumption and the endogenous opioid system in an animal model of posttraumatic stress disorder. Rats were exposed to stress and then tested in a two-bottle free choice (TBC) assay or in a conditioned place preference paradigm. In some experiments, the endogenous opioid system was pharmacologically manipulated prior to stress exposure. The behavioral outcomes of stress exposure were assessed in an elevated plus-maze, with the acoustic startle response, and by monitoring the freezing response to trauma reminder. Immunoreactivity of phosphorylated opioid receptors in hippocampal subregions was also measured. Stress significantly increased the consumption of EtOH in the TBC assay. The severity of the behavioral response to stress was associated with EtOH consumption, cue-triggered freezing response to a trauma reminder, and endogenous levels of phosphorylated opioid receptors in the hippocampus. Pharmacologically manipulating the endogenous opioid system prior to stress exposure attenuated trauma cue-triggered freezing responses and blocked predator scent stress-induced potentiation of EtOH consumption. These data demonstrate a stress-induced potentiation of EtOH self-administration and reveal a clear association between individual patterns of the behavioral response to stress and alcohol preference, while indicating a role for the endogenous opioid system in the neurobiological response to stress. PMID:26965572

  20. Preferential Delivery of an Opioid Antagonist to the Fetal Brain in Pregnant Mice.

    PubMed

    Oberdick, John; Ling, Yonghua; Phelps, Mitch A; Yudovich, Max S; Schilling, Karl; Sadee, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    Prolonged fetal exposure to opioids results in neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), a major medical problem requiring intensive care and increased hospitalization times for newborns with NAS. Multiple strategies are currently available to alleviate withdrawal in infants with NAS. To prevent NAS caused by opioid maintenance programs in pregnant women, blocking fetal dependence without compromising the mother's opiate therapy is desirable. Here we tested in pregnant mice whether a peripherally selective opioid antagonist can preferentially enter the fetal brain and, thereby, in principle, selectively protect the fetus. We show using mass spectrometry that 6β-naltrexol, a neutral opioid antagonist with very limited ability to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), readily crosses the placental barrier and enters the fetal brain at high levels, although it is relatively excluded from the maternal brain. Furthermore, owing to the late development of the BBB in postnatal mice, we show that 6β-naltrexol can readily enter the juvenile mouse brain until at least postnatal day 14. Taking advantage of this observation, we show that long-term exposure to morphine starting in the second postnatal week causes robust and quantifiable dependence behaviors that are suppressed by concomitant administration of 6β-naltrexol with much greater potency (ID50 0.022-0.044 mg/kg, or 1/500 the applied dose of morphine) than previously demonstrated for either the suppression of central nervous system opioid effects or the induction of withdrawal in adults. These results indicate that peripherally selective opioid antagonists capable of penetrating the placenta may be beneficial for preventing or reducing neonatal dependence and NAS in a dose range that should not interfere with maternal opioid maintenance. PMID:27189967

  1. Antinociceptive action of isolated mitragynine from Mitragyna Speciosa through activation of opioid receptor system.

    PubMed

    Shamima, Abdul Rahman; Fakurazi, Sharida; Hidayat, Mohamad Taufik; Hairuszah, Ithnin; Moklas, Mohamad Aris Mohd; Arulselvan, Palanisamy

    2012-01-01

    Cannabinoids and opioids systems share numerous pharmacological properties and antinociception is one of them. Previous findings have shown that mitragynine (MG), a major indole alkaloid found in Mitragyna speciosa (MS) can exert its antinociceptive effects through the opioids system. In the present study, the action of MG was investigated as the antinociceptive agent acting on Cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and effects on the opioids receptor. The latency time was recorded until the mice showed pain responses such as shaking, licking or jumping and the duration of latency was measured for 2 h at every 15 min interval by hot plate analysis. To investigate the beneficial effects of MG as antinociceptive agent, it was administered intraperitoneally 15 min prior to pain induction with a single dosage (3, 10, 15, 30, and 35 mg/kg b.wt). In this investigation, 35 mg/kg of MG showed significant increase in the latency time and this dosage was used in the antagonist receptor study. The treated groups were administered with AM251 (cannabinoid receptor-1 antagonist), naloxone (non-selective opioid antagonist), naltrindole (δ-opioid antagonist) naloxonazine (μ(1)-receptor antagonist) and norbinaltorpimine (κ-opioid antagonist) respectively, prior to administration of MG (35 mg/kg). The results showed that the antinociceptive effect of MG was not antagonized by AM251; naloxone and naltrindole were effectively blocked; and norbinaltorpimine partially blocked the antinociceptive effect of MG. Naloxonazine did inhibit the effect of MG, but it was not statistically significant. These results demonstrate that CB1 does not directly have a role in the antinociceptive action of MG where the effect was observed with the activation of opioid receptor. PMID:23109863

  2. Antinociceptive Action of Isolated Mitragynine from Mitragyna Speciosa through Activation of Opioid Receptor System

    PubMed Central

    Shamima, Abdul Rahman; Fakurazi, Sharida; Hidayat, Mohamad Taufik; Hairuszah, Ithnin; Moklas, Mohamad Aris Mohd; Arulselvan, Palanisamy

    2012-01-01

    Cannabinoids and opioids systems share numerous pharmacological properties and antinociception is one of them. Previous findings have shown that mitragynine (MG), a major indole alkaloid found in Mitragyna speciosa (MS) can exert its antinociceptive effects through the opioids system. In the present study, the action of MG was investigated as the antinociceptive agent acting on Cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and effects on the opioids receptor. The latency time was recorded until the mice showed pain responses such as shaking, licking or jumping and the duration of latency was measured for 2 h at every 15 min interval by hot plate analysis. To investigate the beneficial effects of MG as antinociceptive agent, it was administered intraperitoneally 15 min prior to pain induction with a single dosage (3, 10, 15, 30, and 35 mg/kg b.wt). In this investigation, 35 mg/kg of MG showed significant increase in the latency time and this dosage was used in the antagonist receptor study. The treated groups were administered with AM251 (cannabinoid receptor-1 antagonist), naloxone (non-selective opioid antagonist), naltrindole (δ-opioid antagonist) naloxonazine (μ1-receptor antagonist) and norbinaltorpimine (κ-opioid antagonist) respectively, prior to administration of MG (35 mg/kg). The results showed that the antinociceptive effect of MG was not antagonized by AM251; naloxone and naltrindole were effectively blocked; and norbinaltorpimine partially blocked the antinociceptive effect of MG. Naloxonazine did inhibit the effect of MG, but it was not statistically significant. These results demonstrate that CB1 does not directly have a role in the antinociceptive action of MG where the effect was observed with the activation of opioid receptor. PMID:23109863

  3. Antidepressant-like effect of tetrahydroisoquinoline amines in the animal model of depressive disorder induced by repeated administration of a low dose of reserpine: behavioral and neurochemical studies in the rat.

    PubMed

    Antkiewicz-Michaluk, Lucyna; Wąsik, Agnieszka; Możdżeń, Edyta; Romańska, Irena; Michaluk, Jerzy

    2014-07-01

    Animal models are widely used to study antidepressant-like effect in rodents. However, it should be mentioned that pharmacological models do not always take into account the complexity of the disease process. In the present paper, we demonstrated that repeated but not acute treatment with a low dose of reserpine (0.2 mg/kg i.p.) led to a pharmacological model of depression which was based on its inhibitory effect on the vesicular monoamine transporter 2, and monoamines depleting action in the brain. In fact, we observed that chronic treatment with a low dose of reserpine induced a distinct depressive-like behavior in the forced swim test (FST), and additionally, it produced a significant decrease in the level of dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin in the brain structures. 1,2,3,4-Tetrahydroisoquinoline (TIQ) and its close methyl derivative, 1-methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline (1MeTIQ) are exo/endogenous amines present naturally in the mammalian brain which demonstrated a significant antidepressant-like effect in the FST and the reserpine model of depression in the rat. Both compounds, TIQ and 1MeTIQ, administered chronically in a dose of 25 mg/kg (i.p.) together with reserpine completely antagonized reserpine-produced depression as assessed by the immobility time and swimming time. Biochemical data were in agreement with behavioral experiments and demonstrated that chronic treatment with a low dose of reserpine in contrast to acute administration produced a significant depression of monoamines in the brain structures and impaired their metabolism. These neurochemical effects obtained after repeated reserpine (0.2 mg/kg i.p.) in the brain structures were completely antagonized by joint TIQ or 1MeTIQ (25 mg/kg i.p.) administration with chronic reserpine. A possible molecular mechanism of action of TIQ and 1MeTIQ responsible for their antidepressant action is discussed. On the basis of the presented behavioral and biochemical studies, we suggest that both

  4. Immunoreactive opioid peptides in human breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Scopsi, L.; Balslev, E.; Brünner, N.; Poulsen, H. S.; Andersen, J.; Rank, F.; Larsson, L. I.

    1989-01-01

    Opioid peptides have a variety of actions on inter alia pituitary hormone secretion and the immune system. Release of endogenous opioids has been found to stimulate growth of experimental breast cancers and opiate receptor blockers have reduced the growth of chemically induced rat breast tumors. Opioid peptides may therefore play a role in human breast cancer. Invasive ductal carcinomas from 61 premenopausal women were immunocytochemically analyzed for the presence of opioid peptide immunoreactivity. Positive staining was unambiguously identified in 34 of the tumors (56%). In addition, a medullary carcinoma was positive. In a smaller series of tumors, opioid peptide immunoreactive cells were detected in both primary tumors and metastases. Positive tumor cells were usually few and scattered. Therefore, underestimates of their true frequency of occurrence are likely to have occurred, making accurate correlations with clinical behavior and estrogen receptor status difficult. No correlations with estrogen receptors were established for the unambiguously opioid peptide-positive tumors. Many of the positive tumors also stained with antibodies to gamma-endorphin and alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, suggesting the presence of proopiomelanocortin-derived peptides in them. However, peptides derived from other opioid precursors also may be present in breast cancer. Images Figure 1 PMID:2464945

  5. Nalmefene: radioimmunoassay for a new opioid antagonist.

    PubMed

    Dixon, R; Hsiao, J; Taaffe, W; Hahn, E; Tuttle, R

    1984-11-01

    A specific radioimmunoassay (RIA) has been developed for the quantitation of a new opioid antagonist, nalmefene, in human plasma. The method employs a rabbit antiserum to an albumin conjugate of naltrexone-6-(O-carboxymethyl)oxime and [3H]naltrexone as the radioligand. Assay specificity was achieved by extraction of nalmefene from plasma at pH 9 into ether prior to RIA. The procedure has a limit of sensitivity of 0.2 ng/mL of nalmefene using a 0.5-mL sample of plasma for analysis. The intra- and interassay coefficients of variation did not exceed 5.6 and 11%, respectively. The specificity of the RIA was established by demonstrating excellent agreement (r = 0.99) with a less sensitive and more time consuming HPLC procedure in the analysis of clinical plasma samples. The use of the RIA for the pharmacokinetic evaluation of nalmefene is illustrated with plasma concentration profiles of the drug in humans following intravenous and oral administration. PMID:6520774

  6. Genetics of Opioid Dependence: A Review of the Genetic Contribution to Opioid Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Chetna J; Bawor, Monica; Desai, Dipika; Marsh, David C; Samaan, Zainab

    2014-01-01

    This narrative review aims to provide an overview of the impact of opioid dependence and the contribution of genetics to opioid dependence. Epidemiological data demonstrate that opioid dependence is a global trend with far-reaching effects on the social, economic, and health care systems. A review of classical genetic studies of opioid use suggests significant heritability of drug use behavior, however the evidence from molecular genetic studies is inconclusive. Nonetheless, certain genetic variants are important to consider given their role in the pathophysiology of addictive behavior. We undertook a literature review to identify the current state of knowledge regarding the role of genes in opioid dependence. Determining the association of genetic markers could change the current understanding of the various factors contributing to opioid dependence and therefore may improve recognition of individuals at risk for the disorder and prevention and treatment strategies. PMID:25242908

  7. Oral opioid use alters DNIC but not cold pain perception in patients with chronic pain - new perspective of opioid-induced hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Ram, Kerstin Carlin; Eisenberg, Elon; Haddad, May; Pud, Dorit

    2008-10-15

    Opioids can elicit unexpected changes in pain sensitivity, known as opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). The aim of this study was to explore whether OIH exists in patients with chronic pain treated with oral opioids (OP) versus non-opioid (NOP) analgesics. The sensitivity to cold pain and the magnitude of diffuse noxious inhibitory control (DNIC) were evaluated in 73 OP and 37 NOP treated patients. Pain threshold, intensity and tolerance in response to the cold pressor (1 degrees C) were measured. DNIC was tested by co-administrating conditioned heat stimulation (47 degrees C) to the left forearm and a conditioning stimulation of 12 degrees C for 30s to the right hand. The results showed no differences between the two groups in any of the cold pain measures. In contrast, the magnitude of DNIC was significantly larger in the NOP than in the OP treated patients (p=0.003). A gender based analysis showed a significant difference in DNIC between OP and NOP treated men only. However, a mixed model ANOVA demonstrated a significant effect of treatment (OP versus NOP) (F=5.928, p=0.017) rather than gender on DNIC. A regression analysis showed that opioid dosage and treatment duration had a significant negative effect on the magnitude of DNIC in OP treated men (beta=-2.175, p=0.036 and beta=-2.061, p=0.047, respectively). In conclusion, oral opioids usage for the treatment of chronic pain does not result in abnormal sensitivity to cold pain, but seems to alter pain modulation. The use of 'advanced' psychophysics tests such as evaluation of DNIC can help understanding the phenomenon of OIH. PMID:18583047

  8. Involvement of kappa type opioids on ethanol drinking

    SciTech Connect

    Sandi, C.; Borrell, J.; Guaza, C.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of the administration of the kappa agonist dynorphin/sub 1/..sqrt../sub 17/ andor the kappa antagonist MR-2266-BS on ethanol preference was investigated using a paradigm by which rats develop alcohol preference. Administration of dynorphin shortly before or after the conditioning session (forced ethanol exposure) failed to affect later ethanol preference. However, dynorphin treatment prior to the first choice session reduced ethanol preference during the three consecutive testing days. This effect was reversed by the simultaneous administration of the kappa antagonist MR-2266-BS. The results of the present study provide further support for evidence of the involvement of dynorphinergic systems on drinking behavior and suggest that kappa-type opioid mechanisms may be involved in the consumption and development of preference to ethanol in rats. 32 references, 3 figures, 2 tables

  9. Weighing the Risks and Benefits of Chronic Opioid Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lembke, Anna; Humphreys, Keith; Newmark, Jordan

    2016-06-15

    Evidence supports the use of opioids for treating acute pain. However, the evidence is limited for the use of chronic opioid therapy for chronic pain. Furthermore, the risks of chronic therapy are significant and may outweigh any potential benefits. When considering chronic opioid therapy, physicians should weigh the risks against any possible benefits throughout the therapy, including assessing for the risks of opioid misuse, opioid use disorder, and overdose. When initiating opioid therapy, physicians should consider buprenorphine for patients at risk of opioid misuse, opioid use disorder, and overdose. If and when opioid misuse is detected, opioids do not necessarily need to be discontinued, but misuse should be noted on the problem list and interventions should be performed to change the patient's behavior. If aberrant behavior continues, opioid use disorder should be diagnosed and treated accordingly. When patients are discontinuing opioid therapy, the dosage should be decreased slowly, especially in those who have intolerable withdrawal. It is not unreasonable for discontinuation of chronic opioid therapy to take many months. Benzodiazepines should not be coprescribed during chronic opioid therapy or when tapering, because some patients may develop cross-dependence. For patients at risk of overdose, naloxone should be offered to the patient and to others who may be in a position to witness and reverse opioid overdose. PMID:27304767

  10. Recent advances in abuse-deterrent technologies for the delivery of opioids.

    PubMed

    Maincent, Julien; Zhang, Feng

    2016-08-20

    Over the past decade, the abuse of prescription opioid drugs has become a national health crisis in the United States. Pharmaceutical companies, the Food and Drug Administration, and other government agencies are confronting opioid abuse by developing and commercializing various abuse-deterrent drug delivery technologies. To deter opioid abuse, various strategies including physical barriers, chemical barriers, antagonists, aversive agents, and prodrugs have been investigated. A number of drug products with abuse-deterrent properties have been approved by the FDA over the last six years, while many products and technologies with progressively-improved abuse-deterrence properties are currently being evaluated. This article provides a comprehensive review of the material sciences principles that govern the formulation and processing of a wide range of abuse-deterrent products and technologies. PMID:27291971

  11. Effects of the δ opioid agonist AZD2327 upon operant behaviors and assessment of its potential for abuse.

    PubMed

    Hudzik, T J; Pietras, M R; Caccese, R; Bui, K H; Yocca, F; Paronis, C A; Swedberg, M D B

    2014-09-01

    AZD2327 is a brain-penetrant agonist at δ opioid receptors which has antidepressant and anxiolytic properties in a wide array of animal models. As part of the preclinical safety pharmacology assessment, a number of studies were conducted in order to characterize its behavioral effects and its potential for abuse, in order to enable testing in humans. AZD2327 produced only modest effects when tested in a multiple fixed-ratio differential reinforcement of low rate schedule in rats, and did not enhance the rate-suppressing effects of ethanol in the procedure. In a suppressed responding test, AZD2327 only reduced rates of unpunished responding. In drug discrimination studies, AZD2327 produced partial or no generalization from known drugs of abuse. In primates trained to self-administer cocaine, substitution with AZD2327 did not result in appreciable self-administration of AZD2327, indicating that it does not behave as a positive reinforcer under the present conditions. Following termination of repeated administration of AZD2327, no signs of physical dependence (withdrawal) were noted. Overall, the data suggest that AZD2327 does not possess a high potential for abuse, and appears to have only subtle behavioral effects as measured by operant behaviors. PMID:24857840

  12. Craving and subsequent opioid use among opioid dependent patients who initiate treatment with buprenorphine

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, Judith I.; Anderson, Bradley J.; Strong, David R.; Stein, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Few studies have directly assessed associations between craving and subsequent opioid use among treated patients. Our objective was to prospectively evaluate the relative utility of two craving questionnaires to predict opioid use among opioid dependent patients in treatment. Method Opioid dependent patients (n=147) initiating buprenorphine treatment were assessed for three months. Craving was measured using: 1) the Desires for Drug Questionnaire (DDQ) and 2) the Penn Alcohol-Craving Scale adapted for opioid craving (PCS) for this study. Multi-level logistic regression models estimated the effects of craving on the likelihood of opioid use after adjusting for gender, age, ethnicity, education, opioid of choice, frequency of use, pain and depression. In these analyses craving assessed at time t was entered as a time-varying predictor of opioid use at time t+1. Results In adjusted regression models, a 1-point increase in PCS scores (on a 7-point scale) was associated with a significant increase in the odds of opioid use at the subsequent assessment (OR = 1.27, 95% CI 1.08; 1.49, p < .01). The odds of opioid use at the subsequent follow-up assessment increased significantly as DDQ desire and intention scores increased (OR = 1.25, 95%CI 1.03; 1.51, p< .05), but was not associated significantly with DDQ negative reinforcement (OR = 1.01, 95%CI 0.88; 1.17, p > .05) or DDQ control (OR = 0.97, 95%CI 0.85; 1.11, p > .05) scores. Conclusion Self-reported craving for opioids was associated with subsequent lapse to opioid use among a cohort of patients treated with buprenorphine. PMID:24521036

  13. Opioid drugs: what is next for Lebanon?

    PubMed

    Yamout, Rana; Ayoub, Eliane; Naccache, Nicole; Abou Zeid, Hicham; Matar, Marie-Thérèse; Antakly, Marie-Claire

    2013-01-01

    Opioids remain essential drugs for the treatment of severe cancerous pain. However, many countries have developed new regulations and policies for a better availability and accessibility of these drugs. Lebanon is not too far from these advanced strategies. The Ministry of Health and specifically the Narcotic Department have adjusted regulations related to opioid prescriptions and have registered many new opioid drugs in 2012 for a better pain-free life for our patients. However, there is still a lot to do in this field. PMID:24428075

  14. The Opioid Epidemic in the United States.

    PubMed

    Wilkerson, Richard Gentry; Kim, Hong K; Windsor, Thomas Andrew; Mareiniss, Darren P

    2016-05-01

    There is an epidemic of opioid abuse. This article discusses the history of opioid use. Abusers of opioids are at great risk of harm. There have been increasing legislative efforts to curb this abuse and we present a review of the current state of these laws. Naloxone has made a profound impact in the care of these patients if they present for medical care early enough. This paper discusses naloxone pharmacodynamics, its use in the medical setting, and how its use is now being expanded to include nontraditional providers with take home naloxone programs. PMID:27133253

  15. Self-treatment of opioid withdrawal using kratom (Mitragynia speciosa korth)

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Edward W.; Babu, Kavita M.; Adkins, Jessica E.; McCurdy, Christopher R.; Halpern, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Kratom (Mitragynia speciosa korth) is recognized increasingly as a remedy for opioid withdrawal by individuals who self-treat chronic pain. Case description A patient who had abruptly ceased injection hydromorphone abuse self-managed opioid withdrawal and chronic pain using kratom. After co-administering the herb with modafinil he experienced a tonic-clonic seizure, but he reported only modest abstinence once kratom administration stopped. We confirmed the identity of the plant matter he ingested as kratom and identified no contaminants or adulterants. We also conducted high-throughput molecular screening and the binding affinity at mu, delta and kappa receptors of mitragynine. Conclusion We report the self-treatment of chronic pain and opioid withdrawal with kratom. The predominant alkaloid of kratom, mitragynine, binds mu- and kappa-opioid receptors, but has additional receptor affinities that might augment its effectiveness at mitigating opioid withdrawal. The natural history of kratom use, including its clinical pharmacology and toxicology, are poorly understood. PMID:18482427

  16. National and State Treatment Need and Capacity for Opioid Agonist Medication-Assisted Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Campopiano, Melinda; Baldwin, Grant; McCance-Katz, Elinore

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We estimated national and state trends in opioid agonist medication-assisted treatment (OA-MAT) need and capacity to identify gaps and inform policy decisions. Methods. We generated national and state rates of past-year opioid abuse or dependence, maximum potential buprenorphine treatment capacity, number of patients receiving methadone from opioid treatment programs (OTPs), and the percentage of OTPs operating at 80% capacity or more using Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration data. Results. Nationally, in 2012, the rate of opioid abuse or dependence was 891.8 per 100 000 people aged 12 years or older compared with national rates of maximum potential buprenorphine treatment capacity and patients receiving methadone in OTPs of, respectively, 420.3 and 119.9. Among states and the District of Columbia, 96% had opioid abuse or dependence rates higher than their buprenorphine treatment capacity rates; 37% had a gap of at least 5 per 1000 people. Thirty-eight states (77.6%) reported at least 75% of their OTPs were operating at 80% capacity or more. Conclusions. Significant gaps between treatment need and capacity exist at the state and national levels. Strategies to increase the number of OA-MAT providers are needed. PMID:26066931

  17. Opiate-induced constipation related to activation of small intestine opioid μ2-receptors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wency; Chung, Hsien-Hui; Cheng, Juei-Tang

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of opioid μ-receptor subtype in opiate-induced constipation (OIC). METHODS: The effect of loperamide on intestinal transit was investigated in mice. Ileum strips were isolated from 12-wk-old male BALB/c mice for identification of isometric tension. The ileum strips were precontracted with 1 μmol/L acetylcholine (ACh). Then, decrease in muscle tone (relaxation) was characterized after cumulative administration of 0.1-10 μmol/L loperamide into the organ bath, for a concentration-dependent study. Specific blockers or antagonists were used for pretreatment to compare the changes in loperamide-induced relaxation. RESULTS: In addition to the delay in intestinal transit, loperamide produced a marked relaxation in isolated ileum precontracted with ACh, in a dose-dependent manner. This relaxation was abolished by cyprodime, a selective opioid μ-receptor antagonist, but not modified by naloxonazine at a dose sufficient to block opioid μ-1 receptors. Also, treatment with opioid μ-1 receptor agonist failed to modify the muscle tone. Moreover, the relaxation by loperamide was attenuated by glibenclamide at a dose sufficient to block ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels, and by protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, but was enhanced by an inhibitor of phosphodiesterase for cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). CONCLUSION: Loperamide induces intestinal relaxation by activation of opioid μ-2 receptors via the cAMP-PKA pathway to open KATP channels, relates to OIC. PMID:22493554

  18. Gonadal Hormone Modulation of Mu, Kappa, and Delta Opioid Antinociception in Male and Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Stoffel, Erin C.; Ulibarri, Catherine M.; Folk, John E.; Rice, Kenner C.

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that sex differences in morphine antinociception in rodents might be attributed to the activational effects of gonadal hormones. The present study determined whether hormonal modulation of opioid antinociception in adult rats extends to opioids other than the prototypic mu agonist morphine. Male and female rats were sham-gonadectomized (sham-GDX) or gonadectomized (GDX) and replaced with no hormone, estradiol (E2, females), progesterone (P4, females), E2+P4 (females), or testosterone (males). Approximately 28 days later, nociception was evaluated on the 50°C hot plate and warm water tail withdrawal tests before and after subcutaneous administration of hydromorphone, buprenorphine, U50,488, or SNC 80. In sham-GDX (gonadally intact) rats, the mu agonists and U50,488 were less effective in females than in males in at least one nociceptive test, and the delta agonist SNC 80 was less effective in males than in females. In males, gonadectomy tended to decrease, and testosterone tended to increase antinociception produced by 3 of the 4 agonists. In females, gonadectomy and hormone treatment had more variable effects, although E2 tended to decrease mu opioid antinociception. The present results suggest that activational effects of gonadal hormones are relatively modest and somewhat inconsistent on antinociception produced by various opioid agonists in the adult rat. Perspective: This study demonstrates that reproductive hormones such as testosterone in males and estradiol in females do not consistently modulate sensitivity to the analgesic effects of opioids in the adult organism. PMID:15820914

  19. A comprehensive review of rapid-onset opioids for breakthrough pain.

    PubMed

    Smith, Howard

    2012-06-01

    Breakthrough pain (BTP) is a transitory pain (reaching maximum severity in ~15 minutes and lasting ~60 minutes in patients with cancer) that occurs despite the management of chronic pain with long-term around-the-clock analgesia. BTP occurs in 33-65% of patients with chronic cancer pain and in ~70% of patients with chronic noncancer pain. BTP has historically been managed with short-acting opioids; however, these medications have a pharmacokinetic profile that does not correlate with the sudden onset and short time to maximum severity of BTP. Interest in rapid-onset opioids to relieve BTP has therefore been growing. This comprehensive review aims to summarize the currently available clinical data for the approved rapid-onset opioids, which comprise different formulations of fentanyl, a μ-opioid receptor agonist with anaesthetic and analgesic properties. Administration routes for fentanyl in the management of BTP currently include the transmucosal and intranasal routes; an intrapulmonary formulation is also in development. The findings of this review suggest that the efficacy and safety of the approved rapid-onset opioids are comparable. PMID:22668247

  20. Interactions of Opioids and HIV Infection in the Pathogenesis of Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bolong; Liu, Xin; Tang, Shao-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Over 50% of HIV-1/AIDS patients suffer chronic pain. Currently, opioids are the cornerstone medications for treating severe pain in these patients. Ironically, emerging clinical data indicates that repeated use of opiate pain medicines might in fact heighten the chronic pain states in HIV patients. Both laboratory-based and clinical studies strongly suggest that opioids exacerbate the detrimental effects of HIV-1 infection on the nervous system, both on neurons and glia. The combination of opioids and HIV-1infection may promote the damage of neurons, including those in the pain sensory and transmission pathway, by activating both caspase-dependent and caspase-independent pro-apoptotic pathways. In addition, the opiate-HIV-1 interaction may also cause widespread disturbance of glial function and elicit glial-derived pro-inflammatory responses that dysregulate neuronal function. The deregulation of neuron-glia cross-talk that occurs with the combination of HIV-1 and opioids appears to play an important role in the development of the pathological pain state. In this article, we wish to provide an overview of the potential molecular and cellular mechanisms by which opioids may interact with HIV-1 to cause neurological problems, especially in the context of HIV-associated pathological pain. Elucidating the underlying mechanisms will help researchers and clinicians to understand how chronic use of opioids for analgesia enhances HIV-associated pain. It will also assist in optimizing therapeutic approaches to prevent or minimize this significant side effect of opiate analgesics in pain management for HIV patients. PMID:26903982

  1. Naltrexone and buprenorphine combination in the treatment of opioid dependence.

    PubMed

    Gerra, G; Fantoma, A; Zaimovic, A

    2006-11-01

    Naltrexone treatment has demonstrated some advantages for special populations of heroin addicted individuals, but patients' compliance seems to be very poor, with a low adherence and low retention rate. Kappa-opioid system overdrive seems to contribute to opioid protracted abstinence syndrome, with dysphoria and psychosomatic symptoms during naltrexone treatment. The objective of this observational study was to determine the effectiveness of a functional k antagonist in improving naltrexone treatment outcome. A partial mu agonist/kappa antagonist (buprenorphine) and a mu antagonist (naltrexone) were combined during a 12 weeks protocol, theoretically leaving k antagonism as the major medication effect. Sixty patients were submitted to outpatient rapid detoxification utilizing buprenorphine and opioid antagonists. Starting on the fifth day, 30 patients (group A) received naltrexone alone. Alternatively, 30 patients (group B) received naltrexone (50mg oral dose) plus buprenorphine (4 mg sublingual) for the 12 weeks of the observational study. The endpoints of the study were: retention in treatment, negative urinalyses, changes in psychological symptoms (Symptom Checklist-90 Revised: SCL-90) and craving scores (visual analysis scale (VAS)). Thirty-four subjects (56.67%) completed the 12 weeks study. Twenty-one patients (35.0%) had all urine samples negative for opiates and cocaine. nine subjects (15.0%) had urine samples negative for cocaine and opiates for the last 4 weeks of the study. five subjects (8.3%) continued to use cocaine during the 12 weeks of the study. No significant change in pupillary diameter after buprenorphine administration was evidenced during clinical observations from baseline across the weekly measurements. Retention rates in group A (naltrexone) and group B (naltrexone + buprenorphine) at week 12 were respectively 40% (12 patients) and 73.33% (22 patients), with a significant difference in favour of group B (p= 0.018). Patients treated with

  2. Opioid and non-opioid mechanisms of stress analgesia: lack of cross-tolerance between stressors.

    PubMed

    Terman, G W; Lewis, J W; Liebeskind, J C

    1983-01-31

    Qualitatively different analgesic responses can be evoked in rats by exposure to prolonged, intermittent or brief, continuous footshock stress. These two forms of stress analgesia appear to be mediated by opioid and nonopioid pain-inhibitory substrates, respectively. The present study confirms our previous observation that tolerance develops to only the opioid form of stress analgesia and shows that cross-tolerance does not occur between the opioid and nonopioid forms. These data provide further evidence that independent mechanisms underlie opioid and nonopioid stress analgesia. PMID:6297681

  3. Differential desensitization of mu- and delta- opioid receptors in selected neural pathways following chronic morphine treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Noble, F.; Cox, B. M.

    1996-01-01

    1. Morphine produces a plethora of pharmacological effects and its chronic administration induces several side-effects. The cellular mechanisms by which opiates induce these side-effects are not fully understood. Several studies suggest that regulation of adenylyl cyclase activity by opioids and other transmitters plays an important role in the control of neural function. 2. The aim of this study was to evaluate desensitization of mu- and delta- opioid receptors, defined as a reduced ability of opioid agonists to inhibit adenylyl cyclase activity, in four different brain structures known to be involved in opiate drug actions: caudate putamen, nucleus accumbens, thalamus and periaqueductal gray (PAG). Opiate regulation of adenylyl cyclase in these regions has been studied in control and morphine-dependent rats. 3. The chronic morphine treatment used in the present study (subcutaneous administration of 15.4 mg morphine/rat/day for 6 days via osmotic pump) induced significant physical dependence as indicated by naloxone-precipitated withdrawal symptoms. 4. Basal adenylyl cyclase in the four brain regions was not modified by this chronic morphine treatment. In the PAG and the thalamus, a desensitization of mu- and delta-opioid receptors was observed, characterized by a reduced ability of Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-(NMe)Phe-Gly-ol (DAMGO; mu), Tyr-D-Pen-Gly-Phe-D-Pen (DPDPE; delta) and [D-Ala2]-deltorphin-II (DT-II; delta) to inhibit adenylyl cyclase, activity following chronic morphine treatment. 5. The opioid receptor desensitization in PAG and thalamus appeared to be heterologous since the metabotropic glutamate receptor agonists, L-AP4 and glutamate, and the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)1A receptor agonist, R(+)-8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT), also showed reduced inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity following chronic morphine treatment. 6. In the nucleus accumbens and the caudate putamen, desensitization of delta-opioid receptor

  4. Truncated mu opioid GPCR variant involvement in opioid-dependent and opioid-independent pain modulatory systems within the CNS.

    PubMed

    Marrone, Gina F; Grinnell, Steven G; Lu, Zhigang; Rossi, Grace C; Le Rouzic, Valerie; Xu, Jin; Majumdar, Susruta; Pan, Ying-Xian; Pasternak, Gavril W

    2016-03-29

    The clinical management of severe pain depends heavily on opioids acting through mu opioid receptors encoded by the Oprm1 gene, which undergoes extensive alternative splicing. In addition to generating a series of prototypic seven transmembrane domain (7TM) G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), Oprm1 also produces a set of truncated splice variants containing only six transmembrane domains (6TM) through which selected opioids such as IBNtxA (3'-iodobenzoyl-6β-naltrexamide) mediate a potent analgesia without many undesirable effects. Although morphine analgesia is independent of these 6TM mu receptor isoforms, we now show that the selective loss of the 6TM variants in a knockout model eliminates the analgesic actions of delta and kappa opioids and of α2-adrenergic compounds, but not cannabinoid, neurotensin, or muscarinic drugs. These observations were confirmed by using antisense paradigms. Despite their role in analgesia, loss of the 6TM variants were not involved with delta opioid-induced seizure activity, aversion to the kappa drug U50, 488H, or α2-mediated hypolocomotion. These observations support the existence of parallel opioid and nonopioid pain modulatory systems and highlight the ability to dissociate unwanted delta, kappa1, and α2 actions from analgesia. PMID:26976581

  5. FDA Approves Implant to Battle Opioid Addiction

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159050.html FDA Approves Implant to Battle Opioid Addiction Experts say steady dosing ... 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new long-acting implant that can help treat people addicted to heroin ...

  6. Pharmacology of Nonsteroidal Antiinflammatory Drugs and Opioids

    PubMed Central

    Slater, Dick; Kunnathil, Sushama; McBride, Joseph; Koppala, Rajah

    2010-01-01

    Chronic pain affects up to 50 million Americans every day. Traditional treatment has included acetaminophen, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), or opioids. The combination of NSAIDs and opioids can provide effective treatment for up to 90% of patients with chronic pain, but the NSAIDs have the potential for significant, even life-threatening side effects. Additionally, the nonselective cyclooxygenase inhibitors with 16,000 deaths per year in the United States might not be any safer. The opioids are great for short-term pain, but may need to be adjusted or changed frequently due to the development of tolerance. Understanding of the mechanism of opioids and NSAIDs has improved greatly over the past decade, but is still incomplete. PMID:22550382

  7. College Students Using More Pot, Fewer Opioids

    MedlinePlus

    ... More Pot, Fewer Opioids Nearly 5 percent use marijuana daily, survey finds To use the sharing features ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- American college students' use of marijuana continues to increase, but the appeal of other ...

  8. Opioids by Injection May Drive HIV Outbreaks

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159978.html Opioids by Injection May Drive HIV Outbreaks Indiana case offers a lesson for other ... drug abuse epidemic has increased the risk of HIV outbreaks in rural and suburban communities, where up ...

  9. Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Centers For Disease Control And Prevention Public Health Service U S Department Of Health And Human Services

    2016-06-01

    Improving the way opioids are prescribed through clinical practice guidelines can ensure patients have access to safer, more effective chronic pain treatment while reducing the number of people who misuse, abuse, or overdose from these drugs. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) developed and published the Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain to provide recommendations for the prescribing of opioid pain medication for patients 18 and older in primary care settings. Recommendations focus on the use of opioids in treating chronic pain (pain lasting longer than 3 months or past the time of normal tissue healing) outside of active cancer treatment, palliative care, and end-of-life care. PMID:27301691

  10. Opioid-induced constipation: advances and clinical guidance.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Alfred D; Camilleri, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Currently opioids are the most frequently used medications for chronic noncancer pain. Opioid-induced constipation is the most common adverse effect associated with prolonged use of opioids, having a major impact on quality of life. There is an increasing need to treat opioid-induced constipation. With the recent approval of medications for the treatment of opioid-induced constipation, there are several therapeutic approaches. This review addresses the clinical presentation and diagnosis of opioid-induced constipation, barriers to its diagnosis, effects of opioids in the gastrointestinal tract, differential tolerance to opiates in different gastrointestinal organs, medications approved and in development for the treatment of opioid-induced constipation, and a proposed clinical management algorithm for treating opioid-induced constipation in patients with noncancer pain. PMID:26977281

  11. Opioid-induced constipation: advances and clinical guidance

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Alfred D.; Camilleri, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Currently opioids are the most frequently used medications for chronic noncancer pain. Opioid-induced constipation is the most common adverse effect associated with prolonged use of opioids, having a major impact on quality of life. There is an increasing need to treat opioid-induced constipation. With the recent approval of medications for the treatment of opioid-induced constipation, there are several therapeutic approaches. This review addresses the clinical presentation and diagnosis of opioid-induced constipation, barriers to its diagnosis, effects of opioids in the gastrointestinal tract, differential tolerance to opiates in different gastrointestinal organs, medications approved and in development for the treatment of opioid-induced constipation, and a proposed clinical management algorithm for treating opioid-induced constipation in patients with noncancer pain. PMID:26977281

  12. Effect of Intravenous Acetaminophen on Postoperative Opioid Use in Bariatric Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan; Saha, Ronik; Shah, Neal; Hanna, Adel; DeMuro, Jonas; Calixte, Rose; Brathwaite, Collin

    2015-01-01

    Background: The use of opioids to achieve adequate pain relief following surgery is a common clinical practice. Opioids, however, are associated with serious adverse effects, such as respiratory depression, excessive sedation, and prolonged ileus, as well as increased mortality. The administration of intravenous (IV) acetaminophen to control postoperative pain has been effective in reducing opioid consumption in various surgical populations, but no studies have been conducted in bariatric surgery patients. This investigation was performed to determine whether IV acetaminophen reduces opioid requirements after bariatric surgery. Methods: IV acetaminophen was added to the Winthrop-University Hospital formulary in September 2012. We conducted a retrospective chart-review analysis of bariatric surgery patients who received at least four doses of IV acetaminophen (1 g every six hours) plus opioids from October 2012 to March 2013 (after IV acetaminophen was added to the hospital formulary), compared with bariatric surgery patients who received only opioids for postoperative pain control from January 2012 to June 2012 (before IV acetaminophen was added to the hospital formulary). The study’s primary endpoint was the difference between the two groups in opioid consumption, expressed in oral morphine equivalents (OMEs). Secondary endpoints included the reduction in the baseline pain score; the total amount of each opioid used; and the average hospital length of stay (LOS). Results: A total of 96 patients were identified for potential enrollment from January 2012 to March 2013. Eight patients, however, did not qualify for participation because they had received only one dose of IV acetaminophen. The remaining 88 patients comprised two study groups: IV acetaminophen plus opiates (n = 44) and IV opiates alone (n = 44). Paradoxically, the patients in the acetaminophen/opiates group required significantly more opiates (in OMEs) compared with the group that received opiates

  13. Molecular Pharmacology of δ-Opioid Receptors.

    PubMed

    Gendron, Louis; Cahill, Catherine M; von Zastrow, Mark; Schiller, Peter W; Pineyro, Graciela

    2016-07-01

    Opioids are among the most effective analgesics available and are the first choice in the treatment of acute severe pain. However, partial efficacy, a tendency to produce tolerance, and a host of ill-tolerated side effects make clinically available opioids less effective in the management of chronic pain syndromes. Given that most therapeutic opioids produce their actions via µ-opioid receptors (MOPrs), other targets are constantly being explored, among which δ-opioid receptors (DOPrs) are being increasingly considered as promising alternatives. This review addresses DOPrs from the perspective of cellular and molecular determinants of their pharmacological diversity. Thus, DOPr ligands are examined in terms of structural and functional variety, DOPrs' capacity to engage a multiplicity of canonical and noncanonical G protein-dependent responses is surveyed, and evidence supporting ligand-specific signaling and regulation is analyzed. Pharmacological DOPr subtypes are examined in light of the ability of DOPr to organize into multimeric arrays and to adopt multiple active conformations as well as differences in ligand kinetics. Current knowledge on DOPr targeting to the membrane is examined as a means of understanding how these receptors are especially active in chronic pain management. Insight into cellular and molecular mechanisms of pharmacological diversity should guide the rational design of more effective, longer-lasting, and better-tolerated opioid analgesics for chronic pain management. PMID:27343248

  14. Behavioral effects of perinatal opioid exposure.

    PubMed

    Fodor, Anna; Tímár, Júlia; Zelena, Dóra

    2014-05-28

    Opioids are among the world's oldest known drugs used mostly for pain relief, but recreational use is also widespread. A particularly important problem is opioid exposure in females, as their offspring can also be affected. Adverse intrauterine and postnatal environments can affect offspring development and may lead to various disabilities later in life. It is clear that repetitive painful experiences, such as randomly occurring invasive procedures during neonatal intensive care, can permanently alter neuronal and synaptic organization and therefore later behavior. At the same time, analgesic drugs can also be harmful, inducing neuronal apoptosis or withdrawal symptoms in the neonate and behavioral alterations in adulthood. Hence, risk-benefit ratios should be taken into consideration when pain relief is required during pregnancy or in neonates. Recreational use of opioids can also alter many aspects of life. Intrauterine opioid exposure has many toxic effects, inducing poor pregnancy outcomes due to underdevelopment, but it is believed that later negative consequences are more related to environmental factors such as a chaotic lifestyle and inadequate prenatal care. One of the crucial components is maternal care, which changes profoundly in addicted mothers. In substance-dependent mothers, pre- and postnatal care has special importance, and controlled treatment with a synthetic opioid (e.g., methadone) could be beneficial. We aimed to summarize and compare human and rodent data, as it is important to close the gap between scientific knowledge and societal policies. Special emphasis is given to gender differences in the sensitivity of offspring to perinatal opioid exposure. PMID:24746901

  15. Central kappa opioid receptor-evoked changes in renal function in conscious rats: participation of renal nerves.

    PubMed

    Kapusta, D R; Obih, J C

    1993-10-01

    The present investigations examined the cardiovascular and renal responses produced by central nervous system stimulation of kappa opioid receptors by the selective kappa opioid receptor agonist, U-50488H, in conscious Sprague-Dawley rats. Administration of U-50488H (1 microgram total) into the lateral cerebroventricle produced a profound diuretic and antinatriuretic response. In addition, concurrent with the decrease in urinary sodium excretion, i.c.v. U-50488H elicited an increase in renal sympathetic nerve activity. The increases in urine flow rate and renal sympathetic nerve activity and the decrease in urinary sodium excretion produced by U-50488H were completely prevented in rats that had undergone pretreatment with the selective kappa opioid receptor antagonist, nor-binaltorphimine. In contrast, in animals that had undergone irreversible mu opioid receptor blockade with the selective mu opioid receptor antagonist, beta-funaltrexamine, central U-50488H administration elicited similar diuretic and antinatriuretic responses as observed in intact naive animals. In further studies, the antinatriuretic response produced by i.c.v. U-50488H was completely abolished in rats that had undergone chronic bilateral renal denervation, a technique used to remove the influence of the renal sympathetic nerves. Glomerular filtration rates and effective renal plasma flows were not altered by i.c.v. administration of U-50488H in intact or renal denervated animals. Together, these studies provide evidence for the role of central kappa opioid receptor mechanisms in the regulation of urinary sodium and water excretion. Moreover, these studies indicate that the changes in renal sodium handling produced by central kappa opioid agonists result from an action of these compounds to modulate sympathetic neural outflow to the kidneys. PMID:8229746

  16. Comparison of the effects of two opioid antitussives, vadocaine hydrochloride, clobutinol and lidocaine on lung mechanics in guinea-pigs.

    PubMed

    Salonen, R O

    1988-04-01

    Intravenous administration of opioids, e.g. morphine and codeine, causes bronchoconstriction in animals and susceptible patients such as asthmatics. Therefore, the effects of two opioid antitussives (codeine and dextromethorphan), two non-opioid antitussives (vadocaine hydrochloride (2',4'-dimethyl-6'-methoxy-3-(2-methylpiperidyl) propionanilide hydrochloride, OR K-242-HCl; INN: vadocaine) and clobutinol), and lidocaine on basal lung mechanics and methacholine (MeCh, 6 micrograms/kg i.v.)-induced airway obstruction were investigated in anaesthetized guinea-pigs. Intravenous administration of codeine (10-20 mg/kg) produced a dual response in the airways; initial bronchoconstriction was followed by attenuation of the MeCh-response. Dextromethorphan (10 and 15 mg/kg) caused bronchoconstriction only. Both the opioids affected dynamic lung compliance (CDyn) more than lung resistance (RL). At doses between 1 and 20 mg/kg i.v., vadocaine, clobutinol, and lidocaine had no obvious effect on the airways. Dextromethorphan and vadocaine, both at doses of 10 and 15 mg/kg, and clobutinol (15 and 20 mg/kg) caused irreversible bradycardia and hypotension, whereas codeine (5-20 mg/kg) increased blood pressure, and to a lesser extent heart rate. These results suggest that intravenous administration of an opioid antitussive influences the small peripheral airways more than the large airways, whether the opioid has euphoric analgesic properties or not. In contrast to this, non-opioid antitussives such as vadocaine and clobutinol are without effect. At large doses, all antitussives influence the cardiovascular system considerably. PMID:3395396

  17. Characterization of the decrease of extracellular striatal dopamine induced by intrastriatal morphine administration

    PubMed Central

    Piepponen, T Petteri; Mikkola, Janne A V; Ruotsalainen, Minna; Jonker, Daniël; Ahtee, Liisa

    1999-01-01

    The effect of intrastriatally-administered morphine on striatal dopamine (DA) release was studied in freely moving rats. Morphine (1, 10 or 100 μM) was given into the striatum by reversed microdialysis, and concentrations of DA and its metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA) were simultaneously measured from the striatal dialysates.Intrastriatally-administered morphine significantly and dose-dependently decreased the extracellular concentration of DA, the concentrations of the acidic DA metabolites were only slightly decreased. The effect of morphine was antagonized by naltrexone (2.25 mg kg−1, s.c.). Pretreatment with a preferential κ-opioid receptor antagonist, MR2266 [(−)-5,9 alpha-diethyl-2-(3-furylmethyl)-2′-hydroxy-6,7-benzomorphane; 1 mg kg−1, s.c.], had no effect on the decrease of extracellular DA evoked by intrastriatal morphine (100 μM).Intrastriatal administration of the selective μ-opioid receptor agonist [D-Ala2,MePhe4,Gly-ol5] enkephalin (DAMGO; 1 μM), significantly decreased the extracellular concentration of DA in the striatum.When the rats were given morphine repeatedly in increasing doses (10–25 mg kg−1, s.c.) twice daily for 7 days and withdrawn for 48 h, the decrease of extracellular DA induced by morphine (100 μM) was significantly less than that seen in saline-treated controls.Our results show that besides the well-known stimulatory effect there is a local inhibitory component in the action of morphine on striatal DA release in the terminal regions of nigrostriatal DA neurones. Tolerance develops to this inhibitory effect during repeated morphine treatment. Furthermore, our results suggest that the effect of intrastriatally-administered morphine is mediated by the μ-opioid receptors. PMID:10369482

  18. Clinical pharmacokinetics of transdermal opioids: focus on transdermal fentanyl.

    PubMed

    Grond, S; Radbruch, L; Lehmann, K A

    2000-01-01

    Transdermal delivery allows continuous systemic application of opioids through the intact skin. This review analyses the pharmacokinetic properties of transdermal opioid administration in the context of clinical experience, with a focus on fentanyl. A transdermal therapeutic system (TTS) for fentanyl has been developed. The amount of fentanyl released is proportional to the surface area of the TTS, which is available in different sizes. After the first application of a TTS, a fentanyl depot concentrates in the upper skin layers and it takes several hours until clinical effects are observed. The time from application to minimal effective and maximum serum concentrations is 1.2 to 40 hours and 12 to 48 hours, respectively. Steady state is reached on the third day, and can be maintained as long as patches are renewed. Within each 72-hour period, serum concentrations decrease gradually over the second and third days. When a TTS is removed, fentanyl continues to be absorbed into the systemic circulation from the cutaneous depot. The terminal half-life for TTS fentanyl is approximately 13 to 25 hours. The interindividual variability of serum concentrations, partly caused by different clearance rates, is markedly larger than the intraindividual variability. The effectiveness of TTS fentanyl was first demonstrated in acute postoperative pain. However, the slow pharmacokinetics and large variability of TTS fentanyl, together with the relatively short duration of postoperative pain, precluded adequate dose finding and led to inadequate pain relief or, especially, a high incidence of respiratory depression; such use is now contraindicated. Conversely, in cancer pain, TTS fentanyl offers an interesting alternative to oral morphine, and its effectiveness and tolerability in this indication has been demonstrated by a number of trials. Its usefulness in chronic pain of nonmalignant origin remains to be confirmed in controlled trials. In general, TTS fentanyl produces the same

  19. Update on extended-release opioids in pain management.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Paul

    2014-02-01

    Chronic pain is frequently treated with our most potent analgesics, the opioids. While immediate-release opioids given every 3 - 4 h provide adequate analgesia for most patients with cancer pain and some patients with chronic nonmalignant pain, extended-release (ER) opioid formulations have been developed in the hope that patients with chronic pain would have improved analgesia, reduced side effects, more convenience, improved compliance, improved sleep and reduced nighttime pain. A more recent goal of the ER opioid product is to reduce prescription opioid addiction risk. This editorial will review the evidence that modern ER opioid formulations have advanced toward these goals. PMID:24299558

  20. Antinociceptive effect of 7-hydroxymitragynine in mice: Discovery of an orally active opioid analgesic from the Thai medicinal herb Mitragyna speciosa.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kenjiro; Horie, Syunji; Ishikawa, Hayato; Takayama, Hiromitsu; Aimi, Norio; Ponglux, Dhavadee; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2004-03-12

    Mitragynine is an indole alkaloid isolated from the Thai medicinal plant Mitragyna speciosa. We previously reported the morphine-like action of mitragynine and its related compounds in the in vitro assays. In the present study, we investigated the opioid effects of 7-hydroxymitragynine, which is isolated as its novel constituent, on contraction of isolated ileum, binding of the specific ligands to opioid receptors and nociceptive stimuli in mice. In guinea-pig ileum, 7-hydroxymitragynine inhibited electrically induced contraction through the opioid receptors. Receptor-binding assays revealed that 7-hydroxymitragynine has a higher affinity for micro-opioid receptors relative to the other opioid receptors. Administration of 7-hydroxymitragynine (2.5-10 mg/kg, s.c.) induced dose-dependent antinociceptive effects in tail-flick and hot-plate tests in mice. Its effect was more potent than that of morphine in both tests. When orally administered, 7-hydroxymitragynine (5-10 mg/kg) showed potent antinociceptive activities in tail-flick and hot-plate tests. In contrast, only weak antinociception was observed in the case of oral administration of morphine at a dose of 20 mg/kg. It was found that 7-hydroxymitragynine is a novel opioid agonist that is structurally different from the other opioid agonists, and has potent analgesic activity when orally administered. PMID:14969718

  1. Label-free integrative pharmacology on-target of opioid ligands at the opioid receptor family

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In vitro pharmacology of ligands is typically assessed using a variety of molecular assays based on predetermined molecular events in living cells. Many ligands including opioid ligands pose the ability to bind more than one receptor, and can also provide distinct operational bias to activate a specific receptor. Generating an integrative overview of the binding and functional selectivity of ligands for a receptor family is a critical but difficult step in drug discovery and development. Here we applied a newly developed label-free integrative pharmacology on-target (iPOT) approach to systematically survey the selectivity of a library of fifty-five opioid ligands against the opioid receptor family. All ligands were interrogated using dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) assays in both recombinant and native cell lines that express specific opioid receptor(s). The cells were modified with a set of probe molecules to manifest the binding and functional selectivity of ligands. DMR profiles were collected and translated to numerical coordinates that was subject to similarity analysis. A specific set of opioid ligands were then selected for quantitative pharmacology determination. Results Results showed that among fifty-five opioid ligands examined most ligands displayed agonist activity in at least one opioid receptor expressing cell line under different conditions. Further, many ligands exhibited pathway biased agonism. Conclusion We demonstrate that the iPOT effectively sorts the ligands into distinct clusters based on their binding and functional selectivity at the opioid receptor family. PMID:23497702

  2. Naloxegol: First oral peripherally acting mu opioid receptor antagonists for opioid-induced constipation

    PubMed Central

    Anantharamu, Tejus; Sharma, Sushil; Gupta, Ajay Kumar; Dahiya, Navdeep; Singh Brashier, Dick B.; Sharma, Ashok Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Opioid-induced constipation (OIC) is one of the most troublesome and the most common effects of opioid use leading to deterioration in quality of life of the patients and also has potentially deleterious repercussions on adherence and compliance to opioid therapy. With the current guidelines advocating liberal use of opioids by physicians even for non-cancer chronic pain, the situation is further complicated as these individuals are not undergoing palliative care and hence there cannot be any justification to subject these patients to the severe constipation brought on by opioid therapy which is no less debilitating than the chronic pain. The aim in these patients is to prevent the opioid-induced constipation but at the same time allow the analgesic activity of opioids. Many drugs have been used with limited success but the most specific among them were the peripherally acting mu opioid receptor antagonists (PAMORA). Methylnaltrexone and alvimopan were the early drugs in this group but were not approved for oral use in OIC. However naloxegol, the latest PAMORA has been very recently approved as the first oral drug for OIC. This article gives an overview of OIC, its current management and more specifically the development and approval of naloxegol, including pharmacokinetics, details of various clinical trials, adverse effects and its current status for the management of OIC. PMID:26312011

  3. Effects of the kappa opioid receptor antagonist MR-2266-BS on the acquisition of ethanol preference

    SciTech Connect

    Sandi, C.; Borrell, J.; Guaza, C. )

    1990-01-01

    Using a paradigm by which rats forced to drink a weak ethanol solution develop ethanol preference in consecutive retention testing days, the effects of the administration of the kappa opioid antagonist MR-2266-BS, prior to or after the forced ethanol session, were studied. Pre-conditioning subcutaneous (s.c.) administration of 1 mg/kg of MR-2266-BS induced a decrease in subsequent ethanol consumption without significantly modifying the acquisition of ethanol preference. Post-conditioning administration of MR-2266-BS induced both a dose-dependent reduction in ethanol consumption and in preference throughout the three following days. The results of the present study provide further support of the involvement of kappa-type opioids on drinking behavior, and suggest that kappa receptors may be involved in the consumption and development of preference to ethanol.

  4. Effects of opioid peptides on neural control of renal function in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Kapusta, D R; Jones, S Y; DiBona, G F

    1990-06-01

    The aims of the present study were to examine the effects of opioid receptor agonists and antagonists on the renal vascular (renal blood flow) and tubular (urinary sodium excretion) responses to renal nerve stimulation and norepinephrine in anesthetized spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Graded frequency renal nerve stimulation (0.5-4.0 Hz) and doses of norepinephrine (10-80 ng/kg) produced frequency and dose-dependent decreases in renal blood flow. The renal vasoconstrictor responses were not altered by intravenous infusion of the opioid receptor agonists methionine enkephalin (mu and delta, 75 micrograms/kg/min) or U-50488H (kappa, 20 micrograms/kg/min) or administration of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (1 mg/kg i.v.). The antinatriuretic response to low frequency (less than 1.0 Hz) electrical renal nerve stimulation was prevented by naloxone but not affected by methionine enkephalin administration without changes in glomerular filtration rate or effective renal plasma flow. These studies suggest that endogenous opioid receptor mechanisms are involved in the increased renal tubular sodium reabsorption response to low frequency renal nerve stimulation but not in the renal vasoconstrictor response to either renal nerve stimulation or norepinephrine. This might occur by facilitation of the renal nerve terminal release, the direct renal tubular action, or both, of norepinephrine to influence renal tubular sodium reabsorption. PMID:2351429

  5. Innovative Program Targets Five Common Pain Syndromes With Non-opioid Alternatives.

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    To combat the prescription opioid problem, St. Joseph's Healthcare System in Paterson, NJ, has developed a new program that gives providers options they can use to effectively alleviate pain without resorting to highly addictive medication. Launched in January 2016 in the ED at St. Joseph's Regional Medical Center (SJRMC), the Alternatives to Opioids (ALTO) program utilizes protocols that primarily target five common conditions: renal colic, sciatica, headaches, musculoskeletal pain, and extremity fractures. Administrators say they have successfully treated more than 300 patients under the new program, and they see ALTO as a model other hospitals can duplicate. Among the alternative therapies called for in the ALTO program are trigger point injections, nitrous oxide, and ultrasound-guided nerve blocks. ALTO medications are specifically chosen because of how they affect the pain receptor sites for each different pain syndrome. While the primary goal of the program is to use alternatives to opioids when-ever possible, another important underlying goal is to stop acute pain from becoming chronic. While ALTO therapies typically take a bit longer to deliver than prescribing opioids, administrators note that this has not adversely affected patient flow in the ED. PMID:27295817

  6. Recent developments toward the safer use of opioids, with a focus on hydrocodone.

    PubMed

    Covvey, Jordan R

    2015-01-01

    Opioids have become a mainstay of treatment for pain in the United States, with over 250 million prescription issued in 2012 alone. The increased prescribing of these medications has also contributed to the unintended consequence of a widening prevalence of abuse and misuse, and therefore safety has become a top agenda item for both government and health care providers alike. The move toward new abuse-deterrent formulation technologies, enhanced regulatory requirements from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), and developments in national/state policies have worked together to target a goal of promoting safer clinician prescribing, pharmacy dispensing and patient use of opioids. Hydrocodone in particular, as the most widely prescribed opioid product, has recently been subject to a myriad of changes, both through the federal rescheduling of hydrocodone-combination products (HCPs) to Schedule II, as well as the introduction of two new extended-release formulations to the USA market. These efforts represent a first step toward tackling the opioid harms epidemic, although continuing follow-up through research and policy implementation is needed to see any measureable impact on safety in the future. PMID:25769501

  7. Analgesic tolerance of opioid agonists in mutant mu-opioid receptors expressed in sensory neurons following intrathecal plasmid gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Phosphorylation sites in the C-terminus of mu-opioid receptors (MORs) are known to play critical roles in the receptor functions. Our understanding of their participation in opioid analgesia is mostly based on studies of opioid effects on mutant receptors expressed in in vitro preparations, including cell lines, isolated neurons and brain slices. The behavioral consequences of the mutation have not been fully explored due to the complexity in studies of mutant receptors in vivo. To facilitate the determination of the contribution of phosphorylation sites in MOR to opioid-induced analgesic behaviors, we expressed mutant and wild-type human MORs (hMORs) in sensory dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, a major site for nociceptive (pain) signaling and determined morphine- and the full MOR agonist, DAMGO,-induced effects on heat-induced hyperalgesic behaviors and potassium current (IK) desensitization in these rats. Findings A mutant hMOR DNA with the putative phosphorylation threonine site at position 394 replaced by an alanine (T394A), i.e., hMOR-T, or a plasmid containing wild type hMOR (as a positive control) was intrathecally delivered. The plasmid containing GFP or saline was used as the negative control. To limit the expression of exogenous DNA to neurons of DRGs, a neuron-specific promoter was included in the plasmid. Following a plasmid injection, hMOR-T or hMOR receptors were expressed in small and medium DRG neurons. Compared with saline or GFP rats, the analgesic potency of morphine was increased to a similar extent in hMOR-T and hMOR rats. Morphine induced minimum IK desensitization in both rat groups. In contrast, DAMGO increased analgesic potency and elicited IK desensitization to a significantly less extent in hMOR-T than in hMOR rats. The development and extent of acute and chronic tolerance induced by repeated morphine or DAMGO applications were not altered by the T394A mutation. Conclusions These results indicate that phosphorylation of T394

  8. Non-Medical Prescription Opioid Use and Prescription Opioid Use Disorder: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Tetrault, Jeanette M.; Butner, Jenna L.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few decades, there has been a rise in the non-medical use of prescription opioids, which has now reached epidemic proportions in the United States. In some cases, this non-medical use progresses to prescription opioid use disorder, heroin use, injection, and inhalation drug use, all of which may have further devastating consequences. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the epidemiology of the non-medical use of prescription opioids; discuss the potential progression to subsequent prescription opioid use disorder; review the state and national efforts in development to address addiction and diversion in the United States; discuss treatment options; and, lastly, to evaluate the impact of the related stigma to the development of opioid use disorder. Many unanswered questions remain, and we will explore future possibilities in how the medical community can play a role in curbing this epidemic. PMID:26339205

  9. Non-Medical Prescription Opioid Use and Prescription Opioid Use Disorder: A Review.

    PubMed

    Tetrault, Jeanette M; Butner, Jenna L

    2015-09-01

    Over the past few decades, there has been a rise in the non-medical use of prescription opioids, which has now reached epidemic proportions in the United States. In some cases, this non-medical use progresses to prescription opioid use disorder, heroin use, injection, and inhalation drug use, all of which may have further devastating consequences. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the epidemiology of the non-medical use of prescription opioids; discuss the potential progression to subsequent prescription opioid use disorder; review the state and national efforts in development to address addiction and diversion in the United States; discuss treatment options; and, lastly, to evaluate the impact of the related stigma to the development of opioid use disorder. Many unanswered questions remain, and we will explore future possibilities in how the medical community can play a role in curbing this epidemic. PMID:26339205

  10. An overview of prodrug technology and its application for developing abuse-deterrent opioids.

    PubMed

    Gudin, Jeffrey A; Nalamachu, Srinivas R

    2016-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has classified prescription drug abuse and overdose deaths as an epidemic. Prescription drug overdose is now the leading cause of injury death, with rates that have more than doubled since 1999. This crisis has developed concurrently with the increased prescribing and availability analgesic drugs, especially opioids, resulting from an effort on the part of clinicians to address a critical need for improved pain assessment and treatment. Clinicians have recognized that oftentimes, opioid analgesics are one of the few remaining options for patients who suffer with severe pain. A 2015 fact sheet issued by the Office of National Drug Policy stated: "While we must ensure better access to prescription medications to alleviate suffering, it is also vital that we do all we can to reduce the diversion and abuse of pharmaceuticals." The US Food and Drug Administration has issued guidance that encourages the research and development of abuse-deterrent formulation of opioids which have the potential to curtail abuse. Included among the recommended formulations for development of abuse-deterrent opioids are prodrugs. Prodrugs are chemically modified versions of pharmacological agents that must undergo a biochemical conversion following administration, often by enzymatic cleavage, to free the active drug. Prodrugs may be inherently abuse-deterrent because they are inactive or significantly less active until conversion to the active drug. This requirement for conversion in the GI tract can modify the pharmacokinetic profile and eliminate or reduce the euphoria when abusers change the route of administration. Abusers often attempt to extract the active drug for injection or insufflation. Prodrugs can be designed to be resistant to crushing or dissolving. In this article, we review the concept of prodrugs and introduce and examine the potential of abuse-deterrent opioid prodrugs. PMID:26615852

  11. Hypothalamic opioid-melanocortin appetitive balance and addictive craving.

    PubMed

    Reece, Albert Stuart

    2011-01-01

    Whilst the parallels between drug and food craving are receiving increasing attention, the recently elucidated complex physiology of the hypothalamic appetite regulatory centres has been largely overlooked in the efforts to understand drug craving which is one of the most refractory and problematic aspects of drug and behavioural addictions. Important conceptual gains could be made by researchers from both appetite and addiction neuroscience if they were to have an improved understanding of each others' disciplines. It is well known in addiction medicine that the use of many substances is elevated in opiate dependency. There is voluminous evidence of very high rates of drug use in opiate agonist maintained patients, and the real possibility exists that opiate agonist therapy therefore increases drug craving. Conversely, opiate antagonist therapy with naloxone or naltrexone has been shown to reduce most chemical and behavioural addictions, and naltrexone is now being developed together with bupropion as the anti-obesity drug "Contrave". Hypothalamic melanocortins, particularly α-MSH, are known to constitute the main brake to consumptive behaviour of food. There is a well described antagonism between melanocortins and opioids at many loci including the hypothalamus. Administration of exogenous opiates is known to both suppress α-MSH and to stimulate hedonic food consumption. Opiate maintenance programs are associated with weight gain. As monoamines, opioids and cannabinoids are known to be involved in appetite regulation, and as endorphin opioids are known to be perturbed in other addictions, further exploration of the hypothalamic appetite regulatory centre would appear to be an obvious, albeit presently largely overlooked, locus in which to study drug and other craving mechanisms. PMID:20926200

  12. A Social Gradient in Fatal Opioids and Cocaine Related Overdoses?

    PubMed Central

    Origer, Alain; Le Bihan, Etienne; Baumann, Michèle

    2015-01-01

    Background To determine the existence of a social gradient in fatal overdose cases related to non-prescribed opioids and cocaine use, recorded in Luxembourg between 1994 and 2011. Methods Overdose cases were individually matched with four controls in a nested case-control study design, according to sex, year of birth, drug administration route and duration of drug use. The study sample, composed of 272 cases and 1,056 controls, was stratified according to a Social Inequality Accumulation Score (SIAS), based on educational attainment, employment, income, financial situation of subjects and the professional status of their father or legal guardian. Least squares linear regression analysis on overdose mortality rates and ridit scores were applied to determine the Relative Index of Inequality (RII) of the study sample. Results A negative linear relationship between the overdose mortality rate and the relative socioeconomic position was observed. We found a difference in mortality of 29.22 overdose deaths per 100 drug users in the lowest socioeconomic group compared to the most advantaged group. In terms of the Relative Inequality Index, the overdose mortality rate of opioid and cocaine users with lowest socioeconomic profiles was 9.88 times as high as that of their peers from the highest socioeconomic group (95% CI 6.49–13.26). Conclusions Our findings suggest the existence of a marked social gradient in opioids and cocaine related overdose fatalities. Harm reduction services should integrate socially supportive offers, not only because of their general aim of social (re)integration but crucially in order to meet their most important objective, that is to reduce drug-related mortality. PMID:25938451

  13. κ-opioid receptors are not necessary for the antidepressant treatment of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Megat, Salim; Bohren, Yohann; Doridot, Stephane; Gaveriaux-Ruff, Claire; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Freund-Mercier, Marie-José; Yalcin, Ipek; Barrot, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Tricyclic antidepressants are used clinically as first-line treatments for neuropathic pain. Opioid receptors participate in this pain-relieving action, and preclinical studies in receptor-deficient mice have highlighted a critical role for δ-, but not μ-opioid receptors. In this study, we investigated whether κ-opioid (KOP) receptors have a role in the antiallodynic action of tricyclic antidepressants. Experimental Approach We used a model of neuropathic pain induced by unilateral sciatic nerve cuffing. In this model, the mechanical allodynia was evaluated using von Frey filaments. Experiments were conducted in C57BL/6J mice, and in KOP receptor-deficient mice and their wild-type littermates. The tricyclic antidepressant nortriptyline (5 mg·kg−1) was delivered twice a day for over 2 weeks. Agonists and antagonists of opioid receptors were used to test the selectivity of the KOP receptor antagonist norbinaltorphimine (nor-BNI) in mice with neuropathic pain. Key Results After 12 days of treatment, nortriptyline relieved neuropathic allodynia in both wild-type and KOP receptor-deficient mice. Surprisingly, acute nor-BNI reversed the effect of nortriptyline in both wild-type and KOP receptor-deficient mice. Further experiments showed that nor-BNI action was selective for KOP receptors at a late time-point after its administration (8 h), but not at an early time-point, when it may also interact with δ-opioid (DOP) receptors. Conclusions and Implications KOP receptors are not necessary for the effect of a tricyclic antidepressant against neuropathic allodynia. These findings together with previous data indicate that the DOP receptor is the only opioid receptor that is necessary for the antiallodynic action of antidepressants. PMID:25297905

  14. Opioid-mediated regulation of A11 diencephalospinal dopamine neurons: pharmacological evidence of activation by morphine

    PubMed Central

    Pappas, Samuel S.; Kennedy, Tom; Goudreau, John L.; Lookingland, Keith J.

    2011-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) neurons of the A11 diencephalospinal system represent the sole source of DA innervation to the spinal cord in mice, serving neuromodulatory roles in the processing of nociceptive input and movement. These neurons originate in the dorsocaudal diencephalon and project axons unilaterally throughout the rostrocaudal extent of the spinal cord, terminating predominantly in the dorsal horn. The density of A11 DA axon terminals in the lumbar region is greater in males compared to females, while in both sexes the activity of neurons terminating in the thoracic spinal cord is greater than those terminating in the lumbar region. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that A11 DA neurons are activated by opioids. To test this hypothesis, male and female mice were systemically treated with agonists or antagonists acting at the μ-opioid receptor, and spinal cord concentrations of DA and its metabolite DOPAC were determined in the thoracic and lumbar spinal cord using high performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrochemical detection. Systemic administration of the μ-opioid agonist morphine led to a dose- and time-dependent increase in spinal cord DOPAC/DA ratio (an estimate of DA neuronal activity) in both male and female mice, with greater changes occurring in the lumbar segment. Blockade of opioid receptors with the opioid antagonist naloxone reversed the stimulatory effects of morphine on A11 DA neurons in both male and female mice, but had little to no effect on the activity of these neurons when administered alone. Present findings are consistent with the conclusion that spinal cord- projecting axon terminals of A11 DA neurons are activated by opioids in both male and female mice, most likely through a disinhibitory mechanism. PMID:21605572

  15. Blunted Endogenous Opioid Release Following an Oral Amphetamine Challenge in Pathological Gamblers

    PubMed Central

    Mick, Inge; Myers, Jim; Ramos, Anna C; Stokes, Paul R A; Erritzoe, David; Colasanti, Alessandro; Gunn, Roger N; Rabiner, Eugenii A; Searle, Graham E; Waldman, Adam D; Parkin, Mark C; Brailsford, Alan D; Galduróz, José C F; Bowden-Jones, Henrietta; Clark, Luke; Nutt, David J; Lingford-Hughes, Anne R

    2016-01-01

    Pathological gambling is a psychiatric disorder and the first recognized behavioral addiction, with similarities to substance use disorders but without the confounding effects of drug-related brain changes. Pathophysiology within the opioid receptor system is increasingly recognized in substance dependence, with higher mu-opioid receptor (MOR) availability reported in alcohol, cocaine and opiate addiction. Impulsivity, a risk factor across the addictions, has also been found to be associated with higher MOR availability. The aim of this study was to characterize baseline MOR availability and endogenous opioid release in pathological gamblers (PG) using [11C]carfentanil PET with an oral amphetamine challenge. Fourteen PG and 15 healthy volunteers (HV) underwent two [11C]carfentanil PET scans, before and after an oral administration of 0.5 mg/kg of d-amphetamine. The change in [11C]carfentanil binding between baseline and post-amphetamine scans (ΔBPND) was assessed in 10 regions of interest (ROI). MOR availability did not differ between PG and HV groups. As seen previously, oral amphetamine challenge led to significant reductions in [11C]carfentanil BPND in 8/10 ROI in HV. PG demonstrated significant blunting of opioid release compared with HV. PG also showed blunted amphetamine-induced euphoria and alertness compared with HV. Exploratory analysis revealed that impulsivity positively correlated with caudate baseline BPND in PG only. This study provides the first evidence of blunted endogenous opioid release in PG. Our findings are consistent with growing evidence that dysregulation of endogenous opioids may have an important role in the pathophysiology of addictions. PMID:26552847

  16. Prostatic relaxation induced by loperamide is mediated through activation of opioid μ-2 receptors in vitro

    PubMed Central

    LU, CHIH-CHENG; CHUNG, HSIEN-HUI; CHENG, JUEI-TANG

    2011-01-01

    The merit of opioid μ-receptor activation in the improvement of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) remains obscure. In the present study, we used loperamide to identify the subtype of opioid μ-receptors involved in prostatic relaxation and investigate the possible mechanism of this relaxation. Prostate strips were isolated from 12-week-old male Wistar rats for identification of isometric tension. The prostate strips were precontracted with either 1 μmol/l phenylephrine or 50 mmol/l KCl. The decrease in muscle tone (relaxation) was then characterized after cumulative administration of loperamide (0.1 to 10 μmol/l) into the organ bath for the concentration-dependent study. Pretreatment with specific blockers or antagonists was carried out to compare the changes in loperamide-induced relaxation. Loperamide produced a marked relaxation in the isolated prostates precontracted with phenylephrine or KCl in a dose-dependent manner. This relaxation was abolished by cyprodime, a selective opioid μ-receptor antagonist, but was not modified by naloxonazine at a dose sufficient to block the opioid μ-1 receptors. Treatment with an agonist for opioid μ-1 receptors also failed to modify the muscle tone. Moreover, the relaxation by loperamide was attenuated by glibenclamide at a dose sufficient to block ATP-sensitive K+ channels. In addition, this action of loperamide was abolished by protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor and enhanced by the inhibitor of phosphodiesterase for cyclic AMP (cAMP). Our results suggest that loperamide induces prostatic relaxation through activation of opioid μ-2 receptors via the cAMP-PKA pathway to open ATP-sensitive K+ channels. PMID:22977498