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Sample records for repetitive transcranial stimulation

  1. 21 CFR 882.5805 - Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation....5805 Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation system. (a) Identification. A repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation system is an external device that delivers transcranial repetitive pulsed...

  2. 21 CFR 882.5805 - Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation....5805 Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation system. (a) Identification. A repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation system is an external device that delivers transcranial repetitive pulsed...

  3. 21 CFR 882.5805 - Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation....5805 Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation system. (a) Identification. A repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation system is an external device that delivers transcranial repetitive pulsed...

  4. Effects of slow repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with corticobasal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Civardi, Carlo; Pisano, Fabrizio; Delconte, Carmen; Collini, Alessandra; Monaco, Francesco

    2015-06-01

    Corticobasal syndrome is characterized by asymmetric cortical sensorimotor dysfunction and parkinsonism; an altered cortical excitability has been reported. We explored with transcranial magnetic stimulation the motor cortical excitability in corticobasal syndrome, and the effects of slow repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. With transcranial magnetic stimulation, we studied two corticobasal syndrome patients. We determined bilaterally from the first dorsal interosseous muscle: relaxed threshold, and contralateral and ipsilateral silent period. We also evaluated the contralateral silent period after active/sham slow repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on the most affected side. At T0 the silent period was bilaterally short. On the most affected side, active slow repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation induced a short lasting prolongation of the contralateral silent period. In corticobasal syndrome, transcranial magnetic stimulation showed a reduction cortical inhibitory phenomenon potentially reversed transiently by slow repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. PMID:25693871

  5. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Activates Specific Regions in Rat Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Ru-Rong; Schlaepfer, Thomas E.; Aizenman, Carlos D.; Epstein, Charles M.; Qiu, Dike; Huang, Justin C.; Rupp, Fabio

    1998-12-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a noninvasive technique to induce electric currents in the brain. Although rTMS is being evaluated as a possible alternative to electroconvulsive therapy for the treatment of refractory depression, little is known about the pattern of activation induced in the brain by rTMS. We have compared immediate early gene expression in rat brain after rTMS and electroconvulsive stimulation, a well-established animal model for electroconvulsive therapy. Our result shows that rTMS applied in conditions effective in animal models of depression induces different patterns of immediate-early gene expression than does electroconvulsive stimulation. In particular, rTMS evokes strong neural responses in the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus (PVT) and in other regions involved in the regulation of circadian rhythms. The response in PVT is independent of the orientation of the stimulation probe relative to the head. Part of this response is likely because of direct activation, as repetitive magnetic stimulation also activates PVT neurons in brain slices.

  6. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in anorexia nervosa: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Van den Eynde, F; Guillaume, S; Broadbent, H; Campbell, I C; Schmidt, U

    2013-02-01

    The search for new treatments to improve outcome in people with anorexia nervosa continues. This pilot study investigated whether one session of high frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) delivered to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex reduces eating disorder related symptoms following exposure to visual and real food stimuli. Safety and tolerability were also assessed. Ten right-handed people with anorexia nervosa underwent one session of rTMS. Subjective experiences related to the eating disorder (e.g. urge to restrict, feeling full etc.) were assessed before and after rTMS. Non-parametric repeated measures tests were used. rTMS was safe and well-tolerated, and resulted in reduced levels of feeling full, feeling fat and feeling anxious. Thus, rTMS may reduce core symptoms of anorexia nervosa. Future research should establish the therapeutic potential of rTMS in anorexia nervosa. PMID:21880470

  7. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Improves Handwriting in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Randhawa, Bubblepreet K.; Farley, Becky G.; Boyd, Lara A.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Parkinson disease (PD) is characterized by hypometric movements resulting from loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. PD leads to decreased activation of the supplementary motor area (SMA); the net result of these changes is a poverty of movement. The present study determined the impact of 5 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the SMA on a fine motor movement, handwriting (writing cursive “l”s), and on cortical excitability, in individuals with PD. Methods. In a cross-over design, ten individuals with PD were randomized to receive either 5 Hz or control stimulation over the SMA. Immediately following brain stimulation right handed writing was assessed. Results. 5 Hz stimulation increased vertical size of handwriting and diminished axial pressure. In addition, 5 Hz rTMS significantly decreased the threshold for excitability in the primary motor cortex. Conclusions. These data suggest that in the short term 5 Hz rTMS benefits functional fine motor task performance, perhaps by altering cortical excitability across a network of brain regions. Further, these data may provide the foundation for a larger investigation of the effects of noninvasive brain stimulation over the SMA in individuals with PD. PMID:23841021

  8. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation improves handwriting in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, Bubblepreet K; Farley, Becky G; Boyd, Lara A

    2013-01-01

    Background. Parkinson disease (PD) is characterized by hypometric movements resulting from loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. PD leads to decreased activation of the supplementary motor area (SMA); the net result of these changes is a poverty of movement. The present study determined the impact of 5 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the SMA on a fine motor movement, handwriting (writing cursive "l"s), and on cortical excitability, in individuals with PD. Methods. In a cross-over design, ten individuals with PD were randomized to receive either 5 Hz or control stimulation over the SMA. Immediately following brain stimulation right handed writing was assessed. Results. 5 Hz stimulation increased vertical size of handwriting and diminished axial pressure. In addition, 5 Hz rTMS significantly decreased the threshold for excitability in the primary motor cortex. Conclusions. These data suggest that in the short term 5 Hz rTMS benefits functional fine motor task performance, perhaps by altering cortical excitability across a network of brain regions. Further, these data may provide the foundation for a larger investigation of the effects of noninvasive brain stimulation over the SMA in individuals with PD. PMID:23841021

  9. Neuronavigation-guided Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Aphasia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Woo-Jin; Hahn, Soo Jung; Kim, Won-Seok; Paik, Nam-Jong

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is widely used for several neurological conditions, as it has gained acknowledgement for its potential therapeutic effects. Brain excitability is non-invasively modulated by rTMS, and rTMS to the language areas has proved its potential effects on treatment of aphasia. In our protocol, we aim to artificially induce virtual aphasia in healthy subjects by inhibiting Brodmann area 44 and 45 using neuronavigational TMS (nTMS), and F3 of the International 10-20 EEG system for conventional TMS (cTMS). To measure the degree of aphasia, changes in reaction time to a picture naming task pre- and post-stimulation are measured and compare the delay in reaction time between nTMS and cTMS. Accuracy of the two TMS stimulation methods is compared by averaging the Talairach coordinates of the target and the actual stimulation. Consistency of stimulation is demonstrated by the error range from the target. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate use of nTMS and to describe the benefits and limitations of the nTMS compared to those of cTMS. PMID:27214154

  10. [Contralateral and ipsilateral repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in Parkinson patients].

    PubMed

    de Groot, M; Hermann, W; Steffen, J; Wagner, A; Grahmann, F

    2001-12-01

    In seven women and two men with Parkinson's disease, Hoehn and Yahr stage 1 or 2, the effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) was evaluated. Primary endpoint outcome measure was the changing of the motor items of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (subscale III of UP-DRS) 24 h after stimulation. Kinesiologic tests and writing samples were secondary outcome measures. After discontinuing all medication, stimulation was performed with 5 Hz at 90% of the motor threshold over the primary motor cortex of the more affected. There were 2250 stimuli applied, divided into 15 trains at intervals of 10 s. The identical treatment of the opposite side served as control treatment. Only treatment of the more affected side resulted in a significant improvement of the clinical symptoms of 46% as assessed by the UPDRS (p < 0.02). This effectiveness differed significantly from the control treatment (21%, p < 0.02). The kinesiological testing did not show any significant speeding of movements (p > 0.05). Some patients showed a normalisation of the previously disturbed handwriting specimen. These data confirm the previous observation that rTMS of primary motor regions leads to at least temporary clinical improvement of symptoms in patients with Parkinson's disease. PMID:11789438

  11. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulator with controllable pulse parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterchev, Angel V.; Murphy, David L.; Lisanby, Sarah H.

    2011-06-01

    The characteristics of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) pulses influence the physiological effect of TMS. However, available TMS devices allow very limited adjustment of the pulse parameters. We describe a novel TMS device that uses a circuit topology incorporating two energy storage capacitors and two insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) modules to generate near-rectangular electric field pulses with adjustable number, polarity, duration, and amplitude of the pulse phases. This controllable pulse parameter TMS (cTMS) device can induce electric field pulses with phase widths of 10-310 µs and positive/negative phase amplitude ratio of 1-56. Compared to conventional monophasic and biphasic TMS, cTMS reduces energy dissipation up to 82% and 57% and decreases coil heating up to 33% and 41%, respectively. We demonstrate repetitive TMS trains of 3000 pulses at frequencies up to 50 Hz with electric field pulse amplitude and width variability less than the measurement resolution (1.7% and 1%, respectively). Offering flexible pulse parameter adjustment and reduced power consumption and coil heating, cTMS enhances existing TMS paradigms, enables novel research applications and could lead to clinical applications with potentially enhanced potency.

  12. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulator with Controllable Pulse Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Peterchev, Angel V; Murphy, David L; Lisanby, Sarah H

    2013-01-01

    The characteristics of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) pulses influence the physiological effect of TMS. However, available TMS devices allow very limited adjustment of the pulse parameters. We describe a novel TMS device that uses a circuit topology incorporating two energy storage capacitors and two insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) modules to generate near-rectangular electric field pulses with adjustable number, polarity, duration, and amplitude of the pulse phases. This controllable pulse parameter TMS (cTMS) device can induce electric field pulses with phase widths of 10–310 μs and positive/negative phase amplitude ratio of 1–56. Compared to conventional monophasic and biphasic TMS, cTMS reduces energy dissipation by up to 82% and 57%, and decreases coil heating by up to 33% and 41%, respectively. We demonstrate repetitive TMS trains of 3,000 pulses at frequencies up to 50 Hz with electric field pulse amplitude and width variability less than the measurement resolution (1.7% and 1%, respectively). Offering flexible pulse parameter adjustment and reduced power consumption and coil heating, cTMS enhances existing TMS paradigms, enables novel research applications, and could lead to clinical applications with potentially enhanced potency. PMID:21540487

  13. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulator with controllable pulse parameters.

    PubMed

    Peterchev, Angel V; Murphy, David L; Lisanby, Sarah H

    2011-06-01

    The characteristics of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) pulses influence the physiological effect of TMS. However, available TMS devices allow very limited adjustment of the pulse parameters. We describe a novel TMS device that uses a circuit topology incorporating two energy storage capacitors and two insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) modules to generate near-rectangular electric field pulses with adjustable number, polarity, duration, and amplitude of the pulse phases. This controllable pulse parameter TMS (cTMS) device can induce electric field pulses with phase widths of 10-310 µs and positive/negative phase amplitude ratio of 1-56. Compared to conventional monophasic and biphasic TMS, cTMS reduces energy dissipation up to 82% and 57% and decreases coil heating up to 33% and 41%, respectively. We demonstrate repetitive TMS trains of 3000 pulses at frequencies up to 50 Hz with electric field pulse amplitude and width variability less than the measurement resolution (1.7% and 1%, respectively). Offering flexible pulse parameter adjustment and reduced power consumption and coil heating, cTMS enhances existing TMS paradigms, enables novel research applications and could lead to clinical applications with potentially enhanced potency. PMID:21540487

  14. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation to the Primary Motor Cortex Interferes with Motor Learning by Observing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Liana E.; Wilson, Elizabeth T.; Gribble, Paul L.

    2009-01-01

    Neural representations of novel motor skills can be acquired through visual observation. We used repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to test the idea that this "motor learning by observing" is based on engagement of neural processes for learning in the primary motor cortex (M1). Human subjects who observed another person learning…

  15. Pressure Pain Thresholds Increase after Preconditioning 1 Hz Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation with Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Moloney, Tonya M.; Witney, Alice G.

    2014-01-01

    Background The primary motor cortex (M1) is an effective target of non-invasive cortical stimulation (NICS) for pain threshold modulation. It has been suggested that the initial level of cortical excitability of M1 plays a key role in the plastic effects of NICS. Objective Here we investigate whether transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) primed 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) modulates experimental pressure pain thresholds and if this is related to observed alterations in cortical excitability. Method 15 healthy, male participants received 10 min 1 mA anodal, cathodal and sham tDCS to the left M1 before 15 min 1 Hz rTMS in separate sessions over a period of 3 weeks. Motor cortical excitability was recorded at baseline, post-tDCS priming and post-rTMS through recording motor evoked potentials (MEPs) from right FDI muscle. Pressure pain thresholds were determined by quantitative sensory testing (QST) through a computerized algometer, on the palmar thenar of the right hand pre- and post-stimulation. Results Cathodal tDCS-primed 1 Hz-rTMS was found to reverse the expected suppressive effect of 1 Hz rTMS on cortical excitability; leading to an overall increase in activity (p<0.001) with a parallel increase in pressure pain thresholds (p<0.01). In contrast, anodal tDCS-primed 1 Hz-rTMS resulted in a corresponding decrease in cortical excitability (p<0.05), with no significant effect on pressure pain. Conclusion This study demonstrates that priming the M1 before stimulation of 1 Hz-rTMS modulates experimental pressure pain thresholds in a safe and controlled manner, producing a form of analgesia. PMID:24658333

  16. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation to Supplementary Motor Area in Refractory Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Treatment: a Sham-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Harika-Germaneau, Ghina; Rachid, Fady; Gaudeau-Bosma, Christian; Tanguy, Marie-Laure; BenAdhira, Rene; Bouaziz, Noomane; Popa, Traian; Wassouf, Issa; Saba, Ghassen; Januel, Dominique; Jaafari, Nematollah

    2016-01-01

    Background: Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation has been explored in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder, but with negative or conflicting results. This randomized double-blind study was designed to assess the efficacy of 1-Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over the presupplementary area. Methods: Forty medication-resistant patients were assigned to 4 weeks of either active or sham repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation targeting the presupplementary area with the help of a neuronavigation system. Results: According to the Yale-Brown obsessive-compulsive scale, the baseline-week 4 evolution showed no significant differences between groups. Responder rates at week 4 were not different between groups (repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation 10.5% vs sham 20%; P=.63). Conclusion: Low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation applied to the presupplementary area seems ineffective for the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder patients, at least in severe and drug-refractory cases such as those included in this study. Further research is required to determine profiles of responder patients and appropriate repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation parameters for obsessive-compulsive disorder. PMID:27207923

  17. Phantom limb pain: low frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in unaffected hemisphere.

    PubMed

    Di Rollo, Andrea; Pallanti, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    Phantom limb pain is very common after limb amputation and is often difficult to treat. The motor cortex stimulation is a valid treatment for deafferentation pain that does not respond to conventional pain treatment, with relief for 50% to 70% of patients. This treatment is invasive as it uses implanted epidural electrodes. Cortical stimulation can be performed noninvasively by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). The stimulation of the hemisphere that isn't involved in phantom limb (unaffected hemisphere), remains unexplored. We report a case of phantom limb pain treated with 1 Hz rTMS stimulation over motor cortex in unaffected hemisphere. This stimulation produces a relevant clinical improvement of phantom limb pain; however, further studies are necessary to determine the efficacy of the method and the stimulation parameters. PMID:21629848

  18. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation may induce language switching in bilingual patients.

    PubMed

    Holtzheimer, Paul; Fawaz, Walid; Wilson, Christopher; Avery, David

    2005-09-01

    The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) may participate in the process of language switching in multilingual individuals. We present two cases of bilingual patients who experienced unexpected language switching after receiving high-frequency, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to the left DLPFC as a treatment for major depression. These preliminary findings support the role of the DLPFC in language switching in polyglots and highlight the potential value of rTMS for non-invasively investigating language function in humans. Further investigation is warranted. PMID:16098377

  19. Cognitive effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with neurodegenerative diseases - clinician's perspective.

    PubMed

    Anderkova, Lubomira; Rektorova, Irena

    2014-04-15

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) represents a promising tool for studying and influencing cognition in people with neurodegenerative diseases. This procedure is noninvasive and painless, and it does not require the use of anesthesia or pharmacological substances. In this systematic critical review we report outcomes from research focused on behavioral cognitive effects induced by rTMS in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) preceding AD. There are still major limitations to rTMS use, such as a poor understanding of its after-effects and inter-individual variability in their magnitude, discrepancies in stimulation protocols and study designs, varied selection of the specific stimulated areas and control procedures, and neuropsychological methods for assessment of after-effects; hence, the results of the present research can only be considered preliminary. The future directions are discussed. PMID:24530170

  20. Modulation of N400 in Chronic Non-Fluent Aphasia Using Low Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barwood, Caroline H. S.; Murdoch, Bruce E.; Whelan, Brooke-Mai; Lloyd, David; Riek, Stephan; O'Sullivan, John D.; Coulthard, Alan; Wong, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Low frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) has previously been applied to language homologues in non-fluent populations of persons with aphasia yielding significant improvements in behavioral language function up to 43 months post stimulation. The present study aimed to investigate the electrophysiological correlates…

  1. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex enhances working memory.

    PubMed

    Bagherzadeh, Yasaman; Khorrami, Anahita; Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza; Shariat, Seyed Vahid; Pantazis, Dimitrios

    2016-07-01

    Neuroimaging and electrophysiological studies have unequivocally identified the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) as a crucial structure for top-down control of working memory (WM) processes. By modulating the excitability of neurons in a targeted cortical area, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) offers a unique way to modulate DLPFC function, opening the possibility of WM facilitation. Even though TMS neuromodulation effects over the left DLPFC have successfully improved WM performance in patients with depression and schizophrenia in a multitude of studies, raising the potential of TMS as a safe efficacious treatment for WM deficits, TMS interventions in healthy individuals have produced mixed and inconclusive results. Here, we stimulated the left DLPFC of healthy individuals using a high-frequency repetitive TMS protocol and evaluated behavioral performance in a battery of cognitive tasks. We found that TMS treatment enhanced WM performance in a verbal digit span and a visuospatial 2-back task. PMID:26884132

  2. Daily left prefrontal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for medication-resistant burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Umezaki, Y; Badran, B W; Gonzales, T S; George, M S

    2015-08-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a persistent and chronic burning sensation in the mouth in the absence of any abnormal organic findings. The pathophysiology of BMS is unclear and its treatment is not fully established. Although antidepressant medication is commonly used for treatment, there are some medication-resistant patients, and a new treatment for medication-resistant BMS is needed. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a non-invasive brain stimulation technology approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of depression. Recent studies have found beneficial effects of TMS for the treatment of pain. A case of BMS treated successfully with daily left prefrontal rTMS over a 2-week period is reported here. Based on this patient's clinical course and a recent pain study, the mechanism by which TMS may act to decrease the burning pain is discussed. PMID:25979192

  3. Update on repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in obsessive-compulsive disorder: different targets.

    PubMed

    Blom, Rianne M; Figee, Martijn; Vulink, Nienke; Denys, Damiaan

    2011-08-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a chronic, disabling disorder. Ten percent of patients remain treatment refractory despite several treatments. For these severe, treatment-refractory patients, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been suggested as a treatment option. Since 1997, in published trials, a total of 110 OCD patients have been treated with rTMS. This review aims to provide an update on rTMS treatment in patients with OCD. First, the mechanism of action is discussed, followed by the efficacy and side effects of rTMS at various brain targets, and finally implications for the future. Due to the lack of studies with comparable stimulation or treatment parameters and with reliable designs, it is difficult to draw clear conclusions. In general, rTMS appears to be effective in open-label studies; however, this has not yet been replicated in randomized, sham-controlled trials. PMID:21547545

  4. Effects of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Performing Eye-Hand Integration Tasks: Four Preliminary Studies with Children Showing Low-Functioning Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panerai, Simonetta; Tasca, Domenica; Lanuzza, Bartolo; Trubia, Grazia; Ferri, Raffaele; Musso, Sabrina; Alagona, Giovanna; Di Guardo, Giuseppe; Barone, Concetta; Gaglione, Maria P.; Elia, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    This report, based on four studies with children with low-functioning autism, aimed at evaluating the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation delivered on the left and right premotor cortices on eye-hand integration tasks; defining the long-lasting effects of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation; and…

  5. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct-current stimulation in neuropathic pain due to radiculopathy: a randomized sham-controlled comparative study.

    PubMed

    Attal, Nadine; Ayache, Samar S; Ciampi De Andrade, Daniel; Mhalla, Alaa; Baudic, Sophie; Jazat, Frédérique; Ahdab, Rechdi; Neves, Danusa O; Sorel, Marc; Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal; Bouhassira, Didier

    2016-06-01

    No study has directly compared the effectiveness of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) in neuropathic pain (NP). In this 2-centre randomised double-blind sham-controlled study, we compared the efficacy of 10-Hz rTMS and anodal 2-mA tDCS of the motor cortex and sham stimulation contralateral to the painful area (3 daily sessions) in patients with NP due to lumbosacral radiculopathy. Average pain intensity (primary outcome) was evaluated after each session and 5 days later. Secondary outcomes included neuropathic symptoms and thermal pain thresholds for the upper limbs. We used an innovative design that minimised bias by randomly assigning patients to 1 of 2 groups: active rTMS and tDCS or sham rTMS and tDCS. For each treatment group (active or sham), the order of the sessions was again randomised according to a crossover design. In total, 51 patients were screened and 35 (51% women) were randomized. Active rTMS was superior to tDCS and sham in pain intensity (F = 2.89 and P = 0.023). Transcranial direct-current stimulation was not superior to sham, but its analgesic effects were correlated to that of rTMS (P = 0.046), suggesting common mechanisms of action. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation lowered cold pain thresholds (P = 0.04) and its effect on cold pain was correlated with its analgesic efficacy (P = 0.006). However, rTMS had no impact on individual neuropathic symptoms. Thus, rTMS is more effective than tDCS and sham in patients with NP due to lumbosacral radiculopathy and may modulate the sensory and affective dimensions of pain. PMID:26845524

  6. History, Studies and Specific Uses of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) in Treating Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    NOOHI, Sima; AMIRSALARI, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Objective In this study, repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) and its specific use for treating epilepsy were carefully scrutinized. Materials & Methods Target researches such as review articles, case reports, books and theses, which had to do with therapeutic method of rTMS were surveyed. It is worth mentioning that until the final stages, the search for records and documents related to rTMS went on and in the end, the collected data underwent a qualitative analysis. Results As the literature review suggests, TMS principally applies electromagnetic induction to generate an electric current inside the brain without physical contact. The therapeutic uses of rTMS are for a wide range of mental disorders, namely epilepsy, chronic pains, motor disorders and so on. Conclusion Despite safety concerns and possible side effects, many researchers subscribe to rTMS and see a bright future for it. PMID:27057180

  7. Calcium dependent plasticity applied to repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation with a neural field model.

    PubMed

    Wilson, M T; Fung, P K; Robinson, P A; Shemmell, J; Reynolds, J N J

    2016-08-01

    The calcium dependent plasticity (CaDP) approach to the modeling of synaptic weight change is applied using a neural field approach to realistic repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) protocols. A spatially-symmetric nonlinear neural field model consisting of populations of excitatory and inhibitory neurons is used. The plasticity between excitatory cell populations is then evaluated using a CaDP approach that incorporates metaplasticity. The direction and size of the plasticity (potentiation or depression) depends on both the amplitude of stimulation and duration of the protocol. The breaks in the inhibitory theta-burst stimulation protocol are crucial to ensuring that the stimulation bursts are potentiating in nature. Tuning the parameters of a spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) window with a Monte Carlo approach to maximize agreement between STDP predictions and the CaDP results reproduces a realistically-shaped window with two regions of depression in agreement with the existing literature. Developing understanding of how TMS interacts with cells at a network level may be important for future investigation. PMID:27259518

  8. Electrophysiological correlates of bilateral and unilateral repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with bipolar depression.

    PubMed

    Kazemi, Reza; Rostami, Reza; Khomami, Sanaz; Horacek, Jiri; Brunovsky, Martin; Novak, Tomas; Fitzgerald, Paul B

    2016-06-30

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been demonstrated to have efficacy in the treatment of unipolar depression but limited research has explored the efficacy of rTMS in bipolar depression. Therefore, we conducted a comparative clinical trial evaluating clinical responses to prefrontal bilateral and unilateral rTMS in patients suffering from bipolar depression. We hypothesized that, 1) the response to the treatment would be associated with a decrease in the frequency of beta waves, 2) bilateral stimulation of the cortex would bring about more extensive changes in brain activity than unilateral stimulation, and 3) bilateral stimulation is more effective than unilateral. Thirty patients with bipolar depression were divided into two groups. Bilateral Group (n=15) who received rTMS in the left DLPFC (10Hz) and right DLPFC (1-Hz), and unilateral group (n=15) who received the stimulation only in the right DLPFC (1-Hz) during 20 treatment sessions. The proportion of responders in the bilateral stimulation group was significantly higher than that in the unilateral group [80% versus 47%]. The remission rate was 40% in the bilateral group and 40% in the unilateral group (not significant). In the responders to bilateral rTMS treatment, a significant reduction of alpha1-2, beta 1-3, and gamma frequencies were observed in medial and superior frontal and cingulate gyrus . Responders to the unilateral treatment showed decrease of gamma frequency in postcentral gyrus, precuneus, superior and inferior parietal lobule, Cuneus and angular gyrus. In conclusion, we found that bilateral stimulation was more effective than the unilateral stimulation and evidence that beta frequency activity could possibly be used as a marker for response to rTMS. PMID:27138833

  9. Effects of low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on event-related potential P300

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torii, Tetsuya; Sato, Aya; Iwahashi, Masakuni; Iramina, Keiji

    2012-04-01

    The present study analyzed the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on brain activity. P300 latency of event-related potential (ERP) was used to evaluate the effects of low-frequency and short-term rTMS by stimulating the supramarginal gyrus (SMG), which is considered to be the related area of P300 origin. In addition, the prolonged stimulation effects on P300 latency were analyzed after applying rTMS. A figure-eight coil was used to stimulate left-right SMG, and intensity of magnetic stimulation was 80% of motor threshold. A total of 100 magnetic pulses were applied for rTMS. The effects of stimulus frequency at 0.5 or 1 Hz were determined. Following rTMS, an odd-ball task was performed and P300 latency of ERP was measured. The odd-ball task was performed at 5, 10, and 15 min post-rTMS. ERP was measured prior to magnetic stimulation as a control. Electroencephalograph (EEG) was measured at Fz, Cz, and Pz that were indicated by the international 10-20 electrode system. Results demonstrated that different effects on P300 latency occurred between 0.5-1 Hz rTMS. With 1 Hz low-frequency magnetic stimulation to the left SMG, P300 latency decreased. Compared to the control, the latency time difference was approximately 15 ms at Cz. This decrease continued for approximately 10 min post-rTMS. In contrast, 0.5 Hz rTMS resulted in delayed P300 latency. Compared to the control, the latency time difference was approximately 20 ms at Fz, and this delayed effect continued for approximately 15 min post-rTMS. Results demonstrated that P300 latency varied according to rTMS frequency. Furthermore, the duration of the effect was not similar for stimulus frequency of low-frequency rTMS.

  10. [Evaluation of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation effectiveness in treatment of psychiatric and neurologic diseases].

    PubMed

    Pastuszak, Żanna; Stępień, Anna; Piusińska-Macoch, Renata; Brodacki, Bogdan; Tomczykiewicz, Kazimierz

    2016-06-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a treatment option with proved effectiveness especially in drug resist depression. It is used in functional brain mapping before neurosurgery operations and diagnostic of corticospinal tract transmission. Many studies are performed to evaluate rTMS using in treatment of obsessive - compulsive disorder, schizophrenia, autism, strokes, tinnitus, Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases, cranial traumas. Moreover rTMS was used in treatment of multiple sclerosis, migraine, dystonia. Electromagnetical field generated by rTMS penetrate skin of the scalp and infiltrate brain tissues to a depth of 2 cm, cause neurons depolarization and generating motor, cognitive and affective effects. Depending on the stimulation frequency rTMS can stimuli or inhibit brain cortex. rTMS mechanism of action remains elusive. Probably it is connected with enhancement of neurotransmitters, modulation of signals transductions pathways in Central Nervous System, gene transcription and release of neuroprotective substances. Studies with use of animals revealed that rTMS stimulation can generate brain changes similar to those seen after electric shock therapy without provoking seizures. The aim of presenting study was to analyze actual researches evaluating rTMS use in treatment of psychiatric and neurological diseases. PMID:27403908

  11. Low and High Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for the Treatment of Spasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valle, Angela C.; Dionisio, Karen; Pitskel, Naomi Bass; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Orsati, Fernanda; Ferreira, Merari J. L.; Boggio, Paulo S.; Lima, Moises C.; Rigonatti, Sergio P.; Fregni, Felipe

    2007-01-01

    The development of non-invasive techniques of cortical stimulation, such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), has opened new potential avenues for the treatment of neuropsychiatric diseases. We hypothesized that an increase in the activity in the motor cortex by cortical stimulation would increase its inhibitory influence on spinal…

  12. The emerging role for repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in optimizing the treatment of adolescent depression.

    PubMed

    Croarkin, Paul E; Wall, Christopher A; McClintock, Shawn M; Kozel, Frank Andrew; Husain, Mustafa M; Sampson, Shirlene M

    2010-12-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) in adolescents is a common illness and significant public health problem. Treatment is challenging because of recurrences and limited modalities. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and cognitive behavioral therapy are considered the standard of care in severe or treatment-resistant MDD in this age group. However, responses to these interventions are often suboptimal. A growing body of research supports the efficacy of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for the treatment of MDD in adults. Induced seizures are a primary safety concern, although this is rare with appropriate precautions. There is, however, limited experience with rTMS as a therapeutic intervention for adolescent psychiatric disturbances. This review will summarize the rTMS efficacy and safety data in adults and describe all published experience with adolescent MDD. Applications in other adolescent psychiatric illnesses such as schizophrenia and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder are reviewed. Safety and ethical issues are paramount with investigational treatments in adolescent psychiatric illnesses. However, further research with rTMS in adolescent MDD is imperative to establish standards for optimal stimulation site, treatment parameters, and its role in treatment algorithms. These may diverge from adult data. Early intervention with neuromodulation could also hold the promise of addressing the developmental course of dysfunctional neurocircuitry. PMID:20418774

  13. Effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on auditory function following acoustic trauma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haidi; Xiong, Hao; Ou, Yongkang; Xu, Yaodong; Pang, Jiaqi; Lai, Lan; Zheng, Yiqing

    2016-09-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is one form of non-invasive brain stimulation and increasingly shows neuroprotection in multiple neurological disorders. However, the potential of rTMS for protective action on auditory function following acoustic trauma has not been investigated. Here, we examined effect of TMS on hearing conservation, neurons survival and brain-derived neurotrophin factor (BDNF) expression in the cochlea and auditory cortex following acoustic trauma in rats. Wistar rats were exposed to intense pure tone noise (10 kHz, 120 dB SPL for 2 h) followed by rTMS treatment or sham treatment (handling control) daily for 14 days. Auditory brainstem response revealed there was no significant difference in hearing threshold shifts between rTMS- and sham-treated rats, although rTMS-treated rats showed less neuron loss in the auditory cortex in comparison with sham rats. Additionally, acoustic trauma increased BDNF expression in the cochlea and auditory cortex, and this elevation could be attenuated by rTMS treatment. Our results suggest present regiment of rTMS does not protect hearing against acoustic trauma, but maybe have implications for tinnitus treatment. PMID:27230393

  14. flexTMS--a novel repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation device with freely programmable stimulus currents.

    PubMed

    Gattinger, Norbert; Moessnang, Georg; Gleich, Bernhard

    2012-07-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is able to noninvasively excite neuronal populations due to brief magnetic field pulses. The efficiency and the characteristics of stimulation pulse shapes influence the physiological effect of TMS. However, commercial devices allow only a minimum of control of different pulse shapes. Basically, just sinusoidal and monophasic pulse shapes with fixed pulse widths are available. Only few research groups work on TMS devices with controllable pulse parameters such as pulse shape or pulse width. We describe a novel TMS device with a full-bridge circuit topology incorporating four insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) modules and one energy storage capacitor to generate arbitrary waveforms. This flexible TMS (flexTMS ) device can generate magnetic pulses which can be adjusted with respect to pulse width, polarity, and intensity. Furthermore, the equipment allows us to set paired pulses with a variable interstimulus interval (ISI) from 0 to 20 ms with a step size of 10  μs. All user-defined pulses can be applied continually with repetition rates up to 30 pulses per second (pps) or, respectively, up to 100 pps in theta burst mode. Offering this variety of flexibility, flexTMS will allow the enhancement of existing TMS paradigms and novel research applications. PMID:22531742

  15. Effect of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Patients With Dysarthria After Subacute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Yong Gyu; Do, Kyung Hee; Park, Sung Jong; Chang, Min Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) could improve dysarthria in stroke patients at the subacute stage. Methods This study was a prospective, randomized, double-blind controlled trial. Patients who had unilateral middle cerebral artery infarction were enrolled. In patients in the rTMS group, we found hot spots by searching for the evoked motor potential of the orbicularis oris on the non-affected side. We performed rTMS at a low frequency (1 Hz), 1,500 stimulations/day, 5 days a week for 2 weeks on the hotspots. We used the same protocol in the sham stimulation group patients as that in the rTMS group, except that the angle of the coil was perpendicular to the skull rather than tangential to it. The patients in both groups received speech therapy for 30 minutes, 5 days a week from a skilled speech therapist. The speech therapist measured the Urimal Test of Articulation and Phonology, alternative motion rates, sequential motion rates, and maximal phonation time before and after intervention sessions. Results Forty-two patients were enrolled in this study and 20 completed the study. Statistical analysis revealed significant improvements on the dysarthria scales in both groups. The sequential motion rate (SMR)-PǝTǝKǝ showed significantly greater improvement in the rTMS group patients than in the sham stimulation group. Conclusion Patients in the rTMS group showed greater improvement in articulation than did patients in the sham rTMS group. Therefore, rTMS can have a synergistic effect with speech therapy in treating dysarthria after stroke. PMID:26605178

  16. Treatment-Resistant Depression Entering Remission Following a Seizure during the Course of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ju-Wan; Bae, Kyung-Yeol; Kim, Sung-Wan; Kang, Hee-Ju; Shin, Il-Seon; Yoon, Jin-Sang; Kim, Jae-Min

    2016-07-01

    Major depressive disorder is often resistant to antidepressant treatment. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been used in treatment-resistant depression (TRD). Known adverse events of rTMS include transient headache, local pain, syncope, seizure induction, and hypomania induction. This report outlines a patient with TRD who unexpectedly improved following a seizure during the course of rTMS, which has never been reported. PMID:27482250

  17. Treatment-Resistant Depression Entering Remission Following a Seizure during the Course of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ju-Wan; Bae, Kyung-Yeol; Kim, Sung-Wan; Kang, Hee-Ju; Shin, Il-Seon; Yoon, Jin-Sang

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder is often resistant to antidepressant treatment. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been used in treatment-resistant depression (TRD). Known adverse events of rTMS include transient headache, local pain, syncope, seizure induction, and hypomania induction. This report outlines a patient with TRD who unexpectedly improved following a seizure during the course of rTMS, which has never been reported. PMID:27482250

  18. Safety of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with epilepsy: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Luisa Santos; Müller, Vanessa Teixeira; da Mota Gomes, Marleide; Rotenberg, Alexander; Fregni, Felipe

    2016-04-01

    Approximately one-third of patients with epilepsy remain with pharmacologically intractable seizures. An emerging therapeutic modality for seizure suppression is repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). Despite being considered a safe technique, rTMS carries the risk of inducing seizures, among other milder adverse events, and thus, its safety in the population with epilepsy should be continuously assessed. We performed an updated systematic review on the safety and tolerability of rTMS in patients with epilepsy, similar to a previous report published in 2007 (Bae EH, Schrader LM, Machii K, Alonso-Alonso M, Riviello JJ, Pascual-Leone A, Rotenberg A. Safety and tolerability of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with epilepsy: a review of the literature. Epilepsy Behav. 2007; 10 (4): 521-8), and estimated the risk of seizures and other adverse events during or shortly after rTMS application. We searched the literature for reports of rTMS being applied on patients with epilepsy, with no time or language restrictions, and obtained studies published from January 1990 to August 2015. A total of 46 publications were identified, of which 16 were new studies published after the previous safety review of 2007. We noted the total number of subjects with epilepsy undergoing rTMS, medication usage, incidence of adverse events, and rTMS protocol parameters: frequency, intensity, total number of stimuli, train duration, intertrain intervals, coil type, and stimulation site. Our main data analysis included separate calculations for crude per subject risk of seizure and other adverse events, as well as risk per 1000 stimuli. We also performed an exploratory, secondary analysis on the risk of seizure and other adverse events according to the type of coil used (figure-of-8 or circular), stimulation frequency (≤1Hz or >1Hz), pulse intensity in terms of motor threshold (<100% or ≥100%), and number of stimuli per session (<500 or≥500). Presence or

  19. Innovative treatment approaches in schizophrenia enhancing neuroplasticity: aerobic exercise, erythropoetin and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wobrock, T; Hasan, A; Falkai, P

    2012-06-01

    Schizophrenia is a brain disorder associated with subtle, but replicable cerebral volume loss mostly prevalent in frontal and temporal brain regions. Post-mortem studies of the hippocampus point to a reduction of the neuropil constituting mainly of synapses associated with changes of molecules mediating plastic responses of neurons during development and learning. Derived from animal studies interventions to enhance neuroplasticity by inducing adult neurogenesis, synaptogenesis, angiogenesis and long-term potentiation (LTP) were developed and the results translated into clinical studies in schizophrenia. Out of these interventions aerobic exercise has been shown to increase hippocampal volume, elevate N-acetyl-aspartate in the hippocampus as neuronal marker, and improve short-term memory in schizophrenia. The hematopoietic growth factor erythropoetin (EPO) is involved in brain development and associated with the production and differentiation of neuronal precursor cells. A first study demonstrated a positive effect of EPO application on cognition in schizophrenia patients. In randomised controlled studies with small sample size, the efficacy of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), a biological intervention focussing on the enhancement of LTP, has been shown for the improvement of positive and negative symptoms in schizophrenia,. The putative underlying neurobiological mechanisms of these interventions including the role of neurotrophic factors are outlined and implications for future research regarding neuroprotection strategies to improve schizophrenia are discussed. PMID:22283764

  20. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation as a Novel Therapy in Animal Models of Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Thangavelu Soundara; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Bruschetta, Daniele; Quartarone, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) in humans causes a broad range of structural damage and functional deficits due to both primary and secondary injury mechanisms. Over the past three decades, animal models have been established to replicate the diverse changes of human TBI, to study the underlying pathophysiology and to develop new therapeutic strategies. However, drugs that were identified as neuroprotective in animal brain injury models were not successful in clinical trials phase II or phase III. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a powerful noninvasive approach to excite cortical neurons in humans and animals, widely applied for therapeutic purpose in patients with brain diseases. In addition, recent animal studies showed rTMS as a strong neuroprotective tool. In this chapter, we discuss the rationale and mechanisms related to rTMS as well as therapeutic applications and putative molecular mechanisms. Furthermore, relevant biochemical studies and neuroprotective effect in animal models and possible application of rTMS as a novel treatment for rodent brain injury models are discussed. PMID:27604732

  1. Factors Associated With Upper Extremity Motor Recovery After Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Hwa; Kim, Sang Beom; Lee, Kyeong Woo; Kim, Min Ah; Lee, Sook Joung

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine factors associated with motor recovery of the upper extremity after repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) treatment in stroke patients. Methods Twenty-nine patients with subacute stroke participated in this study. rTMS was applied to the hand motor cortex for 10 minutes at a 110% resting motor threshold and 10 Hz frequency for two weeks. We evaluated the biographical, neurological, clinical, and functional variables, in addition to the motor-evoked potential (MEP) response. The Manual Function Test (MFT) was performed before, immediately after, and two weeks after, the treatment. Patients were divided into a responder and non-responder group according to their respective improvements on the MFT. Data were compared between the two groups. Results Patients with exclusively subcortical stroke, absence of aphasia, the presence of a MEP response, high scores on the Mini-Mental Status Examination, Motricity Index arm score, Functional Independence Measure, and Functional Ambulatory Classification; and a shorter period from stroke onset to rTMS were found to be significantly associated with a response to rTMS. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that rTMS may have a greater effect on upper extremity motor recovery in stroke patients who have a MEP response, suffer an exclusively subcortical stroke, mild paresis, and have good functional status. Applying rTMS early would have additional positive effects in the patients with the identified characteristics. PMID:25932424

  2. Short-term effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on sleep bruxism - a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei-Na; Fu, Hai-Yang; Du, Yi-Fei; Sun, Jian-Hua; Zhang, Jing-Lu; Wang, Chen; Svensson, Peter; Wang, Ke-Lun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on patients with sleep bruxism (SB). Twelve patients with SB were included in an open, single-intervention pilot study. rTMS at 1 Hz and an intensity of 80% of the active motor threshold was applied to the 'hot spot' of the masseter muscle representation at the primary motor cortex bilaterally for 20 min per side each day for 5 consecutive days. The jaw-closing muscle electromyographic (EMG) activity during sleep was recorded with a portable EMG recorder at baseline, during rTMS treatment and at follow-up for 5 days. In addition, patients scored their jaw-closing muscle soreness on a 0-10 numerical rating scale (NRS). Data were analysed with analysis of variance. The intensity of the EMG activity was suppressed during and after rTMS compared to the baseline (P = 0.04; P = 0.02, respectively). The NRS score of soreness decreased significantly during and after rTMS compared with baseline (P < 0.01). These findings indicated a significant inhibition of jaw-closing muscle activity during sleep along with a decrease of muscle soreness. This pilot study raises the possibility of therapeutic benefits from rTMS in patients with bruxism and calls for further and more controlled studies. PMID:27025267

  3. Effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on mood in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Moulier, Virginie; Gaudeau-Bosma, Christian; Isaac, Clémence; Allard, Anne-Camille; Bouaziz, Noomane; Sidhoumi, Djedia; Braha-Zeitoun, Sonia; Benadhira, René; Thomas, Fanny; Januel, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Background High frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) has shown significant efficiency in the treatment of resistant depression. However in healthy subjects, the effects of rTMS remain unclear. Objective Our aim was to determine the impact of 10 sessions of rTMS applied to the DLPFC on mood and emotion recognition in healthy subjects. Design In a randomised double-blind study, 20 subjects received 10 daily sessions of active (10 Hz frequency) or sham rTMS. The TMS coil was positioned on the left DLPFC through neuronavigation. Several dimensions of mood and emotion processing were assessed at baseline and after rTMS with clinical scales, visual analogue scales (VASs), and the Ekman 60 faces test. Results The 10 rTMS sessions targeting the DLPFC were well tolerated. No significant difference was found between the active group and the control group for clinical scales and the Ekman 60 faces test. Compared to the control group, the active rTMS group presented a significant improvement in their adaptation to daily life, which was assessed through VAS. Conclusion This study did not show any deleterious effect on mood and emotion recognition of 10 sessions of rTMS applied on the DLPFC in healthy subjects. This study also suggested a positive effect of rTMS on quality of life. PMID:26993786

  4. Potentiation of quantitative electroencephalograms following prefrontal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with major depression.

    PubMed

    Noda, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Motoaki; Saeki, Takashi; Inoue, Misa; Iwanari, Hideo; Kasai, Kiyoto

    2013-01-01

    The long-lasting effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on electroencephalogram (EEG) activity are not clear. We aimed to investigate the cumulative rTMS effects on EEG and clinical outcomes in patients with major depression. Twenty-five patients with medication-resistant depression underwent 10 daily rTMS sessions over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. We measured resting EEG and spectrum-power before and after the rTMS course. Clinical efficacy was evaluated with the Hamilton's Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) and Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). In an ANOVA model, including all prefrontal electrodes, post hoc analyses revealed significant time effects on the theta (F1,24 = 7.89, P = 0.010; +43%), delta (F1,24 = 6.58, P = 0.017; +26%), and alpha (F1,24 = 4.64, P = 0.042; 31%) bands without site specificity. Clinical correlations were observed between F4 alpha power increases and improvements in HAM-D retardation, F3 alpha power increases and improvements of the absolute changes in perseveration and error number on the WCST, and C3 and C4 theta power increases and improvements of the percent change in perseveration and error number on the WCST following rTMS. Consecutive prefrontal rTMS could induce long-lasting EEG potentiations beyond the aftereffects, resulting in improved cognitive and depressive symptoms. PMID:23827366

  5. Combining near-infrared spectroscopy with electroencephalography and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Näsi, Tiina; Kotilahti, Kalle; Mäki, Hanna; Nissilä, Ilkka; Meriläinen, Pekka

    2009-07-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the usability of a near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) device in multimodal measurements. We combined NIRS with electroencephalography (EEG) to record hemodynamic responses and evoked potentials simultaneously, and with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to investigate hemodynamic responses to repetitive TMS (rTMS). Hemodynamic responses and visual evoked potentials (VEPs) to 3, 6, and 12 s stimuli consisting of pattern-reversing checkerboards were successfully recorded in the NIRS/EEG measurement, and ipsi- and contralateral hemodynamic responses to 0.5, 1, and 2 Hz rTMS in the NIRS/TMS measurement. In the NIRS/EEG measurements, the amplitudes of the hemodynamic responses increased from 3- to 6-s stimulus, but not from 6- to 12-s stimulus, and the VEPs showed peaks N75, P100, and N135. In the NIRS/TMS measurements, the 2-Hz stimulus produced the strongest hemodynamic responses compared to the 0.5- and 1-Hz stimuli. In two subjects oxyhemoglobin concentration decreased and in one increased as a consequence of the 2-Hz rTMS. To locate the origin of the measured NIRS responses, methods have to be developed to investigate TMS-induced scalp muscle contractions. In the future, multimodal measurements may prove useful in monitoring or treating diseases such as stroke or Alzheimer's disease.

  6. 1-Hz Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation over the Posterior Parietal Cortex Modulates Spatial Attention.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guang-Qing; Lan, Yue; Zhang, Qun; Liu, Dong-Xu; He, Xiao-Fei; Lin, Tuo

    2016-01-01

    Lesion and neuroimaging studies have suggested that regions in the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) are involved in visual spatial attention. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential effects on spatial attention resulting from a transient parietal impairment induced by 1-Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). We examined 50 healthy subjects using the attention network test (ANT) after first applying rTMS to right or left PPC. The right parietal rTMS, but not left PPC rTMS, caused a significant slowing in the mean reaction time (RT) to target presentation following a spatial cue during the ANT test. There were no significant effects of rTMS on mean RT under the no-cue, center-cue, and double-cue conditions, or for each flanker type among the experimental groups. Moreover, after rTMS to the right PPC, test subjects displayed deficits in networks related to alerting and orienting, whereas they exhibited improvement following rTMS to the left PPC. These findings indicate that the right PPC serves an important function in spatial orienting and the alerting activities. We interpreted the enhancement in alerting and spatial orienting function following low-frequency rTMS of left PPC as reflecting a disinhibition of right PPC via an inter-hemispheric inhibition account. PMID:26869911

  7. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over frontal eye fields disrupts visually cued auditory attention.

    PubMed

    Smith, Daniel T; Jackson, Stephen R; Rorden, Chris

    2009-04-01

    Voluntary eye movements and covert shifts of visual attention activate the same brain regions. Specifically, the intraparietal sulcus and the frontal eye fields (FEF) appear to be involved both with generating voluntary saccades as well with attending to a peripheral spatial location. Furthermore, these regions appear to be required by both tasks--functional disruption of these regions impairs both tasks. Therefore, it appears that the targeting system that allows us to plan saccades is the same system that allows us to covertly track peripheral visual information. Recent neuroimaging studies suggest that these brain regions are also activated when participants engage in auditory spatial attention tasks. However, it remains unclear whether these regions are required by these tasks. We used repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to disrupt the FEF while participants performed an auditory localization task. On each trial, a visual cue directed attention to the probable laterality of the auditory target, and the participant decided whether the subsequent target sound came from an upper or lower speaker. In the absence of TMS, individuals were faster to respond to targets that occurred on the cued side (valid trials) than when the target appears contralaterally to the cued side (invalid side). TMS interfered with this effect, such that the costs associated with ipsilateral invalidly cued targets were substantially reduced. These results suggest that the eye-movement system is needed for normal auditory attention. PMID:20502626

  8. Short-term effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on sleep bruxism – a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wei-Na; Fu, Hai-Yang; Du, Yi-Fei; Sun, Jian-Hua; Zhang, Jing-Lu; Wang, Chen; Svensson, Peter; Wang, Ke-Lun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on patients with sleep bruxism (SB). Twelve patients with SB were included in an open, single-intervention pilot study. rTMS at 1 Hz and an intensity of 80% of the active motor threshold was applied to the ‘hot spot' of the masseter muscle representation at the primary motor cortex bilaterally for 20 min per side each day for 5 consecutive days. The jaw-closing muscle electromyographic (EMG) activity during sleep was recorded with a portable EMG recorder at baseline, during rTMS treatment and at follow-up for 5 days. In addition, patients scored their jaw-closing muscle soreness on a 0–10 numerical rating scale (NRS). Data were analysed with analysis of variance. The intensity of the EMG activity was suppressed during and after rTMS compared to the baseline (P = 0.04; P = 0.02, respectively). The NRS score of soreness decreased significantly during and after rTMS compared with baseline (P < 0.01). These findings indicated a significant inhibition of jaw-closing muscle activity during sleep along with a decrease of muscle soreness. This pilot study raises the possibility of therapeutic benefits from rTMS in patients with bruxism and calls for further and more controlled studies. PMID:27025267

  9. 1-Hz Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation over the Posterior Parietal Cortex Modulates Spatial Attention

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guang-qing; Lan, Yue; Zhang, Qun; Liu, Dong-xu; He, Xiao-fei; Lin, Tuo

    2016-01-01

    Lesion and neuroimaging studies have suggested that regions in the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) are involved in visual spatial attention. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential effects on spatial attention resulting from a transient parietal impairment induced by 1-Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). We examined 50 healthy subjects using the attention network test (ANT) after first applying rTMS to right or left PPC. The right parietal rTMS, but not left PPC rTMS, caused a significant slowing in the mean reaction time (RT) to target presentation following a spatial cue during the ANT test. There were no significant effects of rTMS on mean RT under the no-cue, center-cue, and double-cue conditions, or for each flanker type among the experimental groups. Moreover, after rTMS to the right PPC, test subjects displayed deficits in networks related to alerting and orienting, whereas they exhibited improvement following rTMS to the left PPC. These findings indicate that the right PPC serves an important function in spatial orienting and the alerting activities. We interpreted the enhancement in alerting and spatial orienting function following low-frequency rTMS of left PPC as reflecting a disinhibition of right PPC via an inter-hemispheric inhibition account. PMID:26869911

  10. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Clinical Applications in Neurological and Psychiatric Disorders: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Sergio; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Paes, Flávia; Vieira, Renata Teles; Caixeta, Leonardo; Novaes, Felipe; Marinho, Tamires; Almada, Leonardo Ferreira; Silva, Adriana Cardoso; Nardi, Antonio Egidio

    2013-01-01

    Neurological and psychiatric disorders are characterized by several disabling symptoms for which effective, mechanism-based treatments remain elusive. Consequently, more advanced non-invasive therapeutic methods are required. A method that may modulate brain activity and be viable for use in clinical practice is repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). It is a non-invasive procedure whereby a pulsed magnetic field stimulates electrical activity in the brain. Here, we focus on the basic foundation of rTMS, the main stimulation parametters, the factors that influence individual responses to rTMS and the experimental advances of rTMS that may become a viable clinical application to treat neurological and psychiatric disorders. The findings showed that rTMS can improve some symptoms associated with these conditions and might be useful for promoting cortical plasticity in patients with neurological and psychiatric disorders. However, these changes are transient and it is premature to propose these applications as realistic therapeutic options, even though the rTMS technique has been evidenced as a potential modulator of sensorimotor integration and neuroplasticity. Functional imaging of the region of interest could highlight the capacity of rTMS to bring about plastic changes of the cortical circuitry and hint at future novel clinical interventions. Thus, we recommend that further studies clearly determine the role of rTMS in the treatment of these conditions. Finally, we must remember that however exciting the neurobiological mechanisms might be, the clinical usefulness of rTMS will be determined by its ability to provide patients with neurological and psychiatric disorders with safe, long-lasting and substantial improvements in quality of life. PMID:25610279

  11. Brain SPECT guided repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in treatment resistant major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Jha, Shailesh; Chadda, Rakesh K; Kumar, Nand; Bal, C S

    2016-06-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has emerged as a potential treatment in treatment resistant major depressive disorder (MDD). However, there is no consensus about the exact site of stimulation for rTMS. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) offers a potential technique in deciding the site of stimulation. The present study was conducted to assess the difference in outcome of brain SPECT assisted rTMS versus standard protocol of twenty sessions of high frequency rTMS as add on treatment in 20 patients with treatment resistant MDD, given over a period of 4 weeks. Thirteen subjects (group I) received high frequency rTMS over an area of hypoperfusion in the prefrontal cortex, as identified on SPECT, whereas 7 subjects (group II) were administered rTMS in the left dorsoslateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) area. Improvement was monitored using standardized instruments. Patients in the group I showed a significantly better response compared to those in the group II. In group I, 46% of the subjects were responders on MADRS, 38% on BDI and 77% on CGI. The parallel figures of responders in Group II were 0% on MADRS, 14% on BDI and 43% on CGI. There were no remitters in the study. No significant untoward side effects were noticed. The study had limitations of a small sample size and non-controlled design, and all the subjects were also receiving the standard antidepressant therapy. Administration of rTMS over brain SPECT specified area of hypoperfusion may have a better clinical outcome compared to the standard protocol. PMID:27208445

  12. Excitatory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation induces improvements in chronic post-stroke aphasia

    PubMed Central

    Szaflarski, Jerzy P.; Vannest, Jennifer; Wu, Steve W.; DiFrancesco, Mark W.; Banks, Christi; Gilbert, Donald L.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Aphasia affects 1/3 of stroke patients with improvements noted only in some of them. The goal of this exploratory study was to provide preliminary evidence regarding safety and efficacy of fMRI-guided excitatory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) applied to the residual left-hemispheric Broca’s area for chronic aphasia treatment. Material/Methods We enrolled 8 patients with moderate or severe aphasia >1 year after LMCA stroke. Linguistic battery was administered pre-/post-rTMS; a semantic decision/tone decision (SDTD) fMRI task was used to localize left-hemispheric Broca’s area. RTMS protocol consisted of 10 daily treatments of 200 seconds each using an excitatory stimulation protocol called intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS). Coil placement was targeted individually to the left Broca’s. Results 6/8 patients showed significant pre-/post-rTMS improvements in semantic fluency (p=0.028); they were able to generate more appropriate words when prompted with a semantic category. Pre-/post-rTMS fMRI maps showed increases in left fronto-temporo-parietal language networks with a significant left-hemispheric shift in the left frontal (p=0.025), left temporo-parietal (p=0.038) regions and global language LI (p=0.018). Patients tended to report subjective improvement on Communicative Activities Log (mini-CAL; p=0.075). None of the subjects reported ill effects of rTMS. Conclusions FMRI-guided, excitatory rTMS applied to the affected Broca’s area improved language skills in patients with chronic post-stroke aphasia; these improvements correlated with increased language lateralization to the left hemisphere. This rTMS protocol appears to be safe and should be further tested in blinded studies assessing its short- and long-term safety/efficacy for post-stroke aphasia rehabilitation. PMID:21358599

  13. The effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Abbasnia, Keramatollah; Ghanbari, Amir; Abedian, Mehrnaz; Ghanbari, Ali; Sharififar, Sharareh

    2015-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a new method for treating many neurological conditions; however, the exact therapeutic mechanisms behind rTMS-induced plasticity are still unknown. Neural stem and progenitor cells (NS/PCs) are active players in brain regeneration and plasticity but their behavior in the context of rTMS therapy needs further elucidation. We aimed to evaluate the effects of rTMS on proliferation and differentiation of NS/PCs in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of adult mouse brain. Adult male mice (n=30) were divided into rTMS (1-Hz and 30-Hz) and sham groups and treated for 7 or 14 consecutive days. Harvested NS/PCs from the SVZ were cultured in the neurosphere assay for 8 days and the number and size of the resulting neurospheres as well as their in vitro differentiation capacity were evaluated. After one week of rTMS treatment at 1-Hz and 30-Hz compared with sham stimulation, the mean neurosphere forming frequency per brain was not different while this measure significantly increased after two weeks (P<0.05). The mean neurosphere diameter in 1-Hz treatment paradigm was significantly larger compared with sham stimulation at both 1 and 2 weeks. In contrast, 30-Hz treatment paradigm resulted in significantly larger neurospheres only after 2 weeks. Importantly, rTMS treatment at both frequencies increased neuronal differentiation of the harvested NS/PCs. Furthermore, one week in vitro rTMS treatment of NS/PCs with both 1-Hz and 30-Hz increased NS/PCs proliferation and neuronal differentiation. It is concluded that both 1-Hz and 30-Hz rTMS treatment increase NS/PCs proliferation and neuronal differentiation. PMID:26140221

  14. Resting state connectivity in alcohol dependent patients and the effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Jochem M; van Wingen, Guido; van den Brink, Wim; Goudriaan, Anna E

    2015-12-01

    Alcohol dependence is thought to result from an overactive neural motivation system and a deficient cognitive control system, and rebalancing these systems may mitigate excessive alcohol use. This study examines the differences in functional connectivity of the fronto-parietal cognitive control network (FPn) and the motivational network (striatum and orbitofrontal cortex) between alcohol dependent patients (ADPs) and healthy controls (HCs), and the effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on these networks. This randomized controlled trial included 38 ADPs and 37 HCs, matched on age, gender and education. Participants were randomly assigned to sham or right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) stimulation with rTMS. A 3T resting state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) scan was acquired before and after active or sham 10Hz rTMS. Group differences of within and between network connectivity and the effect of rTMS on network connectivity was assessed using independent component analysis. Results showed higher connectivity within the left FPn (p=0.012) and the left fronto-striatal motivational network (p=0.03) in ADPs versus HCs, and a further increase in connectivity within the left FPn after active stimulation in ADPs. ADPs also showed higher connectivity between the left and the right FPns (p=0.025), and this higher connectivity was related to fewer alcohol related problems (r=0.30, p=0.06). The results show higher within and between network connectivity in ADPs and a further increase in fronto-parietal connectivity after right dlPFC rTMS in ADPs, suggesting that frontal rTMS may have a beneficial influence on cognitive control and may result in lower relapse rates. PMID:26481907

  15. Effect of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on motor cortical excitability and sensory nerve conduction velocity in subacute-stage incomplete spinal cord injury patients.

    PubMed

    Cha, Hyun Gyu; Ji, Sang-Goo; Kim, Myoung-Kwon

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to determine whether repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation can improve sensory recovery of the lower extremities in subacute-stage spinal cord injury patients. [Subjects and Methods] This study was conducted on 20 subjects with diagnosed paraplegia due to spinal cord injury. These 20 subjects were allocated to an experimental group of 10 subjects that underwent active repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation or to a control group of 10 subjects that underwent sham repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. The SCI patients in the experimental group underwent active repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and conventional rehabilitation therapy, whereas the spinal cord injury patients in the control group underwent sham repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and conventional rehabilitation therapy. Participants in both groups received therapy five days per week for six-weeks. Latency, amplitude, and sensory nerve conduction velocity were assessed before and after the six week therapy period. [Results] A significant intergroup difference was observed for posttreatment velocity gains, but no significant intergroup difference was observed for amplitude or latency. [Conclusion] repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation may be improve sensory recovery of the lower extremities in subacute-stage spinal cord injury patients. PMID:27512251

  16. Effect of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on motor cortical excitability and sensory nerve conduction velocity in subacute-stage incomplete spinal cord injury patients

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Hyun Gyu; Ji, Sang-Goo; Kim, Myoung-Kwon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to determine whether repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation can improve sensory recovery of the lower extremities in subacute-stage spinal cord injury patients. [Subjects and Methods] This study was conducted on 20 subjects with diagnosed paraplegia due to spinal cord injury. These 20 subjects were allocated to an experimental group of 10 subjects that underwent active repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation or to a control group of 10 subjects that underwent sham repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. The SCI patients in the experimental group underwent active repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and conventional rehabilitation therapy, whereas the spinal cord injury patients in the control group underwent sham repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and conventional rehabilitation therapy. Participants in both groups received therapy five days per week for six-weeks. Latency, amplitude, and sensory nerve conduction velocity were assessed before and after the six week therapy period. [Results] A significant intergroup difference was observed for posttreatment velocity gains, but no significant intergroup difference was observed for amplitude or latency. [Conclusion] repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation may be improve sensory recovery of the lower extremities in subacute-stage spinal cord injury patients. PMID:27512251

  17. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation induces oscillatory power changes in chronic tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Schecklmann, Martin; Lehner, Astrid; Gollmitzer, Judith; Schmidt, Eldrid; Schlee, Winfried; Langguth, Berthold

    2015-01-01

    Chronic tinnitus is associated with neuroplastic changes in auditory and non-auditory cortical areas. About 10 years ago, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of auditory and prefrontal cortex was introduced as potential treatment for tinnitus. The resulting changes in tinnitus loudness are interpreted in the context of rTMS induced activity changes (neuroplasticity). Here, we investigate the effect of single rTMS sessions on oscillatory power to probe the capacity of rTMS to interfere with tinnitus-specific cortical plasticity. We measured 20 patients with bilateral chronic tinnitus and 20 healthy controls comparable for age, sex, handedness, and hearing level with a 63-channel electroencephalography (EEG) system. Educational level, intelligence, depressivity and hyperacusis were controlled for by analysis of covariance. Different rTMS protocols were tested: Left and right temporal and left and right prefrontal cortices were each stimulated with 200 pulses at 1 Hz and with an intensity of 60% stimulator output. Stimulation of central parietal cortex with 6-fold reduced intensity (inverted passive-cooled coil) served as sham condition. Before and after each rTMS protocol 5 min of resting state EEG were recorded. The order of rTMS protocols was randomized over two sessions with 1 week interval in between. Analyses on electrode level showed that people with and without tinnitus differed in their response to left temporal and right frontal stimulation. In tinnitus patients left temporal rTMS decreased frontal theta and delta and increased beta2 power, whereas right frontal rTMS decreased right temporal beta3 and gamma power. No changes or increases were observed in the control group. Only non-systematic changes in tinnitus loudness were induced by single sessions of rTMS. This is the first study to show tinnitus-related alterations of neuroplasticity that were specific to stimulation site and oscillatory frequency. The observed effects can be

  18. 5 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over the ipsilesional sensory cortex enhances motor learning after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Brodie, Sonia M.; Meehan, Sean; Borich, Michael R.; Boyd, Lara A.

    2014-01-01

    Sensory feedback is critical for motor learning, and thus to neurorehabilitation after stroke. Whether enhancing sensory feedback by applying excitatory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the ipsilesional primary sensory cortex (IL-S1) might enhance motor learning in chronic stroke has yet to be investigated. The present study investigated the effects of 5 Hz rTMS over IL-S1 paired with skilled motor practice on motor learning, hemiparetic cutaneous somatosensation, and motor function. Individuals with unilateral chronic stroke were pseudo-randomly divided into either Active or Sham 5 Hz rTMS groups (n = 11/group). Following stimulation, both groups practiced a Serial Tracking Task (STT) with the hemiparetic arm; this was repeated for 5 days. Performance on the STT was quantified by response time, peak velocity, and cumulative distance tracked at baseline, during the 5 days of practice, and at a no-rTMS retention test. Cutaneous somatosensation was measured using two-point discrimination. Standardized sensorimotor tests were performed to assess whether the effects might generalize to impact hemiparetic arm function. The active 5 Hz rTMS + training group demonstrated significantly greater improvements in STT performance {response time [F(1, 286.04) = 13.016, p < 0.0005], peak velocity [F(1, 285.95) = 4.111, p = 0.044], and cumulative distance [F(1, 285.92) = 4.076, p = 0.044]} and cutaneous somatosensation [F(1, 21.15) = 8.793, p = 0.007] across all sessions compared to the sham rTMS + training group. Measures of upper extremity motor function were not significantly different for either group. Our preliminary results suggest that, when paired with motor practice, 5 Hz rTMS over IL-S1 enhances motor learning related change in individuals with chronic stroke, potentially as a consequence of improved cutaneous somatosensation, however no improvement in general upper extremity function was observed. PMID:24711790

  19. The Effect of Daily Prefrontal Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Over Several Weeks on Resting Motor Threshold

    PubMed Central

    Zarkowski, Paul; Navarro, Rita; Pavlicova, Martina; George, Mark S.; Avery, David

    2009-01-01

    Background: The resting motor threshold (rMT) is an important factor in the selection of treatment intensity for patients receiving repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). In many clinical studies to date, due to concerns about potential drift, the rMT has been routinely re-measured weekly or every fifth session. Objective: Our aim is to investigate whether ongoing treatment with rTMS affects the rMT, the degree of change, and whether frequent remeasurement is needed. Methods: Clinical data were drawn from 50 medication free patients receiving treatment for major depression with rTMS in a large U.S. NIH-sponsored multisite study. Four measurements of rMT were obtained including before and after the double blind phase, followed by weekly measurements during the open phase. Active treatment consisted of 75 four second trains of 10Hz stimulation applied over 37.5 minutes with the coil over the left DLPFC at 120% rMT. Results: For the group as a whole, there was no significant change in the rMT during a minimum of 2 weeks of treatment with prefrontal rTMS (p=0.911, one way ANOVA). The average within-subject coefficient of variation was 6.58%. On average the last rMT was 2.45% less than the baseline rMT (range 32.3% increase, 40.6% decrease). Conclusion: Daily left prefrontal rTMS over several weeks as delivered in this trial does not cause systematic changes in rMT. While most subjects had <10% variance in rMT over time, 5 subjects had changes of ∼20% from baseline, raising dosing and safety issues if undetected. We recommend that clinical trials of rTMS have periodic retesting of rMT, especially if the dose is at or near the edge of the TMS safety tables. PMID:20161065

  20. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Treatment-Resistant Depression: An Economic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Hong Anh; Palimaka, Stefan; Sehatzadeh, Shayan; Blackhouse, Gord; Yap, Belinda; Tsoi, Bernice; Bowen, Jim; O'Reilly, Daria

    2016-01-01

    Background Major depressive disorder (MDD, 10% over a person's lifetime) is common and costly to the health system. Unfortunately, many MDD cases are resistant to treatment with antidepressant drugs and require other treatment to reduce or eliminate depression. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has long been used to treat persons with treatment-resistant depression (TRD). Despite its effectiveness, ECT has side effects that make patients intolerant to the treatment, or they refuse to use it. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), which has fewer side effects than ECT and might be an alternative for TRD patients who are ineligible for or unwilling to undergo ECT, has been developed to treat TRD. Objectives This analysis evaluates the cost-effectiveness of rTMS for patients with TRD compared with ECT or sham rTMS and estimates the potential budgetary impact of various levels of implementation of rTMS in Ontario. Review Methods A cost-utility analysis compared the costs and health outcomes of two treatments for persons with TRD in Ontario: rTMS alone compared with ECT alone and rTMS alone compared with sham rTMS. We calculated the six-month incremental costs and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) for these treatments. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed to test the robustness of the model's results. A 1-year budget impact analysis estimated the costs of providing funding for rTMS. The base-case analysis examined the additional costs for funding six centres, where rTMS infrastructure is in place. Sensitivity and scenario analyses explored the impact of increasing diffusion of rTMS to centres with existing ECT infrastructure. All analyses were conducted from the Ontario health care payer perspective. Results ECT was cost effective compared to rTMS when the willingness to pay is greater than $37,640.66 per QALY. In the base-case analysis, which had a six-month time horizon, the cost and effectiveness for rTMS was $5,272 and 0

  1. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Affects behavior by Biasing Endogenous Cortical Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Hamidi, Massihullah; Slagter, Heleen A.; Tononi, Giulio; Postle, Bradley R.

    2009-01-01

    A governing assumption about repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been that it interferes with task-related neuronal activity – in effect, by “injecting noise” into the brain – and thereby disrupts behavior. Recent reports of rTMS-produced behavioral enhancement, however, call this assumption into question. We investigated the neurophysiological effects of rTMS delivered during the delay period of a visual working memory task by simultaneously recording brain activity with electroencephalography (EEG). Subjects performed visual working memory for locations or for shapes, and in half the trials a 10-Hz train of rTMS was delivered to the superior parietal lobule (SPL) or a control brain area. The wide range of individual differences in the effects of rTMS on task accuracy, from improvement to impairment, was predicted by individual differences in the effect of rTMS on power in the alpha-band of the EEG (∼10 Hz): a decrease in alpha-band power corresponded to improved performance, whereas an increase in alpha-band power corresponded to the opposite. The EEG effect was localized to cortical sources encompassing the frontal eye fields and the intraparietal sulcus, and was specific to task (location, but not object memory) and to rTMS target (SPL, not control area). Furthermore, for the same task condition, rTMS-induced changes in cross-frequency phase synchrony between alpha- and gamma-band (>40 Hz) oscillations predicted changes in behavior. These results suggest that alpha-band oscillations play an active role cognitive processes and do not simply reflect absence of processing. Furthermore, this study shows that the complex effects of rTMS on behavior can result from biasing endogenous patterns of network-level oscillations. PMID:19587850

  2. Cognitive safety of dorsomedial prefrontal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in major depression.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Laura; Wheeler, Sarah; McAndrews, Mary Pat; Solomon, Chloe J E; Giacobbe, Peter; Downar, Jonathan

    2016-07-01

    The most widely used target for repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in treatment-resistant depression (TRD) is the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Despite convergent evidence that the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (DMPFC) may be a promising alternative target for rTMS in TRD, its cognitive safety profile has not previously been assessed. Here, we applied 20 sessions of rTMS to the DMPFC in 21 TRD patients. Before and after treatment, a battery of neuropsychological tasks was administered to evaluate changes in cognition across three general cognitive domains: learning and memory, attention and processing speed, and cognitive flexibility. Subjects also completed the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HamD17) prior to and following treatment to measure changes in severity of depressive symptoms, and to assess the relationship between mood and cognitive performance over the course of treatment. No serious adverse effects or significant deterioration in cognitive performance were observed. Overall, subjects improved significantly on Stroop Inhibition/Switching and on Trails B, and this improvement was independent of the degree of improvement in depression symptoms. No domains or items significantly predicted clinical outcome, with the exception of baseline performance on Visual Elevator Accuracy. Clinical improvement correlated to improved performance in the overall domain of attention and processing speed, although this effect was not evident following covariate adjustment. DMPFC-rTMS did not produce any detectable cognitive adverse effects during treatment of TRD. Performance did not deteriorate significantly on any measures. Taken together, the present findings support the tolerability and cognitive safety of DMPFC-rTMS in refractory depression. PMID:27157074

  3. Effect of Epidural Electrical Stimulation and Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Rats With Diffuse Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Yong-Soon; Cho, Kang Hee; Kim, Eun-Sil; Lee, Mi-Sook

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of epidural electrical stimulation (EES) and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on motor recovery and brain activity in a rat model of diffuse traumatic brain injury (TBI) compared to the control group. Methods Thirty rats weighing 270-285 g with diffuse TBI with 45 kg/cm2 using a weight-drop model were assigned to one of three groups: the EES group (ES) (anodal electrical stimulation at 50 Hz), the rTMS group (MS) (magnetic stimulation at 10 Hz, 3-second stimulation with 6-second intervals, 4,000 total stimulations per day), and the sham-treated control group (sham) (no stimulation). They were pre-trained to perform a single-pellet reaching task (SPRT) and a rotarod test (RRT) for 14 days. Diffuse TBI was then induced and an electrode was implanted over the dominant motor cortex. The changes in SPRT success rate, RRT performance time rate and the expression of c-Fos after two weeks of EES or rTMS were tracked. Results SPRT improved significantly from day 8 to day 12 in the ES group and from day 4 to day 14 in the MS group (p<0.05) compared to the sham group. RRT improved significantly from day 6 to day 11 in ES and from day 4 to day 9 in MS compared to the sham group. The ES and MS groups showed increased expression of c-Fos in the cerebral cortex compared to the sham group. Conclusion ES or MS in a rat model of diffuse TBI can be used to enhance motor recovery and brain activity. PMID:26161348

  4. Preliminary guidelines for safe and effective use of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in moderate to severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Nielson, Dylan M; McKnight, Curtis A; Patel, Riddhi N; Kalnin, Andrew J; Mysiw, Walter J

    2015-04-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation has generated extensive interest within the traumatic brain injury (TBI) rehabilitation community, but little work has been done with repetitive protocols, which can produce prolonged changes in behavior. This is partly because of concerns about the safety of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in subjects with TBI, particularly the risk of seizures. These risks can be minimized by careful selection of the rTMS protocol and exclusion criteria. In this article, we identify guidelines for safe use of rTMS in subjects with TBI based on a review of the literature and illustrate their application with a case study. Our subject is a 48-year-old man who sustained a severe TBI 5 years prior to beginning rTMS for the treatment of post-TBI depression. After a 4-week baseline period, we administered daily sessions of low-frequency stimulation to the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex for 6 weeks. After stimulation, we performed monthly assessments for 3 months. The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) was our primary outcome measure. The stimulation was well tolerated and the patient reported no side effects. After 6 weeks of stimulation, the patient's depression was slightly improved, and these improvements continued through follow-up. At the end of follow-up, the patient's HAMD score was 49% of the average baseline score. PMID:25281871

  5. A Randomised Controlled Trial of Neuronavigated Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) in Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, Jessica; Kekic, Maria; Bozhilova, Natali; Nestler, Steffen; Dew, Tracy; Van den Eynde, Frederique; David, Anthony S.; Rubia, Katya; Campbell, Iain C.; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Background Anorexia nervosa (AN) is associated with morbid fear of fatness, extreme food restriction and altered self-regulation. Neuroimaging data implicate fronto-striatal circuitry, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Methods In this double-blind parallel group study, we investigated the effects of one session of sham-controlled high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to the left DLPFC (l-DLPFC) in 60 individuals with AN. A food exposure task was administered before and after the procedure to elicit AN-related symptoms. Outcomes The primary outcome measure was ‘core AN symptoms’, a variable which combined several subjective AN-related experiences. The effects of rTMS on other measures of psychopathology (e.g. mood), temporal discounting (TD; intertemporal choice behaviour) and on salivary cortisol concentrations were also investigated. Safety, tolerability and acceptability were assessed. Results Fourty-nine participants completed the study. Whilst there were no interaction effects of rTMS on core AN symptoms, there was a trend for group differences (p = 0.056): after controlling for pre-rTMS scores, individuals who received real rTMS had reduced symptoms post-rTMS and at 24-hour follow-up, relative to those who received sham stimulation. Other psychopathology was not altered differentially following real/sham rTMS. In relation to TD, there was an interaction trend (p = 0.060): real versus sham rTMS resulted in reduced rates of TD (more reflective choice behaviour). Salivary cortisol concentrations were unchanged by stimulation. rTMS was safe, well–tolerated and was considered an acceptable intervention. Conclusions This study provides modest evidence that rTMS to the l-DLPFC transiently reduces core symptoms of AN and encourages prudent decision making. Importantly, individuals with AN considered rTMS to be a viable treatment option. These findings require replication in multiple-session studies to evaluate

  6. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over the supplementary motor area modifies breathing pattern in response to inspiratory loading in normal humans

    PubMed Central

    Nierat, Marie-Cécile; Hudson, Anna L.; Chaskalovic, Joël; Similowski, Thomas; Laviolette, Louis

    2015-01-01

    In awake humans, breathing depends on automatic brainstem pattern generators. It is also heavily influenced by cortical networks. For example, functional magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalographic data show that the supplementary motor area becomes active when breathing is made difficult by inspiratory mechanical loads like resistances or threshold valves, which is associated with perceived respiratory discomfort. We hypothesized that manipulating the excitability of the supplementary motor area with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation would modify the breathing pattern response to an experimental inspiratory load and possibly respiratory discomfort. Seven subjects (three men, age 25 ± 4) were studied. Breathing pattern and respiratory discomfort during inspiratory loading were described before and after conditioning the supplementary motor area with repetitive stimulation, using an excitatory paradigm (5 Hz stimulation), an inhibitory paradigm, or sham stimulation. No significant change in breathing pattern during loading was observed after sham conditioning. Excitatory conditioning shortened inspiratory time (p = 0.001), decreased tidal volume (p = 0.016), and decreased ventilation (p = 0.003), as corroborated by an increased end-tidal expired carbon dioxide (p = 0.013). Inhibitory conditioning did not affect ventilation, but lengthened expiratory time (p = 0.031). Respiratory discomfort was mild under baseline conditions, and unchanged after conditioning of the supplementary motor area. This is the first study to show that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation conditioning of the cerebral cortex can alter breathing pattern. A 5 Hz conditioning protocol, known to enhance corticophrenic excitability, can reduce the amount of hyperventilation induced by inspiratory threshold loading. Further studies are needed to determine whether and under what circumstances rTMS can have an effect on dyspnoea. PMID:26483701

  7. Preliminary Evidence of the Effects of High-frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) on Swallowing Functions in Post-Stroke Individuals with Chronic Dysphagia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Ivy K. Y.; Chan, Karen M. K.; Wong, C. S.; Cheung, Raymond T. F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is growing evidence of potential benefits of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in the rehabilitation of dysphagia. However, the site and frequency of stimulation for optimal effects are not clear. Aims: The aim of this pilot study is to investigate the short-term effects of high-frequency 5 Hz rTMS applied to…

  8. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over the orbitofrontal cortex for obsessive-compulsive disorder: a double-blind, crossover study

    PubMed Central

    Nauczyciel, C; Le Jeune, F; Naudet, F; Douabin, S; Esquevin, A; Vérin, M; Dondaine, T; Robert, G; Drapier, D; Millet, B

    2014-01-01

    This pilot study was designed to assess the efficacy of low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the right orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) by means of a double-cone coil in patients suffering from obsessive-compulsive disorder. We hypothesized that low-frequency stimulation of the OFC would lead to a reduction in clinical symptoms, as measured on the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS). A randomized, double-blind, crossover design was implemented with two 1-week treatment periods (active stimulation versus sham stimulation) separated by a 1-month washout period. Concomitantly, a subgroup of patients underwent a positron emission tomography (PET) scan after each stimulation sequence. Statistical analyses compared the Y-BOCS scores at the end of each period. At day 7, we observed a significant decrease from baseline in the Y-BOCS scores, after both active (P<0.01) and sham stimulation (P=0.02). This decrease tended to be larger after active stimulation than after sham stimulation: −6 (−29, 0) points versus −2 (−20, 4) points (P=0.07). Active versus sham PET scan contrasts showed that stimulation was related to a bilateral decrease in the metabolism of the OFC. The OFC should definitely be regarded as a key neuroanatomical target for rTMS, as it is easier to reach than either the striatum or the subthalamic nucleus, structures favored in neurosurgical approaches. PMID:25203167

  9. Noninvasive Brain Stimulation With High-Frequency and Low-Intensity Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Treatment for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Boggio, Paulo Sergio; Rocha, Martha; Oliveira, Maira Okada; Fecteau, Shirley; Cohen, Roni B.; Campanhã, Camila; Ferreira-Santos, Eduardo; Meleiro, Alexandrina; Corchs, Felipe; Zaghi, Soroush; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Fregni, Felipe

    2011-01-01

    Objective We aimed to investigate the efficacy of 20 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of either right or left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) as compared to sham rTMS for the relief of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)–associated symptoms. Method In this double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II trial conducted between October 2005 and July 2008, 30 patients with DSM-IV–diagnosed PTSD were randomly assigned to receive 1 of the following treatments: active 20 Hz rTMS of the right DLPFC, active 20 Hz rTMS of the left DLPFC, or sham rTMS. Treatments were administered in 10 daily sessions over 2 weeks. A blinded rater assessed severity of core PTSD symptoms, depression, and anxiety before, during, and after completion of the treatment protocol. In addition, a battery of neuropsychological tests was measured before and after treatment. Results Results show that both active conditions—20 Hz rTMS of left and right DLPFC—induced a significant decrease in PTSD symptoms as indexed by the PTSD Checklist and Treatment Outcome PTSD Scale; however, right rTMS induced a larger effect as compared to left rTMS. In addition, there was a significant improvement of mood after left rTMS and a significant reduction of anxiety following right rTMS. Improvements in PTSD symptoms were long lasting; effects were still significant at the 3-month follow-up. Finally, neuropsychological evaluation showed that active 20 Hz rTMS is not associated with cognitive worsening and is safe for use in patients with PTSD. Conclusions These results support the notion that modulation of prefrontal cortex can alleviate the core symptoms of PTSD and suggest that high-frequency rTMS of right DLPFC might be the optimal treatment strategy. PMID:20051219

  10. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) to Treat Social Anxiety Disorder: Case Reports and a Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Paes, Flávia; Baczynski, Tathiana; Novaes, Felipe; Marinho, Tamires; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Budde, Henning; Sack, Alexander T.; Huston, Joseph P.; Almada, Leonardo Ferreira; Carta, Mauro; Silva, Adriana Cardoso; Nardi, Antonio E.; Machado, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is a common and debilitating anxiety disorders. However, few studies had been dedicated to the neurobiology underlying SAD until the last decade. Rates of non-responders to standard methods of treatment remain unsatisfactorily high of approximately 25%, including SAD. Advances in our understanding of SAD could lead to new treatment strategies. A potential non invasive therapeutic option is repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). Thus, we reported two cases of SAD treated with rTMS Methods: The bibliographical search used Pubmed/Medline, ISI Web of Knowledge and Scielo databases. The terms chosen for the search were: anxiety disorders, neuroimaging, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. Results: In most of the studies conducted on anxiety disorders, except SAD, the right prefrontal cortex (PFC), more specifically dorsolateral PFC was stimulated, with marked results when applying high-rTMS compared with studies stimulating the opposite side. However, according to the “valence hypothesis”, anxiety disorders might be characterized by an interhemispheric imbalance associated with increased right-hemispheric activity. With regard to the two cases treated with rTMS, we found a decrease in BDI, BAI and LSAS scores from baseline to follow-up. Conclusion: We hypothesize that the application of low-rTMS over the right medial PFC (mPFC; the main structure involved in SAD circuitry) combined with high-rTMS over the left mPFC, for at least 4 weeks on consecutive weekdays, may induce a balance in brain activity, opening an attractive therapeutic option for the treatment of SAD. PMID:24278088

  11. Low-Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Intensive Occupational Therapy for Poststroke Patients with Upper Limb Hemiparesis: Preliminary Study of a 15-Day Protocol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kakuda, Wataru; Abo, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Kazushige; Momosaki, Ryo; Yokoi, Aki; Fukuda, Akiko; Ishikawa, Atsushi; Ito, Hiroshi; Tominaga, Ayumi

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the safety and feasibility of a 15-day protocol of low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) combined with intensive occupational therapy (OT) on motor function and spasticity in hemiparetic upper limbs in poststroke patients. Fifteen poststroke patients (age at study entry 55 [plus…

  12. An Open-Label Feasibility Trial of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Treatment-Resistant Major Depressive Episodes.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Masaki; Inagaki, Masatoshi; Higuchi, Yuji; Uchitomi, Yosuke; Terada, Seishi; Kodama, Masafumi; Kishi, Yoshiki; Yamada, Norihito

    2016-08-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been reported to be a new treatment option for treatment-resistant depression. In Japan, there has been limited research into its feasibility, efficacy, and tolerability. We have launched a trial of rTMS for treating medication-resistant major depressive disorder and bipolar depression. We are investigating low-frequency rTMS to the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and traditional high-frequency rTMS to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, in 20 patients. The primary outcome of the study is the treatment completion rate. This study will provide new data on the usefulness of rTMS for treatment-resistant depression in Japan. PMID:27549679

  13. Ventrolateral prefrontal cortex repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in the treatment of depersonalization disorder: A consecutive case series.

    PubMed

    Jay, Emma-Louise; Nestler, Steffen; Sierra, Mauricio; McClelland, Jessica; Kekic, Maria; David, Anthony S

    2016-06-30

    Case reports and an open trial have reported promising responses to repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to prefrontal and temporo-parietal sites in patients with depersonalization disorder (DPD). We recently showed that a single session of rTMS to the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) was associated with a reduction in symptoms and increase in physiological arousal. Seven patients with medication-resistant DSM-IV DPD received up to 20 sessions of right-sided rTMS to the VLPFC for 10 weeks. Stimulation was guided using neuronavigation software based on participants' individual structural MRIs, and delivered at 110% of resting motor threshold. A session consisted of 1Hz repetitive TMS for 15min. The primary outcome measure was reduction in depersonalization symptoms on the Cambridge Depersonalization Scale (CDS). Secondary outcomes included scores on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). 20 sessions of rTMS treatment to right VLPFC significantly reduced scores on the CDS by on average 44% (range 2-83.5%). Two patients could be classified as "full responders", four as "partial" and one a non-responder. Response usually occurred within the first 6 sessions. There were no significant adverse events. A randomized controlled clinical trial of VLPFC rTMS for DPD is warranted. PMID:27104926

  14. Bidirectional effects on interhemispheric resting-state functional connectivity induced by excitatory and inhibitory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takamitsu; Hanajima, Ritsuko; Shirota, Yuichiro; Ohminami, Shinya; Tsutsumi, Ryosuke; Terao, Yasuo; Ugawa, Yoshikazu; Hirose, Satoshi; Miyashita, Yasushi; Konishi, Seiki; Kunimatsu, Akira; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2014-05-01

    Several recent studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have shown that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) affects not only brain activity in stimulated regions but also resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) between the stimulated region and other remote regions. However, these studies have only demonstrated an effect of either excitatory or inhibitory rTMS on RSFC, and have not clearly shown the bidirectional effects of both types of rTMS. Here, we addressed this issue by performing excitatory and inhibitory quadripulse TMS (QPS), which is considered to exert relatively large and long-lasting effects on cortical excitability. We found that excitatory rTMS (QPS with interstimulus intervals of 5 ms) decreased interhemispheric RSFC between bilateral primary motor cortices, whereas inhibitory rTMS (QPS with interstimulus intervals of 50 ms) increased interhemispheric RSFC. The magnitude of these effects on RSFC was significantly correlated with that of rTMS-induced effects on motor evoked potential from the corresponding muscle. The bidirectional effects of QPS were also observed in the stimulation over prefrontal and parietal association areas. These findings provide evidence for the robust bidirectional effects of excitatory and inhibitory rTMSs on RSFC, and raise a possibility that QPS can be a powerful tool to modulate RSFC. PMID:23897535

  15. Blood flow and oxygenation changes due to low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation of the cerebral cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesquita, Rickson C.; Faseyitan, Olufunsho K.; Turkeltaub, Peter E.; Buckley, Erin M.; Thomas, Amy; Kim, Meeri N.; Durduran, Turgut; Greenberg, Joel H.; Detre, John A.; Yodh, Arjun G.; Hamilton, Roy H.

    2013-06-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) modulates processing in the human brain and is therefore of interest as a treatment modality for neurologic conditions. During TMS administration, an electric current passing through a coil on the scalp creates a rapidly varying magnetic field that induces currents in the cerebral cortex. The effects of low-frequency (1 Hz), repetitive TMS (rTMS) on motor cortex cerebral blood flow (CBF) and tissue oxygenation in seven healthy adults, during/after 20 min stimulation, is reported. Noninvasive optical methods are employed: diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) for blood flow and diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) for hemoglobin concentrations. A significant increase in median CBF (33%) on the side ipsilateral to stimulation was observed during rTMS and persisted after discontinuation. The measured hemodynamic parameter variations enabled computation of relative changes in cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption during rTMS, which increased significantly (28%) in the stimulated hemisphere. By contrast, hemodynamic changes from baseline were not observed contralateral to rTMS administration (all parameters, p>0.29). In total, these findings provide new information about hemodynamic/metabolic responses to low-frequency rTMS and, importantly, demonstrate the feasibility of DCS/DOS for noninvasive monitoring of TMS-induced physiologic effects.

  16. H-coil repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for treatment of temporal lobe epilepsy: A case report.

    PubMed

    Gersner, R; Oberman, L; Sanchez, M J; Chiriboga, N; Kaye, H L; Pascual-Leone, A; Libenson, M; Roth, Y; Zangen, A; Rotenberg, A

    2016-01-01

    Low frequency repetitive TMS (rTMS) of a cortical seizure focus is emerging as an antiepileptic treatment. While conventional rTMS stimulators activate only superficial cortical areas, reaching deep epileptic foci, for example in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), is possible using specially designed H-coils. We report the results of rTMS in a young adult with pharmacoresistant bilateral TLE who underwent three courses (of 10, 15, and 30 daily sessions) of unilateral rTMS over the hemisphere from which seizures originated most often. Seizure frequency was assessed before and after each block of rTMS sessions, as was the tolerability of the procedure. Seizure frequency declined significantly, by 50 to 70% following each rTMS course. All sessions were well-tolerated. PMID:27114902

  17. H-coil repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for treatment of temporal lobe epilepsy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Gersner, R.; Oberman, L.; Sanchez, M.J.; Chiriboga, N.; Kaye, H.L.; Pascual-Leone, A.; Libenson, M.; Roth, Y.; Zangen, A.; Rotenberg, A.

    2016-01-01

    Low frequency repetitive TMS (rTMS) of a cortical seizure focus is emerging as an antiepileptic treatment. While conventional rTMS stimulators activate only superficial cortical areas, reaching deep epileptic foci, for example in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), is possible using specially designed H-coils. We report the results of rTMS in a young adult with pharmacoresistant bilateral TLE who underwent three courses (of 10, 15, and 30 daily sessions) of unilateral rTMS over the hemisphere from which seizures originated most often. Seizure frequency was assessed before and after each block of rTMS sessions, as was the tolerability of the procedure. Seizure frequency declined significantly, by 50 to 70% following each rTMS course. All sessions were well-tolerated. PMID:27114902

  18. Improvement of white matter and functional connectivity abnormalities by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in crossed aphasia in dextral

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Haitao; Wu, Haiyan; Cheng, Hewei; Wei, Dongjie; Wang, Xiaoyan; Fan, Yong; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Tong

    2014-01-01

    As a special aphasia, the occurrence of crossed aphasia in dextral (CAD) is unusual. This study aims to improve the language ability by applying 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). We studied multiple modality imaging of structural connectivity (diffusion tensor imaging), functional connectivity (resting fMRI), PET, and neurolinguistic analysis on a patient with CAD. Furthermore, we applied rTMS of 1 Hz for 40 times and observed the language function improvement. The results indicated that a significantly reduced structural and function connectivity was found in DTI and fMRI data compared with the control. The PET imaging showed hypo-metabolism in right hemisphere and left cerebellum. In conclusion, one of the mechanisms of CAD is that right hemisphere is the language dominance. Stimulating left Wernicke area could improve auditory comprehension, stimulating left Broca’s area could enhance expression, and the results outlasted 6 months by 1 Hz rTMS balancing the excitability inter-hemisphere in CAD. PMID:25419415

  19. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for the Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective This review was conducted to assess the effectiveness of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD). The Technology rTMS is a noninvasive way to stimulate nerve cells in areas of the brain. During rTMS, an electrical current passes through a wire coil placed over the scalp. The current induces a magnetic field that produces an electrical field in the brain that then causes nerve cells to depolarize, resulting in the stimulation or disruption of brain activity. Researchers have investigated rTMS as an option to treat MDD, as an add-on to drug therapy, and, in particular, as an alternative to electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) for patients with treatment-resistant depression. The advantages of rTMS over ECT for patients with severe refractory depression are that general anesthesia is not needed, it is an outpatient procedure, it requires less energy, the simulation is specific and targeted, and convulsion is not required. The advantages of rTMS as an add-on treatment to drug therapy may include hastening of the clinical response when used with antidepressant drugs. Review Strategy The Medical Advisory Secretariat used its standard search strategy to locate international health technology assessments and English-language journal articles published from January 1996 to March 2004. Summary of Findings Some early meta-analyses suggested rTMS might be effective for the treatment of MDD (for treatment-resistant MDD and as an add-on treatment to drug therapy for patients not specifically defined as treatment resistant). There were, however, several crucial methodological limitations in the included studies that were not critically assessed. These are discussed below. Recent meta-analyses (including 2 international health technology assessments) have done evidence-based critical analyses of studies that have assessed rTMS for MDD. The 2 most recent health technology assessments (from the

  20. Bilateral Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Auditory Hallucinations in Patients with Schizophrenia: A Randomized Controlled, Cross-over Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun-Ji; Yeo, Seonguk; Hwang, Inho; Park, Jong-Il; Cui, Yin; Jin, Hong-Mei; Kim, Hyung Tae; Hwang, Tae-Young

    2014-01-01

    Objective A randomized double-blind cross-over trial was conducted in patients with persistent auditory hallucinations (AHs) to investigate whether bilateral repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) at the temporoparietal area or Broca's area is more effective at high- or low-frequencies compared to a sham condition. Methods Twenty three patients with persistent AHs who remained stable on the same medication for 2 months were enrolled. They were randomized to one of four conditions: low-frequency (1 Hz)-rTMS to the temporoparietal area (L-TP), high-frequency (20 Hz)-rTMS to the temporoparietal area (H-TP), high-frequency (20 Hz)-rTMS to Broca's area (H-B), or sham. Results All the four rTMS conditions resulted in significant decrease in the scores under the auditory hallucination rating scale and hallucination change scale over time. However, there were no significant treatment effects or interaction between time and treatment, suggesting no superior effects of the new paradigms over the sham condition. Conclusion Our findings suggest that bilateral rTMS at the temporoparietal area or Broca's area with high- or low-frequency does not produce superior effects in reducing AHs compared to sham stimulation. PMID:25598827

  1. Efficacy of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation with quetiapine in treating bipolar II depression: a randomized, double-blinded, control study

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shao-hua; Lai, Jian-bo; Xu, Dong-rong; Qi, Hong-li; Peterson, Bradley S.; Bao, Ai-min; Hu, Chan-chan; Huang, Man-li; Chen, Jing-kai; Wei, Ning; Hu, Jian-bo; Li, Shu-lan; Zhou, Wei-hua; Xu, Wei-juan; Xu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The clinical and cognitive responses to repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in bipolar II depressed patients remain unclear. In this study, thirty-eight bipolar II depressed patients were randomly assigned into three groups: (i) left high-frequency (n = 12), (ii) right low-frequency (n = 13), (iii) sham stimulation (n = 13), and underwent four-week rTMS with quetiapine concomitantly. Clinical efficacy was evaluated at baseline and weekly intervals using the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-17) and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). Cognitive functioning was assessed before and after the study with the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), Stroop Word-Color Interference Test (Stroop), and Trail Making Test (TMT). Thirty-five patients were included in the final analysis. Overall, the mean scores of both the HDRS-17 and the MADRS significantly decreased over the 4-week trial, which did not differ among the three groups. Exploratory analyses revealed no differences in factor scores of HDRS-17s, or in response or remission rates. Scores of WCST, Stroop, or TMT did not differ across the three groups. These findings indicated active rTMS combined with quetiapine was not superior to quetiapine monotherapy in improving depressive symptoms or cognitive performance in patients with bipolar II depression. PMID:27460201

  2. Efficacy of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation with quetiapine in treating bipolar II depression: a randomized, double-blinded, control study.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shao-Hua; Lai, Jian-Bo; Xu, Dong-Rong; Qi, Hong-Li; Peterson, Bradley S; Bao, Ai-Min; Hu, Chan-Chan; Huang, Man-Li; Chen, Jing-Kai; Wei, Ning; Hu, Jian-Bo; Li, Shu-Lan; Zhou, Wei-Hua; Xu, Wei-Juan; Xu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The clinical and cognitive responses to repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in bipolar II depressed patients remain unclear. In this study, thirty-eight bipolar II depressed patients were randomly assigned into three groups: (i) left high-frequency (n = 12), (ii) right low-frequency (n = 13), (iii) sham stimulation (n = 13), and underwent four-week rTMS with quetiapine concomitantly. Clinical efficacy was evaluated at baseline and weekly intervals using the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-17) and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). Cognitive functioning was assessed before and after the study with the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), Stroop Word-Color Interference Test (Stroop), and Trail Making Test (TMT). Thirty-five patients were included in the final analysis. Overall, the mean scores of both the HDRS-17 and the MADRS significantly decreased over the 4-week trial, which did not differ among the three groups. Exploratory analyses revealed no differences in factor scores of HDRS-17s, or in response or remission rates. Scores of WCST, Stroop, or TMT did not differ across the three groups. These findings indicated active rTMS combined with quetiapine was not superior to quetiapine monotherapy in improving depressive symptoms or cognitive performance in patients with bipolar II depression. PMID:27460201

  3. Test-retest assessment of cortical activation induced by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation with brain atlas-guided optical topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Fenghua; Kozel, F. Andrew; Yennu, Amarnath; Croarkin, Paul E.; McClintock, Shawn M.; Mapes, Kimberly S.; Husain, Mustafa M.; Liu, Hanli

    2012-11-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a technology that stimulates neurons with rapidly changing magnetic pulses with demonstrated therapeutic applications for various neuropsychiatric disorders. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a suitable tool to assess rTMS-evoked brain responses without interference from the magnetic or electric fields generated by the TMS coil. We have previously reported a channel-wise study of combined rTMS/fNIRS on the motor and prefrontal cortices, showing a robust decrease of oxygenated hemoglobin concentration (Δ[HbO2]) at the sites of 1-Hz rTMS and the contralateral brain regions. However, the reliability of this putative clinical tool is unknown. In this study, we develop a rapid optical topography approach to spatially characterize the rTMS-evoked hemodynamic responses on a standard brain atlas. A hemispherical approximation of the brain is employed to convert the three-dimensional topography on the complex brain surface to a two-dimensional topography in the spherical coordinate system. The test-retest reliability of the combined rTMS/fNIRS is assessed using repeated measurements performed two to three days apart. The results demonstrate that the Δ[HbO2] amplitudes have moderate-to-high reliability at the group level; and the spatial patterns of the topographic images have high reproducibility in size and a moderate degree of overlap at the individual level.

  4. Unilateral and bilateral MRI-targeted repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for treatment-resistant depression: a randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Blumberger, Daniel M.; Maller, Jerome J.; Thomson, Lauren; Mulsant, Benoit H.; Rajji, Tarek K.; Maher, Missy; Brown, Patrick E.; Downar, Jonathan; Vila-Rodriguez, Fidel; Fitzgerald, Paul B.; Daskalakis, Zafiris J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Several factors may mitigate the efficacy of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over sham rTMS in patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD). These factors include unilateral stimulation (i.e., treatment of only the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex [DLPFC]), suboptimal methods of targeting the DLPFC and insufficient stimulation intensity (based on coil-to-cortex distance). Methods We recruited patients with TRD between the ages of 18 and 85 years from a university hospital, and participants were randomized to receive sequential bilateral rTMS (600 pulses at 1 Hz followed by 1500 pulses at 10 Hz), unilateral high-frequency left (HFL)-rTMS (2100 pulses at 10 Hz) or sham rTMS for 3 or 6 weeks depending on treatment response. Stimulation was targeted with MRI localization over the junction of the middle and anterior thirds of the middle frontal gyrus, using 120% of the coil-to-cortex adjusted motor threshold. Our primary outcome of interest was the remission rate. Results A total of 121 patients participated in this study. The remission rate was significantly higher in the bilateral group than the sham group. The remission rate in the HFL-rTMS group was intermediate and did not differ statistically from the rate in the 2 other groups. There were no significant differences in reduction of depression scores among the 3 groups. Limitations The number of pulses used per session in the unilateral group was somewhat lower in our trial than in more recent trials, and the sham condition did not involve active stimulation. Conclusion Our findings suggest that sequential bilateral rTMS is superior to sham rTMS; however, adjusting for coil-to-cortex distance did not yield enhanced efficacy rates. PMID:27269205

  5. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) Modulates Event-Related Potential (ERP) Indices of Attention in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Casanova, Manuel F.; Baruth, Joshua M.; El-Baz, Ayman; Tasman, Allan; Sears, Lonnie; Sokhadze, Estate

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have previously been shown to have significantly augmented and prolonged event-related potentials (ERP) to irrelevant visual stimuli compared to controls at both early and later stages (e.g., N200, P300) of visual processing and evidence of an overall lack of stimulus discrimination. Abnormally large and indiscriminative cortical responses to sensory stimuli may reflect cortical inhibitory deficits and a disruption in the excitation/inhibition ratio. Low-frequency (≤1HZ) repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been shown to increase inhibition of stimulated cortex by the activation of inhibitory circuits. It was our prediction that after 12 sessions of low-frequency rTMS applied bilaterally to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortices in individuals with ASD there would be a significant improvement in ERP indices of selective attention evoked at later (i.e., 200–600 ms) stages of attentional processing as well as an improvement in motor response error rate. We assessed 25 participants with ASD in a task of selective attention using illusory figures before and after 12 sessions of rTMS in a controlled design where a waiting-list group of 20 children with ASD performed the same task twice. We found a significant improvement in both N200 and P300 components as a result of rTMS as well as a significant reduction in response errors. We also found significant reductions in both repetitive behavior and irritability according to clinical behavioral questionnaires as a result of rTMS. We propose that rTMS has the potential to become an important therapeutic tool in ASD research and treatment. PMID:24683490

  6. Chronic repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation is antidepressant but not anxiolytic in rat models of anxiety and depression.

    PubMed

    Hargreaves, Garth A; McGregor, Iain S; Sachdev, Perminder S

    2005-11-15

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been proposed as a treatment for depression and anxiety disorders. While the antidepressant effect has been modelled in animals, there have been few attempts to examine a possible anxiolytic effect of repetitive TMS (rTMS) in animal models. We administered 18 days of rTMS to male Sprague-Dawley rats. On days 10 through 18, rats were tested in several anxiety models (social interaction, emergence, elevated plus-maze, and predator odor avoidance) and in the forced swim test. No group differences were apparent on any of the anxiety models, while TMS produced an antidepressant effect in the forced swim test. Interestingly, on day 1 of the forced swim test, the home cage control group displayed increased swimming behaviour compared with sham-treated animals, suggesting an observable level of stress may have accompanied sham treatment. The results from the forced swim test suggested that TMS had modest antidepressant properties, but it did not show anxiolytic properties in the models examined. The study also suggested that stress associated with handling should be taken into account in the interpretation of TMS studies in animals. PMID:16223528

  7. Impact of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Post-Stroke Dysmnesia and the Role of BDNF Val66Met SNP

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Haitao; Zhang, Tong; Wen, Mei; Sun, Li

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about the effects of low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on dysmnesia and the impact of brain nucleotide neurotrophic factor (BDNF) Val66Met single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). This study investigated the impact of low-frequency rTMS on post-stroke dysmnesia and the impact of BDNF Val66Met SNP. Material/Methods Forty patients with post-stroke dysmnesia were prospectively randomized into the rTMS and sham groups. BDNF Val66Met SNP was determined using restriction fragment length polymorphism. Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), Loewenstein Occupational Therapy of Cognitive Assessment (LOTCA), and Rivermead Behavior Memory Test (RBMT) scores, as well as plasma BDNF concentrations, were measured at baseline and at 3 days and 2 months post-treatment. Results MoCA, LOTCA, and RBMT scores were higher after rTMS. Three days after treatment, BDNF decreased in the rTMS group but it increased in the sham group (P<0.05). Two months after treatment, RMBT scores in the rTMS group were higher than in the sham group, but not MoCA and LOTCA scores. Conclusions Low-frequency rTMS may improve after-stoke memory through various pathways, which may involve polymorphisms and several neural genes, but not through an increase in BDNF levels. PMID:25770310

  8. Benefit of Multiple Sessions of Perilesional Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for an Effective Rehabilitation of Visuo-Spatial Function

    PubMed Central

    Afifi, Linda; Rushmore, R. Jarrett; Valero-Cabré, Antoni

    2012-01-01

    Non-invasive neurostimulation techniques have been used alone or in conjunction with rehabilitation therapy to treat the neurological sequelae of brain damage with rather variable therapeutic outcomes. One potential factor limiting a consistent success for such techniques may be the few sessions carried out in patients, despite reports that their accrual may play a key role in alleviating neurological deficits long-term. In this study, we tested the effects of seventy consecutive sessions of perilesional high frequency (10 Hz) repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in the treatment of chronic neglect deficits in a well-established feline model of visuo-spatial neglect. Under identical rTMS parameters and visuo-spatial testing regimes, half of the subjects improved in visuo-spatial orienting performance. The other half experienced either none or extremely moderate ameliorations in the neglected hemispace and displayed transient patterns of maladaptive visuo-spatial behavior. Detailed analyses suggest that lesion location and extent did not account for the behavioral differences observed between these two groups of animals. We conclude that multi-session perilesional rTMS regimes have the potential to induce functional ameliorations following focal chronic brain injury, and that behavioral performance prior to the onset of the rTMS treatment is the factor that best predicts positive outcomes for non-invasive neurostimulation treatments in visuo-spatial neglect. PMID:23167832

  9. Effect of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on major depressive disorder in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hae-Won; Youn, Young C; Chung, Sun J; Sohn, Young H

    2016-07-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) occurs in a small proportion of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and reduces their quality of life. We performed a randomized sham-controlled study to evaluate the effect of high-frequency (HF) repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) on MDD in patients with PD. Ten patients participated to a real-rTMS group and eight patients to a sham-rTMS group. Evaluations were performed at baseline, 2 and 6 weeks after rTMS treatment. All participants underwent examinations of depression rating scales, including the Hamilton Rating Scale, the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the motor part of the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS-III). The real-rTMS group had improved scores on HRS and the MADRS after 10 sessions, and these beneficial effects persisted for 6 weeks after the initial session. The BDI score did not change immediately after the sessions. The sham-rTMS group had no significant changes in any of the depression rating scales. The UPDRS-III did not change in either group. HF-rTMS of the left DLPFC is an effective treatment for MDD in patients with PD. PMID:27178002

  10. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation improves both hearing function and tinnitus perception in sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dai; Ma, Yuewen

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL) affects not only cochlear activity but also neural activity in the central auditory system. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) above the auditory cortex has been reported to improve auditory processing and to reduce the perception of tinnitus, which results from network dysfunction involving both auditory and non-auditory brain regions. SSHL patients who were refractory to standard corticosteroid therapy (SCT) and hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy received 20 sessions of 1 Hz rTMS to the temporoparietal junction ipsilateral to the symptomatic ear (rTMS group). RTMS therapy administered in addition to SCT and HBO therapy resulted in significantly greater recovery of hearing function and improvement of tinnitus perception compared SCT and HBO therapy without rTMS therapy. Additionally, the single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) measurements obtained in a subgroup of patients suggested that the rTMS therapy could have alleviated the decrease in regional cerebral brain flow (rCBF) in SSHL patients. RTMS appears to be an effective, practical, and safe treatment strategy for SSHL. PMID:26463446

  11. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation improves both hearing function and tinnitus perception in sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dai; Ma, Yuewen

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL) affects not only cochlear activity but also neural activity in the central auditory system. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) above the auditory cortex has been reported to improve auditory processing and to reduce the perception of tinnitus, which results from network dysfunction involving both auditory and non-auditory brain regions. SSHL patients who were refractory to standard corticosteroid therapy (SCT) and hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy received 20 sessions of 1 Hz rTMS to the temporoparietal junction ipsilateral to the symptomatic ear (rTMS group). RTMS therapy administered in addition to SCT and HBO therapy resulted in significantly greater recovery of hearing function and improvement of tinnitus perception compared SCT and HBO therapy without rTMS therapy. Additionally, the single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) measurements obtained in a subgroup of patients suggested that the rTMS therapy could have alleviated the decrease in regional cerebral brain flow (rCBF) in SSHL patients. RTMS appears to be an effective, practical, and safe treatment strategy for SSHL. PMID:26463446

  12. Effects of unilateral repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex on chronic widespread pain in fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Passard, A; Attal, N; Benadhira, R; Brasseur, L; Saba, G; Sichere, P; Perrot, S; Januel, D; Bouhassira, D

    2007-10-01

    Non-invasive unilateral repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the motor cortex induces analgesic effects in focal chronic pain syndromes, probably by modifying central pain modulatory systems. Neuroimaging studies have shown bilateral activation of a large number of structures, including some of those involved in pain processing, suggesting that such stimulation may induce generalized analgesic effects. The goal of this study was to assess the effects of unilateral rTMS of the motor cortex on chronic widespread pain in patients with fibromyalgia. Thirty patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (age: 52.6 +/- 7.9) were randomly assigned, in a double-blind fashion, to two groups, one receiving active rTMS (n = 15) and the other sham stimulation (n = 15), applied to the left primary motor cortex in 10 daily sessions. The primary outcome measure was self-reported average pain intensity over the last 24 h, measured at baseline, daily during the stimulation period and then 15, 30 and 60 days after the first stimulation. Other outcome measures included: sensory and affective pain scores for the McGill pain Questionnaire, quality of life (assessed with the pain interference items of the Brief Pain Inventory and the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire), mood and anxiety (assessed with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, the Beck Depression Inventory and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale). We also assessed the effects of rTMS on the pressure pain threshold at tender points ipsi- and contralateral to stimulation. Follow-up data were obtained for all the patients on days 15 and 30 and for 26 patients (13 in each treatment group) on day 60. Active rTMS significantly reduced pain and improved several aspects of quality of life (including fatigue, morning tiredness, general activity, walking and sleep) for up to 2 weeks after treatment had ended. The analgesic effects were observed from the fifth stimulation onwards and were not related to changes in mood or

  13. Changes in motor cortex excitability associated with temporal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in tinnitus: hints for cross-modal plasticity?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Motor cortex excitability was found to be changed after repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the temporal cortex highlighting the occurrence of cross-modal plasticity in non-invasive brain stimulation. Here, we investigated the effects of temporal low-frequency rTMS on motor cortex plasticity in a large sample of tinnitus patients. In 116 patients with chronic tinnitus different parameters of cortical excitability were assessed before and after ten rTMS treatment sessions. Patients received one of three different protocols all including 1 Hz rTMS over the left temporal cortex. Treatment response was defined as improvement by at least five points in the tinnitus questionnaire (TQ). Variables of interest were resting motor threshold (RMT), short-interval intra-cortical inhibition (SICI), intracortical facilitation (ICF), and cortical silent period (CSP). Results After rTMS treatment RMT was decreased by about 1% of stimulator output near-significantly in the whole group of patients. SICI was associated with significant changes with respect to treatment response. The group of treatment responders showed a decrease of SICI over the course of treatment, the group of non-responders the reverse pattern. Conclusions Minor RMT changes during rTMS treatment do not necessarily suggest the need for systematic re-examination of the RMT for safety and efficacy issues. Treatment response to rTMS was shown to be related to changes in SICI that might reflect modulation of GABAergic mechanisms directly or indirectly related to rTMS treatment effects. PMID:24898574

  14. A Pilot Study of EEG Source Analysis Based Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for the Treatment of Tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Li, Bei; Feng, Yanmei; Cui, Biao; Wu, Hongmin; Shi, Haibo; Yin, Shankai

    2015-01-01

    Objective Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) is a novel therapeutic tool to induce a suppression of tinnitus. However, the optimal target sites are unknown. We aimed to determine whether low-frequency rTMS induced lasting suppression of tinnitus by decreasing neural activity in the cortex, navigated by high-density electroencephalogram (EEG) source analysis, and the utility of EEG for targeting treatment. Methods In this controlled three-armed trial, seven normal hearing patients with tonal tinnitus received a 10-day course of 1-Hz rTMS to the cortex, navigated by high-density EEG source analysis, to the left temporoparietal cortex region, and to the left temporoparietal with sham stimulation. The Tinnitus handicap inventory (THI) and a visual analog scale (VAS) were used to assess tinnitus severity and loudness. Measurements were taken before, and immediately, 2 weeks, and 4 weeks after the end of the interventions. Results Low-frequency rTMS decreased tinnitus significantly after active, but not sham, treatment. Responders in the EEG source analysis-based rTMS group, 71.4% (5/7) patients, experienced a significant reduction in tinnitus loudness, as evidenced by VAS scores. The target site of neuronal generators most consistently associated with a positive response was the frontal lobe in the right hemisphere, sourced using high-density EEG equipment, in the tinnitus patients. After left temporoparietal rTMS stimulation, 42.8% (3/7) patients experienced a decrease in tinnitus loudness. Conclusions Active EEG source analysis based rTMS resulted in significant suppression in tinnitus loudness, showing the superiority of neuronavigation-guided coil positioning in dealing with tinnitus. Non-auditory areas should be considered in the pathophysiology of tinnitus. This knowledge in turn can contribute to investigate the pathophysiology of tinnitus. PMID:26430749

  15. Increased cerebellar activation after repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over the primary motor cortex in patients with multiple system atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Linling; Wu, Tianxia; Hou, Bo; Wu, Shuang; Feng, Feng; Cui, Liying

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous review reported that the high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the primary motor area (M1) of Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients could alleviate their symptoms. This study aimed to investigate the effect of rTMS over the left M1 of patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA). Methods Fifteen MSA patients were randomly assigned to receive a 10-session real (EP: group of experimental patients; n=7) or sham (CP: group of control patients; n=8) rTMS stimulation over two weeks. The overall experimental procedure consisted of two functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) sessions, before and after a 10-session rTMS treatment. A complex self-paced sequential tapping task was performed during fMRI scanning. In addition, 18 age and gender matched healthy controls (HC) were enrolled. Subjects from the HC group did not receive any rTMS treatment and they underwent fMRI examination only once. The primary end point was the motor score change of the Unified Multiple System Atrophy Rating Scale (UMSARS-II) measured before and after the 5th and 10th session. Task-related activation was also compared among groups. Results After active rTMS treatment, only patients of EP group significant improvement in UMSARS-II score. Compared to HC, MSA patients showed significant activation over similar brain areas except for the cerebellum. Increased activation was obtained in the bilateral cerebellum after rTMS treatment in the EP group. On the contrary, no increased activation was identified in the CP group. Conclusions Our results highlight rTMS over M1 induced motor improvement in MSA patients that may be associated with increased activation in the cerebellum. PMID:27127756

  16. Randomized sham controlled double-blind trial of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for adults with severe Tourette syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Landeros-Weisenberger, Angeli; Mantovani, Antonio; Motlagh, Maria; de Alvarenga, Pedro Gomes; Katsovich, Liliya; Leckman, James F.; Lisanby, Sarah H.

    2014-01-01

    Background A small proportion of individuals with Tourette syndrome (TS) have a lifelong course of illness that fails to respond to conventional treatments. Open label studies have suggested that low frequency (1-Hz) repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) targeting the supplementary motor area (SMA) may be effective in reducing tic severity. Objective/Hypothesis To examine the efficacy of rTMS over the SMA for TS in a randomized double-blind sham-controlled trial (RCT). Methods We conducted a two-site RCT-rTMS with 20 adults with severe TS for 3 weeks. Treatment consisted of 15 sessions (1-Hz; 30 min; 1,800 pulses per day) of active or sham rTMS at 110% of the motor threshold over the SMA. A subsequent 3 week course of active rTMS treatment was offered. Results Of the 20 patients (16 males; mean age of 33.7 ± 12.2 years), 9 received active and 11 received sham rTMS. After 3 weeks, patients receiving active rTMS showed on average a 17.3% reduction in the YGTSS total tic score compared to a 13.2% reduction in those receiving sham rTMS, resulting in no statistically significant reduction in tic severity (p=0.27). An additional 3 week open label active treatment for those patients (n = 7) initially randomized to active rTMS resulted in a significant overall 29.7% reduction in tic severity compared to baseline (p=0.04). Conclusion This RCT did not demonstrate efficacy of 3-week SMA-targeted low frequency rTMS in the treatment of severe adult TS. Further studies using longer or alternative stimulation protocols are warranted. PMID:25912296

  17. Increases in frontostriatal connectivity are associated with response to dorsomedial repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in refractory binge/purge behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Dunlop, Katharine; Woodside, Blake; Lam, Eileen; Olmsted, Marion; Colton, Patricia; Giacobbe, Peter; Downar, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Background Conventional treatments for eating disorders are associated with poor response rates and frequent relapse. Novel treatments are needed, in combination with markers to characterize and predict treatment response. Here, resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) was used to identify predictors and correlates of response to repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) at 10 Hz for eating disorders with refractory binge/purge symptomatology. Methods 28 subjects with anorexia nervosa, binge−purge subtype or bulimia nervosa underwent 20–30 sessions of 10 Hz dmPFC rTMS. rs-fMRI data were collected before and after rTMS. Subjects were stratified into responder and nonresponder groups using a criterion of ≥50% reduction in weekly binge/purge frequency. Neural predictors and correlates of response were identified using seed-based functional connectivity (FC), using the dmPFC and adjacent dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) as regions of interest. Results 16 of 28 subjects met response criteria. Treatment responders had lower baseline FC from dmPFC to lateral orbitofrontal cortex and right posterior insula, and from dACC to right posterior insula and hippocampus. Responders had low baseline FC from the dACC to the ventral striatum and anterior insula; this connectivity increased over treatment. However, in nonresponders, frontostriatal FC was high at baseline, and dmPFC-rTMS suppressed FC in association with symptomatic worsening. Conclusions Enhanced frontostriatal connectivity was associated with responders to dmPFC-rTMS for binge/purge behavior. rTMS caused paradoxical suppression of frontostriatal connectivity in nonresponders. rs-fMRI could prove critical for optimizing stimulation parameters in a future sham-controlled trial of rTMS in disordered eating. PMID:26199873

  18. Low Intensity Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Does Not Induce Cell Survival or Regeneration in a Mouse Optic Nerve Crush Model

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Alexander D.; Makowiecki, Kalina; Bartlett, Carole; Rodger, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Low intensity repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (LI-rTMS), a non-invasive form of brain stimulation, has been shown to induce structural and functional brain plasticity, including short distance axonal sprouting. However, the potential for LI-rTMS to promote axonal regeneration following neurotrauma has not been investigated. This study examined the effect of LI-rTMS on retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival, axon regeneration and levels of BDNF in an optic nerve crush neurotrauma model. Adult C57Bl/6J mice received a unilateral intraorbital optic nerve crush. Mice received 10 minutes of sham (handling control without stimulation) (n=6) or LI-rTMS (n = 8) daily stimulation for 14 days to the operated eye. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess RGC survival (β-3 Tubulin) and axon regeneration across the injury (GAP43). Additionally, BDNF expression was quantified in a separate cohort by ELISA in the retina and optic nerve of injured (optic nerve crush) (sham n = 5, LI-rTMS n = 5) and non-injured mice (sham n = 5, LI-rTMS n = 5) that received daily stimulation as above for 7 days. Following 14 days of LI-rTMS there was no significant difference in mean RGC survival between sham and treated animals (p>0.05). Also, neither sham nor LI-rTMS animals showed GAP43 positive labelling in the optic nerve, indicating that regeneration did not occur. At 1 week, there was no significant difference in BDNF levels in the retina or optic nerves between sham and LI-rTMS in injured or non-injured mice (p>0.05). Although LI-rTMS has been shown to induce structural and molecular plasticity in the visual system and cerebellum, our results suggest LI-rTMS does not induce neuroprotection or regeneration following a complete optic nerve crush. These results help define the therapeutic capacity and limitations of LI-rTMS in the treatment of neurotrauma. PMID:25993112

  19. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Treatment-Resistant Depression: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background To date, several randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have shown the efficacy of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in the treatment of major depression. Objective This analysis examined the antidepressant efficacy of rTMS in patients with treatment-resistant unipolar depression. Methods A literature search was performed for RCTs published from January 1, 1994, to November 20, 2014. The search was updated on March 1, 2015. Two independent reviewers evaluated the abstracts for inclusion, reviewed full texts of eligible studies, and abstracted data. Meta-analyses were conducted to obtain summary estimates. The primary outcome was changes in depression scores measured by the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD), and we considered, a priori, the mean difference of 3.5 points to be a clinically important treatment effect. Remission and response to the treatment were secondary outcomes, and we calculated number needed to treat on the basis of these outcomes. We examined the possibility of publication bias by constructing funnel plots and by Begg's and Egger's tests. A meta-regression was undertaken to examine the effect of specific rTMS technical parameters on the treatment effects. Results Twenty-three RCTs compared rTMS with sham, and six RCTs compared rTMS with electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Trials of rTMS versus sham showed a statistically significant improvement in depression scores with rTMS (weighted mean difference [WMD] 2.31, 95% CI 1.19–3.43; P < .001). This improvement was smaller than the pre-specified clinically important treatment effect. There was a 10% absolute difference between rTMS and sham in the rates of remission or response. This translates to a number needed to treat of 10. Risk ratios for remission and response were 2.20 (95% CI 1.44–3.38, P = .001 and 1.72 [95% CI], 1.13–2.62, P = .01), respectively, favouring rTMS. No publication bias was detected. Trials of rTMS versus ECT showed a statistically and

  20. Cognitive and anatomical underpinnings of the conceptual knowledge for common objects and familiar people: a repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

    PubMed

    Campanella, Fabio; Fabbro, Franco; Urgesi, Cosimo

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have addressed the issue of how knowledge of common objects is organized in the brain, whereas the cognitive and anatomical underpinnings of familiar people knowledge have been less explored. Here we applied repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the left and right temporal poles before asking healthy individuals to perform a speeded word-to-picture matching task using familiar people and common objects as stimuli. We manipulated two widely used semantic variables, namely the semantic distance and the familiarity of stimuli, to assess whether the semantic organization of familiar people knowledge is similar to that of common objects. For both objects and faces we reliably found semantic distance and familiarity effects, with less accurate and slower responses for stimulus pairs that were more closely related and less familiar. However, the effects of semantic variables differed across categories, with semantic distance effects larger for objects and familiarity effects larger for faces, suggesting that objects and faces might share a partially comparable organization of their semantic representations. The application of rTMS to the left temporal pole modulated, for both categories, semantic distance, but not familiarity effects, revealing that accessing object and face concepts might rely on overlapping processes within left anterior temporal regions. Crucially, rTMS of the left temporal pole affected only the recognition of pairs of stimuli that could be discriminated at specific levels of categorization (e.g., two kitchen tools or two famous persons), with no effect for discriminations at either superordinate or individual levels. Conversely, rTMS of the right temporal pole induced an overall slowing of reaction times that positively correlated with the visual similarity of the stimuli, suggesting a more perceptual rather than semantic role of the right anterior temporal regions. Results are discussed in the light of current

  1. Therapeutic impact of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on tinnitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Soleimani, Robabeh; Jalali, Mir Mohammad; Hasandokht, Tolou

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we conducted a systematic literature review and meta-analysis on the effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) compared with sham in chronic tinnitus patients. We searched databases, from their onset up to August 2014, for randomized controlled trials (RCT) in English that assessed the effectiveness of rTMS for chronic tinnitus. RCTs were selected according to inclusion/exclusion criteria before data were extracted. For the meta-analysis weighted mean differences (and standard deviations) of Tinnitus Questionnaire (TQ) and Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI) scores were determined. Therapeutic success was defined as difference of at least 7 points in the THI score between baseline and the follow-up assessment after treatment. The odds ratio (OR) for this variable was assessed. Results from 15 RCTs were analyzed. The mean difference for TQ score at 1 week after intervention was 3.42. For THI, the data of mean difference score in two groups, 1 and 6 month after intervention, was 6.71 and 12.89, respectively. The all comparisons indicated a significant medium to large effect size in follow-up which is in favor of the rTMS. The pooled OR of therapeutic success of the studies which used THI at 1 month after intervention was 15.75. These data underscore the clinical effect of rTMS in the treatment of tinnitus. However, there is high variability of studies design and reported outcomes. Replication of data in multicenter trials with a large number of patients and long-term follow-up is needed before further conclusions can be drawn. PMID:25968009

  2. Factors Associated With Upper Extremity Functional Recovery Following Low-Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the factors related to upper extremity functional improvement following inhibitory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in stroke patients. Methods Forty-one stroke patients received low-frequency rTMS over the contralesional hemisphere according to a standard protocol, in addition to conventional physical and occupational therapy. The rTMS-treated patients were divided into two groups according to their responsiveness to rTMS measured by the self-care score of the Korean version of Modified Barthel Index (K-MBI): responded group (n=19) and non-responded group (n=22). Forty-one age-matched stroke patients who had not received rTMS served as controls. Neurological, cognitive and functional assessments were performed before rTMS and 4 weeks after rTMS treatment. Results Among the rTMS-treated patients, the responded group was significantly younger than the non-responded group (51.6±10.5 years and 65.5±13.7 years, respectively; p=0.001). Four weeks after rTMS, the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, the Brunnstrom recovery stage and upper extremity muscle power scores were significantly more improved in the responded group than in the control group. Besides the self-care score, the mobility score of the K-MBI was also more improved in the responded group than in the non-responded group or controls. Conclusion Age is the most obvious factor determining upper extremity functional responsiveness to low-frequency rTMS in stroke patients. PMID:27446773

  3. The Role of Right Inferior Parietal Cortex in Auditory Spatial Attention: A Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study.

    PubMed

    Karhson, Debra S; Mock, Jeffrey R; Golob, Edward J

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral studies support the concept of an auditory spatial attention gradient by demonstrating that attentional benefits progressively diminish as distance increases from an attended location. Damage to the right inferior parietal cortex can induce a rightward attention bias, which implicates this region in the construction of attention gradients. This study used event-related potentials (ERPs) to define attention-related gradients before and after repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to the right inferior parietal cortex. Subjects (n = 16) listened to noise bursts at five azimuth locations (left to right: -90°, -45°, 0° midline, +45°, +90°) and responded to stimuli at one target location (-90°, +90°, separate blocks). ERPs as a function of non-target location were examined before (baseline) and after 0.9 Hz rTMS. Results showed that ERP attention gradients were observed in three time windows (frontal 230-340, parietal 400-460, frontal 550-750 ms). Significant transient rTMS effects were seen in the first and third windows. The first window had a voltage decrease at the farthest location when attending to either the left or right side. The third window had on overall increase in positivity, but only when attending to the left side. These findings suggest that rTMS induced a small contraction in spatial attention gradients within the first time window. The asymmetric effect of attended location on gradients in the third time window may relate to neglect of the left hemispace after right parietal injury. Together, these results highlight the role of the right inferior parietal cortex in modulating frontal lobe attention network activity. PMID:26636333

  4. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation of the Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex Modulates Repetition Suppression to Unfamiliar Faces: An ERP Study

    PubMed Central

    Lafontaine, Marc Philippe; Théoret, Hugo; Gosselin, Frédéric; Lippé, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Repeated visual processing of an unfamiliar face suppresses neural activity in face-specific areas of the occipito-temporal cortex. This "repetition suppression" (RS) is a primitive mechanism involved in learning of unfamiliar faces, which can be detected through amplitude reduction of the N170 event-related potential (ERP). The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) exerts top-down influence on early visual processing. However, its contribution to N170 RS and learning of unfamiliar faces remains unclear. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) transiently increases or decreases cortical excitability, as a function of polarity. We hypothesized that DLPFC excitability modulation by tDCS would cause polarity-dependent modulations of N170 RS during encoding of unfamiliar faces. tDCS-induced N170 RS enhancement would improve long-term recognition reaction time (RT) and/or accuracy rates, whereas N170 RS impairment would compromise recognition ability. Participants underwent three tDCS conditions in random order at ∼72 hour intervals: right anodal/left cathodal, right cathodal/left anodal and sham. Immediately following tDCS conditions, an EEG was recorded during encoding of unfamiliar faces for assessment of P100 and N170 visual ERPs. The P3a component was analyzed to detect prefrontal function modulation. Recognition tasks were administered ∼72 hours following encoding. Results indicate the right anodal/left cathodal condition facilitated N170 RS and induced larger P3a amplitudes, leading to faster recognition RT. Conversely, the right cathodal/left anodal condition caused N170 amplitude and RTs to increase, and a delay in P3a latency. These data demonstrate that DLPFC excitability modulation can influence early visual encoding of unfamiliar faces, highlighting the importance of DLPFC in basic learning mechanisms. PMID:24324721

  5. Cognitive and Anatomical Underpinnings of the Conceptual Knowledge for Common Objects and Familiar People: A Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Campanella, Fabio; Fabbro, Franco; Urgesi, Cosimo

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have addressed the issue of how knowledge of common objects is organized in the brain, whereas the cognitive and anatomical underpinnings of familiar people knowledge have been less explored. Here we applied repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the left and right temporal poles before asking healthy individuals to perform a speeded word-to-picture matching task using familiar people and common objects as stimuli. We manipulated two widely used semantic variables, namely the semantic distance and the familiarity of stimuli, to assess whether the semantic organization of familiar people knowledge is similar to that of common objects. For both objects and faces we reliably found semantic distance and familiarity effects, with less accurate and slower responses for stimulus pairs that were more closely related and less familiar. However, the effects of semantic variables differed across categories, with semantic distance effects larger for objects and familiarity effects larger for faces, suggesting that objects and faces might share a partially comparable organization of their semantic representations. The application of rTMS to the left temporal pole modulated, for both categories, semantic distance, but not familiarity effects, revealing that accessing object and face concepts might rely on overlapping processes within left anterior temporal regions. Crucially, rTMS of the left temporal pole affected only the recognition of pairs of stimuli that could be discriminated at specific levels of categorization (e.g., two kitchen tools or two famous persons), with no effect for discriminations at either superordinate or individual levels. Conversely, rTMS of the right temporal pole induced an overall slowing of reaction times that positively correlated with the visual similarity of the stimuli, suggesting a more perceptual rather than semantic role of the right anterior temporal regions. Results are discussed in the light of current

  6. Primed low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and constraint-induced movement therapy in pediatric hemiparesis: a randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    GILLICK, BERNADETTE T; KRACH, LINDA E; FEYMA, TIM; RICH, TONYA L; MOBERG, KELLI; THOMAS, WILLIAM; CASSIDY, JESSICA M; MENK, JEREMIAH; CAREY, JAMES R

    2013-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility and efficacy of five treatments of 6Hz primed, low-frequency, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) combined with constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) to promote recovery of the paretic hand in children with congenital hemiparesis. Method Nineteen children with congenital hemiparesis aged between 8 and 17 years (10 males, nine females; mean age 10y 10mo, SD 2y 10mo; Manual Ability Classification Scale levels I-III) underwent five sessions of either real rTMS (n=10) or sham rTMS (n=9) alternated daily with CIMT. CIMT consisted of 13 days of continuous long-arm casting with five skin-check sessions. Each child received a total of 10 hours of one-to-one therapy. The primary outcome measure was the Assisting Hand Assessment (AHA) and the secondary outcome variables were the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) and stereognosis. A Wilcoxon signed-rank sum test was used to analyze differences between pre- and post-test scores within the groups. Analysis of covariance was used to compute mean differences between groups adjusting for baseline. Fisher’s exact test was used to compare individual change in AHA raw scores with the smallest detectable difference (SDD) of 4 points. Results All participants receiving treatment finished the study. Improvement in AHA differed significantly between groups (p=0.007). No significant differences in the secondary outcome measures were found. Eight out of 10 participants in the rTMS/CIMT group showed improvement greater than the SDD, but only two out of nine in the sham rTMS/CIMT group showed such improvement (p=0.023). No serious adverse events occurred. Interpretation Primed, low-frequency rTMS combined with CIMT appears to be safe, feasible, and efficacious in pediatric hemiparesis. Larger clinical trials are now indicated. PMID:23962321

  7. Delayed effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on negative symptoms of schizophrenia: Findings from a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhe; Yin, Ming; Lyu, Xiao-Li; Zhang, Lan-Lan; Du, Xiang-Dong; Hung, Galen Chin-Lun

    2016-06-30

    Evidence is inconsistent regarding the effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on negative symptoms of schizophrenia. In this study, 47 patients were randomized to receive either active rTMS over left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (n=25) or sham stimulation (n=22). Negative symptoms were assessed with the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS) at baseline, 4 weeks and 8 weeks. At 4 weeks, there was no difference in SANS scores between 2 groups. By 8 weeks, patients with active rTMS had significantly reduced SANS score than controls. Our findings suggest a delayed effect of rTMS on negative symptoms. PMID:27138827

  8. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) influences spatial cognition and modulates hippocampal structural synaptic plasticity in aging mice.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Zhang, Zhanchi; Kang, Lin; Geng, Dandan; Wang, Yanyong; Wang, Mingwei; Cui, Huixian

    2014-10-01

    Normal aging is characteristic with the gradual decline in cognitive function associated with the progressive reduction of structural and functional plasticity in the hippocampus. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has developed into a novel neurological and psychiatric tool that can be used to investigate the neurobiology of cognitive function. Recent studies have demonstrated that low-frequency rTMS (≤1Hz) affects synaptic plasticity in rats with vascular dementia (VaD), and it ameliorates the spatial cognitive ability in mice with Aβ1-42-mediated memory deficits, but there are little concerns about the effects of rTMS on normal aging related cognition and synaptic plasticity changes. Thus, the current study investigated the effects of rTMS on spatial memory behavior, neuron and synapse morphology in the hippocampus, and synaptic protein markers and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)/tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) in normal aging mice, to illustrate the mechanisms of rTMS in regulating cognitive capacity. Relative to adult animals, aging caused hippocampal-dependent cognitive impairment, simultaneously inhibited the activation of the BDNF-TrkB signaling pathway, reduced the transcription and expression of synaptic protein markers: synaptophysin (SYN), growth associated protein 43 (GAP43) and post-synaptic density protein 95 (PSD95), as well as decreased synapse density and PSD (post-synaptic density) thickness. Interestingly, rTMS with low intensity (110% average resting motor threshold intensity, 1Hz, LIMS) triggered the activation of BDNF and TrkB, upregulated the level of synaptic protein markers, and increased synapse density and thickened PSD, and further reversed the spatial cognition dysfunction in aging mice. Conversely, high-intensity magnetic stimulation (150% average resting motor threshold intensity, 1Hz, HIMS) appeared to be detrimental, inducing thinning of PSDs, disordered synaptic structure, and a large number of

  9. Deception rate in a "lying game": different effects of excitatory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation of right and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex not found with inhibitory stimulation.

    PubMed

    Karton, Inga; Palu, Annegrete; Jõks, Kerli; Bachmann, Talis

    2014-11-01

    Knowing the brain processes involved in lying is the key point in today's deception detection studies. We have previously found that stimulating the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) affects the rate of spontaneous lying in simple behavioural tasks. The main idea of this study was to examine the role of rTMS applied to the DLPFC in the behavioural conditions where subjects were better motivated to lie compared to our earlier studies and where all possible conditions (inhibition of left and right DLPFC with 1-Hz and sham; excitation of left and right DLPFC with 10-Hz and sham) were administered to the same subjects. It was expected that excitation of the left DLPFC with rTMS decreases and excitation of the right DLPFC increases the rate of lying and that inhibitory stimulation reverses the effects. As was expected, excitation of the left DLPFC decreased lying compared to excitation of the right DLPFC, but contrary to the expectation, inhibition had no different effects. These findings suggest that propensity to lie can be manipulated by non-invasive excitatory brain stimulation by TMS targeted at DLPFC and the direction of the effect depends on the cortical target locus. PMID:25233864

  10. Economic evaluation of resistant major depressive disorder treatment in Iranian population: a comparison between repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation with electroconvulsive

    PubMed Central

    Ghiasvand, Hesam; Moradi- Joo, Mohammad; Abolhassani, Nazanin; Ravaghi, Hamid; Raygani, Seyed Mansoor; Mohabbat-Bahar, Sahar

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is estimated that major depression disorders constitute 8.2% of years lived with disability (YLDs) globally. The repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) and Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT) are two relative common interventions to treat major depressive disorders, especially for treatment resistant depression. In this study the cost- effectiveness and cost-utility of rTMS were compared with ECT in Iranian population suffering from major depressive disorder using a decision tree model. Methods: A decision tree model conducted to compare the cost-effectiveness ratio of rTMS with ECT in a health system prospective and 7 months’ time horizon. The outcome variables were: response rate, remission rate and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) of the rTMS and ECT as primary and secondary outcomes extracted from systematic reviews and randomized control trials. The costs were also calculated through a field study in one clinic and one hospital; the direct costs have only been considered. Results: The total cost for rTMS and ECTstrategieswere11015000Rials (373US$) and 11742700 Rials (397.7US$), respectively. Also the rTMS/ECT ratio of costs per improved patients was 1194410Rials (40.5 US$); the ratio for costs per QALYs utility was 21017139 Rials (711.72 US$). The incremental cost- effectiveness ratio of rTMS versus ECT was 1194410 Rials (40.44 US$) after treatment and maintenance courses. Conclusion: Given the current prevalence of depressive disorders in Iranian population, the ECT is more cost-effective than TMS. The sensitivity analysis showed that if the prevalence of major depressive disorders declines to below 5% or the costs of rTMS decrease (rTMS provided by public sector), then the rTMS becomes more cost-effective compared with ECT. However, efficacy of rTMS depends on the frequency of pulsed magnetic field, the location of rTMS on the head, the number of therapeutic sessions and the length of each session. PMID:27390700

  11. [Transcranial magnetic stimulation used in psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Bouché, Christophe; Marigaux, Sandrine; Pattedoie, Nicolas

    2015-11-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation is a non-invasive treatment technique, using electromagnetism properties. It has been used for around twenty years in neurology (treatment of neuropathic pain, certain abnormal movements, Parkinson's disease), and in psychiatry (obsessive compulsive disorder, hallucinations, mood disorders, etc.). The presence and support of a nurse during the sessions is essential. PMID:26548388

  12. Bilateral responses of prefrontal and motor cortices to repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation as measured by functional near infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Fenghua; Kozel, Frank Andrew; Dhamne, Sameer; McClintock, Shawn M.; Croarkin, Paul; Mapes, Kimberly; Husain, Mustafa M.; Liu, Hanli

    2009-02-01

    Simultaneously acquiring cortical functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) during repeated Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) offers the possibility of directly investigating the effects of rTMS on brain regions without quantifiable behavioral changes. In this study, the left motor cortex and subsequently the left prefrontal cortex were stimulated at 1 Hz while fNIRS data was simultaneously acquired. Changes in hemodynamic signals were measured on both ipsilateral and contralateral sides. In each cortex, a significantly larger decrease in the concentration of oxygenated hemoglobin and a smaller increase in the concentration of deoxygenated hemoglobin during the stimulation periods were observed in both the motor and prefrontal cortices. The ipsilateral and contralateral changes showed high temporal consistency. Same experiment was repeated for each subject 2 or 3 days later. The hemodynamic responses associated with the stimulation showed good reproducibility in two sessions. To our knowledge, this is the first report of simultaneous fNIRS measurement of ipsilateral and contralateral changes of either the motor or prefrontal cortex during rTMS stimulation.

  13. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in schizophrenia with treatment-refractory auditory hallucinations and major self-mutilation.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Torsten; Berger, Christoph; Krecklow, Beate; Kurth, Jens; Schwarzenboeck, Sarah; Foley, Paul; Thome, Johannes; Krause, Bernd Joachim; Hoeppner, Jacqueline

    2015-08-01

    Major self-mutilation is one of the most hazardous complications encountered in psychiatric patients, and is generally associated with auditory verbal hallucinations as part of a psychotic syndrome. This case report exemplarily discusses the treatment of such hallucinations with repeated (20 sessions) low-frequency (1 Hz) transcranial magnetic stimulation targeting areas of elevated metabolic activity in the temporo-parietal cortex ('neuronavigated rTMS'), drawing upon experience concerning treatment of a patient with chronic auditory verbal hallucinations that had proved intractable to antipsychotic medication combined with cognitive behavioural therapy, and who had severed a forearm because of the content of these hallucinations. This example of major self-mutilation underscores the urgent requirement for effective management of chronic auditory verbal hallucinations in patients suffering from psychiatric disease, and neuronavigated rTMS represents an approach that deserves further exploration in this regard. PMID:24398780

  14. Repetitive Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Induced Excitability Changes of Primary Visual Cortex and Visual Learning Effects—A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Sczesny-Kaiser, Matthias; Beckhaus, Katharina; Dinse, Hubert R.; Schwenkreis, Peter; Tegenthoff, Martin; Höffken, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Studies on noninvasive motor cortex stimulation and motor learning demonstrated cortical excitability as a marker for a learning effect. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive tool to modulate cortical excitability. It is as yet unknown how tDCS-induced excitability changes and perceptual learning in visual cortex correlate. Our study aimed to examine the influence of tDCS on visual perceptual learning in healthy humans. Additionally, we measured excitability in primary visual cortex (V1). We hypothesized that anodal tDCS would improve and cathodal tDCS would have minor or no effects on visual learning. Anodal, cathodal or sham tDCS were applied over V1 in a randomized, double-blinded design over four consecutive days (n = 30). During 20 min of tDCS, subjects had to learn a visual orientation-discrimination task (ODT). Excitability parameters were measured by analyzing paired-stimulation behavior of visual-evoked potentials (ps-VEP) and by measuring phosphene thresholds (PTs) before and after the stimulation period of 4 days. Compared with sham-tDCS, anodal tDCS led to an improvement of visual discrimination learning (p < 0.003). We found reduced PTs and increased ps-VEP ratios indicating increased cortical excitability after anodal tDCS (PT: p = 0.002, ps-VEP: p = 0.003). Correlation analysis within the anodal tDCS group revealed no significant correlation between PTs and learning effect. For cathodal tDCS, no significant effects on learning or on excitability could be seen. Our results showed that anodal tDCS over V1 resulted in improved visual perceptual learning and increased cortical excitability. tDCS is a promising tool to alter V1 excitability and, hence, perceptual visual learning. PMID:27375452

  15. Successful Treatment of Phantom Limb Pain by 1 Hz Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Over Affected Supplementary Motor Complex: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Hoo; Byun, Jeong-Hyun; Choe, Yu-Ri; Lim, Seung-Kyu; Lee, Ka-Young; Choi, In-Sung

    2015-08-01

    A 37-year-old man with a right transfemoral amputation suffered from severe phantom limb pain (PLP). After targeting the affected supplementary motor complex (SMC) or primary motor cortex (PMC) using a neuro-navigation system with 800 stimuli of 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) at 85% of resting motor threshold, the 1 Hz rTMS over SMC dramatically reduced his visual analog scale (VAS) of PLP from 7 to 0. However, the 1 Hz rTMS over PMC failed to reduce pain. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of a successfully treated severe PLP with a low frequency rTMS over SMC in affected hemisphere. PMID:26361601

  16. Successful Treatment of Phantom Limb Pain by 1 Hz Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Over Affected Supplementary Motor Complex: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-Hoo; Byun, Jeong-Hyun; Choe, Yu-Ri; Lim, Seung-Kyu; Lee, Ka-Young

    2015-01-01

    A 37-year-old man with a right transfemoral amputation suffered from severe phantom limb pain (PLP). After targeting the affected supplementary motor complex (SMC) or primary motor cortex (PMC) using a neuro-navigation system with 800 stimuli of 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) at 85% of resting motor threshold, the 1 Hz rTMS over SMC dramatically reduced his visual analog scale (VAS) of PLP from 7 to 0. However, the 1 Hz rTMS over PMC failed to reduce pain. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of a successfully treated severe PLP with a low frequency rTMS over SMC in affected hemisphere. PMID:26361601

  17. Effect of the stimulus frequency and pulse number of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on the inter-reversal time of perceptual reversal on the right superior parietal lobule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nojima, Kazuhisa; Ge, Sheng; Katayama, Yoshinori; Ueno, Shoogo; Iramina, Keiji

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the stimulus frequency and pulses number of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on the inter-reversal time (IRT) of perceptual reversal on the right superior parietal lobule (SPL). The spinning wheel illusion was used as the ambiguous figures stimulation in this study. To investigate the rTMS effect over the right SPL during perceptual reversal, 0.25 Hz 60 pulse, 1 Hz 60 pulse, 0.5 Hz 120 pulse, 1 Hz 120 pulse, and 1 Hz 240 pulse biphasic rTMS at 90% of resting motor threshold was applied over the right SPL and the right posterior temporal lobe (PTL), respectively. As a control, a no TMS was also conducted. It was found that rTMS on 0.25 Hz 60 pulse and 1 Hz 60 pulse applied over the right SPL caused shorter IRT. In contrast, it was found that rTMS on 1 Hz 240-pulse applied over the right SPL caused longer IRT. On the other hand, there is no significant difference between IRTs when the rTMS on 0.5 Hz 120 pulse and 1 Hz 120 pulse were applied over the right SPL. Therefore, the applying of rTMS over the right SPL suggests that the IRT of perceptual reversal is effected by the rTMS conditions such as the stimulus frequency and the number of pulses.

  18. The role of the left inferior frontal gyrus in episodic encoding of faces: An interference study by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Feurra, Matteo; Fuggetta, Giorgio; Rossi, Simone; Walsh, Vincent

    2010-06-01

    Despite extensive research on face recognition, only a few studies have examined the integration of perceptual features with semantic, biographical, and episodic information. In order to address this issue, we used repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to target the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and the left occipital face area (OFA) during a face recognition task. rTMS was delivered during the encoding of "context" faces (i.e., linked to an occupation, e.g., "lawyer") and "no-context" faces (i.e., linked to a nonword pattern, e.g., "xxxx"). Subjects were then asked to perform a recognition memory task. Accuracy at retrieval showed a mild decrease after left OFA stimulation, whereas rTMS over the left IFG drastically compromised memory performance selectively for no-context faces. On the other hand, absence of rTMS interference on context faces might be due either to the fact that pairing an occupation to a face makes the memory trace stronger, therefore less susceptible to rTMS interference, or to a different functional specificity of the left IFG subregions. PMID:24168278

  19. Neural correlates associated with symptom provocation in pediatric obsessive compulsive disorder after a single session of sham-controlled repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Pedapati, Ernest; DiFrancesco, Mark; Wu, Steve; Giovanetti, Cathy; Nash, Tiffany; Mantovani, Antonio; Ammerman, Robert; Harris, Elana

    2015-09-30

    Treatments for pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) could be enhanced if the physiological changes engendered by treatment were known. This study examined neural correlates of a provocation task in youth with OCD, before and after sham-controlled repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). We hypothesized that rTMS to the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex would inhibit activity in cortico-striato-thalamic (CST) circuits associated with OCD to a greater extent than sham rTMS. After baseline (Time 1) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during a provocation task, subjects received one session of either fMRI-guided sham (SG; n=8) or active (AG; n=10) 1-Hz rTMS over the rDLPFC for 30min. During rTMS, subjects were presented with personalized images that evoked OCD-related anxiety. Following stimulation, fMRI and the provocation task were repeated (Time 2). Contrary to our prediction for the provocation task, the AG was associated with no changes in BOLD response from Times 1 to 2. In contrast, the SG had a significant increase at Time 2 in BOLD response in the right inferior frontal gyrus and right putamen, which persisted after adjusting for age, gender, and time to scanner as covariates. This study provides an initial framework for TMS interrogation of the CST circuit in pediatric OCD. PMID:26228567

  20. Low-frequency, Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for the Treatment of Patients with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: a Double-blind, Sham-controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Dong-Hyun; Pae, Chi-Un

    2013-01-01

    Objective Several studies have suggested that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the right prefrontal cortex may be useful in the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The aim of this study was to compare the effect of rTMS on the right prefrontal cortex with that of sham stimulation among patients with PTSD. Methods In total, 18 patients with PTSD were randomly assigned to the 1-Hz low-frequency rTMS group or the sham group for 3 weeks. Primary efficacy measures were the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) and its subscales, assessed at baseline and at 2, 4, and 8 weeks. Results All CAPS scores improved significantly over the study period. We found significant differences in the re-experiencing scores (F=7.47, p=0.004) and total scores (F=6.45, p=0.008) on the CAPS. The CAPS avoidance scores showed a trend toward significance (F=2.74, p=0.055), but no significant differences in the CAPS hyperarousal scores were observed. Conclusion The present study showed low-frequency rTMS to be an effective and tolerable option for the treatment of PTSD. Trials using variable indices of rTMS to the right prefrontal cortex and explorations of the differences in the effects on specific symptom clusters may be promising avenues of research regarding the use of rTMS for PTSD. PMID:24023554

  1. In Vitro Assessment Reveals Parameters-Dependent Modulation on Excitability and Functional Connectivity of Cerebellar Slice by Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Rongyu; Zhang, Guanghao; Weng, Xiechuan; Han, Yao; Lang, Yiran; Zhao, Yuwei; Zhao, Xiaobo; Wang, Kun; Lin, Qiuxia; Wang, Changyong

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is an increasingly common technique used to selectively modify neural excitability and plasticity. There is still controversy concerning the cortical response to rTMS of different frequencies. In this study, a novel in vitro paradigm utilizing the Multi-Electrodes Array (MEA) system and acute cerebellar slicing is described. In a controllable environment that comprises perfusion, incubation, recording and stimulation modules, the spontaneous single-unit spiking activity in response to rTMS of different frequencies and powers was directly measured and analyzed. Investigation using this in vitro paradigm revealed frequency-dependent modulation upon the excitability and functional connectivity of cerebellar slices. The 1-Hz rTMS sessions induced short-term inhibition or lagged inhibition, whereas 20-Hz sessions induced excitation. The level of modulation is influenced by the value of power. However the long-term response fluctuated without persistent direction. The choice of evaluation method may also interfere with the interpretation of modulation direction. Furthermore, both short-term and long-term functional connectivity was strengthened by 1-Hz rTMS and weakened by 20-Hz rTMS. PMID:27000527

  2. Meta-analysis of the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on negative and positive symptoms in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Catarina; Fregni, Felipe; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2009-01-01

    Background A growing body of evidence suggests that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can alleviate negative and positive symptoms of refractory schizophrenia. However, trials to date have been small and results are mixed. Methods We performed meta-analyses of all prospective studies of the therapeutic application of rTMS in refractory schizophrenia assessing the effects of high-frequency rTMS to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) to treat negative symptoms, and low-frequency rTMS to the left temporo-parietal cortex (TPC) to treat auditory hallucinations (AH) and overall positive symptoms. Results When analyzing controlled (active arms) and uncontrolled studies together, the effect sizes showed significant and moderate effects of rTMS on negative and positive symptoms (based on PANSS-N or SANS, and PANSS-P or SAPS, respectively). However, the analysis for the sham-controlled studies revealed a small non-significant effect size for negative (0.27, p=0.417) and for positive symptoms (0.17, p=0.129). When specifically analyzing AH (based on AHRS, HCS or SAH), the effect size for the sham-controlled studies was large and significant (1.04; p=0.002). Conclusions These meta-analyses support the need for further controlled, larger trials to assess the clinical efficacy of rTMS on negative and positive symptoms of schizophrenia, while suggesting the need for exploration for alternative stimulation protocols. PMID:19138833

  3. Intensity-dependent effects of repetitive anodal transcranial direct current stimulation on learning and memory in a rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xuehong; Li, Yiyan; Wen, Huizhong; Zhang, Yinghui; Tian, Xuelong

    2015-09-01

    Single-session anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) can improve the learning-memory function of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). After-effects of tDCS can be more significant if the stimulation is repeated regularly in a period. Here the behavioral and the histologic effects of the repetitive anodal tDCS on a rat model of AD were investigated. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 6 groups, the sham group, the β-amyloid (Aβ) group, the Aβ+20μA tDCS group, the Aβ+60μA tDCS group, the Aβ+100μA tDCS group and the Aβ+200μA tDCS group. Bilateral hippocampus of the rats in the Aβ group and the Aβ+tDCS groups were lesioned by Aβ1-40 to produce AD models. One day after drug injection, repetitive anodal tDCS (10 sessions in two weeks, 20min per session) was applied to the frontal cortex of the rats in the tDCS groups, while sham stimulation was applied to the Aβ group and the sham group. The spatial learning and memory capability of the rats were tested by Morris water maze. Bielschowsky's silver staining, Nissl's staining, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and glial-fibrillary-acidic protein (GFAP) immunohistochemistry of the hippocampus were conducted for histologic analysis. Results show in the Morris water maze task, rats in the Aβ+100μA and the Aβ+200μA tDCS groups had shorter escape latency and larger number of crossings on the platform. Significant histologic differences were observed in the Aβ+100μA and the Aβ+200μA tDCS groups compared to the Aβ group. The behavioral and the histological experiments indicate that the proposed repetitive anodal tDCS treatment can protect spatial learning and memory dysfunction of Aβ1-40-lesioned AD rats. PMID:26070657

  4. Improvement in Paretic Arm Reach-to-Grasp following Low Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Depends on Object Size: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Tretriluxana, Jarugool; Kantak, Shailesh; Tretriluxana, Suradej; Wu, Allan D.; Fisher, Beth E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Low frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (LF-rTMS) delivered to the nonlesioned hemisphere has been shown to improve limited function of the paretic upper extremity (UE) following stroke. The outcome measures have largely included clinical assessments with little investigation on changes in kinematics and coordination. To date, there is no study investigating how the effects of LF-rTMS are modulated by the sizes of an object to be grasped. Objective. To investigate the effect of LF-rTMS on kinematics and coordination of the paretic hand reach-to-grasp (RTG) for two object sizes in chronic stroke. Methods. Nine participants received two TMS conditions: real rTMS and sham rTMS conditions. Before and after the rTMS conditions, cortico-motor excitability (CE) of the nonlesioned hemisphere, RTG kinematics, and coordination was evaluated. Object sizes were 1.2 and 7.2 cm in diameter. Results. Compared to sham rTMS, real rTMS significantly reduced CE of the non-lesioned M1. While rTMS had no effect on RTG action for the larger object, real rTMS significantly improved movement time, aperture opening, and RTG coordination for the smaller object. Conclusions. LF-rTMS improves RTG action for only the smaller object in chronic stroke. The findings suggest a dissociation between effects of rTMS on M1 and task difficulty for this complex skill. PMID:26664827

  5. Long-term Effectiveness of Modified Electroconvulsive Therapy Compared With Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for the Treatment of Recurrent Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xi-Long; Xu, Wei-Qin; Le, Ya-Juan; Dai, Xiong-Kai

    2016-06-01

    This retrospective study recruited 150 patients with recurrent major depressive disorder (MDD) who received modified electroconvulsive therapy (MECT) and 150 cases treated with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), which aimed to compare the short- and long-term effectiveness, as well as economic outcomes, of MECT and rTMS with a large sample size in patients with recurrent MDD. The results showed that the response rate of patients in the rTMS group was lower than that in the MECT group (46.0% vs 58.7%, p < 0.05). Patients in the rTMS group had elevated rate of dizziness, but reduced rates of poor memory and headache, as well as lower costs compared with the MECT group (p < 0.05). Importantly, we found that the relapse-free survival of patients was similar between the rTMS and MECT groups in the long term. In conclusion, rTMS is an alternative method for MECT in the treatment of patients with recurrent MDD. PMID:26915018

  6. Adjunctive Low-frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation over the Right Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex in Patients with Treatment-resistant Obsessive-compulsive Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Ho-Jun; Jung, Young-Eun; Lim, Hyun Kook; Um, Yoo-Hyun; Lee, Chang Uk; Chae, Jeong-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Objective The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of low frequency (LF) repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) for the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Methods Twenty-seven patients with treatment resistant OCD were randomly assigned to 3 week either active (n=14) or sham (n=13) rTMS. The active rTMS parameters consisted of 1 Hz, 20-minute trains (1,200 pulses/day) at 100% of the resting motor threshold (MT). OCD symptoms, mood, and anxiety were assessed at baseline and every week throughout the treatment period. Results A repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to evaluate changes on the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (YBOCS). Our results revealed a significant reduction in YBOCS scores in the active group compared with the sham group after 3 weeks. Similarly, a repeated-measures ANOVA revealed significant effect of time and time×group interaction on scores on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and the Clinical Global Impression-Severity scale. There were no reports of any serious adverse effects following the active and sham rTMS treatments. Conclusion LF rTMS over the right DLPFC appeared to be superior to sham rTMS for relieving OCD symptoms and depression in patients with treatment-resistant OCD. Further trials with larger sample sizes should be conducted to confirm the present findings. PMID:27121426

  7. Effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over supplementary motor area in patients with schizophrenia with obsessive-compulsive-symptoms: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Mendes-Filho, Vauto Alves; de Jesus, Danilo Rocha; Belmonte-de-Abreu, Paulo; Cachoeira, Carolina Tosetto; Rodrigues Lobato, Maria Inês

    2016-08-30

    In patients with schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCS) are associated with lower rates of quality of life and polypharmacy. No previous controlled studies have tested the efficacy of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on the treatment of OCS in this population. The present study examined the therapeutic effects of rTMS applied to the supplementary motor area (1Hz, 20min, 20 sessions) on OCS and general symptoms in patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder, and whether this intervention can produce changes in plasma levels of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). A double-blind randomized controlled trial was conducted. Active and sham rTMS were delivered to 12 patients (6 on each group). Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) and Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) scores, as well as BDNF levels, were assessed before, after, and 4 weeks after treatment. rTMS did not significantly change the outcomes after treatment and on the follow-up (Y-BOCS: Wald's X(2)=3.172; p=0.205; BPRS: X(2)=1.629; p=0.443; BDNF: X(2)=2.930; p=0.231). There seemed to be a trend towards improvement of BPRS scores 4 weeks after rTMS treatment comparing with sham (Cohen's d=0.875, with 32.9% statistical power). No side effects were reported. Future studies with larger sample sizes are needed. PMID:27254652

  8. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Changes Cerebral Oxygenation on the Left Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex in Bulimia Nervosa: A Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Sutoh, Chihiro; Koga, Yasuko; Kimura, Hiroshi; Kanahara, Nobuhisa; Numata, Noriko; Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Matsuzawa, Daisuke; Iyo, Masaomi; Nakazato, Michiko; Shimizu, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies showed that food craving in eating disorders can be weakened with high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). The aims of this study were to assess cerebral oxygenation change induced with rTMS and to assess the short-term impact of rTMS on food craving and other bulimic symptoms in patients with bulimia nervosa (BN). Eight women diagnosed with BN according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision criteria participated in this study. We measured haemoglobin concentration changes in the DLPFC with near-infrared spectroscopy during cognitive tasks measuring self-regulatory control in response to food photo stimuli, both at baseline and after a single session of rTMS. Subjective ratings for food cravings demonstrated significant reduction. A significant decrease in cerebral oxygenation of the left DLPFC was also observed after a single session of rTMS. Measurement with NIRS after rTMS intervention may be applicable for discussing the mechanisms underlying rTMS modulation in patients with BN. PMID:26481583

  9. Unanticipated Rapid Remission of Refractory Bulimia Nervosa, during High-Dose Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation of the Dorsomedial Prefrontal Cortex: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Downar, Jonathan; Sankar, Ashwin; Giacobbe, Peter; Woodside, Blake; Colton, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    A woman with severe, refractory bulimia nervosa (BN) underwent treatment for comorbid depression using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (DMPFC) using a novel technique. Unexpectedly, she showed a rapid, dramatic remission from BN. For 5 months pre-treatment, she had reported two 5-h binge-purge episodes per day. After rTMS session 2 the episodes stopped entirely for 1 week; after session 10 there were no further recurrences. Depression scores improved more gradually to remission at session 10. Full remission from depression and binge-eating/purging episodes was sustained more than 2 months after treatment completion. In neuroimaging studies, the DMPFC is important in impulse control, and is underactive in BN. DMPFC–rTMS may have enhanced the patient’s ability to deploy previously acquired strategies to avoid binge-eating and purging via a reduction in her impulsivity. A larger sham-controlled trial of DMPFC–rTMS for binge-eating and purging behavior may be warranted. PMID:22529822

  10. Safety of primed repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and modified constraint-induced movement therapy in a randomized controlled trial in pediatric hemiparesis

    PubMed Central

    Gillick, Bernadette; Krach, Linda E; Feyma, Tim; Rich, Tonya L; Moberg, Kelli; Menk, Jeremiah; Cassidy, Jessica; Kimberley, Teresa; Carey, James R

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the safety of combining 6-Hz primed low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) intervention in the contralesional hemisphere with a modified constraint-induced movement therapy (mCIMT) program in children with congenital hemiparesis. Design Phase 1 randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled pretest/posttest trial. Setting University academic facility and a pediatric specialty hospital. Participants Nineteen subjects aged 8 to 17 years with congenital hemiparesis due to ischemic stroke or periventricular leukomalacia. No subject withdrew due to adverse events. All subjects included completed the study. Interventions Subjects were randomized to one of two groups: either rTMSreal with mCIMT (n = 10) or rTMSsham with mCIMT (n = 9). Main Outcome Measures Adverse events, physician assessment, ipsilateral hand function, stereognosis, cognitive function, subject report of symptoms assessment and subject questionnaire. Results No major adverse events occurred. Minor adverse events were found in both groups. The most common were headaches (real: 50%, sham: 89%, p=0.14) and cast irritation (real: 30%, sham: 44%, p = 0.65). No differences between groups in secondary cognitive and unaffected hand motor measures were found. Conclusions Primed rTMS can be used safely with mCIMT in congenital hemiparesis. We provide new information on the use of rTMS in combination with mCIMT in children. These findings could be useful in research and future clinical applications in advancing function in congenital hemiparesis. PMID:25283350

  11. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Treatment-Resistant Depression in Adult and Youth Populations: A Systematic Literature Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Leggett, Laura E.; Soril, Lesley J. J.; Coward, Stephanie; Lorenzetti, Diane L.; MacKean, Gail; Clement, Fiona M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Between 30% and 60% of individuals with major depressive disorder will have treatment-resistant depression (TRD): depression that does not subside with pharmaceutical treatment. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is an emerging treatment for TRD. Objective: To establish the efficacy and optimal protocol for rTMS among adults and youth with TRD. Data Sources: Two systematic reviews were conducted: one to determine the efficacy of rTMS for adults with TRD and another to determine the effectiveness of rTMS for youth with TRD. For adults, MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Health Technology Assessment Database were searched from inception until January 10, 2014 with no language restrictions. Terms aimed at capturing the target diagnosis, such as depression and depressive disorder, were combined with terms describing the technology, such as transcranial magnetic stimulation and rTMS. Results were limited to studies involving human participants and designed as a randomized controlled trial. For youth, the search was altered to include youth only (aged 13–25 years) and all study designs. When possible, meta-analysis of response and remission rates was conducted. Study Selection: Seventy-three articles were included in this review: 70 on adult and 3 on youth populations. Results: Meta-analysis comparing rTMS and sham in adults found statistically significant results favoring rTMS for response (RR: 2.35 [95% CI, 1.70–3.25]) and remission (RR: 2.24 [95% CI, 1.53–3.27]). No statistically significant differences were found when comparing high- and low-frequency, unilateral and bilateral, low- and high-intensity rTMS or rTMS and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). While meta-analysis of results from the youth literature was not possible, the limited evidence base suggests that rTMS may be effective for treating TRD in youth. Conclusions: The evidence

  12. Synergistic effects of noradrenergic modulation with atomoxetine and 10 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on motor learning in healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is able to induce changes in neuronal activity that outlast stimulation. The underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. They might be analogous to long-term potentiation or depression, as the duration of the effects seems to implicate changes in synaptic plasticity. Norepinephrine (NE) has been shown to play a crucial role in neuronal plasticity in the healthy and injured human brain. Atomoxetine (ATX) and other NE reuptake inhibitors have been shown to increase excitability in different systems and to influence learning processes. Thus, the combination of two facilitative interventions may lead to further increase in excitability and motor learning. But in some cases homeostatic metaplasticity might protect the brain from harmful hyperexcitability. In this study, the combination of 60 mg ATX and 10 Hz rTMS over the primary motor cortex was used to examine changes in cortical excitability and motor learning and to investigate their influence on synaptic plasticity mechanisms. Results The results of this double-blind placebo-controlled study showed that ATX facilitated corticospinal and intracortical excitability in motor cortex. 10 Hertz rTMS applied during a motor task was able to further increase intracortical excitability only in combination with ATX. In addition, only the combination of 10 Hz rTMS and ATX was capable of enhancing the total number of correct responses and reaction time significantly, indicating an interaction effect between rTMS and ATX without signs of homeostatic metaplasticity. Conclusion These results suggest that pharmacologically enhanced NE transmission and 10 Hz rTMS exert a synergistic effect on motor cortex excitability and motor learning in healthy humans. PMID:24690416

  13. Efficacy of Adjunctive High Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation of Right Prefrontal Cortex in Adolescent Mania: A Randomized Sham-Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Vijay; Sinha, Vinod Kumar; Praharaj, Samir Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the efficacy of adjunctive right prefrontal high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) treatment in adolescent mania patients as compared to sham stimulation. Methods Twenty six right handed patients aged 12–17 years diagnosed with bipolar mania were randomized to receive daily sessions of active or sham rTMS (20 Hz, 110% of motor threshold, 20 trains, 10 s intertrain interval) over the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex for 10 days. Mania was rated using Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) and Clinical Global Impression (CGI) at baseline, and after 5th and 10th rTMS. Results For YMRS scores, repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed a significant main effect (F=44.49, degree of freedom [df]=1.2/29.29, p<0.001, Greenhouse-Geisser corrected, effect size η2=0.65), but the interaction effect was not significant (F=0.03, df=1.2/29.29, p=0.912, Greenhouse-Geisser corrected). For CGI-Severity, repeated measures ANOVA showed a significant main effect (F=24.49, df=1.42/34.21, p<0.001, Greenhouse-Geisser corrected, effect size η2=0.51), but the interaction effect was not significant (F=0.06, df=1.2/29.29, p=0.881, Greenhouse-Geisser corrected). Conclusion High-frequency right prefrontal rTMS was found to be ineffective as add-on to standard pharmacotherapy in adolescent mania. PMID:26598581

  14. Low-Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) Modulates Evoked-Gamma Frequency Oscillations in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

    PubMed Central

    Baruth, Joshua M.; Casanova, Manuel F.; El-Baz, Ayman; Horrell, Tim; Mathai, Grace; Sears, Lonnie; Sokhadze, Estate

    2010-01-01

    Introduction It has been reported that individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) have abnormal reactions to the sensory environment and visuo-perceptual abnormalities. Electrophysiological research has provided evidence that gamma band activity (30-80 Hz) is a physiological indicator of the co-activation of cortical cells engaged in processing visual stimuli and integrating different features of a stimulus. A number of studies have found augmented and indiscriminative gamma band power at early stages of visual processing in ASD; this may be related to decreased inhibitory processing and an increase in the ratio of cortical excitation to inhibition. Low frequency or ‘slow’ (≤1HZ) repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been shown to increase inhibition of stimulated cortex by the activation of inhibitory circuits. Methods We wanted to test the hypothesis of gamma band abnormalities at early stages of visual processing in ASD by investigating relative evoked (i.e. ~ 100 ms) gamma power in 25 subjects with ASD and 20 age-matched controls using Kanizsa illusory figures. Additionally, we wanted to assess the effects of 12 sessions of bilateral ‘slow’ rTMS to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) on evoked gamma activity using a randomized controlled design. Results In individuals with ASD evoked gamma activity was not discriminative of stimulus type, whereas in controls early gamma power differences between target and non-target stimuli were highly significant. Following rTMS individuals with ASD showed significant improvement in discriminatory gamma activity between relevant and irrelevant visual stimuli. We also found significant improvement in the responses on behavioral questionnaires (i.e., irritability, repetitive behavior) as a result of rTMS. Conclusion We proposed that ‘slow’ rTMS may have increased cortical inhibitory tone which improved discriminatory gamma activity at early stages of visual processing. rTMS has the

  15. Effects of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on spontaneously hypertensive rats, an animal model of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungyun; Park, Heamen; Yu, Seong-Lan; Jee, Sungju; Cheon, Keun-Ah; Song, Dong Ho; Kim, Seung Jun; Im, Woo-Young; Kang, Jaeku

    2016-10-01

    The current treatment of choice for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is pharmacotherapy. A search for new treatment options is underway, however, as the wide application of drugs to the general population of patients with ADHD is limited by side effects and the variance of pharmacokinetic effects of the drugs in each patient. In the present study, we applied repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), a non-invasive treatment used in a number of other psychiatric disorders, to spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs), an animal model of ADHD, in order to assess the efficacy of the treatment in modifying behavioural symptoms as well as levels of dopamine, noradrenaline, serotonin, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). A total of fifteen sessions of high-frequency rTMS treatment were administered. Behavioural symptoms were observed using open field, Y-maze, and elevated plus-maze tests. Upon completion of the experiments, rats were sacrificed, and the neurochemical changes in brain tissue were analysed using high performance liquid chromatography and Western blotting. The SHRs treated with rTMS tended to exhibit less locomotor activity in the open field test over the course of treatment, but there was no improvement in inattention as measured by the Y-maze test. Furthermore, BDNF concentration increased and noradrenaline concentration decreased in the prefrontal cortex of SHRs treated with rTMS. The results of the present preclinical study indicate that rTMS may constitute a new modality of treatment for patients with ADHD, through further evaluation of specific treatment parameters as well as safety and efficacy in humans are required. PMID:27469434

  16. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Promotes Neural Stem Cell Proliferation via the Regulation of MiR-25 in a Rat Model of Focal Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinghui; Zhao, Xiuxiu; Lou, Jicheng; Chen, Hong; Huang, Xiaolin

    2014-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has increasingly been studied over the past decade to determine whether it has a therapeutic benefit on focal cerebral ischemia. However, the underlying mechanism of rTMS in this process remains unclear. In the current study, we investigated the effects of rTMS on the proliferation of adult neural stem cells (NSCs) and explored microRNAs (miRNAs) that were affected by rTMS. Our data showed that 10 Hz rTMS significantly increased the proliferation of adult NSCs after focal cerebral ischemia in the subventricular zone (SVZ), and the expression of miR-25 was obviously up-regulated in the ischemic cortex after rTMS. p57, an identified miR-25 target gene that regulates factors linked to NSC proliferation, was also evaluated, and it exhibited down-regulation. To further verify the role of miR-25, rats were injected with a single dose of antagomir-25 and were subjected to focal cerebral ischemia followed by rTMS treatment. The results confirmed that miR-25 could be repressed specifically and could drive the up-regulation of its target gene (p57), which resulted in the inhibition of adult NSC proliferation in the SVZ after rTMS. Thus, our studies strongly indicated that 10 Hz rTMS can promote the proliferation of adult NSCs in the SVZ after focal cerebral ischemia by regulating the miR-25/p57 pathway. PMID:25302788

  17. Role of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Beneficial Effects of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Upper Limb Hemiparesis after Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kakuda, Wataru; Miyano, Satoshi; Momosaki, Ryo; Abo, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Background Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can improve upper limb hemiparesis after stroke but the mechanism underlying its efficacy remains elusive. rTMS seems to alter brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and such effect is influenced by BDNF gene polymorphism. Objectives To investigate the molecular effects of rTMS on serum levels of BDNF, its precursor proBDNF and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in poststroke patients with upper limb hemiparesis. Methods Poststroke patients with upper limb hemiparesis were studied. Sixty-two patients underwent rehabilitation plus rTMS combination therapy and 33 patients underwent rehabilitation monotherapy without rTMS for 14 days at our hospital. One Hz rTMS was applied over the motor representation of the first dorsal interosseous muscle on the non-lesional hemisphere. Fugl-Meyer Assessment and Wolf Motor Function (WMFT) were used to evaluate motor function on the affected upper limb before and after intervention. Blood samples were collected for analysis of BDNF polymorphism and measurement of BDNF, proBDNF and MMP-9 levels. Results Two-week combination therapy increased BDNF and MMP-9 serum levels, but not serum proBDNF. Serum BDNF and MMP-9 levels did not correlate with motor function improvement, though baseline serum proBDNF levels correlated negatively and significantly with improvement in WMFT (ρ = -0.422, p = 0.002). The outcome of rTMS therapy was not altered by BDNF gene polymorphism. Conclusions The combination therapy of rehabilitation plus low-frequency rTMS seems to improve motor function in the affected limb, by activating BDNF processing. BDNF and its precursor proBDNF could be potentially suitable biomarkers for poststroke motor recovery. PMID:27007747

  18. The Effects of Different Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) Protocols on Cortical Gene Expression in a Rat Model of Cerebral Ischemic-Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ljubisavljevic, Milos R.; Javid, Asma; Oommen, Joji; Parekh, Khatija; Nagelkerke, Nico; Shehab, Safa; Adrian, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Although repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) in treatment of stroke in humans has been explored over the past decade the data remain controversial in terms of optimal stimulation parameters and the mechanisms of rTMS long-term effects. This study aimed to explore the potential of different rTMS protocols to induce changes in gene expression in rat cortices after acute ischemic-reperfusion brain injury. The stroke was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) with subsequent reperfusion. Changes in the expression of 96 genes were examined using low-density expression arrays after MCAO alone and after MCAO combined with 1Hz, 5Hz, continuous (cTBS) and intermittent (iTBS) theta-burst rTMS. rTMS over the lesioned hemisphere was given for two weeks (with a 2-day pause) in a single daily session and a total of 2400 pulses. MCAO alone induced significant upregulation in the expression of 44 genes and downregulation in 10. Two weeks of iTBS induced significant increase in the expression of 52 genes. There were no downregulated genes. 1Hz and 5Hz had no significant effects on gene expression, while cTBS effects were negligible. Upregulated genes included those involved in angiogenesis, inflammation, injury response and cellular repair, structural remodeling, neuroprotection, neurotransmission and neuronal plasticity. The results show that long-term rTMS in acute ischemic-reperfusion brain injury induces complex changes in gene expression that span multiple pathways, which generally promote the recovery. They also demonstrate that induced changes primarily depend on the rTMS frequency (1Hz and 5Hz vs. iTBS) and pattern (cTBS vs. iTBS). The results further underlines the premise that one of the benefits of rTMS application in stroke may be to prime the brain, enhancing its potential to cope with the injury and to rewire. This could further augment its potential to favorably respond to rehabilitation, and to restore some of the loss functions. PMID

  19. Cathodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation of the Right Wernicke's Area Improves Comprehension in Subacute Stroke Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    You, Dae Sang; Kim, Dae-Yul; Chun, Min Ho; Jung, Seung Eun; Park, Sung Jong

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown the appearance of right-sided language-related brain activity in right-handed patients after a stroke. Non-invasive brain stimulation such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) have been shown to modulate excitability in the brain. Moreover, rTMS and…

  20. Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease with Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Combined with Cognitive Training: A Prospective, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Juyoun; Choi, Byong Hee; Oh, Eungseok; Sohn, Eun Hee

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been examined as a potential treatment for many neurological disorders. High-frequency rTMS in particular improves cognitive functions such as verbal fluency and memory. This study explored the effect of rTMS combined with cognitive training (rTMS-COG) on patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Methods A prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was performed with 27 AD patients (18 and 8 in the treatment and sham groups, respectively, and 1 drop-out). The participants were categorized into mild [Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score=21-26] and moderate (MMSE score=18-20) AD groups. The rTMS protocols were configured for six cortical areas (both dorsolateral prefrontal and parietal somatosensory associated cortices and Broca's and Wernicke's areas; 10 Hz, 90-110% intensity, and 5 days/week for 6 weeks). Neuropsychological assessments were performed using the AD Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-cog), Clinical Global Impression of Change (CGIC), and MMSE before, immediately after, and 6 weeks after the end of rTMS-COG treatment. Results Data from 26 AD patients were analyzed in this study. There was no significant interactive effect of time between the groups. The ADAS-cog score in the treatment group was significantly improved compared to the sham group (4.28 and 5.39 in the treatment group vs. 1.75 and 2.88 in the sham group at immediately and 6 weeks after treatment, respectively). The MMSE and CGIC scores were also improved in the treatment group. Based on subgroup analysis, the effect of rTMS-COG was superior for the mild group compared to the total patients, especially in the domains of memory and language. Conclusions The present results suggest that rTMS-COG represents a useful adjuvant therapy with cholinesterase inhibitors, particularly during the mild stage of AD. The effect of rTMS-COG was remarkable in the memory and language domains, which

  1. Efficacy and safety of the Chinese herbal medicine shuganjieyu with and without adjunctive repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for geriatric depression: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    XIE, Minmin; JIANG, Wenhai; YANG, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    Background Pharmacological treatment of geriatric depression is often ineffective because patients cannot tolerate adequate doses of antidepressant medications. Aim Examine the efficacy and safety of shuganjieyu – the first Chinese herbal medicine approved for the treatment of depression by China’s drug regulatory agency -- with and without adjunctive treatment with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in the treatment of geriatric depression. Methods Sixty-five inpatients 60 or older who met ICD-10 criteria for depression were randomly assigned to an experimental group (shuganjieyu + rTMS) (n=36) or a control group (shuganjieyu + sham rTMS)(n=29). All participants received 4 capsules of shuganjieyu daily for 6 weeks. rTMS (or sham rTMS) was administered 20 minutes daily, five days a week for 4 weeks. Blinded raters used the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD-17) and the Treatment Emergent Symptom Scale to assess clinical efficacy and safety at baseline and 1, 2, 4, and 6 weeks after starting treatment. Over the six-week trial, there was only one dropout from the experimental group and two dropouts from the control group. Results None of the patients had serious side effects, but 40% in the experimental group and 50% in the control group experienced minor side effects that all resolved spontaneously. Both groups showed substantial stepwise improvement in depressive symptoms over the 6 weeks. Repeated measures ANOVA found no differences between the two groups. After 6 weeks, 97% of the experimental group had experienced a 25% or greater drop in the level of depression, but only 20% had experience a 50% or greater drop in the level of depression; the corresponding values in the control group were 96% and 19%. There were some minor, non-significant differences in the onset of the treatment effect between the different types of depressive symptoms, but by the second week of treatment all five HAMD-17 subscale scores had improved significantly

  2. Low-Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) Affects Event-Related Potential Measures of Novelty Processing in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Baruth, Joshua; Tasman, Allan; Mansoor, Mehreen; Ramaswamy, Rajesh; Sears, Lonnie; Mathai, Grace; El-Baz, Ayman; Casanova, Manuel F.

    2009-01-01

    In our previous study on individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) (Sokhadze et al., Appl Psychophysiol Biofeedback 34:37–51, 2009a) we reported abnormalities in the attention-orienting frontal event-related potentials (ERP) and the sustained-attention centro-parietal ERPs in a visual oddball experiment. These results suggest that individuals with autism over-process information needed for the successful differentiation of target and novel stimuli. In the present study we examine the effects of low-frequency, repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) on novelty processing as well as behavior and social functioning in 13 individuals with ASD. Our hypothesis was that low-frequency rTMS application to dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLFPC) would result in an alteration of the cortical excitatory/inhibitory balance through the activation of inhibitory GABAergic double bouquet interneurons. We expected to find post-TMS differences in amplitude and latency of early and late ERP components. The results of our current study validate the use of low-frequency rTMS as a modulatory tool that altered the disrupted ratio of cortical excitation to inhibition in autism. After rTMS the parieto-occipital P50 amplitude decreased to novel distracters but not to targets; also the amplitude and latency to targets increased for the frontal P50 while decreasing to non-target stimuli. Low-frequency rTMS minimized early cortical responses to irrelevant stimuli and increased responses to relevant stimuli. Improved selectivity in early cortical responses lead to better stimulus differentiation at later-stage responses as was made evident by our P3b and P3a component findings. These results indicate a significant change in early, middle-latency and late ERP components at the frontal, centro-parietal, and parieto-occipital regions of interest in response to target and distracter stimuli as a result of rTMS treatment. Overall, our preliminary results show that rTMS may prove to

  3. Low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic simulation prevents chronic epileptic seizure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yinxu; Wang, Xiaoming; Ke, Sha; Tan, Juan; Hu, Litian; Zhang, Yaodan; Cui, Wenjuan

    2013-09-25

    Although low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic simulation can potentially treat epilepsy, its underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study investigated the influence of low-frequency re-petitive transcranial magnetic simulation on changes in several nonlinear dynamic electroence-phalographic parameters in rats with chronic epilepsy and explored the mechanism underlying petitive transcranial magnetic simulation-induced antiepileptic effects. An epilepsy model was es-tablished using lithium-pilocarpine intraperitoneal injection into adult Sprague-Dawley rats, which were then treated with repetitive transcranial magnetic simulation for 7 consecutive days. Nonlinear electroencephalographic parameters were obtained from the rats at 7, 14, and 28 days post-stimulation. Results showed significantly lower mean correlation-dimension and Kolmogo-rov-entropy values for stimulated rats than for non-stimulated rats. At 28 days, the complexity and point-wise correlation dimensional values were lower in stimulated rats. Low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic simulation has suppressive effects on electrical activity in epileptic rats, thus explaining its effectiveness in treating epilepsy. PMID:25206567

  4. Low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic simulation prevents chronic epileptic seizure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yinxu; Wang, Xiaoming; Ke, Sha; Tan, Juan; Hu, Litian; Zhang, Yaodan; Cui, Wenjuan

    2013-01-01

    Although low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic simulation can potentially treat epilepsy, its underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study investigated the influence of low-frequency re-petitive transcranial magnetic simulation on changes in several nonlinear dynamic electroence-phalographic parameters in rats with chronic epilepsy and explored the mechanism underlying petitive transcranial magnetic simulation-induced antiepileptic effects. An epilepsy model was es-tablished using lithium-pilocarpine intraperitoneal injection into adult Sprague-Dawley rats, which were then treated with repetitive transcranial magnetic simulation for 7 consecutive days. Nonlinear electroencephalographic parameters were obtained from the rats at 7, 14, and 28 days post-stimulation. Results showed significantly lower mean correlation-dimension and Kolmogo-rov-entropy values for stimulated rats than for non-stimulated rats. At 28 days, the complexity and point-wise correlation dimensional values were lower in stimulated rats. Low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic simulation has suppressive effects on electrical activity in epileptic rats, thus explaining its effectiveness in treating epilepsy. PMID:25206567

  5. Transcranial electrical stimulator producing high amplitude pulses and pulse trains.

    PubMed

    Suihko, V; Eskola, H

    1998-01-01

    Transcranial electrical stimulation can be used for clinical investigations of the central nervous system and for monitoring of motor nerve tracts during surgical operations. We wished to reduce the pain involved with the transcranial electrical stimulation and to improve the usefulness of the method for monitoring during surgical operations. A dedicated transcranial electrical stimulator was designed having special features to reduce the pain sensation and the nerve blocking effect of anaesthetics. It provides constant current and constant voltage stimulation pulses with very short duration and high amplitude. The pulse length is adjustable in the range of 15 to 125 microseconds, while the maximum amplitude is 100 V and 1 A for voltage and current stimulation modes, respectively. Special features included high-repetition-rate pulse trains (50-2000 pulses s-1) and a three-electrode stimulation configuration. We suggest that the electrical transcranial stimulation has the potential to be a relatively painless method for routine clinical investigations and a reliable method for monitoring during surgery. PMID:9807743

  6. Transcranial magnetic stimulation in disorders of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Lapitska, Natallia; Gosseries, Olivia; Delvaux, Valérie; Overgaard, Morten; Nielsen, Feldbaek; Maertens de Noordhout, Alain; Moonen, Gustave; Laureys, Steven

    2009-01-01

    We have reviewed the literature on transcranial magnetic stimulation studies in patients with brain death, coma, vegetative, minimally conscious, and locked-in states. Transcranial magnetic stimulation permits non-invasive study of brain excitability and may extend our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of these disorders. However, use of this technique in severe brain damage remains methodologically ill-defined and must be further validated prior to clinical application in these challenging patients. PMID:20157993

  7. Comparison between neurostimulation techniques repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation vs electroconvulsive therapy for the treatment of resistant depression: patient preference and cost-effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Magnezi, Racheli; Aminov, Emanuel; Shmuel, Dikla; Dreifuss, Merav; Dannon, Pinhas

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a common disorder, widely distributed in the population, and is often associated with severe symptoms and functional impairment. It has been estimated that 30% of MDD patients do not benefit adequately from therapeutic interventions, including pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy. Treatment-resistant depression (TRD) is generally defined as a failure to achieve remission, despite therapeutic interventions. Aim The most effective treatment alternatives for TRD are hospitalization, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Here we compared the clinical effectiveness of ECT and TMS, including success rates, patient responses, side-effect profiles, and financial worthiness. Results We found that ECT (P<0.0001) was more effective than TMS (P<0.012) (not statistically significant in group effect) in TRD patients. However, ECT patients reported a higher percentage of side effects (P<0.01) and the TMS treatment scored better in terms of patient preference. The cost benefit of ECT was higher than that of TMS (US$2075 vs US$814). Patient’s preferences for treatment could be more intense in the TMS, if the TMS is included in the Health Maintenance Organization’s service list. Conclusion We propose that both of these treatment options should be available in psychiatric wards, thus expanding the therapeutic toolkit for TRD. PMID:27536079

  8. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in Stroke Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Schlaug, Gottfried; Renga, Vijay; Nair, Dinesh

    2009-01-01

    TDCS - Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation - is an emerging technique of non-invasive brain stimulation that has been found useful in examining cortical function in normal subjects and in facilitating treatments of various neurological disorders. A better understanding of adaptive as well as maladaptive post-stroke neuroplasticity and its modulation through non-invasive brain stimulation has opened up experimental treatment options using TDCS for patients recovering from stroke. We will review TDCS’s role as a facilitator of stroke recovery, the different modes of transcranial direct current stimulation, and the potential mechanisms underlying the neural effects of TDCS. PMID:19064743

  9. Nonconventional interventions for chronic post-traumatic stress disorder: Ketamine, repetitive trans-cranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), and alternative approaches.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Basant; Kluewer D'Amico, Jessica; Makani, Ramkrishna; Parikh, Tapan

    2016-01-01

    It is alarming that only 59% of those who have post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) respond to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Many existing treatments, both pharmacological and nonpharmacological, do not directly target trauma memories that lay at the core of the PTSD pathogenesis. Notable exceptions are medications like ketamine and propranolol and trauma-focused psychotherapies like eye-movement desensitization and reprocessing therapy (developed by Shapiro) and Trauma Interventions using Mindfulness Based Extinction and Reconsolidation (TIMBER) for trauma memories (developed by Pradhan). Although the antidepressant effects of ketamine are no longer news, ketamine's effects on treatment refractory PTSD (TR-PTSD) is a recent concept. As TR-PTSD has a marked public health burden and significant limitations in terms of treatment interventions, a thorough assessment of current strategies is required. Research to bring clarity to the underlying pathophysiology and neurobiology of TR-PTSD delineating the chemical, structural, and circuitry abnormalities will take time. In the interim, in the absence of a 1-size-fits-all therapeutic approach, pragmatically parallel lines of research can be pursued using the pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatments that have a strong theoretical rationale for efficacy. This article aims to review the current literature on interventions for PTSD, most notably ketamine, trans-cranial magnetic stimulation treatment, yoga and mindfulness interventions, and TIMBER. We present an outline for their future use, alone as well as in combination, with a hope of providing additional insights as well as advocating for developing more effective therapeutic intervention for this treatment-resistant and debilitating condition. PMID:26162001

  10. Transcranial brain stimulation: closing the loop between brain and stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Karabanov, Anke; Thielscher, Axel; Siebner, Hartwig Roman

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review To discuss recent strategies for boosting the efficacy of noninvasive transcranial brain stimulation to improve human brain function. Recent findings Recent research exposed substantial intra- and inter-individual variability in response to plasticity-inducing transcranial brain stimulation. Trait-related and state-related determinants contribute to this variability, challenging the standard approach to apply stimulation in a rigid, one-size-fits-all fashion. Several strategies have been identified to reduce variability and maximize the plasticity-inducing effects of noninvasive transcranial brain stimulation. Priming interventions or paired associative stimulation can be used to ‘standardize’ the brain-state and hereby, homogenize the group response to stimulation. Neuroanatomical and neurochemical profiling based on magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy can capture trait-related and state-related variability. Fluctuations in brain-states can be traced online with functional brain imaging and inform the timing or other settings of transcranial brain stimulation. State-informed open-loop stimulation is aligned to the expression of a predefined brain state, according to prespecified rules. In contrast, adaptive closed-loop stimulation dynamically adjusts stimulation settings based on the occurrence of stimulation-induced state changes. Summary Approaches that take into account trait-related and state-related determinants of stimulation-induced plasticity bear considerable potential to establish noninvasive transcranial brain stimulation as interventional therapeutic tool. PMID:27224087

  11. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Zeiler, F. A.; Matuszczak, M.; Teitelbaum, J.; Gillman, L. M.; Kazina, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Our goal was to perform a systematic review on the use of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in the treatment of status epilepticus (SE) and refractory status epilepticus (RSE). Methods. MEDLINE, BIOSIS, EMBASE, Global Health, Healthstar, Scopus, Cochrane Library, the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, clinicaltrials.gov (inception to August 2015), and gray literature were searched. The strength of evidence was adjudicated using Oxford and GRADE methodology. Results. We identified 11 original articles. Twenty-one patients were described, with 13 adult and 8 pediatric. All studies were retrospective. Seizure reduction/control with rTMS occurred in 15 of the 21 patients (71.4%), with 5 (23.8%) and 10 (47.6%) displaying partial and complete responses, respectively. Seizures recurred after rTMS in 73.3% of the patients who had initially responded. All studies were an Oxford level 4, GRADE D level of evidence. Conclusions. Oxford level 4, GRADE D evidence exists to suggest a potential impact on seizure control with the use of rTMS for FSE and FRSE, though durability of the therapy is short-lived. Routine use of rTMS in this context cannot be recommended at this time. Further prospective study of this intervention is warranted. PMID:26682065

  12. Noninvasive transcranial brain stimulation and pain.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Allyson C; Ramkumar, Mukund; Nguyen, Tam; Hoeft, Fumiko

    2009-02-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) are two noninvasive brain stimulation techniques that can modulate activity in specific regions of the cortex. At this point, their use in brain stimulation is primarily investigational; however, there is clear evidence that these tools can reduce pain and modify neurophysiologic correlates of the pain experience. TMS has also been used to predict response to surgically implanted stimulation for the treatment of chronic pain. Furthermore, TMS and tDCS can be applied with other techniques, such as event-related potentials and pharmacologic manipulation, to illuminate the underlying physiologic mechanisms of normal and pathological pain. This review presents a description and overview of the uses of two major brain stimulation techniques and a listing of useful references for further study. PMID:19126365

  13. Efficacy of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) in the Treatment of Schizophrenia: A Review of the Literature to Date

    PubMed Central

    Green Bernacki, Carolyn; Helmer, Amanda; Pinninti, Narsimha; O’reardon, John P.

    2015-01-01

    We reviewed the literature on transcranial magnetic stimulation and its uses and efficacy in schizophrenia. Multiple sources were examined on transcranial magnetic stimulation efficacy in relieving positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia. Literature review was conducted via Ovid Medline and PubMed databases. We found multiple published studies and metaanalyses that give evidence that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation can have benefit in relieving positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia, particularly auditory hallucinations. These findings should encourage the psychiatric community to expand research into other applications for which transcranial magnetic stimulation may be used to treat patients with psychiatric disability. PMID:26351619

  14. Quetiapine and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation ameliorate depression-like behaviors and up-regulate the proliferation of hippocampal-derived neural stem cells in a rat model of depression: The involvement of the BDNF/ERK signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-huan; Zhang, Rui-guo; Xue, Fen; Wang, Hua-ning; Chen, Yun-chun; Hu, Guang-tao; Peng, Ye; Peng, Zheng-wu; Tan, Qing-rong

    2015-09-01

    Quetiapine (QUE) and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) have been considered to be possible monotherapies for depression or adjunctive therapies for the treatment of the resistant depression, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. The present study aimed to assess the effects of combined QUE and rTMS treatment on depressive-like behaviors, hippocampal proliferation, and the in vivo and in vitro expressions of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (pERK1/2) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in male Sprague-Dawley rats. The administration of QUE and rTMS was determined not only to reverse the depressive-like behaviors of rats exposed to chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) but also to restore the protein expressions of pERK1/2 and BDNF and cell proliferation in the hippocampus. Additionally, QUE and rTMS promoted the proliferation and increased the expression of pERK1/2 and BDNF in hippocampal-derived neural stem cells (NSCs), and these effects were abolished by U0126. Taken together, these results suggest that the antidepressive-like effects of QUE and rTMS might be related to the activation of the BDNF/ERK signaling pathway and the up-regulation of cell proliferation in the hippocampus. PMID:26176197

  15. [Transcranial and invasive brain stimulation for depression].

    PubMed

    Plewnia, C; Padberg, F

    2012-08-01

    Considering the substantial proportion of depressed patients which does not sufficiently benefit from antidepressant pharmacotherapy or psychotherapy, there is increasing interest in non-pharmacological antidepressant strategies. Thus, a whole array of stimulation approaches has been developed as potential new antidepressant interventions. These methods include transcranial convulsive and non-convulsive approaches, e.g. electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), magnetic seizure therapy (MST), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) as well as invasive techniques, e.g. deep brain stimulation (DBS), vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) and epidural cortical stimulation (ECS). Each method represents a specific therapeutic approach with distinct targets within neural networks involved in the pathophysiology of depression. The ECT procedure is an established treatment with the highest efficacy of all antidepressant interventions and TMS reaches the highest level of evidence among the novel neurostimulation approaches and may be clinically used. However, the field yields a promising rapid development which may substantially enrich the armamentarium of antidepressant interventions in the near future. PMID:22843027

  16. The Impact of Accelerated Right Prefrontal High-Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) on Cue-Reactivity: An fMRI Study on Craving in Recently Detoxified Alcohol-Dependent Patients

    PubMed Central

    Herremans, Sarah C.; Van Schuerbeek, Peter; De Raedt, Rudi; Matthys, Frieda; Buyl, Ronald; De Mey, Johan; Baeken, Chris

    2015-01-01

    In alcohol-dependent patients craving is a difficult-to-treat phenomenon. It has been suggested that high-frequency (HF) repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) may have beneficial effects. However, exactly how this application exerts its effect on the underlying craving neurocircuit is currently unclear. In an effort to induce alcohol craving and to maximize detection of HF-rTMS effects to cue-induced alcohol craving, patients were exposed to a block and event-related alcohol cue-reactivity paradigm while being scanned with fMRI. Hence, we assessed the effect of right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) stimulation on cue-induced and general alcohol craving, and the related craving neurocircuit. Twenty-six recently detoxified alcohol-dependent patients were included. First, we evaluated the impact of one sham-controlled stimulation session. Second, we examined the effect of accelerated right DLPFC HF-rTMS treatment: here patients received 15 sessions in an open label accelerated design, spread over 4 consecutive days. General craving significantly decreased after 15 active HF-rTMS sessions. However, cue-induced alcohol craving was not altered. Our brain imaging results did not show that the cue-exposure affected the underlying craving neurocircuit after both one and fifteen active HF-rTMS sessions. Yet, brain activation changes after one and 15 HF-rTMS sessions, respectively, were observed in regions associated with the extended reward system and the default mode network, but only during the presentation of the event-related paradigm. Our findings indicate that accelerated HF-rTMS applied to the right DLPFC does not manifestly affect the craving neurocircuit during an alcohol-related cue-exposure, but instead it may influence the attentional network. PMID:26295336

  17. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Over the Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex for Treating Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: An Exploratory Meta-Analysis of Randomized, Double-Blind and Sham-Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Berlim, Marcelo T; Van den Eynde, Frederique

    2014-01-01

    Objective Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) applied to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) has yielded promising results as a treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, to date, no quantitative review of its clinical utility has been published. Method: We searched for randomized and sham-controlled trials from 1995 to March 2013 using MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, CENTRAL, and SCOPUS. We then performed an exploratory random effects meta-analysis. Results: Studies on rTMS applied to the right DLPFC included 64 adults with PTSD. The pooled Hedges g effect size for pre and post changes in clinician-rated and self-reported PTSD symptoms were, respectively, 1.65 (P < 0.001) and 1.91 (P < 0.001), indicating significant and large-sized differences in outcome favouring active rTMS. Also, there were significant pre and post decreases with active rTMS in overall anxiety (Hedges g = 1.24; P = 0.02) and depressive (Hedges g = 0.85; P < 0.001) symptoms. Dropout rates at study end did not differ between active and sham rTMS groups. Regarding rTMS applied to the left DLPFC, there is only one study published to date (using a high frequency protocol), and its results showed that active rTMS seems to be superior overall to sham rTMS. Conclusions: Our exploratory meta-analysis shows that active rTMS applied to the DLPFC seems to be effective and acceptable for treating PTSD. However, the small number of subjects included in the analyses limits the generalizability of these findings. Future studies should include larger samples and deliver optimized stimulation parameters. PMID:25565694

  18. Stimulating Conversation: Enhancement of Elicited Propositional Speech in a Patient with Chronic Non-Fluent Aphasia following Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Roy H.; Sanders, Linda; Benson, Jennifer; Faseyitan, Olufunsho; Norise, Catherine; Naeser, Margaret; Martin, Paula; Coslett, H. Branch

    2010-01-01

    Although evidence suggests that patients with left hemisphere strokes and non-fluent aphasia who receive 1Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the intact right inferior frontal gyrus experience persistent benefits in naming, it remains unclear whether the effects of rTMS in these patients generalize to other language…

  19. Numerical dosimetry of transcranial magnetic stimulation coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowther, Lawrence; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    2014-03-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive neuromodulation technique capable of stimulating neurons by means of electromagnetic induction. TMS can be used to map brain function and shows promise for the diagnosis and treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Calculation of fields induced in the brain are necessary to accurately identify stimulated neural tissue during TMS. This allows the development of novel TMS coil designs capable of stimulating deeper brain regions and increasing the localization of stimulation that can be achieved. We have performed numerical calculations of magnetic and electric field with high-resolution anatomically realistic human head models to find these stimulated brain regions for a variety of proposed TMS coil designs. The realistic head models contain heterogeneous tissue structures and electrical conductivities, yielding superior results to those obtained from the simplified homogeneous head models that are commonly employed. The attenuation of electric field as a function of depth in the brain and the localization of stimulating field have been methodically investigated. In addition to providing a quantitative comparison of different TMS coil designs the variation of induced field between subjects has been investigated. We also show the differences in induced fields between adult, adolescent and child head models to preemptively identify potential safety issues in the application of pediatric TMS.

  20. Adjunctive treatment with high frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for the behavioral and psychological symptoms of patients with Alzheimer's disease: a randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    WU, Yue; XU, Wenwei; LIU, Xiaowei; XU, Qing; TANG, Li; WU, Shuyan

    2015-01-01

    Background Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) occur in 70-90% of patients at different stages of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), but the available methods for managing these problems are of limited effectiveness. Aim Assess the effects of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), applied over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), on BPSD and cognitive function in persons with AD. Methods Fifty-four patients with AD and accompanying BPSD were randomly divided into an intervention group (n=27) and a control group (n=27). In addition to standard antipsychotic treatment, the intervention group was treated with 20Hz rTMS five days a week for four weeks, while the control group was treated with sham rTMS.The Behavioral Pathology in Alzheimer's Disease Rating Scale (BEHAVE-AD), the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive (ADAS-Cog), and the Treatment Emergent Symptom Scale (TESS) were administered by raters who were blind to the group assignment of patients before and after four weeks of treatment. Results Twenty-six subjects from each group completed the study. After four weeks of antipsychotic treatment with adjunctive real or sham rTMS treatment, the mean (sd) total BEHAVE-AD scores and mean total ADAS-Cog scores of both groups significantly decreased from baseline. After adjusting for baseline values, the intervention group had significantly lower scores (i.e., greater improvement) than the control group on the BEHAVE-AD total score, on five of the seven BEHAVE-AD factor scores (activity disturbances, diurnal rhythm, aggressiveness, affective disturbances, anxieties and phobias), on the ADAS-Cog total score, and on all four ADAS-Cog factor scores (memory, language, constructional praxis, and attention). The proportion of individuals whose behavioral symptoms met a predetermined level of improvement (i.e., a drop in BEHAVE-AD total score of > 30% from baseline) in the intervention group was greater than that

  1. Spinal evoked potentials following transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, J; Sasaki, T; Kikuchi, Y; Konno, Y; Sakuma, J; Kodama, N

    2001-06-01

    Motor evoked potentials by magnetic stimulation is less invasive and causes no pain as opposed to high current electric stimulation. However, the distribution of the magnetic field generated by the round coil has not been fully studied. In this report, we mapped the extent of the magnetic induction flux density, and then the evoked potentials from the spinal cord were investigated by transcranial magnetic stimulation. We also examined the origin of the evoked potentials obtained by the magnetic stimulation. The following results were obtained. The magnetic induction flux density was at its maximum at the edge of the coil. The potentials consisted of a first negative wave and subsequent multiphasic waves. The first negative wave was similar to a response of the subcorticospinal tract in the lower brain stem, while the subsequent multiphasic waves were similar to those of the pyramidal tract. Although magnetic stimulation has certain advantages over electric stimulation, several problems remain to be solved for the monitoring of motor functions in the clinical settings. PMID:11764415

  2. Novel transcranial magnetic stimulation coil for mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    March, Stephen; Stark, Spencer; Crowther, Lawrence; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    2014-03-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) shows potential for non-invasive treatment of various neurological disorders. Significant work has been performed on the design of coils used for TMS on human subjects but few reports have been made on the design of coils for use on the brains of animals such as mice. This work is needed as TMS studies utilizing mice can allow rapid preclinical development of TMS for human disorders but the coil designs developed for use on humans are inadequate for optimal stimulation of the much smaller mouse brain. A novel TMS coil has been developed with the goal of inducing strong and focused electric fields for the stimulation of small animals such as mice. Calculations of induced electric fields were performed utilizing an MRI derived inhomogeneous model of an adult male mouse. Mechanical and thermal analysis of this new TMS helmet-coil design have also been performed at anticipated TMS operating conditions to ensure mechanical stability of the new coil and establish expected linear attraction and rotational force values. Calculated temperature increases for typical stimulation periods indicate the helmet-coil system is capable of operating within established medical standards. A prototype of the coil has been fabricated and characterization results are presented.

  3. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) inhibits cortical dendrites.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Sean C; Palmer, Lucy M; Nyffeler, Thomas; Müri, René M; Larkum, Matthew E

    2016-01-01

    One of the leading approaches to non-invasively treat a variety of brain disorders is transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). However, despite its clinical prevalence, very little is known about the action of TMS at the cellular level let alone what effect it might have at the subcellular level (e.g. dendrites). Here, we examine the effect of single-pulse TMS on dendritic activity in layer 5 pyramidal neurons of the somatosensory cortex using an optical fiber imaging approach. We find that TMS causes GABAB-mediated inhibition of sensory-evoked dendritic Ca(2+) activity. We conclude that TMS directly activates fibers within the upper cortical layers that leads to the activation of dendrite-targeting inhibitory neurons which in turn suppress dendritic Ca(2+) activity. This result implies a specificity of TMS at the dendritic level that could in principle be exploited for investigating these structures non-invasively. PMID:26988796

  4. Dosimetry of typical transcranial magnetic stimulation devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Mai; Ueno, Shoogo

    2010-05-01

    The therapeutic staff using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) devices could be exposed to magnetic pulses. In this paper, dependence of induced currents in real human man model on different coil shapes, distance between the coil and man model as well as the rotation of the coil in space have been investigated by employing impedance method. It was found that the figure-of-eight coil has less leakage magnetic field and low current density induced in the body compared with the round coil. The TMS power supply cables play an important role in the induced current density in human body. The induced current density in TMS operator decreased as the coil rotates from parallel position to perpendicular position. Our present study shows that TMS operator should stand at least 110 cm apart from the coil.

  5. Transcranial direct current stimulation modulates pattern separation.

    PubMed

    Cappiello, Marcus; Xie, Weizhen; David, Alexander; Bikson, Marom; Zhang, Weiwei

    2016-08-01

    Maintaining similar memories in a distinct and nonoverlapping manner, known as pattern separation, is an important mnemonic process. The medial temporal lobe, especially the hippocampus, has been implicated in this crucial memory function. The present study thus examines whether it is possible to modulate pattern separation using bilateral transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the temporal lobes. Specifically, in this study, pattern separation was assessed using the Mnemonic Similarity Task following 15-min offline bilateral temporal lobe tDCS (left cathode and right anode or left anode and right cathode) or sham stimulation. In the Mnemonic Similarity Task, participants studied a series of sequentially presented visual objects. In the subsequent recognition memory test, participants viewed a series of sequentially presented objects that could be old images from study, novel foils, or lures that were visually similar to the studied images. Participants reported whether these images were exactly the same as, similar to, or different from the studied images. Following both active tDCS conditions, participants were less likely to identify lures as 'similar' compared with the sham condition, indicating a reduction in pattern separation resulting from temporal lobe tDCS. In contrast, no significant difference in overall accuracy was found for participants' discrimination of old and new images. Together, these results suggest that temporal lobe tDCS can selectively modulate the pattern separation function without changing participants' baseline recognition memory performance. PMID:27285728

  6. Transcranial direct current stimulation in psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Tortella, Gabriel; Casati, Roberta; Aparicio, Luana V M; Mantovani, Antonio; Senço, Natasha; D’Urso, Giordano; Brunelin, Jerome; Guarienti, Fabiana; Selingardi, Priscila Mara Lorencini; Muszkat, Débora; Junior, Bernardo de Sampaio Pereira; Valiengo, Leandro; Moffa, Adriano H; Simis, Marcel; Borrione, Lucas; Brunoni, André R

    2015-01-01

    The interest in non-invasive brain stimulation techniques is increasing in recent years. Among these techniques, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been the subject of great interest among researchers because of its easiness to use, low cost, benign profile of side effects and encouraging results of research in the field. This interest has generated several studies and randomized clinical trials, particularly in psychiatry. In this review, we provide a summary of the development of the technique and its mechanism of action as well as a review of the methodological aspects of randomized clinical trials in psychiatry, including studies in affective disorders, schizophrenia, obsessive compulsive disorder, child psychiatry and substance use disorder. Finally, we provide an overview of tDCS use in cognitive enhancement as well as a discussion regarding its clinical use and regulatory and ethical issues. Although many promising results regarding tDCS efficacy were described, the total number of studies is still low, highlighting the need of further studies aiming to replicate these findings in larger samples as to provide a definite picture regarding tDCS efficacy in psychiatry. PMID:25815258

  7. Transcranial magnetic stimulation in the treatment of substance addiction.

    PubMed

    Gorelick, David A; Zangen, Abraham; George, Mark S

    2014-10-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a noninvasive method of brain stimulation used to treat a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders, but is still in the early stages of study as addiction treatment. We identified 19 human studies using repetitive TMS (rTMS) to manipulate drug craving or use, which exposed a total of 316 adults to active rTMS. Nine studies involved tobacco, six alcohol, three cocaine, and one methamphetamine. The majority of studies targeted high-frequency (5-20 Hz; expected to stimulate neuronal activity) rTMS pulses to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Only five studies were controlled clinical trials: two of four nicotine trials found decreased cigarette smoking; the cocaine trial found decreased cocaine use. Many aspects of optimal treatment remain unknown, including rTMS parameters, duration of treatment, relationship to cue-induced craving, and concomitant treatment. The mechanisms of rTMS potential therapeutic action in treating addictions are poorly understood, but may involve increased dopamine and glutamate function in corticomesolimbic brain circuits and modulation of neural activity in brain circuits that mediate cognitive processes relevant to addiction, such as response inhibition, selective attention, and reactivity to drug-associated cues. rTMS treatment of addiction must be considered experimental at this time, but appears to have a promising future. PMID:25069523

  8. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in the treatment of substance addiction

    PubMed Central

    Gorelick, David A.; Zangen, Abraham; George, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive method of brain stimulation used to treat a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders, but is still in the early stages of study as addiction treatment. We identified 19 human studies using repetitive TMS (rTMS) to manipulate drug craving or use, which exposed a total of 316 adults to active rTMS. Nine studies involved tobacco, six alcohol, three cocaine, and one methamphetamine. The majority of studies targeted high-frequency (5–20 Hz; expected to stimulate neuronal activity) rTMS pulses to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Only five studies were controlled clinical trials: two of four nicotine trials found decreased cigarette smoking; the cocaine trial found decreased cocaine use. Many aspects of optimal treatment remain unknown, including rTMS parameters, duration of treatment, relationship to cue-induced craving, and concomitant treatment. The mechanisms of rTMS potential therapeutic action in treating addictions are poorly understood, but may involve increased dopamine and glutamate function in corticomesolimbic brain circuits and modulation of neural activity in brain circuits that mediate cognitive processes relevant to addiction, such as response inhibition, selective attention, and reactivity to drug-associated cues. rTMS treatment of addiction must be considered experimental at this time, but appears to have a promising future. PMID:25069523

  9. Computational electromagnetic methods for transcranial magnetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Luis J.

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a noninvasive technique used both as a research tool for cognitive neuroscience and as a FDA approved treatment for depression. During TMS, coils positioned near the scalp generate electric fields and activate targeted brain regions. In this thesis, several computational electromagnetics methods that improve the analysis, design, and uncertainty quantification of TMS systems were developed. Analysis: A new fast direct technique for solving the large and sparse linear system of equations (LSEs) arising from the finite difference (FD) discretization of Maxwell's quasi-static equations was developed. Following a factorization step, the solver permits computation of TMS fields inside realistic brain models in seconds, allowing for patient-specific real-time usage during TMS. The solver is an alternative to iterative methods for solving FD LSEs, often requiring run-times of minutes. A new integral equation (IE) method for analyzing TMS fields was developed. The human head is highly-heterogeneous and characterized by high-relative permittivities (107). IE techniques for analyzing electromagnetic interactions with such media suffer from high-contrast and low-frequency breakdowns. The novel high-permittivity and low-frequency stable internally combined volume-surface IE method developed. The method not only applies to the analysis of high-permittivity objects, but it is also the first IE tool that is stable when analyzing highly-inhomogeneous negative permittivity plasmas. Design: TMS applications call for electric fields to be sharply focused on regions that lie deep inside the brain. Unfortunately, fields generated by present-day Figure-8 coils stimulate relatively large regions near the brain surface. An optimization method for designing single feed TMS coil-arrays capable of producing more localized and deeper stimulation was developed. Results show that the coil-arrays stimulate 2.4 cm into the head while stimulating 3

  10. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) inhibits cortical dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Sean C; Palmer, Lucy M; Nyffeler, Thomas; Müri, René M; Larkum, Matthew E

    2016-01-01

    One of the leading approaches to non-invasively treat a variety of brain disorders is transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). However, despite its clinical prevalence, very little is known about the action of TMS at the cellular level let alone what effect it might have at the subcellular level (e.g. dendrites). Here, we examine the effect of single-pulse TMS on dendritic activity in layer 5 pyramidal neurons of the somatosensory cortex using an optical fiber imaging approach. We find that TMS causes GABAB-mediated inhibition of sensory-evoked dendritic Ca2+ activity. We conclude that TMS directly activates fibers within the upper cortical layers that leads to the activation of dendrite-targeting inhibitory neurons which in turn suppress dendritic Ca2+ activity. This result implies a specificity of TMS at the dendritic level that could in principle be exploited for investigating these structures non-invasively. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13598.001 PMID:26988796

  11. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Sri Mahavir; Shivakumar, Venkataram; Bose, Anushree; Subramaniam, Aditi; Nawani, Hema; Chhabra, Harleen; Kalmady, Sunil V.; Narayanaswamy, Janardhanan C.

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is an upcoming treatment modality for patients with schizophrenia. A series of recent observations have demonstrated improvement in clinical status of schizophrenia patients with tDCS. This review summarizes the research work that has examined the effects of tDCS in schizophrenia patients with respect to symptom amelioration, cognitive enhancement and neuroplasticity evaluation. tDCS is emerging as a safe, rapid and effective treatment for various aspects of schizophrenia symptoms ranging from auditory hallucinations-for which the effect is most marked, to negative symptoms and cognitive symptoms as well. An interesting line of investigation involves using tDCS for altering and examining neuroplasticity in patients and healthy subjects and is likely to lead to new insights into the neurological aberrations and pathophysiology of schizophrenia. The mechanistic aspects of the technique are discussed in brief. Future work should focus on establishing the clinical efficacy of this novel technique and on evaluating this modality as an adjunct to cognitive enhancement protocols. Understanding the mechanism of action of tDCS as well as the determinants and neurobiological correlates of clinical response to tDCS remains an important goal, which will help us expand the clinical applications of tDCS for the treatment of patients with schizophrenia. PMID:24465247

  12. Quiet transcranial magnetic stimulation: Status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Peterchev, Angel V; Murphy, David L K; Goetz, Stefan M

    2015-01-01

    A significant limitation of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is that the magnetic pulse delivery is associated with a loud clicking sound as high as 140 dB resulting from electromagnetic forces. The loud noise significantly impedes both basic research and clinical applications of TMS. It effectively makes TMS less focal since every click activates auditory cortex, brainstem, and other connected regions, synchronously with the magnetic pulse. The repetitive clicking sound can induce neuromodulation that can interfere with and confound the intended effects at the TMS target. As well, there are known concerns regarding blinding of TMS studies, hearing loss, induction of tinnitus, as well as tolerability. Addressing this need, we are developing a quiet TMS (qTMS) device that incorporates two key concepts: First, the dominant frequency components of the TMS pulse sound (typically 2-5 kHz) are shifted to higher frequencies that are above the human hearing upper threshold of about 20 kHz. Second, the TMS coil is designed electrically and mechanically to generate suprathreshold electric field pulses while minimizing the sound emitted at audible frequencies (<; 20 kHz). The enhanced acoustic properties of the coil are accomplished with a novel, layered coil design. We summarize a proof-of-concept qTMS prototype demonstrating noise loudness reduction by 19 dB(A) with ultrabrief pulses at conventional amplitudes. Further, we outline next steps to accomplish further sound reduction and suprathreshold pulse amplitudes. PMID:26736241

  13. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in stroke: Ready for clinical practice?

    PubMed

    Smith, Marie-Claire; Stinear, Cathy M

    2016-09-01

    The use of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in stroke research has increased dramatically over the last decade with two emerging and potentially useful functions identified. Firstly, the use of single pulse TMS as a tool for predicting recovery of motor function after stroke, and secondly, the use of repetitive TMS (rTMS) as a treatment adjunct aimed at modifying the excitability of the motor cortex in preparation for rehabilitation. This review discusses recent advances in the use of TMS in both prediction and treatment after stroke. Prediction of recovery after stroke is a complex process and the use of TMS alone is not sufficient to provide accurate prediction for an individual after stroke. However, when applied in conjunction with other tools such as clinical assessment and MRI, accuracy of prediction using TMS is increased. rTMS temporarily modulates cortical excitability after stroke. Very few rTMS studies are completed in the acute or sub-acute stages after stroke and the translation of altered cortical excitability into gains in motor function are modest, with little evidence of long term effects. Although gains have been made in both of these areas, further investigation is needed before these techniques can be applied in routine clinical care. PMID:27394378

  14. Noninvasive techniques for probing neurocircuitry and treating illness: vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS)

    PubMed Central

    George, Mark S; Aston-Jones, Gary

    2010-01-01

    Although the preceding chapters discuss much of the new knowledge of neurocircuitry of neuropsychiatric diseases, and an invasive approach to treatment, this chapter describes and reviews the noninvasive methods of testing circuit-based theories and treating neuropsychiatric diseases that do not involve implanting electrodes into the brain or on its surface. These techniques are transcranial magnetic stimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, and transcranial direct current stimulation. Two of these approaches have FDA approval as therapies. PMID:19693003

  15. Repetitive magnetic stimulation induces plasticity of inhibitory synapses.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Maximilian; Galanis, Christos; Müller-Dahlhaus, Florian; Opitz, Alexander; Wierenga, Corette J; Szabó, Gábor; Ziemann, Ulf; Deller, Thomas; Funke, Klaus; Vlachos, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is used as a therapeutic tool in neurology and psychiatry. While repetitive magnetic stimulation (rMS) has been shown to induce plasticity of excitatory synapses, it is unclear whether rMS can also modify structural and functional properties of inhibitory inputs. Here we employed 10-Hz rMS of entorhinohippocampal slice cultures to study plasticity of inhibitory neurotransmission on CA1 pyramidal neurons. Our experiments reveal a rMS-induced reduction in GABAergic synaptic strength (2-4 h after stimulation), which is Ca(2+)-dependent and accompanied by the remodelling of postsynaptic gephyrin scaffolds. Furthermore, we present evidence that 10-Hz rMS predominantly acts on dendritic, but not somatic inhibition. Consistent with this finding, a reduction in clustered gephyrin is detected in CA1 stratum radiatum of rTMS-treated anaesthetized mice. These results disclose that rTMS induces coordinated Ca(2+)-dependent structural and functional changes of specific inhibitory postsynapses on principal neurons. PMID:26743822

  16. Repetitive magnetic stimulation induces plasticity of inhibitory synapses

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Maximilian; Galanis, Christos; Müller-Dahlhaus, Florian; Opitz, Alexander; Wierenga, Corette J.; Szabó, Gábor; Ziemann, Ulf; Deller, Thomas; Funke, Klaus; Vlachos, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is used as a therapeutic tool in neurology and psychiatry. While repetitive magnetic stimulation (rMS) has been shown to induce plasticity of excitatory synapses, it is unclear whether rMS can also modify structural and functional properties of inhibitory inputs. Here we employed 10-Hz rMS of entorhinohippocampal slice cultures to study plasticity of inhibitory neurotransmission on CA1 pyramidal neurons. Our experiments reveal a rMS-induced reduction in GABAergic synaptic strength (2–4 h after stimulation), which is Ca2+-dependent and accompanied by the remodelling of postsynaptic gephyrin scaffolds. Furthermore, we present evidence that 10-Hz rMS predominantly acts on dendritic, but not somatic inhibition. Consistent with this finding, a reduction in clustered gephyrin is detected in CA1 stratum radiatum of rTMS-treated anaesthetized mice. These results disclose that rTMS induces coordinated Ca2+-dependent structural and functional changes of specific inhibitory postsynapses on principal neurons. PMID:26743822

  17. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Volitional Quadriceps Activation

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Christopher E.; Pietrosimone, Brian G.; Hart, Joseph M.; Saliba, Susan A.; Ingersoll, Christopher D.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Context: Quadriceps-activation deficits have been reported after meniscectomy. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in conjunction with maximal contractions affects quadriceps activation in patients after meniscectomy. Objective: To determine the effect of single-pulsed TMS on quadriceps central activation ratio (CAR) in patients after meniscectomy. Design: Randomized controlled clinical trial. Setting: University laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty participants who had partial meniscectomy and who had a CAR less than 85% were assigned randomly to the TMS group (7 men, 4 women; age  =  38.1 ± 16.2 years, height  =  176.8 ± 11.5 cm, mass  =  91.8 ± 27.5 kg, postoperative time  =  36.7 ± 34.9 weeks) or the control group (7 men, 2 women; age  =  38.2 ± 17.5 years, height  =  176.5 ± 7.9 cm, mass  =  86.2 ± 15.3 kg, postoperative time  =  36.6 ± 37.4 weeks). Intervention(s): Participants in the experimental group received TMS over the motor cortex that was contralateral to the involved leg and performed 3 maximal quadriceps contractions with the involved leg. The control group performed 3 maximal quadriceps contractions without the TMS. Main Outcome Measure(s): Quadriceps activation was assessed using the CAR, which was measured in 70° of knee flexion at baseline and at 0, 10, 30, and 60 minutes posttest. The CAR was expressed as a percentage of full activation. Results: Differences in CAR were detected over time (F4,72  =  3.025, P  = .02). No interaction (F4,72  =  1.457, P  =  .22) or between-groups differences (F1,18  =  0.096, P  =  .76) were found for CAR. Moderate CAR effect sizes were found at 10 (Cohen d  =  0.54, 95% confidence interval [CI]  =  −0.33, 1.37) and 60 (Cohen d  =  0.50, 95% CI  =  −0.37, 1.33) minutes in the TMS group compared with CAR at baseline. Strong effect sizes were found for CAR at 10 (Cohen d  =  0.82, 95% CI

  18. Modulating Human Auditory Processing by Transcranial Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Heimrath, Kai; Fiene, Marina; Rufener, Katharina S.; Zaehle, Tino

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial electrical stimulation (tES) has become a valuable research tool for the investigation of neurophysiological processes underlying human action and cognition. In recent years, striking evidence for the neuromodulatory effects of transcranial direct current stimulation, transcranial alternating current stimulation, and transcranial random noise stimulation has emerged. While the wealth of knowledge has been gained about tES in the motor domain and, to a lesser extent, about its ability to modulate human cognition, surprisingly little is known about its impact on perceptual processing, particularly in the auditory domain. Moreover, while only a few studies systematically investigated the impact of auditory tES, it has already been applied in a large number of clinical trials, leading to a remarkable imbalance between basic and clinical research on auditory tES. Here, we review the state of the art of tES application in the auditory domain focussing on the impact of neuromodulation on acoustic perception and its potential for clinical application in the treatment of auditory related disorders. PMID:27013969

  19. Modulating Human Auditory Processing by Transcranial Electrical Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Heimrath, Kai; Fiene, Marina; Rufener, Katharina S; Zaehle, Tino

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial electrical stimulation (tES) has become a valuable research tool for the investigation of neurophysiological processes underlying human action and cognition. In recent years, striking evidence for the neuromodulatory effects of transcranial direct current stimulation, transcranial alternating current stimulation, and transcranial random noise stimulation has emerged. While the wealth of knowledge has been gained about tES in the motor domain and, to a lesser extent, about its ability to modulate human cognition, surprisingly little is known about its impact on perceptual processing, particularly in the auditory domain. Moreover, while only a few studies systematically investigated the impact of auditory tES, it has already been applied in a large number of clinical trials, leading to a remarkable imbalance between basic and clinical research on auditory tES. Here, we review the state of the art of tES application in the auditory domain focussing on the impact of neuromodulation on acoustic perception and its potential for clinical application in the treatment of auditory related disorders. PMID:27013969

  20. Use of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oberman, Lindsay M.; Rotenberg, Alexander; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    The clinical, social and financial burden of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is staggering. We urgently need valid and reliable biomarkers for diagnosis and effective treatments targeting the often debilitating symptoms. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is beginning to be used by a number of centers worldwide and may represent a novel…

  1. Transcranial Alternating Current and Random Noise Stimulation: Possible Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Antal, Andrea; Herrmann, Christoph S.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) is a relatively recent method suited to noninvasively modulate brain oscillations. Technically the method is similar but not identical to transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). While decades of research in animals and humans has revealed the main physiological mechanisms of tDCS, less is known about the physiological mechanisms of tACS. Method. Here, we review recent interdisciplinary research that has furthered our understanding of how tACS affects brain oscillations and by what means transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) that is a special form of tACS can modulate cortical functions. Results. Animal experiments have demonstrated in what way neurons react to invasively and transcranially applied alternating currents. Such findings are further supported by neural network simulations and knowledge from physics on entraining physical oscillators in the human brain. As a result, fine-grained models of the human skull and brain allow the prediction of the exact pattern of current flow during tDCS and tACS. Finally, recent studies on human physiology and behavior complete the picture of noninvasive modulation of brain oscillations. Conclusion. In future, the methods may be applicable in therapy of neurological and psychiatric disorders that are due to malfunctioning brain oscillations. PMID:27242932

  2. Transcranial cortical stimulation in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorders: efficacy studies.

    PubMed

    Saba, Ghassen; Moukheiber, Albert; Pelissolo, Antoine

    2015-05-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) are non-invasive brain stimulation methods that became widely used as therapeutic tools during the past two decades especially in cases of depression and schizophrenia. Low frequency rTMS and cathodal effect of tDCS inhibits cortical functioning while high frequency and anodal effect of tDCS have the opposite effect. Prolonged and repetitive application of either methods leads to changes in excitability of the human cortex that outlast the period of stimulation. Both rTMS and tDCS induce functional changes in the brain-modulating neural activity at cortical level. This paper reviews rTMS and tDCS effects in clinical trials for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Low frequency rTMS, particularly targeting the supplementary motor area and the orbital frontal cortex, seems to be the most promising in terms of therapeutic efficacy while older studies targeting the prefrontal dorsal cortex were not as successful. tDCS clearly needs to be investigated in large scale and sufficiently powered randomized control studies. From a general point of view, these non-invasive techniques hold promise as novel therapeutic tools for OCD patients. PMID:25825002

  3. Default Mode Network Mechanisms of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Depression

    PubMed Central

    Liston, Conor; Chen, Ashley C.; Zebley, Benjamin D.; Drysdale, Andrew T.; Gordon, Rebecca; Leuchter, Bruce; Voss, Henning U.; Casey, B.J.; Etkin, Amit; Dubin, Marc J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) is an established treatment for depression, but its underlying mechanism of action remains unknown. Abnormalities in two large-scale neuronal networks—the frontoparietal central executive network (CEN) and the medial prefrontal-medial parietal default mode network (DMN)—are consistent findings in depression and potential therapeutic targets for TMS. Here, we assessed the impact of TMS on activity in these networks and their relation to treatment response. Methods We used resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) to measure functional connectivity within and between the DMN and CEN in 17 depressed patients, before and after a five-week course of TMS. Motivated by prior reports, we focused on connectivity seeded from the DLPFC and the subgenual cingulate, a key region closely aligned with the DMN in depression. Connectivity was also compared to a cohort of 35 healthy controls. Results Prior to treatment, functional connectivity in depressed patients was abnormally elevated within the DMN and diminished within the CEN, and connectivity between these two networks was altered. TMS normalized depression-related subgenual hyperconnectivity in the DMN but did not alter connectivity in the CEN. TMS also induced anticorrelated connectivity between the DLPFC and medial prefrontal DMN nodes. Baseline subgenual connectivity predicted subsequent clinical improvement. Conclusions TMS selectively modulates functional connectivity both within and between the CEN and DMN, and modulation of subgenual cingulate connectivity may play an important mechanistic role in alleviating depression. The results also highlight potential neuroimaging biomarkers for predicting treatment response. PMID:24629537

  4. Possible Mechanisms Underlying the Therapeutic Effects of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Chervyakov, Alexander V.; Chernyavsky, Andrey Yu.; Sinitsyn, Dmitry O.; Piradov, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is an effective method used to diagnose and treat many neurological disorders. Although repetitive TMS (rTMS) has been used to treat a variety of serious pathological conditions including stroke, depression, Parkinson’s disease, epilepsy, pain, and migraines, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the effects of long-term TMS remain unclear. In the present review, the effects of rTMS on neurotransmitters and synaptic plasticity are described, including the classic interpretations of TMS effects on synaptic plasticity via long-term potentiation and long-term depression. We also discuss the effects of rTMS on the genetic apparatus of neurons, glial cells, and the prevention of neuronal death. The neurotrophic effects of rTMS on dendritic growth and sprouting and neurotrophic factors are described, including change in brain-derived neurotrophic factor concentration under the influence of rTMS. Also, non-classical effects of TMS related to biophysical effects of magnetic fields are described, including the quantum effects, the magnetic spin effects, genetic magnetoreception, the macromolecular effects of TMS, and the electromagnetic theory of consciousness. Finally, we discuss possible interpretations of TMS effects according to dynamical systems theory. Evidence suggests that a rTMS-induced magnetic field should be considered a separate physical factor that can be impactful at the subatomic level and that rTMS is capable of significantly altering the reactivity of molecules (radicals). It is thought that these factors underlie the therapeutic benefits of therapy with TMS. Future research on these mechanisms will be instrumental to the development of more powerful and reliable TMS treatment protocols. PMID:26136672

  5. Assessing and Stabilizing Aberrant Neuroplasticity in Autism Spectrum Disorder: The Potential Role of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Desarkar, Pushpal; Rajji, Tarek K.; Ameis, Stephanie H.; Daskalakis, Zafiris Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Exciting developments have taken place in the neuroscience research in autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and results from these studies indicate that brain in ASD is associated with aberrant neuroplasticity. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has rapidly evolved to become a widely used, safe, and non-invasive neuroscientific tool to investigate a variety of neurophysiological processes, including neuroplasticity. The diagnostic and therapeutic potential of TMS in ASD is beginning to be realized. In this article, we briefly reviewed evidence of aberrant neuroplasticity in ASD, suggested future directions in assessing neuroplasticity using repetitive TMS (rTMS), and discussed the potential of rTMS in rectifying aberrant neuroplasticity in ASD. PMID:26441685

  6. Transcranial direct current stimulation modulates efficiency of reading processes

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Jennifer M.; Doruk, Deniz; Mascio, Bryan; Fregni, Felipe; Cerruti, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a neuromodulatory technique that offers promise as an investigative method for understanding complex cognitive operations such as reading. This study explores the ability of a single session of tDCS to modulate reading efficiency and phonological processing performance within a group of healthy adults. Half the group received anodal or cathodal stimulation, on two separate days, of the left temporo-parietal junction while the other half received anodal or cathodal stimulation of the right homologue area. Pre- and post-stimulation assessment of reading efficiency and phonological processing was carried out. A larger pre-post difference in reading efficiency was found for participants who received right anodal stimulation compared to participants who received left anodal stimulation. Further, there was a significant post-stimulation increase in phonological processing speed following right hemisphere anodal stimulation. Implications for models of reading and reading impairment are discussed. PMID:25852513

  7. Transcranial magnetic stimulation for the treatment of major depression

    PubMed Central

    Janicak, Philip G; Dokucu, Mehmet E

    2015-01-01

    Major depression is often difficult to diagnose accurately. Even when the diagnosis is properly made, standard treatment approaches (eg, psychotherapy, medications, or their combination) are often inadequate to control acute symptoms or maintain initial benefit. Additional obstacles involve safety and tolerability problems, which frequently preclude an adequate course of treatment. This leaves an important gap in our ability to properly manage major depression in a substantial proportion of patients, leaving them vulnerable to ensuing complications (eg, employment-related disability, increased risk of suicide, comorbid medical disorders, and substance abuse). Thus, there is a need for more effective and better tolerated approaches. Transcranial magnetic stimulation is a neuromodulation technique increasingly used to partly fill this therapeutic void. In the context of treating depression, we critically review the development of transcranial magnetic stimulation, focusing on the results of controlled and pragmatic trials for depression, which consider its efficacy, safety, and tolerability. PMID:26170668

  8. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Deep Brain Stimulation in the treatment of alcohol dependence

    PubMed Central

    Alba-Ferrara, L.; Fernandez, F.; Salas, R.; de Erausquin, G. A.

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol dependence is a major social, economic, and public health problem. Alcoholism can lead to damage of the gastrointestinal, nervous, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems and it can be lethal, costing hundreds of billions to the health care system. Despite the existence of cognitive-behavioral therapy, psychosocial interventions, and spiritually integrated treatment to treat it, alcohol dependence has a high relapse rate and poor prognosis, albeit with high interindividual variability. In this review, we discuss the use of two neuromodulation techniques, namely repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and deep brain stimulation (DBS), and their advantages and disadvantages compared to first-line pharmacological treatment for alcohol dependence. We also discuss rTMS and DBS targets for alcohol dependence treatment, considering experimental animal and human evidence, with careful consideration of methodological issues preventing the identification of feasible targets for neuromodulation treatments, as well as inter-individual variability factors influencing alcoholism prognosis. Lastly, we anticipate future research aiming to tailor the treatment to each individual patient by combining neurofunctional, neuroanatomical and neurodisruptive techniques optimizing the outcome. PMID:25598743

  9. Electromyographic silent period after transcranial brain stimulation in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Priori, A; Berardelli, A; Inghilleri, M; Polidori, L; Manfredi, M

    1994-03-01

    The silent period evoked by transcranial (TCS) and nerve stimulation was studied in the hand muscles in 13 patients with Huntington's disease and in 11 normal subjects. The duration of the silent period after TCS was longer in patients and correlated significantly with the severity of chorea; in contrast, the duration of the silent period after nerve stimulation was similar in patients and controls. The prolongation of the cortical silent period suggests that the duration of the silent period is a functional correlate reflecting basal ganglia influence over the motor cortex. PMID:8196679

  10. Closed-Loop Control of Epilepsy by Transcranial Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Berényi, Antal; Belluscio, Mariano; Mao, Dun; Buzsáki, György

    2016-01-01

    Many neurological and psychiatric diseases are associated with clinically detectable, altered brain dynamics. The aberrant brain activity, in principle, can be restored through electrical stimulation. In epilepsies, abnormal patterns emerge intermittently, and therefore, a closed-loop feedback brain control that leaves other aspects of brain functions unaffected is desirable. Here, we demonstrate that seizure-triggered, feedback transcranial electrical stimulation (TES) can dramatically reduce spike-and-wave episodes in a rodent model of generalized epilepsy. Closed-loop TES can be an effective clinical tool to reduce pathological brain patterns in drug-resistant patients. PMID:22879515

  11. Transcranial direct current stimulation: electrode montage in stroke.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudi, Hooman; Borhani Haghighi, Afshin; Petramfar, Peyman; Jahanshahi, Sepehr; Salehi, Zahra; Fregni, Felipe

    2011-01-01

    Neurophysiological and computer modelling studies have shown that electrode montage is a critical parameter to determine the neuromodulatory effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). We tested these results clinically by systematically investigating optimal tDCS electrode montage in stroke. Ten patients received in a counterbalanced and randomised order the following conditions of stimulation (i) anodal stimulation of affected M1 (primary motor cortex) and cathodal stimulation of unaffected M1 ('bilateral tDCS'); (ii) anodal stimulation of affected M1 and cathodal stimulation of contralateral supraorbital area ('anodal tDCS'); (iii) cathodal stimulation of unaffected M1 and anodal stimulation of contralateral supraorbital area ('cathodal tDCS'); (iv) anodal stimulation of affected M1 and cathodal stimulation of contralateral deltoid muscle ('extra-cephalic tDCS') and (v) sham stimulation. We used the Jebsen-Taylor Test (JTT) as a widely accepted measure of upper limb function. Bilateral tDCS, anodal tDCS and cathodal tDCS were shown to be associated with significant improvements on the JTT. Placing the reference electrode in an extracephalic position and use of sham stimulation did not induce any significant effects. This small sham controlled cross-over clinical trial is important to provide additional data on the clinical effects of tDCS in stroke and for planning and designing future large tDCS trials in patients with stroke. PMID:21110732

  12. Optimal Coil Orientation for Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Lars; Neumann, Gunnar; Oung, Stephen; Schweikard, Achim; Trillenberg, Peter

    2013-01-01

    We study the impact of coil orientation on the motor threshold (MT) and present an optimal coil orientation for stimulation of the foot. The result can be compared to results of models that predict this orientation from electrodynamic properties of the media in the skull and from orientations of cells, respectively. We used a robotized TMS system for precise coil placement and recorded motor-evoked potentials with surface electrodes on the abductor hallucis muscle of the right foot in 8 healthy control subjects. First, we performed a hot-spot search in standard (lateral) orientation and then rotated the coil in steps of 10° or 20°. At each step we estimated the MT. For navigated stimulation and for correlation with the underlying anatomy a structural MRI scan was obtained. Optimal coil orientation was 33.1±18.3° anteriorly in relation to the standard lateral orientation. In this orientation the threshold was 54±18% in units of maximum stimulator output. There was a significant difference of 8.0±5.9% between the MTs at optimal and at standard orientation. The optimal coil orientations were significantly correlated with the direction perpendicular to the postcentral gyrus (). Robotized TMS facilitates sufficiently precise coil positioning and orientation to study even small variations of the MT with coil orientation. The deviations from standard orientation are more closely matched by models based on field propagation in media than by models based on orientations of pyramidal cells. PMID:23593200

  13. Modeling direct activation of corticospinal axons using transcranial electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Suihko, V

    1998-06-01

    Corticospinal axons can be directly activated using anodal transcranial electrical stimulation. The purpose of this work was to find the location of the direct activation. The response to stimulation was modeled with a spherical head model and an active model of a corticospinal nerve. The nerve model had a deep bend at a location corresponding to a corticospinal fiber entering the midbrain. The threshold activation initiated close to brain surface; the exact location depended on whether the cell body located in the surface layers of the brain or in the bank of the central sulcus. The stimulation time constant was 44 micros. When the stimulus amplitude was increased, the site of activation shifted gradually to deeper level, until the activation initiated directly at the bend causing a half millisecond latency jump at spinal level. These results support the theory that the corticospinal axons can be directly activated at deep locations using anodal transcranial electrical stimulation. However, the high amplitude needed for the direct activation suggests that not only the bends on the fibers, but also the shape of surrounding volume conductor (intracranial cavity) favor activation at this location. PMID:9741790

  14. Transcranial magnetic stimulation of the brain: guidelines for pain treatment research.

    PubMed

    Klein, Max M; Treister, Roi; Raij, Tommi; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Park, Lawrence; Nurmikko, Turo; Lenz, Fred; Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal; Lang, Magdalena; Hallett, Mark; Fox, Michael; Cudkowicz, Merit; Costello, Ann; Carr, Daniel B; Ayache, Samar S; Oaklander, Anne Louise

    2015-09-01

    Recognizing that electrically stimulating the motor cortex could relieve chronic pain sparked development of noninvasive technologies. In transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), electromagnetic coils held against the scalp influence underlying cortical firing. Multiday repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can induce long-lasting, potentially therapeutic brain plasticity. Nearby ferromagnetic or electronic implants are contraindications. Adverse effects are minimal, primarily headaches. Single provoked seizures are very rare. Transcranial magnetic stimulation devices are marketed for depression and migraine in the United States and for various indications elsewhere. Although multiple studies report that high-frequency rTMS of the motor cortex reduces neuropathic pain, their quality has been insufficient to support Food and Drug Administration application. Harvard's Radcliffe Institute therefore sponsored a workshop to solicit advice from experts in TMS, pain research, and clinical trials. They recommended that researchers standardize and document all TMS parameters and improve strategies for sham and double blinding. Subjects should have common well-characterized pain conditions amenable to motor cortex rTMS and studies should be adequately powered. They recommended standardized assessment tools (eg, NIH's PROMIS) plus validated condition-specific instruments and consensus-recommended metrics (eg, IMMPACT). Outcomes should include pain intensity and qualities, patient and clinician impression of change, and proportions achieving 30% and 50% pain relief. Secondary outcomes could include function, mood, sleep, and/or quality of life. Minimum required elements include sample sources, sizes, and demographics, recruitment methods, inclusion and exclusion criteria, baseline and posttreatment means and SD, adverse effects, safety concerns, discontinuations, and medication-usage records. Outcomes should be monitored for at least 3 months after initiation

  15. Transcranial magnetic stimulation of the brain: guidelines for pain treatment research

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Max M.; Treister, Roi; Raij, Tommi; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Park, Lawrence; Nurmikko, Turo; Lenz, Fred; Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal; Lang, Magdalena; Hallett, Mark; Fox, Michael; Cudkowicz, Merit; Costello, Ann; Carr, Daniel B.; Ayache, Samar S.; Oaklander, Anne Louise

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Recognizing that electrically stimulating the motor cortex could relieve chronic pain sparked development of noninvasive technologies. In transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), electromagnetic coils held against the scalp influence underlying cortical firing. Multiday repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can induce long-lasting, potentially therapeutic brain plasticity. Nearby ferromagnetic or electronic implants are contraindications. Adverse effects are minimal, primarily headaches. Single provoked seizures are very rare. Transcranial magnetic stimulation devices are marketed for depression and migraine in the United States and for various indications elsewhere. Although multiple studies report that high-frequency rTMS of the motor cortex reduces neuropathic pain, their quality has been insufficient to support Food and Drug Administration application. Harvard's Radcliffe Institute therefore sponsored a workshop to solicit advice from experts in TMS, pain research, and clinical trials. They recommended that researchers standardize and document all TMS parameters and improve strategies for sham and double blinding. Subjects should have common well-characterized pain conditions amenable to motor cortex rTMS and studies should be adequately powered. They recommended standardized assessment tools (eg, NIH's PROMIS) plus validated condition-specific instruments and consensus-recommended metrics (eg, IMMPACT). Outcomes should include pain intensity and qualities, patient and clinician impression of change, and proportions achieving 30% and 50% pain relief. Secondary outcomes could include function, mood, sleep, and/or quality of life. Minimum required elements include sample sources, sizes, and demographics, recruitment methods, inclusion and exclusion criteria, baseline and posttreatment means and SD, adverse effects, safety concerns, discontinuations, and medication-usage records. Outcomes should be monitored for at least 3 months after

  16. Repetitive Noninvasive Brain Stimulation to Modulate Cognitive Functions in Schizophrenia: A Systematic Review of Primary and Secondary Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Alkomiet; Strube, Wolfgang; Palm, Ulrich; Wobrock, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Despite many years of research, there is still an urgent need for new therapeutic options for the treatment of cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. Noninvasive brain stimulation (NIBS) has been proposed to be such a novel add-on treatment option. The main objective of this review was to systematically evaluate the cognitive effects of repetitive NIBS in schizophrenia. As most studies have not been specifically designed to investigate cognition as primary outcome, we have focused on both, primary and secondary outcomes. The PubMed/MEDLINE database (1985-2015) was systematically searched for interventional studies investigating the effects of repetitive NIBS on schizophrenia symptoms. All interventional clinical trials using repetitive transcranial stimulation, transcranial theta burst stimulation, and transcranial direct current stimulation for the treatment of schizophrenia were extracted and analyzed with regard to cognitive measures as primary or secondary outcomes. Seventy-six full-text articles were assessed for eligibility of which 33 studies were included in the qualitative synthesis. Of these 33 studies, only 4 studies included cognition as primary outcome, whereas 29 studies included cognitive measures as secondary outcomes. A beneficial effect of frontal NIBS could not be clearly established. No evidence for a cognitive disruptive effect of NIBS (temporal lobe) in schizophrenia could be detected. Finally, a large heterogeneity between studies in terms of inclusion criteria, stimulation parameters, applied cognitive measures, and follow-up intervals was observed. This review provides the first systematic overview regarding cognitive effects of repetitive NIBS in schizophrenia. PMID:27460623

  17. Cognitive enhancement by transcranial laser stimulation and acute aerobic exercise.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jungyun; Castelli, Darla M; Gonzalez-Lima, F

    2016-08-01

    This is the first randomized, controlled study comparing the cognitive effects of transcranial laser stimulation and acute aerobic exercise on the same cognitive tasks. We examined whether transcranial infrared laser stimulation of the prefrontal cortex, acute high-intensity aerobic exercise, or the combination may enhance performance in sustained attention and working memory tasks. Sixty healthy young adults were randomly assigned to one of the following four treatments: (1) low-level laser therapy (LLLT) with infrared laser to two forehead sites while seated (total 8 min, 1064 nm continuous wave, 250 mW/cm(2), 60 J/cm(2) per site of 13.6 cm(2)); (2) acute exercise (EX) of high-intensity (total 20 min, with 10-min treadmill running at 85-90 % VO2max); (3) combined treatment (LLLT + EX); or (4) sham control (CON). Participants were tested for prefrontal measures of sustained attention with the psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) and working memory with the delayed match-to-sample task (DMS) before and after the treatments. As compared to CON, both LLLT and EX reduced reaction time in the PVT [F(1.56) = 4.134, p = 0.01, η (2)  = 0.181] and increased the number of correct responses in the DMS [F(1.56) = 4.690, p = 0.005, η (2)  = 0.201], demonstrating a significant enhancing effect of LLLT and EX on cognitive performance. LLLT + EX effects were similar but showed no significantly greater improvement on PVT and DMS than LLLT or EX alone. The transcranial infrared laser stimulation and acute aerobic exercise treatments were similarly effective for cognitive enhancement, suggesting that they augment prefrontal cognitive functions similarly. PMID:27220529

  18. Transcranial static magnetic field stimulation of the human motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Oliviero, Antonio; Mordillo-Mateos, Laura; Arias, Pablo; Panyavin, Ivan; Foffani, Guglielmo; Aguilar, Juan

    2011-10-15

    The aim of the present study was to investigate in healthy humans the possibility of a non-invasive modulation of motor cortex excitability by the application of static magnetic fields through the scalp. Static magnetic fields were obtained by using cylindrical NdFeB magnets. We performed four sets of experiments. In Experiment 1, we recorded motor potentials evoked by single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the motor cortex before and after 10 min of transcranial static magnetic field stimulation (tSMS) in conscious subjects. We observed an average reduction of motor cortex excitability of up to 25%, as revealed by TMS, which lasted for several minutes after the end of tSMS, and was dose dependent (intensity of the magnetic field) but not polarity dependent. In Experiment 2, we confirmed the reduction of motor cortex excitability induced by tSMS using a double-blind sham-controlled design. In Experiment 3, we investigated the duration of tSMS that was necessary to modulate motor cortex excitability. We found that 10 min of tSMS (compared to 1 min and 5 min) were necessary to induce significant effects. In Experiment 4, we used transcranial electric stimulation (TES) to establish that the tSMS-induced reduction of motor cortex excitability was not due to corticospinal axon and/or spinal excitability, but specifically involved intracortical networks. These results suggest that tSMS using small static magnets may be a promising tool to modulate cerebral excitability in a non-invasive, painless, and reversible way. PMID:21807616

  19. Standardization of transcranial magnetic stimulation in the horse.

    PubMed

    Nollet, H; Van Ham, L; Dewulf, J; Vanderstraeten, G; Deprez, P

    2003-11-01

    The influence of coil position on the peak-to-peak amplitude and onset latency of transcranial magnetic motor evoked potentials (MMEPs) in the extensor carpi radialis and cranial tibial muscles of horses was evaluated. Seven different stimulating coil positions were obtained by constructing a frame on the forehead. Two stimulation intensities (80% and 100% of maximal stimulator output) and two different coil currents (clockwise and counter-clockwise) were tested. For both recording sites MMEPs with the shortest onset latency and the largest peak-to-peak amplitude were detected when the coil was placed in the median of the forehead. There was no significant difference between left and right side recordings. The direction of the current flow in the coil had no influence on the onset latency of the MMEPs. PMID:14550735

  20. Does hemispheric lateralization influence therapeutic effects of transcranial direct current stimulation?

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Yong Hyun; Kang, Kyung Woo; Lee, Na Kyung; Son, Sung Min

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) polarity depending on lateralized function of task property in normal individuals performing visuomotor and simple repetitive tasks. Thirty healthy participants with no neurological disorders were recruited to participate in this study. Participants were randomly allocated into active or control condition. For the active condition, tDCS intensity was 2 mA with stimulation applied for 15 minutes to the right hemisphere (tDCS condition). For the sham control, electrodes were placed in the same position, but the stimulator was turned off after 30 seconds (sham condition). The tapping and tracking task tests were performed before and after for both conditions. Univariate analysis revealed significant difference only in the tracking task. For direct comparison of both tasks within each group, the tracking task had significantly higher Z score than the tapping task in the tDCS group (P < 0.05). Thus, our study indicates that stimulation of the right hemisphere using tDCS can effectively improve visuomotor (tracking) task over simple repetitive (tapping) task. PMID:26981100

  1. Neural dynamics during repetitive visual stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoneva, Tsvetomira; Garcia-Molina, Gary; Desain, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs), the brain responses to repetitive visual stimulation (RVS), are widely utilized in neuroscience. Their high signal-to-noise ratio and ability to entrain oscillatory brain activity are beneficial for their applications in brain-computer interfaces, investigation of neural processes underlying brain rhythmic activity (steady-state topography) and probing the causal role of brain rhythms in cognition and emotion. This paper aims at analyzing the space and time EEG dynamics in response to RVS at the frequency of stimulation and ongoing rhythms in the delta, theta, alpha, beta, and gamma bands. Approach.We used electroencephalography (EEG) to study the oscillatory brain dynamics during RVS at 10 frequencies in the gamma band (40-60 Hz). We collected an extensive EEG data set from 32 participants and analyzed the RVS evoked and induced responses in the time-frequency domain. Main results. Stable SSVEP over parieto-occipital sites was observed at each of the fundamental frequencies and their harmonics and sub-harmonics. Both the strength and the spatial propagation of the SSVEP response seem sensitive to stimulus frequency. The SSVEP was more localized around the parieto-occipital sites for higher frequencies (>54 Hz) and spread to fronto-central locations for lower frequencies. We observed a strong negative correlation between stimulation frequency and relative power change at that frequency, the first harmonic and the sub-harmonic components over occipital sites. Interestingly, over parietal sites for sub-harmonics a positive correlation of relative power change and stimulation frequency was found. A number of distinct patterns in delta (1-4 Hz), theta (4-8 Hz), alpha (8-12 Hz) and beta (15-30 Hz) bands were also observed. The transient response, from 0 to about 300 ms after stimulation onset, was accompanied by increase in delta and theta power over fronto-central and occipital sites, which returned to baseline

  2. Enhancing language performance with non-invasive brain stimulation--a transcranial direct current stimulation study in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Sparing, Roland; Dafotakis, Manuel; Meister, Ingo G; Thirugnanasambandam, Nivethida; Fink, Gereon R

    2008-01-15

    In humans, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) can be used to induce, depending on polarity, increases or decreases of cortical excitability by polarization of the underlying brain tissue. Cognitive enhancement as a result of tDCS has been reported. The purpose of this study was to test whether weak tDCS (current density, 57 microA/cm(2)) can be used to modify language processing. Fifteen healthy subjects performed a visual picture naming task before, during and after tDCS applied over the posterior perisylvian region (PPR), i.e. an area which includes Wernicke's area [BA 22]. Four different sessions were carried out: (1) anodal and (2) cathodal stimulation of left PPR and, for control, (3) anodal stimulation of the homologous region of the right hemisphere and (4) sham stimulation. We found that subjects responded significantly faster following anodal tDCS to the left PPR (p<0.01). No decreases in performance were detected. Our finding of a transient improvement in a language task following the application of tDCS together with previous studies which investigated the modulation of picture naming latency by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and repetitive TMS (rTMS) suggest that tDCS applied to the left PPR (including Wernicke's area [BA 22]) can be used to enhance language processing in healthy subjects. Whether this safe, low cost, and easy to use brain stimulation technique can be used to ameliorate deficits of picture naming in aphasic patients needs further investigations. PMID:17804023

  3. Cerebellar transcranial direct current stimulation in neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Ferrucci, Roberta; Bocci, Tommaso; Cortese, Francesca; Ruggiero, Fabiana; Priori, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have highlighted the therapeutic potential of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in patients with neurological diseases, including dementia, epilepsy, post-stroke dysfunctions, movement disorders, and other pathological conditions. Because of this technique's ability to modify cerebellar excitability without significant side effects, cerebellar tDCS is a new, interesting, and powerful tool to induce plastic modifications in the cerebellum. In this report, we review a number of interesting studies on the application of cerebellar tDCS for various neurological conditions (ataxia, Parkinson's disease, dystonia, essential tremor) and the possible mechanism by which the stimulation acts on the cerebellum. Study findings indicate that cerebellar tDCS is a promising therapeutic tool in treating several neurological disorders; however, this method's efficacy appears to be limited, given the current data. PMID:27595007

  4. Effect of transcranial magnetic stimulation on force of finger pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odagaki, Masato; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Hiwaki, Osamu

    2009-04-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is used to explore many aspects of brain function, and to treat neurological disorders. Cortical motor neuronal activation by TMS over the primary motor cortex (M1) produces efferent signals that pass through the corticospinal tracts. Motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) are observed in muscles innervated by the stimulated motor cortex. TMS can cause a silent period (SP) following MEP in voluntary electromyography (EMG). The present study examined the effects of TMS eliciting MEP and SP on the force of pinching using two fingers. Subjects pinched a wooden block with the thumb and index finger. TMS was applied to M1 during the pinch task. EMG of first dorsal interosseous muscles and pinch forces were measured. Force output increased after the TMS, and then oscillated. The results indicated that the motor control system to keep isotonic forces of the muscles participated in the finger pinch was disrupted by the TMS.

  5. Electrode positioning and montage in transcranial direct current stimulation.

    PubMed

    DaSilva, Alexandre F; Volz, Magdalena Sarah; Bikson, Marom; Fregni, Felipe

    2011-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a technique that has been intensively investigated in the past decade as this method offers a non-invasive and safe alternative to change cortical excitability. The effects of one session of tDCS can last for several minutes, and its effects depend on polarity of stimulation, such as that cathodal stimulation induces a decrease in cortical excitability, and anodal stimulation induces an increase in cortical excitability that may last beyond the duration of stimulation. These effects have been explored in cognitive neuroscience and also clinically in a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders--especially when applied over several consecutive sessions. One area that has been attracting attention of neuroscientists and clinicians is the use of tDCS for modulation of pain-related neural networks. Modulation of two main cortical areas in pain research has been explored: primary motor cortex and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Due to the critical role of electrode montage, in this article, we show different alternatives for electrode placement for tDCS clinical trials on pain; discussing advantages and disadvantages of each method of stimulation. PMID:21654618

  6. Measurement of evoked electroencephalography induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iramina, Keiji; Maeno, Takashi; Nonaka, Yukio; Ueno, Shoogo

    2003-05-01

    This study focused on the measurement of evoked potentials induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) for observing the neuronal connectivity in the brain. We developed an electroencephalography (EEG) measurement system to eliminate the electromagnetic interaction emitted from TMS. EEG activities 5 ms after TMS stimulation were measured. Using this artifact free amplifier, we investigated the intensity dependence of brain activation induced by TMS. When the stimulus intensity was changed at three levels, TMS-evoked EEG responses were measured. Several components of the evoked potential appeared at 9 ms, 20 ms, and 50 ms after stimulation. A large response appeared at about 9 ms after cerebellar TMS. There was a significant dependence of these responses on the stimulus intensity. During right-hand side motor area stimulation, there was no clear peak of the wave forms within 10 ms latency. Occipital stimulation caused more evoked responses to spread to the center of the brain than at other areas of stimulation. The evoked signal by TMS was possibly conducted posteriorly to anteriorly along the pathways of the neuronal fiber exiting the cerebellum into the cerebral cortex.

  7. Improved transcranial magnetic stimulation coil design with realistic head modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowther, Lawrence; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    2013-03-01

    We are investigating Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) as a noninvasive technique based on electromagnetic induction which causes stimulation of the neurons in the brain. TMS can be used as a pain-free alternative to conventional electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) which is still widely implemented for treatment of major depression. Development of improved TMS coils capable of stimulating subcortical regions could also allow TMS to replace invasive deep brain stimulation (DBS) which requires surgical implantation of electrodes in the brain. Our new designs allow new applications of the technique to be established for a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic applications of psychiatric disorders and neurological diseases. Calculation of the fields generated inside the head is vital for the use of this method for treatment. In prior work we have implemented a realistic head model, incorporating inhomogeneous tissue structures and electrical conductivities, allowing the site of neuronal activation to be accurately calculated. We will show how we utilize this model in the development of novel TMS coil designs to improve the depth of penetration and localization of stimulation produced by stimulator coils.

  8. Anodal motor cortex stimulation paired with movement repetition increases anterograde interference but not savings.

    PubMed

    Leow, Li-Ann; Hammond, Geoff; de Rugy, Aymar

    2014-10-01

    Retention of motor adaptation is evident in savings, where initial learning improves subsequent learning, and anterograde interference, where initial learning impairs subsequent learning. Previously, we proposed that use-dependent movement biases induced by movement repetition contribute to anterograde interference, but not to savings. Here, we evaluate this proposal by limiting or extending movement repetition while stimulating the motor cortex (M1) with anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), a brain stimulation technique known to increase use-dependent plasticity when applied during movement repetition. Participants first adapted to a counterclockwise rotation of visual feedback imposed either abruptly (extended repetition) or gradually (limited repetition) in a first block (A1), during which either sham or anodal tDCS (2 mA) was applied over M1. Anterograde interference was then assessed in a second block (B) with a clockwise rotation, and savings in a third block (A2) with a counterclockwise rotation. Anodal M1 tDCS elicited more anterograde interference than sham stimulation with extended but not with limited movement repetition. Conversely, anodal M1 tDCS did not affect savings with either limited or extended repetition of the adapted movement. Crucially, the effect of anodal M1 tDCS on anterograde interference did not require large errors evoked by an abrupt perturbation schedule, as anodal M1 tDCS combined with extended movement repetition within a gradual perturbation schedule similarly increased anterograde interference but not savings. These findings demonstrate that use-dependent plasticity contributes to anterograde interference but not to savings. PMID:25160706

  9. Gender Differences in Current Received during Transcranial Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Michael; Goodman, Theodore; Wang, Qiang; Groshong, Bennett; Lyeth, Bruce G.

    2014-01-01

    Low current transcranial electrical stimulation (tCS) is an effective but somewhat inconsistent tool for augmenting neuromodulation. In this study, we used 3D MRI guided electrical transcranial stimulation modeling to estimate the range of current intensities received at cortical brain tissues. Combined T1, T2, and proton density MRIs from 24 adult subjects (12 male and 12 female) were modeled with virtual electrodes placed at F3, F4, C3, and C4. Two sizes of electrodes 20 mm round and 50 mm × 45 mm were examined at 0.5, 1, and 2 mA input currents. The intensity of current received was sampled in a 1-cm sphere placed at the cortex directly under each scalp electrode. There was a 10-fold difference in the amount of current received by individuals. A large gender difference was observed with female subjects receiving significantly less current at targeted parietal cortex than male subjects when stimulated at identical current levels (P < 0.05). Larger electrodes delivered somewhat larger amounts of current than the smaller ones (P < 0.01). Electrodes in the frontal regions delivered less current than those in the parietal region (P < 0.05). There were large individual differences in current levels that the subjects received. Analysis of the cranial bone showed that the gender difference and the frontal parietal differences are due to differences in cranial bone. Males have more cancelous parietal bone and females more dense parietal bone (P < 0.01). These differences should be considered when planning tCS studies and call into question earlier reports of gender differences due to hormonal influences. PMID:25177301

  10. Modulation of cortical oscillatory activity during transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Brignani, Debora; Manganotti, Paolo; Rossini, Paolo M; Miniussi, Carlo

    2008-05-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can transiently modulate cortical excitability, with a net effect depending on the stimulation frequency (< or =1 Hz inhibition vs. > or =5 Hz facilitation, at least for the motor cortex). This possibility has generated interest in experiments aiming to improve deficits in clinical settings, as well as deficits in the cognitive domain. The aim of the present study was to investigate the on-line effects of low frequency (1 Hz) TMS on the EEG oscillatory activity in the healthy human brain, focusing particularly on the outcome of these modulatory effects in relation to the duration of the TMS stimulation. To this end, we used the event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS) approach to determine the patterns of oscillatory activity during two consecutive trains of sham and real TMS. Each train of stimulation was delivered to the left primary motor cortex (MI) of healthy subjects over a period of 10 min, while EEG rhythms were simultaneously recorded. Results indicated that TMS induced an increase in the power of brain rhythms that was related to the period of the stimulation, i.e. the synchronization of the alpha band increased with the duration of the stimulation, and this increase was inversely correlated with motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) amplitude. In conclusion, low frequency TMS over primary motor cortex induces a synchronization of the background oscillatory activity on the stimulated region. This induced modulation in brain oscillations seems to increase coherently with the duration of stimulation, suggesting that TMS effects may involve short-term modification of the neural circuitry sustaining MEPs characteristics. PMID:17557296

  11. Water diffusion reveals networks that modulate multiregional morphological plasticity after repetitive brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Mitsunari; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Mima, Tatsuya

    2014-01-01

    Repetitive brain stimulation protocols induce plasticity in the stimulated site in brain slice models. Recent evidence from network models has indicated that additional plasticity-related changes occur in nonstimulated remote regions. Despite increasing use of brain stimulation protocols in experimental and clinical settings, the neural substrates underlying the additional effects in remote regions are unknown. Diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) probes water diffusion and can be used to estimate morphological changes in cortical tissue that occur with the induction of plasticity. Using DWI techniques, we estimated morphological changes induced by application of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the left primary motor cortex (M1). We found that rTMS altered water diffusion in multiple regions including the left M1. Notably, the change in water diffusion was retained longest in the left M1 and remote regions that had a correlation of baseline fluctuations in water diffusion before rTMS. We conclude that synchronization of water diffusion at rest between stimulated and remote regions ensures retention of rTMS-induced changes in water diffusion in remote regions. Synchronized fluctuations in the morphology of cortical microstructures between stimulated and remote regions might identify networks that allow retention of plasticity-related morphological changes in multiple regions after brain stimulation protocols. These results increase our understanding of the effects of brain stimulation-induced plasticity on multiregional brain networks. DWI techniques could provide a tool to evaluate treatment effects of brain stimulation protocols in patients with brain disorders. PMID:24619090

  12. Neuroprotection trek--the next generation: neuromodulation I. Techniques--deep brain stimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, and transcranial magnetic stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Russell J.

    2003-01-01

    Neuromodulation denotes controlled electrical stimulation of the central or peripheral nervous system. The three forms of neuromodulation described in this paper-deep brain stimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, and transcranial magnetic stimulation-were chosen primarily for their demonstrated or potential clinical usefulness. Deep brain stimulation is a completely implanted technique for improving movement disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, by very focal electrical stimulation of the brain-a technique that employs well-established hardware (electrode and pulse generator/battery). Vagus nerve stimulation is similar to deep brain stimulation in being well-established (for the treatment of refractory epilepsy), completely implanted, and having hardware that can be considered standard at the present time. Vagus nerve stimulation differs from deep brain stimulation, however, in that afferent stimulation of the vagus nerve results in diffuse effects on many regions throughout the brain. Although use of deep brain stimulation for applications beyond movement disorders will no doubt involve placing the stimulating electrode(s) in regions other than the thalamus, subthalamus, or globus pallidus, the use of vagus nerve stimulation for applications beyond epilepsy-for example, depression and eating disorders-is unlikely to require altering the hardware significantly (although stimulation protocols may differ). Transcranial magnetic stimulation is an example of an external or non-implanted, intermittent (at least given the current state of the hardware) stimulation technique, the clinical value of which for neuromodulation and neuroprotection remains to be determined.

  13. Transcranial direct current stimulation influences the cardiac autonomic nervous control.

    PubMed

    Montenegro, Rafael Ayres; Farinatti, Paulo de Tarso Veras; Fontes, Eduardo Bodnariuc; Soares, Pedro Paulo da Silva; Cunha, Felipe Amorim da; Gurgel, Jonas Lírio; Porto, Flávia; Cyrino, Edilson Serpeloni; Okano, Alexandre Hideki

    2011-06-15

    To investigate whether the manipulation of brain excitability by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) modulates the heart rate variability (HRV), the effect of tDCS applied at rest on the left temporal lobe in athletes (AG) and non-athletes (NAG) was evaluated. The HRV parameters (natural logarithms of LF, HF, and LF/HF) was assessed in 20 healthy men before, and immediately after tDCS and sham stimulation. After anodal tDCS in AG the parasympathetic activity (HF(log)) increased (P<0.01) and the sympathetic activity (LF(log)) and sympatho-vagal balance (LF/HF(log)) decreased (P<0.01), whereas no significant effects were detected in NAG (P>0.05). No significant changes in HRV indexes were provoked by sham stimulation in both AG and NAG (P>0.05). In conclusion, tDCS applied on the left temporal lobe significantly increased the overall HRV in AG, enhancing the parasympathetic and decreasing the sympathetic modulation of heart rate. Consequently the sympatho-vagal balance decreased at rest in AG but not in NAG. Releasing a weak electric current to stimulate selected brain areas may induce favorable effects on the autonomic control to the heart in highly fit subjects. PMID:21527314

  14. Deep brain transcranial magnetic stimulation using variable "Halo coil" system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Y.; Hadimani, R. L.; Crowther, L. J.; Xu, Z.; Qu, J.; Jiles, D. C.

    2015-05-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation has the potential to treat various neurological disorders non-invasively and safely. The "Halo coil" configuration can stimulate deeper regions of the brain with lower surface to deep-brain field ratio compared to other coil configurations. The existing "Halo coil" configuration is fixed and is limited in varying the site of stimulation in the brain. We have developed a new system based on the current "Halo coil" design along with a graphical user interface system that enables the larger coil to rotate along the transverse plane. The new system can also enable vertical movement of larger coil. Thus, this adjustable "Halo coil" configuration can stimulate different regions of the brain by adjusting the position and orientation of the larger coil on the head. We have calculated magnetic and electric fields inside a MRI-derived heterogeneous head model for various positions and orientations of the coil. We have also investigated the mechanical and thermal stability of the adjustable "Halo coil" configuration for various positions and orientations of the coil to ensure safe operation of the system.

  15. Is the human mirror neuron system plastic? Evidence from a transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Urvakhsh Meherwan; Waghmare, Avinash V; Thirthalli, Jagadisha; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan; Gangadhar, Bangalore N

    2015-10-01

    Virtual lesions in the mirror neuron network using inhibitory low-frequency (1Hz) transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) have been employed to understand its spatio-functional properties. However, no studies have examined the influence of neuro-enhancement by using excitatory high-frequency (20Hz) repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (HF-rTMS) on these networks. We used three forms of TMS stimulation (HF-rTMS, single and paired pulse) to investigate whether the mirror neuron system facilitates the motor system during goal-directed action observation relative to inanimate motion (motor resonance), a marker of putative mirror neuron activity. 31 healthy individuals were randomized to receive single-sessions of true or sham HF-rTMS delivered to the left inferior frontal gyrus - a component of the human mirror system. Motor resonance was assessed before and after HF-rTMS using three TMS cortical reactivity paradigms: (a) 120% of resting motor threshold (RMT), (b) stimulus intensity set to evoke motor evoked potential of 1-millivolt amplitude (SI1mV) and (c) a short latency paired pulse paradigm. Two-way RMANOVA showed a significant group (true versus sham) X occasion (pre- and post-HF-rTMS motor resonance) interaction effect for SI1mV [F(df)=6.26 (1, 29), p=0.018] and 120% RMT stimuli [F(df)=7.01 (1, 29), p=0.013] indicating greater enhancement of motor resonance in the true HF-rTMS group than the sham-group. This suggests that HF-rTMS could adaptively modulate properties of the mirror neuron system. This neuro-enhancement effect is a preliminary step that can open translational avenues for novel brain stimulation therapeutics targeting social-cognition deficits in schizophrenia and autism. PMID:26194133

  16. Use of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Oberman, Lindsay M.; Rotenberg, Alexander; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    The clinical, social and financial burden of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is staggering. We urgently need valid and reliable biomarkers for diagnosis and effective treatments targeting the often debilitating symptoms. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is beginning to be used by a number of centers worldwide and may represent a novel technique with both diagnostic and therapeutic potential. Here we critically review the current scientific evidence for the use of TMS in ASD. Though preliminary data suggests promise, there is simply not enough evidence yet to conclusively support the clinical widespread use of TMS in ASD, neither diagnostically nor therapeutically. Carefully designed and properly controlled clinical trials are warranted to evaluate the true potential of TMS in ASD. PMID:24127165

  17. The Corticospinal System and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Monica A.; Cohen, Leonardo G.

    2016-01-01

    During the last decades, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been used as a noninvasive method to investigate motor cortical reorganization and neuroplasticity in humans after stroke. An increasing number of studies in the field of motor control have used TMS to gain an understanding of the different aspects of stroke cortical physiology and motor recovery. This review addresses the effects of corticospinal tract (CST) lesions in humans and nonhuman primates on the functional organization of the motor system. We review information on the physiological mechanisms by which the CST contributes to normal motor control and to central nervous system reorganization following stroke when the CST is injured as measured using TMS. Insight into these physiological mechanisms has led to the development of scientifically sound interventional proposals in the field of neurorehabilitation. PMID:19740731

  18. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and language

    PubMed Central

    Monti, Alessia; Ferrucci, Roberta; Fumagalli, Manuela; Mameli, Francesca; Cogiamanian, Filippo; Ardolino, Gianluca; Priori, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), a non-invasive neuromodulation technique inducing prolonged brain excitability changes and promoting cerebral plasticity, is a promising option for neurorehabilitation. Here, we review progress in research on tDCS and language functions and on the potential role of tDCS in the treatment of post-stroke aphasia. Currently available data suggest that tDCS over language-related brain areas can modulate linguistic abilities in healthy individuals and can improve language performance in patients with aphasia. Whether the results obtained in experimental conditions are functionally important for the quality of life of patients and their caregivers remains unclear. Despite the fact that important variables are yet to be determined, tDCS combined with rehabilitation techniques seems a promising therapeutic option for aphasia. PMID:23138766

  19. Sustained excitability elevations induced by transcranial DC motor cortex stimulation in humans.

    PubMed

    Nitsche, M A; Paulus, W

    2001-11-27

    The authors show that in the human transcranial direct current stimulation is able to induce sustained cortical excitability elevations. As revealed by transcranial magnetic stimulation, motor cortical excitability increased approximately 150% above baseline for up to 90 minutes after the end of stimulation. The feasibility of inducing long-lasting excitability modulations in a noninvasive, painless, and reversible way makes this technique a potentially valuable tool in neuroplasticity modulation. PMID:11723286

  20. Comparison of Coil Designs for Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, Priyam; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    2015-03-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive treatment for neurological disorders using time varying magnetic field. The electric field generated by the time varying magnetic field is used to depolarize the brain neurons which can lead to measurable effects. TMS provides a surgical free method for the treatment of neurological brain disorders like depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury and Parkinson's disease. Before using TMS on human subjects, it is appropriate that its effects are verified on animals such as mice. The magnetic field intensity and stimulated region of the brain can be controlled by the shape, position and current in the coils. There are few reports on the designs of the coils for mice. In this paper, different types of coils are developed and compared using an anatomically realistic mouse model derived from MRI images. Parameters such as focality, depth of the stimulation, electric field strength on the scalp and in the deep brain regions, are taken into account. These parameters will help researchers to determine the most suitable coil design according to their need. This should result in improvements in treatment of specific disorders. Carver Charitable Trust.

  1. Electronically Switchable Sham Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) System

    PubMed Central

    Hoeft, Fumiko; Wu, Daw-An; Hernandez, Arvel; Glover, Gary H.; Shimojo, Shinsuke

    2008-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is increasingly being used to demonstrate the causal links between brain and behavior in humans. Further, extensive clinical trials are being conducted to investigate the therapeutic role of TMS in disorders such as depression. Because TMS causes strong peripheral effects such as auditory clicks and muscle twitches, experimental artifacts such as subject bias and placebo effect are clear concerns. Several sham TMS methods have been developed, but none of the techniques allows one to intermix real and sham TMS on a trial-by-trial basis in a double-blind manner. We have developed an attachment that allows fast, automated switching between Standard TMS and two types of control TMS (Sham and Reverse) without movement of the coil or reconfiguration of the setup. We validate the setup by performing mathematical modeling, search-coil and physiological measurements. To see if the stimulus conditions can be blinded, we conduct perceptual discrimination and sensory perception studies. We verify that the physical properties of the stimulus are appropriate, and that successive stimuli do not contaminate each other. We find that the threshold for motor activation is significantly higher for Reversed than for Standard stimulation, and that Sham stimulation entirely fails to activate muscle potentials. Subjects and experimenters perform poorly at discriminating between Sham and Standard TMS with a figure-of-eight coil, and between Reverse and Standard TMS with a circular coil. Our results raise the possibility of utilizing this technique for a wide range of applications. PMID:18398456

  2. Enhancing Working Memory Training with Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Au, Jacky; Katz, Benjamin; Buschkuehl, Martin; Bunarjo, Kimberly; Senger, Thea; Zabel, Chelsea; Jaeggi, Susanne M; Jonides, John

    2016-09-01

    Working memory (WM) is a fundamental cognitive ability that supports complex thought but is limited in capacity. Thus, WM training interventions have become very popular as a means of potentially improving WM-related skills. Another promising intervention that has gained increasing traction in recent years is transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), a noninvasive form of brain stimulation that can modulate cortical excitability and temporarily increase brain plasticity. As such, it has the potential to boost learning and enhance performance on cognitive tasks. This study assessed the efficacy of tDCS to supplement WM training. Sixty-two participants were randomized to receive either right prefrontal, left prefrontal, or sham stimulation with concurrent visuospatial WM training over the course of seven training sessions. Results showed that tDCS enhanced training performance, which was strikingly preserved several months after training completion. Furthermore, we observed stronger effects when tDCS was spaced over a weekend break relative to consecutive daily training, and we also demonstrated selective transfer in the right prefrontal group to nontrained tasks of visual and spatial WM. These findings shed light on how tDCS may be leveraged as a tool to enhance performance on WM-intensive learning tasks. PMID:27167403

  3. Prefrontal transcranial direct current stimulation facilitates affective flexibility.

    PubMed

    Aboulafia-Brakha, Tatiana; Manuel, Aurelie L; Ptak, Radek

    2016-06-01

    Performance on paradigms involving switching between emotional and non-emotional task-sets (affective flexibility) predicts emotion regulation abilities and is impaired in patients with different emotional disorders. A better understanding of how neurostimulation techniques such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) influence affective switching may provide support for the improvement of rehabilitation programs. In the current study healthy volunteers received anodal tDCS over the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), the left DLPFC or sham stimulation while performing an affective-switching task. Participants had to repeat or switch between facial judgments of emotional expressions (emotional task-set) or gender (non-emotional task-set). Right tDCS resulted in faster responses in the gender task only when it followed a judgment of emotion. These effects were not observed following left tDCS. Further, switching away from emotion was easier for the right compared to left tDCS group (reduced switch costs for gender), while switching away from gender toward emotion was easier for the left compared to the right group (reduced switch-costs for emotion). In sum, tDCS over the DLPFC may modulate affective flexibility and right stimulation may be particularly helpful to facilitate disengagement from emotional task-sets. The usefulness of tDCS-trained affective switching may be further investigated on larger therapeutic protocols targeting emotional disorders. PMID:27039163

  4. Enhanced visual perception with occipital transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Mulckhuyse, Manon; Kelley, Todd A; Theeuwes, Jan; Walsh, Vincent; Lavie, Nilli

    2011-10-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the occipital pole can produce an illusory percept of a light flash (or 'phosphene'), suggesting an excitatory effect. Whereas previous reported effects produced by single-pulse occipital pole TMS are typically disruptive, here we report the first demonstration of a location-specific facilitatory effect on visual perception in humans. Observers performed a spatial cueing orientation discrimination task. An orientation target was presented in one of two peripheral placeholders. A single pulse below the phosphene threshold applied to the occipital pole 150 or 200 ms before stimulus onset was found to facilitate target discrimination in the contralateral compared with the ipsilateral visual field. At the 150-ms time window contralateral TMS also amplified cueing effects, increasing both facilitation effects for valid cues and interference effects for invalid cues. These results are the first to show location-specific enhanced visual perception with single-pulse occipital pole stimulation prior to stimulus presentation, suggesting that occipital stimulation can enhance the excitability of visual cortex to subsequent perception. PMID:21848918

  5. Transcranial magnetic stimulation and potential cortical and trigeminothalamic mechanisms in migraine

    PubMed Central

    Andreou, Anna P.; Holland, Philip R.; Akerman, Simon; Summ, Oliver; Fredrick, Joe

    2016-01-01

    A single pulse of transcranial magnetic stimulation has been shown to be effective for the acute treatment of migraine with and without aura. Here we aimed to investigate the potential mechanisms of action of transcranial magnetic stimulation, using a transcortical approach, in preclinical migraine models. We tested the susceptibility of cortical spreading depression, the experimental correlate of migraine aura, and further evaluated the response of spontaneous and evoked trigeminovascular activity of second order trigemontothalamic and third order thalamocortical neurons in rats. Single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation significantly inhibited both mechanical and chemically-induced cortical spreading depression when administered immediately post-induction in rats, but not when administered preinduction, and when controlled by a sham stimulation. Additionally transcranial magnetic stimulation significantly inhibited the spontaneous and evoked firing rate of third order thalamocortical projection neurons, but not second order neurons in the trigeminocervical complex, suggesting a potential modulatory effect that may underlie its utility in migraine. In gyrencephalic cat cortices, when administered post-cortical spreading depression, transcranial magnetic stimulation blocked the propagation of cortical spreading depression in two of eight animals. These results are the first to demonstrate that cortical spreading depression can be blocked in vivo using single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation and further highlight a novel thalamocortical modulatory capacity that may explain the efficacy of magnetic stimulation in the treatment of migraine with and without aura. PMID:27246325

  6. Transcranial magnetic stimulation and potential cortical and trigeminothalamic mechanisms in migraine.

    PubMed

    Andreou, Anna P; Holland, Philip R; Akerman, Simon; Summ, Oliver; Fredrick, Joe; Goadsby, Peter J

    2016-07-01

    A single pulse of transcranial magnetic stimulation has been shown to be effective for the acute treatment of migraine with and without aura. Here we aimed to investigate the potential mechanisms of action of transcranial magnetic stimulation, using a transcortical approach, in preclinical migraine models. We tested the susceptibility of cortical spreading depression, the experimental correlate of migraine aura, and further evaluated the response of spontaneous and evoked trigeminovascular activity of second order trigemontothalamic and third order thalamocortical neurons in rats. Single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation significantly inhibited both mechanical and chemically-induced cortical spreading depression when administered immediately post-induction in rats, but not when administered preinduction, and when controlled by a sham stimulation. Additionally transcranial magnetic stimulation significantly inhibited the spontaneous and evoked firing rate of third order thalamocortical projection neurons, but not second order neurons in the trigeminocervical complex, suggesting a potential modulatory effect that may underlie its utility in migraine. In gyrencephalic cat cortices, when administered post-cortical spreading depression, transcranial magnetic stimulation blocked the propagation of cortical spreading depression in two of eight animals. These results are the first to demonstrate that cortical spreading depression can be blocked in vivo using single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation and further highlight a novel thalamocortical modulatory capacity that may explain the efficacy of magnetic stimulation in the treatment of migraine with and without aura. PMID:27246325

  7. Coil Design Considerations for Deep Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Zhi-De; Lisanby, Sarah H.; Peterchev, Angel V.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To explore the field characteristics and design tradeoffs of coils for deep transcranial magnetic stimulation (dTMS). Methods We simulated parametrically two dTMS coil designs on a spherical head model using the finite element method, and compare them with five commercial TMS coils, including two that are FDA approved for the treatment of depression (ferromagnetic-core figure-8 and H1 coil). Results Smaller coils have a focality advantage over larger coils; however, this advantage diminishes with increasing target depth. Smaller coils have the disadvantage of producing stronger field in the superficial cortex and requiring more energy. When the coil dimensions are large relative to the head size, the electric field decay in depth becomes linear, indicating that, at best, the electric field attenuation is directly proportional to the depth of the target. Ferromagnetic cores improve electrical efficiency for targeting superficial brain areas; however magnetic saturation reduces the effectiveness of the core for deeper targets, especially for highly focal coils. Distancing winding segments from the head, as in the H1 coil, increases the required stimulation energy. Conclusions Among standard commercial coils, the double cone coil offers high energy efficiency and balance between stimulated volume and superficial field strength. Direct TMS of targets at depths of ~ 4 cm or more results in superficial stimulation strength that exceeds the upper limit in current rTMS safety guidelines. Approaching depths of ~ 6 cm is almost certainly unsafe considering the excessive superficial stimulation strength and activated brain volume. Significance Coil design limitations and tradeoffs are important for rational and safe exploration of dTMS. PMID:24411523

  8. Transcranial Current Stimulation of the Temporoparietal Junction Improves Lie Detection.

    PubMed

    Sowden, Sophie; Wright, Gordon R T; Banissy, Michael J; Catmur, Caroline; Bird, Geoffrey

    2015-09-21

    The ability to detect deception is of vital importance in human society, playing a crucial role in communication, cooperation, and trade between societies, businesses, and individuals. However, numerous studies have shown, remarkably consistently, that we are only slightly above chance when it comes to detecting deception. Here we investigate whether inconsistency between one's own opinion and the stated opinion of another impairs judgment of the veracity of that statement, in the same way that one's own mental, affective, and action states, when inconsistent, can interfere with representation of those states in another. Within the context of lie detection, individuals may be less accurate when judging the veracity of another's opinion when it is inconsistent with their own opinion. Here we present a video-mediated lie-detection task to confirm this prediction: individuals correctly identified truths or lies less often when the other's expressed opinion was inconsistent with their own (experiment 1). Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the temporoparietal junction (TPJ) has previously been shown to improve the ability to selectively represent the self or another. We therefore predicted that TPJ stimulation would enable lie detectors to inhibit their own views, enhance those of the other, and improve their ability to determine whether another was presenting their true opinion. Experiment 2 confirmed this second prediction: anodal tDCS of the TPJ improved lie detection specifically when one's own and others' views were conflicting. PMID:26344092

  9. Individual differences in transcranial electrical stimulation current density

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Michael J; Goodman, Theodore; Pierson, Ronald; Shepherd, Shane; Wang, Qiang; Groshong, Bennett; Wiley, David F

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial electrical stimulation (TCES) is effective in treating many conditions, but it has not been possible to accurately forecast current density within the complex anatomy of a given subject's head. We sought to predict and verify TCES current densities and determine the variability of these current distributions in patient-specific models based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. Two experiments were performed. The first experiment estimated conductivity from MRIs and compared the current density results against actual measurements from the scalp surface of 3 subjects. In the second experiment, virtual electrodes were placed on the scalps of 18 subjects to model simulated current densities with 2 mA of virtually applied stimulation. This procedure was repeated for 4 electrode locations. Current densities were then calculated for 75 brain regions. Comparison of modeled and measured external current in experiment 1 yielded a correlation of r = .93. In experiment 2, modeled individual differences were greatest near the electrodes (ten-fold differences were common), but simulated current was found in all regions of the brain. Sites that were distant from the electrodes (e.g. hypothalamus) typically showed two-fold individual differences. MRI-based modeling can effectively predict current densities in individual brains. Significant variation occurs between subjects with the same applied electrode configuration. Individualized MRI-based modeling should be considered in place of the 10-20 system when accurate TCES is needed. PMID:24285948

  10. Transcranial Current Stimulation of the Temporoparietal Junction Improves Lie Detection

    PubMed Central

    Sowden, Sophie; Wright, Gordon R.T.; Banissy, Michael J.; Catmur, Caroline; Bird, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    Summary The ability to detect deception is of vital importance in human society, playing a crucial role in communication, cooperation, and trade between societies, businesses, and individuals. However, numerous studies have shown, remarkably consistently, that we are only slightly above chance when it comes to detecting deception [1]. Here we investigate whether inconsistency between one’s own opinion and the stated opinion of another impairs judgment of the veracity of that statement, in the same way that one’s own mental, affective, and action states, when inconsistent, can interfere with representation of those states in another [2]. Within the context of lie detection, individuals may be less accurate when judging the veracity of another’s opinion when it is inconsistent with their own opinion. Here we present a video-mediated lie-detection task to confirm this prediction: individuals correctly identified truths or lies less often when the other’s expressed opinion was inconsistent with their own (experiment 1). Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the temporoparietal junction (TPJ) has previously been shown to improve the ability to selectively represent the self or another [3–5]. We therefore predicted that TPJ stimulation would enable lie detectors to inhibit their own views, enhance those of the other, and improve their ability to determine whether another was presenting their true opinion. Experiment 2 confirmed this second prediction: anodal tDCS of the TPJ improved lie detection specifically when one’s own and others’ views were conflicting. PMID:26344092

  11. Transcranial magnetic stimulation for the treatment of depression.

    PubMed

    George, Mark S

    2010-11-01

    Repeated daily left prefrontal transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was first proposed as a potential treatment for depression in 1993. Multiple studies from researchers around the world since then have repeatedly demonstrated that TMS has antidepressant effects greater than sham treatment, and that these effects are clinically meaningful. A large industry-sponsored trial, published in 2007, resulted in US FDA approval in October 2008. Most recently, a large NIH-sponsored trial, with a more rigorous sham technique, found that a course of treatment (3-5 weeks) was statistically and clinically significant in reducing depression. However, consistently showing statistically and clinically significant antidepressant effects, and gaining regulatory approval, is merely the beginning for this new treatment. As with any new treatment involving a radically different approach, there are many unanswered questions about TMS, and the field is still rapidly evolving. These unanswered questions include the appropriate scalp location, understanding the mechanisms of action, refining the 'dose' (frequency, train, number of stimuli/day and pattern of delivery), understanding whether and how TMS can be combined with medications or talking/exposure therapy, or both, and how to deliver maintenance TMS. This article summarizes the available clinical information, and discusses key areas where more research is needed. TMS reflects a paradigm shift in treating depression. It is a safe, relatively noninvasive, focal brain stimulation treatment that does not involve seizures or implanted wires, and does not have drug-drug interactions or systemic side effects. PMID:20977332

  12. Characteristics of bowl-shaped coils for transcranial magnetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Keita; Suyama, Momoko; Takiyama, Yoshihiro; Kim, Dongmin; Saitoh, Youichi; Sekino, Masaki

    2015-05-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has recently been used as a method for the treatment of neurological and psychiatric diseases. Daily TMS sessions can provide continuous therapeutic effectiveness, and the installation of TMS systems at patients' homes has been proposed. A figure-eight coil, which is normally used for TMS therapy, induces a highly localized electric field; however, it is challenging to achieve accurate coil positioning above the targeted brain area using this coil. In this paper, a bowl-shaped coil for stimulating a localized but wider area of the brain is proposed. The coil's electromagnetic characteristics were analyzed using finite element methods, and the analysis showed that the bowl-shaped coil induced electric fields in a wider area of the brain model than a figure-eight coil. The expanded distribution of the electric field led to greater robustness of the coil to the coil-positioning error. To improve the efficiency of the coil, the relationship between individual coil design parameters and the resulting coil characteristics was numerically analyzed. It was concluded that lengthening the outer spherical radius and narrowing the width of the coil were effective methods for obtaining a more effective and more uniform distribution of the electric field.

  13. Determinants of the electric field during transcranial direct current stimulation.

    PubMed

    Opitz, Alexander; Paulus, Walter; Will, Susanne; Antunes, Andre; Thielscher, Axel

    2015-04-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) causes a complex spatial distribution of the electric current flow in the head which hampers the accurate localization of the stimulated brain areas. In this study we show how various anatomical features systematically shape the electric field distribution in the brain during tDCS. We constructed anatomically realistic finite element (FEM) models of two individual heads including conductivity anisotropy and different skull layers. We simulated a widely employed electrode montage to induce motor cortex plasticity and moved the stimulating electrode over the motor cortex in small steps to examine the resulting changes of the electric field distribution in the underlying cortex. We examined the effect of skull thickness and composition on the passing currents showing that thinner skull regions lead to higher electric field strengths. This effect is counteracted by a larger proportion of higher conducting spongy bone in thicker regions leading to a more homogenous current over the skull. Using a multiple regression model we could identify key factors that determine the field distribution to a significant extent, namely the thicknesses of the cerebrospinal fluid and the skull, the gyral depth and the distance to the anode and cathode. These factors account for up to 50% of the spatial variation of the electric field strength. Further, we demonstrate that individual anatomical factors can lead to stimulation "hotspots" which are partly resistant to electrode positioning. Our results give valuable novel insights in the biophysical foundation of tDCS and highlight the importance to account for individual anatomical factors when choosing an electrode montage. PMID:25613437

  14. Transcranial magnetic stimulation in autism spectrum disorder: Challenges, promise, and roadmap for future research.

    PubMed

    Oberman, Lindsay M; Enticott, Peter G; Casanova, Manuel F; Rotenberg, Alexander; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; McCracken, James T

    2016-02-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a behaviorally defined complex neurodevelopmental syndrome characterized by impairments in social communication, by the presence of restricted and repetitive behaviors, interests and activities, and by abnormalities in sensory reactivity. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a promising, emerging tool for the study and potential treatment of ASD. Recent studies suggest that TMS measures provide rapid and noninvasive pathophysiological ASD biomarkers. Furthermore, repetitive TMS (rTMS) may represent a novel treatment strategy for reducing some of the core and associated ASD symptoms. However, the available literature on the TMS use in ASD is preliminary, composed of studies with methodological limitations. Thus, off-label clinical rTMS use for therapeutic interventions in ASD without an investigational device exemption and outside of an IRB approved research trial is premature pending further, adequately powered and controlled trials. Leaders in this field have gathered annually for a two-day conference (prior to the 2014 and 2015 International Meeting for Autism Research, IMFAR) to share recent progress, promote collaboration across laboratories, and establish consensus on protocols. Here we review the literature in the use of TMS in ASD in the context of the unique challenges required for the study and exploration of treatment strategies in this population. We also suggest future directions for this field of investigations. While its true potential in ASD has yet to be delineated, TMS represents an innovative research tool and a novel, possibly transformative approach to the treatment of neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:26536383

  15. Lasting EEG/MEG Aftereffects of Rhythmic Transcranial Brain Stimulation: Level of Control Over Oscillatory Network Activity.

    PubMed

    Veniero, Domenica; Vossen, Alexandra; Gross, Joachim; Thut, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    A number of rhythmic protocols have emerged for non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) in humans, including transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS), oscillatory transcranial direct current stimulation (otDCS), and repetitive (also called rhythmic) transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). With these techniques, it is possible to match the frequency of the externally applied electromagnetic fields to the intrinsic frequency of oscillatory neural population activity ("frequency-tuning"). Mounting evidence suggests that by this means tACS, otDCS, and rTMS can entrain brain oscillations and promote associated functions in a frequency-specific manner, in particular during (i.e., online to) stimulation. Here, we focus instead on the changes in oscillatory brain activity that persist after the end of stimulation. Understanding such aftereffects in healthy participants is an important step for developing these techniques into potentially useful clinical tools for the treatment of specific patient groups. Reviewing the electrophysiological evidence in healthy participants, we find aftereffects on brain oscillations to be a common outcome following tACS/otDCS and rTMS. However, we did not find a consistent, predictable pattern of aftereffects across studies, which is in contrast to the relative homogeneity of reported online effects. This indicates that aftereffects are partially dissociated from online, frequency-specific (entrainment) effects during tACS/otDCS and rTMS. We outline possible accounts and future directions for a better understanding of the link between online entrainment and offline aftereffects, which will be key for developing more targeted interventions into oscillatory brain activity. PMID:26696834

  16. Lasting EEG/MEG Aftereffects of Rhythmic Transcranial Brain Stimulation: Level of Control Over Oscillatory Network Activity

    PubMed Central

    Veniero, Domenica; Vossen, Alexandra; Gross, Joachim; Thut, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    A number of rhythmic protocols have emerged for non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) in humans, including transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS), oscillatory transcranial direct current stimulation (otDCS), and repetitive (also called rhythmic) transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). With these techniques, it is possible to match the frequency of the externally applied electromagnetic fields to the intrinsic frequency of oscillatory neural population activity (“frequency-tuning”). Mounting evidence suggests that by this means tACS, otDCS, and rTMS can entrain brain oscillations and promote associated functions in a frequency-specific manner, in particular during (i.e., online to) stimulation. Here, we focus instead on the changes in oscillatory brain activity that persist after the end of stimulation. Understanding such aftereffects in healthy participants is an important step for developing these techniques into potentially useful clinical tools for the treatment of specific patient groups. Reviewing the electrophysiological evidence in healthy participants, we find aftereffects on brain oscillations to be a common outcome following tACS/otDCS and rTMS. However, we did not find a consistent, predictable pattern of aftereffects across studies, which is in contrast to the relative homogeneity of reported online effects. This indicates that aftereffects are partially dissociated from online, frequency-specific (entrainment) effects during tACS/otDCS and rTMS. We outline possible accounts and future directions for a better understanding of the link between online entrainment and offline aftereffects, which will be key for developing more targeted interventions into oscillatory brain activity. PMID:26696834

  17. Effect of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Neuronal Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unsal, Ahmet; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    2013-03-01

    The human brain contains around 100 billion nerve cells controlling our day to day activities. Consequently, brain disorders often result in impairments such as paralysis, loss of coordination and seizure. It has been said that 1 in 5 Americans suffer some diagnosable mental disorder. There is an urgent need to understand the disorders, prevent them and if possible, develop permanent cure for them. As a result, a significant amount of research activities is being directed towards brain research. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a promising tool for diagnosing and treating brain disorders. It is a non-invasive treatment method that produces a current flow in the brain which excites the neurons. Even though TMS has been verified to have advantageous effects on various brain related disorders, there have not been enough studies on the impact of TMS on cells. In this study, we are investigating the electrophysiological effects of TMS on one dimensional neuronal culture grown in a circular pathway. Electrical currents are produced on the neuronal networks depending on the directionality of the applied field. This aids in understanding how neuronal networks react under TMS treatment.

  18. Enhancing the mirror illusion with transcranial direct current stimulation.

    PubMed

    Jax, Steven A; Rosa-Leyra, Diana L; Coslett, H Branch

    2015-05-01

    Visual feedback has a strong impact on upper-extremity movement production. One compelling example of this phenomena is the mirror illusion (MI), which has been used as a treatment for post-stroke movement deficits (mirror therapy). Previous research indicates that the MI increases primary motor cortex excitability, and this change in excitability is strongly correlated with the mirror's effects on behavioral performance of neurologically-intact controls. Based on evidence that primary motor cortex excitability can also be increased using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), we tested whether bilateral tDCS to the primary motor cortices (anode right-cathode left and anode left-cathode right) would modify the MI. We measured the MI using a previously-developed task in which participants make reaching movements with the unseen arm behind a mirror while viewing the reflection of the other arm. When an offset in the positions of the two limbs relative to the mirror is introduced, reaching errors of the unseen arm are biased by the reflected arm's position. We found that active tDCS in the anode right-cathode left montage increased the magnitude of the MI relative to sham tDCS and anode left-cathode right tDCS. We take these data as a promising indication that tDCS could improve the effect of mirror therapy in patients with hemiparesis. PMID:25796410

  19. Transcranial magnetic stimulation and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: pathophysiological insights

    PubMed Central

    Vucic, Steve; Ziemann, Ulf; Eisen, Andrew; Hallett, Mark; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a rapidly progressive neurodegenerative disorder of the motor neurons in the motor cortex, brainstem and spinal cord. A combination of upper and lower motor neuron dysfunction comprises the clinical ALS phenotype. Although the ALS phenotype was first observed by Charcot over 100 years ago, the site of ALS onset and the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the development of motor neuron degeneration remain to be elucidated. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) enables non-invasive assessment of the functional integrity of the motor cortex and its corticomotoneuronal projections. To date, TMS studies have established motor cortical and corticospinal dysfunction in ALS, with cortical hyperexcitability being an early feature in sporadic forms of ALS and preceding the clinical onset of familial ALS. Taken together, a central origin of ALS is supported by TMS studies, with an anterograde transsynaptic mechanism implicated in ALS pathogenesis. Of further relevance, TMS techniques reliably distinguish ALS from mimic disorders, despite a compatible peripheral disease burden, thereby suggesting a potential diagnostic utility of TMS in ALS. This review will focus on the mechanisms underlying the generation of TMS measures used in assessment of cortical excitability, the contribution of TMS in enhancing the understanding of ALS pathophysiology and the potential diagnostic utility of TMS techniques in ALS. PMID:23264687

  20. Prognostication of Bell's palsy using transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Rimpiläinen, I; Eskola, H; Laippala, P; Laranne, J; Karma, P

    1997-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) provides a method to noninvasive excitation of the facial nerve in its intracranial segment close to the internal acoustic meatus. Thus, the site of facial nerve activation with TMS is proximal to or within the site of the lesion in Bell's palsy. To evaluate the prognostic capability of TMS in unilateral Bell's palsy we examined 137 patients with this method, and compared the results with electroneuronography (ENoG). Within 0-4 days from the onset of palsy, the patients with elicitable TMS responses recovered better than those in whom TMS responses were not elicitable. If TMS was performed 5-9 days or 10-28 days after the onset of palsy, it did not provide any prognostic information. Based on amplitude side-to-side differences, ENoG did not contribute prognostic information during the first 9 days from the onset of palsy. Later on, 10-28 days after the onset of palsy, ENoG showed an increased capability to discriminate the patients with poor prognosis. Thus, elicitable facial motor response with TMS predicts good prognosis of Bell's palsy at an early stage whereas poor response with ENoG predicts less favorable prognosis at a later stage. PMID:9288286

  1. Enhancement of human cognitive performance using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)

    PubMed Central

    Luber, Bruce; Lisanby, and Sarah H.

    2014-01-01

    Here we review the usefulness of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in modulating cortical networks in ways that might produce performance enhancements in healthy human subjects. To date over sixty studies have reported significant improvements in speed and accuracy in a variety of tasks involving perceptual, motor, and executive processing. Two basic categories of enhancement mechanisms are suggested by this literature: direct modulation of a cortical region or network that leads to more efficient processing, and addition-by-subtraction, which is disruption of processing which competes or distracts from task performance. Potential applications of TMS cognitive enhancement, including research into cortical function, rehabilitation therapy in neurological and psychiatric illness, and accelerated skill acquisition in healthy individuals are discussed, as are methods of optimizing the magnitude and duration of TMS-induced performance enhancement, such as improvement of targeting through further integration of brain imaging with TMS. One technique, combining multiple sessions of TMS with concurrent TMS/task performance to induce Hebbian-like learning, appears to be promising for prolonging enhancement effects. While further refinements in the application of TMS to cognitive enhancement can still be made, and questions remain regarding the mechanisms underlying the observed effects, this appears to be a fruitful area of investigation that may shed light on the basic mechanisms of cognitive function and their therapeutic modulation. PMID:23770409

  2. [Transcranial direct current stimulation: new clinical roadmaps for psychiatric research].

    PubMed

    Heeren, Alexandre; Coussement, Charlotte; Colon, Élisabeth

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a neuromodulatory technique that has undergone intensive research over the past decade with promising results. tDCS is based on the application of weak, direct current over the scalp, leading to cortical hypo- or hyperpolarization according to the specified parameters. Recent studies have shown that tDCS is able to induce potent changes in cortical excitability as well as to elicit long-lasting modifications in brain activity. Over the last decade, tDCS physiological mechanisms of action have been intensively investigated. This research has given support for the investigation of tDCS applications in a wide range of clinical populations, including patients with post-stroke motor and language deficits, chronic pain, and tinnitus. Recently, its efficacy to treat psychiatric conditions has been explored increasingly. In this review, we will gather clinical studies involving tDCS to ameliorate psychiatric symptoms and discuss reasonable next steps in this direction. PMID:27615184

  3. Transcranial magnetic stimulation in schizophrenia: the contribution of neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhong-de; Wang, R; Prakash, Ravi; Chaudhury, S; Dayananda, G

    2012-01-01

    At the most basic level, the Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation(TMS) is a neuro-scientific tool that exerts its action by influencing the neo-cortical functions. However, in-spite of so many well-evidenced roles of TMS in neuropsychiatric conditions, its exact mechanism of action remains to be known. More intriguing are its therapeutic effects in Schizophrenia at the Cerebral-level. In this review, we adopt a neuro-imaging approach for this exploration. We review the present literature for the studies in Schizophrenia which have used a combination of rTMS with 1) Electroenchephalogram (EEG) 2)The functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and the 3) Positron Emission Tomography (PET)/ Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography. The TMS-EEG combination provides direct effects of TMS on the electro- magnetic field (EMF) of brain. The TMS-fMRI/PET/SPECT combinations are very effective in exploring the functional connectivity in brains of Schizophrenia patients as well as in performing rTMS guided neuro-navigation. Our review suggests that TMS combined with other neuroimaging modalities are needed for a better clarification of its neural actions. PMID:23409741

  4. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation: Decomposing the Processes Underlying Action Preparation.

    PubMed

    Bestmann, Sven; Duque, Julie

    2016-08-01

    Preparing actions requires the operation of several cognitive control processes that influence the state of the motor system to ensure that the appropriate behavior is ultimately selected and executed. For example, some form of competition resolution ensures that the right action is chosen among alternatives, often in the presence of conflict; at the same time, impulse control ought to be deployed to prevent premature responses. Here we review how state-changes in the human motor system during action preparation can be studied through motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation over the contralateral primary motor cortex (M1). We discuss how the physiological fingerprints afforded by MEPs have helped to decompose some of the dynamic and effector-specific influences on the motor system during action preparation. We focus on competition resolution, conflict and impulse control, as well as on the influence of higher cognitive decision-related variables. The selected examples demonstrate the usefulness of MEPs as physiological readouts for decomposing the influence of distinct, but often overlapping, control processes on the human motor system during action preparation. PMID:26163320

  5. Simultaneous EEG monitoring during transcranial direct current stimulation.

    PubMed

    Schestatsky, Pedro; Morales-Quezada, Leon; Fregni, Felipe

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a technique that delivers weak electric currents through the scalp. This constant electric current induces shifts in neuronal membrane excitability, resulting in secondary changes in cortical activity. Although tDCS has most of its neuromodulatory effects on the underlying cortex, tDCS effects can also be observed in distant neural networks. Therefore, concomitant EEG monitoring of the effects of tDCS can provide valuable information on the mechanisms of tDCS. In addition, EEG findings can be an important surrogate marker for the effects of tDCS and thus can be used to optimize its parameters. This combined EEG-tDCS system can also be used for preventive treatment of neurological conditions characterized by abnormal peaks of cortical excitability, such as seizures. Such a system would be the basis of a non-invasive closed-loop device. In this article, we present a novel device that is capable of utilizing tDCS and EEG simultaneously. For that, we describe in a step-by-step fashion the main procedures of the application of this device using schematic figures, tables and video demonstrations. Additionally, we provide a literature review on clinical uses of tDCS and its cortical effects measured by EEG techniques. PMID:23851401

  6. Safety of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation: Evidence Based Update 2016.

    PubMed

    Bikson, Marom; Grossman, Pnina; Thomas, Chris; Zannou, Adantchede Louis; Jiang, Jimmy; Adnan, Tatheer; Mourdoukoutas, Antonios P; Kronberg, Greg; Truong, Dennis; Boggio, Paulo; Brunoni, André R; Charvet, Leigh; Fregni, Felipe; Fritsch, Brita; Gillick, Bernadette; Hamilton, Roy H; Hampstead, Benjamin M; Jankord, Ryan; Kirton, Adam; Knotkova, Helena; Liebetanz, David; Liu, Anli; Loo, Colleen; Nitsche, Michael A; Reis, Janine; Richardson, Jessica D; Rotenberg, Alexander; Turkeltaub, Peter E; Woods, Adam J

    2016-01-01

    This review updates and consolidates evidence on the safety of transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS). Safety is here operationally defined by, and limited to, the absence of evidence for a Serious Adverse Effect, the criteria for which are rigorously defined. This review adopts an evidence-based approach, based on an aggregation of experience from human trials, taking care not to confuse speculation on potential hazards or lack of data to refute such speculation with evidence for risk. Safety data from animal tests for tissue damage are reviewed with systematic consideration of translation to humans. Arbitrary safety considerations are avoided. Computational models are used to relate dose to brain exposure in humans and animals. We review relevant dose-response curves and dose metrics (e.g. current, duration, current density, charge, charge density) for meaningful safety standards. Special consideration is given to theoretically vulnerable populations including children and the elderly, subjects with mood disorders, epilepsy, stroke, implants, and home users. Evidence from relevant animal models indicates that brain injury by Direct Current Stimulation (DCS) occurs at predicted brain current densities (6.3-13 A/m(2)) that are over an order of magnitude above those produced by conventional tDCS. To date, the use of conventional tDCS protocols in human trials (≤40 min, ≤4 milliamperes, ≤7.2 Coulombs) has not produced any reports of a Serious Adverse Effect or irreversible injury across over 33,200 sessions and 1000 subjects with repeated sessions. This includes a wide variety of subjects, including persons from potentially vulnerable populations. PMID:27372845

  7. Transcranial random noise stimulation mitigates increased difficulty in an arithmetic learning task.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Tudor; Krause, Beatrix; Terhune, Devin B; Twose, Olivia; Page, Thomas; Humphreys, Glyn; Cohen Kadosh, Roi

    2016-01-29

    Proficiency in arithmetic learning can be achieved by using a multitude of strategies, the most salient of which are procedural learning (applying a certain set of computations) and rote learning (direct retrieval from long-term memory). Here we investigated the effect of transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS), a non-invasive brain stimulation method previously shown to enhance cognitive training, on both types of learning in a 5-day sham-controlled training study, under two conditions of task difficulty, defined in terms of item repetition. On the basis of previous research implicating the prefrontal and posterior parietal cortex in early and late stages of arithmetic learning, respectively, sham-controlled tRNS was applied to bilateral prefrontal cortex for the first 3 days and to the posterior parietal cortex for the last 2 days of a 5-day training phase. The training involved learning to solve arithmetic problems by applying a calculation algorithm; both trained and untrained problems were used in a brief testing phase at the end of the training phase. Task difficulty was manipulated between subjects by using either a large ("easy" condition) or a small ("difficult" condition) number of repetition of problems during training. Measures of attention and working memory were acquired before and after the training phase. As compared to sham, participants in the tRNS condition displayed faster reaction times and increased learning rate during the training phase; as well as faster reaction times for both trained and untrained (new) problems, which indicated a transfer effect after the end of training. All stimulation effects reached significance only in the "difficult" condition when number of repetition was lower. There were no transfer effects of tRNS on attention or working memory. The results support the view that tRNS can produce specific facilitative effects on numerical cognition--specifically, on arithmetic learning. They also highlight the importance of

  8. Transcranial random noise stimulation mitigates increased difficulty in an arithmetic learning task

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, Tudor; Krause, Beatrix; Terhune, Devin B.; Twose, Olivia; Page, Thomas; Humphreys, Glyn; Cohen Kadosh, Roi

    2016-01-01

    Proficiency in arithmetic learning can be achieved by using a multitude of strategies, the most salient of which are procedural learning (applying a certain set of computations) and rote learning (direct retrieval from long-term memory). Here we investigated the effect of transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS), a non-invasive brain stimulation method previously shown to enhance cognitive training, on both types of learning in a 5-day sham-controlled training study, under two conditions of task difficulty, defined in terms of item repetition. On the basis of previous research implicating the prefrontal and posterior parietal cortex in early and late stages of arithmetic learning, respectively, sham-controlled tRNS was applied to bilateral prefrontal cortex for the first 3 days and to the posterior parietal cortex for the last 2 days of a 5-day training phase. The training involved learning to solve arithmetic problems by applying a calculation algorithm; both trained and untrained problems were used in a brief testing phase at the end of the training phase. Task difficulty was manipulated between subjects by using either a large (“easy” condition) or a small (“difficult” condition) number of repetition of problems during training. Measures of attention and working memory were acquired before and after the training phase. As compared to sham, participants in the tRNS condition displayed faster reaction times and increased learning rate during the training phase; as well as faster reaction times for both trained and untrained (new) problems, which indicated a transfer effect after the end of training. All stimulation effects reached significance only in the “difficult” condition when number of repetition was lower. There were no transfer effects of tRNS on attention or working memory. The results support the view that tRNS can produce specific facilitative effects on numerical cognition – specifically, on arithmetic learning. They also highlight

  9. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation to Address Mild Cognitive Impairment in the Elderly: A Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Drumond Marra, Hellen Livia; Myczkowski, Martin Luiz; Maia Memória, Cláudia; Arnaut, Débora; Leite Ribeiro, Philip; Sardinha Mansur, Carlos Gustavo; Lancelote Alberto, Rodrigo; Boura Bellini, Bianca; Alves Fernandes da Silva, Adriano; Tortella, Gabriel; Ciampi de Andrade, Daniel; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Forlenza, Orestes Vicente; Marcolin, Marco Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a noninvasive brain stimulation technique with potential to improve memory. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI), which still lacks a specific therapy, is a clinical syndrome associated with increased risk of dementia. This study aims to assess the effects of high-frequency repetitive TMS (HF rTMS) on everyday memory of the elderly with MCI. We conducted a double-blinded randomized sham-controlled trial using rTMS over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Thirty-four elderly outpatients meeting Petersen's MCI criteria were randomly assigned to receive 10 sessions of either active TMS or sham, 10 Hz rTMS at 110% of motor threshold, 2,000 pulses per session. Neuropsychological assessment at baseline, after the last session (10th) and at one-month follow-up, was applied. ANOVA on the primary efficacy measure, the Rivermead Behavioural Memory Test, revealed a significant group-by-time interaction (p = 0.05), favoring the active group. The improvement was kept after one month. Other neuropsychological tests were heterogeneous. rTMS at 10 Hz enhanced everyday memory in elderly with MCI after 10 sessions. These findings suggest that rTMS might be effective as a therapy for MCI and probably a tool to delay deterioration. PMID:26160997

  10. Electromagnetic characteristics of eccentric figure-eight coils for transcranial magnetic stimulation: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Takuya; Sekino, Masaki; Matsuzaki, Taiga; Nishikawa, Atsushi; Saitoh, Youichi; Ohsaki, Hiroyuki

    2012-04-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is effective for treatment of several neurological and psychiatric diseases. We proposed an eccentric figure-eight coil, which induces strong eddy currents in the target brain tissue. In this study, numerical analyses were carried out to obtain magnetic field distribution of the eccentric figure-eight coil and eddy current in the brain. The analyses were performed with various coil design parameters, such as the outer and inner diameters and number of turns, to investigate the influence of these parameters on the coil characteristics. Increases in the inner diameter, outer diameter, and number of turns caused increases in the maximum eddy current densities. Coil inductance, working voltage, and heat generation also became higher with the increases in these design parameters. In order to develop a compact stimulator system for use at home, we need to obtain strong eddy current density, keeping the working voltage as low as possible. Our results show that it is effective to enlarge the outer diameter.