Science.gov

Sample records for repository analouge program

  1. Natural repository analouge program. Progress report, January 1-March 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, D.B.

    1981-05-01

    Samples from Oklo Reactor zone-9 (ORZ-9) have been analyzed for the isotopic abundances of Nd, Ce, Ru, and Mo. Interpretation of the Nd data has begun as part of the effort to reconstruct the operating parameters of the reactor. The study of ORZ-9 and the peripheral rocks is being enhanced by additional analytical capabilities. A procedure was developed to measure uranium isotopic ratios with high precision. This new method was used for the analysis of rocks peripheral to ORZ-9. Two rocks containing relatively small quantities of uranium were depleted in /sup 235/U. The result demonstrates that small quantities of uranium were removed from the reactor zone and redistributed over distances of several tens of meters. Procedures are being designed to make high precision measurements of the relative abundances of barium isotopes. They will be used as part of a study of the transport of alkali and alkaline earth elements at Oklo. Samples from distances up to 300 meters from the known mineralized area at Oklo have been selected and prepared in an effort to identify element transport paths over longer distances. A sample from the Athabasca sandstone, overlying the uranium ores at Key Lake, and another from the transition zone at the unconfromity between the sandstone and the basement were subjected to sequential leaches designed to preferentially dissolve specific minerals. Lead isotopic analyses on the leachs yielded two sets of data, which indicate the loss of uranium or the addition of lead from a radiogenic source early in the geologic history of the rocks.

  2. Repository program licensing approach

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, T.M.; Gil, A.V.

    1994-12-31

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada is currently being studied by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as a potential site for a mined geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste. DOE has the responsibility to determine the suitability of the site and to develop a license application (LA) for authorization to construct the potential repository. If the site is suitable, the license application would be submitted to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The repository program licensing approach is focused on the timely acquisition of information needed in licensing and the resolution of potential licensing issues with the NRC staff. Licensing involves an iterative process requiring refinements as data are acquired, analyzed, and evaluated. The repository licensing approach presented in this paper ensures that the information is available when needed to facilitate the licensing process. Identifying the information needed to evaluate compliance with the performance objectives in 10 CFR 60, monitoring the acquisition of such information, and developing a successful license application are integral elements of DOE`s repository program licensing approach. Activities to characterize the site are being systematically conducted as planned in the Site Characterization Plan (SCP). In addition, DOE is implementing the issue resolution initiative, the license application annotated outline (LAAO) process, and interim licensability evaluations to update the early planning in the SCP and to focus site characterization, design, and performance assessment activities on the acquisition of information needed for a site suitability determination and licensing. Collectively, the issue resolution initiative, LAAO process, and interim licensability evaluations are key elements of a transition to the iterative process to answer the question: {open_quotes}When do we have enough data to support licensing?{close_quotes}

  3. The DOE repository program

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, T.

    1988-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has been directed by the Congress in the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act (NWPAA) to characterize the Yucca Mountain, Nevada, site as the initial candidate site for the nation's first geologic repository. Site characterization through ongoing surface-based testing has been under way since the President approved the recommendation of the Yucca Mountain site as one of three candidate sites in May 1986. A more extensive site characterization program, including construction of exploratory shafts and an underground testing facility, has been described in the consultative draft site characterization plan (SCP-CD), which was provided to the state of Nevada and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in January 1988 for review and comment. In addition, technical workshops were held with the state of Nevada, the NRC, and their contractors in February and March to discuss specific technical issues in the SCP-CD.

  4. Repository-based software engineering program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, James

    1992-01-01

    The activities performed during September 1992 in support of Tasks 01 and 02 of the Repository-Based Software Engineering Program are outlined. The recommendations and implementation strategy defined at the September 9-10 meeting of the Reuse Acquisition Action Team (RAAT) are attached along with the viewgraphs and reference information presented at the Institute for Defense Analyses brief on legal and patent issues related to software reuse.

  5. Repository-Based Software Engineering Program: Working Program Management Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Repository-Based Software Engineering Program (RBSE) is a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) sponsored program dedicated to introducing and supporting common, effective approaches to software engineering practices. The process of conceiving, designing, building, and maintaining software systems by using existing software assets that are stored in a specialized operational reuse library or repository, accessible to system designers, is the foundation of the program. In addition to operating a software repository, RBSE promotes (1) software engineering technology transfer, (2) academic and instructional support of reuse programs, (3) the use of common software engineering standards and practices, (4) software reuse technology research, and (5) interoperability between reuse libraries. This Program Management Plan (PMP) is intended to communicate program goals and objectives, describe major work areas, and define a management report and control process. This process will assist the Program Manager, University of Houston at Clear Lake (UHCL) in tracking work progress and describing major program activities to NASA management. The goal of this PMP is to make managing the RBSE program a relatively easy process that improves the work of all team members. The PMP describes work areas addressed and work efforts being accomplished by the program; however, it is not intended as a complete description of the program. Its focus is on providing management tools and management processes for monitoring, evaluating, and administering the program; and it includes schedules for charting milestones and deliveries of program products. The PMP was developed by soliciting and obtaining guidance from appropriate program participants, analyzing program management guidance, and reviewing related program management documents.

  6. Repository-Based Software Engineering (RBSE) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Support of a software engineering program was provided in the following areas: client/customer liaison; research representation/outreach; and program support management. Additionally, a list of deliverables is presented.

  7. Performance assessment implementation plan for the geologic repository program

    SciTech Connect

    1990-01-01

    Performance assessment is a major constituent of the program being conducted in the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (CRWM) Program of the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a geologic repository. Performance assessment is the set of activities needed for quantitative evaluations of repository-system performance to access compliance with regulations and to support the development of the geologic repository. To define the strategy for these evaluations, the DOE has developed this performance assessment strategy plan. This document discusses the need for such a strategy, the objectives and scope of the strategy plan, the relationship of the plan to other program plans. Additionally, it defines performance assessment and describes the roles of performance assessment in this program, discusses concepts and general strategies needed for performance assessment, outlines the content of the Safety Analysis Report, summarizes the requirements for the repository Environmental Impact Statement, discusses the requirements that apply to the site-suitability analyses and describes the site characterization. 10 figs., 7 tabs.

  8. A proposed application programming interface for a physical volume repository

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Merritt; Williams, Joel; Wrenn, Richard

    1996-01-01

    The IEEE Storage System Standards Working Group (SSSWG) has developed the Reference Model for Open Storage Systems Interconnection, Mass Storage System Reference Model Version 5. This document, provides the framework for a series of standards for application and user interfaces to open storage systems. More recently, the SSSWG has been developing Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) for the individual components defined by the model. The API for the Physical Volume Repository is the most fully developed, but work is being done on APIs for the Physical Volume Library and for the Mover also. The SSSWG meets every other month, and meetings are open to all interested parties. The Physical Volume Repository (PVR) is responsible for managing the storage of removable media cartridges and for mounting and dismounting these cartridges onto drives. This document describes a model which defines a Physical Volume Repository, and gives a brief summary of the Application Programming Interface (API) which the IEEE Storage Systems Standards Working Group (SSSWG) is proposing as the standard interface for the PVR.

  9. Repository-based software engineering program: Concept document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This document provides the context for Repository-Based Software Engineering's (RBSE's) evolving functional and operational product requirements, and it is the parent document for development of detailed technical and management plans. When furnished, requirements documents will serve as the governing RBSE product specification. The RBSE Program Management Plan will define resources, schedules, and technical and organizational approaches to fulfilling the goals and objectives of this concept. The purpose of this document is to provide a concise overview of RBSE, describe the rationale for the RBSE Program, and define a clear, common vision for RBSE team members and customers. The document also provides the foundation for developing RBSE user and system requirements and a corresponding Program Management Plan. The concept is used to express the program mission to RBSE users and managers and to provide an exhibit for community review.

  10. The Influence of Rare Book and Manuscript Repositories on Graduate Research in the Humanities: The Graduate Research Fellowship Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Kathryn

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the influence of the rare book and manuscript repository on graduate student researchers in the humanities, through an examination of the graduate research fellowship program. Based on a comparison of residential research fellowship programs at twenty-three rare book and manuscript repositories, this article argues that…

  11. RECON: a computer program for analyzing repository economics. Documentation and user's manual. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, L.L.; Schutz, M.E.; Luksic, A.T.

    1985-07-01

    From 1981 through 1984 the Pacific Northwest Laboratory has been developing a computer model named RECON to calculate repository costs from parametric data input. The objective of the program has been to develop the capability to evaluate the effect on costs of changes in repository design parameters and operating scenario assumptions. This report documents the development of the model through September of 1984. Included in the report are: (1) descriptions of model development and the underlying equations, assumptions and definitions; (2) descriptions of data input using either card images or an interactive data input program; and (3) detailed listings of the program and definitions of program variables. Cost estimates generated using the model have been verified against independent estimates and good agreement has been obtained. 2 refs.

  12. RECON: a computer program for analyzing repository economics. Documentation and user's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, L.L.; Cole, B.M.; McNair, G.W.; Schutz, M.E.

    1983-05-01

    From 1981 through 1983 the Pacific Northwest Laboratory has been developing a computer model named RECON to calculate repository costs from parametric data input. The objective of the program has been to develop the capability to evalute the effect on costs of changes in repository design parameters and operating scenario assumptions. This report documents the development of the model through March of 1983. Included in the report are: (1) descriptions of model development and the underlying equations, assumptions and definitions; (2) descriptions of data input either using card images or an interactive data input program; and (3) detailed listings of the program and definitions of program variables. Cost estimates generated using the model have been verified against independent estimates and good agreement has been obtained.

  13. Concept document of the repository-based software engineering program: A constructive appraisal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A constructive appraisal of the Concept Document of the Repository-Based Software Engineering Program is provided. The Concept Document is designed to provide an overview of the Repository-Based Software Engineering (RBSE) Program. The Document should be brief and provide the context for reading subsequent requirements and product specifications. That is, all requirements to be developed should be traceable to the Concept Document. Applied Expertise's analysis of the Document was directed toward assuring that: (1) the Executive Summary provides a clear, concise, and comprehensive overview of the Concept (rewrite as necessary); (2) the sections of the Document make best use of the NASA 'Data Item Description' for concept documents; (3) the information contained in the Document provides a foundation for subsequent requirements; and (4) the document adequately: identifies the problem being addressed; articulates RBSE's specific role; specifies the unique aspects of the program; and identifies the nature and extent of the program's users.

  14. NWTS program criteria for mined geologic disposal of nuclear waste: repository performance and development criteria. Public draft

    SciTech Connect

    1982-07-01

    This document, DOE/NWTS-33(3) is one of a series of documents to establish the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) program criteria for mined geologic disposal of high-level radioactive waste. For both repository performance and repository development it delineates the criteria for design performance, radiological safety, mining safety, long-term containment and isolation, operations, and decommissioning. The US Department of Energy will use these criteria to guide the development of repositories to assist in achieving performance and will reevaluate their use when the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission issues radioactive waste repository rules.

  15. Salt Repository Project: Waste Package Program (WPP) modeling activiteis: FY 1984 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, W.L.; Simonson, S.A.; Pulsipher, B.A.

    1987-03-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is supporting the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Salt Repository Project (SRP) through its Waste Package Program (WPP). During FY 1984, the WPP continued its program of waste package component development and interactions testing and application of the resulting data base to develop predictive models describing waste package degradation and radionuclide release. Within the WPP, the Modeling Task (Task 04 during FY 1984) was conducted to interpret the tests in such a way that scientifically defensible models can be developed for use in qualification of the waste package.

  16. System description of the Repository-Only System for the FY 1990 systems integration program studies. [CONTAINS GLOSSARY

    SciTech Connect

    McKee, R.W.; Young, J.R.; Konzek, G.J.

    1991-07-01

    This document provides both functional and physical descriptions of a conceptual high-level waste management system defined as a Repository-Only System. Its purpose is to provide a basis for required system computer modeling and system studies initiated in FY 1990 under the Systems Integration Program of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The Repository-Only System is designed to accept 3000 MTU per year of spent fuel and 400 equivalent MTU per year of high-level wastes disposal in the geologic repository. This document contains both functional descriptions of the processes in the waste management system and physical descriptions of the equipment and facilities necessary for performance of those processes. These descriptions contain the level of detail needed for the projected systems analysis studies. The Repository-Only System contains all system components, from the waste storage facilities of the waste generators to the underground facilities for final disposal of the wastes. The major facilities in the system are the waste generator waste storage facilities, a repository facility that packages the wastes and than emplaces them in the geologic repository, and the transportation equipment and facilities for transporting the wastes between these major facilities. 18 refs., 39 figs.

  17. The repository-based software engineering program: Redefining AdaNET as a mainstream NASA source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Repository-based Software Engineering Program (RBSE) is described to inform and update senior NASA managers about the program. Background and historical perspective on software reuse and RBSE for NASA managers who may not be familiar with these topics are provided. The paper draws upon and updates information from the RBSE Concept Document, baselined by NASA Headquarters, Johnson Space Center, and the University of Houston - Clear Lake in April 1992. Several of NASA's software problems and what RBSE is now doing to address those problems are described. Also, next steps to be taken to derive greater benefit from this Congressionally-mandated program are provided. The section on next steps describes the need to work closely with other NASA software quality, technology transfer, and reuse activities and focuses on goals and objectives relative to this need. RBSE's role within NASA is addressed; however, there is also the potential for systematic transfer of technology outside of NASA in later stages of the RBSE program. This technology transfer is discussed briefly.

  18. Brine: a computer program to compute brine migration adjacent to a nuclear waste canister in a salt repository

    SciTech Connect

    Duckworth, G.D.; Fuller, M.E.

    1980-06-10

    This report presents a mathematical model used to predict brine migration toward a nuclear waste canister in a bedded salt repository. The mathematical model is implemented in a computer program called BRINE. The program is written in FORTRAN and executes in the batch mode on a CDC 7600. A description of the program input requirements and output available is included. Samples of input and output are given.

  19. The Use of Underground Research Laboratories to Support Repository Development Programs. A Roadmap for the Underground Research Facilities Network.

    SciTech Connect

    MacKinnon, Robert J.

    2015-10-26

    Under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), nationally developed underground research laboratories (URLs) and associated research institutions are being offered for use by other nations. These facilities form an Underground Research Facilities (URF) Network for training in and demonstration of waste disposal technologies and the sharing of knowledge and experience related to geologic repository development, research, and engineering. In order to achieve its objectives, the URF Network regularly sponsors workshops and training events related to the knowledge base that is transferable between existing URL programs and to nations with an interest in developing a new URL. This report describes the role of URLs in the context of a general timeline for repository development. This description includes identification of key phases and activities that contribute to repository development as a repository program evolves from an early research and development phase to later phases such as construction, operations, and closure. This information is cast in the form of a matrix with the entries in this matrix forming the basis of the URF Network roadmap that will be used to identify and plan future workshops and training events.

  20. How to Shape a Successful Repository Program: Staged Development of Geologic Repositories for High-Level Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, T.

    2004-10-03

    Programs to manage and ultimately dispose of high-level radioactive wastes are unique from scientific and technological as well as socio-political aspects. From a scientific and technological perspective, high-level radioactive wastes remain potentially hazardous for geological time periods--many millennia--and scientific and technological programs must be put in place that result in a system that provides high confidence that the wastes will be isolated from the accessible environment for these many thousands of years. Of course, ''proof'' in the classical sense is not possible at the outset, since the performance of the system can only be known with assurance, if ever, after the waste has been emplaced for those geological time periods. Adding to this challenge, many uncertainties exist in both the natural and engineered systems that are intended to isolate the wastes, and some of the uncertainties will remain regardless of the time and expense in attempting to characterize the system and assess its performance.

  1. Nye County Nuclear Waste Repository Project Office independent scientific investigations program annual report, May 1997--April 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    This annual summary report, prepared by the Nye County Nuclear Waste Repository Project Office (NWRPO), summarizes the activities that were performed during the period from May 1, 1997 to April 30, 1998. These activities were conducted in support of the Independent Scientific Investigation Program (ISIP) of Nye County at the Yucca Mountain Site (YMS). The Nye County NWRPO is responsible for protecting the health and safety of the Nye County residents. NWRPO`s on-site representative is responsible for designing and implementing the Independent Scientific Investigation Program (ISIP). Major objectives of the ISIP include: Investigating key issues related to conceptual design and performance of the repository that can have major impact on human health, safety, and the environment; identifying areas not being addressed adequately by the Department of Energy (DOE). Nye County has identified several key scientific issues of concern that may affect repository design and performance which were not being adequately addressed by DOE. Nye County has been conducting its own independent study to evaluate the significance of these issues. This report summarizes the results of monitoring from two boreholes and the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) tunnel that have been instrumented by Nye County since March and April of 1995. The preliminary data and interpretations presented in this report do not constitute and should not be considered as the official position of Nye County. The ISIP presently includes borehole and tunnel instrumentation, monitoring, data analysis, and numerical modeling activities to address the concerns of Nye County.

  2. US Department of Energy approaches to the assessment of radionuclide migration for the Geologic Repository Program

    SciTech Connect

    Van Luik, A.E.; Apted, M.J.

    1987-09-01

    Potential radionuclide migration in geologic repositories is being addressed. Geohydrologic settings being investigated include unsaturated tuff, saturated basalt, and bedded salt. Several approaches to assessing potential migration are being considered. Mass transfer is prominent among near-field approaches, involving estimation of diffusive transport rates through the engineered barrier system using analytical and finite element methods. For far-field analysis of migration in the geosphere, detailed characterizations of potential repository sites will lead to site-specific models describing radionuclide migration for a variety of postulated release scenarios. Finite-element and finite-difference codes are being used and developed to solve the mathematical equations pertinent to far-field assessments. Computational approaches presently in use generally require distribution coefficients to estimate the retardation of specific radionuclides with respect to the transport rate of water.

  3. Configuration management plan. System definition and project development. Repository Based Software Engineering (RBSE) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, Charles

    1991-01-01

    This is the configuration management Plan for the AdaNet Repository Based Software Engineering (RBSE) contract. This document establishes the requirements and activities needed to ensure that the products developed for the AdaNet RBSE contract are accurately identified, that proposed changes to the product are systematically evaluated and controlled, that the status of all change activity is known at all times, and that the product achieves its functional performance requirements and is accurately documented.

  4. Environmental program planning for the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada; Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1987-08-01

    Environmental protection during the course of siting and constructing a repository is mandated by NWPA in conjunction with various phases of repository siting and development. However, DOE has issued no comprehensive, integrated plan for environmental protection. Consequently, it is unclear how DOE will accomplish environmental assessment, monitoring, impact mitigation, and site reclamation. DOE should, therefore, defer further implementation of its current characterization program until a comprehensive environmental protection plan is available. To fulfill its oversight responsibilities the State of Nevada has proposed a comprehensive environmental program for the Yucca Mountain site that includes immediately undertaking studies to establish a 12-month baseline of environmental information at the site; adopting the DOE Site Characterization Plan (SCP) and the engineering design plans it will contain as the basis for defining the impact potential of site characterization activities; using the environmental baseline and the SCP to evaluate the efficacy of the preliminary impact analyses reported by DOE in the EA; using the SCP as the basis for discussions with federal, state, and local regulatory authorities to decide which environmental requirements apply and how they can be complied with; using the SCP, the EA impact review, and the compliance requirements to determine the scope of reclamation measures needed; and developing environmental monitoring and impact mitigation plans based on the EA impact review, compliance requirements, and anticipated reclamation needs.

  5. Death Valley Lower Carbonate Aquifer Monitoring Program Wells Down gradient of the Proposed Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Inyo County

    2006-07-26

    Inyo County has participated in oversight activities associated with the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository since 1987. The overall goal of these studies are the evaluation of far-field issues related to potential transport, by ground water, or radionuclides into Inyo County, including Death Valley, and the evaluation of a connection between the Lower Carbonate Aquifer (LCA) and the biosphere. Our oversight and completed Cooperative Agreement research, and a number of other investigators research indicate that there is groundwater flow between the alluvial and carbonate aquifers both at Yucca Mountain and in Inyo County. In addition to the potential of radionuclide transport through the LCA, Czarnecki (1997), with the US Geological Survey, research indicate potential radionuclide transport through the shallower Tertiary-age aquifer materials with ultimate discharge into the Franklin Lake Playa in Inyo County. The specific purpose of this Cooperative Agreement drilling program was to acquire geological, subsurface geology, and hydrologic data to: (1) establish the existence of inter-basin flow between the Amargosa Basin and Death Valley Basin; (2) characterize groundwater flow paths in the LCA through Southern Funeral Mountain Range, and (3) Evaluation the hydraulic connection between the Yucca Mountain repository and the major springs in Death Valley through the LCA.

  6. Analysis Repository

    SciTech Connect

    DOE

    2012-03-16

    The Analysis Repository is a compilation of analyses and analytical models relevant to assessing hydrogen fuel and fuel cell issues. Projects in the repository relate to: hydrogen production, delivery, storage, fuel cells, and hydrogen vehicle technology; hydrogen production feedstock cost and availability; electricity production, central and distributed; energy resource estimation and forecasting.

  7. Repository Integration Program: RIP performance assessment and strategy evaluation model theory manual and user`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    This report describes the theory and capabilities of RIP (Repository Integration Program). RIP is a powerful and flexible computational tool for carrying out probabilistic integrated total system performance assessments for geologic repositories. The primary purpose of RIP is to provide a management tool for guiding system design and site characterization. In addition, the performance assessment model (and the process of eliciting model input) can act as a mechanism for integrating the large amount of available information into a meaningful whole (in a sense, allowing one to keep the ``big picture`` and the ultimate aims of the project clearly in focus). Such an integration is useful both for project managers and project scientists. RIP is based on a `` top down`` approach to performance assessment that concentrates on the integration of the entire system, and utilizes relatively high-level descriptive models and parameters. The key point in the application of such a ``top down`` approach is that the simplified models and associated high-level parameters must incorporate an accurate representation of their uncertainty. RIP is designed in a very flexible manner such that details can be readily added to various components of the model without modifying the computer code. Uncertainty is also handled in a very flexible manner, and both parameter and model (process) uncertainty can be explicitly considered. Uncertainty is propagated through the integrated PA model using an enhanced Monte Carlo method. RIP must rely heavily on subjective assessment (expert opinion) for much of its input. The process of eliciting the high-level input parameters required for RIP is critical to its successful application. As a result, in order for any project to successfully apply a tool such as RIP, an enormous amount of communication and cooperation must exist between the data collectors, the process modelers, and the performance. assessment modelers.

  8. RE/SPEC Inc. technical support to the Repository Technology Program; Summary of activities for September 1, 1988--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, R.A.

    1992-06-01

    This report presents a summary of all RE/SPEC Inc. technical support activities to the Repository Technology Program (RTP) from September 1, 1988, through June 30, 1992. The RE/SPEC Inc. activities are grouped into the following categories: project management, project quality assurance (QA), performance assessment (PA), support of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) through technical reviews and general assistance, participation in the Department of Energy (DOE) International Program, and code evaluation and documentation.

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF THE U.S. EPA HEALTH EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY FROZEN BLOOD CELL REPOSITORY PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    In previous efforts, we suggested that proper blood cell freezing and storage is necessary in longitudinal studies with reduced between tests error, for specimen sharing between laboratories and for convenient scheduling of assays. e continue to develop and upgrade programs for o...

  10. Linking data repositories - an illustration of agile data curation principles through robust documentation and multiple application programming interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedict, K. K.; Servilla, M. S.; Vanderbilt, K.; Wheeler, J.

    2015-12-01

    The growing volume, variety and velocity of production of Earth science data magnifies the impact of inefficiencies in data acquisition, processing, analysis, and sharing workflows, potentially to the point of impairing the ability of researchers to accomplish their desired scientific objectives. The adaptation of agile software development principles (http://agilemanifesto.org/principles.html) to data curation processes has significant potential to lower barriers to effective scientific data discovery and reuse - barriers that otherwise may force the development of new data to replace existing but unusable data, or require substantial effort to make data usable in new research contexts. This paper outlines a data curation process that was developed at the University of New Mexico that provides a cross-walk of data and associated documentation between the data archive developed by the Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Network Office (PASTA - http://lno.lternet.edu/content/network-information-system) and UNM's institutional repository (LoboVault - http://repository.unm.edu). The developed automated workflow enables the replication of versioned data objects and their associated standards-based metadata between the LTER system and LoboVault - providing long-term preservation for those data/metadata packages within LoboVault while maintaining the value-added services that the PASTA platform provides. The relative ease with which this workflow was developed is a product of the capabilities independently developed on both platforms - including the simplicity of providing a well-documented application programming interface (API) for each platform enabling scripted interaction and the use of well-established documentation standards (EML in the case of PASTA, Dublin Core in the case of LoboVault) by both systems. These system characteristics, when combined with an iterative process of interaction between the Data Curation Librarian (on the LoboVault side of the process

  11. Project characteristics monitoring report: BWIP (Basalt Waste Isolation Program) repository project

    SciTech Connect

    Friedli, E.A.; Herborn, D.I.; Taylor, C.D.; Tomlinson, K.M.

    1988-03-01

    This monitoring report has been prepared to show compliance with provisions of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA) and to provide local and state government agencies with information concerning the Basalt Waste Isolation Program (BWIP). This report contains data for the time period May 26, 1986 to February 1988. The data include employment figures, salaries, project purchases, taxes and fees paid, worker survey results, and project closedown personal interview summaries. This information has become particularly important since the decision in December 1987 to stop all BWIP activities except those for site reclamation. The Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987 requires nonreclamation work at the Hanford Site to stop as of March 22, 1988. 7 refs., 6 figs., 28 tabs.

  12. Software Repository

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merwarth, P., D.

    1983-01-01

    The Common Software Module Repository (CSMR) is computerized library system with high product and service visibility to potential users. Online capabilities of system allow both librarian and user to interact with library. Librarian is responsible for maintaining information in CSMR library. User searches library to locate software modules that meet his or her current needs.

  13. Staged Repository Development Programmes

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, T

    2003-10-01

    Programs to manage and ultimately dispose of high-level radioactive wastes are unique from scientific and technological as well as socio-political aspects. From a scientific and technological perspective, high-level radioactive wastes remain potentially hazardous for geological time periods-many millennia-and scientific and technological programs must be put in place that result in a system that provides high confidence that the wastes will be isolated from the accessible environment for these many thousands of years. Of course, ''proof'' in the classical sense is not possible at the outset, since the performance of the system can only be known with assurance, if ever, after the waste has been emplaced for those geological time periods. Adding to this challenge, many uncertainties exist in both the natural and engineered systems that are intended to isolate the wastes, and some of the uncertainties will remain regardless of the time and expense in attempting to characterize the system and assess its performance. What was perhaps underappreciated in the early days of waste management and repository program development were the unique and intense reactions that the institutional, political, and public bodies would have to repository program development, particularly in programs attempting to identify and then select sites for characterization, design, licensing, and ultimate development. Reactions in most nations were strong, focused, unrelenting, and often successful in hindering, derailing, and even stopping national repository programs. The reasons for such reactions and the measures to successfully respond to them are still evolving and continue to be the focus of many national program and political leaders. Adaptive Staging suggests an approach to repository program development that reflects the unique challenges associated with the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The step-wise, incremental, learn-as-you-go approach is intended to maximize the

  14. Learning Object Repositories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehman, Rosemary

    2007-01-01

    This chapter looks at the development and nature of learning objects, meta-tagging standards and taxonomies, learning object repositories, learning object repository characteristics, and types of learning object repositories, with type examples. (Contains 1 table.)

  15. Repository performance confirmation.

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Francis D.

    2011-09-01

    Repository performance confirmation links the technical bases of repository science and societal acceptance. This paper explores the myriad aspects of what has been labeled performance confirmation in U.S. programs, which involves monitoring as a collection of distinct activities combining technical and social significance in radioactive waste management. This paper is divided into four parts: (1) A distinction is drawn between performance confirmation monitoring and other testing and monitoring objectives; (2) A case study illustrates confirmation activities integrated within a long-term testing and monitoring strategy for Yucca Mountain; (3) A case study reviews compliance monitoring developed and implemented for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant; and (4) An approach for developing, evaluating and implementing the next generation of performance confirmation monitoring is presented. International interest in repository monitoring is exhibited by the European Commission Seventh Framework Programme 'Monitoring Developments for Safe Repository Operation and Staged Closure' (MoDeRn) Project. The MoDeRn partners are considering the role of monitoring in a phased approach to the geological disposal of radioactive waste. As repository plans advance in different countries, the need to consider monitoring strategies within a controlled framework has become more apparent. The MoDeRn project pulls together technical and societal experts to assimilate a common understanding of a process that could be followed to develop a monitoring program. A fundamental consideration is the differentiation of confirmation monitoring from the many other testing and monitoring activities. Recently, the license application for Yucca Mountain provided a case study including a technical process for meeting regulatory requirements to confirm repository performance as well as considerations related to the preservation of retrievability. The performance confirmation plan developed as part of the

  16. Actinide partitioning-transmutation program final report. VII. Long-term risk analysis of the geologic repository

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, S.E.; Conarty, R.L.; Ng, H.S.; Rahal, L.J.; Shirley, C.G.

    1980-09-01

    This report supports the overall assessment by Oak Ridge National Laboratory of actinide partitioning and transmutation by providing an analysis of the long-term risks associated with the terminal storage of wastes from a fuel cycle which incorporates partitioning and transmutation (P-T) and wastes from a cycle which does not. The system model and associated computer code, called AMRAW (Assessment Method for Radioactive Waste), are used for the analysis and are applied to the Los Medanos area in southeastern New Mexico. Because a conservative approach is used throughout, calculated results are believed to be consistently higher than reasonable expectations from actual disruptive incidents at the site and therefore are not directly suited for comparison with other analyses of the particular geologic location. The assessment is made with (1) the probabilistic, or risk, mode that uses combinations of reasonable possible release incidents with their probability of occurrence distributed and applied throughout the assessment period, and (2) the consequence mode that forces discrete release events to occur at specific times. An assessment period of 1 million years is used. The principal results are: (1) In all but the expulsive modes, /sup 99/Tc and /sup 129/I completely dominate cumulative effects based on their transport to man through leaching and movement with groundwater, effecting about 33,000 health effects (deaths) over the 1 million years; (2) P-T has only limited effectiveness in reducing long-term risk from a radionuclide waste repository under the conditions studied, and such effectiveness is essentially confined to the extremely unlikely (probability of occurrence 10/sup -12//year) expulsive events; (3) Removal or immobilization of /sup 99/Tc and /sup 129/I might provide benefits sufficiently tangible to warrant special consideration.

  17. The Emperor's New Repository

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chudnov, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The author does not know the first thing about building digital repositories. Maybe that is a strange thing to say, given that he works in a repository development group now, worked on the original DSpace project years ago, and worked on a few repository research projects in between. Given how long he has been around people and projects aiming to…

  18. Object linking in repositories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichmann, David (Editor); Beck, Jon; Atkins, John; Bailey, Bill

    1992-01-01

    This topic is covered in three sections. The first section explores some of the architectural ramifications of extending the Eichmann/Atkins lattice-based classification scheme to encompass the assets of the full life cycle of software development. A model is considered that provides explicit links between objects in addition to the edges connecting classification vertices in the standard lattice. The second section gives a description of the efforts to implement the repository architecture using a commercially available object-oriented database management system. Some of the features of this implementation are described, and some of the next steps to be taken to produce a working prototype of the repository are pointed out. In the final section, it is argued that design and instantiation of reusable components have competing criteria (design-for-reuse strives for generality, design-with-reuse strives for specificity) and that providing mechanisms for each can be complementary rather than antagonistic. In particular, it is demonstrated how program slicing techniques can be applied to customization of reusable components.

  19. The INDEPTH Data Repository

    PubMed Central

    Juvekar, Sanjay; Bhattacharjee, Tathagata; Bangha, Martin; Patharia, Nidhi; Tei, Titus; Gilbert, Brendan; Sankoh, Osman

    2015-01-01

    The International Network for the Demographic Evaluation of Populations and Their Health (INDEPTH) is a global network of research centers that conduct longitudinal health and demographic evaluation of populations in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) currently in 52 health and demographic surveillance system (HDSS) field sites situated in sub-Saharan Africa (14 countries), Asia (India, Bangladesh, Thailand, Vietnam, and Indonesia), and Oceania (Papua New Guinea). Through this network of HDSS field sites, INDEPTH is capable of producing reliable longitudinal data about the lives of people in the research communities as well as how development policies and programs affect those lives. The aim of the INDEPTH Data Repository is to enable INDEPTH member centers and associated researchers to contribute and share fully documented, high-quality datasets with the scientific community and health policy makers. PMID:26297754

  20. NASA Biological Specimen Repository

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pietrzyk, Robert; McMonigal, K. A.; Sams, C. F.; Johnson, M. A.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Biological Specimen Repository (NBSR) has been established to collect, process, annotate, store, and distribute specimens under the authority of the NASA/JSC Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects. The International Space Station (ISS) provides a platform to investigate the effects of microgravity on human physiology prior to lunar and exploration class missions. The NBSR is a secure controlled storage facility that is used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time, under well-controlled conditions, for future use in approved human spaceflight-related research protocols. The repository supports the Human Research Program, which is charged with identifying and investigating physiological changes that occur during human spaceflight, and developing and implementing effective countermeasures when necessary. The storage of crewmember samples from many different ISS flights in a single repository will be a valuable resource with which researchers can validate clinical hypotheses, study space-flight related changes, and investigate physiological markers All samples collected require written informed consent from each long duration crewmember. The NBSR collects blood and urine samples from all participating long duration ISS crewmembers. These biological samples are collected pre-flight at approximately 45 days prior to launch, during flight on flight days 15, 30, 60 120 and within 2 weeks of landing. Postflight sessions are conducted 3 and 30 days following landing. The number of inflight sessions is dependent on the duration of the mission. Operations began in 2007 and as of October 2009, 23 USOS crewmembers have completed or agreed to participate in this project. As currently planned, these human biological samples will be collected from crewmembers covering multiple ISS missions until the end of U.S. presence on the ISS or 2017. The NBSR will establish guidelines for sample distribution that are consistent with ethical principles

  1. Geotechnical instrumentation for repository shafts

    SciTech Connect

    Lentell, R.L.; Byrne, J.

    1993-09-01

    The US Congress passed the Nuclear Waste Policy Act in 1980, which required that three distinctly different geologic media be investigated as potential candidate sites for the permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The three media that were selected for study were basalt (WA), salt (TX, LA, MS, UT), and tuff (NV). Preliminary Exploratory Shaft Facilities (ESF) designs were prepared for seven candidate salt sites, including bedded and domal salt environments. A bedded-salt site was selected in Deaf Smith County, TX for detailed site characterization studies and ESF Final Design. Although Congress terminated the Salt Repository Program in 1988, Final Design for the Deaf Smith ESF was completed, and much of the design rationale can be applied to subsequent deep repository shafts. This paper presents the rationale for the geotechnical instrumentation that was designed for construction and operational performance monitoring of the deep shafts of the in-situ test facility. The instrumentation design described herein can be used as a general framework in designing subsequent instrumentation programs for future high-level nuclear waste repository shafts.

  2. Corticotropin, Repository Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... age; episodes of symptoms in people who have multiple sclerosis (MS; a disease in which the nerves do ... When corticotropin repository injection is used to treat multiple sclerosis, it is usually injected once a day for ...

  3. MAJOR REPOSITORY DESIGN ISSUES

    SciTech Connect

    Blink, James A.; Bailey, Jack N.; Chesnut, Dwayne; Compton, James; Snell, Richard D.

    1997-11-10

    The Yucca Mountain Project is focused on producing a four-part viability assessment in late FY98. Its four components (design, performance assessment, cost estimate, and licensing development plan) must be consistent. As a tool to compare design and performance assessment options, a series of repository pictures were developed for the sequential time phases of a repository. The boundaries of the time phases correspond to evolution in the engineered barrier system (EBS).

  4. Managing and Evaluating Digital Repositories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuccala, Alesia; Oppenheim, Charles; Dhiensa, Rajveen

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: We examine the role of the digital repository manager, discuss the future of repository management and evaluation and suggest that library and information science schools develop new repository management curricula. Method: Face-to-face interviews were carried out with managers of five different types of repositories and a Web-based…

  5. Repository seals requirements study

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-03

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project, managed by the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M and O) is conducting investigations to support the Viability Assessment and the License Application for a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The sealing subsystem is part of the Yucca Mountain Waste Isolation System. The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is currently evaluating the role of the sealing subsystem (shaft, ramp and exploratory borehole seals) in achieving the overall performance objectives for the Waste Isolation System. This report documents the results of those evaluations. This report presents the results of a repository sealing requirements study. Sealing is defined as the permanent closure of the shafts, ramps, and exploratory boreholes. Sealing includes those components that would reduce potential inflows above the repository, or that would divert flow near the repository horizon to allow vertical infiltration to below the repository. Sealing of such features as emplacement drifts was not done in this study because the current capability to calculate fracture flow into the drifts is not sufficiently mature. The objective of the study is to provide water or air flow performance based requirements for shafts, ramps, and exploratory boreholes located near the repository. Recommendations, as appropriate, are provided for developing plans, seals component testing, and other studies relating to sealing.

  6. Evolution of a Digital Repository: One Institution's Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Terry M.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the development of a digital repository is examined, specifically how the focus on acquiring content for the repository has transitioned from faculty-published research to include the gray literature produced by the research centers on campus, including unpublished technical reports and undergraduate research from honors programs.…

  7. Microsoft Repository Version 2 and the Open Information Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernstein, Philip A.; Bergstraesser, Thomas; Carlson, Jason; Pal, Shankar; Sanders, Paul; Shutt, David

    1999-01-01

    Describes the programming interface and implementation of the repository engine and the Open Information Model for Microsoft Repository, an object-oriented meta-data management facility that ships in Microsoft Visual Studio and Microsoft SQL Server. Discusses Microsoft's component object model, object manipulation, queries, and information…

  8. Salt repository design approach

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, S.C.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents a summary discussion of the approaches that have been and will be taken in design of repository facilities for use with disposal of radioactive wastes in salt formations. Since specific sites have yet to be identified, the discussion is at a general level, supplemented with illustrative examples where appropriate. 5 references, 1 figure.

  9. Progress Towards International Repositories

    SciTech Connect

    McCombie, C.; Chapman, N.

    2002-02-27

    The nuclear fuel cycle is designed to be very international, with some specialist activities (e.g. fuel fabrication, reprocessing, etc.) being confined to a few countries. Nevertheless, political and public opposition has in the past been faced by proposals to internationalise the back-end of the cycle, in particular waste disposal. Attitudes, however, have been changing recently and there is now more acceptance of the general concept of shared repositories and of specific proposals such as that of Pangea. However, as for national facilities, progress towards implementation of shared repositories will be gradual. Moreover, the best vehicle for promoting the concept may not be a commercial type of organization. Consequently the Pangea project team are currently establishing a widely based Association for this purpose.

  10. Repository seals requirement study

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-03

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project, managed by the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M and O) is conducting investigations to support the Viability Assessment and the License Application for a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The sealing subsystem is part of the Yucca Mountain Waste Isolation System. The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is currently evaluating the role of the sealing subsystem (shaft, ramp and exploratory borehole seals) in achieving the overall performance objectives for the Waste Isolation System. This report documents the results of those evaluations. The objective of the study is to provide water or air flow performance based requirements for shafts, ramps, and exploratory boreholes located near the repository. Recommendations, as appropriate, are provided for developing plans, seals component testing, and other studies relating to sealing.

  11. Depleted Uranium in Repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Haire, M.J.; Croff, A.G.

    1997-12-31

    For uranium to be useful in most fission nuclear reactors, it must be enriched (i.e. the concentration of the fissile isotope 235U must be increased). Therefore, depleted uranium (DU)-uranium which has less than naturally occurring concentrations of 235U-is a co-product of the enrichment process. Four to six tons of DU exist for every ton of fresh light water reactor fuel. There were 407,006 MgU 407,000 metric tons (t) of DU stored on U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites as of July 1993. If this DU were to be declared surplus, converted to a stable oxide form, and emplaced in a near surface disposal facility, the costs are estimated to be several billion dollars. However, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has stated that near surface disposal of large quantities of DU tails is not appropriate. Thus, there is the possibility that disposition via disposal will be in a deep geological repository. One alternative that may significantly reduce the cost of DU disposition is to use it beneficially. In fact, DOE has begun the Beneficial Uses of DU Project to identify large scale uses of DU and to encourage its reuse. Several beneficial uses, many of which involve applications in the repository per se or in managing the wastes to go into the repository, are discussed in this report.

  12. Death Valley Lower Carbonate Aquifer Monitoring Program Wells Down Gradient of the Proposed Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository, U. S. Department of Energy Grant DE-RW0000233 2010 Project Report, prepared by The Hydrodynamics Group, LLC for Inyo County Yucca Mountain Repository Assessment Office

    SciTech Connect

    King, Michael J; Bredehoeft, John D., Dr.

    2010-09-03

    Inyo County completed the first year of the U.S. Department of Energy Grant Agreement No. DE-RW0000233. This report presents the results of research conducted within this Grant agreement in the context of Inyo County's Yucca Mountain oversight program goals and objectives. The Hydrodynamics Group, LLC prepared this report for Inyo County Yucca Mountain Repository Assessment Office. The overall goal of Inyo County's Yucca Mountain research program is the evaluation of far-field issues related to potential transport, by ground water, of radionuclide into Inyo County, including Death Valley, and the evaluation of a connection between the Lower Carbonate Aquifer (LCA) and the biosphere. Data collected within the Grant is included in interpretive illustrations and discussions of the results of our analysis. The centeral elements of this Grant prgoram was the drilling of exploratory wells, geophysical surveys, geological mapping of the Southern Funeral Mountain Range. The cullimination of this research was 1) a numerical ground water model of the Southern Funeral Mountain Range demonstrating the potential of a hydraulic connection between the LCA and the major springs in the Furnace Creek area of Death Valley, and 2) a numerical ground water model of the Amargosa Valley to evaluate the potential for radionuclide transport from Yucca Mountain to Inyo County, California. The report provides a description of research and activities performed by The Hydrodynamics Group, LLC on behalf of Inyo County, and copies of key work products in attachments to this report.

  13. National Geoscience Data Repository System. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffries, C.M.; Milling, M.E.

    1994-03-01

    The American Geological Institute (AGI) has completed the first phase of a study to assess the feasibility of establishing a National Geoscience Data Repository System to capture and preserve valuable geoscientific data. The study was initiated in response to the fact that billions of dollars worth of domestic geological and geophysical data are in jeopardy of being irrevocably lost or destroyed as a consequence of the ongoing downsizing of the US energy and minerals industry. This report focuses on two major issues. First, it documents the types and quantity of data available for contribution to a National Geoscience Data Repository System. Second, it documents the data needs and priorities of potential users of the system. A National Geoscience Data Repository System would serve as an important and valuable source of information for the entire geoscience community for a variety of applications, including environmental protection, water resource management, global change studies, and basic and applied research. The repository system would also contain critical data that would enable domestic energy and minerals companies to expand their exploration and production programs in the United States for improved recovery of domestic oil, gas, and mineral resources.

  14. NASA Biological Specimen Repository

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMonigal, K. A.; Pietrzyk, R. A.; Sams, C. F.; Johnson, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Biological Specimen Repository (NBSR) was established in 2006 to collect, process, preserve and distribute spaceflight-related biological specimens from long duration ISS astronauts. This repository provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning may missions. The NBSR collects blood and urine samples from all participating ISS crewmembers who have provided informed consent. These biological samples are collected once before flight, during flight scheduled on flight days 15, 30, 60, 120 and within 2 weeks of landing. Postflight sessions are conducted 3 and 30 days after landing. The number of in-flight sessions is dependent on the duration of the mission. Specimens are maintained under optimal storage conditions in a manner that will maximize their integrity and viability for future research The repository operates under the authority of the NASA/JSC Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects to support scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment. The NBSR will institute guidelines for the solicitation, review and sample distribution process through establishment of the NBSR Advisory Board. The Advisory Board will be composed of representatives of all participating space agencies to evaluate each request from investigators for use of the samples. This process will be consistent with ethical principles, protection of crewmember confidentiality, prevailing laws and regulations, intellectual property policies, and consent form language. Operations supporting the NBSR are scheduled to continue until the end of U.S. presence on the ISS. Sample distribution is proposed to begin with selections on investigations beginning in 2017. The availability of the NBSR will contribute to the body of knowledge about the diverse factors of spaceflight on human physiology.

  15. Credentialing Data Scientists: A Domain Repository Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, K. A.; Furukawa, H.

    2015-12-01

    A career in data science can have many paths: data curation, data analysis, metadata modeling - all of these in different commercial or scientific applications. Can a certification as 'data scientist' provide the guarantee that an applicant or candidate for a data science position has just the right skills? How valuable is a 'generic' certification as data scientist for an employer looking to fill a data science position? Credentials that are more specific and discipline-oriented may be more valuable to both the employer and the job candidate. One employment sector for data scientists are the data repositories that provide discipline-specific data services for science communities. Data science positions within domain repositories include a wide range of responsibilities in support of the full data life cycle - from data preservation and curation to development of data models, ontologies, and user interfaces, to development of data analysis and visualization tools to community education and outreach, and require a substantial degree of discipline-specific knowledge of scientific data acquisition and analysis workflows, data quality measures, and data cultures. Can there be certification programs for domain-specific data scientists that help build the urgently needed workforce for the repositories? The American Geophysical Union has recently started an initiative to develop a program for data science continuing education and data science professional certification for the Earth and space sciences. An Editorial Board has been charged to identify and develop curricula and content for these programs and to provide input and feedback in the implementation of the program. This presentation will report on the progress of this initiative and evaluate its utility for the needs of domain repositories in the Earth and space sciences.

  16. Coal repository. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-11-01

    The Coal Repository Project was initiated in 1980 by the Department of Energy/Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center to provide a centralized system for the collection of well characterized coal samples, and distribution to organizations involved in the chemical beneficiation of coal and related research. TRW Energy Development Group, together with its subcontractor Commercial Testing and Engineering Company, established the Coal Repository at the TRW Capistrano Chemical Facility, which is the location of the DOE-owned Multi-Use Fuel and Energy Processes Test Plant (MEP). Twenty tons each of three coals (Illinois No. 6, Kentucky No. 11 (West), and Pittsburgh No. 8 (from an Ohio mine)) were collected, characterized, and stored under a nitrogen atmosphere. Ten tons of each coal are 3/8-inch x 0, five tons of each are 14-mesh x 0, and five tons of each are 100-mesh x 0. Although TRW was within budget and on schedule, Department of Energy funding priorities in this area were altered such that the project was terminated prior to completion of the original scope of work. 9 figures, 3 tables.

  17. Accelerator Physics Code Web Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, F.; Basset, R.; Bellodi, G.; Benedetto, E.; Dorda, U.; Giovannozzi, M.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Pieloni, T.; Ruggiero, F.; Rumolo, G.; Schmidt, F.; Todesco, E.; Zotter, B.W.; Payet, J.; Bartolini, R.; Farvacque, L.; Sen, T.; Chin, Y.H.; Ohmi, K.; Oide, K.; Furman, M.; /LBL, Berkeley /Oak Ridge /Pohang Accelerator Lab. /SLAC /TRIUMF /Tech-X, Boulder /UC, San Diego /Darmstadt, GSI /Rutherford /Brookhaven

    2006-10-24

    In the framework of the CARE HHH European Network, we have developed a web-based dynamic accelerator-physics code repository. We describe the design, structure and contents of this repository, illustrate its usage, and discuss our future plans, with emphasis on code benchmarking.

  18. ACCELERATION PHYSICS CODE WEB REPOSITORY.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI, J.

    2006-06-26

    In the framework of the CARE HHH European Network, we have developed a web-based dynamic accelerator-physics code repository. We describe the design, structure and contents of this repository, illustrate its usage, and discuss our future plans, with emphasis on code benchmarking.

  19. Salt repository project closeout status report

    SciTech Connect

    1988-06-01

    This report provides an overview of the scope and status of the US Department of Energy (DOE`s) Salt Repository Project (SRP) at the time when the project was terminated by the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987. The report reviews the 10-year program of siting a geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste in rock salt formations. Its purpose is to aid persons interested in the information developed during the course of this effort. Each area is briefly described and the major items of information are noted. This report, the three salt Environmental Assessments, and the Site Characterization Plan are the suggested starting points for any search of the literature and information developed by the program participants. Prior to termination, DOE was preparing to characterize three candidate sites for the first mined geologic repository for the permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The sites were in Nevada, a site in volcanic tuff; Texas, a site in bedded salt (halite); and Washington, a site in basalt. These sites, identified by the screening process described in Chapter 3, were selected from the nine potentially acceptable sites shown on Figure I-1. These sites were identified in accordance with provisions of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. 196 refs., 21 figs., 11 tabs.

  20. Influence analysis of Github repositories.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yan; Zhang, Jun; Bai, Xiaomei; Yu, Shuo; Yang, Zhuo

    2016-01-01

    With the support of cloud computing techniques, social coding platforms have changed the style of software development. Github is now the most popular social coding platform and project hosting service. Software developers of various levels keep entering Github, and use Github to save their public and private software projects. The large amounts of software developers and software repositories on Github are posing new challenges to the world of software engineering. This paper tries to tackle one of the important problems: analyzing the importance and influence of Github repositories. We proposed a HITS based influence analysis on graphs that represent the star relationship between Github users and repositories. A weighted version of HITS is applied to the overall star graph, and generates a different set of top influential repositories other than the results from standard version of HITS algorithm. We also conduct the influential analysis on per-month star graph, and study the monthly influence ranking of top repositories. PMID:27540501

  1. Examining Repository Loading Options to Expand Yucca Mountain Repository Capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jun; Nicholson, Mark; Proctor, W. Cyrus; Yim, Man-Sung; McNelis, David

    2007-07-01

    Siting a high level nuclear waste repository entails high economic, social, and political costs. Given the difficulty in siting the Yucca Mountain repository and the already identified need for additional capacity, the concept of expanding the capacity of the Yucca Mountain repository is of significant interest to the nuclear industry and the Department of Energy (DOE). As the capacity of the repository is limited by the decay heat inventory of the spent nuclear fuel in relation to the thermal design limits, expanding the capacity requires appropriate schemes for decay heat and spent fuel loading management. The current Yucca Mountain repository is based on a single level, fixed drift spacing design for a fixed area or footprint. Studies performed to date investigating the capacity of Yucca Mountain often assume that the loading of spent fuel is uniform throughout the repository and use the concept of a linear loading or areal power density (APD). However, use of linear loading or APD can be problematic with the various cooling times involved. The temperature within the repository at any point in time is controlled by the integral of the heat deposited in the repository. The integral of the decay heat varies as a function of pre-loading cooling periods even for a fixed linear loading. A meaningful repository capacity analysis requires the use of a computer model that describes the time-dependent temperature distributions of the rock from the dissipation of the heat through the repository system. If variations from the current Yucca Mountain repository design were to be considered, expanding the capacity of the repository would be pursued in several ways including: (1) increase the footprint size; (2) implement multiple-levels in the repository for the given footprint; (3) allow the drift distance to vary within thermal limits; and, (4) allow non-uniform loading of wastes into the drifts within thermal limits. Options (1) and (2) have been investigated by other

  2. Review and critique of the US Department of Energy environmental program plan for site characterization for a high-level waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-31

    This report provides a review and critique of the US Department of Energy (DOE) environmental program plan for site characterization activities at Yucca Mountain which principally addresses compliance with federal and state environmental regulation and to a lesser extent monitoring and mitigation of significant adverse impacts and reclamation of disturbed areas. There are 15 documents which comprise the plan and focus on complying with the environmental requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, as amended, (NWPA) and with single-media environmental statutes and their regulations. All elements of the plan follow from the 1986 statutory environmental assessment (EA) required by NWPA which concluded that no significant adverse impacts would result from characterization of the Yucca Mountain site. The lack of appropriate environmental planning and review for site characterization at Yucca Mountain points to the need for an oversight function by the State of Nevada. It cannot be assumed that on its own DOE will properly comply with environmental requirements, especially the substantive requirements that comprise the intent of NEPA. Thus, procedures must be established to assure that the environmental interests of the State are addressed in the course of the Yucca Mountain Project. Accordingly, steps will be taken by the State of Nevada to review the soundness and efficacy of the DOE field surveys, monitoring and mitigation activities, reclamation actions, and ecological impact studies that follow from the DOE environmental program plans addressed by this review.

  3. Applying insights from repository safety assessments.

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, Peter N.

    2010-03-01

    Despite decades of international consensus that deep geological disposal is the best option for permanent management of long-lived high-level radioactive wastes, no repositories for used nuclear fuel or high-level waste are in operation. Detailed long-term safety assessments have been completed worldwide for a wide range of repository designs and disposal concepts, however, and valuable insights from these assessments are available to inform future decisions about managing radioactive wastes. Qualitative comparisons among the existing safety assessments for disposal concepts in clay, granite, salt, and unsaturated volcanic tuff show how different geologic settings can be matched with appropriate engineered barrier systems to provide a high degree of confidence in the long-term safety of geologic disposal. Review of individual assessments provides insights regarding the release pathways and radionuclides that are most likely to contribute to estimated doses to humans in the far future for different disposal concepts, and can help focus research and development programs to improve management and disposal technologies. Lessons learned from existing safety assessments may be particularly relevant for informing decisions during the process of selecting potential repository sites.

  4. Biospecimen repositories and cytopathology.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Savitri

    2015-03-01

    Biospecimen repositories are important for the advancement of biomedical research. Literature on the potential for biobanking of fine-needle aspiration, gynecologic, and nongynecologic cytology specimens is very limited. The potential for biobanking of these specimens as valuable additional resources to surgically excised tissues appears to be excellent. The cervicovaginal specimens that can be used for biobanking include Papanicolaou-stained monolayer preparations and residual material from liquid-based cytology preparations. Different types of specimen preparations of fine-needle aspiration and nongynecologic specimens, including Papanicolaou-stained and Diff-Quik-stained smears, cell blocks. and dedicated passes/residual material from fine-needle aspiration stored frozen in a variety of solutions, can be used for biobanking. Because of several gaps in knowledge regarding the standard of operative procedures for the procurement, storage, and quality assessment of cytology specimens, further studies as well as national conferences and workshops are needed not only to create awareness but also to facilitate the use of cytopathology specimens for biobanking. PMID:25524469

  5. Repository waste-handling operations, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Cottam, A.E.; Connell, L.

    1986-04-01

    The Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program Mission Plan and the Generic Requirements for a Mined Geologic Disposal System state that beginning in 1998, commercial spent fuel not exceeding 70,000 metric tons of heavy metal, or a quantity of solidified high-level radioactive waste resulting from the reprocessing of such a quantity of spent fuel, will be shipped to a deep geologic repository for permanent storage. The development of a waste-handling system that can process 3000 metric tons of heavy metal annually will require the adoption of a fully automated approach. The safety and minimum exposure of personnel will be the prime goals of the repository waste handling system. A man-out-of-the-loop approach will be used in all operations including the receipt of spent fuel in shipping casks, the inspection and unloading of the spent fuel into automated hot-cell facilities, the disassembly of spent fuel assemblies, the consolidation of fuel rods, and the packaging of fuel rods into heavy-walled site-specific containers. These containers are designed to contain the radionuclides for up to 1000 years. The ability of a repository to handle more than 6000 pressurized water reactor spent-fuel rods per day on a production basis for approximately a 23-year period will require that a systems approach be adopted that combines space-age technology, robotics, and sophisticated automated computerized equipment. New advanced inspection techniques, maintenance by robots, and safety will be key factors in the design, construction, and licensing of a repository waste-handling facility for 1998.

  6. Collaborative Learning Utilizing a Domain-Based Shared Data Repository to Enhance Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubliner, David; Widmeyer, George; Deek, Fadi P.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether there was a quantifiable improvement in learning outcomes by integrating course materials in a 4-year baccalaureate program, utilizing a knowledge repository with a conceptual map that spans a discipline. Two new models were developed to provide the framework for this knowledge repository. A…

  7. Repository Technology Program activities, FY 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Yow, J.L. Jr.; Wijesinghe, A.M.; Thorpe, R.K.; Knapp, R.B.

    1989-07-01

    Our technical activities in FY 1988 included instrument selection and evaluation, calculational work, and simulator development. Near the end of the fiscal year, we began preparing several topical reports to document our results. This fiscal year, we continued developing three-dimensional numerical simulators to model coupled hydrologic-and mechanical-rock mass responses and, thus, to provide representative numerical tools for understanding and calculating these in situ processes. We also began scoping calculations in the second half of FY 1988 to evaluate ERE design criteria, but this work was redirected late in the year when the DOE/AECL Subsidiary Agreement was set aside. Our work in developing and evaluating experimental techniques focused on total pressure measurements, moisture content measurement, and tracer detection instrumentation for sealing experiments and for rock-mass-response field tests. At the end of the fiscal year, we completed a review of measurement technology for instrumenting migration/sorption tests to help define the technological requirements in these areas. By the end of FY 1988, we had completed a review of the existing codes for simulating reactive transport; we are using the results of this review to help formulate plans for future activities in this area. The following sections describe the major RTP tasks and activities at LLNL in more detail, and they include our FY 1988 accomplishments in these areas. 8 refs., 22 figs.

  8. Transportation analysis for the concept of regional repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Joy, D.S.; Hudson, B.J.

    1980-06-01

    Over the past several years, planning associated with the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) program assumed the use of one or two large, centrally located repository facilities. Recently, an alternative approach has been proposed which consists of the use of multiple, smaller regional repositories. In this report, several regional concepts were studied and the transportation requirements for the shipment of spent fuel to the regional repositories were estimated. In general, the transportation requirements decrease as the number of repositories increase. However, as far as transportation is concerned, the point of diminishing returns is reached at approximately one repository in each of three to four regions. Additional savings beyond this point are small. A series of sensitivity studies is also included to demonstrate the impact on the total transportation requirements of varying cask capacity, rail speed, or truck speed. Since most of the projected fuel shipments are to be made by rail, varying the capacity of the rail cask or varying average rail transport speed will have a major effect on overall transportation requirements.

  9. NATIONAL GEOSCIENCE DATA REPOSITORY SYSTEM PHASE III: IMPLEMENTATION AND OPERATION OF THE REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus Milling

    2000-12-01

    In the past six months the NGDRS program has seen a new spike in activity, particularly in October 2000. This new spike in activity is the result of increased activities in the petroleum sector, including new funding to examine infrastructure issues facing many of the companies over the long-term. With industry conditions continuing to rapidly change and evolve, the primary core and cuttings preservation strategy has evolved as well. With the severe lack of available public data repository space and the establishment of a major national geoscience data repository facility unlikely in the near future, the focus is on increasing public awareness and access to nonproprietary company data holdings that remain in the public and private sector. Efforts still continue to identify and facilitate the entry of new repository space into the public sector. Additionally, AGI has been working with the National Academy of Sciences Board on Earth Sciences and Resources staff to initiate a study and workshop to develop a policy recommendation on geoscience data preservation and prioritization of efforts. Additional data transfer efforts were undertaken during the second half of FY00. Altura's Permian Basin core was contributed to the Texas BEG's facility in Midland. Transcription and evaluation of selected seismic data from the Santa Barbara Channel previously owned by Phillips was completed. Additionally, Chevron has released over 180,000 boxes of cores to the public through the NGDRS metadata catalog.

  10. National Date Palm Germplasm Repository

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The National Clonal Germplasm Repository for Citrus & Dates (NCGRCD), located in Riverside, California USA, is a project of the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). The NCGRCD maintains a collection of germplasm of date palm (Phoneix dactylifera ...

  11. Faulty assumptions for repository requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Sutcliffe, W G

    1999-06-03

    Long term performance requirements for a geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste are based on assumptions concerning water use and subsequent deaths from cancer due to ingesting water contaminated with radio isotopes ten thousand years in the future. This paper argues that the assumptions underlying these requirements are faulty for a number of reasons. First, in light of the inevitable technological progress, including efficient desalination of water, over the next ten thousand years, it is inconceivable that a future society would drill for water near a repository. Second, even today we would not use water without testing its purity. Third, today many types of cancer are curable, and with the rapid progress in medical technology in general, and the prevention and treatment of cancer in particular, it is improbable that cancer caused by ingesting contaminated water will be a sign&ant killer in the far future. This paper reviews the performance requirements for geological repositories and comments on the difficulties in proving compliance in the face of inherent uncertainties. The already tiny long-term risk posed by a geologic repository is presented and contrasted with contemporary every day risks. A number of examples of technological progress, including cancer treatments, are advanced. The real and significant costs resulting from the overly conservative requirements are then assessed. Examples are given of how money (and political capital) could be put to much better use to save lives today and in the future. It is concluded that although a repository represents essentially no long-term risk, monitored retrievable dry storage (above or below ground) is the current best alternative for spent fuel and high-level nuclear waste.

  12. A Framework for Integrating Oceanographic Data Repositories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozell, E.; Maffei, A. R.; Beaulieu, S. E.; Fox, P. A.

    2010-12-01

    Oceanographic research covers a broad range of science domains and requires a tremendous amount of cross-disciplinary collaboration. Advances in cyberinfrastructure are making it easier to share data across disciplines through the use of web services and community vocabularies. Best practices in the design of web services and vocabularies to support interoperability amongst science data repositories are only starting to emerge. Strategic design decisions in these areas are crucial to the creation of end-user data and application integration tools. We present S2S, a novel framework for deploying customizable user interfaces to support the search and analysis of data from multiple repositories. Our research methods follow the Semantic Web methodology and technology development process developed by Fox et al. This methodology stresses the importance of close scientist-technologist interactions when developing scientific use cases, keeping the project well scoped and ensuring the result meets a real scientific need. The S2S framework motivates the development of standardized web services with well-described parameters, as well as the integration of existing web services and applications in the search and analysis of data. S2S also encourages the use and development of community vocabularies and ontologies to support federated search and reduce the amount of domain expertise required in the data discovery process. S2S utilizes the Web Ontology Language (OWL) to describe the components of the framework, including web service parameters, and OpenSearch as a standard description for web services, particularly search services for oceanographic data repositories. We have created search services for an oceanographic metadata database, a large set of quality-controlled ocean profile measurements, and a biogeographic search service. S2S provides an application programming interface (API) that can be used to generate custom user interfaces, supporting data and application

  13. Environmental effects on corrosion in the Tuff repository

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.A.; Thompson, N.G.

    1990-02-01

    Cortest Columbus is investigating the long-term performance of container materials used for high-level waste packages as part of the information needed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to assess the Department of Energy`s application to construct a geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. The scope of work consists of employing short-term techniques, to examine a wide range of possible failure modes. Long-term tests are being used to verify and further examine specific failure modes identified as important by the short-term studies. The original focus of the program was on the salt repository but the emphasis was shifted to the Tuff repository. This report summarizes the results of a literature survey performed under Task 1 of the program. The survey focuses on the influence of environmental variables on the corrosion behavior of candidate container materials for the Tuff repository. Environmental variables considered include: radiation, thermal and microbial effects. 80 refs., 44 figs., 44 tabs.

  14. An evaluation of near-field host rock temperatures for a spent fuel repository

    SciTech Connect

    Altenhofen, M.K.; Lowery, P.S.

    1988-11-01

    A repository heat transfer analysis has been performed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy's Performance Assessment Scientific Support Program. The objective of this study was to evaluate the near-field thermal environmental conditions for a spent fuel repository system. A spent fuel logistics analysis was performed using a waste management system simulation model, WASTES-II, to evaluate the thermal characteristics of spent fuel received at the repository. A repository-scale thermal analysis was performed using a finite difference heat transfer code, TEMPEST, to evaluate the near-field host rock temperature. The calculated temporal and spatial distributions of near-field host rock temperatures provide input to the repository source term model in evaluations of engineered barrier system performance. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Object links in the repository

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Jon; Eichmann, David

    1991-01-01

    Some of the architectural ramifications of extending the Eichmann/Atkins lattice-based classification scheme to encompass the assets of the full life-cycle of software development are explored. In particular, we wish to consider a model which provides explicit links between objects in addition to the edges connecting classification vertices in the standard lattice. The model we consider uses object-oriented terminology. Thus, the lattice is viewed as a data structure which contains class objects which exhibit inheritance. A description of the types of objects in the repository is presented, followed by a discussion of how they interrelate. We discuss features of the object-oriented model which support these objects and their links, and consider behavior which an implementation of the model should exhibit. Finally, we indicate some thoughts on implementing a prototype of this repository architecture.

  16. Implementation of the Brazilian National Repository - RBMN Project - 13008

    SciTech Connect

    Cassia Oliveira de Tello, Cledola

    2013-07-01

    Ionizing radiation in Brazil is used in electricity generation, medicine, industry, agriculture and for research and development purposes. All these activities can generate radioactive waste. At this point, in Brazil, the use of nuclear energy and radioisotopes justifies the construction of a national repository for radioactive wastes of low and intermediate-level. According to Federal Law No. 10308, Brazilian National Commission for Nuclear Energy (CNEN) is responsible for designing and constructing the intermediate and final storages for radioactive wastes. Additionally, a restriction on the construction of Angra 3 is that the repository is under construction until its operation start, attaining some requirements of the Brazilian Environmental Regulator (IBAMA). Besides this NPP, in the National Energy Program is previewed the installation of four more plants, by 2030. In November 2008, CNEN launched the Project RBMN (Repository for Low and Intermediate-Level Radioactive Wastes), which aims at the implantation of a National Repository for disposal of low and intermediate-level of radiation wastes. This Project has some aspects that are unique in the Brazilian context, especially referring to the time between its construction and the end of its institutional period. This time is about 360 years, when the area will be released for unrestricted uses. It means that the Repository must be safe and secure for more than three hundred years, which is longer than half of the whole of Brazilian history. This aspect is very new for the Brazilian people, bringing a new dimension to public acceptance. Another point is this will be the first repository in South America, bringing a real challenge for the continent. The current status of the Project is summarized. (authors)

  17. US nuclear repository in jeopardy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwynne, Peter

    2009-04-01

    Physicists have expressed uneasiness about the future of nuclear-waste storage in the US after President Barack Obama's administration proposed slashing funds for a long-planned repository at Yucca Mountain in Nevada. If approved by Congress, the cuts seem likely to spell the death knell of the project, which has been in the works since 1987 and has so far cost the government 9.5bn.

  18. Thermomechanical response of WIPP repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, D.E.; Wahi, K.K.; Dial, B.

    1980-05-01

    Coarsely zoned STEALTH 2D calculations were used to investigate two candidate WIPP repositories. The grid was designed for one hundred thousand years of response with modest computing costs. As a result, the early time mechanical response was compromised by non-real oscillations that could not be damped completely before a few thousand years. In spite of these oscillations, it was possible to see that the dominant effects of stress and strain peaked between one and two thousand years, at the time of maximum heat in the site. This time corresponded to the condition that the surface heat loss rate balanced the heat generation rate. Though the creep strains were quite small, a large volume of salt was involved and the effects were significant. The peak surface uplift of 75HLW was increased by about 25% due to creep. However, the deviatoric stress relaxation due to creep produced large changes in the stress fields. The Rustler layer survived reasonable failure criterion for the 75HLW case with creep, and failed both in tension and shear, according to these same criterion, when the calculation was repeated without creep. The deviatoric stress fields, with and without salt creep, concentrated near the repository as expected and also in the Rustler layer due to its relatively high Young's modulus compared to the neighboring layers. Since the time of interest is so much smaller than the 100,000 years this calculation was designed to examine, it is possible to model the WIPP stratigraphy in much more detail and still be able to calculate the response for the time of interest. A finer zoned calculation of the response of the WIPP stratigraphy to a repository similar to the 75 K watt/acre repository is modeled in this report. In this calculation the Rustler formation is modeled as a five layered formation using material properties derived from data taken at the Nome site.

  19. The Fermilab lattice information repository

    SciTech Connect

    Ostiguy, J.-F.; Michelotti, L.; McCusker-Whiting, M.; Kriss, M.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    Over the years, it has become increasingly obvious that a centralized lattice and machine information repository with the capability of keeping track of revision information could be of great value. This is especially true in the context of a large accelerator laboratory like Fermilab with six rings and sixteen beamlines operating in various modes and configurations, constantly subject to modifications, improvements and even major redesign. While there exist a handful of potentially suitable revision systems--both freely available and commercial--our experience has shown that expecting beam physicists to become fully conversant with complex revision system software used on an occasional basis is neither realistic nor practical. In this paper, we discuss technical aspects of the FNAL lattice repository, whose fully web-based interface hides the complexity of Subversion, a comprehensive open source revision system. The FNAL repository has been operational since September 2004; the unique architecture of ''Subversion'' has been a key ingredient of the technical success of its implementation.

  20. Rock mechanics for hard rock nuclear waste repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Heuze, F.E.

    1981-09-01

    The mined geologic burial of high level nuclear waste is now the favored option for disposal. The US National Waste Terminal Storage Program designed to achieve this disposal includes an extensive rock mechanics component related to the design of the wastes repositories. The plan currently considers five candidate rock types. This paper deals with the three hard rocks among them: basalt, granite, and tuff. Their behavior is governed by geological discontinuities. Salt and shale, which exhibit behavior closer to that of a continuum, are not considered here. This paper discusses both the generic rock mechanics R and D, which are required for repository design, as well as examples of projects related to hard rock waste storage. The examples include programs in basalt (Hanford/Washington), in granitic rocks (Climax/Nevada Test Site, Idaho Springs/Colorado, Pinawa/Canada, Oracle/Arizona, and Stripa/Sweden), and in tuff (Nevada Test Site).

  1. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Biological Specimen Repository

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMonigal, Kathleen A.; Pietrzyk, Robert a.; Johnson, Mary Anne

    2008-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Biological Specimen Repository (Repository) is a storage bank that is used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. Samples from the International Space Station (ISS), including blood and urine, will be collected, processed and archived during the preflight, inflight and postflight phases of ISS missions. This investigation has been developed to archive biosamples for use as a resource for future space flight related research. The International Space Station (ISS) provides a platform to investigate the effects of microgravity on human physiology prior to lunar and exploration class missions. The storage of crewmember samples from many different ISS flights in a single repository will be a valuable resource with which researchers can study space flight related changes and investigate physiological markers. The development of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Biological Specimen Repository will allow for the collection, processing, storage, maintenance, and ethical distribution of biosamples to meet goals of scientific and programmatic relevance to the space program. Archiving of the biosamples will provide future research opportunities including investigating patterns of physiological changes, analysis of components unknown at this time or analyses performed by new methodologies.

  2. Perspectives on cryopreservation, quality control, and artificial insemination of frozen-thawed boar sperm in a national repository

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The National Animal Germplasm Program (NAGP) is a repository for agricultural germplasm (sperm, eggs, embryos, blood, tissue, DNA) that has been collected, cryopreserved, and cataloged for the purpose of creating a living compilation of genetic resources. The repository is multipurpose and can be u...

  3. Decidedly different: Expert and public views of risks from a radioactive waste repository

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, J.; Slovic, P.; Mertz, C.K. )

    1993-12-01

    A questionnaire with items that had been used in a national survey of the general public was administered to persons attending an American Nuclear Society meeting. The items asked about risks associated with high-level nuclear waste (HLNW), trust in nuclear-waste program managers, costs and benefits of a repository project, and images of a HLNW repository. The results suggest that nuclear industry experts may have very different opinions from the general public about most of these items and their images of a repository indicate a vastly different conceptual framework within which their opinions are formed. 8 refs., 4 tabs.

  4. Knowledge repositories for multiple uses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, Keith; Riddle, Patricia

    1991-01-01

    In the life cycle of a complex physical device or part, for example, the docking bay door of the Space Station, there are many uses for knowledge about the device or part. The same piece of knowledge might serve several uses. Given the quantity and complexity of the knowledge that must be stored, it is critical to maintain the knowledge in one repository, in one form. At the same time, because of quantity and complexity of knowledge that must be used in life cycle applications such as cost estimation, re-design, and diagnosis, it is critical to automate such knowledge uses. For each specific use, a knowledge base must be available and must be in a from that promotes the efficient performance of that knowledge base. However, without a single source knowledge repository, the cost of maintaining consistent knowledge between multiple knowledge bases increases dramatically; as facts and descriptions change, they must be updated in each individual knowledge base. A use-neutral representation of a hydraulic system for the F-111 aircraft was developed. The ability to derive portions of four different knowledge bases is demonstrated from this use-neutral representation: one knowledge base is for re-design of the device using a model-based reasoning problem solver; two knowledge bases, at different levels of abstraction, are for diagnosis using a model-based reasoning solver; and one knowledge base is for diagnosis using an associational reasoning problem solver. It was shown how updates issued against the single source use-neutral knowledge repository can be propagated to the underlying knowledge bases.

  5. NATIONAL GEOSCIENCE DATA REPOSITORY SYSTEM PHASE III: IMPLEMENTATION AND OPERATION OF THE REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus Milling

    2000-04-01

    In the past six months the NGDRS program has continued to engaged new contacts, identify additional data transfer targets, and improve the metadata catalog for both easier use and long-term maintainability. With industry conditions continuing to rapidly change and evolve, the primary core and cuttings preservation strategy has evolved as well. With the severe lack of available public data repository space and the establishment of a major national geoscience data repository facility unlikely in the near future, the focus is on increasing public awareness and access to nonproprietary company data holdings that remain in the public and private sector. Efforts still continue to identify and facilitate the entry of new repository space into the public sector. Additionally, AGI has been working with the National Academy of Sciences Board on Earth Sciences and Resources staff to initiate a study and workshop to develop a policy recommendation on geoscience data preservation and prioritization of efforts. Additional data transfer efforts were undertaken during the first half of FY00. AGI is working with the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology to assist in the transfer of Altura's midland core holdings to the University of Texas. Phillips has made selected seismic data from the Santa Barbara Channel available for transfer. A pilot test has been initiated to determine the cost and potential success rate at transcription of the original tapes. Additionally, redesign of the GeoTrek metadata catalog was initiated, including both a redesign of the user interface as well as making GeoTrek fully a broker, accessing multiple databases at remote locations in real time.

  6. Replication and reconfiguration in a distributed mail repository

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Mark S.

    1987-04-01

    Conventional approaches to programming produce centralized programs that run on a single computer. However, an unconventional approach can take advantage of low-cost communication and small, inexpensive computers. A distributed program provides service through programs executing at several nodes of a distributed system. Distributed programs can offer two important advantages over centralized programs: high availability and scalability. In a highly-available system, it is very likely that a randomly-chosen transaction will complete successfully. A scalable system's capacity can be increased or decreased to match changes in the demands placed on the system. When a node is unavailable because of maintenance or a crash, transactions may fail unless copies of the node's information are stored at other nodes. Thus, high availability requires replication of data. This thesis considers the problem of building scalable and highly-available distributed programs without using special processors with redundant hardware and software. It describes a design and implementation of an example distributed program, an electronic mail repository. The thesis focuses on how to design and implement replication and reconfiguration for the distributed mail repository.

  7. The Open Data Repositorys Data Publisher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, N.; Lafuente, B.; Downs, R. T.; Blake, D.; Bristow, T.; Fonda, M.; Pires, A.

    2015-01-01

    Data management and data publication are becoming increasingly important components of researcher's workflows. The complexity of managing data, publishing data online, and archiving data has not decreased significantly even as computing access and power has greatly increased. The Open Data Repository's Data Publisher software strives to make data archiving, management, and publication a standard part of a researcher's workflow using simple, web-based tools and commodity server hardware. The publication engine allows for uploading, searching, and display of data with graphing capabilities and downloadable files. Access is controlled through a robust permissions system that can control publication at the field level and can be granted to the general public or protected so that only registered users at various permission levels receive access. Data Publisher also allows researchers to subscribe to meta-data standards through a plugin system, embargo data publication at their discretion, and collaborate with other researchers through various levels of data sharing. As the software matures, semantic data standards will be implemented to facilitate machine reading of data and each database will provide a REST application programming interface for programmatic access. Additionally, a citation system will allow snapshots of any data set to be archived and cited for publication while the data itself can remain living and continuously evolve beyond the snapshot date. The software runs on a traditional LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP) server and is available on GitHub (http://github.com/opendatarepository) under a GPLv2 open source license. The goal of the Open Data Repository is to lower the cost and training barrier to entry so that any researcher can easily publish their data and ensure it is archived for posterity.

  8. The Open Data Repository's Data Publisher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, N.; Lafuente, B.; Downs, R. T.; Bristow, T.; Blake, D. F.; Fonda, M.; Pires, A.

    2015-12-01

    Data management and data publication are becoming increasingly important components of research workflows. The complexity of managing data, publishing data online, and archiving data has not decreased significantly even as computing access and power has greatly increased. The Open Data Repository's Data Publisher software (http://www.opendatarepository.org) strives to make data archiving, management, and publication a standard part of a researcher's workflow using simple, web-based tools and commodity server hardware. The publication engine allows for uploading, searching, and display of data with graphing capabilities and downloadable files. Access is controlled through a robust permissions system that can control publication at the field level and can be granted to the general public or protected so that only registered users at various permission levels receive access. Data Publisher also allows researchers to subscribe to meta-data standards through a plugin system, embargo data publication at their discretion, and collaborate with other researchers through various levels of data sharing. As the software matures, semantic data standards will be implemented to facilitate machine reading of data and each database will provide a REST application programming interface for programmatic access. Additionally, a citation system will allow snapshots of any data set to be archived and cited for publication while the data itself can remain living and continuously evolve beyond the snapshot date. The software runs on a traditional LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP) server and is available on GitHub (http://github.com/opendatarepository) under a GPLv2 open source license. The goal of the Open Data Repository is to lower the cost and training barrier to entry so that any researcher can easily publish their data and ensure it is archived for posterity. We gratefully acknowledge the support for this study by the Science-Enabling Research Activity (SERA), and NASA NNX11AP82A

  9. Development of reference conditions for geologic repositories for nuclear waste in the USA

    SciTech Connect

    Raines, G.E.; Rickertsen, L.D.; Claiborne, H.C.; McElroy, J.L.; Lynch, R.W.

    1980-10-01

    Activities to determine interim reference conditions for temperatures, pressure, fluid, chemical, and radiation environments that are expected to exist in commercial and defense high-level nuclear waste and spent fuel repositories in salt, basalt, tuff, granite, and shale are summarized. These interim conditions are being generated by the Reference Repository Conditions Interface Working Groups (RRC-IWG), an ad hoc IWG established by the National Waste Terminal Storage Program's (NWTS) Isolation Interface Control Board (I-ICB).

  10. Nevada potential repository preliminary transportation strategy Study 2. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to build on the findings of the Nevada Potential Repository Preliminary Transportation Strategy Study 1 (CRWMS M&O 1995b), and to provide additional information for input to the repository environmental impact statement (EIS) process. In addition, this study supported the future selection of a preferred rail corridor and/or heavy haul route based on defensible data, methods, and analyses. Study research did not consider proposed legislation. Planning was conducted according to the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program Plan (DOE 1994a). The specific objectives of Study 2 were to: eliminate or reduce data gaps, inconsistencies, and uncertainties, and strengthen the analysis performed in Study 1; develop a preliminary list of rail route evaluation criteria that could be used to solicit input from stakeholders during scoping meetings. The evaluation criteria will be revised based on comments received during scoping; restrict and refine the width of the four rail corridors identified in Study 1 to five miles or less, based on land use constraints and engineering criteria identified and established in Study 2; evaluate national-level effects of routing spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste to the four identified branch lines, including the effects of routing through or avoiding Las Vegas; continue to gather published land use information and environmental data to support the repository EIS; continue to evaluate heavy haul truck transport over three existing routes as an alternative to rail and provide sufficient information to support the repository EIS process; and evaluate secondary uses for rail (passenger use, repository construction, shared use).

  11. US/German Collaboration in Salt Repository Research, Design and Operation - 13243

    SciTech Connect

    Steininger, Walter; Hansen, Frank; Biurrun, Enrique; Bollingerfehr, Wilhelm

    2013-07-01

    Recent developments in the US and Germany [1-3] have precipitated renewed efforts in salt repository investigations and related studies. Both the German rock salt repository activities and the US waste management programs currently face challenges that may adversely affect their respective current and future state-of-the-art core capabilities in rock salt repository science and technology. The research agenda being pursued by our respective countries leverages collective efforts for the benefit of both programs. The topics addressed by the US/German salt repository collaborations align well with the findings and recommendations summarized in the January 2012 US Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future (BRC) report [4] and are consistent with the aspirations of the key topics of the Strategic Research Agenda of the Implementing Geological Disposal of Radioactive Waste Technology Platform (IGD-TP) [5]. Against this background, a revival of joint efforts in salt repository investigations after some years of hibernation has been undertaken to leverage collective efforts in salt repository research, design, operations, and related issues for the benefit of respective programs and to form a basis for providing an attractive, cost-effective insurance against the premature loss of virtually irreplaceable scientific expertise and institutional memory. (authors)

  12. REPOSITORY SURFACE FACILITIES PRIMARY SYSTEM CRANE DATA

    SciTech Connect

    K. Schwartztrauber

    2005-03-14

    The purpose of this calculation is to compile crane design data for the mechanical primary structures, systems, and components (SSCs) required for the repository Waste Handling Building (WHB) and Carrier Preparation Building (CPB). The work presented in this document has been prepared in accordance with Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management approved program document AP-3.12Q, Calculations. This calculation has been developed to supplement information previously prepared using the development plan for ''WHB/WTB Space Program Analysis for Site Recommendation'' (Reference 5), which concentrates on the primary, primary support, facility support, and miscellaneous building support areas located in the WHB and Waste Treatment Building (WTB). The development plan was completed in accordance with AP-2.13Q, ''Technical Product Development Planning''. The work in this calculation is a continuance of the work described in the previous development plan; therefore, in accordance with AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities'', a new Technical Work Plan is not required.

  13. Anticipated Degradation Modes of Metallic Engineered Barriers for High-Level Nuclear Waste Repositories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Martín A.

    2014-03-01

    Metallic engineered barriers must provide a period of absolute containment to high-level radioactive waste in geological repositories. Candidate materials include copper alloys, carbon steels, stainless steels, nickel alloys, and titanium alloys. The national programs of nuclear waste management have to identify and assess the anticipated degradation modes of the selected materials in the corresponding repository environment, which evolves in time. Commonly assessed degradation modes include general corrosion, localized corrosion, stress-corrosion cracking, hydrogen-assisted cracking, and microbiologically influenced corrosion. Laboratory testing and modeling in metallurgical and environmental conditions of similar and higher aggressiveness than those expected in service conditions are used to evaluate the corrosion resistance of the materials. This review focuses on the anticipated degradation modes of the selected or reference materials as corrosion-resistant barriers in nuclear repositories. These degradation modes depend not only on the selected alloy but also on the near-field environment. The evolution of the near-field environment varies for saturated and unsaturated repositories considering backfilled and unbackfilled conditions. In saturated repositories, localized corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking may occur in the initial aerobic stage, while general corrosion and hydrogen-assisted cracking are the main degradation modes in the anaerobic stage. Unsaturated repositories would provide an oxidizing environment during the entire repository lifetime. Microbiologically influenced corrosion may be avoided or minimized by selecting an appropriate backfill material. Radiation effects are negligible provided that a thick-walled container or an inner shielding container is used.

  14. Reference repository design concept for bedded salt

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, D.W.; Martin, R.W.

    1980-10-08

    A reference design concept is presented for the subsurface portions of a nuclear waste repository in bedded salt. General geologic, geotechnical, hydrologic and geochemical data as well as descriptions of the physical systems are provided for use on generic analyses of the pre- and post-sealing performance of repositories in this geologic medium. The geology of bedded salt deposits and the regional and repository horizon stratigraphy are discussed. Structural features of salt beds including discontinuities and dissolution features are presented and their effect on repository performance is discussed. Seismic hazards and the potential effects of earthquakes on underground repositories are presented. The effect on structural stability and worker safety during construction from hydrocarbon and inorganic gases is described. Geohydrologic considerations including regional hydrology, repository scale hydrology and several hydrological failure modes are presented in detail as well as the hydrological considerations that effect repository design. Operational phase performance is discussed with respect to operations, ventilation system, shaft conveyances, waste handling and retrieval systems and receival rates of nuclear waste. Performance analysis of the post sealing period of a nuclear repository is discussed, and parameters to be used in such an analysis are presented along with regulatory constraints. Some judgements are made regarding hydrologic failure scenarios. Finally, the design and licensing process, consistent with the current licensing procedure is described in a format that can be easily understood.

  15. Cost-Driven Design for Archival Repositories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crespo, Arturo; Garcia-Molina, Hector

    Digital information can be lost for a variety of reasons, including magnetic decay, format and device obsolescence, human or system error, among many others. A solution is to build an archival repository, a system capable of storing and preserving digital objects as technologies and organizations evolve. Designing an archival repository is a…

  16. Types of Online Hierarchical Repository Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershkovitz, Arnon; Azran, Ronit; Hardof-Jaffe, Sharon; Nachmias, Rafi

    2011-01-01

    This study presents an empirical investigation of online hierarchical repositories of items presented to university students in Web-supported course websites, using Web mining methods. To this end, data from 1747 courses were collected, and the use of online repositories of content items in these courses was examined. At a later stage, courses…

  17. The Surprising Impact of Digital Repositories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huwe, Terence K.

    2008-01-01

    Digital repository is one sector of digital content creation that receives less mainstream attention. Unlike blogs with accretions of documents and commentary or websites with masses of ephemeral pages that come and go, digital repositories have a more plodding pace of development. They conform to demanding standards for metadata and information…

  18. Asset Reuse of Images from a Repository

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Deirdre

    2014-01-01

    According to Markus's theory of reuse, when digital repositories are deployed to collect and distribute organizational assets, they supposedly help ensure accountability, extend information exchange, and improve productivity. Such repositories require a large investment due to the continuing costs of hardware, software, user licenses, training,…

  19. Characteristics of potential repository wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Cowart, C.G.; Notz, K.J.

    1992-10-01

    This report presents the results of a fully documented peer review of DOE/RW-0184, Rev. 1, Characteristics of Potential Repository Wastes''. The peer review was chaired and administered by oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) and was conducted in accordance with OCRWM QA procedure QAAP 3.3 Peer Review'' for the purpose of quailing the document for use in OCRWM quality-affecting work. The peer reviewers selected represent a wide range of experience and knowledge particularly suitable for evaluating the subject matter. A total of 596 formal comments were documented by the seven peer review panels, and all were successfully resolved. The peers reached the conclusion that DOE/RW-0184, Rev. 1, is quality determined and suitable for use in quality-affecting work.

  20. THE PROPOSED YUCCA MOUNTAIN REPOSITORY FROM A CORROSION PERSPECTIVE

    SciTech Connect

    J.H. Payer

    2005-07-29

    In this paper, the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository is viewed from a corrosion perspective. A major component of the long-term strategy for safe disposal of nuclear waste at the Yucca Mountain Repository is first to completely isolate the radionuclides in the waste packages for long times and to greatly retard the egress and transport of radionuclides from penetrated packages. Therefore, long-lived waste packages are important. The corrosion resistance of the waste package outer canister is reviewed, and a framework for the analysis of localized corrosion processes is presented. An overview is presented of the Materials Performance targeted thrust of the U.S. Department of Energy/Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's Office of Science and Technology and International. The thrust program strives for increased scientific understanding, enhanced process models and advanced technologies for corrosion control.

  1. Architecture and Workflow of Medical Knowledge Repository

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hyunsook; Kim, Jeong Ah; Cho, Insook

    Recently, clinical field builds various forms of computerized medical knowledge and tries to use it efficiently. In general, to build and reuse knowledge easily, it is needed to build a knowledge repository. Especially, the credibility of knowledge is important in clinical domain. This paper proposes methods for supporting it. To perform it systematically, we propose the method of the knowledge management processes. The methods for knowledge management can serve equal quality, usability and credibility of knowledge. Knowledge management methods consist of 2 methods. They are the knowledge management processes and the specification of the management targets. And this paper proposes the requirement of a knowledge repository and the architecture of the knowledge repository.

  2. An Optimal Centralized Carbon Dioxide Repository for Florida, USA

    PubMed Central

    Poiencot, Brandon; Brown, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    For over a decade, the United States Department of Energy, and engineers, geologists, and scientists from all over the world have investigated the potential for reducing atmospheric carbon emissions through carbon sequestration. Numerous reports exist analyzing the potential for sequestering carbon dioxide at various sites around the globe, but none have identified the potential for a statewide system in Florida, USA. In 2005, 83% of Florida’s electrical energy was produced by natural gas, coal, or oil (e.g., fossil fuels), from power plants spread across the state. In addition, only limited research has been completed on evaluating optimal pipeline transportation networks to centralized carbon dioxide repositories. This paper describes the feasibility and preliminary locations for an optimal centralized Florida-wide carbon sequestration repository. Linear programming optimization modeling is used to plan and route an idealized pipeline network to existing Florida power plants. Further analysis of the subsurface geology in these general locations will provide insight into the suitability of the subsurface conditions and the available capacity for carbon sequestration at selected possible repository sites. The identification of the most favorable site(s) is also presented. PMID:21695024

  3. The Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository From A Corrosion Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    J.H. Payer

    2005-04-12

    Corrosion is a primary determinant of waste package performance at the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository and will control the delay time for radionuclide transport from the waste package. Corrosion is the most probable and most likely degradation process that will determine when packages will be penetrated and the shape, size, and distribution of those penetrations. The general issues in corrosion science, materials science and electrochemistry are well defined, and the knowledge base is substantial for understanding corrosion processes. In this paper, the Yucca Mountain Repository is viewed from a corrosion perspective. A major component of the long-term strategy for safe disposal of nuclear waste at the Yucca Mountain Repository is first to completely isolate the radionuclides in the waste packages for long times and to greatly retard the egress and transport of radionuclides from penetrated packages. Therefore, long-lived waste packages are important. The corrosion resistance of the waste package outer canister is reviewed, and a framework for the analysis of localized corrosion processes is presented. An overview is presented of the Materials Performance targeted thrust of the U.S. Department of Energy/Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's Office of Science and Technology and International. The thrust program strives for increased scientific understanding, enhanced process models and advanced technologies for corrosion control.

  4. Building the repositories to serve

    SciTech Connect

    Lersch, D.

    1993-04-01

    The project to design and build the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Laboratory also includes the exciting opportunity to implement client/server information systems. Lab technologists were eager to take advantage of the cost savings inherent in the open systems and a distributed, client server environment and, at the same time, conscious of the need to provide secure repositories for sensitive data as well as a schedule sensitive acquisition strategy for mission critical software. During the first year of project activity, micro-based project management and business support systems were acquired and implemented to support a small study project of less than 400 people allocating contracts of less than $1 million. The transition to modern business systems capable of supporting more than 10,000 participants (world wide) who would be researching and developing the new technologies that would support the world`s largest scientific instrument, a 42 Tevatron, superconducting, super collider became a mission critical event. This paper will present the SSC Laboratory`s strategy to balance our commitment to open systems, structured query language (SQL) standards and our success with acquiring commercial off the shelf software (COTS) to support our immediate goals. Included will be an outline of the vital roles played by other labs (Livermore, CERN, Brookhaven, Fermi and others) and a discussion of future collaboration potentials to leverage the information activities of all Department of Energy (DOE) funded labs.

  5. Building the repositories to serve

    SciTech Connect

    Lersch, D.

    1993-04-01

    The project to design and build the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Laboratory also includes the exciting opportunity to implement client/server information systems. Lab technologists were eager to take advantage of the cost savings inherent in the open systems and a distributed, client server environment and, at the same time, conscious of the need to provide secure repositories for sensitive data as well as a schedule sensitive acquisition strategy for mission critical software. During the first year of project activity, micro-based project management and business support systems were acquired and implemented to support a small study project of less than 400 people allocating contracts of less than $1 million. The transition to modern business systems capable of supporting more than 10,000 participants (world wide) who would be researching and developing the new technologies that would support the world's largest scientific instrument, a 42 Tevatron, superconducting, super collider became a mission critical event. This paper will present the SSC Laboratory's strategy to balance our commitment to open systems, structured query language (SQL) standards and our success with acquiring commercial off the shelf software (COTS) to support our immediate goals. Included will be an outline of the vital roles played by other labs (Livermore, CERN, Brookhaven, Fermi and others) and a discussion of future collaboration potentials to leverage the information activities of all Department of Energy (DOE) funded labs.

  6. Will salt repositories be dry?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredehoeft, John D.

    The National Academy of Science committee that considered geologic disposal of nuclear waste in the mid-1950s recommended salt as a repository medium, partly because of its high thermal conductivity and because it was believed to be “dry” (perhaps the appropriate thought is “impermeable”). Certainly, the fact that Paleozoic salt deposits exist in many parts of t h e world is evidence for very low rates of dissolution by moving groundwater. The fact that the dissolution rates were so small led many scientists to the conclusion that the salt beds were nearly impermeable. The major source of brine within the salt beds was thought to be fluid inclusions within salt crystals, which could migrate through differential solution toward a source of high heat. The idea that salt was uniformly “dry” was revised when exploratory drilling in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico encountered brines within the Castile Formation, an evaporite deposit below the Salado Formation. The brine reservoirs were thought to be isolated pockets of brine in an otherwise “impermeable” salt section.

  7. OWLing Clinical Data Repositories With the Ontology Web Language

    PubMed Central

    Pastor, Xavier; Lozano, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Background The health sciences are based upon information. Clinical information is usually stored and managed by physicians with precarious tools, such as spreadsheets. The biomedical domain is more complex than other domains that have adopted information and communication technologies as pervasive business tools. Moreover, medicine continuously changes its corpus of knowledge because of new discoveries and the rearrangements in the relationships among concepts. This scenario makes it especially difficult to offer good tools to answer the professional needs of researchers and constitutes a barrier that needs innovation to discover useful solutions. Objective The objective was to design and implement a framework for the development of clinical data repositories, capable of facing the continuous change in the biomedicine domain and minimizing the technical knowledge required from final users. Methods We combined knowledge management tools and methodologies with relational technology. We present an ontology-based approach that is flexible and efficient for dealing with complexity and change, integrated with a solid relational storage and a Web graphical user interface. Results Onto Clinical Research Forms (OntoCRF) is a framework for the definition, modeling, and instantiation of data repositories. It does not need any database design or programming. All required information to define a new project is explicitly stated in ontologies. Moreover, the user interface is built automatically on the fly as Web pages, whereas data are stored in a generic repository. This allows for immediate deployment and population of the database as well as instant online availability of any modification. Conclusions OntoCRF is a complete framework to build data repositories with a solid relational storage. Driven by ontologies, OntoCRF is more flexible and efficient to deal with complexity and change than traditional systems and does not require very skilled technical people facilitating

  8. The Geant4 Physics Validation Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzel, H.; Yarba, J.; Dotti, A.

    2015-12-23

    The Geant4 collaboration regularly performs validation and regression tests. The results are stored in a central repository and can be easily accessed via a web application. In this article we describe the Geant4 physics validation repository which consists of a relational database storing experimental data and Geant4 test results, a java API and a web application. The functionality of these components and the technology choices we made are also described

  9. The Geant4 physics validation repository

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wenzel, H.; Yarba, J.; Dotti, A.

    2015-01-01

    The Geant4 collaboration regularly performs validation and regression tests. The results are stored in a central repository and can be easily accessed via a web application. In this article we describe the Geant4 physics validation repository which consists of a relational database storing experimental data and Geant4 test results, a java API and a web application. Lastly, the functionality of these components and the technology choices we made are also described

  10. The Geant4 physics validation repository

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, H.; Yarba, J.; Dotti, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Geant4 collaboration regularly performs validation and regression tests. The results are stored in a central repository and can be easily accessed via a web application. In this article we describe the Geant4 physics validation repository which consists of a relational database storing experimental data and Geant4 test results, a java API and a web application. The functionality of these components and the technology choices we made are also described.

  11. 17 CFR 49.12 - Swap data repository recordkeeping requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... data repository within three business days. (c) All records required to be kept pursuant to this... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Swap data repository... COMMISSION SWAP DATA REPOSITORIES § 49.12 Swap data repository recordkeeping requirements. (a) A...

  12. 17 CFR 49.12 - Swap data repository recordkeeping requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... data repository within three business days. (c) All records required to be kept pursuant to this... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Swap data repository... COMMISSION SWAP DATA REPOSITORIES § 49.12 Swap data repository recordkeeping requirements. (a) A...

  13. 17 CFR 49.12 - Swap data repository recordkeeping requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... the swap data repository within three business days. (c) All records required to be kept pursuant to... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Swap data repository... COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SWAP DATA REPOSITORIES § 49.12 Swap data repository recordkeeping requirements. (a)...

  14. 48 CFR 227.7108 - Contractor data repositories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... repositories. 227.7108 Section 227.7108 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS... Technical Data 227.7108 Contractor data repositories. (a) Contractor data repositories may be established when permitted by agency procedures. The contractual instrument establishing the data repository...

  15. Supporting multiple domains in a single reuse repository

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichmann, David

    1992-01-01

    Domain analysis typically results in the construction of a domain-specific repository. Such a repository imposes artificial boundaries on the sharing of similar assets between related domains. A lattice-based approach to repository modeling can preserve a reuser's domain specific view of the repository, while avoiding replication of commonly used assets and supporting a more general perspective on domain interrelationships.

  16. MONITORED GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY SYSTEMS REQUIREMENTS DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect

    V. Trebules

    2006-06-02

    This document establishes the Monitored Geologic Repository system requirements for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS). These requirements are based on the ''Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Requirements Document'' (CRD) (DOE 2004a). The ''Monitored Geologic Repository Systems Requirements Document'' (MGR-RD) is developed in accordance with LP-3.3 SQ-OCRWM, ''Preparation, Review, and Approval of Office of Repository Development Requirements Document''. As illustrated in Figure 1, the MGR-RD forms part of the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Technical Requirements Baseline. Revision 0 of this document identifies requirements for the current phase of repository design that is focused on developing a preliminary design for the repository and will be included in the license application submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission for a repository at Yucca Mountain in support of receiving a construction authorization and subsequent operating license. As additional information becomes available, more detailed requirements will be identified in subsequent revisions to this document.

  17. IMPLEMENTATION AND OPERATION OF THE REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus Milling

    2003-10-01

    The NGDRS has facilitated 85% of cores, cuttings, and other data identified available for transfer to the public sector. Over 12 million linear feet of cores and cuttings, in addition to large numbers of paleontological samples and are now available for public use. To date, with industry contributions for program operations and data transfers, the NGDRS project has realized a 6.5 to 1 return on investment to Department of Energy funds. Large-scale transfers of seismic data have been evaluated, but based on the recommendation of the NGDRS steering committee, cores have been given priority because of the vast scale of the seismic data problem relative to the available funding. The rapidly changing industry conditions have required that the primary core and cuttings preservation strategy evolve as well. Additionally, the NGDRS clearinghouse is evaluating the viability of transferring seismic data covering the western shelf of the Florida Gulf Coast. AGI remains actively involved in working to realize the vision of the National Research Council's report of geoscience data preservation. GeoTrek has been ported to Linux and MySQL, ensuring a purely open-source version of the software. This effort is key in ensuring long-term viability of the software so that is can continue basic operation regardless of specific funding levels. Work has been on a major revision of GeoTrek, using the open-source MapServer project and its related MapScript language. This effort will address a number of key technology issues that appear to be rising for 2003, including the discontinuation of the use of Java in future Microsoft operating systems. The recent donation of BPAmoco's Houston core facility to the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology has provided substantial short-term relief of the space constraints for public repository space.

  18. Summary of four release consequence analyses for hypothetical nuclear waste repositories in salt and granite

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, C.R.; Bond, F.W.

    1980-12-01

    Release consequence methology developed under the Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) program has now been applied to four hypothetical repository sites. This paper summarizes the results of these four studies in order to demonstrate that the far-field methodology developed under the AEGIS program offers a practical approach to the post-closure safety assessment of nuclear waste repositories sited in deep continental geologic formations. The four studies are briefly described and compared according to the following general categories: physical description of the repository (size, inventory, emplacement depth); geologic and hydrologic description of the site and the conceptual hydrologic model for the site; description of release scenario; hydrologic model implementation and results; engineered barriers and leach rate modeling; transport model implementation and results; and dose model implementation and results. These studies indicate the following: numerical modeling is a practical approach to post-closure safety assessment analysis for nuclear waste repositories; near-field modeling capability needs improvement to permit assessment of the consequences of human intrusion and pumping well scenarios; engineered barrier systems can be useful in mitigating consequences for postulated release scenarios that short-circuit the geohydrologic system; geohydrologic systems separating a repository from the natural biosphere discharge sites act to mitigate the consequences of postulated breaches in containment; and engineered barriers of types other than the containment or absorptive type may be useful.

  19. Evaluation of Five Sedimentary Rocks Other Than Salt for Geologic Repository Siting Purposes

    SciTech Connect

    Croff, A.G.; Lomenick, T.F.; Lowrie, R.S.; Stow, S.H.

    2003-11-15

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), in order to increase the diversity of rock types under consideration by the geologic disposal program, initiated the Sedimary ROck Program (SERP), whose immediate objectiv eis to evaluate five types of secimdnary rock - sandstone, chalk, carbonate rocks (limestone and dolostone), anhydrock, and shale - to determine the potential for siting a geologic repository. The evaluation of these five rock types, together with the ongoing salt studies, effectively results in the consideration of all types of relatively impermeable sedimentary rock for repository purposes. The results of this evaluation are expressed in terms of a ranking of the five rock types with respect to their potential to serve as a geologic repository host rock. This comparative evaluation was conducted on a non-site-specific basis, by use of generic information together with rock evaluation criteria (RECs) derived from the DOE siting guidelines for geologic repositories (CFR 1984). An information base relevant to rock evaluation using these RECs was developed in hydrology, geochemistry, rock characteristics (rock occurrences, thermal response, rock mechanics), natural resources, and rock dissolution. Evaluation against postclosure and preclosure RECs yielded a ranking of the five subject rocks with respect to their potential as repository host rocks. Shale was determined to be the most preferred of the five rock types, with sandstone a distant second, the carbonate rocks and anhydrock a more distant third, and chalk a relatively close fourth.

  20. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Repository Impact Evaluation FY-05 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Halsey, W G

    2005-09-12

    An important long-term objective of advanced nuclear fuel cycle (AFC) technologies is to provide improvement in the long-term management of radioactive waste. Compared to a once-thru fuel cycle, it is possible to generate far less waste, and potentially easier waste to manage, with advanced fuel cycles. However, the precise extent and value of these benefits are complex and difficult to quantify. This document presents a status report of efforts within AFCI Systems Analysis to define and quantify the AFC benefits to geologic disposal, development of cooperative efforts with the US repository program, and participation with international evaluations of AFC impacts on waste management. The primary analysis of repository benefits is conducted by ANL. This year repository impact evaluations have included: (1) Continued evaluation of LWR recycle benefits in support of scenario analysis. (2) Extension of repository analyses to consider long-term dose reductions. (3) Developing the opportunity for cooperation with the U.S. repository program. (4) International cooperation with OECD-NEA.

  1. SUBSURFACE REPOSITORY INTEGRATED CONTROL SYSTEM DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    D.C. Randle

    2000-01-07

    The primary purpose of this document is to develop a preliminary high-level functional and physical control system architecture for the potential repository at Yucca Mountain. This document outlines an overall control system concept that encompasses and integrates the many diverse process and communication systems being developed for the subsurface repository design. This document presents integrated design concepts for monitoring and controlling the diverse set of subsurface operations. The Subsurface Repository Integrated Control System design will be composed of a series of diverse process systems and communication networks. The subsurface repository design contains many systems related to instrumentation and control (I&C) for both repository development and waste emplacement operations. These systems include waste emplacement, waste retrieval, ventilation, radiological and air monitoring, rail transportation, construction development, utility systems (electrical, lighting, water, compressed air, etc.), fire protection, backfill emplacement, and performance confirmation. Each of these systems involves some level of I&C and will typically be integrated over a data communications network throughout the subsurface facility. The subsurface I&C systems will also interface with multiple surface-based systems such as site operations, rail transportation, security and safeguards, and electrical/piped utilities. In addition to the I&C systems, the subsurface repository design also contains systems related to voice and video communications. The components for each of these systems will be distributed and linked over voice and video communication networks throughout the subsurface facility. The scope and primary objectives of this design analysis are to: (1) Identify preliminary system-level functions and interfaces (Section 6.2). (2) Examine the overall system complexity and determine how and on what levels the engineered process systems will be monitored, controlled, and

  2. Coupling fuel cycles with repositories: how repository institutional choices may impact fuel cycle design

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.; Miller, W.F.

    2013-07-01

    The historical repository siting strategy in the United States has been a top-down approach driven by federal government decision making but it has been a failure. This policy has led to dispatching fuel cycle facilities in different states. The U.S. government is now considering an alternative repository siting strategy based on voluntary agreements with state governments. If that occurs, state governments become key decision makers. They have different priorities. Those priorities may change the characteristics of the repository and the fuel cycle. State government priorities, when considering hosting a repository, are safety, financial incentives and jobs. It follows that states will demand that a repository be the center of the back end of the fuel cycle as a condition of hosting it. For example, states will push for collocation of transportation services, safeguards training, and navy/private SNF (Spent Nuclear Fuel) inspection at the repository site. Such activities would more than double local employment relative to what was planned for the Yucca Mountain-type repository. States may demand (1) the right to take future title of the SNF so if recycle became economic the reprocessing plant would be built at the repository site and (2) the right of a certain fraction of the repository capacity for foreign SNF. That would open the future option of leasing of fuel to foreign utilities with disposal of the SNF in the repository but with the state-government condition that the front-end fuel-cycle enrichment and fuel fabrication facilities be located in that state.

  3. Summary report of first and foreign high-level waste repository concepts; Technical report, working draft 001

    SciTech Connect

    Hanke, P.M.

    1987-11-04

    Reference repository concepts designs adopted by domestic and foreign waste disposal programs are reviewed. Designs fall into three basic categories: deep borehole from the surface; disposal in boreholes drilled from underground excavations; and disposal in horizontal tunnels or drifts. The repository concepts developed in Sweden, Switzerland, Finland, Canada, France, Japan, United Kingdom, Belgium, Italy, Holland, Denmark, West Germany and the United States are described. 140 refs., 315 figs., 19 tabs.

  4. Census of Institutional Repositories in the United States: MIRACLE Project Research Findings. CLIR Publication No. 140

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markey, Karen; Rieh, Soo Young; St. Jean, Beth; Kim, Jihyun; Yakel, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    In this report, the authors describe results of a nationwide census of institutional repositories in U.S. academic institutions. The census is one of several activities of the MIRACLE Project, an Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS)-funded research program based at the University of Michigan. The acronym MIRACLE means "Making…

  5. Gene banking: A quality control perspective on collection, and analysis of samples for a national repository

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The National Animal Germplasm Program (NAGP) is developing a national repository for germplasm (semen, oocytes, embryos, blood, DNA, tissue) for all agricultural species in the United States. Currently, the swine collection consists of 127,479 samples from 886 boars representing 20 major, minor and...

  6. License for the Konrad Deep Geological Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Biurrun, E.; Hartje, B.

    2003-02-24

    Deep geological disposal of long-lived radioactive waste is currently considered a major challenge. Until present, only three deep geological disposal facilities have worldwide been operated: the Asse experimental repository (1967-1978) and the Morsleben repository (1971-1998) in Germany as well as the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in the USA (1999 to present). Recently, the licensing procedure for the fourth such facility, the German Konrad repository, ended with a positive ''Planfeststellung'' (plan approval). With its plan approval decision, the licensing authority, the Ministry of the Environment of the state of Lower Saxony, approved the single license needed pursuant to German law to construct, operate, and later close down this facility.

  7. A comparison of two potential repositories: The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Pflum, C.G.

    1994-07-11

    Two repositories in the same country, yet Congress and the DOE manage them differently. While Congress encumbers WIPP with unanticipated oversight and inappropriate regulations, Congress streamlines the commercial repository program and promises improved regulations for Yucca Mountain. While DOE encouraged science at the expense of the WIPP infrastructure, DOE postponed its scientific investigations at Yucca Mountain and constructed an infrastructure, large enough to support an ambitious program that was never realized. Somewhere between WIPP and Yucca Mountain lies an ideal repository program. A program where consistent national policy promotes progress; where lucid regulations inspire confidence; where science and infrastructure are balanced; and where oversight groups do not become the tail that wags the dog. Neither WIPP nor Yucca Mountain are ideal programs, but each has its advantages that approach the ideal. Consistent national policy would steer the ideal repository program in a predictable direction. Here Yucca Mountain has the advantage. Successive legislation has streamlined the siting process and promises better regulations. From the beginning, the ideal program would know its regulators and regulations. Again, Yucca Mountain has the advantage. More familiar with regulators and regulations, the Yucca Mountain program had the foresight not to declare HLW to be hazardous and subject to dual regulations. The ideal program would equitably balance its science and infrastructure. Here neither program has the advantage and could possibly represent extremes. The WIPP`s emphasis on scientific investigations left it with little or no infrastructure to deal with regulations and oversight. A regulatory infrastructure, for example, could have forewarned WIPP that its in situ tests were not relevant to the regulations. On the opposite extreme, the Yucca Mountain`s emphasis on infrastructure left it with less money for scientific investigations.

  8. Analytical Performance Models for Geologic Repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Chambre, P.L.; Pigford, T.H.; Fujita, A.; Kanki, T.; Kobayashi,A.; Lung, H.; Ting, D.; Sato, Y.; Savoshy, S.J.

    1982-10-01

    This report presents analytical solutions of the dissolution and hydrogeologic transport of radionuclides in geologic repositories. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the equations resulting from these analyses. The subjects treated in the present report are: (a) Solubility-limited transport with transverse dispersion (Chapter 2); (b) Transport of a radionuclide chain with nonequilibrium chemical reactions (Chapter 3); (c) Advective transport in a two-dimensional flow field (Chapter 4); (d) Radionuclide.transport in fractured media (Chapter 5); (e) A mathematical model for EPA's analysis of generic repositories (Chapter 6); and (f) Dissolution of radionuclides from solid waste (Chapter 7).

  9. Optimizing procedures for a human genome repository

    SciTech Connect

    Nierman, W.C.

    1991-03-01

    Large numbers of clones will be generated during the Human Genome Project. As each is characterized, subsets will be identified which are useful to the scientific community at large. These subsets are most readily distributed through public repositories. The American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) is experienced in repository operation, but before this project had no history in managing clones and associated information in large batches instead of individually. This project permitted the ATCC to develop several procedures for automating and thus reducing the cost of characterizing, preserving, and maintaining information about clones.

  10. The SocioEconomic analysis of repository siting (SEARS): Guide to data base preparation: Final draft

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, R.R.; Murdock, S.H.; Leistritz, F.L.; Kiel, B.; Parpia, B.

    1984-11-01

    This guide describes the data bases in the SocioEconomic Analysis of Repository Siting (SEARS) modeling system. This model is a user-interactive, computerized model for projecting the economic, demographic, public service, and fiscal impacts of repository siting. This guide provides a description of the data bases, sources of data, data formats, and preprocessing programs for adapting and implementing the SEARS system and is seen as an essential reference for technical users of the model. It should be used in conjunction with reports describing the model's features and characteristics. 95 refs., 3 tabs.

  11. Cost-Effective Cementitious Material Compatible with Yucca Mountain Repository Geochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Dole, LR

    2004-12-17

    The current plans for the Yucca Mountain (YM) repository project (YMP) use steel structures to stabilize the disposal drifts and connecting tunnels that are collectively over 100 kilometers in length. The potential exist to reduce the underground construction cost by 100s of millions of dollars and improve the repository's performance. These economic and engineering goals can be achieved by using the appropriate cementitious materials to build out these tunnels. This report describes the required properties of YM compatible cements and reviews the literature that proves the efficacy of this approach. This report also describes a comprehensive program to develop and test materials for a suite of underground construction technologies.

  12. High level nuclear waste repository in salt: Sealing systems status and planning report: Draft report

    SciTech Connect

    1985-09-01

    This report documents the initial conceptual design studies for a repository sealing system for a high-level nuclear waste repository in salt. The first step in the initial design studies was to review the current design level, termed schematic designs. This review identified practicality of construction and development of a design methodology as two key issues for the conceptual design. These two issues were then investigated during the initial design studies for seal system materials, seal placement, backfill emplacement, and a testing and monitoring plan. The results of these studies have been used to develop a program plan for completion of the sealing system conceptual design. 60 refs., 26 figs., 18 tabs.

  13. Some geochemical considerations for a potential repository site in tuff at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Erdal, B.R.; Bish, D.L.; Crowe, B.M.; Daniels, W.R.; Ogard, A.E.; Rundberg, R.S.; Vaniman, D.T.; Wolfsberg, K.

    1982-12-31

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations, which is evaluating potential locations for a high-level waste repository at the Nevada Test Site and environs, is currently focusing its investigations on tuff, principally in Yucca Mountain, as a host rock. This paper discusses some of the geochemical investigations. Particular emphasis is placed on definition of some basic elements and necessary technical approaches for the geochemistry data acquisition and modeling program. Some site-specific tuff geochemical information that is important for site selection and repository performance will be identified and the current status of knowledge will then be discussed.

  14. Generic Repository Concepts and Thermal Analysis for Advanced Fuel Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Hardin, Ernest; Blink, James; Carter, Joe; Massimiliano, Fratoni; Greenberg, Harris; Howard, Rob L

    2011-01-01

    The current posture of the used nuclear fuel management program in the U.S. following termination of the Yucca Mountain Project, is to pursue research and development (R&D) of generic (i.e., non-site specific) technologies for storage, transportation and disposal. Disposal R&D is directed toward understanding and demonstrating the performance of reference geologic disposal concepts selected to represent the current state-of-the-art in geologic disposal. One of the principal constraints on waste packaging and emplacement in a geologic repository is management of the waste-generated heat. This paper describes the selection of reference disposal concepts, and thermal management strategies for waste from advanced fuel cycles. A geologic disposal concept for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) or high-level waste (HLW) consists of three components: waste inventory, geologic setting, and concept of operations. A set of reference geologic disposal concepts has been developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Used Fuel Disposition Campaign, for crystalline rock, clay/shale, bedded salt, and deep borehole (crystalline basement) geologic settings. We performed thermal analysis of these concepts using waste inventory cases representing a range of advanced fuel cycles. Concepts of operation consisting of emplacement mode, repository layout, and engineered barrier descriptions, were selected based on international progress and previous experience in the U.S. repository program. All of the disposal concepts selected for this study use enclosed emplacement modes, whereby waste packages are in direct contact with encapsulating engineered or natural materials. The encapsulating materials (typically clay-based or rock salt) have low intrinsic permeability and plastic rheology that closes voids so that low permeability is maintained. Uniformly low permeability also contributes to chemically reducing conditions common in soft clay, shale, and salt formations. Enclosed modes are associated

  15. Assessment of high-level waste form conformance with proposed regulatory and repository criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, D E; Gray, P L; Jennings, A S; Permar, P H

    1982-04-01

    Federal regulatory criteria for geologic disposal of high-level waste are under development. Also, interim performance specifications for high-level waste forms in geologic isolation are being developed within the Federal program responsible for repository selection and operation. Two high-level waste forms, borosilicate glass and crystalline ceramic, have been selected as candidate immobilization forms for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) which is to immobilize high-level wastes at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). An assessment of how these two waste forms conform with the proposed regulatory criteria and repository specifications was performed. Both forms were determined to be in conformance with postulated rules for radionuclide releases and radiation exposures throughout the entire waste disposal system, as well as with proposed repository operation requirements.

  16. Insights to repository performance through study of a nuclear test site

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D K; Kersting, A B; Thompson, J L; Finnegan, D L

    2000-07-12

    Underground nuclear test sites offer an unprecedented opportunity to evaluate processes relevant to high-level waste repository performance in the absence of engineered barriers. Radionuclide migration programs at the Nevada Test Site represent a twenty-five year systematic investigation of the diverse radiologic source terms residual from weapons testing and the evolution of the hydrologic source term which comprises those radionuclides dissolved in or otherwise available for transport by groundwater. The Nevada Test Site shares actinide source terms, correlative geology, an identical tectonic setting, similar climate, and a thick unsaturated zone with the adjacent proposed Yucca Mountain high-level waste repository and provides a natural laboratory to assess long-term radionuclide transport in the near field. Analog studies may ultimately help validate predictions of radionuclide transport from the Yucca Mountain repository.

  17. Corrosion of breached aluminide fuel under potential repository conditions.

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, M. D.; Goldberg, M. M.

    2000-11-06

    Permanent disposal of spent nuclear fuel is proposed in a repository located in the volcanic tuff beds near Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and it is the responsibility of the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP) to provide the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) with information related to the release of fission products from the DOE-owned SNF resulting from SNF corrosion. Hydrologically unsaturated spent fuel tests (''drip'' tests) are designed to simulate and monitor the release of radionuclides from the spent fuel under potential exposure conditions in the repository. Of the priority fuels being tested under the NSNFP, the aluminum-based fuels are included because of their high relative volume and uranium enrichment. The Al fuel structure is composed of fissile and aluminum powders pressed and annealed between Al plates to form thin metallic plates. The most widely used fissile powder was the intermetallic compound aluminide UAl{sub x} (where x=2,3,4). As part of this testing program, preliminary corrosion tests using unirradiated UAl{sub x} were initiated to address experimental design, sampling, and analysis issues prior to conducting tests with spent fuels. However, during this program the decision was made by U.S. DOE to convert the aluminum-based fuels to safer enrichment levels by using the melt-dilute process at Savannah River. Nonetheless, the product ingot of the melt-dilute process resembles low enriched UAl{sub x} fuel and corrosion of the fuel is expected to be similar. This paper summarizes the preliminary testing results for the first year of the program and compares them to other corrosion testing results on aluminum fuels as well as other DOE fuel types.

  18. Repository Planning, Design, and Engineering: Part I--Infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Baird, Philip M; Gunter, Elaine W

    2016-04-01

    This is a two-part review describing the planning, engineering, and design considerations for building a new repository for biological and environmental samples. Part I addresses the physical infrastructure requirements for a repository; Part II will cover equipment and costing. Planning for construction of a new repository is a complex process requiring comprehensive preplanning and adherence to many regulatory and safety requirements. Guidance and a planning timeline are provided for many of the physical aspects and large capital acquisition costs for the expansion of an existing repository, or the creation of a new repository facility, using an available unoccupied building such as a former warehouse. This article provides a comprehensive set of information about every aspect of repository construction and operation to be considered in the planning process, and also addresses all aspects of designing and constructing a new repository in an existing structure. The engineering and design parameters for the repository are discussed in detail. PMID:26886580

  19. Progress in site selection for China`s high-level radioactive waste repository

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, G.; Wang, J.; Jin, Y.; Chen, W.

    1995-12-31

    In 1985, the China National Nuclear Corporation (CNNC) worked out an R and D program called DG program for the deep geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste in China. The site selection process for China`s HLW repository has been carried out since then according to this program. Granite is considered as the candidate host rock for the repository. The general siting criteria are based on the principle that, under the effect of natural and human activities, the long term (100,000 years) safety of the repository can be reasonably obtained and the disposed radioactive waste can be avoided from entering the biosphere and harming human beings. During siting, two types of factors are considered: (1) social factors, including the nuclear industry distribution population, economic potential and environmental protection etc.; (2) natural factors, including geographic, meteorological and geological (crustal stability, host rocks, hydrogeology, engineering geology). The site selection process is divided into 4 stages: (1) nationwide screening, (2) regional screening; (3) district screening; and (4) site screening. During the first stage (1985--1986) the following were considered as potential regions: (1) southwest China, (2) Guangdong area, (3) Inner Mongolia, (4) east China and (5) northwest China. During the second stage (1986--1988), 21 districts were selected for further investigation. Since 1989 most efforts have been focused on the Beishan area, Gansu province, northwest China, which is considered as the most potential district for the repository.

  20. Unheard Voices: Institutional Repository End-Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jean, Beth St.; Rieh, Soo Young; Yakel, Elizabeth; Markey, Karen

    2011-01-01

    This exploratory study investigates the perceptions and experiences of a group of institutional repository (IR) stakeholders seldom heard from: end-users. We interviewed twenty IR end-users recruited through five IRs to discover how they characterize the IR, how/why they use the IR, their credibility judgments in relation to the IR, and their…

  1. Coupled processes associated with nuclear waste repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, C.F.

    1987-01-01

    This book deals with coupled processes which affect a nuclear waste repository. While there are many descriptive accounts of environmental degradation resulting from various land uses, the author emphasizes the geomorphic processes responsible for such changes and the reasons why various reclamation practices are valuable in environmental management.

  2. 40 CFR 124.33 - Information repository.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... issue RCRA permits pursuant to 40 CFR part 271. (b) The Director may assess the need, on a case-by-case... an information repository. (See 40 CFR 270.30(m) for similar provisions relating to the information...) Applicability. The requirements of this section apply to all applications seeking RCRA permits for...

  3. Hydrologic issues associated with nuclear waste repositories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Chin-Fu; Neretnieks, Ivars; Tsang, Yvonne

    2015-09-01

    Significant progress in hydrology, especially in subsurface flow and solute transport, has been made over the last 35 years because of sustained interest in underground nuclear waste repositories. The present paper provides an overview of the key hydrologic issues involved, and to highlight advances in their understanding and treatment because of these efforts. The focus is not on the development of radioactive waste repositories and their safety assessment, but instead on the advances in hydrologic science that have emerged from such studies. Work and results associated with three rock types, which are being considered to host the repositories, are reviewed, with a different emphasis for each rock type. The first rock type is fractured crystalline rock, for which the discussion will be mainly on flow and transport in saturated fractured rock. The second rock type is unsaturated tuff, for which the emphasis will be on flow from the shallow subsurface through the unsaturated zone to the repository. The third rock type is clay-rich formations, whose permeability is very low in an undisturbed state. In this case, the emphasis will be on hydrologic issues that arise from mechanical and thermal disturbances; i.e., on the relevant coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical processes. The extensive research results, especially those from multiyear large-scale underground research laboratory investigations, represent a rich body of information and data that can form the basis for further development in the related areas of hydrologic research.

  4. Research Students and the Loughborough Institutional Repository

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickton, Margaret; McKnight, Cliff

    2006-01-01

    This article investigates the potential role for research students in an institutional repository (IR). Face-to-face interviews with 34 research students at Loughborough University were carried out. Using a mixture of closed and open questions, the interviews explored the students' experiences and opinions of publishing, open access and the…

  5. A Novel Navigation Paradigm for XML Repositories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azagury, Alain; Factor, Michael E.; Maarek, Yoelle S.; Mandler, Benny

    2002-01-01

    Discusses data exchange over the Internet and describes the architecture and implementation of an XML document repository that promotes a navigation paradigm for XML documents based on content and context. Topics include information retrieval and semistructured documents; and file systems as information storage infrastructure, particularly XMLFS.…

  6. Siting Patterns of Nuclear Waste Repositories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Barry D.; Shelley, Fred M.

    1988-01-01

    Provides an inventory of international radioactive waste-management policies and repository siting decisions for North America, Central and South America, Europe, Asia, and Africa. This discussion stresses the important role of demographic, geologic, and political factors in siting decisions. (Author/BSR)

  7. National Geoscience Data Repository System -- Phase III: Implementation and Operation of the Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Keane, Christopher M.

    2002-05-28

    The National Geoscience Data Repository System, Phase III was an operational project focused on coordinating and facilitating transfers of at-risk geoscience data from the private sector to the public domain.

  8. Institutional Repositories in Indian Universities and Research Institutes: A Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krishnamurthy, M.; Kemparaju, T. D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on a study of the institutional repositories (IRs) in use in Indian universities and research institutes. Design/methodology/approach: Repositories in various institutions in India were accessed and described in a standardised way. Findings: The 20 repositories studied covered collections of diverse…

  9. Semantic Linking of Learning Object Repositories to DBpedia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lama, Manuel; Vidal, Juan C.; Otero-Garcia, Estefania; Bugarin, Alberto; Barro, Senen

    2012-01-01

    Large-sized repositories of learning objects (LOs) are difficult to create and also to maintain. In this paper we propose a way to reduce this drawback by improving the classification mechanisms of the LO repositories. Specifically, we present a solution to automate the LO classification of the Universia repository, a collection of more than 15…

  10. Repositories for Research: Southampton's Evolving Role in the Knowledge Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Pauline; Hey, Jessie

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To provide an overview of how open access (OA) repositories have grown to take a premier place in the e-research knowledge cycle and offer Southampton's route from project to sustainable institutional repository. Design/methodology/approach: The evolution of institutional repositories and OA is outlined raising questions of multiplicity…

  11. The Use of Digital Repositories for Enhancing Teacher Pedagogical Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Anat; Kalimi, Sharon; Nachmias, Rafi

    2013-01-01

    This research examines the usage of local learning material repositories at school, as well as related teachers' attitudes and training. The study investigates the use of these repositories for enhancing teacher performance and assesses whether the assimilation of the local repositories increases their usage of and contribution to by teachers. One…

  12. 48 CFR 227.7207 - Contractor data repositories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Computer Software and Computer Software Documentation 227.7207 Contractor data repositories. Follow 227.7108 when it is in the Government's interests to have a data repository include computer software or to have a separate computer software repository. Contractual instruments establishing the...

  13. 48 CFR 227.7207 - Contractor data repositories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Computer Software and Computer Software Documentation 227.7207 Contractor data repositories. Follow 227.7108 when it is in the Government's interests to have a data repository include computer software or to have a separate computer software repository. Contractual instruments establishing the...

  14. 48 CFR 227.7207 - Contractor data repositories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Computer Software and Computer Software Documentation 227.7207 Contractor data repositories. Follow 227.7108 when it is in the Government's interests to have a data repository include computer software or to have a separate computer software repository. Contractual instruments establishing the...

  15. 48 CFR 227.7207 - Contractor data repositories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Computer Software and Computer Software Documentation 227.7207 Contractor data repositories. Follow 227.7108 when it is in the Government's interests to have a data repository include computer software or to have a separate computer software repository. Contractual instruments establishing the...

  16. 48 CFR 227.7207 - Contractor data repositories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Computer Software and Computer Software Documentation 227.7207 Contractor data repositories. Follow 227.7108 when it is in the Government's interests to have a data repository include computer software or to have a separate computer software repository. Contractual instruments establishing the...

  17. Implementation of an OAIS Repository Using Free, Open Source Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flathers, E.; Gessler, P. E.; Seamon, E.

    2015-12-01

    The Northwest Knowledge Network (NKN) is a regional data repository located at the University of Idaho that focuses on the collection, curation, and distribution of research data. To support our home institution and others in the region, we offer services to researchers at all stages of the data lifecycle—from grant application and data management planning to data distribution and archive. In this role, we recognize the need to work closely with other data management efforts at partner institutions and agencies, as well as with larger aggregation efforts such as our state geospatial data clearinghouses, data.gov, DataONE, and others. In the past, one of our challenges with monolithic, prepackaged data management solutions is that customization can be difficult to implement and maintain, especially as new versions of the software are released that are incompatible with our local codebase. Our solution is to break the monolith up into its constituent parts, which offers us several advantages. First, any customizations that we make are likely to fall into areas that can be accessed through Application Program Interfaces (API) that are likely to remain stable over time, so our code stays compatible. Second, as components become obsolete or insufficient to meet new demands that arise, we can replace the individual components with minimal effect on the rest of the infrastructure, causing less disruption to operations. Other advantages include increased system reliability, staggered rollout of new features, enhanced compatibility with legacy systems, reduced dependence on a single software company as a point of failure, and the separation of development into manageable tasks. In this presentation, we describe our application of the Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) design paradigm to assemble a data repository that conforms to the Open Archival Information System (OAIS) Reference Model primarily using a collection of free and open-source software. We detail the design

  18. WISeREP—An Interactive Supernova Data Repository

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaron, Ofer; Gal-Yam, Avishay

    2012-07-01

    We have entered an era of massive data sets in astronomy. In particular, the number of supernova (SN) discoveries and classifications has substantially increased over the years from few tens to thousands per year. It is no longer the case that observations of a few prototypical events encapsulate most spectroscopic information about SNe, motivating the development of modern tools to collect, archive, organize, and distribute spectra in general and SN spectra in particular. For this reason, we have developed the Weizmann Interactive Supernova Data Repository (WISeREP)—an SQL-based database (DB) with an interactive Web-based graphical interface. The system serves as an archive of high-quality SN spectra, including both historical (legacy) data and data that are accumulated by ongoing modern programs. The archive provides information about objects, their spectra, and related metadata. Utilizing interactive plots, we provide a graphical interface to visualize data, perform line identification of the major relevant species, determine object redshifts, classify SNe, and measure expansion velocities. Guest users may view and download spectra or other data that have been placed in the public domain. Registered users may also view and download data that are proprietary to specific programs with which they are associated. The DB currently holds more than 8000 spectra, of which more than 5000 are public; the latter include published spectra from the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF), all of the SUSPECT (Supernova Spectrum) archive, the Caltech-Core-Collapse Program (CCCP), the CfA SN spectra archive, and published spectra from the University of California, Berkeley, SNDB repository. It offers an efficient and convenient way to archive data and share it with colleagues, and we expect that data stored in this way will be easy to access, increasing its visibility, usefulness, and scientific impact. We encourage the SN community worldwide to make use of the data and tools

  19. A Brief Description of the Operation of the DoD Serum Repository.

    PubMed

    Perdue, Christopher L; Eick-Cost, Angelia A; Rubertone, Mark V

    2015-10-01

    Beginning in 1985, the United States military has consistently maintained repositories of frozen human serum for force health protection reasons. The separate repositories created by the Army, Navy, and Air Force during the startup of their human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) screening programs were fully combined by 1996, along with the Defense Medical Surveillance System, to form the DoD Serum Repository (DoDSR). Currently comprised of 450,000 square feet of storage space at a constant -30 degrees Celsius, the DoDSR, operated by the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center (AFHSC), receives approximately 2 million new serum specimens per year as a result of current HIV screening programs and pre- and post-deployment serum collection. Following initial testing for HIV when required, each specimen remains frozen until needed for clinical testing or a public health study, and its physical location is carefully tracked. Certain militarily-relevant research studies occur, though the serum from a specific individual is never allowed to be fully exhausted. AFHSC maintains careful control over the repository, utilizing a scientific review board to determine which requests for serum will be granted. As of 2012, only 0.42% of all of the frozen specimens in the DoDSR had been thawed for any type of use. The addition of new specimen processing capacity and significant changes to policy would be required if more of the specimens were to be used to answer relevant epidemiological, operational, or medical research questions. PMID:26444888

  20. Preconceptual systems and equipment for plugging of man-made accesses to a repository in basalt

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C.L.; O'Rourke, J.E.; Allirot, D.; O'Connor, K.

    1980-09-01

    This report presents results of a study leading to preconceptual designs for plugging boreholes, shafts, and tunnels to a nuclear waste repository in basalt. Beginning design criteria include a list of preferred plug materials and plugging machines that were selected to suit the environmental conditions, and depths, diameters, and orientations of the accesses to a nuclear waste repository in the Columbia River basalts located in eastern Washington State. The environmental conditions are described. The fiscal year 1979-1980 Task II work is presented in two parts: preliminary testing of materials for plugging of man-made accesses to a repository in basalt (described in a separate report); and preconceptual systems and equipment for plugging of man-made accesses to a repository in basalt (described in this report). To fulfill the scope of the Task II work, Woodward-Clyde Consultants (WCC) was requested to: provide preconceptual systems for plugging boreholes, tunnels, and shafts in basalt; describe preconceptual borehole plugging equipment for placing the selected materials in man-made accesses; utilize the quality assurance program, program plan and schedule, and work plans previously developed for Task II; and prepare a preliminary report.

  1. Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Community College Journal, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Includes a collection of eight short articles describing model community college programs. Discusses a literacy program, a mobile computer classroom, a support program for at-risk students, a timber-harvesting program, a multimedia presentation on successful women graduates, a career center, a collaboration with NASA, and an Israeli engineering…

  2. The zinc repository of Cupriavidus metallidurans.

    PubMed

    Herzberg, Martin; Dobritzsch, Dirk; Helm, Stefan; Baginsky, Sacha; Nies, Dietrich H

    2014-11-01

    Zinc is a central player in the metalloproteomes of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. We used a bottom-up quantitative proteomic approach to reveal the repository of the zinc pools in the proteobacterium Cupriavidus metallidurans. About 60% of the theoretical proteome of C. metallidurans was identified, quantified, and the defect in zinc allocation was compared between a ΔzupT mutant and its parent strain. In both strains, the number of zinc-binding proteins and their binding sites exceeded that of the zinc ions per cell, indicating that the totality of the zinc proteome provides empty binding sites for the incoming zinc ions. This zinc repository plays a central role in zinc homeostasis in C. metallidurans and probably also in other organisms. PMID:25315396

  3. Fukushima Daiichi Information Repository FY13 Status

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis Smith; Cherie Phelan; Dave Schwieder

    2013-09-01

    The accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station in Japan is one of the most serious in commercial nuclear power plant operating history. Much will be learned that may be applicable to the U.S. reactor fleet, nuclear fuel cycle facilities, and supporting systems, and the international reactor fleet. For example, lessons from Fukushima Daiichi may be applied to emergency response planning, reactor operator training, accident scenario modeling, human factors engineering, radiation protection, and accident mitigation; as well as influence U.S. policies towards the nuclear fuel cycle including power generation, and spent fuel storage, reprocessing, and disposal. This document describes the database used to establish a centralized information repository to store and manage the Fukushima data that has been gathered. The data is stored in a secured (password protected and encrypted) repository that is searchable and available to researchers at diverse locations.

  4. Bedded-salt repository analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Guiffre, M.S.; Kaplan, M.F.; Ensminger, D.A.; Oston, S.G.; Nalbandian, J.Y.

    1980-03-31

    This report contains a description of an analysis of generic nuclear waste repository in bedded salt. This analysis was performed by TASC for inclusion in a major Lawrence Livermore Laboratory report to NRC; this report therefore should be viewed as providing more complete and detailed information about this analysis than was possible to include in the LLL report. The analysis is performed with the NUTRAN computer codes which are described in the report. The model to be analyzed is defined, and the results of a series of possible waste migration scenarios are presented. Several of these scenarios are used as the basis for a sensitivity analysis, and an uncertainty analysis utilizing Monte Carlo techniques is also performed. A new method for defining the consequences to users of a well drilled near the repository is also described, and results are presented based on two of the waste migration scenarios.

  5. NATIONAL GEOSCIENCE DATA REPOSITORY SYSTEM PHASE III: IMPLEMENTATION AND OPERATION OF THE REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus Milling

    2002-10-01

    The NGDRS has facilitated 85% of cores, cuttings, and other data identified available for transfer to the public sector. Over 12 million linear feet of cores and cuttings, in addition to large numbers of paleontological samples and are now available for public use. To date, with industry contributions for program operations and data transfers, the NGDRS project has realized a 6.5 to 1 return on investment to Department of Energy funds. Large-scale transfers of seismic data have been evaluated, but based on the recommendation of the NGDRS steering committee, cores have been given priority because of the vast scale of the seismic data problem relative to the available funding. The rapidly changing industry conditions have required that the primary core and cuttings preservation strategy evolve as well. Additionally, the NGDRS clearinghouse is evaluating the viability of transferring seismic data covering the western shelf of the Florida Gulf Coast. AGI remains actively involved in working to realize the vision of the National Research Council's report of geoscience data preservation. GeoTrek has been ported to Linux and MySQL, ensuring a purely open-source version of the software. This effort is key in ensuring long-term viability of the software so that is can continue basic operation regardless of specific funding levels. Work has commenced on a major revision of GeoTrek, using the open-source MapServer project and its related MapScript language. This effort will address a number of key technology issues that appear to be rising for 2002, including the discontinuation of the use of Java in future Microsoft operating systems. Discussions have been held regarding establishing potential new public data repositories, with hope for final determination in 2002.

  6. NATIONAL GEOSCIENCE DATA REPOSITORY SYSTEM PHASE III: IMPLEMENTATION AND OPERATION OF THE REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus Milling

    2003-04-01

    The NGDRS has facilitated 85% of cores, cuttings, and other data identified available for transfer to the public sector. Over 12 million linear feet of cores and cuttings, in addition to large numbers of paleontological samples and are now available for public use. To date, with industry contributions for program operations and data transfers, the NGDRS project has realized a 6.5 to 1 return on investment to Department of Energy funds. Large-scale transfers of seismic data have been evaluated, but based on the recommendation of the NGDRS steering committee, cores have been given priority because of the vast scale of the seismic data problem relative to the available funding. The rapidly changing industry conditions have required that the primary core and cuttings preservation strategy evolve as well. Additionally, the NGDRS clearinghouse is evaluating the viability of transferring seismic data covering the western shelf of the Florida Gulf Coast. AGI remains actively involved in working to realize the vision of the National Research Council's report of geoscience data preservation. GeoTrek has been ported to Linux and MySQL, ensuring a purely open-source version of the software. This effort is key in ensuring long-term viability of the software so that is can continue basic operation regardless of specific funding levels. Work has commenced on a major revision of GeoTrek, using the open-source MapServer project and its related MapScript language. This effort will address a number of key technology issues that appear to be rising for 2002, including the discontinuation of the use of Java in future Microsoft operating systems. Discussions have been held regarding establishing potential new public data repositories, with hope for final determination in 2002.

  7. Sweden picks site for waste repository

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafford, Ned

    2009-07-01

    Nuclear power-plant operators in Sweden have selected a site where they can permanently store the country's spent nuclear fuel. The repository would be located 500 m below ground at Forsmark, roughly 200km north of Stockholm, which is already home to a nuclear power plant. The decision was taken after two decades of study by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB), which is owned by the country's nuclear firms.

  8. Using neural networks in software repositories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichmann, David (Editor); Srinivas, Kankanahalli; Boetticher, G.

    1992-01-01

    The first topic is an exploration of the use of neural network techniques to improve the effectiveness of retrieval in software repositories. The second topic relates to a series of experiments conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using adaptive neural networks as a means of deriving (or more specifically, learning) measures on software. Taken together, these two efforts illuminate a very promising mechanism supporting software infrastructures - one based upon a flexible and responsive technology.

  9. NCI Repository News – Last Call —

    Cancer.gov

    The following strains will be maintained as live colonies until the end of January 2014. After this date, they will be supplied as cryopreserved embryos. If you foresee using one of these strains in the near future, order now! Please be aware that all necessary paperwork (order form, MTA, etc.) needs to be completed and received by the Repository before January 31, 2014 in order to receive live mice.

  10. Quantum blind signature with an offline repository

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, J.; Souto, A.; Mateus, P.

    2015-04-01

    We propose a quantum blind signature scheme that achieves perfect security under the assumption of an honest offline repository. The security of the protocol also relies on perfect private quantum channels, which are achievable using quantum one-time pads with keys shared via a quantum key distribution (QKD) protocol. The proposed approach ensures that signatures cannot be copied and that the sender must compromise to a single message, which are important advantages over classical protocols for certain applications.

  11. Might underground waste repositories blow up?

    SciTech Connect

    Hippel, F. von

    1996-03-01

    Some writers have presented possible scenarios in which a subcritical underground deposit of plutonium or other fissile material might be changed into a critical configuration. The underground criticalities that occurred in Gabon some 1.7 billion years ago in deposits of natural uranium is cited. Other scientists assert that it is virtually impossible that such a configuration could develop in an underground repository. The author presents the pros and cons of these views. 5 refs.

  12. Generic repository design concepts and thermal analysis (FY11).

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, Robert; Dupont, Mark; Blink, James A.; Fratoni, Massimiliano; Greenberg, Harris; Carter, Joe; Hardin, Ernest L.; Sutton, Mark A.

    2011-08-01

    Reference concepts for geologic disposal of used nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in the U.S. are developed, including geologic settings and engineered barriers. Repository thermal analysis is demonstrated for a range of waste types from projected future, advanced nuclear fuel cycles. The results show significant differences among geologic media considered (clay/shale, crystalline rock, salt), and also that waste package size and waste loading must be limited to meet targeted maximum temperature values. In this study, the UFD R&D Campaign has developed a set of reference geologic disposal concepts for a range of waste types that could potentially be generated in advanced nuclear FCs. A disposal concept consists of three components: waste inventory, geologic setting, and concept of operations. Mature repository concepts have been developed in other countries for disposal of spent LWR fuel and HLW from reprocessing UNF, and these serve as starting points for developing this set. Additional design details and EBS concepts will be considered as the reference disposal concepts evolve. The waste inventory considered in this study includes: (1) direct disposal of SNF from the LWR fleet, including Gen III+ advanced LWRs being developed through the Nuclear Power 2010 Program, operating in a once-through cycle; (2) waste generated from reprocessing of LWR UOX UNF to recover U and Pu, and subsequent direct disposal of used Pu-MOX fuel (also used in LWRs) in a modified-open cycle; and (3) waste generated by continuous recycling of metal fuel from fast reactors operating in a TRU burner configuration, with additional TRU material input supplied from reprocessing of LWR UOX fuel. The geologic setting provides the natural barriers, and establishes the boundary conditions for performance of engineered barriers. The composition and physical properties of the host medium dictate design and construction approaches, and determine hydrologic and thermal responses of the

  13. Geotechnical support and topical studies for nuclear waste geologic repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The present report lists the technical reviews and comments made during the fiscal year 1988 and summarizes the technical progress of the topical studies. In the area of technical assistance, there were numerous activities detailed in the next section. These included 24 geotechnical support activities, including reviews of 6 Study Plans (SP) and participation in 6 SP Review Workshops, review of one whole document Site Characterization Plan (SCP) and participation in the Assembled Document SCP Review Workshops by 6 LBL reviewers; the hosting of a DOE program review, the rewriting of the project statement of work, 2 trips to technical and planning meetings; preparation of proposed work statements for two new topics for DOE, and 5 instances of technical assistance to DOE. These activities are described in a Table in the following section entitled Geoscience Technical Support for Nuclear Waste Geologic Repositories.''

  14. A clinical data repository enhances hospital infection control.

    PubMed Central

    Samore, M.; Lichtenberg, D.; Saubermann, L.; Kawachi, C.; Carmeli, Y.

    1997-01-01

    We describe the benefits of a relational database of hospital clinical data (Clinical Data Repository; CDR) for an infection control program. The CDR consists of > 40 Sybase tables, and is directly accessible for ad hoc queries by members of the infection control unit who have been granted privileges for access by the Information Systems Department. The data elements and functional requirements most useful for surveillance of nosocomial infections, antibiotic use, and resistant organisms are characterized. Specific applications of the CDR are presented, including the use of automated definitions of nosocomial infection, graphical monitoring of resistant organisms with quality control limits, and prospective detection of inappropriate antibiotic use. Hospital surveillance and quality improvement activities are significantly benefited by the availability of a querable set of tables containing diverse clinical data. PMID:9357588

  15. Metadata Management and Semantics in Microarray Repositories

    PubMed Central

    Kocabaş, F; Can, T; Baykal, N

    2011-01-01

    The number of microarray and other high-throughput experiments on primary repositories keeps increasing as do the size and complexity of the results in response to biomedical investigations. Initiatives have been started on standardization of content, object model, exchange format and ontology. However, there are backlogs and inability to exchange data between microarray repositories, which indicate that there is a great need for a standard format and data management. We have introduced a metadata framework that includes a metadata card and semantic nets that make experimental results visible, understandable and usable. These are encoded in syntax encoding schemes and represented in RDF (Resource Description Frame-word), can be integrated with other metadata cards and semantic nets, and can be exchanged, shared and queried. We demonstrated the performance and potential benefits through a case study on a selected microarray repository. We concluded that the backlogs can be reduced and that exchange of information and asking of knowledge discovery questions can become possible with the use of this metadata framework. PMID:24052712

  16. Reference Design Description for a Geologic Repository

    SciTech Connect

    NA

    2000-10-07

    One of the current major national environmental problems is the safe disposal of large quantities of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste materials, which are rapidly accumulating throughout the country. These radioactive byproducts are generated as the result of national defense activities and from the generation of electricity by commercial nuclear power plants. At present, spent nuclear fuel is accumulating at over 70 power plant sites distributed throughout 33 states. The safe disposal of these high-level radioactive materials at a central disposal facility is a high national priority. This Reference Design Description explains the current design for a potential geologic repository that may be located at Yucca Mountain in Nevada for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste materials. This document describes a possible design for the three fundamental parts of a repository: a surface facility, subsurface repository, and waste packaging. It also presents the current conceptual design of the key engineering systems for the final four phases of repository processes: operations, monitoring, closure, and postclosure. In accordance with current law, this design does not include an interim storage option. In addition, this Reference Design Description reviews the expected long-term performance of the potential repository. It describes the natural barrier system which, together with the engineered systems, achieves the repository objectives. This design will protect the public and the environment by allowing the safe disposal of radioactive waste received from government-owned custodial spent fuel sites, high-level radioactive waste sites, and commercial power reactor sites. All design elements meet or exceed applicable regulations governing the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The design will provide safe disposal of waste materials for at least a 10,000 year period. During this time interval, natural radioactive decay

  17. Ontario Power Generation's Proposed Deep Geologic Repository, Tiverton, Ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, M.

    2009-05-01

    Ontario Power Generation is proposing to develop a Deep Geologic Repository (DGR) for the long-term management of its Low and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste (L&ILW) at the Bruce site located near Tiverton, Ontario, 225 km northwest of Toronto. The shaft accessed repository, as envisioned, would accommodate 200,000 m3 (as packaged) of L&ILW in emplacement rooms excavated at a depth of 680 m within the Ordovician age argillaceous limestone Cobourg Formation. The Bruce site is underlain by an approximate 860 m thick Paleozoic sedimentary sequence comprised of near horizontally bedded carbonates, shales, evaporates and sandstones, Devonian to Cambrian in age, overlying crystalline basement rocks. Regional and site-specific geoscientific studies to verify the suitability of the Bruce site to host the DGR were initiated in 2006. The focus for the geoscientific investigations has been on gathering data to develop and test an understanding of the evolution and stability of the geologic, hydrogeologic, hydrogeochemical and geomechanical environ as it relates to demonstrating repository safety. Scheduled for completion in 2010, the interim results, which have included the drilling, coring and testing of 4 deep boreholes, are providing evidence of a predictable geosphere with a deep seated (>400 m), low permeability (K < 10-13 m sec-1), low porosity (0.01-0.08), saline (TDS > 250 gm l-1) groundwater regime that is ancient and resilient to external perturbations (e.g. glaciation). Work program activities in this regard have included, among others, detailed studies of rock core lithology, mineralogy and petrophysics, rock matrix pore fluid and groundwater characterisation, in-situ rock mass hydraulic testing, geomechanical rock core testing, 2-D seismic reflection surveys and long-term hydraulic borehole instrumentation. These data, in addition to regional and site-scale hydrogeologic modelling of the sedimentary sequence that among other aspects is examining groundwater

  18. The Geodetic Seamless Archive Centers Service Layer: A System Architecture for Federating Geodesy Data Repositories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWhirter, J.; Boler, F. M.; Bock, Y.; Jamason, P.; Squibb, M. B.; Noll, C. E.; Blewitt, G.; Kreemer, C. W.

    2010-12-01

    Three geodesy Archive Centers, Scripps Orbit and Permanent Array Center (SOPAC), NASA's Crustal Dynamics Data Information System (CDDIS) and UNAVCO are engaged in a joint effort to define and develop a common Web Service Application Programming Interface (API) for accessing geodetic data holdings. This effort is funded by the NASA ROSES ACCESS Program to modernize the original GPS Seamless Archive Centers (GSAC) technology which was developed in the 1990s. A new web service interface, the GSAC-WS, is being developed to provide uniform and expanded mechanisms through which users can access our data repositories. In total, our respective archives hold tens of millions of files and contain a rich collection of site/station metadata. Though we serve similar user communities, we currently provide a range of different access methods, query services and metadata formats. This leads to a lack of consistency in the userís experience and a duplication of engineering efforts. The GSAC-WS API and its reference implementation in an underlying Java-based GSAC Service Layer (GSL) supports metadata and data queries into site/station oriented data archives. The general nature of this API makes it applicable to a broad range of data systems. The overall goals of this project include providing consistent and rich query interfaces for end users and client programs, the development of enabling technology to facilitate third party repositories in developing these web service capabilities and to enable the ability to perform data queries across a collection of federated GSAC-WS enabled repositories. A fundamental challenge faced in this project is to provide a common suite of query services across a heterogeneous collection of data yet enabling each repository to expose their specific metadata holdings. To address this challenge we are developing a "capabilities" based service where a repository can describe its specific query and metadata capabilities. Furthermore, the architecture of

  19. SUBSURFACE REPOSITORY INTEGRATED CONTROL SYSTEM DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    C.J. Fernado

    1998-09-17

    The purpose of this document is to develop preliminary high-level functional and physical control system architectures for the proposed subsurface repository at Yucca Mountain. This document outlines overall control system concepts that encompass and integrate the many diverse systems being considered for use within the subsurface repository. This document presents integrated design concepts for monitoring and controlling the diverse set of subsurface operations. The subsurface repository design will be composed of a series of diverse systems that will be integrated to accomplish a set of overall functions and objectives. The subsurface repository contains several Instrumentation and Control (I&C) related systems including: waste emplacement systems, ventilation systems, communication systems, radiation monitoring systems, rail transportation systems, ground control monitoring systems, utility monitoring systems (electrical, lighting, water, compressed air, etc.), fire detection and protection systems, retrieval systems, and performance confirmation systems. Each of these systems involve some level of I&C and will typically be integrated over a data communication network. The subsurface I&C systems will also integrate with multiple surface-based site-wide systems such as emergency response, health physics, security and safeguards, communications, utilities and others. The scope and primary objectives of this analysis are to: (1) Identify preliminary system level functions and interface needs (Presented in the functional diagrams in Section 7.2). (2) Examine the overall system complexity and determine how and on what levels these control systems will be controlled and integrated (Presented in Section 7.2). (3) Develop a preliminary subsurface facility-wide design for an overall control system architecture, and depict this design by a series of control system functional block diagrams (Presented in Section 7.2). (4) Develop a series of physical architectures that

  20. MRS/IS facility co-located with a repository: preconceptual design and life-cycle cost estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.I.; Nesbitt, J.F.

    1982-11-01

    A program is described to examine the various alternatives for monitored retrievable storage (MRS) and interim storage (IS) of spent nuclear fuel, solidified high-level waste (HLW), and transuranic (TRU) waste until appropriate geologic repository/repositories are available. The objectives of this study are: (1) to develop a preconceptual design for an MRS/IS facility that would become the principal surface facility for a deep geologic repository when the repository is opened, (2) to examine various issues such as transportation of wastes, licensing of the facility, and environmental concerns associated with operation of such a facility, and (3) to estimate the life cycle costs of the facility when operated in response to a set of scenarios which define the quantities and types of waste requiring storage in specific time periods, which generally span the years from 1990 until 2016. The life cycle costs estimated in this study include: the capital expenditures for structures, casks and/or drywells, storage areas and pads, and transfer equipment; the cost of staff labor, supplies, and services; and the incremental cost of transporting the waste materials from the site of origin to the MRS/IS facility. Three scenarios are examined to develop estimates of life cycle costs of the MRS/IS facility. In the first scenario, HLW canisters are stored, starting in 1990, until the co-located repository is opened in the year 1998. Additional reprocessing plants and repositories are placed in service at various intervals. In the second scenario, spent fuel is stored, starting in 1990, because the reprocessing plants are delayed in starting operations by 10 years, but no HLW is stored because the repositories open on schedule. In the third scenario, HLW is stored, starting in 1990, because the repositories are delayed 10 years, but the reprocessing plants open on schedule.

  1. Grid Application Meta-Repository System: Repository Interconnectivity and Cross-domain Application Usage in Distributed Computing Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudose, Alexandru; Terstyansky, Gabor; Kacsuk, Peter; Winter, Stephen

    Grid Application Repositories vary greatly in terms of access interface, security system, implementation technology, communication protocols and repository model. This diversity has become a significant limitation in terms of interoperability and inter-repository access. This paper presents the Grid Application Meta-Repository System (GAMRS) as a solution that offers better options for the management of Grid applications. GAMRS proposes a generic repository architecture, which allows any Grid Application Repository (GAR) to be connected to the system independent of their underlying technology. It also presents applications in a uniform manner and makes applications from all connected repositories visible to web search engines, OGSI/WSRF Grid Services and other OAI (Open Archive Initiative)-compliant repositories. GAMRS can also function as a repository in its own right and can store applications under a new repository model. With the help of this model, applications can be presented as embedded in virtual machines (VM) and therefore they can be run in their native environments and can easily be deployed on virtualized infrastructures allowing interoperability with new generation technologies such as cloud computing, application-on-demand, automatic service/application deployments and automatic VM generation.

  2. Development of local partnership for siting of LILW repository in Slovenia

    SciTech Connect

    Kralj, Metka; Zeleznik, Nadja

    2007-07-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Slovenia has only temporary storage facilities for radioactive waste. According to the legislation, a permanent LILW repository site should be authorized by 2008, and the repository has to acquire the operating licence by 2013. In 2006, ARAO, the general public and three municipalities established local partnerships in order to increase public acceptability of the LILW repository. Civil initiative groups opposed to the siting appeared in all three local communities. In one case they forced the municipality to withdraw, in one case they changed the siting location, and in one case they were integrated to local partnership. In the municipality of Krsko, the program of local partnership was publicly discussed. There is an NPP in Krsko, so the local partnership also demanded to discuss the power plant issues. Thematic committees were established that worked separately. They also discussed the issues of the spatial plan for the repository. In the municipality of Brezice, a steering committee was established to promote local partnership activities and organization of thematic committees. There was only one active thematic committee, but many activities for the general public were organised. In the municipality of Sevnica, the local partnership was soon cancelled. (authors)

  3. Selection of Corrosion Resistant Materials for Nuclear Waste Repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B

    2006-06-01

    Several countries are considering geological repositories to dispose of nuclear waste. The environment of most of the currently considered repositories will be reducing in nature, except for the repository in the US, which is going to be oxidizing. For the reducing repositories alloys such as carbon steel, stainless steels and titanium are being evaluated. For the repository in the US, some of the most corrosion resistant commercially available alloys are being investigated. This paper presents a summary of the behavior of the different materials under consideration for the repositories and the current understanding of the degradation modes of the proposed alloys in ground water environments from the point of view of general corrosion, localized corrosion and environmentally assisted cracking.

  4. Environmental Degradation of Materials for Nuclear Waste Repositories Engineered Barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B

    2006-12-24

    Several countries are considering geological repositories for the storage of nuclear waste. Most of the environments for these repositories will be reducing in nature, except for the repository in the US, which is going to be oxidizing. For the reducing repositories, alloys such as carbon steel, copper, stainless steels and titanium are being evaluated. For the repository in the US, some of the most corrosion resistant commercially available alloys are being investigated. This paper presents a summary of the behavior of the different materials under consideration for the repositories and the current understanding of the degradation modes of the proposed alloys in ground water environments from the point of view of general corrosion, localized corrosion and environmentally assisted cracking.

  5. Selection of Corrosion Resistant Materials for Nuclear Waste Repositories

    SciTech Connect

    R.B. Rebak

    2006-08-28

    Several countries are considering geological repositories to dispose of nuclear waste. The environment of most of the currently considered repositories will be reducing in nature, except for the repository in the US, which is going to be oxidizing. For the reducing repositories, alloys such as carbon steel, stainless steels and titanium are being evaluated. For the repository in the US, some of the most corrosion resistant commercially available alloys are being investigated. This paper presents a summary of the behavior of the different materials under consideration for the repositories and the current understanding of the degradation modes of the proposed alloys in ground water environments from the point of view of general corrosion, localized corrosion and environmentally assisted cracking.

  6. Status of Proposed Repository for Latin-American Spent Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrada, J.J.

    2004-10-04

    This report compiles preliminary information that supports the premise that a repository is needed in Latin America and analyzes the nuclear situation (mainly in Argentina and Brazil) in terms of nuclear capabilities, inventories, and regional spent-fuel repositories. The report is based on several sources and summarizes (1) the nuclear capabilities in Latin America and establishes the framework for the need of a permanent repository, (2) the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) approach for a regional spent-fuel repository and describes the support that international institutions are lending to this issue, (3) the current situation in Argentina in order to analyze the Argentinean willingness to find a location for a deep geological repository, and (4) the issues involved in selecting a location for the repository and identifies a potential location. This report then draws conclusions based on an analysis of this information. The focus of this report is mainly on spent fuel and does not elaborate on other radiological waste sources.

  7. Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document

    SciTech Connect

    P. Curry

    2000-06-01

    The primary objective of the Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document (PDD) is to allocate the functions, requirements, and assumptions to the systems at Level 5 of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) architecture identified in Section 4. It provides traceability of the requirements to those contained in Section 3 of the ''Monitored Geologic Repository Requirements Document'' (MGR RD) (CRWMS M&O 2000b) and other higher-level requirements documents. In addition, the PDD allocates design related assumptions to work products of non-design organizations. The document provides Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) engineering design basis in support of design and performance assessment in preparing for the Site Recommendation (SR) and License Application (LA) milestones. The engineering design basis documented in the PDD is to be captured in the System Description Documents (SDDs) which address each of the systems at Level 5 of the CRWMS architecture. The design engineers obtain the engineering design basis from the SDDs and by reference from the SDDs to the PDD. The design organizations and other organizations will obtain design related assumptions directly from the PDD. These organizations may establish additional assumptions for their individual activities, but such assumptions are not to conflict with the assumptions in the PDD. The PDD will serve as the primary link between the engineering design basis captured in the SDDs and the design requirements captured in U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) documents. The approved PDD is placed under Level 3 baseline control by the CRWMS Management and Operating Contractor (M&O) and the following portions of the PDD constitute the Technical Design Baseline for the MGR: the design characteristics listed in Table 2-1, the MGR Architecture (Section 4.1),the Engineering Design Bases (Section 5), and the Controlled Project Assumptions (Section 6).

  8. Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document

    SciTech Connect

    P. M. Curry

    2001-01-30

    The primary objective of the Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document (PDD) is to allocate the functions, requirements, and assumptions to the systems at Level 5 of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) architecture identified in Section 4. It provides traceability of the requirements to those contained in Section 3 of the ''Monitored Geologic Repository Requirements Document'' (MGR RD) (YMP 2000a) and other higher-level requirements documents. In addition, the PDD allocates design related assumptions to work products of non-design organizations. The document provides Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) technical requirements in support of design and performance assessment in preparing for the Site Recommendation (SR) and License Application (LA) milestones. The technical requirements documented in the PDD are to be captured in the System Description Documents (SDDs) which address each of the systems at Level 5 of the CRWMS architecture. The design engineers obtain the technical requirements from the SDDs and by reference from the SDDs to the PDD. The design organizations and other organizations will obtain design related assumptions directly from the PDD. These organizations may establish additional assumptions for their individual activities, but such assumptions are not to conflict with the assumptions in the PDD. The PDD will serve as the primary link between the technical requirements captured in the SDDs and the design requirements captured in US Department of Energy (DOE) documents. The approved PDD is placed under Level 3 baseline control by the CRWMS Management and Operating Contractor (M and O) and the following portions of the PDD constitute the Technical Design Baseline for the MGR: the design characteristics listed in Table 1-1, the MGR Architecture (Section 4.1), the Technical Requirements (Section 5), and the Controlled Project Assumptions (Section 6).

  9. THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF THE POTENTIAL REPOSITORY HORIZON

    SciTech Connect

    J.E. BEAN

    2004-09-27

    The primary purpose of this report is to assess the spatial variability and uncertainty of bulk thermal conductivity in the host horizon for the repository at Yucca Mountain. More specifically, the lithostratigraphic units studied are located within the Topopah Spring Tuff (Tpt) and consist of the upper lithophysal zone (Tptpul), the middle nonlithophysal zone (Tptpmn), the lower lithophysal zone (Tptpll), and the lower nonlithophysal zone (Tptpln). Design plans indicate that approximately 81 percent of the repository will be excavated in the Tptpll, approximately 12 percent in the Tptpmn, and the remainder in the Tptul and Tptpln (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168370]). This report provides three-dimensional geostatistical estimates of the bulk thermal conductivity for the four stratigraphic layers of the repository horizon. The three-dimensional geostatistical estimates of matrix and lithophysal porosity, dry bulk density, and matrix thermal conductivity are also provided. This report provides input to various models and calculations that simulate heat transport through the rock mass. These models include the ''Drift Degradation Analysis, Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model, Ventilation Model and Analysis Report, Igneous Intrusion Impacts on Waste Packages and Waste Forms, Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and TH Seepage) Models'', and ''Drift Scale THM Model''. These models directly or indirectly provide input to the total system performance assessment (TSPA). The main distinguishing characteristic among the lithophysal and nonlithophysal units is the percentage of large-scale (centimeters-meters) voids within the rock. The Tptpul and Tptpll, as their names suggest, have a higher percentage of lithophysae than the Tptpmn and the Tptpln. Understanding the influence of the lithophysae is of great importance to understanding bulk thermal conductivity.

  10. Engineered barrier development for a nuclear waste repository in basalt: an integration of current knowledge

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.J.

    1980-05-01

    This document represents a compilation of data and interpretive studies conducted as part of the engineered barriers program of the Basalt Waste Isolation Project. The overall objective of these studies is to provide information on barrier system designs, emplacement and isolation techniques, and chemical reactions expected in a nuclear waste repository located in the basalts underlying the Hanford Site within the state of Washington. Backfills, waste-basalt interactions, sorption, borehole plugging, etc., are among the topics discussed.

  11. Integration of defense waste into the Civilian Repository Program

    SciTech Connect

    1988-03-24

    The purpose of this audit was to determine whether the fee calculation method proposed by Waste Management would result in an accurate and fair allocation of costs to both civilian and defense owners of nuclear waste. We reviewed Waste Management`s proposed cost allocation plans to be used in calculating fees for defense waste disposal. We also evaluated Waste Management`s actions toward developing a defense waste fee payment schedule. Our examination was made in accordance with generally accepted government auditing standards which included tests of internal controls and compliance with laws and regulations to the extent necessary to satisfy the scope of the audit.

  12. Assessing repository technology: Where do we go from here?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichmann, David A.

    1992-01-01

    Three sample information retrieval systems, archie, autoLib, and Wide Area Information Service (WAIS), are compared with regard to their expressiveness and usefulness, first in the general context of information retrieval, and then as perspective software reuse repositories. While the representational capabilities of these systems are limited, they provide a useful foundation for future repository efforts, particularly from the perspective of repository distribution and coherent user interface design.

  13. Assessing repository technology. Where do we go from here?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichmann, David

    1992-01-01

    Three sample information retrieval systems, archie, autoLib, and Wide Area Information Service (WAIS), are compared with regard to their expressiveness and usefulness, first in the general context of information retrieval, and then as prospective software reuse repositories. While the representational capabilities of these systems are limited, they provide a useful foundation for future repository efforts, particularly from the perspective of repository distribution and coherent user interface design.

  14. Comparative Study of Metadata Standards and Metadata Repositories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahuja, Gunjan

    2011-12-01

    Lot of work is being accomplished in the national and international standards communities to reach a consensus on standardizing metadata and repositories for organizing the metadata. Descriptions of several metadata standards and their importance to statistical agencies are provided in this paper. Existing repositories based on these standards help to promote interoperability between organizations, systems, and people. Repositories are vehicles for collecting, managing, comparing, reusing, and disseminating the designs, specifications, procedures, and outputs of systems, e.g. statistical surveys.

  15. Cigeo, the French Geological Repository Project - 13022

    SciTech Connect

    Labalette, Thibaud; Harman, Alain; Dupuis, Marie-Claude; Ouzounian, Gerald

    2013-07-01

    The Cigeo industrial-scale geological disposal centre is designed for the disposal of the most highly-radioactive French waste. It will be built in an argillite formation of the Callovo-Oxfordian dating back 160 million years. The Cigeo project is located near the Bure village in the Paris Basin. The argillite formation was studied since 1974, and from the Meuse/Haute-Marne underground research laboratory since end of 1999. Most of the waste to be disposed of in the Cigeo repository comes from nuclear power plants and from reprocessing of their spent fuel. (authors)

  16. Safeguarding Structural Data Repositories against Bad Apples.

    PubMed

    Minor, Wladek; Dauter, Zbigniew; Helliwell, John R; Jaskolski, Mariusz; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    Structural biology research generates large amounts of data, some deposited in public databases or repositories, but a substantial remainder never becomes available to the scientific community. In addition, some of the deposited data contain less or more serious errors that may bias the results of data mining. Thorough analysis and discussion of these problems is needed to ameliorate this situation. This perspective is an attempt to propose some solutions and encourage both further discussion and action on the part of the relevant organizations, in particular the PDB and various bodies of the International Union of Crystallography. PMID:26840827

  17. EXACT Software Repository v 1.1

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-01-07

    The EXACT Software Repository contains a variety of software packages for describing, controlling, and analyzing computer experiments. The EXACT Python framework provides the experimentalist with convenient software tools to ease and organize the entire experimental process, including the description of factors and levels, the design of experiments, the control of experimental runs, the archiving of results, and analysis of results. The FAST package provides a Framework for Agile Software Testing. FAST manage the distributed executionmore » of EXACT, as well as summaries of test results.« less

  18. Libraries program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Congress authorized a library for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in 1879. The library was formally established in 1882 with the naming of the first librarian and began with a staff of three and a collection of 1,400 books. Today, the USGS Libraries Program is one of the world's largest Earth and natural science repositories and a resource of national significance used by researchers and the public worldwide.

  19. Area recommendation report for the crystalline repository project: An evaluation. [Crystalline Repository Project

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, J E; Lowe, H; Yurkovich, S P

    1986-03-28

    An evaluation is given of DOE's recommendation of the Elk River complex in North Carolina for siting the second repository. Twelve recommendations are made including a strong suggestion that the Cherokee Tribe appeal both through political and legal avenues for inclusion as an affected area primarily due to projected impacts upon economy and public health as a consequence of the potential for reduced tourism.

  20. Is There a Role for Research Students in an Institutional Repository? Some Repository Managers' Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickton, Margaret; McKnight, Cliff

    2007-01-01

    Although a number of studies have investigated the attitudes of published academic authors with respect to open access (OA) publishing and institutional repositories (IRs), none have considered the views of other institutional stakeholders. Research students, in particular, are a group that could make a major contribution to an IR, both currently…

  1. National Geoscience Data Repository System, Phase III: Implementation and Operation of the Repository

    SciTech Connect

    American Geological Institute

    1999-11-09

    The NGDRS steering committee met at Unocal's offices on October 1, 1998 in Sugar Land, Texas to review and discuss issues of data transfer and the continued development of the Stapleton prospect for establishment of a national core repository. Company representatives reaffirmed their commitment to donate geoscience data to the NGDRS once appropriate facilities are available.

  2. 15 CFR 1180.10 - NTIS permanent repository.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) TECHNOLOGY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE TRANSFER BY FEDERAL AGENCIES OF SCIENTIFIC, TECHNICAL AND ENGINEERING INFORMATION TO THE NATIONAL TECHNICAL INFORMATION SERVICE § 1180.10 NTIS permanent repository....

  3. 15 CFR 1180.10 - NTIS permanent repository.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) TECHNOLOGY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE TRANSFER BY FEDERAL AGENCIES OF SCIENTIFIC, TECHNICAL AND ENGINEERING INFORMATION TO THE NATIONAL TECHNICAL INFORMATION SERVICE § 1180.10 NTIS permanent repository....

  4. 15 CFR 1180.10 - NTIS permanent repository.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) TECHNOLOGY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE TRANSFER BY FEDERAL AGENCIES OF SCIENTIFIC, TECHNICAL AND ENGINEERING INFORMATION TO THE NATIONAL TECHNICAL INFORMATION SERVICE § 1180.10 NTIS permanent repository....

  5. 15 CFR 1180.10 - NTIS permanent repository.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) TECHNOLOGY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE TRANSFER BY FEDERAL AGENCIES OF SCIENTIFIC, TECHNICAL AND ENGINEERING INFORMATION TO THE NATIONAL TECHNICAL INFORMATION SERVICE § 1180.10 NTIS permanent repository....

  6. Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems: REFERENCE SITE INITIAL ASSESSMENT FOR A SALT DOME REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect

    Harwell, M. A.; Brandstetter, A.; Benson, G. L.; Raymond, J. R.; Brandley, D. J.; Serne, R. J.; Soldat, J. K.; Cole, C. R.; Deutsch, W. J.; Gupta, S. K.; Harwell, C. C.; Napier, B. A.; Reisenauer, A. E.; Prater, L. S.; Simmons, C. S.; Strenge, D. L.; Washburn, J. F.; Zellmer, J. T.

    1982-06-01

    As a methodology demonstration for the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI), the Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program conducted an initial reference site analysis of the long-term effectiveness of a salt dome repository. The Hainesville Salt Dome in Texas was chosen to be representative of the Gulf Coast interior salt domes; however, the Hainesville Site has been eliminated as a possible nuclear waste repository site. The data used for this exercise are not adequate for an actual assessment, nor have all the parametric analyses been made that would adequately characterize the response of the geosystem surrounding the repository. Additionally, because this was the first exercise of the complete AEGIS and WASTE Rock Interaction Technology (WRIT) methodology, this report provides the initial opportunity for the methodology, specifically applied to a site, to be reviewed by the community outside the AEGIS. The scenario evaluation, as a part of the methodology demonstration, involved consideration of a large variety of potentially disruptive phenomena, which alone or in concert could lead to a breach in a salt dome repository and to a subsequent transport of the radionuclides to the environment. Without waste- and repository-induced effects, no plausible natural geologic events or processes which would compromise the repository integrity could be envisioned over the one-million-year time frame after closure. Near-field (waste- and repository-induced) effects were excluded from consideration in this analysis, but they can be added in future analyses when that methodology development is more complete. The potential for consequential human intrusion into salt domes within a million-year time frame led to the consideration of a solution mining intrusion scenario. The AEGIS staff developed a specific human intrusion scenario at 100 years and 1000 years post-closure, which is one of a whole suite of possible scenarios. This scenario

  7. Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems: REFERENCE SITE INITIAL ASSESSMENT FOR A SALT DOME REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect

    Harwell, M. A.; Brandstetter, A.; Benson, G. L.; Bradley, D. J.; Serne, R. J.; Soldat, J. K; Cole, C. R.; Deutsch, W. J.; Gupta, S. K.; Harwell, C. C.; Napier, B. A.; Reisenauer, A. E.; Prater, L. S.; Simmons, C. S.; Strenge, D. L.; Washburn, J. F.; Zellmer, J. T.

    1982-06-01

    As a methodology demonstration for the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI), the Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program conducted an initial reference site analysis of the long-term effectiveness of a salt dome repository. The Hainesville Salt Dome in Texas was chosen to be representative of the Gulf Coast interior salt domes; however, the Hainesville Site has been eliminated as a possible nuclear waste repository site. The data used for this exercise are not adequate for an actual assessment, nor have all the parametric analyses been made that would adequately characterize the response of the geosystem surrounding the repository. Additionally, because this was the first exercise of the complete AEGIS and WASTE Rock Interaction Technology (WRIT) methodology, this report provides the initial opportunity for the methodology, specifically applied to a site, to be reviewed by the community outside the AEGIS. The scenario evaluation, as a part of the methodology demonstration, involved consideration of a large variety of potentially disruptive phenomena, which alone or in concert could lead to a breach in a salt dome repository and to a subsequent transport of the radionuclides to the environment. Without waste- and repository-induced effects, no plausible natural geologic events or processes which would compromise the repository integrity could be envisioned over the one-million-year time frame after closure. Near-field (waste- and repository-induced) effects were excluded from consideration in this analysis, but they can be added in future analyses when that methodology development is more complete. The potential for consequential human intrusion into salt domes within a million-year time frame led to the consideration of a solution mining intrusion scenario. The AEGIS staff developed a specific human intrusion scenario at 100 years and 1000 years post-closure, which is one of a whole suite of possible scenarios. This scenario

  8. MONITORED GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY INTERNAL HAZARDS ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    S.E. Salzman

    1999-11-05

    This analysis was performed by the Management and Operating Contractor (M&O) Safety Assurance Department to identify and document the internal hazards and preliminary events associated with preclosure operations of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). Internal hazards are those hazards presented by operation of the facility and associated processes. These are in contrast to external hazards which involve natural phenomena and external man-made hazards. The hazard analysis methodology used in this analysis provides a systematic means to identify facility hazards and associated events that may result in radiological consequences to the public and facility worker during the MGR preclosure period. The events are documented in a preliminary events list and are intended to be used as input to the MGR Design Basis Event (DBE) selection process. It is expected that the results from this analysis will undergo further screening and analysis based on the criteria that apply to the performance of DBE analyses for the preclosure period of repository operation. As the MGR design progresses, this analysis will be reviewed to ensure no new hazards are introduced and that previously evaluated hazards have not increased in severity.

  9. Swine gene banking: A quality control perspective on collection, and analysis of samples for a national repository

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The National Animal Germplasm Program (NAGP) is developing a national repository for germplasm (semen, oocytes, embryos, blood, DNA, tissue) for all agricultural species in the United States. Currently, the swine collection consists of 127,479 samples from 886 boars representing 20 major, minor and...

  10. Investigating the Thermal Limit of Clay Minerals for Applications in Nuclear Waste Repository Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteo, E. N.; Miller, A. W.; Kruichak, J.; Mills, M.; Tellez, H.; Wang, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Clay minerals are likely candidates to aid in nuclear waste isolation due to their low permeability, favorable swelling properties, and high cation sorption capacities. Establishing the thermal limit for clay minerals in a nuclear waste repository is a potentially important component of repository design, as flexibility of the heat load within the repository can have a major impact on the selection of repository design. For example, the thermal limit plays a critical role in the time that waste packages would need to cool before being transferred to the repository. Understanding the chemical and physical changes that occur in clay minerals at various temperatures above the current thermal limit (of 100 °C) can enable decision-makers with information critical to evaluating the potential trade-offs of increasing the thermal limit within the repository. Most critical is gaining understanding of how varying thermal conditions in the repository will impact radionuclide sorption and transport in clay materials either as engineered barriers or as disposal media. A variety of clays (illite, mixed layer illite/smectite, montmorillonite, and palygorskite) were heated for a range of temperatures between 100-500 °C. These samples were characterized by a variety of methods, including nitrogen adsorption, x-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, barium chloride exchange for cation exchange capacity (CEC), and iodide sorption. The nitrogen porosimetry shows that for all the clays, thermally-induced changes in BET surface area are dominated by collapse/creation of the microporosity, i.e. pore diameters < 17 angstroms. Changes in micro porosity (relative to no heat treatment) are most significant for heat treatments 300 °C and above. Alterations are also seen in the chemical properties (CEC, XRD, iodide sorption) of clays, and like pore size distribution changes, are most significant above 300 °C. Overall, the results imply that changes seen in pores size distribution

  11. 21 CFR 522.480 - Repository corticotropin injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Repository corticotropin injection. 522.480 Section 522.480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.480 Repository corticotropin...

  12. Digital Libraries and Repositories in India: An Evaluative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mittal, Rekha; Mahesh, G.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to identify and evaluate the collections within digital libraries and repositories in India available in the public domain. Design/methodology/approach: The digital libraries and repositories were identified through a study of the literature, as well as internet searching and browsing. The resulting digital…

  13. Neural network-based retrieval from software reuse repositories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichmann, David A.; Srinivas, Kankanahalli

    1992-01-01

    A significant hurdle confronts the software reuser attempting to select candidate components from a software repository - discriminating between those components without resorting to inspection of the implementation(s). We outline an approach to this problem based upon neural networks which avoids requiring the repository administrators to define a conceptual closeness graph for the classification vocabulary.

  14. Creating Complex Repository Collections, Such as Journals, with Manakin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koenig, Jack; Mikeal, Adam

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on a devised method of collection organisation within a DSpace repository using a Manakin theme and descriptive metadata. Design/methodology/approach: Using a Manakin theme, a user interface for a repository collection containing the contents of a serial was created to divide the collection into…

  15. Collaboration Nation: The Building of the Welsh Repository Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowles, Jacqueline

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to disseminate information about the Welsh Repository Network (WRN), innovative work being undertaken to build an integrated network of institutional digital repositories. A collaborative approach, in particular through the provision of centralised technical and organisational support, has demonstrated…

  16. Structure, Features, and Faculty Content in ARL Member Repositories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercer, Holly; Koenig, Jay; McGeachin, Robert B.; Tucker, Sandra L.

    2011-01-01

    Questions about the optimal way to present repository content to authors, submitters, and end-users, prompted this study. The authors examined, through an observation and a survey, the institutional repositories of peer institutions in the ARL for good practices related to the presentation and organization of faculty-authored institutional…

  17. Science Is the First Step to Siting Nuclear Waste Repositories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuzil, C. E.

    2014-02-01

    As Shaw [2014] notes, U.S. research on shale as a repository host was halted before expending anything close to the effort devoted to studying crystalline rock, salt, and—most notably—tuff at Yucca Mountain. The new political reality regarding Yucca Mountain may allow reconsideration of the decision to abandon research on shale as a repository host.

  18. Constructibility issues associated with a nuclear waste repository in basalt

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D.A.

    1981-12-04

    This report contains the text and slide reproductions of a speech on nuclear waste disposal in basalt. The presentation addresses the layout of repository access shafts and subsurface facilities resulting from the conceptual design of a nuclear repository in basalt. The constructibility issues that must be resolved prior to construction are described. (DMC)

  19. My Three Wishes for Digital Repositories. Building Digital Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huwe, Terence K.

    2005-01-01

    In this column on digital repository management, the author defines three areas within the sphere of digital repositories that need work. The first two pertain to information architecture, while the last one pertains to taking action. The author's first "wish" is for top-notch library Web sites that act as a gateway to any sphere of knowledge. He…

  20. Developing an Integrated Institutional Repository at Imperial College London

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afshari, Fereshteh; Jones, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to demonstrate how a highly integrated approach to repository development and deployment can be beneficial in producing a successful archive. Design/methodology/approach: Imperial College London undertook a significant specifications process to gather and formalise requirements for its repository system. This was done…

  1. Digital Preservation in the Context of Institutional Repositories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hockx-Yu, Helen

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To discuss the issues and challenges of digital preservation facing institutional repositories and to illustrate the Joint Information Systems Committee's (JISC) view on institutional repositories and its key initiatives in helping UK institutions address these issues. Design/methodology/approach: A combination of published work and JISC…

  2. Pitting, galvanic, and long-term corrosion studies on candidate container alloys for the Tuff Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.A.; Thompson, N.G.; Durr, C.L.

    1992-01-01

    Contest Columbus Technologies, Inc. (CC Technologies) investigated the long-term performance of container materials for high-level radioactive waste packages as part of the information needed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to assess the Department of Energy`s application to construct a geologic repository for the high-level radioactive waste. The scope of work focused on the Tuff Repository and employed short-term techniques, such as electrochemical and mechanical techniques to examine a wide range of possible failure modes. Two classes of alloys were evaluated for use as container materials for the Tuff Repository; Fe-Cr-Ni alloys and copper-base alloys. The candidate Fe-Cr-Ni alloys were Type 304L Stainless Steel (Alloy 304L) and Incoloy Alloy 825 (Alloy 825). The candidate copper-base alloys were CDA 102 Copper (Alloy CDA 102) and CDA 715 Copper-3D Nickel (Alloy CDA 715). The corrosion testing was performed in a simulated J-13 well water and in solutions selected from an experimental matrix from Task 2 of the program. This report summarizes the results of Task 4 (Pitting Studies), Task 6 (Other Failure Modes) and Task 7 (Long-Term Exposures) of the program. Pit-initiation studies, performed in Task 4, focused on anomalous Cyclic Potentiodynamic Polarization (CPP) behavior of the copper-base alloys reported in Task 2 of the program. Pit propagation studies were performed on Alloy CDA 102 in Task A of the program. Two types of galvanic corrosion studies were performed in Task 6 of the program; thermogalvanic couples and borehole linear-container interactions. In the thermogalvanic couples tests, the effect of temperature variation on the surface of the container on acceleration of corrosion was evaluated for two alloys; Alloy CDA 102 and Alloy 304L. Long-term immersion tests were conducted in Task 7 of the program.

  3. Pitting, galvanic, and long-term corrosion studies on candidate container alloys for the Tuff Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.A.; Thompson, N.G.; Durr, C.L. )

    1992-01-01

    Contest Columbus Technologies, Inc. (CC Technologies) investigated the long-term performance of container materials for high-level radioactive waste packages as part of the information needed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to assess the Department of Energy's application to construct a geologic repository for the high-level radioactive waste. The scope of work focused on the Tuff Repository and employed short-term techniques, such as electrochemical and mechanical techniques to examine a wide range of possible failure modes. Two classes of alloys were evaluated for use as container materials for the Tuff Repository; Fe-Cr-Ni alloys and copper-base alloys. The candidate Fe-Cr-Ni alloys were Type 304L Stainless Steel (Alloy 304L) and Incoloy Alloy 825 (Alloy 825). The candidate copper-base alloys were CDA 102 Copper (Alloy CDA 102) and CDA 715 Copper-3D Nickel (Alloy CDA 715). The corrosion testing was performed in a simulated J-13 well water and in solutions selected from an experimental matrix from Task 2 of the program. This report summarizes the results of Task 4 (Pitting Studies), Task 6 (Other Failure Modes) and Task 7 (Long-Term Exposures) of the program. Pit-initiation studies, performed in Task 4, focused on anomalous Cyclic Potentiodynamic Polarization (CPP) behavior of the copper-base alloys reported in Task 2 of the program. Pit propagation studies were performed on Alloy CDA 102 in Task A of the program. Two types of galvanic corrosion studies were performed in Task 6 of the program; thermogalvanic couples and borehole linear-container interactions. In the thermogalvanic couples tests, the effect of temperature variation on the surface of the container on acceleration of corrosion was evaluated for two alloys; Alloy CDA 102 and Alloy 304L. Long-term immersion tests were conducted in Task 7 of the program.

  4. Stress-corrosion-cracking studies on candidate container alloys for the Tuff Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.A.; Durr, C.L.

    1992-05-01

    Cortest Columbus Technologies, Inc. (CC Technologies) investigated the long-term performance of container materials used for high-level waste package as part of the information needed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to assess the Department of Energy`s application to construct to geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. At the direction of the NRC, the program focused on the Tuff Repository. This report summarizes the results of Stress-Corrosion-Cracking (SCC) studies performed in Tasks 3, 5, and 7 of the program. Two test techniques were used; U-bend exposures and Slow-Strain-Rate (SSR) tests. The testing was performed on two copper-base alloys (Alloy CDA 102 and Alloy CDA 175) and two Fe-Cr-Ni alloys (Alloy 304L and Alloy 825) in simulated J-13 groundwater and other simulated solutions for the Tuff Repository. These solutions were designed to simulate the effects of concentration and irradiation on the groundwater composition. All SCC testing on the Fe-Cr-Ni Alloys was performed on solution-annealed specimens and thus issues such as the effect of sensitization on SCC were not addressed.

  5. Exploring Characterizations of Learning Object Repositories Using Data Mining Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segura, Alejandra; Vidal, Christian; Menendez, Victor; Zapata, Alfredo; Prieto, Manuel

    Learning object repositories provide a platform for the sharing of Web-based educational resources. As these repositories evolve independently, it is difficult for users to have a clear picture of the kind of contents they give access to. Metadata can be used to automatically extract a characterization of these resources by using machine learning techniques. This paper presents an exploratory study carried out in the contents of four public repositories that uses clustering and association rule mining algorithms to extract characterizations of repository contents. The results of the analysis include potential relationships between different attributes of learning objects that may be useful to gain an understanding of the kind of resources available and eventually develop search mechanisms that consider repository descriptions as a criteria in federated search.

  6. Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) Application Repository Design and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handler, Louis M.

    2013-01-01

    The Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) Application Repository Design and Analysis document describes the STRS application repository for software-defined radio (SDR) applications intended to be compliant to the STRS Architecture Standard. The document provides information about the submission of artifacts to the STRS application repository, to provide information to the potential users of that information, and for the systems engineer to understand the requirements, concepts, and approach to the STRS application repository. The STRS application repository is intended to capture knowledge, documents, and other artifacts for each waveform application or other application outside of its project so that when the project ends, the knowledge is retained. The document describes the transmission of technology from mission to mission capturing lessons learned that are used for continuous improvement across projects and supporting NASA Procedural Requirements (NPRs) for performing software engineering projects and NASAs release process.

  7. [The subject repositories of strategy of the Open Access initiative].

    PubMed

    Soares Guimarães, M C; da Silva, C H; Horsth Noronha, I

    2012-11-01

    The subject repositories are defined as a set of digital objects resulting from the research related to a specific disciplinary field and occupy a still restricted space in the discussion agenda of the Free Access Movement when compared to amplitude reached in the discussion of Institutional Repositories. Although the Subject Repository comes to prominence in the field, especially for the success of initiatives such as the arXiv, PubMed and E-prints, the literature on the subject is recognized as very limited. Despite its roots in the Library and Information Science, and focus on the management of disciplinary collections (subject area literature), there is little information available about the development and management of subject repositories. The following text seeks to make a brief summary on the topic as a way to present the potential to develop subject repositories in order to strengthen the initiative of open access. PMID:23568395

  8. Nuclear Waste Programs semiannual progress report, April--September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, J.K.; Bradley, C.R.; Buck, E.C.

    1994-05-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Waste Programs of the Chemical Technology Division (CMT), Argonne National Laboratory, in the period April--September 1992. In these programs, studies are underway on the performance of waste glass and spent fuel in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation`s high-level waste repositories.

  9. Nuclear waste programs; Semiannual progress report, October 1991--March 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, J.K.; Bradley, C.R.; Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Ebert, W.L.; Emery, J.W.; Feng, X.; Finn, P.A.; Gerding, T.J.; Hoh, J.C.

    1993-11-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Waste Programs of the Chemical Technology Division (CMT), Argonne National Laboratory, in the period October 1991-March 1992. In these programs, studies are underway on the performance of waste glass and spent fuel in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation`s high-level waste repositories

  10. Repository Waste Package Transporter Shielding Weight Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    C.E. Sanders; Shiaw-Der Su

    2005-02-02

    The Yucca Mountain repository requires the use of a waste package (WP) transporter to transport a WP from a process facility on the surface to the subsurface for underground emplacement. The transporter is a part of the waste emplacement transport systems, which includes a primary locomotive at the front end and a secondary locomotive at the rear end. The overall system with a WP on board weights over 350 metric tons (MT). With the shielding mass constituting approximately one-third of the total system weight, shielding optimization for minimal weight will benefit the overall transport system with reduced axle requirements and improved maneuverability. With a high contact dose rate on the WP external surface and minimal personnel shielding afforded by the WP, the transporter provides radiation shielding to workers during waste emplacement and retrieval operations. This paper presents the design approach and optimization method used in achieving a shielding configuration with minimal weight.

  11. Repository Subsurface Preliminary Fire Hazard Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Richard C. Logan

    2001-07-30

    This fire hazard analysis identifies preliminary design and operations features, fire, and explosion hazards, and provides a reasonable basis to establish the design requirements of fire protection systems during development and emplacement phases of the subsurface repository. This document follows the Technical Work Plan (TWP) (CRWMS M&O 2001c) which was prepared in accordance with AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities''; Attachment 4 of AP-ESH-008, ''Hazards Analysis System''; and AP-3.11Q, ''Technical Reports''. The objective of this report is to establish the requirements that provide for facility nuclear safety and a proper level of personnel safety and property protection from the effects of fire and the adverse effects of fire-extinguishing agents.

  12. MRS system study for the repository: Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project; Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Sinagra, T.A.; Harig, R.

    1990-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), has initiated a waste management system study to identify the impacts of the presence or absence of a monitored retrievable storage facility (hereinafter referred to as ``MRS``) on system costs and program schedules. To support this study, life-cycle cost estimates and construction schedules have been prepared for the surface and underground facilities and operations of a geologic nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. Nine different operating scenarios (cases) have been identified by OCRWM for inclusion in this study. For each case, the following items are determined: the repository design and construction costs, operating costs, closure and decommissioning costs, required staffing, construction schedules, uncertainties associated with the costs and schedules, and shipping cask and disposal container throughputs. 6 refs., 83 figs., 57 tabs.

  13. MRS system study for the repository: Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project; Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Sinagra, T.A.; Harig, R.

    1990-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), has initiated a waste management system study to identify the impacts of the presence or absence of a monitored retrievable storage facility (hereinafter referred to as ``MRS``) on system costs and program schedules. To support this study, life-cycle cost estimates and construction schedules have been prepared for the surface and underground facilities and operations geologic nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. Nine different operating scenarios (cases) have been identified by OCRWM for inclusion in this study. For each case, the following items are determined: the repository design and construction costs, operating costs, closure and decommissioning costs, required staffing, construction schedules, uncertainties associated with the costs and schedules, and shipping cask and disposal container throughputs. This document contains A-D.

  14. Role of geophysics in identifying and characterizing sites for high-level nuclear waste repositories.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wynn, J.C.; Roseboom, E.H.

    1987-01-01

    Evaluation of potential high-level nuclear waste repository sites is an area where geophysical capabilities and limitations may significantly impact a major governmental program. Since there is concern that extensive exploratory drilling might degrade most potential disposal sites, geophysical methods become crucial as the only nondestructive means to examine large volumes of rock in three dimensions. Characterization of potential sites requires geophysicists to alter their usual mode of thinking: no longer are anomalies being sought, as in mineral exploration, but rather their absence. Thus the size of features that might go undetected by a particular method take on new significance. Legal and regulatory considerations that stem from this different outlook, most notably the requirements of quality assurance (necessary for any data used in support of a repository license application), are forcing changes in the manner in which geophysicists collect and document their data. -Authors

  15. Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document

    SciTech Connect

    P. Curry

    2001-06-26

    The primary objective of the Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document (PDD) is to allocate the functions, requirements, and assumptions to the systems at Level 5 of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) architecture identified in Section 4. It provides traceability of the requirements to those contained in Section 3 of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Requirements Document (YMP RD) (YMP 2001a) and other higher-level requirements documents. In addition, the PDD allocates design related assumptions to work products of non-design organizations. The document provides Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) technical requirements in support of design and performance assessment in preparing for the Site Recommendation (SR) and License Application (LA) milestones. The technical requirements documented in the PDD are to be captured in the System Description Documents (SDDs) which address each of the systems at Level 5 of the CRWMS architecture. The design engineers obtain the technical requirements from the SDDs and by reference from the SDDs to the PDD. The design organizations and other organizations will obtain design related assumptions directly from the PDD. These organizations may establish additional assumptions for their individual activities, but such assumptions are not to conflict with the assumptions in the PDD. The PDD will serve as the primary link between the technical requirements captured in the SDDs and the design requirements captured in US Department of Energy (DOE) documents. The approved PDD is placed under Level 3 baseline control by the CRWMS Management and Operating Contractor (M&O) and the following portions of the PDD constitute the Technical Design Baseline for the MGR: the design characteristics listed in Table 1-1, the MGR Architecture (Section 4.1), the Technical Requirements (Section 5), and the Controlled Project Assumptions (Section 6).

  16. Repository surface design site layout analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Montalvo, H.R.

    1998-02-27

    The purpose of this analysis is to establish the arrangement of the Yucca Mountain Repository surface facilities and features near the North Portal. The analysis updates and expands the North Portal area site layout concept presented in the ACD, including changes to reflect the resizing of the Waste Handling Building (WHB), Waste Treatment Building (WTB), Carrier Preparation Building (CPB), and site parking areas; the addition of the Carrier Washdown Buildings (CWBs); the elimination of the Cask Maintenance Facility (CMF); and the development of a concept for site grading and flood control. The analysis also establishes the layout of the surface features (e.g., roads and utilities) that connect all the repository surface areas (North Portal Operations Area, South Portal Development Operations Area, Emplacement Shaft Surface Operations Area, and Development Shaft Surface Operations Area) and locates an area for a potential lag storage facility. Details of South Portal and shaft layouts will be covered in separate design analyses. The objective of this analysis is to provide a suitable level of design for the Viability Assessment (VA). The analysis was revised to incorporate additional material developed since the issuance of Revision 01. This material includes safeguards and security input, utility system input (size and location of fire water tanks and pump houses, potable water and sanitary sewage rates, size of wastewater evaporation pond, size and location of the utility building, size of the bulk fuel storage tank, and size and location of other exterior process equipment), main electrical substation information, redundancy of water supply and storage for the fire support system, and additional information on the storm water retention pond.

  17. The Research Library's Role in Digital Repository Services: Final Report of the ARL Digital Repository Issues Task Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Research Libraries, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Libraries are making diverse contributions to the development of many types of digital repositories, particularly those housing locally created digital content, including new digital objects or digitized versions of locally held works. In some instances, libraries are managing a repository and its related services entirely on their own, but often…

  18. Draft Area Recommendation Report for the Crystalline Repository Project: Overview. [Second repository

    SciTech Connect

    1986-01-01

    The draft Area Recommendation Report (ARR) for the Crystalline Repository Project identifies portions of crystalline rock bodies as proposed potentially acceptable sites for the Nation's second repository for deep geologic burial of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. This Overview provides a brief summary of that report. The US Department of Energy (DOE) evaluated available geologic and environmental data for 235 crystalline rock bodies in the North Central, Northeastern, and Southeastern Regions to identify preliminary candidate areas. The 12 proposed potentially acceptable sites are located in the States of Georgia (1), Maine (2), Minnesota (3), New Hampshire (1), North Carolina (2), Virginia (2), and Wisconsin (1). The data, analyses and rationale pertaining to the identification of the 12 proposed potentially acceptable sites are presented in the draft ARR. The analyses presented in the draft ARR demonstrate that the evidence available for each proposed potentially acceptable site supports (1) a finding that the site is not disqualified under Appendix III of the DOE Siting Guidelines and (2) a decision to proceed with the continued investigation of the site on the basis of the favorable and potentially adverse conditions identified to date. These potentially acceptable sites will be investigated and evaluated in more detail during the area phase of the siting process and considered along with other candidate sites in a progressive narrowing process to finally choose the site of the second repository in 1998.

  19. Adapting a Clinical Data Repository to ICD-10-CM through the use of a Terminology Repository.

    PubMed

    Cimino, James J; Remennick, Lyubov

    2014-01-01

    Clinical data repositories frequently contain patient diagnoses coded with the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9-CM). These repositories now need to accommodate data coded with the Tenth Revision (ICD-10-CM). Database users wish to retrieve relevant data regardless of the system by which they are coded. We demonstrate how a terminology repository (the Research Entities Dictionary or RED) serves as an ontology relating terms of both ICD versions to each other to support seamless version-independent retrieval from the Biomedical Translational Research Information System (BTRIS) at the National Institutes of Health. We make use of the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services' General Equivalence Mappings (GEMs) to reduce the modeling effort required to determine whether ICD-10-CM terms should be added to the RED as new concepts or as synonyms of existing concepts. A divide-and-conquer approach is used to develop integration heuristics that offer a satisfactory interim solution and facilitate additional refinement of the integration as time and resources allow. PMID:25954344

  20. Ultrafine cement grout for sealing underground nuclear waste repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, E.H.; Onofrei, M.

    1996-02-01

    Sealing fractures in nuclear waste repositories concerns all programs investigating deep burial as a means of disposal. Because the most likely mechanism for contaminant migration is by dissolution and movement through groundwater, sealing programs are seeking low-viscosity sealants that are chemically, mineralogically, and physically compatible with their host. This paper presents the results of collaborative work between Whitesell Laboratories, operated by Atomic Energy of Canada, Ltd., and Sandia National Laboratories; the work was undertaken in support of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This effort addresses the technology associated with long-term isolation of nuclear waste in a natural salt medium. The work presented is part of the plugging and sealing program, specifically the development and optimization of Ultrafine cementitious grout that can be injected to adequately lower excessive, strain-induced permeability in the Distributed Rock Zone (DRZ) surrounding underground excavations. Innovative equipment and procedures employed in the laboratory produced a usable cement-based grout whose particles are 90% smaller than 8 microns and average 4 microns. The process involved simultaneous wet pulverization and mixing. The grout was used for a successful in situ test underground at the WIPP. Injection of grout sealed microfractures as small as 8 microns and lowered the gas permeability of the DRZ by three orders of magnitude. Following the WIPP test, additional work produced an improved version of the grout containing particles 90% smaller than 6 microns and averaging 2 microns. This grout can be produced in the dry form at a competitive cost ready to mix.

  1. Master Metadata Repository and Metadata-Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Edward; Reed, Nate; Zhang, Wen

    2007-01-01

    A master metadata repository (MMR) software system manages the storage and searching of metadata pertaining to data from national and international satellite sources of the Global Ocean Data Assimilation Experiment (GODAE) High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature Pilot Project [GHRSSTPP]. These sources produce a total of hundreds of data files daily, each file classified as one of more than ten data products representing global sea-surface temperatures. The MMR is a relational database wherein the metadata are divided into granulelevel records [denoted file records (FRs)] for individual satellite files and collection-level records [denoted data set descriptions (DSDs)] that describe metadata common to all the files from a specific data product. FRs and DSDs adhere to the NASA Directory Interchange Format (DIF). The FRs and DSDs are contained in separate subdatabases linked by a common field. The MMR is configured in MySQL database software with custom Practical Extraction and Reporting Language (PERL) programs to validate and ingest the metadata records. The database contents are converted into the Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) standard format by use of the Extensible Markup Language (XML). A Web interface enables users to search for availability of data from all sources.

  2. Parametric study of geohydrologic performance characteristics for geologic waste repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, C.E.; Marine, I.W.

    1980-11-01

    One of the major objectives of the National Waste Terminal Storage Program is to identify potential geologic sites for storage and isolation of radioactive waste (and possibly irradiated fuel). Potential sites for the storage and isolation of radioactive waste or spent fuel in a geologic rock unit are being carefully evaluated to ensure that radionuclides from the stored waste or fuel will never appear in the biosphere in amounts that would constitute a hazard to the health and safety of the public. The objective of this report is to quantify and present in graphical form the effects of significant geohydrologic and other performance characteristics that would influence the movement of radionuclides from a storage site in a rock unit to the biosphere. The effort in this study was focused on transport by groundwater because that is the most likely method of radionuclide escape. Graphs of the major performance characteristics that influence the transport of radionuclides from a repository to the biosphere by groundwater are presented. The major characteristics addressed are radioactive decay, leach rate, hydraulic conductivity, porosity, groundwater gradient, hydrodynamic dispersion, ion exchange, and distance to the biosphere. These major performance characteristics are combind with each other and with the results of certain other combinations and presented in graphical form to provide the interrelationships of values measured during field studies. The graphical form of presentation should be useful in the screening process of site selection. An appendix illustrates the use of these graphs to assess the suitability of a site.

  3. Preservation of Earth Science Data History with Digital Content Repository Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Y.; Pan, J.; Shrestha, B.; Cook, R. B.

    2011-12-01

    An increasing need for derived and on-demand data product in Earth Science research makes the digital content more difficult for providers to manage and preserve and for users to locate, understand, and consume. Specifically, this increasing need presents additional challenges in managing data processing history information and delivering such information to end users. For example, the North American Carbon Program (NACP) Multi-scale Synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project (MsTMIP) chose a modified SYNMAP land cover data as one of the input driver data for participating terrestrial biospheric models. The global 1km resolution SYNMAP data was created by harmonizing 3 remote sensing-based land cover products: GLCC, GLC2000, and the MODIS land cover product. The original SYNMAP land cover data was aggregated into half and quarter degree resolution. It was then enhanced with more detailed grassland and cropland types. Currently, there lacks an effective mechanism to convey this data processing information to different modeling teams for them to determine if a data product meets their needs. It still highly relies on offline human interaction. The NASA-sponsored ORNL DAAC has leveraged the contemporary digital object repository technology to promote the representation, management, and delivery of data processing history and provenance information. Within digital object repository, different data products are managed as objects, with metadata as attributes and content delivery and management services as dissemination methods. Derivation relationships among data products can be semantically referenced between digital objects. Within the repository, data users can easily track a derived data product back to its origin, explorer metadata and documents about each intermediate data product, and discover processing details involved in each derivation step. Coupled with Drupal Web Content Management System, the digital repository interface was enhanced to

  4. Rock and Core Repository Coming Digital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maicher, Doris; Fleischer, Dirk; Czerniak, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    In times of whole city centres being available by a mouse click in 3D to virtually walk through, reality sometimes becomes neglected. The reality of scientific sample collections not being digitised to the essence of molecules, isotopes and electrons becomes unbelievable to the upgrowing generation of scientists. Just like any other geological institute the Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research GEOMAR accumulated thousands of specimen. The samples, collected mainly during marine expeditions, date back as far as 1964. Today GEOMAR houses a central geological sample collection of at least 17 000 m of sediment core and more than 4 500 boxes with hard rock samples and refined sample specimen. This repository, having been dormant, missed the onset of the interconnected digital age. Physical samples without barcodes, QR codes or RFID tags need to be migrated and reconnected, urgently. In our use case, GEOMAR opted for the International Geo Sample Number IGSN as the persistent identifier. Consequentially, the software CurationDIS by smartcube GmbH as the central component of this project was selected. The software is designed to handle acquisition and administration of sample material and sample archiving in storage places. In addition, the software allows direct embedding of IGSN. We plan to adopt IGSN as a future asset, while for the initial inventory taking of our sample material, simple but unique QR codes act as "bridging identifiers" during the process. Currently we compile an overview of the broad variety of sample types and their associated data. QR-coding of the boxes of rock samples and sediment cores is near completion, delineating their location in the repository and linking a particular sample to any information available about the object. Planning is in progress to streamline the flow from receiving new samples to their curation to sharing samples and information publically. Additionally, interface planning for linkage to GEOMAR databases Ocean

  5. Rolling Deck to Repository III: Shipboard Event Logging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, C. L.; Arko, R.; Miller, S. P.; Dorsk, A.; McCue, S.; Fisichella, D. C.

    2008-12-01

    Data gathered during NSF-supported scientific research cruises represent an important component of the overall oceanographic data collection. The Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) pilot project aims to improve access to basic shipboard data and ultimately reduce the work required to provide that access. Improved access will be achieved through identification of best practices for shipboard data management, identification of standard metadata and data products from research cruises, development of metadata schemas to describe a research cruise, and development of a prototype data discovery system that could be used by the entire NSF-supported academic research fleet. Shoreside data managers will work collaboratively with ship technicians and vessel operators to develop approaches that scale from smaller coastal vessels to larger open ocean research vessels. One of the coordinated subprojects within the R2R project will focus on development of a shipboard event logging system that would incorporate best practice guidelines, a metadata schema and new and existing applications to generate a scientific sampling event log in the form of a digital text file. A cruise event logging system enables researchers to record digitally all scientific sampling events and assign a unique event identifier to each entry. Decades of work conducted within large coordinated ocean research programs (JGOFS, GLOBEC, WOCE and RIDGE) have shown that creation of a shipboard sampling event log can facilitate greatly the subsequent integration of data sets from individual investigators. In addition to providing a quick way to determine what types of data might have been collected during a cruise, the sampling event log can be used to visualize the relationship, both temporally and geospatially, between the diverse types of sampling events conducted during a research cruise. Research questions in marine ecology or modeling projects are inherently multi-disciplinary and require access to a variety

  6. Engineering for Operation of a Future Belgian Deep Geological Repository for ILW and HLW - 12379

    SciTech Connect

    Haverkamp, B.; Biurrun, E.; Nieder-Westermann, G.H.; Van Humbeeck, H.

    2012-07-01

    In Belgium, an advanced conceptual design is being elaborated for deep geologic disposal of high level waste (HLW) and for low and intermediate level waste (LILW) not amenable for surface disposal. The concept is based on a shielded steel and concrete container for disposal of HLW, i.e., the Super-container. LILW will be disposed of in separately designed concrete caissons. The reference host rock is the Boom Clay, a poorly indurated clay formation in northeastern Belgium. Investigations into the potential host rock are conducted at the HADES underground research laboratory in Mol, Belgium. In 2009 the Belgian Agency for Management of Radioactive Waste and Enriched Fissile Materials (ONDRAF/NIRAS) initiated a four year research project aimed at confirming the fundamental feasibility of building and operating a repository. The goal of the program is to demonstrate at a detailed conceptual level that the proposed geologic disposal system can be safely constructed, operated, and progressively closed. Part of the broader research efforts being conducted includes evaluations optimization of the waste transportation shaft, subsurface transportation system, ventilation system, and evaluation of backfilling and sealing concepts for the repository design. The potential for implementation of a waste retrieval strategy encompassing the first 100 years after emplacement is also considered. In the framework of a four year research program aimed at confirming the fundamental feasibility of building and operating a repository in poorly indurated clay design studies have been underway to optimize the waste transportation shaft, subsurface transportation system, and ventilation system. Additionally backfilling and sealing concepts proposed for the potential repository have been reviewed in conjunction with impacts related to the potential future inclusion of a retrievability requirement in governing regulations. The main engineering challenges in the Belgian repository concept are

  7. Developing a data repository of standard concussion assessment clinical data for research involving college athletes.

    PubMed

    Maerlender, Arthur; Nelson, Jennifer Mize; Honaker, Julie A

    2016-11-01

    In sports concussion research, obtaining quality data from a sufficient number of participants to reach statistical power has been a particular problem. In addition, the necessary requirements of accessibility, informed consent, and confidentiality must be met. There is need to develop more efficient and controlled methods for collecting data to answer research questions in this realm, but the ability to collect and store these data in an efficient manner at the local level is limited. By virtue of their training, neuropsychologists can play a key role in improving data collection quality. The purpose of this paper is to describe a data repository that has been developed in the context of a university sports medicine concussion management program that includes baseline and postinjury data from student athletes. Diagnostic information, basic health information, current symptoms, neuropsychological test data, balance and vestibular data, and visual processing data are currently included in the standard of care for athletes; however, the process described need not be limited to these types of data. While a national traumatic brain injury (TBI) data repository has been developed by the National Institute of Health (NIH), local repositories have not yet become common. Thus, the description of this project is of value at the local level in the United States and internationally. PMID:27396292

  8. Independent Analysis of Seismicity and Rock fall Scenarios for the Yucca Mountain Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Apted, M.J.; Kemeny, J.M.; Martin, C.D.; James, R.J.

    2006-07-01

    Yucca Mountain is located in the somewhat seismically active Basin and Range province. Future seismic activity is identified by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the US National Academy of Sciences as a key scenario for safety assessment of a proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. As part of its on-going program of conducting independent analyses of scientific and technical issues that could be important to the licensing of the Yucca Mountain repository, EPRI has conducted an analysis of the combined scenarios of seismic activity and stability of emplacement drifts with respect to the long-term repository safety. In this paper we present the results of 3D finite element simulations of both static and dynamic loading of a degraded waste package. For the static case, the expected maximum static load is determined by utilizing relationships between cave height and the bulking factor. A static load representing 30 meters of broken rock was simulated using the finite element model. For the dynamic case, block size and velocity data from the most recent Drift Degradation AMR are used. Based on this, a rock block with a volume of 3.11 m{sup 3} and with an impact velocity of 4.81 m/s was simulated using the finite element model. In both cases, the results indicate that the waste package remains intact. (authors)

  9. Sorption of Np by UO2 under repository conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakovskaya, T. V.; Zakharova, E. V.; Haire, M. J.

    2010-03-01

    This work is a part of the joint Russian - American Program on Beneficial Use of Depleted Uranium. The production of nuclear fuels results in the accumulation of large quantities of depleted uranium (DU) in the form of uranium hexafluoride (UF6), which is converted to uranium oxides. Depleted uranium dioxide (DUO2) can be used as a component of radiation shielding and as an absorbent for migrating radionuclides that may emerge from casks containing spent nuclear fuel (SNF) that are stored for hundreds of thousands of years in high-level wastes (HLW) and SNF repositories (e.g. Yucca Mountain Project). In this case DU oxides serve as an additional engineered chemical barrier. It is known that the primary radioisotope contributor to the calculated long-term radiation dose to the public at the Yucca Mountain SNF repository site boundary is neptunium-237 (237Np). This paper describes the sorption of 237Np in various media (deionized water and J-13 solution) by DUO2. Samples of DUO2 used in this work originated from the treatment of UF6 in a reducing media to form UO2(DUO2-1 at 600°C, DUO2-2 at 700°C, and DUO2-3 at 800°C). All species of DUO2 sorb Np(V) and Np(IV) from aqueous media. Equilibrium was achieved in 24 hours for Np(V) and in 2 hours for Np(IV). Np(V) sorption is accompanied with partial reduction of Np(V) to Np(IV) and vice versa. The sorption of Np(V) onto DUO2 surfaces is irreversible. The investigations on DUO2 transformations were performed under dynamic and static conditions. Under static conditions the solubility of the DUO2 samples in J-13 solution is considerably higher than in DW. When the pre-treatment temperature is decreased, the solubility of DUO2 samples raises regardless of the media. The experiments on interaction between DUO2 and aqueous media (DW and J-13 solution) under dynamic conditions demonstrated that during 30-40 days the penetration/filtration rate of DW and J-13 solution through a thin DUO2 layer decreased dramatically, and then

  10. The National Ignition Facility Data Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, R W; Adams, P A; Azevedo, S G; Beeler, R G; Foxworthy, C B; Frazier, T M; Hutton, M S; Lagin, L J; Townsend, S L

    2009-09-24

    NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system, providing a scientific center to study inertial confinement fusion and matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. This presentation discusses the design, architecture, and implementation of the NIF Data Repository (NDR), which provides for the capture and long-term digital storage of peta-scale datasets produced by conducting experimental campaigns. The NDR is a federated database that provides for the capture of: experimental campaign plans, machine configuration & calibration data, raw experimental results and the processed results produced by scientific workflows. The NDR provides for metadata, pedigree, quality, effectivity, versioning and access control for each of the data categories. A critical capability of the NDR is its extensive data provisioning capabilities and protocols that enable scientists, local and remote alike, to review the results of analysis produced by the NDR's analysis pipeline or to download datasets for offline analysis. The NDR provides for the capture of these locally-produced analysis results to enable both peer review and follow-on automated analysis.

  11. Characteristics of potential repository wastes. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    The LWR spent fuels discussed in Volume 1 of this report comprise about 99% of all domestic non-reprocessed spent fuel. In this report we discuss other types of spent fuels which, although small in relative quantity, consist of a number of diverse types, sizes, and compositions. Many of these fuels are candidates for repository disposal. Some non-LWR spent fuels are currently reprocessed or are scheduled for reprocessing in DOE facilities at the Savannah River Site, Hanford Site, and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. It appears likely that the reprocessing of fuels that have been reprocessed in the past will continue and that the resulting high-level wastes will become part of defense HLW. However, it is not entirely clear in some cases whether a given fuel will be reprocessed, especially in cases where pretreatment may be needed before reprocessing, or where the enrichment is not high enough to make reprocessing attractive. Some fuels may be canistered, while others may require special means of disposal. The major categories covered in this chapter include HTGR spent fuel from the Fort St. Vrain and Peach Bottom-1 reactors, research and test reactor fuels, and miscellaneous fuels, and wastes generated from the decommissioning of facilities.

  12. Traits and types of health data repositories.

    PubMed

    Wade, Ted D

    2014-01-01

    We review traits of reusable clinical data and offer a typology of clinical repositories with a range of known examples. Sources of clinical data suitable for research can be classified into types reflecting the data's institutional origin, original purpose, level of integration and governance. Primary data nearly always come from research studies and electronic medical records. Registries collect data on focused populations primarily to track outcomes, often using observational research methods. Warehouses are institutional information utilities repackaging clinical care data. Collections organize data from more organizations than a data warehouse, and more original data sources than a registry. Therefore even if they are heavily curated, their level of internal integration, and thus ease of use, can be less than other types. Federations are like collections except that physical control over data is distributed among donor organizations. Federations sometimes federate, giving a second level of organization. While the size, in number of patients, varies widely within each type of data source, populations over 10 K are relatively numerous, and much larger populations can be seen in warehouses and federations. One imagined ideal structure for research progress has been called an "Information Commons". It would have longitudinal, multi-leveled (environmental through molecular) data on a large population of identified, consenting individuals. These are qualities whose achievement would require long term commitment on the part of many data donors, including a willingness to make their data public. PMID:25825668

  13. Data sharing, small science and institutional repositories.

    PubMed

    Cragin, Melissa H; Palmer, Carole L; Carlson, Jacob R; Witt, Michael

    2010-09-13

    Results are presented from the Data Curation Profiles project research, on who is willing to share what data with whom and when. Emerging from scientists' discussions on sharing are several dimensions suggestive of the variation in both what it means 'to share' and how these processes are carried out. This research indicates that data curation services will need to accommodate a wide range of subdisciplinary data characteristics and sharing practices. As part of a larger set of strategies emerging across academic institutions, institutional repositories (IRs) will contribute to the stewardship and mobilization of scientific research data for e-Research and learning. There will be particular types of data that can be managed well in an IR context when characteristics and practices are well understood. Findings from this study elucidate scientists' views on 'sharable' forms of data-the particular representation that they view as most valued for reuse by others within their own research areas-and the anticipated duration for such reuse. Reported sharing incidents that provide insights into barriers to sharing and related concerns on data misuse are included. PMID:20679120

  14. CADRE: the Central Aspergillus Data REpository 2012.

    PubMed

    Mabey Gilsenan, Jane; Cooley, John; Bowyer, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The Central Aspergillus Data REpository (CADRE; http://www.cadre-genomes.org.uk) is a public resource for genomic data extracted from species of Aspergillus. It provides an array of online tools for searching and visualising features of this significant fungal genus. CADRE arose from a need within the medical community to understand the human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. Due to the paucity of Aspergillus genomic resources 10 years ago, the long-term goal of this project was to collate and maintain Aspergillus genomes as they became available. Since our first release in 2004, the resource has expanded to encompass annotated sequence for eight other Aspergilli and provides much needed support to the international Aspergillus research community. Recent developments, however, in sequencing technology are creating a vast amount of genomic data and, as a result, we shortly expect a tidal wave of Aspergillus data. In preparation for this, we have upgraded the database and software suite. This not only enables better management of more complex data sets, but also improves annotation by providing access to genome comparison data and the integration of high-throughput data. PMID:22080563

  15. Intelligent user interface for intelligent multimedia repository

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Phill-Kyu; Kim, Yong-Hwan; Sim, B. S.; Zhoo, Z. C.; Park, D.-I.

    1997-10-01

    Recently, much effort has been made for efficiency of user interface since the assumption of expertise or well-trained users is nor more valid these days. Today's users of computer systems are expanded to ordinary people. Furthermore, too much network accessible information resources in the form of various media increases rapidly everyday. The primary goal of the intelligent multimedia repository (IMR) is to assist users in accessing multimedia information efficiently. Primary users of the IMR are assumed to be novice users even though the system can be used for users at different levels of expertise. Users are not well-trained people in using computer system. Thus, the semantic gap between users and the system must be mainly reduced form the system site. The technology of intelligent user interface is adopted to minimize the semantic gap. For the intelligent user interface of been designed and developed. Machine learning technologies have been employed to provide user adaptation/intelligent capability to the system. The IUI of the IMR consist user interface manager (UIM), and user model (UM). The UIM performs the function of managing intelligent user interface. The UM stores the behavioral knowledge of the user. The UM stores the history of query and response interactions to absorb communication errors due to semantic gaps between the user and the IMR. The UM is implemented by decision tree based case- based reasoning and back propagation neural networks. Experimental result show the IUI can improve the performance of the IMR.

  16. National Geoscience Data Repository System, Phase III: Implementation and operation of the repository

    SciTech Connect

    American Geological Institute

    2000-03-13

    The American Geological Institute's (AGI) National Geoscience Data Repository System (NGDRS) was initiated in response to the fact that billions of dollars worth of domestic geoscience data are in jeopardy of being irrevocably lost or destroyed as a consequence of the ongoing downsizing of the U.S. energy and minerals industry. Preservation and access to domestic geological and geophysical data are critical to the energy security and economic prosperity of the nation. There is a narrow window of opportunity to act before valuable data are destroyed. The data truly represent a national treasure and immediate steps must be taken to assure their preservation.

  17. Method for storing spent nuclear fuel in repositories

    DOEpatents

    Schweitzer, D.G.; Sastre, C.; Winsche, W.

    A method for storing radioactive spent fuel in repositories containing sulfur as the storage medium is disclosed. Sulfur is non-corrosive and not subject to radiation damage. Thus, storage periods of up to 100 years are possible.

  18. Waste package/repository impact study: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-09-01

    The Waste Package/Repository Impact Study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using the current reference salt waste package in the salt repository conceptual design. All elements of the repository that may impact waste package parameters, i.e., (size, weight, heat load) were evaluated. The repository elements considered included waste hoist feasibility, transporter and emplacement machine feasibility, subsurface entry dimensions, feasibility of emplacement configuration, and temperature limits. The evaluations are discussed in detail with supplemental technical data included in Appendices to this report, as appropriate. Results and conclusions of the evaluations are discussed in light of the acceptability of the current reference waste package as the basis for salt conceptual design. Finally, recommendations are made relative to the salt project position on the application of the reference waste package as a basis for future design activities. 31 refs., 11 figs., 11 tabs.

  19. Method for storing spent nuclear fuel in repositories

    DOEpatents

    Schweitzer, Donald G.; Sastre, Cesar; Winsche, Warren

    1981-01-01

    A method for storing radioactive spent fuel in repositories containing sulfur as the storage medium is disclosed. Sulfur is non-corrosive and not subject to radiation damage. Thus, storage periods of up to 100 years are possible.

  20. Interoperability of Repositories: The Simple Query Interface in ARIADNE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ternier, Stefaan; Duval, Erik

    2006-01-01

    This article reports on our experiences in providing interoperability between the ARIADNE knowledge pool system (KPS) (Duval, Forte, Cardinaels, Verhoeven, Van Durm, Hendrickx et al., 2001) and several other heterogeneous learning object repositories and referatories.

  1. Environmental assessment overview, Reference repository location, Hanford site, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a reference repository location at the Hanford Site in Washington as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The site is in the Columbia Plateau, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. To determine their suitability, the Hanford site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Hanford site is not disqualified under the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Hanford site as one of five sites suitable for characterization. 3 figs.

  2. A Repository for Beyond-the-Standard-Model Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Skands, P.; Richardson, P.; Allanach, B.C.; Baer, H.; Belanger, G.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellwanger, U.; Freitas, A.; Ghodbane, N.; Goujdami, D.; Hahn, T.; Heinemeyer, S.; Kneur, J.-L.; Landsberg, G.; Lee, J.S.; Muhlleitner, M.; Ohl, T.; Perez, E.; Peskin, M.; Pilaftsis, A.; Plehn, T.

    2005-05-01

    To aid phenomenological studies of Beyond-the-Standard-Model (BSM) physics scenarios, a web repository for BSM calculational tools has been created. We here present brief overviews of the relevant codes, ordered by topic as well as by alphabet.

  3. Thermohydeologic Behavior at the Potential Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Buscheck, T.A.; Rosenburg, N.D.; Gansemer, J.; Sun, Y.

    2000-02-17

    Radioactive decay of high-level nuclear waste emplaced in a Yucca Mountain repository will produce an initial heat flux on the order of 30 to 50 times the heat flux in the Geysers geothermal reservoir in California (Hardin et al., 1998). Even though the rate of heat production decreases rapidly with time after emplacement, this heat flux will change the thermal and hydrologic environment, affecting both the host rock and conditions within the drifts in ways significant to key repository performance variables.

  4. Defining the potential repository siting block Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Elayer, R.W.; Nolting, R.M. III

    1996-12-01

    Siting activities for the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain focused on locating a suitable host geologic horizon above the water table. The Topopah Spring Tuff of the Paintbrush Group was identified as the most suitable geologic unit. Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) identified six areas as potential repository sites. Area known as the Primary Area, is the site of the present characterization and design activities. To support current repository Advanced Conceptual Design, a reevaluation of the Primary Area was conducted by the Yucca Mountain Project`s Management and Operating Contractor (M&O). The purpose of the study was to more precisely define the block volume that would be suitable for siting the repository. The Lynx Geoscience Modeling software (Lynx) was selected to be used in this work because of its three-dimensional modeling and visualization capability for geology and underground excavation design. The Lynx model YMP.MO2 was developed in the study. The model includes surfaces that were constructed to represent each of the following limiting criteria: faults, overburden, repository host horizon, and groundwater. The resulting potential repository siting block is the useable volume within these limiting criteria.

  5. Development of a methodology for hydrologic characterization of faults for geological repository siting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, J.; Yoshimura, K.; Moriya, T.; Tsuchi, H.; Karasaki, K.; Onishi, C. T.; Ueta, K.; Kiho, K.

    2011-12-01

    The Nuclear Waste Management Organization of Japan (NUMO) will select a site for HLW and TRU waste repository through the three-staged program, namely, the Literature Surveys, the Preliminary Investigations and the Detailed Investigations. Areas that are susceptible to natural hazards such as volcanism, faulting and significant uplift/erosion will be eliminated at first. Then, sites that have more favorable geological environment will be selected with respect to the repository design and long-term safety after closure. It is internationally acknowledged that hydrologic features of faults are of special concern in the above respects. It is highly likely from the experiences of site characterization worldwide that one could encounter numerous faults in an area of one hundred square kilometer assumed for the Preliminary Investigations. Efficient and practical investigation programs, and reliable models/parameters for the repository design and safety analysis are important aspects for implementers. A comprehensive methodology including strategies and procedures for characterizing such faults should thus be prepared prior to the actual investigations. Surveys on the results of site characterization in the world indicate potential contribution of geological features of faults such as host lithology, geometry, slip direction, internal structure and alteration to the fault hydrology. Therefore, NUMO, in collaboration with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), started a 5-year project in 2007 involving field investigations to develop a comprehensive methodology for hydrologic characterization of faults, with emphasis on the relationship between geological and hydrologic features of faults. A series of field investigations including ground geophysics, geological mapping, trench surveys, borehole investigations, hydrochemical analyses and hydrologic monitoring have been carried out on the Wildcat Fault that runs along the Berkeley Hills, California (see Karasaki, et

  6. Requirements for controlling a repository`s releases of carbon-14 dioxide; the high costs and negligible benefits

    SciTech Connect

    Park, U Sun; Pflum, C.G.

    1990-04-01

    A repository excavated within the unsaturated zone may release carbon (C)-14 dioxide in amounts that exceed limits imposed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The release would not threaten the general population, but may expose some hypothetical maximally exposed individual to 0.0005 millirems/year. Yet a repository`s releases of C-14 dioxide are strictly regulated, perhaps unintentionally. The EPA and NRC regulations could force the Department of Energy to design and fabricate an expensive 10,000-year waste package solely for the sake of controlling releases of C-14 dioxide. This paper argues that the repository regulations should exempt releases of C-14 dioxide or at least impose more equitable limits. 21 refs., 1 tab.

  7. Cave speleothems as repositories of microbial biosignatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Ana Z.; Jurado, Valme; Pereira, Manuel F. C.; Fernández, Octavio; Calaforra, José M.; Dionísio, Amélia; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo

    2015-04-01

    The need to better understand the biodiversity, origins of life on Earth and on other planets, and the wide applications of the microbe-mineral interactions have led to a rapid expansion of interest in subsurface environments. Recently reported results indicated signs of an early wet Mars and rather recent volcanic activity which suggest that Mars's subsurface can house organic molecules or traces of microbial life, making the search for microbial life on Earth's subsurface even more compelling. Caves on Earth are windows into the subsurface that harbor a wide variety of mineral-utilizing microorganisms, which may contribute to the formation of biominerals and unusual microstructures recognized as biosignatures. These environments contain a wide variety of redox interfaces and stable physicochemical conditions, which enhance secondary mineral precipitation and microbial growth under limited organic nutrient inputs. Enigmatic microorganisms and unusual mineral features have been found associated with secondary mineral deposits or speleothems in limestone caves and lava tubes. In this study, Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analyses were conducted on cave speleothem samples to assess microbe-mineral interactions, evaluate biogenicity, as well as to describe unusual mineral formations and microbial features. Microbial mats, extracellular polymeric substances, tubular empty sheaths, mineralized cells, filamentous fabrics, as well as "cell-sized" etch pits or microborings produced by bacterial cells were observed on minerals. These features evidence microbe-mineral interactions and may represent mineralogical signatures of life. We can thus consider that caves on Earth are plausible repositories of terrestrial biosignatures where we can look for microbial signatures. Acknowledgments: AZM acknowledges the support from the Marie Curie Intra-European Fellowship within the 7th European Community Framework

  8. A cloud-based medical image repository

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeder, Anthony J.; Planitz, Birgit M.; El Rifai, Diaa

    2012-02-01

    Many widely used digital medical image collections have been established but these are generally used as raw data sources without related image analysis toolsets. Providing associated functionality to allow specific types of operations to be performed on these images has proved beneficial in some cases (e.g. brain image registration and atlases). However, toolset development to provide generic image analysis functions on medical images has tended to be ad hoc, with Open Source options proliferating (e.g. ITK). Our Automated Medical Image Collection Annotation (AMICA) system is both an image repository, to which the research community can contribute image datasets, and a search/retrieval system that uses automated image annotation. AMICA was designed for the Windows Azure platform to leverage the flexibility and scalability of the cloud. It is intended that AMICA will expand beyond its initial pilot implementation (for brain CT, MR images) to accommodate a wide range of modalities and anatomical regions. This initiative aims to contribute to advances in clinical research by permitting a broader use and reuse of medical image data than is currently attainable. For example, cohort studies for cases with particular physiological or phenotypical profiles will be able to source and include enough cases to provide high statistical power, allowing more individualised risk factors to be assessed and thus allowing screening and staging processes to be optimised. Also, education, training and credentialing of clinicians in image interpretation, will be more effective because it will be possible to select instances of images with specific visual aspects, or correspond to types of cases where reading performance improvement is desirable.

  9. RAC: Repository of Antibiotic resistance Cassettes

    PubMed Central

    Tsafnat, Guy; Copty, Joseph; Partridge, Sally R.

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance in bacteria is often due to acquisition of resistance genes associated with different mobile genetic elements. In Gram-negative bacteria, many resistance genes are found as part of small mobile genetic elements called gene cassettes, generally found integrated into larger elements called integrons. Integrons carrying antibiotic resistance gene cassettes are often associated with mobile elements and here are designated ‘mobile resistance integrons’ (MRIs). More than one cassette can be inserted in the same integron to create arrays that contribute to the spread of multi-resistance. In many sequences in databases such as GenBank, only the genes within cassettes, rather than whole cassettes, are annotated and the same gene/cassette may be given different names in different entries, hampering analysis. We have developed the Repository of Antibiotic resistance Cassettes (RAC) website to provide an archive of gene cassettes that includes alternative gene names from multiple nomenclature systems and allows the community to contribute new cassettes. RAC also offers an additional function that allows users to submit sequences containing cassettes or arrays for annotation using the automatic annotation system Attacca. Attacca recognizes features (gene cassettes, integron regions) and identifies cassette arrays as patterns of features and can also distinguish minor cassette variants that may encode different resistance phenotypes (aacA4 cassettes and bla cassettes-encoding β-lactamases). Gaps in annotations are manually reviewed and those found to correspond to novel cassettes are assigned unique names. While there are other websites dedicated to integrons or antibiotic resistance genes, none includes a complete list of antibiotic resistance gene cassettes in MRI or offers consistent annotation and appropriate naming of all of these cassettes in submitted sequences. RAC thus provides a unique resource for researchers, which should reduce confusion

  10. The Lupus Family Registry and Repository

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Astrid; Sevier, Sydney; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Glenn, Stuart B.; Aberle, Teresa; Cooney, Carisa M.; Grether, Anya; James, Ellen; Ning, Jared; Tesiram, Joanne; Morrisey, Jean; Powe, Tiny; Drexel, Mark; Daniel, Wes; Namjou, Bahram; Ojwang, Joshua O.; Nguyen, Kim L.; Cavett, Joshua W.; Te, Jeannie L.; James, Judith A.; Scofield, R. Hal; Moser, Kathy; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Kamen, Diane L.; Carson, Craig W.; Quintero-del-Rio, Ana I.; Ballesteros, Maria del Carmen; Punaro, Marilynn G.; Karp, David R.; Wallace, Daniel J.; Weisman, Michael; Merrill, Joan T.; Rivera, Roberto; Petri, Michelle A.; Albert, Daniel A.; Espinoza, Luis R.; Utset, Tammy O.; Shaver, Timothy S.; Arthur, Eugene; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Bruner, Gail R.

    2011-01-01

    The Lupus Family Registry and Repository (LFRR) was established with the goal of assembling and distributing materials and data from families with one or more living members diagnosed with SLE, in order to address SLE genetics. In the present article, we describe the problems and solutions of the registry design and biometric data gathering; the protocols implemented to guarantee data quality and protection of participant privacy and consent; and the establishment of a local and international network of collaborators. At the same time, we illustrate how the LFRR has enabled progress in lupus genetics research, answering old scientific questions while laying out new challenges in the elucidation of the biologic mechanisms that underlie disease pathogenesis. Trained staff ascertain SLE cases, unaffected family members and population-based controls, proceeding in compliance with the relevant laws and standards; participant consent and privacy are central to the LFRR’s effort. Data, DNA, serum, plasma, peripheral blood and transformed B-cell lines are collected and stored, and subject to strict quality control and safety measures. Coded data and materials derived from the registry are available for approved scientific users. The LFRR has contributed to the discovery of most of the 37 genetic associations now known to contribute to lupus through 104 publications. The LFRR contains 2618 lupus cases from 1954 pedigrees that are being studied by 76 approved users and their collaborators. The registry includes difficult to obtain populations, such as multiplex pedigrees, minority patients and affected males, and constitutes the largest collection of lupus pedigrees in the world. The LFRR is a useful resource for the discovery and characterization of genetic associations in SLE. PMID:20864496

  11. Assessing microbiologically induced corrosion of waste package materials in the Yucca Mountain repository

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, J. M., LLNL

    1998-01-01

    The contribution of bacterial activities to corrosion of nuclear waste package materials must be determined to predict the adequacy of containment for a potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), NV. The program to evaluate potential microbially induced corrosion (MIC) of candidate waste container materials includes characterization of bacteria in the post-construction YM environment, determination of their required growth conditions and growth rates, quantitative assessment of the biochemical contribution to metal corrosion, and evaluation of overall MIC rates on candidate waste package materials.

  12. NREL's Field Data Repository Supports Accurate Home Energy Analysis (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2012-02-01

    This fact sheet discusses NREL's work to develop a repository of research-level residential building characteristics and historical energy use data to support ongoing efforts to improve the accuracy of residential energy analysis tools and the efficiency of energy assessment processes. The objective of this project is to create a robust empirical data source to support the research goals of the Department of Energy's Building America program, which is to improve the efficiency of existing U.S. homes by 30% to 50%. Researchers can use this data source to test the accuracy of building energy simulation software and energy audit procedures, ultimately leading to more credible and less expensive energy analysis.

  13. Institutional repository for research projects : Case of a research project at Nihon University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimori, Hiroki

    We have participated in the “eSciDoc project” of National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Japan and Max Planck Institute, Germany. We have begun to experiment using the eSciDoc as an institutional repository for research results of the “development of functional materials based on design and control of crystal and electronic structures” in College of Humanities and Sciences, Nihon University of the “Strategic Research Base Development” Program for Private Universities subsidized by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (2009).

  14. LIFE Materials: Fuel Cycle and Repository Volume 11

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, H; Blink, J A

    2008-12-12

    The fusion-fission LIFE engine concept provides a path to a sustainable energy future based on safe, carbon-free nuclear power with minimal nuclear waste. The LIFE design ultimately offers many advantages over current and proposed nuclear energy technologies, and could well lead to a true worldwide nuclear energy renaissance. When compared with existing and other proposed future nuclear reactor designs, the LIFE engine exceeds alternatives in the most important measures of proliferation resistance and waste minimization. The engine needs no refueling during its lifetime. It requires no removal of fuel or fissile material generated in the LIFE engine. It leaves no weapons-attractive material at the end of life. Although there is certainly a need for additional work, all indications are that the 'back end' of the fuel cycle does not to raise any 'showstopper' issues for LIFE. Indeed, the LIFE concept has numerous benefits: (1) Per unit of electricity generated, LIFE engines would generate 20-30 times less waste (in terms of mass of heavy metal) requiring disposal in a HLW repository than does the current once-through fuel cycle. (2) Although there may be advanced fuel cycles that can compete with LIFE's low mass flow of heavy metal, all such systems require reprocessing, with attendant proliferation concerns; LIFE engines can do this without enrichment or reprocessing. Moreover, none of the advanced fuel cycles can match the low transuranic content of LIFE waste. (3) The specific thermal power of LIFE waste is initially higher than that of spent LWR fuel. Nevertheless, this higher thermal load can be managed using appropriate engineering features during an interim storage period, and could be accommodated in a Yucca-Mountain-like repository by appropriate 'staging' of the emplacement of waste packages during the operational period of the repository. The planned ventilation rates for Yucca Mountain would be sufficient for LIFE waste to meet the thermal constraints of

  15. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EXPERIENCE IN CREATING AND COMMUNICATING THE CASE FOR THE SAFETY OF A POTENTIAL YUCCA MOUNTAIN REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect

    W.J. Boyle; A.E. Van Luik

    2005-08-30

    Experience gained by the U.S. Department of Energy (the Department) in making the recommendation for the development of the Yucca Mountain site as the nation's first high-level waste and spent nuclear fuel repository is useful for creating documents to support the next phase in the repository program, the licensing phase. The experience that supported the successful site-recommendation process involved a three-tiered approach. First, was making a highly technical case for regulatory compliance. Second, was making a broader case for safety in an Environmental Impact Statement. And third, producing plain language brochures, made available to the public in hard copy and on the Internet, to explain the Department's action and its legal and scientific bases. This paper reviews lessons learned from this process, and makes suggestions for the next stage of the repository program: licensing.

  16. LLNL/JNC repository collaboration interim progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bourcier, W.L.; Couch, R.G.; Gansemer, J.; Halsey, W.G.; Palmer, C.E.; Sinz, K.H.; Stout, R.B.; Wijesinghe, A.; Wolery, T.J.

    1999-07-01

    Under this Annex, a research program on the near-field performance assessment related to the geological disposal of radioactive waste will be carried out at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in close collaboration with the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan (PNC). This program will focus on activities that provide direct support for PNC's near-term and long-term needs that will, in turn, utilize and further strengthen US capabilities for radioactive waste management. The work scope for two years will be designed based on the PNC's priorities for its second progress report (the H12 report) of research and development for high-level radioactive waste disposal and on the interest and capabilities of the LLNL. The work will focus on the chemical modeling for the near-field environment and long-term mechanical modeling of engineered barrier system as it evolves. Certain activities in this program will provide for a final iteration of analyses to provide additional technical basis prior to the year 2000 as determined in discussions with the PNC's technical coordinator. The work for two years will include the following activities: Activity 1: Chemical Modeling of EBS Materials Interactions--Task 1.1 Chemical Modeling of Iron Effects on Borosilicate Glass Durability; and Task 1.2 Changes in Overpack and Bentonite Properties Due to Metal, Bentonite and Water Interactions. Activity 2: Thermodynamic Database Validation and Comparison--Task 2.1 Set up EQ3/6 to Run with the Pitzer-based PNC Thermodynamic Data Base; Task 2.2 Provide Expert Consultation on the Thermodynamic Data Base; and Task 2.3 Provide Analysis of Likely Solubility Controls on Selenium. Activity 3: Engineered Barrier Performance Assessment of the Unsaturated, Oxidizing Transient--Task 3.1 Apply YMIM to PNC Transient EBS Performance; Task 3.2 Demonstrate Methods for Modeling the Return to Reducing Conditions; and Task 3.3 Evaluate the Potential for Stress Corrosion

  17. Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model Supporting the Total System Performance Assessment for the Proposed Repository at Yucca Mountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscheck, T. A.; Sun, Y.; Hao, Y.; Duan, Y.; Ezzedine, S.; James, S. C.

    2007-12-01

    The MultiScale ThermoHydrologic Model (MSTHM) is used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the proposed nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The MSTHM uses the Nonisothermal Unsaturated Flow and Transport (NUFT) code to represent thermal-hydrologic (TH) processes occurring at scales from a few tens of centimeters around individual waste packages and emplacement drifts (tunnels) all the way to the kilometer scale for heat flow through the mountain. The MSTHM is used to predict the anticipated range of TH conditions within emplacement drifts and adjoining host rock. To be defensible, the range in predicted TH conditions must address the influence of the variability and uncertainty of engineered- and natural-system parameters that significantly influence those conditions. Parameter-sensitivity analyses show that the most important natural-system parameters are host-rock thermal conductivity and percolation flux through the repository. These analyses show that the key engineered-system parameter is the waste-package-to-waste- package variability in heat output. The range in TH conditions is also influenced by the "edge-cooling" effect, where waste packages closer to the repository edge cool more quickly than those closer to the repository center. To account for this effect, the MSTHM represents the geometric details of the repository layout. Improvements have also been made to how the MSTHM incorporates hydrostratigraphic and percolation-flux data from the Unsaturated Zone Flow Model, which supports ambient flow and transport simulations for TSPA. Other improvements allow more parameter sensitivity cases to be investigated. Twelve cases are analyzed, including four percolation-flux scenarios (10-, 30-, 50- and 90-percentile) and three host-rock thermal-conductivities (10- percentile, mean, and 90-percentile). Using the results of stochastic analyses, weighting factors are applied to the twelve cases. This work was performed under the auspices of

  18. The 1981 National Waste Terminal Storage Program Information Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-11-01

    Topics covered include: overview of the national waste terminal storage (NWTS) program; site characterization; repository development; regulatory framework; systems; socioeconomic evaluation; site screening/characterization support activities; repository data base development; regulatory implementation; systems performance assessment; sociopolitical initiatives; Earth sciences; international waste management; waste package development; quality assurance; and Overviews of NWTS Projects.

  19. Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R): Standards and Semantics for Open Access to Research Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arko, Robert; Carbotte, Suzanne; Chandler, Cynthia; Smith, Shawn; Stocks, Karen

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, a growing number of funding agencies and professional societies have issued policies calling for open access to research data. The Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) program is working to ensure open access to the environmental sensor data routinely acquired by the U.S. academic research fleet. Currently 25 vessels deliver 7 terabytes of data to R2R each year, acquired from a suite of geophysical, oceanographic, meteorological, and navigational sensors on over 400 cruises worldwide. R2R is working to ensure these data are preserved in trusted repositories, discoverable via standard protocols, and adequately documented for reuse. R2R maintains a master catalog of cruises for the U.S. academic research fleet, currently holding essential documentation for over 3,800 expeditions including vessel and cruise identifiers, start/end dates and ports, project titles and funding awards, science parties, dataset inventories with instrument types and file formats, data quality assessments, and links to related content at other repositories. A Digital Object Identifier (DOI) is published for 1) each cruise, 2) each original field sensor dataset, 3) each post-field data product such as quality-controlled shiptrack navigation produced by the R2R program, and 4) each document such as a cruise report submitted by the science party. Scientists are linked to personal identifiers, such as the Open Researcher and Contributor ID (ORCID), where known. Using standard global identifiers such as DOIs and ORCIDs facilitates linking with journal publications and generation of citation metrics. Since its inception, the R2R program has worked in close collaboration with other data repositories in the development of shared semantics for oceanographic research. The R2R cruise catalog uses community-standard terms and definitions hosted by the NERC Vocabulary Server, and publishes ISO metadata records for each cruise that use community-standard profiles developed with the NOAA Data

  20. Annotated outline for the SCP conceptual design report: Office of Geologic Repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-06-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA) requires that site characterization plans (SCPs) be submitted to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), affected States and Indian tribes, and the general public for review and comment prior to the sinking of shafts at a candidate repository site. The SCP is also required by the NRC licensing procedures for the disposal of high-level waste. An Annotated Outline (AO) for Site Characterization Plans (OGR/B-5) has been prepared to provide DOE's standard format and guidance for preparation of SCPs. Consistent with the AO for SCPs. Chapter 6 of the SCP is to provide the requirements and references the media-specific design data base, describe the current design concepts, and discuss design information needs. In order to develop this design information, the Office of Geologic Repositories program is planning a SCP conceptual design phase as part of the overall repository design process. This phase is the first step in the design process, and the result and design can be expected to change as the program moves through the site characterization phase. The Annotated Outline which follows provides the standard format and guidance for the preparation of the SCP Conceptual Design Reports. It is considered to meet the intent of NRC's proposed Generic Technical Position philosophy contained therein. The SCP Conceptual Design Report will be the primary basis for preparation of Chapter 6 of the SCP and will be stand-alone reference document for the SCP. Appendix 1 to this Annotated Outline provides a correlation between Chapter 6 of the SCP and SCP Conceptual Design Report for the information purposes.

  1. Feeding the fledgling repository: starting an institutional repository at an academic health sciences library.

    PubMed

    Koopman, Ann; Kipnis, Dan

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, the Scott Memorial Library at Thomas Jefferson University started an institutional repository (IR), the Jefferson Digital Commons (JDC) . Originally intended as a showcase for faculty scholarship, it has evolved to serve also as a university press for original journals and newsletters, and as an institutional archive. Many lessons have been learned about marketing techniques, common IR issues, and advantages of an IR for a library. IR recruitment has come to be viewed as yet another form of collection development and has been integrated into all forms of the Library's outreach. Jefferson's academic health sciences environment has proven similar to other academic environments on issues of acceptance and participation. PMID:19384712

  2. National Geoscience Data Repository System: Phase III - Implementation and Operataion of the Repository.

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    Activities during the second quarter dealt with the deployment of the NGDRS technological infrastructure (hardware, software and network components). Orders were placed for all major items (Sun servers and Xyplex 9000 data router). Sun servers are expected to be delivered during the week of July 21. Setting up of NGDRS continued with the development of the front-end pages for web site and with the development of software items that permit or facilitate the tasks of NGDRS users. Activity on Project Task 1. 0, the conversion and installation of electronic databases, continues at a slower pace until the basic Metadata Repository infrastructure is in place. The additional contacts established with PGS, BEG, Kansas Geological Survey (KGS), Oklahoma Geological Survey (OGS), and Minerals Management Service have led to good progress. A NGDRS project meeting was held on June 18 in Houston to review progress, discuss new targets and define new steps.

  3. Integrating repositories with fuel cycles: The airport authority model

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.

    2012-07-01

    The organization of the fuel cycle is a legacy of World War II and the cold war. Fuel cycle facilities were developed and deployed without consideration of the waste management implications. This led to the fuel cycle model of a geological repository site with a single owner, a single function (disposal), and no other facilities on site. Recent studies indicate large economic, safety, repository performance, nonproliferation, and institutional incentives to collocate and integrate all back-end facilities. Site functions could include geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) with the option for future retrievability, disposal of other wastes, reprocessing with fuel fabrication, radioisotope production, other facilities that generate significant radioactive wastes, SNF inspection (navy and commercial), and related services such as SNF safeguards equipment testing and training. This implies a site with multiple facilities with different owners sharing some facilities and using common facilities - the repository and SNF receiving. This requires a different repository site institutional structure. We propose development of repository site authorities modeled after airport authorities. Airport authorities manage airports with government-owned runways, collocated or shared public and private airline terminals, commercial and federal military facilities, aircraft maintenance bases, and related operations - all enabled and benefiting the high-value runway asset and access to it via taxi ways. With a repository site authority the high value asset is the repository. The SNF and HLW receiving and storage facilities (equivalent to the airport terminal) serve the repository, any future reprocessing plants, and others with needs for access to SNF and other wastes. Non-public special-built roadways and on-site rail lines (equivalent to taxi ways) connect facilities. Airport authorities are typically chartered by state governments and managed by commissions with members

  4. Proceedings of the scientific visit on crystalline rock repository development.

    SciTech Connect

    Mariner, Paul E.; Hardin, Ernest L.; Miksova, Jitka

    2013-02-01

    A scientific visit on Crystalline Rock Repository Development was held in the Czech Republic on September 24-27, 2012. The visit was hosted by the Czech Radioactive Waste Repository Authority (RAWRA), co-hosted by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and supported by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The purpose of the visit was to promote technical information exchange between participants from countries engaged in the investigation and exploration of crystalline rock for the eventual construction of nuclear waste repositories. The visit was designed especially for participants of countries that have recently commenced (or recommenced) national repository programmes in crystalline host rock formations. Discussion topics included repository programme development, site screening and selection, site characterization, disposal concepts in crystalline host rock, regulatory frameworks, and safety assessment methodology. Interest was surveyed in establishing a %E2%80%9Cclub,%E2%80%9D the mission of which would be to identify and address the various technical challenges that confront the disposal of radioactive waste in crystalline rock environments. The idea of a second scientific visit to be held one year later in another host country received popular support. The visit concluded with a trip to the countryside south of Prague where participants were treated to a tour of the laboratory and underground facilities of the Josef Regional Underground Research Centre.

  5. Federated repositories of X-ray diffraction images.

    PubMed

    Androulakis, Steve; Schmidberger, Jason; Bate, Mark A; DeGori, Ross; Beitz, Anthony; Keong, Cyrus; Cameron, Bob; McGowan, Sheena; Porter, Corrine J; Harrison, Andrew; Hunter, Jane; Martin, Jennifer L; Kobe, Bostjan; Dobson, Renwick C J; Parker, Michael W; Whisstock, James C; Gray, Joan; Treloar, Andrew; Groenewegen, David; Dickson, Neil; Buckle, Ashley M

    2008-07-01

    There is a pressing need for the archiving and curation of raw X-ray diffraction data. This information is critical for validation, methods development and improvement of archived structures. However, the relatively large size of these data sets has presented challenges for storage in a single worldwide repository such as the Protein Data Bank archive. This problem can be avoided by using a federated approach, where each institution utilizes its institutional repository for storage, with a discovery service overlaid. Institutional repositories are relatively stable and adequately funded, ensuring persistence. Here, a simple repository solution is described, utilizing Fedora open-source database software and data-annotation and deposition tools that can be deployed at any site cheaply and easily. Data sets and associated metadata from federated repositories are given a unique and persistent handle, providing a simple mechanism for search and retrieval via web interfaces. In addition to ensuring that valuable data is not lost, the provision of raw data has several uses for the crystallographic community. Most importantly, structure determination can only be truly repeated or verified when the raw data are available. Moreover, the availability of raw data is extremely useful for the development of improved methods of image analysis and data processing. PMID:18566516

  6. Sample and Data Sharing: Observations from a Central Data Repository

    PubMed Central

    Ardini, Mary-Anne; Pan, Huaqin; Qin, Ying; Cooley, Philip C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives From 2003–2013, RTI International served as the data repository for the National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). RTI worked closely with two sample repository partners to build and maintain the Central Repository (CR) that made data and samples available to approved requestors. In this paper, we recap aspects of establishing the mechanism; detail the challenges and limitations of data and sample sharing, and explore the future of resource sharing in light of the evolving environment of research funding. Development and Implementation Effective maintenance required the system to be flexible and dynamic while at the same time compliant with established data standards. Challenges and Solutions Our years serving as the CR for NIDDK have yielded a number of observations about the difficulties of running a repository, an operation that is by definition dependent on many outside parties whose degree of expertise and efficiency have a direct impact on repository functioning. The Path Ahead The bio-banking industry will likely continue to become more globally centralized for studying specific genetic diseases and monitoring the health of our environment. The dynamic relationship between emerging technologies and the infrastructure will be needed to support future research that requires the ability of organizations providing support to remain flexible even while following established standards. PMID:24291049

  7. Salt Repository Project shaft design guide: Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-01

    The Salt Repository Project (SRP) Shaft Design Guide (SDG) and the accompanying SRP Input to Seismic Design define the basic approach for developing appropriate shaft designs for a high-level nuclear waste repository in salt at a proposed site in Deaf Smith County, Texas. The SDG is based on current mining industry standards and practices enhanced to meet the special needs of an underground nuclear waste repository. It provides a common approach for design of both the exploratory and repository shafts. The SDG defines shaft lining and material concepts and presents methods for calculating the loads and displacements that will be imposed on lining structures. It also presents the methodology and formulae for sizing lining components. The SDG directs the shaft designer to sources of geoscience and seismic design data for the Deaf Smith County, Texas repository site. In addition, the SDG describes methods for confirming shaft lining design by means of computer analysis, and it discusses performance monitoring needs that must be considered in the design. 113 refs., 18 figs., 14 tabs.

  8. Thermal impact on host rock of geologic repository; Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mou, Ching-Hua

    1986-03-01

    The initial stress of rock was estimated and analyzed based on the geological survey information collected during the site visits. Change in stress and its distribution in the rock due to excavation was investigated and predicted according to the repository geometry. Thermal effects on the magnitude and distribution of stress in rock was also investigated and predicted according to the repository geometry. Thermal effects on the magnitude and distribution of rock stresses were investigated under two different temperature conditions. Emphasis was placed on the development of fractures due to stress concentration at or near the repository openings. Permeability characteristics of host rock were evaluated at three temperature levels. Series of permeability tests were conducted for determining the thermal effect on the hydrological characteristics of rock. The following goals were achieved from this investigation: (1) Better understanding of stress changes in host rock due to repository excavation and thermal impact. (2) Better understanding of the development of rock fractures and its effect on the hydrological characteristics of host rock. (3) To provide the technical information obtained from this study to the Office of Civilian Radioactive Wastes Management (OCRWM) with a hope that it may assist OCRWM in the decision making of selecting a repository site. Due to limited time for this research, only one type of host media, granite, was included in the study.

  9. Monte Carlo simulations for generic granite repository studies

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Shaoping; Lee, Joon H; Wang, Yifeng

    2010-12-08

    In a collaborative study between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for the DOE-NE Office of Fuel Cycle Technologies Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign project, we have conducted preliminary system-level analyses to support the development of a long-term strategy for geologic disposal of high-level radioactive waste. A general modeling framework consisting of a near- and a far-field submodel for a granite GDSE was developed. A representative far-field transport model for a generic granite repository was merged with an integrated systems (GoldSim) near-field model. Integrated Monte Carlo model runs with the combined near- and farfield transport models were performed, and the parameter sensitivities were evaluated for the combined system. In addition, a sub-set of radionuclides that are potentially important to repository performance were identified and evaluated for a series of model runs. The analyses were conducted with different waste inventory scenarios. Analyses were also conducted for different repository radionuelide release scenarios. While the results to date are for a generic granite repository, the work establishes the method to be used in the future to provide guidance on the development of strategy for long-term disposal of high-level radioactive waste in a granite repository.

  10. Zircaloy cladding corrosion degradation in a tuff repository. Initial experimental plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.D.

    1985-07-01

    The potential for degradation or corrosion of spent fuel cladding in a tuff repository is examined, and an initial experimental plan to determine corrosion mechanisms and to estimate long-term corrosion rates is presented. The environmental history of a tuff repository at Yucca Mountain is evaluated for the potentially most severe corrosion conditions for Zircaloy spent fuel cladding. In two of the three distinct periods identified, liquid water can be present. An overview of the corrosion characteristics of zirconium and its alloys indicates that conditions in which liquid water is present should be the most corrosive conditions for spent fuel cladding. The experimental program will model the chemical, physical and geometrical aspects of spent fuel disposal as precisely as possible. The corrosion specimens will be examined by standard techniques such as optical microscopy and SEM and by state-of-the-art techniques such as using the STEM in a SEM mode to achieve much higher resolution that normally obtained with a standard SEM. A key aspect is the comparative examination that will be needed to help establish mechanisms and estimate or bound low corrosion rates. This plan presents an initial program schedule for these studies, as well as proposed schedules for the future. It also spells out what information will be provided in reports, starting at the end of FY 1985. 46 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. A Socio-Technical Perspective on Repository Monitoring - 12229

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmans, Anne; Elam, Mark; Sundqvist, Goeran; Simmons, Peter

    2012-07-01

    Monitoring geological repositories for high-activity radioactive wastes has both technical and social dimensions, which are closely interrelated. To investigate the implications of this for geological disposal, data on experts' expectations of repository monitoring and the functions that it is expected to serve were analysed. The analysis drew on strategic and technical documents on monitoring produced by national agencies and by international organisations or projects; interviews with specialists in radioactive waste management organisations on monitoring and on their perceptions of societal concerns and expectations; and observations from technical workshops on repository monitoring. Three main rationales for monitoring were found: performance confirmation; decision support in a step-wise process; and public and stakeholder confidence building. The expectation that monitoring will enhance public confidence is then examined from a social scientific perspective and the potential for and challenges to using monitoring in this way are reviewed. In conclusion, implications for stakeholder engagement in the development of monitoring objectives and strategies are discussed. (authors)

  12. Site characterization and its role in repository licensing

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, R.

    1988-01-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 and the recently enacted Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987 (the Acts) specify a schedule and a process for the siting of a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. A key step is the collection of geotechnical information as described in a site characterization plan (SCP). The information to be secured should fully support the technical data needs for a license application to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for authorization to construct a repository. Although the Acts only require a general plan for site characterization, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has, as a matter of policy, prepared a comprehensive and detailed draft SCP that includes available geotechnical information about the site, a description of the conceptual design of the repository, a description of the waste package, and a detailed discussion of the plans for characterizing the site.

  13. Archaeological data as a basis for repository marker design

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, M.F.

    1982-10-01

    This report concerns the development of a marking system for a nuclear waste repository which is very likely to survive for 10,000 years. In order to provide a background on the subject, and for the preliminary design presented in this report, a discussion is presented about the issues involved in human interference with the repository system and the communication of information. A separate chapter summarizes six ancient man-made monuments including: materials, effects of associated textual information on our understanding of the monument, and other features of the ancient monument relevant to marking a repository site. The information presented in the two chapters is used to provide the basis and rationale for a preliminary marker system design presented in a final chapter. 86 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab.

  14. The interaction of plutonium with bacteria in the repository environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillow, J. B.; Francis, A. J.; Lucero, D. A.; Papenguth, H. W.

    2000-07-01

    Microorganisms in the nuclear waste repository environment may interact with plutonium through (i) sorption, (ii) intracellular accumulation, and (iii) transformation of chemical speciation. These interactions may retard or enhance the mobility of Pu by precipitation reactions, biocolloid formation, or production of more soluble species. Current and planned radioactive waste repository environments, such as deep subsurface halite and granite formations, are considered extreme relative to life processes in the near-surface terrestrial environment. There is a paucity of information on the biotransformation of radionuclides by microorganisms present in such extreme environments. In order to gain a better understanding of the interaction of plutonium with microorganisms present in the waste repository sites we investigated a pure culture (Halomonas sp.) and a mixed culture of bacteria (Haloarcula sinaiiensis, Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus, Altermonas sp., and a g-proteobacterium) isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site and an Acetobacterium sp. from alkaline groundwater at the Grimsel Test Site in Switzerland.

  15. Functional requirements for a central research imaging data repository.

    PubMed

    Franke, Thomas; Gruetz, Romanus; Dickmann, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The current situation at many university medical centers regarding the management of biomedical research imaging data leaves much to be desired. In contrast to the recommendations of the German Research Foundation (DFG) and the German Council of Sciences and Humanities regarding the professional management of research data, there are commonly many individual data pools for research data in each institute and the management remains the responsibility of the researcher. A possible solution for this situation would be to install local central repositories for biomedical research imaging data. In this paper, we developed a scenario based on abstracted use-cases for institutional research undertakings as well as collaborative biomedical research projects and analyzed the functional requirements that a local repository would have to fulfill. We determined eight generic categories of functional requirements, which can be viewed as a basic guideline for the minimum functionality of a central repository for biomedical research imaging data. PMID:23920564

  16. Reliable predictions of waste performance in a geologic repository

    SciTech Connect

    Pigford, T.H.; Chambre, P.L.

    1985-08-01

    Establishing reliable estimates of long-term performance of a waste repository requires emphasis upon valid theories to predict performance. Predicting rates that radionuclides are released from waste packages cannot rest upon empirical extrapolations of laboratory leach data. Reliable predictions can be based on simple bounding theoretical models, such as solubility-limited bulk-flow, if the assumed parameters are reliably known or defensibly conservative. Wherever possible, performance analysis should proceed beyond simple bounding calculations to obtain more realistic - and usually more favorable - estimates of expected performance. Desire for greater realism must be balanced against increasing uncertainties in prediction and loss of reliability. Theoretical predictions of release rate based on mass-transfer analysis are bounding and the theory can be verified. Postulated repository analogues to simulate laboratory leach experiments introduce arbitrary and fictitious repository parameters and are shown not to agree with well-established theory. 34 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Monitoring system specifications: retrieval of surf from a salt repository

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The task of developing specifications for a reference monitoring system determined by repository environmental conditions, retrieval operations, and federal regulatory criteria is discussed. The monitoring system specified in this report is capable of measuring (1) package position and orientation, (2) vault deformation, (3) brine accumulation, (4) spent fuel dissolution, (5) temperature, (6) nuclear radiation, and (7) package condition with sufficient accuracy to provide data input to a general risk assessment model. In order to define a monitoring system which can provide probabilistic data on radiological risk to operating personnel and the general public for a salt mine repository, the following information is required: (1) a complete design of the salt SURF repository including inventory, density and waste package design details; (2) probalistic failure rate data on containment integrity of the SURF waste package; (3) probabilistic failure rate data on the monitoring system components (i.e., monitoring procedure, instrumentation, data acquisition, data processing and data interpretation).

  18. Interaction of Plutonium with Bacteria in the Repository Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Gillow, J. B.; Francis, A. J.; Lucero, D. A.; Papenguth, H. W.

    2000-07-01

    Microorganisms in the nuclear waste repository environment may interact with plutonium through (1) sorption, (2) intracellular accumulation, and (3) transformation speciation. These interactions may retard or enhance the mobility of Pu by precipitation reactions, biocolloid formation, or production of more soluble species. Current and planned radioactive waste repository environments, such as deep subsurface halite and granite formations, are considered extreme relative to life processes in the near-surface terrestrial environment. There is a paucity of information on the biotransformation of radionuclides by microorganisms present in such extreme environments. In order to gain a better understanding of the interaction of plutonium with microorganisms present in the waste repository sites we investigated a pure culture (Halomonas sp.) and a mixed culture of bacteria (Haloarcula sinaiiensis, Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus, Altermonas sp., and a {gamma}-proteobacterium) isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site and an Acetobacterium sp. from alkaline groundwater at the Grimsel Test Site in Switzerland.

  19. Terminology development towards harmonizing multiple clinical neuroimaging research repositories

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Jessica A.; Pasquerello, Danielle; Turner, Matthew D.; Keator, David B.; Alpert, Kathryn; King, Margaret; Landis, Drew; Calhoun, Vince D.; Potkin, Steven G.; Tallis, Marcelo; Ambite, Jose Luis; Wang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Data sharing and mediation across disparate neuroimaging repositories requires extensive effort to ensure that the different domains of data types are referred to by commonly agreed upon terms. Within the SchizConnect project, which enables querying across decentralized databases of neuroimaging, clinical, and cognitive data from various studies of schizophrenia, we developed a model for each data domain, identified common usable terms that could be agreed upon across the repositories, and linked them to standard ontological terms where possible. We had the goal of facilitating both the current user experience in querying and future automated computations and reasoning regarding the data. We found that existing terminologies are incomplete for these purposes, even with the history of neuroimaging data sharing in the field; and we provide a model for efforts focused on querying multiple clinical neuroimaging repositories. PMID:26688838

  20. On-line remote monitoring of radioactive waste repositories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calì, Claudio; Cosentino, Luigi; Litrico, Pietro; Pappalardo, Alfio; Scirè, Carlotta; Scirè, Sergio; Vecchio, Gianfranco; Finocchiaro, Paolo; Alfieri, Severino; Mariani, Annamaria

    2014-12-01

    A low-cost array of modular sensors for online monitoring of radioactive waste was developed at INFN-LNS. We implemented a new kind of gamma counter, based on Silicon PhotoMultipliers and scintillating fibers, that behaves like a cheap scintillating Geiger-Muller counter. It can be placed in shape of a fine grid around each single waste drum in a repository. Front-end electronics and an FPGA-based counting system were developed to handle the field data, also implementing data transmission, a graphical user interface and a data storage system. A test of four sensors in a real radwaste storage site was performed with promising results. Following the tests an agreement was signed between INFN and Sogin for the joint development and installation of a prototype DMNR (Detector Mesh for Nuclear Repository) system inside the Garigliano radwaste repository in Sessa Aurunca (CE, Italy). Such a development is currently under way, with the installation foreseen within 2014.

  1. Development of models for use in the assessment of waste repository performance

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, A.G.; Weare, J.H. )

    1989-09-01

    The work outlined in this proposal is intended both to provide thermodynamic data that is needed to assist in the assessment of waste repository performance and the modeling necessary to ascertain to what extent the data produced is consistent, both with itself and with other published data on related systems. During this stage of the research we shall endeavor to develop a model of the chemistry of aluminum in aqueous solution which is consistent with a wide variety of experimental data including data generated as part of this project together with data that has been published previously in the research literature. We propose a program of research designed to enable us to model the interaction of canister materials (e.g. copper and iron) with natural waters. Both experimental work and a modeling program are outlined. In the experimental program e.m.f. measurements and spectroscopic measurements will be made so as to determine the various association equilibria of iron and copper with the anions OH{minus}, HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, and CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}. The initial stages of the modeling program will concentrate on the identification and use of existing experimental data to produce a preliminary model. This will allow us to identify those areas where special emphasis should be placed to meet the needs of the waste disposal program objectives. The objective of this research is to produce thermodynamic data for use in the assessment of waste repository performance that has been measured using experimental procedures performed in accord with the Level 1 quality assurance requirements detailed in the L.L.N.L. Yucca Mountain Project Quality Procedures Manual. The modeling approach used in experimental planning and data assessment is a Level 3 activity. In addition to the establishment of the thermodynamic data base proposed here, results should lead to improved consistency in the overall modeling effort. 29 refs., 2 tabs.

  2. Waterproofing and Strengthening Volcanic Tuff in Waste Repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, E.E.; Carter, P.E.; Cooper, D.C.

    2008-07-01

    Waste repositories from surface trenches and shafts at Los Alamos to drilled tunnels at Yucca Mountain are being built in volcanic Tuff, a soft compacted material that is permeable to water and air. US Department of Energy documents on repository design identify the primary design goal of 'preventing water from reaching the waste canisters, dissolving the canisters and carrying the radioactive waste particles away from the repository'. Designers expect to achieve this by use of multiple barriers along with careful placement of the repository both well above the water table and well above the ground level in a mountain. Though repositories are located in areas that have a historically dry climate to minimize the impact of rainfall infiltration, global warming phenomena may have the potential to alter regional climate patterns - potentially leading to higher infiltration rates. Conventional methods of sealing fractures within volcanic tuff may not be sufficiently robust or long lived to isolate a repository shaft from water for the required duration. A new grouting technology based on molten wax shows significant promise for producing the kind of long term sealing performance required. Molten wax is capable of permeating a significant distance through volcanic tuff, as well as sealing fractures by permeation that is thermally dependent instead of chemically or time dependent. The wax wicks into and saturates tuff even if no fractures are present, but penetrates and fills only the heated area. Heated portions of the rock fill like a vessel. The taffy-like wax has been shown to waterproof the tuff, and significantly increase its resistance to fracture. This wax was used in 2004 for grouting of buried radioactive beryllium waste at the Idaho National Laboratory, chiefly to stop the water based corrosion reactions of the waste. The thermoplastic material contains no water and does not dry out or change with age. Recent studies indicate that this kind of wax material may

  3. Public concerns and choices regarding nuclear waste repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Rankin, W.L.; Nealey, S.M.

    1981-06-01

    Survey research on nuclear power issues conducted in the late 1970's has determined that nuclear waste management is now considered to be one of the most important nuclear power issues both by the US public and by key leadership groups. The purpose of this research was to determine the importance placed on specific issues associated with high-level waste disposal. In addition, policy option choices were asked regarding the siting of both low-level and high-level nuclear waste repositories. A purposive sampling strategy was used to select six groups of respondents. Averaged across the six respondent groups, the leakage of liquid wastes from storage tanks was seen as the most important high-level waste issue. There was also general agreement that the issue regarding water entering the final repository and carrying radioactive wastes away was second in importance. Overall, the third most important issue was the corrosion of the metal containers used in the high-level waste repository. There was general agreement among groups that the fourth most important issue was reducing safety to cut costs. The fifth most important issue was radioactive waste transportation accidents. Overall, the issues ranked sixth and seventh were, respectively, workers' safety and earthquakes damaging the repository and releasing radioactivity. The eighth most important issue, overall, was regarding explosions in the repository from too much radioactivity, which is something that is not possible. There was general agreement across all six respondent groups that the two least important issues involved people accidentally digging into the site and the issue that the repository might cost too much and would therefore raise electricity bills. These data indicate that the concerns of nuclear waste technologists and other public groups do not always overlap.

  4. Phase III: Implementation and Operation of the Repository

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    All of the hardware is installed and all available databases are loaded into the metadata repository. The final stages of beta testing of GeoTrek and necessary revisions are underway, with a targeted public release of the NGDRS system in April or May 1998. The Eastern Gulf Region PTTC, Oklahoma Geological Survey, and A2D databases have been converted and loaded into the metadata repository. These are in addition to the four previously installed databases, including the BEG, MMS, PGS, and Fairfield. Data quality improvements, particularly with the MMS and BEG data is continuing, including making the data more intuitive for the typical user. The beta-testing process has resulted in a number of action items that have been reviewed and addressed. Most of these issues have been resolved, and the remaining issues will be resolved early in the second quarter of 1998, leading to the public launch of the NGDRS metadata repository. Installation of GeoTrek at the BEG, in an effort to bring their core holdings into the NDGRS, was completed in December. A review was held concerning the experiences of the BEG with GeoTrek during January. The feedback was largely positive, with only a couple technical details to address. A number of companies have also expressed interest and/or are evaluating PetroTrek, the commercial version of GeoTrek. Thus far, most of those companies, including PGS and Fairfield, which have licensed PetroTrek have simultaneously joined the NGDRS as well. Several data transfer efforts are underway. Vastar has committed to the transfer of 2D Appalachian seismic lines to the NDGRS clearinghouse. Receiving repositories have been identified and the final preparations are being made for transfer to these public repositories. Additionally, discussions continue with the Stapleton Development Corporation concerning the transfer of facilities in Denver for use as a central core repository.

  5. SCALING ANALYSIS OF REPOSITORY HEAT LOAD FOR REDUCED DIMENSIONALITY MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    MICHAEL T. ITAMUA AND CLIFFORD K. HO

    1998-06-04

    The thermal energy released from the waste packages emplaced in the potential Yucca Mountain repository is expected to result in changes in the repository temperature, relative humidity, air mass fraction, gas flow rates, and other parameters that are important input into the models used to calculate the performance of the engineered system components. In particular, the waste package degradation models require input from thermal-hydrologic models that have higher resolution than those currently used to simulate the T/H responses at the mountain-scale. Therefore, a combination of mountain- and drift-scale T/H models is being used to generate the drift thermal-hydrologic environment.

  6. The Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository From A Corrosion Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    J.H. Payer

    2005-03-10

    Corrosion is a primary determinant of waste package performance at the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository and will control the delay time for radionuclide transport from the waste package. Corrosion is the most probable and most likely degradation process that will determine when packages will be penetrated and the shape size and distribution of those penetrations. The general issues in corrosion science, materials science and electrochemistry are well defined, and the knowledge base is substantial for understanding corrosion processes. In this paper, the Yucca Mountain Repository is viewed from a corrosion perspective.

  7. ESF/REPOSITORY INTERFACE LAYOUT COORDINATE GEOMETRY ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    D. McKenzie III

    1995-11-08

    The purpose of this analysis is to produce coordinate geometry calculations sufficient to establish the position of the conceptual Geologic Repository Operations Area (GROA) as it relates to the position of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) planned exploratory drifting and the physical site. The focus of this analysis is to show the mathematical validity of the arrangement. The documentation which supports the development of the configuration can be found in References 5.3 and 5.4. This analysis supports the production of the ESF/GROA Interface drawings which are used by the Project to demonstrate and control the physical interfaces between the ESF and Repository.

  8. ESF/REPOSITORY INTERFACE LAYOUT COORDINATE GEOMETRY ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    D. G. McKenzie, III

    1995-11-07

    The purpose of this analysis is to produce coordinate geometry calculations sufficient to establish the position of the conceptual Geologic Repository Operations Area (GROA) as it relates to the position of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) planned exploratory drifting and the physical site. The focus of this analysis is to show the mathematical validity of the arrangement. The documentation which supports the development of the configuration can be found in References 5.3 and 5.4. This analysis supports the production of the ESF/GROA Interface drawings which are used by the Project to demonstrate and control the physical interfaces between the ESF and Repository.

  9. Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R): Collaborative Development of Linked Data for Oceanographic Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arko, Robert; Chandler, Cynthia; Stocks, Karen; Smith, Shawn; Clark, Paul; Shepherd, Adam; Moore, Carla; Beaulieu, Stace

    2013-04-01

    The Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) program is developing infrastructure to ensure the underway sensor data from U.S. academic oceanographic research vessels are routinely and consistently documented, preserved in long-term archives, and disseminated to the science community. The entire R2R Catalog is published online as a Linked Data collection, making it easily accessible to encourage discovery and integration with data at other repositories. We are developing the R2R Linked Data collection with specific goals in mind: 1.) We facilitate data access and reuse by publishing the richest possible collection of resources to describe vessels, cruises, instruments, and datasets from the U.S. academic fleet, including data quality assessment results and clean trackline navigation; 2.) We facilitate data citation through the entire lifecycle from field acquisition to shoreside archiving to journal articles and global syntheses, by publishing Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) for datasets and encoding them directly into our Linked Data resources; and 3.) We facilitate federation with other repositories such as the Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO), InterRidge Vents Database, and Index to Marine and Lacustrine Geological Samples (IMLGS), by reciprocal linking between RDF resources and supporting the RDF Query Language. R2R participates in the Ocean Data Interoperability Platform (ODIP), a joint European-U.S.-Australian partnership to facilitate the sharing of data and documentation across international borders. We publish our controlled vocabularies as a Simple Knowledge Organization System (SKOS) concept collection, and are working toward alignment with SeaDataNet and other community-standard terms using the NERC Vocabulary Server (NVS). http://rvdata.us/

  10. Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R): Building a Reference Cruise Catalog for the Research Fleet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arko, R. A.; Clark, P. D.; Chandler, C. L.; Smith, S. R.

    2012-12-01

    The Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) program is developing infrastructure to ensure the underway sensor data from NSF-supported oceanographic research vessels are routinely and consistently documented, preserved in long-term archives, and disseminated to the science community. A core element of this infrastructure is a master catalog of research vessels, cruises, sensor systems, underway datasets, navigation products, field reports, event logs, file formats, people, organizations, and funding awards that is maintained uniformly across the research fleet. All NSF-supported vessel operators now submit their underway cruise data and documentation directly to R2R, per the revised Division of Ocean Sciences (OCE) Sample and Data Policy published in 2011. R2R ingests this content into the fleet catalog, assigning globally unique and persistent identifiers at the cruise, dataset, and file (granule) levels. The catalog is aligned with community-standard vocabularies, working collaboratively with the NOAA Data Centers, UNOLS Office, and pan-European SeaDataNet project; and includes links to related data at other inter/national repositories. In response to community demand, we are extending the catalog to include instrument-specific metadata such as installation details, patch tests, and calibration results. The entire R2R catalog is published on the Web as "Linked Data", making it easily accessible to encourage integration with other repositories. Selected content is also published in formal metadata records according to ISO and W3C standards, suitable for submission to long-term archives. We are deploying both faceted (classification/filter) and Web map-based browse and search interfaces.

  11. Semantic Repositories for eGovernment Initiatives: Integrating Knowledge and Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmonari, Matteo; Viscusi, Gianluigi

    In recent years, public sector investments in eGovernment initiatives have depended on making more reliable existing governmental ICT systems and infrastructures. Furthermore, we assist at a change in the focus of public sector management, from the disaggregation, competition and performance measurements typical of the New Public Management (NPM), to new models of governance, aiming for the reintegration of services under a new perspective in bureaucracy, namely a holistic approach to policy making which exploits the extensive digitalization of administrative operations. In this scenario, major challenges are related to support effective access to information both at the front-end level, by means of highly modular and customizable content provision, and at the back-end level, by means of information integration initiatives. Repositories of information about data and services that exploit semantic models and technologies can support these goals by bridging the gap between the data-level representations and the human-level knowledge involved in accessing information and in searching for services. Moreover, semantic repository technologies can reach a new level of automation for different tasks involved in interoperability programs, both related to data integration techniques and service-oriented computing approaches. In this chapter, we discuss the above topics by referring to techniques and experiences where repositories based on conceptual models and ontologies are used at different levels in eGovernment initiatives: at the back-end level to produce a comprehensive view of the information managed in the public administrations' (PA) information systems, and at the front-end level to support effective service delivery.

  12. NASA Life Sciences Data Repositories: Tools for Retrospective Analysis and Future Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, D.; Wear, M.; VanBaalen, M.; Lee, L.; Fitts, M.

    2011-01-01

    As NASA transitions from the Space Shuttle era into the next phase of space exploration, the need to ensure the capture, analysis, and application of its research and medical data is of greater urgency than at any other previous time. In this era of limited resources and challenging schedules, the Human Research Program (HRP) based at NASA s Johnson Space Center (JSC) recognizes the need to extract the greatest possible amount of information from the data already captured, as well as focus current and future research funding on addressing the HRP goal to provide human health and performance countermeasures, knowledge, technologies, and tools to enable safe, reliable, and productive human space exploration. To this end, the Science Management Office and the Medical Informatics and Health Care Systems Branch within the HRP and the Space Medicine Division have been working to make both research data and clinical data more accessible to the user community. The Life Sciences Data Archive (LSDA), the research repository housing data and information regarding the physiologic effects of microgravity, and the Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health (LSAH-R), the clinical repository housing astronaut data, have joined forces to achieve this goal. The task of both repositories is to acquire, preserve, and distribute data and information both within the NASA community and to the science community at large. This is accomplished via the LSDA s public website (http://lsda.jsc.nasa.gov), which allows access to experiment descriptions including hardware, datasets, key personnel, mission descriptions and a mechanism for researchers to request additional data, research and clinical, that is not accessible from the public website. This will result in making the work of NASA and its partners available to the wider sciences community, both domestic and international. The desired outcome is the use of these data for knowledge discovery, retrospective analysis, and planning of future

  13. National Geoscience Data Repository System, Phase II. Final report, January 30, 1995--January 28, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    The American Geological Institute (AGI) has completed Phase II of a project to establish a National Geoscience Data Repository System (NGDRS). The project`s primary objectives are to preserve geoscience data in jeopardy of being destroyed and to make that data available to those who have a need to use it in future investigations. These data are available for donation to the public as a result of the downsizing that has occurred in the major petroleum and mining companies in the United States for the past decade. In recent years, these companies have consolidated domestic operations, sold many of their domestic properties and relinquished many of their leases. The scientific data associated with those properties are no longer considered to be useful assets and are consequently in danger of being lost forever. The national repository project will make many of these data available to the geoscience community for the first time. To address this opportunity, AGI sought support from the Department of Energy (DOE) in 1994 to initiate the NGDRS Phase I feasibility study to determine the types and quantity of data that companies would be willing to donate. The petroleum and mining companies surveyed indicated that they were willing to donate approximately five million well logs, one hundred million miles of seismic reflection data, millions of linear feet of core and cuttings, and a variety of other types of scientific data. Based on the positive results of the Phase I study, AGI undertook Phase II of the program in 1995. Funded jointly by DOE and industry, Phase II encompasses the establishment of standards for indexing and cataloging of geoscience data and determination of the costs of transferring data from the private sector to public-sector data repositories. Pilot projects evaluated the feasibility of the project for transfer of different data types and creation of a Web-based metadata supercatalog and browser.

  14. Geological repository for nuclear high level waste in France from feasibility to design within a legal framework

    SciTech Connect

    Voizard, Patrice; Mayer, Stefan; Ouzounian, Gerald

    2007-07-01

    Over the past 15 years, the French program on deep geologic disposal of high level and long-lived radioactive waste has benefited from a clear legal framework as the result of the December 30, 1991 French Waste Act. To fulfil its obligations stipulated in this law, ANDRA has submitted the 'Dossier 2005 Argile' (clay) and 'Dossier 2005 Granite' to the French Government. The first of those reports presents a concept for the underground disposal of nuclear waste at a specific clay site and focuses on a feasibility study. Knowledge of the host rock characteristics is based on the investigations carried out at the Meuse/Haute Marne Underground Research Laboratory. The repository concept addresses various issues, the most important of which relates to the large amount of waste, the clay host rock and the reversibility requirement. This phase has ended upon review and evaluation of the 'Dossier 2005' made by different organisations including the National Review Board, the National Safety Authority and the NEA International Review Team. By passing the 'new', June 28, 2006 Planning Act on the sustainable management of radioactive materials and waste, the French parliament has further defined a clear legal framework for future work. This June 28 Planning Act thus sets a schedule and defines the objectives for the next phase of repository design in requesting the submission of a construction authorization application by 2015. The law calls for the repository program to be in a position to commission disposal installations by 2025. (authors)

  15. Low pH Concrete and Grout for Use in the US High-Level Waste Repository: Part I

    SciTech Connect

    Dole, Leslie Robert; Mattus, Catherine H

    2008-01-01

    The current baseline plan for the Yucca Mountain (YM) repository project (YMP) uses steel structures to stabilize the disposal drifts that are collectively over 65 kilometers in length. However using cementitious materials and application techniques, the potential exists to reduce the underground construction cost by 100's of millions of dollars, accelerate construction, and improve the repository's performance. this development program was designed to meet the economic and engineering properties of the appropriate cementitious materials to build out these tunnels. This work supposes that cementitious liners and inverts (the flat bedding placed in the drifts upon which the rails are laid) will be used ultimately in the second-generation repository design. This paper describes the required properties of YM-compatible cements and the program to develop and test materials for a suite of underground construction technologies. Specifically, this paper addresses mitigiation of potential impacts of free calcium hydroxide in the concrete and grout binding matrices. Part II describes the formulation and testing in detail.

  16. Perceived risk, stigma, and potential economic impacts of a high-level nuclear waste repository in Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Slovic, P.; Layman, M.; Kraus, N.N.; Chalmers, J.; Gesel, G.; Flynn, J.

    1989-07-01

    This paper describes a program of research designed to assess the potential impacts of a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, upon tourism, retirement and job-related migration, and business development in Las Vegas and the state. Adverse economic impacts may be expected to result from two related social processes. One has to do with perceptions of risk and socially amplified reactions to ``unfortunate events`` associated with the repository (major and minor accidents, discoveries of radiation releases, evidence of mismanagement, attempts to sabotage or disrupt the facility, etc.). The second process that may trigger significant adverse impacts is that of stigmatization. The conceptual underpinnings of risk perception, social amplification, and stigmatization are discussed in this paper and empirical data are presented to demonstrate how nuclear images associated with Las Vegas and the State of Nevada might trigger adverse effects on tourism, migration, and business development.

  17. 10 CFR 60.111 - Performance of the geologic repository operations area through permanent closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Technical Criteria Performance Objectives...) Protection against radiation exposures and releases of radioactive material. The geologic repository... radiation levels, and releases of radioactive materials to unrestricted areas, will be maintained within...

  18. 10 CFR 60.111 - Performance of the geologic repository operations area through permanent closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Technical Criteria Performance Objectives...) Protection against radiation exposures and releases of radioactive material. The geologic repository... radiation levels, and releases of radioactive materials to unrestricted areas, will be maintained within...

  19. 10 CFR 60.111 - Performance of the geologic repository operations area through permanent closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Technical Criteria Performance Objectives...) Protection against radiation exposures and releases of radioactive material. The geologic repository... radiation levels, and releases of radioactive materials to unrestricted areas, will be maintained within...

  20. 10 CFR 60.111 - Performance of the geologic repository operations area through permanent closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Technical Criteria Performance Objectives...) Protection against radiation exposures and releases of radioactive material. The geologic repository... radiation levels, and releases of radioactive materials to unrestricted areas, will be maintained within...

  1. 10 CFR 60.111 - Performance of the geologic repository operations area through permanent closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Technical Criteria Performance Objectives...) Protection against radiation exposures and releases of radioactive material. The geologic repository... radiation levels, and releases of radioactive materials to unrestricted areas, will be maintained within...

  2. National Geoscience Data Repository System, Phase III: Implementation and Operation of the Repository

    SciTech Connect

    American Geological Institute

    1999-05-14

    The NGDRS steering committee met at Chevron's office on March 2, 1999 in Houston, Texas to review and discuss issues of data transfer and the future of the Stapleton prospect for establishment of a national core repository. Company representatives reaffirmed their commitment in principal to the NGDRS project. Given the downturn in oil prices and final results from the due diligence of the Stapleton property, AGI has decided to forego pursuing acquisition and build-out of the Stapleton Airport property. The major petroleum companies indicated that rising the $10-12 million endowment would be difficult in the current climate. The completion of the due diligence of the property also revealed major concerns about the environmental liability associated with the property, which would require indemnification of the AGI by the City of Denver. Given these complicating results, AGI officially terminated efforts regarding the Stapleton property effective March 31, 1999. Several steering committee members put forth a proposal that the companies make their non-proprietary holdings public and list them in the NGDRS GeoTrek metadata catalog. Most of these holdings are at C&M Storage in Schulemburg, Texas. The companies are discussing methods to allow for public access to these data with C&M.

  3. Motivations of Faculty Self-Archiving in Institutional Repositories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jihyun

    2011-01-01

    Professors contribute to Institutional Repositories (IRs) to make their materials widely accessible in keeping with the benefits of Open Access. However, universities' commitment to IRs depends on building trust with faculty and solving copyright concerns. Digital preservation and copyright management in IRs should be strengthened to increase…

  4. 21 CFR 522.480 - Repository corticotropin injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Repository corticotropin injection. 522.480 Section 522.480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL...

  5. Institutional Repositories: The Experience of Master's and Baccalaureate Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markey, Karen; St. Jean, Beth; Soo, Young Rieh; Yakel, Elizabeth; Kim, Jihyun

    2008-01-01

    In 2006, MIRACLE Project investigators censused library directors at all U.S. academic institutions about their activities planning, pilot testing, and implementing the institutional repositories on their campuses. Out of 446 respondents, 289 (64.8 percent) were from master's and baccalaureate institutions (M&BIs) where few operational…

  6. Institutional Repositories at Small Institutions in America: Some Current Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nykanen, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    The research reported in this article was undertaken to determine the level of implementation of institutional repositories (IRs) at small institutions enrolling fewer than 10,000 students. The study analyzed quantitative and qualitative data from IRs at a number of small institutions with the aim of observing relevant patterns and trends that may…

  7. Indian Institutional Repositories: A Study of User's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawant, Sarika

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The present study aims to investigate the experience, contribution and opinions of users of respective institutional repositories (IRs) developed in India. Design/methodology/approach: The survey method was used. The data collection tool was a web questionnaire, which was created with the help of software provided by surveymonkey.com…

  8. Interoperability Gap Challenges for Learning Object Repositories & Learning Management Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Robert T.

    2011-01-01

    An interoperability gap exists between Learning Management Systems (LMSs) and Learning Object Repositories (LORs). Learning Objects (LOs) and the associated Learning Object Metadata (LOM) that is stored within LORs adhere to a variety of LOM standards. A common LOM standard found in LORs is the Sharable Content Object Reference Model (SCORM)…

  9. 10 CFR 51.67 - Environmental information concerning geologic repositories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Environmental information concerning geologic repositories. 51.67 Section 51.67 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION REGULATIONS FOR DOMESTIC LICENSING AND RELATED REGULATORY FUNCTIONS National Environmental Policy...

  10. Research on uranium deposits as analogies of radioactive waste repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, C.J.

    1988-01-01

    The disposal of highly radioactive waste deep underground in suitable geological formations is proposed by many countries to protect public health and safety. The study of natural analogies of nuclear waste repositories is one method of validating mathematical models and assuring that a proposed repository site and design will be safe. Since 1981, the AAEC has studied the major uranium deposits in the Alligator Rivers region of the Northern Territory of Australia as natural analogues of radioactive waste repositories. Results have been obtained on the following: (1) the migration of uranium, thorium and radium isotopes, (2) the behavior of naturally occurring levels of selected fission products and transuranium nuclides, e.g. technetium-99, iodine-129 and plutonium-239; (3) the role of specific minerals in retarding migration, and (4) the importance of colloidal material, in the migration of thorium. The AAEC has initiated a wider international project entitled The Alligator Rivers Analogue Project which will enable participating organizations to obtain additional results and to apply them in modeling, planning and regulating waste repositories.

  11. Public reactions to nuclear waste: Citizens' views of repository siting

    SciTech Connect

    Rosa, E.A.

    1993-01-01

    This book presents revised and updated papers from a panel of social scientists, at the 1989 AAAS meetings, that examined the public's reactions to nuclear waste disposal and the repository siting process. The papers report the results of original empirical research on citizens' views of nuclear waste repository siting. Topics covered include the following: content analysis of public testimony; sources of public concern about nuclear waste disposal in Texas agricultural communities; local attitudes toward high-level waste repository at Hanford; perceived risk and attitudes toward nuclear wastes; attitudes of Nevada urban residents toward a nuclear waste repository; attitudes of rural community residents toward a nuclear waste respository. An introductory chapter provides background and context, and a concluding chapter summarizes the implications of the reports. Two additional chapters cover important features of high-level waste disposal: long term trends in public attitudes toward nuclear energy and nuclear waste policy and assessment of the effects on the Los Vegas convention business if a high-level nuclear waste depository were sited in Nevada.

  12. Enlargement of the Baldone near-surface radioactive waste repository

    SciTech Connect

    Dreimanis, A.

    2007-07-01

    A unified analysis of the enlargement of the Baldone near-surface radioactive waste (RW) repository RADONS considers the interplay of the existing engineering, safety and infrastructure premises, with the foreseen newly socio-technical features. This enlargement consists in construction of two additional RW disposal vaults and in building a long-term storage facility for spent sealed sources at the RADONS territory. Our approach is based on consecutive analysis of following basic elements: - the origin of enlargement - the RADONS safety analysis and a set of optimal socio-technical solutions of Salaspils research reactor decommissioning waste management; - the enlargement - a keystone of the national RW management concept, including the long-term approach; - the enlargement concept - the result of international co-operation and obligations; - arrangement optimization of new disposal and storage space; - environmental impact assessment for the repository enlargement - the update of socio-technical studies. The study of the public opinion revealed: negative attitude to repository enlargement is caused mainly due to missing information on radiation level and on the RADONS previous operations. These results indicate: basic measures to improve the public attitude to repository enlargement: the safety upgrade, public education and compensation mechanisms. A detailed stakeholders engagement and public education plan is elaborated. (author)

  13. 10 CFR 51.67 - Environmental information concerning geologic repositories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Environmental information concerning geologic repositories. 51.67 Section 51.67 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION REGULATIONS FOR DOMESTIC LICENSING AND RELATED REGULATORY FUNCTIONS National Environmental Policy...

  14. Understanding Faculty to Improve Content Recruitment for Institutional Repositories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Nancy Fried.; Gibbons, Susan

    2005-01-01

    Institutional repositories (IRs) offer many clear benefits yet faculty authors have not demonstrated much interest in depositing their content into them. Without the content, IRs will not succeed, because institutions will sustain IRs for only so long without evidence of success. A yearlong study of faculty members at the University of Rochester…

  15. ERM Ideas and Innovations: Digital Repository Management as ERM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinkas, María M.; Lin, Na

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the application of electronic resources management (ERM) to digital repository management at the Health Sciences and Human Services Library at the University of Maryland, Baltimore. The authors discuss electronic resources management techniques, through the application of "Techniques for Electronic Management,"…

  16. Assessment of Self-Archiving in Institutional Repositories: Across Disciplines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xia, Jingfeng

    2007-01-01

    This research examined self-archiving practices by four disciplines in seven institutional repositories. By checking each individual item for its metadata and deposition status, the research found that a disciplinary culture is not obviously presented. Rather, self-archiving is regulated by a liaison system and a mandate policy.

  17. Building an Institutional Repository at Loughborough University: Some Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barwick, Joanna

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide a summary of the experiences of setting up an institutional repository at Loughborough University, focusing on some of the key issues that it was necessary to consider, the choices made and the challenges overcome. Design/methodology/approach: The paper outlines the various decision processes…

  18. Usability Evaluation of a Research Repository and Collaboration Web Site

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Tao; Maron, Deborah J.; Charles, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    This article reports results from an empirical usability evaluation of Human-Animal Bond Research Initiative Central as part of the effort to develop an open access research repository and collaboration platform for human-animal bond researchers. By repurposing and altering key features of the original HUBzero system, Human-Animal Bond Research…

  19. A strategy to establish Food Safety Model Repositories.

    PubMed

    Plaza-Rodríguez, C; Thoens, C; Falenski, A; Weiser, A A; Appel, B; Kaesbohrer, A; Filter, M

    2015-07-01

    Transferring the knowledge of predictive microbiology into real world food manufacturing applications is still a major challenge for the whole food safety modelling community. To facilitate this process, a strategy for creating open, community driven and web-based predictive microbial model repositories is proposed. These collaborative model resources could significantly improve the transfer of knowledge from research into commercial and governmental applications and also increase efficiency, transparency and usability of predictive models. To demonstrate the feasibility, predictive models of Salmonella in beef previously published in the scientific literature were re-implemented using an open source software tool called PMM-Lab. The models were made publicly available in a Food Safety Model Repository within the OpenML for Predictive Modelling in Food community project. Three different approaches were used to create new models in the model repositories: (1) all information relevant for model re-implementation is available in a scientific publication, (2) model parameters can be imported from tabular parameter collections and (3) models have to be generated from experimental data or primary model parameters. All three approaches were demonstrated in the paper. The sample Food Safety Model Repository is available via: http://sourceforge.net/projects/microbialmodelingexchange/files/models and the PMM-Lab software can be downloaded from http://sourceforge.net/projects/pmmlab/. This work also illustrates that a standardized information exchange format for predictive microbial models, as the key component of this strategy, could be established by adoption of resources from the Systems Biology domain. PMID:25863339

  20. Social Influences on User Behavior in Group Information Repositories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rader, Emilee Jeanne

    2009-01-01

    Group information repositories are systems for organizing and sharing files kept in a central location that all group members can access. These systems are often assumed to be tools for storage and control of files and their metadata, not tools for communication. The purpose of this research is to better understand user behavior in group…

  1. Preservation Health Check: Monitoring Threats to Digital Repository Content

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kool, Wouter; van der Werf, Titia; Lavoie, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The Preservation Health Check (PHC) project, undertaken as a joint effort by Open Planets Foundation (OPF) and OCLC Research, aims to evaluate the usefulness of the preservation metadata created and maintained by operational repositories for assessing basic preservation properties. The PHC project seeks to develop an implementable logic to support…

  2. Environmental assessment: Reference repository location, Hanford site, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a reference repository location at the Hanford Site in Washington as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The site is in the Columbia Plateau, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. To determine their suitability, the Hanford site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EAs. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Hanford site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The DOE has also found that is is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Hanford site as one of five sites available for characterization.

  3. A Remote Knowledge Repository System for Teaching and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, Protasio D.; Maidantchik, Carmen; Lemos, Leandro T.; Manoel de Seixas, Jose

    Changes in the global economy and the extensive use of the internet implied a conceptual redefinition of the working and social structure, and consequently an enhancement of educational systems that instruct engineers. This paper presents a repository of remote multimedia information such as formatted or non-formatted documents, hypertext pages,…

  4. User Oriented Platform for Data Analytics in Medical Imaging Repositories.

    PubMed

    Valerio, Miguel; Godinho, Tiago Marques; Costa, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The production of medical imaging studies and associated data has been growing in the last decades. Their primary use is to support medical diagnosis and treatment processes. However, the secondary use of the tremendous amount of stored data is generally more limited. Nowadays, medical imaging repositories have turned into rich databanks holding not only the images themselves, but also a wide range of metadata related to the medical practice. Exploring these repositories through data analysis and business intelligence techniques has the potential of increasing the efficiency and quality of the medical practice. Nevertheless, the continuous production of tremendous amounts of data makes their analysis difficult by conventional approaches. This article proposes a novel automated methodology to derive knowledge from medical imaging repositories that does not disrupt the regular medical practice. Our method is able to apply statistical analysis and business intelligence techniques directly on top of live institutional repositories. It is a Web-based solution that provides extensive dashboard capabilities, including complete charting and reporting options, combined with data mining components. Moreover, it enables the operator to set a wide multitude of query parameters and operators through the use of an intuitive graphical interface. PMID:27577479

  5. 48 CFR 227.7108 - Contractor data repositories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Contractor data repositories. 227.7108 Section 227.7108 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Rights...

  6. Environmental assessment: Reference repository location, Hanford site, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a reference repository location at the Hanford Site in Washington as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The site is in the Columbia Plateau, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. To determine their suitability, the Hanford Site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EAs. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Hanford site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The DOE has also found that it is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Hanford site as one of five sites suitable for characterization.

  7. Malaysian Education Index (MEI): An Online Indexing and Repository System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kabilan, Muhammad Kamarul; Ismail, Hairul Nizam; Yaakub, Rohizani; Yusof, Najeemah Mohd; Idros, Sharifah Noraidah Syed; Umar, Irfan Naufal; Arshad, Muhammad Rafie Mohd.; Idrus, Rosnah; Rahman, Habsah Abdul

    2010-01-01

    This "Project Sheet" describes an on-going project that is being carried out by a group of educational researchers, computer science researchers and librarians from Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang. The Malaysian Education Index (MEI) has two main functions--(1) Online Indexing System, and (2) Online Repository System. In this brief…

  8. Modeling transient heat transfer in nuclear waste repositories.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shaw-Yang; Yeh, Hund-Der

    2009-09-30

    The heat of high-level nuclear waste may be generated and released from a canister at final disposal sites. The waste heat may affect the engineering properties of waste canisters, buffers, and backfill material in the emplacement tunnel and the host rock. This study addresses the problem of the heat generated from the waste canister and analyzes the heat distribution between the buffer and the host rock, which is considered as a radial two-layer heat flux problem. A conceptual model is first constructed for the heat conduction in a nuclear waste repository and then mathematical equations are formulated for modeling heat flow distribution at repository sites. The Laplace transforms are employed to develop a solution for the temperature distributions in the buffer and the host rock in the Laplace domain, which is numerically inverted to the time-domain solution using the modified Crump method. The transient temperature distributions for both the single- and multi-borehole cases are simulated in the hypothetical geological repositories of nuclear waste. The results show that the temperature distributions in the thermal field are significantly affected by the decay heat of the waste canister, the thermal properties of the buffer and the host rock, the disposal spacing, and the thickness of the host rock at a nuclear waste repository. PMID:19376651

  9. Audit and Certification Process for Science Data Digital Repositories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, J. S.; Giaretta, D.; Ambacher, B.; Ashley, K.; Conrad, M.; Downs, R. R.; Garrett, J.; Guercio, M.; Lambert, S.; Longstreth, T.; Sawyer, D. M.; Sierman, B.; Tibbo, H.; Waltz, M.

    2011-12-01

    Science data digital repositories are entrusted to ensure that a science community's data are available and useful to users both today and in the future. Part of the challenge in meeting this responsibility is identifying the standards, policies and procedures required to accomplish effective data preservation. Subsequently a repository should be evaluated on whether or not they are effective in their data preservation efforts. This poster will outline the process by which digital repositories are being formally evaluated in terms of their ability to preserve the digitally encoded information with which they have been entrusted. The ISO standards on which this is based will be identified and the relationship of these standards to the Open Archive Information System (OAIS) reference model will be shown. Six test audits have been conducted with three repositories in Europe and three in the USA. Some of the major lessons learned from these test audits will be briefly described. An assessment of the possible impact of this type of audit and certification on the practice of preserving digital information will also be provided.

  10. Unifying Access to National Hydrologic Data Repositories via Web Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, D. W.; Jennings, B.; Zaslavsky, I.; Maidment, D. R.

    2006-12-01

    The CUAHSI hydrologic information system (HIS) is designed to be a live, multiscale web portal system for accessing, querying, visualizing, and publishing distributed hydrologic observation data and models for any location or region in the United States. The HIS design follows the principles of open service oriented architecture, i.e. system components are represented as web services with well defined standard service APIs. WaterOneFlow web services are the main component of the design. The currently available services have been completely re-written compared to the previous version, and provide programmatic access to USGS NWIS. (steam flow, groundwater and water quality repositories), DAYMET daily observations, NASA MODIS, and Unidata NAM streams, with several additional web service wrappers being added (EPA STORET, NCDC and others.). Different repositories of hydrologic data use different vocabularies, and support different types of query access. Resolving semantic and structural heterogeneities across different hydrologic observation archives and distilling a generic set of service signatures is one of the main scalability challenges in this project, and a requirement in our web service design. To accomplish the uniformity of the web services API, data repositories are modeled following the CUAHSI Observation Data Model. The web service responses are document-based, and use an XML schema to express the semantics in a standard format. Access to station metadata is provided via web service methods, GetSites, GetSiteInfo and GetVariableInfo. The methdods form the foundation of CUAHSI HIS discovery interface and may execute over locally-stored metadata or request the information from remote repositories directly. Observation values are retrieved via a generic GetValues method which is executed against national data repositories. The service is implemented in ASP.Net, and other providers are implementing WaterOneFlow services in java. Reference implementation of

  11. Viability assessment of a repository at Yucca Mountain: Overview

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1998-12-01

    Based on the viability assessment, DOE believes that Yucca Mountain remains a promising site for a geologic repository and that work should proceed to support a decision in 2001 on whether to recommend the site to the President for development as a repository. Over 15 years, extensive research has validated many of the expectations of the scientists who first suggested that remote, desert regions of the Southwest are well-suited for a geologic repository. Engineered barriers can be designed to contain waste for thousands of years, and the natural barriers can delay and dilute any radioactive material that migrates from the waste packages. Current models indicate that the possible radiation exposure to future populations living nearby could be comparable to present-day exposure levels from natural background radiation. Design alternatives that may improve performance and reduce remaining uncertainties are now being evaluated. The performance of a geologic repository over such long time periods--longer than recorded human history--cannot be proven beyond all doubt. Forecasts about future geologic and climatic conditions and engineering estimates of how long the waste packages will remain intact cannot be directly validated. The mathematical models used in the performance assessment are subject to uncertainties that can be reduced but never completely eliminated. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission's general standard for meeting geologic repository regulatory criteria and objectives is reasonable assurance. While considerable uncertainties remain today, DOE believes that reasonable assurance should be achievable in the licensing process after the planned work is completed. The DOE believes, therefore, that ongoing work at Yucca Mountain should proceed as planned.

  12. Identifying Tensions in the Use of Open Licenses in OER Repositories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amiel, Tel; Soares, Tiago Chagas

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of 50 repositories for educational content conducted through an "audit system" that helped us classify these repositories, their software systems, promoters, and how they communicated their licensing practices. We randomly accessed five resources from each repository to investigate the alignment of licensing…

  13. Online Paper Repositories and the Role of Scholarly Societies: An AERA Conference Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Researcher, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This article examines issues faced by scholarly societies that are developing and sustaining online paper repositories. It is based on the AERA Conference on Online Paper Repositories, which focused on fundamental issues of policy and procedure important to the operations of online working paper repositories. The report and recommendations address…

  14. Availability and Accessibility in an Open Access Institutional Repository: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jongwook; Burnett, Gary; Vandegrift, Micah; Baeg, Jung Hoon; Morris, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: This study explores the extent to which an institutional repository makes papers available and accessible on the open Web by using 170 journal articles housed in DigiNole Commons, the institutional repository at Florida State University. Method: To analyse the repository's impact on availability and accessibility, we conducted…

  15. Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R): Linking and Integrating Data for Oceanographic Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arko, R. A.; Chandler, C. L.; Clark, P. D.; Shepherd, A.; Moore, C.

    2012-12-01

    The Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) program is developing infrastructure to ensure the underway sensor data from NSF-supported oceanographic research vessels are routinely and consistently documented, preserved in long-term archives, and disseminated to the science community. We have published the entire R2R Catalog as a Linked Data collection, making it easily accessible to encourage linking and integration with data at other repositories. We are developing the R2R Linked Data collection with specific goals in mind: 1.) We facilitate data access and reuse by providing the richest possible collection of resources to describe vessels, cruises, instruments, and datasets from the U.S. academic fleet, including data quality assessment results and clean trackline navigation. We are leveraging or adopting existing community-standard concepts and vocabularies, particularly concepts from the Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO) ontology and terms from the pan-European SeaDataNet vocabularies, and continually re-publish resources as new concepts and terms are mapped. 2.) We facilitate data citation through the entire data lifecycle from field acquisition to shoreside archiving to (ultimately) global syntheses and journal articles. We are implementing globally unique and persistent identifiers at the collection, dataset, and granule levels, and encoding these citable identifiers directly into the Linked Data resources. 3.) We facilitate linking and integration with other repositories that publish Linked Data collections for the U.S. academic fleet, such as BCO-DMO and the Index to Marine and Lacustrine Geological Samples (IMLGS). We are initially mapping datasets at the resource level, and plan to eventually implement rule-based mapping at the concept level. We work collaboratively with partner repositories to develop best practices for URI patterns and consensus on shared vocabularies. The R2R Linked Data collection is implemented as a

  16. Towards Establishing an Open Access Repository of Indian Publications in Astronomy -- a Case Study of Indian Institute of Astrophysics Repository

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birdie, C.; Vagiswari, A.

    2007-10-01

    The continued escalation of journal prices, and inadequate access to scholarly journals along with a consistent reduction in library resources and the advent of new technologies have all contributed to a change in the present scholarly communication. The initiative towards establishing Open Access communication has been advocated among scholars and researchers. An Institutional Archive for holding pre- and post-prints of articles written by academic and research staff increases the accessibility, visibility and impact of research output. The Indian Institute of Astrophysics (IIA) is one of the astronomical research institutes in India pioneering the Open Access movement. The institute has set up a pilot project to store the institute's publications in an institutional repository (IR). The library at IIA plays an important role in setting up this archive. While the authors and publishers are the key players in this endeavor, the role of librarians needs to be redefined in the present paradigm shift of publishing. When the Institutes decide to develop their own repositories, the skills and expertise of librarians are needed to design, develop, manage and maintain a successful repository. These and the knowledge of copyright issues relevant to the digital content of IRs are highlighted in this paper. This paper also discusses the various opportunities and tools available for librarians to learn the procedures and involve themselves in establishing their institutional repositories.

  17. Knowledge, transparency, refutability, and consequences: Using models to evaluate geologic repositories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, M. C.; Kavetski, D.; Clark, M. P.; Ye, M.; Tiedeman, C. R.; Arabi, M.; Lu, D.

    2012-04-01

    Current knowledge of a geologic repository includes knowledge about data and their errors; knowledge about possible physical, chemical, and biological processes, and their interactions; knowledge about possible hydrologic and geologic frameworks; knowledge about past and future changes in system dynamics and characteristics; and knowledge about potential future development and use of the repository. Model development and analysis methods ideally integrate all of this knowledge, produce the transparency and refutability acknowledged as necessary to useful models of any environmental system; and provide clear understanding of consequences for the geologic repository, including quantification of uncertainty. Yet many model development and analysis methods fail to achieve this goal. For example, many methods fail to properly account for data error and spend many model runs exploring unrealistic error assumptions that are rarely clearly presented to modelers and model users. Many methods expend huge computer resources to address nearly pathologic model nonlinearities which are often programming and numerical artifacts that fail to represent the intended system behavior. Finally, many methods are unfamiliar to people using model results so that transparency and refutability is not achieved by those most in need of understanding likely consequences. This work suggests that ideas for including data error (including epistemic error) in model development and analysis, referred to as error-based weighting, and ideas about addressing nonlinearity, referred to as robust models, can be used to greatly improve model transparency and refutability, and achieve greater and more defensible long-term understanding of system dynamics and consequences for geologic repositories. This talk will discuss error-based weighting and robust models, and outline a model development and analysis approach that uses 10s to 100s of model runs instead of the 1,000s to 100,000s of runs required by many

  18. An online repository of Swift/XRT light curves of γ-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, P. A.; Beardmore, A. P.; Page, K. L.; Tyler, L. G.; Osborne, J. P.; Goad, M. R.; O'Brien, P. T.; Vetere, L.; Racusin, J.; Morris, D.; Burrows, D. N.; Capalbi, M.; Perri, M.; Gehrels, N.; Romano, P.

    2007-07-01

    Context: Swift data are revolutionising our understanding of Gamma Ray Bursts. Since bursts fade rapidly, it is desirable to create and disseminate accurate light curves rapidly. Aims: To provide the community with an online repository of X-ray light curves obtained with Swift. The light curves should be of the quality expected of published data, but automatically created and updated so as to be self-consistent and rapidly available. Methods: We have produced a suite of programs which automatically generates Swift/XRT light curves of GRBs. Effects of the damage to the CCD, automatic readout-mode switching and pile-up are appropriately handled, and the data are binned with variable bin durations, as necessary for a fading source. Results: The light curve repository website (http://www.swift.ac.uk/xrt_curves) contains light curves, hardness ratios and deep images for every GRB which Swift's XRT has observed. When new GRBs are detected, light curves are created and updated within minutes of the data arriving at the UK Swift Science Data Centre.

  19. The United States Polar Rock Repository: A geological resource for the Earth science community

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grunow, Annie M.; Elliot, David H.; Codispoti, Julie E.

    2007-01-01

    The United States Polar Rock Repository (USPRR) is a U. S. national facility designed for the permanent curatorial preservation of rock samples, along with associated materials such as field notes, annotated air photos and maps, raw analytic data, paleomagnetic cores, ground rock and mineral residues, thin sections, and microfossil mounts, microslides and residues from Polar areas. This facility was established by the Office of Polar Programs at the U. S. National Science Foundation (NSF) to minimize redundant sample collecting, and also because the extreme cold and hazardous field conditions make fieldwork costly and difficult. The repository provides, along with an on-line database of sample information, an essential resource for proposal preparation, pilot studies and other sample based research that should make fieldwork more efficient and effective. This latter aspect should reduce the environmental impact of conducting research in sensitive Polar Regions. The USPRR also provides samples for educational outreach. Rock samples may be borrowed for research or educational purposes as well as for museum exhibits.

  20. mHealthApps: A Repository and Database of Mobile Health Apps

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenlong

    2015-01-01

    Background The market of mobile health (mHealth) apps has rapidly evolved in the past decade. With more than 100,000 mHealth apps currently available, there is no centralized resource that collects information on these health-related apps for researchers in this field to effectively evaluate the strength and weakness of these apps. Objective The objective of this study was to create a centralized mHealth app repository. We expect the analysis of information in this repository to provide insights for future mHealth research developments. Methods We focused on apps from the two most established app stores, the Apple App Store and the Google Play Store. We extracted detailed information of each health-related app from these two app stores via our python crawling program, and then stored the information in both a user-friendly array format and a standard JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) format. Results We have developed a centralized resource that provides detailed information of more than 60,000 health-related apps from the Apple App Store and the Google Play Store. Using this information resource, we analyzed thousands of apps systematically and provide an overview of the trends for mHealth apps. Conclusions This unique database allows the meta-analysis of health-related apps and provides guidance for research designs of future apps in the mHealth field. PMID:25786060

  1. Characteristics of potential repository wastes. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    This document, and its associated appendices and microcomputer (PC) data bases, constitutes the reference OCRWM data base of physical and radiological characteristics data of radioactive wastes. This Characteristics Data Base (CDB) system includes data on spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste (HLW), which clearly require geologic disposal, and other wastes which may require long-term isolation, such as sealed radioisotope sources. The data base system was developed for OCRWM by the CDB Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Various principal or official sources of these data provided primary information to the CDB Project which then used the ORIGEN2 computer code to calculate radiological properties. The data have been qualified by an OCRWM-sponsored peer review as suitable for quality-affecting work meeting the requirements of OCRWM`s Quality Assurance Program. The wastes characterized in this report include: light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel and immobilized HLW.

  2. Open source portal to distributed image repositories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Wenchao; Ratib, Osman M.; Kho, Hwa; Hsu, Yung-Chao; Wang, Cun; Lee, Cason; McCoy, J. M.

    2004-04-01

    In large institution PACS, patient data may often reside in multiple separate systems. While most systems tend to be DICOM compliant, none of them offer the flexibility of seamless integration of multiple DICOM sources through a single access point. We developed a generic portal system with a web-based interactive front-end as well as an application programming interface (API) that allows both web users and client applications to query and retrieve image data from multiple DICOM sources. A set of software tools was developed to allow accessing several DICOM archives through a single point of access. An interactive web-based front-end allows user to search image data seamlessly from the different archives and display the results or route the image data to another DICOM compliant destination. An XML-based API allows other software programs to easily benefit from this portal to query and retrieve image data as well. Various techniques are employed to minimize the performance overhead inherent in the DICOM. The system is integrated with a hospital-wide HIPAA-compliant authentication and auditing service that provides centralized management of access to patient medical records. The system is provided under open source free licensing and developed using open-source components (Apache Tomcat for web server, MySQL for database, OJB for object/relational data mapping etc.). The portal paradigm offers a convenient and effective solution for accessing multiple image data sources in a given healthcare enterprise and can easily be extended to multi-institution through appropriate security and encryption mechanisms.

  3. Construction of quality-assured infant feeding process of care data repositories: Construction of the perinatal repository (Part 2).

    PubMed

    García-de-León-Chocano, Ricardo; Muñoz-Soler, Verónica; Sáez, Carlos; García-de-León-González, Ricardo; García-Gómez, Juan M

    2016-04-01

    This is the second in a series of two papers regarding the construction of data quality (DQ) assured repositories, based on population data from Electronic Health Records (EHR), for the reuse of information on infant feeding from birth until the age of two. This second paper describes the application of the computational process of constructing the first quality-assured repository for the reuse of information on infant feeding in the perinatal period, with the aim of studying relevant questions from the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) and monitoring its deployment in our hospital. The construction of the repository was carried out using 13 semi-automated procedures to assess, recover or discard clinical data. The initial information consisted of perinatal forms from EHR related to 2048 births (Facts of Study, FoS) between 2009 and 2011, with a total of 433,308 observations of 223 variables. DQ was measured before and after the procedures using metrics related to eight quality dimensions: predictive value, correctness, duplication, consistency, completeness, contextualization, temporal-stability, and spatial-stability. Once the predictive variables were selected and DQ was assured, the final repository consisted of 1925 births, 107,529 observations and 73 quality-assured variables. The amount of discarded observations mainly corresponds to observations of non-predictive variables (52.90%) and the impact of the de-duplication process (20.58%) with respect to the total input data. Seven out of thirteen procedures achieved 100% of valid births, observations and variables. Moreover, 89% of births and ~98% of observations were consistent according to the experts׳ criteria. A multidisciplinary approach along with the quantification of DQ has allowed us to construct the first repository about infant feeding in the perinatal period based on EHR population data. PMID:26950399

  4. NATIONAL GEOSCIENCE DATA REPOSITORY SYSTEM PHASE III: IMPLEMENTATION AND OPERATION ON THE REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus Milling

    2001-10-01

    The NGDRS has attained 72% of its targeted goal for cores and cuttings transfers, with over 12 million linear feet of cores and cuttings, in addition to large numbers of paleontological samples and are now available for public use. Additionally, large-scale transfers of seismic data have been evaluated, but based on the recommendation of the NGDRS steering committee, cores have been given priority because of the vast scale of the seismic data problem relative to the available funding. The rapidly changing industry conditions have required that the primary core and cuttings preservation strategy evolve as well. Additionally, the NGDRS clearinghouse is evaluating the viability of transferring seismic data covering the western shelf of the Florida Gulf Coast. AGI remained actively involved in assisting the National Research Council with background materials and presentations for their panel convened to study the data preservation issue. A final report of the panel is expected in early 2002. GeoTrek has been ported to Linux and MySQL, ensuring a purely open-source version of the software. This effort is key in ensuring long-term viability of the software so that is can continue basic operation regardless of specific funding levels. Work has commenced on a major revision of GeoTrek, using the open-source MapServer project and its related MapScript language. This effort will address a number of key technology issues that appear to be rising for 2002, including the discontinuation of the use of Java in future Microsoft operating systems. Discussions have been held regarding establishing potential new public data repositories, with hope for final determination in 2002.

  5. Data Publication: The Role of Community-Based, Disciplinary Repositories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, Kerstin; Hsu, Leslie

    2013-04-01

    Data publication is increasingly recognized as a new paradigm to achieve broad and open access to data for their re-use while ensuring proper citation and attribution of the data to their creator. Current models of data publication include special data journals, institutional repositories, and programmatic or disciplinary repositories. This presentation focuses on the critical role that community-based disciplinary repositories should play, using the example of the IEDA data facility (www.iedadata.org). Disciplinary repositories ensure that data publication is successfully implemented and adopted by the science community, so that it can fulfill its promise to advance data reuse, enhance reproducibility of scientific results, and offer new opportunities for scientific discoveries. Disciplinary repositories are ideally poised to address the challenges that can lead to 'data reuse failure' (Rees 2010), which in turn obstruct the successful development and implementation of new data infrastructures for the sciences. Among these challenges are: professional motivation for investigators to publish the data; effort and economic burden of publication; discovery and long-term accessibility of data; adequate documentation of data provenance (measured parameters, uncertainty, reproducibility, materials, methods, data manipulation); and usability (file formats, interfaces to software tools for data analysis, visualization, modeling). The relevant function of a disciplinary repository is to coordinate and bridge the needs of its community with recognized requirements for data curation and demands of evolving technologies. IEDA meets that function, gathering regular guidance from the community, developing community-approved best practices and guidelines; providing guidance and tools to investigators that facilitate the process of data publication; and performing data quality control. IEDA's sustainable infrastructure supports the discovery and access of the data, and IEDA

  6. A Summary of Properties Used to Evaluate INEEL Calcine Disposal in the Yucca Mountain Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, C.A.

    2003-07-14

    To support evaluations of the direct disposal of Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory calcines to the repository at Yucca Mountain, an evaluation of the performance of the calcine in the repository environment must be performed. This type of evaluation demonstrates, through computer modeling and analysis, the impact the calcine would have on the ability of the repository to perform its function of containment of materials during the repository lifetime. This report discusses parameters that were used in the scoping evaluation conducted in FY 2003. It provides nominal values for the parameters, with explanation of the source of the values, and how the values were modified for use in repository analysis activities.

  7. NeuroVault.org: A repository for sharing unthresholded statistical maps, parcellations, and atlases of the human brain.

    PubMed

    Gorgolewski, Krzysztof J; Varoquaux, Gael; Rivera, Gabriel; Schwartz, Yannick; Sochat, Vanessa V; Ghosh, Satrajit S; Maumet, Camille; Nichols, Thomas E; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Yarkoni, Tal; Margulies, Daniel S; Poldrack, Russell A

    2016-01-01

    NeuroVault.org is dedicated to storing outputs of analyses in the form of statistical maps, parcellations and atlases, a unique strategy that contrasts with most neuroimaging repositories that store raw acquisition data or stereotaxic coordinates. Such maps are indispensable for performing meta-analyses, validating novel methodology, and deciding on precise outlines for regions of interest (ROIs). NeuroVault is open to maps derived from both healthy and clinical populations, as well as from various imaging modalities (sMRI, fMRI, EEG, MEG, PET, etc.). The repository uses modern web technologies such as interactive web-based visualization, cognitive decoding, and comparison with other maps to provide researchers with efficient, intuitive tools to improve the understanding of their results. Each dataset and map is assigned a permanent Universal Resource Locator (URL), and all of the data is accessible through a REST Application Programming Interface (API). Additionally, the repository supports the NIDM-Results standard and has the ability to parse outputs from popular FSL and SPM software packages to automatically extract relevant metadata. This ease of use, modern web-integration, and pioneering functionality holds promise to improve the workflow for making inferences about and sharing whole-brain statistical maps. PMID:25869863

  8. NeuroVault.org: A repository for sharing unthresholded statistical maps, parcellations, and atlases of the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Gorgolewski, Krzysztof J.; Varoquaux, Gael; Rivera, Gabriel; Schwartz, Yannick; Sochat, Vanessa V.; Ghosh, Satrajit S.; Maumet, Camille; Nichols, Thomas E.; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Yarkoni, Tal; Margulies, Daniel S.; Poldrack, Russell A.

    2016-01-01

    NeuroVault.org is dedicated to storing outputs of analyses in the form of statistical maps, parcellations and atlases, a unique strategy that contrasts with most neuroimaging repositories that store raw acquisition data or stereotaxic coordinates. Such maps are indispensable for performing meta-analyses, validating novel methodology, and deciding on precise outlines for regions of interest (ROIs). NeuroVault is open to maps derived from both healthy and clinical populations, as well as from various imaging modalities (sMRI, fMRI, EEG, MEG, PET, etc.). The repository uses modern web technologies such as interactive web-based visualization, cognitive decoding, and comparison with other maps to provide researchers with efficient, intuitive tools to improve the understanding of their results. Each dataset and map is assigned a permanent Universal Resource Locator (URL), and all of the data is accessible through a REST Application Programming Interface (API). Additionally, the repository supports the NIDM-Results standard, and has the ability to parse outputs from popular FSL and SPM software packages to automatically extract relevant metadata. This ease of use, modern web-integration, and pioneering functionality holds promise to improve the workflow for making inferences about and sharing whole-brain statistical maps. PMID:25869863

  9. Feasibility assessment of copper-base waste package container materials in nuclear waste repositories sited in basalt and tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Gause, E.P.; Abraham, N.

    1987-12-31

    In early 1984, the United States Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (DOE-OCRWM) established a two-year program (FY 1985 and FY 1986) to evaluate the use of copper and copper alloys in basalt and tuff repository environments in accordance with Congressional directive. The Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) and the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI) Project concluded that copper-base materials are feasible as candidate container materials in a repository sited in a basalt or tuff environment. The feasibility of using copper materials in containers was qualitatively assessed using the following criteria: 1) container design and development; 2) preclosure safety (e.g., fabrication or emplacement risks); 3) repository interfaces (e.g., handling of containers); 4) retrievability considerations; 5) containment (mainly corrosion considerations); 6) radionuclide release (container/waste interactions); and 7) cost and availability. Weighting factors were not used and no comparison to other candidate disposal container materials was made. This paper details the results of testing, literature reviews, and evaluations that were performed for each of the seven criteria on each of the three conceptual container designs. The designs were as follows: A thick-walled Cupronickel 90-10 pressure vessel (BWIP); a copper monolith made by the HIP (hot isostatic pressing) process (BWIP); and a thin-walled aluminum bronze or Cupronickel 70-30 pressure vessel (NNWSI Project). A brief discussion of future plans to evaluate copper-base materials is presented for the BWIP and NNWSI Project.

  10. Monitoring Developments for Safe Repository Operation and staged Closure - The International MoDeRn Project - 12040

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, S.; Bergmans, A.; Garcia-Sineriz, J.L.; Breen, B.J.; Jobmann, M.

    2012-07-01

    The main goal of the collaborative, European Commission 7. Framework MoDeRn project is to take the state-of-the-art of broadly accepted, main monitoring objectives and to develop these to a level of description that is closer to the actual implementation of monitoring during the staged approach of the disposal process. To achieve this goal, 18 partners representing 12 countries and including 8 Waste Management Organizations joined their efforts since 2009, and aim at developing a reference framework for repository monitoring by 2013. Achieving this goal includes analysis of whether the implementation of a realistic monitoring programme is likely to address expert and lay stakeholder expectations (objectives), to provide an understanding of monitoring activities and available technologies that can be implemented in a repository context (feasibility), and to provide recommendations for related, future stakeholder engagement activities (social acceptance). Monitoring programs should describe activities likely to verify - with the aim of confirming and possibly enhancing the prior license basis for safety and pre-closure management options - expected repository system evolutions (i.e. natural environment and engineered system evolutions) during a progressive construction, operation and closure phase that may last on the order of a century. (authors)

  11. Applying the institutional review board data repository approach to manage ethical considerations in evaluating and studying medical education

    PubMed Central

    Thayer, Erin K.; Rathkey, Daniel; Miller, Marissa Fuqua; Palmer, Ryan; Mejicano, George C.; Pusic, Martin; Kalet, Adina; Gillespie, Colleen; Carney, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    Issue Medical educators and educational researchers continue to improve their processes for managing medical student and program evaluation data using sound ethical principles. This is becoming even more important as curricular innovations are occurring across undergraduate and graduate medical education. Dissemination of findings from this work is critical, and peer-reviewed journals often require an institutional review board (IRB) determination. Approach IRB data repositories, originally designed for the longitudinal study of biological specimens, can be applied to medical education research. The benefits of such an approach include obtaining expedited review for multiple related studies within a single IRB application and allowing for more flexibility when conducting complex longitudinal studies involving large datasets from multiple data sources and/or institutions. In this paper, we inform educators and educational researchers on our analysis of the use of the IRB data repository approach to manage ethical considerations as part of best practices for amassing, pooling, and sharing data for educational research, evaluation, and improvement purposes. Implications Fostering multi-institutional studies while following sound ethical principles in the study of medical education is needed, and the IRB data repository approach has many benefits, especially for longitudinal assessment of complex multi-site data. PMID:27443407

  12. Lithophysal Rock Mass Mechanical Properties of the Repository Host Horizon

    SciTech Connect

    D. Rigby

    2004-11-10

    The purpose of this calculation is to develop estimates of key mechanical properties for the lithophysal rock masses of the Topopah Spring Tuff (Tpt) within the repository host horizon, including their uncertainties and spatial variability. The mechanical properties to be characterized include an elastic parameter, Young's modulus, and a strength parameter, uniaxial compressive strength. Since lithophysal porosity is used as a surrogate property to develop the distributions of the mechanical properties, an estimate of the distribution of lithophysal porosity is also developed. The resulting characterizations of rock parameters are important for supporting the subsurface design, developing the preclosure safety analysis, and assessing the postclosure performance of the repository (e.g., drift degradation and modeling of rockfall impacts on engineered barrier system components).

  13. Expected brine movement at potential nuclear waste repository salt sites

    SciTech Connect

    McCauley, V.S.; Raines, G.E.

    1987-08-01

    The BRINEMIG brine migration code predicts rates and quantities of brine migration to a waste package emplaced in a high-level nuclear waste repository in salt. The BRINEMIG code is an explicit time-marching finite-difference code that solves a mass balance equation and uses the Jenks equation to predict velocities of brine migration. Predictions were made for the seven potentially acceptable salt sites under consideration as locations for the first US high-level nuclear waste repository. Predicted total quantities of accumulated brine were on the order of 1 m/sup 3/ brine per waste package or less. Less brine accumulation is expected at domal salt sites because of the lower initial moisture contents relative to bedded salt sites. Less total accumulation of brine is predicted for spent fuel than for commercial high-level waste because of the lower temperatures generated by spent fuel. 11 refs., 36 figs., 29 tabs.

  14. A Web-based repository manager for brain mapping data.

    PubMed Central

    Jakobovits, R. M.; Modayur, B.; Brinkley, J. F.

    1996-01-01

    The Web provides a rapid prototyping environment for building platform-independent graphical user interfaces. A Web-based console can be implemented as a suite of CGI scripts that generate HTML code, manipulate files, execute system commands, and invoke external tools. Often these tools share data by reading and writing flat files, which must be explicitly maintained by the CGI programmer. In a repository system, meta-data about each file object are maintained in a database, and access to all data is regulated by a layer of control services. This paper describes the design and implementation of a Web-based Repository Manager (WRM), which provides an application programmer's interface for controlling applications, generating HTML documents, handling Web forms, and managing multi-media data. The WRM is being used to develop a console for the Brain Mapping Framework, a system for visualizing cortical stimulation data obtained during neurosurgery. Images Figure 2 PMID:8947678

  15. Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System Description Document

    SciTech Connect

    E.F. Loros

    2000-06-29

    The Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System provides supervisory control, monitoring, and selected remote control of primary and secondary repository operations. Primary repository operations consist of both surface and subsurface activities relating to high-level waste receipt, preparation, and emplacement. Secondary repository operations consist of support operations for waste handling and treatment, utilities, subsurface construction, and other selected ancillary activities. Remote control of the subsurface emplacement operations, as well as, repository performance confirmation operations are the direct responsibility of the system. In addition, the system monitors parameters such as radiological data, air quality data, fire detection status, meteorological conditions, unauthorized access, and abnormal operating conditions, to ensure a safe workplace for personnel. Parameters are displayed in a real-time manner to human operators regarding surface and subsurface conditions. The system performs supervisory monitoring and control for both important to safety and non-safety systems. The system provides repository operational information, alarm capability, and human operator response messages during emergency response situations. The system also includes logic control to place equipment, systems, and utilities in a safe operational mode or complete shutdown during emergency response situations. The system initiates alarms and provides operational data to enable appropriate actions at the local level in support of emergency response, radiological protection response, evacuation, and underground rescue. The system provides data communications, data processing, managerial reports, data storage, and data analysis. This system's primary surface and subsurface operator consoles, for both supervisory and remote control activities, will be located in a Central Control Center (CCC) inside one of the surface facility buildings. The system

  16. National Geoscience Data Repository System: Phase 2 final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    The American Geological Institute (AGI) has completed Phase 2 of a project to establish a National Geoscience Data Repository System (NGDRS). The project`s primary objectives are to preserve geoscience data in jeopardy of being destroyed and to make that data available to those who have a need to use it in future investigations. These data are available for donation to the public as a result of the downsizing that has occurred in the major petroleum and mining companies in the US for the past decade. In recent years, these companies have consolidated domestic operations, sold many of their domestic properties and relinquished many of their leases. The scientific data associated with those properties are no longer considered to be useful assets and are consequently in danger of being lost forever. The national repository project will make many of these data available to the geoscience community for the first time. Phase 2 encompasses the establishment of standards for indexing and cataloging of geoscience data and determination of the costs of transferring data from the private sector to public-sector data repositories. Pilot projects evaluated the feasibility of the project for transfer of different data types and creation of a Web-based metadata supercatalog and browser. Also as part of the project, a national directory of geoscience data repositories was compiled to assess what data are currently available in existing facilities. The next step, Phase 3, will focus on the initiation of transfer of geoscience data from the private sector to the public domain and development of the web-based Geotrek metadata supercatalog.

  17. The role of natural analogs in the repository licensing process

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, W.M.

    1995-09-01

    The concept of a permanent geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste (NLW) is implicitly based on analogy to natural systems that have been stable for millions or billions of years. The time of radioactive and chemical toxicity of HLW exceeds the duration of human civilization, and it is impossible to demonstrate the accuracy of predictions of the behavior of engineered or social systems over such long periods.

  18. Repository relevant testing applied to the Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, J.K.; Woodland, A.B.; Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Cunnane, J.C.

    1990-10-01

    The tuff beds of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, are currently being investigated as a site for the disposal of high-level nuclear waste in an underground repository. If this site is found suitable, the repository would be located in the unsaturated zone above the water table, and a description of the site and the methodology of assessing the performance of the repository are described in the Site Characterization Plan (SCP). While many factors are accounted for during performance assessment, an important input parameter is the degradation behavior of the waste forms, which may be either spent fuel or reprocessed waste contained in a borosilicate glass matrix. To develop the necessary waste form degradation input, the waste package environment needs to be identified. This environment will change as the waste decays and also is a function of the repository design which has not yet been finalized. At the present time, an exact description of the waste package environment is not available. The SCP does provide an initial description of conditions that can be used to guide waste form evaluation. However, considerable uncertainty exists concerning the conditions under which waste form degradation and radionuclide release may occur after the waste package containment barriers are finally breached. The release conditions that are considered to be plausible include (1) a {open_quotes}bathtub{close_quotes} condition in which the waste becomes fully or partially submerged in water that enters the breached container and accumulates to fill the container up to the level of the breach opening, (2) a {open_quotes}wet drip{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}trickle through{close_quotes} condition in which the waste form is exposed to dripping water that enters through the top and exits the bottom of a container with multiple holes, and (3) a {open_quotes}dry{close_quotes} condition in which the waste form is exposed to a humid air environment.

  19. Actinide Speciation and Solubility in a Salt Repository (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, D.; Borkowski, M.; Richmann, M.; Lucchini, J.; Khaing, H.; Swanson, J.

    2009-12-01

    The use of bedded salt deposits for the permanent disposal of nuclear waste continues to receive much attention in the United States and internationally. This is largely based on the highly successful Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) transuranic waste repository that was opened in 1999 in Southeastern New Mexico. A bedded salt formation, such as the one in which the WIPP is located, has many advantages that make it an ideal geology for permanent disposal of nuclear waste. This includes well established mining techniques, self-sealing that lead to a naturally-induced geologic isolation, a relatively dry environment, and a favorable chemistry. Herein we report on recent progress in our investigations, as part of ongoing recertification effort for the operating WIPP repository, to establish the redox distribution and overall solubility of actinides in brine. The overall ranking of actinides, from the perspective of potential contribution to release from the WIPP, is: Pu ~ Am >>U > Th >> Np, Cm. Our recent research emphasis has centered on the redox chemistry of multivalent actinides (e.g., U, Pu and Np) with the use of oxidation-state-invariant analogs (Th and Nd) to establish the solubilities. Under a wide range of conditions investigated, the predominant oxidation states established are Pu(III) and Pu(IV) for plutonium, U(IV) and U(VI) for uranium, and Am (III) for americium. Reduction pathways for plutonium include reaction with organics, reaction with reduced iron, and bioreduction by halophiles under anaerobic conditions. Uranium(VI) can also be reduced to U(IV) by reduced iron and microbial processes. Solubility data for neodymium (+3 analog), Uranium (+6 analog) and thorium (+4 analog) in brine are also reported. These data extend our past understanding of WIPP-specific actinide chemistry and show the WIPP, and salt-based repositories in general, to be a robust repository design from the perspective of actinide containment and immobilization.

  20. Analysis of DOE Spent Nuclear Fuels for Repository Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    L.F. Pincock; W.D. Hintze; J. Duguid

    2006-02-07

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) consists of hundreds of different fuel types in various conditions. In order to analyze and model the DOE SNF for its suitability for repository disposal, several generalizations and simplifications were necessary. This paper describes the methodology used to arrive at a suitable DOE SNF surrogate and summarizes the proposed analysis of this DOE SNF surrogate for its appropriateness as a representative SNF.

  1. HYDRIDE-RELATED DEGRADATION OF SNF CLADDING UNDER REPOSITORY CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    K. McCoy

    2000-12-12

    The purpose and scope of this analysis/model report is to analyze the degradation of commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) cladding under repository conditions by the hydride-related metallurgical processes, such as delayed hydride cracking (DHC), hydride reorientation and hydrogen embrittlement, thereby providing a better understanding of the degradation process and clarifying which aspects of the process are known and which need further evaluation and investigation. The intended use is as an input to a more general analysis of cladding degradation.

  2. Analytical model for screening potential CO2 repositories

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Okwen, R.T.; Stewart, M.T.; Cunningham, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Assessing potential repositories for geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide using numerical models can be complicated, costly, and time-consuming, especially when faced with the challenge of selecting a repository from a multitude of potential repositories. This paper presents a set of simple analytical equations (model), based on the work of previous researchers, that could be used to evaluate the suitability of candidate repositories for subsurface sequestration of carbon dioxide. We considered the injection of carbon dioxide at a constant rate into a confined saline aquifer via a fully perforated vertical injection well. The validity of the analytical model was assessed via comparison with the TOUGH2 numerical model. The metrics used in comparing the two models include (1) spatial variations in formation pressure and (2) vertically integrated brine saturation profile. The analytical model and TOUGH2 show excellent agreement in their results when similar input conditions and assumptions are applied in both. The analytical model neglects capillary pressure and the pressure dependence of fluid properties. However, simulations in TOUGH2 indicate that little error is introduced by these simplifications. Sensitivity studies indicate that the agreement between the analytical model and TOUGH2 depends strongly on (1) the residual brine saturation, (2) the difference in density between carbon dioxide and resident brine (buoyancy), and (3) the relationship between relative permeability and brine saturation. The results achieved suggest that the analytical model is valid when the relationship between relative permeability and brine saturation is linear or quasi-linear and when the irreducible saturation of brine is zero or very small. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  3. Evaluation of a potential nuclear fuel repository criticality: Lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.R.; Evans, D.

    1995-10-01

    This paper presents lessons learned from a Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of the potential for a criticality in a repository containing spent nuclear fuel with high enriched uranium. The insights gained consisted of remarkably detailed conclusions about design issues, failure mechanisms, frequencies and source terms for events up to 10,000 years in the future. Also discussed are the approaches taken by the analysts in presenting this very technical report to a nontechnical and possibly antagonistic audience.

  4. Equilibration of Leachants with Basalt Rock for Repository Simulation Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.

    2001-07-02

    In a nuclear waste repository in basalt, the groundwater will have a low redox potential (Eh) which may affect the leach rate of SRP waste glass. Accurate laboratory simulations of conditions in a basalt reposition must maintain low Eh values throughout the course of the experiment. In this report, important parameters affecting the ability of basalt to maintain appropriate Eh-pH conditions are examined, in particular basalt type and groundwater simulation.

  5. Initial demonstration of the NRC`s capability to conduct a performance assessment for a High-Level Waste Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Codell, R.; Eisenberg, N.; Fehringer, D.; Ford, W.; Margulies, T.; McCartin, T.; Park, J.; Randall, J.

    1992-05-01

    In order to better review licensing submittals for a High-Level Waste Repository, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff has expanded and improved its capability to conduct performance assessments. This report documents an initial demonstration of this capability. The demonstration made use of the limited data from Yucca Mountain, Nevada to investigate a small set of scenario classes. Models of release and transport of radionuclides from a repository via the groundwater and direct release pathways provided preliminary estimates of releases to the accessible environment for a 10,000 year simulation time. Latin hypercube sampling of input parameters was used to express results as distributions and to investigate model sensitivities. This methodology demonstration should not be interpreted as an estimate of performance of the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. By expanding and developing the NRC staff capability to conduct such analyses, NRC would be better able to conduct an independent technical review of the US Department of Energy (DOE) licensing submittals for a high-level waste (HLW) repository. These activities were divided initially into Phase 1 and Phase 2 activities. Additional phases may follow as part of a program of iterative performance assessment at the NRC. The NRC staff conducted Phase 1 activities primarily in CY 1989 with minimal participation from NRC contractors. The Phase 2 activities were to involve NRC contractors actively and to provide for the transfer of technology. The Phase 2 activities are scheduled to start in CY 1990, to allow Sandia National Laboratories to complete development and transfer of computer codes and the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA) to be in a position to assist in the acquisition of the codes.

  6. Microstructural and mineralogical characterization of selected shales in support of nuclear waste repository studies

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.; Hyder, L.K.; Alley, P.D.

    1988-01-01

    Five shales were examined as part of the Sedimentary Rock Program evaluation of this medium as a potential host for a US civilian nuclear waste repository. The units selected for characterization were the Chattanooga Shale from Fentress County, Tennessee; the Pierre Shale from Gregory County, South Dakota; the Green River Formation from Garfield County, Colorado; and the Nolichucky Shale and Pumpkin Valley Shale from Roane County, Tennessee. The micromorphology and structure of the shales were examined by petrographic, scanning electron, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Chemical and mineralogical compositions were studied through the use of energy-dispersive x-ray, neutron activation, atomic absorption, thermal, and x-ray diffraction analysis techniques. 18 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Summary of Near-Surface Test Facility results and their application to repository design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, E. C.; Cramer, M. L.; McCabe, W. M.; Kim, K.

    1982-09-01

    Results from ongoing and newly initiated tests at the Near-Surface Test Facility contributed substantially to the store of knowledge of rock mass characterization of basalt at a variety of temperatures. Enhancements in monitoring instrumentation and testing techniques were achieved. These developments assisted in the determination of site suitability of Hanford basalt formations and contributed to refinement of predictive numerical models for use in repository design. Most recently, the testing program resulted in the following: an improved method of determining thermal expansion effects on the borehole deformation gage; an improved method of monitoring the stress relief process during the doorstopper overcoring process; and the development of a high-resolution optical device for monitoring rock mass deformation in several directions simultaneously.

  8. NSNFP Activities in Support of Repository Licensing for Disposal of DOE SNF

    SciTech Connect

    Henry H. Loo; Brett W.. Carlsen; Sheryl L. Morton; Larry L. Taylor; Gregg W. Wachs

    2004-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management is in the process of preparing the Yucca Mountain license application for submission to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission as the nation’s first geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level waste. Because the DOE SNF will be part of the license application, there are various components of the license application that will require information relative to the DOE SNF. The National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP) is the organization that directs the research, development, and testing of treatment, shipment, and disposal technologies for all DOE SNF. This report documents the work activities conducted by the NSNFP and discusses the relationship between these NSNFP technical activities and the license application. A number of the NSNFP activities were performed to provide risk insights and understanding of DOE SNF disposal as well as to prepare for anticipated questions from the regulatory agency.

  9. Drift natural convection and seepage at the Yucca Mountain repository

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halecky, Nicholaus Eugene

    The decay heat from radioactive waste that is to be disposed in the once proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM) will significantly influence the moisture conditions in the fractured rock near emplacement tunnels (drifts). Additionally, large-scale convective cells will form in the open-air drifts and will serve as an important mechanism for the transport of vaporized pore water from the fractured rock, from the hot drift center to the cool drift end. Such convective processes would also impact drift seepage, as evaporation could reduce the build up of liquid water at the tunnel wall. Characterizing and understanding these liquid water and vapor transport processes is critical for evaluating the performance of the repository, in terms of water- induced canister corrosion and subsequent radionuclide containment. To study such processes, we previously developed and applied an enhanced version of TOUGH2 that solves for natural convection in the drift. We then used the results from this previous study as a time-dependent boundary condition in a high-resolution seepage model, allowing for a computationally efficient means for simulating these processes. The results from the seepage model show that cases with strong natural convection effects are expected to improve the performance of the repository, since smaller relative humidity values, with reduced local seepage, form a more desirable waste package environment.

  10. Developing a medical image content repository for e-learning.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Chia-Hung; Hsu, Tien-Cheng; Chang, Jing Ning; Yang, Stephen J H; Young, Shuenn-Tsong; Chu, Woei Chyn

    2006-09-01

    The integration of medical informatics and e-learning systems could provide many advanced applications including training, knowledge management, telemedicine, etc. Currently, both the domains of e-learning and medical image have sophisticated specifications and standards. It is a great challenge to bring about integration. In this paper, we describe the development of a Web interface for searching and viewing medical images that are stored in standard medical image servers. With the creation of a Web solution, we have reduced the overheads of integration. We have packaged Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) network services as a component that can be used via a Web server. The Web server constitutes a content repository for searching, editing, and storing Web-based medical image content. This is a simple method by which the use of Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) can be extended. We show that the content repository can easily interact and integrate with a learning system. With the integration, the user can easily generate and assign medical image content for e-learning. A Web solution might be the simplest way for system integration. The demonstration in this paper should be useful as a method of expanding the usage of medical information. The construction of a Web-based repository and integrated with a learning system may be also applicable to other domains. PMID:16710797

  11. To the Geoportal and Beyond! Preparing the Earth Observing Laboratory's Datasets for Inter-Repository Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, S.; Dattore, E.; Williams, S.

    2014-12-01

    Even when a data center makes it's datasets accessible, they can still be hard to discover if the user is unaware of the laboratory or organization the data center supports. NCAR's Earth Observing Laboratory (EOL) is no exception. In response to this problem and as an inquiry into the feasibility of inter-connecting all of NCAR's repositories at a discovery layer, ESRI's Geoportal was researched. It was determined that an implementation of Geoportal would be a good choice to build a proof of concept model of inter-repository discovery around. This collaborative project between the University of Illinois and NCAR is coordinated through the Data Curation Education in Research Centers program. This program is funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services.Geoportal is open source software. It serves as an aggregation point for metadata catalogs of earth science datasets, with a focus on geospatial information. EOL's metadata is in static THREDDS catalogs. Geoportal can only create records from a THREDDS Data Server. The first step was to make EOL metadata more accessible by utilizing the ISO 19115-2 standard. It was also decided to create DIF records so EOL datasets could be ingested in NASA's Global Change Master Directory (GCMD). To offer records for harvest, it was decided to develop an OAI-PMH server. To make a compliant server, the OAI_DC standard was also implemented. A server was written in Perl to serve a set of static records. We created a sample set of records in ISO 19115-2, FGDC, DIF, and OAI_DC. We utilized GCMD shared vocabularies to enhance discoverability and precision. The proof of concept was tested and verified by having another NCAR laboratory's Geoportal harvest our sample set. To prepare for production, templates for each standard were developed and mapped to the database. These templates will help the automated creation of records. Once the OAI-PMH server is re-written in a Grails framework a dynamic representation of EOL

  12. A Survey of Archives Relating to India and Located in Major Repositories in France and Great Britain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moideen, P. S. M.

    A 2-month study trip was made in 1982 to 4 major repositories of Indian archival material in France and 2 major repositories in the United Kingdom in order to draw up a detailed inventory of dossiers, other file units, and isolated individual documents related to the history of India that are located in these repositories. The repositories visited…

  13. Modeling of the repository behavior of TRISO fuel.

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, E. E.; Bauer, T. H.

    2006-01-31

    This report satisfies Milestone 4295 for Work Package A0403K11. The long-term behavior of TRISO nuclear reactor fuel in a geologic repository is examined in terms of its durability and thermal impact. The TRISO fuel concept, under development at General Atomics[1] involves embedding fissile uranium and/or actinides in a carbonaceous material as shown in Fig. 1. In the concept, fuel kernels containing fissile material are surrounded with a porous carbon buffer and coated with inner and outer pyrocarbon layers separated with a SiC layer. The fuel particles are then imbedded in a graphite compact and the compacts placed in fuel channels drilled in fuel assembly blocks as shown in the lower right-hand corner of the figure. Dimensions are listed in Table 1. Available data on the degradation of the carbonaceous materials in an aqueous environment is reviewed. A model accounting for waste package failure and the resulting degradation of the waste forms is used to evaluate the potential for the long-term sequestration of radionuclides from spent TRISO fuel in the Yucca Mountain Repository. Finally, thermal analyses of decay heat assess the potential benefits in repository space utilization from recycling actinides from PWR spent fuel as very high burnup TRISO fuel. Experimental data on the aqueous dissolution of carbonaceous materials is relatively sparse and in some cases is based on measurements carried out at temperatures much higher than would be expected in the repository. In addition, the degree to which the aqueous solutions used in the measurements are representative of Yucca Mountain groundwater is uncertain. However, the available dissolution rate data are generally two or more orders of magnitude lower than the Yucca Mountain Project's dissolution model for borosilicate glass. Model calculations show that if the observed rates are applicable to the Yucca Mountain environment, directly disposed TRISO fuel has the potential to prevent significant release of

  14. Viability Assessment of a Repository at Yucca Mountain. Volume 5: Costs to Construct and Operate the Repository

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    This volume presents a management summary of the cost estimate to complete the design, and to license, construct, operate, monitor, close, and decommission a Monitored Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain in Nevada. This volume summarizes the scope, estimating methodologies, and assumptions used in development of the Monitored Geologic Repository-VA cost estimate. It identifies the key features necessary to understand the summary costs presented herein. This cost summary derives from a larger body of documented cost analysis. Volume 5 is organized to reflect this structured approach to cost estimation and contains the following sections: Section 1, Cost Elements. This section briefly defines the components of each major repository cost element. Section 2, Project Phases. This section presents the definition, as used in the estimate, of five project phases (Licensing, Pre-emplacement Construction, Emplacement Operations, Monitoring, and Closure and Decommissioning) and the schedule dates for each phase. It also contains major milestone dates and a bar chart schedule. Section 3, Major Assumptions. This section identifies key high-level assumptions for the cost estimate basis. Additional detailed assumptions are included in the appendices. Section 4, Integrated Cost Summary. This section presents a high-level roll-up of the VA costs resulting from the estimating work. The tables and figures contained in this section were compiled from the more detailed cost estimates in the appendices. Section 5, References. This section identifies the references that support this cost volume. Appendices. For each major repository cost element, Appendices B-F [B, C, D, E, F] presents additional information on the scope of cost elements, identifies methodologies used to develop the cost estimates, lists underlying cost assumptions, and tabulates summary results. Appendix A contains a glossary to assist the reader in understanding the terminology in Volume 5. Appendix G presents costs

  15. Repository Safety Strategy: Strategy for Protecting Public Health and Safety after Closure of a Yucca Mountain Repository, Rev. 1

    SciTech Connect

    DOE

    1998-01-01

    The updated Strategy to Protect Public Health and Safety explains the roles that the natural and engineered systems are expected to play in achieving the objectives of a potential repository system at Yucca Mountain. These objectives are to contain the radionuclides within the waste packages for thousands of years, and to ensure that annual doses to a person living near the site will be acceptably low. This strategy maintains the key assumption of the Site Characterization Plan (DOE 1988) strategy that the potential repository level (horizon) will remain unsaturated. Thus, the strategy continues to rely on the natural attributes of the unsaturated zone for primary protection by providing a setting where waste packages assisted by other engineered barriers are expected to contain wastes for thousands of years. As in the Site Characterization Plan (DOE 1988) strategy, the natural system from the walls of the underground openings (drifts) to the human environment is expected to provide additional defense by reducing the concentrations of any radionuclides released from the waste packages. The updated Strategy to Protect Public Health and Safety is the framework for the integration of site information, repository design and assessment of postclosure performance to develop a safety case for the viability assessment and a subsequent license application. Current site information and a reference design are used to develop a quantitative assessment of performance to be compared with a performance measure. Four key attributes of an unsaturated repository system that are critical to meeting the objectives: (1) Limited water contacting the waste packages; (2) Long waste package lifetime; (3) Slow rate of release of radionuclides from the waste form; and (4) Concentration reduction during transport through engineered and natural barriers.

  16. Generic Repository Concepts and Thermal Analysis for Advanced Fuel Cycles - 12477

    SciTech Connect

    Hardin, Ernest; Blink, James; Carter, Joe; Fratoni, Massimiliano; Greenberg, Harris; Sutton, Mark; Howard, Robert

    2012-07-01

    packages, while 12-PWR packages could be emplaced after 40 years or less. HLW from reprocessing LWR UOX fuel or metal fuel from fast reactors, could be disposed of in salt after 10 to 50 years of decay storage depending on the specific composition and other factors. For the deep borehole disposal concept no near-field temperature limits are recognized because no performance credit is taken for waste form or waste package integrity, or containment by the near-field host rock. These results show the key differences in thermal management strategies available to the U.S. repository program, given the range of disposal concepts. A host medium such as salt with greater thermal conductivity and peak temperature tolerance could shorten decay storage by 50 years, or facilitate the use of larger waste packages. The LWR UOX SNF evaluated in this study represents that which could be produced in the coming decades. The existing, lower burnup used fuel that is presently in storage at many LWR locations across the U.S. is significantly cooler, and analyses of this type could be used to show that disposal is possible with less decay storage or larger waste packages. We note that while the temperature limits and waste package capacities used in this study are similar to those used internationally and in past U.S. studies, they might be increased as the result of ongoing research and development activities. This study selected enclosed emplacement modes to conform with disposal concepts developed internationally and previously in the U.S. Open modes (such as that proposed for a repository at Yucca Mountain) afford additional flexibility in waste management and the necessary investment, because the same facility serves both storage and disposal functions. Use of open modes, and combined analysis of storage, transportation, and disposal functions, are appropriate to consider in future studies of this type. (authors)

  17. Viability Assessment of a Repository at Yucca Mountain. Volume 4: License Application Plan and Costs

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    Volume 4 provides the DOE plan and cost estimate for the remaining work necessary to proceed from completing this VA to submitting an LA to NRC. This work includes preparing an EIS and evaluating the suitability of the site. Both items are necessary components of the documentation required to support a decision in 2001 by the Secretary of Energy on whether or not to recommend that the President approve the site for development as a repository. If the President recommends the site to Congress and the site designation becomes effective, then DOE will submit the LA to NRC in 2002 for authorization to construct the repository. The work described in Volume 4 constitutes the last step in the characterization of the Yucca Mountain site and the design and evaluation of the performance of a repository system in the geologic setting of this site. The plans in this volume for the next 4 years' work are based on the results of the previous 15 years' work, as reported in Volumes 1, 2, and 3 of this VA. Volume 1 summarizes what DOE has learned to date about the Yucca Mountain site. Volume 2 describes the current, reference repository design, several design options that might enhance the performance of the reference design, and several alternative designs that represent substantial departures from the reference design. Volume 2 also summarizes the results of tests of candidate materials for waste packages and for support of the tunnels into which waste would be emplaced. Volume 3 provides the results of the latest performance assessments undertaken to evaluate the performance of the design in the geologic setting of Yucca Mountain. The results described in Volumes 1, 2, and 3 provide the basis for identifying and prioritizing the work described in this volume. DOE believes that the planned work, together with the results of previous work, will be sufficient to support a site suitability evaluation for site recommendation and, if the site is recommended and designated, a

  18. Providing Contemporary Access to Historical Biospecimen Collections: Development of the NHLBI Biologic Specimen and Data Repository Information Coordinating Center (BioLINCC)

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Leslie E.; Adams, John T.; Brennan, Sean P.; Coady, Sean A.; Wagner, Elizabeth L.

    2015-01-01

    The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), within the United States' National Institutes of Health (NIH), established a Biorepository in 1976 that initially archived biospecimens from population-based blood product safety surveys. It was later expanded to biospecimens from clinical and epidemiological studies in heart, lung, and blood disorders. The NHLBI also established a Data Repository in 2000 to store and distribute study data from NHLBI-sponsored research. The NHLBI Biologic Specimen and Data Repository Information Coordinating Center (BioLINCC) was established in 2008 to develop the infrastructure needed to link the contents of these two related NHLBI Repositories, facilitate access to repository resources, and streamline request processes. Three key program subcomponents were developed simultaneously: 1) the linkage of biospecimen electronic inventory records with their clinical or characterization data; 2) the development and implementation of a website with both public-facing information and private processing workspaces; and 3) the development of processes to maximize efficiency via a web-based system while maintaining workflow control, document tracking, and secure processes. The BioLINCC website was launched on October 1, 2009 with eight biospecimen collections and data from 72 research studies. By the end of the fourth online year, 38 biospecimen collections were linked and posted, and data from 108 research studies had been made available for request. The number of registered users by the end of the fourth online year approached 2600, and continues to show a trend towards an increasing rate of new users per year. BioLINCC has fulfilled 381 requests comprising 851 data collections, as well as 600 teaching dataset requests and 75 data renewal agreements. 154 biospecimen requests comprising 147,388 biospecimens were fulfilled or actively in process. We conclude that the BioLINCC program has been successful in its goal to increase the

  19. Providing Contemporary Access to Historical Biospecimen Collections: Development of the NHLBI Biologic Specimen and Data Repository Information Coordinating Center (BioLINCC).

    PubMed

    Giffen, Carol A; Carroll, Leslie E; Adams, John T; Brennan, Sean P; Coady, Sean A; Wagner, Elizabeth L

    2015-08-01

    The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), within the United States' National Institutes of Health (NIH), established a Biorepository in 1976 that initially archived biospecimens from population-based blood product safety surveys. It was later expanded to biospecimens from clinical and epidemiological studies in heart, lung, and blood disorders. The NHLBI also established a Data Repository in 2000 to store and distribute study data from NHLBI-sponsored research. The NHLBI Biologic Specimen and Data Repository Information Coordinating Center (BioLINCC) was established in 2008 to develop the infrastructure needed to link the contents of these two related NHLBI Repositories, facilitate access to repository resources, and streamline request processes. Three key program subcomponents were developed simultaneously: 1) the linkage of biospecimen electronic inventory records with their clinical or characterization data; 2) the development and implementation of a website with both public-facing information and private processing workspaces; and 3) the development of processes to maximize efficiency via a web-based system while maintaining workflow control, document tracking, and secure processes. The BioLINCC website was launched on October 1, 2009 with eight biospecimen collections and data from 72 research studies. By the end of the fourth online year, 38 biospecimen collections were linked and posted, and data from 108 research studies had been made available for request. The number of registered users by the end of the fourth online year approached 2600, and continues to show a trend towards an increasing rate of new users per year. BioLINCC has fulfilled 381 requests comprising 851 data collections, as well as 600 teaching dataset requests and 75 data renewal agreements. 154 biospecimen requests comprising 147,388 biospecimens were fulfilled or actively in process. We conclude that the BioLINCC program has been successful in its goal to increase the

  20. Preliminary analyses of scenarios for potential human interference for repositories in three salt formations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-10-01

    Preliminary analyses of scenarios for human interference with the performance of a radioactive waste repository in a deep salt formation are presented. The following scenarios are analyzed: (1) the U-Tube Connection Scenario involving multiple connections between the repository and the overlying aquifer system; (2) the Single Borehole Intrusion Scenario involving penetration of the repository by an exploratory borehole that simultaneously connects the repository with overlying and underlying aquifers; and (3) the Pressure Release Scenario involving inflow of water to saturate any void space in the repository prior to creep closure with subsequent release under near lithostatic pressures following creep closure. The methodology to evaluate repository performance in these scenarios is described and this methodology is applied to reference systems in three candidate formations: bedded salt in the Palo Duro Basin, Texas; bedded salt in the Paradox Basin, Utah; and the Richton Salt Dome, Mississippi, of the Gulf Coast Salt Dome Basin.

  1. Five Years of the RRI Digital Repository: Some Lessons and Reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, G.; Patil, Y. M.; Manjunath, M.; Savanur, K. P.; Nagaraj, M. N.; Benegal, V. J.; Sheshadri, G.

    2010-10-01

    The changing landscape of scholarly communication and the proliferation of electronic resources have given rise to the open access movement and institutional repositories. Librarians have been actively disseminating the intellectual output of their organizations through institutional repositories and thus have been playing a key role in the scholarly communication process. Keeping in view the importance and benefits of an institutional repository, we launched the RRI Digital Repository in early 2006. Five years later this has grown into an omnibus repository containing more than 3750 documents. Our repository now contains all of the research papers published since the institute was established (1948 to date) and also covers historical materials about the institute and its founder C.V. Raman, a Nobel Laureate. When we look at its growth and development during the last five years, we feel that it has many lessons for all of us. We discuss some of them in this paper.

  2. Rolling Deck to Repository I: Designing a Database Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arko, R. A.; Miller, S. P.; Chandler, C. L.; Ferrini, V. L.; O'Hara, S. H.

    2008-12-01

    The NSF-supported academic research fleet collectively produces a large and diverse volume of scientific data, which are increasingly being shared across disciplines and contributed to regional and global syntheses. As both Internet connectivity and storage technology improve, it becomes practical for ships to routinely deliver data and documentation for a standard suite of underway instruments to a central shoreside repository. Routine delivery will facilitate data discovery and integration, quality assessment, cruise planning, compliance with funding agency and clearance requirements, and long-term data preservation. We are working collaboratively with ship operators and data managers to develop a prototype "data discovery system" for NSF-supported research vessels. Our goal is to establish infrastructure for a central shoreside repository, and to develop and test procedures for the routine delivery of standard data products and documentation to the repository. Related efforts are underway to identify tools and criteria for quality control of standard data products, and to develop standard interfaces and procedures for maintaining an underway event log. Development of a shoreside repository infrastructure will include: 1. Deployment and testing of a central catalog that holds cruise summaries and vessel profiles. A cruise summary will capture the essential details of a research expedition (operating institution, ports/dates, personnel, data inventory, etc.), as well as related documentation such as event logs and technical reports. A vessel profile will capture the essential details of a ship's installed instruments (manufacturer, model, serial number, reference location, etc.), with version control as the profile changes through time. The catalog's relational database schema will be based on the UNOLS Data Best Practices Committee's recommendations, and published as a formal XML specification. 2. Deployment and testing of a central repository that holds

  3. 10 CFR 63.144 - Quality assurance program change.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Quality assurance program change. 63.144 Section 63.144... REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Quality Assurance § 63.144 Quality assurance program change. Changes to... follows: (a) DOE may change a previously accepted quality assurance program description included...

  4. ACCOUNTING FOR A VITRIFIED PLUTONIUM WASTE FORM IN THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN REPOSITORY TOTAL SYSTEM PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT (TSPA)

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, J

    2007-02-12

    A vitrification technology utilizing a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass appears to be a viable option for dispositioning excess weapons-useable plutonium that is not suitable for processing into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel. A significant effort to develop a glass formulation and vitrification process to immobilize plutonium was completed in the mid-1990s to support the Plutonium Immobilization Program (PIP). Further refinement of the vitrification process was accomplished as part of the Am/Cm solution vitrification project. The LaBS glass formulation was found to be capable of immobilizing in excess of 10 wt% Pu and to be very tolerant of the impurities accompanying the plutonium material streams. Thus, this waste form would be suitable for dispositioning plutonium owned by the Department of Energy-Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) that may not be well characterized and may contain high levels of impurities. The can-in-canister technology demonstrated in the PIP could be utilized to dispose of the vitrified plutonium in the federal radioactive waste repository. The can-in-canister technology involves placing small cans of the immobilized Pu form into a high level waste (HLW) glass canister fitted with a rack to hold the cans and then filling the canister with HLW glass. Testing was completed to demonstrate that this technology could be successfully employed with little or no impact to current Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) operation and that the resulting canisters were essentially equivalent to the present HLW glass canisters to be dispositioned in the federal repository. The performance of wastes in the repository and, moreover, the performance of the entire repository system is being evaluated by the Department of Energy-Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (DOE-RW) using a Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) methodology. Technical bases documents (e.g., Analysis/Modeling Reports (AMR)) that address specific issues regarding

  5. Handling encapsulated spent fuel in a geologic repository environment

    SciTech Connect

    Ballou, L.B.

    1983-02-01

    In support of the Spent Fuel Test-Climate at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Nevada Test Site, a spent-fuel canister handling system has been designed, deployed, and operated successfully during the past five years. This system transports encapsulated commercial spent-fuel assemblies between the packaging facility and the test site ({similar_to}100 km), transfers the canisters 420 m vertically to and from a geologic storage drift, and emplaces or retrieves the canisters from the storage holes in the floor of the drift. The spent-fuel canisters are maintained in a fully shielded configuration at all times during the handling cycle, permitting manned access at any time for response to any abnormal conditions. All normal operations are conducted by remote control, thus assuring as low as reasonably achievable exposures to operators; specifically, we have had no measurable exposure during 30 canister transfer operations. While not intended to be prototypical of repository handling operations, the system embodies a number of concepts, now demonstrated to be safe, reliable, and economical, which may be very useful in evaluating full-scale repository handling alternatives in the future. Among the potentially significant concepts are: Use of an integral shielding plug to minimize radiation streaming at all transfer interfaces. Hydraulically actuated transfer cask jacking and rotation features to reduce excavation headroom requirements. Use of a dedicated small diameter (0.5 m) drilled shaft for transfer between the surface and repository workings. A wire-line hoisting system with positive emergency braking device which travels with the load. Remotely activated grapples - three used in the system - which are insensitive to load orientation. Rail-mounted underground transfer vehicle operated with no personnel underground.

  6. Central Satellite Data Repository Supporting Research and Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, W.; Brust, J.

    2015-12-01

    Near real-time satellite data is critical to many research and development activities of atmosphere, land, and ocean processes. Acquiring and managing huge volumes of satellite data without (or with less) latency in an organization is always a challenge in the big data age. An organization level data repository is a practical solution to meeting this challenge. The STAR (Center for Satellite Applications and Research of NOAA) Central Data Repository (SCDR) is a scalable, stable, and reliable repository to acquire, manipulate, and disseminate various types of satellite data in an effective and efficient manner. SCDR collects more than 200 data products, which are commonly used by multiple groups in STAR, from NOAA, GOES, Metop, Suomi NPP, Sentinel, Himawari, and other satellites. The processes of acquisition, recording, retrieval, organization, and dissemination are performed in parallel. Multiple data access interfaces, like FTP, FTPS, HTTP, HTTPS, and RESTful, are supported in the SCDR to obtain satellite data from their providers through high speed internet. The original satellite data in various raster formats can be parsed in the respective adapter to retrieve data information. The data information is ingested to the corresponding partitioned tables in the central database. All files are distributed equally on the Network File System (NFS) disks to balance the disk load. SCDR provides consistent interfaces (including Perl utility, portal, and RESTful Web service) to locate files of interest easily and quickly and access them directly by over 200 compute servers via NFS. SCDR greatly improves collection and integration of near real-time satellite data, addresses satellite data requirements of scientists and researchers, and facilitates their primary research and development activities.

  7. Optimising the Performance of the Low Level Waste Repository - 12144

    SciTech Connect

    Huntington, Amy; Baker, Andrew; Cummings, Richard; Shevelan, John; Sumerling, Trevor

    2012-07-01

    The Low Level Waste Repository (LLWR) is the United Kingdom's principal facility for the disposal of low-level waste (LLW). The LLWR made a major submission to its environmental regulator (the Environment Agency) on 1 May 2011, the LLWR's 2011 Environmental Safety Case (ESC). One of the key regulatory requirements is that all aspects of the construction, operation and closure of the disposal facility should be optimised. An optimised Site Development Plan for the repository was developed and produced as part of the ESC. The Site Development Plan covers all aspects of the construction, operation and closure of the disposal facility. This includes the management of past and future disposals, emplacement strategies, design of the disposal vaults, and the closure engineering for the site. The Site Development Plan also covers the period of active institutional control, when disposals at the site have ceased, but it is still under active management, and plans for the long-term sustainable use of the site. We have a practical approach to optimisation based on recorded judgements and realistic assessments of practicable options framed within the demands of UK policy for LLW management and the characteristics the LLWR site and existing elements of the facility. The final performance assessments undertaken for the ESC were based on the Site Development Plan. The ESC will be used as a tool to inform future decision-making concerning the repository design, operation and the acceptance of wastes, as set out in the evolving Site Development Plan. Maintaining the ESC is thus essential to ensure that the Site Development Plan takes account of an up-to-date understanding and analysis of environmental performance, and that the Plan continues to be optimised. (authors)

  8. Benefits of an Integrated Fuel Cycle on Repository Effective Capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, D.; Hunter, I.; Vinoche, R.; Clement, G.; Louvet, T.; Bruyere, J.

    2006-07-01

    Today, the Yucca Mountain repository is limited by legislation to a maximum capacity of 70,000 metric tons of initial heavy metal (MTiHM), of which 63,000 MTiHM is reserved for civilian nuclear used fuel. Various sources have estimated the 'real' or 'technical' capacity of Yucca Mountain could be around 125,000 MTiHM. Whatever the actual number is, it will be significantly less than the anticipated total volume of used fuel expected to be generated in the US by 2100. This paper briefly reviews the design constraints of the Yucca Mountain repository and shows the potential gains in capacity by early recycling of used fuel from US commercial reactors using an evolutionary COEX process (co-extraction of uranium and plutonium) design. To optimize the Yucca Mountain loading, two important constraints need to be addressed: heat load and physical volume. For heat load there is a long-term issue with actinides (primarily plutonium and americium) and a short-term issue with fission products (primarily cesium and strontium). We present a new way to increase the capacity of Yucca Mountain by increasing the unit loading of the repository - early recycling approach. For the once-through option and the early recycling solution, drift loading factors are calculated, looking at both volume and heat. The resulting densification factor (ratio of drift loading factor of treatment high level waste residues to used fuel) is 4 using COEX technology. In simple terms, the total length of Yucca Mountain tunnels needed to dispose of 63,000 MTiHM of used fuel (legal limit) could be used to dispose of the residues from the treatment of 252,000 MTiHM of used fuel. (authors)

  9. A repository based on a dynamically extensible data model supporting multidisciplinary research in neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    integration aspects have been addressed by providing the repository application with an efficient dynamic interface designed to enable the user to both easily query the data depending on defined datatypes and view all the data of every patient in an integrated and simple way. Results The results of our work have been twofold. First, a dynamically extensible data model has been implemented and tested based on a “meta” data-model enabling users to define their own data types independently from the application context. This data model has allowed users to dynamically include additional data types without the need of rebuilding the underlying database. Then a complex process-event data structure has been built, based on this data model, describing patient-centered diagnostic processes and merging information from data and metadata. Second, a repository implementing such a data structure has been deployed on a distributed Data Grid in order to provide scalability both in terms of data input and data storage and to exploit distributed data and computational approaches in order to share resources more efficiently. Moreover, data managing has been made possible through a friendly web interface. The driving principle of not being forced to preconfigured data types has been satisfied. It is up to users to dynamically configure the data model for the given experiment or data acquisition program, thus making it potentially suitable for customized applications. Conclusions Based on such repository, data managing has been made possible through a friendly web interface. The driving principle of not being forced to preconfigured data types has been satisfied. It is up to users to dynamically configure the data model for the given experiment or data acquisition program, thus making it potentially suitable for customized applications. PMID:23043673

  10. Establishing Baseline environmental Conditions for the Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository, Nevada, U.S.A.

    SciTech Connect

    D.S. Shafer; K.F. Pohlmann; C.E. Russell; D. Hovey-Spencer; M. Ye

    2004-12-21

    Research is underway to develop baseline site conditions and design monitoring programs for assurance to offsite residents and for performance confirmation for the proposed Yucca Mountain (YM) high-level waste repository in Nevada. This includes evaluation of existing and potential impacts on the proposed ''land withdrawal'' for the repository. A significant portion of the proposed land withdrawal includes areas now managed as part of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and there is both contamination and land disturbance associated with past NTS activities. Establishing baseline conditions for the land withdrawal is important to distinguish potential impacts from repository operations from those resulting from previous activities, including some that took place from activities outside the land withdrawal. Among existing contamination is mixed fission products associated with the Nuclear Rocket Testing Program on the NTS in the 1960s. Some of these sites are being remediated as part of a federal facility agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy and the State of Nevada. However, even where radionuclides exist at levels below regulatory concern, characterizing them may be desirable if they are above background. In addition, Forty Mile Wash, the major drainage on the east side of YM, may be transporting radionuclides created from Plowshare project nuclear cratering experiments on Buckboard Mesa on the NTS. Although contaminant levels are not anticipated to present a risk, the point at which Forty Mile Wash leaves the proposed land withdrawal would be the closest point for an offsite receptor to YM. In addition, there is existing land disturbance (not necessarily associated with contamination) on both the NTS, as well as the portions of the proposed land withdrawal currently managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Air Force. To establish a land disturbance baseline, high resolution multispectral satellite imagery collected in 2004 as well as

  11. Collocation and integration of reprocessing and repositories: implications for aqueous flowsheets and waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.; Lewis, L.

    2013-07-01

    It is an accident of history that the current model of the fuel cycle is a separate set of facilities connected by transportation. The question is whether collocation and integration of reprocessing and fuel fabrication with the repository significantly reduce the costs of a closed fuel cycle while improving system performance in terms of safety and long-term repository performance. This paper examines the question in terms of higher-level functional requirements of reprocessing systems and geological repositories.

  12. Flight Data Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) Repository

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Elmain M.; Winterhalter, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Daniel Winterhalter, NASA Engineering and Safety Center Chief Engineer at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, requested the NASA Engineering and Safety Center sponsor a 3-year effort to collect entry, descent, and landing material and to establish a NASA-wide archive to serve the material. The principle focus of this task was to identify entry, descent, and landing repository material that was at risk of being permanently lost due to damage, decay, and undocumented storage. To provide NASA-wide access to this material, a web-based digital archive was created. This document contains the outcome of the effort.

  13. PGP repository: a plant phenomics and genomics data publication infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Arend, Daniel; Junker, Astrid; Scholz, Uwe; Schüler, Danuta; Wylie, Juliane; Lange, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Plant genomics and phenomics represents the most promising tools for accelerating yield gains and overcoming emerging crop productivity bottlenecks. However, accessing this wealth of plant diversity requires the characterization of this material using state-of-the-art genomic, phenomic and molecular technologies and the release of subsequent research data via a long-term stable, open-access portal. Although several international consortia and public resource centres offer services for plant research data management, valuable digital assets remains unpublished and thus inaccessible to the scientific community. Recently, the Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research and the German Plant Phenotyping Network have jointly initiated the Plant Genomics and Phenomics Research Data Repository (PGP) as infrastructure to comprehensively publish plant research data. This covers in particular cross-domain datasets that are not being published in central repositories because of its volume or unsupported data scope, like image collections from plant phenotyping and microscopy, unfinished genomes, genotyping data, visualizations of morphological plant models, data from mass spectrometry as well as software and documents.The repository is hosted at Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research using e!DAL as software infrastructure and a Hierarchical Storage Management System as data archival backend. A novel developed data submission tool was made available for the consortium that features a high level of automation to lower the barriers of data publication. After an internal review process, data are published as citable digital object identifiers and a core set of technical metadata is registered at DataCite. The used e!DAL-embedded Web frontend generates for each dataset a landing page and supports an interactive exploration. PGP is registered as research data repository at BioSharing.org, re3data.org and OpenAIRE as valid EU Horizon 2020 open

  14. Building of multilevel stakeholder consensus in radioactive waste repository siting

    SciTech Connect

    Dreimanis, A.

    2007-07-01

    This report considers the problem of multilevel consensus building for siting and construction of shared multinational/regional repositories for radioactive waste (RW) deep disposal. In the siting of a multinational repository there appears an essential innovative component of stakeholder consensus building, namely: to reach consent - political, social, economic, ecological - among international partners, in addition to solving the whole set of intra-national consensus building items. An entire partnering country is considered as a higher-level stakeholder - the national stakeholder, represented by the national government, being faced to simultaneous seeking an upward (international) and a downward (intra-national) consensus in a psychologically stressed environment, possibly being characterized by diverse political, economic and social interests. The following theses as a possible interdisciplinary approach towards building of shared understanding and stakeholder consensus on the international scale of RW disposal are forwarded and developed: a) building of international stakeholder consensus would be promoted by activating and diversifying on the international scale multilateral interactions between intra- and international stakeholders, including web-based networks of the RW disposal site investigations and decision-making, as well as networks for international cooperation among government authorities in nuclear safety, b) gradual progress in intergovernmental consensus and reaching multilateral agreements on shared deep repositories will be the result of democratic dialogue, via observing the whole set of various interests and common resolving of emerged controversies by using advanced synergetic approaches of conflict resolution, c) cross-cultural thinking and world perception, mental flexibility, creativity and knowledge are considered as basic prerogatives for gaining a higher level of mutual understanding and consensus for seeking further consensus, for

  15. E-facts: business process management in clinical data repositories.

    PubMed

    Wattanasin, Nich; Peng, Zhaoping; Raine, Christine; Mitchell, Mariah; Wang, Charles; Murphy, Shawn N

    2008-01-01

    The Partners Healthcare Research Patient Data Registry (RPDR) is a centralized data repository that gathers clinical data from various hospital systems. The RPDR allows clinical investigators to obtain aggregate numbers of patients with user-defined characteristics such as diagnoses, procedures, medications, and laboratory values. They may then obtain patient identifiers and electronic medical records with prior IRB approval. Moreover, the accurate identification and efficient population of worthwhile and quantifiable facts from doctor's report into the RPDR is a significant process. As part of our ongoing e-Fact project, this work describes a new business process management technology that helps coordinate and simplify this procedure. PMID:18999043

  16. A Modular, Standards-based Digital Object Repository

    SciTech Connect

    De Sompel, Herbert Van; Bekaert, Jeroen; Liu, Xiaoming; Balakireva, Lyudmila L.; Schwander, Thorsten

    2005-08-01

    The aDORe repository architecture, designed and implemented for ingesting, storing, and accessing a vast collection of Digital Objects. aDORe was originally created for use at the Research Library of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The aDORe architecture is highly modular and standards-based. In the architecture, the MPEG-21 Digital Item Declaration Language is used as the XML-based format to represent Digital Objects that can consist of multiple datastreams as Open Archival Information System Archival Information Packages (OAIS AIPs).

  17. Method for minimizing technetium-99 migration from a geologic repository

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demartino, Virlynda

    2000-10-01

    A method for minimizing technetium-99 (99Tc) migration in groundwater by using reducing agents was investigated. This information could be used to tailor the spent nuclear fuel waste packages or near-field environment at a geologic repository to prevent 99Tc migration should water infiltration occur. The proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain will likely remain dry for several hundred years because (1) it will be located in the unsaturated zone above the water table, and (2) it will have significant radioactive decay heat. As time passes, the decay heat generated will lessen. The repository will then cool below the boiling point of water, and then water could contact spent fuel in any breached waste package. At that time, the soluble radionuclides, such as 99Tc, may possibly dissolve and migrate from the repository into the environment. This research also could be applied to technetium-soil decontamination by adding the reducing agent to the soil and disposing of the soil as hazardous mixed waste. A computational analysis (EQ3/6 software package) and an experimental approach were used during this investigation. Both approaches investigated the effect of reducing agents on technetium(VII) solutions. Theoretically, the 99Tc would precipitate as lower valent oxides or technetium metal because of the reducing environment, and its migration would be minimized. Copper, iron, stannous chloride, and tin were used as reducing agents in both approaches. Experimentally, iron reduced the technetium concentration to below detectable limits; copper, tin, and stannous chloride only temporarily reduced the technetium concentration. The experimental results were consistent with the computer simulations for iron and one of the stannous chloride experiments. The other stannous chloride experiment temporarily reduced the technetium concentration, but not to the values indicated by the codes. Experimentally, copper and tin developed passivation layers, and therefore, the

  18. A Modular, Standards-based Digital Object Repository

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-08-01

    The aDORe repository architecture, designed and implemented for ingesting, storing, and accessing a vast collection of Digital Objects. aDORe was originally created for use at the Research Library of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The aDORe architecture is highly modular and standards-based. In the architecture, the MPEG-21 Digital Item Declaration Language is used as the XML-based format to represent Digital Objects that can consist of multiple datastreams as Open Archival Information System Archival Information Packagesmore » (OAIS AIPs).« less

  19. PGP repository: a plant phenomics and genomics data publication infrastructure

    PubMed Central

    Arend, Daniel; Junker, Astrid; Scholz, Uwe; Schüler, Danuta; Wylie, Juliane; Lange, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Plant genomics and phenomics represents the most promising tools for accelerating yield gains and overcoming emerging crop productivity bottlenecks. However, accessing this wealth of plant diversity requires the characterization of this material using state-of-the-art genomic, phenomic and molecular technologies and the release of subsequent research data via a long-term stable, open-access portal. Although several international consortia and public resource centres offer services for plant research data management, valuable digital assets remains unpublished and thus inaccessible to the scientific community. Recently, the Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research and the German Plant Phenotyping Network have jointly initiated the Plant Genomics and Phenomics Research Data Repository (PGP) as infrastructure to comprehensively publish plant research data. This covers in particular cross-domain datasets that are not being published in central repositories because of its volume or unsupported data scope, like image collections from plant phenotyping and microscopy, unfinished genomes, genotyping data, visualizations of morphological plant models, data from mass spectrometry as well as software and documents. The repository is hosted at Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research using e!DAL as software infrastructure and a Hierarchical Storage Management System as data archival backend. A novel developed data submission tool was made available for the consortium that features a high level of automation to lower the barriers of data publication. After an internal review process, data are published as citable digital object identifiers and a core set of technical metadata is registered at DataCite. The used e!DAL-embedded Web frontend generates for each dataset a landing page and supports an interactive exploration. PGP is registered as research data repository at BioSharing.org, re3data.org and OpenAIRE as valid EU Horizon 2020 open

  20. Streamlining Metadata in Nasa's Eosdis Common Metadata Repository

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baynes, K.; Mitchell, A. E.; Pilone, D.; Murphy, K. J.

    2014-12-01

    EOSDIS Common Metadata Repository (CMR) will bring a fast, centralized catalog to NASA's Earth Science metadata. In addition to cleaning up and consolidating the traditional collection and granule metadata holdings, the CMR will be developing unified metadata concept models for several additional holdings, enabling collaboration and expanding services across all of NASA's DAACs. This talk will focus on the status of current metadata models for collections and granules as well as reporting progress on additional concepts such as a services model, a visualization model and parameter level metadata.

  1. A Semantically Enabled Metadata Repository for Solar Irradiance Data Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, A.; Cox, M.; Lindholm, D. M.; Nadiadi, I.; Traver, T.

    2014-12-01

    The Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, LASP, has been conducting research in Atmospheric and Space science for over 60 years, and providing the associated data products to the public. LASP has a long history, in particular, of making space-based measurements of the solar irradiance, which serves as crucial input to several areas of scientific research, including solar-terrestrial interactions, atmospheric, and climate. LISIRD, the LASP Interactive Solar Irradiance Data Center, serves these datasets to the public, including solar spectral irradiance (SSI) and total solar irradiance (TSI) data. The LASP extended metadata repository, LEMR, is a database of information about the datasets served by LASP, such as parameters, uncertainties, temporal and spectral ranges, current version, alerts, etc. It serves as the definitive, single source of truth for that information. The database is populated with information garnered via web forms and automated processes. Dataset owners keep the information current and verified for datasets under their purview. This information can be pulled dynamically for many purposes. Web sites such as LISIRD can include this information in web page content as it is rendered, ensuring users get current, accurate information. It can also be pulled to create metadata records in various metadata formats, such as SPASE (for heliophysics) and ISO 19115. Once these records are be made available to the appropriate registries, our data will be discoverable by users coming in via those organizations. The database is implemented as a RDF triplestore, a collection of instances of subject-object-predicate data entities identifiable with a URI. This capability coupled with SPARQL over HTTP read access enables semantic queries over the repository contents. To create the repository we leveraged VIVO, an open source semantic web application, to manage and create new ontologies and populate repository content. A variety of ontologies were used in

  2. Hydrologic and geologic characteristics of the Yucca Mountain site relevant to the performance of a potential repository

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levich, R.A.; Linden, R.M.; Patterson, R.L.; Stuckless, J.S.

    2000-01-01

    Yucca Mountain, located ~100 mi northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, has been designated by Congress as a site to be characterized for a potential mined geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. This field trip will examine the regional geologic and hydrologic setting for Yucca Mountain, as well as specific results of the site characterization program. The first day focuses on the regional setting with emphasis on current and paleo hydrology, which are both of critical concern for predicting future performance of a potential repository. Morning stops will be southern Nevada and afternoon stops will be in Death Valley. The second day will be spent at Yucca Mountain. The field trip will visit the underground testing sites in the "Exploratory Studies Facility" and the "Busted Butte Unsaturated Zone Transport Field Test" plus several surface-based testing sites. Much of the work at the site has concentrated on studies of the unsaturated zone, an element of the hydrologic system that historically has received little attention. Discussions during the second day will compromise selected topics of Yucca Mountain geology, hydrology and geochemistry and will include the probabilistic volcanic hazard analysis and the seismicity and seismic hazard in the Yucca Mountain area. Evening discussions will address modeling of regional groundwater flow, the results of recent hydrologic studies by the Nye County Nuclear Waste Program Office, and the relationship of the geology and hydrology of Yucca Mountain to the performance of a potential repository. Day 3 will examine the geologic framework and hydrology of the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley Groundwater Basin and then will continue to Reno via Hawthorne, Nevada and the Walker Lake area.

  3. The Economic, repository and proliferation implications of advanced nuclear fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Deinert, Mark; Cady, K B

    2011-09-04

    The goal of this project was to compare the effects of recycling actinides using fast burner reactors, with recycle that would be done using inert matrix fuel burned in conventional light water reactors. In the fast reactor option, actinides from both spent light water and fast reactor fuel would be recycled. In the inert matrix fuel option, actinides from spent light water fuel would be recycled, but the spent inert matrix fuel would not be reprocessed. The comparison was done over a limited 100-year time horizon. The economic, repository and proliferation implications of these options all hinge on the composition of isotopic byproducts of power production. We took the perspective that back-end economics would be affected by the cost of spent fuel reprocessing (whether conventional uranium dioxide fuel, or fast reactor fuel), fuel manufacture, and ultimate disposal of high level waste in a Yucca Mountain like geological repository. Central to understanding these costs was determining the overall amount of reprocessing needed to implement a fast burner, or inert matrix fuel, recycle program. The total quantity of high level waste requiring geological disposal (along with its thermal output), and the cost of reprocessing were also analyzed. A major advantage of the inert matrix fuel option is that it could in principle be implemented using the existing fleet of commercial power reactors. A central finding of this project was that recycling actinides using an inert matrix fuel could achieve reductions in overall actinide production that are nearly very close to those that could be achieved by recycling the actinides using a fast burner reactor.

  4. Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R): Research Cruise Event Logging System Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maffei, A. R.; Chandler, C. L.; Stolp, L.

    2010-12-01

    Data gathered aboard research vessels coordinated by the University-National Oceanographic Laboratory System (UNOLS) represent an important component of the overall oceanographic data collection. The Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) project aims to improve access to basic shipboard data and ultimately reduce the work required to provide that access. The ultimate vision of R2R is to assist in transforming the academic fleet into an integrated global observing system. One of the coordinated subprojects within the R2R project is the development of a shipboard scientific event logging system that incorporates best practice guidelines, controlled vocabularies, a cruise metadata schema, and a scientific event log. The event log application will use new and existing components to generate a digital text file with a fleet-wide agreed upon format. A cruise event logging system enables researchers to record digitally all scientific sampling events and assign a unique event identifier to each entry. Decades of work conducted within large coordinated ocean research programs (JGOFS, GLOBEC, WOCE and RIDGE) have shown that creation of a shipboard sampling event log can facilitate greatly the ingestion of these data into oceanographic repositories and subsequent integration of data sets from individual investigators. An event logger application, based on ELOG, has been developed and is being tested by scientists at sea. An important aspect of this project is the development of a controlled vocabulary and ontology for documenting the scientific sampling events that occur during a research cruise. The controlled vocabulary development is being influenced by similar efforts in other communities. In addition, a Web application is being developed for oceanographers to use to pre-configure the R2R event logger application with vocabulary terms and entry forms appropriate to the specific needs of their upcoming research cruise. Results and lessons learned from the R2R event logger

  5. Continuous Improvement and the Safety Case for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Geologic Repository - 13467

    SciTech Connect

    Van Luik, Abraham; Patterson, Russell; Nelson, Roger; Leigh, Christi

    2013-07-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a geologic repository 2150 feet (650 m) below the surface of the Chihuahuan desert near Carlsbad, New Mexico. WIPP permanently disposes of transuranic waste from national defense programs. Every five years, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) submits an application to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to request regulatory-compliance re-certification of the facility for another five years. Every ten years, DOE submits an application to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) for the renewal of its hazardous waste disposal permit. The content of the applications made by DOE to the EPA for re-certification, and to the NMED for permit-renewal, reflect any optimization changes made to the facility, with regulatory concurrence if warranted by the nature of the change. DOE points to such changes as evidence for its having taken seriously its 'continuous improvement' operations and management philosophy. Another opportunity for continuous improvement is to look at any delta that may exist between the re-certification and re-permitting cases for system safety and the consensus advice on the nature and content of a safety case as being developed and published by the Nuclear Energy Agency's Integration Group for the Safety Case (IGSC) expert group. DOE at WIPP, with the aid of its Science Advisor and teammate, Sandia National Laboratories, is in the process of discerning what can be done, in a reasonably paced and cost-conscious manner, to continually improve the case for repository safety that is being made to the two primary regulators on a recurring basis. This paper will discuss some aspects of that delta and potential paths forward to addressing them. (authors)

  6. Overweight truck shipments to nuclear waste repositories: legal, political, administrative and operational considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-03-01

    This report, prepared for the Chicago Operations Office and the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) of the US Department of Energy (DOE), identifies and analyzes legal, political, administrative, and operational issues that could affect an OCRWM decision to develop an overweight truck cask fleet for the commercial nuclear waste repository program. It also provides information required by DOE on vehicle size-and-weight administration and regulation, pertinent to nuclear waste shipments. Current legal-weight truck casks have a payload of one pressurized-water reactor spent fuel element or two boiling-water reactor spent fuel elements (1 PWR/2 BWR). For the requirements of the 1960s and 1970s, casks were designed with massive shielding to accommodate 6-month-old spent fuel; the gross vehicle weight was limited to 73,280 pounds. Spent fuel to be moved in the 1990s will have aged five years or more. Gross vehicle weight limitation for the Interstate highway system has been increased to 80,000 pounds. These changes allow the design of 25-ton legal-weight truck casks with payloads of 2 PWR/5 BWR. These changes may also allow the development of a 40-ton overweight truck cask with a payload of 4 PWR/10 BWR. Such overweight casks will result in significantly fewer highway shipments compared with legal-weight casks, with potential reductions in transport-related repository risks and costs. These advantages must be weighed against a number of institutional issues surrounding such overweight shipments before a substantial commitment is made to develop an overweight truck cask fleet. This report discusses these issues in detail and provides recommended actions to DOE.

  7. Systems engineering programs for geologic nuclear waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Klett, R. D.; Hertel, Jr., E. S.; Ellis, M. A.

    1980-06-01

    The design sequence and system programs presented begin with general approximate solutions that permit inexpensive analysis of a multitude of possible wastes, disposal media, and disposal process properties and configurations. It then continues through progressively more precise solutions as parts of the design become fixed, and ends with repository and waste form optimization studies. The programs cover both solid and gaseous waste forms. The analytical development, a program listing, a users guide, and examples are presented for each program. Sensitivity studies showing the effects of disposal media and waste form thermophysical properties and repository layouts are presented as examples.

  8. Viability Assessment of a Repository at Yucca Mountain. Volume 2: Preliminary Design Concept for the Repository and Waste Package

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    This volume describes the major design features of the Monitored Geologic Repository. This document is not intended to provide an exhaustive, detailed description of the repository design. Rather, this document summarizes the major systems and primary elements of the design that are radiologically significant, and references the specific technical documents and design analyses wherein the details can be found. Not all portions of the design are at the same level of completeness. Highest priority has been given to assigning resources to advance the design of the Monitored Geologic Repository features that are important to radiological safety and/or waste isolation and for which there is no NRC licensing precedent. Those features that are important to radiological safety and/or waste isolation, but for which there is an NRC precedent, receive second priority. Systems and features that have no impact on radiological safety or waste isolation receive the lowest priority. This prioritization process, referred to as binning, is discussed in more detail in Section 2.3. Not every subject discussed in this volume is given equal treatment with regard to the level of detail provided. For example, less detail is provided for the surface facility design than for the subsurface and waste package designs. This different level of detail is intentional. Greater detail is provided for those functions, structures, systems, and components that play key roles with regard to protecting radiological health and safety and that are not common to existing nuclear facilities already licensed by NRC. A number of radiological subjects are not addressed in the VA, (e.g., environmental qualification of equipment). Environmental qualification of equipment and other radiological safety considerations will be addressed in the LA. Non-radiological safety considerations such as silica dust control and other occupational safety considerations are considered equally important but are not addressed in

  9. Contact zones and hydrothermal systems as analogues to repository conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Wollenberg, H.A.; Flexser, S.

    1984-10-01

    Radioactive waste isolation efforts in the US are currently focused on examining basalt, tuff, salt, and crystalline rock as candidate rock types to encompass waste repositories. As analogues to near-field conditions, the distributions of radio- and trace-elements have been examined across contacts between these rocks and dikes and stocks that have intruded them. The intensive study of the Stripa quartz monzonite has also offered the opportunity to observe the distribution of uranium and its daughters in groundwater and its relationship to U associated with fracture-filling and alteration minerals. Investigations of intrusive contact zones to date have included (1) a tertiary stock into Precambrian gneiss, (2) a stock into ash flow tuff, (3) a rhyodacite dike into Columbia River basalt, and (4) a kimberlite dike into salt. With respect to temperature and pressure, these contact zones may be considered "worst-case scenario" analogues. Results indicate that there has been no appreciable migration of radioelements from the more radioactive intrusives into the less radioactive country rocks, either in response to the intrusions or in the fracture-controlled hydrological systems that developed following emplacement. In many cases, the radioelements are locked up in accessory minerals, suggesting that artificial analogues to these would make ideal waste forms. Emphasis should now shift to examination of active hydrothermal systems, studying the distribution of key elements in water, fractures, and alteration minerals under pressure and temperature conditions most similar to those expected in the near-field environment of a repository. 14 refs.

  10. Climate and the eastern repository: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaels, Patrick J.; Stenger, Philip J.; Sappington, David E.

    1987-09-01

    We present a comparison of the climate in prospective states or sites under consideration for the eastern repository for high-level nuclear waste in the United States. We found that atmospheric conditions over several south-eastern sites rank lower than the other prospective areas in effective dispersal, as per Federal Register 10CFR 960.5-2-3 (1984). Also, damage rates in North Carolina and Virginia, and death rates in Virginia, from tropical storms and hurricanes exceed those of the other candidate states. These storms, as well as other mechanisms, subject piedmont Virginia and North Carolina to a high frequency of flash flooding. Death rates from all weather-related causes (including winter storms, tornadoes, and weather-related vehicle accidents) are also highest in Virginia and North Carolina. This finding is rather surprising in light of tornado and blizzard frequencies in northern candidate states. Based upon a 20-year study of damage and mortality figures from the US Department of Commerce publication Storm Data for all weather-related causes, Virginia and North Carolina rank highest. If this is taken as a measure of relative compliance with Federal Register “potentially adverse condition” 960.5-2-3[c][2] pertaining to the history of severe weather phenomena in relation to repository siting, then these states are the least favorable from a climatic viewpoint.

  11. The Function Biomedical Informatics Research Network Data Repository.

    PubMed

    Keator, David B; van Erp, Theo G M; Turner, Jessica A; Glover, Gary H; Mueller, Bryon A; Liu, Thomas T; Voyvodic, James T; Rasmussen, Jerod; Calhoun, Vince D; Lee, Hyo Jong; Toga, Arthur W; McEwen, Sarah; Ford, Judith M; Mathalon, Daniel H; Diaz, Michele; O'Leary, Daniel S; Jeremy Bockholt, H; Gadde, Syam; Preda, Adrian; Wible, Cynthia G; Stern, Hal S; Belger, Aysenil; McCarthy, Gregory; Ozyurt, Burak; Potkin, Steven G

    2016-01-01

    The Function Biomedical Informatics Research Network (FBIRN) developed methods and tools for conducting multi-scanner functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies. Method and tool development were based on two major goals: 1) to assess the major sources of variation in fMRI studies conducted across scanners, including instrumentation, acquisition protocols, challenge tasks, and analysis methods, and 2) to provide a distributed network infrastructure and an associated federated database to host and query large, multi-site, fMRI and clinical data sets. In the process of achieving these goals the FBIRN test bed generated several multi-scanner brain imaging data sets to be shared with the wider scientific community via the BIRN Data Repository (BDR). The FBIRN Phase 1 data set consists of a traveling subject study of 5 healthy subjects, each scanned on 10 different 1.5 to 4 T scanners. The FBIRN Phase 2 and Phase 3 data sets consist of subjects with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder along with healthy comparison subjects scanned at multiple sites. In this paper, we provide concise descriptions of FBIRN's multi-scanner brain imaging data sets and details about the BIRN Data Repository instance of the Human Imaging Database (HID) used to publicly share the data. PMID:26364863

  12. Active Exploration of Large 3D Model Repositories.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lin; Cao, Yan-Pei; Lai, Yu-Kun; Huang, Hao-Zhi; Kobbelt, Leif; Hu, Shi-Min

    2015-12-01

    With broader availability of large-scale 3D model repositories, the need for efficient and effective exploration becomes more and more urgent. Existing model retrieval techniques do not scale well with the size of the database since often a large number of very similar objects are returned for a query, and the possibilities to refine the search are quite limited. We propose an interactive approach where the user feeds an active learning procedure by labeling either entire models or parts of them as "like" or "dislike" such that the system can automatically update an active set of recommended models. To provide an intuitive user interface, candidate models are presented based on their estimated relevance for the current query. From the methodological point of view, our main contribution is to exploit not only the similarity between a query and the database models but also the similarities among the database models themselves. We achieve this by an offline pre-processing stage, where global and local shape descriptors are computed for each model and a sparse distance metric is derived that can be evaluated efficiently even for very large databases. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method by interactively exploring a repository containing over 100 K models. PMID:26529460

  13. Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository prompts heated congressional hearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-11-01

    Although the final report of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future is not expected until January 2012, the tentative conclusions of the commission's draft report were dissected during a recent joint hearing by two subcommittees of the House of Representatives' Committee on Science, Space, and Technology. Among the more heated issues debated at the hearing was the fate of the stalled Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository in Nevada. The Blue Ribbon Commission's (BRC) draft report includes recommendations for managing nuclear waste and for developing one or more permanent deep geological repositories and interim storage facilities, but the report does not address the future of Yucca Mountain. The BRC charter indicates that the commission is to "conduct a comprehensive review of policies for managing the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle." However, the draft report states that the commission was not asked to consider, and therefore did not address, several key issues. "We have not rendered an opinion on the suitability of the Yucca Mountain site or on the request to withdraw the license application for Yucca Mountain," the draft report states.

  14. Immersion studies on candidate container alloys for the Tuff Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.A.; Durr, C.L.

    1991-05-01

    Cortest Columbus Technologies (CC Technologies) is investigating the long-term performance of container materials used for high-level radioactive waste packages. This information is being developed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to aid in their assessment of the Department of Energy`s application to construct a geologic repository for disposal of high-level radioactive waste. This report summarizes the results of exposure studies performed on two copper-base and two Fe-Cr-Ni alloys in simulated Tuff Repository conditions. Testing was performed at 90{degrees}C in three environments; simulated J-13 well water, and two environments that simulated the chemical effects resulting from boiling and irradiation of the groundwater. Creviced specimens and U-bends were exposed to liquid, to vapor above the condensed phase, and to alternate immersion. A rod specimen was used to monitor corrosion at the vapor-liquid interface. The specimens were evaluated by electrochemical, gravimetric, and metallographic techniques following approximately 2000 hours of exposure. Results of the exposure tests indicated that all four alloys exhibited acceptable general corrosion rates in simulated J-13 well water. These rates decreased with time. Incipient pitting was observed under deposits on Alloy 825 and pitting was observed on both Alloy CDA 102 and Alloy CDA 715 in the simulated J-13 well water. No SCC was observed in U-bend specimens of any of the alloys in simulated J-13 well water. 33 refs., 48 figs., 23 tabs.

  15. A cloud-based information repository for bridge monitoring applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Seongwoon; Zhang, Yilan; Hou, Rui; Lynch, Jerome P.; Sohn, Hoon; Law, Kincho H.

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes an information repository to support bridge monitoring applications on a cloud computing platform. Bridge monitoring, with instrumentation of sensors in particular, collects significant amount of data. In addition to sensor data, a wide variety of information such as bridge geometry, analysis model and sensor description need to be stored. Data management plays an important role to facilitate data utilization and data sharing. While bridge information modeling (BrIM) technologies and standards have been proposed and they provide a means to enable integration and facilitate interoperability, current BrIM standards support mostly the information about bridge geometry. In this study, we extend the BrIM schema to include analysis models and sensor information. Specifically, using the OpenBrIM standards as the base, we draw on CSI Bridge, a commercial software widely used for bridge analysis and design, and SensorML, a standard schema for sensor definition, to define the data entities necessary for bridge monitoring applications. NoSQL database systems are employed for data repository. Cloud service infrastructure is deployed to enhance scalability, flexibility and accessibility of the data management system. The data model and systems are tested using the bridge model and the sensor data collected at the Telegraph Road Bridge, Monroe, Michigan.

  16. Dessicant materials screening for backfill in a salt repository

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, D.R.

    1980-10-01

    Maintaining an anhydrous environment around nuclear waste stored in a salt repository is a concern which can be alleviated by using a desiccant material for backfilling. Such a desiccant should desiccate a brine yet be non deliquescent, the hydrated product should have moderate thermal stability, and the desiccant should have a high capacity and be readily available. From a literature search MgO and CaO were identified for detailed study. These oxides, and an intimate mixture of the two obtained by calcining dolomite, were used in experiments to further determine their suitability. They proved to be excellent desiccants with a high water capacity. The hydrates of both have moderate thermal stability and a high water content. Both MgO and CaO react in an alkaline chloride brine forming oxychloride compounds with different waters of crystallization. Some of these compounds are the Sorel Cements. CaO hydrates to Ca(OH)/sub 2/ which carbonates with CO/sub 2/ in air to form CaCO/sub 3/ and release the hydrated water. Thus the intimate mixture of CaO and MgO from calcined dolomite may serve as a desiccant and remove CO/sub 2/ from the repository atmosphere.

  17. Hydrogeologic effects of natural disruptive events on nuclear waste repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, S.N.

    1980-06-01

    Some possible hydrogeologic effects of disruptive events that may affect repositories for nuclear wastte are described. A very large number of combinations of natural events can be imagined, but only those events which are judged to be most probable are covered. Waste-induced effects are not considered. The disruptive events discussed above are placed into four geologic settings. Although the geology is not specific to given repository sites that have been considered by other agencies, the geology has been generalized from actual field data and is, therefore, considered to be physically reasonable. The geologic settings considered are: (1) interior salt domes of the Gulf Coast, (2) bedded salt of southeastern New Mexico, (3) argillaceous rocks of southern Nevanda, and (4) granitic stocks of the Basin and Range Province. Log-normal distributions of permeabilities of rock units are given for each region. Chapters are devoted to: poresity and permeability of natural materials, regional flow patterns, disruptive events (faulting, dissolution of rock forming minerals, fracturing from various causes, rapid changes of hydraulic regimen); possible hydrologic effects of disruptive events; and hydraulic fracturing.

  18. Repository disposal requirements for commercial transuranic wastes (generated without reprocessing)

    SciTech Connect

    Daling, P.M.; Ludwick, J.D.; Mellinger, G.B.; McKee, R.W.

    1986-06-01

    This report forms a preliminary planning basis for disposal of commercial transuranic (TRU) wastes in a geologic repository. Because of the unlikely prospects for commercial spent nuclear fuel reprocessing in the near-term, this report focuses on TRU wastes generated in a once-through nuclear fuel cycle. The four main objectives of this study were to: develop estimates of the current inventories, projected generation rates, and characteristics of commercial TRU wastes; develop proposed acceptance requirements for TRU wastes forms and waste canisters that ensure a safe and effective disposal system; develop certification procedures and processing requirements that ensure that TRU wastes delivered to a repository for disposal meet all applicable waste acceptance requirements; and identify alternative conceptual strategies for treatment and certification of commercial TRU first objective was accomplished through a survey of commercial producers of TRU wastes. The TRU waste acceptance and certification requirements that were developed were based on regulatory requirements, information in the literature, and from similar requirements already established for disposal of defense TRU wastes in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) which were adapted, where necessary, to disposal of commercial TRU wastes. The results of the TRU waste-producer survey indicated that there were a relatively large number of producers of small quantities of TRU wastes.

  19. Assessing accuracy of an electronic provincial medication repository

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Jurisdictional drug information systems are being implemented in many regions around the world. British Columbia, Canada has had a provincial medication dispensing record, PharmaNet, system since 1995. Little is known about how accurately PharmaNet reflects actual medication usage. Methods This prospective, multi-centre study compared pharmacist collected Best Possible Medication Histories (BPMH) to PharmaNet profiles to assess accuracy of the PharmaNet profiles for patients receiving a BPMH as part of clinical care. A review panel examined the anonymized BPMHs and discrepancies to estimate clinical significance of discrepancies. Results 16% of medication profiles were accurate, with 48% of the discrepant profiles considered potentially clinically significant by the clinical review panel. Cardiac medications tended to be more accurate (e.g. ramipril was accurate >90% of the time), while insulin, warfarin, salbutamol and pain relief medications were often inaccurate (80–85% of the time). 1215 sequential BPMHs were collected and reviewed for this study. Conclusions The PharmaNet medication repository has a low accuracy and should be used in conjunction with other sources for medication histories for clinical or research purposes. This finding is consistent with other, smaller medication repository accuracy studies in other jurisdictions. Our study highlights specific medications that tend to be lower in accuracy. PMID:22621690

  20. SASBDB, a repository for biological small-angle scattering data

    PubMed Central

    Valentini, Erica; Kikhney, Alexey G.; Previtali, Gianpietro; Jeffries, Cy M.; Svergun, Dmitri I.

    2015-01-01

    Small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering (SAXS and SANS) are fundamental tools used to study the global shapes of proteins, nucleic acids, macromolecular complexes and assemblies in solution. Due to recent advances in instrumentation and computational methods, the quantity of experimental scattering data and subsequent publications is increasing dramatically. The need for a global repository allowing investigators to locate and access experimental scattering data and associated models was recently emphasized by the wwPDB small-angle scattering task force (SAStf). The small-angle scattering biological data bank (SASBDB) www.sasbdb.org has been designed in accordance with the plans of the SAStf as part of a future federated system of databases for biological SAXS and SANS. SASBDB is a comprehensive repository of freely accessible and fully searchable SAS experimental data and models that are deposited together with the relevant experimental conditions, sample details and instrument characteristics. At present the quality of deposited experimental data and the accuracy of models are manually curated, with future plans to integrate automated systems as the database expands. PMID:25352555

  1. The SKI repository performance assessment project Site-94

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, J.; Dverstorp, B.; Sjoeblom, R.; Wingefors, S.

    1995-12-01

    SITE-94 is a research project conducted as a performance assessment of a hypothetical repository for spent nuclear fuel, but with real pre-excavation data from a real site. The geosphere, the engineered barriers and the processes for radionuclide release and transport comprise an integrated interdependent system, which is described by an influence diagram (PID) that reflects how different Features, Events or Processes (FEPs) inside the system interact. Site evaluation is used to determine information of transport paths in the geosphere and to deliver information on geosphere interaction with the engineered barriers. A three-dimensional geological structure model of the site as well as alternative conceptual models consistent with the existing hydrological field data, have been analyzed. Groundwater chemistry is evaluated and a model, fairly consistent with the flow model, for the origin of the different waters has been developed. The geological structure model is also used for analyzing the mechanical stability of the site. Several phenomena of relevance for copper corrosion in a repository environment have been investigated. For Reference Case conditions and regardless of flow variability, output is dominated by I-129, which, for a single canister, may give rise to drinking water well doses in the order of 10{sup -6}Sv/yr. Finally, it appears that the procedures involved in the development of influence diagrams may be a promising tool for quality assurance of performance assessments.

  2. Robotics Scoping Study to Evaluate Advances in Robotics Technologies that Support Enhanced Efficiencies for Yucca Mountain Repository Operations

    SciTech Connect

    T. Burgess; M. Noakes; P. Spampinato

    2005-03-17

    This paper presents an evaluation of robotics and remote handling technologies that have the potential to increase the efficiency of handling waste packages at the proposed Yucca Mountain High-Level Nuclear Waste Repository. It is expected that increased efficiency will reduce the cost of operations. The goal of this work was to identify technologies for consideration as potential projects that the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, Office of Science and Technology International Programs, could support in the near future, and to assess their ''payback'' value. The evaluation took into account the robotics and remote handling capabilities planned for incorporation into the current baseline design for the repository, for both surface and subsurface operations. The evaluation, completed at the end of fiscal year 2004, identified where significant advantages in operating efficiencies could accrue by implementing any given robotics technology or approach, and included a road map for a multiyear R&D program for improvements to remote handling technology that support operating enhancements.

  3. BIODOSE: a code for predicting the dose to man from radionuclides released from underground nuclear waste repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Bonner, N.A.; Ng, Y.C.

    1980-03-01

    The BIODOSE computer program simulates the environmental transport of radionuclides released to surface water and predicts the resulting dosage to humans. This report describes the program and discusses its use in the evaluation of nuclear waste repositories. The methods used to estimate dose are examined critically, and the most important parameters in each stage of the calculations are identified as an aid in planning for measurements in the field. Dose predictions from releases of nuclear waste to a large northwestern river (the baseline river) are presented to point out the nuclides, compartments and pathways that contribute most to the hazard as a function of waste storage time. Predictions for five other water systems are presented to identify the most important system parameters that determine the concentrations of individual nuclides in compartments and the resultant dose. The uncertainties in the biological parameters for dose prediction are identified, and changes in current values are suggested. Various ways of reporting dose estimates for radiological safety assessments are discussed. Additional work needed to improve the dose predictions from BIODOSE and specific areas and steps to improve our capabilities to assess the environmental transport of nuclides released from nuclear waste repositories and the resultant dose to man are suggested.

  4. Comparison of potential radiological consequences from a spent-fuel repository and natural uranium deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Wick, O.J.; Cloninger, M.O.

    1980-09-01

    A general criterion has been suggested for deep geological repositories containing spent fuel - the repositories should impose no greater radiological risk than due to naturally occurring uranium deposits. The following analysis investigates the rationale of that suggestion and determines whether current expectations of spent-fuel repository performance are consistent with such a criterion. In this study, reference spent-fuel repositories were compared to natural uranium-ore deposits. Comparisons were based on intrinsic characteristics, such as radionuclide inventory, depth, proximity to aquifers, and regional distribution, and actual and potential radiological consequences that are now occurring from some ore deposits and that may eventually occur from repositories and other ore deposits. The comparison results show that the repositories are quite comparable to the natural ore deposits and, in some cases, present less radiological hazard than their natural counterparts. On the basis of the first comparison, placing spent fuel in a deep geologic repository apparently reduces the hazard from natural radioactive materials occurring in the earth's crust by locating the waste in impermeable strata without access to oxidizing conditions. On the basis of the second comparison, a repository constructed within reasonable constraints presents no greater hazard than a large ore deposit. It is recommended that if the naturally radioactive environment is to be used as a basis for a criterion regarding repositories, then this criterion should be carefully constructed. The criterion should be based on the radiological quality of the waters in the immediate region of a specific repository, and it should be in terms of an acceptable potential increase in the radiological content of those waters due to the existence of the repository.

  5. The National Trauma Research Repository: Ushering in a New ERA of trauma research (Commentary).

    PubMed

    Smith, Sharon L; Price, Michelle A; Fabian, Timothy C; Jurkovich, Gregory J; Pruitt, Basil A; Stewart, Ronald M; Jenkins, Donald H

    2016-09-01

    Despite being the leading cause of death in the United States for individuals 46 years and younger and the primary cause of death among military service members, trauma care research has been underfunded for the last 50 years. Sustained federal funding for a coordinated national trauma clinical research program is required to advance the science of caring for the injured. The Department of Defense is committed to funding studies with military relevance; therefore, it cannot fund pediatric or geriatric trauma clinical trials. Currently, trauma clinical trials are often performed within a single site or a small group of trauma hospitals, and research data are not available for secondary analysis or sharing across studies. Data-sharing platforms encourage transfer of research data and knowledge between civilian and military researchers, reduce redundancy, and maximize limited research funding. In collaboration with the Department of Defense, trauma researchers formed the Coalition for National Trauma Research (CNTR) in 2014 to advance trauma research in a coordinated effort. CNTR's member organizations are the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST), the American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma (ACS COT), the Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma (EAST), the Western Trauma Association (WTA), and the National Trauma Institute (NTI). CNTR advocates for sustained federal funding for a multidisciplinary national trauma research program to be conducted through a large clinical trials network and a national trauma research repository. The initial advocacy and research activities underway to accomplish these goals are presented. PMID:27496599

  6. Containment barrier metals for high-level waste packages in a Tuff repository

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, E.W.; McCright, R.D.; O`Neal, W.C.

    1983-10-12

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Waste Package project is part of the US Department of Energy`s Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (CRWM) Program. The NNWSI project is working towards the development of multibarriered packages for the disposal of spent fuel and high-level waste in tuff in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The final engineered barrier system design may be composed of a waste form, canister, overpack, borehole liner, packing, and the near field host rock, or some combination thereof. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL) role is to design, model, and test the waste package subsystem for the tuff repository. At the present stage of development of the nuclear waste management program at LLNL, the detailed requirements for the waste package design are not yet firmly established. In spite of these uncertainties as to the detailed package requirements, we have begun the conceptual design stage. By conceptual design, we mean design based on our best assessment of present and future regulatory requirements. We anticipate that changes will occur as the detailed requirements for waste package design are finalized. 17 references, 4 figures, 10 tables.

  7. Geotechnical support and topical studies for nuclear waste geologic repositories: Annual report, fiscal year 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This multidisciplinary project was initiated in fiscal year 1986. It comprises 11 reports in two major interrelated tasks: The technical assistance part of the project includes reviewing the progress of the major projects in the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive waste Management (OCRWM) Program and advising the Engineering and Geotechnology Division on significant technical issues facing each project; analyzing geotechnical data, reports, tests, surveys and plans for the different projects; reviewing and commenting on major technical reports and other program documents such as Site Characterization Plans (SCP) and Study Plans; and providing scientific and technical input at technical meetings. The topical studies activity comprises studies on scientific and technical ions and issues of significance to in-situ testing, test analysis methods, and site characterization of nuclear waste geologic repositories. The subjects of study were selected based on discussions with DOE staff. One minor topic is a preliminary consideration and planning exercise for postclosure monitoring studies. The major task, with subtasks involving various geoscience disciplines, is a study of the mechanical, hydraulic, geophysical and geochemical properties of fractures in geologic rock masses.

  8. Investigations on Repository Near-Field Thermal Modeling - Repository Science/Thermal Load Management & Design Concepts (M41UF033302)

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, M; Blink, J A; Fratoni, M; Greenberg, H R; Ross, A D

    2011-07-15

    The various layers of material from the waste package (such as components of the engineered barrier system and the host rock surface) to a given distance within the rock wall at a given distance can be described as concentric circles with varying thermal properties (see Figure 5.1-1). The selected model approach examines the contributions of the waste package, axial waste package neighbors and lateral neighboring emplacement drifts (see Section 5.2.1 and Appendix H, Section 2). In clay and deep borehole media, the peak temperature is driven by the central waste package whereas, in granite and salt, the contribution to the temperature rise by adjacent (lateral) waste packages in drift or emplacement borehole lines is dominant at the time of the peak temperature. Mathematical models generated using Mathcad software provide insight into the effects of changing waste package spacing for six waste forms, namely UOX, MOX, co-extraction, new extraction, E-Chem ceramic and E-Chem metal in four different geologic media (granite, clay, salt and deep borehole). Each scenario includes thermal conductivity and diffusivity for each layer between the waste package and the host rock, dimensions of representative repository designs (such as waste package spacing, drift or emplacement borehole spacing, waste package dimensions and layer thickness), and decay heat curves generated from knowledge of the contents of a given waste form after 10, 50, 100 and 200 years of surface storage. Key results generated for each scenario include rock temperature at a given time calculated at a given radius from the central waste package (Section 5.2.1 and Appendix H, Section 3), the corresponding temperature at the interface of the waste package and EBS material, and at each EBS layer in between (Section 5.2.2 and Appendix H, Section 4). This information is vital to understand the implications of repository design (waste package capacity, surface storage time, waste package spacing, and emplacement

  9. A University Library Creates a Digital Repository for Documenting and Disseminating Community Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, William A.; Billings, Marilyn

    2012-01-01

    Digital repositories are new tools for documenting the accumulated scholarly work produced at academic institutions and disseminating that material broadly via the internet. Digital repositories support all file types and can be adapted to meet the custom design specifications of individual institutions. A section for community engagement…

  10. Building Connections, Collections, and Communities: Increasing the Visibility and Impact of Extension through Institutional Repositories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inefuku, Harrison W.; Franz, Nancy K.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, university libraries have developed and manage institutional repositories--digital libraries that provide free, public access to the research, scholarship, and publications of their university's faculty, staff, and students. Although underused by Extension professionals, institutional repositories are powerful tools that…

  11. 10 CFR 60.112 - Overall system performance objective for the geologic repository after permanent closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Overall system performance objective for the geologic repository after permanent closure. 60.112 Section 60.112 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Technical Criteria Performance Objectives § 60.112 Overall system...

  12. 17 CFR 45.10 - Reporting to a single swap data repository.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... the swap data repository to which the first report of required swap creation data is made pursuant to... designated contract market that reports required swap creation data as required by § 45.3 shall report all... of the swap data repository to which required swap creation data is reported by the swap...

  13. The Situation of Open Access Institutional Repositories in Spain: 2009 Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melero, Remedios; Abadal, Ernest; Abad, Francisca; Rodriguez-Gairin, Josep Manel

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: The DRIVER I project drew up a detailed report of European repositories based on data gathered in a survey in which Spain's participation was very low. This created a highly distorted image of the implementation of repositories in Spain. This study aims to analyse the current state of Spanish open-access institutional repositories…

  14. 10 CFR Appendix I to Part 960 - NRC and EPA Requirements for Postclosure Repository Performance

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false NRC and EPA Requirements for Postclosure Repository Performance I Appendix I to Part 960 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Pt. 960, App. I Appendix I to Part 960—NRC and EPA Requirements for Postclosure...

  15. 10 CFR 60.112 - Overall system performance objective for the geologic repository after permanent closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Overall system performance objective for the geologic repository after permanent closure. 60.112 Section 60.112 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Technical Criteria Performance Objectives § 60.112 Overall system...

  16. 10 CFR 60.112 - Overall system performance objective for the geologic repository after permanent closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Overall system performance objective for the geologic repository after permanent closure. 60.112 Section 60.112 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Technical Criteria Performance Objectives § 60.112 Overall system...

  17. 10 CFR 60.112 - Overall system performance objective for the geologic repository after permanent closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Overall system performance objective for the geologic repository after permanent closure. 60.112 Section 60.112 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Technical Criteria Performance Objectives § 60.112 Overall system...

  18. World Saccharum Collection at the USDA Subtropical Research Station, National Germplasm Repository Miami, Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 1980, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Agricultural Research Service (ARS), established a genebank, the National Clonal Germplasm Repository (NCGR) in Miami, Florida. This repository is devoted to conservation of subtropical and tropical fruit, sugarcane and related grasses and ornamen...

  19. Task-Based Navigation of a Taxonomy Interface to a Digital Repository

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khoo, Christopher S. G.; Wang, Zhonghong; Chaudhry, Abdus Sattar

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: This is a study of hierarchical navigation; how users browse a taxonomy-based interface to an organizational repository to locate information resources. The study is part of a project to develop a taxonomy for an library and information science department to organize resources and support user browsing in a digital repository.…

  20. Institutional Repositories, Open Access, and Scholarly Communication: A Study of Conflicting Paradigms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Rowena; Chawner, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    The Open Access movement of the past decade, and institutional repositories developed by universities and academic libraries as a part of that movement, have openly challenged the traditional scholarly communication system. This article examines the growth of repositories around the world, and summarizes a growing body of evidence of the response…

  1. Institutional Repositories in the UK: What Can the Google User Find There?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markland, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates the efficiency of the Google search engine at retrieving items from 26 UK Institutional Repositories, covering a wide range of subject areas. One item is chosen from each repository and four searches are carried out: two keyword searches and two full title searches, each using both Google and then Google Scholar. A further…

  2. 10 CFR 60.112 - Overall system performance objective for the geologic repository after permanent closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Overall system performance objective for the geologic repository after permanent closure. 60.112 Section 60.112 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Technical Criteria Performance Objectives § 60.112 Overall system...

  3. Personal Spaces in Public Repositories as a Facilitator for Open Educational Resource Usage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Anat; Reisman, Sorel; Sperling, Barbra Bied

    2015-01-01

    Learning object repositories are a shared, open and public space; however, the possibility and ability of personal expression in an open, global, public space is crucial. The aim of this study is to explore personal spaces in a big learning object repository as a facilitator for adoption of Open Educational Resources (OER) into teaching practices…

  4. Repository Collection Policies: Is a Liberal and Inclusive Policy Helpful or Harmful?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bankier, Jean-Gabriel; Smith, Courtney

    2010-01-01

    Institutional repositories have been established by most university libraries but their level of success has varied. Determining what belongs in such repositories has been the subject of some discussion but research would suggest that a broader rather than narrower compass is a positive approach to adopt. By seeking out a variety of content types,…

  5. Viability Assessment of a Repository at Yucca Mountain. Volume 1: Introduction and Site Characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    This first volume contains an introduction to the viability assessment, including the purpose, scope, waste forms, technical challenges, an historical perspective, regulatory framework, management of the repository, technical components, preparations for the license application, and repository milestones after the assessment. The second part of this first volume addresses characteristics of the Yucca Mountain site.

  6. Embracing the Future: Embedding Digital Repositories in Higher Education Institutions. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoorens, Stijn; van Dijk, Lidia Villalba; van Stolk, Christian

    2009-01-01

    This briefing paper captures the key findings and recommendations of a study commissioned by the Joint Information Systems Committee on aspects of the strategic commitment of institutions to repository sustainability. This project, labelled EMBRACE (EMBedding Repositories And Consortial Enhancement), is aimed at enhancing the functionality,…

  7. A Comparison of Subject and Institutional Repositories in Self-Archiving Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xia, Jingfeng

    2008-01-01

    The disciplinary culture theory presumes that if a scholar has been familiar with self-archiving through an existing subject-based repository, this scholar will be more enthusiastic about contributing his/her research to an institutional repository than one who has not had the experience. To test the theory, this article examines self-archiving…

  8. The Efficacy of Institutional Repositories: Reflections on the Development of a Personalised Collection on UPSpace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivier, Elsabe

    2007-01-01

    There is much speculation that the development of institutional repositories will impact on or even change the traditional scholarly communication process. The purpose of this conversation is to introduce the reader to the use of and response to institutional repositories which were initiated by the Open Access Initiative. The concept of…

  9. Planting Seeds for a Successful Institutional Repository: Role of the Archivist as Manager, Designer, and Policymaker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watterworth, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    Recent surveys indicate that many colleges and universities have reached a pivotal moment in assessing the function and future development of their institutional repositories. Other surveys convey that archivists are participating in the development and implementation of institutional repositories at a variety of levels and have contributed to the…

  10. Attitudes to the Rights and Rewards for Author Contributions to Repositories for Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Melanie; Loddington, Steve; Manuel, Sue; Oppenheim, Charles

    2007-01-01

    In the United Kingdom over the past few years there has been a dramatic growth of national and regional repositories to collect and disseminate resources related to teaching and learning. Most notable of these are the Joint Information Systems Committee's Online Repository for [Learning and Teaching] Materials as well as the Higher Education…

  11. 10 CFR 63.113 - Performance objectives for the geologic repository after permanent closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Performance objectives for the geologic repository after permanent closure. 63.113 Section 63.113 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Technical...

  12. 10 CFR 63.161 - Emergency plan for the geologic repository operations area through permanent closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Emergency plan for the geologic repository operations area through permanent closure. 63.161 Section 63.161 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA...

  13. 10 CFR 63.111 - Performance objectives for the geologic repository operations area through permanent closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Performance objectives for the geologic repository operations area through permanent closure. 63.111 Section 63.111 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN,...

  14. 10 CFR 63.161 - Emergency plan for the geologic repository operations area through permanent closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Emergency plan for the geologic repository operations area through permanent closure. 63.161 Section 63.161 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA...

  15. 10 CFR 63.113 - Performance objectives for the geologic repository after permanent closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Performance objectives for the geologic repository after permanent closure. 63.113 Section 63.113 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Technical...

  16. Development and Implementation of a Learning Object Repository for French Teaching and Learning: Issues and Promises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caws, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses issues surrounding the development of a learning object repository (FLORE) for teaching and learning French at the postsecondary level. An evaluation based on qualitative and quantitative data was set up in order to better assess how second-language (L2) students in French perceived the integration of this new repository into…

  17. Using OAI-PMH and METS for Exporting Metadata and Digital Objects between Repositories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Jonathan; Lewis, Stuart

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the relationship between deposit of electronic theses in institutional and archival repositories. Specifically the paper considers the automated export of theses for deposit in the archival repository in continuation of the existing arrangement in Wales for paper-based theses. Design/methodology/approach: The paper presents a…

  18. 10 CFR 63.111 - Performance objectives for the geologic repository operations area through permanent closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Performance objectives for the geologic repository operations area through permanent closure. 63.111 Section 63.111 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN,...

  19. 10 CFR 63.113 - Performance objectives for the geologic repository after permanent closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Performance objectives for the geologic repository after permanent closure. 63.113 Section 63.113 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Technical...

  20. 10 CFR 63.161 - Emergency plan for the geologic repository operations area through permanent closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Emergency plan for the geologic repository operations area through permanent closure. 63.161 Section 63.161 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA...

  1. 10 CFR 63.161 - Emergency plan for the geologic repository operations area through permanent closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Emergency plan for the geologic repository operations area through permanent closure. 63.161 Section 63.161 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA...

  2. 10 CFR 63.111 - Performance objectives for the geologic repository operations area through permanent closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Performance objectives for the geologic repository operations area through permanent closure. 63.111 Section 63.111 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN,...

  3. 10 CFR 63.113 - Performance objectives for the geologic repository after permanent closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Performance objectives for the geologic repository after permanent closure. 63.113 Section 63.113 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Technical...

  4. 10 CFR 63.111 - Performance objectives for the geologic repository operations area through permanent closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Performance objectives for the geologic repository operations area through permanent closure. 63.111 Section 63.111 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN,...

  5. 10 CFR 63.161 - Emergency plan for the geologic repository operations area through permanent closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Emergency plan for the geologic repository operations area through permanent closure. 63.161 Section 63.161 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA...

  6. 10 CFR 63.111 - Performance objectives for the geologic repository operations area through permanent closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Performance objectives for the geologic repository operations area through permanent closure. 63.111 Section 63.111 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN,...

  7. 10 CFR 63.113 - Performance objectives for the geologic repository after permanent closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Performance objectives for the geologic repository after permanent closure. 63.113 Section 63.113 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Technical...

  8. Digital Archiving and Preservation: Technologies and Processes for a Trusted Repository

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jantz, Ronald; Giarlo, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This article examines what is implied by the term "trusted" in the phrase "trusted digital repositories." Digital repositories should be able to preserve electronic materials for periods at least comparable to existing preservation methods. Our collective lack of experience with preserving digital objects and consensus about the reliability of our…

  9. Reinventing the Library--How Repositories Are Causing Librarians to Rethink Their Professional Roles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Tyler O.

    2007-01-01

    The rise of digital repositories is helping libraries reinvent themselves. The benefits to libraries and universities creating institutional repositories (IRs) are great as libraries restructure, pursue collaborations, and re-position themselves to become major digital publishers and broadcasters in the scholarly world. They will no longer be…

  10. 76 FR 14028 - Center for Devices and Radiological Health 510(k) Implementation: Online Repository of Medical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...) Implementation: Online Repository of Medical Device Labeling, Including Photographs; Public Meeting AGENCY: Food... of an Online Repository of Medical Device Labeling and of Making Device Photographs Available in...

  11. 10 CFR 63.112 - Requirements for preclosure safety analysis of the geologic repository operations area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Requirements for preclosure safety analysis of the... Criteria Preclosure Safety Analysis § 63.112 Requirements for preclosure safety analysis of the geologic repository operations area. The preclosure safety analysis of the geologic repository operations area...

  12. 10 CFR 63.112 - Requirements for preclosure safety analysis of the geologic repository operations area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requirements for preclosure safety analysis of the... Criteria Preclosure Safety Analysis § 63.112 Requirements for preclosure safety analysis of the geologic repository operations area. The preclosure safety analysis of the geologic repository operations area...

  13. Research on wild relatives of fruit and nut crops at the Davis repository

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA germplasm repository in Davis is responsible for acquiring, conserving and distributing a broad spectrum of diversity of subtropical and temperate fruit and nut species germplasm to stakeholders around the world. Currently the repository holds over 7000 accessions of germplasm including Act...

  14. THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF NON-REPOSITORY LITHOSTRATIGRAPHIC LAYERS

    SciTech Connect

    R. JONES

    2004-10-22

    This model report addresses activities described in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport Thermal Properties and Analysis Reports Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171708]). The model develops values for thermal conductivity, and its uncertainty, for the nonrepository layers of Yucca Mountain; in addition, the model provides estimates for matrix porosity and dry bulk density for the nonrepository layers. The studied lithostratigraphic units, as identified in the ''Geologic Framework Model'' (GFM 2000) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170029]), are the Timber Mountain Group, the Tiva Canyon Tuff, the Yucca Mountain Tuff, the Pah Canyon Tuff, the Topopah Spring Tuff (excluding the repository layers), the Calico Hills Formation, the Prow Pass Tuff, the Bullfrog Tuff, and the Tram Tuff. The deepest model units of the GFM (Tund and Paleozoic) are excluded from this study because no data suitable for model input are available. The parameter estimates developed in this report are used as input to various models and calculations that simulate heat transport through the rock mass. Specifically, analysis model reports that use product output from this report are: (1) Drift-scale coupled processes (DST and TH seepage) models; (2) Drift degradation analysis; (3) Multiscale thermohydrologic model; and (4) Ventilation model and analysis report. In keeping with the methodology of the thermal conductivity model for the repository layers in ''Thermal Conductivity of the Potential Repository Horizon'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169854]), the Hsu et al. (1995 [DIRS 158073]) three-dimensional (3-D) cubic model (referred to herein as ''the Hsu model'') was used to represent the matrix thermal conductivity as a function of the four parameters (matrix porosity, thermal conductivity of the saturating fluid, thermal conductivity of the solid, and geometric connectivity of the solid). The Hsu model requires input data from each test specimen to meet three specific conditions: (1) Known value for

  15. Phase III: Implementation and Operation of the Repository

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1998-07-01

    The metadata catalog was brought online for public access May 14, 1998. Since then dozens of users have registered and began to access the system. The system was demonstrated at the AAPG annual meeting in Salt Lake City and the EAGE (European Association of Geoscientists and Engineers) annual meeting in Leipzig, Germany. Hart Publications and PTTC "NetworkNews" have published articles about the metadata catalog, and articles for the AAPG Explorer and GSA Today are being developed. A back-up system at AGI headquarters was established. In support of the metadata catalog system, a leased-line Internet connection and two servers were installed. Porting of the GeoTrek server software to the new systems has begun. The back-up system will be operational during the 3 rd quarter of 1998 and will serve the NGDRS needs during periods when access to the site in Houston is down. Additionally, experimentation with new data types and deployment schemes will be tested on the system at AGI. The NGDRS has picked-up additional endorsements from the American Association of State Geologists, the MMS Outer Continental Shelf Policy Committee, and a new endorsement is being formulated by the AAPG Core Preservation Committee for consideration by the AAPG Executive Committee. The Texas Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) is currently geocoding the well locations for the metadata catalog. Also, they have solicited proposals for the development of a core inventory control system that will work hand-in-hand with GeoTrek. A contract for that system will probably be given during the 3 rd quarter of 1998. The Texas Railroad Commission proposes to test the application of GeoTrek for accessing data in a joint project with the BEG. Several data transfer projects are underway. Vastar has committed to the transfer of 2D Appalachian seismic lines to the NDGRS clearinghouse. Receiving repositories have been identified and the final preparations are being made for transfer to these public repositories

  16. Civilian radioactive waste management program plan. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    This revision of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program Plan describes the objectives of the Civilian Radioactive Waste management Program (Program) as prescribed by legislative mandate, and the technical achievements, schedule, and costs planned to complete these objectives. The Plan provides Program participants and stakeholders with an updated description of Program activities and milestones for fiscal years (FY) 1998 to 2003. It describes the steps the Program will undertake to provide a viability assessment of the Yucca Mountain site in 1998; prepare the Secretary of Energy`s site recommendation to the President in 2001, if the site is found to be suitable for development as a repository; and submit a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in 2002 for authorization to construct a repository. The Program`s ultimate challenge is to provide adequate assurance to society that an operating geologic repository at a specific site meets the required standards of safety. Chapter 1 describes the Program`s mission and vision, and summarizes the Program`s broad strategic objectives. Chapter 2 describes the Program`s approach to transform strategic objectives, strategies, and success measures to specific Program activities and milestones. Chapter 3 describes the activities and milestones currently projected by the Program for the next five years for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project; the Waste Acceptance, Storage and Transportation Project; ad the Program Management Center. The appendices present information on the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended, and the Energy Policy Act of 1992; the history of the Program; the Program`s organization chart; the Commission`s regulations, Disposal of High-Level Radioactive Wastes in geologic Repositories; and a glossary of terms.

  17. Fiscal year 1987 program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-12-01

    The Defense TRU Waste Program (DTWP) is the focal point for the Department of Energy in national planning, integration, operation, and technical development for TRU waste management. The scope of this program extends from the point of TRU waste generation through delivery to a permanent repository. The TRU program maintains a close interface with repository development to ensure program compatibility and coordination. The defense TRU program does not directly address commercial activities that generate TRU waste. Instead, it is concerned with providing alternatives to manage existing and future defense TRU wastes. The FY 87 Program Plan is consistent with the Defense TRU Waste Program goals and objectives stated in the Defense Transuranic Waste Program Strategy Document, January 1984. The roles of participants, the responsibilities and authorities for Operations, and Research Development (R D), the organizational interfaces and communication channels for R D and the establishment of procedures for planning, reporting, and budgeting of Operations and R D activities meet requirements stated in the Technical Management Plan for the Transuranic Waste Management Program. Detailed budget planning (i.e., programmatic funding and capital equipment) is presented for FY 87; outyear budget projections are presented for future years.

  18. Report on Intact and Degraded Criticality for Selected Plutonium Waste Forms in a Geologic Repository, Volume I: MOX SNF

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. McClure

    1998-09-21

    As part of the plutonium waste form development and down-select process, repository analyses have been conducted to evaluate the long-term performance of these forms for repository acceptance. Intact and degraded mode criticality analysis of the mixed oxide (MOX) spent fuel is presented in Volume I, while Volume II presents the evaluations of the waste form containing plutonium immobilized in a ceramic matrix. Although the ceramic immobilization development program is ongoing, and refinements are still being developed and evaluated, this analysis provides value through quick feed-back to this development process, and as preparation for the analysis that will be conducted starting in fiscal year (FY) 1999 in support of the License Application. While no MOX fuel has been generated in the United States using weapons-usable plutonium, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has conducted calculations on Westinghouse-type reactors to determine the expected characteristics of such a fuel. These spent nuclear fuel (SNF) characteristics have been used to determine the long-term potential for criticality in a repository environment. In all instances the methodology and scenarios used in these analyses are compatible with those developed and used for Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel (CSNF) and Defense High Level Waste (DHLW), as tailored for the particular characteristics of the waste forms. This provides a common basis for comparison of the results. This analysis utilizes dissolution, solubility, and thermodynamic data that are currently available. Additional data on long-term behavior is being developed, and later analyses (FY 99) to support the License Application will use the very latest information that has been generated. Ranges of parameter values are considered to reflect sensitivity to uncertainty. Most of the analysis is focused on those parameter values that produce the worst case results, so that potential licensing issues can be identified.

  19. Characterizing the proposed geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada--hydrology and geochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuckless, John S.; Levich, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    This hydrology and geochemistry volume is a companion volume to the 2007 Geological Society of America Memoir 199, The Geology and Climatology of Yucca Mountain and Vicinity, Southern Nevada and California, edited by Stuckless and Levich. The work in both volumes was originally reported in the U.S. Department of Energy regulatory document Yucca Mountain Site Description, for the site characterization study of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as the proposed U.S. geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. The selection of Yucca Mountain resulted from a nationwide search and numerous committee studies during a period of more than 40 yr. The waste, largely from commercial nuclear power reactors and the government's nuclear weapons programs, is characterized by intense penetrating radiation and high heat production, and, therefore, it must be isolated from the biosphere for tens of thousands of years. The extensive, unique, and often innovative geoscience investigations conducted at Yucca Mountain for more than 20 yr make it one of the most thoroughly studied geologic features on Earth. The results of these investigations contribute extensive knowledge to the hydrologic and geochemical aspects of radioactive waste disposal in the unsaturated zone. The science, analyses, and interpretations are important not only to Yucca Mountain, but also to the assessment of other sites or alternative processes that may be considered for waste disposal in the future. Groundwater conditions, processes, and geochemistry, especially in combination with the heat from radionuclide decay, are integral to the ability of a repository to isolate waste. Hydrology and geochemistry are discussed here in chapters on unsaturated zone hydrology, saturated zone hydrology, paleohydrology, hydrochemistry, radionuclide transport, and thermally driven coupled processes affecting long-term waste isolation. This introductory chapter reviews some of the reasons for choosing to study Yucca Mountain as a

  20. Characterizing the proposed geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada: hydrology and geochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuckless, John S.; Levich, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    This hydrology and geochemistry volume is a companion volume to the 2007 Geological Society of America Memoir 199, The Geology and Climatology of Yucca Mountain and Vicinity, Southern Nevada and California, edited by Stuckless and Levich. The work in both volumes was originally reported in the U.S. Department of Energy regulatory document Yucca Mountain Site Description, for the site characterization study of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as the proposed U.S. geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. The selection of Yucca Mountain resulted from a nationwide search and numerous committee studies during a period of more than 40 yr. The waste, largely from commercial nuclear power reactors and the government's nuclear weapons programs, is characterized by intense penetrating radiation and high heat production, and, therefore, it must be isolated from the biosphere for tens of thousands of years. The extensive, unique, and often innovative geoscience investigations conducted at Yucca Mountain for more than 20 yr make it one of the most thoroughly studied geologic features on Earth. The results of these investigations contribute extensive knowledge to the hydrologic and geochemical aspects of radioactive waste disposal in the unsaturated zone. The science, analyses, and interpretations are important not only to Yucca Mountain, but also to the assessment of other sites or alternative processes that may be considered for waste disposal in the future. Groundwater conditions, processes, and geochemistry, especially in combination with the heat from radionuclide decay, are integral to the ability of a repository to isolate waste. Hydrology and geochemistry are discussed here in chapters on unsaturated zone hydrology, saturated zone hydrology, paleohydrology, hydrochemistry, radionuclide transport, and thermally driven coupled processes affecting long-term waste isolation. This introductory chapter reviews some of the reasons for choosing to study Yucca Mountain as a